WorldWideScience

Sample records for high quality hydrogen

  1. Hydrogen assisted growth of high quality epitaxial graphene on the C-face of 4H-SiC

    Cai, Tuocheng; Jia, Zhenzhao; Yan, Baoming; Yu, Dapeng; Wu, Xiaosong, E-mail: xswu@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Artificial Microstructure and Mesoscopic Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-01-05

    We demonstrate hydrogen assisted growth of high quality epitaxial graphene on the C-face of 4H-SiC. Compared with the conventional thermal decomposition technique, the size of the growth domain by this method is substantially increased and the thickness variation is reduced. Based on the morphology of epitaxial graphene, the role of hydrogen is revealed. It is found that hydrogen acts as a carbon etchant. It suppresses the defect formation and nucleation of graphene. It also improves the kinetics of carbon atoms via hydrocarbon species. These effects lead to increase of the domain size and the structure quality. The consequent capping effect results in smooth surface morphology and suppression of multilayer growth. Our method provides a viable route to fine tune the growth kinetics of epitaxial graphene on SiC.

  2. High density hydrogen research

    Hawke, R.S.

    1977-01-01

    The interest in the properties of very dense hydrogen is prompted by its abundance in Saturn and Jupiter and its importance in laser fusion studies. Furthermore, it has been proposed that the metallic form of hydrogen may be a superconductor at relatively high temperatures and/or exist in a metastable phase at ambient pressure. For ten years or more, laboratories have been developing the techniques to study hydrogen in the megabar region (1 megabar = 100 GPa). Three major approaches to study dense hydrogen experimentally have been used, static presses, shockwave compression, and magnetic compression. Static tchniques have crossed the megabar threshold in stiff materials but have not yet been convincingly successful in very compressible hydrogen. Single and double shockwave techniques have improved the precision of the pressure, volume, temperature Equation of State (EOS) of molecular hydrogen (deuterium) up to near 1 Mbar. Multiple shockwave and magnetic techniques have compressed hydrogen to several megabars and densities in the range of the metallic phase. The net result is that hydrogen becomes conducting at a pressure between 2 and 4 megabars. Hence, the possibility of making a significant amount of hydrogen into a metal in a static press remains a formidable challenge. The success of such experiments will hopefully answer the questions about hydrogen's metallic vs. conducting molecular phase, superconductivity, and metastability. 4 figures, 15 references

  3. High-quality global hydrogen silsequioxane contact planarization for nanoimprint lithography

    Büyükköse, S.; Vratzov, Boris; van der Wiel, Wilfred Gerard

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a novel global contact planarization technique based on the spin-on-glass material hydrogen silsequioxane (HSQ) and demonstrate its excellent performance on patterns of 70 nm up to several microns generated by UV-based nanoimprint lithography. The HSQ layer (∼165 nm) is spin

  4. Charged particle detectors based on high quality amorphous silicon deposited with hydrogen or helium dilution of silane

    Hong, Wan-Shick; Drewery, J.S.; Jing, Tao; Lee, Hyoung-Koo; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Mireshghi, Ali; Kitsuno, Yu

    1994-11-01

    Electrical transport properties of the authors PECVD a-Si:H material has been improved by using hydrogen and/or helium dilution of silane and lower substrate temperature for deposition. For hydrogen-diluted material they have measured electron and hole mobilities ∼ 4 times larger, and μτ values 2-3 times higher than for their standard a-Si:H. The density of ionized dangling bonds (N D *) also showed a factor of 5-10 improvement. Due to its higher conductivity, the improved a- Si:H material is more suitable than conventional a-Si:H for TFT applications. However, it is difficult to make thick layers by H-dilution because of high internal stress. On the other hand, thick detectors can be made at a faster rate and lower stress by low temperature deposition with He-dilution and subsequent annealing. The internal stress, which causes substrate bending and delamination, was reduced by a factor of 4 to ∼90 MPa, while the electronic quality was kept as good as that of the standard material. By this technique 35 μm-thick n-i-p diodes were made without significant substrate bending, and the electronic properties, such as electron mobility and ionized dangling bond density, were suitable for detecting minimum ionizing particles

  5. Charged particle detectors based on high quality amorphous silicon deposited with hydrogen or helium dilution of silane

    Hong, W.S.; Drewery, J.S.; Jing, T.; Lee, H.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kitsuno, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Electrical transport properties of the PECVD a-Si:H material has been improved by using hydrogen and/or helium dilution of silane and lower substrate temperature for deposition. For hydrogen-diluted material the authors measured electron and hole mobilities ∼4 times larger, and microτ values 2--3 times higher than for the standard a-Si:H. The density of ionized dangling bonds (N D *) also showed a factor of 5--10 improvement. Due to its higher conductivity, the improved a-Si:H material is more suitable than conventional a-Si:H for TFT applications. However, it is difficult to make thick layers by H-dilution because of high internal stress. On the other hand, thick detectors can be made at a faster rate and lower stress by low temperature deposition with He-dilution and subsequent annealing. The internal stress, which causes substrate bending and delamination, was reduced by a factor of 4 to ∼90 MPa, while the electronic quality was kept as good as that of the standard material. By this technique 35 microm-thick n-i-p diodes were made without significant substrate bending, and the electronic properties, such as electron mobility and ionized dangling bond density, were suitable for detecting minimum ionizing particles

  6. High efficiency atomic hydrogen source

    Lagomarsino, V.; Bassi, D.; Bertok, E.; De Paz, M.; Tommasini, F.

    1974-01-01

    This work presents preliminary results of research intended to produce a M.W. discharge atomic hydrogen source with good dissociation at pressures larger than 10 torr. Analysis of the recombination process at these pressures shows that the volume recombination by three body collisions may be more important than wall recombination or loss of atoms by diffusion and flow outside the discharge region

  7. Hydrogen - High pressure production and storage

    Lauretta, J.R

    2005-01-01

    The development of simple, safe and more and more efficient technologies for the production and the storage of hydrogen is necessary condition for the transition towards the economy of hydrogen.In this work the hydrogen production studies experimentally to high pressure by electrolysis of alkaline solutions without the intervention of compressing systems and its direct storage in safe containers.The made tests show that the process of electrolysis to high pressure is feasible and has better yield than to low pressure, and that is possible to solve the operation problems, with relatively simple technology.The preliminary studies and tests indicate that the system container that studied is immune to the outbreak and can have forms and very different sizes, nevertheless, to reach or to surpass the efficiency of storage of the conventional systems the investments necessary will be due to make to be able to produce aluminum alloy tubes of high resistance

  8. High Capacity Hydrogen Storage on Nanoporous Biocarbon

    Burress, Jacob; Wood, Mikael; Gordon, Michael; Parilla, Phillip; Benham, Michael; Wexler, Carlos; Hawthorne, Fred; Pfeifer, Peter

    2008-03-01

    The Alliance for Collaborative Research in Alternative Fuel Technology (http://all-craft.missouri.edu) has been optimizing nanoporous biocarbon for high capacity hydrogen storage. The hydrogen storage was measured gravimetrically and volumetrically (Sievert's apparatus). These measurements have been validated by NREL and Hiden Isochema. Sample S-33/k, our current best performer, stores 73-91 g H2/kg carbon at 77 K and 47 bar, and 1.0-1.6 g H2/kg carbon at 293 K and 47 bar. Hydrogen isotherms run by Hiden Isochema have given experimental binding energies of 8.8 kJ/mol compared to the binding energy of graphite of 5 kJ/mol. Results from a novel boron doping technique will also be presented. The benefits and validity of using boron-doping on carbon will also be discussed.

  9. Very High Energy Neutron Scattering from Hydrogen

    Cowley, R A; Stock, C; Bennington, S M; Taylor, J; Gidopoulos, N I

    2010-01-01

    The neutron scattering from hydrogen in polythene has been measured with the direct time-of flight spectrometer, MARI, at the ISIS facility of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory with incident neutron energies between 0.5 eV and 600 eV. The results of experiments using the spectrometer, VESUVIO, have given intensities from hydrogen containing materials that were about 60% of the intensity expected from hydrogen. Since VESUVIO is the only instrument in the world that routinely operates with incident neutron energies in the eV range we have chosen to measure the scattering from hydrogen at high incident neutron energies with a different type of instrument. The MARI, direct time-of-flight, instrument was chosen for the experiment and we have studied the scattering for several different incident neutron energies. We have learnt how to subtract the gamma ray background, how to calibrate the incident energy and how to convert the spectra to an energy plot . The intensity of the hydrogen scattering was independent of the scattering angle for scattering angles from about 5 degrees up to 70 degrees for at least 3 different incident neutron energies between 20 eV and 100 eV. When the data was put on an absolute scale, by measuring the scattering from 5 metal foils with known thicknesses under the same conditions we found that the absolute intensity of the scattering from the hydrogen was in agreement with that expected to an accuracy of ± 5.0% over a wide range of wave-vector transfers between 1 and 250 A -1 . These measurements show that it is possible to measure the neutron scattering with incident neutron energies up to at least 100 eV with a direct geometry time-of-flight spectrometer and that the results are in agreement with conventional scattering theory.

  10. Vanadium alloy membranes for high hydrogen permeability and suppressed hydrogen embrittlement

    Kim, Kwang Hee; Park, Hyeon Cheol; Lee, Jaeho; Cho, Eunseog; Lee, Sang Mock

    2013-01-01

    The structural properties and hydrogen permeation characteristics of ternary vanadium–iron–aluminum (V–Fe–Al) alloy were investigated. To achieve not only high hydrogen permeability but also strong resistance to hydrogen embrittlement, the alloy composition was modulated to show high hydrogen diffusivity but reduced hydrogen solubility. We demonstrated that matching the lattice constant to the value of pure V by co-alloying lattice-contracting and lattice-expanding elements was quite effective in maintaining high hydrogen diffusivity of pure V

  11. High capacity hydrogen storage nanocomposite materials

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Wellons, Matthew S.

    2017-12-12

    A novel hydrogen absorption material is provided comprising a mixture of a lithium hydride with a fullerene. The subsequent reaction product provides for a hydrogen storage material which reversibly stores and releases hydrogen at temperatures of about 270.degree. C.

  12. First high energy hydrogen cluster beams

    Gaillard, M.J.; Genre, R.; Hadinger, G.; Martin, J.

    1993-03-01

    The hydrogen cluster accelerator of the Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (IPN Lyon) has been upgraded by adding a Variable Energy Post-accelerator of RFQ type (VERFQ). This operation has been performed in the frame of a collaboration between KfK Karlsruhe, IAP Frankfurt and IPN Lyon. The facility has been designed to deliver beams of mass selected Hn + clusters, n chosen between 3 and 49, in the energy range 65-100 keV/u. For the first time, hydrogen clusters have been accelerated at energies as high as 2 MeV. This facility opens new fields for experiments which will greatly benefit from a velocity range never available until now for such exotic projectiles. (author) 13 refs.; 1 fig

  13. Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy via High Temperature Electrolysis

    James E. O'Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring; Grant L. Hawkes

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the technical case for high-temperature nuclear hydrogen production. A general thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen production based on high-temperature thermal water splitting processes is presented. Specific details of hydrogen production based on high-temperature electrolysis are also provided, including results of recent experiments performed at the Idaho National Laboratory. Based on these results, high-temperature electrolysis appears to be a promising technology for efficient large-scale hydrogen production

  14. Hydrogen high pressure proportional drift detector

    Arefiev, A.; Balaev, A.

    1983-01-01

    The design and operation performances of a proportional drift detector PDD are described. High sensitivity of the applied PAD makes it possible to detect the neutron-proton elastic scattering in the energy range of recoil protons as low as 1 keV. The PDD is filled with hydrogen up to the pressure at 40 bars. High purity of the gas is maintained by a continuously operating purification system. The detector has been operating for several years in a neutron beam at the North Area of the CERN SPS

  15. Hydrogen distribution in a containment with a high-velocity hydrogen-steam source

    Bloom, G.R.; Muhlestein, L.D.; Postma, A.K.; Claybrook, S.W.

    1982-09-01

    Hydrogen mixing and distribution tests are reported for a modeled high velocity hydrogen-steam release from a postulated small pipe break or release from a pressurizer relief tank rupture disk into the lower compartment of an Ice Condenser Plant. The tests, which in most cases used helium as a simulant for hydrogen, demonstrated that the lower compartment gas was well mixed for both hydrogen release conditions used. The gas concentration differences between any spatial locations were less than 3 volume percent during the hydrogen/steam release period and were reduced to less than 0.5 volume percent within 20 minutes after termination of the hydrogen source. The high velocity hydrogen/steam jet provided the dominant mixing mechanism; however, natural convection and forced air recirculation played important roles in providing a well mixed atmosphere following termination of the hydrogen source. 5 figures, 4 tables

  16. Increased Optoelectronic Quality and Uniformity of Hydrogenated p-InP Thin Films

    Wang, Hsin-Ping; Sutter-Fella, Carolin M.; Lobaccaro, Peter; Hettick, Mark; Zheng, Maxwell; Lien, Der-Hsien; Miller, D. Westley; Warren, Charles W.; Roe, Ellis T; Lonergan, Mark C; Guthrey, Harvey L.; Haegel, Nancy M.; Ager, Joel W.; Carraro, Carlo; Maboudian, Roya; He, Jr-Hau; Javey, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The thin-film vapor-liquid-solid (TF-VLS) growth technique presents a promising route for high quality, scalable and cost-effective InP thin films for optoelectronic devices. Towards this goal, careful optimization of material properties and device performance is of utmost interest. Here, we show that exposure of polycrystalline Zn-doped TF-VLS InP to a hydrogen plasma (in the following referred to as hydrogenation) results in improved optoelectronic quality as well as lateral optoelectronic uniformity. A combination of low temperature photoluminescence and transient photocurrent spectroscopy were used to analyze the energy position and relative density of defect states before and after hydrogenation. Notably, hydrogenation reduces the intra-gap defect density by one order of magnitude. As a metric to monitor lateral optoelectronic uniformity of polycrystalline TF-VLS InP, photoluminescence and electron beam induced current mapping reveal homogenization of the grain versus grain boundary upon hydrogenation. At the device level, we measured more than 260 TF-VLS InP solar cells before and after hydrogenation to verify the improved optoelectronic properties. Hydrogenation increased the average open-circuit voltage (VOC) of individual TF-VLS InP solar cells by up to 130 mV, and reduced the variance in VOC for the analyzed devices.

  17. Increased Optoelectronic Quality and Uniformity of Hydrogenated p-InP Thin Films

    Wang, Hsin-Ping

    2016-06-08

    The thin-film vapor-liquid-solid (TF-VLS) growth technique presents a promising route for high quality, scalable and cost-effective InP thin films for optoelectronic devices. Towards this goal, careful optimization of material properties and device performance is of utmost interest. Here, we show that exposure of polycrystalline Zn-doped TF-VLS InP to a hydrogen plasma (in the following referred to as hydrogenation) results in improved optoelectronic quality as well as lateral optoelectronic uniformity. A combination of low temperature photoluminescence and transient photocurrent spectroscopy were used to analyze the energy position and relative density of defect states before and after hydrogenation. Notably, hydrogenation reduces the intra-gap defect density by one order of magnitude. As a metric to monitor lateral optoelectronic uniformity of polycrystalline TF-VLS InP, photoluminescence and electron beam induced current mapping reveal homogenization of the grain versus grain boundary upon hydrogenation. At the device level, we measured more than 260 TF-VLS InP solar cells before and after hydrogenation to verify the improved optoelectronic properties. Hydrogenation increased the average open-circuit voltage (VOC) of individual TF-VLS InP solar cells by up to 130 mV, and reduced the variance in VOC for the analyzed devices.

  18. Determining air quality and greenhouse gas impacts of hydrogen infrastructure and fuel cell vehicles.

    Stephens-Romero, Shane; Carreras-Sospedra, Marc; Brouwer, Jacob; Dabdub, Donald; Samuelsen, Scott

    2009-12-01

    Adoption of hydrogen infrastructure and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (HFCVs) to replace gasoline internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles has been proposed as a strategy to reduce criteria pollutant and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the transportation sector and transition to fuel independence. However, it is uncertain (1) to what degree the reduction in criteria pollutants will impact urban air quality, and (2) how the reductions in pollutant emissions and concomitant urban air quality impacts compare to ultralow emission gasoline-powered vehicles projected for a future year (e.g., 2060). To address these questions, the present study introduces a "spatially and temporally resolved energy and environment tool" (STREET) to characterize the pollutant and GHG emissions associated with a comprehensive hydrogen supply infrastructure and HFCVs at a high level of geographic and temporal resolution. To demonstrate the utility of STREET, two spatially and temporally resolved scenarios for hydrogen infrastructure are evaluated in a prototypical urban airshed (the South Coast Air Basin of California) using geographic information systems (GIS) data. The well-to-wheels (WTW) GHG emissions are quantified and the air quality is established using a detailed atmospheric chemistry and transport model followed by a comparison to a future gasoline scenario comprised of advanced ICE vehicles. One hydrogen scenario includes more renewable primary energy sources for hydrogen generation and the other includes more fossil fuel sources. The two scenarios encompass a variety of hydrogen generation, distribution, and fueling strategies. GHG emissions reductions range from 61 to 68% for both hydrogen scenarios in parallel with substantial improvements in urban air quality (e.g., reductions of 10 ppb in peak 8-h-averaged ozone and 6 mug/m(3) in 24-h-averaged particulate matter concentrations, particularly in regions of the airshed where concentrations are highest for the gasoline scenario).

  19. Confinement of hydrogen at high pressure in carbon nanotubes

    Lassila, David H [Aptos, CA; Bonner, Brian P [Livermore, CA

    2011-12-13

    A high pressure hydrogen confinement apparatus according to one embodiment includes carbon nanotubes capped at one or both ends thereof with a hydrogen-permeable membrane to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough. A hydrogen confinement apparatus according to another embodiment includes an array of multi-walled carbon nanotubes each having first and second ends, the second ends being capped with palladium (Pd) to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough as a function of palladium temperature, wherein the array of carbon nanotubes is capable of storing hydrogen gas at a pressure of at least 1 GPa for greater than 24 hours. Additional apparatuses and methods are also presented.

  20. A new type of hydrogen generator-HHEG (high-compressed hydrogen energy generator)

    Harada, H.; Tojima, K.; Takeda, M.; Nakazawa, T.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' We have developed a new type of hydrogen generator named HHEG (High-compressed Hydrogen Energy Generator). HHEG can produce 35 MPa high-compressed hydrogen for fuel cell vehicle without any mechanical compressor. HHEG is a kind of PEM(proton exchange membrane)electrolysis. It was well known that compressed hydrogen could be generated by water electrolysis. However, the conventional electrolysis could not generate 35 MPa or higher pressure that is required for fuel cell vehicle, because electrolysis cell stack is destroyed in such high pressure. In HHEG, the cell stack is put in high-pressure vessel and the pressure difference of oxygen and hydrogen that is generated by the cell stack is always kept at nearly zero by an automatic compensator invented by Mitsubishi Corporation. The cell stack of HHEG is not so special one, but it is not broken under such high pressure, because the automatic compensator always offsets the force acting on the cell stack. Hydrogen for fuel cell vehicle must be produce by no emission energy such as solar and atomic power. These energies are available as electricity. So, water electrolysis is the only way of producing hydrogen fuel. Hydrogen fuel is also 35 MPa high-compressed hydrogen and will become 70 MPa in near future. But conventional mechanical compressor is not useful for such high pressure hydrogen fuel, because of the short lifetime and high power consumption. Construction of hydrogen station network is indispensable in order to come into wide use of fuel cell vehicles. For such network contraction, an on-site type hydrogen generator is required. HHEG can satisfy above these requirements. So we can conclude that HHEG is the only way of realizing the hydrogen economy. (author)

  1. Metallic Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separation

    Ma, Y.H.; Catalano, Jacopo; Guazzone, Federico

    2013-01-01

    membrane fabrication methods have matured over the last decades, and the deposition of very thin films (1–5 µm) of Pd over porous ceramics or modified porous metal supports is quite common. The H2 permeances and the selectivities achieved at 400–500 °C were in the order of 50–100 Nm3/m/h/bar0.5 and greater......Composite palladium membranes have extensively been studied in laboratories and, more recently, in small pilot industrial applications for the high temperature separation of hydrogen from reactant mixtures such as water-gas shift (WGS) reaction or methane steam reforming (MSR). Composite Pd...... than 1000, respectively. This chapter describes in detail composite Pd-based membrane preparation methods, which consist of the grading of the support and the deposition of the dense metal layer, their performances, and their applications in catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) at high temperatures (400...

  2. Low Cost, High Efficiency, High Pressure Hydrogen Storage

    Mark Leavitt

    2010-03-31

    A technical and design evaluation was carried out to meet DOE hydrogen fuel targets for 2010. These targets consisted of a system gravimetric capacity of 2.0 kWh/kg, a system volumetric capacity of 1.5 kWh/L and a system cost of $4/kWh. In compressed hydrogen storage systems, the vast majority of the weight and volume is associated with the hydrogen storage tank. In order to meet gravimetric targets for compressed hydrogen tanks, 10,000 psi carbon resin composites were used to provide the high strength required as well as low weight. For the 10,000 psi tanks, carbon fiber is the largest portion of their cost. Quantum Technologies is a tier one hydrogen system supplier for automotive companies around the world. Over the course of the program Quantum focused on development of technology to allow the compressed hydrogen storage tank to meet DOE goals. At the start of the program in 2004 Quantum was supplying systems with a specific energy of 1.1-1.6 kWh/kg, a volumetric capacity of 1.3 kWh/L and a cost of $73/kWh. Based on the inequities between DOE targets and Quantum’s then current capabilities, focus was placed first on cost reduction and second on weight reduction. Both of these were to be accomplished without reduction of the fuel system’s performance or reliability. Three distinct areas were investigated; optimization of composite structures, development of “smart tanks” that could monitor health of tank thus allowing for lower design safety factor, and the development of “Cool Fuel” technology to allow higher density gas to be stored, thus allowing smaller/lower pressure tanks that would hold the required fuel supply. The second phase of the project deals with three additional distinct tasks focusing on composite structure optimization, liner optimization, and metal.

  3. Anomalously deep penetration of hydrogen into niobium under action of pulse high temperature hydrogen plasma

    Didyk, A.Yu.

    2011-01-01

    The method of elastic recoil detection (ERD) has been used for the study of storage and redistribution processes of hydrogen atoms under the influence of pulse high temperature hydrogen plasma obtained using the 'Plasma Focus' PF-4 set-up in three high purity niobium foils. It was established that with an increase of number of PF-4 set-up pulses there occur spreading and transfer of implanted hydrogen atoms to large depths in three Nb-foils which are significantly larger than the projected range of hydrogen ions (with the velocity ∼ 10 8 cm/s). The maximum hydrogen concentration up to 60 at. % is reached in the nearest to Ph-4 surface of the third Nb-foil at 20 impulses of the Ph-4 set-up. The observed phenomenon can be described by transfer of implanted hydrogen atoms under the action of powerful shock waves, created by pulse hydrogen plasma and (or) by accelerating hydrogen atom diffusion under the influence of compression straining wave at the front of the shock wave at redistribution of hydrogen atoms at large depths. Similar behavior was discovered and described also in series of nickel, vanadium, niobium and tantalum foils (two or three foils and more in a series) including series of foils from heterogeneous (different) materials, which were studied, too

  4. A light hydrocarbon fuel processor producing high-purity hydrogen

    Löffler, Daniel G.; Taylor, Kyle; Mason, Dylan

    This paper discusses the design process and presents performance data for a dual fuel (natural gas and LPG) fuel processor for PEM fuel cells delivering between 2 and 8 kW electric power in stationary applications. The fuel processor resulted from a series of design compromises made to address different design constraints. First, the product quality was selected; then, the unit operations needed to achieve that product quality were chosen from the pool of available technologies. Next, the specific equipment needed for each unit operation was selected. Finally, the unit operations were thermally integrated to achieve high thermal efficiency. Early in the design process, it was decided that the fuel processor would deliver high-purity hydrogen. Hydrogen can be separated from other gases by pressure-driven processes based on either selective adsorption or permeation. The pressure requirement made steam reforming (SR) the preferred reforming technology because it does not require compression of combustion air; therefore, steam reforming is more efficient in a high-pressure fuel processor than alternative technologies like autothermal reforming (ATR) or partial oxidation (POX), where the combustion occurs at the pressure of the process stream. A low-temperature pre-reformer reactor is needed upstream of a steam reformer to suppress coke formation; yet, low temperatures facilitate the formation of metal sulfides that deactivate the catalyst. For this reason, a desulfurization unit is needed upstream of the pre-reformer. Hydrogen separation was implemented using a palladium alloy membrane. Packed beds were chosen for the pre-reformer and reformer reactors primarily because of their low cost, relatively simple operation and low maintenance. Commercial, off-the-shelf balance of plant (BOP) components (pumps, valves, and heat exchangers) were used to integrate the unit operations. The fuel processor delivers up to 100 slm hydrogen >99.9% pure with <1 ppm CO, <3 ppm CO 2. The

  5. Hydrogen concentration and distribution in high-purity germanium crystals

    Hansen, W.L.; Haller, E.E.; Luke, P.N.

    1981-10-01

    High-purity germanium crystals used for making nuclear radiation detectors are usually grown in a hydrogen ambient from a melt contained in a high-purity silica crucible. The benefits and problems encountered in using a hydrogen ambient are reviewed. A hydrogen concentration of about 2 x 10 15 cm -3 has been determined by growing crystals in hydrogen spiked with tritium and counting the tritium β-decays in detectors made from these crystals. Annealing studies show that the hydrogen is strongly bound, either to defects or as H 2 with a dissociation energy > 3 eV. This is lowered to 1.8 eV when copper is present. Etching defects in dislocation-free crystals grown in hydrogen have been found by etch stripping to have a density of about 1 x 10 7 cm -3 and are estimated to contain 10 8 H atoms each

  6. High-pressure torsion for new hydrogen storage materials.

    Edalati, Kaveh; Akiba, Etsuo; Horita, Zenji

    2018-01-01

    High-pressure torsion (HPT) is widely used as a severe plastic deformation technique to create ultrafine-grained structures with promising mechanical and functional properties. Since 2007, the method has been employed to enhance the hydrogenation kinetics in different Mg-based hydrogen storage materials. Recent studies showed that the method is effective not only for increasing the hydrogenation kinetics but also for improving the hydrogenation activity, for enhancing the air resistivity and more importantly for synthesizing new nanostructured hydrogen storage materials with high densities of lattice defects. This manuscript reviews some major findings on the impact of HPT process on the hydrogen storage performance of different titanium-based and magnesium-based materials.

  7. Ceramic membranes for high temperature hydrogen separation

    Fain, D.E.; Roettger, G.E. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Ceramic gas separation membranes can provide very high separation factors if the pore size is sufficiently small to separate gas molecules by molecular sieving and if oversized pores are adequately limited. Ceramic membranes typically have some pores that are substantially larger than the mean pore size and that should be regarded as defects. To assess the effects of such defects on the performance of ceramic membranes, a simple mathematical model has been developed to describe flow through a gas separation membrane that has a primary mode of flow through very small pores but that has a secondary mode of flow through undesirably large pores. This model permits separation factors to be calculated for a specified gas pair as a function of the molecular weights and molecular diameters of the gases, the membrane pore diameter, and the diameter and number of defects. This model will be described, and key results from the model will be presented. The separation factors of the authors membranes continue to be determined using a permeance test system that measures flows of pure gases through a membrane at temperatures up to 275{degrees}C. A primary goal of this project for FY 1996 is to develop a mixed gas separation system for measuring the separation efficiency of membranes at higher temperatures. Performance criteria have been established for the planned mixed gas separation system and design of the system has been completed. The test system is designed to measure the separation efficiency of membranes at temperatures up to 600{degrees}C and pressures up to 100 psi by separating the constituents of a gas mixture containing hydrogen. The system will accommodate the authors typical experimental membrane that is tubular and has a diameter of about 9 mm and a length of about 23 cm. The design of the new test system and its expected performance will be discussed.

  8. Hydrogen Pressurization of LOX: High Risk/High Reward (Preprint)

    Turner, Andrew E; Leichner, Aaron

    2006-01-01

    ... filled with hydrogen gas. Airship commercial service, enabled by relatively low-cost hydrogen, died along with the longest vehicle ever to fly, even though thousands of passengers had been transported without incident prior to that time...

  9. New perspectives on potential hydrogen storage materials using high pressure.

    Song, Yang

    2013-09-21

    In addressing the global demand for clean and renewable energy, hydrogen stands out as the most suitable candidate for many fuel applications that require practical and efficient storage of hydrogen. Supplementary to the traditional hydrogen storage methods and materials, the high-pressure technique has emerged as a novel and unique approach to developing new potential hydrogen storage materials. Static compression of materials may result in significant changes in the structures, properties and performance that are important for hydrogen storage applications, and often lead to the formation of unprecedented phases or complexes that have profound implications for hydrogen storage. In this perspective article, 22 types of representative potential hydrogen storage materials that belong to four major classes--simple hydride, complex hydride, chemical hydride and hydrogen containing materials--were reviewed. In particular, their structures, stabilities, and pressure-induced transformations, which were reported in recent experimental works together with supporting theoretical studies, were provided. The important contextual aspects pertinent to hydrogen storage associated with novel structures and transitions were discussed. Finally, the summary of the recent advances reviewed and the insight into the future research in this direction were given.

  10. Lifecycle impacts of natural gas to hydrogen pathways on urban air quality

    Wang, Guihua; Ogden, Joan M.; Nicholas, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we examine the potential air quality impacts of hydrogen transportation fuel from a lifecycle analysis perspective, including impacts from fuel production, delivery, and vehicle use. We assume that hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are introduced in a specific region, Sacramento County, California. We consider two levels of market penetration where 9% or 20% of the light duty fleet are hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. The following three natural gas to hydrogen supply pathways are assessed in detail and compared in terms of emissions and the resulting changes in ambient air quality: (1) onsite hydrogen production; (2) centralized hydrogen production with gaseous hydrogen pipeline delivery systems; and (3) centralized hydrogen production with liquid hydrogen truck delivery systems. All the pathways examined use steam methane reforming (SMR) of natural gas to produce hydrogen. The source contributions to incremental air pollution are estimated and compared among hydrogen pathways. All of the hydrogen pathways result in extremely low contributions to ambient air concentrations of NO x , CO, particulates, and SO x , typically less than 0.1% of the current ambient pollution for both levels of market penetration. Among the hydrogen supply options, it is found that the central SMR with pipeline delivery systems is the lowest pollution option available provided the plant is located to avoid transport of pollutants into the city via prevailing winds. The onsite hydrogen pathway is comparable to the central hydrogen pathway with pipeline systems in terms of the resulting air pollution. The pathway with liquid hydrogen trucks has a greater impact on air quality relative to the other pathways due to emissions associated with diesel trucks and electricity consumption to liquefy hydrogen. However, all three hydrogen pathways result in negligible air pollution in the region. (author)

  11. Characterization of chemical vapour deposited diamond films: correlation between hydrogen incorporation and film morphology and quality

    Tang, C J; Neves, A J; Carmo, M C

    2005-01-01

    In order to tailor diamond synthesized through chemical vapour deposition (CVD) for different applications, many diamond films of different colours and variable quality were deposited by a 5 kW microwave plasma CVD reactor under different growth conditions. The morphology, quality and hydrogen incorporation of these films were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, respectively. From this study, a general trend between hydrogen incorporation and film colour, morphology and quality was found. That is, as the films sorted by colour gradually become darker, ranging from white through grey to black, high magnification SEM images illustrate that the smoothness of the well defined crystalline facet gradually decreases and second nucleation starts to appear on it, indicating gradual degradation of the crystalline quality. Correspondingly, Raman spectra evidence that the diamond Raman peak at 1332 cm -1 becomes broader and the non-diamond carbon band around 1500 cm -1 starts to appear and becomes stronger, confirming increase of the non-diamond component and decrease of the phase purity of the film, while FTIR spectra show that the CH stretching band and the two CVD diamond specific peaks around 2830 cm -1 rise rapidly, and this indicates that the total amount of hydrogen incorporated into the film increases significantly

  12. Effect of high pressure hydrogen on low-cycle fatigue

    Rie, K.T.; Kohler, W.

    1979-01-01

    It has been shown that the fatigue life can be influenced in low-cycle range by high pressure hydrogen while the effect of high pressure hydrogen on high-cycle fatigue will not be as significant. The paper reports the details and the results of the investigations of the effect of high pressure hydrogen on the low-cycle endurance of commercially pure titanium. The results of this study indicate that: 1. The degradation of the fatigue life in low-cycle region for commercially pure titanium under high pressure hydrogen can be described by Nsub(cr)sup(α x Δepsilon)sub(pl)sup(=c) 2. The fatigue life decreases with decreasing strain rate. 3. The fatigue life decreases with increasing hydrogen pressure. It was found that the semilogarithmic plot of the fatigue life versus the hydrogen pressure gives a linear relationship. The Sievert's law does not hold in low-cycle fatigue region. 4. HAC in titanium in low-cycle fatigue region is the result of the disolution of hydrogen at the crack tip and of the strain-induced hybride formation. (orig.) 891 RW/orig. 892 RKD [de

  13. Premixer Design for High Hydrogen Fuels

    Benjamin P. Lacy; Keith R. McManus; Balachandar Varatharajan; Biswadip Shome

    2005-12-16

    This 21-month project translated DLN technology to the unique properties of high hydrogen content IGCC fuels, and yielded designs in preparation for a future testing and validation phase. Fundamental flame characterization, mixing, and flame property measurement experiments were conducted to tailor computational design tools and criteria to create a framework for predicting nozzle operability (e.g., flame stabilization, emissions, resistance to flashback/flame-holding and auto-ignition). This framework was then used to establish, rank, and evaluate potential solutions to the operability challenges of IGCC combustion. The leading contenders were studied and developed with the most promising concepts evaluated via computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and using the design rules generated by the fundamental experiments, as well as using GE's combustion design tools and practices. Finally, the project scoped the necessary steps required to carry the design through mechanical and durability review, testing, and validation, towards full demonstration of this revolutionary technology. This project was carried out in three linked tasks with the following results. (1) Develop conceptual designs of premixer and down-select the promising options. This task defined the ''gap'' between existing design capabilities and the targeted range of IGCC fuel compositions and evaluated the current capability of DLN pre-mixer designs when operated at similar conditions. Two concepts (1) swirl based and (2) multiple point lean direct injection based premixers were selected via a QFD from 13 potential design concepts. (2) Carry out CFD on chosen options (1 or 2) to evaluate operability risks. This task developed the leading options down-selected in Task 1. Both a GE15 swozzle based premixer and a lean direct injection concept were examined by performing a detailed CFD study wherein the aerodynamics of the design, together with the chemical kinetics of the

  14. Hydrogenation and high temperature oxidation of Zirconium claddings

    Novotny, T.; Perez-Feró, E.; Horváth, M.

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years a new series of experiments started for supporting the new LOCA criteria, considering the proposals of US NRC. The effects which can cause the embrittlement of VVER fuel claddings were reviewed and evaluated in the framework of the project. The purpose of the work was to determine how the fuel cladding’s hydrogen uptake under normal operating conditions, effect the behavior of the cladding under LOCA conditions. As a first step a gas system equipment with gas valves and pressure gauge was built, in which the zirconium alloy can absorb hydrogen under controlled conditions. In this apparatus E110 (produced by electrolytic method, currently used at Paks NPP) and E110G (produced by a new technology) alloys were hydrogenated to predetermined hydrogen contents. According the results of ring compression tests the E110G alloys lose their ductility above 3200 ppm hydrogen content. This limit can be applied to determine the ductile-brittle transition of the nuclear fuel claddings. After the hydrogenation, high temperature oxidation experiments were carried out on the E110G and E110 samples at 1000 °C and 1200 °C. 16 pieces of E110G and 8 samples of E110 with 300 ppm and 600 ppm hydrogen content were tested. The oxidation of the specimens was performed in steam, under isothermal conditions. Based on the ring compression tests load-displacement curves were recorded. The main objective of the compression tests was to determine the ductile-brittle transition. These results were compared to the results of our previous experiments where the samples did not contain hydrogen. The original claddings showed more ductile behavior than the samples with hydrogen content. The higher hydrogen content resulted in a more brittle mechanical behavior. However no significant difference was observed in the oxidation kinetics of the same cladding types with different hydrogen content. The experiments showed that the normal operating hydrogen uptake of the fuel claddings

  15. Atomic hydrogen effects on high-Tc superconductors

    Frantskevich, N.V.; Ulyashin, A.G.; Alifanov, A.V.; Stepanenko, A.V.; Fedotova, V.V.

    1999-01-01

    The atomic hydrogen effects on the properties of bulk high-temperature superconductors were investigated. It is shown that the insertion of the atomic hydrogen into the bulk of these materials from a DC plasma leads to the increase of the critical current density J c for YBaCuO(123) as well as for BiSrCaCuO(2223) high-temperature superconductors. It is found that the hydrogenation of the He implanted samples with following annealing leads to the optically detected blistering on the surface. It means that the textured thin subsurface layers of high-temperature superconductors can be formed by this method. The improvement of superconductivity by atomic hydrogen can be explained by the passivation of dangling bonds and defects on grain boundaries of these materials

  16. Electrochemical Hydrogen Storage in a Highly Ordered Mesoporous Carbon

    Dan eLiu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A highly order mesoporous carbon has been synthesized through a strongly acidic, aqueous cooperative assembly route. The structure and morphology of the carbon material were investigated using TEM, SEM and nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms. The carbon was proven to be meso-structural and consisted of graphitic micro-domain with larger interlayer space. AC impedance and electrochemical measurements reveal that the synthesized highly ordered mesoporous carbon exhibits a promoted electrochemical hydrogen insertion process and improved capacitance and hydrogen storage stability. The meso-structure and enlarged interlayer distance within the highly ordered mesoporous carbon are suggested as possible causes for the enhancement in hydrogen storage. Both hydrogen capacity in the carbon and mass diffusion within the matrix were improved.

  17. Recovery of high-purity hydrogen from COG

    Tsukiyama, Y

    1982-01-01

    A general account of the latest trends in the recovery of high-purity hydrogen from coke oven gas (COG), the article being based on both Japanese and overseas literature: 1) Deep-freeze separation: impurities are liquefied and removed. This method make use of the fact that hydrogen is hard to liquefy. 2) The PSA method: high-purity hydrogen is recovered by the adsorption of other constituents at high pressures. This technique makes use of the fact that the adsorption capacity of an adsorbent varies with the partial pressure of the substances being adsorbed. 3) Membrane separation: a permeation separation method that uses a functional polymer separation membrane, and that depends on the fact that hydrogen has a low molecular weight in comparison with the other constituents. (19 refs.) (In Japanese)

  18. Ignition during hydrogen release from high pressure into the atmosphere

    Oleszczak, P.; Wolanski, P.

    2010-12-01

    The first investigations concerned with a problem of hydrogen jet ignition, during outflow from a high-pressure vessel were carried out nearly 40 years ago by Wolanski and Wojcicki. The research resulted from a dramatic accident in the Chorzow Chemical Plant Azoty, where the explosion of a synthesis gas made up of a mixture composed of three moles of hydrogen per mole of nitrogen, at 300°C and 30 MPa killed four people. Initial investigation had excluded potential external ignition sources and the main aim of the research was to determine the cause of ignition. Hydrogen is currently considered as a potential fuel for various vehicles such as cars, trucks, buses, etc. Crucial safety issues are of potential concern, associated with the storage of hydrogen at a very high pressure. Indeed, the evidence obtained nearly 40 years ago shows that sudden rupture of a high-pressure hydrogen storage tank or other component can result in ignition and potentially explosion. The aim of the present research is identification of the conditions under which hydrogen ignition occurs as a result of compression and heating of the air by the shock wave generated by discharge of high-pressure hydrogen. Experiments have been conducted using a facility constructed in the Combustion Laboratory of the Institute of Heat Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology. Tests under various configurations have been performed to determine critical conditions for occurrence of high-pressure hydrogen ignition. The results show that a critical pressure exists, leading to ignition, which depends mainly on the geometric configuration of the outflow system, such as tube diameter, and on the presence of obstacles.

  19. Hydrogen production from fusion reactors coupled with high temperature electrolysis

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.; Steinberg, M.

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and complement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Processes which may be considered for this purpose include electrolysis, thermochemical decomposition or thermochemical-electrochemical hybrid cycles. Preliminary studies at Brookhaven indicate that high temperature electrolysis has the highest potential efficiency for production of hydrogen from fusion. Depending on design electric generation efficiencies of approximately 40 to 60 percent and hydrogen production efficiencies of approximately 50 to 70 percent are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets

  20. High temperature equation of state of metallic hydrogen

    Shvets, V. T.

    2007-01-01

    The equation of state of liquid metallic hydrogen is solved numerically. Investigations are carried out at temperatures from 3000 to 20 000 K and densities from 0.2 to 3 mol/cm 3 , which correspond both to the experimental conditions under which metallic hydrogen is produced on earth and the conditions in the cores of giant planets of the solar system such as Jupiter and Saturn. It is assumed that hydrogen is in an atomic state and all its electrons are collectivized. Perturbation theory in the electron-proton interaction is applied to determine the thermodynamic potentials of metallic hydrogen. The electron subsystem is considered in the randomphase approximation with regard to the exchange interaction and the correlation of electrons in the local-field approximation. The proton-proton interaction is taken into account in the hard-spheres approximation. The thermodynamic characteristics of metallic hydrogen are calculated with regard to the zero-, second-, and third-order perturbation theory terms. The third-order term proves to be rather essential at moderately high temperatures and densities, although it is much smaller than the second-order term. The thermodynamic potentials of metallic hydrogen are monotonically increasing functions of density and temperature. The values of pressure for the temperatures and pressures that are characteristic of the conditions under which metallic hydrogen is produced on earth coincide with the corresponding values reported by the discoverers of metallic hydrogen to a high degree of accuracy. The temperature and density ranges are found in which there exists a liquid phase of metallic hydrogen

  1. Storage of hydrogen in advanced high pressure container. Appendices

    Bentzen, J.J.; Lystrup, A.

    2005-07-01

    The objective of the project has been to study barriers for a production of advanced high pressure containers especially suitable for hydrogen, in order to create a basis for a container production in Denmark. The project has primarily focused on future Danish need for hydrogen storage in the MWh area. One task has been to examine requirement specifications for pressure tanks that can be expected in connection with these stores. Six potential storage needs have been identified: (1) Buffer in connection with start-up/regulation on the power grid. (2) Hydrogen and oxygen production. (3) Buffer store in connection with VEnzin vision. (4) Storage tanks on hydrogen filling stations. (5) Hydrogen for the transport sector from 1 TWh surplus power. (6) Tanker transport of hydrogen. Requirements for pressure containers for the above mentioned use have been examined. The connection between stored energy amount, pressure and volume compared to liquid hydrogen and oil has been stated in tables. As starting point for production technological considerations and economic calculations of various container concepts, an estimation of laminate thickness in glass-fibre reinforced containers with different diameters and design print has been made, for a 'pure' fibre composite container and a metal/fibre composite container respectively. (BA)

  2. Stability analysis of high temperature superconducting coil in liquid hydrogen

    Nakayama, T.; Yagai, T.; Tsuda, M.; Hamajima, T.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, it is expected that hydrogen plays an important role in energy source including electric power in near future. Liquid hydrogen has high potential for cooling down superconducting coil wound with high temperature superconductors (HTS), such as BSCCO, YBCO. In this paper, we study stabilities of the coils wound with BSCCO tapes, which are immersed in the liquid hydrogen, and compare stability results with those cooled by liquid helium. We treat a minimum propagation zone (MPZ) theory to evaluate the coil stability considering boiling heat flux of the liquid hydrogen, and specific heat, heat conduction and resistivity of HTS materials as a function of temperature. It is found that the coil cooled by the liquid hydrogen has higher stability margin than that cooled by the liquid helium. We compare the stability margins of both coils wound with Bi-2223/Ag tape and Bi-2212/Ag tape in liquid hydrogen. As a result, it is found that the stability of Bi-2212 coil is equivalent to that of Bi-2223 coil in low and high magnetic field, while the maximum current of Bi-2212 coil exceeds a little bit that of Bi-2223 coil in both magnetic fields

  3. Renewable carbohydrates are a potential high-density hydrogen carrier

    Zhang, Y.-H. Percival [Biological Systems Engineering Department, 210-A Seitz Hall, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Sciences (ICTAS), Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); DOE BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The possibility of using renewable biomass carbohydrates as a potential high-density hydrogen carrier is discussed here. Gravimetric density of polysaccharides is 14.8 H{sub 2} mass% where water can be recycled from PEM fuel cells or 8.33% H{sub 2} mass% without water recycling; volumetric densities of polysaccharides are >100 kg of H{sup 2}/m{sup 3}. Renewable carbohydrates (e.g., cellulosic materials and starch) are less expensive based on GJ than are other hydrogen carriers, such as hydrocarbons, biodiesel, methanol, ethanol, and ammonia. Biotransformation of carbohydrates to hydrogen by cell-free synthetic (enzymatic) pathway biotransformation (SyPaB) has numerous advantages, such as high product yield (12 H{sub 2}/glucose unit), 100% selectivity, high energy conversion efficiency (122%, based on combustion energy), high-purity hydrogen generated, mild reaction conditions, low-cost of bioreactor, few safety concerns, and nearly no toxicity hazards. Although SyPaB may suffer from current low reaction rates, numerous approaches for accelerating hydrogen production rates are proposed and discussed. Potential applications of carbohydrate-based hydrogen/electricity generation would include hydrogen bioreactors, home-size electricity generators, sugar batteries for portable electronics, sugar-powered passenger vehicles, and so on. Developments in thermostable enzymes as standardized building blocks for cell-free SyPaB projects, use of stable and low-cost biomimetic NAD cofactors, and accelerating reaction rates are among the top research and development priorities. International collaborations are urgently needed to solve the above obstacles within a short time. (author)

  4. Ceramic membranes for high temperature hydrogen separation

    Adcock, K.D.; Fain, D.E.; James, D.L.; Powell, L.E.; Raj, T.; Roettger, G.E.; Sutton, T.G. [East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The separative performance of the authors` ceramic membranes has been determined in the past using a permeance test system that measured flows of pure gases through a membrane at temperatures up to 275 C. From these data, the separation factor was determined for a particular gas pair from the ratio of the pure gas specific flows. An important project goal this year has been to build a Mixed Gas Separation System (MGSS) for measuring the separation efficiencies of membranes at higher temperatures and using mixed gases. The MGSS test system has been built, and initial operation has been achieved. The MGSS is capable of measuring the separation efficiency of membranes at temperatures up to 600 C and pressures up to 100 psi using a binary gas mixture such as hydrogen/methane. The mixed gas is fed into a tubular membrane at pressures up to 100 psi, and the membrane separates the feed gas mixture into a permeate stream and a raffinate stream. The test membrane is sealed in a stainless steel holder that is mounted in a split tube furnace to permit membrane separations to be evaluated at temperatures up to 600 C. The compositions of the three gas streams are measured by a gas chromatograph equipped with thermal conductivity detectors. The test system also measures the temperatures and pressures of all three gas streams as well as the flow rate of the feed stream. These data taken over a range of flows and pressures permit the separation efficiency to be determined as a function of the operating conditions. A mathematical model of the separation has been developed that permits the data to be reduced and the separation factor for the membrane to be determined.

  5. Hydrogen production from high temperature electrolysis and fusion reactor

    Dang, V.D.; Steinberg, J.F.; Issacs, H.S.; Lazareth, O.; Powell, J.R.; Salzano, F.J.

    1978-01-01

    Production of hydrogen from high temperature electrolysis of steam coupled with a fusion reactor is studied. The process includes three major components: the fusion reactor, the high temperature electrolyzer and the power conversion cycle each of which is discussed in the paper. Detailed process design and analysis of the system is examined. A parametric study on the effect of process efficiency is presented

  6. Thermoanalytical investigation of the hydrogen absorption behaviour of Sm2Fe17-xGax at high hydrogen pressures

    Handstein, A.; Kubis, M.; Gebel, B.; Mueller, K.-H.; Schultz, L.; Gutfleisch, O.; Harris, I.R.; Birmingham Univ.

    1998-01-01

    The complete disproportionation of Sm 2 Fe 17-x Ga x during annealing in hydrogen is hindered due to an increased stability of the compounds with a higher Ga content (x ≥ 1). Therefore the HD process as the first step of HDDR (hydrogenation-disproportionation-desorption-recombination) has to be carried out at a high hydrogen pressure for x ≥ 1. The hydrogen absorption behaviour of Sm 2 Fe 17-x Ga x (x = 0, 0.5, 1 and 2) was investigated by means of hydrogen differential thermal analysis (HDTA) and high pressure differential scanning calorimetry (HPDSC) at hydrogen pressures up to 70 bar. A dependency of hydrogenation and disproportionation temperatures on hydrogen pressure and Ga content was found. The comparison with other substituents (M = Al and Si) instead of M = Ga showed an increased stability of Sm 2 Fe 17-x M x compounds against disproportionation by hydrogen in the sequence Al, Ga and Si. The Curie temperatures of the interstitially hydrogenated Th 2 Zn 17 -type materials increase with the hydrogen pressure. In order to produce coercive and thermally stable Sm 2 Fe 15 Ga 2 C y powder by means of the HDDR process, we recombined material disproportionated at different hydrogen pressures. Preliminary results of magnetic properties of this HDDR treated and gas-carburized Sm 2 Fe 15 Ga 2 C y are discussed. (orig.)

  7. Modelling of hydrogen permeability of membranes for high-purity hydrogen production

    Zaika, Yury V.; Rodchenkova, Natalia I.

    2017-11-01

    High-purity hydrogen is required for clean energy and a variety of chemical technology processes. Different alloys, which may be well-suited for use in gas-separation plants, were investigated by measuring specific hydrogen permeability. One had to estimate the parameters of diffusion and sorption to numerically model the different scenarios and experimental conditions of the material usage (including extreme ones), and identify the limiting factors. This paper presents a nonlinear mathematical model taking into account the dynamics of sorption-desorption processes and reversible capture of diffusing hydrogen by inhomogeneity of the material’s structure, and also modification of the model when the transport rate is high. The results of numerical modelling allow to obtain information about output data sensitivity with respect to variations of the material’s hydrogen permeability parameters. Furthermore, it is possible to analyze the dynamics of concentrations and fluxes that cannot be measured directly. Experimental data for Ta77Nb23 and V85Ni15 alloys were used to test the model. This work is supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (Project No. 15-01-00744).

  8. Hydrogen desorption from mechanically milled carbon micro coils hydrogenated at high temperature

    Yoshio Furuya; Shuichi Izumi; Seiji Motojima; Yukio Hishikawa

    2005-01-01

    Carbon micro coils (CMC) have been prepared by the catalytic pyrolysis of acetylene at 750-800 C. The as grown coils have an almost amorphous structure and contain about 1 mass% hydrogen. They have 0.1 - 10 mm coil length, 1-5 μm coil diameter, 0.1-0.5 μm coil pitch and about 100 m 2 /g specific surface area. They were graphitized, as maintaining the morphology of the coils, by heat-treating at a higher temperature than 2500 C in Ar atmosphere. The layer space (d) of graphitized CMC was determined to be 0.341 nm, forming a 'herringbone' structure with an inclination of 10-40 degree versus the coiled fiber axis, having a specific surface area of about 8 m 2 /g. The hydrogen absorption behaviors of CMC were investigated from RT to 1200 C by a thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) using a quadrupole mass analyzer. In TDS measurements, pre-existing hydrogen, which was due to the residual acetylene incorporated into CMC on its growing, desorbed from 700 C and peaked at about 900 C. The increment in the main peak of desorbed hydrogen in the as-grown CMC heat-treated at 500 C for 1 h under high pressure of hydrogen gas (1.9 or 8.9 MPa) was not remarkable as is shown in Fig.1. While, in the CMC samples milled mechanically for 1 h at RT using a planetary ball mill, the increase of desorbed hydrogen became to be great with the hydrogen pressure (up to 8.9 MPa) on heat-treating at 500 C, as is shown in Fig.2. In these CMC samples, the building up temperature of the hydrogen desorption was shifted to a lower one and the temperature range of desorption became to be wider than those in the as-grown CMC because of the appearance of another desorption peak at about 600 C in addition to the peak ranging from 850 C to 900 C. The same kind of peak was also slightly observed in as-grown CMC (Fig.1). It is clear that this desorption at about 600 C has contributed to the remarkable increase of desorbed hydrogen in the milled CMC. In this work, values of more than 2 mass% were obtained

  9. Hydrogen-induced high damping of bulk metallic glasses

    Hasegawa, M.

    2009-01-01

    There are two important topics concerned with the recent researches on the damping materials of hydrogenated metallic glasses (HMGs). One is the mechanism of the high hydrogen-induced internal friction of HMGs. The other is the materials processing of 'bulk' HMGs for engineering. This article describes the summary of our recent studies on these topics. The first one is closely related to the local structure of the metallic glasses. Therefore, our recent results on the intermediate-range local structure of the simple two Zr-based metallic glasses are described, which has been clarified by the Voronoi analysis using the experimental data of the neutron diffraction measurements. The hydrogen-induced internal friction of HMGs is also discussed on the basis of these recent results of the local structure of the metallic glasses. In terms of the second topic, the first successful preparation of heavily hydrogenated Zr-based bulk HMG rods without hydrogen-induced surface embrittlement is described. They are prepared by a powder-compact-melting and liquid-casting process using Zr-Al-Ni-Cu metallic glass and ZrH 2 powders as the starting materials. It has been found that they have high damping properties.

  10. High temperature electrolysis for hydrogen production using nuclear energy

    Herring, J. Stephen; O'brien, James E.; Stoots, Carl M.; Hawkes, Grant L.; Hartvigsen, Joseph J.

    2005-01-01

    High-temperature nuclear reactors have the potential for substantially increasing the efficiency of hydrogen production from water splitting, which can be accomplished via high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) or thermochemical processes. In order to achieve competitive efficiencies, both processes require high-temperature operation (∼850degC). High-temperature electrolytic water splitting supported by nuclear process heat and electricity has the potential to produce hydrogen with overall system efficiencies of 45 to 55%. At the Idaho National Laboratory, we are developing solid-oxide cells to operate in the steam electrolysis mode. The research program includes both experimental and modeling activities. Experimental results were obtained from ten-cell and 22-cell planar electrolysis stacks, fabricated by Ceramatec, Inc. The electrolysis cells are electrolyte-supported, with scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolytes (∼200 μm thick, 64 cm 2 active area), nickel-cermet steam/hydrogen electrodes, and manganite air-side electrodes. The metallic interconnect plates are fabricated from ferritic stainless steel. The experiments were performed over a range of steam inlet mole fractions, gas glow rates, and current densities. Hydrogen production rates greater than 100 normal liters per hour for 196 hours have been demonstrated. In order to evaluate the performance of large-scale HTE operations, we have developed single-cell models, based on FLUENT, and a process model, using the systems-analysis code HYSYS. (author)

  11. Non-combustible nuclear radiation shields with high hydrogen content

    Hall, W.C.; Peterson, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    The invention relates to compositions, methods of production, and uses of non-combustible nuclear radiation shields, with particular emphasis on those containing a high concentration of hydrogen atoms, especially effective for moderating neutron energy by elastic scatter, dispersed as a discontinuous phase in a continuous phase of a fire resistant matrix

  12. Study on hydrogen production by high temperature electrolysis of steam

    Hino, Ryutaro; Aita, Hideki; Sekita, Kenji; Haga, Katsuhiro; Iwata, Tomo-o.

    1997-09-01

    In JAERI, design and R and D works on hydrogen production process have been conducted for connecting to the HTTR under construction at the Oarai Research Establishment of JAERI as a nuclear heat utilization system. As for a hydrogen production process by high-temperature electrolysis of steam, laboratory-scale experiments were carried out with a practical electrolysis tube with 12 cells connected in series. Hydrogen was produced at a maximum density of 44 Nml/cm 2 h at 950degC, and know-how of operational procedures and operational experience were also accumulated. Thereafter, a planar electrolysis cell supported by a metallic plate was fabricated in order to improve hydrogen production performance and durability against thermal cycles. In the preliminary test with the planar cell, hydrogen has been produced continuously at a maximum density of 33.6 Nml/cm 2 h at an electrolysis temperature of 950degC. This report presents typical test results mentioned above, a review of previous studies conducted in the world and R and D items required for connecting to the HTTR. (author)

  13. High temperature hydrogenation of CaC6

    Srinivas, G.; Howard, C.A.; Skipper, N.T.; Bennington, S.M.; Ellerby, M.

    2009-01-01

    The structure and superconducting properties of high temperature hydrogenated calcium-graphite intercalation compound, CaC 6 have been investigated using room temperature X-ray diffraction, and temperature and field dependence of magnetisation. It is found that the hydrogenation can only decompose the CaC 6 phase, and generate a mixture of CaH 2 and graphite as the final compound. The hydrogenation of CaC 6 also reveals a degradation of its superconducting properties. The experimental results are discussed in detail and it is found that the formation of stable CaH 2 and deintercalation are the main source for observed phase separation and suppression in superconductivity.

  14. An experimental study of high-hydrogen welding processes

    Fydrych, Dariusz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents investigation results of determination of the diffusible hydrogen content in deposited metal obtained by means of two most often used methods-the glycerin method and the mercury method. Relation has been defined between results of those methods in the area characteristic of low-hydrogen as well as high-hydrogen welding processes. Relations available in the literature do not include the diffusible hydrogen content in deposited metal greater than 35 ml/100 g. Extending the scope of analysis of the diffusible hydrogen quantity to an 80 ml/100 g level considerably simplifies carrying out the steel weldability assessment with the use of high-hydrogen processes and with welding in water environment.Este trabajo presenta los resultados de una investigación sobre la determinación del contenido de hidrógeno difusible en el material aportado mediante dos métodos: el de la glicerina (el más utilizado y el del mercurio. El contenido de dicho hidrógeno se ha definido a partir de los resultados de esos métodos en una zona con bajo contenido en hidrógeno, así como procesos de soldadura con alto contenido en hidrógeno. No hay datos disponibles en la literatura para contenidos de hidrógeno difusible en metal depositado mayores de 35 ml/100 g. Ampliando el análisis de la cantidad de dicho hidrógeno hasta los 80 ml/100 g, se simplifica considerablemente la realización de ensayos de soldabilidad del acero en procesos de alto contenido en hidrógeno así como en la soldadura en medio acuoso.

  15. Study of hydrogenated silicene: The initialization model of hydrogenation on planar, low buckled and high buckled structures of silicene

    Syaputra, Marhamni; Wella, Sasfan Arman; Wungu, Triati Dewi Kencana; Purqon, Acep; Suprijadi

    2015-01-01

    We study the hydrogenation structures possessed by silicene i.e. planar (PL), low buckled (LB) and high buckled (HB). On those structures we found the hydrogenation process occurs with some particular notes. Hydrogen stable position on the silicene surface is determined by its initial configuration. We only considered the fully hydrogenated case with the formula unit (SiH) n for all of these structures. Physical and electronic structure shift after the process are compared with hydrogenated graphene. Moreover, we observed a chemical process in the presence of hydrogen on the PL structure by nudged elastic band (NEB) which illustrates how hydrogen has a significant impact to the force barrier of the PL that changing it from its original structure

  16. High Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution Activity of an Anomalous Ruthenium Catalyst

    Zheng, Yao; Jiao, Yan; Zhu, Yihan; Li, Lu Hua; Han, Yu; Chen, Ying; Jaroniec, Mietek; Qiao, Shi Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is a critical process due to its fundamental role in electrocatalysis. Practically, the development of high-performance electrocatalysts for HER in alkaline media is of great importance for the conversion of renewable energy to hydrogen fuel via photoelectrochemical water splitting. However, both mechanistic exploration and materials development for HER under alkaline conditions are very limited. Precious Pt metal, which still serves as the state-of-the-art catalyst for HER, is unable to guarantee a sustainable hydrogen supply. Here we report an anomalously structured Ru catalyst that shows 2.5 times higher hydrogen generation rate than Pt and is among the most active HER electrocatalysts yet reported in alkaline solutions. The identification of new face-centered cubic crystallographic structure of Ru nanoparticles was investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging, and its formation mechanism was revealed by spectroscopic characterization and theoretical analysis. For the first time, it is found that the Ru nanocatalyst showed a pronounced effect of the crystal structure on the electrocatalytic activity tested under different conditions. The combination of electrochemical reaction rate measurements and density functional theory computation shows that the high activity of anomalous Ru catalyst in alkaline solution originates from its suitable adsorption energies to some key reaction intermediates and reaction kinetics in the HER process.

  17. High Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution Activity of an Anomalous Ruthenium Catalyst.

    Zheng, Yao; Jiao, Yan; Zhu, Yihan; Li, Lu Hua; Han, Yu; Chen, Ying; Jaroniec, Mietek; Qiao, Shi-Zhang

    2016-12-14

    Hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is a critical process due to its fundamental role in electrocatalysis. Practically, the development of high-performance electrocatalysts for HER in alkaline media is of great importance for the conversion of renewable energy to hydrogen fuel via photoelectrochemical water splitting. However, both mechanistic exploration and materials development for HER under alkaline conditions are very limited. Precious Pt metal, which still serves as the state-of-the-art catalyst for HER, is unable to guarantee a sustainable hydrogen supply. Here we report an anomalously structured Ru catalyst that shows 2.5 times higher hydrogen generation rate than Pt and is among the most active HER electrocatalysts yet reported in alkaline solutions. The identification of new face-centered cubic crystallographic structure of Ru nanoparticles was investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging, and its formation mechanism was revealed by spectroscopic characterization and theoretical analysis. For the first time, it is found that the Ru nanocatalyst showed a pronounced effect of the crystal structure on the electrocatalytic activity tested under different conditions. The combination of electrochemical reaction rate measurements and density functional theory computation shows that the high activity of anomalous Ru catalyst in alkaline solution originates from its suitable adsorption energies to some key reaction intermediates and reaction kinetics in the HER process.

  18. High Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution Activity of an Anomalous Ruthenium Catalyst

    Zheng, Yao

    2016-11-28

    Hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is a critical process due to its fundamental role in electrocatalysis. Practically, the development of high-performance electrocatalysts for HER in alkaline media is of great importance for the conversion of renewable energy to hydrogen fuel via photoelectrochemical water splitting. However, both mechanistic exploration and materials development for HER under alkaline conditions are very limited. Precious Pt metal, which still serves as the state-of-the-art catalyst for HER, is unable to guarantee a sustainable hydrogen supply. Here we report an anomalously structured Ru catalyst that shows 2.5 times higher hydrogen generation rate than Pt and is among the most active HER electrocatalysts yet reported in alkaline solutions. The identification of new face-centered cubic crystallographic structure of Ru nanoparticles was investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging, and its formation mechanism was revealed by spectroscopic characterization and theoretical analysis. For the first time, it is found that the Ru nanocatalyst showed a pronounced effect of the crystal structure on the electrocatalytic activity tested under different conditions. The combination of electrochemical reaction rate measurements and density functional theory computation shows that the high activity of anomalous Ru catalyst in alkaline solution originates from its suitable adsorption energies to some key reaction intermediates and reaction kinetics in the HER process.

  19. Lichen Symbiosis: Nature's High Yielding Machines for Induced Hydrogen Production

    Papazi, Aikaterini; Kastanaki, Elizabeth; Pirintsos, Stergios; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is a promising future energy source. Although the ability of green algae to produce hydrogen has long been recognized (since 1939) and several biotechnological applications have been attempted, the greatest obstacle, being the O2-sensitivity of the hydrogenase enzyme, has not yet been overcome. In the present contribution, 75 years after the first report on algal hydrogen production, taking advantage of a natural mechanism of oxygen balance, we demonstrate high hydrogen yields by lichens. Lichens have been selected as the ideal organisms in nature for hydrogen production, since they consist of a mycobiont and a photobiont in symbiosis. It has been hypothesized that the mycobiont’s and photobiont’s consumption of oxygen (increase of COX and AOX proteins of mitochondrial respiratory pathways and PTOX protein of chrolorespiration) establishes the required anoxic conditions for the activation of the phycobiont’s hydrogenase in a closed system. Our results clearly supported the above hypothesis, showing that lichens have the ability to activate appropriate bioenergetic pathways depending on the specific incubation conditions. Under light conditions, they successfully use the PSII-dependent and the PSII-independent pathways (decrease of D1 protein and parallel increase of PSaA protein) to transfer electrons to hydrogenase, while under dark conditions, lichens use the PFOR enzyme and the dark fermentative pathway to supply electrons to hydrogenase. These advantages of lichen symbiosis in combination with their ability to survive in extreme environments (while in a dry state) constitute them as unique and valuable hydrogen producing natural factories and pave the way for future biotechnological applications. PMID:25826211

  20. Lichen symbiosis: nature's high yielding machines for induced hydrogen production.

    Aikaterini Papazi

    Full Text Available Hydrogen is a promising future energy source. Although the ability of green algae to produce hydrogen has long been recognized (since 1939 and several biotechnological applications have been attempted, the greatest obstacle, being the O2-sensitivity of the hydrogenase enzyme, has not yet been overcome. In the present contribution, 75 years after the first report on algal hydrogen production, taking advantage of a natural mechanism of oxygen balance, we demonstrate high hydrogen yields by lichens. Lichens have been selected as the ideal organisms in nature for hydrogen production, since they consist of a mycobiont and a photobiont in symbiosis. It has been hypothesized that the mycobiont's and photobiont's consumption of oxygen (increase of COX and AOX proteins of mitochondrial respiratory pathways and PTOX protein of chrolorespiration establishes the required anoxic conditions for the activation of the phycobiont's hydrogenase in a closed system. Our results clearly supported the above hypothesis, showing that lichens have the ability to activate appropriate bioenergetic pathways depending on the specific incubation conditions. Under light conditions, they successfully use the PSII-dependent and the PSII-independent pathways (decrease of D1 protein and parallel increase of PSaA protein to transfer electrons to hydrogenase, while under dark conditions, lichens use the PFOR enzyme and the dark fermentative pathway to supply electrons to hydrogenase. These advantages of lichen symbiosis in combination with their ability to survive in extreme environments (while in a dry state constitute them as unique and valuable hydrogen producing natural factories and pave the way for future biotechnological applications.

