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Sample records for high-accuracy cryogenic radiometer

  1. BOLUX: A cryogenic electrical-substitution radiometer as high accuracy primary detector in the 150-11,000 eV range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troussel, Ph.; Coron, N.

    2010-03-01

    We have measured the electrical and radiometric properties of a cryogenic absolute radiometer BOLUX (Bolomètre pour l'Utilisation dans le domaine de rayons X). BOLUX is intended for use as a primary detector standard for radiant power measurement of a synchrotron beam from EUV to X-ray spectral ranges. The absolute radiometer uses a composite bolometer with a built-in electrical heating element. The bolometer's absorber, optimized for beam diameter and for X-ray absorption, is coupled both to a Ge doped thermometer and to the electrical resistance calibrator with similar thermal paths so that electrical and radiant heating are equivalent. This device operates between 4 K the liquid helium temperature, and 1.25 K obtained by pumping helium. The main advantage of BOLUX over other radiometers is its portability (weight 12 kg) which means it can be used with any synchrotron beamline. The second advantage is its very small time constant (20 ms) compared with other apparatus (typically a few min). We can use it in DC mode or in AC mode and Alpha sources calibration experiments have already been realized. We have measured synchrotron radiant power at the laboratory of the Physikalisch- Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) at the Berlin electron storage ring BESSY II. We reported experiments in DC mode and showed the possibility to study the drift and the temporal stability at the exit of a synchrotron beamline. For a helium bath temperature of 1.33 K and in the spectral range of 150 eV-11 keV, we have measured a high limit of detection (in 1 s integrated) to be 10 -10 W, with a DC responsivity of 1.3×10 5 V/W, spatial nonuniformity over 4 mm diameter below 1% and possibility to use over five decades between a few nW and 100 μW with a good linearity (<1%). Typically available radiant power of 50 nW can be measured with a standard uncertainty as low as 1%. BOLUX response has been directly compared with qualified photodiodes [1]; we have observed a standard deviation between

  2. High Accuracy Thermal Expansion Measurement at Cryogenic Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Jim; Despit, Gregory; Stallcup, Michael; Presson, Joan; Nein, Max

    2003-01-01

    A new, interferometer-based system for measuring thermal expansion to an absolute accuracy of 20 ppb or better at cryogenic temperatures has been developed. Data from NIST Copper SRM 736 measured from room temperature to 15 K will be presented along with data from many other materials including beryllium, ULE, Zerodur, and composite materials. Particular attention will be given to a study by the Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center (SOMTC) investigating the variability of ULE and beryllium materials used in the AMSD program Approximately 20 samples of each material, tested from room temperature to below 30 K are compared as a function of billet location.

  3. SLSTR: a high accuracy dual scan temperature radiometer for sea and land surface monitoring from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppo, P.; Ricciarelli, B.; Brandani, F.; Delderfield, J.; Ferlet, M.; Mutlow, C.; Munro, G.; Nightingale, T.; Smith, D.; Bianchi, S.; Nicol, P.; Kirschstein, S.; Hennig, T.; Engel, W.; Frerick, J.; Nieke, J.

    2010-10-01

    SLSTR is a high accuracy infrared radiometer which will be embarked in the Earth low-orbit Sentinel 3 operational GMES mission. SLSTR is an improved version of the previous AATSR and ATSR-1/2 instruments which have flown respectively on Envisat and ERS-1/2 ESA missions. SLSTR will provide data continuity with respect to these previous missions but with a substantial improvement due to its higher swaths (750 km in dual view and 1400 km in single view) which should permit global coverage of SST and LST measurements (at 1 km of spatial resolution in IR channels) with daily revisit time, useful for climatological and meteorological applications. Two more SWIR channels and a higher spatial resolution in the VIS/SWIR channels (0.5 km) are also implemented for a better clouds/aerosols screening. Two further additional channels for global scale fire monitoring are present at the same time as the other nominal channels.

  4. Cryogenic environment and performance for testing the Planck radiometers

    CERN Document Server

    Terenzi, L; Laaninen, M; Battaglia, P; Cavaliere, F; De Rosa, A; Hughes, N; Jukkala, P; Kilpiä, V -H; Morgante, G; Tomasi, M; Varis, J; Bersanelli, M; Butler, R C; Ferrari, F; Franceschet, C; Leutenegger, P; Mandolesi, N; Mennella, A; Silvestri, R; Stringhetti, L; Tuovinen, J; Valenziano, L; Villa, F; 10.1088/1748-0221/4/12/T12015

    2010-01-01

    This paper is part of the Prelaunch status LFI papers published on JINST: http://www.iop.org/EJ/journal/-page=extra.proc5/jinst The Planck LFI Radiometer Chain Assemblies (RCAs) have been calibrated in two dedicated cryogenic facilities. In this paper the facilities and the related instrumentation are described. The main satellite thermal interfaces for the single chains have to be reproduced and stability requirements have to be satisfied. Setup design, problems occurred and improving solutions implemented are discussed. Performance of the cryogenic setup are reported.

  5. Improvement of a cryogenic radiometer for XFEL absolute intensity measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, T., E-mail: takahiro-tanaka@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), NMIJ, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan); Kato, M.; Kurosawa, T.; Morishita, Y.; Saito, N. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), NMIJ, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan); Yabashi, M.; Tono, K.; Kudo, T.; Ishikawa, T. [SPring-8/RIKEN, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Shiraiwa, S. [Rockgate Co., 1-11-12 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2011-12-11

    A cryogenic radiometer was improved for measurements of the absolute radiant power of x-ray Free Electron Laser, which provides intense radiation with an ultra-short pulse duration. Based on simulation results obtained by the Monte Carlo program EGS 5 code, a new cavity absorber of the cryogenic radiometer was developed. The simulation results show that the new cavity absorber achieves absorptance close to unity for hard x-rays up to photon energies of 40 keV. The excellent performance of the new cavity absorber, as well as the consistency between the new and the former cavity, was confirmed by calibrating two different types of silicon photodiodes. The calibration results agreed well within their relative expanded uncertainties. To confirm the performance of the new cavity absorber in the high radiant power region, the radiant powers obtained with the cryogenic radiometer and an x-ray beam monitor were also compared. A strong correlation between the two detectors was obtained. With the new cavity absorber, the absolute radiant power of XFEL for photon energies of up to 40 keV with low uncertainties is expected to be measured.

  6. Direct Solar Irradiance measurements with a Cryogenic Solar Absolute Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Benjamin; Winkler, Rainer; Graber, Florian; Finsterle, Wolfgang; Fox, Nigel; Li, Vivian; Schmutz, Werner

    2017-02-01

    The World Radiometric Reference (WRR) is an artefact based reference for Direct Solar Irradiance (DSI) measurements. The WRR is realized by a group of electrical substitution radiometers, the World Standard Group (WSG). In recent years, a relative difference of about -0.3% between the International System of Units (SI) scale and the WRR scale was observed with the SI scale being lower. The Cryogenic Solar Absolute Radiometer (CSAR) aims for i) providing direct traceability of DSI measurements to the SI system, ii) reducing the overall uncertainty of DSI measurements towards 0.01% and for iii) replacing the WSG in future. The latest SI-WRR intercomparisons performed with CSAR revealed a relative difference of -0.29% ± 0.064% (k = 1) between the SI and the WRR scale, a result that agrees well with previous findings. The uncertainty of corrections for the window transmittance results currently in the largest contribution to the total uncertainty for the CSAR measurements. The formal transition from the WRR to the SI-scale for DSI measurements is currently being discussed in the WMO/CIMO Task Team on Radiation References.

  7. Cryogenic absolute radiometers as laboratory irradiance standards, remote sensing detectors, and pyroheliometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foukal, Peter V.; Hoyt, C.; Kochling, H.; Miller, P.

    1990-01-01

    The dramatic improvement in heat diffusivity of pure Cu at liquid-He temperatures makes possible very important advances in the absolute accuracy, reproducibility, sensitivity, and time constant of cryogenic electrical substitution radiometers (ESRs), relative to conventional ESRs. The design and characterization of a table-top cryogenic ESR now available for detector calibration work to the 0.01-percent level of absolute accuracy under laser illumination is discussed. A sensitive cryogenic ESR recently delivered to the NIST for radiometric calibrations of black bodies is also described, along with the design and testing of a very fast cryogenic ESR developed for NASA remote-sensing studies of the earth's radiation budget.

  8. Realization of photometric base unit of candela traceable to cryogenic radiometer at UME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samedov, F.; Bazkır, Ö.

    2005-06-01

    At National Metrology Institute of Turkey (UME, Ulusal Metroloji Enstitüsü), luminous intensity unit of candela was realized using detector-based approach and photometric scale was re-established depending on this new realization. Candela was measured on photometric bench using interferometric distance measurement system and filter-radiometer traceable to UME primary level electrical-substitution cryogenic radiometer. Thermally stabilized filter radiometer, which has been designed for spectral irradiance measurements, is consists of trap detector, filter housing and precision aperture. Different measurement techniques were used to fully characterize each parameter of filter-radiometer; like effective aperture area, spectral transmittance of V(λ) filter and responsivity of trap detector.

  9. Planar electrical-substitution carbon nanotube cryogenic radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlin, N. A.; White, M.; Vayshenker, I.; Woods, S. I.; Lehman, J. H.

    2015-04-01

    We have developed a fully-lithographic electrical-substitution planar bolometric-radiometer (PBR) that employs multiwall vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNT) as the absorber and thermistor, micro-machined Si as the weak thermal link and thin-film Mo as the electrical heater. The near-unity absorption of the VACNT over a broad wavelength range permits a planar geometry, compatible with lithographic fabrication. We present performance results on a PBR with an absorption of 0.999 35 at 1550 nm, a thermal conductance of 456 µW K-1 at 4 K and a time constant (1/e) of 7.7 ms. A single measurement of approximately 100 µW optical power at 1550 nm achieved in less than 100 s yields an expanded uncertainty of 0.14% (k = 2). We also observe an elevated superconducting transition temperature of 3.884 K for the Mo heater, which opens the possibility of future devices incorporating more sensitive thermistors and superconducting thin-film wiring. Contribution of an agency of the US government; not subject to copyright

  10. Study of a Vuilleumier cycle cryogenic refrigerator for detector cooling on the limb scanning infrared radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, S. C.

    1976-01-01

    A program to detect and monitor the presence of trace constituents in the earth's atmosphere by using the Limb Scanning Infrared Radiometer (LSIR) is reported. The LSIR, which makes radiometric measurements of the earth's limb radiance profile from a space platform, contains a detector assembly that must be cooled to a temperature of 65 + or - 2 K. The feasibility of cooling the NASA-type detector package with Vuilleumier (VM) cryogenic refrigerator was investigated to develop a preliminary conceptual design of a VM refrigerator that is compatible with a flight-type LSIR instrument. The scope of the LSIR program consists of analytical and design work to establish the size, weight, power consumption, interface requirements, and other important characteristics of a cryogenic cooler that would meet the requirements of the LSIR. The cryogenic cooling requirements under the conditions that NASA specified were defined. Following this, a parametric performance analysis was performed to define the interrelationships between refrigeration characteristics and mission requirements. This effort led to the selection of an optimum refrigerator design for the LSIR mission.

  11. Absolute calibration of an ultraviolet spectrometer using a stabilized laser and a cryogenic cavity radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauniskis, L.; Foukal, P.; Kochling, H.

    1992-01-01

    We carry out the calibration of an ultraviolet spectrometer by using a cryogenic electrical-substitution radiometer and intensity-stabilized laser sources. A comparison of the error budgets for the laser-based calibration described here and for a calibration using a type-FEL tungsten spectral-irradiance standard indicates that this technique could provide an improvement of a factor of about three in the uncertainty of the spectrometer calibration, resulting in an absolute accuracy (standard deviation of three) of about 1 percent at 257 nm. The technique described here might significantly improve the accuracy of calibrations on NASA ozone-monitoring and solar ultraviolet-monitoring spectrophotometers when used to complement present procedures that employ lamps and the SURF II synchrotron ultraviolet radiation facility at the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

  12. Bilateral comparison of cryogenic radiometers between NPL and UME, linked to the CCPR-S3 supplementary comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, T.

    2016-01-01

    This report presents the results of a bilateral comparison between NPL and UME, which was carried out to establish the unilateral degrees of equivalence for UME with respect to the defined reference value of the CCPR S3 supplementary comparison of cryogenic radiometers using silicon trap detectors as transfer devices. In accordance with the protocol for the CCPR S3 comparison, UME was asked to calibrate a set of NPL supplied silicon trap transfer detectors at a series of laser wavelengths; UME chose to measure at 514.5 nm and 632.8 nm. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCPR, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  13. A 110 GHz ozone radiometer with a cryogenic planar Schottky mixer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koistinen, O.P.; Valmu, H.T.; Raeisaenen, A. (Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Espoo (Finland)); Vdovin, V.F.; Dryagin, Y.A.; Lapkin, I.V. (Russian Academy of Science, Nizhny-Novgorod (Russian Federation))

    1993-12-01

    A total power radiometer is presented for monitoring of the stratospheric ozone spectral line at 110 GHz. Special features such as a cooled planar Schottky mixer as the front end and efficient reduction of standing waves in the quasi-optics, are discussed in detail. The noise temperature of the receiver is 530 K (SSB), and the total bandwidth of the receiver is 1 GHz. A dual acousto-optical spectrometer is used for the signal detection.

  14. Validation of the uncertainty budget for soft X-ray radiant power measurement using a cryogenic radiometer

    CERN Document Server

    Rabus, H; Scholze, F; Thornagel, R; Ulm, G

    2002-01-01

    The cryogenic radiometer SYRES, a thermal detector based on the electrical substitution principle, has been used as the primary detector standard for radiant power measurement in the ultraviolet, vacuum ultraviolet and soft X-ray spectral ranges. In order to investigate the possibility of radiant energy being deposited in its absorber cavity without being transformed into heat when detecting soft X-rays, SYRES has been directly compared with the electron storage ring BESSY 1, a primary radiometric source standard of calculable spectral radiant power. To this end, the integral radiant power emitted by the storage ring,into a solid angle defined by a high-precision aperture was measured with SYRES. The experiments were conducted at two nominal energies of the circulating electrons, 800 MeV and 340 MeV, to study the influence of the different spectral distributions of the synchrotron radiation. For the original graphite-coated cavity absorber, significant discrepancies were found which could be traced back to th...

  15. High accuracy flexural hinge development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, I.; Ortiz de Zárate, I.; Migliorero, G.

    2005-07-01

    This document provides a synthesis of the technical results obtained in the frame of the HAFHA (High Accuracy Flexural Hinge Assembly) development performed by SENER (in charge of design, development, manufacturing and testing at component and mechanism levels) with EADS Astrium as subcontractor (in charge of doing an inventory of candidate applications among existing and emerging projects, establishing the requirements and perform system level testing) under ESA contract. The purpose of this project has been to develop a competitive technology for a flexural pivot, usuable in highly accurate and dynamic pointing/scanning mechanisms. Compared with other solutions (e.g. magnetic or ball bearing technologies) flexural hinges are the appropriate technology for guiding with accuracy a mobile payload over a limited angular ranges around one rotation axes.

  16. PHOCUS radiometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Nyström

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available PHOCUS – Particles, Hydrogen and Oxygen Chemistry in the Upper Summer Mesosphere is a Swedish sounding rocket experiment, launched in July 2011, with the main goal of investigating the upper atmosphere in the altitude range 50–110 km. This paper describes the SondRad instrument in the PHOCUS payload, the radiometer comprising two frequency channels, 183 GHz and 557 GHz, aimed at exploring the water vapour concentration distribution in connection with the appearance of noctilucent (night shining clouds. The design of the radiometer system has been done in a collaboration between Omnisys Instruments AB and the Group for Advanced Receiver Development (GARD at Chalmers University of Technology where Omnisys was responsible for the overall design, implementation, and verification of the radiometers and backend whereas GARD was responsible for the radiometer optics and calibration systems.

    The SondRad instrument covers the water absorption lines at 183 GHz and 557 GHz. The 183 GHz channel is a side-looking radiometer while the 557 GHz radiometer is placed along the rocket axis looking in the forward direction. Both channels employ sub-harmonically pumped Schottky mixers and FFT spectrometer backends with 67 kHz resolution.

    The radiometers include novel calibration systems specifically adjusted for use with each frequency channel. The 183 GHz channel employs a CW-pilot signal calibrating the entire receiving chain while the IF-chain of the 557 GHz channel is calibrated by injecting a signal from a reference noise source through a directional coupler.

    The instrument collected complete spectra for both the 183 GHz and the 557 GHz with 300 Hz data rate for the 183 GHz channel and 10 Hz data rate for the 557 GHz channel for about 60 s reaching the apogee of the flight trajectory and 100 s after that. With lossless data compression using variable resolution over the spectrum, the data set was reduced to 2 × 12 MByte.

  17. PHOCUS radiometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Nyström

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available PHOCUS – Particles, Hydrogen and Oxygen Chemistry in the Upper Summer Mesosphere is a Swedish sounding rocket experiment, launched in July 2011, with the main goal of investigating the upper atmosphere in the altitude range 50–110 km. This paper describes the SondRad instrument in the PHOCUS payload, a radiometer comprising two frequency channels (183 GHz and 557 GHz aimed at exploring the water vapour concentration distribution in connection with the appearance of noctilucent (night shining clouds. The design of the radiometer system has been done in a collaboration between Omnisys Instruments AB and the Group for Advanced Receiver Development (GARD at Chalmers University of Technology where Omnisys was responsible for the overall design, implementation, and verification of the radiometers and backend, whereas GARD was responsible for the radiometer optics and calibration systems.

    The SondRad instrument covers the water absorption lines at 183 GHz and 557 GHz. The 183 GHz channel is a side-looking radiometer, while the 557 GHz radiometer is placed along the rocket axis looking in the forward direction. Both channels employ sub-harmonically pumped Schottky mixers and Fast Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FFTS backends with 67 kHz resolution.

    The radiometers include novel calibration systems specifically adjusted for use with each frequency channel. The 183 GHz channel employs a continuous wave CW pilot signal calibrating the entire receiving chain, while the intermediate frequency chain (the IF-chain of the 557 GHz channel is calibrated by injecting a signal from a reference noise source through a directional coupler.

    The instrument collected complete spectra for both the 183 GHz and the 557 GHz with 300 Hz data rate for the 183 GHz channel and 10 Hz data rate for the 557 GHz channel for about 60 s reaching the apogee of the flight trajectory and 100 s after that. With lossless data compression using variable

  18. High Accuracy Imaging Polarimetry with NICMOS

    CERN Document Server

    Batcheldor, D; Hines, D C; Schmidt, G D; Axon, D J; Robinson, A; Sparks, W; Tadhunter, C

    2008-01-01

    The ability of NICMOS to perform high accuracy polarimetry is currently hampered by an uncalibrated residual instrumental polarization at a level of 1.2-1.5%. To better quantify and characterize this residual we obtained observations of three polarimetric standard stars at three separate space-craft roll angles. Combined with archival data, these observations were used to characterize the residual instrumental polarization to enable NICMOS to reach its full polarimetric potential. Using these data, we calculate values of the parallel transmission coefficients that reproduce the ground-based results for the polarimetric standards. The uncertainties associated with the parallel transmission coefficients, a result of the photometric repeatability of the observations, dominate the accuracy of p and theta. However, the new coefficients now enable imaging polarimetry of targets with p~1.0% at an accuracy of +/-0.6% and +/-15 degrees.

  19. Computing High Accuracy Power Spectra with Pico

    CERN Document Server

    Fendt, William A

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the second release of Pico (Parameters for the Impatient COsmologist). Pico is a general purpose machine learning code which we have applied to computing the CMB power spectra and the WMAP likelihood. For this release, we have made improvements to the algorithm as well as the data sets used to train Pico, leading to a significant improvement in accuracy. For the 9 parameter nonflat case presented here Pico can on average compute the TT, TE and EE spectra to better than 1% of cosmic standard deviation for nearly all $\\ell$ values over a large region of parameter space. Performing a cosmological parameter analysis of current CMB and large scale structure data, we show that these power spectra give very accurate 1 and 2 dimensional parameter posteriors. We have extended Pico to allow computation of the tensor power spectrum and the matter transfer function. Pico runs about 1500 times faster than CAMB at the default accuracy and about 250,000 times faster at high accuracy. Training Pico can be...

  20. High Accuracy Transistor Compact Model Calibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hembree, Charles E. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mar, Alan [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Robertson, Perry J. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Typically, transistors are modeled by the application of calibrated nominal and range models. These models consists of differing parameter values that describe the location and the upper and lower limits of a distribution of some transistor characteristic such as current capacity. Correspond- ingly, when using this approach, high degrees of accuracy of the transistor models are not expected since the set of models is a surrogate for a statistical description of the devices. The use of these types of models describes expected performances considering the extremes of process or transistor deviations. In contrast, circuits that have very stringent accuracy requirements require modeling techniques with higher accuracy. Since these accurate models have low error in transistor descriptions, these models can be used to describe part to part variations as well as an accurate description of a single circuit instance. Thus, models that meet these stipulations also enable the calculation of quantifi- cation of margins with respect to a functional threshold and uncertainties in these margins. Given this need, new model high accuracy calibration techniques for bipolar junction transis- tors have been developed and are described in this report.

  1. Radiometer on a Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Gill, John J.; Mehdi, Imran; Lee, Choonsup; Schlecht, Erich T.; Skalare, Anders; Ward, John S.; Siegel, Peter H.; Thomas, Bertrand C.

    2009-01-01

    The radiometer on a chip (ROC) integrates whole wafers together to p rovide a robust, extremely powerful way of making submillimeter rece ivers that provide vertically integrated functionality. By integratin g at the wafer level, customizing the interconnects, and planarizing the transmission media, it is possible to create a lightweight asse mbly performing the function of several pieces in a more conventiona l radiometer.

  2. Helium cryogenics

    CERN Document Server

    Van Sciver, Steven W

    2012-01-01

    Twenty five years have elapsed since the original publication of Helium Cryogenics. During this time, a considerable amount of research and development involving helium fluids has been carried out culminating in several large-scale projects. Furthermore, the field has matured through these efforts so that there is now a broad engineering base to assist the development of future projects. Helium Cryogenics, 2nd edition brings these advances in helium cryogenics together in an updated form. As in the original edition, the author's approach is to survey the field of cryogenics with emphasis on helium fluids. This approach is more specialized and fundamental than that contained in other cryogenics books, which treat the associated range of cryogenic fluids. As a result, the level of treatment is more advanced and assumes a certain knowledge of fundamental engineering and physics principles, including some quantum mechanics. The goal throughout the work is to bridge the gap between the physics and engineering aspe...

  3. Cryogenic exciter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, James William [Niskayuna, NY; Garces, Luis Jose [Niskayuna, NY

    2012-03-13

    The disclosed technology is a cryogenic static exciter. The cryogenic static exciter is connected to a synchronous electric machine that has a field winding. The synchronous electric machine is cooled via a refrigerator or cryogen like liquid nitrogen. The static exciter is in communication with the field winding and is operating at ambient temperature. The static exciter receives cooling from a refrigerator or cryogen source, which may also service the synchronous machine, to selected areas of the static exciter and the cooling selectively reduces the operating temperature of the selected areas of the static exciter.

  4. Microwave Radiometer Profiler

    Data.gov (United States)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory — The microwave radiometer profiler (MWRP) provides vertical profiles of temperature, humidity, and cloud liquid water content as a function of height or pressure at...

  5. Solar-Collector Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, J. M., Jr

    1984-01-01

    Water-cooled Kendall radiometer measures output of solar energy concentrators. Unit measures irradiance up to 30,000 solar constants with 1 percent accuracy and responds to wavelengths from ultraviolet to far infrared.

  6. Microwave Radiometer - high frequency

    Data.gov (United States)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory — The Microwave Radiometer-High Frequency (MWRHF) provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from two channels centered at 90 and 150 GHz. These two...

  7. High accuracy computational methods for behavioral modeling of thick-film resistors at cryogenic temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balik Franciszek

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to elaborate two-dimensional behavioral modeling method of thick-film resistors working in low-temperature conditions. The investigated resistors (made from 5 various resistive inks: 10 resistor coupons, each with 36 resistors with various dimensions, were measured automatically in a cryostat system. The low temperature was achieved in a nitrogen-helium continuous-flow cryostat. For nitrogen used as a freezing liquid the minimal temperature possible to achieve was equal to −195.85 °C (77.3 K. Mathematical model in the form of a multiplication of two polynomials was elaborated based on the above mentioned measurements. The first polynomial approximated temperature behavior of the normalized resistance, while the second one described the dependence of resistance on planar resistors dimensions. Special computational procedures for multidimensional approximation purpose were elaborated. It was shown that proper approximation polynomials and sufficiently exact methods of calculations ensure acceptable modeling errors.

  8. A SINGLE STEP SCHEME WITH HIGH ACCURACY FOR PARABOLIC PROBLEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈传淼; 胡志刚

    2001-01-01

    A single step scheme with high accuracy for solving parabolic problem is proposed. It is shown that this scheme possesses good stability and fourth order accuracy with respect to both time and space variables, which are superconvergent.

  9. Calibration chain design based on integrating sphere transfer radiometer for SI-traceable on-orbit spectral radiometric calibration and its uncertainty analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei-Ning; Fang, Wei; Sun, Li-Wei; Cui, Li-Hong; Wang, Yu-Peng

    2016-09-01

    In order to satisfy the requirement of SI-traceable on-orbit absolute radiation calibration transfer with high accuracy for satellite remote sensors, a transfer chain consisting of a fiber coupling monochromator (FBM) and an integrating sphere transfer radiometer (ISTR) was designed in this paper. Depending on the Sun, this chain based on detectors provides precise spectral radiometric calibration and measurement to spectrometers in the reflective solar band (RSB) covering 300-2500 nm with a spectral bandwidth of 0.5-6 nm. It shortens the traditional chain based on lamp source and reduces the calibration uncertainty from 5% to 0.5% by using the cryogenic radiometer in space as a radiometric benchmark and trap detectors as secondary standard. This paper also gives a detailed uncertainty budget with reasonable distribution of each impact factor, including the weak spectral signal measurement with uncertainty of 0.28%. According to the peculiar design and comprehensive uncertainty analysis, it illustrates that the spectral radiance measurement uncertainty of the ISTR system can reach to 0.48%. The result satisfies the requirements of SI-traceable on-orbit calibration and has wider significance for expanding the application of the remote sensing data with high-quality. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41474161) and the National High-Technology Program of China (Grant No. 2015AA123703).

  10. Development and application of cryogenic radiometry with hard X-rays; Entwicklung und Anwendung der Kryoradiometrie mit harter Roentgenstrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerlach, Martin

    2008-06-06

    To establish cryogenic radiometry with hard X-ray radiation for photon energies of up to 60 keV, a novel type of cavity absorber had to be developed for the cryogenic radiometer SYRES I, which is deployed by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) as primary standard detector at the electron storage ring BESSY II. This new type of cavity absorber allows for the complete absorption of hard X-ray radiation in combination with an appropriate sensitivity and an adequate time constant for the measurement of synchrotron radiation at BESSY II. As the process of fabrication of different types of absorbers is very time-consuming, the interaction of hard X-ray radiation with different absorber materials and geometries was studied intensively by using the Monte Carlo simulation code Geant4. The accuracy of the simulations was verified comparing them to scattering experiments performed at a wavelength shifter beamline at BESSY II with a calibrated energy dispersive detector. It was shown that Geant4 describes the photo-effect, including fluorescence as well as Compton- and Rayleigh scattering, with high accuracy. The simulations and experiments resulted in a cavity absorber with a gold base 550 {mu}m in thickness and a cylindrical shell made of copper 90 {mu}m in thickness to reduce losses caused by fluorescence and scattered radiation. Monochromatized synchrotron radiation of high spectral purity was then used to calibrate semiconductor photodiodes, which can be used as compact and inexpensive secondary standard detectors, against a cryogenic radiometer, covering the entire photon energy range of three beamlines from 50 eV to 60 keV with relative uncertainties of less than 0.5 %. Furthermore the spatial homogeneity of the spectral responsivity, the transmittance and the linearity of the photodiodes was investigated. Through a direct comparison of the free-air ionization chamber PK100, a primary detector standard of PTB used in dosimetry, and the cryogenic radiometer

  11. The Boundary Layer Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irshad, Ranah; Bowles, N. E.; Calcutt, S. B.; Hurley, J.

    2010-10-01

    The Boundary Layer Radiometer is a small, low mass (<1kg) radiometer with only a single moving part - a scan/calibration mirror. The instrument consists of a three mirror telescope system incorporating an intermediate focus for use with miniature infrared and visible filters. It also has an integrated low power blackbody calibration target to provide long-term calibration stability The instrument may be used as an upward looking boundary layer radiometer for both the terrestrial and Martian atmospheres with appropriate filters for the mid-infrared carbon dioxide band, as well as a visible channel for the detection of aerosol components such as dust. The scan mirror may be used to step through different positions from the local horizon to the zenith, allowing the vertical temperature profile of the atmosphere to be retrieved. The radiometer uses miniature infrared filter assemblies developed for previous space-based instruments by Oxford, Cardiff and Reading Universities. The intermediate focus allows for the use of upstream blocking filters and baffles, which not only simplifies the design of the filters and focal plane assembly, but also reduces the risk of problems due to stray light. Combined with the calibration target this means it has significant advantages over previous generations of small radiometers.

  12. The conical scan radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosch, T.; Hennings, D.

    1982-07-01

    A satellite-borne conical scan radiometer (CSR) is proposed, offering multiangular and multispectral measurements of Earth radiation fields, including the total radiances, which are not available from conventional radiometers. Advantages of the CSR for meteorological studies are discussed. In comparison to conventional cross track scanning instruments, the CSR is unique with respect to the selected picture element size which is kept constant by means of a specially shaped detector matrix at all scan angles. The conical scan mode offers the chance to improve angular sampling. Angular sampling gaps of previous satellite-borne radiometers can be interpolated and complemented by CSR data. Radiances are measured through 10 radiometric channels which are selected to study cloudiness, water vapor, ozone, surface albedo, ground and mean stratospheric temperature, and aerosols.

  13. Electron Cyclotron Emission Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Cristina

    2009-11-01

    There is much interest in studying plasmas that generate hot electrons. The goal of this project is to develop a wide band electron cyclotron radiometer to measure the non-Maxwellian rapid rises in electron temperature. These rapid increases in temperature will then be correlated to instabilities in the plasma. This project explores a type of noncontact temperature measurement. We will attempt to show the feasibility of electron cyclotron emissions to measure the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment's electron plasma temperature. The radiometer has been designed to have 100dB of gain and a sensitivity of 24mV/dB given by its logarithmic amplifier. If successful, this radiometer will be used as a diagnostic tool in later projects such as the proposed experiment studying magnetic reconnection using solar flux loops.

  14. A Multifrequency Radiometer System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    1977-01-01

    A radiometer system having four channels: 5 GHz, l7 GHz, 34 GHz, all vertical polarization, and a 34 GHz sky horn, will be described. The system which is designed for collecting glaciological and oceanographic data is intended for airborne use and imaging is achieved by means of a multifrequency ...... elaborate processing later, using ground facilities. In conjunction with a side looking radar which is under development at present, the radiometers are intended as the remote sensing basis for an all-weather ice reconnaissance service in the Greenland seas....

  15. Microwave Radiometer (MWR) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, VR

    2006-08-01

    The Microwave Radiometer (MWR) provides time-series measurements of column-integrated amounts of water vapor and liquid water. The instrument itself is essentially a sensitive microwave receiver. That is, it is tuned to measure the microwave emissions of the vapor and liquid water molecules in the atmosphere at specific frequencies.

  16. Statistical Topics Concerning Radiometer Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hunter, Todd R

    2015-01-01

    We present a derivation of the radiometer equation based on the original references and fundamental statistical concepts. We then perform numerical simulations of white noise to illustrate the radiometer equation in action. Finally, we generate 1/f and 1/f^2 noise, demonstrate that it is non-stationary, and use it to simulate the effect of gain fluctuations on radiometer performance.

  17. Nanostructured Material for Accurate and Fast Tracking of Cryogenic Temperatures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The use of cryogenic propellants in next-generation launch vehicles and rockets relies to a great extent on the availability of rugged, high accuracy (0.2%), fast...

  18. Filter-radiometer-based realization of candela and establishment of photometric scale at UME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samedov, Farhad; Durak, Murat; Bazkır, Özcan

    2005-11-01

    The luminous intensity unit of candela was realized based on filter-radiometer, which is traceable to detector-based primary standard electrical substitution cryogenic radiometer (ESCR). In that realization the traditional Osram Wi41/G-type incandescent lamp and filter-radiometer consisting of an aperture, a V(λ) filter and a silicon photodiode based trap detector were used as light source and detection element, respectively. Measurement techniques of effective aperture area, spectral transmittance of V(λ) filter and absolute responsivity of trap detector are also presented.

  19. DIPSY, a low-cost GPS application with high accuracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, W.F.M. van der

    1998-01-01

    To improve the control of unmanned aircraft flying out of visual range, the controller needs to be provided with realtime information about the position and behaviour of the drone during the flight. The position of the drone has to be presented with a relative high accuracy to obtain accurate flight

  20. DIPSY, a low-cost GPS application with high accuracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, W.F.M. van der

    1999-01-01

    To improve the control of unmanned aircraft flying out of visual range, the controller needs to be provided with real-time information about the position and behaviour of the drone during the flight. The position of the drone has to be presented with a relative high accuracy to obtain accurate lligh

  1. DIPSY, a low-cost GPS application with high accuracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, W.F.M. van der

    1999-01-01

    To improve the control of unmanned aircraft flying out of visual range, the controller needs to be provided with real-time information about the position and behaviour of the drone during the flight. The position of the drone has to be presented with a relative high accuracy to obtain accurate lligh

  2. DIPSY, a low-cost GPS application with high accuracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, W.F.M. van der

    1998-01-01

    To improve the control of unmanned aircraft flying out of visual range, the controller needs to be provided with realtime information about the position and behaviour of the drone during the flight. The position of the drone has to be presented with a relative high accuracy to obtain accurate flight

  3. DIPSY, a low-cost GPS application with high accuracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, W.F.M. van der

    1999-01-01

    To improve the control of unmanned aircraft flying out of visual range, the controller needs to be provided with real-time information about the position and behaviour of the drone during the flight. The position of the drone has to be presented with a relative high accuracy to obtain accurate

  4. Cryogenic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoyama, Kenji

    2002-02-01

    In this lecture we discuss the principle of method of cooling to a very low temperature, i.e. cryogenic. The "gas molecular model" will be introduced to explain the mechanism cooling by the expansion engine and the Joule-Thomson expansion valve. These two expansion processes are normally used in helium refrigeration systems to cool the process gas to cryogenic temperature. The reverse Carnot cycle will be discussed in detail as an ideal refrigeration cycle. First the fundamental process of liquefaction and refrigeration cycles will be discussed, and then the practical helium refrigeration system. The process flow of the system and the key components; -compressor, expander, and heat exchanger- will be discussed. As an example of an actual refrigeration system, we will use the cryogenic system for the KEKB superconducting RF cavity. We will also discuss the liquid helium distribution system, which is very important, especially for the cryogenic systems used in accelerator applications. 1 Principles of Cooling and Fundamental Cooling Cycle 2 Expansion engine, Joule-Thomson expansion, kinetic molecular theory, and enthalpy 3 Liquefaction Systems 4 Refrigeration Systems 5 Practical helium liquefier/refrigeration system 6 Cryogenic System for TRISTAN Superconducting RF Cavity

  5. Hurricane Imaging Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, Daniel J.; Biswas, Sayak K.; James, Mark W.; Roberts, J. Brent; Jones, W. Linwood; Johnson, James; Farrar, Spencer; Sahawneh, Saleem; Ruf, Christopher S.; Morris, Mary; hide

    2014-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is a synthetic thinned array passive microwave radiometer designed to allow retrieval of surface wind speed in hurricanes, up through category five intensity. The retrieval technology follows the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which measures surface wind speed in hurricanes along a narrow strip beneath the aircraft. HIRAD maps wind speeds in a swath below the aircraft, about 50-60 km wide when flown in the lower stratosphere. HIRAD has flown in the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment in 2010 on a WB-57 aircraft, and on a Global Hawk unmanned aircraft system (UAS) in 2012 and 2013 as part of NASA's Hurricane and Severe Storms Sentinel (HS3) program. The GRIP program included flights over Hurricanes Earl and Karl (2010). The 2012 HS3 deployment did not include any hurricane flights for the UAS carrying HIRAD. The 2013 HS3 flights included one flight over the predecessor to TS Gabrielle, and one flight over Hurricane Ingrid. This presentation will describe the HIRAD instrument, its results from the 2010 and 2013 flights, and potential future developments.

  6. Radiant Temperature Nulling Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A nulling, self-calibrating infrared radiometer is being developed for use in noncontact measurement of temperature in any of a variety of industrial and scientific applications. This instrument is expected to be especially well-suited to measurement of ambient or near-ambient temperature and, even more specifically, for measuring the surface temperature of a natural body of water. Although this radiometer would utilize the long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) portion of the spectrum (wavelengths of 8 to 12 m), its basic principle of operation could also be applied to other spectral bands (corresponding to other temperature ranges) in which the atmosphere is transparent and in which design requirements for sensitivity and temperature-measurement accuracy could be satisfied. The underlying principle of nulling and self-calibration is the same as that of a typical microwave radiometer, but because of differences between the characteristics of signals in the infrared and microwave spectral regions, the principle must be implemented in a different way. A detailed description of the instrument including an infrared photodetector equipped with focusing input optics [e.g., lens(es) and/or mirrors] and an input LWIR band-pass filter is presented.

  7. CRYOGENIC MAGNETS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, R.F.; Taylor, C.E.

    1963-05-21

    A cryogenic magnet coil is described for generating magnetic fields of the order of 100,000 gauss with a minimum expenditure of energy lost in resistive heating of the coil inductors and energy lost irreversibly in running the coil refrigeration plant. The cryogenic coil comprises a coil conductor for generating a magnetic field upon energization with electrical current, and refrigeration means disposed in heat conductive relation to the coil conductor for cooling to a low temperature. A substantial reduction in the power requirements for generating these magnetic fields is attained by scaling the field generating coil to large size and particular dimensions for a particular conductor, and operating the coil at a particular optimum temperature commensurate with minimum overall power requirements. (AEC)

  8. Cryogenics; Criogenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez R, C.; Jimenez D, J.; Cejudo A, J.; Hernandez M, V. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    Cryogenics is one of these technologies which contributes to scientific research that supports to the industry in the following benefits: 1. Storage ability and a great quantity of dense gases with cryogenic liquid which is found at high pressure. 2. Production ability at low cost with high purity gases through distillation or condensation. 3. Ability to use low temperatures in the refrigerating materials or alteration of the physical properties. This technology is used for reprocessing of those short and long half life radioactive wastes which always have been required that to be separated with classical methods. In this text we report the radioactive wastes separation by more sophisticated methods but more quickly and reliable. (Author)

  9. Portable Diagnostic Radiometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-07-01

    noise. The single-throw-double-pole switch is usually realized with an electronically- switched , latching ferrite circulator; however, at these...R2. Dl, D2 and R2 are then displayed on the liquid crystal display. The Q lines are next set to switch the latching switches into the 800 MHz...operation is basically as follows: On start- up, the CPU resets the Q line (P1-6) which sets the latching switches (see Fig. 18) to the 4 GHz radiometer

  10. High Accuracy Near-infrared Imaging Polarimetry with NICMOS

    CERN Document Server

    Batcheldor, D; Hines, D C; Schmidt, G D; Axon, D J; Robinson, A; Sparks, W; Tadhunter, C

    2008-01-01

    The findings of a nine orbit calibration plan carried out during HST Cycle 15, to fully determine the NICMOS camera 2 (2.0 micron) polarization calibration to high accuracy, are reported. Recently Ueta et al. and Batcheldor et al. have suggested that NICMOS possesses a residual instrumental polarization at a level of 1.2-1.5%. This would completely inhibit the data reduction in a number of GO programs, and hamper the ability of the instrument to perform high accuracy polarimetry. We obtained polarimetric calibration observations of three polarimetric standards at three spacecraft roll angles separated by ~60deg. Combined with archival data, these observations were used to characterize the residual instrumental polarization in order for NICMOS to reach its full potential of accurate imaging polarimetry at p~1%. Using these data, we place an 0.6% upper limit on the instrumental polarization and calculate values of the parallel transmission coefficients that reproduce the ground-based results for the polarimetri...

  11. Navigation message designing with high accuracy for NAV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Luxiao; Huang Zhigang; Zhao Yun

    2014-01-01

    Navigation message designing with high accuracy guarantee is the key to efficient navi-gation message distribution in the global navigation satellite system (GNSS). Developing high accu-racy-aware navigation message designing algorithms is an important topic. This paper investigates the high-accuracy navigation message designing problem with the message structure unchanged. The contributions made in this paper include a heuristic that employs the concept of the estimated range deviation (ERD) to improve the existing well-known navigation message on L1 frequency (NAV) of global positioning system (GPS) for good accuracy service; a numerical analysis approximation method (NAAM) to evaluate the range error due to truncation (RET) of different navigation messages; and a basic positioning parameters designing algorithm in the limited space allocation. Based on the predicted ultra-rapid data from the ultra-rapid data from the international GPS service for geodynamic (IGU), ERDs are generated in real time for error correction. Simulations show that the algorithms developed in this paper are general and flexible, and thus are applicable to NAV improvement and other navigation message designs.

  12. Systematic Calibration for Ultra-High Accuracy Inertial Measurement Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qingzhong; Yang, Gongliu; Song, Ningfang; Liu, Yiliang

    2016-06-22

    An inertial navigation system (INS) has been widely used in challenging GPS environments. With the rapid development of modern physics, an atomic gyroscope will come into use in the near future with a predicted accuracy of 5 × 10(-6)°/h or better. However, existing calibration methods and devices can not satisfy the accuracy requirements of future ultra-high accuracy inertial sensors. In this paper, an improved calibration model is established by introducing gyro g-sensitivity errors, accelerometer cross-coupling errors and lever arm errors. A systematic calibration method is proposed based on a 51-state Kalman filter and smoother. Simulation results show that the proposed calibration method can realize the estimation of all the parameters using a common dual-axis turntable. Laboratory and sailing tests prove that the position accuracy in a five-day inertial navigation can be improved about 8% by the proposed calibration method. The accuracy can be improved at least 20% when the position accuracy of the atomic gyro INS can reach a level of 0.1 nautical miles/5 d. Compared with the existing calibration methods, the proposed method, with more error sources and high order small error parameters calibrated for ultra-high accuracy inertial measurement units (IMUs) using common turntables, has a great application potential in future atomic gyro INSs.

  13. Systematic Calibration for Ultra-High Accuracy Inertial Measurement Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingzhong Cai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available An inertial navigation system (INS has been widely used in challenging GPS environments. With the rapid development of modern physics, an atomic gyroscope will come into use in the near future with a predicted accuracy of 5 × 10−6°/h or better. However, existing calibration methods and devices can not satisfy the accuracy requirements of future ultra-high accuracy inertial sensors. In this paper, an improved calibration model is established by introducing gyro g-sensitivity errors, accelerometer cross-coupling errors and lever arm errors. A systematic calibration method is proposed based on a 51-state Kalman filter and smoother. Simulation results show that the proposed calibration method can realize the estimation of all the parameters using a common dual-axis turntable. Laboratory and sailing tests prove that the position accuracy in a five-day inertial navigation can be improved about 8% by the proposed calibration method. The accuracy can be improved at least 20% when the position accuracy of the atomic gyro INS can reach a level of 0.1 nautical miles/5 d. Compared with the existing calibration methods, the proposed method, with more error sources and high order small error parameters calibrated for ultra-high accuracy inertial measurement units (IMUs using common turntables, has a great application potential in future atomic gyro INSs.

  14. Influence of spatial temperature distribution on high accuracy interferometric metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yongqiang; Miao, Erlong; Yan, Feng; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Huaijiang

    2010-10-01

    We calculate the influence of temperature change on the refractive index of air, establish a model of air temperature distribution and analyze the effect of different temperature distribution on the high accuracy interferometric metrology. First, a revised Edlen formula is employed to acquire the relation between temperature and refractive index of air, followed by introducing the fixed temperature gradient distribution among the spatial grid within the optical cavity between the reference flat and the test flat of the Fizeau interferometer, accompanied by a temperature change random function within each grid. Finally, all the rays through the air layer with different incident angles are traced by Matlab program in order to obtain the final output position, angle and OPD for each ray. The influence of different temperature distribution and the length of the optical cavity in on the testing accuracy can be analyzed through the RMS value that results from repeatable rays tracing. As a result, the horizontal distribution (vertical to optical axis) has a large effect on the testing accuracy. Thus, to realize the high accuracy figure metrology, the horizontal distribution of temperature must be rigorously controlled as well as to shorten the length of the optical cavity to a large extent. The results from our simulation are of great significant for the accuracy analysis of interferometric testing and the research of manufacturing a interferometer.

  15. Planck-LFI radiometers' spectral response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zonca, A [INAF-IASF Milano, Via E. Bassini 15, 20133 Milano (Italy); Franceschet, C; Mennella, A; Bersanelli, M [Universita di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via G. Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Battaglia, P; Silvestri, R [Thales Alenia Space Italia S.p.A., S.S. Padana Superiore 290, 20090 Vimodrone, Milano (Italy); Villa, F; Butler, R C; Cuttaia, F; Mandolesi, N [INAF-IASF Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); D' Arcangelo, O [IFP-CNR, via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Artal, E [Departamento de IngenierIa de Comunicaciones, Universidad de Cantabria, Avenida de los Castros s/n. 39005 Santander (Spain); Davis, R J [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Galeotta, S; Maris, M [INAF-OATs, Via G.B. Tiepolo 11, I-34131, Trieste (Italy); Hughes, N; Jukkala, P; Kilpiae, V-H [DA-Design Oy, Keskuskatu 29, FI-31600, Jokioinen (Finland); Laaninen, M [Ylinen Electronics Oy, Teollisuustie 9A, FIN-02700, Kauniainen (Finland); Mendes, L, E-mail: andrea.zonca@fisica.unimi.i [ESA - ESAC, Camino bajo del Castillo, s/n, Villanueva de la Canada 28692 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-12-15

    The Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) is an array of pseudo-correlation radiometers on board the Planck satellite, the ESA mission dedicated to precision measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background. The LFI covers three bands centred at 30, 44 and 70 GHz, with a goal bandwidth of 20% of the central frequency. The characterization of the broadband frequency response of each radiometer is necessary to understand and correct for systematic effects, particularly those related to foreground residuals and polarization measurements. In this paper we present the measured band shape of all the LFI channels and discuss the methods adopted for their estimation. The spectral characterization of each radiometer was obtained by combining the measured spectral response of individual units through a dedicated RF model of the LFI receiver scheme. As a consistency check, we also attempted end-to-end spectral measurements of the integrated radiometer chain in a cryogenic chamber. However, due to systematic effects in the measurement setup, only qualitative results were obtained from these tests. The measured LFI bandpasses exhibit a moderate level of ripple, compatible with the instrument scientific requirements.

  16. High-accuracy measurements of snow Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function at visible and NIR wavelengths – comparison with modelling results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Arnaud

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available High-accuracy measurements of snow Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF were performed for four natural snow samples with a spectrogonio-radiometer in the 500–2600 nm wavelength range. These measurements are one of the first set of direct snow BRDF values over a wide range of lighting and viewing geometry. They were compared to BRDF calculated with two optical models. Variations of the snow anisotropy factor with lighting geometry, wavelength and snow physical properties were investigated. Results show that at wavelengths with small penetration depth, scattering mainly occurs in the very top layers and the anisotropy factor is controlled by the phase function. In this condition, forward scattering peak or double scattering peak is observed. In constrast at shorter wavelengths, the penetration of the radiation is much deeper and the number of scattering events increases. The anisotropy factor is thus nearly constant and decreases at grazing observation angles.

  17. High-accuracy measurements of snow Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function at visible and NIR wavelengths - comparison with modelling results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, M.; Brissaud, O.; Picard, G.; Schmitt, B.; Gallet, J.-C.; Arnaud, Y.

    2010-03-01

    High-accuracy measurements of snow Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) were performed for four natural snow samples with a spectrogonio-radiometer in the 500-2600 nm wavelength range. These measurements are one of the first sets of direct snow BRDF values over a wide range of lighting and viewing geometry. They were compared to BRDF calculated with two optical models. Variations of the snow anisotropy factor with lighting geometry, wavelength and snow physical properties were investigated. Results show that at wavelengths with small penetration depth, scattering mainly occurs in the very top layers and the anisotropy factor is controlled by the phase function. In this condition, forward scattering peak or double scattering peak is observed. In contrast at shorter wavelengths, the penetration of the radiation is much deeper and the number of scattering events increases. The anisotropy factor is thus nearly constant and decreases at grazing observation angles. The whole dataset is available on demand from the corresponding author.

  18. Researching the technology of high-accuracy camshaft measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Chen, Yong-Le; Wang, Hong; Liao, Hai-Yang

    1996-10-01

    This paper states the cam's data processing algorithm in detail in high accurate camshaft measurement system. It contains: 1) using minimum error of curve symmetry to seek the center position of the key slot; 2) Calculating the minimum error by cam's curve in theory to search top area; 3) According to cam's tolerance E(i) function and minimum angle error at cam top, seeking the best position of cam top and getting the best angle value and error curve. The algorithm is suitable for measuring all kinds of symmetry or asymmetry cam, and plain push-rod or spherical push-rod cam, for example, bus camshaft, car camshaft, motor camshaft, etc. Using the algorithm, high accuracy measurement can be achieved.

  19. Read-only high accuracy volume holographic optical correlator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tian; Li, Jingming; Cao, Liangcai; He, Qingsheng; Jin, Guofan

    2011-10-01

    A read-only volume holographic correlator (VHC) is proposed. After the recording of all of the correlation database pages by angular multiplexing, a stand-alone read-only high accuracy VHC will be separated from the VHC recording facilities which include the high-power laser and the angular multiplexing system. The stand-alone VHC has its own low power readout laser and very compact and simple structure. Since there are two lasers that are employed for recording and readout, respectively, the optical alignment tolerance of the laser illumination on the SLM is very sensitive. The twodimensional angular tolerance is analyzed based on the theoretical model of the volume holographic correlator. The experimental demonstration of the proposed read-only VHC is introduced and discussed.

  20. Compensation of motion error in a high accuracy AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yuguo; Arai, Yoshikazu; He, Gaofa; Asai, Takemi; Gao, Wei

    2008-10-01

    An atomic force microscope (AFM) system is used for large-area measurement with a spiral scanning strategy, which is composed of an air slide, an air spindle and a probe unit. The motion error which is brought from the air slide and the air spindle will increase with the increasing of the measurement area. Then the measurement accuracy will decrease. In order to achieve a high speed and high accuracy measurement, the probe scans along X-direction with constant height mode driven by the air slide, and at the same time, based on the change way of the motion error, it moves along Zdirection conducted by piezoactuator. According to the above method of error compensation, the profile measurement experiment of a micro-structured surface has been carried out. The experimental result shows that this method is effective for eliminating motion error, and it can achieve high speed and precision measurement of micro-structured surface.

  1. High accuracy autonomous navigation using the global positioning system (GPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Son H.; Hart, Roger C.; Shoan, Wendy C.; Wood, Terri; Long, Anne C.; Oza, Dipak H.; Lee, Taesul

    1997-01-01

    The application of global positioning system (GPS) technology to the improvement of the accuracy and economy of spacecraft navigation, is reported. High-accuracy autonomous navigation algorithms are currently being qualified in conjunction with the GPS attitude determination flyer (GADFLY) experiment for the small satellite technology initiative Lewis spacecraft. Preflight performance assessments indicated that these algorithms are able to provide a real time total position accuracy of better than 10 m and a velocity accuracy of better than 0.01 m/s, with selective availability at typical levels. It is expected that the position accuracy will be increased to 2 m if corrections are provided by the GPS wide area augmentation system.

  2. Spatial augmented reality based high accuracy human face projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Xie, Jinghui; Li, Yufeng; Weng, Dongdong; Liu, Yue

    2015-08-01

    This paper discusses the imaging principles and the technical difficulties of spatial augmented reality based human face projection. A novel geometry correction method is proposed to realize fast, high-accuracy face model projection. Using a depth camera to reconstruct the projected object, the relative position from the rendered model to the projector can be accessed and the initial projection image is generated. Then the projected image is distorted by using Bezier interpolation to guarantee that the projected texture matches with the object surface. The proposed method is under a simple process flow and can achieve high perception registration of virtual and real object. In addition, this method has a good performance in the condition that the reconstructed model is not exactly same with the rendered virtual model which extends its application area in the spatial augmented reality based human face projection.

  3. CRYOGENIC DEWAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, W.H.; Maseck, H.E.

    1964-01-28

    This patent relates to a dewar for storing cryogenic gase and is of the type having aii inner flask surrounded by a vacuum jacket and having a vent spout through which evaporating gas escapes. Heretofore substantial gas loss has resulted from the radiation of heat towards the flask from the warmer outer elements of the dewar. In this invention, the mask is surrounded by a thermally conducting shield which is disposed in the vacuum space between the flask and the outer elements of the dewar. The shield contacts only the vent spout, which is cooled by the evaporating gas, and thus is maintained at a temperature very close to that of the flask itself. Accordingly, heat radiated toward the flask is intercepted and conducted to the evaporating gas rather than being re-radiated towards the hask. In a liquid helium dewar of typical configniration the mention reduces the boil-off rate by approximately one-half.(AEC)

  4. High accuracy mantle convection simulation through modern numerical methods

    KAUST Repository

    Kronbichler, Martin

    2012-08-21

    Numerical simulation of the processes in the Earth\\'s mantle is a key piece in understanding its dynamics, composition, history and interaction with the lithosphere and the Earth\\'s core. However, doing so presents many practical difficulties related to the numerical methods that can accurately represent these processes at relevant scales. This paper presents an overview of the state of the art in algorithms for high-Rayleigh number flows such as those in the Earth\\'s mantle, and discusses their implementation in the Open Source code Aspect (Advanced Solver for Problems in Earth\\'s ConvecTion). Specifically, we show how an interconnected set of methods for adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), higher order spatial and temporal discretizations, advection stabilization and efficient linear solvers can provide high accuracy at a numerical cost unachievable with traditional methods, and how these methods can be designed in a way so that they scale to large numbers of processors on compute clusters. Aspect relies on the numerical software packages deal.II and Trilinos, enabling us to focus on high level code and keeping our implementation compact. We present results from validation tests using widely used benchmarks for our code, as well as scaling results from parallel runs. © 2012 The Authors Geophysical Journal International © 2012 RAS.

