WorldWideScience

Sample records for high sensitivity imaging

  1. High sensitivity optical molecular imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yu; Yuan, Gao; Huang, Chao; Jiang, Shixin; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Kun; Tian, Jie

    2018-02-01

    Optical Molecular Imaging (OMI) has the advantages of high sensitivity, low cost and ease of use. By labeling the regions of interest with fluorescent or bioluminescence probes, OMI can noninvasively obtain the distribution of the probes in vivo, which play the key role in cancer research, pharmacokinetics and other biological studies. In preclinical and clinical application, the image depth, resolution and sensitivity are the key factors for researchers to use OMI. In this paper, we report a high sensitivity optical molecular imaging system developed by our group, which can improve the imaging depth in phantom to nearly 5cm, high resolution at 2cm depth, and high image sensitivity. To validate the performance of the system, special designed phantom experiments and weak light detection experiment were implemented. The results shows that cooperated with high performance electron-multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) camera, precision design of light path system and high efficient image techniques, our OMI system can simultaneously collect the light-emitted signals generated by fluorescence molecular imaging, bioluminescence imaging, Cherenkov luminance and other optical imaging modality, and observe the internal distribution of light-emitting agents fast and accurately.

  2. A CMOS In-Pixel CTIA High Sensitivity Fluorescence Imager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murari, Kartikeya; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Thakor, Nitish; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2011-10-01

    Traditionally, charge coupled device (CCD) based image sensors have held sway over the field of biomedical imaging. Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) based imagers so far lack sensitivity leading to poor low-light imaging. Certain applications including our work on animal-mountable systems for imaging in awake and unrestrained rodents require the high sensitivity and image quality of CCDs and the low power consumption, flexibility and compactness of CMOS imagers. We present a 132×124 high sensitivity imager array with a 20.1 μm pixel pitch fabricated in a standard 0.5 μ CMOS process. The chip incorporates n-well/p-sub photodiodes, capacitive transimpedance amplifier (CTIA) based in-pixel amplification, pixel scanners and delta differencing circuits. The 5-transistor all-nMOS pixel interfaces with peripheral pMOS transistors for column-parallel CTIA. At 70 fps, the array has a minimum detectable signal of 4 nW/cm(2) at a wavelength of 450 nm while consuming 718 μA from a 3.3 V supply. Peak signal to noise ratio (SNR) was 44 dB at an incident intensity of 1 μW/cm(2). Implementing 4×4 binning allowed the frame rate to be increased to 675 fps. Alternately, sensitivity could be increased to detect about 0.8 nW/cm(2) while maintaining 70 fps. The chip was used to image single cell fluorescence at 28 fps with an average SNR of 32 dB. For comparison, a cooled CCD camera imaged the same cell at 20 fps with an average SNR of 33.2 dB under the same illumination while consuming over a watt.

  3. Ultra-high sensitivity imaging of cancer using SERRS nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kircher, Moritz F.

    2016-05-01

    "Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy" (SERS) nanoparticles have gained much attention in recent years for in silico, in vitro and in vivo sensing applications. Our group has developed novel generations of biocompatible "surfaceenhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy" (SERRS) nanoparticles as novel molecular imaging agents. Via rigorous optimization of the different variables contributing to the Raman enhancement, we were able to design SERRS nanoparticles with so far unprecedented sensitivity of detection under in vivo imaging conditions (femto-attomolar range). This has resulted in our ability to visualize, with a single nanoparticle, many different cancer types (after intravenous injection) in mouse models. The cancer types we have tested so far include brain, breast, esophagus, stomach, pancreas, colon, sarcoma, and prostate cancer. All mouse models used are state-of-the-art and closely mimic the tumor biology in their human counterparts. In these animals, we were able to visualize not only the bulk tumors, but importantly also microscopic extensions and locoregional satellite metastases, thus delineating for the first time the true extent of tumor spread. Moreover, the particles enable the detection of premalignant lesions. Given their inert composition they are expected to have a high chance for clinical translation, where we envision them to have an impact in various scenarios ranging from early detection, image-guidance in open or minimally invasive surgical procedures, to noninvasive imaging in conjunction with spatially offset (SESORS) Raman detection devices.

  4. A new compact, high sensitivity neutron imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caillaud, T.; Landoas, O.; Briat, M.; Rosse, B.; Thfoin, I.; Philippe, F.; Casner, A.; Bourgade, J. L.; Disdier, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF,F-91297 Arpajon (France); Glebov, V. Yu.; Marshall, F. J.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Park, H. S.; Robey, H. F.; Amendt, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    We have developed a new small neutron imaging system (SNIS) diagnostic for the OMEGA laser facility. The SNIS uses a penumbral coded aperture and has been designed to record images from low yield (10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} neutrons) implosions such as those using deuterium as the fuel. This camera was tested at OMEGA in 2009 on a rugby hohlraum energetics experiment where it recorded an image at a yield of 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}. The resolution of this image was 54 {mu}m and the camera was located only 4 meters from target chamber centre. We recently improved the instrument by adding a cooled CCD camera. The sensitivity of the new camera has been fully characterized using a linear accelerator and a {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray source. The calibration showed that the signal-to-noise ratio could be improved by using raw binning detection.

  5. A new compact, high sensitivity neutron imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caillaud, T.; Landoas, O.; Briat, M.; Rossé, B.; Thfoin, I.; Philippe, F.; Casner, A.; Bourgade, J. L.; Disdier, L.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Marshall, F. J.; Sangster, T. C.; Park, H. S.; Robey, H. F.; Amendt, P.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a new small neutron imaging system (SNIS) diagnostic for the OMEGA laser facility. The SNIS uses a penumbral coded aperture and has been designed to record images from low yield (10 9 –10 10 neutrons) implosions such as those using deuterium as the fuel. This camera was tested at OMEGA in 2009 on a rugby hohlraum energetics experiment where it recorded an image at a yield of 1.4 × 10 10 . The resolution of this image was 54 μm and the camera was located only 4 meters from target chamber centre. We recently improved the instrument by adding a cooled CCD camera. The sensitivity of the new camera has been fully characterized using a linear accelerator and a 60 Co γ-ray source. The calibration showed that the signal-to-noise ratio could be improved by using raw binning detection.

  6. High sensitivity tracer imaging of iron oxides using magnetic particle imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwill, Patrick [University of California, Dept. of Bioengineering, Berkeley, CA (United States); Konkle, Justin; Lu, Kuan; Zheng, Bo [UC Berkeley (UCSF), Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, CA (United States); Conolly, Steven [University of California, Berkeley Bioengineering, Electrical Engineering, and Computer Science, CA (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Full text: Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new tracer imaging modality that is gaining significant interest from NMR and MRI researchers. While the physics of MPI differ substantially from MRI, it employs hardware and imaging concepts that are familiar to MRI researchers, such as magnetic excitation and detection, pulse sequences, and relaxation effects. Furthermore, MPI employs the same superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) contrast agents that are sometimes used for MR angiography and are often used for MRI cell tracking studies. These SPIOs are much safer for humans than iodine or gadolinium, especially for Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) patients. The weak kidneys of CKD patients cannot safely excrete iodine or gadolinium, leading to increased morbidity and mortality after iodinated X-ray or CT angiograms, or after gadolinium-MRA studies. Iron oxides, on the other hand, are processed in the liver, and have been shown to be safe even for CKD patients. Unlike the 'black blood' contrast generated by SPIOs in MRI due to increased T2 dephasing, SPIOs in MPI generate positive, 'bright blood' contrast. With this ideal contrast, even prototype MPI scanners can already achieve fast, high-sensitivity, and high-contrast angiograms with millimeter-scale resolutions in phantoms and in animals. Moreover, MPI shows great potential for an exciting array of applications, including stem cell tracking in vivo, first-pass contrast studies to diagnose or stage cancer, and inflammation imaging in vivo. So far, only a handful of prototype small-animal MPI scanners have been constructed worldwide. Hence, MPI is open to great advances, especially in hardware, pulse sequence, and nanoparticle improvements, with the potential to revolutionize the biomedical imaging field. (author)

  7. High sensitivity tracer imaging of iron oxides using magnetic particle imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwill, Patrick; Konkle, Justin; Lu, Kuan; Zheng, Bo; Conolly, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Full text: Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new tracer imaging modality that is gaining significant interest from NMR and MRI researchers. While the physics of MPI differ substantially from MRI, it employs hardware and imaging concepts that are familiar to MRI researchers, such as magnetic excitation and detection, pulse sequences, and relaxation effects. Furthermore, MPI employs the same superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) contrast agents that are sometimes used for MR angiography and are often used for MRI cell tracking studies. These SPIOs are much safer for humans than iodine or gadolinium, especially for Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) patients. The weak kidneys of CKD patients cannot safely excrete iodine or gadolinium, leading to increased morbidity and mortality after iodinated X-ray or CT angiograms, or after gadolinium-MRA studies. Iron oxides, on the other hand, are processed in the liver, and have been shown to be safe even for CKD patients. Unlike the 'black blood' contrast generated by SPIOs in MRI due to increased T2 dephasing, SPIOs in MPI generate positive, 'bright blood' contrast. With this ideal contrast, even prototype MPI scanners can already achieve fast, high-sensitivity, and high-contrast angiograms with millimeter-scale resolutions in phantoms and in animals. Moreover, MPI shows great potential for an exciting array of applications, including stem cell tracking in vivo, first-pass contrast studies to diagnose or stage cancer, and inflammation imaging in vivo. So far, only a handful of prototype small-animal MPI scanners have been constructed worldwide. Hence, MPI is open to great advances, especially in hardware, pulse sequence, and nanoparticle improvements, with the potential to revolutionize the biomedical imaging field. (author)

  8. A high sensitivity imaging detector for electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faruqi, A.R.; Andrews, H.N.; Henderson, R.

    1995-01-01

    A camera for electron microscopy based on a low readout noise cooled-CCD is described in this paper. The primary purpose of this camera is to record electron diffraction from ordered arrays of proteins but also has potential applications in imaging, electron tomography and for the automatic alignment of the electron microscope. Electrons (energy similar 120 kV) which are scattered by the specimen to form the image, which is normally recorded on film, are converted to visible photons in a polycrystalline phosphor and the resulting image is stored on the CCD (EEV 05-20, 1152 by 814, 22.5 μm square pixels). The main advantages of using CCDs include a large dynamic range, very good linearity and the possibility of immediate access to the data which is in a digitised form capable of further processing on-line during the experiment. We have built specially designed CCD ''drive'' electronics in a VME crate, interfaced to a Sun Sparcstation, for controlling the CCD operations. Data reduction programs have been installed, previously used off-line, to speed up data processing, and provide analysed data within a few minutes after the exposure. (orig.)

  9. High sensitivity phase retrieval method in grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zhao; Gao, Kun; Chen, Jian; Wang, Dajiang; Wang, Shenghao; Chen, Heng; Bao, Yuan; Shao, Qigang; Wang, Zhili, E-mail: wangnsrl@ustc.edu.cn [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029 (China); Zhang, Kai [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhu, Peiping; Wu, Ziyu, E-mail: wuzy@ustc.edu.cn [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029, China and Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging is considered as one of the most promising techniques for future medical imaging. Many different methods have been developed to retrieve phase signal, among which the phase stepping (PS) method is widely used. However, further practical implementations are hindered, due to its complex scanning mode and high radiation dose. In contrast, the reverse projection (RP) method is a novel fast and low dose extraction approach. In this contribution, the authors present a quantitative analysis of the noise properties of the refraction signals retrieved by the two methods and compare their sensitivities. Methods: Using the error propagation formula, the authors analyze theoretically the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the refraction images retrieved by the two methods. Then, the sensitivities of the two extraction methods are compared under an identical exposure dose. Numerical experiments are performed to validate the theoretical results and provide some quantitative insight. Results: The SNRs of the two methods are both dependent on the system parameters, but in different ways. Comparison between their sensitivities reveals that for the refraction signal, the RP method possesses a higher sensitivity, especially in the case of high visibility and/or at the edge of the object. Conclusions: Compared with the PS method, the RP method has a superior sensitivity and provides refraction images with a higher SNR. Therefore, one can obtain highly sensitive refraction images in grating-based phase contrast imaging. This is very important for future preclinical and clinical implementations.

  10. High sensitivity phase retrieval method in grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Zhao; Gao, Kun; Chen, Jian; Wang, Dajiang; Wang, Shenghao; Chen, Heng; Bao, Yuan; Shao, Qigang; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Kai; Zhu, Peiping; Wu, Ziyu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging is considered as one of the most promising techniques for future medical imaging. Many different methods have been developed to retrieve phase signal, among which the phase stepping (PS) method is widely used. However, further practical implementations are hindered, due to its complex scanning mode and high radiation dose. In contrast, the reverse projection (RP) method is a novel fast and low dose extraction approach. In this contribution, the authors present a quantitative analysis of the noise properties of the refraction signals retrieved by the two methods and compare their sensitivities. Methods: Using the error propagation formula, the authors analyze theoretically the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the refraction images retrieved by the two methods. Then, the sensitivities of the two extraction methods are compared under an identical exposure dose. Numerical experiments are performed to validate the theoretical results and provide some quantitative insight. Results: The SNRs of the two methods are both dependent on the system parameters, but in different ways. Comparison between their sensitivities reveals that for the refraction signal, the RP method possesses a higher sensitivity, especially in the case of high visibility and/or at the edge of the object. Conclusions: Compared with the PS method, the RP method has a superior sensitivity and provides refraction images with a higher SNR. Therefore, one can obtain highly sensitive refraction images in grating-based phase contrast imaging. This is very important for future preclinical and clinical implementations

  11. A novel high resolution, high sensitivity SPECT detector for molecular imaging of cardiovascular diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusanno, F.; Argentieri, A.; Baiocchi, M.; Colilli, S.; Cisbani, E.; De Vincentis, G.; Fratoni, R.; Garibaldi, F.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lucentini, M.; Magliozzi, M. L.; Majewski, S.; Marano, G.; Musico, P.; Musumeci, M.; Santavenere, F.; Torrioli, S.; Tsui, B. M. W.; Vitelli, L.; Wang, Y.

    2010-05-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of death in western countries. Understanding the rupture of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques and monitoring the effect of innovative therapies of heart failure is of fundamental importance. A flexible, high resolution, high sensitivity detector system for molecular imaging with radionuclides on small animal models has been designed for this aim. A prototype has been built using tungsten pinhole and LaBr3(Ce) scintillator coupled to Hamamatsu Flat Panel PMTs. Compact individual-channel readout has been designed, built and tested. Measurements with phantoms as well as pilot studies on mice have been performed, the results show that the myocardial perfusion in mice can be determined with sufficient precision. The detector will be improved replacing the Hamamatsu Flat Panel with Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) to allow integration of the system with MRI scanners. Application of LaBr3(Ce) scintillator coupled to photosensor with high photon detection efficiency and excellent energy resolution will allow dual-label imaging to monitor simultaneously the cardiac perfusion and the molecular targets under investigation during the heart therapy.

  12. An automated quantitative DNA image cytometry system detects abnormal cells in cervical cytology with high sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, O G; Ho, M W; Tsun, O K; Ng, A K; Tsui, E Y; Chow, J N; Ip, P P; Cheung, A N

    2018-03-26

    To evaluate the performance of an automated DNA-image-cytometry system as a tool to detect cervical carcinoma. Of 384 liquid-based cervical cytology samples with available biopsy follow-up were analyzed by both the Imager System and a high-risk HPV test (Cobas). The sensitivity and specificity of Imager System for detecting biopsy proven high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia [CIN]2-3) and carcinoma were 89.58% and 56.25%, respectively, compared to 97.22% and 23.33% of HPV test but additional HPV 16/18 genotyping increased the specificity to 69.58%. The sensitivity and specificity of the Imager System for predicting HSIL+ (CIN2-3+) lesions among atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance samples were 80.00% and 70.53%, respectively, compared to 100% and 11.58% of HPV test whilst the HPV 16/18 genotyping increased the specificity to 77.89%. Among atypical squamous cells-cannot exclude HSIL, the sensitivity and specificity of Imager System for predicting HSIL+ (CIN2-3+) lesions upon follow up were 82.86% and 33.33%%, respectively, compared to 97.14% and 4.76% of HPV test and the HPV 16/18 genotyping increased the specificity to 19.05%. Among low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion cases, the sensitivity and specificity of the Imager System for predicting HSIL+ (CIN2-3+) lesions were 66.67% and 35.71%%, respectively, compared to 66.67% and 29.76% of HPV test while HPV 16/18 genotyping increased the specificity to 79.76%. The overall results of imager and high-risk HPV test agreed in 69.43% (268) of all samples. The automated imager system and HPV 16/18 genotyping can enhance the specificity of detecting HSIL+ (CIN2-3+) lesions. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. High spatial precision nano-imaging of polarization-sensitive plasmonic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunbo; Wang, Yipei; Lee, Somin Eunice

    2018-02-01

    Precise polarimetric imaging of polarization-sensitive nanoparticles is essential for resolving their accurate spatial positions beyond the diffraction limit. However, conventional technologies currently suffer from beam deviation errors which cannot be corrected beyond the diffraction limit. To overcome this issue, we experimentally demonstrate a spatially stable nano-imaging system for polarization-sensitive nanoparticles. In this study, we show that by integrating a voltage-tunable imaging variable polarizer with optical microscopy, we are able to suppress beam deviation errors. We expect that this nano-imaging system should allow for acquisition of accurate positional and polarization information from individual nanoparticles in applications where real-time, high precision spatial information is required.

  14. Compton imaging with a highly-segmented, position-sensitive HPGe detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbach, T.; Hirsch, R.; Reiter, P.; Birkenbach, B.; Bruyneel, B.; Eberth, J.; Hess, H.; Lewandowski, L. [Universitaet zu Koeln, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Koeln (Germany); Gernhaeuser, R.; Maier, L.; Schlarb, M.; Weiler, B.; Winkel, M. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department, Garching (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    A Compton camera based on a highly-segmented high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector and a double-sided silicon-strip detector (DSSD) was developed, tested, and put into operation; the origin of γ radiation was determined successfully. The Compton camera is operated in two different modes. Coincidences from Compton-scattered γ-ray events between DSSD and HPGe detector allow for best angular resolution; while the high-efficiency mode takes advantage of the position sensitivity of the highly-segmented HPGe detector. In this mode the setup is sensitive to the whole 4π solid angle. The interaction-point positions in the 36-fold segmented large-volume HPGe detector are determined by pulse-shape analysis (PSA) of all HPGe detector signals. Imaging algorithms were developed for each mode and successfully implemented. The angular resolution sensitively depends on parameters such as geometry, selected multiplicity and interaction-point distances. Best results were obtained taking into account the crosstalk properties, the time alignment of the signals and the distance metric for the PSA for both operation modes. An angular resolution between 13.8 {sup circle} and 19.1 {sup circle}, depending on the minimal interaction-point distance for the high-efficiency mode at an energy of 1275 keV, was achieved. In the coincidence mode, an increased angular resolution of 4.6 {sup circle} was determined for the same γ-ray energy. (orig.)

  15. Mobile Phone Ratiometric Imaging Enables Highly Sensitive Fluorescence Lateral Flow Immunoassays without External Optical Filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Kamal G; Singh, Vidhi; Kauffman, Peter C; Abe, Koji; Yager, Paul

    2018-05-14

    Paper-based diagnostic tests based on the lateral flow immunoassay concept promise low-cost, point-of-care detection of infectious diseases, but such assays suffer from poor limits of detection. One factor that contributes to poor analytical performance is a reliance on low-contrast chromophoric optical labels such as gold nanoparticles. Previous attempts to improve the sensitivity of paper-based diagnostics include replacing chromophoric labels with enzymes, fluorophores, or phosphors at the expense of increased fluidic complexity or the need for device readers with costly optoelectronics. Several groups, including our own, have proposed mobile phones as suitable point-of-care readers due to their low cost, ease of use, and ubiquity. However, extant mobile phone fluorescence readers require costly optical filters and were typically validated with only one camera sensor module, which is inappropriate for potential point-of-care use. In response, we propose to couple low-cost ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with long Stokes-shift quantum dots to enable ratiometric mobile phone fluorescence measurements without optical filters. Ratiometric imaging with unmodified smartphone cameras improves the contrast and attenuates the impact of excitation intensity variability by 15×. Practical application was shown with a lateral flow immunoassay for influenza A with nucleoproteins spiked into simulated nasal matrix. Limits of detection of 1.5 and 2.6 fmol were attained on two mobile phones, which are comparable to a gel imager (1.9 fmol), 10× better than imaging gold nanoparticles on a scanner (18 fmol), and >2 orders of magnitude better than gold nanoparticle-labeled assays imaged with mobile phones. Use of the proposed filter-free mobile phone imaging scheme is a first step toward enabling a new generation of highly sensitive, point-of-care fluorescence assays.

  16. A highly sensitive x-ray imaging modality for hepatocellular carcinoma detection in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Danielle; Walsh, Edward G.; Derdak, Zoltan; Wands, Jack R.; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Innovations that improve sensitivity and reduce cost are of paramount importance in diagnostic imaging. The novel x-ray imaging modality called spatial frequency heterodyne imaging (SFHI) is based on a linear arrangement of x-ray source, tissue, and x-ray detector, much like that of a conventional x-ray imaging apparatus. However, SFHI rests on a complete paradigm reversal compared to conventional x-ray absorption-based radiology: while scattered x-rays are carefully rejected in absorption-based x-ray radiology to enhance the image contrast, SFHI forms images exclusively from x-rays scattered by the tissue. In this study we use numerical processing to produce x-ray scatter images of hepatocellular carcinoma labeled with a nanoparticle contrast agent. We subsequently compare the sensitivity of SFHI in this application to that of both conventional x-ray imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Although SFHI is still in the early stages of its development, our results show that the sensitivity of SFHI is an order of magnitude greater than that of absorption-based x-ray imaging and approximately equal to that of MRI. As x-ray imaging modalities typically have lower installation and service costs compared to MRI, SFHI could become a cost effective alternative to MRI, particularly in areas of the world with inadequate availability of MRI facilities.

  17. A monolithic 640 × 512 CMOS imager with high-NIR sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauxtermann, Stefan; Fisher, John; McDougal, Michael

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we present first results from a backside illuminated CMOS image sensor that we fabricated on high resistivity silicon. Compared to conventional CMOS imagers, a thicker photosensitive membrane can be depleted when using silicon with low background doping concentration while maintaining low dark current and good MTF performance. The benefits of such a fully depleted silicon sensor are high quantum efficiency over a wide spectral range and a fast photo detector response. Combining these characteristics with the circuit complexity and manufacturing maturity available from a modern, mixed signal CMOS technology leads to a new type of sensor, with an unprecedented performance spectrum in a monolithic device. Our fully depleted, backside illuminated CMOS sensor was designed to operate at integration times down to 100nsec and frame rates up to 1000Hz. Noise in Integrate While Read (IWR) snapshot shutter operation for these conditions was simulated to be below 10e- at room temperature. 2×2 binning with a 4× increase in sensitivity and a maximum frame rate of 4000 Hz is supported. For application in hyperspectral imaging systems the full well capacity in each row can individually be programmed between 10ke-, 60ke- and 500ke-. On test structures we measured a room temperature dark current of 360pA/cm2 at a reverse bias of 3.3V. A peak quantum efficiency of 80% was measured with a single layer AR coating on the backside. Test images captured with the 50μm thick VGA imager between 30Hz and 90Hz frame rate show a strong response at NIR wavelengths.

  18. Sensitive and selective tumor imaging with novel and highly activatable fluorescence probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urano, Yasuteru

    2008-01-01

    Selective and sensitive tumor imaging in vivo is one of the most requested methodologies in medical sciences. Although several imaging modalities have been developed including positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for the detection of tumors, none of these modalities can activate the signals upon being accumulated or uptaken to tumor sites. Among these modalities, only optical fluorescence imaging has a marked advantage, that is, their signals can be dramatically increased upon detecting some biological features. In this short review, I will introduce some recent strategies for activatable optical fluorescence imaging of tumors, and discuss their advantages over other modalities. (author)

  19. High-resolution high-sensitivity elemental imaging by secondary ion mass spectrometry: from traditional 2D and 3D imaging to correlative microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirtz, T; Philipp, P; Audinot, J-N; Dowsett, D; Eswara, S

    2015-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) constitutes an extremely sensitive technique for imaging surfaces in 2D and 3D. Apart from its excellent sensitivity and high lateral resolution (50 nm on state-of-the-art SIMS instruments), advantages of SIMS include high dynamic range and the ability to differentiate between isotopes. This paper first reviews the underlying principles of SIMS as well as the performance and applications of 2D and 3D SIMS elemental imaging. The prospects for further improving the capabilities of SIMS imaging are discussed. The lateral resolution in SIMS imaging when using the microprobe mode is limited by (i) the ion probe size, which is dependent on the brightness of the primary ion source, the quality of the optics of the primary ion column and the electric fields in the near sample region used to extract secondary ions; (ii) the sensitivity of the analysis as a reasonable secondary ion signal, which must be detected from very tiny voxel sizes and thus from a very limited number of sputtered atoms; and (iii) the physical dimensions of the collision cascade determining the origin of the sputtered ions with respect to the impact site of the incident primary ion probe. One interesting prospect is the use of SIMS-based correlative microscopy. In this approach SIMS is combined with various high-resolution microscopy techniques, so that elemental/chemical information at the highest sensitivity can be obtained with SIMS, while excellent spatial resolution is provided by overlaying the SIMS images with high-resolution images obtained by these microscopy techniques. Examples of this approach are given by presenting in situ combinations of SIMS with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), helium ion microscopy (HIM) and scanning probe microscopy (SPM). (paper)

  20. Imaging and high-sensitivity quantification of chemiluminescent labeled DNA-blots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorner, G.

    1997-01-01

    The present thesis has for objective the development of both, methods of DNA labeling by chemiluminescence (via the catalytic activity of the enzyme alkaline phosphatase - AP) and an appropriate imaging system. Offering a competitive alternative to the detection of classical radio-labels in molecular-biological experiments of the blotting type, this technique should permit the realization of quantitative studies of gene expression at ultra-high sensitivity necessary in particular for differential-screening experiments. To reach our aim. we separated the project into three different parts. In a first step an imager based on a liquid-nitrogen-cooled CCD coupled to a standard optics (50 mm/fl.2) has been installed and characterized. This system offers a sensitive area of up to 625 cm 2 , a spatial resolution of 0.3-1 mm (depending on the field of view) and a sensitivity sufficient to detect 10 fg/mm 2 labeled DNA. In a second part, the chemiluminescent light-generation process in solution has been investigated to optimize the parameters temperature. pH and concentration of the substrate as well as the enzyme. The substrate offering the highest light yield (CDP-Star in addition with the enhancer EMERALD II) allows quantification of AP down to 10 -15 M within a dynamic range of 10 4 in solution. Finally. preparation, immobilization and detection of AP-labeled DNA probes (via a biotin-streptavidin-biotin-AP bridge) on nylon membranes has been optimized. A linear relation between the light intensities and the amount of DNA was observed in a range of 10 fg/mm 2 - 100 pg/mm 2 . Hybridization of the probes to bacterial cloned target-DNA has been addressed after examination of the best hybridization conditions. Our protocol includes the treatment of a proteinase, which resulted in a significantly lower background on the filter. The results of our investigations suggest that the main conditions for a reliable differential-screening experiment are fulfilled when using

  1. High-sensitivity imaging method of singlet oxygen and superoxide anion in photodynamic and sonodynamic actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Da; He, Yonghong; Hao, Min; Chen, Qun

    2004-07-01

    A novel method of photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) of cancer mediated by chemiluminescence (CL) probe is presented. The mechanism for photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as singlet oxygen (1O2) and superoxide (O2-), generated by during the photochemical process. Both 1O2 and O2- can react with Cypridina luciferin analogue (FCLA), a highly selective CL probe for detecting the ROS. Chemiluminescence from the reaction of FCLA with the ROS, at about 530 nm, was detected by a highly sensitive ICCD system. The CL was markedly inhibited by the addition of 10 mmol/L sodium azide (NaN3) in a sample solution. Similar phenomena, with lesser extents of changes, were observed at the additions of 10 μmol/L superoxide dismutase (SOD), 10 mmol/L mannitol, and 100 μg/mL catalase, respectively. This indicates that the detected CL signals were mainly from ROS generated during the photosensitization reactions. Also, the chemiluminescence method was used to detect the ROS during sonodynamic action, both in vitro and in vivo. ROS formation during sonosensitizations of HpD and ATX-70 were detected using our newly-developed imaging technique, in real time, on tumor bearing animals. This method can provide a new means in clinics for tumor diagnosis.

  2. Versatile ultrafast pump-probe imaging with high sensitivity CCD camera

    OpenAIRE

    Pezeril , Thomas; Klieber , Christoph; Temnov , Vasily; Huntzinger , Jean-Roch; Anane , Abdelmadjid

    2012-01-01

    International audience; A powerful imaging technique based on femtosecond time-resolved measurements with a high dynamic range, commercial CCD camera is presented. Ultrafast phenomena induced by a femtosecond laser pump are visualized through the lock-in type acquisition of images recorded by a femtosecond laser probe. This technique allows time-resolved measurements of laser excited phenomena at multiple probe wavelengths (spectrometer mode) or conventional imaging of the sample surface (ima...

  3. High-Resolution Ultrasound-Switchable Fluorescence Imaging in Centimeter-Deep Tissue Phantoms with High Signal-To-Noise Ratio and High Sensitivity via Novel Contrast Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bingbing; Bandi, Venugopal; Wei, Ming-Yuan; Pei, Yanbo; D'Souza, Francis; Nguyen, Kytai T; Hong, Yi; Yuan, Baohong

    2016-01-01

    For many years, investigators have sought after high-resolution fluorescence imaging in centimeter-deep tissue because many interesting in vivo phenomena-such as the presence of immune system cells, tumor angiogenesis, and metastasis-may be located deep in tissue. Previously, we developed a new imaging technique to achieve high spatial resolution in sub-centimeter deep tissue phantoms named continuous-wave ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (CW-USF). The principle is to use a focused ultrasound wave to externally and locally switch on and off the fluorophore emission from a small volume (close to ultrasound focal volume). By making improvements in three aspects of this technique: excellent near-infrared USF contrast agents, a sensitive frequency-domain USF imaging system, and an effective signal processing algorithm, for the first time this study has achieved high spatial resolution (~ 900 μm) in 3-centimeter-deep tissue phantoms with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and high sensitivity (3.4 picomoles of fluorophore in a volume of 68 nanoliters can be detected). We have achieved these results in both tissue-mimic phantoms and porcine muscle tissues. We have also demonstrated multi-color USF to image and distinguish two fluorophores with different wavelengths, which might be very useful for simultaneously imaging of multiple targets and observing their interactions in the future. This work has opened the door for future studies of high-resolution centimeter-deep tissue fluorescence imaging.

  4. Design and implementation of a sensitive high-resolution nonlinear spectral imaging microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palero, Jonathan A.; Latouche, Gwendal; de Bruijn, Henriëtte S.; van der Ploeg van den Heuvel, Angélique; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.; Gerritsen, Hans C.

    2008-01-01

    Live tissue nonlinear microscopy based on multiphoton autofluorescence and second harmonic emission originating from endogenous fluorophores and noncentrosymmetric-structured proteins is rapidly gaining interest in biomedical applications. The advantage of this technique includes high imaging

  5. High-resolution imaging of redox signaling in live cells through an oxidation-sensitive yellow fluorescent protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maulucci, Giuseppe; Labate, Valentina; Mele, Marina

    2008-01-01

    We present the application of a redox-sensitive mutant of the yellow fluorescent protein (rxYFP) to image, with elevated sensitivity and high temporal and spatial resolution, oxidative responses of eukaryotic cells to pathophysiological stimuli. The method presented, based on the ratiometric...... quantitation of the distribution of fluorescence by confocal microscopy, allows us to draw real-time "redox maps" of adherent cells and to score subtle changes in the intracellular redox state, such as those induced by overexpression of redox-active proteins. This strategy for in vivo imaging of redox...

  6. Position sensitive detection coupled to high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry: Imaging for molecular beam deflection experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El Rahim, M.; Antoine, R.; Arnaud, L.; Barbaire, M.; Broyer, M.; Clavier, Ch.; Compagnon, I.; Dugourd, Ph.; Maurelli, J.; Rayane, D.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed and tested a high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer coupled to a position sensitive detector for molecular beam deflection experiments. The major achievement of this new spectrometer is to provide a three-dimensional imaging (X and Y positions and time-of-flight) of the ion packet on the detector, with a high acquisition rate and a high resolution on both the mass and the position. The calibration of the experimental setup and its application to molecular beam deflection experiments are discussed

  7. Highly sensitive transient absorption imaging of graphene and graphene oxide in living cells and circulating blood

    OpenAIRE

    Junjie Li; Weixia Zhang; Ting-Fung Chung; Mikhail N. Slipchenko; Yong P. Chen; Ji-Xin Cheng; Chen Yang

    2015-01-01

    We report a transient absorption (TA) imaging method for fast visualization and quantitative layer analysis of graphene and GO. Forward and backward imaging of graphene on various substrates under ambient condition was imaged with a speed of 2??s per pixel. The TA intensity linearly increased with the layer number of graphene. Real-time TA imaging of GO in vitro with capability of quantitative analysis of intracellular concentration and ex vivo in circulating blood were demonstrated. These re...

  8. Use of a highly sensitive two-dimensional luminescence imaging system to monitor endogenous bioluminescence in plant leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flor-Henry Michel

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All living organisms emit spontaneous low-level bioluminescence, which can be increased in response to stress. Methods for imaging this ultra-weak luminescence have previously been limited by the sensitivity of the detection systems used. Results We developed a novel configuration of a cooled charge-coupled device (CCD for 2-dimensional imaging of light emission from biological material. In this study, we imaged photon emission from plant leaves. The equipment allowed short integration times for image acquisition, providing high resolution spatial and temporal information on bioluminescence. We were able to carry out time course imaging of both delayed chlorophyll fluorescence from whole leaves, and of low level wound-induced luminescence that we showed to be localised to sites of tissue damage. We found that wound-induced luminescence was chlorophyll-dependent and was enhanced at higher temperatures. Conclusions The data gathered on plant bioluminescence illustrate that the equipment described here represents an improvement in 2-dimensional luminescence imaging technology. Using this system, we identify chlorophyll as the origin of wound-induced luminescence from leaves.

  9. Sub-millimeter nuclear medical imaging with high sensitivity in positron emission tomography using β+γ coincidences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, C.; Habs, D.; Parodi, K.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2014-01-01

    We present a nuclear medical imaging technique, employing triple-γ trajectory intersections from β+-γ coincidences, able to reach sub-millimeter spatial resolution in 3 dimensions with a reduced requirement of reconstructed intersections per voxel compared to a conventional PET reconstruction analysis. This 'γ-PET' technique draws on specific β+-decaying isotopes, simultaneously emitting an additional photon. Exploiting the triple coincidence between the positron annihilation and the third photon, it is possible to separate the reconstructed 'true' events from background. In order to characterize this technique, Monte-Carlo simulations and image reconstructions have been performed. The achievable spatial resolution has been found to reach ca. 0.4 mm (FWHM) in each direction for the visualization of a 22Na point source. Only 40 intersections are sufficient for a reliable sub-millimeter image reconstruction of a point source embedded in a scattering volume of water inside a voxel volume of about 1 mm3 ('high-resolution mode'). Moreover, starting with an injected activity of 400 MBq for 76Br, the same number of only about 40 reconstructed intersections are needed in case of a larger voxel volume of 2 x 2 x 3 mm3 ('high-sensitivity mode'). Requiring such a low number of reconstructed events significantly reduces the required acquisition time for image reconstruction (in the above case to about 140 s) and thus may open up the perspective for a quasi real-time imaging.

  10. Highly sensitive transient absorption imaging of graphene and graphene oxide in living cells and circulating blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junjie; Zhang, Weixia; Chung, Ting-Fung; Slipchenko, Mikhail N; Chen, Yong P; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Yang, Chen

    2015-07-23

    We report a transient absorption (TA) imaging method for fast visualization and quantitative layer analysis of graphene and GO. Forward and backward imaging of graphene on various substrates under ambient condition was imaged with a speed of 2 μs per pixel. The TA intensity linearly increased with the layer number of graphene. Real-time TA imaging of GO in vitro with capability of quantitative analysis of intracellular concentration and ex vivo in circulating blood were demonstrated. These results suggest that TA microscopy is a valid tool for the study of graphene based materials.

  11. Highly sensitive magneto-motive photoacoustic and ultrasound (PAUS) imaging with cyclic excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnal, B; Wei, C-W; Li, J; Gao, X; O’Donnell, M

    2016-01-01

    Highly specific molecular imaging with photoacoustics (PA) must suppress background endogenous signals while maintaining signals from target nanoagents. Magneto-motive PA was introduced to perform motion-based background suppression using a low frequency magnetic field. Previous studies show suppression based on displacement magnitude can suffer if significant physiological motion is present. This limitation can be overcome using cyclic magneto-motive PA (cmmPA), where multiple cycles of an ac magnetic field are used and the coherence of detected displacements is the retrieved information. In this paper, we show a method to enhance the magnetic response of an electromagnet specifically for cmmPA. Several magnetic frequencies were tested and a simple model is proposed to describe displacement frequency dependence. By choosing optimal parameters based on this model, we show that the technique can detect a low number of tagged cells using either US-based or PA-based displacement estimation. In addition, robustness to physiological motion is demonstrated in a moving phantom. (paper)

  12. Quantification of Eosinophilic Granule Protein Deposition in Biopsies of Inflammatory Skin Diseases by Automated Image Analysis of Highly Sensitive Immunostaining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kiehl

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic granulocytes are major effector cells in inflammation. Extracellular deposition of toxic eosinophilic granule proteins (EGPs, but not the presence of intact eosinophils, is crucial for their functional effect in situ. As even recent morphometric approaches to quantify the involvement of eosinophils in inflammation have been only based on cell counting, we developed a new method for the cell‐independent quantification of EGPs by image analysis of immunostaining. Highly sensitive, automated immunohistochemistry was done on paraffin sections of inflammatory skin diseases with 4 different primary antibodies against EGPs. Image analysis of immunostaining was performed by colour translation, linear combination and automated thresholding. Using strictly standardized protocols, the assay was proven to be specific and accurate concerning segmentation in 8916 fields of 520 sections, well reproducible in repeated measurements and reliable over 16 weeks observation time. The method may be valuable for the cell‐independent segmentation of immunostaining in other applications as well.

  13. Vibrational Imaging with High Sensitivity via Epidetected Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkmer, Andreas; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Sunney Xie, X.

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally a novel epidetection scheme for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy that significantly improves the detection sensitivity. Calculations show that epidetected CARS (E-CARS) signals are present for scatterers smaller than the wavelength of light, whereas the large background signals from the surrounding bulk solvent are suppressed by destructive interference. E-CARS microscopy is capable of revealing small intracellular features that are otherwise buried by the strong water CARS signal

  14. Redox sensor proteins for highly sensitive direct imaging of intracellular redox state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Kazunori; Nagai, Takeharu; Nakano, Masahiro; Ichinose, Hiroshi; Nakabayashi, Takakazu; Ohta, Nobuhiro; Hisabori, Toru

    2015-02-13

    Intracellular redox state is a critical factor for fundamental cellular functions, including regulation of the activities of various metabolic enzymes as well as ROS production and elimination. Genetically-encoded fluorescent redox sensors, such as roGFP (Hanson, G. T., et al. (2004)) and Redoxfluor (Yano, T., et al. (2010)), have been developed to investigate the redox state of living cells. However, these sensors are not useful in cells that contain, for example, other colored pigments. We therefore intended to obtain simpler redox sensor proteins, and have developed oxidation-sensitive fluorescent proteins called Oba-Q (oxidation balance sensed quenching) proteins. Our sensor proteins derived from CFP and Sirius can be used to monitor the intracellular redox state as their fluorescence is drastically quenched upon oxidation. These blue-shifted spectra of the Oba-Q proteins enable us to monitor various redox states in conjunction with other sensor proteins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ion-implanted PLZT ceramics: a new high-sensitivity image storage medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peercy, P.S.; Land, C.E.

    1980-01-01

    Results were presented of our studies of photoferroelectric (PFE) image storage in H- and He-ion implanted PLZT (lead lanthanum zirconate titanate) ceramics which demonstrate that the photosensitivity of PLZT can be significantly increased by ion implantation in the ceramic surface to be exposed to image light. More recently, implantations of Ar and Ar + Ne into the PLZT surface have produced much greater photosensitivity enhancement. For example, the photosensitivity after implantation with 1.5 x 10 14 350 keV Ar/cm 2 + 1 x 10 15 500 keV Ne/cm 2 is increased by about four orders of magnitude over that of unimplanted PLZT. Measurements indicate that the photosensitivity enhancement in ion-implanted PLZT is controlled by implantation-produced disorder which results in marked decreases in dielectric constant and dark conductivity and changes in photoconductivity of the implanted layer. The effects of Ar- and Ar + Ne-implantation are presented along with a phenomenological model which describes the enhancement in photosensitivity obtained by ion implantation. This model takes into account both light- and implantation-induced changes in conductivity and gives quantitative agreement with the measured changes in the coercive voltage V/sub c/ as a function of near-uv light intensity for both unimplanted and implanted PLZT. The model, used in conjunction with calculations of the profiles of implantation-produced disorder, has provided the information needed for co-implanting ions of different masses, e.g., Ar and Ne, to improve photosensitivity

  16. A highly sensitive, single selective, fluorescent sensor for Al3+ detection and its application in living cell imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Xing-Pei; Sun, Shao-bo; Li, Ying-dong; Zhi, Li-hua; Wu, Wei-na; Wang, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    A new o-aminophenol-based fluorogenic chemosensor methyl 3,5-bis((E)-(2-hydroxyphenylimino)methyl)-4-hydroxybenzoate 1 have been synthesized by Schiff base condensation of methyl 3,5-diformyl-4-hydroxybenzoate with o-aminophenol, which exhibits high selectivity and sensitivity toward Al 3+ . Fluorescence titration studies of receptors 1 with different metal cations in CH 3 OH medium showed highly selective and sensitive towards Al 3+ ions even in the presence of other commonly coexisting metal ions. The detection limit of Al 3+ ions is at the parts per billion level. Interestingly, the Al(III) complex of 1 offered a large Stokes shift (>120 nm), which can miximize the selfquenching effect. In addition, possible utilization of this receptor as bio-imaging fluorescent probe to detect Al 3+ in human cervical HeLa cancer cell lines was also investigated by confocal fluorescence microscopy. - Highlights: • A new Schiff base chemosensor is reported. • The sensor for Al 3+ offers large Stokes shift. • The detection limit of Al 3+ in CH 3 OH solution is at the parts per billion level. • The utilization of sensor for the monitoring of Al 3+ levels in living cells was examined

  17. A highly sensitive, single selective, fluorescent sensor for Al{sup 3+} detection and its application in living cell imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Xing-Pei [Department of Physics and Chemistry, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 (China); Sun, Shao-bo; Li, Ying-dong [Institute of Integrated Traditional and Western Medicine, Gansu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhi, Li-hua [Department of Physics and Chemistry, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 (China); Wu, Wei-na, E-mail: wuwn08@hpu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Chemistry, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 (China); Wang, Yuan, E-mail: wangyuan08@hpu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Chemistry, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 (China)

    2014-11-15

    A new o-aminophenol-based fluorogenic chemosensor methyl 3,5-bis((E)-(2-hydroxyphenylimino)methyl)-4-hydroxybenzoate 1 have been synthesized by Schiff base condensation of methyl 3,5-diformyl-4-hydroxybenzoate with o-aminophenol, which exhibits high selectivity and sensitivity toward Al{sup 3+}. Fluorescence titration studies of receptors 1 with different metal cations in CH{sub 3}OH medium showed highly selective and sensitive towards Al{sup 3+} ions even in the presence of other commonly coexisting metal ions. The detection limit of Al{sup 3+} ions is at the parts per billion level. Interestingly, the Al(III) complex of 1 offered a large Stokes shift (>120 nm), which can miximize the selfquenching effect. In addition, possible utilization of this receptor as bio-imaging fluorescent probe to detect Al{sup 3+} in human cervical HeLa cancer cell lines was also investigated by confocal fluorescence microscopy. - Highlights: • A new Schiff base chemosensor is reported. • The sensor for Al{sup 3+} offers large Stokes shift. • The detection limit of Al{sup 3+} in CH{sub 3}OH solution is at the parts per billion level. • The utilization of sensor for the monitoring of Al{sup 3+} levels in living cells was examined.

  18. Highly sensitive detection of the soft tissues based on refraction contrast by in-plane diffraction-enhanced imaging CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuasa, Tetsuya; Hashimoto, Eiko; Maksimenko, Anton; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Arai, Yoshinori; Shimao, Daisuke; Ichihara, Shu; Ando, Masami

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the recently proposed computed tomography (CT) technique based on refractive effects for biomedical use, which reconstructs the in-plane refractive-index gradient vector field in a cross-sectional plane of interest by detecting the angular deviation of the beam, refracted by a sample, from the incident beam, using the diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) method. The CT has advantages for delineating biological weakly absorbing soft tissues over the conventional absorption-contrast CT because of the use of phase sensitive detection. The paper aims to define the imaging scheme rigidly and to demonstrate its efficacy for non-destructive measurement of biomedical soft-tissue samples without imaging agent. We first describe the imaging principle of in-plane DEI-CT from the physico-mathematical viewpoints in detail, and investigate what physical quantities are extracted from the reconstructed images. Then, we introduce the imaging system using the synchrotron radiation as a light source, constructed at beamline BL-14B in KEK, Japan. Finally, we demonstrate the advantage of the refraction-based image for non-destructive analysis of biological sample by investigating the image of human breast cancer tumors obtained using the imaging system. Here, the refraction- and the apparent absorption-based images obtained simultaneously by the in-plane DEI-CT are compared. Also, the conventional absorption-based image obtained using micro-computed tomography (μCT) imaging system is compared with them. Thereby, it is shown that the refraction contrast much more sensitively delineates the soft tissues than the absorption contrast. In addition, the radiologic-histologic correlation study not only validates the efficacy for imaging soft tissues, but also produces the potential that the pathological inspection for the breast cancer tumors may be feasible non-destructively

  19. TU-G-207-03: High Spatial Resolution and High Sensitivity X-Ray Fluorescence Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, L.

    2015-01-01

    Last few years has witnessed the development of novel of X-ray imaging modalities, such as spectral CT, phase contrast CT, and X-ray acoustic/fluorescence/luminescence imaging. This symposium will present the recent advances of these emerging X-ray imaging modalities and update the attendees with knowledge in various related topics, including X-ray photon-counting detectors, X-ray physics underlying the emerging applications beyond the traditional X-ray imaging, image reconstruction for the novel modalities, characterization and evaluation of the systems, and their practical implications. In addition, the concept and practical aspects of X-ray activatable targeted nanoparticles for molecular X-ray imaging will be discussed in the context of X-ray fluorescence and luminescence CT. Learning Objectives: Present background knowledge of various emerging X-ray imaging techniques, such as spectral CT, phase contrast CT and X-ray fluorescence/luminescence CT. Discuss the practical need, technical aspects and current status of the emerging X-ray imaging modalities. Describe utility and future impact of the new generation of X-ray imaging applications

  20. High-Sensitivity Spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, T. D.

    1982-01-01

    Selected high-sensitivity spectrophotometric methods are examined, and comparisons are made of their relative strengths and weaknesses and the circumstances for which each can best be applied. Methods include long path cells, noise reduction, laser intracavity absorption, thermocouple calorimetry, photoacoustic methods, and thermo-optical methods.…

  1. High-resolution and high sensitivity mesoscopic fluorescence tomography based on de-scanning EMCCD: System design and thick tissue imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Mehmet Saadeddin

    Optical microscopy has been one of the essential tools for biological studies for decades, however, its application areas was limited to superficial investigation due to strong scattering in live tissues. Even though advanced techniques such as confocal or multiphoton methods have been recently developed to penetrate beyond a few hundreds of microns deep in tissues, they still cannot perform in the mesoscopic regime (millimeter scale) without using destructive sample preparation protocols such as clearing techniques. They provide rich cellular information; however, they cannot be readily employed to investigate the biological processes at larger scales. Herein, we will present our effort to establish a novel imaging approach that can quantify molecular expression in intact tissues, well beyond the current microscopy depth limits. Mesoscopic Fluorescence Molecular Tomography (MFMT) is an emerging imaging modality that offers unique potential for the non-invasive molecular assessment of thick in-vitro and in-vivo live tissues. This novel imaging modality is based on an optical inverse problem that allows for retrieval of the quantitative spatial distribution of fluorescent tagged bio-markers at millimeter depth. MFMT is well-suited for in-vivo subsurface tissue imaging and thick bio-printed specimens due to its high sensitivity and fast acquisition times, as well as relatively large fields of view. Herein, we will first demonstrate the potential of this technique using our first generation MFMT system applied to multiplexed reporter gene imaging (in-vitro) and determination of Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) agent bio-distribution in a mouse model (in-vivo). Second, we will present the design rationale, in silico benchmarking, and experimental validation of a second generation MFMT (2GMFMT) system. We will demonstrate the gain in resolution and sensitivity achieved due to the de-scanned dense detector configuration implemented. The potential of this novel platform will be

  2. Highly Sensitive Optical Receivers

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Kerstin

    2006-01-01

    Highly Sensitive Optical Receivers primarily treats the circuit design of optical receivers with external photodiodes. Continuous-mode and burst-mode receivers are compared. The monograph first summarizes the basics of III/V photodetectors, transistor and noise models, bit-error rate, sensitivity and analog circuit design, thus enabling readers to understand the circuits described in the main part of the book. In order to cover the topic comprehensively, detailed descriptions of receivers for optical data communication in general and, in particular, optical burst-mode receivers in deep-sub-µm CMOS are presented. Numerous detailed and elaborate illustrations facilitate better understanding.

  3. Highly sensitive and quantitative FRET-FLIM imaging in single dendritic spines using improved non-radiative YFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakoshi, Hideji; Lee, Seok-Jin; Yasuda, Ryohei

    2008-08-01

    Two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (TPFLIM) enables the quantitative measurements of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in small subcellular compartments in light scattering tissue. We evaluated and optimized the FRET pair of mEGFP (monomeric EGFP with the A206K mutation) and REACh (non-radiative YFP variants) for TPFLIM. We characterized several mutants of REACh in terms of their "darkness," and their ability to act as a FRET acceptor for mEGFP in HeLa cells and hippocampal neurons. Since the commonly used monomeric mutation A206K increases the brightness of REACh, we introduced a different monomeric mutation (F223R) which does not affect the brightness. Also, we found that the folding efficiency of original REACh, as measured by the fluorescence lifetime of a mEGFP-REACh tandem dimer, was low and variable from cell to cell. Introducing two folding mutations (F46L, Q69M) into REACh increased the folding efficiency by approximately 50%, and reduced the variability of FRET signal. Pairing mEGFP with the new REACh (super-REACh, or sREACh) improved the signal-to-noise ratio compared to the mEGFP-mRFP or mEGFP-original REACh pair by approximately 50%. Using this new pair, we demonstrated that the fraction of actin monomers in filamentous and globular forms in single dendritic spines can be quantitatively measured with high sensitivity. Thus, the mEGFP-sREACh pair is suited for quantitative FRET measurement by TPFLIM, and enables us to measure protein-protein interactions in individual dendritic spines in brain slices with high sensitivity.

  4. Limited magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine has high sensitivity for detection of acute fractures, infection, and malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Benjamin; Fintelmann, Florian J.; Kamath, Ravi S.; Kattapuram, Susan V.; Rosenthal, Daniel I.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine how a limited protocol MR examination compares to a full conventional MR examination for the detection of non-degenerative pathology such as acute fracture, infection, and malignancy. A sample of 349 non-contrast MR exams was selected retrospectively containing a 3:1:1:1 distribution of negative/degenerative change only, acute fracture, infection, and malignancy. This resulted in an even distribution of pathology and non-pathology. A limited protocol MR exam was simulated by extracting T1-weighted sagittal and T2-weighted fat-saturated (or STIR) sagittal sequences from each exam and submitting them for blinded review by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. The exams were evaluated for the presence or absence of non-degenerative pathology. Interpretation of the limited exam was compared to the original report of the full examination. If either reader disagreed with the original report, the case was submitted for an unblinded adjudication process with the participation of a third musculoskeletal radiologist to establish a consensus diagnosis. There were five false negatives for a sensitivity of 96.9 % for the limited protocol MR exam. Infection in the psoas, paraspinal muscles, and sacroiliac joint, as well as acute fractures in transverse processes and sacrum were missed by one or more readers. No cases of malignancy were missed. Overall diagnostic accuracy was 96.0 % (335/349). MR imaging of the lumbar spine limited to sagittal T1-weighted and sagittal T2 fat-saturated (or STIR) sequences has high sensitivity for the detection of acute fracture, infection, or malignancy compared to a conventional MR examination. (orig.)

  5. Limited magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine has high sensitivity for detection of acute fractures, infection, and malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Benjamin; Fintelmann, Florian J.; Kamath, Ravi S.; Kattapuram, Susan V.; Rosenthal, Daniel I. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-12-15

    The objective of this study is to determine how a limited protocol MR examination compares to a full conventional MR examination for the detection of non-degenerative pathology such as acute fracture, infection, and malignancy. A sample of 349 non-contrast MR exams was selected retrospectively containing a 3:1:1:1 distribution of negative/degenerative change only, acute fracture, infection, and malignancy. This resulted in an even distribution of pathology and non-pathology. A limited protocol MR exam was simulated by extracting T1-weighted sagittal and T2-weighted fat-saturated (or STIR) sagittal sequences from each exam and submitting them for blinded review by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. The exams were evaluated for the presence or absence of non-degenerative pathology. Interpretation of the limited exam was compared to the original report of the full examination. If either reader disagreed with the original report, the case was submitted for an unblinded adjudication process with the participation of a third musculoskeletal radiologist to establish a consensus diagnosis. There were five false negatives for a sensitivity of 96.9 % for the limited protocol MR exam. Infection in the psoas, paraspinal muscles, and sacroiliac joint, as well as acute fractures in transverse processes and sacrum were missed by one or more readers. No cases of malignancy were missed. Overall diagnostic accuracy was 96.0 % (335/349). MR imaging of the lumbar spine limited to sagittal T1-weighted and sagittal T2 fat-saturated (or STIR) sequences has high sensitivity for the detection of acute fracture, infection, or malignancy compared to a conventional MR examination. (orig.)

  6. High resolution, high sensitivity imaging and analysis of minerals and inclusions (fluid and melt) using the new CSIRO-GEMOC nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, C.G.; McInnes, B.M.; Van Achterbergh, E.; Williams, P.J.; Dong, G.; Zaw, K.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The new CSIRO-GEMOC Nuclear Microprobe (NMP) The instrument was designed specifically for minerals analysis and imaging and to achieve ppm to sub-ppm sensitivity at a spatial resolution of 1-2 μm using X-rays and y-rays induced by MeV energy ion beams. The key feature of the design is a unique magnetic quadrupole quintuplet ion focussing system that combines high current with high spatial resolution (Ryan et al., 1999). These design goals have been achieved or exceeded. On the first day of operation, a spot-size of 1.3 μm was obtained at a beam current of 0.5 nA, suitable for fluid inclusion analysis and imaging. The spot-size grows to just 1.8 μm at 10 nA (3 MeV protons), ideal for mineralogical samples with detection limits down to 0.2 ppm achieved in quantitative, high resolution, trace element images. Applications of the NMP include: research into ore deposit processes through trace element geochemistry, mineralogy and fluid inclusion analysis of ancient deposits and active sea-floor environments, ore characterization, and fundamental studies of mantle processes and extraterrestrial material. Quantitative True Elemental Imaging Dynamic Analysis is a method for projecting quantitative major and trace element images from proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) data obtained using the NMP (Ryan et al., 1995). The method un-mixes full elemental spectral signatures to produce quantitative images that can be directly interrogated for the concentrations of all elements in selected areas or line projections, etc. Fluid Inclusion Analysis and Imaging The analysis of fluids trapped as fluid inclusions in minerals holds the key to understanding ore metal pathways and ore formation processes. PIXE analysis using the NMP provides a direct non-destructive method to determine the composition of these trapped fluids with detection limits down to 20 ppm. However, some PIXE results have been controversial, such as the strong partitioning of Cu into the vapour phase (e

  7. Highly Specific and Sensitive Fluorescent Nanoprobes for Image-Guided Resection of Sub-Millimeter Peritoneal Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colby, Aaron H; Berry, Samantha M; Moran, Ann M; Pasion, Kristine Amber; Liu, Rong; Colson, Yolonda L; Ruiz-Opazo, Nelson; Grinstaff, Mark W; Herrera, Victoria L M

    2017-02-28

    A current challenge in the treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis is the inability to detect, visualize, and resect small or microscopic tumors of pancreatic, ovarian, or mesothelial origin. In these diseases, the completeness of primary tumor resection is directly correlated with patient survival, and hence, identifying small sub-millimeter tumors (i.e., disseminated disease) is critical. Thus, new imaging techniques and probes are needed to improve cytoreductive surgery and patient outcomes. Highly fluorescent rhodamine-labeled expansile nanoparticles (HFR-eNPs) are described for use as a visual aid during cytoreductive surgery of pancreatic carcinomatosis. The covalent incorporation of rhodamine into ∼30 nm eNPs increases the fluorescent signal compared to free rhodamine, thereby affording a brighter and more effective probe than would be achieved by a single rhodamine molecule. Using the intraperitoneal route of administration, HFR-eNPs localize to regions of large (∼1 cm), sub-centimeter, and sub-millimeter intraperitoneal tumor in three different animal models, including pancreatic, mesothelioma, and ovarian carcinoma. Tumoral localization of the HFR-eNPs depends on both the material property (i.e., eNP polymer) as well as the surface chemistry (anionic surfactant vs PEGylated noncharged surfactant). In a rat model of pancreatic carcinomatosis, HFR-eNP identification of tumor is validated against gold-standard histopathological analysis to reveal that HFR-eNPs possess high specificity (99%) and sensitivity (92%) for tumors, in particular, sub-centimeter and microscopic sub-millimeter tumors, with an overall accuracy of 95%. Finally, as a proof-of-concept, HFR-eNPs are used to guide the resection of pancreatic tumors in a rat model of peritoneal carcinomatosis.

  8. Methodological approaches to planar and volumetric scintigraphic imaging of small volume targets with high spatial resolution and sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejia, J.; Galvis-Alonso, O.Y.; Braga, J.; Correa, R.; Leite, J.P.; Simoes, M.V.

    2009-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a non-invasive imaging technique, which provides information reporting the functional states of tissues. SPECT imaging has been used as a diagnostic tool in several human disorders and can be used in animal models of diseases for physiopathological, genomic and drug discovery studies. However, most of the experimental models used in research involve rodents, which are at least one order of magnitude smaller in linear dimensions than man. Consequently, images of targets obtained with conventional gamma-cameras and collimators have poor spatial resolution and statistical quality. We review the methodological approaches developed in recent years in order to obtain images of small targets with good spatial resolution and sensitivity. Multi pinhole, coded mask- and slit-based collimators are presented as alternative approaches to improve image quality. In combination with appropriate decoding algorithms, these collimators permit a significant reduction of the time needed to register the projections used to make 3-D representations of the volumetric distribution of target's radiotracers. Simultaneously, they can be used to minimize artifacts and blurring arising when single pinhole collimators are used. Representation images are presented, which illustrate the use of these collimators. We also comment on the use of coded masks to attain tomographic resolution with a single projection, as discussed by some investigators since their introduction to obtain near-field images. We conclude this review by showing that the use of appropriate hardware and software tools adapted to conventional gamma-cameras can be of great help in obtaining relevant functional information in experiments using small animals. (author)

  9. Methodological approaches to planar and volumetric scintigraphic imaging of small volume targets with high spatial resolution and sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia, J.; Galvis-Alonso, O.Y. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Biologia Molecular], e-mail: mejia_famerp@yahoo.com.br; Braga, J. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Div. de Astrofisica; Correa, R. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Ciencia Espacial e Atmosferica; Leite, J.P. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Neurologia, Psiquiatria e Psicologia Medica; Simoes, M.V. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Clinica Medica

    2009-08-15

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a non-invasive imaging technique, which provides information reporting the functional states of tissues. SPECT imaging has been used as a diagnostic tool in several human disorders and can be used in animal models of diseases for physiopathological, genomic and drug discovery studies. However, most of the experimental models used in research involve rodents, which are at least one order of magnitude smaller in linear dimensions than man. Consequently, images of targets obtained with conventional gamma-cameras and collimators have poor spatial resolution and statistical quality. We review the methodological approaches developed in recent years in order to obtain images of small targets with good spatial resolution and sensitivity. Multi pinhole, coded mask- and slit-based collimators are presented as alternative approaches to improve image quality. In combination with appropriate decoding algorithms, these collimators permit a significant reduction of the time needed to register the projections used to make 3-D representations of the volumetric distribution of target's radiotracers. Simultaneously, they can be used to minimize artifacts and blurring arising when single pinhole collimators are used. Representation images are presented, which illustrate the use of these collimators. We also comment on the use of coded masks to attain tomographic resolution with a single projection, as discussed by some investigators since their introduction to obtain near-field images. We conclude this review by showing that the use of appropriate hardware and software tools adapted to conventional gamma-cameras can be of great help in obtaining relevant functional information in experiments using small animals. (author)

  10. Methodological approaches to planar and volumetric scintigraphic imaging of small volume targets with high spatial resolution and sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mejia

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT is a non-invasive imaging technique, which provides information reporting the functional states of tissues. SPECT imaging has been used as a diagnostic tool in several human disorders and can be used in animal models of diseases for physiopathological, genomic and drug discovery studies. However, most of the experimental models used in research involve rodents, which are at least one order of magnitude smaller in linear dimensions than man. Consequently, images of targets obtained with conventional gamma-cameras and collimators have poor spatial resolution and statistical quality. We review the methodological approaches developed in recent years in order to obtain images of small targets with good spatial resolution and sensitivity. Multipinhole, coded mask- and slit-based collimators are presented as alternative approaches to improve image quality. In combination with appropriate decoding algorithms, these collimators permit a significant reduction of the time needed to register the projections used to make 3-D representations of the volumetric distribution of target’s radiotracers. Simultaneously, they can be used to minimize artifacts and blurring arising when single pinhole collimators are used. Representation images are presented, which illustrate the use of these collimators. We also comment on the use of coded masks to attain tomographic resolution with a single projection, as discussed by some investigators since their introduction to obtain near-field images. We conclude this review by showing that the use of appropriate hardware and software tools adapted to conventional gamma-cameras can be of great help in obtaining relevant functional information in experiments using small animals.

  11. Gold nanocage decorated pH-sensitive micelle for highly effective photothermo-chemotherapy and photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guoyong; Xiao, Hong; Li, Xiaoxia; Huang, Yi; Song, Wei; Song, Liang; Chen, Meiwan; Cheng, Du; Shuai, Xintao

    2017-12-01

    A pH-sensitive copolymer PAsp(DIP)-b-PAsp(MEA) (PDPM) was synthesized and self-assembled to micelle loading chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin (DOX) and introducing a gold nanocage structure for photothermo-chemotherapy and photoacoustic imaging. After further surface modification with polyethylene glycol (PEG), the DOX-loaded pH-sensitive gold nanocage (D-PGNC) around 100 nm possessed a uniform spherical structure with a pH-sensitive core of PAsp(DIP) incorporating DOX, an interlayer crosslinked via disulfide bonds and decorated with discontinuous gold shell, and a PEG corona. The release of DOX from D-PGNC was turned off in bloodstream due to the cross-linking and gold decoration of interlayer but turned on inside tumor tissue by multiple stimulations including the low pH value of tumor tissue (≈6.8), the low lysosomal pH value of cancer cells (≈5.0) and near-infrared (NIR) irradiation. The gold nanocage receiving NIR irradiation could generate hyperthermia to ablate tumor cells. Moreover, the photoacoustic (PA) imaging and analysis of DOX fluorescence inside tumor tissue demonstrated that photothermal therapy based on the gold nanocage effectively drove DOX penetration inside tumor. Owing to the rapid intratumor release and deep tissue penetration of drug favorable for killing cancer cells survived the photothermal therapy, the combined therapy based on D-PGNC via NIR irradiation exhibited a synergistic treatment effect superior to either chemotherapy or NIR-induced photothermal therapy alone. The novelty of the manuscript is its multifunctional system which incorporates anticancer drug DOX in its pH-sensitive core and acts as a template to introduce a gold nanocage. This nanomedicine presents potentials of sequestrating drug molecules in blood circulation but releasing them inside tumor upon responding to the acidic microenvironment therein. Exposure to NIR laser further expedited the pH-sensitive DOX release and promoted DOX penetration into cancer

  12. Reflective type objective based spectral-domain phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography for high-sensitive structural and functional imaging of cochlear microstructures through intact bone of an excised guinea pig cochlea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhash, Hrebesh M.; Wang, Ruikang K.; Chen, Fangyi; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2013-03-01

    Most of the optical coherence tomographic (OCT) systems for high resolution imaging of biological specimens are based on refractive type microscope objectives, which are optimized for specific wave length of the optical source. In this study, we present the feasibility of using commercially available reflective type objective for high sensitive and high resolution structural and functional imaging of cochlear microstructures of an excised guinea pig through intact temporal bone. Unlike conventional refractive type microscopic objective, reflective objective are free from chromatic aberrations due to their all-reflecting nature and can support a broadband of spectrum with very high light collection efficiency.

