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Sample records for high specific impulse

  1. Coaxial plasma thrusters for high specific impulse propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenberg, Kurt F.; Gerwin, Richard A.; Barnes, Cris W.; Henins, Ivars; Mayo, Robert; Moses, Ronald, Jr.; Scarberry, Richard; Wurden, Glen

    1991-01-01

    A fundamental basis for coaxial plasma thruster performance is presented and the steady-state, ideal MHD properties of a coaxial thruster using an annular magnetic nozzle are discussed. Formulas for power usage, thrust, mass flow rate, and specific impulse are acquired and employed to assess thruster performance. The performance estimates are compared with the observed properties of an unoptimized coaxial plasma gun. These comparisons support the hypothesis that ideal MHD has an important role in coaxial plasma thruster dynamics.

  2. Numerical Simulation of High Specific Impulse Ion Thruster Grid System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Yoshinori

    A high specific impulse ion thruster (HiIsp-IT) operated at a voltage of over 10 kV has been studied and the problems of direct ion impingement on the accelerating grid and of production and impingement of charge-exchange ions have been considered. In order to investigate these problems and to facilitate the grid systems design, a three-dimensional particle simulation code that employs an energy compensation method, a simplified pre-sheath definition method, a region sharing method was developed. This code also simulates the production and subsequent motion of charge-exchange ions. Using this code, results obtained quickly using a personal computer are shown to be in good agreement with experimental data associated with: the crossover impingement under low-beam-current condition and the star-shaped pattern of ion beam cross section as it passes through the accelerating grid. It argued that this code is a useful tool for rapid preliminary analysis and design of HiIsp-IT grid systems.

  3. Trajectories for High Specific Impulse High Specific Power Deep Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsgrove, T.; Adams, R. B.; Brady, Hugh J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented for two methods to approximate the mission performance of high specific impulse high specific power vehicles. The first method is based on an analytical approximation derived by Williams and Shepherd and can be used to approximate mission performance to outer planets and interstellar space. The second method is based on a parametric analysis of trajectories created using the well known trajectory optimization code, VARITOP. This parametric analysis allows the reader to approximate payload ratios and optimal power requirements for both one-way and round-trip missions. While this second method only addresses missions to and from Jupiter, future work will encompass all of the outer planet destinations and some interstellar precursor missions.

  4. Simulation of Trajectories for High Specific Impulse Deep Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsgrove, Tara; Adams, Robert B.; Brady, Hugh J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Difficulties in approximating flight times and deliverable masses for continuous thrust propulsion systems have complicated comparison and evaluation of proposed propulsion concepts. These continuous thrust propulsion systems are of interest to many groups, not the least of which are the electric propulsion and fusion communities. Several charts plotting the results of well-known trajectory simulation codes were developed and are contained in this paper. These charts illustrate the dependence of time of flight and payload ratio on jet power, initial mass, specific impulse and specific power. These charts are intended to be a tool by which people in the propulsion community can explore the possibilities of their propulsion system concepts. Trajectories were simulated using the tools VARITOP and IPOST. VARITOP is a well known trajectory optimization code that involves numerical integration based on calculus of variations. IPOST has several methods of trajectory simulation; the one used in this paper is Cowell's method for full integration of the equations of motion. The analytical method derived in the companion paper was also used to simulate the trajectory. The accuracy of this method is discussed in the paper.

  5. A centre-triggered magnesium fuelled cathodic arc thruster uses sublimation to deliver a record high specific impulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Patrick R. C.; Bilek, Marcela; McKenzie, David R.

    2016-08-01

    The cathodic arc is a high current, low voltage discharge that operates in vacuum and provides a stream of highly ionised plasma from a solid conducting cathode. The high ion velocities, together with the high ionisation fraction and the quasineutrality of the exhaust stream, make the cathodic arc an attractive plasma source for spacecraft propulsion applications. The specific impulse of the cathodic arc thruster is substantially increased when the emission of neutral species is reduced. Here, we demonstrate a reduction of neutral emission by exploiting sublimation in cathode spots and enhanced ionisation of the plasma in short, high-current pulses. This, combined with the enhanced directionality due to the efficient erosion profiles created by centre-triggering, substantially increases the specific impulse. We present experimentally measured specific impulses and jet power efficiencies for titanium and magnesium fuels. Our Mg fuelled source provides the highest reported specific impulse for a gridless ion thruster and is competitive with all flight rated ion thrusters. We present a model based on cathode sublimation and melting at the cathodic arc spot explaining the outstanding performance of the Mg fuelled source. A further significant advantage of an Mg-fuelled thruster is the abundance of Mg in asteroidal material and in space junk, providing an opportunity for utilising these resources in space.

  6. Measurement of the spatial specific impulse distribution due to buried high explosive charge detonation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Denefeld

    2017-06-01

    The momentum transfer to a vehicle depends on a number of influencing factors such as: charge mass, embedding material (e.g. sand, gravel, clay, density, water content, saturation, depth of burial, ground clearance and vehicle shape. The presented technology is applied to quantify the influence of the embedding material (alluvial sand, quartz sand, the burial depth and the water content on the local specific impulse distribution. The obtained data can be used as initial condition for the numerical simulation of occupant safety assessment and as input for empirical modeling of momentum transfer on structures.

  7. Ultrahigh Specific Impulse Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anne Charmeau; Brandon Cunningham; Samim Anghaie

    2009-02-09

    Research on nuclear thermal propulsion systems (NTP) have been in forefront of the space nuclear power and propulsion due to their design simplicity and their promise for providing very high thrust at reasonably high specific impulse. During NERVA-ROVER program in late 1950's till early 1970's, the United States developed and ground tested about 18 NTP systems without ever deploying them into space. The NERVA-ROVER program included development and testing of NTP systems with very high thrust (~250,000 lbf) and relatively high specific impulse (~850 s). High thrust to weight ratio in NTP systems is an indicator of high acceleration that could be achieved with these systems. The specific impulse in the lowest mass propellant, hydrogen, is a function of square root of absolute temperature in the NTP thrust chamber. Therefor optimizing design performance of NTP systems would require achieving the highest possible hydrogen temperature at reasonably high thrust to weight ratio. High hydrogen exit temperature produces high specific impulse that is a diret measure of propellant usage efficiency.

  8. Hybrid-PIC Modeling of a High-Voltage, High-Specific-Impulse Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brandon D.; Boyd, Iain D.; Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng

    2013-01-01

    The primary life-limiting mechanism of Hall thrusters is the sputter erosion of the discharge channel walls by high-energy propellant ions. Because of the difficulty involved in characterizing this erosion experimentally, many past efforts have focused on numerical modeling to predict erosion rates and thruster lifespan, but those analyses were limited to Hall thrusters operating in the 200-400V discharge voltage range. Thrusters operating at higher discharge voltages (V(sub d) >= 500 V) present an erosion environment that may differ greatly from that of the lower-voltage thrusters modeled in the past. In this work, HPHall, a well-established hybrid-PIC code, is used to simulate NASA's High-Voltage Hall Accelerator (HiVHAc) at discharge voltages of 300, 400, and 500V as a first step towards modeling the discharge channel erosion. It is found that the model accurately predicts the thruster performance at all operating conditions to within 6%. The model predicts a normalized plasma potential profile that is consistent between all three operating points, with the acceleration zone appearing in the same approximate location. The expected trend of increasing electron temperature with increasing discharge voltage is observed. An analysis of the discharge current oscillations shows that the model predicts oscillations that are much greater in amplitude than those measured experimentally at all operating points, suggesting that the differences in oscillation amplitude are not strongly associated with discharge voltage.

  9. Portable High Voltage Impulse Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gómez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a portable high voltage impulse generator which was designed and built with insulation up to 20 kV. This design was based on previous work in which simulation software for standard waves was developed. Commercial components and low-cost components were used in this work; however, these particular elements are not generally used for high voltage applications. The impulse generators used in industry and laboratories are usually expensive; they are built to withstand extra high voltage and they are big, making them impossible to transport. The proposed generator is portable, thereby allowing tests to be made on devices that cannot be moved from their location. The results obtained with the proposed impulse generator were satisfactory in terms of time and waveforms compared to other commercial impulse generators and the standard impulse wave simulator.

  10. Method and apparatus to produce high specific impulse and moderate thrust from a fusion-powered rocket engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Samuel A.; Pajer, Gary A.; Paluszek, Michael A.; Razin, Yosef S.

    2017-11-21

    A system and method for producing and controlling high thrust and desirable specific impulse from a continuous fusion reaction is disclosed. The resultant relatively small rocket engine will have lower cost to develop, test, and operate that the prior art, allowing spacecraft missions throughout the planetary system and beyond. The rocket engine method and system includes a reactor chamber and a heating system for heating a stable plasma to produce fusion reactions in the stable plasma. Magnets produce a magnetic field that confines the stable plasma. A fuel injection system and a propellant injection system are included. The propellant injection system injects cold propellant into a gas box at one end of the reactor chamber, where the propellant is ionized into a plasma. The propellant and fusion products are directed out of the reactor chamber through a magnetic nozzle and are detached from the magnetic field lines producing thrust.

  11. Cognitive impulsivity in specific learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donfrancesco, Renato; Mugnaini, Daniele; Dell'Uomo, Andrea

    2005-08-01

    Many studies on cognitive impulsivity in learning disabled children have been criticized for their methodological limitations, and they have not dealt with the different types of learning disability. The aim of this study was to overcome these limitations and to assess if there was a significant cognitive impulsivity in reading disorder and/or spelling disorder by using the 20-item Matching Familiar Figures Test (MFF20). A total of 110 children (second through eighth grades) were recruited from a cohort of children assessed for the first time in a National Health clinic specialized in the study of specific learning disabilities. In all, 30 dyslexic children and 25 children with spelling disorder (all children without an ADHD comorbidity) were compared with 55 children of a control group on the MMF20 (accuracy and time latency). Results showed that the children with reading disorder were less accurate than the children with spelling disability (pdata seem to confirm the idea that, similar to ADHD children, dyslexic children have impaired frontal/prefrontal functions. Clinical and treatment implications are discussed.

  12. Homotopy method for optimization of variable-specific-impulse low-thrust trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Zhemin; Yang, Hongwei; Chen, Shiyu; Li, Junfeng

    2017-11-01

    The homotopy method has been used as a useful tool in solving fuel-optimal trajectories with constant-specific-impulse low thrust. However, the specific impulse is often variable for many practical solar electric power-limited thrusters. This paper investigates the application of the homotopy method for optimization of variable-specific-impulse low-thrust trajectories. Difficulties arise when the two commonly-used homotopy functions are employed for trajectory optimization. The optimal power throttle level and the optimal specific impulse are coupled with the commonly-used quadratic and logarithmic homotopy functions. To overcome these difficulties, a modified logarithmic homotopy function is proposed to serve as a gateway for trajectory optimization, leading to decoupled expressions of both the optimal power throttle level and the optimal specific impulse. The homotopy method based on this homotopy function is proposed. Numerical simulations validate the feasibility and high efficiency of the proposed method.

  13. 20mN, Variable Specific Impulse Colloid Thruster Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Colloid thrusters have long been known for their exceptional thrust efficiency and ability to operate over a range of specific impulse due to easily variable...

  14. Diet-induced impulsivity: Effects of a high-fat and a high-sugar diet on impulsive choice in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Catherine C; Pirkle, Jesseca R A; Kirkpatrick, Kimberly

    2017-01-01

    Impulsive choice is a common charactertistic among individuals with gambling problems, obesity, and substance abuse issues. Impulsive choice has been classified as a trans-disease process, and understanding the etiology of trait impulsivity could help to understand how diseases and disorders related to impulsive choice are manifested. The Western diet is a possible catalyst of impulsive choice as individuals who are obese and who eat diets high in fat and sugar are typically more impulsive. However, such correlational evidence is unable to discern the direction and causal nature of the relationship. The present study sought to determine how diet may directly contribute to impulsive choice. After 8 weeks of dietary exposure (high-fat, high-sugar, chow), the rats were tested on an impulsive choice task, which presented choices between a smaller-sooner reward (SS) and a larger-later reward (LL). Then, the rats were transferred to a chow diet and retested on the impulsive choice task. The high-sugar and high-fat groups made significantly more impulsive choices than the chow group. Both groups became more self-controlled when they were off the diet, but there were some residual effects of the diet on choice behavior. These results suggest that diet, specifically one high in processed fat or sugar, induces impulsive choice. This diet-induced impulsivity could be a precursor to other disorders that are characterized by impulsivity, such as diet-induced obesity, and could offer potential understanding of the trans-disease nature of impulsive choice.

  15. Unique aspects of impulsive traits in substance use and overeating: specific contributions of common assessments of impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaton, Derek; Abdi, Hervé; Filbey, Francesca M

    2014-11-01

    Abstract Background: Impulsivity is a complex trait often studied in substance abuse and overeating disorders, but the exact nature of impulsivity traits and their contribution to these disorders are still debated. Thus, understanding how to measure impulsivity is essential for comprehending addictive behaviors. Identify unique impulsivity traits specific to substance use and overeating. Impulsive Sensation Seeking (ImpSS) and Barratt's Impulsivity scales (BIS) Scales were analyzed with a non-parametric factor analytic technique (discriminant correspondence analysis) to identify group-specific traits on 297 individuals from five groups: Marijuana (n = 88), Nicotine (n = 82), Overeaters (n = 27), Marijuauna + Nicotine (n = 63), and CONTROLs (n = 37). A significant overall factor structure revealed three components of impulsivity that explained respectively 50.19% (pperm impulsivity traits specific to these groups. The group specific traits are (1) CONTROL: low impulse, avoids thrill-seeking behaviors; (2) Marijuana: seeks mild sensation, is focused and attentive; (3) Marijuana + Nicotine: pursues thrill-seeking, lacks focus and attention; (4) Nicotine: lacks focus and planning; (5) Overeating: lacks focus, but plans (short and long term). Our results reveal impulsivity traits specific to each group. This may provide better criteria to define spectrums and trajectories - instead of categories - of symptoms for substance use and eating disorders. Defining symptomatic spectrums could be an important step forward in diagnostic strategies.

  16. Overweight in adolescent, psychiatric inpatients: A problem of general or food-specific impulsivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deux, Natalie; Schlarb, Angelika A; Martin, Franziska; Holtmann, Martin; Hebebrand, Johannes; Legenbauer, Tanja

    2017-05-01

    Adolescent psychiatric patients are vulnerable to weight problems and show an overrepresentation of overweight compared to the healthy population. One potential factor that can contribute to the etiology of overweight is higher impulsivity. As of yet, it is unclear whether it is a general impulse control deficit or weight-related aspects such as lower impulse control in response to food that have an impact on body weight. As this may have therapeutic implications, the current study investigated differences between overweight and non-overweight adolescent psychiatric inpatients (N = 98; aged 12-20) in relation to trait impulsivity and behavioral inhibition performance. The Barratt Impulsiveness Scale and two go/no-go paradigms with neutral and food-related stimulus materials were applied. Results indicated no significant differences concerning trait impulsivity, but revealed that overweight inpatients had significantly more difficulties in inhibition performance (i.e. they reacted more impulsively) in response to both food and neutral stimuli compared to non-overweight inpatients. Furthermore, no specific inhibition deficit for high-caloric vs. low-caloric food cues emerged in overweight inpatients, whereas non-overweight participants showed significantly lower inhibition skills in response to high-caloric than low-caloric food stimuli. The results highlight a rather general, non-food-specific reduced inhibition performance in an overweight adolescent psychiatric population. Further research is necessary to enhance the understanding of the role of impulsivity in terms of body weight status in this high-risk group of adolescent inpatients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. High-intensity drying processes: Impulse drying. Progress report on furnish evaluations for impulse drying commercialization demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orloff, D.I.; Phelan, P.M.; Rudman, I.

    1995-02-01

    Laboratory and pilot scale experiments were performed to identify potential furnishes and operating parameters for upcoming high-speed pilot scale trials and commercial demonstration of impulse drying of heavy weight grades of paper. Results indicate that hydrodynamic specific surface is highly dependent on sheet formation and prehandling. Mill refined pulp and machine paper were comparable to laboratory prepared samples in regards to permeability and impulse drying. Process variables such as platen surface coating, felt type, felt moisture, and presteaming temperature profiles were investigated. Substantial improvements in sheet smoothness were achieved.

  18. Artificial Heads for High-Level Impulse Sound Measurement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Buck, K

    1999-01-01

    If the Insertion Loss (IL) of hearing protectors has to be determined with very high impulse or continuous noise levels, the acoustic insulation of the Artificial Test Fixture has to exceed at least the Insertion Loss (IL...

  19. Domain-Specific Impulsivity in School-Age Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukayama, Eli; Duckworth, Angela Lee; Kim, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity is a salient individual difference in children with well-established predictive validity for life outcomes. The current investigation proposes that impulsive behaviors vary systematically by domain. In a series of studies with ethnically and socioeconomically diverse samples of middle school students, we find that schoolwork-related…

  20. Muscle-Specific Effective Mechanical Advantage and Joint Impulse in Weightlifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipp, Kristof; Harris, Chad

    2017-07-01

    Kipp, K, and Harris, C. Muscle-specific effective mechanical advantage and joint impulse in weightlifting. J Strength Cond Res 31(7): 1905-1910, 2017-Lifting greater loads during weightlifting exercises may theoretically be achieved through increasing the magnitudes of net joint impulses or manipulating the joints' effective mechanical advantage (EMA). The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle-specific EMA and joint impulse as well as impulse-momentum characteristics of the lifter-barbell system across a range of external loads during the execution of the clean. Collegiate-level weightlifters performed submaximal cleans at 65, 75, and 85% of their 1-repetition maximum (1-RM), whereas data from a motion analysis system and a force plate were used to calculate lifter-barbell system impulse and velocity, as well as net extensor impulse generated at the hip, knee, and ankle joints and the EMA of the gluteus maximus, hamstrings, quadriceps, and triceps surae muscles. The results indicated that the lifter-barbell system impulse did not change as load increased, whereas the velocity of the lifter-barbell system decreased with greater load. In addition, the net extensor impulse at all joints increased as load increased. The EMA of all muscles did not, however, change as load increased. The load-dependent effects on the impulse-velocity characteristics of the lifter-barbell system may reflect musculoskeletal force-velocity behaviors, and may further indicate that the weightlifting performance is limited by the magnitude of ground reaction force impulse. In turn, the load-dependent effects observed at the joint level indicated that lifting greater loads were due to greater net extensor impulses generated at the joints of the lower extremity and not greater EMAs of the respective extensor muscles. In combination, these results suggest that lifting greater external loads during the clean is due to the ability to generate large extensor joint impulses, rather than

  1. Direct measurement method of specific impulse for pulse laser ablation micro-propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weijing; Jin, Xing; Chang, Hao

    2017-05-01

    Laser ablation micro-propulsion technology is the most promising field in laser propulsion. The specific impulse is the important evaluate indicator of the micro propulsion performance. It represents the impulse generation by consuming unit weight of the working medium. Its accurate measurement can not only help to analyze the mechanism of laser ablation matter, but also help the design of micro laser ablation thruster. This paper presents a measurement method, which can not only obtain the impulse by single pulsed laser ablation the working medium, but also measure the ablation mass, which can directly measure the specific impulse. The method is based on the model of torsion pendulum in vertical direction movement, which is the direction of impulse by pulsed laser ablation and the gravitation direction caused by the loss of the ablation mass, to obtain the corresponding impulse and ablative weight. The paper deduced the measuring principle, pointed out the error and analysed the design principle of the torsion balance, the results show that, according to the torsion angle change due to the impulse by pulsed laser ablation and the mass loss by laser ablation, the maximum angle can be used to calculate the impulse and the stable rotation angle can be used to calculate the loss weight when the torsion period is much greater than four times the width of a single pulse.

  2. Impulsivity, aggression and brain structure in high and low lethality suicide attempters with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloff, Paul; White, Richard; Diwadkar, Vaibhav A

    2014-06-30

    Impulsivity and aggressiveness are trait dispositions associated with the vulnerability to suicidal behavior across diagnoses. They are associated with structural and functional abnormalities in brain networks involved in regulation of mood, impulse and behavior. They are also core characteristics of borderline personality disorder (BPD), a disorder defined, in part, by recurrent suicidal behavior. We assessed the relationships between personality traits, brain structure and lethality of suicide attempts in 51 BPD attempters using multiple regression analyses on structural MRI data. BPD was diagnosed by the Diagnostic Interview for Borderline Patients-revised, impulsivity by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS), aggression by the Brown-Goodwin Lifetime History of Aggression (LHA), and high lethality by a score of 4 or more on the Lethality Rating Scale (LRS). Sixteen High Lethality attempters were compared to 35 Low Lethality attempters, with no significant differences noted in gender, co-morbidity, childhood abuse, BIS or LHA scores. Degree of medical lethality (LRS) was negatively related to gray matter volumes across multiple fronto-temporal-limbic regions. Effects of impulsivity and aggression on gray matter volumes discriminated High from Low Lethality attempters and differed markedly within lethality groups. Lethality of suicide attempts in BPD may be related to the mediation of these personality traits by specific neural networks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. High-intensity drying processes-impulse drying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orloff, D.I.

    1991-06-01

    Impulse drying is an innovative process for drying paper that holds great promise for reducing the energy consumed during the manufacture of paper and similar web products. impulse drying occurs when a wet paper web passes through a press nip in which one of the rolls is heated to a high temperature. A steam layer adjacent to the heated surface grows and displaces water from the sheet in a very efficient manner. The energy required for water removal is very much less than that required for conventional evaporative drying. To eliminate sheet delamination, low thermal mass ceramic press roll coatings were developed to reduce heat transfer to the sheet, while maintaining high heat flux during early stages of the process. In so doing, most of the transferred energy is used to form steam that displaces liquid water, rather than in excessively heating the sheet. During this period, a prototype ceramic coating was developed and its impulse drying performance was compared to that of steel surfaces. It was observed that ceramic platens can be operated at higher temperatures and pressures resulting in improved water removal and physical properties without inducing sheet delamination. Heat flux measurement techniques were developed to provide a mechanistic explanation for the superior performance of the prototype. The work confirmed that the prototype ceramic coating is more energy efficient than the steel surface.

  4. High-intensity drying processes-impulse drying. Yearly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orloff, D.I.

    1991-06-01

    Impulse drying is an innovative process for drying paper that holds great promise for reducing the energy consumed during the manufacture of paper and similar web products. impulse drying occurs when a wet paper web passes through a press nip in which one of the rolls is heated to a high temperature. A steam layer adjacent to the heated surface grows and displaces water from the sheet in a very efficient manner. The energy required for water removal is very much less than that required for conventional evaporative drying. To eliminate sheet delamination, low thermal mass ceramic press roll coatings were developed to reduce heat transfer to the sheet, while maintaining high heat flux during early stages of the process. In so doing, most of the transferred energy is used to form steam that displaces liquid water, rather than in excessively heating the sheet. During this period, a prototype ceramic coating was developed and its impulse drying performance was compared to that of steel surfaces. It was observed that ceramic platens can be operated at higher temperatures and pressures resulting in improved water removal and physical properties without inducing sheet delamination. Heat flux measurement techniques were developed to provide a mechanistic explanation for the superior performance of the prototype. The work confirmed that the prototype ceramic coating is more energy efficient than the steel surface.

  5. High-definition tDCS alters impulsivity in a baseline-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Bo; Yin, Yunlu; Wang, Jiashu; Zhou, Xiaolin; McClure, Samuel M; Li, Jian

    2016-12-01

    In intertemporal choice (ITC), people discount future rewards in proportion to the time delay until reward receipt. Despite recent non-invasive brain stimulation studies suggesting a general causal link between dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) activity and ITC impulsivity, results regarding the functional specificity of dlPFC are mixed. We used high-definition transcranial direct current stimulation (HD-tDCS) to map changes in causal impulsivity through bi-directional modulation of left and right dlPFC during ITC. Model-free and model-based analyses demonstrated that anodal and cathodal stimulation of left dlPFC, but not right dlPFC, decreased and increased impulsivity, respectively. Critically, an individual differences analysis revealed that modulation of impulsivity was contingent on participants' baseline impulsivity. Overall, our results might reconcile the discrepancies in the existing literature and suggest a baseline-dependent role for left dlPFC during ITC. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. High harmonic generation from impulsively aligned SO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devin, Julien; Wang, Song; Kaldun, Andreas; Bucksbaum, Phil

    2016-05-01

    Previous work in high harmonics generation (HHG) in aligned molecular gases has mainly focused on rotational dynamics in order to determine the contributions of different orbitals to the ionization step. In our experiment, we focus on the shorter timescale of vibrational dynamics. We generate high harmonics from impulsively aligned SO2 molecules in a gas jet and record the emitted attosecond pulse trains in a home-built high resolution vacuum ultra violet (VUV) spectrometer. Using the high temporal resolution of our setup, we are able to map out the effects of vibrational wavepackets with a sub-femtosecond resolution. The target molecule, SO2 gas, is impulsively aligned by a near-infrared laser pulse and has accessible vibrations on the timescale of the short laser pulse used. We present first experimental results for the response to this excitation in high-harmonics. We observe both fast oscillations in the time domain as well as shifts of the VUV photon energy outside of the pulse overlaps. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division and by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship.

  7. Discharge current modes of high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongzhen Wu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on the production and disappearance of ions and electrons in the high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasma near the target, the expression of the discharge current is derived. Depending on the slope, six possible modes are deduced for the discharge current and the feasibility of each mode is discussed. The discharge parameters and target properties are simplified into the discharge voltage, sputtering yield, and ionization energy which mainly affect the discharge plasma. The relationship between these factors and the discharge current modes is also investigated.

  8. High impulsivity predicting vulnerability to cocaine addiction in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molander, Anna C; Mar, Adam; Norbury, Agnes

    2011-01-01

    RATIONALE: Impulsivity is a vulnerability marker for drug addiction in which other behavioural traits such as anxiety and novelty seeking ('sensation seeking') are also widely present. However, inter-relationships between impulsivity, novelty seeking and anxiety traits are poorly understood...... increasing or decreasing impulsivity in SHI and SLI rats, did reduce the contrast in impulsivity between these two groups of animals. CONCLUSIONS: This investigation indicates that behavioural impulsivity in rats on the 5-CSRTT, which predicts vulnerability for cocaine addiction, is distinct from anxiety...

  9. Dysfunctional decision-making in pathological gambling: pattern specificity and the role of impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kräplin, Anja; Dshemuchadse, Maja; Behrendt, Silke; Scherbaum, Stefan; Goschke, Thomas; Bühringer, Gerhard

    2014-03-30

    Dysfunctional decision-making in individuals with pathological gambling (PGs) may result from dominating reward-driven processes, indicated by higher impulsivity. In the current study we examined (1) if PGs show specific decision-making impairments related to dominating reward-driven processes rather than to strategic planning deficits and (2) whether these impairments are related to impulsivity. Nineteen PGs according to DSM-IV and 19 matched control subjects undertook the Cambridge Gambling Task (CGT) to assess decision-making. The delay discounting paradigm (DDP) as well as the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale (measuring urgency, premeditation, perseverance and sensation seeking) were administered as multidimensional measures of impulsivity. Results revealed that (1) PGs exhibited higher risk seeking and an immediate reward focus in the CGT and, in contrast, comparable strategic planning to the control group. (2) Decision-making impairments were related to more severe delay discounting and, specifically, to increased urgency and less premeditation. Our findings suggest (1) the necessity to disentangle decision-making components in order to improve etiological models of PGs, and (2) that urgency and premeditation are specifically related to disadvantageous decision-making and should be tackled in intervention strategies focusing on emotion tolerance and control strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Field Independence, Impulsiveness, High School Training, and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feij, Jan A.

    1976-01-01

    Investigates the relationship between performance on field-independence tests and two variables which may be thought of as important determinants of performance on a variety of cognitive tasks: impulsiveness and previous education. (Author/RC)

  11. Gender-specific mediational links between parenting styles, parental monitoring, impulsiveness, drinking control, and alcohol-related problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patock-Peckham, Julie A; King, Kevin M; Morgan-Lopez, Antonio A; Ulloa, Emilio C; Moses, Jennifer M Filson

    2011-03-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that traits may dynamically change as conditions change. One possible mechanism that may influence impulsiveness is parental monitoring. Parental monitoring reflects a knowledge regarding one's offspring's whereabouts and social connections. The aim of this investigation was to examine potential gender-specific parental influences to impulsiveness (general behavioral control), control over one's own drinking (specific behavioral control), and alcohol-related problems among individuals in a period of emerging adulthood. Direct and mediational links between parenting styles (permissive, authoritarian, and authoritative), parental monitoring, impulsiveness, drinking control, and alcohol-related problems were investigated. A multiple-group, SEM model with (316 women, 265 men) university students was examined. In general, the overall pattern among male and female respondents was distinct. For daughters, perceptions of a permissive father were indirectly linked to more alcohol-related problems through lower levels of monitoring by fathers and more impulsive symptoms. Perceptions of an authoritative father were also indirectly linked to fewer impulsive symptoms through higher levels of monitoring by fathers among daughters. For men, perceptions of a permissive mother were indirectly linked to more alcohol-related problems through lower levels of monitoring by mothers and more impulsive symptoms. For sons, perceptions of mother authoritativeness were indirectly linked to fewer alcohol-related problems through more monitoring by mothers and fewer impulsive symptoms. Monitoring by an opposite-gender parent mediated the link between parenting styles (i.e., permissive, authoritative) on impulsiveness.

  12. Discharge Physics of High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2010-10-13

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) is pulsed sputtering where the peak power exceeds the time-averaged power by typically two orders of magnitude. The peak power density, averaged over the target area, can reach or exceed 107 W/m2, leading to plasma conditions that make ionization of the sputtered atoms very likely. A brief review of HIPIMS operation is given in a tutorial manner, illustrated by some original data related to the self-sputtering of niobium in argon and krypton. Emphasis is put on the current-voltage-time relationships near the threshold of self-sputtering runaway. The great variety of current pulse shapes delivers clues on the very strong gas rarefaction, self-sputtering runaway conditions, and the stopping of runaway due to the evolution of atom ionization and ion return probabilities as the gas plasma is replaced by metal plasma. The discussions are completed by considering instabilities and the special case of ?gasless? self-sputtering.

  13. Pharmacologic dissociation between impulsivity and alcohol drinking in high alcohol preferring mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlin, Brandon G; Bristow, Robert Evan; Heighton, Meredith E; Grahame, Nicholas J

    2010-08-01

    Impulsivity is genetically correlated with, and precedes, addictive behaviors and alcoholism. If impulsivity or attention is causally related to addiction, certain pharmacological manipulations of impulsivity and/or attention may affect alcohol drinking, and vice versa. The current studies were designed to explore the relationship among impulsivity, drinking, and vigilance in selectively bred High Alcohol Preferring (HAP) mice, a line that has previously demonstrated both high impulsivity and high alcohol consumption. Amphetamine, naltrexone, and memantine were tested in a delay discounting (DD) task for their effects on impulsivity and vigilance. The same drugs and doses were also assessed for effects on alcohol drinking in a 2-bottle choice test. HAP mice were subjected to a modified version of adjusting amount DD using 0.5-second and 10-second delays to detect decreases and increases, respectively, in impulsive responding. In 2 experiments, mice were given amphetamine (0.4, 0.8, or 1.2 mg/kg), naltrexone (3 and 10 mg/kg), and memantine (1 and 5 mg/kg) before DD testing. Another pair of studies used scheduled access, 2-bottle choice drinking to assess effects of amphetamine (0.4, 1.2, or 3.0 mg/kg), naltrexone (3 and 10 mg/kg), and memantine (1 and 5 mg/kg) on alcohol consumption. Amphetamine dose-dependently reduced impulsivity and vigilance decrement in DD, but similar doses left alcohol drinking unaffected. Naltrexone and memantine decreased alcohol intake at doses that did not affect water drinking but had no effects on impulsivity or vigilance decrement in the DD task. Contrary to our hypothesis, none of the drugs tested here, while effective on either alcohol drinking or impulsivity, decreased both behaviors. These findings suggest that the genetic association between drinking and impulsivity observed in this population is mediated by mechanisms other than those targeted by the drugs tested in these studies.

  14. Low attentive and high impulsive rats: A translational animal model of ADHD and disorders of attention and impulse control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Andrew; Tomlinson, Anneka; Neill, Joanna C

    2016-02-01

    Many human conditions such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), schizophrenia and drug abuse are characterised by deficits in attention and impulse control. Carefully validated animal models are required to enhance our understanding of the pathophysiology of these disorders, enabling development of improved pharmacotherapy. Recent models have attempted to recreate the psychopathology of these conditions using chemical lesions or genetic manipulations. In a diverse population, where the aetiology is not fully understood and is multifactorial, these methods are restricted in their ability to identify novel targets for drug discovery. Two tasks of visual attention and impulsive action typically used in rodents and based on the human continuous performance task (CPT) include, the well-established 5 choice serial reaction time task (5C-SRTT) and the more recently validated, 5 choice continuous performance task (5C-CPT) which provides enhanced translational value. We suggest that separating animals by behavioural performance into high and low attentive and impulsivity cohorts using established parameters in these tasks offers a model with enhanced translational value. In this review, methods to separate animals are compared and the results discussed to highlight advantages over more constrained models, in addition to potential future directions for enhanced validation. Advantages include reliability, flexibility and enhanced translation to clinical conditions, all important considerations in modelling ADHD, schizophrenia and drug abuse, conditions with multifactorial aetiology. Based on the existing evidence, we suggest that future studies should incorporate an element of behavioural separation when studying the constructs of visual attention and impulsive action of relevance to human disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Positive association between trait impulsivity and high gambling-related cognitive biases among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuping; Zhong, Xue; Wu, Daxing; Li, Hangui; Li, Mulei

    2016-09-30

    The present study examined whether people with high gambling-related cognitive bias are more likely to have higher levels of impulsivity than are those with low gambling-related cognitive bias. We used Barratt Impulsiveness Scale version 11, Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire and the Iowa gambling task to explore differences in impulsivity between high and low gambling-related cognitive bias groups. Extreme group design was applied. 110 participants (high gambling related cognition group=58, low one=52) were recruited to complete the gambling related cognition scale, impulsivity self-rating scales and Iowa gambling task. Impulsivity self-rating scores were higher among subjects with high than among those with low gambling-related cognitive bias. Compared with individuals with low gambling-related cognitive bias, those with high levels of such bias showed greater degrees of trait impulsivity. We are unable to identify group differences on IGT. State and trait impulsivity may be dissociated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. High trait impulsivity predicts food addiction-like behavior in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez-Sánchez, Clara; Ferragud, Antonio; Moore, Catherine F; Everitt, Barry J; Sabino, Valentina; Cottone, Pietro

    2014-09-01

    Impulsivity is a behavioral trait frequently seen not only in drug-addicted individuals but also in individuals who pathologically overeat. However, whether impulsivity predates the development of uncontrollable feeding is unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that a high impulsivity trait precedes and confers vulnerability for food addiction-like behavior. For this purpose, we trained ad libitum-fed male Wistar rats in a differential reinforcement of low rates of responding (DRL) task to select Low- and High-impulsive rats. Then, we allowed Low- and High-impulsive rats to self-administer a highly palatable diet (Palatable group) or a regular chow diet (Chow group) in 1-h daily sessions, under fixed ratio (FR) 1, FR3, FR5, and under a progressive ratio (PR) schedules of reinforcement. In addition, we tested the compulsiveness for food in Low- and High-impulsive rats by measuring the food eaten in the aversive, open compartment of a light/dark conflict test. Finally, we measured the expression of the transcription factor ΔFosB in the shell and the core of the nucleus accumbens, which is a marker for neuroadaptive changes following addictive drug exposure. The data we obtained demonstrate that impulsivity is a trait that predicts the development of food addiction-like behaviors, including: (i) excessive intake, (ii) heightened motivation for food, and (iii) compulsive-like eating, when rats are given access to highly palatable food. In addition, we show that the food addiction phenotype in high impulsive subjects is characterized by an increased expression of the transcription factor ΔFosB in the nucleus accumbens shell. These results reveal that impulsivity confers an increased propensity to develop uncontrollable overeating of palatable food.

  17. High impulse voltage and current measurement techniques fundamentals, measuring instruments, measuring methods

    CERN Document Server

    Schon, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Equipment to be installed in electric power-transmission and distribution systems must pass acceptance tests with standardized high-voltage or high-current test impulses which simulate the stress on the insulation caused by external lightning discharges and switching operations in the grid. High impulse voltages and currents are also used in many other fields of science and engineering for various applications. Therefore, precise impulse-measurement techniques are necessary, either to prevent an over- or understressing of the insulation or to guarantee the effectiveness and quality of the application. The book deals with: principal generator circuits for generating high-voltage and high-current impulses measuring systems and their calibration according to IEC 60060 and IEC 62475 methods of estimating uncertainties of measurement mathematical and experimental basis for characterizing the transfer behavior of spatially extended systems used for measuring fast transients. This book is intended for engineers and ...

  18. Single stage to orbit mass budgets derived from propellant density and specific impulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, J.C.

    1996-06-06

    The trade between specific impulse (Isp) and density is examined in view of Single Stage To Orbit (SSTO) requirements. Mass allocations for vehicle hardware are derived from these two properties, for several propellant combinations and a dual-fuel case. This comparative analysis, based on flight-proven hardware, indicates that the higher density of several alternative propellants compensates for reduced Isp, when compared with cryogenic oxygen and hydrogen. Approximately half the orbiting mass of a rocket- propelled SSTO vehicle must be allocated to propulsion hardware and residuals. Using hydrogen as the only fuel requires a slightly greater fraction of orbiting mass for propulsion, because hydrogen engines and tanks are heavier than those for denser fuels. The advantage of burning both a dense fuel and hydrogen in succession depends strongly on tripropellant engine weight. The implications of the calculations for SSTO vehicle design are discussed, especially with regard to the necessity to minimize non-tankage structure.

  19. Different relations between schedule-induced polydipsia and impulsive behaviour in the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat and in high impulsive Wistar rats: questioning the role of impulsivity in adjunctive behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibias, Javier; Pellón, Ricardo

    2014-09-01

    Rats belonging to three different strains (15 Wistar, 8 Spontaneously Hypertensive - SHR- and 8 Wistar Kyoto - WKY-) were used to evaluate the possible relationship between different levels of impulsivity and development of schedule-induced polydipsia (SIP). We first measured the rats' levels of impulsivity by means of delay-discounting and indifference-point procedures. Secondly, development of SIP was studied under a series of fixed time 15, 30, 60 and 120s food schedules, which were counterbalanced by means of a Latin-square design. Finally, we re-assessed the rats' levels of impulsivity by replicating the delay-discounting test. The findings showed that, starting from equivalent levels of impulsivity, development of SIP differed among the groups of rats. In comparison with the rest of the animals, the SHRs were observed to attain elevated drinking rates under SIP. On the other hand, the Wistar rats which had initial high impulsivity levels similar to those of the SHRs, displayed the lowest rates of induced drinking. Moreover, low levels of impulsivity in Wistar rats prior to SIP acquisition were reflected into high drinking rates. Relation of SIP and impulsivity is questioned by present results, which gives ground to the understanding of the behavioural mechanisms involved in adjunctive behaviour and its usefulness as an animal model of excessive behaviour. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Mouthguard BITES (Behavior, Impulsivity, Theory Evaluation Study): What Drives Mouthguard Use Among High School Basketball and Baseball/Softball Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Christy L.; McKenzie, Lara B.; Roberts, Kristin J.; Fields, Sarah K.; Comstock, R. Dawn

    2017-01-01

    Although mouthguards are effective, inexpensive, easy to use, and readily available, this form of protective equipment has been underutilized. “Impulsive delay discounting” (an index of impulsive behavior) among high school athletes may help explain their decision making regarding use of protective equipment such as mouthguards. We investigated the relationship between high school baseball, softball, and basketball players’ mouthguard use, impulsive delay discounting, and the precaution adoption process model (a behavior change theory). A convenience sample of boys’ and girls’ basketball and baseball/softball players at 21 high schools in the Greater Columbus, Ohio, metro area completed a self-administered survey that captured their demographic information, knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding mouthguard use, impulsive delay discounting, and precaution adoption process model stage. We surveyed a total of 1636 students (55.9 % male, 43.8 % female, 0.3 % unknown). Only 12.3 % reported using a mouthguard either every time or sometimes during practice or competition. The primary reasons reported for not wearing mouthguards were they were not required to (65.3 %) and that the athletes could not breathe or talk while wearing one (61.5 %). These reasons were consistent across sex and sport. Most athletes reported that their coaches (87.3 %) and parents (64.5 %) had never talked to them about wearing a mouthguard. Lower precaution adoption process model stage was significantly associated with higher impulsivity (p athletes playing basketball and baseball/softball remains low despite the risk of dental injury in these sports. Effective, evidence-based, targeted, and tailored interventions to improve adolescent athletes’ use of mouthguards to prevent sports-related dental injuries should be based on the specific behavioral and social factors influencing each athlete’s decision making regarding use of mouthguards. PMID:26391156

  1. General and Food-Specific Inhibitory Control As Moderators of the Effects of the Impulsive Systems on Food Choices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuemeng Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to extend the application of the reflective-impulsive model to restrained eating and explore the effect of automatic attention (impulsive system on food choices. Furthermore, we examined the moderating effects of general inhibitory control (G-IC and food-specific inhibitory control (F-IC on successful and unsuccessful restrained eaters (US-REs. Automatic attention was measured using “the EyeLink 1000,” which tracked eye movements during the process of making food choices, and G-IC and F-IC were measured using the Stop-Signal Task. The results showed that food choices were related to automatic attention and that G-IC and F-IC moderated the predictive relationship between automatic attention and food choices. Furthermore, among successful restrained eaters (S-REs, automatic attention to high caloric foods did not predict food choices, regardless of whether G-IC or F-IC was high or low. Whereas food choice was positively correlated with automatic attention among US-REs with poor F-IC, this pattern was not observed in those with poor G-IC. In conclusion, the S-REs had more effective self-management skills and their food choices were affected less by automatic attention and inhibitory control. Unsuccessful restrained eating was associated with poor F-IC (not G-IC and greater automatic attention to high caloric foods. Thus, clinical interventions should focus on enhancing F-IC, not G-IC, and on reducing automatic attention to high caloric foods.

  2. Cocaine-, caffeine-, and stress-evoked cocaine reinstatement in high vs. low impulsive rats: treatment with allopregnanolone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regier, Paul S; Claxton, Alexander B; Zlebnik, Natalie E; Carroll, Marilyn E

    2014-10-01

    Previous research indicates that individual differences in traits such as impulsivity, avidity for sweets, and novelty reactivity are predictors of several aspects of drug addiction. Specifically, rats that rank high on these behavioral measures are more likely than their low drug-seeking counterparts to exhibit several characteristics of drug-seeking behavior. In contrast, initial work suggests that the low drug-seeking animals are more reactive to negative events (e.g., punishment and anxiogenic stimuli). The goal of this study was to compare high and low impulsive rats on reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior elicited by cocaine (COC) and by negative stimuli such as the stress-inducing agent yohimbine (YOH) or a high dose of caffeine (CAFF). An additional goal was to determine whether treatment with allopregnanolone (ALLO) would reduce reinstatement (or relapse) of cocaine-seeking behavior under these priming conditions. Female rats were selected as high (HiI) or low (LoI) impulsive using a delay-discounting task. After selection, they were allowed to self-administer cocaine for 12 days. Cocaine was then replaced with saline, and rats extinguished lever responding over 16 days. Subsequently, rats were pretreated with either vehicle control or ALLO, and cocaine seeking was reinstated by injections of COC, CAFF, or YOH. While there were no phenotype differences in maintenance and extinction of cocaine self-administration or reinstatement under control treatment conditions, ALLO attenuated COC- and CAFF-primed reinstatement in LoI but not HiI rats. Overall, the present findings suggest that individual differences in impulsive behavior may influence efficacy of interventions aimed to reduce drug-seeking behavior. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Divergent effects of D₂/₃ receptor activation in the nucleus accumbens core and shell on impulsivity and locomotor activity in high and low impulsive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, M; Economidou, D; Mar, A C; López-Granero, C; Caprioli, D; Theobald, D E; Fernando, A; Newman, A H; Robbins, T W; Dalley, Jeffrey W

    2013-07-01

    Previously we demonstrated reduced D2/3 receptor availability in the ventral striatum of hyper-impulsive rats on the five-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT). However, the anatomical locus of D2/3 receptor dysfunction in high impulsive (HI) rats is unknown. In the present study, we investigated whether D2/3 receptor dysfunction in HI rats is localised to the core or shell sub-regions of the nucleus accumbens (NAcb). Rats were selected for low (low impulsive, LI) and high impulsivity on the 5-CSRTT and implanted with guide cannulae targeting the NAcb core and shell. The D2/3 receptor agonist quinpirole was locally injected in the NAcb (0.1, 0.3 and 1 μg per infusion) and its effects investigated on the performance of LI and HI rats on the 5-CSRTT as well as spontaneous locomotor activity in an open field. Intra-NAcb core quinpirole increased premature responding in HI rats but not in LI rats. In contrast, intra-NAcb shell quinpirole strongly increased locomotor activity in HI rats, unlike LI rats. This effect was blocked by intra-NAcb shell infusions of the D2/3 receptor antagonist nafadotride (0.03 μg). However, nafadotride was ineffective in blocking the effects of intra-NAcb core quinpirole on premature responding in HI rats. These findings indicate that impulsivity and hyperactivity are separately regulated by core and shell sub-regions of the NAcb and that HI rats show an enhanced response to D2/3 receptor activation in these regions. These results suggest that the symptom clusters of hyperactivity and impulsivity in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder may be neurally dissociable at the level of the NAcb.

  4. Overlapping and disease specific aspects of impulsivity in children and adolescents with schizophrenia spectrum disorders or Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Jens Richardt Møllegaard; Rydkjær, Jacob; Fagerlund, Birgitte

    Objectives: To identify disease specific and overlapping aspects of impulsivity in children and adolescents with early-onset schizophrenia spectrum disorders or ADHD. Methods: Motor impulsivity (Stop Signal Task), reflection impulsivity (Information Sampling Task), and trait impulsivity (Barratt...... Impulsiveness Scale) are compared between three groups of children and adolescents between 12 and 17 years of age: patients with early-onset schizophrenia spectrum disorders (N=29), patients with ADHD (N=29), and healthy controls (N=45). Results: Preliminary results: Reflection impulsivity is significantly...... increased in patients with ADHD but not in early-onset schizophrenia spectrum disorder patients who perform non-significantly different from the healthy controls in the decreased win condition. Discussion: Reduced information sampling in children and adolescents with ADHD may reflect an inability to delay...

  5. A web-based study of bipolarity and impulsivity in athletes engaging in extreme and high-risk sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek, Dominika; Siwek, Marcin; Jaeschke, Rafał; Drozdowicz, Katarzyna; Styczeń, Krzysztof; Arciszewska, Aleksandra; Chrobak, Adrian A; Rybakowski, Janusz K

    2016-06-01

    We hypothesised that men and women who engage in extreme or high-risk sports would score higher on standardised measures of bipolarity and impulsivity compared to age and gender matched controls. Four-hundred and eighty extreme or high-risk athletes (255 males and 225 females) and 235 age-matched control persons (107 males and 128 females) were enrolled into the web-based case-control study. The Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) and Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11) were administered to screen for bipolarity and impulsive behaviours, respectively. Results indicated that extreme or high-risk athletes had significantly higher scores of bipolarity and impulsivity, and lower scores on cognitive complexity of the BIS-11, compared to controls. Further, there were positive correlations between the MDQ and BIS-11 scores. These results showed greater rates of bipolarity and impulsivity, in the extreme or high-risk athletes, suggesting these measures are sensitive to high-risk behaviours.

  6. Child Problems as a Moderator of Relations Between Maternal Impulsivity and Family Environment in a High-Risk Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Carly K; Ryan, Stacy R; Charles, Nora E; Mathias, Charles W; Acheson, Ashley; Dougherty, Donald M

    2016-08-23

    Previous studies have suggested that maternal characteristics are related to family environment; however, the relation between maternal impulsivity, in particular, and family environment is not well understood. As such, we examined direct relations between maternal impulsivity and family environment, as well as whether the relation between maternal impulsivity and family environment was moderated by child problems for sons and daughters. We hypothesized that child problems would moderate the association between maternal impulsivity and family environment. We also explored whether these associations differ for boys and girls. Data from the initial visit of a longitudinal study was used for the current study. Participants included 297 youth (137 boys; 160 girls) of 10 to 12 years of age (M = 10.99, SD = .84) and their mothers. The majority of the sample had a family history of substance use disorder (n = 236). Hierarchical linear regressions showed that for sons there was a significant interaction between maternal impulsivity and child problems on family environment. Maternal impulsivity was positively related to family environment problems among sons with few emotional and behavioral problems, but there was no significant correlation among sons with high problem levels. Among daughters, there was no significant interaction between maternal impulsivity and child emotional and behavioral problems on family environment. The results suggest that the association between maternal impulsivity and family environment may depend on problem level and child gender. Thus, addressing maternal impulsivity in therapy may benefit some families.

  7. Development of a Specific Impulse Balance for a Pulsed Capillary Discharge (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-13

    is an interferometric system. One particular laserinterferometric vibrometer has an advertised displacement range of ±20 mm, a resolution on the...stand. To cover the higher region of impulse calibration, a piezoelectric impact hammer will be implemented to calibrate in the lO^-lO1 N s range. Such

  8. The Influence of Using Momentum and Impulse Computer Simulation to Senior High School Students’ Concept Mastery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaniawati, I.; Samsudin, A.; Hasopa, Y.; Sutrisno, A. D.; Suhendi, E.

    2016-08-01

    This research is based on students’ lack of mastery of physics abstract concepts. Thus, this study aims to improve senior high school students’ mastery of momentum and impulse concepts with the use of computer simulation. To achieve these objectives, the research method employed was pre experimental design with one group pre-test post-test. A total of 36 science students of grade 11 in one of public senior high school in Bandung became the sample in this study. The instruments utilized to determine the increase of students’ concept mastery were pretest and posttest in the form of multiple choices. After using computer simulations in physics learning, students’ mastery of momentum and impulse concept has increased as indicated by the normalized gain of 0.64 with the medium category.

  9. Setup of an experimental device for high-speed debris flows generating 2D impulse waves

    OpenAIRE

    Bateman Pinzón, Allen; Bregoli, Francesco; Medina Iglesias, Vicente César de; Rast, Manuel; Bentz, Clara

    2011-01-01

    Landslides and debris flows falling into reservoirs, natural lakes, fjords or seas can generate impulse waves, which can be assimilated to tsunami-water waves. Such wave’s behavior can be highly destructive regarding dams and other structures and infrastructures as well as people living along shorelines. Destructive observed past events, such Vajont Dam in Italy (1963) or Lituya Bay in Alaska (1958), are not enough to describe and finally properly prevent the phenomenon. Experimental studies ...

  10. A Low-Cost Time-Hopping Impulse Radio System for High Data Rate Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyun Zhang

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available We present an efficient, low-cost implementation of time-hopping impulse radio that fulfills the spectral mask mandated by the FCC and is suitable for high-data-rate, short-range communications. Key features are (i all-baseband implementation that obviates the need for passband components, (ii symbol-rate (not chip rate sampling, A/D conversion, and digital signal processing, (iii fast acquisition due to novel search algorithms, and (iv spectral shaping that can be adapted to accommodate different spectrum regulations and interference environments. Computer simulations show that this system can provide 110 Mbps at 7–10 m distance, as well as higher data rates at shorter distances under FCC emissions limits. Due to the spreading concept of time-hopping impulse radio, the system can sustain multiple simultaneous users, and can suppress narrowband interference effectively.

  11. Highly conductive ultrathin Co films by high-power impulse magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonka, L.; Riekehr, L.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, S.-L.; Kubart, T.

    2018-01-01

    Ultrathin Co films deposited on SiO2 with conductivities exceeding that of Cu are demonstrated. Ionized deposition implemented by high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) is shown to result in smooth films with large grains and low resistivities, namely, 14 µΩ cm at a thickness of 40 nm, which is close to the bulk value of Co. Even at a thickness of only 6 nm, a resistivity of 35 µΩ cm is obtained. The improved film quality is attributed to a higher nucleation density in the Co-ion dominated plasma in HiPIMS. In particular, the pulsed nature of the Co flux as well as shallow ion implantation of Co into SiO2 can increase the nucleation density. Adatom diffusion is further enhanced in the ionized process, resulting in a dense microstructure. These results are in contrast to Co deposited by conventional direct current magnetron sputtering where the conductivity is reduced due to smaller grains, voids, rougher interfaces, and Ar incorporation. The resistivity of the HiPIMS films is shown to be in accordance with models by Mayadas-Shatzkes and Sondheimer which consider grain-boundary and surface-scattering.

  12. Swedish high-school pupils' attitudes towards drugs in relation to drug usage, impulsiveness and other risk factors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mousavi, Fariba; Garcia, Danilo; Jimmefors, Alexander; Archer, Trevor; Ewalds-Kvist, Béatrice

    2014-01-01

    .... Current research shows that there is an increase in young people's drug use in Sweden. The aim was to investigate Swedish high-school pupils' attitudes, impulsiveness and gender differences linked to drug use...

  13. Pay attention to impulsivity: modelling low attentive and high impulsive subtypes of adult ADHD in the 5-choice continuous performance task (5C-CPT) in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Anneka; Grayson, Ben; Marsh, Samuel; Harte, Michael K; Barnes, Samuel A; Marshall, Kay M; Neill, Joanna C

    2014-08-01

    Varying levels of attention and impulsivity deficits are core features of the three subtypes of adult attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). To date, little is known about the neurobiological correlates of these subtypes. Development of a translational animal model is essential to improve our understanding and improve therapeutic strategies. The 5-choice continuous performance task (5C-CPT) in rats can be used to examine different forms of attention and impulsivity. Adult rats were trained to pre-set 5C-CPT criterion and subsequently separated into subgroups according to baseline levels of sustained attention, vigilance, premature responding and response disinhibition in the 5C-CPT. The behavioural subgroups were selected to represent the different subtypes of adult ADHD. Consequently, effects of the clinically used pharmacotherapies (methylphenidate and atomoxetine) were assessed in the different subgroups. Four subgroups were identified: low-attentive (LA), high-attentive (HA), high-impulsive (HI) and low-impulsive (LI). Methylphenidate and atomoxetine produced differential effects in the subgroups. Methylphenidate increased sustained attention and vigilance in LA animals, and reduced premature responding in HI animals. Atomoxetine also improved sustained attention and vigilance in LA animals, and reduced response disinhibition and premature responding in HI animals. This is the first study using adult rats to demonstrate the translational value of the 5C-CPT to select subgroups of rats, which may be used to model the subtypes observed in adult ADHD. Our findings suggest that this as an important paradigm to increase our understanding of the neurobiological underpinnings of adult ADHD-subtypes and their response to pharmacotherapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  14. Time Devours Things: How Impulsivity and Time Affect Temporal Decisions in Pathological Gamblers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grecucci, A.; Giorgetta, C.; Rattin, A.; Guerreschi, C.; Sanfey, A.G.; Bonini, N.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is associated with several psychiatric disorders in which the loss of control of a specific behavior determines the syndrome itself. One particularly interesting population characterized by reported high impulsivity and problematic decision-making are those diagnosed with pathological

  15. Family history of suicide and high motor impulsivity distinguish suicide attempters from suicide ideators among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Guang; Chen, Shen; Xu, Zhi-Ming; Shen, Zhi-Hua; Wang, Yi-Quan; He, Xiao-Yan; Cao, Ri-Fang; Roberts, David L; Shi, Jian-Fei; Wang, Yi-Qiang

    2017-07-01

    Suicide in college students has become an important public health issue in China. The aim of this study was to identify the differences between suicide attempters and suicide ideators based on a cross-sectional survey. Our results indicate that although female gender, positive screening for psychiatric illness, positive family history of suicide, elevated overall impulsivity, and elevated motor impulsivity were correlated with suicidal ideation, only positive family history of suicide and high motor impulsivity could differentiate suicide attempters from suicidal ideators. Future research with a longitudinal and prospective study design should be conducted to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Contingency management improves smoking cessation treatment outcomes among highly impulsive adolescent smokers relative to cognitive behavioral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morean, Meghan E; Kong, Grace; Camenga, Deepa R; Cavallo, Dana A; Carroll, Kathleen M; Pittman, Brian; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra

    2015-03-01

    Impulsive adolescents have difficulty quitting smoking. We examined if treatments that provide behavioral incentives for abstinence improve treatment outcomes among impulsive adolescent smokers, who have been shown to be highly sensitive to reward. We ran secondary data analyses on 64 teen smokers (mean age=16.36 [1.44]; cigarettes/day=13.97 [6.61]; 53.1% female; 90.6% Caucasian) who completed a four-week smoking cessation trial to determine whether impulsive adolescents differentially benefit from receiving cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), contingency management (CM), or the combination of the two (CM/CBT). Indices of treatment efficacy included self-report percent days abstinent and end of treatment biochemically-confirmed 7-day point prevalence abstinence (EOT abstinence). We assessed self-reported impulsivity using the Brief Barratt Impulsiveness Scale. We used univariate Generalized Linear Modeling to examine main effects and interactions of impulsivity and treatment condition as predictors of self-reported abstinence, and exact logistic regression to examine EOT abstinence. CM/CBT and CM were comparably effective in promoting abstinence, so analyses were conducted comparing the efficacy of CBT to treatments with a CM component (i.e., CM and CM/CBT). CBT and deficient self-regulation predicted lower self-reported abstinence rates within the total analytic sample. Treatments containing CM were more effective than CBT in predicting 1) self-reported abstinence among behaviorally impulsive adolescents (% days abstinent: CM 77%; CM/CBT 81%; CBT 30%) and 2) EOT point prevalence abstinence among behaviorally impulsive adolescents and adolescents with significant deficits in self-regulation. CM-based interventions may improve the low smoking cessation rates previously observed among impulsive adolescent smokers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Experimental evaluation of high speed impulse radio UWB interference on WiMAX narrowband systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Xianbin; Yin, Xiaoli; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2010-01-01

    Interference of high speed impulse radio ultrawideband (IR-UWB) on 5.735GHz single carrier 64/256-QAM WiMAX narrowband signals is experimentally investigated. The experimental results indicate that the coexistence of 625Mbps and 2Gbps IR-UWB signals causes penalties of 3dB and 0.5dB respectively ...... to the WiMAX channel. At higher bit rates, IR-UWB technology is therefore expected to reduce its interference on WiMAX signals. This work serves as further motivation for the exploration of IR-UWB systems with higher speed and higher capacity....

  18. Study of magnetic iron nitride thin films deposited by high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    OpenAIRE

    Tayal, Akhil; Gupta, Mukul; Gupta, Ajay; Ganesan, V.; Behera, Layanta; Singh, Surendra; Basu, Saibal

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we studied phase formation, structural and magnetic properties of iron-nitride (Fe-N) thin films deposited using high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) and direct current magnetron sputtering (dc-MS). The nitrogen partial pressure during deposition was systematically varied both in HiPIMS and dc-MS. Resulting Fe-N films were characterized for their microstructure, magnetic properties and nitrogen concentration. We found that HiPIMS deposited Fe-N films show a globular ...

  19. Ground state atomic oxygen in high-power impulse magnetron sputtering: a quantitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britun, Nikolay; Belosludtsev, Alexandr; Silva, Tiago; Snyders, Rony

    2017-02-01

    The ground state density of oxygen atoms in reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges has been studied quantitatively. Both time-resolved and space-resolved measurements were conducted. The measurements were performed using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF), and calibrated by optical emission actinometry with multiple Ar emission lines. The results clarify the dynamics of the O ground state atoms in the discharge afterglow significantly, including their propagation and fast decay after the plasma pulse, as well as the influence of gas pressure, O2 admixture, etc.

  20. Influence of High-Current-Density Impulses on the Compression Behavior: Experiments with Iron and a Nickel-Based Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demler, E.; Gerstein, G.; Dalinger, A.; Epishin, A.; Rodman, D.; Nürnberger, F.

    2017-01-01

    Difficulties of processing of high strength and/or brittle materials by plastic deformation, e.g., by forging, require to develop new industrial technologies. In particular, the feasible deformation rates are limited for low-ductile metallic materials. For this reason, processes were investigated to improve the deformability in which electrical impulses are to be applied to lower the yield strength. However, owing to the impulse duration and low current densities, concomitant effects always occur, e.g., as a result of Joule heating. Current developments in power electronics allow now to transmit high currents as short pulses. By reducing the impulse duration and increasing the current density, the plasticity of metallic materials can be correspondingly increased. Using the examples of polycrystalline iron and a single-crystal, nickel-based alloy (PWA 1480), current advances in the development of methods for forming materials by means of high-current-density impulses are demonstrated. For this purpose, appropriate specimens were loaded in compression and, using novel testing equipment, subjected to a current strength of 10 kA with an impulse duration of 2 ms. For a pre-defined strain, the test results show a significant decrease in the compressive stress during the compression test and a significant change in the dislocation distribution following the current impulse treatment.

  1. Adolescent gambling and impulsivity: Does employment during high school moderate the association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canale, Natale; Scacchi, Luca; Griffiths, Mark D

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the potential moderating relationships between adolescent gambling and impulsivity traits (negative urgency, positive urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance and sensation seeking) with employment status. High-school students (N=400; 69% male; mean age=18.35years; SD=1.16; past year gamblers) were surveyed to provide data on impulsivity and employment. Multiple linear regression analysis was applied to examine associations with gambling and related problems. Positive urgency was associated with stronger scores of both gambling frequency and problem gambling. Students in employment had substantially higher frequency of gambling and greater problem gambling. Moreover, the combination of having a job and low perseverance was associated with a particularly high frequency on gambling. These findings further support the importance of positive urgency and employment status in adolescent gambling. The study highlights unique moderating relationship between gambling and lack of perseverance with employment status. Youth with a low perseverance and having a job may have particular need for interventions to reduce gambling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire data on alcoholic violent offenders: specific connections to severe impulsive cluster B personality disorders and violent criminality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindberg Nina

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The validity of traditional categorical personality disorder diagnoses is currently re-evaluated from a continuous perspective, and the evolving DSM-V classification may describe personality disorders dimensionally. The utility of dimensional personality assessment, however, is unclear in violent offenders with severe personality pathology. Methods The temperament structure of 114 alcoholic violent offenders with antisocial personality disorder (ASPD was compared to 84 offenders without ASPD, and 170 healthy controls. Inclusion occurred during a court-ordered mental examination preceded by homicide, assault, battery, rape or arson. Participants underwent assessment of temperament with the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire (TPQ and were diagnosed with DSM-III-R criteria. Results The typical temperament profile in violent offender having ASPD comprised high novelty seeking, high harm avoidance, and low reward dependence. A 21% minority scored low in trait harm avoidance. Results, including the polarized harm avoidance dimension, are in accordance with Cloninger's hypothesis of dimensional description of ASPD. The low harm avoidance offenders committed less impulsive violence than high harm avoidance offenders. High harm avoidance was associated with comorbid antisocial personality disorder and borderline personality disorder. Conclusion Results indicate that the DSM based ASPD diagnosis in alcoholic violent offenders associates with impulsiveness and high novelty seeking but comprises two different types of ASPD associated with distinct second-order traits that possibly explain differences in type of violent criminality. Low harm avoidance offenders have many traits in common with high scorers on the Hare Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R. Results link high harm avoidance with broad personality pathology and argue for the usefulness of self-report questionnaires in clinical praxis.

  3. Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire data on alcoholic violent offenders: specific connections to severe impulsive cluster B personality disorders and violent criminality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikkanen, Roope; Holi, Matti; Lindberg, Nina; Virkkunen, Matti

    2007-07-30

    The validity of traditional categorical personality disorder diagnoses is currently re-evaluated from a continuous perspective, and the evolving DSM-V classification may describe personality disorders dimensionally. The utility of dimensional personality assessment, however, is unclear in violent offenders with severe personality pathology. The temperament structure of 114 alcoholic violent offenders with antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) was compared to 84 offenders without ASPD, and 170 healthy controls. Inclusion occurred during a court-ordered mental examination preceded by homicide, assault, battery, rape or arson. Participants underwent assessment of temperament with the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire (TPQ) and were diagnosed with DSM-III-R criteria. The typical temperament profile in violent offender having ASPD comprised high novelty seeking, high harm avoidance, and low reward dependence. A 21% minority scored low in trait harm avoidance. Results, including the polarized harm avoidance dimension, are in accordance with Cloninger's hypothesis of dimensional description of ASPD. The low harm avoidance offenders committed less impulsive violence than high harm avoidance offenders. High harm avoidance was associated with comorbid antisocial personality disorder and borderline personality disorder. Results indicate that the DSM based ASPD diagnosis in alcoholic violent offenders associates with impulsiveness and high novelty seeking but comprises two different types of ASPD associated with distinct second-order traits that possibly explain differences in type of violent criminality. Low harm avoidance offenders have many traits in common with high scorers on the Hare Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R). Results link high harm avoidance with broad personality pathology and argue for the usefulness of self-report questionnaires in clinical praxis.