  5. Novel method for high accuracy figure measurement of optical flat

    Science.gov (United States)

    E, Kewei; Li, Dahai; Yang, Lijie; Guo, Guangrao; Li, Mengyang; Wang, Xuemin; Zhang, Tao; Xiong, Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Phase Measuring Deflectometry (PMD) is a non-contact, high dynamic-range and full-field metrology which becomes a serious competitor to interferometry. However, the accuracy of deflectometry metrology is strongly influenced by the level of the calibrations, including test geometry, imaging pin-hole camera and digital display. In this paper, we propose a novel method that can measure optical flat surface figure to a high accuracy. We first calibrate the camera using a checker pattern shown on a LCD display at six different orientations, and the last orientation is aligned at the same position as the test optical flat. By using this method, lens distortions and the mapping relationship between the CCD pixels and the subaperture coordinates on the test optical flat can be determined at the same time. To further reduce the influence of the calibration errors on measurements, a reference optical flat with a high quality surface is measured, and then the system errors in our PMD setup can be eliminated by subtracting the figure of the reference flat from the figure of the test flat. Although any expensive coordinates measuring machine, such as laser tracker and coordinates measuring machine are not applied in our measurement, our experimental results of optical flat figure from low to high order aberrations still show a good agreement with that from the Fizeau interferometer.

  6. High-accuracy mass spectrometry for fundamental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, H-Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometry for fundamental studies in metrology and atomic, nuclear and particle physics requires extreme sensitivity and efficiency as well as ultimate resolving power and accuracy. An overview will be given on the global status of high-accuracy mass spectrometry for fundamental physics and metrology. Three quite different examples of modern mass spectrometric experiments in physics are presented: (i) the retardation spectrometer KATRIN at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, employing electrostatic filtering in combination with magnetic-adiabatic collimation-the biggest mass spectrometer for determining the smallest mass, i.e. the mass of the electron anti-neutrino, (ii) the Experimental Cooler-Storage Ring at GSI-a mass spectrometer of medium size, relative to other accelerators, for determining medium-heavy masses and (iii) the Penning trap facility, SHIPTRAP, at GSI-the smallest mass spectrometer for determining the heaviest masses, those of super-heavy elements. Finally, a short view into the future will address the GSI project HITRAP at GSI for fundamental studies with highly-charged ions.

  7. High Accuracy Monocular SFM and Scale Correction for Autonomous Driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shiyu; Chandraker, Manmohan; Guest, Clark C

    2016-04-01

    We present a real-time monocular visual odometry system that achieves high accuracy in real-world autonomous driving applications. First, we demonstrate robust monocular SFM that exploits multithreading to handle driving scenes with large motions and rapidly changing imagery. To correct for scale drift, we use known height of the camera from the ground plane. Our second contribution is a novel data-driven mechanism for cue combination that allows highly accurate ground plane estimation by adapting observation covariances of multiple cues, such as sparse feature matching and dense inter-frame stereo, based on their relative confidences inferred from visual data on a per-frame basis. Finally, we demonstrate extensive benchmark performance and comparisons on the challenging KITTI dataset, achieving accuracy comparable to stereo and exceeding prior monocular systems. Our SFM system is optimized to output pose within 50 ms in the worst case, while average case operation is over 30 fps. Our framework also significantly boosts the accuracy of applications like object localization that rely on the ground plane.

  8. High-accuracy diagnostic tool for electron cloud observation in the LHC based on synchronous phase measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban Müller, J. F.; Baudrenghien, P.; Mastoridis, T.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Valuch, D.

    2015-11-01

    Electron cloud effects, which include heat load in the cryogenic system, pressure rise, and beam instabilities, are among the main intensity limitations for the LHC operation with 25 ns spaced bunches. A new observation tool was proposed and developed to monitor the e-cloud activity and it has already been used successfully during the LHC run 1 (2010-2012) and it is being intensively used in operation during the start of the LHC run 2 (2015-2018). It is based on the fact that the power loss of each bunch due to e-cloud can be estimated using bunch-by-bunch measurement of the synchronous phase. The measurements were done using the existing beam phase module of the low-level rf control system. In order to achieve the very high accuracy required, corrections for reflection in the cables and for systematic errors need to be applied followed by a post-processing of the measurements. Results clearly show the e-cloud buildup along the bunch trains and its time evolution during each LHC fill as well as from fill to fill. Measurements during the 2012 LHC scrubbing run reveal a progressive reduction in the e-cloud activity and therefore a decrease in the secondary electron yield. The total beam power loss can be computed as a sum of the contributions from all bunches and compared with the heat load deposited in the cryogenic system.

  9. Recent Developments and Qualification of Cryogenic Helium Flow Meters

    CERN Document Server

    Bézaguet, Alain-Arthur; Serio, L

    2002-01-01

    Flow measurement of cryogenic fluids is a useful diagnostic tool not only to assess thermal performance of superconducting devices and related components but also for early diagnosis of faulty components/systems and to assure the correct sharing of cryogenic power. It is mainly performed on the recovery at room temperature of vapor from liquid boil-off due to lack of commercially available robust and precise cryogenic mass flow meters. When high-accuracy or fast-time response is needed, or individual gas recovery at room temperature is not available, it is necessary to measure directly the fluid feed at cryogenic temperature. The results of extensive testing of industrially available and in-house developed flowmeters outlining characteristics and advantages of each measuring method are presented.

  10. Cryogenic Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The storage of cryogenic propellants is challenging because heat leaks into the cryogenic storage tanks no matter how good the insulation, resulting in a necessity...

  11. Cryogenics a textbook

    CERN Document Server

    Thipse, S S

    2013-01-01

    A Textbook covers lucidly various cryogenic applications including cryogenic engines and space and electronic applications. Importance of cryogenic engines in space propulsion, complete thermodynamic analysis of cryogenic systems with special emphasis on cryogenic cycles, Dewar vessels used to store cryogenic fluids and their applications in various industries have also been discussed in detail. Explanation of Superconductivity and its applications with a description of various Cryocoolers used in industry has also been provided with extensive details. Further technical information on cryogens has been specified alongwith the vacuum technology which has been sufficiently described with examples. Science of Cryonics has been elaborated and all aspects of technology related to functioning of cryogenic plants and their construction including valves, pipes has been incorporated in this book.

  12. Energy Efficient Cryogenics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghelli, Barry J.; Notardonato, William; Fesmire, James E.

    2016-01-01

    The Cryogenics Test Laboratory, NASA Kennedy Space Center, works to provide practical solutions to low-temperature problems while focusing on long-term technology targets for the energy-efficient use of cryogenics on Earth and in space.

  13. Cryogenic immersion microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-12-14

    A cryogenic immersion microscope whose objective lens is at least partially in contact with a liquid reservoir of a cryogenic liquid, in which reservoir a sample of interest is immersed is disclosed. When the cryogenic liquid has an index of refraction that reduces refraction at interfaces between the lens and the sample, overall resolution and image quality are improved. A combination of an immersion microscope and x-ray microscope, suitable for imaging at cryogenic temperatures is also disclosed.

  14. A Novel Miniature Wide-band Radiometer for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykulska-Lawrence, Hanna

    2016-10-01

    Design, development and testing of a novel miniaturised infrared radiometer is described. The instrument opens up new possibilities in planetary science of deployment on smaller platforms - such as unmanned aerial vehicles and microprobes - to enable study of a planet's radiation balance, as well as terrestrial volcano plumes and trace gases in planetary atmospheres, using low-cost long-term observations. Thus a key enabling development is that of miniaturised, low-power and well-calibrated instrumentation.The paper reports advances in miniature technology to perform high accuracy visible / IR remote sensing measurements. The infrared radiometer is akin to those widely used for remote sensing for earth and space applications, which are currently either large instruments on orbiting platforms or medium-sized payloads on balloons. We use MEMS microfabrication techniques to shrink a conventional design, while combining the calibration benefits of large (>1kg) type radiometers with the flexibility and portability of a measures broadband (0.2 to 100um) upward and downward radiation fluxes, with built-in calibration capability, incorporating traceability to temperature standards such as ITS-90.The miniature instrument described here was derived from a concept developed for a European Space Agency study, Dalomis (Proc. of 'i-SAIRAS 2005', Munich, 2005), which involved dropping multiple probes into the atmosphere of Venus from a balloon to sample numerous parts of the complex weather systems on the planet. Data from such an in-situ instrument would complement information from a satellite remote sensing instrument or balloon radiosonde. Moreover, the addition of an internal calibration standard facilitates comparisons between datasets.One of the main challenges for a reduced size device is calibration. We use an in-situ method whereby a blackbody source is integrated within the device and a micromirror switches the input to the detector between the measured signal and the

  15. Researches on High Accuracy Prediction Methods of Earth Orientation Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X. Q.

    2015-09-01

    The Earth rotation reflects the coupling process among the solid Earth, atmosphere, oceans, mantle, and core of the Earth on multiple spatial and temporal scales. The Earth rotation can be described by the Earth's orientation parameters, which are abbreviated as EOP (mainly including two polar motion components PM_X and PM_Y, and variation in the length of day ΔLOD). The EOP is crucial in the transformation between the terrestrial and celestial reference systems, and has important applications in many areas such as the deep space exploration, satellite precise orbit determination, and astrogeodynamics. However, the EOP products obtained by the space geodetic technologies generally delay by several days to two weeks. The growing demands for modern space navigation make high-accuracy EOP prediction be a worthy topic. This thesis is composed of the following three aspects, for the purpose of improving the EOP forecast accuracy. (1) We analyze the relation between the length of the basic data series and the EOP forecast accuracy, and compare the EOP prediction accuracy for the linear autoregressive (AR) model and the nonlinear artificial neural network (ANN) method by performing the least squares (LS) extrapolations. The results show that the high precision forecast of EOP can be realized by appropriate selection of the basic data series length according to the required time span of EOP prediction: for short-term prediction, the basic data series should be shorter, while for the long-term prediction, the series should be longer. The analysis also showed that the LS+AR model is more suitable for the short-term forecasts, while the LS+ANN model shows the advantages in the medium- and long-term forecasts. (2) We develop for the first time a new method which combines the autoregressive model and Kalman filter (AR+Kalman) in short-term EOP prediction. The equations of observation and state are established using the EOP series and the autoregressive coefficients

  16. Radiometer Testbed Development for SWOT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka; Brown, Shannon; Gaier, Todd; Dawson, Douglas; Harding, Dennis; Fu, Lee-Lueng; Esteban-Fernandez, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Conventional altimeters include nadir looking colocated 18-37 GHz microwave radiometer to measure wet tropospheric path delay. These have reduced accuracy in coastal zone (within 50 km from land) and do not provide wet path delay over land. The addition of high frequency channels to Jason-class radiometer will improve retrievals in coastal regions and enable retrievals over land. High-frequency window channels, 90, 130 and 166 GHz are optimum for improving performance in coastal region and channels on 183 GHz water vapor line are ideal for over-land retrievals.

  17. Compact Radiometers Expand Climate Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of Earth's water, energy, and carbon cycles, NASA plans to embark on the Soil Moisture Active and Passive mission in 2015. To prepare, Goddard Space Flight Center provided Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) funding to ProSensing Inc., of Amherst, Massachusetts, to develop a compact ultrastable radiometer for sea surface salinity and soil moisture mapping. ProSensing incorporated small, low-cost, high-performance elements into just a few circuit boards and now offers two lightweight radiometers commercially. Government research agencies, university research groups, and large corporations around the world are using the devices for mapping soil moisture, ocean salinity, and wind speed.

  18. Assessing the Accuracy of Sentinel-3 SLSTR Sea-Surface Temperature Retrievals Using High Accuracy Infrared Radiiometers on Ships of Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnett, P. J.; Izaguirre, M. A.; Szcszodrak, M.; Williams, E.; Reynolds, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    The assessment of errors and uncertainties in satellite-derived SSTs can be achieved by comparisons with independent measurements of skin SST of high accuracy. Such validation measurements are provided by well-calibrated infrared radiometers mounted on ships. The second generation of Marine-Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometers (M-AERIs) have recently been developed and two are now deployed on cruise ships of Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines that operate in the Caribbean Sea, North Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea. In addition, two Infrared SST Autonomous Radiometers (ISARs) are mounted alternately on a vehicle transporter of NYK Lines that crosses the Pacific Ocean between Japan and the USA. Both M-AERIs and ISARs are self-calibrating radiometers having two internal blackbody cavities to provide at-sea calibration of the measured radiances, and the accuracy of the internal calibration is periodically determined by measurements of a NIST-traceable blackbody cavity in the laboratory. This provides SI-traceability for the at-sea measurements. It is anticipated that these sensors will be deployed during the next several years and will be available for the validation of the SLSTRs on Sentinel-3a and -3b.

  19. Cryogenic heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Barron, Randall F

    2016-01-01

    Cryogenic Heat Transfer, Second Edition continues to address specific heat transfer problems that occur in the cryogenic temperature range where there are distinct differences from conventional heat transfer problems. This updated version examines the use of computer-aided design in cryogenic engineering and emphasizes commonly used computer programs to address modern cryogenic heat transfer problems. It introduces additional topics in cryogenic heat transfer that include latent heat expressions; lumped-capacity transient heat transfer; thermal stresses; Laplace transform solutions; oscillating flow heat transfer, and computer-aided heat exchanger design. It also includes new examples and homework problems throughout the book, and provides ample references for further study.

  20. Cryogen Safety Course 8876

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, George [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-13

    Cryogenics (from the Greek word κρvoζ, meaning frost or icy cold) is the study of the behavior of matter at very cold temperatures. The purpose of this course is to provide trainees with an introduction to cryogen use, the hazards and potential accidents related to cryogen systems, cryogen safety components, and the requirements that govern the design and use of cryogen systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The knowledge you gain will help you keep your workplace safe for yourself and your coworkers.

  1. Digital Array Gas Radiometer (DAGR) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation proposed here is a digital array gas radiometer (DAGR), a new design for a gas filter correlation radiometer (GFCR) to accurately measure and monitor...

  2. Thermal conductivity of silver loaded conductive epoxy from cryogenic to ambient temperature and its application for precision cryogenic noise measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amils, Ricardo I.; Gallego, Juan Daniel; Sebastián, José Luis; Muñoz, Sagrario; Martín, Agustín; Leuther, Arnulf

    2016-06-01

    The pressure to increase the sensitivity of instrumentation has pushed the use of cryogenic Low Noise Amplifier (LNA) technology into a growing number of fields. These areas range from radio astronomy and deep space communications to fundamental physics. In this context manufacturing for cryogenic environments requires a proper thermal knowledge of the materials to be able to achieve adequate design behavior. In this work, we present experimental measurements of the thermal conductivity of a silver filled conductive epoxy (EPO-TEK H20E) which is widely used in cryogenic electronics applications. The characterization has been made using a sample preparation which mimics the practical use of this adhesive in the fabrication of cryogenic devices. We apply the data obtained to a detailed analysis of the effects of the conductive epoxy in a monolithic thermal noise source used for high accuracy cryogenic microwave noise measurements. In this application the epoxy plays a fundamental role since its limited thermal conductivity allows heating the chip with relatively low power. To our knowledge, the cryogenic thermal conductivity data of this epoxy has not been reported before in the literature in the 4-300 K temperature range. A second non-conductive epoxy (Gray Scotch-Weld 2216 B/A), also widely used in cryogenic applications, has been measured in order to validate the method by comparing with previous published data.

  3. Laboratory panel and radiometer calibration

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Deadman, AJ

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available AND RADIOMETER CALIBRATION A.J Deadmana, I.D Behnerta, N.P Foxa, D. Griffithb aNational Physical Laboratory (NPL), United Kingdom bCouncil for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), South Africa ABSTRACT This paper presents the results...

  4. Microwave Radiometer Linearity Measured by Simple Means

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    2002-01-01

    Modern spaceborne radiometer systems feature an almost perfect on-board calibration, hence the primary calibration task to be carried out before launch is a check of radiometer linearity. This paper describes two ways of measuring linearity of microwave radiometers only requiring relatively simple...

  5. Microwave Radiometer Systems, Design and Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Vine, David Le

    Two important microwave remote sensors are the radar and the radiometer. There have been a number of books written on various aspects of radar, but there have been only a few written on microwave radiometers, especially on subjects of how to design and build radiometer systems. This book, which...

  6. Microwave Radiometer Systems, Design and Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Vine, David Le

    Two important microwave remote sensors are the radar and the radiometer. There have been a number of books written on various aspects of radar, but there have been only a few written on microwave radiometers, especially on subjects of how to design and build radiometer systems. This book, which...

  7. Imaging radiometers employing linear thermoelectric arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Timothy J.; Mickelson, Steve

    1999-07-01

    Infrared Solutions, Inc. has developed a family of radiometers which employ silicon microstructure uncooled linear thermoelectric arrays, prepared by Honeywell Technology Center. Included in the family is a handheld imaging radiometer for predictive and preventive maintenance having a frame time of 1.4 sec, a linescanner radiometer for monitoring of industrial web process, an imaging radiometer for monitoring stationary industrial processes such as a die casting, and a linescanner radiometer for monitoring the temperature distribution of railcar wheels on trains moving at speeds up to 80 mph.

  8. TEMPEST-D MM-Wave Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, S.; Gaier, T.; Reising, S. C.; Lim, B.; Stachnik, R. A.; Jarnot, R.; Berg, W. K.; Kummerow, C. D.; Chandrasekar, V.

    2016-12-01

    The TEMPEST-D radiometer is a five-frequency millimeter-wave radiometer at 89, 165, 176, 180, and 182 GHz. The direct-detection architecture of the radiometer reduces its power consumption and eliminates the need for a local oscillator, reducing complexity. The Instrument includes a blackbody calibrator and a scanning reflector, which enable precision calibration and cross-track scanning. The MMIC-based millimeter-wave radiometers take advantage of the technology developed under extensive investment by the NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO). The five-frequency millimeter-wave radiometer is built by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), which has produced a number of state-of-the-art spaceborne microwave radiometers, such as the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), Advanced Microwave Radiometer (AMR) for Jason-2/OSTM, Jason-3, and the Juno Microwave Radiometer (MWR). The TEMPEST-D Instrument design is based on a 165 to 182 GHz radiometer design inherited from RACE and an 89 GHz receiver developed under the ESTO ACT-08 and IIP-10 programs at Colorado State University (CSU) and JPL. The TEMPEST reflector scan and calibration methodology is adapted from the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) and has been validated on the Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) using the High Altitude MMIC Sounding radiometer (HAMSR) instrument. This presentation will focus on the design, development and performance of the TEMPEST-D radiometer instrument. The flow-down of the TEMPEST-D mission objectives to instrument level requirements will also be discussed.

  9. High-accuracy measurements of snow Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function at visible and NIR wavelengths – comparison with modelling results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dumont

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available High-accuracy measurements of snow Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF were performed for four natural snow samples with a spectrogonio-radiometer in the 500–2600 nm wavelength range. These measurements are one of the first sets of direct snow BRDF values over a wide range of lighting and viewing geometry. They were compared to BRDF calculated with two optical models. Variations of the snow anisotropy factor with lighting geometry, wavelength and snow physical properties were investigated. Results show that at wavelengths with small penetration depth, scattering mainly occurs in the very top layers and the anisotropy factor is controlled by the phase function. In this condition, forward scattering peak or double scattering peak is observed. In contrast at shorter wavelengths, the penetration of the radiation is much deeper and the number of scattering events increases. The anisotropy factor is thus nearly constant and decreases at grazing observation angles. The whole dataset is available on demand from the corresponding author.

  10. Planck pre-launch status: calibration of the Low Frequency Instrument flight model radiometers

    CERN Document Server

    Villa, F; Sandri, M; Meinhold, P; Poutanen, T; Battaglia, P; Franceschet, C; Hughes, N; Laaninen, M; Lapolla, P; Bersanelli, M; Butler, R C; Cuttaia, F; D'Arcangelo, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Gregorio, A; Leonardi, R; Lowe, S R; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Morgante, G; Stringhetti, L; Tomasi, M; Valenziano, L; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A; Aja, B; Artal, E; Balasini, M; Bernardino, T; Blackhurst, E; Boschini, L; Cappellini, B; Cavaliere, F; Colin, A; Colombo, F; Davis, R J; De La Fuente, L; Edgeley, J; Gaier, T; Galtress, A; Hoyland, R; Jukkala, P; Kettle, D; Kilpia, V-H; Lawrence, C R; Lawson, D; Leahy, J P; Leutenegger, P; Levin, S; Maino, D; Malaspina, M; Mediavilla, A; Miccolis, M; Pagan, L; Pascual, J P; Pasian, F; Pecora, M; Pospieszalski, M; Roddis, N; Salmon, M J; Seiffert, M; Silvestri, R; Simonetto, A; Sjoman, P; Sozzi, C; Tuovinen, J; Varis, J; Wilkinson, A; Winder, F

    2010-01-01

    The Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) on-board the ESA Planck satellite carries eleven radiometer subsystems, called Radiometer Chain Assemblies (RCAs), each composed of a pair of pseudo-correlation receivers. We describe the on-ground calibration campaign performed to qualify the flight model RCAs and to measure their pre-launch performances. Each RCA was calibrated in a dedicated flight-like cryogenic environment with the radiometer front-end cooled to 20K and the back-end at 300K, and with an external input load cooled to 4K. A matched load simulating a blackbody at different temperatures was placed in front of the sky horn to derive basic radiometer properties such as noise temperature, gain, and noise performance, e.g. 1/f noise. The spectral response of each detector was measured as was their susceptibility to thermal variation. All eleven LFI RCAs were calibrated. Instrumental parameters measured in these tests, such as noise temperature, bandwidth, radiometer isolation, and linearity, provide essential i...

  11. A cryogenic test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenendaal, Ian

    The next generation, space-borne instruments for far infrared spectroscopy will utilize large diameter, cryogenically cooled telescopes in order to achieve unprecedented sensitivities. Low background, ground-based cryogenic facilities are required for the cryogenic testing of materials, components and subsystems. The Test Facility Cryostat (TFC) at the University of Lethbridge is a large volume, closed cycle, 4K cryogenic facility, developed for this purpose. This thesis discusses the design and performance of the facility and associated external instrumentation. An apparatus for measuring the thermal properties of materials is presented, and measurements of the thermal expansion and conductivity of carbon fibre reinforced polymers (CFRPs) at cryogenic temperatures are reported. Finally, I discuss the progress towards the design and fabrication of a demonstrator cryogenic, far infrared Fourier transform spectrometer.

  12. Modeling the frequency response of microwave radiometers with QUCS

    CERN Document Server

    Zonca, Andrea; Williams, Brian; Rubin, Ishai; D'Arcangelo, Ocleto; Meinhold, Peter; Lubin, Philip; Franceschet, Cristian; Yahn, Stefan; Mennella, Aniello; Bersanelli, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Characterization of the frequency response of coherent radiometric receivers is a key element in estimating the flux of astrophysical emissions, since the measured signal depends on the convolution of the source spectral emission with the instrument band shape. Laboratory Radio Frequency (RF) measurements of the instrument bandpass often require complex test setups and are subject to a number of systematic effects driven by thermal issues and impedance matching, particularly if cryogenic operation is involved. In this paper we present an approach to modeling radiometers bandpasses by integrating simulations and RF measurements of individual components. This method is based on QUCS (Quasi Universal Circuit Simulator), an open-source circuit simulator, which gives the flexibility of choosing among the available devices, implementing new analytical software models or using measured S-parameters. Therefore an independent estimate of the instrument bandpass is achieved using standard individual component measureme...

  13. Cloud Top Scanning radiometer (CTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    A scanning radiometer to be used for measuring cloud radiances in each of three spectral regions is described. Significant features incorporated in the Cloud Top Scanner design are: (1) flexibility and growth potential through use of easily replaceable modular detectors and filters; (2) full aperture, multilevel inflight calibration; (3) inherent channel registration through employment of a single shared field stop; and (4) radiometric sensitivity margin in a compact optical design through use of Honeywell developed (Hg,Cd)Te detectors and preamplifiers.

  14. A Cryogenic Radiometry Based Spectral Responsivity Scale at the National Metrology Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gan; Huang, Xuebo

    This paper describes the spectral responsivity scale established at the National Metrology Centre (NMC) based on cryogenic radiometry. A primary standard - a mechanically pumped cryogenic radiometer together with a set of intensity-stabilised lasers provides traceability for optical power measurement with an uncertainty in the order of 10-4 at 14 discrete wavelengths in the spectral range from 350 nm to 800 nm. A silicon trap detector, with its absolute responsivity calibrated against the cryogenic radiometer is used as a transfer standard for the calibration of other detectors using a specially built spectral comparator. The relative spectral responsivity of a detector at other wavelengths can be determined through the use of a cavity pyroelectric detector and the extrapolation technique. With this scale, NMC is capable to calibrate the spectral responsivity of different type of photo detectors from 250 nm to 1640 nm with an uncertainty range from 3.7% to 0.3%.

  15. Introduction to cryogenic engineering

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Vandoni, Giovanna; Niinikoski, Tapio O

    2005-01-01

    Cryogenic engineering is one of the key technologies at CERN. It is widely used in research and has many applications in industry and last but not least in medicine. In research cryogenic engineering and its applications are omnipresent from the smallest laboratories to fusion reactors, hughe detectors and accelerators. With the termination of the LHC, CERN will in fact become the world's largest cryogenic installation. This series of talks intends to introduce the non-cryogenist to the basic principles and challenges of cryogenic engineering and its applications. The course will also provide a basis for practical application as well as for further learning.

  16. A Cryogenic Flow Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Technologies Group, Inc. proposes the development of a Cryogenic Flow Sensor (CFS) for determining mass flow of cryogens in spacecraft propellant...

  17. Modeling the frequency response of microwave radiometers with QUCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonca, A.; Roucaries, B.; Williams, B.; Rubin, I.; D'Arcangelo, O.; Meinhold, P.; Lubin, P.; Franceschet, C.; Jahn, S.; Mennella, A.; Bersanelli, M.

    2010-12-01

    Characterization of the frequency response of coherent radiometric receivers is a key element in estimating the flux of astrophysical emissions, since the measured signal depends on the convolution of the source spectral emission with the instrument band shape. Laboratory Radio Frequency (RF) measurements of the instrument bandpass often require complex test setups and are subject to a number of systematic effects driven by thermal issues and impedance matching, particularly if cryogenic operation is involved. In this paper we present an approach to modeling radiometers bandpasses by integrating simulations and RF measurements of individual components. This method is based on QUCS (Quasi Universal Circuit Simulator), an open-source circuit simulator, which gives the flexibility of choosing among the available devices, implementing new analytical software models or using measured S-parameters. Therefore an independent estimate of the instrument bandpass is achieved using standard individual component measurements and validated analytical simulations. In order to automate the process of preparing input data, running simulations and exporting results we developed the Python package python-qucs and released it under GNU Public License. We discuss, as working cases, bandpass response modeling of the COFE and Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) radiometers and compare results obtained with QUCS and with a commercial circuit simulator software. The main purpose of bandpass modeling in COFE is to optimize component matching, while in LFI they represent the best estimation of frequency response, since end-to-end measurements were strongly affected by systematic effects.

  18. Modeling the frequency response of microwave radiometers with QUCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zonca, A; Williams, B; Rubin, I; Meinhold, P; Lubin, P [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Roucaries, B [Universite Paris-Est, Laboratoire Central des Ponts et Chaussees, 75732 Paris (France); D' Arcangelo, O [IFP-CNR, via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Franceschet, C; Mennella, A; Bersanelli, M [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Jahn, S, E-mail: zonca@deepspace.ucsb.edu [Infineon Technologies AG, Am Campeon 1-12, 85579 Neubiberg, Munich (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    Characterization of the frequency response of coherent radiometric receivers is a key element in estimating the flux of astrophysical emissions, since the measured signal depends on the convolution of the source spectral emission with the instrument band shape. Laboratory Radio Frequency (RF) measurements of the instrument bandpass often require complex test setups and are subject to a number of systematic effects driven by thermal issues and impedance matching, particularly if cryogenic operation is involved. In this paper we present an approach to modeling radiometers bandpasses by integrating simulations and RF measurements of individual components. This method is based on QUCS (Quasi Universal Circuit Simulator), an open-source circuit simulator, which gives the flexibility of choosing among the available devices, implementing new analytical software models or using measured S-parameters. Therefore an independent estimate of the instrument bandpass is achieved using standard individual component measurements and validated analytical simulations. In order to automate the process of preparing input data, running simulations and exporting results we developed the Python package python-qucs and released it under GNU Public License. We discuss, as working cases, bandpass response modeling of the COFE and Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) radiometers and compare results obtained with QUCS and with a commercial circuit simulator software. The main purpose of bandpass modeling in COFE is to optimize component matching, while in LFI they represent the best estimation of frequency response, since end-to-end measurements were strongly affected by systematic effects.

  19. Realization and performance of cryogenic selection mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitink-Kroes, Gabby; Bettonvil, Felix; Kragt, Jan; Elswijk, Eddy; Tromp, Niels

    2014-07-01

    Within Infra-Red large wavelength bandwidth instruments the use of mechanisms for selection of observation modes, filters, dispersing elements, pinholes or slits is inevitable. The cryogenic operating environment poses several challenges to these cryogenic mechanisms; like differential thermal shrinkage, physical property change of materials, limited use of lubrication, high feature density, limited space etc. MATISSE the mid-infrared interferometric spectrograph and imager for ESO's VLT interferometer (VLTI) at Paranal in Chile coherently combines the light from 4 telescopes. Within the Cold Optics Bench (COB) of MATISSE two concepts of selection mechanisms can be distinguished based on the same design principles: linear selection mechanisms (sliders) and rotating selection mechanisms (wheels).Both sliders and wheels are used at a temperature of 38 Kelvin. The selection mechanisms have to provide high accuracy and repeatability. The sliders/wheels have integrated tracks that run on small, accurately located, spring loaded precision bearings. Special indents are used for selection of the slider/wheel position. For maximum accuracy/repeatability the guiding/selection system is separated from the actuation in this case a cryogenic actuator inside the cryostat. The paper discusses the detailed design of the mechanisms and the final realization for the MATISSE COB. Limited lifetime and performance tests determine accuracy, warm and cold and the reliability/wear during life of the instrument. The test results and further improvements to the mechanisms are discussed.

  20. Research of MMW radiometer virtual prototyping technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Qinghui; Li Xingguo; Zhang Guangfeng

    2008-01-01

    The idea of millimeter-wave (MMW) radiometer virtual prototyping is discussed in this paper. Designing en-vironment, designing method and the main modeling components of virtual MMW radiometer are researched. Important external parameters, which have significant influence to composing system, are used to components modeling, and then components are taken to buildup virtual MMW radiometer system. Moreover, the effect to output is contrasted whether there is a low-noise amplifier or not.

  1. Sky Radiometers on Stand for Downwelling Radiation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory — The Sky Radiation (SKYRAD) collection of radiometers provides each Atmospheric Radiation and Cloud Station (ARCS) with continuous measurements of broadband shortwave...

  2. Microwave Radiometry and Radiometers for Ocean Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    2008-01-01

    The microwave radiometer system measures, within its bandwidth, the naturally emitted radiation – the brightness temperature – of substances within its antenna’s field of view. Thus a radiometer is really a sensitive and calibrated microwave receiver. The radiometer can be a basic total power...... aperture radiometer technique, both yielding imaging capability without scanning. Typical applications of microwave radiometry concerning oceans are: sea salinity, sea surface temperature, wind speed and direction, sea ice detection and classification. However, in an attempt to measure properties...

  3. Millimeter-Wave Radiometer Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, W. J.; Howard, R. J.; Ibbott, A. C.; Parks, G. S.; Ricketts, W. B.

    1988-01-01

    A 3-mm radiometer system with mechanically scanned antenna built for use on small aircraft or helicopter to produce near-real-time moderate-resolution images of ground. Main advantage of passive imaging sensor able to provide information through clouds, smoke, and dust when visual and infrared (IR) systems unusable. Used also for variety of remote-sensing applications such as measurements of surface moisture, snow cover, vegetation type and extent, mineral type and extent, surface temperature, and thermal inertia. Possible to map fires and volcanic lava flows through obscuring clouds and smoke.

  4. High-accuracy determination for optical indicatrix rotation in ferroelectric DTGS

    OpenAIRE

    O.S.Kushnir; O.A.Bevz; O.G.Vlokh

    2000-01-01

    Optical indicatrix rotation in deuterated ferroelectric triglycine sulphate is studied with the high-accuracy null-polarimetric technique. The behaviour of the effect in ferroelectric phase is referred to quadratic spontaneous electrooptics.

  5. High-accuracy interferometric measurements of flatness and parallelism of a step gauge

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kruger, OA

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available for the calibration of step gauges to a high accuracy. A system was also developed for interferometric measurements of the flatness and parallelism of gauge block faces for use in uncertainty calculations....

  6. High Accuracy Reference Network (HARN), Points generated from coordinates supplied by NGS, Published in 1993, MARIS.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This High Accuracy Reference Network (HARN) dataset, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 1993. It is described as 'Points generated...

  7. Methodology of High Accuracy and Resolution 3D Geological Model Generation and Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴键; 曹代勇; 邓爱居; 李东津; 蒋涛; 翟光华

    2004-01-01

    By generating a high accuracy and high resolution geological model in Liuchu oil field, the technique of geological modeling is expanded and involved in primary geological study, making the sand bodies and reservoir be easily described in detail. The 3D visualization and 3D interactive editing of geological structure model are the key for modeling procedure. And a high accuracy and resolution geological model has been well applied in optimizing the production scheme.

  8. Design of an ultra-portable field transfer radiometer supporting automated vicarious calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Nikolaus; Thome, Kurtis; Czapla-Myers, Jeffrey; Biggar, Stuart

    2015-09-01

    The University of Arizona Remote Sensing Group (RSG) began outfitting the radiometric calibration test site (RadCaTS) at Railroad Valley Nevada in 2004 for automated vicarious calibration of Earth-observing sensors. RadCaTS was upgraded to use RSG custom 8-band ground viewing radiometers (GVRs) beginning in 2011 and currently four GVRs are deployed providing an average reflectance for the test site. This measurement of ground reflectance is the most critical component of vicarious calibration using the reflectance-based method. In order to ensure the quality of these measurements, RSG has been exploring more efficient and accurate methods of on-site calibration evaluation. This work describes the design of, and initial results from, a small portable transfer radiometer for the purpose of GVR calibration validation on site. Prior to deployment, RSG uses high accuracy laboratory calibration methods in order to provide radiance calibrations with low uncertainties for each GVR. After deployment, a solar radiation based calibration has typically been used. The method is highly dependent on a clear, stable atmosphere, requires at least two people to perform, is time consuming in post processing, and is dependent on several large pieces of equipment. In order to provide more regular and more accurate calibration monitoring, the small portable transfer radiometer is designed for quick, one-person operation and on-site field calibration comparison results. The radiometer is also suited for laboratory calibration use and thus could be used as a transfer radiometer calibration standard for ground viewing radiometers of a RadCalNet site.

  9. Infrared Filter Radiometers for Thermodynamic Temperature Determination below 660 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noulkow, N.; Taubert, R. D.; Meindl, P.; Hollandt, J.

    2009-02-01

    At the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), absolutely-calibrated filter radiometers based on silicon photodiodes are routinely used for thermodynamic temperature determinations of blackbodies in the range from the zinc fixed point (FP) (419 °C) up to 3,000 °C. To extend the temperature range down to the tin FP (232 °C), we have designed two new filter radiometers based on indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) photodiodes with center wavelengths at 1,300 nm and 1,550 nm. For the absolute calibration of the spectral irradiance responsivity of the new InGaAs filter radiometers, the spectral responsivity measurement in the near-infrared (NIR) spectral range has been significantly improved. With a newly developed tuneable laser and monochromator-based cryogenic radiometer facility, the relative standard uncertainty of the NIR spectral responsivity has been reduced from 0.17 % to about 0.03 %. By using the calibrated InGaAs filter radiometer in conjunction with the large-area double sodium heat pipe of the PTB, the first results for the difference between the thermodynamic temperature T and the ITS-90 temperature T 90 in the temperature range from the zinc FP up to the aluminum FP (660 °C) are presented. The values for T - T 90 determined with the new InGaAs filter radiometers are consistent within their relative standard uncertainty of about 30 mK at 419 °C to about 60 mK at 660 °C.

  10. Fundamentals of absolute pyroheliometry and objective characterization. [using a narrow field of view radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crommelynck, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    The radiometric methodology in use with a narrow field of view radiometer for observation of the solar constant is described. The radiation output of the Sun is assumed to be constant, enabling the monitoring of the solar source by an accurately pointed radiometer, and the Sun's output is measured as a function of time. The instrument is described, its angular response considered, and principles for absolute radiometric measurement presented. Active modes of operation are analyzed, taking into consideration instrumental perturbations and sensor efficiency, heating wire effect, cavity sensor efficiency, thermal effects on the surface of the sensitive area, the effect of the field of view limiting system, and the frequency response of the heat flux detector and absolute radiometric system. Performance of absolute measurements with relatively high accuracy is demonstrated.

  11. Polymers at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Shao-Yun

    2013-01-01

    Kalia and Fu's novel monograph covers cryogenic treatment, properties and applications of cryo-treated polymer materials. Written by numerous international experts, the twelve chapters in this book offer the reader a comprehensive picture of the latest findings and developments, as well as an outlook on the field. Cryogenic technology has seen remarkable progress in the past few years and especially cryogenic properties of polymers are attracting attention through new breakthroughs in space, superconducting, magnetic and electronic techniques. This book is a valuable resource for researchers, educators, engineers and graduate students in the field and at technical institutions.

  12. SNS Cryogenic Systems Commissioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, D.; Casagrande, F.; Campisi, I.; Gurd, P.; Howell, M.; Stout, D.; Strong, H.; Arenius, D.; Creel, J.; Dixon, K.; Ganni, V.; Knudsen, P.

    2006-04-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The cold section of the Linac consists of 81 superconducting radio frequency cavities cooled to 2.1K by a 2400 watt cryogenic refrigeration system. The major cryogenic system components include warm helium compressors with associated oil removal and gas management, 4.5K cold box, 7000L liquid helium dewar, 2.1K cold box (consisting of 4 stages of cold compressors), gaseous helium storage, helium purification and gas impurity monitoring system, liquid nitrogen storage and the cryogenic distribution transfer line system. The overall system commissioning and future plans will be presented.

  13. FRIB Cryogenic Plant Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, Kelly D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Ganni, Venkatarao [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Knudsen, Peter N. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Casagranda, Fabio [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2015-12-01

    After practical changes were approved to the initial conceptual design of the cryogenic system for MSU FRIB and an agreement was made with JLab in 2012 to lead the design effort of the cryogenic plant, many activities are in place leading toward a cool-down of the linacs prior to 2018. This is mostly due to using similar equipment used at CHLII for the 12 GeV upgrade at JLab and an aggressive schedule maintained by the MSU Conventional Facilities department. Reported here is an updated status of the cryogenic plant, including the equipment procurement status, plant layout, facility equipment and project schedule.

  14. SNS Cryogenic Systems Commissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Hatfield; F. Casagrande; I. Campisi; P. Gurd; M. Howell; D. Stout; H. Strong; D. Arenius; J. Creel; K. Dixon; V. Ganni; and P. Knudsen

    2005-08-29

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The cold section of the Linac consists of 81 superconducting radio frequency cavities cooled to 2.1K by a 2400 watt cryogenic refrigeration system. The major cryogenic system components include warm helium compressors with associated oil removal and gas management, 4.5K cold box, 7000L liquid helium dewar, 2.1K cold box (consisting of 4 stages of cold compressors), gaseous helium storage, helium purification and gas impurity monitoring system, liquid nitrogen storage and the cryogenic distribution transfer line system. The overall system commissioning and future plans will be presented.

  15. Fundamentals of cryogenic engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Mamata

    2014-01-01

    The author, with her vast and varied experience in teaching and allied fields, clearly enunciates the behaviour and various properties of common cryogenic fluids, methods of liquefaction, and separation and applications of cryogens with thermodynamic analysis for process selection. This profusely illustrated study with clear-cut diagrams and process charts, should serve not only as a textbook for students but also as an excellent reference for researchers and practising engineers on design of cryogenic refrigeration, and liquefaction and separation process plants for various applications.

  16. Planck-LFI radiometers tuning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuttaia, F; Stringhetti, L; Terenzi, L; Villa, F; Butler, R C; Franceschi, E [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica, INAF, via P. Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Mennella, A; Tomasi, M; Bersanelli, M; Cappellini, B; Franceschet, C; Hoyland, R [Universita degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Maris, M; Frailis, M [INAF / OATS, via Tiepolo 11, 34143 Trieste (Italy); Cuevas, L P [Research and Scientific Support Department of ESA, ESTEC, Noordwijk (Netherlands); D' Arcangelo, O [IFP-CNR, via Cozzi 53, 20013 Milano (Italy); Davis, R; Lowe, S [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Gregorio, A [University of Trieste, Department of Physics, via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Leonardi, R, E-mail: cuttaia@iasfbo.inaf.i [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9530 (United States)

    2009-12-15

    This paper describes the Planck Low Frequency Instrument tuning activities performed through the ground test campaigns, from Unit to Satellite Levels. Tuning is key to achieve the best possible instrument performance and tuning parameters strongly depend on thermal and electrical conditions. For this reason tuning has been repeated several times during ground tests and it has been repeated in flight before starting nominal operations. The paper discusses the tuning philosophy, the activities and the obtained results, highlighting developments and changes occurred during test campaigns. The paper concludes with an overview of tuning performed during the satellite cryogenic test campaign (Summer 2008) and of the plans for the just started in-flight calibration.

  17. Measuring the instrument function of radiometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winston, R. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Littlejohn, R.G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The instrument function is a function of position and angle, the knowledge of which allows one to compute the response of a radiometer to an incident wave field in any state of coherence. The instrument function of a given radiometer need not be calculated; instead, it may be measured by calibration with incident plane waves.

  18. Cryogenics for LHC experiments

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Cryogenic systems will be used by LHC experiments to maximize their performance. Institutes around the world are collaborating with CERN in the construction of these very low temperature systems. The cryogenic test facility in hall 180 for ATLAS magnets. High Energy Physics experiments have frequently adopted cryogenic versions of their apparatus to achieve optimal performance, and those for the LHC will be no exception. The two largest experiments for CERN's new flagship accelerator, ATLAS and CMS, will both use large superconducting magnets operated at 4.5 Kelvin - almost 270 degrees below the freezing point of water. ATLAS also includes calorimeters filled with liquid argon at 87 Kelvin. For the magnets, the choice of a cryogenic version was dictated by a combination economy and transparency to emerging particles. For the calorimeters, liquid argon was selected as the fluid best suited to the experiment's physics requirements. High Energy Physics experiments are the result of worldwide collaborations and...

  19. Advances in Cryogenic Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, R. F.

    During the past 50 years, the use of digital computers has significantly influenced the design and analysis of cryogenic systems. At the time when the first Cryogenic Engineering Conference was held, thermodynamic data were presented in graphical or tabular form (the "steam table" format), whereas thermodynamic data for cryogenic system design is computer generated today. The thermal analysis of cryogenic systems in the 1950s involved analytical solutions, graphical solutions, and relatively simple finite-difference approaches. These approaches have been supplanted by finite-element numerical programs which readily solve complicated thermal problems that could not be solved easily using the methods of the 1950s. In distillation column design, the use of the McCabe-Thiele graphical method for determination of the number of theoretical plates has been replaced by numerical methods that allow consideration of several different components in the feed and product streams.

  20. Distributed High Accuracy Peer-to-Peer Localization in Mobile Multipath Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Ekambaram, Venkatesan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of high accuracy localization of mobile nodes in a multipath-rich environment where sub-meter accuracies are required. We employ a peer to peer framework where the vehicles/nodes can get pairwise multipath-degraded ranging estimates in local neighborhoods together with a fixed number of anchor nodes. The challenge is to overcome the multipath-barrier with redundancy in order to provide the desired accuracies especially under severe multipath conditions when the fraction of received signals corrupted by multipath is dominating. We invoke a message passing analytical framework based on particle filtering and reveal its high accuracy localization promise through simulations.

  1. Very high-accuracy calibration of radiation pattern and gain of a near-field probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pivnenko, Sergey; Nielsen, Jeppe Majlund; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, very high-accuracy calibration of the radiation pattern and gain of a near-field probe is described. An open-ended waveguide near-field probe has been used in a recent measurement of the C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Antenna Subsystem for the Sentinel 1 mission of the Europ......In this paper, very high-accuracy calibration of the radiation pattern and gain of a near-field probe is described. An open-ended waveguide near-field probe has been used in a recent measurement of the C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Antenna Subsystem for the Sentinel 1 mission...

  2. Development of an automatic calibration device for high-accuracy low temperature thermometers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Based on the analysis and investigation of calibration systems for high-accuracy low temperature thermometers,a new facility for automatic calibration of high-accuracy low temperature thermometers was developed.Continuous calibration for multiple points can be made automatically with this device.According to the thermophysical characteristics of the constant-temperature block in this device,segmented Fuzzy-PID (proportional-integral-differential) algorithm was applied.The experimental results showed that the temperature fluctuation was smaller than ±0.005 K in 30 min.Therefore,this new device can fully meet the calibration requirement of high-precision low temperature thermometers.

  3. A Scanning Microwave Radar and Radiometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    1995-01-01

    The Scanning Microwave Radar and Radiometer (SMRR) is a line scanner featuring a combined radar and radiometer system operating around 35 and 94 GHz. The layout of the SMRR is shown. The 2 offset antenna parabolas scan in synchronism, the receiver antenna has the highest gain in order to ensure...... that footprints are identical for the radar and the radiometer. The instrument will be flown in a pod under a Gulfstream G3 normally cruising with 240 m/sec at 12500 m, and will thus be able to sense clouds and precipitation from above...

  4. Cryogenic Refractive Index of Heraeus Homosil Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kevin H.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Leviton, Douglas B.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports measurements of the refractive index of Homosil (Heraeus) over the wavelength range of 0.343.16 m and temperature range of 120335 K. These measurements were performed by using the Cryogenic High Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS) facility at the NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center. These measurements were in support of an integrated Structural-Thermal-Optical-Performance (STOP) model that was developed for a field-widened Michelson interferometer that is being built and tested for the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) project at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The cryogenic refractive index measurements were required in order to account for the highly sensitivity performance of the HSRL instrument to changes in refractive index with temperature, temperature gradients, thermal expansion, and deformation due to mounting stresses. A dense coverage of the absolute refractive index over the aforementioned wavelength and temperature ranges was used to determine the thermo-optic coefficient (dndT) and dispersion relation (dnd) as a function of wavelength and temperature. Our measurements of Homosil will be compared with measurements of other glasses from the fused silica family studied in CHARMS as well as measurements reported elsewhere in literature.

  5. Gated viewing and high-accuracy three-dimensional laser radar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busck, Jens; Heiselberg, Henning

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a fast and high-accuracy three-dimensional (3-D) imaging laser radar that can achieve better than 1 mm range accuracy for half a million pixels in less than 1 s. Our technique is based on range-gating segmentation. We combine the advantages of gated viewing with our new fast...

  6. High-accuracy C-14 measurements for atmospheric CO2 samples by AMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, H.A.J.; Pertuisot, M.H.; van der Plicht, J.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate how to achieve high-accuracy radiocarbon measurements by accelerator mass spectrometry (ANIS) and present measurement series (performed on archived CO2) of (CO2)-C-14 between 1985 and 1991 for Point Barrow (Alaska) and the South Pole. We report in detail the measurement

  7. Further results on the operation of high-accuracy drift chambers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breskin, A.; Charpak, G.; Gabioud, B.; Sauli, F.; Trautner, N.

    Optimization of the working parameters in the drift chambers with adjustable electric fields permits stable operation and high accuracies. Full saturation of the drift velocity leads to remarkable improvements, namely a very linear space-time correlation for perpendicular tracks, and simple

  8. Gated viewing and high-accuracy three-dimensional laser radar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busck, Jens; Heiselberg, Henning

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a fast and high-accuracy three-dimensional (3-D) imaging laser radar that can achieve better than 1 mm range accuracy for half a million pixels in less than 1 s. Our technique is based on range-gating segmentation. We combine the advantages of gated viewing with our new fast...

  9. A 1-V 15 μW High-Accuracy Temperature Switch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinkel, D.; Boer, de R.P.; Annema, A.J.; Tuijl, van A.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    A CMOS temperature switch with uncalibrated high accuracy is presented. The circuit is based on the classical CMOS bandgap reference structure, using parasitic PNPs and a PTAT multiplier. The circuit was designed in a standard digital 0.18 m CMOS process. The temperature switch has an in-designed hy

  10. Microwave Radiometer for Aviation Safety Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SBIR Phase I Project proposes a new passive microwave airborne sensor for in flight icing hazard detection, Microwave Radiometer for Aviation Safety. A feasibility...

  11. Microwave Radiometry and Radiometers for Ocean Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    2008-01-01

    aperture radiometer technique, both yielding imaging capability without scanning. Typical applications of microwave radiometry concerning oceans are: sea salinity, sea surface temperature, wind speed and direction, sea ice detection and classification. However, in an attempt to measure properties...

  12. Digital Array Gas Radiometer (DAGR) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The digital array gas radiometer (DAGR) is a new sensor design for accurate measurement and monitoring of trace gases in the boundary layer from space, aircraft, or...

  13. Cryogenic Hybrid Magnetic Bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Crawford R.; Dirusso, Eliseo; Brown, Gerald V.

    1994-01-01

    Cryogenic hybrid magnetic bearing is example of class of magnetic bearings in which permanent magnets and electromagnets used to suspend shafts. Electromagnets provide active control of position of shaft. Bearing operates at temperatures from -320 degrees F (-196 degrees C) to 650 degrees F (343 degrees C); designed for possible use in rocket-engine turbopumps, where effects of cryogenic environment and fluid severely limit lubrication of conventional ball bearings. This and similar bearings also suitable for terrestrial rotating machinery; for example, gas-turbine engines, high-vacuum pumps, canned pumps, precise gimbals that suspend sensors, and pumps that handle corrosive or gritty fluids.

  14. Cryogenic regenerative heat exchangers

    CERN Document Server

    Ackermann, Robert A

    1997-01-01

    An in-depth survey of regenerative heat exchangers, this book chronicles the development and recent commercialization of regenerative devices for cryogenic applications. Chapters cover historical background, concepts, practical applications, design data, and numerical solutions, providing the latest information for engineers to develop advanced cryogenic machines. The discussions include insights into the operation of a regenerator; descriptions of the cyclic and fluid temperature distributions in a regenerator; data for various matrix geometries and materials, including coarse and fine bronze, stainless steel-woven wire mesh screens, and lead spheres; and unique operating features of cryocoolers that produce deviations from ideal regenerator theory.

  15. Cryogenics Research and Engineering Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro Medina, Jaime A.

    2013-01-01

    Energy efficient storage, transfer and use of cryogens and cryogenic propellants on Earth and in space have a direct impact on NASA, government and commercial programs. Research and development on thermal insulation, propellant servicing, cryogenic components, material properties and sensing technologies provides industry, government and research institutions with the cross-cutting technologies to manage low-temperature applications. Under the direction of the Cryogenic Testing Lab at Kennedy Space Center, the work experience acquired allowed me to perform research, testing, design and analysis of current and future cryogenic technologies to be applied in several projects.

  16. Seals For Cryogenic Turbomachines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Tam, L. T.; Braun, M. J.; Vlcek, B. L.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis considers effects of seals on stability. Report presents method of calculation of flows of cryogenic fluids through shaft seals. Key to stability is local average velocity in seal. Local average velocity strongly influenced by effects of inlet and outlet and injection of fluid.

  17. High Power Cryogenic Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory Smith

    2011-08-01

    The development of high power cryogenic targets for use in parity violating electron scattering has been a crucial ingredient in the success of those experiments. As we chase the precision frontier, the demands and requirements for these targets have grown accordingly. We discuss the state of the art, and describe recent developments and strategies in the design of the next generation of these targets.

  18. Cryogenic current leads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zizek, F.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical, technical and design questions are examined of cryogenic current leads for SP of magnetic systems. Simplified mathematical models are presented for the current leads. To illustrate modeling, the calculation is made of the real current leads for 500 A and three variants of current leads for 1500 A for the enterprise ''Shkoda.''

  19. High Accuracy Gravitational Waveforms from Black Hole Binary Inspirals Using OpenCL

    CERN Document Server

    McKennon, Justin; Khanna, Gaurav

    2012-01-01

    There is a strong need for high-accuracy and efficient modeling of extreme-mass-ratio binary black hole systems because these are strong sources of gravitational waves that would be detected by future observatories. In this article, we present sample results from our Teukolsky EMRI code: a time-domain Teukolsky equation solver (a linear, hyperbolic, partial differential equation solver using finite-differencing), that takes advantage of several mathematical and computational enhancements to efficiently generate long-duration and high-accuracy EMRI waveforms. We emphasize here the computational advances made in the context of this code. Currently there is considerable interest in making use of many-core processor architectures, such as Nvidia and AMD graphics processing units (GPUs) for scientific computing. Our code uses the Open Computing Language (OpenCL) for taking advantage of the massive parallelism offered by modern GPU architectures. We present the performance of our Teukolsky EMRI code on multiple mod...

  20. [Study on high accuracy detection of multi-component gas in oil-immerse power transformer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jie; Chen, Xiao; Huang, Qi-Feng; Zhou, Yu; Chen, Gang

    2013-12-01

    In order to solve the problem of low accuracy and mutual interference in multi-component gas detection, a kind of multi-component gas detection network with high accuracy was designed. A semiconductor laser with narrow bandwidth was utilized as light source and a novel long-path gas cell was also used in this system. By taking the single sine signal to modulate the spectrum of laser and using space division multiplexing (SDM) and time division multiplexing (TDM) technique, the detection of multi-component gas was achieved. The experiments indicate that the linearity relevance coefficient is 0. 99 and the measurement relative error is less than 4%. The system dynamic response time is less than 15 s, by filling a volume of multi-component gas into the gas cell gradually. The system has advantages of high accuracy and quick response, which can be used in the fault gas on-line monitoring for power transformers in real time.

