WorldWideScience

Sample records for high performance antiproton

  1. Analog measurement of delayed antiproton annihilation time spectra in a high intensity pulsed antiproton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niestroj, A.; Hayano, R.S.; Ishikawa, T.; Tamura, H.; Torii, H.A.; Morita, N.; Yamazaki, T.; Sugai, I.; Nakayoshi, K.; Horvath, D.; Eades, J.; Widmann, E.

    1996-01-01

    An analog detection system has been developed to measure delayed antiproton annihilation time spectra for laser resonance spectroscopy of metastable antiprotonic helium atoms using the high-intensity pulsed beam of antiprotons from LEAR at CERN. (orig.)

  2. Review of the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) Experiment at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, J. B.; Sims, Herb; Martin, James; Chakrabarti, Suman; Lewis, Raymond; Fant, Wallace

    2003-01-01

    The significant energy density of matter-antimatter annihilation is attractive to the designers of future space propulsion systems, with the potential to offer a highly compact source of power. Many propulsion concepts exist that could take advantage of matter-antimatter reactions, and current antiproton production rates are sufficient to support basic proof-of-principle evaluation of technology associated with antimatter- derived propulsion. One enabling technology for such experiments is portable storage of low energy antiprotons, allowing antiprotons to be trapped, stored, and transported for use at an experimental facility. To address this need, the Marshall Space Flight Center's Propulsion Research Center is developing a storage system referred to as the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) with a design goal of containing 10(exp 12) particles for up to 18 days. The HiPAT makes use of an electromagnetic system (Penning- Malmberg design) consisting of a 4 Telsa superconductor, high voltage electrode structure, radio frequency (RF) network, and ultra high vacuum system. To evaluate the system normal matter sources (both electron guns and ion sources) are used to generate charged particles. The electron beams ionize gas within the trapping region producing ions in situ, whereas the ion sources produce the particles external to the trapping region and required dynamic capture. A wide range of experiments has been performed examining factors such as ion storage lifetimes, effect of RF energy on storage lifetime, and ability to routinely perform dynamic ion capture. Current efforts have been focused on improving the FW rotating wall system to permit longer storage times and non-destructive diagnostics of stored ions. Typical particle detection is performed by extracting trapped ions from HiPAT and destructively colliding them with a micro-channel plate detector (providing number and energy information). This improved RF system has been used to detect various

  3. Compression of a mixed antiproton and electron non-neutral plasma to high densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghion, Stefano; Amsler, Claude; Bonomi, Germano; Brusa, Roberto S.; Caccia, Massimo; Caravita, Ruggero; Castelli, Fabrizio; Cerchiari, Giovanni; Comparat, Daniel; Consolati, Giovanni; Demetrio, Andrea; Di Noto, Lea; Doser, Michael; Evans, Craig; Fanì, Mattia; Ferragut, Rafael; Fesel, Julian; Fontana, Andrea; Gerber, Sebastian; Giammarchi, Marco; Gligorova, Angela; Guatieri, Francesco; Haider, Stefan; Hinterberger, Alexander; Holmestad, Helga; Kellerbauer, Alban; Khalidova, Olga; Krasnický, Daniel; Lagomarsino, Vittorio; Lansonneur, Pierre; Lebrun, Patrice; Malbrunot, Chloé; Mariazzi, Sebastiano; Marton, Johann; Matveev, Victor; Mazzotta, Zeudi; Müller, Simon R.; Nebbia, Giancarlo; Nedelec, Patrick; Oberthaler, Markus; Pacifico, Nicola; Pagano, Davide; Penasa, Luca; Petracek, Vojtech; Prelz, Francesco; Prevedelli, Marco; Rienaecker, Benjamin; Robert, Jacques; Røhne, Ole M.; Rotondi, Alberto; Sandaker, Heidi; Santoro, Romualdo; Smestad, Lillian; Sorrentino, Fiodor; Testera, Gemma; Tietje, Ingmari C.; Widmann, Eberhard; Yzombard, Pauline; Zimmer, Christian; Zmeskal, Johann; Zurlo, Nicola; Antonello, Massimiliano

    2018-04-01

    We describe a multi-step "rotating wall" compression of a mixed cold antiproton-electron non-neutral plasma in a 4.46 T Penning-Malmberg trap developed in the context of the AEḡIS experiment at CERN. Such traps are routinely used for the preparation of cold antiprotons suitable for antihydrogen production. A tenfold antiproton radius compression has been achieved, with a minimum antiproton radius of only 0.17 mm. We describe the experimental conditions necessary to perform such a compression: minimizing the tails of the electron density distribution is paramount to ensure that the antiproton density distribution follows that of the electrons. Such electron density tails are remnants of rotating wall compression and in many cases can remain unnoticed. We observe that the compression dynamics for a pure electron plasma behaves the same way as that of a mixed antiproton and electron plasma. Thanks to this optimized compression method and the high single shot antiproton catching efficiency, we observe for the first time cold and dense non-neutral antiproton plasmas with particle densities n ≥ 1013 m-3, which pave the way for an efficient pulsed antihydrogen production in AEḡIS.

  4. Antiproton radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, Niels; Beyer, Gerd; DeMarco, John J.; Doser, Michael; Hajdukovic, Dragan; Hartley, Oliver; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Jakel, Oliver; Knudsen, Helge V.; Kovacevic, Sandra; Møller, Søren Pape; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B.à; Solberg, Timothy D.; Sørensen, Brita S.; Vranjes, Sanja; Wouters, Bradly G.; Holzscheiter, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    Antiprotons are interesting as a possible future modality in radiation therapy for the following reasons: When fast antiprotons penetrate matter, protons and antiprotons have near identical stopping powers and exhibit equal radiobiology well before the Bragg-peak. But when the antiprotons come to rest at the Bragg-peak, they annihilate, releasing almost 2 GeV per antiproton–proton annihilation. Most of this energy is carried away by energetic pions, but the Bragg-peak of the antiprotons is still locally augmented with ∼20–30 MeV per antiproton. Apart from the gain in physical dose, an increased relative biological effect also has been observed, which can be explained by the fact that some of the secondary particles from the antiproton annihilation exhibit high-LET properties. Finally, the weakly interacting energetic pions, which are leaving the target volume, may provide a real time feedback on the exact location of the annihilation peak. We have performed dosimetry experiments and investigated the rad...

  5. Challenging the Standard Model: High-Precision Comparisons of the Fundamental Properties of Protons and Antiprotons

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    The Baryon Antibaryon Symmetry Experiment (BASE-CERN) at CERN’s antiproton decelerator facility is aiming at high-precision comparisons of the fundamental properties of protons and antiprotons, such as charge-to-mass ratios, magnetic moments and lifetimes. Such experiments provide sensitive tests of the fundamental charge-parity-time invariance in the baryon sector. BASE was approved in 2013 and has measured since then, utilizing single-particle multi-Penning-trap techniques, the antiproton-to-proton charge-to-mass ratio with a fractional precision of 69 p.p.t. [1], as well as the antiproton magnetic moment with fractional precisions of 0.8 p.p.m. and 1.5 p.p.b., respectively [2]. At our matter companion experiment BASE-Mainz, we have performed proton magnetic moment measurements with fractional uncertainties of 3.3 p.p.b. [3] and 0.3 p.p.b. [4]. By combining the data of both experiments we provide a baryon-magnetic-moment based CPT test gpbar/gp = 1.000 000 000 2(15), which improves the uncertainty of p...

  6. High resolution X-ray spectroscopy in light antiprotonic atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Borchert, G L; Augsburger, M A; Castelli, C M; Chatellard, D; Egger, J P; El-Khoury, P; Elble, M; Gorke, H; Gotta, D; Hauser, P R; Indelicato, P J; Kirch, K; Lenz, S; Nelms, N; Rashid, K; Schult, O W B; Siems, T; Simons, L M

    2000-01-01

    At the LEAR facility, CERN, antiprotonic L alpha transitions in light elements have been investigated with a focussing crystal spectrometer. The high resolution of the experiment allowed for the first time to resolve in pH/pH the 2/sup 3/P/sub 0/ state from the close-lying states 2/sup 3/P/sub 2/, 2/sup 1/P/sub 1/, and 2/sup 3/P /sub 1/. In pD the corresponding transitions were found to be more than an order of magnitude broader. To a large extent the results for pH support the meson exchange model. (15 refs).

  7. High resolution charmonium spectroscopy with antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seth, K.K.

    1989-01-01

    The ultimate goal of all physics is to understand the elementary interactions and their manifestations in nature. Remarkable success has been achieved in the understanding of the electromagnetic and weak interactions. However, similar success has eluded the understanding of the strong interactions. Quantum ChromoDynamics, QCD, is the attempt to construct an elementary theory of strong interactions patterned after the highly successful electroweak theory [1]. In this paper, it is claimed that QCD is the theory of strong interactions, and that: hadrons are color singlets made of quarks and antiquarks, each of three colors and (so far) three generations. (u.d), (s.c) and (b.t) and six flavors; the short range WCD interaction is correctly patterned after QED as that due to one-gluon exchange and therefore proportional to 1/r; the additional unique feature of QCD is confinement. It is well approximated by a linear confining potential proportional r. The fact of the matter is that none of the above assertions can be proved. They have to be checked against experimental observations

  8. Carbon filament beam profile monitor for high energy proton-antiproton storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, L.R.; Shafer, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    The measurement of the evolution of the transverse profile of the stored beams in high energy proton storage rings such as the p-anti p colliders at CERN and at FNAL is of considerable importance. In the present note, a simple monitor is discussed which will allow almost non-destructive measurement of the profile of each individual proton and antiproton bunch separately. It is based on the flying wire technique first used at CEA and more recently at the CPS. A fine carbon filament is passed quickly through the beam, acting as a target for secondary particle production. The flux of secondary particles is measured by two scintillator telescopes, one for protons and one for antiprotons, having an angular acceptance between 30 and 100 mrad. Measurements of secondary particle production performed at FNAL in this angular range show that a very respectable flux can be expected

  9. Multiple collision effects on the antiproton production by high energy proton (100 GeV - 1000 GeV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Powell, J.

    1987-01-01

    Antiproton production rates which take into account multiple collision are calculated using a simple model. Methods to reduce capture of the produced antiprotons by the target are discussed, including geometry of target and the use of a high intensity laser. Antiproton production increases substantially above 150 GeV proton incident energy. The yield increases almost linearly with incident energy, alleviating space charge problems in the high current accelerator that produces large amounts of antiprotons

  10. Design of a High Luminosity 100 TeV Proton-Antiproton Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveros Tautiva, Sandra Jimena

    Currently new physics is being explored with the Large Hadron Collider at CERN and with Intensity Frontier programs at Fermilab and KEK. The energy scale for new physics is known to be in the multi-TeV range, signaling the need for a future collider which well surpasses this energy scale. A 10 34 cm-2 s-1 luminosity 100 TeV proton-antiproton collider is explored with 7x the energy of the LHC. The dipoles are 4.5 T to reduce cost. A proton-antiproton collider is selected as a future machine for several reasons. The cross section for many high mass states is 10 times higher in pp than pp collisions. Antiquarks for production can come directly from an antiproton rather than indirectly from gluon splitting. The higher cross sections reduce the synchrotron radiation in superconducting magnets and the number of events per bunch crossing, because lower beam currents can produce the same rare event rates. Events are also more centrally produced, allowing a more compact detector with less space between quadrupole triplets and a smaller beta* for higher luminosity. To adjust to antiproton beam losses (burn rate), a Fermilab-like antiproton source would be adapted to disperse the beam into 12 different momentum channels, using electrostatic septa, to increase antiproton momentum capture 12 times. At Fermilab, antiprotons were stochastically cooled in one Debuncher and one Accumulator ring. Because the stochastic cooling time scales as the number of particles, two options of 12 independent cooling systems are presented. One electron cooling ring might follow the stochastic cooling rings for antiproton stacking. Finally antiprotons in the collider ring would be recycled during runs without leaving the collider ring, by joining them to new bunches with snap bunch coalescence and synchrotron damping. These basic ideas are explored in this work on a future 100 TeV proton-antiproton collider and the main parameters are presented.

  11. Design of a High Luminosity 100 TeV Proton Antiproton Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveros Tuativa, Sandra Jimena [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Currently new physics is being explored with the Large Hadron Collider at CERN and with Intensity Frontier programs at Fermilab and KEK. The energy scale for new physics is known to be in the multi-TeV range, signaling the need for a future collider which well surpasses this energy scale. A 10$^{\\,34}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ luminosity 100 TeV proton-antiproton collider is explored with 7$\\times$ the energy of the LHC. The dipoles are 4.5\\,T to reduce cost. A proton-antiproton collider is selected as a future machine for several reasons. The cross section for many high mass states is 10 times higher in $p\\bar{p}$ than $pp$ collisions. Antiquarks for production can come directly from an antiproton rather than indirectly from gluon splitting. The higher cross sections reduce the synchrotron radiation in superconducting magnets and the number of events per bunch crossing, because lower beam currents can produce the same rare event rates. Events are also more centrally produced, allowing a more compact detector with less space between quadrupole triplets and a smaller $\\beta^{*}$ for higher luminosity. To adjust to antiproton beam losses (burn rate), a Fermilab-like antiproton source would be adapted to disperse the beam into 12 different momentum channels, using electrostatic septa, to increase antiproton momentum capture 12 times. At Fermilab, antiprotons were stochastically cooled in one Debuncher and one Accumulator ring. Because the stochastic cooling time scales as the number of particles, two options of 12 independent cooling systems are presented. One electron cooling ring might follow the stochastic cooling rings for antiproton stacking. Finally antiprotons in the collider ring would be recycled during runs without leaving the collider ring, by joining them to new bunches with snap bunch coalescence and synchrotron damping. These basic ideas are explored in this work on a future 100 TeV proton-antiproton collider and the main parameters are presented.

  12. Possibility of resonant capture of antiprotons by highly charged hydrogenlike ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genkin, M.; Lindroth, E.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, an experimental setup was proposed by Lapierre et al. which would allow antiprotons and highly charged ions to collide repeatedly in an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) due to a nested trap configuration. As mentioned by the authors, such a setup may open the possibility to study antiproton capture into well-defined states through a resonant process which involves simultaneous electron excitation. In the present work, we give some theoretical estimations of the feasibility of that process. It appears that the exotic dielectronic-like process of resonant anti-proton capture in highly charged ions does not seem to be completely out of reach

  13. Practical Uses of Antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, Gerald P.

    2003-01-01

    The production of commercial quantities of antiprotons has been a reality for many years now. The deceleration and trapping of antiprotons is a relatively new activity, but has been sufficiently proven to be translated into a business enterprise. Now that NASA has a portable Penning trap for transporting antiprotons, all the elements are in place to begin the commercial distribution of antiprotons. The list of potential customers for antiprotons is continuously growing, with detailed market analyses already performed on some medical and propulsion applications. In this paper these applications are reviewed, along with their appetite for antiprotons and the steps needed to bring them to market.

  14. Practical Uses of Antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Gerald P.

    The production of commercial quantities of antiprotons has been a reality for many years now. The deceleration and trapping of antiprotons is a relatively new activity, but has been sufficiently proven to be translated into a business enterprise. Now that NASA has a portable Penning trap for transporting antiprotons, all the elements are in place to begin the commercial distribution of antiprotons. The list of potential customers for antiprotons is continuously growing, with detailed market analyses already performed on some medical and propulsion applications. In this paper these applications are reviewed, along with their appetite for antiprotons and the steps needed to bring them to market.

  15. Physics using cold antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Hayano, R S

    2004-01-01

    Recent progress of low-energy antiproton physics by atomic spectroscopy and collisions using slow antiprotons collaboration at CERN AD is presented. High-precision spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium - a neutral three-body system pe**-He**2**+(=pHe**+) produced when antiprotons (p) are stopped in various phases of helium - has tested 3-body QED theories as well as proton-vs-antiproton CPT to within similar to 10**-**8. This was achieved by using a newly- developed radiofrequency quadrupole decelerator. Other ongoing and future experiments using low-energy antiprotons are discussed.

  16. High-precision comparison of the antiproton-to-proton charge-to-mass ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, S; Smorra, C; Mooser, A; Franke, K; Nagahama, H; Schneider, G; Higuchi, T; Van Gorp, S; Blaum, K; Matsuda, Y; Quint, W; Walz, J; Yamazaki, Y

    2015-08-13

    Invariance under the charge, parity, time-reversal (CPT) transformation is one of the fundamental symmetries of the standard model of particle physics. This CPT invariance implies that the fundamental properties of antiparticles and their matter-conjugates are identical, apart from signs. There is a deep link between CPT invariance and Lorentz symmetry--that is, the laws of nature seem to be invariant under the symmetry transformation of spacetime--although it is model dependent. A number of high-precision CPT and Lorentz invariance tests--using a co-magnetometer, a torsion pendulum and a maser, among others--have been performed, but only a few direct high-precision CPT tests that compare the fundamental properties of matter and antimatter are available. Here we report high-precision cyclotron frequency comparisons of a single antiproton and a negatively charged hydrogen ion (H(-)) carried out in a Penning trap system. From 13,000 frequency measurements we compare the charge-to-mass ratio for the antiproton (q/m)p- to that for the proton (q/m)p and obtain (q/m)p-/(q/m)p − 1 =1(69) × 10(-12). The measurements were performed at cyclotron frequencies of 29.6 megahertz, so our result shows that the CPT theorem holds at the atto-electronvolt scale. Our precision of 69 parts per trillion exceeds the energy resolution of previous antiproton-to-proton mass comparisons as well as the respective figure of merit of the standard model extension by a factor of four. In addition, we give a limit on sidereal variations in the measured ratio of baryonic antimatter, and it sets a new limit on the gravitational anomaly parameter of |α − 1| < 8.7 × 10(-7).

  17. FERMILAB: More antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visnjic, Vladimir

    1993-01-01

    The excellent performance of the Fermilab antiproton complex during the recent Collider run and its future potential are the cumulative result of many improvements over the past few years, ranging from major projects like upgrading the stack-tail stochastic cooling system in the Accumulator to minor improvements like automating tuning procedures. The antiprotons are created when the 120 GeV proton beam from the Main Ring hits the target. A good target should have high yield of antiprotons, should not melt, and should not crack due to shock waves. The old copper target has been replaced by a new one made of nickel. The yield into the Debuncher is 2 x 10 -5 antiprotons/proton. While this is only marginally better than for copper, the nickel target has high melting point energy (1070 J/g) and a low rate of increase in pressure with deposited energy, making it the target of choice for the proton intensities expected in the Main Injector era (June, page 10). Of the broad spectrum of all kinds of secondaries, only a tiny fraction are 8 GeV antiprotons. The 8 GeV negative charge secondaries are bent through 3° by a new pulsed magnet. Instead of a 200-turn magnet with coils separated by epoxy as in the past, the new magnet has one turn carrying 45.5 kA of current. This single turn pulsed magnet uses radiation hard ceramic and is much more robust

  18. A reservoir trap for antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Smorra, Christian; Franke, Kurt; Nagahama, Hiroki; Schneider, Georg; Higuchi, Takashi; Van Gorp, Simon; Blaum, Klaus; Matsuda, Yasuyuki; Quint, Wolfgang; Walz, Jochen; Yamazaki, Yasunori; Ulmer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    We have developed techniques to extract arbitrary fractions of antiprotons from an accumulated reservoir, and to inject them into a Penning-trap system for high-precision measurements. In our trap-system antiproton storage times > 1.08 years are estimated. The device is fail-safe against power-cuts of up to 10 hours. This makes our planned comparisons of the fundamental properties of protons and antiprotons independent from accelerator cycles, and will enable us to perform experiments during long accelerator shutdown periods when background magnetic noise is low. The demonstrated scheme has the potential to be applied in many other precision Penning trap experiments dealing with exotic particles.

  19. Antiproton physics at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazarus, D.M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1993-06-07

    A review of antiproton physics at the Brookhaven AGS in past decade is given as well as a description of the present high energy physics program. Existing and potential facilities for antiproton physics at the AGS are discussed and are found to provide useful antiproton intensities over the momentum range proposed for SUPERLEAR in a multiple user environment. (orig.)

  20. Weighing the antiproton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayano, Ryugo S., E-mail: hayano@phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics (Japan)

    2013-03-15

    Antiprotonic helium is a metastable three-body neutral atom consisting of an antiproton, a helium nucleus and an electron, which we serendipitously discovered some 20 years ago. The antiproton, which normally annihilates within a few picoseconds when injected into matter, can be 'stored' in this system for up to several microseconds, and laser spectroscopy is possible within this time window. From the laser transition frequency, the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio can be deduced to high precision. Recent progress at CERN's antiproton decelerator (AD) will be discussed.

  1. Challenging the standard model by high-precision comparisons of the fundamental properties of protons and antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, S.; Mooser, A.; Nagahama, H.; Sellner, S.; Smorra, C.

    2018-03-01

    The BASE collaboration investigates the fundamental properties of protons and antiprotons, such as charge-to-mass ratios and magnetic moments, using advanced cryogenic Penning trap systems. In recent years, we performed the most precise measurement of the magnetic moments of both the proton and the antiproton, and conducted the most precise comparison of the proton-to-antiproton charge-to-mass ratio. In addition, we have set the most stringent constraint on directly measured antiproton lifetime, based on a unique reservoir trap technique. Our matter/antimatter comparison experiments provide stringent tests of the fundamental charge-parity-time invariance, which is one of the fundamental symmetries of the standard model of particle physics. This article reviews the recent achievements of BASE and gives an outlook to our physics programme in the ELENA era. This article is part of the Theo Murphy meeting issue `Antiproton physics in the ELENA era'.

  2. Challenging the standard model by high-precision comparisons of the fundamental properties of protons and antiprotons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, S; Mooser, A; Nagahama, H; Sellner, S; Smorra, C

    2018-03-28

    The BASE collaboration investigates the fundamental properties of protons and antiprotons, such as charge-to-mass ratios and magnetic moments, using advanced cryogenic Penning trap systems. In recent years, we performed the most precise measurement of the magnetic moments of both the proton and the antiproton, and conducted the most precise comparison of the proton-to-antiproton charge-to-mass ratio. In addition, we have set the most stringent constraint on directly measured antiproton lifetime, based on a unique reservoir trap technique. Our matter/antimatter comparison experiments provide stringent tests of the fundamental charge-parity-time invariance, which is one of the fundamental symmetries of the standard model of particle physics. This article reviews the recent achievements of BASE and gives an outlook to our physics programme in the ELENA era.This article is part of the Theo Murphy meeting issue 'Antiproton physics in the ELENA era'. © 2018 The Authors.

  3. Antiproton Cancer Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels

    . The stopping power of high-energetic antiprotons in tissue, is similar to that of protons. Most energy is lost per unit distance as the particle comes to rest, but when the antiprotons stops, each one will annihilate on a nuclei, releasing 1.9 GeV of energy. Most of this energy is carried away by pions, gamma...... rays and neutrons, but a part of the annihilation energy is still deposited locally as recoiling nuclear fragments with limited range. These fragments will also increase the relative biological effect at the annihilation vertex. We have masured the biological effect of an antiproton beam for the first...... to handle antiprotons. This will enable us to do treatment planning with antiprotons, and thereby bring us closer to answer the question of the potential clinical benefit of antiprotons....

  4. Conceptual Design of an Antiproton Generation and Storage Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peggs, Stephen

    2006-10-24

    The Antiproton Generation and Storage Facility (AGSF) creates copious quantities of antiprotons, for bottling and transportation to remote cancer therapy centers. The first step in the generation and storage process is to accelerate an intense proton beam down the Main Linac for injection into the Main Ring, which is a Rapid Cycling Synchrotron that accelerates the protons to high energy. The beam is then extracted from the ring into a transfer line and into a Proton Target. Immediately downstream of the target is an Antiproton Collector that captures some of the antiprotons and focuses them into a beam that is transported sequentially into two antiproton rings. The Precooler ring rapidly manipulates antiproton bunches from short and broad (in momentum) to long and thin. It then performs some preliminary beam cooling, in the fraction of a second before the next proton bunch is extracted from the Main Ring. Pre-cooled antiprotons are passed on to the Accumulator ring before the next antiprotons arrive from the target. The Accumulator ring cools the antiprotons, compressing them into a dense state that is convenient for mass storage over many hours. Occasionally the Accumulator ring decelerates a large number of antiprotons, injecting them into a Deceleration Linac that passes them into a waiting Penning trap.