  4. Swedish high-school pupils’ attitudes towards drugs in relation to drug usage, impulsiveness and other risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Mousavi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Illicit drug use influences people’s lives and elicits unwanted behaviour. Current research shows that there is an increase in young people’s drug use in Sweden. The aim was to investigate Swedish high-school pupils’ attitudes, impulsiveness and gender differences linked to drug use. Risk and protective factors relative to drug use were also a focus of interest.Method. High school pupils (n = 146 aged 17–21 years, responded to the Adolescent Health and Development Inventory, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale and Knowledge, and the Attitudes and Beliefs. Direct logistic, multiple regression analyses, and Multivariate Analysis of Variance were used to analyze the data.Results. Positive Attitudes towards drugs were predicted by risk factors (odds ratio = 37.31 and gender (odds ratio = .32. Risk factors (odds ratio = 46.89, positive attitudes towards drugs (odds ratio = 4.63, and impulsiveness (odds ratio = 1.11 predicted drug usage. Risk factors dimensions Family, Friends and Individual Characteristic were positively related to impulsiveness among drug users. Moreover, although boys reported using drugs to a greater extent, girls expressed more positive attitude towards drugs and even reported more impulsiveness than boys.Conclusion. This study reinforces the notion that research ought to focus on gender differences relative to pro-drug attitudes along with testing for differences in the predictors of girls’ and boys’ delinquency and impulsiveness. Positive attitudes towards drugs among adolescents seem to be part of a vicious circle including risk factors, such as friendly drug environments (e.g., friends who use drugs and unsupportive family environments, individual characteristics, and impulsiveness.

  5. Study on the lightning impulse breakdown characteristics of gaseous insulation media for the design of a high voltage superconducting apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, H.; Na, J. B.; Ahn, M. C.; Bae, D. K.; Kim, Y. H.; Ko, T. K.

    2010-11-01

    In general, the current leads of high voltage superconducting apparatuses cooled by liquid nitrogen are exposed to gaseous insulation media. Therefore, the investigation on the electrical breakdown characteristics of gaseous insulation media should be performed to develop electrically reliable high voltage superconducting power apparatuses. In this study, the lightning impulse breakdown tests on gaseous insulation media are conducted by using sphere-to-plane electrode systems made of stainless steel. Also, the lightning impulse breakdown voltage tests on gaseous insulation media according to various pressures are performed. The experimental results show that the electrical breakdown characteristics under lightning impulse voltage are affected by the gap length between electrode systems, the size of electrodes, and the field utilization factors. From these results, the electrical insulation design criteria to estimate the electrical breakdown voltage are established. The results are expected to be applicable to the design of current leads for high voltage superconducting apparatuses.

  6. Impulsivity, Emotion Regulation, and Developmental Psychopathology: Specificity Versus Generality of Linkages

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hinshaw, Stephen P

    2003-01-01

    ...‐deficit/hyperactivity (ADHD) and aggressive‐spectrum or disruptive behavior disorders. The multifaceted nature of inhibitory deficits requires careful specification in any explanatory accounts of psychopathology...

  7. Effect of high-voltage impulse current on the structure and function of rabbit heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-ping XU

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the effect of high-voltage impulse current(HVIC on the structure and function of rabbit heart.Methods Sixty healthy male rabbits were involved in present study and divided into 6 groups randomly(n=10.The rabbits were then shocked using a high-voltage pulse generator with current intensity of 0,50,100,150,250 and 500mA(pulse width 100μs,duration 5s respectively.The heart rate and electrocardiogram(ECG of rabbits were detected before and 0,1,3,7,14 and 28 days after the electric shock.Moreover,the myocardial tissue of rabbits was obtained immediately and 28 days after shock to observe the pathological changes.Results Immediately after electric shock of 50 to 500mA,the heart rate of rabbit increased by different degree,and the ECG showed arrhythmia,myocardial ischemia,atrial fibrillation and atrioventricular block,and the changes recovered gradually one day later.The pathological observation showed cell swelling,separation of myofibril and sarcoplasmic condensation of Purkinje fibers immediately after electric shock of 50 to 500mA,and the changes recovered 28 days after shock.The cardiac injuries aggravated with the increasing of current intensity,especially when it exceeded 150mA,and the recovery time prolonged.Conclusion High-voltage impulse current may induce recoverable injuries on heart structure and function,and the damage effect shows a correlation with the current intensity.

  8. Sex differences in impulsive action and impulsive choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weafer, Jessica; de Wit, Harriet

    2013-01-01

    Here, we review the evidence for sex differences in behavioral measures of impulsivity for both humans and laboratory animals. We focus on two specific components of impulsivity: impulsive action (i.e., difficulty inhibiting a prepotent response) and impulsive choice (i.e., difficulty delaying gratification). Sex differences appear to exist on these measures, but the direction and magnitude of the differences vary. In laboratory animals, impulsive action is typically greater in males than females, whereas impulsive choice is typically greater in females. In humans, women discount more steeply than men, but sex differences on measures of impulsive action depend on tasks and subject samples. We discuss implications of these findings as they relate to drug addiction. We also point out the major gaps in this research to date, including the lack of studies designed specifically to examine sex differences in behavioral impulsivity, and the lack of consideration of menstrual or estrous phase or sex hormone levels in the studies. PMID:24286704

  9. Specific yield, High Plains aquifer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This raster data set represents specific-yield ranges in the High Plains aquifer of the United States. The High Plains aquifer underlies 112.6 million acres (176,000...

  10. Overlapping and disease specific trait, response, and reflection impulsivity in adolescents with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, J. R.M.; Rydkjaer, J.; Fagerlund, B.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Schizophrenia and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are developmental disorders with shared clinical characteristics such as cognitive impairments and impulsivity. Impulsivity is a core feature of ADHD and an important factor in aggression, violence, and substance use...... in schizophrenia. Based on the hypothesis that schizophrenia and ADHD represent a continuum of neurodevelopmental impairments, the aim was to identify overlapping and disease specific forms of impulsivity. Methods: Adolescents between 12 and 17 years of age were assessed with the Schedule for Affective Disorders...... and Schizophrenia for School-aged Children – Present and Lifetime Version. Subjects with early-onset, first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders (EOS) (N = 29) or ADHD (N = 29) and healthy controls (N = 45) were compared on two performance measures (Information Sampling Task, Stop Signal Task) and a subjective...

  11. Impulsivity and Academic Cheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderman, Eric M.; Cupp, Pamela K.; Lane, Derek

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the relations between academic cheating and impulsivity in a large sample of adolescents enrolled in high school health education classes. Results indicated that impulsivity predicts academic cheating for students who report extensive involvement in cheating. However, students who engage in extensive cheating are less likely…

  12. High specific heat superconducting composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyert, Jr., William A.

    1979-01-01

    A composite superconductor formed from a high specific heat ceramic such as gadolinium oxide or gadolinium-aluminum oxide and a conventional metal conductor such as copper or aluminum which are insolubly mixed together to provide adiabatic stability in a superconducting mode of operation. The addition of a few percent of insoluble gadolinium-aluminum oxide powder or gadolinium oxide powder to copper, increases the measured specific heat of the composite by one to two orders of magnitude below the 5.degree. K. level while maintaining the high thermal and electrical conductivity of the conventional metal conductor.

  13. Plasma"anti-assistance" and"self-assistance" to high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.

    2009-01-30

    A plasma assistance system was investigated with the goal to operate high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) at lower pressure than usual, thereby to enhance the utilization of the ballistic atoms and ions with high kinetic energy in the film growth process. Gas plasma flow from a constricted plasma source was aimed at the magnetron target. Contrary to initial expectations, such plasma assistance turned out to be contra-productive because it led to the extinction of the magnetron discharge. The effect can be explained by gas rarefaction. A better method of reducing the necessary gas pressure is operation at relatively high pulse repetition rates where the afterglow plasma of one pulse assists in the development of the next pulse. Here we show that this method, known from medium-frequency (MF) pulsed sputtering, is also very important at the much lower pulse repetition rates of HiPIMS. A minimum in the possible operational pressure is found in the frequency region between HiPIMS and MF pulsed sputtering.

  14. Spatial and temporal evolution of ion energies in high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasma discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecimovic, A.; Ehiasarian, A. P.

    2010-09-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) is a novel deposition technology successfully implemented on full scale industrial machines. HIPIMS utilizes short pulses of high power delivered to the target in order to generate high amount of metal ions. The life-span of ions between the pulses and their energy distribution could strongly influence the properties and characteristics of the deposited coating. In modern industrial coating machines the sample rotates on a substrate holder and changes its position and distance with regard to the magnetron. Time resolved measurements of the ion energy distribution function (IEDF) at different distances from the magnetron have been performed to investigate the temporal evolution of ions at various distances from target. The measurements were performed using two pressures, 1 and 3 Pa to investigate the influence of working gas pressure on IEDF. Plasma sampling energy-resolved mass spectroscopy was used to measure the IEDF of Ti1+, Ti2+, Ar1+, and Ar2+ ions in HIPIMS plasma discharge with titanium (Ti) target in Ar atmosphere. The measurements were done over a full pulse period and the distance between the magnetron and the orifice of the mass spectrometer was changed from 25 to 215 mm.

  15. Robustness Evaluation of Elastoplastic Base-Isolated High-Rise Buildings Subjected to Critical Double Impulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Fujita

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A new method of robustness evaluation is proposed for an elastoplastic base-isolated high-rise building considering simultaneous uncertainties of structural parameters. Since it is difficult to evaluate the robustness of elastoplastic structures due to heavy computational load on the time-history response analysis including elastoplastic response, a double impulse input is used to provide a closed-form solution of the critical response of a single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF elastic–perfectly plastic structure under a near-field ground motion. Introducing an equivalent elastoplastic SDOF model of a base-isolated high-rise building, the worst combination of uncertain structural parameters, i.e., the stiffness and yield deformation at the base-isolation story and the stiffness of the superstructure, can be derived which leads to the upper bound of the critical elastoplastic response. It is shown that, by using the derived upper bound of the critical response, the robustness function, a measure of the robustness, of elastoplastic structures can be evaluated efficiently. In numerical examples, the robustness of a 30-story base-isolated high-rise building is compared with those of other models with different yield deformations at the base-isolation story to find a preferable design with larger robustness.

  16. Antimicrobial brass coatings prepared on poly(ethylene terephthalate) textile by high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying-Hung, E-mail: tieamo2002@gmail.com; Wu, Guo-Wei; He, Ju-Liang

    2015-03-01

    The goal of this work is to prepare antimicrobial, corrosion-resistant and low-cost Cu65Zn35 brass film on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fabric by high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS), which is known to provide high-density plasma, so as to generate a strongly adherent film at a reduced substrate temperature. The results reveal that the brass film grows in a layer-plus-island mode. Independent of their deposition time, the obtained films retain a Cu/Zn elemental composition ratio of 1.86 and exhibit primarily an α copper phase structure. Oxygen plasma pre-treatment for 1 min before coating can significantly increase film adhesion such that the brass-coated fabric of Grade 5 or Grade 4–5 can ultimately be obtained under dry and wet rubbing tests, respectively. However, a deposition time of 1 min suffices to provide effective antimicrobial properties for both Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. As a whole, the feasibility of using such advanced HIPIMS coating technique to develop durable antimicrobial textile was demonstrated. - Highlights: • Prepare antimicrobial, corrosion-resistant and low-cost Cu65Zn35 brass film on PET fabric by HIPIMS • Brass-coated fabric with excellent durability, even undergone rubbing and washing tests • Brass-coated fabric provides effective antimicrobial properties for E. coli and S. aureus. • After brass coating, PET fabric still retained its mechanical property.

  17. Origins of ion energy distribution function (IEDF) in high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) plasma discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecimovic, A.; Burcalova, K.; Ehiasarian, A. P.

    2008-05-01

    The ion energy distribution function (IEDF) in high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) discharges was studied by plasma sampling energy-resolved mass spectroscopy. HIPIMS of chromium (Cr), titanium (Ti) and carbon (C) targets in argon (Ar) atmosphere was analysed. Singly and doubly charged ions of both the target and the gas were detected. Time-averaged IEDFs were measured for all detected ions at the substrate position at a distance of 150 mm from the target. The effects of target current and discharge pressure on the IEDF were investigated. Measurements were done at two pressures and for three peak discharge currents. The IEDF of both the target and the gas ions was found to comprise two Maxwellian distributions. Quantitative analysis of target IEDFs at a low pressure showed that the main peak had a lower average energy with an approximate value of EAV = 1 eV which is attributed to collisions with thermalized gas atoms and ions. The higher energy distribution has a tail extending up to 70 eV, which is assumed to originate from a Thompson distribution of sputtered metal atoms which, due to collisions, are thermalized and appear as a Maxwell distribution. The proportion of high energy IEDFs for metal ions increases monotonically as a function of Id. The effective ion temperature kBT, extracted from the main low energy peak, showed a weak dependence on peak current. The effective ion temperature extracted from the high energy tail showed a strong correlation with the change in Id. The IEDF at high pressure shows that a proportion of high energy IEDFs was very low and dominated by a low energy main peak. The gas IEDF at high pressure was completely thermalized. The metal-ion-to-gas-ion ratio was found to increase with Id and with the sputtering yield of the target material.

  18. Modafinil increases reward salience in a slot machine game in low and high impulsivity pathological gamblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Kelly; Desmond, Renée C; Poulos, Constantine X; Zack, Martin

    2013-10-01

    This study examined the effects of modafinil (200 mg) on slot machine betting profiles from a previous sample of low and high impulsivity (LI/HI) pathological gamblers (10/Group; Zack and Poulos, 2009). Hierarchical regression assessed the prospective relationship between Payoff and Bet Size on consecutive trials, along with moderating effects of Group, Cumulative Winnings (low/high) and Phase of game (early/late) under drug and placebo. Y intercepts for the simple regressions of Bet Size on Payoff indexed overall motivation to bet. Under placebo, both groups gauged their bets less closely to the preceding Payoff as trials continued when Winnings were low but not high. Under modafinil, both groups gauged their bets more closely to the preceding Payoff when Winnings were low but gauged their bets less closely to the previous Payoff when Winnings were high. The tendency to gauge bets closely to the previous Payoff coincided with a bias toward low overall Bet Size, and modafinil accentuated this relationship, in LI but not HI subjects. Results suggest that modafinil increases the salience of environmental rewards, leading to more tightly calibrated responses to individual rewards when resources are low, but progressively loosens reward-response calibration when resources are high. Increased relative impact of phasic vs. tonic dopamine signals may account for patterns seen at low vs. high Winnings, respectively, under the drug. Clinically, modafinil may deter pathological gamblers from chasing losses but also encourage them to continue betting rather than quit while they are ahead. Whether low-dose modafinil confers more uniform benefits deserves investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mouthguard BITES (behavior, impulsivity, theory evaluation study): what drives mouthguard use among high school basketball and baseball/softball athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Christy L; McKenzie, Lara B; Roberts, Kristin J; Fields, Sarah K; Comstock, R Dawn

    2015-10-01

    Although mouthguards are effective, inexpensive, easy to use, and readily available, this form of protective equipment has been underutilized. "Impulsive delay discounting" (an index of impulsive behavior) among high school athletes may help explain their decision making regarding use of protective equipment such as mouthguards. We investigated the relationship between high school baseball, softball, and basketball players' mouthguard use, impulsive delay discounting, and the precaution adoption process model (a behavior change theory). A convenience sample of boys' and girls' basketball and baseball/softball players at 21 high schools in the Greater Columbus, Ohio, metro area completed a self-administered survey that captured their demographic information, knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding mouthguard use, impulsive delay discounting, and precaution adoption process model stage. We surveyed a total of 1636 students (55.9 % male, 43.8 % female, 0.3 % unknown). Only 12.3 % reported using a mouthguard either every time or sometimes during practice or competition. The primary reasons reported for not wearing mouthguards were they were not required to (65.3 %) and that the athletes could not breathe or talk while wearing one (61.5 %). These reasons were consistent across sex and sport. Most athletes reported that their coaches (87.3 %) and parents (64.5 %) had never talked to them about wearing a mouthguard. Lower precaution adoption process model stage was significantly associated with higher impulsivity (p behavioral and social factors influencing each athlete's decision making regarding use of mouthguards.

  20. Localized traveling ionization zones and their importance for the high power impulse magnetron sputtering process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maszl, Christian

    2016-09-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) is a technique to deposit thin films with superior quality. A high ionization degree up to 90% and the natural occurence of high energetic metal ions are the reason why HiPIMS exceeds direct current magnetron sputtering in terms of coating quality. On the other hand HiPIMS suffers from a reduced efficiency, especially if metal films are produced. Therefore, a lot of research is done by experimentalists and theoreticians to clarify the transport mechanisms from target to substrate and to identify the energy source of the energetic metal ions. Magnetron plasmas are prone to a wide range of wave phenomena and instabilities. Especially, during HiPIMS at elevated power/current densities, symmetry breaks and self-organization in the plasma torus are observed. In this scenario localized travelling ionization zones with certain quasi-mode numbers are present which are commonly referred to as spokes. Because of their high rotation speed compared to typical process times of minutes their importance for thin film deposition was underestimated at first. Recent investigations show that spokes have a strong impact on particle transport, are probably the source of the high energetic metal ions and are therefore the essence of HiPIMS plasmas. In this contribution we will describe the current understanding of spokes, discuss implications for thin film synthesis and highlight open questions. This project is supported by the DFG (German Science Foundation) within the framework of the Coordinated Research Center SFB-TR 87 and the Research Department ``Plasmas with Complex Interactions'' at Ruhr-University Bochum.

  1. In Situ Acoustic Monitoring of Thermal Spray Process Using High-Frequency Impulse Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, Wolfgang; Walther, Frank; Luo, Weifeng; Haack, Matthias; Nellesen, Jens; Knyazeva, Marina

    2018-01-01

    In order to guarantee their protective function, thermal spray coatings must be free from cracks, which expose the substrate surface to, e.g., corrosive media. Cracks in thermal spray coatings are usually formed because of tensile residual stresses. Most commonly, the crack occurrence is determined after the thermal spraying process by examination of metallographic cross sections of the coating. Recent efforts focus on in situ monitoring of crack formation by means of acoustic emission analysis. However, the acoustic signals related to crack propagation can be absorbed by the noise of the thermal spraying process. In this work, a high-frequency impulse measurement technique was applied to separate different acoustic sources by visualizing the characteristic signal of crack formation via quasi-real-time Fourier analysis. The investigations were carried out on a twin wire arc spraying process, utilizing FeCrBSi as a coating material. The impact of the process parameters on the acoustic emission spectrum was studied. Acoustic emission analysis enables to obtain global and integral information on the formed cracks. The coating morphology and coating defects were inspected using light microscopy on metallographic cross sections. Additionally, the resulting crack patterns were imaged in 3D by means of x-ray microtomography.

  2. High-Resolution Acoustic-Radiation-Force-Impulse Imaging for Assessing Corneal Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Cho-Chiang; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk

    2013-01-01

    In ophthalmology, detecting the biomechanical properties of the cornea can provide valuable information about various corneal pathologies, including keratoconus and the phototoxic effects of ultraviolet radiation on the cornea. Also, the mechanical properties of the cornea can be used to evaluate the recovery from corneal refractive surgeries. Therefore, noninvasive and high-resolution estimation of the stiffness distribution in the cornea is important in ophthalmic diagnosis. The present study established a method for high-resolution acoustic-radiation-force-impulse (ARFI) imaging based on a dual-frequency confocal transducer in order to obtain a relative stiffness map, which was used to assess corneal sclerosis. An 11-MHz pushing element was used to induce localized displacements of tissue, which were monitored by a 48-MHz imaging element. Since the tissue displacements are directly correlated with the tissue elastic properties, the stiffness distribution in a tiny region of the cornea can be found by a mechanical B/D scan. The experimental system was verified using tissue-mimicking phantoms that included different geometric structures. Ex vivo cornea experiments were carried out using fresh porcine eyeballs. Corneas with localized sclerosis were created artificially by the injection of a formalin solution. The phantom experiments showed that the distributions of stiffness within different phantoms can be recognized clearly using ARFI imaging, and the measured lateral and axial resolutions of this imaging system were 177 and 153 μm, respectively. The ex vivo experimental results from ARFI imaging showed that a tiny region of localized sclerosis in the cornea could be distinguished. All of the obtained results demonstrate that high-resolution ARFI imaging has considerable potential for the clinical diagnosis of corneal sclerosis. PMID:23584258

  3. Tutorial: Reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering (R-HiPIMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, André

    2017-05-01

    High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS) is a coating technology that combines magnetron sputtering with pulsed power concepts. By applying power in pulses of high amplitude and a relatively low duty cycle, large fractions of sputtered atoms and near-target gases are ionized. In contrast to conventional magnetron sputtering, HiPIMS is characterized by self-sputtering or repeated gas recycling for high and low sputter yield materials, respectively, and both for most intermediate materials. The dense plasma in front of the target has the dual function of sustaining the discharge and providing plasma-assistance to film growth, affecting the microstructure of growing films. Many technologically interesting thin films are compound films, which are composed of one or more metals and a reactive gas, most often oxygen or nitrogen. When reactive gas is added, non-trivial consequences arise for the system because the target may become "poisoned," i.e., a compound layer forms on the target surface affecting the sputtering yield and the yield of secondary electron emission and thereby all other parameters. It is emphasized that the target state depends not only on the reactive gas' partial pressure (balanced via gas flow and pumping) but also on the ion flux to the target, which can be controlled by pulse parameters. This is a critical technological opportunity for reactive HiPIMS (R-HiPIMS). The scope of this tutorial is focused on plasma processes and mechanisms of operation and only briefly touches upon film properties. It introduces R-HiPIMS in a systematic, step-by-step approach by covering sputtering, magnetron sputtering, reactive magnetron sputtering, pulsed reactive magnetron sputtering, HiPIMS, and finally R-HiPIMS. The tutorial is concluded by considering variations of R-HiPIMS known as modulated pulsed power magnetron sputtering and deep-oscillation magnetron sputtering and combinations of R-HiPIMS with superimposed dc magnetron sputtering.

  4. High-resolution acoustic-radiation-force-impulse imaging for assessing corneal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Cho-Chiang; Huang, Chih-Chung; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K Kirk

    2013-07-01

    In ophthalmology, detecting the biomechanical properties of the cornea can provide valuable information about various corneal pathologies, including keratoconus and the phototoxic effects of ultraviolet radiation on the cornea. Also, the mechanical properties of the cornea can be used to evaluate the recovery from corneal refractive surgeries. Therefore, noninvasive and high-resolution estimation of the stiffness distribution in the cornea is important in ophthalmic diagnosis. The present study established a method for high-resolution acoustic-radiation-force-impulse (ARFI) imaging based on a dual-frequency confocal transducer in order to obtain a relative stiffness map, which was used to assess corneal sclerosis. An 11-MHz pushing element was used to induce localized displacements of tissue, which were monitored by a 48-MHz imaging element. Since the tissue displacements are directly correlated with the tissue elastic properties, the stiffness distribution in a tiny region of the cornea can be found by a mechanical B/D scan. The experimental system was verified using tissue-mimicking phantoms that included different geometric structures. Ex vivo cornea experiments were carried out using fresh porcine eyeballs. Corneas with localized sclerosis were created artificially by the injection of a formalin solution. The phantom experiments showed that the distributions of stiffness within different phantoms can be recognized clearly using ARFI imaging, and the measured lateral and axial resolutions of this imaging system were 177 and 153 μ m, respectively. The ex vivo experimental results from ARFI imaging showed that a tiny region of localized sclerosis in the cornea could be distinguished. All of the obtained results demonstrate that high-resolution ARFI imaging has considerable potential for the clinical diagnosis of corneal sclerosis.

  5. Enhanced alcohol self-administration and reinstatement in a highly impulsive, inattentive recombinant inbred mouse strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten eLoos

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Deficits in executive control have frequently been associated with alcohol use disorder. Here we investigated to what extent pre-existing genetically encoded levels of impulsive/inattentive behavior associate with motivation to take alcohol and vulnerability to cue-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking in an operant self-administration paradigm. We took advantage of BXD16, a recombinant inbred strain previously shown to have enhanced impulsivity and poor attentional control. We compared BXD16 with C57BL/6J mice in a simple choice reaction time task (SCRTT and confirmed its impulsive/inattentive phenotype. BXD16 mice were less active in a novel open field, and were equally active in an automated home cage environment, showing that increased impulsive responding of BXD16 mice could not be explained by enhanced general activity compared to C57BL/6J mice. After training in a sucrose/alcohol fading self-administration procedure, BXD16 showed increased motivation to earn 10% alcohol solution, both under fixed ratio (FR1 and progressive ratio (PR2 schedules of reinforcement. Responding on the active lever readily decreased during extinction training with no apparent differences between strains. However, upon re-exposure to alcohol-associated cues, alcohol seeking was reinstated to a larger extent in BXD16 than in C57BL/6J mice. Although further studies are needed to determine whether impulsivity/inattention and alcohol seeking depend on common or separate genetic loci, these data show that in mice enhanced impulsivity coincides with increased motivation to take alcohol, as well as relapse vulnerability.

  6. Neural correlates of high-risk behaviour tendencies and impulsivity in an emotional Go/NoGo fMRI task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R G Brown

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Improved neuroscientific understanding of high-risk behaviours such as alcohol binging, drug use, and unsafe sex will lead to therapeutic advances for high-risk groups. High-risk behaviour often occurs in an emotionally-charged context, and behavioural inhibition and emotion regulation play important roles in risk-related decision making. High impulsivity is an important potential contributor to high-risk behaviour tendencies. We explored the relationships between high-risk behaviour tendencies, impulsivity, and fMRI brain activations in an emotional Go/NoGo task. This task presented emotional distractor pictures (aversive vs. neutral simultaneously with Go/NoGo stimuli (square vs. circle that required a button press or withholding of the press, respectively. Participants' risk behaviour tendencies were assessed with the Cognitive Appraisal of Risky Events (CARE scale. The Barratt Impulsivity Scale 11 (BIS was used to assess participant impulsivity. Individuals with higher CARE risk scores exhibited reduced activation related to response inhibition (NoGo-Go in right orbital frontal cortex (OFC and ventromedial prefrontal cortex. These regions did not show a significant relationship with impulsivity scores. Conversely, more impulsive individuals showed reduced emotion-related activity (aversive-neutral distractors in dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, perigenual anterior cingulate cortex, and right posterior OFC. There were distinct neural correlates of high-risk behaviour tendency and impulsivity in terms of brain activity in the emotional Go/NoGo task. This dissociation supports the conception of high-risk behaviour tendency as a distinct construct from that of impulsivity. Our results suggest that treatment for high-risk behaviour may be more effective with a nuanced approach that does not conflate high impulsivity necessarily with high-risk behaviour tendencies.

  7. The role of motor impulsivity in socioemotional adjustment in high-risk seven year old children and healthy controls: a follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José C. Perales

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the present study was two-wise: first, to assess the presence of behavioral and intellectual disturbances in high-risk 7-year-old children, compared to healthy controls; and, second, and most importantly, to evaluate the discriminative validity of a motor impulsivity neuropsychological task (Go/No-go as an indicator of daily-life socioemotional adjustment. We administered the Behavior Assessment Scale for Children (BASC, the Weschler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISCIV, and the Go/No-go task to 14 high-risk 7 year-olds and 20 matched healthy controls. High-risk children had been classified as so shortly after birth, due to the presence of perinatal risk factors, and later released from the early care unit. They are currently schooled according to their age. We expected performance in the Go/No-go task to be a good indicator of behavioral disturbances in high-risk children, and more specifically of those related to socioemotional adjustment. Accordingly to such a hypothesis, high-risk children showed significantly worse scores in most BASC and WISC subscales, and committed more commission and omission errors on the Go/No-go task. Most importantly, regression analyses showed that performance on the Go/No-go task (but not WISC scores was an independent indicator of socioemotional adjustment problems. This result is in accordance with proposals that motor impulsivity is an important mediator between altered executive function development and socioemotional adjustment.

  8. Vanadium and vanadium nitride thin films grown by high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajihoseini, H.; Gudmundsson, J. T.

    2017-12-01

    Thin vanadium and vanadium nitride films were grown on SiO2 by non-reactive and reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS), respectively. The film properties were compared to films grown by conventional dc magnetron sputtering (dcMS) at similar conditions. We explored the influence of the stationary magnetic confinement field strength on the film properties and the process parameters. The deposition rate is much lower for non-reactive sputtering by HiPIMS than for dcMS. Furthermore, for both dcMS and HiPIMS the deposition rate is lower for strong magnetic confinement. Structural characterization was carried out using x-ray diffraction and reflection methods as well as atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscope. Both dcMS and HiPIMS grown vanadium films are polycrystalline with similar grain size regardless of magnetic field strength. For dcMS grown vanadium films the surface roughness is higher when a strong magnetic field is used. For both non-reactive growth of vanadium and reactive growth of vanadium nitride the HiPIMS process produces denser films with lower surface roughness than dcMS does. Lowering the magnetic field strength increases the deposition rate significantly for reactive HiPIMS while it increases only slightly in the reactive dcMS case. The films grown by HiPIMS with strong magnetic confinement exhibit higher density and lower roughness. We find that the operating pressure, growth temperature, discharge voltage and film thickness has influence on the properties of HiPIMS grown vanadium nitride films. The films are denser when grown at high temperature, high discharge voltage and low pressure. The density of those films is lower for thicker films and thicker films consist of larger grain size. For all the films explored, higher density coincides with lower surface roughness. Thus, the deposition method, magnetic field strength, growth temperature, discharge voltage, film thickness and growth pressure have a significant

  9. Test-retest reliability of behavioral measures of impulsive choice, impulsive action, and inattention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weafer, Jessica; Baggott, Matthew J; de Wit, Harriet

    2013-12-01

    Behavioral measures of impulsivity are widely used in substance abuse research, yet relatively little attention has been devoted to establishing their psychometric properties, especially their reliability over repeated administration. The current study examined the test-retest reliability of a battery of standardized behavioral impulsivity tasks, including measures of impulsive choice (i.e., delay discounting, probability discounting, and the Balloon Analogue Risk Task), impulsive action (i.e., the stop signal task, the go/no-go task, and commission errors on the continuous performance task), and inattention (i.e., attention lapses on a simple reaction time task and omission errors on the continuous performance task). Healthy adults (n = 128) performed the battery on two separate occasions. Reliability estimates for the individual tasks ranged from moderate to high, with Pearson correlations within the specific impulsivity domains as follows: impulsive choice (r range: .76-.89, ps reliable measures and thus can be confidently used to assess various facets of impulsivity as intermediate phenotypes for drug abuse.

  10. Does impulsivity predict outcome in treatment for binge eating disorder? A multimodal investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasse, Stephanie M; Espel, Hallie M; Schumacher, Leah M; Kerrigan, Stephanie G; Zhang, Fengqing; Forman, Evan M; Juarascio, Adrienne S

    2016-10-01

    Multiple dimensions of impulsivity (e.g., affect-driven impulsivity, impulsive inhibition - both general and food-specific, and impulsive decision-making) are associated with binge eating pathology cross-sectionally, yet the literature on whether impulsivity predicts treatment outcome is limited. The present pilot study explored impulsivity-related predictors of 20-week outcome in a small open trial (n = 17) of a novel treatment for binge eating disorder. Overall, dimensions of impulsivity related to emotions (i.e., negative urgency) and food cues emerged as predictors of treatment outcomes (i.e., binge eating frequency and global eating pathology as measured by the Eating Disorders Examination), while more general measures of impulsivity were statistically unrelated to global eating pathology or binge frequency. Specifically, those with higher levels of negative urgency at baseline experienced slower and less pronounced benefit from treatment, and those with higher food-specific impulsivity had more severe global eating pathology at baseline that was consistent at post-treatment and follow-up. These preliminary findings suggest that patients high in negative urgency and with poor response inhibition to food cues may benefit from augmentation of existing treatments to achieve optimal outcomes. Future research will benefit from replication with a larger sample, parsing out the role of different dimensions of impulsivity in treatment outcome for eating disorders, and identifying how treatment can be improved to accommodate higher levels of baseline impulsivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Three-Dimensional ISAR Imaging Method for High-Speed Targets in Short-Range Using Impulse Radar Based on SIMO Array

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Xinpeng; Wei, Guohua; Wu, Siliang; Wang, Dawei

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a three-dimensional inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging method for high-speed targets in short-range using an impulse radar. According to the requirements for high-speed target measurement in short-range, this paper establishes the single-input multiple-output (SIMO) antenna array, and further proposes a missile motion parameter estimation method based on impulse radar. By analyzing the motion geometry relationship of the warhead scattering center after transla...

  12. Impulsivity trajectories and gambling in adolescence among urban male youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiwei; Lee, Grace P; Goldweber, Asha; Petras, Hanno; Storr, Carla L; Ialongo, Nicholas S; Martins, Silvia S

    2013-04-01

    Building on the recent emerging literature on the impulsivity trajectory-gambling association, this study investigated the association between developmental trajectories of teacher-rated impulsivity in early adolescence (ages 11-15 years) and subsequent gambling and gambling problems (i.e. at-risk and problem gambling) by age 19. Prospective cohort design. Urban communities in Baltimore, Maryland. The sample consists of 310 predominately minority (87%) and low socio-economic status (SES) (70%) males followed from first grade to late adolescence. Impulsivity was measured using teacher ratings of classroom behavior. Self-reported gambling behavior was assessed using the South Oaks Gambling Screen-Revised for Adolescents (SOGS-RA). Results from a conventional growth model suggest that the intercept of the impulsivity development (as measured by the repeated assessments of impulsivity across the entire developmental period) was associated significantly with gambling. Results from a general growth mixture model evidenced two distinct trajectories: a high impulsivity trajectory (41% of the sample) and a low impulsivity trajectory (59% of the sample). Despite its non-significant association with any gambling, heterogeneity in impulsivity development was associated significantly with gambling problems. Specifically, being in the high impulsivity trajectory doubled the odds of meeting criteria for at-risk or problem gambling [odds ratio (OR) = 2.09, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02, 4.27)] and tripled the odds of meeting criteria for problem gambling (OR = 2.84, 95% CI: 1.02, 7.91). Development in impulsivity is associated strongly with problem/at-risk gambling in adolescence among urban male youth. Findings highlight the importance of distinguishing gambling problems from any gambling when evaluating programs aimed at reducing youth gambling problems through reducing impulsivity. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  13. High pressure, energy, and impulse loading of the wall in a 1-GJ Laboratory Microfusion Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrach, R.J.

    1989-07-24

    A proposed Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF) must be able to withstand repeated, low-repetition-rate fusion explosions at the 1-GJ (one-quarter ton) yield level. The energy release will occur at the center of a chamber only a few meters in radius, subjecting the interior or first wall to severe levels of temperature, pressure, and impulse. We show by theory and computation that the wall loading can be ameliorated by interposing a spherical shell of low-Z material between the fuel and the wall. This sacrificial shield converts the source energy components that are most damaging to the wall (soft x-rays and fast ions) to more benign plasma kinetic energy from the vaporized shield, and stretches the time duration over which this energy is delivered to the wall from nanoseconds to microseconds. Numerical calculations emphasize thin, volleyball-sized plastic shields, and much thicker ones of frozen nitrogen. Wall shielding criteria of small (or no) amount of surface ablation, low impulse and pressure loading, minimal shrapnel danger, small expense, and convenience in handling all favor the thin plastic shields. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  14. DEPOSITION OF NIOBIUM AND OTHER SUPERCONDUCTING MATERIALS WITH HIGH POWER IMPULSE MAGNETRON SPUTTERING: CONCEPT AND FIRST RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    High Current Electronics Institute, Tomsk, Russia; Anders, Andre; Mendelsberg, Rueben J.; Lim, Sunnie; Mentink, Matthijs; Slack, Jonathan L.; Wallig, Joseph G.; Nollau, Alexander V.; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.

    2011-07-24

    Niobium coatings on copper cavities have been considered as a cost-efficient replacement of bulk niobium RF cavities, however, coatings made by magnetron sputtering have not quite lived up to high expectations due to Q-slope and other issues. High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) is a promising emerging coatings technology which combines magnetron sputtering with a pulsed power approach. The magnetron is turned into a metal plasma source by using very high peak power density of ~ 1 kW/cm{sup 2}. In this contribution, the cavity coatings concept with HIPIMS is explained. A system with two cylindrical, movable magnetrons was set up with custom magnetrons small enough to be inserted into 1.3 GHz cavities. Preliminary data on niobium HIPIMS plasma and the resulting coatings are presented. The HIPIMS approach has the potential to be extended to film systems beyond niobium, including other superconducting materials and/or multilayer systems.

  15. VHDL Specification Methodology from High-level Specification

    OpenAIRE

    Benmohammed, M.; S. Merniz

    2005-01-01

    Design complexity has been increasing exponentially this last decade. In order to cope with such an increase and to keep up designers' productivity, higher level specifications were required. Moreover new synthesis systems, starting with a high level specification, have been developed in order to automate and speed up processor design. This study presents a VHDL specification methodology aimed to extend structured design methodologies to the behavioral level. The goal is t...

  16. Increased plantar force and impulse in American football players with high arch compared to normal arch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Daniel W.; Myer, Gregory D.; Hewett, Timothy E.; Heidt, Robert S.; Ford, Kevin R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Risk of overuse injury among athletes is high due in part to repeated loading of the lower extremities. Compared to individuals with normal arch (NA) structure, those with high (HA) or low arch (LA) may be at increased risk of specific overuse injuries, including stress fractures. A high medial longitudinal arch may result in decreased shock absorbing properties due to increased rigidity in foot mechanics. While the effect of arch structure on dynamic function has been examined in straight line walking and running, the relationship between the two during multi-directional movements remains unstudied. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine if differences in plantar loading in football players occur during both walking and pivoting movements. Method Plantar loading was examined in 9 regions of the foot for 26 participants (16 NA, 10 HA). Results High arch athletes demonstrated increased maximum force in the lateral rear foot and medial forefoot, and force time integral in the medial forefoot while walking. HA athletes also demonstrated increased maximum force in the medial rear foot and medial and central forefoot during rapid pivoting. Conclusions The current findings demonstrate that loading patterns differ between football players with high and normal arch structure, which could possibly influence injury risk in this population. PMID:23141809

  17. Baseline impulsive choice predicts the effects of nicotine and nicotine withdrawal on impulsivity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayir, Hakan; Semenova, Svetlana; Markou, Athina

    2014-01-03

    Impulsive choice, a form of impulsivity, is associated with tobacco smoking in humans. Trait impulsivity may be a vulnerability factor for smoking, or smoking may lead to impulsive behaviors. We investigated the effects of 14-day nicotine exposure (6.32mg/kg/day base, subcutaneous minipumps) and spontaneous nicotine withdrawal on impulsive choice in low impulsive (LI) and high impulsive (HI) rats. Impulsive choice was measured in the delayed reward task in which rats choose between a small immediate reward and a large delayed reward. HI and LI rats were selected from the highest and lowest quartiles of the group before exposure to nicotine. In non-selected rats, nicotine or nicotine withdrawal had no effect on impulsive choice. In LI rats, chronic nicotine exposure decreased preference for the large reward with larger effects at longer delays, indicating increased impulsive choice. Impulsive choices for the smaller immediate rewards continued to increase during nicotine withdrawal in LI rats. In HI rats, nicotine exposure and nicotine withdrawal had no effect on impulsive choice, although there was a tendency for decreased preference for the large reward at short delays. These results indicate that nicotine- and nicotine withdrawal-induced increases in impulsive choice depend on trait impulsivity with more pronounced increases in impulsive choice in LI compared to HI subjects. Increased impulsivity during nicotine exposure may strengthen the addictive properties of nicotine and contribute to compulsive nicotine use. © 2013.

  18. Impulse: Memory System Support for Scientific Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John B. Carter

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Impulse is a new memory system architecture that adds two important features to a traditional memory controller. First, Impulse supports application‐specific optimizations through configurable physical address remapping. By remapping physical addresses, applications control how their data is accessed and cached, improving their cache and bus utilization. Second, Impulse supports prefetching at the memory controller, which can hide much of the latency of DRAM accesses. Because it requires no modification to processor, cache, or bus designs, Impulse can be adopted in conventional systems. In this paper we describe the design of the Impulse architecture, and show how an Impulse memory system can improve the performance of memory‐bound scientific applications. For instance, Impulse decreases the running time of the NAS conjugate gradient benchmark by 67%. We expect that Impulse will also benefit regularly strided, memory‐bound applications of commercial importance, such as database and multimedia programs.

  19. Red-detuned, high-intensity, short-duration sweet spot for impulsive X-ray Raman excitation in atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Ware, Matthew R; Haxton, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Impulsive X-ray Raman excitations of Lithium, Neon, and Sodium are calculated using the Multiconfiguration Time-Dependent Hartree-Fock method. Using linearly polarized laser pulses without chirp, we determine the optimum central frequency, intensity, and duration for maximum population transfer to valence excited states. We demonstrate the existence of two "sweet spots" for optimum population transfer, either of which, depending on the system, may be superior. The "red-detuned hypothesis" is the proposition that population transfer can be maximized by nonresonant Raman transitions, red-detuned below K-edge, because such detuning minimizes core-excited populations and ionization loss. We find that this hypothesis is verified in the case of Neon -- for Neon, the global optimum for population transfer occurs at high intensity (8 $\\times$ 10$^{19}$ W cm$^{-2}$), short duration (82as full-width-at-half-maximum), and 24eV red-detuned from the K-edge.

  20. IMPULSIVITY PARAMETER FOR SOLAR FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajardo-Mendieta, W. G.; Alvarado-Gómez, J. D.; Calvo-Mozo, B. [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá (Colombia); Martinez-Oliveros, J. C., E-mail: wgfajardom@unal.edu.co, E-mail: bcalvom@unal.edu.co, E-mail: oliveros@ssl.berkeley.edu, E-mail: jalvarad@eso.org [Space Sciences Laboratory, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-02-10

    Three phases are typically observed during solar flares: the preflare, impulsive, and decay phases. During the impulsive phase, it is believed that the electrons and other particles are accelerated after the stored energy in the magnetic field is released by reconnection. The impulsivity of a solar flare is a quantifiable property that shows how quickly this initial energy release occurs. It is measured via the impulsivity parameter, which we define as the inverse of the overall duration of the impulsive phase. We take the latter as the raw width of the most prominent nonthermal emission of the flare. We computed this observable over a work sample of 48 M-class events that occurred during the current Solar Cycle 24 by using three different methods. The first method takes into account all of the nonthermal flare emission and gives very accurate results, while the other two just cover fixed energy intervals (30–40 keV and 25–50 keV) and are useful for fast calculations. We propose an alternative way to classify solar flares according to their impulsivity parameter values, defining three different types of impulsivity, namely, high, medium, and low. This system of classification is independent of the manner used to calculated the impulsivity parameter. Lastly, we show the relevance of this tool as a discriminator of different HXR generation processes.

  1. Impulsivity and rapid decision-making for reward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie eBurnett Heyes

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Impulsivity is a feature of many brain disorders. Although often defined as the predisposition to act with an inadequate degree of deliberation, forethought or control, it has proven difficult to measure. This may in part be because, increasingly, impulsivity is recognized as a multifaceted construct, with impulsive decisions potentially arising due to a number of underlying mechanisms. Indeed, in certain contexts, a ‘functional’ degree of impulsivity may promote effective, motivated behavior in healthy participants. Although many tasks have been developed to study impulsivity, few examine decisions made rapidly, for time-sensitive rewards: In this context, a degree of impulsivity may be adaptive. In the current study we examine behavior in 59 adults on a manual ‘Traffic Light’ task which requires participants to take risks under time pressure, if they are to maximize reward. We show that behavioral variables that index rapid anticipatory responding in this paradigm are correlated with a specific self-report measure of impulsivity: ‘lack of premeditation’ on the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale. Participants who scored more highly on this subscale performed better on the task. Moreover, anticipatory behavior reduced significantly with age (18-79 years, an effect that continued to be upheld after correction for potential age differences in the ability to judge the timing of responses. Based on these findings, we argue that the Traffic Light task provides a parametric method to study a ‘functional’ aspect of impulsivity in health and disease: namely, rapid decision-making in pursuit of risky, time-sensitive rewards.

  2. Serotonergic blunting to meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPP) highly correlates with sustained childhood abuse in impulsive and autoaggressive female borderline patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinne, T; Westenberg, HGM; den Boer, JA

    2000-01-01

    Background: Disturbances of affect, impulse regulation and autoaggressive behavior which are all said to be related to an altered function of the central serotonergic (5-HT) system, are prominent features of borderline personality disorder (BPD). A high coincidence of childhood physical and sexual

  3. Serotonergic blunting to meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPP) highly correlates with sustained childhood abuse in impulsive and autoaggressive female borderline patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinne, T.; Westenberg, H. G.; den Boer, J. A.; van den Brink, W.

    2000-01-01

    Disturbances of affect, impulse regulation, and autoaggressive behavior, which are all said to be related to an altered function of the central serotonergic (5-HT) system, are prominent features of borderline personality disorder (BPD). A high coincidence of childhood physical and sexual abuse is

  4. Neuroanatomical and Neurochemical Basis of Impulsivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Yazici

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The term ‘impulsivity’ encompasses a multitude of behaviours that are poorly conceived, premature, inappropriate, and that frequently result in unwanted or deleterious outcomes. Impulsivity manifests as impatience carelessness, risk-taking, sensation-seeking and pleasure-seeking, an underestimated sense of harm, and extroversion. Impulsivity is a core symptom of a broad spectrum of psychiatric disorders. Through focusing on different aspects of impulsive behavior, it has proved possible to devise a variety of behavioral paradigms to measure impulsivity in both human and non-human subjects. These can be broadly divided into two categories: those measuring impulsive action or motoric impulsivity, and those measuring impulsive choice or impulsive decision-making. Impulsive action can be broadly defined as the inability to withhold from making a response. Within the framework of behavioral neuroscience and cognitive psychology, impulse control has been described as an active inhibitory mechanism which modulates the internally or externally driven pre-potent desire for primary reinforcers such as food, sex or other highly desirable rewards. This inhibitory control mechanism may provide the substrate by which rapid conditioned responses and reflexes are transiently suppressed, so that slower cognitive mechanisms can guide behavior. This process is referred to as response inhibition. Two of the most common tests used to study inhibitory processes are the go/no-go and stop-signal reaction time tasks. Impulsivity is also evident in the making of impulsive decisions or choices as well as in impulsive actions. Here, there is no “pre-potent” response that is primed and then forcibly inhibited, but a decision-making processes. Impulsive decision making or impulsive choice is defined as initiating actions without adequately considering other possible choices or consequences. Impulsive choice is typically measured in the delay discounting paradigm. In

  5. Physics of Plasma-Based Ion Implantation&Deposition (PBIID)and High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HIPIMS): A Comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2007-08-28

    The emerging technology of High Power Impulse MagnetronSputtering (HIPIMS) has much in common with the more establishedtechnology of Plasma Based Ion Implantation&Deposition (PBIID):both use pulsed plasmas, the pulsed sheath periodically evolves andcollapses, the plasma-sheath system interacts with the pulse-drivingpower supply, the plasma parameters are affected by the power dissipated,surface atoms are sputtered and secondary electrons are emitted, etc.Therefore, both fields of science and technology could learn from eachother, which has not been fully explored. On the other hand, there aresignificant differences, too. Most importantly, the operation of HIPIMSheavilyrelies on the presence of a strong magnetic field, confiningelectrons and causing their ExB drift, which is closed for typicalmagnetron configurations. Second, at the high peak power levels used forHIPIMS, 1 kW/cm2 or greater averaged over the target area, the sputteredmaterial greatly affects plasma generation. For PBIID, in contrast,plasma generation and ion processing of the surface (ion implantation,etching, and deposition) are considered rela-tively independentprocesses. Third, secondary electron emission is generally considered anuisance for PBIID, especially at high voltages, whereas it is a criticalingredient to the operation of HIPIMS. Fourth, the voltages in PBIID areoften higher than in HIPIMS. For the first three reasons listed above,modelling of PBIID seems to be easier and could give some guidance forfuture HIPIMS models, which, clearly, will be more involved.

  6. Laser-Powered Thrusters for High Efficiency Variable Specific Impulse Missions (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Phipps, Claude R; Luke, J. R; Helgeson, W. D

    2007-01-01

    .... Considering a laser ablation propulsion device as an electric thruster, use of energetic ablation fuels can give thrust electrical efficiency greater than unity at the bottom of this Isp range...

  7. Unique and interactive effects of impulsivity facets on reckless driving and driving under the influence in a high-risk young adult sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Jeremy W; Trim, Ryan S; Karyadi, Kenny A; Curry, Inga; Hopfer, Christian J; Hewitt, John K; Stallings, Michael C; Brown, Sandra A; Wall, Tamara L

    2017-08-01

    Risky driving behaviors are disproportionately high among young adults and impulsivity is a robust risk factor. Recent conceptualizations have proposed multidimensional facets of impulsivity comprised of negative urgency, premeditation, perseverance, sensation seeking, and positive urgency (UPPS-P model). Prior studies have found these facets are associated with risky driving behaviors in college student samples, but no prior studies have examined these facets in clinical samples. This study examined the unique and interactive effects of UPPS-P impulsivity facets on past-year risky driving behaviors in a sample of high-risk young adults (ages 18-30 years) with a history of substance use and antisocial behavior and their siblings ( n =1,100). Multilevel Poisson regressions indicated that sensation seeking and negative urgency were uniquely and positively associated with both frequency of past-year reckless driving and driving under the influence. Moreover, lack of premeditation was uniquely and positively associated with reckless driving, whereas lack of perseverance was uniquely and positively associated with driving under the influence. Furthermore, lack of premeditation moderated and strengthened the positive association between sensation seeking and driving under the influence. These study findings suggest that assessing multiple facets of trait impulsivity could facilitate targeted prevention efforts among young adults with a history of externalizing psychopathology.

  8. Functional impulsivity and reinforcement sensitivity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smillie, Luke D; Jackson, Chris J

    2006-02-01

    In this article, we attempt to integrate Dickman's (1990) descriptive concept of Functional Impulsivity (FI) with Gray's (1970, 1991) Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST). Specifically, we consider that FI bears great conceptual similarity to Gray's concept of reward-reactivity, which is thought to be caused by the combined effects of a Behavioral Activation System (BAS) and Behavioral Inhibition System (BIS). In our first study, we examine the construct validity and structural correlates of FI. Results indicate that FI is related positively to measures of BAS and Extraversion, negatively to measures of BIS and Neuroticism, and is separate from Psychoticism and typical trait Impulsivity, which Dickman calls Dysfunctional Impulsivity (DI). In our second study, we use a go/no-go discrimination task to examine the relationship between FI and response bias under conditions of rewarding and punishing feedback. Results indicate that FI, along with two measures of BAS, predicted the development of a response bias for the rewarded alternative. In comparison, high DI appeared to reflect indifference toward either reward or punishment. We consider how these findings might reconcile the perspectives of Gray and Dickman and help clarify the broader understanding of Impulsivity.

  9. The uncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonists ketamine and memantine preferentially increase the choice for a small, immediate reward in low-impulsive rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iemolo, Attilio; Narayan, Aditi R.; Kwak, Jina; Momaney, Duncan

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Impulsive behavior is categorically differentiated between impulsive action, the inability to withhold from acting out a response, and impulsive choice, the greater preference for an immediate and smaller reward over a delayed but more advantageous reward. While the effects of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonists on impulsive action have been extensively characterized, there are very few and conflicting reports on the effects of this class of drugs on impulsive choice. Objectives Using a modified adjusting delay task, we investigated the effects of uncompetitive and competitive blockade of NMDA receptors on impulsive choice. Methods Male Wistar rats were trained in a modified adjusting delay task, which involved repeated choice between a low reinforcing solution delivered immediately and a highly reinforcing solution delivered after a variable delay. Rats were then administered either the NMDA receptor uncompetitive antagonists ketamine or memantine, or the competitive antagonists D-AP-5 or CGS 19755. Results Ketamine treatment dose-dependently increased impulsive choice, and this effect was selective for low-impulsive but not high-impulsive rats. Similarly, memantine treatment dose-dependently increased impulsive choice with a preferential effect for low-impulsive rats. While D-AP-5 treatment did not affect impulsive choice, CGS 19755 increased impulsivity, however, at the same doses at which it caused a marked response inhibition. Conclusions NMDA receptor uncompetitive, but not competitive, antagonists significantly increased impulsive choice, preferentially in low-impulsive rats. These findings demonstrate that the effects of NMDA receptor blockade on impulsive choice are not generalizable and depend on the specific mechanism of action of the antagonist used. PMID:23104264

  10. Does impulsivity predict outcome in treatment for binge eating disorder? A multimodal investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Manasse, Stephanie M.; Espel, Hallie M.; Schumacher, Leah M.; Kerrigan, Stephanie G.; Zhang, Fengqing; Forman, Evan M.; Juarascio, Adrienne S.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple dimensions of impulsivity (e.g., affect-driven impulsivity, impulsive inhibition – both general and food-specific, and impulsive decision-making) are associated with binge eating pathology cross-sectionally, yet the literature on whether impulsivity predicts treatment outcome is limited. The present pilot study explored impulsivity-related predictors of 20-week outcome in a small open trial (n=17) of a novel treatment for binge eating disorder. Overall, dimensions of impulsivity rela...

  11. Development of superlattice CrN/NbN coatings for joint replacements deposited by high power impulse magnetron sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovsepian, Papken Ehiasarian; Ehiasarian, Arutiun Papken; Purandare, Yashodhan; Sugumaran, Arunprabhu Arunachalam; Marriott, Tim; Khan, Imran

    2016-09-01

    The demand for reliable coating on medical implants is ever growing. In this research, enhanced performance of medical implants was achieved by a CrN/NbN coating, utilising nanoscale multilayer/superlattice structure. The advantages of the novel high power impulse magnetron sputtering technology, namely, its unique highly ionised plasma, were exploited to deposit dense and strongly adherent coatings on CoCr implants. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed coating superlattice structure with bi-layer thickness of 3.5 nm. CrN/NbN deposited on CoCr samples showed exceptionally high adhesion, critical load values of LC2 = 50 N in scratch adhesion tests. Nanoindentation tests showed high hardness of 34 GPa and Young's modulus of 447 GPa. Low coefficient of friction (μ) 0.49 and coating wear coefficient (K C) = 4.94 × 10(-16) m(3) N(-1) m(-1) were recorded in dry sliding tests. Metal ion release studies showed a reduction in Co, Cr and Mo release at physiological and elevated temperatures (70 °C) to almost undetectable levels (<1 ppb). Rotating beam fatigue testing showed a significant increase in fatigue strength from 349 ± 59 MPa (uncoated) to 539 ± 59 MPa (coated). In vitro biological testing has been performed in order to assess the safety of the coating in biological environment; cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and sensitisation testing have been performed, all showing no adverse effects.

  12. High-latitude ionospheric response to a sudden impulse event during northward IMF conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moretto, T.; Ridley, A.J.; Engebretson, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    A high-density structure under northward interplanetary magnetic field B-z conditions is identified at the Wind and IMP 8 satellites, both in the solar wind on August 22, 1995. A compression of the magnetosphere is observed by the GOES 7 magnetometer within a few minutes of the pressure increase ...... the interpretation as events of traveling convection vortices, as has been suggested by past studies....

  13. Trait impulsivity and impaired prefrontal impulse inhibition function in adolescents with internet gaming addiction revealed by a Go/No-Go fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wei-na; Sun, Jin-hua; Sun, Ya-Wen; Chen, Xue; Zhou, Yan; Zhuang, Zhi-guo; Li, Lei; Zhang, Yong; Xu, Jian-rong; Du, Ya-song

    2014-05-30

    Recent studies suggest that Internet gaming addiction (IGA) is an impulse disorder, or is at least related to impulse control disorders. In the present study, we hypothesized that different facets of trait impulsivity may be specifically linked to the brain regions with impaired impulse inhibition function in IGA adolescents. Seventeen adolescents with IGA and seventeen healthy controls were scanned during performance of a response-inhibition Go/No-Go task using a 3.0 T MRI scanner. The Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS)-11 was used to assess impulsivity. There were no differences in the behavioral performance on the Go/No-Go task between the groups. However, the IGA group was significantly hyperactive during No-Go trials in the left superior medial frontal gyrus, right anterior cingulate cortex, right superior/middle frontal gyrus, left inferior parietal lobule, left precentral gyrus, and left precuneus and cuneus. Further, the bilateral middle temporal gyrus, bilateral inferior temporal gyrus, and right superior parietal lobule were significantly hypoactive during No-Go trials. Activation of the left superior medial frontal gyrus was positively associated with BIS-11 and Chen Internet Addiction Scale (CIAS) total score across IGA participants. Our data suggest that the prefrontal cortex may be involved in the circuit modulating impulsivity, while its impaired function may relate to high impulsivity in adolescents with IGA, which may contribute directly to the Internet addiction process.

  14. Telomere length is highly inherited and associated with hyperactivity-impulsivity in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Souza Costa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Telomere length (TL is highly heritable, and a shorter telomere at birth may increase the risk of age-related problems. Telomere length (TL is highly heritable, and a shorter telomere at birth may increase the risk of age-related problems. Additionally, a shorter TL may represent a biomarker of chronic stress and has been associated with psychiatric disorders. However, no study has explored whether there is an association between TL and the symptoms of one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders in childhood: Attention Deficit/Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD. We evaluated 61 (range, 6-16 years ADHD children and their parents between 2012 and 2014. Telomere length was measured with a quantitative polymerase chain reaction method with telomere signal normalized to the signal from a single copy gene (36B4 to generate a T/S ratio. Family data was processed through a GEE model to determine the effect of parental TL on children TL. Inattentive and hyperactive-impulsive symptoms were also evaluated in relation to TL. For the first time, we found general heritability to be the major mechanism explaining interindividual telomere length variation in ADHD (father-child: 95%CI=0.35/0.91, p0.05. The ADHD inattentive dimension was not significant associated with TL in this study (p>0.05. TL was shown to be a potential biomarker of the ADHD symptoms burden in families affected by this neurodevelopmental disorder. However, it is crucial that future studies investigating the rate of telomere attrition in relation to psychiatric problems to consider the strong determination of telomere length at birth by inheritance.

  15. Relative Effects of Social Self-Control, Sensation Seeking, and Impulsivity on Future Cigarette Use in a Sample of High-Risk Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, Pallav; Sussman, Steve; Stacy, Alan

    2016-01-01

    We used confirmatory factor analysis to compare convergence/divergence across self-report measures of social self-control, sensation seeking, and impulsivity in a sample of high-risk adolescents. In addition, we tested baseline social self-control as a predictor of cigarette use one year later, controlling for baseline cigarette use, impulsivity/sensation seeking, and demographic. variables. Data were collected in 2004–2005 from 821 adolescents (M age = 16.3; SD = 1.36) enrolled in 14 continuation high schools in Southern California. Of the baseline sample, 566 students participated in a follow-up survey one year later. Results indicated that social self-control represents a unique dimension of self-control and is a salient predictor of future cigarette use. PMID:24093522

  16. Acoustical simulation based on head-tracked auralization and measured high-resolution head related transfer function (HRTF) and impulse responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnert, Wolfgang; Feistel, Stefan; Moldrzyk, Christoph

    2004-10-01

    A very desirable feature of modern acoustical simulation programs is the easy, fast and reliable auralization of the prediction results. In this paper we consider a new auralization method, based on a head-tracked headphone system with high spatial resolution and real-time convolution. We discuss the way to measure the directional head-related transfer functions, the calculation of the directional binaural impulse responses and the realization as a real-time convolution software. Furthermore, high-resolution impulse responses have been measured to compare reality, measurement and prediction results of an example room. The measurements were performed with a newly developed software tool EASERA. We conclude that, using this new method, auralization results are obtained equivalent to the human perception in reality.

  17. Three-Dimensional ISAR Imaging Method for High-Speed Targets in Short-Range Using Impulse Radar Based on SIMO Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinpeng Zhou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a three-dimensional inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR imaging method for high-speed targets in short-range using an impulse radar. According to the requirements for high-speed target measurement in short-range, this paper establishes the single-input multiple-output (SIMO antenna array, and further proposes a missile motion parameter estimation method based on impulse radar. By analyzing the motion geometry relationship of the warhead scattering center after translational compensation, this paper derives the receiving antenna position and the time delay after translational compensation, and thus overcomes the shortcomings of conventional translational compensation methods. By analyzing the motion characteristics of the missile, this paper estimates the missile’s rotation angle and the rotation matrix by establishing a new coordinate system. Simulation results validate the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  18. Three-Dimensional ISAR Imaging Method for High-Speed Targets in Short-Range Using Impulse Radar Based on SIMO Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinpeng; Wei, Guohua; Wu, Siliang; Wang, Dawei

    2016-03-11

    This paper proposes a three-dimensional inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging method for high-speed targets in short-range using an impulse radar. According to the requirements for high-speed target measurement in short-range, this paper establishes the single-input multiple-output (SIMO) antenna array, and further proposes a missile motion parameter estimation method based on impulse radar. By analyzing the motion geometry relationship of the warhead scattering center after translational compensation, this paper derives the receiving antenna position and the time delay after translational compensation, and thus overcomes the shortcomings of conventional translational compensation methods. By analyzing the motion characteristics of the missile, this paper estimates the missile's rotation angle and the rotation matrix by establishing a new coordinate system. Simulation results validate the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  19. Sweet taste liking is associated with impulsive behaviors in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica eWeafer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Evidence from both human and animal studies suggests that sensitivity to rewarding stimuli is positively associated with impulsive behaviors, including both impulsive decision making and inhibitory control. The current study examined associations between the hedonic value of a sweet taste and two forms of impulsivity (impulsive choice and impulsive action in healthy young adults (n=100. Participants completed a sweet taste test in which they rated their liking of various sweetness concentrations. Subjects also completed measures of impulsive choice (delay discounting, and impulsive action (go/no-go task. Subjects who discounted more steeply (i.e., greater impulsive choice liked the high sweetness concentration solutions more. By contrast, sweet liking was not related to impulsive action. These findings indicate that impulsive choice may be associated with heightened sensitivity to the hedonic value of a rewarding stimulus, and that these constructs might share common underlying neurobiological mechanisms.

  20. Sweet taste liking is associated with impulsive behaviors in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weafer, Jessica; Burkhardt, Anne; de Wit, Harriet

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from both human and animal studies suggests that sensitivity to rewarding stimuli is positively associated with impulsive behaviors, including both impulsive decision making and inhibitory control. The current study examined associations between the hedonic value of a sweet taste and two forms of impulsivity (impulsive choice and impulsive action) in healthy young adults (N = 100). Participants completed a sweet taste test in which they rated their liking of various sweetness concentrations. Subjects also completed measures of impulsive choice (delay discounting), and impulsive action (go/no-go task). Subjects who discounted more steeply (i.e., greater impulsive choice) liked the high sweetness concentration solutions more. By contrast, sweet liking was not related to impulsive action. These findings indicate that impulsive choice may be associated with heightened sensitivity to the hedonic value of a rewarding stimulus, and that these constructs might share common underlying neurobiological mechanisms.

  1. The use of segmented cathodes to determine the spoke current density distribution in high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poolcharuansin, Phitsanu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L69 3GJ (United Kingdom); The Technological Plasma Research Unit, Department of Physics, Mahasarakham University, Maha Sarakham 44150 (Thailand); Estrin, Francis Lockwood; Bradley, James W., E-mail: j.w.bradley@liverpool.ac.uk [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L69 3GJ (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-28

    The localized target current density associated with quasi-periodic ionization zones (spokes) has been measured in a high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge using an array of azimuthally separated and electrical isolated probes incorporated into a circular aluminum target. For a particular range of operating conditions (pulse energies up to 2.2 J and argon pressures from 0.2 to 1.9 Pa), strong oscillations in the probe current density are seen with amplitudes up to 52% above a base value. These perturbations, identified as spokes, travel around the discharge above the target in the E×B direction. Using phase information from the angularly separated probes, the spoke drift speeds, angular frequencies, and mode number have been determined. Generally, at low HiPIMS pulse energies E{sub p} < 0.8 J, spokes appear to be chaotic in nature (with random arrival times), however as E{sub p} increases, coherent spokes are observed with velocities between 6.5 and 10 km s{sup −1} and mode numbers m = 3 or above. At E{sub p} > 1.8 J, the plasma becomes spoke-free. The boundaries between chaotic, coherent, and no-spoke regions are weakly dependent on pressure. During each HiPIMS pulse, the spoke velocities increase by about 50%. Such an observation is explained by considering spoke velocities to be determined by the critical ionization velocity, which changes as the plasma composition changes during the pulse. From the shape of individual current density oscillations, it appears that the leading edge of the spoke is associated with a slow increase in local current density to the target and the rear with a more rapid decrease. The measurements show that the discharge current density associated with individual spokes is broadly spread over a wide region of the target.