  1. A study for high accuracy real-time 3D ultrasonic location system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ping; Ha, Zhang; Zhou, Kangyuan

    2006-12-22

    We discussed a high accuracy real-time 3D ultrasonic location system in this article. The signal received was sampled after it passed the TGC and the logarithmic amplifier. Inside the DSP, we used the dynamic threshold tracing technique to improve the accuracy. The result was processed with Weighted Arithmetic Average. By testing the 40 kHz 3D location system, we have arrived at the accuracy of 1 cm.

  2. View-limiting shrouds for insolation radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, E. W.; Trentelman, G. F.

    1985-01-01

    Insolation radiometers (normal incidence pyrheliometers) are used to measure the solar radiation incident on solar concentrators for calibrating thermal power generation measurements. The measured insolation value is dependent on the atmospheric transparency, solar elevation angle, circumsolar radiation, and radiometer field of view. The radiant energy entering the thermal receiver is dependent on the same factors. The insolation value and the receiver input will be proportional if the concentrator and the radiometer have similar fields of view. This report describes one practical method for matching the field of view of a radiometer to that of a solar concentrator. The concentrator field of view can be calculated by optical ray tracing methods and the field of view of a radiometer with a simple shroud can be calculated by using geometric equations. The parameters for the shroud can be adjusted to provide an acceptable match between the respective fields of view. Concentrator fields of view have been calculated for a family of paraboloidal concentrators and receiver apertures. The corresponding shroud parameters have also been determined.

  3. The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer: Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Roberts, J. B.; Biswas, S. K.; Cecil, D.; Jones, W. L.; Johnson, J.; Farrar, S.; Sahawneh, S.; Ruf, C. S.; Morris, M.; Uhlhorn, E. W.; Black, P. G.

    2013-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is an airborne passive microwave radiometer designed to provide high resolution, wide swath imagery of surface wind speed in tropical cyclones from a low profile planar antenna with no mechanical scanning. Wind speed and rain rate images from HIRAD's first field campaign (GRIP, 2010) are presented here followed, by a discussion on the performance of the newly installed thermal control system during the 2012 HS3 campaign. The paper ends with a discussion on the next generation dual polarization HIRAD antenna (already designed) for a future system capable of measuring wind direction as well as wind speed.

  4. Cryogenic treatment of gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Jose Luis [Houston, TX; Harvey, III, Albert Destrehan; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX

    2012-04-03

    Systems and methods of treating a gas stream are described. A method of treating a gas stream includes cryogenically separating a first gas stream to form a second gas stream and a third stream. The third stream is cryogenically contacted with a carbon dioxide stream to form a fourth and fifth stream. A majority of the second gas stream includes methane and/or molecular hydrogen. A majority of the third stream includes one or more carbon oxides, hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2, one or more sulfur compounds, or mixtures thereof. A majority of the fourth stream includes one or more of the carbon oxides and hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2. A majority of the fifth stream includes hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3 and one or more of the sulfur compounds.

  5. Cryogenic Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goloborod' ko, S.; /Fermilab

    1989-02-27

    The control system (CS) for the cryogenic arrangement of the DO Liquid Argon Calorimeter consists of a Texas instruments 560/565 Programmable Logical Controller (PLC), two remote bases with Remote Base Controllers and a corresponding set of input/output (I/O) modules, and a PC AST Premium 286 (IBM AT Compatible). The PLC scans a set of inputs and provides a set of outputs based on a ladder logic program and PID control loops. The inputs are logic or analog (current, voltage) signals from equipment status switches or transducers. The outputs are logic or analog (current or voltage) signals for switching solenoids and positioning pneumatic actuators. Programming of the PLC is preformed by using the TISOFT2/560/565 package, which is installed in the PC. The PC communicates to the PLC through a serial RS232 port and provides operator interface to the cryogenic process using Xpresslink software.

  6. Cryogenic treatment of gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravo, Jose Luis [Houston, TX; Harvey, III, Albert Destrehan (Kingwood, TX); Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX

    2012-04-03

    Systems and methods of treating a gas stream are described. A method of treating a gas stream includes cryogenically separating a first gas stream to form a second gas stream and a third stream. The third stream is cryogenically contacted with a carbon dioxide stream to form a fourth and fifth stream. A majority of the second gas stream includes methane and/or molecular hydrogen. A majority of the third stream includes one or more carbon oxides, hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2, one or more sulfur compounds, or mixtures thereof. A majority of the fourth stream includes one or more of the carbon oxides and hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2. A majority of the fifth stream includes hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3 and one or more of the sulfur compounds.

  7. Cryogenic Selective Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngquist, Robert; Nurge, Mark; Gibson, Tracy; Johnson, Wesley

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Innovative Advanced Concept (NIAC) program has been funding work at KSC on a novel coating that should allow cryogenic materials to be stored in deep space. The NIAC Symposium will be the last week of September and it is a requirement that the funded material be presented both orally and at a poster session. This DAA submission is requesting approval to go public with both the presentation and the poster.

  8. Cryogenic Test Technology 1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-04-01

    aircraft configuration Pathfinder II (Figure 16) made of Vascomax 200, a set of six bodies of revolution (Figure 17) made from 6061 aluminium alloy, a...iron and aluminium alloys appear to be viable candidates. AS loads increase the number of avail- able alloys is severely constrained by toughness...using A-286 screws in four steels and one aluminium alloy. In the absence of loads cryogenic cycling gene- rally produced decreases in breakaway

  9. Advances in Helium Cryogenics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciver, S. W. Van

    This review provides a survey of major advances that have occurred in recent years in the area of helium cryogenics. Helium-temperature cryogenics is the enabling technology for a substantial and growing number of low-temperature systems from superconducting magnets to space-based experimental facilities. In recent years there have been many advances in the technology of low-temperature helium, driven mostly by new applications. However, to keep the review from being too broad, this presentation focuses mainly on three of the most significant advances. These are: (1) the development of large-scale recuperative refrigeration systems mainly for superconducting magnet applications in accelerators and other research facilities; (2) the use of stored superfluid helium (He II) as a coolant for spacebased astrophysics experiments; and (3) the application of regenerative cryocoolers operating at liquid helium temperatures primarily for cooling superconducting devices. In each case, the reader should observe that critical technologies were developed to facilitate these applications. In addition to these three primary advances, other significant helium cryogenic technologies are briefly reviewed at the end of this chapter, along with some vision for future developments in these areas.

  10. High-accuracy thickness measurement of a transparent plate with the heterodyne central fringe identification technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wang-Tsung; Hsieh, Hung-Chih; Chang, Wei-Yao; Chen, Yen-Liang; Su, Der-Chin

    2011-07-20

    In a modified Twyman-Green interferometer, the optical path variation is measured with the heterodyne central fringe identification technique, as the light beam is focused by a displaced microscopic objective on the front/rear surface of the test transparent plate. The optical path length variation is then measured similarly after the test plate is removed. The geometrical thickness of the test plate can be calculated under the consideration of dispersion effect. This method has a wide measurable range and a high accuracy in the measurable range.

  11. A small and high accuracy gyro stabilization electro-optical platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Haitao; Han, Yonggen; Lv, Yanhong

    2008-10-01

    A high accuracy line-of-sight (LOS) Stabilization system based on digital control technology was designed. The current feedback closed-loop system was introduced which uses the CCD graphic and resolver to constitute the position closed-loop and uses the optic fiber gyro to constitute the rate closed-loop. In order to realize zero steady-state error of angular output in counteracting disturbance from carrier, a PII2 (proportional-integral-double integral) control scheme is proposed. The hardware configuration and software system is presented. Experimental results show that the system has perfect dynamic and static performance and the technical requirements were satisfied.

  12. High-accuracy mass determination of unstable nuclei with a Penning trap mass spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The mass of a nucleus is its most fundamental property. A systematic study of nuclear masses as a function of neutron and proton number allows the observation of collective and single-particle effects in nuclear structure. Accurate mass data are the most basic test of nuclear models and are essential for their improvement. This is especially important for the astrophysical study of nuclear synthesis. In order to achieve the required high accuracy, the mass of ions captured in a Penning trap is determined via their cyclotron frequency $ \

  13. Dual Microwave Radiometer Experiment Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchand, Roger [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Passive microwave radiometers (MWRs) are the most commonly used and accurate instruments the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Research Facility has to retrieve cloud liquid water path (LWP). The MWR measurements (microwave radiances or brightness temperatures) are often used to derive LWP using climatological constraints, but are frequently also combined with measurements from radar and other instruments for cloud microphysical retrievals. Nominally this latter approach improves the retrieval of LWP and other cloud microphysical quantities (such as effective radius or number concentration), but this also means that when MWR data are poor, other cloud microphysical quantities are also negatively affected. Unfortunately, current MWR data is often contaminated by water on the MWR radome. This water makes a substantial contribution to the measured radiance and typically results in retrievals of cloud liquid water and column water vapor that are biased high. While it is obvious when the contamination by standing water is large (and retrieval biases are large), much of the time it is difficult to know with confidence that there is no contamination. At present there is no attempt to estimate or correct for this source of error, and identification of problems is largely left to users. Typically users are advised to simply throw out all data when the MWR “wet-window” resistance-based sensor indicates water is present, but this sensor is adjusted by hand and is known to be temperamental. In order to address this problem, a pair of ARM microwave radiometers was deployed to the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle, Washington, USA. The radiometers were operated such that one radiometer was scanned under a cover that (nominally) prevents this radiometer radome from gathering water and permits measurements away from zenith; while the other radiometer is operated normally – open or uncovered - with the radome exposed to the sky

  14. Application of Uncooled Monolithic Thermoelectric Linear Arrays to Imaging Radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Paul W.

    Introduction Identification of Incipient Failure of Railcar Wheels Technical Description of the Model IR 1000 Imaging Radiometer Performance of the Model IR 1000 Imaging Radiometer Initial Application Summary Imaging Radiometer for Predictive and Preventive Maintenance Description Operation Specifications Summary References INDEX CONTENTS OF VOLUMES IN THIS SERIES

  15. Aerogel Insulation to Support Cryogenic Technologies Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is seeking a high performance thermal insulation material for cryogenic applications in space launch development. Many of the components in cryogenic...

  16. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer project will demonstrate the capability to safely and efficiently store, transfer and measure cryogenic propellants,...

  17. Study on High Accuracy Topographic Mapping via UAV-based Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Yun-Yao; Lee, Ya-Fen; Tsai, Shang-En

    2016-10-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) provides a promising tool for the acquisition of such multi-temporal aerial stereo photos and high-resolution digital surface models. Recently, the flight of UAVs operates with high degrees of autonomy by the global position system and onboard digit camera and computer. The UAV-based mapping can be obtained faster and cheaper, but its accuracy is anxious. This paper aims to identify the integration ability of high accuracy topographic map via the image of quad-rotors UAV and ground control points (GCPs). The living survey data is collected in the Errn river basins area in Tainan, Taiwan. The high accuracy UAV-based topographic in the study area is calibrated by the local coordinate of GCPs using the total station with the accuracy less than 1/2000. The comparison results show the accuracy of UAV-based topographic is accepted by overlapping. The results can be a reference for the practice works of mapping survey in earth.

  18. High-accuracy optimal finite-thrust trajectories for Moon escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hong-Xin; Casalino, Lorenzo

    2017-02-01

    The optimization problem of fuel-optimal trajectories from a low circular Moon orbit to a target hyperbolic excess velocity vector using finite-thrust propulsion is solved. The ability to obtain the most accurate satisfaction of necessary optimality conditions in a high-accuracy dynamic model is the main motivation of the current study. The solutions allow attaining anytime-return Earth-interface conditions from a low lunar orbit. Gravitational effects of the Sun, Earth, and Moon are included throughout the entire trajectory. Severe constraints on the fuel budget combined with high-accuracy demands on the endpoint conditions necessitate a high-fidelity solution to the trajectory optimization problem and JPL DE405 ephemeris model is used to determine the perturbing bodies' positions. The optimization problem is solved using an indirect method. The optimality of the solution is verified by an application of Pontryagin's maximum principle. More accurate and fuel-efficient trajectories are found for the same mission objectives and constraints published in other research, emphasizing the advantages of this technique. It is also shown that the thrust structure consists of three finite burns. In contrast to previous research, no singular arc is required in the optimal solutions, and all the controls appear bang-bang.

  19. A High-Throughput, High-Accuracy System-Level Simulation Framework for System on Chips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanyi Sun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Today's System-on-Chips (SoCs design is extremely challenging because it involves complicated design tradeoffs and heterogeneous design expertise. To explore the large solution space, system architects have to rely on system-level simulators to identify an optimized SoC architecture. In this paper, we propose a system-level simulation framework, System Performance Simulation Implementation Mechanism, or SPSIM. Based on SystemC TLM2.0, the framework consists of an executable SoC model, a simulation tool chain, and a modeling methodology. Compared with the large body of existing research in this area, this work is aimed at delivering a high simulation throughput and, at the same time, guaranteeing a high accuracy on real industrial applications. Integrating the leading TLM techniques, our simulator can attain a simulation speed that is not slower than that of the hardware execution by a factor of 35 on a set of real-world applications. SPSIM incorporates effective timing models, which can achieve a high accuracy after hardware-based calibration. Experimental results on a set of mobile applications proved that the difference between the simulated and measured results of timing performance is within 10%, which in the past can only be attained by cycle-accurate models.

  20. Optical System Error Analysis and Calibration Method of High-Accuracy Star Trackers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng You

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The star tracker is a high-accuracy attitude measurement device widely used in spacecraft. Its performance depends largely on the precision of the optical system parameters. Therefore, the analysis of the optical system parameter errors and a precise calibration model are crucial to the accuracy of the star tracker. Research in this field is relatively lacking a systematic and universal analysis up to now. This paper proposes in detail an approach for the synthetic error analysis of the star tracker, without the complicated theoretical derivation. This approach can determine the error propagation relationship of the star tracker, and can build intuitively and systematically an error model. The analysis results can be used as a foundation and a guide for the optical design, calibration, and compensation of the star tracker. A calibration experiment is designed and conducted. Excellent calibration results are achieved based on the calibration model. To summarize, the error analysis approach and the calibration method are proved to be adequate and precise, and could provide an important guarantee for the design, manufacture, and measurement of high-accuracy star trackers.

  1. Development of a cryogenic FTIR system for measuring very small attenuation coefficients of infrared materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaji, Sayumi; Sarugaku, Yuki; Ikeda, Yuji; Nakanishi, Kenshi; Kobayashi, Naoto; Kondo, Sohei; Arasaki, Takayuki; Kawakita, Hideyo

    2016-07-01

    We have been working on a long-term project for developing a variety of infrared immersion gratings for near- to mid-infrared wavelengths. The transmittance of material is essential to realize high-efficiency immersion gratings for astronomical applications. For a typical grating, the attenuation coefficient αatt must be 70%. However, as there are few reports of αatt optical materials in the literatures, we performed high-accuracy measurements of αatt for a variety of infrared materials applicable to immersion gratings. We have already reported αatt at room temperature for single-crystal Si, single-crystal Ge, CVD-ZnS, CVDZnSe, and high-resistivity single-crystal CdZnTe (Ikeda et al. 2009[7], Kaji et al. 2014[10], and Sarugaku et al. 2016[9]). Next, we proceeded with the measurements of αatt at cryogenic temperatures of 20-80 K range, which is the typical operational temperatures of infrared instruments, and for which the shifts of the band gap and/or the sharpness of the lattice absorption lines from the corresponding room temperature values are expected. Thus, we developed a new cryogenic FTIR system that enables high-accuracy measurements at cryogenic temperatures. The system has a mechanism with which two sample cells and a reference cell can be easily and quickly switched without any vacuum leak or temperature change. Our preliminary measurement of Ge using this cryogenic FTIR system found that both the cut-on and cut-off wavelengths shift to the shorter (from 2.0 to 1.7 μm) and longer (from 10.6 to 10.9 μm) wavelengths, respectively, when the temperature is decreased from room temperature to the cryogenic temperature (<28 K). We plan to complete cryogenic measurements for a variety of infrared materials by the end of 2016.

  2. Radiometer calibration methods and resulting irradiance differences: Radiometer calibration methods and resulting irradiance differences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, Aron [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO 80401 USA; Sengupta, Manajit [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO 80401 USA; Andreas, Afshin [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO 80401 USA; Reda, Ibrahim [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO 80401 USA; Robinson, Justin [GroundWork Renewables Inc., Logan UT 84321 USA

    2016-10-07

    Accurate solar radiation measured by radiometers depends on instrument performance specifications, installation method, calibration procedure, measurement conditions, maintenance practices, location, and environmental conditions. This study addresses the effect of different calibration methodologies and resulting differences provided by radiometric calibration service providers such as the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and manufacturers of radiometers. Some of these methods calibrate radiometers indoors and some outdoors. To establish or understand the differences in calibration methodologies, we processed and analyzed field-measured data from radiometers deployed for 10 months at NREL's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. These different methods of calibration resulted in a difference of +/-1% to +/-2% in solar irradiance measurements. Analyzing these differences will ultimately assist in determining the uncertainties of the field radiometer data and will help develop a consensus on a standard for calibration. Further advancing procedures for precisely calibrating radiometers to world reference standards that reduce measurement uncertainties will help the accurate prediction of the output of planned solar conversion projects and improve the bankability of financing solar projects.

  3. ADFE METHOD WITH HIGH ACCURACY FOR NONLINEAR PARABOLIC INTEGRO-DIFFERENTIAL SYSTEM WITH NONLINEAR BOUNDARY CONDITIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔霞

    2002-01-01

    Alternating direction finite element (ADFE) scheme for d-dimensional nonlinear system of parabolic integro-differential equations is studied. By using a local approximation based on patches of finite elements to treat the capacity term qi(u), decomposition of the coefficient matrix is realized; by using alternating direction, the multi-dimensional problem is reduced to a family of single space variable problems, calculation work is simplified; by using finite element method, high accuracy for space variant is kept; by using inductive hypothesis reasoning, the difficulty coming from the nonlinearity of the coefficients and boundary conditions is treated; by introducing Ritz-Volterra projection, the difficulty coming from the memory term is solved. Finally, by using various techniques for priori estimate for differential equations, the unique resolvability and convergence properties for both FE and ADFE schemes are rigorously demonstrated, and optimal H1 and L2norm space estimates and O((△t)2) estimate for time variant are obtained.

  4. High Accuracy Attitude Control System Design for Satellite with Flexible Appendages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenya Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to realize the high accuracy attitude control of satellite with flexible appendages, attitude control system consisting of the controller and structural filter was designed. When the low order vibration frequency of flexible appendages is approximating the bandwidth of attitude control system, the vibration signal will enter the control system through measurement device to bring impact on the accuracy or even the stability. In order to reduce the impact of vibration of appendages on the attitude control system, the structural filter is designed in terms of rejecting the vibration of flexible appendages. Considering the potential problem of in-orbit frequency variation of the flexible appendages, the design method for the adaptive notch filter is proposed based on the in-orbit identification technology. Finally, the simulation results are given to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed design techniques.

  5. High-accuracy determination of the neutron flux at n{sub T}OF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbagallo, M.; Colonna, N.; Mastromarco, M.; Meaze, M.; Tagliente, G.; Variale, V. [Sezione di Bari, INFN, Bari (Italy); Guerrero, C.; Andriamonje, S.; Boccone, V.; Brugger, M.; Calviani, M.; Cerutti, F.; Chin, M.; Ferrari, A.; Kadi, Y.; Losito, R.; Versaci, R.; Vlachoudis, V. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Tsinganis, A. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); National Technical University of Athens (NTUA), Athens (Greece); Tarrio, D.; Duran, I.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Paradela, C. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago (Spain); Altstadt, S.; Goebel, K.; Langer, C.; Reifarth, R.; Schmidt, S.; Weigand, M. [Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe Universitaet, Frankfurt (Germany); Andrzejewski, J.; Marganiec, J.; Perkowski, J. [Uniwersytet Lodzki, Lodz (Poland); Audouin, L.; Leong, L.S.; Tassan-Got, L. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique/IN2P3 - IPN, Orsay (France); Becares, V.; Cano-Ott, D.; Garcia, A.R.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Martinez, T.; Mendoza, E. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Becvar, F.; Krticka, M.; Kroll, J.; Valenta, S. [Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Belloni, F.; Fraval, K.; Gunsing, F.; Lampoudis, C.; Papaevangelou, T. [Commissariata l' Energie Atomique (CEA) Saclay - Irfu, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Berthoumieux, E.; Chiaveri, E. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Commissariata l' Energie Atomique (CEA) Saclay - Irfu, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Billowes, J.; Ware, T.; Wright, T. [University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Bosnar, D.; Zugec, P. [University of Zagreb, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Zagreb (Croatia); Calvino, F.; Cortes, G.; Gomez-Hornillos, M.B.; Riego, A. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Carrapico, C.; Goncalves, I.F.; Sarmento, R.; Vaz, P. [Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); Cortes-Giraldo, M.A.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J.M.; Sabate-Gilarte, M. [Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla (Spain); Diakaki, M.; Karadimos, D.; Kokkoris, M.; Vlastou, R. [National Technical University of Athens (NTUA), Athens (Greece); Domingo-Pardo, C.; Giubrone, G.; Tain, J.L. [CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Valencia (Spain); Dressler, R.; Kivel, N.; Schumann, D.; Steinegger, P. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Dzysiuk, N.; Mastinu, P.F. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, INFN, Rome (Italy); Eleftheriadis, C.; Manousos, A. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece); Ganesan, S.; Gurusamy, P.; Saxena, A. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai (IN); Griesmayer, E.; Jericha, E.; Leeb, H. [Technische Universitaet Wien, Atominstitut, Wien (AT); Hernandez-Prieto, A. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (CH); Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (ES); Jenkins, D.G.; Vermeulen, M.J. [University of York, Heslington, York (GB); Kaeppeler, F. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Campus Nord, Karlsruhe (DE); Koehler, P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge (US); Lederer, C. [Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe Universitaet, Frankfurt (DE); University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Vienna (AT); Massimi, C.; Mingrone, F.; Vannini, G. [Universita di Bologna (IT); INFN, Sezione di Bologna, Dipartimento di Fisica, Bologna (IT); Mengoni, A.; Ventura, A. [Agenzia nazionale per le nuove tecnologie, l' energia e lo sviluppo economico sostenibile (ENEA), Bologna (IT); Milazzo, P.M. [Sezione di Trieste, INFN, Trieste (IT); Mirea, M. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH, Bucharest - Magurele (RO); Mondalaers, W.; Plompen, A.; Schillebeeckx, P. [Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, European Commission JRC, Geel (BE); Pavlik, A.; Wallner, A. [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Vienna (AT); Rauscher, T. [University of Basel, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Basel (CH); Roman, F. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (CH); Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH, Bucharest - Magurele (RO); Rubbia, C. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (CH); Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso dell' INFN, Assergi (AQ) (IT); Weiss, C. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (CH); Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe Universitaet, Frankfurt (DE)

    2013-12-15

    The neutron flux of the n{sub T}OF facility at CERN was measured, after installation of the new spallation target, with four different systems based on three neutron-converting reactions, which represent accepted cross sections standards in different energy regions. A careful comparison and combination of the different measurements allowed us to reach an unprecedented accuracy on the energy dependence of the neutron flux in the very wide range (thermal to 1 GeV) that characterizes the n{sub T}OF neutron beam. This is a pre-requisite for the high accuracy of cross section measurements at n{sub T}OF. An unexpected anomaly in the neutron-induced fission cross section of {sup 235}U is observed in the energy region between 10 and 30keV, hinting at a possible overestimation of this important cross section, well above currently assigned uncertainties. (orig.)

  6. Study on Calibration System for Electronic Transformers Based on High-Accuracy PCI Card

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingzhu Zhang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available With preliminary applying of Electronic Transformer (ET based on IEC 61850 standards in power grid, the calibrations of tested transformers have attracted extensive research attention. This study proposes a novel Calibration System of ET (CSET based on high-accuracy card. Data acquisition of ET and Standard Trans-former (ST is gotten by optic Ethernet and PCI-4462 data acquisition card, respectively. Meanwhile, the synchronized sampling between ET and ST is completed on the optic/electronic pulse signal of PCI synchronization card. The signals processing and human interface are realized by Labview software. The system proposed in the study is feasible for calibrating Electronic Voltage/Current Transformers (EVT/ECT of different voltage classes. System tests show that the precision of the system can get to 0.2°.

  7. Study on Calibration System for Electronic Transformers Based on High-Accuracy PCI Card

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingzhu Zhang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available With preliminary applying of Electronic Transformer (ET based on IEC 61850 standards in power grid, the calibration of tested transformers has attracted extensive research attention. This study proposes a novel Calibration System of ET (CSET based on high-accuracy card. Data acquisition of ET and standard trans-former (ST is gotten by optic Ethernet and PCI-4462 data acquisition card, respectively. Meanwhile, the synchronized sampling between ET and ST is completed on the optic/electronic pulse signal of PCI synchronization card. The signals processing and human interface are realized by Lab view software. The system proposed in the study is feasible for calibrating Electronic Voltage/Current Transformers (EVT/ECT of different voltage classes. System tests show that the precision of the system can get to 0.2°.

  8. Navigation Facility for High Accuracy Offline Trajectory and Attitude Estimation in Airborne Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Renga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on a navigation facility, relying on commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS technology, developed to generate high-accuracy attitude and trajectory measurements in postprocessing. Target performance is cm-level positioning with tenth of degree attitude accuracy. The facility is based on the concept of GPS-aided inertial navigation but comprises carrier-phase differential GPS (CDGPS processing and attitude estimation based on multiantenna GPS configurations. Expected applications of the system include: (a performance assessment of integrated navigation systems, developed for general aviation aircraft and medium size unmanned aircraft systems (UAS; (b generation of reference measurements to evaluate the flight performance of airborne sensors (e.g., radar or laser; and (c generation of reference trajectory and attitude for improving imaging quality of airborne remote sensing data. The paper describes system architecture, selected algorithms for data processing and integration, and theoretical performance evaluation. Experimental results are also presented confirming the effectiveness of the implemented approach.

  9. High-Accuracy Programmable Timing Generator with Wide-Range Tuning Capability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Li Chu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a high-accuracy programmable timing generator with wide-range tuning capability is proposed. With the aid of dual delay-locked loop (DLL, both of the coarse- and fine-tuning mechanisms are operated in precise closed-loop scheme to lessen the effects of the ambient variations. The timing generator can provide sub-gate resolution and instantaneous switching capability. The circuit is implemented and simulated in TSMC 0.18 μm 1P6M technology. The test chip area occupies 1.9 mm2. The reference clock cycle can be divided into 128 bins by interpolation to obtain 14 ps resolution with the clock rate at 550 MHz. The INL and DNL are within −0.21~+0.78 and −0.27~+0.43 LSB, respectively.

  10. High Accuracy mass Measurement of the very Short-Lived Halo Nuclide $^{11}$Li

    CERN Multimedia

    Le scornet, G

    2002-01-01

    The archetypal halo nuclide $^{11}$Li has now attracted a wealth of experimental and theoretical attention. The most outstanding property of this nuclide, its extended radius that makes it as big as $^{48}$Ca, is highly dependent on the binding energy of the two neutrons forming the halo. New generation experiments using radioactive beams with elastic proton scattering, knock-out and transfer reactions, together with $\\textit{ab initio}$ calculations require the tightening of the constraint on the binding energy. Good metrology also requires confirmation of the sole existing precision result to guard against a possible systematic deviation (or mistake). We propose a high accuracy mass determintation of $^{11}$Li, a particularly challenging task due to its very short half-life of 8.6 ms, but one perfectly suiting the MISTRAL spectrometer, now commissioned at ISOLDE. We request 15 shifts of beam time.

  11. High accuracy digital aging monitor based on PLL-VCO circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuejun, Zhang; Zhidi, Jiang; Pengjun, Wang; Xuelong, Zhang

    2015-01-01

    As the manufacturing process is scaled down to the nanoscale, the aging phenomenon significantly affects the reliability and lifetime of integrated circuits. Consequently, the precise measurement of digital CMOS aging is a key aspect of nanoscale aging tolerant circuit design. This paper proposes a high accuracy digital aging monitor using phase-locked loop and voltage-controlled oscillator (PLL-VCO) circuit. The proposed monitor eliminates the circuit self-aging effect for the characteristic of PLL, whose frequency has no relationship with circuit aging phenomenon. The PLL-VCO monitor is implemented in TSMC low power 65 nm CMOS technology, and its area occupies 303.28 × 298.94 μm2. After accelerating aging tests, the experimental results show that PLL-VCO monitor improves accuracy about high temperature by 2.4% and high voltage by 18.7%.

  12. High-accuracy measurement of the magnetic moment anomaly of the electron bound in hydrogenlike carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häffner, H; Beier, T; Hermanspahn, N; Kluge, H J; Quint, W; Stahl, S; Verdú, J; Werth, G

    2000-12-18

    We present a new experimental value for the magnetic moment of the electron bound in hydrogenlike carbon (12C5+): g(exp) = 2.001 041 596 (5). This is the most precise determination of an atomic g(J) factor so far. The experiment was carried out on a single 12C5+ ion stored in a Penning trap. The high accuracy was made possible by spatially separating the induction of spin flips and the analysis of the spin direction. The current theoretical value amounts to g(th) = 2.001 041 591 (7). Together experiment and theory test the bound-state QED contributions to the g(J) factor of a bound electron to a precision of 1%.

  13. Data supporting the high-accuracy haplotype imputation using unphased genotype data as the references

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzhi Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article is related to the research article entitled “High-accuracy haplotype imputation using unphased genotype data as the references” which reports the unphased genotype data can be used as reference for haplotyping imputation [1]. This article reports different implementation generation pipeline, the results of performance comparison between different implementations (A, B, and C and between HiFi and three major imputation software tools. Our data showed that the performances of these three implementations are similar on accuracy, in which the accuracy of implementation-B is slightly but consistently higher than A and C. HiFi performed better on haplotype imputation accuracy and three other software performed slightly better on genotype imputation accuracy. These data may provide a strategy for choosing optimal phasing pipeline and software for different studies.

  14. High Accuracy Liquid Propellant Slosh Predictions Using an Integrated CFD and Controls Analysis Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsell, Brandon; Griffin, David; Schallhorn, Dr. Paul; Roth, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Coupling computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with a controls analysis tool elegantly allows for high accuracy predictions of the interaction between sloshing liquid propellants and th e control system of a launch vehicle. Instead of relying on mechanical analogs which are not valid during aU stages of flight, this method allows for a direct link between the vehicle dynamic environments calculated by the solver in the controls analysis tool to the fluid flow equations solved by the CFD code. This paper describes such a coupling methodology, presents the results of a series of test cases, and compares said results against equivalent results from extensively validated tools. The coupling methodology, described herein, has proven to be highly accurate in a variety of different cases.

  15. Integrated CFD and Controls Analysis Interface for High Accuracy Liquid Propellant Slosh Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsell, Brandon; Griffin, David; Schallhorn, Paul; Roth, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Coupling computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with a controls analysis tool elegantly allows for high accuracy predictions of the interaction between sloshing liquid propellants and the control system of a launch vehicle. Instead of relying on mechanical analogs which are n0t va lid during all stages of flight, this method allows for a direct link between the vehicle dynamic environments calculated by the solver in the controls analysis tool to the fluid now equations solved by the CFD code. This paper describes such a coupling methodology, presents the results of a series of test cases, and compares said results against equivalent results from extensively validated tools. The coupling methodology, described herein, has proven to be highly accurate in a variety of different cases.

  16. Computer-aided diagnosis of breast MRI with high accuracy optical flow estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Baese, Anke; Barbu, Adrian; Lobbes, Marc; Hoffmann, Sebastian; Burgeth, Bernhard; Kleefeld, Andreas; Meyer-Bäse, Uwe

    2015-05-01

    Non-mass enhancing lesions represent a challenge for the radiological reading. They are not well-defined in both morphology (geometric shape) and kinetics (temporal enhancement) and pose a problem to lesion detection and classification. To enhance the discriminative properties of an automated radiological workflow, the correct preprocessing steps need to be taken. In an usual computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system, motion compensation plays an important role. To this end, we employ a new high accuracy optical flow based motion compensation algorithm with robustification variants. An automated computer-aided diagnosis system evaluates the atypical behavior of these lesions, and additionally considers the impact of non-rigid motion compensation on a correct diagnosis.

  17. Using Mobile Laser Scanning Data for Features Extraction of High Accuracy Driving Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bisheng; Liu, Yuan; Liang, Fuxun; Dong, Zhen

    2016-06-01

    High Accuracy Driving Maps (HADMs) are the core component of Intelligent Drive Assistant Systems (IDAS), which can effectively reduce the traffic accidents due to human error and provide more comfortable driving experiences. Vehicle-based mobile laser scanning (MLS) systems provide an efficient solution to rapidly capture three-dimensional (3D) point clouds of road environments with high flexibility and precision. This paper proposes a novel method to extract road features (e.g., road surfaces, road boundaries, road markings, buildings, guardrails, street lamps, traffic signs, roadside-trees, power lines, vehicles and so on) for HADMs in highway environment. Quantitative evaluations show that the proposed algorithm attains an average precision and recall in terms of 90.6% and 91.2% in extracting road features. Results demonstrate the efficiencies and feasibilities of the proposed method for extraction of road features for HADMs.

  18. High Accuracy Speed-fed Grating Angular Acceleration Measurement System Based on FPGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zhao

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Shaft angular acceleration is one of the most important parameter of rotary machines, the error of angular acceleration increased when the shaft speed up. For this problem, a new high accuracy angular acceleration measurement system is presented, the principle of measurement is self-regulating the period of speed sampling signal according to the proportion of the shaft speed up. This measurement system combined FPGA and SCM, the speed of shaft is received by the timer of SCM responding the interrupts of FPGA, and then set the parameter of frequency divider in FPGA, so as to make the period of speed sampling consistent with the proportion of the speed up. This measurement system could overcome the error when system speed up according to the experiment.

  19. James Webb Space Telescope Integrated Science Instrument Module Calibration and Verification of High-Accuracy Instrumentation to Measure Heat Flow in Cryogenic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comber, Brian; Glazer, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is an upcoming flagship observatory mission scheduled to be launched in 2018. Three of the four science instruments are passively cooled to their operational temperature range of 36K to 40K, and the fourth instrument is actively cooled to its operational temperature of approximately 6K. The requirement for multiple thermal zoned results in the instruments being thermally connected to five external radiators via individual high purity aluminum heat straps. Thermal-vacuum and thermal balance testing of the flight instruments at the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) element level will take place within a newly constructed shroud cooled by gaseous helium inside Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Space environment Simulator (SES). The flight external radiators are not available during ISIM-level thermal vacuum/thermal testing, so they will be replaced in test with stable and adjustable thermal boundaries with identical physical interfaces to the flight radiators. Those boundaries are provided by specially designed test hardware which also measures the heat flow within each of the five heat straps to an accuracy of less than 2 mW, which is less than 5% of the minimum predicted heat flow values. Measurement of the heat loads to this accuracy is essential to ISIM thermal model correlation, since thermal models are more accurately correlated when temperature data is supplemented by accurate knowledge of heat flows. It also provides direct verification by test of several high-level thermal requirements. Devices that measure heat flow in this manner have historically been referred to a "Q-meters". Perhaps the most important feature of the design of the JWST Q-meters is that it does not depend on the absolute accuracy of its temperature sensors, but rather on knowledge of precise heater power required to maintain a constant temperature difference between sensors on two stages, for which a table is empirically developed during a calibration campaign in a small chamber at GSFC. This paper provides a brief review of Q-meter design, and discusses the Q-meter calibration procedure including calibration chamber modifications and accommodations, handling of differing conditions between calibration and usage, the calibration process itself, and the results of the tests used to determine if the calibration is successful.

  20. Discovery and validation of urine markers of acute pediatric appendicitis using high accuracy mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentsis, Alex; Lin, Yin Yin; Kurek, Kyle; Calicchio, Monica; Wang, Yan Yan; Monigatti, Flavio; Campagne, Fabien; Lee, Richard; Horwitz, Bruce; Steen, Hanno; Bachur, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective Molecular definition of disease has been changing all aspects of medical practice, from diagnosis and screening to understanding and treatment. Acute appendicitis is among many human conditions that are complicated by the heterogeneity of clinical presentation and shortage of diagnostic markers. Here, we sought to profile the urine of patients with appendicitis with the goal of identifying new diagnostic markers. Methods Candidate markers were identified from the urine of children with histologically proven appendicitis by using high accuracy mass spectrometry proteome profiling. These systemic and local markers were used to assess the probability of appendicitis in a blinded, prospective study of children being evaluated for acute abdominal pain in our emergency department. Tests of performance of the markers were evaluated against the pathologic diagnosis and histologic grade of appendicitis. Results Test performance of 57 identified candidate markers was studied in 67 patients, with median age of 11 years, 37% of whom had appendicitis. Several exhibited favorable diagnostic performance, including calgranulin A (S100-A8), α-1-acid glycoprotein 1 (orosomucoid), and leucine-rich α-2-glycoprotein (LRG), with the ROC AUC and values of 0.84 (95 % CI 0.72-0.95), 0.84 (0.72-0.95), and 0.97 (0.93-1.0), respectively. LRG was enriched in diseased appendices and its abundance correlated with severity of appendicitis. Conclusions High accuracy mass spectrometry urine proteome profiling allowed identification of diagnostic markers of acute appendicitis. Usage of LRG and other identified biomarkers may improve the diagnostic accuracy of clinical evaluations of appendicitis. PMID:19556024

  1. High-accuracy infra-red thermography method using reflective marker arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirollos, Benjamin; Povey, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we describe a new method for high-accuracy infra-red (IR) thermography measurements in situations with significant spatial variation in reflected radiation from the surroundings, or significant spatial variation in surface emissivity due to viewing angle non-uniformity across the field of view. The method employs a reflective marker array (RMA) on the target surface—typically, high emissivity circular dots—and an integrated image analysis algorithm designed to require minimal human input. The new technique has two particular advantages which make it suited to high-accuracy measurements in demanding environments: (i) it allows the reflected radiation component to be calculated directly, in situ, and as a function of position, overcoming a key problem in measurement environments with non-uniform and unsteady stray radiation from the surroundings; (ii) using image analysis of the marker array (via apparent aspect ratio of the circular reflective markers), the local viewing angle of the target surface can be estimated, allowing corrections for angular variation of local emissivity to be performed without prior knowledge of the geometry. A third advantage of the technique is that allows for simple focus-stacking algorithms due to increased image entropy. The reflective marker array method is demonstrated for an isothermal, hemispherical object exposed to an external IR source arranged to give a significant non-uniform reflected radiation term. This is an example of a challenging environment, both because of the significant non-uniform reflected radiation term, and also the significant variation in target emissivity due to surface angle variation. We demonstrate that the new RMA IR technique leads to significantly lower error in evaluated surface temperature than conventional IR techniques. The method is applicable to any complex radiative environment.

  2. Cryogenic Piezoelectric Actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaoning; Cook, William B.; Hackenberger, Wesley S.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, PMN-PT single crystal piezoelectric stack actuators and flextensional actuators were designed, prototyped and characterized for space optics applications. Single crystal stack actuators with footprint of 10 mm x10 mm and the height of 50 mm were assembled using 10 mm x10mm x0.15mm PMN-PT plates. These actuators showed stroke > 65 - 85 microns at 150 V at room temperature, and > 30 microns stroke at 77 K. Flextensional actuators with dimension of 10mm x 5 mm x 7.6 mm showed stroke of >50 microns at room temperature at driving voltage of 150 V. A flextensional stack actuator with dimension of 10 mm x 5 mm x 47 mm showed stroke of approx. 285 microns at 150 V at room temperature and > 100 microns at 77K under driving of 150 V should be expected. The large cryogenic stroke and high precision of these actuators are promising for cryogenic optics applications.

  3. High Accuracy Reference Network (HARN), Published in 2000, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, Brown County, WI.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This High Accuracy Reference Network (HARN) dataset, published at 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 2000....

  4. Ozone monitoring with an infrared heterodyne radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, R. T.; Seals, R. K., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of the total burden and of the concentration-versus-altitude profiles of ozone have been made with a ground-based heterodyne radiometer at Pasadena, California. The measurements were made in the 9.5-micron wavelength region, where a strong ozone infrared absorption band exists. The radiometer measured solar absorption at selected wavelengths with a spectral resolution of 0.001 reciprocal centimeter, equivalent to the half-width of an ozone absorption line at the 10-millibar altitude level. A carbon dioxide laser served as the local oscillator. This technique can be used to gather important data on both tropospheric and stratospheric ozone, which are not readily accessible with other remote-sensing techniques.

  5. Analysis of radiometer calibration effects with TOUCHSTONE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, William D.

    1990-01-01

    The microwave circuit analysis program TOUCHSTONE is used to study two effects of importance in radiometer calibration. The two effects are impedance mismatches at the antenna-air and cold load-air interfaces and dissipatives losses, which radiate thermal noise into the system. The results predicted by TOUCHSTONE are shown to be in very close agreement with earlier results obtained by purely analytical methods. The techniques used in establishing the circuit models and in processing the resulting data are described in detail.

  6. Advanced Microwave Radiometer (AMR) for SWOT mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, C. S.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the SWOT (Surface Water & Ocean Topography) satellite mission is to measure wide-swath, high resolution ocean topography and terrestrial surface waters. Since main payload radar will use interferometric SAR technology, conventional microwave radiometer system which has single nadir look antenna beam (i.e., OSTM/Jason-2 AMR) is not ideally applicable for the mission for wet tropospheric delay correction. Therefore, SWOT AMR incorporates two antenna beams along cross track direction. In addition to the cross track design of the AMR radiometer, wet tropospheric error requirement is expressed in space frequency domain (in the sense of cy/km), in other words, power spectral density (PSD). Thus, instrument error allocation and design are being done in PSD which are not conventional approaches for microwave radiometer requirement allocation and design. A few of novel analyses include: 1. The effects of antenna beam size to PSD error and land/ocean contamination, 2. Receiver error allocation and the contributions of radiometric count averaging, NEDT, Gain variation, etc. 3. Effect of thermal design in the frequency domain. In the presentation, detailed AMR design and analyses results will be discussed.

  7. Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer detection assembly design and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppo, Peter; Mastrandrea, Carmine; Stagi, Moreno; Calamai, Luciano; Nieke, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometers (SLSTRs) are high-accuracy radiometers selected for the Copernicus mission Sentinel-3 space component to provide sea surface temperature (SST) data continuity with respect to previous (Advanced) Along Track Scanning Radiometers [(A)ATSRs] for climatology. Many satellites are foreseen over a 20-year period, each with a 7.5-year lifetime. Sentinel-3A will be launched in 2015 and Sentinel-3B at least six months later, implying that two identical satellites will be maintained in the same orbit with a 180-deg phase delay. Each SLSTR has an improved design with respect to AATSR affording wider near-nadir and oblique view swaths (1400 and 740 km) for SST/land surface temperature global coverage at a 1-km spatial resolution (at SSP) with a daily revisit time (with two satellites), appropriate for both climate and meteorology. Cloud screening and other products are obtained with 0.5 km spatial resolution [at sub-satellite point (SSP)] in visible and short wave infrared (SWIR) bands, while two additional channels are included to monitor high temperature events such as forest fires. The two swaths are obtained with two conical scans and telescopes combined optically at a common focus, representing the input of a cooled focal plane assembly, where nine channels are separated with dichroic and are focalized on detectors with appropriate optical relays. IR and SWIR optics/detectors are cooled to 85 K by an active mechanical cryo-cooler with vibration compensation, while the VIS ones are maintained at a stable temperature. The opto-mechanical design and the expected electro-optical performance of the focal plane assembly are described and the model predictions at system level are compared with experimental data acquired in the vacuum chamber in flight representative thermal conditions or in the laboratory.

  8. Network operability of ground-based microwave radiometers: Calibration and standardization efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospichal, Bernhard; Löhnert, Ulrich; Küchler, Nils; Czekala, Harald

    2017-04-01

    Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWR) are already widely used by national weather services and research institutions all around the world. Most of the instruments operate continuously and are beginning to be implemented into data assimilation for atmospheric models. Especially their potential for continuously observing boundary-layer temperature profiles as well as integrated water vapor and cloud liquid water path makes them valuable for improving short-term weather forecasts. However until now, most MWR have been operated as stand-alone instruments. In order to benefit from a network of these instruments, standardization of calibration, operation and data format is necessary. In the frame of TOPROF (COST Action ES1303) several efforts have been undertaken, such as uncertainty and bias assessment, or calibration intercomparison campaigns. The goal was to establish protocols for providing quality controlled (QC) MWR data and their uncertainties. To this end, standardized calibration procedures for MWR have been developed and recommendations for radiometer users compiled. Based on the results of the TOPROF campaigns, a new, high-accuracy liquid-nitrogen calibration load has been introduced for MWR manufactured by Radiometer Physics GmbH (RPG). The new load improves the accuracy of the measurements considerably and will lead to even more reliable atmospheric observations. Next to the recommendations for set-up, calibration and operation of ground-based MWR within a future network, we will present homogenized methods to determine the accuracy of a running calibration as well as means for automatic data quality control. This sets the stage for the planned microwave calibration center at JOYCE (Jülich Observatory for Cloud Evolution), which will be shortly introduced.

  9. Nanodielectrics for Cryogenic Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuncer, Enis [ORNL; Sauers, Isidor [ORNL; James, David Randy [ORNL; Ellis, Alvin R [ORNL; Pace, Marshall O [ORNL; More, Karren [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Sathyamurthy, Srivatsan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Woodward, Jonathan [ORNL; Rondinone, Adam Justin [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we report the recent advances in nanodielectrics that were developed and tested for cryogenic dielectric applications. The systems studied are composed of nanometer size particles. Particles were produced using either an ex-situ or in-situ technique. It is observed that there are clear differences in the structural properties of materials produced using these two approaches. Either no significant degradation or improvement in the electrical insulation properties were observed for ex-situ nano-particle samples processed with an ultrasonic processor and in-situ nano-particle samples. Nanodielectrics have the potential to be tailored with better thermal and mechanical properties without losing their electrical insulation characteristics.

  10. Cryogenic Cam Butterfly Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Kenneth J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A cryogenic cam butterfly valve has a body that includes an axially extending fluid conduit formed there through. A disc lug is connected to a back side of a valve disc and has a circular bore that receives and is larger than a cam of a cam shaft. The valve disc is rotatable for a quarter turn within the body about a lug axis that is offset from the shaft axis. Actuating the cam shaft in the closing rotational direction first causes the camming side of the cam of the cam shaft to rotate the disc lug and the valve disc a quarter turn from the open position to the closed position. Further actuating causes the camming side of the cam shaft to translate the valve disc into sealed contact with the valve seat. Opening rotational direction of the cam shaft reverses these motions.

  11. Cryogenic Tracking Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Luukka, P R; Tuominen, E M; Mikuz, M

    2002-01-01

    The recent advances in Si and diamond detector technology give hope of a simple solution to the radiation hardness problem for vertex trackers at the LHC. In particular, we have recently demonstrated that operating a heavily irradiated Si detector at liquid nitrogen (LN$_2$) temperature results in significant recovery of Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE). Among other potential benefits of operation at cryogenic temperatures are the use of large low-resistivity wafers, simple processing, higher and faster electrical signal because of higher mobility and drift velocity of carriers, and lower noise of the readout circuit. A substantial reduction in sensor cost could result The first goal of the approved extension of the RD39 program is to demonstrate that irradiation at low temperature in situ during operation does not affect the results obtained so far by cooling detectors which were irradiated at room temperature. In particular we shall concentrate on processes and materials that could significantly reduce th...

  12. The Impact of Ionospheric Disturbances on High Accuracy Positioning in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L.; Park, J.; Susnik, A.; Aquino, M. H.; Dodson, A.

    2013-12-01

    High positioning accuracy is a key requirement to a number of applications with a high economic impact, such as precision agriculture, surveying, geodesy, land management, off-shore operations. Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) carrier phase measurement based techniques, such as Real Time Kinematic (RTK), Network-RTK (NRTK) and Precise Point Positioning (PPP), have played an important role in providing centimetre-level positioning accuracy, and become the core of the above applications. However these techniques are especially sensitive to ionospheric perturbations, in particular scintillation. Brazil sits in one of the most affected regions of the Earth and can be regarded as a test-bed for scenarios of the severe ionospheric condition. Over the Brazilian territory, the ionosphere behaves in a considerably unpredictable way and scintillation activity is very prominent, occurring especially after sunset hours. NRTK services may not be able to provide satisfactory accuracy, or even continuous positioning during strong scintillation periods. CALIBRA (Countering GNSS high Accuracy applications Limitations due to Ionospheric disturbances in BRAzil) started in late 2012 and is a project funded by the GSA (European GNSS Agency) and the European Commission under the Framework Program 7 to deliver improvements on carrier phase based high accuracy algorithms and their implementation in GNSS receivers, aiming to counter the adverse ionospheric effects over Brazil. As the first stage of this project, the ionospheric disturbances, which affect the applications of RTK, NRTK or PPP, are characterized. Typical problems include degraded positioning accuracy, difficulties in ambiguity fixing, NRTK network interpolation errors, long PPP convergence time etc. It will identify how GNSS observables and existing algorithms are degraded by ionosphere related phenomena, evaluating the impact on positioning techniques in terms of accuracy, integrity and availability. Through the

  13. A Cryogenic Flow Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Based on the success of the phase I effort, Advanced Technologies Group, Inc. proposes the development of a Cryogenic Flow Sensor (CFS) for determining mass flow of...

  14. Cryogenic Acoustic Suppression Testing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project will explore and test the feasibility and effectiveness of using a cryogenic fluid (liquid nitrogen) to facilitate acoustic suppression in a...

  15. Cryogenic MEMS Pressure Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A directly immersible cryogenic MEMS pressure sensor will be developed. Each silicon die will contain a vacuum-reference and a tent-like membrane. Offsetting thermal...

  16. Lightweight Inflatable Cryogenic Tank Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of an inflatable and lightweight polymer-fabric structured pressure vessel designed for the containment of cryogenic fluids....

  17. Cryogenic Systems and Superconductive Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report defines, investigates, and experimentally evaluates the key elements of a representative crogenic turborefrigerator subsystem suitable for providing reliable long-lived cryogenic refrigeration for a superconductive ship propulsion system.

  18. High-accuracy current sensing circuit with current compensation technique for buck-boost converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Yuan; Deng, Wan-Ling; Huang, Jun-Kai

    2015-03-01

    A novel on-chip current sensing circuit with current compensation technique suitable for buck-boost converter is presented in this article. The proposed technique can sense the full-range inductor current with high accuracy and high speed. It is mainly based on matched current mirror and does not require a large proportion of aspect ratio between the powerFET and the senseFET, thus it reduces the complexity of circuit design and the layout mismatch issue without decreasing the power efficiency. The circuit is fabricated with TSMC 0.25 µm 2P5M mixed-signal process. Simulation results show that the buck-boost converter can be operated at 200 kHz to 4 MHz switching frequency with an input voltage from 2.8 to 4.7 V. The output voltage is 3.6 V, and the maximum accuracy for both high and low side sensing current reaches 99% within the load current ranging from 200 to 600 mA.

  19. A high-accuracy surgical augmented reality system using enhanced integral videography image overlay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinran; Chen, Guowen; Liao, Hongen

    2015-01-01

    Image guided surgery has been used in clinic to improve the surgery safety and accuracy. Augmented reality (AR) technique, which can provide intuitive image guidance, has been greatly evolved these years. As one promising approach of surgical AR systems, integral videography (IV) autostereoscopic image overlay has achieved accurate fusion of full parallax guidance into surgical scene. This paper describes an image enhanced high-accuracy IV overlay system. A flexible optical image enhancement system (IES) is designed to increase the resolution and quality of IV image. Furthermore, we introduce a novel IV rendering algorithm to promote the spatial accuracy with the consideration of distortion introduced by micro lens array. Preliminary experiments validated that the image accuracy and resolution are improved with the proposed methods. The resolution of the IV image could be promoted to 1 mm for a micro lens array with pitch of 2.32 mm and IES magnification value of 0.5. The relative deviation of accuracy in depth and lateral directions are -4.68 ± 0.83% and -9.01 ± 0.42%.

  20. Simple high-accuracy resolution program for convective modelling of discontinuities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, B. P.

    1988-01-01

    For steady multidimensional convection, the Quadratic Upstream Interpolation for Convective Kinematics (QUICK) scheme has several attractive properties. However, for highly convective simulation of step profiles, QUICK produces unphysical overshoots and a few oscillations, and this may cause serious problems in nonlinear flows. Fortunately, it is possible to modify the convective flux by writing the normalized convected control-volume face value as a function of the normalized adjacent upstream node value, developing criteria for monotonic resolution without sacrificing formal accuracy. This results in a nonlinear functional relationship between the normalized variables, whereas standard methods are all linear in this sense. The resulting Simple High Accuracy Resolution Program (SHARP) can be applied to steady multidimensional flows containing thin shear or mixing layers, shock waves, and other frontal phenomena. This represents a significant advance in modeling highly convective flows of engineering and geophysical importance. SHARP is based on an explicit, conservative, control-volume flux formation, equally applicable to one, two, or three dimensional elliptic, parabolic, hyperbolic, or mixed-flow regimes. Results are given for the bench-mark purely convective first-order results and the nonmonotonic predictions of second- and third-order upwinding.

  1. Hybrid head-tracker being examined for the high-accuracy attack rotorcraft market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton, Buddy

    2002-08-01

    The need for the helmet-mounted display (HMD) to present flight, navigation, and weapon information in the pilot's line-of-sight has continued to rise as helicopter missions increase in complexity. To obtain spatial correlation of the direction of the head line-of-sight and pilotage imagery generated from helicopter-mounted sensors, it is necessary to slave the sensors to the head motion. To accomplish this task, a head-tracking system (HTS) must be incorporated into the HMD. There are a variety of techniques that could be applied for locating the position and attitude of a helmet-mounted display. Regardless of the technology, an HTS must provide defined measurements of accuracy. System parameters include motion box size, angular range, pointing angle accuracy, pointing angle resolution, update rate, and slew rate. This paper focuses on a hybrid tracker implementation in which a combination of optical and inertial tracking using strap-down gyros is preferred. Specifically, this tracker implementation is being examined for the high-accuracy attack rotorcraft market which requires a high degree of accuracy. The performance and resultant cost of the tracker components are determined by the specific needs of the intended application. The paper will also indicate how the various requirements drive the cost, configuration, and performance of the resultant hybrid head-tracker.