  5. Conceptual Design of an Antiproton Generation and Storage Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peggs, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    The Antiproton Generation and Storage Facility (AGSF) creates copious quantities of antiprotons, for bottling and transportation to remote cancer therapy centers. The first step in the generation and storage process is to accelerate an intense proton beam down the Main Linac for injection into the Main Ring, which is a Rapid Cycling Synchrotron that accelerates the protons to high energy. The beam is then extracted from the ring into a transfer line and into a Proton Target. Immediately downstream of the target is an Antiproton Collector that captures some of the antiprotons and focuses them into a beam that is transported sequentially into two antiproton rings. The Precooler ring rapidly manipulates antiproton bunches from short and broad (in momentum) to long and thin. It then performs some preliminary beam cooling, in the fraction of a second before the next proton bunch is extracted from the Main Ring. Pre-cooled antiprotons are passed on to the Accumulator ring before the next antiprotons arrive from the target. The Accumulator ring cools the antiprotons, compressing them into a dense state that is convenient for mass storage over many hours. Occasionally the Accumulator ring decelerates a large number of antiprotons, injecting them into a Deceleration Linac that passes them into a waiting Penning trap

  6. Application of high quality antiproton beam to study charmonium and exotics above DD-bar threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabanov, M.Y.; Vodopyanov, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    The spectroscopy of charmonium and exotic states with hidden charm is discussed. It is a good testing tool for theories of strong interactions including QCD in both perturbative and non-perturbative regime, lattice QCD, potential models and phenomenological models. An elaborated analysis of charmonium and charmed hybrid spectrum is given, and attempts to interpret recent experimental data in the above DD-bar threshold region are considered. Experiments using antiproton beam take advantage of the intensive production of particle-antiparticle pairs in antiproton-proton annihilations. Experimental data from different collaboration are analyzed with special attention given to new states with hidden charm that were discovered recently. Some of these states can be interpreted as higher-laying S, P and D wave charmonium states. But much more data on different decay modes are needed before firmer conclusions can be made. These data can be derived directly from the experiments using high quality antiproton beam with momentum up to 15 GeV/c. (authors)

  7. Antiproton complex at the FAIR project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolinskii, A.; Knie, K.; Dimopoulou, C.; Gostishchev, V.; Litvinov, S.; Nolden, F.; Steck, M.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes a set of calculations for the antiproton production in a complex composed of target area, collector, separator, beam line and collector ring for the antiproton source of the future FAIR facility (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) at GSI, Darmstadt, Germany. The emphasis is on the optimization of the accumulation rate of antiprotons in order to maximize the luminosity of experiments with cooled antiproton beams in the High Energy Storage Ring (HESR). Results of simulations for each component of the antiproton production complex are presented in order to identify the present limitations of the antiproton production rate.

  8. A new description of high energy antiproton (proton)-proton elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barshay, S.; Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa. Dept. of Physics); Goldberg, J.

    1987-01-01

    We develop a generalization of the geometric picture for high-energy antiproton (proton)-proton elastic scattering. The eikonal at each impact parameter is considered to have fluctuations about an average value, and is thus characterized by a distribution. A connection to parton branching is made through the specific form of the distribution function for the eikonal. A unified physical theory with significant fluctuations accurately describes the anti p(p)-p data at both √s = 546 GeV and 53 GeV. The fluctuation parameter is remarkably well given by that directly observed in multiparticle production. (orig.)

  9. New description of high energy antiproton (proton)-proton elastic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barshay, S; Goldberg, J

    1987-10-15

    We develop a generalization of the geometric picture for high-energy antiproton (proton)-proton elastic scattering. The eikonal at each impact parameter is considered to have fluctuations about an average value, and is thus characterized by a distribution. A connection to parton branching is made through the specific form of the distribution function for the eikonal. A unified physical theory with significant fluctuations accurately describes the anti p(p)-p data at both ..sqrt..s = 546 GeV and 53 GeV. The fluctuation parameter is remarkably well given by that directly observed in multiparticle production.

  10. Exploration of a High Luminosity 100 TeV Proton Antiproton Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveros, Sandra J. [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Summers, Don [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Cremaldi, Lucien [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Acosta, John [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Neuffer, David [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2017-04-12

    New physics is being explored with the Large Hadron Collider at CERN and with Intensity Frontier programs at Fermilab and KEK. The energy scale for new physics is known to be in the multi-TeV range, signaling the need for a future collider which well surpasses this energy scale. We explore a 10$^{\\,34}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ luminosity, 100 TeV $p\\bar{p}$ collider with 7$\\times$ the energy of the LHC but only 2$\\times$ as much NbTi superconductor, motivating the choice of 4.5 T single bore dipoles. The cross section for many high mass states is 10 times higher in $p\\bar{p}$ than $pp$ collisions. Antiquarks for production can come directly from an antiproton rather than indirectly from gluon splitting. The higher cross sections reduce the synchrotron radiation in superconducting magnets and the number of events per beam crossing, because lower beam currents can produce the same rare event rates. Events are more centrally produced, allowing a more compact detector with less space between quadrupole triplets and a smaller $\\beta^{*}$ for higher luminosity. A Fermilab-like $\\bar p$ source would disperse the beam into 12 momentum channels to capture more antiprotons. Because stochastic cooling time scales as the number of particles, 12 cooling ring sets would be used. Each set would include phase rotation to lower momentum spreads, equalize all momentum channels, and stochastically cool. One electron cooling ring would follow the stochastic cooling rings. Finally antiprotons would be recycled during runs without leaving the collider ring by joining them to new bunches with synchrotron damping.

  11. High precision spectroscopy of pionic and antiprotonic atoms; Spectroscopie de precision des atomes pioniques et antiprotoniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, P

    1998-04-15

    The study of exotic atoms, in which an orbiting electron of a normal atom is replaced by a negatively charged particle ({pi}{sup -}, {mu}{sup -}, p, {kappa}{sup -}, {sigma}{sup -},...) may provide information on the orbiting particle and the atomic nucleus, as well as on their interaction. In this work, we were interested in pionic atoms ({pi}{sup -14} N) on the one hand in order to determine the pion mass with high accuracy (4 ppm), and on the other hand in antiprotonic atoms (pp-bar) in order to study the strong nucleon-antinucleon interaction at threshold. In this respect, a high-resolution crystal spectrometer was coupled to a cyclotron trap which provides a high stop density for particles in gas targets at low pressure. Using curved crystals, an extended X-ray source could be imaged onto the detector. Charge-Coupled Devices were used as position sensitive detectors in order to measure the Bragg angle of the transition to a high precision. The use of gas targets resolved the ambiguity owing to the number of K electrons for the value of the pion mass, and, for the first time, strong interaction shift and broadening of the 2p level in antiprotonic hydrogen were measured directly. (author)

  12. Perspectives for polarized antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenisa, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Polarized antiprotons would open a new window in hadron physics providing access to a wealth of single and double spin observables in proton-antiproton interactions. The PAX Collaboration aims to perform the first ever measurement of the spin-dependence of the proton-antiproton cross section at the AD ring at CERN. The spin-dependence of the cross section could in principle be exploited by the spin-filtering technique for the production of a polarized antiproton beam. As a preparatory phase to the experimentation at AD, the PAX Collaboration has initiated a series of dedicated studies with protons at the COSY-ring in Juelich (Germany), aimed at the commissioning of the experimental apparatus and confirmation of the predictions for spin-filtering with protons.

  13. LEAP [Low-Energy Antiproton]: A balloon-borne search for low-energy cosmic-ray antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moats, A.R.M.

    1989-01-01

    The LEAP (Low-Energy Antiproton) experiment is a search for cosmic-ray antiprotons in the 120 MeV to 1.2 GeV kinetic energy range. The motivation for this project was the result announced by Buffington et. al. (1981) that indicated an anomalously high antiproton flux below 300 MeV; this result has compelled theorists to propose sources of primary antiprotons above the small secondary antiproton flux produced by high energy cosmic-ray collisions with nuclei in the interstellar medium. LEAP consisted of the NMSU magnetic spectrometer, a time-of-flight system designed at Goddard Space Flight Center, two scintillation detectors, and a Cherenkov counter designed and built at the University of Arizona. Analysis of flight data performed by the high-energy astrophysics group at Goddard Space Flight Center revealed no antiproton candidates found in the 120 MeV to 360 MeV range; 3 possible antiproton candidate events were found in the 500 MeV to 1.2 GeV range in an analysis done here at the University of Arizona. However, since it will be necessary to sharpen the calibration on all of the LEAP systems in order to positively identify these events as antiprotons, only an upper limit has been determined at present. Thus, combining the analyses performed at the University of Arizona and Goddard Space Flight Center, 90% confidence upper limits of 3.5 x 10 -5 in the 120 MeV to 360 MeV range and 2.3 x 10 -4 in the 500 MeV to 1.2 GeV range for the antiproton/proton ratio is indicated by the LEAP results. LEAP disagrees sharply with the results of the Buffington group, indicating a low antiproton flux at these energies

  14. Antiproton production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarus, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    The results for the antiproton momentum spectrum produced in proton reactions on lead at the CERN Antiproton Accumulator is scaled to AGS operating conditions using the Sanford-Wang formula with no correction for target material. Yield predictions as a function of momentum are shown for 28.3 GeV protons on beryllium and results are converted to antiproton beam flux. The AGS Medium Energy Separated Beam has a flux which is a factor of 2 lower than Sanford-Wang predictions. This may be due to factors affecting beam acceptance

  15. High intensity proton injector for facility of antiproton and ion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezov, R., E-mail: r.berezov@gsi.de; Brodhage, R.; Fils, J.; Hollinger, R.; Ivanova, V. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Chauvin, N.; Delferriere, O.; Tuske, O. [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, IRFU, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ullmann, C. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut für Angewandte Physik, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    The high current ion source with the low energy beam transport (LEBT) will serve as injector into the proton LINAC to provide primary proton beam for the production of antiprotons. The pulsed ion source developed and built in CEA/Saclay operates with a frequency of 2.45 GHz based on ECR plasma production with two coils with 87.5 mT magnetic field necessary for the electron cyclotron resonance. The compact LEBT consists of two solenoids with a maximum magnetic field of 500 mT including two integrated magnetic steerers to adjust the horizontal and vertical beam positions. The total length of the compact LEBT is 2.3 m and was made as short as possible to reduced emittance growth along the beam line. To measure ion beam intensity behind the pentode extraction system, between solenoids and at the end of the beam line, two current transformers and a Faraday cup are installed. To get information about the beam quality and position, the diagnostic chamber with different equipment will be installed between the two solenoids. This article reports the current status of the proton injector for the facility of antiproton and ion research.

  16. Further properties of high-mass multijet events at the Fermilab proton-antiproton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, F.; Akimoto, H.; Akopian, A.; Albrow, M.G.; Amendolia, S.R.; Amidei, D.; Antos, J.; Anway-Wiese, C.; Aota, S.; Apollinari, G.; Asakawa, T.; Ashmanskas, W.; Atac, M.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Badgett, W.; Bagdasarov, S.; Bailey, M.W.; Bao, J.; de Barbaro, P.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Barzi, E.; Bauer, G.; Baumann, T.; Bedeschi, F.; Behrends, S.; Belforte, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Benlloch, J.; Bensinger, J.; Benton, D.; Beretvas, A.; Berge, J.P.; Berryhill, J.; Bertolucci, S.; Bhatti, A.; Biery, K.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Blair, R.E.; Blocker, C.; Bodek, A.; Bokhari, W.; Bolognesi, V.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Breccia, L.; Bromberg, C.; Bruner, N.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Budd, H.S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Byon-Wagner, A.; Byrum, K.L.; Cammerata, J.; Campagnari, C.; Campbell, M.; Caner, A.; Carithers, W.; Carlsmith, D.; Castro, A.; Cauz, D.; Cen, Y.; Cervelli, F.; Chang, P.S.; Chang, P.T.; Chao, H.Y.; Chapman, J.; Cheng, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chikamatsu, T.; Chiou, C.N.; Christofek, L.; Cihangir, S.; Clark, A.G.; Cobal, M.; Contreras, M.; Conway, J.; Cooper, J.; Cordelli, M.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Crane, D.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Culbertson, R.; Cunningham, J.D.; Daniels, T.; DeJongh, F.; Delchamps, S.; DellAgnello, S.; DellOrso, M.; Demina, R.; Demortier, L.; Denby, B.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P.F.; Devlin, T.; Dittmann, J.R.; Donati, S.; Done, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dunn, A.; Eddy, N.; Einsweiler, K.; Elias, J.E.; Ely, R.; Engels, E. Jr.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Fan, Q.; Fiori, I.; Flaugher, B.; Foster, G.W.; Franklin, M.; Frautschi, M.; Freeman, J.; Friedman, J.; Frisch, H.; Fuess, T.A.; Fukui, Y.; Funaki, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Galeotti, S.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Gay, C.; Geer, S.; Gerdes, D.W.; Giannetti, P.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Gladney, L.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Gonzalez, J.; Gordon, A.; Goshaw, A.T.; Goulianos, K.; Grassmann, H.; Groer, L.

    1996-01-01

    The properties of high-mass multijet events produced at the Fermilab proton-antiproton collider are compared with leading order QCD matrix element predictions, QCD parton shower Monte Carlo predictions, and the predictions from a model in which events are distributed uniformly over the available multibody phase space. Multijet distributions corresponding to (4N-4) variables that span the N-body parameter space are found to be well described by the QCD calculations for inclusive three-jet, four-jet, and five-jet events. The agreement between data, QCD matrix element calculations, and QCD parton shower Monte Carlo predictions suggests that 2→2 scattering plus gluon radiation provides a good first approximation to the full LO QCD matrix element for events with three, four, or even five jets in the final state. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  17. Deceleration of Antiprotons in Support of Antiproton Storage/Utilization Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, Steven D.; Jackson, Gerald P.; Pearson, J. Boise; Lewis, Raymond A.

    2005-01-01

    Antimatter has the highest energy density known to mankind. Many concepts have been studied that use antimatter for propulsion. All of these concepts require the development of high density storage. H-bar Technologies, under contract with the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, has undertaken the first step toward development of high density storage. Demonstration of the ability to store antiprotons in a Penning Trap provides the technology to pursue research in alternative storage methods that may lead to eventually to high density concepts. H-bar Technologies has undertaken research activity on the detailed design and operations required to decelerate and redirect the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) antiproton beam to lay the groundwork for a source of low energy antiprotons. We have performed a detailed assessment of an antiproton deceleration scheme using the FNAL Main Injector, outlining the requirements to significantly and efficiently lower the energy of antiprotons. This task shall require a combination of: theoretical/computation simulations, development of specialized accelerator controls programming, modification of specific Main Injector hardware, and experimental testing of the modified system. Testing shall be performed to characterize the system with a goal of reducing the beam momentum from 8.9 GeV/c to a level of 1 GeV/c or less. We have designed an antiproton degrader system that will integrate with the FNAL decelerated/transferred beam. The degrader shall be designed to maximize the number of low energy antiprotons with a beam spot sized for acceptance by the Mark I test hardware

  18. PHYSICS WITH ULTRA-LOW ENERGY ANTIPROTONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. HOLZSCHEITER

    2001-02-01

    In this report the author describes the current status of the antiproton deceleration (AD) facility at CERN, and highlights the physics program with ultra-low energy antiproton at this installation. He also comments on future possibilities provided higher intensity antiproton beams become available at Fermilab, and review possibilities for initial experiments using direct degrading of high energy antiprotons in material has been developed and proven at CERN.

  19. High-precision spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium-first results from the AD of CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Widmann, E

    2001-01-01

    New results of the laser and microwave spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium "atomcules" obtained in the first year of operation of the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility of CERN are presented. They include the discovery of three new resonant transitions and the determination of the zero-density wavelength of six transitions with an accuracy of 130 ppb in the best case. Auger rates of those states were also determined, and two of them were found to be several orders of magnitude larger than expected from a simple estimate based on the multipolarity Delta l, i.e., the jump in angular momentum required for the antiproton to reach the next lower-lying state of ionized pHe /sup ++/. Furthermore, a first signal of a two-laser microwave triple resonance to measure the hyperfine splitting in antiprotonic helium was observed. (39 refs).

  20. Antiproton production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allaby, J.V.

    1984-01-01

    The basic definitions used in the physics literature on particle production are reviewed. The data on anti p production are interpreted in order to provide an estimate of the yield of anti p's from typical target at the antiproton accumulator, including the effects of re-absorption in the target. (orig.)

  1. Antiproton Target

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Antiproton target used for the AA (antiproton accumulator). The first type of antiproton production target used from 1980 to 1982 comprised a rod of copper 3mm diameter and 120mm long embedded in a graphite cylinder that was itself pressed into a finned aluminium container. This assembly was air-cooled and it was used in conjunction with the Van der Meer magnetic horn. In 1983 Fermilab provided us with lithium lenses to replace the horn with a view to increasing the antiproton yield by about 30%. These lenses needed a much shorter target made of heavy metal - iridium was chosen for this purpose. The 50 mm iridium rod was housed in an extension to the original finned target container so that it could be brought very close to the entrance to the lithium lens. Picture 1 shows this target assembly and Picture 2 shows it mounted together with the lithium lens. These target containers had a short lifetime due to a combination of beam heating and radiation damage. This led to the design of the water-cooled target in...

  2. The Antiproton Accumulator becomes Antiproton Decelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    The photos show the Antiproton Accumulator (AA) transformed into Antiproton Decelerator. The AA was used at CERN between 1981 and 1999 before being replaced by the Antiproton Decelerator (AD). The AA was used to collect and stochastically cool antiprotons used in proton-antiproton collisions in the SPS collider. This lead to the discovery of the W and Z bosons in 1983 and the Nobel Prize for Carlo Rubbia and Simon van der Meer in 1984.

  3. LEAP: A balloon-borne search for low-energy cosmic ray antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moats, Anne Rosalie Myers

    The LEAP (Low Energy Antiproton) experiment is a search for cosmic ray antiprotons in the 120 MeV to 1.2 GeV kinetic energy range. The motivation for this project was the result announced by Buffington et al. (1981) that indicated an anomalously high antiproton flux below 300 MeV; this result has compelled theorists to propose sources of primary antiprotons above the small secondary antiproton flux produced by high energy cosmic ray collisions with nuclei in the interstellar medium. LEAP consisted of the NMSU magnet spectrometer, a time-of-flight system designed at NASA-Goddard, two scintillation detectors, and a Cherenkov counter. Analysis of flight data performed by the high energy astrophysics group at Goddard Space Flight Center revealed no antiproton candidates found in the 120 MeV to 360 MeV range; 3 possible antiproton candidate events were found in the 500 MeV to 1.2 GeV range in an analysis done here at the University of Arizona. However, since it will be necessary to sharpen the calibration on all of the LEAP systems in order to positively identify these events as antiprotons, only an upper limit has been determined at present. Thus, combining the analyses performed at the University of Arizona and NASA-Goddard, 90 percent confidence upper limits of 3.5 x 10-5 in the 120 MeV to 360 MeV range and 2.3 x 10-4 in the 500 MeV to 1.2 GeV range for the antiproton/proton ratio is indicated by the LEAP results. LEAP disagrees sharply with the results of the Buffington group, indicating a low antiproton flux at these energies. Thus, a purely secondary antiproton flux may be adequate at low energies.

  4. Autoresonant Excitation of Antiproton Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, Gorm B; Baquero-Ruiz, Marcelo; Bertsche, William; Bowe, Paul D; Butler, Eoin; Carpenter, P T; Cesar, Claudio L; Chapman, Steven; Charlton, Michael; Fajans, Joel; Friesen, Tim; Fujiwara, Makoto C; Gill, David R; Hangst, Jeffrey S; Hardy, Walter N; Hayden, Michael E; Humphries, Andrew J; Hurt, J L; Hydomako, Richard; Jonsell, Svante; Madsen, Niels; Menary, Scott; Nolan, Paul; Olchanski, Konstantin; Olin, Art; Povilus, Alexander; Pusa, Petteri; Robicheaux, Francis; Sarid, Eli; Silveira, Daniel M; So, Chukman; Storey, James W; Thompson, Robert I; van der Werf, Dirk P; Wurtele, Jonathan S; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate controllable excitation of the center-of-mass longitudinal motion of a thermal antiproton plasma using a swept-frequency autoresonant drive. When the plasma is cold, dense, and highly collective in nature, we observe that the entire system behaves as a single-particle nonlinear oscillator, as predicted by a recent theory. In contrast, only a fraction of the antiprotons in a warm plasma can be similarly excited. Antihydrogen was produced and trapped by using this technique to drive antiprotons into a positron plasma, thereby initiating atomic recombination.

  5. Performance of the CERN plasma lens in laboratory and beam tests at the Antiproton Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalewicz, R.; Lubrano di Scampamorte, M.; Milner, S.; Pedersen, F.; Riege, H.; Christiansen, J.; Frank, K.; Stetter, M.; Tkotz, R.; Boggasch, E.

    1991-01-01

    The CERN plasma lens is based on a dynamic z-pinch which creates during 500 ns a cylindrical plasma current conductor of 290 mm length and 38 to 45 mm diameter. The lens is designed for pulsed pinched currents of 400 kA and magnetic field gradients of 200 T/m produced with stored energies of 56 kJ. Life tests of different lens components were carried through at a repetition rate of 4.8 s/pulse. The results of the first beam tests of the plasma lens at the CERN antiproton source are very encouraging in view of other potential plasma lens applications

  6. Commissioning of the ECR ion source of the high intensity proton injector of the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuske, O.; Chauvin, N.; Delferriere, O.; Fils, J.; Gauthier, Y.

    2018-05-01

    The CEA at Saclay is in charge of developing and building the ion source and the low energy line of the proton linac of the FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) accelerator complex located at GSI (Darmstadt) in Germany. The FAIR facility will deliver stable and rare isotope beams covering a huge range of intensities and beam energies for experiments in the fields of atomic physics, plasma physics, nuclear physics, hadron physics, nuclear matter physics, material physics, and biophysics. A significant part of the experimental program at FAIR is dedicated to antiproton physics that requires an ultimate number 7 × 1010 cooled pbar/h. The high-intensity proton beam that is necessary for antiproton production will be delivered by a dedicated 75 mA/70 MeV proton linac. A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source will deliver a 100 mA H+ beam pulsed at 4 Hz with an energy of 95 keV. A 2 solenoids low energy beam transport line allows the injection of the proton beam into the radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) within an acceptance of 0.3π mm mrad (norm. rms). An electrostatic chopper system located between the second solenoid and the RFQ is used to cut the beam macro-pulse from the source to inject 36 μs long beam pulses into the RFQ. At present time, a Ladder-RFQ is under construction at the University of Frankfurt. This article reports the first beam measurements obtained since mid of 2016. Proton beams have been extracted from the ECR ion source and analyzed just after the extraction column on a dedicated diagnostic chamber. Emittance measurements as well as extracted current and species proportion analysis have been performed in different configurations of ion source parameters, such as magnetic field profile, radio frequency power, gas injection, and puller electrode voltage.

  7. Antiprotons are another matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hynes, M.V.

    1987-01-01

    Theories of gravity abound, whereas experiments in gravity are few in number. An important experiment in gravity that has not been performed is the measurement of the gravitational acceleration of antimatter. Although there have been attempts to infer these properties from those of normal matter, none of these theoretical arguments are compelling. Modern theories of gravity that attempt to unify gravity with the other forces of nature predict that in principle antimatter can fall differently than normal matter in the Earth's field. Some of these supergravity theories predict that antimatter will fall faster, and that normal matter will fall with a small Baryon-number dependance in the earth's field. All of these predictions violate the Weak Equivalence Principle, a cornerstone of General Relativity, but are consistent with CPT conservation. In our approved experiment at LEAR (PS-200) we will test the Weak Equivalence Principle for antimatter by measuring the gravitational acceleration of the antiproton. Through a series of deceleration stages, antiprotons from LEAR will be lowered in energy to ∼4 Kelvin at which energy the gravitational effect will be measureable. The measurement will employ the time-of-flight technique wherein the antiprotons are released vertically in a drift tube. The spectrum of time-of-flight measurements can be used to extract the gravitational acceleration experienced by the particles. The system will be calibrated using H - ions which simulates the electromagnetic behavior of the antiproton, yet is a baryon to ∼0.1%. To extract the gravitational acceleration of the antiproton relative to the H - ion with a statistical precision of 1% will require the release of ∼10 6 to 10 7 particles

  8. Antiprotons are another matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hynes, M.V.

    1988-01-01

    Theories of gravity abound whereas experiments in gravity are few in number. An important experiment in gravity that has not been performed is the measurement of the gravitational acceleration of antimatter. Although there have been attempts to infer this property from those of normal matter, none of these theoretical arguments are compelling. Modern theories of gravity that attempt to unify gravity with the other forces of nature predict that in principle antimatter can fall differently than normal matter in the Earth's field. Some of these supergravity theories predict that antimatter will fall faster and that normal matter will fall with a small Baryon-number dependence in the Earth's field. All of these predictions violate the Weak Equivalence Principle, a cornerstone of General Relativity, but are consistent with CPT conservation. In our approved experiment at LEAR (PS-200) we will test the Weak Equivalence Principle for antimatter by measuring the gravitational acceleration of the antiproton. Through a series of deceleration stages, antiprotons from LEAR will be lowered in energy to ≅ 4 Kelvin at which energy the gravitational effect will be measureable. The measurement will employ the time-of-flight technique wherein the antiprotons are released vertically in a drift tube. The spectrum of time-of-flight measurements can be used to extract the gravitational acceleration experienced by the particles. The system will be calibrated using H - ions which simulate the electromagnetic behavior of the antiproton yet are baryons to ≅ 0.1%. To extract the gravitational acceleration of the antiproton relative to the H - ion with a statistical precision of 1% will require the release of ≅ 10 6 -10 7 particles. (orig.)