  1. HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER

    BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH,RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

    2003-06-01

    OAK B202 HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER. Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from

  2. Characterization of high-pressure, underexpanded hydrogen-jet flames

    Schefer, R.W.; Houf, W.G.; Williams, T.C. [Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Bourne, B.; Colton, J. [SRI International, 333 Ravenwood Ave., Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    Measurements were performed to characterize the dimensional and radiative properties of large-scale, vertical hydrogen-jet flames. This data is relevant to the safety scenario of a sudden leak in a high-pressure hydrogen containment vessel and will provide a technological basis for determining hazardous length scales associated with unintended hydrogen releases at storage and distribution centers. Jet flames originating from high-pressure sources up to 413 bar (6000 psi) were studied to verify the application of correlations and scaling laws based on lower-pressure subsonic and choked-flow jet flames. These higher pressures are expected to be typical of the pressure ranges in future hydrogen storage vessels. At these pressures the flows exiting the jet nozzle are categorized as underexpanded jets in which the flow is choked at the jet exit. Additionally, the gas behavior departs from that of an ideal-gas and alternate formulations for non-ideal gas must be introduced. Visible flame emission was recorded on video to evaluate flame length and structure. Radiometer measurements allowed determination of the radiant heat flux characteristics. The flame length results show that lower-pressure engineering correlations, based on the Froude number and a non-dimensional flame length, also apply to releases up to 413 bar (6000 psi). Similarly, radiative heat flux characteristics of these high-pressure jet flames obey scaling laws developed for low-pressure, smaller-scale flames and a wide variety of fuels. The results verify that such correlations can be used to a priori predict dimensional characteristics and radiative heat flux from a wide variety of hydrogen-jet flames resulting from accidental releases. (author)

  3. Development of a high strength, hydrogen-resistant austenitic alloy

    Chang, K.M.; Klahn, D.H.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1980-08-01

    Research toward high-strength, high toughness nonmagnetic steels for use in the retaining rings of large electrical generators led to the development of a Ta-modified iron-based superalloy (Fe-36 Ni-3 Ti-3 Ta-0.5 Al-1.3 Mo-0.3 V-0.01 B) which combines high strength with good toughness after suitable aging. The alloy did, however, show some degradation in fatigue resistance in gaseous hydrogen. This sensitivity was associated with a deformation-induced martensitic transformation near the fracture surface. The addition of a small amount of chromium to the alloy suppressed the martensite transformation and led to a marked improvement in hydrogen resistance

  4. Synthesis and stability of hydrogen selenide compounds at high pressure

    Pace, Edward J.; Binns, Jack; Alvarez, Miriam Pena; Dalladay-Simpson, Philip; Gregoryanz, Eugene; Howie, Ross T. (Edinburgh); (CHPSTAR- China)

    2017-11-14

    The observation of high-temperature superconductivity in hydride sulfide (H2S) at high pressures has generated considerable interest in compressed hydrogen-rich compounds. High-pressure hydrogen selenide (H2Se) has also been predicted to be superconducting at high temperatures; however, its behaviour and stability upon compression remains unknown. In this study, we synthesize H2Se in situ from elemental Se and molecular H2 at pressures of 0.4 GPa and temperatures of 473 K. On compression at 300 K, we observe the high-pressure solid phase sequence (I-I'-IV) of H2Se through Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction measurements, before dissociation into its constituent elements. Through the compression of H2Se in H2 media, we also observe the formation of a host-guest structure, (H2Se)2H2, which is stable at the same conditions as H2Se, with respect to decomposition. These measurements show that the behaviour of H2Se is remarkably similar to that of H2S and provides further understanding of the hydrogen chalcogenides under pressure.

  5. Plasma Temperature Determination of Hydrogen Containing High-Frequency Electrodeless Lamps by Intensity Distribution Measurements of Hydrogen Molecular Band

    Gavare, Zanda; Revalde, Gita; Skudra, Atis

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the present work was the investigation of the possibility to use intensity distribution of the Q-branch lines of the hydrogen Fulcher-α diagonal band (d3Πu−→a3∑g+ electronic transition; Q-branch with v=v′=2) to determine the temperature of hydrogen containing high-frequency electrodeless lamps (HFEDLs). The values of the rotational temperatures have been obtained from the relative intensity distributions for hydrogen-helium and hydrogen-argon HFEDLs depending on the applied curren...

  6. Superconductivity in hydrogen-rich materials at high pressures

    Drozdov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    A room temperature superconductor is probably one of the most desired systems in solid state physics. The highest critical temperature (T{sub c}) that has been achieved so far is in the copper oxide system: 133 kelvin (K) at ambient pressure ([82]Schilling et al. 1993) and 160 K under pressure ([42]Gao et al. 1994). The nature of superconductivity in the cuprates and in the recently discovered iron-based superconductor family (T{sub c}=57 K) is still not fully understood. In contrast, there is a class of superconductors which is well-described by the Bardeen, Cooper, Schrieffer (BCS) theory - conventional superconductors. Great efforts were spent in searching for high-temperature (T{sub c} > 77 K) conventional superconductor but only T{sub c} = 39 K has been reached in MgB2 ([68]Nagamatsu et al. 2001). BCS theory puts no bounds for T{sub c} as follows from Eliashberg's formulation of BCS theory. T{sub c} can be high, if there is a favorable combination of high-frequency phonons, strong electron-phonon coupling, and a high density of states. It does not predict however in which materials all three parameters are large. At least it gives a clear indication that materials with light elements are favorable as light elements provide high frequencies in the phonon spectrum. The lightest element is hydrogen, and Ashcroft made a first prediction that metallic hydrogen will be a high-temperature superconductor ([6]Ashcroft 1968). As pressure of hydrogen metallization was too high (about 400-500 GPa) for experimental techniques then he proposed that compounds dominated by hydrogen (hydrides) also might be good high temperature superconductors ([6]Ashcroft 1968; [7]Ashcroft 2004). A lot of the followed calculations supported this idea. T{sub c} in the range of 50-235 kelvin was predicted for many hydrides. Unfortunately, only a moderate T{sub c} of 17 kelvin has been observed experimentally ([27]Eremets et al. 2008) so far. A goal of the present work is to find a

  7. Volume generation of negative ions in high density hydrogen discharges

    Hiskes, J.R.; Karo, A.M.

    1983-01-01

    A parametric survey is made of a high-density tandem two-chamber hydrogen negative ion system. The optimum extracted negative ion current densities are sensitive to the atom concentration in the discharge and to the system scale length. For scale lengths ranging from 10 cm to 0.1 cm optimum current densities range from of order 1 to 100 mA cm -2 , respectively

  8. High-rate fermentative hydrogen production from beverage wastewater

    Sivagurunathan, Periyasamy; Sen, Biswarup; Lin, Chiu-Yue

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Hybrid immobilized-bacterial cells show stable operation over 175 days. • Low HRT of 1.5 h shows peak hydrogen production rate of 55 L/L-d. • Electricity generation is 9024 kW-d from 55 L/L-d hydrogen using beverage wastewater. • Granular sludge formed only at 2–3 h HRT with presence of Selenomonas sp. - Abstract: Hydrogen production from beverage industry wastewater (20 g/L hexose equivalent ) using an immobilized cell reactor with a continuous mode of operation was studied at various hydraulic retention times (HRT, 8–1.5 h). Maximum hydrogen production rate (HPR) of 55 L/L-d was obtained at HRT 1.5 h (an organic loading of 320 g/L-d hexose equivalent ). This HPR value is much higher than those of other industrial wastewaters employed in fermentative hydrogen production. The cell biomass concentration peaked at 3 h HRT with a volatile suspended solids (VSS) concentration of 6.31 g/L (with presence of self-flocculating Selenomonas sp.), but it dropped to 3.54 gVSS/L at 1.5 h HRT. With the shortening of HRT, lactate concentration increased but the concentration of the dominant metabolite butyrate did not vary significantly. The Clostridium species dynamics was not significantly affected, but total microbial community structure changed with respect to HRT variation as evident from PCR–DGGE analyses. Analysis of energy production rate suggests that beverage wastewater is a high energy yielding feedstock, and can replace 24% of electricity consumption in a model beverage industry

  9. Dinamical polarizability of highly excited hydrogen-like states

    Delone, N.B.; Krajnov, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    Analytic expressions are derived for the dynamic polarizability of highly excited hydrogen-like atomic states. It is shown that in the composite matrix element which determines the dynamic polarizability there is a strong compensation of the terms as a result of which the resulting magnitude of the dynamic polarizability is quasiclasically small compared to the individual terms of the composite matrix. It is concluded that the resonance behaviour of the dynamic polarizability of highly excited states differs significantly from the resonance behaviour of the polarizability for the ground and low-lying atomic states. The static limit and high-frequency limit of on electromagnetic field are considered

  10. Structural changes and intermolecular interactions of filled ice Ic structure for hydrogen hydrate under high pressure

    Machida, S; Hirai, H; Kawamura, T; Yamamoto, Y; Yagi, T

    2010-01-01

    High-pressure experiments of hydrogen hydrate were performed using a diamond anvil cell under conditions of 0.1-44.2 GPa and at room temperature. Also, high pressure Raman studies of solid hydrogen were performed in the pressure range of 0.1-43.7 GPa. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) for hydrogen hydrate revealed that a known high-pressure structure, filled ice Ic structure, of hydrogen hydrate transformed to a new high-pressure structure at approximately 35-40 GPa. A comparison of the Raman spectroscopy of a vibron for hydrogen molecules between hydrogen hydrate and solid hydrogen revealed that the extraction of hydrogen molecules from hydrogen hydrate occurred above 20 GPa. Also, the Raman spectra of a roton revealed that the rotation of hydrogen molecules in hydrogen hydrate was suppressed at around 20 GPa and that the rotation recovered under higher pressure. These results indicated that remarkable intermolecular interactions in hydrogen hydrate between neighboring hydrogen molecules and between guest hydrogen molecules and host water molecules might occur. These intermolecular interactions could produce the stability of hydrogen hydrate.

  11. Selective gettering of hydrogen in high pressure metal iodide lamps

    Kuus, G.

    1976-01-01

    One of the main problems in the manufacture of high pressure gas discharge lamps is the elimination of gaseous impurities from their arc tubes. Long degassing processes of all the lamp components are necessary in order to produce lamps with a low ignition voltage and good maintenance of the radiation properties. The investigation described deals with a selective getter place in the arc tube which can replace the long degassing process. The getter consists of a piece of yttrium encapsulated in thin tantalum foil. By this way it is possible to use the gettering action of tantalum and yttrium without having reaction between the metal iodide of the arc tube and yttrium. Yttrium is used because this metal can adsorb a large quantity of hydrogen even at a temperature of 1000 0 C. Hydrogen forms the main gaseous impurity in the high pressure metal iodide lamp. For this reason the adsorption properties like adsorption rate and capacity of the tantalum--yttrium getter for hydrogen are examined, and the results obtained from lamp experiments are given

  12. HIGH-n HYDROGEN RECOMBINATION LINES FROM THE FIRST GALAXIES

    Rule, E.; Loeb, A.; Strelnitski, V. S.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the prospects of blind and targeted searches in the radio domain (10 MHz to 1 THz) for high-n hydrogen recombination lines from the first generation of galaxies, at z ∼ 4 km s –1 , allow us to assess the blind search time necessary for detection by a given facility. We show that the chances for detection are the highest in the millimeter and submillimeter domains, but finding spontaneous emission in a blind search, especially from redshifts z >> 1, is a challenge even with powerful facilities, such as the Actama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array and Square Kilometre Array. The probability of success is higher for a targeted search of lines with principal quantum number n ∼ 10 in Lyman-break galaxies amplified by gravitational lensing. Detection of more than one hydrogen line in such a galaxy will allow for line identification and a precise determination of the galaxy's redshift

  13. Fast High-Quality Noise

    Frisvad, Jeppe Revall; Wyvill, Geoff

    2007-01-01

    At the moment the noise functions available in a graphics programmer's toolbox are either slow to compute or they involve grid-line artifacts making them of lower quality. In this paper we present a real-time noise computation with no grid-line artifacts or other regularity problems. In other words......, we put a new tool in the box that computes fast high-quality noise. In addition to being free of artifacts, the noise we present does not rely on tabulated data (everything is computed on the fly) and it is easy to adjust quality vs. quantity for the noise. The noise is based on point rendering (like...... spot noise), but it extends to more than two dimensions. The fact that it is based on point rendering makes art direction of the noise much easier....

  14. Hydrogen.

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  15. Confined high-pressure chemical deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon.

    Baril, Neil F; He, Rongrui; Day, Todd D; Sparks, Justin R; Keshavarzi, Banafsheh; Krishnamurthi, Mahesh; Borhan, Ali; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Peacock, Anna C; Healy, Noel; Sazio, Pier J A; Badding, John V

    2012-01-11

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is one of the most technologically important semiconductors. The challenge in producing it from SiH(4) precursor is to overcome a significant kinetic barrier to decomposition at a low enough temperature to allow for hydrogen incorporation into a deposited film. The use of high precursor concentrations is one possible means to increase reaction rates at low enough temperatures, but in conventional reactors such an approach produces large numbers of homogeneously nucleated particles in the gas phase, rather than the desired heterogeneous deposition on a surface. We report that deposition in confined micro-/nanoreactors overcomes this difficulty, allowing for the use of silane concentrations many orders of magnitude higher than conventionally employed while still realizing well-developed films. a-Si:H micro-/nanowires can be deposited in this way in extreme aspect ratio, small-diameter optical fiber capillary templates. The semiconductor materials deposited have ~0.5 atom% hydrogen with passivated dangling bonds and good electronic properties. They should be suitable for a wide range of photonic and electronic applications such as nonlinear optical fibers and solar cells. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  16. Hydrogen incorporation in high hole density GaN:Mg

    Zvanut, M. E.; Uprety, Y.; Dashdorj, J.; Moseley, M.; Doolittle, W. Alan

    2011-03-01

    We investigate hydrogen passivation in heavily doped p-type GaN using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Samples include both conventionally grown GaN (1019 cm-3 Mg, 1017 cm-3 holes) and films grown by metal modulation epitaxy (MME), which yielded higher Mg (1- 4 x 1020 cm-3) and hole (1- 40 x 1018 cm-3) densities than found in conventionally grown GaN. The Mg acceptor signal is monitored throughout 30 minute annealing steps in N2 :H2 (92%:7%)) and subsequently pure N2 . N2 :H2 heat treatments of the lower hole density films begin to reduce the Mg EPR intensity at 750 o C, but quench the signal in high hole density films at 600 o C. Revival of the signal by subsequent N2 annealing occurs at 800 o C for the low hole density material and 600 o C in MME GaN. The present work highlights chemical differences between heavily Mg doped and lower doped films; however, it is unclear whether the difference is due to changes in hydrogen-Mg complex formation or hydrogen diffusion. The work at UAB is supported by the NSF.

  17. High-temperature study of superconducting hydrogen and deuterium sulfide

    Durajski, A.P. [Institute of Physics, Czestochowa University of Technology, Ave. Armii Krajowej 19, 42-200 Czestochowa (Poland); Szczesniak, R. [Institute of Physics, Czestochowa University of Technology, Ave. Armii Krajowej 19, 42-200 Czestochowa (Poland); Institute of Physics, Jan Dlugosz University, Ave. Armii Krajowej 13/15, 42-200 Czestochowa (Poland); Pietronero, L. [Sapienza, Universita di Roma, Dip. Fisica, P. le A. Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Institute of Complex Systems, CNR, Via dei Taurini 19 Roma (Italy); London Institute for Mathematical Sciences, South Street 22, Mayfair London (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-15

    Hydrogen-rich compounds are extensively explored as candidates for a high-temperature superconductors. Currently, the measured critical temperature of 203 K in hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 3}S) is among the highest over all-known superconductors. In present paper, using the strong-coupling Eliashberg theory of superconductivity, we compared in detail the thermodynamic properties of two samples containing different hydrogen isotopes H{sub 3}S and D{sub 3}S at 150 GPa. Our research indicates that it is possible to reproduce the measured values of critical temperature 203 K and 147 K for H{sub 3}S and D{sub 3}S by using a Coulomb pseudopotential of 0.123 and 0.131, respectively. However, we also discuss a scenario in which the isotope effect is independent of pressure and the Coulomb pseudopotential for D{sub 3}S is smaller than for H{sub 3}S. For both scenarios, the energy gap, specific heat, thermodynamic critical field and related dimensionless ratios are calculated and compared with other conventional superconductors. We shown that the existence of the strong-coupling and retardation effects in the systems analysed result in significant differences between values obtained within the framework of the Eliashberg formalism and the prediction of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory. (copyright 2015 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Production of JET fuel containing molecules of high hydrogen content

    Tomasek Sz.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The harmful effects of aviation can only be reduced by using alternative fuels with excellent burning properties and a high hydrogen content in the constituent molecules. Due to increasing plastic consumption the amount of the plastic waste is also higher. Despite the fact that landfill plastic waste has been steadily reduced, the present scenario is not satisfactory. Therefore, the aim of this study is to produce JET fuel containing an alternative component made from straight-run kerosene and the waste polyethylene cracking fraction. We carried out our experiments on a commercial NiMo/Al2O3/P catalyst at the following process parameters: T=200-300°C, P=40 bar, LHSV=1.0-3.0 h-1, hydrogen/hydrocarbon ratio= 400 Nm3/m3. We investigated the effects of the feedstocks and the process parameters on the product yields, the hydrodesulfurization and hydrodearomatization efficiencies, and the main product properties. The liquid product yields varied between 99.7-99.8%. As a result of the hydrogenation the sulfur (1-1780 mg/kg and the aromatic contents (9.0-20.5% of the obtained products and the values of their smoke points (26.0-34.7 mm fulfilled the requirements of JET fuel standard. Additionally, the concentration of paraffins increased in the products and the burning properties were also improved. The freezing points of the products were higher than -47°C, therefore product blending is needed.

  19. Hydrogen gettering the overpressure gas from highly radioactive liquids

    Riley, D.L.; Schicker, J.R.

    1996-04-01

    Remediation of current inventories of high-activity radioactive liquid waste (HALW) requires transportation of Type-B quantities of radioactive material, possibly up to several hundred liters. However, the only currently certified packaging is limited to quantities of 50 ml (0.01 gal) quantities of Type-B radioactive liquid. Efforts are under way to recertify the existing packaging to allow the shipment of up to 4 L (1.1 gal) of Type-B quantities of HALW, but significantly larger packaging could be needed in the future. Scoping studies and preliminary designs have identified the feasibility of retrofitting an insert into existing casks, allowing the transport of up to 380 L (100 gal) of HALW. However, the insert design and ultimate certification strategy depend heavily on the gas-generating attributes of the HALW. A non-vented containment vessel filled with HALW, in the absence of any gas-mitigation technologies, poses a deflagration threat and, therefore, gas generation, specifically hydrogen generation, must be reliably controlled during all phases of transportation. Two techniques are available to mitigate hydrogen accumulation: recombiners and getters. Getters have an advantage over recombiners in that oxides are not required to react with the hydrogen. A test plan was developed to evaluate three forms of getter material in the presence of both simulated HALW and the gases that are produced by the HALW. These tests demonstrated that getters can react with hydrogen in the presence of simulated waste and in the presence of several other gases generated by the HALW, such as nitrogen, ammonia, nitrous oxide, and carbon monoxide. Although the use of such a gettering system has been shown to be technically feasible, only a preliminary design for its use has been completed. No further development is planned until the requirement for bulk transport of Type-B quantities of HALW is more thoroughly defined

  20. Composite high-pressure vessels for hydrogen storage in mobile application. Pt. 1 / Light weight composite cylinders for compressed hydrogen. Pt. 2 - custom made hydrogen storage tanks and vessels

    Rasche, C. [MCS Cylinder Systems GmbH, Dinslaken (Germany)

    2000-07-01

    Recent developments on fuel cell technology demonstrated the feasibility of propelling vehicles by converting fuel directly into electricity. Fuel cells conveniently use either compressed (CGH{sub 2}) or liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) or methanol as the fuel source from a tank. Mobile storage of these fuelling will become an urgent need as this technology will come into series production expected for 2010. Due to the requirements on mobile hydrogen storage and the energy losses in the hydrogen-to-application-chain, a light-weight and energetic qualities and minimise ist bulky nature. Mobile storage of hydrogen can be realised either at high pressure values (> 20 MPa) or at deep temperatures (<-253 C). CGH{sub 2}: In the last few years, the introduction of natural gas driven vehicles has seen the development of compact mobile pressurised gas tanks in principle, this storage technique is also applicable for the compressed storage of hydrogen at filling pressures of > 20 MPa. LH{sub 2} : Storing hydrogen or natural gases in general in the liquid phase is accomplished either by applying a overpressure or keeping it below the phase transition temperature at ambient pressure in super insulated devices. (orig.)

  1. Hydrogen content, interfacial exchange and hydrogen diffusion in high-temperature protonic conductors based on strontium and barium cerates

    Vdovin, G.K.; Kurumchin, Eh.Kh.

    2004-01-01

    The hydrogen content and kinetics of the hydrogen exchange in the barium and strontium doped cerates are studied in the reduction atmosphere through the methods of isotope counterbalancing and isotope exchange. The measurements are carried out at 500-840 Deg C and hydrogen pressure of 2.7-16 gPa. It is established, that the hydrogen interfacial exchange proceeds at high velocities through the dissociative-type mechanisms. The effective activation energy of the hydrogen heteroexchange is determined. The coefficient of the hydrogen diffusion in BaCe 0.95 Nd 0.5 O 3-δ is calculated. The hydrogen content per formula unit constituted (0.48±0.05) in the SrCe 0.95 Y 0.05 O 3-δ and (0.60±0.05) in the BaCe 0.95 Nd 0.5 O 3-δ at 550 and 720 Deg C correspondingly and hydrogen pressure of 6.7 gPa [ru

  2. Thermodynamic analyses of hydrogen production from sub-quality natural gas. Part I: Pyrolysis and autothermal pyrolysis

    Huang, Cunping; T-Raissi, Ali

    Sub-quality natural gas (SQNG) is defined as natural gas whose composition exceeds pipeline specifications of nitrogen, carbon dioxide (CO 2) and/or hydrogen sulfide (H 2S). Approximately one-third of the U.S. natural gas resource is sub-quality gas [1]. Due to the high cost of removing H 2S from hydrocarbons using current processing technologies, SQNG wells are often capped and the gas remains in the ground. We propose and analyze a two-step hydrogen production scheme using SQNG as feedstock. The first step of the process involves hydrocarbon processing (via steam-methane reformation, autothermal steam-methane reformation, pyrolysis and autothermal pyrolysis) in the presence of H 2S. Our analyses reveal that H 2S existing in SQNG is stable and can be considered as an inert gas. No sulfur dioxide (SO 2) and/or sulfur trioxide (SO 3) is formed from the introduction of oxygen to SQNG. In the second step, after the separation of hydrogen from the main stream, un-reacted H 2S is used to reform the remaining methane, generating more hydrogen and carbon disulfide (CS 2). Thermodynamic analyses on SQNG feedstock containing up to 10% (v/v) H 2S have shown that no H 2S separation is required in this process. The Part I of this paper includes only thermodynamic analyses for SQNG pyrolysis and autothermal pyrolysis.

  3. Hydrogen

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  4. Liquid alternative diesel fuels with high hydrogen content

    Hancsok, Jenoe; Varga, Zoltan; Eller, Zoltan; Poelczmann, Gyoergy [Pannonia Univ., Veszprem (Hungary). MOL Dept. of Hydrocarbon Processing; Kasza, Tamas [MOL Hungarian Oil and Gas Plc., Szazhalombatta (Hungary)

    2013-06-01

    Mobility is a keystone of the sustainable development. In the operation of the vehicles as the tools of mobility internal combustion engines, so thus Diesel engines will play a remarkable role in the next decades. Beside fossil fuels - used for power these engines - liquid alternative fuels have higher and higher importance, because of their known advantages. During the presentation the categorization possibilities based on the chronology of their development and application will be presented. The importance of fuels with high hydrogen content will be reviewed. Research and development activity in the field of such kind of fuels will be presented. During this developed catalytic systems and main performance properties of the product will be presented which were obtained in case of biogasoils produced by special hydrocracking of natural triglycerides and in case of necessity followed by isomerization; furthermore in case of synthetic biogasoils obtained by the isomerization hydrocracking of Fischer-Tropsch paraffins produced from biomass based synthesis gas. Excellent combustion properties (cetane number > 65-75), good cold flow properties and reduced harmful material emission due to the high hydrogen content (C{sub n}H{sub 2n+2}) are highlighted. Finally production possibilities of linear and branched paraffins based on lignocelluloses are briefly reviewed. Summarizing it was concluded that liquid hydrocarbons with high isoparaffin content are the most suitable fuels regarding availability, economical and environmental aspects, namely the sustainable development. (orig.)

  5. High temperature fast reactor for hydrogen production in Brazil

    Nascimento, Jamil A. do; Ono, Shizuca; Guimaraes, Lamartine N.F.

    2008-01-01

    The main nuclear reactors technology for the Generation IV, on development phase for utilization after 2030, is the fast reactor type with high temperature output to improve the efficiency of the thermo-electric conversion process and to enable applications of the generated heat in industrial process. Currently, water electrolysis and thermo chemical cycles using very high temperature are studied for large scale and long-term hydrogen production, in the future. With the possible oil scarcity and price rise, and the global warming, this application can play an important role in the changes of the world energy matrix. In this context, it is proposed a fast reactor with very high output temperature, ∼ 1000 deg C. This reactor will have a closed fuel cycle; it will be cooled by lead and loaded with nitride fuel. This reactor may be used for hydrogen, heat and electricity production in Brazil. It is discussed a development strategy of the necessary technologies and some important problems are commented. The proposed concept presents characteristics that meet the requirements of the Generation IV reactor class. (author)

  6. Combined Solid State and High Pressure Hydrogen Storage

    Grube, Elisabeth; Jensen, Torben René

    Presented at The First European Early Stage Researcher's Conference on Hydrogen Storage in Belgrade, Serbia.......Presented at The First European Early Stage Researcher's Conference on Hydrogen Storage in Belgrade, Serbia....

  7. Ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and particulate matter emissions from California high-rise layer houses

    Lin, X.-J.; Cortus, E. L.; Zhang, R.; Jiang, S.; Heber, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia and hydrogen sulfide are hazardous substances that are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency through community right-to-know legislation (EPCRA, EPA, 2011). The emissions of ammonia and hydrogen sulfide from large commercial layer facilities are of concern to legislators and nearby neighbors. Particulate matter (PM 10 and PM 2.5) released from layer houses are two of seven criteria pollutants for which EPA has set National Ambient Air Quality Standards as required by the Clean Air Act. Therefore, it is important to quantify the baseline emissions of these pollutants. The emissions of ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and PM from two California high-rise layer houses were monitored for two years from October 2007 to October 2009. Each house had 32,500 caged laying hens. The monitoring site was setup in compliance with a U.S. EPA-approved quality assurance project plan. The results showed the average daily mean emission rates of ammonia, hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide were 0.95 ± 0.67 (standard deviation) g d -1 bird -1, 1.27 ± 0.78 mg d -1 bird -1 and 91.4 ± 16.5 g d -1 bird -1, respectively. The average daily mean emission rates of PM 2.5, PM 10 and total suspended particulate (TSP) were 5.9 ± 12.6, 33.4 ± 27.4, and 78.0 ± 42.7 mg d -1 bird -1, respectively. It was observed that ammonia emission rates in summer were lower than in winter because the high airflow stabilized the manure by drying it. The reductions due to lower moisture content were greater than the increases due to higher temperature. However, PM 10 emission rates in summer were higher than in winter because the drier conditions coupled with higher internal air velocities increased PM 10 release from feathers, feed and manure.

  8. Plasma Temperature Determination of Hydrogen Containing High-Frequency Electrode less Lamps by Intensity Distribution Measurements of Hydrogen Molecular Band

    Gavare, Z.; Revalde, G.; Skudra, A.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the present work was the investigation of the possibility to use intensity distribution of the Q-branch lines of the hydrogen Fulcher-a diagonal band (d3η u- a3Σg + electronic transition; Q-branch with ν=ν=2) to determine the temperature of hydrogen containing high-frequency electrode less lamps (HFEDLs). The values of the rotational temperatures have been obtained from the relative intensity distributions for hydrogen-helium and hydrogen-argon HFEDLs depending on the applied current. The results have been compared with the method of temperature derivation from Doppler profiles of He 667.8 nm and Ar 772.4 nm lines. The results of both methods are in good agreement, showing that the method of gas temperature determination from the intensity distribution in the hydrogen Fulcher-a (2-2)Q band can be used for the hydrogen containing HFEDLs. It was observed that the admixture of 10% hydrogen in the argon HFEDLs significantly reduces the gas temperature

  9. Investigation of hydrogen bubbles behavior in tungsten by high-flux hydrogen implantation

    Zhao, Jiangtao; Meng, Xuan; Guan, Xingcai; Wang, Qiang; Fang, Kaihong; Xu, Xiaohui; Lu, Yongkai; Gao, Jun; Liu, Zhenlin; Wang, Tieshan

    2018-05-01

    Hydrogen isotopes retention and bubbles formation are critical issues for tungsten as plasma-facing material in future fusion reactors. In this work, the formation and growing up behavior of hydrogen bubbles in tungsten were investigated experimentally. The planar TEM samples were implanted by 6.0keV hydrogens to a fluence of 3.38 ×1018 H ṡ cm-2 at room temperature, and well-defined hydrogen bubbles were observed by TEM. It was demonstrated that hydrogen bubbles formed when exposed to a fluence of 1.5 ×1018 H ṡ cm-2 , and the hydrogen bubbles grew up with the implantation fluence. In addition, the bubbles' size appeared larger with higher beam flux until saturated at a certain flux, even though the total fluence was kept the same. Finally, in order to understand the thermal annealing effect on the bubbles behavior, hydrogen-implanted samples were annealed at 400, 600, 800, and 1000 °C for 3 h. It was obvious that hydrogen bubbles' morphology changed at temperatures higher than 800 °C.

  10. Development of a cryogenic hydrogen microjet for high-intensity, high-repetition rate experiments

    Kim, J. B.; Göde, S.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-11-01

    The advent of high-intensity, high-repetition-rate lasers has led to the need for replenishing targets of interest for high energy density sciences. We describe the design and characterization of a cryogenic microjet source, which can deliver a continuous stream of liquid hydrogen with a diameter of a few microns. The jet has been imaged at 1 μm resolution by shadowgraphy with a short pulse laser. The pointing stability has been measured at well below a mrad, for a stable free-standing filament of solid-density hydrogen.

  11. High Conversion of Styrene, Ethylene, and Hydrogen to Linear Monoalkylbenzenes

    David Hermann Lamparelli

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available 1-Alkylbenzenes as a precursor of surfactants, can be produced from ethylene, styrene, and hydrogen. These intermediates, lacking tertiary carbons, are environmentally more benign than commercial ones that bear the aromatic ring linked to an internal carbon of the aliphatic chain. The one-pot synthesis of highly linear 1-alkylbenzenes (LABs through the homogeneous catalysis of olefin poly-insertion from cheap and largely available reagents can be carried out with a high turnover and selectivity. A purposely designed reactor that allows for the fine control of the three components feed, along with temperature, plays a key role in this achievement. A turnover of 194 g of LABs per mmol of catalyst per hour can be obtained with the simultaneous removal of polyethylene as a by-product.

  12. Impact of hydrogen dilution on optical properties of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon films prepared by high density plasma chemical vapor deposition for solar cell applications

    Chen, Huai-Yi; Lee, Yao-Jen; Chang, Chien-Pin; Koo, Horng-Show; Lai, Chiung-Hui

    2013-01-01

    P-i-n single-junction hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film solar cells were successfully fabricated in this study on a glass substrate by high density plasma chemical vapor deposition (HDP-CVD) at low power of 50 W, low temperature of 200°C and various hydrogen dilution ratios (R). The open circuit voltage (Voc ), short circuit current density (Jsc ), fill factor (FF) and conversion efficiency (η) of the solar cell as well as the refractive index (n) and absorption coefficient (α) of the i-layer at 600 nm wavelength rise with increasing R until an abrupt drop at high hydrogen dilution, i.e. R > 0.95. However, the optical energy bandgap (Eg ) of the i-layer decreases with the R increase. Voc and α are inversely correlated with Eg . The hydrogen content affects the i-layer and p/i interface quality of the a-Si:H thin film solar cell with an optimal value of R = 0.95, which corresponds to solar cell conversion efficiency of 3.85%. The proposed a-Si:H thin film solar cell is expected to be improved in performance.

  13. Hydrogen in trapping states innocuous to environmental degradation of high-strength steels

    Takai, Kenichi

    2003-01-01

    Hydrogen in trapping states innocuous to environmental degradation of the mechanical properties of high-strength steels has been separated and extracted using thermal desorption analysis (TDA) and slow strain rate test (SSRT). The high-strength steel occluding only hydrogen desorbed at low temperature (peak 1), as determined by TDA, decreases in maximum stress and plastic elongation with increasing occlusion time of peak 1 hydrogen. Thus the trapping state of peak 1 hydrogen is directly associated with environmental degradation. The trap activation energy for peak 1 hydrogen is 23.4 kJ/mol, so the peak 1 hydrogen corresponds to weaker binding states and diffusible states at room temperature. In contrast, the high-strength steel occluding only hydrogen desorbed at high temperature (peak 2), by TDA, maintains the maximum stress and plastic elongation in spite of an increasing content of peak 2 hydrogen. This result indicates that the peak 2 hydrogen trapping state is innocuous to environmental degradation, even though the steel occludes a large amount of peak 2 hydrogen. The trap activation energy for peak 2 hydrogen is 65.0 kJ/mol, which indicates a stronger binding state and nondiffusibility at room temperature. The trap activation energy for peak 2 hydrogen suggests that the driving force energy required for stress-induced, diffusion during elastic and plastic deformation, and the energy required for hydrogen dragging by dislocation mobility during plastic deformation are lower than the binding energy between hydrogen and trapping sites. The peak 2 hydrogen, therefore, is believed to not accumulate in front of the crack tip and to not cause environmental degradation in spite of being present in amounts as high as 2.9 mass ppm. (author)

  14. High-temperature nuclear reactor power plant cycle for hydrogen and electricity production – numerical analysis

    Dudek Michał

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (called HTR or HTGR for both electricity generation and hydrogen production is analysed. The HTR reactor because of the relatively high temperature of coolant could be combined with a steam or gas turbine, as well as with the system for heat delivery for high-temperature hydrogen production. However, the current development of HTR’s allows us to consider achievable working temperature up to 750°C. Due to this fact, industrial-scale hydrogen production using copper-chlorine (Cu-Cl thermochemical cycle is considered and compared with high-temperature electrolysis. Presented calculations show and confirm the potential of HTR’s as a future solution for hydrogen production without CO2 emission. Furthermore, integration of a hightemperature nuclear reactor with a combined cycle for electricity and hydrogen production may reach very high efficiency and could possibly lead to a significant decrease of hydrogen production costs.

  15. Development of Criteria for Flameholding Tendencies within Premixer Passages for High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    Lewis, Elliot Sullivan- [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); McDonell, Vincent G. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Due to increasingly stringent air quality requirements stationary power gas turbines have moved to lean-premixed operation, which reduces pollutant emissions but can result in flashback. Flashback can cause serious damage to the premixer hardware. Curtailing flashback can be difficult with hydrocarbon fuels and becomes even more challenging when hydrogen is used as the fuel. The two main approaches for coping with flashback are either to design a combustor that is resistant to flashback, or to design a premixer that will not anchor a flame if flashback occurs. Even with a well-designed combustor flashback can occur under certain circumstances, thus it is necessary to determine how to avoid flameholding within the premixer passageways of a gas turbine. To this end, an experiment was designed that would determine the flameholding propensities at elevated pressures and temperatures of three different classes of geometric features commonly found in gas turbine premixers, with both natural gas and hydrogen fuel. Experiments to find the equivalence ratio at blow off were conducted within an optically accessible test apparatus with four flameholders: 0.25 and 0.50 inch diameter cylinders, a reverse facing step with a height of 0.25 inches, and a symmetric airfoil with a thickness of 0.25 inches and a chord length of one inch. Tests were carried out at temperatures between 300 K and 750 K, at pressures up to 9 atmospheres. Typical bulk velocities were between 40 and 100 m/s. The effect of airfoil’s angle of rotation was also investigated. Blow off for hydrogen flames was found to occur at much lower adiabatic flame temperatures than natural gas flames. Additionally it was observed that at high pressures and high turbulence intensities, reactant velocity does not have a noticeable effect on the point of blow off due in large part to corresponding increases in turbulent flame speed. Finally a semi empirical correlation was developed that predicts flame extinction for both

  16. Damage process of high purity tungsten coatings by hydrogen beam heat loads

    Tamura, S.; Tokunaga, K.; Yoshida, N.; Taniguchi, M.; Ezato, K.; Sato, K.; Suzuki, S.; Akiba, M.; Tsunekawa, Y.; Okumiya, M.

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the synergistic effects of heat load and hydrogen irradiation, cyclic heat load tests with a hydrogen beam and a comparable electron beam were performed for high purity CVD-tungsten coatings. Surface modification was examined as a function of the peak temperature by changing the heat flux. Scanning Electron Microscopy analysis showed that the surface damage caused by the hydrogen beam was more severe than that by the electron beam. In the hydrogen beam case, cracking at the surface occurred at all peak temperatures examined from 300 deg. C to 1600 deg. C. These results indicate that the injected hydrogen induces embrittlement for the CVD-tungsten coating

  17. Alloy and composition dependence of hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility in high-strength steel fasteners

    Brahimi, S. V.; Yue, S.; Sriraman, K. R.

    2017-06-01

    High-strength steel fasteners characterized by tensile strengths above 1100 MPa are often used in critical applications where a failure can have catastrophic consequences. Preventing hydrogen embrittlement (HE) failure is a fundamental concern implicating the entire fastener supply chain. Research is typically conducted under idealized conditions that cannot be translated into know-how prescribed in fastener industry standards and practices. Additionally, inconsistencies and even contradictions in fastener industry standards have led to much confusion and many preventable or misdiagnosed fastener failures. HE susceptibility is a function of the material condition, which is comprehensively described by the metallurgical and mechanical properties. Material strength has a first-order effect on HE susceptibility, which increases significantly above 1200 MPa and is characterized by a ductile-brittle transition. For a given concentration of hydrogen and at equal strength, the critical strength above which the ductile-brittle transition begins can vary due to second-order effects of chemistry, tempering temperature and sub-microstructure. Additionally, non-homogeneity of the metallurgical structure resulting from poorly controlled heat treatment, impurities and non-metallic inclusions can increase HE susceptibility of steel in ways that are measurable but unpredictable. Below 1200 MPa, non-conforming quality is often the root cause of real-life failures. This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'.

  18. Design of hydroforming processes for metallic liners used in high pressure hydrogen storage

    Gelin, J.C.; Labergere, C.; Thibaud, S.; Boudeau, N.

    2005-01-01

    Within the framework of an European project concerning hydrogen storage, one analyze the way to manufacture high pressure tanks (700bars) for hydrogen storage, intended to be embarked for using in motor vehicles. These tanks consist of a metallic liner, which ensure a barrier role compared to the hydrogen atoms as well as a part of the mechanical resistance, and of a composite envelope built by filament rolling up which ensures the complementary part of the mechanical resistance. The paper describes the work completed within this framework, on the basis of the simulation of the hydroforming process thanks to the complete control of the process, in volume of fluid injected. One was thus brought to develop an optimization module based on finite element calculations. This optimization module includes MPI library in order to launch several calculations in parallel on a Linux cluster. It consists in seeking the optimal evolution of the fluid volume injected vs. time to obtain a good quality component. In our case, the optimization criterion is based on the variation thickness of the tube and the possible appearance of necking. It is shown that such a way for controlling the process provide the way to get minimal thickness variation, comparatively to standard optimization approaches where the process parameters are discretized through processing time in a more standard way

  19. Potential for air quality improvement in the Tokyo metropolitan area from use of hydrogen fuel

    Kruger, Paul; Murdock, Mork

    1998-01-01

    A revised estimation has been made of the local air quality improvement that can be achieved in Tokyo as a byproduct of a word-wide hydrogen energy economy based on global reduction of CO2 emission from fossil fuels. The study for the WE-NET Project in Japan examined the potential for reduction in nitrogen oxide emission with hydrogen fuel in the Tokyo metropolitan area where sufficient data exist on trends in population, vehicle registrations, traffic activity, and exhaust emissions. A dynamic model was developed to extrapolate the trends in these data to estimate future NOx emission rates in comparison to regulatory scenarios based on policy and technical decisions of the Tokyo Metropolitan Government for improvement of air quality in the metropolitan area. The results of the model show significant potential for reduction of NOx emission by the year 2020 with a concomitant reduction in mean roadside NOx concentration. (author)

  20. [Biochemical quality assessment of broiler production using a hydrogen bacteria biomass in the diet].

    Trubachev, I N; Okladnikov, Iu N; Barashkov, V A; Kalacheva, G S; Tabakov, N A

    1985-01-01

    The authors studied the biochemical composition of the meat of broilers, eggs, liver and muscles of laying hens of 3 generations on a 5, 10, 25, 50 and 100% (broilers), 10 and 20% (laying hens) replacement of the animal protein quota in the diet by protein obtained from the hydrogen bacteria Alcaligenes eutrophus L-1. No deterioration of the quality of the produce was found from the standpoint of the main biochemical parameters.

  1. Electrochemical Separation, Pumping, and Storage of Hydrogen or Oxygen into Nanocapillaries Via High Pressure MEA Seals

    2015-10-13

    412TW-PA-15560 Electrochemical Separation, Pumping, and Storage of Hydrogen or Oxygen into Nanocapillaries Via High Pressure MEA Seals...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Electrochemical Separation, Pumping, and Storage of Hydrogen or Oxygen into Nanocapillaries Via High Pressure MEA Seals...density storage of gases remains a major technological hurdle for many fields. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), for example, reduced their hydrogen

  2. High Growth Rate Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon-Germanium Films and Devices Using ECR-PECVD

    Liu, Yong [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon germanium films (a-SiGe:H) and devices have been extensively studied because of the tunable band gap for matching the solar spectrum and mature the fabrication techniques. a-SiGe:H thin film solar cells have great potential for commercial manufacture because of very low cost and adaptability to large-scale manufacturing. Although it has been demonstrated that a-SiGe:H thin films and devices with good quality can be produced successfully, some issues regarding growth chemistry have remained yet unexplored, such as the hydrogen and inert-gas dilution, bombardment effect, and chemical annealing, to name a few. The alloying of the SiGe introduces above an order-of-magnitude higher defect density, which degrades the performance of the a-SiGe:H thin film solar cells. This degradation becomes worse when high growth-rate deposition is required. Preferential attachment of hydrogen to silicon, clustering of Ge and Si, and columnar structure and buried dihydride radicals make the film intolerably bad. The work presented here uses the Electron-Cyclotron-Resonance Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (ECR-PECVD) technique to fabricate a-SiGe:H films and devices with high growth rates. Helium gas, together with a small amount of H2, was used as the plasma species. Thickness, optical band gap, conductivity, Urbach energy, mobility-lifetime product, I-V curve, and quantum efficiency were characterized during the process of pursuing good materials. The microstructure of the a-(Si,Ge):H material was probed by Fourier-Transform Infrared spectroscopy. They found that the advantages of using helium as the main plasma species are: (1) high growth rate--the energetic helium ions break the reactive gas more efficiently than hydrogen ions; (2) homogeneous growth--heavy helium ions impinging on the surface promote the surface mobility of the reactive radicals, so that heteroepitaxy growth as clustering of Ge and Si, columnar structure are

  3. Hydrogen Assisted Cracking of High Strength Steel Welds

    1988-05-01

    differs in general from the previous models in that hydrogen is assumed , to enhance local plasticity rather than truly embrittle the lattice. 5) Formation...measured. - The salient caracteristics of the IIW test include: - A 10mm X 15mm X 30mm specimen machined from mild steel with a sur- . .. face ground...hydrogen so %4. -. ,*. that a crack can grow under a lower applied stress. This theory has been criticized on the basis that the small but finite plastic

  4. High Performance, Low Cost Hydrogen Generation from Renewable Energy

    Ayers, Katherine [Proton OnSite; Dalton, Luke [Proton OnSite; Roemer, Andy [Proton OnSite; Carter, Blake [Proton OnSite; Niedzwiecki, Mike [Proton OnSite; Manco, Judith [Proton OnSite; Anderson, Everett [Proton OnSite; Capuano, Chris [Proton OnSite; Wang, Chao-Yang [Penn State University; Zhao, Wei [Penn State University

    2014-02-05

    Renewable hydrogen from proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis is gaining strong interest in Europe, especially in Germany where wind penetration is already at critical levels for grid stability. For this application as well as biogas conversion and vehicle fueling, megawatt (MW) scale electrolysis is required. Proton has established a technology roadmap to achieve the necessary cost reductions and manufacturing scale up to maintain U.S. competitiveness in these markets. This project represents a highly successful example of the potential for cost reduction in PEM electrolysis, and provides the initial stack design and manufacturing development for Proton’s MW scale product launch. The majority of the program focused on the bipolar assembly, from electrochemical modeling to subscale stack development through prototyping and manufacturing qualification for a large active area cell platform. Feasibility for an advanced membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with 50% reduction in catalyst loading was also demonstrated. Based on the progress in this program and other parallel efforts, H2A analysis shows the status of PEM electrolysis technology dropping below $3.50/kg production costs, exceeding the 2015 target.

  5. Thermodynamic analyses of hydrogen production from sub-quality natural gas

    Huang, Cunping; T-Raissi, Ali [Florida Solar Energy Center, University of Central Florida, 1679 Clearlake Road, Cocoa, FL 32922-5403 (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Part I of this paper analyzed sub-quality natural gas (SQNG) pyrolysis and autothermal pyrolysis. Production of hydrogen via direct thermolysis of SQNGs produces only 2mol of hydrogen and 1mol of carbon per mole of methane (CH{sub 4}). Steam reforming of SQNG (SRSQNG) could become a more effective approach because the processes produce two more moles of hydrogen via water splitting. A Gibbs reactor unit operation in the AspenPlus(TM) chemical process simulator was employed to accomplish equilibrium calculations for the SQNG+H{sub 2}O and SQNG+H{sub 2}O+O{sub 2} systems. The results indicate that water and oxygen inlet flow rates do not significantly affect the decomposition of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) at temperatures lower than 1000{sup o}C. The major co-product of the processes is carbonyl sulfide (COS) while sulfur dimer (S{sub 2}) and carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}) are minor by-products within this temperature range. At higher temperatures (>1300{sup o}C), CS{sub 2} and S{sub 2} become major co-products. No sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) or sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}) is formed during either SRSQNG or autothermal SRSQNG processes, indicating that no environmentally harmful acidic gases are generated. (author)

  6. Basic study on high temperature gas cooled reactor technology for hydrogen production

    Chang, Jong Hwa; Lee, W. J.; Lee, H. M.

    2003-01-01

    The annual production of hydrogen in the world is about 500 billion m 3 . Currently hydrogen is consumed mainly in chemical industries. However hydrogen has huge potential to be consumed in transportation sector in coming decades. Assuming that 10% of fossil energy in transportation sector is substituted by hydrogen in 2020, the hydrogen in the sector will exceed current hydrogen consumption by more than 2.5 times. Currently hydrogen is mainly produced by steam reforming of natural gas. Steam reforming process is chiefest way to produce hydrogen for mass production. In the future, hydrogen has to be produced in a way to minimize CO2 emission during its production process as well as to satisfy economic competition. One of the alternatives to produce hydrogen under such criteria is using heat source of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. The high-temperature gas-cooled reactor represents one type of the next generation of nuclear reactors for safe and reliable operation as well as for efficient and economic generation of energy

  7. LARGE-SCALE HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY USING HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS

    O'Brien, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen can be produced from water splitting with relatively high efficiency using high-temperature electrolysis. This technology makes use of solid-oxide cells, running in the electrolysis mode to produce hydrogen from steam, while consuming electricity and high-temperature process heat. When coupled to an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor, the overall thermal-to-hydrogen efficiency for high-temperature electrolysis can be as high as 50%, which is about double the overall efficiency of conventional low-temperature electrolysis. Current large-scale hydrogen production is based almost exclusively on steam reforming of methane, a method that consumes a precious fossil fuel while emitting carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Demand for hydrogen is increasing rapidly for refining of increasingly low-grade petroleum resources, such as the Athabasca oil sands and for ammonia-based fertilizer production. Large quantities of hydrogen are also required for carbon-efficient conversion of biomass to liquid fuels. With supplemental nuclear hydrogen, almost all of the carbon in the biomass can be converted to liquid fuels in a nearly carbon-neutral fashion. Ultimately, hydrogen may be employed as a direct transportation fuel in a 'hydrogen economy.' The large quantity of hydrogen that would be required for this concept should be produced without consuming fossil fuels or emitting greenhouse gases. An overview of the high-temperature electrolysis technology will be presented, including basic theory, modeling, and experimental activities. Modeling activities include both computational fluid dynamics and large-scale systems analysis. We have also demonstrated high-temperature electrolysis in our laboratory at the 15 kW scale, achieving a hydrogen production rate in excess of 5500 L/hr.

  8. Polymeric hydrogen diffusion barrier, high-pressure storage tank so equipped, method of fabricating a storage tank and method of preventing hydrogen diffusion

    Lessing, Paul A [Idaho Falls, ID

    2008-07-22

    An electrochemically active hydrogen diffusion barrier which comprises an anode layer, a cathode layer, and an intermediate electrolyte layer, which is conductive to protons and substantially impermeable to hydrogen. A catalytic metal present in or adjacent to the anode layer catalyzes an electrochemical reaction that converts any hydrogen that diffuses through the electrolyte layer to protons and electrons. The protons and electrons are transported to the cathode layer and reacted to form hydrogen. The hydrogen diffusion barrier is applied to a polymeric substrate used in a storage tank to store hydrogen under high pressure. A storage tank equipped with the electrochemically active hydrogen diffusion barrier, a method of fabricating the storage tank, and a method of preventing hydrogen from diffusing out of a storage tank are also disclosed.

  9. Silicon Carbide-Based Hydrogen Gas Sensors for High-Temperature Applications

    Sangchoel Kim

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigated SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors with metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS structure for high temperature process monitoring and leak detection applications in fields such as the automotive, chemical and petroleum industries. In this work, a thin tantalum oxide (Ta2O5 layer was exploited with the purpose of sensitivity improvement, because tantalum oxide has good stability at high temperature with high permeability for hydrogen gas. Silicon carbide (SiC was used as a substrate for high-temperature applications. We fabricated Pd/Ta2O5/SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors, and the dependence of their I-V characteristics and capacitance response properties on hydrogen concentrations were analyzed in the temperature range from room temperature to 500 °C. According to the results, our sensor shows promising performance for hydrogen gas detection at high temperatures.

  10. Availability of high quality weather data measurements

    Andersen, Elsa; Johansen, Jakob Berg; Furbo, Simon

    In the period 2016-2017 the project “Availability of high quality weather data measurements” is carried out at Department of Civil Engineering at the Technical University of Denmark. The aim of the project is to establish measured high quality weather data which will be easily available...... for the building energy branch and the solar energy branch in their efforts to achieve energy savings and for researchers and students carrying out projects where measured high quality weather data are needed....

  11. Precursors-Derived Ceramic Membranes for High-Temperature Separation of Hydrogen

    Yuji, Iwamoto

    2007-01-01

    This review describes recent progress in the development of hydrogen-permselective ceramic membranes derived from organometallic precursors. Microstructure and gas transport property of microporous amorphous silica-based membranes are briefly described. Then, high-temperature hydrogen permselectivity, hydrothermal stability as well as hydrogen/steam selectivity of the amorphous silica-based membranes are discussed from a viewpoint of application to membrane reactors for conversion enhancement...

  12. High Density Hydrogen Storage in Metal Hydride Composites with Air Cooling

    Dieterich, Mila; Bürger, Inga; Linder, Marc

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION In order to combine fluctuating renewable energy sources with the actual demand of electrical energy, storages are essential. The surplus energy can be stored as hydrogen to be used either for mobile use, chemical synthesis or reconversion when needed. One possibility to store the hydrogen gas at high volumetric densities, moderate temperatures and low pressures is based on a chemical reaction with metal hydrides. Such storages must be able to absorb and desorb the hydrogen qu...

  13. Modelling high density phenomena in hydrogen fibre Z-pinches

    Chittenden, J.P.

    1990-09-01

    The application of hydrogen fibre Z-pinches to the study of the radiative collapse phenomenon is studied computationally. Two areas of difficulty, the formation of a fully ionized pinch from a cryogenic fibre and the processes leading to collapse termination, are addressed in detail. A zero-D model based on the energy equation highlights the importance of particle end losses and changes in the Coulomb logarithm upon collapse initiation and termination. A 1-D Lagrangian resistive MHD code shows the importance of the changing radial profile shapes, particularly in delaying collapse termination. A 1-D, three fluid MHD code is developed to model the ionization of the fibre by thermal conduction from a high temperature surface corona to the cold core. Rate equations for collisional ionization, 3-body recombination and equilibration are solved in tandem with fluid equations for the electrons, ions and neutrals. Continuum lowering is found to assist ionization at the corona-core interface. The high density plasma phenomena responsible for radiative collapse termination are identified as the self-trapping of radiation and free electron degeneracy. A radiation transport model and computational analogues for the effects of degeneracy upon the equation of state, transport coefficients and opacity are implemented in the 1-D, single fluid model. As opacity increases the emergent spectrum is observed to become increasingly Planckian and a fall off in radiative cooling at small radii and low frequencies occurs giving rise to collapse termination. Electron degeneracy terminates radiative collapse by supplementing the radial pressure gradient until the electromagnetic pinch force is balanced. Collapse termination is found to be a hybrid process of opacity and degeneracy effects across a wide range of line densities with opacity dominant at large line densities but with electron degeneracy becoming increasingly important at lower line densities. (author)

  14. Effects of high heat flux hydrogen and helium mixture beam irradiation on surface modification and hydrogen retention in tungsten materials

    Tokunaga, K.; Fujiwara, T.; Ezato, K.; Suzuki, S.; Akiba, M.; Kurishita, H.; Nagata, S.; Tsuchiya, B.; Tonegawa, A.; Yoshida, N.

    2009-01-01

    High heat flux experiments using a hydrogen-helium mixture beam have been carried out on powder metallurgy tungsten (PM-W) and ultra fine grain W-TiC alloy (W-0.5 wt%TiC-H 2 ). The energy of is 18 keV. Beam flux and heat flux at the beam center is 2.0 x 10 21 atoms/m 2 s and 7.0 MW/m 2 , respectively. Typical ratio of He/D ion is 0.25. Beam duration is 1.5-3 s and interval of beam shot start is 30 s. The samples are irradiated up to a fluence of 10 22 -10 24 He/m 2 by the repeated irradiation pulses. After the irradiation, surface modification by the irradiation and hydrogen retention, surface composition have been investigated. Surface modification by hydrogen-helium mixture beams is completely different from results of single beam irradiation. In particular, mixture beam irradiation causes remarkably high hydrogen retention.

  15. Efficient preparation of highly hydrogenated graphene and its application as a high-performance anode material for lithium ion batteries

    Chen, Wufeng; Zhu, Zhiye; Li, Sirong; Chen, Chunhua; Yan, Lifeng

    2012-03-01

    A novel method has been developed to prepare hydrogenated graphene (HG) via a direct synchronized reduction and hydrogenation of graphene oxide (GO) in an aqueous suspension under 60Co gamma ray irradiation at room temperature. GO can be reduced by the aqueous electrons (eaq-) while the hydrogenation takes place due to the hydrogen radicals formed in situ under irradiation. The maximum hydrogen content of the as-prepared highly hydrogenated graphene (HHG) is found to be 5.27 wt% with H/C = 0.76. The yield of the target product is on the gram scale. The as-prepared HHG also shows high performance as an anode material for lithium ion batteries.

  16. Hydrogen embrittlement and hydrogen induced stress corrosion cracking of high alloyed austenitic materials; Wasserstoffversproedung und wasserstoffinduzierte Spannungsrisskorrosion hochlegierter austenitischer Werkstoffe

    Mummert, K; Uhlemann, M; Engelmann, H J [Institut fuer Festkoerper- und Werkstofforschung Dresden e.V. (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    The susceptiblity of high alloyed austenitic steels and nickel base alloys to hydrogen-induced cracking is particularly determined by 1. the distribution of hydrogen in the material, and 2. the microstructural deformation behaviour, which last process is determined by the effects of hydrogen with respect to the formation of dislocations and the stacking fault energy. The hydrogen has an influence on the process of slip localization in slip bands, which in turn affects the microstructural deformation behaviour. Slip localization increases with growing Ni contents of the alloys and clearly reduces the ductility of the Ni-base alloy. Although there is a local hydrogen source involved in stress corrosion cracking, emanating from the corrosion process at the cathode, crack growth is observed only in those cases when the hydrogen concentration in a small zone ahead of the crack tip reaches a critical value with respect to the stress conditions. Probability of onset of this process gets lower with growing Ni content of the alloy, due to increasing diffusion velocity of the hydrogen in the austenitic lattice. This is why particularly austenitic steels with low Ni contents are susceptible to transcrystalline stress corrosion cracking. In this case, the microstructural deformation process at the crack tip is also influenced by analogous processes, as could be observed in hydrogen-loaded specimens. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Die Empfindlichkeit von hochlegierten austentischen Staehlen und Nickelbasislegierungen gegen wasserstoffinduziertes Risswachstum wird im wesentlichen bestimmt durch 1. die Verteilung von Wasserstoff im Werkstoff und 2. das mikrostrukturelle Verformungsverhalten. Das mikrostrukturelle Deformationsverhalten ist wiederum durch den Einfluss von Wasserstoff auf die Versetzungsbildung und die Stapelfehlerenergie charakterisiert. Das mikrostrukturelle Verformungsverhalten wird durch wasserstoffbeeinflusste Gleitlokalisierung in Gleitbaendern bestimmt. Diese nimmt mit

  17. Hydrogen permeation behavior through F82H at high temperature

    Matsuda, S.; Katayama, K.; Shimozori, M.; Fukada, S. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, Kyushu (Japan); Ushida, H. [Energy Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Kyushu (Japan); Nishikawa, M. [Malaysia-Japan International Institute of Technology, UTM, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-03-15

    F82H is a primary candidate of structural material and coolant pipe material in a blanket of a fusion reactor. Understanding tritium permeation behavior through F82H is important. In a normal operation of a fusion reactor, the temperature of F82H will be controlled below 550 C. degrees because it is considered that F82H can be used up to 30,000 hours at 550 C. degrees. However, it is necessary to assume the situation where F82H is heated over 550 C. degrees in a severe accident. In this study, hydrogen permeation behavior through F82H was investigated in the temperature range from 500 to 800 C. degrees. In some cases, water vapor was added in a sample gas to investigate an effect of water vapor on hydrogen permeation. The permeability of hydrogen in the temperature range from 500 to 700 C. degrees agreed well with the permeability reported by E. Serra et al. The degradation of the permeability by water vapor was not observed. After the hydrogen permeation reached in a steady state at 700 C. degrees, the F82H sample was heated to 800 C. degrees. The permeability of hydrogen through F82H sample which was once heated up to 800 C. degrees was lower than that of the original one. (authors)

  18. Effects of hydrogen bonds on solid state TATB, RDX, and DATB under high pressures

    Guo Feng; Hu Hai-Quan; Zhang Hong; Cheng Xin-Lu

    2014-01-01

    To probe the behavior of hydrogen bonds in solid energetic materials, we conduct ReaxFF and SCC–DFTB molecular dynamics simulations of crystalline TATB, RDX, and DATB. By comparing the intra- and inter-molecular hydrogen bonding rates, we find that the crystal structures are stabilized by inter-molecular hydrogen bond networks. Under high-pressure, the inter- and intra-molecular hydrogen bonds in solid TATB and DATB are nearly equivalent. The hydrogen bonds in solid TATB and DATB are much shorter than in solid RDX, which suggests strong hydrogen bond interactions existing in these energetic materials. Stretching of the C–H bond is observed in solid RDX, which may lead to further decomposition and even detonation. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  19. Optimizing a High-Temperature Hydrogen Co-generation Reactor for Both Economic and Environmental Performance

    Weimar, Mark R.; Wood, Thomas W.; Reichmuth, Barbara A.; Johnson, Wayne L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper analyzes outcomes for a 3000 MWt High Temperature Gas Reaction nuclear power plant, given price and cost assumptions, and determined what level of hydrogen and electricity production would optimize the plant economically and environmentally (carbon reduction). The tradeoff between producing hydrogen through steam methane reformation and producing electricity is so disproportionate, that advanced reactors will likely be used only as peaking plants for electricity unless policymakers intervene with incentives to change the mix of electricity and hydrogen. The magnitude of the increase in electric prices or decrease in hydrogen prices required to allow electricity production indicate that substantial error in cost estimates would be required to change our analysis.

  20. High Efficiency Solar Thermochemical Reactor for Hydrogen Production.

    McDaniel, Anthony H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-30

    This research and development project is focused on the advancement of a technology that produces hydrogen at a cost that is competitive with fossil-based fuels for transportation. A twostep, solar-driven WS thermochemical cycle is theoretically capable of achieving an STH conversion ratio that exceeds the DOE target of 26% at a scale large enough to support an industrialized economy [1]. The challenge is to transition this technology from the laboratory to the marketplace and produce hydrogen at a cost that meets or exceeds DOE targets.

  1. DATA COLLECTION, QUALITY ASSURANCE, AND ANALYSIS PLAN FOR THE 2008/2009 HYDROGEN AND FUEL CELLS KNOWLEDGE AND OPINIONS SURVEYS

    Schmoyer, Richard L [ORNL; Truett, Lorena Faith [ORNL; Diegel, Susan W [ORNL

    2008-09-01

    The 2008/2009 Knowledge and Opinions Survey, conducted for the Department of Energy's Hydrogen Program will measure the levels of awareness and understanding of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies within five target populations: (1) the general public, (2) students, (3) personnel in state and local governments, (4) potential end users of hydrogen fuel and fuel cell technologies in business and industry, and (5) safety and code officials. The ultimate goal of the surveys is a statistically valid, nationally based assessment. Distinct information collections are required for each of the target populations. Each instrument for assessing baseline knowledge is targeted to the corresponding population group. While many questions are identical across all populations, some questions are unique to each respondent group. The biggest data quality limitation of the hydrogen survey data (at least of the general public and student components) will be nonresponse bias. To ensure as high a response rate as possible, various measures will be taken to minimize nonresponse, including automated callbacks, cycling callbacks throughout the weekdays, and availability of Spanish speaking interviewers. Statistical adjustments (i.e., sampling weights) will also be used to account for nonresponse and noncoverage. The primary objective of the data analysis is to estimate the proportions of target population individuals who would respond to the questions in the various possible ways. Data analysis will incorporate necessary adjustments for the sampling design and sampling weights (i.e., probability sampling). Otherwise, however, the analysis will involve standard estimates of proportions of the interviewees responding in various ways to the questions. Sample-weight-adjusted contingency table chi-square tests will also be computed to identify differences between demographic groups The first round of Knowledge and Opinions Surveys was conducted in 2004. Analysis of these surveys produced a

  2. Effect of high pressure hydrogen on the mechanical characteristics of single carbon fiber

    Jeon, Sang Koo; Kwon, Oh Heon; Jang, Hoon-Sik; Ryu, Kwon Sang; Nahm, Seung Hoon

    2018-02-01

    In this study, carbon fiber was exposed to a pressure of 7 MPa for 24 h in high pressure chamber. The tensile test for carbon fiber was conducted to estimate the effect on the high pressure hydrogen in the atmosphere. To determine the tensile strength and Weibull modulus, approximately thirty carbon fiber samples were measured in all cases, and carbon fiber exposed to high pressure argon was evaluated to verify only the effect of hydrogen. Additionally, carbon fiber samples were annealed at 1950 °C for 1 h for a comparison with normal carbon fiber and then tested under identical conditions. The results showed that the tensile strength scatter of normal carbon fiber exposed to hydrogen was relatively wider and the Weibull modulus was decreased. Moreover, the tensile strength of the annealed carbon fiber exposed to hydrogen was increased, and these samples indicated a complex Weibull modulus because the hydrogen stored in the carbon fiber influenced the mechanical characteristic.

  3. Residual gas entering high density hydrogen plasma: rarefaction due to rapid heating

    N. den Harder,; D.C. Schram,; W. J. Goedheer,; de Blank, H. J.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; van Rooij, G. J.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of background molecular hydrogen with magnetized (0.4 T) high density (1–5 × 10 20  m −3 ) low temperature (∼3 eV) hydrogen plasma was inferred from the Fulcher band emission in the linear plasma generator Pilot-PSI. In the plasma center,

  4. Application of railgun principle to high-velocity hydrogen pellet injection for magnetic fusion reactor fueling

    Kim, K.; Zhang, J.

    1992-01-01

    Three separate papers are included which report research progress during this period: (1) A new railgun configuration with perforated sidewalls, (2) development of a fuseless small-bore railgun for injection of high-speed hydrogen pellets into magnetically confined plasmas, and (3) controls and diagnostics on a fuseless railgun for solid hydrogen pellet injection

  5. Hydrogen termination of CVD diamond films by high-temperature annealing at atmospheric pressure

    Seshan, V.; Ullien, D.; Castellanos-Gomez, A.; Sachdeva, S.; Murthy, D.H.K.; Savenije, T.J.; Ahmad, H.A.; Nunney, T.S.; Janssens, S.D.; Haenen, K.; Nesládek, M.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; De Smet, L.C.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    A high-temperature procedure to hydrogenate diamond films using molecular hydrogen at atmospheric pressure was explored. Undoped and doped chemical vapour deposited (CVD) polycrystalline diamond films were treated according to our annealing method using a H2 gas flow down to ?50 ml/min (STP) at

  6. Zerodur polishing process for high surface quality and high efficiency

    Tesar, A.; Fuchs, B.