  2. A high accuracy broadband measurement system for time resolved complex bioimpedance measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, S; Malhotra, A; Ardelt, G; Ryschka, M

    2014-06-01

    Bioimpedance measurements are useful tools in biomedical engineering and life science. Bioimpedance is the electrical impedance of living tissue and can be used in the analysis of various physiological parameters. Bioimpedance is commonly measured by injecting a small well known alternating current via surface electrodes into an object under test and measuring the resultant surface voltages. It is non-invasive, painless and has no known hazards. This work presents a field programmable gate array based high accuracy broadband bioimpedance measurement system for time resolved bioimpedance measurements. The system is able to measure magnitude and phase of complex impedances under test in a frequency range of about 10-500 kHz with excitation currents from 10 µA to 5 mA. The overall measurement uncertainties stay below 1% for the impedance magnitude and below 0.5° for the phase in most measurement ranges. Furthermore, the described system has a sample rate of up to 3840 impedance spectra per second. The performance of the bioimpedance measurement system is demonstrated with a resistor based system calibration and with measurements on biological samples.

  3. High Accuracy Decoding of Dynamical Motion from a Large Retinal Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Marre

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Motion tracking is a challenge the visual system has to solve by reading out the retinal population. It is still unclear how the information from different neurons can be combined together to estimate the position of an object. Here we recorded a large population of ganglion cells in a dense patch of salamander and guinea pig retinas while displaying a bar moving diffusively. We show that the bar's position can be reconstructed from retinal activity with a precision in the hyperacuity regime using a linear decoder acting on 100+ cells. We then took advantage of this unprecedented precision to explore the spatial structure of the retina's population code. The classical view would have suggested that the firing rates of the cells form a moving hill of activity tracking the bar's position. Instead, we found that most ganglion cells in the salamander fired sparsely and idiosyncratically, so that their neural image did not track the bar. Furthermore, ganglion cell activity spanned an area much larger than predicted by their receptive fields, with cells coding for motion far in their surround. As a result, population redundancy was high, and we could find multiple, disjoint subsets of neurons that encoded the trajectory with high precision. This organization allows for diverse collections of ganglion cells to represent high-accuracy motion information in a form easily read out by downstream neural circuits.

  4. Real-Time and High-Accuracy Arctangent Computation Using CORDIC and Fast Magnitude Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Pilato

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an improved VLSI (Very Large Scale of Integration architecture for real-time and high-accuracy computation of trigonometric functions with fixed-point arithmetic, particularly arctangent using CORDIC (Coordinate Rotation Digital Computer and fast magnitude estimation. The standard CORDIC implementation suffers of a loss of accuracy when the magnitude of the input vector becomes small. Using a fast magnitude estimator before running the standard algorithm, a pre-processing magnification is implemented, shifting the input coordinates by a proper factor. The entire architecture does not use a multiplier, it uses only shift and add primitives as the original CORDIC, and it does not change the data path precision of the CORDIC core. A bit-true case study is presented showing a reduction of the maximum phase error from 414 LSB (angle error of 0.6355 rad to 4 LSB (angle error of 0.0061 rad, with small overheads of complexity and speed. Implementation of the new architecture in 0.18 µm CMOS technology allows for real-time and low-power processing of CORDIC and arctangent, which are key functions in many embedded DSP systems. The proposed macrocell has been verified by integration in a system-on-chip, called SENSASIP (Sensor Application Specific Instruction-set Processor, for position sensor signal processing in automotive measurement applications.

  5. High Accuracy Mass Measurement of the Dripline Nuclides $^{12,14}$Be

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    State-of-the art, three-body nuclear models that describe halo nuclides require the binding energy of the halo neutron(s) as a critical input parameter. In the case of $^{14}$Be, the uncertainty of this quantity is currently far too large (130 keV), inhibiting efforts at detailed theoretical description. A high accuracy, direct mass deterlnination of $^{14}$Be (as well as $^{12}$Be to obtain the two-neutron separation energy) is therefore required. The measurement can be performed with the MISTRAL spectrometer, which is presently the only possible solution due to required accuracy (10 keV) and short half-life (4.5 ms). Having achieved a 5 keV uncertainty for the mass of $^{11}$Li (8.6 ms), MISTRAL has proved the feasibility of such measurements. Since the current ISOLDE production rate of $^{14}$Be is only about 10/s, the installation of a beam cooler is underway in order to improve MISTRAL transmission. The projected improvement of an order of magnitude (in each transverse direction) will make this measureme...

  6. High-accuracy defect sizing for nozzle attachment welds using asymmetric TOFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloodworth, T. [AEA Technology, Risley (United Kingdom)

    1999-09-01

    Inspection procedures for the detection, characterisation and high-accuracy sizing of defects in nozzle attachment welds in a Swedish BWR have been developed. These welds are set-on nozzle-to-pipe attachment welds between the main recirculation pipe and related piping systems. The nozzles and the main recirculation pipe are made of ferritic steel with austenitic stainless steel cladding on the inner surface. The overall wall thickness of the nozzle is 30 mm. The inspection uses an automated pulse-echo technique for the detection and length sizing of defects. Software for the display of complex geometry ultrasonic data is used to assist in data analysis. An unorthodox automated ultrasonic TOFD technique is used to measure the through-wall height of defects. This technique deploys probes on both the nozzle and main pipe surfaces. The TOFD data for this complex geometry are analysed using the CGTOFD software, to locate the origin of defect edge signals. The Qualification detection criterion for this inspection is the detection of defects 6 mm x 18 mm (height x length) or greater. The required length measurement accuracy is {+-}14 mm and the required through-wall height measurement accuracy is {+-}2.3 mm. This last requirement is very demanding. The inspection procedures for detection and sizing passed Procedure Qualification when measured against the above criteria on an `open` test specimen. Data collection and analysis personnel have subsequently passed Personnel Qualification using `blind` specimens. (Author)

  7. High-accuracy same-beam VLBI observations using Shanghai and Urumqi telescopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KIKUCHI; Fuyuhiko; KAMATA; Shun’ichi; MATSUMOTO; Koji; HANADA; Hideo

    2009-01-01

    The same-beam VLBI observations of Rstar and Vstar,which were two small satellites of Japanese lunar mission,SELENE,were successfully performed by using Shanghai and Urumqi 25-m telescopes. When the separation angle between Rstar and Vstar was less than 0.1 deg,the differential phase delay of the X-band signals between Rstar and Vstar on Shanghai-Urumqi baseline was obtained with a very small error of 0.15 mm rms,which was reduced by 1-2 order compared with the former VLBI results. When the separation angle was less than 0.56 deg,the differential phase delay of the S-band signals was also obtained with a very small error of several mm rms. The orbit determination for Rstar and Vstar was performed,and the accuracy was improved to a level of several meters by using VLBI and Doppler data. The high-accuracy same-beam differential VLBI technique is very useful in orbit determination for a spacecraft,and will be used in orbit determination for Mars missions of China Yinghuo-1 and Russia Phobos-grunt.

  8. High-accuracy same-beam VLBI observations using Shanghai and Urumqi telescopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU QingHui; PING JingSong; FAN QingYuan; XIA Bo; AN Tao; QIAN ZhiHan; YANG WenJun; ZHANG Hua; WANG Zhen; WANG Na; SHI Xian; KIKUCHI Fuyuhiko; HUANG Qian; KAMATA Shun'ichi; MATSUMOTO Koji; HANADA Hideo; HONG XiaoYu; YU AiLi

    2009-01-01

    The same-beam VLBI observations of Rstar and Vstar, which were two small satellites of Japanese lunar mission, SELENE, were successfully performed by using Shanghai and Urumqi 25-m telescopes.When the separation angle between Rstar and Vstar was less than 0.1 deg, the differential phase delay of the X-band signals between Rstar and Vstar on Shanghai-Urumqi baseline was obtained with a very small error of 0.15 mm rms, which was reduced by 1-2 order compared with the former VLBI results.When the separation angle was less than 0.56 deg, the differential phase delay of the S-band signals was also obtained with a very small error of several mm rms. The orbit determination for Rstar and Vstar was performed, and the accuracy was improved to a level of several meters by using VLBI and Doppler data. The high-accuracy same-beam differential VLBI technique is very useful in orbit determination for a spacecraft, and will be used in orbit determination for Mars missions of China Yinghuo-1 and Russia Phobos-grunt.

  9. High Accuracy Extraction of Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia with Statistical Processing using Normal Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Takashi; Ogawa, Yutaro; Yoshida, Lui; Kotani, Kiyoshi; Jimbo, Yasuhiko

    The autonomic nervous system is important in maintaining homeostasis by mediating the opposing effects of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous activity on organs. Although it is known that the amplitude of RSA (Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia) is an index of parasympathetic nervous activity, it is difficult to estimate that activity in real-time in everyday situations. It is partly caused by body motions and extrasystoles. Also, automatic recognition of the R-wave on electrocardiograms is required for real-time analysis of RSA amplitude, there is an unresolved problem of false recognition of the R-wave. In this paper, we propose a method to evaluate the amplitude of RSA accurately using statistical processing with probabilistic models. Then, we estimate parasympathetic nervous activity during body motion and isometric exercise to examine the validity of the method. As a result, using the proposed method, we demonstrate that the amplitude of RSA can be extracted with false recognition of the R-wave. In addition, an appropriate threshold for the estimate is one or five percent because waveforms of RSA amplitude do not follow the abrupt changes of the parasympathetic nervous activity evoked by isometric exercise with the threshold at ten percent. Furthermore, the method using normal distribution is found to be more appropriate than that of chi-square distribution for statistical processing. Therefore, we expect that the proposed method can evaluate parasympathetic nervous activity with high accuracy in everyday situations.

  10. High accuracy measurements of magnetic field integrals for the european XFEL undulator systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff-Fabris, Frederik; Viehweger, Marc; Li, Yuhui; Pflüger, Joachim

    2016-10-01

    Two high accuracy moving wire (MW) measurement systems based on stretched wire technique were built for the European XFEL (XFEL.EU). They were dedicated to monitor, tune and improve the magnetic field integrals properties during the serial production of the undulator segments, phase shifters and air coil correctors for XFEL.EU. For the magnetic tuning of phase shifters and the calibration of the air coils correctors a short portable MW measurement bench was built to measure first field integrals in short devices with magnetic length of less than about 300 mm and with an ultimate accuracy much better than 1 G cm (0.001 T mm). A long MW measurement setup was dedicated to obtain the total first and second field integrals on the 5-meters long undulator segments with accuracy of about 4 G cm (0.004 T mm) and 2000 G cm2 (20 T mm2) for the 1st and 2nd field integrals, respectively. Using these data a method was developed to compute the proper corrections for the air coils correctors used at both extremities so that zero first and second field integrals for an undulator segment are obtained. It is demonstrated that charging air coils correctors with these corrections results in near zero effect to the electron trajectory in the undulator systems and consequently no negative impact on the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) process should occur.

  11. High-speed, high-accuracy large range 3D measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yatong; Zhang, Song

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents such a high-speed, high-accuracy structured light technique that could achieve large range 3D shape measurement. The enabling method is our recently proposed system calibration that splits the calibration process into two stages. Specifically, we calibrate the intrinsic parameters at a near position with a regular size yet precisely fabricated calibration target, and then calibrate the extrinsic parameters with the assistance of an additional large range yet low accuracy low cost 3D scanner (i.e., Kinect). We developed a system that achieved 500 Hz with a resolution 2304 × 1400. The field of view (FOV) of our structured light system is 0.9 m(W) × 1.4 m(H) × 0.8 m(D). Our experimental data demonstrated that such a large range structured light system can achieve an mean error of 0.13 mm with a standard deviation of 1.18 mm by measuring a 304.8 mm diameter sphere. We further experimentally demonstrated that proposed method can simultaneously measure multiple objects or large dynamically changing objects.

  12. Raman spectroscopic determination of the molecular constants of the hydrogen isotopologues with high accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasch, Bennet; Mirz, Sebastian; Groessle, Robin [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology KIT (Germany). Institute for Technical Physics (ITEP), Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK); Collaboration: KATRIN-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The interest in the thermodynamic properties of gases as the chemical equilibrium is faced by the challenge of time-consuming and technical extensive experimental setups. One possible solution is the derivation of these properties from the molecular constants. The rotational and vibrational movement of diatomic molecules, as the hydrogen isotopologues, is described by the concept of the rotational anharmonic oscillator. The molecular constants are the free parameters of this concept. Molecular constants themselves can be determined by measuring the line position of rotational and/or rotational transitions e.g. with Raman spectroscopy for hydrogen as it has been done since several years. In this contribution a Raman method was development to measure the molecular constant of the hydrogen isotopologues with high accuracy to obtain reliable results. But not only the method was development but also a complete measurement uncertainty budget was set up. The uncertainty budget contains all possible sources for uncertainties from the measurement period or the analysis process as well the contribution of each single uncertainty. The method and the uncertainty budget were exemplary tested on Deuterium.

  13. Fast-type high-accuracy universal polarimeter using charge-coupled device spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akifumi Takanabe

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A fast, high-accuracy universal polarimeter was developed using a charge-coupled device (CCD spectrometer (CCD-HAUP, to carry out simultaneous optical anisotropic (linear birefringence, LB; linear dichroism, LD and chiroptical (circular birefringence, CB; circular dichroism, CD measurements on single crystals without any pretreatment, in the visible region between 400–680 nm. The principle of the HAUP method is to measure the intensities of emergent light passing through a polarizer, a crystal sample, and then an analyzer, as the azimuth angles of the polarizer and analyzer are independently altered. The CCD-HAUP has the unique feature that white transmitted light intensity can be measured using a CCD spectrometer, compared with the generalized HAUP (G-HAUP system in which monochromatic transmitted light is measured using a photomultiplier. The CCD-HAUP measurements across the entire wavelength region are completed within the G-HAUP measurement time for a single wavelength. The CCD-HAUP drastically reduces the measurement time for a dataset to only 1.5 h, from the 24 h required for the G-HAUP system. LB, LD, CB, and CD measurements of single crystals of α-quartz and enantiomeric photomechanical salicylidenephenylethylamines before, during, and after ultraviolet light irradiation show results comparable to those obtained using the G-HAUP system. The newly developed system is very effective for samples susceptible to degradation induced by external stimuli, such as light and heat.

  14. Determining dynamical parameters of the Milky Way Galaxy based on high-accuracy radio astrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Mareki; Nagayama, Takumi; Sakai, Nobuyuki

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we evaluate how the dynamical structure of the Galaxy can be constrained by high-accuracy VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) astrometry such as VERA (VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry). We generate simulated samples of maser sources which follow the gas motion caused by a spiral or bar potential, with their distribution similar to those currently observed with VERA and VLBA (Very Long Baseline Array). We apply the Markov chain Monte Carlo analyses to the simulated sample sources to determine the dynamical parameter of the models. We show that one can successfully determine the initial model parameters if astrometric results are obtained for a few hundred sources with currently achieved astrometric accuracy. If astrometric data are available from 500 sources, the expected accuracy of R0 and Θ0 is ˜ 1% or higher, and parameters related to the spiral structure can be constrained by an error of 10% or with higher accuracy. We also show that the parameter determination accuracy is basically independent of the locations of resonances such as corotation and/or inner/outer Lindblad resonances. We also discuss the possibility of model selection based on the Bayesian information criterion (BIC), and demonstrate that BIC can be used to discriminate different dynamical models of the Galaxy.

  15. Reducing Systematic Centroid Errors Induced by Fiber Optic Faceplates in Intensified High-Accuracy Star Trackers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Kun; Jiang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Compared with traditional star trackers, intensified high-accuracy star trackers equipped with an image intensifier exhibit overwhelmingly superior dynamic performance. However, the multiple-fiber-optic faceplate structure in the image intensifier complicates the optoelectronic detecting system of star trackers and may cause considerable systematic centroid errors and poor attitude accuracy. All the sources of systematic centroid errors related to fiber optic faceplates (FOFPs) throughout the detection process of the optoelectronic system were analyzed. Based on the general expression of the systematic centroid error deduced in the frequency domain and the FOFP modulation transfer function, an accurate expression that described the systematic centroid error of FOFPs was obtained. Furthermore, reduction of the systematic error between the optical lens and the input FOFP of the intensifier, the one among multiple FOFPs and the one between the output FOFP of the intensifier and the imaging chip of the detecting system were discussed. Two important parametric constraints were acquired from the analysis. The correctness of the analysis on the optoelectronic detecting system was demonstrated through simulation and experiment. PMID:26016920

  16. Results of error correction techniques applied on two high accuracy coordinate measuring machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pace, C.; Doiron, T.; Stieren, D.; Borchardt, B.; Veale, R. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA); National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The Primary Standards Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Precision Engineering Division at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) are in the process of implementing software error correction on two nearly identical high-accuracy coordinate measuring machines (CMMs). Both machines are Moore Special Tool Company M-48 CMMs which are fitted with laser positioning transducers. Although both machines were manufactured to high tolerance levels, the overall volumetric accuracy was insufficient for calibrating standards to the levels both laboratories require. The error mapping procedure was developed at NIST in the mid 1970's on an earlier but similar model. The error mapping procedure was originally very complicated and did not make any assumptions about the rigidness of the machine as it moved, each of the possible error motions was measured at each point of the error map independently. A simpler mapping procedure was developed during the early 1980's which assumed rigid body motion of the machine. This method has been used to calibrate lower accuracy machines with a high degree of success and similar software correction schemes have been implemented by many CMM manufacturers. The rigid body model has not yet been used on highly repeatable CMMs such as the M48. In this report we present early mapping data for the two M48 CMMs. The SNL CMM was manufactured in 1985 and has been in service for approximately four years, whereas the NIST CMM was delivered in early 1989. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Spline-based high-accuracy piecewise-polynomial phase-to-sinusoid amplitude converters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrinović, Davor; Brezović, Marko

    2011-04-01

    We propose a method for direct digital frequency synthesis (DDS) using a cubic spline piecewise-polynomial model for a phase-to-sinusoid amplitude converter (PSAC). This method offers maximum smoothness of the output signal. Closed-form expressions for the cubic polynomial coefficients are derived in the spectral domain and the performance analysis of the model is given in the time and frequency domains. We derive the closed-form performance bounds of such DDS using conventional metrics: rms and maximum absolute errors (MAE) and maximum spurious free dynamic range (SFDR) measured in the discrete time domain. The main advantages of the proposed PSAC are its simplicity, analytical tractability, and inherent numerical stability for high table resolutions. Detailed guidelines for a fixed-point implementation are given, based on the algebraic analysis of all quantization effects. The results are verified on 81 PSAC configurations with the output resolutions from 5 to 41 bits by using a bit-exact simulation. The VHDL implementation of a high-accuracy DDS based on the proposed PSAC with 28-bit input phase word and 32-bit output value achieves SFDR of its digital output signal between 180 and 207 dB, with a signal-to-noise ratio of 192 dB. Its implementation requires only one 18 kB block RAM and three 18-bit embedded multipliers in a typical field-programmable gate array (FPGA) device.

  18. Making high-accuracy null depth measurements for the LBTI exozodi survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennesson, Bertrand; Defrère, Denis; Nowak, Matthias; Hinz, Philip; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Absil, Olivier; Bailey, Vanessa; Bryden, Geoffrey; Danchi, William; Kennedy, Grant M.; Marion, Lindsay; Roberge, Aki; Serabyn, Eugene; Skemer, Andy J.; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Wyatt, Mark

    2016-08-01

    The characterization of exozodiacal light emission is both important for the understanding of planetary systems evolution and for the preparation of future space missions aiming to characterize low mass planets in the habitable zone of nearby main sequence stars. The Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer (LBTI) exozodi survey aims at providing a ten-fold improvement over current state of the art, measuring dust emission levels down to a typical accuracy of 12 zodis per star, for a representative ensemble of 30+ high priority targets. Such measurements promise to yield a final accuracy of about 2 zodis on the median exozodi level of the targets sample. Reaching a 1 σ measurement uncertainty of 12 zodis per star corresponds to measuring interferometric cancellation ("null") levels, i.e visibilities at the few 100 ppm uncertainty level. We discuss here the challenges posed by making such high accuracy mid-infrared visibility measurements from the ground and present the methodology we developed for achieving current best levels of 500 ppm or so. We also discuss current limitations and plans for enhanced exozodi observations over the next few years at LBTI.

  19. High-Accuracy, Compact Scanning Method and Circuit for Resistive Sensor Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Seok Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The zero-potential scanning circuit is widely used as read-out circuit for resistive sensor arrays because it removes a well known problem: crosstalk current. The zero-potential scanning circuit can be divided into two groups based on type of row drivers. One type is a row driver using digital buffers. It can be easily implemented because of its simple structure, but we found that it can cause a large read-out error which originates from on-resistance of the digital buffers used in the row driver. The other type is a row driver composed of operational amplifiers. It, very accurately, reads the sensor resistance, but it uses a large number of operational amplifiers to drive rows of the sensor array; therefore, it severely increases the power consumption, cost, and system complexity. To resolve the inaccuracy or high complexity problems founded in those previous circuits, we propose a new row driver which uses only one operational amplifier to drive all rows of a sensor array with high accuracy. The measurement results with the proposed circuit to drive a 4 × 4 resistor array show that the maximum error is only 0.1% which is remarkably reduced from 30.7% of the previous counterpart.

  20. A fast and high accuracy numerical simulation algorithm of the polymer spherulite at the mesoscale Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongzhi; Geng, Tie; (Tom Turng, Lih-Sheng; Liu, Chuntai; Cao, Wei; Shen, Changyu

    2017-09-01

    In the multiscale numerical simulation of polymer crystallization during the processing period, flow and temperature of the polymer melt are simulated on the macroscale level, while nucleation and growth of the spherulite are simulated at the mesoscale level. As a part of the multiscale simulation, the meso-simulation requires a fast solving speed because the meso-simulation software must be run several times in every macro-element at each macro-step. Meanwhile, the accuracy of the calculation results is also very important. It is known that the simulation geometry of crystallization includes planar (2D) and three-dimensional space (3D). The 3D calculations are more accurate but more expensive because of the long CPU time consumed. On the contrary, 2D calculations are always much faster but lower in accuracy. To reach the desirable speed and high accuracy at the same time, an algorithm is presented, in which the Delesse law coupled with the Monte Carlo method and pixel method are employed to simulate the nucleation, growth, and impingement of the polymer spherulite at the mesoscale level. Based on this algorithm, a software is developed with the Visual C++ language, and its numerical examples’ results prove that the solving speed of this algorithm is as fast as the 2D classical simulation and the calculation accuracy is at the same level as the 3D simulation.

  1. A Piezoelectric Cryogenic Heat Switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahromi, Amir E.; Sullivan, Dan F.

    2014-01-01

    We have measured the thermal conductance of a mechanical heat switch actuated by a piezoelectric positioner, the PZHS (PieZo electric Heat Switch), at cryogenic temperatures. The thermal conductance of the PZHS was measured between 4 K and 10 K, and on/off conductance ratios greater than 100 were achieved when the positioner applied its maximum force of 8 N. We discuss the advantages of using this system in cryogenic applications, and estimate the ultimate performance of an optimized PZHS.

  2. High-accuracy measurement of the emission spectrum of liquid xenon in the vacuum ultraviolet region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Keiko, E-mail: fujii-keiko-nv@ynu.jp [Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University, Yokohama, Kanagawa 240-8501 (Japan); Endo, Yuya; Torigoe, Yui; Nakamura, Shogo [Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University, Yokohama, Kanagawa 240-8501 (Japan); Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Kasami, Katsuyu [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Mihara, Satoshi; Saito, Kiwamu; Sasaki, Shinichi [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); The Graduate School of Advanced Studies, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); Tawara, Hiroko [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2015-09-21

    The emission spectrum of cryogenic liquid xenon in the vacuum ultraviolet region was measured by irradiating liquid xenon with gamma-rays from a radioactive source. To achieve a high signal-to-noise ratio, we employed coincident photon counting. Additionally, the charge of the photo-sensor signals was measured to estimate the number of detected photons accurately. In addition, proper corrections were incorporated for the wavelength; response functions of the apparatus obtained using a low-pressure mercury lamp, and photon detection efficiencies of the optical system were considered. The obtained emission spectrum is found to be in the shape of a Gaussian function, with the center at 57,199±34 (stat.)±33 (syst.) cm{sup −1} (174.8±0.1 (stat.)±0.1 (syst.) nm) and the full width at half maximum of 3328±72 (stat.)±65 (syst.) cm{sup −1} (10.2±0.2 (stat.)±0.2 (sys.) nm). These results are the most accurate values obtained in terms of the data acquisition method and the calibration for the experimental system and provide valuable information regarding the high-precision instruments that employ a liquid-xenon scintillator.

  3. A new radiometer for earth radiation budget studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, P.G.

    1992-01-01

    A critical need for the US Global Change Research Program is to provide continuous, well-calibrated radiometric data for radiation balance studies. This paper describes a new, compact, relatively light-weight, adaptable radiometer which will provide both spectrally integrated measurements and data in selected spectral bands. The radiometer design is suitable for use on (small) satellites, aircraft, or Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles (UAVs). Some considerations for the implementation of this radiometer on a small satellite are given. 17 refs.

  4. Method for high-accuracy reflectance measurements in the 2.5-microm region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Rudolf; Müller, Andreas

    2003-02-20

    Reflectance measurement with spectroradiometers in the solar wavelength region (0.4-2.5 microm) are frequently conducted in the laboratory or in the field to characterize surface materials of artificial and natural targets. The spectral surface reflectance is calculated as the ratio of the signals obtained over the target surface and a reference panel, yielding a relative reflectance value. If the reflectance of the reference panel is known, the absolute target reflectance can be computed. This standard measurement technique assumes that the signal at the radiometer is due completely to reflected target and reference radiation. However, for field measurements in the 2.4-2.5-microm region with the Sun as the illumination source, the emitted thermal radiation is not a negligible part of the signal even at ambient temperatures, because the atmospheric transmittance, and thus the solar illumination level, is small in the atmospheric absorption regions. A new method is proposed that calculates reflectance values in the 2.4-2.5-microm region while it accounts for the reference panel reflectance and the emitted radiation. This technique needs instruments with noise-equivalent radiances of 2 orders of magnitude below currently commercially available instruments and requires measurement of the surface temperatures of target and reference. If the reference panel reflectance and temperature effects are neglected, the standard method yields reflectance errors up to 0.08 and 0.15 units for 7- and 2-nm bandwidth instruments, respectively. For the new method the corresponding errors can be reduced to approximately 0.01 units for the surface temperature range of 20-35 degrees C.

  5. Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset represents multiple products archived at the Land Processes DAAC for ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) aboard the...

  6. Galileo Net Flux Radiometer Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sromovsky, Lawrence A.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes analysis of the Galileo Net Flux Radiometer (NFR), an instrument mounted on the Galileo probe, a spacecraft designed for entry into and direct measurements of Jupiter's atmosphere. The grant period for NAG2-1028 began on 1 April 1996, nearly four months after Jupiter atmospheric entry on 7 December 1995, and at which time the probe data were fully recovered and quick look analysis completed. This grant supported the detailed data analysis, resulting in a preliminary paper in Science in May 1996 and a final paper in the journal of Geophysical Research in .September 1998, with conference papers presented within this period.

  7. RF Reference Switch for Spaceflight Radiometer Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuble, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this technology is to provide improved calibration and measurement sensitivity to the Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission (SMAP) radiometer. While RF switches have been used in the past to calibrate microwave radiometers, the switch used on SMAP employs several techniques uniquely tailored to the instrument requirements and passive remote-sensing in general to improve radiometer performance. Measurement error and sensitivity are improved by employing techniques to reduce thermal gradients within the device, reduce insertion loss during antenna observations, increase insertion loss temporal stability, and increase rejection of radar and RFI (radio-frequency interference) signals during calibration. The two legs of the single-pole double-throw reference switch employ three PIN diodes per leg in a parallel-shunt configuration to minimize insertion loss and increase stability while exceeding rejection requirements at 1,413 MHz. The high-speed packaged diodes are selected to minimize junction capacitance and resistance while ensuring the parallel devices have very similar I-V curves. Switch rejection is improved by adding high-impedance quarter-wave tapers before and after the diodes, along with replacing the ground via of one diode per leg with an open circuit stub. Errors due to thermal gradients in the switch are reduced by embedding the 50-ohm reference load within the switch, along with using a 0.25-in. (approximately equal to 0.6-cm) aluminum prebacked substrate. Previous spaceflight microwave radiometers did not embed the reference load and thermocouple directly within the calibration switch. In doing so, the SMAP switch reduces error caused by thermal gradients between the load and switch. Thermal issues are further reduced by moving the custom, highspeed regulated driver circuit to a physically separate PWB (printed wiring board). Regarding RF performance, previous spaceflight reference switches have not employed high-impedance tapers to improve

  8. Initial development of high-accuracy CFRP panel for DATE5 antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yuan; Lou, Zheng; Hao, Xufeng; Zhu, Jing; Cheng, Jingquan; Wang, Hairen; Zuo, Yingxi; Yang, Ji

    2016-07-01

    DATE5 antenna, which is a 5m telescope for terahertz exploration, will be sited at Dome A, Antarctica. It is necessary to keep high surface accuracy of the primary reflector panels so that high observing efficiency can be achieved. In antenna field, carbon fiber reinforced composite (CFRP) sandwich panels are widely used as these panels are light in weight, high in strength, low in thermal expansion, and cheap in mass fabrication. In DATE5 project, CFRP panels are important panel candidates. In the design study phase, a CFRP prototype panel of 1-meter size is initially developed for the verification purpose. This paper introduces the material arrangement in the sandwich panel, measured performance of this testing sandwich structure samples, and together with the panel forming process. For anti-icing in the South Pole region, a special CFRP heating film is embedded in the front skin of sandwich panel. The properties of some types of basic building materials are tested. Base on the results, the deformation of prototype panel with different sandwich structures and skin layers are simulated and a best structural concept is selected. The panel mold used is a high accuracy one with a surface rms error of 1.4 μm. Prototype panels are replicated from the mold. Room temperature curing resin is used to reduce the thermal deformation in the resin transfer process. In the curing, vacuum negative pressure technology is also used to increase the volume content of carbon fiber. After the measurement of the three coordinate measure machine (CMM), a prototype CFRP panel of 5.1 μm rms surface error is developed initially.

  9. Automated, high accuracy classification of Parkinsonian disorders: a pattern recognition approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre F Marquand

    Full Text Available Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP, multiple system atrophy (MSA and idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD can be clinically indistinguishable, especially in the early stages, despite distinct patterns of molecular pathology. Structural neuroimaging holds promise for providing objective biomarkers for discriminating these diseases at the single subject level but all studies to date have reported incomplete separation of disease groups. In this study, we employed multi-class pattern recognition to assess the value of anatomical patterns derived from a widely available structural neuroimaging sequence for automated classification of these disorders. To achieve this, 17 patients with PSP, 14 with IPD and 19 with MSA were scanned using structural MRI along with 19 healthy controls (HCs. An advanced probabilistic pattern recognition approach was employed to evaluate the diagnostic value of several pre-defined anatomical patterns for discriminating the disorders, including: (i a subcortical motor network; (ii each of its component regions and (iii the whole brain. All disease groups could be discriminated simultaneously with high accuracy using the subcortical motor network. The region providing the most accurate predictions overall was the midbrain/brainstem, which discriminated all disease groups from one another and from HCs. The subcortical network also produced more accurate predictions than the whole brain and all of its constituent regions. PSP was accurately predicted from the midbrain/brainstem, cerebellum and all basal ganglia compartments; MSA from the midbrain/brainstem and cerebellum and IPD from the midbrain/brainstem only. This study demonstrates that automated analysis of structural MRI can accurately predict diagnosis in individual patients with Parkinsonian disorders, and identifies distinct patterns of regional atrophy particularly useful for this process.

  10. High accuracy solution of bi-directional wave propagation in continuum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulloth, Akhil; Sawant, Nilesh; Haider, Ijlal; Sharma, Nidhi; Sengupta, Tapan K.

    2015-10-01

    Solution of partial differential equations by numerical method is strongly affected due to numerical errors, which are caused mainly by deviation of numerical dispersion relation from the physical dispersion relation. To quantify and control such errors and obtain high accuracy solutions, we consider a class of problems which involve second derivative of unknowns with respect to time. Here, we analyse numerical metrics such as the numerical group velocity, numerical phase speed and the numerical amplification factor for different methods in solving the model bi-directional wave equation (BDWE). Such equations can be solved directly, for example, by Runge-Kutta-Nyström (RKN) method. Alternatively, the governing equation can be converted to a set of first order in time equations and then using four-stage fourth order Runge-Kutta (RK4) method for time integration. Spatial discretisation considered are the classical second and fourth order central difference schemes, along with Lele's central compact scheme for evaluating second derivatives. In another version, we have used Lele's scheme for evaluating first derivatives twice to obtain the second derivative. As BDWE represents non-dissipative, non-dispersive dynamics, we also consider the canonical problem of linearised rotating shallow water equation (LRSWE) in a new formulation involving second order derivative in time, which represents dispersive waves along with a stationary mode. The computations of LRSWE with RK4 and RKN methods for temporal discretisation and Lele's compact schemes for spatial discretisation are compared with computations performed with RK4 method for time discretisation and staggered compact scheme (SCS) for spatial discretisation by treating it as a set of three equations as reported in Rajpoot et al. (2012) [1].

  11. In-depth, high-accuracy proteomics of sea urchin tooth organic matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mann Matthias

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The organic matrix contained in biominerals plays an important role in regulating mineralization and in determining biomineral properties. However, most components of biomineral matrices remain unknown at present. In sea urchin tooth, which is an important model for developmental biology and biomineralization, only few matrix components have been identified. The recent publication of the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome sequence rendered possible not only the identification of genes potentially coding for matrix proteins, but also the direct identification of proteins contained in matrices of skeletal elements by in-depth, high-accuracy proteomic analysis. Results We identified 138 proteins in the matrix of tooth powder. Only 56 of these proteins were previously identified in the matrices of test (shell and spine. Among the novel components was an interesting group of five proteins containing alanine- and proline-rich neutral or basic motifs separated by acidic glycine-rich motifs. In addition, four of the five proteins contained either one or two predicted Kazal protease inhibitor domains. The major components of tooth matrix were however largely identical to the set of spicule matrix proteins and MSP130-related proteins identified in test (shell and spine matrix. Comparison of the matrices of crushed teeth to intact teeth revealed a marked dilution of known intracrystalline matrix proteins and a concomitant increase in some intracellular proteins. Conclusion This report presents the most comprehensive list of sea urchin tooth matrix proteins available at present. The complex mixture of proteins identified may reflect many different aspects of the mineralization process. A comparison between intact tooth matrix, presumably containing odontoblast remnants, and crushed tooth matrix served to differentiate between matrix components and possible contributions of cellular remnants. Because LC-MS/MS-based methods directly

  12. A Smart High Accuracy Silicon Piezoresistive Pressure Sensor Temperature Compensation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanwu Zhou

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical analysis in this paper indicates that the accuracy of a silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is mainly affected by thermal drift, and varies nonlinearly with the temperature. Here, a smart temperature compensation system to reduce its effect on accuracy is proposed. Firstly, an effective conditioning circuit for signal processing and data acquisition is designed. The hardware to implement the system is fabricated. Then, a program is developed on LabVIEW which incorporates an extreme learning machine (ELM as the calibration algorithm for the pressure drift. The implementation of the algorithm was ported to a micro-control unit (MCU after calibration in the computer. Practical pressure measurement experiments are carried out to verify the system’s performance. The temperature compensation is solved in the interval from −40 to 85 °C. The compensated sensor is aimed at providing pressure measurement in oil-gas pipelines. Compared with other algorithms, ELM acquires higher accuracy and is more suitable for batch compensation because of its higher generalization and faster learning speed. The accuracy, linearity, zero temperature coefficient and sensitivity temperature coefficient of the tested sensor are 2.57% FS, 2.49% FS, 8.1 × 10−5/°C and 29.5 × 10−5/°C before compensation, and are improved to 0.13%FS, 0.15%FS, 1.17 × 10−5/°C and 2.1 × 10−5/°C respectively, after compensation. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed system is valid for the temperature compensation and high accuracy requirement of the sensor.

  13. High accuracy of arterial spin labeling perfusion imaging in differentiation of pilomyxoid from pilocytic astrocytoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabavizadeh, S.A.; Assadsangabi, R.; Hajmomenian, M.; Vossough, A. [Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Santi, M. [Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Pilomyxoid astrocytoma (PMA) is a relatively new tumor entity which has been added to the 2007 WHO Classification of tumors of the central nervous system. The goal of this study is to utilize arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion imaging to differentiate PMA from pilocytic astrocytoma (PA). Pulsed ASL and conventional MRI sequences of patients with PMA and PA in the past 5 years were retrospectively evaluated. Patients with history of radiation or treatment with anti-angiogenic drugs were excluded. A total of 24 patients (9 PMA, 15 PA) were included. There were statistically significant differences between PMA and PA in mean tumor/gray matter (GM) cerebral blood flow (CBF) ratios (1.3 vs 0.4, p < 0.001) and maximum tumor/GM CBF ratio (2.3 vs 1, p < 0.001). Area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for differentiation of PMA from PA was 0.91 using mean tumor CBF, 0.95 using mean tumor/GM CBF ratios, and 0.89 using maximum tumor/GM CBF. Using a threshold value of 0.91, the mean tumor/GM CBF ratio was able to diagnose PMA with 77 % sensitivity, 100 % specificity, and a threshold value of 0.7, provided 88 % sensitivity and 86 % specificity. There was no statistically significant difference between the two tumors in enhancement pattern (p = 0.33), internal architecture (p = 0.15), or apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values (p = 0.07). ASL imaging has high accuracy in differentiating PMA from PA. The result of this study may have important applications in prognostication and treatment planning especially in patients with less accessible tumors such as hypothalamic-chiasmatic gliomas. (orig.)

  14. Ultra-high accuracy optical testing: creating diffraction-limitedshort-wavelength optical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Rekawa, Senajith B.; Denham, Paul E.; Liddle, J. Alexander; Gullikson, Eric M.; Jackson, KeithH.; Anderson, Erik H.; Taylor, John S.; Sommargren, Gary E.; Chapman,Henry N.; Phillion, Donald W.; Johnson, Michael; Barty, Anton; Soufli,Regina; Spiller, Eberhard A.; Walton, Christopher C.; Bajt, Sasa

    2005-08-03

    Since 1993, research in the fabrication of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) optical imaging systems, conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has produced the highest resolution optical systems ever made. We have pioneered the development of ultra-high-accuracy optical testing and alignment methods, working at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths, and pushing wavefront-measuring interferometry into the 2-20-nm wavelength range (60-600 eV). These coherent measurement techniques, including lateral shearing interferometry and phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometry (PS/PDI) have achieved RMS wavefront measurement accuracies of 0.5-1-{angstrom} and better for primary aberration terms, enabling the creation of diffraction-limited EUV optics. The measurement accuracy is established using careful null-testing procedures, and has been verified repeatedly through high-resolution imaging. We believe these methods are broadly applicable to the advancement of short-wavelength optical systems including space telescopes, microscope objectives, projection lenses, synchrotron beamline optics, diffractive and holographic optics, and more. Measurements have been performed on a tunable undulator beamline at LBNL's Advanced Light Source (ALS), optimized for high coherent flux; although many of these techniques should be adaptable to alternative ultraviolet, EUV, and soft x-ray light sources. To date, we have measured nine prototype all-reflective EUV optical systems with NA values between 0.08 and 0.30 (f/6.25 to f/1.67). These projection-imaging lenses were created for the semiconductor industry's advanced research in EUV photolithography, a technology slated for introduction in 2009-13. This paper reviews the methods used and our program's accomplishments to date.

  15. Cryogenic holographic distortion testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, David G.

    1994-06-01

    Hughes cryogenic holographic test facility allows for the rapid characterization of optical components and mechanical structures at elevated and reduced temperatures. The facility consists of a 1.6 meter diameter thermal vacuum chamber, vibration isolated experiment test platform, and a holographic camera assembly. Temperatures as low as 12 Kelvin and as high as 350 Kelvin have been demonstrated. Complex aspheric mirrors are tested without the need for auxiliary null lenses and may be tested in either the polished or unpolished state. Structural elements such as optical benches, solar array panels, and spacecraft antennas have been tested. Types of materials tested include beryllium, silicon carbide, aluminum, graphite epoxy, silicon/aluminum matrix material and injection molded plastics. Sizes have ranged from 7 cm X 15 cm to 825 cm X 1125 cm and have weighed as little as 0.2 Kg and as much as 130 Kg. Surface figure changes as little as (lambda) /10 peak-to-valley ((lambda) equals .514 micrometers ) are routinely measured.

  16. Dual Cryogenic Capacitive Density Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngquist, Robert; Mata, Carlos; Vokrot, Peter; Cox, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A dual cryogenic capacitive density sensor has been developed. The device contains capacitive sensors that monitor two-phase cryogenic flow density to within 1% accuracy, which, if temperature were known, could be used to determine the ratio of liquid to gas in the line. Two of these density sensors, located a known distance apart, comprise the sensor, providing some information on the velocity of the flow. This sensor was constructed as a proposed mass flowmeter with high data acquisition rates. Without moving parts, this device is capable of detecting the density change within a two-phase cryogenic flow more than 100 times a second. Detection is enabled by a series of two sets of five parallel plates with stainless steel, cryogenically rated tubing. The parallel plates form the two capacitive sensors, which are measured by electrically isolated digital electronics. These capacitors monitor the dielectric of the flow essentially the density of the flow and can be used to determine (along with temperature) the ratio of cryogenic liquid to gas. Combining this information with the velocity of the flow can, with care, be used to approximate the total two-phase mass flow. The sensor can be operated at moderately high pressures and can be lowered into a cryogenic bath. The electronics have been substantially improved over the older sensors, incorporating a better microprocessor, elaborate ground loop protection and noise limiting circuitry, and reduced temperature sensitivity. At the time of this writing, this design has been bench tested at room temperature, but actual cryogenic tests are pending

  17. Microfluidic Radiometal Labeling Systems for Biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichert, D E; Kenis, P J. A.

    2011-12-29

    In a typical labeling procedure with radiometals, such as Cu-64 and Ga-68; a very large (~ 100-fold) excess of the non-radioactive reactant (precursor) is used to promote rapid and efficient incorporation of the radioisotope into the PET imaging agent. In order to achieve high specific activities, careful control of reaction conditions and extensive chromatographic purifications are required in order to separate the labeled compounds from the cold precursors. Here we propose a microfluidic approach to overcome these problems, and achieve high specific activities in a more convenient, semi-automated fashion and faster time frame. Microfluidic reactors, consisting of a network of micron-sized channels (typical dimensions in the range 10 - 300¼m), filters, separation columns, electrodes and reaction loops/chambers etched onto a solid substrate, are now emerging as an extremely useful technology for the intensification and miniaturization of chemical processes. The ability to manipulate, process and analyze reagent concentrations and reaction interfaces in both space and time within the channel network of a microreactor provides the fine level of reaction control that is desirable in PET radiochemistry practice. These factors can bring radiometal labeling, specifically the preparation of radio-labeled biomolecules such as antibodies, much closer to their theoretical maximum specific activities.

  18. Infrared Correlation Radiometer for GEO-CAPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil, D. O.; Boldt, J.; Edwards, D. P.; Yee, J.

    2009-12-01

    We present our plans as part of NASA’s Instrument Incubator Program to characterize the performance of a 2.3 μm infrared correlation radiometer (IRCR) prototype subsystem for an instrument designed specifically to measure carbon monoxide (CO) from geostationary orbit. The Earth Science and Applications Decadal Survey mission GEO-CAPE specifies infrared correlation radiometry to measure CO in two spectral regions. CO measurements at 2.3 μm are uniformly sensitive throughout the troposphere, and 4.7 μm measurements are most sensitive to the free troposphere. In combination, the measurements yield information of this Criteria Pollutant near Earth's surface. The success of NASA’s Shuttle-based Measurement of Air Pollution from Satellites (MAPS) and Terra/MOPITT infrared gas correlation radiometers for CO measurements at 4.7 μm shifts the technology focus toward improving existing 2.3 μm CO measurement capability. GEO-CAPE uses this robust IRCR measurement technique at GEO, nearly 50 times farther away than the Terra/MOPITT orbit, to determine hourly changes in CO across a continental domain. We have structured the IRCR project around an analytical performance model to enable rapid evaluation of design specifics once the mission is defined. We present the architecture of the performance model, and the design of the simulator hardware and test plan which will populate the performance model.

  19. Radiometric inter-sensor cross-calibration uncertainty using a traceable high accuracy reference hyperspectral imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorroño, Javier; Banks, Andrew C.; Fox, Nigel P.; Underwood, Craig

    2017-08-01

    Optical earth observation (EO) satellite sensors generally suffer from drifts and biases relative to their pre-launch calibration, caused by launch and/or time in the space environment. This places a severe limitation on the fundamental reliability and accuracy that can be assigned to satellite derived information, and is particularly critical for long time base studies for climate change and enabling interoperability and Analysis Ready Data. The proposed TRUTHS (Traceable Radiometry Underpinning Terrestrial and Helio-Studies) mission is explicitly designed to address this issue through re-calibrating itself directly to a primary standard of the international system of units (SI) in-orbit and then through the extension of this SI-traceability to other sensors through in-flight cross-calibration using a selection of Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) recommended test sites. Where the characteristics of the sensor under test allows, this will result in a significant improvement in accuracy. This paper describes a set of tools, algorithms and methodologies that have been developed and used in order to estimate the radiometric uncertainty achievable for an indicative target sensor through in-flight cross-calibration using a well-calibrated hyperspectral SI-traceable reference sensor with observational characteristics such as TRUTHS. In this study, Multi-Spectral Imager (MSI) of Sentinel-2 and Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) is evaluated as an example, however the analysis is readily translatable to larger-footprint sensors such as Sentinel-3 Ocean and Land Colour Instrument (OLCI) and Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS). This study considers the criticality of the instrumental and observational characteristics on pixel level reflectance factors, within a defined spatial region of interest (ROI) within the target site. It quantifies the main uncertainty contributors in the spectral, spatial, and temporal domains. The resultant tool

  20. Conceptual radiometer design studies for Earth observations from low Earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Richard F.

    1994-01-01

    A conceptual radiometer design study was performed to determine the optimum design approach for spaceborne radiometers in low Earth orbit. Radiometric system configurations which included total power radiometers, unbalanced Dicke radiometers, and balanced Dicke, or as known as noise injection, radiometers were studied. Radiometer receiver configurations which were analyzed included the direct detection radiometer receiver, the double sideband homodyne radiometer receiver, and the single sideband heterodyne radiometer receiver. Radiometer system performance was also studied. This included radiometric sensitivity analysis of the three different radiometer system configurations studied. Both external and internal calibration techniques were analyzed. An accuracy analysis with and without mismatch losses was performed. It was determined that the balanced Dicke radiometer system configuration with direct detection receivers and external calibrations was optimum where frequent calibration such as once per minute were not feasible.

  1. Statistical downscaling of precipitation using local regression and high accuracy surface modeling method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Na; Yue, Tianxiang; Zhou, Xun; Zhao, Mingwei; Liu, Yu; Du, Zhengping; Zhang, Lili

    2017-07-01

    Downscaling precipitation is required in local scale climate impact studies. In this paper, a statistical downscaling scheme was presented with a combination of geographically weighted regression (GWR) model and a recently developed method, high accuracy surface modeling method (HASM). This proposed method was compared with another downscaling method using the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) database and ground-based data from 732 stations across China for the period 1976-2005. The residual which was produced by GWR was modified by comparing different interpolators including HASM, Kriging, inverse distance weighted method (IDW), and Spline. The spatial downscaling from 1° to 1-km grids for period 1976-2005 and future scenarios was achieved by using the proposed downscaling method. The prediction accuracy was assessed at two separate validation sites throughout China and Jiangxi Province on both annual and seasonal scales, with the root mean square error (RMSE), mean relative error (MRE), and mean absolute error (MAE). The results indicate that the developed model in this study outperforms the method that builds transfer function using the gauge values. There is a large improvement in the results when using a residual correction with meteorological station observations. In comparison with other three classical interpolators, HASM shows better performance in modifying the residual produced by local regression method. The success of the developed technique lies in the effective use of the datasets and the modification process of the residual by using HASM. The results from the future climate scenarios show that precipitation exhibits overall increasing trend from T1 (2011-2040) to T2 (2041-2070) and T2 to T3 (2071-2100) in RCP2.6, RCP4.5, and RCP8.5 emission scenarios. The most significant increase occurs in RCP8.5 from T2 to T3, while the lowest increase is found in RCP2.6 from T2 to T3, increased by 47.11 and 2.12 mm, respectively.

  2. Integrative fitting of absorption line profiles with high accuracy, robustness, and speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrotzki, Julian; Habig, Jan Christoph; Ebert, Volker

    2014-08-01

    The principle of the integrative evaluation of absorption line profiles relies on the numeric integration of absorption line signals to retrieve absorber concentrations, e.g., of trace gases. Thus, it is a fast and robust technique. However, previous implementations of the integrative evaluation principle showed shortcomings in terms of accuracy and the lack of a fit quality indicator. This has motivated the development of an advanced integrative (AI) fitting algorithm. The AI fitting algorithm retains the advantages of previous integrative implementations—robustness and speed—and is able to achieve high accuracy by introduction of a novel iterative fitting process. A comparison of the AI fitting algorithm with the widely used Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) fitting algorithm indicates that the AI algorithm has advantages in terms of robustness due to its independence from appropriately chosen start values for the initialization of the fitting process. In addition, the AI fitting algorithm shows speed advantages typically resulting in a factor of three to four shorter computational times on a standard personal computer. The LM algorithm on the other hand retains advantages in terms of a much higher flexibility, as the AI fitting algorithm is restricted to the evaluation of single absorption lines with precomputed line width. Comparing both fitting algorithms for the specific application of in situ laser hygrometry at 1,370 nm using direct tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) suggests that the accuracy of the AI algorithm is equivalent to that of the LM algorithm. For example, a signal-to-noise ratio of 80 and better typically yields a deviation of TDLAS hygrometry at the aerosol and cloud chamber aerosol interactions and dynamics in the atmosphere (AIDA)—a unique large-scale facility to study atmospheric processes. The robustness of the AI fitting algorithm has been validated for typical AIDA conditions encompassing strong transmission fluctuations

  3. The research of digital circuit system for high accuracy CCD of portable Raman spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yu; Cui, Yongsheng; Zhang, Xiuda; Yan, Huimin

    2013-08-01

    The Raman spectrum technology is widely used for it can identify various types of molecular structure and material. The portable Raman spectrometer has become a hot direction of the spectrometer development nowadays for its convenience in handheld operation and real-time detection which is superior to traditional Raman spectrometer with heavy weight and bulky size. But there is still a gap for its measurement sensitivity between portable and traditional devices. However, portable Raman Spectrometer with Shell-Isolated Nanoparticle-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SHINERS) technology can enhance the Raman signal significantly by several orders of magnitude, giving consideration in both measurement sensitivity and mobility. This paper proposed a design and implementation of driver and digital circuit for high accuracy CCD sensor, which is core part of portable spectrometer. The main target of the whole design is to reduce the dark current generation rate and increase signal sensitivity during the long integration time, and in the weak signal environment. In this case, we use back-thinned CCD image sensor from Hamamatsu Corporation with high sensitivity, low noise and large dynamic range. In order to maximize this CCD sensor's performance and minimize the whole size of the device simultaneously to achieve the project indicators, we delicately designed a peripheral circuit for the CCD sensor. The design is mainly composed with multi-voltage circuit, sequential generation circuit, driving circuit and A/D transition parts. As the most important power supply circuit, the multi-voltage circuits with 12 independent voltages are designed with reference power supply IC and set to specified voltage value by the amplifier making up the low-pass filter, which allows the user to obtain a highly stable and accurate voltage with low noise. What's more, to make our design easy to debug, CPLD is selected to generate sequential signal. The A/D converter chip consists of a correlated

  4. Statistical downscaling of precipitation using local regression and high accuracy surface modeling method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Na; Yue, Tianxiang; Zhou, Xun; Zhao, Mingwei; Liu, Yu; Du, Zhengping; Zhang, Lili

    2016-03-01

    Downscaling precipitation is required in local scale climate impact studies. In this paper, a statistical downscaling scheme was presented with a combination of geographically weighted regression (GWR) model and a recently developed method, high accuracy surface modeling method (HASM). This proposed method was compared with another downscaling method using the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) database and ground-based data from 732 stations across China for the period 1976-2005. The residual which was produced by GWR was modified by comparing different interpolators including HASM, Kriging, inverse distance weighted method (IDW), and Spline. The spatial downscaling from 1° to 1-km grids for period 1976-2005 and future scenarios was achieved by using the proposed downscaling method. The prediction accuracy was assessed at two separate validation sites throughout China and Jiangxi Province on both annual and seasonal scales, with the root mean square error (RMSE), mean relative error (MRE), and mean absolute error (MAE). The results indicate that the developed model in this study outperforms the method that builds transfer function using the gauge values. There is a large improvement in the results when using a residual correction with meteorological station observations. In comparison with other three classical interpolators, HASM shows better performance in modifying the residual produced by local regression method. The success of the developed technique lies in the effective use of the datasets and the modification process of the residual by using HASM. The results from the future climate scenarios show that precipitation exhibits overall increasing trend from T1 (2011-2040) to T2 (2041-2070) and T2 to T3 (2071-2100) in RCP2.6, RCP4.5, and RCP8.5 emission scenarios. The most significant increase occurs in RCP8.5 from T2 to T3, while the lowest increase is found in RCP2.6 from T2 to T3, increased by 47.11 and 2.12 mm, respectively.

  5. High-accuracy real-time automatic thresholding for centroid tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Wang, Yanjie

    2006-01-01

    Many of the video image trackers today use the centroid as the tracking point. In engineering, a target's centroid is computed from a binary image to reduce the processing time. Hence thresholding of gray level image to binary image is a decisive step in centroid tracking. How to choose the feat thresholds in clutter is still an intractability problem unsolved today. This paper introduces a high-accuracy real-time automatic thresholding method for centroid tracker. It works well for variety types of target tracking in clutter. The core of this method is to get the entire information contained in the histogram, such as the number of the peaks, their height, position and other properties in the histogram. Combine with this histogram analysis; we can get several key pairs of peaks which can include the target and the background around it and use the method of Otsu to get intensity thresholds from them. According to the thresholds, we can gain the binary image and get the centroid from it. To track the target, the paper also suggests subjoining an eyeshot-window, just like our eyes focus on a target, we will not miss it unless it is out of our eyeshot, the impression will help us to extract the target in clutter and track it and we will wait its emergence since it has been covered. To obtain the impression, the paper offers a idea comes from the method of Snakes; it give a great help for us to get a glancing size, so that we can compare the size of the object in the current frame with the former. If the change is little, we consider the object has been tracked well. Otherwise, if the change is bigger than usual, we should analyze the inflection in the histogram to find out what happened to the object. In general, what we have to do is turning the analysis into codes for the tracker to determine a feat threshold. The paper will show the steps in detail. The paper also discusses the hardware architecture which can meet the speed requirement.