  9. Formation and decay of nuclei heated with high-energy antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Lott, B; Eades, J.; Egidy, T.v.; Figuera, P.; Fuchs, H.; Galin, J.; Gulda, K.; Goldenbaum, F.; Hilscher, D.; Jahnke, U.; Jastrzebski, J.; Kurcewicz, W.; Morjean, M.; Pausch, G.; Péghaire, A.; Pienkowski, L.; Polster, D.; Proschitzki, S.; Quednau, B.; Rossner, H.; Schmid, S.; Schmid, W.; Ziem, P.

    1999-01-01

    The decay of nuclei excited via the annihilation of 1.2 GeV antiprotons has been investigated. Thanks to the ability to determine the excitation energy, E sup * , for all events, largely irrespective of their mass partitions, the probabilities of the different channels at play could be estimated as a function of E sup *. The data show the prevalence of fission and evaporation up to E sup * = 4 MeV/nucleon, with no hint of a transition towards multifragmentation.

  10. Radiation studies in the antiproton source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Church, M.

    1990-01-01

    Experiment E760 has a lead glass (Pb-G) calorimeter situated in the antiproton source tunnel in the accumulator ring at location A50. This location is exposed to radiation from several sources during antiproton stacking operations. A series of radiation studies has been performed over the last two years to determine the sources of this radiation and as a result, some shielding has been installed in the antiproton source in order to protect the lead glass from radiation damage

  11. High-voltage switching for in-flight capture of keV antiprotons in a Penning trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fei, X.; Davisson, R.; Gabrielse, G.

    1987-01-01

    The recently observed in-flight capture of keV antiprotons and protons in a Penning trap requires that the -3-kV potentials on electrodes of a Penning trap near 4.2 K be switched on and off with switching times less than 20 ns. These rapidly switched potentials are applied via transmission lines which are not terminated at the trap, thereby avoiding unacceptable heat load on the helium Dewar. Simple high-voltage switching circuits are constructed using krytrons and reed relays. A krytron provides the rapid switching and stays on just long enough for a reed relay to kick in and maintain the switched state indefinitely

  12. Anitproton-matter interactions in antiproton applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, David L., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    By virtue of the highly energetic particles released when they annihilate in matter, antiprotons have a variety of potentially important applications. Among others, these include remote 3-D density and composition imaging of the human body and also of thick, dense materials, cancer therapy, and spacecraft propulsion. Except for spacecraft propulsion, the required numbers of low energy antiprotons can be produced, stored, and transported through reliance on current or near term technology. Paramount to these applications and to fundamental research involving antiprotons is knowledge of how antiprotons interact with matter. The basic annihilation process is fairly well understood, but the antiproton annihilation and energy loss rates in matter depend in complex ways on a number of atomic processes. The rates, and the corresponding cross sections, were measured or are accurately predictable only for limited combinations of antiproton kinetic energy and material species.

  13. The future of the antiproton accumulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autin, B.

    1983-01-01

    When the Antiproton Accumulator was designed in 1977, it was considered as an element of the high energy proton-antiproton collision experiments in the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. Since that time, antiproton physics has become more and more popular: a second experimental area was built in the SPS, the Intersecting Storage Rings started a special antiproton programme and a considerable interest has bloomed in the energy range of nuclear physics with the LEAR machine. Moreover, any projection on hadron physics in the coming years shows an insatiable appetite of experimentalists for more antiprotons. Therefore, basic studies have been pursued since the beginning of last year to transform the accumulator into an abundant source of antiprotons

  14. The antiproton depth–dose curve in water

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, N; Jäkel, O; Knudsen, H V; Kovacevic, S

    2008-01-01

    We have measured the depth–dose curve of 126 MeV antiprotons in a water phantom using ionization chambers. Since the antiproton beam provided by CERN has a pulsed structure and possibly carries a high-LET component from the antiproton annihilation, it is necessary to correct the acquired charge for ion recombination effects. The results are compared with Monte Carlo calculations and were found to be in good agreement. Based on this agreement we calculate the antiproton depth–dose curve for antiprotons and compare it with that for protons and find a doubling of the physical dose in the peak region for antiprotons.

  15. Antiproton radiation found effective in cancer research

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "An international collaboration of scientists has completed the first ever antiproton beam experiments designed to reveal the biological effectiveness of antiproton radiation in terminating cells used for cancer research...PBar Labs assembled the collaboration at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research in Geneva) to perform the measurements" (1 page).

  16. Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1980-01-01

    The AA in its final stage of construction, before it disappeared from view under concrete shielding. Antiprotons were first injected, stochastically cooled and accumulated in July 1980. From 1981 on, the AA provided antiprotons for collisions with protons, first in the ISR, then in the SPS Collider. From 1983 on, it also sent antiprotons, via the PS, to the Low-Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR). The AA was dismantled in 1997 and shipped to Japan.

  17. The antiproton decelerator: AD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baird, S.; Berlin, D.; Boillot, J.; Bosser, J.; Brouet, M.; Buttkus, J.; Caspers, F.; Chohan, V.; Dekkers, D.; Eriksson, T.; Garoby, R.; Giannini, R.; Grobner, O.; Gruber, J.; Hemery, J.Y.; Koziol, H.; Maccaferri, R.; Maury, S.; Metzger, C.; Metzmacher, K.; Moehl, D.; Mulder, H.; Paoluzzi, M.; Pedersen, F.; Riunaud, J.P.; Serre, C.; Simon, D.J.; Tranquille, G.; Tuyn, J.; Williams, B.

    1997-01-01

    In view of a possible future programme of physics with low-energy antiprotons, a simplified scheme for the provision of antiprotons at 100 MeV/c has been studied. It uses the present target area and the modified antiproton collector (AC) in its present location. In this report the modifications and the operation are discussed. (orig.)

  18. Antiprotons get biological

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    After its final run in September, the first results of the Antiproton Cell Experiment (ACE) look very promising. It was the first experiment to take data on the biological effects of antiproton beams to evaluate the potential of antiprotons in radiation therapy.

  19. Calculated LET spectrum from antiproton beams stopping in water

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Antiprotons have been proposed as a potential modality for radiotherapy because the annihilation at the end of range leads to roughly a doubling of physical dose in the Bragg peak region. So far it has been anticipated that the radiobiology of antiproton beams is similar to that of protons in the entry region of the beam, but very different in the annihilation region, due to the expected high-LET components resulting from the annihilation. On closer inspection we find that calculations of dose averaged LET in the entry region may suggest that the RBE of antiprotons in the plateau region could significantly differ from unity, which seems to warrant closer inspection of the radiobiology in this region. Materials and Methods. Monte Carlo simulations using FLUKA were performed for calculating the entire particle spectrum of a beam of 126 MeV antiprotons hitting a water phantom. Results and Discussion. In the plateau region of the simulated antiproton beam we observe a dose-averaged unrestrict...

  20. Nuclear Excitations by Antiprotons and Antiprotonic Atoms

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The proposal aims at the investigation of nuclear excitations following the absorption and annihilation of stopped antiprotons in heavier nuclei and at the same time at the study of the properties of antiprotonic atoms. The experimental arrangement will consist of a scintillation counter telescope for the low momentum antiproton beam from LEAR, a beam degrader, a pion multiplicity counter, a monoisotopic target and Ge detectors for radiation and charged particles. The data are stored by an on-line computer.\\\\ \\\\ The Ge detectors register antiprotonic x-rays and nuclear @g-rays which are used to identify the residual nucleus and its excitation and spin state. Coincidences between the two detectors will indicate from which quantum state the antiprotons are absorbed and to which nuclear states the various reactions are leading. The measured pion multiplicity characterizes the annihilation process. Ge&hyphn. and Si-telescopes identify charged particles and determine their energies.\\\\ \\\\ The experiment will gi...

  1. The Antiproton Depth-Dose Curve in Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael; Jäkel, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    We have measured the depth-dose curve of 126 MeV antiprotons in a water phantom using ionization chambers. Since the antiproton beam provided by CERN has a pulsed structure and possibly carries a high-LET component from the antiproton annihilation, it is necessary to correct the acquired charge...

  2. Spectroscopy of antiproton helium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayano, Ryugo

    2005-01-01

    Antiproton helium atom is three-body system consisting of an antiproton, electrons and a helium nucleus (denoted by the chemical symbol, p-bar H + ). The authors produced abundant atoms of p-bar 4 He + , and p-bar 3 He + in a cooled He gas target chamber stopping the p-bar beam decelerated to approximately 100 keV in the Antiproton Decelerator at CERN. A precision laser spectroscopy on the atomic transitions in the p-bar 4 He + , and in p-bar 3 He + was performed. Principle of laser spectroscopy and various modifications of the system to eliminate factors affecting the accuracy of the experiment were described. Deduced mass ratio of antiproton and proton, (|m p -bar - m p |)/m p reached to the accuracy of 10 ppb (10 -8 ) as of 2002, as adopted in the recent article of the Particle Data Group by P.J. Mohr and B.N. Taylor. This value is the highest precise data for the CPT invariance in baryon. In future, antihydrogen atoms will be produced in the same facility, and will provide far accurate value of antiproton mass thus enabling a better confirmation of CPT theorem in baryon. (T. Tamura)

  3. Search for Wh Production Using High-PT Isolated Like-Sign Dilepton Events in 1.96-TeV Proton-Antiproton Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakisaka, Takayuki [Osaka City Univ. (Japan)

    2009-04-01

    The thesis describes search for the neutral Higgs production associated with the W boson using high-PT isolated like-sign (LS) dilepton events in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV.

  4. Laser-driven ultrafast antiproton beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shun; Pei, Zhikun; Shen, Baifei; Xu, Jiancai; Zhang, Lingang; Zhang, Xiaomei; Xu, Tongjun; Yu, Yong; Bu, Zhigang

    2018-02-01

    Antiproton beam generation is investigated based on the ultra-intense femtosecond laser pulse by using two-dimensional particle-in-cell and Geant4 simulations. A high-flux proton beam with an energy of tens of GeV is generated in sequential radiation pressure and bubble regime and then shoots into a high-Z target for producing antiprotons. Both yield and energy of the antiproton beam increase almost linearly with the laser intensity. The generated antiproton beam has a short pulse duration of about 5 ps and its flux reaches 2 × 10 20 s - 1 at the laser intensity of 2.14 × 10 23 W / cm 2 . Compared to conventional methods, this new method based on the ultra-intense laser pulse is able to provide a compact, tunable, and ultrafast antiproton source, which is potentially useful for quark-gluon plasma study, all-optical antihydrogen generation, and so on.

  5. The relative biological effectiveness of antiprotons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Alsner, Jan; Bassler, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose: Aside from the enhancement of physical dose deposited by antiprotons annihilating in tissue-like material compared to protons of the same range a further increase of biological effective dose has been demonstrated. This enhancement can be expressed in an increase of the re......Background and purpose: Aside from the enhancement of physical dose deposited by antiprotons annihilating in tissue-like material compared to protons of the same range a further increase of biological effective dose has been demonstrated. This enhancement can be expressed in an increase...... of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of antiprotons near the end of range. We have performed the first-ever direct measurement of the RBE of antiprotons both at rest and in flight. Materials and methods: Experimental data were generated on the RBE of an antiproton beam entering a tissue-like target...

  6. AA antiproton production target

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1979-01-01

    The first version of the antiproton production target was a tungsten rod, 11 cm long and 3 mm in diameter. The rod was embedded in graphite, pressure-seated into an outer casing of stainless steel. At the entrance to the target assembly was a scintillator screen, imprinted with circles every 5 mm in radius, which allowed to precisely aim the 26 GeV high-intensity proton beam from the PS onto the centre of the target rod. The scintillator screen was a 1 mm thick plate of Cr-doped alumina. See also 7903034 and 7905091.

  7. AA antiproton production target

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1979-01-01

    The first version of the antiproton production target was a tungsten rod, 11 cm long (actually a row of 11 rods, each 1 cm long) and 3 mm in diameter. The rod was embedded in graphite, pressure-seated into an outer casing made of stainless steel. The casing had fins for forced-air cooling. In this picture, the 26 GeV high-intensity beam from the PS enters from the right, where a scintillator screen, with circles every 5 mm in radius, permits precise aim at the target centre. See also 7903034 and 7905094.

  8. Some preliminary considerations on antiproton-nucleus experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavin, A.I.

    1981-05-01

    The antiproton as a probe of the atomic nucleus is discussed in the expectation that fairly intense beams of high quality will be available in 1983 at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) facility at CERN and possibly also in some other laboratories at a later date. Several antiproton-nucleus experiments are proposed, and the possibility of observing antiprotonic nuclei as well as antineutronic nuclei is discussed. It is demonstrated that even for the study of the elementary nucleon-antinucleon systems it could be advantageous to use nuclei rather than protons as target. The possibility of investigating several antiprotonic atomic systems is also briefly discussed [fr

  9. ASACUSA hits antiproton jackpot

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The Japanese-European ASACUSA collaboration, which takes its name from the oldest district of Tokyo, approaches the antimatter enigma in a different way from the other two AD experiments, by inserting antiprotons into ordinary atoms. Last month the collaboration succeeded in trapping about a million antiprotons. The ASACUSA antiproton trap (lower cylinder), surmounted by its liquid helium reservoir. Looking on are Ken Yoshiki-Franzen, Zhigang Wang, Takahito Tasaki, Suzanne Reed, John Eades, Masaki Hori, Yasunori Yamazaki, Naofumi Kuroda, Jun Sakaguchi, Berti Juhasz, Eberhard Widmann and Ryu Hayano. A key element of the ASACUSA apparatus is its decelerating Radiofrequency Quadrupole magnet, RFQD. After tests with protons in Aarhus, this was installed in ASACUSA's antiproton beam last October (Bulletin 41/2000, 9 October 2000). Constructed by Werner Pirkl's group in PS Division, the RFQD works by applying an electric field to the AD antiproton pulse the opposite direction to its motion. As the antiprotons slo...

  10. The CERN antiproton collector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autin, B.

    1984-01-01

    The Antiproton Collector is a new ring of much larger acceptance than the present accumulator. It is designed to receive 10 8 antiprotons per PS cycle. In order to be compatible with the Antiproton Accumulator, the momentum spread and the emittances are reduced from 6% to 0.2% and from 200 π mm mrad to 25 π mm mrad respectively. In addition to the ring itself, the new target area and the modifications to the stochastic systems of the Antiproton Accumulator are described. (orig.)

  11. Recent progress of laser spectroscopy experiments on antiprotonic helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Masaki

    2018-03-01

    The Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons (ASACUSA) collaboration is currently carrying out laser spectroscopy experiments on antiprotonic helium ? atoms at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator facility. Two-photon spectroscopic techniques have been employed to reduce the Doppler width of the measured ? resonance lines, and determine the atomic transition frequencies to a fractional precision of 2.3-5 parts in 109. More recently, single-photon spectroscopy of buffer-gas cooled ? has reached a similar precision. By comparing the results with three-body quantum electrodynamics calculations, the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio was determined as ?, which agrees with the known proton-to-electron mass ratio with a precision of 8×10-10. The high-quality antiproton beam provided by the future Extra Low Energy Antiproton Ring (ELENA) facility should enable further improvements in the experimental precision. This article is part of the Theo Murphy meeting issue `Antiproton physics in the ELENA era'.

  12. Antiproton Radiotherapy Peripheral Dose from Secondary Neutrons produced in the Annihilation of Antiprotons in the Target

    CERN Document Server

    Fahimian, Benjamin P; Keyes, Roy; Bassler, Niels; Iwamoto, Keisuke S; Zankl, Maria; Holzscheiter, Michael H

    2009-01-01

    The AD-4/ACE collaboration studies the biological effects of antiprotons with respect to a possible use of antiprotons in cancer therapy. In vitro experiments performed by the collaboration have shown an enhanced biological effectiveness for antiprotons relative to protons. One concern is the normal tissue dose resulting from secondary neutrons produced in the annihilation of antiprotons on the nucleons of the target atoms. Here we present the first organ specific Monte Carlo calculations of normal tissue equivalent neutron dose in antiproton therapy through the use of a segmented CT-based human phantom. The MCNPX Monte Carlo code was employed to quantify the peripheral dose for a cylindrical spread out Bragg peak representing a treatment volume of 1 cm diameter and 1 cm length in the frontal lobe of a segmented whole-body phantom of a 38 year old male. The secondary neutron organ dose was tallied as a function of energy and organ.

  13. Measurement of the Shadowing of High-Energy Cosmic Rays by the Moon A Search for TeV-Energy Antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, G J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, F; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kraber, M; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Novák, T; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosemann, C; Rosenbleck, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, L; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2005-01-01

    The shadowing of high-energy cosmic rays by the Moon has been observed with a significance of 9.4 standard deviations with the L3+C muon spectrometer at CERN. A significant effect of the Earth magnetic field is observed. Since no event deficit on the east side of the Moon has been observed, an upper limit at 90% confidence level on the antiproton to proton ratio of 0.11 is obtained for primary energies around 1 TeV.

  14. Antiproton fast ignition for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, L.J.

    1999-01-01

    With 180 MJ/microg, antiprotons offer the highest stored energy per unit mass of any known entity. The use of antiprotons to promote fast ignition in an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule and produce high target gains with only modest compression of the main fuel is investigated. Unlike standard fast ignition where the ignition energy is supplied by energetic, short pulse laser, the energy here is supplied through the ionization energy deposited when antiprotons annihilate at the center of a compressed fuel capsule. This can be considered in-situ fast ignition as it obviates the need for the external injection of the ignition energy. In the first of two candidate schemes, the antiproton package is delivered by a low-energy ion beam. In the second, autocatalytic scheme, the antiprotons are preemplaced at the center of the capsule prior to compression. In both schemes, the author estimates that ∼10 12 antiprotons are required to initiate fast ignition in a typical ICF capsule and show that incorporation of a thin, heavy metal shell is desirable to enhance energy deposition within the ignitor zone. In addition to eliminating the need for a second, energetic fast laser and vulnerable final optics, this scheme would achieve central ignition without reliance on laser channeling through halo plasma or Hohlraum debris. However, in addition to the practical difficulties of storage and manipulation of antiprotons at low energy, the other large uncertainty for the practicality of such a speculative scheme is the ultimate efficiency of antiproton production in an external, optimized facility. Estimates suggest that the electrical wall plug energy per pulse required for the separate production of the antiprotons is of the same order as that required for the conventional slow compression driver

  15. CERN: Antiprotons resist annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Ask any particle physicist what is the eventual fate of an antiproton in matter and he will likely tell you that It annihilates'. True as this answer is, it hides a number of fascinating questions about the actual 'route' followed by the antiproton into the nucleus where it finally stops before annihilating with a nuclear particle

  16. LEAR: antiproton extraction lines

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1992-01-01

    Antiprotons, decelerated in LEAR to a momentum of 100 MeV/c (kinetic energy of 5.3 MeV), were delivered to the experiments in an "Ultra-Slow Extraction", dispensing some 1E9 antiprotons over times counted in hours. Beam-splitters and a multitude of beam-lines allowed several users to be supplied simultaneously.

  17. Lattices for antiproton rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autin, B.

    1984-01-01

    After a description of the constraints imposed by the cooling of Antiprotons on the lattice of the rings, the reasons which motivate the shape and the structure of these machines are surveyed. Linear and non-linear beam optics properties are treated with a special amplification to the Antiproton Accumulator. (orig.)

  18. Searching for antiproton decay at the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geer, S.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes an experimental search for antiproton decay at the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator. The E868 (APEX) experimental setup is described. The APEX data is expected to be sensitive to antiproton decay if the antiproton lifetimes is less than a few times 100,000 years

  19. Antiproton chain of the FAIR storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, T; Kamerdzhiev, V; Lehrach, A; Maier, R; Prasuhn, D; Stassen, R; Stockhorst, H; Herfurth, F; Lestinsky, M; Litvinov, Yu A; Steck, M; Stöhlker, T

    2015-01-01

    In the Modularized Start Version of the Facility of Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt Germany, the 3 GeV antiprotons are precooled in the collector ring and accumulated in the high energy storage ring (HESR). They are further accelerated to 14 GeV or decelerated to 1 GeV for the experiments with a high-density internal target. The powerful beam cooling devices, stochastic cooling and electron cooling will support the provision of a high-resolution antiproton beam. The other option of FAIR is to prepare the low energy, 300 keV antiproton beam connecting the existing storage rings ESR and CRYRING with HESR. Beam physics issues related with these concepts are described. (paper)

  20. High energy density physics studies at the facility for antiprotons and ion research: the HEDgeHOB collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, N.A.; Stoehlker, T.; Geissel, H.; Shutov, A.; Lomonosov, I.V.; Fortov, V.E.; Piriz, A.R.; Redmer, R.; Deutsch, C.

    2011-01-01

    The forthcoming Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt, is going to be a unique accelerator facility that will deliver high quality, strongly bunched, well focused, intense beams of heavy ions that will lead to unprecedented specific power deposition in solid matter. This will generate macroscopic samples of High Energy Density (HED) matter with fairly uniform physical conditions. These samples can be used to study the thermophysical and transport properties of HED matter. Extensive theoretical work has been carried out over the past decade to design numerous dedicated experiments to study HED physics at the FAIR, which has provided the basis for the HEDgeHOB (High Energy Density Matter Generated by Heavy Ion Beams) scientific proposal. This work is still in progress as the feasibility studies for more experimental schemes are being carried out. Another, very important research area that will benefit tremendously from the FAIR facility, is the production of radioactive beams. A superconducting fragment separator, Super-FRS is being designed for the production and separation of rare radioactive isotopes. Unlike the HED targets, the Super-FRS production target should not be destroyed or damaged by the beam, but should remain intact during the long experimental campaign. However, the high level of specific power deposited in the production target by the high intensity ion beam at FAIR, could cause serious problems to the target survival. These HED issues related to the Super-FRS production target are also discussed in the present paper (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. Antiproton Induced Fission and Fragmentation of Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The annihilation of slow antiprotons with nuclei results in a large highly localized energy deposition primarily on the nuclear surface. \\\\ \\\\ The study of antiproton induced fission and fragmentation processes is expected to yield new information on special nuclear matter states, unexplored fission modes, multifragmentation of nuclei, and intranuclear cascades.\\\\ \\\\ In order to investigate the antiproton-nucleus interaction and the processes following the antiproton annihilation at the nucleus, we propose the following experiments: \\item A)~Measurement of several fragments from fission and from multifragmentation in coincidence with particle spectra, especially neutrons and kaons. \\item B)~Precise spectra of $\\pi$, K, n, p, d and t with time-of-flight techniques. \\item C)~Installation of the Berlin 4$\\pi$ neutron detector with a 4$\\pi$ Si detector placed inside for fragments and charged particles. This yields neutron multiplicity distributions and consequently distributions of thermal excitation energies and...