  13. Analytical electron microscope based on scanning transmission electron microscope with wavelength dispersive x-ray spectroscopy to realize highly sensitive elemental imaging especially for light elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koguchi, Masanari; Tsuneta, Ruriko; Anan, Yoshihiro; Nakamae, Koji

    2017-01-01

    An analytical electron microscope based on the scanning transmission electron microscope with wavelength dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (STEM-WDX) to realize highly sensitive elemental imaging especially for light elements has been developed. In this study, a large-solid-angle multi-capillary x-rays lens with a focal length of 5 mm, long-time data acquisition (e.g. longer than 26 h), and a drift-free system made it possible to visualize boron-dopant images in a Si substrate at a detection limit of 0.2 atomic percent. (paper)

  14. The usefulness of high-resolution three-dimensional dynamic MR imaging with sensitivity encoding for evaluating extrahepatic bile duct cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Kon; Ko, Seog Wan [Chonbuk National University Hospital and Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-15

    We assessed the usefulness of high-resolution 3D dynamic MR imaging with sensitivity encoding (mSENSE) for evaluating bile duct cancer. Twenty-three patients with extrahepatic bile duct cancer underwent multiphasic 3D GRE MRI, including two delayed phases without and with mSENSE. The first delayed phases were obtained with volumetric interpolated breath-hold imaging (VIBE) and then the higher in-place resolution images (320 X 168) were obtained using mSENSE. The two delayed phase images were compared quantitatively by measuring the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of liver and tumor, the liver-visceral fat contrast and the tumor-visceral fat contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR); the two delayed phase images were compared qualitatively by evaluating the sharpness of the hepatic vessels and bile duct, the artifacts and the conspicuity of bile duct cancer. The quantitative results with mSENSE image were significantly better than those with conventional VIBE. Though the clarity of the intrahepatic vessels and the intrahepatic bile duct, and the artifacts did not differ significantly between the two images ( {rho} > 0.05), the clarity of the extrahepatic vessels, the extrahepatic bile duct and the bile duct cancer were better on the mSENSE image than on the VIBE ( {rho} < 0.05). The higher in-plane resolution 3D GRE image obtained with mSENSE was of a better image quality than the conventional VIBE images. This technique shows promise for use as a comprehensive exam for assessing bile duct cancer.

  15. The usefulness of high-resolution three-dimensional dynamic MR imaging with sensitivity encoding for evaluating extrahepatic bile duct cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Kon; Ko, Seog Wan

    2006-01-01

    We assessed the usefulness of high-resolution 3D dynamic MR imaging with sensitivity encoding (mSENSE) for evaluating bile duct cancer. Twenty-three patients with extrahepatic bile duct cancer underwent multiphasic 3D GRE MRI, including two delayed phases without and with mSENSE. The first delayed phases were obtained with volumetric interpolated breath-hold imaging (VIBE) and then the higher in-place resolution images (320 X 168) were obtained using mSENSE. The two delayed phase images were compared quantitatively by measuring the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of liver and tumor, the liver-visceral fat contrast and the tumor-visceral fat contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR); the two delayed phase images were compared qualitatively by evaluating the sharpness of the hepatic vessels and bile duct, the artifacts and the conspicuity of bile duct cancer. The quantitative results with mSENSE image were significantly better than those with conventional VIBE. Though the clarity of the intrahepatic vessels and the intrahepatic bile duct, and the artifacts did not differ significantly between the two images ( ρ > 0.05), the clarity of the extrahepatic vessels, the extrahepatic bile duct and the bile duct cancer were better on the mSENSE image than on the VIBE ( ρ < 0.05). The higher in-plane resolution 3D GRE image obtained with mSENSE was of a better image quality than the conventional VIBE images. This technique shows promise for use as a comprehensive exam for assessing bile duct cancer

  16. SU-G-IeP3-07: High-Resolution, High-Sensitivity Imaging and Quantification of Intratumoral Distributions of Gold Nanoparticles Using a Benchtop L-Shell XRF Imaging System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar, N; Diagaradjane, P; Krishnan, S; Cho, S [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Reynoso, F [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the ability to perform high-resolution imaging and quantification of sparse distributions of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) within ex vivo tumor samples using a highly-sensitive benchtop L-shell x-ray fluorescence (XRF) imaging system. Methods: An optimized L-shell XRF imaging system was assembled using a tungsten-target x-ray source (operated at 62 kVp and 45 mA). The x-rays were filtered (copper: 0.08 mm & aluminum: 0.04 mm) and collimated (lead: 5 cm thickness, 3 cm aperture diameter) into a cone-beam in order to irradiate small samples or objects. A collimated (stainless steel: 4 cm thickness, 2 mm aperture diameter) silicon drift detector, capable of 2D translation, was placed at 90° with respect to the beam to acquire XRF/scatter spectra from regions of interest. Spectral processing involved extracting XRF signal from background, followed by attenuation correction using a Compton scatter-based normalization algorithm. Calibration phantoms with water/GNPs (0 and 0.00001–10 mg/cm{sup 3}) were used to determine the detection limit of the system at a 10-second acquisition time. The system was then used to map the distribution of GNPs within a 12×11×2 mm{sup 3} slice excised from the center of a GNP-loaded ex vivo murine tumor sample; a total of 110 voxels (2.65×10{sup −3} cm{sup 3}) were imaged with 1.3-mm spatial resolution. Results: The detection limit of the current cone-beam benchtop L-shell XRF system was 0.003 mg/cm{sup 3} (3 ppm). Intratumoral GNP concentrations ranging from 0.003 mg/cm{sup 3} (3 ppm) to a maximum of 0.055 mg/cm{sup 3} (55 ppm) and average of 0.0093 mg/cm{sup 3} (9.3 ppm) were imaged successfully within the ex vivo tumor slice. Conclusion: The developed cone-beam benchtop L-shell XRF imaging system can immediately be used for imaging of ex vivo tumor samples containing low concentrations of GNPs. With minor finetuning/optimization, the system can be directly adapted for performing routine preclinical in vivo

  17. A study of the sensitivity of an imaging telescope (GRITS) for high energy gamma-ray astronomy. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yearian, M.R.

    1990-08-01

    When a gamma-ray telescope is placed in Earth orbit, it is bombarded by a flux of cosmic protons much greater than the flux of interesting gammas. These protons can interact in the telescope's thermal shielding to produce detectable gamma rays, most of which are vetoed. Since the proton flux is so high, the unvetoed gamma rays constitute a significant background relative to some weak sources. This background increases the observing time required to pinpoint some sources and entirely obscures other sources. Although recent telescopes have been designed to minimize this background, its strength and spectral characteristics were not previously calculated in detail. Monte Carlo calculations are presented which characterize the strength, spectrum and other features of the cosmic proton background using FLUKA, a hadronic cascade program. Several gamma-ray telescopes, including SAS-2, EGRET and the Gamma Ray Imaging Telescope System (GRITS), are analyzed, and their proton-induced backgrounds are characterized. In all cases, the backgrounds are either shown to be low relative to interesting signals or suggestions are made which would reduce the background sufficiently to leave the telescope unimpaired. In addition, several limiting cases are examined for comparison to previous estimates and calibration measurements

  18. High energy positron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Shengzu

    2003-01-01

    The technique of High Energy Positron Imaging (HEPI) is the new development and extension of Positron Emission Tomography (PET). It consists of High Energy Collimation Imaging (HECI), Dual Head Coincidence Detection Imaging (DHCDI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET). We describe the history of the development and the basic principle of the imaging methods of HEPI in details in this paper. Finally, the new technique of the imaging fusion, which combined the anatomical image and the functional image together are also introduced briefly

  19. High-Sensitivity Semiconductor Photocathodes for Space-Born UV Photon-Counting and Imaging, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Many UV photon-counting and imaging applications, including space-borne astronomy, missile tracking and guidance, UV spectroscopy for chemical/biological...

  20. Polarimetric imaging of retinal disease by polarization sensitive SLO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Masahiro; Elsner, Ann E.; Iwasaki, Takuya; Goto, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    Polarimetry imaging is used to evaluate different features of the macular disease. Polarimetry images were recorded using a commercially- available polarization-sensitive scanning laser opthalmoscope at 780 nm (PS-SLO, GDx-N). From data sets of PS-SLO, we computed average reflectance image, depolarized light images, and ratio-depolarized light images. The average reflectance image is the grand mean of all input polarization states. The depolarized light image is the minimum of crossed channel. The ratio-depolarized light image is a ratio between the average reflectance image and depolarized light image, and was used to compensate for variation of brightness. Each polarimetry image is compared with the autofluorescence image at 800 nm (NIR-AF) and autofluorescence image at 500 nm (SW-AF). We evaluated four eyes with geographic atrophy in age related macular degeneration, one eye with retinal pigment epithelium hyperplasia, and two eyes with chronic central serous chorioretinopathy. Polarization analysis could selectively emphasize different features of the retina. Findings in ratio depolarized light image had similarities and differences with NIR-AF images. Area of hyper-AF in NIR-AF images showed high intensity areas in the ratio depolarized light image, representing melanin accumulation. Areas of hypo-AF in NIR-AF images showed low intensity areas in the ratio depolarized light images, representing melanin loss. Drusen were high-intensity areas in the ratio depolarized light image, but NIR-AF images was insensitive to the presence of drusen. Unlike NIR-AF images, SW-AF images showed completely different features from the ratio depolarized images. Polarization sensitive imaging is an effective tool as a non-invasive assessment of macular disease.

  1. Highly fluorescent and morphology-controllable graphene quantum dots-chitosan hybrid xerogels for in vivo imaging and pH-sensitive drug carrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Ouyang; Tao, Yongxin; Qin, Yong [Advanced Catalysis and Green Manufacturing Collaborative Innovation Center, School of Petrochemical Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China); Chen, Chuanxiang [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University of Science and Technology, Zhenjiang 212003 (China); Pan, Yan; Deng, Linhong [Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Health Sciences, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China); Liu, Li [School of pharmaceutical Engineering & Life Science, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China); Kong, Yong, E-mail: yzkongyong@126.com [Advanced Catalysis and Green Manufacturing Collaborative Innovation Center, School of Petrochemical Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China)

    2016-10-01

    Highly fluorescent graphene quantum dots (GQDs)-chitosan (CS) hybrid xerogels (GQDs-CS) were facilely synthesized, and the morphology of GQDs-CS was controllable by varying the content of GQDs in the xerogel. The GQDs-CS exhibited a porous and three-dimensional (3D) network structure when the content of GQDs reached 43% (wt%) in the xerogel, which was beneficial for drug loading and sustained release. The as-prepared GQDs-CS could also be applied for in vivo imaging since it showed strong blue, green and red luminescence under excitation of varying wavelengths. Moreover, the pH-induced protonation/deprotonation of the –NH{sub 2} groups on CS chains can result in a pH-dependent drug delivery behavior of the GQDs-CS hybrid xerogel. - Graphical abstract: Highly fluorescent and morphology-controllable graphene quantum dots-chitosan hybrid xerogels for in vivo imaging and pH-sensitive drug carrier. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Highly fluorescent GQDs-CS hybrid xerogels were facilely synthesized. • The as-made xerogels exhibited various morphologies with different GQDs contents. • The GQDs-CS exhibited a porous and 3D network when the content of GQDs reached 43%. • The GQDs-CS could be applied for in vivo imaging since it showed strong luminescence. • The protonation/deprotonation of –NH{sub 2} on CS result in a pH-dependent drug delivery.

  2. Highly fluorescent and morphology-controllable graphene quantum dots-chitosan hybrid xerogels for in vivo imaging and pH-sensitive drug carrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv, Ouyang; Tao, Yongxin; Qin, Yong; Chen, Chuanxiang; Pan, Yan; Deng, Linhong; Liu, Li; Kong, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Highly fluorescent graphene quantum dots (GQDs)-chitosan (CS) hybrid xerogels (GQDs-CS) were facilely synthesized, and the morphology of GQDs-CS was controllable by varying the content of GQDs in the xerogel. The GQDs-CS exhibited a porous and three-dimensional (3D) network structure when the content of GQDs reached 43% (wt%) in the xerogel, which was beneficial for drug loading and sustained release. The as-prepared GQDs-CS could also be applied for in vivo imaging since it showed strong blue, green and red luminescence under excitation of varying wavelengths. Moreover, the pH-induced protonation/deprotonation of the –NH_2 groups on CS chains can result in a pH-dependent drug delivery behavior of the GQDs-CS hybrid xerogel. - Graphical abstract: Highly fluorescent and morphology-controllable graphene quantum dots-chitosan hybrid xerogels for in vivo imaging and pH-sensitive drug carrier. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Highly fluorescent GQDs-CS hybrid xerogels were facilely synthesized. • The as-made xerogels exhibited various morphologies with different GQDs contents. • The GQDs-CS exhibited a porous and 3D network when the content of GQDs reached 43%. • The GQDs-CS could be applied for in vivo imaging since it showed strong luminescence. • The protonation/deprotonation of –NH_2 on CS result in a pH-dependent drug delivery.

  3. High order depletion sensitivity analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naguib, K.; Adib, M.; Morcos, H.N.

    2002-01-01

    A high order depletion sensitivity method was applied to calculate the sensitivities of build-up of actinides in the irradiated fuel due to cross-section uncertainties. An iteration method based on Taylor series expansion was applied to construct stationary principle, from which all orders of perturbations were calculated. The irradiated EK-10 and MTR-20 fuels at their maximum burn-up of 25% and 65% respectively were considered for sensitivity analysis. The results of calculation show that, in case of EK-10 fuel (low burn-up), the first order sensitivity was found to be enough to perform an accuracy of 1%. While in case of MTR-20 (high burn-up) the fifth order was found to provide 3% accuracy. A computer code SENS was developed to provide the required calculations

  4. A high sensitivity 20Mfps CMOS image sensor with readout speed of 1Tpixel/sec for visualization of ultra-high speed phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, R.; Sugawa, S.

    2017-02-01

    Ultra-high speed (UHS) CMOS image sensors with on-chop analog memories placed on the periphery of pixel array for the visualization of UHS phenomena are overviewed in this paper. The developed UHS CMOS image sensors consist of 400H×256V pixels and 128 memories/pixel, and the readout speed of 1Tpixel/sec is obtained, leading to 10 Mfps full resolution video capturing with consecutive 128 frames, and 20 Mfps half resolution video capturing with consecutive 256 frames. The first development model has been employed in the high speed video camera and put in practical use in 2012. By the development of dedicated process technologies, photosensitivity improvement and power consumption reduction were simultaneously achieved, and the performance improved version has been utilized in the commercialized high-speed video camera since 2015 that offers 10 Mfps with ISO16,000 photosensitivity. Due to the improved photosensitivity, clear images can be captured and analyzed even under low light condition, such as under a microscope as well as capturing of UHS light emission phenomena.

  5. Culture-free, highly sensitive, quantitative detection of bacteria from minimally processed samples using fluorescence imaging by smartphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Sajal; Lee, Won-Il; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2018-06-30

    A critical unmet need in the diagnosis of bacterial infections, which remain a major cause of human morbidity and mortality, is the detection of scarce bacterial pathogens in a variety of samples in a rapid and quantitative manner. Herein, we demonstrate smartphone-based detection of Staphylococcus aureus in a culture-free, rapid, quantitative manner from minimally processed liquid samples using aptamer-functionalized fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles. The tagged S. aureus cells were magnetically captured in a detection cassette, and then fluorescence was imaged using a smartphone camera with a light-emitting diode as the excitation source. Our results showed quantitative detection capability with a minimum detectable concentration as low as 10 cfu/ml by counting individual bacteria cells, efficiently capturing S. aureus cells directly from a peanut milk sample within 10 min. When the selectivity of detection was investigated using samples spiked with other pathogenic bacteria, no significant non-specific detection occurred. Furthermore, strains of S. aureus from various origins showed comparable results, ensuring that the approach can be widely adopted. Therefore, the quantitative fluorescence imaging platform on a smartphone could allow on-site detection of bacteria, providing great potential assistance during major infectious disease outbreaks in remote and resource-limited settings. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Highly sensitive and area-efficient CMOS image sensor using a PMOSFET-type photodetector with a built-in transfer gate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Sang-Ho; Kim, Kyoung-Do; Kong, Jae-Sung; Shin, Jang-Kyoo; Choi, Pyung

    2007-02-01

    In this paper, a new CMOS image sensor is presented, which uses a PMOSFET-type photodetector with a transfer gate that has a high and variable sensitivity. The proposed CMOS image sensor has been fabricated using a 0.35 μm 2-poly 4- metal standard CMOS technology and is composed of a 256 × 256 array of 7.05 × 7.10 μm pixels. The unit pixel has a configuration of a pseudo 3-transistor active pixel sensor (APS) with the PMOSFET-type photodetector with a transfer gate, which has a function of conventional 4-transistor APS. The generated photocurrent is controlled by the transfer gate of the PMOSFET-type photodetector. The maximum responsivity of the photodetector is larger than 1.0 × 10 3 A/W without any optical lens. Fabricated 256 × 256 CMOS image sensor exhibits a good response to low-level illumination as low as 5 lux.

  7. An Improved Method to Watermark Images Sensitive to Blocking Artifacts

    OpenAIRE

    Afzel Noore

    2007-01-01

    A new digital watermarking technique for images that are sensitive to blocking artifacts is presented. Experimental results show that the proposed MDCT based approach produces highly imperceptible watermarked images and is robust to attacks such as compression, noise, filtering and geometric transformations. The proposed MDCT watermarking technique is applied to fingerprints for ensuring security. The face image and demographic text data of an individual are used as multi...

  8. A highly selective and sensitive photoswitchable fluorescent probe for Hg2+ based on bisthienylethene-rhodamine 6G dyad and for live cells imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li; Wang, Sheng; Lv, Yingnian; Son, Young-A; Cao, Derong

    2014-07-15

    A new photochromic diarylethene derivative bearing rhodamine 6G dimmer as a fluorescent molecular probe is designed and synthesized successfully. All the compounds are characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry. The bisthienylethene-rhodamine 6G dyad exhibit excellent phtochromism with reversibly color and fluorescence changes alternating irradiation with ultraviolet and visible light. Upon addition of Hg(2+), its color changes from colorless to red and its fluorescence is remarkably enhanced. Whereas other ions including K(+), Na(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Mn(2+), Pb(2+), Ni(2+), Fe(3+), Al(3+), Cr(3+) and so on induce basically no spectral changes, which constitute a highly selective and sensitive photoswitchable fluorescent probe toward Hg(2+). Furthermore, by means of laser confocal scanning microscopy experiments, it is demonstrated that this probe can be applied for live cell imaging and monitoring Hg(2+) in living lung cancer cells with satisfying results, which shows its value of potential application in environmental and biological systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Label-free and highly sensitive optical imaging of detailed microcirculation within meninges and cortex in mice with the cranium left intact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yali; An, Lin; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that the detailed blood flow distribution within intracranial dura mater and cortex can be visualized by an ultrahigh sensitive optical microangiography (UHS-OMAG). The study uses an UHS-OMAG system operating at 1310 nm with an imaging speed at 150 frames per second that requires ~10 s to complete one 3-D scan of ~2.5×2.5 mm2. The system is sensitive to blood flow with a velocity ranging from ~4 μm/s to ~23 mm/s. We show superior performance of UHS-OMAG in providing functional images of capillary level microcirculation within meninges in mice with the cranium left intact, the results of which correlate well with the standard dural histopathology.

  10. Application of position-sensitive detectors to positron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Takaji; Uchida, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Mitsuo; Omura, Tomohide

    1994-01-01

    Positron imaging including positron emission tomography (PET) is expected to be a promising tool for basic and clinical research, because it makes possible the study of regional chemistry within multiple organs of the body in living human beings and experimental animals. New schemes of high resolution block detectors have been developed to improve the performance of positron imaging systems, which employ small segments of bismuth germanate (BGO) arrays and position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PS-PMT). The coincidence detector resolution of less than 2.0 mm in full width at half maximum was achieved with the detectors, which is very close to the theoretical resolution limit in positron imaging. (author)

  11. Systems for increasing the sensitivity of gamma-ray imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailescu, Lucian; Vetter, Kai M.; Chivers, Daniel H.

    2012-12-11

    Systems that increase the position resolution and granularity of double sided segmented semiconductor detectors are provided. These systems increase the imaging resolution capability of such detectors, either used as Compton cameras, or as position sensitive radiation detectors in imagers such as SPECT, PET, coded apertures, multi-pinhole imagers, or other spatial or temporal modulated imagers.

  12. Aminoquinoline based highly sensitive fluorescent sensor for lead(II) and aluminum(III) and its application in live cell imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anand, Thangaraj; Sivaraman, Gandhi; Mahesh, Ayyavu; Chellappa, Duraisamy

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Aminoquinoline derivative was synthesized and used to recognize Pb 2+ /Al 3+ . • ANQ was high sensitive, selective and turn-on sensor for Pb 2+ /Al 3+ . • The Pb 2+ detection limit (2.08 × 10 −9 mol L −1 ) is reported. • This fluorescence change was further supported by DFT/TD-DFT calculations. • The probe is applied successfully for recognizing intracellular Pb 2+ /Al 3+ within living cells. - Abstract: We have synthesized a new probe 5-((anthracen-9-ylmethylene) amino)quinolin-10-ol (ANQ) based on anthracene platform. The probe was tested for its sensing behavior toward heavy metal ions Hg 2+ , Pb 2+ , light metal Al 3+ ion, alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metal ions by UV–visible and fluorescent techniques in ACN/H 2 O mixture buffered with HEPES (pH 7.4). It shows high selectivity toward sensing Pb 2+ /Al 3+ metal ions. Importantly, 10-fold and 5- fold fluorescence enhancement at 429 nm was observed for probe upon complexation with Pb 2+ and Al 3+ ions, respectively. This fluorescence enhancement is attributable to the prevention of photoinduced electron transfer. The photonic studies indicate that the probe can be adopted as a sensitive fluorescent chemosensor for Pb 2+ and Al 3+ ions

  13. Aminoquinoline based highly sensitive fluorescent sensor for lead(II) and aluminum(III) and its application in live cell imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anand, Thangaraj; Sivaraman, Gandhi [School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625021 (India); Mahesh, Ayyavu, E-mail: mahesh.a06@gmail.com [School of Biological Sciences, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625021 (India); Chellappa, Duraisamy, E-mail: dcmku123@gmail.com [School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625021 (India)

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Aminoquinoline derivative was synthesized and used to recognize Pb{sup 2+}/Al{sup 3+}. • ANQ was high sensitive, selective and turn-on sensor for Pb{sup 2+}/Al{sup 3+}. • The Pb{sup 2+} detection limit (2.08 × 10{sup −9} mol L{sup −1}) is reported. • This fluorescence change was further supported by DFT/TD-DFT calculations. • The probe is applied successfully for recognizing intracellular Pb{sup 2+}/Al{sup 3+} within living cells. - Abstract: We have synthesized a new probe 5-((anthracen-9-ylmethylene) amino)quinolin-10-ol (ANQ) based on anthracene platform. The probe was tested for its sensing behavior toward heavy metal ions Hg{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, light metal Al{sup 3+} ion, alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metal ions by UV–visible and fluorescent techniques in ACN/H{sub 2}O mixture buffered with HEPES (pH 7.4). It shows high selectivity toward sensing Pb{sup 2+}/Al{sup 3+} metal ions. Importantly, 10-fold and 5- fold fluorescence enhancement at 429 nm was observed for probe upon complexation with Pb{sup 2+} and Al{sup 3+} ions, respectively. This fluorescence enhancement is attributable to the prevention of photoinduced electron transfer. The photonic studies indicate that the probe can be adopted as a sensitive fluorescent chemosensor for Pb{sup 2+} and Al{sup 3+} ions.

  14. Highly fluorescent and morphology-controllable graphene quantum dots-chitosan hybrid xerogels for in vivo imaging and pH-sensitive drug carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Ouyang; Tao, Yongxin; Qin, Yong; Chen, Chuanxiang; Pan, Yan; Deng, Linhong; Liu, Li; Kong, Yong

    2016-10-01

    Highly fluorescent graphene quantum dots (GQDs)-chitosan (CS) hybrid xerogels (GQDs-CS) were facilely synthesized, and the morphology of GQDs-CS was controllable by varying the content of GQDs in the xerogel. The GQDs-CS exhibited a porous and three-dimensional (3D) network structure when the content of GQDs reached 43% (wt%) in the xerogel, which was beneficial for drug loading and sustained release. The as-prepared GQDs-CS could also be applied for in vivo imaging since it showed strong blue, green and red luminescence under excitation of varying wavelengths. Moreover, the pH-induced protonation/deprotonation of the -NH2 groups on CS chains can result in a pH-dependent drug delivery behavior of the GQDs-CS hybrid xerogel. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of Thin Prep® imaging system on laboratory rate and relative sensitivity of atypical squamous cells, high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion not excluded and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion interpretations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke R Koltz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Automated screening of Thin Prep ® Papanicolaou Tests has become increasingly common in clinical practice. Increased productivity has initiated laboratory use of the Thin Prep ® Imaging System (TIS. Increased sensitivity is a potential additional benefit of TIS. Published studies have shown an increase in discovery of dysplastic cells. This study evaluates the effect of TIS on the incidence of atypical squamous cells high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion not excluded (ASC-H and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HGSIL results on Thin Prep ® Pap Tests by comparing TIS-assisted and manual screening findings and the diagnoses on subsequent follow-up in a screening population over a 1-year time period. Materials and Methods: A compilation of all ASC-H and HGSIL cases was prepared by conducting a computerized search over a 1-year period (7/06-6/07. The accumulated cases include Thin Prep Pap tests that were both TIS and manually screened. Follow-up results of cytologic and histologic cervical specimens were obtained for a time period extending to 2010. Interpretation utilizing TIS was in place 10 months prior to the study′s initiation. Results: During the study period 70,522 Pap tests were performed in our laboratory. One third (33% of Pap tests were screened with assistance of TIS. Manual screening was performed on 47,380 Pap tests of which 153 (0.32% were interpreted as ASC-H and 164 (0.35% were interpreted as HGSIL. During the same time period automated screening (TIS was performed on 23,111 Pap tests. Interpretation of 62 (0.27% cases provided an ASC-H result, while 71 (0.31% were HGSIL. Follow-up cervical dysplasia by colposcopic biopsy and cone biopsy was distributed proportionally between TIS and manual screening for both ASC-H and HGSIL categories. Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN II/III was identified on follow-up biopsy of 41% TIS cases and 45% manually screened cases for ASC-H. In the HGSIL subset 71

  16. High sensitivity optical measurement of skin gloss

    OpenAIRE

    Ezerskaia, Anna; Ras, Arno; Bloemen, Pascal; Pereira, Silvania F.; Urbach, H. Paul; Varghese, Babu

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate a low-cost optical method for measuring the gloss properties with improved sensitivity in the low gloss regime, relevant for skin gloss properties. The gloss estimation method is based on, on the one hand, the slope of the intensity gradient in the transition regime between specular and diffuse reflection and on the other on the sum over the intensities of pixels above threshold, derived from a camera image obtained using unpolarized white light illumination. We demonstrate the...

  17. High resolution, position sensitive detector for energetic particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, E.P.; Strathman, M.D.; Reed, D.A.; Odom, R.W.; Morse, D.H.; Pontau, A.E.

    1993-01-01

    The performance and design of an imaging position sensitive, particle beam detector will be presented. The detector is minimally invasive, operates a wide dynamic range (>10 10 ), and exhibits high spatial resolution. The secondary electrons produced when a particle beam passes through a thin foil are imaged using stigmatic ion optics onto a two-dimensional imaging detector. Due to the low scattering cross section of the 6 nm carbon foil the detector is a minimal perturbation on the primary beam. A prototype detector with an image resolution of approximately 5 μm for a field of view of 1 mm has been reported. A higher resolution detector for imaging small beams (<50 μm) with an image resolution of better than 0.5 μm has since been developed and its design is presented. (orig.)

  18. High resolution, position sensitive detector for energetic particle beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, E P [Charles Evans and Associates, Redwood City, CA (United States); Strathman, M D [Charles Evans and Associates, Redwood City, CA (United States); Reed, D A [Charles Evans and Associates, Redwood City, CA (United States); Odom, R W [Charles Evans and Associates, Redwood City, CA (United States); Morse, D H [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Pontau, A E [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-05-01

    The performance and design of an imaging position sensitive, particle beam detector will be presented. The detector is minimally invasive, operates a wide dynamic range (>10[sup 10]), and exhibits high spatial resolution. The secondary electrons produced when a particle beam passes through a thin foil are imaged using stigmatic ion optics onto a two-dimensional imaging detector. Due to the low scattering cross section of the 6 nm carbon foil the detector is a minimal perturbation on the primary beam. A prototype detector with an image resolution of approximately 5 [mu]m for a field of view of 1 mm has been reported. A higher resolution detector for imaging small beams (<50 [mu]m) with an image resolution of better than 0.5 [mu]m has since been developed and its design is presented. (orig.)

  19. Phase sensitive diffraction sensor for high sensitivity refractive index measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumawat, Nityanand; Varma, Manoj; Kumar, Sunil

    2018-02-01

    In this study a diffraction based sensor has been developed for bio molecular sensing applications and performing assays in real time. A diffraction grating fabricated on a glass substrate produced diffraction patterns both in transmission and reflection when illuminated by a laser diode. We used zeroth order I(0,0) as reference and first order I(0,1) as signal channel and conducted ratiometric measurements that reduced noise by more than 50 times. The ratiometric approach resulted in a very simple instrumentation with very high sensitivity. In the past, we have shown refractive index measurements both for bulk and surface adsorption using the diffractive self-referencing approach. In the current work we extend the same concept to higher diffraction orders. We have considered order I(0,1) and I(1,1) and performed ratiometric measurements I(0,1)/I(1,1) to eliminate the common mode fluctuations. Since orders I(0,1) and I(1,1) behaved opposite to each other, the resulting ratio signal amplitude increased more than twice compared to our previous results. As a proof of concept we used different salt concentrations in DI water. Increased signal amplitude and improved fluid injection system resulted in more than 4 times improvement in detection limit, giving limit of detection 1.3×10-7 refractive index unit (RIU) compared to our previous results. The improved refractive index sensitivity will help significantly for high sensitivity label free bio sensing application in a very cost-effective and simple experimental set-up.

  20. Advances in polarization sensitive multiphoton nano-bio-imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zyss J.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this talk, we shall shortly review four main directions of ongoing research in our laboratories, directed at the conception and demonstration of a variety of innovative configurations in nanoscale multiphoton imaging. A common feature to all of these directions appears to be the central role played by the involvement of polarization features, both in- and outgoing, moreover so in view of the tensorial aspects inherent to nonlinear schemes such second-harmonic generation, electro-optic modulation or two-photon fluorescence which will ne emphasized. These advances relate to the new domain of nonlinear ellipsometry in multiphoton imaging [1], of high relevance to fundamental aspects of nanophotonics and nanomaterial engineering as well as towards basic life science issues. The four domains to be shortly reported are: a polarization resolved second-harmonic generation in semiconductor QD’s with record small sizes in the 10-12 nm range [2] b original use of two-photon confocal polarization resolved microscopy in DNA stained by two photon fluorescent dyes in different LC phases arrangements so as to characterize these as well as ascertain the respective DNA-dye orientation (intercalant or groves [3] c elaboration and demonstration of an electrooptic confocal microscope in a highly sensitive interferometric and homodyne detection configuration allowing to map weak electric potentials such as in artificial functionalized membranes, the dynamical investigation of firing and propagation aspects of action potentials in neurones being currently the next step [4] d original plasmon based enhanced nanoscale confocal imaging involving a dual detection scheme (fluorescence imaging and ATR plasmon coupling in reflection whereby adequate preparation and switching of the incoming polarization state between radial, linear and azimuthal configurations, entail different images and plasmon enhancement levels [5].

  1. Heterogeneous catalysis in highly sensitive microreactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jakob Lind

    This thesis present a highly sensitive silicon microreactor and examples of its use in studying catalysis. The experimental setup built for gas handling and temperature control for the microreactor is described. The implementation of LabVIEW interfacing for all the experimental parts makes...

  2. Aluminum nanocantilevers for high sensitivity mass sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Zachary James; Boisen, Anja

    2005-01-01

    We have fabricated Al nanocantilevers using a simple, one mask contact UV lithography technique with lateral and vertical dimensions under 500 and 100 nm, respectively. These devices are demonstrated as highly sensitive mass sensors by measuring their dynamic properties. Furthermore, it is shown ...

  3. Position-sensitive detector system OBI for High Resolution X-Ray Powder Diffraction using on-site readable image plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, M.; Joco, V.; Baehtz, C.; Brecht, H.H.; Berghaeuser, A.; Ehrenberg, H.; Seggern, H. von; Fuess, H.

    2004-01-01

    A one-dimensional detector system has been developed using image plates. The detector is working in transmission mode or Debye-Scherrer geometry and is on-site readable which reduces the effort for calibration. It covers a wide angular range up to 110 deg. and shows narrow reflection half-widths depending on the capillary diameter. The acquisition time is in the range of minutes and the data quality allows for reliable Rietveld refinement of complicated structures, even in multi-phase samples. The detector opens a wide field of new applications in kinetics and temperature resolved measurements

  4. Single photon detector with high polarization sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qi; Li, Hao; You, LiXing; Zhang, WeiJun; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Zhen; Xie, XiaoMing; Qi, Ming

    2015-04-15

    Polarization is one of the key parameters of light. Most optical detectors are intensity detectors that are insensitive to the polarization of light. A superconducting nanowire single photon detector (SNSPD) is naturally sensitive to polarization due to its nanowire structure. Previous studies focused on producing a polarization-insensitive SNSPD. In this study, by adjusting the width and pitch of the nanowire, we systematically investigate the preparation of an SNSPD with high polarization sensitivity. Subsequently, an SNSPD with a system detection efficiency of 12% and a polarization extinction ratio of 22 was successfully prepared.

  5. Optical Molecular Imaging Frontiers in Oncology: The Pursuit of Accuracy and Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cutting-edge technologies in optical molecular imaging have ushered in new frontiers in cancer research, clinical translation, and medical practice, as evidenced by recent advances in optical multimodality imaging, Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI, and optical image-guided surgeries. New abilities allow in vivo cancer imaging with sensitivity and accuracy that are unprecedented in conventional imaging approaches. The visualization of cellular and molecular behaviors and events within tumors in living subjects is improving our deeper understanding of tumors at a systems level. These advances are being rapidly used to acquire tumor-to-tumor molecular heterogeneity, both dynamically and quantitatively, as well as to achieve more effective therapeutic interventions with the assistance of real-time imaging. In the era of molecular imaging, optical technologies hold great promise to facilitate the development of highly sensitive cancer diagnoses as well as personalized patient treatment—one of the ultimate goals of precision medicine.

  6. Graphene Oxide/Ag Nanoparticles Cooperated with Simvastatin as a High Sensitive X-Ray Computed Tomography Imaging Agent for Diagnosis of Renal Dysfunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhan; Tian, Longlong; Liu, Jianli; Qi, Wei; Wu, Qiang; Wang, Haijing; Ali, Mohammad Chand; Wu, Wangsuo; Qiu, Hongdeng

    2017-09-01

    Graphene oxides (GO) are attracting much attention in the diagnosis and therapy of the subcutaneous tumor as a novel biomaterial, but its diagnosis to tissue dysfunction is yet to be found. Here, a novel application of GO for diagnosis of renal dysfunction via contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) is proposed. In order to serve as contrast-enhanced agent, Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) are composited on the surface of GO to promote its X-ray absorption, and then simvastatin is coinjected for eliminating in vivo toxicity induced by AgNPs. It is found that GO/AgNPs can enhance the imaging of CT into the lung, liver, and kidney of mice for a long circulation time (≈24 h) and a safety profile in vivo in the presence of simvastatin. Interestingly, the lower dose of GO/AgNPs (≈0.5 mg per kg bw) shows an excellent performance for CT imaging of renal perfusion, and visually exhibits the right renal dysfunction in model mice. Hence, this work suggests that graphene nanoparticles will play a vital role for the future medical translational development including drug carrier, biosensing, and disease therapy. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Highly sensitive microcalorimeters for radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avaev, V.N.; Demchuk, B.N.; Ioffe, L.A.; Efimov, E.P.

    1984-01-01

    Calorimetry is used in research at various types of nuclear-physics installations to obtain information on the quantitative and qualitative composition of ionizing radiation in a reactor core and in the surrounding layers of the biological shield. In this paper, the authors examine the characteristics of highly sensitive microcalorimeters with modular semiconductor heat pickups designed for operation in reactor channels. The microcalorimeters have a thin-walled aluminum housing on whose inner surface modular heat pickups are placed radially as shown here. The results of measurements of the temperature dependence of the sensitivity of the microcalorimeters are shown. The results of measuring the sensitivity of a PMK-2 microcalorimeter assembly as a function of integrated neutron flux for three energy intervals and the adsorbed gamma energy are shown. In order to study specimens with different shapes and sizes, microcalorimeters with chambers in the form of cylinders and a parallelepiped were built and tested

  8. High blood pressure and visual sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisner, Alvin; Samples, John R.

    2003-09-01

    The study had two main purposes: (1) to determine whether the foveal visual sensitivities of people treated for high blood pressure (vascular hypertension) differ from the sensitivities of people who have not been diagnosed with high blood pressure and (2) to understand how visual adaptation is related to standard measures of systemic cardiovascular function. Two groups of middle-aged subjects-hypertensive and normotensive-were examined with a series of test/background stimulus combinations. All subjects met rigorous inclusion criteria for excellent ocular health. Although the visual sensitivities of the two subject groups overlapped extensively, the age-related rate of sensitivity loss was, for some measures, greater for the hypertensive subjects, possibly because of adaptation differences between the two groups. Overall, the degree of steady-state sensitivity loss resulting from an increase of background illuminance (for 580-nm backgrounds) was slightly less for the hypertensive subjects. Among normotensive subjects, the ability of a bright (3.8-log-td), long-wavelength (640-nm) adapting background to selectively suppress the flicker response of long-wavelength-sensitive (LWS) cones was related inversely to the ratio of mean arterial blood pressure to heart rate. The degree of selective suppression was also related to heart rate alone, and there was evidence that short-term changes of cardiovascular response were important. The results suggest that (1) vascular hypertension, or possibly its treatment, subtly affects visual function even in the absence of eye disease and (2) changes in blood flow affect retinal light-adaptation processes involved in the selective suppression of the flicker response from LWS cones caused by bright, long-wavelength backgrounds.

  9. In vivo sensitivity estimation and imaging acceleration with rotating RF coil arrays at 7 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingyan; Jin, Jin; Zuo, Zhentao; Liu, Feng; Trakic, Adnan; Weber, Ewald; Zhuo, Yan; Xue, Rong; Crozier, Stuart

    2015-03-01

    Using a new rotating SENSitivity Encoding (rotating-SENSE) algorithm, we have successfully demonstrated that the rotating radiofrequency coil array (RRFCA) was capable of achieving a significant reduction in scan time and a uniform image reconstruction for a homogeneous phantom at 7 Tesla. However, at 7 Tesla the in vivo sensitivity profiles (B1-) become distinct at various angular positions. Therefore, sensitivity maps at other angular positions cannot be obtained by numerically rotating the acquired ones. In this work, a novel sensitivity estimation method for the RRFCA was developed and validated with human brain imaging. This method employed a library database and registration techniques to estimate coil sensitivity at an arbitrary angular position. The estimated sensitivity maps were then compared to the acquired sensitivity maps. The results indicate that the proposed method is capable of accurately estimating both magnitude and phase of sensitivity at an arbitrary angular position, which enables us to employ the rotating-SENSE algorithm to accelerate acquisition and reconstruct image. Compared to a stationary coil array with the same number of coil elements, the RRFCA was able to reconstruct images with better quality at a high reduction factor. It is hoped that the proposed rotation-dependent sensitivity estimation algorithm and the acceleration ability of the RRFCA will be particularly useful for ultra high field MRI.

  10. In vivo sensitivity estimation and imaging acceleration with rotating RF coil arrays at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingyan; Jin, Jin; Zuo, Zhentao; Liu, Feng; Trakic, Adnan; Weber, Ewald; Zhuo, Yan; Xue, Rong; Crozier, Stuart

    2015-03-01

    Using a new rotating SENSitivity Encoding (rotating-SENSE) algorithm, we have successfully demonstrated that the rotating radiofrequency coil array (RRFCA) was capable of achieving a significant reduction in scan time and a uniform image reconstruction for a homogeneous phantom at 7 Tesla. However, at 7 Tesla the in vivo sensitivity profiles (B1(-)) become distinct at various angular positions. Therefore, sensitivity maps at other angular positions cannot be obtained by numerically rotating the acquired ones. In this work, a novel sensitivity estimation method for the RRFCA was developed and validated with human brain imaging. This method employed a library database and registration techniques to estimate coil sensitivity at an arbitrary angular position. The estimated sensitivity maps were then compared to the acquired sensitivity maps. The results indicate that the proposed method is capable of accurately estimating both magnitude and phase of sensitivity at an arbitrary angular position, which enables us to employ the rotating-SENSE algorithm to accelerate acquisition and reconstruct image. Compared to a stationary coil array with the same number of coil elements, the RRFCA was able to reconstruct images with better quality at a high reduction factor. It is hoped that the proposed rotation-dependent sensitivity estimation algorithm and the acceleration ability of the RRFCA will be particularly useful for ultra high field MRI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Diffusion Properties and 3D Architecture of Human Lower Leg Muscles Assessed with Ultra-High-Field-Strength Diffusion-Tensor MR Imaging and Tractography: Reproducibility and Sensitivity to Sex Difference and Intramuscular Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouré, Alexandre; Ogier, Augustin C; Le Troter, Arnaud; Vilmen, Christophe; Feiweier, Thorsten; Guye, Maxime; Gondin, Julien; Besson, Pierre; Bendahan, David

    2018-05-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the reproducibility of the diffusion properties and three-dimensional structural organization measurements of the lower leg muscles by using diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) assessed with ultra-high-field-strength (7.0-T) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and tractography of skeletal muscle fibers. On the basis of robust statistical mapping analyses, this study also aimed at determining the sensitivity of the measurements to sex difference and intramuscular variability. Materials and Methods All examinations were performed with ethical review board approval; written informed consent was obtained from all volunteers. Reproducibility of diffusion tensor indexes assessment including eigenvalues, mean diffusivity, and fractional anisotropy (FA) as well as muscle volume and architecture (ie, fiber length and pennation angle) were characterized in lower leg muscles (n = 8). Intramuscular variability and sex differences were characterized in young healthy men and women (n = 10 in each group). Student t test, statistical parametric mapping, correlation coefficients (Spearman rho and Pearson product-moment) and coefficient of variation (CV) were used for statistical data analysis. Results High reproducibility of measurements (mean CV ± standard deviation, 4.6% ± 3.8) was determined in diffusion properties and architectural parameters. Significant sex differences were detected in FA (4.2% in women for the entire lower leg; P = .001) and muscle volume (21.7% in men for the entire lower leg; P = .008), whereas architecture parameters were almost identical across sex. Additional differences were found independently of sex in diffusion properties and architecture along several muscles of the lower leg. Conclusion The high-spatial-resolution DTI assessed with 7.0-T MR imaging allows a reproducible assessment of structural organization of superficial and deep muscles, giving indirect information on muscle function. © RSNA, 2018 Online supplemental material is

  12. Low Cost, Low Power, High Sensitivity Magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    which are used to measure the small magnetic signals from brain. Other types of vector magnetometers are fluxgate , coil based, and magnetoresistance...concentrator with the magnetometer currently used in Army multimodal sensor systems, the Brown fluxgate . One sees the MEMS fluxgate magnetometer is...Guedes, A.; et al., 2008: Hybrid - LOW COST, LOW POWER, HIGH SENSITIVITY MAGNETOMETER A.S. Edelstein*, James E. Burnette, Greg A. Fischer, M.G

  13. High sensitivity optical measurement of skin gloss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezerskaia, Anna; Ras, Arno; Bloemen, Pascal; Pereira, Silvania F; Urbach, H Paul; Varghese, Babu

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate a low-cost optical method for measuring the gloss properties with improved sensitivity in the low gloss regime, relevant for skin gloss properties. The gloss estimation method is based on, on the one hand, the slope of the intensity gradient in the transition regime between specular and diffuse reflection and on the other on the sum over the intensities of pixels above threshold, derived from a camera image obtained using unpolarized white light illumination. We demonstrate the improved sensitivity of the two proposed methods using Monte Carlo simulations and experiments performed on ISO gloss calibration standards with an optical prototype. The performance and linearity of the method was compared with different professional gloss measurement devices based on the ratio of specular to diffuse intensity. We demonstrate the feasibility for in-vivo skin gloss measurements by quantifying the temporal evolution of skin gloss after application of standard paraffin cream bases on skin. The presented method opens new possibilities in the fields of cosmetology and dermatopharmacology for measuring the skin gloss and resorption kinetics and the pharmacodynamics of various external agents.

  14. High-resolution CCD imaging alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D. L.; Acker, D. E.

    1992-08-01

    High resolution CCD color cameras have recently stimulated the interest of a large number of potential end-users for a wide range of practical applications. Real-time High Definition Television (HDTV) systems are now being used or considered for use in applications ranging from entertainment program origination through digital image storage to medical and scientific research. HDTV generation of electronic images offers significant cost and time-saving advantages over the use of film in such applications. Further in still image systems electronic image capture is faster and more efficient than conventional image scanners. The CCD still camera can capture 3-dimensional objects into the computing environment directly without having to shoot a picture on film develop it and then scan the image into a computer. 2. EXTENDING CCD TECHNOLOGY BEYOND BROADCAST Most standard production CCD sensor chips are made for broadcast-compatible systems. One popular CCD and the basis for this discussion offers arrays of roughly 750 x 580 picture elements (pixels) or a total array of approximately 435 pixels (see Fig. 1). FOR. A has developed a technique to increase the number of available pixels for a given image compared to that produced by the standard CCD itself. Using an inter-lined CCD with an overall spatial structure several times larger than the photo-sensitive sensor areas each of the CCD sensors is shifted in two dimensions in order to fill in spatial gaps between adjacent sensors.

  15. Review of high-sensitivity Radon studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, M.; Zuzel, G.; Simgen, H.

    2017-10-01

    A challenge in many present cutting-edge particle physics experiments is the stringent requirements in terms of radioactive background. In peculiar, the prevention of Radon, a radioactive noble gas, which occurs from ambient air and it is also released by emanation from the omnipresent progenitor Radium. In this paper we review various high-sensitivity Radon detection techniques and approaches, applied in the experiments looking for rare nuclear processes happening at low energies. They allow to identify, quantitatively measure and finally suppress the numerous sources of Radon in the detectors’ components and plants.

  16. High sensitivity troponin and valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Cian P; Donnellan, Eoin; Phelan, Dermot; Griffin, Brian P; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice; McEvoy, John W

    2017-07-01

    Blood-based biomarkers have been extensively studied in a range of cardiovascular diseases and have established utility in routine clinical care, most notably in the diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (e.g., troponin) and the management of heart failure (e.g., brain-natriuretic peptide). The role of biomarkers is less well established in the management of valvular heart disease (VHD), in which the optimal timing of surgical intervention is often challenging. One promising biomarker that has been the subject of a number of recent VHD research studies is high sensitivity troponin (hs-cTn). Novel high-sensitivity assays can detect subclinical myocardial damage in asymptomatic individuals. Thus, hs-cTn may have utility in the assessment of asymptomatic patients with severe VHD who do not have a clear traditional indication for surgical intervention. In this state-of-the-art review, we examine the current evidence for hs-cTn as a potential biomarker in the most commonly encountered VHD conditions, aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation. This review provides a synopsis of early evidence indicating that hs-cTn has promise as a biomarker in VHD. However, the impact of its measurement on clinical practice and VHD outcomes needs to be further assessed in prospective studies before routine clinical use becomes a reality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. High intensity radiation imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, H.H.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear imaging system is described for mapping a spatially distributed source of high energy nuclear particles from a living organ which has selectively absorbed a radioactive compound in which the nuclear energy is spatially coded by a zone plate positioned between the source and a spatial detector, and a half tone screen is positioned between the source and the zone plate to increase the definition of the image

  18. High resolution metric imaging payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delclaud, Y.

    2017-11-01

    Alcatel Space Industries has become Europe's leader in the field of high and very high resolution optical payloads, in the frame work of earth observation system able to provide military government with metric images from space. This leadership allowed ALCATEL to propose for the export market, within a French collaboration frame, a complete space based system for metric observation.

  19. Highly sensitive high resolution Raman spectroscopy using resonant ionization methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owyoung, A.; Esherick, P.

    1984-05-01

    In recent years, the introduction of stimulated Raman methods has offered orders of magnitude improvement in spectral resolving power for gas phase Raman studies. Nevertheless, the inherent weakness of the Raman process suggests the need for significantly more sensitive techniques in Raman spectroscopy. In this we describe a new approach to this problem. Our new technique, which we call ionization-detected stimulated Raman spectroscopy (IDSRS), combines high-resolution SRS with highly-sensitive resonant laser ionization to achieve an increase in sensitivity of over three orders of magnitude. The excitation/detection process involves three sequential steps: (1) population of a vibrationally excited state via stimulated Raman pumping; (2) selective ionization of the vibrationally excited molecule with a tunable uv source; and (3) collection of the ionized species at biased electrodes where they are detected as current in an external circuit

  20. Dynamic high resolution imaging of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyaoka, R.S.; Lewellen, T.K.; Bice, A.N.

    1990-01-01

    A positron emission tomography with the sensitivity and resolution to do dynamic imaging of rats would be an invaluable tool for biological researchers. In this paper, the authors determine the biological criteria for dynamic positron emission imaging of rats. To be useful, 3 mm isotropic resolution and 2-3 second time binning were necessary characteristics for such a dedicated tomograph. A single plane in which two objects of interest could be imaged simultaneously was considered acceptable. Multi-layered detector designs were evaluated as a possible solution to the dynamic imaging and high resolution imaging requirements. The University of Washington photon history generator was used to generate data to investigate a tomograph's sensitivity to true, scattered and random coincidences for varying detector ring diameters. Intrinsic spatial uniformity advantages of multi-layered detector designs over conventional detector designs were investigated using a Monte Carlo program. As a result, a modular three layered detector prototype is being developed. A module will consist of a layer of five 3.5 mm wide crystals and two layers of six 2.5 mm wide crystals. The authors believe adequate sampling can be achieved with a stationary detector system using these modules. Economical crystal decoding strategies have been investigated and simulations have been run to investigate optimum light channeling methods for block decoding strategies. An analog block decoding method has been proposed and will be experimentally evaluated to determine whether it can provide the desired performance

  1. Color sensitivity of the multi-exposure HDR imaging process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenseigne, Boris; Jacobs, Valéry Ann; Withouck, Martijn; Hanselaer, Peter; Jonker, Pieter P.

    2013-04-01

    Multi-exposure high dynamic range(HDR) imaging builds HDR radiance maps by stitching together different views of a same scene with varying exposures. Practically, this process involves converting raw sensor data into low dynamic range (LDR) images, estimate the camera response curves, and use them in order to recover the irradiance for every pixel. During the export, applying white balance settings and image stitching, which both have an influence on the color balance in the final image. In this paper, we use a calibrated quasi-monochromatic light source, an integrating sphere, and a spectrograph in order to evaluate and compare the average spectral response of the image sensor. We finally draw some conclusion about the color consistency of HDR imaging and the additional steps necessary to use multi-exposure HDR imaging as a tool to measure the physical quantities such as radiance and luminance.

  2. Sensitivity Calibration of Far-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. -J. Kim

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe the in-flight sensitivity calibration of the Far ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (FIMS, also known as SPEAR onboard the first Korean science satellite, STSAT-1, which was launched in September 2003. The sensitivity calibration is based on a comparison of the FIMS observations of the hot white dwarf G191B2B, and two O-type stars Alpha-Cam, HD93521 with the HUT (Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope observations. The FIMS observations for the calibration targets have been conducted from November 2003 through May 2004. The effective areas calculated from the targets are compared with each other.

  3. CALDER: High-sensitivity cryogenic light detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casali, N.; Bellini, F.; Cardani, L.

    2017-01-01

    The current bolometric experiments searching for rare processes such as neutrinoless double-beta decay or dark matter interaction demand for cryogenic light detectors with high sensitivity, large active area and excellent scalability and radio-purity in order to reduce their background budget. The CALDER project aims to develop such kind of light detectors implementing phonon-mediated Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs). The goal for this project is the realization of a 5 × 5 cm"2 light detector working between 10 and 100mK with a baseline resolution RMS below 20 eV. In this work the characteristics and the performances of the prototype detectors developed in the first project phase will be shown.

  4. High sensitive radiation detector for radiology dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valente, M.; Malano, F. [Instituto de Fisica Enrique Gaviola, Oficina 102 FaMAF - UNC, Av. Luis Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Molina, W.; Vedelago, J., E-mail: valente@famac.unc.edu.ar [Laboratorio de Investigaciones e Instrumentacion en Fisica Aplicada a la Medicina e Imagenes por Rayos X, Laboratorio 448 FaMAF - UNC, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2014-08-15

    Fricke solution has a wide range of applications as radiation detector and dosimetry. It is particularly appreciated in terms of relevant comparative advantages, like tissue equivalence when prepared in aqueous media like gel matrix, continuous mapping capability, dose rate recorded and incident direction independence as well as linear dose response. This work presents the development and characterization of a novel Fricke gel system, based on modified chemical compositions making possible its application in clinical radiology. Properties of standard Fricke gel dosimeter for high dose levels are used as starting point and suitable chemical modifications are introduced and carefully investigated in order to attain high resolution for low dose ranges, like those corresponding to radiology interventions. The developed Fricke gel radiation dosimeter system achieves the expected typical dose dependency, actually showing linear response in the dose range from 20 up to 4000 mGy. Systematic investigations including several chemical compositions are carried out in order to obtain a good enough dosimeter response for low dose levels. A suitable composition among those studied is selected as a good candidate for low dose level radiation dosimetry consisting on a modified Fricke solution fixed to a gel matrix containing benzoic acid along with sulfuric acid, ferrous sulfate, xylenol orange and ultra-pure reactive grade water. Dosimeter samples are prepared in standard vials for its in phantom irradiation and further characterization by spectrophotometry measuring visible light transmission and absorbance before and after irradiation. Samples are irradiated by typical kV X-ray tubes and calibrated Farmer type ionization chamber is used as reference to measure dose rates inside phantoms in at vials locations. Once sensitive material composition is already optimized, dose-response curves show significant improvement regarding overall sensitivity for low dose levels. According to

  5. High sensitivity amplifier/discriminator for PWC's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, S.

    1983-01-01

    The facility support group at Fermilab is designing and building a general purpose beam chamber for use in several locations at the laboratory. This pwc has 128 wires per plane spaced 1 mm apart. An initial production of 25 signal planes is anticipated. In proportional chambers, the size of the signal depends exponentially on the charge stored per unit of length along the anode wire. As the wire spacing decreases, the capacitance per unit length decreases, thereby requiring increased applied voltage to restore the necessary charge per unit length. In practical terms, this phenomenon is responsible for difficulties in constructing chambers with less than 2 mm wire spacing. 1 mm chambers, therefore, are frequently operated very near to their breakdown point and/or a high gain gas containing organic compounds such as magic gas is used. This argon/iso-butane mixture has three drawbacks: it is explosive when exposed to the air, it leaves a residue on the wires after extended use and is costly. An amplifier with higher sensitivity would reduce the problems associated with operating chambers with small wire spacings and allow them to be run a safe margin below their breakdown voltage even with an inorganic gas mixture such as argon/CO2, this eliminating the need to use magic gas. Described here is a low cost amplifier with a usable threshold of less than 0.5 μA. Data on the performance of this amplifier/discriminator in operation on a prototype beam chamber are given. This data shows the advantages of the high sensitivity of this design

  6. High sensitive radiation detector for radiology dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valente, M.; Malano, F.; Molina, W.; Vedelago, J.

    2014-08-01

    Fricke solution has a wide range of applications as radiation detector and dosimetry. It is particularly appreciated in terms of relevant comparative advantages, like tissue equivalence when prepared in aqueous media like gel matrix, continuous mapping capability, dose rate recorded and incident direction independence as well as linear dose response. This work presents the development and characterization of a novel Fricke gel system, based on modified chemical compositions making possible its application in clinical radiology. Properties of standard Fricke gel dosimeter for high dose levels are used as starting point and suitable chemical modifications are introduced and carefully investigated in order to attain high resolution for low dose ranges, like those corresponding to radiology interventions. The developed Fricke gel radiation dosimeter system achieves the expected typical dose dependency, actually showing linear response in the dose range from 20 up to 4000 mGy. Systematic investigations including several chemical compositions are carried out in order to obtain a good enough dosimeter response for low dose levels. A suitable composition among those studied is selected as a good candidate for low dose level radiation dosimetry consisting on a modified Fricke solution fixed to a gel matrix containing benzoic acid along with sulfuric acid, ferrous sulfate, xylenol orange and ultra-pure reactive grade water. Dosimeter samples are prepared in standard vials for its in phantom irradiation and further characterization by spectrophotometry measuring visible light transmission and absorbance before and after irradiation. Samples are irradiated by typical kV X-ray tubes and calibrated Farmer type ionization chamber is used as reference to measure dose rates inside phantoms in at vials locations. Once sensitive material composition is already optimized, dose-response curves show significant improvement regarding overall sensitivity for low dose levels. According to

  7. High sensitivity thermal sensors on insulating diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Job, R. [Fernuniversitaet Hagen (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Electron. Devices; Denisenko, A.V. [Fernuniversitaet Hagen (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Electron. Devices; Zaitsev, A.M. [Fernuniversitaet Hagen (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Electron. Devices; Melnikov, A.A. [Belarussian State Univ., Minsk (Belarus). HEII and FD; Werner, M. [VDI/VDE-IT, Teltow (Germany); Fahrner, W.R. [Fernuniversitaet Hagen (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Electron. Devices

    1996-12-15

    Diamond is a promising material to develop sensors for applications in harsh environments. To increase the sensitivity of diamond temperature sensors the effect of thermionic hole emission (TE) over an energetic barrier formed in the interface between highly boron-doped p-type and intrinsic insulating diamond areas has been suggested. To study the TE of holes a p-i-p diode has been fabricated and analyzed by electrical measurements in the temperature range between 300 K and 700 K. The experimental results have been compared with numerical simulations of its electrical characteristics. Based on a model of the thermionic emission of carriers into an insulator it has been suggested that the temperature sensitivity of the p-i-p diode on diamond is strongly affected by the re-emission of holes from a group of donor-like traps located at a level of 0.7-1.0 eV above the valence band. The mechanism of thermal activation of the current includes a spatial redistribution of the potential, which results in the TE regime from a decrease of the immobilized charge of the ionized traps within the i-zone of the diode and the correspondent lowering of the forward biased barrier. The characteristics of the p-i-p diode were studied with regard to temperature sensor applications. The temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR=-0.05 K{sup -1}) for temperatures above 600 K is about four times larger than the maximal attainable TCR for conventional boron-doped diamond resistors. (orig.)

  8. Transportable high sensitivity small sample radiometric calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetzel, J.R.; Biddle, R.S.; Cordova, B.S.; Sampson, T.E.; Dye, H.R.; McDow, J.G.

    1998-01-01

    A new small-sample, high-sensitivity transportable radiometric calorimeter, which can be operated in different modes, contains an electrical calibration method, and can be used to develop secondary standards, will be described in this presentation. The data taken from preliminary tests will be presented to indicate the precision and accuracy of the instrument. The calorimeter and temperature-controlled bath, at present, require only a 30-in. by 20-in. tabletop area. The calorimeter is operated from a laptop computer system using unique measurement module capable of monitoring all necessary calorimeter signals. The calorimeter can be operated in the normal calorimeter equilibration mode, as a comparison instrument, using twin chambers and an external electrical calibration method. The sample chamber is 0.75 in (1.9 cm) in diameter by 2.5 in. (6.35 cm) long. This size will accommodate most 238 Pu heat standards manufactured in the past. The power range runs from 0.001 W to <20 W. The high end is only limited by sample size

  9. Imaging of dental material by polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichtl, Sabine; Baumgartner, Angela; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.; Moritz, Andreas; Wernisch, Johann; Robl, Barbara; Sattmann, Harald; Leitgeb, Rainer; Sperr, Wolfgang; Fercher, Adolf F.

    1999-05-01

    Partial coherence interferometry (PCI) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) are noninvasive and noncontact techniques for high precision biometry and for obtaining cross- sectional images of biologic structures. OCT was initially introduced to depict the transparent tissue of the eye. It is based on interferometry employing the partial coherence properties of a light source with high spatial coherence ut short coherence length to image structures with a resolution of the order of a few microns. Recently this technique has been modified for cross section al imaging of dental and periodontal tissues. In vitro and in vivo OCT images have been recorded, which distinguish enamel, cemento and dentin structures and provide detailed structural information on clinical abnormalities. In contrast to convention OCT, where the magnitude of backscattered light as a function of depth is imaged, polarization sensitive OCT uses backscattered light to image the magnitude of the birefringence in the sample as a function of depth. First polarization sensitive OCT recordings show, that changes in the mineralization status of enamel or dentin caused by caries or non-caries lesions can result in changes of the polarization state of the light backscattered by dental material. Therefore polarization sensitive OCT might provide a new diagnostic imaging modality in clinical and research dentistry.

  10. Highly sensitive detection of a current ripple

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Takashi; Gushiken, Tutomu; Nishikigouri, Kazutaka; Kumada, Masayuki.

    1996-01-01

    In the HIMAC, there are six thyristor-controlled power sources for driving two synchrotrons. These power sources are the three-output terminal power sources which are equipped with positive output, negative output and neutral point for the common mode countermeasures. As electromagnet circuits are connected to the three-output terminal power sources, those are three-line type. In the inside of the power source circuits controlled by thyristors, there is the oscillation peculiar to the power sources, and the variation of voltage induces current spikes. This time, in order to assess the results of the common mode countermeasures in the power source and electromagnet circuits, as one method of cross-check, it is considered that since electromagnet current flows being divided to the bridging resistance and the coil, if attention is paid to the current on bridging resistance side, the ripple components of common mode and normal mode can be detected with high sensitivity, and this was verified. The present state of heightening the performance of synchrotron power sources is explained. The cross-check of the method of assessing the performance of electromagnet power sources is reported. The method of measuring ripple current and the results of the measurement are reported. (K.I.)

  11. Development of high sensitivity radon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Takeuchi, Y; Kajita, T; Tasaka, S; Hori, H; Nemoto, M; Okazawa, H

    1999-01-01

    High sensitivity detectors for radon in air and in water have been developed. We use electrostatic collection and a PIN photodiode for these detectors. Calibration systems have been also constructed to obtain collection factors. As a result of the calibration study, the absolute humidity dependence of the radon detector for air is clearly observed in the region less than about 1.6 g/m sup 3. The calibration factors of the radon detector for air are 2.2+-0.2 (counts/day)/(mBq/m sup 3) at 0.08 g/m sup 3 and 0.86+-0.06 (counts/day)/(mBq/m sup 3) at 11 g/m sup 3. The calibration factor of the radon detector for water is 3.6+-0.5 (counts/day)/(mBq/m sup 3). The background level of the radon detector for air is 2.4+-1.3 counts/day. As a result, one standard deviation excess of the signal above the background of the radon detector for air should be possible for 1.4 mBq/m sup 3 in a one-day measurement at 0.08 g/m sup 3.

  12. Ultrahigh sensitivity endoscopic camera using a new CMOS image sensor: providing with clear images under low illumination in addition to fluorescent images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Hisae; Yamashita, Hiromasa; Mori, Toshiyuki; Fukuyo, Tsuneo; Chiba, Toshio

    2014-11-01

    We developed a new ultrahigh-sensitive CMOS camera using a specific sensor that has a wide range of spectral sensitivity characteristics. The objective of this study is to present our updated endoscopic technology that has successfully integrated two innovative functions; ultrasensitive imaging as well as advanced fluorescent viewing. Two different experiments were conducted. One was carried out to evaluate the function of the ultrahigh-sensitive camera. The other was to test the availability of the newly developed sensor and its performance as a fluorescence endoscope. In both studies, the distance from the endoscopic tip to the target was varied and those endoscopic images in each setting were taken for further comparison. In the first experiment, the 3-CCD camera failed to display the clear images under low illumination, and the target was hardly seen. In contrast, the CMOS camera was able to display the targets regardless of the camera-target distance under low illumination. Under high illumination, imaging quality given by both cameras was quite alike. In the second experiment as a fluorescence endoscope, the CMOS camera was capable of clearly showing the fluorescent-activated organs. The ultrahigh sensitivity CMOS HD endoscopic camera is expected to provide us with clear images under low illumination in addition to the fluorescent images under high illumination in the field of laparoscopic surgery.

  13. A 128 x 128 CMOS Active Pixel Image Sensor for Highly Integrated Imaging Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendis, Sunetra K.; Kemeny, Sabrina E.; Fossum, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    A new CMOS-based image sensor that is intrinsically compatible with on-chip CMOS circuitry is reported. The new CMOS active pixel image sensor achieves low noise, high sensitivity, X-Y addressability, and has simple timing requirements. The image sensor was fabricated using a 2 micrometer p-well CMOS process, and consists of a 128 x 128 array of 40 micrometer x 40 micrometer pixels. The CMOS image sensor technology enables highly integrated smart image sensors, and makes the design, incorporation and fabrication of such sensors widely accessible to the integrated circuit community.

  14. Sensitivity of imaging for multifocal-multicentric breast carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viale Giuseppe

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This retrospective study aims to determine: 1 the sensitivity of preoperative mammography (Mx and ultrasound (US, and re-reviewed Mx to detect multifocal multicentric breast carcinoma (MMBC, defined by pathology on surgical specimens, and 2 to analyze the characteristics of both detected and undetected foci on Mx and US. Methods Three experienced breast radiologists re-reviewed, independently, digital mammography of 97 women with MMBC pathologically diagnosed on surgical specimens. The radiologists were informed of all neoplastic foci, and blinded to the original mammograms and US reports. With regards to Mx, they considered the breast density, number of foci, the Mx characteristics of the lesions and their BI-RADS classification. For US, they considered size of the lesions, BI-RADS classification and US pattern and lesion characteristics. According to the histological size, the lesions were classified as: index cancer, 2nd lesion, 3rd lesion, and 4th lesion. Any pathologically identified malignant foci not previously described in the original imaging reports, were defined as undetected or missed lesions. Sensitivity was calculated for Mx, US and re-reviewed Mx for detecting the presence of the index cancer as well as additional satellite lesions. Results Pathological examination revealed 13 multifocal and 84 multicentric cancers with a total of 303 malignant foci (282 invasive and 21 non invasive. Original Mx and US reports had an overall sensitivity of 45.5% and 52.9%, respectively. Mx detected 83/97 index cancers with a sensitivity of 85.6%. The number of lesions undetected by original Mx was 165/303. The Mx pattern of breasts with undetected lesions were: fatty in 3 (1.8%; scattered fibroglandular density in 40 (24.3%, heterogeneously dense in 91 (55.1% and dense in 31 (18.8% cases. In breasts with an almost entirely fatty pattern, Mx sensitivity was 100%, while in fibroglandular or dense pattern it was reduced to 45

  15. B1 -sensitivity analysis of quantitative magnetization transfer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, Mathieu; Stikov, Nikola; Pike, G Bruce

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the sensitivity of quantitative magnetization transfer (qMT) fitted parameters to B 1 inaccuracies, focusing on the difference between two categories of T 1 mapping techniques: B 1 -independent and B 1 -dependent. The B 1 -sensitivity of qMT was investigated and compared using two T 1 measurement methods: inversion recovery (IR) (B 1 -independent) and variable flip angle (VFA), B 1 -dependent). The study was separated into four stages: 1) numerical simulations, 2) sensitivity analysis of the Z-spectra, 3) healthy subjects at 3T, and 4) comparison using three different B 1 imaging techniques. For typical B 1 variations in the brain at 3T (±30%), the simulations resulted in errors of the pool-size ratio (F) ranging from -3% to 7% for VFA, and -40% to > 100% for IR, agreeing with the Z-spectra sensitivity analysis. In healthy subjects, pooled whole-brain Pearson correlation coefficients for F (comparing measured double angle and nominal flip angle B 1 maps) were ρ = 0.97/0.81 for VFA/IR. This work describes the B 1 -sensitivity characteristics of qMT, demonstrating that it varies substantially on the B 1 -dependency of the T 1 mapping method. Particularly, the pool-size ratio is more robust against B 1 inaccuracies if VFA T 1 mapping is used, so much so that B 1 mapping could be omitted without substantially biasing F. Magn Reson Med 79:276-285, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  16. High sensitivity MOSFET-based neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragopoulou, M.; Konstantakos, V.; Zamani, M.; Siskos, S.; Laopoulos, T.; Sarrabayrouse, G.