  6. Novel multi-beam radiometers for accurate ocean surveillance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappellin, C.; Pontoppidan, K.; Nielsen, P. H.

    2014-01-01

    Novel antenna architectures for real aperture multi-beam radiometers providing high resolution and high sensitivity for accurate sea surface temperature (SST) and ocean vector wind (OVW) measurements are investigated. On the basis of the radiometer requirements set for future SST/OVW missions...

  7. Measurement errors with low-cost citizen science radiometers

    OpenAIRE

    Bardají, Raúl; Piera, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    The KdUINO is a Do-It-Yourself buoy with low-cost radiometers that measure a parameter related to water transparency, the diffuse attenuation coefficient integrated into all the photosynthetically active radiation. In this contribution, we analyze the measurement errors of a novel low-cost multispectral radiometer that is used with the KdUINO. Peer Reviewed

  8. A novel L-band polarimetric radiometer featuring subharmonic sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotbøll, J.; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Skou, Niels

    2003-01-01

    A novel L-band radiometer trading analog components for digital circuits has been designed, built and operated. It is a fully polarimetric radiometer of the correlation type, and it is based on the subharmonic sampling principle in which the L-band signal is directly sampled by a fast A to D...

  9. The DC-8 Submillimeter-Wave Cloud Ice Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Steven J.; Batelaan, Paul; Siegel, Peter; Evans, K. Franklin; Evans, Aaron; Balachandra, Balu; Gannon, Jade; Guldalian, John; Raz, Guy; Shea, James

    2000-01-01

    An airborne radiometer is being developed to demonstrate the capability of radiometry at submillimeter-wavelengths to characterize cirrus clouds. At these wavelengths, cirrus clouds scatter upwelling radiation from water vapor in the lower troposphere. Radiometric measurements made at multiple widely spaced frequencies permit flux variations caused by changes in scattering due to crystal size to be distinguished from changes in cloud ice content. Measurements at dual polarizations can also be used to constrain the mean crystal shape. An airborne radiometer measuring the upwelling submillimeter-wave flux should then able to retrieve both bulk and microphysical cloud properties. The radiometer is being designed to make measurements at four frequencies (183 GHz, 325 GHz, 448 GHz, and 643 GHz) with dual-polarization capability at 643 GHz. The instrument is being developed for flight on NASA's DC-8 and will scan cross-track through an aircraft window. Measurements with this radiometer in combination with independent ground-based and airborne measurements will validate the submillimeter-wave radiometer retrieval techniques. The goal of this effort is to develop a technique to enable spaceborne characterization of cirrus, which will meet a key climate measurement need. The development of an airborne radiometer to validate cirrus retrieval techniques is a critical step toward development of spaced-based radiometers to investigate and monitor cirrus on a global scale. The radiometer development is a cooperative effort of the University of Colorado, Colorado State University, Swales Aerospace, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory and is funded by the NASA Instrument Incubator Program.

  10. Cryogenics bringing the temperature down, underground

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The first 600m of the LHC cryogenic distribution line (QRL), which will feed the accelerator's superconducting magnets, has passed initial validating tests of its mechanical design at room and cryogenic temperatures.

  11. Cryogenic engineering fifty years of progress

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Cryogenic Engineering: Fifty Years of Progress is a benchmark reference work which chronicles the major developments in the field. Starting with an historical background dating to the 1850s, this book reviews the development of data resources now available for cryogenic fields and properties of materials. The advances in cryogenic fundamentals are covered by reviews of cryogenic principles, cryogenic insulation, low-loss storage systems, modern liquefaction processes, helium cryogenics and low-temperature thermometry. Several well-established applications resulting from cryogenic advances include aerospace cryocoolers and refrigerators, use of LTS and HTS systems in electrical applications, and recent changes in cryopreservation. Extensive references are provided for the readers interested in the details of these cryogenic engineering advances.

  12. HIGH ACCURACY FINITE VOLUME ELEMENT METHOD FOR TWO-POINT BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEM OF SECOND ORDER ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王同科

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a high accuracy finite volume element method is presented for two-point boundary value problem of second order ordinary differential equation, which differs fromthe high order generalized difference methods. It is proved that the method has optimal order er-ror estimate O(h3) in H1 norm. Finally, two examples show that the method is effective.

  13. Etched track radiometers in radon measurements: a review

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolaev, V A

    1999-01-01

    Passive radon radiometers, based on alpha particle etched track detectors, are very attractive for the assessment of radon exposure. The present review considers various devices used for measurement of the volume activity of radon isotopes and their daughters and determination of equilibrium coefficients. Such devices can be classified into 8 groups: (i) open or 'bare' detectors, (ii) open chambers, (iii) sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn chambers with an inlet filter, (iv) advanced sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn radiometers, (v) multipurpose radiometers, (vi) radiometers based on a combination of etched track detectors and an electrostatic field, (vii) radiometers based on etched track detectors and activated charcoal and (viii) devices for the measurement of radon isotopes and/or radon daughters by means of track parameter measurements. Some of them such as the open detector and the chamber with an inlet filter have a variety of modifications and are applied widely both in geophysical research and radon dosimetric surveys. At the...

  14. Thermodynamic properties of cryogenic fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Leachman, Jacob; Lemmon, Eric; Penoncello, Steven

    2017-01-01

    This update to a classic reference text provides practising engineers and scientists with accurate thermophysical property data for cryogenic fluids. The equations for fifteen important cryogenic fluids are presented in a basic format, accompanied by pressure-enthalpy and temperature-entropy charts and tables of thermodynamic properties. It begins with a chapter introducing the thermodynamic relations and functional forms for equations of state, and goes on to describe the requirements for thermodynamic property formulations, needed for the complete definition of the thermodynamic properties of a fluid. The core of the book comprises extensive data tables and charts for the most commonly-encountered cryogenic fluids. This new edition sees significant updates to the data presented for air, argon, carbon monoxide, deuterium, ethane, helium, hydrogen, krypton, nitrogen and xenon. The book supports and complements NIST’s REFPROP - an interactive database and tool for the calculation of thermodynamic propertie...

  15. Cryogenic safety organisation at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    With Safety being a top priority of CERN’s general policy, the Organisation defines and implements a Policy that sets out the general principles governing Safety at CERN. To the end of the attainment of said Safety objectives, the organic units (owners/users of the equipment) are assigned the responsibility for the implementation of the CERN Safety Policy at all levels of the organization, whereas the Health and Safety and Environmental Protection Unit (HSE) has the role of providing assistance for the implementation of the Safety Policy, and a monitoring role related to the implementation of continuous improvement of Safety, compliance with the Safety Rules and the handling of emergency situations. This talk will elaborate on the roles, responsibilities and organisational structure of the different stakeholders within the Organization with regards to Safety, and in particular to cryogenic safety. The roles of actors of particular importance such as the Cryogenic Safety Officers (CSOs) and the Cryogenic Sa...

  16. Cryogenic needs for future tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katheder, H.

    The ITER tokamak is a machine using superconducting magnets. The windings of these magnets will be subjected to high heat loads resulting from a combination of nuclear energy absorption and AC-losses. It is estimated that about 100 kW at 4.5 K are needed. The total cooling mass flow rate will be around 10 - 15 kg/s. In addition to the large cryogenic power required for the superconducting magnets cryogenic power is also needed for refrigerated radiation shield, various cryopumps, fuel processing and test beds. A general description of the overall layout and the envisaged refrigerator cycle, necessary cold pumps and ancillary equipment is given. The basic cryogenic layout for the ITER tokakmak design, as developed during the conceptual design phase and a short overview about existing tokamak designs using superconducting magnets is given.

  17. Microwave integrated circuit radiometer front-ends for the Push Broom Microwave Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, R. F.; Hearn, C. P.

    1982-01-01

    Microwave integrated circuit front-ends for the L-band, S-band and C-band stepped frequency null-balanced noise-injection Dicke-switched radiometer to be installed in the NASA Langley airborne prototype Push Broom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR) are described. These front-ends were developed for the fixed frequency of 1.413 GHz and the variable frequencies of 1.8-2.8 GHz and 3.8-5.8 GHz. Measurements of the noise temperature of these units were made at 55.8 C, and the results of these tests are given. While the overall performance was reasonable, improvements need to be made in circuit losses and noise temperatures, which in the case of the C-band were from 1000 to 1850 K instead of the 500 K specified. Further development of the prototypes is underway to improve performance and extend the frequency range.

  18. Ozone height profiles using laser heterodyne radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, S. L.

    1994-01-01

    The monitoring of vertical profiles of ozone and related minor constituents in the atmosphere are of great significance to understanding the complex interaction between atmospheric dynamics, chemistry and radiation budget. An ultra high spectral resolution tunable CO2 laser heterodyne radiometer has been designed, developed and set up at the National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi to obtain vertical profiles of various minor constituents the characteristic absorption lines in 9 to 11 micron spectral range. Due to its high spectral resolution the lines can be resolved completely and data obtained are inverted to get vertical profiles using an inversion technique developed by the author. In the present communication the salient features of the laser heterodyne system and the results obtained are discussed in detail.

  19. Magnetic bearings for cryogenic turbomachines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannello, Victor; Sixsmith, Herbert

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic bearings offer a number of advantages over gas bearings for the support of rotors in cryogenic turboexpanders and compressors. Their performance is relatively independent of the temperature or pressure of the process gas for a large range of conditions. Active magnetic bearing systems that use capacitive sensors have been developed for high speed compressors for use in cryogenic refrigerators. Here, the development of a magnetic bearing system for a miniature ultra high speed compressor is discussed. The magnetic bearing has demonstrated stability at rotational speeds exceeding 250,000 rpm. This paper describes the important features of the magnetic bearing and presents test results demonstrating its performance characteristics.

  20. A method to measure internal stray radiation of cryogenic infrared imaging systems under various ambient temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qijie; Chang, Songtao; Li, Zhou; He, Fengyun; Qiao, Yanfeng

    2017-03-01

    The suppression level of internal stray radiation is a key criterion for infrared imaging systems, especially for high-precision cryogenic infrared imaging systems. To achieve accurate measurement for internal stray radiation of cryogenic infrared imaging systems under various ambient temperatures, a measurement method, which is based on radiometric calibration, is presented in this paper. First of all, the calibration formula is deduced considering the integration time, and the effect of ambient temperature on internal stray radiation is further analyzed in detail. Then, an approach is proposed to measure the internal stray radiation of cryogenic infrared imaging systems under various ambient temperatures. By calibrating the system under two ambient temperatures, the quantitative relation between the internal stray radiation and the ambient temperature can be acquired, and then the internal stray radiation of the cryogenic infrared imaging system under various ambient temperatures can be calculated. Finally, several experiments are performed in a chamber with controllable inside temperatures to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method can be used to measure internal stray radiation with high accuracy at various ambient temperatures and integration times. The proposed method has some advantages, such as simple implementation and the capability of high-precision measurement. The measurement results can be used to guide the stray radiation suppression and to test whether the internal stray radiation suppression performance meets the requirement or not.

  1. Four absolute cavity radiometer (pyrheliometer) intercomparisons at New River, Arizona: radiometer standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estey, R.S.; Seaman, C.H.

    1981-07-01

    Four detailed intercomparisons were made for a number of models of cavity-type self-calibrating radiometers (pyrheliometers). Each intercomparison consisted of simultaneous readings of pyrheliometers at 30-second intervals in runs of 10 minutes, with at least 15 runs per intercomparison. Twenty-seven instruments were in at least one intercomparison, and five were in all four. Summarized results and all raw data are provided from the intercomparisons.

  2. Millimeter-Wave Airborne Interferometry for High-accuracy Topography Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, D.; Hensley, S.; Wu, X.; Rodriguez, E.

    2011-12-01

    sensor geometry, bandwidth and number of channels needed for SWOT cal/val cannot be met within the framework of GLISTIN-A or a similar interface to UAVSAR. To address SWOT's cal/val requirements, the Ka-band SWOT Phenomenology Airborne Radar (KaSPAR) builds upon GLISTIN-A heritage and is the primary payload of the AirSWOT program. KaSPAR is a unique system with multiple temporal and cross-track baselines to fully characterize the scattering and statistics expected from SWOT, provide data for developing classification algorithms, and understanding instrument performance over the vast variety of scenes that SWOT will encounter. Furthermore a >5km swath high-accuracy WSE mapping capability provides the framework to translate traditional point or profile measurements to the spatial framework that SWOT will measure. Specific measurements from the integrated AirSWOT assembly are 1) WSE maps over a 5km swath with <3cm mean error at 100m x 100m postings (for ocean surface at 6m/s wind speed), 2) 2-D slope maps derived from WSE maps and 3) shoreline delineation at 10m resolution. These measurements will be made at resolutions exceeding that of SWOT to better characterize corrections for the spaceborne sensor.

  3. Towards Building Reliable, High-Accuracy Solar Irradiance Database For Arid Climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munawwar, S.; Ghedira, H.

    2012-12-01

    based models and tools can subsequently be recalibrated or improvised to address the unique features of characteristically high aerosol load, frequent dust episodes and yet, typically clear skies, in the Gulf's primarily arid region. For example, though clouds are an important factor, radiative extinction in desert climates is primarily due to aerosols; a fact that needs to be taken into consideration since most of the existing solar radiation models are technically cloud-based. Satellite derived irradiance, although carrying a tag of uncertainties (5-10%), have special relevance in the Gulf due to lack of long-term data at the source of application. Satellite data can be merged or combined with short-term ground measurements, by various techniques available in the literature, to smooth out uncertainties in the data and build high-accuracy long-term solar irradiance profiles. Such concatenation is of particular interest to investors as it provides vital information on solar resource variability.

  4. Calibration of Correlation Radiometers Using Pseudo-Random Noise Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Pantoja

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The calibration of correlation radiometers, and particularly aperture synthesis interferometric radiometers, is a critical issue to ensure their performance. Current calibration techniques are based on the measurement of the cross-correlation of receivers’ outputs when injecting noise from a common noise source requiring a very stable distribution network. For large interferometric radiometers this centralized noise injection approach is very complex from the point of view of mass, volume and phase/amplitude equalization. Distributed noise injection techniques have been proposed as a feasible alternative, but are unable to correct for the so-called “baseline errors” associated with the particular pair of receivers forming the baseline. In this work it is proposed the use of centralized Pseudo-Random Noise (PRN signals to calibrate correlation radiometers. PRNs are sequences of symbols with a long repetition period that have a flat spectrum over a bandwidth which is determined by the symbol rate. Since their spectrum resembles that of thermal noise, they can be used to calibrate correlation radiometers. At the same time, since these sequences are deterministic, new calibration schemes can be envisaged, such as the correlation of each receiver’s output with a baseband local replica of the PRN sequence, as well as new distribution schemes of calibration signals. This work analyzes the general requirements and performance of using PRN sequences for the calibration of microwave correlation radiometers, and particularizes the study to a potential implementation in a large aperture synthesis radiometer using an optical distribution network.

  5. Cryogenic technology for tracking detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Granata, V; Watts, S; Borer, K; Janos, S; Pretzl, Klaus P; Dezillie, B; Li, Z; Casagrande, L; Collins, P; Grohmann, S; Heijne, Erik H M; Lourenço, C; Niinikoski, T O; Palmieri, V G; Sonderegger, P; Borchi, E; Bruzzi, Mara; Pirollo, S; Chapuy, S; Dimcovski, Zlatomir; Grigoriev, E; Bell, W; Devine, S R H; O'Shea, V; Ruggiero, G; Smith, K; Berglund, P; de Boer, Wim; Hauler, F; Heising, S; Jungermann, L; Abreu, M C; Rato-Mendes, P; Sousa, P; Cindro, V; Mikuz, M; Zavrtanik, M; Esposito, A P; Konorov, I; Paul, S; Buontempo, S; D'Ambrosio, D; Pagano, S; Eremin, V V; Verbitskaya, E

    2001-01-01

    A low-mass cryogenic cooling technique for silicon sensor modules has been developed in the framework of the RD39 Collaboration at CERN. A prototype low-mass beam tracker cryostat has been designed, constructed and tested for applications in fixed target experiments. We shall report here briefly the main features and results of the system. (2 refs).

  6. USAF Space Sensing Cryogenic Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    capacitance dilatometer for measuring thermal expansion and magnetostriction Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 095102 (2012) Compact radio-frequency resonator...enhancing when the refrigeration system is considered as part of an overall optimization problem. INTRODUCTION The use of cryogenics in space sensing

  7. LHC Cryogenics on the mend

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    On 29 September, repairs began on the LHC cryogenic distribution line, or QRL, to replace a faulty part that occurs in the hundreds of elements of the line that are already on-site. The Accelerator Technology Department is designing a work programme to finish the repairs as soon as possible and minimize delays to the rest of the LHC project.

  8. Champagne for the cryogenics teams

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Christmas has come early for the LHC as a complete sector of the cryogenic distribution line has been operating at 10 degrees Kelvin (-263°C) for the past two weeks, just a few degrees above the machine's nominal operating temperature.

  9. Background reduction in cryogenic detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Daniel A.; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    This paper discusses the background reduction and rejection strategy of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment. Recent measurements of background levels from CDMS II at Soudan are presented, along with estimates for future improvements in sensitivity expected for a proposed SuperCDMS experiment at SNOLAB.

  10. Survey of cryogenic semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talarico, L.J.; McKeever, J.W.

    1996-04-01

    Improved reliability and electronic performance can be achieved in a system operated at cryogenic temperatures because of the reduction in mechanical insult and in disruptive effects of thermal energy on electronic devices. Continuing discoveries of new superconductors with ever increasing values of T{sub c} above that of liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT) have provided incentive for developing semiconductor electronic systems that may also operate in the superconductor`s liquid nitrogen bath. Because of the interest in high-temperature superconductor (HTS) devices, liquid nitrogen is the cryogen of choice and LNT is the temperature on which this review is focused. The purpose of this survey is to locate and assemble published information comparing the room temperature (298 K), performance of commercially available conventional and hybrid semiconductor device with their performance at LNT (77K), to help establish their candidacy as cryogenic electronic devices specifically for use at LNT. The approach to gathering information for this survey included the following activities. Periodicals and proceedings were searched for information on the behavior of semiconductor devices at LNT. Telephone calls were made to representatives of semiconductor industries, to semiconductor subcontractors, to university faculty members prominent for their research in the area of cryogenic semiconductors, and to representatives of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and NASA subcontractors. The sources and contacts are listed with their responses in the introduction, and a list of references appears at the end of the survey.

  11. A Magnetically Coupled Cryogenic Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Walter; Jumper, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Historically, cryogenic pumps used for propellant loading at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and other NASA Centers have a bellows mechanical seal and oil bath ball bearings, both of which can be problematic and require high maintenance. Because of the extremely low temperatures, the mechanical seals are made of special materials and design, have wearing surfaces, are subject to improper installation, and commonly are a potential leak path. The ball bearings are non-precision bearings [ABEC-1 (Annular Bearing Engineering Council)] and are lubricated using LOX compatible oil. This oil is compatible with the propellant to prevent explosions, but does not have good lubricating properties. Due to the poor lubricity, it has been a goal of the KSC cryogenics community for the last 15 years to develop a magnetically coupled pump, which would eliminate these two potential issues. A number of projects have been attempted, but none of the pumps was a success. An off-the-shelf magnetically coupled pump (typically used with corrosive fluids) was procured that has been used for hypergolic service at KSC. The KSC Cryogenics Test Lab (CTL) operated the pump in cryogenic LN2 as received to determine a baseline for modifications required. The pump bushing, bearings, and thrust rings failed, and the pump would not flow liquid (this is a typical failure mode that was experienced in the previous attempts). Using the knowledge gained over the years designing and building cryogenic pumps, the CTL determined alternative materials that would be suitable for use under the pump design conditions. The CTL procured alternative materials for the bearings (bronze, aluminum bronze, and glass filled PTFE) and machined new bearing bushings, sleeves, and thrust rings. The designed clearances among the bushings, sleeves, thrust rings, case, and case cover were altered once again using experience gained from previous cryogenic pump rebuilds and designs. The alternative material parts were assembled into

  12. Status of the Sea & Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR) for the Sentinel 3 GMES Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppo, Peter; Cosi, Massimo; Engel, Wolfgang; Nieke, Jens; Smith, Dave; Bianchi, Stephane

    2010-10-01

    The Sea & Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR) is a high accuracy infrared radiometer selected as optical payload for the Sentinel 3 component of the GMES mission, to provide climatological data continuity respect to the previous ERS and ESA Envisat missions, that embarked respectively the ATSR, ATSR-2 and AATSR payloads. The instrument design follows the dual view concept of the ATSR series with some notable improvements. An increased swath width in both nadir and oblique views (1400 and 740 km) provides measurements at global coverage of Sea and Land Surface Temperature (SST/LST) with daily revisit times, which is useful for climate and meteorology (1 Km spatial resolution). Improved day-time cloud screening and other atmospheric products will be possible from the increased spatial resolution (0.5 Km) of the VIS and SWIR channels and additional SWIR channels at 1.375μm and 2.25μm. Two additional channels using dedicated detector and electronics elements are also included for high temperature events monitoring (1 km spatial resolution). The two Earth viewing swaths are generated using two telescopes and scan mirrors that are optically combined by means of a switching mirror at the entrance of a common Focal Plane Assembly. The eleven spectral channels (3 VIS, 3 SWIR, 2 MWIR, 3 TIR) are split within the FPA using a series of dichroics. The SWIR, MWIR and TIR optics/detectors are cooled down to 80 K with an active cryocooler, while the VIS detectors work at a stabilised uncooled temperature. The paper highlights the technical and programmatic status of the project, which is now in phase C.

  13. Calibration of electron cyclotron emission radiometer for KSTAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kogi, Y. [Fukuoka Institute of Technology, Fukuoka 811-0295 (Japan); Jeong, S. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, K. D.; Kwon, M. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Akaki, K.; Mase, A. [KASTEC, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Kuwahara, D. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Yoshinaga, T.; Nagayama, Y.; Kawahata, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    We developed and installed an electron cyclotron emission radiometer for taking measurements of Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) plasma. In order to precisely measure the absolute value of electron temperatures, a calibration measurement of the whole radiometer system was performed, which confirmed that the radiometer has an acceptably linear output signal for changes in input temperature. It was also found that the output power level predicted by a theoretical calculation agrees with that obtained by the calibration measurement. We also showed that the system displays acceptable noise-temperature performance around 0.23 eV.

  14. Calibration of electron cyclotron emission radiometer for KSTAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogi, Y; Jeong, S H; Lee, K D; Akaki, K; Mase, A; Kuwahara, D; Yoshinaga, T; Nagayama, Y; Kwon, M; Kawahata, K

    2010-10-01

    We developed and installed an electron cyclotron emission radiometer for taking measurements of Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) plasma. In order to precisely measure the absolute value of electron temperatures, a calibration measurement of the whole radiometer system was performed, which confirmed that the radiometer has an acceptably linear output signal for changes in input temperature. It was also found that the output power level predicted by a theoretical calculation agrees with that obtained by the calibration measurement. We also showed that the system displays acceptable noise-temperature performance around 0.23 eV.

  15. An airborne microwave radiometer and measurements of cloud liquid water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI Hengchi; JIN Dezhen; WEI Chong; SHEN Zhilai

    2003-01-01

    A single-channel (9.5 mm) airborne microwave radiometer with one antenna is developed. The retrieval methods and primary observation results of cloud liquid water and super-cooled cloud liquid water are discussed. The aircraft experiments show that the cloud liquid water and super-cooled liquid water can be sensitively monitored at some level of accuracy by the radiometer. The results of cloud liquid water content are reasonable and correspond well with the surface radar echo intensity. The design of the airborne radiometer and its retrieval methods are feasible, giving it application value.

  16. Aquarius L-Band Radiometers Calibration Using Cold Sky Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinnat, Emmanuel P.; Le Vine, David M.; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Brown, Shannon T.; Hong, Liang

    2015-01-01

    An important element in the calibration plan for the Aquarius radiometers is to look at the cold sky. This involves rotating the satellite 180 degrees from its nominal Earth viewing configuration to point the main beams at the celestial sky. At L-band, the cold sky provides a stable, well-characterized scene to be used as a calibration reference. This paper describes the cold sky calibration for Aquarius and how it is used as part of the absolute calibration. Cold sky observations helped establish the radiometer bias, by correcting for an error in the spillover lobe of the antenna pattern, and monitor the long-term radiometer drift.

  17. Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) Handbook With subsections for derivative instruments: Multifilter Radiometer (MFR) Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodges, Gary B [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States). Earth System Research Lab.; Michalsky, Joseph J [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States). Earth System Research Lab.

    2016-03-01

    The visible Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) is a passive instrument that measures global and diffuse components of solar irradiance at six narrowband channels and one open, or broadband, channel (Harrison et al. 1994). Direct irradiance is not a primary measurement, but is calculated using diffuse and global measurements. To collect one data record, the MFRSR takes measurements at four different shadowband positions. The first measurement is taken with the shadowband in the nadir (home) position. The next three measurements are, in order, the first side-band, sun-blocked, and second side-band. The side-band measurements are used to correct for the portion of the sky obscured by the shadowband. The nominal wavelengths of the narrowband channels are 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm. From such measurements, one may infer the atmosphere’s aerosol optical depth at each wavelength. In turn, these optical depths may be used to derive information about the column abundances of ozone and water vapor (Michalsky et al. 1995), as well as aerosol (Harrison and Michalsky 1994) and other atmospheric constituents.

  18. A High Accuracy Pedestrian Detection System Combining a Cascade AdaBoost Detector and Random Vector Functional-Link Net

    OpenAIRE

    Zhihui Wang; Sook Yoon; Shan Juan Xie; Yu Lu; Dong Sun Park

    2014-01-01

    In pedestrian detection methods, their high accuracy detection rates are always obtained at the cost of a large amount of false pedestrians. In order to overcome this problem, the authors propose an accurate pedestrian detection system based on two machine learning methods: cascade AdaBoost detector and random vector functional-link net. During the offline training phase, the parameters of a cascade AdaBoost detector and random vector functional-link net are trained by standard dataset. These...

  19. Next generation along track scanning radiometer - SLSTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frerick, J.; Nieke, J.; Mavrocordatos, C.; Berruti, B.; Donlon, C.; Cosi, M.; Engel, W.; Bianchi, S.; Smith, Dave

    2012-10-01

    Since 1991, along track scanning radiometers (A)ATSR have been flown on a series of satellite platforms. These instruments use an along-track scanning design that provides two views of the same earth target through different atmospheric paths. Dual-view multispectral measurements can be used to derive an accurate atmospheric correction when retrieving geophysical parameters such as Sea Surface Temperature (SST). In addition, the (A)ATSR family of instruments use actively cooled detector systems and two precision calibration blackbody targets to maintain and manage on-board calibration. Visible channel calibration is implemented using a solar diffuser viewed once per orbit. As a consequence of these design features, resulting data derived from (A)ATSR instruments is both accurate and well characterized. After 10 years of Service the ENVISAT platform was lost in early 2012 asnd AATSR operations stopped. The Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) Sentinel-3 "Sea Land Surface Temperature Radiometer" (SLSTR) instrument is the successor to the AATSR family of instruments and is expected to launch in April 2014. The challenge for SLSTR is to develop and deliver a new instrument with identical or improved performance to that of the (A)ATSR family. The SLSTR design builds on the heritage features of the (A)ATSR with important extensions to address GMES requirements. SLSTR maintains the main instrument principles (along-track scanning, a two point infrared on-board radiometric calibration, actively cooled detectors, solar diffuser). The design also includes more spectral channels including additional bands at 1.3 and 2.2 μm providing enhanced cloud detection, dedicated fire channels, an increase of dual view swath from 500 to 740 km, an increase in the nadir swath of 1400 km. The increase in swath has led to, a new optical front-end design incorporating two rotating scan mirrors (with encoders to provide pointing knowledge) and an innovative flip mechanism to

  20. Calibration plan for the sea and land surface temperature radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David L.; Nightingale, Tim J.; Mortimer, Hugh; Middleton, Kevin; Edeson, Ruben; Cox, Caroline V.; Mutlow, Chris T.; Maddison, Brian J.

    2013-10-01

    The Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR) to be flown on ESA's Sentinel-3 mission is a multichannel scanning radiometer that will continue the 21-year datasets of the Along Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) series. As its name implies, measurements from SLSTR will be used to retrieve global sea surface temperatures to an uncertainty of SLSTR instrument, infrared calibration sources and alignment equipment. The calibration rig has been commissioned and results of these tests will be presented. Finally the authors will present the planning for the on-orbit monitoring and calibration activities to ensure that calibration is maintained. These activities include vicarious calibration techniques that have been developed through previous missions, and the deployment of ship-borne radiometers.

  1. Submillimeter-Wave Radiometer Technology for Earth Remote Sensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, P.

    2000-01-01

    Recent innovations in ultra-high frequency, semiconductor device/component technology have enabled both traditional and new applications for space-borne millimeter- and submillimeter-wave heterodyne radiometer instruments.

  2. Wide-range logarithmic radiometer for measuring high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liston, E. M.

    1971-01-01

    Filter radiometer utilizing photomultiplier circuit, in which a direct-coupled amplifier varies dynode voltage to maintain constant anode current, measures rapid variations of temperature of white-hot charred body at 2000 K to 3000 K.

  3. Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) was successfully launched into sun-synchronous polar orbit aboard Terra, NASA's first Earth Observing System (EOS)...

  4. Sources of errors in the measurements of underwater profiling radiometer

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Silveira, N.; Suresh, T.; Talaulikar, M.; Desa, E.; Matondkar, S.G.P.; Lotlikar, A.

    There are various sources of errors from the measurements of optical parameters using a radiometer, which can be classified as mode of deployment, instrument and environment. The errors from the deployment are primarily from the ship...

  5. Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodges, GB; Michalsky, JJ

    2011-02-07

    The visible Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) is a passive instrument that measures global and diffuse components of solar irradiance at six narrowband channels and one open, or broadband, channel (Harrison et al. 1994). Direct irradiance is not a primary measurement, but is calculated using the diffuse and global measurements. To collect one data record, the MFRSR takes measurements at four different shadowband positions. The first measurement is taken with the shadowband in the nadir (home) position. The next three measurements are, in order, the first side-band, sun-blocked, and second side-band. The side-band measurements are used to correct for the portion of the sky obscured by the shadowband. The nominal wavelengths of the narrowband channels are 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm. From such measurements, one may infer the atmosphere's aerosol optical depth at each wavelength. In turn, these optical depths may be used to derive information about the column abundances of ozone and water vapor (Michalsky et al. 1995), as well as aerosol (Harrison and Michalsky 1994) and other atmospheric constituents.

  6. Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodges, GB; Michalsky, JJ

    2011-02-07

    The visible Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) is a passive instrument that measures global and diffuse components of solar irradiance at six narrowband channels and one open, or broadband, channel (Harrison et al. 1994). Direct irradiance is not a primary measurement, but is calculated using the diffuse and global measurements. To collect one data record, the MFRSR takes measurements at four different shadowband positions. The first measurement is taken with the shadowband in the nadir (home) position. The next three measurements are, in order, the first side-band, sun-blocked, and second side-band. The side-band measurements are used to correct for the portion of the sky obscured by the shadowband. The nominal wavelengths of the narrowband channels are 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm. From such measurements, one may infer the atmosphere's aerosol optical depth at each wavelength. In turn, these optical depths may be used to derive information about the column abundances of ozone and water vapor (Michalsky et al. 1995), as well as aerosol (Harrison and Michalsky 1994) and other atmospheric constituents.

  7. Cryogenics and the Human Exploration of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Louis J.; Kittel, Peter; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Current plans within NASA involve extending the human exploration of space from low earth orbit into the solar system, with the first human exploration of Mars presently planned in 2011. Integral to all hum Mars mission phases is cryogenic fluid management. Cryogenic fluids will be required both as propellant and for In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). Without safe and efficient cryogen storage human Mars missions will not be possible. Effective control and handling of cryogenic fluids is the key to affordable Mars missions, and advancing active thermal control technology is synergistic with all of NASA's exploration initiatives and with existing and future instrument cooling programs, including MTPE and Origins. Present mission scenarios for human exploration require cryogenic propellant storage for up to 1700 days and for up to 60 metric tons. These requirements represent increases of an order of magnitude over previous storage masses and lifetimes. The key cryogenic terminology areas to be addressed in human Mars missions are long-term propellant storage, cryogenic refrigeration, cryogenic liquefaction, and zero gravity fluid management. Long-term storage for the thermal control of cryogenic propellants is best accomplished with a mix of passive and active technologies. Passive technologies such as advanced multilayer insulation (MLI) concepts will be combined with the development of active coolers (cryogenic refrigerators). Candidates for long-life active cooling applications include Reverse Turbo-Brayton, Stirling, and Pulse-Tube coolers. The integration of passive and active technologies will form a hybrid system optimized to minimize the launch mass while preserving the cryogenic propellants. Since cryogenic propellants are the largest mass that Mars missions must launch from earth, even a modest reduction in the percentage of propellant carried results in a significant weight saving. This paper will present a brief overview of cryogenic fluid management

  8. A novel L-band polarimetric radiometer featuring subharmonic sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotbøll, J.; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Skou, Niels

    2003-01-01

    A novel L-band radiometer trading analog components for digital circuits has been designed, built and operated. It is a fully polarimetric radiometer of the correlation type, and it is based on the subharmonic sampling principle in which the L-band signal is directly sampled by a fast A to D...... converter at a frequency well below L-band. Overall stability has been a design driver, as the instrument is intended for airborne measurements of polarimetric sea signatures....

  9. L-Band Polarimetric Correlation Radiometer with Subharmonic Sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotbøll, Jesper; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Skou, Niels

    2001-01-01

    A novel L-band radiometer trading analog complexity for digital ditto has been designed and built. It is a fully polarimetric radiometer of the correlation type and it is based on the sub-harmonic sampling principle in which the L-band signal is directly sampled by a fast A to D converter...... at a frequency well below L-band. Stability has been a design driver, and the instrument is intended for airborne measurements of polarimetric sea signatures...

  10. Multibeam 1.4-GHz Pushbroom Microwave Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Roland W.; Bailey, Marion C.; Harrington, Richard F.; Hearn, Chase P.; Wells, John G., Jr.; Stanley, William L.

    1990-01-01

    Airborne prototype of multiple-beam pushbroom microwave radiometer (PBMR) developed to advance radiometric technology necessary for remote sensing of geophysical parameters. Instrument used in several joint Langley Research Center/United States Department of Agriculture soil-moisture flight experiments in Virginia, Texas, and California. Data from experiments used to modify, develop, and verify algorithms used to predict soil moisture from remote-sensing measurements. Image data useful in study of effects of characters of beams on radiometer imaging data.

  11. A cryogenic receiver for EPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narkowicz, R; Ogata, H; Reijerse, E; Suter, D

    2013-12-01

    Cryogenic probes have significantly increased the sensitivity of NMR. Here, we present a compact EPR receiver design capable of cryogenic operation. Compared to room temperature operation, it reduces the noise by a factor of ≈2.5. We discuss in detail the design and analyze the resulting noise performance. At low microwave power, the input noise density closely follows the emission of a cooled 50Ω resistor over the whole measurement range from 20K up to room temperature. To minimize the influence of the microwave source noise, we use high microwave efficiency (≈1.1-1.7mTW(-1/2)) planar microresonators. Their efficient conversion of microwave power to magnetic field permits EPR measurements with very low power levels, typically ranging from a few μW down to fractions of nW. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Joel

    2004-05-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) is an experiment to search for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). The experiment initially was deployed at a shallow underground site, and is currently deployed at a deep underground site at the Soudan Mine in Minnesota. The detectors operate at cryogenic temperature, and are capable of distinguishing nuclear recoils from WIMP interactions from various backgrounds. The detectors are shielded from background by both active and passive elements. We will describe the components of the overall experiment, and focus on the novel data acquisition system that has been develop to control and monitor the experiment via the World Wide Web. Preliminary signals from the operation at Soudan will be discussed.

  13. Cryogenic High-Sensitivity Magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Peter; Chui, Talso; Goodstein, David

    2005-01-01

    A proposed magnetometer for use in a cryogenic environment would be sensitive enough to measure a magnetic-flux density as small as a picogauss (10(exp -16) Tesla). In contrast, a typical conventional flux-gate magnetometer cannot measure a magnetic-flux density smaller that about 1 microgauss (10(exp -10) Tesla). One version of this device, for operation near the low end of the cryogenic temperature range, would include a piece of a paramagnetic material on a platform, the temperature of which would be controlled with a periodic variation. The variation in temperature would be measured by use of a conventional germanium resistance thermometer. A superconducting coil would be wound around the paramagnetic material and coupled to a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer.

  14. Cryogenic Flange and Seal Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    The assembly of flanges, seals, and pipes are used to carry cryogenic fluid from a storage tank to the vehicle at launch sites. However, after a certain amount of cycles these raised face flanges with glass-filled Teflon gaskets have been found to have torque relaxation and are as a result susceptible to cryogenic fluid leakage if not re-torqued. The intent of this project is to identify alternate combinations of flanges and seals which may improve thermal cycle performance and decrease re-torque requirements. The general approach is to design a test fixture to evaluate leak characteristics between spiral and concentric serrations and to test alternate flange and seal combinations. Due to insufficient time, it was not possible to evaluate these different types of combinations for the combination that improved thermal cycle performance the most. However, the necessary drawings for the test fixture were designed and assembled along with the collection of the necessary parts.

  15. The cryogenic storage ring project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Robert von; Blaum, Klaus; Becker, Arno; Fellenberger, Florian; George, Sebastian; Grieser, Manfred; Grussie, Florian; Herwig, Philipp; Krantz, Claude; Kreckel, Holger; Lange, Michael; Menk, Sebastian; Repnow, Roland; Vogel, Stephen; Wolf, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Spruck, Kaija [Justus-Liebig-Universitaet, Giessen (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    At MPIK the electrostatic cryogenic storage ring CSR is nearing completion. At beam energies of 20 to 300 keV per charge unit and 35 m circumference the CSR will allow experiments in a cryogenic environment providing conditions of extremely low vacuum and heat radiation. By using liquid helium at 2 K for cryopumping, the projected vacuum (confirmed at a prototype) lies at 1E-13 mbar or below, ensuring long storage times for slow singly charged and highly charged ions, molecules and clusters. Moreover, phase space cooling by electrons will be implemented. The internal quantum states of molecular and cluster ions can be cooled to low temperature, yielding well defined vibrational and for smaller systems also rotational structures. In the CSR construction, the cryogenic ion beam vacuum system has been set up. Extensive tests confirming the criteria on heat flow, alignment and high-voltage stability were successfully completed on the first quadrant. In addition beam diagnostic units for electric pickup signals and spatial profiles, detectors for neutral and charged fragments, the injection beam line, and an electron cooling device are under construction.

  16. ZERODUR TAILORED for cryogenic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedamzik, R.; Westerhoff, T.

    2014-07-01

    ZERODUR® glass ceramic from SCHOTT is known for its very low thermal expansion coefficient (CTE) at room temperature and its excellent CTE homogeneity. It is widely used for ground-based astronomical mirrors but also for satellite applications. Many reference application demonstrate the excellent and long lasting performance of ZERODUR® components in orbit. For space application a low CTE of the mirror material is required at cryogenic temperatures together with a good match of the thermal expansion to the supporting structure material. It is possible to optimize the coefficient of thermal expansion of ZERODUR® for cryogenic applications. This paper reports on measurements of thermal expansion of ZERODUR® down to cryogenic temperatures of 10 K performed by the PTB (Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstallt, Braunschweig, Germany, the national metrology laboratory). The ZERODUR® TAILORED CRYO presented in this paper has a very low coefficient of thermal expansion down to 70 K. The maximum absolute integrated thermal expansion down to 10 K is only about 20 ppm. Mirror blanks made from ZERODUR® TAILORED CRYO can be light weighted to almost 90% with our modern processing technologies. With ZERODUR® TAILORED CRYO, SCHOTT offers the mirror blank material for the next generation of space telescope applications.

  17. Positronium production in cryogenic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, B. S.; Alonso, A. M.; Deller, A.; Liszkay, L.; Cassidy, D. B.

    2016-03-01

    We report measurements of positronium (Ps) formation following positron irradiation of mesoporous SiO2 films and Ge(100) single crystals at temperatures ranging from 12-700 K. As both of these materials generate Ps atoms via nonthermal processes, they are able to function as positron-positronium converters at cryogenic temperatures. Our data show that such Ps formation is possibly provided the targets are not compromised by adsorption of residual gas. In the case of SiO2 films, we observe a strong reduction in the Ps formation efficiency following irradiation with UV laser light (λ =243.01 nm) below 250 K, in accordance with previous observations of radiation-induced surface paramagnetic centers. Conversely, Ps emission from Ge is enhanced by irradiation with visible laser light (λ =532 nm) via a photoemission process that persists at cryogenic temperatures. Both mesoporous SiO2 films and Ge crystals were found to produce Ps efficiently in cryogenic environments. Accordingly, these materials are likely to prove useful in several areas of research, including Ps mediated antihydrogen formation conducted in the cold bore of a superconducting magnet, the production of Rydberg Ps for experiments in which the effects of black-body radiation must be minimized, and the utilization of mesoporous structures that have been modified to produce cold Ps atoms.

  18. The evolution of cryogenic safety at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanek, R.; Kilmer, J.

    1992-12-01

    Over the past twenty-five years, Fermilab has been involved in cryogenic technology as it relates to pursuing experimentation in high energy physics. The Laboratory has instituted a strong cryogenic safety program and has maintained a very positive safety record. The solid commitment of management and the cryogenic community to incorporating safety into the system life cycle has led to policies that set requirements and help establish consistency for the purchase and installation of equipment and the safety analysis and documentation.

  19. High Reliability Cryogenic Piezoelectric Valve Actuator Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cryogenic fluid valves are subject to harsh exposure and actuators to drive these valves require robust performance and high reliability. DSM's piezoelectric...

  20. Cryogenic MEMS Technology for Sensing Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The development of cryogenic microwave components, such as focal plane polarization modulators, first requires an RF MEMS switching technology that operates...

  1. Real-time displacement measurement with large range and high accuracy using sinusoidal phase modulating laser diode interferometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guotian He; Xiangzhao Wang; Aijun Zeng; Feng Tang; Bingjie Huang

    2007-01-01

    To resolve the conflict of large measurement range and high accuracy in the existing real-time displacement measurement laser diode (LD) interferometers, a novel real-time displacement measurement LD interferometry is proposed and its measurement principle is analyzed. By use of a new phase demodulation algorithm and a new phase compensation lgorithm of real-time phase unwrapping, the measurement accuracy is improved, and the measurement range is enlarged to a few wavelengths. In experiments, the peak-to-peak amplitude of the speaker vibration was 2361.7 nm, and the repeatability was 2.56 nm. The measurement time was less than 26μs.

  2. Improved algorithm of ray tracing in ICF cryogenic targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Yang, Yongying; Ling, Tong; Jiang, Jiabin

    2016-10-01

    The high precision ray tracing inside inertial confinement fusion (ICF) cryogenic targets plays an important role in the reconstruction of the three-dimensional density distribution by algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) algorithm. The traditional Runge-Kutta methods, which is restricted by the precision of the grid division and the step size of ray tracing, cannot make an accurate calculation in the case of refractive index saltation. In this paper, we propose an improved algorithm of ray tracing based on the Runge-Kutta methods and Snell's law of refraction to achieve high tracing precision. On the boundary of refractive index, we apply Snell's law of refraction and contact point search algorithm to ensure accuracy of the simulation. Inside the cryogenic target, the combination of the Runge-Kutta methods and self-adaptive step algorithm are employed for computation. The original refractive index data, which is used to mesh the target, can be obtained by experimental measurement or priori refractive index distribution function. A finite differential method is performed to calculate the refractive index gradient of mesh nodes, and the distance weighted average interpolation methods is utilized to obtain refractive index and gradient of each point in space. In the simulation, we take ideal ICF target, Luneberg lens and Graded index rod as simulation model to calculate the spot diagram and wavefront map. Compared the simulation results to Zemax, it manifests that the improved algorithm of ray tracing based on the fourth-order Runge-Kutta methods and Snell's law of refraction exhibits high accuracy. The relative error of the spot diagram is 0.2%, and the peak-to-valley (PV) error and the root-mean-square (RMS) error of the wavefront map is less than λ/35 and λ/100, correspondingly.

  3. An Ultra-Wideband Cross-Correlation Radiometer for Mesoscopic Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toonen, Ryan; Haselby, Cyrus; Qin, Hua; Eriksson, Mark; Blick, Robert

    2007-03-01

    We have designed, built and tested a cross-correlation radiometer for detecting statistical order in the quantum fluctuations of mesoscopic experiments at sub-Kelvin temperatures. Our system utilizes a fully analog front-end--operating over the X- and Ku-bands (8 to 18 GHz)--for computing the cross-correlation function. Digital signal processing techniques are used to provide robustness against instrumentation drifts and offsets. The economized version of our instrument can measure, with sufficient correlation efficiency, noise signals having power levels as low as 10 fW. We show that, if desired, we can improve this performance by including cryogenic preamplifiers which boost the signal-to-noise ratio near the signal source. By adding a few extra components, we can measure both the real and imaginary parts of the cross-correlation function--improving the overall signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of sqrt[2]. We demonstrate the utility of our cross-correlator with noise power measurements from a quantum point contact.

  4. Cryogenic Operation Methodology and Cryogen Management at CERN over the last 15 Years

    CERN Document Server

    Delikaris, D; Claudet, S; Gayet, Ph; Passardi, Giorgio; Serio, L; Tavian, L

    2009-01-01

    CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research has progressively implemented and brought into operation an impressive number of cryogenic units (34). The paper will present the evolution of CERN’s cryogenic infrastructure and summarize results from cryogenic operation cumulating 590’000 running hours over the last fifteen years. The implemented methodology allowing reaching a high level of plant reliability will be described. CERN also becomes an intensive user of cryogens. Contracts for the delivery of 320 t of liquid helium and 70’000 t of liquid nitrogen have been adjudicated. The paper will describe the procurement strategy, the storage infrastructure and cryogen inventory.

  5. High-accuracy extrapolated ab initio thermochemistry. II. Minor improvements to the protocol and a vital simplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomble, Yannick J.; Vázquez, Juana; Kállay, Mihály; Michauk, Christine; Szalay, Péter G.; Császár, Attila G.; Gauss, Jürgen; Stanton, John F.

    2006-08-01

    The recently developed high-accuracy extrapolated ab initio thermochemistry method for theoretical thermochemistry, which is intimately related to other high-precision protocols such as the Weizmann-3 and focal-point approaches, is revisited. Some minor improvements in theoretical rigor are introduced which do not lead to any significant additional computational overhead, but are shown to have a negligible overall effect on the accuracy. In addition, the method is extended to completely treat electron correlation effects up to pentuple excitations. The use of an approximate treatment of quadruple and pentuple excitations is suggested; the former as a pragmatic approximation for standard cases and the latter when extremely high accuracy is required. For a test suite of molecules that have rather precisely known enthalpies of formation {as taken from the active thermochemical tables of Ruscic and co-workers [Lecture Notes in Computer Science, edited by M. Parashar (Springer, Berlin, 2002), Vol. 2536, pp. 25-38; J. Phys. Chem. A 108, 9979 (2004)]}, the largest deviations between theory and experiment are 0.52, -0.70, and 0.51kJmol-1 for the latter three methods, respectively. Some perspective is provided on this level of accuracy, and sources of remaining systematic deficiencies in the approaches are discussed.

  6. Adaptive switching frequency buck DC—DC converter with high-accuracy on-chip current sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinguang, Jiang; Fei, Huang; Zhihui, Xiong

    2015-05-01

    A current-mode PWM buck DC—DC converter is proposed. With the high-accuracy on-chip current sensor, the switching frequency can be selected automatically according to load requirements. This method improves efficiency and obtains an excellent transient response. The high accuracy of the current sensor is achieved by a simple switch technique without an amplifier. This has the direct benefit of reducing power dissipation and die size. Additionally, a novel soft-start circuit is presented to avoid the inrush current at the starting up state. Finally, this DC—DC converter is fabricated with the 0.5 μm standard CMOS process. The chip occupies 3.38 mm2. The accuracy of the proposed current sensor can achieve 99.5% @ 200 mA. Experimental results show that the peak efficiency is 91.8%. The input voltage ranges from 5 to 18 V, while a 2 A load current can be obtained. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 41274047), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province (No. BK2012639), the Science and Technology Enterprises in Jiangsu Province Technology Innovation Fund (No. BC2012121), and the Changzhou Science and Technology Support (Industrial) Project (No. CE20120074).

  7. Foam vessel for cryogenic fluid storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Jonathan D [San Francisco, CA

    2011-07-05

    Cryogenic storage and separator vessels made of polyolefin foams are disclosed, as are methods of storing and separating cryogenic fluids and fluid mixtures using these vessels. In one embodiment, the polyolefin foams may be cross-linked, closed-cell polyethylene foams with a density of from about 2 pounds per cubic foot to a density of about 4 pounds per cubic foot.

  8. Neutron Detection with Cryogenics and Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    bell, Z.W.; Carpenter, D.A.; Cristy, S.S.; Lamberti, V.E.

    2005-03-10

    The common methods of neutron detection are reviewed with special attention paid to the application of cryogenics and semiconductors to the problem. The authors' work with LiF- and boron-based cryogenic instruments is described as well as the use of CdTe and HgI{sub 2} for direct detection of neutrons.

  9. Low Mn alloy steel for cryogenic service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J.W. Jr.; Niikura, M.

    A ferritic cryogenic steel which has a relatively low (about 4 to 6%) manganese content and which has been made suitable for use at cryogenic temperatures by a thermal cycling treatment followed by a final tempering. The steel includes 4 to 6% manganese, 0.02 to 0.06% carbon, 0.1 to 0.4% molybdenum and 0 to 3% nickel.

  10. Continuous-Reading Cryogen Level Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, F. E.; Fox, E.; Macumber, S.

    1984-01-01

    Two pressure transducers used in system for measuring amount of cryogenic liquid in tank. System provides continuous measurements accurate within 0.03 percent. Sensors determine pressure in liquid and vapor in tank. Microprocessor uses pressure difference to compute mass of cryogenic liquid in tank. New system allows continuous sensing; unaffected by localized variations in composition and density as are capacitance-sensing schemes.

  11. Cryogenic fluid management program flight concept definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, Erich

    1987-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center's cryogenic fluid management program flight concept definition is presented in viewgraph form. Diagrams are given of the cryogenic fluid management subpallet and its configuration with the Delta launch vehicle. Information is given in outline form on feasibility studies, requirements definition, and flight experiments design.

  12. Residual contact restraints in cryogenics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretegny, J. F.; Demonicault, J. M.

    The use of residual stress measurements to evaluate the state of cryogenic turbomachines, whose surfaces are worn by the working conductions in dry contact, is addressed. Their contribution to the understanding of the reasons of possible ruptures is considered. It is stated that residual stress measurements should be used as a complementary tool rather than as input data for models. It is shown, thanks to two examples concerning the ball bearings and splines of the liquid hydrogen turbopump of the Vulcain engine, what can be expected from such techniques. Total exploitation of the results has still to be done, but preliminary results are quite encouraging.

  13. ISOCAM experiment cryogenic test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sa, L.; Collaudin, B.

    The thermal requirements for ISOCAM, an IR camera to be mounted aboard the ISO satellite, are reviewed, and model predictions are matched with test results. The degree of model validation suggested by analytical prediction vs test results is described. Predictions of thermal conduction through mounting screws, from ball bearings, and of the heat distribution in the rotor and stator of a cryogenic stepper motor correlate well with actual test results. It is shown that ISOCAM meets the thermal requirements necessary for successful on-orbit operation. The model predicted such phenomena as 'chopped' motor function and the twofold increase in temperature resulting from continuous motor operation.

  14. Radiometer effect in space missions to test the equivalence principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobili, A. M.; Bramanti, D.; Comandi, G.; Toncelli, R.; Polacco, E.; Catastini, G.

    2001-05-01

    Experiments to test the equivalence principle in space by testing the universality of free fall in the gravitational field of the Earth have to take into account the radiometer effect, caused by temperature differences in the residual gas inside the spacecraft as it is exposed to the infrared radiation from Earth itself. We report the results of our evaluation of this effect for the three proposed experiments currently under investigation by space agencies: μSCOPE, STEP, and GG. It is found that in μSCOPE, which operates at room temperature, and even in STEP, where the effect is greatly reduced by means of very low temperatures, the radiometer effect is a serious limitation to the achievable sensitivity. Instead, by axially spinning the whole spacecraft and with an appropriate choice of the sensitivity axes-as proposed in GG-the radiometer effect averages out and becomes unimportant even at room temperature.