  2. Process- and optoelectronic-control of NiOx thin films deposited by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keraudy, Julien; Delfour-Peyrethon, Brice; Ferrec, Axel; Garcia Molleja, Javier; Richard-Plouet, Mireille; Payen, Christophe; Hamon, Jonathan; Corraze, Benoît; Goullet, Antoine; Jouan, Pierre-Yves

    2017-05-01

    In this contribution, based on the analyses of the discharge behavior as well as final properties of the deposited Ni-O films during reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge, we have demonstrated that monitoring the oxygen flow rate leads to 4 different regimes of discharge. Tuning the oxygen partial pressure allows deposition of a large range of chemical compositions from pure nickel to nickel-deficient NiOx (x > 1) in the poisoned mode. Investigation of the plasma dynamics by time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy suggests that the discharge behavior in the poisoned mode principally comes from the higher contribution of both oxygen and argon ions in the total ionic current, leading to a change in the ion induced secondary electron emission coefficient. Additionally, material characterizations have revealed that optoelectronic properties of NiOx films can be easily tuned by adjusting the O/Ni ratio, which is influenced by the change of the oxygen flow rate. Stoichiometric NiO films (O/Ni ratio ˜ 1) are transparent in the visible range with a transmittance ˜80% and insulating as expected with an electrical resistivity ˜106 Ω cm. On the other hand, increasing the O/Ni > 1 leads to the deposition of more conductive coating (ρ ˜ 10 Ω cm) films with a lower transmittance ˜ 50%. These optoelectronic evolutions are accompanied by a band-gap narrowing 3.65 to 3.37 eV originating from the introduction of acceptor states between the Fermi level and the valence band maximum. In addition, our analysis has demonstrated that nickel vacancies are homogeneously distributed over the film thickness, explaining the p-type of the films.

  3. A unified treatment of self-sputtering, process gas recycling, and runaway for high power impulse sputtering magnetrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenning, N.; Gudmundsson, J. T.; Raadu, M. A.; Petty, T. J.; Minea, T.; Lundin, D.

    2017-12-01

    The combined processes of self-sputter (SS)-recycling and process gas recycling in high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharges are analyzed using the generalized recycling model (GRM). The study uses experimental data from discharges with current densities from the direct current magnetron sputtering range to the HiPIMS range, and using targets with self-sputter yields Y SS from ≈ 0.1 to 2.6. The GRM analysis reveals that, above a critical current density of the order of J crit ≈ 0.2 A cm‑2, a combination of self-sputter recycling and gas-recycling is generally the case. The relative contributions of these recycling mechanisms, in turn, influence both the electron energy distribution and the stability of the discharges. For high self-sputter yields, above Y SS ≈ 1, the discharges become dominated by SS-recycling, contain few hot secondary electrons from sheath energization, and have a relatively low electron temperature T e. Here, stable plateau values of the discharge current develop during long pulses, and these values increase monotonically with the applied voltage. For low self-sputter yields, below Y SS ≈ 0.2, the discharges above J crit are dominated by process gas recycling, have a significant sheath energization of secondary electrons and a higher T e, and the current evolution is generally less stable. For intermediate values of Y SS the discharge character gradually shifts between these two types. All of these discharges can, at sufficiently high discharge voltage, give currents that increase rapidly in time. For such cases we propose that a distinction should be made between ‘unlimited’ runaway and ‘limited’ runaway: in unlimited runaway the current can, in principle, increase without a limit for a fixed discharge voltage, while in limited runaway it can only grow towards finite, albeit very high, levels. For unlimited runway Y SS > 1 is found to be a necessary criterion, independent of the amount of gas-recycling in the

  4. Photomask specifications for high energy physics detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Pindo, M

    2002-01-01

    Planar technologies used for radiation detector fabrication imply an extensive use of photomasks whose characteristics are critical in determining final detector performance. Compatibly with their manufacturing process, photomasks must satisfy the application-specific requirements dictated both by wafer manufacturers and detector final users. The design and realization of microstrip and pixel detectors, widely used in high energy physics experiments, ask for intensive scientific effort, advanced technology and important economical investments. Photomask specification definition is one of the fundamental steps to optimize detector fabrication processes and fulfill experimental requirements at the most appropriate cost.

  5. Impulsivity in body-focused repetitive behavior disorders: Disparate clinical associations between three distinct measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppink, Eric W; Redden, Sarah A; Grant, Jon E

    2016-01-01

    Research on trichotillomania (TTM) and excoriation (skin-picking) disorder (SPD) has suggested that impulsivity may be an important cognitive underpinning of the behavior, but many studies have produced mixed results. This analysis assessed impulsivity in TTM and SPD using three measures: the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS), the Eysenck Impulsiveness Questionnaire (EIQ), and the Stop-Signal Task (SST). Two hundred and eighty three subjects with TTM or SPD completed measurement of impulsivity as a part of participation in several research studies. Subjects scoring one standard deviation above or below measure means were included in the analysis for that scale (SST: N = 45; EIQ: N = 32; BIS: N = 34). High and low impulsive groups were compared within measures on demographic, clinical, and behavioral variables. Results differed by group, with domains of the BIS showing associations with clinical severity, quality of life, and anxiety, and the SST showing several differences, but not clinical severity. The EIQ domains showed no significant differences. No groups differed demographically. These results suggest that the EIQ, BIS, and SST assess distinct characteristics. Notably, only the attentional domain from the BIS predicted higher severity scores. Future research needs to clarify the ideal utility for these scales as they relate to TTM and SPD. Key points The BIS, EIQ, and SST domains are associated with distinct clinical differences between high and low impulsivity groups. Only the subjects in the high attentional impulsivity domain of the BIS showed significantly elevated symptom severity. The high and low impulsivity groups within the EIQ domains did not show any significant differences. These disparate associations may indicate the need for better subtyping of impulsivity, as different measures of specific domains appear to show associations with distinct features.

  6. Buying impulses : a study on impulsive consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herabadi, A.G.

    2003-01-01

    This dissertation's objectives were to validate impulse buying tendency as a genuinely distinctive construct related to impulse purchase behavior and attached to fundamental personality traits, and its relationships to a number of relevant factors. Studies reported were steps to a better

  7. Development of an apparatus to produce fractures from short-duration high-impulse loading with an application in the lower leg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quenneville, Cheryl E; Fraser, Gillian S; Dunning, Cynthia E

    2010-01-01

    Axial loading of the lower leg during impact events can cause significant fractures of the tibia. The magnitude of lower leg axial loading that occurs during short-duration high-impulse events, such as antivehicular landmine blasts, can lead to life-altering injuries. These events achieve higher forces over shorter durations than car crashes, the current standard used for protective measures. In order to determine appropriate injury limits for the lower limb, a testing apparatus has been designed that can simulate these types of events for testing of anthropomorphic test device (ATD) lower legs as well as cadaveric specimens. Moreover, the design allows for the velocity at which the specimen is struck to be varied independently of the force applied, thus allowing independent investigation into the effect of momentum or energy on fracture strength. Test specimens are supported on a low-friction bearing system, and receive the controlled impulse from a projectile of variable mass that is accelerated using pneumatics. The apparatus includes velocity sensors, a six-degree-of-freedom load cell, and an accelerometer to completely quantify the loading event. The apparatus' performance was validated against an ATD lower leg. It was able to create impulse events with forces from 0.5 kN to 17.0 kN, and projectile speeds of 2.3-13.9 m/s. Various momenta could be achieved at a constant force level by varying the mass of the projectile, with a maximum difference of 65%, whereas kinetic energy was inherently linked to the impact force. This apparatus will be useful in future studies for determining the appropriateness of currently used injury limits for the lower limb to high-impulse events, as well as for quantifying the relationship between cadaveric fracture response and ATD measurements. This device can also be readily applied to other bones of the body, to create realistic fracture patterns for known injury mechanisms.

  8. Development of High Specific Strength Envelope Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Keiji; Sano, Masa-Aki; Kakuta, Yoshiaki

    Progress in materials technology has produced a much more durable synthetic fabric envelope for the non-rigid airship. Flexible materials are required to form airship envelopes, ballonets, load curtains, gas bags and covering rigid structures. Polybenzoxazole fiber (Zylon) and polyalirate fiber (Vectran) show high specific tensile strength, so that we developed membrane using these high specific tensile strength fibers as a load carrier. The main material developed is a Zylon or Vectran load carrier sealed internally with a polyurethane bonded inner gas retention film (EVOH). The external surface provides weather protecting with, for instance, a titanium oxide integrated polyurethane or Tedlar film. The mechanical test results show that tensile strength 1,000 N/cm is attained with weight less than 230g/m2. In addition to the mechanical properties, temperature dependence of the joint strength and solar absorptivity and emissivity of the surface are measured. 

  9. Life Event Stress and Binge Eating Among Adolescents: The Roles of Early Maladaptive Schemas and Impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong; Luo, Xingwei; Cai, Taisheng; He, Jinbo; Lu, Yao; Wu, Siyao

    2016-10-01

    This study examined the relationships between life event stress, early maladaptive schemas, impulsivity and binge eating among adolescents and investigated the effects of early maladaptive schemas and impulsivity on the relationship between life event stress and binge eating. Specifically, we examined a moderated mediation model in which early maladaptive schemas mediated this relationship and impulsivity moderated the mediation effect. Life event stress, early maladaptive schemas, impulsivity and binge eating were investigated in a sample of 2172 seventh-, eighth- and tenth-grade middle and high school students (mean age = 14.55 years, standard deviation = 1.29). The results indicated that adolescents with greater life event stress, more early maladaptive schemas and higher levels of impulsivity displayed more severe binge eating. In addition, early maladaptive schemas mediated the relationship between life event stress and binge eating, while impulsivity moderated this relationship. Furthermore, impulsivity also moderated the mediation effect of early maladaptive schemas; as impulsivity levels increased, the strength of the association between life event stress and early maladaptive schemas increased. This study illustrates the importance of understanding individual differences and their effects on the relationship between life event stress and binge eating. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Impulsivity and the modular organization of resting-state neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, F Caroline; Knodt, Annchen R; Sporns, Olaf; Lahey, Benjamin B; Zald, David H; Brigidi, Bart D; Hariri, Ahmad R

    2013-06-01

    Impulsivity is a complex trait associated with a range of maladaptive behaviors, including many forms of psychopathology. Previous research has implicated multiple neural circuits and neurotransmitter systems in impulsive behavior, but the relationship between impulsivity and organization of whole-brain networks has not yet been explored. Using graph theory analyses, we characterized the relationship between impulsivity and the functional segregation ("modularity") of the whole-brain network architecture derived from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. These analyses revealed remarkable differences in network organization across the impulsivity spectrum. Specifically, in highly impulsive individuals, regulatory structures including medial and lateral regions of the prefrontal cortex were isolated from subcortical structures associated with appetitive drive, whereas these brain areas clustered together within the same module in less impulsive individuals. Further exploration of the modular organization of whole-brain networks revealed novel shifts in the functional connectivity between visual, sensorimotor, cortical, and subcortical structures across the impulsivity spectrum. The current findings highlight the utility of graph theory analyses of resting-state fMRI data in furthering our understanding of the neurobiological architecture of complex behaviors.

  11. Impulsivity and the Modular Organization of Resting-State Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, F. Caroline; Knodt, Annchen R.; Sporns, Olaf; Lahey, Benjamin B.; Zald, David H.; Brigidi, Bart D.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity is a complex trait associated with a range of maladaptive behaviors, including many forms of psychopathology. Previous research has implicated multiple neural circuits and neurotransmitter systems in impulsive behavior, but the relationship between impulsivity and organization of whole-brain networks has not yet been explored. Using graph theory analyses, we characterized the relationship between impulsivity and the functional segregation (“modularity”) of the whole-brain network architecture derived from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. These analyses revealed remarkable differences in network organization across the impulsivity spectrum. Specifically, in highly impulsive individuals, regulatory structures including medial and lateral regions of the prefrontal cortex were isolated from subcortical structures associated with appetitive drive, whereas these brain areas clustered together within the same module in less impulsive individuals. Further exploration of the modular organization of whole-brain networks revealed novel shifts in the functional connectivity between visual, sensorimotor, cortical, and subcortical structures across the impulsivity spectrum. The current findings highlight the utility of graph theory analyses of resting-state fMRI data in furthering our understanding of the neurobiological architecture of complex behaviors. PMID:22645253

  12. High specific power lithium polymer rechargeable battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, M.Y.; De Jonghe, L.; Visco, S. [PolyPlus Battery Co., Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-11-01

    PolyPlus Battery Company (PPBC) is developing an advanced lithium polymer rechargeable battery based on its proprietary positive electrode. This battery offers high steady-state (> 250 W/kg) and peak power densities (3,000 W/kg), in a low cost and environmentally benign format. This PolyPlus lithium polymer battery also delivers high specific energy. The first generation battery has an energy density of 100 Wh/kg (120 Wh/l) and subsequent generations increases the performance in excess of 500 Wh/kg (600 Wh/l). The high power and energy densities, along with the low toxicity and low cost of materials used in the PolyPlus solid-state cell makes this battery exceptionally attractive for both hybrid and electric vehicle applications.

  13. Impulse control disorders in adult psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jon E; Levine, Laura; Kim, Daniel; Potenza, Marc N

    2005-11-01

    The authors' goal was to examine the prevalence of impulse control disorders in psychiatric inpatients. They used the Minnesota Impulsive Disorders Interview, a semistructured clinical interview assessing pathological gambling, trichotillomania, kleptomania, pyromania, intermittent explosive disorder, compulsive buying, and compulsive sexual behavior, to screen 204 consecutively admitted psychiatric inpatients. One hundred twelve of the inpatients were women (54.9%), and the mean age of the 204 inpatients was 40.5 years (SD=13.2, range=18-83). Patients whose screen was positive for an impulse control disorder were evaluated with structured clinical interviews. Sixty-three patients (30.9%) were diagnosed with at least one current impulse control disorder. The most common impulse control disorders were compulsive buying (N=19 [9.3%]), kleptomania (N=16 [7.8%]), and pathological gambling (N=14 [6.9%]). Patients with and without co-occurring impulse control disorders did not differ significantly from each other on demographic measures or number or type of psychiatric diagnoses other than impulse control disorders. Impulse control disorders appear common among psychiatric inpatients. Additional, larger studies are needed to examine the prevalence of impulse control disorders in the general population and specific psychiatric groups.

  14. Conversion of Impulse Voltage Generator Into Steep Wave Impulse Test-Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammed Zaid; Tanwar, Surender Singh; Dayama, Ravindra; Choudhary, Rahul Raj; Mangal, Ravindra

    This paper demonstrates the alternative measures to generate the Steep wave impulse by using Impulse Voltage Generator (IVG) for high voltage testing of porcelain insulators. The modification of IVG by incorporating compensation of resistor, inductor, and capacitor has been achieved and further performance of the modified system has been analyzed by applying the generated lightning impulse and analyzing the electrical characteristics of impulse waves under standard lightning and fast rise multiple lightning waveform to determine the effect to improve rise time. The advantageous results have been received and being reported such as increase in overshoot compensation, increase in capacitive and inductive load ranges. Such further reduces the duration of oscillations of standard impulse voltages. The reduction in oscillation duration of steep front impulse voltages may be utilized in up gradation of Impulse Voltage Generator System. Stray capacitance could further be added in order to get the minimized difference of measurement between simulation and the field establishment.

  15. Campground marketing - the impulse camper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur F. LaPage; Dale P. Ragain

    1972-01-01

    Impulse or unplanned campground visits may account for one-fourth to one-half of all camping activity. The concepts of impulse travel and impulse camping appear to be potentially useful extensions of the broader concept of impulse purchasing, which has become an important influence in retail marketing. Impulse campers may also be impulse buyers; they were found to...

  16. Association of ventral striatum monoamine oxidase-A binding and functional connectivity in antisocial personality disorder with high impulsivity: A positron emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolla, Nathan J; Dunlop, Katharine; Downar, Jonathan; Links, Paul; Bagby, R Michael; Wilson, Alan A; Houle, Sylvain; Rasquinha, Fawn; Simpson, Alexander I; Meyer, Jeffrey H

    2016-04-01

    Impulsivity is a core feature of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) associated with abnormal brain function and neurochemical alterations. The ventral striatum (VS) is a key region of the neural circuitry mediating impulsive behavior, and low monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) level in the VS has shown a specific relationship to the impulsivity of ASPD. Because it is currently unknown whether phenotypic MAO-A markers can influence brain function in ASPD, we investigated VS MAO-A level and the functional connectivity (FC) of two seed regions, superior and inferior VS (VSs, VSi). Nineteen impulsive ASPD males underwent [(11)C] harmine positron emission tomography scanning to measure VS MAO-A VT, an index of MAO-A density, and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging that assessed the FC of bilateral seed regions in the VSi and VSs. Subjects also completed self-report impulsivity measures. Results revealed functional coupling of the VSs with bilateral dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC) that was correlated with VS MAO-A VT (r=0.47, p=0.04), and functional coupling of the VSi with right hippocampus that was anti-correlated with VS MAO-A VT (r=-0.55, p=0.01). Additionally, VSs-DMPFC FC was negatively correlated with NEO Personality Inventory-Revised impulsivity (r=-0.49, p=0.03), as was VSi-hippocampus FC with Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11 motor impulsiveness (r=-0.50, p=0.03). These preliminary results highlight an association of VS MAO-A level with the FC of striatal regions linked to impulsive behavior in ASPD and suggest that phenotype-based brain markers of ASPD have relevance to understanding brain function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  17. Impulsive phenomena, the impulsive character (der Triebhafte Charakter) and DSM personality disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J Christopher; Körner, Annett C

    2011-10-01

    Impulsive phenomena have frequently been associated with personality disorders, beginning with Reich's description of the impulsive-character (Reich, 1925/1975). However, questions remain regarding the cooccurrence of a wide variety of impulsive phenomena and whether an underlying structure influences the differential association of impulses to individual personality disorders. Adults entering residential treatment for treatment-refractory disorders were interviewed about their lifetime histories of 33 impulse items, following independent diagnostic interviews. Factor analysis suggested 12 underlying dimensions of impulsive phenomena, explaining 68% of the variance. Borderline and antisocial PDs had the highest impulse scores, followed by self-defeating, narcissistic, depressive, and passive-aggressive PDs. Schizoid, avoidant, obsessive-compulsive, and dependent types were negatively associated with impulsive phenomena. Individuals with the highest impulse scores showed higher levels of borderline, antisocial and either self-defeating or passive-aggressive personality pathology, and were characterized by high Neuroticism and Openness and low Agreeableness on the NEO-FFI. Personality disorders and the NEO-FFI personality traits both predicted unique variance in impulsive phenomena, with the former predominating. Our findings bear striking similarities to Reich's (1925/1975) descriptions of the impulsive character.

  18. Genetic markers of striatal dopamine predict individual differences in dysfunctional, but not functional impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colzato, L S; van den Wildenberg, W P M; Van der Does, A J W; Hommel, B

    2010-10-27

    Various psychiatric disorders are characterized by elevated levels of impulsivity. Although extensive evidence supports a specific role of striatal, but not frontal dopamine (DA) in human impulsivity, recent studies on genetic variability have raised some doubts on such a role. Importantly, impulsivity consists of two dissociable components that previous studies have failed to separate: functional and dysfunctional impulsivity. We compared participants with a genetic predisposition to have relatively high striatal DA levels (DAT1 9-repeat carriers, DRD2 C957T T/T homozygotes, and DRD4 7-repeat carriers) with participants with other genetic predispositions. We predicted that the first group would show high scores of dysfunctional, but not functional, self-reported impulsivity and greater difficulty in inhibiting a behavioral response to a stop-signal, a behavioral measure of impulsivity. In a sample of 130 healthy adults, we studied the relation between DAT1, DRD4, and C957T polymorphism at the DRD2 gene (polymorphisms related to striatal DA) and catechol-Omethyltransferase (COMT) Val158Met (a polymorphism related to frontal DA) on self-reported dysfunctional and functional impulsivity, assessed by the Dickman impulsivity inventory (DII), and the efficiency of inhibitory control, assessed by the stop-signal paradigm. DRD2 C957T T/T homozygotes and DRD4 7-repeat carriers indeed had significantly higher scores on self-reported dysfunctional, but not functional, impulsivity. T/T homozygotes were also less efficient in inhibiting prepotent responses. Our findings support the claim that dopaminergic variation affects dysfunctional impulsivity. This is in line with the notion that the over-supply of striatal DA might weaken inhibitory pathways, thereby enhancing the activation of, and the competition between responses. Copyright © 2010 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The utility of rat models of impulsivity in developing pharmacotherapies for impulse control disorders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Winstanley, Catharine A

    2011-01-01

    High levels of impulsive behaviours are a clinically significant symptom in a range of psychiatric disorders, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, bipolar disorder, personality disorders...

  20. [Affective disorders and impulsivity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzeaux, R; Correard, N; Mazzola-Pomietto, P; Adida, M; Cermolacce, M; Azorin, J-M

    2014-12-01

    Impulsivity is a complex and important phenomenon in mood disorders. Impulse control disorders, as defined in DSM, are more frequent in mood disorders especially in Bipolar Disorder type I, and are associated with a more severe course of illness. Dimensional studies demonstrate that impulsivity is a core manifestation of bipolar disorder both as state- and trait-dependent markers in patients. Comorbid substance use disorders are often associated with a higher level of impulsivity whereas the relation between suicidal behaviors and higher impulsivity remains uncertain. Moreover, neuropsychological tests were used to study correlation between clinical impulsivity and laboratory measurements of impulsivity. Level of correlation remains weak and several explanations are proposed in the literature. Copyright © 2014 L’Encéphale. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  1. Role of Serotonin and Dopamine System Interactions in the Neurobiology of Impulsive Aggression and its Comorbidity with other Clinical Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dongju; Patrick, Christopher J; Kennealy, Patrick J

    2008-10-01

    Impulsive aggression is characterized by an inability to regulate affect as well as aggressive impulses, and is highly comorbid with other mental disorders including depression, suicidal behavior, and substance abuse. In an effort to elucidate the neurobiological underpinnings of impulsive aggression and to help account for its connections with these other disorders, this paper reviews relevant biochemical, brain imaging, and genetic studies. The review suggests that dysfunctional interactions between serotonin and dopamine systems in the prefrontal cortex may be an important mechanism underlying the link between impulsive aggression and its comorbid disorders. Specifically, serotonin hypofunction may represent a biochemical trait that predisposes individuals to impulsive aggression, with dopamine hyperfunction contributing in an additive fashion to the serotonergic deficit. The current paper proposes a modified diathesis-stress model of impulsive aggression in which the underlying biological diathesis may be deficient serotonergic function in the ventral prefrontal cortex. This underlying disposition can be manifested behaviorally as impulsive aggression towards oneself and others, and as depression under precipitating life stressors. Substance abuse associated with impulsive aggression is understood in the context of dopamine dysregulation resulting from serotonergic deficiency. Also discussed are future research directions in the neurobiology of impulsive aggression and its comorbid disorders.

  2. Temporal Preparation, Response Inhibition and Impulsivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Angel; Trivino, Monica; Perez-Duenas, Carolina; Acosta, Alberto; Lupianez, Juan

    2010-01-01

    Temporal preparation and impulsivity involve overlapping neural structures (prefrontal cortex) and cognitive functions (response inhibition and time perception), however, their interrelations had not been investigated. We studied such interrelations by comparing the performance of groups with low vs. high non-clinical trait impulsivity during a…

  3. The Effect of Individual Differences on Adolescents' Impulsive Buying Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien-Huang; Chuang, Shin-Chieh

    2005-01-01

    This study posits a relationship between Emotional Intelligence (EI) and Impulsive Buying Tendency (IBT). A survey of 574 adolescents found that high-EI adolescents manifested less impulsive behavior than did low-EI adolescents, and high-IBT adolescents were more likely to engage in more impulsive buying behavior than were low-IBT adolescents.…

  4. Impact of pulse duration in high power impulse magnetron sputtering on the low-temperature growth of wurtzite phase (Ti,Al)N films with high hardness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Tetsuhide, E-mail: simizu-tetuhide@tmu.ac.jp [Division of Human Mechatronics Systems, Graduate School of System Design, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 6-6, Asahigaoka, Hino-shi, 191-0065 Tokyo (Japan); Teranishi, Yoshikazu; Morikawa, Kazuo; Komiya, Hidetoshi; Watanabe, Tomotaro; Nagasaka, Hiroshi [Surface Finishing Technology Group, Tokyo Metropolitan Industrial Technology Research Institute, 2-4-10, Aomi, Kohtoh-ku, 135-0064 Tokyo (Japan); Yang, Ming [Division of Human Mechatronics Systems, Graduate School of System Design, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 6-6, Asahigaoka, Hino-shi, 191-0065 Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-04-30

    (Ti,Al)N films were deposited from a Ti{sub 0.33}Al{sub 0.67} alloy target with a high Al content at a substrate temperature of less than 150 °C using high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) plasma. The pulse duration was varied from 60 to 300 μs with a low frequency of 333 Hz to investigate the effects on the dynamic variation of the substrate temperature, microstructural grain growth and the resulting mechanical properties. The chemical composition, surface morphology and phase composition of the films were analyzed by energy dispersive spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively. Mechanical properties were additionally measured by using a nanoindentation tester. A shorter pulse duration resulted in a lower rate of increase in the substrate temperature with an exponentially higher peak target current. The obtained films had a high Al content of 70–73 at.% with a mixed highly (0002) textured wurtzite phase and a secondary phase of cubic (220) grains. Even with the wurtzite phase and the relatively high Al contents of more than 70 at.%, the films exhibited a high hardness of more than 30 GPa with a relatively smooth surface of less than 2 nm root-mean-square roughness. The hardest and smoothest surfaces were obtained for pulses with an intermediate duration of 150 μs. The differences between the obtained film properties under different pulse durations are discussed on the basis of the grain growth process observed by transmission electron microscopy. The feasibility of the low-temperature synthesis of AlN rich wurtzite phase (Ti,Al)N films with superior hardness by HIPIMS plasma duration was demonstrated. - Highlights: • Low temperature synthesis of AlN rich wurtzite phase (Ti,Al)N film was demonstrated. • 1 μm-thick TiAlN film was deposited under the temperature less than 150 °C by HIPIMS. • High Al content with highly (0002) textured wurtzite phase structure was obtained. • High hardness of 35 GPa were

  5. Impulsiveness in Professional Fighters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Banks, Sarah J; Mayer, Brittany; Obuchowski, Nancy; Shin, Wanyong; Lowe, Mark; Phillips, Michael; Modic, Michael; Bernick, Charles

    2014-01-01

    ...). Among the behavioral manifestations of CTE is increased impulsiveness. Sports involving repeated head trauma are associated with risk of neurodegenerative disorders such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE...

  6. The latent structure of impulsivity: impulsive choice, impulsive action, and impulsive personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKillop, James; Weafer, Jessica; C Gray, Joshua; Oshri, Assaf; Palmer, Abraham; de Wit, Harriet

    2016-09-01

    Impulsivity has been strongly linked to addictive behaviors, but can be operationalized in a number of ways that vary considerably in overlap, suggesting multidimensionality. This study tested the hypothesis that the latent structure among multiple measures of impulsivity would reflect the following three broad categories: impulsive choice, reflecting discounting of delayed rewards; impulsive action, reflecting ability to inhibit a prepotent motor response; and impulsive personality traits, reflecting self-reported attributions of self-regulatory capacity. The study used a cross-sectional confirmatory factor analysis of multiple impulsivity assessments. Participants were 1252 young adults (62 % female) with low levels of addictive behavior, who were assessed in individual laboratory rooms at the University of Chicago and the University of Georgia. The battery comprised a Delay (replace hyphen with space) Discounting Task, Monetary Choice Questionnaire, Conners' Continuous Performance Test, Go/NoGo Task, Stop Signal Task, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, and the UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale. The hypothesized three-factor model provided the best fit to the data, although sensation seeking was excluded from the final model. The three latent factors were largely unrelated to each other and were variably associated with substance use. These findings support the hypothesis that diverse measures of impulsivity can broadly be organized into three categories that are largely distinct from one another. These findings warrant investigation among individuals with clinical levels of addictive behavior and may be applied to understanding the underlying biological mechanisms of these categories.

  7. Semicircular canal plane head impulses detect absent function of individual semicircular canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, P D; Halmagyi, G M; Aw, S T; Curthoys, I S; McGarvie, L A; Todd, M J; Black, R A; Hannigan, I P

    1998-04-01

    We studied the human vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) in response to head 'impulses': brief, unpredictable, passive, high-acceleration (up to 4000 degrees/s2), low-amplitude (20-30 degrees) head rotations. We delivered the head impulses approximately in the plane of the semicircular canal (SCC) being tested. To test the anterior and posterior SCCs, the head impulses were delivered in a diagonal plane, midway between the frontal (roll) and sagittal (pitch) planes. We recorded head and eye position in three dimensions with scleral search coils in nine normal subjects, seven patients following unilateral surgical vestibular neurectomy and three patients following unilateral posterior SCC occlusion. In the post-surgical patients we demonstrated a severe, permanent VOR gain deficit (0.2-0.3) for head impulses directed toward any single non-functioning SCC. The sensitivity of the test depends on the physiological properties of primary vestibular afferents, and its specificity depends on the anatomical orientation of the SCCs. The diagonal head impulse is the first test of individual vertical SCC function in humans, and together with the horizontal head impulse, forms a comprehensive battery of SCC-plane tests. These canal-plane impulses could be useful in evaluating patients with vertigo or other vestibular disorders.

  8. Time devours things: how impulsivity and time affect temporal decisions in pathological gamblers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Grecucci

    Full Text Available Impulsivity is associated with several psychiatric disorders in which the loss of control of a specific behavior determines the syndrome itself. One particularly interesting population characterized by reported high impulsivity and problematic decision-making are those diagnosed with pathological gambling. However the association between impulsivity and decision making in pathological gambling has been only partially confirmed until now. We tested 23 normal controls and 23 diagnosed pathological gamblers in an intertemporal choice task, as well as other personality trait measurements. Results showed that gamblers scored higher on impulsivity questionnaires, and selected a higher percentage of impatient choices (higher percentage of smaller, sooner rewards, when compared to normal controls. Moreover, gamblers were faster in terms of reaction times at selecting the smaller, sooner options and discounted rewards more rapidly over time. Importantly, regression analyses clarified that self-reported measures of impulsivity played a significant role in biasing decisions towards small but more rapidly available rewards. In the present study we found evidence for impulsivity in personality traits and decisions in pathological gamblers relative to controls. We conclude by speculating on the need to incorporate impulsivity and decision biases in the conceptualization of pathological gambling for a better understanding and treatment of this pathology.

  9. Correlation between impulsivity and executive function in patients with Parkinson disease experiencing depression and anxiety symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonoff, Fernanda Colucci; Fonoff, Erich Talamoni; Barbosa, Egberto Reis; Quaranta, Thais; Machado, Rachael Brant; de Andrade, Daniel Ciampi; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Fuentes, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Depression and anxiety are comorbidities often associated with Parkinson disease (PD). Recent studies debate on how affective disorders can influence the cognition of patients with PD. This study sought to investigate how depression and anxiety affect specific executive functions and impulsivity traits in these patients. Twenty-eight patients with advanced PD and 28 closely matched healthy volunteers (HV) were assessed for depressive and anxiety symptoms, impulsivity, executive function and control attention and behavioral response. Compared to the HV group, the PD group showed significantly higher perseverative responses and slowness to adapt to changes in environmental stimuli and longer reaction time for inter-stimulus interval change. Depression symptoms were significantly correlated to motor impulsivity score and total Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS -11) score. Moreover, there was also significant correlation between anxiety symptoms and attentional impulsivity score and total BIS-11 score. Correlation analysis between impulsivity and control attention indicated a positive correlation in commission and a negative correlation in reaction time and detectability in the PD group. The present results suggest that depression and anxiety were highly correlated to impulsivity but not to executive functions changes in these PD patients. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Impulsivity moderates promotive environmental influences on adolescent delinquency: a comparison across family, school, and neighborhood contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pan; Jacobson, Kristen C

    2013-10-01

    The present study examined moderating effects of impulsivity on the relationships between promotive factors from family (family warmth, parental knowledge), school (school connectedness), and neighborhood (neighborhood cohesion) contexts with delinquency using data collected from N = 2,978 sixth to eighth graders from 16 schools surrounding a major city in the Midwestern United States. More than half of the respondents were non-Caucasian (M age  = 12.48; 41.0 % male). Multilevel modeling analyses were conducted to take into account the clustering of the participants within schools. Impulsivity was positively associated with adolescent delinquency. Additionally, family warmth, parental knowledge, and school connectedness, but not neighborhood cohesion, were independently and inversely related to adolescent delinquency. Finally, impulsivity moderated relationships between family warmth and parental knowledge with delinquency but not relationships between school attachment and neighborhood cohesion with delinquency. Specifically, the negative relationship between family warmth and delinquency was significant for adolescents with high levels of, but not for those with below-average levels of, impulsivity. In addition, parental knowledge had a stronger association with decreased levels of delinquency for adolescents reporting higher levels of impulsivity. The moderating effects of impulsivity did not differ for males and females or for minority and non-minority participants. Findings indicate that impulsivity may have greater impact on adolescents' susceptibility to positive family influences than on their susceptibility to promotive factors from school or neighborhood contexts. Implications for future research and practice are discussed.

  11. Measuring Impulsivity in Adolescents with Serious Substance and Conduct Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Laetitia L.; Whitmore, Elizabeth A.; Raymond, Kristen M.; Crowley, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    Adolescents with substance use and conduct disorders have high rates of aggression and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), all of which have been characterized in part by impulsivity. Developing measures that capture impulsivity behaviorally and correlate with self-reported impulsivity has been difficult. One promising behavioral…

  12. Pathological gambling: an impulse control disorder? Measurement of impulsivity using neurocognitive tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannon, Pinhas N; Shoenfeld, Netta; Rosenberg, Oded; Kertzman, Semion; Kotler, Moshe

    2010-04-01

    Pathological gambling is classified in the DSM-IV-TR (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) and in the ICD-10 (International Classification of Disease) as an impulse control disorder. The association between impulsivity and pathological gambling remains a matter of debate: some researchers find high levels of impulsivity within pathological gamblers, others report no difference compared to controls, and yet others even suggest that it is lower. In this review we examine the relationship between pathological gambling and impulsivity assessed by various neurocognitive tests. These tests--the Stroop task, the Stop Signal Task, the Matching Familiar Figures Task, the Iowa Gambling Task, the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, the Tower of London test, and the Continuous Performance Test--demonstrated less impulsivity in gambling behavior. The differences in performance between pathological gamblers and healthy controls on the neurocognitive tasks could be due to addictive behavior features rather than impulsive behavior.

  13. High specific energy, high capacity nickel-hydrogen cell design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, James R.

    1993-01-01

    A 3.5 inch rabbit-ear-terminal nickel-hydrogen cell was designed and tested to deliver high capacity at steady discharge rates up to and including a C rate. Its specific energy yield of 60.6 wh/kg is believed to be the highest yet achieved in a slurry-process nickel-hydrogen cell, and its 10 C capacity of 113.9 AH the highest capacity yet of any type in a 3.5 inch diameter size. The cell also demonstrated a pulse capability of 180 amps for 20 seconds. Specific cell parameters and performance are described. Also covered is an episode of capacity fading due to electrode swelling and its successful recovery by means of additional activation procedures.

  14. Dimensions of impulsive behavior in adolescents: laboratory behavioral assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Brady; Penfold, Robert B; Patak, Michele

    2008-04-01

    Impulsivity is a multifaceted construct that defines a range of maladaptive behavioral styles. The present research aimed to identify different dimensions of impulsive behavior in adolescents from a battery of laboratory behavioral assessments. In one analysis, correlations were examined between two self report and seven laboratory behavioral measures of impulsivity. The correlation between the two self report measures was high compared to correlations between the self report and laboratory behavioral measures. In a second analysis, a principal components analysis was performed with just the laboratory behavioral measures. Three behavioral dimensions were identified -- "impulsive decision-making", "impulsive inattention", and "impulsive disinhibition". These dimensions were further evaluated using the same sample with a confirmatory factor analysis, which did support the hypothesis that these are significant and independent dimensions of impulsivity. This research indicates there are at least three separate subtypes of impulsive behavior when using laboratory behavioral assessments with adolescent participants.

  15. Impulsive social influence increases impulsive choices on a temporal discounting task in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, Jodi M; Curran, Max T; Calderon, Vanessa; Stoeckel, Luke E; Evins, A Eden

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults who affiliate with friends who engage in impulsive behavior are more likely to engage in impulsive behaviors themselves, and those who associate with prosocial (i.e. more prudent, future oriented) peers are more likely to engage in prosocial behavior. However, it is difficult to disentangle the contribution of peer influence vs. peer selection (i.e., whether individuals choose friends with similar traits) when interpreting social behaviors. In this study, we combined a novel social manipulation with a well-validated delay discounting task assessing impulsive behavior to create a social influence delay discounting task, in which participants were exposed to both impulsive (smaller, sooner or SS payment) and non-impulsive (larger, later or LL payment) choices from their peers. Young adults in this sample, n = 51, aged 18-25 had a higher rate of SS choices after exposure to impulsive peer influence than after exposure to non-impulsive peer influence. Interestingly, in highly susceptible individuals, the rate of non-impulsive choices did not increase after exposure to non-impulsive influence. There was a positive correlation between self-reported suggestibility and degree of peer influence on SS choices. These results suggest that, in young adults, SS choices appear to be influenced by the choices of same-aged peers, especially for individuals who are highly susceptible to influence.

  16. Impulsive social influence increases impulsive choices on a temporal discounting task in young adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodi M Gilman

    Full Text Available Adolescents and young adults who affiliate with friends who engage in impulsive behavior are more likely to engage in impulsive behaviors themselves, and those who associate with prosocial (i.e. more prudent, future oriented peers are more likely to engage in prosocial behavior. However, it is difficult to disentangle the contribution of peer influence vs. peer selection (i.e., whether individuals choose friends with similar traits when interpreting social behaviors. In this study, we combined a novel social manipulation with a well-validated delay discounting task assessing impulsive behavior to create a social influence delay discounting task, in which participants were exposed to both impulsive (smaller, sooner or SS payment and non-impulsive (larger, later or LL payment choices from their peers. Young adults in this sample, n = 51, aged 18-25 had a higher rate of SS choices after exposure to impulsive peer influence than after exposure to non-impulsive peer influence. Interestingly, in highly susceptible individuals, the rate of non-impulsive choices did not increase after exposure to non-impulsive influence. There was a positive correlation between self-reported suggestibility and degree of peer influence on SS choices. These results suggest that, in young adults, SS choices appear to be influenced by the choices of same-aged peers, especially for individuals who are highly susceptible to influence.

  17. Dealing with Impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neidhardt, Janet

    1987-01-01

    A mother recounts her neurologically impaired son's struggles and progress in combating impulsivity in his work and social habits. Now 23 years old, employed full-time, and off medication, the son is still impulsive, has problems with social skills, but has improved his self-image through a photography hobby. (CB)

  18. Rethinking Impulsivity in Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klonsky, E. David; May, Alexis

    2010-01-01

    Elevated impulsivity is thought to facilitate the transition from suicidal thoughts to suicidal behavior. Therefore, impulsivity should distinguish those who have attempted suicide (attempters) from those who have only considered suicide (ideators-only). This hypothesis was examined in three large nonclinical samples: (1) 2,011 military recruits,…

  19. High-sucrose diets in male rats disrupt aspects of decision making tasks, motivation and spatial memory, but not impulsivity measured by operant delay-discounting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Alanna; Dogra, Vimi R; Reichelt, Amy C

    2017-06-01

    Excessive consumption of sugar sweetened drinks is proposed to produce functional changes in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, leading to perturbations in behavioural control. Impairments in behavioural control have been observed in obese people on tasks that involve making choices, including delay-discounting, indicative of increased impulsivity. In this study we examined the impact of 2h daily access to 10% sucrose (or no sucrose in controls) in young male rats on behavioural tasks reliant on hippocampal function including delay-discounting, T-maze forced choice alternation and place recognition memory, as well as progressive ratio to measure motivation. We observed deficits in place recognition memory and T-maze forced choice alternation, indicative of hippocampal deficits in rats with a history of sucrose consumption. Moreover, rats with a history of sucrose consumption were less motivated to lever press for rewards on a progressive ratio schedule. However, rats with a history of sucrose consumption performed equally to control animals during the delay-discounting task, suggesting that they discounted for reward size over a delay in a manner comparable to control animals. These findings indicate that high-sucrose diets impact on spatial and working memory processes, but do not induce impulsive-like choice behaviours in rats, suggesting that unhealthy diet choices may not influence this aspect of decision-making behaviour. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Measuring Specific Heats at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandersande, Jan W.; Zoltan, Andrew; Wood, Charles

    1987-01-01

    Flash apparatus for measuring thermal diffusivities at temperatures from 300 to 1,000 degrees C modified; measures specific heats of samples to accuracy of 4 to 5 percent. Specific heat and thermal diffusivity of sample measured. Xenon flash emits pulse of radiation, absorbed by sputtered graphite coating on sample. Sample temperature measured with thermocouple, and temperature rise due to pulse measured by InSb detector.

  1. Behavioural aspects of impulsivity in alcoholics with and without a cluster-B personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dom, Geert; De Wilde, Bieke; Hulstijn, Wouter; van den Brink, Wim; Sabbe, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    Studies have shown that alcoholics with a cluster-B personality disorder (cluster-B PD) are characterized by high levels of impulsivity. However, impulsivity has mainly been studied as a broad concept without its different aspects being considered. The present study compared abstinent alcoholic inpatients without any personality disorder (PD) and abstinent alcoholics with cluster-B PD on different aspects of impulsivity, i.e. self-reported impulsivity and neuropsychological indicators such as behavioural control and delay of gratification. Forty alcohol-dependent inpatients without PD and 22 alcohol-dependent inpatients with a cluster-B PD were compared on two self-report impulsivity questionnaires (Barratt impulsiveness scale; sensation-seeking scales) and three behavioural impulsivity tasks [Go/No-Go task; delay discounting task (DDT); Stroop colour word test]. Tests were administered after stable abstinence of at least 3 weeks. Self-report measures of impulsivity were higher in cluster-B alcoholics than in alcoholics without PD. Behavioural tasks revealed a more differentiated pattern of impairments. On the Go/No-Go task, cluster-B alcoholics were impaired in inhibitory control but not in reaction time compared with alcoholics without PD. In contrast, no significant differences on the DDT and the Stroop were observed. Alcohol-dependent patients with and without a cluster-B PD differ in terms of behavioural inhibition but not in terms of activation or the ability to delay gratification. This finding may partly account for their impulsive and (self-) destructive behaviours. Treatment planning should pay specific attention to these impairments in behavioural control.

  2. Impulse sales cooler. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, Per Henrik (DTI, Taastrup (Denmark))

    2010-11-15

    In the past years, the use of impulse coolers has increased considerably and it is estimated that at least 30.000 are installed in shops in Denmark. In addition, there are many small barrel-shaped can coolers. Most impulse coolers are open, which results in a large consumption of energy, and the refrigeration systems are often quite inefficient. A typical impulse cooler uses app. 5 - 8 kWh/day corresponding to a consumption of energy in the magnitude of 60 GWh/year. For several years, the Danish company Vestfrost A/S has produced an impulse sales cooler in the high-efficiency end and the energy consumption of the cooler is measured to be 4.15 kWh/day. The POS72 cooler formed the baseline of this project. At the start-up meeting in 2008, several ideas were discussed with the objective to reduce energy consumption and to use natural refrigerants. Among the ideas were better air curtains, removable lids, better condensers, use of R600a refrigeration system and better insulation. Three generations of prototypes were built and tested in a climate chamber at Danish Technological Institute and the third generation showed very good performance: the energy consumption was measured to 2.215 kWh/day, which is a 47% reduction compared to the baseline. That was achieved by: 1) Improving the cold air cycling system including the air curtain. 2) Using the natural refrigerant R600a (isobutane) and the Danfoss NLE9KTK compressor, which has better efficiency compared to the compressor in the baseline product. 3) Using a box type condenser without fins (preventing dust build-up) and with a relatively high surface area. 4) Improving the insulation value of the plastic cabinet by reducing turbulence in the air gap between the plastic walls and improving the insulation value of the EPS moulded insulation surrounding the refrigeration system at the bottom of the cooler. 5) Preventing short-circuit of warm air around the condenser. 6) The improvements are cost efficient and will not add

  3. The relationship between impulsivity and impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaias, Ioannis U; Siri, Chiara; Cilia, Roberto; De Gaspari, Danilo; Pezzoli, Gianni; Antonini, Angelo

    2008-02-15

    A range of behaviors presumed to be related to dopaminergic medications have been recently recognized in Parkinson's disease (PD). We evaluated 50 consecutive cognitively intact PD patients on stable dopamine agonist and levodopa therapy and 100 healthy controls for compulsive sexual behavior, compulsive buying, or intermittent explosive disorders assessed by the Minnesota Impulsive Disorders Interview (MIDI), pathological gambling (South Oaks Gambling Screen, SOGS), impulsivity (Barratt Impulsiveness Scale), compulsivity (Maudsley obsessional-compulsive inventory), and depression scores (Geriatric Depression Scale). Overall 28% PD (14/50) and 20% healthy controls (20/100) reported at least one abnormal behavior at MIDI or pathological SOGS score. PD patients had higher scores than controls for impulsivity (P = 0.006), compulsivity (P impulsivity, compulsivity, and depression scores in PD. Male gender and higher impulsivity score, but not dose and kind of dopaminergic medications, were associated in PD with increased probability of impulsive disorders at MIDI. Impulse control disorders are also common in the control population. Individual susceptibility factors, such as high impulsivity and depression, underline abnormal behaviors in PD patients treated with stable dopaminergic therapy. 2007 Movement Disorder Society

  4. Studies on the propagation of an impulse breakdown across the surface of artificial acid rainwater by high-speed Schlieren method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Yoshitaka; Juste, Kouamenan A.; Takeda, Satoshi; Itoh, Hidenori; Sakaguchi, Takeshi; Sakai, Yosuke; Tagashira, Hiroaki

    1995-05-01

    Rain water polluted with natural and industrial contaminants, more commonly known as acid rain, has been used as an electrolyte to account for its effect on the flashover phenomenon across high voltage outdoor insulators. Optical and electrical techniques using high speed Schlieren photography and current measurement with LED were employed. The propagation of an impulse breakdown was then studied by varying the voltage waveforms. Experiments were also conducted with artificial acid rainwater of low pH value to determine the factor of safety over the actual rainwater characteristics. It was found in the present conditions, that given the same conductivity (sigma) neither the dissolved components nor the pH value of the rainwater influence significantly the discharge growth, while a substantial decrease of the propagation speed was measured with the increase of the front duration of the applied voltage.

  5. [Impulsiveness Among Short-Term Prisoners with Antisocial Personality Disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Fabian U; Otte, Stefanie; Vasic, Nenad; Jäger, Markus; Dudeck, Manuela

    2015-07-01

    The study aimed to investigate the correlation between impulsiveness and the antisocial personality disorder among short-term prisoners. The impulsiveness was diagnosed by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS). Short-term prisoners with antisocial personality disorder scored significant higher marks on the BIS total scale than those without any personality disorder. In detail, they scored higher marks on each subscale regarding attentional, motor and nonplanning impulsiveness. Moderate and high effects were calculated. It is to be considered to regard impulsivity as a conceptual component of antisociality. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Impulsivity and emotion dysregulation as predictors of food addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivarunas, Bernadette; Conner, Bradley T

    2015-12-01

    Food addiction is the clinical occurrence in which individuals develop physical and psychological dependencies on high fat, high sugar, and highly palatable foods. Past research has demonstrated a number of similarities between food addiction and drug use disorders including the activation of specific brain regions and neurotransmitters, disrupted neuronal circuitry, and behavioral indicators of addiction such as continued use despite negative consequences. The present study examined the role of impulsivity and emotion dysregulation in food addiction as both play salient roles in drug use disorders. Poisson regression analyses using data from 878 undergraduate students revealed negative urgency, the tendency to act impulsively when under distress, and emotion dysregulation positively predicted symptom count on the Yale Food Addiction Scale (Gearhardt, Corbin, & Brownell, 2009) whereas a lack of premeditation negatively predicted symptom count (all psfood addiction, elucidate causal mechanisms, and support an explanatory model of food addiction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Norepinephrine and impulsivity: Effects of acute yohimbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, Alan C.; Lijffijt, Marijn; Lane, Scott D.; Cox, Blake; Steinberg, Joel L.; Moeller, F. Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Rapid-response impulsivity, characterized by inability to withhold response to a stimulus until it is adequately appraised, is associated with risky behavior and may be increased in a state-dependent manner by norepinephrine. Objective We assessed effects of yohimbine, which increases norepinephrine release by blocking alpha-2 noradrenergic receptors, on plasma catecholamine metabolites, blood pressure, subjective symptoms, and laboratory-measured rapid-response impulsivity. Methods Subjects were twenty-three healthy controls recruited from the community, with normal physical examination and ECG, and negative history for hypertension, cardiovascular illness, and Axis I or II disorder. Blood pressure, pulse, and behavioral measures were obtained before and periodically after 0.4 mg/kg oral yohimbine or placebo in a randomized, counterbalanced design. Metabolites of norepinephrine (3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol, MHPG; vanillylmandelic acid, VMA) and dopamine (homovanillic acid, HVA) were measured by high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Rapid-response impulsivity was measured by commission errors and reaction times on the Immediate Memory Task (IMT), a continuous performance test designed to measure impulsivity and attention. Results Yohimbine increased plasma MHPG and VMA but not HVA. Yohimbine increased systolic and diastolic blood pressure and pulse rate. On the IMT, yohimbine increased impulsive errors and impulsive response bias and accelerated reaction times. Yohimbine-associated increase in plasma MHPG correlated with increased impulsive response rates. Time courses varied; effects on blood pressure generally preceded those on metabolites and test performance. Conclusions These effects are consistent with increased rapid-response impulsivity after pharmacological noradrenergic stimulation in healthy controls. Labile noradrenergic responses, or increased sensitivity to norepinephrine, may increase risk for impulsive

  8. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy-Based Frontal Lobe Neurofeedback Integrated in Virtual Reality Modulates Brain and Behavior in Highly Impulsive Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudak, Justin; Blume, Friederike; Dresler, Thomas; Haeussinger, Florian B; Renner, Tobias J; Fallgatter, Andreas J; Gawrilow, Caterina; Ehlis, Ann-Christine

    2017-01-01

    Based on neurofeedback (NF) training as a neurocognitive treatment in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), we designed a randomized, controlled functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) NF intervention embedded in an immersive virtual reality classroom in which participants learned to control overhead lighting with their dorsolateral prefrontal brain activation. We tested the efficacy of the intervention on healthy adults displaying high impulsivity as a sub-clinical population sharing common features with ADHD. Twenty participants, 10 in an experimental and 10 in a shoulder muscle-based electromyography control group, underwent eight training sessions across 2 weeks. Training was bookended by a pre- and post-test including go/no-go, n-back, and stop-signal tasks (SST). Results indicated a significant reduction in commission errors on the no-go task with a simultaneous increase in prefrontal oxygenated hemoglobin concentration for the experimental group, but not for the control group. Furthermore, the ability of the subjects to gain control over the feedback parameter correlated strongly with the reduction in commission errors for the experimental, but not for the control group, indicating the potential importance of learning feedback control in moderating behavioral outcomes. In addition, participants of the fNIRS group showed a reduction in reaction time variability on the SST. Results indicate a clear effect of our NF intervention in reducing impulsive behavior possibly via a strengthening of frontal lobe functioning. Virtual reality additions to conventional NF may be one way to improve the ecological validity and symptom-relevance of the training situation, hence positively affecting transfer of acquired skills to real life.

  9. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy-Based Frontal Lobe Neurofeedback Integrated in Virtual Reality Modulates Brain and Behavior in Highly Impulsive Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Hudak

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on neurofeedback (NF training as a neurocognitive treatment in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, we designed a randomized, controlled functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS NF intervention embedded in an immersive virtual reality classroom in which participants learned to control overhead lighting with their dorsolateral prefrontal brain activation. We tested the efficacy of the intervention on healthy adults displaying high impulsivity as a sub-clinical population sharing common features with ADHD. Twenty participants, 10 in an experimental and 10 in a shoulder muscle-based electromyography control group, underwent eight training sessions across 2 weeks. Training was bookended by a pre- and post-test including go/no-go, n-back, and stop-signal tasks (SST. Results indicated a significant reduction in commission errors on the no-go task with a simultaneous increase in prefrontal oxygenated hemoglobin concentration for the experimental group, but not for the control group. Furthermore, the ability of the subjects to gain control over the feedback parameter correlated strongly with the reduction in commission errors for the experimental, but not for the control group, indicating the potential importance of learning feedback control in moderating behavioral outcomes. In addition, participants of the fNIRS group showed a reduction in reaction time variability on the SST. Results indicate a clear effect of our NF intervention in reducing impulsive behavior possibly via a strengthening of frontal lobe functioning. Virtual reality additions to conventional NF may be one way to improve the ecological validity and symptom-relevance of the training situation, hence positively affecting transfer of acquired skills to real life.

  10. Impact of Impulse Stops on Pedestrian Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Kwak, Jaeyoung; Jo, Hang-Hyun; Luttinen, Tapio; Kosonen, Iisakki

    2015-01-01

    We numerically study the impact of impulse stops on pedestrian flow for a straight corridor with multiple attractions. The impulse stop is simulated by the switching behavior model, a function of the social influence strength and the number of attendees near the attraction. When the pedestrian influx is low, one can observe a stable flow where attendees make a complete stop at an attraction and then leave the attraction after a certain amount of time. When the pedestrian influx is high, an un...

  11. The association between impulsivity and alcohol/drug use among prison inmates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Michael H; McSheffrey, Savannah N; van den Berg, Jacob J; Vela, Jamie E; Stein, L A R; Roberts, Mary B; Martin, Rosemarie A; Clarke, Jennifer G

    2015-03-01

    Few studies have examined the relation between impulsivity and drug involvement with prison inmates, in spite of their heavy drug use. Among this small body of work, most studies look at clinically relevant drug dependence, rather than drug use specifically. N=242 adult inmates (34.8% female, 52% White) with an average age of 35.58 (SD=9.19) completed a modified version of the 15-item Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS) and measures assessing lifetime alcohol, opiate, benzodiazepine, cocaine, cannabis, hallucinogen, and polysubstance use. Lifetime users also reported the frequency of use for the 30days prior to incarceration. Impulsivity was higher among lifetime users (versus never users) of all substances other than cannabis. Thirty day drug use frequency was only related to impulsivity for opiates and alcohol. This study extends prior work, by showing that a lifetime history of non-clinical substance use is positively associated with impulsivity among prison inmates. Implications for drug interventions are considered for this population, which is characterized by high rates of substance use and elevated impulsivity. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Impulsive corporal punishment by mothers and antisocial behavior and impulsiveness of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straus, M A; Mouradian, V E

    1998-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that corporal punishment (CP), such as spanking or slapping a child for purposes of correcting misbehavior, is associated with antisocial behavior (ASB) and impulsiveness by the child. The data were obtained through interviews with a probability sample of 933 mothers of children age 2-14 in two small American cities. Analyses of variance found that the more CP experienced by the child, the greater the tendency for the child to engage in ASB and to act impulsively. These relationships hold even after controlling for family socioeconomic status, the age and sex of the child, nurturance by the mother, and the level of noncorporal interventions by the mother. There were also significant interaction effects of CP with impulsiveness by the mother. When CP was carried out impulsively, it was most strongly related to child impulsiveness and ASB; when CP was done when the mother was under control, the relationship to child behavior problems was reduced but still present. In view of the fact that there is a high risk of losing control when engaged in CP, even by parents who are not usually impulsive, and the fact that impulsive CP is so strongly associated with child behavior problems, the results of this study suggest that CP is an important risk factor for children developing a pattern of impulsive and antisocial behavior which, in turn, may contribute to the level of violence and other crime in society.

  13. Shock Tube as an Impulsive Application Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Ranjan Nanda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Current investigations solely focus on application of an impulse facility in diverse area of high-speed aerodynamics and structural mechanics. Shock tube, the fundamental impulse facility, is specially designed and calibrated for present objectives. Force measurement experiments are performed on a hemispherical test model integrated with the stress wave force balance. Similar test model is considered for heat transfer measurements using coaxial thermocouple. Force and heat transfer experiments demonstrated that the strain gauge and thermocouple have lag time of 11.5 and 9 microseconds, respectively. Response time of these sensors in measuring the peak load is also measured successfully using shock tube facility. As an outcome, these sensors are found to be suitable for impulse testing. Lastly, the response of aluminum plates subjected to impulsive loading is analyzed by measuring the in-plane strain produced during deformation. Thus, possibility of forming tests in shock is also confirmed.

  14. Mixed-mode high-power impulse magnetron sputter deposition of tetrahedral amorphous carbon with pulse-length control of ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, M. D.; Marks, N. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia 6102 (Australia); Ganesan, R.; Bilek, M. M. M.; McKenzie, D. R. [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); McCulloch, D. G.; Partridge, J. G. [School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476, Melbourne, Victoria 3001 (Australia); Stueber, M.; Ulrich, S. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology—KIT, Institute for Applied Materials—IAM, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2016-04-21

    High-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) is used to deposit amorphous carbon thin films with sp{sup 3} fractions of 13% to 82%. Increasing the pulse length results in a transition from conventional HiPIMS deposition to a “mixed-mode” in which an arc triggers on the target surface, resulting in a large flux of carbon ions. The films are characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, ellipsometry, nanoindentation, elastic recoil detection analysis, and measurements of stress and contact angle. All properties vary in a consistent manner, showing a high tetrahedral character only for long pulses, demonstrating that mixed-mode deposition is the source of the high carbon ion flux. Varying the substrate bias reveals an “energy window” effect, where the sp{sup 3} fraction of the films is greatest for a substrate bias around −100 V and decreases for higher or lower bias values. In the absence of bias, the films' properties show little dependence on the pulse length, showing that energetic ions are the origin of the highly tetrahedral character.

  15. Lower Monoamine Oxidase-A Total Distribution Volume in Impulsive and Violent Male Offenders with Antisocial Personality Disorder and High Psychopathic Traits: An [(11)C] Harmine Positron Emission Tomography Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolla, Nathan J; Matthews, Brittany; Wilson, Alan A; Houle, Sylvain; Bagby, R Michael; Links, Paul; Simpson, Alexander I; Hussain, Amina; Meyer, Jeffrey H

    2015-10-01

    Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) often presents with highly impulsive, violent behavior, and pathological changes in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and ventral striatum (VS) are implicated. Several compelling reasons support a relationship between low monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A), an enzyme that regulates neurotransmitters, and ASPD. These include MAO-A knockout models in rodents evidencing impulsive aggression and positron emission tomography (PET) studies of healthy subjects reporting associations between low brain MAO-A levels and greater impulsivity or aggression. However, a fundamental gap in the literature is that it is unknown whether brain MAO-A levels are low in more severe, clinical disorders of impulsivity, such as ASPD. To address this issue, we applied [(11)C] harmine PET to measure MAO-A total distribution volume (MAO-A VT), an index of MAO-A density, in 18 male ASPD participants and 18 age- and sex-matched controls. OFC and VS MAO-A VT were lower in ASPD compared with controls (multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA): F2,33=6.8, P=0.003; OFC and VS MAO-A VT each lower by 19%). Similar effects were observed in other brain regions: prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, dorsal putamen, thalamus, hippocampus, and midbrain (MANOVA: F7,28=2.7, P=0.029). In ASPD, VS MAO-A VT was consistently negatively correlated with self-report and behavioral measures of impulsivity (r=-0.50 to -0.52, all P-valuesdisorder marked by pathological aggression and impulsivity.

  16. Neural connectivity during reward expectation dissociates psychopathic criminals from non-criminal individuals with high impulsive/antisocial psychopathic traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, D.E.; Borries, K. von; Volman, I.; Bulten, B.H.; Cools, R.; Verkes, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    Criminal behaviour poses a big challenge for society. A thorough understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying criminality could optimize its prevention and management. Specifically,elucidating the neural mechanisms underpinning reward expectation might be pivotal to understanding

  17. Dimensions of impulsive behavior in adolescent smokers and nonsmokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Sherecce; Collins, Christine; Leraas, Kristen; Reynolds, Brady

    2009-10-01

    Robust associations have been identified between impulsive personality characteristics and cigarette smoking during adolescents, indicating that impulsive behavior may play an important role in the initiation of cigarette smoking. The present study extended this research by using laboratory behavioral assessments to explore relationships between three specific dimensions of impulsive behavior (impulsive decision-making, inattention, and disinhibition) and adolescent cigarette smoking. Participants were male and female adolescent smokers (n = 50) and nonsmokers (n = 50). Adolescent smokers were more impulsive on a measure of decision-making; however, there were significant smoking status by gender interaction effects for impulsive inattention and disinhibition. Male smokers were most impulsive on the measure of inattention, but male smokers were least impulsive on the measure of disinhibition. Correlations between biomarkers of smoking and impulsive inattention and disinhibition were found for females but not males. The current findings, coupled with previous findings (Reynolds et al., 2007), indicate there may be robust gender difference in associations between certain types of impulsive behavior and cigarette smoking during adolescence.

  18. Study on the effect of electromagnetic impulse on neurotransmitter metabolism in nerve cells by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection coupled with microdialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fang; Gao, Mengnan; Wang, Lin; Jin, Litong

    2002-08-01

    In this paper, a reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic method using a chemically modified electrode coupled with microdialysis was developed to study the effect of electromagnetic impulse (EMI) on monoamine neurotransmitter metabolism in nerve cells. To detect the monoamines and their metabolites, a poly (para-aminobenzoic acid) (P-pABA)-modified electrode was prepared. The modified electrode exhibited efficiently electrocatalytic oxidation for monoamines and their metabolites with relatively high sensitivity, stability, and long life. Nerve cells were primarily cultured. EMI was radiated to three experimental model nerve cells: (i) on mature nerve cells, (ii) on the culture medium, and (iii) on juvenile nerve cells for various periods of time. Then the levels of monoamines in the culture medium were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection. The data indicated that electromagnetic fields could influence neurotransmitter metabolism by direct effect on nerve cells or effect on the nutrient medium and that the effect was not only relevant with the length of radiation time, but also with the growing state of the nerve cells.

  19. Protection of Si photocathode using TiO2 deposited by high power impulse magnetron sputtering for H2 evolution in alkaline media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bae, Dowon; Shayestehaminzadeh, Seyedmohammad; Thorsteinsson, Einar B.

    2016-01-01

    Si is an excellent absorber material for use in photoelectrochemical (PEC) hydrogen production. Only a few studies have been done using Si in alkaline electrolyte for hydrogen evolution due to its poor chemical stability in high pH electrolyte, indicating that a chemically stable protection layer...... is essential. Here we investigate thin TiO2 films deposited by high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) as a protection layer for a p-type silicon photocathode for photoelectrochemical H2 evolution in a high pH electrolyte. The X-ray reflectometry analysis reveals that the HiPIMS process provides...... improved film density for TiO2 films (4.15 g/cm3), and consequently results in a significantly less corroded Si surface. The Si photocathode protected by the HiPIMS grown TiO2 film along with Pt as co-catalyst produced a photocurrent onset potential of ~0.5 V vs. RHE in 1 M KOH and showed a 4% decay over...

  20. Co-deposition of band-gap tuned Zn1-xMgxO using high impulse power- and dc-magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, E. L. H.; Murdoch, B. J.; Bilek, M. M. M.; McKenzie, D. R.; McCulloch, D. G.; Partridge, J. G.