    1992-08-01

    Zerodur is a glass-ceramic composite importance in applications where temperature instabilities influence optical and mechanical performance, such as in earthbound and spaceborne telescope mirror substrates. Polished Zerodur surfaces of high quality have been required for laser gyro mirrors. Polished surface quality of substrates affects performance of high reflection coatings. Thus, the interest in improving Zerodur polished surface quality has become more general. Beyond eliminating subsurface damage, high quality surfaces are produced by reducing the amount of hydrated material redeposited on the surface during polishing. With the proper control of polishing parameters, such surfaces exhibit roughnesses of < l Angstrom rms. Zerodur polishing was studied to recommend a high surface quality polishing process which could be easily adapted to standard planetary continuous polishing machines and spindles. This summary contains information on a polishing process developed at LLNL which reproducibly provides high quality polished Zerodur surfaces at very high polishing efficiencies

  7. High-brightness negative-hydrogen linear accelerator

    Wadlinger, E.A.; Farrell, J.A.; Dogliani, H.O.

    1982-01-01

    We have designed a linear accelerator to accelerate negative hydrogen ions to 50 MeV with an instantaneous output current of 100 mA and a normalized rms emittance in both transverse planes of 0.02 π cm mrad. The design and results obtained to date with a 2-MeV prototype are presented

  8. Electrical conductivity of highly ionized dense hydrogen plasma

    Radtke, R.; Guenther, K.

    1976-01-01

    A diagnostic technique for the determination of pressure, temperature and its radial distribution, the strength of the electric field and the current of a wall-stabilized pulse hydrogen arc at a pressure of 10 atm and a maximum power of 120 kW/cm arc length is developed. (author)

  9. High purity hydrogen production system by the PSA method

    1986-01-01

    In a process developed by Nippon Steel, coke oven gas is compressed and purified of tarry matter, sulphur compounds and gum-formers by adsorption. It is then passed through a three-tower pressure-swing adsorption system to recover hydrogen whose purity can be selected in the range 99 to 99.999%. A composite adsorption agent is used.

  10. Influence of hydrogen on high cycle fatigue of polycrystalline vanadium

    Chung, D.W.; Lee, K.S.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1977-02-01

    The room temperature fatigue behavior of several polycrystalline V-H 2 alloys is described. Hydrogen extends the life of unnotched vanadium but has a deleterious effect in notched materials. Crack propagation data are correlated with tensile yield stress and cyclic strain hardening data

  11. System Evaluation and Economic Analysis of a HTGR Powered High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    McKellar, Michael G.; Harvego, Edwin A.; Gandrik, Anastasia A.

    2010-01-01

    A design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production has been developed. The HTE plant is powered by a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) whose configuration and operating conditions are based on the latest design parameters planned for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The current HTGR reference design specifies a reactor power of 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 322 C and 750 C, respectively. The power conversion unit will be a Rankine steam cycle with a power conversion efficiency of 40%. The reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes a steam-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the higher heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 40.4% at a hydrogen production rate of 1.75 kg/s and an oxygen production rate of 13.8 kg/s. An economic analysis of this plant was performed with realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a cost of $3.67/kg of hydrogen assuming an internal rate of return, IRR, of 12% and a debt to equity ratio of 80%/20%. A second analysis shows that if the power cycle efficiency increases to 44.4%, the hydrogen production efficiency increases to 42.8% and the hydrogen and oxygen production rates are 1.85 kg/s and 14.6 kg/s respectively. At the higher power cycle efficiency and an IRR of 12% the cost of hydrogen production is $3.50/kg.

  12. Economic Analysis of a Nuclear Reactor Powered High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

    2008-01-01

    A reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production was developed to provide a basis for comparing the HTE concept with other hydrogen production concepts. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540 C and 900 C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen includes 4,009,177 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The alternating-current, AC, to direct-current, DC, conversion efficiency is 96%. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the lower heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.12% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.356 kg/s. An economic analysis of this plant was performed using the standardized H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program, and using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost. A cost of $3.23/kg of hydrogen was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10%

  13. Engineering high quality medical software

    Coronato, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    This book focuses on high-confidence medical software in the growing field of e-health, telecare services and health technology. It covers the development of methodologies and engineering tasks together with standards and regulations for medical software.

  14. High temperature cathodic charging of hydrogen in zirconium alloys and iron and nickel base alloys

    John, J.T.; De, P.K.; Gadiyar, H.S.

    1990-01-01

    These investigations lead to the development of a new technique for charging hydrogen into metals and alloys. In this technique a mixture of sulfates and bisulfates of sodium and potassium is kept saturated with water at 250-300degC in an open pyrex glass beaker and electrolysed using platinum anode and the material to be charged as the cathode. Most of the studies were carried out on Zr alloys. It is shown that because of the high hydrogen flux available at the surface and the high diffusivity of hydrogen in metals at these temperatures the materials pick up hydrogen faster and more uniformly than the conventional electrolytic charging at room temperature and high temperature autoclaving in LiOH solutions. Chemical analysis, metallographic examination and XRD studies confirm this. This technique has been used to charge hydrogen into many iron and nickel base austentic alloys, which are very resistant to hydrogen pick up and to H-embrittlement. Since this involved a novel method of electrolysing water, the hydrogen/deuterium isotopic ratio has been studied. At this temperatures the D/H ratio in the evolved hydrogen gas was found to be closer to the value in the liquid water, which means a smaller separation factor. This confirm the earlier observation that separation factor decreases with increase of temperature. (author). 16 refs., 21 fi gs., 6 tabs

  15. Highly efficient hydrogen storage system based on ammonium bicarbonate/formate redox equilibrium over palladium nanocatalysts.

    Su, Ji; Yang, Lisha; Lu, Mi; Lin, Hongfei

    2015-03-01

    A highly efficient, reversible hydrogen storage-evolution process has been developed based on the ammonium bicarbonate/formate redox equilibrium over the same carbon-supported palladium nanocatalyst. This heterogeneously catalyzed hydrogen storage system is comparable to the counterpart homogeneous systems and has shown fast reaction kinetics of both the hydrogenation of ammonium bicarbonate and the dehydrogenation of ammonium formate under mild operating conditions. By adjusting temperature and pressure, the extent of hydrogen storage and evolution can be well controlled in the same catalytic system. Moreover, the hydrogen storage system based on aqueous-phase ammonium formate is advantageous owing to its high volumetric energy density. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Application of CFRP with High Hydrogen Gas Barrier Characteristics to Fuel Tanks of Space Transportation System

    Yonemoto, Koichi; Yamamoto, Yuta; Okuyama, Keiichi; Ebina, Takeo

    In the future, carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRPs) with high hydrogen gas barrier performance will find wide applications in all industrial hydrogen tanks that aim at weight reduction; the use of such materials will be preferred to the use of conventional metallic materials such as stainless steel or aluminum. The hydrogen gas barrier performance of CFRP will become an important issue with the introduction of hydrogen-fuel aircraft. It will also play an important role in realizing fully reusable space transportation system that will have high specific tensile CFRP structures. Such materials are also required for the manufacture of high-pressure hydrogen gas vessels for use in the fuel cell systems of automobiles. This paper introduces a new composite concept that can be used to realize CFRPs with high hydrogen gas barrier performance for applications in the cryogenic tanks of fully reusable space transportation system by the incorporation of a nonmetallic crystal layer, which is actually a dense and highly oriented clay crystal laminate. The preliminary test results show that the hydrogen gas barrier characteristics of this material after cryogenic heat shocks and cyclic loads are still better than those of other polymer materials by approximately two orders of magnitude.

  17. Heat pump cycle by hydrogen-absorbing alloys to assist high-temperature gas-cooled reactor in producing hydrogen

    Satoshi, Fukada; Nobutaka, Hayashi

    2010-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system using two hydrogen-absorbing alloys is proposed to utilise heat exhausted from a high-temperature source such as a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), more efficiently. The heat pump system is designed to produce H 2 based on the S-I cycle more efficiently. The overall system proposed here consists of HTGR, He gas turbines, chemical heat pumps and reaction vessels corresponding to the three-step decomposition reactions comprised in the S-I process. A fundamental research is experimentally performed on heat generation in a single bed packed with a hydrogen-absorbing alloy that may work at the H 2 production temperature. The hydrogen-absorbing alloy of Zr(V 1-x Fe x ) 2 is selected as a material that has a proper plateau pressure for the heat pump system operated between the input and output temperatures of HTGR and reaction vessels of the S-I cycle. Temperature jump due to heat generated when the alloy absorbs H 2 proves that the alloy-H 2 system can heat up the exhaust gas even at 600 deg. C without any external mechanical force. (authors)

  18. Nanoenergetics and High Hydrogen Content Materials for Space Propulsion

    2014-01-28

    past twenty years. Ammonia borane has already been used with success to produce hydrogen for chemical lasers and fuel cells. The alternatives being...adduct solution in the presence of a titanium catalyst under an inert atmosphere. The resulting material was used to reduce complexes of gold, nickel...A. Varma, B. Legrand, C. Chauveau, and I. Gokalp, “Ignition and Combustion of Al Particles Clad by Ni”, Combust. Sci. Tech., Vol. 174, 2002, pp

  19. High sensitivity hydrogen sensors based on GaN

    Yatskiv, Roman; Grym, Jan; Žďánský, Karel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 9 (2012), s. 1661-1663 ISSN 1610-1642. [16th International Semiconducting and Insulating Materials Conference (SIMC-XVI). Stockholm, 19.06.2011-23.06.2011] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) OC10021 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Pt nanoparticles * Graphite based Schottky diodes * Hydrogen sensor * GaN Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  20. HIGH-TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY

    James E. O& #39; Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

    2005-10-01

    An experimental study is under way to assess the performance of solid-oxide cells operating in the steam electrolysis mode for hydrogen production over a temperature range of 800 to 900ºC. Results presented in this paper were obtained from a ten-cell planar electrolysis stack, with an active area of 64 cm2 per cell. The electrolysis cells are electrolyte-supported, with scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolytes (~140 µm thick), nickel-cermet steam/hydrogen electrodes, and manganite air-side electrodes. The metallic interconnect plates are fabricated from ferritic stainless steel. The experiments were performed over a range of steam inlet mole fractions (0.1 - 0.6), gas flow rates (1000 - 4000 sccm), and current densities (0 to 0.38 A/cm2). Steam consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation. Cell operating potentials and cell current were varied using a programmable power supply. Hydrogen production rates up to 90 Normal liters per hour were demonstrated. Values of area-specific resistance and stack internal temperatures are presented as a function of current density. Stack performance is shown to be dependent on inlet steam flow rate.

  1. Fruit quality in the peach and nectarine with application of hydrogenated cyanamide and mineral oil

    Sarita Leonel

    Full Text Available This work evaluated the quality of the fruit in peach and nectarine cultivars with and without the application of hydrogenated cyanamide and mineral oil, for two production cycles (2009 and 2010. The experiment was carried out at the School of Agricultural Science of the São Paulo State University (UNESP, at Botucatu in the Brazilian state of São Paulo, located at latitude 22º51'55" S and longitude 48º26'22" E, at an altitude of 810 m. The predominant climate type is warm temperate (mesothermal with rains in the summer and dry in the winter. The following were evaluated: soluble solids, titratable acidity, pH, ratio, firmness, vitamin C and pulp yield. The use of hydrogenated cyanamide and mineral oil had no effect on the quality attributes of the fruit, except for pH, where those fruits under application of the products showed higher values. The cultivars all had a pulp yield greater than 90%, with 'Tourmaline' showing the highest yield (96 %. The levels of vitamin C varied according to the cultivars, where 'Marli' (16.9 mg 100 g-1 and 'Dourado-2' (16.5 mg 100 g-1, stood out for having the highest levels.

  2. The risk of hydrogen embrittlement in high-strength prestressing steels under cathodic protection

    Isecke, B.; Mietz, J. (Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany))

    1993-01-01

    High strength prestressing steels in prestressed concrete structures are protected against corrosion due to passivation resulting from the high alkalinity of the concrete. If depassivation of the prestressing steel occurs due to the ingress of chlorides the corrosion risk can be minimized by application of cathodic protection with impressed current. The risk of hydrogen embrittlement of the prestressing steel is especially pronounced if overprotection is applied due to hydrogen evolution in the cathodic reaction. The present work considers this risk by hydrogen activity measurements under practical conditions and application of different levels of cathodic protection potentials. Information on threshold potentials in prestressed concrete structures is provided, too. (orig.).

  3. High Hydrogen Thoraeus Rubber Gossamer Radiation Shielding for Human Protection, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NanoSonic has recently developed ultra-lightweight, durable, high hydrogen containing Thoraeus Rubber™ nanocomposites that may serve as radiation protection for...

  4. High-temperature effect of hydrogen on sintered alpha-silicon carbide

    Hallum, G. W.; Herbell, T. P.

    1986-01-01

    Sintered alpha-silicon carbide was exposed to pure, dry hydrogen at high temperatures for times up to 500 hr. Weight loss and corrosion were seen after 50 hr at temperatures as low as 1000 C. Corrosion of SiC by hydrogen produced grain boundary deterioration at 1100 C and a mixture of grain and grain boundary deterioration at 1300 C. Statistically significant strength reductions were seen in samples exposed to hydrogen for times greater than 50 hr and temperatures above 1100 C. Critical fracture origins were identified by fractography as either general grain boundary corrision at 1100 C or as corrosion pits at 1300 C. A maximum strength decrease of approximately 33 percent was seen at 1100 and 1300 C after 500 hr exposure to hydrogen. A computer assisted thermodynamic program was also used to predict possible reaction species of SiC and hydrogen.

  5. Quality management manual for production of high quality cassava flour

    Dziedzoave, Nanam Tay; Abass, Adebayo Busura; Amoa-Awua, Wisdom K.

    The high quality cassava flour (HQCF) industry has just started to evolve in Africa and elsewhere. The sustainability of the growing industry, the profitability of small- and medium-scale enterprises (SMEs) that are active in the industry and good-health of consumers can best be guaranteed through...... the adoption of proper quality and food safety procedures. Cassava processing enterprises involved in the productionof HQCF must therefore be commited to the quality and food safety of the HQCF. They must have the right technology, appropriate processing machhinery, standard testing instruments...... and the necessary technical expertise. This quality manual was therefore developed to guide small- to medium-scale cassava in the design and implematation of Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) system and Good manufacturing Practices (GMP) plans for HQCF production. It describes the HQCF production...

  6. Effect of Nb on hydrogen-induced delayed fracture in high strength hot stamping steels

    Zhang, Shiqi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); College of Mechanical Engineering, Yangtze University, Jingzhou 434023 (China); Huang, Yunhua, E-mail: huangyh@mater.ustb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Sun, Bintang, E-mail: bingtangsun@ustb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Liao, Qingliang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Lu, Hongzhou [CITIC Metal Co. Ltd., Room 1901, Capital Mansion 6, Xin Yuan Nanlu, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100004 (China); The School of Resources and Environmental Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Meilong road 130, Xujiahui District, Shanghai 200237 (China); Jian, Bian [Niobium Tech Asia, 068898 Singapore (Singapore); Mohrbacher, Hardy [NiobelCon bvba, 2970 Schilde (Belgium); Zhang, Wei; Guo, Aimin [CITIC Metal Co. Ltd., Room 1901, Capital Mansion 6, Xin Yuan Nanlu, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100004 (China); Zhang, Yue [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); The State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2015-02-25

    The effect of Nb addition (0.022, 0.053, 0.078 wt%) on the hydrogen-induced delayed fracture resistance of 22MnB5 was studied by constant load test and electrochemical hydrogen permeation method. It is shown that the appropriate addition of Nb is beneficial to the improvement of the delayed fracture resistance of tested steel, especially when the steel contains high concentration of hydrogen, and the maximum delayed fracture resistance is obtained at a Nb content of 0.053%.The result of hydrogen permeation test shows that the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen in the steel containing niobium is lower than that in steel without niobium, which indicates that it is harder for hydrogen in the steels containing niobium to diffuse and aggregate. In addition, the reason for Nb improving the delayed fracture resistance of steels is discussed from two aspects: hydrogen trap effect and grain refinement effect. The analysis shows that the main reason leading to the improvement of the delayed fracture resistance is the hydrogen trapping effect of NbC while the grain refinement effect of Nb(C,N) secondary.

  7. Effect of Nb on hydrogen-induced delayed fracture in high strength hot stamping steels

    Zhang, Shiqi; Huang, Yunhua; Sun, Bintang; Liao, Qingliang; Lu, Hongzhou; Jian, Bian; Mohrbacher, Hardy; Zhang, Wei; Guo, Aimin; Zhang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    The effect of Nb addition (0.022, 0.053, 0.078 wt%) on the hydrogen-induced delayed fracture resistance of 22MnB5 was studied by constant load test and electrochemical hydrogen permeation method. It is shown that the appropriate addition of Nb is beneficial to the improvement of the delayed fracture resistance of tested steel, especially when the steel contains high concentration of hydrogen, and the maximum delayed fracture resistance is obtained at a Nb content of 0.053%.The result of hydrogen permeation test shows that the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen in the steel containing niobium is lower than that in steel without niobium, which indicates that it is harder for hydrogen in the steels containing niobium to diffuse and aggregate. In addition, the reason for Nb improving the delayed fracture resistance of steels is discussed from two aspects: hydrogen trap effect and grain refinement effect. The analysis shows that the main reason leading to the improvement of the delayed fracture resistance is the hydrogen trapping effect of NbC while the grain refinement effect of Nb(C,N) secondary

  8. A cohesive zone model to simulate the hydrogen embrittlement effect on a high-strength steel

    G. Gobbi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims to model the fracture mechanical behavior of a high-strength low carbon steel, AISI 4130 operating in hydrogen contaminated environment. The study deals with the development of 2D finite element cohesive zone model (CZM reproducing a toughness test. Along the symmetry plane over the crack path of a C(T specimen a zero thickness layer of cohesive elements are implemented in order to simulate the crack propagation. The main feature of this kind of model is the definition of a traction-separation law (TSL that reproduces the constitutive response of the material inside to the cohesive elements. Starting from a TSL calibrated on hydrogen non-contaminated material, the embrittlement effect is simulated by reducing the cohesive energy according to the total hydrogen content including the lattice sites (NILS and the trapped amount. In this perspective, the proposed model consists of three steps of simulations. First step evaluates the hydrostatic pressure. It drives the initial hydrogen concentration assigned in the second step, a mass diffusion analysis, defining in this way the contribution of hydrogen moving across the interstitial lattice sites. The final stress analysis, allows getting the total hydrogen content, including the trapped amount, and evaluating the new crack initiation and propagation due to the hydrogen presence. The model is implemented in both plane strain and plane stress configurations; results are compared in the discussion. From the analyses, it resulted that hydrogen is located only into lattice sites and not in traps, and that the considered steel experiences a high hydrogen susceptibility. By the proposed procedure, the developed numerical model seems a reliable and quick tool able to estimate the mechanical behavior of steels in presence of hydrogen.

  9. High quality-factor optical resonators

    Henriet, Rémi; Salzenstein, Patrice; Coillet, Aurélien; Saleh, Khaldoun; Chembo, Yanne K; Ristic, Davor; Ferrari, Maurizio; Mortier, Michel; Rasoloniaina, Alphonse; Dumeige, Yannick; Féron, Patrice; Cibiel, Gilles; Llopis, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Various resonators are investigated for microwave photonic applications. Micro-sphere, disk and fiber ring resonators were designed, realized and characterized. Obtained quality factors are as high as Q = 10 10 . (paper)

  10. Hydrogen production methods efficiency coupled to an advanced high temperature accelerator driven system

    Rodríguez, Daniel González; Lira, Carlos Alberto Brayner de Oliveira

    2017-01-01

    The hydrogen economy is one of the most promising concepts for the energy future. In this scenario, oil is replaced by hydrogen as an energy carrier. This hydrogen, rather than oil, must be produced in volumes not provided by the currently employed methods. In this work two high temperature hydrogen production methods coupled to an advanced nuclear system are presented. A new design of a pebbled-bed accelerator nuclear driven system called TADSEA is chosen because of the advantages it has in matters of transmutation and safety. For the conceptual design of the high temperature electrolysis process a detailed computational fluid dynamics model was developed to analyze the solid oxide electrolytic cell that has a huge influence on the process efficiency. A detailed flowsheet of the high temperature electrolysis process coupled to TADSEA through a Brayton gas cycle was developed using chemical process simulation software: Aspen HYSYS®. The model with optimized operating conditions produces 0.1627 kg/s of hydrogen, resulting in an overall process efficiency of 34.51%, a value in the range of results reported by other authors. A conceptual design of the iodine-sulfur thermochemical water splitting cycle was also developed. The overall efficiency of the process was calculated performing an energy balance resulting in 22.56%. The values of efficiency, hydrogen production rate and energy consumption of the proposed models are in the values considered acceptable in the hydrogen economy concept, being also compatible with the TADSEA design parameters. (author)

  11. Hydrogen production methods efficiency coupled to an advanced high temperature accelerator driven system

    Rodríguez, Daniel González; Lira, Carlos Alberto Brayner de Oliveira [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Fernández, Carlos García, E-mail: danielgonro@gmail.com, E-mail: mmhamada@ipen.br [Instituto Superior de Tecnologías y Ciencias aplicadas (InSTEC), La Habana (Cuba)

    2017-07-01

    The hydrogen economy is one of the most promising concepts for the energy future. In this scenario, oil is replaced by hydrogen as an energy carrier. This hydrogen, rather than oil, must be produced in volumes not provided by the currently employed methods. In this work two high temperature hydrogen production methods coupled to an advanced nuclear system are presented. A new design of a pebbled-bed accelerator nuclear driven system called TADSEA is chosen because of the advantages it has in matters of transmutation and safety. For the conceptual design of the high temperature electrolysis process a detailed computational fluid dynamics model was developed to analyze the solid oxide electrolytic cell that has a huge influence on the process efficiency. A detailed flowsheet of the high temperature electrolysis process coupled to TADSEA through a Brayton gas cycle was developed using chemical process simulation software: Aspen HYSYS®. The model with optimized operating conditions produces 0.1627 kg/s of hydrogen, resulting in an overall process efficiency of 34.51%, a value in the range of results reported by other authors. A conceptual design of the iodine-sulfur thermochemical water splitting cycle was also developed. The overall efficiency of the process was calculated performing an energy balance resulting in 22.56%. The values of efficiency, hydrogen production rate and energy consumption of the proposed models are in the values considered acceptable in the hydrogen economy concept, being also compatible with the TADSEA design parameters. (author)

  12. The high pressure equation of state of the isotopes of solid hydrogen and helium

    Driessen, A.

    1982-01-01

    The initial aim of this thesis was to provide the high pressure equipment and the knowledge about the equation of state (EOS) necessary for a research program in a laboratory dealing with spectroscopy of solid hydrogen under high pressure. Once this first goal was reached, a logical step was to extend the work on the EOS to all three hydrogen isotopes and later also to the helium isotpes. During the experiments on the EOS of hydrogen, the effects of the concentration C 1 of the rotationally excited molecules provoked interest, resulting in an extensive experimental and theoretical study. Chapter I describes the results and experience with high pressure equipment for hydrogen up to 7 kbar and chapter II gives a short general introduction to the calculation of the EOS by introducing the Mie-Grueneisen picture and the Silvera-Goldman (SG) potential for hydrogen. Chapter III gives the results of the first EOS of H 2 and D 2 and chapter IV gives a prediction of the EOS of solid T 2 with aid of the SG potential and the experimental results of H 2 and D 2 . Chapter V presents calculations on the thermal expansion of the hydrogen isotopes, which are compared with direct experiments and chapter VI deals in detail with the influence of C 1 on the EOS of H 2 . Ortho-para conversion in hydrogen is considered in chapter VII, and chapter VIII describes experiments on 4 He. (Auth.)

  13. High-quality compressive ghost imaging

    Huang, Heyan; Zhou, Cheng; Tian, Tian; Liu, Dongqi; Song, Lijun

    2018-04-01

    We propose a high-quality compressive ghost imaging method based on projected Landweber regularization and guided filter, which effectively reduce the undersampling noise and improve the resolution. In our scheme, the original object is reconstructed by decomposing of regularization and denoising steps instead of solving a minimization problem in compressive reconstruction process. The simulation and experimental results show that our method can obtain high ghost imaging quality in terms of PSNR and visual observation.

  14. Zirconium-Based metal organic framework (Zr-MOF) material with high hydrostability for hydrogen storage applications

    Ren, Jianwei

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Material-based solutions, such as metal organic frameworks (MOFs), continue to attract increasing attention as viable options for hydrogen storage applications. MOFs are widely regarded as promising materials for hydrogen storage due to their high...

  15. CHALLENGES IN GENERATING HYDROGEN BY HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS USING SOLID OXIDE CELLS

    M. S. Sohal; J. E. O' Brien; C. M. Stoots; M. G. McKellar; J. S. Herring; E. A. Harvego

    2008-03-01

    Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) high temperature electrolysis research to generate hydrogen using solid oxide electrolysis cells is presented in this paper. The research results reported here have been obtained in a laboratory-scale apparatus. These results and common scale-up issues also indicate that for the technology to be successful in a large industrial setting, several technical, economical, and manufacturing issues have to be resolved. Some of the issues related to solid oxide cells are stack design and performance optimization, identification and evaluation of cell performance degradation parameters and processes, integrity and reliability of the solid oxide electrolysis (SOEC) stacks, life-time prediction and extension of the SOEC stack, and cost reduction and economic manufacturing of the SOEC stacks. Besides the solid oxide cells, balance of the hydrogen generating plant also needs significant development. These issues are process and ohmic heat source needed for maintaining the reaction temperature (~830°C), high temperature heat exchangers and recuperators, equal distribution of the reactants into each cell, system analysis of hydrogen and associated energy generating plant, and cost optimization. An economic analysis of this plant was performed using the standardized H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program, and using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a cost of $3.23/kg of hydrogen assuming an internal rate of return of 10%. These issues need interdisciplinary research effort of federal laboratories, solid oxide cell manufacturers, hydrogen consumers, and other such stakeholders. This paper discusses research and development accomplished by INL on such issues and highlights associated challenges that need to

  16. High stability of palladium/kieselguhr composites during absorption/desorption cycling for hydrogen isotope separation

    Lei, Yang, E-mail: lei.y@outlook.com; Liu, Xiaopeng; Li, Shuo; Jiang, Lijun; Zhang, Chao; Li, Shuai; He, Di; Wang, Shumao

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Pd/K composites with as high as 57 wt.% of Pd have been successfully prepared. • Palladium particles can be effectively packed into the pores of kieselguhr substrates. • Variation of heat-treatment temperatures hardly affect hydrogen absorption capacity and hydrogen saturation time of the Pd/K. • Anti-pulverization property of Pd/K can be improved by packing palladium into the kieselguhr internal pores and heating at 1300 °C. - Abstract: Palladium/kieselguhr (Pd/K) composites with 57 wt.% of Pd were prepared by an improved dipping and thermal decomposition method and heated at elevated temperature to reduce breakdown during hydrogenation-dehydrogenation cycles. The hydrogen absorption kinetic properties of the samples heated at different temperatures were tested under the condition of 20 °C with 100 kPa hydrogen pressure. The 1300 °C heated Pd/K composites were repeated up to 4010 absorption and desorption cycles at temperature ranges between −40 °C and 200 °C. The results show that the phase structure, hydrogen absorption capacity and hydrogen saturation time of the Pd/K were not affected by the change of heat-treated temperatures. And after heat treatment at 1300 °C, the Pd/K particles were strengthened and fraction of larger than 80 mesh were as high as 93.4%.

  17. High levels of hydrogen peroxide in overnight tooth-whitening formulas: effects on enamel and pulp.

    Pugh, George; Zaidel, Lynette; Lin, Nora; Stranick, Michael; Bagley, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Limited data are available to assess the safety of high levels of hydrogen peroxide in overnight tooth-whitening formulas. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of hydrogen peroxide on enamel microhardness, pulp penetration, and enamel morphology. Colgate Platinum Professional Overnight Whitening System (Colgate Oral Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Canton, MA, USA) (10% carbamide peroxide, equivalent to 3.5% hydrogen peroxide) was compared with two prototype formulations containing either 7.0% or 12.0% hydrogen peroxide. In the pulp chamber studies, human extracted teeth were exposed to 3.5%, 7.0%, or 12.0% hydrogen peroxide for 30 minutes, 4 hours, or 7 hours. Microhardness, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, and atomic force microscopy evaluations were made from enamel blocks cut from human extracted molars. The enamel blocks were evaluated following 14 7-hour treatments (98 h total). At 7 hours' post-treatment, hydrogen peroxide penetrated the pulp chamber at 23.12 +/- 10.09, 24.58 +/- 6.90, and 26.39 +/- 5.43 microg for 3.5%, 7.0%, and 12.0% hydrogen peroxide, respectively. With regard to enamel morphology, pulp penetration, microhardness, and elemental composition, no statistically significant differences were observed between treatment groups following 98 hours of treatment. Hydrogen peroxide does not adversely affect enamel morphology or microhardness. The levels recovered in pulp indicate that hydrogen peroxide is not expected to inhibit pulpal enzymes. Overnight tray products containing levels of hydrogen peroxide of 3.5%, 7.0%, and 12.0% are not expected to adversely affect the enamel or pulpal enzymes. Additional safety studies are needed to assess the potential for tooth sensitivity and gingival irritation.

  18. Hydrogen production from high moisture content biomass in supercritical water

    Antal, M.J. Jr.; Xu, X. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States). Hawaii Natural Energy Inst.

    1998-08-01

    By mixing wood sawdust with a corn starch gel, a viscous paste can be produced that is easily delivered to a supercritical flow reactor by means of a cement pump. Mixtures of about 10 wt% wood sawdust with 3.65 wt% starch are employed in this work, which the authors estimate to cost about $0.043 per lb. Significant reductions in feed cost can be achieved by increasing the wood sawdust loading, but such an increase may require a more complex pump. When this feed is rapidly heated in a tubular flow reactor at pressures above the critical pressure of water (22 MPa), the sawdust paste vaporizes without the formation of char. A packed bed of carbon catalyst in the reactor operating at about 650 C causes the tarry vapors to react with water, producing hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and some methane with a trace of carbon monoxide. The temperature and history of the reactor`s wall influence the hydrogen-methane product equilibrium by catalyzing the methane steam reforming reaction. The water effluent from the reactor is clean. Other biomass feedstocks, such as the waste product of biodiesel production, behave similarly. Unfortunately, sewage sludge does not evidence favorable gasification characteristics and is not a promising feedstock for supercritical water gasification.

  19. High brilliance multicusp ion source for hydrogen microscopy at SNAKE

    Moser, M., E-mail: marcus.moser@unibw.de [Universitaet der Bundeswehr Muenchen, Institut fuer Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik, LRT2, Department fuer Luft- und Raumfahrttechnik, 85577 Neubiberg (Germany); Reichart, P. [Universitaet der Bundeswehr Muenchen, Institut fuer Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik, LRT2, Department fuer Luft- und Raumfahrttechnik, 85577 Neubiberg (Germany); Carli, W. [Maier-Leibniz-Laboraturium der LMU und TU Muenchen, 85478 Garching (Germany); Greubel, C.; Peeper, K. [Universitaet der Bundeswehr Muenchen, Institut fuer Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik, LRT2, Department fuer Luft- und Raumfahrttechnik, 85577 Neubiberg (Germany); Hartung, P. [Maier-Leibniz-Laboraturium der LMU und TU Muenchen, 85478 Garching (Germany); Dollinger, G. [Universitaet der Bundeswehr Muenchen, Institut fuer Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik, LRT2, Department fuer Luft- und Raumfahrttechnik, 85577 Neubiberg (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    In order to improve the lateral resolution of the 3D hydrogen microscopy by proton-proton scattering at the Munich microprobe SNAKE, we have installed a new multicusp ion source for negative hydrogen ions manufactured by HVEE at the Munich 14 MV tandem accelerator that boosts the proton beam brilliance with the potential to reduce the beam diameter at the focal plane of SNAKE. We measured a beam brilliance B = 27 A m{sup -2} rad{sup -2} eV{sup -1} directly behind the ion source that is at the space charge limit for conventional ion sources. After preacceleration to in total 180 keV beam energy we measure a slightly reduced beam brilliance of B = 10 {mu}A mm{sup -2} mrad{sup -2} MeV{sup -1}. For injection into the tandem accelerator, the extracted H{sup -}-current of the multicusp source of 1 mA is reduced to about 10 {mu}A because of radiation safety regulations and heating problems at the object slits of SNAKE. Due to beam oscillations and influences of the terminal stripper of the tandem we measured a reduced beam brilliance of 0.8 {mu}A mm{sup -2} mrad{sup -2} MeV{sup -1} in front of SNAKE at 25 MeV but still being nearly 10 times larger than measured with any other ion source.

  20. Thermoanalytical investigation of the hydrogen absorption behaviour of Sm{sub 2}Fe{sub 17-x}Ga{sub x} at high hydrogen pressures

    Handstein, A.; Kubis, M.; Gebel, B.; Mueller, K.-H.; Schultz, L. [Institut fuer Festkoerper- und Werkstofforschung Dresden e.V. (Germany). Inst. fuer Metallische Werkstoffe; Gutfleisch, O.; Harris, I.R. [Institut fuer Festkoerper- und Werkstofforschung Dresden e.V. (Germany). Inst. fuer Metallische Werkstoffe]|[Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Metallurgy and Materials

    1998-07-01

    The complete disproportionation of Sm{sub 2}Fe{sub 17-x}Ga{sub x} during annealing in hydrogen is hindered due to an increased stability of the compounds with a higher Ga content (x {>=} 1). Therefore the HD process as the first step of HDDR (hydrogenation-disproportionation-desorption-recombination) has to be carried out at a high hydrogen pressure for x {>=} 1. The hydrogen absorption behaviour of Sm{sub 2}Fe{sub 17-x}Ga{sub x} (x = 0, 0.5, 1 and 2) was investigated by means of hydrogen differential thermal analysis (HDTA) and high pressure differential scanning calorimetry (HPDSC) at hydrogen pressures up to 70 bar. A dependency of hydrogenation and disproportionation temperatures on hydrogen pressure and Ga content was found. The comparison with other substituents (M = Al and Si) instead of M = Ga showed an increased stability of Sm{sub 2}Fe{sub 17-x}M{sub x} compounds against disproportionation by hydrogen in the sequence Al, Ga and Si. The Curie temperatures of the interstitially hydrogenated Th{sub 2}Zn{sub 17}-type materials increase with the hydrogen pressure. In order to produce coercive and thermally stable Sm{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}Ga{sub 2}C{sub y} powder by means of the HDDR process, we recombined material disproportionated at different hydrogen pressures. Preliminary results of magnetic properties of this HDDR treated and gas-carburized Sm{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}Ga{sub 2}C{sub y} are discussed. (orig.)

  1. Hydrogen and Carbon Black Production from Thermal Decomposition of Sub-Quality Natural Gas

    M. Javadi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is computational investigation of the hydrogen and carbon black production through thermal decomposition of waste gases containing CH4 and H2S, without requiring a H2S separation process. The chemical reaction model, which involves solid carbon, sulfur compounds and precursor species for the formation of carbon black, is based on an assumed Probability Density Function (PDF parameterized by the mean and variance of mixture fraction and β-PDF shape. The effects of feedstock mass flow rate and reactor temperature on hydrogen, carbon black, S2, SO2, COS and CS2 formation are investigated. The results show that the major factor influencing CH4 and H2S conversions is reactor temperature. For temperatures higher than 1100° K, the reactor CH4 conversion reaches 100%, whilst H2S conversion increases in temperatures higher than 1300° K. The results reveal that at any temperature, H2S conversion is less than that of CH4. The results also show that in the production of carbon black from sub-quality natural gas, the formation of carbon monoxide, which is occurring in parallel, play a very significant role. For lower values of feedstock flow rate, CH4 mostly burns to CO and consequently, the production of carbon black is low. The results show that the yield of hydrogen increases with increasing feedstock mass flow rate until the yield reaches a maximum value, and then drops with further increase in the feedstock mass flow rate.

  2. Titanium-decorated graphene for high-capacity hydrogen storage studied by density functional simulations

    Liu Yali; Ren Ling; He Yao; Cheng Haiping

    2010-01-01

    We present results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the adsorption of hydrogen molecules on Ti-decorated graphene. Our results indicate that the binding energies of molecular hydrogen on Ti-decorated graphene can be dramatically enhanced to 0.23-0.60 eV. The hybridization of the Ti 3d orbitals with the H 2 σ and σ* orbitals plays a central role in the enhanced binding. There is also a contribution from the attractive interaction between the surface dipole and the dipole of polarized H 2 . It can be expected that Ti-decorated graphene could be considered as a potential high-capacity hydrogen storage medium.

  3. Hysec Process: production of high-purity hydrogen from coke oven gas

    Nishida, S

    1984-01-01

    An account is given of the development of the Hysec Process by the Kansai Netsukagaku and Mitsubishi Kakoki companies. The process is outlined and its special features noted. The initial development aim was to obtain high-purity hydrogen from coke oven gas by means of PSA. To achieve this, ways had to be found for removing the impurities in the coke oven gas and the trace amounts of oxygen which are found in the product hydrogen. The resulting hydrogen is 99.9999% pure. 3 references.

  4. A new concept for high-cycle-life LEO: Rechargeable MnO2-hydrogen

    Appleby, A. J.; Dhar, H. P.; Kim, Y. J.; Murphy, O. J.

    1989-01-01

    The nickel-hydrogen secondary battery system, developed in the early 1970s, has become the system of choice for geostationary earth orbit (GEO) applications. However, for low earth orbit (LEO) satellites with long expected lifetimes the nickel positive limits performance. This requires derating of the cell to achieve very long cycle life. A new system, rechargeable MnO2-Hydrogen, which does not require derating, is described here. For LEO applications, it promises to have longer cycle life, high rate capability, a higher effective energy density, and much lower self-discharge behavior than those of the nickel-hydrogen system.

  5. Liquid Hydrogen Regulated Low Pressure High Flow Pneumatic Panel AFT Arrow Analysis

    Jones, Kelley, M.

    2013-01-01

    Project Definition: Design a high flow pneumatic regulation panel to be used with helium and hydrogen. The panel will have two circuits, one for gaseous helium (GHe) supplied from the GHe Movable Storage Units (MSUs) and one for gaseous hydrogen (GH2) supplied from an existing GH2 Fill Panel. The helium will supply three legs; to existing panels and on the higher pressure leg and Simulated Flight Tanks (SFTs) for the lower pressure legs. The hydrogen line will pressurize a 33,000 gallon vacuum jacketed vessel.

  6. Hydrogen-boron complexes in heavily boron-doped silicon treated with high concentration of hydrogen atoms

    Fukata, N.; Fukuda, S.; Sato, S.; Ishioka, K.; Kitajima, M.; Hishita, S.; Murakami, K.

    2006-01-01

    The formation of hydrogen (H)-related complexes was investigated in boron (B)-doped Si treated with high concentration of H. The isotope shifts of H-related Raman peaks by replacement of H to deuterium and 1 B to 11 B clearly showed the formation of the B-H complexes in which H directly bonds to B in Si. The results of the resistivity measurements suggested that the B acceptors are passivated via the formation of the B-H complexes, as well as the well-known passivation center in B-doped Si, namely, H-B passivation center

  7. Design Configurations and Coupling High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor and Hydrogen Plant

    Chang H. Oh; Eung Soo Kim; Steven Sherman

    2008-01-01

    The US Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature nuclear reactors to produce hydrogen using either thermochemical cycles or high-temperature electrolysis. Although the hydrogen production processes are in an early stage of development, coupling either of these processes to the high-temperature reactor requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear power plant. An intermediate heat transport loop will be required to separate the operations and safety functions of the nuclear and hydrogen plants. A next generation high-temperature reactor could be envisioned as a single-purpose facility that produces hydrogen or a dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. Early plants, such as the proposed Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), may be dual-purpose facilities that demonstrate both hydrogen and efficient electrical generation. Later plants could be single-purpose facilities. At this stage of development, both single- and dual-purpose facilities need to be understood

  8. Numerical and Experimental Study of Mixing Processes Associated with Hydrogen and High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    McDonell, Vincent; Hill, Scott; Akbari, Amin; McDonell, Vincent

    2011-09-30

    As simulation capability improves exponentially with increasingly more cost effective CPUs and hardware, it can be used ?routinely? for engineering applications. Many commercial products are available and they are marketed as increasingly powerful and easy to use. The question remains as to the overall accuracy of results obtained. To support the validation of the CFD, a hierarchical experiment was established in which the type of fuel injection (radial, axial) as well as level of swirl (non-swirling, swirling) could be systematically varied. The effort was limited to time efficient approaches (i.e., generally RANS approaches) although limited assessment of time resolved methods (i.e., unsteady RANS and LES) were considered. Careful measurements of the flowfield velocity and fuel concentration were made using both intrusive and non-intrusive methods. This database was then used as the basis for the assessment of the CFD approach. The numerical studies were carried out with a statistically based matrix. As a result, the effect of turbulence model, fuel type, axial plane, turbulent Schmidt number, and injection type could be studied using analysis of variance. The results for the non-swirling cases could be analyzed as planned, and demonstrate that turbulence model selection, turbulence Schmidt number, and the type of injection will strongly influence the agreement with measured values. Interestingly, the type of fuel used (either hydrogen or methane) has no influence on the accuracy of the simulations. For axial injection, the selection of proper turbulence Schmidt number is important, whereas for radial injection, the results are relatively insensitive to this parameter. In general, it was found that the nature of the flowfield influences the performance of the predictions. This result implies that it is difficult to establish a priori the ?best? simulation approach to use. However, the insights from the relative orientation of the jet and flow do offer some

  9. Turbulent Flame Propagation Characteristics of High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    Seitzman, Jerry [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Lieuwen, Timothy [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    This final report describes the results of an effort to better understand turbulent flame propagation, especially at conditions relevant to gas turbines employing fuels with syngas or hydrogen mixtures. Turbulent flame speeds were measured for a variety of hydrogen/carbon monoxide (H2/CO) and hydrogen/methane (H2/CH4) fuel mixtures with air as the oxidizer. The measurements include global consumption speeds (ST,GC) acquired in a turbulent jet flame at pressures of 1-10 atm and local displacement speeds (ST,LD) acquired in a low-swirl burner at atmospheric pressure. The results verify the importance of fuel composition in determining turbulent flame speeds. For example, different fuel-air mixtures having the same unstretched laminar flame speed (SL,0) but different fuel compositions resulted in significantly different ST,GC for the same turbulence levels (u'). This demonstrates the weakness of turbulent flame speed correlations based simply on u'/SL,0. The results were analyzed using a steady-steady leading points concept to explain the sensitivity of turbulent burning rates to fuel (and oxidizer) composition. Leading point theories suggest that the premixed turbulent flame speed is controlled by the flame front characteristics at the flame brush leading edge, or, in other words, by the flamelets that advance farthest into the unburned mixture (the so-called leading points). For negative Markstein length mixtures, this is assumed to be close to the maximum stretched laminar flame speed (SL,max) for the given fuel-oxidizer mixture. For the ST,GC measurements, the data at a given pressure were well-correlated with an SL,max scaling. However the variation with pressure was not captured, which may be due to non-quasi-steady effects that are not included in the current model. For the ST,LD data, the leading points model again faithfully captured the variation of turbulent flame speed over a wide range of fuel-compositions and turbulence intensities. These

  10. Fabrication of high-quality brazed joints

    Orlov, A.V.

    1980-01-01

    Problem of ensuring of joint high-quality when brazing different parts in power engineering is considered. To obtain high-quality joints it is necessary to correctly design brazed joint and to choose a gap width, overlap length and fillet radius; to clean up carefully the surfaces to be brazed and fix them properly one relative to another; to apply a solder so as to provide its flowing into the gap and sticking in it; to exactly regulate thermal conditions of brazing. High quality and reliability of brazed joints are ensured by the application of solders based on noble metals, and cheap solders based on nickel, manganese and copper. Joints brazed with nickel base solders may operate at temperatures as high as 888 deg C

  11. Quantum theoretical study of hydrogen under high pressure

    Biermann, S.

    2001-12-01

    In the first chapter we will review our knowledge of the phase diagram of hydrogen. Chapter 2 is dedicated to a summary of the standard density functional and molecular dynamics methods and shows how these are combined in the Car-Parrinello method. Here the nuclei are still treated as classical particles obeying Newtonian mechanics. In chapter 3 we drop this approximation. The path integral description of quantum statistics is added on top of the classical Car-Parrinello method and yields a formalism that includes quantum effects due to the finite de Broglie wavelength of the nuclei. Some technical aspects, namely the parallel implementation of the Path Integral Car-Parrinello (PICP) method, are discussed in chapter 4. In chapter 5 we present the results of our PICP calculations and compare them with prior calculations using the classical Car-Parrinello method as described in chapter 2. (orig.)

  12. Penetration of hydrogen isotopes through EhI 698 alloy at high pressure and temperature

    Bystritskij, V.M.; Voznyak, Ya.; Granovskij, V.B.

    1986-01-01

    The paper deals with investigations of the process of hydrogen and deuterium penetration through the high-temperature alloy EhI-698 at a pressure up to 1 kbar and temperature up to 1050 K. Parameters of the process obey Sieverts's law and can be described by Arrenius's and Vant-Goff's equations. The obtained results lead to a conclusion that the alloy EhI-698 is good for vessels to be employed in hydrogen media

  13. Indirect, reversible high-density hydrogen storage in compact metal ammine salts

    Sørensen, Rasmus Zink; Hummelshøj, Jens Strabo; Klerke, Asbjørn

    2008-01-01

    The indirect hydrogen storage capabilities of Mg(NH3)(6)Cl-2, Ca(NH3)(6)Cl-2, Mn(NH3)(6)Cl-2, and Ni(NH3)(6)Cl-2 are investigated. All four metal ammine chlorides can be compacted to solid tablets with densities of at least 95% of the crystal density. This gives very high indirect hydrogen...

  14. 650 mm long liquid hydrogen target for use in a high intensity electron beam

    Mark, J.W.

    1983-07-01

    This paper describes a 650 mm long liquid hydrogen target constructed for use in the high intensity electron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The main design problem was to construct a target that would permit the heat deposited by the electron beam to be removed rapidly without boiling the hydrogen so as to maintain constant target density for optimum data taking. Design requirements, construction details and operating experience are discussed

  15. TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN HIGH EDUCATION

    Hasan SERİN, Alper AYTEKİN

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The approach of Total Quality Management (TQM has been even more common and most recently its use in high education has been discussed. Likewise the enterprises producing various products, universities have also inputs, processes, and outputs. Due to conditions of competition, universities have to improve the qualities of these inputs, processes, and outputs, according to satisfaction, demands, and expectations of internal and external customers. If the TQM has been implemented in the universities with a manner that aims for customer satisfaction (students, lecturers, public and private establishments, and families, supports constant development, ensures participatory approach, and encourages working in groups, it will provide universities with effectiveness, efficiency, dynamics, and economics. In this study, common problems of universities, definitions of quality and TQM in high education, customer concept at universities, and factors affecting the quality of education have been explained. Besides, in order TQM approach to be successfully implemented in the universities, various suggestions have been presented.

  16. Water containing deuterium electrolysis to obtain gaseous hydrogen isotope in a high state of purity

    Bellanger, Gilbert

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the basic concept is to prepare hydrogen in a high state of purity by electrolysing water using a palladium cathode. During electrolysis, hydrogen is at first adsorbed at the palladium surface, and next it diffuses through it till opposite face of its entry where it is desorbed; thus permitting to regain it in a very pure state for storage. The method can be used from water containing deuterium. To improve hydrogen adsorption, surface effect of palladium must be studied. It was found that heat treatment of palladium improved the hydrogen permeation flux. The diffusivity of hydrogen is controlled by Fick and Sieverts equations in which temperature has a significant influence on permeation rates. Anyway, hydrogen desorption does not cause any difficulty. In a second part, we have studied the isotopic separation factor using water containing deuterium. We remarked in fact that it depends on current density, overpotential, diffusivity of hydrogen and deuterium and isotopic composition of electrolyte as expected. In the last part, we realized an original electrolysis model in a glove-box in which are taken into account the results given before and also the technology components employed in processes involving the use of tritium. (author) [fr

  17. Preliminary estimations on the heat recovery method for hydrogen production by the high temperature steam electrolysis

    Koh, Jae Hwa; Yoon, Duck Joo

    2009-01-01

    As a part of the project 'development of hydrogen production technologies by high temperature electrolysis using very high temperature reactor', we have developed an electrolyzer model for high temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE) system and carried out some preliminary estimations on the effects of heat recovery on the HTSE hydrogen production system. To produce massive hydrogen by using nuclear energy, the HTSE process is one of the promising technologies with sulfur-iodine and hybrid sulfur process. The HTSE produces hydrogen through electrochemical reaction within the solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC), which is a reverse reaction of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). The HTSE system generally operates in the temperature range of 700∼900 .deg. C. Advantages of HTSE hydrogen production are (a) clean hydrogen production from water without carbon oxide emission, (b) synergy effect due to using the current SOFC technology and (c) higher thermal efficiency of system when it is coupled nuclear reactor. Since the HTSE system operates over 700 .deg. C, the use of heat recovery is an important consideration for higher efficiency. In this paper, four different heat recovery configurations for the HTSE system have been investigated and estimated

  18. Diagnostics of Argon Injected Hydrogen Peroxide Added High Frequency Underwater Capillary Discharge

    Muhammad Waqar Ahmed

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The effects of hydrogen peroxide addition and Argon injection on electrical and spectral characteristics of underwater capillary discharge were investigated. The flowing water discharge was created in a quartz tube (Φ = 4mm outer; Φ = 2mm inner; thickness 1mm by applying high frequency (25 kHz alternating current voltage (0-15kV across the tungsten electrodes (Φ=0.5mm, in pin-pin electrode configuration, separated by a gap distance of 10 mm. The results of no hydrogen peroxide addition and no Argon gas injection were compared with addition of hydrogen peroxide and Argon injection for different values. The emission spectrum was taken to present the increase in concentration of •OH radicals with and without hydrogen peroxide addition under different argon injection rates. The results demonstrated that addition of hydrogen peroxide do not remarkably affected the conductivity of water, but its addition increased the yield rate of •OH radicals generated by plasma discharge. The addition of Argon generated bubbles and gas channels reduced the high power consumption required for inducing flowing water long gap discharge. The results showed large concentration of •OH radicals due to hydrogen peroxide addition, less required input power for generating flowing water discharge by using high frequency input voltage and due to Argon injection.

  19. A combinatorial characterization scheme for high-throughput investigations of hydrogen storage materials

    Hattrick-Simpers, Jason R; Chiu, Chun; Bendersky, Leonid A; Tan Zhuopeng; Oguchi, Hiroyuki; Heilweil, Edwin J; Maslar, James E

    2011-01-01

    In order to increase measurement throughput, a characterization scheme has been developed that accurately measures the hydrogen storage properties of materials in quantities ranging from 10 ng to 1 g. Initial identification of promising materials is realized by rapidly screening thin-film composition spread and thickness wedge samples using normalized IR emissivity imaging. The hydrogen storage properties of promising samples are confirmed through measurements on single-composition films with high-sensitivity (resolution <0.3 μg) Sievert's-type apparatus. For selected samples, larger quantities of up to ∼100 mg may be prepared and their (de)hydrogenation and micro-structural properties probed via parallel in situ Raman spectroscopy. Final confirmation of the hydrogen storage properties is obtained on ∼1 g powder samples using a combined Raman spectroscopy/Sievert's apparatus.

  20. Production price of hydrogen from grid connected electrolysis in a power market with high wind penetration

    Joergensen, Claus; Ropenus, Stephanie

    2008-01-01

    In liberalized power markets, there are significant power price fluctuations due to independently varying changes in demand and supply, the latter being substantial in systems with high wind power penetration. In such systems, hydrogen production by grid connected electrolysis can be cost optimized by operating an electrolyzer part time. This paper presents a study on the minimization of the hydrogen production price and its dependence on estimated power price fluctuations. The calculation of power price fluctuations is based on a parameterization of existing data on wind power production, power consumption and power price evolution in the West Danish power market area. The price for hydrogen is derived as a function of the optimal electrolyzer operation hours per year for four different wind penetration scenarios. It is found to amount to 0.41-0.45 EUR/Nm 3 . The study further discusses the hydrogen price sensitivity towards investment costs and the contribution from non-wind power sources. (author)

  1. DETERMINATION OF HYDROGEN DESORBED THROUGH THERMAL CALORIMETRY IN A HIGH STRENGTH STEEL

    Carolina A. Asmus

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The following study aims to quantify the release activation energy (Ea of hydrogen (H from lattice sites, reversible or irreversible, where the H can be trapped. Moreover, enthalpy changes associated with the main hydrogen (H trapping sites can be analyzed by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. In this technique, the peak temperature measurement is determined at two different heating rates, 3ºC/min y 5ºC/min, from ambient temperature to 500°C. In order to simulate severe conditions of hydrogen income into resulfurized high strength steel, electrolytic permeation tests were performed on test tubes suitable for fatigue tests. Sometimes during charging, H promoters were aggregated to electrolytic solution. Subsequently, the test tubes were subjected to flow cycle fatigue tests. Finally, irreversible trap which anchor more strongly H atoms are MnS inclusions. Its role on hydrogen embrittlement during fatigue tests is conclusive.

  2. Combustion of a high-velocity hydrogen microjet effluxing in air

    Kozlov, V. V.; Grek, G. R.; Korobeinichev, O. P.; Litvinenko, Yu. A.; Shmakov, A. G.

    2016-09-01

    This study is devoted to experimental investigation of hydrogen-combustion modes and the structure of a diffusion flame formed at a high-velocity efflux of hydrogen in air through round apertures of various diameters. The efflux-velocity range of the hydrogen jet and the diameters of nozzle apertures at which the flame is divided in two zones with laminar and turbulent flow are found. The zone with the laminar flow is a stabilizer of combustion of the flame as a whole, and in the zone with the turbulent flow the intense mixing of fuel with an oxidizer takes place. Combustion in these two zones can occur independently from each other, but the steadiest mode is observed only at the existence of the flame in the laminar-flow zone. The knowledge obtained makes it possible to understand more deeply the features of modes of microjet combustion of hydrogen promising for various combustion devices.

  3. High Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH4 Based Complex Compound Hydrides

    Daniel A. Mosher; Xia Tang; Ronald J. Brown; Sarah Arsenault; Salvatore Saitta; Bruce L. Laube; Robert H. Dold; Donald L. Anton

    2007-07-27

    This final report describes the motivations, activities and results of the hydrogen storage independent project "High Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH4 Based Complex Compound Hydrides" performed by the United Technologies Research Center under the Department of Energy Hydrogen Program, contract # DE-FC36-02AL67610. The objectives of the project were to identify and address the key systems technologies associated with applying complex hydride materials, particularly ones which differ from those for conventional metal hydride based storage. This involved the design, fabrication and testing of two prototype systems based on the hydrogen storage material NaAlH4. Safety testing, catalysis studies, heat exchanger optimization, reaction kinetics modeling, thermochemical finite element analysis, powder densification development and material neutralization were elements included in the effort.

  4. Production price of hydrogen from grid connected electrolysis in a power market with high wind penetration

    Joergensen, Claus [Materials Research Department, Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, P.O. Box 49, Frederiksborgvej 399, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Ropenus, Stephanie [Systems Analysis Department, Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, P.O. Box 49, Frederiksborgvej 399, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark)

    2008-10-15

    In liberalized power markets, there are significant power price fluctuations due to independently varying changes in demand and supply, the latter being substantial in systems with high wind power penetration. In such systems, hydrogen production by grid connected electrolysis can be cost optimized by operating an electrolyzer part time. This paper presents a study on the minimization of the hydrogen production price and its dependence on estimated power price fluctuations. The calculation of power price fluctuations is based on a parameterization of existing data on wind power production, power consumption and power price evolution in the West Danish power market area. The price for hydrogen is derived as a function of the optimal electrolyzer operation hours per year for four different wind penetration scenarios. It is found to amount to 0.41-0.45 EUR/Nm{sup 3}. The study further discusses the hydrogen price sensitivity towards investment costs and the contribution from non-wind power sources. (author)

  5. Production price of hydrogen from grid connected electrolysis in a power market with high wind penetration.

    Joergensen, Claus [Materials Research Department, Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, P.O. Box 49, Frederiksborgvej 399, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Ropenus, Stephanie [Systems Analysis Department, Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, P.O. Box 49, Frederiksborgvej 399, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark)

    2008-10-15

    In liberalized power markets, there are significant power price fluctuations due to independently varying changes in demand and supply, the latter being substantial in systems with high wind power penetration. In such systems, hydrogen production by grid connected electrolysis can be cost optimized by operating an electrolyzer part time. This paper presents a study on the minimization of the hydrogen production price and its dependence on estimated power price fluctuations. The calculation of power price fluctuations is based on a parameterization of existing data on wind power production, power consumption and power price evolution in the West Danish power market area. The price for hydrogen is derived as a function of the optimal electrolyzer operation hours per year for four different wind penetration scenarios. It is found to amount to 0.41-0.45 EUR/Nm{sup 3}. The study further discusses the hydrogen price sensitivity towards investment costs and the contribution from non-wind power sources. (author)

  6. Research and development program of hydrogen production system with high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    Miyamoto, Y.; Shiozawa, S.; Ogawa, M.; Inagaki, Y.; Nishihara, T.; Shimizu, S.

    2000-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been developing a hydrogen production system with a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). While the HTGR hydrogen production system has the following advantages compared with a fossil-fired hydrogen production system; low operation cost (economical fuel cost), low CO 2 emission and saving of fossil fuel by use of nuclear heat, it requires some items to be solved as follows; cost reduction of facility such as a reactor, coolant circulation system and so on, development of control and safety technologies. As for the control and safety technologies, JAERI plans demonstration test with hydrogen production system by steam reforming of methane coupling to 30 Wt HTGR, named high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR). Prior to the demonstration test, a 1/30-scale out-of-pile test facility is in construction for safety review and detailed design of the HTTR hydrogen production system. Also, design study will start for reduction of facility cost. Moreover, basic study on hydrogen production process without CO 2 emission is in progress by thermochemical water splitting. (orig.)

  7. The role of hydrogen in high wind energy penetration electricity systems: the Irish case

    Gonzalez, A.; McKeogh, E.; Gallachoir, B.O.

    2004-01-01

    The deployment of wind energy is constrained by wind uncontrollability, which poses operational problems on the electricity supply system at high penetration levels, lessening the value of wind-generated electricity to a significant extent. This paper studies the viability of hydrogen production via electrolysis using wind power that cannot be easily accommodated on the system. The potential benefits of hydrogen and its role in enabling a large penetration of wind energy are assessed, within the context of the enormous wind energy resource in Ireland. The exploitation of this wind resource may in the future give rise to significant amounts of surplus wind electricity, which could be used to produce hydrogen, the zero-emissions fuel that many experts believe will eventually replace fossil fuels in the transport sector. In this paper the operation of a wind powered hydrogen production system is simulated and optimised. The results reveal that, even allowing for significant cost-reductions in electrolyser and associated balance-of-plant equipment, low average surplus wind electricity cost and a high hydrogen market price are also necessary to achieve the economic viability of the technology. These conditions would facilitate the installation of electrolysis units of sufficient capacity to allow an appreciable increase in installed wind power in Ireland. The simulation model was also used to determine the CO 2 abatement potential associated with the wind energy/hydrogen production. (author)

  8. Measurement and interpretation of threshold stress intensity factors for steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas.

    Dadfarnia, Mohsen (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Nibur, Kevin A.; San Marchi, Christopher W.; Sofronis, Petros (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Somerday, Brian P.; Foulk, James W., III; Hayden, Gary A. (CP Industries, McKeesport, PA)

    2010-07-01

    Threshold stress intensity factors were measured in high-pressure hydrogen gas for a variety of low alloy ferritic steels using both constant crack opening displacement and rising crack opening displacement procedures. The sustained load cracking procedures are generally consistent with those in ASME Article KD-10 of Section VIII Division 3 of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which was recently published to guide design of high-pressure hydrogen vessels. Three definitions of threshold were established for the two test methods: K{sub THi}* is the maximum applied stress intensity factor for which no crack extension was observed under constant displacement; K{sub THa} is the stress intensity factor at the arrest position for a crack that extended under constant displacement; and K{sub JH} is the stress intensity factor at the onset of crack extension under rising displacement. The apparent crack initiation threshold under constant displacement, K{sub THi}*, and the crack arrest threshold, K{sub THa}, were both found to be non-conservative due to the hydrogen exposure and crack-tip deformation histories associated with typical procedures for sustained-load cracking tests under constant displacement. In contrast, K{sub JH}, which is measured under concurrent rising displacement and hydrogen gas exposure, provides a more conservative hydrogen-assisted fracture threshold that is relevant to structural components in which sub-critical crack extension is driven by internal hydrogen gas pressure.

  9. Optical frequency comb for high resolution hydrogen spectroscopy

    Arnoult, O.

    2006-11-01

    In this work, we perform an absolute frequency measurement of the 1S-3S transition in atomic hydrogen, in order to improve the uncertainties on both the Rydberg constant and the Lamb shift L1S. In the experiment, a CW stabilized Ti:Sa laser is doubled twice in LBO (LiB 3 O 5 ) and BBO (β-BaB 2 O 4 ) crystals. The 1S-3S transition is excited by two photons at 205 nm in an optical cavity colinear with the atomic beam, at room temperature. The remaining second-order Doppler effect is compensated by a quadratic Stark effect resulting from an applied static magnetic field. An optical frequency comb is used to compare directly the Ti:Sa frequency with the microwave frequency standard. We detect fluorescence at 656 nm thanks to a CCD camera. Fitting the experimental data with our calculated line shapes leads to a value of the second-order Doppler effect in disagreement with approximative predictions for the 1S-3S frequency. We suggest the existence of stray electric fields as a possible systematic effect. The slides of the defence of the thesis have been added at the end of the document. (author)

  10. Collision processes of highly excited hydrogen atom, 1

    Toshima, Nobuyuki

    1977-01-01

    The cross sections for the transitions 5S sub(1/2) → 5P sub(1/2), 5S sub(1/2) → 5P sub(3/2), 5P sub(1/2) → 5D sub(3/2), 5S sub(1/2) → 5D sub(3/2) and 5S sub(1/2) → 5D sub(5/2) in the hydrogen atom by proton impact are calculated on the basis of the impact parameter method. Distant collisions are dominant and the couplings among the sub-levels belonging to the same n are important at low energies, but the couplings with the levels belonging to different n's are negligibly small. The Glauber and the Born approximations are also applied to the same problem and the Glauber approximation gives a good agreement with the impact parameter method over a wide energy range down to at least about 100 eV. (auth.)

  11. Ultrasonic and metallographic studies on AISI 4140 steel exposed to hydrogen at high pressure and temperature

    Oruganti, Malavika

    This thesis conducts an investigation to study the effects of hydrogen exposure at high temperature and pressure on the behavior of AISI 4140 steel. Piezoelectric ultrasonic technique was primarily used to evaluate surface longitudinal wave velocity and defect geometry variations, as related to time after exposure to hydrogen at high temperature and pressure. Critically refracted longitudinal wave technique was used for the former and pulse-echo technique for the latter. Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to correlate the ultrasonic results with the microstructure of the steel and to provide better insight into the steel behavior. The results of the investigation indicate that frequency analysis of the defect echo, determined using the pulse-echo technique at regular intervals of time, appears to be a promising tool for monitoring defect growth induced by a high temperature and high pressure hydrogen-related attack.

  12. Hydrogen Production System with High Temperature Electrolysis for Nuclear Power Plant

    Kentaro, Matsunaga; Eiji, Hoashi; Seiji, Fujiwara; Masato, Yoshino; Taka, Ogawa; Shigeo, Kasai

    2006-01-01

    Steam electrolysis with solid oxide cells is one of the most promising methods for hydrogen production, which has the potential to be high efficiency. Its most parts consist of environmentally sound and common materials. Recent development of ceramics with high ionic conductivity suggests the possibility of widening the range of operating temperature with maintaining the high efficiency. Toshiba is constructing a hydrogen production system with solid oxide electrolysis cells for nuclear power plants. Tubular-type cells using YSZ (Yttria-Stabilized- Zirconia) as electrolyte showed good performance of steam electrolysis at 800 to 900 deg C. Larger electrolysis cells with present configuration are to be combined with High Temperature Reactors. The hydrogen production efficiency on the present designed system is expected around 50% at 800 to 900 deg C of operating temperature. For the Fast Reactors, 'advanced cell' with higher efficiency at lower temperature are to be introduced. (authors)

  13. High capacity hydrogen absorption in transition-metal ethylene complexes: consequences of nanoclustering

    Phillips, A B; Shivaram, B S

    2009-01-01

    We have recently shown that organo-metallic complexes formed by laser ablating transition metals in ethylene are high hydrogen absorbers at room temperature (Phillips and Shivaram 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 105505). Here we show that the absorption percentage depends strongly on the ethylene pressure. High ethylene pressures (>100 mTorr) result in a lowered hydrogen uptake. Transmission electron microscopy measurements reveal that while low pressure ablations result in metal atoms dispersed uniformly on a near atomic scale, high pressure ones yield distinct nanoparticles with electron energy-loss spectroscopy demonstrating that the metal atoms are confined solely to the nanoparticles.

  14. Effect of forage quality in faeces from different ruminant species fed high and low quality forage

    Jalali, A R; Nørgaard, P; Nielsen, M O

    2010-01-01

    Effect of forage quality in faeces from different ruminant species fed high and low quality forage......Effect of forage quality in faeces from different ruminant species fed high and low quality forage...