  2. CERN: Antiprotons probe the nuclear stratosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The outer periphery of heavy stable nuclei is notoriously difficult to study experimentally. While the well understood electromagnetic interaction between electrons (or muons) and protons has given the nuclear charge (or proton) distribution with high precision for almost all stable nuclei, neutron distribution studies are much less precise. This is especially true for large nuclear distances, where the nuclear density is small. A few previous experiments probing the nuclear ''stratosphere'' suggested that far from the centre of the nucleus (of the order of 2 nuclear radii) this stratosphere may be composed predominantly of neutrons. At the end of the sixties the term ''neutron halo'' was introduced to describe this phenomenon, but experimental evidence was scarce or even controversial, and remained so for almost a quarter of a century. Recently, the Warsaw/Munich/Berlin collaboration working within the PS203 experiment at CERN's LEAR low energy antiproton ring, proposed a new method to study the nuclear periphery using stopped antiprotons. The halo now looks firmer. A 200 MeV/c beam of antiprotons was slowed down by interactions with atomic electrons. When antiproton kinetic energy drops well below 1 keV, the particles are captured in the outermost orbits of ''exotic atoms'', where the antiprotons take the place of the usual orbital electrons. With the lower orbits in this antiprotonic atom empty, the antiproton drops toward the nuclear surface, first emitting Auger electrons and later predominantly antiprotonic X-rays. Due to the strong interaction between antiprotons and nucleons, the antiproton succumbs to annihilation with a nucleon in the rarified nuclear stratosphere, far above the innermost Bohr orbit of the atom. The annihilation probability in heavy nuclei is maximal where the nuclear density is about 3% of its central value and extends to densities many orders of magnitude smaller

  3. CERN: Antiprotons probe the nuclear stratosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1995-06-15

    The outer periphery of heavy stable nuclei is notoriously difficult to study experimentally. While the well understood electromagnetic interaction between electrons (or muons) and protons has given the nuclear charge (or proton) distribution with high precision for almost all stable nuclei, neutron distribution studies are much less precise. This is especially true for large nuclear distances, where the nuclear density is small. A few previous experiments probing the nuclear ''stratosphere'' suggested that far from the centre of the nucleus (of the order of 2 nuclear radii) this stratosphere may be composed predominantly of neutrons. At the end of the sixties the term ''neutron halo'' was introduced to describe this phenomenon, but experimental evidence was scarce or even controversial, and remained so for almost a quarter of a century. Recently, the Warsaw/Munich/Berlin collaboration working within the PS203 experiment at CERN's LEAR low energy antiproton ring, proposed a new method to study the nuclear periphery using stopped antiprotons. The halo now looks firmer. A 200 MeV/c beam of antiprotons was slowed down by interactions with atomic electrons. When antiproton kinetic energy drops well below 1 keV, the particles are captured in the outermost orbits of ''exotic atoms'', where the antiprotons take the place of the usual orbital electrons. With the lower orbits in this antiprotonic atom empty, the antiproton drops toward the nuclear surface, first emitting Auger electrons and later predominantly antiprotonic X-rays. Due to the strong interaction between antiprotons and nucleons, the antiproton succumbs to annihilation with a nucleon in the rarified nuclear stratosphere, far above the innermost Bohr orbit of the atom. The annihilation probability in heavy nuclei is maximal where the nuclear density is about 3% of its central value and extends to densities many orders of magnitude smaller. Antiproton annihilation on a proton or on a neutron at the nuclear

  4. A new approach to experiments with non-relativistic antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poth, H.

    1990-05-01

    Is low-energy antiproton physics phasing out with the present round of experiments or are there good reasons to continue at an improved slow antiproton facility which could be located at a high intensity hadron accelerator? We point out, that there are four frontiers where substantial advances could be made. In particular, we discuss the low-energy frontier and emphasize that experiments with no-relativistic antiprotons would increase drastically the sensitivity and would reveal new effects. (orig.)

  5. New Experiments with Antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    Fermilab operates the world's most intense antiproton source. Recently proposed experiments can use those antiprotons either parasitically during Teva-tron Collider running or after the Tevatron Collider finishes in about 2011. For example, the annihilation of 8 GeV antiprotons might make the world's most intense source of tagged D0 mesons, and thus the best near-term opportunity to study charm mixing and search for new physics via its CP-violation signature. Other possible precision measurements include properties of the X(3872) and the charmonium system. An experiment using a Penning trap and an atom interferometer could make the world's first measurement of the gravitational force on antimatter. These and other potential measurements using antiprotons could yield a broad physics program at Fermilab in the post-Tevatron era.

  6. Antiprotonic-hydrogen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batty, C.J.

    1989-07-01

    Experimental studies of antiprotonic-hydrogen atoms have recently made great progress following the commissioning of the low energy antiproton facility (LEAR) at CERN in 1983. At the same time our understanding of the atomic cascade has increased considerably through measurements of the X-ray spectra. The life history of the p-bar-p atom is considered in some detail, from the initial capture of the antiproton when stopping in hydrogen, through the atomic cascade with the emission of X-rays, to the final antiproton annihilation and production of mesons. The experiments carried out at LEAR are described and the results compared with atomic cascade calculations and predictions of strong interaction effects. (author)

  7. CERN accelerator school: Antiprotons for colliding beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, P.; Newman, S.

    1984-01-01

    This is a specialized course which addresses a wide spectrum of theoretical and technological problems confronting the designer of an antiproton facility for high-energy-physics research. A broad and profound basis is provided by the lecturers' substantial experience gained over many years with CERN's unique equipment. Topics include beam optics, special lattices for antiproton accumulation and storage rings, antiproton production, stochastic cooling, acceleration and storage, r.f. noise, r.f. beam manipulations, beam-beam interaction, beam stability due to ion accumulation, and diagnostics. The SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) panti p collider, LEAR (the Low Energy Antiproton Ring at CERN), antiprotons in the ISR (Intersecting Storage Rings), the new antiproton collector (ACOL) and gas jet targets are also discussed. A table is included listing the parameters of all CERN's accelerators and storage rings. See hints under the relevant topics. (orig./HSI)

  8. Antiproton rate estimates for the 1996 E866 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shea, J.Y.; Garcia-Solis, E.J.; Stanskas, P.J.

    1996-01-01

    There has always been a strong interest to study antiprotons produced in relativistic heavy ion collisions. A specific point has been a puzzle for years in that both ARC and RQMD predict the correct antiproton yield for Au+Au collisions at the AGS, but with two entirely different physical explanations. The RQMD is able to describe available data by relying on the enhanced production of antiprotons, followed by the annihilation of a large fraction of the produced antiprotons. Conversely, ARC describes the data by producing less antiprotons initially, but the annihilation of the antiprotons is open-quotes screenedclose quotes in the high density environment of the collision on account of collisions with mesons. It is then particularly interesting to studying the shadowing effect in the Au-Au collisions at the AGS to shine a light in the theoretical debate in heavy-ion collisions

  9. Comparison of proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering at very high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauron, P.; Nicolescu, B.; Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie, 75 - Paris; Leader, E.

    1985-09-01

    The ISR results on the differential cross-sections for pp and anti-pp show unambiguously that the crossing-odd amplitude is still important at very high energies. Comparison of ISR and CERN collider anti-pp data suggests that the crossing-odd amplitude is growing maximally fast with energy. We explore the phenomenological consequences of such a ''maximal odderon'' behaviour at TeV energies

  10. QCD in high-energy proton-proton and proton-antiproton collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baier, R.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental and theoretical investigation of nucleon-nucleon collisions at high energies allows to explore the structure of the nucleon by large momentum transfer (deep-inelastic) processes. In these lectures the structure of the nucleon from momentum scales Q > 1 GeV/c ( -16 cm) is discussed. In the first lecture the basic concepts of the parton model and of perturbative quantum chromodynamics (QCD) are introduced, and applied to deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering. The following lectures cover large transverse momentum, psub(T), hadronic processes, massive dilepton production and production of prompt real photons at large psub(T). The present status of the theoretical understanding of these processes is summarized. (Auth.)

  11. Physics with antiprotons: from antihydrogen to the top-quark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, H.

    2001-01-01

    The talk gives a survey on experiments performed with antiprotons of different energies. The emphasis will be on results obtained at LEAR/CERN, but the exciting investigations with higher energy antiprotons, leading to the discovery of the intermediate bosons W + , W - , Z 0 and the top quark t, will also be discussed. (orig.)

  12. Biological Effectiveness of Antiproton Annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maggiore, C.; Agazaryan, N.; Bassler, N.

    2004-01-01

    from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in ‘‘biological dose’’ in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The background, description, and status...

  13. Interaction of antiprotons with nuclei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrtánková, Jaroslava; Mareš, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 945, JAN (2016), s. 197-215 ISSN 0375-9474 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-04301S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : antiproton-nucleus interaction * antiproton annihilation * antiproton nuclear bound states Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.916, year: 2016

  14. Antiprotonic helium atomcules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauge Sébastien

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available About 3% of antiprotons ( stopped in helium are long-lived with microsecond lifetimes, against picoseconds in all other materials. This unusual longevity has been ascribed to the trapping of on metastable bound states in He+ helium atom-molecules thus named atomcules. Apart from their unique dual structure investigated by laser spectroscopy – a near-circular quasi-classical Rydberg atom with l ~ n – 1 ~ 37 or a special diatomic molecule with a negatively charged nucleus in high rotational state with J = l – the chemical physics aspects of their interaction with other atoms or molecules constitute an interesting topic for molecular physics. While atomcules may resist to million collisions in helium, molecular contaminants such as H2 are likely to destroy them in a single one, down to very low temperatures. In the Born-Oppenheimer framework, we interpret the molecular interaction obtained by ab initio quantum chemical calculations in terms of classical reactive channels, with activation barriers accounting for the experiments carried out in He and H2. From classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations, we show that the thermalization stage strongly quenches initial populations, thus reduced to a recovered 3 % trapping fraction. This work illustrates the pertinence of chemical physics concepts to the study of exotic processes involving antimatter. New insights into the physico-chemistry of cold interstellar radicals are anticipated.

  15. The CERN antiproton programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herr, H.

    1979-01-01

    A diagram and basic parameters of the ICE (Initial Cooling Experiment) storage ring constructed in CERN are examined. The experimental results of stochastic and electron cooling and the results of measuring of the antiproton lifetime are discussed. The main parameters of the antiproton storage are listed. Comparison between stochastic and electron cooling has shown that the latter is characterized by shorter cooling time independent of the particle number in a beam. Advantage of stochastic cooling lies in its possible usage at higher energies [ru

  16. An apparatus to measure stopping powers for low-energy antiprotons and protons

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, H H; Ichioka, T; Knudsen, H; Møller, S P; Uggerhøj, U

    2002-01-01

    One of the experiments to be performed under the ASACUSA collaboration at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator is a measurement of the energy loss of low energy antiprotons in thin foils. An electrostatic spectrometer has been developed for this task. We describe the design and initial tests of the apparatus with protons. By changing a high-voltage applied on the target the energy of the projectile ions at impact on the target can easily be varied. In this way we have measured the stopping-power and the energy-loss straggling for protons over a wide energy range to below one keV.

  17. The PANDA experiment: Antiproton physics at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montagna, P.

    2011-01-01

    The new Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR), under construction at the GSI laboratory at Darmstadt, in a few years will make available, among different types of beams, even antiproton beams with unique features. Through a High Energy Storage Ring (HESR) for antiprotons, an antiproton beam will be available in a momentum range from 1.5 to 15 GeV/c, which will interact on a hydrogen target. The products of the interaction, including hadronic systems with strangeness and/or charm, will be detected with the PANDA magnetic spectrometer (antiProton ANnihilation at DArmstadt), and the spectroscopic analysis will allow a detailed investigation on a number of open problems of the hadronic physics, as the quark confinement, the existence of non-conventional meson states (so-called glueballs and hybrids), the structure of hadrons and of the strong interaction, with particular attention to charmonium spectroscopy. An overview of the scientific program of PANDA and the current status of the project will be presented.

  18. Biological effectiveness of antiproton annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, M.H.; Agazaryan, N.; Bassler, Niels

    2004-01-01

    We describe an experiment designed to determine whether or not the densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in ‘‘biological dose’’ in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct...... measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The experiment has been approved by the CERN Research Board for running at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) as AD-4/ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) and has begun data taking in June of 2003. The background, description and the current...

  19. Biological effectiveness of antiproton annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Bassler, Niels; Beyer, Gerd; De Marco, John J.; Doser, Michael; Ichioka, Toshiyasu; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Knudsen, Helge V.; Landua, Rolf; Maggiore, Carl; McBride, William H.; Møller, Søren Pape; Petersen, Jorgen; Smathers, James B.; Skarsgard, Lloyd D.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.; Withers, H.Rodney; Vranjes, Sanja; Wong, Michelle; Wouters, Bradly G.

    2004-01-01

    We describe an experiment designed to determine whether or not the densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in “biological dose” in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The experiment has been approved by the CERN Research Board for running at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) as AD-4/ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) and has begun data taking in June of 2003. The background, description and the current status of the experiment are given.

  20. The proton-antiproton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, L.

    1988-01-01

    The subject of this lecture is the CERN Proton-Antiproton (panti p) Collider, in which John Adams was intimately involved at the design, development, and construction stages. Its history is traced from the original proposal in 1966, to the first panti p collisions in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) in 1981, and to the present time with drastically improved performance. This project led to the discovery of the intermediate vector boson in 1983 and produced one of the most exciting and productive physics periods in CERN's history. (orig.)

  1. Studies of Lear antiproton deceleration: radiofrequency quadripole or synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iazzourene, F.

    1987-06-01

    The aim of this work is to study a radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) and a synchrotron as decelerating systems for antiprotons extracted from the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. Antiprotons at energies lower than those available from LEAR are need by some experiments, eg. the measurement of the mass difference between protons and antiprotons with 10 -9 accuracy, using a Smith and Princeton spectrometer, and the measurement of gravitation on the antiprotons, using a trap. Depending on the LEAR performances, one can conclude that the RFQ is suitable for the experiment on the gravitation, and the synchrotron, owing to its electron cooling system, is a better solution for the experiment on the mass difference measurement, because of the very small acceptance of the spectrometer [fr

  2. Coincidence studies with antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGovern, M; Walters, H R J [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen' s University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Assafrao, D; Mohallem, J R [Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, P.O Box 702, 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Whelan, Colm T, E-mail: mmcgovern06@qub.ac.u [Department of Physics, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529-0116 (United States)

    2010-02-01

    We present a short overview of a new method for calculating fully differential cross sections that is able to describe any aspect of coincidence measurements involving heavy projectiles. The method is based upon impact parameter close coupling with pseudostates. Examples from antiproton impact ionization are shown.

  3. Progress in antiproton physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miettinen, H.I.

    1976-09-01

    Some recent results on proton-antiproton collisions are reviewed. The duality structure of processes where baryon number or strangeness may be annihilated receives particular attention. Attempts to obtain experimental information on the impact parameter space structure of multiparticle processes are discussed. Suggestions for future research are made

  4. Antiproton Production beam and Reverse Injection System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chadwick, G.

    1981-08-16

    The objectives of this project are two fold: (1) To extract high energy protons from the Main Ring (MR) and target them to produce antiprotons which are subsequently captured in the existing Booster accelerator; and (2) to provide a channel for injecting either protons or antiprotons into the MR from the booster in a direction opposite to that of the normal proton acceleration as colliding beams can be created. The present design, therefore, is in support of two separate larger projects, viz., the collisions of protons in the Tevatron (normal circulation direction) with 'reverse injected' protons in the MR, and the collision of normal direction protons with reverse injected antiprotons either in the MR or in the Tevatron. Figure 1 shows the layout of the project area. It spans the shortest distance between possible injection/ejection points in the existing accelerator structures, hence minimizing costs. The tunnel will lie underground at the level of the MR and booster.

  5. Collisions of antiprotons with hydrogen molecular ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    Time-dependent close-coupling calculations of the ionization and excitation cross section for antiproton collisions with molecular hydrogen ions are performed in an impact energy range from 0.5 keV to 10 MeV. The Born-Oppenheimer and Franck-Condon approximations as well as the impact parameter...

  6. Calculated LET-Spectrum of Antiprotons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels

    -LET components resulting from the annihilation. Though, the calculations of dose-averaged LET in the entry region may suggest that the RBE of antiprotons in the plateau region could significantly differ from unity. Materials and Methods Monte Carlo simulations using FLUKA were performed for calculating...

  7. Laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, M

    2005-01-01

    When antiprotons (i.e. the antimatter counterpart of protons) are stopped in helium gas, 97% of them annihilate within picoseconds by reacting with the helium nuclei; a 3% fraction, however, survive with an anomalously long lifetime of several microseconds. This longevity is due to the formation of antiprotonic helium, which is a three-body Rydberg atom composed of an antiproton, electron, and helium nucleus. The ASACUSA experimental collaboration has recently synthesized large numbers of these atoms using CERN's Antiproton Decelerator facility, and measured the atom's transition frequencies to 60 parts per billion by laser spectroscopy. By comparing the experimental results with recent three-body QED calculations and the known antiproton cyclotron frequency, we were able to show that the antiproton mass and charge are the same as the corresponding proton values to a precision of 10 parts per billion. Ongoing and future series of experiments will further improve the experimental precision by using chirp-compe...

  8. Antiprotons in the CERN intersecting storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    High-sensitivity electronics for TTl and ring 2 had been developed and installed, the original experimental stochastic cooling systems in the ISR were rebuilt and considerably improved, the split-field magnet (SFM) vacuum chamber was modified, some steering dipoles were designed, made and installed, and finally innumerable interlocks and computer programs were revised for antiproton operation. (orig./HSI)

  9. Antiproton Radiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    2007-01-01

    the radiobiological properties using antiprotons at 50 and 125 MeV from the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN. Dosimetry experiments were carried out with ionization chambers, alanine pellets and radiochromic film. Radiobiological experiments were done with Chinese V79 WNRE hamster cells. Monte Carlo particle...... transport codes were investigated and compared with results obtained from the ionization chambers and alanine pellets. A track structure model have been applied on the calculated particle spectrum, and been used to predict the LET-dependent response of the alanine pellets. The particle transport program...... FLUKA produced data which were in excellent agreement with our ionization chamber measurements, and in good agreement with our alanine measurements. FLUKA is now being used to generate a wide range of depth dose data at several energies, including secondary particle–energy spectra, which will be used...

  10. On the antiproton discovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piccioni, O.

    1989-01-01

    The author of this article describes his own role in the discovery of the antiproton. Although Segre and Chamberlain received the Nobel Prize in 1959 for its discovery, the author claims that their experimental method was his idea which he communicated to them informally in December 1954. He describes how his application for citizenship (he was Italian), and other scientists' manipulation, prevented him from being at Berkeley to work on the experiment himself. (UK)

  11. Bubble chamber: antiproton annihilation

    CERN Multimedia

    1971-01-01

    These images show real particle tracks from the annihilation of an antiproton in the 80 cm Saclay liquid hydrogen bubble chamber. A negative kaon and a neutral kaon are produced in this process, as well as a positive pion. The invention of bubble chambers in 1952 revolutionized the field of particle physics, allowing real tracks left by particles to be seen and photographed by expanding liquid that had been heated to boiling point.

  12. ALPHA freezes antiprotons

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Laboratories like CERN can routinely produce many different types of antiparticles. In 1995, the PS210 experiment formed the first antihydrogen atoms and a few years later, in 2002, ATRAP and ATHENA were already able to produce several thousand of them. However, no experiment in the world has succeeded in ‘trapping’ these anti-atoms in order to study them. This is the goal of the ALPHA experiment, which has recently managed to cool down the antiprotons to just a few Kelvin. This represents a major step towards trapping the anti-atom, thus opening a new avenue into the investigation of antimatter properties.   Members of the ALPHA collaboration working on the apparatus in the Antiproton Decelerator experimental hall at CERN. Just like the atom, the anti-atom is neutral. Unlike the atom, the anti-atom is made up of antiprotons (as opposed to protons in the atom) and positrons (as opposed to electrons). In order to thoroughly study the properties of the anti-atoms, scien...

  13. Extra Low ENergy Antiproton

    CERN Multimedia

    To produce dense antiproton beams at very low energies (110 keV), it has been proposed to install a small decelerator ring between the existing AD ring and the experimental area. Phase-space blowup during deceleration is compensated by electron cooling such that the final emittances are comparable to the 5MeV beam presently delivered by the AD. An immediate consequence is a significant increase in the number of trapped antiprotons at the experiments as outlined in the proposal CERN/SPSC-2009-026; SPCS-P-338. This report describes the machine parameters and layout of the proposal ELENA (Extra Low ENergy Antiproton)ring also gives an approximate estimate of cost and manpower needs. Since the initial estimate, published in 2007 (CERN-AB-2007-079), the ELENA design has evolved considerably. This is due to a new location in the AD hall to acommodate for the possibility of another experimental zone, as suggested by the SPCS, and also due to improvements in the ring optics and layout. The cost estimate that is prese...

  14. Antiproton compression and radial measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jorgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page R D; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, achieved by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile, and its relation to that of the electron plasma. We also measure the outer radial profile by ejecting antiprotons to the trap wall using an octupole magnet.

  15. Two-photon laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium and the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, Masaki; Barna, Daniel; Andreas Dax,; Hayano, Ryugo; Friedreich, Susanne; Juhász, Bertalan; Pask, Thomas; Widmann, Eberhard; Horváth, Dezső; Venturelli, Luca; Zurlo, Nicola; 10.1038/nature10260

    2013-01-01

    Physical laws are believed to be invariant under the combined transformations of charge, parity and time reversal (CPT symmetry). This implies that an antimatter particle has exactly the same mass and absolute value of charge as its particle counterpart. Metastable antiprotonic helium ($\\bar{p}He^+$) is a three-body atom2 consisting of a normal helium nucleus, an electron in its ground state and an antiproton ($\\bar{p}$) occupying a Rydberg state with high principal and angular momentum quantum numbers, respectively n and l, such that n ≈ l + 1 ≈ 38. These atoms are amenable to precision laser spectroscopy, the results of which can in principle be used to determine the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio and to constrain the equality between the antiproton and proton charges and masses. Here we report two-photon spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium, in which $\\bar{p}^{3}He^{+}$ and $\\bar{p}^{4}He^{+}$ isotopes are irradiated by two counter-propagating laser beams. This excites nonlinear, two-phot...

  16. Atomic physics of the antimatter explored with slow antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torii, Hiroyuki A.

    2010-01-01

    Frontiers of antimatter physics are reviewed, with a focus on our ASACUSA collaboration, doing research on 'Atomic Spectroscopy And Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons' at the 'Antiproton Decelerator' facility at CERN. Antiprotonic helium atoms give a unique test ground for testing CPT invariance between particles and antiparticles. Laser spectroscopy of this exotic atom has reached a precision of a few parts per billion in determation of the antiproton mass. We also have developed techniques to decelerate antiprotons and cool them to sub-eV energies in an electromagnetic trap at ultra-high vacuum and extract them as an ultra-slow beam at typically 250 eV. This unique low-energy beam opens up the possibility to study ionization and formation of antiprotonic atoms. The antihydrogen has been synthesized at low temperature in nested Penning traps by ATRAP and ATHENA(presently ALPHA) collaborations. Confinement of this neutral anti-atoms in a trap with magnetic field gradient is being studied, with an aim of 1S-2S laser spectroscopy in the future. ASACUSA has prepared a cusp trap for production of antihydrogen atoms, and aims at microwave spectroscopy between the hyperfine states of spin-polarized antihydrogen. A wide variety of low-energy antiproton physics also includes measurement of nuclear scattering, radiational biological effects, and gravity test of antimatter. (author)

  17. Measurement of antiproton production in $p$–He collisions at LHCb to constrain the secondary cosmic antiproton flux

    CERN Document Server

    Graziani, Giacomo

    2018-01-01

    The flux of cosmic ray antiprotons is a powerful tool for indirect detection of dark matter. The sensitivity is limited by the uncertainty on the predicted antiproton flux from scattering of primary rays on the interstellar medium. This is, in turn, limited by the knowledge of production cross-sections, notably in p–He scattering. Thanks to its internal gas target, the LHCb experiment performed the first measurement of antiproton production from collisions of LHC proton beams on He nuclei at rest. The results and prospects are presented.

  18. Measuring and manipulating an accumulated stack of antiprotons in the CERN antiproton accumulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johson, R.; van der Meer, S.; Pederson, F.