    2015-04-01

    High impulse power- and direct current- magnetron sputtering have been used to reactively co-deposit Zn1 - xMgxO onto a 100 mm diameter a-plane sapphire wafer at 200 °C. The Zn1 - xMgxO film exhibited low surface roughness, high transparency, high electrical resistivity and a Mg fraction (x) depending on substrate location. The optical bandgap of the film varied monotonically with x up to the miscibility limit of ~0.32, beyond which a mixed cubic/wurtzite structure formed. Annealing at 550 °C in forming gas (95% N2, 5% H2), caused reduced compressive stress and dramatically reduced electrical resistivity. The latter was attributed to shallow doping by hydrogen bound to oxygen vacancies and these changes occurred in the wurtzite Zn1 - xMgxO without detectable phase transformation. A filtered UV detector, with active and filter layers fabricated from the co-deposited film, exhibited sensitivity to UV in a 330-355 nm pass-band and approximately three orders of magnitude UV-to-visible rejection.

  1. Self-reported impulsivity, but not behavioral choice or response impulsivity, partially mediates the effect of stress on drinking behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Kristen R; Ansell, Emily B; Reynolds, Brady; Potenza, Marc N; Sinha, Rajita

    2013-01-01

    Stress and impulsivity contribute to alcohol use, and stress may also act via impulsivity to increase drinking behavior. Impulsivity represents a multi-faceted construct and self-report and behavioral assessments may effectively capture distinct clinically relevant factors. The present research investigated whether aspects of impulsivity mediate the effect of stress on alcohol use. A community-based sample of 192 men and women was assessed on measures of cumulative stress, alcohol use, self-reported impulsivity, and behavioral choice and response impulsivity. Data were analyzed using regression and bootstrapping techniques to estimate indirect effects of stress on drinking via impulsivity. Cumulative adversity exhibited both direct effects and indirect effects (via self-reported impulsivity) on drinking behavior. Additional models examining specific types of stress indicated direct and indirect effects of trauma and recent life events, and indirect effects of major life events and chronic stressors on drinking behavior. Overall, cumulative stress was associated with increased drinking behavior, and this effect was partially mediated by self-reported impulsivity. Self-reported impulsivity also mediated the effects of different types of stress on drinking behavior. These findings highlight the value of mediation models to examine the pathways through which different types of stress increase drinking behavior. Treatment and prevention strategies should focus on enhancing stress management and self-control.

  2. Applied impulsive mathematical models

    CERN Document Server

    Stamova, Ivanka

    2016-01-01

    Using the theory of impulsive differential equations, this book focuses on mathematical models which reflect current research in biology, population dynamics, neural networks and economics. The authors provide the basic background from the fundamental theory and give a systematic exposition of recent results related to the qualitative analysis of impulsive mathematical models. Consisting of six chapters, the book presents many applicable techniques, making them available in a single source easily accessible to researchers interested in mathematical models and their applications. Serving as a valuable reference, this text is addressed to a wide audience of professionals, including mathematicians, applied researchers and practitioners.

  3. Ion Voltage Diagnostics in the Far-Field Plume of a High-Specific Impulse Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Richard R.; Haas, James M.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of the magnetic field and discharge voltage on the far-field plume of the NASA 173Mv2 laboratory-model Hall thruster were investigated. A cylindrical Langmuir probe was used to measure the plasma potential and a retarding potential analyzer was employed to measure the ion voltage distribution. The plasma potential was affected by relatively small changes in the external magnetic field, which suggested a means to control the plasma surrounding the thruster. As the discharge voltage increased, the ion voltage distribution showed that the acceleration efficiency increased and the dispersion efficiency decreased. This implied that the ionization zone was growing axially and moving closer to the anode, which could have affected thruster efficiency and lifetime due to higher wall losses. However, wall losses may have been reduced by improved focusing efficiency since the total efficiency increased and the plume divergence decreased with discharge voltage.

  4. Specifics of marketing strategy in the segment of high fashion

    OpenAIRE

    Butigan, Ružica; Grilec Kaurić, Alica; Ujević, Darko

    2013-01-01

    The success of high fashion designers is not only in a specificity of the products but also in specific and very well executed marketing strategy. Emphasis is placed on the design of very specific marketing program and marketing strategies that must concider all the characteristics of the high fashion market. Therefore, a scientific research problem is defined as follows: although the market of high fashion at first glance does not imply a completely different marketing approach than other fa...

  5. Trait impulsivity components correlate differently with proactive and reactive control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shihua Huang

    Full Text Available The relationship between impulsivity and cognitive control is still unknown. We hypothesized that trait impulsivity would differentially correlate with specific cognitive control processes. Trait impulsivity was measured by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, which assesses motor, attention, and non-planning impulsiveness components. Cognitive control was measured by a hybrid-designed Stroop task, which distinguishes proactive and reactive control. Thirty-three participants performed the Stroop task while they were scanned by functional magnetic resonance imaging. Proactive and reactive control involved increased activity in the fronto-parietal network, and brain activity was associated with impulsivity scores. Specifically, higher motor impulsiveness was associated with a larger proactive control effect in the inferior parietal lobule and a smaller reactive control effect in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC and anterior cingulate contex. Higher attention impulsivity was associated with a smaller proactive control effect in the right DLPFC. Such a correlation pattern suggests that impulsivity trait components are attributable to different cognitive control subsystems.

  6. A High-Power Electrically Driven Impulsive Acoustic Source for Target Effects Experiments and Area-Denial Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boesch, H

    1998-01-01

    .... These devices are attractive for development as fieldable weapons because they offer the advantages of simplicity of design and very high-intensity acoustic output from relatively small packages...

  7. Selective cocaine-related difficulties in emotional intelligence: relationship to stress and impulse control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Helen C; Bergquist, Keri L; Casey, James; Hong, K Adam; Sinha, Rajita

    2011-01-01

    Emotional Intelligence (EI) comprises the ability to perceive, use, understand, and regulate emotions and may potentially contribute to variability in risk-related factors such as stress perception and impulse control in cocaine dependent individuals. The main objective of the current study is to better define EI in cocaine dependent individuals compared with healthy controls, using the Mayer, Salovey, and Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). Secondary analysis investigates the association between EI, IQ factors, perceived stress, and impulse control in both populations. Seventy-two abstinent treatment-seeking cocaine patients and 52 healthy controls were administered the MSCEIT as well as measures of IQ, perceived stress, and impulse control. Findings showed that cocaine dependent participants demonstrated highly selective EI difficulties compared with healthy controls, specifically with regard to higher-level emotional reasoning including the understanding, management, and regulation of emotion. These EI problems were associated with increased perceived stress and impulse control difficulties. IQ was significantly associated with all MSCEIT measures in the cocaine dependent participants, but not controls. Findings indicate that specific aspects of EI may be of clinical importance to cocaine dependent populations, impacting relapse-related factors such as stress dysregulation and impulse control.  © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  8. Selective Cocaine-Related Difficulties in Emotional Intelligence: Relationship to Stress and Impulse Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Helen C.; Bergquist, Keri L.; Casey, James; Hong, K. Adam; Sinha, Rajita

    2010-01-01

    Emotional Intelligence (EI) comprises the ability to perceive, use, understand and regulate emotions and may potentially contribute to variability in risk-related factors such as stress perception and impulse control in cocaine dependent individuals. The main objective of the current study is to better define EI in cocaine dependent individuals compared with healthy controls, using the Mayer, Salovey, and Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT1). Secondary analysis investigates the association between EI, IQ factors, perceived stress and impulse control in both populations. Seventy-two abstinent treatment-seeking cocaine patients and 52 healthy controls were administered the MSCEIT as well as measures of IQ, perceived stress and impulse control. Findings showed that cocaine dependent participants demonstrated highly selective EI difficulties compared with healthy controls, specifically with regard to higher level emotional reasoning including the understanding, management and regulation of emotion. These EI problems were associated with increased perceived stress and impulse control difficulties. IQ was significantly associated with all MSCEIT measures in the cocaine dependent participants, but not controls. Findings indicate that specific aspects of EI may be of clinical importance to cocaine dependent populations, impacting relapse related factors such as stress dysregulation and impulse control. PMID:21314758

  9. Does drinking refusal self-efficacy mediate the impulsivity-problematic alcohol use relation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Angela K; Littlefield, Andrew K; Blanchard, Brittany E; Talley, Amelia E; Brown, Jennifer L

    2016-02-01

    There is consistent evidence that impulsivity-like traits relate to problematic alcohol involvement; however, identifying mechanisms that account for this relation remains an important area of research. Drinking refusal self-efficacy (or a person's ability to resist alcohol; DRSE) has been shown to predict alcohol use among college students and may be a relevant mediator of the impulsivity-alcohol relation. The current study examined the indirect effect of various constructs related to impulsivity (i.e., urgency, sensation seeking, and deficits in conscientiousness) via several facets of DRSE (i.e., social pressure, opportunistic, and emotional relief) on alcohol-related problems among a large sample of college students (N=891). Overall, results indicated that certain DRSE facets were significant mediators of the relation between impulsivity-related constructs and alcohol problems. More specifically, emotional-relief DRSE was a mediator for the respective relations between urgency and deficits in conscientiousness and alcohol problems, whereas social-DRSE was a significant mediator of the respective relations between urgency and sensation seeking with alcohol problems. Results from this study suggest particular types of DRSE are important mediators of the relations between specific impulsivity constructs and alcohol-related problems. These findings support prevention and intervention efforts that seek to enhance drinking refusal self-efficacy skills of college students, particularly those high in certain personality features, in order to reduce alcohol-related problems among this population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. COAXIAL DISK SHUNT FOR MEASURING IN THE HEAVY-CURRENT CHAIN OF HIGH-VOLTAGE GENERATOR OF STORM DISCHARGES OF IMPULSES OF CURRENT OF ARTIFICIAL LIGHTNING WITH THE INTEGRAL OF ACTION TO 15•106 J/OHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Baranov

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Description of construction and basic technical descriptions developed and created in Research & Design Institute «Molniya» National Technical University «Kharkiv Polytechnic Institute» high-voltage heavy-current coaxial disk shunt of type of SC-300M2, allowing reliably to measure the peak-temporal parameters (PTP of impulses of current of artificial lightning in wide peak and temporal ranges with the integral of their action to 15·106 J/Ohm. Methodology. Electrophysics bases of high-voltage impulsive technique, scientific and technical bases of development and creation of high-voltage heavy-current impulsive electrical equipment, including the powerful generators of current of lightning (GCL, and also measuring methods in bit chains powerful high-voltage GCL AVP large impulsive currents of micro- and millisecond temporal ranges. Results. Offered and described new construction of measuring high-voltage heavy-current shunt, containing a measuring round disk from stainless steel easily soiled a 12Х18Н10Т thickness 2 mm and external diameter 80 mm. Experimental a way impulsive active resistance of RS≈0,08 mOhm of the indicated measuring disk and on his basis a calculation coefficient transformation is found of SS of coaxial disk shunt of type of SC-300M2, numeral equal in the concerted mode of operations of his coaxial cable line (CCL SS≈2/RS≈25·103 A/V. It is rotined that it is expedient to use this value SS for measuring in the heavy-current bit chain of GCL ATP impulsive A- and repeated impulsive D- component of current of artificial lightning, and also ATP of aperiodic impulse of current of artificial lightning of temporal form 10 μc/350 μc. It is set that taking into account application in the end CCL of shunt of a co-ordinate divizor of voltage with two output coaxial sockets 1:1 (for SSA≈25·103 A/V and 1:2 (SSC≈12,5·103 A/V at measuring of ATP intermediate B-, protracted C- and shortened protracted C

  11. Compositionally modulated multilayer diamond-like carbon coatings with AlTiSi multi-doping by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wei; Gao, Xiang; Liu, Jingmao; Kwon, Se-Hun; Wang, Qimin

    2017-12-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings with AlTiSi multi-doping were prepared by a reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering with using a gas mixture of Ar and C2H2 as precursor. The composition, microstructure, compressive stress, and mechanical property of the as-deposited DLC coatings were studied systemically by using SEM, XPS, TEM, Raman spectrum, stress-tester, and nanoindentation as a function of the Ar fraction. The results show that the doping concentrations of the Al, Ti and Si atoms increased as the Ar fraction increased. The doped Ti and Si preferred to bond with C while the doped Al mainly existed in oxidation state without bonding with C. As the doping concentrations increased, TiC carbide nanocrystals were formed in the DLC matrix. The microstructure of coatings changed from an amorphous feature dominant AlTiSi-DLC to a carbide nanocomposite AlTiSi-DLC with TiC nanoparticles embedding. In addition, the coatings exhibited the compositionally modulated multilayer consisting of alternate Al-rich layer and Al-poor layer due to the rotation of the substrate holder and the diffusion behavior of the doped Al which tended to separate from C and diffuse towards the DLC matrix surface owing to its weak interactions with C. The periodic Al-rich layer can effectively release the compressive stress of the coatings. On the other hand, the hard TiC nanoparticles were conducive to the hardness of the coatings. Consequently, the DLC coatings with relatively low residual stress and high hardness could be acquired successfully through AlTiSi multi-doping. It is believed that the AlCrSi multi-doping may be a good way for improving the comprehensive properties of the DLC coatings. In addition, we believe that the DLC coatings with Al-rich multilayered structure have a high oxidation resistance, which allows the DLC coatings application in high temperature environment.

  12. Impulsivity, aggression and suicide risk among male schizophrenia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iancu, Iulian; Bodner, Ehud; Roitman, Suzana; Piccone Sapir, Anna; Poreh, Amir; Kotler, Moshe

    2010-01-01

    Impulsivity has been shown to be a major variable in the etiology of suicide and aggression, but has not been researched as much in the schizophrenic population, which is characterized by serious suicide and aggression risks. 68 male schizophrenia patients responded to a battery of measures including the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), the impulsivity control scale (IS), the Suicide Risk Scale (SRS) and the Overt Aggression Scale. We divided our subjects into those who received scores above and below the median on the IS. The high-impulsivity group had higher present and past rates of suicidal ideation and showed a trend for more lifetime suicidal attempts than the low-impulsivity group. The impulsivity score correlated positively with the SRS score and with some of the scores of the PANSS (the positive symptoms score, the general psychopathology score and the total score). A multiple regression analysis revealed that an older age, higher levels of aggression, high impulsivity and an elevated score on the general psychopathology subscale of the PANSS contributed positively and significantly to the explained variance of the SRS. Our study supports the contention that high impulsivity in schizophrenia patients is significant in the etiology of suicide in schizophrenia. However, the relationship between impulsivity and aggression in schizophrenia patients, and also the amelioration of impulsivity by pharmacological interventions, require further study. Copyright (c) 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Drifting localization of ionization runaway: Unraveling the nature of anomalous transport in high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Pavel; Rauch, Albert

    2011-12-04

    The plasma over the magnetron’s erosion “racetrack” is not azimuthally uniform but concentrated in distinct dense plasma zones which move in the {vector E}×{vector B} direction with about 10% of the electrons’ {vector E}×{vector B}/B{sup 2} drift velocity. The plasma zones are investigated with a gated camera working in concert with a streak camera for Al, Nb, Cu, and W targets in Ar or Kr background gas. It is found that each plasma zone has a high density edge which is the origin of a plasma-generating electron jet leaving the target zone. Each region of strong azimuthal density gradient generates an azimuthal electric field which promotes the escape of magnetized electrons and the formation of electron jets and plasma flares. The phenomena are proposed to be caused by an ionization instability where each dense plasma zone exhibits a high stopping power for drifting high energy electrons, thereby enhancing itself.

  14. Sex differences in impulsivity and brain morphometry in methamphetamine users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogachi, Shannon; Chang, Linda; Alicata, Daniel; Cunningham, Eric; Ernst, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is an addictive stimulant, and METH users have abnormal brain structures and function. The aims of this study were to investigate the relationships between impulsivity, brain structures, and possible sex-specific differences between METH users and non-drug using Controls. Structural MRI and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS) questionnaire were completed in 124 subjects: 62 METH (ages 41.2 ± 1.4 years, 34 males) and 62 Controls (ages 43.3 ± 2.3 years, 36 males). Independent and interactive effects of METH use status and sex were evaluated. Relationships between METH usage characteristics, brain morphometry, and impulsivity scores were examined. METH users had higher impulsivity scores, on both the Cognitive and Behavioral Factors from the BIS (p impulsivity (interaction-p ≤ 0.05). Only female METH users showed relatively larger nucleus accumbens (interaction-p = 0.03). Greater impulsivity and thinner frontal cortices in METH users are validated. Larger superior frontal cortex in male METH users with greater cognitive impulsivity suggest decreased dendritic pruning during adolescence might have contributed to their impulsive and drug use behaviors. In the female METH users, smaller frontal cortices and the associated greater impulsivity suggest greater neurotoxicity to these brain regions, while their relatively larger nucleus accumbens suggest an estrogen-mediated neuroprotective glial response. Men and women may be affected differently by METH use.

  15. Association between Impulsivity and Weight Status in a General Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bénard, Marc; Camilleri, Géraldine M; Etilé, Fabrice; Méjean, Caroline; Bellisle, France; Reach, Gérard; Hercberg, Serge; Péneau, Sandrine

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the association between impulsivity and weight status in a large sample of the adult general population in France, and the influence of gender on this relationship. A total of 11,929 men and 39,114 women participating in the NutriNet-Santé cohort were selected in this cross-sectional analysis. The Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11) was used to assess impulsivity. Weight and height were self-reported. The association between impulsivity and BMI was estimated using logistic regressions adjusted for socio-demographic and lifestyle factors. Individuals with high impulsivity levels (BIS-11 total score >71) were more likely to be obese (Odds Ratio (OR) = 1.80, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.39, 2.33 in men; OR = 1.30, 95% CI: 1.15, 1.48 in women) compared to individuals in the average range of impulsivity. The strongest associations between impulsivity and obesity were observed in men, where highly impulsive participants were more likely to be class III obese (BMI > 40 kg/m²) (OR = 3.57, 95% CI: 1.86, 6.85). This large sample analysis supports the existence of a relationship between impulsivity and weight status and the importance of psychological factors in the prevention of obesity.

  16. Association between Impulsivity and Weight Status in a General Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Bénard

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to examine the association between impulsivity and weight status in a large sample of the adult general population in France, and the influence of gender on this relationship. A total of 11,929 men and 39,114 women participating in the NutriNet-Santé cohort were selected in this cross-sectional analysis. The Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11 was used to assess impulsivity. Weight and height were self-reported. The association between impulsivity and BMI was estimated using logistic regressions adjusted for socio-demographic and lifestyle factors. Individuals with high impulsivity levels (BIS-11 total score >71 were more likely to be obese (Odds Ratio (OR = 1.80, 95% Confidence Interval (CI: 1.39, 2.33 in men; OR = 1.30, 95% CI: 1.15, 1.48 in women compared to individuals in the average range of impulsivity. The strongest associations between impulsivity and obesity were observed in men, where highly impulsive participants were more likely to be class III obese (BMI > 40 kg/m2 (OR = 3.57, 95% CI: 1.86, 6.85. This large sample analysis supports the existence of a relationship between impulsivity and weight status and the importance of psychological factors in the prevention of obesity.

  17. Objects, decision considerations and self-image in men's and women's impulse purchases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmar, H; Beattie, J; Friese, S

    1996-09-01

    Current theories in economics, marketing, and psychology fail to explain underlying reasons for impulse buying and, crucially, why certain goods (e.g., clothes) are bought impulsively more than others (e.g., basic kitchen equipment). We propose and examine a social psychological model, which predicts that people impulse buy to acquire material symbols of personal and social identity. We predict that consumers will differ systematically in the goods they buy on impulse, and in their reasons for doing so, depending on their attitudes towards shopping, and also along important social categories, such as gender. Specifically, our theoretical model-drawing on a social constructionist model of material possessions (e.g., Dittmar, 1992) and symbolic self-completion theory (e.g. Wicklund and Gollwitzer, 1982)-leads to three sets of hypotheses: (i) some consumer durables are more likely to be bought on impulse than others, and there may be gender differences in object choices, (ii) differences will emerge in the buying considerations (e.g., functional, emotional, symbolic) that are used for impulse and planned buying, and (iii) magnitude of self-discrepancies will predict relative impulse buying frequency and the buying considerations used, if the individual uses consumption as a self-completion strategy. These predictions were expected to hold particularly strongly for individuals high in compulsive shopping tendencies. We test our model in a questionnaire study with a sample of British consumers (n = 61). The results lend support to all three sets of hypotheses. The implications of these findings are discussed with respect to economic and consumer theory, and the treatment offered to the increasing number of 'addicted' shoppers.

  18. High-latitude observations of impulse-driven ULF pulsations in the ionosphere and on the ground

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. W. Menk

    Full Text Available We report the simultaneous observation of 1.6–1.7 mHz pulsations in the ionospheric F-region with the CUTLASS bistatic HF radar and an HF Doppler sounder, on the ground with the IMAGE and SAMNET magnetometer arrays, and in the upstream solar wind. CUTLASS was at the time being operated in a special mode optimized for high resolution studies of ULF waves. A novel use is made of the ground returns to detect the ionospheric signature of ULF waves. The pulsations were initiated by a strong, sharp decrease in solar wind dynamic pressure near 09:28 UT on 23 February 1996, and persisted for some hours. They were observed with the magnetometers over 20° in latitude, coupling to a field line resonance near 72° magnetic latitude. The magnetic pulsations had azimuthal m numbers ~ -2, consistent with propagation away from the noon sector. The radars show transient high velocity flows in the cusp and auroral zones, poleward of the field line resonance, and small amplitude 1.6–1.7 mHz F-region oscillations across widely spaced regions at lower latitudes. The latter were detected in the radar ground scatter returns and also with the vertical incidence Doppler sounder. Their amplitude is of the order of ± 10 ms-1. A similar perturbation frequency was present in the solar wind pressure recorded by the WIND spacecraft. The initial solar wind pressure decrease was also associated with a decrease in cosmic noise absorption on an imaging riometer near 66° magnetic latitude. The observations suggest that perturbations in the solar wind pressure or IMF result in fast compressional mode waves that propagate through the magnetosphere and drive forced and resonant oscillations of geomagnetic field lines. The compressional wave field may also stimulate ionospheric perturbations. The observations demonstrate that HF radar ground scatter may contain important information on small-amplitude features, extending the scope and capability of these radars to

  19. High-latitude observations of impulse-driven ULF pulsations in the ionosphere and on the ground

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. W. Menk

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available We report the simultaneous observation of 1.6–1.7 mHz pulsations in the ionospheric F-region with the CUTLASS bistatic HF radar and an HF Doppler sounder, on the ground with the IMAGE and SAMNET magnetometer arrays, and in the upstream solar wind. CUTLASS was at the time being operated in a special mode optimized for high resolution studies of ULF waves. A novel use is made of the ground returns to detect the ionospheric signature of ULF waves. The pulsations were initiated by a strong, sharp decrease in solar wind dynamic pressure near 09:28 UT on 23 February 1996, and persisted for some hours. They were observed with the magnetometers over 20° in latitude, coupling to a field line resonance near 72° magnetic latitude. The magnetic pulsations had azimuthal m numbers ~ -2, consistent with propagation away from the noon sector. The radars show transient high velocity flows in the cusp and auroral zones, poleward of the field line resonance, and small amplitude 1.6–1.7 mHz F-region oscillations across widely spaced regions at lower latitudes. The latter were detected in the radar ground scatter returns and also with the vertical incidence Doppler sounder. Their amplitude is of the order of ± 10 ms-1. A similar perturbation frequency was present in the solar wind pressure recorded by the WIND spacecraft. The initial solar wind pressure decrease was also associated with a decrease in cosmic noise absorption on an imaging riometer near 66° magnetic latitude. The observations suggest that perturbations in the solar wind pressure or IMF result in fast compressional mode waves that propagate through the magnetosphere and drive forced and resonant oscillations of geomagnetic field lines. The compressional wave field may also stimulate ionospheric perturbations. The observations demonstrate that HF radar ground scatter may contain important information on small-amplitude features, extending the scope and capability of these radars to track

  20. Impulsive Actions and Choices in Laboratory Animals and Humans: Effects of High vs. Low Dopamine States Produced by Systemic Treatments Given to Neurologically Intact Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie eD'Amour-Horvat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Increases and decreases in dopamine transmission have both been suggested to influence reward-related impulse-control. The present literature review suggests that, in laboratory animals, the systemic administration of dopamine augmenters preferentially increases susceptibility to premature responding; with continued dopamine transmission, reward approach behaviors are sustained. Decreases in dopamine transmission, in comparison, diminish the appeal of distal and difficult to obtain rewards, thereby increasing susceptibility to temporal discounting and other forms of impulsive choice. The evidence available in humans is not incompatible with this model but is less extensive.

  1. Dynamics of processes during the deposition of ZrO2 films by controlled reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering: A modelling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozák, Tomáš; Vlček, Jaroslav

    2017-07-01

    A time-dependent parametric model was applied to controlled reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) depositions of stoichiometric ZrO2 films, carried out in our laboratories, (i) to clarify the complicated dynamics of the processes on the target and substrate surfaces during voltage pulses, and (ii) to corroborate the importance of the O2 inlet configuration (position and direction) which strongly affects the O2 dissociation in the discharge and the chemisorption flux of oxygen atoms and molecules onto the substrate. The repetition frequency was 500 Hz at the deposition-averaged target power densities of 25 Wcm-2, being close to a target power density applicable in industrial HiPIMS systems, and 50 Wcm-2 with a pulse-averaged target power density up to 2 kWcm-2. The pulse duration was 50 μs. For the experimental conditions with the to-substrate O2 inlets, the deposition-averaged target power density of 50 Wcm-2, and the oxygen partial pressure of 0.05 Pa (being close to the mean value during controlled depositions), our model predicts a low compound fraction, changing between 8% and 12%, in the target surface layer at an almost constant high compound fraction, changing between 92% and 93%, in the substrate surface layer during the pulse period (2000 μs). The calculated deposition rate of 89 nm/min for these films is in good agreement with the measured value of 80 nm/min achieved for optically transparent stoichiometric ZrO2 films prepared under these conditions.

  2. Physical and electrical properties of induced high-k ZrHfO crystallization with ZrN cap by high power impulse magnetron sputtering for metal-gate metal-insulator-semiconductor structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jung-Ruey; Juan, Pi-Chun; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Guo-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Metal-gate TiN/ZrN/ZrHfO/p-Si metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structures have been fabricated in this work. The physical and electrical properties were characterized. The crystallization of high-k ZrHfO thin-film is induced by high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) during the deposition of ZrN capping layer. The binding energies and depth profiles were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It is found that Zr and Hf out-diffusion from high-k dielectric in samples with HIPIMS is lesser than those in samples with the conventional DC magnetron sputtering (DCMS). The dielectric constant which strongly relates to the tetragonal phase becomes higher and the flatband voltage shift shows smaller by using the HIPIMS method than by the conventional DCMS. The cation and anion vacancies have been investigated by the defect reaction model.

  3. Micropower impulse radar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    From designs developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in radar and imaging technologies, there exists the potential for a variety of applications in both public and private sectors. Presently tests are being conducted for the detection of buried mines and the analysis of civil structures. These new systems use a patented ultra-wide band (impulse) radar technology known as Micropower Impulse Radar (GPR) imaging systems. LLNL has also developed signal processing software capable of producing 2-D and 3-D images of objects embedded in materials such as soil, wood and concrete. My assignment while at LLNL has focused on the testing of different radar configurations and applications, as well as assisting in the creation of computer algorithms which enable the radar to scan target areas of different geometeries.

  4. Trait Impulsivity Predicts Escalation of Sucrose Seeking and Hypersensitivity to Sucrose-Associated Stimuli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diergaarde, L.; Pattij, T.; Nawijn, L.; Schoffelmeer, A.N.M.; de Vries, T.J.

    2009-01-01

    Poor impulse control has been associated with compulsive drug seeking and an enhanced risk of relapse, suggesting that impulsivity is causally related to addiction proneness and relapse vulnerability. However, whether this association is specific to drugs of abuse or whether heightened impulsivity

  5. Measuring Impulsivity in Daily Life: The Momentary Impulsivity Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomko, Rachel L.; Carpenter, Ryan W.; Brown, Whitney C.; Solhan, Marika B.; Jahng, Seungmin; Wood, Phillip K.; Trull, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is a core feature of many psychiatric disorders. Traditionally, impulsivity has been assessed using retrospective questionnaires or laboratory tasks. Both approaches neglect intraindividual variability in impulsivity and do not capture impulsivity as it occurs in real-world settings. The goal of the current study was to provide a method for assessing impulsivity in daily life that provides both between-individual and within-individual information. Participants with borderline personality disorder (BPD; n = 67) or a depressive disorder (DD; n = 38) carried an electronic diary for 28 days and responded to 9 impulsivity items up to 6 times per day. Item distributions and iterative exploratory factor analysis (EFA) results were examined to select the items that best captured momentary impulsivity. A brief 4-item scale was created that can be used for the assessment of momentary impulsivity. Model fit was good for both within- and between-individual EFA. As expected, the BPD group showed significantly higher scores on our Momentary Impulsivity Scale than the DD group, and the resulting scale was moderately correlated with common trait impulsivity scales. PMID:24274047

  6. Impulsive for life? The nature of long-term impulsivity in domestic dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemer, Stefanie; Mills, Daniel S; Wright, Hannah

    2014-05-01

    Individual differences in impulsivity occur at a cognitive and/or behavioural level and are associated with differing life outcomes. However, there is a lack of empirical evidence to support the long-term stability of these characteristics in non-human animals. This study reports on the stability of convergent measures of impulsivity in domestic dogs assessed more than 6 years apart. Measures were (1) owner assessment by means of a questionnaire, the validated 'Dog Impulsivity Assessment Scale' (DIAS) and (2) dogs' performance in a delayed reward choice test. Dogs had 15-min free access to two food dispensers, one dispensing a piece of food immediately, the other dispensing three pieces after a delay, which increased by 1 s every other time the dogs sampled it. Maximum delay reached in this task reflects decision-making, or cognitive impulsivity, whereas the rate of extra presses on the delayed reward device during the delay can be considered as a measure of motor or behavioural impulsivity. DIAS scores were strongly and significantly correlated across years. The maximum delay reached in the behaviour test was also highly stable, whereas paw-pressing rate was uncorrelated between the years. These results demonstrate that cognitive but not motor impulsivity is highly consistent over time in dogs.

  7. Validity of proposed DSM-5 ADHD impulsivity symptoms in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünsel Bolat, Gül; Ercan, Eyüp Sabri; Salum, Giovanni Abrahão; Bilaç, Öznur; Massuti, Rafael; Uysal Özaslan, Taciser; Bolat, Hilmi; Rohde, Luis Augusto

    2016-10-01

    The American Psychiatric Association (APA) working group on Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) proposed the inclusion of four new impulsivity symptoms. However, they were not included in DSM-5 due to the lack of sufficient evidence. The aim of this study is to investigate the performance of the proposed four ADHD impulsivity symptoms with respect to: (a) ADHD factor structure; (b) performance in predicting clinical impairment; (c) specificity for ADHD diagnosis and (d) best symptomatic threshold to predict clinical impairment. The sample comprised 416 children (31 ADHD subjects according to both DSM-IV and proposed DSM-5, 20 ADHD subjects according to just one diagnostic system and 365 controls) from 12 schools. Diagnoses were derived using semi-structured interviews and ADHD rating scales. Results from confirmatory factor analysis indicate that addition of the four new impulsivity items provided a slightly better factor structure if compared to models including only 18 items. Regression analyses showed that only one of the new impulsivity symptoms (impatient) was part of the list of best predictors of impairment. None of the four new impulsivity items was specifically associated with ADHD diagnosis. The best cutoff point in the hyperactivity/impulsivity dimension for predicting impairment did not change significantly. Overall, our findings suggest that the determination on how to best capture impulsivity dimension as part of the ADHD construct needs more investigation and that there is not enough evidence to include these four assessed impulsivity symptoms as part of the ADHD criteria.

  8. The Relationship Between Impulsivity And Problem Gambling In Adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Secades-Villa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gambling has become one of the most frequently reported addictive behaviors among young people. Understanding risk factors associated with the onset or maintenance of gambling problems in adolescence has implications for its prevention and treatment. The main aim of the present study was to examine the potential relationships between impulsivity and problem gambling in adolescence. Participants were 874 high school students (average age: 15 years old who were surveyed to provide data on gambling and impulsivity. Self-reported gambling behavior was assessed using the South Oaks Gambling Screen – Revised for Adolescents (SOGS-RA and impulsivity was measured using the Impulsive Sensation Seeking Questionnaire (ZKPQ, the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11-A, and a delay discounting task. The data were analyzed using both a prospective-longitudinal and a cross-sectional design. In the longitudinal analyses, results showed that the impulsivity subscale of the ZKPQ increased the risk of problem gambling (p =.003. In the cross-sectional analyses, all the impulsivity measures were higher in at-risk/problem gamblers than in non-problem gamblers (p = .04; .03 and .01 respectively. These findings further support the relationship between impulsivity and gambling in adolescence. Moreover, our findings suggest a bidirectional relationship between impulsivity and problem gambling in adolescence. These results have consequences for the development of prevention and treatment programs for adolescents with gambling problems.

  9. PIV applied to landslide generated impulse waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, H.M. [Swiss Federal Inst. of Tech. (ETH), Zurich (CH). Lab. of Hydraulics, Hydrology and Glaciology (VAW)

    2002-07-01

    Large scale digital particle image velocimetry (PIV) and laser speckle velocimetry (LSV) are applied to landslide generated impulse waves. The challenges posed to the measurement techniques in an extremely unsteady three phase flow consisting of granular matter, air and water are considered. Areas of interest up to 0.8 m by 0.8 m are investigated in the impulse wave generation zone. The complex flow phenomena present in the first stage of impulse wave initiation are: High speed granular slide impact, impulse flux transfer, flow separation and reattachment, cavity formation and collapse, slide deformation and penetration into fluid. During this first stage the three phases are separated along sharp interfaces changing significantly within time and space. A combined analysis method for PIV in water flow and LSV on the corona of the landslide surface is presented. Digital masking techniques are applied to distinguish between phases thereafter allowing phase separated image processing. The combination of PIV and LSV reveals insight into the impulse transfer mechanism. Applicability of PIV at large scale as well as to flows with large velocity gradients due to the presence of a strong shock are highlighted. (orig.)

  10. The Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna ultra-high energy neutrino detector: Design, performance, and sensitivity for 2006-2007 balloon flight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorham, P. W. [Univ. of Hawaii, Manoa, HI (United States); Allison, P. [Univ. of Hawaii, Manoa, HI (United States); Barwick, S. W. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Beatty, J. J. [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Besson, D. Z. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Binns, W. R. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Chen, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Chen, P. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Clem, J. M. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Connolly, A. [Univ. College London, London (United Kingdom); Dowkontt, P. F. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); DuVernois, M. A. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Field, R. C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Goldstein, D. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Goodhue, A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Hast, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hebert, C. L. [Univ. of Hawaii, Manoa, HI (United States); Hoover, S. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Israel, M. H. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Learned, J. G. [Univ. of Hawaii, Manoa, HI (United States). et al.

    2009-05-23

    In this article, we present a comprehensive report on the experimental details of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) long-duration balloon payload, including the design philosophy and realization, physics simulations, performance of the instrument during its first Antarctic flight completed in January of 2007, and expectations for the limiting neutrino detection sensitivity.

  11. Multiphase clock generators with controlled clock impulse width for programmable high order rotator SC FIR filters realized in 0.35 μm CMOS technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlugosz, Rafal; Pawlowski, Pawel; Dabrowski, Adam

    2005-06-01

    Complexity of clock generator is one of the most important parameters in the design and optimization of switched-capacitor (SC) finite impulse response (FIR) filters. There are different SC FIR filter architectures. Some of them need a simple clock generator but the others require a quite complicated multiphase clock system. In the latter case an external clock system (i.e., outside the integrated circuit) is unrealistic because of a great number of the required external pins. We have implemented various SC FIR filter architectures together with complex internal clock generators in the CMOS 0.8 μm and 0.35 μm technologies. One of the most important problems in the design process was the optimization of waveforms and widths of the clock impulses. SC FIR filters are very sensitive to parameters of clock systems. Thus the clock generators must be designed very precisely. We demonstrate results of the design of the 64-phase clock generator for a programmable rotator SC FIR filter. In our approach the width of the clock impulses is controlled by two external signals. This is a very convenient solution, because optimization of the clock impulses, which was difficult in other approaches, is currently much easier. The internal clock generator area is ca. 0.15 mm2 in the CMOS 0.35 μm technology, i.e., only 7 % of the entire SC FIR filter chip area.

  12. High-intensity drying processes -- Impulse drying: Report 15 (final report). Production of linerboard on a pilot paper machine, subsequent commercial converting trials and preliminary economic assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orloff, D.I.

    1999-04-01

    In September 1998, 33{number_sign} liner was produced on the {number_sign}4 pilot machine under both single-felted wet pressing and impulse drying conditions. In October 1998, the pilot produced liner and commercial liner were converted to combined board and corrugated boxes at a commercial box plant. In January 1999, linerboard, medium, and combined board and box testing were completed. The pilot trials demonstrated that 33{number_sign} liner could be impulse dried at a reel speed of 380 m/min. Press dryness was improved by as much as 4 points, while CD STFI and CD ring crush were improved by more than 10%. Improvements to the smoothness of heated side of sheet were also realized. Commercial box plant converting trials demonstrated that impulse dried linerboard can be used to increase ECT and box compression strength by as much as 10%. As anticipated, print quality was found to be superior. A preliminary economic analysis was performed in which an impulse dryer would increase press dryness by 4 points and would allow the basis weight to be reduced by 10%. The economic model showed that the 4 points in dryness would translate to a 17% tonnage increase. Applying the 10% basis weight reduction resulted in an increase in productivity, on an area basis, of 30%. The pulp cost savings was found to outweigh any additional electric power costs.

  13. Trait impulsive choice predicts resistance to extinction and propensity to relapse to cocaine seeking: a bidirectional investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broos, Nienke; Diergaarde, Leontien; Schoffelmeer, Anton Nm; Pattij, Tommy; De Vries, Taco J

    2012-05-01

    Despite the strong association between impulsivity and addiction in humans, it is still a matter of debate whether impulsive choice predisposes to, or results from, drug dependence. Furthermore, it is unknown whether treating impulsivity can protect against relapse propensity. Therefore, this study explored the bidirectional relationship between impulsive choice and cocaine taking and seeking in rat behavioral models. In experiment 1, to determine whether impulsive choice predisposes to cocaine taking or seeking, rats were selected based on trait impulsivity in a delayed reward task and subsequently compared on various stages of cocaine self-administration (SA). To examine the consequence of cocaine intake on impulsive choice, impulsivity was monitored once a week throughout various stages of cocaine SA. To determine whether treating impulsive choice can protect against relapse propensity, in experiment 2, impulsive choice was manipulated by pharmacological interventions and cocaine-associated contextual cues. Trait impulsive choice as determined in experiment 1 predicted high extinction resistance and enhanced propensity to context-induced relapse in the cocaine SA model, whereas cocaine intake did not alter impulsive choice. Furthermore, acute changes in impulsive choice were not related to rates of context-induced relapse. Taken together, the current data indicate that trait impulsive choice predicts persistent cocaine seeking during extinction and enhanced propensity to relapse, whereas acute manipulations of impulsive choice had no favorable outcomes on relapse measures. These observations suggest that trait impulsivity can be used as a predictive factor for addiction liability, but treating this impulsivity does not necessarily protect against relapse.

  14. Trait Impulsive Choice Predicts Resistance to Extinction and Propensity to Relapse to Cocaine Seeking: A Bidirectional Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broos, Nienke; Diergaarde, Leontien; Schoffelmeer, Anton NM; Pattij, Tommy; De Vries, Taco J

    2012-01-01

    Despite the strong association between impulsivity and addiction in humans, it is still a matter of debate whether impulsive choice predisposes to, or results from, drug dependence. Furthermore, it is unknown whether treating impulsivity can protect against relapse propensity. Therefore, this study explored the bidirectional relationship between impulsive choice and cocaine taking and seeking in rat behavioral models. In experiment 1, to determine whether impulsive choice predisposes to cocaine taking or seeking, rats were selected based on trait impulsivity in a delayed reward task and subsequently compared on various stages of cocaine self-administration (SA). To examine the consequence of cocaine intake on impulsive choice, impulsivity was monitored once a week throughout various stages of cocaine SA. To determine whether treating impulsive choice can protect against relapse propensity, in experiment 2, impulsive choice was manipulated by pharmacological interventions and cocaine-associated contextual cues. Trait impulsive choice as determined in experiment 1 predicted high extinction resistance and enhanced propensity to context-induced relapse in the cocaine SA model, whereas cocaine intake did not alter impulsive choice. Furthermore, acute changes in impulsive choice were not related to rates of context-induced relapse. Taken together, the current data indicate that trait impulsive choice predicts persistent cocaine seeking during extinction and enhanced propensity to relapse, whereas acute manipulations of impulsive choice had no favorable outcomes on relapse measures. These observations suggest that trait impulsivity can be used as a predictive factor for addiction liability, but treating this impulsivity does not necessarily protect against relapse. PMID:22318198

  15. Oscillatory activity in the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens correlates with impulsivity and reward outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A Donnelly

    Full Text Available Actions expressed prematurely without regard for their consequences are considered impulsive. Such behaviour is governed by a network of brain regions including the prefrontal cortex (PFC and nucleus accumbens (NAcb and is prevalent in disorders including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD and drug addiction. However, little is known of the relationship between neural activity in these regions and specific forms of impulsive behaviour. In the present study we investigated local field potential (LFP oscillations in distinct sub-regions of the PFC and NAcb on a 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT, which measures sustained, spatially-divided visual attention and action restraint. The main findings show that power in gamma frequency (50-60 Hz LFP oscillations transiently increases in the PFC and NAcb during both the anticipation of a cue signalling the spatial location of a nose-poke response and again following correct responses. Gamma oscillations were coupled to low-frequency delta oscillations in both regions; this coupling strengthened specifically when an error response was made. Theta (7-9 Hz LFP power in the PFC and NAcb increased during the waiting period and was also related to response outcome. Additionally, both gamma and theta power were significantly affected by upcoming premature responses as rats waited for the visual cue to respond. In a subgroup of rats showing persistently high levels of impulsivity we found that impulsivity was associated with increased error signals following a nose-poke response, as well as reduced signals of previous trial outcome during the waiting period. Collectively, these in-vivo neurophysiological findings further implicate the PFC and NAcb in anticipatory impulsive responses and provide evidence that abnormalities in the encoding of rewarding outcomes may underlie trait-like impulsive behaviour.

  16. External eating mediates the relationship between impulsivity and unhealthy food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakoschke, Naomi; Kemps, Eva; Tiggemann, Marika

    2015-08-01

    Recent evidence from the eating domain shows a link between impulsivity and unhealthy food intake. However, the mechanism underlying this relationship remains unclear. One possibility is an external eating style, which has been linked to both impulsivity and food intake. The current study investigated the potential mediating role of external eating in the relationship between impulsivity and food intake. Participants were 146 undergraduate women who completed measures of impulsivity and external eating, and took part in a laboratory taste test as a behavioural index of unhealthy snack food intake. It was found that attentional and motor impulsivity interacted in predicting sweet food intake, but only motor impulsivity predicted both external eating and sweet food intake. Furthermore, the relationship between motor impulsivity and food intake was mediated by external eating. These findings support the development of interventions aimed at targeting specific aspects of impulsivity in order to reduce unhealthy eating behaviour. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Preparation of Labeled Aflatoxins with High Specific Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, D. P. H.; Mateles, R. I.

    1971-01-01

    Resting cells of Aspergillus parasiticus ATCC 15517 were used to prepare highly labeled aflatoxins from labeled acetate. High synthetic activity in growing cells was evidenced only during 40 to 70 hr of incubation. Glucose was required for high incorporation efficiency, whereas the concentration of the labeled acetate determined the specific activity of the product. When labeled acetate was continuously added to maintain a concentration near but not exceeding 10 mm, in a culture containing 30 g of glucose per liter, 2% of its labels could be recovered in the purified aflatoxins which have a specific activity more than three times that of the labeled acetate. PMID:4329435

  18. Individual differences in impulsivity predict anticipatory eye movements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia Cirilli

    Full Text Available Impulsivity is the tendency to act without forethought. It is a personality trait commonly used in the diagnosis of many psychiatric diseases. In clinical practice, impulsivity is estimated using written questionnaires. However, answers to questions might be subject to personal biases and misinterpretations. In order to alleviate this problem, eye movements could be used to study differences in decision processes related to impulsivity. Therefore, we investigated correlations between impulsivity scores obtained with a questionnaire in healthy subjects and characteristics of their anticipatory eye movements in a simple smooth pursuit task. Healthy subjects were asked to answer the UPPS questionnaire (Urgency Premeditation Perseverance and Sensation seeking Impulsive Behavior scale, which distinguishes four independent dimensions of impulsivity: Urgency, lack of Premeditation, lack of Perseverance, and Sensation seeking. The same subjects took part in an oculomotor task that consisted of pursuing a target that moved in a predictable direction. This task reliably evoked anticipatory saccades and smooth eye movements. We found that eye movement characteristics such as latency and velocity were significantly correlated with UPPS scores. The specific correlations between distinct UPPS factors and oculomotor anticipation parameters support the validity of the UPPS construct and corroborate neurobiological explanations for impulsivity. We suggest that the oculomotor approach of impulsivity put forth in the present study could help bridge the gap between psychiatry and physiology.

  19. Individual Differences in Impulsivity Predict Anticipatory Eye Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirilli, Laetitia; de Timary, Philippe; Lefèvre, Phillipe; Missal, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Impulsivity is the tendency to act without forethought. It is a personality trait commonly used in the diagnosis of many psychiatric diseases. In clinical practice, impulsivity is estimated using written questionnaires. However, answers to questions might be subject to personal biases and misinterpretations. In order to alleviate this problem, eye movements could be used to study differences in decision processes related to impulsivity. Therefore, we investigated correlations between impulsivity scores obtained with a questionnaire in healthy subjects and characteristics of their anticipatory eye movements in a simple smooth pursuit task. Healthy subjects were asked to answer the UPPS questionnaire (Urgency Premeditation Perseverance and Sensation seeking Impulsive Behavior scale), which distinguishes four independent dimensions of impulsivity: Urgency, lack of Premeditation, lack of Perseverance, and Sensation seeking. The same subjects took part in an oculomotor task that consisted of pursuing a target that moved in a predictable direction. This task reliably evoked anticipatory saccades and smooth eye movements. We found that eye movement characteristics such as latency and velocity were significantly correlated with UPPS scores. The specific correlations between distinct UPPS factors and oculomotor anticipation parameters support the validity of the UPPS construct and corroborate neurobiological explanations for impulsivity. We suggest that the oculomotor approach of impulsivity put forth in the present study could help bridge the gap between psychiatry and physiology. PMID:22046334

  20. Murine High Specificity/Sensitivity Competitive Europium Insulin Autoantibody Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaya, Naru; Liu, Edwin; Miao, DongMei; Li, Marcella; Yu, Liping

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Most insulin autoantibody assays for both human and animal models are in a radioassay format utilizing 125I-insulin, but despite the radioassay format international workshops have documented difficulty in standardization between laboratories. There is thus a need for simpler assay formats that do not utilize radioactivity, yet retain the high specificity and sensitivity of radioassays. Methods To establish an easier enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for insulin autoantibodies of non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, we used an ELISA format, competition with unlabeled insulin, europium-avidin, and time-resolved fluorescence detection (competitive europium insulin autoantibody assay). Results The competitive europium assay of insulin autoantibodies when applied to sera from NOD mice had high sensitivity and specificity (92% sensitivity, 100% specificity) compared to our standard insulin autoantibody radioassay (72% sensitivity, 100% specificity) in analyzing blind workshop sera. It is noteworthy that though the assay has extremely high sensitivity for murine insulin autoantibodies and utilizes human insulin as target autoantigen, human sera with high levels of insulin autoantibodies are not detected. Conclusions Our results clearly indicate that low levels of insulin autoantibodies can be detected in an ELISA-like format. Combining a europium-based ELISA with competition with fluid-phase autoantigen can be applicable to many autoantigens to achieve high specificity and sensitivity in an ELISA format. PMID:19344197

  1. Food-Related Impulsivity in Obesity and Binge Eating Disorder—A Systematic Update of the Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin E. Giel

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The specific eating pattern of Binge Eating Disorder (BED patients has provoked the assumption that BED might represent a phenotype within the obesity spectrum that is characterized by increased impulsivity. Following the guidelines of the PRISMA statement (preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses, we here provide a systematic update on the evidence on food-related impulsivity in obese individuals, with and without BED, as well as normal-weight individuals. We separately analyzed potential group differences in the impulsivity components of reward sensitivity and rash-spontaneous behavior. Our search resulted in twenty experimental studies with high methodological quality. The synthesis of the latest evidence consolidates conclusions drawn in our initial systematic review that BED represents a distinct phenotype within the obesity spectrum that is characterized by increased impulsivity. Rash-spontaneous behavior in general, and specifically towards food, is increased in BED, while food-specific reward sensitivity is also increased in obese individuals without BED, but potentially to a lesser degree. A major next step for research entails the investigation of sub-domains and temporal components of inhibitory control in BED and obesity. Based on the evidence of impaired inhibitory control in BED, affected patients might profit from interventions that address impulsive behavior.

  2. Impulse Detectors for Noised Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Lukac

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on a problem of impulse detection in thedynamic image environments corrupted by impulse noise. Using a proposedarchitecture that includes an impulse detector and the median filter,the effective methods can be designed. Thus, the image points areclassified into two classes such as a class of noise free samples and aclass of noised image points. In the case of impulse detection theestimate is performed by a median filter whereas a noise free sample ispassed on the output without the change i.e. system works as anidentity filter.

  3. Mathematical Modeling of Impulsive Forming Processes Using Various Energy Sources and Transmitting Medium

    OpenAIRE

    Sabelkin, V.; Taran, V.; Vovk, A.; Vovk, V. (Vitaliy)

    2006-01-01

    High-speed forming uses high explosives, gun powder, combustible gas mixes and compressed gases as sources of energy. Special mathematical models are used to take into account specific dynamic properties. Different technological processes of forming have been modeled in the work. They use liquid (water), elastic (polyurethane), and gaseous transmitting medium. The difference between impulse energy transference, load distribution on a blank and tool surface, and also wave propagation is sho...

  4. Recent Insights into the Neurobiology of Impulsivity

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Marci R.; Marc N Potenza

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is associated with various psychopathologies, and elevated impulsivity is typically disadvantageous. This manuscript reviews recent investigations into the neurobiology of impulsivity using human imaging techniques and animal models. Both human imaging and preclinical pharmacological manipulations have yielded important insights into the neurobiological underpinnings of impulsivity. A more thorough understanding of the complex neurobiology underlying aspects of impulsivity may pro...

  5. Impulse Noise Injury Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Philemon; Ho, Kevin; Ryan, Allen F

    2016-05-01

    The new Auditory 4.0 model has been developed for the assessment of auditory outcomes, expressed as temporary threshold shift (TTS) and permanent threshold shift (PTS), from exposures to impulse noise for unprotected ears, including the prediction of TTS recovery. Auditory 4.0 is an empirical model, constructed from test data collected from chinchillas exposed to impulse noise in the laboratory. Injury outcomes are defined as TTS and PTS, and Auditory 4.0 provides the full range of TTS and PTS dose-response curves with the risk factor constructed from A-weighted sound exposure level. Human data from large weapons noise exposure was also used to guide the development of the recovery model. Guided by data, a 28-dBA shift was applied to the dose-response curves to account for the scaling from chinchillas to humans. Historical data from rifle noise tests were used to validate the dose-response curves. New chinchilla tests were performed to collect recovery data to construct the TTS recovery model. Auditory 4.0 is the only model known to date that provides the full TTS and PTS dose-response curves, including a TTS recovery model. The model shows good agreement with historical data. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  6. Specific Impulses Losses in Solid Propellant Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-12-17

    spectropyrometer enables the mean temperature of the particles to be found and infra- red emission to be measured; from this one deduces the gas temper...corresponds to phase equilibrium, we study the evolucion of velocity and temperature of the particles in this flow. We can thus calculate the inter-phase

  7. Temperamental components of impulsivity in ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Lipowska

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the above research was to identify the temperamental profile differentiating children with diagnosed ADHD from their friends who are not affected by developmental deficiency. Moreover, the objective was to examine whether the temperamental profile of hyperactive children can be characterized by the same specific configuration of traits. Material and method: The experimental group comprised 63 children with diagnosed ADHD (32 girls and 31 boys. The control group consisted of children without any diagnosed developmental deficiency (37 girls and 30 boys in the age adequate to the research group (control group aged M=11.5; SD=0.9; ADHD children aged M=11.6; SD=0.4. Temperamental profile was evaluated by means of Buss and Plomin EAS-C Temperament Questionnaire, Polish version adapted by Oniszczenko (1997 and evaluated by parents and teachers. The severity of symptoms criterial for ADHD was described with the use of Wolańczyk and Kołakowski Questionnaire for diagnosing ADHD and behavioural disorders (2005. Results: Correlates were found between the severity of ADHD symptoms and the child’s specific temperamental profile. In case of hyperactive children, teachers ranked shyness significantly higher (t=-5.2; p=0.000, whereas parents ranked emotionality higher (t=5.1; p=0.000. In both examined groups the activity level was estimated as average and high (6-7 sten. It appeared that the trait differentiating the temperamental profile of children from both groups was emotionality – a higher level of this trait was indicated both by parents (t=8.6; p=0.000 and teachers (t=6.4; p=0.000. As far as the relation between particular temperamental traits and criterial ADHD dimensions is concerned, a correlation was found between emotionality and impulsivity (r=3.4; p=0.008 and hyperactivity (r=3.5; p=0.007 in parents’ evaluation and impulsivity (r=3.6; p=0.004 in teachers’ perception. Moreover, the teachers also emphasised the correlation

  8. Impulsivity and self-harm in adolescence: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Joanna; Daley, David; Townsend, Ellen; Sayal, Kapil

    2017-04-01

    Research supports an association between impulsivity and self-harm, yet inconsistencies in methodology across studies have complicated understanding of this relationship. This systematic review examines the association between impulsivity and self-harm in community-based adolescents aged 11-25 years and aims to integrate findings according to differing concepts and methods. Electronic searches of EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsychINFO, CINAHL, PubMed and The Cochrane Library, and manual searches of reference lists of relevant reviews identified 4496 articles published up to July 2015, of which 28 met inclusion criteria. Twenty-four of the studies reported an association between broadly specified impulsivity and self-harm. However, findings varied according to the conception and measurement of impulsivity and the precision with which self-harm behaviours were specified. Specifically, lifetime non-suicidal self-injury was most consistently associated with mood-based impulsivity-related traits. However, cognitive facets of impulsivity (relating to difficulties maintaining focus or acting without forethought) differentiated current self-harm from past self-harm. These facets also distinguished those with thoughts of self-harm (ideation) from those who acted on thoughts (enaction). The findings suggested that mood-based impulsivity is related to the initiation of self-harm, while cognitive facets of impulsivity are associated with the maintenance of self-harm. In addition, behavioural impulsivity is most relevant to self-harm under conditions of negative affect. Collectively, the findings indicate that distinct impulsivity facets confer unique risks across the life-course of self-harm. From a clinical perspective, the review suggests that interventions focusing on reducing rash reactivity to emotions or improving self-regulation and decision making may offer most benefit in supporting those who self-harm.

  9. Effects of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant on distinct measures of impulsive behavior in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pattij, Tommy; Janssen, Mieke; Schepers, Inga; González-Cuevas, Gustavo; Vries, de Taco; Schoffelmeer, Anton

    2007-01-01

    Rationale Pathological impulsivity is a prominent feature in several psychiatric disorders, but detailed understanding of the specific neuronal processes underlying impulsive behavior is as yet lacking. Objectives As recent findings have suggested involvement of the brain cannabinoid

  10. High Thrust Efficiency MPD Thruster Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters can provide the high-specific impulse, high-power propulsion required to support human and robotic exploration missions to the...

  11. Heroin and amphetamine users display opposite relationships between trait and neurobehavioral dimensions of impulsivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassileva, Jasmin; Paxton, Jessica; Moeller, F. Gerard; Wilson, Michael; Bozgunov, Kiril; Martin, Eileen; Gonzalez, Raul; Vasilev, Georgi

    2014-01-01

    The multidimensional construct of impulsivity is implicated in all phases of the addiction cycle. Substance dependent individuals (SDIs) demonstrate elevated impulsivity on both trait and laboratory tests of neurobehavioral impulsivity; however our understanding of the relationship between these different aspects of impulsivity in users of different classes of drugs remains rudimentary. The goal of this study was to assess for commonalities and differences in the relationships between trait and neurobehavioral impulsivity in heroin and amphetamine addicts. Participants included 58 amphetamine dependent (ADI) and 74 heroin dependent individuals (HDI) in protracted abstinence. We conducted principal components analyses (PCA) on two self-report trait and six neurobehavioral measures of impulsivity, which resulted in two trait impulsivity (action, planning) and four neurobehavioral impulsivity composites (discriminability, response inhibition efficiency, decision-making efficiency, quality of decision-making). Multiple regression analyses were used to determine whether neurobehavioral impulsivity is predicted by trait impulsivity and drug type. The analyses revealed a significant interaction between drug type and trait action impulsivity on response inhibition efficiency, which showed opposite relationships for ADIs and HDIs. Specifically, increased trait action impulsivity was associated with worse response inhibition efficiency in ADIs, but with better efficiency in HDIs. These results challenge the unitary account of drug addiction and contribute to a growing body of literature that reveals important behavioral, cognitive, and neurobiological differences between users of different classes of drugs. PMID:24342174

  12. Recent Insights into the Neurobiology of Impulsivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Marci R.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is associated with various psychopathologies, and elevated impulsivity is typically disadvantageous. This manuscript reviews recent investigations into the neurobiology of impulsivity using human imaging techniques and animal models. Both human imaging and preclinical pharmacological manipulations have yielded important insights into the neurobiological underpinnings of impulsivity. A more thorough understanding of the complex neurobiology underlying aspects of impulsivity may provide insight into new treatment options that target elevated impulsivity and psychopathologies such as addictions. PMID:25431750

  13. High specificity in plant leaf metabolic responses to arbuscular mycorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, Rabea; Baier, Markus C; Persicke, Marcus; Müller, Caroline

    2014-05-22

    The chemical composition of plants (phytometabolome) is dynamic and modified by environmental factors. Understanding its modulation allows to improve crop quality and decode mechanisms underlying plant-pest interactions. Many studies that investigate metabolic responses to the environment focus on single model species and/or few target metabolites. However, comparative studies using environmental metabolomics are needed to evaluate commonalities of chemical responses to certain challenges. We assessed the specificity of foliar metabolic responses of five plant species to the widespread, ancient symbiosis with a generalist arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus. Here we show that plant species share a large 'core metabolome' but nevertheless the phytometabolomes are modulated highly species/taxon-specifically. Such a low conservation of responses across species highlights the importance to consider plant metabolic prerequisites and the long time of specific plant-fungus coevolution. Thus, the transferability of findings regarding phytometabolome modulation by an identical AM symbiont is severely limited even between closely related species.

  14. Accelerator Production and Separations for High Specific Activity Rhenium-186

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurisson, Silvia S. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Wilbur, D. Scott [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Tungsten and osmium targets were evaluated for the production of high specific activity rhenium-186. Rhenium-186 has potential applications in radiotherapy for the treatment of a variety of diseases, including targeting with monoclonal antibodies and peptides. Methods were evaluated using tungsten metal, tungsten dioxide, tungsten disulfide and osmium disulfide. Separation of the rhenium-186 produced and recycling of the enriched tungsten-186 and osmium-189 enriched targets were developed.

  15. Impulsivity is relevant for trauma exposure and PTSD symptoms in a non-clinical population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netto, Liana R; Pereira, Juliana L; Nogueira, José F; Cavalcanti-Ribeiro, Patrícia; Santana, Rejane Conceição; Teles, Carlos A; Koenen, Karestan C; Quarantini, Lucas C

    2016-05-30

    Impulsivity is a relevant construct for explaining both normal individual differences in personality and more extreme personality disorder, and is often investigated within clinical populations. This study aims to explore the college students' impulsivity patterns and to investigate the association across levels of impulsivity with trauma exposure and PTSD development in a non-clinical population. A one-phase census survey of seven college institutions assessed 2213 students in three metropolitan regions of Northeastern Brazil. All subjects anonymously completed a self-applied protocol consisting of: a socio-demographic questionnaire, Trauma History Questionnaire (THQ), PTSD Checklist (PCL-C), and Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11). The median for frequency of trauma exposure was 4 events for people with low and normal impulsivity, and 6 for highly impulsive ones. Individuals with higher impulsivity presented earlier exposition than non-impulsive ones, and worst outcome: 12.4% with PTSD, against 8.4% and 2.3% (normal and low impulsivity). Of the three factors of impulsivity, the Attentional factor conferred the strongest association with PTSD development. Results suggest that impulsivity is also a relevant trait in a non-clinical population and is associated with trauma exposure and PTSD. Strategies to promote mental health in adolescents may be pertinent, especially with the aim of managing impulsivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Impulsivity, gender, and the platelet serotonin transporter in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Marazziti

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Donatella Marazziti, Stefano Baroni, Irene Masala, Francesca Golia, Giorgio Consoli, Gabriele Massimetti, Michela Picchetti, Mario Catena Dell’Osso, Gino Giannaccini, Laura Betti, Antonio Lucacchini, Antonio CiapparelliDipartimento di Psichiatria, Neurobiologia, Farmacologia e Biotecnologie, University of Pisa, Pisa, ItalyAbstract: The present study explored the possible relationships between impulsivity, gender, and a peripheral serotonergic marker, the platelet serotonin (5-HT transporter (SERT, in a group of 32 healthy subjects. The impulsivity was measured by means of the Barratt Impulsivity Scale, version 11 (BIS-11, a widely used self-report questionnaire, and the platelet SERT was evaluated by means of the specific binding of 3H-paroxetine (3H-Par to platelet membranes, according to standardized protocols. The results showed that women had a higher BIS-11 total score than men, and also higher scores of two factors of the same scale: the motor impulsivity and the cognitive complexity. The analysis of the correlations revealed that the density of the SERT proteins, as measured by the maximum binding capacity (Bmax of 3H-Par, was significantly and positively related to the cognitive complexity factor, but only in men. Men showed also a significant and negative correlation with the dissociation constant, Kd, of (3H-Par binding, and the motor impulsivity factor. These findings suggest that women are generally more impulsive than men, but that the 5-HT system is more involved in the impulsivity of men than in that of women.Keywords: impulsivity, gender, serotonin transporter, Barratt Impulsivity Scale, platelets, 3H-paroxetine

  17. Temperament and impulsivity predictors of smoking cessation outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca López-Torrecillas

    respectively. CONCLUSION: Temperament measures, and specifically novelty seeking and reward dependence, predict smoking cessation treatment retention, whereas persistence, non-planning impulsivity and poor decision-making predict smoking relapse.

  18. "Impulsivity": relations between self-report and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Leigh; Kohl, Krista; Morgan, Theresa A; Clark, Lee Anna

    2013-03-01

    The trait of "impulsivity" is difficult to place within a personality framework due to the many potential pathways to impulsive behavior and the lack of consensus regarding the structure of the trait(s). This lack of consensus also hinders systematic investigation into relations between "impulsivity" and its behavioral manifestations. Undergraduates (Sample 1 N = 507) completed a battery of self-report measures, all purporting to assess trait "impulsivity"; a subset (n = 408) and Sample 2 (N = 388) also completed a retrospective questionnaire about specific behaviors they may have engaged in over the past year, and another subset of Sample 1 agreed to complete (n = 208) and actually completed (n = 152) a 2-week prospective measure of impulsive behaviors. Finally, a subset of Sample 1 (n = 321) and Sample 2 completed an omnibus self-report inventory in a follow-up study. Structural equation modeling confirmed a 3-factor structure of what we call impulsigenic traits-traits that are manifested in impulsive behavior. This finding is consistent with previous research and supports the growing consensus that "impulsivity" is a colloquial label attached to a group of distinct traits that have phenotypically similar behavioral manifestations. Each of these impulsigenic traits relates differentially to impulsive behavior and to broad temperamental dimensions. The results also show clear 2-factor structures of both daily and less frequent (yearly/semiyearly) impulsive behaviors. Finally, a unique method of data collection permitted an investigation of relations between the impulsigenic and other personality traits and observed behaviors, demonstrating the predictive utility of personality traits to discrete, in situ behaviors. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  19. Control yourself: alcohol and impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potenza, Marc N; de Wit, Harriet

    2010-08-01

    Impulsivity represents a complex, multifaceted construct with relevance to alcohol use, abuse, and dependence. Researchers are refining the definitions and assessment of different subtypes of impulsive behavior and relating these to the causes and consequences of alcohol-related behaviors and disorders. A satellite symposium on alcohol and impulsivity was held at the 2009 convention of the Research Society on Alcoholism. This article provides an overview of the rationale for the symposium, a synopsis of review and original research articles emanating from the symposium, and a description of the implications of the work and possible future research directions.