  15. Advanced Intermediate Heat Transport Loop Design Configurations for Hydrogen Production Using High Temperature Nuclear Reactors

    Chang Oh; Cliff Davis; Rober Barner; Paul Pickard

    2005-01-01

    The US Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature nuclear reactors to produce hydrogen using either thermochemical cycles or high-temperature electrolysis. Although the hydrogen production processes are in an early stage of development, coupling either of these processes to the high-temperature reactor requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear power plant. An intermediate heat transport loop will be required to separate the operations and safety functions of the nuclear and hydrogen plants. A next generation high-temperature reactor could be envisioned as a single-purpose facility that produces hydrogen or a dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. Early plants, such as the proposed Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), may be dual-purpose facilities that demonstrate both hydrogen and efficient electrical generation. Later plants could be single-purpose facilities. At this stage of development, both single- and dual-purpose facilities need to be understood. A number of possible configurations for a system that transfers heat between the nuclear reactor and the hydrogen and/or electrical generation plants were identified. These configurations included both direct and indirect cycles for the production of electricity. Both helium and liquid salts were considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. Methods were developed to perform thermal-hydraulic evaluations and cycle-efficiency evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The thermal-hydraulic evaluations estimated the sizes of various components in the intermediate heat transport loop for the different configurations. The relative sizes of components provide a relative indication of the capital cost associated with the various configurations. Estimates of the overall cycle efficiency of the various

  16. Assuring quality in high-consequence engineering

    Hoover, Marcey L.; Kolb, Rachel R.

    2014-03-01

    In high-consequence engineering organizations, such as Sandia, quality assurance may be heavily dependent on staff competency. Competency-dependent quality assurance models are at risk when the environment changes, as it has with increasing attrition rates, budget and schedule cuts, and competing program priorities. Risks in Sandia's competency-dependent culture can be mitigated through changes to hiring, training, and customer engagement approaches to manage people, partners, and products. Sandia's technical quality engineering organization has been able to mitigate corporate-level risks by driving changes that benefit all departments, and in doing so has assured Sandia's commitment to excellence in high-consequence engineering and national service.

  17. Hydrogen production by high temperature electrolysis of water vapour and nuclear reactors

    Jean-Pierre Py; Alain Capitaine

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents hydrogen production by a nuclear reactor (High Temperature Reactor, HTR or Pressurized Water Reactor, PWR) coupled to a High Temperature Electrolyser (HTE) plant. With respect to the coupling of a HTR with a HTE plant, EDF and AREVA NP had previously selected a combined cycle HTR scheme to convert the reactor heat into electricity. In that case, the steam required for the electrolyser plant is provided either directly from the steam turbine cycle or from a heat exchanger connected with such cycle. Hydrogen efficiency production is valued using high temperature electrolysis. Electrolysis production of hydrogen can be performed with significantly higher thermal efficiencies by operating in the steam phase than in the water phase. The electrolysis performance is assessed with solid oxide and solid proton electrolysis cells. The efficiency from the three operating conditions (endo-thermal, auto-thermal and thermo-neutral) of a high temperature electrolysis process is evaluated. The technical difficulties to use the gases enthalpy to heat the water are analyzed, taking into account efficiency and technological challenges. EDF and AREVA NP have performed an analysis to select an optimized process giving consideration to plant efficiency, plant operation, investment and production costs. The paper provides pathways and identifies R and D actions to reach hydrogen production costs competitive with those of other hydrogen production processes. (authors)

  18. Effects of hydrogen peroxide, modified atmosphere and their combination on quality of minimally processed cluster beans.

    Waghmare, Roji B; Annapure, Uday S

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the potential of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on quality of fresh-cut cluster beans. Fresh-cut cluster beans were dipped in a solution of 2% H 2 O 2 for 2 min, packed in an atmosphere of (5% O 2 , 10% CO 2 , 85% N 2 ) and stored in polypropylene bags at 5 °C for 35 days. Passive MAP was created by consuming O 2 and producing CO 2 by fresh-cut cluster beans. The combined effect of H 2 O 2 and MAP on physico-chemical analysis (Headspace gas, weight loss, chlorophyll, hardness and color), microbial quality (mesophilic aerobics and yeasts and molds) and sensory analysis were studied. Chemical treatment and MAP both are equally effective in extending the shelf life at 5 °C for 28 days. Hence, MAP can be an alternative for chemical treatment to achieve a shelf life of 28 days for fresh-cut cluster beans. Control samples, without chemical treatment and modified atmosphere, stored at 5 °C were spoiled after 14 days. Chemical treatment followed by MAP underwent minimum changes in weight, chlorophyll, hardness and color of fresh-cut cluster beans. Combination treatment gives a storage life of 35 days.

  19. Highly hydrothermally stable microporous silica membranes for hydrogen separation.

    Wei, Qi; Wang, Fei; Nie, Zuo-Ren; Song, Chun-Lin; Wang, Yan-Li; Li, Qun-Yan

    2008-08-07

    Fluorocarbon-modified silica membranes were deposited on gamma-Al2O3/alpha-Al2O3 supports by the sol-gel technique for hydrogen separation. The hydrophobic property, pore structure, gas transport and separation performance, and hydrothermal stability of the modified membranes were investigated. It is observed that the water contact angle increases from 27.2+/-1.5 degrees for the pure silica membranes to 115.0+/-1.2 degrees for the modified ones with a (trifluoropropyl)triethoxysilane (TFPTES)/tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) molar ratio of 0.6. The modified membranes preserve a microporous structure with a micropore volume of 0.14 cm3/g and a pore size of approximately 0.5 nm. A single gas permeation of H2 and CO2 through the modified membranes presents small positive apparent thermal activation energies, indicating a dominant microporous membrane transport. At 200 degrees C, a single H2 permeance of 3.1x10(-6) mol m(-2) s(-1) Pa(-1) and a H2/CO2 permselectivity of 15.2 were obtained after proper correction for the support resistance and the contribution from the defects. In the gas mixture measurement, the H2 permeance and the H2/CO2 separation factor almost remain constant at 200 degrees C with a water vapor pressure of 1.2x10(4) Pa for at least 220 h, indicating that the modified membranes are hydrothermally stable, benefiting from the integrity of the microporous structure due to the fluorocarbon modification.

  20. Producing high-quality slash pine seeds

    James Barnett; Sue Varela

    2003-01-01

    Slash pine is a desirable species. It serves many purposes and is well adapted to poorly drained flatwoods and seasonally flooded areas along the lower Coastal Plain of the Southeastern US. The use of high-quality seeds has been shown to produce uniform seedlings for outplanting, which is key to silvicultural success along the Coastal Plain and elsewhere. We present...

  1. Endorectal high dose rate brachytherapy quality assurance

    Devic, S.; Vuong, T.; Evans, M.; Podgorsak, E.

    2008-01-01

    We describe our quality assurance method for preoperative high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy of endorectal tumours. Reproduction of the treatment planning dose distribution on a daily basis is crucial for treatment success. Due to the cylindrical symmetry, two types of adjustments are necessary: applicator rotation and dose distribution shift along the applicator axis. (author)

  2. High hydrogen production from glycerol or glucose by electrohydrogenesis using microbial electrolysis cells

    Selembo, Priscilla A.

    2009-07-01

    The use of glycerol for hydrogen gas production was examined via electrohydrogenesis using microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). A hydrogen yield of 3.9 mol-H2/mol was obtained using glycerol, which is higher than that possible by fermentation, at relatively high rates of 2.0 ± 0.4 m3/m3 d (Eap = 0.9 V). Under the same conditions, hydrogen was produced from glucose at a yield of 7.2 mol-H2/mol and a rate of 1.9 ± 0.3 m3/m3 d. Glycerol was completely removed within 6 h, with 56% of the electrons in intermediates (primarily 1,3-propanediol), with the balance converted to current, intracellular storage products or biomass. Glucose was removed within 5 h, but intermediates (mainly propionate) accounted for only 19% of the electrons. Hydrogen was also produced using the glycerol byproduct of biodiesel fuel production at a rate of 0.41 ± 0.1 m3/m3 d. These results demonstrate that electrohydrogenesis is an effective method for producing hydrogen from either pure glycerol or glycerol byproducts of biodiesel fuel production. © 2009 International Association for Hydrogen Energy.

  3. Hydrogen Fuel System Design Trades for High-Altitude Long-Endurance Remotely- Operated Aircraft

    Millis, Marc G.; Tornabene, Robert T.; Jurns, John M.; Guynn, Mark D.; Tomsik, Thomas M.; VanOverbeke, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Preliminary design trades are presented for liquid hydrogen fuel systems for remotely-operated, high-altitude aircraft that accommodate three different propulsion options: internal combustion engines, and electric motors powered by either polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells or solid oxide fuel cells. Mission goal is sustained cruise at 60,000 ft altitude, with duration-aloft a key parameter. The subject aircraft specifies an engine power of 143 to 148 hp, gross liftoff weight of 9270 to 9450 lb, payload of 440 lb, and a hydrogen fuel capacity of 2650 to 2755 lb stored in two spherical tanks (8.5 ft inside diameter), each with a dry mass goal of 316 lb. Hydrogen schematics for all three propulsion options are provided. Each employs vacuum-jacketed tanks with multilayer insulation, augmented with a helium pressurant system, and using electric motor driven hydrogen pumps. The most significant schematic differences involve the heat exchangers and hydrogen reclamation equipment. Heat balances indicate that mission durations of 10 to 16 days appear achievable. The dry mass for the hydrogen system is estimated to be 1900 lb, including 645 lb for each tank. This tank mass is roughly twice that of the advanced tanks assumed in the initial conceptual vehicle. Control strategies are not addressed, nor are procedures for filling and draining the tanks.

  4. Hydrogen production system coupled with high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTTR)

    Shiozawa, Shusaku

    2003-01-01

    On the HTTR program, R and D on nuclear reactor technology and R and D on thermal application technology such as hydrogen production and so on, are advanced. When carrying out power generation and thermal application such as hydrogen production and so on, it is, at first, necessary to supply nuclear heat safely, stably and in low cost, JAERI carries out some R and Ds on nuclear reactor technology using HTTR. In parallel to this, JAERI also carries out R and D for jointing nuclear reactor system with thermal application systems because of no experience in the world on high temperature heat of about 1,000 centigrade supplied by nuclear reactor except power generation, and R and D on thermochemical decomposition method IS process for producing hydrogen from water without exhaust of carbon dioxide. Here were described summaries on R and D on nuclear reactor technology, R and D on jointing technology using HTTR hydrogen production system, R and D on IS process hydrogen production, and comparison hydrogen production with other processes. (G.K.)

  5. Research on High Sensitive D-Shaped FBG Hydrogen Sensors in Power Transformer Oil.

    Luo, Ying-Ting; Wang, Hong-Bin; Ma, Guo-Ming; Song, Hong-Tu; Li, Chengrong; Jiang, Jun

    2016-10-04

    Dissolved hydrogen is a symbol gas decomposed by power transformer oil for electrical faults such as overheat or partial discharges. A novel D-shaped fiber Bragg grating (D-FBG) sensor is herein proposed and was fabricated with magnetron sputtering to measure the dissolved hydrogen concentration in power transformer oil in this paper. Different from the RI (refractive index)-based effect, D-FBG in this case is sensitive to curvature caused by stress from sensing coating, leading to Bragg wavelength shifts accordingly. The relationship between the D-FBG wavelength shift and dissolved hydrogen concentration in oil was measured experimentally in the laboratory. The detected sensitivity could be as high as 1.96 μL/L at every 1-pm wavelength shift. The results proved that a simple, polished FBG-based hydrogen sensor provides a linear measuring characteristic in the range of low hydrogen concentrations in transformer oil. Moreover, the stable hydrogen sensing performance was investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis.

  6. Research on High Sensitive D-Shaped FBG Hydrogen Sensors in Power Transformer Oil

    Ying-Ting Luo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved hydrogen is a symbol gas decomposed by power transformer oil for electrical faults such as overheat or partial discharges. A novel D-shaped fiber Bragg grating (D-FBG sensor is herein proposed and was fabricated with magnetron sputtering to measure the dissolved hydrogen concentration in power transformer oil in this paper. Different from the RI (refractive index-based effect, D-FBG in this case is sensitive to curvature caused by stress from sensing coating, leading to Bragg wavelength shifts accordingly. The relationship between the D-FBG wavelength shift and dissolved hydrogen concentration in oil was measured experimentally in the laboratory. The detected sensitivity could be as high as 1.96 μL/L at every 1-pm wavelength shift. The results proved that a simple, polished FBG-based hydrogen sensor provides a linear measuring characteristic in the range of low hydrogen concentrations in transformer oil. Moreover, the stable hydrogen sensing performance was investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis.

  7. High-performance a -Si/c-Si heterojunction photoelectrodes for photoelectrochemical oxygen and hydrogen evolution

    Wang, Hsin Ping

    2015-05-13

    Amorphous Si (a-Si)/crystalline Si (c-Si) heterojunction (SiHJ) can serve as highly efficient and robust photoelectrodes for solar fuel generation. Low carrier recombination in the photoelectrodes leads to high photocurrents and photovoltages. The SiHJ was designed and fabricated into both photoanode and photocathode with high oxygen and hydrogen evolution efficiency, respectively, by simply coating of a thin layer of catalytic materials. The SiHJ photoanode with sol-gel NiOx as the catalyst shows a current density of 21.48 mA/cm2 at the equilibrium water oxidation potential. The SiHJ photocathode with 2 nm sputter-coated Pt catalyst displays excellent hydrogen evolution performance with an onset potential of 0.640 V and a solar to hydrogen conversion efficiency of 13.26%, which is the highest ever reported for Si-based photocathodes. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  8. Hydrogen storage materials discovery via high throughput ball milling and gas sorption.

    Li, Bin; Kaye, Steven S; Riley, Conor; Greenberg, Doron; Galang, Daniel; Bailey, Mark S

    2012-06-11

    The lack of a high capacity hydrogen storage material is a major barrier to the implementation of the hydrogen economy. To accelerate discovery of such materials, we have developed a high-throughput workflow for screening of hydrogen storage materials in which candidate materials are synthesized and characterized via highly parallel ball mills and volumetric gas sorption instruments, respectively. The workflow was used to identify mixed imides with significantly enhanced absorption rates relative to Li2Mg(NH)2. The most promising material, 2LiNH2:MgH2 + 5 atom % LiBH4 + 0.5 atom % La, exhibits the best balance of absorption rate, capacity, and cycle-life, absorbing >4 wt % H2 in 1 h at 120 °C after 11 absorption-desorption cycles.

  9. Equation-of-state for fluids at high densities-hydrogen isotope measurements and thermodynamic derivations

    Liebenberg, D.H.; Mills, R.L.; Bronson, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopes play an important role in energy technologies, in particular, the compression to high densities for initiation of controlled thermonuclear fusion energy. At high densities the properties of the compressed hydrogen isotopes depart drastically from ideal thermodynamic predictions. The measurement of accurate data including the author's own recent measurements of n-H 2 and n-D 2 in the range 75 to 300 K and 0.2 to 2.0 GPa (2 to 20 kbar) is reviewed. An equation-of-state of the Benedict type is fit to these data with a double-process least-squares computer program. The results are reviewed and compared with existing data and with a variety of theoretical work reported for fluid hydrogens. A new heuristic correlation is presented for simplicity in predicting volumes and sound velocity at high pressures. 9 figures, 1 table

  10. Automatic torque magnetometer for vacuum-to-high-pressure hydrogen environments

    Larsen, J.W.; Livesay, B.R.

    1979-01-01

    An automatic torque magnetometer has been developed for use in high-pressure hydrogen. It will contain pressures ranging from vacuum to 200 atm of hydrogen gas at sample temperatures greater than 400 0 C. This magnetometer, which uses an optical lever postion sensor and a restoring force technique has an operating range of 2.0 x 10 3 dyn cm to l.6 x 10 -4 dyn cm. An accompanying digital data collection system extends the sensitivity to 1 x 10 -5 dyn cm as well as increasing the data handling capacity of the system. The magnetic properties of thin films in high-temperature and high-pressure hydrogen environments can be studied using this instruments

  11. Core--strategy leading to high reversible hydrogen storage capacity for NaBH4.

    Christian, Meganne L; Aguey-Zinsou, Kondo-François

    2012-09-25

    Owing to its high storage capacity (10.8 mass %), sodium borohydride (NaBH(4)) is a promising hydrogen storage material. However, the temperature for hydrogen release is high (>500 °C), and reversibility of the release is unachievable under reasonable conditions. Herein, we demonstrate the potential of a novel strategy leading to high and stable hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling for NaBH(4) under mild pressure conditions (4 MPa). By an antisolvent precipitation method, the size of NaBH(4) particles was restricted to a few nanometers (hydrogen at 400 °C. Further encapsulation of these nanoparticles upon reaction of nickel chloride at their surface allowed the synthesis of a core--shell nanostructure, NaBH(4)@Ni, and this provided a route for (a) the effective nanoconfinement of the melted NaBH(4) core and its dehydrogenation products, and (b) reversibility and fast kinetics owing to short diffusion lengths, the unstable nature of nickel borohydride, and possible modification of reaction paths. Hence at 350 °C, a reversible and steady hydrogen capacity of 5 mass % was achieved for NaBH(4)@Ni; 80% of the hydrogen could be desorbed or absorbed in less than 60 min, and full capacity was reached within 5 h. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that such performances have been achieved with NaBH(4). This demonstrates the potential of the strategy in leading to major advancements in the design of effective hydrogen storage materials from pristine borohydrides.

  12. High pressure direct synthesis of adipic acid from cyclohexene and hydrogen peroxide via capillary microreactors

    Shang, M.; Noël, T.; Su, Y.; Hessel, V.

    2016-01-01

    The direct synthesis of adipic acid from hydrogen peroxide and cyclohexene was investigated in capillary microreactors at high temperature (up to 115°C ) and pressure (up to 70 bar). High temperature was already applied in micro-flow packed-bed reactors for the direct adipic acid synthesis. In our

  13. ZIF-8 immobilized nickel nanoparticles: highly effective catalysts for hydrogen generation from hydrolysis of ammonia borane.

    Li, Pei-Zhou; Aranishi, Kengo; Xu, Qiang

    2012-03-28

    Highly dispersed Ni nanoparticles have been successfully immobilized by the zeolitic metal-organic framework ZIF-8 via sequential deposition-reduction methods, which show high catalytic activity and long durability for hydrogen generation from hydrolysis of aqueous ammonia borane (NH(3)BH(3)) at room temperature. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  14. Hydrogen detector

    Kumagaya, Hiromichi; Yoshida, Kazuo; Sanada, Kazuo; Chigira, Sadao.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a hydrogen detector for detecting water-sodium reaction. The hydrogen detector comprises a sensor portion having coiled optical fibers and detects hydrogen on the basis of the increase of light transmission loss upon hydrogen absorption. In the hydrogen detector, optical fibers are wound around and welded to the outer circumference of a quartz rod, as well as the thickness of the clad layer of the optical fiber is reduced by etching. With such procedures, size of the hydrogen detecting sensor portion can be decreased easily. Further, since it can be used at high temperature, diffusion rate is improved to shorten the detection time. (N.H.)

  15. Hydrogen storage in carbon nanofibres for defence applications : the influence of growth parameters on graphitic quality and storage capacity

    Turpin, M.; Mellor, I. [Morgan Materials Technology Ltd., Worcestershire (United Kingdom); Shatwell, R.A.; Prentice, C. [QinetiQ Farnborough, Hampshire (United Kingdom); Browning, D.J. [QinetiQ Haslar, Gosport, Hampshire (United Kingdom); Lakeman, J.B. [Dstl Portsdown, Cosham, Hampshire (United Kingdom); Gerrard, M.L.; Mortimer, R.J. [Loughborough Univ. of Technology, Loughborough, Leicestershire (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    2002-07-01

    The results of a study on hydrogen storage in carbon or graphite nanofibres (GNFs) were presented. Graphite nanofibres used in hydrogen storage treatment were synthesized at 600 degrees C by passing ethylene over a series of Fe:Ni:Cu catalysts. It was shown that while hydrogen storage can occur for up to 6.5 wt per cent, this number can vary depending on the method of preparation and heat treatment. Hydrogen storage requires an effective method, such as Raman spectroscopy, for characterising the product. Transmission Electron Microscopy also helped in the optimisation of the process to produce highly graphitic nanofibres. The main role of heat treatment is to remove carbon from the surface of the GNFs, allowing access to the graphene planes. Hydrogen storage experiments were conducted at 120 bar, using a bespoke apparatus with differential pressure. A detailed error analysis was performed on the uptake measurement system. The rate of penetration by hydrogen into a layer of carbon capping graphene planes is found to be negligible. It is concluded that hydrogen adsorption will not be observed unless the layer is removed. A maximum uptake of 4.2 wt per cent was achieved, increasing to more than 6.5 wt per cent following heat treatment at 1000 degrees C. 32 refs., 3 tabs., 7 figs.

  16. High-Sulfur-Vacancy Amorphous Molybdenum Sulfide as a High Current Electrocatalyst in Hydrogen Evolution

    Lu, Ang-Yu

    2016-08-31

    The remote hydrogen plasma is able to create abundant S-vacancies on amorphous molybdenum sulfide (a-MoSx) as active sites for hydrogen evolution. The results demonstrate that the plasma-treated a-MoSx exhibits superior performance and higher stability than Pt in a proton exchange membrane based electrolyzers measurement as a proof-of-concept of industrial application.

  17. Isolation of high quality graphene from Ru by solution phase intercalation

    Koren, E.; Sutter, E.; Bliznakov, S.; Ivars-Barcelo, F.; Sutter, P.

    2013-09-01

    We introduce a method for isolating graphene grown on epitaxial Ru(0001)/α-Al2O3. The strong graphene/Ru(0001) coupling is weakened by electrochemically driven intercalation of hydrogen underpotentially deposited in aqueous KOH solution, which allows the penetration of water molecules at the graphene/Ru(0001) interface. Following these electrochemically driven processes, the graphene can be isolated by electrochemical hydrogen evolution and transferred to arbitrary supports. Raman and transport measurements demonstrate the high quality of the transferred graphene. Our results show that intercalation, typically carried out in vacuum, can be extended to solution environments for graphene processing under ambient conditions.

  18. Preventing the embrittling by hydrogen when galvanizing high-grade steel

    Paatsch, W.

    1987-09-01

    Galvanic precipitation of a double layer consisting of a dull nickel layer overlaid with a brilliant zinc layer on low-alloyed high-strength steel grades leads to the forming of zinc-nickel alloy layers during the subsequent heat treatment. According to traction tests carried out on high-strength steel grades, as well as to hydrogen permeability tests, this process prevents embrittling by hydrogen which might be caused by galvanic process sequences - and creates a diffusion block at the same time. The alloy layers have an excellent corrosion resistance and temperature stability.

  19. Achieving Hydrogen Storage Goals through High-Strength Fiber Glass - Final Technical Report

    Li, Hong [PPG Industries, Inc., Cheswick, PA (United States); Johnson, Kenneth I. [PPG Industries, Inc., Cheswick, PA (United States); Newhouse, Norman L. [PPG Industries, Inc., Cheswick, PA (United States)

    2017-06-05

    Led by PPG and partnered with Hexagon Lincoln and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the team recently carried out a project “Achieving Hydrogen Storage Goals through High-Strength Fiber Glass”. The project was funded by DOE’s Fuel Cell Technologies office within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, starting on September 1, 2014 as a two-year project to assess technical and commercial feasibilities of manufacturing low-cost, high-strength glass fibers to replace T700 carbon fibers with a goal of reducing the composite total cost by 50% of the existing, commercial 700 bar hydrogen storage tanks used in personal vehicles.

  20. Screening of hydrogen storage media applying high pressure thermogravimetry

    Bentzen, J.J.; Pedersen, Allan Schrøder; Kjøller, J.

    2001-01-01

    A number of commercially available hydride-forming alloys of the MmNi5–xSnx (Mm=mischmetal, a mixture of lanthanides) type were examined using a high pressure, high temperature microbalance,scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Activation conditions, reversible storage capacity...

  1. High Quality Virtual Reality for Architectural Exhibitions

    Kreutzberg, Anette

    2016-01-01

    This paper will summarise the findings from creating and implementing a visually high quality Virtual Reality (VR) experiment as part of an international architecture exhibition. It was the aim to represent the architectural spatial qualities as well as the atmosphere created from combining natural...... and artificial lighting in a prominent not yet built project. The outcome is twofold: Findings concerning the integration of VR in an exhibition space and findings concerning the experience of the virtual space itself. In the exhibition, an important aspect was the unmanned exhibition space, requiring the VR...... experience to be self-explanatory. Observations of different visitor reactions to the unmanned VR experience compared with visitor reactions at guided tours with personal instructions are evaluated. Data on perception of realism, spatial quality and light in the VR model were collected with qualitative...

  2. Study on introduction scenario of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor hydrogen cogeneration system (GTHTR300C). Part 1

    Nishihara, Tetsuo; Takeda, Tetsuaki

    2005-09-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute is carrying out the research and development of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor hydrogen cogeneration system (GTHTR300C) aiming at the practical use around 2030. Preconditions of GTHTR300C introduction are the increase of hydrogen demand and the needs of new nuclear power plants. In order to establish the introduction scenario, it should be clarified that the operational status of existing nuclear power plants, the introduction number of fuel cell vehicles as a main user of hydrogen and the capability of hydrogen supply by existing plants. In this report, estimation of the nuclear power plants that will be decommissioned with a high possibility by 2030 and selection of the model district where the GTHTR300C can be introduced as an alternative system are conducted. Then the hydrogen demand and the capability of hydrogen supply in this district are investigated and the hydrogen supply scenario in 2030 is considered. (author)

  3. Nanoporous Ni with High Surface Area for Potential Hydrogen Storage Application.

    Zhou, Xiaocao; Zhao, Haibo; Fu, Zhibing; Qu, Jing; Zhong, Minglong; Yang, Xi; Yi, Yong; Wang, Chaoyang

    2018-06-01

    Nanoporous metals with considerable specific surface areas and hierarchical pore structures exhibit promising applications in the field of hydrogen storage, electrocatalysis, and fuel cells. In this manuscript, a facile method is demonstrated for fabricating nanoporous Ni with a high surface area by using SiO₂ aerogel as a template, i.e., electroless plating of Ni into an SiO₂ aerogel template followed by removal of the template at moderate conditions. The effects of the prepared conditions, including the electroless plating time, temperature of the structure, and the magnetism of nanoporous Ni are investigated in detail. The resultant optimum nanoporous Ni with a special 3D flower-like structure exhibited a high specific surface area of about 120.5 m²/g. The special nanoporous Ni exhibited a promising prospect in the field of hydrogen storage, with a hydrogen capacity of 0.45 wt % on 4.5 MPa at room temperature.

  4. Computational model for a high temperature electrolyzer coupled to a HTTR for efficient nuclear hydrogen production

    Gonzalez, Daniel; Rojas, Leorlen; Rosales, Jesus; Castro, Landy; Gamez, Abel; Brayner, Carlos, E-mail: danielgonro@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Garcia, Lazaro; Garcia, Carlos; Torre, Raciel de la, E-mail: lgarcia@instec.cu [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), La Habana (Cuba); Sanchez, Danny [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz (UESC), Ilheus, BA (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    High temperature electrolysis process coupled to a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) is one of the most promising methods for hydrogen production using a nuclear reactor as the primary heat source. However there are not references in the scientific publications of a test facility that allow to evaluate the efficiency of the process and other physical parameters that has to be taken into consideration for its accurate application in the hydrogen economy as a massive production method. For this lack of experimental facilities, mathematical models are one of the most used tools to study this process and theirs flowsheets, in which the electrolyzer is the most important component because of its complexity and importance in the process. A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model for the evaluation and optimization of the electrolyzer of a high temperature electrolysis hydrogen production process flowsheet was developed using ANSYS FLUENT®. Electrolyzer's operational and design parameters will be optimized in order to obtain the maximum hydrogen production and the higher efficiency in the module. This optimized model of the electrolyzer will be incorporated to a chemical process simulation (CPS) code to study the overall high temperature flowsheet coupled to a high temperature accelerator driven system (ADS) that offers advantages in the transmutation of the spent fuel. (author)

  5. Computational model for a high temperature electrolyzer coupled to a HTTR for efficient nuclear hydrogen production

    Gonzalez, Daniel; Rojas, Leorlen; Rosales, Jesus; Castro, Landy; Gamez, Abel; Brayner, Carlos; Garcia, Lazaro; Garcia, Carlos; Torre, Raciel de la; Sanchez, Danny

    2015-01-01

    High temperature electrolysis process coupled to a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) is one of the most promising methods for hydrogen production using a nuclear reactor as the primary heat source. However there are not references in the scientific publications of a test facility that allow to evaluate the efficiency of the process and other physical parameters that has to be taken into consideration for its accurate application in the hydrogen economy as a massive production method. For this lack of experimental facilities, mathematical models are one of the most used tools to study this process and theirs flowsheets, in which the electrolyzer is the most important component because of its complexity and importance in the process. A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model for the evaluation and optimization of the electrolyzer of a high temperature electrolysis hydrogen production process flowsheet was developed using ANSYS FLUENT®. Electrolyzer's operational and design parameters will be optimized in order to obtain the maximum hydrogen production and the higher efficiency in the module. This optimized model of the electrolyzer will be incorporated to a chemical process simulation (CPS) code to study the overall high temperature flowsheet coupled to a high temperature accelerator driven system (ADS) that offers advantages in the transmutation of the spent fuel. (author)

  6. Hydrogen production by high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Conceptual design of advanced process heat exchangers of the HTTR-IS hydrogen production system

    Sakaba, Nariaki; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Sato, Hiroyuki; Hara, Teruo; Kato, Ryoma; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear hydrogen production is necessary in an anticipated hydrogen society that demands a massive quantity of hydrogen without economic disadvantage. Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has launched the conceptual design study of a hydrogen production system with a near-term plan to connect it to Japan's first high-temperature gas-cooled reactor HTTR. The candidate hydrogen production system is based on the thermochemical water-splitting iodine sulphur (IS) process.The heat of 10 MWth at approximately 900degC, which can be provided by the secondary helium from the intermediate heat exchanger of the HTTR, is the energy input to the hydrogen production system. In this paper, we describe the recent progresses made in the conceptual design of advanced process heat exchangers of the HTTR-IS hydrogen production system. A new concept of sulphuric acid decomposer is proposed. This involves the integration of three separate functions of sulphuric acid decomposer, sulphur trioxide decomposer, and process heat exchanger. A new mixer-settler type of Bunsen reactor is also designed. This integrates three separate functions of Bunsen reactor, phase separator, and pump. The new concepts are expected to result in improved economics through construction and operation cost reductions because the number of process equipment and complicated connections between the equipment has been substantially reduced. (author)

  7. Hydrogen pumping and release by graphite under high flux plasma bombardment

    Hirooka, Y.; Leung, W.K.; Conn, R.W.; Goebel, D.M.; LaBombard, B.; Nygren, R.; Wilson, K.L.

    1988-01-01

    Inert gas (helium or argon) plasma bombardment has been found to increase the surface gas adsorptivity of isotropic graphite (POCO-graphite), which can then getter residual gases in a high vacuum system. The inert gas plasma bombardment was carried out at a flux ≅ 1 x 10 18 ions s -1 cm -2 to a fluence of the order of 10 21 ions/cm 2 and at temperatures around 800 0 C. The gettering capability of graphite can be easily recovered by repeating inert gas plasma bombardment. The activated graphite surface exhibits a smooth, sponge-like morphology with significantly increased pore openings, which correlates with the observed increase in the surface gas adsorptivity. The activated graphite surface has been observed to pump hydrogen plasma particles as well. From calibrated H-alpha measurements, the dynamic hydrogen retention capacity is evaluated to be as large as 2 x 10 18 H/cm 2 at temperatures below 100 0 C and at a plasma bombarding energy of 300 eV. The graphite temperature was varied between 15 and 480 0 C. Due to the plasma particle pumping capability, hydrogen recycling from the activated graphite surface is significantly reduced, relative to that from a pre-saturated surface. A pre-saturated surface was also observed to reproducibly pump a hydrogen plasma to a concentration of 9.5 x 10 17 H/cm 2 . The hydrogen retention capacity of graphite is found to decrease with increasing temperature. A transient pumping mechanism associated with the sponge-like surface morphology is conjectured to explain the large hydrogen retention capacity. Hydrogen release behavior under helium and argon plasma bombardment was also investigated, and the result indicated the possibility of some in-pore retrapping effect. 43 refs., 11 figs

  8. A high-flux low-energy hydrogen ion beam using an end-Hall ion source

    Veldhoven, J. van; Sligte, E. te; Janssen, J.P.B.

    2016-01-01

    Most ion sources that produce high-flux hydrogen ion beams perform best in the high energy range (keV). Alternatively, some plasma sources produce very-lowenergy ions (<< 10 eV). However, in an intermediate energy range of 10-200 eV, no hydrogen ion sources were found that produce high-flux beams.

  9. LANL Virtual Center for Chemical Hydrogen Storage: Chemical Hydrogen Storage Using Ultra-high Surface Area Main Group Materials

    Susan M. Kauzlarich; Phillip P. Power; Doinita Neiner; Alex Pickering; Eric Rivard; Bobby Ellis, T. M.; Atkins, A. Merrill; R. Wolf; Julia Wang

    2010-09-05

    The focus of the project was to design and synthesize light element compounds and nanomaterials that will reversibly store molecular hydrogen for hydrogen storage materials. The primary targets investigated during the last year were amine and hydrogen terminated silicon (Si) nanoparticles, Si alloyed with lighter elements (carbon (C) and boron (B)) and boron nanoparticles. The large surface area of nanoparticles should facilitate a favorable weight to volume ratio, while the low molecular weight elements such as B, nitrogen (N), and Si exist in a variety of inexpensive and readily available precursors. Furthermore, small NPs of Si are nontoxic and non-corrosive. Insights gained from these studies will be applied toward the design and synthesis of hydrogen storage materials that meet the DOE 2010 hydrogen storage targets: cost, hydrogen capacity and reversibility. Two primary routes were explored for the production of nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm in diameter. The first was the reduction of the elemental halides to achieve nanomaterials with chloride surface termination that could subsequently be replaced with amine or hydrogen. The second was the reaction of alkali metal Si or Si alloys with ammonium halides to produce hydrogen capped nanomaterials. These materials were characterized via X-ray powder diffraction, TEM, FTIR, TG/DSC, and NMR spectroscopy.

  10. Interferometric determination of electron density in a high pressure hydrogen arc. 1. Calculation of refraction index

    Radtke, R; Guenther, K; Ulbricht, R [Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Berlin. Zentralinstitut fuer Elektronenphysik

    1980-01-14

    The refraction index of a hydrogen plasma in LTE was calculated as a function of the wavelength of observation, temperature and pressure, taking into account bound-bound and bound-free transitions of the neutral atom. According to the present calculation, the influence of excited states at higher temperatures is smaller than indicated by Baum et al (Plasma Phys.; 17: 79 (1975)) for argon. Using the calculations presented here, the interferometric investigation of a high pressure hydrogen arc should allow the determination of the electron density with an accuracy of the order of 1%.

  11. Robust, Reliable Low Emission Gas Turbine Combustion of High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    Wooldridge, Margaret Stacy [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Im, Hong Geum [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-12-16

    The effects of high hydrogen content fuels were studied using experimental, computational and theoretical approaches to understand the effects of mixture and state conditions on the ignition behavior of the fuels. A rapid compression facility (RCF) was used to measure the ignition delay time of hydrogen and carbon monoxide mixtures. The data were combined with results of previous studies to develop ignition regime criteria. Analytical theory and direct numerical simulation were used to validate and interpret the RCF ignition data. Based on the integrated information the ignition regime criteria were extended to non-dimensional metrics which enable application of the results to practical gas turbine combustion systems.

  12. Studies of the use of high-temperature nuclear heat from an HTGR for hydrogen production

    Peterman, D. D.; Fontaine, R. W.; Quade, R. N.; Halvers, L. J.; Jahromi, A. M.

    1975-01-01

    The results of a study which surveyed various methods of hydrogen production using nuclear and fossil energy are presented. A description of these methods is provided, and efficiencies are calculated for each case. The process designs of systems that utilize the heat from a general atomic high temperature gas cooled reactor with a steam methane reformer and feed the reformer with substitute natural gas manufactured from coal, using reforming temperatures, are presented. The capital costs for these systems and the resultant hydrogen production price for these cases are discussed along with a research and development program.

  13. Studies of the use of high-temperature nuclear heat from an HTGR for hydrogen production

    Peterman, D.D.; Fontaine, R.W.; Quade, R.N.; Halvers, L.J.; Jahromi, A.M.

    1975-01-01

    The results of a study which surveyed various methods of hydrogen production using nuclear and fossil energy are presented. A description of these methods is provided, and efficiencies are calculated for each case. The process designs of systems that utilize the heat from a general atomic high temperature gas cooled reactor with a steam methane reformer and feed the reformer with substitute natural gas manufactured from coal, using reforming temperatures, are presented. The capital costs for these systems and the resultant hydrogen production price for these cases are discussed along with a research and development program

  14. High quality transportation fuels from renewable feedstock

    Lindfors, Lars Peter

    2010-09-15

    Hydrotreating of vegetable oils is novel process for producing high quality renewable diesel. Hydrotreated vegetable oils (HVO) are paraffinic hydrocarbons. They are free of aromatics, have high cetane numbers and reduce emissions. HVO can be used as component or as such. HVO processes can also be modified to produce jet fuel. GHG savings by HVO use are significant compared to fossil fuels. HVO is already in commercial production. Neste Oil is producing its NExBTL diesel in two plants. Production of renewable fuels will be limited by availability of sustainable feedstock. Therefore R and D efforts are made to expand feedstock base further.

  15. Boiling curve in high quality flow boiling

    Shiralkar, B.S.; Hein, R.A.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    1980-01-01

    The post dry-out heat transfer regime of the flow boiling curve was investigated experimentally for high pressure water at high qualities. The test section was a short round tube located downstream of a hot patch created by a temperature controlled segment of tubing. Results from the experiment showed that the distance from the dryout point has a significant effect on the downstream temperatures and there was no unique boiling curve. The heat transfer coefficients measured sufficiently downstream of the dryout point could be correlated using the Heineman correlation for superheated steam, indicating that the droplet deposition effects could be neglected in this region

  16. Microbial Electrolysis Cells for High Yield Hydrogen Gas Production from Organic Matter

    Logan, B.E.; Call, D.; Cheng, S.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Sleutels, T.H.J.A.; Jeremiasse, A.W.; Rozendal, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    The use of electrochemically active bacteria to break down organic matter, combined with the addition of a small voltage (>0.2 V in practice) in specially designed microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), can result in a high yield of hydrogen gas. While microbial electrolysis was invented only a few

  17. The INNOHYP-CA Project: producing Hydrogen by innovative high-temperature processes

    Giaconia, A.; Giorgiantoni, G.; Liberatore, R.; Tarquini, P.; Vignolini, M.

    2008-01-01

    The Project, financed under the 6. Framework Programme, has selected a member of innovative high-temperature processes that seem promising for large-scale production of Hydrogen. ENEA has contributed to the analysis of the status of national and regional projects in the European countries and to the definition of guidelines for the future development of these technologies [it

  18. Atomic layer deposition of high-mobility hydrogen-doped zinc oxide

    Macco, B.; Knoops, H.C.M.; Verheijen, M.A.; Beyer, W.; Creatore, M.; Kessels, W.M.M.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been employed to prepare high-mobility H-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:H) films. Hydrogen doping was achieved by interleaving the ZnO ALD cycles with H2 plasma treatments. It has been shown that doping with H2 plasma offers key advantages over traditional

  19. Defect enhanced diffusion process and hydrogen delayed fracture in high strength steels

    Lung, C.W.; Mu Zaiqin.

    1985-10-01

    A defect enhanced diffusion model for hydrogen delayed fracture in high strength steels is suggested. It is shown that the rate of crack growth is dependent on the square or higher power of the stress intensity factor which is consistent with recent experiments. (author)

  20. High throughput deposition of hydrogenated amorphous carbon coatings on rubber with expanding thermal plasma

    Pei, Y.T.; Eivani, A.R.; Zaharia, T.; Kazantis, A.V.; Sanden, van de M.C.M.; De Hosson, J.T.M.

    2014-01-01

    Flexible hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) thin film coated on rubbers has shown outstanding protection of rubber seals from friction and wear. This work concentrates on the potential advances of expanding thermal plasma (ETP) process for a high throughput deposition of a-C:H thin films in

  1. A high-porosity carbon molybdenum sulphide composite with enhanced electrochemical hydrogen evolution and stability

    Laursen, Anders B.; Vesborg, Peter C. K.; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2013-01-01

    This work describes a highly active and stable acid activated carbon fibre and amorphous MoSx composite hydrogen evolution catalyst. The increased electrochemical-surface area is demonstrated to cause increased catalyst electrodeposition and activity. These composite electrodes also show...

  2. High-temperature oxidation of Zircaloy in hydrogen-steam mixtures

    Chung, H.M.; Thomas, G.R.

    1982-09-01

    Oxidation rates of Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes have been measured in hydrogen-steam mixtures at 1200 to 1700 0 C. For a given isothermal oxidation temperature, the oxide layer thicknesses have been measured as a function of time, steam supply rate, and hydrogen overpressure. The oxidation rates in the mixtures were compared with similar data obtained in pure steam and helium-steam environments under otherwise identical conditions. The rates in pure steam and helium-steam mixtures were equivalent and comparable to the parabolic rates obtained under steam-saturated conditions and reported in the literature. However, when the helium was replaced with hydrogen of equivalent partial pressure, a significantly smaller oxidation rate was observed. For high steam-supply rates, the oxidation kinetics in a hydrogen-steam mixture were parabolic, but the rate was smaller than for pure steam or helium-steam mixtures. Under otherwise identical conditions, the ratio of the parabolic rate for hydrogen-steam to that for pure steam decreased with increasing temperature and decreasing steam-supply rate

  3. High Temperature Electrolysis for Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy – TechnologySummary

    J. E. O' Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; M. S. Sohal; K. G. Condie

    2010-02-01

    The Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, has requested that a Hydrogen Technology Down-Selection be performed to identify the hydrogen production technology that has the best potential for timely commercial demonstration and for ultimate deployment with the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). An Independent Review Team has been assembled to execute the down-selection. This report has been prepared to provide the members of the Independent Review Team with detailed background information on the High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) process, hardware, and state of the art. The Idaho National Laboratory has been serving as the lead lab for HTE research and development under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. The INL HTE program has included small-scale experiments, detailed computational modeling, system modeling, and technology demonstration. Aspects of all of these activities are included in this report. In terms of technology demonstration, the INL successfully completed a 1000-hour test of the HTE Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) technology demonstration experiment during the fall of 2008. The HTE ILS achieved a hydrogen production rate in excess of 5.7 Nm3/hr, with a power consumption of 18 kW. This hydrogen production rate is far larger than has been demonstrated by any of the thermochemical or hybrid processes to date.

  4. High Temperature Electrolysis for Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy - Technology Summary

    O'Brien, J.E.; Stoots, C.M.; Herring, J.S.; McKellar, M.G.; Harvego, E.A.; Sohal, M.S.; Condie, K.G.

    2010-01-01

    The Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, has requested that a Hydrogen Technology Down-Selection be performed to identify the hydrogen production technology that has the best potential for timely commercial demonstration and for ultimate deployment with the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). An Independent Review Team has been assembled to execute the down-selection. This report has been prepared to provide the members of the Independent Review Team with detailed background information on the High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) process, hardware, and state of the art. The Idaho National Laboratory has been serving as the lead lab for HTE research and development under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. The INL HTE program has included small-scale experiments, detailed computational modeling, system modeling, and technology demonstration. Aspects of all of these activities are included in this report. In terms of technology demonstration, the INL successfully completed a 1000-hour test of the HTE Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) technology demonstration experiment during the fall of 2008. The HTE ILS achieved a hydrogen production rate in excess of 5.7 Nm3/hr, with a power consumption of 18 kW. This hydrogen production rate is far larger than has been demonstrated by any of the thermochemical or hybrid processes to date.

  5. Present status of r and d on hydrogen production by high temperature electrolysis of steam

    Hino, Ryutaro; Aita, Hideki; Sekita, Kenji; Haga, Katsuhiro; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Iwata, Tomo-o.

    1995-08-01

    In JAERI, design and R and D works on hydrogen production process have been conducted for connecting to the HTTR under construction at the Oarai Establishment of the JAERI as the nuclear heat utilization system. As for a hydrogen production process by high-temperature electrolysis of steam, laboratory-scale experiments have been conducted using a practical electrolysis tube with 12 cells connected in series. Hydrogen was produced at a maximum density of 44 Nml/cm 2 h at 950degC, and know-how of operational procedures and operational experience have been also accumulated. Then, a self-supporting planar electrolysis cell was fabricated in order to improve hydrogen production performance. In the preliminary test with the planar cell, hydrogen has been produced continuously at a maximum density of 36 Nml/cm 2 h at lower electrolysis temperature of 850degC. This report presents typical test results mentioned above, a review of previous studies conducted in the world and R and D items required for connecting to the HTTR. (author)

  6. Microbial Electrolysis Cells for High Yield Hydrogen Gas Production from Organic Matter

    Logan, Bruce E.

    2008-12-01

    The use of electrochemically active bacteria to break down organic matter, combined with the addition of a small voltage (>0.2 V in practice) in specially designed microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), can result in a high yield of hydrogen gas. While microbial electrolysis was invented only a few years ago, rapid developments have led to hydrogen yields approaching 100%, energy yields based on electrical energy input many times greater than that possible by water electrolysis, and increased gas production rates. MECs used to make hydrogen gas are similar in design to microbial fuel cells (MFCs) that produce electricity, but there are important differences in architecture and analytical methods used to evaluate performance. We review here the materials, architectures, performance, and energy efficiencies of these MEC systems that show promise as a method for renewable and sustainable energy production, and wastewater treatment. © 2008 American Chemical Society.

  7. Breeding and maintaining high-quality insects

    Jensen, Kim; Kristensen, Torsten Nygård; Heckmann, Lars-Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Insects have a large potential for sustainably enhancing global food and feed production, and commercial insect production is a rising industry of high economic value. Insects suitable for production typically have fast growth, short generation time, efficient nutrient utilization, high...... reproductive potential, and thrive at high density. Insects may cost-efficiently convert agricultural and industrial food by-products into valuable protein once the technology is finetuned. However, since insect mass production is a new industry, the technology needed to efficiently farm these animals is still...... in a starting phase. Here, we discuss the challenges and precautions that need to be considered when breeding and maintaining high-quality insect populations for food and feed. This involves techniques typically used in domestic animal breeding programs including maintaining genetically healthy populations...

  8. Sensitivity Studies of Advanced Reactors Coupled to High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) Hydrogen Production Processes

    Edwin A. Harvego; Michael G. McKellar; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring

    2007-01-01

    High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE), when coupled to an advanced nuclear reactor capable of operating at reactor outlet temperatures of 800 C to 950 C, has the potential to efficiently produce the large quantities of hydrogen needed to meet future energy and transportation needs. To evaluate the potential benefits of nuclear-driven hydrogen production, the UniSim process analysis software was used to evaluate different reactor concepts coupled to a reference HTE process design concept. The reference HTE concept included an Intermediate Heat Exchanger and intermediate helium loop to separate the reactor primary system from the HTE process loops and additional heat exchangers to transfer reactor heat from the intermediate loop to the HTE process loops. The two process loops consisted of the water/steam loop feeding the cathode side of a HTE electrolysis stack, and the steam or air sweep loop used to remove oxygen from the anode side. The UniSim model of the process loops included pumps to circulate the working fluids and heat exchangers to recover heat from the oxygen and hydrogen product streams to improve the overall hydrogen production efficiencies. The reference HTE process loop model was coupled to separate UniSim models developed for three different advanced reactor concepts (a high-temperature helium cooled reactor concept and two different supercritical CO2 reactor concepts). Sensitivity studies were then performed to evaluate the affect of reactor outlet temperature on the power cycle efficiency and overall hydrogen production efficiency for each of the reactor power cycles. The results of these sensitivity studies showed that overall power cycle and hydrogen production efficiencies increased with reactor outlet temperature, but the power cycle producing the highest efficiencies varied depending on the temperature range considered

  9. Hybrid Molten Bed Gasifier for High Hydrogen Syngas Production

    Rue, David [Gas Technology Institute, Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2017-05-23

    was stable over the full oxygen to fuel firing range (0.8 to 1.05 of fuel gas stoichiometry) and with all fuel gases (natural gas and two syngas compositions), with steam, and without steam. The lower Btu content of the syngases presented no combustion difficulties. The molten bed was stable throughout testing. The molten bed was easily established as a bed of molten glass. As the composition changed from glass cullet to cullet with slag, no instabilities were encountered. The bed temperature and product syngas temperature remained stable throughout testing, demonstrating that the bed serves as a good heat sink for the gasification process. Product syngas temperature measured above the bed was stable at ~1600ºF. Testing found that syngas quality measured as H2/CO ratio increased with decreasing oxygen to fuel gas stoichiometric ratio, higher steam to inlet carbon ratio, higher temperature, and syngas compared with natural gas. The highest H2/CO ratios achieved were in the range of 0.70 to 0.78. These values are well below the targets of 1.5 to 2.0 that were expected and were predicted by modeling. The team, however, is encouraged that the HMB process can and will achieve H2/CO ratios up to 2.0. Changes needed include direct injection of coal into the molten bed of slag to prevent coal particle bypass into the product gas stream, elevation of the molten bed temperature to approximately 2500ºF, and further decrease of the oxygen to fuel gas ratio to well below the 0.85 minimum ratio used in the testing in this project.

  10. Properties of partially ionized hydrogen plasmas in high electric fields

    Morawetz, K.

    1993-03-01

    In this thesis the fundamental equations of many-particle quantum-statistics of nonequilibrium are treated in respect to arbitrary high electric fields. Generalizations are found for the T-matrix approximation as well as for the shielded potential approximation valid for any field strength. These result in a non-Markovian behavior of the obtained collision integrals, also known as intra-collisional-field-effect (ICFE), and in a broadening of the energy conservation, the so-called collisional broadening (CB), caused by applied electric fields. In linear response it is shown in a new way, how the Debye-Onsager relaxation effect can be rederived from these collision integrals. Furthermore the complete quantum result is presented. Both effects, ICFE and CB, contribute to the right classical limit. The quantum result yields an surprising maximum of this field effects in dependence of the interacting mass ratio, which may be important in exciton-plasmas and semiconductors. (orig.)

  11. Charge Modulation in Graphitic Carbon Nitride as a Switchable Approach to High-Capacity Hydrogen Storage.

    Tan, Xin; Kou, Liangzhi; Tahini, Hassan A; Smith, Sean C

    2015-11-01

    Electrical charging of graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets (g-C4 N3 and g-C3 N4 ) is proposed as a strategy for high-capacity and electrocatalytically switchable hydrogen storage. Using first-principle calculations, we found that the adsorption energy of H2 molecules on graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets is dramatically enhanced by injecting extra electrons into the adsorbent. At full hydrogen coverage, the negatively charged graphitic carbon nitride achieves storage capacities up to 6-7 wt %. In contrast to other hydrogen storage approaches, the storage/release occurs spontaneously once extra electrons are introduced or removed, and these processes can be simply controlled by switching on/off the charging voltage. Therefore, this approach promises both facile reversibility and tunable kinetics without the need of specific catalysts. Importantly, g-C4 N3 has good electrical conductivity and high electron mobility, which can be a very good candidate for electron injection/release. These predictions may prove to be instrumental in searching for a new class of high-capacity hydrogen storage materials. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Hydrogen: the great debate. 'Power to Gas - how to cope with the challenge of electricity storage?; Hydrogen in energy transition: which challenges to be faced?; Hydrogen, essential today, indispensable tomorrow; Electrolytic hydrogen, a solution for energy transition?; Development of high power electrolysis systems: need and approach; Hydrogen as energy vector, Potential and stakes: a perspective; The Toyota Fuel Cell System: a new era for the automotive industry; Three key factors: production, applications to mobility, and public acceptance; Hydrogen, benevolent fairy or tempting demon

    Hauet, Jean-Pierre; Boucly, Philippe; Beeker, Etienne; Mauberger, Pascal; Quint, Aliette; Pierre, Helene; Lucchese, Paul; Bouillon-Delporte, Valerie; Chauvet, Bertrand; Brisse, Annabelle; Gautier, Ludmila; Hercberg, Sylvain; De Volder, Marc; Gruson, Jean-Francois; Marion, Pierre; Grellier, Sebastien; Devezeaux, Jean-Guy; Mansilla, Christine; Le Net, Elisabeth; Le Duigou, Alain; Maire, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This publication proposes a set of contributions which address various issues related to the development of the use of hydrogen as an energy source. More precisely, these contributions discuss how to face the challenge of electricity storage by using the Power-to-Gas technology, the challenges to be faced regarding the role of hydrogen in energy transition, the essential current role of hydrogen and its indispensable role for tomorrow, the possible role of electrolytic hydrogen as a solution for energy transition, the need of and the approach to a development of high power electrolysis systems, the potential and stakes of hydrogen as an energy vector, the Toyota fuel cell system as a sign for new era for automotive industry, the three main factors (production, applications to mobility, and public acceptance) for the use of hydrogen in energy transition, and the role of hydrogen perceived either as a benevolent fairy or a tempting demon

  13. Study of the high temperature characteristics of hydrogen storage alloys

    Rong, Li; Shaoxiong, Zhou; Yan, Qi; 10.1016/j.jallcom.2004.07.006

    2005-01-01

    In this work, the phase structure of as-cast and melt-spun (MmY)/sub 1/(NiCoMnAl)/sub 5/ alloys (the content of yttrium is 0-2.5wt.%) and their electrochemical properties were studied with regard to discharge capacity at different temperatures (30-80 degrees C) and cycling life at 30 degrees C. It is found that the substitution of yttrium increase the electrochemical capacity of the compounds and decrease the difference in capacity between as-cast and as-quenched compounds at 30 degrees C. When increasing the yttrium concentration from 0 to 2.5wt.%, the cycling life of both the as-cast and the melt- spun compounds deteriorated, although the latter have a slightly longer cycle life than the former. The remarkable feature of the alloys obtained by yttrium substitution is the improvement of the high temperature electrochemical properties. It shows that the stability of the hydrides is increased. Compared with the as-cast alloys, the melt-spun ribbons have higher electrochemical charge /discharge capacity in the ...

  14. System Evaluations and Life-Cycle Cost Analyses for High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Facilities

    Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O' Brien; Michael G. McKellar

    2012-05-01

    This report presents results of system evaluations and lifecycle cost analyses performed for several different commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) hydrogen production concepts. The concepts presented in this report rely on grid electricity and non-nuclear high-temperature process heat sources for the required energy inputs. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to evaluate both central plant designs for large-scale hydrogen production (50,000 kg/day or larger) and forecourt plant designs for distributed production and delivery at about 1,500 kg/day. The HYSYS software inherently ensures mass and energy balances across all components and it includes thermodynamic data for all chemical species. The optimized designs described in this report are based on analyses of process flow diagrams that included realistic representations of fluid conditions and component efficiencies and operating parameters for each of the HTE hydrogen production configurations analyzed. As with previous HTE system analyses performed at the INL, a custom electrolyzer model was incorporated into the overall process flow sheet. This electrolyzer model allows for the determination of the average Nernst potential, cell operating voltage, gas outlet temperatures, and electrolyzer efficiency for any specified inlet steam, hydrogen, and sweep-gas flow rates, current density, cell active area, and external heat loss or gain. The lifecycle cost analyses were performed using the H2A analysis methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. This methodology utilizes spreadsheet analysis tools that require detailed plant performance information (obtained from HYSYS), along with financial and cost information to calculate lifecycle costs. There are standard default sets of assumptions that the methodology uses to ensure consistency when comparing the cost of different production or plant design options. However, these assumptions may also be varied within the

  15. High Pressure Hydrogen Pressure Relief Devices: Accelerated Life Testing and Application Best Practices

    Burgess, Robert M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Post, Matthew B. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Buttner, William J. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Rivkin, Carl H. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-06

    Pressure relief devices (PRDs ) are used to protect high pressure systems from burst failure caused by overpressurization. Codes and standards require the use of PRDs for the safe design of many pressurized systems. These systems require high reliability due to the risks associated with a burst failure. Hydrogen service can increase the risk of PRD failure due to material property degradation caused by hydrogen attack. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has conducted an accelerated life test on a conventional spring loaded PRD. Based on previous failures in the field, the nozzles specific to these PRDs are of particular interest. A nozzle in a PRD is a small part that directs the flow of fluid toward the sealing surface to maintain the open state of the valve once the spring force is overcome. The nozzle in this specific PRD is subjected to the full tensile force of the fluid pressure. These nozzles are made from 440C material, which is a type of hardened steel that is commonly chosen for high pressure applications because of its high strength properties. In a hydrogen environment, however, 440C is considered a worst case material since hydrogen attack results in a loss of almost all ductility and thus 440C is prone to fatigue and material failure. Accordingly, 440C is not recommended for hydrogen service. Conducting an accelerated life test on a PRD with 440C material provides information on necessary and sufficient conditions required to produce crack initiation and failure. The accelerated life test also provides information on other PRD failure modes that are somewhat statistically random in nature.

  16. Integration of atomic layer deposited high-k dielectrics on GaSb via hydrogen plasma exposure

    Laura B. Ruppalt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this letter we report the efficacy of a hydrogen plasma pretreatment for integrating atomic layer deposited (ALD high-k dielectric stacks with device-quality p-type GaSb(001 epitaxial layers. Molecular beam eptiaxy-grown GaSb surfaces were subjected to a 30 minute H2/Ar plasma treatment and subsequently removed to air. High-k HfO2 and Al2O3/HfO2 bilayer insulating films were then deposited via ALD and samples were processed into standard metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS capacitors. The quality of the semiconductor/dielectric interface was probed by current-voltage and variable-frequency admittance measurements. Measurement results indicate that the H2-plamsa pretreatment leads to a low density of interface states nearly independent of the deposited dielectric material, suggesting that pre-deposition H2-plasma exposure, coupled with ALD of high-k dielectrics, may provide an effective means for achieving high-quality GaSb MOS structures for advanced Sb-based digital and analog electronics.

  17. Summary - Advanced high-temperature reactor for hydrogen and electricity production

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    2001-01-01

    Historically, the production of electricity has been assumed to be the primary application of nuclear energy. That may change. The production of hydrogen (H 2 ) may become a significant application. The technology to produce H 2 using nuclear energy imposes different requirements on the reactor, which, in turn, may require development of new types of reactors. Advanced High Temperature reactors can meet the high temperature requirements to achieve this goal. This alternative application of nuclear energy may necessitate changes in the regulatory structure

  18. Study of high energy ion loss during hydrogen minority heating in TFTR

    Park, J.; Zweben, S.J.

    1994-03-01

    High energy ion loss during hydrogen minority ICRF heating is measured and compared with the loss of the D-D fusion products. During H minority heating a relatively large loss of high energy ions is observed at 45 degrees below the outer midplane, with or without simultaneous NBI heating. This increase is most likely due to a loss of the minority tail protons, a possible model for this process is described

  19. High resolution measurements and modeling of auroral hydrogen emission line profiles

    B. S. Lanchester

    Full Text Available Measurements in the visible wavelength range at high spectral resolution (1.3 Å have been made at Longyearbyen, Svalbard (15.8 E,78.2 N during an interval of intense proton precipitation. The shape and Doppler shift of hydrogen Balmer beta line profiles have been compared with model line profiles, using as input ion energy spectra from almost coincident passes of the FAST and DMSP spacecraft. The comparison shows that the simulation contains the important physical processes that produce the profiles, and confirms that measured changes in the shape and peak wave-length of the hydrogen profiles are the result of changing energy input. This combination of high resolution measurements with modeling provides a method of estimating the incoming energy and changes in flux of precipitating protons over Svalbard, for given energy and pitch-angle distributions. Whereas for electron precipitation, information on the incident particles is derived from brightness and brightness ratios which require at least two spectral windows, for proton precipitation the Doppler profile of resulting hydrogen emission is directly related to the energy and energy flux of the incident energetic protons and can be used to gather information about the source region. As well as the expected Doppler shift to shorter wavelengths, the measured profiles have a significant red-shifted component, the result of upward flowing emitting hydrogen atoms.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; particle precipitation – Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena

  20. High resolution measurements and modeling of auroral hydrogen emission line profiles

    B. S. Lanchester

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Measurements in the visible wavelength range at high spectral resolution (1.3 Å have been made at Longyearbyen, Svalbard (15.8 E,78.2 N during an interval of intense proton precipitation. The shape and Doppler shift of hydrogen Balmer beta line profiles have been compared with model line profiles, using as input ion energy spectra from almost coincident passes of the FAST and DMSP spacecraft. The comparison shows that the simulation contains the important physical processes that produce the profiles, and confirms that measured changes in the shape and peak wave-length of the hydrogen profiles are the result of changing energy input. This combination of high resolution measurements with modeling provides a method of estimating the incoming energy and changes in flux of precipitating protons over Svalbard, for given energy and pitch-angle distributions. Whereas for electron precipitation, information on the incident particles is derived from brightness and brightness ratios which require at least two spectral windows, for proton precipitation the Doppler profile of resulting hydrogen emission is directly related to the energy and energy flux of the incident energetic protons and can be used to gather information about the source region. As well as the expected Doppler shift to shorter wavelengths, the measured profiles have a significant red-shifted component, the result of upward flowing emitting hydrogen atoms.Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; particle precipitation – Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena

  1. Hydrogen retention properties of co-deposition under high-density plasmas in TRIAM-1M

    Tokitani, M.; Miyamoto, M.; Tokunaga, K.; Fujiwara, T.; Yoshida, N.; Sakamoto, M.; Zushi, H.; Hanada, K.; TRIAM Group,; Nagata, S.; Tsuchiya, B.

    2007-01-01

    Retention of hydrogen in co-deposits formed under high-density plasma discharge in TRIAM-1M was studied. In order to quantify the retained hydrogen, material probe experiments were performed under the high-density (n at e ∼10 19 m -3 ) discharges. After the exposure to the plasma, the quantitative analysis of deposition, hydrogen retention, and microscopic modification of specimens were performed by means of ion beam analysis and transmission electron microscopy. The co-deposits mainly consisted of Mo. The deposition rate of Mo was about ten times higher than that of the low-density discharge case. The hydrogen concentrations (H/Mo) retained in the co-deposits were 0.06-0.17, which was much higher than that in bulk-Mo and almost equal to the low-density case. These results indicate that as long as the co-deposition layers are continuously formed, strong wall pumping in TRIAM-1M is maintained during the discharges

  2. High density hydrogen storage in nanocavities: Role of the electrostatic interaction

    Reguera, L. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada del IPN, Legaria 694, Mexico D.F (Mexico); Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de La Habana, La Habana (Cuba); Roque, J. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada del IPN, Legaria 694, Mexico D.F (Mexico); Hernandez, J. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada del IPN, Legaria 694, Mexico D.F (Mexico); Universidad de Pinar del Rio, Pinar del Rio (Cuba); Reguera, E. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada del IPN, Legaria 694, Mexico D.F (Mexico); Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Materiales, Universidad de La Habana, La Habana (Cuba)

    2010-12-15

    High pressure H{sub 2} adsorption isotherms at N{sub 2} liquid temperature were recorded for the series of cubic nitroprussides, Ni{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}[Fe(CN){sub 5}NO] with x = 0, 0.5, 0.7, 1. The obtained data were interpreted according to the effective polarizing power for the metal found at the surface of the cavity. The cavity volume where the hydrogen molecules are accumulated was estimated from the amount of water molecules that are occupying that available space in the as-synthesized solids considering a water density of 1 g/cm{sup 3}. The calculated cavity volume was then used to obtain the density of H{sub 2} storage in the cavity. For the Ni-containing material the highest storage density was obtained, in a cavity volume of 448.5 A{sup 3} up to 10.4 hydrogen molecules are accumulated, for a local density of 77.6 g/L, above the density value corresponding to liquid hydrogen (71 g/L). Such high value of local density was interpreted as related to the electrostatic contribution to the adsorption potential for the hydrogen molecule within the cavity. (author)

  3. Effect of dissolved hydrogen on corrosion of 316NG stainless steel in high temperature water

    Dong, Lijin [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 62 Wencui Road, Shenyang City 110016 (China); Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang City 110819 (China); Peng, Qunjia, E-mail: qunjiapeng@imr.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 62 Wencui Road, Shenyang City 110016 (China); Zhang, Zhiming [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 62 Wencui Road, Shenyang City 110016 (China); Shoji, Tetsuo [Frontier Research Initiative, New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, Tohoku University, 6-6-10, Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Han, En-Hou; Ke, Wei [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 62 Wencui Road, Shenyang City 110016 (China); Wang, Lei [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang City 110819 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Dissolved hydrogen (DH) effect on corrosion of stainless steel in high temperature water. • Increasing DH caused decrease of Cr- but increase of Fe-concentrations in the inner oxide layer. • Concentration gradient of Cr and Fe in the inner oxide layer. • DH effect was attributed to the accelerated diffusion of Fe ion in the inner oxide layer. - Abstract: Characterizations of oxide films formed on 316 stainless steel in high temperature, hydrogenated water were conducted. The results show the oxide film consists of an outer layer with oxide particles of Fe–Ni spinel and hematite, and an inner continuous layer of Fe–Cr–Ni spinel. Increasing dissolved hydrogen (DH) concentrations causes decrease of Cr- and increase of Fe-concentrations in the inner layer. A continuous decrease of Cr- and increase of Fe-concentrations was observed from the surface of the inner layer to the oxide/substrate interface. The DH effect is attributed to the enhanced diffusion of Fe ions in the oxide film by hydrogen.