    1983-01-01

    The antiproton stack is observed through Schottky scans, both longitudinal and transverse. A particular feature is the wide dynamic range needed for observing both the dense core and the freshly-deposited tail. Separating batches of antiprotons from the stack (unstacking) is a highly automated process including the measurement of the momentum distribution and the generation of a suitable RF function to remove a slice of the desired density. Multiple slices may be removed successively and a process for locally flattening the distribution to obtain equal batch intensities is used. When successive batches are unstacked and ejected, the process may have to be aborted if the particles do not arrive correctly at the user. A ''restack'' facility is provided to return any antiprotons to the stack that have been unstacked but not ejected. A missing-bucket scheme for unstacking low-intensity batches for LEAR is also described

  19. Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Scandale, Walter

    2014-01-01

    In the last five decades, proton–proton and proton–antiproton colliders have been the most powerful tools for high energy physics investigations. They have also deeply catalyzed innovation in accelerator physics and technology. Among the large number of proposed colliders, only four have really succeeded in becoming operational: the ISR, the SppbarS, the Tevatron and the LHC. Another hadron collider, RHIC, originally conceived for ion–ion collisions, has also been operated part-time with polarized protons. Although a vast literature documenting them is available, this paper is intended to provide a quick synthesis of their main features and key performance.

  20. An analytical simulation of the ion-antiproton instabilities in the CERN Antiproton Accumulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dainelli, A.; Pusterla, M.

    1988-01-01

    A direct map method with a Mathieu approach to tune modulation is proposed and used to simulate nonlinear effects on particle motion that are generated by a beam-beam-like interaction of antiprotons with ions of the residual gas in the CERN Antiproton Accumulator. Two different Gaussian ion distributions are used, and the effects of the simulated beam-beam force on the particle motion is studied in phase space, with a particular attention to high-order nonlinear resonances. (author) 16 refs., 4 figs

  1. Cosmic ray antiproton/electron discrimination capability of the CAPRICE silicon-tungsten calorimeter using neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Castellano, M.; De Marzo, C.; Picozza, P.; Prigiobbe, V.; Sparvoli, R.; Tirocchi, M.

    1996-01-01

    A data analysis based on an artificial neural network classifier is proposed to identify cosmic ray antiprotons detected with the CAPRICE silicon-tungsten imaging calorimeter against electron background in the energy range 1.2-4.0 GeV. A set of new physical variables, describing the events inside the calorimeter on the base of their different patterns, are introduced in order to discriminate between hadronic and electromagnetic showers. The ability of the artificial neural network classifier to perform a careful multidimensional analysis gives the possibility to identify antiprotons with an electron rejection 408±85 (stat) at 95.0±0.2 (stat)% of signal detection efficiency. The high accuracy achieved by this method improves substantially the efficiency in the evaluation of the cosmic ray antiproton spectrum. (orig.)

  2. Testing Quantum Chromodynamics with Antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S.

    2004-10-21

    The antiproton storage ring HESR to be constructed at GSI will open up a new range of perturbative and nonperturbative tests of QCD in exclusive and inclusive reactions. I discuss 21 tests of QCD using antiproton beams which can illuminate novel features of QCD. The proposed experiments include the formation of exotic hadrons, measurements of timelike generalized parton distributions, the production of charm at threshold, transversity measurements in Drell-Yan reactions, and searches for single-spin asymmetries. The interactions of antiprotons in nuclear targets will allow tests of exotic nuclear phenomena such as color transparency, hidden color, reduced nuclear amplitudes, and the non-universality of nuclear antishadowing. The central tool used in these lectures are light-front Fock state wavefunctions which encode the bound-state properties of hadrons in terms of their quark and gluon degrees of freedom at the amplitude level. The freedom to choose the light-like quantization four-vector provides an explicitly covariant formulation of light-front quantization and can be used to determine the analytic structure of light-front wave functions. QCD becomes scale free and conformally symmetric in the analytic limit of zero quark mass and zero {beta} function. This ''conformal correspondence principle'' determines the form of the expansion polynomials for distribution amplitudes and the behavior of non-perturbative wavefunctions which control hard exclusive processes at leading twist. The conformal template also can be used to derive commensurate scale relations which connect observables in QCD without scale or scheme ambiguity. The AdS/CFT correspondence of large N{sub C} supergravity theory in higher-dimensional anti-de Sitter space with supersymmetric QCD in 4-dimensional space-time has important implications for hadron phenomenology in the conformal limit, including the nonperturbative derivation of counting rules for exclusive processes and

  3. Search for antiproton decay at the Fermilab antiproton accumulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geer, S.; Marriner, J.; Ray, R.; Streets, J.; Lindgren, M.; Muller, T.; Quackenbush, J.; Armstrong, T.

    1994-01-01

    A search for antiproton decay has been made at the Fermilab antiproton accumulator. Limits are placed on five antiproton decay modes. At the 95% C.L. we find that τ bar p /B(bar p→e - γ)>1848 yr, τ bar p /B(bar p→e 0 π 0 )>554 yr, τ bar p /B(bar p→e - η)>171 yr,τ bar p /B(bar p→e - K S 0 )>29 yr, and τ bar p /B(bar p→e - K L 0 )>9 yr

  4. Proton-antiproton collider physics

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido

    1989-01-01

    This volume reviews the physics studied at the CERN proton-antiproton collider during its first phase of operation, from the first physics run in 1981 to the last one at the end of 1985. The volume consists of a series of review articles written by physicists who are actively involved with the collider research program. The first article describes the proton-antiproton collider facility itself, including the antiproton source and its principle of operation based on stochastic cooling. The subsequent six articles deal with the various physics subjects studied at the collider. Each article descr

  5. Reliability of the Fermilab Antiproton Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, E. Jr.

    1993-05-01

    This paper reports on the reliability of the Fermilab Antiproton source since it began operation in 1985. Reliability of the complex as a whole as well as subsystem performance is summarized. Also discussed is the trending done to determine causes of significant machine downtime and actions taken to reduce the incidence of failure. Finally, results of a study to detect previously unidentified reliability limitations are presented

  6. The Antiproton Accumulator and Collector and the discovery of the W & Z intermediate vector bosons

    CERN Document Server

    Chohan, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    The following sections are included: Preface ; Brief outline of the overall scheme for antiprotons of the SPS as a collider ; Antiproton production and accumulation ; The AA and AC storage rings ; Stochastic cooling and stacking ; Post-acceleration of antiprotons and beams for SPS Collider ; Proton test beams for the AA and AC from the PS ; The W and Z discoveries and the Nobel Prize ; Accumulator performance ; Acknowledgements and conclusions ; References

  7. The Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Section 06 - 08*) of the AA where the dispersion (and hence the horizontal beam size) is large. One can distinguish (left to right): A vacuum-tank, two bending magnets (BST06 and BST07 in blue) with a quadrupole (QDN07, in red) in between, another vacuum-tank, a wide quadrupole (QFW08) and a further tank . The tanks are covered with heating tape for bake-out. The tank left of BST06 contained the stack core pickup for stochastic cooling (see 7906193, 7906190, 8005051), the two other tanks served mainly as vacuum chambers in the region where the beam was large. Peter Zettwoch works on BST06. *) see: H. Koziol, Antiproton Accumulator Parameter List, PS/AA/Note 84-2 (1984)

  8. Anisotropic flow of charged hadrons, pions and (anti-)protons measured at high transverse momentum in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=2.76 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abelev, Betty; Adamova, Dagmar; Adare, Andrew Marshall; Aggarwal, Madan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agocs, Andras Gabor; Agostinelli, Andrea; Aguilar Salazar, Saul; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Arshad; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahn, Sang Un; Akindinov, Alexander; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Almaraz Avina, Erick Jonathan; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altini, Valerio; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshauser, Harald; Arbor, Nicolas; Arcelli, Silvia; Armesto, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas Robert; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Awes, Terry; Aysto, Juha Heikki; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldini Ferroli, Rinaldo; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baldit, Alain; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Ban, Jaroslav; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Barret, Valerie; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Baumann, Christoph Heinrich; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont-Moreno, Ernesto; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bergognon, Anais Annick Erica; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blanco, F; Blanco, Francesco; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Nicolas; Boettger, Stefan; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Bogolyubsky, Mikhail; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Bose, Suvendu Nath; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Boyer, Bruno Alexandre; Braidot, Ermes; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brun, Rene; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Bugaiev, Kyrylo; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Canoa Roman, Veronica; Cara Romeo, Giovanni; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carminati, Federico; Casanova Diaz, Amaya Ofelia; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Catanescu, Vasile; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chawla, Isha; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chiavassa, Emilio; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Coccetti, Fabrizio; Colamaria, Fabio; Colella, Domenico; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa del Valle, Zaida; Constantin, Paul; Contin, Giacomo; Contreras, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Cotallo, Manuel Enrique; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Alaniz, Emilia; Cuautle, Eleazar; Cunqueiro, Leticia; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; Dainese, Andrea; Dalsgaard, Hans Hjersing; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Kushal; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; de Barros, Gabriel; De Caro, Annalisa; de Cataldo, Giacinto; de Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; de Rooij, Raoul Stefan; Delagrange, Hugues; Deloff, Andrzej; Demanov, Vyacheslav; Denes, Ervin; Deppman, Airton; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Giglio, Carmelo; Di Liberto, Sergio; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Dominguez, Isabel; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Driga, Olga; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Dutta Majumdar, AK; Dutta Majumdar, Mihir Ranjan; Elia, Domenico; Emschermann, David Philip; Engel, Heiko; Erdal, Hege Austrheim; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Evans, David; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Falchieri, Davide; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Fearick, Roger Worsley; Fedunov, Anatoly; Fehlker, Dominik; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Fenton-Olsen, Bo; Feofilov, Grigory; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Ferretti, Alessandro; Ferretti, Roberta; Figiel, Jan; Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago, Alberto; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Garabatos, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo; Garishvili, Irakli; Gerhard, Jochen; Germain, Marie; Geuna, Claudio; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghidini, Bruno; Ghosh, Premomoy; Gianotti, Paola; Girard, Martin Robert; Giubellino, Paolo; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez, Ramon; Gonschior, Alexey; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Gonzalez-Trueba, Laura Helena; Gonzalez-Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Goswami, Ankita; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Grajcarek, Robert; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoriev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grinyov, Boris; Grion, Nevio; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerra Gutierrez, Cesar; Guerzoni, Barbara; Guilbaud, Maxime Rene Joseph; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Gutbrod, Hans; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hanratty, Luke David; Hansen, Alexander; Harmanova, Zuzana; Harris, John William; Hartig, Matthias; Hasegan, Dumitru; Hatzifotiadou, Despoina; Hayrapetyan, Arsen; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Heide, Markus Ansgar; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Herrmann, Norbert; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hicks, Bernard; Hille, Per Thomas; Hippolyte, Boris; Horaguchi, Takuma; Hori, Yasuto; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Hrivnacova, Ivana; Huang, Meidana; Humanic, Thomas; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ichou, Raphaelle; Ilkaev, Radiy; Ilkiv, Iryna; Inaba, Motoi; Incani, Elisa; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivan, Cristian George; Ivanov, Andrey; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Ivanytskyi, Oleksii; Jacholkowski, Adam Wlodzimierz; Jacobs, Peter; Jangal, Swensy Gwladys; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Janik, Rudolf; Jayarathna, Sandun; Jena, Satyajit; Jha, Deeptanshu Manu; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jirden, Lennart; Jones, Peter Graham; Jung, Hyung Taik; Jusko, Anton; Kakoyan, Vanik; Kalcher, Sebastian; Kalinak, Peter; Kalliokoski, Tuomo Esa Aukusti; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kanaki, Kalliopi; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kazantsev, Andrey; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Khan, Mohisin Mohammed; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Beomkyu; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Jonghyun; Kim, Jin Sook; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Mimae; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Seon Hee; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Bosing, Christian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Koch, Kathrin; Kohler, Markus; Kolojvari, Anatoly; Kondratiev, Valery; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Konevskih, Artem; Korneev, Andrey; Kour, Ravjeet; Kowalski, Marek; Kox, Serge; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kral, Jiri; Kralik, Ivan; Kramer, Frederick; Kraus, Ingrid Christine; Krawutschke, Tobias; Krelina, Michal; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Krus, Miroslav; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kucheriaev, Yury; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paul; Kulakov, Igor; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, A; Kurepin, AB; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kushpil, Vasily; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Ladron de Guevara, Pedro; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lara, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Bornec, Yves; Lea, Ramona; Lechman, Mateusz; Lee, Graham Richard; Lee, Ki Sang; Lee, Sung Chul; Lefevre, Frederic; Lehnert, Joerg Walter; Leistam, Lars; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenhardt, Matthieu Laurent; Lenti, Vito; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Leon Vargas, Hermes; Leoncino, Marco; Levai, Peter; Lien, Jorgen; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Liu, Lijiao; Loenne, Per-Ivar; Loggins, Vera; Loginov, Vitaly; Lohn, Stefan Bernhard; Lohner, Daniel; Loizides, Constantinos; Loo, Kai Krister; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lovhoiden, Gunnar; Lu, Xianguo; Luettig, Philipp; Lunardon, Marcello; Luo, Jiebin; Luparello, Grazia; Luquin, Lionel; Luzzi, Cinzia; Ma, Rongrong; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahapatra, Durga Prasad; Maire, Antonin; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Ludmila; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manceau, Loic Henri Antoine; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Mao, Yaxian; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; 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Shahoyan, Ruben; Sharma, Natasha; Sharma, Satish; Shigaki, Kenta; Shimomura, Maya; Shtejer, Katherin; Sibiriak, Yury; Siciliano, Melinda; Sicking, Eva; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, catherine; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singha, Subhash; Singhal, Vikas; Sinha, Bikash; Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Skjerdal, Kyrre; Smakal, Radek; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Sogaard, Carsten; Soltz, Ron Ariel; Son, Hyungsuk; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Soos, Csaba; Soramel, Francesca; Sputowska, Iwona; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Stefanini, Giorgio; Steinbeck, Timm Morten; Steinpreis, Matthew; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Stolpovskiy, Mikhail; Strabykin, Kirill; Strmen, Peter; Suaide, Alexandre Alarcon do Passo; Subieta Vasquez, Martin Alfonso; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Sukhorukov, Mikhail; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Susa, Tatjana; Szanto de Toledo, Alejandro; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szostak, Artur Krzysztof; Szymanski, Maciej; Takahashi, Jun; Tapia Takaki, Daniel Jesus; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terrevoli, Cristina; Thader, Jochen Mathias; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Timmins, Anthony; Toia, Alberica; Torii, Hisayuki; Tosello, Flavio; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ulery, Jason Glyndwr; Ullaland, Kjetil; Ulrich, Jochen; Uras, Antonio; Urban, Jozef; Urciuoli, Guido Marie; Usai, Gianluca; Vajzer, Michal; Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vallero, Sara; van der Kolk, Naomi; van Leeuwen, Marco; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Vannucci, Luigi; Vargas, Aurora Diozcora; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veldhoen, Misha; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Vikhlyantsev, Oleg; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Yury; Virgili, Tiziano; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopianov, Alexander; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; von Haller, Barthelemy; Vranic, Danilo; Øvrebekk, Gaute; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Vyushin, Alexey; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Vladimir; Wan, Renzhuo; Wang, Dong; Wang, Mengliang; Wang, Yifei; Wang, Yaping; Watanabe, Kengo; Weber, Michael; Wessels, Johannes; Westerhoff, Uwe; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Alexander; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, Leonidas; Yaldo, Chris G; Yamaguchi, Yorito; Yang, Hongyan; Yang, Shiming; Yasnopolsky, Stanislav; Yi, JunGyu; Yin, Zhongbao; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yoon, Jongik; Yu, Weilin; Yuan, Xianbao; Yushmanov, Igor; Zach, Cenek; Zampolli, Chiara; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zaviyalov, Nikolai; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zelnicek, Pierre; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, Fengchu; Zhou, You; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zoccarato, Yannick Denis; Zynovyev, Mykhaylo; Zyzak, Maksym

    2013-02-12

    The elliptic, $v_2$, triangular, $v_3$, and quadrangular, $v_4$, azimuthal anisotropic flow coefficients are measured for unidentified charged particles, pions, and (anti-)protons in Pb–Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV with the ALICE detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Results obtained with the event plane and four-particle cumulant methods are reported for the pseudo-rapidity range |$\\eta$|8 GeV/c. The small $p_T$ dependence of the difference between elliptic flow results obtained from the event plane and four-particle cumulant methods suggests a common origin of flow fluctuations up to $p_T$ =8 GeV/c. The magnitude of the (anti-)proton elliptic and triangular flow is larger than that of pions out to at least $p_T$ =8 GeV/c indicating that the particle type dependence persists out to high $p_T$.

  9. The discovery of the antiproton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, Owen

    1989-01-01

    A number of groups of particle physicists competed to provide track evidence of the existence of Dirac's postulated antiproton in the mid-1950s. The work of the several teams is described briefly. The author describes the work of his own group on the Bevatron in more detail, and how they finally observed the antiproton. The article finishes with an assessment of the importance of this discovery. (UK)

  10. Measurement of interaction between antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Bairathi, V.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, Z. M.; Li, Y.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, R.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M. K.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, X.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Webb, J. C.; Webb, G.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I. -K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2015-11-04

    © 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved. One of the primary goals of nuclear physics is to understand the force between nucleons, which is a necessary step for understanding the structure of nuclei and how nuclei interact with each other. Rutherford discovered the atomic nucleus in 1911, and the large body of knowledge about the nuclear force that has since been acquired was derived from studies made on nucleons or nuclei. Although antinuclei up to antihelium-4 have been discovered and their masses measured, little is known directly about the nuclear force between antinucleons. Here, we study antiproton pair correlations among data collected by the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), where gold ions are collided with a centre-of-mass energy of 200 gigaelectronvolts per nucleon pair. Antiprotons are abundantly produced in such collisions, thus making it feasible to study details of the antiproton-antiproton interaction. By applying a technique similar to Hanbury Brown and Twiss intensity interferometry, we show that the force between two antiprotons is attractive. In addition, we report two key parameters that characterize the corresponding strong interaction: the scattering length and the effective range of the interaction. Our measured parameters are consistent within errors with the corresponding values for proton-proton interactions. Our results provide direct information on the interaction between two antiprotons, one of the simplest systems of antinucleons, and so are fundamental to understanding the structure of more-complex antinuclei and the ir properties.

  11. Measurement of interaction between antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Star Collaboration; Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Bairathi, V.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de La Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; de Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, Z. M.; Li, Y.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, R.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M. K.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, X.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Webb, J. C.; Webb, G.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2015-11-01

    One of the primary goals of nuclear physics is to understand the force between nucleons, which is a necessary step for understanding the structure of nuclei and how nuclei interact with each other. Rutherford discovered the atomic nucleus in 1911, and the large body of knowledge about the nuclear force that has since been acquired was derived from studies made on nucleons or nuclei. Although antinuclei up to antihelium-4 have been discovered and their masses measured, little is known directly about the nuclear force between antinucleons. Here, we study antiproton pair correlations among data collected by the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), where gold ions are collided with a centre-of-mass energy of 200 gigaelectronvolts per nucleon pair. Antiprotons are abundantly produced in such collisions, thus making it feasible to study details of the antiproton-antiproton interaction. By applying a technique similar to Hanbury Brown and Twiss intensity interferometry, we show that the force between two antiprotons is attractive. In addition, we report two key parameters that characterize the corresponding strong interaction: the scattering length and the effective range of the interaction. Our measured parameters are consistent within errors with the corresponding values for proton-proton interactions. Our results provide direct information on the interaction between two antiprotons, one of the simplest systems of antinucleons, and so are fundamental to understanding the structure of more-complex antinuclei and their properties.

  12. Antiproton Powered Gas Core Fission Rocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kammash, Terry

    2005-01-01

    Extensive research in recent years has demonstrated that 'at rest' annihilation of antiprotons in the uranium isotope U238 leads to fission at nearly 100% efficiency. The resulting highly-ionizing, energetic fission fragments can heat a suitable medium to very high temperatures, making such a process particularly suitable for space propulsion applications. Such an ionized medium, which would serve as a propellant, can be confined by a magnetic field during the heating process, and subsequently ejected through a magnetic nozzle to generate thrust. The gasdynamic mirror (GDM) magnetic configuration is especially suited for this application since the underlying confinement principle is that the plasma be of such density and temperature as to make the ion-ion collision mean free path shorter than the plasma length. Under these conditions the plasma behaves like a fluid, and its escape from the system is analogous to the flow of a gas into vacuum from a vessel with a hole. For the system we propose we envisage radially injecting atomic or U238 plasma beam at a pre-determined position and axially pulsing an antiproton beam which upon interaction with the uranium target gives rise to near isotropic ejection of fission fragments with a total mass of 212 amu and total energy of about 160 MeV. These particles, along with the annihilation products (i.e. pions and muons) will heat the background U238 gas - inserted into the chamber just prior to the release of the antiproton - to one keV temperature. Preliminary analysis reveals that such a propulsion system can produce a specific impulse of about 3000 seconds at a thrust of about 50 kN. When applied to a round trip Mars mission, we find that such a journey can be accomplished in about 142 days with 2 days of thrusting and requiring only one gram of antiprotons to achieve it

  13. Search for antiproton-nucleus states with (anti p,p) reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garreta, D.; Birien, P.; Bruge, G.; Chaumeaux, A.; Drake, D.M.; Janouin, S.; Legrand, D.; Lemaire, M.C.; Mayer, B.; Pain, J.; Peng, J.C.; Berrada, M.; Bocquet, J.P.; Monnand, E.; Mougey, J.; Perrin, P.

    1985-01-01

    We have studied (anti p,p) reactions on 12 C, 63 Cu, and 209 Bi to search for possible nuclear states formed by antiprotons and nuclei. The experiments used the 180 MeV antiproton beam from LEAR, and the high-resolution magnetic spectrometer, SPES II, to detect the outgoing protons. No evidence of antiproton-nucleus states was found. The gross features of the proton spectra are reasonably well described by intranuclear cascade model calculations, which consider proton emission following antiproton annihilations in the target nucleus. (orig.)

  14. Precision tests of CPT invariance with single trapped antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulmer, Stefan [RIKEN, Ulmer Initiative Research Unit, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Collaboration: BASE-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The reason for the striking imbalance of matter and antimatter in our Universe has yet to be understood. This is the motivation and inspiration to conduct high precision experiments comparing the fundamental properties of matter and antimatter equivalents at lowest energies and with greatest precision. According to theory, the most sensitive tests of CPT invariance are measurements of antihydrogen ground-state hyperfine splitting as well as comparisons of proton and antiproton magnetic moments. Within the BASE collaboration we target the latter. By using a double Penning trap we performed very recently the first direct high precision measurement of the proton magnetic moment. The achieved fractional precision of 3.3 ppb improves the currently accepted literature value by a factor of 2.5. Application of the method to a single trapped antiproton will improve precision of the particles magnetic moment by more than a factor of 1000, thus providing one of the most stringent tests of CPT invariance. In my talk I report on the status and future perspectives of our efforts.

  15. Search for a High-Mass Higgs Boson Produced in Proton Anti-Proton Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ Tev with an Hadronic t in the Final State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Errico, Maria [Univ. of Padua (Italy)

    2011-01-01

    In this Thesis a search for Higgs boson production has been performed analysing data gathered by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) from proton-antiproton (p$\\bar{p}$) collisions at the center of mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV. Event selection has been optimized on Higgs decaying into W+W- bosons in order to reconstruct final states with two charged leptons formed by either an electron and a tau or a muon and a tau focusing on taus decaying into hadrons. No evidence of Higgs production has been found analysing 4.8 fb-1 of data and an up- per limit has been set on the production cross section as a function of the mass mH in the range from 130 to 200 GeV/c2 with a 95% Confidence Level. For a Higgs mass hypothesis of 160 GeV/c2 the observed limit is 33.5 times the Standard Model predicted cross section σSM while the expected upper limit for the same mass is 19.6×σSM. The high recorded luminosity along with the development of new analysis techniques are expected to improve the CDF sensitivity to the search for Higgs boson with hadronic taus reconstructed in the final state, in the mass range 130 to 200 GeV/c2.