  15. An angle encoder for super-high resolution and super-high accuracy using SelfA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tsukasa; Kon, Masahito; Nabeshima, Nobuo; Taniguchi, Kayoko

    2014-06-01

    Angular measurement technology at high resolution for applications such as in hard disk drive manufacturing machines, precision measurement equipment and aspherical process machines requires a rotary encoder with high accuracy, high resolution and high response speed. However, a rotary encoder has angular deviation factors during operation due to scale error or installation error. It has been assumed to be impossible to achieve accuracy below 0.1″ in angular measurement or control after the installation onto the rotating axis. Self-calibration (Lu and Trumper 2007 CIRP Ann. 56 499; Kim et al 2011 Proc. MacroScale; Probst 2008 Meas. Sci. Technol. 19 015101; Probst et al Meas. Sci. Technol. 9 1059; Tadashi and Makoto 1993 J. Robot. Mechatronics 5 448; Ralf et al 2006 Meas. Sci. Technol. 17 2811) and cross-calibration (Probst et al 1998 Meas. Sci. Technol. 9 1059; Just et al 2009 Precis. Eng. 33 530; Burnashev 2013 Quantum Electron. 43 130) technologies for a rotary encoder have been actively discussed on the basis of the principle of circular closure. This discussion prompted the development of rotary tables which achieve reliable and high accuracy angular verification. We apply these technologies for the development of a rotary encoder not only to meet the requirement of super-high accuracy but also to meet that of super-high resolution. This paper presents the development of an encoder with 221 = 2097 152 resolutions per rotation (360°), that is, corresponding to a 0.62″ signal period, achieved by the combination of a laser rotary encoder supplied by Magnescale Co., Ltd and a self-calibratable encoder (SelfA) supplied by The National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science & Technology (AIST). In addition, this paper introduces the development of a rotary encoder to guarantee ±0.03″ accuracy at any point of the interpolated signal, with respect to the encoder at the minimum resolution of 233, that is, corresponding to a 0.0015″ signal period after

  16. ESTAR - A synthetic aperture microwave radiometer for measuring soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vine, D. M.; Griffis, A.; Swift, C. T.; Jackson, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    The measurement of soil moisture from space requires putting relatively large microwave antennas in orbit. Aperture synthesis, an interferometric technique for reducing the antenna aperture needed in space, offers the potential for a practical means of meeting these requirements. An aircraft prototype, electronically steered thinned array L-band radiometer (ESTAR), has been built to develop this concept and to demonstrate its suitability for the measurement of soil moisture. Recent flights over the Walnut Gulch Watershed in Arizona show good agreement with ground truth and with measurements with the Pushbroom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR).

  17. Cloud Absorption Radiometer Autonomous Navigation System - CANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, Duncan; Gatebe, Charles; McCune, Bill; Hellwig, Dustan

    2013-01-01

    CAR (cloud absorption radiometer) acquires spatial reference data from host aircraft navigation systems. This poses various problems during CAR data reduction, including navigation data format, accuracy of position data, accuracy of airframe inertial data, and navigation data rate. Incorporating its own navigation system, which included GPS (Global Positioning System), roll axis inertia and rates, and three axis acceleration, CANS expedites data reduction and increases the accuracy of the CAR end data product. CANS provides a self-contained navigation system for the CAR, using inertial reference and GPS positional information. The intent of the software application was to correct the sensor with respect to aircraft roll in real time based upon inputs from a precision navigation sensor. In addition, the navigation information (including GPS position), attitude data, and sensor position details are all streamed to a remote system for recording and later analysis. CANS comprises a commercially available inertial navigation system with integral GPS capability (Attitude Heading Reference System AHRS) integrated into the CAR support structure and data system. The unit is attached to the bottom of the tripod support structure. The related GPS antenna is located on the P-3 radome immediately above the CAR. The AHRS unit provides a RS-232 data stream containing global position and inertial attitude and velocity data to the CAR, which is recorded concurrently with the CAR data. This independence from aircraft navigation input provides for position and inertial state data that accounts for very small changes in aircraft attitude and position, sensed at the CAR location as opposed to aircraft state sensors typically installed close to the aircraft center of gravity. More accurate positional data enables quicker CAR data reduction with better resolution. The CANS software operates in two modes: initialization/calibration and operational. In the initialization/calibration mode

  18. The cryogenic storage ring CSR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hahn, R; Becker, A; Berg, F; Blaum, K; Breitenfeldt, C; Fadil, H; Fellenberger, F; Froese, M; George, S; Göck, J; Grieser, M; Grussie, F; Guerin, E A; Heber, O; Herwig, P; Karthein, J; Krantz, C; Kreckel, H; Lange, M; Laux, F; Lohmann, S; Menk, S; Meyer, C; Mishra, P M; Novotný, O; O'Connor, A P; Orlov, D A; Rappaport, M L; Repnow, R; Saurabh, S; Schippers, S; Schröter, C D; Schwalm, D; Schweikhard, L; Sieber, T; Shornikov, A; Spruck, K; Sunil Kumar, S; Ullrich, J; Urbain, X; Vogel, S; Wilhelm, P; Wolf, A; Zajfman, D

    2016-06-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm(-3) is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10(-14) mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  19. Cryogenics for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Tavian, L; Claudet, S; Ferlin, G; Wagner, U; van Weelderen, R

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of a Higgs boson at CERN in 2012 is the start of a major program of work to measure this particle's properties with the highest possible precision for testing the validity of the Standard Model and to search for further new physics at the energy frontier. The LHC is in a unique position to pursue this program. Europe's top priority is the exploitation of the full potential of the LHC, including the high-luminosity upgrade of the machine and detectors with an objective to collect ten times more data than in the initial design, by around 2030. To reach this objective, the LHC cryogenic system must be upgraded to withstand higher beam current and higher luminosity at top energy while keeping the same operation availability by improving the collimation system and the protection of electronics sensitive to radiation. This chapter will present the conceptual design of the cryogenic system upgrade with recent updates in performance requirements, the corresponding layout and architecture of the system a...

  20. The cryogenic storage ring CSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hahn, R.; Becker, A.; Berg, F.; Blaum, K.; Breitenfeldt, C.; Fadil, H.; Fellenberger, F.; Froese, M.; George, S.; Göck, J.; Grieser, M.; Grussie, F.; Guerin, E. A.; Heber, O.; Herwig, P.; Karthein, J.; Krantz, C.; Kreckel, H.; Lange, M.; Laux, F.; Lohmann, S.; Menk, S.; Meyer, C.; Mishra, P. M.; Novotný, O.; O'Connor, A. P.; Orlov, D. A.; Rappaport, M. L.; Repnow, R.; Saurabh, S.; Schippers, S.; Schröter, C. D.; Schwalm, D.; Schweikhard, L.; Sieber, T.; Shornikov, A.; Spruck, K.; Sunil Kumar, S.; Ullrich, J.; Urbain, X.; Vogel, S.; Wilhelm, P.; Wolf, A.; Zajfman, D.

    2016-06-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm-3 is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10-14 mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  1. Simulations of Cavitating Cryogenic Inducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorney, Dan (Technical Monitor); Hosangadi, Ashvin; Ahuja, Vineet; Ungewitter, Ronald J.

    2004-01-01

    Simulations of cavitating turbopump inducers at their design flow rate are presented. Results over a broad range of Nss, numbers extending from single-phase flow conditions through the critical head break down point are discussed. The flow characteristics and performance of a subscale geometry designed for water testing are compared with the fullscale configuration that employs LOX. In particular, thermal depression effects arising from cavitation in cryogenic fluids are identified and their impact on the suction performance of the inducer quantified. The simulations have been performed using the CRUNCH CFD[R] code that has a generalized multi-element unstructured framework suitable for turbomachinery applications. An advanced multi-phase formulation for cryogenic fluids that models temperature depression and real fluid property variations is employed. The formulation has been extensively validated for both liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen by simulating the experiments of Hord on hydrofoils; excellent estimates of the leading edge temperature and pressure depression were obtained while the comparisons in the cavity closure region were reasonable.

  2. High accuracy microwave frequency measurement based on single-drive dual-parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Ying; Pang, Xiaodan; Deng, Lei

    2011-01-01

    A novel approach for broadband microwave frequency measurement by employing a single-drive dual-parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Based on bias manipulations of the modulator, conventional frequency-to-power mapping technique is developed by performing a...... 10−3 relative error. This high accuracy frequency measurement technique is a promising candidate for high-speed electronic warfare and defense applications.......A novel approach for broadband microwave frequency measurement by employing a single-drive dual-parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Based on bias manipulations of the modulator, conventional frequency-to-power mapping technique is developed by performing...... a two-stage frequency measurement cooperating with digital signal processing. In the experiment, 10GHz measurement range is guaranteed and the average uncertainty of estimated microwave frequency is 5.4MHz, which verifies the measurement accuracy is significantly improved by achieving an unprecedented...

  3. Swing arm profilometer: high accuracy testing for large reaction-bonded silicon carbide optics with a capacitive probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ling; Luo, Xiao; Hu, Hai-xiang; Zhang, Zhi-yu; Zhang, Feng; Zheng, Li-gong; Zhang, Xue-jun

    2017-08-01

    A feasible way to improve the manufacturing efficiency of large reaction-bonded silicon carbide optics is to increase the processing accuracy in the ground stage before polishing, which requires high accuracy metrology. A swing arm profilometer (SAP) has been used to measure large optics during the ground stage. A method has been developed for improving the measurement accuracy of SAP using a capacitive probe and implementing calibrations. The experimental result compared with the interferometer test shows the accuracy of 0.068 μm in root-mean-square (RMS) and maps in 37 low-order Zernike terms show accuracy of 0.048 μm RMS, which shows a powerful capability to provide a major input in high-precision grinding.

  4. Static Calibration and Analysis of the Velodyne HDL-64E S2 for High Accuracy Mobile Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Glennie

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The static calibration and analysis of the Velodyne HDL-64E S2 scanning LiDAR system is presented and analyzed. The mathematical model for measurements for the HDL-64E S2 scanner is derived and discussed. A planar feature based least squares adjustment approach is presented and utilized in a minimally constrained network in order to derive an optimal solution for the laser’s internal calibration parameters. Finally, the results of the adjustment along with a detailed examination of the adjustment residuals are given. A three-fold improvement in the planar misclosure residual RMSE over the standard factory calibration model was achieved by the proposed calibration. Results also suggest that there may still be some unmodelled distortions in the range measurements from the scanner. However, despite this, the overall precision of the adjusted laser scanner data appears to make it a viable choice for high accuracy mobile scanning applications.

  5. High-accuracy CFD prediction methods for fluid and structure temperature fluctuations at T-junction for thermal fatigue evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Shaoxiang, E-mail: qian.shaoxiang@jgc.com [EN Technology Center, Process Technology Division, JGC Corporation, 2-3-1 Minato Mirai, Nishi-ku, Yokohama 220-6001 (Japan); Kanamaru, Shinichiro [EN Technology Center, Process Technology Division, JGC Corporation, 2-3-1 Minato Mirai, Nishi-ku, Yokohama 220-6001 (Japan); Kasahara, Naoto [Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Numerical methods for accurate prediction of thermal loading were proposed. • Predicted fluid temperature fluctuation (FTF) intensity is close to the experiment. • Predicted structure temperature fluctuation (STF) range is close to the experiment. • Predicted peak frequencies of FTF and STF also agree well with the experiment. • CFD results show the proposed numerical methods are of sufficiently high accuracy. - Abstract: Temperature fluctuations generated by the mixing of hot and cold fluids at a T-junction, which is widely used in nuclear power and process plants, can cause thermal fatigue failure. The conventional methods for evaluating thermal fatigue tend to provide insufficient accuracy, because they were developed based on limited experimental data and a simplified one-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA). CFD/FEA coupling analysis is expected as a useful tool for the more accurate evaluation of thermal fatigue. The present paper aims to verify the accuracy of proposed numerical methods of simulating fluid and structure temperature fluctuations at a T-junction for thermal fatigue evaluation. The dynamic Smagorinsky model (DSM) is used for large eddy simulation (LES) sub-grid scale (SGS) turbulence model, and a hybrid scheme (HS) is adopted for the calculation of convective terms in the governing equations. Also, heat transfer between fluid and structure is calculated directly through thermal conduction by creating a mesh with near wall resolution (NWR) by allocating grid points within the thermal boundary sub-layer. The simulation results show that the distribution of fluid temperature fluctuation intensity and the range of structure temperature fluctuation are remarkably close to the experimental results. Moreover, the peak frequencies of power spectrum density (PSD) of both fluid and structure temperature fluctuations also agree well with the experimental results. Therefore, the numerical methods used in the present paper are

  6. The use of low density high accuracy (LDHA) data for correction of high density low accuracy (HDLA) point cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rak, Michal Bartosz; Wozniak, Adam; Mayer, J. R. R.

    2016-06-01

    Coordinate measuring techniques rely on computer processing of coordinate values of points gathered from physical surfaces using contact or non-contact methods. Contact measurements are characterized by low density and high accuracy. On the other hand optical methods gather high density data of the whole object in a short time but with accuracy at least one order of magnitude lower than for contact measurements. Thus the drawback of contact methods is low density of data, while for non-contact methods it is low accuracy. In this paper a method for fusion of data from two measurements of fundamentally different nature: high density low accuracy (HDLA) and low density high accuracy (LDHA) is presented to overcome the limitations of both measuring methods. In the proposed method the concept of virtual markers is used to find a representation of pairs of corresponding characteristic points in both sets of data. In each pair the coordinates of the point from contact measurements is treated as a reference for the corresponding point from non-contact measurement. Transformation enabling displacement of characteristic points from optical measurement to their match from contact measurements is determined and applied to the whole point cloud. The efficiency of the proposed algorithm was evaluated by comparison with data from a coordinate measuring machine (CMM). Three surfaces were used for this evaluation: plane, turbine blade and engine cover. For the planar surface the achieved improvement was of around 200 μm. Similar results were obtained for the turbine blade but for the engine cover the improvement was smaller. For both freeform surfaces the improvement was higher for raw data than for data after creation of mesh of triangles.

  7. Novel Low-Impact Integration of a Microwave Radiometer into Cloud Radar System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The radiometer channel will have significant filtering to reduce the contamination of the radar signal into the radiometer channels.The successful isolation between...

  8. Science Results From The ARCADE Open-Aperture Cryogenic Balloon Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, Alan; Fixsen, D. J.; Levin, S. M.; Limon; Lubin, P. M.; Mirel, P.; Seiffert; Villela, Thyrso; Wollack, E.; Wuensche, C. A.

    The Absolute Radiometer for Cosmology, Astrophysics, and Diffuse Emission (ARCADE) is a balloon-borne instrument to measure the frequency spectrum of the cosmic microwave back-ground and diffuse Galactic foregrounds at centimeter wavelengths. ARCADE greatly reduces measurement uncertainties compared to previous balloon-borne or ground-based instrument using a double-nulled design that features fully cryogenic optics with no windows between the atmosphere and the 2.7 K instrument. A four-hour flight in 2006 achieved sensitivity com-parable to the COBE/FIRAS satellite measurement while providing new insights for emission ranging from spinning dust in the interstellar medium to an unexpectedly bright extragalactic radio background. I will discuss scientific results from the ARCADE program and implications of the ARCADE cold optics for millimeter and sub-mm astronomy.

  9. Design and Calibration of a Cryogenic Blackbody Calibrator at Centimeter Wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Kogut, A J; Fixsen, D J; Limon, M; Mirel, P G A; Levin, S; Seiffert, M; Lubin, P M

    2004-01-01

    We describe the design and calibration of an external cryogenic blackbody calibrator used for the first two flights of the Absolute Radiometer for Cosmology, Astrophysics, and Diffuse Emission (ARCADE) instrument. The calibrator consists of a microwave absorber weakly coupled to a superfluid liquid helium bath. Half-wave corrugations viewed 30 deg off axis reduce the return loss below -35 dB. Ruthenium oxide resistive thermometers embedded within the absorber monitor the temperature across the face of the calibrator. The thermal calibration transfers the calibration of a reference thermometer to the flight thermometers using the flight thermometer readout system. Data taken near the superfluid transition in 8 independent calibrations 4 years apart agree within 0.3 mK, providing an independent verification of the thermometer calibration at temperatures near that of the cosmic microwave background.

  10. Aerosol optical depth determination in the UV using a four-channel precision filter radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlund, Thomas; Kouremeti, Natalia; Kazadzis, Stelios; Gröbner, Julian

    2017-03-01

    The determination of aerosol properties, especially the aerosol optical depth (AOD) in the ultraviolet (UV) wavelength region, is of great importance for understanding the climatological variability of UV radiation. However, operational retrievals of AOD at the biologically most harmful wavelengths in the UVB are currently only made at very few places. This paper reports on the UVPFR (UV precision filter radiometer) sunphotometer, a stable and robust instrument that can be used for AOD retrievals at four UV wavelengths. Instrument characteristics and results of Langley calibrations at a high-altitude site were presented. It was shown that due to the relatively wide spectral response functions of the UVPFR, the calibration constants (V0) derived from Langley plot calibrations underestimate the true extraterrestrial signals. Accordingly, correction factors were introduced. In addition, the instrument's spectral response functions also result in an apparent air-mass-dependent decrease in ozone optical depth used in the AOD determinations. An adjusted formula for the calculation of AOD, with a correction term dependent on total column ozone amount and ozone air mass, was therefore introduced. Langley calibrations performed 13-14 months apart resulted in sensitivity changes of ≤ 1.1 %, indicating good instrument stability. Comparison with a high-accuracy standard precision filter radiometer, measuring AOD at 368-862 nm wavelengths, showed consistent results. Also, very good agreement was achieved by comparing the UVPFR with AOD at UVB wavelengths derived with a Brewer spectrophotometer, which was calibrated against the UVPFR at an earlier date. Mainly due to non-instrumental uncertainties connected with ozone optical depth, the total uncertainty of AOD in the UVB is higher than that reported from AOD instruments measuring in UVA and visible ranges. However, the precision can be high among instruments using harmonized algorithms for ozone and Rayleigh optical depth as

  11. Calibration of the solar UV radiometers in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leszczynski, K.; Jokela, K.; Visuri, R.; Ylianttila, L. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland). Non-Ionizing Radiation Lab.

    1996-12-31

    In this report, the main emphasis is given to (1) the problems associated with the basic calibration of the spectroradiometer and (2) the year-to-year variability of the calibrations of the solar UV network radiometers. Also, the results from intercomparisons of the Brewer and OL 742 spectroradiometers are included

  12. Calibration of Hurricane Imaging Radiometer C-Band Receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Sayak K.; Cecil, Daniel J.; James, Mark W.

    2017-01-01

    The laboratory calibration of airborne Hurricane Imaging Radiometer's C-Band multi-frequency receivers is described here. The method used to obtain the values of receiver frontend loss, internal cold load brightness temperature and injected noise diode temperature is presented along with the expected RMS uncertainty in the final calibration.

  13. Landmine detection with an imaging 94-GHz radiometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, J.S.; Dekker, R.J.; Ewijk, L.J.

    1996-01-01

    We analyzed a time series of 94 GHz radiometer images of a sandbox with buried and unburied, metal and plastic AP and AT dummy mines. The images covered almost a complete 24 hour cycle, with both clear sky and rain conditions occurring. The AP nor the buried mines were visible at any time. The contr

  14. Microwave Radiometer – 3 Channel (MWR3C) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadeddu, MP

    2012-05-04

    The microwave radiometer 3-channel (MWR3C) provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from three channels centered at 23.834, 30, and 89 GHz. These three channels are sensitive to the presence of liquid water and precipitable water vapor.

  15. Dense Focal Plane Arrays for Pushbroom Satellite Radiometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iupikov, O. A.; Ivashina, M. V.; Pontoppidan, K.

    2014-01-01

    Performance of a dense focal plane array feeding an offset toroidal reflector antenna system is studied and discussed in the context of a potential application in multi-beam radiometers for ocean surveillance. We present a preliminary design of the array feed for the 5-m diameter antenna at X...

  16. Radio-frequency interference mitigating hyperspectral L-band radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toose, Peter; Roy, Alexandre; Solheim, Frederick; Derksen, Chris; Watts, Tom; Royer, Alain; Walker, Anne

    2017-02-01

    Radio-frequency interference (RFI) can significantly contaminate the measured radiometric signal of current spaceborne L-band passive microwave radiometers. These spaceborne radiometers operate within the protected passive remote sensing and radio-astronomy frequency allocation of 1400-1427 MHz but nonetheless are still subjected to frequent RFI intrusions. We present a unique surface-based and airborne hyperspectral 385 channel, dual polarization, L-band Fourier transform, RFI-detecting radiometer designed with a frequency range from 1400 through ≈ 1550 MHz. The extended frequency range was intended to increase the likelihood of detecting adjacent RFI-free channels to increase the signal, and therefore the thermal resolution, of the radiometer instrument. The external instrument calibration uses three targets (sky, ambient, and warm), and validation from independent stability measurements shows a mean absolute error (MAE) of 1.0 K for ambient and warm targets and 1.5 K for sky. A simple but effective RFI removal method which exploits the large number of frequency channels is also described. This method separates the desired thermal emission from RFI intrusions and was evaluated with synthetic microwave spectra generated using a Monte Carlo approach and validated with surface-based and airborne experimental measurements.

  17. Measurements on Active Cold Loads for Radiometer Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Balling, Jan E.

    2008-01-01

    Two semi-conductor Active Cold Loads (ACLs) to be used as cold references in spaceborne microwave radiometers have been developed. An X-band frequency was chosen, and the target noise temperature value was in the 50 to 100 K range. The ACLs are characterized in the operating temperature range 0 50...

  18. Measurements on Active Cold Loads for Radiometer Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Skou, Niels; Balling, Jan E.

    2009-01-01

    Two semiconductor active cold loads (ACLs) to be used as cold references in spaceborne microwave radiometers have been developed. An X-band frequency was chosen, and the target noise temperature value was in the 50-100-K range. The ACLs are characterized in the operating temperature range of 0deg...

  19. Performance Measurements on Active Cold Loads for Radiometer Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Balling, Jan E.

    2007-01-01

    Two semi-conductor Active Cold Loads (ACLs) to be used as cold references in spaceborne microwave radiometers have been developed. An X-band frequency has been chosen, and the target noise temperature value is in the 50 to 100 K range. The ACLs are to be characterized in the operating temperature...

  20. Measurement of small antenna reflector losses for radiometer calibration budget

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    1997-01-01

    Antenna reflector losses play an important role in the calibration budget for a microwave radiometer. If the losses are small, they are difficult to measure by traditional means. However, they can be assessed directly by radiometric means using the sky brightness temperature as incident radiation...

  1. The design of an in-water optical radiometer

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desa, E.S.; Desa, B.A.E.; DeSa, E.J.

    and downwelling spectral irradiance over an effective dynamic range greater than six decades and with a spectral resolution of 2nm. The emergence of a new generation of radiometers is now practically possible with the advent of scientific grade CCD (charged couple...

  2. Hybrid Composite Cryogenic Tank Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLay, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid lightweight composite tank has been created using specially designed materials and manufacturing processes. The tank is produced by using a hybrid structure consisting of at least two reinforced composite material systems. The inner composite layer comprises a distinct fiber and resin matrix suitable for cryogenic use that is a braided-sleeve (and/or a filamentwound layer) aramid fiber preform that is placed on a removable mandrel (outfitted with metallic end fittings) and is infused (vacuum-assisted resin transfer molded) with a polyurethane resin matrix with a high ductility at low temperatures. This inner layer is allowed to cure and is encapsulated with a filamentwound outer composite layer of a distinct fiber resin system. Both inner and outer layer are in intimate contact, and can also be cured at the same time. The outer layer is a material that performs well for low temperature pressure vessels, and it can rely on the inner layer to act as a liner to contain the fluids. The outer layer can be a variety of materials, but the best embodiment may be the use of a continuous tow of carbon fiber (T-1000 carbon, or others), or other high-strength fibers combined with a high ductility epoxy resin matrix, or a polyurethane matrix, which performs well at low temperatures. After curing, the mandrel can be removed from the outer layer. While the hybrid structure is not limited to two particular materials, a preferred version of the tank has been demonstrated on an actual test tank article cycled at high pressures with liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen, and the best version is an inner layer of PBO (poly-pphenylenebenzobisoxazole) fibers with a polyurethane matrix and an outer layer of T-1000 carbon with a high elongation epoxy matrix suitable for cryogenic temperatures. A polyurethane matrix has also been used for the outer layer. The construction method is ideal because the fiber and resin of the inner layer has a high strain to failure at cryogenic

  3. Radiometer effect in the μSCOPE space mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobili, A. M.; Bramanti, D.; Comandi, G. L.; Toncelli, R.; Polacco, E.

    2002-12-01

    Space experiments to test the Equivalence Principle (EP) are affected by a systematic radiometer effect having the same signature as the target signal. In [PhRvD 63 (2001) 101101(R)] we have investigated this effect for the three proposed experiments currently under study by space agencies: μSCOPE, STEP and GG, setting the requirements to be met—on temperature gradients at the level of the test masses—for each experiment to reach its goal. We have now re-examined the radiometer effect in the case of μSCOPE and carried out a quantitative comparative analysis, on this issue, with the proposed heliocentric LISA mission for the detection of gravity waves. We find that, even assuming that the μSCOPE spacecraft and payload be built to meet all the challenging requirements of LISA, temperature gradients along its test masses would still make the radiometer effect larger than the target signal of an EP violation because of flying in the low geocentric orbit required for EP testing. We find no way to separate with certainty the radiometer systematic disturbance from the signal. μSCOPE is designed to fly a second accelerometer whose test masses have the same composition, in order to separate out systematic effects which—not being composition dependent like the signal—must be detected by both accelerometers. We point out that this accelerometer is in fact insensitive to the radiometer effect, just as it is to an EP violation signal, and therefore even having it onboard will not allow this disturbance to be separated out. μSCOPE is under construction and it is scheduled to fly in 2004. If it will detect a signal to the expected level, it will be impossible to establish with certainty whether it is due to the well known classical radiometer effect or else to a violation of the equivalence principle—which would invalidate General Relativity. The option to increase the rotation speed of the spacecraft (now set at about 10 -3 Hz) so as to average out the temperature

  4. A New Way to Demonstrate the Radiometer as a Heat Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hladkouski, V. I.; Pinchuk, A. I.

    2015-01-01

    While the radiometer is readily available as a toy, A. E. Woodruff notes that it is also a very useful tool to help us understand how to resolve certain scientific problems. Many physicists think they know how the radiometer works, but only a few actually understand it. Here we present a demonstration that shows that a radiometer can be thought of…

  5. Design of a Push-Broom Multi-Beam Radiometer for Future Ocean Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappellin, C.; Pontoppidan, K.; Nielsen, P. H.

    2015-01-01

    The design of a push-broom multi-beam radiometer for future ocean observations is described. The radiometer provides a sensitivity one order of magnitude higher than a traditional conical scanning radiometer, and has the big advantage of being fully stationary relative to the satellite platform...

  6. A New Way to Demonstrate the Radiometer as a Heat Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hladkouski, V. I.; Pinchuk, A. I.

    2015-01-01

    While the radiometer is readily available as a toy, A. E. Woodruff notes that it is also a very useful tool to help us understand how to resolve certain scientific problems. Many physicists think they know how the radiometer works, but only a few actually understand it. Here we present a demonstration that shows that a radiometer can be thought of…

  7. Design and Development of the SMAP Microwave Radiometer Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Medeiros, James J.; Horgan, Kevin A.; Brambora, Clifford K.; Estep, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The SMAP microwave radiometer will measure land surface brightness temperature at L-band (1413 MHz) in the presence of radio frequency interference (RFI) for soil moisture remote sensing. The radiometer design was driven by the requirements to incorporate internal calibration, to operate synchronously with the SMAP radar, and to mitigate the deleterious effects of RFI. The system design includes a highly linear super-heterodyne microwave receiver with internal reference loads and noise sources for calibration and an innovative digital signal processor and detection system. The front-end comprises a coaxial cable-based feed network, with a pair of diplexers and a coupled noise source, and radiometer front-end (RFE) box. Internal calibration is provided by reference switches and a common noise source inside the RFE. The RF back-end (RBE) downconverts the 1413 MHz channel to an intermediate frequency (IF) of 120 MHz. The IF signals are then sampled and quantized by high-speed analog-to-digital converters in the radiometer digital electronics (RDE) box. The RBE local oscillator and RDE sampling clocks are phase-locked to a common reference to ensure coherency between the signals. The RDE performs additional filtering, sub-band channelization, cross-correlation for measuring third and fourth Stokes parameters, and detection and integration of the first four raw moments of the signals. These data are packetized and sent to the ground for calibration and further processing. Here we discuss the novel features of the radiometer hardware particularly those influenced by the need to mitigate RFI.

  8. Columnar water vapor retrievals from multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail; Schmid, Beat; Turner, David D.; Cairns, Brian; Oinas, Valdar; Lacis, Andrew A.; Gutman, S.; Westwater, Ed R.; Smirnov, A.; Eilers, J.

    2009-01-26

    The Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) measures direct and diffuse irradiances in the visible and near IR spectral range. In addition to characteristics of atmospheric aerosols, MFRSR data also allow retrieval of precipitable water vapor (PWV) column amounts, which are determined from the direct normal irradiances in the 940 nm spectral channel. The HITRAN 2004 spectral database was used in our retrievals to model the water vapor absorption. We present a detailed error analysis describing the influence of uncertainties in instrument calibration and spectral response, as well as those in available spectral databases, on the retrieval results. The results of our PWV retrievals from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site operated by the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program were compared with correlative standard measurements by Microwave Radiometers (MWRs) and a Global Positioning System (GPS) water vapor sensor, as well as with retrievals from other solar radiometers (AERONET’s CIMEL, AATS-6). Some of these data are routinely available at the SGP’s Central Facility, however, we also used measurements from a wider array of instrumentation deployed at this site during the Water Vapor Intensive Observation Period (WVIOP2000) in September – October 2000. The WVIOP data show better agreement between different solar radiometers or between different microwave radiometers (both groups showing relative biases within 4%) than between these two groups of instruments, with MWRs values being consistently higher (up to 14%) than those from solar instruments. We also demonstrate the feasibility of using MFRSR network data for creation of 2D datasets comparable with the MODIS satellite water vapor product.

  9. Cryogenic vacuumm RF feedthrough device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Genfa [Yorktown, VA; Phillips, Harry Lawrence [Hayes, VA

    2008-12-30

    A cryogenic vacuum rf feedthrough device comprising: 1) a probe for insertion into a particle beam; 2) a coaxial cable comprising an inner conductor and an outer conductor, a dielectric/insulating layer surrounding the inner conductor, the latter being connected to the probe for the transmission of higher mode rf energy from the probe; and 3) a high thermal conductivity stub attached to the coaxial dielectric about and in thermal contact with the inner conductor which high thermal conductivity stub transmits heat generated in the vicinity of the probe efficiently and radially from the area of the probe and inner conductor all while maintaining useful rf transmission line characteristics between the inner and outer coaxial conductors.

  10. The Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, Michael G.; Kim, Tony; Emrich, William J.; Hickman, Robert R.; Broadway, Jeramie W.; Gerrish, Harold P.; Doughty, Glen; Belvin, Anthony; Borowski, Stanley K.; Scott, John

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental capability of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is game changing for space exploration. A first generation Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) based on NTP could provide high thrust at a specific impulse above 900 s, roughly double that of state of the art chemical engines. Characteristics of fission and NTP indicate that useful first generation systems will provide a foundation for future systems with extremely high performance. The role of the NCPS in the development of advanced nuclear propulsion systems could be analogous to the role of the DC-3 in the development of advanced aviation. Progress made under the NCPS project could help enable both advanced NTP and advanced Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP). Nuclear propulsion can be affordable and viable compared to other propulsion systems and must overcome a biased public fear due to hyper-environmentalism and a false perception of radiation and explosion risk.

  11. Photomultiplier Tubes at Cryogenic Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Nathan

    2016-09-01

    Liquid noble gas scintillators are widely used in experiments searching for physics beyond the Standard Model. Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs) working at cryogenic temperatures have been developed as the primary light readout device in those experiments. Three PMTs from Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. (R6041, R11065, and R8520) have been systematically characterized at liquid nitrogen temperature. The high voltage dividing circuits for two of the PMTs were custom-built to make sure there is similar performance at both room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. Their dark count rates at both temperatures were measured. Also measured were their single photoelectron responses at both temperatures using 300, 340, 370, and 420 nm LEDs. The intention is to couple these PMTs directly with inorganic scintillators at liquid nitrogen temperature to achieve high light yeilds for rare-event searches.

  12. A Cryogenic Infrared Calibration Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollack, E. J.; Kinzer, R. E., Jr.; Rinehart, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    A compact cryogenic calibration target is presented that has a peak diffuse reflectance, R < or = 0.003, from 800 to 4800/cm (12 - 2 microns ). Upon expanding the spectral range under consideration to 400-10,000/ cm-1 (25 - 1 microns) the observed performance gracefully degrades to R < or = 0.02 at the band edges. In the implementation described, a high-thermal-conductivity metallic substrate is textured with a pyramidal tiling and subsequently coated with a thin lossy dielectric coating that enables high absorption and thermal uniformity across the target. The resulting target assembly is lightweight, has a low-geometric profile, and has survived repeated thermal cycling from room temperature to approx.4 K. Basic design considerations, governing equations, and test data for realizing the structure described are provided. The optical properties of selected absorptive materials-Acktar Fractal Black, Aeroglaze Z306, and Stycast 2850 FT epoxy loaded with stainless steel powder-are characterized and presented

  13. Computed tomography of cryogenic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Gerd; Anderson, E.; Vogt, S.; Knochel, C.; Weiss, D.; LeGros, M.; Larabell, C.

    2001-08-30

    Due to the short wavelengths of X-rays and low numerical aperture of the Fresnel zone plates used as X-ray objectives, the depth of field is several microns. Within the focal depth, imaging a thick specimen is to a good approximation equivalent to projecting the specimen absorption. Therefore, computed tomography based on a tilt series of X-ray microscopic images can be used to reconstruct the local linear absorption coefficient and image the three-dimensional specimen structure. To preserve the structural integrity of biological objects during image acquisition, microscopy is performed at cryogenic temperatures. Tomography based on X-ray microscopic images was applied to study the distribution of male specific lethal 1 (MSL-1), a nuclear protein involved in dosage compensation in Drosophila melanogaster, which ensures that males with single X chromosome have the same amount of most X-linked gene products as females with two X chromosomes. Tomographic reconstructions of X-ray microscopic images were used to compute the local three-dimensional linear absorption coefficient revealing the arrangement of internal structures of Drosophila melanogaster cells. Combined with labelling techniques, nanotomography is a new technique to study the 3D distribution of selected proteins inside whole cells. We want to improve this technique with respect to resolution and specimen preparation. The resolution in the reconstruction can be significantly improved by reducing the angular step size to collect more viewing angles, which requires an automated data acquisition. In addition, fast-freezing with liquid ethane instead of cryogenic He gas will be applied to improve the vitrification of the hydrated samples. We also plan to apply cryo X-ray nanotomography in order to study different types of cells and their nuclear protein distributions.

  14. Sprayable Thermal Insulation for Cryogenic Tanks Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Sprayable Thermal Insulation for Cryogenic Tanks (STICT) is a thermal management system applied by either an automated or manual spraying process with less...

  15. Cryogenic fatigue data developed for Inconel 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, E. H.

    1967-01-01

    Data were obtained on the cryogenic fatigue properties of Inconel 718 bar using axial loading and rotating beam fatigue tests. Results also disclosed the fatigue properties of Inconel 718 sheet materials.

  16. Temperature Stratification in a Cryogenic Fuel Tank

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A reduced dynamical model describing temperature stratification effects driven by natural convection in a liquid hydrogen cryogenic fuel tank has been developed. It...

  17. Advanced Insulation Techniques for Cryogenic Tanks Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ability to store large amounts of cryogenic fluids for long durations has a profound effect on the success of many future space programs using these fluids for...

  18. Cryogenic and Vacuum Compatible Metrology Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase I SBIR project for NASA, Flexure Engineering of Greenbelt, MD will leverage the work we did in our current SBIR project entitled: Cryogenic Optical...

  19. A brief overview of cryogenics in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S.-M.

    In this paper general aspects of cryogenics in China are introduced, and applications of cryogenics in the space programme are described briefly, such as its application to the Long March 3 rocket vehicles with LH2/LO2 engines, the development of a 750 dm 3 hr -1 liquid hydrogen plant and railway tank cars with 60 and 70 m 3 capacities. In addition, the progress of various cryogenic techniques in China is presented, such as the FY-1 radiation refrigerator loaded on a meteorology satellite, regenerative cryocoolers of the Gifford-McMahon, Solvay, Vuilleumier, Stirling and pulse tube types, and the KM-3 and KM-4 space simulation facilities. Finally, the paper discusses current education about refrigeration and cryogenics for undergraduates and graduates.

  20. The cryogenic control system of BEPCⅡ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gang; WANG Ke-Xiang; ZHAO Ji-Jiu; YUE Ke-Juan; DAI Ming-Sui; HUANG Yi-Ling; JIANG Bo

    2008-01-01

    A superconducting cryogenic system has been designed and deployed in the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider Upgrade Project(BEPCⅡ).The system consists of a Siemens PLC(ST-PLC,Programmable Logic Controller)for the compressor control,an Allen Bradley(AB)PLC for the cryogenic equipments,and the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System(EPICS)that integrates the PLCs.The system fully automates the superconducting cryogenic control with process control,PID(Proportional-Integral-Differential)control loops,real-time data access and data storage,alarm handler and human machine interface.It is capable of automatic recovery as well.This paper describes the BEPCⅡ cryogenic control system,data communication between ST-PLC and EPICS Input/Output Controllers(IOCs),and the integration of the flow control,the low level interlock,the AB-PLC,and EPICS.

  1. Cryogenic Safety Rules and Guidelines at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    CERN defines and implements a Safety Policy that sets out the general principles governing safety at CERN. As an intergovernmental organisation, CERN further establishes its own Safety Rules as necessary for its proper functioning. In this process, it takes into account the laws and regulation of the Host States (France and Switzerland), EU regulations and directives, as well as international regulations, standards and directives. For the safety of cryogenic equipment, this is primarily covered by the Safety Regulation for Mechanical Equipment and the General Safety Instruction for Cryogenic Equipment. In addition, CERN has also developed Safety Guidelines to support the implementation of these safety rules, covering cryogenic equipment and oxygen deficiency hazard assessment and mitigation. An overview of the cryogenic safety rules and these safety guidelines will be presented.

  2. Small Scroll Pump for Cryogenic Liquids Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation is a compact, reliable, light weight, electrically driven pump capable of pumping cryogenic liquids, based on scroll pump technology. This pump will...

  3. The cryogenic control system of BEPCII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Wang, Ke-Xiang; Zhao, Ji-Jiu; Yue, Ke-Juan; Dai, Ming-Hui; Huang, Yi-Ling; Jiang, Bo

    2008-04-01

    A superconducting cryogenic system has been designed and deployed in the Beijing Electron- Positron Collider Upgrade Project (BEPCII). The system consists of a Siemens PLC (S7-PLC, Programmable Logic Controller) for the compressor control, an Allen Bradley (AB) PLC for the cryogenic equipments, and the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) that integrates the PLCs. The system fully automates the superconducting cryogenic control with process control, PID (Proportional-Integral-Differential) control loops, real-time data access and data storage, alarm handler and human machine interface. It is capable of automatic recovery as well. This paper describes the BEPCII cryogenic control system, data communication between S7-PLC and EPICS Input/Output Controllers (IOCs), and the integration of the flow control, the low level interlock, the AB-PLC, and EPICS.

  4. Sprayable Thermal Insulation for Cryogenic Tanks Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation addressed in this proposal is Sprayable Thermal Insulation for Cryogenic Tanks, or STICT. This novel system could be applied in either an automated or...

  5. The sea and land surface temperature radiometer (SLSTR) detection assembly design and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppo, Peter; Mastrandrea, Carmine; Stagi, Moreno; Calamai, Luciano; Barilli, Marco; Nieke, Jens

    2013-10-01

    The SLSTRs are high accuracy radiometers selected for the GMES mission Sentinel-3 space component to provide SST data continuity respect to previous (A)ATSRs for climatology. Many satellites, each with 7.5-year lifetime, over a 20- year period are foreseen. Sentinel-3A will be launched in 2014 and Sentinel-3B at least 6 months later implying that two identical satellites will be maintained in the same orbit with 180° phase delay. Each SLSTR has an improved design respect to AATSR affording large near nadir and oblique view swaths (1400 and 740 km) for SST/LST global coverage at 1 km spatial resolution with a daily revisit time (with two satellites), appropriate for climate and meteorology. Clouds screening and other products are obtained with 0.5 Km spatial resolution in visible and SWIR bands while two additional channels are included to monitor high temperature events, such as forest fires. The two swaths are obtained with two conical scans and telescopes combined optically at a common focus, representing the input of a cooled Focal Plane Assembly, where nine channels are separated with dichroic and focalized on detectors with appropriate optical relays. IR and SWIR optics/detectors are cooled to 85 K by an active mechanical cryo-cooler with vibration compensation, while the VIS ones are maintained at a stable temperature. The opto-mechanical design and the expected electro-optical performance of the Focal Plane Assembly are described and the models predictions at system level are compared with experimental data acquired in the vacuum chamber in flight representative thermal conditions or in laboratory.

  6. Visual-Inspection Probe For Cryogenic Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Steve; Valenzuela, James; Yoshinaga, Jay

    1990-01-01

    Visual-inspection probe that resembles borescope enables observer at ambient temperature to view objects immersed in turbulent flow of liquid oxygen, liquid nitrogen, or other cryogenic fluid. Design of probe fairly conventional, except special consideration given to selection of materials and to thermal expansion to provide for expected range of operating temperatures. Penetrates wall of cryogenic chamber to provide view of interior. Similar probe illuminates scene. View displayed on video monitor.

  7. A three axis turntable's online initial state measurement method based on the high-accuracy laser gyro SINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chunfeng; Wei, Guo; Wang, Qi; Xiong, Zhenyu; Wang, Qun; Long, Xingwu

    2016-10-01

    As an indispensable equipment in inertial technology tests, the three-axis turntable is widely used in the calibration of various types inertial navigation systems (INS). In order to ensure the calibration accuracy of INS, we need to accurately measure the initial state of the turntable. However, the traditional measuring method needs a lot of exterior equipment (such as level instrument, north seeker, autocollimator, etc.), and the test processing is complex, low efficiency. Therefore, it is relatively difficult for the inertial measurement equipment manufacturers to realize the self-inspection of the turntable. Owing to the high precision attitude information provided by the laser gyro strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) after fine alignment, we can use it as the attitude reference of initial state measurement of three-axis turntable. For the principle that the fixed rotation vector increment is not affected by measuring point, we use the laser gyro INS and the encoder of the turntable to provide the attitudes of turntable mounting plat. Through this way, the high accuracy measurement of perpendicularity error and initial attitude of the three-axis turntable has been achieved.

  8. Design and calibration of a high-sensitivity and high-accuracy polarimeter based on liquid crystal variable retarders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing; Ren, De-Qing; Liu, Cheng-Chao; Zhu, Yong-Tian; Dou, Jiang-Pei; Zhang, Xi; Beck, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Polarimetry plays an important role in the measurement of solar magnetic fields. We developed a high-sensitivity and high-accuracy polarimeter (HHP) based on nematic liquid crystal variable retarders (LCVRs), which has a compact setup and no mechanical moving parts. The system design and calibration methods are discussed in detail. The azimuth error of the transmission axis of the polarizer as well as the fast axes of the two LCVRs and the quarter-wave plate were determined using dedicated procedures. Linearly and circularly polarized light were employed to evaluate the performance of the HHP. The experimental results indicate that a polarimetric sensitivity of better than \\[5.7 × {10 - 3}\\] can be achieved by using a single short-exposure image, while an accuracy on the order of 10‑5 can be reached by using a large number of short-exposure images. This makes the HHP a high-performance system that can be used with a ground-based solar telescope for high-precision solar magnetic field investigations.

  9. High-accuracy approximation of high-rank derivatives: isotropic finite differences based on lattice-Boltzmann stencils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, Keijo Kalervo; Hegele Júnior, Luiz Adolfo; Philippi, Paulo Cesar

    2014-01-01

    We propose isotropic finite differences for high-accuracy approximation of high-rank derivatives. These finite differences are based on direct application of lattice-Boltzmann stencils. The presented finite-difference expressions are valid in any dimension, particularly in two and three dimensions, and any lattice-Boltzmann stencil isotropic enough can be utilized. A theoretical basis for the proposed utilization of lattice-Boltzmann stencils in the approximation of high-rank derivatives is established. In particular, the isotropy and accuracy properties of the proposed approximations are derived directly from this basis. Furthermore, in this formal development, we extend the theory of Hermite polynomial tensors in the case of discrete spaces and present expressions for the discrete inner products between monomials and Hermite polynomial tensors. In addition, we prove an equivalency between two approaches for constructing lattice-Boltzmann stencils. For the numerical verification of the presented finite differences, we introduce 5th-, 6th-, and 8th-order two-dimensional lattice-Boltzmann stencils.

  10. Novel technique to suppress hydrocarbon contamination for high accuracy determination of carbon content in steel by FE-EPMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Takako; Tanaka, Yuji; Yagoshi, Masayasu; Ishida, Kiyohito

    2016-07-01

    In multiphase steels, control of the carbon contents in the respective phases is the most important factor in alloy design for achieving high strength and high ductility. However, it is unusually difficult to determine the carbon contents in multiphase structures with high accuracy by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) due to the unavoidable effect of hydrocarbon contamination during measurements. We have investigated new methods for suppressing hydrocarbon contamination during field emission (FE) EPMA measurements as well as a conventional liquid nitrogen trap. Plasma cleaner inside the specimen chamber results in a improvement of carbon-content determination by point analysis, increasing precision tenfold from the previous 0.1 mass%C to 0.01 mass%C. Stage heating at about 100 °C dramatically suppresses contamination growth during continuous point measurement and mapping. By the combination of above two techniques, we successfully visualized the two-dimensional carbon distribution in a dual-phase steel. It was also noted that the carbon concentrations at the ferrite/martensite interfaces were not the same across all interfaces, and local variation was observed. The developed technique is expected to be a powerful tool for understanding the mechanisms of mechanical properties and microstructural evolution, thereby contributing to the design of new steel products with superior properties.

  11. High Accuracy Potential Energy Surface, Dipole Moment Surface, Rovibrational Energies and Line List Calculations for ^{14}NH_3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Phillip; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Polyansky, Oleg; Kyuberis, Aleksandra; Ovsyannikov, Roman I.; Zobov, Nikolay Fedorovich; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2017-06-01

    We present a new spectroscopic potential energy surface (PES) for ^{14}NH_3, produced by refining a high accuracy ab initio PES to experimental energy levels taken predominantly from MARVEL. The PES reproduces 1722 matched J=0-8 experimental energies with a root-mean-square error of 0.035 cm-1 under 6000 cm^{-1} and 0.059 under 7200 cm^{-1}. In conjunction with a new DMS calculated using multi reference configuration interaction (MRCI) and H=aug-cc-pVQZ, N=aug-cc-pWCVQZ basis sets, an infrared (IR) line list has been computed which is suitable for use up to 2000 K. The line list is used to assign experimental lines in the 7500 - 10,500 cm^{-1} region and previously unassigned lines in HITRAN in the 6000-7000 cm^{-1} region. Oleg L. Polyansky, Roman I. Ovsyannikov, Aleksandra A. Kyuberis, Lorenzo Lodi, Jonathan Tennyson, Andrey Yachmenev, Sergei N. Yurchenko, Nikolai F. Zobov, J. Mol. Spec., 327 (2016) 21-30 Afaf R. Al Derzia, Tibor Furtenbacher, Jonathan Tennyson, Sergei N. Yurchenko, Attila G. Császár, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Trans., 161 (2015) 117-130

  12. Novel technique to suppress hydrocarbon contamination for high accuracy determination of carbon content in steel by FE-EPMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Takako; Tanaka, Yuji; Yagoshi, Masayasu; Ishida, Kiyohito

    2016-07-19

    In multiphase steels, control of the carbon contents in the respective phases is the most important factor in alloy design for achieving high strength and high ductility. However, it is unusually difficult to determine the carbon contents in multiphase structures with high accuracy by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) due to the unavoidable effect of hydrocarbon contamination during measurements. We have investigated new methods for suppressing hydrocarbon contamination during field emission (FE) EPMA measurements as well as a conventional liquid nitrogen trap. Plasma cleaner inside the specimen chamber results in a improvement of carbon-content determination by point analysis, increasing precision tenfold from the previous 0.1 mass%C to 0.01 mass%C. Stage heating at about 100 °C dramatically suppresses contamination growth during continuous point measurement and mapping. By the combination of above two techniques, we successfully visualized the two-dimensional carbon distribution in a dual-phase steel. It was also noted that the carbon concentrations at the ferrite/martensite interfaces were not the same across all interfaces, and local variation was observed. The developed technique is expected to be a powerful tool for understanding the mechanisms of mechanical properties and microstructural evolution, thereby contributing to the design of new steel products with superior properties.

  13. High-accuracy measurement of ship velocities by DGPS; DGPS ni yoru sensoku keisoku no koseidoka ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, S.; Koterayama, W. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1996-04-10

    The differential global positioning system (DGPS) can eliminate most of errors in ship velocity measurement by GPS positioning alone. Through two rounds of marine observations by towing an observation robot in summer 1995, the authors attempted high-accuracy measurement of ship velocities by DGPS, and also carried out both positioning by GPS alone and measurement using the bottom track of ADCP (acoustic Doppler current profiler). In this paper, the results obtained by these measurement methods were examined through comparison among them, and the accuracy of the measured ship velocities was considered. In DGPS measurement, both translocation method and interference positioning method were used. ADCP mounted on the observation robot allowed measurement of the velocity of current meter itself by its bottom track in shallow sea areas less than 350m. As the result of these marine observations, it was confirmed that the accuracy equivalent to that of direct measurement by bottom track is possible to be obtained by DGPS. 3 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. High-accuracy current generation in the nanoampere regime from a silicon single-trap electron pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamahata, Gento; Giblin, Stephen P.; Kataoka, Masaya; Karasawa, Takeshi; Fujiwara, Akira

    2017-01-01

    A gigahertz single-electron (SE) pump with a semiconductor charge island is promising for a future quantum current standard. However, high-accuracy current in the nanoampere regime is still difficult to achieve because the performance of SE pumps tends to degrade significantly at frequencies exceeding 1 GHz. Here, we demonstrate robust SE pumping via a single-trap level in silicon up to 7.4 GHz, at which the pumping current exceeds 1 nA. An accuracy test with an uncertainty of about one part per million (ppm) reveals that the pumping current deviates from the ideal value by only about 20 ppm at the flattest part of the current plateau. This value is two orders of magnitude better than the best one reported in the nanoampere regime. In addition, the pumping accuracy is almost unchanged up to 7.4 GHz, probably due to strong electron confinement in the trap. These results indicate that trap-mediated SE pumping is promising for achieving the practical operation of the quantum current standard. PMID:28322339

  15. The LLNL High Accuracy Volume Renderer for Unstructured Data: Capabilities, Current Limits, and Potential for ASCI/VIEWS Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, P L; Max, N L

    2001-06-04

    This report describes a volume rendering system for unstructured data, especially finite element data, that creates images with very high accuracy. The system will currently handle meshes whose cells are either linear or quadratic tetrahedra, or meshes with mixed cell types: tetrahedra, bricks, prisms, and pyramids. The cells may have nonplanar facets. Whenever possible, exact mathematical solutions for the radiance integrals and for interpolation are used. Accurate semitransparent shaded isosurfaces may be embedded in the volume rendering. For very small cells, subpixel accumulation by splatting is used to avoid sampling error. A new exact and efficient visibility ordering algorithm is described. The most accurate images are generated in software, however, more efficient algorithms utilizing graphics hardware may also be selected. The report describes the parallelization of the system for a distributed-shared memory multiprocessor machine, and concludes by discussing the system's limits, desirable future work, and ways to extend the system so as to be compatible with projected ASCI/VIEWS architectures.

  16. Underlying Surface Remote Sensing by the Microwave Radiometer with High Measurement Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubaichin Anton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a new approach to microwave radiometer design. The approach implies simultaneous using both modified zero measurement method and multi-receiver technique. Simultaneous using increases the operating characteristics of airborne microwave radiometers for aircrafts with self-contained power supply. The block diagram of the onboard Earth remote sensing microwave radiometric system is presented. The block diagram and operating timing diagrams of the designed radiometer are shown. An original technique to design a fiducial noise source for transfer characteristics is discussed. The advantages of the designed radiometer in comparison with the state of the art zero-type microwave radiometer are described.

  17. Academic Training: Introduction to cryogenic Engineering

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 December from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Introduction to cryogenic Engineering by G. Perinic - CERN-AT Cryogenic engineering is one of the key technologies at CERN. It is widely used in research and has many applications in industry and last but not least in medicine. In research cryogenic engineering and its applications are omnipresent from the smallest laboratories to fusion reactors, hughe detectors and accelerators. With the termination of the LHC, CERN will in fact become the world's largest cryogenic installation. This series of talks intends to introduce the non-cryogenist to the basic principles and challenges of cryogenic engineering and its applications. The course will also provide a basis for practical application as well as for further learning. From history to modern refrigeration cycles (1/5) Refrigerants, standard cryostats, cryogenic design (2/5) Heat transfer and insulation (3/5) Safety in cryoge...

  18. Academic Training: Introduction to cryogenic Engineering

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 December from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Introduction to cryogenic Engineering by G. Perinic - CERN-AT Cryogenic engineering is one of the key technologies at CERN. It is widely used in research and has many applications in industry and last but not least in medicine. In research cryogenic engineering and its applications are omnipresent from the smallest laboratories to fusion reactors, huge detectors and accelerators. With the termination of the LHC, CERN will in fact become the world’s largest cryogenic installation. This series of talks intends to introduce the non-cryogenist to the basic principles and challenges of cryogenic engineering and its applications. The course will also provide a basis for practical application as well as for further learning. Monday 5.12.2005 Introduction: From History to Modern Refrigeration Cycles (Goran Perinic) Tuesday 6.12.2005 Refrigerants, Standard Cryostats, Cryogenic Des...

  19. Flight Performance of the AKARI Cryogenic System

    CERN Document Server

    Nakagawa, Takao; Hirabayashi, Masayuki; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Kii, Tsuneo; Kimura, Yoshiyuki; Matsumoto, Toshio; Murakami, Hiroshi; Murakami, Masahide; Narasaki, Katsuhiro; Narita, Masanao; Ohnishi, Akira; Tsunematsu, Shoji; Yoshida, Seiji

    2007-01-01

    We describe the flight performance of the cryogenic system of the infrared astronomical satellite AKARI, which was successfully launched on 2006 February 21 (UT). AKARI carries a 68.5 cm telescope together with two focal plane instruments, Infrared Cameras (IRC) and Far Infrared Surveyor (FIS), all of which are cooled down to cryogenic temperature to achieve superior sensitivity. The AKARI cryogenic system is a unique hybrid system, which consists of cryogen (liquid helium) and mechanical coolers (2-stage Stirling coolers). With the help of the mechanical coolers, 179 L (26.0 kg) of super-fluid liquid helium can keep the instruments cryogenically cooled for more than 500 days. The on-orbit performance of the AKARI cryogenics is consistent with the design and pre-flight test, and the boil-off gas flow rate is as small as 0.32 mg/s. We observed the increase of the major axis of the AKARI orbit, which can be explained by the thrust due to thermal pressure of vented helium gas.