  4. Development of Criteria for Flashback Propensity in Jet Flames for High Hydrogen Content and Natural Gas Type Fuels

    Kalantari, Alireza [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Sullivan-Lewis, Elliot [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); McDonell, Vincent [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2016-10-17

    Due to increasingly stringent air quality requirements stationary power gas turbines have moved to lean-premixed operation, which reduces pollutant emissions but can result in flashback. Curtailing flashback can be difficult with hydrocarbon fuels and becomes even more challenging when hydrogen is used as the fuel. In fact, flashback is a key operability issue associated with low emission combustion of high hydrogen content fuels. Flashback can cause serious damage to the premixer hardware. Hence, design tools to predict flashback propensity are of interest. Such a design tool has been developed based on the data gathered by experimental study to predict boundary layer flashback using non-dimensional parameters. The flashback propensity of a premixed jet flame has been studied experimentally. Boundary layer flashback has been investigated under turbulent flow conditions at elevated pressures and temperatures (i.e. 3 atm to 8 atm and 300 K to 500 K). The data presented in this study are for hydrogen fuel at various Reynolds numbers, which are representative of practical gas turbine premixer conditions and are significantly higher than results currently available in the literature. Three burner heads constructed of different materials (stainless steel, copper, and zirconia ceramic) were used to evaluate the effect of tip temperature, a parameter found previously to be an important factor in triggering flashback. This study characterizes flashback systematically by developing a comprehensive non-dimensional model which takes into account all effective parameters in boundary layer flashback propensity. The model was optimized for new data and captures the behavior of the new results well. Further, comparison of the model with the single existing study of high pressure jet flame flashback also indicates good agreement. The model developed using the high pressure test rig is able to predict flashback tendencies for a commercial gas turbine engine and can thus serve as a

  5. Performance and emission characteristics of a turbocharged CNG engine fueled by hydrogen-enriched compressed natural gas with high hydrogen ratio

    Ma, Fanhua; Wang, Mingyue; Jiang, Long; Chen, Renzhe; Deng, Jiao; Naeve, Nashay; Zhao, Shuli [State Key Laboratory of Automotive Safety and Energy Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-06-15

    This paper investigates the effect of high hydrogen volumetric ratio of 55% on performance and emission characteristics in a turbocharged lean burn natural gas engine. The experimental data was conducted under various operating conditions including different spark timing, excess air ratio (lambda), and manifold pressure. It is found that the addition of hydrogen at a high volumetric ratio could significantly extend the lean burn limit, improve the engine lean burn ability, decrease burn duration, and yield higher thermal efficiency. The CO, CH{sub 4} emissions were reduced and NO{sub x} emission could be kept an acceptable low level with high hydrogen content under lean burn conditions when ignition timing were optimized. (author)

  6. Nanoporous, Metal Carbide, Surface Diffusion Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separations

    Way, J. Douglas [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering; Wolden, Colin A. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-09-30

    Colorado School of Mines (CSM) developed high temperature, hydrogen permeable membranes that contain no platinum group metals with the goal of separating hydrogen from gas mixtures representative of gasification of carbon feedstocks such as coal or biomass in order to meet DOE NETL 2015 hydrogen membrane performance targets. We employed a dual synthesis strategy centered on transition metal carbides. In the first approach, novel, high temperature, surface diffusion membranes based on nanoporous Mo2C were fabricated on ceramic supports. These were produced in a two step process that consisted of molybdenum oxide deposition followed by thermal carburization. Our best Mo2C surface diffusion membrane achieved a pure hydrogen flux of 367 SCFH/ft2 at a feed pressure of only 20 psig. The highest H2/N2 selectivity obtained with this approach was 4.9. A transport model using “dusty gas” theory was derived to describe the hydrogen transport in the Mo2C coated, surface diffusion membranes. The second class of membranes developed were dense metal foils of BCC metals such as vanadium coated with thin (< 60 nm) Mo2C catalyst layers. We have fabricated a Mo2C/V composite membrane that in pure gas testing delivered a H2 flux of 238 SCFH/ft2 at 600 °C and 100 psig, with no detectable He permeance. This exceeds the 2010 DOE Target flux. This flux is 2.8 times that of pure Pd at the same membrane thickness and test conditions and over 79% of the 2015 flux target. In mixed gas testing we achieved a permeate purity of ≥99.99%, satisfying the permeate purity milestone, but the hydrogen permeance was low, ~0.2 SCFH/ft2.psi. However, during testing of a Mo2C coated Pd alloy membrane with DOE 1 feed gas mixture a hydrogen permeance of >2 SCFH/ft2.psi was obtained which was stable during the entire test, meeting the permeance associated with

  7. Influence of rolling direction and carbide precipitation on IGSCC susceptibility in hydrogenated high temperature water

    Arioka, Koji; Yamada, Takuyo; Terachi, Takumi; Chiba, Goro

    2005-01-01

    IGSCC growth behaviors of austenitic stainless steels in hydrogenated high temperature water were studied using compact type specimens (0.5T for cold worked materials). The effect of cold rolling direction, alloy composition and carbide precipitation on crack growth behaviors was studied in hydrogenated high temperature water. Then, to examine the effect of cold work and carbide precipitation on IGSCC behaviors, the role of grain boundary sliding studied in high temperature air using CT specimens. The similar dependences of carbide precipitation and cold work on IGSCC and creep behaviors suggest that grain boundary sliding might play an important role by itself or in conjunction with other reactions such as crack tip dissolution etc. (author)

  8. Highly Selective TiN-Supported Highly Dispersed Pt Catalyst: Ultra Active toward Hydrogen Oxidation and Inactive toward Oxygen Reduction.

    Luo, Junming; Tang, Haibo; Tian, Xinlong; Hou, Sanying; Li, Xiuhua; Du, Li; Liao, Shijun

    2018-01-31

    The severe dissolution of the cathode catalyst, caused by an undesired oxygen reduction reaction at the anode during startup and shutdown, is a fatal challenge to practical applications of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. To address this important issue, according to the distinct structure-sensitivity between the σ-type bond in H 2 and the π-type bond in O 2 , we design a HD-Pt/TiN material by highly dispersing Pt on the TiN surface to inhibit the unwanted oxygen reduction reaction. The highly dispersed Pt/TiN catalyst exhibits excellent selectivity toward hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions. With a Pt loading of 0.88 wt %, our catalyst shows excellent hydrogen oxidation reaction activity, close to that of commercial 20 wt % Pt/C catalyst, and much lower oxygen reduction reaction activity than the commercial 20 wt % Pt/C catalyst. The lack of well-ordered Pt facets is responsible for the excellent selectivity of the HD-Pt/TiN materials toward hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions. Our work provides a new and cost-effective solution to design selective catalysts toward hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions, making the strategy of using oxygen-tolerant anode catalyst to improve the stability of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells during startup and shutdown more affordable and practical.

  9. Hydrogen production from high-moisture content biomass in supercritical water

    Antal, M.J. Jr.; Adschiri, T.; Ekbom, T. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    Most hydrogen is produced by steam reforming methane at elevated pressures. The goal of this research is to develop commercial processes for the catalytic steam reforming of biomass and other organic wastes at high pressures. This approach avoids the high cost of gas compression and takes advantage of the unique properties of water at high pressures. Prior to this year the authors reported the ability of carbon to catalyze the decomposition of biomass and related model compounds in supercritical water. The product gas consists of hydrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, and traces of higher hydrocarbons. During the past year the authors have: (a) developed a method to extend the catalyst life, (b) begun studies of the role of the shift reaction, (c) completed studies of carbon dioxide absorption from the product effluent by high pressure water, (d) measured the rate of carbon catalyst gasification in supercritical water, (e) discovered the pumpability of oil-biomass slurries, and (f) completed the design and begun fabrication of a flow reactor that will steam reform whole biomass feedstocks (i.e. sewage sludge) and produce a hydrogen rich synthesis gas at very high pressure (>22 MPa).

  10. Thermodynamic analyses of hydrogen production from sub-quality natural gas. Part II: Steam reforming and autothermal steam reforming

    Huang, Cunping; T-Raissi, Ali

    Part I of this paper analyzed sub-quality natural gas (SQNG) pyrolysis and autothermal pyrolysis. Production of hydrogen via direct thermolysis of SQNGs produces only 2 mol of hydrogen and 1 mol of carbon per mole of methane (CH 4). Steam reforming of SQNG (SRSQNG) could become a more effective approach because the processes produce two more moles of hydrogen via water splitting. A Gibbs reactor unit operation in the AspenPlus™ chemical process simulator was employed to accomplish equilibrium calculations for the SQNG + H 2O and SQNG + H 2O + O 2 systems. The results indicate that water and oxygen inlet flow rates do not significantly affect the decomposition of hydrogen sulfide (H 2S) at temperatures lower than 1000 °C. The major co-product of the processes is carbonyl sulfide (COS) while sulfur dimer (S 2) and carbon disulfide (CS 2) are minor by-products within this temperature range. At higher temperatures (>1300 °C), CS 2 and S 2 become major co-products. No sulfur dioxide (SO 2) or sulfur trioxide (SO 3) is formed during either SRSQNG or autothermal SRSQNG processes, indicating that no environmentally harmful acidic gases are generated.

  11. Active Edge Sites Engineering in Nickel Cobalt Selenide Solid Solutions for Highly Efficient Hydrogen Evolution

    Xia, Chuan

    2017-01-06

    An effective multifaceted strategy is demonstrated to increase active edge site concentration in NiCoSe solid solutions prepared by in situ selenization process of nickel cobalt precursor. The simultaneous control of surface, phase, and morphology result in as-prepared ternary solid solution with extremely high electrochemically active surface area (C = 197 mF cm), suggesting significant exposure of active sites in this ternary compound. Coupled with metallic-like electrical conductivity and lower free energy for atomic hydrogen adsorption in NiCoSe, identified by temperature-dependent conductivities and density functional theory calculations, the authors have achieved unprecedented fast hydrogen evolution kinetics, approaching that of Pt. Specifically, the NiCoSe solid solutions show a low overpotential of 65 mV at -10 mV cm, with onset potential of mere 18 mV, an impressive small Tafel slope of 35 mV dec, and a large exchange current density of 184 μA cm in acidic electrolyte. Further, it is shown that the as-prepared NiCoSe solid solution not only works very well in acidic electrolyte but also delivers exceptional hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) performance in alkaline media. The outstanding HER performance makes this solid solution a promising candidate for mass hydrogen production.

  12. High-speed hydrogen pellet acceleration using an electromagnetic railgun system

    Onozuka, M.; Oda, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Using a low electric energy railgun system, solid hydrogen pellet acceleration test have been conducted to investigate the application of the electromagnetic railgun system for high-speed pellet injection into fusion plasmas. Pneumatically pre-accelerated hydrogen pellets measuring 3 mm in diameter and 4-9 mm in length were successfully accelerated by a railgun system that uses a laser-induced plasma armature formation. A 2 m long single railgun with ceramic insulators accelerated th hydrogen pellet to 2.6 kms -1 with a supplied energy of 1.7 kJ. The average acceleration rate and the energy conversion coefficient were improved to about 1.6 x 10 6 ms -2 and 0.37%, which is 1.6 times and three times as large as that using a railgun with plastic insulators, respectively. Furthermore, using the 1 m long augment railgun with ceramic insulators, the energy conversion coefficient was improved to about 0.55% while the acceleration rate was increased to 2.4 x 10 6 ms -2 . The highest hydrogen pellet velocity attained was about 2.3 kms -1 for the augment railgun under an energy supply of 1.1 kJ. Based on the findings, it is expected that the acceleration efficiency and the pellet velocity can be further improved by using a longer augment railgun with ceramic insulators and by applying an optimal power supply. (orig.)

  13. High-speed hydrogen pellet acceleration using an electromagnetic railgun system

    Onozuka, M.; Oda, Y. [Mitsubishi Heavy Ind., Ltd., Yokohama (Japan). Nucl. Fuel Cycle Eng. Dept.; Azuma, K.; Kasai, S.; Hasegawa, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Res. Inst., Tokai (Japan)

    1997-07-01

    Using a low electric energy railgun system, solid hydrogen pellet acceleration test have been conducted to investigate the application of the electromagnetic railgun system for high-speed pellet injection into fusion plasmas. Pneumatically pre-accelerated hydrogen pellets measuring 3 mm in diameter and 4-9 mm in length were successfully accelerated by a railgun system that uses a laser-induced plasma armature formation. A 2 m long single railgun with ceramic insulators accelerated th hydrogen pellet to 2.6 kms{sup -1} with a supplied energy of 1.7 kJ. The average acceleration rate and the energy conversion coefficient were improved to about 1.6 x 10{sup 6} ms{sup -2} and 0.37%, which is 1.6 times and three times as large as that using a railgun with plastic insulators, respectively. Furthermore, using the 1 m long augment railgun with ceramic insulators, the energy conversion coefficient was improved to about 0.55% while the acceleration rate was increased to 2.4 x 10{sup 6} ms{sup -2}. The highest hydrogen pellet velocity attained was about 2.3 kms{sup -1} for the augment railgun under an energy supply of 1.1 kJ. Based on the findings, it is expected that the acceleration efficiency and the pellet velocity can be further improved by using a longer augment railgun with ceramic insulators and by applying an optimal power supply. (orig.)

  14. Phase II Final Project Report SBIR Project: "A High Efficiency PV to Hydrogen Energy System"

    Slade, A; Turner, J; Stone, K; McConnell, R

    2008-09-02

    The innovative research conducted for this project contributed greatly to the understanding of generating low-cost hydrogen from solar energy. The project’s research identified two highly leveraging and complementary pathways. The first pathway is to dramatically increase the efficiency of converting sunlight into electricity. Improving solar electric conversion efficiency directly increases hydrogen production. This project produced a world record efficiency for silicon solar cells and contributed to another world record efficiency for a solar concentrator module using multijunction solar cells. The project’s literature review identified a second pathway in which wasted heat from the solar concentration process augments the electrolysis process generating hydrogen. One way to do this is to use a “heat mirror” that reflects the heat-producing infrared and transmits the visible spectrum to the solar cells; this also increases solar cell conversion efficiency. An economic analysis of this concept confirms that, if long-term concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) and solid-oxide electrolyzer cost goals can be achieved, hydrogen will be produced from solar energy cheaper than the cost of gasoline. The potential public benefits from this project are significant. The project has identified a potential energy source for the nation’s future electricity and transportation needs that is entirely “home grown” and carbon free. As CPV enter the nation’s utility markets, the opportunity for this approach to be successful is greatly increased. Amonix strongly recommends further exploration of this project’s findings.

  15. Production and detection of cold anti-hydrogen atoms A first step towards high precision CPT test

    Variola, A; Bonomi, G; Boutcha, A; Bowe, P; Carraro, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Doser, Michael; Filippini, V; Fontana, A; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Genova, P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Jørgensen, L V; Lagomarsino, V; Landua, Rolf; Lindelöf, D; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Macri, M; Madsen, N; Manuzio, G; Montagna, P; Pruys, H S; Regenfus, C; Rotondi, A; Riedler, P; Testera, G; Van der Werf, D P

    2003-01-01

    Observations of anti-hydrogen in small quantities have been reported at CERN and at FermiLab, but these experiments were not suited to spectroscopy experiments. In 2002 the ATHENA collaboration reported the production and detection of very low energy anti-hydrogen atoms produced in cryogenic environment. This is the first major step in the study of antiatom's internal structure and it can lead to a high precision test of the CPT fundamental symmetry. The method of production and detection of cold anti-hydrogen will be introduced. The absolute rate of anti-hydrogen production and the signal to background ratio in the ATHENA experiment will be discussed. (7 refs) .

  16. Enhanced hydrogen evolution rates at high pH with a colloidal cadmium sulphide–platinum hybrid system

    Schneider, Julian; Vaneski, Aleksandar; Susha, Andrei S.; Rogach, Andrey L.; Pesch, Georg R.; Yang Teoh, Wey

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate enhanced hydrogen generation rates at high pH using colloidal cadmium sulphide nanorods decorated with Pt nanoparticles. We introduce a simplified procedure for the decoration and subsequent hydrogen generation, reducing both the number of working steps and the materials costs. Different Pt precursor concentrations were tested to reveal the optimal conditions for the efficient hydrogen evolution. A sharp increase in hydrogen evolution rates was measured at pH 13 and above, a condition at which the surface charge transfer was efficiently mediated by the formation of hydroxyl radicals and further consumption by the sacrificial triethanolamine hole scavenger

  17. Enhanced hydrogen evolution rates at high pH with a colloidal cadmium sulphide–platinum hybrid system

    Schneider, Julian; Vaneski, Aleksandar; Susha, Andrei S.; Rogach, Andrey L., E-mail: andrey.rogach@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science and Centre for Functional Photonics (CFP), City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Pesch, Georg R.; Yang Teoh, Wey [Clean Energy and Nanotechnology (CLEAN) Laboratory, School of Energy and Environment, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate enhanced hydrogen generation rates at high pH using colloidal cadmium sulphide nanorods decorated with Pt nanoparticles. We introduce a simplified procedure for the decoration and subsequent hydrogen generation, reducing both the number of working steps and the materials costs. Different Pt precursor concentrations were tested to reveal the optimal conditions for the efficient hydrogen evolution. A sharp increase in hydrogen evolution rates was measured at pH 13 and above, a condition at which the surface charge transfer was efficiently mediated by the formation of hydroxyl radicals and further consumption by the sacrificial triethanolamine hole scavenger.

  18. Vapor Phase Hydrogen Peroxide Sanitization of an Isolator for Aseptic Filling of Monoclonal Antibody Drug Product - Hydrogen Peroxide Uptake and Impact on Protein Quality.

    Hubbard, Aaron; Reodl, Thomas; Hui, Ada; Knueppel, Stephanie; Eppler, Kirk; Lehnert, Siegfried; Maa, Yuh-Fun

    2018-03-15

    A monoclonal antibody drug product (DP) manufacturing process was transferred to a different production site, where aseptic filling took place within an isolator that was sanitized using vapor phase hydrogen peroxide (VPHP). A quality-by-design approach was applied for study design to understand the impact of VPHP uptake in the isolator on DP quality. A combination of small-scale and manufacturing-scale studies was performed to evaluate the sensitivity of the monoclonal antibody to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as well as VPHP uptake mechanisms during the filling process. The acceptable H2O2 level was determined to be 100 ng/mL for the antibody in the H2O2 spiking study; protein oxidation was observed above this threshold. The most prominent sources of VPHP uptake were identified to be via the silicone tubing assembly (associated with the peristaltic pumps) and open, filled vials. Silicone tubing, an effective depot to H2O2, could absorb VPHP during different stages of the filling process and discharge H2O2 into the DP solution during filling interruptions. A small-scale isolator model, established to simulate manufacturing-scale conditions, was a useful tool in understanding H2O2 uptake in relation to tubing dimensions and VPHP concentration in the isolator air (or atmosphere). Although the tubing assembly had absorbed a substantial amount of VPHP during the decontamination phase, the majority of H2O2 could be removed during tubing cleaning and sterilization in the subsequent isolator aeration phase, demonstrating that H2O2 in the DP solution is taken up primarily via atmospheric VPHP residues in the isolator during filling. Picarro sensor monitoring suggested that the validated VPHP aeration process generates reproducible residual VPHP profiles in isolator air, thus allowing small-scale studies to provide more relevant recommendations on tubing size and interruption time limits for commercial manufacturing. The recommended process parameters were demonstrated to be

  19. Si:P as a laboratory analogue for hydrogen on high magnetic field white dwarf stars.

    Murdin, B N; Li, Juerong; Pang, M L Y; Bowyer, E T; Litvinenko, K L; Clowes, S K; Engelkamp, H; Pidgeon, C R; Galbraith, I; Abrosimov, N V; Riemann, H; Pavlov, S G; Hübers, H-W; Murdin, P G

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen in a magnetic flux density of 10(5) T (1 gigagauss), the maximum observed on high-field magnetic white dwarfs, is impossible because practically available fields are about a thousand times less. In this regime, the cyclotron and binding energies become equal. Here we demonstrate Lyman series spectra for phosphorus impurities in silicon up to the equivalent field, which is scaled to 32.8 T by the effective mass and dielectric constant. The spectra reproduce the high-field theory for free hydrogen, with quadratic Zeeman splitting and strong mixing of spherical harmonics. They show the way for experiments on He and H(2) analogues, and for investigation of He(2), a bound molecule predicted under extreme field conditions.

  20. Turbojet Performance and Operation at High Altitudes with Hydrogen and Jp-4 Fuels

    Fleming, W A; Kaufman, H R; Harp, J L , Jr; Chelko, L J

    1956-01-01

    Two current turbojet engines were operated with gaseous-hydrogen and JP-4 fuels at very high altitudes and a simulated Mach number of 0.8. With gaseous hydrogen as the fuel stable operation was obtained at altitudes up to the facility limit of about 90,000 feet and the specific fuel consumption was only 40 percent of that with JP-4 fuel. With JP-4 as the fuel combustion was unstable at altitudes above 60,000 to 65,000 feet and blowout limits were reached at 75,000 to 80,000 feet. Over-all performance, component efficiencies, and operating range were reduced considerable at very high altitudes with both fuels.

  1. Li4FeH6: Iron-containing complex hydride with high gravimetric hydrogen density

    Hiroyuki Saitoh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Li4FeH6, which has the highest gravimetric hydrogen density of iron-containing complex hydrides reported so far, is synthesized by hydrogenation of a powder mixture of iron and LiH above 6.1 GPa at 900 °C. In situ synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction measurements reveal that while kinetics require high temperature and thus high pressure for the synthesis, Li4FeH6 is expected to be thermodynamically stable slightly below room temperature at ambient pressure; further synthetic studies to suppress the kinetic effects may enable us to synthesize Li4FeH6 at moderate pressures. Li4FeH6 can be recovered at ambient conditions where Li4FeH6 is metastable.

  2. Hydrogen/Oxygen Reactions at High Pressures and Intermediate Temperatures: Flow Reactor Experiments and Kinetic Modeling

    Hashemi, Hamid; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Glarborg, Peter

    A series of experimental and numerical investigations into hydrogen oxidation at high pressures and intermediate temperatures has been conducted. The experiments were carried out in a high pressure laminar flow reactor at 50 bar pressure and a temperature range of 600–900 K. The equivalence ratio......, the mechanism is used to simulate published data on ignition delay time and laminar burning velocity of hydrogen. The flow reactor results show that at reducing, stoichiometric, and oxidizing conditions, conversion starts at temperatures of 750–775 K, 800–825 K, and 800–825 K, respectively. In oxygen atmosphere......, ignition occurs at the temperature of 775–800 K. In general, the present model provides a good agreement with the measurements in the flow reactor and with recent data on laminar burning velocity and ignition delay time....

  3. High-Capacity Hydrogen-Based Green-Energy Storage Solutions For The Grid Balancing

    D'Errico, F.; Screnci, A.

    One of the current main challenges in green-power storage and smart grids is the lack of effective solutions for accommodating the unbalance between renewable energy sources, that offer intermittent electricity supply, and a variable electricity demand. Energy management systems have to be foreseen for the near future, while they still represent a major challenge. Integrating intermittent renewable energy sources, by safe and cost-effective energy storage systems based on solid state hydrogen is today achievable thanks to recently some technology breakthroughs. Optimized solid storage method made of magnesium-based hydrides guarantees a very rapid absorption and desorption kinetics. Coupled with electrolyzer technology, high-capacity storage of green-hydrogen is therefore practicable. Besides these aspects, magnesium has been emerging as environmentally friend energy storage method to sustain integration, monitoring and control of large quantity of GWh from high capacity renewable generation in the EU.

  4. Seawater splitting for high-efficiency hydrogen evolution by alloyed PtNix electrocatalysts

    Zheng, Jingjing

    2017-08-01

    Robust electrocatalyst is a prerequisite to realize high-efficiency hydrogen evolution by water splitting. Expensive platinum (Pt) is a preferred electrode catalyst for state-of-the-art hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We present here a category of alloyed PtNix electrocatalysts by a facile green chemical reduction method, which are used to catalyze HER during seawater splitting. The catalytic performances are optimized by tuning stoichiometric Pt/Ni ratio, yielding a maximized catalytic behavior for PtNi5 electrode. The minimized onset potential is as low as -0.38 V and the corresponding Tafel slope is 119 mV dec-1. Moreover, the launched alloy electrodes have remarkable stability at -1.2 V over 12 h. The high efficiency as well as good durability demonstrates the PtNix electrocatalysts to be promising in practical applications.

  5. Hydrogen selective NH{sub 2}-MIL-53(Al) MOF membranes with high permeability

    Zhang, Feng; Zou, Xiaoqin; Gao, Xue; Fan, Songjie; Sun, Fuxing; Ren, Hao; Zhu, Guangshan [State Key Laboratory of Inorganic, Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun (China)

    2012-09-11

    Hydrogen-based energy is a promising renewable and clean resource. Thus, hydrogen selective microporous membranes with high performance and high stability are demanded. Novel NH{sub 2}-MIL-53(Al) membranes are evaluated for hydrogen separation for this goal. Continuous NH{sub 2}-MIL-53(Al) membranes have been prepared successfully on macroporous glass frit discs assisted with colloidal seeds. The gas sorption ability of NH{sub 2}-MIL-53(Al) materials is studied by gas adsorption measurement. The isosteric heats of adsorption in a sequence of CO{sub 2}> N{sub 2}> CH{sub 4}{approx} H{sub 2} indicates different interactions between NH{sub 2}-MIL-53(Al) framework and these gases. As-prepared membranes are measured by single and binary gas permeation at different temperatures. The results of singe gas permeation show a decreasing permeance in an order of H{sub 2}> CH{sub 4}> N{sub 2}> CO{sub 2}, suggesting that the diffusion and adsorption properties make significant contributions in the gas permeation through the membrane. In binary gas permeation, the NH{sub 2}-MIL-53(Al) membrane shows high selectivity for H{sub 2} with separation factors of 20.7, 23.9 and 30.9 at room temperature (288 K) for H{sub 2} over CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}, respectively. In comparison to single gas permeation, a slightly higher separation factor is obtained due to the competitive adsorption effect between the gases in the porous MOF membrane. Additionally, the NH{sub 2}-MIL-53(Al) membrane exhibits very high permeance for H{sub 2} in the mixtures separation (above 1.5 x 10{sup -6} mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1} Pa{sup -1}) due to its large cavity, resulting in a very high separation power. The details of the temperature effect on the permeances of H{sub 2} over other gases are investigated from 288 to 353 K. The supported NH{sub 2}-MIL-53(Al) membranes with high hydrogen separation power possess high stability, resistance to cracking, temperature cycling and show high reproducibility

  6. Single-catalyst high-weight% hydrogen storage in an N-heterocycle synthesized from lignin hydrogenolysis products and ammonia.

    Forberg, Daniel; Schwob, Tobias; Zaheer, Muhammad; Friedrich, Martin; Miyajima, Nobuyoshi; Kempe, Rhett

    2016-10-20

    Large-scale energy storage and the utilization of biomass as a sustainable carbon source are global challenges of this century. The reversible storage of hydrogen covalently bound in chemical compounds is a particularly promising energy storage technology. For this, compounds that can be sustainably synthesized and that permit high-weight% hydrogen storage would be highly desirable. Herein, we report that catalytically modified lignin, an indigestible, abundantly available and hitherto barely used biomass, can be harnessed to reversibly store hydrogen. A novel reusable bimetallic catalyst has been developed, which is able to hydrogenate and dehydrogenate N-heterocycles most efficiently. Furthermore, a particular N-heterocycle has been identified that can be synthesized catalytically in one step from the main lignin hydrogenolysis product and ammonia, and in which the new bimetallic catalyst allows multiple cycles of high-weight% hydrogen storage.

  7. Electrochemical catalytic reforming of oxygenated-organic compounds: a highly efficient method for production of hydrogen from bio-oil.

    Yuan, Lixia; Chen, Yaqiong; Song, Chongfu; Ye, Tongqi; Guo, Qingxiang; Zhu, Qingshi; Torimoto, Youshifumi; Li, Quanxin

    2008-11-07

    A novel approach to produce hydrogen from bio-oil was obtained with high carbon conversion (>90%) and hydrogen yield (>90%) at Tcatalytic reforming of oxygenated-organic compounds over 18%NiO/Al(2)O(3) reforming catalyst; thermal electrons play important promoting roles in the decomposition and reforming of the oxygenated-organic compounds in the bio-oil.

  8. Oxidation of Inconel 625 superalloy upon treatment with oxygen or hydrogen plasma at high temperature

    Vesel, A.; Drenik, A.; Elersic, K.; Mozetič, M.; Kovač, J.; Gyergyek, T.; Stöckel, Jan; Varju, Jozef; Pánek, Radomír; Balat-Pichelin, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 305, June (2014), s. 674-682 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011021 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Inconel * Oxidation * High temperature * Oxygen plasma * Hydrogen plasma Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.711, year: 2014 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169433214007119

  9. Feasibility study of hydrogenated amorphous alloys as high-damping materials

    Mizubayashi, H.; Ishikawa, Y.; Tanimoto, H.

    2004-01-01

    The hydrogen internal friction peak (HIFP) and the tensile strength, σ f , in amorphous (denoted by 'a') Zr 60-y Cu 30 Al 10 Si y (y=0, 1) and a-Zr 40 Cu 50-x Al 10 Si x (x=0, 1) alloys are investigated as a function of the hydrogen concentration, C H . The drastic increase in the peak temperature, T p , of the HIFP due to the Si addition by 1 at.% is found for the a-Zr 40 Cu 49 Al 10 Si 1 , where the decrease in 1/τ 0 (τ 0 denotes the pre-exponential factor of the relaxation time for the HIFP) from 1.5x10 12 s -1 to 3.0x10 10 s -1 is observed. On the other hand, the increase in T p due to the Si addition by 1 at.% is much smaller for a-Zr 59 Cu 30 Al 10 Si 1 , where 1/τ 0 for the HIFP in a-Zr 60 Cu 30 Al 10 is already as low as that for a- Zr 40 Cu 49 Al 10 Si 1 . For the HIFP with the peak height, Q p -1 , beyond 1x10 -2 , Q p -1 in the as-charged state decreases after heating to about 380 K because of the hydrogen induced structural relaxation (HISR). The HIFP with Q p -1 below 1x10 -2 is rather stable against the HISR. It is suggested that the highly anisotropic local strain around a hydrogen atom is responsible for the very high Q p -1 and the HISR. For the high-strength and high-damping performance, σ f is higher than 1.5 GPa and Q p -1 after the HISR is slightly lower than 1x10 -2 for the present Zr-Cu-Al-(Si) a-alloys

  10. Investigation of Y6Mn23 and YMn12 intermetallic alloys under high hydrogen pressure

    Filipek, S. M.; Sato, R.; Kuriyama, N.; Tanaka, H.; Takeichi, N.

    2010-03-01

    Among three intermetallic compounds existing in Y-Mn system the YMn2 and Y6Mn23 can easily form interstitial hydrides while for YMn12 existence of hydride has never been reported. At moderate hydrogen pressure YMn2 and Y6Mn23 transform into YMn2H4.5 and Y6Mn23H25 respectively. At high hydrogen pressure the YMn2 (C15 or C14 parent structure) forms a unique YMn2H6 (s.g. Fm3m) complex hydride of fluorite structure in which one Mn atom Mn(1) and Y randomly occupy the 8c sites while second manganese (Mn2) in position 4a forms complex anion with 6 hydrogen atoms located in positions 24e. Formation of YMn2H6 independently of the structure of parent phase (C14 or C15) as well as occupation of the same site (8c) by Y and Mn(1) atoms suggested that also Y6Mn23 and YMn12 could transform into YMn2H6 - type hydride in which suitable number of Y atoms will be substituted by Mn(1) in the 8c positions. This assumption was confirmed by exposing R6Mn23 and RMn12 to 1 GPa of hydrogen pressure at 1000C. Formation of (RxMn2-x)MnH6 (where x = 18/29 or 3/13 for R6Mn23 and RMn12 hydrides respectively) was confirmed by XRD. Hydrogen concentration in both R6Mn23 and RMn12 based hydrides reached H/Me = 2 thus value two times higher than in R6Mn23H25.

  11. Investigation of Y6Mn23 and YMn12 intermetallic alloys under high hydrogen pressure

    Filipek, S M; Sato, R; Kuriyama, N; Tanaka, H; Takeichi, N

    2010-01-01

    Among three intermetallic compounds existing in Y-Mn system the YMn 2 and Y 6 Mn 23 can easily form interstitial hydrides while for YMn 12 existence of hydride has never been reported. At moderate hydrogen pressure YMn 2 and Y 6 Mn 23 transform into YMn 2 H 4.5 and Y 6 Mn 23 H 25 respectively. At high hydrogen pressure the YMn 2 (C15 or C14 parent structure) forms a unique YMn 2 H 6 (s.g. Fm3m) complex hydride of fluorite structure in which one Mn atom Mn(1) and Y randomly occupy the 8c sites while second manganese (Mn2) in position 4a forms complex anion with 6 hydrogen atoms located in positions 24e. Formation of YMn 2 H 6 independently of the structure of parent phase (C14 or C15) as well as occupation of the same site (8c) by Y and Mn(1) atoms suggested that also Y 6 Mn 23 and YMn 12 could transform into YMn 2 H 6 - type hydride in which suitable number of Y atoms will be substituted by Mn(1) in the 8c positions. This assumption was confirmed by exposing R 6 Mn 23 and RMn 12 to 1 GPa of hydrogen pressure at 100 0 C. Formation of (R x Mn 2-x )MnH 6 (where x = 18/29 or 3/13 for R 6 Mn 23 and RMn 12 hydrides respectively) was confirmed by XRD. Hydrogen concentration in both R 6 Mn 23 and RMn 12 based hydrides reached H/Me = 2 thus value two times higher than in R 6 Mn 23 H 25 .

  12. High density plasma productions by hydrogen storage electrode in the Tohoku University Heliac

    Utoh, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, Y.; Takenaga, M.; Ogawa, M.; Shinde, J.; Iwazaki, K.; Shinto, K.; Kitajima, S.; Sasao, M.; Nishimura, K.; Inagaki, S.

    2005-01-01

    In the Tohoku University Heliac (TU-Heliac), the influence of a radial electric field on improved modes has been investigated by an electrode biasing. In both positive and negative biasing experiments by the stainless steel (SUS) electrode (cold-electron or ion collection), the improvement of plasma confinement was clearly observed. Furthermore, by negative biasing with a hot cathode (electron injection), the radial electric fields can be actively controlled as a consequence of the control of the electrode current I E . By using the electrode made of a hydrogen storage metal, for example Titanium (Ti) or Vanadium (V), the following possibility can be expected: (1) ions accelerated from the positive biased electrode allow the simulation for the orbit loss of high-energy particles, (2) the electrons/neutral- particles injected from the negative biased electrode provide the production of the high- density plasma, if hydrogen are successfully stored in the electrode. In this present work, several methods were tried as the treatment for hydrogen storage. In the case of the Ti electrode biased positively after the treatment, the improvement of plasma confinement was observed in He plasma, which were same as the experimental results of the SUS electrode. However, in the electron density profiles inside the electrode position there was difference between the biased plasma by the Ti electrode and that by the SUS electrode. In some of Ar discharges biased negatively with the Ti electrode after the treatment, the electron density and the line intensity of H α increased about 10 times of those before biasing. This phenomenon has not been observed in the Ar plasma biased by the SUS electrode. This result suggested that the Ti electrode injected electrons/neutral-hydrogen into the plasma. This high-density plasma productions were observed only 1 ∼ 3 times in the one treatment for hydrogen storage. By using a Vanadium (V) electrode, productions of the high-density plasma

  13. Method for synthesis of high quality graphene

    Lanzara, Alessandra [Piedmont, CA; Schmid, Andreas K [Berkeley, CA; Yu, Xiaozhu [Berkeley, CA; Hwang, Choonkyu [Albany, CA; Kohl, Annemarie [Beneditkbeuern, DE; Jozwiak, Chris M [Oakland, CA

    2012-03-27

    A method is described herein for the providing of high quality graphene layers on silicon carbide wafers in a thermal process. With two wafers facing each other in close proximity, in a first vacuum heating stage, while maintained at a vacuum of around 10.sup.-6 Torr, the wafer temperature is raised to about 1500.degree. C., whereby silicon evaporates from the wafer leaving a carbon rich surface, the evaporated silicon trapped in the gap between the wafers, such that the higher vapor pressure of silicon above each of the wafers suppresses further silicon evaporation. As the temperature of the wafers is raised to about 1530.degree. C. or more, the carbon atoms self assemble themselves into graphene.

  14. Hydrogen production from biomass pyrolysis gas via high temperature steam reforming process

    Wongchang, Thawatchai; Patumsawad, Suthum

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this work has been undertaken as part of the design of continuous hydrogen production using the high temperature steam reforming process. The steady-state test condition was carried out using syngas from biomass pyrolysis, whilst operating at high temperatures between 600 and 1200 degree Celsius. The main reformer operating parameters (e.g. temperature, resident time and steam to biomass ratio (S/B)) have been examined in order to optimize the performance of the reformer. The operating temperature is a key factor in determining the extent to which hydrogen production is increased at higher temperatures (900 -1200 degree Celsius) whilst maintaining the same as resident time and S/B ratio. The effects of exhaust gas composition on heating value were also investigated. The steam reforming process produced methane (CH 4 ) and ethylene (C 2 H 4 ) between 600 to 800 degree Celsius and enhanced production ethane (C 2 H 6 ) at 700 degree Celsius. However carbon monoxide (CO) emission was slightly increased for higher temperatures all conditions. The results show that the use of biomass pyrolysis gas can produce higher hydrogen production from high temperature steam reforming. In addition the increasing reformer efficiency needs to be optimized for different operating conditions. (author)

  15. Palladium Gate All Around - Hetero Dielectric -Tunnel FET based highly sensitive Hydrogen Gas Sensor

    Madan, Jaya; Chaujar, Rishu

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents a novel highly sensitive Hetero-Dielectric-Gate All Around Tunneling FET (HD-GAA-TFET) based Hydrogen Gas Sensor, incorporating the advantages of band to band tunneling (BTBT) mechanism. Here, the Palladium supported silicon dioxide is used as a sensing media and sensing relies on the interaction of hydrogen with Palladium-SiO2-Si. The high surface to volume ratio in the case of cylindrical GAA structure enhances the fortuities for surface reactions between H2 gas and Pd, and thus improves the sensitivity and stability of the sensor. Behaviour of the sensor in presence of hydrogen and at elevated temperatures is discussed. The conduction path of the sensor which is dependent on sensors radius has also been varied for the optimized sensitivity and static performance analysis of the sensor where the proposed design exhibits a superior performance in terms of threshold voltage, subthreshold swing, and band to band tunneling rate. Stability of the sensor with respect to temperature affectability has also been studied, and it is found that the device is reasonably stable and highly sensitive over the bearable temperature range. The successful utilization of HD-GAA-TFET in gas sensors may open a new door for the development of novel nanostructure gas sensing devices.

  16. Partial hydrogenation of alkynes on highly selective nano-structured mesoporous silica MCM-41 composite catalyst

    Kojoori, R.K.

    2016-01-01

    In this research, we have developed a silica MCM-41/Metformin/Pd (II) nano composite catalyst for the selective hydrogenation of alkynes to the corresponding (Z)-alkenes under a mild condition of atmospheric pressure and room temperature. Firstly, functionalized Si-MCM-41 metformin catalyst with the optimum performance was prepared. Then, the synthesized catalyst was elucidated by X-ray powder diffraction, BET surface area, FT-IR spectrophotometer, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and applied in partial hydrogenation of different alkynes, with high selectivity and high yield. The products were characterized by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, FT-IR, and Mass Spectrometry (MS) that strongly approved the (Z)-double bond configuration of produced alkenes. This prepared catalyst is competitive with the best palladium catalysts known for the selective liquid phase hydrogenation of alkynes and can be easily recovered and regenerated with keeping high activity and selectivity over at least three cycles with a simple regeneration procedure. (author)

  17. High Performance Electrocatalytic Reaction of Hydrogen and Oxygen on Ruthenium Nanoclusters

    Ye, Ruquan; Liu, Yuanyue; Peng, Zhiwei; Wang, Tuo; Jalilov, Almaz S.; Yakobson, Boris I.; Wei, Su-Huai; Tour, James M.

    2017-01-18

    The development of catalytic materials for the hydrogen oxidation, hydrogen evolution, oxygen reduction or oxygen evolution reactions with high reaction rates and low overpotentials are key goals for the development of renewable energy. We report here Ru(0) nanoclusters supported on nitrogen-doped graphene as high-performance multifunctional catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), showing activities similar to that of commercial Pt/C in alkaline solution. For HER performance in alkaline media, sample Ru/NG-750 reaches 10 mA cm-2 at an overpotential of 8 mV with a Tafel slope of 30 mV dec-1. The high HER performance in alkaline solution is advantageous because most catalysts for ORR and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) also prefer alkaline solution environment whereas degrade in acidic electrolytes. For ORR performance, Ru/NG effectively catalyzes the conversion of O2 into OH- via a 4e process at a current density comparable to that of Pt/C. The unusual catalytic activities of Ru(0) nanoclusters reported here are important discoveries for the advancement of renewable energy conversion reactions.

  18. High quality data: An evaluation of AIM data quality and data quality procedures

    The goal of every monitoring program is to collect high-quality data which can then be used to provide information to decision makers. The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Assessment, Inventory, and Monitoring (AIM) program is one such data set which provides rangeland status, condition, and trend in...

  19. High-picture quality industrial CT scanner

    Shoji, Takao; Nishide, Akihiko; Fujii, Masashi.

    1989-01-01

    Industrial X-ray-CT-scanners, which provide cross-sectional images of a tested sample without destroying it, are attracting attention as a new nondestructive inspection device. In 1982, Toshiba commenced the development of industrial CT scanners, and introduced the 'TOSCANER' -3000 and-4000 series. Now, the state of the art 'TOSCANER'-20000 series of CT systems has been developed incorporating the latest computer tomography and image processing technology, such as the T9506 image processor. One of the advantages of this system is its applicability to a wide range of X-ray energy . The 'TOSCANER'-20000 series can be utilized for inspecting castings and other materials with relatively low-transparency to X-rays, as well as ceramics, composite materials and other materials with high X-ray transparency. A further feature of the new system is its high-picture quality, with a high-spatial resolution resulting from a pixel size of 0.2x0.2(mm). (author)

  20. [Quality management is associated with high quality services in health care].

    Nielsen, Tenna Hassert; Riis, Allan; Mainz, Jan; Jensen, Anne-Louise Degn

    2013-12-09

    In these years, quality management has been the focus in order to meet high quality services for the patients in Danish health care. This article provides information on quality management and quality improvement and it evaluates its effectiveness in achieving better organizational structures, processes and results in Danish health-care organizations. Our findings generally support that quality management is associated with high quality services in health care.

  1. System Evaluation and Economic Analysis of a Nuclear Reactor Powered High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen-Production Plant

    Harvego, E.A.; McKellar, M.G.; Sohal, M.S.; O'Brien, J.E.; Herring, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    A reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production was developed to provide a basis for comparing the HTE concept with other hydrogen production concepts. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540 C and 900 C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen includes 4,009,177 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The alternating current (AC) to direct current (DC) conversion efficiency is 96%. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the lower heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.1% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.356 kg/s. An economic analysis of this plant was performed using the standardized H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program, and using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost. A cost of $3.23/kg of hydrogen was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10%.

  2. Optical studies of high quality synthetic diamond

    Sharp, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the study of fundamental and defect induced optical properties of synthetic diamond grown using high pressure, high temperature (HPHT) synthesis or chemical vapour deposition (CVD). The primary technique used for investigation is cathodoluminescence (including imaging and decay-time measurements) in addition to other forms of optical spectroscopy. This thesis is timely in that the crystallinity and purity of synthetic diamond has increased ten fold over the last few years. The diamond exciton emission, which is easily quenched by the presence of defects, is studied in high quality samples in detail. In addition the ability now exists to engineer the isotopic content of synthetic diamond to a high degree of accuracy. The experimental chapters are divided as follows: Chapter 2: High resolution, low temperature spectra reveal a splitting of the free-exciton phonon recombination emission peaks and the bound-exciton zero phonon line. Included are measurements of the variation in intensity and decay-time as a function of temperature. Chapter 3: The shift in energy of the phonon-assisted free-exciton phonon replicas with isotopic content has been measured. The shift is in agreement with the results of interatomic force model for phonon scattering due to isotope disorder. Chapter 4: A study of the shift in energy with isotopic content of the diamond of the GR1 band due to the neutral vacancy has allowed a verification of the theoretical predictions due to the Jahn Teller effect. Chapter 5: The spatial distribution of the free-exciton luminescence is studied in HPHT synthetic and CVD diamond. A variation in intensity with distance from the surface is interpreted as a significant non-radiative loss of excitons to the surface. Chapter 6: The decay-times of all known self-interstitial related centres have been measured in order to calculate the concentration of these centres present in electron irradiated diamond. (author)

  3. High Quality Data for Grid Integration Studies

    Clifton, Andrew; Draxl, Caroline; Sengupta, Manajit; Hodge, Bri-Mathias

    2017-01-22

    As variable renewable power penetration levels increase in power systems worldwide, renewable integration studies are crucial to ensure continued economic and reliable operation of the power grid. The existing electric grid infrastructure in the US in particular poses significant limitations on wind power expansion. In this presentation we will shed light on requirements for grid integration studies as far as wind and solar energy are concerned. Because wind and solar plants are strongly impacted by weather, high-resolution and high-quality weather data are required to drive power system simulations. Future data sets will have to push limits of numerical weather prediction to yield these high-resolution data sets, and wind data will have to be time-synchronized with solar data. Current wind and solar integration data sets are presented. The Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit is the largest and most complete grid integration data set publicly available to date. A meteorological data set, wind power production time series, and simulated forecasts created using the Weather Research and Forecasting Model run on a 2-km grid over the continental United States at a 5-min resolution is now publicly available for more than 126,000 land-based and offshore wind power production sites. The National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB) is a similar high temporal- and spatial resolution database of 18 years of solar resource data for North America and India. The need for high-resolution weather data pushes modeling towards finer scales and closer synchronization. We also present how we anticipate such datasets developing in the future, their benefits, and the challenges with using and disseminating such large amounts of data.

  4. Graphene sheets/cobalt nanocomposites as low-cost/high-performance catalysts for hydrogen generation

    Zhang, Fei; Hou, Chengyi; Zhang, Qinghong; Wang, Hongzhi; Li, Yaogang

    2012-01-01

    The production of clean and renewable hydrogen through the hydrolysis of sodium borohydride has received much attention owing to increasing global energy demands. Graphene sheets/cobalt (GRs/Co) nanocomposites, which are highly efficient catalysts, have been prepared using a one-step solvothermal method in ethylene glycol. Co 2+ salts were converted to Co nanoparticles, which were simultaneously inserted into the graphene layers with the reduction of graphite oxide sheets to GRs. The as-synthesized samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectra, Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer. The maximum saturation magnetization value reached 80.8 emu g −1 , meaning they are more suitable for magnet-controlled generation of H 2 than noble metal catalysts. The catalytic activity of the composite was investigated by the hydrolysis of sodium borohydride in aqueous solution both with and without a GRs support. It was found that the high electronic conductive GRs support increased the hydrogen generation rate (about two times) compared with pure cobalt. The improved hydrogen generation rate, low cost and uncomplicated recycling makes the GRs/Co nanocomposites promising candidates as catalysts for hydrogen generation. Highlights: ► Graphene sheets/cobalt nanocomposites were prepared by a one-step solvothermal method. ► The maximum saturation magnetization value of the composites reached 80.8 emu g −1 . ► The graphene support greatly increased the catalytic activity of cobalt. ► An easily removed, recycled and controlled functional filter was obtained.

  5. Hydrogen peroxide plasma sterilization of a waterproof, high-definition video camera case for intraoperative imaging in veterinary surgery.

    Adin, Christopher A; Royal, Kenneth D; Moore, Brandon; Jacob, Megan

    2018-06-13

    To evaluate the safety and usability of a wearable, waterproof high-definition camera/case for acquisition of surgical images by sterile personnel. An in vitro study to test the efficacy of biodecontamination of camera cases. Usability for intraoperative image acquisition was assessed in clinical procedures. Two waterproof GoPro Hero4 Silver camera cases were inoculated by immersion in media containing Staphylococcus pseudointermedius or Escherichia coli at ≥5.50E+07 colony forming units/mL. Cases were biodecontaminated by manual washing and hydrogen peroxide plasma sterilization. Cultures were obtained by swab and by immersion in enrichment broth before and after each contamination/decontamination cycle (n = 4). The cameras were then applied by a surgeon in clinical procedures by using either a headband or handheld mode and were assessed for usability according to 5 user characteristics. Cultures of all poststerilization swabs were negative. One of 8 cultures was positive in enrichment broth, consistent with a low level of contamination in 1 sample. Usability of the camera was considered poor in headband mode, with limited battery life, inability to control camera functions, and lack of zoom function affecting image quality. Handheld operation of the camera by the primary surgeon improved usability, allowing close-up still and video intraoperative image acquisition. Vaporized hydrogen peroxide sterilization of this camera case was considered effective for biodecontamination. Handheld operation improved usability for intraoperative image acquisition. Vaporized hydrogen peroxide sterilization and thorough manual washing of a waterproof camera may provide cost effective intraoperative image acquisition for documentation purposes. © 2018 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  6. Hydrogenated TiO{sub 2} nanobelts as highly efficient photocatalytic organic dye degradation and hydrogen evolution photocatalyst

    Tian, Jian [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266590 (China); State key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Leng, Yanhua [State key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Cui, Hongzhi, E-mail: cuihongzhi1965@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266590 (China); Liu, Hong, E-mail: hongliu@sdu.edu.cn [State key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • A facile synthesis of hydrogenated TiO{sub 2} nanobelts is reported. • Utilizing UV and visible light in photocatalytic degradation and H{sub 2} production. • The improved photocatalytic property is owe to Ti{sup 3+} ions and oxygen vacancies. - Abstract: TiO{sub 2} nanobelts have gained increasing interest because of its outstanding properties and promising applications in a wide range of fields. Here we report the facile synthesis of hydrogenated TiO{sub 2} (H-TiO{sub 2}) nanobelts, which exhibit excellent UV and visible photocatalytic decomposing of methyl orange (MO) and water splitting for hydrogen production. The improved photocatalytic property can be attributed to the Ti{sup 3+} ions and oxygen vacancies in TiO{sub 2} nanobelts created by hydrogenation. Ti{sup 3+} ions and oxygen vacancies can enhance visible light absorption, promote charge carrier trapping, and hinder the photogenerated electron–hole recombination. This work offers a simple strategy for the fabrication of a wide solar spectrum of active photocatalysts, which possesses significant potential for more efficient photodegradation, photocatalytic water splitting, and enhanced solar cells using sunlight as light source.

  7. Searching for magnetism in hydrogenated graphene: Using highly hydrogenated graphene prepared via birch reduction of graphite oxides

    Eng, A.Y.S.; Poh, H. L.; Šaněk, F.; Maryško, Miroslav; Matějková, Stanislava; Šofer, Z.; Pumera, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 7 (2013), s. 5930-5939 ISSN 1936-0851 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-20507S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : hydrogenated graphene * graphane * graphite oxide * ferromagnetism Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UOCHB-X) Impact factor: 12.033, year: 2013

  8. Hydrogenated TiO2 Thin Film for Accelerating Electron Transport in Highly Efficient Planar Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Yao, Xin; Liang, Junhui; Li, Yuelong; Luo, Jingshan; Shi, Biao; Wei, Changchun; Zhang, Dekun; Li, Baozhang; Ding, Yi; Zhao, Ying; Zhang, Xiaodan

    2017-10-01

    Intensive studies on low-temperature deposited electron transport materials have been performed to improve the efficiency of n-i-p type planar perovskite solar cells to extend their application on plastic and multijunction device architectures. Here, a TiO 2 film with enhanced conductivity and tailored band edge is prepared by magnetron sputtering at room temperature by hydrogen doping (HTO), which accelerates the electron extraction from perovskite photoabsorber and reduces charge transfer resistance, resulting in an improved short circuit current density and fill factor. The HTO film with upward shifted Fermi level guarantees a smaller loss on V OC and facilitates the growth of high-quality absorber with much larger grains and more uniform size, leading to devices with negligible hysteresis. In comparison with the pristine TiO 2 prepared without hydrogen doping, the HTO-based device exhibits a substantial performance enhancement leading to an efficiency of 19.30% and more stabilized photovoltaic performance maintaining 93% of its initial value after 300 min continuous illumination in the glove box. These properties permit the room-temperature magnetron sputtered HTO film as a promising electron transport material for flexible and tandem perovskite solar cell in the future.

  9. Effect of hydrogen on passivation quality of SiNx/Si-rich SiNx stacked layers deposited by catalytic chemical vapor deposition on c-Si wafers

    Thi, Trinh Cham; Koyama, Koichi; Ohdaira, Keisuke; Matsumura, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the role of hydrogen content and fixed charges of catalytic chemical vapor deposited (Cat-CVD) SiN x /Si-rich SiN x stacked layers on the quality of crystalline silicon (c-Si) surface passivation. Calculated density of fixed charges is on the order of 10 12 cm −2 , which is high enough for effective field effect passivation. Hydrogen content in the films is also found to contribute significantly to improvement in passivation quality of the stacked layers. Furthermore, Si-rich SiN x films deposited with H 2 dilution show better passivation quality of SiN x /Si-rich SiN x stacked layers than those prepared without H 2 dilution. Effective minority carrier lifetime (τ eff ) in c-Si passivated by SiN x /Si-rich SiN x stacked layers is as high as 5.1 ms when H 2 is added during Si-rich SiN x deposition, which is much higher than the case of using Si-rich SiN x films prepared without H 2 dilution showing τ eff of 3.3 ms. - Highlights: • Passivation mechanism of Si-rich SiN x /SiN x stacked layers is investigated. • H atoms play important role in passivation quality of the stacked layer. • Addition of H 2 gas during Si-rich SiN x film deposition greatly enhances effective minority carrier lifetime (τ eff ). • For a Si-rich SiN x film with refractive index of 2.92, τ eff improves from 3.3 to 5.1 ms by H 2 addition

  10. Initial Screening of Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycles for High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Nuclear Power

    Brown, L.C.; Funk, J.F.; Showalter, S.K.

    1999-01-01

    OAK B188 Initial Screening of Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycles for High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Nuclear Power There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process, nor is such a process available for commercialization. Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, which potentially could replace the fossil fuels used in the transportation sector of our economy. Fossil fuels are polluting and carbon dioxide emissions from their combustion are thought to be responsible for global warming. The purpose of this work is to determine the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear power station. Almost 800 literature references were located which pertain to thermochemical production of hydrogen from water and over 100 thermochemical watersplitting cycles were examined. Using defined criteria and quantifiable metrics, 25 cycles have been selected for more detailed study

  11. High and rapid hydrogen release from thermolysis of ammonia borane near PEM fuel cell operating temperature

    Varma, Arvind; Hwang, Hyun Tae; Al-Kukhun, Ahmad

    2016-11-15

    A system for generating and purifying hydrogen. To generate hydrogen, the system includes inlets configured to receive a hydrogen carrier and an inert insulator, a mixing chamber configured to combine the hydrogen carrier and the inert insulator, a heat exchanger configured to apply heat to the mixture of hydrogen carrier and the inert insulator, wherein the applied heat results in the generation of hydrogen from the hydrogen carrier, and an outlet configured to release the generated hydrogen. To purify hydrogen, the system includes a primary inlet to receive a starting material and an ammonia filtration subassembly, which may include an absorption column configured to absorb the ammonia into water for providing purified hydrogen at a first purity level. The ammonia filtration subassembly may also include an adsorbent member configured to adsorb ammonia from the starting material into an adsorbent for providing purified hydrogen at a second purity level.

  12. Perchlorate reduction by hydrogen autotrophic bacteria and microbial community analysis using high-throughput sequencing.

    Wan, Dongjin; Liu, Yongde; Niu, Zhenhua; Xiao, Shuhu; Li, Daorong

    2016-02-01

    Hydrogen autotrophic reduction of perchlorate have advantages of high removal efficiency and harmless to drinking water. But so far the reported information about the microbial community structure was comparatively limited, changes in the biodiversity and the dominant bacteria during acclimation process required detailed study. In this study, perchlorate-reducing hydrogen autotrophic bacteria were acclimated by hydrogen aeration from activated sludge. For the first time, high-throughput sequencing was applied to analyze changes in biodiversity and the dominant bacteria during acclimation process. The Michaelis-Menten model described the perchlorate reduction kinetics well. Model parameters q(max) and K(s) were 2.521-3.245 (mg ClO4(-)/gVSS h) and 5.44-8.23 (mg/l), respectively. Microbial perchlorate reduction occurred across at pH range 5.0-11.0; removal was highest at pH 9.0. The enriched mixed bacteria could use perchlorate, nitrate and sulfate as electron accepter, and the sequence of preference was: NO3(-) > ClO4(-) > SO4(2-). Compared to the feed culture, biodiversity decreased greatly during acclimation process, the microbial community structure gradually stabilized after 9 acclimation cycles. The Thauera genus related to Rhodocyclales was the dominated perchlorate reducing bacteria (PRB) in the mixed culture.

  13. High effective heterogeneous plasma vortex reactor for production of heat energy and hydrogen

    Belov, N. K.; Zavershinskii, I. P.; Klimov, A. I.; Molevich, N. E.; Porfiriev, D. P.; Tolkunov, B. N.

    2018-03-01

    This work is a continuation of our previous studies [1-10] of physical parameters and properties of a long-lived heterogeneous plasmoid (plasma formation with erosive nanoclusters) created by combined discharge in a high-speed swirl flow. Here interaction of metal nanoclusters with hydrogen atoms is studied in a plasma vortex reactor (PVR) with argon-water steam mixture. Metal nanoclusters were created by nickel cathode’s erosion at combined discharge on. Dissociated hydrogen atoms and ions were obtained in water steam by electric discharge. These hydrogen atoms and ions interacted with metal nanoclusters, which resulted in the creation of a stable plasmoid in a swirl gas flow. This plasmoid has been found to create intensive soft X-ray radiation. Plasma parameters of this plasmoid were measured by optical spectroscopy method. It has been obtained that there is a high non-equilibrium plasmoid: Te > TV >> TR. The measured coefficient of energy performance of this plasmoid is about COP = 2÷10. This extra power release in plasmoid is supposed to be connected with internal excited electrons. The obtained experimental results have proved our suggestion.

  14. Red soil as a regenerable sorbent for high temperature removal of hydrogen sulfide from coal gas

    Ko, T.-H.; Chu Hsin; Lin, H.-P.; Peng, C.-Y.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) was removed from coal gas by red soil under high temperature in a fixed-bed reactor. Red soil powders were collected from the northern, center and southern of Taiwan. They were characterized by XRPD, porosity analysis and DCB chemical analysis. Results show that the greater sulfur content of LP red soils is attributed to the higher free iron oxides and suitable sulfidation temperature is around 773 K. High temperature has a negative effect for use red soil as a desulfurization sorbent due to thermodynamic limitation in a reduction atmosphere. During 10 cycles of regeneration, after the first cycle the red soil remained stable with a breakthrough time between 31 and 36 min. Hydrogen adversely affects sulfidation reaction, whereas CO exhibits a positive effect due to a water-shift reaction. COS was formed during the sulfidation stage and this was attributed to the reaction of H 2 S and CO. Results of XRPD indicated that, hematite is the dominant active species in fresh red soil and iron sulfide (FeS) is a product of the reaction between hematite and hydrogen sulfide in red soils. The spinel phase FeAl 2 O 4 was found during regeneration, moreover, the amount of free iron oxides decreased after regeneration indicating the some of the free iron oxide formed a spinel phase, further reducting the overall desulfurization efficiency

  15. Remarks on the thermochemical production of hydrogen from water using heat from the high temperature reactor

    Barnert, H.

    1980-06-01

    In this report, some aspects of the production of hydrogen from water using heat from the High Temperature Reactor has been studied. These aspects are: the theoretical potential for economic competitivness, the application of hydrogen in the Heat Market, the size of the market potential in the Federal Republic of Germany and the extent of research and development work. In addition another novel proposal for a thermochemical cycle has been studied. For the description of the theoretical potential for economic competitivness, a definition of the 'coupling', has been introduced, which is thermodynamicaly developed; the thermochemical cycle is compared with the thermochemical cycle. Using the coupling, it becomes possible to describe a relation between thermodynamical parameters and the ecomomical basic data of capital costs. Reasons are given from the theoretical point of view for the application of hydrogen as an energy carrier of high exergetic value in the heat market. The discussion of energy problems as 'questions of global survival' leads here to a proposal for the introduction of the term 'extropy'. The market potential in the Federal Republic of Germany is estimated. A further novel proposal for a thermochemical cycle is the 'hydrocarbon-hybrid-process'. The extent of research and development work is explained. (orig.) [de

  16. Fractures in high-strength bolts due to hydrogen induced stress corrosion. Causes and corrective actions

    Hoche, Holger; Oechsner, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Delayed brittle fractures of high-strength bolts of the strength class 10.9 are presented, taking the example of three damage cases. The respective damage mechanisms could be attributed to hydrogen induced stress corrosion which was caused, in turn, by hydrogen absorption during operation. The examples were chosen with a particular focus on the material condition's susceptibility which explains the cause for the occurrence of the damage mechanism. However, in only one of the three cases the susceptibility was evident and could be explained by violations of normative specifications and an unfavorable material choice. Whereas in the two other examples, only slight or no deviations from the standards and/or regulations could be found. The influencing parameters that caused the damage, those that further promoted the damage, as well as possible corrective actions are discussed taking into account the three exemplary damage cases.

  17. Double-side illuminated titania nanotubes for high volume hydrogen generation by water splitting

    Mohapatra, Susanta K.; Mahajan, Vishal K.; Misra, Mano

    2007-11-01

    A sonoelectrochemical anodization method is proposed to synthesize TiO2 nanotubular arrays on both sides of a titanium foil (TiO2/Ti/TiO2). Highly ordered TiO2 nanotubular arrays of 16 cm2 area with uniform surface distribution can be obtained using this anodization procedure. These double-sided TiO2/Ti/TiO2 materials are used as both photoanode (carbon-doped titania nanotubes) and cathode (Pt nanoparticles dispersed on TiO2 nanotubes; PtTiO2/Ti/PtTiO2) in a specially designed photoelectrochemical cell to generate hydrogen by water splitting at a rate of 38 ml h-1. The nanomaterials are characterized by FESEM, HRTEM, STEM, EDS, FFT, SAED and XPS techniques. The present approach can be used for large-scale hydrogen generation using renewable energy sources.

  18. Investigation of cryogenic hydrogen storage on high surface area activated carbon. Equilibrium and dynamics

    Paggiaro, Ricardo Gaspar

    2008-11-29

    This thesis investigates cryo-adsorptive systems for hydrogen storage for mobile applications. By means of macroscopic and microscopic balance models, an extensive analysis is carried out, including among others the investigation of the thermal effects during high-pressure system filling, venting losses during normal operation and inactivity, time-course of system pressure and temperature and gas delivery under various operating conditions. Model results were compared with experimental data, good agreement was obtained. The analysis also includes a comparison to other storage technologies such as cryo-compressed gas and liquefaction storage. The results show that cryo-adsorptive systems have storage characteristics comparable to compressed gas systems, but at a much lower pressure. They are also energetically more efficient than liquid hydrogen systems. However, the necessity of cryotemperatures and thermal management during operation and filling might limit their application. (orig.)

  19. The effects of H sub 2 addition on the enhanced deposition rate and high quality Cu films by MOCVD

    Lee, J H; Park, S J; Choi, S Y

    1998-01-01

    High-quality Cu thin films were deposited on the TiN/Si substrate from the hexafluoroacetylacetonate Copper thrmethylvinylsilane [Cu (hfac) (tmvs)] source using a metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique. The optimum deposition condition is with a substrate temperature of 200 .deg. C and the hydrogen flow rate of 80 sccm. The deposition rate, electrical resistivity, surface morphology, grain size, and optical properties of the deposited Cu films were investigated by the AES, four-point probe, SEM, XRD, and the visible spectrophotometer as a function of hydrogen gas flow rate, The results indicated that additional hydrogen gas affects the CVD hydrogen reduction reaction improving the purity, deposition rate, and electrical resistivity of Cu thin films. A prospective idea will be discussed for the preparation of Cu thin films showing a more enhanced electromigration resistance applicable to the next-generation interconnection.

  20. High-temperature hydrogen-air-steam detonation experiments in the BNL small-scale development apparatus

    Ciccarelli, G.; Ginsburg, T.; Boccio, J.; Economos, C.; Finfrock, C.; Gerlach, L.; Sato, K.; Kinoshita, M.

    1994-08-01

    The Small-Scale Development Apparatus (SSDA) was constructed to provide a preliminary set of experimental data to characterize the effect of temperature on the ability of hydrogen-air-steam mixtures to undergo detonations and, equally important, to support design of the larger scale High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) by providing a test bed for solution of a number of high-temperature design and operational problems. The SSDA, the central element of which is a 10-cm inside diameter, 6.1-m long tubular test vessel designed to permit detonation experiments at temperatures up to 700K, was employed to study self-sustained detonations in gaseous mixtures of hydrogen, air, and steam at temperatures between 300K and 650K at a fixed initial pressure of 0.1 MPa. Hydrogen-air mixtures with hydrogen composition from 9 to 60 percent by volume and steam fractions up to 35 percent by volume were studied for stoichiometric hydrogen-air-steam mixtures. Detonation cell size measurements provide clear evidence that the effect of hydrogen-air gas mixture temperature, in the range 300K-650K, is to decrease cell size and, hence, to increase the sensitivity of the mixture to undergo detonations. The effect of steam content, at any given temperature, is to increase the cell size and, thereby, to decrease the sensitivity of stoichiometric hydrogen-air mixtures. The hydrogen-air detonability limits for the 10-cm inside diameter SSDA test vessel, based upon the onset of single-head spin, decreased from 15 percent hydrogen at 300K down to between 9 and 10 percent hydrogen at 650K. The one-dimensional ZND model does a very good job at predicting the overall trends in the cell size data over the range of hydrogen-air-steam mixture compositions and temperature studied in the experiments

  1. The hydrogen mine introduction initiative

    Betournay, M.C.; Howell, B. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). CANMET Mining and Mineral Sciences Laboratories

    2009-07-01

    In an effort to address air quality concerns in underground mines, the mining industry is considering the use fuel cells instead of diesel to power mine production vehicles. The immediate issues and opportunities associated with fuel cells use include a reduction in harmful greenhouse gas emissions; reduction in ventilation operating costs; reduction in energy consumption; improved health benefits; automation; and high productivity. The objective of the hydrogen mine introduction initiative (HMII) is to develop and test the range of fundamental and needed operational technology, specifications and best practices for underground hydrogen power applications. Although proof of concept studies have shown high potential for fuel cell use, safety considerations must be addressed, including hydrogen behaviour in confined conditions. This presentation highlighted the issues to meet operational requirements, notably hydrogen production; delivery and storage; mine regulations; and hydrogen behaviour underground. tabs., figs.