    2010-01-01

    A new dosemeter based on a metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor sensitive to both neutrons and gamma radiation was manufactured at LAAS-CNRS Laboratory, Toulouse, France. In order to be used for neutron dosimetry, a thin film of lithium fluoride was deposited on the surface of the gate of the device. The characteristics of the dosemeter, such as the dependence of its response to neutron dose and dose rate, were investigated. The studied dosemeter was very sensitive to gamma rays compared to other dosemeters proposed in the literature. Its response in thermal neutrons was found to be much higher than in fast neutrons and gamma rays.

  17. Environmental Sensitivity in Children: Development of the Highly Sensitive Child Scale and Identification of Sensitivity Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluess, Michael; Assary, Elham; Lionetti, Francesca; Lester, Kathryn J.; Krapohl, Eva; Aron, Elaine N.; Aron, Arthur

    2018-01-01

    A large number of studies document that children differ in the degree they are shaped by their developmental context with some being more sensitive to environmental influences than others. Multiple theories suggest that "Environmental Sensitivity" is a common trait predicting the response to negative as well as positive exposures.…

  18. High sensitivity optical measurement of skin gloss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ezerskaia, A.; Ras, Arno; Bloemen, Pascal; Pereira, S.F.; Urbach, Paul; Varghese, Babu

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate a low-cost optical method for measuring the gloss properties with improved sensitivity in the low gloss regime, relevant for skin gloss properties. The gloss estimation method is based on, on the one hand, the slope of the intensity gradient in the transition regime between

  19. Portable high energy gamma ray imagers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guru, S.V.; Squillante, M.R.

    1996-01-01

    To satisfy the needs of high energy gamma ray imagers for industrial nuclear imaging applications, three high energy gamma cameras are presented. The RMD-Pinhole camera uses a lead pinhole collimator and a segmented BGO detector viewed by a 3 in. square position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). This pinhole gamma camera displayed an energy resolution of 25.0% FWHM at the center of the camera at 662 keV and an angular resolution of 6.2 FWHM at 412 keV. The fixed multiple hole collimated camera (FMCC), used a multiple hole collimator and a continuous slab of NaI(Tl) detector viewed by the same PSPMT. The FMCC displayed an energy resolution of 12.4% FWHM at 662 keV at the center of the camera and an angular resolution of 6.0 FWHM at 412 keV. The rotating multiple hole collimated camera (RMCC) used a 180 antisymmetric rotation modulation collimator and CsI(Tl) detectors coupled to PIN silicon photodiodes. The RMCC displayed an energy resolution of 7.1% FWHM at 662 keV and an angular resolution of 4.0 FWHM at 810 keV. The performance of these imagers is discussed in this paper. (orig.)

  20. Heuristic optimization in penumbral image for high resolution reconstructed image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azuma, R.; Nozaki, S.; Fujioka, S.; Chen, Y. W.; Namihira, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Penumbral imaging is a technique which uses the fact that spatial information can be recovered from the shadow or penumbra that an unknown source casts through a simple large circular aperture. The size of the penumbral image on the detector can be mathematically determined as its aperture size, object size, and magnification. Conventional reconstruction methods are very sensitive to noise. On the other hand, the heuristic reconstruction method is very tolerant of noise. However, the aperture size influences the accuracy and resolution of the reconstructed image. In this article, we propose the optimization of the aperture size for the neutron penumbral imaging.

  1. High resolution PET breast imager with improved detection efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Stanislaw

    2010-06-08

    A highly efficient PET breast imager for detecting lesions in the entire breast including those located close to the patient's chest wall. The breast imager includes a ring of imaging modules surrounding the imaged breast. Each imaging module includes a slant imaging light guide inserted between a gamma radiation sensor and a photodetector. The slant light guide permits the gamma radiation sensors to be placed in close proximity to the skin of the chest wall thereby extending the sensitive region of the imager to the base of the breast. Several types of photodetectors are proposed for use in the detector modules, with compact silicon photomultipliers as the preferred choice, due to its high compactness. The geometry of the detector heads and the arrangement of the detector ring significantly reduce dead regions thereby improving detection efficiency for lesions located close to the chest wall.

  2. Plane-wise sensitivity based inhomogeneous excitation fields for magnetorelaxometry imaging of magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgarten, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.baumgarten@tu-ilmenau.de [Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Informatics, Technische Universität Ilmenau, 98693 Ilmenau (Germany); IJN-UTM Cardiovascular Engineering Centre, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor Bahru (Malaysia); Braune, Friedemann [Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Informatics, Technische Universität Ilmenau, 98693 Ilmenau (Germany); Supriyanto, Eko [IJN-UTM Cardiovascular Engineering Centre, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor Bahru (Malaysia); Haueisen, Jens [Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Informatics, Technische Universität Ilmenau, 98693 Ilmenau (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Promising biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles share the need for a quantitative knowledge of their in vivo distribution. From multichannel magnetorelaxometry measurements with sequential activation of inhomogeneous excitation fields, the distribution can be quantitatively determined. In first studies, single excitation coils were consecutively activated. We aim at further advancing this imaging technology by suitable activation patterns involving multiple excitation coils. In this work, we propose the estimation of these patterns based on the spatial sensitivity in order to reduce the number of required measurements. The sensitivity of a voxel carrying magnetic nanoparticles is determined by its position relative to the sensors and the excitation field. Whereas the position is fixed within a given setup, the excitation is controlled by the currents in the coils. The currents required for a defined target sensitivity are estimated by solving an inverse problem. In our work, two target sensitivity paradigms are presented: (a) plane-wise activation, where only one plane with high sensitivities is sought and moved through the source space and (b) plane-wise non-activation, where all voxels except for one plane should receive high sensitivity. Our approach is investigated in simulation studies using a setup with a cubic region of interest and a planar sensor array. The imaging quality of both activation paradigms is evaluated. Our results demonstrate the principal applicability of this spatial sensitivity based approach for defining inhomogeneous activation patterns. The obtained patterns allow for a similar imaging quality using a lower number of activation sequences compared to the conventional single coil activation.

  3. Plane-wise sensitivity based inhomogeneous excitation fields for magnetorelaxometry imaging of magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgarten, Daniel; Braune, Friedemann; Supriyanto, Eko; Haueisen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Promising biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles share the need for a quantitative knowledge of their in vivo distribution. From multichannel magnetorelaxometry measurements with sequential activation of inhomogeneous excitation fields, the distribution can be quantitatively determined. In first studies, single excitation coils were consecutively activated. We aim at further advancing this imaging technology by suitable activation patterns involving multiple excitation coils. In this work, we propose the estimation of these patterns based on the spatial sensitivity in order to reduce the number of required measurements. The sensitivity of a voxel carrying magnetic nanoparticles is determined by its position relative to the sensors and the excitation field. Whereas the position is fixed within a given setup, the excitation is controlled by the currents in the coils. The currents required for a defined target sensitivity are estimated by solving an inverse problem. In our work, two target sensitivity paradigms are presented: (a) plane-wise activation, where only one plane with high sensitivities is sought and moved through the source space and (b) plane-wise non-activation, where all voxels except for one plane should receive high sensitivity. Our approach is investigated in simulation studies using a setup with a cubic region of interest and a planar sensor array. The imaging quality of both activation paradigms is evaluated. Our results demonstrate the principal applicability of this spatial sensitivity based approach for defining inhomogeneous activation patterns. The obtained patterns allow for a similar imaging quality using a lower number of activation sequences compared to the conventional single coil activation

  4. Development of high sensitivity and high speed large size blank inspection system LBIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Shinobu; Yoshida, Akinori; Hirai, Mitsuo; Kato, Takenori; Moriizumi, Koichi; Kusunose, Haruhiko

    2017-07-01

    The production of high-resolution flat panel displays (FPDs) for mobile phones today requires the use of high-quality large-size photomasks (LSPMs). Organic light emitting diode (OLED) displays use several transistors on each pixel for precise current control and, as such, the mask patterns for OLED displays are denser and finer than the patterns for the previous generation displays throughout the entire mask surface. It is therefore strongly demanded that mask patterns be produced with high fidelity and free of defect. To enable the production of a high quality LSPM in a short lead time, the manufacturers need a high-sensitivity high-speed mask blank inspection system that meets the requirement of advanced LSPMs. Lasertec has developed a large-size blank inspection system called LBIS, which achieves high sensitivity based on a laser-scattering technique. LBIS employs a high power laser as its inspection light source. LBIS's delivery optics, including a scanner and F-Theta scan lens, focus the light from the source linearly on the surface of the blank. Its specially-designed optics collect the light scattered by particles and defects generated during the manufacturing process, such as scratches, on the surface and guide it to photo multiplier tubes (PMTs) with high efficiency. Multiple PMTs are used on LBIS for the stable detection of scattered light, which may be distributed at various angles due to irregular shapes of defects. LBIS captures 0.3mμ PSL at a detection rate of over 99.5% with uniform sensitivity. Its inspection time is 20 minutes for a G8 blank and 35 minutes for G10. The differential interference contrast (DIC) microscope on the inspection head of LBIS captures high-contrast review images after inspection. The images are classified automatically.

  5. Faraday imaging at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Reichert, Patrick

    1997-01-01

    A Faraday filter rejects background light from self-luminous thermal objects, but transmits laser light at the passband wavelength, thus providing an ultra-narrow optical bandpass filter. The filter preserves images so a camera looking through a Faraday filter at a hot target illuminated by a laser will not see the thermal radiation but will see the laser radiation. Faraday filters are useful for monitoring or inspecting the uranium separator chamber in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. Other uses include viewing welds, furnaces, plasma jets, combustion chambers, and other high temperature objects. These filters are can be produced at many discrete wavelengths. A Faraday filter consists of a pair of crossed polarizers on either side of a heated vapor cell mounted inside a solenoid.

  6. Faraday imaging at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackel, L.A.; Reichert, P.

    1997-01-01

    A Faraday filter rejects background light from self-luminous thermal objects, but transmits laser light at the passband wavelength, thus providing an ultra-narrow optical bandpass filter. The filter preserves images so a camera looking through a Faraday filter at a hot target illuminated by a laser will not see the thermal radiation but will see the laser radiation. Faraday filters are useful for monitoring or inspecting the uranium separator chamber in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. Other uses include viewing welds, furnaces, plasma jets, combustion chambers, and other high temperature objects. These filters are can be produced at many discrete wavelengths. A Faraday filter consists of a pair of crossed polarizers on either side of a heated vapor cell mounted inside a solenoid. 3 figs

  7. Muscle magnetic resonance imaging sensitivity does not decrease in chronic, mild, or proximal lower limb neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deroide, Nicolas; Bousson, Valérie; Daguet, Edouard; Dumurgier, Julien; Tin, Sophie Ng Wing; Hannouche, Didier; Richette, Pascal; Beaudreuil, Johann; Lioté, Frédéric; Lévy, Bernard; Vicaut, Eric; Laredo, Jean Denis; Kubis, Nathalie

    2012-05-01

    Muscle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an innovative tool for exploring focal neuropathies. However, its usefulness in mild, proximal, or chronic lesions, when electromyography (EMG), the current "gold standard" sensitivity is inadequate, has yet to be studied. Clinical, MRI, and EMG examinations were performed in 113 muscles of 17 consecutive patients with clinically diagnosed lower limb focal neuropathies. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI and EMG were evaluated in relation to disease duration, severity, and anatomical location. Muscle MRI was highly sensitive for the detection of denervated muscle, and, unlike EMG, its sensitivity did not decrease regardless of the anatomical location, duration, or severity of the neuropathy. Five MRI false positives were noted, including three in the thigh muscles. Muscle MRI is an alternative tool to EMG in proximal, mild, or chronic clinical diagnoses of lower limb focal neuropathies. However, it also seems prone to false-positive results, particularly in proximal muscles. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The selectively bred high alcohol sensitivity (HAS) and low alcohol sensitivity (LAS) rats differ in sensitivity to nicotine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fiebre, NancyEllen C; Dawson, Ralph; de Fiebre, Christopher M

    2002-06-01

    Studies in rodents selectively bred to differ in alcohol sensitivity have suggested that nicotine and ethanol sensitivities may cosegregate during selective breeding. This suggests that ethanol and nicotine sensitivities may in part be genetically correlated. Male and female high alcohol sensitivity (HAS), control alcohol sensitivity, and low alcohol sensitivity (LAS) rats were tested for nicotine-induced alterations in locomotor activity, body temperature, and seizure activity. Plasma and brain levels of nicotine and its primary metabolite, cotinine, were measured in these animals, as was the binding of [3H]cytisine, [3H]epibatidine, and [125I]alpha-bungarotoxin in eight brain regions. Both replicate HAS lines were more sensitive to nicotine-induced locomotor activity depression than the replicate LAS lines. No consistent HAS/LAS differences were seen on other measures of nicotine sensitivity; however, females were more susceptible to nicotine-induced seizures than males. No HAS/LAS differences in nicotine or cotinine levels were seen, nor were differences seen in the binding of nicotinic ligands. Females had higher levels of plasma cotinine and brain nicotine than males but had lower brain cotinine levels than males. Sensitivity to a specific action of nicotine cosegregates during selective breeding for differential sensitivity to a specific action of ethanol. The differential sensitivity of the HAS/LAS rats is due to differences in central nervous system sensitivity and not to pharmacokinetic differences. The differential central nervous system sensitivity cannot be explained by differences in the numbers of nicotinic receptors labeled in ligand-binding experiments. The apparent genetic correlation between ethanol and nicotine sensitivities suggests that common genes modulate, in part, the actions of both ethanol and nicotine and may explain the frequent coabuse of these agents.

  9. Luminescent Lanthanide Reporters for High-Sensitivity Novel Bioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anstey, Mitchell R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Fruetel, Julia A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Foster, Michael E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Hayden, Carl C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Buckley, Heather L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Arnold, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Biological imaging and assay technologies rely on fluorescent organic dyes as reporters for a number of interesting targets and processes. However, limitations of organic dyes such as small Stokes shifts, spectral overlap of emission signals with native biological fluorescence background, and photobleaching have all inhibited the development of highly sensitive assays. To overcome the limitations of organic dyes for bioassays, we propose to develop lanthanide-based luminescent dyes and demonstrate them for molecular reporting applications. This relatively new family of dyes was selected for their attractive spectral and chemical properties. Luminescence is imparted by the lanthanide atom and allows for relatively simple chemical structures that can be tailored to the application. The photophysical properties offer unique features such as narrow and non-overlapping emission bands, long luminescent lifetimes, and long wavelength emission, which enable significant sensitivity improvements over organic dyes through spectral and temporal gating of the luminescent signal.Growth in this field has been hindered due to the necessary advanced synthetic chemistry techniques and access to experts in biological assay development. Our strategy for the development of a new lanthanide-based fluorescent reporter system is based on chelation of the lanthanide metal center using absorbing chromophores. Our first strategy involves "Click" chemistry to develop 3-fold symmetric chelators and the other involves use of a new class of tetrapyrrole ligands called corroles. This two-pronged approach is geared towards the optimization of chromophores to enhance light output.

  10. Cheetah: A high frame rate, high resolution SWIR image camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neys, Joel; Bentell, Jonas; O'Grady, Matt; Vermeiren, Jan; Colin, Thierry; Hooylaerts, Peter; Grietens, Bob

    2008-10-01

    A high resolution, high frame rate InGaAs based image sensor and associated camera has been developed. The sensor and the camera are capable of recording and delivering more than 1700 full 640x512pixel frames per second. The FPA utilizes a low lag CTIA current integrator in each pixel, enabling integration times shorter than one microsecond. On-chip logics allows for four different sub windows to be read out simultaneously at even higher rates. The spectral sensitivity of the FPA is situated in the SWIR range [0.9-1.7 μm] and can be further extended into the Visible and NIR range. The Cheetah camera has max 16 GB of on-board memory to store the acquired images and transfer the data over a Gigabit Ethernet connection to the PC. The camera is also equipped with a full CameralinkTM interface to directly stream the data to a frame grabber or dedicated image processing unit. The Cheetah camera is completely under software control.

  11. High-Sensitivity GaN Microchemical Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Kyung-ah; Yang, Baohua; Liao, Anna; Moon, Jeongsun; Prokopuk, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    Systematic studies have been performed on the sensitivity of GaN HEMT (high electron mobility transistor) sensors using various gate electrode designs and operational parameters. The results here show that a higher sensitivity can be achieved with a larger W/L ratio (W = gate width, L = gate length) at a given D (D = source-drain distance), and multi-finger gate electrodes offer a higher sensitivity than a one-finger gate electrode. In terms of operating conditions, sensor sensitivity is strongly dependent on transconductance of the sensor. The highest sensitivity can be achieved at the gate voltage where the slope of the transconductance curve is the largest. This work provides critical information about how the gate electrode of a GaN HEMT, which has been identified as the most sensitive among GaN microsensors, needs to be designed, and what operation parameters should be used for high sensitivity detection.

  12. High resolution imaging detectors and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Swapan K

    2015-01-01

    Interferometric observations need snapshots of very high time resolution of the order of (i) frame integration of about 100 Hz or (ii) photon-recording rates of several megahertz (MHz). Detectors play a key role in astronomical observations, and since the explanation of the photoelectric effect by Albert Einstein, the technology has evolved rather fast. The present-day technology has made it possible to develop large-format complementary metal oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) and charge-coupled device (CCD) array mosaics, orthogonal transfer CCDs, electron-multiplication CCDs, electron-avalanche photodiode arrays, and quantum-well infrared (IR) photon detectors. The requirements to develop artifact-free photon shot noise-limited images are higher sensitivity and quantum efficiency, reduced noise that includes dark current, read-out and amplifier noise, smaller point-spread functions, and higher spectral bandwidth. This book aims to address such systems, technologies and design, evaluation and calibration, control...

  13. Development of a highly sensitive lithium fluoride thermoluminescence dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes da Silva, Teresinha de; Campos, Leticia Lucente

    1995-01-01

    In recent times, LiF: Mg, Cu, P thermoluminescent phosphor has been increasingly in use for radiation monitoring due its high sensitivity and ease of preparation. The Dosimetric Materials Production Laboratory of IPEN, (Nuclear Energy Institute) has developed a simple method to obtain high sensitivity LiF. The preparation method is described. (author). 4 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  14. High dynamic range coding imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Renfan; Huang, Yifan; Hou, Guangqi

    2014-10-01

    We present a high dynamic range (HDR) imaging system design scheme based on coded aperture technique. This scheme can help us obtain HDR images which have extended depth of field. We adopt Sparse coding algorithm to design coded patterns. Then we utilize the sensor unit to acquire coded images under different exposure settings. With the guide of the multiple exposure parameters, a series of low dynamic range (LDR) coded images are reconstructed. We use some existing algorithms to fuse and display a HDR image by those LDR images. We build an optical simulation model and get some simulation images to verify the novel system.

  15. Triggers for a high sensitivity charm experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christian, D.C.

    1994-07-01

    Any future charm experiment clearly should implement an E T trigger and a μ trigger. In order to reach the 10 8 reconstructed charm level for hadronic final states, a high quality vertex trigger will almost certainly also be necessary. The best hope for the development of an offline quality vertex trigger lies in further development of the ideas of data-driven processing pioneered by the Nevis/U. Mass. group

  16. Sensitivity of imaging properties of metal-dielectric layered flat lens to fabrication inaccuracies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotynski, R.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Stefaniuk, T.

    2010-01-01

    We characterize the sensitivity of imaging properties of a layered silver-TiO2 flat lens to fabrication inaccuracies. The lens is designed for approximately diffraction-free imaging with subwavelength resolution at distances in the order of a wavelength. Its operation may be attributed to self......-collimation with a secondary role of Fabry-Perot resonant transmission, even though the first order effective medium description of the structure is inaccurate. Super-resolution is maintained for a broad range of overall thicknesses and the total thickness of the multilayer is limited by absorption. The tolerance analysis...... indicates that the resolution and transmission efficiency are highly sensitive to small changes of layer thicknesses....

  17. High speed global shutter image sensors for professional applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xu; Meynants, Guy

    2015-04-01

    Global shutter imagers expand the use to miscellaneous applications, such as machine vision, 3D imaging, medical imaging, space etc. to eliminate motion artifacts in rolling shutter imagers. A low noise global shutter pixel requires more than one non-light sensitive memory to reduce the read noise. But larger memory area reduces the fill-factor of the pixels. Modern micro-lenses technology can compensate this fill-factor loss. Backside illumination (BSI) is another popular technique to improve the pixel fill-factor. But some pixel architecture may not reach sufficient shutter efficiency with backside illumination. Non-light sensitive memory elements make the fabrication with BSI possible. Machine vision like fast inspection system, medical imaging like 3D medical or scientific applications always ask for high frame rate global shutter image sensors. Thanks to the CMOS technology, fast Analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) can be integrated on chip. Dual correlated double sampling (CDS) on chip ADC with high interface digital data rate reduces the read noise and makes more on-chip operation control. As a result, a global shutter imager with digital interface is a very popular solution for applications with high performance and high frame rate requirements. In this paper we will review the global shutter architectures developed in CMOSIS, discuss their optimization process and compare their performances after fabrication.

  18. Low Power and High Sensitivity MOSFET-Based Pressure Sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhao-Hua; Ren Tian-Ling; Zhang Yan-Hong; Han Rui-Rui; Liu Li-Tian

    2012-01-01

    Based on the metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) stress sensitive phenomenon, a low power MOSFET pressure sensor is proposed. Compared with the traditional piezoresistive pressure sensor, the present pressure sensor displays high performances on sensitivity and power consumption. The sensitivity of the MOSFET sensor is raised by 87%, meanwhile the power consumption is decreased by 20%. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  19. Algorithm sensitivity analysis and parameter tuning for tissue image segmentation pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurç, Tahsin M.; Taveira, Luís F. R.; Melo, Alba C. M. A.; Gao, Yi; Kong, Jun; Saltz, Joel H.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Motivation: Sensitivity analysis and parameter tuning are important processes in large-scale image analysis. They are very costly because the image analysis workflows are required to be executed several times to systematically correlate output variations with parameter changes or to tune parameters. An integrated solution with minimum user interaction that uses effective methodologies and high performance computing is required to scale these studies to large imaging datasets and expensive analysis workflows. Results: The experiments with two segmentation workflows show that the proposed approach can (i) quickly identify and prune parameters that are non-influential; (ii) search a small fraction (about 100 points) of the parameter search space with billions to trillions of points and improve the quality of segmentation results (Dice and Jaccard metrics) by as much as 1.42× compared to the results from the default parameters; (iii) attain good scalability on a high performance cluster with several effective optimizations. Conclusions: Our work demonstrates the feasibility of performing sensitivity analyses, parameter studies and auto-tuning with large datasets. The proposed framework can enable the quantification of error estimations and output variations in image segmentation pipelines. Availability and Implementation: Source code: https://github.com/SBU-BMI/region-templates/. Contact: teodoro@unb.br Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:28062445

  20. Semiconductor crystal high resolution imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Craig S. (Inventor); Matteson, James (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A radiation imaging device (10). The radiation image device (10) comprises a subject radiation station (12) producing photon emissions (14), and at least one semiconductor crystal detector (16) arranged in an edge-on orientation with respect to the emitted photons (14) to directly receive the emitted photons (14) and produce a signal. The semiconductor crystal detector (16) comprises at least one anode and at least one cathode that produces the signal in response to the emitted photons (14).

  1. Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging (HROI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging (HROI) develops novel technologies for studying biological processes at unprecedented speed and resolution. Research...

  2. High-speed reconstruction of compressed images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Jerome R., Jr.; Moore, Stephen M.

    1990-07-01

    A compression scheme is described that allows high-definition radiological images with greater than 8-bit intensity resolution to be represented by 8-bit pixels. Reconstruction of the images with their original intensity resolution can be carried out by means of a pipeline architecture suitable for compact, high-speed implementation. A reconstruction system is described that can be fabricated according to this approach and placed between an 8-bit display buffer and the display's video system thereby allowing contrast control of images at video rates. Results for 50 CR chest images are described showing that error-free reconstruction of the original 10-bit CR images can be achieved.

  3. Novel charge sensitive preamplifier without high-value feedback resistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi Deming

    1992-01-01

    A novel charge sensitive preamplifier is introduced. The method of removing the high value feedback resistor, the circuit design and analysis are described. A practical circuit and its measured performances are provided

  4. Recent advances in surface plasmon resonance imaging: detection speed, sensitivity, and portability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Youjun

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Surface plasmon resonance (SPR biosensor is a powerful tool for studying the kinetics of biomolecular interactions because they offer unique real-time and label-free measurement capabilities with high detection sensitivity. In the past two decades, SPR technology has been successfully commercialized and its performance has continuously been improved with lots of engineering efforts. In this review, we describe the recent advances in SPR technologies. The developments of SPR technologies focusing on detection speed, sensitivity, and portability are discussed in details. The incorporation of imaging techniques into SPR sensing is emphasized. In addition, our SPR imaging biosensors based on the scanning of wavelength by a solid-state tunable wavelength filter are highlighted. Finally, significant advances of the vast developments in nanotechnology-associated SPR sensing for sensitivity enhancements are also reviewed. It is hoped that this review will provide some insights for researchers who are interested in SPR sensing, and help them develop SPR sensors with better sensitivity and higher throughput.

  5. Probe-Specific Procedure to Estimate Sensitivity and Detection Limits for 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J Taylor

    Full Text Available Due to low fluorine background signal in vivo, 19F is a good marker to study the fate of exogenous molecules by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI using equilibrium nuclear spin polarization schemes. Since 19F MRI applications require high sensitivity, it can be important to assess experimental feasibility during the design stage already by estimating the minimum detectable fluorine concentration. Here we propose a simple method for the calibration of MRI hardware, providing sensitivity estimates for a given scanner and coil configuration. An experimental "calibration factor" to account for variations in coil configuration and hardware set-up is specified. Once it has been determined in a calibration experiment, the sensitivity of an experiment or, alternatively, the minimum number of required spins or the minimum marker concentration can be estimated without the need for a pilot experiment. The definition of this calibration factor is derived based on standard equations for the sensitivity in magnetic resonance, yet the method is not restricted by the limited validity of these equations, since additional instrument-dependent factors are implicitly included during calibration. The method is demonstrated using MR spectroscopy and imaging experiments with different 19F samples, both paramagnetically and susceptibility broadened, to approximate a range of realistic environments.

  6. Probe-Specific Procedure to Estimate Sensitivity and Detection Limits for 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alexander J; Granwehr, Josef; Lesbats, Clémentine; Krupa, James L; Six, Joseph S; Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Thomas, Neil R; Auer, Dorothee P; Meersmann, Thomas; Faas, Henryk M

    2016-01-01

    Due to low fluorine background signal in vivo, 19F is a good marker to study the fate of exogenous molecules by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using equilibrium nuclear spin polarization schemes. Since 19F MRI applications require high sensitivity, it can be important to assess experimental feasibility during the design stage already by estimating the minimum detectable fluorine concentration. Here we propose a simple method for the calibration of MRI hardware, providing sensitivity estimates for a given scanner and coil configuration. An experimental "calibration factor" to account for variations in coil configuration and hardware set-up is specified. Once it has been determined in a calibration experiment, the sensitivity of an experiment or, alternatively, the minimum number of required spins or the minimum marker concentration can be estimated without the need for a pilot experiment. The definition of this calibration factor is derived based on standard equations for the sensitivity in magnetic resonance, yet the method is not restricted by the limited validity of these equations, since additional instrument-dependent factors are implicitly included during calibration. The method is demonstrated using MR spectroscopy and imaging experiments with different 19F samples, both paramagnetically and susceptibility broadened, to approximate a range of realistic environments.

  7. Recent advances in surface plasmon resonance imaging: detection speed, sensitivity, and portability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Youjun; Hu, Rui; Wang, Lei; Gu, Dayong; He, Jianan; Wu, Shu-Yuen; Ho, Ho-Pui; Li, Xuejin; Qu, Junle; Gao, Bruce Zhi; Shao, Yonghong

    2017-06-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor is a powerful tool for studying the kinetics of biomolecular interactions because they offer unique real-time and label-free measurement capabilities with high detection sensitivity. In the past two decades, SPR technology has been successfully commercialized and its performance has continuously been improved with lots of engineering efforts. In this review, we describe the recent advances in SPR technologies. The developments of SPR technologies focusing on detection speed, sensitivity, and portability are discussed in details. The incorporation of imaging techniques into SPR sensing is emphasized. In addition, our SPR imaging biosensors based on the scanning of wavelength by a solid-state tunable wavelength filter are highlighted. Finally, significant advances of the vast developments in nanotechnology-associated SPR sensing for sensitivity enhancements are also reviewed. It is hoped that this review will provide some insights for researchers who are interested in SPR sensing, and help them develop SPR sensors with better sensitivity and higher throughput.

  8. Synthesis and evaluation of a new Rhodamine B and Di(2-picolyl)amine conjugate as a highly sensitive and selective chemosensor for Al3+ and its application in living-cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaofeng; Cao, Qiansheng; Xu, Yazhou; Gao, Yuanxue; Xu, Yuan; Nie, Xuemei; Zhou, Baojing; Pang, Tao; Zhu, Jing

    2015-02-15

    A new Rhodamine B derivative (RBDPA), namely, N(1)-(2-(3',6'-bis(diethylamino)-3-oxospiro[isoindoline-1,9'-xanthen]-2-yl)ethyl)-N(4),N(4)-bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)succinamide, was designed, synthesized and structurally characterized to develop a chemosensor. The studies show that RBDPA exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity toward Al(3+) among many other metal cations in an ethanol/H2O (1:1, v/v, pH=7.2, HEPES buffer, 0.1mM) solution. Fluorescence microscopy experiments further demonstrate that RBDPA can be used as a fluorescent probe to detect Al(3+) in living cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of a high sensitivity monitor for radionuclides characterization. Final report, August 1995--April 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the development of a high sensitivity monitor for radiation, and the feasibility of applying a new radiation imaging concept developed for medical research to soil contamination. The concept utilizes sensors with storage photostimulable phosphor technology as radiation detectors. They are applicable to all types of radiation including tritium.

  10. Development of a high sensitivity monitor for radionuclides characterization. Final report, August 1995--April 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the development of a high sensitivity monitor for radiation, and the feasibility of applying a new radiation imaging concept developed for medical research to soil contamination. The concept utilizes sensors with storage photostimulable phosphor technology as radiation detectors. They are applicable to all types of radiation including tritium

  11. High-speed high-sensitivity infrared spectroscopy using mid-infrared swept lasers (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, David T. D.; Groom, Kristian M.; Hogg, Richard A.; Revin, Dmitry G.; Cockburn, John W.; Rehman, Ihtesham U.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is a highly attractive read-out technology for compositional analysis of biomedical specimens because of its unique combination of high molecular sensitivity without the need for exogenous labels. Traditional techniques such as FTIR and Raman have suffered from comparatively low speed and sensitivity however recent innovations are challenging this situation. Direct mid-IR spectroscopy is being speeded up by innovations such as MEMS-based FTIR instruments with very high mirror speeds and supercontinuum sources producing very high sample irradiation levels. Here we explore another possible method - external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL's) with high cavity tuning speeds (mid-IR swept lasers). Swept lasers have been heavily developed in the near-infrared where they are used for non-destructive low-coherence imaging (OCT). We adapt these concepts in two ways. Firstly by combining mid-IR quantum cascade gain chips with external cavity designs adapted from OCT we achieve spectral acquisition rates approaching 1 kHz and demonstrate potential to reach 100 kHz. Secondly we show that mid-IR swept lasers share a fundamental sensitivity advantage with near-IR OCT swept lasers. This makes them potentially able to achieve the same spectral SNR as an FTIR instrument in a time x N shorter (N being the number of spectral points) under otherwise matched conditions. This effect is demonstrated using measurements of a PDMS sample. The combination of potentially very high spectral acquisition rates, fundamental SNR advantage and the use of low-cost detector systems could make mid-IR swept lasers a powerful technology for high-throughput biomedical spectroscopy.

  12. Highly integrated image sensors enable low-cost imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Paul K.; Lake, Don; Chalmers, David; Hurwitz, J. E. D.

    1997-09-01

    The highest barriers to wide scale implementation of vision systems have been cost. This is closely followed by the level of difficulty of putting a complete imaging system together. As anyone who has every been in the position of creating a vision system knows, the various bits and pieces supplied by the many vendors are not under any type of standardization control. In short, unless you are an expert in imaging, electrical interfacing, computers, digital signal processing, and high speed storage techniques, you will likely spend more money trying to do it yourself rather than to buy the exceedingly expensive systems available. Another alternative is making headway into the imaging market however. The growing investment in highly integrated CMOS based imagers is addressing both the cost and the system integration difficulties. This paper discusses the benefits gained from CMOS based imaging, and how these benefits are already being applied.

  13. Context sensitive labeling of spinal structure in MR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhole, Chetan; Kompalli, Suryaprakash; Chaudhary, Vipin

    2009-02-01

    We present a new method for automatic detection of the lumbar vertebrae and disk structure from MR images. In clinical settings, radiologists utilize several images of the lumbar structure for diagnosis of lumbar disorders. These images are co-registered by technicians and represent orthogonal features of the lumbar region. We combine information from T1W sagittal, T2W sagittal and T2W axial MR images to automatically label disks and vertebral columns. The method couples geometric and tissue property information available from the three types of images with image analysis approaches to achieve 98.8% accuracy for the disk labeling task on a test set of 67 images containing 335 disks.

  14. Wide-Field Imaging of Single-Nanoparticle Extinction with Sub-nm2 Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Lukas M.; Langbein, Wolfgang; Borri, Paola

    2018-03-01

    We report on a highly sensitive wide-field imaging technique for quantitative measurement of the optical extinction cross section σext of single nanoparticles. The technique is simple and high speed, and it enables the simultaneous acquisition of hundreds of nanoparticles for statistical analysis. Using rapid referencing, fast acquisition, and a deconvolution analysis, a shot-noise-limited sensitivity down to 0.4 nm2 is achieved. Measurements on a set of individual gold nanoparticles of 5 nm diameter using this method yield σext=(10.0 ±3.1 ) nm2, which is consistent with theoretical expectations and well above the background fluctuations of 0.9 nm2 .

  15. High-resolution imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennycook, S.J.; Jesson, D.E.

    1992-03-01

    The high-resolution imaging of crystalline materials in the scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is reviewed with particular emphasis on the conditions under which an incoherent image can be obtained. It is shown that a high-angle annular detector can be used to break the coherence of the imaging process, in the transverse plane through the geometry of the detector, or in three dimensions if multiphonon diffuse scattering is detected. In the latter case, each atom can be treated as a highly independent source of high-angle scattering. The most effective fast electron states are therefore tightly bound s-type Bloch states. Furthermore, they add constructively for each incident angle in the coherent STEM probe, so that s states are responsible for practically the entire image contrast. Dynamical effects are largely removed, and almost perfect incoherent imaging is achieved. s states are relatively insensitive to neighboring strings, so that incoherent imaging is maintained for superlattice and interfaces, and supercell calculations are unnecessary. With an optimum probe profile, the incoherent image represents a direct image of the crystal projection, with compositional sensitivity built in through the strong dependence of the scattering cross sections on atomic number Z

  16. A high-sensitivity neutron counter and waste-drum counting with the high-sensitivity neutron instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hankins, D.E.; Thorngate, J.H.

    1993-04-01

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), a highly sensitive neutron counter was developed that can detect and accurately measure the neutrons from small quantities of plutonium or from other low-level neutron sources. This neutron counter was originally designed to survey waste containers leaving the Plutonium Facility. However, it has proven to be useful in other research applications requiring a high-sensitivity neutron instrument

  17. Highly sensitive and multiplexed platforms for allergy diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Margo R.

    Allergy is a disorder of the immune system caused by an immune response to otherwise harmless environmental allergens. Currently 20% of the US population is allergic and 90% of pediatric patients and 60% of adult patients with asthma have allergies. These percentages have increased by 18.5% in the past decade, with predicted similar trends for the future. Here we design sensitive, multiplexed platforms to detect allergen-specific IgE using the Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (IRIS) for various clinical settings. A microarray platform for allergy diagnosis allows for testing of specific IgE sensitivity to a multitude of allergens, while requiring only small volumes of patient blood sample. However, conventional fluorescent microarray technology is limited by i) the variation of probe immobilization, which hinders the ability to make quantitative, assertive, and statistically relevant conclusions necessary in immunodiagnostics and ii) the use of fluorophore labels, which is not suitable for some clinical applications due to the tendency of fluorophores to stick to blood particulates and require daily calibration methods. This calibrated fluorescence enhancement (CaFE) method integrates the low magnification modality of IRIS with enhanced fluorescence sensing in order to directly correlate immobilized probe (major allergens) density to allergen-specific IgE in patient serum. However, this platform only operates in processed serum samples, which is not ideal for point of care testing. Thus, a high magnification modality of IRIS was adapted as an alternative allergy diagnostic platform to automatically discriminate and size single nanoparticles bound to specific IgE in unprocessed, characterized human blood and serum samples. These features make IRIS an ideal candidate for clinical and diagnostic applications, such a POC testing. The high magnification (nanoparticle counting) modality in conjunction with low magnification of IRIS in a combined instrument

  18. High frame rate synthetic aperture duplex imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stuart, Matthias Bo; Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev; Pihl, Michael Johannes

    2013-01-01

    aperture flow imaging as demonstrated in this paper. Synthetic aperture, directional beamforming, and cross-correlation are used to produce B-mode and vector velocity images at high frame rates. The frame rate equals the effective pulse repetition frequency of each imaging mode. Emissions for making the B...... estimation is −1.8% and the relative standard deviation 5.4%. The approach can thus estimate both high and low velocities with equal accuracy and thereby makes it possible to present vector flow images with a high dynamic range. Measurements are made using the SARUS research scanner, a linear array......Conventional color flow images are limited in velocity range and can either show the high velocities in systole or be optimized for the lower diastolic velocities. The full dynamics of the flow is, thus, hard to visualize. The dynamic range can be significantly increased by employing synthetic...

  19. A Sensitive Measurement for Estimating Impressions of Image-Contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Mie; Matouge, Shingo; Mori, Toshifumi; Suzuki, Noboru; Kasuga, Masao

    We have investigated Kansei Content that appeals maker's intention to viewer's kansei. An SD method is a very good way to evaluate subjective impression of image-contents. However, because the SD method is performed after subjects view the image-contents, it is difficult to examine impression of detailed scenes of the image-contents in real time. To measure viewer's impression of the image-contents in real time, we have developed a Taikan sensor. With the Taikan sensor, we investigate relations among the image-contents, the grip strength and the body temperature. We also explore the interface of the Taikan sensor to use it easily. In our experiment, a horror movie is used that largely affects emotion of the subjects. Our results show that there is a possibility that the grip strength increases when the subjects view a strained scene and that it is easy to use the Taikan sensor without its circle base that is originally installed.

  20. Terahertz reflectometry imaging for low and high grade gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Young Bin; Oh, Seung Jae; Kang, Seok-Gu; Heo, Jung; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Choi, Yuna; Song, Seungri; Son, Hye Young; Kim, Se Hoon; Lee, Ji Hyun; Haam, Seung Joo; Huh, Yong Min; Chang, Jong Hee; Joo, Chulmin; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2016-01-01

    Gross total resection (GTR) of glioma is critical for improving the survival rate of glioma patients. One of the greatest challenges for achieving GTR is the difficulty in discriminating low grade tumor or peritumor regions that have an intact blood brain barrier (BBB) from normal brain tissues and delineating glioma margins during surgery. Here we present a highly sensitive, label-free terahertz reflectometry imaging (TRI) that overcomes current key limitations for intraoperative detection of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II (low grade), and grade III and IV (high grade) gliomas. We demonstrate that TRI provides tumor discrimination and delineation of tumor margins in brain tissues with high sensitivity on the basis of Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained image. TRI may help neurosurgeons to remove gliomas completely by providing visualization of tumor margins in WHO grade II, III, and IV gliomas without contrast agents, and hence, improve patient outcomes. PMID:27782153

  1. Achieving sensitive, high-resolution laser spectroscopy at CRIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groote, R. P. de [Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven (Belgium); Lynch, K. M., E-mail: kara.marie.lynch@cern.ch [EP Department, CERN, ISOLDE (Switzerland); Wilkins, S. G. [The University of Manchester, School of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Collaboration: the CRIS collaboration

    2017-11-15

    The Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment, located at the ISOLDE facility, has recently performed high-resolution laser spectroscopy, with linewidths down to 20 MHz. In this article, we present the modifications to the beam line and the newly-installed laser systems that have made sensitive, high-resolution measurements possible. Highlights of recent experimental campaigns are presented.

  2. Multimodal Nonlinear Optical Imaging for Sensitive Detection of Multiple Pharmaceutical Solid-State Forms and Surface Transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakovic, Dunja; Saarinen, Jukka; Rojalin, Tatu; Antikainen, Osmo; Fraser-Miller, Sara J; Laaksonen, Timo; Peltonen, Leena; Isomäki, Antti; Strachan, Clare J

    2017-11-07

    Two nonlinear imaging modalities, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and sum-frequency generation (SFG), were successfully combined for sensitive multimodal imaging of multiple solid-state forms and their changes on drug tablet surfaces. Two imaging approaches were used and compared: (i) hyperspectral CARS combined with principal component analysis (PCA) and SFG imaging and (ii) simultaneous narrowband CARS and SFG imaging. Three different solid-state forms of indomethacin-the crystalline gamma and alpha forms, as well as the amorphous form-were clearly distinguished using both approaches. Simultaneous narrowband CARS and SFG imaging was faster, but hyperspectral CARS and SFG imaging has the potential to be applied to a wider variety of more complex samples. These methodologies were further used to follow crystallization of indomethacin on tablet surfaces under two storage conditions: 30 °C/23% RH and 30 °C/75% RH. Imaging with (sub)micron resolution showed that the approach allowed detection of very early stage surface crystallization. The surfaces progressively crystallized to predominantly (but not exclusively) the gamma form at lower humidity and the alpha form at higher humidity. Overall, this study suggests that multimodal nonlinear imaging is a highly sensitive, solid-state (and chemically) specific, rapid, and versatile imaging technique for understanding and hence controlling (surface) solid-state forms and their complex changes in pharmaceuticals.

  3. High Dynamic Range Imaging Using Multiple Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xinglin; Luo, Haibo; Zhou, Peipei; Zhou, Wei

    2017-06-01

    It is challenging to capture a high-dynamic range (HDR) scene using a low-dynamic range (LDR) camera. This paper presents an approach for improving the dynamic range of cameras by using multiple exposure images of same scene taken under different exposure times. First, the camera response function (CRF) is recovered by solving a high-order polynomial in which only the ratios of the exposures are used. Then, the HDR radiance image is reconstructed by weighted summation of the each radiance maps. After that, a novel local tone mapping (TM) operator is proposed for the display of the HDR radiance image. By solving the high-order polynomial, the CRF can be recovered quickly and easily. Taken the local image feature and characteristic of histogram statics into consideration, the proposed TM operator could preserve the local details efficiently. Experimental result demonstrates the effectiveness of our method. By comparison, the method outperforms other methods in terms of imaging quality.

  4. Classification of high resolution satellite images

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Anders

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis the Support Vector Machine (SVM)is applied on classification of high resolution satellite images. Sveral different measures for classification, including texture mesasures, 1st order statistics, and simple contextual information were evaluated. Additionnally, the image was segmented, using an enhanced watershed method, in order to improve the classification accuracy.

  5. Plasmophore sensitized imaging of ammonia release from biological tissues using optodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroemberg, Niklas; Hakonen, Aron

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A plasmophore sensitized optode for imaging ammonia (NH 3 ) concentrations in muscle tissues was developed. → Ammonia concentrations ranging from 10 nM and upwards can be quantified reversibly with an optical resolution of 127 μm. → The general sensing scheme offers new possibilities for the development of artificial optical noses and tongues. - Abstract: A plasmophore sensitized optode was developed for imaging ammonia (NH 3 ) concentrations in muscle tissues. The developed ammonia sensor and an equivalent non plasmophore version of the sensor were tested side by side to compare their limit of detection, dynamic range, reversibility and overall imaging quality. Bio-degradation patterns of ammonia release from lean porcine skeletal muscle were studied over a period of 11 days. We demonstrate that ammonia concentrations ranging from 10 nM can be quantified reversibly with an optical resolution of 127 μm in a sample area of 25 mm x 35 mm. The plasmophore ammonia optode showed improved reversibility, less false pixels and a 2 nM ammonia detection limit compared to 200 nM for the non-plasmophore sensor. Main principles of the sensing mechanism include ammonia transfer over a gas permeable film, ammonia protonation, nonactin facilitated merocyanine-ammonium coextraction and plasmophore enhancement. The vast signal improvement is suggested to rely on solvatochroism, nanoparticle scattering and plasmonic interactions that are utilized constructively in a fluorescence ratio. In addition to fundamental medicinal and biological research applications in tissue physiology, reversible ammonia quantification will be possible for a majority of demanding imaging and non imaging applications such as monitoring of low ammonia background concentrations in air and non-invasive medicinal diagnosis through medical breath or saliva analysis. The nanoparticle doped sensor constitutes a highly competitive technique for ammonia sensing in complex matrixes and the

  6. Propagation of errors from the sensitivity image in list mode reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Jinyi; Huesman, Ronald H.

    2003-01-01

    List mode image reconstruction is attracting renewed attention. It eliminates the storage of empty sinogram bins. However, a single back projection of all LORs is still necessary for the pre-calculation of a sensitivity image. Since the detection sensitivity is dependent on the object attenuation and detector efficiency, it must be computed for each study. Exact computation of the sensitivity image can be a daunting task for modern scanners with huge numbers of LORs. Thus, some fast approximate calculation may be desirable. In this paper, we theoretically analyze the error propagation from the sensitivity image into the reconstructed image. The theoretical analysis is based on the fixed point condition of the list mode reconstruction. The non-negativity constraint is modeled using the Kuhn-Tucker condition. With certain assumptions and the first order Taylor series approximation, we derive a closed form expression for the error in the reconstructed image as a function of the error in the sensitivity image. The result provides insights on what kind of error might be allowable in the sensitivity image. Computer simulations show that the theoretical results are in good agreement with the measured results

  7. Retinal sensitivity and choroidal thickness in high myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaben, Ahmad; Zapata, Miguel Á; Garcia-Arumi, Jose

    2015-03-01

    To estimate the association between choroidal thickness in the macular area and retinal sensitivity in eyes with high myopia. This investigation was a transversal study of patients with high myopia, all of whom had their retinal sensitivity measured with macular integrity assessment microperimetry. The choroidal thicknesses in the macular area were then measured by optical coherence tomography, and statistical correlations between their functionality and the anatomical structuralism, as assessed by both types of measurements, were analyzed. Ninety-six eyes from 77 patients with high myopia were studied. The patients had a mean age ± standard deviation of 38.9 ± 13.2 years, with spherical equivalent values ranging from -6.00 diopter to -20.00 diopter (8.74 ± 2.73 diopter). The mean central choroidal thickness was 159.00 ± 50.57. The mean choroidal thickness was directly correlated with sensitivity (r = 0.306; P = 0.004) and visual acuity but indirectly correlated with the spherical equivalent values and patient age. The mean sensitivity was not significantly correlated with the macular foveal thickness (r = -0.174; P = 0.101) or with the overall macular thickness (r = 0.103; P = 0.334); furthermore, the mean sensitivity was significantly correlated with visual acuity (r = 0.431; P < 0.001) and the spherical equivalent values (r = -0.306; P = 0.003). Retinal sensitivity in highly myopic eyes is directly correlated with choroidal thickness and does not seem to be associated with retinal thickness. Thus, in patients with high myopia, accurate measurements of choroidal thickness may provide more accurate information about this pathologic condition because choroidal thickness correlates to a greater degree with the functional parameters, patient age, and spherical equivalent values.

  8. High-quality compressive ghost imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Heyan; Zhou, Cheng; Tian, Tian; Liu, Dongqi; Song, Lijun

    2018-04-01

    We propose a high-quality compressive ghost imaging method based on projected Landweber regularization and guided filter, which effectively reduce the undersampling noise and improve the resolution. In our scheme, the original object is reconstructed by decomposing of regularization and denoising steps instead of solving a minimization problem in compressive reconstruction process. The simulation and experimental results show that our method can obtain high ghost imaging quality in terms of PSNR and visual observation.

  9. High contrast two-photon imaging of fingermarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltzfus, Caleb R.; Rebane, Aleksander

    2016-04-01

    Optically-acquired fingermarks are widely used as evidence across law enforcement agencies as well as in the courts of law. A common technique for visualizing latent fingermarks on nonporous surfaces consists of cyanoacrylate fuming of the fingerprint material, followed by impregnation with a fluorescent dye, which under ultra violet (UV) illumination makes the fingermarks visible and thus accessible for digital recording. However, there exist critical circumstances, when the image quality is compromised due to high background scattering, high auto-fluorescence of the substrate material, or other detrimental photo-physical and photo-chemical effects such as light-induced damage to the sample. Here we present a novel near-infrared (NIR), two-photon induced fluorescence imaging modality, which significantly enhances the quality of the fingermark images, especially when obtained from highly reflective and/or scattering surfaces, while at the same time reducing photo-damage to sensitive forensic samples.

  10. High Fidelity Raman Chemical Imaging of Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobba, Venkata Nagamalli Koteswara Rao

    The development of high fidelity Raman imaging systems is important for a number of application areas including material science, bio-imaging, bioscience and healthcare, pharmaceutical analysis, and semiconductor characterization. The use of Raman imaging as a characterization tool for detecting the amorphous and crystalline regions in the biopolymer poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) is the precis of my thesis. In the first chapter, a brief insight about the basics of Raman spectroscopy, Raman chemical imaging, Raman mapping, and Raman imaging techniques has been provided. The second chapter contains details about the successful development of tailored sample of PLLA. Biodegradable polymers are used in areas of tissue engineering, agriculture, packaging, and in medical field for drug delivery, implant devices, and surgical sutures. Detailed information about the sample preparation and characterization of these cold-drawn PLLA polymer substrates has been provided. Wide-field Raman hyperspectral imaging using an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) was demonstrated in the early 1990s. The AOTF contributed challenges such as image walk, distortion, and image blur. A wide-field AOTF Raman imaging system has been developed as part of my research and methods to overcome some of the challenges in performing AOTF wide-field Raman imaging are discussed in the third chapter. This imaging system has been used for studying the crystalline and amorphous regions on the cold-drawn sample of PLLA. Of all the different modalities that are available for performing Raman imaging, Raman point-mapping is the most extensively used method. The ease of obtaining the Raman hyperspectral cube dataset with a high spectral and spatial resolution is the main motive of performing this technique. As a part of my research, I have constructed a Raman point-mapping system and used it for obtaining Raman hyperspectral image data of various minerals, pharmaceuticals, and polymers. Chapter four offers

  11. BH3105 type neutron dose equivalent meter of high sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Changsong; Zhang Enshan; Yang Jianfeng; Zhang Hong; Huang Jiling

    1995-10-01

    It is noted that to design a neutron dose meter of high sensitivity is almost impossible in the frame of traditional designing principle--'absorption net principle'. Based on a newly proposed principle of obtaining neutron dose equi-biological effect adjustment--' absorption stick principle', a brand-new neutron dose-equivalent meter with high neutron sensitivity BH3105 has been developed. Its sensitivity reaches 10 cps/(μSv·h -1 ), which is 18∼40 times higher than one of foreign products of the same kind and is 10 4 times higher than that of domestic FJ342 neutron rem-meter. BH3105 has a measurement range from 0.1μSv/h to 1 Sv/h which is 1 or 2 orders wider than that of the other's. It has the advanced properties of gamma-resistance, energy response, orientation, etc. (6 tabs., 5 figs.)

  12. A high sensitivity nanomaterial based SAW humidity sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, T-T; Chou, T-H [Institute of Applied Mechanics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chen, Y-Y [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tatung University, Taipei 104, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: wutt@ndt.iam.ntu.edu.tw

    2008-04-21

    In this paper, a highly sensitive humidity sensor is reported. The humidity sensor is configured by a 128{sup 0}YX-LiNbO{sub 3} based surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonator whose operating frequency is at 145 MHz. A dual delay line configuration is realized to eliminate external temperature fluctuations. Moreover, for nanostructured materials possessing high surface-to-volume ratio, large penetration depth and fast charge diffusion rate, camphor sulfonic acid doped polyaniline (PANI) nanofibres are synthesized by the interfacial polymerization method and further deposited on the SAW resonator as selective coating to enhance sensitivity. The humidity sensor is used to measure various relative humidities in the range 5-90% at room temperature. Results show that the PANI nanofibre based SAW humidity sensor exhibits excellent sensitivity and short-term repeatability.

  13. Performance of terahertz metamaterials as high-sensitivity sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yanan; Zhang, Bo; Shen, Jingling

    2017-09-01

    A high-sensitivity sensor based on the resonant transmission characteristics of terahertz (THz) metamaterials was investigated, with the proposal and fabrication of rectangular bar arrays of THz metamaterials exhibiting a period of 180 μm on a 25 μm thick flexible polyimide. Varying the size of the metamaterial structure revealed that the length of the rectangular unit modulated the resonant frequency, which was verified by both experiment and simulation. The sensing characteristics upon varying the surrounding media in the sample were tested by simulation and experiment. Changing the surrounding medium from that of air to that of alcohol or oil produced resonant frequency redshifts of 80 GHz or 150 GHz, respectively, which indicates that the sensor possessed a high sensitivity of 667 GHz per unit of refractive index. Finally, the influence of the sample substrate thickness on the sensor sensitivity was investigated by simulation. It may be a reference for future sensor design.

  14. Automatic diagnosis of imbalanced ophthalmic images using a cost-sensitive deep convolutional neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiewei; Liu, Xiyang; Zhang, Kai; Long, Erping; Wang, Liming; Li, Wangting; Liu, Lin; Wang, Shuai; Zhu, Mingmin; Cui, Jiangtao; Liu, Zhenzhen; Lin, Zhuoling; Li, Xiaoyan; Chen, Jingjing; Cao, Qianzhong; Li, Jing; Wu, Xiaohang; Wang, Dongni; Wang, Jinghui; Lin, Haotian

    2017-11-21

    Ocular images play an essential role in ophthalmological diagnoses. Having an imbalanced dataset is an inevitable issue in automated ocular diseases diagnosis; the scarcity of positive samples always tends to result in the misdiagnosis of severe patients during the classification task. Exploring an effective computer-aided diagnostic method to deal with imbalanced ophthalmological dataset is crucial. In this paper, we develop an effective cost-sensitive deep residual convolutional neural network (CS-ResCNN) classifier to diagnose ophthalmic diseases using retro-illumination images. First, the regions of interest (crystalline lens) are automatically identified via twice-applied Canny detection and Hough transformation. Then, the localized zones are fed into the CS-ResCNN to extract high-level features for subsequent use in automatic diagnosis. Second, the impacts of cost factors on the CS-ResCNN are further analyzed using a grid-search procedure to verify that our proposed system is robust and efficient. Qualitative analyses and quantitative experimental results demonstrate that our proposed method outperforms other conventional approaches and offers exceptional mean accuracy (92.24%), specificity (93.19%), sensitivity (89.66%) and AUC (97.11%) results. Moreover, the sensitivity of the CS-ResCNN is enhanced by over 13.6% compared to the native CNN method. Our study provides a practical strategy for addressing imbalanced ophthalmological datasets and has the potential to be applied to other medical images. The developed and deployed CS-ResCNN could serve as computer-aided diagnosis software for ophthalmologists in clinical application.

  15. Estimation of Compton Imager Using Single 3D Position-Sensitive LYSO Scintillator: Monte Carlo Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Taewoong; Lee, Hyounggun; Kim, Younghak; Lee, Wonho [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    The performance of a Compton imager using a single three-dimensional position-sensitive LYSO scintillator detector was estimated using a Monte Carlo simulation. The Compton imager consisted of a single LYSO scintillator with a pixelized structure. The size of the scintillator and each pixel were 1.3 × 1.3 × 1.3 cm{sup 3} and 0.3 × 0.3 × 0.3 cm{sup 3}, respectively. The order of γ-ray interactions was determined based on the deposited energies in each detector. After the determination of the interaction sequence, various types of reconstruction algorithms such as simple back-projection, filtered back-projection, and list-mode maximum-likelihood expectation maximization (LM-MLEM) were applied and compared with each other in terms of their angular resolution and signal-tonoise ratio (SNR) for several γ-ray energies. The LM-MLEM reconstruction algorithm exhibited the best performance for Compton imaging in maintaining high angular resolution and SNR. The two sources of {sup 137}Cs (662 keV) could be distinguishable if they were more than 17 ◦ apart. The reconstructed Compton images showed the precise position and distribution of various radiation isotopes, which demonstrated the feasibility of the monitoring of nuclear materials in homeland security and radioactive waste management applications.

  16. Sensitive high performance liquid chromatographic method for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A new simple, sensitive, cost-effective and reproducible high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method for the determination of proguanil (PG) and its metabolites, cycloguanil (CG) and 4-chlorophenylbiguanide (4-CPB) in urine and plasma is described. The extraction procedure is a simple three-step process ...

  17. Methylation-Sensitive High Resolution Melting (MS-HRM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussmann, Dianna; Hansen, Lise Lotte

    2018-01-01

    Methylation-Sensitive High Resolution Melting (MS-HRM) is an in-tube, PCR-based method to detect methylation levels at specific loci of interest. A unique primer design facilitates a high sensitivity of the assays enabling detection of down to 0.1-1% methylated alleles in an unmethylated background.Primers for MS-HRM assays are designed to be complementary to the methylated allele, and a specific annealing temperature enables these primers to anneal both to the methylated and the unmethylated alleles thereby increasing the sensitivity of the assays. Bisulfite treatment of the DNA prior to performing MS-HRM ensures a different base composition between methylated and unmethylated DNA, which is used to separate the resulting amplicons by high resolution melting.The high sensitivity of MS-HRM has proven useful for detecting cancer biomarkers in a noninvasive manner in urine from bladder cancer patients, in stool from colorectal cancer patients, and in buccal mucosa from breast cancer patients. MS-HRM is a fast method to diagnose imprinted diseases and to clinically validate results from whole-epigenome studies. The ability to detect few copies of methylated DNA makes MS-HRM a key player in the quest for establishing links between environmental exposure, epigenetic changes, and disease.

  18. Aluminum nano-cantilevers for high sensitivity mass sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Zachary James; Boisen, Anja

    2005-01-01

    We have fabricated Al nano-cantilevers using a very simple one mask contact UV lithography technique with lateral dimensions under 500 nm and vertical dimensions of approximately 100 nm. These devices are demonstrated as highly sensitive mass sensors by measuring their dynamic properties. Further...

  19. High sensitivity probe absorption technique for time-of-flight ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We report on a phase-sensitive probe absorption technique with high sen- sitivity, capable of detecting a few hundred ultra-cold atoms in flight in an observation time of a few milliseconds. The large signal-to-noise ratio achieved is sufficient for reliable measurements on low intensity beams of cold atoms.

  20. High Throughput Neuro-Imaging Informatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael I Miller

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes neuroinformatics technologies at 1 mm anatomical scale based on high throughput 3D functional and structural imaging technologies of the human brain. The core is an abstract pipeline for converting functional and structural imagery into their high dimensional neuroinformatic representations index containing O(E3-E4 discriminating dimensions. The pipeline is based on advanced image analysis coupled to digital knowledge representations in the form of dense atlases of the human brain at gross anatomical scale. We demonstrate the integration of these high-dimensional representations with machine learning methods, which have become the mainstay of other fields of science including genomics as well as social networks. Such high throughput facilities have the potential to alter the way medical images are stored and utilized in radiological workflows. The neuroinformatics pipeline is used to examine cross-sectional and personalized analyses of neuropsychiatric illnesses in clinical applications as well as longitudinal studies. We demonstrate the use of high throughput machine learning methods for supporting (i cross-sectional image analysis to evaluate the health status of individual subjects with respect to the population data, (ii integration of image and non-image information for diagnosis and prognosis.

  1. High speed fluorescence imaging with compressed ultrafast photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J. V.; Mason, J. D.; Beier, H. T.; Bixler, J. N.

    2017-02-01

    Fluorescent lifetime imaging is an optical technique that facilitates imaging molecular interactions and cellular functions. Because the excited lifetime of a fluorophore is sensitive to its local microenvironment,1, 2 measurement of fluorescent lifetimes can be used to accurately detect regional changes in temperature, pH, and ion concentration. However, typical state of the art fluorescent lifetime methods are severely limited when it comes to acquisition time (on the order of seconds to minutes) and video rate imaging. Here we show that compressed ultrafast photography (CUP) can be used in conjunction with fluorescent lifetime imaging to overcome these acquisition rate limitations. Frame rates up to one hundred billion frames per second have been demonstrated with compressed ultrafast photography using a streak camera.3 These rates are achieved by encoding time in the spatial direction with a pseudo-random binary pattern. The time domain information is then reconstructed using a compressed sensing algorithm, resulting in a cube of data (x,y,t) for each readout image. Thus, application of compressed ultrafast photography will allow us to acquire an entire fluorescent lifetime image with a single laser pulse. Using a streak camera with a high-speed CMOS camera, acquisition rates of 100 frames per second can be achieved, which will significantly enhance our ability to quantitatively measure complex biological events with high spatial and temporal resolution. In particular, we will demonstrate the ability of this technique to do single-shot fluorescent lifetime imaging of cells and microspheres.

  2. Highly sensitive detection using microring resonator and nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougot-Robin, K.; Hoste, J. W.; Le Thomas, N.; Bienstman, P.; Edel, J. B.

    2016-04-01

    One of the most significant challenges facing physical and biological scientists is the accurate detection and identification of single molecules in free-solution environments. The ability to perform such sensitive and selective measurements opens new avenues for a large number of applications in biological, medical and chemical analysis, where small sample volumes and low analyte concentrations are the norm. Access to information at the single or few molecules scale is rendered possible by a fine combination of recent advances in technologies. We propose a novel detection method that combines highly sensitive label-free resonant sensing obtained with high-Q microcavities and position control in nanoscale pores (nanopores). In addition to be label-free and highly sensitive, our technique is immobilization free and does not rely on surface biochemistry to bind probes on a chip. This is a significant advantage, both in term of biology uncertainties and fewer biological preparation steps. Through combination of high-Q photonic structures with translocation through nanopore at the end of a pipette, or through a solid-state membrane, we believe significant advances can be achieved in the field of biosensing. Silicon microrings are highly advantageous in term of sensitivity, multiplexing, and microfabrication and are chosen for this study. In term of nanopores, we both consider nanopore at the end of a nanopipette, with the pore being approach from the pipette with nanoprecise mechanical control. Alternatively, solid state nanopores can be fabricated through a membrane, supporting the ring. Both configuration are discussed in this paper, in term of implementation and sensitivity.

  3. NK sensitivity of neuroblastoma cells determined by a highly sensitive coupled luminescent method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogbomo, Henry; Hahn, Anke; Geiler, Janina; Michaelis, Martin; Doerr, Hans Wilhelm; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2006-01-01

    The measurement of natural killer (NK) cells toxicity against tumor or virus-infected cells especially in cases with small blood samples requires highly sensitive methods. Here, a coupled luminescent method (CLM) based on glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase release from injured target cells was used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of interleukin-2 activated NK cells against neuroblastoma cell lines. In contrast to most other methods, CLM does not require the pretreatment of target cells with labeling substances which could be toxic or radioactive. The effective killing of tumor cells was achieved by low effector/target ratios ranging from 0.5:1 to 4:1. CLM provides highly sensitive, safe, and fast procedure for measurement of NK cell activity with small blood samples such as those obtained from pediatric patients

  4. Instruction manual for ORNL tandem high abundance sensitivity mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.H.; McKown, H.S.; Chrisite, W.H.; Walker, R.L.; Carter, J.A.

    1976-06-01

    This manual describes the physical characteristics of the tandem mass spectrometer built by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the International Atomic Energy Agency. Specific requirements met include ability to run small samples, high abundance sensitivity, good precision and accuracy, and adequate sample throughput. The instrument is capable of running uranium samples as small as 10 -12 g and has an abundance sensitivity in excess of 10 6 . Precision and accuracy are enhanced by a special sweep control circuit. Sample throughput is 6 to 12 samples per day. Operating instructions are also given

  5. A highly sensitive and specific assay for vertebrate collagenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodek, J.; Hurum, S.; Feng, J.