  20. High-accuracy diagnostic tool for electron cloud observation in the LHC based on synchronous phase measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Esteban Müller, J F; Shaposhnikova, E; Valuch, D; Mastoridis, T

    2014-01-01

    Electron cloud effects such as heat load in the cryogenic system, pressure rise and beam instabilities are among the main limitations for the LHC operation with 25 ns spaced bunches. A new observation tool was developed to monitor the e-cloud activity and has been successfully used in the LHC during Run 1 (2010-2012). The power loss of each bunch due to the e-cloud can be estimated using very precise bunch-by-bunch measurement of the synchronous phase shift. In order to achieve the required accuracy, corrections for reflection in the cables and some systematic errors need to be applied followed by a post-processing of the measurements. Results clearly show the e-cloud build-up along the bunch trains and its evolution during each LHC fill as well as from fill to fill. Measurements during the 2012 LHC scrubbing run reveal a progressive reduction in the e-cloud activity and therefore a decrease in the secondary electron yield (SEY). The total beam power loss can be computed as a sum of the contributions from all...

  1. High accuracy thermal conductivity measurement of aqueous cryoprotective agents and semi-rigid biological tissues using a microfabricated thermal sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xin M; Sekar, Praveen K; Zhao, Gang; Zhou, Xiaoming; Shu, Zhiquan; Huang, Zhongping; Ding, Weiping; Zhang, Qingchuan; Gao, Dayong

    2015-05-20

    An improved thermal-needle approach for accurate and fast measurement of thermal conductivity of aqueous and soft biomaterials was developed using microfabricated thermal conductivity sensors. This microscopic measuring device was comprehensively characterized at temperatures from 0 °C to 40 °C. Despite the previous belief, system calibration constant was observed to be highly temperature-dependent. Dynamic thermal conductivity response during cooling (40 °C to -40 °C) was observed using the miniaturized single tip sensor for various concentrations of CPAs, i.e., glycerol, ethylene glycol and dimethyl sulfoxide. Chicken breast, chicken skin, porcine limb, and bovine liver were assayed to investigate the effect of anatomical heterogeneity on thermal conductivity using the arrayed multi-tip sensor at 20 °C. Experimental results revealed distinctive differences in localized thermal conductivity, which suggests the use of approximated or constant property values is expected to bring about results with largely inflated uncertainties when investigating bio-heat transfer mechanisms and/or performing sophisticated thermal modeling with complex biological tissues. Overall, the presented micro thermal sensor with automated data analysis algorithm is a promising approach for direct thermal conductivity measurement of aqueous solutions and soft biomaterials and is of great value to cryopreservation of tissues, hyperthermia or cryogenic, and other thermal-based clinical diagnostics and treatments.

  2. Cryogenic ion chemistry and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolk, Arron B; Leavitt, Christopher M; Garand, Etienne; Johnson, Mark A

    2014-01-21

    The use of mass spectrometry in macromolecular analysis is an incredibly important technique and has allowed efficient identification of secondary and tertiary protein structures. Over 20 years ago, Chemistry Nobelist John Fenn and co-workers revolutionized mass spectrometry by developing ways to non-destructively extract large molecules directly from solution into the gas phase. This advance, in turn, enabled rapid sequencing of biopolymers through tandem mass spectrometry at the heart of the burgeoning field of proteomics. In this Account, we discuss how cryogenic cooling, mass selection, and reactive processing together provide a powerful way to characterize ion structures as well as rationally synthesize labile reaction intermediates. This is accomplished by first cooling the ions close to 10 K and condensing onto them weakly bound, chemically inert small molecules or rare gas atoms. This assembly can then be used as a medium in which to quench reactive encounters by rapid evaporation of the adducts, as well as provide a universal means for acquiring highly resolved vibrational action spectra of the embedded species by photoinduced mass loss. Moreover, the spectroscopic measurements can be obtained with readily available, broadly tunable pulsed infrared lasers because absorption of a single photon is sufficient to induce evaporation. We discuss the implementation of these methods with a new type of hybrid photofragmentation mass spectrometer involving two stages of mass selection with two laser excitation regions interfaced to the cryogenic ion source. We illustrate several capabilities of the cryogenic ion spectrometer by presenting recent applications to peptides, a biomimetic catalyst, a large antibiotic molecule (vancomycin), and reaction intermediates pertinent to the chemistry of the ionosphere. First, we demonstrate how site-specific isotopic substitution can be used to identify bands due to local functional groups in a protonated tripeptide designed to

  3. Integrated Cryogenic Satellite Communications Cross-Link Receiver Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanofsky, R. R.; Bhasin, K. B.; Downey, A. N.; Jackson, C. J.; Silver, A. H.; Javadi, H. H. S.

    1995-01-01

    An experiment has been devised which will validate, in space, a miniature, high-performance receiver. The receiver blends three complementary technologies; high temperature superconductivity (HTS), pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistor (PHEMT) monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC), and a miniature pulse tube cryogenic cooler. Specifically, an HTS band pass filter, InP MMIC low noise amplifier, HTS-sapphire resonator stabilized local oscillator (LO), and a miniature pulse tube cooler will be integrated into a complete 20 GHz receiver downconverter. This cooled downconverter will be interfaced with customized signal processing electronics and integrated onto the space shuttle's 'HitchHiker' carrier. A pseudorandom data sequence will be transmitted to the receiver, which is in low Earth orbit (LEO), via the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) on a 20 GHz carrier. The modulation format is QPSK and the data rate is 2.048 Mbps. The bit error rate (BER) will be measured in situ. The receiver is also equipped with a radiometer mode so that experiment success is not totally contingent upon the BER measurement. In this mode, the receiver uses the Earth and deep space as a hot and cold calibration source, respectively. The experiment closely simulates an actual cross-link scenario. Since the receiver performance depends on channel conditions, its true characteristics would be masked in a terrestrial measurement by atmospheric absorption and background radiation. Furthermore, the receiver's performance depends on its physical temperature, which is a sensitive function of platform environment, thermal design, and cryocooler performance. This empirical data is important for building confidence in the technology.

  4. Rotating shadowband radiometer development and analysis of spectral shortwave data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalsky, J.; Harrison, L.; Min, Q. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Our goals in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program are improved measurements of spectral shortwave radiation and improved techniques for the retrieval of climatologically sensitive parameters. The multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) that was developed during the first years of the ARM program has become a workhorse at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site, and it is widely deployed in other climate programs. We have spent most of our effort this year developing techniques to retrieve column aerosol, water vapor, and ozone from direct beam spectral measurements of the MFRSR. Additionally, we have had some success in calculating shortwave surface diffuse spectral irradiance. Using the surface albedo and the global irradiance, we have calculated cloud optical depths. From cloud optical depth and liquid water measured with the microwave radiometer, we have calculated effective liquid cloud particle radii. The rest of the text will provide some detail regarding each of these efforts.

  5. Effect of a spacer moiety on radiometal labelled Neurotensin derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mascarin, A.; Valverde, I.E.; Mindt, T.L. [Univ. of Basel Hospital (Switzerland). Div. of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry

    2013-07-01

    The binding sequence of the regulatory peptide Neurotensin, NT(8-13), represents a promising tumour-specific vector for the development of radiopeptides useful in nuclear oncology for the diagnosis (imaging) and therapy of cancer. A number of radiometal-labelled NT(8-13) derivatives have been reported, however, the effect of the spacer which connects the vector with the radiometal complex has yet not been investigated systematically. Because a spacer moiety can influence potentially important biological characteristics of radiopeptides, we synthesized three [DOTA({sup 177}Lu)]-X-NT(8-13) derivatives and evaluated the effect of a spacer (X) on the physico-chemical properties of the conjugate including lipophilicity, stability, and in vitro receptor affinity and cell internalization. (orig.)

  6. Narrow Field of View Zenith Radiometer (NFOV) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, C; Marshak, A; Hodges, G; Barnard, JC; Schmelzer, J

    2008-11-01

    The two-channel narrow field-of-view radiometer (NFOV2) is a ground-based radiometer that looks straight up and measures radiance directly above the instrument at wavelengths of 673 and 870 nm. The field-of-view of the instrument is 1.2 degrees, and the sampling time resolution is one second. Measurements of the NFOV2 have been used to retrieve optical properties for overhead clouds that range from patchy to overcast. With a one-second sampling rate of the NFOV2, faster than almost any other ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) instrument, we are able, for the first time, to capture changes in cloud optical properties at the natural time scale of cloud evolution.

  7. Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Impacts on Silicon Photodiode Radiometers: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, D. R.

    2011-04-01

    Inexpensive broadband pyranometers with silicon photodiode detectors have a non-uniform spectral response over the spectral range of 300-1100 nm. The response region includes only about 70% to 75% of the total energy in the terrestrial solar spectral distribution from 300 nm to 4000 nm. The solar spectrum constantly changes with solar position and atmospheric conditions. Relative spectral distributions of diffuse hemispherical irradiance sky radiation and total global hemispherical irradiance are drastically different. This analysis convolves a typical photodiode response with SMARTS 2.9.5 spectral model spectra for different sites and atmospheric conditions. Differences in solar component spectra lead to differences on the order of 2% in global hemispherical and 5% or more in diffuse hemispherical irradiances from silicon radiometers. The result is that errors of more than 7% can occur in the computation of direct normal irradiance from global hemispherical irradiance and diffuse hemispherical irradiance using these radiometers.

  8. Thermoelectric temperature control system for the pushbroom microwave radiometer (PBMR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon-Townes, L. A.; Averill, R. D.

    1984-06-01

    A closed loop thermoelectric temperature control system is developed for stabilizing sensitive RF integrated circuits within a microwave radiometer to an accuracy of + or - 0.1 C over a range of ambient conditions from -20 C to +45 C. The dual mode (heating and cooling) control concept utilizes partial thermal isolation of the RF units from an instrument deck which is thermally controlled by thermoelectric coolers and thin film heaters. The temperature control concept is simulated with a thermal analyzer program (MITAS) which consists of 37 nodes and 61 conductors. A full scale thermal mockup is tested in the laboratory at temperatures of 0 C, 21 C, and 45 C to confirm the validity of the control concept. A flight radiometer and temperature control system is successfully flight tested on the NASA Skyvan aircraft.

  9. Offset balancing in pseudo-correlation radiometers for CMB measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennella, A.; Bersanelli, M.; Seiffert, M.; Kettle, D.; Roddis, N.; Wilkinson, A.; Meinhold, P.

    2003-11-01

    Radiometeric CMB measurements need to be highly stable and this stability is best obtained with differential receivers. The residual 1/f noise in the differential output is strongly dependent on the radiometer input offset which can be cancelled using various balancing strategies. In this paper we discuss a software method implemented in the PLANCK-LFI pseudo-correlation receivers which uses a tunable gain modulation factor, r, in the sky-load difference. Numerical simulations and experimental data show how proper tuning of the parameter r ensures a very stable differential output with knee frequencies of the order of few mHz. Various approaches to calculate r using the radiometer total power data are discussed with some examples relevant to PLANCK-LFI. Although the paper focuses on pseudo-correlation receivers and the examples are relative to PLANCK-LFI, the proposed method and its analysis is general and can be applied to a large class of differential radiometric receivers.

  10. Offset balancing in pseudo-correlation radiometers for CMB measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Mennella, A; Seiffert, M; Kettle, D; Roddis, N; Wilkinson, A; Meinhold, P; Mennella, Aniello; Bersanelli, Marco; Seiffert, Michael; Kettle, Danielle; Roddis, Neil; Wilkinson, Althea; Meinhold, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Radiometeric CMB measurements need to be highly stable and this stability is best obtained with differential receivers. The residual 1/f noise in the differential output is strongly dependent on the radiometer input offset which can be cancelled using various balancing strategies. In this paper we discuss a software method implemented in the Planck-LFI pseudo-correlation receivers which uses a tunable "gain modulation factor, r, in the sky-load difference. Numerical simulations and experimental data show how proper tuning of the parameter r ensures a very stable differential output with knee frequencies of the order of few mHz. Various approaches to calculate r using the radiometer total power data are discussed with some examples relevant to Planck-LFI. Although the paper focuses on pseudo-correlation receivers and the examples are relative to Planck-LFI, the proposed method and its analysis is general and can be applied to a large class of differential radiometric receivers.

  11. An improved outdoor calibration procedure for broadband ultraviolet radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancillo, M L; Serrano, A; Antón, M; García, J A; Vilaplana, J M; de la Morena, B

    2005-01-01

    This article aims at improving the broadband ultraviolet radiometer's calibration methodology. For this goal, three broadband radiometers are calibrated against a spectrophotometer of reference. Three different one-step calibration models are tested: ratio, first order and second order. The latter is proposed in order to adequately reproduce the high dependence on the solar zenith angle shown by the other two models and, therefore, to improve the calibration performance at high solar elevations. The proposed new second-order model requires no additional information and, thus, keeps the operational character of the one-step methodology. The models are compared in terms of their root mean square error and the most qualified is subsequently validated by comparing its predictions with the spectrophotometer measurements within an independent validation data subset. Results show that the best calibration is achieved by the second-order model, with a mean bias error and mean absolute bias error lower than 2.2 and 6.7%, respectively.

  12. Cryogenic deformation in soils and their engineering geology consequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danilov, I.D. [Moscow State Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation); Roujansky, V.E. [EBA Engineering Consultants Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    Cryogenic soil deformation was studied. Three basic types were considered, i. e. cryogenic-lithogenic, cryogenic-disjunctive and cryogenic-plastic. Different mechanisms of their formation were explained. The diversity of cryogenic deformations and their morphological resemblance to the tectonic dislocations pointed towards a specific type of the exogenic tectogenesis, namely, the `cryogenic tectogenesis`. Investigation of these phenomena were described. Results suggested that to prevent the development of severe permafrost-related engineering geology processes, such as soil instability, differential thaw settlement, and thermal erosion, appropriate precautions should be taken since they could potentially result in loss of support and damage to engineering structures erected on permafrost. 10 refs.

  13. Anti-aliasing filters for deriving high-accuracy DEMs from TLS data: A case study from Freeport, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Lin.; Wang, Guoquan; Wessel, Paul

    2017-03-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), also known as ground-based Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), has been frequently applied to build bare-earth digital elevation models (DEMs) for high-accuracy geomorphology studies. The point clouds acquired from TLS often achieve a spatial resolution at fingerprint (e.g., 3 cm×3 cm) to handprint (e.g., 10 cm×10 cm) level. A downsampling process has to be applied to decimate the massive point clouds and obtain manageable DEMs. It is well known that downsampling can result in aliasing that causes different signal components to become indistinguishable when the signal is reconstructed from the datasets with a lower sampling rate. Conventional DEMs are mainly the results of upsampling of sparse elevation measurements from land surveying, satellite remote sensing, and aerial photography. As a consequence, the effects of aliasing caused by downsampling have not been fully investigated in the open literature of DEMs. This study aims to investigate the spatial aliasing problem of regridding dense TLS data. The TLS data collected from the beach and dune area near Freeport, Texas in the summer of 2015 are used for this study. The core idea of the anti-aliasing procedure is to apply a low-pass spatial filter prior to conducting downsampling. This article describes the successful use of a fourth-order Butterworth low-pass spatial filter employed in the Generic Mapping Tools (GMT) software package as an anti-aliasing filter. The filter can be applied as an isotropic filter with a single cutoff wavelength or as an anisotropic filter with two different cutoff wavelengths in the X and Y directions. The cutoff wavelength for the isotropic filter is recommended to be three times the grid size of the target DEM.

  14. Eruptions of the last 2200 years at Vulcano and Vulcanello (Aeolian Islands, Italy) dated by high-accuracy archeomagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Simone; Tanguy, Jean-Claude; Rosi, Mauro

    2006-12-01

    The recent eruptive history of the Vulcano island (Southern Italy) was investigated through the high-accuracy "large sample" archeomagnetic method (Tanguy, J.C., Le Goff, M., Principe, C., Arrighi, S., Chillemi, V., Paiotti, A., La Delfa, S., Patanè, G., 2003. Archeomagnetic dating of Mediterranean volcanics of the last 2100 years: validity and limits. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 211, 111-124; Tanguy, J.C., Principe, C., Arrighi, S., 2005. Comment on "Historical measurements of the Earth's magnetic field compared with remanence directions from lava flows in Italy over the last four centuries" by R. Lanza, A. Meloni, and E. Tema. Phys. Earth Planet. Interiors 152, 116-120; Arrighi, S., 2004. The large sample archeomagnetic method applied to Neapolitan volcanoes and Aeolian Islands. PhD Thesis. University of Pisa, Italy, pp. 1-186). Age determination is based upon directional geomagnetic variation reconstructed from historically dated lavas in Southern Italy, and from archeological sites in Western Europe (Gallet, Y., Genevey, A., Le Goff, M., 2002. Three millennia of directional variation of the Earth's magnetic field in Western Europe as revealed by archeological artefacts. Phys. Earth Planet. Interiors 131, 81-89) relocated to Sicily. Results in the present paper were obtained on 12 sites including 185 samples weighing 0.5-1 kg, distributed over the Vulcanello platform lavas and pyroclastic cones, and on the lava flows from the Fossa cone. It is shown that the Vulcanello platform was built by nearly continuous activity between AD 1000 and 1250, which is more than a millennium younger than believed until now from questionable interpretation of imprecise historical accounts. Most of the lavas from the Fossa cone, whose ages were rather hypothetical or known with a large uncertainty, have erupted within the same period. However, the last "Pietre Cotte" obsidian flow is confirmed to date from 1720 ± 30, in agreement with historical data (1739).

  15. High-accuracy alignment based on atmospherical dispersion - technological approaches and solutions for the dual-wavelength transmitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkhard, Boeckem [Institute for Geodesy and Photogrammetry, ETH Zurich (Switzerland)

    1999-07-01

    In the course of the progressive developments of sophisticated geodetic systems utilizing electromagnetic waves in the visible or near IR-range a more detailed knowledge of the propagation medium and coevally solutions of atmospherically induced limitations will become important. An alignment system based on atmospherical dispersion, called a dispersometer, is a metrological solution to the atmospherically induced limitations, in optical alignment and direction observations of high accuracy. In the dispersometer we are using the dual-wavelength method for dispersive air to obtain refraction compensated angle measurements, the detrimental impact of atmospheric turbulence notwithstanding. The principle of the dual-wavelength method utilizes atmospherical dispersion, i.e. the wavelength dependence of the refractive index. The difference angle between two light beams of different wavelengths, which is called the dispersion angle {delta}{beta}, is to first approximation proportional to the refraction angle: {beta}{sub IR} {nu}({beta}{sub blue} - {beta}{sub IR}) = {nu} {delta}{beta}, this equation implies that the dispersion angle has to be measured at least 42 times more accurate than the desired accuracy of the refraction angle for the wavelengths used in the present dispersometer. This required accuracy constitutes one major difficulty for the instrumental performance in applying the dispersion effect. However, the dual-wavelength method can only be successfully used in an optimized transmitter-receiver combination. Beyond the above mentioned resolution requirement for the detector, major difficulties in instrumental realization arise in the availability of a suitable dual-wavelength laser light source, laser light modulation with a very high extinction ratio and coaxial emittance of mono-mode radiation at both wavelengths. Therefore, this paper focuses on the solutions of the dual-wavelength transmitter introducing a new hardware approach and a complete re-design of

  16. Characterization of an experimental arrangement to measure position of particles in 3D with a high accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez González, A.; Guerrero Viramontes, J. A.; Moreno Hernández, D.

    2011-09-01

    Single particle position calculation in three dimensions (3D) with high accuracy is the very important in several branches of science. On the other hand, the use of in-line holography to study very small objects in a dynamic volume is a technique of importance for scientists and engineers across a variety of disciplines for obtaining information about size, shape, trajectory and velocity of small objects such as dust particles. However, in general for in-line holography, accurate determination of the object's position in the optical axis direction is difficult. In order to overcome this shortcoming, we proposed to use in-line holography set up to record particle images in two orthogonal forward configurations. In this study, we avoid digital holography reconstruction to calculate particle position. To determine particle position, the proposed method is based on the calculation of the size and position of the central spot size (CSS) of a particle diffraction image. The size of the CSS is calculated by using the Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) and Continuous Hough Transforms (CHT), an then the size of the CSS is related to a calibration curve calculated experimentally in order to determine the "z" particle position and centroid of the CSS render the "x-y" position of a particle image. The procedure proposed in this work to determine the 3D particle position is so simple since it avoids a complicated experimental set-up and several computational steps in order to obtain the 3D position of the particles. Our approach offers the following advantages: First, the mathematical accuracy, light illumination as well as particle and medium refractive indexes are used during the analysis. Second, it is not required to resolve the size of particle since we calculate only the size of CSS of a diffraction particle image pattern.

  17. Development and application of an automated precision solar radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Gang-gang; Li, Xin; Zhang, Quan; Zheng, Xiao-bing; Yan, Jing

    2016-10-01

    Automated filed vicarious calibration is becoming a growing trend for satellite remote sensor, which require a solar radiometer have to automatic measure reliable data for a long time whatever the weather conditions and transfer measurement data to the user office. An automated precision solar radiometer has been developed. It is used in measuring the solar spectral irradiance received at the Earth surface. The instrument consists of 8 parallel separate silicon-photodiode-based channels with narrow band-pass filters from the visible to near-IR regions. Each channel has a 2.0° full-angle Filed of View (FOV). The detectors and filters are temperature stabilized using a Thermal Energy Converter at 30+/-0.2°. The instrument is pointed toward the sun via an auto-tracking system that actively tracks the sun within a +/-0.1°. It collects data automatically and communicates with user terminal through BDS (China's BeiDou Navigation Satellite System) while records data as a redundant in internal memory, including working state and error. The solar radiometer is automated in the sense that it requires no supervision throughout the whole process of working. It calculates start-time and stop-time every day matched with the time of sunrise and sunset, and stop working once the precipitation. Calibrated via Langley curves and simultaneous observed with CE318, the different of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) is within 5%. The solar radiometer had run in all kinds of harsh weather condition in Gobi in Dunhuang and obtain the AODs nearly eight months continuously. This paper presents instrument design analysis, atmospheric optical depth retrievals as well as the experiment result.

  18. Measurement of small antenna reflector losses for radiometer calibration budget

    OpenAIRE

    Skou, Niels

    1997-01-01

    Antenna reflector losses play an important role in the calibration budget for a microwave radiometer. If the losses are small, they are difficult to measure by traditional means. However, they can be assessed directly by radiometric means using the sky brightness temperature as incident radiation. This paper describes how such measurements are carried out as well as a suitable experimental setup. The main reflector of the European Space Agency's MIMR system is used to demonstrate the principle

  19. Transfer function considerations for the CERES scanning radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manalo, N.; Smith, G. L.; Barkstrom, Bruce R.

    1991-01-01

    The Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) scanning radiometer will determine the radiation budget of the Earth on a regional basis over a number of years. The error in the reconstructed field is used as a design criterion for selecting design parameters for the instrument. The reconstruction error is comprised of errors due to aliasing, blurring and radiance equivalent noise of the instrument, and can be evaluated in terms of the transfer function of the system.

  20. A One-Dimensional Synthetic-Aperture Microwave Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Terence; Piepmeier, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    A proposed one-dimensional synthetic- aperture microwave radiometer could serve as an alternative to either the two-dimensional synthetic-aperture radiometer described in the immediately preceding article or to a prior one-dimensional one, denoted the Electrically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR), mentioned in that article. The proposed radiometer would operate in a pushbroom imaging mode, utilizing (1) interferometric cross-track scanning to obtain cross-track resolution and (2) the focusing property of a reflector for along-track resolution. The most novel aspect of the proposed system would be the antenna (see figure), which would include a cylindrical reflector of offset parabolic cross section. The reflector could be made of a lightweight, flexible material amenable to stowage and deployment. Other than a stowage/deployment mechanism, the antenna would not include moving parts, and cross-track scanning would not entail mechanical rotation of the antenna. During operation, the focal line, parallel to the cylindrical axis, would be oriented in the cross-track direction, so that placement of receiving/radiating elements at the focal line would afford the desired along-track resolution. The elements would be microwave feed horns sparsely arrayed along the focal line. The feed horns would be oriented with their short and long cross-sectional dimensions parallel and perpendicular, respectively, to the cylindrical axis to obtain fan-shaped beams having their broad and narrow cross-sectional dimensions parallel and perpendicular, respectively, to the cylindrical axis. The interference among the beams would be controlled in the same manner as in the ESTAR to obtain along-cylindrical- axis (cross-track) resolution and cross-track scanning.

  1. Accurate antenna reflector loss measurements for radiometer calibration budget

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    1996-01-01

    Antenna reflector losses may play an important role in the calibration budget for a microwave radiometer. If the losses are small they are difficult to measure by traditional means. However, they can be assessed directly by radiometric means using the sky brightness temperature as incident radiat...... radiation. The paper describes how such measurements are carried out as well as a suitable experimental set-up. The main reflector of the European Space Agency's MIMR system is used to demonstrate the principle...

  2. Ozone profiles above Kiruna from two ground-based radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Niall J.; Walker, Kaley A.; Raffalski, Uwe; Kivi, Rigel; Gross, Jochen; Manney, Gloria L.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents new atmospheric ozone concentration profiles retrieved from measurements made with two ground-based millimetre-wave radiometers in Kiruna, Sweden. The instruments are the Kiruna Microwave Radiometer (KIMRA) and the Millimeter wave Radiometer 2 (MIRA 2). The ozone concentration profiles are retrieved using an optimal estimation inversion technique, and they cover an altitude range of ˜ 16-54 km, with an altitude resolution of, at best, 8 km. The KIMRA and MIRA 2 measurements are compared to each other, to measurements from balloon-borne ozonesonde measurements at Sodankylä, Finland, and to measurements made by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) aboard the Aura satellite. KIMRA has a correlation of 0.82, but shows a low bias, with respect to the ozonesonde data, and MIRA 2 shows a smaller magnitude low bias and a 0.98 correlation coefficient. Both radiometers are in general agreement with each other and with MLS data, showing high correlation coefficients, but there are differences between measurements that are not explained by random errors. An oscillatory bias with a peak of approximately ±1 ppmv is identified in the KIMRA ozone profiles over an altitude range of ˜ 18-35 km, and is believed to be due to baseline wave features that are present in the spectra. A time series analysis of KIMRA ozone for winters 2008-2013 shows the existence of a local wintertime minimum in the ozone profile above Kiruna. The measurements have been ongoing at Kiruna since 2002 and late 2012 for KIMRA and MIRA 2, respectively.

  3. Source analysis of spaceborne microwave radiometer interference over land

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li GUAN; Sibo ZHANG

    2016-01-01

    Satellite microwave thermal emissions mixed with signals from active sensors are referred to as radiofrequency interference (RFI).Based on Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) observations from June 1 to 16,2011,RFI over Europe was identified and analyzed using the modified principal component analysis algorithm in this paper.The X band AMSR-E measurements in England and Italy are mostly affected by the stable,persistent,active microwave transmitters on the surface,while the RFI source of other European countries is the interference of the reflected geostationary TV satellite downlink signals to the measurements of spaceborne microwave radiometers.The locations and intensities of the RFI induced by the geostationary TV and communication satellites changed with time within the observed period.The observations of spacebome microwave radiometers in ascending portions of orbits are usually interfered with over European land,while no RFI was detected in descending passes.The RFI locations and intensities from the reflection of downlink radiation are highly dependent upon the relative geometry between the geostationary satellite and the measuring passive sensor.Only these fields of view of a spacebome instrument whose scan azimuths are close to the azimuth relative to the geostationary satellite are likely to be affected by RFI.

  4. Advanced modelling of the Planck-LFI radiometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battaglia, P [Thales Alenia Space Italia S.p.A., S.S. Padana Superiore 290, 20090 Vimodrone (Italy); Franceschet, C; Bersanelli, M; Maino, D; Mennella, A [Universita di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via G. Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Zonca, A [INAF-IASF Milano, Via E. Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Butler, R C; Mandolesi, N [INAF-IASF Bologna, Via P. Gobetti, 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); D' Arcangelo, O; Platania, P [IFP-CNR, via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Davis, R J [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Galeotta, S [INAF-OATs, Via G.B. Tiepolo 11, I-34131, Trieste (Italy); Guzzi, P [Numonyx, R and D Technology Center, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20041 Agrate Brianza (Italy); Hoyland, R [Instituto de AstrofIsica de Canarias, C/ Via Lactea S/N, E-38200, La Laguna (Tenerife) (Spain); Hughes, N; Jukkala, P [DA-Design Oy Jokioinen (Finland); Kettle, D [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester, M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Laaninen, M [Ylinen Electronics Oy Kauniainen (Finland); Leonardi, R; Meinhold, P, E-mail: paola.battaglia@thalesaleniaspace.co [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9530 (United States)

    2009-12-15

    The Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) is a radiometer array covering the 30-70 GHz spectral range on-board the ESA Planck satellite, launched on May 14th, 2009 to observe the cosmic microwave background (CMB) with unprecedented precision. In this paper we describe the development and validation of a software model of the LFI pseudo-correlation receivers which enables to reproduce and predict all the main system parameters of interest as measured at each of the 44 LFI detectors. These include system total gain, noise temperature, band-pass response, non-linear response. The LFI Advanced RF Model (LARFM) has been constructed by using commercial software tools and data of each radiometer component as measured at single unit level. The LARFM has been successfully used to reproduce the LFI behavior observed during the LFI ground-test campaign. The model is an essential element in the database of LFI data processing center and will be available for any detailed study of radiometer behaviour during the survey.

  5. Microwave radiometer observations of soil moisture in HAPEX-SAHEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmugge, Thomas J.; Chanzy, Andre; Kerr, Yann H.; van Oevelen, Peter

    1995-01-01

    Water stored in the soil serves as the reservoir for the evapotranspiration process, thus the interest in trying to map its spatial and temporal variations in experiments studying the soil- plant-atmosphere interactions at the GCM grid scale. During the 8 week intensive observation period (IOP) of HAPEX-Sahel (Hydrologic Atmospheric Pilot Experiment in the Sahel), this was done with two airborne microwave radiometer systems. The five frequency (5 to 90 GHz) PORTOS radiometer on the French ARAT aircraft and the single frequency (1.42 GHz) multibeam pushbroom microwave radiometer (PBMR) on the NASA C-130 were used. These aircraft measurements were supported by ground based observations at the central sites and, because of several rains during the IOP, covered a good range of soil wetness conditions that existed. The PBMR and the 5.05 GHz PORTOS channel in H polarization show a large dynamic range of TB on each day and between different days in response to variations in rainfall and drying conditions ranging from low TBs of 210 to 220 K for the wettest conditions to values of 280 to 290 K for the driest.

  6. Radiometer system to map the cosmic background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorenstein, M. V.; Muller, R. A.; Smoot, G. F.; Tyson, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    A 33-GHz airborne radiometer system has been developed to map large angular scale variations in the temperature of the 3 K cosmic background radiation. A ferrite circulator switches a room-temperature mixer between two antennas pointing 60 deg apart in the sky. In 40 min of observing, the radiometer can measure the anisotropy of the microwave background with an accuracy of plus or minus 1 mK rms, or about 1 part in 3000 of 3 K. The apparatus is flown in a U-2 jet to 20 km altitude where 33-GHz thermal microwave emission from the atmosphere is at a low level. A second radiometer, tuned to 54 GHz near oxygen emission lines, monitors spurious signals from residual atmospheric radiation. The antennas, which have an extremely low side-lobe response of less than -65 dB past 60 deg, reject anisotropic radiation from the earth's surface. Periodic interchange of the antenna positions and reversal of the aircraft's flight direction cancel equipment-based imbalances. The system has been operated successfully in U-2 aircraft flown from NASA-Ames at Moffett Field, Calif.

  7. Source analysis of spaceborne microwave radiometer interference over land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Li; Zhang, Sibo

    2016-03-01

    Satellite microwave thermal emissions mixed with signals from active sensors are referred to as radiofrequency interference (RFI). Based on Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) observations from June 1 to 16, 2011, RFI over Europe was identified and analyzed using the modified principal component analysis algorithm in this paper. The X band AMSR-E measurements in England and Italy are mostly affected by the stable, persistent, active microwave transmitters on the surface, while the RFI source of other European countries is the interference of the reflected geostationary TV satellite downlink signals to the measurements of spaceborne microwave radiometers. The locations and intensities of the RFI induced by the geostationary TV and communication satellites changed with time within the observed period. The observations of spaceborne microwave radiometers in ascending portions of orbits are usually interfered with over European land, while no RFI was detected in descending passes. The RFI locations and intensities from the reflection of downlink radiation are highly dependent upon the relative geometry between the geostationary satellite and the measuring passive sensor. Only these fields of view of a spaceborne instrument whose scan azimuths are close to the azimuth relative to the geostationary satellite are likely to be affected by RFI.

  8. Repeatability of Cryogenic Multilayer Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. L.; Vanderlaan, M.; Wood, J. J.; Rhys, N. O.; Guo, W.; Van Sciver, S.; Chato, D. J.

    2017-01-01

    Due to the variety of requirements across aerospace platforms, and one off projects, the repeatability of cryogenic multilayer insulation has never been fully established. The objective of this test program is to provide a more basic understanding of the thermal performance repeatability of MLI systems that are applicable to large scale tanks. There are several different types of repeatability that can be accounted for: these include repeatability between multiple identical blankets, repeatability of installation of the same blanket, and repeatability of a test apparatus. The focus of the work in this report is on the first two types of repeatability. Statistically, repeatability can mean many different things. In simplest form, it refers to the range of performance that a population exhibits and the average of the population. However, as more and more identical components are made (i.e. the population of concern grows), the simple range morphs into a standard deviation from an average performance. Initial repeatability testing on MLI blankets has been completed at Florida State University. Repeatability of five GRC provided coupons with 25 layers was shown to be +/- 8.4 whereas repeatability of repeatedly installing a single coupon was shown to be +/- 8.0. A second group of 10 coupons have been fabricated by Yetispace and tested by Florida State University, through the first 4 tests, the repeatability has been shown to be +/- 16. Based on detailed statistical analysis, the data has been shown to be statistically significant.

  9. The Cryogenic Storage Ring CSR

    CERN Document Server

    von Hahn, Robert; Berg, Felix; Blaum, Klaus; Breitenfeldt, Christian; Fadil, Hisham; Fellenberger, Florian; Froese, Michael; George, Sebastian; Göck, Jürgen; Grieser, Manfred; Grussie, Florian; Guerin, Elisabeth A; Heber, Oded; Herwig, Philipp; Karthein, Jonas; Krantz, Claude; Kreckel, Holger; Lange, Michael; Laux, Felix; Lohmann, Svenja; Menk, Sebastian; Meyer, Christian; Mishra, Preeti M; Novotný, Oldřich; Connor, Aodh P O; Orlov, Dmitry A; Rappaport, Michael L; Repnow, Roland; Saurabh, Sunny; Schippers, Stefan; Schröter, Claus Dieter; Schwalm, Dirk; Schweikhard, Lutz; Sieber, Thomas; Shornikov, Andrey; Spruck, Kaija; Kumar, Sudhakaran Sunil; Ullrich, Joachim; Urbain, Xavier; Vogel, Stephen; Wilhelm, Patrick; Wolf, Andreas; Zajfman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 $\\pm$ 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion) and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas den...

  10. Cryogenic silicon surface ion trap

    CERN Document Server

    Niedermayr, Michael; Kumph, Muir; Partel, Stefan; Edlinger, Johannes; Brownnutt, Michael; Blatt, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Trapped ions are pre-eminent candidates for building quantum information processors and quantum simulators. They have been used to demonstrate quantum gates and algorithms, quantum error correction, and basic quantum simulations. However, to realise the full potential of such systems and make scalable trapped-ion quantum computing a reality, there exist a number of practical problems which must be solved. These include tackling the observed high ion-heating rates and creating scalable trap structures which can be simply and reliably produced. Here, we report on cryogenically operated silicon ion traps which can be rapidly and easily fabricated using standard semiconductor technologies. Single $^{40}$Ca$^+$ ions have been trapped and used to characterize the trap operation. Long ion lifetimes were observed with the traps exhibiting heating rates as low as $\\dot{\\bar{n}}=$ 0.33 phonons/s at an ion-electrode distance of 230 $\\mu$m. These results open many new avenues to arrays of micro-fabricated ion traps.

  11. A Cryogenic Infrared Calibration Target

    CERN Document Server

    Wollack, Edward J; Rinehart, Stephan A

    2014-01-01

    A compact cryogenic calibration target is presented that has a peak diffuse reflectance, $R \\le 0.003$, from $800-4,800\\,{\\rm cm}^{-1}$ $(12-2\\,\\mu$m). Upon expanding the spectral range under consideration to $400-10,000\\,{\\rm cm}^{-1}$ $(25-1\\,\\mu$m) the observed performance gracefully degrades to $R \\le 0.02$ at the band edges. In the implementation described, a high-thermal-conductivity metallic substrate is textured with a pyramidal tiling and subsequently coated with a thin lossy dielectric coating that enables high absorption and thermal uniformity across the target. The resulting target assembly is lightweight, has a low-geometric profile, and has survived repeated thermal cycling from room temperature to $\\sim4\\,$K. Basic design considerations, governing equations, and test data for realizing the structure described are provided. The optical properties of selected absorptive materials -- Acktar Fractal Black, Aeroglaze Z306, and Stycast 2850 FT epoxy loaded with stainless steel powder -- are character...

  12. The future of cryogenic propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palerm, S.; Bonhomme, C.; Guelou, Y.; Chopinet, J. N.; Danous, P.

    2015-07-01

    As the French Space Agency, CNES is funding an ambitious program to identify, develop and evaluate the technologies and skills that will enable to design cost efficient future launchers. This program deals together with, researches for mastering complex physical phenomena, set ups of robust and efficient numerical tools for design and justification, and identification of innovative manufacturing processes and hardware. It starts from low Technical Readiness Level (TRL 2) up to a maturation of TRL 6 with the use of demonstrators, level that allows to be ready for a development. This paper focuses on cryogenic propulsion activities conducted with SNECMA and French laboratories to prepare next generation engines. The physics in that type of hardware addresses a large range of highly complex phenomena, among them subcritical and supercritical combustion and possible associated High Frequency oscillations in combustion devices, tribology in bearings and seals, cavitation and rotordynamics in turbopump. The research activities conducted to master those physical phenomena are presented. Moreover, the operating conditions of these engines are very challenging, both thermally and mechanically. The innovative manufacturing processes and designs developed to cope with these conditions while filling cost reduction requirements are described. Finally, the associated demonstrators put in place to prepare the implementation of these new technologies on future engines are presented.

  13. Cryogenic Fluid Management Technology Development Roadmaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. R.; Johnson, W. L.

    2017-01-01

    Advancement in Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) Technologies is essential for achieving NASA's future long duration missions. Propulsion systems utilizing cryogens are necessary to achieve mission success. Current State Of the Art (SOA) CFM technologies enable cryogenic propellants to be stored for several hours. However, some envisioned mission architectures require cryogens to be stored for two years or longer. The fundamental roles of CFM technologies are long term storage of cryogens, propellant tank pressure control and propellant delivery. In the presence of heat, the cryogens will "boil-off" over time resulting in excessive pressure buildup, off-nominal propellant conditions, and propellant loss. To achieve long term storage and tank pressure control, the CFM elements will intercept and/or remove any heat from the propulsion system. All functions are required to perform both with and without the presence of a gravitational field. Which CFM technologies are required is a function of the cryogens used, mission architecture, vehicle design and propellant tank size. To enable NASA's crewed mission to the Martian surface, a total of seventeen CFM technologies have been identified to support an In-Space Stage and a Lander/Ascent Vehicle. Recognizing that FY2020 includes a Decision Point regarding the In-Space Stage Architecture, a set of CFM Technology Development Roadmaps have been created identifying the current Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of each element, current technology "gaps", and existing technology development efforts. The roadmaps include a methodical approach and schedule to achieve a flight demonstration in FY2023, hence maturing CFM technologies to TRL 7 for infusion into the In-Space Stage Preliminary Design.

  14. The multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) - precision infrared radiometer (PIR) platform in Fairbanks: Scientific objectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stamnes, K.; Leontieva, E. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) and precision infrared radiometer (PIR) have been employed at the Geophysical Institute in Fairbanks to check their performance under arctic conditions. Drawing on the experience of the previous measurements in the Arctic, the PIR was equipped with a ventilator to prevent frost and moisture build-up. We adopted the Solar Infrared Observing Sytem (SIROS) concept from the Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) to allow implementation of the same data processing software for a set of radiation and meteorological instruments. To validate the level of performance of the whole SIROS prior to its incorporation into the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Cloud and Radiation Testbed Site instrumental suite for flux radiatin measurements, the comparison between measurements and model predictions will be undertaken to assess the MFRSR-PIR Arctic data quality.

  15. A Microwave Radiometer for Internal Body Temperature Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheeler, Robert Patterson

    This thesis presents the analysis and design of a microwave radiometer for internal body temperature measurements. There is currently no available method for non-invasive temperature measurement inside the human body. However, knowledge of both relative and absolute temperature variations over time is important to a number of medical applications. The research presented in this thesis details a proof-of-concept near-field microwave radiometer demonstrating relative thermometry of a multi-layer phantom. There are a number of technical challenges addressed in this thesis for radiometric determination of sub-degree temperature variations in the human body. A theoretical approach is developed for determining sensing depth from known complex layered tissues, which is defined as a figure of merit, and is shown to be dependent on frequency, electrical properties of the tissues, and the near-field probe. In order to obtain depth resolution, multiple frequency operation can be used, so multi-frequency probes are designed and demonstrated in this work. The choice of frequencies is determined not only by the tissue material properties, but also by the ever increasing radio interference in the environment. In this work, quiet bands allocated to radio astronomy are investigated. The radiometer and probe need to be compact to be wearable, and several advancements are made towards a fully wearable device: multi-frequency low-profile probes are designed and fabricated on a flexible substrate and the process of on-chip integration is demonstrated by a GaAs MMIC cold noise source for radiometer calibration. The implemented proof-of-concept device consists of two radiometers at 1.4 GHz and 2.7 GHz, designed with commercial inexpensive devices that can enable sufficient sensitivity. The device is tested on a phantom with two water layers whose temperatures are varied in a controlled manner, and focused on the human body temperature range. Measured results are discussed qualitatively

  16. Measuring symmetry of implosions in cryogenic Hohlraums at the NIF using gated x-ray detectors (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrala, G A; Dixit, S; Glenzer, S; Kalantar, D; Bradley, D; Izumi, N; Meezan, N; Landen, O L; Callahan, D; Weber, S V; Holder, J P; Glenn, S; Edwards, M J; Bell, P; Kimbrough, J; Koch, J; Prasad, R; Suter, L; Kline, J L; Kilkenny, J

    2010-10-01

    Ignition of imploding inertial confinement capsules requires, among other things, controlling the symmetry with high accuracy and fidelity. We have used gated x-ray imaging, with 10 μm and 70 ps resolution, to detect the x-ray emission from the imploded core of symmetry capsules at the National Ignition Facility. The measurements are used to characterize the time dependent symmetry and the x-ray bang time of the implosion from two orthogonal directions. These measurements were one of the primary diagnostics used to tune the parameters of the laser and Hohlraum to vary the symmetry and x-ray bang time of the implosion of cryogenically cooled ignition scale deuterium/helium filled plastic capsules. Here, we will report on the successful measurements performed with up to 1.2 MJ of laser energy in a fully integrated cryogenics gas-filled ignition-scale Hohlraum and capsule illuminated with 192 smoothed laser beams. We will describe the technique, the accuracy of the technique, and the results of the variation in symmetry with tuning parameters, and explain how that set was used to predictably tune the implosion symmetry as the laser energy, the laser cone wavelength separation, and the Hohlraum size were increased to ignition scales. We will also describe how to apply that technique to cryogenically layered tritium-hydrogen-deuterium capsules.

  17. NASA's Cryogenic Fluid Management Technology Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramel, Terri L.; Motil, Susan M.

    2008-01-01

    The Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) Project's primary objective is to develop storage, transfer, and handling technologies for cryogens that will support the enabling of high performance cryogenic propulsion systems, lunar surface systems and economical ground operations. Such technologies can significantly reduce propellant launch mass and required on-orbit margins, reduce or even eliminate propellant tank fluid boil-off losses for long term missions, and simplify vehicle operations. This paper will present the status of the specific technologies that the CFM Project is developing. The two main areas of concentration are analysis models development and CFM hardware development. The project develops analysis tools and models based on thermodynamics, hydrodynamics, and existing flight/test data. These tools assist in the development of pressure/thermal control devices (such as the Thermodynamic Vent System (TVS), and Multi-layer insulation); with the ultimate goal being to develop a mature set of tools and models that can characterize the performance of the pressure/thermal control devices incorporated in the design of an entire CFM system with minimal cryogen loss. The project does hardware development and testing to verify our understanding of the physical principles involved, and to validate the performance of CFM components, subsystems and systems. This database provides information to anchor our analytical models. This paper describes some of the current activities of the NASA's Cryogenic Fluid Management Project.

  18. Cryogenic System for the Spallation Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenius, D.; Chronis, W.; Creel, J.; Dixon, K.; Ganni, V.; Knudsen, P.

    2004-06-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a neutron-scattering facility being built at Oak Ridge, TN for the US Department of Energy. The SNS accelerator linac consists of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities in cryostats (cryomodules). The linac cryomodules are cooled to 2.1 K by a 2300 watt cryogenic refrigeration system. As an SNS partner laboratory, Jefferson Lab is responsible for the installed integrated cryogenic system design for the SNS linac accelerator consisting of major subsystem equipment engineered and procured from industry. Jefferson Lab's work included developing the major vendor subsystem equipment procurement specifications, equipment procurement, and the integrated system engineering support of the field installation and commissioning. The major cryogenic system components include liquid nitrogen storage, gaseous helium storage, cryogen distribution transfer line system, 2.1-K cold box consisting of four stages of cold compressors, 4.5-K cold box, warm helium compressors with its associated oil removal, gas management, helium purification, gas impurity monitoring systems, and the supportive utilities of electrical power, cooling water and instrument air. The system overview, project organization, the important aspects, and the capabilities of the cryogenic system are described.

  19. Advanced Devices for Cryogenic Thermal Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugby, D.; Stouffer, C.; Garzon, J.; Beres, M.; Gilchrist, A.

    2006-04-01

    This paper describes six advanced cryogenic thermal management devices/subsystems developed by Swales Aerospace for ground/space-based applications of interest to NASA, DoD, and the commercial sector. The devices/subsystems described herein include the following: (a) a differential thermal expansion cryogenic thermal switch (DTE-CTSW) constructed with high purity aluminum end-pieces and an Ultem support rod for the 6 K Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) (b) a quad-redundant DTE-CTSW assembly for the 35 K science instruments (NIRCam, NIRSpec, and FGS) mounted on the JWST Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) (c) a cryogenic diode heat pipe (CDHP) thermal switching system using methane as the working fluid for the 100 K CRISM hyperspectral mapping instrument on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) and (d) three additional devices/subsystems developed during the AFRL-sponsored CRYOTOOL program, which include a dual DTE-CTSW/dual cryocooler test bed, a miniaturized neon cryogenic loop heat pipe (mini-CLHP), and an across gimbal cryogenic thermal transport system (GCTTS). For the first three devices/subsystems mentioned above, this paper describes key aspects of the development efforts including concept definition, design, fabrication, and testing. For the latter three, this paper provides brief overview descriptions as key details are provided in a related paper.

  20. Cryogenic Applications of Commercial Electronic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Ernest D.; Benford, Dominic J.; Forgione, Joshua B.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Wollack, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a range of techniques useful for constructing analog and digital circuits for operation in a liquid Helium environment (4.2K), using commercially available low power components. The challenges encountered in designing cryogenic electronics include finding components that can function usefully in the cold and possess low enough power dissipation so as not to heat the systems they are designed to measure. From design, test, and integration perspectives it is useful for components to operate similarly at room and cryogenic temperatures; however this is not a necessity. Some of the circuits presented here have been used successfully in the MUSTANG and in the GISMO camera to build a complete digital to analog multiplexer (which will be referred to as the Cryogenic Address Driver board). Many of the circuit elements described are of a more general nature rather than specific to the Cryogenic Address Driver board, and were studied as a part of a more comprehensive approach to addressing a larger set of cryogenic electronic needs.

  1. Advanced Sprayable Composite Coating for Cryogenic Insulation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Materials Technology, Inc (AMTI) responds to the NASA solicitation X10 "Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer" under subtopic X.01 "Cryogenic Fluid...

  2. Low evaporation rate storage media for cryogenic liquids Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Considerable design work has been devoted to the development of cryogenic liquid storage containers. Containers which hold cryogenic liquids such as liquid nitrogen,...

  3. Manufacture of Novel Cryogenic Thermal Protection Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Materials Technology, Inc (AMTI) responds to the NASA SBIR solicitation X8 "Space Cryogenic Systems" under subtopic X8.01, "Cryogenic Fluid Transfer and...

  4. In-Space Cryogenic VOST Connect/Disconnect Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Two novel cryogenic couplings will be designed, fabricated and tested. Intended for in-space use at cryogenic propellant depots, the couplings are based on patented...

  5. In-Space Cryogenic VOST Connect/Disconnect Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A novel cryogenic coupling will be designed and modeled. Intended for in-space use at cryogenic propellant depots, the coupling is based on patented Venturi-Offset...

  6. Energy Efficient Cryogenics on Earth and in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, James E.

    2012-01-01

    The Cryogenics Test Laboratory, NASA Kennedy Space Center, works to provide practical solutions to low-temperature problems while focusing on long-term technology targets for energy-efficient cryogenics on Earth and in space.

  7. Estimating subsurface water volumes and transit times in Hokkaido river catchments, Japan, using high-accuracy tritium analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusyev, Maksym; Yamazaki, Yusuke; Morgenstern, Uwe; Stewart, Mike; Kashiwaya, Kazuhisa; Hirai, Yasuyuki; Kuribayashi, Daisuke; Sawano, Hisaya

    2015-04-01

    The goal of this study is to estimate subsurface water transit times and volumes in headwater catchments of Hokkaido, Japan, using the New Zealand high-accuracy tritium analysis technique. Transit time provides insights into the subsurface water storage and therefore provides a robust and quick approach to quantifying the subsurface groundwater volume. Our method is based on tritium measurements in river water. Tritium is a component of meteoric water, decays with a half-life of 12.32 years, and is inert in the subsurface after the water enters the groundwater system. Therefore, tritium is ideally suited for characterization of the catchment's responses and can provide information on mean water transit times up to 200 years. Only in recent years has it become possible to use tritium for dating of stream and river water, due to the fading impact of the bomb-tritium from thermo-nuclear weapons testing, and due to improved measurement accuracy for the extremely low natural tritium concentrations. Transit time of the water discharge is one of the most crucial parameters for understanding the response of catchments and estimating subsurface water volume. While many tritium transit time studies have been conducted in New Zealand, only a limited number of tritium studies have been conducted in Japan. In addition, the meteorological, orographic and geological conditions of Hokkaido Island are similar to those in parts of New Zealand, allowing for comparison between these regions. In 2014, three field trips were conducted in Hokkaido in June, July and October to sample river water at river gauging stations operated by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT). These stations have altitudes between 36 m and 860 m MSL and drainage areas between 45 and 377 km2. Each sampled point is located upstream of MLIT dams, with hourly measurements of precipitation and river water levels enabling us to distinguish between the snow melt and baseflow contributions

  8. A Reference Guide for Cryogenic Properties of Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisend, John G

    2003-09-16

    A thorough knowledge of the behavior of materials at cryogenic temperatures is critical for the design of successful cryogenic systems. Over the past 50 years, a tremendous amount of material properties at cryogenic temperatures have been measured and published. This guide lists resources for finding these properties. It covers online databases, computer codes, conference proceedings, journals, handbooks, overviews and monographs. It includes references for finding reports issued by government laboratories and agencies. Most common solids and fluids used in cryogenics are covered.

  9. Cryogenic cooling system for HTS cable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Shigeru [Taiyo Nippon Sanso, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2017-06-15

    Recently, Research and development activity of HTS (High Temperature Superconducting) power application is very progressive worldwide. Especially, HTS cable system and HTSFCL (HTS Fault current limiter) system are proceeding to practical stages. In such system and equipment, cryogenic cooling system, which makes HTS equipment cooled lower than critical temperature, is one of crucial components. In this article, cryogenic cooling system for HTS application, mainly cable, is reviewed. Cryogenic cooling system can be categorized into conduction cooling system and immersion cooling system. In practical HTS power application area, immersion cooling system with sub-cooled liquid nitrogen is preferred. The immersion cooling system is besides grouped into open cycle system and closed cycle system. Turbo-Brayton refrigerator is a key component for closed cycle system. Those two cooling systems are focused in this article. And, each design and component of the cooling system is explained.

  10. Process Identification through Test on Cryogenic System

    CERN Document Server

    Pezzetti, M; Chadli, M; Coppier, H

    2008-01-01

    UNICOS (UNified Industrial Control System) is the CERN object-based control standard for the cryogenics of the LHC and its experiments. It includes a variety of embedded functions, dedicated to the specific cryogenic processes. To enlarge the capabilities of the standard it is proposed to integrate the parametrical identification step in the control system of large scale cryogenic plants. Different methods of parametrical identification have been tested and the results were combined to obtain a better model. The main objective of the work is to find a compromise between an easy-to-use solution and a good level of process identification model. The study focuses on identification protocol for large delayed system, the measurement consistency and correlation between different inputs and outputs. Furthermore the paper describes in details, the results and the tests carried out on parametrical identification investigations with large scale systems.

  11. Cryogenic hydrogen-induced air liquefaction technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Extensively utilizing a special advanced airbreathing propulsion archives database, as well as direct contacts with individuals who were active in the field in previous years, a technical assessment of cryogenic hydrogen-induced air liquefaction, as a prospective onboard aerospace vehicle process, was performed and documented. The resulting assessment report is summarized. Technical findings are presented relating the status of air liquefaction technology, both as a singular technical area, and also that of a cluster of collateral technical areas including: compact lightweight cryogenic heat exchangers; heat exchanger atmospheric constituents fouling alleviation; para/ortho hydrogen shift conversion catalysts; hydrogen turbine expanders, cryogenic air compressors and liquid air pumps; hydrogen recycling using slush hydrogen as heat sink; liquid hydrogen/liquid air rocket-type combustion devices; air collection and enrichment systems (ACES); and technically related engine concepts.