  20. Towards Ultrahigh Speed Impulse Radio THz Wireless Communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Xianbin; Galili, Michael; Morioka, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    evaluate the realistic throughput and accessible wireless range of a THz impulse radio communication link based on a uni-travelling photodiode (UTC-PD) as THz emitter and a photoconductive antenna (PCA) as THz receiver. The impact of highly frequency-selective THz channel and the noise in the system......THz impulse radio technologies promise a new paradigm of fast wireless access with simplified wireless reception. However, huge loss of propagating broad bandwidth THz impulse radio signals limits THz wireless transmission distance and reduces the achievable link data rates. In this paper, we...

  1. Impulsive Control of Memristive Chaotic Systems with Impulsive Time Window

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FuLi Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of impulsive control for memristor-based chaotic circuit systems with impulsive time windows is investigated. Based on comparison principle, several novel criteria which guarantee the asymptotic stabilization of the memristor-based chaotic circuit systems are obtained. In comparison with previous results, the present results are easily verified. Numerical simulations are given to further illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  2. To Take the Stairs or Not to Take the Stairs? Employing the Reflective–Impulsive Model to Predict Spontaneous Physical Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Daou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The reflective–impulsive model (RIM has been employed to explain various health behaviors. The present study used RIM to predict a spontaneous physical activity behavior. Specifically, 107 participants (75 females; Mage = 20.6 years, SD = 1.92 years completed measures of (1 reflections about spontaneous physical activity, as indexed by self-report questionnaire; (2 impulse toward physical activity, as indexed by the manikin task; and (3 (state self-control, as indexed by the Stroop task. The dependent variable was whether participants took the stairs or the elevator to the study laboratory. Results revealed reflections toward spontaneous physical activity positively predicted stair-taking. Further, a significant impulse toward physical activity × self-control interaction was observed. This interaction revealed that participants with high self-control who had a high impulse toward PA were more likely to take the stairs than their counterparts with a low impulse toward PA, whereas the opposite was the case for participants with low self-control. However, the impulse × self-control interaction was not significant when employing a self-report measure of trait self-control. Thus, RIM may be a good framework with which to consider spontaneous physical activity, but careful consideration must be given when examining variables within RIM (e.g., the boundary condition of self-control.

  3. The five-factor model of impulsivity-like traits and emotional lability in aggressive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, Robert D; Pearson, Matthew R; Kuvaas, Nicholas J

    2013-01-01

    Factors that increase automatic psychological processes may result in impulsive action and, consequently, aggressive behavior. The current cross-sectional study examined the association between the five-factor model of impulsivity-like traits (negative urgency, positive urgency, premeditation, perseverance, and sensation seeking), emotional lability, and physically aggressive behaviors among college students (n = 481) in a negative binomial hurdle model. In the logistic portion of the model, emotional lability was related to a higher likelihood of engaging in aggressive acts in the past 6 months. The association between emotional lability and the likelihood of aggressive behavior was moderated by two impulsivity-like traits: negative urgency and positive urgency. Specifically, emotional lability was related to engaging in aggressive acts among those with high negative urgency, and among those with low positive urgency. In the count portion of the model, emotional lability was uniquely related to the number of aggressive acts in the past 6 months. Our results indicate that emotional lability and facets of impulsivity interactively relate to engagement in aggressive behavior, suggesting that these variables be integrated into models of aggression. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Vaporization and shock wave dynamics for impulse generation in laser propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinko, John

    A high-power carbon dioxide laser was used to ablate bulk liquid, polymer, and thin film targets. Time-resolved force sensing measurements, ballistic pendulum impulse measurements, and quantitative shadowgraph and Schlieren imaging techniques were used to study ablation. Propulsion parameters (including imparted impulse, momentum coupling coefficient, ablated mass, specific impulse, and internal efficiency) were measured for the materials when possible. In addition, a detailed examination was conducted as to the dependence of these parameters on the absorption depth of the materials, and on the thence at the target. An initial study was made on the scaling of the propulsion parameters with the ablated spot area. The effects of varying the thin film thickness on the impulse were also noted. A calibration technique for piezoelectric force sensors was developed using impacts of spheres on the sensors. Finally, a basic physical analysis of the propulsive quantities was made that raises questions about the standard interpretation of the dependence of the coupling coefficient on the fluence.

  5. Effect of management of patients with Anorexia and Bulimia nervosa on symptoms and impulsive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sernec, Karin; Tomori, Martina; Zalar, Bojan

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the study was to provide further and up to date information on the evaluation of the management of Anorexia and Bulimia nervosa at the Eating Disorders Unit (EDU) of the Ljubljana Psychiatric Clinic, based upon detailed assessment of the eating disorders specific and non specific symptoms of impulsive behaviors, highly correlated with these entities. 34 female patients with anorexia (restrictive or purgative type) and 38 female patients with Bulimia nervosa (purgative or non-purgative type) undergoing hospital treatment at the EDU were evaluated upon admission, as well as upon discharge and three and six months after discharge, using the Eating Disorder Questionnaire. Upon discharge a marked decrease in the overall symptoms was noted. The differences in symptoms incidences between the two groups were significantly specific for the individual form of eating disorder, especially upon admission, and were more pronounced in anorexia group. In later measurements, performed during the period of three and six months after discharge, a mild trend of increase in the disorder specific symptoms was detected in both groups, but was not statistically significant. In addition to binging on food, striking, quarreling and spending sprees are characteristics of patients with eating disorders, which in particular apply to the Bulimia nervosa group. Apart from the disorder specific symptoms, impulsive behavior was also reduced during study period, while the difference in its occurrence between the two groups gradually became non-significant. The management of patients with eating disorders at the EDU was successful in both groups, confirmed by an intense reduction of the disorder specific symptoms, impulsive behavior and increased stability recorded three and six months after discharge. The study strongly suggests that the effect of treatment regime for eating disorders can be predicted by careful assessment of the relevant symptoms and impulsive behavioral patterns.

  6. Training impulsive choices for healthy and sustainable food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veling, Harm; Chen, Zhang; Tombrock, Merel C; Verpaalen, Iris A M; Schmitz, Laura I; Dijksterhuis, Ap; Holland, Rob W

    2017-06-01

    Many people find it hard to change their dietary choices. Food choice often occurs impulsively, without deliberation, and it has been unclear whether impulsive food choice can be experimentally created. Across 3 exploratory and 2 confirmatory preregistered experiments we examined whether impulsive food choice can be trained. Participants were cued to make motor responses upon the presentation of, among others, healthy and sustainable food items. They subsequently selected these food items more often for actual consumption when they needed to make their choices impulsively as a result of time pressure. This effect disappeared when participants were asked to think about their choices, merely received more time to make their choices, or when choosing required attention to alternatives. Participants preferred high to low valued food items under time pressure and without time pressure, suggesting that the impulsive choices reflect valid preferences. These findings demonstrate that it is possible to train impulsive choices for food items while leaving deliberative choices for these items unaffected, and connect research on attention training to dual-process theories of decision making. The present research suggests that attention training may lead to behavioral change only when people behave impulsively. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. High efficiency cell-specific targeting of cytokine activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcin, Geneviève; Paul, Franciane; Staufenbiel, Markus; Bordat, Yann; van der Heyden, José; Wilmes, Stephan; Cartron, Guillaume; Apparailly, Florence; de Koker, Stefaan; Piehler, Jacob; Tavernier, Jan; Uzé, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Systemic toxicity currently prevents exploiting the huge potential of many cytokines for medical applications. Here we present a novel strategy to engineer immunocytokines with very high targeting efficacies. The method lies in the use of mutants of toxic cytokines that markedly reduce their receptor-binding affinities, and that are thus rendered essentially inactive. Upon fusion to nanobodies specifically binding to marker proteins, activity of these cytokines is selectively restored for cell populations expressing this marker. This ‘activity-by-targeting’ concept was validated for type I interferons and leptin. In the case of interferon, activity can be directed to target cells in vitro and to selected cell populations in mice, with up to 1,000-fold increased specific activity. This targeting strategy holds promise to revitalize the clinical potential of many cytokines.

  8. Lightcraft Impulse Measurements under Vacuum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schall, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    Under an EOARD contract, the DLR has conducted a series of comparative impulse measurements for two different lightcraft configurations with the same nozzle exit diameter of 10 cm: The German design (GL...

  9. US German Lightcraft Impulse Measurements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bonn, Willy

    2001-01-01

    .... In the second phase, he will measure the impulse coupling coefficient of a US supplied lightcraft on the DLR test stand for various laser pulse energies and will write a report discussing the results...

  10. The Neurobiology of Impulsive Aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Robert J R

    2016-02-01

    This selective review provides a model of the neurobiology of impulsive aggression from a cognitive neuroscience perspective. It is argued that prototypical cases of impulsive aggression, those associated with anger, involve the recruitment of the acute threat response system structures; that is, the amygdala, hypothalamus, and periaqueductal gray. It is argued that whether the recruitment of these structures results in impulsive aggression or not reflects the functional roles of ventromedial frontal cortex and dorsomedial frontal and anterior insula cortex in response selection. It is also argued that impulsive aggression may occur because of impaired decision making. The aggression may not be accompanied by anger, but it will reflect disrupted evaluation of the rewards/benefits of the action.

  11. Production of N-13 labeled compounds with high specific activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Sasaki, Motoji; Yoshida, Yuichiro; Haradahira, Terushi; Inoue, Osamu [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    Nitrogen-13 was produced by irradiating ultra pure water saturated with a pure gas (N2, O2, He, H2) with 18 MeV protons. Ion species generated by irradiation were analyzed with radio ion chromatography systems. An automated equipment was developed to synthesize anhydrous (13N)NH3 as a synthetic precursor and (13N)p-nitrophenyl carbamate ((13N)NPC) as a model compound, using the (13N)NH3. The radiochemical yield and specific activity of (13N)NPC was high enough to carry out the receptor study with PET. (author)

  12. The spatio-temporal structure of impulse-generated azimuthalsmall-scale Alfvén waves interacting with high-energy chargedparticles in the magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Klimushkin

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available It is assumed to date that the energy source of azimuthal small-scale ULF waves in the magnetosphere (azimuthal wave numbers m≧1 is provided by the energetic particles interacting with the waves through the bounce-drift resonance. In this paper we have solved the problem of the bounce-drift instability influence on the spatio-temporal structure of Alfvén waves excited by a source of the type of sudden impulse in a dipole-like magnetosphere. It is shown that the impulse-generated Alfvén oscillation within a time τ~m∕ΩTN (where ΩTN is the toroidal eigenfrequency is a poloidal one, and each field line oscillates with its own eigenfrequency that coincides with the poloidal frequency of a given L-shell. As time elapses, the wave becomes toroidally polarized because of the phase difference of the disturbance, and the oscillation frequency of field lines tends to the toroidal frequency. The drift-bounce instability growth rate becomes smaller during the wave temporal evolution, and the instability undergoes stabilization when the wave frequency coincides with the toroidal eigenfrequency. The total amplification of the wave can be estimated as , where is the wave growth rate at the beginning of the process, when it has its maximum value. The wave amplitude can increase only within a time ~τ, when it is poloidally polarized. After this time, when the wave becomes to be toroidally polarized, it goes damped because of the finite ionospheric conductivity. This is in qualitative agreement with the recent radar experimental data.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (MHD waves and instabilities. Space plasma physics (kinetic and MHD theory; wave-particle interactions

  13. Impulsivity, risk taking, and timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Ana A; Odum, Amy L

    2012-07-01

    This study examined the relations among measures of impulsivity and timing. Impulsivity was assessed using delay and probability discounting, and self-report impulsivity (as measured by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale; BIS-11). Timing was assessed using temporal perception as measured on a temporal bisection task and time perspective (as measured by the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory). One hundred and forty three college students completed these measures in a computer laboratory. The degree of delay discounting was positively correlated with the mean and range of the temporal bisection procedure. The degree of delay and probability discounting were also positively correlated. Self-reported motor impulsiveness on the BIS-11 was positively correlated with present hedonism and negatively correlated with future orientation on the ZTPI. Self-reported non-planning on the BIS-11 was positively correlated with fatalism on the ZTPI. These results show that people who overestimate the passage of time (perceive time as passing more quickly) hold less value in delayed rewards. They also confirm previous results regarding the relation between delay and probability discounting, as well as highlight similarities in self-report measures of impulsivity and time perspective. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Highly sensitive and specific radioimmunoassays for dihydroergotoxine components in plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradelles, P.; Collignon, F.

    1984-01-01

    The development of three analogous radioimmunoassay (RIA) procedures for dihydroergotoxine components is described. The antisera were produced by immunization of rabbits with immunogens obtained by coupling egg albumin to the indole group of each ergot alkaloid derivative. In each radioimmunoassay, antibodies do not cross-react more than 5% with the two other derivatives. The tracers iodinated with iodine 125 were prepared by the chloramine-T method and purified by thin layer chromatography. Both antibody affinity and high specific radioactivity of tracers allow a sensitive assay (detection limit less than 20 pg/ml) in human plasma. After high performance liquid chromatography of extracted plasma, immunoreactive materials other than those corresponding to the elution of the three dihydroergotoxine components were not detected. Two preliminary pharmacokinetic profiles obtained in dog and human for each derivative are shown.

  15. Saccadic entropy of head impulses in acute unilateral vestibular loss

    OpenAIRE

    Hsieh, Li-Chun; Lin, Hung-Ching; Lee, Guo-She

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the complexity of vestibular–ocular reflex (VOR) in patients with acute unilateral vestibular loss (AUVL) via entropy analysis of head impulses. Methods: Horizontal head impulse test (HIT) with high-velocity alternating directions was used to evaluate 12 participants with AUVL and 16 healthy volunteers. Wireless electro-oculography and electronic gyrometry were used to acquire eye positional signals and head velocity signals. The eye velocity signals were then obtained through ...

  16. The Effect of Implicit Preferences on Food Consumption: Moderating Role of Ego Depletion and Impulsivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Zhu, Jinglei; Hu, Yi; Fang, Yuan; Wang, Guosen; Cui, Xianghua; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Ego depletion has been found to moderate the effect of implicit preferences on food consumption, such that implicit preferences predict consumption only under a depleted state. The present study tested how trait impulsivity impacts the effect of implicit preferences on food consumption in a depleted condition. Trait impulsivity was measured by means of self-report and a stop signal task. Results showed that both self-reported impulsivity and behavioral impulsivity moderated the ‘depletion and then eating according to implicit preferences’ effect, albeit in different ways. Participants high in self-reported impulsivity and low in behavioral impulsivity were more vulnerable to the effect of depletion on eating. The implications of these results for extant theories are discussed. Future research is needed to verify whether or not trait impulsivity is associated with vulnerability to depletion across different self-control domains. PMID:27881966

  17. Self-reported tactics of impulse control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainslie, G

    1987-02-01

    Recent behavioral research has suggested that delayed incentives are discounted in a highly concave curve, which should produce temporary preference for the poorer of two alternatives when that alternative is available earlier than the better one. Unlike the psychoanalytic model of impulsiveness, the temporary preference model implies a rational need for people to forestall impulses by committing their choices in advance. A questionnaire elicited college students' and prisoners' self-reports of approval of four basic kinds of precommitting tactics as applied to 14 commonplace temptations. Endorsement of private rules as a precommitting device was correlated with self-reported compulsive personality traits and negatively correlated with endorsement of extra-psychic (social or physical) devices; the latter endorsement was correlated with self-reported oral/paranoid traits. Female subjects endorsed attention control as a precommitting device more than males, and male subjects endorsed extrapsychic devices more than females. The ego psychology of conflict may be practical at the conscious level.

  18. Impact of Impulse Stops on Pedestrian Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Kwak, Jaeyoung; Luttinen, Tapio; Kosonen, Iisakki

    2015-01-01

    We numerically study the impact of impulse stops on pedestrian flow for a straight corridor with multiple attractions. The impulse stop is simulated by the switching behavior model, a function of the social influence strength and the number of attendees near the attraction. When the pedestrian influx is low, one can observe a stable flow where attendees make a complete stop at an attraction and then leave the attraction after a certain amount of time. When the pedestrian influx is high, an unstable flow is observed for strong social influence. In the unstable flow, attendees near the attraction are crowded out from the clusters by others due to the interpersonal repulsion. The expelled pedestrians impede the pedestrian traffic between the left and right boundaries of the corridor. These collective patterns of pedestrian flow are summarized in a schematic phase diagram.

  19. The Video Head Impulse Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halmagyi, G. M.; Chen, Luke; MacDougall, Hamish G.; Weber, Konrad P.; McGarvie, Leigh A.; Curthoys, Ian S.

    2017-01-01

    In 1988, we introduced impulsive testing of semicircular canal (SCC) function measured with scleral search coils and showed that it could accurately and reliably detect impaired function even of a single lateral canal. Later we showed that it was also possible to test individual vertical canal function in peripheral and also in central vestibular disorders and proposed a physiological mechanism for why this might be so. For the next 20 years, between 1988 and 2008, impulsive testing of individual SCC function could only be accurately done by a few aficionados with the time and money to support scleral search-coil systems—an expensive, complicated and cumbersome, semi-invasive technique that never made the transition from the research lab to the dizzy clinic. Then, in 2009 and 2013, we introduced a video method of testing function of each of the six canals individually. Since 2009, the method has been taken up by most dizzy clinics around the world, with now close to 100 refereed articles in PubMed. In many dizzy clinics around the world, video Head Impulse Testing has supplanted caloric testing as the initial and in some cases the final test of choice in patients with suspected vestibular disorders. Here, we consider seven current, interesting, and controversial aspects of video Head Impulse Testing: (1) introduction to the test; (2) the progress from the head impulse protocol (HIMPs) to the new variant—suppression head impulse protocol (SHIMPs); (3) the physiological basis for head impulse testing; (4) practical aspects and potential pitfalls of video head impulse testing; (5) problems of vestibulo-ocular reflex gain calculations; (6) head impulse testing in central vestibular disorders; and (7) to stay right up-to-date—new clinical disease patterns emerging from video head impulse testing. With thanks and appreciation we dedicate this article to our friend, colleague, and mentor, Dr Bernard Cohen of Mount Sinai Medical School, New York, who since his

  20. The Video Head Impulse Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Halmagyi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In 1988, we introduced impulsive testing of semicircular canal (SCC function measured with scleral search coils and showed that it could accurately and reliably detect impaired function even of a single lateral canal. Later we showed that it was also possible to test individual vertical canal function in peripheral and also in central vestibular disorders and proposed a physiological mechanism for why this might be so. For the next 20 years, between 1988 and 2008, impulsive testing of individual SCC function could only be accurately done by a few aficionados with the time and money to support scleral search-coil systems—an expensive, complicated and cumbersome, semi-invasive technique that never made the transition from the research lab to the dizzy clinic. Then, in 2009 and 2013, we introduced a video method of testing function of each of the six canals individually. Since 2009, the method has been taken up by most dizzy clinics around the world, with now close to 100 refereed articles in PubMed. In many dizzy clinics around the world, video Head Impulse Testing has supplanted caloric testing as the initial and in some cases the final test of choice in patients with suspected vestibular disorders. Here, we consider seven current, interesting, and controversial aspects of video Head Impulse Testing: (1 introduction to the test; (2 the progress from the head impulse protocol (HIMPs to the new variant—suppression head impulse protocol (SHIMPs; (3 the physiological basis for head impulse testing; (4 practical aspects and potential pitfalls of video head impulse testing; (5 problems of vestibulo-ocular reflex gain calculations; (6 head impulse testing in central vestibular disorders; and (7 to stay right up-to-date—new clinical disease patterns emerging from video head impulse testing. With thanks and appreciation we dedicate this article to our friend, colleague, and mentor, Dr Bernard Cohen of Mount Sinai Medical School, New York, who

  1. Dopamine-agonists and impulsivity in Parkinson's disease: impulsive choices vs. impulsive actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelli, Francesca; Ko, Ji Hyun; Miyasaki, Janis; Lang, Anthony E; Houle, Sylvain; Valzania, Franco; Ray, Nicola J; Strafella, Antonio P

    2014-06-01

    The control of impulse behavior is a multidimensional concept subdivided into separate subcomponents, which are thought to represent different underlying mechanisms due to either disinhibitory processes or poor decision-making. In patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), dopamine-agonist (DA) therapy has been associated with increased impulsive behavior. However, the relationship among these different components in the disease and the role of DA is not well understood. In this imaging study, we investigated in PD patients the effects of DA medication on patterns of brain activation during tasks testing impulsive choices and actions. Following overnight withdrawal of antiparkinsonian medication, PD patients were studied with a H2 ((15)) O PET before and after administration of DA (1 mg of pramipexole), while they were performing the delay discounting task (DDT) and the GoNoGo Task (GNG). We observed that pramipexole augmented impulsivity during DDT, depending on reward magnitude and activated the medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate cortex and deactivated ventral striatum. In contrast, the effect of pramipexole during the GNG task was not significant on behavioral performance and involved different areas (i.e., lateral prefrontal cortex). A voxel-based correlation analysis revealed a significant negative correlation between the discounting value (k) and the activation of medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate suggesting that more impulsive patients had less activation in those cortical areas. Here we report how these different subcomponents of inhibition/impulsivity are differentially sensitive to DA treatment with pramipexole influencing mainly the neural network underlying impulsive choices but not impulsive action. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Family Functioning as a Mediator of Relations between Family History of Substance Use Disorder and Impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Stacy R; Friedman, Carly K; Liang, Yuanyuan; Lake, Sarah L; Mathias, Charles W; Charles, Nora E; Acheson, Ashley; Dougherty, Donald M

    2016-03-01

    Impulsivity is strongly related to the development of adolescent substance use. Therefore, understanding factors that influence impulsive characteristics is important for the development of prevention and intervention programs. Intervention and prevention programs focused on factors that influence impulsive characteristics are especially important for those at particularly high risk for the expression of impulsivity - those with a family history of substance use disorder. A factor of particular interest is family functioning. To examine family functioning as a mediator of relations between having a family history of substance use disorder and impulsivity. Participants included a majority Hispanic sample of pre-adolescent boys and girls (mean age 10.99, SD = .84) recruited from the community who did (FH+) and did not (FH-) have a family history of substance use disorder. FH status and the quality of family functioning were compared at the initial visit with impulsiveness assessed a year later. Results showed FH+ children had worse family functioning; worse family functioning was related to higher levels of impulsivity, and higher levels of impulsivity among FH+ children were due to the influence of family functioning on levels of impulsivity. In other words, family functioning mediated relations between having a family history of substance use disorder and impulsivity. These results indicate that higher levels of impulsivity in FH+ children are due in part to worse family functioning.

  3. Impulsivity and overeating in children in the absence and presence of hunger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nederkoorn, Chantal; Dassen, Fania C M; Franken, Loes; Resch, Christine; Houben, Katrijn

    2015-10-01

    Overweight children appear to be more responsive to environmental, hedonic cues and easily overeat in the current obesogenic environment. They are also found to overeat in the absence of hunger, and this overeating seems related to impulsivity: impulsive participants are more prone to external eating. However, some studies showed that impulsive adults are also more prone to hunger cues: impulsive participants overate especially when feeling hungry. This would mean impulsive people are more reactive to both external and internal cues. The overeating was limited to palatable high energy-dense foods: hunger made them fancy a snack. In the current study, we wanted to test the interaction between impulsivity, hunger and consumption of food type in children. Impulsivity was measured in 88 children between the ages of 7 and 9. Next, half of the participants performed a taste test before their own regular lunch and half of the participants immediately after their lunch. During the taste test, low, medium and high energy-dense food items were presented. Results showed that impulsive children ate more high energy-dense foods than low impulsive children, both before and after their lunch. No differences were found on low or medium energy-dense foods. Impulsive children therefore showed normal sensitivity for internal hunger and satiety cues, but abnormal response to high energy-dense foods. This might render them vulnerable to tasty temptation in the environment and to weight gain in their future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Multi-facetted impulsivity following nigral degeneration and dopamine replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engeln, Michel; Ansquer, Solène; Dugast, Emilie; Bezard, Erwan; Belin, David; Fernagut, Pierre-Olivier

    2016-10-01

    Impulse control disorders (ICDs) are debilitating side effects of dopamine replacement therapy (DRT) in Parkinson's disease (PD) that severely affect the quality of life of patients. While DRT, the pattern and extent of neurodegeneration, and prodromic factors of vulnerability (e.g. impulsivity) have all been hypothesized to play a role in the development of ICDs, their respective, and potentially interacting, contributions remain to be established. High impulsive (HI), Intermediate (Int) or low impulsive (LI) rats were identified based on their performance in both a differential reinforcement of low rate of responding (DRL) and a fixed consecutive number (FCN) schedules, that operationalize two independent facets of impulsivity, waiting and action inhibition (motor impulsivity). We investigated whether high impulsivity trait influenced the progressive development of a parkinsonian state induced by viral-mediated overexpression of α-synuclein, and whether impulsivity trait and nigrostriatal neurodegeneration independently or jointly influenced the effects of DRT on impulse control. α-synuclein-induced nigrostriatal neurodegeneration increased both waiting and motor impulsivity. The D2/D3 dopamine receptor agonist pramipexole exacerbated motor impulsivity more than waiting. However, the pramipexole-induced increase in waiting impulsivity observed in both sham and lesioned rats, was more pronounced in HI lesioned rats, which displayed a restricted α-synuclein-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration. Thus, a PD-like nigrostriatal lesion increases both motor and waiting impulsivity, but its interaction with a pre-existing impulsivity trait, which, at the cellular level, confers resilience to dopaminergic neurodegeneration, worsens the detrimental effects of D2/D3 dopamine receptor agonists on inhibitory control. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Usage of measured reverberation tail in a binaural room impulse response synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markovic, Milos; Olesen, Søren Krarup; Madsen, Esben

    2011-01-01

    utilizing correct acoustical properties of the specific environments. Binaural room impulse response (BRIR) synthesis represents one of the main tasks in the binaural auralization. When the BRIRs are simulated, high order reflections (reverberation tail) are usually modeled statistically because of the high...... density of reflections. That can lead to metallic and unnatural sound. Also, room-specific sound envelopment feeling is lost. This paper investigates the possibility of using measured reverberation tail instead of the modeled one in BRIRs synthesis. Three cases are observed. In the first one, BRIRs...

  6. An adaptive dynamically weighted median filter for impulse noise removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sajid; Lee, Dong-Ho

    2017-12-01

    A new impulsive noise removal filter, adaptive dynamically weighted median filter (ADWMF), is proposed. A popular method for removing impulsive noise is a median filter whereas the weighted median filter and center weighted median filter were also investigated. ADWMF is based on weighted median filter. In ADWMF, instead of fixed weights, weightages of the filter are dynamically assigned with the results of noise detection. A simple and efficient noise detection method is also used to detect noise candidates and dynamically assign zero or small weights to the noise candidates in the window. This paper proposes an adaptive method which increases the window size according to the amounts of impulsive noise. Simulation results show that the AMWMF works better for both images with low and high density of impulsive noise than existing methods work.

  7. Fear signals inhibit impulsive behavior toward rewarding food objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veling, Harm; Aarts, Henk; Stroebe, Wolfgang

    2011-06-01

    We examined whether presentation of environmental cues that are associated with motor inhibition, i.e., fearful facial expressions, can be effective in controlling unintentionally evoked impulses toward rewarding food objects. Participants were presented with palatable foods or control objects. During presentation of the objects, facial expressions displaying fear, disgust, or neutral emotion were shortly presented. Results show that presentation of fearful facial expressions together with palatable foods slowed down subsequent responding to action probes, but only for participants who perceive palatable foods as highly rewarding and impulse-evoking, i.e., restrained eaters. Facial expressions of disgust did not show this effect. This finding suggests that unintentionally evoked motor impulses toward rewarding objects are inhibited upon presentation of a fear signal. The present research provides new insight on how emotional signals may be used to control impulsive responses toward palatable foods by the environment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pre-attentive information processing and impulsivity in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, Alan C; Lijffijt, Marijn; Lane, Scott D; Steinberg, Joel L; Acas, Michelle D; Cox, Blake; Moeller, F Gerard

    2013-12-01

    Early responses to stimuli can be measured by sensory evoked potentials (EP) using repeated identical stimuli, S1 and S2. Response to S1 may represent efficient stimulus detection, while suppression of response to S2 may represent inhibition. Early responses to stimuli may be related to impulsivity. We compared EP reflecting stimulus detection and inhibition in bipolar disorder and healthy controls, and investigated relationships to impulsivity. Subjects were 48 healthy controls without family histories of mood disorder and 48 with bipolar disorder. EP were measured as latencies and amplitudes for auditory P50 (pre-attentional), N100 (initial direction of attention) and P200 (initial conscious awareness), using a paired-click paradigm, with identical stimuli 0.5 s apart. Impulsivity was measured by questionnaire and by laboratory tests for inability to suppress responses to stimuli or to delay response for a reward. Analyses used general linear models. S1 amplitudes for P50, N100, and P200, and gating of N100 and P200, were lower in bipolar disorder than in controls. P50 S1 amplitude correlated with accurate laboratory-task responding, and S2 amplitude correlated with impulsive task performance and fast reaction times, in bipolar disorder. N100 and P200 EP did not correlate with impulsivity. These findings were independent of symptoms, treatment, or substance-use history. EPs were not related to questionnaire-measured or reward-based impulsivity. Bipolar I disorder is characterized by reduced pre-attentional and early attentional stimulus registration relative to controls. Within bipolar disorder, rapid-response impulsivity correlates with impaired pre-attentional response suppression. These results imply specific relationships between ERP-measured response inhibition and rapid-response impulsivity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Trait Impulsivity and Anhedonia: Two Gateways for the Development of Impulse Control Disorders in Parkinson's Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houeto, Jean-Luc; Magnard, Robin; Dalley, Jeffrey W; Belin, David; Carnicella, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    Apathy and impulsivity are two major comorbid syndromes of Parkinson's disease (PD) that may represent two extremes of a behavioral spectrum modulated by dopamine-dependent processes. PD is characterized by a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta to which are attributed the cardinal motor symptoms of the disorder. Dopamine replacement therapy (DRT), used widely to treat these motor symptoms, is often associated with deficits in hedonic processing and motivation, including apathy and depression, as well as impulse control disorders (ICDs). ICDs comprise pathological gambling, hypersexuality, compulsive shopping, binge eating, compulsive overuse of dopaminergic medication, and punding. More frequently observed in males with early onset PD, ICDs are associated not only with comorbid affective symptoms, such as depression and anxiety, but also with behavioral traits, such as novelty seeking and impulsivity, as well as with personal or familial history of alcohol use. This constellation of associated risk factors highlights the importance of inter-individual differences in the vulnerability to develop comorbid psychiatric disorders in PD patients. Additionally, withdrawal from DRT in patients with ICDs frequently unmasks a severe apathetic state, suggesting that apathy and ICDs may be caused by overlapping neurobiological mechanisms within the cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical networks. We suggest that altered hedonic and impulse control processes represent distinct prodromal substrates for the development of these psychiatric symptoms, the etiopathogenic mechanisms of which remain unknown. Specifically, we argue that deficits in hedonic and motivational states and impulse control are mediated by overlapping, yet dissociable, neural mechanisms that differentially interact with DRT to promote the emergence of ICDs in vulnerable individuals. Thus, we provide a novel heuristic framework for basic and clinical research to better

  10. Trait impulsivity and anhedonia: two gateways for the development of impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Luc eHoueto

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Apathy and impulsivity are two major comorbid syndromes of Parkinson’s disease (PD that may represent two extremes of a behavioral spectrum modulated by dopamine-dependent processes. PD is characterized by a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta to which are attributed the cardinal motor symptoms of the disorder. Dopamine replacement therapy (DRT, used widely to treat these motor symptoms, is often associated with deficits in hedonic processing and motivation, including apathy and depression, as well as impulse control disorders (ICDs. ICDs comprise pathological gambling, hypersexuality, compulsive shopping, binge eating, compulsive overuse of dopaminergic medication, and punding. More frequently observed in males with early onset PD, ICDs are associated not only with co-morbid affective symptoms such as depression and anxiety, but also with behavioral traits such as novelty seeking and impulsivity, as well as with personal or familial history of alcohol use. This constellation of associated risk factors highlights the importance of inter-individual differences in the vulnerability to develop comorbid psychiatric disorders in PD patients. Additionally, withdrawal from DRT in patients with ICDs frequently unmasks a severe apathetic state, suggesting that apathy and ICDs may be caused by overlapping neurobiological mechanisms within the cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical networks. We suggest that altered hedonic and impulse control processes represent distinct prodromal substrates for the development of these psychiatric symptoms, the etiopathogenic mechanisms of which remain unknown. Specifically, we argue that deficits in hedonic and motivational states and impulse control are mediated by overlapping, yet dissociable, neural mechanisms that differentially interact with DRT to promote the emergence of ICDs in vulnerable individuals. We thus provide a novel heuristic framework for basic and clinical

  11. Ti-Al Composite Wires with High Specific Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludwig Schultz

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available An alternative deformation technique was applied to a composite made of titanium and an aluminium alloy in order to achieve severe plastic deformation. This involves accumulative swaging and bundling. Furthermore, it allows uniform deformation of a composite material while producing a wire which can be further used easily. Detailed analysis concerning the control of the deformation process, mesostructural and microstructural features and tensile testing was carried out on the as produced wires. A strong grain refinement to a grain size of 250–500 nm accompanied by a decrease in 〈111〉 fibre texture component and a change from low angle to high angle grain boundary characteristics is observed in the Al alloy. A strong increase in the mechanical properties in terms of ultimate tensile strength ranging from 600 to 930 MPa being equivalent to a specific strength of up to 223 MPa/g/cm3 was achieved.

  12. Partial sleep deprivation impacts impulsive action but not impulsive decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demos, K E; Hart, C N; Sweet, L H; Mailloux, K A; Trautvetter, J; Williams, S E; Wing, R R; McCaffery, J M

    2016-10-01

    Sleep deprivation may lead to increased impulsivity, however, previous literature has focused on examining effects of total sleep deprivation (TSD) rather than the more common condition, partial sleep deprivation (PSD) or 'short sleep'. Moreover, it has been unclear whether PSD impacts impulse-related cognitive processes, and specifically if it differentially affects impulsive action versus impulsive decision-making. We sought to determine if short compared to long sleep (6 vs. 9h/night) impacts impulsive action via behavioral inhibition (Go/No-Go), and/or impulsive decision-making processes of risk taking (Balloon Analogue Risk Task [BART]) and preferences for immediate over delayed rewards (Delay Discounting). In a within-subject design, 34 participants (71% female, mean age=37.0years, SD=10.54) were assigned to four consecutive nights of 6h/night (short sleep) and 9h/night (long sleep) in their own home in random counterbalanced order. Sleep was measured via wrist-worn actigraphs to confirm adherence to the sleep schedules (mean short sleep=5.9h, SD=0.3; mean long sleep=8.6h, SD=0.3, psleep conditions. Participants had more inhibition errors on the Go/No-Go task after short (mean false alarms=19.79%, SD=14.51) versus long sleep (mean=15.97%, SD=9.51, p=0.039). This effect was strongest in participants reporting longer habitual time in bed (p=0.04). There were no differences in performance following long- versus short-sleep for either delay discounting or the BART (p's>0.4). Overall, these results indicate that four days of PSD diminishes behavioral inhibition abilities, but may not alter impulsive decision-making. These findings contribute to the emerging understanding of how partial sleep deprivation, currently an epidemic, impacts cognitive ability. Future research should continue to explore the connection between PSD and cognitive functions, and ways to minimize the occurrence and negative consequences of short sleep. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All

  13. Examining impulsivity as a moderator of the relationship between body shame and bulimic symptoms in Black and White young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, M K; Lin, Stacy L; Alvarez, Alexandra; Bardone-Cone, Anna M

    2015-06-01

    Impulsivity has been linked to bulimic symptomatology in a number of studies; however, few have examined this relationship among Black women. We investigated the correlations between impulsivity and bulimic symptoms, and tested impulsivity as a moderator of the body shame/bulimic symptoms relationship among a sample of female undergraduates (N=276; 97 Blacks, 179 Whites). These participants provided data on body shame, impulsivity, and bulimic symptoms (EDE-Q binge eating frequency, BULIT-R, EDI-Bulimia). Among Blacks, impulsivity was significantly positively associated with all bulimic symptoms measures; among Whites, impulsivity was only positively correlated with binge eating frequency. Furthermore, among Blacks, the combination of high body shame and high impulsivity was associated with the highest levels of bulimic symptoms; these findings were not observed among Whites. This study highlights the importance of impulsivity and body shame in identifying bulimic symptomatology among Black women. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Impulse control disorders and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejoyeux, Michel; Arbaretaz, Marie; McLoughlin, Mary; Adès, Jean

    2002-05-01

    This study assessed the frequency of impulse control disorders (ICDs) and their association with bulimia, compulsive buying, and suicide attempts in a population of depressed inpatients. We investigated ICDs using the Minnesota Impulsive Disorders Interview. Patients answered the Zuckerman Sensation-Seeking Scale and the Barratt Impulsivity Rating Scale. Among the 31 depressed patients who met criteria for ICD (ICD+ group), we found 18 cases of intermittent explosive disorder, three cases of pathological gambling, four cases of kleptomania, three cases of pyromania, and three cases of trichotillomania. Patients with co-occurring ICDs were significantly younger (mean age = 37.7 versus 42.8 years). Patients with kleptomania had a higher number of previous depressive episodes (5.7 versus 1.3), and patients with pyromania had a higher number of previous depressions (3.3 versus 1.3, p =.01). Bipolar disorders were more frequent in the ICD+ group than in the ICD- group (19% versus 1.3%, p =.002), whereas antisocial personality was not (3% versus 1%, p = ns). Bulimia (42% versus 10.5%, p =.005) and compulsive buying (51% versus 22%, p =.006) were significantly more frequent in the ICD+ group. Patients from the ICD+ group had higher scores of motor impulsivity assessed with the Barratt Impulsivity rating scale (p =.01).

  15. Cigarette cravings, impulsivity and the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane ePotvin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Craving is a core feature of tobacco use disorder as well as a significant predictor of smoking relapse. Studies have shown that appetitive smoking-related stimuli (e.g. someone smoking trigger significant cravings in smokers which impedes their self-control capacities and promotes drug seeking behavior. In this review, we begin by an overview of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies investigating the neural correlates of smokers to appetitive smoking cues. The literature reveals a complex and vastly distributed neuronal network underlying smokers’ craving response that recruits regions involved in self-referential processing, panning/regulatory processes, emotional responding, attentional biases, and automatic conducts. We then selectively review important factors contributing to the heterogeneity of results that significantly limit the implications of these findings, namely between- (abstinence, smoking expectancies and self-regulation and within-studies factors (severity of smoking dependence, sex-differences, motivation to quit and genetic factors. Remarkably, we found that little to no attention has been devoted to examine the influence of personality traits on the neural correlates of cigarette cravings in fMRI studies. Impulsivity has been linked with craving and relapse in substance and tobacco use, which prompted our research team to examine the influence of impulsivity on cigarette cravings in an fMRI study. We found that the influence of impulsivity on cigarette cravings was mediated by fronto-cingular mechanisms. Given the high prevalence of cigarette smoking in several psychiatric disorders that are characterized by significant levels of impulsivity, we conclude by identifying psychiatric patients as a target population whose tobacco smoking habits deserve further behavioral and neuro-imaging investigation.

  16. Smoking cessation with teenagers: the relationship between impulsivity, emotional problems, program retention and effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegmann, Lena; Bühler, Anneke; Strunk, Mareike; Lang, Peter; Nowak, Dennis

    2012-04-01

    This study examines whether individual differences in impulsivity and emotional problems in adolescent smokers are related to initial smoking characteristics of participants, acceptance, retention and outcome of a school-based smoking cessation program. The data was obtained from a feasibility study of a youth-specific, cognitive-behavioral and motivation enhancing program at 22 schools with 139 participating teenage smokers in Germany. A one-group-pre-posttest design was realized. Impulsivity levels were assessed by use of the impulsivity scale of the IVE ("Inventar zur Erfassung von Impulsivität, Risikoverhalten und Empathie", Stadler, Janke, & Schmeck, 2004). To evaluate the extent of emotional problems, the corresponding 5-items scale of the SDQ-Deu ("Strength and difficulties questionnaire", Klasen et al., 2000) was applied. Smoking behavior and acceptance of the program were assessed by students' self-reports. Acceptance and retention did not differ with regard to impulsivity and emotional problems, but initial smoking status did. Cessation rates varied with level of impulsivity: compared to non-impulsive participants, impulsive adolescents succeeded in quitting smoking less often. Emotional problems were not related to the rate of quitting. Impulsive adolescents were similarly compliant to the offered cessation intervention as less impulsive smokers. In spite of their general positive evaluation, impulsive adolescents seem to benefit less from a smoking cessation program than their non-impulsive counterparts. Specific elements supporting impulsive teenage smokers in their goal to quit should be incorporated into youth-specific cessation programs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Depression in university students: associations with impulse control disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppink, Eric W; Lust, Katherine; Grant, Jon E

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the implications of depression in a sample of university students, particularly relating to impulse control disorders. While previous studies have shown high rates of depression among university students, no study to date has assessed whether levels of depression show associations with the incidence of impulse control disorders in this population. In all, 6000 students participated in the College Student Computer Use Survey. A total of 1717 students completed the scales of interest for this analysis. Participants were assigned to groups based on depression scores: severe (N = 75), mild/moderate (N = 647) and none (N = 995). The three groups were assessed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) or chi-square test. A multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to elucidate associations between depression and impulse control disorder diagnoses. Groups differed across demographic, health and academic variables. The severe depression group reported higher rates of skin-picking disorder, compulsive sexual behaviour and compulsive buying. Results suggest a significant association between depression and impulse control disorders. One possibility is that a facet of impulsivity contributes to both problems, which could be important information for clinicians. Future studies will need to clarify the exact nature of the relationship between depression and impulse control disorders.

  18. Impulsivity in Hong Kong-Chinese club-drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loxton, Natalie J; Wan, Venice L-N; Ho, Ada M-C; Cheung, Ben K-L; Tam, Nicole; Leung, Freedom Y K; Stadlin, Alfreda

    2008-05-01

    To investigate the relationship between personality, club-drug use and high-risk drug-related behaviour, 360 club-drug users and 303 non-drug users in Hong Kong were assessed on measures of two impulsivity dimensions, reward drive and rash impulsivity, and a related trait of punishment sensitivity. The most frequently used drugs were ketamine, ecstasy, and cannabis, with the majority of participants using two or more drugs on any one occasion. Club-drug users were more rash-impulsive and reward-driven, and less punishment-sensitive than non-drug users (p<0.001). Rash impulsivity, but not reward drive or punishment sensitivity, was significantly (p<0.001) associated with risky drug-related behaviour. There was no association between any personality traits and preferred drug. These findings suggest that, while those who use club drugs are generally more impulsive and less punishment-sensitive, some discrete facets of impulsivity are associated with differing patterns of drug-use behaviour.

  19. On the Spur of the Moment: Intrinsic Predictors of Impulse Sports Betting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hing, Nerilee; Li, En; Vitartas, Peter; Russell, Alex M T

    2017-09-27

    Betting on impulse, without thoughtful consideration, research or informed decision-making, may cause financial and other harms and lead to the development of gambling problems. Impulse betting undermines responsible consumption of gambling because it reflects self-regulatory failure, impaired control, unreflective decision-making and betting more than planned. In this paper we define impulse gambling and report on a study that aimed to understand more about the intrinsic characteristics of sports bettors who have a greater tendency to bet on impulse. Specifically, the study aimed to identify behavioural, psychological and socio-demographic predictors of impulse sports betting. A sample of 1816 Australian sports bettors completed an online survey that measured the proportion of their bets placed on impulse both before and during sporting events, as well as bets that were researched and planned in advance. Impulse betting was common, accounting for nearly one-half of all past-year sports bets by respondents. Over three-quarters of respondents had placed one or more impulse bets in the last year and one in seven respondents had made all of their sports bets on impulse. More impulsive sports bettors were characterised as having higher trait impulsiveness, higher problem gambling severity, more frequent sports betting and a shorter history of sports betting. They favoured betting on in-match contingencies instead of overall match outcomes. While health promotion strategies are needed to discourage impulse betting, research into contextual factors that arouse urges to bet would also provide direction for harm minimisation measures that help consumers to resist impulsive betting decisions.

  20. The role of affective instability and UPPS impulsivity in borderline personality disorder features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tragesser, Sarah L; Robinson, R Joe

    2009-08-01

    Current theories of borderline personality disorder (BPD) suggest that extreme levels of affective instability/emotional dysregulation, impulsivity, or a combination of these traits account for the symptoms of BPD. The present study tested the extent to which personality measures of affective instability and impulsivity could account for BPD features in a nonclinical sample. One hundred forty-one undergraduates completed the Affective Lability Scale, the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale, and the Personality Assessment Inventory for Borderlines. Both affective instability and impulsivity were uniquely associated with BPD features. Shifts between euthymia and anger, and between anxiety and depression, were associated with BPD features, as were the urgency and (lack of) premeditation scales. Results indicated that specific BPD features may be differentially accounted for by affective instability vs. impulsivity, consistent with perspectives on BPD emphasizing combinations of affective instability and impulsivity as underlying dimensions of the disorder.

  1. Are executive function and impulsivity antipodes? A conceptual reconstruction with special reference to addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, Warren K.; Jarmolowicz, David P.; Mueller, E. Terry; Gatchalian, Kirstin M.; McClure, Samuel M.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Although there is considerable interest in how either executive function (EF) or impulsivity relate to addiction, there is little apparent overlap between these research areas. Objectives The present paper aims to determine if components of these two constructs are conceptual antipodes—widely separated on a shared continuum. Methods EFs and impulsivities were compared and contrasted. Specifically, the definitions of the components of EF and impulsivity, the methods used to measure the various components, the populations of drug users that show deficits in these components, and the neural substrates of these components were compared and contrasted. Results Each component of impulsivity had an antipode in EF. EF, however, covered a wider range of phenomena, including compulsivity. Conclusions Impulsivity functions as an antipode of certain components of EF. Recognition of the relationship between EF and impulsivity may inform the scientific inquiry of behavioral problems such as addiction. Other theoretical implications are discussed. PMID:22441659

  2. High voltage and high specific capacity dual intercalating electrode Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, William C. (Inventor); Blanco, Mario (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides high capacity and high voltage Li-ion batteries that have a carbonaceous cathode and a nonaqueous electrolyte solution comprising LiF salt and an anion receptor that binds the fluoride ion. The batteries can comprise dual intercalating electrode Li ion batteries. Methods of the present invention use a cathode and electrode pair, wherein each of the electrodes reversibly intercalate ions provided by a LiF salt to make a high voltage and high specific capacity dual intercalating electrode Li-ion battery. The present methods and systems provide high-capacity batteries particularly useful in powering devices where minimizing battery mass is important.

  3. Existence of solutions to boundary value problem of fractional differential equations with impulsive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua JIANG

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to solve the boundary value problem of fractional impulsive differential equations with countable impulses and integral boundary conditions on the half line, the existence of solutions to the boundary problem is specifically studied. By defining suitable Banach spaces, norms and operators, using the properties of fractional calculus and applying the contraction mapping principle and Krasnoselskii's fixed point theorem, the existence of solutions for the boundary value problem of fractional impulsive differential equations with countable impulses and integral boundary conditions on the half line is proved, and examples are given to illustrate the existence of solutions to this kind of equation boundary value problems.

  4. Transient Impulsive Giant Electronic Raman Redistribution

    CERN Document Server

    Miyabe, S

    2014-01-01

    Resonant Raman excitation by ultrafast vacuum ultraviolet laser pulses is a powerful means to study electron dynamics in molecules, but experiments must contend with linear background ionization: frequencies high enough to reach resonant core-valence transitions will usually ionize all occupied orbitals as well, and the ionization cross sections are usually dominant. Here we show that attosecond pulses can induce a new process, transient impulsive stimulated Raman scattering, which can overwhelm valence ionization. Calculations are performed for atomic sodium, but the principal is valid for many molecular systems. This approach opens the path for high fidelity multidimensional spectroscopy with attosecond pulses.

  5. Impulsive oculomotor action selection in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duprez, Joan; Houvenaghel, Jean-François; Argaud, Soizic; Naudet, Florian; Robert, Gabriel; Drapier, Dominique; Vérin, Marc; Sauleau, Paul

    2017-01-27

    The effects of Parkinson's disease (PD) on the dynamics of impulsive action selection and suppression have recently been studied using distributional analyses, but with mixed results, especially for selection. Furthermore, some authors have suggested that impulsivity, regarded as a personality trait, shares common features with behavioral tasks' measures. The current study was designed to clarify the impact of PD on impulsive action selection and suppression, and investigate the link between cognitive action control and self-reported impulsivity. We administered an oculomotor version of the Simon task to 32 patients with PD and 32 matched healthy controls (HC), and conducted distributional analyses in accordance with the activation-suppression model. Patients and HC also filled out the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS) questionnaire. Results showed that patients with PD were faster overall and exhibited a greater congruence effect than HC. They also displayed enhanced impulsive action selection. By contrast, the suppression of impulsive responses was similar across both groups. Furthermore, patients had higher impulsivity scores, which were correlated with higher impulsive action selection and higher suppression. Our study yielded two interesting findings. First, PD resulted in a higher number of fast errors. The activation-suppression model suggests that patients with PD are more susceptible to the impulsive action selection induced by the irrelevant stimulus dimension. Second, impulsive action selection and suppression were both associated with trait impulsivity, as measured by the BIS, indicating that these two aspects of impulsivity share common features. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. High Performance Organ-Specific Nuclear Medicine Imagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Stan

    2006-04-01

    One of the exciting applications of nuclear science is nuclear medicine. Well-known diagnostic imaging tools such as PET and SPECT (as well as MRI) were developed as spin-offs of basic scientific research in atomic and nuclear physics. Development of modern instrumentation for applications in particle physics experiments offers an opportunity to contribute to development of improved nuclear medicine (gamma and positron) imagers, complementing the present set of standard imaging tools (PET, SPECT, MRI, ultrasound, fMRI, MEG, etc). Several examples of new high performance imagers developed in national laboratories in collaboration with academia will be given to demonstrate this spin-off activity. These imagers are designed to specifically image organs such as breast, heart, head (brain), or prostate. The remaining and potentially most important challenging application field for dedicated nuclear medicine imagers is to assist with cancer radiation treatments. Better control of radiation dose delivery requires development of new compact in-situ imagers becoming integral parts of the radiation delivery systems using either external beams or based on radiation delivery by inserting or injecting radioactive sources (gamma, beta or alpha emitters) into tumors.

  7. Bottomside Ionospheric Electron Density Specification using Passive High Frequency Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeppler, S. R.; Cosgrove, R. B.; Mackay, C.; Varney, R. H.; Kendall, E. A.; Nicolls, M. J.

    2016-12-01

    The vertical bottomside electron density profile is influenced by a variety of natural sources, most especially traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs). These disturbances cause plasma to be moved up or down along the local geomagnetic field and can strongly impact the propagation of high frequency radio waves. While the basic physics of these perturbations has been well studied, practical bottomside models are not well developed. We present initial results from an assimilative bottomside ionosphere model. This model uses empirical orthogonal functions based on the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) to develop a vertical electron density profile, and features a builtin HF ray tracing function. This parameterized model is then perturbed to model electron density perturbations associated with TIDs or ionospheric gradients. Using the ray tracing feature, the model assimilates angle of arrival measurements from passive HF transmitters. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the model using angle of arrival data. Modeling results of bottomside electron density specification are compared against suitable ancillary observations to quantify accuracy of our model.

  8. Impulse control disorder comorbidity among patients with bipolar I disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakus, Gonca; Tamam, Lut

    2011-01-01

    Impulsivity is associated with mood instability, behavioral problems, and action without planning in patients with bipolar disorder. Increased impulsivity levels are reported at all types of mood episodes. This association suggests a high comorbidity between impulse control disorders (ICDs) and bipolar disorder. The aim of this study is to compare the prevalence of ICDs and associated clinical and sociodemographic variables in euthymic bipolar I patients. A total of 124 consecutive bipolar I patients who were recruited from regular attendees from the outpatient clinic of our Bipolar Disorder Unit were included in the study. All patients were symptomatically in remission. Diagnosis of bipolar disorder was confirmed using the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. Impulse control disorders were investigated using the modified version of the Minnesota Impulsive Disorders Interview. Impulsivity was measured with the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale Version 11. Furthermore, all patients completed the Zuckerman Sensation-Seeking Scale Form V. The prevalence rate of all comorbid ICDs in our sample was 27.4% (n = 34). The most common ICD subtype was pathologic skin picking, followed by compulsive buying, intermittent explosive disorder, and trichotillomania. There were no instances of pyromania or compulsive sexual behavior. There was no statistically significant difference between the sociodemographic characteristics of bipolar patients with and without ICDs with regard to age, sex, education level, or marital status. Comorbidity of alcohol/substance abuse and number of suicide attempts were higher in the ICD(+) group than the ICD(-) group. Length of time between mood episodes was higher in the ICD(-) group than the ICD(+) group. There was a statistically significant difference between the total number of mood episodes between the 2 groups, but the number of depressive episodes was higher in the ICD(+) patients

  9. Recreational drug use and impulsivity in a population of canadian undergraduate drinkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balodis, Iris M; Potenza, Marc N; Olmstead, Mary C

    2010-01-01

    The consumption of drugs during young adulthood may be particularly detrimental given important neurodevelopmental changes occurring during this period. As impulsivity may lead to substance use and substance use to the commission of seemingly impulsive acts, an improved understanding of the relationship between alcohol use, other substance use and impulsivity in young adults is important. We gathered information on self-reported impulsivity, recreational drug use, and drinking habits of 205 (105 female) undergraduate students. Results showed that 64% of the students reported using marijuana at least once and these individuals were more likely to report binge drinking. Polysubstance use, defined as using marijuana and at least one other illicit substance, was reported by 20% of students. These individuals reported more drinking occasions per month and had higher levels of trait impulsivity. Rates of recreational drug use were similar to those reported in recent national surveys, suggesting an increase in experimentation with specific illicit drugs. Given that a majority of undergraduate drinkers reported marijuana use and its association with binge drinking, future research should clarify the relationship between marijuana use and binge consumption of alcohol and prevention efforts should consider the conjoint targeting of marijuana and binge drinking. The associations between polysubstance use, binge-level alcohol consumption and elevated self-reported impulsivity suggests that perceived trait impulsivity across multiple domains may predispose to excessive use of multiple substances. Longitudinal studies should examine the contribution of impulsivity to the initiation and experimentation with illicit drugs and the influence of specific substances on impulsivity.

  10. Impulsivity: four ways five factors are not basic to addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullo, Matthew J; Loxton, Natalie J; Dawe, Sharon

    2014-11-01

    Several impulsivity-related models have been applied to understanding the vulnerability to addiction. While there is a growing consensus that impulsivity is multifaceted, debate continues as to the precise number of facets and, more critically, which are most relevant to explaining the addiction-risk profile. In many ways, the current debate mirrors that which took place in the personality literature in the early 1990s (e.g., Eysenck's 'Big Three' versus Costa and McCrae's 'Big Five'). Indeed, many elements of this debate are relevant to the current discussion of the role of impulsivity in addictive behavior. Specifically, 1) the use of factor analysis as an atheoretical 'truth-grinding machine'; 2) whether additional facets add explanatory power over fewer; 3) the delineation of specific neurocognitive pathways from each facet to addictive behaviors, and; 4) the relative merit of 'top-down' versus 'bottom-up' approaches to the understanding of impulsivity. Ultimately, the utility of any model of impulsivity and addiction lies in its heuristic value and ability to integrate evidence from different levels of analysis. Here, we make the case that theoretically-driven, bottom-up models proposing two factors deliver the optimal balance of explanatory power, parsimony, and integration of evidence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Impulsivity and Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder: Subtype Classification Using the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Drew J; Derefinko, Karen J; Lynam, Donald R; Milich, Richard; Fillmore, Mark T

    2010-09-01

    This study examined the classification accuracy of the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale (UPPS) in discriminating several attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) subtypes, including predominantly inattentive type (ADHD/I), combined type (ADHD/C), and combined type with behavioral problems (ADHD/ODD), between each other and a non-ADHD control group using logistic regression analyses. The sample consisted of 88 children ranging in age from 9.0 years to 12.8 years, with a mean of 10.9 years. Children were predominantly male (74%) and Caucasian (86%) and in grades 3-7. Results indicated that the UPPS performed well in classifying ADHD subtypes relative to traditional diagnostic measures. In addition, analyses indicated that differences in symptoms between subtypes can be explained by specific pathways to impulsivity. Implications for the assessment of ADHD and conceptual issues are discussed.

  12. Surprisingly high substrate specificities observed in complex biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nierychlo, Marta; Kindaichi, Tomonori; Kragelund, Caroline

    to investigate the cell-specific in situ substrate uptake pattern of different bacteria. Different substrates were tested by combination of Microautoradiography and Fluorescence in situ Hybridization. Conditions applied (different substrate concentrations, starvation, induction with specific substrates, multiple...... by selection for different specialized species. We hypothesized that bacteria growing in natural environment express strongly conserved substrate specificity which is independent on short-term (few hours) variations in growth conditions. In this study, biofilm from Aalborg wastewater treatment plant was used...

  13. Trait Impulsivity and Newlyweds' Marital Trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavner, Justin A; Lamkin, Joanna; Miller, Joshua D

    2017-02-01

    Despite the relationship of impulsivity with interpersonal dysfunction, including romantic relationship dysfunction, surprisingly little research has examined the degree to which impulsivity predicts how marriages unfold over time. The current study used data from 172 newlywed couples to examine spouses' impulsivity in relation to their 4-year trajectories of marital satisfaction, marital problems, relationship commitment, and verbal aggression, as well as their 10-year divorce rates. Hierarchical linear modeling indicated that husbands' and wives' impulsivity predicted their own intercepts of marital satisfaction and marital problems, reflecting lower levels of satisfaction and higher levels of problems. Wives' impulsivity also predicted their relationship commitment and their verbal aggression intercepts. No cross-spouse effects or effects on slopes were found, and impulsivity did not predict 10-year divorce rates. These findings indicate that the relationship distress associated with impulsivity begins early in marriage, and they suggest a need for further research on the processes by which impulsivity undermines marital quality.

  14. Genetic markers of striatal dopamine predict individual differences in dysfunctional, but not functional impulsivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colzato, L.S.; van den Wildenberg, W.P.M.; van der Does, A.J.W.; Hommel, B.

    2010-01-01

    Various psychiatric disorders are characterized by elevated levels of impulsivity. Although extensive evidence supports a specific role of striatal, but not frontal dopamine (DA) in human impulsivity, recent studies on genetic variability have raised some doubts on such a role. Importantly,

  15. Commentary on Hyperkinetic Impulse Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkley, Russell A.

    2011-01-01

    Dr. Goldstein continues the laudable practice of reprinting articles of historical significance in the history of ADHD with this selective reprinting of material from the original article by Maurice Laufer, Eric Denhoff, and Gerald Solomons on hyperkinetic impulsive disorder (HID) in children. This article on HID is among the first articles to…

  16. Early age of e-cigarette use onset mediates the association between impulsivity and e-cigarette use frequency in youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bold, Krysten W; Morean, Meghan E; Kong, Grace; Simon, Patricia; Camenga, Deepa R; Cavallo, Dana A; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra

    2017-12-01

    Identifying risk factors for youth e-cigarette use is critical, given high rates of e-cigarette use and unknown health effects of long-term use. The current study examined whether an early age of onset of e-cigarette use mediates the association between impulsivity and e-cigarette frequency. Cross-sectional survey data of e-cigarette users (n=927) were collected from 8 high schools in southeastern Connecticut. The sample was 44.7% female (mean age 16.2 [SD=1.2], mean age of e-cigarette onset 14.7 [SD=1.6]). Two domains of self-reported, trait impulsivity were assessed using the abbreviated Barratt Impulsiveness Scale: impaired self-regulation (e.g., problems with concentration or self-control) and behavioral impulsivity (e.g., doing things without thinking). Mediation was tested with Mplus, and the model included school as a cluster variable and controlled for covariates related to e-cigarette use (i.e., sex, age, race, peer use, and other tobacco products ever tried). The hypothesized mediation was supported for both domains of impulsivity (impaired self-regulation a 1 b=0.09, SE=0.02, 95%CI [0.03-0.14], p=.002; behavioral impulsivity a 2 b=0.07, SE=0.03, 95%CI [.01-.14], p=0.03). Specifically, impaired self-regulation (B=-0.33, SE=0.06, pe-cigarettes at an earlier age, and earlier initiation was associated with more days of e-cigarette use in the past month (B=-0.28, SE=0.08, pe-cigarette use through an early age of e-cigarette initiation. Further research is needed to evaluate these relationships longitudinally and to develop targeted e-cigarette interventions for impulsive youth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Impulse breakdown of liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Ushakov, Vasily Y

    2007-01-01

    The book describes the main physical processes and phenomena in pulsed electric breakdown. The knowledge and the control of the electric breakdown of liquids is important not only for the insulation inside power systems but it is also used for the creation and information of high voltage and high current pulses. Such high-voltage micro- and nanosecond pulses find wide application in experimental physics, electro discharge technology, physics of dielectrics, radar detection and ranging, high-speed photography. The nature of charge carriers, mechanism of formation and evolution of the gas phase,

  18. Impulsivity, Frontal Lobes and Risk for Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Crews, Fulton Timm; Boettiger, Charlotte Ann

    2009-01-01

    Alcohol and substance abuse disorders involve continued use of substances despite negative consequences, i.e. loss of behavioral control of drug use. The frontal cortical areas of brain oversee behavioral control through executive functions. Executive functions include abstract thinking, motivation, planning, attention to tasks and inhibition of impulsive responses. Impulsiveness generally refers to premature, unduly risky, poorly conceived actions. Dysfunctional impulsivity includes deficits...

  19. Full averaging of fuzzy impulsive differential inclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia V. Skripnik

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the substantiation of the method of full averaging for fuzzy impulsive differential inclusions is studied. We extend the similar results for impulsive differential inclusions with Hukuhara derivative (Skripnik, 2007, for fuzzy impulsive differential equations (Plotnikov and Skripnik, 2009, and for fuzzy differential inclusions (Skripnik, 2009.

  20. Psychedelic symptoms of cannabis and cocaine use as a function of trait impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wel, J H P; Spronk, D B; Kuypers, K P C; Theunissen, E L; Toennes, S W; Verkes, R J; Ramaekers, J G

    2015-03-01

    Trait impulsivity has been linked to addiction in humans. It has been suggested that drug users with high trait impulsivity levels are more sensitive to subjective drug intoxication. This study assessed whether subjective response to drugs differs between drug users with normal or high levels of trait impulsivity. Regular drug users (N = 122) received doses of cocaine HCl, cannabis, and placebo in a three-way crossover study. Their mood, dissociative state, and psychedelic symptoms were measured with subjective rating scales (CADDS, Bowdle, POMS). Trait impulsivity was assessed with the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale. Cannabis increased dissociation and psychedelic state, as well as fatigue, confusion, depression and anxiety, and decreased arousal, positive mood, vigor, friendliness, and elation. Cocaine increased dissociation, psychedelic state, vigor, friendliness, elation, positive mood, anxiety and arousal, while decreasing fatigue. Only a few subjective items revealed a drug × trait impulsivity interaction, suggesting that psychedelic symptoms were most intense in high impulsivity subjects. Trait impulsiveness ratings were negatively correlated with ratings of vigor (r = -.197) and positively correlated with ratings of loss of thought control (r = .237) during cannabis intoxication. It is concluded that a broad association between trait impulsivity and psychedelic subjective drug experience appears to be absent. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. The effectiveness of EEG-feedback on attention, impulsivity and EEG: a sham feedback controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logemann, H N Alexander; Lansbergen, Marieke M; Van Os, Titus W D P; Böcker, Koen B E; Kenemans, J Leon

    2010-07-19

    EEG-feedback, also called neurofeedback, is a training procedure aimed at altering brain activity, and is used as a treatment for disorders like Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Studies have reported positive effects of neurofeedback on attention and other dependent variables. However, double-blind studies including a sham neurofeedback control group are lacking. The inclusion of such group is crucial to control for unspecific effects. The current work presents a sham-controlled, double-blind evaluation. The hypothesis was that neurofeedback enhances attention and decreases impulsive behavior. Participants (n=27) were students selected on relatively high scores on impulsivity/inattention questionnaires (Barrat Impulsivity Scale and Broadbent CFQ). They were assigned to a neurofeedback treatment or a sham group. (sham)Neurofeedback training was planned for 15 weeks consisting of a total of 30 sessions, each lasting 22 min. Before and after 16 sessions (i.e., interim analyses), qEEG was recorded and impulsivity and inattention was assessed using a stop signal task and reversed continuous performance task and two questionnaires. Results of the interim analyses showed that participants were blind with respect to group inclusion, but no trend towards an effect of neurofeedback on behavioral measures was observed. Therefore in line with ethical guidelines the experiment was ceased. These results implicate a possible lack of effect of neurofeedback when one accounts for non-specific effects. However, the specific form of feedback and application of the sham-controlled double-blind design may have diminished the effect of neurofeedback. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Psychedelic symptoms of cannabis and cocaine use as a function of trait impulsivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wel, J. van; Spronk, D.B.; Kuypers, K.; Theunissen, E.; Toennes, S.; Verkes, R.J.; Ramaekers, J.