    1981-01-01

    A highly sensitive and specific assay for vertebrate collagenase has been developed using a [ 14 C]-labeled collagen substrate and a combination of SDS-PAGE (sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) and fluorography to identify and quantitate the digestion products. The assay was sufficiently sensitive to permit the detection and quantitation of collagenase activity in 0.1 μl of gingival sulcal fluid, and in samples of cell culture medium without prior concentration. The assay has also been used to detect the presence of inhibitors of collagenolytic enzymes in various cell culture fluids. (author)

  6. Sensitivity study of voxel-based PET image comparison to image registration algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, Stephen, E-mail: syip@lroc.harvard.edu; Chen, Aileen B.; Berbeco, Ross [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Aerts, Hugo J. W. L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 and Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Accurate deformable registration is essential for voxel-based comparison of sequential positron emission tomography (PET) images for proper adaptation of treatment plan and treatment response assessment. The comparison may be sensitive to the method of deformable registration as the optimal algorithm is unknown. This study investigated the impact of registration algorithm choice on therapy response evaluation. Methods: Sixteen patients with 20 lung tumors underwent a pre- and post-treatment computed tomography (CT) and 4D FDG-PET scans before and after chemoradiotherapy. All CT images were coregistered using a rigid and ten deformable registration algorithms. The resulting transformations were then applied to the respective PET images. Moreover, the tumor region defined by a physician on the registered PET images was classified into progressor, stable-disease, and responder subvolumes. Particularly, voxels with standardized uptake value (SUV) decreases >30% were classified as responder, while voxels with SUV increases >30% were progressor. All other voxels were considered stable-disease. The agreement of the subvolumes resulting from difference registration algorithms was assessed by Dice similarity index (DSI). Coefficient of variation (CV) was computed to assess variability of DSI between individual tumors. Root mean square difference (RMS{sub rigid}) of the rigidly registered CT images was used to measure the degree of tumor deformation. RMS{sub rigid} and DSI were correlated by Spearman correlation coefficient (R) to investigate the effect of tumor deformation on DSI. Results: Median DSI{sub rigid} was found to be 72%, 66%, and 80%, for progressor, stable-disease, and responder, respectively. Median DSI{sub deformable} was 63%–84%, 65%–81%, and 82%–89%. Variability of DSI was substantial and similar for both rigid and deformable algorithms with CV > 10% for all subvolumes. Tumor deformation had moderate to significant impact on DSI for progressor

  7. An HVS-based location-sensitive definition of mutual information between two images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haijun; Wu, Huayi

    2006-10-01

    Quantitative measure of image information amount is of great importance in many image processing applications, e.g. image compression and image registration. Many commonly used metrics are defined mathematically. However, the ultimate consumers of images are human observers in most situations, thus such measures without consideration of internal mechanism of human visual system (HVS) may not be appropriate. This paper proposes an improved definition of mutual information between two images based on the visual information which is actually perceived by human beings in different subbands of image. This definition is both sensitive to the pixels' spatial location and correlates well with human perceptual feeling than mutual information purely calculated by pixels' grayscale value. Experimental results on images with different noises and JPEG&JPEG2000 compressed images are also given.

  8. Are inflationary predictions sensitive to very high energy physics?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, C.P.; Lemieux, F.; Holman, R.; Cline, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    It has been proposed that the successful inflationary description of density perturbations on cosmological scales is sensitive to the details of physics at extremely high (trans-Planckian) energies. We test this proposal by examining how inflationary predictions depend on higher-energy scales within a simple model where the higher-energy physics is well understood. We find the best of all possible worlds: inflationary predictions are robust against the vast majority of high-energy effects, but can be sensitive to some effects in certain circumstances, in a way which does not violate ordinary notions of decoupling. This implies both that the comparison of inflationary predictions with CMB data is meaningful, and that it is also worth searching for small deviations from the standard results in the hopes of learning about very high energies. (author)

  9. Design of highly sensitive multichannel bimetallic photonic crystal fiber biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Mohamed Farhat O.; Alrayk, Yassmin K. A.; Shaalan, Abdelhamid A.; El Deeb, Walid S.; Obayya, Salah S. A.

    2016-10-01

    A design of a highly sensitive multichannel biosensor based on photonic crystal fiber is proposed and analyzed. The suggested design has a silver layer as a plasmonic material coated by a gold layer to protect silver oxidation. The reported sensor is based on detection using the quasi transverse electric (TE) and quasi transverse magnetic (TM) modes, which offers the possibility of multichannel/multianalyte sensing. The numerical results are obtained using a finite element method with perfect matched layer boundary conditions. The sensor geometrical parameters are optimized to achieve high sensitivity for the two polarized modes. High-refractive index sensitivity of about 4750 nm/RIU (refractive index unit) and 4300 nm/RIU with corresponding resolutions of 2.1×10-5 RIU, and 2.33×10-5 RIU can be obtained according to the quasi TM and quasi TE modes of the proposed sensor, respectively. Further, the reported design can be used as a self-calibration biosensor within an unknown analyte refractive index ranging from 1.33 to 1.35 with high linearity and high accuracy. Moreover, the suggested biosensor has advantages in terms of compactness and better integration of microfluidics setup, waveguide, and metallic layers into a single structure.

  10. Sensitivity of radiographic features and specificity of scintigraphic imaging in hand osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckland-Wright, J.C.; MacFarlane, D.G.; Lynch, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    We undertook to determine which of the radiographic features most reliably detected the presence and disease progression in osteoarthritis in the hand; and which of the radiographic features corresponded with the radionuclide bone scan images. 32 patients with osteoarthritis had X5 macroradiographs taken of their wrists and hands at 6 monthly intervals over an 18 month period. The high magnification and resolution of microfocal radiography permitted quantitative detection of the extent and change in joint space width, subchondral sclerosis, osteophytosis and juxtaarticular radiolucencies. 4-hour technetium 99 m methylene bisphophonate bone scans were taken at 0 and 12 months and the activity of the tracer uptake at each joint scored. The latter was compared with the radiographic features at each visit and the changes between visits analysed. In hand OA the most sensitive radiographic parameters for detecting disease were osteophytes, subchondral sclerosis and justaarticular radiolucencies, with radionuclide imaging demonstrating the increased activity in bone formation associated with the growth and remodelling of osteophytes. Changes in the number and size of osteophytes and joint space narrowing were the only reliable and sensitive parameters for assessing disease progression. We conclude that in osteoarthritis, the bony changes progress significantly before the occurrence of radiographically evident joint space narrowing indicative of cartilage thinning. (authors). 48 refs., 2 tabs., 11 figs

  11. X-ray computed tomography imaging of a tumor with high sensitivity using gold nanoparticles conjugated to a cancer-specific antibody via polyethylene glycol chains on their surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Tomohiko; Gonda, Kohsuke; Kamei, Takashi; Cong, Liman; Hamada, Yoh; Kitamura, Narufumi; Tada, Hiroshi; Ishida, Takanori; Aimiya, Takuji; Furusawa, Naoko; Nakano, Yasushi; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2016-01-01

    Contrast agents are often used to enhance the contrast of X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging of tumors to improve diagnostic accuracy. However, because the iodine-based contrast agents currently used in hospitals are of low molecular weight, the agent is rapidly excreted from the kidney or moves to extravascular tissues through the capillary vessels, depending on its concentration gradient. This leads to nonspecific enhancement of contrast images for tissues. Here, we created gold (Au) nanoparticles as a new contrast agent to specifically image tumors with CT using an enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Au has a higher X-ray absorption coefficient than does iodine. Au nanoparticles were supported with polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains on their surface to increase the blood retention and were conjugated with a cancer-specific antibody via terminal PEG chains. The developed Au nanoparticles were injected into tumor-bearing mice, and the distribution of Au was examined with CT imaging, transmission electron microscopy, and elemental analysis using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The results show that specific localization of the developed Au nanoparticles in the tumor is affected by a slight difference in particle size and enhanced by the conjugation of a specific antibody against the tumor.

  12. Sensitivity of photon-counting based K-edge imaging in X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessl, Ewald; Brendel, Bernhard; Engel, Klaus-Jürgen; Schlomka, Jens-Peter; Thran, Axel; Proksa, Roland

    2011-09-01

    The feasibility of K-edge imaging using energy-resolved, photon-counting transmission measurements in X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been demonstrated by simulations and experiments. The method is based on probing the discontinuities of the attenuation coefficient of heavy elements above and below the K-edge energy by using energy-sensitive, photon counting X-ray detectors. In this paper, we investigate the dependence of the sensitivity of K-edge imaging on the atomic number Z of the contrast material, on the object diameter D , on the spectral response of the X-ray detector and on the X-ray tube voltage. We assume a photon-counting detector equipped with six adjustable energy thresholds. Physical effects leading to a degradation of the energy resolution of the detector are taken into account using the concept of a spectral response function R(E,U) for which we assume four different models. As a validation of our analytical considerations and in order to investigate the influence of elliptically shaped phantoms, we provide CT simulations of an anthropomorphic Forbild-Abdomen phantom containing a gold-contrast agent. The dependence on the values of the energy thresholds is taken into account by optimizing the achievable signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) with respect to the threshold values. We find that for a given X-ray spectrum and object size the SNR in the heavy element's basis material image peaks for a certain atomic number Z. The dependence of the SNR in the high- Z basis-material image on the object diameter is the natural, exponential decrease with particularly deteriorating effects in the case where the attenuation from the object itself causes a total signal loss below the K-edge. The influence of the energy-response of the detector is very important. We observed that the optimal SNR values obtained with an ideal detector and with a CdTe pixel detector whose response, showing significant tailing, has been determined at a synchrotron differ by factors of

  13. A Sensitive Dynamic and Active Pixel Vision Sensor for Color or Neural Imaging Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeys, Diederik Paul; Corradi, Federico; Li, Chenghan; Bamford, Simeon A; Longinotti, Luca; Voigt, Fabian F; Berry, Stewart; Taverni, Gemma; Helmchen, Fritjof; Delbruck, Tobi

    2018-02-01

    Applications requiring detection of small visual contrast require high sensitivity. Event cameras can provide higher dynamic range (DR) and reduce data rate and latency, but most existing event cameras have limited sensitivity. This paper presents the results of a 180-nm Towerjazz CIS process vision sensor called SDAVIS192. It outputs temporal contrast dynamic vision sensor (DVS) events and conventional active pixel sensor frames. The SDAVIS192 improves on previous DAVIS sensors with higher sensitivity for temporal contrast. The temporal contrast thresholds can be set down to 1% for negative changes in logarithmic intensity (OFF events) and down to 3.5% for positive changes (ON events). The achievement is possible through the adoption of an in-pixel preamplification stage. This preamplifier reduces the effective intrascene DR of the sensor (70 dB for OFF and 50 dB for ON), but an automated operating region control allows up to at least 110-dB DR for OFF events. A second contribution of this paper is the development of characterization methodology for measuring DVS event detection thresholds by incorporating a measure of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). At average SNR of 30 dB, the DVS temporal contrast threshold fixed pattern noise is measured to be 0.3%-0.8% temporal contrast. Results comparing monochrome and RGBW color filter array DVS events are presented. The higher sensitivity of SDAVIS192 make this sensor potentially useful for calcium imaging, as shown in a recording from cultured neurons expressing calcium sensitive green fluorescent protein GCaMP6f.

  14. Iris Recognition for Partially Occluded Images: Methodology and Sensitivity Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poursaberi A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate iris detection is a crucial part of an iris recognition system. One of the main issues in iris segmentation is coping with occlusion that happens due to eyelids and eyelashes. In the literature, some various methods have been suggested to solve the occlusion problem. In this paper, two different segmentations of iris are presented. In the first algorithm, a circle is located around the pupil with an appropriate diameter. The iris area encircled by the circular boundary is used for recognition purposes then. In the second method, again a circle is located around the pupil with a larger diameter. This time, however, only the lower part of the encircled iris area is utilized for individual recognition. Wavelet-based texture features are used in the process. Hamming and harmonic mean distance classifiers are exploited as a mixed classifier in suggested algorithm. It is observed that relying on a smaller but more reliable part of the iris, though reducing the net amount of information, improves the overall performance. Experimental results on CASIA database show that our method has a promising performance with an accuracy of 99.31%. The sensitivity of the proposed method is analyzed versus contrast, illumination, and noise as well, where lower sensitivity to all factors is observed when the lower half of the iris is used for recognition.

  15. Image Quality in High-resolution and High-cadence Solar Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denker, C.; Dineva, E.; Balthasar, H.; Verma, M.; Kuckein, C.; Diercke, A.; González Manrique, S. J.

    2018-03-01

    Broad-band imaging and even imaging with a moderate bandpass (about 1 nm) provides a photon-rich environment, where frame selection (lucky imaging) becomes a helpful tool in image restoration, allowing us to perform a cost-benefit analysis on how to design observing sequences for imaging with high spatial resolution in combination with real-time correction provided by an adaptive optics (AO) system. This study presents high-cadence (160 Hz) G-band and blue continuum image sequences obtained with the High-resolution Fast Imager (HiFI) at the 1.5-meter GREGOR solar telescope, where the speckle-masking technique is used to restore images with nearly diffraction-limited resolution. The HiFI employs two synchronized large-format and high-cadence sCMOS detectors. The median filter gradient similarity (MFGS) image-quality metric is applied, among others, to AO-corrected image sequences of a pore and a small sunspot observed on 2017 June 4 and 5. A small region of interest, which was selected for fast-imaging performance, covered these contrast-rich features and their neighborhood, which were part of Active Region NOAA 12661. Modifications of the MFGS algorithm uncover the field- and structure-dependency of this image-quality metric. However, MFGS still remains a good choice for determining image quality without a priori knowledge, which is an important characteristic when classifying the huge number of high-resolution images contained in data archives. In addition, this investigation demonstrates that a fast cadence and millisecond exposure times are still insufficient to reach the coherence time of daytime seeing. Nonetheless, the analysis shows that data acquisition rates exceeding 50 Hz are required to capture a substantial fraction of the best seeing moments, significantly boosting the performance of post-facto image restoration.

  16. Phase-space evolution of x-ray coherence in phase-sensitive imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2008-08-01

    X-ray coherence evolution in the imaging process plays a key role for x-ray phase-sensitive imaging. In this work we present a phase-space formulation for the phase-sensitive imaging. The theory is reformulated in terms of the cross-spectral density and associated Wigner distribution. The phase-space formulation enables an explicit and quantitative account of partial coherence effects on phase-sensitive imaging. The presented formulas for x-ray spectral density at the detector can be used for performing accurate phase retrieval and optimizing the phase-contrast visibility. The concept of phase-space shearing length derived from this phase-space formulation clarifies the spatial coherence requirement for phase-sensitive imaging with incoherent sources. The theory has been applied to x-ray Talbot interferometric imaging as well. The peak coherence condition derived reveals new insights into three-grating-based Talbot-interferometric imaging and gratings-based x-ray dark-field imaging.

  17. Development of a high sensitivity pinhole type gamma camera using semiconductors for low dose rate fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Isao; Ishitsu, Takafumi; Tadokoro, Takahiro; Okada, Koichi; Nagumo, Yasushi; Fujishima, Yasutake; Yoshida, Akira; Umegaki, Kikuo

    2018-06-01

    We developed a pinhole type gamma camera, using a compact detector module of a pixelated CdTe semiconductor, which has suitable sensitivity and quantitative accuracy for low dose rate fields. In order to improve the sensitivity of the pinhole type semiconductor gamma camera, we adopted three methods: a signal processing method to set the discriminating level lower, a high sensitivity pinhole collimator and a smoothing image filter that improves the efficiency of the source identification. We tested basic performances of the developed gamma camera and carefully examined effects of the three methods. From the sensitivity test, we found that the effective sensitivity was about 21 times higher than that of the gamma camera for high dose rate fields which we had previously developed. We confirmed that the gamma camera had sufficient sensitivity and high quantitative accuracy; for example, a weak hot spot (0.9 μSv/h) around a tree root could be detected within 45 min in a low dose rate field test, and errors of measured dose rates with point sources were less than 7% in a dose rate accuracy test.

  18. Impact of image denoising on image quality, quantitative parameters and sensitivity of ultra-low-dose volume perfusion CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, Ahmed E.; Brockmann, Carolin; Afat, Saif; Pjontek, Rastislav; Nikoubashman, Omid; Brockmann, Marc A.; Wiesmann, Martin; Yang, Zepa; Kim, Changwon; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Kim, Jong Hyo

    2016-01-01

    To examine the impact of denoising on ultra-low-dose volume perfusion CT (ULD-VPCT) imaging in acute stroke. Simulated ULD-VPCT data sets at 20 % dose rate were generated from perfusion data sets of 20 patients with suspected ischemic stroke acquired at 80 kVp/180 mAs. Four data sets were generated from each ULD-VPCT data set: not-denoised (ND); denoised using spatiotemporal filter (D1); denoised using quanta-stream diffusion technique (D2); combination of both methods (D1 + D2). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was measured in the resulting 100 data sets. Image quality, presence/absence of ischemic lesions, CBV and CBF scores according to a modified ASPECTS score were assessed by two blinded readers. SNR and qualitative scores were highest for D1 + D2 and lowest for ND (all p ≤ 0.001). In 25 % of the patients, ND maps were not assessable and therefore excluded from further analyses. Compared to original data sets, in D2 and D1 + D2, readers correctly identified all patients with ischemic lesions (sensitivity 1.0, kappa 1.0). Lesion size was most accurately estimated for D1 + D2 with a sensitivity of 1.0 (CBV) and 0.94 (CBF) and an inter-rater agreement of 1.0 and 0.92, respectively. An appropriate combination of denoising techniques applied in ULD-VPCT produces diagnostically sufficient perfusion maps at substantially reduced dose rates as low as 20 % of the normal scan. (orig.)

  19. In vivo imaging of human oral hard and soft tissues by polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Julia; Golde, Jonas; Kirsten, Lars; Tetschke, Florian; Hempel, Franz; Rosenauer, Tobias; Hannig, Christian; Koch, Edmund

    2017-12-01

    Since optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides three-dimensional high-resolution images of biological tissue, the benefit of polarization contrast in the field of dentistry is highlighted in this study. Polarization-sensitive OCT (PS OCT) with phase-sensitive recording is used for imaging dental and mucosal tissues in the human oral cavity in vivo. An enhanced polarization contrast of oral structures is reached by analyzing the signals of the co- and crosspolarized channels of the swept source PS OCT system quantitatively with respect to reflectivity, retardation, optic axis orientation, and depolarization. The calculation of these polarization parameters enables a high tissue-specific contrast imaging for the detailed physical interpretation of human oral hard and soft tissues. For the proof-of-principle, imaging of composite restorations and mineralization defects at premolars as well as gingival, lingual, and labial oral mucosa was performed in vivo within the anterior oral cavity. The achieved contrast-enhanced results of the investigated human oral tissues by means of polarization-sensitive imaging are evaluated by the comparison with conventional intensity-based OCT.

  20. Sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Otazo, Ricardo; Caprihan, Arvind; Wald, Lawrence L; Belliveau, John W; Posse, Stefan

    2007-02-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) provides spatially resolved metabolite information that is invaluable for both neuroscience studies and clinical applications. However, lengthy data acquisition times, which are a result of time-consuming phase encoding, represent a major challenge for MRSI. Fast MRSI pulse sequences that use echo-planar readout gradients, such as proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI), are capable of fast spectral-spatial encoding and thus enable acceleration of image acquisition times. Combining PEPSI with recent advances in parallel MRI utilizing RF coil arrays can further accelerate MRSI data acquisition. Here we investigate the feasibility of ultrafast spectroscopic imaging at high field (3T and 4T) by combining PEPSI with sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) MRI using eight-channel head coil arrays. We show that the acquisition of single-average SENSE-PEPSI data at a short TE (15 ms) can be accelerated to 32 s or less, depending on the field strength, to obtain metabolic images of choline (Cho), creatine (Cre), N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), and J-coupled metabolites (e.g., glutamate (Glu) and inositol (Ino)) with acceptable spectral quality and localization. The experimentally measured reductions in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and Cramer-Rao lower bounds (CRLBs) of metabolite resonances were well explained by both the g-factor and reduced measurement times. Thus, this technology is a promising means of reducing the scan times of 3D acquisitions and time-resolved 2D measurements. Copyright (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Ultraviolet /UV/ sensitive phosphors for silicon imaging detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viehmann, W.; Cowens, M. W.; Butner, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The fluorescence properties of UV sensitive organic phosphors and the radiometric properties of phosphor coated silicon detectors in the VUV, UV, and visible wavelengths are described. With evaporated films of coronene and liumogen, effective quantum efficiencies of up to 20% have been achieved on silicon photodiodes in the vacuum UV. With thin films of methylmethacrylate (acrylic), which are doped with organic laser dyes and deposited from solution, detector quantum efficiencies of the order of 15% for wavelengths of 120-165 nm and of 40% for wavelengths above 190 nm have been obtained. The phosphor coatings also act as antireflection coatings and thereby enhance the response of coated devices throughout the visible and near IR.

  2. Introduction of a novel ultrahigh sensitivity collimator for brain SPECT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Mi-Ae, E-mail: miaepark@bwh.harvard.edu; Kijewski, Marie Foley; Lyon, Morgan C.; Horky, Laura; Moore, Stephen C. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Keijzers, Ronnie; Keijzers, Mark [Nuclear Fields USA, Des Plaines, Illinois 60018 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: Noise levels of brain SPECT images are highest in central regions, due to preferential attenuation of photons emitted from deep structures. To address this problem, the authors have designed a novel collimator for brain SPECT imaging that yields greatly increased sensitivity near the center of the brain without loss of resolution. This hybrid collimator consisted of ultrashort cone-beam holes in the central regions and slant-holes in the periphery (USCB). We evaluated this collimator for quantitative brain imaging tasks. Methods: Owing to the uniqueness of the USCB collimation, the hole pattern required substantial variations in collimator parameters. To utilize the lead-casting technique, the authors designed two supporting plates to position about 37 000 hexagonal, slightly tapered pins. The holes in the supporting plates were modeled to yield the desired focal length, hole length, and septal thickness. To determine the properties of the manufactured collimator and to compute the system matrix, the authors prepared an array of point sources that covered the entire detector area. Each point source contained 32 μCi of Tc-99m at the first scan time. The array was imaged for 5 min at each of the 64 shifted locations to yield a 2-mm sampling distance, and hole parameters were calculated. The sensitivity was also measured using a point source placed along the central ray at several distances from the collimator face. High-count projection data from a five-compartment brain phantom were acquired with the three collimators on a dual-head SPECT/CT system. The authors calculated Cramer-Rao bounds on the precision of estimates of striatal and background activity concentration. In order to assess the new collimation system to detect changes in striatal activity, the authors evaluated the precision of measuring a 5% decrease in right putamen activity. The authors also reconstructed images of projection data obtained by summing data from the individual phantom

  3. Development of High Sensitivity Nuclear Emulsion and Fine Grained Emulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, H.; Asada, T.; Naka, T.; Naganawa, N.; Kuwabara, K.; Nakamura, M.

    2014-08-01

    Nuclear emulsion is a particle detector having high spacial resolution and angular resolution. It became useful for large statistics experiment thanks to the development of automatic scanning system. In 2010, a facility for emulsion production was introduced and R&D of nuclear emulsion began at Nagoya university. In this paper, we present results of development of the high sensitivity emulsion and fine grained emulsion for dark matter search experiment. Improvement of sensitivity is achieved by raising density of silver halide crystals and doping well-adjusted amount of chemicals. Production of fine grained emulsion was difficult because of unexpected crystal condensation. By mixing polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to gelatin as a binder, we succeeded in making a stable fine grained emulsion.

  4. Development of High Sensitivity Nuclear Emulsion and Fine Grained Emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahara, H.; Asada, T.; Naka, T.; Naganawa, N.; Kuwabara, K.; Nakamura, M.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear emulsion is a particle detector having high spacial resolution and angular resolution. It became useful for large statistics experiment thanks to the development of automatic scanning system. In 2010, a facility for emulsion production was introduced and R and D of nuclear emulsion began at Nagoya university. In this paper, we present results of development of the high sensitivity emulsion and fine grained emulsion for dark matter search experiment. Improvement of sensitivity is achieved by raising density of silver halide crystals and doping well-adjusted amount of chemicals. Production of fine grained emulsion was difficult because of unexpected crystal condensation. By mixing polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to gelatin as a binder, we succeeded in making a stable fine grained emulsion

  5. Parallel and Efficient Sensitivity Analysis of Microscopy Image Segmentation Workflows in Hybrid Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreiros, Willian; Teodoro, George; Kurc, Tahsin; Kong, Jun; Melo, Alba C M A; Saltz, Joel

    2017-09-01

    We investigate efficient sensitivity analysis (SA) of algorithms that segment and classify image features in a large dataset of high-resolution images. Algorithm SA is the process of evaluating variations of methods and parameter values to quantify differences in the output. A SA can be very compute demanding because it requires re-processing the input dataset several times with different parameters to assess variations in output. In this work, we introduce strategies to efficiently speed up SA via runtime optimizations targeting distributed hybrid systems and reuse of computations from runs with different parameters. We evaluate our approach using a cancer image analysis workflow on a hybrid cluster with 256 nodes, each with an Intel Phi and a dual socket CPU. The SA attained a parallel efficiency of over 90% on 256 nodes. The cooperative execution using the CPUs and the Phi available in each node with smart task assignment strategies resulted in an additional speedup of about 2×. Finally, multi-level computation reuse lead to an additional speedup of up to 2.46× on the parallel version. The level of performance attained with the proposed optimizations will allow the use of SA in large-scale studies.

  6. Online high sensitivity measurement system for transuranic aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kordas, J.F.; Phelps, P.L.

    1976-01-01

    A measurement system for transuranic aerosols has been designed that will be able to withstand the corrosive nature of stack effluents and yet have extremely high sensitivity. It will be capable of measuring 1 maximum permissible concentration (MPC) of plutonium or americium in 30 minutes with a fractional standard deviation of less than 0.33. Background resulting from 218 Po is eliminated by alpha energy discrimination and a decay scheme analysis. A microprocessor controls all data acquisition, data reduction, and instrument calibration

  7. Macro-/micro-environment-sensitive chemosensing and biological imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhigang; Cao, Jianfang; He, Yanxia; Yang, Jung Ho; Kim, Taeyoung; Peng, Xiaojun; Kim, Jong Seung

    2014-07-07

    Environment-related parameters, including viscosity, polarity, temperature, hypoxia, and pH, play pivotal roles in controlling the physical or chemical behaviors of local molecules. In particular, in a biological environment, such factors predominantly determine the biological properties of the local environment or reflect corresponding status alterations. Abnormal changes in these factors would cause cellular malfunction or become a hallmark of the occurrence of severe diseases. Therefore, in recent years, they have increasingly attracted research interest from the fields of chemistry and biological chemistry. With the emergence of fluorescence sensing and imaging technology, several fluorescent chemosensors have been designed to respond to such parameters and to further map their distributions and variations in vitro/in vivo. In this work, we have reviewed a number of various environment-responsive chemosensors related to fluorescent recognition of viscosity, polarity, temperature, hypoxia, and pH that have been reported thus far.

  8. Dedicated mobile high resolution prostate PET imager with an insertable transrectal probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Proffitt, James

    2010-12-28

    A dedicated mobile PET imaging system to image the prostate and surrounding organs. The imaging system includes an outside high resolution PET imager placed close to the patient's torso and an insertable and compact transrectal probe that is placed in close proximity to the prostate and operates in conjunction with the outside imager. The two detector systems are spatially co-registered to each other. The outside imager is mounted on an open rotating gantry to provide torso-wide 3D images of the prostate and surrounding tissue and organs. The insertable probe provides closer imaging, high sensitivity, and very high resolution predominately 2D view of the prostate and immediate surroundings. The probe is operated in conjunction with the outside imager and a fast data acquisition system to provide very high resolution reconstruction of the prostate and surrounding tissue and organs.

  9. Recent trends in high spin sensitivity magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Aharon; Twig, Ygal; Ishay, Yakir

    2017-07-01

    new ideas, show how these limiting factors can be mitigated to significantly improve the sensitivity of induction detection. Finally, we outline some directions for the possible applications of high-sensitivity induction detection in the field of electron spin resonance.

  10. High-sensitivity bend angle measurements using optical fiber gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauf, Abdul; Zhao, Jianlin; Jiang, Biqiang

    2013-07-20

    We present a high-sensitivity and more flexible bend measurement method, which is based on the coupling of core mode to the cladding modes at the bending region in concatenation with optical fiber grating serving as band reflector. The characteristics of a bend sensing arm composed of bending region and optical fiber grating is examined for different configurations including single fiber Bragg grating (FBG), chirped FBG (CFBG), and double FBGs. The bend loss curves for coated, stripped, and etched sections of fiber in the bending region with FBG, CFBG, and double FBG are obtained experimentally. The effect of separation between bending region and optical fiber grating on loss is measured. The loss responses for single FBG and CFBG configurations are compared to discover the effectiveness for practical applications. It is demonstrated that the sensitivity of the double FBG scheme is twice that of the single FBG and CFBG configurations, and hence acts as sensitivity multiplier. The bend loss response for different fiber diameters obtained through etching in 40% hydrofluoric acid, is measured in double FBG scheme that resulted in a significant increase in the sensitivity, and reduction of dead-zone.

  11. Using GRAPPA to improve autocalibrated coil sensitivity estimation for the SENSE family of parallel imaging reconstruction algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoge, W Scott; Brooks, Dana H

    2008-08-01

    Two strategies are widely used in parallel MRI to reconstruct subsampled multicoil image data. SENSE and related methods employ explicit receiver coil spatial response estimates to reconstruct an image. In contrast, coil-by-coil methods such as GRAPPA leverage correlations among the acquired multicoil data to reconstruct missing k-space lines. In self-referenced scenarios, both methods employ Nyquist-rate low-frequency k-space data to identify the reconstruction parameters. Because GRAPPA does not require explicit coil sensitivities estimates, it needs considerably fewer autocalibration signals than SENSE. However, SENSE methods allow greater opportunity to control reconstruction quality though regularization and thus may outperform GRAPPA in some imaging scenarios. Here, we employ GRAPPA to improve self-referenced coil sensitivity estimation in SENSE and related methods using very few auto-calibration signals. This enables one to leverage each methods' inherent strength and produce high quality self-referenced SENSE reconstructions. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Sensitivity of an eight-element phased array coil in 3 Tesla MR imaging: a basic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratsuka, Yoshiyasu; Miki, Hitoshi; Kikuchi, Keiichi; Kiriyama, Ikuko; Mochizuki, Teruhito; Takahashi, Shizue; Sadamoto, Kazuhiko

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the performance advantages of an 8-element phased array head coil (8 ch coil) over a conventional quadrature-type birdcage head coil (QD coil) with regard to the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and image uniformity in 3 Tesla magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. We scanned a phantom filled with silicon oil using an 8 ch coil and a QD coil in a 3T MR imaging system and compared the SNR and image uniformity obtained from T(1)-weighted spin echo (SE) images and T(2)-weighted fast SE images between the 2 coils. We also visually evaluated images from 4 healthy volunteers. The SNR with the 8 ch coil was approximately twice that with the QD coil in the region of interest (ROI), which was set as 75% of the area in the center of the phantom images. With regard to the spatial variation of sensitivity, the SNR with the 8 ch coil was lower at the center of the images than at the periphery, whereas the SNR with the QD coil exhibited an inverse pattern. At the center of the images with the 8 ch coil, the SNR was somewhat lower, and that distribution was relatively flat compared to that in the periphery. Image uniformity varied less with the 8 ch coil than with the QD coil on both imaging sequences. The 8 ch phased array coil was useful for obtaining high quality 3T images because of its higher SNR and improved image uniformity than those obtained with conventional quadrature-type birdcage head coil.

  13. A theoretical-experimental methodology for assessing the sensitivity of biomedical spectral imaging platforms, assays, and analysis methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavesley, Silas J; Sweat, Brenner; Abbott, Caitlyn; Favreau, Peter; Rich, Thomas C

    2018-01-01

    Spectral imaging technologies have been used for many years by the remote sensing community. More recently, these approaches have been applied to biomedical problems, where they have shown great promise. However, biomedical spectral imaging has been complicated by the high variance of biological data and the reduced ability to construct test scenarios with fixed ground truths. Hence, it has been difficult to objectively assess and compare biomedical spectral imaging assays and technologies. Here, we present a standardized methodology that allows assessment of the performance of biomedical spectral imaging equipment, assays, and analysis algorithms. This methodology incorporates real experimental data and a theoretical sensitivity analysis, preserving the variability present in biomedical image data. We demonstrate that this approach can be applied in several ways: to compare the effectiveness of spectral analysis algorithms, to compare the response of different imaging platforms, and to assess the level of target signature required to achieve a desired performance. Results indicate that it is possible to compare even very different hardware platforms using this methodology. Future applications could include a range of optimization tasks, such as maximizing detection sensitivity or acquisition speed, providing high utility for investigators ranging from design engineers to biomedical scientists. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. High Resolution Energetic X-ray Imager (HREXI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindlay, Jonathan

    We propose to design and build the first imaging hard X-ray detector system that incorporates 3D stacking of closely packed detector readouts in finely-spaced imaging arrays with their required data processing and control electronics. In virtually all imaging astronomical detectors, detector readout is done with flex connectors or connections that are not vertical but rather horizontal , requiring loss of focal plane area. For high resolution pixel detectors needed for high speed event-based X-ray imaging, from low energy applications (CMOS) with focusing X-ray telescopes, to hard X-ray applications with pixelated CZT for large area coded aperture telescopes, this new detector development offers great promise. We propose to extend our previous and current APRA supported ProtoEXIST program that has developed the first large area imaging CZT detectors and demonstrated their astrophysical capabilities on two successful balloon flight to a next generation High Resolution Energetic X-ray Imager (HREXI), which would incorporate microvia technology for the first time to connect the readout ASIC on each CZT crystal directly to its control and data processing system. This 3-dimensional stacking of detector and readout/control system means that large area (>2m2) imaging detector planes for a High Resolution Wide-field hard X-ray telescope can be built with initially greatly reduced detector gaps and ultimately with no gaps. This increases detector area, efficiency, and simplicity of detector integration. Thus higher sensitivity wide-field imagers will be possible at lower cost. HREXI will enable a post-Swift NASA mission such as the EREXS concept proposed to PCOS to be conducted as a future MIDEX mission. This mission would conduct a high resolution (<2 arcmin) , broad band (5 200 keV) hard X-ray survey of black holes on all scales with ~10X higher sensitivity than Swift. In the current era of Time Domain Astrophysics, such a survey capability, in conjunction with a n

  15. Highly-sensitive and large-dynamic diffuse optical tomography system for breast tumor detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wenwen; Zhang, Limin; Yin, Guoyan; Zhang, Yanqi; Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng

    2018-02-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) as a new functional imaging has important clinical applications in many aspects such as benign and malignant breast tumor detection, tumor staging and so on. For quantitative detection of breast tumor, a three-wavelength continuous-wave DOT prototype system combined the ultra-high sensitivity of the photon-counting detection and the measurement parallelism of the lock-in technique was developed to provide high temporal resolution, high sensitivity, large dynamic detection range and signal-to-noise ratio. Additionally, a CT-analogous scanning mode was proposed to cost-effectively increase the detection data. To evaluate the feasibility of the system, a series of assessments were conducted. The results demonstrate that the system can obtain high linearity, stability and negligible inter-wavelength crosstalk. The preliminary phantom experiments show the absorption coefficient is able to be successfully reconstructed, indicating that the system is one of the ideal platforms for optical breast tumor detection.

  16. Sensitivity of susceptibility-weighted imaging in detecting developmental venous anomalies and associated cavernomas and microhemorrhages in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Allen; Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Goel, Reema; Huisman, Thierry A.G.M.; Poretti, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Developmental venous anomalies (DVA) are common neuroimaging abnormalities that are traditionally diagnosed by contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images as the gold standard. We aimed to evaluate the sensitivity of SWI in detecting DVA and associated cavernous malformations (CM) and microhemorrhages in children in order to determine if SWI may replace contrast-enhanced MRI sequences. Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images were used as diagnostic gold standard for DVA. The presence of DVA was qualitatively assessed on axial SWI and T2-weighted images by an experienced pediatric neuroradiologist. In addition, the presence of CM and microhemorrhages was evaluated on SWI and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. Fifty-seven children with DVA (34 males, mean age at neuroimaging 11.2 years, range 1 month to 17.9 years) were included in this study. Forty-nine out of 57 DVA were identified on SWI (sensitivity of 86%) and 16 out of 57 DVA were detected on T2-weighted images (sensitivity of 28.1%). General anesthesia-related changes in brain hemodynamics and oxygenation were most likely responsible for the majority of SWI false negative. CM were detected in 12 patients on axial SWI, but only in six on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. Associated microhemorrhages could be identified in four patients on both axial SWI and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images, although more numerous and conspicuous on SWI. SWI can identify DVA and associated cavernous malformations and microhemorrhages with high sensitivity, obviating the need for contrast-enhanced MRI sequences. (orig.)

  17. Sensitivity of susceptibility-weighted imaging in detecting developmental venous anomalies and associated cavernomas and microhemorrhages in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Allen; Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Goel, Reema; Huisman, Thierry A.G.M. [The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Charlotte R. Bloomberg Children' s Center, Division of Pediatric Radiology and Pediatric Neuroradiology, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Poretti, Andrea [The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Charlotte R. Bloomberg Children' s Center, Division of Pediatric Radiology and Pediatric Neuroradiology, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Kennedy Krieger Institute, Department of Neurogenetics, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2017-08-15

    Developmental venous anomalies (DVA) are common neuroimaging abnormalities that are traditionally diagnosed by contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images as the gold standard. We aimed to evaluate the sensitivity of SWI in detecting DVA and associated cavernous malformations (CM) and microhemorrhages in children in order to determine if SWI may replace contrast-enhanced MRI sequences. Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images were used as diagnostic gold standard for DVA. The presence of DVA was qualitatively assessed on axial SWI and T2-weighted images by an experienced pediatric neuroradiologist. In addition, the presence of CM and microhemorrhages was evaluated on SWI and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. Fifty-seven children with DVA (34 males, mean age at neuroimaging 11.2 years, range 1 month to 17.9 years) were included in this study. Forty-nine out of 57 DVA were identified on SWI (sensitivity of 86%) and 16 out of 57 DVA were detected on T2-weighted images (sensitivity of 28.1%). General anesthesia-related changes in brain hemodynamics and oxygenation were most likely responsible for the majority of SWI false negative. CM were detected in 12 patients on axial SWI, but only in six on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. Associated microhemorrhages could be identified in four patients on both axial SWI and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images, although more numerous and conspicuous on SWI. SWI can identify DVA and associated cavernous malformations and microhemorrhages with high sensitivity, obviating the need for contrast-enhanced MRI sequences. (orig.)

  18. Towards highly sensitive strain sensing based on nanostructured materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao, Dzung Viet; Nakamura, Koichi; Sugiyama, Susumu; Bui, Tung Thanh; Dau, Van Thanh; Yamada, Takeo; Hata, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents our recent theoretical and experimental study of piezo-effects in nanostructured materials for highly sensitive, high resolution mechanical sensors. The piezo-effects presented here include the piezoresistive effect in a silicon nanowire (SiNW) and single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin film, as well as the piezo-optic effect in a Si photonic crystal (PhC) nanocavity. Firstly, the electronic energy band structure of the silicon nanostructure is discussed and simulated by using the First-Principles Calculations method. The result showed a remarkably different energy band structure compared with that of bulk silicon. This difference in the electronic state will result in different physical, chemical, and therefore, sensing properties of silicon nanostructures. The piezoresistive effects of SiNW and SWCNT thin film were investigated experimentally. We found that, when the width of ( 110 ) p-type SiNW decreases from 500 to 35 nm, the piezoresistive effect increases by more than 60%. The longitudinal piezoresistive coefficient of SWCNT thin film was measured to be twice that of bulk p-type silicon. Finally, theoretical investigations of the piezo-optic effect in a PhC nanocavity based on Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) showed extremely high resolution strain sensing. These nanostructures were fabricated based on top-down nanofabrication technology. The achievements of this work are significant for highly sensitive, high resolution and miniaturized mechanical sensors

  19. High sensitivity tests of the standard model for electroweak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koetke, D.D.

    1992-01-01

    The work done on this project was focussed mainly on LAMPF experiment E969 known as the MEGA experiment, a high sensitivity search for the lepton family number violating decay μ → eγ to a sensitivity which, measured in terms of the branching ratio, BR = [μ→eγ]/[μ→e ν μ ν e ] ∼10 -13 is over two orders of magnitude better than previously reported values. The work done on MEGA during this period was divided between that done at Valparaiso University and that done at LAMPF. In addition, some contributions were made to a proposal to the LAMPF PAC to perform a precision measurement of the Michel ρ parameter, described below

  20. High sensitivity tests of the standard model for electroweak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The work done on this project focused on two LAMPF experiments. The MEGA experiment is a high-sensitivity search for the lepton family number violating decay μ → eγ to a sensitivity which, measured in terms of the branching ratio, BR = [μ → eγ]/[μ eν μ ν e ] ∼ 10 -13 , will be over two orders of magnitude better than previously reported values. The second is a precision measurement of the Michel ρ parameter from the positron energy spectrum of μ → eν μ ν e to test the predictions V-A theory of weak interactions. In this experiment the uncertainty in the measurement of the Michel ρ parameter is expected to be a factor of three lower than the present reported value. The detectors are operational, and data taking has begun

  1. High sensitivity tests of the standard model for electroweak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koetke, D.D.; Manweiler, R.W.; Shirvel Stanislaus, T.D.

    1993-01-01

    The work done on this project was focused on two LAMPF experiments. The MEGA experiment, a high-sensitivity search for the lepton-family-number-violating decay μ → e γ to a sensitivity which, measured in terms of the branching ratio, BR = [μ → e γ]/[μ → ev μ v e ] ∼ 10 -13 , is over two orders of magnitude better than previously reported values. The second is a precision measurement of the Michel ρ parameter from the positron energy spectrum of μ → ev μ v e to test the V-A theory of weak interactions. The uncertainty in the measurement of the Michel ρ parameter is expected to be a factor of three lower than the present reported value

  2. High sensitive quench detection method using an integrated test wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fevrier, A.; Tavergnier, J.P.; Nithart, H.; Kiblaire, M.; Duchateau, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    A high sensitive quench detection method which works even in the presence of an external perturbing magnetic field is reported. The quench signal is obtained from the difference in voltages at the superconducting winding terminals and at the terminals at a secondary winding strongly coupled to the primary. The secondary winding could consist of a ''zero-current strand'' of the superconducting cable not connected to one of the winding terminals or an integrated normal test wire inside the superconducting cable. Experimental results on quench detection obtained by this method are described. It is shown that the integrated test wire method leads to efficient and sensitive quench detection, especially in the presence of an external perturbing magnetic field

  3. Development of miniature γ dose rate monitor with high sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Huilu; Tuo Xianguo; Xi Dashun; Tang Rong; Mu Keliang; Yang Jianbo

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces a miniature γ dose rate monitor with high sensitivity which design based on single chip microcomputer, it can continue monitoring γ dose rate and then choose wire or wireless communications to sent the monitoring data to host according to the actual conditions. It has two kinds of power supply system, AC power supply system and battery which can be chose by concrete circumstances. The design idea and implementation technology of hardware and software and the system structure of the monitor are detailed illustrated in this paper. The experimental results show that measurable range is 0.1 mR/h-200 mR/h, the sensitivity of γ is 90 cps/mR/h, dead time below 200 us, error of stability below ±10%. (authors)

  4. Polymer-Particle Pressure-Sensitive Paint with High Photostability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Matsuda

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel fast-responding and paintable pressure-sensitive paint (PSP based on polymer particles, i.e. polymer-particle (pp-PSP. As a fast-responding PSP, polymer-ceramic (PC-PSP is widely studied. Since PC-PSP generally consists of titanium (IV oxide (TiO2 particles, a large reduction in the luminescent intensity will occur due to the photocatalytic action of TiO2. We propose the usage of polymer particles instead of TiO2 particles to prevent the reduction in the luminescent intensity. Here, we fabricate pp-PSP based on the polystyrene particle with a diameter of 1 μm, and investigate the pressure- and temperature-sensitives, the response time, and the photostability. The performances of pp-PSP are compared with those of PC-PSP, indicating the high photostability with the other characteristics comparable to PC-PSP.

  5. Field test investigation of high sensitivity fiber optic seismic geophone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Min, Li; Zhang, Xiaolei; Zhang, Faxiang; Sun, Zhihui; Li, Shujuan; Wang, Chang; Zhao, Zhong; Hao, Guanghu

    2017-10-01

    Seismic reflection, whose measured signal is the artificial seismic waves ,is the most effective method and widely used in the geophysical prospecting. And this method can be used for exploration of oil, gas and coal. When a seismic wave travelling through the Earth encounters an interface between two materials with different acoustic impedances, some of the wave energy will reflect off the interface and some will refract through the interface. At its most basic, the seismic reflection technique consists of generating seismic waves and measuring the time taken for the waves to travel from the source, reflect off an interface and be detected by an array of geophones at the surface. Compared to traditional geophones such as electric, magnetic, mechanical and gas geophone, optical fiber geophones have many advantages. Optical fiber geophones can achieve sensing and signal transmission simultaneously. With the development of fiber grating sensor technology, fiber bragg grating (FBG) is being applied in seismic exploration and draws more and more attention to its advantage of anti-electromagnetic interference, high sensitivity and insensitivity to meteorological conditions. In this paper, we designed a high sensitivity geophone and tested its sensitivity, based on the theory of FBG sensing. The frequency response range is from 10 Hz to 100 Hz and the acceleration of the fiber optic seismic geophone is over 1000pm/g. sixteen-element fiber optic seismic geophone array system is presented and the field test is performed in Shengli oilfield of China. The field test shows that: (1) the fiber optic seismic geophone has a higher sensitivity than the traditional geophone between 1-100 Hz;(2) The low frequency reflection wave continuity of fiber Bragg grating geophone is better.

  6. Highly sensitive detection of urinary cadmium to assess personal exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argun, Avni A.; Banks, Ashley M.; Merlen, Gwendolynne; Tempelman, Linda A. [Giner, Inc., 89 Rumford Ave., Newton 02466, MA United States (United States); Becker, Michael F.; Schuelke, Thomas [Fraunhofer USA – CCL, 1449 Engineering Research Ct., East Lansing 48824, MI (United States); Dweik, Badawi M., E-mail: bdweik@ginerinc.com [Giner, Inc., 89 Rumford Ave., Newton 02466, MA United States (United States)

    2013-04-22

    Highlights: ► An electrochemical sensor capable of detecting cadmium at parts-per-billion levels in urine. ► A novel fabrication method for Boron-Doped Diamond (BDD) ultramicroelectrode (UME) arrays. ► Unique combination of BDD UME arrays and a differential pulse voltammetry algorithm. ► High sensitivity, high reproducibility, and very low noise levels. ► Opportunity for portable operation to assess on-site personal exposure. -- Abstract: A series of Boron-Doped Diamond (BDD) ultramicroelectrode arrays were fabricated and investigated for their performance as electrochemical sensors to detect trace level metals such as cadmium. The steady-state diffusion behavior of these sensors was validated using cyclic voltammetry followed by electrochemical detection of cadmium in water and in human urine to demonstrate high sensitivity (>200 μA ppb{sup −1} cm{sup −2}) and low background current (<4 nA). When an array of ultramicroelectrodes was positioned with optimal spacing, these BDD sensors showed a sigmoidal diffusion behavior. They also demonstrated high accuracy with linear dose dependence for quantification of cadmium in a certified reference river water sample from the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) as well as in a human urine sample spiked with 0.25–1 ppb cadmium.

  7. Radiographic imaging system for high energy radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A radiographic imaging system for high energy radiation is described utilizing a detector of such radiation and a mask having regions relatively transparent to such radiation and interspersed among regions relatively opaque to such radiation. A relative motion is imparted between the mask and the detector, the detector providing a time varying signal in response to the incident radiation and in response to the relative motion. The time varying signal provides, with the aid of a decoder, an image of a source of such radiation

  8. Architecture Of High Speed Image Processing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Toshio; Hayashi, Hiroshi; Ohki, Tohru

    1988-01-01

    One of architectures for a high speed image processing system which corresponds to a new algorithm for a shape understanding is proposed. And the hardware system which is based on the archtecture was developed. Consideration points of the architecture are mainly that using processors should match with the processing sequence of the target image and that the developed system should be used practically in an industry. As the result, it was possible to perform each processing at a speed of 80 nano-seconds a pixel.

  9. Radiographic imaging system for high energy radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, H.H.

    1976-01-01

    A radiographic imaging system for high energy radiation utilizing a detector of such radiation and a mask having regions relatively transparent to such radiation interspersed among regions relatively opaque to such radiation is described. A relative motion is imparted between the mask and the detector, the detector providing a time varying signal in response to the incident radiation and in response to the relative motion. The time varying signal provides, with the aid of a decoder, an image of a source of such radiation

  10. High dynamic range imaging sensors and architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Darmont, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    Illumination is a crucial element in many applications, matching the luminance of the scene with the operational range of a camera. When luminance cannot be adequately controlled, a high dynamic range (HDR) imaging system may be necessary. These systems are being increasingly used in automotive on-board systems, road traffic monitoring, and other industrial, security, and military applications. This book provides readers with an intermediate discussion of HDR image sensors and techniques for industrial and non-industrial applications. It describes various sensor and pixel architectures capable

  11. GRANULOMETRIC MAPS FROM HIGH RESOLUTION SATELLITE IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Mering

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A new method of land cover mapping from satellite images using granulometric analysis is presented here. Discontinuous landscapes such as steppian bushes of semi arid regions and recently growing urban settlements are especially concerned by this study. Spatial organisations of the land cover are quantified by means of the size distribution analysis of the land cover units extracted from high resolution remotely sensed images. A granulometric map is built by automatic classification of every pixel of the image according to the granulometric density inside a sliding neighbourhood. Granulometric mapping brings some advantages over traditional thematic mapping by remote sensing by focusing on fine spatial events and small changes in one peculiar category of the landscape.

  12. High order effects in cross section sensitivity analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.; Karni, Y.; Gilai, D.

    1978-01-01

    Two types of high order effects associated with perturbations in the flux shape are considered: Spectral Fine Structure Effects (SFSE) and non-linearity between changes in performance parameters and data uncertainties. SFSE are investigated in Part I using a simple single resonance model. Results obtained for each of the resolved and for representative unresolved resonances of 238 U in a ZPR-6/7 like environment indicate that SFSE can have a significant contribution to the sensitivity of group constants to resonance parameters. Methods to account for SFSE both for the propagation of uncertainties and for the adjustment of nuclear data are discussed. A Second Order Sensitivity Theory (SOST) is presented, and its accuracy relative to that of the first order sensitivity theory and of the direct substitution method is investigated in Part II. The investigation is done for the non-linear problem of the effect of changes in the 297 keV sodium minimum cross section on the transport of neutrons in a deep-penetration problem. It is found that the SOST provides a satisfactory accuracy for cross section uncertainty analysis. For the same degree of accuracy, the SOST can be significantly more efficient than the direct substitution method

  13. Operationalization of the Russian Version of Highly Sensitive Person Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Регина Вячеславовна Ершова

    2018-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to operationalize a Russian version of the Highly Sensitive Person Scale (HSPS. The empirical data were collected in two ways: active, through oral advertising and inviting those who wish to take part in the study (snowball technique and passive (placement of ads about taking part in a research in social networks VKontakte and Facebook. As a result, 350 university students (117 men, 233 women, an average age of 18,2 (± 1,7 applied to a research laboratory and filled out the HSPS questionnaire, and another 510 respondents (380 women, 130 men, average age 22,6 ( ± 7,9 filled the HSPS online. The results of the study did not confirm the one-dimensional model of the construct, proposed by Aron & Aron (1997, as well as the most commonly used in the English-language studies three-factor solution. The hierarchical claster and confirmatory analyses used in the operationalization procedure allowed us to conclude that the variance of the Russian version of HSPS is best described in the framework of a two-factor model including the two separate subscales: Ease of Excitation (EOE, Low threshold of sensitivity (LTS. Sensory Processing Sensitivity may be defined as an increased susceptibility to external and internal stimuli, realized through negative emotional responses and deep susceptibility (distress to excessive stimulation.

  14. A wide-bandwidth and high-sensitivity robust microgyroscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, Korhan; Sahin, Emre; Akin, Tayfun; Alper, Said Emre

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports a microgyroscope design concept with the help of a 2 degrees of freedom (DoF) sense mode to achieve a wide bandwidth without sacrificing mechanical and electronic sensitivity and to obtain robust operation against variations under ambient conditions. The design concept is demonstrated with a tuning fork microgyroscope fabricated with an in-house silicon-on-glass micromachining process. When the fabricated gyroscope is operated with a relatively wide bandwidth of 1 kHz, measurements show a relatively high raw mechanical sensitivity of 131 µV (° s −1 ) −1 . The variation in the amplified mechanical sensitivity (scale factor) of the gyroscope is measured to be less than 0.38% for large ambient pressure variations such as from 40 to 500 mTorr. The bias instability and angle random walk of the gyroscope are measured to be 131° h −1 and 1.15° h −1/2 , respectively

  15. Development of an underwater high sensitivity Cherenkov detector: Sea Urchin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camerini, U.; McGibney, D.; Roberts, A.

    1982-01-01

    The need for a high gain, high sensitivity Cherenkov light sensor to be used in a deep underwater muon and neutrino detector (DUMAND) array has led to the design of the Sea Urchin detector. In this design a spherical photocathode PMTis optically coupled through a glass hemisphere to a large number of glass spines, each of which is filled with a wavelength-shifting (WLS) solution of a high quantum efficiency phosphor. The Cherenkov radiation is absorbed in the spine, isotropically re-radiated at a longer wavelength, and a fraction of the fluorescent light is internally reflected in the spine, and guided to the photomultiplier concentrically located in the glass hemisphere. Experiments measuring the optical characteristics of the spines and computer programs simulating light transformation and detection cross sections are described. Overall optical gains in the range 5-10 are achieved. The WLS solution is inexpensive, and may have other applications. (orig.)

  16. Position sensitive detection of neutrons in high radiation background field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavrik, D; Jakubek, J; Pospisil, S; Vacik, J

    2014-01-01

    We present the development of a high-resolution position sensitive device for detection of slow neutrons in the environment of extremely high γ and e(-) radiation background. We make use of a planar silicon pixelated (pixel size: 55 × 55 μm(2)) spectroscopic Timepix detector adapted for neutron detection utilizing very thin (10)B converter placed onto detector surface. We demonstrate that electromagnetic radiation background can be discriminated from the neutron signal utilizing the fact that each particle type produces characteristic ionization tracks in the pixelated detector. Particular tracks can be distinguished by their 2D shape (in the detector plane) and spectroscopic response using single event analysis. A Cd sheet served as thermal neutron stopper as well as intensive source of gamma rays and energetic electrons. Highly efficient discrimination was successful even at very low neutron to electromagnetic background ratio about 10(-4).

  17. Highly Sensitive Flexible Magnetic Sensor Based on Anisotropic Magnetoresistance Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiguang; Wang, Xinjun; Li, Menghui; Gao, Yuan; Hu, Zhongqiang; Nan, Tianxiang; Liang, Xianfeng; Chen, Huaihao; Yang, Jia; Cash, Syd; Sun, Nian-Xiang

    2016-11-01

    A highly sensitive flexible magnetic sensor based on the anisotropic magnetoresistance effect is fabricated. A limit of detection of 150 nT is observed and excellent deformation stability is achieved after wrapping of the flexible sensor, with bending radii down to 5 mm. The flexible AMR sensor is used to read a magnetic pattern with a thickness of 10 μm that is formed by ferrite magnetic inks. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. High sensitivity on-line monitor for radioactive effluent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Toshimi [Tohoku Electric Power Co. Ltd., Sendai (Japan); Ishizuka, Akira; Abe, Eisuke; Inoue, Yasuhiko; Fujii, Masaaki; Kitaguchi, Hiroshi; Doi, Akira

    1983-04-01

    A new approach for a highly sensitive effluent monitor is presented. The free flow type monitor, which consists of a straightener, nozzle, monitoring section and ..gamma..-ray detector, is demonstrated to be effective in providing long term stability. The 160 start-and-stop cycles of effluent discharge were repeated in a 120-h testing period. Results showed a background increase was not observed for the free flow type monitor. The background count rate was calibrated to the lowest detection limit to be 2.2 x 10/sup -2/ Bq/ml for a 300 s measurement time.

  19. High-Sensitivity Measurement of Density by Magnetic Levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemiroski, Alex; Kumar, A A; Soh, Siowling; Harburg, Daniel V; Yu, Hai-Dong; Whitesides, George M

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents methods that use Magnetic Levitation (MagLev) to measure very small differences in density of solid diamagnetic objects suspended in a paramagnetic medium. Previous work in this field has shown that, while it is a convenient method, standard MagLev (i.e., where the direction of magnetization and gravitational force are parallel) cannot resolve differences in density mm) because (i) objects close in density prevent each other from reaching an equilibrium height due to hard contact and excluded volume, and (ii) using weaker magnets or reducing the magnetic susceptibility of the medium destabilizes the magnetic trap. The present work investigates the use of weak magnetic gradients parallel to the faces of the magnets as a means of increasing the sensitivity of MagLev without destabilization. Configuring the MagLev device in a rotated state (i.e., where the direction of magnetization and gravitational force are perpendicular) relative to the standard configuration enables simple measurements along the axes with the highest sensitivity to changes in density. Manipulating the distance of separation between the magnets or the lengths of the magnets (along the axis of measurement) enables the sensitivity to be tuned. These modifications enable an improvement in the resolution up to 100-fold over the standard configuration, and measurements with resolution down to 10(-6) g/cm(3). Three examples of characterizing the small differences in density among samples of materials having ostensibly indistinguishable densities-Nylon spheres, PMMA spheres, and drug spheres-demonstrate the applicability of rotated Maglev to measuring the density of small (0.1-1 mm) objects with high sensitivity. This capability will be useful in materials science, separations, and quality control of manufactured objects.

  20. High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Fujii, Kento; Morishita, Yuki; Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, Aichi 462-8508 (Japan)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: In proton therapy, imaging of the positron distribution produced by fragmentation during or soon after proton irradiation is a useful method to monitor the proton range. Although positron emission tomography (PET) is typically used for this imaging, its spatial resolution is limited. Cerenkov light imaging is a new molecular imaging technology that detects the visible photons that are produced from high-speed electrons using a high sensitivity optical camera. Because its inherent spatial resolution is much higher than PET, the authors can measure more precise information of the proton-induced positron distribution with Cerenkov light imaging technology. For this purpose, they conducted Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy. Methods: First, the authors evaluated the spatial resolution of our Cerenkov light imaging system with a {sup 22}Na point source for the actual imaging setup. Then the transparent acrylic phantoms (100 × 100 × 100 mm{sup 3}) were irradiated with two different proton energies using a spot scanning proton therapy system. Cerenkov light imaging of each phantom was conducted using a high sensitivity electron multiplied charge coupled device (EM-CCD) camera. Results: The Cerenkov light’s spatial resolution for the setup was 0.76 ± 0.6 mm FWHM. They obtained high resolution Cerenkov light images of the positron distributions in the phantoms for two different proton energies and made fused images of the reference images and the Cerenkov light images. The depths of the positron distribution in the phantoms from the Cerenkov light images were almost identical to the simulation results. The decay curves derived from the region-of-interests (ROIs) set on the Cerenkov light images revealed that Cerenkov light images can be used for estimating the half-life of the radionuclide components of positrons. Conclusions: High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of proton-induced positron distribution was possible. The

  1. High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Fujii, Kento; Morishita, Yuki; Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In proton therapy, imaging of the positron distribution produced by fragmentation during or soon after proton irradiation is a useful method to monitor the proton range. Although positron emission tomography (PET) is typically used for this imaging, its spatial resolution is limited. Cerenkov light imaging is a new molecular imaging technology that detects the visible photons that are produced from high-speed electrons using a high sensitivity optical camera. Because its inherent spatial resolution is much higher than PET, the authors can measure more precise information of the proton-induced positron distribution with Cerenkov light imaging technology. For this purpose, they conducted Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy. Methods: First, the authors evaluated the spatial resolution of our Cerenkov light imaging system with a 22 Na point source for the actual imaging setup. Then the transparent acrylic phantoms (100 × 100 × 100 mm 3 ) were irradiated with two different proton energies using a spot scanning proton therapy system. Cerenkov light imaging of each phantom was conducted using a high sensitivity electron multiplied charge coupled device (EM-CCD) camera. Results: The Cerenkov light’s spatial resolution for the setup was 0.76 ± 0.6 mm FWHM. They obtained high resolution Cerenkov light images of the positron distributions in the phantoms for two different proton energies and made fused images of the reference images and the Cerenkov light images. The depths of the positron distribution in the phantoms from the Cerenkov light images were almost identical to the simulation results. The decay curves derived from the region-of-interests (ROIs) set on the Cerenkov light images revealed that Cerenkov light images can be used for estimating the half-life of the radionuclide components of positrons. Conclusions: High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of proton-induced positron distribution was possible. The authors

  2. High pressure-sensitive gene expression in Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.F. Vogel

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis is a Gram-positive lactic acid bacterium used in food biotechnology. It is necessary to investigate many aspects of a model organism to elucidate mechanisms of stress response, to facilitate preparation, application and performance in food fermentation, to understand mechanisms of inactivation, and to identify novel tools for high pressure biotechnology. To investigate the mechanisms of the complex bacterial response to high pressure we have analyzed changes in the proteome and transcriptome by 2-D electrophoresis, and by microarrays and real time PCR, respectively. More than 16 proteins were found to be differentially expressed upon high pressure stress and were compared to those sensitive to other stresses. Except for one apparently high pressure-specific stress protein, no pressure-specific stress proteins were found, and the proteome response to pressure was found to differ from that induced by other stresses. Selected pressure-sensitive proteins were partially sequenced and their genes were identified by reverse genetics. In a transcriptome analysis of a redundancy cleared shot gun library, about 7% of the genes investigated were found to be affected. Most of them appeared to be up-regulated 2- to 4-fold and these results were confirmed by real time PCR. Gene induction was shown for some genes up-regulated at the proteome level (clpL/groEL/rbsK, while the response of others to high hydrostatic pressure at the transcriptome level seemed to differ from that observed at the proteome level. The up-regulation of selected genes supports the view that the cell tries to compensate for pressure-induced impairment of translation and membrane transport.

  3. Optimizing structure in nanodiamonds using in-situ strain-sensitive Bragg coherent diffraction imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruszkewycz, Stephan; Cha, Wonsuk; Ulvestad, Andrew; Fuoss, Paul; Heremans, F. Joseph; Harder, Ross; Andrich, Paolo; Anderson, Christopher; Awschalom, David

    The nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond has attracted considerable attention for nanoscale sensing due to unique optical and spin properties. Many of these applications require diamond nanoparticles which contain large amounts of residual strain due to the detonation or milling process used in their fabrication. Here, we present experimental, in-situ observations of changes in morphology and internal strain state of commercial nanodiamonds during high-temperature annealing using Bragg coherent diffraction imaging to reconstruct a strain-sensitive 3D image of individual sub-micron-sized crystals. We find minimal structural changes to the nanodiamonds at temperatures less than 650 C, and that at higher temperatures up to 750 C, the diamond-structured volume fraction of nanocrystals tend to shrink. The degree of internal lattice distortions within nanodiamond particles also decreases during the anneal. Our findings potentially enable the design of efficient processing of commercial nanodiamonds into viable materials suitable for device design. We acknowledge support from U.S. DOE, Office of Science, BES, MSE.

  4. Smart stimuli sensitive nanogels in cancer drug delivery and imaging: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya, S; Sarmento, Bruno; Nair, Amrita; Rejinold, N Sanoj; Nair, Shantikumar V; Jayakumar, R

    2013-01-01

    Nanogels are nanosized hydrogel particles formed by physical or chemical cross-linked polymer networks. The advantageous properties of nanogels related to the ability of retaining considerable amount of water, the biocompatibility of the polymers used, the ability to encapsulate and protect a large quantity of payload drugs within the nanogel matrix, the high stability in aqueous media, their stimuli responsively behavior potential, and the versatility in release drugs in a controlled manner make them very attractive for use in the area of drug delivery. The materials used for the preparation of nanogels ranged from natural polymers like ovalbumin, pullulan, hyaluronic acid, methacrylated chondroitin sulfate and chitosan, to synthetic polymers like poly (N-isopropylacrylamide), poly (Nisopropylacrylamide- co-acrylic acid) and poly (ethylene glycol)-b-poly (methacrylic acid). The porous nanogels have been finding application as anti-cancer drug and imaging agent reservoirs. Smart nanogels responding to external stimuli such as temperature, pH etc can be designed for diverse therapeutic and diagnostic applications. The nanogels have also been surface functionalized with specific ligands aiding in targeted drug delivery. This review focus on stimuli-sensitive, multi-responsive, magnetic and targeted nanogels providing a brief insight on the application of nanogels in cancer drug delivery and imaging in detail.

  5. High speed imaging system for nuclear diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyer, H.H.

    1976-01-01

    A high speed imaging system based on state-of-the-art photosensor arrays has been designed for use in nuclear diagnostics. The system is comprised of a front-end rapid-scan solid-state camera, a high speed digitizer, and a PCM line driver in a downhole package and a memory buffer system in a uphole trailer. The downhole camera takes a ''snapshot'' of a nuclear device created flux stream, digitizes the image and transmits it to the uphole memory system before being destroyed. The memory system performs two functions: it retains the data for local display and processing by a microprocessor, and it buffers the data for retransmission at slower rates to the LLL computational facility (NADS). The impetus for such a system as well as its operation are discussed. Also discussed are new systems under development which incorporate higher data rates and more resolution

  6. Smartphone microendoscopy for high resolution fluorescence imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangqian Hong

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available High resolution optical endoscopes are increasingly used in diagnosis of various medical conditions of internal organs, such as the cervix and gastrointestinal (GI tracts, but they are too expensive for use in resource-poor settings. On the other hand, smartphones with high resolution cameras and Internet access have become more affordable, enabling them to diffuse into most rural areas and developing countries in the past decade. In this paper, we describe a smartphone microendoscope that can take fluorescence images with a spatial resolution of 3.1 μm. Images collected from ex vivo, in vitro and in vivo samples using the device are also presented. The compact and cost-effective smartphone microendoscope may be envisaged as a powerful tool for detecting pre-cancerous lesions of internal organs in low and middle-income countries (LMICs.