  2. SCC growth behavior of stainless steel weld heat-affected zone in hydrogenated high temperature water

    Yamada, Takuyo; Terachi, Takumi; Miyamoto, Tomoki; Arioka, Koji

    2010-01-01

    It is known that the SCC growth rate of stainless steels in high-temperature water is accelerated by cold-work (CW). The weld heat-affected-zone (HAZ) of stainless steels is also deformed by weld shrinkage. However, only little have been reported on the SCC growth of weld HAZ of SUS316 and SUS304 in hydrogenated high-temperature water. Thus, in this present study, SCC growth experiments were performed using weld HAZ of stainless steels, especially to obtain data on the dependence of SCC growth on (1) temperature and (2) hardness in hydrogenated water at temperatures from 250degC to 340degC. And then, the SCC growth behaviors were compared between weld HAZ and CW stainless steels. The following results have been obtained. Significant SCC growth were observed in weld HAZ (SUS316 and SUS304) in hydrogenated water at 320degC. The SCC growth rates of the HAZ are similar to that of 10% CW non-sensitized SUS316, in accordance with that the hardness of weld HAZ is also similar to that of 10% CW SUS316. Temperature dependency of SCC growth of weld HAZ (SUS316 and SUS304) is also similar to that of 10% CW non-sensitized SUS316. That is, no significant SCC were observed in the weld HAZ (SUS316 and SUS304) in hydrogenated water at 340degC. This suggests that SCC growth behaviors of weld HAZ and CW stainless steels are similar and correlated with the hardness or yield strength of the materials, at least in non-sensitized regions. And the similar temperature dependence between the HAZ and CW stainless steels suggests that the SCC growth behaviors are also attributed to the common mechanism. (author)

  3. On-line hydrogen-isotope measurements of organic samples using elemental chromium: An extension for high temperature elemental-analyzer techniques

    Gehre, Matthias; Renpenning, Julian; Gilevska, Tetyana; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.; Meijer, Harro A.J.; Brand, Willi A.; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2015-01-01

    The high temperature conversion (HTC) technique using an elemental analyzer with a glassy carbon tube and filling (temperature conversion/elemental analysis, TC/EA) is a widely used method for hydrogen isotopic analysis of water and many solid and liquid organic samples with analysis by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). However, the TC/EA IRMS method may produce inaccurate δ2H results, with values deviating by more than 20 mUr (milliurey = 0.001 = 1‰) from the true value for some materials. We show that a single-oven, chromium-filled elemental analyzer coupled to an IRMS substantially improves the measurement quality and reliability for hydrogen isotopic compositions of organic substances (Cr-EA method). Hot chromium maximizes the yield of molecular hydrogen in a helium carrier gas by irreversibly and quantitatively scavenging all reactive elements except hydrogen. In contrast, under TC/EA conditions, heteroelements like nitrogen or chlorine (and other halogens) can form hydrogen cyanide (HCN) or hydrogen chloride (HCl) and this can cause isotopic fractionation. The Cr-EA technique thus expands the analytical possibilities for on-line hydrogen-isotope measurements of organic samples significantly. This method yielded reproducibility values (1-sigma) for δ2H measurements on water and caffeine samples of better than 1.0 and 0.5 mUr, respectively. To overcome handling problems with water as the principal calibration anchor for hydrogen isotopic measurements, we have employed an effective and simple strategy using reference waters or other liquids sealed in silver-tube segments. These crimped silver tubes can be employed in both the Cr-EA and TC/EA techniques. They simplify considerably the normalization of hydrogen-isotope measurement data to the VSMOW-SLAP (Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water-Standard Light Antarctic Precipitation) scale, and their use improves accuracy of the data by eliminating evaporative loss and associated isotopic fractionation while

  4. On-line hydrogen-isotope measurements of organic samples using elemental chromium: an extension for high temperature elemental-analyzer techniques.

    Gehre, Matthias; Renpenning, Julian; Gilevska, Tetyana; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B; Meijer, Harro A J; Brand, Willi A; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2015-01-01

    The high temperature conversion (HTC) technique using an elemental analyzer with a glassy carbon tube and filling (temperature conversion/elemental analysis, TC/EA) is a widely used method for hydrogen isotopic analysis of water and many solid and liquid organic samples with analysis by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). However, the TC/EA IRMS method may produce inaccurate δ(2)H results, with values deviating by more than 20 mUr (milliurey = 0.001 = 1‰) from the true value for some materials. We show that a single-oven, chromium-filled elemental analyzer coupled to an IRMS substantially improves the measurement quality and reliability for hydrogen isotopic compositions of organic substances (Cr-EA method). Hot chromium maximizes the yield of molecular hydrogen in a helium carrier gas by irreversibly and quantitatively scavenging all reactive elements except hydrogen. In contrast, under TC/EA conditions, heteroelements like nitrogen or chlorine (and other halogens) can form hydrogen cyanide (HCN) or hydrogen chloride (HCl) and this can cause isotopic fractionation. The Cr-EA technique thus expands the analytical possibilities for on-line hydrogen-isotope measurements of organic samples significantly. This method yielded reproducibility values (1-sigma) for δ(2)H measurements on water and caffeine samples of better than 1.0 and 0.5 mUr, respectively. To overcome handling problems with water as the principal calibration anchor for hydrogen isotopic measurements, we have employed an effective and simple strategy using reference waters or other liquids sealed in silver-tube segments. These crimped silver tubes can be employed in both the Cr-EA and TC/EA techniques. They simplify considerably the normalization of hydrogen-isotope measurement data to the VSMOW-SLAP (Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water-Standard Light Antarctic Precipitation) scale, and their use improves accuracy of the data by eliminating evaporative loss and associated isotopic fractionation while

  5. Hydrogen production through high-temperature electrolysis in a solid oxide cell

    Herring, J.St.; Lessing, P.; O'Brien, J.E.; Stoots, C.; Hartvigsen, J.; Elangovan, S.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental research programme is being conducted by the INEEL and Ceramatec, Inc., to test the high-temperature, electrolytic production of hydrogen from steam using a solid oxide cell. The research team is designing and testing solid oxide cells for operation in the electrolysis mode, producing hydrogen rising a high-temperature heat and electrical energy. The high-temperature heat and the electrical power would be supplied simultaneously by a high-temperature nuclear reactor. Operation at high temperature reduces the electrical energy requirement for electrolysis and also increases the thermal efficiency of the power-generating cycle. The high-temperature electrolysis process will utilize heat from a specialized secondary loop carrying a steam/hydrogen mixture. It is expected that, through the combination of a high-temperature reactor and high-temperature electrolysis, the process will achieve an overall thermal conversion efficiency of 40 to 50%o while avoiding the challenging chemistry and corrosion issues associated with the thermochemical processes. Planar solid oxide cell technology is being utilised because it has the best potential for high efficiency due to minimized voltage and current losses. These losses also decrease with increasing temperature. Initial testing has determined the performance of single 'button' cells. Subsequent testing will investigate the performance of multiple-cell stacks operating in the electrolysis mode. Testing is being performed both at Ceramatec and at INEEL. The first cells to be tested were single cells based on existing materials and fabrication technology developed at Ceramatec for production of solid oxide fuel cells. These cells use a relatively thick (∼ 175 μm) electrolyte of yttria- or scandia-stabilised zirconia, with nickel-zirconia cermet anodes and strontium-doped lanthanum manganite cathodes. Additional custom cells with lanthanum gallate electrolyte have been developed and tested. Results to date have

  6. Hydrogen safety

    Frazier, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA experience with hydrogen began in the 1950s when the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics (NACA) research on rocket fuels was inherited by the newly formed National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Initial emphasis on the use of hydrogen as a fuel for high-altitude probes, satellites, and aircraft limited the available data on hydrogen hazards to small quantities of hydrogen. NASA began to use hydrogen as the principal liquid propellant for launch vehicles and quickly determined the need for hydrogen safety documentation to support design and operational requirements. The resulting NASA approach to hydrogen safety requires a joint effort by design and safety engineering to address hydrogen hazards and develop procedures for safe operation of equipment and facilities. NASA also determined the need for rigorous training and certification programs for personnel involved with hydrogen use. NASA's current use of hydrogen is mainly for large heavy-lift vehicle propulsion, which necessitates storage of large quantities for fueling space shots and for testing. Future use will involve new applications such as thermal imaging

  7. Performance of CVD and CVR coated carbon-carbon in high temperature hydrogen

    Adams, J. W.; Barletta, R. E.; Svandrlik, J.; Vanier, P. E.

    As a part of the component development process for the particle bed reactor (PBR), it is necessary to develop coatings which will be time and temperature stable at extremely high temperatures in flowing hydrogen. These coatings must protect the underlying carbon structure from attack by the hydrogen coolant. Degradation which causes small changes in the reactor component, e.g. hole diameter in the hot frit, can have a profound effect on operation. The ability of a component to withstand repeated temperature cycles is also a coating development issue. Coatings which crack or spall under these conditions would be unacceptable. While refractory carbides appear to be the coating material of choice for carbon substrates being used in PBR components, the method of applying these coatings can have a large effect on their performance. Two deposition processes for these refractory carbides, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and chemical vapor reaction (CVR), have been evaluated. Screening tests for these coatings consisted of testing of coated 2-D and 3-D weave carbon-carbon in flowing hot hydrogen at one atmosphere. Carbon loss from these samples was measured as a function of time. Exposure temperatures up to 3,000 K were used, and samples were exposed in a cyclical fashion cooling to room temperature between exposures. The results of these measurements are presented along with an evaluation of the relative merits of CVR and CVD coatings for this application.

  8. Hydrogen extraction from Pb-17Li: results with a 800 mm high packed column

    Alpy, N.; Terlain, A.; Lorentz, V.

    2000-01-01

    Within the framework of the studies carried out for the development of a gas-liquid alloy contactor for the extraction of hydrogen from Pb-17Li, the behaviour of a 800 mm high packed column has been investigated on the Melodie loop. The previous contactor technology, a structured packing supplied by the Sulzer Company, has been retained since it had shown satisfying efficiency, likely due to the beneficial effect, on the mass transfer, of the liquid flow division that it involves. The best results of the present study have been achieved via a reduction of the liquid load on the packing: an efficiency of up to 30% was reached at 673 K for an inlet hydrogen pressure in Pb-17Li of 1000 Pa. The impact of the hydrogen pressure in the inlet Pb-17Li flow and on the extraction efficiency has been experimentally assessed: this study allowed us to evaluate the potential of the process in terms of packing height. Finally, a future experimental facility, which should allow us to observe the hydraulic behaviour of liquid mercury (simulating Pb-17Li) on the packing is presented

  9. Catalytic processing of high-sulfur fuels for distributed hydrogen production

    Muradov, Nazim; Ramasamy, Karthik; Huang, Cunping; T-Raissi, Ali [Central Florida Univ., FL (United States)

    2010-07-01

    In this work, the development of a new on-demand hydrogen production technology is reported. In this process, a liquid hydrocarbon fuel (e.g., high-S diesel) is first catalytically pre-reformed to shorter chain gaseous hydrocarbons (predominantly, C{sub 1}-C{sub 3}) before being directed to the steam reformer, where it is converted to syngas and then to high-purity hydrogen. In the pre-reformer, most sulfurous species present in the fuel are catalytically converted to H{sub 2}S. In the desulfurization unit, H{sub 2}S is scrubbed and converted to H{sub 2} and elemental sulfur. Desulfurization of the pre-reformate gas is carried out in a special regenerative redox system, which includes Fe(II)/Fe(III)-containing aqueous phase scrubber coupled with an electrolyzer. The integrated pre-reformer/scrubber/electrolyzer unit operated successfully on high-S diesel fuel for more than 100 hours meeting the required desulfurization target of >95 % sulfur removal. (orig.)

  10. Ensuring High-Quality Learning for All

    Núñez, Elsa M.

    2018-01-01

    The Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) has embarked on a sustained program to enhance the quality of student learning on campuses, while also supporting AAC&U members' efforts to bring liberal education to all sectors of society. This commitment to quality and equity in service to democracy forms the basis for…

  11. Comparison of hydrogenated vegetable shortening and nutritionally complete high fat diet on limited access-binge behavior in rats

    Davis, Jon F.; Melhorn, Susan J.; Heiman, Justin U.; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Clegg, Deborah J.; Benoit, Stephen C.

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that intermittent exposure to hydrogenated vegetable shortening yields a binge/compensate pattern of feeding in rats. The present study was designed to assess whether rats would exhibit similar patterns of intake when given intermittent access to a nutritionally complete high-fat diet. Four groups of rats received varying exposure to either hydrogenated vegetable shortening or high-fat diet for 8 consecutive weeks. Animals were given daily and intermittent acce...

  12. Diffractive Photon Dissociation in a High Pressure Hydrogen Time Projection Chamber

    Snow, Gregory Roy [Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    1983-11-01

    We have performed an experiment at the Tagged Photon Facility of Fermilab to study the diffraction dissociation of high energy photons on hydrogen y + p -+ x + p in the region 0.02 < $\\mid t \\mid$ < 0.1 $(GeV/c)^2$, $M_x$ $^2/s$ < 0.1. In this process, incident photons whose energies range from 70 to 140 GeV transform coherently to massive hadronic states in the mass range M < 5 GeV/c 2 • x We measure the inclusive differential cross section$\\frac{d^20}{dt dM_x ^2}$) The behavior of this cross section, especially when compared to the corresponding cross sections for the diffraction dissociation of incident hadrons (pions, kaons, and protons), reveals some fundamental characteristics of photon hadronic interactions. We use the Recoil Technique to determine the missing mass, $M_x$, and the square of the 4-momentum transfer, t. The recoil detector, TREAD, is a cylindrical time projection chamber filled with high pressure hydrogen gas which serves both as the target and as the drift medium for the ionization track created by recoil protons. The ionization drifts up to 75 cm in a high axial electric field. Concentric sense wires mounted on endplates sample different parts of the track, yielding the polar angle of the recoil. The energy of the recoil is determined by stopping the proton in scintillation counters located inside the high pressure vessel....

  13. Electron-capture cross sections for low-energy highly charged neon and argon ions from molecular and atomic hydrogen

    Can, C.; Gray, T.J.; Varghese, S.L.; Hall, J.M.; Tunnell, L.N.

    1985-01-01

    Electron-capture cross sections for low-velocity (10 6 --10 7 cm/s) highly charged Ne/sup q/+ (2< or =q< or =7) and Ar/sup q/+ (2< or =q< or =10)= projectiles incident on molecular- and atomic-hydrogen targets have been measured. A recoil-ion source that used the collisions of fast heavy ions (1 MeV/amu) with target gas atoms was utilized to produce slow highly charged ions. Atomic hydrogen was produced by dissociating hydrogen molecules in a high-temperature oven. Measurements and analysis of the data for molecular- and atomic-hydrogen targets are discussed in detail. The measured absolute cross sections are compared with published data and predictions of theoretical models

  14. Economic Analysis of the Reference Design for a Nuclear-Driven High-Temperature-Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

    2008-01-01

    A reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production was developed to provide a basis for comparing the HTE concept with other hydrogen production concepts. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540 C and 900 C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen consists of 4,009,177 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. A nominal cell area-specific resistance, ASR, value of 0.4 Ohm-cm2 with a current density of 0.25 A/cm2 was used, and isothermal boundary conditions were assumed. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The alternating current, AC, to direct current, DC, conversion is 96%. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the low heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.12% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.356 kg/s. An economic analysis of the plant was also performed using the H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. A required cost of $3.23 per kg of hydrogen produced was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10%. Approximately 73% of this cost ($2.36/kg) is the result of capital costs associated with

  15. Hydrogen Embrittlement

    Woods, Stephen; Lee, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    hydrogen embrittlement. The effects of hydrogen gas on mechanical properties such as tensile strength, ductility, fracture, low and high cycle fatigue, crack growth rate, and creep rupture are analyzed with respect to the general trends established from the HEE index values. It is observed that the severity of HE effects is also influenced by environmental factors such as pressure, temperature, and hydrogen gas purity. The severity of HE effects is also influenced by material factors such as surface finish, heat treatment, and product forms, compositions, grain direction, and crystal orientations.

  16. Materials for high-temperature hydrogen fluorine environments. Final report, June 1976-December 1978

    Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Kovach, L.

    1981-03-01

    A determination has been made of the stability of 35 materials under high-temperature, fluorine rich, hydrogen fluoride torch testing. Refractory materials tested included 4 borides, 3 carbides, 3 nitrides, 12 oxides, 1 oxynitride, 1 sulfide, 10 metals, and carbon (10 types). Three materials distinctly performed better than nickel: lanthanum hexaboride, calcium hexaboride, and lanthanum silicon oxynitride. Of these, lanthanum hexaboride is the best candidate tested since it has an estimated upper use temperature > 1726 K, which is above the melting point and more than 300 K above the upper use temperature of nickel

  17. Quasi-two-dimensional metallic hydrogen in diphosphide at a high pressure

    Degtyarenko, N. N.; Mazur, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    The structural, electronic, phonon, and other characteristics of the normal phases of phosphorus hydrides with stoichiometry PH k are analyzed. The properties of the initial substance, namely, diphosphine are calculated. In contrast to phosphorus hydrides with stoichiometry PH 3 , a quasi-two-dimensional phosphorus-stabilized lattice of metallic hydrogen can be formed in this substance during hydrostatic compression at a high pressure. The formed structure with H–P–H elements is shown to be locally stable in phonon spectrum, i.e., to be metastable. The properties of diphosphine are compared with the properties of similar structures of sulfur hydrides.

  18. Quasi-two-dimensional metallic hydrogen inside di-phosphide at high pressure

    Degtyarenko, N N; Mazur, E A

    2016-01-01

    The method of mathematical modelling was used for the calculation of the structural, electronic, phononic, and other characteristics of various normal phases of phosphorus hydrides with stoichiometry PH k . It was shown that the di-phosphine may form 2D lattice of the metallic hydrogen in it, stabilized by phosphorus atoms under high hydrostatic pressure. The resulting structure with the elements of H-P-H has a locally stable (or metastable) phonon spectrum. The properties of di-phosphine were compared with the properties of similar structures such as the sulphur hydrides. (paper)

  19. Two-dimensional gold nanostructures with high activity for selective oxidation of carbon–hydrogen bonds

    Wang, Liang

    2015-04-22

    Efficient synthesis of stable two-dimensional (2D) noble metal catalysts is a challenging topic. Here we report the facile synthesis of 2D gold nanosheets via a wet chemistry method, by using layered double hydroxide as the template. Detailed characterization with electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates that the nanosheets are negatively charged and [001] oriented with thicknesses varying from single to a few atomic layers. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals unusually low gold–gold coordination numbers. These gold nanosheets exhibit high catalytic activity and stability in the solvent-free selective oxidation of carbon–hydrogen bonds with molecular oxygen.

  20. Two-dimensional gold nanostructures with high activity for selective oxidation of carbon-hydrogen bonds

    Wang, Liang; Zhu, Yihan; Wang, Jian-Qiang; Liu, Fudong; Huang, Jianfeng; Meng, Xiangju; Basset, Jean-Marie; Han, Yu; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2015-04-01

    Efficient synthesis of stable two-dimensional (2D) noble metal catalysts is a challenging topic. Here we report the facile synthesis of 2D gold nanosheets via a wet chemistry method, by using layered double hydroxide as the template. Detailed characterization with electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates that the nanosheets are negatively charged and [001] oriented with thicknesses varying from single to a few atomic layers. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals unusually low gold-gold coordination numbers. These gold nanosheets exhibit high catalytic activity and stability in the solvent-free selective oxidation of carbon-hydrogen bonds with molecular oxygen.

  1. Quasi-two-dimensional metallic hydrogen in diphosphide at a high pressure

    Degtyarenko, N. N.; Mazur, E. A., E-mail: eugen-mazur@mail.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    The structural, electronic, phonon, and other characteristics of the normal phases of phosphorus hydrides with stoichiometry PH{sub k} are analyzed. The properties of the initial substance, namely, diphosphine are calculated. In contrast to phosphorus hydrides with stoichiometry PH{sub 3}, a quasi-two-dimensional phosphorus-stabilized lattice of metallic hydrogen can be formed in this substance during hydrostatic compression at a high pressure. The formed structure with H–P–H elements is shown to be locally stable in phonon spectrum, i.e., to be metastable. The properties of diphosphine are compared with the properties of similar structures of sulfur hydrides.

  2. Materials for high-temperature hydrogen fluorine environments. Final report, June 1976-December 1978

    Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Kovach, L.

    1981-03-01

    A determination has been made of the stability of 35 materials under high-temperature, fluorine rich, hydrogen fluoride torch testing. Refractory materials tested included 4 borides, 3 carbides, 3 nitrides, 12 oxides, 1 oxynitride, 1 sulfide, 10 metals, and carbon (10 types). Three materials distinctly performed better than nickel: lanthanum hexaboride, calcium hexaboride, and lanthanum silicon oxynitride. Of these, lanthanum hexaboride is the best candidate tested since it has an estimated upper use temperature > 1726 K, which is above the melting point and more than 300 K above the upper use temperature of nickel.

  3. Mechanical ball-milling preparation of fullerene/cobalt core/shell nanocomposites with high electrochemical hydrogen storage ability.

    Bao, Di; Gao, Peng; Shen, Xiande; Chang, Cheng; Wang, Longqiang; Wang, Ying; Chen, Yujin; Zhou, Xiaoming; Sun, Shuchao; Li, Guobao; Yang, Piaoping

    2014-02-26

    The design and synthesis of new hydrogen storage nanomaterials with high capacity at low cost is extremely desirable but remains challenging for today's development of hydrogen economy. Because of the special honeycomb structures and excellent physical and chemical characters, fullerenes have been extensively considered as ideal materials for hydrogen storage materials. To take the most advantage of its distinctive symmetrical carbon cage structure, we have uniformly coated C60's surface with metal cobalt in nanoscale to form a core/shell structure through a simple ball-milling process in this work. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), Raman spectra, high-solution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX) elemental mappings, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements have been conducted to evaluate the size and the composition of the composites. In addition, the blue shift of C60 pentagonal pinch mode demonstrates the formation of Co-C chemical bond, and which enhances the stability of the as-obtained nanocomposites. And their electrochemical experimental results demonstrate that the as-obtained C60/Co composites have excellent electrochemical hydrogen storage cycle reversibility and considerably high hydrogen storage capacities of 907 mAh/g (3.32 wt % hydrogen) under room temperature and ambient pressure, which is very close to the theoretical hydrogen storage capacities of individual metal Co (3.33 wt % hydrogen). Furthermore, their hydrogen storage processes and the mechanism have also been investigated, in which the quasi-reversible C60/Co↔C60/Co-Hx reaction is the dominant cycle process.

  4. Influence of cold deformation and annealing on hydrogen embrittlement of cold hardening bainitic steel for high strength bolts

    Hui, Weijun, E-mail: wjhui@bjtu.edu.cn [School of Mechanical, Electronic and Control Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Zhang, Yongjian; Zhao, Xiaoli; Shao, Chengwei [School of Mechanical, Electronic and Control Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Wang, Kaizhong; Sun, Wei; Yu, Tongren [Technical Center, Maanshan Iron & Steel Co., Ltd., Maanshan 243002, Anhui (China)

    2016-04-26

    The influence of cold drawing and annealing on hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of newly developed cold hardening bainitic steel was investigated by using slow strain rate testing (SSRT) and thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS), for ensuring safety performance of 10.9 class high strength bolts made of this kind of steel against HE under service environments. Hydrogen was introduced into the specimen by electrochemical charging. TDS analysis shows that the hydrogen-charged cold drawn specimen exhibits an additional low-temperature hydrogen desorption peak besides the original high-temperature desorption peak of the as-rolled specimen, causing remarkable increase of absorbed hydrogen content. It is found that cold drawing significantly enhances the susceptibility to HE, which is mainly attributed to remarkable increase of diffusible hydrogen absorption, the occurrence of strain-induced martensite as well as the increase of strength level. Annealing after cold deformation is an effective way to improve HE resistance and this improvement strongly depends on annealing temperature, i.e. HE susceptibility decreases slightly with increasing annealing temperature up to 200 °C and then decreases significantly with further increasing annealing temperature. This phenomenon is explained by the release of hydrogen, the recovery of cold worked microstructure and the decrease of strength with increasing annealing temperature.

  5. Very High Efficiency Reactor (VHER) Concepts for Electrical Power Generation and Hydrogen Production

    PARMA JR, EDWARD J.; PICKARD, PAUL S.; SUO-ANTTILA, AHTI JORMA

    2003-01-01

    The goal of the Very High Efficiency Reactor study was to develop and analyze concepts for the next generation of nuclear power reactors. The next generation power reactor should be cost effective compared to current power generation plant, passively safe, and proliferation-resistant. High-temperature reactor systems allow higher electrical generating efficiencies and high-temperature process heat applications, such as thermo-chemical hydrogen production. The study focused on three concepts; one using molten salt coolant with a prismatic fuel-element geometry, the other two using high-pressure helium coolant with a prismatic fuel-element geometry and a fuel-pebble element design. Peak operating temperatures, passive-safety, decay heat removal, criticality, burnup, reactivity coefficients, and material issues were analyzed to determine the technical feasibility of each concept

  6. Rhodium Nanoparticle-mesoporous Silicon Nanowire Nanohybrids for Hydrogen Peroxide Detection with High Selectivity

    Song, Zhiqian; Chang, Hucheng; Zhu, Weiqin; Xu, Chenlong; Feng, Xinjian

    2015-01-01

    Developing nanostructured electrocatalysts, with low overpotential, high selectivity and activity has fundamental and technical importance in many fields. We report here rhodium nanoparticle and mesoporous silicon nanowire (RhNP@mSiNW) hybrids for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) detection with high electrocatalytic activity and selectivity. By employing electrodes that loaded with RhNP@mSiNW nanohybrids, interference caused from both many electroactive substances and dissolved oxygen were eliminated by electrochemical assaying at an optimal potential of +75 mV. Furthermore, the electrodes exhibited a high detection sensitivity of 0.53 μA/mM and fast response (< 5 s). This high-performance nanohybrid electrocatalyst has great potential for future practical application in various oxidase-base biosensors. PMID:25588953

  7. Line profiles of hydrogenic ions from high-temperature and high-density plasmas

    Hou Qing; Li Jianming

    1991-01-01

    Applying the Hooper's first-order theory, the authors calculate the static micro-electric field distributions in plasmas containing various multiply-charged ions. The influences of the impurity concentrations on the micro electric field distributions and on the Lyman profiles (n→1) from hydrogenic ions are analysed. Based on the optical-thin line profiles, the radiation transfer equation in sphere plasmas with various optical depths is solved. The results confirm that the opacity-broadening of the line profiles has almost no effect on the separation of Lyman β splitted peaks. Such separation is determined by electric field at which the static micro-electric field distribution has a maximum. The separation can be utilized for spatially resolved and temporally resolved density diagnostic of fusion plasmas

  8. Hydrogen bond based smart polymer for highly selective and tunable capture of multiply phosphorylated peptides.

    Qing, Guangyan; Lu, Qi; Li, Xiuling; Liu, Jing; Ye, Mingliang; Liang, Xinmiao; Sun, Taolei

    2017-09-06

    Multisite phosphorylation is an important and common mechanism for finely regulating protein functions and subsequent cellular responses. However, this study is largely restricted by the difficulty to capture low-abundance multiply phosphorylated peptides (MPPs) from complex biosamples owing to the limitation of enrichment materials and their interactions with phosphates. Here we show that smart polymer can serve as an ideal platform to resolve this challenge. Driven by specific but tunable hydrogen bonding interactions, the smart polymer displays differential complexation with MPPs, singly phosphorylated and non-modified peptides. Importantly, MPP binding can be modulated conveniently and precisely by solution conditions, resulting in highly controllable MPP adsorption on material surface. This facilitates excellent performance in MPP enrichment and separation from model proteins and real biosamples. High enrichment selectivity and coverage, extraordinary adsorption capacities and recovery towards MPPs, as well as high discovery rates of unique phosphorylation sites, suggest its great potential in phosphoproteomics studies.Capture of low-abundance multiply phosphorylated peptides (MPPs) is difficult due to limitation of enrichment materials and their interactions with phosphates. Here the authors show, a smart polymer driven by specific but tunable hydrogen bonding interactions can differentially complex with MPPs, singly phosphorylated and non-modified peptides.

  9. Highly efficient and stable MoP-RGO nanoparticles as electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution

    Wu, Zexing; Wang, Jie; Zhu, Jing; Guo, Junpo; Xiao, Weiping; Xuan, Cuijuan; Lei, Wen; Wang, Deli

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Graphene supported MoP (MoP-RGO) was synthesized through a facile solvothermal reaction followed by high-temperature phosphating treatment method. The material exhibits an outstanding HER performance in both acid and alkaline media. RGO act as a substrate which can not only avoid the nanoparticles aggregation, but also facilitate the electron transfer during the electrocatalytic process. - Abstract: Electrochemical splitting of water to obtain hydrogen plays a vital role in high energy density devices, especially for fuel cells. In this work, reduced graphene oxide supported molybdenum phosphide nanoparticles (MoP-RGO) were prepared via a facile solvothermal reaction followed by high-temperature phosphating treatment. The electrochemical measurement results indicate that the MoP-RGO nanocomposite obtained at 900 °C exhibits excellent electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) with overpotentials of 117 mV and 150 mV at a current density of 10 mA cm"−"2 in acid and alkaline media, respectively. Furthermore, the instability of the catalyst in basic medium was systemically investigated. This work provides a facile strategy for the synthesis of cost-effective carbon supported metal phosphide as HER electrocatalyst.

  10. High strength films from oriented, hydrogen-bonded "graphamid" 2D polymer molecular ensembles.

    Sandoz-Rosado, Emil; Beaudet, Todd D; Andzelm, Jan W; Wetzel, Eric D

    2018-02-27

    The linear polymer poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide), better known by its tradename Kevlar, is an icon of modern materials science due to its remarkable strength, stiffness, and environmental resistance. Here, we propose a new two-dimensional (2D) polymer, "graphamid", that closely resembles Kevlar in chemical structure, but is mechanically advantaged by virtue of its 2D structure. Using atomistic calculations, we show that graphamid comprises covalently-bonded sheets bridged by a high population of strong intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Molecular and micromechanical calculations predict that these strong intermolecular interactions allow stiff, high strength (6-8 GPa), and tough films from ensembles of finite graphamid molecules. In contrast, traditional 2D materials like graphene have weak intermolecular interactions, leading to ensembles of low strength (0.1-0.5 GPa) and brittle fracture behavior. These results suggest that hydrogen-bonded 2D polymers like graphamid would be transformative in enabling scalable, lightweight, high performance polymer films of unprecedented mechanical performance.

  11. High Efficiency, Illumination Quality OLEDs for Lighting

    Joseph Shiang; James Cella; Kelly Chichak; Anil Duggal; Kevin Janora; Chris Heller; Gautam Parthasarathy; Jeffery Youmans; Joseph Shiang

    2008-03-31

    The goal of the program was to demonstrate a 45 lumen per watt white light device based upon the use of multiple emission colors through the use of solution processing. This performance level is a dramatic extension of the team's previous 15 LPW large area illumination device. The fundamental material system was based upon commercial polymer materials. The team was largely able to achieve these goals, and was able to deliver to DOE a 90 lumen illumination source that had an average performance of 34 LPW a 1000 cd/m{sup 2} with peak performances near 40LPW. The average color temperature is 3200K and the calculated CRI 85. The device operated at a brightness of approximately 1000cd/m{sup 2}. The use of multiple emission colors particularly red and blue, provided additional degrees of design flexibility in achieving white light, but also required the use of a multilayered structure to separate the different recombination zones and prevent interconversion of blue emission to red emission. The use of commercial materials had the advantage that improvements by the chemical manufacturers in charge transport efficiency, operating life and material purity could be rapidly incorporated without the expenditure of additional effort. The program was designed to take maximum advantage of the known characteristics of these material and proceeded in seven steps. (1) Identify the most promising materials, (2) assemble them into multi-layer structures to control excitation and transport within the OLED, (3) identify materials development needs that would optimize performance within multilayer structures, (4) build a prototype that demonstrates the potential entitlement of the novel multilayer OLED architecture (5) integrate all of the developments to find the single best materials set to implement the novel multilayer architecture, (6) further optimize the best materials set, (7) make a large area high illumination quality white OLED. A photo of the final deliverable is shown

  12. Active Edge Sites Engineering in Nickel Cobalt Selenide Solid Solutions for Highly Efficient Hydrogen Evolution

    Xia, Chuan; Liang, Hanfeng; Zhu, Jiajie; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2017-01-01

    free energy for atomic hydrogen adsorption in NiCoSe, identified by temperature-dependent conductivities and density functional theory calculations, the authors have achieved unprecedented fast hydrogen evolution kinetics, approaching that of Pt

  13. Role of vanadium carbide traps in reducing the hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of high strength alloy steels. Final report

    Spencer, G.L.; Duquette, D.J.

    1998-08-01

    High strength alloy steels typically used for gun steel were investigated to determine their susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. Although AISI grade 4340 was quite susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement, ASTM A723 steel, which has identical mechanical properties but slightly different chemistries, was not susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement when exposed to the same conditions. The degree of embrittlement was determined by conducting notched tensile testing on uncharged and cathodically charged specimens. Chemical composition was modified to isolate the effect of alloying elements on hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility. Two steels-Modified A723 (C increased from 0.32% to 0.40%) and Modified 4340 (V increased from 0 to O.12%) were tested. X-ray diffraction identified the presence of vanadium carbide, V{sub 4}C{sub 3}, in A-23 steels, and subsequent hydrogen extraction studies evaluated the trapping effect of vanadium carbide. Based on these tests, it was determined that adding vanadium carbide to 4340 significantly decreased hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility because vanadium carbide traps ties up diffusible hydrogen. The effectiveness of these traps is examined and discussed in this paper.

  14. Storage of hydrogen in advanced high pressure container. Appendices; Lagring af brint i avancerede hoejtryksbeholdere. Appendiks 1

    Bentzen, J.J.; Lystrup, A. [Forskningscenter Risoe, Roskilde (Denmark)

    2005-07-15

    The objective of the project has been to study barriers for a production of advanced high pressure containers especially suitable for hydrogen, in order to create a basis for a container production in Denmark. The project has primarily focused on future Danish need for hydrogen storage in the MWh area. One task has been to examine requirement specifications for pressure tanks that can be expected in connection with these stores. Six potential storage needs have been identified: (1) Buffer in connection with start-up/regulation on the power grid. (2) Hydrogen and oxygen production. (3) Buffer store in connection with VEnzin vision. (4) Storage tanks on hydrogen filling stations. (5) Hydrogen for the transport sector from 1 TWh surplus power. (6) Tanker transport of hydrogen. Requirements for pressure containers for the above mentioned use have been examined. The connection between stored energy amount, pressure and volume compared to liquid hydrogen and oil has been stated in tables. As starting point for production technological considerations and economic calculations of various container concepts, an estimation of laminate thickness in glass-fibre reinforced containers with different diameters and design print has been made, for a 'pure' fibre composite container and a metal/fibre composite container respectively. (BA)

  15. Highly sensitive work function hydrogen gas sensor based on PdNPs/SiO2/Si structure at room temperature

    G. Behzadi pour

    Full Text Available In this study, fabrication of highly sensitive PdNPs/SiO2/Si hydrogen gas sensor using experimental and theoretical methods has been investigated. Using chemical method the PdNPs are synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD. The average size of PdNPs is 11 nm. The thickness of the oxide film was 20 nm and the surface of oxide film analyzed using Atomic-force microscopy (AFM. The C-V curve for the PdNPs/SiO2/Si hydrogen gas sensor in 1% hydrogen concentration and at the room temperature has been reported. The response time and recovery time for 1% hydrogen concentration at room temperature were 1.2 s and 10 s respectively. The response (R% for PdNPs/SiO2/Si MOS capacitor hydrogen sensor was 96%. The PdNPs/SiO2/Si MOS capacitor hydrogen sensor showed very fast response and recovery times compared to SWCNTs/PdNPs, graphene/PdNPs, nanorod/PdNPs and nanowire/PdNPs hydrogen gas sensors. Keywords: Sensitive, Oxide film, Capacitive, Resistance

  16. High Efficient Reduction of Graphene Oxide via Nascent Hydrogen at Room Temperature

    Qiqi Zhuo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available To develop a green and efficient method to synthesize graphene in relative milder conditions is prerequisite for graphene applications. A chemical reducing method has been developed to high efficiently reduce graphene oxide (GO using Fe2O3 and NH3BH3 as catalyst and reductants, respectively. During the process, environmental and strong reductive nascent hydrogen were generated surrounding the surface of GO sheets by catalyst hydrolysis reaction of NH3BH3 and were used for reduction of GO. The reduction process was studied by ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectrum. The structure and morphology of the reduced GO were characterized with scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Compared to metal (Mg/Fe/Zn/Al particles and acid system which also use nascent hydrogen to reduce GO, this method exhibited higher reduction efficiency (43.6%. Also the reduction was carried out at room temperature condition, which is environmentally friendly. As a supercapacitor electrode, the reversible capacity of reduced graphene oxide was 113.8 F g−1 at 1 A g−1 and the capacitance retention still remained at 90% after 200 cycles. This approach provides a new method to reduce GO with high reduction efficiency by green reductant.

  17. Surface preparation for high purity alumina ceramics enabling direct brazing in hydrogen atmospheres

    Cadden, Charles H.; Yang, Nancy Yuan Chi; Hosking, Floyd M.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for preparing the surface of a high purity alumina ceramic or sapphire specimen that enables direct brazing in a hydrogen atmosphere using an active braze alloy. The present invention also relates to a method for directly brazing a high purity alumina ceramic or sapphire specimen to a ceramic or metal member using this method of surface preparation, and to articles produced by this brazing method. The presence of silicon, in the form of a SiO.sub.2 -containing surface layer, can more than double the tensile bond strength in alumina ceramic joints brazed in a hydrogen atmosphere using an active Au-16Ni-0.75 Mo-1.75V filler metal. A thin silicon coating applied by PVD processing can, after air firing, produce a semi-continuous coverage of the alumina surface with a SiO.sub.2 film. Room temperature tensile strength was found to be proportional to the fraction of air fired surface covered by silicon-containing films. Similarly, the ratio of substrate fracture versus interface separation was also related to the amount of surface silicon present prior to brazing. This process can replace the need to perform a "moly-manganese" metallization step.

  18. A highly polarized hydrogen/deuterium internal gas target embedded in a toroidal magnetic spectrometer

    Cheever, D.; Ihloff, E.; Kelsey, J.; Kolster, H.; Meitanis, N.; Milner, R.; Shinozaki, A.; Tsentalovich, E.; Zwart, T.; Ziskin, V.; Xiao, Y.; Zhang, C.

    2006-01-01

    A polarized hydrogen/deuterium internal gas target has been constructed and operated at the internal target region of the South Hall Ring (SHR) of the MIT-Bates Linear Accelerator Center to carry out measurements of spin-dependent electron scattering at 850MeV. The target used an Atomic Beam Source (ABS) to inject a flux of highly polarized atoms into a thin-walled, coated storage cell. The polarization of the electron beam was determined using a Compton laser backscattering polarimeter. The target polarization was determined using well-known nuclear reactions. The ABS and storage cell were embedded in the Bates Large Acceptance Toroidal Spectrometer (BLAST), which was used to detect scattered particles from the electron-target interactions. The target has been designed to rapidly (∼8h) switch operation from hydrogen to deuterium. Further, this target was the first to be operated inside a magnetic spectrometer in the presence of a magnetic field exceeding 2kG. An ABS intensity 2.5x10 16 at/s and a high polarization (∼70%) inside the storage cell have been achieved. The details of the target design and construction are described here and the performance over an 18 month period is reported

  19. Hydrogen-bonded structure in highly concentrated aqueous LiBr solutions

    Imano, Masahiro; Kameda, Yasuo; Usuki, Takeshi; Uemura, Osamu

    2001-01-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements were carried out for H/D isotopically substituted aqueous 10, 25 and 33 mol% LiBr solutions in order to obtain structural information on the intermolecular hydrogen bonds among water molecules in highly concentrated aqueous solutions. Observed scattering cross sections for D 2 O (99.9 % D), 0 H 2 O(35.9 % D) and 0-2 H 2 O(68.0 % D) solutions were combined to deduce partial structure factors, a HH (Q), a XH (Q) and a XX (Q) (X: O, Br and Li). The least squares fitting analysis was applied to the observed partial structure factors to determine the nearest neighbor interatomic distance, root-mean-square amplitude and coordination number. Intermolecular distances, r OH =1.91(1) A, r HH =2.38(1) A and r OO =3.02(1) A, between the nearest neighbor water molecules, were obtained for the 10 mol% LiBr solution. On the other hand, the intermolecular O···H interaction was found to almost disappear in concentrated 25 and 33 mol% LiBr solutions. The result implies that the hydrogen-bonded network is completely broken in highly concentrated aqueous LiBr solutions. (author)

  20. Highly Sensitive Nanostructured SnO2 Thin Films For Hydrogen Sensing

    Patil, L. A.; Shinde, M. D.; Bari, A. R.; Deo, V. V.

    2010-10-01

    Nanostructured SnO2 thin films were prepared by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis technique. Aqueous solution (0.05 M) of SnCl4ṡ5H2O in double distilled water was chosen as the starting solution for the preparation of the films. The stock solution was delivered to nozzle with constant and uniform flow rate of 70 ml/h by Syringe pump SK5001. Sono-tek spray nozzle, driven by ultrasonic frequency of 120 kHz, converts the solution into fine spray. The aerosol produced by nozzle was sprayed on glass substrate heated at 150 °C. The sensing performance of the films was tested for various gases such as LPG, hydrogen, ethanol, carbon dioxide and ammonia. The sensor (30 min) showed high gas response (S = 3040 at 350 °C) on exposure of 1000 ppm of hydrogen and high selectivity against other gases. Its response time was short (2 s) and recovery was also fast (12 s). To understand reasons behind this uncommon gas sensing performance of the films, their structural, microstructural, and optical properties were studied using X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) respectively. The results are interpreted

  1. Thermal and hydrodynamic study of a whirling liquid hydrogen layer under high heat flux

    Ewald, R.

    1969-01-01

    In order to achieve a cold neutrons source (λ ≥ 4.10 -10 m) in a high flux reactor (∼ 10 15 neutrons/cm 2 .s), a whirling liquid hydrogen layer (145 mm OD, effective thickness 15 mm, height about 180 mm) was formed, out-of-pile, in a cylindrical transparent glass vessel. The whirling motion was obtained by tangential injection of the liquid, near the wall. Thermal and hydrodynamical conditions of formation and laws of similarity of such a layer were studied. The characteristics of this whirling flow were observed as a function of mass flow rate (5 to 27 g/s; 4.3 to 23 l/mn), and of spillway width (18 and 25 mm). Six different nozzles were used : 1.0; 1.5; 1.9; 2.25; 2.65 and 3.0 mm ID. The total heat influx was found between 8.6 and 10.4 kW. The heat flux density was about 9.4 W/cm 2 and the mean layer density around 80 per cent of that of the liquid hydrogen at 20.4 Kelvin. High speed movies were used to analyze the boiling regime. (author) [fr

  2. Study and modelling of an industrial plant for hydrogen production by High Temperature Steam Electrolysis

    Bertier, L.

    2012-01-01

    HTSE field (High Temperature Steam Electrolysis) is moving from the research phase to development phase. It's now necessary to prove and to possibly improve the technology competitiveness. Therefore we need a tool able to allow communication between hydrogen producers and electrolysis cell stack designers. Designers seek where their efforts have to focus, for example by searching what are the operating best conditions for HTSE (voltage, temperature). On the contrary, the producer wants to choose the most suitable stack for its needs and under the best conditions: hydrogen has to be produced at the lowest price. Two main constraints have been identified to reach this objective: the tool has to be inserted into a process simulation software and needs to be representative of the cell and stack used technology. These constraints are antagonistic. Making an object model in a process simulation usually involves a highly simplified representation of it. To meet these constraints, we have built a model chain starting from the electrode models and leading to a representative model of the HTSE technology used process. Work and added value of this thesis mainly concern a global and local energy optimization approach. Our model allows at each scale an appropriate analysis of the main phenomena occurring in each object and a quantification of the energy and economic impacts of the technology used. This approach leads to a tool able to achieve the technical and economic optimization of a HTSE production unit. (author) [fr

  3. Analysis of high-quality modes in open chaotic microcavities

    Fang, W.; Yamilov, A.; Cao, H.

    2005-01-01

    We present a numerical study of the high-quality modes in two-dimensional dielectric stadium microcavities. Although the classical ray mechanics is fully chaotic in a stadium billiard, all of the high-quality modes show a 'strong scar' around unstable periodic orbits. When the deformation (ratio of the length of the straight segments over the diameter of the half circles) is small, the high-quality modes correspond to whispering-gallery-type trajectories and their quality factors decrease monotonically with increasing deformation. At large deformation, each high-quality mode is associated with multiple unstable periodic orbits. Its quality factor changes nonmonotonically with the deformation, and there exists an optimal deformation for each mode at which its quality factor reaches a local maximum. This unusual behavior is attributed to the interference of waves propagating along different constituent orbits that could minimize light leakage out of the cavity

  4. New nitrogen-containing materials for hydrogen storage and their characterization by high-pressure microbalance

    Vestbø, Andreas Peter

    Hydrogen storage for practical applications is under intense scrutiny worldwide since hopes are prevalent of being able to use hydrogen as energy vector in a continually difficult time in terms of having access to clean and affordable energy in the world. Hydrogen can be stored in compressed or l...

  5. High quality steel casting for energy technics

    Schuster, F.; Koefler, G.

    1982-01-01

    The casting of several chromium-molybdenum steels for steam and hydraulic turbines is discussed. Non-destructive testing of the castings is performed demonstrating the safety for use in nuclear technology. The effect of metallurgical parameters on steel casting quality, the heat treatment, and the effect of construction design on costs for fettling and repair weldings are considered. (Auth.)

  6. Highly sensitive hydrogen detection of catalyst-free ZnO nanorod networks suspended by lithography-assisted growth

    Huh, Junghwan; Kim, Gyu Tae; Park, Jonghyurk; Park, Jeong Young

    2011-01-01

    We have successfully demonstrated a ZnO nanorod-based 3D nanostructure to show a high sensitivity and very fast response/recovery to hydrogen gas. ZnO nanorods have been synthesized selectively over the pre-defined area at relatively low temperature using a simple self-catalytic solution process assisted by a lithographic method. The conductance of the ZnO nanorod device varies significantly as the concentration of the hydrogen is changed without any additive metal catalyst, revealing a high sensitivity to hydrogen gas. Its superior performance can be explained by the porous structure of its three-dimensional network and the enhanced surface reaction of the hydrogen molecules with the oxygen defects resulting from a high surface-to-volume ratio. It was found that the change of conductance follows a power law depending on the hydrogen concentration. A Langmuir isotherm following an ideal power law and a cross-over behavior of the activation energy with respect to hydrogen concentration were observed. This is a very novel and intriguing phenomenon on nanostructured materials, which suggests competitive surface reactions in ZnO nanorod gas sensors.

  7. Highly sensitive hydrogen detection of catalyst-free ZnO nanorod networks suspended by lithography-assisted growth.

    Huh, Junghwan; Park, Jonghyurk; Kim, Gyu Tae; Park, Jeong Young

    2011-02-25

    We have successfully demonstrated a ZnO nanorod-based 3D nanostructure to show a high sensitivity and very fast response/recovery to hydrogen gas. ZnO nanorods have been synthesized selectively over the pre-defined area at relatively low temperature using a simple self-catalytic solution process assisted by a lithographic method. The conductance of the ZnO nanorod device varies significantly as the concentration of the hydrogen is changed without any additive metal catalyst, revealing a high sensitivity to hydrogen gas. Its superior performance can be explained by the porous structure of its three-dimensional network and the enhanced surface reaction of the hydrogen molecules with the oxygen defects resulting from a high surface-to-volume ratio. It was found that the change of conductance follows a power law depending on the hydrogen concentration. A Langmuir isotherm following an ideal power law and a cross-over behavior of the activation energy with respect to hydrogen concentration were observed. This is a very novel and intriguing phenomenon on nanostructured materials, which suggests competitive surface reactions in ZnO nanorod gas sensors.

  8. High-temperature hydrogen-air-steam detonation experiments in the BNL small-scale development apparatus

    Ciccarelli, G.; Ginsberg, T.; Boccio, J.; Economos, C.; Finfrock, C.; Gerlach, L.; Sato, K.

    1994-01-01

    The Small-Scale Development Apparatus (SSDA) was constructed to provide a preliminary set of experimental data to characterize the effect of temperature on the ability of hydrogen-air-steam-mixtures to undergo detonations and, equally important, to support design of the larger-scale High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) by providing a test bed for solution of a number of high-temperature design and operational problems. The SSDA, the central element of which is 10-cm inside diameter, 6.1-m long tubular test vessel designed to permit detonation experiments at temperatures up to 700K, was employed to study self-sustained detonations in gaseous mixtures of hydrogen, air, and steam at temperature between 300K and 650K at a fixed pressure of 0.1 MPa. Detonation cell size measurements provide clear evidence that the effect of hydrogen-air gas mixture temperature, in the range 300K to 650K, is to decrease cell size and, hence, to increase the sensitivity of the mixture to undergo detonations. The effect of steam content, at any given temperature, is to increase the cell size and, thereby, to decrease the sensitivity of stoichiometric hydrogen-air mixtures. The one-dimensional ZND model does a very good job at predicting the overall trends in the cell size data over the range of hydrogen-air-steam mixture compositions and temperature studied in the experiments. Experiments were conducted to measure the rate of hydrogen oxidation in the absence of ignition sources at temperatures of 500K and 650K, for hydrogen-air mixtures of 15% and 50%, and for a mixture of equimolar hydrogen-air and 30% steam at 650K. The rate of hydrogen oxidation was found to be significant at 650K. Reduction of hydrogen concentration by chemical reaction from 50 to 44% hydrogen, and from 15 to 11% hydrogen, were observed on a time frame of minutes. The DeSoete rate equation predicts the 50% experiment very well, but greatly underestimates the reaction rate of the lean mixtures

  9. Optimized Flow Sheet for a Reference Commercial-Scale Nuclear-Driven High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    M. G. McKellar; J. E. O'Brien; E. A. Harvego; J. S. Herring

    2007-01-01

    This report presents results from the development and optimization of a reference commercial scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540 C and 900 C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen consists of 4.176 - 10 6 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. A nominal cell area-specific resistance, ASR, value of 0.4 Ohm-cm2 with a current density of 0.25 A/cm2 was used, and isothermal boundary conditions were assumed. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the low heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 49.07% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.45 kg/s with the high-temperature helium-cooled reactor concept. The information presented in this report is intended to establish an optimized design for the reference nuclear-driven HTE hydrogen production plant so that parameters can be compared with other hydrogen production methods and power cycles to evaluate relative performance characteristics and plant economics

  10. Hydrogen exchange

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical method for investigation of protein conformation and dynamics. HX-MS monitors isotopic exchange of hydrogen in protein backbone amides and thus serves as a sensitive method for probing protein conformation...... and dynamics along the entire protein backbone. This chapter describes the exchange of backbone amide hydrogen which is highly quenchable as it is strongly dependent on the pH and temperature. The HX rates of backbone amide hydrogen are sensitive and very useful probes of protein conformation......, as they are distributed along the polypeptide backbone and form the fundamental hydrogen-bonding networks of basic secondary structure. The effect of pressure on HX in unstructured polypeptides (poly-dl-lysine and oxidatively unfolded ribonuclease A) and native folded proteins (lysozyme and ribonuclease A) was evaluated...

  11. Feasibility of the hydrogen sulfide test for the assessment of drinking water quality in post-earthquake Haiti.

    Weppelmann, Thomas A; Alam, Meer T; Widmer, Jocelyn; Morrissey, David; Rashid, Mohammed H; De Rochars, Valery M Beau; Morris, J Glenn; Ali, Afsar; Johnson, Judith A

    2014-12-01

    In 2010, a magnitude 7.0 earthquake struck Haiti, severely damaging the drinking and wastewater infrastructure and leaving millions homeless. Compounding this problem, the introduction of Vibrio cholerae resulted in a massive cholera outbreak that infected over 700,000 people and threatened the safety of Haiti's drinking water. To mitigate this public health crisis, non-government organizations installed thousands of wells to provide communities with safe drinking water. However, despite increased access, Haiti currently lacks the monitoring capacity to assure the microbial safety of any of its water resources. For these reasons, this study was designed to assess the feasibility of using a simple, low-cost method to detect indicators of fecal contamination of drinking water that could be implemented at the community level. Water samples from 358 sources of drinking water in the Léogâne flood basin were screened with a commercially available hydrogen sulfide test and a standard membrane method for the enumeration of thermotolerant coliforms. When compared with the gold standard method, the hydrogen sulfide test had a sensitivity of 65 % and a specificity of 93 %. While the sensitivity of the assay increased at higher fecal coliform concentrations, it never exceeded 88 %, even with fecal coliform concentrations greater than 100 colony-forming units per 100 ml. While its simplicity makes the hydrogen sulfide test attractive for assessing water quality in low-resource settings, the low sensitivity raises concerns about its use as the sole indicator of the presence or absence of fecal coliforms in individual or community water sources.

  12. Hydrogen Permeation in Cold-Rolled High-Mn Twinning-Induced Plasticity Steels

    Han, Do Kyeong; Hwang, A. In; Byeon, Woo Jun; Noh, Seung Jeong; Suh, Dong-Woo

    2017-11-01

    Hydrogen permeation is investigated in cold-rolled Fe-0.6C-18Mn-(1.5Al) alloys. The hydrogen mobility is lower in cold-rolled alloys compared with annealed alloys. Al-containing alloy shows less deceleration of hydrogen mobility compared with the Al-free alloy. This is attributed to the reduced formation of mechanical twins and dislocations. Mechanical twins trap hydrogen strongly but are vulnerable to crack initiation; suppression of these is thought to be a major favorable influence of Al on hydrogen-induced mechanical degradation.

  13. Physiological and genomic features of highly alkaliphilic hydrogen-utilizing Betaproteobacteria from a continental serpentinizing site.

    Suzuki, Shino; Kuenen, J Gijs; Schipper, Kira; van der Velde, Suzanne; Ishii, Shun'ichi; Wu, Angela; Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Tenney, Aaron; Meng, XianYing; Morrill, Penny L; Kamagata, Yoichi; Muyzer, Gerard; Nealson, Kenneth H

    2014-05-21

    Serpentinization, or the aqueous alteration of ultramafic rocks, results in challenging environments for life in continental sites due to the combination of extremely high pH, low salinity and lack of obvious electron acceptors and carbon sources. Nevertheless, certain Betaproteobacteria have been frequently observed in such environments. Here we describe physiological and genomic features of three related Betaproteobacterial strains isolated from highly alkaline (pH 11.6) serpentinizing springs at The Cedars, California. All three strains are obligate alkaliphiles with an optimum for growth at pH 11 and are capable of autotrophic growth with hydrogen, calcium carbonate and oxygen. The three strains exhibit differences, however, regarding the utilization of organic carbon and electron acceptors. Their global distribution and physiological, genomic and transcriptomic characteristics indicate that the strains are adapted to the alkaline and calcium-rich environments represented by the terrestrial serpentinizing ecosystems. We propose placing these strains in a new genus 'Serpentinomonas'.

  14. Study of Electron Swarm in High Pressure Hydrogen Gas Filled RF Cavities

    Yonehara, K.; Chung, M.; Jansson, A.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Tollestrup, A.; Alsharo'a, M.; Johnson, R.P.; Notani, M.; Oka, T.; Wang, H.

    2010-01-01

    A high pressure hydrogen gas filled RF cavity has been proposed for use in the muon collection system for a muon collider. It allows for high electric field gradients in RF cavities located in strong magnetic fields, a condition frequently encountered in a muon cooling channel. In addition, an intense muon beam will generate an electron swarm via the ionization process in the cavity. A large amount of RF power will be consumed into the swarm. We show the results from our studies of the HV RF breakdown in a cavity without a beam and present some results on the resulting electron swarm dynamics. This is preliminary to actual beam tests which will take place late in 2010.

  15. Engineering Pt/Pd Interfacial Electronic Structures for Highly Efficient Hydrogen Evolution and Alcohol Oxidation.

    Fan, Jinchang; Qi, Kun; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Haiyan; Yu, Shansheng; Cui, Xiaoqiang

    2017-05-31

    Tailoring the interfacial structure of Pt-based catalysts has emerged as an effective strategy to improve catalytic activity. However, little attention has been focused on investigating the relationship between the interfacial facets and their catalytic activity. Here, we design and implement Pd-Pt interfaces with controlled heterostructure features by epitaxially growing Pt nanoparticles on Pd nanosheets. On the basis of both density functional theory calculation and experimental results, we demonstrate that charge transfer from Pd to Pt is highly dependent on the interfacial facets of Pd substrates. Therefore, the Pd-Pt heterostructure with Pd(100)-Pt interface exhibits excellent activity and long-term stability for hydrogen evolution and methanol/ethanol oxidation reactions in alkaline medium, much better than that with Pd (111)-Pt interface or commercial Pt/C. Interfacial crystal facet-dependent electronic structural modulation sheds a light on the design and investigation of new heterostructures for high-activity catalysts.

  16. Hydrogen and helium under high pressure: a case for a classical theory of dense matter

    Celebonovic, V.

    1989-01-01

    When subject to high pressure, H 2 and 3 He are expected to undergo phase transitions, and to become metallic at a sufficiently high pressure. Using a semiclassical theory of dense matter proposed by Savic and Kasanin (1962/65), calculations of phase transition and metallisation pressure have been performed for these two materials. In hydrogen, metallisation occurs at 3.0±0.2 Mbar, while for helium the corresponding value is 106±1 Mbar. A phase transition occurs in helium at 10.0±0.4 Mbar. These values are close to the results obtainable by more rigorous methods. Possibilities of experimental verification of the calculations are briefly discussed. 38 refs

  17. Metal-organic framework based highly selective fluorescence turn-on probe for hydrogen sulphide

    Nagarkar, Sanjog S.; Saha, Tanmoy; Desai, Aamod V.; Talukdar, Pinaki; Ghosh, Sujit K.

    2014-11-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is known to play a vital role in human physiology and pathology which stimulated interest in understanding complex behaviour of H2S. Discerning the pathways of H2S production and its mode of action is still a challenge owing to its volatile and reactive nature. Herein we report azide functionalized metal-organic framework (MOF) as a selective turn-on fluorescent probe for H2S detection. The MOF shows highly selective and fast response towards H2S even in presence of other relevant biomolecules. Low cytotoxicity and H2S detection in live cells, demonstrate the potential of MOF towards monitoring H2S chemistry in biological system. To the best of our knowledge this is the first example of MOF that exhibit fast and highly selective fluorescence turn-on response towards H2S under physiological conditions.

  18. Hydrogen and helium under high pressure: a case for a classical theory of dense matter

    Celebonovic, V. (Belgrade Univ. (Yugoslavia). Inst. za Fiziku)

    1989-06-01

    When subject to high pressure, H{sub 2} and {sup 3}He are expected to undergo phase transitions, and to become metallic at a sufficiently high pressure. Using a semiclassical theory of dense matter proposed by Savic and Kasanin (1962/65), calculations of phase transition and metallisation pressure have been performed for these two materials. In hydrogen, metallisation occurs at 3.0{plus minus}0.2 Mbar, while for helium the corresponding value is 106{plus minus}1 Mbar. A phase transition occurs in helium at 10.0{plus minus}0.4 Mbar. These values are close to the results obtainable by more rigorous methods. Possibilities of experimental verification of the calculations are briefly discussed. 38 refs.

  19. Formation of metastable phases in magnesium–titanium system by high-pressure torsion and their hydrogen storage performance

    Edalati, Kaveh; Emami, Hoda; Staykov, Aleksandar; Smith, David J.; Akiba, Etsuo; Horita, Zenji

    2015-01-01

    No binary phases exist in the Mg–Ti binary equilibrium phase diagram and the two elements are totally immiscible even in liquid form. This study shows that four metastable phases (two with the bcc and fcc structures and two with the hcp structures) are formed in the Mg–Ti system by severe plastic deformation (SPD) through the process of high-pressure torsion (HPT). Investigation of hydrogenation properties reveals that these metastable phases are decomposed to pure Mg and Ti during heating before they can absorb the hydrogen in the form of ternary Mg–Ti hydrides. First-principles calculations show that the hydrogenation reaction should occur thermodynamically, and ternary Mg–Ti hydrides with the cubic structure should form at low temperature. However, the slow kinetics for this reaction appears to be the limiting step. Calculations show that the binding energy of hydrogen increases and the thermodynamic stability of hydrides undesirably increases by addition of Ti to Mg

  20. High-rate continuous hydrogen production by Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum PSU-2 immobilized on heat-pretreated methanogenic granules

    O-Thong, Sompong; Prasertsan, P.; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov

    2008-01-01

    as carrier to immobilize T. thermosaccharolyticum strain PSU-2 in UASB reactor operated at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) ranging from 0.75 to 24h and corresponding sucrose loading rate from 58.5 to 2.4 mmol sucrose l(-1)h(-1). In comparison with hydrogen production rate of 12.1 mmol H(2)l(-1)h(-1......) obtained by carrier-free reactor upflow anaerobic (UA) system, a greatly improved hydrogen production rate up to 152 mmol H(2)l(-1)h(-1) was demonstrated by the granular cells in UASB system. The biofilm of T. thermosaccharolyticum strain PSU-2 developed on treated methanogenic granules in UASB reactor...... substantially enhanced biomass retention (3 times), and production of hydrogen (12 times) compared to carrier-free reactor. It appears to be the most preferred process for highly efficient dark fermentative hydrogen production from sugar containing wastewater under thermophilic conditions. (C) 2008...

  1. Development status on hydrogen production technology using high-temperature gas-cooled reactor at JAEA, Japan

    Shiozawa, Shusaku; Ogawa, Masuro; Hino, Ryutaro

    2006-01-01

    The high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), which is graphite-moderated and helium-cooled, is attractive due to its unique capability of producing high temperature helium gas and its fully inherent reactor safety. In particular, hydrogen production using the nuclear heat from HTGR (up to 900 deg. C) offers one of the most promising technological solutions to curb the rising level of CO 2 emission and resulting risk of climate change. The interests in HTGR as an advanced nuclear power source for the next generation reactor, therefore, continue to rise. This is represented by the Japanese HTTR (High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) Project and the Chinese HTR-10 Project, followed by the international Generation IV development program, US nuclear hydrogen initiative program, EU innovative HTR technology development program, etc. To enhance nuclear energy application to heat process industries, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has continued extensive efforts for development of hydrogen production system using the nuclear heat from HTGR in the framework of the HTTR Project. The HTTR Project has the objectives of establishing both HTGR technology and heat utilization technology. Using the HTTR constructed at the Oarai Research and Development Center of JAEA, reactor performance and safety demonstration tests have been conducted as planned. The reactor outlet temperature of 950 deg. C was successfully achieved in April 2004. For hydrogen production as heat utilization technology, R and D on thermo-chemical water splitting by the 'Iodine-Sulfur process' (IS process) has been conducted step by step. Proof of the basic IS process was made in 1997 on a lab-scale of hydrogen production of 1 L/h. In 2004, one-week continuous operation of the IS process was successfully demonstrated using a bench-scale apparatus with hydrogen production rate of 31 L/h. Further test using a pilot scale facility with greater hydrogen production rate of 10 - 30 m 3 /h is planned as

  2. Nitrophenylboronic acids as highly chemoselective probes to detect hydrogen peroxide in foods and agricultural products.

    Lu, Chun-Ping; Lin, Chieh-Ti; Chang, Ching-Ming; Wu, Shih-Hsiung; Lo, Lee-Chiang

    2011-11-09

    Hydrogen peroxide is commonly used in the food processing industry as a chlorine-free bleaching and sterilizing agent, but excessive amounts of residual hydrogen peroxide have led to cases of food poisoning. Here we describe the development of a novel nonenzymatic colorimetric method for the determination of residual hydrogen peroxide in foods and agricultural products. Nitrophenylboronic acids chemoselectively react with hydrogen peroxide under alkaline conditions to produce yellow nitrophenolates. Of the three nitrophenylboronic acid isomers tested, the p-isomer displayed the highest sensitivity for hydrogen peroxide and the fastest reaction kinetics. The reaction product, p-nitrophenolate, has an absorption maximum at 405 nm and a good linear correlation between the hydrogen peroxide concentration and the A(405) values was obtained. We successfully applied this convenient and rapid method for hydrogen peroxide determination to samples of dried bean curds and disposable chopsticks, thereby demonstrating its potential in foods and agricultural industries.

  3. Studies on the permeation of hydrogen through steam generator tubes at high temperatures using an electrochemical method

    Giraudeau, F.; Yang, L.; Steward, F.R.; DeBouvier, O.