  16. The Bess Investigation of the Origin of Cosmic-ray Antiprotons and Search for Cosmological Antimatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, John; Yamamoto, Akira; Yoshimura, Koji; Makida, Yasuhiro; Matsuda, Shinya; Hasegawa, Masaya; Horikoshi, Atsushi; Tanaka,Ken-ichi; Suzuki, Junichi; Nishimura, Jun; hide

    2008-01-01

    The Balloon-borne Experiment with a Superconducting Spectrometer (BESS) collaboration has made precise measurements of the spectra of cosmic ray antiprotons and light nuclei and conducted a sensitive search for antinuclei. Ten BESS high-latitude flights, eight from Canada and two from Antarctica, span more than a Solar cycle between 1993 and 2007/2008. BESS measurements of low-energy antiprotons constrain candidate models for dark matter including the possible signature of primordial black hole evaporation. The stringent BESS measurements of antiprotons and the elemental and isotopic spectra of H and He provide strong constraints on models of cosmic-ray transport in the Galaxy and Solar System. BESS has also reported the first antideuterium upper limit. BESS employs a superconducting magnetic-rigity spectrometer with time-of-flight and aerogel Cherenkov detectors to identify incident particles by charge, charge sign, mass, and energy. The BESS-Polar long-duration instrument has reduced lower energy limit of 100 MeV (top of the atmosphere) to increase its sensitivity to possible primary antiproton sources. BESS-Polar II was rebuilt with extended magnet lifetime, improved detector and electronic performance, and greater data storage capacity. It was flown fro Antarctica December 2007-January 2008, recording about 4.6 bission events during 24.5 days at float altitude with the magnet on. During the flight the influence of a high-speed stream in the Solar wind was observed. Details of the BESS-Polar II instrument and flight performance are reported elsewhere at this conference. The successful BESS-Polar II flight at Solar minimum is especially important. Most cosmic-ray antiprotons are secondary products of nuclear interactions of primary cosmic-ray nuclei with the interstellar gas, giving a spectrum that peaks at about 2 GeV and falls rapidly to higher and lower energies. However, BESS data taken in the previous Solar minimum show a small excess over secondary

  17. Intensity-Frontier Antiproton Physics with The Antiproton Annihilation Spectrometer (TAPAS) at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apollinari, Giorgio; /Fermilab; Asner, David M.; /PNL, Richland; Baldini, Wander; /INFN, Ferrara; Bartoszek, Larry; Broemmelsiek, Daniel R.; Brown, Charles N.; /Fermilab; Chakravorty, Alak; /St. Xavier U., Chicago; Colas, Paul; /Saclay; Derwent, Paul; /Fermilab; Drutskoy, Alexey; /Moscow, ITEP; Fortner, Michael; /Northern Illinois U. /Saclay /Indian Inst. Tech., Hyderabad

    2011-11-01

    The Fermilab Antiproton Source is the world's most intense source of antimatter. With the Tevatron program now behind us, this unique facility can help make the case for Fermilab's continued accelerator operations. The Antiproton Source can be used for unique, dedicated antimatter studies, including medium-energy {bar p}-annihilation experiments. We propose to assemble a powerful, yet cost-effective, solenoidal magnetic spectrometer for antiproton-annihilation events, and to use it at the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator to measure the charm production cross section, study rare hyperon decays, search for hyperon CP asymmetry, precisely measure the properties of several charmonium and nearby states, and make the first measurements of the Drell-Yan continuum in medium-energy antiproton annihilation. Should the charm production cross section be as large as some have proposed, we will also be able to measure D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing with high precision and discover (or sensitively limit) charm CP violation. The observation of charm or hyperon CP violation would be evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model, with possible implications for the origin of the baryon asymmetry of the universe - the question of what happened to all the antimatter that must have been produced in the Big Bang. The experiment will be carried out by an international collaboration and will require some four years of running time. As possibly the sole hadron experiment in progress at Fermilab during that time, it will play an important role in maintaining a broad particle physics program at Fermilab and in the U.S. It will thus help us to continue attracting creative and capable young people into science and technology, and introducing them to the important technologies of accelerators, detectors, and data acquisition and analysis - key roles in society that accelerator-based particle physics has historically played.

  18. The Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    A section of the AA where the dispersion (and hence the horizontal beam size) is large. One can distinguish (left to right): A large vacuum-tank, a quadrupole (QDN09*), a bending magnet (BST08), another vacuum-tank, a wide quadrupole (QFW08) and (in the background) a further bending magnet (BST08). The tanks are covered with heating tape for bake-out. The tank left of QDN09 contained the kickers for stochastic pre-cooling (see 790621, 8002234, 8002637X), the other one served mainly as vacuum chamber in the region where the beam was large. Peter Zettwoch works on QFW08. * see: H. Koziol, Antiproton Accumulator Parameter List, PS/AA/Note 84-2 (1984) See under 7911303, 7911597X, 8004261 and 8202324. For photos of the AA in different phases of completion (between 1979 and 1982) see: 7911303, 7911597X, 8004261, 8004608X, 8005563X, 8005565X, 8006716X, 8006722X, 8010939X, 8010941X, 8202324, 8202658X, 8203628X .

  19. In the steps of the antiproton

    CERN Multimedia

    Amsler, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Sixty years after the discovery of the antiproton at Berkeley, a look at some of the ways that studies with antiprotons at CERN have cast light on basic physics and, in particular, on fundamental symmetries.

  20. Jagiellonian University Drift Chamber Calibration and Track Reconstruction in the P349 Antiproton Polarization Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Alfs, D; Moskal, P; Zieliński, M; Grzonka, D; Hauenstein, F; Kilian, K; Lersch, D; Ritman, J; Sefzick, T; Oelert, W; Diermaier, M; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J; Wolke, M; Nadel-Turonski, P; Carmignotto, M; Horn, T; Mkrtchyan, H; Asaturyan, A; Mkrtchyan, A; Tadevosyan, V; Zhamkochyan, S; Malbrunot-Ettenauer, S; Eyrich, W; Zink, A

    2017-01-01

    The goal of the P349 experiment is to test whether the antiproton production process can be itself a source of antiproton polarization. In this article, we present the motivation and details of the performed measurement. We report on the status of the analysis focusing mainly on calibration of the drift chambers and 3d track reconstruction.

  1. Status of the analysis for the search of polarization in the antiproton production process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfs, D.; Asaturyan, A.; Carmignotto, M.; Diermaier, M.; Eyrich, W.; Głowacz, B.; Grzonka, D.; Hauenstein, F.; Horn, T.; Kilian, K.; Malbrunot-Ettenauer, S.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Moskal, P.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Oelert, W.; Ritman, J.; Sefzick, T.; Tadevosyan, V.; Widmann, E.; Wolke, M.; Zhamkochyan, S.; Zieliński, M.; Zink, A.; Zmeskal, J.

    2016-01-01

    The P-349 experiment aims to test whether for antiprotons the production process itself can be a source of polarization in view of the preparation of a polarized antiproton beam. In this article we present the details of performed measurements and report on the status of the ongoing analysis.

  2. A low-energy antiproton detector prototype for AFIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Lingxin; Greenwald, Daniel; Hahn, Alexander; Hauptmann, Philipp; Konorov, Igor; Losekamm, Martin; Paul, Stephan; Poeschl, Thomas; Renker, Dieter [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Antiprotons are produced in interactions of primary cosmic rays with earth's exosphere, where a fraction of them will be confined in the geomagnetic field in the inner van Allen Belt. The antiproton-to-proton flux ratio predicted by theory is in good agreement with recent results from the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) published by the PAMELA collaboration. We have designed the AFIS (Antiproton Flux in Space) project in order to extend the measurable range of antiprotons towards the low-energy region. In scope of this project a small antiproton detector consisting of scintillating fibers and silicon photomultipliers is being developed as payload for a CubeSat traversing the SAA in Low Earth Orbit. For the proof of concept we have built a prototype called ''CubeZero'' which completed its first test using pion and proton beams at PSI, Switzerland. Our primary goal was to investigate on the performance of tracking and Bragg peak identification in hardware and software. Analysis of detector performance based on data taken during this beam test is presented in this talk.

  3. Compression of Antiproton Clouds for Antihydrogen Trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report the first detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile and its relation to that of the electron plasma.

  4. Antiproton collisions with molecular hydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical antiproton and proton cross sections for ionization and excitation of hydrogen molecules as well as energy spectra of the ionized electrons were calculated in the impact-energy range from 8  to  4000  keV. The cross sections were computed with the close-coupling formulation of the sem......Theoretical antiproton and proton cross sections for ionization and excitation of hydrogen molecules as well as energy spectra of the ionized electrons were calculated in the impact-energy range from 8  to  4000  keV. The cross sections were computed with the close-coupling formulation...

  5. Large amounts of antiproton production by heavy ion collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Powell, J.

    1987-01-01

    To produce large amounts of antiprotons, on the order of several grams/year, use of machines to produce nuclear collisions are studied. These can be of either proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus in nature. To achieve high luminosity colliding beams, on the order of 10 41 m/cm 2 , a self-colliding machine is required, rather than a conventional circular colliding type. The self-colliding machine can produce additional antiprotons through successive collisions of secondary particles, such as spectator nucleons. A key problem is how to collect the produced antiprotons without capture by beam nuclei in the collision zone. Production costs for anti-matter are projected for various energy source options and technology levels. Dedicated facilities using heavy ion collisions could produce antiproton at substantially less than 1 million $/milligram. With co-production of other valuable products, e.g., nuclear fuel for power reactors, antiproton costs could be reduced to even lower values

  6. Antiproton tagging and vertex fitting in a Timepix3 detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aghion, S.; The AEGIS collaboration; Antonello, M.; Belov, A.; Bonomi, G.; Brusah, R. S.; Caccia, M.; Camper, A.; Caravita, R.; Castelli, F.; Cerchiari, G.; Comparat, D.; Consolati, G.; Demetrio, A.; Di Noto, L.; Doser, M.; Evans, C.; Fanì, M.; Ferragut, R.; Fesel, J.; Fontana, A.; Gerber, S.; Giammarchi, M.; Gligorova, A.; Guatieri, F.; Hackstock, P.; Haider, S.; Hinterberger, A.; Holmestad, H.; Kellerbauer, A.; Khalidova, O.; Krasnický, D.; Lagomarsino, V.; Lansonneur, P.; Lebrun, P.; Malbrunot, C.; Mariazzi, S.; Marton, J.; Matveev, V.; Müller, S. R.; Nebbia, G.; Nedelec, P.; Oberthaler, M.; Pacifico, N.; Pagano, D.; Penasa, L.; Petracek, V.; Prelz, F.; Prevedelli, M.; Rienaecker, B.; Robert, J.; Røhne, O. M.; Rotondi, A.; Sandaker, H.; Santoro, R.; Smestad, L.; Sorrentino, F.; Testera, G.; Tietje, I. C.; Widmann, E.; Yzombard, P.; Zimmer, C.; Zmeskal, J.; Zurlo, N.

    2018-01-01

    Studies of antimatter are important for understanding our universe at a fundamental level. There are still unsolved problems, such as the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe. The AEgIS experiment at CERN aims at measuring the gravitational fall of antihydrogen in order to determine the gravitational force on antimatter. The proposed method will make use of a position-sensitive detector to measure the annihilation point of antihydrogen. Such a detector must be able to tag the antiproton, measure its time of arrival and reconstruct its annihilation point with high precision in the vertical direction. This work explores a new method for tagging antiprotons and reconstructing their annihilation point. Antiprotons from the Antiproton Decelerator at CERN was used to obtain data on direct annihilations on the surface of a silicon pixel sensor with Timepix3 readout. These data were used to develop and verify a detector response model for annihilation of antiprotons in this detector. Using this model and the a...

  7. Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons \\\\ ASACUSA Collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Matsuda, Y; Lodi-rizzini, E; Kuroda, N; Schettino, G; Hori, M; Pirkl, W; Mascagna, V; Leali, M; Malbrunot, C L S; Yamazaki, Y; Eades, J; Simon, M; Massiczek, O; Sauerzopf, C; Nagata, Y; Knudsen, H; Uggerhoj, U I; Mc cullough, R W; Toekesi, K M; Venturelli, L; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J; Kanai, Y; Kristiansen, H; Todoroki, K; Bartel, M A; Moller, S P; Charlton, M; Diermaier, M; Kolbinger, B

    2002-01-01

    ASACUSA (\\underline{A}tomic \\underline{S}pectroscopy \\underline{A}nd \\underline{C}ollisions \\underline{U}sing \\underline{S}low \\underline{A}ntiprotons) is a collaboration between a number of Japanese and European research institutions, with the goal of studying bound and continuum states of antiprotons with simple atoms.\\\\ Three phases of experimentation are planned for ASACUSA. In the first phase, we use the direct $\\overline{p}$ beam from AD at 5.3 MeV and concentrate on the laser and microwave spectroscopy of the metastable antiprotonic helium atom, $\\overline{p}$He$^+$, consisting of an electron and antiproton bound by the Coulomb force to the helium nucleus. Samples of these are readily created by bringing AD antiproton beam bunches to rest in helium gas. With the help of techniques developed at LEAR for resonating high precision laser beams with antiproton transitions in these atoms, ASACUSA achieved several of these first-phase objectives during a few short months of AD operation in 2000. Six atomic tr...

  8. Large amounts of antiproton production by heavy ion collision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Powell, J.

    1987-01-01

    To produce large amounts of antiprotons, on the order of several grams/year, use of machines to produce nuclear collisions are studied. These can be of either proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus in nature. To achieve high luminosity colliding beams, on the order of 10/sup 41/ m/cm/sup 2/, a self-colliding machine is required, rather than a conventional circular colliding type. The self-colliding machine can produce additional antiprotons through successive collisions of secondary particles, such as spectator nucleons. A key problem is how to collect the produced antiprotons without capture by beam nuclei in the collision zone. Production costs for anti-matter are projected for various energy source options and technology levels. Dedicated facilities using heavy ion collisions could produce antiproton at substantially less than 1 million $/milligram. With co-production of other valuable products, e.g., nuclear fuel for power reactors, antiproton costs could be reduced to even lower values.

  9. Improved Study of the Antiprotonic Helium Hyperfine Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Pask, T.; Dax, A.; Hayano, R.S.; Hori, M.; Horvath, D.; Juhasz, B.; Malbrunot, C.; Marton, J.; Ono, N.; Suzuki, K.; Zmeskal, J.; Widmann, E.

    2008-01-01

    We report the initial results from a systematic study of the hyperfine (HF) structure of antiprotonic helium (n,l) = (37,~35) carried out at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN. We performed a laser-microwave-laser resonance spectroscopy using a continuous wave (cw) pulse-amplified laser system and microwave cavity to measure the HF transition frequencies. Improvements in the spectral linewidth and stability of our laser system have increased the precision of these measurements by a factor of five and reduced the line width by a factor of three compared to our previous results. A comparison of the experimentally measured transition frequencies with three body QED calculations can be used to determine the antiproton spin magnetic moment, leading towards a test of CPT invariance.

  10. Measurement of interaction between antiprotons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adamczyk, L.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, Jana; Federič, Pavol; Chaloupka, P.; Rusňák, Jan; Rusňáková, O.; Šimko, Miroslav; Šumbera, Michal; Tlustý, David; Trzeciak, B. A.; Vértési, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 527, č. 7578 (2015), s. 345-348 ISSN 0028-0836 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-20841S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : STAR collaboration * antiprotons * protons Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 38.138, year: 2015

  11. Physics at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, M

    2013-01-01

    The Antiproton Decelerator of CERN began operation in 1999 to serve experiments for studies of CPT invariance by precision laser and microwave spectroscopy of antihydrogen ($\\bar{\\rm H}$) and antiprotonic helium ($\\bar{p}{\\rm He}^+$). The first 12 years of operation saw cold $\\bar{\\rm H}$ synthesized by overlapping clouds of positrons ($e^+$) and antiprotons ($\\bar{p}$) confined in magnetic Penning traps. Cold $\\bar{\\rm H}$ was also produced in collisions between Rydberg positronium atoms and $\\bar{p}$. Ground-state $\\bar{\\rm H}$ was later trapped for up to $\\sim 1000$ s in a magnetic bottle trap, and microwave transitions excited between its hyperfine levels. In the $\\bar{p}{\\rm He}^+$ atom, UV transitions were measured to a precision of (2.3-5) $\\times$ $10^{-9}$ by sub-Doppler two-photon laser spectroscopy. From this the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio was determined as $M_{\\bar{p}}/m_e=$1836.1526736(23), which agrees with the p value. Microwave spectroscopy of $\\bar{p}{\\rm He}^+$ yielded a measurement o...

  12. Measurement of antiproton annihilation on Cu, Ag and Au with emulsion films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghion, S.; Consolati, G.; Evans, C.; Ferragut, R.; Amsler, C.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Ereditato, A.; Bonomi, G.; Bräunig, P.; Demetrio, A.; Brusa, R.S.; Cabaret, L.; Comparat, D.; Caccia, M.; Castelli, F.; Caravita, R.; Noto, L. Di; Cerchiari, G.; Doser, M.

    2017-01-01

    The characteristics of low energy antiproton annihilations on nuclei (e.g. hadronization and product multiplicities) are not well known, and Monte Carlo simulation packages that use different models provide different descriptions of the annihilation events. In this study, we measured the particle multiplicities resulting from antiproton annihilations on nuclei. The results were compared with predictions obtained using different models in the simulation tools GEANT4 and FLUKA. For this study, we exposed thin targets (Cu, Ag and Au) to a very low energy antiproton beam from CERN's Antiproton Decelerator, exploiting the secondary beamline available in the AEgIS experimental zone. The antiproton annihilation products were detected using emulsion films developed at the Laboratory of High Energy Physics in Bern, where they were analysed at the automatic microscope facility. The fragment multiplicity measured in this study is in good agreement with results obtained with FLUKA simulations for both minimally and heavily ionizing particles.

  13. Measurement of antiproton annihilation on Cu, Ag and Au with emulsion films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghion, S.; Amsler, C.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Bonomi, G.; Bräunig, P.; Brusa, R. S.; Cabaret, L.; Caccia, M.; Caravita, R.; Castelli, F.; Cerchiari, G.; Comparat, D.; Consolati, G.; Demetrio, A.; Di Noto, L.; Doser, M.; Ereditato, A.; Evans, C.; Ferragut, R.; Fesel, J.; Fontana, A.; Gerber, S.; Giammarchi, M.; Gligorova, A.; Guatieri, F.; Haider, S.; Hinterberger, A.; Holmestad, H.; Huse, T.; Kawada, J.; Kellerbauer, A.; Kimura, M.; Krasnický, D.; Lagomarsino, V.; Lansonneur, P.; Lebrun, P.; Malbrunot, C.; Mariazzi, S.; Matveev, V.; Mazzotta, Z.; Müller, S. R.; Nebbia, G.; Nedelec, P.; Oberthaler, M.; Pacifico, N.; Pagano, D.; Penasa, L.; Petracek, V.; Pistillo, C.; Prelz, F.; Prevedelli, M.; Ravelli, L.; Rienaecker, B.; RØhne, O. M.; Rotondi, A.; Sacerdoti, M.; Sandaker, H.; Santoro, R.; Scampoli, P.; Simon, M.; Smestad, L.; Sorrentino, F.; Testera, G.; Tietje, I. C.; Vamosi, S.; Vladymyrov, M.; Widmann, E.; Yzombard, P.; Zimmer, C.; Zmeskal, J.; Zurlo, N.

    2017-04-01

    The characteristics of low energy antiproton annihilations on nuclei (e.g. hadronization and product multiplicities) are not well known, and Monte Carlo simulation packages that use different models provide different descriptions of the annihilation events. In this study, we measured the particle multiplicities resulting from antiproton annihilations on nuclei. The results were compared with predictions obtained using different models in the simulation tools GEANT4 and FLUKA. For this study, we exposed thin targets (Cu, Ag and Au) to a very low energy antiproton beam from CERN's Antiproton Decelerator, exploiting the secondary beamline available in the AEgIS experimental zone. The antiproton annihilation products were detected using emulsion films developed at the Laboratory of High Energy Physics in Bern, where they were analysed at the automatic microscope facility. The fragment multiplicity measured in this study is in good agreement with results obtained with FLUKA simulations for both minimally and heavily ionizing particles.

  14. Calculated LET Spectrum from Antiproton Beams Stopping in Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael

    2009-01-01

    significantly differ from unity, which seems to warrant closer inspection of the radiobiology in this region. Monte Carlo simulations using FLUKA were performed for calculating the entire particle spectrum of a beam of 126 MeV antiprotons hitting a water phantom. In the plateau region of the simulated...

  15. Production of a pion in association with a high-Q2 dilepton pair in antiproton-proton annihilation at GSI-FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lansberg, J. P.; Pire, B.; Szymanowski, L.

    2007-01-01

    We evaluate the cross section for pp→l + l - π 0 in the forward direction and for a large lepton pair invariant mass. In this kinematical region, the leading-twist amplitude factorizes into a short-distance matrix element, long-distance antiproton-distribution amplitudes, and proton to pion transition distribution amplitudes (TDAs). Using a modeling inspired from the chiral limit for these TDAs, we obtain a first estimate of this cross section, which demonstrates that this process can be measured at GSI-FAIR

  16. High performance homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne; Vibæk, Kasper Sánchez

    2014-01-01

    Can prefabrication contribute to the development of high performance homes? To answer this question, this chapter defines high performance in more broadly inclusive terms, acknowledging the technical, architectural, social and economic conditions under which energy consumption and production occur....... Consideration of all these factors is a precondition for a truly integrated practice and as this chapter demonstrates, innovative project delivery methods founded on the manufacturing of prefabricated buildings contribute to the production of high performance homes that are cost effective to construct, energy...

  17. A silicon multiplicity detector system for an experiment on the interaction of antiprotons with nuclei at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, S.; Bonner, B.E.; Buchanan, J.A.; Clement, J.M.; Empl, A.; Mutchler, G.S.; Toshkov, S.; Chan, C.S.; Kramer, M.A.; Lindenbaum, S.J.; Hallman, T.J.; Madansky, L.; Peaslee, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    A Large Angle Multiplicity Detector (LAMD) system has been developed and used at the BNL experiment E854: Antiproton Nucleus Interactions. This system performed well with an energetic antiproton beam. Charged particle multiplicity distributions from pbar annihilations were measured. We discuss the design and performance of the LAMD system in this paper. 6 refs., 10 figs

  18. Antiproton source beam position system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagwell, T.; Holmes, S.; McCarthy, J.; Webber, R.

    1984-05-01

    The TeV I Beam Position Monitor (BPM) system is designed to provide a useful diagnostic tool during the commissioning and operational phases of the antiproton source. Simply stated the design goal is to provide single turn position information for intensities of > 1x10 9 particles, and multi-turn (clocked orbit) information for beam intensities of > 1x10 7 particles, both with sub-millimeter resolution. It is anticipated that the system will be used during commissioning for establishing the first turn through the Debuncher and Accumulator, for aligning injection orbits, for providing information necessary to correct closed orbits, and for measuring various machine parameters (e.g. tunes, dispersion, aperture, chromaticity). During normal antiproton operation the system will be used to monitor the beam position throughout the accumulation process

  19. On the determination of the energy of antiprotonic X-rays by critical absorption and the theoretical discussion of results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joedicke, B.

    1985-06-01

    This work examines the possibility of measuring the energies of antiprotonic X-rays by critical absorption. Scanning the periodic table many isotopes are found where the energy of an antiprotonic X-ray coincides with a K-absorption-edge of a chemical element. Those candidates where the energy can be measured with high accuracy are discussed here. Also a computer program which calculates transition energies of antiprotonic atoms is examined. Necessary additions are listed and the corrections are shown. In combination with this program the candidates are the basis for a precise determination of the mass of the antiproton. (orig.) [de

  20. High Performance Marine Vessels

    CERN Document Server

    Yun, Liang

    2012-01-01

    High Performance Marine Vessels (HPMVs) range from the Fast Ferries to the latest high speed Navy Craft, including competition power boats and hydroplanes, hydrofoils, hovercraft, catamarans and other multi-hull craft. High Performance Marine Vessels covers the main concepts of HPMVs and discusses historical background, design features, services that have been successful and not so successful, and some sample data of the range of HPMVs to date. Included is a comparison of all HPMVs craft and the differences between them and descriptions of performance (hydrodynamics and aerodynamics). Readers will find a comprehensive overview of the design, development and building of HPMVs. In summary, this book: Focuses on technology at the aero-marine interface Covers the full range of high performance marine vessel concepts Explains the historical development of various HPMVs Discusses ferries, racing and pleasure craft, as well as utility and military missions High Performance Marine Vessels is an ideal book for student...

  1. High performance systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil, M.B. [comp.

    1995-03-01

    This document provides a written compilation of the presentations and viewgraphs from the 1994 Conference on High Speed Computing given at the High Speed Computing Conference, {open_quotes}High Performance Systems,{close_quotes} held at Gleneden Beach, Oregon, on April 18 through 21, 1994.