  7. High speed imaging system for nuclear diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyer, H.H.

    1976-01-01

    A high speed imaging system based on state-of-the-art photosensor arrays has been designed for use in nuclear diagnostics. The system is comprised of a front-end rapid-scan solid-state camera, a high speed digitizer, and a PCM line driver in a downhole package and a memory buffer system in an uphole trailer. The downhole camera takes a ''snapshot'' of a nuclear device created flux stream, digitizes the image and transmits it to the uphole memory system before being destroyed. The memory system performs two functions: it retains the data for local display and processing by a microprocessor, and it buffers the data for retransmission at slower rates to the LLL computational facility (NADS). The impetus for such a system as well as its operation is discussed. Also discussed are new systems under development which incorporate higher data rates and more resolution

  8. Functional magnetic resonance imaging with ultra-high fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windischberger, C.; Schoepf, V.; Sladky, R.; Moser, E.; Fischmeister, F.P.S.

    2010-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is currently the primary method for non-invasive functional localization in the brain. With the emergence of MR systems with field strengths of 4 Tesla and above, neuronal activation may be studied with unprecedented accuracy. In this article we present different approaches to use the improved sensitivity and specificity for expanding current fMRT resolution limits in space and time based on several 7 Tesla studies. In addition to the challenges that arise with ultra-high magnetic fields possible solutions will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  9. The practicality of high magnification imaging by positron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Pendyala, S.

    1988-01-01

    The positron emission microscope has the capability of contrasting areas having high concentrations of monatomic vacancies and other defects. Since the positrons traveling through the specimen will have energies of the same magnitude as that of valence electrons, image contrast will be sensitive to the chemistry of the specimen. In the near future resolutions of 10 nm or lower will be achieved. Whether or not optical aberrations will permit one atom resolution is not clear. For one atom resolution to be obtained positron emission fluxes must be brightness enhanced to 10 11 sec/sup/minus/1/cm/sup/minus/2/ or greater. 5 refs., 1 fig

  10. A simple, tunable, and highly sensitive radio-frequency sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yan; Sun, Jiwei; He, Yuxi; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Pingshan

    2013-08-05

    We report a radio frequency (RF) sensor that exploits tunable attenuators and phase shifters to achieve high-sensitivity and broad band frequency tunability. Three frequency bands are combined to enable sensor operations from ∼20 MHz to ∼38 GHz. The effective quality factor ( Q eff ) of the sensor is as high as ∼3.8 × 10 6 with 200  μ l of water samples. We also demonstrate the measurement of 2-proponal-water-solution permittivity at 0.01 mole concentration level from ∼1 GHz to ∼10 GHz. Methanol-water solution and de-ionized water are used to calibrate the RF sensor for the quantitative measurements.

  11. Correcting systematic errors in high-sensitivity deuteron polarization measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantjes, N. P. M.; Dzordzhadze, V.; Gebel, R.; Gonnella, F.; Gray, F. E.; van der Hoek, D. J.; Imig, A.; Kruithof, W. L.; Lazarus, D. M.; Lehrach, A.; Lorentz, B.; Messi, R.; Moricciani, D.; Morse, W. M.; Noid, G. A.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Özben, C. S.; Prasuhn, D.; Levi Sandri, P.; Semertzidis, Y. K.; da Silva e Silva, M.; Stephenson, E. J.; Stockhorst, H.; Venanzoni, G.; Versolato, O. O.

    2012-02-01

    This paper reports deuteron vector and tensor beam polarization measurements taken to investigate the systematic variations due to geometric beam misalignments and high data rates. The experiments used the In-Beam Polarimeter at the KVI-Groningen and the EDDA detector at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY at Jülich. By measuring with very high statistical precision, the contributions that are second-order in the systematic errors become apparent. By calibrating the sensitivity of the polarimeter to such errors, it becomes possible to obtain information from the raw count rate values on the size of the errors and to use this information to correct the polarization measurements. During the experiment, it was possible to demonstrate that corrections were satisfactory at the level of 10 -5 for deliberately large errors. This may facilitate the real time observation of vector polarization changes smaller than 10 -6 in a search for an electric dipole moment using a storage ring.

  12. Correcting systematic errors in high-sensitivity deuteron polarization measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brantjes, N.P.M. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, NL-9747AA Groningen (Netherlands); Dzordzhadze, V. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Gebel, R. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Gonnella, F. [Physica Department of ' Tor Vergata' University, Rome (Italy); INFN-Sez. ' Roma tor Vergata,' Rome (Italy); Gray, F.E. [Regis University, Denver, CO 80221 (United States); Hoek, D.J. van der [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, NL-9747AA Groningen (Netherlands); Imig, A. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Kruithof, W.L. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, NL-9747AA Groningen (Netherlands); Lazarus, D.M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Lehrach, A.; Lorentz, B. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Messi, R. [Physica Department of ' Tor Vergata' University, Rome (Italy); INFN-Sez. ' Roma tor Vergata,' Rome (Italy); Moricciani, D. [INFN-Sez. ' Roma tor Vergata,' Rome (Italy); Morse, W.M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Noid, G.A. [Indiana University Cyclotron Facility, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); and others

    2012-02-01

    This paper reports deuteron vector and tensor beam polarization measurements taken to investigate the systematic variations due to geometric beam misalignments and high data rates. The experiments used the In-Beam Polarimeter at the KVI-Groningen and the EDDA detector at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY at Juelich. By measuring with very high statistical precision, the contributions that are second-order in the systematic errors become apparent. By calibrating the sensitivity of the polarimeter to such errors, it becomes possible to obtain information from the raw count rate values on the size of the errors and to use this information to correct the polarization measurements. During the experiment, it was possible to demonstrate that corrections were satisfactory at the level of 10{sup -5} for deliberately large errors. This may facilitate the real time observation of vector polarization changes smaller than 10{sup -6} in a search for an electric dipole moment using a storage ring.

  13. Wide bandwidth transimpedance amplifier for extremely high sensitivity continuous measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Giorgio; Sampietro, Marco

    2007-09-01

    This article presents a wide bandwidth transimpedance amplifier based on the series of an integrator and a differentiator stage, having an additional feedback loop to discharge the standing current from the device under test (DUT) to ensure an unlimited measuring time opportunity when compared to switched discharge configurations while maintaining a large signal amplification over the full bandwidth. The amplifier shows a flat response from 0.6 Hz to 1.4 MHz, the capability to operate with leakage currents from the DUT as high as tens of nanoamperes, and rail-to-rail dynamic range for sinusoidal current signals independent of the DUT leakage current. Also available is a monitor output of the stationary current to track experimental slow drifts. The circuit is ideal for noise spectral and impedance measurements of nanodevices and biomolecules when in the presence of a physiological medium and in all cases where high sensitivity current measurements are requested such as in scanning probe microscopy systems.

  14. Design of a charge sensitive preamplifier on high resistivity silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radeka, V.; Rehak, P.; Rescia, S.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sampietro, M.; Holl, P.; Strueder, L.; Kemmer, J.

    1987-01-01

    A low noise, fast charge sensitive preamplifier was designed on high resistivity, detector grade silicon. It is built at the surface of a fully depleted region of n-type silicon. This allows the preamplifier to be placed very close to a detector anode. The preamplifier uses the classical input cascode configuration with a capacitor and a high value resistor in the feedback loop. The output stage of the preamplifier can drive a load up to 20pF. The power dissipation of the preamplifier is 13mW. The amplifying elements are ''Single Sided Gate JFETs'' developed especially for this application. Preamplifiers connected to a low capacitance anode of a drift type detector should achieve a rise time of 20ns and have an equivalent noise charge (ENC), after a suitable shaping, of less than 50 electrons. This performance translates to a position resolution better than 3μm for silicon drift detectors. 6 refs., 9 figs

  15. High speed gated x-ray imagers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilkenny, J.D.; Bell, P.; Hanks, R.; Power, G.; Turner, R.E.; Wiedwald, J.

    1988-01-01

    Single and multi-frame gated x-ray images with time-resolution as fast as 150 psec are described. These systems are based on the gating of microchannel plates in a stripline configuration. The gating voltage comes from the avalanche breakdown of reverse biased p-n junction producing high power voltage pulses as short as 70 psec. Results from single and four frame x-ray cameras used on Nova are described. 8 refs., 9 figs

  16. Phase-Sensitive Coherence and the Classical-Quantum Boundary in Ghost Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkmen, Baris I.; Hardy, Nicholas D.; Venkatraman, Dheera; Wong, Franco N. C.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2011-01-01

    The theory of partial coherence has a long and storied history in classical statistical optics. the vast majority of this work addresses fields that are statistically stationary in time, hence their complex envelopes only have phase-insensitive correlations. The quantum optics of squeezed-state generation, however, depends on nonlinear interactions producing baseband field operators with phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive correlations. Utilizing quantum light to enhance imaging has been a topic of considerable current interest, much of it involving biphotons, i.e., streams of entangled-photon pairs. Biphotons have been employed for quantum versions of optical coherence tomography, ghost imaging, holography, and lithography. However, their seemingly quantum features have been mimicked with classical-sate light, questioning wherein lies the classical-quantum boundary. We have shown, for the case of Gaussian-state light, that this boundary is intimately connected to the theory of phase-sensitive partial coherence. Here we present that theory, contrasting it with the familiar case of phase-insensitive partial coherence, and use it to elucidate the classical-quantum boundary of ghost imaging. We show, both theoretically and experimentally, that classical phase-sensitive light produces ghost imaging most closely mimicking those obtained in biphotons, and we derived the spatial resolution, image contrast, and signal-to-noise ratio of a standoff-sensing ghost imager, taking into account target-induced speckle.

  17. Ultra high field magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lethimonnier, F.; Vedrine, P.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding human brain function, brain development and brain dysfunction is one of the great challenges of the twenty first century. Biomedical imaging has now run up against a number of technical constraints that are exposing limits to its potential. In order to overcome the current limits to high-field magnetic resonance cerebral imaging (MRI) and unleash its fullest potential, the Cea has built NeuroSpin, an ultra-high-field neuroimaging facility at its Saclay centre (in the Essonne). NeuroSpin already boasts three fully operational MRI systems. The first is a 3-tesla high-field system and the second is a very-high-field 7-tesla system, both of which are dedicated to clinical studies and investigations in humans, while the third is an ultra-high-field 17.65-tesla system designed for studies on small animals. In 2011, NeuroSpin will be commissioning an 11.7-tesla ultra-high-field system of unprecedented power that is designed for research on human subjects. The level of the magnetic field and the scale required will make this joint French-German project to build the magnet a breakthrough in the international arena. (authors)

  18. Image simulation of high-speed imaging by high-pressure gas ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Jichen; Liu Ximing; Wu Zhifang

    2005-01-01

    The signal of the neighbor pixels is cumulated in Freight Train Inspection System because data fetch time is shorter than ion excursion time. This paper analyzes the pertinency of neighbor pixels and designs computer simulation method to generate some emulate images such as indicator image. The result indicates the high-pressure gas ionization detector can be used in high-speed digital radiography field. (authors)

  19. High-Sensitivity Temperature-Independent Silicon Photonic Microfluidic Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kangbaek

    Optical biosensors that can precisely quantify the presence of specific molecular species in real time without the need for labeling have seen increased use in the drug discovery industry and molecular biology in general. Of the many possible optical biosensors, the TM mode Si biosensor is shown to be very attractive in the sensing application because of large field amplitude on the surface and cost effective CMOS VLSI fabrication. Noise is the most fundamental factor that limits the performance of sensors in development of high-sensitivity biosensors, and noise reduction techniques require precise studies and analysis. One such example stems from thermal fluctuations. Generally SOI biosensors are vulnerable to ambient temperature fluctuations because of large thermo-optic coefficient of silicon (˜2x10 -4 RIU/K), typically requiring another reference ring and readout sequence to compensate temperature induced noise. To address this problem, we designed sensors with a novel TM-mode shallow-ridge waveguide that provides both large surface amplitude for bulk and surface sensing. With proper design, this also provides large optical confinement in the aqueous cladding that renders the device athermal using the negative thermo-optic coefficient of water (~ --1x10-4RIU/K), demonstrating cancellation of thermo-optic effects for aqueous solution operation near 300K. Additional limitations resulting from mechanical actuator fluctuations, stability of tunable lasers, and large 1/f noise of lasers and sensor electronics can limit biosensor performance. Here we also present a simple harmonic feedback readout technique that obviates the need for spectrometers and tunable lasers. This feedback technique reduces the impact of 1/f noise to enable high-sensitivity, and a DSP lock-in with 256 kHz sampling rate can provide down to micros time scale monitoring for fast transitions in biomolecular concentration with potential for small volume and low cost. In this dissertation, a novel

  20. SNR-optimized phase-sensitive dual-acquisition turbo spin echo imaging: a fast alternative to FLAIR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunyeol; Park, Jaeseok

    2013-07-01

    Phase-sensitive dual-acquisition single-slab three-dimensional turbo spin echo imaging was recently introduced, producing high-resolution isotropic cerebrospinal fluid attenuated brain images without long inversion recovery preparation. Despite the advantages, the weighted-averaging-based technique suffers from noise amplification resulting from different levels of cerebrospinal fluid signal modulations over the two acquisitions. The purpose of this work is to develop a signal-to-noise ratio-optimized version of the phase-sensitive dual-acquisition single-slab three-dimensional turbo spin echo. Variable refocusing flip angles in the first acquisition are calculated using a three-step prescribed signal evolution while those in the second acquisition are calculated using a two-step pseudo-steady state signal transition with a high flip-angle pseudo-steady state at a later portion of the echo train, balancing the levels of cerebrospinal fluid signals in both the acquisitions. Low spatial frequency signals are sampled during the high flip-angle pseudo-steady state to further suppress noise. Numerical simulations of the Bloch equations were performed to evaluate signal evolutions of brain tissues along the echo train and optimize imaging parameters. In vivo studies demonstrate that compared with conventional phase-sensitive dual-acquisition single-slab three-dimensional turbo spin echo, the proposed optimization yields 74% increase in apparent signal-to-noise ratio for gray matter and 32% decrease in imaging time. The proposed method can be a potential alternative to conventional fluid-attenuated imaging. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. High throughput imaging cytometer with acoustic focussing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmijan, Robert; Jonnalagadda, Umesh S; Carugo, Dario; Kochi, Yu; Lemm, Elizabeth; Packham, Graham; Hill, Martyn; Glynne-Jones, Peter

    2015-10-31

    We demonstrate an imaging flow cytometer that uses acoustic levitation to assemble cells and other particles into a sheet structure. This technique enables a high resolution, low noise CMOS camera to capture images of thousands of cells with each frame. While ultrasonic focussing has previously been demonstrated for 1D cytometry systems, extending the technology to a planar, much higher throughput format and integrating imaging is non-trivial, and represents a significant jump forward in capability, leading to diagnostic possibilities not achievable with current systems. A galvo mirror is used to track the images of the moving cells permitting exposure times of 10 ms at frame rates of 50 fps with motion blur of only a few pixels. At 80 fps, we demonstrate a throughput of 208 000 beads per second. We investigate the factors affecting motion blur and throughput, and demonstrate the system with fluorescent beads, leukaemia cells and a chondrocyte cell line. Cells require more time to reach the acoustic focus than beads, resulting in lower throughputs; however a longer device would remove this constraint.

  2. High sensitivity pyrogen testing in water and dialysis solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshian, Mardas; Wendel, Albrecht; Hartung, Thomas; von Aulock, Sonja

    2008-07-20

    The dialysis patient is confronted with hundreds of litres of dialysis solution per week, which pass the natural protective barriers of the body and are brought into contact with the tissue directly in the case of peritoneal dialysis or indirectly in the case of renal dialysis (hemodialysis). The components can be tested for living specimens or dead pyrogenic (fever-inducing) contaminations. The former is usually detected by cultivation and the latter by the endotoxin-specific Limulus Amoebocyte Lysate Assay (LAL). However, the LAL assay does not reflect the response of the human immune system to the wide variety of possible pyrogenic contaminations in dialysis fluids. Furthermore, the test is limited in its sensitivity to detect extremely low concentrations of pyrogens, which in their sum result in chronic pathologies in dialysis patients. The In vitro Pyrogen Test (IPT) employs human whole blood to detect the spectrum of pyrogens to which humans respond by measuring the release of the endogenous fever mediator interleukin-1beta. Spike recovery checks exclude interference. The test has been validated in an international study for pyrogen detection in injectable solutions. In this study we adapted the IPT to the testing of dialysis solutions. Preincubation of 50 ml spiked samples with albumin-coated microspheres enhanced the sensitivity of the assay to detect contaminations down to 0.1 pg/ml LPS or 0.001 EU/ml in water or saline and allowed pyrogen detection in dialysis concentrates or final working solutions. This method offers high sensitivity detection of human-relevant pyrogens in dialysis solutions and components.

  3. High accuracy FIONA-AFM hybrid imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fronczek, D.N.; Quammen, C.; Wang, H.; Kisker, C.; Superfine, R.; Taylor, R.; Erie, D.A.; Tessmer, I.

    2011-01-01

    Multi-protein complexes are ubiquitous and play essential roles in many biological mechanisms. Single molecule imaging techniques such as electron microscopy (EM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) are powerful methods for characterizing the structural properties of multi-protein and multi-protein-DNA complexes. However, a significant limitation to these techniques is the ability to distinguish different proteins from one another. Here, we combine high resolution fluorescence microscopy and AFM (FIONA-AFM) to allow the identification of different proteins in such complexes. Using quantum dots as fiducial markers in addition to fluorescently labeled proteins, we are able to align fluorescence and AFM information to ≥8 nm accuracy. This accuracy is sufficient to identify individual fluorescently labeled proteins in most multi-protein complexes. We investigate the limitations of localization precision and accuracy in fluorescence and AFM images separately and their effects on the overall registration accuracy of FIONA-AFM hybrid images. This combination of the two orthogonal techniques (FIONA and AFM) opens a wide spectrum of possible applications to the study of protein interactions, because AFM can yield high resolution (5-10 nm) information about the conformational properties of multi-protein complexes and the fluorescence can indicate spatial relationships of the proteins in the complexes. -- Research highlights: → Integration of fluorescent signals in AFM topography with high (<10 nm) accuracy. → Investigation of limitations and quantitative analysis of fluorescence-AFM image registration using quantum dots. → Fluorescence center tracking and display as localization probability distributions in AFM topography (FIONA-AFM). → Application of FIONA-AFM to a biological sample containing damaged DNA and the DNA repair proteins UvrA and UvrB conjugated to quantum dots.

  4. Supervised detection of exoplanets in high-contrast imaging sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez Gonzalez, C. A.; Absil, O.; Van Droogenbroeck, M.

    2018-06-01

    Context. Post-processing algorithms play a key role in pushing the detection limits of high-contrast imaging (HCI) instruments. State-of-the-art image processing approaches for HCI enable the production of science-ready images relying on unsupervised learning techniques, such as low-rank approximations, for generating a model point spread function (PSF) and subtracting the residual starlight and speckle noise. Aims: In order to maximize the detection rate of HCI instruments and survey campaigns, advanced algorithms with higher sensitivities to faint companions are needed, especially for the speckle-dominated innermost region of the images. Methods: We propose a reformulation of the exoplanet detection task (for ADI sequences) that builds on well-established machine learning techniques to take HCI post-processing from an unsupervised to a supervised learning context. In this new framework, we present algorithmic solutions using two different discriminative models: SODIRF (random forests) and SODINN (neural networks). We test these algorithms on real ADI datasets from VLT/NACO and VLT/SPHERE HCI instruments. We then assess their performances by injecting fake companions and using receiver operating characteristic analysis. This is done in comparison with state-of-the-art ADI algorithms, such as ADI principal component analysis (ADI-PCA). Results: This study shows the improved sensitivity versus specificity trade-off of the proposed supervised detection approach. At the diffraction limit, SODINN improves the true positive rate by a factor ranging from 2 to 10 (depending on the dataset and angular separation) with respect to ADI-PCA when working at the same false-positive level. Conclusions: The proposed supervised detection framework outperforms state-of-the-art techniques in the task of discriminating planet signal from speckles. In addition, it offers the possibility of re-processing existing HCI databases to maximize their scientific return and potentially improve

  5. New application of superconductors: High sensitivity cryogenic light detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardani, L., E-mail: laura.cardani@roma1.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Physics Department, Princeton University, Washington Road, 08544 Princeton, NJ (United States); Bellini, F.; Casali, N. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); INFN – Sezione di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma, Italy (Italy); Castellano, M.G. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie – CNR, Via Cineto Romano 42, 00156 Roma (Italy); Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Cosmelli, C.; Cruciani, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); INFN – Sezione di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma, Italy (Italy); D' Addabbo, A. [INFN – Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (L' Aquila) 67010 (Italy); Di Domizio, S. [INFN – Sezione di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Martinez, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); INFN – Sezione di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma, Italy (Italy); Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear y Astroparticulas, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza 50009 (Spain); Tomei, C. [INFN – Sezione di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma, Italy (Italy); and others

    2017-02-11

    In this paper we describe the current status of the CALDER project, which is developing ultra-sensitive light detectors based on superconductors for cryogenic applications. When we apply an AC current to a superconductor, the Cooper pairs oscillate and acquire kinetic inductance, that can be measured by inserting the superconductor in a LC circuit with high merit factor. Interactions in the superconductor can break the Cooper pairs, causing sizable variations in the kinetic inductance and, thus, in the response of the LC circuit. The continuous monitoring of the amplitude and frequency modulation allows to reconstruct the incident energy with excellent sensitivity. This concept is at the basis of Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) that are characterized by natural aptitude to multiplexed read-out (several sensors can be tuned to different resonant frequencies and coupled to the same line), resolution of few eV, stable behavior over a wide temperature range, and ease in fabrication. We present the results obtained by the CALDER collaboration with 2×2 cm{sup 2} substrates sampled by 1 or 4 Aluminum KIDs. We show that the performances of the first prototypes are already competitive with those of other commonly used light detectors, and we discuss the strategies for a further improvement.

  6. New application of superconductors: High sensitivity cryogenic light detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardani, L.; Bellini, F.; Casali, N.; Castellano, M.G.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Cosmelli, C.; Cruciani, A.; D'Addabbo, A.; Di Domizio, S.; Martinez, M.; Tomei, C.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we describe the current status of the CALDER project, which is developing ultra-sensitive light detectors based on superconductors for cryogenic applications. When we apply an AC current to a superconductor, the Cooper pairs oscillate and acquire kinetic inductance, that can be measured by inserting the superconductor in a LC circuit with high merit factor. Interactions in the superconductor can break the Cooper pairs, causing sizable variations in the kinetic inductance and, thus, in the response of the LC circuit. The continuous monitoring of the amplitude and frequency modulation allows to reconstruct the incident energy with excellent sensitivity. This concept is at the basis of Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) that are characterized by natural aptitude to multiplexed read-out (several sensors can be tuned to different resonant frequencies and coupled to the same line), resolution of few eV, stable behavior over a wide temperature range, and ease in fabrication. We present the results obtained by the CALDER collaboration with 2×2 cm"2 substrates sampled by 1 or 4 Aluminum KIDs. We show that the performances of the first prototypes are already competitive with those of other commonly used light detectors, and we discuss the strategies for a further improvement.

  7. High resolution X radiography imaging detector-micro gap chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Huqiang; Wang Yun; Xu Dong; Xie Kuanzhong; Bian Jianjiang

    2007-01-01

    Micro gap chamber (MGC) is a new type of Two-Dimensional position sensitive detector having excellent properties on the space and time resolution, counting rate, 2D compact structure and the flexible of application. It will become a candidate of a new tracking detector for high energy physics experiment. The basic structure and properties of MGC as well as its main research subjects are presented in this paper. Furthermore, the feasibility and validity of utilizing diamond films as the MGC gap material were also discussed in detail. So, a potential radiography imaging detector is provided in order to realize X image and X ray diffraction experiment having very good spatial and time resolution in the 3rd Generation of Synchrotron Radiation Facility. (authors)

  8. Limiting liability via high resolution image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwade, L.E.; Overlin, T.K.

    1996-12-31

    The utilization of high resolution image processing allows forensic analysts and visualization scientists to assist detectives by enhancing field photographs, and by providing the tools and training to increase the quality and usability of field photos. Through the use of digitized photographs and computerized enhancement software, field evidence can be obtained and processed as `evidence ready`, even in poor lighting and shadowed conditions or darkened rooms. These images, which are most often unusable when taken with standard camera equipment, can be shot in the worst of photographic condition and be processed as usable evidence. Visualization scientists have taken the use of digital photographic image processing and moved the process of crime scene photos into the technology age. The use of high resolution technology will assist law enforcement in making better use of crime scene photography and positive identification of prints. Valuable court room and investigation time can be saved and better served by this accurate, performance based process. Inconclusive evidence does not lead to convictions. Enhancement of the photographic capability helps solve one major problem with crime scene photos, that if taken with standard equipment and without the benefit of enhancement software would be inconclusive, thus allowing guilty parties to be set free due to lack of evidence.

  9. Imaging of surface plasmon polariton interference using phase-sensitive scanning tunneling microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jose, J.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Herek, Jennifer Lynn; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2011-01-01

    We report the surface plasmon polariton interference, generated via a ‘buried’ gold grating, and imaged using a phase-sensitive Photon Scanning Tunneling Microscope (PSTM). The phase-resolved PSTM measurement unravels the complex surface plasmon polariton interference fields at the gold-air

  10. Increasing the sensitivity for stem cell monitoring in system-function based magnetic particle imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Them, Kolja; Szwargulski, P; Knopp, Tobias; Salamon, J; Kaul, M G; Ittrich, H; Sequeira, S; Lange, C

    2016-01-01

    The use of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) has provided new possibilities in biophysics and biomedical imaging technologies. The magnetization dynamics of SPIONs, which can be influenced by the environment, are of central interest. In this work, different biological SPION environments are used to investigate three different calibration methods for stem cell monitoring in magnetic particle imaging. It is shown that calibrating using SPIONs immobilized via agarose gel or intracellular uptake results in superior stem cell image quality compared to mobile SPIONs in saline. This superior image quality enables more sensitive localization and identification of a significantly smaller number of magnetically labeled stem cells. The results are important for cell tracking and monitoring of future SPION based therapies such as hyperthermia based cancer therapies, targeted drug delivery, or tissue regeneration approaches where it is crucial to image a sufficiently small number of SPIONs interacting with biological matter. (paper)

  11. Multifunctional pH-sensitive superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanocomposites for targeted drug delivery and MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lijuan; Wang, Dali; Wei, Xuan; Zhu, Xinyuan; Li, Jianqi; Tu, Chunlai; Su, Yue; Wu, Jieli; Zhu, Bangshang; Yan, Deyue

    2013-08-10

    A multifunctional pH-sensitive superparamagnetic iron-oxide (SPIO) nanocomposite system was developed for simultaneous tumor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and therapy. Small-size SPIO nanoparticles were chemically bonded with antitumor drug doxorubicin (DOX) and biocompatible poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) through pH-sensitive acylhydrazone linkages, resulting in the formation of SPIO nanocomposites with magnetic targeting and pH-sensitive properties. These DOX-conjugated SPIO nanocomposites exhibited not only good stability in aqueous solution but also high saturation magnetizations. Under an acidic environment, the DOX was quickly released from the SPIO nanocomposites due to the cleavage of pH-sensitive acylhydrazone linkages. With the help of magnetic field, the DOX-conjugated SPIO nanocomposites showed high cellular uptake, indicating their magnetic targeting property. Comparing to free DOX, the DOX-conjugated SPIO nanocomposites showed better antitumor effect under magnetic field. At the same time, the relaxivity value of these SPIO nanocomposites was higher than 146s(-1)mM(-1) Fe, leading to ~4 times enhancement compared to that of free SPIO nanoparticles. As a negative contrast agent, these SPIO nanocomposites illustrated high resolution in MRI diagnosis of tumor-bearing mice. All of these results confirm that these pH-sensitive SPIO nanocomposites are promising hybrid materials for synergistic MRI diagnosis and tumor therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. High-Sensitivity AGN Polarimetry at Sub-Millimeter Wavelengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Martí-Vidal

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The innermost regions of radio loud Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN jets are heavily affected by synchrotron self-absorption, due to the strong magnetic fields and high particle densities in these extreme zones. The only way to overcome this absorption is to observe at sub-millimeter wavelengths, although polarimetric observations at such frequencies have so far been limited by sensitivity and calibration accuracy. However, new generation instruments such as the Atacama Large mm/sub-mm Array (ALMA overcome these limitations and are starting to deliver revolutionary results in the observational studies of AGN polarimetry. Here we present an overview of our state-of-the-art interferometric mm/sub-mm polarization observations of AGN jets with ALMA (in particular, the gravitationally-lensed sources PKS 1830−211 and B0218+359, which allow us to probe the magneto-ionic conditions at the regions closest to the central black holes.

  13. Highly Sensitive Filter Paper Substrate for SERS Trace Explosives Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro M. Fierro-Mercado

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on a novel and extremely low-cost surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS substrate fabricated depositing gold nanoparticles on common lab filter paper using thermal inkjet technology. The paper-based substrate combines all advantages of other plasmonic structures fabricated by more elaborate techniques with the dynamic flexibility given by the inherent nature of the paper for an efficient sample collection, robustness, and stability. We describe the fabrication, characterization, and SERS activity of our substrate using 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, 2,4-dinitrotoluene, and 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene as analytes. The paper-based SERS substrates presented a high sensitivity and excellent reproducibility for analytes employed, demonstrating a direct application in forensic science and homeland security.

  14. High efficiency solid-state sensitized heterojunction photovoltaic device

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Mingkui

    2010-06-01

    The high molar extinction coefficient heteroleptic ruthenium dye, NaRu(4,4′-bis(5-(hexylthio)thiophen-2-yl)-2,2′-bipyridine) (4-carboxylic acid-4′-carboxylate-2,2′-bipyridine) (NCS) 2, exhibits certified 5% electric power conversion efficiency at AM 1.5 solar irradiation (100 mW cm-2) in a solid-state dye-sensitized solar cell using 2,2′,7,7′-tetrakis-(N,N-di-pmethoxyphenylamine)-9, 9′-spirobifluorene (spiro-MeOTAD) as the organic hole-transporting material. This demonstration elucidates a class of photovoltaic devices with potential for low-cost power generation. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. High efficiency solid-state sensitized heterojunction photovoltaic device

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Mingkui; Liu, Jingyuan; Cevey-Ha, Ngoc-Le; Moon, Soo-Jin; Liska, Paul; Humphry-Baker, Robin; Moser, Jacques-E.; Grä tzel, Carole; Wang, Peng; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M.

    2010-01-01

    The high molar extinction coefficient heteroleptic ruthenium dye, NaRu(4,4′-bis(5-(hexylthio)thiophen-2-yl)-2,2′-bipyridine) (4-carboxylic acid-4′-carboxylate-2,2′-bipyridine) (NCS) 2, exhibits certified 5% electric power conversion efficiency at AM 1.5 solar irradiation (100 mW cm-2) in a solid-state dye-sensitized solar cell using 2,2′,7,7′-tetrakis-(N,N-di-pmethoxyphenylamine)-9, 9′-spirobifluorene (spiro-MeOTAD) as the organic hole-transporting material. This demonstration elucidates a class of photovoltaic devices with potential for low-cost power generation. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. High-speed photoacoustic imaging using an LED-based photoacoustic imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Naoto; Kuniyil Ajith Singh, Mithun; Shigeta, Yusuke; Hanaoka, Takamitsu; Agano, Toshitaka

    2018-02-01

    Recently we developed a multispectral LED-based photoacoustic/ultrasound imaging system (AcousticX) and have been continuously working on its technical/functional improvements. AcousticX is a linear array ultrasound transducer (128 elements, 10 MHz)-based system in which LED arrays (selectable wavelengths, pulse repetition frequency: 4 kHz, pulse width: tunable from 40 - 100 ns) are fixed on both sides of the transducer to illuminate the tissue for photoacoustic imaging. The ultrasound/photoacoustic data from all 128 elements can be simultaneously acquired, processed and displayed. We already demonstrated our system's capability to perform photoacoustic/ultrasound imaging for dynamic imaging of the tissue at a frame rate of 10 Hz (for example to visualize the pulsation of arteries in vivo in human subjects). In this work, we present the development of a new high-speed imaging mode in AcousticX. In this mode, instead of toggling between ultrasound and photoacoustic measurements, it is possible to continuously acquire only photoacoustic data for 1.5 seconds with a time interval of 1 ms. With this improvement, we can record photoacoustic signals from the whole aperture (38 mm) at fast rate and can be reviewed later at different speeds for analyzing dynamic changes in the photoacoustic signals. We believe that AcousticX with this new high-speed mode opens up a feasible technical path for multiple dynamic studies, for example one which focus on imaging the response of voltage sensitive dyes. We envisage to improve the acquisition speed further in future for exploring ultra-high-speed applications.

  17. Effective dose calculation in CT using high sensitivity TLDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, Z.; Johnston, P.N.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: To determine the effective dose for common paediatric CT examinations using thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) mea surements. High sensitivity TLD chips (LiF:Mg,Cu,P, TLD-IOOH, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Waltham, MA) were calibrated on a linac at an energy of 6 MY. A calibration was also performed on a superricial X-ray unit at a kilovoltage energy to validate the megavoltage cali bration for the purpose of measuring doses in the diagnostic energy range. The dose variation across large organs was assessed and a methodology for TLD placement in a 10 year old anthropomorphic phantom developed. Effective dose was calculated from the TLD measured absorbed doses for typical CT examinations after correcting for the TLD energy response and taking into account differences in the mass energy absorption coefficients for different tissues and organs. Results Using new tissue weighting factors recommended in ICRP Publication 103, the effective dose for a CT brain examination on a 10 year old was 1.6 millisieverts (mSv), 4.9 mSv for a CT chest exa ination and 4.7 mSv for a CT abdomen/pelvis examination. These values are lower for the CT brain examination, higher for the CT chest examination and approximately the same for the CT abdomen/ pelvis examination when compared with effective doses calculated using ICRP Publication 60 tissue weighting factors. Conclusions High sensitivity TLDs calibrated with a radiotherapy linac are useful for measuring dose in the diagnostic energy range and overcome limitations of output reproducibility and uniformity asso ciated with traditional TLD calibration on CT scanners or beam quality matched diagnostic X-ray units.

  18. Correlated cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy with high spatial precision and improved sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schorb, Martin; Briggs, John A.G.

    2014-01-01

    Performing fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy on the same sample allows fluorescent signals to be used to identify and locate features of interest for subsequent imaging by electron microscopy. To carry out such correlative microscopy on vitrified samples appropriate for structural cryo-electron microscopy it is necessary to perform fluorescence microscopy at liquid-nitrogen temperatures. Here we describe an adaptation of a cryo-light microscopy stage to permit use of high-numerical aperture objectives. This allows high-sensitivity and high-resolution fluorescence microscopy of vitrified samples. We describe and apply a correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy workflow together with a fiducial bead-based image correlation procedure. This procedure allows us to locate fluorescent bacteriophages in cryo-electron microscopy images with an accuracy on the order of 50 nm, based on their fluorescent signal. It will allow the user to precisely and unambiguously identify and locate objects and events for subsequent high-resolution structural study, based on fluorescent signals. - Highlights: • Workflow for correlated cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy. • Cryo-fluorescence microscopy setup incorporating a high numerical aperture objective. • Fluorescent signals located in cryo-electron micrographs with 50 nm spatial precision

  19. Correlated cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy with high spatial precision and improved sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schorb, Martin [Structural and Computational Biology Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Briggs, John A.G., E-mail: john.briggs@embl.de [Structural and Computational Biology Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Cell Biology and Biophysics Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-08-01

    Performing fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy on the same sample allows fluorescent signals to be used to identify and locate features of interest for subsequent imaging by electron microscopy. To carry out such correlative microscopy on vitrified samples appropriate for structural cryo-electron microscopy it is necessary to perform fluorescence microscopy at liquid-nitrogen temperatures. Here we describe an adaptation of a cryo-light microscopy stage to permit use of high-numerical aperture objectives. This allows high-sensitivity and high-resolution fluorescence microscopy of vitrified samples. We describe and apply a correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy workflow together with a fiducial bead-based image correlation procedure. This procedure allows us to locate fluorescent bacteriophages in cryo-electron microscopy images with an accuracy on the order of 50 nm, based on their fluorescent signal. It will allow the user to precisely and unambiguously identify and locate objects and events for subsequent high-resolution structural study, based on fluorescent signals. - Highlights: • Workflow for correlated cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy. • Cryo-fluorescence microscopy setup incorporating a high numerical aperture objective. • Fluorescent signals located in cryo-electron micrographs with 50 nm spatial precision.

  20. 3D elemental sensitive imaging using transmission X-ray microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yijin; Meirer, Florian; Wang, Junyue; Requena, Guillermo; Williams, Phillip; Nelson, Johanna; Mehta, Apurva; Andrews, Joy C; Pianetta, Piero

    2012-09-01

    Determination of the heterogeneous distribution of metals in alloy/battery/catalyst and biological materials is critical to fully characterize and/or evaluate the functionality of the materials. Using synchrotron-based transmission x-ray microscopy (TXM), it is now feasible to perform nanoscale-resolution imaging over a wide X-ray energy range covering the absorption edges of many elements; combining elemental sensitive imaging with determination of sample morphology. We present an efficient and reliable methodology to perform 3D elemental sensitive imaging with excellent sample penetration (tens of microns) using hard X-ray TXM. A sample of an Al-Si piston alloy is used to demonstrate the capability of the proposed method.

  1. Scanning Auger microscopy for high lateral and depth elemental sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, E., E-mail: eugenie.martinez@cea.fr [CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Yadav, P. [CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Bouttemy, M. [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles, 45 av. des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles Cedex (France); Renault, O.; Borowik, Ł.; Bertin, F. [CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Etcheberry, A. [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles, 45 av. des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles Cedex (France); Chabli, A. [CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: •SAM performances and limitations are illustrated on real practical cases such as the analysis of nanowires and nanodots. •High spatial elemental resolution is shown with the analysis of reference semiconducting Al{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}As/GaAs multilayers. •High in-depth elemental resolution is also illustrated. Auger depth profiling with low energy ion beams allows revealing ultra-thin layers (∼1 nm). •Analysis of cross-sectional samples is another effective approach to obtain in-depth elemental information. -- Abstract: Scanning Auger microscopy is currently gaining interest for investigating nanostructures or thin multilayers stacks developed for nanotechnologies. New generation Auger nanoprobes combine high lateral (∼10 nm), energy (0.1%) and depth (∼2 nm) resolutions thus offering the possibility to analyze the elemental composition as well as the chemical state, at the nanometre scale. We report here on the performances and limitations on practical examples from nanotechnology research. The spatial elemental sensitivity is illustrated with the analysis of Al{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}As/GaAs heterostructures, Si nanowires and SiC nanodots. Regarding the elemental in-depth composition, two effective approaches are presented: low energy depth profiling to reveal ultra-thin layers (∼1 nm) and analysis of cross-sectional samples.

  2. Characterization of a high resolution and high sensitivity pre-clinical PET scanner with 3D event reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Rissi, M; Bolle, E; Dorholt, O; Hines, K E; Rohne, O; Skretting, A; Stapnes, S; Volgyes, D

    2012-01-01

    COMPET is a preclinical PET scanner aiming towards a high sensitivity, a high resolution and MRI compatibility by implementing a novel detector geometry. In this approach, long scintillating LYSO crystals are used to absorb the gamma-rays. To determine the point of interaction (P01) between gamma-ray and crystal, the light exiting the crystals on one of the long sides is collected with wavelength shifters (WLS) perpendicularly arranged to the crystals. This concept has two main advantages: (1) The parallax error is reduced to a minimum and is equal for the whole field of view (FOV). (2) The P01 and its energy deposit is known in all three dimension with a high resolution, allowing for the reconstruction of Compton scattered gamma-rays. Point (1) leads to a uniform point source resolution (PSR) distribution over the whole FOV, and also allows to place the detector close to the object being imaged. Both points (1) and (2) lead to an increased sensitivity and allow for both high resolution and sensitivity at the...

  3. 3-d brownian motion simulator for high-sensitivity nanobiotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Arpád; Banky, Dániel; Grolmusz, Vince

    2011-12-01

    A wide variety of nanobiotechnologic applications are being developed for nanoparticle based in vitro diagnostic and imaging systems. Some of these systems make possible highly sensitive detection of molecular biomarkers. Frequently, the very low concentration of the biomarkers makes impossible the classical, partial differential equation-based mathematical simulation of the motion of the nanoparticles involved. We present a three-dimensional Brownian motion simulation tool for the prediction of the movement of nanoparticles in various thermal, viscosity, and geometric settings in a rectangular cuvette. For nonprofit users the server is freely available at the site http://brownian.pitgroup.org.

  4. Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Based on High Surface Area Nanocrystalline Zinc Oxide Spheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavuluri Srinivasu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available High surface area nanocrystalline zinc oxide material is fabricated using mesoporous nanostructured carbon as a sacrificial template through combustion process. The resulting material is characterized by XRD, N2 adsorption, HR-SEM, and HR-TEM. The nitrogen adsorption measurement indicates that the materials possess BET specific surface area ca. 30 m2/g. Electron microscopy images prove that the zinc oxide spheres possess particle size in the range of 0.12 μm–0.17 μm. The nanocrystalline zinc oxide spheres show 1.0% of energy conversion efficiency for dye-sensitized solar cells.

  5. Design and development of a very high resolution thermal imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuerbitz, Gunther; Duchateau, Ruediger

    1998-10-01

    The design goal of this project was to develop a thermal imaging system with ultimate geometrical resolution without sacrificing thermal sensitivity. It was necessary to fulfil the criteria for a future advanced video standard. This video standard is the so-called HDTV standard (HDTV High Definition TeleVision). The thermal imaging system is a parallel scanning system working in the 7...11 micrometer spectral region. The detector for that system has to have 576 X n (n number of TDI stages) detector elements taking into account a twofold interlace. It must be carefully optimized in terms of range performance and size of optics entrance pupil as well as producibility and yield. This was done in strong interaction with the detector manufacturer. The 16:9 aspect ratio of the HDTV standard together with the high number of 1920 pixels/line impose high demands on the scanner design in terms of scan efficiency and linearity. As an advanced second generation thermal imager the system has an internal thermal reference. The electronics is fully digitized and comprises circuits for Non Uniformity Correction (NUC), scan conversion, electronic zoom, auto gain and level, edge enhancement, up/down and left/right reversion etc. It can be completely remote-controlled via a serial interface.

  6. Ecological Sensitivity Evaluation of Tourist Region Based on Remote Sensing Image - Taking Chaohu Lake Area as a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y.; Li, W. J.; Yu, J.; Wu, C. Z.

    2018-04-01

    Remote sensing technology is of significant advantages for monitoring and analysing ecological environment. By using of automatic extraction algorithm, various environmental resources information of tourist region can be obtained from remote sensing imagery. Combining with GIS spatial analysis and landscape pattern analysis, relevant environmental information can be quantitatively analysed and interpreted. In this study, taking the Chaohu Lake Basin as an example, Landsat-8 multi-spectral satellite image of October 2015 was applied. Integrated the automatic ELM (Extreme Learning Machine) classification results with the data of digital elevation model and slope information, human disturbance degree, land use degree, primary productivity, landscape evenness , vegetation coverage, DEM, slope and normalized water body index were used as the evaluation factors to construct the eco-sensitivity evaluation index based on AHP and overlay analysis. According to the value of eco-sensitivity evaluation index, by using of GIS technique of equal interval reclassification, the Chaohu Lake area was divided into four grades: very sensitive area, sensitive area, sub-sensitive areas and insensitive areas. The results of the eco-sensitivity analysis shows: the area of the very sensitive area was 4577.4378 km2, accounting for about 37.12 %, the sensitive area was 5130.0522 km2, accounting for about 37.12 %; the area of sub-sensitive area was 3729.9312 km2, accounting for 26.99 %; the area of insensitive area was 382.4399 km2, accounting for about 2.77 %. At the same time, it has been found that there were spatial differences in ecological sensitivity of the Chaohu Lake basin. The most sensitive areas were mainly located in the areas with high elevation and large terrain gradient. Insensitive areas were mainly distributed in slope of the slow platform area; the sensitive areas and the sub-sensitive areas were mainly agricultural land and woodland. Through the eco-sensitivity analysis of

  7. ECOLOGICAL SENSITIVITY EVALUATION OF TOURIST REGION BASED ON REMOTE SENSING IMAGE – TAKING CHAOHU LAKE AREA AS A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Lin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing technology is of significant advantages for monitoring and analysing ecological environment. By using of automatic extraction algorithm, various environmental resources information of tourist region can be obtained from remote sensing imagery. Combining with GIS spatial analysis and landscape pattern analysis, relevant environmental information can be quantitatively analysed and interpreted. In this study, taking the Chaohu Lake Basin as an example, Landsat-8 multi-spectral satellite image of October 2015 was applied. Integrated the automatic ELM (Extreme Learning Machine classification results with the data of digital elevation model and slope information, human disturbance degree, land use degree, primary productivity, landscape evenness , vegetation coverage, DEM, slope and normalized water body index were used as the evaluation factors to construct the eco-sensitivity evaluation index based on AHP and overlay analysis. According to the value of eco-sensitivity evaluation index, by using of GIS technique of equal interval reclassification, the Chaohu Lake area was divided into four grades: very sensitive area, sensitive area, sub-sensitive areas and insensitive areas. The results of the eco-sensitivity analysis shows: the area of the very sensitive area was 4577.4378 km2, accounting for about 37.12 %, the sensitive area was 5130.0522 km2, accounting for about 37.12 %; the area of sub-sensitive area was 3729.9312 km2, accounting for 26.99 %; the area of insensitive area was 382.4399 km2, accounting for about 2.77 %. At the same time, it has been found that there were spatial differences in ecological sensitivity of the Chaohu Lake basin. The most sensitive areas were mainly located in the areas with high elevation and large terrain gradient. Insensitive areas were mainly distributed in slope of the slow platform area; the sensitive areas and the sub-sensitive areas were mainly agricultural land and woodland

  8. Correlation between neuromelanin-sensitive MR imaging and 123I-FP-CIT SPECT in patients with parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuya, Keita; Shinohara, Yuki; Miyoshi, Fuminori; Fujii, Shinya; Tanabe, Yoshio; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2016-01-01

    Neuromelanin-sensitive MR imaging (MRI) can visualize neuromelanin-containing neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), and its utility has been reported in the evaluation of parkinsonism. Conversely, dopamine transporter imaging by 123 I-N-v-fluoropropyl-2b-carbomethoxy-3b-(4-iodophenyl)nortropane (FP-CIT) SPECT (DaTSCAN) is now an established method for evaluating parkinsonism, detecting presynaptic dopamine neuronal dysfunction. Both methods can assist differentiating neurodegenerative and other forms of parkinsonism. However, to our knowledge, there have been no studies concerning a correlation between the two methods. The aim of this study was to assess the utility of neuromelanin-sensitive MRI for diagnosing parkinsonism by examining a correlation with DaTSCAN. Twenty-three patients with parkinsonism who underwent both neuromelanin-sensitive MRI and DaTSCAN were included. We measured the neuromelanin-positive SNc region volume by manually contouring the high signal intensity region of the SNc on neuromelanin-sensitive MRI and measured the specific binding ratio (SBR) on DaTSCAN. The asymmetry index of neuromelanin-positive SNc volume and the asymmetry index of SBR were also calculated. The volume of the neuromelanin-positive SNc region showed significant correlation with specific binding ratio (SBR) (right P <.001, ρ = 0.78, left P <.001, ρ = 0.86). The asymmetry index of neuromelanin-positive SNc volume also showed significant correlations with the asymmetry index of SBR (P <.001, ρ = 0.73). Decrease of the high signal intensity region of the SNc on neuromelanin-sensitive MRI would indicate damage to the nigrostriatal dopaminergic function as well as loss of dopaminergic neurons. We conclude that neuromelanin-sensitive MRI is a useful diagnostic biomarker for parkinsonism. (orig.)

  9. Correlation between neuromelanin-sensitive MR imaging and {sup 123}I-FP-CIT SPECT in patients with parkinsonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuya, Keita; Shinohara, Yuki; Miyoshi, Fuminori; Fujii, Shinya; Tanabe, Yoshio; Ogawa, Toshihide [Tottori University, Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine, Yonago (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    Neuromelanin-sensitive MR imaging (MRI) can visualize neuromelanin-containing neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), and its utility has been reported in the evaluation of parkinsonism. Conversely, dopamine transporter imaging by {sup 123}I-N-v-fluoropropyl-2b-carbomethoxy-3b-(4-iodophenyl)nortropane (FP-CIT) SPECT (DaTSCAN) is now an established method for evaluating parkinsonism, detecting presynaptic dopamine neuronal dysfunction. Both methods can assist differentiating neurodegenerative and other forms of parkinsonism. However, to our knowledge, there have been no studies concerning a correlation between the two methods. The aim of this study was to assess the utility of neuromelanin-sensitive MRI for diagnosing parkinsonism by examining a correlation with DaTSCAN. Twenty-three patients with parkinsonism who underwent both neuromelanin-sensitive MRI and DaTSCAN were included. We measured the neuromelanin-positive SNc region volume by manually contouring the high signal intensity region of the SNc on neuromelanin-sensitive MRI and measured the specific binding ratio (SBR) on DaTSCAN. The asymmetry index of neuromelanin-positive SNc volume and the asymmetry index of SBR were also calculated. The volume of the neuromelanin-positive SNc region showed significant correlation with specific binding ratio (SBR) (right P <.001, ρ = 0.78, left P <.001, ρ = 0.86). The asymmetry index of neuromelanin-positive SNc volume also showed significant correlations with the asymmetry index of SBR (P <.001, ρ = 0.73). Decrease of the high signal intensity region of the SNc on neuromelanin-sensitive MRI would indicate damage to the nigrostriatal dopaminergic function as well as loss of dopaminergic neurons. We conclude that neuromelanin-sensitive MRI is a useful diagnostic biomarker for parkinsonism. (orig.)

  10. Study of fish response using particle image velocimetry and high-speed, high-resolution imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Z. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richmond, M. C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mueller, R. P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gruensch, G. R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2004-10-01

    Fish swimming has fascinated both engineers and fish biologists for decades. Digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) and high-speed, high-resolution digital imaging are recently developed analysis tools that can help engineers and biologists better understand how fish respond to turbulent environments. This report details studies to evaluate DPIV. The studies included a review of existing literature on DPIV, preliminary studies to test the feasibility of using DPIV conducted at our Flow Biology Laboratory in Richland, Washington September through December 2003, and applications of high-speed, high-resolution digital imaging with advanced motion analysis to investigations of fish injury mechanisms in turbulent shear flows and bead trajectories in laboratory physical models. Several conclusions were drawn based on these studies, which are summarized as recommendations for proposed research at the end of this report.

  11. Laser-engraved carbon nanotube paper for instilling high sensitivity, high stretchability, and high linearity in strain sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Xin, Yangyang

    2017-06-29

    There is an increasing demand for strain sensors with high sensitivity and high stretchability for new applications such as robotics or wearable electronics. However, for the available technologies, the sensitivity of the sensors varies widely. These sensors are also highly nonlinear, making reliable measurement challenging. Here we introduce a new family of sensors composed of a laser-engraved carbon nanotube paper embedded in an elastomer. A roll-to-roll pressing of these sensors activates a pre-defined fragmentation process, which results in a well-controlled, fragmented microstructure. Such sensors are reproducible and durable and can attain ultrahigh sensitivity and high stretchability (with a gauge factor of over 4.2 × 10(4) at 150% strain). Moreover, they can attain high linearity from 0% to 15% and from 22% to 150% strain. They are good candidates for stretchable electronic applications that require high sensitivity and linearity at large strains.

  12. Application of a Noise Adaptive Contrast Sensitivity Function to Image Data Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Scott J.

    1989-08-01

    The visual contrast sensitivity function (CSF) has found increasing use in image compression as new algorithms optimize the display-observer interface in order to reduce the bit rate and increase the perceived image quality. In most compression algorithms, increasing the quantization intervals reduces the bit rate at the expense of introducing more quantization error, a potential image quality degradation. The CSF can be used to distribute this error as a function of spatial frequency such that it is undetectable by the human observer. Thus, instead of being mathematically lossless, the compression algorithm can be designed to be visually lossless, with the advantage of a significantly reduced bit rate. However, the CSF is strongly affected by image noise, changing in both shape and peak sensitivity. This work describes a model of the CSF that includes these changes as a function of image noise level by using the concepts of internal visual noise, and tests this model in the context of image compression with an observer study.

  13. Accelerated Sensitivity Analysis in High-Dimensional Stochastic Reaction Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arampatzis, Georgios; Katsoulakis, Markos A; Pantazis, Yannis

    2015-01-01

    Existing sensitivity analysis approaches are not able to handle efficiently stochastic reaction networks with a large number of parameters and species, which are typical in the modeling and simulation of complex biochemical phenomena. In this paper, a two-step strategy for parametric sensitivity analysis for such systems is proposed, exploiting advantages and synergies between two recently proposed sensitivity analysis methodologies for stochastic dynamics. The first method performs sensitivity analysis of the stochastic dynamics by means of the Fisher Information Matrix on the underlying distribution of the trajectories; the second method is a reduced-variance, finite-difference, gradient-type sensitivity approach relying on stochastic coupling techniques for variance reduction. Here we demonstrate that these two methods can be combined and deployed together by means of a new sensitivity bound which incorporates the variance of the quantity of interest as well as the Fisher Information Matrix estimated from the first method. The first step of the proposed strategy labels sensitivities using the bound and screens out the insensitive parameters in a controlled manner. In the second step of the proposed strategy, a finite-difference method is applied only for the sensitivity estimation of the (potentially) sensitive parameters that have not been screened out in the first step. Results on an epidermal growth factor network with fifty parameters and on a protein homeostasis with eighty parameters demonstrate that the proposed strategy is able to quickly discover and discard the insensitive parameters and in the remaining potentially sensitive parameters it accurately estimates the sensitivities. The new sensitivity strategy can be several times faster than current state-of-the-art approaches that test all parameters, especially in "sloppy" systems. In particular, the computational acceleration is quantified by the ratio between the total number of parameters over the

  14. Accelerated Sensitivity Analysis in High-Dimensional Stochastic Reaction Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Arampatzis

    Full Text Available Existing sensitivity analysis approaches are not able to handle efficiently stochastic reaction networks with a large number of parameters and species, which are typical in the modeling and simulation of complex biochemical phenomena. In this paper, a two-step strategy for parametric sensitivity analysis for such systems is proposed, exploiting advantages and synergies between two recently proposed sensitivity analysis methodologies for stochastic dynamics. The first method performs sensitivity analysis of the stochastic dynamics by means of the Fisher Information Matrix on the underlying distribution of the trajectories; the second method is a reduced-variance, finite-difference, gradient-type sensitivity approach relying on stochastic coupling techniques for variance reduction. Here we demonstrate that these two methods can be combined and deployed together by means of a new sensitivity bound which incorporates the variance of the quantity of interest as well as the Fisher Information Matrix estimated from the first method. The first step of the proposed strategy labels sensitivities using the bound and screens out the insensitive parameters in a controlled manner. In the second step of the proposed strategy, a finite-difference method is applied only for the sensitivity estimation of the (potentially sensitive parameters that have not been screened out in the first step. Results on an epidermal growth factor network with fifty parameters and on a protein homeostasis with eighty parameters demonstrate that the proposed strategy is able to quickly discover and discard the insensitive parameters and in the remaining potentially sensitive parameters it accurately estimates the sensitivities. The new sensitivity strategy can be several times faster than current state-of-the-art approaches that test all parameters, especially in "sloppy" systems. In particular, the computational acceleration is quantified by the ratio between the total number of

  15. Amplified photoacoustic performance and enhanced photothermal stability of reduced graphene oxide coated gold nanorods for sensitive photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hyungwon; Kumar, Dinesh; Kim, Haemin; Sim, Changbeom; Chang, Jin-Ho; Kim, Jung-Mu; Kim, Hyuncheol; Lim, Dong-Kwon

    2015-03-24

    We report a strongly amplified photoacoustic (PA) performance of the new functional hybrid material composed of reduced graphene oxide and gold nanorods. Due to the excellent NIR light absorption properties of the reduced graphene oxide coated gold nanorods (r-GO-AuNRs) and highly efficient heat transfer process through the reduced graphene oxide layer, r-GO-AuNRs exhibit excellent photothermal stability and significantly higher photoacoustic amplitudes than those of bare-AuNRs, nonreduced graphene oxide coated AuNRs (GO-AuNRs), or silica-coated AuNR, as demonstrated in both in vitro and in vivo systems. The linear response of PA amplitude from reduced state controlled GO on AuNR indicates the critical role of GO for a strong photothermal effect of r-GO-AuNRs. Theoretical studies with finite-element-method lab-based simulation reveal that a 4 times higher magnitude of the enhanced electromagnetic field around r-GO-AuNRs can be generated compared with bare AuNRs or GO-AuNRs. Furthermore, the r-GO-AuNRs are expected to be a promising deep-tissue imaging probe because of extraordinarily high PA amplitudes in the 4-11 MHz operating frequency of an ultrasound transducer. Therefore, the r-GO-AuNRs can be a useful imaging probe for highly sensitive photoacoustic images and NIR sensitive therapeutics based on a strong photothermal effect.

  16. IR sensitivity enhancement of CMOS Image Sensor with diffractive light trapping pixels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokogawa, Sozo; Oshiyama, Itaru; Ikeda, Harumi; Ebiko, Yoshiki; Hirano, Tomoyuki; Saito, Suguru; Oinoue, Takashi; Hagimoto, Yoshiya; Iwamoto, Hayato

    2017-06-19

    We report on the IR sensitivity enhancement of back-illuminated CMOS Image Sensor (BI-CIS) with 2-dimensional diffractive inverted pyramid array structure (IPA) on crystalline silicon (c-Si) and deep trench isolation (DTI). FDTD simulations of semi-infinite thick c-Si having 2D IPAs on its surface whose pitches over 400 nm shows more than 30% improvement of light absorption at λ = 850 nm and the maximum enhancement of 43% with the 540 nm pitch at the wavelength is confirmed. A prototype BI-CIS sample with pixel size of 1.2 μm square containing 400 nm pitch IPAs shows 80% sensitivity enhancement at λ = 850 nm compared to the reference sample with flat surface. This is due to diffraction with the IPA and total reflection at the pixel boundary. The NIR images taken by the demo camera equip with a C-mount lens show 75% sensitivity enhancement in the λ = 700-1200 nm wavelength range with negligible spatial resolution degradation. Light trapping CIS pixel technology promises to improve NIR sensitivity and appears to be applicable to many different image sensor applications including security camera, personal authentication, and range finding Time-of-Flight camera with IR illuminations.

  17. Final report on LDRD project : single-photon-sensitive imaging detector arrays at 1600 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, Kenton David; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Geib, Kent Martin; Hawkins, Samuel D.; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Klem, John Frederick; Sheng, Josephine Juin-Jye; Patel, Rupal K.; Bolles, Desta; Bauer, Tom M.; Koudelka, Robert

    2006-01-01

    The key need that this project has addressed is a short-wave infrared light detector for ranging (LIDAR) imaging at temperatures greater than 100K, as desired by nonproliferation and work for other customers. Several novel device structures to improve avalanche photodiodes (APDs) were fabricated to achieve the desired APD performance. A primary challenge to achieving high sensitivity APDs at 1550 nm is that the small band-gap materials (e.g., InGaAs or Ge) necessary to detect low-energy photons exhibit higher dark counts and higher multiplication noise compared to materials like silicon. To overcome these historical problems APDs were designed and fabricated using separate absorption and multiplication (SAM) regions. The absorption regions used (InGaAs or Ge) to leverage these materials 1550 nm sensitivity. Geiger mode detection was chosen to circumvent gain noise issues in the III-V and Ge multiplication regions, while a novel Ge/Si device was built to examine the utility of transferring photoelectrons in a silicon multiplication region. Silicon is known to have very good analog and GM multiplication properties. The proposed devices represented a high-risk for high-reward approach. Therefore one primary goal of this work was to experimentally resolve uncertainty about the novel APD structures. This work specifically examined three different designs. An InGaAs/InAlAs Geiger mode (GM) structure was proposed for the superior multiplication properties of the InAlAs. The hypothesis to be tested in this structure was whether InAlAs really presented an advantage in GM. A Ge/Si SAM was proposed representing the best possible multiplication material (i.e., silicon), however, significant uncertainty existed about both the Ge material quality and the ability to transfer photoelectrons across the Ge/Si interface. Finally a third pure germanium GM structure was proposed because bulk germanium has been reported to have better dark count properties. However, significant

  18. Final report on LDRD project : single-photon-sensitive imaging detector arrays at 1600 nm.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Childs, Kenton David; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Geib, Kent Martin; Hawkins, Samuel D.; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Klem, John Frederick; Sheng, Josephine Juin-Jye; Patel, Rupal K.; Bolles, Desta; Bauer, Tom M.; Koudelka, Robert

    2006-11-01

    The key need that this project has addressed is a short-wave infrared light detector for ranging (LIDAR) imaging at temperatures greater than 100K, as desired by nonproliferation and work for other customers. Several novel device structures to improve avalanche photodiodes (APDs) were fabricated to achieve the desired APD performance. A primary challenge to achieving high sensitivity APDs at 1550 nm is that the small band-gap materials (e.g., InGaAs or Ge) necessary to detect low-energy photons exhibit higher dark counts and higher multiplication noise compared to materials like silicon. To overcome these historical problems APDs were designed and fabricated using separate absorption and multiplication (SAM) regions. The absorption regions used (InGaAs or Ge) to leverage these materials 1550 nm sensitivity. Geiger mode detection was chosen to circumvent gain noise issues in the III-V and Ge multiplication regions, while a novel Ge/Si device was built to examine the utility of transferring photoelectrons in a silicon multiplication region. Silicon is known to have very good analog and GM multiplication properties. The proposed devices represented a high-risk for high-reward approach. Therefore one primary goal of this work was to experimentally resolve uncertainty about the novel APD structures. This work specifically examined three different designs. An InGaAs/InAlAs Geiger mode (GM) structure was proposed for the superior multiplication properties of the InAlAs. The hypothesis to be tested in this structure was whether InAlAs really presented an advantage in GM. A Ge/Si SAM was proposed representing the best possible multiplication material (i.e., silicon), however, significant uncertainty existed about both the Ge material quality and the ability to transfer photoelectrons across the Ge/Si interface. Finally a third pure germanium GM structure was proposed because bulk germanium has been reported to have better dark count properties. However, significant

  19. Comparison of increased venous contrast in ischemic stroke using phase-sensitive MR imaging with perfusion changes on flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery at 3 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Eijiro; Kanasaki, Yoshiko; Fujii, Shinya; Ogawa, Toshihide; Tanaka, Takuro; Hirata, Yoshiharu

    2011-01-01

    Background Increased venous contrast in ischemic stroke using susceptibility-weighted imaging has been widely reported, although few reports have compared increased venous contrast areas with perfusion change areas. Purpose To compare venous contrast on phase-sensitive MR images (PSI) with perfusion change on flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) images, and to discuss the clinical use of PSI in ischemic stroke. Material and Methods Thirty patients with clinically suspected acute infarction of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory within 7 days of onset were evaluated. Phase-sensitive imaging (PSI), flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) were obtained using 3 Tesla scanner. Two neuroradiologists independently reviewed the MR images, as well as the PSI, DWI, and FAIR images. They were blinded to the clinical data and to each other's findings. The abnormal area of each image was ultimately identified after both neuroradiologists reached consensus. We analyzed areas of increased venous contrast on PSI, perfusion changes on FAIR images and signal changes on DWI for each case. Results Venous contrast increased on PSI and hypoperfusion was evident on FAIR images from 22 of the 30 patients (73%). The distribution of the increased venous contrast was the same as that of the hypoperfused areas on FAIR images in 16 of these 22. The extent of these lesions was larger than that of lesions visualized by on DWI in 18 of the 22 patients. Hypointense signals reflecting hemorrhage and no increased venous contrast on PSI and hyperperfusion on FAIR images were found in six of the remaining eight patients (20%). Findings on PSI were normal and hypoperfusion areas were absent on FAIR images of two patients (7%). Conclusion Increased venous contrast on PSI might serve as an index of misery perfusion and provide useful information

  20. The position dependent influence that sensitivity correction processing gives the signal-to-noise ratio measurement in parallel imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Koichi; Yoshida, Koji; Yanagimoto, Shinichi

    2012-01-01

    We studied the position dependent influence that sensitivity correction processing gave the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measurement of parallel imaging (PI). Sensitivity correction processing that referred to the sensitivity distribution of the body coil improved regional uniformity more than the sensitivity uniformity correction filter with a fixed correction factor. In addition, the position dependent influence to give the SNR measurement in PI was different from the sensitivity correction processing. Therefore, if we divide SNR of the sensitivity correction processing image by SNR of the original image in each pixel and calculate SNR ratio, we can show the position dependent influence that sensitivity correction processing gives the SNR measurement in PI. It is with an index of the sensitivity correction processing precision. (author)

  1. Iron oxide nanoparticle-micelles (ION-micelles for sensitive (molecular magnetic particle imaging and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas W E Starmans

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs are a promising nanoplatform for contrast-enhanced MRI. Recently, magnetic particle imaging (MPI was introduced as a new imaging modality, which is able to directly visualize magnetic particles and could serve as a more sensitive and quantitative alternative to MRI. However, MPI requires magnetic particles with specific magnetic properties for optimal use. Current commercially available iron oxide formulations perform suboptimal in MPI, which is triggering research into optimized synthesis strategies. Most synthesis procedures aim at size control of iron oxide nanoparticles rather than control over the magnetic properties. In this study, we report on the synthesis, characterization and application of a novel ION platform for sensitive MPI and MRI. METHODS AND RESULTS: IONs were synthesized using a thermal-decomposition method and subsequently phase-transferred by encapsulation into lipidic micelles (ION-Micelles. Next, the material and magnetic properties of the ION-Micelles were analyzed. Most notably, vibrating sample magnetometry measurements showed that the effective magnetic core size of the IONs is 16 nm. In addition, magnetic particle spectrometry (MPS measurements were performed. MPS is essentially zero-dimensional MPI and therefore allows to probe the potential of iron oxide formulations for MPI. ION-Micelles induced up to 200 times higher signal in MPS measurements than commercially available iron oxide formulations (Endorem, Resovist and Sinerem and thus likely allow for significantly more sensitive MPI. In addition, the potential of the ION-Micelle platform for molecular MPI and MRI was showcased by MPS and MRI measurements of fibrin-binding peptide functionalized ION-Micelles (FibPep-ION-Micelles bound to blood clots. CONCLUSIONS: The presented data underlines the potential of the ION-Micelle nanoplatform for sensitive (molecular MPI and warrants further investigation of the Fib

  2. VIP: Vortex Image Processing Package for High-contrast Direct Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez Gonzalez, Carlos Alberto; Wertz, Olivier; Absil, Olivier; Christiaens, Valentin; Defrère, Denis; Mawet, Dimitri; Milli, Julien; Absil, Pierre-Antoine; Van Droogenbroeck, Marc; Cantalloube, Faustine; Hinz, Philip M.; Skemer, Andrew J.; Karlsson, Mikael; Surdej, Jean

    2017-07-01

    We present the Vortex Image Processing (VIP) library, a python package dedicated to astronomical high-contrast imaging. Our package relies on the extensive python stack of scientific libraries and aims to provide a flexible framework for high-contrast data and image processing. In this paper, we describe the capabilities of VIP related to processing image sequences acquired using the angular differential imaging (ADI) observing technique. VIP implements functionalities for building high-contrast data processing pipelines, encompassing pre- and post-processing algorithms, potential source position and flux estimation, and sensitivity curve generation. Among the reference point-spread function subtraction techniques for ADI post-processing, VIP includes several flavors of principal component analysis (PCA) based algorithms, such as annular PCA and incremental PCA algorithms capable of processing big datacubes (of several gigabytes) on a computer with limited memory. Also, we present a novel ADI algorithm based on non-negative matrix factorization, which comes from the same family of low-rank matrix approximations as PCA and provides fairly similar results. We showcase the ADI capabilities of the VIP library using a deep sequence on HR 8799 taken with the LBTI/LMIRCam and its recently commissioned L-band vortex coronagraph. Using VIP, we investigated the presence of additional companions around HR 8799 and did not find any significant additional point source beyond the four known planets. VIP is available at http://github.com/vortex-exoplanet/VIP and is accompanied with Jupyter notebook tutorials illustrating the main functionalities of the library.