    1998-01-01

    The permeation of hydrogen through steam generator tubes at high temperatures (∼ 300 degrees C) has been studied using an electrochemical technique. With this technique, hydrogen is generated on one side of the tube and monitored on the other side. The time for the hydrogen to reach the other side is used to determine the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen in the tube. Boundary conditions at the entry and exit sides have been investigated separately. Preliminary studies were performed on Stainless Steel 316 and Nickel Alloy 800 to better understand the influence of the solution chemistry on the electrochemical evolution of hydrogen. The surface phenomena effect and the trapping effect are discussed to account for differences observed in the permeation response. The hydrogen permeation through oxides at the exit side has been studied. Two nickel alloys (Alloy 800 and Alloy 600), materials widely used for steam generator tubes, have been investigated. The tubes were prefilmed using two different treatments. The oxides were formed in dry air at high temperatures (300 degrees C to 600 degrees C), or in humid gas at 300 degrees C. The diffusion coefficients at 300 degrees C in Stainless Steel 316 and Alloy 800 were determined to be of the order of 10 -6 - 10 -7 cm 2 /s for the bare metal. This is in agreement with results obtained by gas phase permeation techniques in the literature. (author)

  4. Microwave-activated Ni/carbon catalysts for highly selective hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to cyclohexylamine.

    Lu, Xinhuan; He, Jie; Jing, Run; Tao, Peipei; Nie, Renfeng; Zhou, Dan; Xia, Qinghua

    2017-06-01

    Biocarbon supported Ni catalysts have been prepared by facile impregnation of Ni species by microwave-heating and used for selective hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to cyclohexylamine. These catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectra, N2 sorption measurement, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, temperature programmed reduction of H2 and H2 temperature-programmed desorption. The morphology and particle size of catalysts were imaged by scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope. For the hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to cyclohexylamine, 10%Ni/CSC-II(b) exhibits the best catalytic activity to achieve 100 mol% conversion of nitrobenzene and 96.7% selectivity of cyclohexylamine under reaction conditions of 2.0 MPa H2 and 200 °C, ascribed to high dispersion of Ni species and formation of nanosized Ni particles on the support aided by microwave-heating. Thus-prepared Ni/CSC catalyst is greatly activated, in which the addition of precious metal like Rh is totally avoided.

  5. A high-pressure hydrogen time projection chamber for the MuCap experiment

    Egger, J.; Fahrni, D.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hofer, A.; Meier, L.; Petitjean, C. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Andreev, V.A.; Ganzha, V.A.; Kravtsov, P.A.; Krivshich, A.G.; Maev, E.M.; Maev, O.E.; Petrov, G.; Semenchuk, G.G.; Vasilyev, A.A.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Vznuzdaev, M.E. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Banks, T.I. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, California (United States); Clayton, S.M. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Physics, Urbana, Illinois (United States); Gray, F.E. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, California (United States); Regis University, Department of Physics and Computational Science, Denver, Colorado (United States); University of Washington, Department of Physics, Seattle, Washington (United States); Kammel, P.; Kiburg, B.; Winter, P. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Physics, Urbana, Illinois (United States); University of Washington, Department of Physics, Seattle, Washington (United States); Lauss, B. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, California (United States)

    2014-10-15

    The MuCap experiment at the Paul Scherrer Institute performed a high-precision measurement of the rate of the basic electroweak process of nuclear muon capture by the proton, μ{sup -} + p → n + ν{sub μ}. The experimental approach was based on the use of a time projection chamber (TPC) that operated in pure hydrogen gas at a pressure of 10bar and functioned as an active muon stopping target. The TPC detected the tracks of individual muon arrivals in three dimensions, while the trajectories of outgoing decay (Michel) electrons were measured by two surrounding wire chambers and a plastic scintillation hodoscope. The muon and electron detectors together enabled a precise measurement of the μp atom's lifetime, from which the nuclear muon capture rate was deduced. The TPC was also used to monitor the purity of the hydrogen gas by detecting the nuclear recoils that follow muon capture by elemental impurities. This paper describes the TPC design and performance in detail. (orig.)

  6. High performance supercapacitor and non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensor based on tellurium nanoparticles

    M. Manikandan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Tellurium nanoparticles (Te Nps were synthesized by wet chemical method and characterized by XRD, Raman, FESEM, TEM, XPS, UV–Vis and FL. The Nps were coated on graphite foil and Glassy carbon electrode to prepare the electrodes for supercapacitor and biosensor applications. The supercapacitor performance is evaluated in 2 M KOH electrolyte by both Cyclic Voltammetry (CV and galvanostatic charge-discharge method. From charge-discharge method, Te Nps show a specific capacitance of 586 F/g at 2 mA/cm2 and 100 F/g at 30 mA/cm2 as well as an excellent cycle life (100% after 1000 cycles. In addition, the H2O2 sensor performance of Te Nps modified glassy carbon electrode is checked by CV and Chronoamperometry (CA in phosphate buffer solution (PBS. In the linear range of 0.67 to 8.04 μM of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, Te NPs show a high sensitivity of 0.83 mA mM−1 cm−2 with a correlation coefficient of 0.995. The detection limit is 0.3 μM with a response time less than 5 s. Keywords: Tellurium nanoparticles, Supercapacitor, Biosensor, Hydrogen peroxide

  7. High-energy-density hydrogen-halogen fuel cells for advanced military applications

    Balko, E.N.; McElroy, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that hydrogen-halogen fuel cell systems are particularly suited for an employment as ground power sources for military applications. The large cell potential and reversible characteristics of the H 2 Cl 2 and H 2 Br 2 couples permit high energy storage density and efficient energy conversion. When used as flow batteries, the fluid nature of the reactants in the hydrogen-halogen systems has several advantages over power sources which involve solid phases. Very deep discharge is possible without degradation of subsequent performance, and energy storage capacity is limited only by the external reactant storage volume. Very rapid chemical recharging is possible through replenishment of the reactant supply. A number of H 2 Cl 2 and H 2 Br 2 fuel cell systems have been studied. These systems use the same solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) cell technology originally developed for H2/O2 fuel cells. The results of the investigation are illustrated with the aid of a number of graphs

  8. Hydrogen pumping and release by graphite under high flux plasma bombardment

    Hirooka, Y.; Leung, W.K.; Conn, R.W.; Goebel, D.M.; Labombard, B.; Nygren, R.; Wilson, K.L.

    1988-01-01

    Inert gas (helium or argon) plasma bombardment has been found to increase the surface gas adsorptivity of isotropic graphite (POCO-graphite), which can then getter residual gases in a high vacuum system. The inert gas plasma bombardment was carried out at a flux ∼ 1 x 10 18 ions s -1 cm -2 to a fluence of the order of 10 21 ions/cm 2 and at temperatures around 800 degree C. The plasma bombarding energy was varied between 100 and 200 eV. The gettering speed of the activated graphite surface is estimated to be as large as 25 liters s -1 cm -2 at total pressures between 10 -6 and 10 -7 torr. The gettering capacity estimated is 0.025 torr-liter/cm 2 at room temperature. The gettering capability of graphite can be easily recovered by repeating inert gas plasma bombardment. The activated graphite surface exhibits a smooth, sponge-like morphology with significantly increased pore openings, which correlates with the observed increase in the surface gas adsorptivity. The activated graphite surface has been observed to pump hydrogen plasma particles as well. From calibrated H-alpha measurements, the dynamic hydrogen retention capacity is evaluated to be as large as 2 x 10 18 H/cm 2 at temperatures below 100 degree C and at a plasma bombarding energy of 300 eV

  9. Indoor Air Quality in High Performance Schools

    High performance schools are facilities that improve the learning environment while saving energy, resources, and money. The key is understanding the lifetime value of high performance schools and effectively managing priorities, time, and budget.

  10. Energy supply and conversion to hydrogen: how to improve the air quality in Buenos Aires city

    Venturini, Nestor R.; Bergallo, Juan E.; Corso, Hugo L.; Bolcich, Juan C.

    1998-01-01

    The regional power distribution and the market free regulation, take the companies of this sector to an increasing competition by the supply. This situation induces conceptual and technical changes, that seem oriented to a greater complementation of power menu, with consequent structuring of power chains of better economic management. In the case of electrical park, they exist power stations nonsintonizables with the fluctuations of demand, those that noticeably alter the prices to which energy can be sold. In these cases, the strategy is oriented to accumulation, to supply energy deferred in time, or in the form and place that greater rent offers. Multinational programs that illustrate these situations, with long trajectory and important resources exist, like the EUROQUEBEC, that contemplates the hydroelectricity surplus export from Canada to Europe in hydrogen form. (author)

  11. FINAL REPORT - Development of High Pressure Hydrogen Storage Tank for Storage and Gaseous Truck Delivery

    Baldwin, Donald [Hexagon Lincoln LLC, Lincoln, NE (United States)

    2017-08-04

    The “Development of High Pressure Hydrogen Storage Tanks for Storage and Gaseous Truck Delivery” project [DE-FG36-08GO18062] was initiated on 01 July 2008. Hexagon Lincoln (then Lincoln Composites) received grant funding from the U.S. Department of Energy to support the design and development of an improved bulk hauling and storage solution for hydrogen in terms of cost, safety, weight and volumetric efficiency. The development of this capability required parallel development and qualification of large all-composites pressure vessels, a custom ISO container to transport and store said tanks, and performance of trade studies to identify optimal operating pressure for the system. Qualification of the 250 bar TITAN® module was completed in 2009 with supervision from the American Bureau of Shipping [ABS], and the equipment has been used internationally for bulk transportation of fuel gases since 2010. Phase 1 of the project was successfully completed in 2012 with the issuance of USDOT SP 14951, the special permit authorizing the manufacture, marking, sale and use of TITAN® Mobile Pipeline® equipment in the United States. The introduction of tube trailers with light weight composite tankage has meant that 2 to 3 times as much gaseous fuel can be transported with each trip. This increased hauling efficiency offers dramatically reduced operating costs and has enabled a profitable business model for over-the-road compressed natural gas delivery. The economic drivers of this business opportunity vary from country to country and region to region, but in many places gas distribution companies have realized profitable operations. Additional testing was performed in 2015 to characterize hydrogen-specific operating protocols for use of TITAN® systems in CHG service at 250 bar. This program demonstrated that existing compression and decompression methodologies can efficiently and safely fill and unload lightweight bulk hauling systems. Hexagon Lincoln and U.S. DOE agreed

  12. Influence of fillers on hydrogen penetration properties and blister fracture of rubber composites for O-ring exposed to high-pressure hydrogen gas

    Yamabe, Junichiro; Nishimura, Shin [Department of Mechanical Science Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Research Center for Hydrogen Industrial Use and Storage (HYDROGENIUS), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2009-02-15

    Ethylene-propylene rubber (EPDM) and nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) composites having carbon black, silica, and no fillers were exposed to hydrogen gas at a maximum pressure of 10 MPa; then, blister tests and the measurement of hydrogen content were conducted. The hydrogen contents of the composites were proportional to the hydrogen pressure, i.e., the behavior of their hydrogen contents follows Henry's law. This implies that hydrogen penetrates into the composite as a hydrogen molecule. The addition of carbon black raised the hydrogen content of the composite, while the addition of silica did not. Based on observations, the blister damages of composites with silica were less pronounced, irrespective of the hydrogen pressures. This may be attributed to their lower hydrogen content and relatively better tensile properties than the others. (author)

  13. INFLUENCE OF BLEACHING WITH OZONE AND PEROXIDO OF HYDROGEN IN THE YIELD AND QUALITY OF SECONDARY FIBERS

    Gustavo Ventorim

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Total Chlorine Free (TCF bleaching processes were evaluated for bleaching a secondary fiber of different origens. The samples were bleached to a target brightness of 78 % ISO. The results were interpreted on the basis of chemical cost to reach the target brightness, bleaching yield and bleached pulp quality as measured by viscosity, fluorescence and b* color coordinate. The ozone stage was responsible for improve TCF bleaching performance. The pulp bleached by sequences contained a ozone stage followed by chelation, without interstage washing (ZQ, and a final hydrogen peroxide stage unpressurized (P or pressurized with oxygen (PO, designed as (ZQ(PO showed good results. These sequences decreased pulp b* coordinate significantly and fluorescence slightly. For  all three bleaching processes, it was determined that process yield is negatively affected by hot alkaline stages such as oxygen, O, peroxide, P, and peroxide pressurized with oxygen, (PO and also for the origin of the pulps of secondary fibers.

  14. Polymer-derived microporous ceramics for membranes and sensors for high temperature hydrogen purification and sensing

    Prasad, Ravi Mohan

    2012-06-11

    The growing interest in the use of hydrogen as main fuel has increased the need for pure hydrogen (H{sub 2}) production and purification. There are several by-products (CO, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}) associated with the production of hydrogen which might damage the production rate. Therefore, separation of hydrogen from other gases is an important step in the hydrogen production process. If H{sub 2} can be selectively removed from the product side during hydrogen production in membrane reactors, then it would be possible to achieve complete CO conversion in a single-step under high temperature conditions. The main goal of the present work is the high temperature H{sub 2} purification and sensing by applying polymer-derived ceramics. To prove the concept, the microporous SiBCN, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and SiCN ceramic membranes have been synthesized by the polymer-pyrolysis route and their performance for the hydrogen separation have been evaluated in tubular membranes as well as in planar chemiresistors. The synthesis of amorphous SiBCN ceramics has been realized through pyrolysis of poly(organoborosilazanes) in argon. Multilayered amorphous SiBCN/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/{alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membranes with gradient porosity have been realized and assessed with respect to the thermal stability, pore-size distribution and H{sub 2}/CO permeance. N{sub 2}-adsorption measurement indicates micropores in the range of 0.68-0.73 nm for three-fold SiBCN/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/{alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membrane. SEM characterization of three-fold SiBCN/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/{alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membrane shows the thickness of SiBCN membrane layer is 2.8 {mu}m; gas permeance measurements of the membrane shows H{sub 2}/CO selectivity of about 10.5 and the H{sub 2} permeance of about 1.05 x 10{sup -8} mol m{sup -2}s{sup -1}Pa{sup -1}. The observed gas permeation properties point out that the transportation of gas molecules through the membrane is governed by both

  15. High quality junctions by interpenetration of vapor liquid solid grown nanostructures for microchip integration

    Jebril, Seid; Kuhlmann, Hanna; Adelung, Rainer [Funktionale Nanomaterialien, CAU Kiel (Germany); Mueller, Sven [Nanowires and Thin Films, II. Physikalisches Institut, Goettingen (Germany); Ronning, Carsten [Institute for Solid State Physics, Universitaet Jena (Germany); Kienle, Lorenz [Synthese und Realstruktur, CAU Kiel (Germany); Duppel, Viola [MPI fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The usability of nanostructures in electrical devices like gas sensors depends critically on the ability to form high quality contacts and junctions. For the fabrication of various nanostructures, vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth is a wide spread and very efficient technique. However, forming contacts with the VLS grown structures to utilize them in a device is still tedious, because either the substrate has to be epitaxial to the VLS material or a manual alignment is necessary. Here we demonstrate the contact formation by simply using the ability of individual crystals to interpenetrate each other during the straight forward VLS growth. This allows growing VLS structures directly on two neighboring gold circuit paths of a microchip; bridges over predefined gaps will be formed. Moreover, TEM investigations confirm the high quality of the crystalline junctions that allow demonstrations as UV and hydrogen-sensor. The VLS devices are compared with conventional produced.

  16. Fe(III)-functionalized carbon dots—Highly efficient photoluminescence redox catalyst for hydrogenations of olefins and decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    Bourlinos, Athanasios B.

    2017-03-21

    We present the first bottom-up approach to synthesize Fe(III)-functionalized carbon dots (CDs) from molecular precursors without the need of conventional thermal or microwave treatment and additional reagents. Specifically, sonication of xylene in the presence of anhydrous FeCl3 results in oxidative coupling of the aromatic substrate towards Fe(III)-functionalized CDs. The as-prepared CDs are spherical in shape with a size of 3–8 nm, highly dispersible in organic solvents and display wavelength-dependent photoluminescence (PL). The iron ions attached to the surface endow the CDs with superior catalytic activity for olefin hydrogenation with excellent conversion and selectivity (up to 100%). The Fe(III)-CDs are more effective in the hydrogenation of a series of electron donating or withdrawing olefin substrates compared to conventional homogeneous or heterogeneous Fe(III)-based catalysts. The as-prepared heterogeneous nanocatalyst can be used repeatedly without any loss of catalytic activity. Importantly, the stability of the new catalysts can be easily monitored by PL intensity or quantum yield measurements, which certainly opens the doors for real time monitoring in a range of applications. Additionally, to the best of our knowledge, for the first time, the oxidative property of Fe-CDs was also explored in decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in water with the first order rate constant of 0.7 × 10−2 min−1, proving the versatile catalytic properties of such hybrid systems.

  17. Fe(III)-functionalized carbon dots—Highly efficient photoluminescence redox catalyst for hydrogenations of olefins and decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    Bourlinos, Athanasios B.; Rathi, Anuj K.; Gawande, Manoj B.; Hola, Katerina; Goswami, Anandarup; Kalytchuk, Sergii; Karakassides, Michael A.; Kouloumpis, Antonios; Gournis, Dimitrios; Deligiannakis, Yannis; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.; Zboril, Radek

    2017-01-01

    We present the first bottom-up approach to synthesize Fe(III)-functionalized carbon dots (CDs) from molecular precursors without the need of conventional thermal or microwave treatment and additional reagents. Specifically, sonication of xylene in the presence of anhydrous FeCl3 results in oxidative coupling of the aromatic substrate towards Fe(III)-functionalized CDs. The as-prepared CDs are spherical in shape with a size of 3–8 nm, highly dispersible in organic solvents and display wavelength-dependent photoluminescence (PL). The iron ions attached to the surface endow the CDs with superior catalytic activity for olefin hydrogenation with excellent conversion and selectivity (up to 100%). The Fe(III)-CDs are more effective in the hydrogenation of a series of electron donating or withdrawing olefin substrates compared to conventional homogeneous or heterogeneous Fe(III)-based catalysts. The as-prepared heterogeneous nanocatalyst can be used repeatedly without any loss of catalytic activity. Importantly, the stability of the new catalysts can be easily monitored by PL intensity or quantum yield measurements, which certainly opens the doors for real time monitoring in a range of applications. Additionally, to the best of our knowledge, for the first time, the oxidative property of Fe-CDs was also explored in decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in water with the first order rate constant of 0.7 × 10−2 min−1, proving the versatile catalytic properties of such hybrid systems.

  18. Study of crosslinking onset and hydrogen annealing of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene irradiated with high-energy protons

    Wilson, John Ford

    1997-09-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE) is used extensively in hip and knee endoprostheses. Radiation damage from the sterilization of these endoprostheses prior to surgical insertion results in polymer crosslinking and decreased oxidative stability. The motivation for this study was to determine if UHMW-PE could be crosslinked by low dose proton irradiation with minimal radiation damage and its subsequent deleterious effects. I found that low dose proton irradiation and post irradiation hydrogen annealing did crosslink UHMW-PE and limit post irradiation oxidation. Crosslinking onset was investigated for UHMW-PE irradiated with 2.6 and 30 MeV H+ ions at low doses from 5.7 × 1011-2.3 × 1014 ions/cm2. Crosslinking was determined from gel permeation chromatography (GPC) of 1,2,4 trichlorobenzene sol fractions and increased with dose. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed irradiation resulted in increased free radicals confirmed from increased carbonyl groups. Radiation damage, especially at the highest doses observed, also showed up in carbon double bonds and increased methyl end groups. Hydrogen annealing after ion irradiation resulted in 40- 50% decrease in FTIR absorption associated with carbonyl. The hydrogen annealing prevented further oxidation after aging for 1024 hours at 80oC. Hydrogen annealing was successful in healing radiation damage through reacting with the free radicals generated during proton irradiation. Polyethylenes, polyesters, and polyamides are used in diverse applications by the medical profession in the treatment of orthopedic impairments and cardiovascular disease and for neural implants. These artificial implants are sterilized with gamma irradiation prior to surgery and the resulting radiation damage can lead to accelerated deterioration of the implant properties. The findings in this study will greatly impact the continued use of these materials through the elimination of many problems associated with radiation

  19. Hydrogen trapping energy levels and hydrogen diffusion at high and low strain rates (~10{sup 5} s{sup −1} and 10{sup −7} s{sup −1}) in lean duplex stainless steel

    Silverstein, R., E-mail: barrav@post.bgu.ac.il; Eliezer, D.

    2016-09-30

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) alloys are high strength steels combined with ductility and excellent resistance to stress corrosion cracking, which makes them attractive for the pressure vessels or underwater pipelines industries. Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) is caused by the action of hydrogen in combination with residual or applied stress and can lead to the mechanical degradation of a material. Dynamic and quasi-static experiments were conducted at room temperature and strain rates of 10{sup 5} s{sup −1} and 10{sup −7} s{sup −1} on gas-phase hydrogen charged DSS. Hydrogen trapping in the various defects and its effect on the mechanical properties are discussed in details. A linear model of Lee and Lee was applied to calculate the trap activation energies. It was found that lower strain rates (~10{sup −7} s{sup −1}) will create less deep hydrogen trapping energies values; ~40% lower than in non-loaded sample. In addition, higher dynamic pressure will create higher trapping energy sites for hydrogen. Based on our experimental studies we developed an analytical model for hydrogen trapping. We have found that the strain rate has a direct influence on both hydrogen diffusion and hydrogen potential trapping sites. During deformation processes created at low strain rates (~10{sup −7} s{sup −1}) hydrogen has enough time to migrate with dislocations from deeper potential trapping sites to lower potential trapping sites.

  20. Nano-ferrites for water splitting: Unprecedented high photocatalytic hydrogen production under visible light

    Mangrulkar, Priti A.; Polshettiwar, Vivek; Labhsetwar, Nitin K.; Varma, Rajender S.; Rayalu, Sadhana Suresh

    2012-01-01

    In the present investigation, hydrogen production via water splitting by nano-ferrites was studied using ethanol as the sacrificial donor and Pt as co-catalyst. Nano-ferrite is emerging as a promising photocatalyst with a hydrogen evolution rate of 8.275 μmol h -1 and a hydrogen yield of 8275 μmol h -1 g -1 under visible light compared to 0.0046 μmol h -1 for commercial iron oxide (tested under similar experimental conditions). Nano-ferrites were tested in three different photoreactor configurations. The rate of hydrogen evolution by nano-ferrite was significantly influenced by the photoreactor configuration. Altering the reactor configuration led to sevenfold (59.55 μmol h -1) increase in the hydrogen evolution rate. Nano-ferrites have shown remarkable stability in hydrogen production up to 30 h and the cumulative hydrogen evolution rate was observed to be 98.79 μmol h -1. The hydrogen yield was seen to be influenced by several factors like photocatalyst dose, illumination intensity, irradiation time, sacrificial donor and presence of co-catalyst. These were then investigated in detail. It was evident from the experimental data that nano-ferrites under optimized reaction conditions and photoreactor configuration could lead to remarkable hydrogen evolution activity under visible light. Temperature had a significant role in enhancing the hydrogen yield. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  1. The H_6_0Si_6C_5_4 heterofullerene as high-capacity hydrogen storage medium

    Yong, Yongliang; Zhou, Qingxiao; Li, Xiaohong; Lv, Shijie

    2016-01-01

    With the great success in Si atoms doped C_6_0 fullerene and the well-established methods for synthesis of hydrogenated carbon fullerenes, this leads naturally to wonder whether Si-doped fullerenes are possible for special applications such as hydrogen storage. Here by using first-principles calculations, we design a novel high-capacity hydrogen storage material, H_6_0Si_6C_5_4 heterofullerene, and confirm its geometric stability. It is found that the H_6_0Si_6C_5_4 heterofullerene has a large HOMO-LUMO gap and a high symmetry, indicating it is high chemically stable. Further, our finite temperature simulations indicate that the H_6_0Si_6C_5_4 heterofullerene is thermally stable at 300 K. H_2 molecules would enter into the cage from the Si-hexagon ring because of lower energy barrier. Through our calculation, a maximum of 21 H_2 molecules can be stored inside the H_6_0Si_6C_5_4 cage in molecular form, leading to a gravimetric density of 11.11 wt% for 21H_2@H_6_0Si_6C_5_4 system, which suggests that the hydrogenated Si_6C_5_4 heterofullerene could be suitable as a high-capacity hydrogen storage material.

  2. System Evaluation and Life-Cycle Cost Analysis of a Commercial-Scale High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O' Brien; Michael G. McKellar

    2012-11-01

    Results of a system evaluation and lifecycle cost analysis are presented for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) central hydrogen production plant. The plant design relies on grid electricity to power the electrolysis process and system components, and industrial natural gas to provide process heat. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to evaluate the reference central plant design capable of producing 50,000 kg/day of hydrogen. The HYSYS software performs mass and energy balances across all components to allow optimization of the design using a detailed process flow sheet and realistic operating conditions specified by the analyst. The lifecycle cost analysis was performed using the H2A analysis methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. This methodology utilizes Microsoft Excel spreadsheet analysis tools that require detailed plant performance information (obtained from HYSYS), along with financial and cost information to calculate lifecycle costs. The results of the lifecycle analyses indicate that for a 10% internal rate of return, a large central commercial-scale hydrogen production plant can produce 50,000 kg/day of hydrogen at an average cost of $2.68/kg. When the cost of carbon sequestration is taken into account, the average cost of hydrogen production increases by $0.40/kg to $3.08/kg.

  3. Complete genome sequence of Enterobacter sp. IIT-BT 08: A potential microbial strain for high rate hydrogen production.

    Khanna, Namita; Ghosh, Ananta Kumar; Huntemann, Marcel; Deshpande, Shweta; Han, James; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Mavrommatis, Kostas; Szeto, Ernest; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Pitluck, Sam; Nolan, Matt; Woyke, Tanja; Teshima, Hazuki; Chertkov, Olga; Daligault, Hajnalka; Davenport, Karen; Gu, Wei; Munk, Christine; Zhang, Xiaojing; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Xu, Yan; Quintana, Beverly; Reitenga, Krista; Kunde, Yulia; Green, Lance; Erkkila, Tracy; Han, Cliff; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Lang, Elke; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Goodwin, Lynne; Chain, Patrick; Das, Debabrata

    2013-12-20

    Enterobacter sp. IIT-BT 08 belongs to Phylum: Proteobacteria, Class: Gammaproteobacteria, Order: Enterobacteriales, Family: Enterobacteriaceae. The organism was isolated from the leaves of a local plant near the Kharagpur railway station, Kharagpur, West Bengal, India. It has been extensively studied for fermentative hydrogen production because of its high hydrogen yield. For further enhancement of hydrogen production by strain development, complete genome sequence analysis was carried out. Sequence analysis revealed that the genome was linear, 4.67 Mbp long and had a GC content of 56.01%. The genome properties encode 4,393 protein-coding and 179 RNA genes. Additionally, a putative pathway of hydrogen production was suggested based on the presence of formate hydrogen lyase complex and other related genes identified in the genome. Thus, in the present study we describe the specific properties of the organism and the generation, annotation and analysis of its genome sequence as well as discuss the putative pathway of hydrogen production by this organism.

  4. High-current negative hydrogen ion beam production in a cesium-injected multicusp source

    Takeiri, Y.; Tsumori, K.; Kaneko, O.

    1997-01-01

    A high-current negative hydrogen ion source has been developed, where 16.2 A of the H - current was obtained with a current density of 31 mA/cm 2 . The ion source is a multicusp source with a magnetic filter for negative ion production, and cesium vapor is injected into the arc chamber, leading to enhancement of the negative ion yields. The cesium-injection effects are discussed, based on the experimental observations. Although the surface production of the negative ions on the cesium-covered plasma grid is thought to be a dominant mechanism of the H - current enhancement, the cesium effects in the plasma volume, such as the cesium ionization and the electron cooling, are observed, and could contribute to the improved operation of the negative ion source. (author)

  5. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of the Hydrogen-Deficient Binary υ Sgr

    Kipper Tõnu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The high resolution spectra of hydrogen-deficient binary υ Sgr are analyzed. The atmospheric parameters are Teff = 12300±200 K, log g = 2:5±0:5 and ξt = 5 - 15 kms−1 depending on the element. For Fe II ξt = 9:3 ± 0:3 kms−1. Iron is slightly underabundant (-0.2 dex. Nitrogen is overabundant with [N/Fe]ͬ ≈ 1.0, carbon and oxygen are underabundant with [C/Fe] ≈ -1.6 and [O/Fe] ≈ -1.1. The s-process elements Y, Zr and Ba are overabundant about 0.5 dex. Quite large number of emission lines, both permitted and forbidden, originating from low excitation levels of neutral and ionized metals, are identified. Radial velocities of these emission lines indicate that an accretion disk in the system is present.

  6. Melting curves of molecular hydrogen and molecular deuterium under high pressures between 20 and 373 K

    Diatschenko, V.; Chu, C.W.; Liebenberg, D.H.; Young, D.A.; Ross, M.; Mills, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    We determined the melting curve of molecular hydrogen and molecular deuterium at closely spaced intervals from 20 to 373 K by two different techniques using high-pressure diamond cells. The cells were loaded with liquid at low temperature or with compressed gas at room temperature. Empirical functions for the melting curves were evaluated from least-squares fits of the data. Values of the compressibility and Debye temperature were computed at melting, and the results are compared with those calculated from various theoretical models. The good agreement shows that the models are generally valid, although small systematic deviations may point the way toward refinements in modeling. Our study also demonstrates the need to determine a one-piece intermolecular potential valid over a wide pressure range by refitting all experimental data, including the shock data recently made available

  7. Hydrogen production by water-splitting using heat supplied by a high-temperature reactor

    Courvoisier, P.; Rastoin, J.; Titiliette, Z.

    1976-01-01

    Some aspects of the use of heat of nuclear origin for the production of hydrogen by water-splitting are considered. General notions pertaining to the yield of chemical cycles are discussed and the heat balance corresponding to two specific processes is evaluated. The possibilities of high temperature reactors, with respect to the coolant temperature levels, are examined from the standpoint of core design and technology of some components. Furthermore, subject to a judicious selection of their characteristics, these reactors can lead to excellent use of nuclear fuel. The coupling of the nuclear reactor with the chemical plant by means of a secondary helium circuit gives rise to the design of an intermediate heat exchanger, which is an important component of the overall installation. (orig.) [de

  8. Lithium decoration of three dimensional boron-doped graphene frameworks for high-capacity hydrogen storage

    Wang, Yunhui; Meng, Zhaoshun; Liu, Yuzhen; You, Dongsen; Wu, Kai; Lv, Jinchao; Wang, Xuezheng; Deng, Kaiming; Lu, Ruifeng; Rao, Dewei

    2015-01-01

    Based on density functional theory and the first principles molecular dynamics simulations, a three-dimensional B-doped graphene-interconnected framework has been constructed that shows good thermal stability even after metal loading. The average binding energy of adsorbed Li atoms on the proposed material (2.64 eV) is considerably larger than the cohesive energy per atom of bulk Li metal (1.60 eV). This value is ideal for atomically dispersed Li doping in experiments. From grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations, high hydrogen storage capacities of 5.9 wt% and 52.6 g/L in the Li-decorated material are attained at 298 K and 100 bars

  9. High-Sensitivity and Low-Power Flexible Schottky Hydrogen Sensor Based on Silicon Nanomembrane.

    Cho, Minkyu; Yun, Jeonghoon; Kwon, Donguk; Kim, Kyuyoung; Park, Inkyu

    2018-04-18

    High-performance and low-power flexible Schottky diode-based hydrogen sensor was developed. The sensor was fabricated by releasing Si nanomembrane (SiNM) and transferring onto a plastic substrate. After the transfer, palladium (Pd) and aluminum (Al) were selectively deposited as a sensing material and an electrode, respectively. The top-down fabrication process of flexible Pd/SiNM diode H 2 sensor is facile compared to other existing bottom-up fabricated flexible gas sensors while showing excellent H 2 sensitivity (Δ I/ I 0 > 700-0.5% H 2 concentrations) and fast response time (τ 10-90 = 22 s) at room temperature. In addition, selectivity, humidity, and mechanical tests verify that the sensor has excellent reliability and robustness under various environments. The operating power consumption of the sensor is only in the nanowatt range, which indicates its potential applications in low-power portable and wearable electronics.

  10. Virtual cathode regime in nonstationary electric high-current discharge in hydrogen

    Baksht, F.G.; Borodin, V.S.; Zhuravlev, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    Virtual cathode (VC) regime in a non-stationary high-current hydrogen arch is constructed. Basic calculational characteristics of the near-the-cathode layer are presented. The calculation was conducted for a 1 cm long cathode under 2x10 4 A/cm 2 current density in pulse and 10 atm. pressure. A rectangular current pulse was considered. It is shown that VC formation is caused by electron temperature reduction in the near-the-cathode area. This results in the reduction of ion flux from plasma to the cathode surface and finally in the change of a sign of space charge and field intensity near the surface. Under the transition to VC regime only the cathode temperature and its effective work function are practically changed, while the rest of parameters remain approximately constant

  11. Nitrate removal from alkaline high nitrate effluent by in situ generation of hydrogen using zinc dust

    Rajagopal, S.; Chitra, S.; Paul, Biplob

    2016-01-01

    Alkaline radioactive low level waste generated in Nuclear Fuel Cycle contains substantial amount of nitrate and needs to be treated to meet Central Pollution Control Board discharge limits of 90 mg/L in marine coastal area. Several denitrification methods like chemical treatment, electrochemical reduction, biological denitrification, ion exchange, reverse osmosis, photochemical reduction etc are followed for removal of nitrate. In effluent treatment plants where chemical treatment is carried out, chemical denitrification can be easily adapted without any additional set up. Reducing agents like zinc and aluminum are suitable for reducing nitrate in alkaline solution. Study on denitrification with zinc dust was taken up in this work. Not much work has been done with zinc dust on reduction of nitrate to nitrogen in alkaline waste with high nitrate content. In the present work, nitrate is reduced by nascent hydrogen generated in situ, caused by reaction between zinc dust and sodium hydroxide

  12. Highly conducting p-type nanocrystalline silicon thin films preparation without additional hydrogen dilution

    Patra, Chandralina; Das, Debajyoti

    2018-04-01

    Boron doped nanocrystalline silicon thin film has been successfully prepared at a low substrate temperature (250 °C) in planar inductively coupled RF (13.56 MHz) plasma CVD, without any additional hydrogen dilution. The effect of B2H6 flow rate on structural and electrical properties of the films has been studied. The p-type nc-Si:H films prepared at 5 ≤ B2H6 (sccm) ≤ 20 retains considerable amount of nanocrystallites (˜80 %) with high conductivity ˜101 S cm-1 and dominant crystallographic orientation which has been correlated with the associated increased ultra- nanocrystalline component in the network. Such properties together make the material significantly effective for utilization as p-type emitter layer in heterojunction nc-Si solar cells.

  13. Editors' Choice Growth of Layered WS2Electrocatalysts for Highly Efficient Hydrogen Production Reaction

    Alsabban, Merfat M.

    2016-08-18

    Seeking more economical alternative electrocatalysts without sacrificing much in performance to replace precious metal Pt is one of the major research topics in hydrogen evolution reactions (HER). Tungsten disulfide (WS2) has been recognized as a promising substitute for Pt owing to its high efficiency and low-cost. Since most existing works adopt solution-synthesized WS2 crystallites for HER, direct growth of WS2 layered materials on conducting substrates should offer new opportunities. The growth of WS2 by the thermolysis of ammonium tetrathiotungstate (NH4)(2)WS4 was examined under various gaseous environments. Structural analysis and electrochemical studies show that the H2S environment leads to the WS2 catalysts with superior HER performance with an extremely low overpotential (eta(10) = 184 mV). (C) The Author(s) 2016. Published by ECS. All rights reserved.

  14. Editors' Choice Growth of Layered WS2Electrocatalysts for Highly Efficient Hydrogen Production Reaction

    Alsabban, Merfat M.; Min, Shixiong; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Ming, Jun; Li, Lain-Jong; Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Seeking more economical alternative electrocatalysts without sacrificing much in performance to replace precious metal Pt is one of the major research topics in hydrogen evolution reactions (HER). Tungsten disulfide (WS2) has been recognized as a promising substitute for Pt owing to its high efficiency and low-cost. Since most existing works adopt solution-synthesized WS2 crystallites for HER, direct growth of WS2 layered materials on conducting substrates should offer new opportunities. The growth of WS2 by the thermolysis of ammonium tetrathiotungstate (NH4)(2)WS4 was examined under various gaseous environments. Structural analysis and electrochemical studies show that the H2S environment leads to the WS2 catalysts with superior HER performance with an extremely low overpotential (eta(10) = 184 mV). (C) The Author(s) 2016. Published by ECS. All rights reserved.

  15. Vortex combustor for low NOX emissions when burning lean premixed high hydrogen content fuel

    Steele, Robert C; Edmonds, Ryan G; Williams, Joseph T; Baldwin, Stephen P

    2012-11-20

    A trapped vortex combustor. The trapped vortex combustor is configured for receiving a lean premixed gaseous fuel and oxidant stream, where the fuel includes hydrogen gas. The trapped vortex combustor is configured to receive the lean premixed fuel and oxidant stream at a velocity which significantly exceeds combustion flame speed in a selected lean premixed fuel and oxidant mixture. The combustor is configured to operate at relatively high bulk fluid velocities while maintaining stable combustion, and low NOx emissions. The combustor is useful in gas turbines in a process of burning synfuels, as it offers the opportunity to avoid use of diluent gas to reduce combustion temperatures. The combustor also offers the possibility of avoiding the use of selected catalytic reaction units for removal of oxides of nitrogen from combustion gases exiting a gas turbine.

  16. One- and two-electron processes in collisions between hydrogen molecules and slow highly charged ions

    Wells, E.; Carnes, K.D.; Tawara, H.; Ali, R.; Sidky, Emil Y.; Illescas, Clara; Ben-Itzhak, I.

    2005-01-01

    A coincidence time-of-flight technique coupled with projectile charge state analysis was used to study electron capture in collisions between slow highly charged ions and hydrogen molecules. We found single electron capture with no target excitation to be the dominant process for both C 6+ projectiles at a velocity of 0.8 atomic units and Ar 11+ projectiles at v 0.63 a.u. Double electron capture and transfer excitation, however, were found to be comparable and occur about 30% of the time relative to single capture. Most projectiles (96%) auto-ionize quickly following double capture into doubly excited states. The data are compared to classical and quantum mechanical model calculations

  17. High photoconductive hydrogenated silicon by reactive sputtering in helium containing atmosphere

    Ohbiki, Tohru; Imura, Takeshi; Hiraki, Akio

    1982-01-01

    Mixed phase of amorphous and microcrystalline silicon-hydrogen alloys has been fabricated by reactive sputtering in He containing H 2 of which mole fraction is less than about 5 mole%. The degree of the crystallization, evaluated by electron microscopy and optical absorption spectroscopy, becomes high as the amount of H 2 in the atmosphere increases. The conductivity in dark and photoconductivity increase as the partial pressure of H 2 increases (form 0 to 1 mole%) and also as the pressure during sputtering increases. This increase in conductivity and photoconductivity is supposed to be related to the development of microcrystals. The highest photoconductivity is observed at the H 2 mole fraction of about 1 mole%. This film contains a small amount of microcrystals and show the photoconductivity higher by 2 orders of magnitude than that in a film sputter-deposited in Ar and H 2 atmosphere in the same apparatus. (author)

  18. High photoconductive hydrogenated silicon by reactive sputtering in helium containing atmosphere

    Ohbiki, Tohru; Imura, Takeshi; Hiraki, Akio

    1982-08-01

    Mixed phase of amorphous and microcrystalline silicon-hydrogen alloys has been fabricated by reactive sputtering in He containing H/sub 2/ of which mole fraction is less than about 5 mole%. The degree of the crystallization, evaluated by electron microscopy and optical absorption spectroscopy, becomes high as the amount of H/sub 2/ in the atmosphere increases. The conductivity in dark and photoconductivity increase as the partial pressure of H/sub 2/ increases (form 0 to 1 mole%) and also as the pressure during sputtering increases. This increase in conductivity and photoconductivity is supposed to be related to the development of microcrystals. The highest photoconductivity is observed at the H/sub 2/ mole fraction of about 1 mole%. This film contains a small amount of microcrystals and show the photoconductivity higher by 2 orders of magnitude than that in a film sputter-deposited in Ar and H/sub 2/ atmosphere in the same apparatus.

  19. High-pressure, ambient temperature hydrogen storage in metal-organic frameworks and porous carbon

    Beckner, Matthew; Dailly, Anne

    2014-03-01

    We investigated hydrogen storage in micro-porous adsorbents at ambient temperature and pressures up to 320 bar. We measured three benchmark adsorbents: two metal-organic frameworks, Cu3(1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate)2 [Cu3(btc)2; HKUST-1] and Zn4O(1,3,5-benzenetribenzoate)2 [Zn4O(btb)2; MOF-177], and the activated carbon MSC-30. In this talk, we focus on adsorption enthalpy calculations using a single adsorption isotherm. We use the differential form of the Claussius-Clapeyron equation applied to the Dubinin-Astakhov adsorption model to calculate adsorption enthalpies. Calculation of the adsorption enthalpy in this way gives a temperature independent enthalpy of 5-7 kJ/mol at the lowest coverage for the three materials investigated. Additionally, we discuss the assumptions and corrections that must be made when calculating adsorption isotherms at high-pressure and adsorption enthalpies.

  20. Effect of high hydrogen content on metallurgical and mechanical properties of zirconium alloy claddings after heat-treatment at high temperature

    Turque, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Under hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident conditions, fuel cladding tubes made of zirconium alloys can be exposed to steam at high temperature (HT, up 1200 C) before being cooled and then quenched in water. In some conditions, after burst occurrence the cladding can rapidly absorb a significant amount of hydrogen (secondary hydriding), up to 3000 wt.ppm locally, during steam exposition at HT. The study deals with the effect, poorly studied up to date, of high contents of hydrogen on the metallurgical and mechanical properties of two zirconium alloys, Zircaloy-4 and M5, during and after cooling from high temperatures, at which zirconium is in its β phase. A specific facility was developed to homogeneously charge in hydrogen up to ∼ 3000 wt.ppm cladding tube samples of several centimeters in length. Phase transformations, chemical element partitioning and hydrogen precipitation during cooling from the β temperature domain of zirconium were studied by using several techniques, for the materials containing up to ∼ 3000 wt.ppm of hydrogen in average: in-situ neutron diffraction upon cooling from 700 C, X-ray diffraction, μ-ERDA, EPMA and electron microscopy in particular. The results were compared to thermodynamic predictions. In order to study the effect of high hydrogen contents on the mechanical behavior of the (prior-)μ phase of zirconium, axial tensile tests were performed at various temperatures between 20 and 700 C upon cooling from the β temperature domain, on samples with mean hydrogen contents up to ∼ 3000 wt.ppm. The results show that metallurgical and mechanical properties of the (prior-)β phase of zirconium alloys strongly depend on temperature and hydrogen content. (author) [fr

  1. Double quantum dots decorated 3D graphene flowers for highly efficient photoelectrocatalytic hydrogen production

    Cheng, Qifa; Xu, Jing; Wang, Tao; Fan, Ling; Ma, Ruifang; Yu, Xinzhi; Zhu, Jian; Xu, Zhi; Lu, Bingan

    2017-11-01

    Photoelectrocatalysis (PEC) has been demonstrated as a promising technique for hydrogen production. However, the high over-potential and high recombination rate of photo-induced electron-hole pairs lead to poor hydrogen production efficiency. In order to overcome these problems, TiO2 and Au dual quantum dots (QDs) on three-dimensional graphene flowers (Au@TiO2@3DGFs) was synthesized by an electro-deposition strategy. The combination of Au and TiO2 modulates the band gap of TiO2, shifts the absorption to visible lights and improves the utilization efficiency of solar light. Simultaneously, the size-quantization TiO2 on 3DGFs not only achieves a larger specific surface area over conventional nanomaterials, but also promotes the separation of the photo-induced electron-hole pairs. Besides, the 3DGFs as a scaffold for QDs can provide more active sites and stable structure. Thus, the newly-developed Au@TiO2@3DGFs composite exhibited an impressive PEC activity and excellent durability. Under -240 mV potential (vs. RHE), the photoelectric current density involved visible light illumination (100 mW cm-2) reached 90 mA cm-2, which was about 3.6 times of the natural current density (without light, only 25 mA cm-2). It worth noting that the photoelectric current density did not degrade and even increased to 95 mA cm-2 over 90 h irradiation, indicating an amazing chemical stability.

  2. Monitoring and data acquisition of the high speed hydrogen pellet in SPINS

    Mukherjee, Samiran Shanti, E-mail: samiran@ipr.res.in; Mishra, Jyotishankar; Gangradey, Ranjana; Dutta, Pramit; Rastogi, Naveen; Panchal, Paresh; Nayak, Pratik; Agarwal, Jyoti; Bairagi, Pawan; Patel, Haresh; Sharma, Hardik

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Pellet INjector System with monitoring and data acquisition is described. • A high speed camera was used to view pellet size, and its flight trajectory. • PXI based high speed control system is used data acquisition. • Pellets of length 2–4.8 mm and speed 250–750 m/s were obtained. - Abstract: Injection of solid hydrogen pellets is an efficient way of replenishing the spent fuel in high temperature plasmas. Aiming that, a Single Pellet INjector System (SPINS) is developed at Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), India, to initiate pellet injection related research in SST-1. The pellet injector is controlled by a PXI system based data acquisition and control (DAC) system for pellet formation, precise firing control, data collection and diagnostics. The velocity of high speed moving pellets is estimated by using two sets of light gate diagnostic. Apart from light gate, a fast framing camera is used to measure the pellet size and its speed. The pellet images are captured at a frame rate of ∼200,000 frames per second at (128 × 64) pixel resolution with an exposure time of 1 μs. Using these diagnostic, various cylindrical pellets of length ranging from 2 to 4.8 mm and speed 250–750 m/s were successfully obtained. This paper describes the control and data acquisition system of SPINS, the techniques for measurement of pellet velocity and capturing images of high speed moving pellet.

  3. Improved Solar-Driven Photocatalytic Performance of Highly Crystalline Hydrogenated TiO2 Nanofibers with Core-Shell Structure

    Wu, Ming-Chung; Chen, Ching-Hsiang; Huang, Wei-Kang; Hsiao, Kai-Chi; Lin, Ting-Han; Chan, Shun-Hsiang; Wu, Po-Yeh; Lu, Chun-Fu; Chang, Yin-Hsuan; Lin, Tz-Feng; Hsu, Kai-Hsiang; Hsu, Jen-Fu; Lee, Kun-Mu; Shyue, Jing-Jong; Kordás, Krisztián; Su, Wei-Fang

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogenated titanium dioxide has attracted intensive research interests in pollutant removal applications due to its high photocatalytic activity. Herein, we demonstrate hydrogenated TiO2 nanofibers (H:TiO2 NFs) with a core-shell structure prepared by the hydrothermal synthesis and subsequent heat treatment in hydrogen flow. H:TiO2 NFs has excellent solar light absorption and photogenerated charge formation behavior as confirmed by optical absorbance, photo-Kelvin force probe microscopy and photoinduced charge carrier dynamics analyses. Photodegradation of various organic dyes such as methyl orange, rhodamine 6G and brilliant green is shown to take place with significantly higher rates on our novel catalyst than on pristine TiO2 nanofibers and commercial nanoparticle based photocatalytic materials, which is attributed to surface defects (oxygen vacancy and Ti3+ interstitial defect) on the hydrogen treated surface. We propose three properties/mechanisms responsible for the enhanced photocatalytic activity, which are: (1) improved absorbance allowing for increased exciton generation, (2) highly crystalline anatase TiO2 that promotes fast charge transport rate, and (3) decreased charge recombination caused by the nanoscopic Schottky junctions at the interface of pristine core and hydrogenated shell thus promoting long-life surface charges. The developed H:TiO2 NFs can be helpful for future high performance photocatalysts in environmental applications.

  4. Conceptual design of a hydrogen production system by DME steam reforming and high-efficiency nuclear reactor technology

    Fukushima, Kimichika; Ogawa, Takashi

    2003-01-01

    Hydrogen is a potential alternative energy source and produced commercially by methane (natural gas) or LPG steam reforming, a process that requires high temperatures, which are produced by burning fossil fuels. However, since this process emits large amounts of CO 2 , replacement of the combustion heat source with a nuclear heat source for 773-1173 K processes has been proposed in order to eliminate these CO 2 emissions. This paper proposes a novel method of low-temperature nuclear hydrogen production by reforming dimethyl ether (DME) with steam produced by a low-temperature nuclear reactor at about 573 K. The authors identified conditions that provide high hydrogen production fraction at low pressure and temperatures of about 523-573 K. By setting this low-temperature hydrogen production process at about 573K upstream from a turbine, it was found theoretically that the total energy utilization efficiency is about 50% and very high. By setting a turbine upstream of the hydrogen production plant, an overall efficiency of is 75% for an FBR and 76% for a supercritical-water cooled power reactor (SCPR). (author)

  5. Quality Assurance Strategy for Existing Homes: Final Quality Management Primer for High Performing Homes

    Del Bianco, M.; Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wood, A.

    2012-12-01

    This guide is designed to help Building America (BA) Teams understand quality management and its role in transitioning from conventional to high performance home building and remodeling. It explains what quality means, the value of quality management systems, the unique need for QMS when building high performing homes, and the first steps to a implementing a comprehensive QMS. This document provides a framework and context for BA teams when they encounter builders and remodelers.

  6. Quality Assurance Strategy for Existing Homes. Final Quality Management Primer for High Performing Homes

    Del Bianco, M. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Taggart, J. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Sikora, J. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Wood, A. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    2012-12-01

    This guide is designed to help Building America (BA) teams understand quality management and its role in transitioning from conventional to high performance home building and remodeling. It explains what quality means, the value of quality management systems, the unique need for QMS when building high performing homes, and the first steps to a implementing a comprehensive QMS. This document provides a framework and context for BA teams when they encounter builders and remodelers.

  7. Influence of hydrogen additions on high-temperature superplasticity of titanium alloys

    Lederich, R.J.; Sastry, S.M.L.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of the addition of up to 1.0 wt pct hydrogen as a transient alloying element on the superplastic formability (SPF) of fine-grained, equiaxed Ti-6Al-4V (Ti-64) and duplex-annealed Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo (Ti-6242) were determined. Small amounts of internal hydrogen greatly improve the SPF of the alloys. Formability at 720-900 C was evaluated by an instrumented cone-forming test with continuous monitoring of strain with time. Argon/1 pct hydrogen and argon/4 pct hydrogen gas mixtures were used for charging the alloys with hydrogen as well as for superplastic forming. Hydrogen additions lower the beta-transus temperature of alpha-beta titanium alloys, and the proportions of the alpha and beta phases required for optimum superplasticity can thus be obtained at lower temperatures in hydrogen-modified alloys than in standard alloys. The increased amount of beta phase in the hydrogen-modified titanium alloys reduces the grain growth rates at forming temperature, thus reducing the time-dependent decrease in superplastic strain rate at constant stress or the increase in flow stress at constant strain rate. Process parameters for superplastic forming of Ti-64 and Ti-6242 using argon-hydrogen gas mixtures were determined. 8 references

  8. Inequality in Preschool Quality? Community-Level Disparities in Access to High-Quality Learning Environments

    Bassok, Daphna; Galdo, Eva

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, unequal access to high-quality preschool has emerged as a growing public policy concern. Because of data limitations, it is notoriously difficult to measure disparities in access to early learning opportunities across communities and particularly challenging to quantify gaps in access to "high-quality" programs. Research…

  9. Catalyzed Nano-Framework Stablized High Density Reversible Hydrogen Storage Systems

    Tang, Xia [value too long for type character varying(50); Opalka, Susanne M.; Mosher, Daniel A; Laube, Bruce L; Brown, Ronald J; Vanderspurt, Thomas H; Arsenault, Sarah; Wu, Robert; Strickler, Jamie; Ronnebro, Ewa; Boyle, Tim; Cordaro, Joseph

    2010-06-30

    A wide range of high capacity on-board rechargeable material candidates have exhibited non-ideal behavior related to irreversible hydrogen discharge / recharge behavior, and kinetic instability or retardation. This project addresses these issues by incorporating solvated and other forms of complex metal hydrides, with an emphasis on borohydrides, into nano-scale frameworks of low density, high surface area skeleton materials to stabilize, catalyze, and control desorption product formation associated with such complex metal hydrides. A variety of framework chemistries and hydride / framework combinations were investigated to make a relatively broad assessment of the method's potential. In this project, the hydride / framework interactions were tuned to decrease desorption temperatures for highly stable compounds or increase desorption temperatures for unstable high capacity compounds, and to influence desorption product formation for improved reversibility. First principle modeling was used to explore heterogeneous catalysis of hydride reversibility by modeling H2 dissociation, hydrogen migration, and rehydrogenation. Atomic modeling also demonstrated enhanced NaTi(BH4)4 stabilization at nano-framework surfaces modified with multi-functional agents. Amine multi-functional agents were found to have more balanced interactions with nano-framework and hydride clusters than other functional groups investigated. Experimentation demonstrated that incorporation of Ca(BH4)2 and Mg(BH4)2 in aerogels enhanced hydride desorption kinetics. Carbon aerogels were identified as the most suitable nano-frameworks for hydride kinetic enhancement and high hydride loading. High loading of NaTi(BH4)4 ligand complex in SiO2 aerogel was achieved and hydride stability was improved with the aerogel. Although improvements of desorption kinetics was observed, the incorporation of

  10. Large scale, highly dense nanoholes on metal surfaces by underwater laser assisted hydrogen etching near nanocrystalline boundary

    Lin Dong; Zhang, Martin Yi; Ye Chang; Liu Zhikun; Liu, C. Richard [School of Industrial Engineering and Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906 (United States); Cheng, Gary J., E-mail: gjcheng@purdue.edu [School of Industrial Engineering and Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906 (United States)

    2012-03-01

    A new method to generate large scale and highly dense nanoholes is presented in this paper. By the pulsed laser irradiation under water, the hydrogen etching is introduced to form high density nanoholes on the surfaces of AISI 4140 steel and Ti. In order to achieve higher nanohole density, laser shock peening (LSP) followed by recrystallization is used for grain refinement. It is found that the nanohole density does not increase until recrystallization of the substructures after laser shock peening. The mechanism of nanohole generation is studied in detail. This method can be also applied to generate nanoholes on other materials with hydrogen etching effect.

  11. Large scale, highly dense nanoholes on metal surfaces by underwater laser assisted hydrogen etching near nanocrystalline boundary

    Lin Dong; Zhang, Martin Yi; Ye Chang; Liu Zhikun; Liu, C. Richard; Cheng, Gary J.

    2012-01-01

    A new method to generate large scale and highly dense nanoholes is presented in this paper. By the pulsed laser irradiation under water, the hydrogen etching is introduced to form high density nanoholes on the surfaces of AISI 4140 steel and Ti. In order to achieve higher nanohole density, laser shock peening (LSP) followed by recrystallization is used for grain refinement. It is found that the nanohole density does not increase until recrystallization of the substructures after laser shock peening. The mechanism of nanohole generation is studied in detail. This method can be also applied to generate nanoholes on other materials with hydrogen etching effect.

  12. Effect of thermal annealing on the optical and structural properties of silicon implanted with a high hydrogen fluence

    Kling, A.; Soares, J.C.; Rodriguez, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Avella, M.; Jimenez, J.

    2006-01-01

    Silicon capped by thermal oxide has been implanted with 1 x 10 17 H/cm 2 and the implant profile peaking at the interface. Samples were subjected to thermal annealing and characterized by ERD, FTIR, RBS/channeling, UV/VIS reflectance and cathodoluminescence regarding H-content, crystalline quality and light emission. The results show that the luminescent properties are independent of the hydrogen content but are strongly related with the present damage

  13. Cold Plasma-activated hydrogen peroxide aerosol inactivates Escherichia coli 0157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria innocua and maintains quality of grape tomato, spinach and cantaloupe

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of aerosolized hydrogen peroxide in inactivating bacteria and maintaining quality of grape tomato, baby spinach leaves and cantaloupe. Stem scar and smooth surfaces of tomatoes, spinach leaves, and cantaloupe rinds, inoculated with Escherich...

  14. Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation under continuous light: implications for paleoenvironmental interpretations of the High Arctic during Paleogene warming.

    Yang, Hong; Pagani, Mark; Briggs, Derek E G; Equiza, M A; Jagels, Richard; Leng, Qin; Lepage, Ben A

    2009-06-01

    The effect of low intensity continuous light, e.g., in the High Arctic summer, on plant carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionations is unknown. We conducted greenhouse experiments to test the impact of light quantity and duration on both carbon and hydrogen isotope compositions of three deciduous conifers whose fossil counterparts were components of Paleogene Arctic floras: Metasequoia glyptostroboides, Taxodium distichum, and Larix laricina. We found that plant leaf bulk carbon isotopic values of the examined species were 1.75-4.63 per thousand more negative under continuous light (CL) than under diurnal light (DL). Hydrogen isotope values of leaf n-alkanes under continuous light conditions revealed a D-enriched hydrogen isotope composition of up to 40 per thousand higher than in diurnal light conditions. The isotope offsets between the two light regimes is explained by a higher ratio of intercellular to atmospheric CO(2) concentration (C (i)/C (a)) and more water loss for plants under continuous light conditions during a 24-h transpiration cycle. Apparent hydrogen isotope fractionations between source water and individual lipids (epsilon(lipid-water)) range from -62 per thousand (Metasequoia C(27) and C(29)) to -87 per thousand (Larix C(29)) in leaves under continuous light. We applied these hydrogen fractionation factors to hydrogen isotope compositions of in situ n-alkanes from well-preserved Paleogene deciduous conifer fossils from the Arctic region to estimate the deltaD value in ancient precipitation. Precipitation in the summer growing season yielded a deltaD of -186 per thousand for late Paleocene, -157 per thousand for early middle Eocene, and -182 per thousand for late middle Eocene. We propose that high-latitude summer precipitation in this region was supplemented by moisture derived from regionally recycled transpiration of the polar forests that grew during the Paleogene warming.

  15. An Experimental and Chemical Kinetics Study of the Combustion of Syngas and High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    Santoro, Robers [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Dryer, Frederick [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Ju, Yiguang [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2013-09-30

    An integrated and collaborative effort involving experiments and complementary chemical kinetic modeling investigated the effects of significant concentrations of water and CO2 and minor contaminant species (methane [CH4], ethane [C2H6], NOX, etc.) on the ignition and combustion of HHC fuels. The research effort specifically addressed broadening the experimental data base for ignition delay, burning rate, and oxidation kinetics at high pressures, and further refinement of chemical kinetic models so as to develop compositional specifications related to the above major and minor species. The foundation for the chemical kinetic modeling was the well validated mechanism for hydrogen and carbon monoxide developed over the last 25 years by Professor Frederick Dryer and his co-workers at Princeton University. This research furthered advance the understanding needed to develop practical guidelines for realistic composition limits and operating characteristics for HHC fuels. A suite of experiments was utilized that that involved a high-pressure laminar flow reactor, a pressure-release type high-pressure combustion chamber and a high-pressure turbulent flow reactor.

  16. Hydrogen detonation and detonation transition data from the High-Temperature Combustion Facility

    Ciccarelli, G.; Boccio, J.L.; Ginsberg, T.; Finfrock, C.; Gerlach, L.; Malliakos, A.

    1995-01-01

    The BNL High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) is an experimental research tool capable of investigating the effects of initial thermodynamic state on the high-speed combustion characteristic of reactive gas mixtures. The overall experimental program has been designed to provide data to help characterize the influence of elevated gas-mixture temperature (and pressure) on the inherent sensitivity of hydrogen-air-steam mixtures to undergo detonation, on the potential for flames accelerating in these mixtures to transition into detonations, on the effects of gas venting on the flame-accelerating process, on the phenomena of initiation of detonations in these mixtures by jets of hot reactant product,s and on the capability of detonations within a confined space to transmit into another, larger confined space. This paper presents results obtained from the completion of two of the overall test series that was designed to characterize high-speed combustion phenomena in initially high-temperature gas mixtures. These two test series are the intrinsic detonability test series and the deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) test series. A brief description of the facility is provided below

  17. Hydrogen detonation and detonation transition data from the High-Temperature Combustion Facility

    Ciccarelli, G.; Boccio, J.L.; Ginsberg, T.; Finfrock, C.

    1996-01-01

    The BNL High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) is an experimental research tool capable of investigating the effects of initial thermodynamic state on the high-speed combustion characteristic of reactive gas mixtures. The overall experimental program has been designed to provide data to help characterize the influence of elevated gas-mixture temperature (and pressure) on the inherent sensitivity of hydrogen-air-steam mixtures to undergo detonation, on the potential for flames accelerating in these mixtures to transition into detonations, on the effects of gas venting on the flame-accelerating process, on the phenomena of initiation of detonations in these mixtures by jets of hot reactant products, and on the capability of detonations within a confined space to transmit into another, larger confined space. This paper presents results obtained from the completion of two of the overall test series that was designed to characterize high-speed combustion phenomena in initially high-temperature gas mixtures. These two test series are the intrinsic detonability test series and the deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) test series. A brief description of the facility is provided below

  18. Advanced gasifier and water gas shift technologies for low cost coal conversion to high hydrogen syngas

    Kramer, Andrew Kramer [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2016-09-30

    The Gas Technology Institute (GTI) and team members RTI International (RTI), Coanda Research and Development, and Nexant, are developing and maturing a portfolio of technologies to meet the United States Department of Energy (DOE) goals for lowering the cost of producing high hydrogen syngas from coal for use in carbon capture power and coal-to-liquids/chemicals. This project matured an advanced pilot-scale gasifier, with scalable and commercially traceable components, to readiness for use in a first-of-a-kind commercially-relevant demonstration plant on the scale of 500-1,000 tons per day (TPD). This was accomplished through cold flow simulation of the gasifier quench zone transition region at Coanda and through an extensive hotfire gasifier test program on highly reactive coal and high ash/high ash fusion temperature coals at GTI. RTI matured an advanced water gas shift process and catalyst to readiness for testing at pilot plant scale through catalyst development and testing, and development of a preliminary design basis for a pilot scale reactor demonstrating the catalyst. A techno-economic analysis was performed by Nexant to assess the potential benefits of the gasifier and catalyst technologies in the context of power production and methanol production. This analysis showed an 18%reduction in cost of power and a 19%reduction in cost of methanol relative to DOE reference baseline cases.

  19. Cellulose Nanocrystal Templated Graphene Nanoscrolls for High Performance Supercapacitors and Hydrogen Storage: An Experimental and Molecular Simulation Study.

    Dhar, Prodyut; Gaur, Surendra Singh; Kumar, Amit; Katiyar, Vimal

    2018-03-01

    Graphene nanoscrolls (GNS), due to their remarkably interesting properties, have attracted significant interest with applications in various engineering sectors. However, uncontrolled morphologies, poor yield and low quality GNS produced through traditional routes are major challenges associated. We demonstrate sustainable approach of utilizing bio-derived cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) as template for fabrication of GNS with tunable morphological dimensions ranging from micron-to-nanoscale(controlled length 1 μm), alongwith encapsulation of catalytically active metallic-species in scroll interlayers. The surface-modified magnetic CNCs acts as structural-directing agents which provides enough momentum to initiate self-scrolling phenomenon of graphene through van der Waals forces and π-π interactions, mechanism of which is demonstrated through experimental and molecular simulation studies. The proposed approach of GNS fabrication provides flexibility to tune physico-chemical properties of GNS by simply varying interlayer spacing, scrolling density and fraction of encapsulated metallic nanoparticles. The hybrid GNS with confined palladium or platinum nanoparticles (at lower loading ~1 wt.%) shows enhanced hydrogen storage capacity (~0.2 wt.% at~20 bar and ~273 K) and excellent supercapacitance behavior (~223-357 F/g) for prolonged cycles (retention ~93.5-96.4% at ~10000 cycles). The current strategy of utilizing bio-based templates can be further extended to incorporate complex architectures or nanomaterials in GNS core or inter-layers, which will potentially broaden its applications in fabrication of high-performance devices.

  20. The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) for Producing Hydrogen to Manufacture Liquid Fuels

    Forsberg, C.W.; Peterson, P.F.; Ott, L.