  12. Technical presentation: BGM Cryogenic Engineering Limited

    CERN Multimedia

    Caroline Laignel - FI Department

    2006-01-01

    13 - 14 June 2006 TECHNICAL PRESENTATION BGM Cryogenic Engineering Limited 09:00 - 18:00, 60-2-016, Main Building. Presentation on BGM: 11:00 - 12:00, 60-2-016, Main Building. BGM Cryogenic Engineering Limited manufactures assemblies, sub-assemblies and machined components for the cryogenic technology sector. The primary markets served include superconducting magnets used in the healthcare sector (eg MRI body scanners), spectroscopy and NMR equipment for numerous R & D and technology applications, high vacuum applications and particle physics research. BGM has specialist assembly capability including stainless steel and aluminium welding, vacuum testing, electromechanical assembly and metal finishing. BGM offers a ‘one stop shop'facility to satisfy any customer requirement. Through our design partner we can offer a full design and modelling service, including 3D modelling and production of 2D drawings on your own borders. We can conduct heat load and force calculations and advise on the best...

  13. Cryogenics for Particle Accelerators and Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, P; Vandoni, Giovanna; Wagner, U

    2002-01-01

    Cryogenics has become a key ancillary technology of particle accelerators and detectors, contributing to their sustained development over the last fifty years. Conversely, this development has produced new challenges and markets for cryogenics, resulting in a fruitful symbiotic relation which materialized in significant technology transfer and technical progress. This began with the use of liquid hydrogen and deuterium in the targets and bubble chambers of the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. It developed more recently with increasing amounts of liquefied noble gases - mainly argon, but also krypton and even today xenon - in calorimeters. In parallel with these applications, the availability of practical type II superconductors from the early 1960s triggered the use of superconductivity in large spectrometer magnets - mostly driven by considerations of energy savings - and the corresponding development of helium cryogenics. It is however the generalized application of superconductivity in particle accelerators - RF ac...

  14. Characterization of a cryogenic ion guide at IGISOL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saastamoinen, A.; Moore, I. D.; Ranjan, M.; Dendooven, P.; Penttila, H.; Perajarvi, K.; Popov, A.; Aysto, J.

    2012-01-01

    A small volume cryogenic ion guide has been characterized at the IGISOL facility, Jyvaskyla, as a prototype to verify whether there are any major obstacles to the use of high-density cryogenic helium gas for the stopping and extraction of high-energy ions from a large volume cryogenic ion catcher.

  15. 49 CFR 173.319 - Cryogenic liquids in tank cars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cryogenic liquids in tank cars. 173.319 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.319 Cryogenic liquids in tank cars. (a) General requirements. (1) A tank car containing a flammable cryogenic liquid may not be...

  16. 49 CFR 173.316 - Cryogenic liquids in cylinders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cryogenic liquids in cylinders. 173.316 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.316 Cryogenic liquids in cylinders. (a) General requirements. (1) A cylinder may not be loaded with a cryogenic liquid colder than...

  17. 21 CFR 882.4250 - Cryogenic surgical device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cryogenic surgical device. 882.4250 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4250 Cryogenic surgical device. (a) Identification. A cryogenic surgical device is a device used to destroy nervous tissue or produce...

  18. 49 CFR 173.320 - Cryogenic liquids; exceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cryogenic liquids; exceptions. 173.320 Section 173... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.320 Cryogenic liquids; exceptions. (a) Atmospheric gases and helium, cryogenic liquids, in Dewar flasks, insulated cylinders...

  19. 49 CFR 173.318 - Cryogenic liquids in cargo tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cryogenic liquids in cargo tanks. 173.318 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.318 Cryogenic liquids in cargo tanks. (a) General requirements. (1) A cargo tank may not be loaded with a cryogenic liquid colder than...

  20. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnacki, Kent

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: 1) Store cryogenic propellants in a manner that maximizes their availability for use regardless of mission duration. 2) Efficiently transfer conditioned cryogenic propellant to an engine or tank situated in a microgravity environment. 3) Accurately monitor and gauge cryogenic propellants situated in a microgravity environment.

  1. Characterization of a cryogenic ion guide at IGISOL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saastamoinen, A.; Moore, I. D.; Ranjan, M.; Dendooven, P.; Penttila, H.; Perajarvi, K.; Popov, A.; Aysto, J.

    2012-01-01

    A small volume cryogenic ion guide has been characterized at the IGISOL facility, Jyvaskyla, as a prototype to verify whether there are any major obstacles to the use of high-density cryogenic helium gas for the stopping and extraction of high-energy ions from a large volume cryogenic ion catcher. T

  2. Resolving Ultrafast Heating of Dense Cryogenic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zastrau, U.; Sperling, P.; Harmand, M.; Becker, A.; Bornath, T.; Bredow, R.; Dziarzhytski, S.; Fennel, T.; Fletcher, L. B.; Förster, E.; Göde, S.; Gregori, G.; Hilbert, V.; Hochhaus, D.; Holst, B.; Laarmann, T.; Lee, H. J.; Ma, T.; Mithen, J. P.; Mitzner, R.; Murphy, C. D.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Neumayer, P.; Przystawik, A.; Roling, S.; Schulz, M.; Siemer, B.; Skruszewicz, S.; Tiggesbäumker, J.; Toleikis, S.; Tschentscher, T.; White, T.; Wöstmann, M.; Zacharias, H.; Döppner, T.; Glenzer, S. H.; Redmer, R.

    2014-03-01

    We report on the dynamics of ultrafast heating in cryogenic hydrogen initiated by a ≲300 fs, 92 eV free electron laser x-ray burst. The rise of the x-ray scattering amplitude from a second x-ray pulse probes the transition from dense cryogenic molecular hydrogen to a nearly uncorrelated plasmalike structure, indicating an electron-ion equilibration time of ˜0.9 ps. The rise time agrees with radiation hydrodynamics simulations based on a conductivity model for partially ionized plasma that is validated by two-temperature density-functional theory.

  3. Compact insert design for cryogenic pressure vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceves, Salvador M.; Ledesma-Orozco, Elias Rigoberto; Espinosa-Loza, Francisco; Petitpas, Guillaume; Switzer, Vernon A.

    2017-06-14

    A pressure vessel apparatus for cryogenic capable storage of hydrogen or other cryogenic gases at high pressure includes an insert with a parallel inlet duct, a perpendicular inlet duct connected to the parallel inlet. The perpendicular inlet duct and the parallel inlet duct connect the interior cavity with the external components. The insert also includes a parallel outlet duct and a perpendicular outlet duct connected to the parallel outlet duct. The perpendicular outlet duct and the parallel outlet duct connect the interior cavity with the external components.

  4. Cryogenic Yb: YAG Thin-Disk Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-09

    Spitzberg, "Cryogenic Yb3+-Doped Solid-State Lasers," IEEE Journ. of Sel. Topics in Quant. Elect., 13(3), 448-459 (2007). [3] S. Tokita, J. Kawanaka, M...Europe ( IEEE ,2005) ,CTu3 (2005). [4] D. C. Brown, J. M. Singley, E. Yager, J. W. Kuper, B. J. Lotito, L. L. Bennett, "Innovative high-power CW...Y. Sun, and R. W. Equall, "Yb:YAG Absorption at Ambient and Cryogenic Temperatures," IEEE Journ. Sel. Topics Quant. Elect. 11(3), 604-612 (2005

  5. MCP-based Photodetectors for Cryogenic Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dharmapalan, Ranjan; Byrum, Karen; Demarteau, Marcel; Elam, Jeffrey; May, Edward; Wagner, Robert; Walters, Dean; Xia, Lei; Xie, Junqi; Zhao, Huyue; Wang, J

    2016-01-01

    The Argonne MCP-based photo detector is an offshoot of the Large Area Pico-second Photo Detector (LAPPD) project, wherein 6 cm x 6 cm sized detectors are made at Argonne National Laboratory. We have successfully built and tested our first detectors for pico-second timing and few mm spatial resolution. We discuss our efforts to customize these detectors to operate in a cryogenic environment. Initial plans aim to operate in liquid argon. We are also exploring ways to mitigate wave length shifting requirements and also developing bare-MCP photodetectors to operate in a gaseous cryogenic environment.

  6. S193 radiometer brightness temperature precision/accuracy for SL2 and SL3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pounds, D. J.; Krishen, K.

    1975-01-01

    The precision and accuracy with which the S193 radiometer measured the brightness temperature of ground scenes is investigated. Estimates were derived from data collected during Skylab missions. Homogeneous ground sites were selected and S193 radiometer brightness temperature data analyzed. The precision was expressed as the standard deviation of the radiometer acquired brightness temperature. Precision was determined to be 2.40 K or better depending on mode and target temperature.

  7. Boreal Inundation Mapping with SMAP Radiometer Data for Methane Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seungbum; Brisco, Brian; Poncos, Valentin

    2017-04-01

    Inundation and consequent anoxic condition induce methane release, which is one of the most potent greenhouse gases. Boreal regions contain large amounts of organic carbon, which is a potentially major methane emission source under climatic warming conditions. Boreal wetlands in particular are one of the largest sources of uncertainties in global methane budget. Wetland spatial extent together with the gas release rate remains highly unknown. Characterization of the existing inundation database is poor, because of the inundation under clouds and dense vegetation. In this work, the inundation extent is derived using brightness temperature data acquired by the L-band Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite, which offers the L-band capabilities to penetrate clouds and vegetation at 3-day revisit. The fidelity of the SMAP watermask is assessed as a first step in this investigation by comparing with the following data sets: 3-m resolution maps derived using Radarsat synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data in northern Canada and multi-sensor climatology over Siberia. Because Radarsat coverages are limited despite its high spatial resolution, at the time and location where Radarsats are not available, we also compare with 3-km resolution SMAP SAR data that are concurrent with the SMAP radiometer data globally until July 2015. Inundation extents were derived with Radarsat, SMAP SAR, and SMAP radiometer over the 60 km x 60km area at Peace Athabasca Delta (PAD), Canada on 6 days in spring and summer 2015. The SMAP SAR results match the locations of Radarsat waterbodies. However, the SMAP SAR underestimates the water extent, mainly over mixed pixels that have subpixel land presence. The threshold value (-3 dB) applied to the SMAP SAR was determined previously over the global domain. The threshold is dependent on the type of local landcover within a mixed pixel. Further analysis is needed to locally optimize the threshold. The SMAP radiometer water fraction over Peace

  8. Strategy for high-accuracy-and-precision retrieval of atmospheric methane from the mid-infrared FTIR network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sussmann

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a strategy (MIR-GBM v1.0 for the retrieval of column-averaged dry-air mole fractions of methane (XCH4 with a precision <0.3% (1-σ diurnal variation, 7-min integration and a seasonal bias <0.14% from mid-infrared ground-based solar FTIR measurements of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC, comprising 22 FTIR stations. This makes NDACC methane data useful for satellite validation and for the inversion of regional-scale sources and sinks in addition to long-term trend analysis. Such retrievals complement the high accuracy and precision near-infrared observations of the younger Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON with time series dating back 15 years or so before TCCON operations began.

    MIR-GBM v1.0 is using HITRAN 2000 (including the 2001 update release and 3 spectral micro windows (2613.70–2615.40 cm−1, 2835.50–2835.80 cm−1, 2921.00–2921.60 cm−1. A first-order Tikhonov constraint is applied to the state vector given in units of per cent of volume mixing ratio. It is tuned to achieve minimum diurnal variation without damping seasonality. Final quality selection of the retrievals uses a threshold for the goodness of fit (χ2 < 1 as well as for the ratio of root-mean-square spectral noise and information content (<0.15%. Column-averaged dry-air mole fractions are calculated using the retrieved methane profiles and four-times-daily pressure-temperature-humidity profiles from National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP interpolated to the time of measurement.

    MIR-GBM v1.0 is the optimum of 24 tested retrieval strategies (8 different spectral micro-window selections, 3 spectroscopic line lists: HITRAN 2000, 2004, 2008. Dominant errors of the non-optimum retrieval strategies are systematic HDO/H2O-CH4 interference errors leading to a seasonal bias up to ≈5%. Therefore interference

  9. An integrating sphere radiometer as a solution for high power calibrations in fibre optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Sanz, Ana; Rodríguez-Barrios, Félix; Corredera, Pedro; Martín-López, Sonia; González-Herráez, Miguel; Hernanz, María Luisa

    2006-04-01

    This paper describes the design, characterization and calibration of a high power transfer standard for optical power measurements in optical fibres based on an integrating sphere radiometer. This radiometer, based on two detectors (Si and InGaAs), can measure powers between 100 nW and 10 W within the wavelength range of (400-1700) nm. The radiometer has been calibrated over the total spectral range of use against an electrically calibrated pyroelectric radiometer and different fibre laser diodes and ion lasers. The total uncertainty obtained is lower than ±1.5% for these wavelengths and power ranges (excluding the water absorption region).

  10. Radiometer Calibration and Characterization (RCC) User's Manual: Windows Version 4.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreas, Afshin M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wilcox, Stephen M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-02-29

    The Radiometer Calibration and Characterization (RCC) software is a data acquisition and data archival system for performing Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibrations (BORCAL). RCC provides a unique method of calibrating broadband atmospheric longwave and solar shortwave radiometers using techniques that reduce measurement uncertainty and better characterize a radiometer's response profile. The RCC software automatically monitors and controls many of the components that contribute to uncertainty in an instrument's responsivity. This is a user's manual and guide to the RCC software.

  11. Comparison of Profiling Microwave Radiometer, Aircraft, and Radiosonde Measurements From the Alliance Icing Research Study (AIRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reehorst, Andrew L.

    2001-01-01

    Measurements from a profiling microwave radiometer are compared to measurements from a research aircraft and radiosondes. Data compared is temperature, water vapor, and liquid water profiles. Data was gathered at the Alliance Icing Research Study (AIRS) at Mirabel Airport outside Montreal, Canada during December 1999 and January 2000. All radiometer measurements were found to lose accuracy when the radome was wet. When the radome was not wetted, the radiometer was seen to indicate an inverted distribution of liquid water within a cloud. When the radiometer measurements were made at 15 deg. instead of the standard zenith, the measurements were less accurate.

  12. Integrating a Microwave Radiometer into Radar Hardware for Simultaneous Data Collection Between the Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLinden, Matthew; Piepmeier, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    The conventional method for integrating a radiometer into radar hardware is to share the RF front end between the instruments, and to have separate IF receivers that take data at separate times. Alternatively, the radar and radiometer could share the antenna through the use of a diplexer, but have completely independent receivers. This novel method shares the radar's RF electronics and digital receiver with the radiometer, while allowing for simultaneous operation of the radar and radiometer. Radars and radiometers, while often having near-identical RF receivers, generally have substantially different IF and baseband receivers. Operation of the two instruments simultaneously is difficult, since airborne radars will pulse at a rate of hundreds of microseconds. Radiometer integration time is typically 10s or 100s of milliseconds. The bandwidth of radar may be 1 to 25 MHz, while a radiometer will have an RF bandwidth of up to a GHz. As such, the conventional method of integrating radar and radiometer hardware is to share the highfrequency RF receiver, but to have separate IF subsystems and digitizers. To avoid corruption of the radiometer data, the radar is turned off during the radiometer dwell time. This method utilizes a modern radar digital receiver to allow simultaneous operation of a radiometer and radar with a shared RF front end and digital receiver. The radiometer signal is coupled out after the first down-conversion stage. From there, the radar transmit frequencies are heavily filtered, and the bands outside the transmit filter are amplified and passed to a detector diode. This diode produces a DC output proportional to the input power. For a conventional radiometer, this level would be digitized. By taking this DC output and mixing it with a system oscillator at 10 MHz, the signal can instead be digitized by a second channel on the radar digital receiver (which typically do not accept DC inputs), and can be down-converted to a DC level again digitally. This

  13. Compositional Ground Truth of Diviner Lunar Radiometer Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhagen, B. T.; Thomas, I. R.; Bowles, N. E.; Allen, C. C.; Donaldson Hanna, K. L.; Foote, E. J.; Paige, D. A.

    2012-01-01

    The Moon affords us a unique opportunity to "ground truth" thermal infrared (i.e. 3 to 25 micron) observations of an airless body. The Moon is the most accessable member of the most abundant class of solar system bodies, which includes Mercury, astroids, and icy satellites. The Apollo samples returned from the Moon are the only extraterrestrial samples with known spatial context. And the Diviner Lunar Radiometer (Diviner) is the first instrument to globally map the spectral thermal emission of an airless body. Here we compare Diviner observations of Apollo sites to compositional and spectral measurements of Apollo lunar soil samples in simulated lunar environment (SLE).

  14. The airborne EMIRAD L-band radiometer system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Kristensen, Steen Savstrup; Balling, Jan E.;

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the EMIRAD L-band radiometer, developed in support of the ESA/SMOS mission. The instrument is a fully polarimetric, dual antenna system, built with special focus on antenna accuracy, receiver stability, and detection and mitigation of radio frequency interference (RFI......). The EMIRAD system has been installed on three different airborne platforms for measurements of sea surface signatures and salinity, soil moisture, and the homogeneity of the Antarctic SMOS calibration site. The installations are shown in the paper, and some major results for ocean and ice observations...

  15. Cryogenic crashworthiness of LNG fuel storage tanks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atli-Veltin, B.; Vredeveldt, A.W.

    2014-01-01

    Shipping is gradually embracing natural gas as bunker fuel. The most viable way to store natural gas on board is in its liquid form. Gas needs to be cooled to cryogenic temperatures and in practice moderately pressurized. On board ships, solely double walled pressure tanks are used for this purpose.

  16. Transient boiling crisis of cryogenic liquids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deev, [No Value; Kharitonov, VS; Kutsenko, KV; Lavrukhin, AA

    2004-01-01

    This paper introduces a new physical model of boiling crisis under rapid increase of power on the heated surface. The calculation of the time interval of the transition to film boiling in cryogenic liquids was carried out depending on heat flux and pressure. The obtained results are in good

  17. Exergy Analysis of Cryogenic Air Separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, Rene; Hirs, Gerard

    1998-01-01

    An exergy analysis is performed to analyse the possibilities of fuel saving in the cryogenic distillation process, which is the main method of air separation. It is shown that more than half of the exergy loss takes place in the liquefaction unit and almost one-third in the air compression unit.

  18. Impact resistance cryogenic bunker fuel tanks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voormeeren, L.O.; Atli-Veltin, B.; Vredeveldt, A.W.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing use of liquefied natural gas (LNG) as bunker fuel in ships, calls for an elaborate study regarding the risks involved. One particular issue is the vulnerability of cryogenic LNG storage tanks with respect to impact loadings, such as ship collisions and dropped objects. This requires a

  19. Cryogenic crashworthiness of LNG fuel storage tanks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atli-Veltin, B.; Vredeveldt, A.W.

    2014-01-01

    Shipping is gradually embracing natural gas as bunker fuel. The most viable way to store natural gas on board is in its liquid form. Gas needs to be cooled to cryogenic temperatures and in practice moderately pressurized. On board ships, solely double walled pressure tanks are used for this purpose.

  20. Cryogenic Propellant Boil-Off Reduction System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachta, D. W.; Christie, R. J.; Carlberg, E.; Feller, J. R.

    2008-03-01

    Lunar missions under consideration would benefit from incorporation of high specific impulse propellants such as LH2 and LO2, even with their accompanying boil-off losses necessary to maintain a steady tank pressure. This paper addresses a cryogenic propellant boil-off reduction system to minimize or eliminate boil-off. Concepts to do so were considered under the In-Space Cryogenic Propellant Depot Project. Specific to that was an investigation of cryocooler integration concepts for relatively large depot sized propellant tanks. One concept proved promising—it served to efficiently move heat to the cryocooler even over long distances via a compressed helium loop. The analyses and designs for this were incorporated into NASA Glenn Research Center's Cryogenic Analysis Tool. That design approach is explained and shown herein. Analysis shows that, when compared to passive only cryogenic storage, the boil-off reduction system begins to reduce system mass if durations are as low as 40 days for LH2, and 14 days for LO2. In addition, a method of cooling LH2 tanks is presented that precludes development issues associated with LH2 temperature cryocoolers.

  1. Transient boiling crisis of cryogenic liquids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deev, [No Value; Kharitonov, VS; Kutsenko, KV; Lavrukhin, AA

    2004-01-01

    This paper introduces a new physical model of boiling crisis under rapid increase of power on the heated surface. The calculation of the time interval of the transition to film boiling in cryogenic liquids was carried out depending on heat flux and pressure. The obtained results are in good agreemen

  2. Composite aerogel insulation for cryogenic liquid storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyeongho, Kim; Hyungmook, Kang; Soojin, Shin; In Hwan, Oh; Changhee, Son; Hyung, Cho Yun; Yongchan, Kim; Sarng Woo, Karng

    2017-02-01

    High porosity materials such as aerogel known as a good insulator in a vacuum range (10-3 ∼ 1 Torr) was widely used to storage and to transport cryogenic fluids. It is necessary to be investigated the performance of aerogel insulations for cryogenic liquid storage in soft vacuum range to atmospheric pressure. A one-dimensional insulating experimental apparatus was designed and fabricated to consist of a cold mass tank, a heat absorber and an annular vacuum space with 5-layer (each 10 mm thickness) of the aerogel insulation materials. Aerogel blanket for cryogenic (used maximum temperature is 400K), aerogel blanket for normal temperature (used maximum temperature is 923K), and combination of the two kinds of aerogel blankets were 5-layer laminated between the cryogenic liquid wall and the ambient wall in vacuum space. Also, 1-D effective thermal conductivities of the insulation materials were evaluated by measuring boil-off rate from liquid nitrogen and liquid argon. In this study, the effective thermal conductivities and the temperature-thickness profiles of the two kinds of insulators and the layered combination of the two different aerogel blankets were presented.

  3. Robust Multilayer Insulation for Cryogenic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Scholtens, B. F.; Augustynowicz, S. D.

    2007-01-01

    New requirements for thermal insulation include robust Multilayer insulation (MU) systems that work for a range of environments from high vacuum to no vacuum. Improved MLI systems must be simple to install and maintain while meeting the life-cycle cost and thermal performance objectives. Performance of actual MLI systems has been previously shown to be much worse than ideal MLI. Spacecraft that must contain cryogens for both lunar service (high vacuum) and ground launch operations (no vacuum) are planned. Future cryogenic spacecraft for the soft vacuum environment of Mars are also envisioned. Industry products using robust MLI can benefit from improved cost-efficiency and system safety. Novel materials have been developed to operate as excellent thermal insulators at vacuum levels that are much less stringent than the absolute high vacuum requirement of current MLI systems. One such robust system, Layered Composite Insulation (LCI), has been developed by the Cryogenics Test Laboratory at NASA Kennedy Space Center. The experimental testing and development of LCI is the focus of this paper. LCI thermal performance under cryogenic conditions is shown to be six times better than MLI at soft vacuum and similar to MLI at high vacuum. The experimental apparent thermal conductivity (k-value) and heat flux data for LCI systems are compared with other MLI systems.

  4. Preliminary Thermal Design of Cryogenic Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyi; Mustafi, Shuvo; Boutte, Alvin

    2015-01-01

    Cryogenic Hydrogen Radiation Shielding (CHRS) is the most mass efficient material radiation shielding strategy for human spaceflight beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). Future human space flight, mission beyond LEO could exceed one year in duration. Previous radiation studies showed that in order to protect the astronauts from space radiation with an annual allowable radiation dose less than 500 mSv, 140 kgm2 of polyethylene is necessary. For a typical crew module that is 4 meter in diameter and 8 meter in length. The mass of polyethylene radiation shielding required would be more than 17,500 kg. The same radiation study found that the required hydrogen shielding for the same allowable radiation dose is 40 kgm2, and the mass of hydrogen required would be 5, 000 kg. Cryogenic hydrogen has higher densities and can be stored in relatively small containment vessels. However, the CHRS system needs a sophisticated thermal system which prevents the cryogenic hydrogen from evaporating during the mission. This study designed a cryogenic thermal system that protects the CHRS from hydrogen evaporation for one to up to three year mission. The design also includes a ground based cooling system that can subcool and freeze liquid hydrogen. The final results show that the CHRS with its required thermal protection system is nearly half of the mass of polyethylene radiation shielding.

  5. Exergy analysis of cryogenic air separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, R.L.; Hirs, G.G.

    1998-01-01

    An exergy analysis is performed to analyse the possibilities of fuel saving in the cryogenic distillation process, which is the main method of air separation. It is shown that more than half of the exergy loss takes place in the liquefaction unit and almost one-third in the air compression unit. Min

  6. Testing the LHC magnet cryogenic systems

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    The magnets in the LHC will be cooled to 1.9 K (- 270.3°C). To keep this 27 km long machine at such a low temperatures requires one of the largest refrigeration systems in the world. These pictures show the cryogenics plant in the testing area.

  7. Stabilizing stainless steel components for cryogenic service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, C. F.

    1967-01-01

    Warpage and creep in stainless steel valve components are decreased by a procedure in which components are machined to a semifinish and then cold soaked in a bath of cryogenic liquid. After the treatment they are returned to ambient temperature and machine finished to the final drawing dimensions.

  8. Cryogenic Heat Exchanger with Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrit, Jay; Douay, Christelle; Dubois, Francis; Defresne, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    An evaporator-type cryogenic heat exchanger is designed and built for introducing fluid-solid heat exchange phenomena to undergraduates in a practical and efficient way. The heat exchanger functions at liquid nitrogen temperature and enables cooling of N[subscript 2] and He gases from room temperatures. We present first the experimental results of…

  9. Cryogenic Laser Calorimetry for Impurity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swimm, R. T.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a one-year effort to determine the applicability of laser-calorimetric spectroscopy to the study of deep-level impurities in silicon are presented. Critical considerations for impurity analysis by laser-calorimetric spectroscopy are discussed, the design and performance of a cryogenic laser calorimeter is described, and measurements of background absorption in high-purity silicon are presented.

  10. Cryogenic Heat Exchanger with Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrit, Jay; Douay, Christelle; Dubois, Francis; Defresne, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    An evaporator-type cryogenic heat exchanger is designed and built for introducing fluid-solid heat exchange phenomena to undergraduates in a practical and efficient way. The heat exchanger functions at liquid nitrogen temperature and enables cooling of N[subscript 2] and He gases from room temperatures. We present first the experimental results of…

  11. Energy Efficient Storage and Transfer of Cryogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Cryogenics is globally linked to energy generation, storage, and usage. Thermal insulation systems research and development is an enabling part of NASA's technology goals for Space Launch and Exploration. New thermal testing methodologies and materials are being transferred to industry for a wide range of commercial applications.

  12. Cryogenic Liquid Fluctuations in a Motionless Tank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Vin Ai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers approximate numerical methods to determine own frequencies of cryogenic liquid fluctuations stratification of which changes under any law. The increasing use of cryogenic liquids, liquefied gas, superfluid solutions, and slush liquids in modern mechanical engineering define relevance of a perspective. Interest in the considered problem is also caused by the fact that in cryogenic liquid along with superficial waves there can be internal wave movements penetrating all thickness of liquid in a tank and therefore playing important role in many hydro-dynamic processes.This article considers problems of determining the own frequencies of cryogenic liquid fluctuations, partially filling cylindrical tank of any cross section. It is supposed that the change of the liquid particles density due to thermal stratification of entire liquid mass can proceed continuously under any law. To solve numerically a similar problem, a method of trigonometric series (MTS and a method of final elements (MFE were used. When using the MTS method the unknown solution and variable coefficients of the equation were presented in the form of trigonometric series. Further, after multiplication of series and the subsequent mathematical operations the frequency equation was obtained. Bubnov-Galyorkin's approach was used to obtain solutions by the MFE method. Reliability of received numerical results is confirmed by coincidence with frequency results calculated by analytical formulas of solutions of differential equations with constant frequency of buoyancy.

  13. Cryogenics system: strategy to achieve nominal performance and reliable operation

    CERN Document Server

    Bremer, J; Casas, J; Claudet, S; Delikaris, D; Delruelle, N; Ferlin, G; Fluder, C; Perin, A; Perinic, G; Pezzetti, M; Pirotte, O; Tavian, L; Wagner, U

    2012-01-01

    During the LHC operation in 2010 and 2011, the cryogenic system has achieved an availability level fulfilling the overall requirement. To reach this level, the cryogenic system has profited like many other beam-dependent systems from the reduced beam parameters. Therefore, impacts of some failures occurred during the LHC operation were mitigated by using the overcapacity margin, the existing built-in redundancy in between adjacent sector cryogenic plants and the "cannibalization" of spares on two idle cryogenic plants. These two first years of operation were also crucial to identify the weaknesses of the present cryogenic maintenance plan and new issues like SEUs. After the LS1, nominal beam parameters are expected and the mitigated measures will be less effective or not applicable at all. Consequently, a consolidation plan to improve the MTBF and the MTTR of the LHC cryogenic system is under definition. Concerning shutdown periods, the present cryogenic sectorization imposes some restrictions in the type of ...

  14. Comparative Analysis of Radiometer Systems Using Non-Stationary Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racette, Paul; Lang, Roger; Krebs, Carolyn A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Radiometers require periodic calibration to correct for instabilities in the receiver response. Various calibration techniques exist that minimize the effect of instabilities in the receivers. The optimal technique depends upon many parameters. Some parameters are constrained by the particular application and others can be chosen in the system design. For example, the measurement uncertainty may be reduced to the limits of the resolution of the measurement (sensitivity) if periodic absolute calibration can be performed with sufficient frequency. However if the period between calibrations is long, a reference-differencing technique, i.e. Dicke-type design, can yield better performance. The measurement uncertainty not only depends upon the detection scheme but also on the number of pixels between calibrations, the integration time per pixel, integration time per calibration reference measurement, calibration reference temperature, and the brightness temperature of what is being measured. The best scheme for reducing the measurement uncertainty also depends, in large part, on the stability of the receiver electronics. In this presentation a framework for evaluating calibration schemes for a wide range of system architectures is presented. Two methods for treating receiver non-stationarity are compared with radiometer measurements.

  15. ECE RADIOMETER UPGRADE ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AUSTIN, ME; LOHR, J

    2002-08-01

    OAK A271 ECE RADIOMETER UPGRADE ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK. The electron cyclotron emission (ECE) heterodyne radiometer diagnostic on DIII-D has been upgraded with the addition of eight channels for a total of 40. The new, higher frequency channels allow measurements of electron temperature into the magnetic axis in discharges at maximum field, 2.15 T. The complete set now extends over the full usable range of second harmonic emission frequencies at 2.0 T covering radii from the outer edge inward to the location of third harmonic overlap on the high field side. Full coverage permits the measurement of heat pulses and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluctuations on both sides of the magnetic axis. In addition, the symmetric measurements are used to fix the location of the magnetic axis in tokamak magnetic equilibrium reconstructions. Also, the new higher frequency channels have been used to determine central T{sub e} with good time resolution in low field, high density discharges using third harmonic ECE in the optically gray and optically thick regimes.

  16. First national intercomparison of solar ultraviolet radiometers in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diémoz, H.; Siani, A. M.; Casale, G. R.; di Sarra, A.; Serpillo, B.; Petkov, B.; Scaglione, S.; Bonino, A.; Facta, S.; Fedele, F.; Grifoni, D.; Verdi, L.; Zipoli, G.

    2011-08-01

    A blind intercomparison of ground-based ultraviolet (UV) instruments has been organized for the first time in Italy. The campaign was coordinated by the Environmental Protection Agency of Aosta Valley (ARPA Valle d'Aosta) and took place in Saint-Christophe (45.8° N, 7.4° E, 570 m a.s.l.), in the Alpine region, from 8 to 23 June 2010. It involved 8 institutions, 10 broadband radiometers, 2 filter radiometers and 2 spectroradiometers. Synchronized measurements of downward global solar UV irradiance at the ground were collected and the raw series were then individually processed by the respective operators on the base of their own procedures and calibration data. A radiative transfer model was successfully applied as an interpretative tool. The input parameters and output results are described in detail. The comparison was performed in terms of global solar UV Index and integrated UV-A irradiance against a well-calibrated double monochromator spectroradiometer as reference. An improved algorithm for comparing broadband data and spectra has been developed and is discussed in detail. For some instruments, we found average deviations ranging from -16 % up to 20 % relative to the reference and diurnal variations as large as 15 % even in clear days. Remarkable deviations were found for the instruments calibrated in the manufacturers' facilities and never involved in field intercomparison. Finally, some recommendations to the UV operators based on the campaign results are proposed.

  17. First national intercomparison of solar ultraviolet radiometers in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Diémoz

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A blind intercomparison of ground-based ultraviolet (UV instruments has been organized for the first time in Italy. The campaign was coordinated by the Environmental Protection Agency of Aosta Valley (ARPA Valle d'Aosta and took place in Saint-Christophe (45.8° N, 7.4° E, 570 m a.s.l., in the Alpine region, from 8 to 23 June 2010. It involved 8 institutions, 10 broadband radiometers, 2 filter radiometers and 2 spectroradiometers. Synchronized measurements of downward global solar UV irradiance at the ground were collected and the raw series were then individually processed by the respective operators on the basis of their own procedures and calibration data. The comparison was performed in terms of global solar UV Index and integrated UV-A irradiance against a well-calibrated double monochromator spectroradiometer as reference. An improved algorithm for comparing broadband data and spectra has been developed. For some instruments, we found average deviations ranging from −16 % up to 20 % relative to the reference and diurnal variations as large as 15 % even in clear days. Remarkable deviations also arose from instruments recently in operation and never involved in field intercomparison.

  18. Spatial sampling errors for a satellite-borne scanning radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manalo, Natividad D.; Smith, G. L.

    1991-01-01

    The Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) scanning radiometer is planned as the Earth radiation budget instrument for the Earth Observation System, to be flown in the late 1990's. In order to minimize the spatial sampling errors of the measurements, it is necessary to select design parameters for the instrument such that the resulting point spread function will minimize spatial sampling errors. These errors are described as aliasing and blurring errors. Aliasing errors are due to presence in the measurements of spatial frequencies beyond the Nyquist frequency, and blurring errors are due to attenuation of frequencies below the Nyquist frequency. The design parameters include pixel shape and dimensions, sampling rate, scan period, and time constants of the measurements. For a satellite-borne scanning radiometer, the pixel footprint grows quickly at large nadir angles. The aliasing errors thus decrease with increasing scan angle, but the blurring errors grow quickly. The best design minimizes the sum of these two errors over a range of scan angles. Results of a parameter study are presented, showing effects of data rates, pixel dimensions, spacecraft altitude, and distance from the spacecraft track.

  19. First national intercomparison of solar ultraviolet radiometers in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Diémoz

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A blind intercomparison of ground-based ultraviolet (UV instruments has been organized for the first time in Italy. The campaign was coordinated by the Environmental Protection Agency of Aosta Valley (ARPA Valle d'Aosta and took place in Saint-Christophe (45.8° N, 7.4° E, 570 m a.s.l., in the Alpine region, from 8 to 23 June 2010. It involved 8 institutions, 10 broadband radiometers, 2 filter radiometers and 2 spectroradiometers. Synchronized measurements of downward global solar UV irradiance at the ground were collected and the raw series were then individually processed by the respective operators on the base of their own procedures and calibration data. A radiative transfer model was successfully applied as an interpretative tool. The input parameters and output results are described in detail. The comparison was performed in terms of global solar UV Index and integrated UV-A irradiance against a well-calibrated double monochromator spectroradiometer as reference. An improved algorithm for comparing broadband data and spectra has been developed and is discussed in detail. For some instruments, we found average deviations ranging from −16 % up to 20 % relative to the reference and diurnal variations as large as 15 % even in clear days. Remarkable deviations were found for the instruments calibrated in the manufacturers' facilities and never involved in field intercomparison. Finally, some recommendations to the UV operators based on the campaign results are proposed.

  20. Cryogenic Michelson Interferometer on the Space Shuttle

    OpenAIRE

    Wellard, Stan; Blakeley, Jeff; Brown, Steven; Bartschi, Brent

    1993-01-01

    A helium-cooled interferometer was flown aboard shuttle ifight STS-39. This interferometer, along with its sister radiometer, set new benchmarks for the quantity and quality of data collected. The interferometer generated approximately 150,000 interferograms during the course of the ifight. Data was collected at tangent heights from the earth's surface to celestial targets. The interferograms encoded spectral data from aurora, earth limb, and earth terminator scenes. The interfemmeter collect...

  1. The Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, Michael G.; Kim, Tony; Emrich, William J.; Hickman, Robert R.; Broadway, Jeramie W.; Gerrish, Harold P.; Belvin, Anthony D.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Scott, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) development efforts in the United States have demonstrated the technical viability and performance potential of NTP systems. For example, Project Rover (1955 - 1973) completed 22 high power rocket reactor tests. Peak performances included operating at an average hydrogen exhaust temperature of 2550 K and a peak fuel power density of 5200 MW/m3 (Pewee test), operating at a thrust of 930 kN (Phoebus-2A test), and operating for 62.7 minutes in a single burn (NRX-A6 test). Results from Project Rover indicated that an NTP system with a high thrust-to-weight ratio and a specific impulse greater than 900 s would be feasible. Excellent results were also obtained by the former Soviet Union. Although historical programs had promising results, many factors would affect the development of a 21st century nuclear thermal rocket (NTR). Test facilities built in the US during Project Rover no longer exist. However, advances in analytical techniques, the ability to utilize or adapt existing facilities and infrastructure, and the ability to develop a limited number of new test facilities may enable affordable development, qualification, and utilization of a Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS). Bead-loaded graphite fuel was utilized throughout the Rover/NERVA program, and coated graphite composite fuel (tested in the Nuclear Furnace) and cermet fuel both show potential for even higher performance than that demonstrated in the Rover/NERVA engine tests.. NASA's NCPS project was initiated in October, 2011, with the goal of assessing the affordability and viability of an NCPS. FY 2014 activities are focused on fabrication and test (non-nuclear) of both coated graphite composite fuel elements and cermet fuel elements. Additional activities include developing a pre-conceptual design of the NCPS stage and evaluating affordable strategies for NCPS development, qualification, and utilization. NCPS stage designs are focused on supporting human Mars

  2. Physical, biological, and chemical data from radiometer, profiling reflectance radiometer, and CTD casts in a world-wide distribution as part of the SeaWiFS/SIMBIOS project from 13 September 1981 to 16 December 1999 (NODC Accession 0000632)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, biological, and chemical data were collected using radiometer, profiling reflectance radiometer, and CTD casts in a world-wide distribution from 13...

  3. A simple method to minimize orientation effects in a profiling radiometer

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suresh, T.; Talaulikar, M.; Desa, E.; Matondkar, S.G.P.; SrinivasaKumar, T.; Lotlikar, A.

    -fall radiometer is found to be a better option for measuring underwater light parameters as it avoids the effects of ship shadow and is easy to operate, the measurements demand profiling the radiometer vertical in water with minimum tilt. Here we present...

  4. Compact Front-end Prototype for Next Generation RFI-rejecting Polarimetric L-band Radiometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Brian Sveistrup; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Skou, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Realizing the need for lower noise figure and smaller physical size in todays higly sensitive radiometers, this paper presents a new compact analog front-end (AFE) for use with the existing L-band (1400-1427 MHz) radiometer designed and operated by the Technical University of Denmark. Using...

  5. Intercomparison of 51 radiometers for determining global horizontal irradiance and direct normal irradiance measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin; Wilcox, Stephen; Stoffel, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Accurate solar radiation measurements require properly installed and maintained radiometers with calibrations traceable to the World Radiometric Reference. This study analyzes the performance of 51 commercially available and prototype radiometers used for measuring global horizontal irradiances or direct normal irradiances. These include pyranometers, pyrheliometers, rotating shadowband radiometers, and a pyranometer with an internal shading mask deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. The radiometers in this study were deployed for one year (from April 1, 2011, through March 31, 2012), and their measurements were compared under clear-sky, partly cloudy, and mostly cloudy conditions to reference values of low estimated measurement uncertainties. The intent of this paper is to present a general overview of each radiometer's performance based on the instrumentation and environmental conditions available at NREL.

  6. Cryogenic Detectors (Narrow Field Instruments)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoevers, H.; Verhoeve, P.

    Two cryogenic imaging spectrometer arrays are currently considered as focal plane instruments for XEUS. The narrow field imager 1 (NFI 1) will cover the energy range from 0.05 to 3 keV with an energy resolution of 2 eV, or better, at 500 eV. A second narrow field imager (NFI 2) covers the energy range from 1 to 15 keV with an energy resolution of 2 eV (at 1 keV) and 5 eV (at 7 keV), creating some overlap with part of the NFI 1 energy window. Both narrow field imagers have a 0.5 arcmin field of view. Their imaging capabilities are matched to the XEUS optics of 2 to 5 arcsec leading to 1 arcsec pixels. The detector arrays will be cooled by a closed cycle system comprising a mechanical cooler with a base temperature of 2.5 K and either a low temperature 3He sorption pump providing the very low temperature stage and/or an Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator (ADR). The ADR cooler is explicitly needed to cool the NFI 2 array. The narrow field imager 1} Currently a 48 times 48 element array of superconducting tunnel junctions (STJ) is envisaged. Its operating temperature is in the range between 30 and 350 mK. Small, single Ta STJs (20-50 mum on a side) have shown 3.5 eV (FWHM) resolution at E = 525 eV and small arrays have been successfully demonstrated (6 times 6 pixels), or are currently tested (10 times 12 pixels). Alternatively, a prototype Distributed Read-Out Imaging Device (DROID), consisting of a linear superconducting Ta absorber of 20 times 100 mum2, including a 20 times 20 mum STJ for readout at either end, has shown a measured energy resolution of 2.4 eV (FWHM) at E = 500 eV. Simulations involving the diffusion properties as well as loss and tunnel rates have shown that the performance can be further improved by slight modifications in the geometry, and that the size of the DROIDS can be increased to 0.5-1.0 mm without loss in energy resolution. The relatively large areas and good energy resolution compared to single STJs make DROIDS good candidates for the

  7. Estimating atmospheric temperature profile by an airborne microwave radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Xu, Jian; Kenntner, Mareike; Schreier, Franz; Doicu, Adrian

    2017-04-01

    As the rising atmospheric issues such as climate change, air pollution, and ozone depletion have extracted extensive attraction worldwide, observing and modeling of atmospheric quantities becomes critical to our understanding of the environment. This work focuses on the performance of an airborne passive microwave radiometer called MTP (Microwave Temperature Profiler). We aim to obtain vertically distributed atmospheric temperature from intensities measured by the instrument in terms of three frequencies and ten viewing angles. A retrieval program TIRAMISU (Temperature InveRsion Algorithm for MIcrowave SoUnding) has been utilized for processing the MTP data. To solve this severely ill-posed inverse problem, an analysis of different ways of constructing the penalty term onto the Tikhonov-type objective function is conducted. This numerical analysis can help us to better understand pros and cons of these regularization methods and to investigate the measurement capabilities of MTP.

  8. Water Vapour Radiometers for the Australia Telescope Compact Array

    CERN Document Server

    Indermuehle, Balthasar T; Crofts, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    We have developed Water Vapour Radiometers (WVRs) for the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) that are capable of determining path fluctuations by virtue of measuring small temperature fluctuations in the atmosphere using the 22.2 GHz water vapour line for each of the six antennae. By measuring the line of sight variations of the water vapour, the induced path excess and thus the phase delay can be estimated and corrections can then be applied during data reduction. This reduces decorrelation of the source signal. We demonstrate how this recovers the telescope's efficiency and image quality as well as how this improves the telescope's ability to use longer baselines at higher frequencies, thereby resulting in higher spatial resolution. A description of the WVR hardware design, their calibration and water vapour retrieval mechanism is given.

  9. Deep-sea low-light radiometer system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Justin M; Roberts, Paul L D; Papen, George C; Jaffe, Jules S; Li, Linhai; Stramski, Dariusz

    2014-12-01

    Two single-waveband low-light radiometers were developed to characterize properties of the underwater light field relevant to biological camouflage at mesopelagic ocean depths. Phenomena of interest were vertical changes in downward irradiance of ambient light at wavelengths near 470 nm and 560 nm, and flashes from bioluminescent organisms. Depth profiles were acquired at multiple deep stations in different geographic regions. Results indicate significant irradiance magnitudes at 560 nm, providing direct evidence of energy transfer as described by Raman scattering. Analysis of a night profile yielded multiple examples of bioluminescent flashes. The selection of high-sensitivity, high-speed silicon photomultipliers as detectors enabled measurement of spectrally-resolved irradiance to greater than 400 m depth.

  10. The Planck/LFI Radiometer Electronics Box Assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Herreros, J M; Rebolo, R; Chulani, H; Rubino-Martin, J A; Hildebrandt, S R; Bersanelli, M; Butler, R C; Miccolis, M; Pena, A; Pereira, M; Torrero, F; Franceschet, C; Lopez, M; Alcala, C; 10.1088/1748-0221/4/12/T12008

    2010-01-01

    The Radiometer Electronics Box Assembly (REBA) is the control and data processing on board computer of the Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) of the Planck mission (ESA). The REBA was designed and built incorporating state of the art processors, communication interfaces and real time operating system software in order to meet the scientific performance of the LFI. We present a technical summary of the REBA, including a physical, functional, electrical, mechanical and thermal description. Aspects of the design and development, the assembly, the integration and the verification of the equipment are provided. A brief description of the LFI on board software is given including the Low-Level Software and the main functionalities and architecture of the Application Software. The compressor module, which has been developed as an independent product, later integrated in the application, is also described in this paper. Two identical engineering models EM and AVM, the engineering qualification model EQM, the flight model ...

  11. COBE Differential Microwave Radiometers - Instrument design and implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoot, G.; Bennett, Charles; Weber, R.; Maruschak, John; Ratliff, Roger; Janssen, M.

    1990-01-01

    Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMRs) at frequencies of 31.5, 53, and 90 GHz have been designed and built to map the large angular scale variations in the brightness temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation. The instrument is being flown aboard NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, launched on November 18, 1989. Each receiver input is switched between two antennas pointing 60 deg apart on the sky. The satellite is in near-polar orbit with the orbital plane precessing at 1 deg per day, causing the beams to scan the entire sky in 6 months. In 1 year of observation, the instruments are capable of mapping the sky to an rms sensitivity of 0.1 mK per 7 deg field of view. The mission and the instrument have been carefully designed to minimize the need for systematic corrections to the data.

  12. Retrieving cloudy atmosphere parameters from RPG-HATPRO radiometer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostsov, V. S.

    2015-03-01

    An algorithm for simultaneously determining both tropospheric temperature and humidity profiles and cloud liquid water content from ground-based measurements of microwave radiation is presented. A special feature of this algorithm is that it combines different types of measurements and different a priori information on the sought parameters. The features of its use in processing RPG-HATPRO radiometer data obtained in the course of atmospheric remote sensing experiments carried out by specialists from the Faculty of Physics of St. Petersburg State University are discussed. The results of a comparison of both temperature and humidity profiles obtained using a ground-based microwave remote sensing method with those obtained from radiosonde data are analyzed. It is shown that this combined algorithm is comparable (in accuracy) to the classical method of statistical regularization in determining temperature profiles; however, this algorithm demonstrates better accuracy (when compared to the method of statistical regularization) in determining humidity profiles.

  13. Cryogenic Insulation Standard Data and Methodologies Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerfield, Burton; Thompson, Karen; Zeitlin, Nancy; Mullenix, Pamela; Fesmire, James; Swanger, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Extending some recent developments in the area of technical consensus standards for cryogenic thermal insulation systems, a preliminary Inter-Laboratory Study of foam insulation materials was performed by NASA Kennedy Space Center and LeTourneau University. The initial focus was ambient pressure cryogenic boil off testing using the Cryostat-400 flat-plate instrument. Completion of a test facility at LETU has enabled direct, comparative testing, using identical cryostat instruments and methods, and the production of standard thermal data sets for a number of materials under sub-ambient conditions. The two sets of measurements were analyzed and indicate there is reasonable agreement between the two laboratories. Based on cryogenic boiloff calorimetry, new equipment and methods for testing thermal insulation systems have been successfully developed. These boiloff instruments (or cryostats) include both flat plate and cylindrical models and are applicable to a wide range of different materials under a wide range of test conditions. Test measurements are generally made at large temperature difference (boundary temperatures of 293 K and 78 K are typical) and include the full vacuum pressure range. Results are generally reported in effective thermal conductivity (ke) and mean heat flux (q) through the insulation system. The new cryostat instruments provide an effective and reliable way to characterize the thermal performance of materials under subambient conditions. Proven in through thousands of tests of hundreds of material systems, they have supported a wide range of aerospace, industry, and research projects. Boiloff testing technology is not just for cryogenic testing but is a cost effective, field-representative methodology to test any material or system for applications at sub-ambient temperatures. This technology, when adequately coupled with a technical standards basis, can provide a cost-effective, field-representative methodology to test any material or system

  14. Design of the NIF Cryogenic Target System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, C; Baltz, J; Malsbury, T; Atkinson, D; Brugmann, V; Coffield, F; Edwards, O; Haid, B; Locke, S; Shiromizu, S; Skulina, K

    2008-06-10

    The United States Department of Energy has embarked on a campaign to conduct credible fusion ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in 2010. The target assembly specified for this campaign requires the formation of a deuterium/tritium (DT) fuel ice layer in a 2 mm diameter capsule at the center of a 9 mm long by 5 mm diameter cylinder, called a hohlraum. The ice layer must be formed and maintained at temperatures below 20 K. At laser shot time, the target is positioned at the center of the NIF target chamber, aligned to the laser beams and held stable to less than 7 {micro}m rms. We have completed the final design of the Cryogenic Target System and are integrating the devices necessary to create, characterize and position the cryogenic target for ignition experiments. These designs, with supporting analysis and prototype test results, will be presented.

  15. A cryogenic valve for spacecraft applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, L. J.; Spivak, A. L.

    1982-01-01

    Space-compatible cryogenic valves are now required to operate between room and liquid helium temperatures. A remotely controllable cryogenic valve is described, which is made of bellows-type stainless steel and is operated by a miniature dc motor with integral gearset (485:1) at a nominal voltage of 28 Vdc. The power transmission provides a further reduction of 7.2:1 to give an overall gear ratio of nearly 3500:1, assuring reliability of operation at low temperatures. Valve performance (leak rate) data are presented at LN2, LHe, and SfHe temperatures at delivered torques of 18, 27, 31, and 35 N-m. At a closing torque of 31 N-m, a leak rate of 0.028 scc/sec was achieved at 2 K, while at a torque of 18 N-m the leak rate at 300 K was less than 3 x 10 to the -9th scc/sec.

  16. The Cryogenic Supervision System in NSRRC

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hsing-Chieh; Chiou, Wen-Song; Hsiao, Feng-Zone; Tsai, Zong-Da

    2005-01-01

    The helium cryogenic system in NSRRC is a fully automatic PLC system using the Siemens SIMATIC 300 controller. Modularization in both hardware and software makes it easy in the program reading, the system modification and the problem debug. Based on the Laview program we had developed a supervision system taking advantage of the Internet technology to get system's real-time information in any place. The functions of this supervision system include the real-time data accessing with more than 300 digital/analog signals, the data restore, the history trend display, and the human machine interface. The data is accessed via a Profibus line connecting the PLC system and the supervision system with a maximum baud rate 1.5 Mbit/s. Due to this supervision system, it is easy to master the status of the cryogenic system within a short time and diagnose the problem.

  17. Absorber Materials at Room and Cryogenic Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Marhauser, T.S. Elliott, A.T. Wu, E.P. Chojnacki, E. Savrun

    2011-09-01

    We recently reported on investigations of RF absorber materials at cryogenic temperatures conducted at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The work was initiated to find a replacement material for the 2 Kelvin low power waveguide Higher Order Mode (HOM) absorbers employed within the original cavity cryomodules of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). This effort eventually led to suitable candidates as reported in this paper. Furthermore, though constrained by small funds for labor and resources, we have analyzed a variety of lossy ceramic materials, several of which could be usable as HOM absorbers for both normal conducting and superconducting RF structures, e.g. as loads in cavity waveguides and beam tubes either at room or cryogenic temperatures and, depending on cooling measures, low to high operational power levels.

  18. Progress of the FAIR Cryogenic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauschke, M.; Kollmus, H.; Martinez-Lopez, M.

    2017-02-01

    The planning revision of the cryogenic system for the Facility of Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR, Darmstadt, Germany) resulted in the choice of a single universal plant, which should provide a wide range of cryogenic operation modes, as refrigeration capacity at 4.4K, liquefaction or intermediate temperature levels. The adaptation to the FAIR specific requirements will be done later by adding a second plant. One major demand for the plant is the short term adaptation to variations in the load requirements in the system. An exemplary integration into the overall FAIR system will be shown with the experiments in the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) cave. The CBM cave will house an already existing magnet, HADES, and a new magnet for the CBM experiment, which is still under design. The scheduling of the different operation modes related to the operation of the main consumers as SIS100 or SuperFRS is shown.

  19. Cryogenic cooling for high power laser amplifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perin J.P.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Using DPSSL (Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers as pumping technology, PW-class lasers with enhanced repetition rates are developed. Each of the Yb YAG amplifiers will be diode-pumped at a wavelength of 940 nm. This is a prerequisite for achieving high repetition rates (light amplification duration 1 millisecond and repetition rate 10 Hz. The efficiency of DPSSL is inversely proportional to the temperature, for this reason the slab amplifier have to be cooled at a temperature in the range of 100 K–170 K with a heat flux of 1 MW*m−2. This paper describes the thermo-mechanical analysis for the design of the amplification laser head, presents a preliminary proposal for the required cryogenic cooling system and finally outlines the gain of cryogenic operation for the efficiency of high pulsed laser.

  20. A Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Fan; Taylor, Stephen F; Turner, Richard W; Lev, Benjamin L

    2016-01-01

    Microscopic imaging of local magnetic fields provides a window into the organizing principles of complex and technologically relevant condensed matter materials. However, a wide variety of intriguing strongly correlated and topologically nontrivial materials exhibit poorly understood phenomena outside the detection capability of state-of-the-art high-sensitivity, high-resolution scanning probe magnetometers. We introduce a quantum-noise-limited scanning probe magnetometer that can operate from room-to-cryogenic temperatures with unprecedented DC-field sensitivity and micron-scale resolution. The Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope (SQCRAMscope) employs a magnetically levitated atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), thereby providing immunity to conductive and blackbody radiative heating. The SQCRAMscope has a noise floor of 300 pT and provides a 100x improvement in magnetic flux sensitivity over previous atomic scanning probe magnetometers. These capabilities are carefully benchmarked by imaging magnet...