  2. Ion Storage Tests with the High Performance Antimatter Trap (HiPAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, James J.; Lewis, Raymond A.; Chakrabarti, Suman; Pearson, Boise; Schafer, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA/Marshall Space Flight Centers (NASA/MSFC) Propulsion Research Center (PRC) is evaluating an antiproton storage system, referred to as the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT). This interest stems from the sheer energy represented by matter/antimatter annihilation process with has an energy density approximately 10 order of magnitude above that of chemical propellants. In other terms, one gram of antiprotons contains the equivalent energy of approximately 23 space shuttle external tanks or ET's (each ET contains roughly 740,000 kgs of fuel and oxidizer). This incredible source of stored energy, if harnessed, would be an enabling technology for deep space mission where both spacecraft weight and propulsion performance are key to satisfying aggressive mission requirements. The HiPAT hardware consists of a 4 Tesla superconductor system, an ultra high vacuum test section (vacuum approaching 10(exp -12) torr), and a high voltage confinement electrode system (up to 20 kvolts operation). The current laboratory layout is illustrated. The HiPAT designed objectives included storage of up to 1 trillion antiprotons with corresponding lifetimes approaching 18 days. To date, testing has centered on the storage of positive hydrogen ions produced in situ by a stream of high-energy electrons that passes through the trapping region. However, due to space charge issues and electron beam compression as it passes through the HiPAT central field, current ion production is limited to less then 50,000 ions. Ion lifetime was determined by counting particle populations at the end of various storage time intervals. Particle detection was accomplished by destructively expelling the ions against a micro-channel plate located just outside the traps magnetic field. The effect of radio frequency (RF) stabilization on the lifetime of trapped particles was also examined. This technique, referred to as a rotating wall, made use of a segmented electrode located near the center of the trap

  3. Design study of an Antiproton Collector for the Antiproton Accumulator (ACOL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, E.J.N.

    1983-01-01

    The Report gives a full description of an Antiproton Collector Ring which, placed around the existing Antiproton Accumulator at CERN, would enhance the antiproton flux available to both the SPS and LEAR by a factor of ten. The new ring and the focusing devices which precede it are designed to accept a much larger fraction of the antiproton production cone from the target. Each pulse of particles will be pre-cooled before being fed to the Antiproton Accumulator, where improved stochastic cooling systems will build up the stack. A full list of parameters is included. (orig.)

  4. Responsive design high performance

    CERN Document Server

    Els, Dewald

    2015-01-01

    This book is ideal for developers who have experience in developing websites or possess minor knowledge of how responsive websites work. No experience of high-level website development or performance tweaking is required.

  5. High Performance Macromolecular Material

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Forest, M

    2002-01-01

    .... In essence, most commercial high-performance polymers are processed through fiber spinning, following Nature and spider silk, which is still pound-for-pound the toughest liquid crystalline polymer...

  6. Galactic diffusion and the antiproton signal of supersymmetric dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Chardonnet, P; Salati, Pierre; Taillet, R

    1996-01-01

    The leaky box model is now ruled out by measurements of a cosmic ray gradient throughout the galactic disk. It needs to be replaced by a more refined treatment which takes into account the diffusion of cosmic rays in the magnetic fields of the Galaxy. We have estimated the flux of antiprotons on the Earth in the framework of a two-zone diffusion model. Those species are created by the spallation reactions of high-energy nuclei with the interstellar gas. Another potential source of antiprotons is the annihilation of supersymmetric particles in the dark halo that surrounds our Galaxy. In this letter, we investigate both processes. Special emphasis is given to the antiproton signature of supersymmetric dark matter. The corresponding signal exceeds the conventional spallation flux below 300 MeV, a domain that will be thoroughly explored by the Antimatter Spectrometer experiment. The propagation of the antiprotons produced in the remote regions of the halo back to the Earth plays a crucial role. Depending on the e...

  7. Enhancing trappable antiproton populations through deceleration and frictional cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolotorev, M.; Sessler, A.; Penn, G.; Wurtele, J. S.; Charman, A. E.

    2012-03-01

    CERN currently delivers antiprotons for trapping experiments with the Antiproton Decelerator (AD), which slows the antiprotons down to about 5 MeV.This energy is currently too high for direct trapping, and thick foils are used to slow down the beam to energies which can be trapped.To allow further deceleration to $\\sim 100 \\;\\mbox{keV}$, CERN is initiating the construction of ELENA,consisting of a ring which will combine RF deceleration and electron cooling capabilities. We describe a simple frictionalcooling scheme that can serve to provide significantly improved trapping efficiency, either directly from the AD or first usinga standard deceleration mechanism (induction linac or RFQ). This scheme could be implemented in a short time.The device itself is short in length, uses accessible voltages, and at reasonable cost could serve in the interim beforeELENA becomes operational, or possibly in lieu of ELENA for some experiments. Simple theory and simulations provide a preliminary assessment of theconcept and its strengths and limitations, and highlight important areas for experimental studies, in particular to pin down the level of multiplescattering for low-energy antiprotons. We show that the frictional cooling scheme can provide a similar energy spectrum to that of ELENA,but with higher transverse emittances.

  8. Improved forced impulse method calculations of single and double ionization of helium by collision with high-energy protons and antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, A.L.; Reading, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    Our previous forced impulse method calculations of single and double ionization of helium by protons and antiprotons have been improved by including d orbitals in the target centre basis. The calculations are in good agreement with experimental measurements of the ratio R of double to single ionization, without the 1.35 scaling factor we applied to our previous results. We also compare the separate single and double ionization cross sections to experiment and find good agreement. Experimental cross sections differential in projectile scattering angle at large angle (greater than 2.5 mrad) are compared to our impact parameter dependent ionization probabilities at small impact parameter, for the double to single ratio. The agreement is good, except at the lowest energy we have considered, 0.3 eV. (Author)

  9. Comparison of electromagnetic and hadronic models generated using Geant 4 with antiproton dose measured in CERN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Mohammad Bagher; Reiazi, Reza; Mohammadi, Mohammad Mehdi; Jabbari, Keyvan

    2015-01-01

    After proposing the idea of antiproton cancer treatment in 1984 many experiments were launched to investigate different aspects of physical and radiobiological properties of antiproton, which came from its annihilation reactions. One of these experiments has been done at the European Organization for Nuclear Research known as CERN using the antiproton decelerator. The ultimate goal of this experiment was to assess the dosimetric and radiobiological properties of beams of antiprotons in order to estimate the suitability of antiprotons for radiotherapy. One difficulty on this way was the unavailability of antiproton beam in CERN for a long time, so the verification of Monte Carlo codes to simulate antiproton depth dose could be useful. Among available simulation codes, Geant4 provides acceptable flexibility and extensibility, which progressively lead to the development of novel Geant4 applications in research domains, especially modeling the biological effects of ionizing radiation at the sub-cellular scale. In this study, the depth dose corresponding to CERN antiproton beam energy by Geant4 recruiting all the standard physics lists currently available and benchmarked for other use cases were calculated. Overall, none of the standard physics lists was able to draw the antiproton percentage depth dose. Although, with some models our results were promising, the Bragg peak level remained as the point of concern for our study. It is concluded that the Bertini model with high precision neutron tracking (QGSP_BERT_HP) is the best to match the experimental data though it is also the slowest model to simulate events among the physics lists.

  10. The Fermilab proton-antiproton collider upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marriner, J.P.

    1996-10-01

    The plans for increases in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider luminosity in the near future (Run II) and the more distant future (TeV33) are described. While there are many important issues, the fundamental requirement is to produce more antiprotons and to use them more efficiently

  11. PANDA : Strong Interaction Studies with Antiprotons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Klaus; Schmitt, Lars; Stockmanns, Tobias; Messchendorp, Johan

    2017-01-01

    The Antiproton Anihilation in Darmstadt (PANDA) collaboration at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) is a cooperation of more than 400 scientists from 19 countries. FAIR will be an accelerator facility leading the European research in nuclear and hadron physics in the coming decade.

  12. The biological effectiveness of antiproton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Bassler, Niels; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Beyer, Gerd; Blackmore, Ewart; DeMarco, John J.; Doser, Michael; Durand, Ralph E.; Hartley, Oliver; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Knudsen, Helge V.; Landua, Rolf; Maggiore, Carl; McBride, William H.; Moller, Soren Pape; Petersen, Jorgen; Skarsgard, Lloyd D.; Smathers, James B.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Uggerhoj, Ulrik I.; Vranjes, Sanja; Withers, H. Rodney; Wong, Michelle; Wouters, Bradly G.

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Antiprotons travel through tissue in a manner similar to that for protons until they reach the end of their range where they annihilate and deposit additional energy. This makes them potentially interesting for radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to conduct the first ever measurements of the biological effectiveness of antiprotons. Materials and methods: V79 cells were suspended in a semi-solid matrix and irradiated with 46.7 MeV antiprotons, 48 MeV protons, or 6 Co γ-rays. Clonogenic survival was determined as a function of depth along the particle beams. Dose and particle fluence response relationships were constructed from data in the plateau and Bragg peak regions of the beams and used to assess the biological effectiveness. Results: Due to uncertainties in antiproton dosimetry we defined a new term, called the biologically effective dose ratio (BEDR), which compares the response in a minimally spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) to that in the plateau as a function of particle fluence. This value was ∼3.75 times larger for antiprotons than for protons. This increase arises due to the increased dose deposited in the Bragg peak by annihilation and because this dose has a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Conclusion: We have produced the first measurements of the biological consequences of antiproton irradiation. These data substantiate theoretical predictions of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation within the Bragg peak, and suggest antiprotons warrant further investigation

  13. The biological effectiveness of antiproton irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Bassler, Niels; Agazaryan, Nzhde

    2006-01-01

    ever measurements of the biological effectiveness of antiprotons. Materials and methods: V79 cells were suspended in a semi-solid matrix and irradiated with 46.7 MeV antiprotons, 48 MeV protons, or 60Co c-rays. Clonogenic survival was determined as a function of depth along the particle beams. Dose...... and particle fluence response relationships were constructed from data in the plateau and Bragg peak regions of the beams and used to assess the biological effectiveness. Results: Due to uncertainties in antiproton dosimetry we defined a new term, called the biologically effective dose ratio (BEDR), which...... has a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Conclusion: We have produced the first measurements of the biological consequences of antiproton irradiation. These data substantiate theoretical predictions of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation within the Bragg peak, and suggest...

  14. Physics with antiprotons at LEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilian, K.

    1984-01-01

    The low energy antiproton ring LEAR started to work at CERN in 1983. It provides clean anti p beams of much higher intensity and much better quality than available so far in the range from 0.1 to 2 GeV/c momentum. 16 of the 17 accepted experiments are installed and 14 of them took first data in 1983. After approx.= 240 hours of LEAR operation very first results are available. One can expect that exciting physics results be produced in many different domains provided LEAR gets enough anti p in the future. (orig.)

  15. High-x sub T single-spin asymmetry in. pi. sup 0 and. eta. production at x sub F =0 by 200 GeV polarized antiprotons and protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, D L; Akchurin, N; Belikov, N I; Bystricky, J; Corcoran, M D; Cossairt, J D; Cranshaw, J; Derevschikov, A A; En' yo, H; Funahashi, H; Goto, Y; Grachov, O A; Grosnick, D P; Hill, D A; Imai, K; Itow, Y; Iwatani, K; Krueger, K W; Kuroda, K; Laghai, M; Lehar, F; Lesquen, A de; Lopiano, D; Luehring, F C; Maki, T; Makino, S; Masaike, A; Matulenko, Yu A; Meschanin, A P; Michalowicz, A; Miller, D H; Miyake, K; Nagamine, T; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Nessi, M; Nguyen, C; Nurushev, S B; Ohashi, Y; Onel, Y; Patalakha, D I; Pauletta, G; Penzo, A; Read, A L; Roberts, J B; Van Rossum, L; Rykov, V L; Saito, N; Salvato, G; Schiavon, P; Skeens, J; Solovyanov, V L; Spinka, H; Takashima, R; Takeutchi, F; Tamura, N; Tanaka, N; Underwood, D G; Vasiliev, A N; Villari, A; White, J L; Yamashita, S; Yokosawa, A; Yoshida, T; Zanetti, A [T.W. Bonner Nuclear Lab., Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States) Dept. of Physics, Univ. Iowa, Iowa City, IA (Unite; FNAL E704 Collaboration

    1992-02-20

    A measurement of the single-spin asymmetry A{sub N} in p{up arrow}+p{yields}{pi}{sup 0}+X at 200 GeV with x{sub F}=0 shows a transition in the production process from a 'low-x{sub T}' regime with A{sub N}=0, through an intermediate region of negative asymmetry, to a 'high-x{sub T}' regime with A{sub N}>0.3. This transition occurs at x{sub T}{approx equal}0.4 and is consistent with x{sub T}-scaling of A{sub N} in pion production using polarized beams or targets from {radical}-s=5.2 to 19.4 GeV. Results for A{sub N} in {eta} production by polarized protons and in {pi}{sup 0} production by polarized antiprotons are also presented. (orig.).

  16. Measurement of the antiproton-nucleus annihilation cross-section at low energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghai-Khozani, H.; Bianconi, A.; Corradini, M.; Hayano, R.; Hori, M.; Leali, M.; Lodi Rizzini, E.; Mascagna, V.; Murakami, Y.; Prest, M.; Vallazza, E.; Venturelli, L.; Yamada, H.

    2018-02-01

    Systematic measurements of the annihilation cross sections of low energy antinucleons were performed at CERN in the 80's and 90's. However the antiproton data on medium-heavy and heavy nuclear targets are scarce. The ASACUSA Collaboration at CERN has measured the antiproton annihilation cross section on carbon at 5.3 MeV: the value is (1.73 ± 0.25) barn. The result is compared with the antineutron experimental data and with the theoretical previsions.

  17. Primary populations of metastable antiprotonic $^{4}He$ and $^{3}He$ atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, Masaki; Hayano, R S; Ishikawa, T; Sakuguchi, J; Tasaki, T; Widmann, E; Yamaguchi, H; Torii, H A; Juhász, B; Horváth, D; Yamazaki, T

    2002-01-01

    Initial population distributions of metastable antiprotonic **4He and **3He atoms over principal and angular momentum quantum numbers were investigated using laser spectroscopy. The total fractions of antiprotons captured into the metastable states of the atoms were deduced. Cascade calculations were performed using the measure populations to reproduce the delayed annihilation time spectrum. Results showed agreement between the simulated and measured spectra. (Edited abstract) 30 Refs.

  18. Clojure high performance programming

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Shantanu

    2013-01-01

    This is a short, practical guide that will teach you everything you need to know to start writing high performance Clojure code.This book is ideal for intermediate Clojure developers who are looking to get a good grip on how to achieve optimum performance. You should already have some experience with Clojure and it would help if you already know a little bit of Java. Knowledge of performance analysis and engineering is not required. For hands-on practice, you should have access to Clojure REPL with Leiningen.

  19. Antiproton Cancer Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels

    An essential part in cancer radiotherapy, is to direct a sufficiently high dose towards the tumour, without damaging the surrounding tissue. Different techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy and proton therapy have been developed, in order to reduce the dose to the normal tissue...

  20. High Performance Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Traian Oneţ

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the last studies and researches accomplished in Cluj-Napoca related to high performance concrete, high strength concrete and self compacting concrete. The purpose of this paper is to raid upon the advantages and inconveniences when a particular concrete type is used. Two concrete recipes are presented, namely for the concrete used in rigid pavement for roads and another one for self-compacting concrete.

  1. High performance polymeric foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gargiulo, M.; Sorrentino, L.; Iannace, S.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the foamability of high-performance polymers (polyethersulfone, polyphenylsulfone, polyetherimide and polyethylenenaphtalate). Two different methods have been used to prepare the foam samples: high temperature expansion and two-stage batch process. The effects of processing parameters (saturation time and pressure, foaming temperature) on the densities and microcellular structures of these foams were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy

  2. High performance conductometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, B.

    2000-01-01

    Inexpensive but high performance systems have emerged progressively for basic and applied measurements in physical and analytical chemistry on one hand, and for on-line monitoring and leak detection in plants and facilities on the other. Salient features of the developments will be presented with specific examples

  3. Danish High Performance Concretes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M. P.; Christoffersen, J.; Frederiksen, J.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper the main results obtained in the research program High Performance Concretes in the 90's are presented. This program was financed by the Danish government and was carried out in cooperation between The Technical University of Denmark, several private companies, and Aalborg University...... concretes, workability, ductility, and confinement problems....

  4. High performance homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne; Vibæk, Kasper Sánchez

    2014-01-01

    . Consideration of all these factors is a precondition for a truly integrated practice and as this chapter demonstrates, innovative project delivery methods founded on the manufacturing of prefabricated buildings contribute to the production of high performance homes that are cost effective to construct, energy...

  5. Comprehensive Study for an Optimized Redesign of the CERN's Antiproton Decelerator Target

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2089345; Perillo-Marcone, Antonio; Muñoz-Cobo, Jose-Luis

    2018-04-16

    The Antiproton Decelerator Target (AD-Target) is a unique device responsible for the production of antiprotons at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). During operation, intense 26 GeV energy proton beams are impacted into its core, made of a 3 mm diameter rod of a high density material such as iridium, creating secondary particles -including antiprotons- from the nuclear reactions induced in its interior. This thesis delves into the characteristics of antiproton production and in particular in the mechanical response of the target core material, which is exposed to a rise of temperature of approximate 2000 degrees Celsius in less than 0.5 microseconds each time is impacted by the primary proton beam. A coupled numerical-experimental approach has been applied for this purpose. Specific computational tools, called hydrocodes, have been used for simulating the extreme dynamic response taking place in the target core and its containing graphite matrix, indicating their potential damage and frag...

  6. High-Performance Networking

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    The series will start with an historical introduction about what people saw as high performance message communication in their time and how that developed to the now to day known "standard computer network communication". It will be followed by a far more technical part that uses the High Performance Computer Network standards of the 90's, with 1 Gbit/sec systems as introduction for an in depth explanation of the three new 10 Gbit/s network and interconnect technology standards that exist already or emerge. If necessary for a good understanding some sidesteps will be included to explain important protocols as well as some necessary details of concerned Wide Area Network (WAN) standards details including some basics of wavelength multiplexing (DWDM). Some remarks will be made concerning the rapid expanding applications of networked storage.

  7. Antiprotonic Radioactive Atom for Nuclear Structure Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, M.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2005-01-01

    A future experiment to synthesize antiprotonic radioactive nuclear ions is proposed for nuclear structure studies. Antiprotonic radioactive nuclear atom can be synthesized in a nested Penning trap where a cloud of antiprotons is prestored and slow radioactive nuclear ions are bunch-injected into the trap. By observing of the ratio of π+ and π- produced in the annihilation process, we can deduce the different abundance of protons and neutrons at the surface of the nuclei. The proposed method would provide a unique probe for investigating the nuclear structure of unstable nuclei

  8. Proton-antiproton interactions (experimental status of baryonium states)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, Y.

    1980-07-01

    Many experiments have been performed in the last few years to search for the existence of baryonium (baryon-antibaryon bound) states. The current status in this direction is reviewed. Prominent resonances such as the S-meson resonance, broad resonances, narrow resonances and states such as the strange baryonium states, exotic states, antiproton-proton states below threshold, six-quark states are explained. A summary of the experimental data with illustrations is presented in a table.

  9. On the Utility of Antiprotons as Drivers for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, L J; Orth, C D; Tabak, M

    2003-01-01

    By contrast to the large mass, complexity and recirculating power of conventional drivers for inertial confinement fusion (ICF), antiproton annihilation offers a specific energy of 90MJ/(micro)g and thus a unique form of energy packaging and delivery. In principle, antiproton drivers could provide a profound reduction in system mass for advanced space propulsion by ICF. We examine the physics underlying the use of antiprotons ((bar p)) to drive various classes of high-yield ICF targets by the methods of volumetric ignition, hotspot ignition and fast ignition. The useable fraction of annihilation deposition energy is determined for both (bar p)-driven ablative compression and (bar p)-driven fast ignition, in association with 0-D and 1-D target burn models. Thereby, we deduce scaling laws for the number of injected antiprotons required per capsule, together with timing and focal spot requirements. The kinetic energy of the injected antiproton beam required to penetrate to the desired annihilation point is always small relative to the deposited annihilation energy. We show that heavy metal seeding of the fuel and/or ablator is required to optimize local deposition of annihilation energy and determine that a minimum of ∼3x10 15 injected antiprotons will be required to achieve high yield (several hundred megajoules) in any target configuration. Target gains - i.e., fusion yields divided by the available p - (bar p) annihilation energy from the injected antiprotons (1.88GeV/(bar p)) - range from ∼3 for volumetric ignition targets to ∼600 for fast ignition targets. Antiproton-driven ICF is a speculative concept, and the handling of antiprotons and their required injection precision - temporally and spatially - will present significant technical challenges. The storage and manipulation of low-energy antiprotons, particularly in the form of antihydrogen, is a science in its infancy and a large scale-up of antiproton production over present supply methods would be

  10. On the utility of antiprotons as drivers for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, L. John; Orth, Charles D.; Tabak, Max

    2004-01-01

    In contrast to the large mass, complexity and recirculating power of conventional drivers for inertial confinement fusion (ICF), antiproton annihilation offers a specific energy of 90 MJ μg -1 and thus a unique form of energy packaging and delivery. In principle, antiproton drivers could provide a profound reduction in system mass for advanced space propulsion by ICF. We examine the physics underlying the use of antiprotons (p-bar) to drive various classes of high-yield ICF targets by the methods of volumetric ignition, hotspot ignition and fast ignition. The useable fraction of annihilation deposition energy is determined for both p-bar-driven ablative compression and p-bar-driven fast ignition, in association with zero- and one-dimensional target burn models. Thereby, we deduce scaling laws for the number of injected antiprotons required per capsule, together with timing and focal spot requirements. The kinetic energy of the injected antiproton beam required to penetrate to the desired annihilation point is always small relative to the deposited annihilation energy. We show that heavy metal seeding of the fuel and/or ablator is required to optimize local deposition of annihilation energy and determine that a minimum of ∼3 x 10 15 injected antiprotons will be required to achieve high yield (several hundred megajoules) in any target configuration. Target gains-i.e. fusion yields divided by the available p-p-bar annihilation energy from the injected antiprotons (1.88 GeV/p-bar)-range from ∼3 for volumetric ignition targets to ∼600 for fast ignition targets. Antiproton-driven ICF is a speculative concept, and the handling of antiprotons and their required injection precision - temporally and spatially - will present significant technical challenges. The storage and manipulation of low-energy antiprotons, particularly in the form of antihydrogen, is a science in its infancy and a large scale-up of antiproton production over present supply methods would be

  11. On the Utility of Antiprotons as Drivers for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, L J; Orth, C D; Tabak, M

    2003-10-20

    By contrast to the large mass, complexity and recirculating power of conventional drivers for inertial confinement fusion (ICF), antiproton annihilation offers a specific energy of 90MJ/{micro}g and thus a unique form of energy packaging and delivery. In principle, antiproton drivers could provide a profound reduction in system mass for advanced space propulsion by ICF. We examine the physics underlying the use of antiprotons ({bar p}) to drive various classes of high-yield ICF targets by the methods of volumetric ignition, hotspot ignition and fast ignition. The useable fraction of annihilation deposition energy is determined for both {bar p}-driven ablative compression and {bar p}-driven fast ignition, in association with 0-D and 1-D target burn models. Thereby, we deduce scaling laws for the number of injected antiprotons required per capsule, together with timing and focal spot requirements. The kinetic energy of the injected antiproton beam required to penetrate to the desired annihilation point is always small relative to the deposited annihilation energy. We show that heavy metal seeding of the fuel and/or ablator is required to optimize local deposition of annihilation energy and determine that a minimum of {approx}3x10{sup 15} injected antiprotons will be required to achieve high yield (several hundred megajoules) in any target configuration. Target gains - i.e., fusion yields divided by the available p - {bar p} annihilation energy from the injected antiprotons (1.88GeV/{bar p}) - range from {approx}3 for volumetric ignition targets to {approx}600 for fast ignition targets. Antiproton-driven ICF is a speculative concept, and the handling of antiprotons and their required injection precision - temporally and spatially - will present significant technical challenges. The storage and manipulation of low-energy antiprotons, particularly in the form of antihydrogen, is a science in its infancy and a large scale-up of antiproton production over present supply

  12. Precocious scaling in antiproton-proton scattering at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion, D.B.; Petrascu, C.; Topor Pop, V.; Popa, V.