    2004-01-01

    Conventional world oil production is expected to peak within a decade. Shortfalls in production of liquid fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) from conventional oil sources are expected to be offset by increased production of fuels from heavy oils and tar sands that are primarily located in the Western Hemisphere (Canada, Venezuela, the United States, and Mexico). Simultaneously, there is a renewed interest in liquid fuels from biomass, such as alcohol; but, biomass production requires fertilizer. Massive quantities of hydrogen (H2) are required (1) to convert heavy oils and tar sands to liquid fuels and (2) to produce fertilizer for production of biomass that can be converted to liquid fuels. If these liquid fuels are to be used while simultaneously minimizing greenhouse emissions, nonfossil methods for the production of H2 are required. Nuclear energy can be used to produce H2. The most efficient methods to produce H2 from nuclear energy involve thermochemical cycles in which high-temperature heat (700 to 850 C) and water are converted to H2 and oxygen. The peak nuclear reactor fuel and coolant temperatures must be significantly higher than the chemical process temperatures to transport heat from the reactor core to an intermediate heat transfer loop and from the intermediate heat transfer loop to the chemical plant. The reactor temperatures required for H2 production are at the limits of practical engineering materials. A new high-temperature reactor concept is being developed for H2 and electricity production: the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR). The fuel is a graphite-matrix, coated-particle fuel, the same type that is used in modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (MHTGRs). The coolant is a clean molten fluoride salt with a boiling point near 1400 C. The use of a liquid coolant, rather than helium, reduces peak reactor fuel and coolant temperatures 100 to 200 C relative to those of a MHTGR. Liquids are better heat transfer fluids than gases

  1. Syntheses and properties of several metastable and stable hydrides derived from intermetallic compounds under high hydrogen pressure

    Filipek, S.M., E-mail: sfilipek@unipress.waw.pl [Institute of High Pressure Physics PAS, ul. Sokolowska 29, 01-142 Warsaw (Poland); Paul-Boncour, V. [ICMPE-CMTR, CNRS-UPEC, 2-8 rue Henri Dunant, 94320 Thiais (France); Liu, R.S. [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Jacob, I. [Unit Nuclear Eng., Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Tsutaoka, T. [Dept. of Sci. Educ., Grad. School of Educ., Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Budziak, A. [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAS, 31-342 Kraków (Poland); Morawski, A. [Institute of High Pressure Physics PAS, ul. Sokolowska 29, 01-142 Warsaw (Poland); Sugiura, H. [Yokohama City University, 22-2 Seto, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0027 (Japan); Zachariasz, P. [Institute of Electron Technology Cracow Division, ul. Zablocie 39, 30-701 Krakow (Poland); Dybko, K. [Institute of Physics, PAS, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Diduszko, R. [Tele and Radio Research Institute, ul. Ratuszowa 11, Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-12-01

    Brief summary of our former work on high hydrogen pressure syntheses of novel hydrides and studies of their properties is supplemented with new results. Syntheses and properties of a number of hydrides (unstable, metastable or stable in ambient conditions) derived under high hydrogen pressure from intermetallic compounds, like MeT{sub 2}, MeNi{sub 5}, Me{sub 7}T{sub 3}, Y{sub 6}Mn{sub 23} and YMn{sub 12} (where Me = zirconium, yttrium or rare earth; T = transition metal) are presented. Stabilization of ZrFe{sub 2}H{sub 4} due to surface phenomena was revealed. Unusual role of manganese in hydride forming processes is pointed out. Hydrogen induced phase transitions, suppression of magnetism, antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic and metal-insulator or semimetal-metal transitions are described. Equations of state (EOS) of hydrides submitted to hydrostatic pressures up to 30 GPa are presented and discussed.

  2. A high-throughput microtiter plate based method for the determination of peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide.

    Putt, Karson S; Pugh, Randall B

    2013-01-01

    Peracetic acid is gaining usage in numerous industries who have found a myriad of uses for its antimicrobial activity. However, rapid high throughput quantitation methods for peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide are lacking. Herein, we describe the development of a high-throughput microtiter plate based assay based upon the well known and trusted titration chemical reactions. The adaptation of these titration chemistries to rapid plate based absorbance methods for the sequential determination of hydrogen peroxide specifically and the total amount of peroxides present in solution are described. The results of these methods were compared to those of a standard titration and found to be in good agreement. Additionally, the utility of the developed method is demonstrated through the generation of degradation curves of both peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide in a mixed solution.

  3. A high-throughput microtiter plate based method for the determination of peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide.

    Karson S Putt

    Full Text Available Peracetic acid is gaining usage in numerous industries who have found a myriad of uses for its antimicrobial activity. However, rapid high throughput quantitation methods for peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide are lacking. Herein, we describe the development of a high-throughput microtiter plate based assay based upon the well known and trusted titration chemical reactions. The adaptation of these titration chemistries to rapid plate based absorbance methods for the sequential determination of hydrogen peroxide specifically and the total amount of peroxides present in solution are described. The results of these methods were compared to those of a standard titration and found to be in good agreement. Additionally, the utility of the developed method is demonstrated through the generation of degradation curves of both peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide in a mixed solution.

  4. Effects of acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide application during defeathering on the microbiological quality of broiler carcasses prior to evisceration.

    Dickens, J A; Whittemore, A D

    1997-04-01

    The microbiological quality and skin appearance of New York dressed broiler carcasses were determined in two separate experiments after a water control, acetic acid, or H2O2 spray during defeathering. Broilers were picked up from a local processor and transported in coops to the pilot facility. In both experiments, commercial processing parameters were followed up to the defeathering step. After feather removal, the vents of all carcasses were blocked with a cotton plug to prevent contamination of the whole carcass rinse diluent with fecal material from the lower gut. The neck and feet were removed, and the carcasses were placed in individual plastic bags in preparation for a whole carcass rinse. Results showed a statistically significant reduction (P < 0.05) in the log10 total aerobic plate counts for carcasses treated with 1% acetic acid in comparison to the water control (log10 cfu counts = 3.93 and 4.53, respectively). No differences were observed in skin appearance due to the 1% acid treatment. The addition of 0.5, 1, or 1.5% H2O2 to spray waters had no effect on microbiological quality of the carcasses when compared to the water control (4.92, 5.01, 4.91, and 4.99 log10 counts, respectively). The skin of carcasses treated with hydrogen peroxide, regardless of the concentration was bleached and bloated.

  5. The Role of κ-Carbides as Hydrogen Traps in High-Mn Steels

    Tobias A. Timmerscheidt

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the addition of Al to high-Mn steels is known to reduce their sensitivity to hydrogen-induced delayed fracture, we investigate possible trapping effects connected to the presence of Al in the grain interior employing density-functional theory (DFT. The role of Al-based precipitates is also investigated to understand the relevance of short-range ordering effects. So-called E21-Fe3AlC κ-carbides are frequently observed in Fe-Mn-Al-C alloys. Since H tends to occupy the same positions as C in these precipitates, the interaction and competition between both interstitials is also investigated via DFT-based simulations. While the individual H–H/C–H chemical interactions are generally repulsive, the tendency of interstitials to increase the lattice parameter can yield a net increase of the trapping capability. An increased Mn content is shown to enhance H trapping due to attractive short-range interactions. Favorable short-range ordering is expected to occur at the interface between an Fe matrix and the E21-Fe3AlC κ-carbides, which is identified as a particularly attractive trapping site for H. At the same time, accumulation of H at sites of this type is observed to yield decohesion of this interface, thereby promoting fracture formation. The interplay of these effects, evident in the trapping energies at various locations and dependent on the H concentration, can be expressed mathematically, resulting in a term that describes the hydrogen embrittlement.

  6. Development of Thin Film Amorphous Silicon Tandem Junction Based Photocathodes Providing High Open-Circuit Voltages for Hydrogen Production

    F. Urbain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin film tandem solar cells (a-Si:H/a-Si:H have been developed with focus on high open-circuit voltages for the direct application as photocathodes in photoelectrochemical water splitting devices. By temperature variation during deposition of the intrinsic a-Si:H absorber layers the band gap energy of a-Si:H absorber layers, correlating with the hydrogen content of the material, can be adjusted and combined in a way that a-Si:H/a-Si:H tandem solar cells provide open-circuit voltages up to 1.87 V. The applicability of the tandem solar cells as photocathodes was investigated in a photoelectrochemical cell (PEC measurement set-up. With platinum as a catalyst, the a-Si:H/a-Si:H based photocathodes exhibit a high photocurrent onset potential of 1.76 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE and a photocurrent of 5.3 mA/cm2 at 0 V versus RHE (under halogen lamp illumination. Our results provide evidence that a direct application of thin film silicon based photocathodes fulfills the main thermodynamic requirements to generate hydrogen. Furthermore, the presented approach may provide an efficient and low-cost route to solar hydrogen production.

  7. Prototype high current, high duty factor negative hydrogen ion source for LAMPF

    Lawrence, G.P.; Hayward, T.D.; Jackson, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    Present plans for the high current proton storage ring at LAMPF incorporate charge changing (stripping) injection of H - ions in all modes of operation. Achievable stored current levels in this device will be strongly dependent on the maximum H - beam intensity which can be accelerated by the linac, consistent with acceptable beam spill. This requirement has stimulated a program to develop an H - ion source capable of providing a suitably high peak current (up to 25 mA) at high duty factor (up to 12 percent), with a normalized x,x' or y,y' emittance acceptable to the accelerating system. There are presently two main approaches which could lead to H - ion sources providing this kind of performance. These are (a) the charge exchange method, in which an intense proton beam is fractionally converted to H - beam in a suitable charge adding medium, and (b) the direct extraction method, in which H - ions are obtained by a surface emission process associated with a gas discharge plasma. While both approaches may eventually find optimum application in different situations, it is not obvious, at present, which scheme will turn out to be the most satisfactory for LAMPF. A prototype charge exchange H - ion source has been constructed as a first step in the development program and is presently being evaluated. Work on surface emission direct extraction techniques is in the planning stages. (U.S.)

  8. IGSCC growth behaviors of Alloy 690 in hydrogenated high temperature water

    Arioka, K.; Yamada, T.; Miyamoto, T.; Terachi, T. [INSS, (Japan)

    2011-07-01

    The rate of growth of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was measured for cold worked and thermally treated and solution treated Alloy 690 (UNS N06690, CW TT690, CW ST690) in hydrogenated pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water under static load condition. Three important patterns were observed: First, Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) was observed on both TT and ST690 even in static load condition if materials were heavily cold worked although the rate of SCC growth was much slower than that of CW mill annealed Alloy 600. Furthermore much rapid SCC growth was recognized in 20% CW TT690 than that of 20% CW ST690. This is quite different result in the literature in high temperature caustic solution. Second, in order to assess the role of creep, rates of creep crack growth were measured in air, argon, and hydrogen gas environments using 20% CW TT690, and 20% CW MA600 in the range of temperatures between 360 and 460 C; intergranular creep cracking (IG creep cracking) was observed on the test materials even in air. Similar slope of 1/T-type temperature dependencies on IGSCC and IG creep crack growth were observed on 20% CW TT690. Similar fracture morphologies and similar 1/T-type temperature dependencies suggest that creep is important in the growth of IGSCC of CW TT690 in high temperature water. Third, cavities and pores were observed at grain boundaries near tips of SCC and creep although the size of the cavities and pores of SCC were much smaller than that of creep cracks. Also the population and size of cavities seem to decrease with decreasing test temperature. These results suggest that the difference in the size and population of cavities might be related with the difference in crack growth rate. And the cavities seem to be formed result from collapse of vacancies at grain boundaries as the crack embryo. This result suggests that diffusion of condensation of vacancies in high stressed fields occurs in high temperature water and gas environments

  9. High hydrogen production from glycerol or glucose by electrohydrogenesis using microbial electrolysis cells

    Selembo, Priscilla A.; Perez, Joe M.; Lloyd, Wallis A.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2009-01-01

    The use of glycerol for hydrogen gas production was examined via electrohydrogenesis using microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). A hydrogen yield of 3.9 mol-H2/mol was obtained using glycerol, which is higher than that possible by fermentation

  10. Distinctive properties of high hydrogen producing extreme thermophiles, Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus and Thermotaga elfii

    Niel, van E.W.J.; Budde, M.A.W.; Haas, de G.G.; Wal, van der F.J.; Claassen, P.A.M.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Growth and hydrogen production by two extreme thermophiles during sugar fermentation was investigated. In cultures of Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus grown on sucrose and Thermotoga elfii grown on glucose stoichiometries of 3.3 mol of hydrogen and 2 mol of acetate per mol C6-sugar unit were

  11. Inactivation of uptake hydrogenase leads to enhanced and sustained hydrogen production with high nitrogenase activity under high light exposure in the cyanobacterium Anabaena siamensis TISTR 8012

    Khetkorn Wanthanee

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biohydrogen from cyanobacteria has attracted public interest due to its potential as a renewable energy carrier produced from solar energy and water. Anabaena siamensis TISTR 8012, a novel strain isolated from rice paddy field in Thailand, has been identified as a promising cyanobacterial strain for use as a high-yield hydrogen producer attributed to the activities of two enzymes, nitrogenase and bidirectional hydrogenase. One main obstacle for high hydrogen production by A. siamensis is a light-driven hydrogen consumption catalyzed by the uptake hydrogenase. To overcome this and in order to enhance the potential for nitrogenase based hydrogen production, we engineered a hydrogen uptake deficient strain by interrupting hupS encoding the small subunit of the uptake hydrogenase. Results An engineered strain lacking a functional uptake hydrogenase (∆hupS produced about 4-folds more hydrogen than the wild type strain. Moreover, the ∆hupS strain showed long term, sustained hydrogen production under light exposure with 2–3 folds higher nitrogenase activity compared to the wild type. In addition, HupS inactivation had no major effects on cell growth and heterocyst differentiation. Gene expression analysis using RT-PCR indicates that electrons and ATP molecules required for hydrogen production in the ∆hupS strain may be obtained from the electron transport chain associated with the photosynthetic oxidation of water in the vegetative cells. The ∆hupS strain was found to compete well with the wild type up to 50 h in a mixed culture, thereafter the wild type started to grow on the relative expense of the ∆hupS strain. Conclusions Inactivation of hupS is an effective strategy for improving biohydrogen production, in rates and specifically in total yield, in nitrogen-fixing cultures of the cyanobacterium Anabaena siamensis TISTR 8012.

  12. CoP nanosheet assembly grown on carbon cloth: A highly efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen generation

    Yang, Xiulin

    2015-07-01

    There exists a strong demand to replace expensive noble metal catalysts with cheap metal sulfides or phosphides for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Recently metal phosphides such as NixP, FeP and CoP have been considered as promising candidates to replace Pt cathodes. Here we report that the nanocrystalline CoP nanosheet assembly on carbon cloth can be formed by a two-step process: electrochemical deposition of Co species followed by gas phase phosphidation. The CoP catalyst in this report exhibits a Tafel slope of 30.1mV/dec in 0.5M H2SO4 and 42.6mV/dec in 1M KOH. The high HER performance of our CoP catalysts is attributed to the rugae-like morphology which results in a high double-layer capacitance and high density of active sites, estimated as 7.77×1017sites/cm2. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Thermodynamic analysis of the efficiency of high-temperature steam electrolysis system for hydrogen production

    Mingyi, Liu; Bo, Yu; Jingming, Xu; Jing, Chen

    High-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), a reversible process of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) in principle, is a promising method for highly efficient large-scale hydrogen production. In our study, the overall efficiency of the HTSE system was calculated through electrochemical and thermodynamic analysis. A thermodynamic model in regards to the efficiency of the HTSE system was established and the quantitative effects of three key parameters, electrical efficiency (η el), electrolysis efficiency (η es), and thermal efficiency (η th) on the overall efficiency (η overall) of the HTSE system were investigated. Results showed that the contribution of η el, η es, η th to the overall efficiency were about 70%, 22%, and 8%, respectively. As temperatures increased from 500 °C to 1000 °C, the effect of η el on η overall decreased gradually and the η es effect remained almost constant, while the η th effect increased gradually. The overall efficiency of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) coupled with the HTSE system under different conditions was also calculated. With the increase of electrical, electrolysis, and thermal efficiency, the overall efficiencies were anticipated to increase from 33% to a maximum of 59% at 1000 °C, which is over two times higher than that of the conventional alkaline water electrolysis.

  14. Discrimination of the oral microbiota associated with high hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan production.

    Takeshita, Toru; Suzuki, Nao; Nakano, Yoshio; Yasui, Masaki; Yoneda, Masahiro; Shimazaki, Yoshihiro; Hirofuji, Takao; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2012-01-01

    Both hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and methyl mercaptan (CH(3)SH) are frequently detected in large amounts in malodorous mouth air. We investigated the bacterial composition of saliva of 30 subjects with severe oral malodor exhibiting extreme CH(3)SH/H(2)S ratios (high H(2)S but low CH(3)SH concentrations, n 5 14; high CH(3)SH but low H2S concentrations, n 5 16) and 13 subjects without malodor, using barcoded pyrosequencing analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. Phylogenetic community analysis with the UniFrac distance metric revealed a distinct bacterial community structure in each malodor group. The H2S group showed higher proportions of the genera Neisseria, Fusobacterium, Porphyromonas and SR1 than the other two groups, whereas the CH(3)SH group had higher proportions of the genera Prevotella, Veillonella,Atopobium, Megasphaera, and Selenomonas. Our results suggested that distinct bacterial populations in the oral microbiota are involved in production of high levels of H2S and CH3SH in the oral cavity.

  15. A high precision mass spectrometer for hydrogen isotopic analysis of water samples

    Murthy, M.S.; Prahallada Rao, B.S.; Handu, V.K.; Satam, J.V.

    1979-01-01

    A high precision mass spectrometer with two ion collector assemblies and direct on line reduction facility (with uranium at 700 0 C) for water samples for hydrogen isotopic analysis has been designed and developed. The ion source particularly gives high sensitivity and at the same tike limits the H 3 + ions to a minimum. A digital ratiometer with a H 2 + compensator has also been developed. The overall precision obtained on the spectrometer is 0.07% 2sub(sigmasub(10)) value. Typical results on the performance of the spectrometer, which is working since a year and a half are given. Possible methods of extending the ranges of concentration the spectrometer can handle, both on lower and higher sides are discussed. Problems of memory between samples are briefly listed. A multiple inlet system to overcome these problems is suggested. This will also enable faster analysis when samples of highly varying concentrations are to be analyzed. A few probable areas in which the spectrometer will be shortly put to use are given. (auth.)

  16. Hydrogen sulfide: a new endogenous player in an old mechanism of plant tolerance to high salinity

    Cristiane J. da-Silva

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT High salinity affects plants due to stimulation of osmotic stress. Cell signaling triggered by nitric oxide (NO and hydrogen sulfide (H2S activates a cascade of biochemical events that culminate in plant tolerance to abiotic and biotic stresses. For instance, the NO/H2S-stimulated biochemical events that occur in plants during response to high salinity include the control of reactive oxygen species, activation of antioxidant system, accumulation of osmoprotectants in cytosol, induction of K+ uptake and Na+ cell extrusion or its vacuolar compartmentation among others. This review is a compilation of what we have learned in the last 10 years about NO participation during cell signaling in response to high salinity as well as the role of H2S, a new player in the mechanism of plant tolerance to salt stress. The main sources of NO and H2S in plant cells is also discussed together with the evidence of interplay between both signaling molecules during response to stress.

  17. Chelating ligands: enhancers of quality and purity of biogas ...

    The quality of biogas depends largely on the percentage of methane and hydrogen sulphide gas present. High concentration of hydrogen sulphide results in low quality biogas. This work employed the use of chelating ligands in scrubbing hydrogen sulphide gas while improving the yield of methane gas. Experimental ...

  18. Techno-economic study of hydrogen production by high temperature electrolysis and coupling with different thermal energy sources

    Rivera-Tinoco, R.

    2009-03-01

    This work focuses on the techno-economic study of massive hydrogen production by the High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) process and also deals with the possibility of producing the steam needed in the process by using different thermal energy sources. Among several sources, those retained in this study are the biomass and domestic waste incineration units, as well as two nuclear reactors (European Pressurised water Reactor - EPR and Sodium Fast Reactor - SFR). Firstly, the technical evaluation of the steam production by each of these sources was carried out. Then, the design and modelling of the equipments composing the process, specially the electrolysers (Solid Oxides Electrolysis Cells), are presented. Finally, the hydrogen production cost for each energy sources coupled with the HTE process is calculated. Moreover, several sensibility studies were performed in order to determine the process key parameter and to evaluate the influence of the unit size effect, the electric energy cost, maintenance, the cells current density, their investment cost and their lifespan on the hydrogen production cost. Our results show that the thermal energy cost is much more influent on the hydrogen production cost than the steam temperature at the outlet stream of the thermal source. It seems also that the key parameters for this process are the electric energy cost and the c ells lifespan. The first one contributes for more than 70% of the hydrogen production cost. From several cell lifespan values, it seems that a 3 year value, rather than 1 year, could lead to a hydrogen production cost reduced on 34%. However, longer lifespan values going from 5 to 10 years would only lead to a 8% reduction on the hydrogen production cost. (author)

  19. Amorphous MoS{sub x} on CdS nanorods for highly efficient photocatalytic hydrogen evolution

    Li, Xiaofang; Tang, Chaowan; Zheng, Qun; Shao, Yu; Li, Danzhen, E-mail: dzli@fzu.edu.cn

    2017-02-15

    Loading cocatalyst on semiconductors was crucially necessary for improving the photocatalytic hydrogen evolution. Amorphous MoS{sub x} as a novel and noble metal-free cocatalyst was loaded on CdS nanorods by a simple photodeposition method. Efficient hydrogen evolution with amount of 15 mmol h{sup −1} g{sup −1} was observed over the MoS{sub x} modified CdS nanorods, which was about 6 times higher than that by using Pt as cocatalyst. Meanwhile, with MoS{sub x} cocatalyst, the efficiency of CdS nanorods was superior to that of CdS nanoparticles and bulk CdS. No deactivation could be observed in the efficiency of MoS{sub x} modified CdS nanorods under irradiation for successive 10 h. Further experimental results indicated that the efficient electrons transfer, low overpotential of hydrogen evolution and active S atoms over the MoS{sub x} modified CdS nanorods were responsible for the higher efficiency. Our results provided guidance for synthesizing noble metal-free materials as cocatalyst for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution. - Graphical abstract: Photodeposition of amorphous MoS{sub x} on CdS nanorods for highly efficient photocatalytic hydrogen evolution. - Highlights: • Amorphous MoSx cocatalyst was loaded on CdS NRs by a simple photodeposition. • MoS{sub x}/CdS NRs exhibited 6 times higher hydrogen evolution efficiency than Pt/CdS NRs. • The hydrogen evolution of MoS{sub x}/CdS NRs linearly increased with prolonging time. • Lower overpotential and efficient electron transfer were observed over MoS{sub x}/CdS NRs.

  20. Questioning hydrogen

    Hammerschlag, Roel; Mazza, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    As an energy carrier, hydrogen is to be compared to electricity, the only widespread and viable alternative. When hydrogen is used to transmit renewable electricity, only 51% can reach the end user due to losses in electrolysis, hydrogen compression, and the fuel cell. In contrast, conventional electric storage technologies allow between 75% and 85% of the original electricity to be delivered. Even when hydrogen is extracted from gasified coal (with carbon sequestration) or from water cracked in high-temperature nuclear reactors, more of the primary energy reaches the end user if a conventional electric process is used instead. Hydrogen performs no better in mobile applications, where electric vehicles that are far closer to commercialization exceed fuel cell vehicles in efficiency, cost and performance. New, carbon-neutral energy can prevent twice the quantity of GHG's by displacing fossil electricity than it can by powering fuel cell vehicles. The same is true for new, natural gas energy. New energy resources should be used to displace high-GHG electric generation, not to manufacture hydrogen

  1. Prediction of bread-making quality using size exclusion high ...

    Variation in the distribution of protein molecular weight in wheat (Triticum aestivum), influences breadmaking quality of wheat cultivars, resulting in either poor or good bread. The objective of this study was to predict breadmaking quality of wheat cultivars using size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography.

  2. Adoption and impact of high quality bambara flour (HQBF ...

    Adoption and impact of high quality bambara flour (HQBF) technology in the ... consumer acceptability/quality of products, credit, availability of raw materials, and ... as a result of 12.5 per cent increase in demand for bambara-based products.

  3. Possibilities of obtaining and controlling high-quality pressure castings

    S. Pietrowski

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the influence of the type of furnace charging melting, refining and modification silumins 226 and 231 on the porosity and microstructure of castings. It was shown that in order to reduce or eliminate the porosity of the castings is necessary to the refining ECOSAL-AL113 of liquid silumin both in the melting furnace, and in the ladle and an additional nitrogen, in the heat furnace modified and refining with nitrogen. To control the effects of refining and modifying the TDA method was used. It was found that based on crystal- lization curve can be qualitatively assess the gas porosity of the castings. In order to control and quality control silumins author developed a computer program using the method of TDA, which sets out: Rm, A5, HB and casting porosity P and the concentration of hydrogen in them. The program also informs the technological procedures to be performed for liquid silumin improper preparation.

  4. The study of microplasticity mechanism in Ti-50 wt.%Nb alloy with high hydrogen content

    Golovin, I.S.; Kollerov, M.U.; Schinaeva, E.V.

    1996-01-01

    The upper yield point (∼ 700 MPa) appears at the compression test curves (ε=0.024 sec -1 ) of b.c.c. Nb-50 wt.%Ti due to the increase of hydrogen content from 0 to 0.2 wt.% and more and leads to the non monotonous increase in compressive lower yield stress from 400 to 550 MPa. Taking into account close connection between macro- and microplasticity of metallic materials the low frequency (∼ 2 Hz) amplitude dependent internal friction (ADIF) spectrum (γ = 1. 60.10 -5 ) in hydrogenized Nb-50 wt.% Ti and Nb samples are studied. The ADIF investigation of the closed hysteresis loop ''loading-unloading'' shows the dependence of its width from the hydrogen content which evidences the fact of dislocation unpinning from hydrogen atmospheres in the 1/2 cycle of loading. The study of ADIF spectrum for samples with different hydrogen content before and after torsion deformation (γ ∼ 2%) shows the sharp increase of IF level at γ = 1. 10.10 -5 after ∼1 hour of natural ageing. At that time the ADIF curves change its shape from Γ-shape to U-shape. The amplitude range of the IF increase depends on the hydrogen content. It is the interaction of hydrogen atoms with dislocations that caused the above mentioned effect which has not been observed in hydrogen free samples. The time estimation for the formation of thermodynamically stable hydrogen atmospheres on dislocations shows that hydrogen atmospheres could not follow the dislocation during compressive tests and that leads to the upper yield point appearance. (orig.)

  5. Hydrogen Production via a High-Efficiency Low-Temperature Reformer

    Paul KT Liu; Theo T. Tsotsis

    2006-05-31

    Fuel cells are promoted by the US government as a viable alternative for clean and efficient energy generation. It is anticipated that the fuel cell market will rise if the key technical barriers can be overcome. One of them is certainly fuel processing and purification. Existing fuel reforming processes are energy intensive, extremely complicated and capital intensive; these disadvantages handicap the scale-down of existing reforming process, targeting distributed or on-board/stationary hydrogen production applications. Our project involves the bench-scale demonstration of a high-efficiency low-temperature steam reforming process. Hydrogen production can be operated at 350 to 400ºC with our invention, as opposed to >800ºC of existing reforming. In addition, our proposed process improves the start-up deficiency of conventional reforming due to its low temperature operation. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the invented process concept via a bench scale unit and verify mathematical simulation for future process optimization study. Under this project, we have performed the experimental work to determine the adsorption isotherm, reaction kinetics, and membrane permeances required to perform the process simulation based upon the mathematical model developed by us. A ceramic membrane coated with palladium thin film fabricated by us was employed in this study. The adsorption isotherm for a selected hydrotalcite adsorbent was determined experimentally. Further, the capacity loss under cyclic adsorption/desorption was confirmed to be negligible. Finally a commercial steam reforming catalyst was used to produce the reaction kinetic parameters required for the proposed operating condition. With these input parameters, a mathematical simulation was performed to predict the performance of the invented process. According to our simulation, our invented hybrid process can deliver 35 to 55% methane conversion, in comparison with the 12 and 18-21% conversion of

  6. A non-destructive evaluation of transverse hydrogen cracking in high strength flux-cored weld metal

    Sterjovski, Z.; Carr, D. G.; Holdstock, R.; Nolan, D.; Norrish, J.

    2007-01-01

    Transverse hydrogen cracking in high strength weld metal (WM) is a potentially serious problem in thick-sections, especially in highly restrained structures. This paper presents preliminary re suits for which transverse weld metal hydrogen cracking was purposefully generated in 40 mm thick high strength WM to study the effectiveness of various non-destructive testing methods in locating and sizing transverse cracks. Transverse WM hydrogen cracking was intentionally produced by: increasing diffusible hydrogen levels through the introduction of 2% hydrogen in CO 2 shielding gas and minimizing interpass temperature and time; increasing the cracking susceptibility of the micro structure by increasing cooling rate with a large-scale test plate and maintaining an interpass temperature below 70 deg C; increasing stress levels with the use of stiffeners and end welds; and rapid postweld cooling to a temperature lower than 100 deg C. The extent of transverse weld metal hydrogen cracking was evaluated by non-destructive testing (NDT), which included conventional ultrasonic testing, radiography, acoustic emission monitoring and magnetic particle inspection. It was established that conventional ultrasonic testing was the most effective of the NDT techniques used. Acoustic emission monitoring revealed that two different types of emissions emanated from the weld metal and that the majority of emissions occurred within the first 48 hours of welding, although there was some evidence of cracking well after this initial 48 hour period. Larger sized cracks were observed near the transverse stiffeners (and weld ends) where tensile residual stresses (both longitudinal and transverse) were thought to be highest and the micro structure was therefore more susceptible to cracking. Additionally, numerous finer cracks were located in the top third of the plate (in the thickness direction) and on both sides of the weld centre line

  7. Quack: A quality assurance tool for high throughput sequence data.

    Thrash, Adam; Arick, Mark; Peterson, Daniel G

    2018-05-01

    The quality of data generated by high-throughput DNA sequencing tools must be rapidly assessed in order to determine how useful the data may be in making biological discoveries; higher quality data leads to more confident results and conclusions. Due to the ever-increasing size of data sets and the importance of rapid quality assessment, tools that analyze sequencing data should quickly produce easily interpretable graphics. Quack addresses these issues by generating information-dense visualizations from FASTQ files at a speed far surpassing other publicly available quality assurance tools in a manner independent of sequencing technology. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Innovative and high quality education through Open Education and OER

    Stracke, Christian M.

    2017-01-01

    Online presentation and webinar by Stracke, C. M. (2017, 18 December) on "Innovative and high quality education through Open Education and OER" for the Belt and Road Open Education Learning Week by the Beijing Normal University, China.

  9. Improving high quality, equitable maternal health services in Malawi ...

    Improving high quality, equitable maternal health services in Malawi (IMCHA) ... In response, the Ministry of Health implemented a Standards-Based Management and Recognition for Reproductive Health initiative to improve ... Total funding.

  10. High Quality Education and Learning for All through Open Education

    Stracke, Christian M.

    2016-01-01

    Keynote at the International Lensky Education Forum 2016, Yakutsk, Republic of Sakha, Russian Federation, by Stracke, C. M. (2016, 16 August): "High Quality Education and Learning for All through Open Education"

  11. Development of High Temperature SiC Based Hydrogen/Hydrocarbon Sensors with Bond Pads for Packaging

    Xu, Jennifer C.; Hunter, Gary W.; Chen, Liangyu; Biagi-Labiosa, Azlin M.; Ward, Benjamin J.; Lukco, Dorothy; Gonzalez, Jose M., III; Lampard, Peter S.; Artale, Michael A.; Hampton, Christopher L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes efforts towards the transition of existing high temperature hydrogen and hydrocarbon Schottky diode sensor elements to packaged sensor structures that can be integrated into a testing system. Sensor modifications and the technical challenges involved are discussed. Testing of the sensors at 500 C or above is also presented along with plans for future development.

  12. Charge deep-level transient spectroscopy study of high-energy-electron-beam-irradiated hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Klaver, A.; Nádaždy, V.; Zeman, M.; Swaaiij, R.A.C.M.M.

    2006-01-01

    We present a study of changes in the defect density of states in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) due to high-energy electron irradiation using charged deep-level transient spectroscopy. It was found that defect states near the conduction band were removed, while in other band gap regions the

  13. High Yields of Hydrogen Production Induced by Meta-Substituted Dichlorophenols Biodegradation from the Green Alga Scenedesmus obliquus

    Papazi, Aikaterini; Andronis, Efthimios; Ioannidis, Nikolaos E.; Chaniotakis, Nikolaos; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen is a highly promising energy source with important social and economic implications. The ability of green algae to produce photosynthetic hydrogen under anaerobic conditions has been known for years. However, until today the yield of production has been very low, limiting an industrial scale use. In the present paper, 73 years after the first report on H2-production from green algae, we present a combinational biological system where the biodegradation procedure of one meta-substituted dichlorophenol (m-dcp) is the key element for maintaining continuous and high rate H2-production (>100 times higher than previously reported) in chloroplasts and mitochondria of the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus. In particular, we report that reduced m-dcps (biodegradation intermediates) mimic endogenous electron and proton carriers in chloroplasts and mitochondria, inhibit Photosystem II (PSII) activity (and therefore O2 production) and enhance Photosystem I (PSI) and hydrogenase activity. In addition, we show that there are some indications for hydrogen production from sources other than chloroplasts in Scenedesmus obliquus. The regulation of these multistage and highly evolved redox pathways leads to high yields of hydrogen production and paves the way for an efficient application to industrial scale use, utilizing simple energy sources and one meta-substituted dichlorophenol as regulating elements. PMID:23145057

  14. Life cycle assessment of hydrogen production from S-I thermochemical process coupled to a high temperature gas reactor

    Giraldi, M. R.; Francois, J. L.; Castro-Uriegas, D. [Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Paseo Cuauhnahuac No. 8532, Col. Progreso, C.P. 62550, Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to quantify the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated to the hydrogen produced by the sulfur-iodine thermochemical process, coupled to a high temperature nuclear reactor, and to compare the results with other life cycle analysis (LCA) studies on hydrogen production technologies, both conventional and emerging. The LCA tool was used to quantify the impacts associated with climate change. The product system was defined by the following steps: (i) extraction and manufacturing of raw materials (upstream flows), (U) external energy supplied to the system, (iii) nuclear power plant, and (iv) hydrogen production plant. Particular attention was focused to those processes where there was limited information from literature about inventory data, as the TRISO fuel manufacture, and the production of iodine. The results show that the electric power, supplied to the hydrogen plant, is a sensitive parameter for GHG emissions. When the nuclear power plant supplied the electrical power, low GHG emissions were obtained. These results improve those reported by conventional hydrogen production methods, such as steam reforming. (authors)

  15. High-resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy studies of clean and hydrogen-covered tungsten (100) surfaces

    Woods, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    High-resolution (10-meV FWHM) low-energy (≤ 100eV) electrons are scattered from the tungsten (100) surface. Electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) selection rules are utilized to identify vibrational modes of the surface tungsten atoms. A 36-meV mode is measured on the c(2 X 2) thermally reconstructed surface and is modeled as an overtone of the 18-meV mode at M in the surface Brillouin zone. The superstructure of the reconstructed surface allows this mode to be observed in specular scattering. The surface tungsten atoms return to their bulk lateral positions with saturated hydrogen (β 1 phase) adsorption; and a 26-meV mode identified is due to the perpendicular vibration of the surface tungsten layers. The clean-room temperature surface does not display either low-energy vibrations and the surface is modeled as disordered. The three β 1 phase hydrogen vibrations are observed and a new vibration at 118 meV is identified. The 118-meV cross section displays characteristics of a parallel mode, but calculations show this assignment to be erroneous. There are two hydrogen atoms for each surface tungsten atom in the β 1 phase, and lattice-dynamical calculations show that the 118-meV mode is due to a hydrogen-zone edge vibration. The predicted breakdown of the parallel hydrogen vibration selection rule was not observed

  16. A Highly Sensitive Chemiluminometric Assay for Real-Time Detection of Biological Hydrogen Peroxide Formation.

    Zhu, Hong; Jia, Zhenquan; Trush, Michael A; Li, Y Robert

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) is a major reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by various cellular sources, especially mitochondria. At high levels, H 2 O 2 causes oxidative stress, leading to cell injury, whereas at low concentrations, this ROS acts as an important second messenger to participate in cellular redox signaling. Detection and measurement of the levels or rates of production of cellular H 2 O 2 are instrumental in studying the biological effects of this major ROS. While a number of assays have been developed over the past decades for detecting and/or quantifying biological H 2 O 2 formation, none has been shown to be perfect. Perhaps there is no perfect assay for sensitively and accurately quantifying H 2 O 2 as well as other ROS in cells, wherein numerous potential reactants are present to interfere with the reliable measurement of the specific ROS. In this context, each assay has its own advantages and intrinsic limitations. This article describes a highly sensitive assay for real-time detection of H 2 O 2 formation in cultured cells and isolated mitochondria. This assay is based on the luminol/horseradish peroxidase-dependent chemiluminescence that is inhibitable by catalase. The article discusses the usefulness and shortcomings of this chemiluminometric assay in detecting biological H 2 O 2 formation induced by beta-lapachone redox cycling with both cells and isolated mitochondria.

  17. Status of Charge Exchange Cross Section Measurements for Highly Charged Ions on Atomic Hydrogen

    Draganic, I. N.; Havener, C. C.; Schultz, D. R.; Seely, D. G.; Schultz, P. C.

    2011-05-01

    Total cross sections of charge exchange (CX) for C5+, N6+, and O7+ ions on ground state atomic hydrogen are measured in an extended collision energy range of 1 - 20,000 eV/u. Absolute CX measurements are performed using an improved merged-beams technique with intense highly charged ion beams extracted from a 14.5 GHz ECR ion source mounted on a high voltage platform. In order to improve the problematic H+ signal collection for these exoergic CX collisions at low relative energies, a new double focusing electrostatic analyzer was installed. Experimental CX data are in good agreement with all previous H-oven relative measurements at higher collision energies. We compare our results with the most recent molecular orbital close-coupling (MOCC) and atomic orbital close-coupling (AOCC) theoretical calculations. Work supported by the NASA Solar & Heliospheric Physics Program NNH07ZDA001N, the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences and the Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, and the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the U.S. DoE.

  18. Hydrogen microscopy and analysis of DNA repair using focused high energy ion beams

    Dollinger, G. [Universitaet der Bundeswehr Muenchen, LRT 2, Werner Heisenberg Weg 39, D-85579 Neubiberg (Germany)]. E-mail: guenther.dollinger@unibw.de; Bergmaier, A. [Universitaet der Bundeswehr Muenchen, LRT 2, Werner Heisenberg Weg 39, D-85579 Neubiberg (Germany); Hauptner, A. [Physik Department E 12, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Dietzel, S. [Department Biologie II, Ludwigs-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Grosshaderner Str. 2, 82152 Planegg-Martinsried (Germany); Drexler, G.A. [Strahlenbiologisches Institut, LMU Muenchen, Schillerstr. 42, D-80336 Muenchen und Institut fuer Strahlenbiologie, GSF-Forschungszentrum, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Greubel, C. [Physik Department E 12, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Hable, V. [Universitaet der Bundeswehr Muenchen, LRT 2, Werner Heisenberg Weg 39, D-85579 Neubiberg (Germany); Reichart, P. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Kruecken, R. [Physik Department E 12, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Cremer, T. [Department Biologie II, Ludwigs-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Grosshaderner Str. 2, 82152 Planegg-Martinsried (Germany); Friedl, A.A. [Strahlenbiologisches Institut, LMU Muenchen, Schillerstr. 42, D-80336 Muenchen und Institut fuer Strahlenbiologie, GSF-Forschungszentrum, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    2006-08-15

    The ion microprobe SNAKE (Supraleitendes Nanoskop fuer Angewandte Kernphysikalische Experimente) at the Munich 14 MV tandem accelerator achieves beam focussing by a superconducting quadrupole doublet and can make use of a broad range of ions and ion energies, i.e. 4-28 MeV protons or up to 250 MeV gold ions. Due to these ion beams, SNAKE is particularly attractive for ion beam analyses in various fields. Here we describe two main applications of SNAKE. One is the unique possibility to perform three-dimensional hydrogen microscopy by elastic proton-proton scattering utilizing high energy proton beams. The high proton energies allow the analysis of samples with a thickness in the 100 {mu}m range with micrometer resolution and a sensitivity better than 1 ppm. In a second application, SNAKE is used to analyse protein dynamics in cells by irradiating live cells with single focussed ions. Fluorescence from immunostained protein 53BP1 is used as biological track detector after irradiation of HeLa cells. It is used to examine the irradiated region in comparison with the targeted region. Observed patterns of fluorescence foci agree reasonably well with irradiation patterns, indicating an overall targeting accuracy of about 2 {mu}m while the beam spot size is less than 0.5 {mu}m in diameter. This performance shows successful adaptation of SNAKE for biological experiments where cells are targeted on a sub-cellular level by energetic ions.

  19. Nanoplasmonically Engineered Interfaces on Amorphous TiO2 for Highly Efficient Photocatalysis in Hydrogen Evolution.

    Liang, Huijun; Meng, Qiuxia; Wang, Xiaobing; Zhang, Hucheng; Wang, Jianji

    2018-04-25

    The nanoplasmonic metal-driven photocatalytic activity depends heavily on the spacing between metal nanoparticles (NPs) and semiconductors, and this work shows that ethylene glycol (EG) is an ideal candidate for interface spacer. Controlling the synthetic systems at pH 3, the composite of Ag NPs with EG-stabilized amorphous TiO 2 (Ag/TiO 2 -3) was synthesized by the facile light-induced reduction. It is verified that EG spacers can set up suitable geometric arrangement in the composite: the twin hydroxyls act as stabilizers to bind Ag NPs and TiO 2 together and the nonconductive alkyl chains consisting only of two CH 2 are able to separate the two building blocks completely and also provide the shortest channels for an efficient transfer of radiation energies to reach TiO 2 . Employed as photocatalysts in hydrogen evolution under visible light, amorphous TiO 2 hardly exhibits the catalytic activity due to high defect density, whereas Ag/TiO 2 -3 represents a remarkably high catalytic efficiency. The enhancement mechanism of the reaction rate is proposed by the analysis of the compositional, structural, and optical properties from a series of Ag/TiO 2 composites.

  20. The phase diagram of solid hydrogen at high pressure: A challenge for first principles calculations

    Azadi, Sam; Foulkes, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    We present comprehensive results for the high-pressure phase diagram of solid hydrogen. We focus on the energetically most favorable molecular and atomic crystal structures. To obtain the ground-state static enthalpy and phase diagram, we use semi-local and hybrid density functional theory (DFT) as well as diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) methods. The closure of the band gap with increasing pressure is investigated utilizing quasi-particle many-body calculations within the GW approximation. The dynamical phase diagram is calculated by adding proton zero-point energies (ZPE) to static enthalpies. Density functional perturbation theory is employed to calculate the proton ZPE and the infra-red and Raman spectra. Our results clearly demonstrate the failure of DFT-based methods to provide an accurate static phase diagram, especially when comparing insulating and metallic phases. Our dynamical phase diagram obtained using fully many-body DMC calculations shows that the molecular-to-atomic phase transition happens at the experimentally accessible pressure of 374 GPa. We claim that going beyond mean-field schemes to obtain derivatives of the total energy and optimize crystal structures at the many-body level is crucial. This work was supported by the UK engineering and physics science research council under Grant EP/I030190/1, and made use of computing facilities provided by HECTOR, and by the Imperial College London high performance computing centre.

  1. Production of bioelectricity, bio-hydrogen, high value chemicals and bioinspired nanomaterials by electrochemically active biofilms.

    Kalathil, Shafeer; Khan, Mohammad Mansoob; Lee, Jintae; Cho, Moo Hwan

    2013-11-01

    Microorganisms naturally form biofilms on solid surfaces for their mutual benefits including protection from environmental stresses caused by contaminants, nutritional depletion or imbalances. The biofilms are normally dangerous to human health due to their inherited robustness. On the other hand, a recent study suggested that electrochemically active biofilms (EABs) generated by electrically active microorganisms have properties that can be used to catalyze or control the electrochemical reactions in a range of fields, such as bioenergy production, bioremediation, chemical/biological synthesis, bio-corrosion mitigation and biosensor development. EABs have attracted considerable attraction in bioelectrochemical systems (BESs), such as microbial fuel cells and microbial electrolysis cells, where they act as living bioanode or biocathode catalysts. Recently, it was reported that EABs can be used to synthesize metal nanoparticles and metal nanocomposites. The EAB-mediated synthesis of metal and metal-semiconductor nanocomposites is expected to provide a new avenue for the greener synthesis of nanomaterials with high efficiency and speed than other synthetic methods. This review covers the general introduction of EABs, as well as the applications of EABs in BESs, and the production of bio-hydrogen, high value chemicals and bio-inspired nanomaterials. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. High-vacuum pumping out of hydrogen isotopes by compressed and electrophysical pumps

    Bychkova, A.D.; Ershova, Z.V.; Saksaganskij, G.L.; Serebrennikov, D.V.

    1982-01-01

    To explain the selection of parameters of vacuum systems of projected thermonuclear devices, experiments are performed on the pumping-out of deuterium and tritium by high-vacuum pumps of different types. The values of the fast response of turbomolecular, diffusion vapour-mercury, magneto-discharge and titanium getter pumps in the operation pressure range are determined. The rate of sorption of hydrogen isotopes by non-spraying gas absorber of cial alloy depending on the amount of the gas absorbed and temperature, is measured. Gas current is determined by the pressure drop on the diagram of the known conductivity. Individual calibration of manometric converters for different gases using a mercury burette is performed preliminarily. The means of high-vacuum pumping-out that have been studied have the following values of fast response for tritium (relatively to protium): turbomolecular pump-0.95; evaporation getter pump-0.25; magneto-discharge pumps-0.65-0.9; cial alloy-0.1...0.5

  3. High Hydrogen Content Graphene Hydride Compounds & High Cross-Section Cladding Coatings for Fast Neutron Detection

    Chandrashekhar, MVS

    2017-01-01

    The objective is to develop and implement a superior low-cost, large area (potentially >32in), easily deployable, close proximity, harsh environment innovative neutron sensor needed for next generation fuel cycle monitoring. We will exploit recent breakthroughs at the PI's lab on the electrochemistry of epitaxial graphene (EG) formed on commercial SiC wafers, a transformative nanomaterial system with superior radiation detection and durability properties to develop a new paradigm in detection for fast neutrons, a by-product of fission reactors. There are currently few effective detection/monitoring schemes, especially solid-state ones at present. This is essential for monitoring and control of future fuel cycles to make them more efficient and reliable. By exploiting these novel materials, as well as innovative hybrid SiC/EG/Cladding device architectures conceived by the team, will develop low-cost, high performance solutions to fast-neutron detection. Finally, we will also explore 3-terminal device implementations for neutron detectors with built-in electronic gain to further shrink these devices and improve their sensitivity.

  4. Experimental investigation of solid hydrogen pellet ablation in high-temperature plasmas using holographic interferometry and other diagnostics

    Thomas, C.E. Jr.

    1981-03-01

    The technology currently most favored for the refueling of fusion reactors is the high-velocity injection of solid hydrogen pellets. Design details are presented for a holographic interferometer/shadowgraph used to study the microscopic characteristics of a solid hydrogen pellet ablating in an approx. 1-keV plasma. Experimental data are presented for two sets of experiments in which the interferometer/shadowgraph was used to study approx. 1-mm-diam solid hydrogen pellets injected into the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at velocities of 1000 m/s. In addition to the use of the holographic interferometer, the pellet ablation process is diagnosed by studying the emission of Balmer-alpha photons and by using the available tokamak diagnostics

  5. Hydrogen Sulphide modulating mitochondrial morphology to promote mitophagy in endothelial cells under high-glucose and high-palmitate.

    Liu, Ning; Wu, Jichao; Zhang, Linxue; Gao, Zhaopeng; Sun, Yu; Yu, Miao; Zhao, Yajun; Dong, Shiyun; Lu, Fanghao; Zhang, Weihua

    2017-12-01

    Endothelial cell dysfunction is one of the main reasons for type II diabetes vascular complications. Hydrogen sulphide (H 2 S) has antioxidative effect, but its regulation on mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagy in aortic endothelial cells under hyperglycaemia and hyperlipidaemia is unclear. Rat aortic endothelial cells (RAECs) were treated with 40 mM glucose and 200 μM palmitate to imitate endothelium under hyperglycaemia and hyperlipidaemia, and 100 μM NaHS was used as an exogenous H 2 S donor. Firstly, we demonstrated that high glucose and palmitate decreased H 2 S production and CSE expression in RAECs. Then, the antioxidative effect of H 2 S was proved in RAECs under high glucose and palmitate to reduce mitochondrial ROS level. We also showed that exogenous H 2 S inhibited mitochondrial apoptosis in RAECs under high glucose and palmitate. Using Mito Tracker and transmission electron microscopy assay, we revealed that exogenous H 2 S decreased mitochondrial fragments and significantly reduced the expression of p-Drp-1/Drp-1 and Fis1 compared to high-glucose and high-palmitate group, whereas it increased mitophagy by transmission electron microscopy assay. We demonstrated that exogenous H 2 S facilitated Parkin recruited by PINK1 by immunoprecipitation and immunostaining assays and then ubiquitylated mitofusin 2 (Mfn2), which illuminated the mechanism of exogenous H 2 S on mitophagy. Parkin siRNA suppressed the expression of Mfn2, Nix and LC3B, which revealed that it eliminated mitophagy. In summary, exogenous H 2 S could protect RAECs against apoptosis under high glucose and palmitate by suppressing oxidative stress, decreasing mitochondrial fragments and promoting mitophagy. Based on these results, we proposed a new mechanism of H 2 S on protecting endothelium, which might provide a new strategy for type II diabetes vascular complication. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for

  6. Parametric Evaluation of Large-Scale High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Using Different Advanced Nuclear Reactor Heat Sources

    Harvego, Edwin A.; McKellar, Michael G.; O'Brien, James E.; Herring, J. Stephen

    2009-01-01

    High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE), when coupled to an advanced nuclear reactor capable of operating at reactor outlet temperatures of 800 C to 950 C, has the potential to efficiently produce the large quantities of hydrogen needed to meet future energy and transportation needs. To evaluate the potential benefits of nuclear-driven hydrogen production, the UniSim process analysis software was used to evaluate different reactor concepts coupled to a reference HTE process design concept. The reference HTE concept included an Intermediate Heat Exchanger and intermediate helium loop to separate the reactor primary system from the HTE process loops and additional heat exchangers to transfer reactor heat from the intermediate loop to the HTE process loops. The two process loops consisted of the water/steam loop feeding the cathode side of a HTE electrolysis stack, and the sweep gas loop used to remove oxygen from the anode side. The UniSim model of the process loops included pumps to circulate the working fluids and heat exchangers to recover heat from the oxygen and hydrogen product streams to improve the overall hydrogen production efficiencies. The reference HTE process loop model was coupled to separate UniSim models developed for three different advanced reactor concepts (a high-temperature helium cooled reactor concept and two different supercritical CO2 reactor concepts). Sensitivity studies were then performed to evaluate the affect of reactor outlet temperature on the power cycle efficiency and overall hydrogen production efficiency for each of the reactor power cycles. The results of these sensitivity studies showed that overall power cycle and hydrogen production efficiencies increased with reactor outlet temperature, but the power cycles producing the highest efficiencies varied depending on the temperature range considered

  7. Treatment of simulated high-level radioactive waste with formic acid: Bench-scale study on hydrogen evolution

    Hsu, C.L.W.; Ritter, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    At the Savannah River Site, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was constructed to vitrify high-level radioactive liquid waste in borosilicate glass for permanent storage. Formic acid, which serves as both an acid and a reducing agent, is used to treat the washed alkaline sludge during melter feed preparation primarily to improve the processability of the feed and to reduce mercury to its zero state for steam stripping. The high-level sludge is composed of many transition metal hydroxides. Among them, there are small quantities of platinum group metals. During the treatment of simulated sludge with formic acid, significant amounts of hydrogen were generated when the platinum group metals were included in the sludge. Apparently the noble metals in the sludge were reduced to their zero states and caused formic acid to decompose catalytically into hydrogen and carbon dioxide, usually with an induction period. The production of hydrogen gas presented the DWPF with a safety issue. Therefore, the objective of this research was to gain a fundamental understanding of what controlled the hydrogen evolution so that a practical solution to the safety issue could be obtained. A bench-scale parametric study revealed the following: increasing the amount of formic acid added to the sludge increased the hydrogen generation rate dramatically; once the catalysts were activated, the hydrogen generation rate decreased significantly with a lowering of the temperature of the sludge; the relative catalytic activities of the noble metals in the sludge decreased in the following order: rhodium > ruthenium much-gt palladium; ammonium ions were generated catalytically from the reaction between formic acid and nitrate; and when present, the noble metals caused higher upward drifts of the sludge pH

  8. Emblems of Quality in Higher Education. Developing and Sustaining High-Quality Programs.

    Haworth, Jennifer Grant; Conrad, Clifton F.

    This book proposes an "engagement" theory of program quality to evaluate and improve higher education programs at all degree levels. Based on interviews with 781 participants in a national study of Masters degree programs, it focuses on the interactive roles of students, faculty, and administrators in developing high-quality programs…

  9. Exergoeconomic optimization of coaxial tube evaporators for cooling of high pressure gaseous hydrogen during vehicle fuelling

    Jensen, Jonas Kjær; Rothuizen, Erasmus Damgaard; Markussen, Wiebke Brix

    2014-01-01

    Gaseous hydrogen as an automotive fuel is reaching the point of commercial introduction. Development of hydrogen fuelling stations considering an acceptable fuelling time by cooling the hydrogen to -40 C has started. This paper presents a design study of coaxial tube ammonia evaporators for three......-stage evaporator. The main contribution to the total cost was the cost associated with exergy destruction, the capital investment cost contributed with 5-14 %. The main contribution to the exergy destruction was found to be thermally driven. The pressure driven exergy destruction accounted for 3-9 %....

  10. High-temperature hydrogenation of pure and silver-decorated titanate nanotubes to increase their solar absorbance for photocatalytic applications

    Plodinec, Milivoj [Ruđer Bošković Institute, Bijenička 54, HR-1002 Zagreb (Croatia); Gajović, Andreja, E-mail: gajovic@irb.hr [Ruđer Bošković Institute, Bijenička 54, HR-1002 Zagreb (Croatia); Jakša, Gregor; Žagar, Kristina; Čeh, Miran [Institute Jožef Stefan, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2014-04-05

    Graphical abstract: The aim of the work is to study how annealing in a reducing atmosphere of titanate nanotubes (TiNT) and Ag decorated titanate nanotubes (TiNT@Ag) influenced on their structure, morphology, phase transitions, UV–ViS-NIR absorbance and photocatalytic activity. An increase of photocatalytic activity after a heat treatment in a reducing atmosphere was observed in the TiNT and TiNT@Ag. We found that the hydrogenated TiNT@Ag samples (TiNT@Ag-HA) had a two-times higher photodegradation impact on the caffeine than the TiNT samples, which is a consequence of the increased absorption of visible light and the synergetic effects between the silver and the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles that increase the efficiency of the formation of electron–hole pairs and the charge transfer to the surface of the nanoparticles. -- Highlights: • Titanate nanotubes with and without Ag nanoparticles were hydrogenated at 550 °C. • TiO{sub 2} nanostructures obtained by hydrogenation have core–shell structure. • Hydrogenated samples show absorption in the visible spectral region. • Hydrogenated Ag decorated sample show stronger absorption in visible than in UV. • Photocatalytic efficiency is improved by hydrogenation and by Ag nanoparticles. -- Abstract: Titanate nanotubes (TiNTs) and silver-decorated titanate nanotubes (TiNTs@Ag) were synthesized using the hydrothermal method. In the decorated nanotubes the silver particles were obtained by the photoreduction of AgNO{sub 3} under UV light. Pure and Ag-decorated nanotubes were high-temperature heat treated at 550 °C in a hydrogen atmosphere and the “core–shell”-structured TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were formed. For the structural characterization of all the titanate nanostructures we used conventional and analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. The Ag-decorated titanate nanostructures were additionally studied by X-ray photo

  11. Hydrogen alternatives for a regional upgrader

    Bailey, R.T.; Padamsey, R.

    1991-01-01

    For a proposed regional upgrader in Alberta, hydrogen will be needed to upgrade the bitumen and heavy oil to be processed by that facility. The upgrader will rely on high conversion hydrocracking which consumes 3.4 wt % hydrogen to produce a 106% volume yield of high quality synthetic crude. The costs of producing hydrogen via steam reforming of methane, partial oxidation of coal or upgrading residues, and electrolysis are compared, showing that steam reforming is the cheapest. However, an even cheaper source of hydrogen is available in the Edmonton and Fort Saskatchewan area as byproducts from petrochemical plants. An economic analysis is presented of a proposed scheme to capture, purify, compress, and transfer hydrogen from one or two such plants to a nearby regional upgrader. The two plants could supply a total of 126.6 million ft 3 /d of hydrogen at a total installed capital cost of about half of that of a steam reforming plant of equivalent size. When operating costs are added (including the cost of replacing the hydrogen, currently used as fuel at the two plants, with natural gas), the total cost of hydrogen is substantially less than the costs for a hydrogen plant within the upgrader. 3 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  12. Pt Single Atoms Embedded in the Surface of Ni Nanocrystals as Highly Active Catalysts for Selective Hydrogenation of Nitro Compounds.

    Peng, Yuhan; Geng, Zhigang; Zhao, Songtao; Wang, Liangbing; Li, Hongliang; Wang, Xu; Zheng, Xusheng; Zhu, Junfa; Li, Zhenyu; Si, Rui; Zeng, Jie

    2018-06-13

    Single-atom catalysts exhibit high selectivity in hydrogenation due to their isolated active sites, which ensure uniform adsorption configurations of substrate molecules. Compared with the achievement in catalytic selectivity, there is still a long way to go in exploiting the catalytic activity of single-atom catalysts. Herein, we developed highly active and selective catalysts in selective hydrogenation by embedding Pt single atoms in the surface of Ni nanocrystals (denoted as Pt 1 /Ni nanocrystals). During the hydrogenation of 3-nitrostyrene, the TOF numbers based on surface Pt atoms of Pt 1 /Ni nanocrystals reached ∼1800 h -1 under 3 atm of H 2 at 40 °C, much higher than that of Pt single atoms supported on active carbon, TiO 2 , SiO 2 , and ZSM-5. Mechanistic studies reveal that the remarkable activity of Pt 1 /Ni nanocrystals derived from sufficient hydrogen supply because of spontaneous dissociation of H 2 on both Pt and Ni atoms as well as facile diffusion of H atoms on Pt 1 /Ni nanocrystals. Moreover, the ensemble composed of the Pt single atom and nearby Ni atoms in Pt 1 /Ni nanocrystals leads to the adsorption configuration of 3-nitrostyrene favorable for the activation of nitro groups, accounting for the high selectivity for 3-vinylaniline.

  13. Hydrothermal synthesis of p-type nanocrystalline NiO nanoplates for high response and low concentration hydrogen gas sensor application

    Nakate, Umesh T.; Lee, Gun Hee; Ahmad, Rafiq; Patil, Pramila; Bhopate, Dhanaji P.; Hahn, Y.B.; Yu, Y.T.; Suh, Eun-kyung

    2018-01-01

    High quality nanocrystalline NiO nanoplates were synthesized using surfactant and template free hydrothermal route. The gas sensing properties of NiO nanoplates were investigated. The nanoplates morphology of NiO with average thickness ~20 nm and diameter ~100 nm has been confirmed by FE-SEM and TEM. Crystalline quality of NiO has been studied using HRTEM and SAED techniques. Structural properties and elemental compositions have been analysed by XRD and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) respectively. The detailed investigation of structural parameters has been carried out. The optical properties of NiO were analyzed from UV-Visible and photoluminescence spectra. NiO nanoplates have good selectivity towards hydrogen (H2) gas. The lowest H2 response of 3% was observed at 2 ppm, whereas 90% response was noted for 100 ppm at optimized temperature of 200 °C with response time 180 s. The H2 responses as functions of different operating temperature as well as gas concentrations have been studied along with sensor stability. The hydrogen sensing mechanism was also elucidated.

  14. Hydrothermal synthesis of p-type nanocrystalline NiO nanoplates for high response and low concentration hydrogen gas sensor application

    Nakate, Umesh T.

    2018-05-30

    High quality nanocrystalline NiO nanoplates were synthesized using surfactant and template free hydrothermal route. The gas sensing properties of NiO nanoplates were investigated. The nanoplates morphology of NiO with average thickness ~20 nm and diameter ~100 nm has been confirmed by FE-SEM and TEM. Crystalline quality of NiO has been studied using HRTEM and SAED techniques. Structural properties and elemental compositions have been analysed by XRD and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) respectively. The detailed investigation of structural parameters has been carried out. The optical properties of NiO were analyzed from UV-Visible and photoluminescence spectra. NiO nanoplates have good selectivity towards hydrogen (H2) gas. The lowest H2 response of 3% was observed at 2 ppm, whereas 90% response was noted for 100 ppm at optimized temperature of 200 °C with response time 180 s. The H2 responses as functions of different operating temperature as well as gas concentrations have been studied along with sensor stability. The hydrogen sensing mechanism was also elucidated.

  15. Microbial Electrolysis Cells for High Yield Hydrogen Gas Production from Organic Matter

    Logan, Bruce E.; Call, Douglas; Cheng, Shaoan; Hamelers, Hubertus V. M.; Sleutels, Tom H. J. A.; Jeremiasse, Adriaan W.; Rozendal, René A.

    2008-01-01

    production rates. MECs used to make hydrogen gas are similar in design to microbial fuel cells (MFCs) that produce electricity, but there are important differences in architecture and analytical methods used to evaluate performance. We review here

  16. High Electrocatalytic Response of a Mechanically Enhanced NbC Nanocomposite Electrode Towards Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    Coy, Emerson; Yate, Luis; Valencia, Drochss P; Aperador, Willian; Siuzdak, Katarzyna; Torruella, Pau; Azanza, Eduardo; Estrade, Sonia; Iatsunskyi, Igor; Peiró , Francesca; Zhang, Xixiang; Tejada, Javier; Ziolo, Ronald F.

    2017-01-01

    Resistant and efficient electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) are desired to replace scarce and commercially expensive platinum electrodes. Thin film electrodes of metal-carbides are a promising alternative due to their reduced

  17. Development of a high-pressure microbalance for hydrogen storage materials

    Vestbø, Andreas Peter; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Bjerrum, Niels

    2007-01-01

    Pressure-composition isotherms (PCI's) help to determine thermodynamic properties related to hydrogen uptake of materials. PCI's are normally obtained volumetrically with a Sieverts type apparatus or gravimetrically with a microbalance. A potential problem with the gravimetric technique is that t......Pressure-composition isotherms (PCI's) help to determine thermodynamic properties related to hydrogen uptake of materials. PCI's are normally obtained volumetrically with a Sieverts type apparatus or gravimetrically with a microbalance. A potential problem with the gravimetric technique...... of an electromagnetic microbalance, pressure resistant casing for up to 100 bar hydrogen, a flow system for hydrogen and inert gas, heating elements for temperature control, and software for controlling the system. Thermal convection effects are observed and dampened by heating on both the sample and a counterweight...

  18. High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Solar Thermochemical Splitting of Water

    Heske, Clemens; Moujaes, Samir; Weimer, Alan; Wong, Bunsen; Siegal, Nathan; McFarland, Eric; Miller, Eric; Lewis, Michele; Bingham, Carl; Roth, Kurth; Sabacky, Bruce; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2011-09-29

    The objective of this work is to identify economically feasible concepts for the production of hydrogen from water using solar energy. The ultimate project objective was to select one or more competitive concepts for pilot-scale demonstration using concentrated solar energy. Results of pilot scale plant performance would be used as foundation for seeking public and private resources for full-scale plant development and testing. Economical success in this venture would afford the public with a renewable and limitless source of energy carrier for use in electric power load-leveling and as a carbon-free transportation fuel. The Solar Hydrogen Generation Research (SHGR) project embraces technologies relevant to hydrogen research under the Office of Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technology (HFCIT) as well as concentrated solar power under the Office of Solar Energy Technologies (SET). Although the photoelectrochemical work is aligned with HFCIT, some of the technologies in this effort are also consistent with the skills and technologies found in concentrated solar power and photovoltaic technology under the Office of Solar Energy Technologies (SET). Hydrogen production by thermo-chemical water-splitting is a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or a combination of heat and electrolysis instead of pure electrolysis and meets the goals for hydrogen production using only water and renewable solar energy as feed-stocks. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production also meets these goals by implementing photo-electrolysis at the surface of a semiconductor in contact with an electrolyte with bias provided by a photovoltaic source. Here, water splitting is a photo-electrolytic process in which hydrogen is produced using only solar photons and water as feed-stocks. The thermochemical hydrogen task engendered formal collaborations among two universities, three national laboratories and two private sector

  19. High temperature corrosion in the thermochemical hydrogen production from nuclear heat

    Coen-Porisini, F.; Imarisio, G.

    1976-01-01

    In the production of hydrogen by water decomposition utilizing nuclear heat, a multistep process has to be employed. Water and the intermediate chemical products reach in chemical cycles giving hydrogen and oxygen with regeneration of the primary products used. Three cycles are examined, characterized by the presence of halide compounds and particularly hydracids at temperatures up to 800 0 C. Corrosion tests were carried out in hydrobromic acid, hydrochloric acid, ferric chloride solutions, and hydriodic acid

  20. Air-stable magnesium nanocomposites provide rapid and high-capacity hydrogen storage without using heavy-metal catalysts

    Jeon, Ki-Joon; Moon, Hoi Ri; Ruminski, Anne M.; Jiang, Bin; Kisielowski, Christian; Bardhan, Rizia; Urban, Jeffrey J.

    2011-04-01

    Hydrogen is a promising alternative energy carrier that can potentially facilitate the transition from fossil fuels to sources of clean energy because of its prominent advantages such as high energy density (142 MJ kg-1 ref. 1), great variety of potential sources (for example water, biomass, organic matter), light weight, and low environmental impact (water is the sole combustion product). However, there remains a challenge to produce a material capable of simultaneously optimizing two conflicting criteria—absorbing hydrogen strongly enough to form a stable thermodynamic state, but weakly enough to release it on-demand with a small temperature rise. Many materials under development, including metal-organic frameworks, nanoporous polymers, and other carbon-based materials, physisorb only a small amount of hydrogen (typically 1-2 wt%) at room temperature. Metal hydrides were traditionally thought to be unsuitable materials because of their high bond formation enthalpies (for example MgH2 has a ΔHf˜75 kJ mol-1), thus requiring unacceptably high release temperatures resulting in low energy efficiency. However, recent theoretical calculations and metal-catalysed thin-film studies have shown that microstructuring of these materials can enhance the kinetics by decreasing diffusion path lengths for hydrogen and decreasing the required thickness of the poorly permeable hydride layer that forms during absorption. Here, we report the synthesis of an air-stable composite material that consists of metallic Mg nanocrystals (NCs) in a gas-barrier polymer matrix that enables both the storage of a high density of hydrogen (up to 6 wt% of Mg, 4 wt% for the composite) and rapid kinetics (loading in <30 min at 200 °C). Moreover, nanostructuring of the Mg provides rapid storage kinetics without using expensive heavy-metal catalysts.