  3. High temporal resolution functional MRI using parallel echo volumar imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabrait, C.; Ciuciu, P.; Ribes, A.; Poupon, C.; Dehaine-Lambertz, G.; LeBihan, D.; Lethimonnier, F.; Le Roux, P.; Dehaine-Lambertz, G.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To combine parallel imaging with 3D single-shot acquisition (echo volumar imaging, EVI) in order to acquire high temporal resolution volumar functional MRI (fMRI) data. Materials and Methods: An improved EVI sequence was associated with parallel acquisition and field of view reduction in order to acquire a large brain volume in 200 msec. Temporal stability and functional sensitivity were increased through optimization of all imaging parameters and Tikhonov regularization of parallel reconstruction. Two human volunteers were scanned with parallel EVI in a 1.5 T whole-body MR system, while submitted to a slow event-related auditory paradigm. Results: Thanks to parallel acquisition, the EVI volumes display a low level of geometric distortions and signal losses. After removal of low-frequency drifts and physiological artifacts,activations were detected in the temporal lobes of both volunteers and voxel-wise hemodynamic response functions (HRF) could be computed. On these HRF different habituation behaviors in response to sentence repetition could be identified. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the feasibility of high temporal resolution 3D fMRI with parallel EVI. Combined with advanced estimation tools,this acquisition method should prove useful to measure neural activity timing differences or study the nonlinearities and non-stationarities of the BOLD response. (authors)

  4. Using Satellites to Investigate the Sensitivity of Longwave Downward Radiation to Water Vapor at High Elevations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naud, Catherine M.; Miller, James R.; Landry, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Many studies suggest that high-elevation regions may be among the most sensitive to future climate change. However, in situ observations in these often remote locations are too sparse to determine the feedbacks responsible for enhanced warming rates. One of these feedbacks is associated with the sensitivity of longwave downward radiation (LDR) to changes in water vapor, with the sensitivity being particularly large in many high-elevation regions where the average water vapor is often low. We show that satellite retrievals from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) can be used to expand the current ground-based observational database and that the monthly averaged clear-sky satellite estimates of humidity and LDR are in good agreement with the well-instrumented Center for Snow and Avalanche Studies ground-based site in the southwestern Colorado Rocky Mountains. The relationship between MODIS-retrieved precipitable water vapor and surface specific humidity across the contiguous United States was found to be similar to that previously found for the Alps. More important, we show that satellites capture the nonlinear relationship between LDR and water vapor and confirm that LDR is especially sensitive to changes in water vapor at high elevations in several midlatitude mountain ranges. Because the global population depends on adequate fresh water, much of which has its source in high mountains, it is critically important to understand how climate will change there. We demonstrate that satellites can be used to investigate these feedbacks in high-elevation regions where the coverage of surface-based observations is insufficient to do so.

  5. Simbol-X: Imaging The Hard X-ray Sky with Unprecedented Spatial Resolution and Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Simbol-X Joint Scientific Mission Group

    2009-01-01

    Simbol-X is a hard X-ray mission, with imaging capability in the 0.5-80 keV range. It is based on a collaboration between the French and Italian space agencies with participation of German laboratories. The launch is foreseen in late 2014. It relies on a formation flight concept, with two satellites carrying one the mirror module and the other one the focal plane detectors. The mirrors will have a 20 m focal length, while the two focal plane detectors will be put one on top of the other one. This combination will provide over two orders of magnitude improvement in angular resolution and sensitivity in the hard X-ray range with respect to non-focusing techniques. The Simbol-X revolutionary instrumental capabilities will allow us to elucidate outstanding questions in high energy astrophysics such as those related to black-holes accretion physics and census, and to particle acceleration mechanisms. We will give an overall description of the mission characteristics, performances and scientific objectives.

  6. A longitudinal study of neuromelanin-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Keita; Maeda, Masayuki; Tabei, Ken-Ichi; Umino, Maki; Kajikawa, Hiroyuki; Satoh, Masayuki; Kida, Hirotaka; Tomimoto, Hidekazu

    2016-10-28

    Neuromelanin-sensitive MR imaging (NMI) is an increasingly powerful tool for the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD). This study was undertaken to evaluate longitudinal changes on NMI in PD patients. We examined longitudinal changes on NMI in 14 PD patients. The area and contrast ratio (CR) of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) were comparatively analyzed. The total area and CR of the SNc upon follow-up NMI were significantly smaller than those on initial NMI (from 33.5±18.9 pixels and 6.35±2.86% to 21.5±16.7 pixels and 4.19±2.11%; Wilcoxon signed-rank test, pWilcoxon signed-rank test, p=0.002 and p=0.007, respectively). On a case-by-case basis, the area of the SNc invariably decreased upon follow-up NMI in all patients. We further demonstrated that the total area and CR of the SNc negatively correlated with disease duration (Pearson correlation coefficient, r=-0.63, p<0.001 and r=-0.41, p=0.031, respectively). In area analyses, our results demonstrated very high intraclass correlation coefficients for both intra- and inter-rater reliability. NMI is a useful and reliable tool for detecting neuropathological changes over time in PD patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A tilted fiber-optic plate coupled CCD detector for high resolution neutron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jongyul; Cho, Gyuseong [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jongyul; Hwy, Limchang; Kim, Taejoo; Lee, Kyehong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seungwook [Pusan National Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    One of these efforts is that a tilted scintillator geometry and lens coupled CCD detector for neutron imaging system were used to improve spatial resolution in one dimension. The increased spatial resolution in one dimension was applied to fuel cell study. However, a lens coupled CCD detector has lower sensitivity than a fiber-optic plate coupled CCD detector due to light loss. In this research, a tilted detector using fiber-optic plate coupled CCD detector was developed to improve resolution and sensitivity. In addition, a tilted detector can prevent an image sensor from direct radiation damage. Neutron imaging has been used for fuel cell study, lithium ion battery study, and many scientific applications. High quality neutron imaging is demanded for more detailed studies of applications, and spatial resolution should be considered to get high quality neutron imaging. Therefore, there were many efforts to improve spatial resolution.

  8. Phase contrast enhanced high resolution X-ray imaging and tomography of soft tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakubek, Jan; Granja, Carlos; Dammer, Jiri; Hanus, Robert; Holy, Tomas; Pospisil, Stanislav; Tykva, Richard; Uher, Josef; Vykydal, Zdenek

    2007-01-01

    A tabletop system for digital high resolution and high sensitivity X-ray micro-radiography has been developed for small-animal and soft-tissue imaging. The system is based on a micro-focus X-ray tube and the semiconductor hybrid position sensitive Medipix2 pixel detector. Transmission radiography imaging, conventionally based only on absorption, is enhanced by exploiting phase-shift effects induced in the X-ray beam traversing the sample. Phase contrast imaging is realized by object edge enhancement. DAQ is done by a novel fully integrated USB-based readout with online image generation. Improved signal reconstruction techniques make use of advanced statistical data analysis, enhanced beam hardening correction and direct thickness calibration of individual pixels. 2D and 3D micro-tomography images of several biological samples demonstrate the applicability of the system for biological and medical purposes including in-vivo and time dependent physiological studies in the life sciences

  9. A piecewise-focused high DQE detector for MV imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Star-Lack, Josh; Shedlock, Daniel; Swahn, Dennis; Humber, Dave; Wang, Adam; Hirsh, Hayley; Zentai, George; Sawkey, Daren; Kruger, Isaac; Sun, Mingshan; Abel, Eric; Virshup, Gary; Shin, Mihye; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-09-01

    Electronic portal imagers (EPIDs) with high detective quantum efficiencies (DQEs) are sought to facilitate the use of the megavoltage (MV) radiotherapy treatment beam for image guidance. Potential advantages include high quality (treatment) beam's eye view imaging, and improved cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) generating images with more accurate electron density maps with immunity to metal artifacts. One approach to increasing detector sensitivity is to couple a thick pixelated scintillator array to an active matrix flat panel imager (AMFPI) incorporating amorphous silicon thin film electronics. Cadmium tungstate (CWO) has many desirable scintillation properties including good light output, a high index of refraction, high optical transparency, and reasonable cost. However, due to the 0 1 0 cleave plane inherent in its crystalline structure, the difficulty of cutting and polishing CWO has, in part, limited its study relative to other scintillators such as cesium iodide and bismuth germanate (BGO). The goal of this work was to build and test a focused large-area pixelated "strip" CWO detector. A 361 × 52 mm scintillator assembly that contained a total of 28 072 pixels was constructed. The assembly comprised seven subarrays, each 15 mm thick. Six of the subarrays were fabricated from CWO with a pixel pitch of 0.784 mm, while one array was constructed from BGO for comparison. Focusing was achieved by coupling the arrays to the Varian AS1000 AMFPI through a piecewise linear arc-shaped fiber optic plate. Simulation and experimental studies of modulation transfer function (MTF) and DQE were undertaken using a 6 MV beam, and comparisons were made between the performance of the pixelated strip assembly and the most common EPID configuration comprising a 1 mm-thick copper build-up plate attached to a 133 mg/cm(2) gadolinium oxysulfide scintillator screen (Cu-GOS). Projection radiographs and CBCT images of phantoms were acquired. The work also introduces the use of a

  10. Image Alignment for Multiple Camera High Dynamic Range Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Eastwood, Brian S.; Childs, Elisabeth C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the problem of image alignment for multiple camera high dynamic range (HDR) imaging. HDR imaging combines information from images taken with different exposure settings. Combining information from multiple cameras requires an alignment process that is robust to the intensity differences in the images. HDR applications that use a limited number of component images require an alignment technique that is robust to large exposure differences. We evaluate the suitability fo...

  11. Adjoint sensitivity analysis of high frequency structures with Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Bakr, Mohamed; Demir, Veysel

    2017-01-01

    This book covers the theory of adjoint sensitivity analysis and uses the popular FDTD (finite-difference time-domain) method to show how wideband sensitivities can be efficiently estimated for different types of materials and structures. It includes a variety of MATLAB® examples to help readers absorb the content more easily.

  12. Polypyrrole–gold nanoparticle composites for highly sensitive DNA detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spain, Elaine; Keyes, Tia E.; Forster, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    DNA capture surfaces represent a powerful approach to developing highly sensitive sensors for identifying the cause of infection. Electrochemically deposited polypyrrole, PPy, films have been functionalized with electrodeposited gold nanoparticles to give a nanocomposite material, PPy–AuNP. Thiolated capture strand DNA, that is complementary to the sequence from the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus that causes mammary gland inflammation, was then immobilized onto the gold nanoparticles and any of the underlying gold electrode that is exposed. A probe strand, labelled with horse radish peroxidase, HRP, was then hybridized to the target. The concentration of the target was determined by measuring the current generated by reducing benzoquinone produced by the HRP label. Semi-log plots of the pathogen DNA concentration vs. faradaic current are linear from 150 pM to 1 μM and pM concentrations can be detected without the need for molecular, e.g., PCR or NASBA, amplification. The nanocomposite also exhibits excellent selectivity and single base mismatches in a 30 mer sequence can be detected

  13. Improvement of sensitivity in high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, H.; Nakajima, K.; Suzuki, M.; Kimura, K.; Sasakawa, K.

    2011-01-01

    The sensitivity (limit of detection) of high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (HRBS) is mainly determined by the background noise of the spectrometer. There are two major origins of the background noise in HRBS, one is the stray ions scattered from the inner wall of the vacuum chamber of the spectrometer and the other is the dark noise of the microchannel plate (MCP) detector which is commonly used as a focal plane detector of the spectrometer in HRBS. In order to reject the stray ions, several barriers are installed inside the spectrometer and a thin Mylar foil is mounted in front of the detector. The dark noise of the MCP detector is rejected by the coincidence measurement with the secondary electrons emitted from the Mylar foil upon the ion passage. After these improvements, the background noise is reduced by a factor of 200 at a maximum. The detection limit can be improved down to 10 ppm for As in Si at a measurement time of 1 h under ideal conditions.

  14. Highly sensitive MoS2 photodetectors with graphene contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Peize; St. Marie, Luke; Wang, Qing X.; Quirk, Nicholas; El Fatimy, Abdel; Ishigami, Masahiro; Barbara, Paola

    2018-05-01

    Two-dimensional materials such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are ideal candidates to create ultra-thin electronics suitable for flexible substrates. Although optoelectronic devices based on TMDs have demonstrated remarkable performance, scalability is still a significant issue. Most devices are created using techniques that are not suitable for mass production, such as mechanical exfoliation of monolayer flakes and patterning by electron-beam lithography. Here we show that large-area MoS2 grown by chemical vapor deposition and patterned by photolithography yields highly sensitive photodetectors, with record shot-noise-limited detectivities of 8.7 × 1014 Jones in ambient condition and even higher when sealed with a protective layer. These detectivity values are higher than the highest values reported for photodetectors based on exfoliated MoS2. We study MoS2 devices with gold electrodes and graphene electrodes. The devices with graphene electrodes have a tunable band alignment and are especially attractive for scalable ultra-thin flexible optoelectronics.

  15. Characterization of three high efficiency and blue sensitive silicon photomultipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otte, Adam Nepomuk, E-mail: otte@gatech.edu; Garcia, Distefano; Nguyen, Thanh; Purushotham, Dhruv

    2017-02-21

    We report about the optical and electrical characterization of three high efficiency and blue sensitive Silicon photomultipliers from FBK, Hamamatsu, and SensL. Key features of the tested devices when operated at 90% breakdown probability are peak photon detection efficiencies between 40% and 55%, temperature dependencies of gain and PDE that are less than 1%/°C, dark rates of ∼50 kHz/mm{sup 2} at room temperature, afterpulsing of about 2%, and direct optical crosstalk between 6% and 20%. The characteristics of all three devices impressively demonstrate how the Silicon-photomultiplier technology has improved over the past ten years. It is further demonstrated how the voltage and temperature characteristics of a number of quantities can be parameterized on the basis of physical models. The models provide a deeper understanding of the device characteristics over a wide bias and temperature range. They also serve as examples how producers could provide the characteristics of their SiPMs to users. A standardized parameterization of SiPMs would enable users to find the optimal SiPM for their application and the operating point of SiPMs without having to perform measurements thus significantly reducing design and development cycles.

  16. A new position-sensitive transmission detector for epithermal neutron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schooneveld, E M; Kockelmann, W; Rhodes, N; Tardocchi, M; Gorini, G; Perelli Cippo, E; Nakamura, T; Postma, H; Schillebeeckx, P

    2009-01-01

    A new neutron resonant transmission (NRT) detector for epithermal neutron imaging has been designed and built for the ANCIENT CHARM project, which is developing a set of complementary neutron imaging methods for analysis of cultural heritage objects. One of the techniques being exploited is NRT with the aim of performing bulk elemental analysis. The 16-pixel prototype NRT detector consists of independent crystals of 2 x 2 mm pixel size, which allow for 2D position-sensitive transmission measurements with epithermal neutrons. First results obtained at the ISIS pulsed spallation neutron source are presented. (fast track communication)

  17. Introducing wet aerosols into the static high sensitivity ICP (SHIP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheffer, Andy; Engelhard, Carsten; Sperling, Michael; Buscher, Wolfgang [University of Muenster, Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Muenster (Germany)

    2007-08-15

    A demountable design of the static high sensitivity ICP (SHIP) for optical emission spectrometry is presented, and its use as an excitation source with the introduction of wet aerosols was investigated. Aerosols were produced by standard pneumatic sample introduction systems, namely a cross flow nebulizer, Meinhard nebulizer and PFA low flow nebulizer, which have been applied in conjunction with a double pass and a cyclonic spray chamber. The analytical capabilities of these sample introduction systems in combination with the SHIP system were evaluated with respect to the achieved sensitivity. It was found that a nebulizer tailored for low argon flow rates (0.3-0.5 L min{sup -1}) is best suited for the low flow plasma (SHIP). An optimization of all gas flow rates of the SHIP system with the PFA low flow nebulizer was carried out in a two-dimensional way with the signal to background ratio (SBR) and the robustness as optimization target parameters. Optimum conditions for a torch model with 1-mm injector tube were 0.25 and 0.36 L min{sup -1} for the plasma gas and the nebulizer gas, respectively. A torch model with a 2-mm injector tube was optimized to 0.4 L min{sup -1} for the plasma gas and 0.44 L min{sup -1} for the nebulizer gas. In both cases the SHIP system saves approximately 95% of the argon consumed by conventional inductively coupled plasma systems. The limits of detection were found to be in the low microgram per litre range and below for many elements, which was quite comparable to those of the conventional setup. Furthermore, the short-term stability and the wash out behaviour of the SHIP were investigated. Direct comparison with the conventional setup indicated that no remarkable memory effects were caused by the closed design of the torch. The analysis of a NIST SRM 1643e (Trace Elements in Water) with the SHIP yielded recoveries of 97-103% for 13 elements, measured simultaneously. (orig.)

  18. Sets of RNA repeated tags and hybridization-sensitive fluorescent probes for distinct images of RNA in a living cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Kubota

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Imaging the behavior of RNA in a living cell is a powerful means for understanding RNA functions and acquiring spatiotemporal information in a single cell. For more distinct RNA imaging in a living cell, a more effective chemical method to fluorescently label RNA is now required. In addition, development of the technology labeling with different colors for different RNA would make it easier to analyze plural RNA strands expressing in a cell. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Tag technology for RNA imaging in a living cell has been developed based on the unique chemical functions of exciton-controlled hybridization-sensitive oligonucleotide (ECHO probes. Repetitions of selected 18-nucleotide RNA tags were incorporated into the mRNA 3'-UTR. Pairs with complementary ECHO probes exhibited hybridization-sensitive fluorescence emission for the mRNA expressed in a living cell. The mRNA in a nucleus was detected clearly as fluorescent puncta, and the images of the expression of two mRNAs were obtained independently and simultaneously with two orthogonal tag-probe pairs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A compact and repeated label has been developed for RNA imaging in a living cell, based on the photochemistry of ECHO probes. The pairs of an 18-nt RNA tag and the complementary ECHO probes are highly thermostable, sequence-specifically emissive, and orthogonal to each other. The nucleotide length necessary for one tag sequence is much shorter compared with conventional tag technologies, resulting in easy preparation of the tag sequences with a larger number of repeats for more distinct RNA imaging.

  19. High spectral resolution image of Barnacle Bill

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The rover Sojourner's first target for measurement by the Alpha-Proton-Xray Spectrometer (APXS) was the rock named Barnacle Bill, located close to the ramp down which the rover made its egress from the lander. The full spectral capability of the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP), consisting of 13 wavelength filters, was used to characterize the rock's surface. The measured area is relatively dark, and is shown in blue. Nearby on the rock surface, soil material is trapped in pits (shown in red).Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  20. A Near-Infrared Photon Counting Camera for High Sensitivity Astronomical Observation, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation is a Near Infrared Photon-Counting Sensor (NIRPCS), an imaging device with sufficient sensitivity to capture the spectral signatures, in the...

  1. A Near-Infrared Photon Counting Camera for High Sensitivity Astronomical Observation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation is a Near Infrared Photon-Counting Sensor (NIRPCS), an imaging device with sufficient sensitivity to capture the spectral signatures, in the...

  2. Reproducible high-resolution multispectral image acquisition in dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duliu, Alexandru; Gardiazabal, José; Lasser, Tobias; Navab, Nassir

    2015-07-01

    Multispectral image acquisitions are increasingly popular in dermatology, due to their improved spectral resolution which enables better tissue discrimination. Most applications however focus on restricted regions of interest, imaging only small lesions. In this work we present and discuss an imaging framework for high-resolution multispectral imaging on large regions of interest.

  3. Tongue Images Classification Based on Constrained High Dispersal Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Meng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer aided tongue diagnosis has a great potential to play important roles in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM. However, the majority of the existing tongue image analyses and classification methods are based on the low-level features, which may not provide a holistic view of the tongue. Inspired by deep convolutional neural network (CNN, we propose a novel feature extraction framework called constrained high dispersal neural networks (CHDNet to extract unbiased features and reduce human labor for tongue diagnosis in TCM. Previous CNN models have mostly focused on learning convolutional filters and adapting weights between them, but these models have two major issues: redundancy and insufficient capability in handling unbalanced sample distribution. We introduce high dispersal and local response normalization operation to address the issue of redundancy. We also add multiscale feature analysis to avoid the problem of sensitivity to deformation. Our proposed CHDNet learns high-level features and provides more classification information during training time, which may result in higher accuracy when predicting testing samples. We tested the proposed method on a set of 267 gastritis patients and a control group of 48 healthy volunteers. Test results show that CHDNet is a promising method in tongue image classification for the TCM study.

  4. High-sensitivity Cardiac Troponin Elevation after Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duma, Andreas; Pal, Swatilika; Johnston, Joshua; Helwani, Mohammad A.; Bhat, Adithya; Gill, Bali; Rosenkvist, Jessica; Cartmill, Christopher; Brown, Frank; Miller, J. Philip; Scott, Mitchell G; Sanchez-Conde, Francisco; Jarvis, Michael; Farber, Nuri B.; Zorumski, Charles F.; Conway, Charles; Nagele, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Background While electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is widely regarded as a life-saving and safe procedure, evidence regarding its effects on myocardial cell injury are sparse. The objective of this investigation was to determine incidence and magnitude of new cardiac troponin elevation after ECT using a novel high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I (hscTnI) assay. Methods This was a prospective cohort study in adult patients undergoing ECT in a single academic center (up to three ECT treatments per patient). The primary outcome was new hscTnI elevation after ECT, defined as an increase of hscTnI >100% after ECT compared to baseline with at least one value above the limit of quantification (10 ng/L). 12-lead ECG and hscTnI values were obtained prior to and 15–30 minutes after ECT; in a subset of patients an additional 2-hour hscTnI value was obtained. Results The final study population was 100 patients and a total of 245 ECT treatment sessions. Eight patients (8/100, 8%) experienced new hscTnI elevation after ECT with a cumulative incidence of 3.7% (9/245 treatments; one patient had two hscTnI elevations), two of whom had a non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (incidence 2/245, 0.8%). Median hscTnI concentrations did not increase significantly after ECT. Tachycardia and/or elevated systolic blood pressure developed after approximately two thirds of ECT treatments. Conclusions ECT appears safe from a cardiac standpoint in a large majority of patients. A small subset of patients with pre-existing cardiovascular risk factors, however, may develop new cardiac troponin elevation after ECT, the clinical relevance of which is unclear in the absence of signs of myocardial ischemia. PMID:28166110

  5. Halftoning for high-contrast imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper M.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available High-contrast instruments, such as SPHERE (upcoming planet finder instrument for the ESO-VLT, or EPICS (planet hunter project for the future E-ELT, will require customized components with spatially varying transmission (e.g. coronagraphs, optical components that reduce the contrast between a companion and its parent star. The goal of these sub-systems is to control the spatial transmission, either in a pupil plane (pupil apodization, or in a focal plane of the instrument (occulting mask, i.e. low-frequency filter. Reliably producing components with spatially varying transmission is not trivial, and different techniques have been already investigated for application to astronomy (e.g. metal deposition with spatially-varying thickness, or high-energy beam sensitive glass using e-beam lithography. We present some results related to the recent development of components with spatially varying transmission using a relatively simple technique analogous to the digital halftoning process used for printing applications.

  6. Gas scintillation glass GEM detector for high-resolution X-ray imaging and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, T., E-mail: fujiwara-t@aist.go.jp [Research Institute for Measurement and Analytical Instrumentation, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Mitsuya, Y. [Nuclear Professional School, The University of Tokyo, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Fushie, T. [Radiment Lab. Inc., Setagaya, Tokyo 156-0044 (Japan); Murata, K.; Kawamura, A.; Koishikawa, A. [XIT Co., Naruse, Machida, Tokyo 194-0045 (Japan); Toyokawa, H. [Research Institute for Measurement and Analytical Instrumentation, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Takahashi, H. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan)

    2017-04-01

    A high-spatial-resolution X-ray-imaging gaseous detector has been developed with a single high-gas-gain glass gas electron multiplier (G-GEM), scintillation gas, and optical camera. High-resolution X-ray imaging of soft elements is performed with a spatial resolution of 281 µm rms and an effective area of 100×100 mm. In addition, high-resolution X-ray 3D computed tomography (CT) is successfully demonstrated with the gaseous detector. It shows high sensitivity to low-energy X-rays, which results in high-contrast radiographs of objects containing elements with low atomic numbers. In addition, the high yield of scintillation light enables fast X-ray imaging, which is an advantage for constructing CT images with low-energy X-rays.

  7. High-intensity xenon plasma discharge lamp for bulk-sensitive high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souma, S; Sato, T; Takahashi, T; Baltzer, P

    2007-12-01

    We have developed a highly brilliant xenon (Xe) discharge lamp operated by microwave-induced electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) for ultrahigh-resolution bulk-sensitive photoemission spectroscopy (PES). We observed at least eight strong radiation lines from neutral or singly ionized Xe atoms in the energy region of 8.4-10.7 eV. The photon flux of the strongest Xe I resonance line at 8.437 eV is comparable to that of the He Ialpha line (21.218 eV) from the He-ECR discharge lamp. Stable operation for more than 300 h is achieved by efficient air-cooling of a ceramic tube in the resonance cavity. The high bulk sensitivity and high-energy resolution of PES using the Xe lines are demonstrated for some typical materials.

  8. High frame rate multi-resonance imaging refractometry with distributed feedback dye laser sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vannahme, Christoph; Dufva, Martin; Kristensen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    imaging refractometry without moving parts is presented. DFB dye lasers are low-cost and highly sensitive refractive index sensors. The unique multi-wavelength DFB laser structure presented here comprises several areas with different grating periods. Imaging in two dimensions of space is enabled...... by analyzing laser light from all areas in parallel with an imaging spectrometer. With this multi-resonance imaging refractometry method, the spatial position in one direction is identified from the horizontal, i.e., spectral position of the multiple laser lines which is obtained from the spectrometer charged...

  9. A highly sensitive underwater video system for use in turbid aquaculture ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chin-Chang; Tsao, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Kuo-Hao; Jang, Jia-Pu; Chang, Hsu-Kuang; Dobbs, Fred C

    2016-08-24

    The turbid, low-light waters characteristic of aquaculture ponds have made it difficult or impossible for previous video cameras to provide clear imagery of the ponds' benthic habitat. We developed a highly sensitive, underwater video system (UVS) for this particular application and tested it in shrimp ponds having turbidities typical of those in southern Taiwan. The system's high-quality video stream and images, together with its camera capacity (up to nine cameras), permit in situ observations of shrimp feeding behavior, shrimp size and internal anatomy, and organic matter residues on pond sediments. The UVS can operate continuously and be focused remotely, a convenience to shrimp farmers. The observations possible with the UVS provide aquaculturists with information critical to provision of feed with minimal waste; determining whether the accumulation of organic-matter residues dictates exchange of pond water; and management decisions concerning shrimp health.

  10. Model dependence of isospin sensitive observables at high densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Wen-Mei [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); School of Science, Huzhou Teachers College, Huzhou 313000 (China); Yong, Gao-Chan, E-mail: yonggaochan@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wang, Yongjia [School of Science, Huzhou Teachers College, Huzhou 313000 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Li, Qingfeng [School of Science, Huzhou Teachers College, Huzhou 313000 (China); Zhang, Hongfei [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zuo, Wei [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2013-10-07

    Within two different frameworks of isospin-dependent transport model, i.e., Boltzmann–Uehling–Uhlenbeck (IBUU04) and Ultrarelativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD) transport models, sensitive probes of nuclear symmetry energy are simulated and compared. It is shown that neutron to proton ratio of free nucleons, π{sup −}/π{sup +} ratio as well as isospin-sensitive transverse and elliptic flows given by the two transport models with their “best settings”, all have obvious differences. Discrepancy of numerical value of isospin-sensitive n/p ratio of free nucleon from the two models mainly originates from different symmetry potentials used and discrepancies of numerical value of charged π{sup −}/π{sup +} ratio and isospin-sensitive flows mainly originate from different isospin-dependent nucleon–nucleon cross sections. These demonstrations call for more detailed studies on the model inputs (i.e., the density- and momentum-dependent symmetry potential and the isospin-dependent nucleon–nucleon cross section in medium) of isospin-dependent transport model used. The studies of model dependence of isospin sensitive observables can help nuclear physicists to pin down the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy through comparison between experiments and theoretical simulations scientifically.

  11. Robust image registration for multiple exposure high dynamic range image synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Susu

    2011-03-01

    Image registration is an important preprocessing technique in high dynamic range (HDR) image synthesis. This paper proposed a robust image registration method for aligning a group of low dynamic range images (LDR) that are captured with different exposure times. Illumination change and photometric distortion between two images would result in inaccurate registration. We propose to transform intensity image data into phase congruency to eliminate the effect of the changes in image brightness and use phase cross correlation in the Fourier transform domain to perform image registration. Considering the presence of non-overlapped regions due to photometric distortion, evolutionary programming is applied to search for the accurate translation parameters so that the accuracy of registration is able to be achieved at a hundredth of a pixel level. The proposed algorithm works well for under and over-exposed image registration. It has been applied to align LDR images for synthesizing high quality HDR images..

  12. Density-based retrieval from high-similarity image databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Edberg; Carstensen, Jens Michael

    2004-01-01

    Many image classification problems can fruitfully be thought of as image retrieval in a "high similarity image database" (HSID) characterized by being tuned towards a specific application and having a high degree of visual similarity between entries that should be distinguished. We introduce a me...

  13. On the sensitivity of IMRT dose optimization to the mathematical form of a biological imaging-based prescription function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, Stephen R; Bentzen, Soeren M; Jeraj, Robert; Flynn, Ryan T

    2009-01-01

    Voxel-based prescriptions of deliberately non-uniform dose distributions based on molecular imaging, so-called dose painting or theragnostic radiation therapy, require specification of a transformation that maps the image data intensities to prescribed doses. However, the functional form of this transformation is currently unknown. An investigation into the sensitivity of optimized dose distributions resulting from several possible prescription functions was conducted. Transformations between the radiotracer activity concentrations from Cu-ATSM PET images, as a surrogate of tumour hypoxia, and dose prescriptions were implemented to yield weighted distributions of prescribed dose boosts in high uptake regions. Dose escalation was constrained to reflect clinically realistic whole tumour doses and constant normal tissue doses. Optimized heterogeneous dose distributions were found by minimizing a voxel-by-voxel quadratic objective function in which all tumour voxels were given equal weight. Prescriptions based on a polynomial mapping function were found to be least constraining on their optimized plans, while prescriptions based on a sigmoid mapping function were the most demanding to deliver. A prescription formalism that fixed integral dose was less sensitive to errors in the choice of the mapping function than one that boosted integral dose. Integral doses to normal tissue and critical structures were insensitive to the shape of the prescription function. Planned target dose conformity improved with smaller beamlet dimensions until the inherent spatial resolution of the functional image was matched. Clinical implementation of dose painting depends on advances in absolute quantification of functional images and improvements in delivery techniques over smaller spatial scales.

  14. High contrast sensitivity for visually guided flight control in bumblebees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthi, Aravin; Kelber, Almut; Baird, Emily; Dacke, Marie

    2017-12-01

    Many insects rely on vision to find food, to return to their nest and to carefully control their flight between these two locations. The amount of information available to support these tasks is, in part, dictated by the spatial resolution and contrast sensitivity of their visual systems. Here, we investigate the absolute limits of these visual properties for visually guided position and speed control in Bombus terrestris. Our results indicate that the limit of spatial vision in the translational motion detection system of B. terrestris lies at 0.21 cycles deg -1 with a peak contrast sensitivity of at least 33. In the perspective of earlier findings, these results indicate that bumblebees have higher contrast sensitivity in the motion detection system underlying position control than in their object discrimination system. This suggests that bumblebees, and most likely also other insects, have different visual thresholds depending on the behavioral context.

  15. Metal ion-organic compound for high sensitive ESR dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, G.M.; Ikeya, Motoji

    2000-01-01

    A systematic study to find a tissue equivalent and high sensitive dosimeter material has been made to stimulate the field of ESR dosimetry. Lithium acetate dihydrate (Li-Ac·2H 2 O:CH 3 COOLi·2H 2 O) and lithium phosphate (Li-phosphate:Li 3 PO 4 ) were irradiated by γ-rays to study radicals with (ESR) in addition to magnesium lactate (Mg-lactate (CH 3 CH(OH)COO) 2 Mg) doped with nominal pure lithium lactate (Mg(Li)-lactate) and lithium lactate (CH 3 CH(OH)COOLi) doped with Mg-lactate (Li(Mg)-lactate). A triplet spectrum with intensity ratio of 1:2:1 in Li-Ac·2H 2 O was ascribed to acetate radical which has g=2.0031±0.0004 and hyperfine splitting of A/gβ=2.12±0.1 mT. The Li-phosphate spectrum shows splitting due to anisotropic g-factors of g par =2.0190±0.0005 and g perp =1.9974±0.0004. Quartet spectra with the intensity ratio of 1:3:3:1 in Mg(Li)-lactate and Li(Mg)-lactate were ascribed to lactate radicals with g-factors of 2.0032 ± 0.0004 and 2.0029 ± 0.0004 and the intensity ratio of 1:3:3:1 and A/gβ=1.92±0.06 and 1.82 ± 0.06 mT, respectively. The response to γ-ray dose and the thermal stability as well as the effect of UV-illumination have been studied. The obtained number of free radicals per 100 eV (G-values) were 0.4 ± 0.13, 1.02 ± 0.31, 1.35 ± 0.35 and 0.78 ± 0 for Li-Ac.2H 2 O, Li-phosphate, Mg(Li)-lactate, and Li(Mg)-lactate, respectively. The lifetimes were estimated from Arrhenius plots to be approximately 2.0 ± 0.6, 50.7 ± 20 and 10 ± 3.5 years for Li-phosphate, Mg(Li)-lactate and Li(Mg)-lactate, respectively. The lifetime for Li-Ac·2H 2 O cannot be estimated because of the decomposition by heating

  16. Development of High Temperature/High Sensitivity Novel Chemical Resistive Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Chunrui [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Enriquez, Erik [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Wang, Haibing [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Xu, Xing [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Bao, Shangyong [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Collins, Gregory [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2013-08-13

    The research has been focused to design, fabricate, and develop high temperature/high sensitivity novel multifunctional chemical sensors for the selective detection of fossil energy gases used in power and fuel systems. By systematically studying the physical properties of the LnBaCo2O5+d (LBCO) [Ln=Pr or La] thin-films, a new concept chemical sensor based high temperature chemical resistant change has been developed for the application for the next generation highly efficient and near zero emission power generation technologies. We also discovered that the superfast chemical dynamic behavior and an ultrafast surface exchange kinetics in the highly epitaxial LBCO thin films. Furthermore, our research indicates that hydrogen can superfast diffuse in the ordered oxygen vacancy structures in the highly epitaxial LBCO thin films, which suggest that the LBCO thin film not only can be an excellent candidate for the fabrication of high temperature ultra sensitive chemical sensors and control systems for power and fuel monitoring systems, but also can be an excellent candidate for the low temperature solid oxide fuel cell anode and cathode materials.

  17. A high sensitivity, high throughput, automated single-cell gel electrophoresis ('Comet') DNA damage assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vojnovic, B.; Barber, P.R.; Johnston, P.J.; Gregory, H.C.; Locke, R.J.

    2003-01-01

    A fully automated microscopy machine vision image capture and analysis system for the collection of data from slides of 'comets' has been developed. The novel image processing algorithms employed in delineating the 'comet head' from the 'comet tail' allow us to determine accurately very low levels of damage. In conjunction with calibrated and automated image capture methods, we are able to eliminate operator subjectivity and analyse large numbers of cells (>2500) in a short time (<1 hour). The image processing algorithm is designed to handle particularly difficult nuclei containing a high degree of structure, due to DNA clumping. We also present techniques used to extend the assay's dynamic range by removing interfering background fluorescence and to define a region of interest. If subtle biological variations are to be quantified (e.g. cell cycle dependant damage), then the use of large cell populations is dictated. Under those circumstances, the use of a fully automated system is particularly advantageous providing that the manner in which data is extracted does not introduce any inadvertent bias. In practice, it is essential that the image processing steps are geared towards the correct recognition of an acceptable cell nucleus, i.e. comet 'head'. We acknowledge the financial support of CRUK, Programme Grant C133/A1812 - SP 2195-01/02 and the US Department of Energy Low Dose Radiation Research Program grant DE-FG07-99ER62878

  18. Median filters as a tool to determine dark noise thresholds in high resolution smartphone image sensors for scientific imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igoe, Damien P.; Parisi, Alfio V.; Amar, Abdurazaq; Rummenie, Katherine J.

    2018-01-01

    An evaluation of the use of median filters in the reduction of dark noise in smartphone high resolution image sensors is presented. The Sony Xperia Z1 employed has a maximum image sensor resolution of 20.7 Mpixels, with each pixel having a side length of just over 1 μm. Due to the large number of photosites, this provides an image sensor with very high sensitivity but also makes them prone to noise effects such as hot-pixels. Similar to earlier research with older models of smartphone, no appreciable temperature effects were observed in the overall average pixel values for images taken in ambient temperatures between 5 °C and 25 °C. In this research, hot-pixels are defined as pixels with intensities above a specific threshold. The threshold is determined using the distribution of pixel values of a set of images with uniform statistical properties associated with the application of median-filters of increasing size. An image with uniform statistics was employed as a training set from 124 dark images, and the threshold was determined to be 9 digital numbers (DN). The threshold remained constant for multiple resolutions and did not appreciably change even after a year of extensive field use and exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation. Although the temperature effects' uniformity masked an increase in hot-pixel occurrences, the total number of occurrences represented less than 0.1% of the total image. Hot-pixels were removed by applying a median filter, with an optimum filter size of 7 × 7; similar trends were observed for four additional smartphone image sensors used for validation. Hot-pixels were also reduced by decreasing image resolution. The method outlined in this research provides a methodology to characterise the dark noise behavior of high resolution image sensors for use in scientific investigations, especially as pixel sizes decrease.

  19. Gallium imaging of esophageal carcinoma: Increased sensitivity with lateral views of the thorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sostre, S.; Romero, I.; Rivera, J.V.; Baez, L.; Cintron, E.

    1990-01-01

    Ga-67 imaging has not been very successful in the detection of esophageal carcinoma. In most reports, sensitivity for the primary tumor ranged from 25-61%, but imaging had been done only in anterior and posterior (A-P) projections. We performed gallium scans in 30 patients with esophageal carcinoma, adding lateral views to the routine A-P projections, to study the effect of lateral views on tumor detection. The A-P views detected only 57% of the tumors while the right lateral visualized 89%, and the left lateral detected 100%. Some lesions may be hidden by the sternum and the spine in the routine A-P views. Previous disappointments with Ga-67 imaging of esophageal carcinoma were probably due to this technical factor. Being gallium-avid, esophageal tumors deserve further studies with this agent to determine the role of Ga-67 imaging in this condition. These studies should be performed with multiple views of the thorax or, better yet, with SPECT imaging of the chest, to circumvent the problem of sternum and spine interference

  20. Exercise thallium-201 myocardial imaging in left main coronary artery disease: sensitive but not specific

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehn, T.; Griffith, L.S.; Achuff, S.C.; Bailey, I.K.; Bulkley, B.H.; Burow, R.; Pitt, B.; Becker, L.C.

    1981-01-01

    To determine the usefulness of thallium-201 scintigraphy for identifying left main coronary artery disease, the results of scintigraphy at rest and during exercise were compared in 24 patients with 50 percent or greater narrowing of the left main coronary artery and 80 patients with 50 percent or greater narrowing of one or more of the major coronary arteries but without left main coronary involvement. By segmental analysis of the scintigrams, perfusion defects were assigned to the left anterior descending, left circumflex or right coronary artery, singly or in combination, and the pattern of simultaneous left anterior descending and circumflex arterial defects was used to identify left main coronary artery disease. Of the 24 patients with left main coronary artery disease, 22 (92 percent) had abnormal exercise scintigrams. Despite this high sensitivity, the pattern of perfusion defects was not specific; the ''left main pattern'' was found in 3 patients (13 percent) with left main coronary artery disease but also in 3 (33 percent) of 9 patients with combined left anterior descending and left circumflex arterial disease, 4 (19 percent) of 21 patients with three vessel disease and 3 (6 percent) of 50 patients with one or two vessel disease but excluding the group with left anterior descending plus left circumflex arterial disease. The pattern of perfusion defects in the patients with left main coronary artery disease was determined by the location and severity of narrowings in the coronary arteries downstream from the left main arterial lesion. Concomitant lesions in other arteries were found in all patients with left main coronary disease (one vessel in 1 patient, two vessels in 7 patients and three vessels in 16). For this reason, it is unlikely that even with improvements in radiopharmaceutical agents and imaging techniques, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy will be sufficiently specific for definitive identification of left main coronary artery disease

  1. Study and realization of pixelated APD Geiger photodetectors of very high sensitivity for Very High Energy gamma astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jradi, K.

    2010-07-01

    Very High Energy gamma ray astronomy uses till now exclusively as detector the Photomultiplier Tube (PMT) to collect weak light flux of atmospheric showers. But an alternative is now emerging: Avalanche Photodiodes polarized in Geiger mode called 'Geiger-APD'. The PMT is a detector designed in the 70's which presents many advantages but also suffers from several drawbacks: size, weight, cost, sensitivity to magnetic field but especially difficulty to realize its pixelation in matrix. Geiger-APDs are semi-conductor devices made of PN junction integrated in a special technology to detect very low light flux, thanks to the polarization beyond the avalanche voltage. Geiger-APD presents very high photoelectron gain (∼106) strongly dependant on the polarization voltage beyond avalanche. These photodiodes present many advantages with respect to PMT, mainly as concerns miniaturization for applications based on imaging, such as the detection of Cerenkov flashes in gamma ray astronomy. In this thesis, we present the study, the design and the realization of a technological structure, based on Silicon. This structure has shown reliability to detect weak luminous flux with breakdown voltage at 12 V and dark current below 10 pA at breakdown. We also developed several models, physical and electrical, necessary to the technological optimization, as well to the development of control and readout circuits, i.e. the basis of any imaging technology. The work presented here consists in the study, the design and the realization of a matrix of high sensitivity pixels. A project of a Cerenkov telescope based on this innovative technology is also presented. (author)

  2. A high-resolution optical imaging system for obtaining the serial transverse section images of biologic tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li; Zhang, Bin; Wu, Ping; Liu, Qian; Gong, Hui

    2007-05-01

    A high-resolution optical imaging system was designed and developed to obtain the serial transverse section images of the biologic tissue, such as the mouse brain, in which new knife-edge imaging technology, high-speed and high-sensitive line-scan CCD and linear air bearing stages were adopted and incorporated with an OLYMPUS microscope. The section images on the tip of the knife-edge were synchronously captured by the reflection imaging in the microscope while cutting the biologic tissue. The biologic tissue can be sectioned at interval of 250 nm with the same resolution of the transverse section images obtained in x and y plane. And the cutting job can be automatically finished based on the control program wrote specially in advance, so we save the mass labor of the registration of the vast images data. In addition, by using this system a larger sample can be cut than conventional ultramicrotome so as to avoid the loss of the tissue structure information because of splitting the tissue sample to meet the size request of the ultramicrotome.

  3. The Pajarito Monitor: a high-sensitivity monitoring system for highly enriched uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehlau, P.E.; Coop, K.; Garcia, C.; Martinez, J.

    1984-01-01

    The Pajarito Monitor for Special Nuclear Material is a high-sensitivity gamma-ray monitoring system for detecting small quantities of highly enriched uranium transported by pedestrians or motor vehicles. The monitor consists of two components: a walk-through personnel monitor and a vehicle monitor. The personnel monitor has a plastic-scintillator detector portal, a microwave occupancy monitor, and a microprocessor control unit that measures the radiation intensity during background and monitoring periods to detect transient diversion signals. The vehicle monitor examines stationary motor vehicles while the vehicle's occupants pass through the personnel portal to exchange their badges. The vehicle monitor has four groups of large plastic scintillators that scan the vehicle from above and below. Its microprocessor control unit measures separate radiation intensities in each detector group. Vehicle occupancy is sensed by a highway traffic detection system. Each monitor's controller is responsible for detecting diversion as well as serving as a calibration and trouble-shooting aid. Diversion signals are detected by a sequential probability ratio hypothesis test that minimizes the monitoring time in the vehicle monitor and adapts itself well to variations in individual passage speed in the personnel monitor. Designed to be highly sensitive to diverted enriched uranium, the monitoring system also exhibits exceptional sensitivity for plutonium

  4. In vivo non-invasive optical imaging of temperature-sensitive co-polymeric nanohydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiyan; Zhang, Jian; Qian, Zhiyu; Liu, Fei; Chen, Xinyang; Hu, Yuzhu; Gu, Yueqing

    2008-05-01

    Assessment of hyperthermia in pathological tissue is a promising strategy for earlier diagnosis of malignant tumors. In this study, temperature-sensitive co-polymeric nanohydrogel poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) (PNIPA-co-AA) was successfully synthesized by the precipitation polymerization method. The diameters of nanohydrogels were controlled to be less than 100 nm. Also the lower critical solution temperature (LCST, 40 °C) was manipulated above physiological temperature after integration of near-infrared (NIR) organic dye (heptamethine cyanine dye, HMCD) within its interior cores. NIR laser light (765 nm), together with sensitive charge coupled device (CCD) cameras, were designed to construct an NIR imaging system. The dynamic behaviors of PNIPA-co-AA-HMCD composites in denuded mice with or without local hyperthermia treatment were real-time monitored by an NIR imager. The results showed that the PNIPA-co-AA-HMCD composites accumulated in the leg treated with local heating and diffused much slower than that in the other leg without heating. The results demonstrated that the temperature-responsive PNIPA-co-AA-HMCD composites combining with an NIR imaging system could be an effective temperature mapping technique, which provides a promising prospect for earlier tumor diagnosis and thermally related therapeutic assessment.

  5. In vivo non-invasive optical imaging of temperature-sensitive co-polymeric nanohydrogel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Haiyan; Hu Yuzhu; Zhang Jian; Liu Fei; Chen Xinyang; Gu Yueqing; Qian Zhiyu

    2008-01-01

    Assessment of hyperthermia in pathological tissue is a promising strategy for earlier diagnosis of malignant tumors. In this study, temperature-sensitive co-polymeric nanohydrogel poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) (PNIPA-co-AA) was successfully synthesized by the precipitation polymerization method. The diameters of nanohydrogels were controlled to be less than 100 nm. Also the lower critical solution temperature (LCST, 40 deg. C) was manipulated above physiological temperature after integration of near-infrared (NIR) organic dye (heptamethine cyanine dye, HMCD) within its interior cores. NIR laser light (765 nm), together with sensitive charge coupled device (CCD) cameras, were designed to construct an NIR imaging system. The dynamic behaviors of PNIPA-co-AA-HMCD composites in denuded mice with or without local hyperthermia treatment were real-time monitored by an NIR imager. The results showed that the PNIPA-co-AA-HMCD composites accumulated in the leg treated with local heating and diffused much slower than that in the other leg without heating. The results demonstrated that the temperature-responsive PNIPA-co-AA-HMCD composites combining with an NIR imaging system could be an effective temperature mapping technique, which provides a promising prospect for earlier tumor diagnosis and thermally related therapeutic assessment

  6. Planoconcave optical microresonator sensors for photoacoustic imaging: pushing the limits of sensitivity (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guggenheim, James A.; Zhang, Edward Z.; Beard, Paul C.

    2016-03-01

    Most photoacoustic scanners use piezoelectric detectors but these have two key limitations. Firstly, they are optically opaque, inhibiting backward mode operation. Secondly, it is difficult to achieve adequate detection sensitivity with the small element sizes needed to provide near-omnidirectional response as required for tomographic imaging. Planar Fabry-Perot (FP) ultrasound sensing etalons can overcome both of these limitations and have proved extremely effective for superficial (beam. However, this has the disadvantage that beam walk-off due to the divergence of the beam fundamentally limits the etalon finesse and thus sensitivity - in essence, the problem is one of insufficient optical confinement. To overcome this, novel planoconcave micro-resonator sensors have been fabricated using precision ink-jet printed polymer domes with curvatures matching that of the laser wavefront. By providing near-perfect beam confinement, we show that it is possible to approach the maximum theoretical limit for finesse (f) imposed by the etalon mirror reflectivities (e.g. f=400 for R=99.2% in contrast to a typical planar sensor value of fbeam walk-off, viable sensors can be made with significantly greater thickness than planar FP sensors. This provides an additional sensitivity gain for deep tissue imaging applications such as breast imaging where detection bandwidths in the low MHz can be tolerated. For example, for a 250 μm thick planoconcave sensor with a -3dB bandwidth of 5MHz, the measured NEP was 4 Pa. This NEP is comparable to that provided by mm scale piezoelectric detectors used for breast imaging applications but with more uniform frequency response characteristics and an order-of-magnitude smaller element size. Following previous proof-of-concept work, several important advances towards practical application have been made. A family of sensors with bandwidths ranging from 3MHz to 20MHz have been fabricated and characterised. A novel interrogation scheme based on

  7. High dynamic range image acquisition based on multiplex cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hairui; Sun, Huayan; Zhang, Tinghua

    2018-03-01

    High dynamic image is an important technology of photoelectric information acquisition, providing higher dynamic range and more image details, and it can better reflect the real environment, light and color information. Currently, the method of high dynamic range image synthesis based on different exposure image sequences cannot adapt to the dynamic scene. It fails to overcome the effects of moving targets, resulting in the phenomenon of ghost. Therefore, a new high dynamic range image acquisition method based on multiplex cameras system was proposed. Firstly, different exposure images sequences were captured with the camera array, using the method of derivative optical flow based on color gradient to get the deviation between images, and aligned the images. Then, the high dynamic range image fusion weighting function was established by combination of inverse camera response function and deviation between images, and was applied to generated a high dynamic range image. The experiments show that the proposed method can effectively obtain high dynamic images in dynamic scene, and achieves good results.

  8. High angular resolution diffusion imaging : processing & visualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prckovska, V.

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a recent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique that can map the orientation architecture of neural tissues in a completely non-invasive way by measuring the directional specificity (anisotropy) of the local water diffusion. However, in areas of complex fiber

  9. Image Alignment for Multiple Camera High Dynamic Range Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, Brian S; Childs, Elisabeth C

    2012-01-09

    This paper investigates the problem of image alignment for multiple camera high dynamic range (HDR) imaging. HDR imaging combines information from images taken with different exposure settings. Combining information from multiple cameras requires an alignment process that is robust to the intensity differences in the images. HDR applications that use a limited number of component images require an alignment technique that is robust to large exposure differences. We evaluate the suitability for HDR alignment of three exposure-robust techniques. We conclude that image alignment based on matching feature descriptors extracted from radiant power images from calibrated cameras yields the most accurate and robust solution. We demonstrate the use of this alignment technique in a high dynamic range video microscope that enables live specimen imaging with a greater level of detail than can be captured with a single camera.

  10. Desensitization protocol in highly HLA-sensitized and ABO-incompatible high titer kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, J; Machida, Y; Iwai, T; Naganuma, T; Kitamoto, K; Iguchi, T; Maeda, S; Kamada, Y; Kuwabara, N; Kim, T; Nakatani, T

    2010-12-01

    A positive crossmatch indicates the presence of donor-specific alloantibodies and is associated with a graft loss rate of >80%; anti-ABO blood group antibodies develop in response to exposure to foreign blood groups, resulting in immediate graft loss. However, a desensitization protocol for highly HLA-sensitized and ABO-incompatible high-titer kidney transplantation has not yet been established. We treated 6 patients with high (≥1:512) anti-A/B antibody titers and 2 highly HLA-sensitized patients. Our immunosuppression protocol was initiated 1 month before surgery and included mycophenolate mofetil (1 g/d) and/or low-dose steroid (methylprednisolone 8 mg/d). Two doses of the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab (150 mg/m(2)) were administered 2 weeks before and on the day of transplantation. We performed antibody removal with 6-12 sessions of plasmapheresis (plasma exchange or double-filtration plasmapheresis) before transplantation. Splenectomy was also performed on the day of transplantation. Postoperative immunosuppression followed the same regimen as ABO-compatible cases, in which calcineurin inhibitors were initiated 3 days before transplantation, combined with 2 doses of basiliximab. Of the 8 patients, 7 subsequently underwent successful living-donor kidney transplantation. Follow-up of our recipients showed that the patient and graft survival rates were 100%. Acute cellular rejection and antibody-mediated rejection episodes occurred in 1 of the 7 recipients. These findings suggest that our immunosuppression regimen consisting of rituximab infusions, splenectomy, plasmapheresis, and pharmacologic immunosuppression may prove to be effective as a desensitization protocol for highly HLA-sensitized and ABO-incompatible high-titer kidney transplantation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Highly sensitive straightness measurement system using a ball-lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Minho; Yang, Hyun-Ik; Cho, Nahm-Gyoo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new and simple optical technique to accurately measure the straightness errors of a linear stage is proposed. To improve the performance, including the measurement sensitivity and resolution of the measurement system, and to simultaneously measure two-dimensional straightness errors (2D straightness errors), an optical system was designed using a laser, a retro-reflector, a ball-lens, and a two-dimensional position sensitive detector (2D PSD). The characteristics of the measurement system were analytically and experimentally investigated. A prototype measurement system was manufactured based on the investigated results, and the performances of this system have been tested. The measuring performance of the system was easily improved by about 12 times using the proposed technique and it can be further improved. It is shown that the proposed technique can easily and effectively improve the performance of a conventional straightness measurement system based on the geometric optical method using a PSD. (paper)

  12. Highly Sensitive Cadmium Concentration Sensor Using Long Period Grating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Lalasangi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we have proposed a simple and effective Long Period Grating chemical sensor for detecting the traces of Cadmium (Cd++ in drinking water at ppm level. Long Period gratings (LPG were fabricated by point-by-point technique with CO2 laser. We have characterized the LPG concentration sensor sensitivity for different solutions of Cd concentrations varying from 0.01 ppm to 0.04 ppm by injecting white Light source and observed transmitted spectra using Optical Spectrum Analyzer (OSA. Proper reagents have been used in the solutions for detection of the Cd species. The overall shift in wavelength is 10 nm when surrounding medium gradually changed from water to 0.04 ppm of cadmium concentrations. A comparative study has been done using sophisticated spectroscopic atomic absorption spectrometer (AAS and Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP instruments. The spectral sensitivity enhancement was done by modifying grating surface with gold nanoparticles.

  13. Highly sensitive BTX detection using surface functionalized QCM sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozkurt, Asuman Aşıkoğlu; Özdemir, Okan; Altındal, Ahmet, E-mail: altindal@yildiz.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Yildiz Technical University, Davutpasa, 34210 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2016-03-25

    A novel organic compound was designed and successfully synthesized for the fabrication of QCM based sensors to detect the low concentrations of BTX gases in indoor air. The effect of the long-range electron orbital delocalization on the BTX vapour sensing properties of azo-bridged Pcs based chemiresistor-type sensors have also been investigated in this work. The sensing behaviour of the film for the online detection of volatile organic solvent vapors was investigated by utilizing an AT-cut quartz crystal resonator. It was observed that the adsorption of the target molecules on the coating surface cause a reversible negative frequency shift of the resonator. Thus, a variety of solvent vapors can be detected by using the phthalocyanine film as sensitive coating, with sensitivity in the ppm range and response times in the order of several seconds depending on the molecular structure of the organic solvent.

  14. High pain sensitivity is distinct from high susceptibility to non-painful sensory input at threshold level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Thomas; Springborn, Maria; Croy, Ilona; Kaiser, Jochen; Lötsch, Jörn

    2011-04-01

    Individuals may differ considerably in their sensitivity towards various painful stimuli supporting the notion of a person as stoical or complaining about pain. Molecular and functional imaging research provides support that this may extend also to other sensory qualities. Whether a person can be characterized as possessing a generally high or low sensory acuity is unknown. This was therefore assessed with thresholds to painful and non-painful stimuli, with a focus on chemical stimuli that besides pain may evoke clearly non-painful sensations such as taste or smell. In 36 healthy men and 78 women (ages 18 to 52 years), pain thresholds to chemo-somatosensory (intranasal gaseous CO(2)) and electrical stimuli (cutaneous stimulation) were significantly correlated (ρ(2)=0.2268, psensory qualities, i.e., for the rose-like odor phenyl ethyl alcohol and gustatory thresholds for sour (citric acid) and salty (NaCl). Similarly, pain clusters showed no differences in thresholds to other stimuli. Moreover, no clustering was obtained for thresholds to both painful and non-painful stimuli together. Thus, individuals could not be characterized as highly sensitive (or insensitive) to all chemical stimuli no matter of evoking pain. This suggests that pain is primarily a singular sensory perception distinct from others such as olfaction or taste. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Antibody Desensitization Therapy in Highly Sensitized Lung Transplant Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, L. D.; Gray, A. L.; Reynolds, J. M.; Arepally, G. M.; Bedoya, A.; Hartwig, M. G.; Davis, R. D.; Lopes, K. E.; Wegner, W. E.; Chen, D. F.; Palmer, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    As HLAs antibody detection technology has evolved, there is now detailed HLA antibody information available on prospective transplant recipients. Determining single antigen antibody specificity allows for a calculated panel reactive antibodies (cPRA) value, providing an estimate of the effective donor pool. For broadly sensitized lung transplant candidates (cPRA ≥ 80%), our center adopted a pretransplant multimodal desensitization protocol in an effort to decrease the cPRA and expand the donor pool. This desensitization protocol included plasmapheresis, solumedrol, bortezomib and rituximab given in combination over 19 days followed by intravenous immunoglobulin. Eight of 18 candidates completed therapy with the primary reasons for early discontinuation being transplant (by avoiding unacceptable antigens) or thrombocytopenia. In a mixed-model analysis, there were no significant changes in PRA or cPRA changes over time with the protocol. A sub-analysis of the median fluorescence intensity (MFI) change indicated a small decline that was significant in antibodies with MFI 5000–10 000. Nine of 18 candidates subsequently had a transplant. Posttransplant survival in these nine recipients was comparable to other pretransplant-sensitized recipients who did not receive therapy. In summary, an aggressive multi-modal desensitization protocol does not significantly reduce pretransplant HLA antibodies in a broadly sensitized lung transplant candidate cohort. PMID:24666831

  16. Pelvic endometriosis: a comparison between low-field (0.2 T) and high-field (1.5 T) magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minaif, Karine; Ajzen, Sergio; Shigueoka, David Carlos; Minami, Cintia Cristina Satie; Sales, Danilo Moulin; Szejnfeld, Jacob; Ruano, Jose Maria Cordeiro; Noguti, Alberto Sinhiti

    2008-01-01

    Objective: to compare low-field (0.2 T) with high-field (1.5 T) magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of pelvic endometriosis and adenomyosis. Materials and methods: twenty-seven female patients with clinically suspected endometriosis were prospectively evaluated by means of high-field and low-field magnetic resonance imaging. The reading of the images was performed by a single radiologist, initiating by the low-field, followed by the high-field images. High-field magnetic resonance imaging was utilized as the golden-standard. Results: among the 27 patients included in the present study, 18 (66.7%) had some type of lesion suggesting the presence of endometriosis demonstrated at high-field images. In 14 of these patients the diagnosis was correctly established by low-field magnetic resonance imaging. Endometriomas, tubal lesions, and endometriotic foci > 7 mm identified at the high-field images were also identified at low-field images with 100% accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. Among the nine patients diagnosed with adenomyosis by high-field images, eight were correctly diagnosed by low-field images with 88.9% accuracy, specificity and sensitivity. Conclusion: low-field magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a low sensitivity in the detection of small endometriotic foci, high sensitivity in the detection of endometriomas and large endometriotic foci, and high accuracy in the detection of adenomyosis when compared with high-field magnetic resonance imaging. (author)

  17. Pelvic endometriosis: a comparison between low-field (0.2 T) and high-field (1.5 T) magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minaif, Karine; Ajzen, Sergio [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Imaging Diagnosis]. E-mail: kminaif@uol.com.br; Shigueoka, David Carlos; Minami, Cintia Cristina Satie; Sales, Danilo Moulin; Szejnfeld, Jacob [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Imaging Diagnosis. Unit of Abdomen; Ruano, Jose Maria Cordeiro [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of General Gynecology. Sector of Videlaparoscopy; Noguti, Alberto Sinhiti [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of General Gynecology

    2008-11-15

    Objective: to compare low-field (0.2 T) with high-field (1.5 T) magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of pelvic endometriosis and adenomyosis. Materials and methods: twenty-seven female patients with clinically suspected endometriosis were prospectively evaluated by means of high-field and low-field magnetic resonance imaging. The reading of the images was performed by a single radiologist, initiating by the low-field, followed by the high-field images. High-field magnetic resonance imaging was utilized as the golden-standard. Results: among the 27 patients included in the present study, 18 (66.7%) had some type of lesion suggesting the presence of endometriosis demonstrated at high-field images. In 14 of these patients the diagnosis was correctly established by low-field magnetic resonance imaging. Endometriomas, tubal lesions, and endometriotic foci > 7 mm identified at the high-field images were also identified at low-field images with 100% accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. Among the nine patients diagnosed with adenomyosis by high-field images, eight were correctly diagnosed by low-field images with 88.9% accuracy, specificity and sensitivity. Conclusion: low-field magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a low sensitivity in the detection of small endometriotic foci, high sensitivity in the detection of endometriomas and large endometriotic foci, and high accuracy in the detection of adenomyosis when compared with high-field magnetic resonance imaging. (author)

  18. Method and apparatus for enhanced sensitivity filmless medical x-ray imaging, including three-dimensional imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Sherwood

    1995-01-01

    A filmless X-ray imaging system includes at least one X-ray source, upper and lower collimators, and a solid-state detector array, and can provide three-dimensional imaging capability. The X-ray source plane is distance z.sub.1 above upper collimator plane, distance z.sub.2 above the lower collimator plane, and distance z.sub.3 above the plane of the detector array. The object to be X-rayed is located between the upper and lower collimator planes. The upper and lower collimators and the detector array are moved horizontally with scanning velocities v.sub.1, v.sub.2, v.sub.3 proportional to z.sub.1, z.sub.2 and z.sub.3, respectively. The pattern and size of openings in the collimators, and between detector positions is proportional such that similar triangles are always defined relative to the location of the X-ray source. X-rays that pass through openings in the upper collimator will always pass through corresponding and similar openings in the lower collimator, and thence to a corresponding detector in the underlying detector array. Substantially 100% of the X-rays irradiating the object (and neither absorbed nor scattered) pass through the lower collimator openings and are detected, which promotes enhanced sensitivity. A computer system coordinates repositioning of the collimators and detector array, and X-ray source locations. The computer system can store detector array output, and can associate a known X-ray source location with detector array output data, to provide three-dimensional imaging. Detector output may be viewed instantly, stored digitally, and/or transmitted electronically for image viewing at a remote site.

  19. A High-Sensitivity Current Sensor Utilizing CrNi Wire and Microfiber Coils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Xie

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We obtain an extremely high current sensitivity by wrapping a section of microfiber on a thin-diameter chromium-nickel wire. Our detected current sensitivity is as high as 220.65 nm/A2 for a structure length of only 35 μm. Such sensitivity is two orders of magnitude higher than the counterparts reported in the literature. Analysis shows that a higher resistivity or/and a thinner diameter of the metal wire may produce higher sensitivity. The effects of varying the structure parameters on sensitivity are discussed. The presented structure has potential for low-current sensing or highly electrically-tunable filtering applications.