    2015-01-01

    Trait impulsivity has been linked to addiction in humans. It has been suggested that drug users with high trait impulsivity levels are more sensitive to subjective drug intoxication. This study assessed whether subjective response to drugs differs between drug users with normal or high levels of

  3. Religiosity is a moderator of the relationship between impulsivity and internalizing symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JONAS JARDIM DE PAULA

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is growing interest in the role of religion in psychiatric disorders. Impulsivity is a psychological trait associated with acting without thinking, with a decision process favoring short-term outcomes without further consideration of its consequences, and is a risk factor for the development of mental disorders. Objective In this study, the objective was to analyze the role of religiosity as a possible moderator between the association of impulsivity and internalizing psychiatric symptoms. Methods The hypothesis was assessed in a cross-sectional study enrolling 366 adults evaluated using the abbreviated version of the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11, the Self Reporting Questionnaire-20, and the Duke Religion Index. Results Internalizing symptoms were significantly influenced by an interaction between religiosity and impulsivity. Religiosity acted as a protective factor against internalizing symptoms only for participants with high impulsivity. Discussion The results suggest a moderation role of religiosity in the association of impulsivity with internalizing symptoms.

  4. (Dis)similarity in Impulsivity and Marital Satisfaction: A Comparison of Volatility, Compatibility, and Incompatibility Hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrick, Jaye L; Houston, Rebecca J; Quigley, Brian M; Testa, Maria; Kubiak, Audrey; Levitt, Ash; Homish, Gregory G; Leonard, Kenneth E

    2016-04-01

    Impulsivity is negatively associated with relationship satisfaction, but whether relationship functioning is harmed or helped when both partners are high in impulsivity is unclear. The influence of impulsivity might be exacerbated (the Volatility Hypothesis) or reversed (the Compatibility Hypothesis). Alternatively, discrepancies in impulsivity might be particularly problematic (the Incompatibility Hypothesis). Behavioral and self-report measures of impulsivity were collected from a community sample of couples. Mixed effect polynomial regressions with response surface analysis provide evidence in favor of both the Compatibility Hypothesis and the Incompatibility Hypothesis, but not the Volatility Hypothesis. Mediation analyses suggest results for satisfaction are driven by perceptions of the partner's negative behavior and responsiveness. Implications for the study of both impulsivity and relationship functioning are discussed.

  5. High plastic concrete temperature specifications for paving mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    This report documents a study performed for the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) regarding : concrete roadway construction in hot weather. The main objective in this project is to develop improved : specifications and procedures with resp...

  6. Diagnosis and treatment of impulse control disorders in patients with movement disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, Tiago A.; Strafella, Antonio P.; Thomsen, Teri; Voon, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Impulse control disorders are a psychiatric condition characterized by the failure to resist an impulsive act or behavior that may be harmful to self or others. In movement disorders, impulse control disorders are associated with dopaminergic treatment, notably dopamine agonists (DAs). Impulse control disorders have been studied extensively in Parkinson’s disease, but are also recognized in restless leg syndrome and atypical Parkinsonian syndromes. Epidemiological studies suggest younger age, male sex, greater novelty seeking, impulsivity, depression and premorbid impulse control disorders as the most consistent risk factors. Such patients may warrant special monitoring after starting treatment with a DA. Various individual screening tools are available for people without Parkinson’s disease. The Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson’s Disease has been developed specifically for Parkinson’s disease. The best treatment for impulse control disorders is prevention. However, after the development of impulse control disorders, the mainstay intervention is to reduce or discontinue the offending anti-Parkinsonian medication. In refractory cases, other pharmacological interventions are available, including neuroleptics, antiepileptics, amantadine, antiandrogens, lithium and opioid antagonists. Unfortunately, their use is only supported by case reports, small case series or open-label clinical studies. Prospective, controlled studies are warranted. Ongoing investigations include naltrexone and nicotine. PMID:23634190

  7. Diagnosis and treatment of impulse control disorders in patients with movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, Tiago A; Strafella, Antonio P; Thomsen, Teri; Voon, Valerie; Miyasaki, Janis

    2013-05-01

    Impulse control disorders are a psychiatric condition characterized by the failure to resist an impulsive act or behavior that may be harmful to self or others. In movement disorders, impulse control disorders are associated with dopaminergic treatment, notably dopamine agonists (DAs). Impulse control disorders have been studied extensively in Parkinson's disease, but are also recognized in restless leg syndrome and atypical Parkinsonian syndromes. Epidemiological studies suggest younger age, male sex, greater novelty seeking, impulsivity, depression and premorbid impulse control disorders as the most consistent risk factors. Such patients may warrant special monitoring after starting treatment with a DA. Various individual screening tools are available for people without Parkinson's disease. The Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's Disease has been developed specifically for Parkinson's disease. The best treatment for impulse control disorders is prevention. However, after the development of impulse control disorders, the mainstay intervention is to reduce or discontinue the offending anti-Parkinsonian medication. In refractory cases, other pharmacological interventions are available, including neuroleptics, antiepileptics, amantadine, antiandrogens, lithium and opioid antagonists. Unfortunately, their use is only supported by case reports, small case series or open-label clinical studies. Prospective, controlled studies are warranted. Ongoing investigations include naltrexone and nicotine.

  8. The convergence and divergence of impulsivity facets in daily life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperry, Sarah H; Lynam, Donald R; Kwapil, Thomas R

    2017-11-10

    Impulsivity appears to be best conceptualized as a multidimensional construct. For example, the UPPS-P model posits that there are five underlying facets of impulsivity. The present study examined the expression of the UPPS-P facets in daily life using experience sampling methodology. A specific goal of the study was to examine positive urgency, a facet added to the original UPPS model, and its convergence and divergence from the negative urgency facet. A large nonclinical sample of young adults (n = 294) completed the UPPS-P scale and was signaled to complete questionnaires assessing daily affect, cognitions, sense of self, and impulsive behaviors eight times a day for 7 days. Results indicated that the UPPS-P facets are associated with disruptions in affect, cognitions, and behavior in daily life. Furthermore, all of the UPPS-P facets were associated with impulsivity in daily life. Contrary to expectation, positive urgency was associated with negative affect rather than positive affect and had a profile indistinguishable from negative urgency. These results generally support a four-factor model of multidimensional impulsivity with a general overall urgency factor instead of separate positive and negative urgency facets. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Impulse noise estimation and removal for OFDM systems

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Naffouri, Tareq Y.

    2014-03-01

    Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) is a modulation scheme that is widely used in wired and wireless communication systems. While OFDM is ideally suited to deal with frequency selective channels and AWGN, its performance may be dramatically impacted by the presence of impulse noise. In fact, very strong noise impulses in the time domain might result in the erasure of whole OFDM blocks of symbols at the receiver. Impulse noise can be mitigated by considering it as a sparse signal in time, and using recently developed algorithms for sparse signal reconstruction. We propose an algorithm that utilizes the guard band subcarriers for the impulse noise estimation and cancellation. Instead of relying on ℓ1 minimization as done in some popular general-purpose compressive sensing schemes, the proposed method jointly exploits the specific structure of this problem and the available a priori information for sparse signal recovery. The computational complexity of the proposed algorithm is very competitive with respect to sparse signal reconstruction schemes based on ℓ1 minimization. The proposed method is compared with respect to other state-of-the-art methods in terms of achievable rates for an OFDM system with impulse noise and AWGN. © 2014 IEEE.

  10. Impulse Based Scheme for Crystal-less ULP Radios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drago, S.; Sebastiano, Fabio; Breems, Lucien J.; Leenaerts, Domine M.W.; Makinwa, Kofi A.A.; Nauta, Bram

    2009-01-01

    Abstract—This study describes a method of implementing a fully integrated ultra-low-power (ULP) radio for wireless sensor networks (WSNs). This is achieved using an ad hoc modulation scheme (impulse radio), with a bandwidth of 17.7 MHz in the 2.4 GHz—ISM band and a specific medium access control

  11. Removal of impulse noise clusters from color images with local order statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchay, Alexey; Kober, Vitaly

    2017-09-01

    This paper proposes a novel algorithm for restoring images corrupted with clusters of impulse noise. The noise clusters often occur when the probability of impulse noise is very high. The proposed noise removal algorithm consists of detection of bulky impulse noise in three color channels with local order statistics followed by removal of the detected clusters by means of vector median filtering. With the help of computer simulation we show that the proposed algorithm is able to effectively remove clustered impulse noise. The performance of the proposed algorithm is compared in terms of image restoration metrics with that of common successful algorithms.

  12. Solar flare impulsive phase emission observed with SDO/EVE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, Michael B.; Milligan, Ryan O.; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Keenan, Francis P., E-mail: mkennedy29@qub.ac.uk [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-10

    Differential emission measures (DEMs) during the impulsive phase of solar flares were constructed using observations from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) and the Markov-Chain Monte Carlo method. Emission lines from ions formed over the temperature range log T{sub e} = 5.8-7.2 allow the evolution of the DEM to be studied over a wide temperature range at 10 s cadence. The technique was applied to several M- and X-class flares, where impulsive phase EUV emission is observable in the disk-integrated EVE spectra from emission lines formed up to 3-4 MK and we use spatially unresolved EVE observations to infer the thermal structure of the emitting region. For the nine events studied, the DEMs exhibited a two-component distribution during the impulsive phase, a low-temperature component with peak temperature of 1-2 MK, and a broad high-temperature component from 7 to 30 MK. A bimodal high-temperature component is also found for several events, with peaks at 8 and 25 MK during the impulsive phase. The origin of the emission was verified using Atmospheric Imaging Assembly images to be the flare ribbons and footpoints, indicating that the constructed DEMs represent the spatially average thermal structure of the chromospheric flare emission during the impulsive phase.

  13. Neural circuitry of impulsivity in a cigarette craving paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiane eBourque

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Impulsivity has been shown to play a pivotal role in the onset, pattern of consumption, relapse and, most notably, craving of illicit and licit drugs such as cigarette smoking. The goal of this study was to examine the neurobiological influence of trait impulsivity during cue-induced cigarette craving. Thirty-one chronic smokers passively viewed appetitive smoking-related and neutral images while being scanned and reported their feelings of craving. They completed the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, a measure of trait impulsivity. We conducted functional connectivity analyses using the psycho-physiological interaction method. During the processing of smoking stimuli, participants presented increased activations in the cingulate and prefrontal cortices, as well as in the limbic system. We observed a significant positive relationship between impulsivity scores and reported craving. A negative correlation was observed between the impulsivity score and activity in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC. The insula, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC as well as the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC presented a negative connectivity with the PCC. Consistent with the view that the PCC is related to the ability to resist cigarette craving, our results suggest that high impulsive smokers have greater difficulty in controlling their cravings, and that this weakness may be mediated by lower PCC activity. Moreover, we argue that the less PCC activity, the greater the probability of a stronger emotional, physiological and biased attentional response to smoking cues mediated by insula, dACC and DLPFC activity. This is the first study on this topic, and so, results will need to be replicated in both licit and illicit drug abusers. Our findings also highlight a need for more emphasis on the PCC in drug addiction research, as it is one of the most consistently activated regions in fMRI studies examining the neural correlates of cue-induced alcohol, drug and

  14. TEA HF laser with a high specific radiation energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchikin, A. V.; Andreev, M. V.; Losev, V. F.; Panchenko, Yu. N.

    2017-01-01

    Results of experimental studies of the chemical HF laser with a non-chain reaction are presented. The possibility of the total laser efficiency of 5 % is shown when a traditional C-to-C pumping circuit with the charging voltage of 20-24 kV is used. It is experimentally shown that the specific radiation output energy of 21 J/l is reached at the specific pump energy of 350 J/l in SF6/H2 = 14/1 mixture at the total pressure of 0.27 bar.

  15. The impact of self-reported life stress on current impulsivity in cocaine dependent adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Elizabeth L; Yoon, Jin H; Mahoney, James J; Omar, Yasmine; Newton, Thomas F; De La Garza, Richard

    2013-10-01

    Current cocaine treatments may be enhanced with a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms that contribute to the onset and maintenance of the disease, such as life stress and impulsivity. Life stress and impulsivity have previously been studied independently as contributors to drug use, and the current study expands upon past research by examining how these factors interact with one another. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the role of life stress in predicting impulsivity in a non-treatment seeking cocaine-dependent sample (N=112). Analyses revealed that trait impulsivity (as measured by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale) was associated with education (r=-3.09, p<0.01), as those who had higher educational attainment also reported lower rates of trait impulsivity. In addition, those over the age of 30 demonstrated lower impulsivity in decision-making (as measured by delay discounting) than those under 30 (t=2.21, p=0.03). Overall exposure to life stress was not significantly correlated to either aspect of impulsivity. However several specific life stressors were significantly related to greater impulsivity including having been put up for adoption or in foster care (t=-2.96, p<0.01), and having a child taken away against their will (t=-2.68, p=0.01). These findings suggest that age and education relate to impulsivity; and that while an overall compilation of life stress scores was not related to impulsivity, specific types of stress related to either being taken away from a parent or having a child taken away were. Future studies should assess these constructs longitudinally to restrict response bias. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. High Specificity of Quantitative Methylation-Specific PCR Analysis for MGMT Promoter Hypermethylation Detection in Gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Parrella

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal brain tissue from 28 individuals and 50 glioma samples were analyzed by real-time Quantitative Methylation-Specific PCR (QMSP. Data from this analysis were compared with results obtained on the same samples by MSP. QMSP analysis demonstrated a statistically significant difference in both methylation level (P=.000009 Mann Whitney Test and frequencies (P=.0000007, Z-test in tumour samples as compared with normal brain tissues. Although QMSP and MSP showed similar sensitivity, the specificity of QMSP analysis was significantly higher (93%; CI95%: 84%–100% as compared with MSP (64%; 95%CI: 46%–82%. Our results suggest that QMSP analysis may represent a powerful tool to identify glioma patients that will benefit from alkylating agents chemotherapy.

  17. A meta-analytic review of the relationship between adolescent risky sexual behavior and impulsivity across gender, age, and race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dir, Allyson L; Coskunpinar, Ayca; Cyders, Melissa A

    2014-11-01

    Impulsivity is frequently included as a risk factor in models of adolescent sexual risk-taking; however, findings on the magnitude of association between impulsivity and risky sexual behavior are variable across studies. The aims of the current meta-analysis were to examine (1) how specific impulsivity traits relate to specific risky sexual behaviors in adolescents, and (2) how the impulsivity-risky sex relationship might differ across gender, age, and race. Eighty-one studies were meta-analyzed using a random effects model to examine the overall impulsivity-risky sex relationship and relationships among specific impulsivity traits and risky sexual behaviors. Overall, results revealed a significant, yet small, association between impulsivity and adolescent risky sexual behavior (r=0.19, psexual behaviors as compared to negative outcomes related to these behaviors. Gender moderated the overall relationship (β=0.22, p=0.04), such that effect sizes were significantly larger in samples with more females. Age, race, study design, and sample type did not moderate the relationship, although there was a pattern suggesting smaller effects for adolescents in juvenile detention settings. Adolescent samples with more females showed a larger impulsivity-risky sex relationship, suggesting that impulsivity may be a more important risk factor for risky sex among adolescent females. Research and treatment should consider gender differences when investigating the role of impulsivity in adolescent sexual risk-taking. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Specification of High Activity Gamma-Ray Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, Washington, DC.

    The report is concerned with making recommendations for the specifications of gamma ray sources, which relate to the quantity of radioactive material and the radiation emitted. Primary consideration is given to sources in teletherapy and to a lesser extent those used in industrial radiography and in irradiation units used in industry and research.…

  19. High seroprevalence of specific Toxoplasma gondii IgG antibodies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toxoplasmosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with advanced HIV disease. However, there is limited data on the magnitude of toxoplasmosis among HIV patients with immunological treatment failure. Therefore, this study was designed to determine the seroprevalence of specific Toxoplasma ...

  20. Impulsivity, impulsive and reflective processes and the development of alcohol use and misuse in adolescents and young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinout Wiers

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper contrasts dual-process and personality approaches in the prediction of addictive behaviors and related risk behaviors. In dual-process models, behavior is described as the joint outcome of qualitatively different “impulsive” (or associative and “reflective” processes. There are important individual differences regarding both types of processes, and the relative strength of both in a specific situation is influenced by prior behavior and state variables (e.g., fatigue, alcohol use. From this perspective, a specific behavior (e.g., alcohol misuse can be predicted by the combined indices of the behavior-related impulsive processes (e.g., associations with alcohol, and reflective processes, including the ability to refrain from a motivationally salient action. Personality approaches have reported that general traits such as impulsivity predict addictive behaviors. Here we contrast these two approaches, with supplementary analyses on four datasets. We hypothesized that trait impulsivity can predict specific risky behaviors, but that its predictive power disappears once specific behavior-related associations, indicators of executive functioning, and their interaction are entered into the equation. In all four studies the observed interaction between specific associations and Executive Control (EC was robust: trait impulsivity did not diminish the prediction of alcohol use by the interaction. Trait impulsivity was not always related to alcohol use, and when it was, the predictive power disappeared after entering the interaction between behavior-specific associations and EC in one study, but not in the other. These findings are interpreted in relation to the validity of the measurements used, which leads to a more refined hypothesis.

  1. Impulsivity, Impulsive and Reflective Processes and the Development of Alcohol Use and Misuse in Adolescents and Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiers, Reinout W.; Ames, Susan L.; Hofmann, Wilhelm; Krank, Marvin; Stacy, Alan W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper contrasts dual-process and personality approaches in the prediction of addictive behaviors and related risk behaviors. In dual-process models, behavior is described as the joint outcome of qualitatively different “impulsive” (or associative) and “reflective” processes. There are important individual differences regarding both types of processes, and the relative strength of both in a specific situation is influenced by prior behavior and state variables (e.g., fatigue, alcohol use). From this perspective, a specific behavior (e.g., alcohol misuse) can be predicted by the combined indices of the behavior-related impulsive processes (e.g., associations with alcohol), and reflective processes, including the ability to refrain from a motivationally salient action. Personality approaches have reported that general traits such as impulsivity predict addictive behaviors. Here we contrast these two approaches, with supplementary analyses on four datasets. We hypothesized that trait impulsivity can predict specific risky behaviors, but that its predictive power disappears once specific behavior-related associations, indicators of executive functioning, and their interaction are entered into the equation. In all four studies the observed interaction between specific associations and executive control (EC) was robust: trait impulsivity did not diminish the prediction of alcohol use by the interaction. Trait impulsivity was not always related to alcohol use, and when it was, the predictive power disappeared after entering the interaction between behavior-specific associations and EC in one study, but not in the other. These findings are interpreted in relation to the validity of the measurements used, which leads to a more refined hypothesis. PMID:21833213

  2. High specific power flexible integrated IMM photovoltaic blanket Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Originally designed for space applications, multi-junction solar cells have a high overall power conversion efficiency (>30%) which compares favorably to...

  3. Impulsive Phase Transport. Chapter 3,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-30

    with extensive UV coordinated through the SMY (Svestka, Rust, and Dryer line spectroscopy. Contemporarily though not simultane- 1982). Ground support...calculations of the production of the non- the best job of explaining the wide variety of impulsive-phase thermal red shifted La line by capture processes on...slow if the injection occurred over many sub-resolution elements down. Second. there is strong local heating produced near (a "’ pepper -pot" scenario

  4. Impulsivity and socio-economic status interact to increase the risk of gambling onset among youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, Nathalie; Lo, Ernest; Cantinotti, Michael; O'Loughlin, Jennifer

    2010-12-01

    To determine if impulsivity and socio-economic status (SES) interact to influence gambling onset in youth. Longitudinal study of grade 7 students followed for 8 years. Montréal, Canada. A total of 628 adult students aged 12.6 years on average at cohort inception. Impulsivity and SES (parent education, area deprivation) were collected during secondary school. Age of gambling onset was collected retrospectively when participants were aged 20.3 years. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to model the association between time to first report of gambling and interaction terms for each of impulsivity and parent education, and impulsivity and area deprivation accounting for sex and ethnicity. Median (interquartile range) age of gambling onset was 17.0 (4.0) years. Impulsivity independently increased the risk of gambling onset among participants with no university-educated parent [hazard ratio (HR) 1.3; 95% confidence interval 1.1-1.5] and those living in highly deprived areas (HR 1.7; 1.5-2.0). Impulsivity was not associated with gambling onset among high SES youth. Among participants with high impulsivity, risks were elevated for those with no university-educated parent relative to one or more university-educated parent (HR 1.7; 1.1-2.7), and for participants living in deprived relative to advantaged areas (HR 5.0; 2.6-9.6). SES was not associated with gambling onset among participants with low impulsivity. Impulsivity is a risk factor for gambling onset among low but not high SES youth, and low SES influences gambling onset primarily among impulsive youth. Gambling prevention programmes may need to consider potential interaction between impulsivity and SES. © 2010 The Authors, Addiction © 2010 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  5. Prefrontal cortical–striatal dopamine receptor mRNA expression predicts distinct forms of impulsivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Nicholas W.; Beas, Blanca S.; Montgomery, Karienn S.; Haberman, Rebecca P.; Bizon, Jennifer L.; Setlow, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Variation in dopamine receptor levels has been associated with different facets of impulsivity. To further delineate the neural substrates underlying impulsive action (inability to withhold a prepotent motor response) and impulsive choice (delay aversion), we characterised rats in the Differential Reinforcement of Low Rates of Responding task and a delay discounting task. We also measured performance on an effort-based discounting task. We then assessed D1 and D2 dopamine receptor mRNA expression in subregions of the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens using in situ hybridisation, and compared these data with behavioral performance. Expression of D1 and D2 receptor mRNA in distinct brain regions was predictive of impulsive action. A dissociation within the nucleus accumbens was observed between subregions and receptor subtypes; higher D1 mRNA expression in the shell predicted greater impulsive action, whereas lower D2 mRNA expression in the core predicted greater impulsive action. We also observed a negative correlation between impulsive action and D2 mRNA expression in the prelimbic cortex. Interestingly, a similar relationship was present between impulsive choice and prelimbic cortex D2 mRNA, despite the fact that behavioral indices of impulsive action and impulsive choice were uncorrelated. Finally, we found that both high D1 mRNA expression in the insular cortex and low D2 mRNA expression in the infralimbic cortex were associated with willingness to exert effort for rewards. Notably, dopamine receptor mRNA in these regions was not associated with either facet of impulsivity. The data presented here provide novel molecular and neuroanatomical distinctions between different forms of impulsivity, as well as effort-based decision-making. PMID:23510331

  6. Relationships of Impulsivity and Subjective Response to Alcohol Use and Related Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berey, Benjamin L; Leeman, Robert F; Pittman, Brian; O'Malley, Stephanie S

    2017-11-01

    Impulsivity and subjective response to alcohol are predictors of alcohol use disorder. The purpose of this study was to replicate and extend prior research examining relationships between impulsivity and subjective response patterns. In addition, impulsivity and initial subjective response patterns were examined in relation to current heavy episodic drinking and alcohol-related problems. Data were cross-sectional, retrospective self-reports, obtained from baseline assessments from five studies affiliated with the Yale Center for the Translational Neuroscience of Alcoholism. Analyses were conducted in a sample restricted to nondependent, young adults (n = 186) and in a larger, more heterogeneous sample (n = 363). Data were analyzed using hierarchical regression in three separate types of models. In the young adult, nondependent sample, impulsivity was a statistically significant predictor of lower recent sedative subjective response. Impulsivity and initial sedative subjective response patterns were statistically significant predictors of past-year heavy drinking. Impulsivity, but not initial subjective response patterns, was a statistically significant predictor of past-year alcohol-related problems. Findings in the larger sample were similar. More-impulsive individuals may perceive less sedation from alcohol, which is associated with increased heavy drinking. However, higher levels of impulsivity may be more responsible than diminished subjective response for poor decision making that results in negative drinking consequences. These results suggest that high impulsivity and certain subjective response patterns are worthy intervention targets.

  7. A Novel Approach of Impulsive Signal Extraction for Early Fault Detection of Rolling Element Bearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Aijun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The fault signals of rolling element bearing are often characterized by the presence of periodic impulses, which are modulated high-frequency harmonic components. The features of early fault in rolling bearing are very weak, which are often masked by background noise. The impulsiveness of the vibration signal has affected the identification of characteristic frequency for the early fault detection of the bearing. In this paper, a novel approach based on morphological operators is presented for impulsive signal extraction of early fault in rolling element bearing. The combination Top-Hat (CTH is proposed to extract the impulsive signal and enhance the impulsiveness of the bearing fault signal, and the envelope analysis is applied to reveal the fault-related signatures. The impulsive extraction performance of the proposed CTH is compared with that of finite impulse response filter (FIR by analyzing the simulated bearing fault signals, and the result indicates that the CTH is more effective in extracting impulsive signals. The method is evaluated using real fault signals from defective bearings with early rolling element fault and early fault located on the outer race. The results show that the proposed method is able to enhance the impulsiveness of early bearing fault signals.

  8. Behavioural aspects of impulsivity in alcoholics with and without a cluster-b personality disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dom, G.; Wilde, B. de; Brink, W. van den; Hulstijn, W.; Sabbe, B.G.C.

    2006-01-01

    Studies have shown that alcoholics with a cluster-B personality disorder (cluster-B PD) are characterized by high levels of impulsivity. However, impulsivity has mainly been studied as a broad concept without its different aspects being considered. The present study compared abstinent alcoholic

  9. Behavioural aspects of impulsivity in alcoholics with and without a cluster-B personality disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dom, Geert; de Wilde, Bieke; Hulstijn, Wouter; van den Brink, Wim; Sabbe, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    AIMS: Studies have shown that alcoholics with a cluster-B personality disorder (cluster-B PD) are characterized by high levels of impulsivity. However, impulsivity has mainly been studied as a broad concept without its different aspects being considered. The present study compared abstinent

  10. Limitations caused by distortion in room impulse response measurements by swept sine technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stojic, Branko; Ciric, Dejan; Markovic, Milos

    2011-01-01

    The significance of a room impulse response implies the requirement that its measurement should have a high level of accuracy in certain applications. One of the common problems in a measurement process is nonlinearity leading to the distortion of a room impulse response. Limitations caused by th...

  11. "Speedy Action over Goal Orientation": Cognitive Impulsivity in Male Forensic Patients with Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daderman, Anna M.; Meurling, Ann Wirsen; Levander, Sten

    2012-01-01

    Previous neuropsychiatric studies suggest a relationship between reading disability and cognitive impulsivity. This relationship is not entirely explained by the high comorbidity between reading disability and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), as children with a co-occurrence of these disorders tend to be more impulsive than those…

  12. Impulsivity and Its Relationship to Risky Sexual Behaviors and Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Ken C.; Botzet, Andria M.; Fahnhorst, Tamara; Baumel, Lindsey; Lee, Susanne

    2009-01-01

    We examined a mediational model of the interrelationship of drug use, sexual risk, and impulsivity in a sample of young adults (N = 89), of which almost half displayed highly disruptive behaviors as children. We chose a mediational model given the emerging evidence that impulsivity is an underlying risk factor for many youth health risk problems,…

  13. Association of impulsivity and polymorphic microRNA-641 target sites in the SNAP-25 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nóra Németh

    Full Text Available Impulsivity is a personality trait of high impact and is connected with several types of maladaptive behavior and psychiatric diseases, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, alcohol and drug abuse, as well as pathological gambling and mood disorders. Polymorphic variants of the SNAP-25 gene emerged as putative genetic components of impulsivity, as SNAP-25 protein plays an important role in the central nervous system, and its SNPs are associated with several psychiatric disorders. In this study we aimed to investigate if polymorphisms in the regulatory regions of the SNAP-25 gene are in association with normal variability of impulsivity. Genotypes and haplotypes of two polymorphisms in the promoter (rs6077690 and rs6039769 and two SNPs in the 3' UTR (rs3746544 and rs1051312 of the SNAP-25 gene were determined in a healthy Hungarian population (N = 901 using PCR-RFLP or real-time PCR in combination with sequence specific probes. Significant association was found between the T-T 3' UTR haplotype and impulsivity, whereas no association could be detected with genotypes or haplotypes of the promoter loci. According to sequence alignment, the polymorphisms in the 3' UTR of the gene alter the binding site of microRNA-641, which was analyzed by luciferase reporter system. It was observed that haplotypes altering one or two nucleotides in the binding site of the seed region of microRNA-641 significantly increased the amount of generated protein in vitro. These findings support the role of polymorphic SNAP-25 variants both at psychogenetic and molecular biological levels.

  14. Impulsive and hybrid dynamical systems stability, dissipativity, and control

    CERN Document Server

    Haddad, Wassim M; Nersesov, Sergey G

    2014-01-01

    This book develops a general analysis and synthesis framework for impulsive and hybrid dynamical systems. Such a framework is imperative for modern complex engineering systems that involve interacting continuous-time and discrete-time dynamics with multiple modes of operation that place stringent demands on controller design and require implementation of increasing complexity--whether advanced high-performance tactical fighter aircraft and space vehicles, variable-cycle gas turbine engines, or air and ground transportation systems. Impulsive and Hybrid Dynamical Systems goes beyond similar

  15. Directional Total Generalized Variation Regularization for Impulse Noise Removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongskov, Rasmus Dalgas; Dong, Yiqiu

    2017-01-01

    A recently suggested regularization method, which combines directional information with total generalized variation (TGV), has been shown to be successful for restoring Gaussian noise corrupted images. We extend the use of this regularizer to impulse noise removal and demonstrate that using...... this regularizer for directional images is highly advantageous. In order to estimate directions in impulse noise corrupted images, which is much more challenging compared to Gaussian noise corrupted images, we introduce a new Fourier transform-based method. Numerical experiments show that this method is more...

  16. Trait impulsivity and increased pre-attentional sensitivity to intense stimuli in bipolar disorder and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lijffijt, Marijn; Lane, Scott D; Moeller, F Gerard; Steinberg, Joel L; Swann, Alan C

    2015-01-01

    Impulsivity and sensation seeking are stimulus-oriented traits. Because they differ in degree of intention and planning, they may have distinct neurophysiological mechanisms. Impulsivity is prominent in bipolar disorder, and may be related to pre-attentional information filtering and stimulus-orientation. We investigated specificity of relationships between impulsivity and sensitivity to stimulus intensity in bipolar disorder and controls, using intensity-sensitivity of auditory evoked potentials. Seventy-six subjects (37 healthy controls, 39 with bipolar disorder) were administered an intensity-sensitivity paradigm. Additional measures included Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11) and Eysenck Impulsivity and Venturesomeness scores. State-dependent rapid-response impulsivity was measured using the Immediate Memory Task. Intensity-sensitivities of the auditory evoked P1N1, N1P2, P1, N1, and P2 potentials were assessed as the slope of amplitude relative to loudness. Analyses used general linear models (GLM) with impulsivity-related measures as dependent variables and age, gender, education, and diagnosis as dependent variables. BIS-11 total, motor, and attentional impulsivity scores correlated positively with pre-attentional N1 and P1N1 intensity-sensitivity slopes in bipolar disorder, but not in controls. BIS-11 nonplanning and Eysenck Venturesomeness scores did not correlate with intensity-sensitivity. Intensity-sensitivity slopes did not correlate with rapid-response impulsivity. Correlations between N1 or P1N1 slopes and BIS-11 scores in bipolar disorder were not affected by age, education, WAIS, treatment, symptoms, or gender. Trait impulsivity in bipolar disorder may be related to poorly modulated stimulus-driven late pre-attentional responses to stimuli, potentially resulting in exaggerated responses to intense stimuli even before conscious awareness. Components of trait impulsivity are physiologically heterogenous relative to intensity-sensitivity. Copyright

  17. Penrose junction conditions extended: Impulsive waves with gyratons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolský, J.; Švarc, R.; Steinbauer, R.; Sämann, C.

    2017-09-01

    We generalize the classical junction conditions for constructing impulsive gravitational waves by the Penrose "cut and paste" method. Specifically, we study nonexpanding impulses which propagate in spaces of constant curvature with any value of the cosmological constant (that is, Minkowski, de Sitter, or anti-de Sitter universes) when additional off-diagonal metric components are present. Such components encode a possible angular momentum of the ultrarelativistic source of the impulsive wave—the so-called gyraton. We explicitly derive and analyze a specific transformation that relates the distributional form of the metric to a new form which is (Lipschitz) continuous. Such a transformation automatically implies an extended version of the Penrose junction conditions. It turns out that the conditions for identifying points of the background spacetime across the impulse are the same as in the original Penrose cut and paste construction, but their derivatives now directly represent the influence of the gyraton on the axial motion of test particles. Our results apply both for vacuum and nonvacuum solutions of Einstein's field equations and can also be extended to other theories of gravity.

  18. Advanced Space Power Systems (ASPS): High Specific Energy Li-ion Battery Cells Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the High Specific Energy Battery project element is to develop high specific energy battery technologies that enable new capabilities for future...

  19. Role of serotonin transporter function in rat orbitofrontal cortex in impulsive choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darna, Mahesh; Chow, Jonathan J; Yates, Justin R; Charnigo, Richard J; Beckmann, Joshua S; Bardo, Michael T; Dwoskin, Linda P

    2015-10-15

    Impulsivity is a multi-faceted personality construct that plays a prominent role in drug abuse vulnerability. Dysregulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin, 5-HT) systems in subregions of the prefrontal cortex has been implicated in impulsivity. Extracellular 5-HT concentrations are regulated by 5-HT transporters (SERTs), indicating that these transporters may be important molecular targets underlying individual differences in impulsivity and drug abuse vulnerability. The present study evaluated the role of SERT in mediating individual differences in impulsivity. Rats were tested for both impulsive action using the cued go/no-go task and for impulsive choice using a delay discounting task in a counterbalanced design. Following behavioral evaluation, Km and Vmax were obtained from kinetic analysis of [(3)H]5-HT uptake by SERT using synaptosomes prepared from both orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) obtained from each individual rat. Vmax for SERT in OFC, but not mPFC, was negatively correlated with mean adjusted delay scores in the delay discounting task. In contrast, Vmax for SERT in OFC and mPFC was not correlated with performance in the cued go/no-go task. To further evaluate the relationship between SERT function and impulsive choice, a selective SERT inhibitor, fluoxetine (0, 15, 50 and 150pmol/side) was microinjected bilaterally into OFC and effects on the delay discounting task determined. Following stabilization of behavior, fluoxetine increased mean adjusted delay scores (decreased impulsivity) in high impulsive rats compared to saline microinjection, but had no effect in low impulsive rats. These ex vivo and in vivo results suggest that enhanced SERT function in OFC underlies high impulsive choice behavior. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Impulsive Rats Exhibit Blunted Dopamine Release Dynamics during a Delay Discounting Task Independent of Cocaine History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschak, Travis M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The inability to wait for a large, delayed reward when faced with a small, immediate one, known as delay discounting, has been implicated in a number of disorders including substance abuse. Individual differences in impulsivity on the delay discounting task are reflected in differences in neural function, including in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) core. We examined the role of a history of cocaine self-administration, as well as individual differences in impulsivity, on rapid dopamine (DA) release dynamics in the NAc core. Rats with a history of cocaine or water/saline self-administration were tested on delay discounting while being simultaneously assayed for rapid DA release using electrochemical methods. In controls, we found that cue DA release was modulated by reward delay and magnitude, consistent with prior reports. A history of cocaine had no effect on either delay discounting or DA release dynamics. Nonetheless, independent of drug history, individual differences in impulsivity were related to DA release in the NAc core. First, high impulsive animals exhibited dampened cue DA release during the delay discounting task. Second, reward delay and magnitude in high impulsive animals failed to robustly modulate changes in cue DA release. Importantly, these two DAergic mechanisms were uncorrelated with each other and, together, accounted for a high degree of variance in impulsive behavior. Collectively, these findings demonstrate two distinct mechanisms by which rapid DA signaling may influence impulsivity, and illustrate the importance of NAc core DA release dynamics in impulsive behavior. PMID:28451642

  1. Imaging impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease and their relationship to addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Nicola J; Strafella, Antonio P

    2013-04-01

    Established substance addictions and impulse control disorders (ICDs) such as pathological gambling share similar underlying neurobiology, and recent data extends these commonalities to the risk factors that increase an individuals' susceptibility to develop such behaviours. In Parkinson's disease (PD), impulse control disorders (ICDs) are increasingly recognised to develop after patients begin dopamine (DA) restoration therapy, in particular DA agonists. In both the PD and non-PD population, more impulsive individuals are at increased risk for impulse control disorders. Here, we review the neuroimaging data confirming the connection between addiction and ICDs, and revealing how DA agonists might cause specific alterations of basal ganglia and cortical function that vary as a function of an individuals' propensity for impulsivity.

  2. A compressed sensing based method with support refinement for impulse noise cancelation in DSL

    KAUST Repository

    Quadeer, Ahmed Abdul

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a compressed sensing based method to suppress impulse noise in digital subscriber line (DSL). The proposed algorithm exploits the sparse nature of the impulse noise and utilizes the carriers, already available in all practical DSL systems, for its estimation and cancelation. Specifically, compressed sensing is used for a coarse estimate of the impulse position, an a priori information based maximum aposteriori probability (MAP) metric for its refinement, followed by least squares (LS) or minimum mean square error (MMSE) estimation for estimating the impulse amplitudes. Simulation results show that the proposed scheme achieves higher rate as compared to other known sparse estimation algorithms in literature. The paper also demonstrates the superior performance of the proposed scheme compared to the ITU-T G992.3 standard that utilizes RS-coding for impulse noise refinement in DSL signals. © 2013 IEEE.

  3. Deep Brain Stimulation of the Nucleus Accumbens Core Affects Trait Impulsivity in a Baseline-Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schippers, Maria C; Bruinsma, Bastiaan; Gaastra, Mathijs; Mesman, Tanja I; Denys, Damiaan; De Vries, Taco J; Pattij, Tommy

    2017-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the nucleus accumbens (NA) is explored as a treatment for refractory psychiatric disorders, such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), depressive disorder (MDD), and substance use disorder (SUD). A common feature of some of these disorders is pathological impulsivity. Here, the effects of NAcore DBS on impulsive choice and impulsive action, two distinct forms of impulsive behavior, were investigated in translational animal tasks, the delayed reward task (DRT) and five-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT), respectively. In both tasks, the effects of NAcore DBS were negatively correlated with baseline impulsive behavior, with more pronounced effects in the 5-CSRTT. To further examine the effects of DBS on trait impulsive action, rats were screened for high (HI) and low (LI) impulsive responding in the 5-CSRTT. NAcore DBS decreased impulsive, premature responding in HI rats under conventional conditions. However, upon challenged conditions to increase impulsive responding, NAcore DBS did not alter impulsivity. These results strongly suggest a baseline-dependent effect of DBS on impulsivity, which is in line with clinical observations.

  4. Deep Brain Stimulation of the Nucleus Accumbens Core Affects Trait Impulsivity in a Baseline-Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schippers, Maria C.; Bruinsma, Bastiaan; Gaastra, Mathijs; Mesman, Tanja I.; Denys, Damiaan; De Vries, Taco J.; Pattij, Tommy

    2017-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the nucleus accumbens (NA) is explored as a treatment for refractory psychiatric disorders, such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), depressive disorder (MDD), and substance use disorder (SUD). A common feature of some of these disorders is pathological impulsivity. Here, the effects of NAcore DBS on impulsive choice and impulsive action, two distinct forms of impulsive behavior, were investigated in translational animal tasks, the delayed reward task (DRT) and five-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT), respectively. In both tasks, the effects of NAcore DBS were negatively correlated with baseline impulsive behavior, with more pronounced effects in the 5-CSRTT. To further examine the effects of DBS on trait impulsive action, rats were screened for high (HI) and low (LI) impulsive responding in the 5-CSRTT. NAcore DBS decreased impulsive, premature responding in HI rats under conventional conditions. However, upon challenged conditions to increase impulsive responding, NAcore DBS did not alter impulsivity. These results strongly suggest a baseline-dependent effect of DBS on impulsivity, which is in line with clinical observations. PMID:28386221

  5. Boron Nanoparticles with High Hydrogen Loading: Mechanism for B-H Binding, Size Reduction, and Potential for Improved Combustibility and Specific Impulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    possible effects such as combustion catalysis on the particle surfaces and improvements in heating rates due to radiative heating of the particles (which...carried the sample through a 1400 °C glassy carbon pyrolytic reactor , desorbing any hydrogen as H2. Gases are separated in a 1 meter long gas

  6. Specific Abilities May Increment Psychometric g for High Ability Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-14

    1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 04/2016 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 04/2015 – 08/2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE...higher ability groups. Intelligence, 23, 45-57. Lynn, R. (1990). Does Spearman’s g decline at high levels? Some evidence from Scotland . The Journal...1979). Use of the position analysis questionnaire for establishing the job component validity of tests. Journal of Applied Psychology, 64, 51

  7. Reprogrammable Controller Design From High-Level Specification

    OpenAIRE

    Benmohammed, M.; M. Bourahla; S. Merniz

    2003-01-01

    Existing techniques in high-level synthesis mostly assume a simple controller architecture model in the form of a single FSM. However, in reality more complex controller architectures are often used. On the other hand, in the case of programmable processors, the controller architecture is largely defined by the available control-flow instructions in the instruction set. With the wider acceptance of behavioral synthesis, the application of these methods for the design of programmable contr...

  8. Design and specification of a high speed transport protocol

    OpenAIRE

    McArthur, Robert C.

    1992-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Due to the increase in data throughput potential provided by high speed (fiber optic) networks, existing transport protocols are becoming increasingly incapable of providing reli­able and timely transfer of data. Whereas in networks of the past it was the transmission medium that caused the greatest communications delay, it is the case today that the transport protocols themselves have become the bottleneck. This thesis provides de...

  9. The relationship between impulsive choice and impulsive action: a cross-species translational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broos, Nienke; Schmaal, Lianne; Wiskerke, Joost; Kostelijk, Lennard; Lam, Thomas; Stoop, Nicky; Weierink, Lonneke; Ham, Jannemieke; de Geus, Eco J C; Schoffelmeer, Anton N M; van den Brink, Wim; Veltman, Dick J; de Vries, Taco J; Pattij, Tommy; Goudriaan, Anna E

    2012-01-01

    Maladaptive impulsivity is a core symptom in various psychiatric disorders. However, there is only limited evidence available on whether different measures of impulsivity represent largely unrelated aspects or a unitary construct. In a cross-species translational study, thirty rats were trained in impulsive choice (delayed reward task) and impulsive action (five-choice serial reaction time task) paradigms. The correlation between those measures was assessed during baseline performance and after pharmacological manipulations with the psychostimulant amphetamine and the norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine. In parallel, to validate the animal data, 101 human subjects performed analogous measures of impulsive choice (delay discounting task, DDT) and impulsive action (immediate and delayed memory task, IMT/DMT). Moreover, all subjects completed the Stop Signal Task (SST, as an additional measure of impulsive action) and filled out the Barratt impulsiveness scale (BIS-11). Correlations between DDT and IMT/DMT were determined and a principal component analysis was performed on all human measures of impulsivity. In both rats and humans measures of impulsive choice and impulsive action did not correlate. In rats the within-subject pharmacological effects of amphetamine and atomoxetine did not correlate between tasks, suggesting distinct underlying neural correlates. Furthermore, in humans, principal component analysis identified three independent factors: (1) self-reported impulsivity (BIS-11); (2) impulsive action (IMT/DMT and SST); (3) impulsive choice (DDT). This is the first study directly comparing aspects of impulsivity using a cross-species translational approach. The present data reveal the non-unitary nature of impulsivity on a behavioral and pharmacological level. Collectively, this warrants a stronger focus on the relative contribution of distinct forms of impulsivity in psychopathology.

  10. The relationship between impulsive choice and impulsive action: a cross-species translational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nienke Broos

    Full Text Available Maladaptive impulsivity is a core symptom in various psychiatric disorders. However, there is only limited evidence available on whether different measures of impulsivity represent largely unrelated aspects or a unitary construct. In a cross-species translational study, thirty rats were trained in impulsive choice (delayed reward task and impulsive action (five-choice serial reaction time task paradigms. The correlation between those measures was assessed during baseline performance and after pharmacological manipulations with the psychostimulant amphetamine and the norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine. In parallel, to validate the animal data, 101 human subjects performed analogous measures of impulsive choice (delay discounting task, DDT and impulsive action (immediate and delayed memory task, IMT/DMT. Moreover, all subjects completed the Stop Signal Task (SST, as an additional measure of impulsive action and filled out the Barratt impulsiveness scale (BIS-11. Correlations between DDT and IMT/DMT were determined and a principal component analysis was performed on all human measures of impulsivity. In both rats and humans measures of impulsive choice and impulsive action did not correlate. In rats the within-subject pharmacological effects of amphetamine and atomoxetine did not correlate between tasks, suggesting distinct underlying neural correlates. Furthermore, in humans, principal component analysis identified three independent factors: (1 self-reported impulsivity (BIS-11; (2 impulsive action (IMT/DMT and SST; (3 impulsive choice (DDT. This is the first study directly comparing aspects of impulsivity using a cross-species translational approach. The present data reveal the non-unitary nature of impulsivity on a behavioral and pharmacological level. Collectively, this warrants a stronger focus on the relative contribution of distinct forms of impulsivity in psychopathology.

  11. The Relationship between Impulsive Choice and Impulsive Action: A Cross-Species Translational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiskerke, Joost; Kostelijk, Lennard; Lam, Thomas; Stoop, Nicky; Weierink, Lonneke; Ham, Jannemieke; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Schoffelmeer, Anton N. M.; van den Brink, Wim; Veltman, Dick J.; de Vries, Taco J.

    2012-01-01

    Maladaptive impulsivity is a core symptom in various psychiatric disorders. However, there is only limited evidence available on whether different measures of impulsivity represent largely unrelated aspects or a unitary construct. In a cross-species translational study, thirty rats were trained in impulsive choice (delayed reward task) and impulsive action (five-choice serial reaction time task) paradigms. The correlation between those measures was assessed during baseline performance and after pharmacological manipulations with the psychostimulant amphetamine and the norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine. In parallel, to validate the animal data, 101 human subjects performed analogous measures of impulsive choice (delay discounting task, DDT) and impulsive action (immediate and delayed memory task, IMT/DMT). Moreover, all subjects completed the Stop Signal Task (SST, as an additional measure of impulsive action) and filled out the Barratt impulsiveness scale (BIS-11). Correlations between DDT and IMT/DMT were determined and a principal component analysis was performed on all human measures of impulsivity. In both rats and humans measures of impulsive choice and impulsive action did not correlate. In rats the within-subject pharmacological effects of amphetamine and atomoxetine did not correlate between tasks, suggesting distinct underlying neural correlates. Furthermore, in humans, principal component analysis identified three independent factors: (1) self-reported impulsivity (BIS-11); (2) impulsive action (IMT/DMT and SST); (3) impulsive choice (DDT). This is the first study directly comparing aspects of impulsivity using a cross-species translational approach. The present data reveal the non-unitary nature of impulsivity on a behavioral and pharmacological level. Collectively, this warrants a stronger focus on the relative contribution of distinct forms of impulsivity in psychopathology. PMID:22574225

  12. Analysis of a developed analog trilateration system of impulsive sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    López R., Juan Manuel; Marulanda B., Jose Ignacio

    2014-05-01

    A characterization study is made from a trilateration system for impulsive sounds, in which theoretical analysis and experimental results are presented. This system uses an analog trilateration method, avoiding to implement high frequency ADC conversion elements. It also presents the optimization of the chosen array of microphones, thus allowing for a better trilateration algorithm behavior.

  13. Homophobia: An Impulsive Attraction to the Same Sex? Evidence From Eye-Tracking Data in a Picture-Viewing Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheval, Boris; Radel, Remi; Grob, Emmanuelle; Ghisletta, Paolo; Bianchi-Demicheli, Francesco; Chanal, Julien

    2016-05-01

    Some models suggest that homophobia can be explained as a denied attraction toward same-sex individuals. While it has been found that homophobic men have same-sex attraction, these results are not consistent. This study drew on the dual-process models to test the assumption that sexual interest in homosexual cues among men high in homophobia will depend on their specific impulses toward homosexual-related stimuli. Heterosexual men (N = 38) first completed a scale measuring their level of homonegativity. Then, they performed a manikin task to evaluate their impulsive approach tendencies toward homosexual stimuli (IAHS). A picture-viewing task was performed with simultaneous eye-tracking recording to assess participants' viewing time of the visual area of interest (i.e., face and body). IAHS positively predicted the viewing time of homosexual photographs among men with a high score of homonegativity. Men with a high homonegativity score looked significantly longer at homosexual than at heterosexual photographs but only when they had a high IAHS. These findings confirm the importance of considering the variability in impulsive processes to understand why some (but not all) men high in homophobia have homosexual interest. These findings reinforce the theoretical basis for elaborating a dual-process model for behaviors in the sexual context. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Relationship between anhedonia and impulsivity in schizophrenia, major depression and schizoaffective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amr, Mostafa; Volpe, Fernando Madalena

    2013-12-01

    Anhedonia and impulsivity are prominent symptoms of many psychiatric disorders and may indicate worse prognosis, notably in schizophrenia and major depression. Despite the convergence of negative outcomes from both dimensions, the relationship between anhedonia and impulsivity in psychiatric disorders has been seldom directly assessed. The objective of the present study is to examine the correlations between anhedonia and impulsivity in three diagnostic groups: major depression, schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. 121 outpatients (Mansoura University Hospital, Egypt) with major depressive disorder (N=29), schizophrenia (N=59), and schizoaffective disorder (N=33), were assessed and responded to the Beck Depression Inventory, Barrat's Impulsivity Scale-11, and Chapman's Social and Physical Anhedonia Scales. Physical and social anhedonia scores were negatively correlated to impulsivity scores in major depression patients. Conversely, higher scores in physical and social anhedonia predicted higher impulsivity scores in schizophrenia. No correlations between impulsivity and anhedonia were evidenced among schizoaffectives. The relationship between self-reported physical and social anhedonia and impulsivity is diagnosis-specific. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Impulsive behavior and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmura, Yu; Tsutsui-Kimura, Iku; Yoshioka, Mitsuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Higher impulsivity is thought to be a risk factor for drug addiction, criminal involvement, and suicide. Excessive levels of impulsivity are often observed in several psychiatric disorders including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and schizophrenia. Previous studies have demonstrated that nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are involved in impulsive behavior. Here, we introduce recent advances in this field and describe the role of the following nAChR-related brain mechanisms in modulating impulsive behavior: dopamine release in the ventral striatum; α4β2 nAChRs in the infralimbic cortex, which is a ventral part of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC); and dopamine release in the mPFC. We also suggest several potential therapeutic drugs to address these mechanisms in impulsivity-related disorders and explore future directions to further elucidate the roles of central nAChRs in impulsive behavior.

  16. Plasma characterization in reactive sputtering processes of Ti in Ar/O2 mixtures operated in metal, transition and poisoned modes: a comparison between direct current and high-power impulse magnetron discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Fabian; Kersten, Holger; Lundin, Daniel

    2017-10-01

    Two reactive sputtering techniques have been studied: direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) and high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS), operated in various Ar/O2 gas mixtures using a Ti target. The processes were characterized during different modes of operation including pure argon, metallic, transition and compound mode. Energy flux data as well as data on electron density and temperature were combined to obtain knowledge about the trends and changes in the investigated internal process plasma properties for the different modes investigated. Although there is a large reduction of the mass deposition rate (a factor 10 in DCMS and a factor 14 in HiPIMS), when transiting from the metal to compound mode, we detect no significant decrease of the total energy flux in DCMS and only a minor decrease in HiPIMS ( <20%). Such a result is surprising considering that the neutral flux contribution to the total energy flux is known to be significant. Instead, we find that the reduction of the neutral component is compensated by an increase in the electron and ion flux components, which is experimentally detected as an increase of the effective electron temperature and a slightly increasing (DCMS) or essentially constant (HiPIMS) electron density with increasing oxygen flow rate.

  17. High efficiency video coding coding tools and specification

    CERN Document Server

    Wien, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    The video coding standard High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) targets at improved compression performance for video resolutions of HD and beyond, providing Ultra HD video at similar compressed bit rates as for HD video encoded with the well-established video coding standard H.264 | AVC. Based on known concepts, new coding structures and improved coding tools have been developed and specified in HEVC. The standard is expected to be taken up easily by established industry as well as new endeavors, answering the needs of todays connected and ever-evolving online world. This book presents the High Efficiency Video Coding standard and explains it in a clear and coherent language. It provides a comprehensive and consistently written description, all of a piece. The book targets at both, newbies to video coding as well as experts in the field. While providing sections with introductory text for the beginner, it suits as a well-arranged reference book for the expert. The book provides a comprehensive reference for th...

  18. High Specific Power Motors in LN2 and LH2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gerald V.; Jansen, Ralph H.; Trudell, Jeffrey J.

    2007-01-01

    A switched reluctance motor has been operated in liquid nitrogen (LN2) with a power density as high as that reported for any motor or generator. The high performance stems from the low resistivity of Cu at LN2 temperature and from the geometry of the windings, the combination of which permits steady-state rms current density up to 7000 A/sq cm, about 10 times that possible in coils cooled by natural convection at room temperature. The Joule heating in the coils is conducted to the end turns for rejection to the LN2 bath. Minimal heat rejection occurs in the motor slots, preserving that region for conductor. In the end turns, the conductor layers are spaced to form a heat-exchanger-like structure that permits nucleate boiling over a large surface area. Although tests were performed in LN2 for convenience, this motor was designed as a prototype for use with liquid hydrogen (LH2) as the coolant. End-cooled coils would perform even better in LH2 because of further increases in copper electrical and thermal conductivities. Thermal analyses comparing LN2 and LH2 cooling are presented verifying that end-cooled coils in LH2 could be either much longer or could operate at higher current density without thermal runaway than in LN2.

  19. Impulse control disorders and related behaviours (ICD-RBs) in Parkinson's disease patients: Assessment using “Questionnaire for impulsive-compulsive disorders in Parkinson's disease” (QUIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashish; Goyal, Vinay; Behari, Madhuri; Srivastva, Achal; Shukla, Garima; Vibha, Deepti

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is limited data on the prevalence of impulse control disorder and related behaviors (ICD-RBs) in Indian patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD). In the context of potential genetic and environmental factors affecting the expression of ICD-RBs, studying other multiethnic populations may bring in-sights into the mechanisms of these disorders. Objectives: To ascertain point prevalence estimate of ICD-RBs in Indian PD patients, using the validated “Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's disease (QUIP)” and to examine their association with Dopamine replacement therapy (DRT). Materials and Methods: This was a hospital based observational cross-sectional study. After taking informed consent, patients and their informants (spouse, or primary caregiver) were made to complete the QUIP, and were instructed to answer questions based on behaviors that occurred anytime during PD that lasted at least four consecutive weeks. Results: Total of 299 patients participated in the study. At least one ICD-RB was present in 128 (42.8%), at least one Impulse control disorder (ICD) was present in 74 (24.75%) and at least one Impulse control related compulsive behaviour (ICRB) was present in 93 (31.1%) patients. Punding was the most frequent (12.4%) followed by hyper sexuality (11.04%), compulsive hobbyism (9.4%), compulsive shopping (8.4%), compulsive medication use (7.7%), compulsive eating (5.35%), walkabout (4%) and pathological gambling (3.3%). ≥ 2 ICD-RBs were observed in 15.7% of patients. After multivariate analysis, younger age of onset, being unmarried were specifically associated with presence of ICD. Longer disease duration was specifically associated with presence of ICRB. Whereas smoking and higher dopamine levodopa equivalent daily doses (DA LEDD) were associated with both presence of ICD and ICRB. Higher LD LEDD was specifically associated with presence of ICD-RB. Conclusions: Our study revealed a relatively higher frequency of

  20. Impulse control disorders and related behaviours (ICD-RBs) in Parkinson's disease patients: Assessment using "Questionnaire for impulsive-compulsive disorders in Parkinson's disease" (QUIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashish; Goyal, Vinay; Behari, Madhuri; Srivastva, Achal; Shukla, Garima; Vibha, Deepti

    2015-01-01

    There is limited data on the prevalence of impulse control disorder and related behaviors (ICD-RBs) in Indian patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD). In the context of potential genetic and environmental factors affecting the expression of ICD-RBs, studying other multiethnic populations may bring in-sights into the mechanisms of these disorders. To ascertain point prevalence estimate of ICD-RBs in Indian PD patients, using the validated "Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's disease (QUIP)" and to examine their association with Dopamine replacement therapy (DRT). This was a hospital based observational cross-sectional study. After taking informed consent, patients and their informants (spouse, or primary caregiver) were made to complete the QUIP, and were instructed to answer questions based on behaviors that occurred anytime during PD that lasted at least four consecutive weeks. Total of 299 patients participated in the study. At least one ICD-RB was present in 128 (42.8%), at least one Impulse control disorder (ICD) was present in 74 (24.75%) and at least one Impulse control related compulsive behaviour (ICRB) was present in 93 (31.1%) patients. Punding was the most frequent (12.4%) followed by hyper sexuality (11.04%), compulsive hobbyism (9.4%), compulsive shopping (8.4%), compulsive medication use (7.7%), compulsive eating (5.35%), walkabout (4%) and pathological gambling (3.3%). ≥ 2 ICD-RBs were observed in 15.7% of patients. After multivariate analysis, younger age of onset, being unmarried were specifically associated with presence of ICD. Longer disease duration was specifically associated with presence of ICRB. Whereas smoking and higher dopamine levodopa equivalent daily doses (DA LEDD) were associated with both presence of ICD and ICRB. Higher LD LEDD was specifically associated with presence of ICD-RB. Our study revealed a relatively higher frequency of ICD-RBs, probably because of the use of screening instrument and because

  1. Are adolescents gambling with cannabis use? A longitudinal study of impulsivity measures and adolescent substance use: the TRAILS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince van Leeuwen, Andrea; Creemers, Hanneke E; Verhulst, Frank C; Ormel, Johan; Huizink, Anja C

    2011-01-01

    This study examined (a) the predictive value of observed versus reported measures of impulsivity on the onset of cannabis use and determined if lifetime tobacco and cannabis users can be differentiated by their level of impulsivity and (b) the predictive value of observed versus reported measures of impulsivity on repeated cannabis use and determined if repeated tobacco and cannabis users can be differentiated by their level of impulsivity. The present study involves 667 (50.5% female) adolescents assessed at two time points of the TRacking Adolescents' Individual Lives Survey (TRAILS). Adolescents in our study participated in the Bangor Gambling Task (BGT), as well as completed self-report questionnaires assessing cannabis use behavior (Mage = 16.11 years) and the Behavioral Inhibition System (BIS)/Behavioral Activation System (BAS) questionnaire (Mage = 13.56 years). Higher levels of BAS functioning increased the likelihood that adolescents would ever use substances such as tobacco or cannabis during their lifetime. In contrast, low BIS functioning increased the likelihood of repeated cannabis use. Repeated tobacco users did not significantly differ from lifetime users by their BIS functioning. The BGT measures were not significant in relation to lifetime or repeated use of cannabis or tobacco. High BAS seems to be more important for experimental substance use, whereas low BIS seems to be more important for progression into regular cannabis use specifically. In contrast to the BIS/BAS, our laboratory test of impulsivity, the BGT, is not correlated with early-onset tobacco/cannabis use. Furthermore, the BGT is not correlated with the BIS/BAS measures.

  2. Impulsive suicide attempts: a systematic literature review of definitions, characteristics and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimkeviciene, Jurgita; O'Gorman, John; De Leo, Diego

    2015-01-15

    Extensive research on impulsive suicide attempts, but lack of agreement on the use of this term indicates the need for a systematic literature review of the area. The aim of this review was to examine definitions and likely correlates of impulsive attempts. A search of Medline, Psychinfo, Scopus, Proquest and Web of Knowledge databases was conducted. Additional articles were identified using the cross-referencing function of Google Scholar. 179 relevant papers were identified. Four different groups of research criteria used to assess suicide attempt impulsivity emerged: (a) time-related criteria, (b) absence of proximal planning/preparations, (c) presence of suicide plan in lifetime/previous year, and (d) other. Subsequent analysis used these criteria to compare results from different studies on 20 most researched hypotheses. Conclusions regarding the characteristics of impulsive attempts are more consistent than those on the risk factors specific to such attempts. No risk factors were identified that uniformly related to suicide attempt impulsivity across all criteria groups, but relationships emerged between separate criteria and specific characteristics of suicide attempters. Only published articles were included. Large inconsistencies in methods of the studies included in this review prevented comparison of effect sizes. The vast disparities in findings on risk factors for impulsive suicide attempts among different criteria groups suggest the need to address the methodological issues in defining suicide attempt impulsivity before further research into correlates of such attempts can effectively progress. Specific recommendations are offered for necessary research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Impulsive differential inclusions a fixed point approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ouahab, Abdelghani; Henderson, Johnny

    2013-01-01

    Impulsive differential equations have been developed in modeling impulsive problems in physics, population dynamics, ecology, biotechnology, industrial robotics, pharmacokinetics, optimal control, etc. The questions of existence and stability of solutions for different classes of initial values problems for impulsive differential equations and inclusions with fixed and variable moments are considered in detail. Attention is also given to boundary value problems and relative questions concerning differential equations. This monograph addresses a variety of side issues that arise from its simple

  4. High Performance Computing - Power Application Programming Interface Specification.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laros, James H.,; Kelly, Suzanne M.; Pedretti, Kevin; Grant, Ryan; Olivier, Stephen Lecler; Levenhagen, Michael J.; DeBonis, David

    2014-08-01

    Measuring and controlling the power and energy consumption of high performance computing systems by various components in the software stack is an active research area [13, 3, 5, 10, 4, 21, 19, 16, 7, 17, 20, 18, 11, 1, 6, 14, 12]. Implementations in lower level software layers are beginning to emerge in some production systems, which is very welcome. To be most effective, a portable interface to measurement and control features would significantly facilitate participation by all levels of the software stack. We present a proposal for a standard power Application Programming Interface (API) that endeavors to cover the entire software space, from generic hardware interfaces to the input from the computer facility manager.

  5. Reprogrammable Controller Design From High-Level Specification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Benmohammed

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Existing techniques in high-level synthesis mostly assume a simple controller architecture model in the form of a single FSM. However, in reality more complex controller architectures are often used. On the other hand, in the case of programmable processors, the controller architecture is largely defined by the available control-flow instructions in the instruction set. With the wider acceptance of behavioral synthesis, the application of these methods for the design of programmable controllers is of fundamental importance in embedded system technology. This paper describes an important extension of an existing architectural synthesis system targeting the generation of ASIP reprogrammable architectures. The designer can then generate both style of architecture, hardwired and programmable, using the same synthesis system and can quickly evaluate the trade-offs of hardware decisions.

  6. The effect of 5-HTT gene promoter polymorphism on impulsivity depends on family relations in girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paaver, Marika; Kurrikoff, Triin; Nordquist, Niklas; Oreland, Lars; Harro, Jaanus

    2008-07-01

    The short (S) allele of the 5-HTT gene promoter region polymorphism (5-HTTLPR), in combination with adverse environmental influence, leads to higher likelihood of depression. Impulsivity has been related to low serotonin turnover, poor regulation of affect, and problems in the family, including child maltreatment. The current study explored the effect of the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism in the serotonin transporter gene and adverse family environment on impulsivity in adolescents. Healthy adolescents participating in the Estonian Children Personality Behaviour and Health Study (n=483) filled the Adaptive and Maladaptive Impulsivity Scale (AMIS), Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11), a scale measuring family relations, and were genotyped. While genotype alone was not associated with thoughtlessness, BIS-11 impulsiveness, fast decision-making or excitement seeking, 5-HTTLPR S allele carriers, however, had higher scores of disinhibition. In girls carrying the S allele, scores of thoughtlessness and disinhibition depended on family relations, being higher with less warmth in the family. Adverse family relations had no effect on impulsivity in girls with LL genotype. In boys, the effects of family relations on maladaptive impulsivity did not depend on genotype. However, the S allele and high maltreatment in the family both independently increased disinhibition and the BIS-11 score in boys. Family environment and the 5-HTTLPR genotype had no interactive effect on excitement seeking or fast decision-making. In summary, carrying the S allele may lead to high maladaptive impulsivity due to higher sensitivity to environmental adversity, which is more significantly expressed in girls.

  7. Associations between impulsivity, aggression, and suicide in Chinese college students

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Although there are accumulating data regarding the epidemiology of suicide in China, there are meager data on suicidal ideation and attempts among college students. Interestingly, elevated impulsivity is thought to facilitate the transition from suicidal thoughts to suicidal behavior. Therefore, the objective of this research was to identify the associations between suicide and the personality factors of impulsivity and aggression. Methods This study’s sampling method employed stratified random cluster sampling. A multi-stage stratified sampling procedure was used to select participants (n = 5,245). We conducted structured interviews regarding a range of socio-demographic characteristics and suicidal morbidity. The Patient Health Questionnaire depression module (PHQ-9) was used to acquire the information about thoughts of being better off dead or hurting themselves in some ways during the past two weeks. The impulsivity symptoms in this study were assessed with the BIS-11-CH (i.e., the Chinese version of the BIS-11), and the Aggressive symptoms were assessed with the BAQ. The statistical package for social science (SPSS) v.13.0 program (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) was used for statistical analysis. Socio-demographic variables such as ethnic and gender were compared between groups, through the use of χ2 tests. The nonparametric test (k Independent Sample test, Kruskal-Wallis H) was performed to determine differences between the personality factors of impulsivity and aggression and suicide. Results In total, 9.1% (n = 479) of the 5,245 students reported they have ever thought about committing suicide; and 1% (n = 51) reported a history of attempted suicide (attempters). The analyses detected significant differences in scores on cognitive impulsivity (p students. Students with high aggression scores were more susceptible to committing suicide. Scores on self-oriented attack and cognitive impulsivity may be important factors for

  8. Impaired decisional impulsivity in pathological videogamers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Irvine

    Full Text Available Pathological gaming is an emerging and poorly understood problem. Impulsivity is commonly impaired in disorders of behavioural and substance addiction, hence we sought to systematically investigate the different subtypes of decisional and motor impulsivity in a well-defined pathological gaming cohort.Fifty-two pathological gaming subjects and age-, gender- and IQ-matched healthy volunteers were tested on decisional impulsivity (Information Sampling Task testing reflection impulsivity and delay discounting questionnaire testing impulsive choice, and motor impulsivity (Stop Signal Task testing motor response inhibition, and the premature responding task. We used stringent diagnostic criteria highlighting functional impairment.In the Information Sampling Task, pathological gaming participants sampled less evidence prior to making a decision and scored fewer points compared with healthy volunteers. Gaming severity was also negatively correlated with evidence gathered and positively correlated with sampling error and points acquired. In the delay discounting task, pathological gamers made more impulsive choices, preferring smaller immediate over larger delayed rewards. Pathological gamers made more premature responses related to comorbid nicotine use. Greater number of hours played also correlated with a Motivational Index. Greater frequency of role playing games was associated with impaired motor response inhibition and strategy games with faster Go reaction time.We show that pathological gaming is associated with impaired decisional impulsivity with negative consequences in task performance. Decisional impulsivity may be a potential target in therapeutic management.

  9. Impulsivity and internalizing disorders in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosi, Sandra; Hernández-Martínez, Carmen; Canals, Josepa; Vigil-Colet, Andreu

    2011-12-30

    Impulsivity has often been related to externalizing disorders, but little is known about how it is related to symptoms of internalizing disorders. This study aims to examine the relationship between impulsivity and depression and anxiety symptoms of depression and anxiety in childhood, and compare it with its relationship with a measure of aggressive behavior, which is present in many externalizing disorders. We administered the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11 for children, the Children's Depression Inventory and the Screen for Children's Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders to a case-control sample of 562 children aged between 9 and 13 who were selected from an epidemiological study of anxiety and depression and whose teachers provided information about their proactive and reactive aggression. Impulsivity was related to measures of anxiety, depression and aggressive behavior, and showed higher relationships with measures of internalizing symptoms than with aggression. Motor impulsivity, a component of impulsivity related to inhibition deficits, was the component most related to anxiety and depression. Cognitive impulsivity, on the other hand, was negatively related to anxiety and depression. The relationships between impulsivity and symptoms of internalizing disorders seem to indicate that impulsivity should be taken into account not only in externalizing problems, but also in depression and anxiety in children and adolescents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Impulsive choice and impulsive action predict vulnerability to distinct stages of nicotine seeking in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diergaarde, L.; Pattij, T.; Poortvliet, I.; Hogenboom, F.; de Vries, W.; Schoffelmeer, A.N.M.; de Vries, T.J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Although heavy smoking has been associated with impulsivity in humans, it is not clear whether poor impulse control represents a risk factor in the etiology of nicotine dependence. Methods: To address this issue, rats were selected on the basis of individual differences in impulsivity in

  11. Impulsivity and the Sexes: Measurement and Structural Invariance of the UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyders, Melissa A.

    2013-01-01

    Before it is possible to test whether men and women differ in impulsivity, it is necessary to evaluate whether impulsivity measures are invariant across sex. The UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale (negative urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance, and sensation seeking, with added subscale of positive urgency) is one measure of five…

  12. Impulsivity, gambling cognitions, and the gambler's fallacy in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmurek, Harvey H C; Switzer, Jessica; D'Alvise, Joshua

    2015-03-01

    The present study explored the associations among impulsivity, gambling cognitions, and behavioral adherence to the gambler's fallacy in university students (N = 142). Both impulsivity and gambling cognitions were significant predictors of non-problem and problem gambler categories as defined the Problem Gambling Severity Index. A logistic regression analysis showed that the independent contribution of cognition was statistically significant but that the contribution of impulsivity was not. A behavioral measure of gambling was obtained by asking participants to play an online game of roulette for a maximum of 15 min. Only outside bets were permitted whereby participants were to bet on the color of the winning number. Adherence to the gambler's fallacy was indexed by the likelihood of betting on an alternation in the color of the winning number as the number of consecutive outcomes of the other color increased. Gambling cognitions and gender, but not impulsivity, were associated with adherence to the gambler's fallacy. Tracing the sources of specific influences on gambling behavior may benefit from a framework that distinguishes between "hot" (emotional) and "cold" (non-emotional) mechanisms that promote problem gambling.

  13. [Aggressive and impulsive behavior: neurobiological models explain how affectregulation might work and social skills develop].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienast, T; Hein, J; Wrase, J; Heinz, A

    2007-01-18

    A person's impulsive actions are characterized by a lack of sufficient planning or an assessment of possibly harmful consequences. An impulse control disorder can be diagnosed if such actions occur frequently, even in low-stress situations. In psychiatry there are a number of syndromes that are associated with an impulse control disorder. Neurobiological findings point to a reduced turnover of serotonin in the brain of persons with an impulse control disorder and aggressive behaviour. However, a reduced turnover of serotonin is also found in persons who can consume immoderate amounts of alcohol but who experience no such unpleasant effects and thus have a high risk of becoming dependent. The serotonin turnover of an individual is controlled by environmental influences in interaction with genetic factors. In this article, impulse control disorders will be discussed with regard to their origin and social effects.

  14. The relationships between functional and dysfunctional impulsivity and aggression across different samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigil-Colet, Andreu; Morales-Vives, Fabia; Tous, Jordi

    2008-11-01

    E. S. Barratt proposed the term impulsive aggression to define a kind of aggression that is characterized by acting without thinking because of high levels of impulsivity. Previous research using psychometric measures has shown that impulsivity and aggression are related as far as psychometric measures are concerned. Nevertheless, most of the research has been done with samples of university students. Our research tests whether this relationship is stable across different samples; university students, teenagers and workers. Our results show that impulsivity and aggression have a consistent pattern of relationships across these samples, with impulsivity being specially related to emotional and instrumental aspects of aggression. Furthermore, the effects of anger on aggression seem to show a pattern of relationship that depends on age, with a tendency to physical aggression in young people and verbal aggression in adults.

  15. Sensation-seeking and impulsivity as predictors of reactive and proactive aggression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Del Carmen Pérez Fuentes

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In adolescence, such matters as substance use and impulsiveness may give rise to problematic behavior repertoires. This study was therefore done to analyze the predictive value of sensation-seeking and impulsiveness dimensions related to the functions of aggression (reactive/proactive and types of expression (physical/relational. A total of 822 high school students in Almeria (Spain aged 13 to 18, were administered the Sensation-Seeking Scale, the State Impulsiveness Scale and Peer Conflict Scale. The results show the existence of a positive correlation of the majority of factors analyzed, both in impulsiveness and sensation-seeking, with respect to the different types of aggression. Furthermore, aggressive behavior is explained by the combination of a sensation-seeking factor (Disinhibition and two impulsiveness factors (Gratification and Automatism. This study shows the need to analyze aggression as a multidimensional construct.

  16. Impulsiveness and Child-to-Parent Violence: The Role of Aggressor's Sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, Eva; Rosado, Jaime; Cantón-Cortés, David

    2017-02-21

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the role of minors' impulsiveness in the perpetration of child-to-parent violence (CPV), controlling for sex, age, interest allocated to studies, and participant´s and parent´s drug consumption habits, as well as to test the moderating role of the aggressor's sex on impulsiveness. The sample comprised 934 students from high school centers (438 boys and 496 girls), aged between 13 and 21 years. Impulsiveness was assessed through the Barratt's Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11), whereas CPV perpetration was assessed employing the Child-to-Parent Aggression Questionnaire. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses showed that both attentional (β = .09, p sex over motor impulsiveness in the case of CPV towards the father (β = .29, p sex of the perpetrator.

  17. Sensation-Seeking and Impulsivity as Predictors of Reactive and Proactive Aggression in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Fuentes, María Del Carmen; Molero Jurado, Maria Del Mar; Carrión Martínez, José J; Mercader Rubio, Isabel; Gázquez, José J

    2016-01-01

    In adolescence, such matters as substance use and impulsiveness may give rise to problematic behavior repertoires. This study was therefore done to analyze the predictive value of sensation-seeking and impulsiveness dimensions related to the functions of aggression (reactive/proactive) and types of expression (physical/relational). A total of 822 high school students in Almeria (Spain) aged 13-18, were administered the Sensation-Seeking Scale, the State Impulsiveness Scale and Peer Conflict Scale. The results show the existence of a positive correlation of the majority of factors analyzed, both in impulsiveness and sensation-seeking, with respect to the different types of aggression. Furthermore, aggressive behavior is explained by the combination of a sensation-seeking factor (Disinhibition) and two impulsiveness factors (Gratification and Automatism). This study shows the need to analyze aggression as a multidimensional construct.

  18. Impulsivity in Multiplayer Online Battle Arena Gamers: Preliminary Results on Experimental and Self-Report Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuyens, Filip; Deleuze, Jory; Maurage, Pierre; Griffiths, Mark D; Kuss, Daria J; Billieux, Joël

    2016-06-01

    Background and aims Multiplayer Online Battle Arena (MOBA) games have become the most popular type of video games played worldwide, superseding the playing of Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games and First-Person Shooter games. However, empirical studies focusing on the use and abuse of MOBA games are still very limited, particularly regarding impulsivity, which is an indicator of addictive states but has not yet been explored in MOBA games. In this context, the objective of the present study is to explore the associations between impulsivity and symptoms of addictive use of MOBA games in a sample of highly involved League of Legends (LoL, currently the most popular MOBA game) gamers. Methods Thirty-six LoL gamers were recruited and completed both experimental (Single Key Impulsivity Paradigm) and self-reported impulsivity assessments (s-UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale), in addition to an assessment of problematic video game use (Problematic Online Gaming Questionnaire). Results Results showed links between impulsivity-related constructs and signs of excessive MOBA game involvement. Findings indicated that impaired ability to postpone rewards in an experimental laboratory task was strongly related to problematic patterns of MOBA game involvement. Although less consistent, several associations were also found between self-reported impulsivity traits and signs of excessive MOBA game involvement. Conclusions Despite these results are preliminary and based upon a small (self-selected) sample, the present study highlights potential psychological factors related to the addictive use of MOBA games.

  19. [Relationship between impulsivity and sleep disorders in children aged 6 to 12 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie-Min; Yi, Zhu-Wen; Su, Lin-Yan; Cai, Yi-Min; Luo, Xue-Mei; Liu, Ji-Hong; Jiang, Yan

    2009-04-01

    To study the relationship between impulsivity and sleep disorders in children. A total of 1 736 children at ages of 6 to 12 years were randomly sampled from five districts of Changsha. Their parents completed the questionnaires about children's sleep conditions and behaviors (using Barratt Impulsiveness Scale 11th version). Five hundred and fifty-four children (31.9%) had sleep disorders. The incidence of sleep disorders in boys was significantly higher than that in girls (35.4% vs 28.3%; P<0.01). The scores of attentional, motor, and non-planning impulsiveness factors as well as the total score of Barratt Impulsiveness Scale in children with sleep disorders were significantly higher than those in children without (P<0.01). The incidence of daytime sleepiness (35.9%) in children with sleep disorders was significantly higher than that in children without (24.7%; P<0.01). The scores of attentional, motor, and non-planning impulsiveness factors increased with the grade of sleep disorders, and reached a peak at the fifth grade. The children with frequent sleep snoring showed higher scores of above three impulsiveness factors than children without sleep snoring or having rare snoring (P<0.01). Sleep disorders are associated with impulsivity in children. It is thus essential to pay close attentions to children's sleep for children with relatively high impulsiveness.

  20. Cavitation and bubble dynamics: the Kelvin impulse and its applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, John R; Leppinen, David M; Wang, Qianxi

    2015-10-06

    Cavitation and bubble dynamics have a wide range of practical applications in a range of disciplines, including hydraulic, mechanical and naval engineering, oil exploration, clinical medicine and sonochemistry. However, this paper focuses on how a fundamental concept, the Kelvin impulse, can provide practical insights into engineering and industrial design problems. The pathway is provided through physical insight, idealized experiments and enhancing the accuracy and interpretation of the computation. In 1966, Benjamin and Ellis made a number of important statements relating to the use of the Kelvin impulse in cavitation and bubble dynamics, one of these being 'One should always reason in terms of the Kelvin impulse, not in terms of the fluid momentum…'. We revisit part of this paper, developing the Kelvin impulse from first principles, using it, not only as a check on advanced computations (for which it was first used!), but also to provide greater physical insights into cavitation bubble dynamics near boundaries (rigid, potential free surface, two-fluid interface, flexible surface and axisymmetric stagnation point flow) and to provide predictions on different types of bubble collapse behaviour, later compared against experiments. The paper concludes with two recent studies involving (i) the direction of the jet formation in a cavitation bubble close to a rigid boundary in the presence of high-intensity ultrasound propagated parallel to the surface and (ii) the study of a 'paradigm bubble model' for the collapse of a translating spherical bubble, sometimes leading to a constant velocity high-speed jet, known as the Longuet-Higgins jet.

  1. Impulsive choice predicts anxiety-like behavior, but not alcohol or sucrose consumption, in male Long-Evans rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Jeffrey S; Renda, C Renee; Barker, Shayne M; Liston, Kennan J; Shahan, Timothy A; Madden, Gregory J

    2015-05-01

    Prior human research indicates robust, positive relations between impulsive choice (i.e., preference for smaller, immediate over larger, delayed rewards) and alcohol use disorders. However, varied findings in the nonhuman literature reveal a relatively ambiguous relation between impulsive choice and alcohol consumption in rodents. In addition, few rodent studies have investigated potential relations between impulsive choice and common covariates of alcohol consumption (e.g., avidity for sweet substances or anxiety-like behavior). Ninety-two male Long-Evans rats completed an impulsive-choice task. From this larger sample, extreme high- and low-impulsive groups (n = 30 each) were retained for further testing. In separate tests, subsequent open-field behavior and consumption of oral alcohol (12% w/v) and isocaloric sucrose were examined. Impulsive choice was then retested to examine whether behavior remained stable over the course of the experiment. No significant relations emerged between impulsive choice and either alcohol or sucrose consumption. However, impulsive choice predicted greater anxiety-like behavior (avoidance of the center field, defecation) in the open-field test. In turn, greater anxiety predicted lower alcohol and sucrose consumption. Finally, choice remained generally stable across the experiment, although high-impulsive rats tended toward less impulsive choice in the retest. Although impulsive choice and alcohol consumption appear to share some variance with anxiety-like behavior, the present data offer no support for a relation between impulsive choice and alcohol consumption in Long-Evans rats. Together with mixed rodent data from prior reports, these findings attenuate cross-species comparisons to human relations between impulsive choice and alcohol use disorders. Copyright © 2015 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  2. Mindful eating reduces impulsive food choice in adolescents and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Kelsie L; Rasmussen, Erin B

    2017-03-01

    The present study tested the extent to which age and obesity predicted impulsive choices for food and monetary outcomes and tested how a brief mindful-eating training would alter delay discounting for food and money choices compared with control groups. First, 172 adolescents (M age = 13.13 years) and 176 (M age = 23.33 years) adults completed the Food Choice Questionnaire (FCQ) and Monetary Choice Questionnaire (MCQ) as measures of food and money delay discounting, respectively. Then, participants returned to the lab and were randomly assigned to complete a brief mindful-eating training, watch a DVD on nutrition, or serve as a control. Participants completed the FCQ and MCQ again as a postmanipulation measure. Participants with high percent body fat (PBF) were more impulsive for food than those with low PBF. Adults with high PBF were also more impulsive for money compared with adults with low PBF; no PBF-related differences were found for adolescents. Participants in the mindful-eating group exhibited more self-controlled choices for food, but not for money. The control conditions did not exhibit changes. The study suggests that individuals with high PBF make more impulsive food choices relative to those with low PBF, which could increase the risk of obesity over time. It also is the first to demonstrate shifts in choice patterns for food and money using a brief mindful-eating training with adolescents. Mindful eating is a beneficial strategy to reduce impulsive food choice, at least temporarily, that may impede weight gain. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Influence of impulsiveness on emotional modulation of response inhibition: An ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerotti Benvenuti, Simone; Sarlo, Michela; Buodo, Giulia; Mento, Giovanni; Palomba, Daniela

    2015-10-01

    To examine how impulsiveness influences the emotional modulation of behavioral and neural correlates of response inhibition. Twenty-nine healthy individuals scoring high (HI, N=16) or low (LI, N=13) on motor impulsiveness performed an emotional Go/Nogo task, including the presentation of pleasant, neutral and unpleasant pictures. Behavioral [reaction times (RTs), accuracy to Go and Nogo trials] and neural (Nogo-N2 and Nogo-P3) correlates of response inhibition were compared between HI and LI groups. Larger Nogo-P3 was found for emotional than neutral stimuli in HI relative to LI group. Faster RTs to Go stimuli and lower accuracy to Nogo stimuli were correlated with larger Nogo-P3 in HI, but not LI, group. No significant interactions between emotion content and impulsiveness for Nogo-N2 and behavioral measures were noted. Impulsiveness influences the emotional modulation of response inhibition by potentiating the response tendencies evoked by the emotional stimuli. Accordingly, high impulsive individuals may need an increased and/or more effortful response inhibition in order to counteract the prepotent tendency to respond elicited by the combination of high trait impulsiveness and high emotional arousal. The present study suggests the importance to examine how pathological impulsiveness may interact with emotional arousal in modulating response inhibition. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Hyperkinetic Impulse Disorder in Children's Behavior Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Maurice W.; Denhoff, Eric; Solomons, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    A very common cause of children's behavior disorder disturbance is an entity described as the hyperkinetic impulse disorder. This is characterized by hyperactivity, short attention span and poor powers of concentration, irritability, impulsiveness, variability, and poor schoolwork. The existence of this complexity may lead to many psychological…

  5. Impulsive Vaccination for an Epidemiology Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Sen, M.; Garrido, A. J.

    2017-03-01

    This paper investigates sufficient conditions of almost periodic sand periodic solutions of an integral model under impulsive controls. Since the model is of generic epidemiological interest, such impulsive controls are either vaccination actions or abrupt variations of the infected population due to infected immigration or lost of infective numbers due to either vaccination or lost of infected population by out-migration.

  6. Impulsivity, School Context, and School Misconduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Matt; Barton, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity holds a central place in the explanations of adolescent delinquency. Recent research suggests that neighborhood characteristics, particularly SES (socioeconomic status), perceived supervision, and collective efficacy, moderate the association between impulsivity and delinquency. However, findings to date have been equivocal, and the…

  7. Non-instantaneous impulses in differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Ravi; O'Regan, Donal

    2017-01-01

    This monograph is the first published book devoted to the theory of differential equations with non-instantaneous impulses. It aims to equip the reader with mathematical models and theory behind real life processes in physics, biology, population dynamics, ecology and pharmacokinetics. The authors examine a wide scope of differential equations with non-instantaneous impulses through three comprehensive chapters, providing an all-rounded and unique presentation on the topic, including: - Ordinary differential equations with non-instantaneous impulses (scalar and n-dimensional case) - Fractional differential equa tions with non-instantaneous impulses (with Caputo fractional derivatives of order q ϵ (0, 1)) - Ordinary differential equations with non-instantaneous impulses occurring at random moments (with exponential, Erlang, or Gamma distribution) Each chapter focuses on theory, proofs and examples, and contains numerous graphs to enrich the reader’s understanding. Additionally, a carefully selected bibliogr...

  8. Impulse position control algorithms for nonlinear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesekin, A. N.; Nepp, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    The article is devoted to the formalization and description of impulse-sliding regime in nonlinear dynamical systems that arise in the application of impulse position controls of a special kind. The concept of trajectory impulse-sliding regime formalized as some limiting network element Euler polygons generated by a discrete approximation of the impulse position control This paper differs from the previously published papers in that it uses a definition of solutions of systems with impulse controls, it based on the closure of the set of smooth solutions in the space of functions of bounded variation. The need for the study of such regimes is the fact that they often arise when parry disturbances acting on technical or economic control system.

  9. Impulse position control algorithms for nonlinear systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sesekin, A. N., E-mail: sesekin@list.ru [Ural Federal University, 19 S. Mira, Ekaterinburg, 620002 (Russian Federation); Institute of Mathematics and Mechanics, Ural Division of Russian Academy of Sciences, 16 S. Kovalevskaya, Ekaterinburg, 620990 (Russian Federation); Nepp, A. N., E-mail: anepp@urfu.ru [Ural Federal University, 19 S. Mira, Ekaterinburg, 620002 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-30

    The article is devoted to the formalization and description of impulse-sliding regime in nonlinear dynamical systems that arise in the application of impulse position controls of a special kind. The concept of trajectory impulse-sliding regime formalized as some limiting network element Euler polygons generated by a discrete approximation of the impulse position control This paper differs from the previously published papers in that it uses a definition of solutions of systems with impulse controls, it based on the closure of the set of smooth solutions in the space of functions of bounded variation. The need for the study of such regimes is the fact that they often arise when parry disturbances acting on technical or economic control system.

  10. Aggression and impulsivity with impulsive behaviours in patients with purgative anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalar, Bojan; Weber, Urška; Sernec, Karin

    2011-03-01

    The study aimed to compare purgative anorexia and bulimia nervosa patients in regard of their level of aggression and impulsivity traits, as well as dynamics of selected impulsive behaviours over time-course of eating disorder treatment. 30 females with purgative anorexia nervosa, 33 females with purgative bulimia nervosa and 31 controls were included. Impulsive behaviours were assessed upon hospital admission, discharge, and three and six months after, using the internal ward questionnaire. Aggression and impulsivity traits were evaluated three months after discharge using Buss-Durkee Hostility Inventory and Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, 11th Revision. In all patients, the expressed impulsive behaviours were most frequent upon admission, when bingeing, striking and quarrelling were more expressed in bulimic patients. Later, patient groups did not differ regarding any impulsive behaviour. These all substantially resolved till discharge, and showed further decline at later assessments. All patients had a higher level of aggression and impulsivity traits and lower overt and higher covert aggression than controls. Patient groups had similar within group distribution of aggression and impulsivity intensity levels. Regarding individual dimensions of these traits no difference was found between them, except for the higher level of suspiciousness in anorectic individuals. Purgative anorectic and bulimic patients show similar dynamics of impulsive behaviours which substantially decline over time-course of eating disorder treatment. They both present similarly heightened levels of aggression and impulsivity traits, with some minor differences regarding their individual dimensions, possibly reflecting higher overt aggression in bulimic and higher covert aggression in anorectic patients.

  11. From impulses to maladaptive actions: the insula is a neurobiological gate for the development of compulsive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belin-Rauscent, A; Daniel, M-L; Puaud, M; Jupp, B; Sawiak, S; Howett, D; McKenzie, C; Caprioli, D; Besson, M; Robbins, T W; Everitt, B J; Dalley, J W; Belin, D

    2016-04-01

    Impulsivity is an endophenotype of vulnerability for compulsive behaviors. However, the neural mechanisms whereby impulsivity facilitates the development of compulsive disorders, such as addiction or obsessive compulsive disorder, remain unknown. We first investigated, in rats, anatomical and functional correlates of impulsivity in the anterior insular (AI) cortex by measuring both the thickness of, and cellular plasticity markers in, the AI with magnetic resonance imaging and in situ hybridization of the immediate early gene zif268, respectively. We then investigated the influence of bilateral AI cortex lesions on the high impulsivity trait, as measured in the five-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT), and the associated propensity to develop compulsivity as measured by high drinking levels in a schedule-induced polydipsia procedure (SIP). We demonstrate that the AI cortex causally contributes to individual vulnerability to impulsive-compulsive behavior in rats. Motor impulsivity, as measured by premature responses in the 5-CSRTT, was shown to correlate with the thinness of the anterior region of the insular cortex, in which highly impulsive (HI) rats expressed lower zif268 mRNA levels. Lesions of AI reduced impulsive behavior in HI rats, which were also highly susceptible to develop compulsive behavior as measured in a SIP procedure. AI lesions also attenuated both the development and the expression of SIP. This study thus identifies the AI as a novel neural substrate of maladaptive impulse control mechanisms that may facilitate the development of compulsive disorders.

  12. Food-related impulsivity in obesity and binge eating disorder--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schag, K; Schönleber, J; Teufel, M; Zipfel, S; Giel, K E

    2013-06-01

    Impulsivity towards food has been recognized as a potential factor leading to increased food intake in obesity. Patients suffering from binge eating disorder (BED) form a specific subgroup of obese people that might be characterized by increased impulsivity. These assumptions, although, have yet to be verified. Therefore, this review evaluates evidence for food-related impulsivity in obese people with and without BED and examines possible differences between both populations. More precisely, evidence for the two components of impulsivity is analyzed separately: evidence for reward sensitivity, specifically, the urge for appetitive stimuli and evidence for rash-spontaneous behaviour such as acting disinhibited with no regard for the consequences. Our search resulted in 51 articles demonstrating generally increased food-related impulsivity. We found particular emphasis on increased reward sensitivity in obese people, which appeared to be more pronounced in people with BED. There was little and conflicting evidence, however, concerning increased rash-spontaneous behaviour in obese people without BED, but consistent evidence of an increase in obese people with BED. All in all, the evidence supports the view that BED represents a specific phenotype of obesity with increased food-related impulsivity. Taking these specific deficits into account can enhance the effectiveness of weight reduction programmes and psychotherapy. © 2013 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2013 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  13. Alcohol use and drunk driving: the modifying effect of impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moan, Inger Synnøve; Norström, Thor; Storvoll, Elisabet E

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was twofold: (a) to examine how an increase in the frequency of heavy drinking episodes affects the incidence of drunk driving and (b) to examine whether the effect of alcohol use on drunk driving is contingent on impulsivity. Two waves of the Young in Norway Longitudinal Study were applied (N = 2,603; response rate: 67%), when the respondents were on average 17 (1994) and 28 (2005) years of age. Measurements consisted of self-reported heavy episodic drinking, drunk driving, and impulsivity. The first difference method was applied to estimate the association between heavy episodic drinking and drunk driving. This means that changes in the frequency of drunk driving were regressed on changes in the frequency of drinking. In this way, the effects of time-invariant confounders were eliminated. The results showed that every additional episode of heavy drinking was associated with a 2.6% increase in the frequency of drunk driving. The increase for males was significantly higher than among females. The analyses supported the hypothesis that impulsivity modifies the association between alcohol use and drunk driving. The association between drinking and drunk driving is significantly stronger among those with a high score on impulsivity compared with those who have a low score.

  14. High specificity but low sensitivity of mutation-specific antibodies against EGFR mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondgaard, Anna-Louise; Høgdall, Estrid; Mellemgaard, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Determination of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations has a pivotal impact on treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A standardized test has not yet been approved. So far, Sanger DNA sequencing has been widely used. Its rather low sensitivity has led to the development......, and staining score (multipum of intensity (graded 0-3) and percentages (0-100%) of stained tumor cells) was calculated. Positivity was defined as staining score >0. Specificity of exon19 antibody was 98.8% (95% confidence interval=95.9-99.9%) and of exon21 antibody 97.8% (95% confidence interval=94...... positive (immunohistochemistry positive, RT-PCR negative). One false positive exon21 mutation had staining score 300. The EGFR variantIII antibody showed no correlation to EGFR mutation status determined by RT-PCR or to EGFR immunohistochemistry. High specificity of the mutation-specific antibodies...

  15. Recreational drug use and impulsivity in a population of Canadian undergraduate drinkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris M Balodis

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The consumption of drugs during young adulthood may be particularly detrimental given important neurodevelopmental changes occurring during this period. As impulsivity may lead to substance use and substance use to the commission of seemingly impulsive acts, an improved understanding of the relationship between alcohol use, other substance use and impulsivity in young adults is important. We gathered information on self-reported impulsivity, recreational drug use, and drinking habits of 205 (105 female undergraduate students. Results showed that 64% of the students reported using marijuana at least once and these individuals were more likely to report binge drinking. Polydrug use, defined as using marijuana and at least one other illicit substance, was reported by 20% of students. These individuals reported more drinking occasions per month and had higher levels of trait impulsivity. Rates of recreational drug use were similar to those reported in recent national surveys, suggesting an increase in experimentation with specific illicit drugs. Given that a majority of undergraduate drinkers reported marijuana use and its association with binge drinking, future research should clarify the relationship between marijuana use and binge consumption of alcohol and prevention efforts should consider the conjoint targeting of marijuana and binge drinking. The associations between polydrug use, binge-level alcohol consumption and elevated self-reported impulsivity suggests that perceived trait impulsivity across multiple domains may predispose to excessive use of multiple substances. Longitudinal studies should examine the contribution of impulsivity to the initiation and experimentation with illicit drugs and the influence of specific substances on impulsivity.

  16. Role of Serotonin and Dopamine System Interactions in the Neurobiology of Impulsive Aggression and its Comorbidity with other Clinical Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Dongju; Patrick,Christopher J.; Kennealy, Patrick J.

    2008-01-01

    Impulsive aggression is characterized by an inability to regulate affect as well as aggressive impulses, and is highly comorbid with other mental disorders including depression, suicidal behavior, and substance abuse. In an effort to elucidate the neurobiological underpinnings of impulsive aggression and to help account for its connections with these other disorders, this paper reviews relevant biochemical, brain imaging, and genetic studies. The review suggests that dysfunctional interaction...

  17. Impulsividad y búsqueda de sensaciones: factores asociados a síntomas de anorexia y bulimia nerviosas en estudiantes de secundaria (Impulsiveness and sensation seeking: Factors associated with symptoms of anorexia and bulimia nervosa in high school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serafina Castro-Zamudio

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the potential association of impulsiveness and sensation seeking and the attitudes and behaviour characteristic of anorexia and bulimia nervosa in male and female students (between 12 and 20 years. The study had an observational case-control design, in which the case group comprised symptomatic subjects who had scores above the cutoff point designated by the authors for several assessment instruments, and the control group, which comprised asymptomatic participants who had scores below the cutoff point. The study included 300 participants (136 men [45.33%] and 164 women [(54.66%] from Malaga (Spain. All participants received parental authorization to take part in the study. The participants anonymously completed the following self-administered tests: Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-II, Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26, Bulimia Test Revised (BULIT-R, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11, and (SSS-V. The results suggest an association between impulsiveness and symptomatology associated with eating disorders, anorexia, and bulimia nervosa. In contrast, sensation seeking was only associated with bulimic symptoms. In summary, the variables impulsivity and sensation seeking appear to be closely associated with eating disorders. Thus, these aspects should be addressed in healthy lifestyle programs, because their inclusion may help to reduce or prevent the increase in eating disorders in the teenage population.

  18. Adolescent Exposure to Methylphenidate Increases Impulsive Choice Later in Life

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sweet, Arwen; Hernandez, Giovanni; Arvanitogiannis, Andreas; Abbas, Zarish

    2017-01-01

    ...: Using an animal model for impulsive choice, we examined first whether giving MPH through early adolescence alters delay discounting, an operational measure of impulsive choice, later in adulthood...

  19. Dynamics of force impulses and bubble oscillations during gas burning on a thrust wall in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teslenko, V. S.; Drozhzhin, A. P.; Medvedev, R. N.

    2017-09-01

    Comparative experiments are formed for measuring the force impulses during combustion of a stoichiometric propane-oxygen mixture on a thrust wall in cylindrical combustors and on an open wall shaped as a flat disk. For identical gas charges, the mean specific impulse generated by pulsed burning of the gas on an open thrust wall is found to be higher than that in the case of gas charge burning in cylindrical barrels.

  20. The Determinants of Impulse Buying in Construction Sector: Evidence from North Cyprus Economy

    OpenAIRE

    Noroozi, Elahe

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The objective of this thesis is to empirically investigate the relationship between impulse buying and its determinants by using cross-sectional data over 200 participants. Specifically, a questionnaire was conducted within the North Cyprus region takes into account the role of price, location, state agency and property rights. OLS technique is applied to test the validity of the model and the relative importance of different variables which may have an impact on impulse buying fac...

  1. Relationships between trait impulsivity and cognitive control: the effect of attention switching on response inhibition and conflict resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshem, Rotem

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the relationship between trait impulsivity and cognitive control, as measured by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS) and a focused attention dichotic listening to words task, respectively. In the task, attention was manipulated in two attention conditions differing in their cognitive control demands: one in which attention was directed to one ear at a time for a whole block of trials (blocked condition) and another in which attention was switched pseudo-randomly between the two ears from trial to trial (mixed condition). Results showed that high impulsivity participants exhibited more false alarm and intrusion errors as well as a lesser ability to distinguish between stimuli in the mixed condition, as compared to low impulsivity participants. In the blocked condition, the performance levels of the two groups were comparable with respect to these measures. In addition, total BIS scores were correlated with intrusions and laterality index in the mixed but not the blocked condition. The findings suggest that high impulsivity individuals may be less prone to attentional difficulties when cognitive load is relatively low. In contrast, when attention switching is involved, high impulsivity is associated with greater difficulty in inhibiting responses and resolving cognitive conflict than is low impulsivity, as reflected in error-prone information processing. The conclusion is that trait impulsivity in a non-clinical population is manifested more strongly when attention switching is required than during maintained attention. This may have important implications for the conceptualization and treatment of impulsivity in both non-clinical and clinical populations.

  2. Methamphetamine use, impulsivity, and sexual risk behavior among HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, Shirley J; Zians, Jim; Grant, Igor; Patterson, Thomas L

    2006-01-01

    This study examined impulsivity as a moderator of the relationship between meth use and sexual risk behavior in a sample of HIV-positive meth-using Men who have Sex with Men (MSM). Higher impulsivity was associated with less education, lower income, being unemployed, psychiatric diagnosis, and higher Beck depression scores. Intensity of meth use and sexual risk behavior were significantly correlated. In a multiple regression analysis, more education, greater intensity of meth use and higher levels of impulsivity predicted more unprotected sex. To test for moderating effects of impulsivity, an interaction term was added to the regression. The interactive effects model was statistically significant. A plot of the interaction revealed that the relationship between intensity of meth use and total unprotected sex was strongest among participants who had higher levels of impulsivity. This suggests that targeting impulsivity in interventions may help reduce sexual risk behaviors in high intensity meth-using HIV-positive MSM.

  3. Impulse oscillometry: a measure for airway obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Geraldine R; Arets, Hubertus G M; van der Laag, Johan; van der Ent, Cornelis K

    2003-03-01

    The impulse oscillometry system (IOS) was introduced as a new technique to assess airflow obstruction in patients who are not able to perform forced breathing maneuvers, e.g., subjects with cerebral palsy or severe mental retardation, and young children. This study evaluates the sensitivity and specificity of IOS parameters to quantify changes in airflow obstruction in comparison with forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV(1)) and peak expiratory flow (PEF) measurements. Measurements of FEV(1), PEF, and resistance (R) and reactance (X) at frequencies of 5-35 Hz were performed in 19 children with asthma before, during, and after methacholine challenge and subsequent bronchodilatation. All parameters changed significantly during tests. Values of R5 and R10 correlated with FEV(1) (r = -0.71 and -0.73, respectively, P operating characteristic (ROC) curve to predict a 15% fall in FEV(1) showed better sensitivity and specificity for R5 (area under the curve, 0.85) compared to PEF (0.79) or R10 (0.73). We conclude that IOS parameters can be easily used as an indirect measure of airflow obstruction. This might be helpful in patients who are not able to perform forced breathing maneuvers. In individual subjects, R values measured at 5 Hz showed to be superior to PEF measurements in the detection of a 15% fall in FEV(1). Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. High Efficiency, High Mass Specific Power Two-Terminal Solar Cells Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future NASA missions will require significant improvements in photovoltaic energy conversion efficiency (>30%) and mass specific power (>600 W/kg), and...

  5. The Social Organization of the High School: School-Specific Aspects of School Crime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianni, Francis A. J.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a study of three New York high schools (rural, suburban, and urban) that developed a model of high school social organization in order to provide a school-specific focus for examining school violence and crime. (JG)

  6. Adults with a family history of alcohol related problems are more impulsive on measures of response initiation and response inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acheson, Ashley; Richard, Dawn M; Mathias, Charles W; Dougherty, Donald M

    2011-09-01

    Previous studies have found individuals with family histories of alcohol use disorders are more impulsive on some but not all laboratory behavioral measures, suggesting deficits on specific forms of impulse control. However, drawing conclusions is tenuous because these different measures have not been administered together in the same group of participants. In the present study, we compared healthy 21-35 year old adults with family histories of alcohol related problems (FHAP+) or without such histories (FHAP-) on behavioral measures of response inhibition, response initiation, and consequence sensitivity impulsivity. FHAP+ (n=36) and FHAP- (n=36) participants were compared on performance on the Immediate Memory Task (IMT, response initiation), GoStop Impulsivity Paradigm (GoStop, response inhibition), Two Choice Impulsivity Paradigm (TCIP, consequence sensitivity) and Single Key Impulsivity Paradigm (SKIP, consequence sensitivity). FHAP+ individuals were more impulsive on the IMT and GoStop but not on the TCIP or SKIP. These results suggest that response initiation and response inhibition impulsivity are increased in individuals with family histories of alcohol related problems despite not having alcohol or drug use disorders themselves. In contrast, increased consequence sensitivity impulsivity may be associated with additional risk factors such as more severe family histories of alcohol use disorders, or it may be increased as a consequence of heavy drug or alcohol use. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The neuronal mechanisms underlying improvement of impulsivity in ADHD by theta/beta neurofeedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluschke, Annet; Broschwitz, Felicia; Kohl, Simon; Roessner, Veit; Beste, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Neurofeedback is increasingly recognized as an intervention to treat core symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Despite the large number of studies having been carried out to evaluate its effectiveness, it is widely elusive what neuronal mechanisms related to the core symptoms of ADHD are modulated by neurofeedback. 19 children with ADHD undergoing 8 weeks of theta/beta neurofeedback and 17 waiting list controls performed a Go/Nogo task in a pre-post design. We used neurophysiological measures combining high-density EEG recording with source localization analyses using sLORETA. Compared to the waiting list ADHD control group, impulsive behaviour measured was reduced after neurofeedback treatment. The effects of neurofeedback were very specific for situations requiring inhibitory control over responses. The neurophysiological data shows that processes of perceptual gating, attentional selection and resource allocation processes were not affected by neurofeedback. Rather, neurofeedback effects seem to be based on the modulation of response inhibition processes in medial frontal cortices. The study shows that specific neuronal mechanisms underlying impulsivity are modulated by theta/beta neurofeedback in ADHD. The applied neurofeedback protocol could be particularly suitable to address inhibitory control. The study validates assumed functional neuroanatomical target regions of an established neurofeedback protocol on a neurophysiological level. PMID:27514985

  8. Gambling and Impulsivity Traits: A Recipe for Criminal Behavior?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Mestre-Bach

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Gambling disorder (GD is a psychiatric condition that was recently recategorized as a non-substance-related addiction in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Health Disorders. Criminal activity is commonly associated with gambling; however, few empirical studies to date have examined sociodemographic and psychological variables in this population. In this study, we explored criminal behavior history in a sample of consecutively recruited treatment-seeking gamblers (n = 382 and compared subjects with a history of illegal acts (n = 103, 26.9% to those with no criminal record (n = 279, 73.1%. Impulsivity and personality traits were specifically explored, along with other gambling-related severity factors. We found that gamblers who engaged in illegal activity were more likely to endorse high levels of urgency (i.e., the tendency to act out when experiencing heightened emotional states and increased lack of premeditation. Gamblers with a history of criminal behavior also had greater GD severity levels and gambling-related debts. Additionally, these gamblers reported lower levels of self-directedness, which is characterized by difficulty in establishing and redirecting behavior toward one’s goals. Likewise, gamblers who had conducted criminal acts showed a tendency to engage in greater risk-taking behavior. These results shed new light on this understudied population and provide insights for developing targeted harm-prevention interventions and treatment protocols.

  9. A survey on impulsive dynamical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everaldo Bonotto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this survey we provide an introduction to the theory of impulsive dynamical systems in both the autonomous and nonautonomous cases. In the former, we will show two different approaches which have been proposed to analyze such kind of dynamical systems which can experience some abrupt changes in their evolution (impulses. But, unlike the autonomous framework, the nonautonomous one is being developed right now and some progress is being obtained over the recent years. We will provide some results on how the theory of autonomous impulsive dynamical systems can be extended to cover such nonautonomous situations, which are more often to occur in the real world.

  10. Impulse Control Disorders in Parkinson’s Disease:Management, Controversies, and Potential Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, M; Rodriguez-Oroz, M; Antonini, A; Brotchie, JM; Ray Chaudhuri, K; Brown, RG; Galpern, WR; Nirenberg, MJ; Okun, MS; Lang, AE

    2016-01-01

    Impulse control disorders in Parkinson’s disease are a group of impulsive behaviors most often associated with dopaminergic treatment. Presently, there is a lack of high quality evidence available to guide their management. This manuscript reviews current management strategies, before concentrating on the concept of dopamine agonist withdrawal syndrome and its implications for the management of impulse control disorders. Further, we focus on controversies including the role of more recently available anti-parkinsonian drugs, and potential future approaches involving routes of drug delivery, non-pharmacological treatments (such as cognitive behaviour therapy and deep brain stimulation), and other as yet experimental strategies. PMID:25607799

  11. Management of impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease: Controversies and future approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Michael; Rodriguez-Oroz, Maria; Antonini, Angelo; Brotchie, Jonathan M; Ray Chaudhuri, Kallol; Brown, Richard G; Galpern, Wendy R; Nirenberg, Melissa J; Okun, Michael S; Lang, Anthony E

    2015-02-01

    Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease are a group of impulsive behaviors most often associated with dopaminergic treatment. Presently, there is a lack of high quality evidence available to guide their management. This manuscript reviews current management strategies, before concentrating on the concept of dopamine agonist withdrawal syndrome and its implications for the management of impulse control disorders. Further, we focus on controversies, including the role of more recently available anti-parkinsonian drugs, and potential future approaches involving routes of drug delivery, nonpharmacological treatments (such as cognitive behavioral therapy and deep brain stimulation), and other as yet experimental strategies. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  12. Temperament, insecure attachment, impulsivity, and sexuality in women in jail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliceto, Paolo; Pompili, Maurizio; Candilera, Gabriella; Rosafio, Iole; Erbuto, Denise; Battuello, Michele; Lester, David; Girardi, Paolo

    2012-03-01

    Women constitute only a small proportion of inmates, but several studies have shown that they have higher rates of psychiatric disturbance than incarcerated men and community samples. Mental health treatment is necessary to prevent severe illness and suicide in these women. The convenience sample consisted of 40 female detainees and 40 controls who were administered self-report questionnaires to assess temperament (TEMPS-A), insecure attachment (ECR), impulsivity (BIS-11), and sexual behavior (SESAMO). The incarcerated women had higher levels of affective temperament (except for hyperthymia), avoidance, anxiety, impulsivity, and psychosexual issues than the female community sample. Many interrelated emotional and affective disturbances affect the physical and psychological well-being of women in jail, and it is possible that these problems may lead to suicide. Health professionals need to develop gender-specific therapeutic interventions for women in jail. © 2012 International Association of Forensic Nurses.

  13. Increased multiaxial lumbar motion responses during multiple-impulse mechanical force manually assisted spinal manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunzburg Robert

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal manipulation has been found to create demonstrable segmental and intersegmental spinal motions thought to be biomechanically related to its mechanisms. In the case of impulsive-type instrument device comparisons, significant differences in the force-time characteristics and concomitant motion responses of spinal manipulative instruments have been reported, but studies investigating the response to multiple thrusts (multiple impulse trains have not been conducted. The purpose of this study was to determine multi-axial segmental and intersegmental motion responses of ovine lumbar vertebrae to single impulse and multiple impulse spinal manipulative thrusts (SMTs. Methods Fifteen adolescent Merino sheep were examined. Tri-axial accelerometers were attached to intraosseous pins rigidly fixed to the L1 and L2 lumbar spinous processes under fluoroscopic guidance while the animals were anesthetized. A hand-held electromechanical chiropractic adjusting instrument (Impulse was used to apply single and repeated force impulses (13 total over a 2.5 second time interval at three different force settings (low, medium, and high along the posteroanterior axis of the T12 spinous process. Axial (AX, posteroanterior (PA, and medial-lateral (ML acceleration responses in adjacent segments (L1, L2 were recorded at a rate of 5000 samples per second. Peak-peak segmental accelerations (L1, L2 and intersegmental acceleration transfer (L1–L2 for each axis and each force setting were computed from the acceleration-time recordings. The initial acceleration response for a single thrust and the maximum acceleration response observed during the 12 multiple impulse trains were compared using a paired observations t-test (POTT, alpha = .05. Results Segmental and intersegmental acceleration responses mirrored the peak force magnitude produced by the Impulse Adjusting Instrument. Accelerations were greatest for AX and PA measurement axes. Compared to

  14. Multidimensional assessment of impulsivity in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder: testing for shared endophenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortgang, R G; Hultman, C M; van Erp, T G M; Cannon, T D

    2016-05-01

    Impulsivity is associated with bipolar disorder as a clinical feature during and between manic episodes and is considered a potential endophenotype for the disorder. Schizophrenia and major depressive disorder share substantial genetic overlap with bipolar disorder, and these two disorders have also been associated with elevations in impulsivity. However, little is known about the degree of overlap among these disorders in discrete subfacets of impulsivity and whether any overlap is purely phenotypic or due to shared genetic diathesis. We focused on five subfacets of impulsivity: self-reported attentional, motor, and non-planning impulsivity, self-reported sensation seeking, and a behavioral measure of motor inhibition (stop signal reaction time; SSRT). We examined these facets within and across disorder proband and co-twin groups, modeled heritability, and tested for endophenotypic patterning in a sample of twin pairs recruited from the Swedish Twin Registry (N = 420). We found evidence of moderate to high levels of heritability for all five subfacets. All three proband groups and their unaffected co-twins showed elevations on attentional, motor, and non-planning impulsivity. Schizophrenia probands (but not their co-twins) showed significantly lower sensation seeking, and schizophrenia and bipolar disorder probands (but not in their co-twins) had significantly longer SSRTs, compared with healthy controls and the other groups. Attentional, motor, and non-planning impulsivity emerged as potential shared endophenotypes for the three disorders, whereas sensation seeking and SSRT were associated with phenotypic affection but not genetic loading for these disorders.

  15. Relationships between impulsivity and subjective response in an IV ethanol paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeman, Robert F; Ralevski, Elizabeth; Limoncelli, Diana; Pittman, Brian; O'Malley, Stephanie S; Petrakis, Ismene L

    2014-07-01

    Impulsivity and individual differences in subjective response to alcohol are risk factors for alcohol problems and possibly endophenotypes for alcohol dependence. Few prior studies have addressed relationships between the two constructs. To predict subjective responses to ethanol, we tested self-reported impulsiveness, ethanol dose condition (high dose, low dose, or placebo), and time (seven time points) along with interactions among these variables. The present study is a secondary analysis of data from a within-subject, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging ethanol administration study using IV infusion with a clamping technique to maintain steady-state breath alcohol concentration. The sample consisted of healthy, non-alcohol dependent social alcohol drinkers between the ages of 21 and 30 (N=105). Participants at varying levels of impulsivity were compared with regard to stimulant and subjective responses to three ethanol dose conditions over time. Individuals with higher impulsivity reported elavated stimulant and dampened sedative response to alcohol, particularly at the higher dose. Higher impulsivity was associated with a steeper increase in stimulant effects during the first half of clamped ethanol infusion with the higher dose. These results suggest that impulsive individuals may experience enhanced reinforcing, stimulant effects, and relatively muted aversive sedative effects from alcohol. These subjective responses may relate to enhanced risk of alcohol problems among more impulsive individuals.

  16. Research on Discharge Circuit of Electro-Hydraulic Power Impulse Water Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaohui; Gao, Quanjie; Wang, Wei; Liao, Zhenfang

    2012-01-01

    Electro-hydraulic power impulse water jets can convert the shock wave generated in the liquid by discharging into mechanical energy, and it has been widely used in material forming, surface cleaning, pipeline dirt cleaning and ore breaking process. Compared with the traditional high pressure water jets, the energy utilization of electro-hydraulic power impulse water jets is up to 80% while the water consumption is reduced by 40-55%. This paper has taken electro-hydraulic power impulse water jets as the research object, employed obtaining the maximum pressure of compression impulse matrix surface as the research goal, studied in depth the equivalent discharge circuit, characteristic equation and the relationship between the electrical parameters of the electro-hydraulic power impulse discharge circuit and built the calculation method of the voltage, the inductance, the capacitance and the electrode spacing parameter of electro-hydraulic power impulse water jets discharge circuit. So, it will provide important theoretical basis for further studies of electro-hydraulic power impulse technology and the existing water jets device.

  17. 'Speedy action over goal orientation': cognitive impulsivity in male forensic patients with dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dåderman, Anna M; Meurling, Ann Wirsén; Levander, Sten

    2012-11-01

    Previous neuropsychiatric studies suggest a relationship between reading disability and cognitive impulsivity. This relationship is not entirely explained by the high comorbidity between reading disability and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), as children with a co-occurrence of these disorders tend to be more impulsive than those with ADHD only. Other research has demonstrated that poor verbal skill (irrespective of the presence of dyslexia) deficits in executive functions and impulsivity are important risk factors for criminal behaviour. The present study bridges these two research traditions by examining whether patients undergoing forensic psychiatric investigation who also have dyslexia, have a cognitive style characterized by impulsivity. Male forensic patients (mean age 27 years, range 16-35) with (n = 9) and without (n = 13) dyslexia were evaluated on the computerized EuroCog test battery. The findings suggest that patients with dyslexia tend to use a cognitive impulsive style and suggest a more direct link between dyslexia and cognitive impulsivity that is not mediated by the presence of ADHD. In order to identify treatment needs and tailor treatment accordingly, forensic patients should be assessed with respect to poor verbal skill, dyslexia and impulsivity. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Impulse control disorders in Chinese Parkinson's disease patients: the effect of ergot derived dopamine agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auyeung, M; Tsoi, T H; Tang, W K; Cheung, C M; Lee, C N; Li, R; Yeung, Eric

    2011-09-01

    We studied the prevalence and related risk factors of impulse control disorders in Chinese Parkinson's disease patients. We screened all non-demented Parkinson's disease patients attending our Parkinson's disease clinic from August 2009 to March 2010. The clinical characteristics of patients with impulse control disorders and those without were compared. Of the 213 PD subjects screened, 15 (7.0%) with impulse control disorders were identified. Fourteen of these subjects were on both a dopamine agonist and Levodopa, and one was on Levodopa alone. Of the fourteen subjects on both a dopamine agonist and Levodopa, eleven were on bromocriptine and Levodopa; 10.5% of the subjects exposed to bromocriptine had impulse control disorder. Upon multivariate analysis, dose of dopamine agonist used, young age at onset of Parkinson's disease and a history of anxiety or depression were independent predictors for developing impulse control disorders. 7% of our Chinese PD subjects had impulse control disorders. When young Parkinson's disease patients with a history of anxiety or depression are treated with high dose of DA, they are at risk of developing impulse control disorders. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation influences expression and suppression of impulsive behaviour in Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridderinkhof, K. Richard; Elias, William J.; Frysinger, Robert C.; Bashore, Theodore R.; Downs, Kara E.; van Wouwe, Nelleke C.; van den Wildenberg, Wery P. M.

    2010-01-01

    Past studies show beneficial as well as detrimental effects of subthalamic nucleus deep-brain stimulation on impulsive behaviour. We address this paradox by investigating individuals with Parkinson’s disease treated with subthalamic nucleus stimulation (n = 17) and healthy controls without Parkinson’s disease (n = 17) on performance in a Simon task. In this reaction time task, conflict between premature response impulses and goal-directed action selection is manipulated. We applied distributional analytic methods to separate the strength of the initial response impulse from the proficiency of inhibitory control engaged subsequently to suppress the impulse. Patients with Parkinson’s disease were tested when stimulation was either turned on or off. Mean conflict interference effects did not differ between controls and patients, or within patients when stimulation was on versus off. In contrast, distributional analyses revealed two dissociable effects of subthalamic nucleus stimulation. Fast response errors indicated that stimulation increased impulsive, premature responding in high conflict situations. Later in the reaction process, however, stimulation improved the proficiency with which inhibitory control was engaged to suppress these impulses selectively, thereby facilitating selection of the correct action. This temporal dissociation supports a conceptual framework for resolving past paradoxical findings and further highlights that dynamic aspects of impulse and inhibitory control underlying goal-directed behaviour rely in part on neural circuitry inclusive of the subthalamic nucleus. PMID:20861152

  20. Interrelationships among impulsive personality traits, food addiction, and Body Mass Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Cara M; Stojek, Monika K; MacKillop, James

    2014-02-01

    Impulsive personality traits have been robustly associated with alcohol and drug misuse, but have received little attention in the context of food addiction. The goal of the current study was to examine the interrelationships between impulsive personality traits, food addiction, and Body Mass Index (BMI), including indirect pathways of influence. Participants (N = 233) completed the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS) to assess patterns of addictive consumption of food, the upps-p impulsivity scale to assess impulsive personality traits, and provided weight and height to generate BMI. Significant positive associations were found between facets of impulsivity, food addiction symptoms, and BMI. Impulsivity was found to be indirectly associated with BMI by way of associations with addictive consumption of food. In particular, an inclination toward behaving irrationally while experiencing negative mood states (Negative Urgency) and low levels of task persistence (lack of Perseverance) were significantly associated with food addiction directly and that relationship was responsible for their relationship to BMI. Dispositional impulsivity, routinely associated with high-risk behaviors including addictive consumption of alcohol and drugs, may be an important risk factor when considering tendency to engage in addictive consumption of food. Monitoring food addiction symptoms early may help reduce the likelihood that compulsive food consumption patterns result in weight gain and obesity. Methodological considerations are discussed.

  1. Vegetation effects on impulsive events in the acoustic signature of fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedinak, Kara M; Anderson, Michael J; Apostol, Kent G; Smith, Alistair M S

    2017-01-01

    Acoustic impulse events have long been used as diagnostics for discrete phenomena in the natural world, including the detection of meteor impacts and volcanic eruptions. Wildland fires display an array of such acoustic impulse events in the form of crackling noises. Exploratory research into the properties of these impulse events revealed information regarding the specific properties of plant material. Unique acoustic frequency bands in the upper end of the sonic spectrum correlated to changes in vegetation properties. The signature of acoustic impulse events as they relate to plant species and plant water stress, were investigated in controlled laboratory combustion experiments. Correlation in the frequency range of 6.0-15.0 kHz was found for both species and water stress, indicating the possibility that a digital filter may be capable of identifying vegetation properties during wildland fire events.

  2. Impulsive responding in threat and reward contexts as a function of PTSD symptoms and trait disinhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeh, Naomi; Spielberg, Jeffrey M; Hayes, Jasmeet P

    2018-01-01

    We examined current posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, trait disinhibition, and affective context as contributors to impulsive and self-destructive behavior in 94 trauma-exposed Veterans. Participants completed an affective Go/No-Go task (GNG) with different emotional contexts (threat, reward, and a multidimensional threat/reward condition) and current PTSD, trait disinhibition, and risky/self-destructive behavior measures. PTSD interacted with trait disinhibition to explain recent engagement in risky/self-destructive behavior, with Veterans scoring high on trait disinhibition and current PTSD symptoms reporting the highest levels of these behaviors. On the GNG task, commission errors were also associated with the interaction of PTSD symptoms and trait disinhibition. Specifically, PTSD symptoms were associated with greater commission errors in threat vs. reward contexts for individuals who were low on trait disinhibition. In contrast, veterans high on PTSD and trait disinhibition exhibited the greatest number of commission errors in the multidimensional affective context that involved both threat and reward processing. Results highlight the interactive effects of PTSD and disinhibited personality traits, as well as threat and reward systems, as risk factors for impulsive and self-destructive behavior in trauma-exposed groups. Findings have clinical implications for understanding heterogeneity in the expression of PTSD and its association with disinhibited behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. 5-HT2A and mGlu2 receptor binding levels are related to differences in impulsive behavior in the Roman Low- (RLA) and High- (RHA) avoidance rat strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, A B; Ultved, L; Adamsen, D

    2014-01-01

    . In the more impulsive RHA-I rats, 5-HT(2A), 5-HT(1A) and SERT binding in the frontal cortex was significantly higher compared to RLA-I rats. In contrast, mGlu2/3 receptor binding was decreased by 40% in RHA-I rats compared to RLA-I rats. To differentiate between mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptor protein levels...

  4. Controlling Your Impulses: Electrical Stimulation of the Human Supplementary Motor Complex Prevents Impulsive Errors

    OpenAIRE

    Spieser, L.; Van den Wildenberg, W; Hasbroucq, T.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.; Burle, B.

    2015-01-01

    International audience; To err is human. However, an inappropriate urge does not always result in error. Impulsive errors thus entail both a motor system capture by an urge to act and a failed inhibition of that impulse. Here we show that neuromodulatory electrical stimulation of the supplementary motor complex in healthy humans leaves action urges unchanged but prevents them from turning into overt errors. Subjects performed a choice reaction-time task known to trigger impulsive responses, l...

  5. Dissociable Rate-Dependent Effects of Oral Methylphenidate on Impulsivity and D2/3 Receptor Availability in the Striatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprioli, Daniele; Jupp, Bianca; Hong, Young T.; Sawiak, Stephen J.; Ferrari, Valentina; Wharton, Laura; Williamson, David J.; McNabb, Carolyn; Berry, David; Aigbirhio, Franklin I.; Robbins, Trevor W.; Fryer, Tim D.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that impulsivity in rats is linked to decreased dopamine D2/3 receptor availability in the ventral striatum. In the present study, we investigated, using longitudinal positron emission tomography (PET), the effects of orally administered methylphenidate (MPH), a first-line treatment for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, on D2/3 receptor availability in the dorsal and ventral striatum and related these changes to impulsivity. Rats were screened for impulsive behavior on a five-choice serial reaction time task. After a baseline PET scan with the D2/3 ligand [18F]fallypride, rats received 6 mg/kg MPH, orally, twice each day for 28 d. Rats were then reassessed for impulsivity and underwent a second [18F]fallypride PET scan. Before MPH treatment, we found that D2/3 receptor availability was significantly decreased in the left but not the right ventral striatum of high-impulse (HI) rats compared with low-impulse (LI) rats. MPH treatment increased impulsivity in LI rats, and modulated impulsivity and D2/3 receptor availability in the dorsal and ventral striatum of HI rats through inverse relationships with baseline levels of impulsivity and D2/3 receptor availability, respectively. However, we found no relationship between the effects of MPH on impulsivity and D2/3 receptor availability in any of the striatal subregions investigated. These findings indicate that trait-like impulsivity is associated with decreased D2/3 receptor availability in the left ventral striatum, and that stimulant drugs modulate impulsivity and striatal D2/3 receptor availability through independent mechanisms. PMID:25740505

  6. Detecting Impulses in Mechanical Signals by Wavelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang W-X

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of periodical or nonperiodical impulses in vibration signals often indicates the occurrence of machine faults. This knowledge is applied to the fault diagnosis of such machines as engines, gearboxes, rolling element bearings, and so on. The development of an effective impulse detection technique is necessary and significant for evaluating the working condition of these machines, diagnosing their malfunctions, and keeping them running normally over prolong periods. With the aid of wavelet transforms, a wavelet-based envelope analysis method is proposed. In order to suppress any undesired information and highlight the features of interest, an improved soft threshold method has been designed so that the inspected signal is analyzed in a more exact way. Furthermore, an impulse detection technique is developed based on the aforementioned methods. The effectiveness of the proposed technique on the extraction of impulsive features of mechanical signals has been proved by both simulated and practical experiments.

  7. Childhood impulsive behavior and problem gambling by adulthood: a 30-year prospective community-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenassa, Edmond D; Paradis, Angela D; Dolan, Sara L; Wilhelm, Charlotte S; Buka, Stephen L

    2012-01-01

    Problem gambling can create major financial, emotional and sometimes criminal problems for an individual. This study prospectively investigated the association between impulsive behavior at age 7 and the development of life-time problem gambling by adulthood. We also examined the specificity of any observed association between impulsive behaviors and problem gambling by conducting parallel analyses examining the link between respondents' shy/depressed behavior in childhood and later problem gambling. Cohort study of 958 offspring of mothers enrolled in the Collaborative Perinatal Project who participated in an adult follow-up study at a mean age of 39.2 years. Multivariable logistic regression models were fitted to determine associations between psychologist-rated impulsive and shy/depressed behaviors at age 7 and life-time self-reported gambling as measured by the South Oaks Gambling Screen administered during the adult follow-up study. Children who exhibited impulsive behaviors at age 7, compared to their non-impulsive counterparts, were 3.09 (95% confidence interval: 1.40-6.82) times as likely to report problem gambling years later. In contrast, we did not find a significant association between childhood shy/depressed behavior and problem gambling by adulthood in adjusted analyses. Impulsive behaviors at age 7 are a specific and significant risk factor for later problem gambling. © 2011 The Authors, Addiction © 2011 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  8. Effects of cannabis on impulsivity: a systematic review of neuroimaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrege, Johannes; Schmidt, Andre; Walter, Anna; Smieskova, Renata; Bendfeldt, Kerstin; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Lang, Undine E; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review to assess the evidence for specific effects of cannabis on impulsivity, disinhibition and motor control. The review had a specific focus on neuroimaging findings associated with acute and chronic use of the drug and covers literature published up until May 2012. Seventeen studies were identified, of which 13 met the inclusion criteria; three studies investigated acute effects of cannabis (1 fMRI, 2 PET), while six studies investigated non-acute functional effects (4 fMRI, 2 PET), and four studies investigated structural alterations. Functional imaging studies of impulsivity studies suggest that prefrontal blood flow is lower in chronic cannabis users than in controls. Studies of acute administration of THC or marijuana report increased brain metabolism in several brain regions during impulsivity tasks. Structural imaging studies of cannabis users found differences in reduced prefrontal volumes and white matter integrity that might mediate the abnormal impulsivity and mood observed in marijuana users. To address the question whether impulsivity as a trait precedes cannabis consumption or whether cannabis aggravates impulsivity and discontinuation of usage more longitudinal study designs are warranted.