  20. Acquiring additional delayed PET images improves sensitivity and specificity in oncology cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamki, L.M.; Barron, B.J.; Mullani, N.; Joseph, U.; Ehert, E.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: This study looked into utility of acquiring PET images at 2-3 hours in addition to the standard whole body PET done at 1-hour after FDG injection in certain oncology cases. The objective is to evaluate whether the delayed additional images can decipher equivocal foci of FDG accumulation commonly seen in oncology patients. Typical example is the bowel activity that moves with time. Materials and Methods: PET protocol at our Institution in patients with colon Cancer, Pancreas Ca, Ovarian Ca and Breast Ca include a whole body PET (6-7 bed positions) done at 1-hour after 15 mCi F-18-FDG followed by select limited area PET scan (typically 2 bed stops over the area of interest) at 2-3 hours. Acquisition was undertaken on Siemens ECAT-EXACT Camera - 2-D acquisition and 8 mins. per bed position (5 mins. Emission and 3 mins. Transmission), 16.3 cm FOV and then Iterative Reconstruction. Results: Analysis of the first 115 patients who had additional delayed images resulted in 80% of patients where delayed images helped in interpretation. In 70% of these, delayed images helped in identifying physiological structures, e.g., ureters, bowel, blood vessels and muscles versus pathology. In 25%, they actually helped in identifying malignancy, e.g. more definite FDG accumulation. Almost all helped to boost the confidence of the reader. The contribution was mainly in differentiating bowel and ureter activity from cancer in the abdomen, as these change position with time. In case of pancreas and breast cancer, delayed images contributed in clarifying tumor metabolic activity as well. Inflammation and motion artifacts could also be better defined and so was muscle uptake. Conclusion: (1) Additional delayed PET imaging is very helpful in certain cancers in identifying more lesions and avoiding pitfalls. (2) They can yield higher sensitivity and specificity for colon, ovarian, breast and pancreas cancers. (3) Identification of physiologic structures and differentiation of these from

  1. An integral design strategy combining optical system and image processing to obtain high resolution images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiaoyang; Wang, Lin; Yang, Ying; Gong, Rui; Shao, Xiaopeng; Liang, Chao; Xu, Jun

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, an integral design that combines optical system with image processing is introduced to obtain high resolution images, and the performance is evaluated and demonstrated. Traditional imaging methods often separate the two technical procedures of optical system design and imaging processing, resulting in the failures in efficient cooperation between the optical and digital elements. Therefore, an innovative approach is presented to combine the merit function during optical design together with the constraint conditions of image processing algorithms. Specifically, an optical imaging system with low resolution is designed to collect the image signals which are indispensable for imaging processing, while the ultimate goal is to obtain high resolution images from the final system. In order to optimize the global performance, the optimization function of ZEMAX software is utilized and the number of optimization cycles is controlled. Then Wiener filter algorithm is adopted to process the image simulation and mean squared error (MSE) is taken as evaluation criterion. The results show that, although the optical figures of merit for the optical imaging systems is not the best, it can provide image signals that are more suitable for image processing. In conclusion. The integral design of optical system and image processing can search out the overall optimal solution which is missed by the traditional design methods. Especially, when designing some complex optical system, this integral design strategy has obvious advantages to simplify structure and reduce cost, as well as to gain high resolution images simultaneously, which has a promising perspective of industrial application.

  2. Solar monochromatic images in magneto-sensitive spectral lines and maps of vector magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shihui, Y.; Jiehai, J.; Minhan, J.

    1985-01-01

    A new method which allows by use of the monochromatic images in some magneto-sensitive spectra line to derive both the magnetic field strength as well as the angle between magnetic field lines and line of sight for various places in solar active regions is described. In this way two dimensional maps of vector magnetic fields may be constructed. This method was applied to some observational material and reasonable results were obtained. In addition, a project for constructing the three dimensional maps of vector magnetic fields was worked out.

  3. Imaging of human breast tissue using polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Y.; Gautam, M.; Divakar Rao, K.; Swami, M. K.; Gupta, P. K.

    2011-12-01

    We report a study on the use of polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PSOCT) for discriminating malignant (invasive ductal carcinoma), benign (fibroadenoma) and normal (adipocytes) breast tissue sites. The results show that while conventional OCT, that utilizes only the intensity of light back-scattered from tissue microstructures, is able to discriminate breast tissues as normal (adipocytes) and abnormal (malignant and benign) tissues, PS-OCT helps in discriminating between malignant and benign tissue sites also. The estimated values of birefringence obtained from the PSOCT imaging show that benign breast tissue samples have significantly higher birefringence as compared to the malignant tissue samples.

  4. Image processor for high resolution video

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pessoa, P.P.; Assis, J.T.; Cardoso, S.B.; Lopes, R.T.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss an image presentation and processing system developed in Turbo Pascal 5.0 Language. Our system allows the visualization and processing of images in 16 different colors, taken at a time from a set of 64 possible ones. Digital filters of the mean, mediam Laplacian, gradient and histograms equalization type have been implemented, so as to allow a better image quality. Possible applications of our system are also discussed e.g., satellites, computerized tomography, medicine, microscopes. (author) [pt

  5. High-resolution, high-sensitivity NMR of nano-litre anisotropic samples by coil spinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakellariou, D [CEA Saclay, DSM, DRECAM, SCM, Lab Struct and Dynam Resonance Magnet, CNRS URA 331, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Le Goff, G; Jacquinot, J F [CEA Saclay, DSM, DRECAM, SPEC: Serv Phys Etat Condense, CNRS URA 2464, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France)

    2007-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) can probe the local structure and dynamic properties of liquids and solids, making it one of the most powerful and versatile analytical methods available today. However, its intrinsically low sensitivity precludes NMR analysis of very small samples - as frequently used when studying isotopically labelled biological molecules or advanced materials, or as preferred when conducting high-throughput screening of biological samples or 'lab-on-a-chip' studies. The sensitivity of NMR has been improved by using static micro-coils, alternative detection schemes and pre-polarization approaches. But these strategies cannot be easily used in NMR experiments involving the fast sample spinning essential for obtaining well-resolved spectra from non-liquid samples. Here we demonstrate that inductive coupling allows wireless transmission of radio-frequency pulses and the reception of NMR signals under fast spinning of both detector coil and sample. This enables NMR measurements characterized by an optimal filling factor, very high radio-frequency field amplitudes and enhanced sensitivity that increases with decreasing sample volume. Signals obtained for nano-litre-sized samples of organic powders and biological tissue increase by almost one order of magnitude (or, equivalently, are acquired two orders of magnitude faster), compared to standard NMR measurements. Our approach also offers optimal sensitivity when studying samples that need to be confined inside multiple safety barriers, such as radioactive materials. In principle, the co-rotation of a micrometer-sized detector coil with the sample and the use of inductive coupling (techniques that are at the heart of our method) should enable highly sensitive NMR measurements on any mass-limited sample that requires fast mechanical rotation to obtain well-resolved spectra. The method is easy to implement on a commercial NMR set-up and exhibits improved performance with miniaturization, and we

  6. Effects of menopause and high-intensity training on insulin sensitivity and muscle metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrup, Camilla M; Egelund, Jon; Nyberg, Michael; Enevoldsen, Lotte Hahn; Kjær, Andreas; Clemmensen, Andreas E; Christensen, Anders Nymark; Suetta, Charlotte; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Steenberg, Dorte Enggaard; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F P; Hellsten, Ylva; Stallknecht, Bente M

    2018-02-01

    To investigate peripheral insulin sensitivity and skeletal muscle glucose metabolism in premenopausal and postmenopausal women, and evaluate whether exercise training benefits are maintained after menopause. Sedentary, healthy, normal-weight, late premenopausal (n = 21), and early postmenopausal (n = 20) women were included in a 3-month high-intensity exercise training intervention. Body composition was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, whole body glucose disposal rate (GDR) by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp (40 mU/m/min), and femoral muscle glucose uptake by positron emission tomography/computed tomography, using the glucose analog fluorodeoxyglucose, expressed as estimated metabolic rate (eMR). Insulin signaling was investigated in muscle biopsies. Age difference between groups was 4.5 years, and no difference was observed in body composition. Training increased lean body mass (estimate [95% confidence interval] 0.5 [0.2-0.9] kg, P training (eMR vastus lateralis muscle: 27.8 [19.6-36.0] μmol/min/kg, P training-induced increases in insulin sensitivity included increased expression of hexokinase (19.2 [5.0-24.7] AU, P = 0.02) and glycogen synthase (32.4 [15.0-49.8] AU, P high-intensity exercise training.

  7. High-speed atomic force microscope imaging: Adaptive multiloop mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Juan; Zou, Qingze; Li, Bo; Lin, Zhiqun

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, an imaging mode (called the adaptive multiloop mode) of atomic force microscope (AFM) is proposed to substantially increase the speed of tapping mode (TM) imaging while preserving the advantages of TM imaging over contact mode (CM) imaging. Due to its superior image quality and less sample disturbances over CM imaging, particularly for soft materials such as polymers, TM imaging is currently the most widely used imaging technique. The speed of TM imaging, however, is substantially (over an order of magnitude) lower than that of CM imaging, becoming the major bottleneck of this technique. Increasing the speed of TM imaging is challenging as a stable probe tapping on the sample surface must be maintained to preserve the image quality, whereas the probe tapping is rather sensitive to the sample topography variation. As a result, the increase of imaging speed can quickly lead to loss of the probe-sample contact and/or annihilation of the probe tapping, resulting in image distortion and/or sample deformation. The proposed adaptive multiloop mode (AMLM) imaging overcomes these limitations of TM imaging through the following three efforts integrated together: First, it is proposed to account for the variation of the TM deflection when quantifying the sample topography; second, an inner-outer feedback control loop to regulate the TM deflection is added on top of the tapping-feedback control loop to improve the sample topography tracking; and, third, an online iterative feedforward controller is augmented to the whole control system to further enhance the topography tracking, where the next-line sample topography is predicted and utilized to reduce the tracking error. The added feedback regulation of the TM deflection ensures the probe-sample interaction force remains near the minimum for maintaining a stable probe-sample interaction. The proposed AMLM imaging is tested and demonstrated by imaging a poly(tert-butyl acrylate) sample in experiments. The

  8. Comparison of sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging and evoked potentials in the detection of brainstem involvement in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comi, G.; Martinelli, V.; Medaglini, S.; Locatelli, T.; Magnani, G.; Poggi, A.; Triulzi, F.

    1988-01-01

    A comparison was made of the sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging and the combined use of Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential and Median Somatosensory Evoked Potential in the detection of brainstem dysfunction in 54 multiple sclerosis patients. 10 refs.; 2 tabs

  9. From Molecular Design to Co-sensitization; High performance indole based photosensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babu, Dickson D.; Su, Rui; El-Shafei, Ahmed; Adhikari, Airody Vasudeva

    2016-01-01

    displays promising photovoltaic results and exhibited an enhanced efficiency of 8.06%. Further, good agreement between the calculated and experimental results showcase the precision of the energy functional and basis set utilized in this study. All these findings provide a deeper insight and better understanding into the intricacies involved in the design of superior co-sensitizers for development of highly efficient DSSCs.

  10. Ultrahigh-speed, high-sensitivity color camera with 300,000-pixel single CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, K.; Arai, T.; Yonai, J.; Hayashida, T.; Ohtake, H.; Kurita, T.; Tanioka, K.; Maruyama, H.; Namiki, J.; Yanagi, T.; Yoshida, T.; van Kuijk, H.; Bosiers, Jan T.; Etoh, T. G.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed an ultrahigh-speed, high-sensitivity portable color camera with a new 300,000-pixel single CCD. The 300,000-pixel CCD, which has four times the number of pixels of our initial model, was developed by seamlessly joining two 150,000-pixel CCDs. A green-red-green-blue (GRGB) Bayer filter is used to realize a color camera with the single-chip CCD. The camera is capable of ultrahigh-speed video recording at up to 1,000,000 frames/sec, and small enough to be handheld. We also developed a technology for dividing the CCD output signal to enable parallel, highspeed readout and recording in external memory; this makes possible long, continuous shots up to 1,000 frames/second. As a result of an experiment, video footage was imaged at an athletics meet. Because of high-speed shooting, even detailed movements of athletes' muscles were captured. This camera can capture clear slow-motion videos, so it enables previously impossible live footage to be imaged for various TV broadcasting programs.

  11. New approach to 3-D, high sensitivity, high mass resolution space plasma composition measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a new type of 3-D space plasma composition analyzer. The design combines high sensitivity, high mass resolution measurements with somewhat lower mass resolution but even higher sensitivity measurements in a single compact and robust design. While the lower resolution plasma measurements are achieved using conventional straight-through time-of-flight mass spectrometry, the high mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions reflected in a linear electric field (LEF), where the restoring force that an ion experiences is proportional to the depth it travels into the LEF region. Consequently, the ion's equation of motion in that dimension is that of a simple harmonic oscillator and its travel time is simply proportional to the square root of the ion's mass/charge (m/q). While in an ideal LEF, the m/q resolution can be arbitrarily high, in a real device the resolution is limited by the field linearity which can be achieved. In this paper we describe how a nearly linear field can be produced and discuss how the design can be optimized for various different plasma regimes and spacecraft configurations

  12. High mass resolution time of flight mass spectrometer for measuring products in heterogeneous catalysis in highly sensitive microreactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas; Jensen, Robert; Christensen, M. K.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a combined microreactor and time of flight system for testing and characterization of heterogeneous catalysts with high resolution mass spectrometry and high sensitivity. Catalyst testing is performed in silicon-based microreactors which have high sensitivity and fast thermal...

  13. Analysis of Cyberbullying Sensitivity Levels of High School Students and Their Perceived Social Support Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akturk, Ahmet Oguz

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to determine the cyberbullying sensitivity levels of high school students and their perceived social supports levels, and analyze the variables that predict cyberbullying sensitivity. In addition, whether cyberbullying sensitivity levels and social support levels differed according to gender was also…

  14. The Relationship between Ethical Sensitivity, High Ability and Gender in Higher Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutte, Ingrid; Wolfensberger, Marca; Tirri, Kirsi

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the ethical sensitivity of high-ability undergraduate students (n=731) in the Netherlands who completed the 28-item Ethical Sensitivity Scale Questionnaire (ESSQ) developed by Tirri & Nokelainen (2007; 2011). The ESSQ is based on Narvaez' (2001) operationalization of ethical sensitivity in seven dimensions. The following…

  15. Platinum decorated carbon nanotubes for highly sensitive amperometric glucose sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Jining; Wang Shouyan; Aryasomayajula, L; Varadan, V K

    2007-01-01

    Fine platinum nanoparticles (1-5 nm in diameter) were deposited on functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) through a decoration technique. A novel type of enzymatic Pt/MWNTs paste-based mediated glucose sensor was fabricated. Electrochemical measurements revealed a significantly improved sensitivity (around 52.7 μA mM -1 cm -2 ) for glucose sensing without using any picoampere booster or Faraday cage. In addition, the calibration curve exhibited a good linearity in the range of 1-28 mM of glucose concentration. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were performed to investigate the nanoscale structure and the chemical bonding information of the Pt/MWNTs paste-based sensing material, respectively. The improved sensitivity of this novel glucose sensor could be ascribed to its higher electroactive surface area, enhanced electron transfer, efficient enzyme immobilization, unique interaction in nanoscale and a synergistic effect on the current signal from possible multi-redox reactions

  16. High Sensitivity TSS Prediction: Estimates of Locations Where TSS Cannot Occur

    KAUST Repository

    Schaefer, Ulf; Kodzius, Rimantas; Kai, Chikatoshi; Kawai, Jun; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2013-01-01

    from mouse and human genomes, we developed a methodology that allows us, by performing computational TSS prediction with very high sensitivity, to annotate, with a high accuracy in a strand specific manner, locations of mammalian genomes that are highly

  17. Development and application of high energy imaging technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Shengzu

    1999-01-01

    High Energy Positron Imaging (HEPI) is a new technology. The idea of positron imaging can be traced back to early 1950's. HEPI imaging is formed by positron emitter radionuclide produced by cyclotron, such as 15 O, 13 N, 11 C and 18 F, which are most abundant elements in human body. Clinical applications of HEPI have been witnessed rapidly in recent years. HEPI imaging can be obtained by both PET and SPECT, namely high energy collimation imaging, Mdecular Coincidence Detection (MCD) and positron emission tomography

  18. High visibility temporal ghost imaging with classical light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianbin; Wang, Jingjing; Chen, Hui; Zheng, Huaibin; Liu, Yanyan; Zhou, Yu; Li, Fu-li; Xu, Zhuo

    2018-03-01

    High visibility temporal ghost imaging with classical light is possible when superbunching pseudothermal light is employed. In the numerical simulation, the visibility of temporal ghost imaging with pseudothermal light, equaling (4 . 7 ± 0 . 2)%, can be increased to (75 ± 8)% in the same scheme with superbunching pseudothermal light. The reasons for that the retrieved images are different for superbunching pseudothermal light with different values of degree of second-order coherence are discussed in detail. It is concluded that high visibility and high quality temporal ghost image can be obtained by collecting sufficient number of data points. The results are helpful to understand the difference between ghost imaging with classical light and entangled photon pairs. The superbunching pseudothermal light can be employed to improve the image quality in ghost imaging applications.

  19. Marine electrical resistivity imaging of submarine groundwater discharge: Sensitivity analysis and application in Waquoit Bay, Massachusetts, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Rory; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Abarca, Elena; Harvey, Charles F.; Karam, Hanan N.; Liu, Lanbo; Lane, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Electrical resistivity imaging has been used in coastal settings to characterize fresh submarine groundwater discharge and the position of the freshwater/salt-water interface because of the relation of bulk electrical conductivity to pore-fluid conductivity, which in turn is a function of salinity. Interpretation of tomograms for hydrologic processes is complicated by inversion artifacts, uncertainty associated with survey geometry limitations, measurement errors, and choice of regularization method. Variation of seawater over tidal cycles poses unique challenges for inversion. The capabilities and limitations of resistivity imaging are presented for characterizing the distribution of freshwater and saltwater beneath a beach. The experimental results provide new insight into fresh submarine groundwater discharge at Waquoit Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, East Falmouth, Massachusetts (USA). Tomograms from the experimental data indicate that fresh submarine groundwater discharge may shut down at high tide, whereas temperature data indicate that the discharge continues throughout the tidal cycle. Sensitivity analysis and synthetic modeling provide insight into resolving power in the presence of a time-varying saline water layer. In general, vertical electrodes and cross-hole measurements improve the inversion results regardless of the tidal level, whereas the resolution of surface arrays is more sensitive to time-varying saline water layer.

  20. Sensitivity and specificity of narrow-band imaging nasoendoscopy compared to histopathology results in patients with suspected nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adham, M.; Musa, Z.; Lisnawati; Suryati, I.

    2017-08-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a disease which is prevalent in developing countries like Indonesia. There were 164 new cases of nasopharyngeal carcinoma in the ear, nose, and throat (ENT) oncology outpatient clinic of the Cipto Mangunkusumo hospital in 2014, and 142 cases in 2015. Unfortunately, almost all of these cases presented at an advanced stage. The success of nasopharyngeal carcinoma treatment is largely determined by the stage when patients are diagnosed; it is critical to diagnose NPC as early as possible. Narrow-band imaging (NBI) is an endoscopic instrument with a light system that can improve the visualization of blood vessels of mucosal epithelial malignant tumors. NBI is expected to help clinicians to assess whether a lesion is malignant or not; to do so, it is important to know the value of sensitivity and specificity. This study is a cross-sectional form of a diagnostic test which was performed in the outpatient clinic of the ENT Head and Neck Surgery Department for the Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, from January to June 2016, and involved 56 subjects. Patients with a nasopharyngeal mass discovered by physical examination or imaging, and a suspected nasopharyngeal carcinoma were included as a subject. An NBI examination and biopsy was performed locally. Based on this research, NBI could be used as a screening tool for nasopharyngeal carcinoma with high sensitivity (100%), but with a low specificity result (6.7%).

  1. Light-sensitive elements for radiographic use and process for the formation of an X-ray image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussi, G.; Cavallo, E.

    1990-01-01

    A light-sensitive silver halide element for radiographic use with X-ray intensifying screens comprising coated on at least one side of a transparent support base at least a spectrally sensitized silver halide emulsion layer and, between the base and a silver halide emulsion layer, a hydrophillic colloid layer containing a) substantially light-insensitivelow iodide silver bromoiodide grains having an avergae grain size in therange of from 0.01 to 0.1 μm on which a spectral sensitizing dye is adsorbed to form a J-band, said dye adsorbed on said grains having a significant portion of its absorption in a region of the electromagnetic spectrum corresponding substantially to the spectral sensitivity of the silver halide emulsion, and b) dispersed zinc oxide particles. The invention allows the use of low coverage weights of silver halide light-sensitive elements and provides X-ray images with a favorable image quality and sensitivity ratio. (author)

  2. Light-sensitive elements for radiographic use and process for the formation of an X-ray image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bussi, G; Cavallo, E

    1990-12-15

    A light-sensitive silver halide element for radiographic use with X-ray intensifying screens comprising coated on at least one side of a transparent support base at least a spectrally sensitized silver halide emulsion layer and, between the base and a silver halide emulsion layer, a hydrophillic colloid layer containing (a) substantially light-insensitivelow iodide silver bromoiodide grains having an avergae grain size in therange of from 0.01 to 0.1 {mu}m on which a spectral sensitizing dye is adsorbed to form a J-band, said dye adsorbed on said grains having a significant portion of its absorption in a region of the electromagnetic spectrum corresponding substantially to the spectral sensitivity of the silver halide emulsion, and (b) dispersed zinc oxide particles. The invention allows the use of low coverage weights of silver halide light-sensitive elements and provides X-ray images with a favorable image quality and sensitivity ratio. (author).

  3. FDTD based model of ISOCT imaging for validation of nanoscale sensitivity (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Aya; Zhang, Di; Yi, Ji; Backman, Vadim

    2017-02-01

    Many of the earliest structural changes associated with neoplasia occur on the micro and nanometer scale, and thus appear histologically normal. Our group has established Inverse Spectroscopic OCT (ISOCT), a spectral based technique to extract nanoscale sensitive metrics derived from the OCT signal. Thus, there is a need to model light transport through relatively large volumes (< 50 um^3) of media with nanoscale level resolution. Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) is an iterative approach which directly solves Maxwell's equations to robustly estimate the electric and magnetic fields propagating through a sample. The sample's refractive index for every spatial voxel and wavelength are specified upon a grid with voxel sizes on the order of λ/20, making it an ideal modelling technique for nanoscale structure analysis. Here, we utilize the FDTD technique to validate the nanoscale sensing ability of ISOCT. The use of FDTD for OCT modelling requires three components: calculating the source beam as it propagates through the optical system, computing the sample's scattered field using FDTD, and finally propagating the scattered field back through the optical system. The principles of Fourier optics are employed to focus this interference field through a 4f optical system and onto the detector. Three-dimensional numerical samples are generated from a given refractive index correlation function with known parameters, and subsequent OCT images and mass density correlation function metrics are computed. We show that while the resolvability of the OCT image remains diffraction limited, spectral analysis allows nanoscale sensitive metrics to be extracted.

  4. SENSITIVITY OF STACKED IMAGING DETECTORS TO HARD X-RAY POLARIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muleri, Fabio; Campana, Riccardo, E-mail: fabio.muleri@iaps.inaf.it [INAF-IAPS, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy)

    2012-06-01

    The development of multi-layer optics which allow to focus photons up to 100 keV and more promises an enormous jump in sensitivity in the hard X-ray energy band. This technology is already planned to be exploited by future missions dedicated to spectroscopy and imaging at energies >10 keV, e.g., Astro-H and NuSTAR. Nevertheless, our understanding of the hard X-ray sky would greatly benefit from carrying out contemporaneous polarimetric measurements, because the study of hard spectral tails and of polarized emission are often two complementary diagnostics of the same non-thermal and acceleration processes. At energies above a few tens of keV, the preferred technique to detect polarization involves the determination of photon directions after a Compton scattering. Many authors have asserted that stacked detectors with imaging capabilities can be exploited for this purpose. If it is possible to discriminate those events which initially interact in the first detector by Compton scattering and are subsequently absorbed by the second layer, then the direction of scattering is singled out from the hit pixels in the two detectors. In this paper, we give the first detailed discussion of the sensitivity of such a generic design to the X-ray polarization. The efficiency and the modulation factor are calculated analytically from the geometry of the instruments and then compared with the performance as derived by means of Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations.

  5. High resolution transmission imaging without lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodenburg, J M; Hurst, A C; Maiden, A

    2010-01-01

    The whole history of transmission imaging has been dominated by the lens, whether used in visible-light optics, electron optics or X-ray optics. Lenses can be thought of as a very efficient method of processing a wave front scattered from an object into an image of that object. An alternative approach is to undertake this image-formation process using a computational technique. The crudest scattering experiment is to simply record the intensity of a diffraction pattern. Recent progress in so-called diffractive imaging has shown that it is possible to recover the phase of a scattered wavefield from its diffraction pattern alone, as long as the object (or the illumination on the object) is of finite extent. In this paper we present results from a very efficient phase retrieval method which can image infinitely large fields of view. It may have important applications in improving resolution in electron microscopy, or at least allowing low specification microscopes to achieve resolution comparable to state-of-the-art machines.

  6. Highly sensitive urea sensing with ion-irradiated polymer foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, Dietmar; Muñoz Hernandez, Gerardo; Alfonta, Lital

    2012-01-01

    Recently we prepared urea-sensors by attaching urease to the inner walls of etched ion tracks within thin polymer foil. Here, alternative track-based sensor configurations are examined where the enzyme remained in solution. The conductivities of systems consisting of two parallel irradiated polymer foils and confining different urea/urease mixtures in between were examined. The correlations between conductivity and urea concentration differed strongly for foils with unetched and etched tracks, which points at different sensing mechanisms – tentatively attributed to the adsorption of enzymatic reaction products on the latent track entrances and to the enhanced conductivity of reaction product-filled etched tracks, respectively. All examined systems enable in principle, urea sensing. They point at the possibility of sensor cascade construction for more sensitive or selective sensor systems.

  7. Highly Protable Airborne Multispectral Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnemann, Robert; Mcnamee, Todd

    2001-01-01

    A portable instrumentation system is described that includes and airborne and a ground-based subsytem. It can acquire multispectral image data over swaths of terrain ranging in width from about 1.5 to 1 km. The system was developed especially for use in coastal environments and is well suited for performing remote sensing and general environmental monitoring. It includes a small,munpilotaed, remotely controlled airplance that carries a forward-looking camera for navigation, three downward-looking monochrome video cameras for imaging terrain in three spectral bands, a video transmitter, and a Global Positioning System (GPS) reciever.

  8. Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite Polarization Sensitivity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junqiang; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Waluschka, Eugene; Wang, Menghua

    2016-01-01

    The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is one of five instruments onboard the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite that launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, on October 28, 2011. It is a whiskbroom radiometer that provides +/-56.28deg scans of the Earth view. It has 22 bands, among which 14 are reflective solar bands (RSBs). The RSBs cover a wavelength range from 410 to 2250 nm. The RSBs of a remote sensor are usually sensitive to the polarization of incident light. For VIIRS, it is specified that the polarization factor should be smaller than 3% for 410 and 862 nm bands and 2.5% for other RSBs for the scan angle within +/-45deg. Several polarization sensitivity tests were performed prelaunch for SNPP VIIRS. The first few tests either had large uncertainty or were less reliable, while the last one was believed to provide the more accurate information about the polarization property of the instrument. In this paper, the measured data in the last polarization sensitivity test are analyzed, and the polarization factors and phase angles are derived from the measurements for all the RSBs. The derived polarization factors and phase angles are band, detector, and scan angle dependent. For near-infrared bands, they also depend on the half-angle mirror side. Nevertheless, the derived polarization factors are all within the specification, although the strong detector dependence of the polarization parameters was not expected. Compared to the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer on both Aqua and Terra satellites, the polarization effect on VIIRS RSB is much smaller.

  9. Asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM) for ultrafast high-contrast cellular imaging in flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Terence T. W.; Lau, Andy K. S.; Ho, Kenneth K. Y.; Tang, Matthew Y. H.; Robles, Joseph D. F.; Wei, Xiaoming; Chan, Antony C. S.; Tang, Anson H. L.; Lam, Edmund Y.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.; Chan, Godfrey C. F.; Shum, Ho Cheung; Tsia, Kevin K.

    2014-01-01

    Accelerating imaging speed in optical microscopy is often realized at the expense of image contrast, image resolution, and detection sensitivity – a common predicament for advancing high-speed and high-throughput cellular imaging. We here demonstrate a new imaging approach, called asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM), which can deliver ultrafast label-free high-contrast flow imaging with well delineated cellular morphological resolution and in-line optical image amplification to overcome the compromised imaging sensitivity at high speed. We show that ATOM can separately reveal the enhanced phase-gradient and absorption contrast in microfluidic live-cell imaging at a flow speed as high as ~10 m/s, corresponding to an imaging throughput of ~100,000 cells/sec. ATOM could thus be the enabling platform to meet the pressing need for intercalating optical microscopy in cellular assay, e.g. imaging flow cytometry – permitting high-throughput access to the morphological information of the individual cells simultaneously with a multitude of parameters obtained in the standard assay. PMID:24413677

  10. High spatial resolution gamma imaging detector based on a 5 inch diameter R3292 Hamamatsu PSPMT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojcik, R.; Majewski, S.; Kross, B.; Weisenberger, A.G.; Steinbach, D.

    1998-01-01

    High resolution imaging gamma-ray detectors were developed using Hamamatsu's 5 inch diameter R3292 position sensitive PMT (PSPMT) and a variety of crystal scintillator arrays. Special readout techniques were used to maximize the active imaging area while reducing the number of readout channels. Spatial resolutions approaching 1 mm were obtained in a broad energy range from 20 to 511 keV. Results are also presented of coupling the scintillator arrays to the PMT via imaging light guides consisting of acrylic optical fibers

  11. The enhanced cyan fluorescent protein: a sensitive pH sensor for fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poëa-Guyon, Sandrine; Pasquier, Hélène; Mérola, Fabienne; Morel, Nicolas; Erard, Marie

    2013-05-01

    pH is an important parameter that affects many functions of live cells, from protein structure or function to several crucial steps of their metabolism. Genetically encoded pH sensors based on pH-sensitive fluorescent proteins have been developed and used to monitor the pH of intracellular compartments. The quantitative analysis of pH variations can be performed either by ratiometric or fluorescence lifetime detection. However, most available genetically encoded pH sensors are based on green and yellow fluorescent proteins and are not compatible with multicolor approaches. Taking advantage of the strong pH sensitivity of enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), we demonstrate here its suitability as a sensitive pH sensor using fluorescence lifetime imaging. The intracellular ECFP lifetime undergoes large changes (32 %) in the pH 5 to pH 7 range, which allows accurate pH measurements to better than 0.2 pH units. By fusion of ECFP with the granular chromogranin A, we successfully measured the pH in secretory granules of PC12 cells, and we performed a kinetic analysis of intragranular pH variations in living cells exposed to ammonium chloride.

  12. Reliability and sensitivity to change of the OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis magnetic resonance imaging score in a multireader, longitudinal setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haavardsholm, ea; Østergaard, Mikkel; Kvan, NP

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the intra- and interreader reliability and the sensitivity to change of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (RAMRIS) system on digital images of the wrist joints of patients with early or establi...

  13. Ultra-sensitive chemiluminescence imaging DNA hybridization method in the detection of mosquito-borne viruses and parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingjie; Liu, Qiqi; Zhou, Biao; Wang, Xiaobo; Chen, Suhong; Wang, Shengqi

    2017-01-25

    Mosquito-borne viruses (MBVs) and parasites (MBPs) are transmitted through hematophagous arthropods-mosquitoes to homoiothermous vertebrates. This study aims at developing a detection method to monitor the spread of mosquito-borne diseases to new areas and diagnose the infections caused by MBVs and MBPs. In this assay, an ultra-sensitive chemiluminescence (CL) detection method was developed and used to simultaneously detect 19 common MBVs and MBPs. In vitro transcript RNA, virus-like particles (VLPs), and plasmids were established as positive or limit of detection (LOD) reference materials. MBVs and MBPs could be genotyped with high sensitivity and specificity. The cut-off values of probes were calculated. The absolute LODs of this strategy to detect serially diluted in vitro transcribed RNAs of MBVs and serially diluted plasmids of MBPs were 10 2 -10 3 copies/μl and 10 1 -10 2 copies/μl, respectively. Further, the LOD of detecting a strain of pre-quantified JEV was 10 1.8 -10 0.8 PFU/ml, fitted well in a linear regression model (coefficient of determination = 0.9678). Ultra-sensitive CL imaging DNA hybridization was developed and could simultaneously detect various MBVs and MBPs. The method described here has the potential to provide considerable labor savings due to its ability to screen for 19 mosquito-borne pathogens simultaneously.

  14. Identification of lung cancer with high sensitivity and specificity by blood testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Bernhard

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer is a very frequent and lethal tumor with an identifiable risk population. Cytological analysis and chest X-ray failed to reduce mortality, and CT screenings are still controversially discussed. Recent studies provided first evidence for the potential usefulness of autoantigens as markers for lung cancer. Methods We used extended panels of arrayed antigens and determined autoantibody signatures of sera from patients with different kinds of lung cancer, different common non-tumor lung pathologies, and controls without any lung disease by a newly developed computer aided image analysis procedure. The resulting signatures were classified using linear kernel Support Vector Machines and 10-fold cross-validation. Results The novel approach allowed for discriminating lung cancer patients from controls without any lung disease with a specificity of 97.0%, a sensitivity of 97.9%, and an accuracy of 97.6%. The classification of stage IA/IB tumors and controls yielded a specificity of 97.6%, a sensitivity of 75.9%, and an accuracy of 92.9%. The discrimination of lung cancer patients from patients with non-tumor lung pathologies reached an accuracy of 88.5%. Conclusion We were able to separate lung cancer patients from subjects without any lung disease with high accuracy. Furthermore, lung cancer patients could be seprated from patients with other non-tumor lung diseases. These results provide clear evidence that blood-based tests open new avenues for the early diagnosis of lung cancer.

  15. High fat diet-fed obese rats are highly sensitive to doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, Mayurranjan S.; Donthamsetty, Shashikiran; White, Brent; Mehendale, Harihara M.

    2008-01-01

    Often, chemotherapy by doxorubicin (Adriamycin) is limited due to life threatening cardiotoxicity in patients during and posttherapy. Recently, we have shown that moderate diet restriction remarkably protects against doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. This cardioprotection is accompanied by decreased cardiac oxidative stress and triglycerides and increased cardiac fatty-acid oxidation, ATP synthesis, and upregulated JAK/STAT3 pathway. In the current study, we investigated whether a physiological intervention by feeding 40% high fat diet (HFD), which induces obesity in male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-275 g), sensitizes to doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. A LD 10 dose (8 mg doxorubicin/kg, ip) administered on day 43 of the HFD feeding regimen led to higher cardiotoxicity, cardiac dysfunction, lipid peroxidation, and 80% mortality in the obese (OB) rats in the absence of any significant renal or hepatic toxicity. Doxorubicin toxicokinetics studies revealed no change in accumulation of doxorubicin and doxorubicinol (toxic metabolite) in the normal diet-fed (ND) and OB hearts. Mechanistic studies revealed that OB rats are sensitized due to: (1) higher oxyradical stress leading to upregulation of uncoupling proteins 2 and 3, (2) downregulation of cardiac peroxisome proliferators activated receptor-α, (3) decreased plasma adiponectin levels, (4) decreased cardiac fatty-acid oxidation (666.9 ± 14.0 nmol/min/g heart in ND versus 400.2 ± 11.8 nmol/min/g heart in OB), (5) decreased mitochondrial AMP-α2 protein kinase, and (6) 86% drop in cardiac ATP levels accompanied by decreased ATP/ADP ratio after doxorubicin administration. Decreased cardiac erythropoietin and increased SOCS3 further downregulated the cardioprotective JAK/STAT3 pathway. In conclusion, HFD-induced obese rats are highly sensitized to doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity by substantially downregulating cardiac mitochondrial ATP generation, increasing oxidative stress and downregulating the JAK/STAT3

  16. Increased Sensitivity to Pathological Brain Changes Using Co-registration of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdett, J.; Stevens, J.; Flugel, D.; Williams, E.; Duncan, J.S.; Lemieux, L. [National Society for Epilepsy, Chalfont St Peter (United Kingdom). The MRI Unit

    2006-12-15

    Purpose: To compare automatic software-based co-registration of serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans with conventional visual comparison, by expert neuroradiologists.Material and Methods: Sixty-four patients who were referred to our epilepsy MRI unit for cerebral imaging were identified as having potentially, non- or slow-growing lesions or cerebral atrophy and followed with sequential scans over a period of up to 8 years, resulting in a total of 92 pairs of scans. Scans were categorized as showing either lesions or atrophy. Each pair of scans was reviewed twice for the presence of change, with and without co-registration, performed using automated software. Results: Co-registration and visual reporting without co-registration were discordant in the lesions group in nine out of 69 datasets (13%), and in 16 out of 23 pairs of scans in the atrophy group (69%). The most common cause of discordance was visual reporting not detecting changes apparent by co-registration. In three cases, changes detected visually were not detected following co-registration. Conclusion: In the group of patients studied, co-registration was more sensitive for detecting changes than visual comparison, particularly with respect to atrophic changes of the brain. With the increasing availability of sophisticated independent consoles attached to MRI scanners that may be used for image co-registration, we propose that serial T1-weighted volumetric MRI brain co-registration should be considered for integration into routine clinical practice to assess patients with suspected progressive disease.

  17. Increased Sensitivity to Pathological Brain Changes Using Co-registration of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdett, J.; Stevens, J.; Flugel, D.; Williams, E.; Duncan, J.S.; Lemieux, L.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To compare automatic software-based co-registration of serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans with conventional visual comparison, by expert neuroradiologists.Material and Methods: Sixty-four patients who were referred to our epilepsy MRI unit for cerebral imaging were identified as having potentially, non- or slow-growing lesions or cerebral atrophy and followed with sequential scans over a period of up to 8 years, resulting in a total of 92 pairs of scans. Scans were categorized as showing either lesions or atrophy. Each pair of scans was reviewed twice for the presence of change, with and without co-registration, performed using automated software. Results: Co-registration and visual reporting without co-registration were discordant in the lesions group in nine out of 69 datasets (13%), and in 16 out of 23 pairs of scans in the atrophy group (69%). The most common cause of discordance was visual reporting not detecting changes apparent by co-registration. In three cases, changes detected visually were not detected following co-registration. Conclusion: In the group of patients studied, co-registration was more sensitive for detecting changes than visual comparison, particularly with respect to atrophic changes of the brain. With the increasing availability of sophisticated independent consoles attached to MRI scanners that may be used for image co-registration, we propose that serial T1-weighted volumetric MRI brain co-registration should be considered for integration into routine clinical practice to assess patients with suspected progressive disease

  18. Novel single-cell mega-size chambers for electrochemical etching of panorama position-sensitive polycarbonate ion image detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, Mehdi

    2017-11-01

    A novel development is made here by inventing panorama single-cell mega-size electrochemical etching (MS-ECE) chamber systems for processing panorama position-sensitive mega-size polycarbonate ion image detectors (MS-PCIDs) of potential for many neutron and ion detection applications in particular hydrogen ions or proton tracks and images detected for the first time in polycarbonates in this study. The MS-PCID is simply a large polycarbonate sheet of a desired size. The single-cell MS-ECE invented consists of two large equally sized transparent Plexiglas sheets as chamber walls holding a MS-PCID and the ECE chamber components tightly together. One wall has a large flat stainless steel electrode (dry cell) attached to it which is directly in contact with the MS-PCID and the other wall has a rod electrode with two holes to facilitate feeding and draining out the etching solution from the wet cell. A silicon rubber washer plays the role of the wet cell to hold the etchant and the electrical insulator to isolate the dry cell from the wet cell. A simple 50 Hz-HV home-made generator provides an adequate field strength through the two electrodes across the MS-ECE chamber. Two panorama single-cell MS-ECE chamber systems (circular and rectangular shapes) constructed were efficiently applied to processing the MS-PCIDs for 4π ion emission image detection of different gases in particular hydrogen ions or protons in a 3.5 kJ plasma focus device (PFD as uniquely observed by the unaided eyes). The panorama MS-PCID/MS-ECE image detection systems invented are novel with high potential for many applications in particular as applied to 4π panorama ion emission angular distribution image detection studies in PFD space, some results of which are presented and discussed.

  19. Highly sensitive assay for tyrosine hydroxylase activity by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatsu, T; Oka, K; Kato, T

    1979-07-21

    A highly sensitive assay for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with amperometric detection was devised based on the rapid isolation of enzymatically formed DOPA by a double-column procedure, the columns fitted together sequentially (the top column of Amberlite CG-50 and the bottom column of aluminium oxide). DOPA was adsorbed on the second aluminium oxide column, then eluted with 0.5 M hydrochloric acid, and assayed by HPLC with amperometric detection. D-Tyrosine was used for the control. alpha-Methyldopa was added to the incubation mixture as an internal standard after incubation. This assay was more sensitive than radioassays and 5 pmol of DOPA formed enzymatically could be measured in the presence of saturating concentrations of tyrosine and 6-methyltetrahydropterin. The TH activity in 2 mg of human putamen could be easily measured, and this method was found to be particularly suitable for the assay of TH activity in a small number of nuclei from animal and human brain.

  20. A highly sensitive quantitative cytosensor technique for the identification of receptor ligands in tissue extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenkei, Z; Beaudet, A; Chartrel, N; De Mota, N; Irinopoulou, T; Braun, B; Vaudry, H; Llorens-Cortes, C

    2000-11-01

    Because G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute excellent putative therapeutic targets, functional characterization of orphan GPCRs through identification of their endogenous ligands has great potential for drug discovery. We propose here a novel single cell-based assay for identification of these ligands. This assay involves (a) fluorescent tagging of the GPCR, (b) expression of the tagged receptor in a heterologous expression system, (c) incubation of the transfected cells with fractions purified from tissue extracts, and (d) imaging of ligand-induced receptor internalization by confocal microscopy coupled to digital image quantification. We tested this approach in CHO cells stably expressing the NT1 neurotensin receptor fused to EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein), in which neurotensin promoted internalization of the NT1-EGFP receptor in a dose-dependent fashion (EC(50) = 0.98 nM). Similarly, four of 120 consecutive reversed-phase HPLC fractions of frog brain extracts promoted internalization of the NT1-EGFP receptor. The same four fractions selectively contained neurotensin, an endogenous ligand of the NT1 receptor, as detected by radioimmunoassay and inositol phosphate production. The present internalization assay provides a highly specific quantitative cytosensor technique with sensitivity in the nanomolar range that should prove useful for the identification of putative natural and synthetic ligands for GPCRs.

  1. Nitrogen detected TROSY at high field yields high resolution and sensitivity for protein NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Koh; Arthanari, Haribabu; Shimada, Ichio; Wagner, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Detection of 15 N in multidimensional NMR experiments of proteins has sparsely been utilized because of the low gyromagnetic ratio (γ) of nitrogen and the presumed low sensitivity of such experiments. Here we show that selecting the TROSY components of proton-attached 15 N nuclei (TROSY 15 N H ) yields high quality spectra in high field magnets (>600 MHz) by taking advantage of the slow 15 N transverse relaxation and compensating for the inherently low 15 N sensitivity. The 15 N TROSY transverse relaxation rates increase modestly with molecular weight but the TROSY gain in peak heights depends strongly on the magnetic field strength. Theoretical simulations predict that the narrowest line width for the TROSY 15 N H component can be obtained at 900 MHz, but sensitivity reaches its maximum around 1.2 GHz. Based on these considerations, a 15 N-detected 2D 1 H– 15 N TROSY-HSQC ( 15 N-detected TROSY-HSQC) experiment was developed and high-quality 2D spectra were recorded at 800 MHz in 2 h for 1 mM maltose-binding protein at 278 K (τ c  ∼ 40 ns). Unlike for 1 H detected TROSY, deuteration is not mandatory to benefit 15 N detected TROSY due to reduced dipolar broadening, which facilitates studies of proteins that cannot be deuterated, especially in cases where production requires eukaryotic expression systems. The option of recording 15 N TROSY of proteins expressed in H 2 O media also alleviates the problem of incomplete amide proton back exchange, which often hampers the detection of amide groups in the core of large molecular weight proteins that are expressed in D 2 O culture media and cannot be refolded for amide back exchange. These results illustrate the potential of 15 N H -detected TROSY experiments as a means to exploit the high resolution offered by high field magnets near and above 1 GHz

  2. Nitrogen detected TROSY at high field yields high resolution and sensitivity for protein NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Koh [National Institute for Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Molecular Profiling Research Center for Drug Discovery (Japan); Arthanari, Haribabu [Harvard Medical School, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology (United States); Shimada, Ichio, E-mail: shimada@iw-nmr.f.u-tokyo.ac.jp [National Institute for Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Molecular Profiling Research Center for Drug Discovery (Japan); Wagner, Gerhard, E-mail: gerhard-wagner@hms.harvard.edu [Harvard Medical School, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Detection of {sup 15}N in multidimensional NMR experiments of proteins has sparsely been utilized because of the low gyromagnetic ratio (γ) of nitrogen and the presumed low sensitivity of such experiments. Here we show that selecting the TROSY components of proton-attached {sup 15}N nuclei (TROSY {sup 15}N{sub H}) yields high quality spectra in high field magnets (>600 MHz) by taking advantage of the slow {sup 15}N transverse relaxation and compensating for the inherently low {sup 15}N sensitivity. The {sup 15}N TROSY transverse relaxation rates increase modestly with molecular weight but the TROSY gain in peak heights depends strongly on the magnetic field strength. Theoretical simulations predict that the narrowest line width for the TROSY {sup 15}N{sub H} component can be obtained at 900 MHz, but sensitivity reaches its maximum around 1.2 GHz. Based on these considerations, a {sup 15}N-detected 2D {sup 1}H–{sup 15}N TROSY-HSQC ({sup 15}N-detected TROSY-HSQC) experiment was developed and high-quality 2D spectra were recorded at 800 MHz in 2 h for 1 mM maltose-binding protein at 278 K (τ{sub c} ∼ 40 ns). Unlike for {sup 1}H detected TROSY, deuteration is not mandatory to benefit {sup 15}N detected TROSY due to reduced dipolar broadening, which facilitates studies of proteins that cannot be deuterated, especially in cases where production requires eukaryotic expression systems. The option of recording {sup 15}N TROSY of proteins expressed in H{sub 2}O media also alleviates the problem of incomplete amide proton back exchange, which often hampers the detection of amide groups in the core of large molecular weight proteins that are expressed in D{sub 2}O culture media and cannot be refolded for amide back exchange. These results illustrate the potential of {sup 15}N{sub H}-detected TROSY experiments as a means to exploit the high resolution offered by high field magnets near and above 1 GHz.

  3. Applications of molecules as high-resolution, high-sensitivity threshold electron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chutjian, A.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of the work under the contract entitled ''Applications of Molecules as High-Resolution, High-Sensitivity Threshold Electron Detectors'' (DoE IAA No. DE-AI01-83ER13093 Mod. A006) was to explore the electron attachment properties of a variety of molecules at electron energies not accessible by other experimental techniques. As a result of this work, not only was a large body of basic data measured on attachment cross sections and rate constants; but also extensive theoretical calculations were carried out to verify the underlying phenomenon of s-wave attachment. Important outgrowths of this week were also realized in other areas of research. The basic data have applications in fields such as combustion, soot reduction, rocket-exhaust modification, threshold photoelectron spectroscopy, and trace species detection

  4. An application of impediography to the high sensitivity and high resolution identification of structural damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, L; Yang, J; Semperlotti, F; Wang, K W

    2015-01-01

    In this study we explore the use of impediographic techniques to perform damage detection in plate-like metal structures. Impediography relies on the piezo-resistive coupling of the host structure to reconstruct high sensitivity and high resolution maps of the internal electrical conductivity. By exploiting localized strain perturbations generated via focused acoustic waves, the piezo-resistive coupling allows extracting a set of linearly independent boundary voltage data that drastically reduces the ill-conditioning of the inverse problem, therefore increasing the performance. The localized perturbation is achieved by leveraging the concept of frequency selective structure (FSS), that is a dynamically tailored structural element enabling the required acoustic focusing via vibration localization. Based on the FSS approach, the impediographic technique is numerically tested to investigate the performance of the combined approach for structural damage detection. The effects of practical implementation issues, such as limited perturbations and limited boundary data, are also explored. (paper)

  5. Storing quantum information in spins and high-sensitivity ESR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, John J L; Bertet, Patrice

    2018-02-01

    Quantum information, encoded within the states of quantum systems, represents a novel and rich form of information which has inspired new types of computers and communications systems. Many diverse electron spin systems have been studied with a view to storing quantum information, including molecular radicals, point defects and impurities in inorganic systems, and quantum dots in semiconductor devices. In these systems, spin coherence times can exceed seconds, single spins can be addressed through electrical and optical methods, and new spin systems with advantageous properties continue to be identified. Spin ensembles strongly coupled to microwave resonators can, in principle, be used to store the coherent states of single microwave photons, enabling so-called microwave quantum memories. We discuss key requirements in realising such memories, including considerations for superconducting resonators whose frequency can be tuned onto resonance with the spins. Finally, progress towards microwave quantum memories and other developments in the field of superconducting quantum devices are being used to push the limits of sensitivity of inductively-detected electron spin resonance. The state-of-the-art currently stands at around 65 spins per Hz, with prospects to scale down to even fewer spins. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Storing quantum information in spins and high-sensitivity ESR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, John J. L.; Bertet, Patrice

    2018-02-01

    Quantum information, encoded within the states of quantum systems, represents a novel and rich form of information which has inspired new types of computers and communications systems. Many diverse electron spin systems have been studied with a view to storing quantum information, including molecular radicals, point defects and impurities in inorganic systems, and quantum dots in semiconductor devices. In these systems, spin coherence times can exceed seconds, single spins can be addressed through electrical and optical methods, and new spin systems with advantageous properties continue to be identified. Spin ensembles strongly coupled to microwave resonators can, in principle, be used to store the coherent states of single microwave photons, enabling so-called microwave quantum memories. We discuss key requirements in realising such memories, including considerations for superconducting resonators whose frequency can be tuned onto resonance with the spins. Finally, progress towards microwave quantum memories and other developments in the field of superconducting quantum devices are being used to push the limits of sensitivity of inductively-detected electron spin resonance. The state-of-the-art currently stands at around 65 spins per √{ Hz } , with prospects to scale down to even fewer spins.

  7. Highly sensitive DNA sensors based on cerium oxide nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyet, Nguyen Thi; Hai Yen, Le Thi; Van Thu, Vu; lan, Hoang; Trung, Tran; Vuong, Pham Hung; Tam, Phuong Dinh

    2018-04-01

    In this work, a CeO2 nanorod (NR)-based electrochemical DNA sensor was developed to identify Salmonella that causes food-borne infections. CeO2 NRs were synthesized without templates via a simple and unexpensive hydrothermal approach at 170 °C for 12 h by using CeO(NO3)3·6H2O as a Ce source. The DNA probe was immobilized onto the CeO2 NR-modified electrode through covalent attachment. The characteristics of the hybridized DNA were analyzed through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) with [Fe(CN)6]3-/4- as a redox probe. Experimental results showed that electron transfer resistance (Ret) increased after the DNA probe was attached to the electrode surface and increased further after the DNA probe hybridized with its complementary sequence. A linear response of Ret to the target DNA concentration was found from 0.01 μM to 2 μM. The detection limit and sensitivity of the DNA sensor were 0.01 μM and 3362.1 Ω μM-1 cm-2, respectively. Various parameters, such as pH value, ionic strength, DNA probe concentration, and hybridization time, influencing DNA sensor responses were also investigated.

  8. Correlation of collagen synthesis with polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography imaging of in vitro human atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Wen-Chuan; Shyu, Jeou-Jong; Chou, Nai-Kuan; Lai, Chih-Ming; Tien, En-Kuang; Huang, Huan-Jang; Chou, Chien; Jan, Gwo-Jen

    2005-04-01

    Atherosclerosis is unquestionably the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. In the mean time, the worldwide importance of acute vascular syndromes is increasing. Because collagen fiber is a critical component of atherosclerotic lesions; it constitutes up to 60% of the total atherosclerotic plaque protein. The uncontrolled collagen accumulation leads to arterial stenosis, whereas excessive collagen breakdown weakens plaques thereby making them prone to rupture finally. Thus, in this study, we present the first application, to our knowledge, of using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) in human atherosclerosis. We demonstrate this technique for imaging of intensity, birefringence, and fast-axis orientation simultaneously in atherosclerotic plaques. This in vitro study suggests that the birefringence change in plaque is due to the prominent deposition of collagen according to the correlation of PS-OCT images with histological counterpart. Moreover, we can acquire quantitative criteria based on the change of polarization of incident beam to estimate whether the collagen synthesized is "too much" or "not enough". Thus by combining of high resolution intensity imaging and birefringence detection makes PS-OCT could be a potentially powerful tool for early assessment of atherosclerosis appearance and the prediction of plaque rupture in clinic.

  9. High performance gel imaging with a commercial single lens reflex camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobodan, J.; Corbett, R.; Wye, N.; Schein, J. E.; Marra, M. A.; Coope, R. J. N.

    2011-03-01

    A high performance gel imaging system was constructed using a digital single lens reflex camera with epi-illumination to image 19 × 23 cm agarose gels with up to 10,000 DNA bands each. It was found to give equivalent performance to a laser scanner in this high throughput DNA fingerprinting application using the fluorophore SYBR Green®. The specificity and sensitivity of the imager and scanner were within 1% using the same band identification software. Low and high cost color filters were also compared and it was found that with care, good results could be obtained with inexpensive dyed acrylic filters in combination with more costly dielectric interference filters, but that very poor combinations were also possible. Methods for determining resolution, dynamic range, and optical efficiency for imagers are also proposed to facilitate comparison between systems.

  10. Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography at 1060 nm for retinal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torzicky, T.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to develop a Polarization Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography (PS-OCT) device for ocular imaging in the 1 µm wavelength range and to explore its capabilities to image healthy subjects and patients with various retinal disorders. PS-OCT set-ups working in the 840 nm range have been used in several clinical studies, for examining different retinal pathologies. Especially the segmentation of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) based on PS-OCT data shows advantages in cases of age related macular degeneration (AMD) in comparison to segmentation based on intensity images from commercial OCT systems. OCT imaging in the 1 µm wavelength region has recently gained popularity for ophthalmic applications due to the fact that it is perfectly suitable for enhanced visualization of choroid and sclera. This is due to decreased scattering and absorption in the RPE with increasing wavelength and due to the local absorption minimum of water (the vitreous of the eye consists mainly of water) for wavelengths around 1060 nm. An additional advantage is that a higher imaging quality in patients with corneal haze or cataract can be achieved when using OCT systems working at 1 µm. In this work we combine the advantages of PS-OCT imaging with the enhanced penetration depth of the 1 µm wavelength range for acquiring intensity, retardation, axis orientation and degree of polarization uniformity (DOPU) images of choroid and sclera. As a first step different PS-OCT set-ups working at 1060 nm were developed and a comparison regarding set-up parameters and imaging performance was accomplished. The two different set-ups that were built and investigated were a spectrometer based Fourier Domain OCT set-up and a swept source Fourier Domain OCT set-up. The swept source set-up was tested with two different light sources, a commercially available swept source laser (A-Scan rate of 100 kHz) and a prototype of a Fourier Domain Mode Locked (FDML) laser (A-Scan rate of 350

  11. Biomarker discovery in high grade sarcomas by mass spectrometry imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Lou, S.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis demonstrates a detailed biomarker discovery Mass Spectrometry Imaging workflow for histologically heterogeneous high grade sarcomas. Panels of protein and metabolite signatures were discovered either distinguishing different histological subtypes or stratifying high risk patients with poor survival.

  12. Design of a high-sensitivity classifier based on a genetic algorithm: application to computer-aided diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahiner, Berkman; Chan, Heang-Ping; Petrick, Nicholas; Helvie, Mark A.; Goodsitt, Mitchell M.

    1998-01-01

    A genetic algorithm (GA) based feature selection method was developed for the design of high-sensitivity classifiers, which were tailored to yield high sensitivity with high specificity. The fitness function of the GA was based on the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) partial area index, which is defined as the average specificity above a given sensitivity threshold. The designed GA evolved towards the selection of feature combinations which yielded high specificity in the high-sensitivity region of the ROC curve, regardless of the performance at low sensitivity. This is a desirable quality of a classifier used for breast lesion characterization, since the focus in breast lesion characterization is to diagnose correctly as many benign lesions as possible without missing malignancies. The high-sensitivity classifier, formulated as the Fisher's linear discriminant using GA-selected feature variables, was employed to classify 255 biopsy-proven mammographic masses as malignant or benign. The mammograms were digitized at a pixel size of 0.1mmx0.1mm, and regions of interest (ROIs) containing the biopsied masses were extracted by an experienced radiologist. A recently developed image transformation technique, referred to as the rubber-band straightening transform, was applied to the ROIs. Texture features extracted from the spatial grey-level dependence and run-length statistics matrices of the transformed ROIs were used to distinguish malignant and benign masses. The classification accuracy of the high-sensitivity classifier was compared with that of linear discriminant analysis with stepwise feature selection (LDA sfs ). With proper GA training, the ROC partial area of the high-sensitivity classifier above a true-positive fraction of 0.95 was significantly larger than that of LDA sfs , although the latter provided a higher total area (A z ) under the ROC curve. By setting an appropriate decision threshold, the high-sensitivity classifier and LDA sfs correctly

  13. Highly efficient and stable cyclometalated ruthenium(II) complexes as sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Jian-Feng; Liu, Jun-Min; Su, Pei-Yang; Chen, Yi-Fan; Shen, Yong; Xiao, Li-Min; Kuang, Dai-Bin; Su, Cheng-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Four novel thiocyanate-free cyclometalated ruthenium sensitizer were conveniently synthesized. • The D-CF 3 -sensitized DSSCs show higher efficiency compared to N719 based cells. • The DSSCs based on D-CF 3 and D-bisCF 3 sensitizers exhibit excellent long-term stability. • The diverse cyclometalated Ru complexes can be developed as high-performance sensitizers for use in DSSC. - Abstract: Four novel thiocyanate-free cyclometallted Ru(II) complexes, D-bisCF 3 , D-CF 3 , D-OMe, and D-DPA, with two 4,4′-dicarboxylic acid-2,2′-bipyridine together with a functionalized phenylpyridine ancillary ligand, have been designed and synthesized. The effect of different substituents (R = bisCF 3 , CF 3 , OMe, and DPA) on the ancillary C^N ligand on the photophysical properties and photovoltaic performance is investigated. Under standard global AM 1.5 solar conditions, the device based on D-CF 3 sensitizer gives a higher conversion efficiency of 8.74% than those based on D-bisCF 3 , D-OMe, and D-DPA, which can be ascribed to its broad range of visible light absorption, appropriate localization of the frontier orbitals, weak hydrogen bonds between -CF 3 and -OH groups at the TiO 2 surface, moderate dye loading on TiO 2 , and high charge collection efficiency. Moreover, the D-bisCF 3 and D-CF 3 based DSSCs exhibit good stability under 100 mW cm −2 light soaking at 60 °C for 400 h

  14. Low-field MRI can be more sensitive than high-field MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Aaron M.; Truong, Milton L.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2013-12-01

    MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is the key factor for image quality. Conventionally, SNR is proportional to nuclear spin polarization, which scales linearly with magnetic field strength. Yet ever-stronger magnets present numerous technical and financial limitations. Low-field MRI can mitigate these constraints with equivalent SNR from non-equilibrium ‘hyperpolarization' schemes, which increase polarization by orders of magnitude independently of the magnetic field. Here, theory and experimental validation demonstrate that combination of field independent polarization (e.g. hyperpolarization) with frequency optimized MRI detection coils (i.e. multi-turn coils using the maximum allowed conductor length) results in low-field MRI sensitivity approaching and even rivaling that of high-field MRI. Four read-out frequencies were tested using samples with identical numbers of 1H and 13C spins. Experimental SNRs at 0.0475 T were ∼40% of those obtained at 4.7 T. Conservatively, theoretical SNRs at 0.0475 T 1.13-fold higher than those at 4.7 T were possible despite an ∼100-fold lower detection frequency, indicating feasibility of high-sensitivity MRI without technically challenging, expensive high-field magnets. The data at 4.7 T and 0.0475 T was obtained from different spectrometers with different RF probes. The SNR comparison between the two field strengths accounted for many differences in parameters such as system noise figures and variations in the probe detection coils including Q factors and coil diameters.

  15. Photoelastic colloidal gel for a high-sensitivity strain sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hui; Chen, Zhixin; Zhu, Shenmin; Jiang, Chun; Zhang, Di

    2018-04-01

    Nanoparticles, having the ability to self-assemble into an ordered structure in their suspensions, analogous to liquid crystals, have attracted extensive attention. Herein, we report a new type of colloidal gel with an ordered crystal structure assembled from 1D and 2D nanoparticles. The material has high elasticity and, more interestingly, it shows significant photoelasticity. Its refractive index can be tuned under external stress and exhibits an ultra-wide dynamic range (Δn) of the order of 10-2. Due to the large Δn, the material shows an extremely high strain sensibility of 720 nm/ɛ, an order of magnitude higher than the reported ones.

  16. High-sensitivity mass spectrometry with a tandem accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, W.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristic features of accelerator mass spectrometry are discussed. A short overview is given of the current status of mass spectrometry with high-energy (MeV/nucleon) heavy-ion accelerators. Emphasis is placed on studies with tandem accelerators and on future mass spectrometry of heavier isotopes with the new generation of higher-voltage tandems

  17. Correcting systematic errors in high-sensitivity deuteron polarization measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brantjes, N. P. M.; Dzordzhadze, V.; Gebel, R.; Gonnella, F.; Gray, F. E.; van der Hoek, D. J.; Imig, A.; Kruithof, W. L.; Lazarus, D. M.; Lehrach, A.; Lorentz, B.; Messi, R.; Moricciani, D.; Morse, W. M.; Noid, G. A.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Ozben, C. S.; Prasuhn, D.; Sandri, P. Levi; Semertzidis, Y. K.; da Silva e Silva, M.; Stephenson, E. J.; Stockhorst, H.; Venanzoni, G.; Versolato, O. O.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports deuteron vector and tensor beam polarization measurements taken to investigate the systematic variations due to geometric beam misalignments and high data rates. The experiments used the In-Beam Polarimeter at the KVI-Groningen and the EDDA detector at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY

  18. Variable high pressure processing sensitivities for GII human noroviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human norovirus (HuNoV) is the leading cause of foodborne diseases worldwide. High pressure processing (HPP) is one of the most promising non-thermal technologies for decontamination of viral pathogens in foods. However, the survival of HuNoVs by HPP is poorly understood because these viruses cann...

  19. Real-time computer treatment of THz passive device images with the high image quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Trofimov, Vladislav V.

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate real-time computer code improving significantly the quality of images captured by the passive THz imaging system. The code is not only designed for a THz passive device: it can be applied to any kind of such devices and active THz imaging systems as well. We applied our code for computer processing of images captured by four passive THz imaging devices manufactured by different companies. It should be stressed that computer processing of images produced by different companies requires using the different spatial filters usually. The performance of current version of the computer code is greater than one image per second for a THz image having more than 5000 pixels and 24 bit number representation. Processing of THz single image produces about 20 images simultaneously corresponding to various spatial filters. The computer code allows increasing the number of pixels for processed images without noticeable reduction of image quality. The performance of the computer code can be increased many times using parallel algorithms for processing the image. We develop original spatial filters which allow one to see objects with sizes less than 2 cm. The imagery is produced by passive THz imaging devices which captured the images of objects hidden under opaque clothes. For images with high noise we develop an approach which results in suppression of the noise after using the computer processing and we obtain the good quality image. With the aim of illustrating the efficiency of the developed approach we demonstrate the detection of the liquid explosive, ordinary explosive, knife, pistol, metal plate, CD, ceramics, chocolate and other objects hidden under opaque clothes. The results demonstrate the high efficiency of our approach for the detection of hidden objects and they are a very promising solution for the security problem.

  20. High Sensitivity Indium Phosphide Based Avalanche Photodiode Focal Plane Arrays, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — nLight has demonstrated highly-uniform APD arrays based on the highly sensitive InGaAs/InP material system. These results provide great promise for achieving the...

  1. Use of imaging plates at near saturation for high energy density particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimoto, Tsuyoshi; Ohta, Kazuhide; Habara, Hideaki; Kodama, Ryousuke; Tanaka, Kazuo A.; Yabuuchi, Toshinori; Tampo, Motonobu; Zheng Jian

    2008-01-01

    Since an imaging plate (IP) is sensitive to electron, ion, and x rays, it can be used as a detector for laser plasma experiment using ultraintense laser. Moreover, an IP has the advantageous features such as high sensitivity, wide dynamic range, and high spatial resolution. Even though IP itself has a considerable wide dynamic range up to 10 5 , the IP data have appeared often saturated at an IP reading device. We propose a reading technique by inserting optical density filters so that an apparently saturated IP data can be saved.

  2. High performance deformable image registration algorithms for manycore processors

    CERN Document Server

    Shackleford, James; Sharp, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    High Performance Deformable Image Registration Algorithms for Manycore Processors develops highly data-parallel image registration algorithms suitable for use on modern multi-core architectures, including graphics processing units (GPUs). Focusing on deformable registration, we show how to develop data-parallel versions of the registration algorithm suitable for execution on the GPU. Image registration is the process of aligning two or more images into a common coordinate frame and is a fundamental step to be able to compare or fuse data obtained from different sensor measurements. E

  3. High Speed Imaging using Nanoprobe Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    resistance was (2.01 ± 0.04) × 10−3 Ω/Ω · ◦C. When biased at 2 V in a Wheatstone bridge, the deflection sensitivity of the piezo - resistor was (4.25...for both the piezo - resistor and the heater using a low noise preamplifier (SR560, Stanford research systems) and a spectrum analyzer (SR770...noninductive resistors were used for the Wheatstone bridge. III. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Before operating the cantilever in tapping mode, the can

  4. A subspace approach to high-resolution spectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Fan; Liang, Zhi-Pei

    2014-04-01

    To accelerate spectroscopic imaging using sparse sampling of (k,t)-space and subspace (or low-rank) modeling to enable high-resolution metabolic imaging with good signal-to-noise ratio. The proposed method, called SPectroscopic Imaging by exploiting spatiospectral CorrElation, exploits a unique property known as partial separability of spectroscopic signals. This property indicates that high-dimensional spectroscopic signals reside in a very low-dimensional subspace and enables special data acquisition and image reconstruction strategies to be used to obtain high-resolution spatiospectral distributions with good signal-to-noise ratio. More specifically, a hybrid chemical shift imaging/echo-planar spectroscopic imaging pulse sequence is proposed for sparse sampling of (k,t)-space, and a low-rank model-based algorithm is proposed for subspace estimation and image reconstruction from sparse data with the capability to incorporate prior information and field inhomogeneity correction. The performance of the proposed method has been evaluated using both computer simulations and phantom studies, which produced very encouraging results. For two-dimensional spectroscopic imaging experiments on a metabolite phantom, a factor of 10 acceleration was achieved with a minimal loss in signal-to-noise ratio compared to the long chemical shift imaging experiments and with a significant gain in signal-to-noise ratio compared to the accelerated echo-planar spectroscopic imaging experiments. The proposed method, SPectroscopic Imaging by exploiting spatiospectral CorrElation, is able to significantly accelerate spectroscopic imaging experiments, making high-resolution metabolic imaging possible. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Mass Spectrometry-based Assay for High Throughput and High Sensitivity Biomarker Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xuejiang; Tang, Keqi

    2017-06-14

    Searching for disease specific biomarkers has become a major undertaking in the biomedical research field as the effective diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of many complex human diseases are largely determined by the availability and the quality of the biomarkers. A successful biomarker as an indicator to a specific biological or pathological process is usually selected from a large group of candidates by a strict verification and validation process. To be clinically useful, the validated biomarkers must be detectable and quantifiable by the selected testing techniques in their related tissues or body fluids. Due to its easy accessibility, protein biomarkers would ideally be identified in blood plasma or serum. However, most disease related protein biomarkers in blood exist at very low concentrations (<1ng/mL) and are “masked” by many none significant species at orders of magnitude higher concentrations. The extreme requirements of measurement sensitivity, dynamic range and specificity make the method development extremely challenging. The current clinical protein biomarker measurement primarily relies on antibody based immunoassays, such as ELISA. Although the technique is sensitive and highly specific, the development of high quality protein antibody is both expensive and time consuming. The limited capability of assay multiplexing also makes the measurement an extremely low throughput one rendering it impractical when hundreds to thousands potential biomarkers need to be quantitatively measured across multiple samples. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based assays have recently shown to be a viable alternative for high throughput and quantitative candidate protein biomarker verification. Among them, the triple quadrupole MS based assay is the most promising one. When it is coupled with liquid chromatography (LC) separation and electrospray ionization (ESI) source, a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer operating in a special selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode

  6. Position sensitive detector with semiconductor and image electron tube comprising such a detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roziere, Guy.