  9. Impulsivity and drinking motives predict problem behaviours relating to alcohol use in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Katy A; Chryssanthakis, Alexandra; Groom, Madeleine J

    2014-01-01

    This study used a four-factor model of impulsivity to investigate inter-relationships between alcohol consumption, impulsivity, motives for drinking and the tendency to engage in alcohol-related problem behaviours. 400 University students aged 18-25 completed an online survey consisting of the following measures: Urgency, Premeditation, Perseverance and Sensation Seeking Scale (UPPS) to measure impulsivity; Student Alcohol Questionnaire to assess drinking quantity, frequency and rates of problem behaviours; Drinking Motives Questionnaire to assess motives for drinking. The majority of the sample (94.5%) drank alcohol at least monthly. Path analysis revealed direct effects of urgency, sensation seeking and premeditation, as well as the quantity of alcohol consumed, on the tendency to engage in risky behaviours with negative consequences. The effect of urgency was mediated by drinking for coping motives and by a combined effect of drinking for social motives and consumption of wine or spirits. Conversely the effect of sensation seeking was mediated by the quantity of alcohol consumed, irrespective of drink type, and the effect of premeditation was mediated by the consumption of wine and spirits, in combination with enhancement motives. Sensation seeking, urgency and lack of premeditation are related to different motives for drinking and also demonstrate dissociable relationships with the consumption of specific types of alcohol (beer, wine and spirits) and the tendency to engage in risky behaviours associated with alcohol consumption. Screening for high levels of urgency and for severe drinking consequences may be useful predictors of alcohol-related problems in UK University students aged 18 to 25 years. © 2013.

  10. [Clinical and psychopathological factors associated with impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-Francàs, N; Martí Andrés, G; Ramírez, N; de Fàbregues, O; Álvarez-Sabín, J; Casas, M; Hernández-Vara, J

    2016-05-01

    Impulse control disorders (ICD) constitute a complication that may arise during the course of Parkinson's disease (PD). Several factors have been linked to the development of these disorders, and their associated severe functional impairment requires specific and multidisciplinary management. The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency of ICDs and the clinical and psychopathological factors associated with the appearance of these disorders. Cross-sectional, descriptive, and analytical study of a sample of 115 PD patients evaluated to determine the presence of an ICD. Clinical scales were administered to assess disease severity, personality traits, and presence of psychiatric symptoms at the time of evaluation. Of the 115 patients with PD, 27 (23.48%) displayed some form of ICD; hypersexuality, exhibited by 14 (12.2%), and binge eating, present in 12 (10.1%), were the most common types. Clinical factors associated with ICD were treatment with dopamine agonists (OR: 13.39), earlier age at disease onset (OR: 0.92), and higher score on the UPDRS-I subscale; psychopathological factors with a significant association were trait anxiety (OR: 1.05) and impulsivity (OR: 1.13). ICDs are frequent in PD, and treatment with dopamine agonists is the most important risk factor for these disorders. High impulsivity and anxiety levels at time of evaluation, and younger age at disease onset, were also linked to increased risk. However, presence of these personality traits prior to evaluation did not increase risk of ICD. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of dopamine agonist dose and gender on the prognosis of impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joutsa, Juho; Martikainen, Kirsti; Vahlberg, Tero; Kaasinen, Valtteri

    2012-12-01

    Cross-sectional studies have demonstrated that Parkinson's disease patients have an increased risk of impulse control disorders, and that the disorders frequently co-exist with depressive symptoms. There have been no previous large-scale prospective studies investigating predictive and prognostic factors of these disorders. A population of 290 Parkinson's disease patients was studied at baseline and approximately 15 months later. The same screening methodology was used at both time-points (demographic and medication data together with the Questionnaire for Impulsive-compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's disease and the Beck Depression Inventory). The data was analyzed separating patients with and without impulse control disorders at baseline to obtain clinically useful prognostic factors. In patients who had impulse control disorders at baseline (n = 119), high dopamine agonist dose was associated with the presence of disorders at follow-up. Dopamine agonist levodopa equivalent daily dose over 160 mg was significantly associated with impulse control disorders with a positive predictive value of 92.5% (95% confidence interval 79.6%-98.4%). In addition, females had a better prognosis of impulse control disorders compared to males. The development of novel impulse control disorders (no disorder at baseline, disorder at follow-up) was associated with a concurrent increase in depression scores. The results suggest that dopamine agonist dose and gender are associated with the prognosis of impulse control disorders. Symptoms of depression emerge together with novel impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Role of depression severity and impulsivity in the relationship between hopelessness and suicidal ideation in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-yu; Jiang, Neng-zhi; Cheung, Eric F C; Sun, Hong-wei; Chan, Raymond C K

    2015-09-01

    Hopelessness, depression and impulsivity all contribute to the development of suicidal ideation in patients with major depressive disorder, but the pathway of these factors to suicidal ideation is not clear. This study examined the meditating effect of depression severity on the relationship between hopelessness and suicidal ideation and explored how this mediating effect was moderated by impulsivity. A total of 162 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) completed a structured clinical diagnostic interview and a battery of scales assessing depression severity, hopelessness, suicidal ideation, and impulsivity. Regression analyses with bootstrapping methods were used to examine the mediating and moderating effects of various risk factors. Mediation analysis revealed a significant indirect effect of hopelessness on suicidal ideation, and the effect was fully mediated through depression severity. On moderation analysis, the moderating effects of the relationship between depression severity and suicidal ideation were significant in both the medium and high impulsivity groups. The present study was limited by the assessment of trait impulsivity and observer-rated depression severity, which might not fully reflect momentary impulsivity and feeling of depression when suicidal ideation occurs. Depression severity plays a mediator role in the relationship between hopelessness and suicidal ideation and this mechanism is contingent on the levels of impulsivity. MDD patients with higher impulsivity appear to be more likely to have suicidal ideations even when they are less depressed. These findings highlight the importance of impulsivity assessment and alleviation of depressive symptoms to prevent suicidality in patients with MDD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Impulsive nature in collisional driven reconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitabata, Hideyuki; Hayashi, Takaya; Sato, Tetsuya

    1995-11-01

    Compressible magnetohydrodynamic simulation is carried out in order to investigate energy relaxation process of the driven magnetic reconnection in an open finite system through a long time calculation. It is found that a very impulsive energy release occurs in an intermittent fashion through magnetic reconnection for a continuous magnetic flux injection on the boundary. In the impulsive phase, the reconnection rate is remarkably enhanced up to more than ten times of the driving rate on the boundary. (author).

  14. The loudness of decaying impulsive sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namba, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Rice, C. G.

    1987-08-01

    In the case of short duration sounds it is well known that temporal loudness summation occurs within a certain time period (i.e., critical duration), and a trade-off relationship is established between the sound intensity and the duration of the sound. Therefore, for the estimation of the loudness of brief sounds such as impulsive noise the temporal loudness summation must be considered. This paper deals with artificial impulsive sounds with a relatively short rise time and a long decay, as usually observed for actual impulsive sounds, and whether the loudness of an impulsive sound is determined by the peak level of the sound or by the total energy of the sound including the decaying part. L AX in ISO 1996, which is the single event exposure level, is chosen as an energy index of the sound in this paper. It is probable, however, that the time varying pattern of the sound or auditory after effect has an effect on the loudness of impulsive sounds. Such effects, however, are not reflected either in L AX or in the peak level measurement. Accordingly additional experiments have been carried out to examine the temporal characteristics of the hearing mechanism in relation to the loudness of impulsive sounds. As a result, it seems that L AX is a good measure of the loudness of impulsive sounds which are not too short, but when the duration of the sound is less than 60 ms the contribution of the auditory after-effect on the loudness needs to be taken into consideration. No relation could be found between the peak level and the loudness of impulsive sounds.

  15. Forensic Psychiatric Aspects of Impulse Control Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Soysal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Impulse control disorders is an important psychiatric disorder group which draws attention in recent years. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and other classical disorders like pyromania, kleptomania, intermittent explosive disorder and compulsive buying could be evasuated under this topic. The aim of this article is to review forensic psychiatric aspects of impulse control disorders and evaluate the disorders in terms of their legal status. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2015; 7(1: 16-29

  16. Impulsive Behaviors in Patients With Pathological Buying

    OpenAIRE

    Zander, Heike; Claes, Laurence; Voth, Eva; de Zwaan, Martina; Mueller, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate impulsive behaviors in pathological buying (PB). Methods The study included three groups matched for age and gender: treatment seeking outpatients with PB (PB+), treatment seeking psychiatric inpatients without PB (PB?), and a healthy control group (HC). PB was assessed by means of the Compulsive Buying Scale and by the impulse control disorder (ICD) module of the research version of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-ICD). All participants answered question...

  17. Mediation effect of social skills between impulsivity with substance abuse in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Poorkord

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to examine mediation effect of social skills between impulsivity with substance abuse in adolescents. The research sample consists of 616 students of vulnerable high schools in Ardabil City. Together the data of Impulsivity Scale, Matson social skills scale and substance abuse survey were used [Matson, J. L., Rotatori, A. F., & Helsel, W. J. (1983. Development of a rating scale to measure social skills in children: The Matson Evaluation of Social Skills with Youngsters (MESSY. Behaviour Research and therapy, 21(4, 335-340.]. The results show that impulsivity indirectly is associated with substance abuse students (P<0.001 through the effect on social skills. The results indicate that high levels of impulsivity and low-level social skills increase substance abuse in students. These results are consistent with other existing results found in the literature.

  18. Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas, Dolores; Pont-Sunyer, Claustre; Tolosa, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Impulse control disorders (ICDs), a group of complex behavioral disorders, occur more commonly in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients than in the general population, with a reported prevalence up to 13.6% in some studies. The most common ICDs reported are pathological gambling (PG), hypersexuality (HS), compulsive shopping and compulsive eating. More than a quarter of the patients with ICDs have 2 or more behavioral addictions. These abnormal behaviors impair activities of daily living and have a negative impact on quality of life of patients and their families. As with many other non motor symptoms in PD, ICDs are frequently under-reported by patients and caregivers and may be under-recognized by the treating physicians. Treatment with dopamine agonists (DA) is the main risk factor for developing ICDs, and stimulation of mesolimbic D3 receptors by DA is thought to underlie their development. The DA effect seems to be a class effect and not specific for any DA. Levodopa can also induce ICDs but much less so than the DAs. The management of ICDs in PD is complex. Modifications in dopaminergic drug treatment are frequently necessary. In some cases alternative therapies such as atypical antipsychotics, antidepressants or deep brain stimulation if motor symptoms become incapacitating after adjustment of dopamine replacement therapy should be considered. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Optimal neurocognitive, personality and behavioral measures for assessing impulsivity in cocaine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoBue, Christian; Cullum, C Munro; Braud, Jacqueline; Walker, Robrina; Winhusen, Theresa; Suderajan, Prabha; Adinoff, Bryon

    2014-11-01

    Impulsivity may underlie the poor treatment retention and high relapse rates observed in cocaine-dependent persons. However, observed differences in measures of impulsivity between cocaine-dependent and healthy control participants often do not reach clinical significance, suggesting that the clinical relevance of these differences may be limited. To examine which measures of impulsivity (i.e. self-report impulsivity, self-report personality, neurocognitive testing) best distinguish cocaine-dependent and healthy control participants (i.e. showing differences at least 1.5 standard deviations [SD] from controls). Optimal measures were considered to demonstrate sufficient classification accuracy. Sixty-five recently abstinent cocaine-dependent and 25 healthy control participants were assessed using select neurocognitive tests and self-report questionnaires including the NEO Personality Inventory-Revised (NEO-PI-R), Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11a), and the Frontal Systems Behavior Scale (FrSBe). When corrected for years of education and gender, neurocognitive measures did not demonstrate clinically significant differences between cocaine-dependent and control participants. The personality measures TCI Purposefulness and Congruent Second Nature and NEO-PI-R Impulsiveness, and the self-rating measures FrSBe Disinhibition and BIS-11 Motor Impulsivity and Total successfully identified clinically meaningful elevations in impulsivity within cocaine-dependent participants (>1.5 SDs from controls). Furthermore, these measures achieved 84-93% accuracy in discriminating cocaine-dependent from control participants. Clinically significant neurocognitive impairment in cocaine-dependent participants was not observed in this sample. As the BIS-11 or FrSBe are brief to administer, accurate, and have been shown to predict treatment retention and relapse, these measures appear to be optimal, relative to the personality measures, for

  20. Optimal neurocognitive, personality and behavioral measures for assessing impulsivity in cocaine dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoBue, Christian; Cullum, C. Munro; Braud, Jacqueline; Walker, Robrina; Winhusen, Theresa; Suderajan, Prabha; Adinoff, Bryon

    2015-01-01

    Background Impulsivity may underlie the poor treatment retention and high relapse rates observed in cocaine-dependent persons. However, observed differences in measures of impulsivity between cocaine-dependent and healthy control participants often do not reach clinical significance, suggesting that the clinical relevance of these differences may be limited. Objectives To examine which measures of impulsivity (i.e. self-report impulsivity, self-report personality, neurocognitive testing) best distinguish cocaine-dependent and healthy control participants (i.e. showing differences at least 1.5 standard deviations [SD] from controls). Optimal measures were considered to demonstrate sufficient classification accuracy. Methods Sixty-five recently abstinent cocaine-dependent and 25 healthy control participants were assessed using select neurocognitive tests and self-report questionnaires including the NEO Personality Inventory-Revised (NEO-PI-R), Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11a), and the Frontal Systems Behavior Scale (FrSBe). Results When corrected for years of education and gender, neurocognitive measures did not demonstrate clinically significant differences between cocaine-dependent and control participants. The personality measures TCI Purposefulness and Congruent Second Nature and NEO-PI-R Impulsiveness, and the self-rating measures FrSBe Disinhibition and BIS-11 Motor Impulsivity and Total successfully identified clinically meaningful elevations in impulsivity within cocaine-dependent participants (>1.5 SDs from controls). Furthermore, these measures achieved 84–93% accuracy in discriminating cocaine-dependent from control participants. Conclusion Clinically significant neurocognitive impairment in cocaine-dependent participants was not observed in this sample. As the BIS-11 or FrSBe are brief to administer, accurate, and have been shown to predict treatment retention and relapse, these measures appear to be

  1. The relationship between impulsivity and craving in cocaine- and methamphetamine-dependent volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tziortzis, Desey; Mahoney, James J; Kalechstein, Ari D; Newton, Thomas F; De La Garza, Richard

    2011-04-01

    Impulsivity and craving have been independently hypothesized to contribute to sustained drug use and relapse in addiction. The primary focus of this project was to determine the relationship between impulsivity and craving in 85 cocaine-dependent and 73 methamphetamine-dependent, non-treatment-seeking volunteers. Drug use was assessed with a 14-item, self-report drug and alcohol use questionnaire. Self report instruments utilized included the Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS) and the Visual Analog Scale (VAS), which probed "just before your last use of cocaine (for cocaine-dependent participants) or methamphetamine (for methamphetamine-dependent participants), how much craving did you experience?" The groups were similar with respect to recent use of cocaine or methamphetamine, alcohol, nicotine, and marijuana. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) did not reveal significant differences between cocaine and methamphetamine groups for total impulsivity or total craving. Simple linear regression revealed correlations between total impulsivity and total craving in cocaine (r(2)=0.05, p≤0.03) and methamphetamine users (r(2)=0.09, p≤0.008). Participants were separated into high impulsivity (HIBIS) or low impulsivity (LOBIS) subgroups using a median split. ANOVA revealed significantly higher craving in the HIBIS group versus the LOBIS group in methamphetamine users (p≤0.02), but not in cocaine users. For both cocaine and methamphetamine groups, level of impulsivity and craving were found to be related to some drug use variables including years of alcohol use, severity of withdrawal, and craving level following drug use. Taken together, this study shows a marginal relationship between impulsivity and craving, which may further the understanding of motivational factors contributing to ongoing drug use and addiction in psychostimulant users. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cognitive impulsivity in abused children: influencing factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUAN M. FERNÁNDEZ MILLÁN

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Although the impulsivity is a topic that it has been studied for some time for different psychologicalschools, it has been in the last decades, at least in our country, when the impulsivity has acquired a biggerinterest. The numerous studies of Buela-Casal’s investigation group can be presented as example ofthis growing interest (Buela-Casal, Carretero-Dios and De los Santos-Roig, 2002. This interest comesmotivated by the relationship that the impulsivity has with the school yield and with the violence, sincesome studies show its linking with the aggressive behaviors. In this study, centered in the continuousReflection-impulsivity (R-I, the existent impulsivity differences are shown among the mistreatedminor took in protection centers, and the minor that have not been mistreated. We have also studiedthe influence or relationship with diverse factors like the school, the years of establishment or thebehavioral impulsivity. We have followed a cognitive-behavioral conceptualization and we have usedthe MMF20 like instrument for the mensuration of the study topic. The results show a correlationbetween the number of made errors and the abuse, as well as with a certain negative correlation betweenerrors and years in school.

  3. [Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Heuvel, O A; Van der Werf, Y D; Groenewegen, H J; Foncke, E M J; Berendse, H W

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is characterised not only by the classic triad of bradykinesia, rigidity and tremor, but also by the frequent occurrence of various non-motor symptoms such as the impulse control disorders (pathological gambling, hypersexuality, compulsive buying, binge eating, punding and dopamine dependency). To increase insight into the clinical presentation, risk factors, treatment and the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease. Relevant literature was reviewed. Impulse control disorders belong to an important group of neuropsychiatric disorders that occur at some point in 5-10% of patients with Parkinson's disease. They generally occur in conjunction with dopaminergic medication and can have a marked social, relational and/ or financial impact. Early recognition of impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease is important and a close collaboration between the neurologist and the psychiatrist is essential in order to ensure correct diagnosis and the best possible treatment. Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease show considerable phenomenological overlap with other repetitive behaviours within the impulsive-compulsive spectrum of disorders to which the obsessive-compulsive disorders and addiction disorders belong. The overlap can possibly be explained by a shared pathophysiological mechanism involving an imbalance between the direct and indirect pathways of the dorsal and ventral frontal-striatal circuits.

  4. Impulsivity across the course of bipolar disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strakowski, Stephen M.; Fleck, David E.; DelBello, Melissa P.; Adler, Caleb M.; Shear, Paula K.; Kotwal, Renu; Arndt, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether abnormalities of impulse control persist across the course of bipolar disorder, thereby representing potential state markers and endophenotypes. Methods Impulse control of 108 bipolar I manic or mixed patients was measured on three tasks designed to study response inhibition, ability to delay gratification, and attention; namely a stop signal task, a delayed reward task, and a continuous performance task, respectively. Barrett Impulsivity Scale (BIS-11) scores were also obtained. Patients were then followed for up to one year and re-assessed with the same measures if they developed depression or euthymia. Healthy comparison subjects were also assessed with the same instruments on two occasions to assess measurement stability. Results At baseline, bipolar subjects demonstrated significant deficits on all three tasks as compared to healthy subjects, consistent with more impulsive responding in the bipolar manic/mixed group. In general, performance on the three behavioral tasks normalized upon switching to depression or developing euthymia. In contrast, BIS-11 scores were elevated during mania and remained elevated as bipolar subjects developed depression or achieved euthymia. Conclusions Bipolar I disorder patients demonstrate deficits on laboratory tests of various aspects of impulsivity when manic, as compared to healthy subjects, that largely normalize with recovery and switching into depression. However, elevated BIS scores persist across phases of illness. These findings suggest that impulsivity has both affective-state dependent and trait components in bipolar disorder. PMID:20565435

  5. Correlations between impulsiveness and biochemical parameters in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdil Demiryürek, Esra; Tekin, Atilla; Çakmak, Engin; Temizkan, Osman; Karamustafalıoğlu, Oğuz; Gökova, Sibel; Demiryürek, Enes

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between anger, impulsiveness, and biochemical parameters (testosterone, insulin, insulin resistance) in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. We recruited 84 women diagnosed with polycystic ovary syndrome according to the Rotterdam diagnostic criteria. Psychiatric interviews were performed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders. The Barratt Impulsiveness Scale and the State Trait Anger Expression Inventory were also administered to each participant. Lastly, the women's biochemical parameters, which included total testosterone, free androgen index, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, insulin and insulin resistance, thyroid functions, and prolactin, were measured. A statistically significant correlation was found between participants' increasing total testosterone levels and total impulsiveness scores, and their increasing free androgen index levels and motor and non-planning-related impulsiveness (r=0.24, p=0.027; r=0.27, p=0.015; and r=0.26, p=0.017, respectively). High insulin and insulin resistance levels were associated with high non-planning-related impulsiveness scores (r=0.26, p=0.018; and r=0.26, p=0.019). Lastly, high trait anger and anger expression scores were related to high total testosterone and insulin and insulin resistance levels. Androgens and glucose dysregulation seemingly affect anger expression as well as the attentional, motor, and non-planning-related impulsiveness of women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Gender Differences in University EFL Students' Language Proficiency Corresponding to Self-Rated Attention, Hyperactivity and Impulsivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hsin-Yi; Kelsen, Brent A.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: This study examines university students' self-reported inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity, and their relation to performance on a high-stakes English proficiency test while taking gender into consideration. Method: Inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity attributes were assessed using the Adult Attention…

  7. Study on the streamer inception characteristics under positive lightning impulse voltage

    OpenAIRE

    Zezhong Wang; Yinan Geng

    2017-01-01

    The streamer is the main process in an air gap discharge, and the inception characteristics of streamers have been widely applied in engineering. Streamer inception characteristics under DC voltage have been studied by many researchers, but the inception characteristics under impulse voltage, and particularly under lightning impulse voltage with a high voltage rise rate have rarely been studied. A measurement system based on integrated optoelectronic technology has been proposed in this paper...

  8. Poor impulse control predicts inelastic demand for nicotine but not alcohol in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diergaarde, Leontien; van Mourik, Yvar; Pattij, Tommy; Schoffelmeer, Anton N M; De Vries, Taco J

    2012-05-01

    Tobacco and alcohol dependence are characterized by continued use despite deleterious health, social and occupational consequences, implying that addicted individuals pay a high price for their use. In behavioral economic terms, such persistent consumption despite increased costs can be conceptualized as inelastic demand. Recent animal studies demonstrated that high-impulsive individuals are more willing to work for nicotine or cocaine infusions than their low-impulsive counterparts, indicating that this trait might be causally related to inelastic drug demand. By employing progressive ratio schedules of reinforcement combined with a behavioral economics approach of analysis, we determined whether trait impulsivity is associated with an insensitivity of nicotine or alcohol consumption to price increments. Rats were trained on a delayed discounting task, measuring impulsive choice. Hereafter, high- and low-impulsive rats were selected and trained to nose poke for intravenous nicotine or oral alcohol. Upon stable self-administration on a continuous reinforcement schedule, the price (i.e. response requirement) was increased. Demand curves, depicting the relationship between price and consumption, were produced using Hursh's exponential demand equation. Similar to human observations, nicotine and alcohol consumption in rats fitted this equation, thereby demonstrating the validity of our model. Moreover, high-impulsive rats displayed inelastic nicotine demand, as their nicotine consumption was less sensitive to price increments as compared with that in low-impulsive rats. Impulsive choice was not related to differences in alcohol demand elasticity. Our model seems well suited for studying nicotine and alcohol demand in rats and, as such, might contribute to our understanding of tobacco and alcohol dependence. © 2011 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2011 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  9. Clinical aspects of impulsive compulsive behaviours in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djamshidian, Atbin; Averbeck, Bruno B; Lees, Andrew J; O'Sullivan, Sean S

    2011-11-15

    Impulsive-compulsive behaviours (ICBs) are an increasingly well-recognised adverse-effect of dopaminergic medications used to treat Parkinson's disease. ICBs include pathological gambling, compulsive sexual behaviour, compulsive buying, and binge eating, together with punding and the addiction-like compulsive use of dopamine replacement therapy, or dopamine dysregulation syndrome. The prevalence of ICBs was approximately 14% in a large study undertaken in specialist movement disorder clinics. Dopamine dysregulation syndrome is more associated with compulsive l-dopa use, whereas other ICBs are more linked with oral dopamine agonist use. Other mechanisms implicated in the development and perpetuation of ICBs in PD include aberrant learning from reward-related situations, including decreased learning from negative feedback, increased measures of impulsivity or sensation seeking, and strong preference for immediate over future rewards. Treatment options for impulsive-compulsive behaviours include pharmacological, surgical and psychological interventions. The early recognition and prevention of ICBs, coupled with awareness of clinical risk factors for the development of these behaviours is of paramount importance, given the lack of specific treatments for these sometimes debilitating behaviours. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Dysfunctional, but not functional, impulsivity is associated with a history of seriously violent behaviour and reduced orbitofrontal and hippocampal volumes in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Veena; Barkataki, Ian; Goswami, Sangeeta; Flora, Satinder; Das, Mrigendra; Taylor, Pamela

    2009-07-15

    Aggression and violent acts have been linked with impulsive responding. We investigated whether impulsive personality trait, especially suggestive of dysfunctional impulsivity (i.e. fast and inaccurate responding where this is non-optimal), is associated with a history of seriously violent behaviour and specific brain deficits in schizophrenia. Twenty-four male participants with schizophrenia, of whom 10 had a history of serious physical violence, and 14 healthy male participants were assessed on impulsiveness (dysfunctional impulsivity), venturesomeness (functional impulsivity), and empathy. All participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging. The results revealed that participants with schizophrenia and a history of violence showed elevated impulsiveness but had comparable scores on venturesomeness and empathy dimensions. Impulsiveness scores correlated negatively with reduced orbitofrontal grey matter volume in both the patient and healthy control groups, and with hippocampal volume in the patient group. Our findings suggest that dysfunctional, but not functional, impulsivity is elevated in patients with schizophrenia with a propensity for repetitive violence, and this in turn appears to be associated with reduce volumes of both the orbitofrontal cortex grey matter and the hippocampus. Violence risk prediction and management strategies in schizophrenia may benefit from including specific measures of dysfunctional impulsive traits.

  11. High specificity but low sensitivity of mutation-specific antibodies against EGFR mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondgaard, Anna-Louise; Høgdall, Estrid; Mellemgaard, Anders; Skov, Birgit G

    2014-12-01

    Determination of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations has a pivotal impact on treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A standardized test has not yet been approved. So far, Sanger DNA sequencing has been widely used. Its rather low sensitivity has led to the development of more sensitive methods including real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Immunohistochemistry with mutation-specific antibodies might be a promising detection method. We evaluated 210 samples with NSCLC from an unselected Caucasian population. Extracted DNA was analyzed for EGFR mutations by RT-PCR (Therascreen EGFR PCR kit, Qiagen, UK; reference method). For immunohistochemistry, antibodies against exon19 deletions (clone 6B6), exon21 mutations (clone 43B2) from Cell Signaling Technology (Boston, USA) and EGFR variantIII (clone 218C9) from Dako (Copenhagen, DK) were applied. Protein expression was evaluated, and staining score (multipum of intensity (graded 0-3) and percentages (0-100%) of stained tumor cells) was calculated. Positivity was defined as staining score >0. Specificity of exon19 antibody was 98.8% (95% confidence interval=95.9-99.9%) and of exon21 antibody 97.8% (95% confidence interval=94.4-99.4%). Sensitivity of exon19 antibody was 63.2% (95% confidence interval=38.4-83.7%) and of exon21 antibody was 80.0% (95% confidence interval=44.4-97.5%). Seven exon19 and four exon21 mutations were false negatives (immunohistochemistry negative, RT-PCR positive). Two exon19 and three exon21 mutations were false positive (immunohistochemistry positive, RT-PCR negative). One false positive exon21 mutation had staining score 300. The EGFR variantIII antibody showed no correlation to EGFR mutation status determined by RT-PCR or to EGFR immunohistochemistry. High specificity of the mutation-specific antibodies was demonstrated. However, sensitivity was low, especially for exon19 deletions, and thus these antibodies cannot yet be used as screening method for EGFR mutations in NSCLC

  12. Further evidence of the heterogeneous nature of impulsivity ?

    OpenAIRE

    Caswell, Amy J.; Bond, Rod; Duka, Theodora; Morgan, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    ?Impulsivity? refers to a range of behaviours including preference for immediate reward (temporal-impulsivity) and the tendency to make premature decisions (reflection-impulsivity) and responses (motor-impulsivity). The current study aimed to examine how different behavioural and self-report measurements of impulsivity can be categorised into distinct subtypes. Exploratory factor analysis using full information maximum likelihood was conducted on 10 behavioural and 1 self-report measure of im...

  13. Genetic and Modeling Approaches Reveal Distinct Components of Impulsive Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nautiyal, Katherine M; Wall, Melanie M; Wang, Shuai; Magalong, Valerie M; Ahmari, Susanne E; Balsam, Peter D; Blanco, Carlos; Hen, René

    2017-05-01

    Impulsivity is an endophenotype found in many psychiatric disorders including substance use disorders, pathological gambling, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Two behavioral features often considered in impulsive behavior are behavioral inhibition (impulsive action) and delayed gratification (impulsive choice). However, the extent to which these behavioral constructs represent distinct facets of behavior with discrete biological bases is unclear. To test the hypothesis that impulsive action and impulsive choice represent statistically independent behavioral constructs in mice, we collected behavioral measures of impulsivity in a single cohort of mice using well-validated operant behavioral paradigms. Mice with manipulation of serotonin 1B receptor (5-HT1BR) expression were included as a model of disordered impulsivity. A factor analysis was used to characterize correlations between the measures of impulsivity and to identify covariates. Using two approaches, we dissociated impulsive action from impulsive choice. First, the absence of 5-HT1BRs caused increased impulsive action, but not impulsive choice. Second, based on an exploratory factor analysis, a two-factor model described the data well, with measures of impulsive action and choice separating into two independent factors. A multiple-indicator multiple-causes analysis showed that 5-HT1BR expression and sex were significant covariates of impulsivity. Males displayed increased impulsivity in both dimensions, whereas 5-HT1BR expression was a predictor of increased impulsive action only. These data support the conclusion that impulsive action and impulsive choice are distinct behavioral phenotypes with dissociable biological influences that can be modeled in mice. Our work may help inform better classification, diagnosis, and treatment of psychiatric disorders, which present with disordered impulsivity.

  14. Synthesis of a high specific activity methyl sulfone tritium isotopologue of fevipiprant (NVP-QAW039).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Van T; Goujon, Jean-Yves; Meisterhans, Christian; Frommherz, Matthias; Bauer, Carsten

    2015-05-15

    The synthesis of a triple tritiated isotopologue of the CRTh2 antagonist NVP-QAW039 (fevipiprant) with a specific activity >3 TBq/mmol is described. Key to the high specific activity is the methylation of a bench-stable dimeric disulfide precursor that is in situ reduced to the corresponding thiol monomer and methylated with [(3)H3]MeONos having per se a high specific activity. The high specific activity of the tritiated active pharmaceutical ingredient obtained by a build-up approach is discussed in the light of the specific activity usually to be expected if hydrogen tritium exchange methods were applied. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Associations between impulsivity, aggression, and suicide in Chinese college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; He, Chang Zhi; Yu, Yun Miao; Qiu, Xiao Hui; Yang, Xiu Xian; Qiao, Zheng Xue; Sui, Hong; Zhu, Xiong Zhao; Yang, Yan Jie

    2014-06-03

    Chinese university students. Students with high aggression scores were more susceptible to committing suicide. Scores on self-oriented attack and cognitive impulsivity may be important factors for differentially predicting suicide ideation and suicide attempts.

  16. Effects of chronic administration of drugs of abuse on impulsive choice (delay discounting) in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlow, Barry; Mendez, Ian A; Mitchell, Marci R; Simon, Nicholas W

    2009-09-01

    Drug-addicted individuals show high levels of impulsive choice, characterized by preference for small immediate over larger but delayed rewards. Although the causal relationship between chronic drug use and elevated impulsive choice in humans has been unclear, a small but growing body of literature over the past decade has shown that chronic drug administration in animal models can cause increases in impulsive choice, suggesting that a similar causal relationship may exist in human drug users. This article reviews this literature, with a particular focus on the effects of chronic cocaine administration, which have been most thoroughly characterized. The potential mechanisms of these effects are described in terms of drug-induced neural alterations in ventral striatal and prefrontal cortical brain systems. Some implications of this research for pharmacological treatment of drug-induced increases in impulsive choice are discussed, along with suggestions for future research in this area.

  17. Half-Year Retest-Reliability of the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale–Short Form (BIS-15

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Meule

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the most widely used instruments for the measurement of impulsivity is the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11. The short form of the BIS-11, the BIS-15, consists of 15 items representing the three subscales Attentional, Motor, and Non-Planning Impulsivity. In the current study, retest-reliabilities of BIS-15 scores were examined. Female university students completed the BIS-15 at the beginning of the first (n = 133 and second (n = 120 semesters. Half-year retest-reliability was rtt = .79 for the BIS-15 total score and ranged between rtt = .61 and .78 for the subscales. Considering the long time span of almost half a year between measurements, the total score of the BIS-15 has high retest-reliability and, thus, measures impulsivity as a stable personality trait.

  18. Differentiating risk for mania and borderline personality disorder: The nature of goal regulation and impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulford, Daniel; Eisner, Lori R; Johnson, Sheri L

    2015-06-30

    Researchers and clinicians have long noted the overlap among features and high comorbidity of bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder. The shared features of impulsivity and labile mood in both disorders make them challenging to distinguish. We tested the hypothesis that variables related to goal dysregulation would be uniquely related to risk for mania, while emotion-relevant impulsivity would be related to risk for both disorders. We administered a broad range of measures related to goal regulation traits and impulsivity to 214 undergraduates. Findings confirmed that risk for mania, but not for borderline personality disorder, was related to higher sensitivity to reward and intense pursuit of goals. In contrast, borderline personality disorder symptoms related more strongly than did mania risk with threat sensitivity and with impulsivity in the context of negative affect. Results highlight potential differences and commonalities in mania risk versus borderline personality disorder risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Personality differences in the susceptibility to stress-eating: The influence of emotional control and impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Blyderveen, Sherry; Lafrance, Adele; Emond, Michael; Kosmerly, Stacey; O'Connor, Megan; Chang, Felicia

    2016-12-01

    Stress has been associated with deviations from typical eating patterns, with respect to both food choice and overall caloric intake. Both increases and decreases in dietary intake have been previously noted in response to stress. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether the affect regulation strategies of emotional control and impulsivity predict susceptibility to eating in response to stress. Specifically, it was anticipated that emotional suppression would predict decreases in caloric intake, whereas impulsivity would predict increases in caloric intake, in response to a stressor. Participants were randomly assigned to view either a video designed to elicit stress or a control video. Food was provided during the video and the amount and type of food consumed was measured. Participants' nutritional intake was greater in the stress condition than in the control condition. One aspect of affect regulation, impulsivity, moderated this relationship, with a tendency for greater impulsivity to be associated with greater caloric intake in the stress condition. The degree of negative affect that participants experienced in the stress condition predicted food choice and overall caloric intake. Both emotional control and impulsivity moderated the relationship between negative affect and both food choice and caloric intake in the stress condition. The present study highlights the importance of considering the personality attributes of both impulsivity and emotional suppression in understanding stress eating. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. The Relationship between Impulsive Choice and Impulsive Action: A Cross-Species Translational Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broos, Nienke; Schmaal, Lianne; Wiskerke, Joost; Kostelijk, Lennard; Lam, Thomas; Stoop, Nicky; Weierink, Lonneke; Ham, Jannemieke; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Schoffelmeer, Anton N. M.; van den Brink, Wim; Veltman, Dick J.; de Vries, Taco J.; Pattij, Tommy; Goudriaan, Anna E.

    2012-01-01

    Maladaptive impulsivity is a core symptom in various psychiatric disorders. However, there is only limited evidence available on whether different measures of impulsivity represent largely unrelated aspects or a unitary construct. In a cross-species translational study, thirty rats were trained in

  1. The relationship between impulsive choice and impulsive action: a cross-species translational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broos, N.; Schmaal, L.; Wiskerke, J.; Kostelijk, L.; Lam, T.; Stoop, N.; Weierink, L.; Ham, J..; de Geus, E.J.C.; Schoffelmeer, A.N.M.; van den Brink, W.; Veltman, D.J.; de Vries, T.J.; Pattij, T.; Goudriaan, A.E.

    2012-01-01

    Maladaptive impulsivity is a core symptom in various psychiatric disorders. However, there is only limited evidence available on whether different measures of impulsivity represent largely unrelated aspects or a unitary construct. In a cross-species translational study, thirty rats were trained in

  2. Controlling your impulses: electrical stimulation of the human supplementary motor complex prevents impulsive errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieser, Laure; van den Wildenberg, Wery; Hasbroucq, Thierry; Ridderinkhof, K Richard; Burle, Borís

    2015-02-18

    To err is human. However, an inappropriate urge does not always result in error. Impulsive errors thus entail both a motor system capture by an urge to act and a failed inhibition of that impulse. Here we show that neuromodulatory electrical stimulation of the supplementary motor complex in healthy humans leaves action urges unchanged but prevents them from turning into overt errors. Subjects performed a choice reaction-time task known to trigger impulsive responses, leading to fast errors that can be revealed by analyzing accuracy as a function of poststimulus time. Yet, such fast errors are only the tip of the iceberg: electromyography (EMG) revealed fast subthreshold muscle activation in the incorrect response hand in an even larger proportion of overtly correct trials, revealing covert response impulses not discernible in overt behavior. Analyzing both overt and covert response tendencies enables to gauge the ability to prevent these incorrect impulses from turning into overt action errors. Hyperpolarizing the supplementary motor complex using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) preserves action impulses but prevents their behavioral expression. This new combination of detailed behavioral, EMG, and tDCS techniques clarifies the neurophysiology of impulse control, and may point to avenues for improving impulse control deficits in various neurologic and psychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/333010-06$15.00/0.

  3. Controlling your impulses: Electrical stimulation of the human supplementary motor complex prevents impulsive errors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spieser, L.; van den Wildenberg, W.; Hasbroucq, T.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.; Burle, B.

    2015-01-01

    To err is human. However, an inappropriate urge does not always result in error. Impulsive errors thus entail both a motor system capture by an urge to act and a failed inhibition of that impulse. Here we show that neuromodulatory electrical stimulation of the supplementary motor complex in healthy

  4. Modeling impulsivity in forensic patients: A three-dimensional model of impulsivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tonnaer, F.; Cima, M.; Arntz, A.R.

    2016-01-01

    The current study investigated whether a multidimensional model could underlie impulsivity and its associations with various disorders in a forensic sample. Data were available from self-report and behavioral impulsivity instruments of 87 forensic patients. Principal component analysis (PCA) was

  5. Modeling Impulsivity in Forensic Patients : A Three-Dimensional Model of Impulsivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tonnaer, F.; Cima, M.; Arntz, A.

    2016-01-01

    The current study investigated whether a multidimensional model could underlie impulsivity and its associations with various disorders in a forensic sample. Data were available from self-report and behavioral impulsivity instruments of 87 forensic patients. Principal component analysis (PCA) was

  6. Impulse control disorders and levodopa-induced dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voon, Valerie; Napier, T Celeste; Frank, Michael J; Sgambato-Faure, Veronique; Grace, Anthony A; Rodriguez-Oroz, Maria; Obeso, Jose; Bezard, Erwan; Fernagut, Pierre-Olivier

    2017-03-01

    Dopaminergic medications used in the treatment of patients with Parkinson's disease are associated with motor and non-motor behavioural side-effects, such as dyskinesias and impulse control disorders also known as behavioural addictions. Levodopa-induced dyskinesias occur in up to 80% of patients with Parkinson's after a few years of chronic treatment. Impulse control disorders, including gambling disorder, binge eating disorder, compulsive sexual behaviour, and compulsive shopping occur in about 17% of patients with Parkinson's disease on dopamine agonists. These behaviours reflect the interactions of the dopaminergic medications with the individual's susceptibility, and the underlying neurobiology of Parkinson's disease. Parkinsonian rodent models show enhanced reinforcing effects of chronic dopaminergic medication, and a potential role for individual susceptibility. In patients with Parkinson's disease and impulse control disorders, impairments are observed across subtypes of decisional impulsivity, possibly reflecting uncertainty and the relative balance of rewards and losses. Impairments appear to be more specific to decisional than motor impulsivity, which might reflect differences in ventral and dorsal striatal engagement. Emerging evidence suggests impulse control disorder subtypes have dissociable correlates, which indicate that individual susceptibility predisposes towards the expression of different behavioural subtypes and neurobiological substrates. Therapeutic interventions to treat patients with Parkinson's disease and impulse control disorders have shown efficacy in randomised controlled trials. Large-scale studies are warranted to identify individual risk factors and novel therapeutic targets for these diseases. Mechanisms underlying impulse control disorders and dyskinesias could provide crucial insights into other behavioural symptoms in Parkinson's disease and addictions in the general population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  7. The effects of lactation on impulsive behavior in vasopressin-deficient Brattleboro rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliczki, Mano; Fodor, Anna; Balogh, Zoltan; Haller, Jozsef; Zelena, Dora

    2014-08-01

    Vasopressin (AVP)-deficient Brattleboro rats develop a specific behavioral profile, which-among other things-include altered cognitive performance. This profile is markedly affected by alterations in neuroendocrine state of the animal such as during lactation. Given the links between AVP and cognition we hypothesized that AVP deficiency may lead to changes in impulsivity that is under cognitive control and the changes might be altered by lactation. Comparing virgin and lactating AVP-deficient female Brattleboro rats to their respective controls, we assessed the putative lactation-dependent effects of AVP deficiency on impulsivity in the delay discounting paradigm. Furthermore, to investigate the basis of such effects, we assessed possible interactions of AVP deficiency with GABAergic and serotonergic signaling and stress axis activity, systems playing important roles in impulse control. Our results showed that impulsivity was unaltered by AVP deficiency in virgin rats. In contrast a lactation-induced increase in impulsivity was abolished by AVP deficiency in lactating females. We also found that chlordiazepoxide-induced facilitation of GABAergic and imipramine-induced enhancement of serotonergic activity in virgins led to increased and decreased impulsivity, respectively. In contrast, during lactation these effects were visible only in AVP-deficient rats. These rats also exhibited increased stress axis activity compared to virgin animals, an effect that was abolished by AVP deficiency. Taken together, AVP appears to play a role in the regulation of impulsivity exclusively during lactation: it has an impulsivity increasing effect which is potentially mediated via stress axis-dependent mechanisms and fine-tuning of GABAergic and serotonergic function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Differential associations between impulsivity and risk-taking and brain activations underlying working memory in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwar, Karni; Rutherford, Helena J V; Mencl, W Einar; Lacadie, Cheryl M; Potenza, Marc N; Mayes, Linda C

    2014-11-01

    Increased impulsivity and risk-taking are common during adolescence and relate importantly to addictive behaviors. However, the extent to which impulsivity and risk-taking relate to brain activations that mediate cognitive processing is not well understood. Here we examined the relationships between impulsivity and risk-taking and the neural correlates of working memory. Neural activity was measured in 18 adolescents (13-18 years) while they engaged in a working memory task that included verbal and visuospatial components that each involved encoding, rehearsal and recognition stages. Risk-taking and impulsivity were assessed using the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART) and the adolescent version of the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11 (BIS-11A), respectively. We found overlapping as well as distinct regions subserving the different stages of verbal and visuospatial working memory. In terms of risk-taking, we found a positive correlation between BART scores and activity in subcortical regions (e.g., thalamus, dorsal striatum) recruited during verbal rehearsal, and an inverse correlation between BART scores and cortical regions (e.g., parietal and temporal regions) recruited during visuospatial rehearsal. The BIS-11A evidenced that motor impulsivity was associated with activity in regions recruited during all stages of working memory, while attention and non-planning impulsivity was only associated with activity in regions recruited during recognition. In considering working memory, impulsivity and risk-taking together, both impulsivity and risk-taking were associated with activity in regions recruited during rehearsal; however, during verbal rehearsal, differential correlations were found. Specifically, positive correlations were found between: (1) risk-taking and activity in subcortical regions, including the thalamus and dorsal striatum; and, (2) motor impulsivity and activity in the left inferior frontal gyrus, insula, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Therefore

  9. Differential associations between impulsivity and risk-taking and brain activations underlying working memory in adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwar, Karni; Rutherford, Helena J.V.; Mencl, W. Einar; Lacadie, Cheryl M.; Potenza, Marc N.; Mayes, Linda C.

    2014-01-01

    Increased impulsivity and risk-taking are common during adolescence and relate importantly to addictive behaviors. However, the extent to which impulsivity and risk-taking relate to brain activations that mediate cognitive processing is not well understood. Here we examined the relationships between impulsivity and risk-taking and the neural correlates of working memory. Neural activity was measured in 18 adolescents (13–18 years) while they engaged in a working memory task that included verbal and visuospatial components that each involved encoding, rehearsal and recognition stages. Risk-taking and impulsivity were assessed using the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART) and the adolescent version of the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale -11 (BIS-11A), respectively. We found overlapping as well as distinct regions subserving the different stages of verbal and visuospatial working memory. In terms of risk-taking, we found a positive correlation between BART scores and activity in subcortical regions (e.g., thalamus, dorsal striatum) recruited during verbal rehearsal, and an inverse correlation between BART scores and cortical regions (e.g., parietal and temporal regions) recruited during visuospatial rehearsal. The BIS-11A evidenced that motor impulsivity was associated with activity in regions recruited during all stages of working memory, while attention and non-planning impulsivity was only associated with activity in regions recruited during recognition. In considering working memory, impulsivity and risk-taking together, both impulsivity and risk-taking were associated with activity in regions recruited during rehearsal; however, during verbal rehearsal, differential correlations were found. Specifically, positive correlations were found between: (1) risk-taking and activity in subcortical regions, including the thalamus and dorsal striatum; and, (2) motor impulsivity and activity in the left inferior frontal gyrus, insula, dorsolateral and ventrolateral prefrontal

  10. Impulsivity and Concussion in Juvenile Rats: Examining Molecular and Structural Aspects of the Frontostriatal Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harleen Hehar

    Full Text Available Impulsivity and poor executive control have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many developmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. Similarly, concussions/mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI have been associated with increased risk for neuropsychiatric disorders and the development of impulsivity and inattention. Researchers and epidemiologists have therefore considered whether or not concussions induce symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, or merely unmask impulsive tendencies that were already present. The purpose of this study was to determine if a single concussion in adolescence could induce ADHD-like impulsivity and impaired response inhibition, and subsequently determine if inherent impulsivity prior to a pediatric mTBI would exacerbate post-concussion symptomology with a specific emphasis on impulsive and inattentive behaviours. As these behaviours are believed to be associated with the frontostriatal circuit involving the nucleus accumbens (NAc and the prefrontal cortex (PFC, the expression patterns of 8 genes (Comt, Drd2, Drd3, Drd4, Maoa, Sert, Tph1, and Tph2 from these two regions were examined. In addition, Golgi-Cox staining of medium spiny neurons in the NAc provided a neuroanatomical examination of mTBI-induced structural changes. The study found that a single early brain injury could induce impulsivity and impairments in response inhibition that were more pronounced in males. Interestingly, when animals with inherent impulsivity experienced mTBI, injury-related deficits were exacerbated in female animals. The single concussion increased dendritic branching, but reduced synaptic density in the NAc, and these changes were likely associated with the increase in impulsivity. Finally, mTBI-induced impulsivity was associated with modifications to gene expression that differed dramatically from the gene expression pattern associated with inherent impulsivity, despite very similar behavioural phenotypes. Our

  11. Heterogeneity of compulsive buyers based on impulsivity and compulsivity dimensions: a latent profile analytic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Sunghwan

    2013-07-30

    Despite the recognition that compulsive buyers are not one homogenous group, there is a dearth of theory-guided empirical investigation. Furthermore, although compulsivity and impulsivity are used as major psychiatric criteria for diagnosing compulsive buyers, these dimensions have rarely been considered in assessing the heterogeneity issue. We fill this gap by applying the motivation shift model of addiction to compulsive buying and empirically assessing the heterogeneity issue in the bi-dimensional space represented by the buying impulsivity and compulsivity dimensions. These hypotheses were tested with latent profile analysis based on survey data (N=445). Consistent with the hypothesis, we identified the cluster of buyers with high buying compulsivity and impulsivity ("compulsive-impulsive buyers"), the cluster of buyers with low buying compulsivity and high impulsivity ("impulsive excessive buyers"), and the cluster of ordinary buyers. Furthermore, it was found that disparate clusters of buyers exhibit unique dispositional tendencies. Theoretical contributions and policy implications of the findings are discussed as well. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of tryptophan depletion and a simulated alcohol binge on impulsivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Donald M.; Mullen, Jillian; Hill-Kapturczak, Nathalie; Liang, Yuanyuan; Karns, Tara E.; Lake, Sarah L.; Mathias, Charles W.; Roache, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Researchers have suggested that binge drinkers experience disproportionate increases in impulsivity during the initial period of drinking, leading to a loss of control over further drinking, and that serotonergic mechanisms may underlie such effects. Methods We examined the effects of a simulated-alcohol binge and tryptophan depletion on three types of impulsivity: response initiation (IMT task), response inhibition (GoStop task), and delay discounting (SKIP task), and tested whether observed effects were related to “real world” binge drinking. 179 adults with diverse drinking histories completed a within-subject crossover design over 4 experimental days. Each day, participants underwent one of four test conditions: tryptophan depletion/alcohol, tryptophan depletion/placebo, tryptophan balanced control/alcohol, or tryptophan balanced control/placebo. The simulated binge involved consuming 0.3 g/kg of alcohol at 5, 6, and 7 hours after consuming the tryptophan depletion/balanced mixture. Impulsivity was measured before and after each drink. Results Relative to the placebo beverage condition, when alcohol was consumed, impulsive responding was increased at moderate and high levels of intoxication on the IMT and GoStop, but only at high levels of intoxication on the SKIP. Tryptophan depletion had no effect on impulsivity measured under either placebo or alcohol beverage conditions. Effects of alcohol and tryptophan manipulations on impulsivity were unrelated to patterns of binge drinking outside the laboratory. Conclusion The effects of alcohol consumption on impulsivity depend on the component of impulsivity being measured and the dose of alcohol consumed. Such effects do not appear to be a result of reduced serotonin synthesis. Additionally, “real world” binge drinking behaviors were unrelated to behavioral changes observed in the laboratory. PMID:25730415

  13. Electrolytes with Improved Safety Characteristics for High Voltage, High Specific Energy Li-ion Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, M. C.; Krause, F. C.; Hwang, C.; West, W. C.; Soler, J.; Whitcanack, L. W.; Prakash, G. K. S.; Ratnakumar, B. V.

    2012-01-01

    (1) NASA is actively pursuing the development of advanced electrochemical energy storage and conversion devices for future lunar and Mars missions; (2) The Exploration Technology Development Program, Energy Storage Project is sponsoring the development of advanced Li-ion batteries and PEM fuel cell and regenerative fuel cell systems for the Altair Lunar Lander, Extravehicular Activities (EVA), and rovers and as the primary energy storage system for Lunar Surface Systems; (3) At JPL, in collaboration with NASA-GRC, NASA-JSC and industry, we are actively developing advanced Li-ion batteries with improved specific energy, energy density and safety. One effort is focused upon developing Li-ion battery electrolyte with enhanced safety characteristics (i.e., low flammability); and (4) A number of commercial applications also require Li-ion batteries with enhanced safety, especially for automotive applications.

  14. Thermal Impulse Sensors for use in Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilers, Hergen; Gunawidjaja, Ray; Anderson, Benjamin

    2017-06-01

    We have developed temperature and thermal impulse (temperature and duration) sensors for use in explosive fireballs. These sensors are seeded into an explosive fireball and record temperature and duration via morphological phase changes that are optically probed. The thermal impulse sensors include two sensor materials with different phase transition kinetics, and may include a reference material which does not undergo temperature-induced phase changes, and can aid in the optical analysis. Analyzing the sensor materials allows us to determine heating temperature and heating duration of an explosion. The temperature sensors and thermal impulse sensors were recently tested and showed promising results. However, we found that the different components of the thermal impulse sensors tend to get separated during the explosion. We are now evaluating several approaches for redesigning our thermal impulse sensors so that the components remain together during the explosion. These approaches include a core/shell assembly, crosslinking, and co-synthesis. The integrity of the chemically bonded components is evaluated by subjecting the sensors to dispersing forces, while temperature-dependent phase changes of these sensors are assessed by rapid heating using a CO2 laser.

  15. Evaluating impulse purchases generated by affections and advertisement effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aakash Kamble

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Impulse buying occurs when a consumer experiences a sudden, often powerful and persistent urge to buy something immediately. This on-going research considers the affections generated by con-sumers towards the chocolate brand which is endorsed by a celebrity. The Dual Mediation Hypoth-esis Model (DMH is used to ascertain the ad effectiveness of the product/ brand, in this research advertisement featuring the celebrity. The affections generated by the ad leads to generation of af-fection towards the brand leading to purchase a product/ brand. The chocolate brand selected for the research has high market share and manufactures chocolate based products catering to all classes of consumers. The research primarily focuses on the significance of affections generated by the adver-tisement for the product. The purchase decision for such products is usually based on consumer impulses and attitudes towards the product/ brand. A convenience sample of 116 individuals was considered for the research and the survey was done using questionnaire method. The findings from the analysis revealed that the consumers purchased the products due to the impulses and af-fections generated by the ad and brand. There was no clear linkage between the celebrity and brand which lead to purchase intentions of the product/ brand. The Dual Mediation Model was found to be applicable as the affections towards the brand and the ad resulted in purchase intention.

  16. Alexithymia, impulsiveness, and psychopathology in nonsuicidal self-injured adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatta, Michela; Dal Santo, Francesco; Rago, Alessio; Spoto, Andrea; Battistella, Pier Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a multifaceted phenomenon and a major health issue among adolescents. A better understanding of self-injury comorbidities is crucial to improve our ability to assess, treat, and prevent NSSI. Purpose This study aimed at analyzing some of the psychobehavioral correlates of NSSI: psychological problems, alexithymia, impulsiveness, and sociorelational aspects. Patients and methods This was a case–control study. The clinical sample (n=33) included adolescents attending our unit for NSSI and other issues; the controls (n=79) were high-school students. Data were collected using six questionnaires: Youth Self-Report, Barratt’s Impulsiveness Scale, Toronto Alexithymia Scale, Children’s Depression Inventory, Symptom Checklist-90-R, and Child Behavior Checklist. Results Cases scored significantly higher in all questionnaires. Habitual self-injurers scored higher on impulsiveness and alexithymia. The gesture’s repetition seems relevant to the global clinical picture: habitual self-injurers appear more likely to seek help from the sociosanitary services. We found a difference between the self-injurers’ and their parents’ awareness of the disorder. Conclusion Habitual self-injurers show signs of having difficulty with assessing the consequences of their actions (nonplanning impulsiveness) and the inability to manage their feelings. Given the significantly higher scores found for cases than for controls on all the psychopathological scales, NSSI can be seen as a cross-category psychiatric disorder, supporting the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders decision to include it as a pathological entity in its own right. PMID:27672324

  17. Impulsive and Compulsive Behaviors in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoxin eZhang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Impulsive and compulsive behaviors (ICBs are a heterogeneous group of conditions that may be caused by long-term dopaminergic replacement therapy (DRT of Parkinson's disease (PD. The spectrum of ICBs includes dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS, punding and impulsive control disorders (ICDs.Contents: We made a detailed review regarding the epidemiology, pathology, clinical characteristics, risk factors, diagnosis as well as treatment of ICBs.Results: The prevalence of ICBs in PD patients is approximately 3-4% for DDS, 0.34-4.2% for punding and 6-14% for ICDs, with higher prevalence in Western populations than in Asian. Those who take high dose of Levodopa are more prone to have DDS, whereas ICDs are markedly associated with dopamine agonists (DAs. Different subtypes of ICBs share many risk factors such as male gender, higher Levodopa equivalent daily dose (LEDD, younger age at PD onset, history of alcoholism, impulsive or novelty-seeking personality. The Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorder in Parkinson’s Disease-Rating Scale (QUIP-RS seems to be a rather efficacious instrument to obtain relevant information from patients and caregivers. Treatment of ICBs is still a great challenge for clinicians. Readjustment of DRT remains the primary method. Atypical antipsychotics, antidepressants, amantadine, and psychosocial interventions are also prescribed in controlling episodes of psychosis caused by compulsive DRT, but attention should be drawn to balance ICBs symptoms and motor disorders. Moreover, deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS might be a potential method in controlling ICBs.Conclusions: The exact pathophysiological mechanisms of ICBs in PD remains poorly understood. Further researches are needed not only to study the pathogenesis, prevalence, features and risk factors of ICBs, but to find efficacious therapy for patients with these devastating consequences.

  18. A low-cost lead-acid battery with high specific-energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    the cost of forming a corrosion-resistant coating on the grids by a sputtering process is likely to be high. Similar studies to develop high specific energy lead- acid batteries have also been reported.7–12 More re- cently, Shivashankar et al13,14 have employed a cost- effective, thermally activated chemical reaction process.

  19. 20-mN Variable Specific Impulse (Isp) Colloid Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmons, Nathaniel

    2015-01-01

    Busek Company, Inc., has designed and manufactured an electrospray emitter capable of generating 20 mN in a compact package (7x7x1.7 in). The thruster consists of nine porous-surface emitters operating in parallel from a common propellant supply. Each emitter is capable of supporting over 70,000 electrospray emission sites with the plume from each emitter being accelerated through a single aperture, eliminating the need for individual emission site alignment to an extraction grid. The total number of emission sites during operation is expected to approach 700,000. This Phase II project optimized and characterized the thruster fabricated during the Phase I effort. Additional porous emitters also were fabricated for full-scale testing. Propellant is supplied to the thruster via existing feed-system and microvalve technology previously developed by Busek, under the NASA Space Technology 7's Disturbance Reduction System (ST7-DRS) mission and via follow-on electric propulsion programs. This project investigated methods for extending thruster life beyond the previously demonstrated 450 hours. The life-extending capabilities will be demonstrated on a subscale version of the thruster.

  20. 20mN, Variable Specific Impulse Colloid Thruster Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During Phase I, Busek designed and manufactured an electrospray emitter capable of generating 20 mN in a 7" x 7" x 1.7" package. The thruster consists of nine...

  1. Almost periodic solutions of impulsive differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Stamov, Gani T

    2012-01-01

    Impulsive differential equations are suitable for the mathematical simulation of evolutionary processes in which the parameters undergo relatively long periods of smooth variation followed by short-term rapid changes (that is, jumps) in their values. Processes of this type are often investigated in various fields of science and technology. The question of the existence and uniqueness of almost periodic solutions of differential equations is an age-old problem of great importance. The qualitative theory of impulsive differential equations is currently undergoing rapid development in relation to the investigation of various processes which are subject to impacts during their evolution, and many findings on the existence and uniqueness of almost periodic solutions of these equations are being made. This book systematically presents findings related to almost periodic solutions of impulsive differential equations and illustrates their potential applications.

  2. Impulsive-compulsive buying disorder: clinical overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Allen, Andrea; Altamura, A Carlo; Buoli, Massimiliano; Hollander, Eric

    2008-04-01

    Impulsive-compulsive buying disorder (ICBD) is an impulse control disorder not otherwise specified (ICD-NOS) characterized by impulsive drives and compulsive behaviours (buying unneeded things), personal distress, impaired social and vocational functioning and financial problems. Despite being described in the 19th century, serious attention to ICBD began only in the last decade with the first epidemiological and pharmacological investigation. Biological, social and psychological factors contribute to the aetiology of ICBD. Cognitive-behavioural therapy and selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors are currently considered the more effective interventions in the treatment of ICBD. The present review aims to provide a broad overview of the epidemiology, aetiology, phenomenology and treatment options of ICBD.

  3. Pathological love: impulsivity, personality, and romantic relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sophia, Eglacy C; Tavares, Hermano; Berti, Marina P; Pereira, Ana P; Lorena, Andrea; Mello, Cidália; Gorenstein, Clarice; Zilberman, Monica L

    2009-05-01

    Pathological love (PL)--behavior characterized by providing repetitive and uncontrolled care and attention to the partner in a romantic relationship--is a rarely studied condition, despite not being rare and causing suffering. This study aims at investigating impulsivity, personality, and characteristics related to the romantic relationship in this population. Eighty-nine individuals (50 with PL; 39 individuals with no psychiatric disorder) were compared regarding impulsivity, personality, type of attachment, satisfaction with romantic relationship, and love style. Individuals with PL have higher levels of impulsivity (Promantic relationships (P<.001; Adapted Relationship Assessment Scale). Individuals with PL present personality traits and relationship aspects that must be taken into account in devising assessment and therapeutic strategies for this population.

  4. Impulse control disorders and depression in Finnish patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joutsa, Juho; Martikainen, Kirsti; Vahlberg, Tero; Voon, Valerie; Kaasinen, Valtteri

    2012-02-01

    Impulse control disorders occur frequently in patients with Parkinson's disease. However, the frequencies have been investigated mainly in patients from secondary or tertiary care centers, and thus, the prevalence rates in general community are not known. Our objective was to study the prevalence rates of impulse control disorders and related factors in a large, non-selected sample of Parkinson's disease patients. We conducted a cross-sectional survey among Parkinson's disease patients from Finnish Parkinson Association [n = 575; 365 men, 240 women, median age 64 (range 43-90) years]. Problem and pathological gambling were estimated with the South Oaks Gambling Screen, risk for impulse control disorders with the validated Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's Disease, and depression with the Beck Depression Inventory. The frequency of pathological gambling was 7.0%. The overall frequency of a positive screen for an impulse control disorder was 34.8%, and 12.5% of the patients screened positive for multiple disorders. Depressive symptoms were statistically the most important factor in explaining variance in impulse control disorder risk, even more than sex, age, age of disease onset, alcohol use, or medication. The high proportion of patients screened positive for impulse control disorders in a non-selected sample emphasize the importance of routine screening of these disorders in Parkinson's disease. Pathological gambling prevalence in Parkinson's disease is seven times higher than in the general population in Finland. The results underline the importance of depression in impulse control disorders associated with Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Micropower impulse radar technology and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, J., LLNL

    1998-04-15

    The LLNL-developed Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR) technology has quickly gone from laboratory concept to embedded circuitry in numerous government and commercial systems in the last few years[l]. The main ideas behind MIR, invented by T. McEwan in the Laser Program, are the generation and detection systems for extremely low- power ultra-wideband pulses in the gigaHertz regime using low-cost components. These ideas, coupled with new antenna systems, timing and radio-frequency (RF) circuitry, computer interfaces, and signal processing, have provided the catalyst for a new generation of compact radar systems. Over the past several years we have concentrated on a number of applications of MIR which address a number of remote-sensing applications relevant to emerging programs in defense, transportation, medical, and environmental research. Some of the past commercial successes have been widely publicized [2] and are only now starting to become available for market. Over 30 patents have been filed and over 15 licenses have been signed on various aspects of the MIR technology. In addition, higher performance systems are under development for specific laboratory programs and government reimbursables. The MIR is an ultra- wideband, range-gated radar system that provides the enabling hardware technology used in the research areas mentioned above. It has numerous performance parameters that can be Selected by careful design to fit the requirements. We have improved the baseline, short- range, MIR system to demonstrate its effectiveness. The radar operates over the hand from approximately I to 4 GHz with pulse repetition frequencies up to 10 MHz. It provides a potential range resolution of I cm at ranges of greater than 20 m. We have developed a suite of algorithms for using MIR for image formation. These algorithms currently support Synthetic aperture and multistate array geometries. This baseline MIR radar imaging system has been used for several programmatic applications.

  6. Effect of specific soccer training on general soccer ability of high fit tribal soccer players

    OpenAIRE

    Dr.Gopal Chandra Saha; Dr. Hiralal Adhikari

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of specific soccer training on General Soccer ability (volleying Skill) by using Mcdonald Soccer Test of high fit tribal soccer players. ninety, high fit tribal Soccer players out of two hundred and seventy, 9th and 10th grade school level tribal Soccer players from Ergoda School parihati of paschim Medinipur, District of West Bengal were randomly selected as the tribal subjects for this study. To ascertain the high fit tribal Soccer play...

  7. Impulsive behavior and associated clinical variables in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abosch, Aviva; Gupte, Akshay; Eberly, Lynn E; Tuite, Paul J; Nance, Martha; Grant, Jon E

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a degenerative brain disorder accompanied by the loss of dopaminergic neurons and the presence of motor and non-motor symptoms. We performed a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based analysis of impulsive behavior in our PD clinic population to assess prevalence and associated characteristics. We found a higher prevalence of impulsive behavior (29.7%) than previously reported, and found multiple, concurrent impulsive behaviors in 26% of subjects reporting impulsive behavior. Our findings contribute to the growing awareness of impulsive behavior in PD, and support the need for longitudinal studies to assess changes in impulsive behaviors in Parkinson's patients. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. The independent effects of child sexual abuse and impulsivity on lifetime suicide attempts among female patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daray, Federico M; Rojas, Sasha M; Bridges, Ana J; Badour, Christal L; Grendas, Leandro; Rodante, Demián; Puppo, Soledad; Rebok, Federico

    2016-08-01

    Child sexual abuse (CSA) is a causal agent in many negative adulthood outcomes, including the risk for life-threatening behaviors such as suicide ideation and suicide attempts. Traumatic events such as CSA may pose risk in the healthy development of cognitive and emotional functioning during childhood. I