    1977-01-01

    This invention concerns a position sensitive detector comprising a semiconducting substrate. It also concerns the electron tubes in which the detector may be incorporated in order to obtain an image formed at the tube input by an incident flux of particles or radiation. When a charged particle or group of such particles, electrons in particular, enter the space charge region of an inversely biased semiconductor diode, the energy supplied by these particles releases in the diode a certain number of electron-hole pairs which move in the field existing in the area towards the diode contacts. A corresponding current arises in the connections of this diode which constitutes the signal corresponding to the incident energy. Such a tube or chain of tubes is employed in nuclear medicine for observing parts of the human body, particularly by gamma radiation [fr

  7. High performance image processing of SPRINT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeGroot, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    This talk will describe computed tomography (CT) reconstruction using filtered back-projection on SPRINT parallel computers. CT is a computationally intensive task, typically requiring several minutes to reconstruct a 512x512 image. SPRINT and other parallel computers can be applied to CT reconstruction to reduce computation time from minutes to seconds. SPRINT is a family of massively parallel computers developed at LLNL. SPRINT-2.5 is a 128-node multiprocessor whose performance can exceed twice that of a Cray-Y/MP. SPRINT-3 will be 10 times faster. Described will be the parallel algorithms for filtered back-projection and their execution on SPRINT parallel computers.

  8. High Resolution Astrophysical Observations Using Speckle Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-11

    reserved. Printed in U.S A . A NEW OPTICAL SOURCE ASSOCIATED WITH T TAURI P. NISENSON, R. V. STACHNIK, M. KAROVSKA , AND R. NOYES Harvard-Smithsonian Center...NISENSON, STACHNIK, KAROVSKA . AND NoYEs (see page L18) APPENDIX F ON THE a ORIONIS TRIPLE SYSTEM M. Karovska , P. Nisenson, R. Noyes Harvard-Smithsonian...3.5 and 4.0 at a wavelengtRh of 530 nm. In Addition, Karovska (1984) inferred the possible existence of a second companion from an image recon

  9. Image Harvest: an open-source platform for high-throughput plant image processing and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Avi C; Campbell, Malachy T; Caprez, Adam; Swanson, David R; Walia, Harkamal

    2016-05-01

    High-throughput plant phenotyping is an effective approach to bridge the genotype-to-phenotype gap in crops. Phenomics experiments typically result in large-scale image datasets, which are not amenable for processing on desktop computers, thus creating a bottleneck in the image-analysis pipeline. Here, we present an open-source, flexible image-analysis framework, called Image Harvest (IH), for processing images originating from high-throughput plant phenotyping platforms. Image Harvest is developed to perform parallel processing on computing grids and provides an integrated feature for metadata extraction from large-scale file organization. Moreover, the integration of IH with the Open Science Grid provides academic researchers with the computational resources required for processing large image datasets at no cost. Image Harvest also offers functionalities to extract digital traits from images to interpret plant architecture-related characteristics. To demonstrate the applications of these digital traits, a rice (Oryza sativa) diversity panel was phenotyped and genome-wide association mapping was performed using digital traits that are used to describe different plant ideotypes. Three major quantitative trait loci were identified on rice chromosomes 4 and 6, which co-localize with quantitative trait loci known to regulate agronomically important traits in rice. Image Harvest is an open-source software for high-throughput image processing that requires a minimal learning curve for plant biologists to analyzephenomics datasets. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  10. Image Harvest: an open-source platform for high-throughput plant image processing and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Avi C.; Campbell, Malachy T.; Caprez, Adam; Swanson, David R.; Walia, Harkamal

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput plant phenotyping is an effective approach to bridge the genotype-to-phenotype gap in crops. Phenomics experiments typically result in large-scale image datasets, which are not amenable for processing on desktop computers, thus creating a bottleneck in the image-analysis pipeline. Here, we present an open-source, flexible image-analysis framework, called Image Harvest (IH), for processing images originating from high-throughput plant phenotyping platforms. Image Harvest is developed to perform parallel processing on computing grids and provides an integrated feature for metadata extraction from large-scale file organization. Moreover, the integration of IH with the Open Science Grid provides academic researchers with the computational resources required for processing large image datasets at no cost. Image Harvest also offers functionalities to extract digital traits from images to interpret plant architecture-related characteristics. To demonstrate the applications of these digital traits, a rice (Oryza sativa) diversity panel was phenotyped and genome-wide association mapping was performed using digital traits that are used to describe different plant ideotypes. Three major quantitative trait loci were identified on rice chromosomes 4 and 6, which co-localize with quantitative trait loci known to regulate agronomically important traits in rice. Image Harvest is an open-source software for high-throughput image processing that requires a minimal learning curve for plant biologists to analyzephenomics datasets. PMID:27141917

  11. Self-powered neutron detector of high sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brixy, H.; Spillekothen, H.G.; Benninghofen, G.; Serafin, N.

    1983-01-01

    A self-powered neutron detector is proposed, consisting of three concentrically arranged electrically conducting tubes; where the central one forms the emitter and the inner and outer ones form the collector and where the tubes are electrically insulated from each other by insulating material. The emitter consists of a material with a high absorption cross-section for thermal neutrons, particularly of gadolinium, and is provided with an auxiliary emitter layer on the inside or the outside. With suitable dimensions and material, the auxiliary emitter layer increases the yield of electrons. (orig./HP) [de

  12. High-field MR imaging of spinal cord vascular lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blas, C.; Halimi, P.; Sigal, R.; Doyon, D.; Hurth, M.

    1986-01-01

    MR imaging (1.5T) was performed in 20 patients with spinal cord vascular malformations and hemangioblastomas. MR imaging findings were correlated with data obtained by other imaging modalities (myelography, CT and selective angiography). A diagnosis of vascular legions was suspected or established in 15 patients. Seven had a history of embolization or surgery prior to MR imaging. Six of seven hemangioblastomas were detected on MR imaging. The diagnosis was incorrect in one case because of the small size of the hemangioblastoma nodule, although the cystic part of the lesion was correctly identified. In three cases, the diagnosis was made first on MR imaging and then confirmed on angiography and surgery. Eleven vascular malformations were studied. Malformative thrombosis was found in four of the 11, as suggested by high-intensity signals on T1- and T2-weighted images

  13. An Underwater Acoustic Vector Sensor with High Sensitivity and Broad Band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Zhang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, acoustic vector sensor that use accelerators as sensing elements are widely used in underwater acoustic engineering, but the sensitivity of which at low frequency band is usually lower than -220 dB. In this paper, using a piezoelectric trilaminar optimized low frequency sensing element, we designed a high sensitivity internal placed ICP piezoelectric accelerometer as sensing element. Through structure optimization, we made a high sensitivity, broadband, small scale vector sensor. The working band is 10-2000 Hz, sound pressure sensitivity is -185 dB (at 100 Hz, outer diameter is 42 mm, length is 80 mm.

  14. Serine Protease Zymography: Low-Cost, Rapid, and Highly Sensitive RAMA Casein Zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasumitsu, Hidetaro

    2017-01-01

    To detect serine protease activity by zymography, casein and CBB stain have been used as a substrate and a detection procedure, respectively. Casein zymography has been using substrate concentration at 1 mg/mL and employing conventional CBB stain. Although ordinary casein zymography provides reproducible results, it has several disadvantages including time-consuming and relative low sensitivity. Improved casein zymography, RAMA casein zymography, is rapid and highly sensitive. RAMA casein zymography completes the detection process within 1 h after incubation and increases the sensitivity at least by tenfold. In addition to serine protease, the method also detects metalloprotease 7 (MMP7, Matrilysin) with high sensitivity.

  15. Highly sensitive determination of atropine using cobalt oxide nanostructures: Influence of functional groups on the signal sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soomro, Razium Ali, E-mail: raziumsoomro@gmail.com [Interface Analysis Centre, School of Physics, University of Bristol, Bristol, BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); National Centre of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, 76080 (Pakistan); Nafady, Ayman [Department of Chemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Sohag University, Sohag (Egypt); Hallam, Keith Richard [Interface Analysis Centre, School of Physics, University of Bristol, Bristol, BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Jawaid, Sana [National Centre of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, 76080 (Pakistan); Al Enizi, Abdullah [Department of Chemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Sherazi, Syed Tufail Hussain; Sirajuddin [National Centre of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, 76080 (Pakistan); Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain [Dr M.A. Kazi Institute of Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, 76080 (Pakistan); Willander, Magnus [Department of Science and Technology, Campus Norrkoping, Linkoping University, SE-60174, Norrkoping (Sweden)

    2016-12-15

    This study describes sensitive determination of atropine using glassy carbon electrodes (GCE) modified with Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanostructures. The as-synthesised nanostructures were grown using cysteine (CYS), glutathione (GSH) and histidine (HYS) as effective templates under hydrothermal action. The obtained morphologies revealed interesting structural features, including both cavity-based and flower-shaped structures. The as-synthesised morphologies were noted to actively participate in electro-catalysis of atropine (AT) drug where GSH-assisted structures exhibited the best signal response in terms of current density and over-potential value. The study also discusses the influence of functional groups on the signal sensitivity of atropine electro-oxidation. The functionalisation was carried with the amino acids originally used as effective templates for the growth of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanostructures. The highest increment was obtained when GSH was used as the surface functionalising agent. The GSH-functionalised Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}-modified electrode was utilised for the electro-chemical sensing of AT in a concentration range of 0.01–0.46 μM. The developed sensor exhibited excellent working linearity (R{sup 2} = 0.999) and signal sensitivity up to 0.001 μM of AT. The noted high sensitivity of the sensor is associated with the synergy of superb surface architectures and favourable interaction facilitating the electron transfer kinetics for the electro-catalytic oxidation of AT. Significantly, the developed sensor demonstrated excellent working capability when used for AT detection in human urine samples with strong anti-interference potential against common co-existing species, such as glucose, fructose, cysteine, uric acid, dopamine and ascorbic acid. - Highlights: • Template-assisted growth of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanostructures. • Shape-dependent electro-catalysis of atropine. • Effect of functionalisation of signal sensitivity.

  16. High-speed asynchronous optical sampling for high-sensitivity detection of coherent phonons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dekorsy, T; Taubert, R; Hudert, F; Schrenk, G; Bartels, A; Cerna, R; Kotaidis, V; Plech, A; Koehler, K; Schmitz, J; Wagner, J

    2007-01-01

    A new optical pump-probe technique is implemented for the investigation of coherent acoustic phonon dynamics in the GHz to THz frequency range which is based on two asynchronously linked femtosecond lasers. Asynchronous optical sampling (ASOPS) provides the performance of on all-optical oscilloscope and allows us to record optically induced lattice dynamics over nanosecond times with femtosecond resolution at scan rates of 10 kHz without any moving part in the set-up. Within 1 minute of data acquisition time signal-to-noise ratios better than 10 7 are achieved. We present examples of the high-sensitivity detection of coherent phonons in superlattices and of the coherent acoustic vibration of metallic nanoparticles

  17. High-precision high-sensitivity clock recovery circuit for a mobile payment application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Lichong; Yan Na; Min Hao; Ren Wenliang

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a fully integrated carrier clock recovery circuit for a mobile payment application. The architecture is based on a sampling-detection module and a charge pump phase locked loop. Compared with clock recovery in conventional 13.56 MHz transponders, this circuit can recover a high-precision consecutive carrier clock from the on/off keying (OOK) signal sent by interrogators. Fabricated by a SMIC 0.18-μm EEPROM CMOS process, this chip works from a single power supply as low as 1.5 V Measurement results show that this circuit provides 0.34% frequency deviation and 8 mV sensitivity. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  18. Stereo Vision-Based High Dynamic Range Imaging Using Differently-Exposed Image Pair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Jae Park

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a high dynamic range (HDR imaging method based on the stereo vision system is presented. The proposed method uses differently exposed low dynamic range (LDR images captured from a stereo camera. The stereo LDR images are first converted to initial stereo HDR images using the inverse camera response function estimated from the LDR images. However, due to the limited dynamic range of the stereo LDR camera, the radiance values in under/over-exposed regions of the initial main-view (MV HDR image can be lost. To restore these radiance values, the proposed stereo matching and hole-filling algorithms are applied to the stereo HDR images. Specifically, the auxiliary-view (AV HDR image is warped by using the estimated disparity between initial the stereo HDR images and then effective hole-filling is applied to the warped AV HDR image. To reconstruct the final MV HDR, the warped and hole-filled AV HDR image is fused with the initial MV HDR image using the weight map. The experimental results demonstrate objectively and subjectively that the proposed stereo HDR imaging method provides better performance compared to the conventional method.

  19. LabVIEW Graphical User Interface for a New High Sensitivity, High Resolution Micro-Angio-Fluoroscopic and ROI-CBCT System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keleshis, C; Ionita, Cn; Yadava, G; Patel, V; Bednarek, Dr; Hoffmann, Kr; Verevkin, A; Rudin, S

    2008-01-01

    A graphical user interface based on LabVIEW software was developed to enable clinical evaluation of a new High-Sensitivity Micro-Angio-Fluoroscopic (HSMAF) system for real-time acquisition, display and rapid frame transfer of high-resolution region-of-interest images. The HSMAF detector consists of a CsI(Tl) phosphor, a light image intensifier (LII), and a fiber-optic taper coupled to a progressive scan, frame-transfer, charged-coupled device (CCD) camera which provides real-time 12 bit, 1k × 1k images capable of greater than 10 lp/mm resolution. Images can be captured in continuous or triggered mode, and the camera can be programmed by a computer using Camera Link serial communication. A graphical user interface was developed to control the camera modes such as gain and pixel binning as well as to acquire, store, display, and process the images. The program, written in LabVIEW, has the following capabilities: camera initialization, synchronized image acquisition with the x-ray pulses, roadmap and digital subtraction angiography acquisition (DSA), flat field correction, brightness and contrast control, last frame hold in fluoroscopy, looped playback of the acquired images in angiography, recursive temporal filtering and LII gain control. Frame rates can be up to 30 fps in full-resolution mode. The user friendly implementation of the interface along with the high framerate acquisition and display for this unique high-resolution detector should provide angiographers and interventionalists with a new capability for visualizing details of small vessels and endovascular devices such as stents and hence enable more accurate diagnoses and image guided interventions. (Support: NIH Grants R01NS43924, R01EB002873).

  20. High Speed impedance tomography for cardiac imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehrani, J.N.; Jin, C.; Schaik, Andre

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) calculates the internal conductivity distribution within a body using electrical contact measurements. Previous investigation has shown that optimizing electrode placement can give better information about the stroke volume and better separation between the ventricles and atria than with the electrodes attached in the transverse plane. In our investigation we are developing fast three dimensional imaging of the heart (two planes of 16 electrodes) including internal electrodes in esophagus. The reconstruction speed in EIT is one of the main limitations for real time imaging when using a detailed three dimensional finite element mesh. For that reason we investigated new iterative algorithms for solving large scale LJ regularization. In this research we compare these algorithms on noise reliability and speed for 2D cardiac models. The four methods were as follows: (I) an interior point method for solving Ll-regularized least squares problems (Ll-LS); (2) total variation using a Lagrangian multiplier (TV AL3); (3) a two step iterative shrinkage/thresholding method (TWIST) for solving the Lo-regularized least squares problem; (4) The Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO). In our investigation, using 1600 elements, we found all four algorithms provided an improvement over the best conventional EIT reconstruction method, Total Variation, in three important areas: robustness to noise, increased computational speed of at least 40 x and a visually apparent improvement in spatial resolution. Out of the four algorithms we found TWIST was the fastest with at least a 1 00 x speed increase. (author)

  1. Energy-sensitive imaging detector applied to the dissociative recombination of D2H+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buhr, H.; Schwalm, D.; Mendes, M. B.; Novotny, O.; Berg, M. H.; Bing, D.; Krantz, C.; Orlov, D. A.; Sorg, T.; Stuetzel, J.; Varju, J.; Wolf, A.; Heber, O.; Rappaport, M. L.; Zajfman, D.

    2010-01-01

    We report on an energy-sensitive imaging detector for studying the fragmentation of polyatomic molecules in the dissociative recombination of fast molecular ions with electrons. The system is based on a large area (10x10 cm 2 ) position-sensitive, double-sided Si-strip detector with 128 horizontal and 128 vertical strips, whose pulse height information is read out individually. The setup allows us to uniquely identify fragment masses and is thus capable of measuring branching ratios between different fragmentation channels, kinetic energy releases, and breakup geometries as a function of the relative ion-electron energy. The properties of the detection system, which has been installed at the Test Storage Ring (TSR) facility of the Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, is illustrated by an investigation of the dissociative recombination of the deuterated triatomic hydrogen cation D 2 H + . A huge isotope effect is observed when comparing the relative branching ratio between the D 2 + H and the HD + D channel; the ratio 2B(D 2 + H)/B(HD + D), which is measured to be 1.27±0.05 at relative electron-ion energies around 0 eV, is found to increase to 3.7±0.5 at ∼5 eV.

  2. Energy-sensitive imaging detector applied to the dissociative recombination of D2H+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhr, H.; Mendes, M. B.; Novotný, O.; Schwalm, D.; Berg, M. H.; Bing, D.; Heber, O.; Krantz, C.; Orlov, D. A.; Rappaport, M. L.; Sorg, T.; Stützel, J.; Varju, J.; Wolf, A.; Zajfman, D.

    2010-06-01

    We report on an energy-sensitive imaging detector for studying the fragmentation of polyatomic molecules in the dissociative recombination of fast molecular ions with electrons. The system is based on a large area (10×10 cm2) position-sensitive, double-sided Si-strip detector with 128 horizontal and 128 vertical strips, whose pulse height information is read out individually. The setup allows us to uniquely identify fragment masses and is thus capable of measuring branching ratios between different fragmentation channels, kinetic energy releases, and breakup geometries as a function of the relative ion-electron energy. The properties of the detection system, which has been installed at the Test Storage Ring (TSR) facility of the Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, is illustrated by an investigation of the dissociative recombination of the deuterated triatomic hydrogen cation D2H+. A huge isotope effect is observed when comparing the relative branching ratio between the D2 + H and the HD + D channel; the ratio 2B(D2 + H)/B(HD + D), which is measured to be 1.27±0.05 at relative electron-ion energies around 0 eV, is found to increase to 3.7±0.5 at ~5 eV.

  3. High Resolution Depth-Resolved Imaging From Multi-Focal Images for Medical Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamantis, Konstantinos; Dalgarno, Paul A.; Greenaway, Alan H.

    2015-01-01

    An ultrasound imaging technique providing subdiffraction limit axial resolution for point sources is proposed. It is based on simultaneously acquired multi-focal images of the same object, and on the image metric of sharpness. The sharpness is extracted by image data and presents higher values...... calibration curves combined with the use of a maximum-likelihood algorithm is then able to estimate, with high precision, the depth location of any emitter fron each single image. Estimated values are compared with the ground truth demonstrating that an accuracy of 28.6 µm (0.13λ) is achieved for a 4 mm depth...

  4. High speed display algorithm for 3D medical images using Multi Layer Range Image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Ryuuichi

    1993-01-01

    We propose high speed algorithm that display 3D voxel images obtained from medical imaging systems such as MRI. This algorithm convert voxel image data to 6 Multi Layer Range Image (MLRI) data, which is an augmentation of the range image data. To avoid the calculation for invisible voxels, the algorithm selects at most 3 MLRI data from 6 in accordance with the view direction. The proposed algorithm displays 256 x 256 x 256 voxel data within 0.6 seconds using 22 MIPS Workstation without a special hardware such as Graphics Engine. Real-time display will be possible on 100 MIPS class Workstation by our algorithm. (author)

  5. A highly sensitive method for quantification of iohexol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, A.; Boeringer, F.; Swifka, J.

    2014-01-01

    -chromatography-electrospray-massspectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) approach using the multiple reaction monitoring mode for iohexol quantification. In order to test whether a significantly decreased amount of iohexol is sufficient for reliable quantification, a LC-ESI-MS approach was assessed. We analyzed the kinetics of iohexol in rats after application...... of different amounts of iohexol (15 mg to 150 1.tg per rat). Blood sampling was conducted at four time points, at 15, 30, 60, and 90 min, after iohexol injection. The analyte (iohexol) and the internal standard (iotha(amic acid) were separated from serum proteins using a centrifugal filtration device...... with a cut-off of 3 kDa. The chromatographic separation was achieved on an analytical Zorbax SB C18 column. The detection and quantification were performed on a high capacity trap mass spectrometer using positive ion ESI in the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. Furthermore, using real-time polymerase...

  6. High Quality Rapeseed Products as Feed for Sensitive Monogastrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Heidi Blok

    in plants of the order Brassicales (former known as Capparales), which include rapeseed, rype (Brassica campestris L.) Indian mustard (Brassica juncea L.), broccoli (Brassica oleracea L.var. italica) and many other plants. Glucosinolates have been studied widely for their biologic effects ranging from...... by xenobiotica enzymes in the liver. The last study (manuscript IV) deals with the novel processing techniques, pulsed electric field (PEF) and high pressure treatment (HPT) and the processing effects on glucosinolates in broccoli. The largest effects were observed to be a result of the different handling...... of the plant materials prior to the process treatment. It was thus found that a great amount of the glucosinolate loss has occurred in the broccoli juice and purée prior to PEF processing. Only a minor loss was observed in broccoli flowers prior to processing, and HP treatment at 700 MPa for 10 min. was found...

  7. Sensitive elemental detection using microwave-assisted laser-induced breakdown imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Adeel; Sun, Zhiwei; Wall, Matthew; Alwahabi, Zeyad T.

    2017-10-01

    This study reports a sensitive spectroscopic method for quantitative elemental detection by manipulating the temporal and spatial parameters of laser-induced plasma. The method was tested for indium detection in solid samples, in which laser ablation was used to generate a tiny plasma. The lifetime of the laser-induced plasma can be extended to hundreds of microseconds using microwave injection to remobilize the electrons. In this novel method, temporal integrated signal of indium emission was significantly enhanced. Meanwhile, the projected detectable area of the excited indium atoms was also significantly improved using an interference-, instead of diffraction-, based technique, achieved by directly imaging microwave-enhanced plasma through a novel narrow-bandpass filter, exactly centered at the indium emission line. Quantitative laser-induce breakdown spectroscopy was also recorded simultaneously with the new imaging method. The intensities recorded from both methods exhibit very good mutual linear relationship. The detection intensity was improved to 14-folds because of the combined improvements in the plasma lifetime and the area of detection.

  8. A 75-ps Gated CMOS Image Sensor with Low Parasitic Light Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Niu, Hanben

    2016-06-29

    In this study, a 40 × 48 pixel global shutter complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor with an adjustable shutter time as low as 75 ps was implemented using a 0.5-μm mixed-signal CMOS process. The implementation consisted of a continuous contact ring around each p+/n-well photodiode in the pixel array in order to apply sufficient light shielding. The parasitic light sensitivity of the in-pixel storage node was measured to be 1/8.5 × 10⁷ when illuminated by a 405-nm diode laser and 1/1.4 × 10⁴ when illuminated by a 650-nm diode laser. The pixel pitch was 24 μm, the size of the square p+/n-well photodiode in each pixel was 7 μm per side, the measured random readout noise was 217 e(-) rms, and the measured dynamic range of the pixel of the designed chip was 5500:1. The type of gated CMOS image sensor (CIS) that is proposed here can be used in ultra-fast framing cameras to observe non-repeatable fast-evolving phenomena.

  9. Calcium imaging shows differential sensitivity to cooling and communication in luminous transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A K; Trewavas, A J; Knight, M R

    1996-03-01

    Imaging of a recombinant bioluminescent Ca2+ indicator, aequorin, in an entire organism showed three novel features of Ca2+ signals in plants. First, cooling the plant from 25 degrees C to 2 degrees C demonstrated differential sensitivities between organs, the roots firing a Ca2+ signal at some 8-10 degrees C higher than the cotyledons. Secondly, prolonged cooling provoked Ca2+ oscillations, but only in the cotyledons. These oscillations occurred with a frequency of 100 s and damped down within 800 s. Thirdly, cooling the roots of mature plants triggered a Ca2+ signal in the leaves, as a result of organ-organ communication. However, warming and then recooling the roots did not generate a second Ca2+ signal in these leaves. This desensitisation was not due to down-regulation in the leaf since this was able to generate a Ca2+ signal of its own when cooled directly. Thus a combination of a recombinant bioluminescent indicator with photon counting imaging reveals startling new aspects of signalling in intact organs and whole organisms.

  10. A very high energy imaging for radioactive wastes processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulin, V.; Pettier, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    The X imaging occurs at a lot of steps of the radioactive wastes processing: selection for conditioning, physical characterization with a view to radiological characterization, quality control of the product before storage, transport or disposal. Size and volume of the objects considered here necessitate to work with very high energy systems. Here is shown, through some examples, in which conditions this X imaging is carried out as well as the contribution of the obtained images. (O.M.)

  11. Silicon nanowire structures as high-sensitive pH-sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belostotskaya, S O; Chuyko, O V; Kuznetsov, A E; Kuznetsov, E V; Rybachek, E N

    2012-01-01

    Sensitive elements for pH-sensors created on silicon nanostructures were researched. Silicon nanostructures have been used as ion-sensitive field effect transistor (ISFET) for the measurement of solution pH. Silicon nanostructures have been fabricated by 'top-down' approach and have been studied as pH sensitive elements. Nanowires have the higher sensitivity. It was shown, that sensitive element, which is made of 'one-dimensional' silicon nanostructure have bigger pH-sensitivity as compared with 'two-dimensional' structure. Integrated element formed from two p- and n-type nanowire ISFET ('inverter') can be used as high sensitivity sensor for local relative change [H+] concentration in very small volume.

  12. Echo planar perfusion imaging with high spatial and temporal resolution: methodology and clinical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitzer, M.; Klose, U.; Naegele, T.; Friese, S.; Kuntz, R.; Voigt, K.; Fetter, M.; Opitz, H.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to analyse specific advantages of calculated parameter images and their limitations using an optimized echo-planar imaging (EPI) technique with high spatial and temporal resolution. Dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) was performed in 12 patients with cerebrovascular disease and in 13 patients with brain tumours. For MR imaging of cerebral perfusion an EPI sequence was developed which provides a temporal resolution of 0.68 s for three slices with a 128 x 128 image matrix. To evaluate DSC-MRI, the following parameter images were calculated pixelwise: (1) Maximum signal reduction (MSR); (2) maximum signal difference (ΔSR); (3) time-to-peak (T p ); and (4) integral of signal-intensity-time curve until T p (S Int ). The MSR maps were superior in the detection of acute infarctions and ΔSR maps in the delineation of vasogenic brain oedema. The time-to-peak (T p ) maps seemed to be highly sensitive in the detection of poststenotic malperfused brain areas (sensitivity 90 %). Hyperperfused areas of brain tumours were detectable down to a diameter of 1 cm with high sensitivity (> 90 %). Distinct clinical and neuroradiological conditions revealed different suitabilities for the parameter images. The time-to-peak (T p ) maps may be an important advantage in the detection of poststenotic ''areas at risk'', due to an improved temporal resolution using an EPI technique. With regard to spatial resolution, a matrix size of 128 x 128 is sufficient for all clinical conditions. According to our results, a further increase in matrix size would not improve the spatial resolution in DSC-MRI, since the degree of the vascularization of lesions and the susceptibility effect itself seem to be the limiting factors. (orig.)

  13. A High-Capacity Image Data Hiding Scheme Using Adaptive LSB Substitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Yang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Many existing steganographic methods hide more secret data into edged areas than smooth areas in the host image, which does not differentiate textures from edges and causes serious degradation in actual edge areas. To avoid abrupt changes in image edge areas, as well as to achieve better quality of the stego-image, a novel image data hiding technique by adaptive Least Significant Bits (LSBs substitution is proposed in this paper. The scheme exploits the brightness, edges, and texture masking of the host image to estimate the number k of LSBs for data hiding. Pixels in the noise non-sensitive regions are embedded by a k-bit LSB substitution with a lager value of k than that of the pixels in noise sensitive regions. Moreover, an optimal pixel adjustment process is used to enhance stego-image visual quality obtained by simple LSB substitution method. To ensure that the adaptive number k of LSBs remains unchanged after pixel modification, the LSBs number is computed by the high-order bits rather than all the bits of the image pixel value. The theoretical analyses and experiment results show that the proposed method achieves higher embedding capacity and better stegoimage quality compared with some existing LSB methods.

  14. High-speed image converter x-ray studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryukhnevitch, G.I.; Kas'yanov, Yu.S.; Korobkin, V.V.; Prokhorov, A.M.; Stepanov, B.M.; Chevokin, V.K.; Schelev, M.Ya.

    1975-01-01

    Two X-ray high-speed image-converter cameras (ICC) have been developed. In the first one a soft X-ray radiation is converted into visible light with the aid of a 0.5ns response time, plastic scintillator. The second camera incorporates a photocathode which is sensitive to visible and X-ray radiation. Its calculated temporal resolution approaches 5 to 7ps. Both developed cameras were employed for studies of X-ray radiation emitted by laser plasma. For the smooth nanosecond excited laser pulses, a noticeable amplitude modulation was recorded in all laser pulses reflected by plasma as well as in each third pulse of X-ray plasma radiation. It was also observed that the duration of X-ray plasma radiation is 20 to 40% shorter than that of the incident nanosecond laser pulses and this duration being 3 to 6 times longer than that of the picosecond irradiating pulses. The half-width of the recorded X-ray plasma pulses was 30 to 60ps. (author)

  15. A parallel solution for high resolution histological image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, G; González, R; Déniz, O; García-Rojo, M; González-García, J; Fernández-Carrobles, M M; Vállez, N; Salido, J

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes a general methodology for developing parallel image processing algorithms based on message passing for high resolution images (on the order of several Gigabytes). These algorithms have been applied to histological images and must be executed on massively parallel processing architectures. Advances in new technologies for complete slide digitalization in pathology have been combined with developments in biomedical informatics. However, the efficient use of these digital slide systems is still a challenge. The image processing that these slides are subject to is still limited both in terms of data processed and processing methods. The work presented here focuses on the need to design and develop parallel image processing tools capable of obtaining and analyzing the entire gamut of information included in digital slides. Tools have been developed to assist pathologists in image analysis and diagnosis, and they cover low and high-level image processing methods applied to histological images. Code portability, reusability and scalability have been tested by using the following parallel computing architectures: distributed memory with massive parallel processors and two networks, INFINIBAND and Myrinet, composed of 17 and 1024 nodes respectively. The parallel framework proposed is flexible, high performance solution and it shows that the efficient processing of digital microscopic images is possible and may offer important benefits to pathology laboratories. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Highly accelerated acquisition and homogeneous image reconstruction with rotating RF coil array at 7T-A phantom based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingyan; Zuo, Zhentao; Jin, Jin; Xue, Rong; Trakic, Adnan; Weber, Ewald; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2014-03-01

    Parallel imaging (PI) is widely used for imaging acceleration by means of coil spatial sensitivities associated with phased array coils (PACs). By employing a time-division multiplexing technique, a single-channel rotating radiofrequency coil (RRFC) provides an alternative method to reduce scan time. Strategically combining these two concepts could provide enhanced acceleration and efficiency. In this work, the imaging acceleration ability and homogeneous image reconstruction strategy of 4-element rotating radiofrequency coil array (RRFCA) was numerically investigated and experimental validated at 7T with a homogeneous phantom. Each coil of RRFCA was capable of acquiring a large number of sensitivity profiles, leading to a better acceleration performance illustrated by the improved geometry-maps that have lower maximum values and more uniform distributions compared to 4- and 8-element stationary arrays. A reconstruction algorithm, rotating SENSitivity Encoding (rotating SENSE), was proposed to provide image reconstruction. Additionally, by optimally choosing the angular sampling positions and transmit profiles under the rotating scheme, phantom images could be faithfully reconstructed. The results indicate that, the proposed technique is able to provide homogeneous reconstructions with overall higher and more uniform signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) distributions at high reduction factors. It is hoped that, by employing the high imaging acceleration and homogeneous imaging reconstruction ability of RRFCA, the proposed method will facilitate human imaging for ultra high field MRI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Sensitivity encoded silicon photomultiplier—a new sensor for high-resolution PET-MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Volkmar; Berker, Yannick; Berneking, Arne; Omidvari, Negar; Kiessling, Fabian; Gola, Alberto; Piemonte, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Detectors for simultaneous positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in particular with sub-mm spatial resolution are commonly composed of scintillator crystal arrays, readout via arrays of solid state sensors, such as avalanche photo diodes (APDs) or silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). Usually a light guide between the crystals and the sensor is used to enable the identification of crystals which are smaller than the sensor elements. However, this complicates crystal identification at the gaps and edges of the sensor arrays. A solution is to use as many sensors as crystals with a direct coupling, which unfortunately increases the complexity and power consumption of the readout electronics. Since 1997, position-sensitive APDs have been successfully used to identify sub-mm crystals. Unfortunately, these devices show a limitation in their time resolution and a degradation of spatial resolution when placed in higher magnetic fields. To overcome these limitations, this paper presents a new sensor concept that extends conventional SiPMs by adding position information via the spatial encoding of the channel sensitivity. The concept allows a direct coupling of high-resolution crystal arrays to the sensor with a reduced amount of readout channels. The theory of sensitivity encoding is detailed and linked to compressed sensing to compute unique sparse solutions. Two devices have been designed using one- and two-dimensional linear sensitivity encoding with eight and four readout channels, respectively. Flood histograms of both devices show the capability to precisely identify all 4 × 4 LYSO crystals with dimensions of 0.93 × 0.93 × 10 mm 3 . For these crystals, the energy and time resolution (MV ± SD) of the devices with one (two)-dimensional encoding have been measured to be 12.3 · (1 ± 0.047)% (13.7 · (1 ± 0.047)%) around 511 keV with a paired coincidence time resolution (full width at half maximum) of 462 · (1 ± 0.054) ps (452 · (1 ± 0

  18. Sensitivity encoded silicon photomultiplier—a new sensor for high-resolution PET-MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Volkmar; Berker, Yannick; Berneking, Arne; Omidvari, Negar; Kiessling, Fabian; Gola, Alberto; Piemonte, Claudio

    2013-07-01

    Detectors for simultaneous positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in particular with sub-mm spatial resolution are commonly composed of scintillator crystal arrays, readout via arrays of solid state sensors, such as avalanche photo diodes (APDs) or silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). Usually a light guide between the crystals and the sensor is used to enable the identification of crystals which are smaller than the sensor elements. However, this complicates crystal identification at the gaps and edges of the sensor arrays. A solution is to use as many sensors as crystals with a direct coupling, which unfortunately increases the complexity and power consumption of the readout electronics. Since 1997, position-sensitive APDs have been successfully used to identify sub-mm crystals. Unfortunately, these devices show a limitation in their time resolution and a degradation of spatial resolution when placed in higher magnetic fields. To overcome these limitations, this paper presents a new sensor concept that extends conventional SiPMs by adding position information via the spatial encoding of the channel sensitivity. The concept allows a direct coupling of high-resolution crystal arrays to the sensor with a reduced amount of readout channels. The theory of sensitivity encoding is detailed and linked to compressed sensing to compute unique sparse solutions. Two devices have been designed using one- and two-dimensional linear sensitivity encoding with eight and four readout channels, respectively. Flood histograms of both devices show the capability to precisely identify all 4 × 4 LYSO crystals with dimensions of 0.93 × 0.93 × 10 mm3. For these crystals, the energy and time resolution (MV ± SD) of the devices with one (two)-dimensional encoding have been measured to be 12.3 · (1 ± 0.047)% (13.7 · (1 ± 0.047)%) around 511 keV with a paired coincidence time resolution (full width at half maximum) of 462 · (1 ± 0.054) ps (452 · (1 ± 0

  19. Sensitivity encoded silicon photomultiplier--a new sensor for high-resolution PET-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Volkmar; Berker, Yannick; Berneking, Arne; Omidvari, Negar; Kiessling, Fabian; Gola, Alberto; Piemonte, Claudio

    2013-07-21

    Detectors for simultaneous positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in particular with sub-mm spatial resolution are commonly composed of scintillator crystal arrays, readout via arrays of solid state sensors, such as avalanche photo diodes (APDs) or silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). Usually a light guide between the crystals and the sensor is used to enable the identification of crystals which are smaller than the sensor elements. However, this complicates crystal identification at the gaps and edges of the sensor arrays. A solution is to use as many sensors as crystals with a direct coupling, which unfortunately increases the complexity and power consumption of the readout electronics. Since 1997, position-sensitive APDs have been successfully used to identify sub-mm crystals. Unfortunately, these devices show a limitation in their time resolution and a degradation of spatial resolution when placed in higher magnetic fields. To overcome these limitations, this paper presents a new sensor concept that extends conventional SiPMs by adding position information via the spatial encoding of the channel sensitivity. The concept allows a direct coupling of high-resolution crystal arrays to the sensor with a reduced amount of readout channels. The theory of sensitivity encoding is detailed and linked to compressed sensing to compute unique sparse solutions. Two devices have been designed using one- and two-dimensional linear sensitivity encoding with eight and four readout channels, respectively. Flood histograms of both devices show the capability to precisely identify all 4 × 4 LYSO crystals with dimensions of 0.93 × 0.93 × 10 mm(3). For these crystals, the energy and time resolution (MV ± SD) of the devices with one (two)-dimensional encoding have been measured to be 12.3 · (1 ± 0.047)% (13.7 · (1 ± 0.047)%) around 511 keV with a paired coincidence time resolution (full width at half maximum) of 462 · (1 ± 0.054) ps (452 · (1 ± 0

  20. Nanowire-templated microelectrodes for high-sensitivity pH detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antohe, V.A.; Radu, Adrian; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Mária

    2009-01-01

    A highly sensitive pH capacitive sensor has been designed by confined growth of vertically aligned nanowire arrays on interdigited microelectrodes. The active surface of the device has been functionalized with an electrochemical pH transducer (polyaniline). We easily tune the device features...... by combining lithographic techniques with electrochemical synthesis. The reported electrical LC resonance measurements show considerable sensitivity enhancement compared to conventional capacitive pH sensors realized with microfabricated interdigited electrodes. The sensitivity can be easily improved...

  1. Eating high-fat chow enhances sensitization to the effects of methamphetamine on locomotion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Blaine A; Baladi, Michelle G; France, Charles P

    2011-05-11

    Eating high-fat chow can modify the effects of drugs acting directly or indirectly on dopamine systems and repeated intermittent drug administration can markedly increase sensitivity (i.e., sensitization) to the behavioral effects of indirect-acting dopamine receptor agonists (e.g., methamphetamine). This study examined whether eating high-fat chow alters the sensitivity of male Sprague Dawley rats to the locomotor stimulating effects of acute or repeated administration of methamphetamine. The acute effects of methamphetamine on locomotion were not different between rats (n=6/group) eating high-fat or standard chow for 1 or 4 weeks. Sensitivity to the effects of methamphetamine (0.1-10mg/kg, i.p.) increased progressively across 4 once per week tests; this sensitization developed more rapidly and to a greater extent in rats eating high-fat chow as compared with rats eating standard chow. Thus, while eating high-fat chow does not appear to alter sensitivity of rats to acutely-administered methamphetamine, it significantly increases the sensitization that develops to repeated intermittent administration of methamphetamine. These data suggest that eating certain foods influences the development of sensitization to drugs acting on dopamine systems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Highly efficient dye-sensitized solar cell with GNS/MWCNT/PANI as a counter electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-bahrani, Majid Raissan; Xu, Xiaobao; Ahmad, Waqar; Ren, Xiaoliang; Su, Jun; Cheng, Ze; Gao, Yihua

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • High-performance PANI/MWCNT-CE was incorporated in a Pt-CE in DSSCs. • GNS/MWCNT/PANI-CE exhibits a high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.52%. • GNS/MWCNT/PANI composite has a high catalytic activity for the reduction of I 3 − . • GNS/MWCNT/PANI composite has a low R CT on the electrolyte/CE interface. - Abstract: A graphene-based nanosheet composite/multiwalled carbon nanotube/polyaniline (GNS/MWCNT/PANI) was synthesized via an in situ polymerization technique and applied by the spin-coating method as a counter electrode (CE) in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The combination of the high catalytic activity of PANI and outstanding conductivity of GNS/MWCNT improved the photovoltaic performance of the hybrid CE. The cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) showed that the GNS/MWCNT/PANI composite has high catalytic activity for the reduction of triiodide to iodide and low charge-transfer resistance at the electrolyte/electrode interface. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed that the GNS/MWCNT/PANI-CE has a rough and porous structure and X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the formation of PANI coating on the surface of the GNS/CNT. In particular, current–voltage measurements showed the superior power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.52% of the DSSC based on GNS/MWCNT/PANI-CE compared to the PCE of 6.69% of the DSSC based on Pt-CE

  3. Highly efficient dye-sensitized solar cell with GNS/MWCNT/PANI as a counter electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-bahrani, Majid Raissan [Center for Nanoscale Characterization and Devices (CNCD), Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (WNLO)-School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology - HUST, Luoyu Road 1037, Wuhan 430074 (China); Faculty of Science, Thi-Qar University, Nassiriya (Iraq); Xu, Xiaobao [Michael Grätzel Center for Mesoscopic Solar Cells, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, 430074 Wuhan (China); Ahmad, Waqar; Ren, Xiaoliang; Su, Jun [Center for Nanoscale Characterization and Devices (CNCD), Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (WNLO)-School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology - HUST, Luoyu Road 1037, Wuhan 430074 (China); Cheng, Ze [School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Luoyu Road 1037, Wuhan 430074 (China); Gao, Yihua, E-mail: gaoyihua@hust.edu.cn [Center for Nanoscale Characterization and Devices (CNCD), Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (WNLO)-School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology - HUST, Luoyu Road 1037, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • High-performance PANI/MWCNT-CE was incorporated in a Pt-CE in DSSCs. • GNS/MWCNT/PANI-CE exhibits a high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.52%. • GNS/MWCNT/PANI composite has a high catalytic activity for the reduction of I{sub 3}{sup −}. • GNS/MWCNT/PANI composite has a low R{sub CT} on the electrolyte/CE interface. - Abstract: A graphene-based nanosheet composite/multiwalled carbon nanotube/polyaniline (GNS/MWCNT/PANI) was synthesized via an in situ polymerization technique and applied by the spin-coating method as a counter electrode (CE) in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The combination of the high catalytic activity of PANI and outstanding conductivity of GNS/MWCNT improved the photovoltaic performance of the hybrid CE. The cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) showed that the GNS/MWCNT/PANI composite has high catalytic activity for the reduction of triiodide to iodide and low charge-transfer resistance at the electrolyte/electrode interface. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed that the GNS/MWCNT/PANI-CE has a rough and porous structure and X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the formation of PANI coating on the surface of the GNS/CNT. In particular, current–voltage measurements showed the superior power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.52% of the DSSC based on GNS/MWCNT/PANI-CE compared to the PCE of 6.69% of the DSSC based on Pt-CE.

  4. High Frame Rate Synthetic Aperture 3D Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Holbek, Simon; Stuart, Matthias Bo

    2016-01-01

    , current volumetric ultrasonic flow methods are limited to one velocity component or restricted to a reduced field of view (FOV), e.g. fixed imaging planes, in exchange for higher temporal resolutions. To solve these problems, a previously proposed accurate 2-D high frame rate vector flow imaging (VFI...

  5. Recovery of atmospheric water vapor total column abundance from imaging spectrometer data around 940 nm - Sensitivity analysis and application to Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrere, V.; Conel, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    Two simple techniques to retrieve path precipitable water from the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) high spectral resolution radiance data (Continuum Interpolated Band Ratio, CIBR, and Narrow/Wide ratio, N/W), using the 940 nm water absorption band, are compared. Since the shape and depth of the atmospheric water bands are influenced not only by the water present but also by surface (background) reflectance, atmospheric scattering, and instrument radiance by calibration, a sensitivity analysis was performed using the radiative transfer code LOWTRAN 7 to determine which one of these two approaches will provide a better estimate over land and water areas. The CIBR proved to be the technique less sensitive to perturbing effects, except for errors in visibility estimate. Both techniques were applied to AVIRIS radiance data acquired over Salton Sea, California. Resulting images confirmed that the used of a constant gray reflectance in the model led to a higher overestimation of the amount of water retrieved for N/W over vegetated areas. Validation was performed through comparison between an independent estimate of water vapor from concurrent Reagan sunphotometer measurements and AVIRIS estimates. Amounts retrieved using the N/W approach match more closely in situ measurements, even after adjusting model parameters for background reflectance, viewing geometry and type of aerosol at the site. The 13% underestimation observed for the CIBR was explained by small differences ΔL(λ i ) between AVIRIS and LOWTRAN 7 modeled radiances. Results from this study emphasizes the importance of accurate instrument calibration in flight and correct physical modeling of atmospheric absorptions

  6. CONSTRUCTION OF A DIFFERENTIAL ISOTHERMAL CALORIMETER OF HIGH SENSITIVITY AND LOW COST.

    OpenAIRE

    Trinca, RB; Perles, CE; Volpe, PLO

    2009-01-01

    CONSTRUCTION OF A DIFFERENTIAL ISOTHERMAL CALORIMETER OF HIGH SENSITIVITY AND LOW COST The high cost of sensitivity commercial calorimeters may represent an obstacle for many calorimetric research groups. This work describes (fie construction and calibration of a batch differential heat conduction calorimeter with sample cells volumes of about 400 mu L. The calorimeter was built using two small high sensibility square Peltier thermoelectric sensors and the total cost was estimated to be about...

  7. Linearized inversion frameworks toward high-resolution seismic imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Aldawood, Ali

    2016-09-01

    Seismic exploration utilizes controlled sources, which emit seismic waves that propagate through the earth subsurface and get reflected off subsurface interfaces and scatterers. The reflected and scattered waves are recorded by recording stations installed along the earth surface or down boreholes. Seismic imaging is a powerful tool to map these reflected and scattered energy back to their subsurface scattering or reflection points. Seismic imaging is conventionally based on the single-scattering assumption, where only energy that bounces once off a subsurface scatterer and recorded by a receiver is projected back to its subsurface position. The internally multiply scattered seismic energy is considered as unwanted noise and is usually suppressed or removed from the recorded data. Conventional seismic imaging techniques yield subsurface images that suffer from low spatial resolution, migration artifacts, and acquisition fingerprint due to the limited acquisition aperture, number of sources and receivers, and bandwidth of the source wavelet. Hydrocarbon traps are becoming more challenging and considerable reserves are trapped in stratigraphic and pinch-out traps, which require highly resolved seismic images to delineate them. This thesis focuses on developing and implementing new advanced cost-effective seismic imaging techniques aiming at enhancing the resolution of the migrated images by exploiting the sparseness of the subsurface reflectivity distribution and utilizing the multiples that are usually neglected when imaging seismic data. I first formulate the seismic imaging problem as a Basis pursuit denoise problem, which I solve using an L1-minimization algorithm to obtain the sparsest migrated image corresponding to the recorded data. Imaging multiples may illuminate subsurface zones, which are not easily illuminated by conventional seismic imaging using primary reflections only. I then develop an L2-norm (i.e. least-squares) inversion technique to image

  8. High resolution imaging of boron carbide microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKinnon, I.D.R.; Aselage, T.; Van Deusen, S.B.

    1986-01-01

    Two samples of boron carbide have been examined using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). A hot-pressed B 13 C 2 sample shows a high density of variable width twins normal to (10*1). Subtle shifts or offsets of lattice fringes along the twin plane and normal to approx.(10*5) were also observed. A B 4 C powder showed little evidence of stacking disorder in crystalline regions

  9. Improving high resolution retinal image quality using speckle illumination HiLo imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaolin; Bedggood, Phillip; Metha, Andrew

    2014-08-01

    Retinal image quality from flood illumination adaptive optics (AO) ophthalmoscopes is adversely affected by out-of-focus light scatter due to the lack of confocality. This effect is more pronounced in small eyes, such as that of rodents, because the requisite high optical power confers a large dioptric thickness to the retina. A recently-developed structured illumination microscopy (SIM) technique called HiLo imaging has been shown to reduce the effect of out-of-focus light scatter in flood illumination microscopes and produce pseudo-confocal images with significantly improved image quality. In this work, we adopted the HiLo technique to a flood AO ophthalmoscope and performed AO imaging in both (physical) model and live rat eyes. The improvement in image quality from HiLo imaging is shown both qualitatively and quantitatively by using spatial spectral analysis.

  10. The high throughput virtual slit enables compact, inexpensive Raman spectral imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Edward; Deutsch, Erik R.; Huehnerhoff, Joseph; Hajian, Arsen R.

    2018-02-01

    Raman spectral imaging is increasingly becoming the tool of choice for field-based applications such as threat, narcotics and hazmat detection; air, soil and water quality monitoring; and material ID. Conventional fiber-coupled point source Raman spectrometers effectively interrogate a small sample area and identify bulk samples via spectral library matching. However, these devices are very slow at mapping over macroscopic areas. In addition, the spatial averaging performed by instruments that collect binned spectra, particularly when used in combination with orbital raster scanning, tends to dilute the spectra of trace particles in a mixture. Our design, employing free space line illumination combined with area imaging, reveals both the spectral and spatial content of heterogeneous mixtures. This approach is well suited to applications such as detecting explosives and narcotics trace particle detection in fingerprints. The patented High Throughput Virtual Slit1 is an innovative optical design that enables compact, inexpensive handheld Raman spectral imagers. HTVS-based instruments achieve significantly higher spectral resolution than can be obtained with conventional designs of the same size. Alternatively, they can be used to build instruments with comparable resolution to large spectrometers, but substantially smaller size, weight and unit cost, all while maintaining high sensitivity. When used in combination with laser line imaging, this design eliminates sample photobleaching and unwanted photochemistry while greatly enhancing mapping speed, all with high selectivity and sensitivity. We will present spectral image data and discuss applications that are made possible by low cost HTVS-enabled instruments.

  11. A Versatile High Speed 250 MHz Pulse Imager for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epel, Boris; Sundramoorthy, Subramanian V.; Mailer, Colin; Halpern, Howard J.

    2009-01-01

    A versatile 250 MHz pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) instrument for imaging of small animals is presented. Flexible design of the imager hardware and software makes it possible to use virtually any pulse EPR imaging modality. A fast pulse generation and data acquisition system based on general purpose PCI boards performs measurements with minimal additional delays. Careful design of receiver protection circuitry allowed us to achieve very high sensitivity of the instrument. In this article we demonstrate the ability of the instrument to obtain three dimensional images using the electron spin echo (ESE) and single point imaging (SPI) methods. In a phantom that contains a 1 mM solution of narrow line (16 μT, peak-to-peak) paramagnetic spin probe we achieved an acquisition time of 32 seconds per image with a fast 3D ESE imaging protocol. Using an 18 minute 3D phase relaxation (T2e) ESE imaging protocol in a homogeneous sample a spatial resolution of 1.4 mm and a standard deviation of T2e of 8.5% were achieved. When applied to in vivo imaging this precision of T2e determination would be equivalent to 2 torr resolution of oxygen partial pressure in animal tissues. PMID:19924261

  12. Development of the "Highly Sensitive Dog" questionnaire to evaluate the personality dimension "Sensory Processing Sensitivity" in dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Braem

    Full Text Available In humans, the personality dimension 'sensory processing sensitivity (SPS', also referred to as "high sensitivity", involves deeper processing of sensory information, which can be associated with physiological and behavioral overarousal. However, it has not been studied up to now whether this dimension also exists in other species. SPS can influence how people perceive the environment and how this affects them, thus a similar dimension in animals would be highly relevant with respect to animal welfare. We therefore explored whether SPS translates to dogs, one of the primary model species in personality research. A 32-item questionnaire to assess the "highly sensitive dog score" (HSD-s was developed based on the "highly sensitive person" (HSP questionnaire. A large-scale, international online survey was conducted, including the HSD questionnaire, as well as questions on fearfulness, neuroticism, "demographic" (e.g. dog sex, age, weight; age at adoption, etc. and "human" factors (e.g. owner age, sex, profession, communication style, etc., and the HSP questionnaire. Data were analyzed using linear mixed effect models with forward stepwise selection to test prediction of HSD-s by the above-mentioned factors, with country of residence and dog breed treated as random effects. A total of 3647 questionnaires were fully completed. HSD-, fearfulness, neuroticism and HSP-scores showed good internal consistencies, and HSD-s only moderately correlated with fearfulness and neuroticism scores, paralleling previous findings in humans. Intra- (N = 447 and inter-rater (N = 120 reliabilities were good. Demographic and human factors, including HSP score, explained only a small amount of the variance of HSD-s. A PCA analysis identified three subtraits of SPS, comparable to human findings. Overall, the measured personality dimension in dogs showed good internal consistency, partial independence from fearfulness and neuroticism, and good intra- and inter

  13. An Adjoint Sensitivity Method Applied to Time Reverse Imaging of Tsunami Source for the 2009 Samoa Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossen, M. Jakir; Gusman, Aditya; Satake, Kenji; Cummins, Phil R.

    2018-01-01

    We have previously developed a tsunami source inversion method based on "Time Reverse Imaging" and demonstrated that it is computationally very efficient and has the ability to reproduce the tsunami source model with good accuracy using tsunami data of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake tsunami. In this paper, we implemented this approach in the 2009 Samoa earthquake tsunami triggered by a doublet earthquake consisting of both normal and thrust faulting. Our result showed that the method is quite capable of recovering the source model associated with normal and thrust faulting. We found that the inversion result is highly sensitive to some stations that must be removed from the inversion. We applied an adjoint sensitivity method to find the optimal set of stations in order to estimate a realistic source model. We found that the inversion result is improved significantly once the optimal set of stations is used. In addition, from the reconstructed source model we estimated the slip distribution of the fault from which we successfully determined the dipping orientation of the fault plane for the normal fault earthquake. Our result suggests that the fault plane dip toward the northeast.

  14. High-resolution 3D laser imaging based on tunable fiber array link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Sisi; Ruan, Ningjuan; Yang, Song

    2017-10-01

    Airborne photoelectric reconnaissance system with the bore sight down to the ground is an important battlefield situational awareness system, which can be used for reconnaissance and surveillance of complex ground scene. Airborne 3D imaging Lidar system is recognized as the most potential candidates for target detection under the complex background, and is progressing in the directions of high resolution, long distance detection, high sensitivity, low power consumption, high reliability, eye safe and multi-functional. However, the traditional 3D laser imaging system has the disadvantages of lower imaging resolutions because of the small size of the existing detector, and large volume. This paper proposes a high resolution laser 3D imaging technology based on the tunable optical fiber array link. The echo signal is modulated by a tunable optical fiber array link and then transmitted to the focal plane detector. The detector converts the optical signal into electrical signals which is given to the computer. Then, the computer accomplishes the signal calculation and image restoration based on modulation information, and then reconstructs the target image. This paper establishes the mathematical model of tunable optical fiber array signal receiving link, and proposes the simulation and analysis of the affect factors on high density multidimensional point cloud reconstruction.

  15. High-resolution axial MR imaging of tibial stress injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mammoto Takeo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate the relative involvement of tibial stress injuries using high-resolution axial MR imaging and the correlation with MR and radiographic images. Methods A total of 33 patients with exercise-induced tibial pain were evaluated. All patients underwent radiograph and high-resolution axial MR imaging. Radiographs were taken at initial presentation and 4 weeks later. High-resolution MR axial images were obtained using a microscopy surface coil with 60 × 60 mm field of view on a 1.5T MR unit. All images were evaluated for abnormal signals of the periosteum, cortex and bone marrow. Results Nineteen patients showed no periosteal reaction at initial and follow-up radiographs. MR imaging showed abnormal signals in the periosteal tissue and partially abnormal signals in the bone marrow. In 7 patients, periosteal reaction was not seen at initial radiograph, but was detected at follow-up radiograph. MR imaging showed abnormal signals in the periosteal tissue and entire bone marrow. Abnormal signals in the cortex were found in 6 patients. The remaining 7 showed periosteal reactions at initial radiograph. MR imaging showed abnormal signals in the periosteal tissue in 6 patients. Abnormal signals were seen in the partial and entire bone marrow in 4 and 3 patients, respectively. Conclusions Bone marrow abnormalities in high-resolution axial MR imaging were related to periosteal reactions at follow-up radiograph. Bone marrow abnormalities might predict later periosteal reactions, suggesting shin splints or stress fractures. High-resolution axial MR imaging is useful in early discrimination of tibial stress injuries.

  16. High-resolution axial MR imaging of tibial stress injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relative involvement of tibial stress injuries using high-resolution axial MR imaging and the correlation with MR and radiographic images. Methods A total of 33 patients with exercise-induced tibial pain were evaluated. All patients underwent radiograph and high-resolution axial MR imaging. Radiographs were taken at initial presentation and 4 weeks later. High-resolution MR axial images were obtained using a microscopy surface coil with 60 × 60 mm field of view on a 1.5T MR unit. All images were evaluated for abnormal signals of the periosteum, cortex and bone marrow. Results Nineteen patients showed no periosteal reaction at initial and follow-up radiographs. MR imaging showed abnormal signals in the periosteal tissue and partially abnormal signals in the bone marrow. In 7 patients, periosteal reaction was not seen at initial radiograph, but was detected at follow-up radiograph. MR imaging showed abnormal signals in the periosteal tissue and entire bone marrow. Abnormal signals in the cortex were found in 6 patients. The remaining 7 showed periosteal reactions at initial radiograph. MR imaging showed abnormal signals in the periosteal tissue in 6 patients. Abnormal signals were seen in the partial and entire bone marrow in 4 and 3 patients, respectively. Conclusions Bone marrow abnormalities in high-resolution axial MR imaging were related to periosteal reactions at follow-up radiograph. Bone marrow abnormalities might predict later periosteal reactions, suggesting shin splints or stress fractures. High-resolution axial MR imaging is useful in early discrimination of tibial stress injuries. PMID:22574840

  17. High-field MR imaging of spinal cord tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halimi, P.; Sigal, R.; Blas, C.; Doyon, D.; Hurth, M.; Bittoun, J.

    1986-01-01

    In 60 patients with spinal cord tumors, MR imaging was performed using a 1.5-T unit (GE Signa) and a planar surface coil, 5-mm-thick sections, and spin-echo pulse sequences (TE/TR = 25/600 and 25-100/2,000-2,500 msec). There were 32 astrocytomas, 13 ependymomas, and five hemangioblastomas. Ten patients were not operated on. Surgical follow-up was available in 35 patients. The MR imaging results were correlated with findings on CT, myelography, intraoperative US, surgery, and pathologic examination. In all cases the tumor appeared markedly inhomogeneous. Four imaging patterns corresponding to structural abnormalities were observed: low signal intensity of the tumor core on both T1- and T2-weighted images; hypointensity on T1-weighted images and hyperintensity on T2-weighted images (low-protein cyst, syrinx, edema); isointensity on T1-weighted and slight hypertensity on T2-weighted images (high-protein tumoral necrotic cyst); and high spinal intensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images (chronic hemorrhage). MR imaging contributes the most information in the diagnosis of spinal cord tumors and delineation of their extent, and consequently has a potential impact on surgical management

  18. RADIANCE DOMAIN COMPOSITING FOR HIGH DYNAMIC RANGE IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Renu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available High dynamic range imaging aims at creating an image with a range of intensity variations larger than the range supported by a camera sensor. Most commonly used methods combine multiple exposure low dynamic range (LDR images, to obtain the high dynamic range (HDR image. Available methods typically neglect the noise term while finding appropriate weighting functions to estimate the camera response function as well as the radiance map. We look at the HDR imaging problem in a denoising frame work and aim at reconstructing a low noise radiance map from noisy low dynamic range images, which is tone mapped to get the LDR equivalent of the HDR image. We propose a maximum aposteriori probability (MAP based reconstruction of the HDR image using Gibb’s prior to model the radiance map, with total variation (TV as the prior to avoid unnecessary smoothing of the radiance field. To make the computation with TV prior efficient, we extend the majorize-minimize method of upper bounding the total variation by a quadratic function to our case which has a nonlinear term arising from the camera response function. A theoretical justification for doing radiance domain denoising as opposed to image domain denoising is also provided.

  19. Differential sensitivity of long-sleep and short-sleep mice to high doses of cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fiebre, C M; Ruth, J A; Collins, A C

    1989-12-01

    The cocaine sensitivity of male and female long-sleep (LS) and short-sleep (SS) mice, which have been selectively bred for differential ethanol-induced "sleep-time," was examined in a battery of behavioral and physiological tests. Differences between these two mouse lines were subtle and were seen primarily at high doses. At high doses, SS mice were more sensitive than LS mice, particularly to cocaine-induced hypothermia; however, significant hypothermia was not seen except at doses which were very near to the seizure threshold. During a 60-min test of locomotor activity, LS mice showed greater stimulation of Y-maze activity by 20 mg/kg cocaine than SS mice. Consistent with the finding of subtle differences in sensitivity to low doses of cocaine. LS and SS mice did not differ in sensitivity to cocaine inhibition of synaptosomal uptake of [3H]-dopamine, [3H]-norepinephrine or [3H]-5-hydroxytryptamine. However, consistent with the finding of differential sensitivity to high doses of cocaine, SS mice were more sensitive to the seizure-producing effects of the cocaine and lidocaine, a local anesthetic. It is hypothesized that the differential sensitivity of these mouse lines to high doses of cocaine is due to differential sensitivity to cocaine's actions on systems that regulate local anesthetic effects. Selective breeding for differential duration of alcohol-induced "sleep-time" may have resulted in differential ion channel structure or function in these mice.

  20. Organic dye for highly efficient solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt-Mende, L.; Bach, U.; Humphry-Baker, R.; Ito, S.; Graetzel, M. [Institut des Sciences et Ingenierie Chimiques (ISIC), Laboratoire de Photonique et Interfaces (LPI), Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Horiuchi, T.; Miura, H. [Technology Research Laboratory, Corporate Research Center, Mitsubishi Paper Mills Limited, 46, Wadai, Tsukuba City, Ibaraki 300-4247 (Japan); Uchida, S. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials (IMRAM), Tohoku University, 1-1 Katahira 2-chome, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2005-04-04

    The feasibility of solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells as a low-cost alternative to amorphous silicon cells is demonstrated. Such a cell with a record efficiency of over 4 % under simulated sunlight is reported, made possible by using a new organic metal-free indoline dye as the sensitizer with high absorption coefficient. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  1. Fast iterative segmentation of high resolution medical images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebert, T.J.

    1996-01-01

    Various applications in positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) require segmentation of 20 to 60 high resolution images of size 256x256 pixels in 3-9 seconds per image. This places particular constraints on the design of image segmentation algorithms. This paper examines the trade-offs in segmenting images based on fitting a density function to the pixel intensities using curve-fitting versus the maximum likelihood method. A quantized data representation is proposed and the EM algorithm for fitting a finite mixture density function to the quantized representation for an image is derived. A Monte Carlo evaluation of mean estimation error and classification error showed that the resulting quantized EM algorithm dramatically reduces the required computation time without loss of accuracy

  2. Liver imaging with MDCT and high concentration contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spielmann, Audrey L.

    2003-01-01

    Liver imaging has advanced greatly over the last 10 years with helical CT capability and more recently the addition of multidetector-row CT (MDCT). Multidetector CT technology facilitates imaging at faster speeds with improved image quality and less breathing artifact [Abdom. Imaging 25 (2000) 643]. Exquisite three-dimensional data sets can be obtained with thin collimation providing improved lesion detection, multiplanar imaging, and the ability to perform CT angiography of the liver and mesenteric vessels. New challenges arise with this advance in technology including safety considerations. The radiation dose to the patient has increased with MDCT and this is compounded by the ability to perform multi-phase liver imaging. Furthermore, issues of contrast media administration require reconsideration including optimal timing and rate of administration, the total volume of contrast needed and the ideal iodine concentration of the contrast media. Recently, the use of high concentration contrast media (HCCM) has been explored and study results to date will be reviewed

  3. High Temperature Fiberoptic Thermal Imaging System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed Phase 1 program will fabricate and demonstrate a small diameter single fiber endoscope that can perform high temperature thermal imaging in a jet engine...

  4. High speed intravascular photoacoustic imaging of atherosclerotic arteries (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Zhonglie; Ma, Teng; Qu, Yueqiao; Li, Jiawen; Yu, Mingyue; He, Youmin; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Kim, Chang-Seok; Chen, Zhongping

    2016-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the industrialized nations. Accurate quantification of both the morphology and composition of lipid-rich vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque are essential for early detection and optimal treatment in clinics. In previous works, intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) imaging for detection of lipid-rich plaque within coronary artery walls has been demonstrated in ex vivo, but the imaging speed is still limited. In order to increase the imaging speed, a high repeti