    1993-08-01

    The scaling of the diffraction peak in antiproton-proton scattering has been investigated from nera threshold up to 3 GeV/c laboratory momenta. It was shown that the scaling of the differential cross sections are evidentiated with a surprising accuracy not only at high energies, but also at very low ones (e.g. p LAB = 0.1 - 0.5 GeV/c), beyond the resonance and exotic resonance regions. This precocious scaling strongly suggests that the s-channel helicity conservation (SCHC) can be a peculiar property that should be tested in antiproton-proton interaction not only at high energies but also at low energy even below p LAB = 1 GeV/c. (author). 36 refs, 9 figs

  13. Examination of X-ray spectra from the antiprotonic helium isotopes 3He and 4He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, M.

    1987-05-01

    Using the high intensity antiprotonic LEAR beam at CERN (Geneva), several measurements were done to investigate the X-ray spectra of the antiprotonic Helium isotopes 3 He and 4 He. For the first time antiprotons were stopped in gases at low pressures (600, 375, 72 and 36 mbar), which permitted observations on nearly isolated atoms. A newly developed method for stopping the antiprotons in gases by means of a focusing cyclotron field surrounding the target gas was used. The field was supplied by a superconducting magnet ('cyclotron trap'). The antiprotons were tangentially injected into the cyclotron field, where they slowed down by ionising the target gas. The inhomogeneous magnetic field guided the antiprotons in spiral orbits to the magnetic center. Thus, even at low pressures a very small stopping volume could be achieved. To detect the X-rays different Si(Li)- and Ge-semiconductor detectors were used, some of which were furnished with 'guard-rings'. They were used to investigate the effects of the strong interaction between the antiproton and the nucleus in the (3d → 2p) transition in both isotopes. The analyzis of this transition permitted directly the determination of the shift and width of the 2p-level. The width of the 3d-level could be determined only indirectly using an intensity balance. The utilization of gases with different pressures permitted investigations of the pressure dependence of the antiprotonic deexcitation process. The results for the widths and shifts were compared with earlier measurements and theoretical predictions. The theory agrees only partly with the measurements. The evaluation of a complex scattering length using an optical model contradicts some of the results of calculations. (orig.) [de

  14. High performance data transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, R.; Fang, C.; Hanushevsky, A.; Kreuger, W.; Yang, W.

    2017-10-01

    The exponentially increasing need for high speed data transfer is driven by big data, and cloud computing together with the needs of data intensive science, High Performance Computing (HPC), defense, the oil and gas industry etc. We report on the Zettar ZX software. This has been developed since 2013 to meet these growing needs by providing high performance data transfer and encryption in a scalable, balanced, easy to deploy and use way while minimizing power and space utilization. In collaboration with several commercial vendors, Proofs of Concept (PoC) consisting of clusters have been put together using off-the- shelf components to test the ZX scalability and ability to balance services using multiple cores, and links. The PoCs are based on SSD flash storage that is managed by a parallel file system. Each cluster occupies 4 rack units. Using the PoCs, between clusters we have achieved almost 200Gbps memory to memory over two 100Gbps links, and 70Gbps parallel file to parallel file with encryption over a 5000 mile 100Gbps link.

  15. Superconducting beam charge monitors for antiproton storage rings

    OpenAIRE

    Tympel, Volker; Neubert, Ralf; Seidel, Paul; Geithner, René; Golm, Jessica; Stöhlker, Thomas; Kurian, Febian; Sieber, Thomas; Schwickert, Marcus; Fernandes, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    A Cryogenic Current Comparator (CCC) is a new type of instruments for monitoring charged beams like ions or antiprotons. Using superconducting effects is it possible to create a nondestructive, contactless and easy to calibrate beam measurement system with a high current resolution in amplitude and time. The Meissner effect enables an effective magnetic shielding of the system. The screening current enables creation of DC-transformers and therefore a DC-current measurement system. The combina...

  16. A beam sweeping system for the Fermilab antiproton production target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieniosek, F.M.

    1993-08-01

    In the Main Injector era beam intensities high enough to damage the antiproton production target will be available. In order to continue to operate with a tightly-focused primary beam spot on the target, and thus maintain yield, it will be necessary to spread the hot spot on the target by use of a beam sweeping system. This report summarizes the requirements for such a system, and addresses the issues involved in the design of a sweeping system

  17. Prospects for antiproton experiments at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, Daniel M.

    2012-01-01

    Fermilab operates the world’s most intense antiproton source. Newly proposed experiments can use those antiprotons either parasitically during Tevatron Collider running or after the end of the Tevatron Collider program. For example, the annihilation of 5 to 8 GeV antiprotons is expected to yield world-leading sensitivities to hyperon rare decays and CP violation. It could also provide the world’s most intense source of tagged D 0 mesons, and thus the best near-term opportunity to study charm mixing and, via CP violation, to search for new physics. Other measurements that could be made include properties of the X(3872) and the charmonium system. An experiment using a Penning trap and an atom interferometer could make the world’s most precise measurement of the gravitational force on antimatter. These and other potential measurements using antiprotons offer a great opportunity for a broad and exciting physics program at Fermilab in the post-Tevatron era.

  18. ASACUSA measures microwave transition in antiprotonic helium

    CERN Document Server

    Eades, John

    2003-01-01

    The ASACUSA collaboration has reinforced its status as a paragon of precision physics by following up its impressive six parts in 10/sup 8/ measurement of the antiproton's charge and mass with new measurements of its magnetism. (4 refs).

  19. Physics with ultra-low energy antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtkamp, D.B.; Holzscheiter, M.H.; Hughes, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    The experimental observation that all forms of matter experience the same gravitational acceleration is embodied in the weak equivalence principle of gravitational physics. However no experiment has tested this principle for particles of antimatter such as the antiproton or the antihydrogen atom. Clearly the question of whether antimatter is in compliance with weak equivalence is a fundamental experimental issue, which can best be addressed at an ultra-low energy antiproton facility. This paper addresses the issue. 20 refs

  20. Constraining heavy dark matter with cosmic-ray antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuoco, Alessandro; Heisig, Jan; Korsmeier, Michael; Krämer, Michael

    2018-04-01

    Cosmic-ray observations provide a powerful probe of dark matter annihilation in the Galaxy. In this paper we derive constraints on heavy dark matter from the recent precise AMS-02 antiproton data. We consider all possible annihilation channels into pairs of standard model particles. Furthermore, we interpret our results in the context of minimal dark matter, including higgsino, wino and quintuplet dark matter. We compare the cosmic-ray antiproton limits to limits from γ-ray observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies and to limits from γ-ray and γ-line observations towards the Galactic center. While the latter limits are highly dependent on the dark matter density distribution and only exclude a thermal wino for cuspy profiles, the cosmic-ray limits are more robust, strongly disfavoring the thermal wino dark matter scenario even for a conservative estimate of systematic uncertainties.

  1. High performance sapphire windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Stephen C.; Liou, Larry

    1993-02-01

    High-quality, wide-aperture optical access is usually required for the advanced laser diagnostics that can now make a wide variety of non-intrusive measurements of combustion processes. Specially processed and mounted sapphire windows are proposed to provide this optical access to extreme environment. Through surface treatments and proper thermal stress design, single crystal sapphire can be a mechanically equivalent replacement for high strength steel. A prototype sapphire window and mounting system have been developed in a successful NASA SBIR Phase 1 project. A large and reliable increase in sapphire design strength (as much as 10x) has been achieved, and the initial specifications necessary for these gains have been defined. Failure testing of small windows has conclusively demonstrated the increased sapphire strength, indicating that a nearly flawless surface polish is the primary cause of strengthening, while an unusual mounting arrangement also significantly contributes to a larger effective strength. Phase 2 work will complete specification and demonstration of these windows, and will fabricate a set for use at NASA. The enhanced capabilities of these high performance sapphire windows will lead to many diagnostic capabilities not previously possible, as well as new applications for sapphire.

  2. Measurement of asymmetries and differential cross sections in antiproton-proton elastic scattering at momenta between 497 and 1550 MeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunne, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    An intermediate energy antiproton proton (anti pp) elastic scattering experiment is described. The data comprise a set of 15 measurements of the differential cross section and the asymmetry between 497 and 1550 MeV/c antiproton momentum. The measurements were carried out using the high quality antiproton beam provided by the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. A conventional polarized target was used, consisting of pentanol. The motivation for the measurements is the study of the anti pp interaction by providing data on the spin observable A on in a momentum range where it has never been measured before. 56 refs.; 55 figs.; 40 tabs

  3. Evidence For The Production Of Slow Antiprotonic Hydrogen In Vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Zurlo, N.; Amsler, C.; Bonomi, G.; Carraro, C.; Cesar, C.L.; Charlton, M.; Doser, M.; Fontana, A.; Funakoshi, R.; Genova, P.; Hayano, R.S.; Jorgensen, L.V.; Kellerbauer, A.; Lagomarsino, V.; Landua, R.; Lodi Rizzini, E.; Macri, M.; Madsen, N.; Manuzio, G.; Mitchard, D.; Montagna, P.; Posada, L.G.; Pruys, H.; Regenfus, C.; Rotondi, A.; Testera, G.; der Werf, D.P.Van; Variola, A.; Venturelli, L.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2006-01-01

    We present evidence showing how antiprotonic hydrogen, the quasistable antiproton-proton (pbar-p) bound system, has been synthesized following the interaction of antiprotons with the hydrogen molecular ion (H2+) in a nested Penning trap environment. From a careful analysis of the spatial distributions of antiproton annihilation events, evidence is presented for antiprotonic hydrogen production with sub-eV kinetic energies in states around n=70, and with low angular momenta. The slow antiprotonic hydrogen may be studied using laser spectroscopic techniques.

  4. Antiproton-nucleus potentials from global fits to antiprotonic X-rays and radiochemical data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Mareš, Jiří

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 761, 3/4 (2005), s. 283-295 ISSN 0375-9474 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1048305 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : antiproton-nuclear interaction * RMF calculations * antiproton X-rays Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.950, year: 2005

  5. The new large-scale international facility for antiproton and ion research in Europe, FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosner, Guenther

    2012-01-01

    Full text: FAIR is currently the largest project in nuclear and particle physics worldwide, with investment costs of 1.6B euro in its first phase. It has been founded by Finland, France, Germany, India, Poland, Romania, Russia, Slovenia and Sweden in Oct. 2010. The facility will provide the international scientific community with a unique and technically innovative particle accelerator system to perform cutting-edge research in the sciences concerned with the basic structure of matter in: nuclear and particle physics, atomic and anti-matter physics, high density plasma physics, and applications in condensed matter physics, biology and the bio-medical sciences. The work horse of FAIR will be a 1.1 km circumference double ring of rapidly cycling 100 and 300 Tm synchrotrons, which will be used to produce high intensity secondary beams of anti-protons and very short-lived radioactive ions. A subsequent suite of cooler and storage rings will deliver anti-proton and heavy-ion beams of unprecedented quality regarding intensity and resolution. Large experimental facilities are presently being prototyped by the APPA, CBM, NuSTAR and PANDA Collaborations to be used by a global community of more than 3000 scientists from 2018. (author)

  6. Simulation of an antiprotons beam applied to the radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prata, Leonardo de Almeida

    2006-07-01

    Results for the interaction of a antiproton beam with constituent nuclei of the organic matter are presented. This method regards of the application of an computational algorithm to determine quantitatively the differential cross sections for the scattered particles, starting from the interaction of these antiprotons with the nuclei, what will allow in the future to draw the isodose curve for antiproton therapy, once these beams are expected to be used in cancer treatment soon. The calculation will be done through the application of the concepts of the method of intranuclear cascade, providing yield and differential cross sections of the scattered particles, present in the software MCMC. Th algorithm was developed based on Monte Carlo's method, already taking into account a validate code. The following physical quantities are presented: the yield of secondary particles, their spectral and angular distributions for these interactions. For the energy range taken into account the more important emitted particles are protons, neutrons and pions. Results shown that emitted secondary particles can modify the isodose curves, because they present high yield and energy for transverse directions. (author)

  7. Antihydrogen formation by autoresonant excitation of antiproton plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertsche, William Alan, E-mail: bertsche@cern.ch [Swansea University, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Andresen, G. B. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Ashkezari, M. D. [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Baquero-Ruiz, M. [University of California, Department of Physics (United States); Bowe, P. D. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Carpenter, P. T. [Auburn University, Department of Physics (United States); Butler, E. [CERN, Physics Department (Switzerland); Cesar, C. L. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Fisica (Brazil); Chapman, S. F. [University of California, Department of Physics (United States); Charlton, M.; Eriksson, S. [Swansea University, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Fajans, J. [University of California, Department of Physics (United States); Friesen, T. [University of Calgary, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R. [TRIUMF (Canada); Gutierrez, A. [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Hangst, J. S. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Hardy, W. N. [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Hayano, R. S. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics (Japan); Hayden, M. E. [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Collaboration: ALPHA Collaboration; and others

    2012-12-15

    In efforts to trap antihydrogen, a key problem is the vast disparity between the neutral trap energy scale ({approx} 50 {mu}eV), and the energy scales associated with plasma confinement and space charge ({approx}1 eV). In order to merge charged particle species for direct recombination, the larger energy scale must be overcome in a manner that minimizes the initial antihydrogen kinetic energy. This issue motivated the development of a novel injection technique utilizing the inherent nonlinear nature of particle oscillations in our traps. We demonstrated controllable excitation of the center-of-mass longitudinal motion of a thermal antiproton plasma using a swept-frequency autoresonant drive. When the plasma is cold, dense and highly collective in nature, we observe that the entire system behaves as a single-particle nonlinear oscillator, as predicted by a recent theory. In contrast, only a fraction of the antiprotons in a warm or tenuous plasma can be similarly excited. Antihydrogen was produced and trapped by using this technique to drive antiprotons into a positron plasma, thereby initiating atomic recombination. The nature of this injection overcomes some of the difficulties associated with matching the energies of the charged species used to produce antihydrogen.

  8. Antihydrogen formation by autoresonant excitation of antiproton plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertsche, William Alan; Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bowe, P. D.; Carpenter, P. T.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S. F.; Charlton, M.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M. E.

    2012-01-01

    In efforts to trap antihydrogen, a key problem is the vast disparity between the neutral trap energy scale (∼ 50 μeV), and the energy scales associated with plasma confinement and space charge (∼1 eV). In order to merge charged particle species for direct recombination, the larger energy scale must be overcome in a manner that minimizes the initial antihydrogen kinetic energy. This issue motivated the development of a novel injection technique utilizing the inherent nonlinear nature of particle oscillations in our traps. We demonstrated controllable excitation of the center-of-mass longitudinal motion of a thermal antiproton plasma using a swept-frequency autoresonant drive. When the plasma is cold, dense and highly collective in nature, we observe that the entire system behaves as a single-particle nonlinear oscillator, as predicted by a recent theory. In contrast, only a fraction of the antiprotons in a warm or tenuous plasma can be similarly excited. Antihydrogen was produced and trapped by using this technique to drive antiprotons into a positron plasma, thereby initiating atomic recombination. The nature of this injection overcomes some of the difficulties associated with matching the energies of the charged species used to produce antihydrogen.

  9. R high performance programming

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Aloysius

    2015-01-01

    This book is for programmers and developers who want to improve the performance of their R programs by making them run faster with large data sets or who are trying to solve a pesky performance problem.

  10. Simulation of an antiprotons beam applied to the radiotherapy; Simulacao de um feixe de antiprotons aplicado a radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prata, Leonardo de Almeida

    2006-07-15

    Results for the interaction of a antiproton beam with constituent nuclei of the organic matter are presented. This method regards of the application of an computational algorithm to determine quantitatively the differential cross sections for the scattered particles, starting from the interaction of these antiprotons with the nuclei, what will allow in the future to draw the isodose curve for antiproton therapy, once these beams are expected to be used in cancer treatment soon. The calculation will be done through the application of the concepts of the method of intranuclear cascade, providing yield and differential cross sections of the scattered particles, present in the software MCMC. Th algorithm was developed based on Monte Carlo's method, already taking into account a validate code. The following physical quantities are presented: the yield of secondary particles, their spectral and angular distributions for these interactions. For the energy range taken into account the more important emitted particles are protons, neutrons and pions. Results shown that emitted secondary particles can modify the isodose curves, because they present high yield and energy for transverse directions. (author)

  11. Simulation of an antiprotons beam applied to the radiotherapy; Simulacao de um feixe de antiprotons aplicado a radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prata, Leonardo de Almeida

    2006-07-15

    Results for the interaction of a antiproton beam with constituent nuclei of the organic matter are presented. This method regards of the application of an computational algorithm to determine quantitatively the differential cross sections for the scattered particles, starting from the interaction of these antiprotons with the nuclei, what will allow in the future to draw the isodose curve for antiproton therapy, once these beams are expected to be used in cancer treatment soon. The calculation will be done through the application of the concepts of the method of intranuclear cascade, providing yield and differential cross sections of the scattered particles, present in the software MCMC. Th algorithm was developed based on Monte Carlo's method, already taking into account a validate code. The following physical quantities are presented: the yield of secondary particles, their spectral and angular distributions for these interactions. For the energy range taken into account the more important emitted particles are protons, neutrons and pions. Results shown that emitted secondary particles can modify the isodose curves, because they present high yield and energy for transverse directions. (author)

  12. Antiprotons four times more effective than protons for cell irradiation

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "A pioneering experiment at CERN with potential future application in cancer therapy has produced its first results. Started in 2003, ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) is the first investigation of the biological effects of antiprotons." (1,5 page)

  13. Antiprotons four times more effective than protons for cell irradiation

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "A pioneering experiment at CERN with potential future application in cancer therapy has produced its first results. Started in 2003, ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) is the first investigation of the biological effects of antiprotons." (1,5 page)

  14. Supplemental figure: Anisotropic flow of charged hadrons, pions and (anti-)protons measured at high transverse momentum in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\mathbf{\\sqrt{{\\textit s}_{\\rm NN}}}$ = 2.76 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This note provides a supplemental figure for data on ``Anisotropic flow of charged hadrons, pions and (anti-)protons measured at high transverse momentum in Pb-Pb collisions $\\mathbf{\\sqrt{{\\textit s}_{\\rm NN}}}$ = 2.76~TeV" published in \\href{http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S037026931300004X}{Phys.\\ Lett.\\ B {\\bf 719}, 18 (2013)}, \\href{http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.5761}{arXiv:1205.5761}. The figure~(\\ref{fig:v2_pid}) presents the $v_2$ of charged pions and protons (particles and anti-particles are not distinguished in this analysis) from the event plane method as a function of transverse momentum for different centrality classes as reported in Fig. 5 of the \\href{http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S037026931300004X}{publication}. The proton $v_2$ is higher than that of pions out to $\\pt=8$~GeV/$c$ where the uncertainties become large.

  15. High performance work practices, innovation and performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Frances; Newton, Cameron; Johnston, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Research spanning nearly 20 years has provided considerable empirical evidence for relationships between High Performance Work Practices (HPWPs) and various measures of performance including increased productivity, improved customer service, and reduced turnover. What stands out from......, and Africa to examine these various questions relating to the HPWP-innovation-performance relationship. Each paper discusses a practice that has been identified in HPWP literature and potential variables that can facilitate or hinder the effects of these practices of innovation- and performance...

  16. The measurement of antiproton-proton total cross sections and small-angle elastic scattering at low momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linssen, L.H.A.J.

    1986-01-01

    In this thesis two low-momentum antiproton-proton (anti pp) experiments are described. The first one is a set of 24 high statistics anti pp total cross section measurements as a function of the incoming antiproton momentum between p=388 MeV/c and p=599 MeV/c. These measurements simultaneously yield the charge exchange cross section (anti pp → anti nn). The second one comprises two high statistics anti pp small-angle elastic scattering measurements at p=233 MeV/c and p=272 MeV/c. The measurements were carried out using the high quality antiproton beam extracted from the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. The physics motivation for these experiments is a search for anti pp resonances or bound states on one hand, and a detailed study of the anti pp interaction on the other hand. (orig.)

  17. Python high performance programming

    CERN Document Server

    Lanaro, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    An exciting, easy-to-follow guide illustrating the techniques to boost the performance of Python code, and their applications with plenty of hands-on examples.If you are a programmer who likes the power and simplicity of Python and would like to use this language for performance-critical applications, this book is ideal for you. All that is required is a basic knowledge of the Python programming language. The book will cover basic and advanced topics so will be great for you whether you are a new or a seasoned Python developer.

  18. High performance germanium MOSFETs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saraswat, Krishna [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)]. E-mail: saraswat@stanford.edu; Chui, Chi On [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Krishnamohan, Tejas [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Kim, Donghyun [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Nayfeh, Ammar [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Pethe, Abhijit [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2006-12-15

    Ge is a very promising material as future channel materials for nanoscale MOSFETs due to its high mobility and thus a higher source injection velocity, which translates into higher drive current and smaller gate delay. However, for Ge to become main-stream, surface passivation and heterogeneous integration of crystalline Ge layers on Si must be achieved. We have demonstrated growth of fully relaxed smooth single crystal Ge layers on Si using a novel multi-step growth and hydrogen anneal process without any graded buffer SiGe layer. Surface passivation of Ge has been achieved with its native oxynitride (GeO {sub x}N {sub y} ) and high-permittivity (high-k) metal oxides of Al, Zr and Hf. High mobility MOSFETs have been demonstrated in bulk Ge with high-k gate dielectrics and metal gates. However, due to their smaller bandgap and higher dielectric constant, most high mobility materials suffer from large band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) leakage currents and worse short channel effects. We present novel, Si and Ge based heterostructure MOSFETs, which can significantly reduce the BTBT leakage currents while retaining high channel mobility, making them suitable for scaling into the sub-15 nm regime. Through full band Monte-Carlo, Poisson-Schrodinger and detailed BTBT simulations we show a dramatic reduction in BTBT and excellent electrostatic control of the channel, while maintaining very high drive currents in these highly scaled heterostructure DGFETs. Heterostructure MOSFETs with varying strained-Ge or SiGe thickness, Si cap thickness and Ge percentage were fabricated on bulk Si and SOI substrates. The ultra-thin ({approx}2 nm) strained-Ge channel heterostructure MOSFETs exhibited >4x mobility enhancements over bulk Si devices and >10x BTBT reduction over surface channel strained SiGe devices.

  19. High performance germanium MOSFETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saraswat, Krishna; Chui, Chi On; Krishnamohan, Tejas; Kim, Donghyun; Nayfeh, Ammar; Pethe, Abhijit

    2006-01-01

    Ge is a very promising material as future channel materials for nanoscale MOSFETs due to its high mobility and thus a higher source injection velocity, which translates into higher drive current and smaller gate delay. However, for Ge to become main-stream, surface passivation and heterogeneous integration of crystalline Ge layers on Si must be achieved. We have demonstrated growth of fully relaxed smooth single crystal Ge layers on Si using a novel multi-step growth and hydrogen anneal process without any graded buffer SiGe layer. Surface passivation of Ge has been achieved with its native oxynitride (GeO x N y ) and high-permittivity (high-k) metal oxides of Al, Zr and Hf. High mobility MOSFETs have been demonstrated in bulk Ge with high-k gate dielectrics and metal gates. However, due to their smaller bandgap and higher dielectric constant, most high mobility materials suffer from large band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) leakage currents and worse short channel effects. We present novel, Si and Ge based heterostructure MOSFETs, which can significantly reduce the BTBT leakage currents while retaining high channel mobility, making them suitable for scaling into the sub-15 nm regime. Through full band Monte-Carlo, Poisson-Schrodinger and detailed BTBT simulations we show a dramatic reduction in BTBT and excellent electrostatic control of the channel, while maintaining very high drive currents in these highly scaled heterostructure DGFETs. Heterostructure MOSFETs with varying strained-Ge or SiGe thickness, Si cap thickness and Ge percentage were fabricated on bulk Si and SOI substrates. The ultra-thin (∼2 nm) strained-Ge channel heterostructure MOSFETs exhibited >4x mobility enhancements over bulk Si devices and >10x BTBT reduction over surface channel strained SiGe devices

  20. Direct detection of antiprotons with the Timepix3 in a new electrostatic selection beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacifico, N., E-mail: nicola.pacifico@cern.ch [Institute of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, Allgaten 55, 5007 Bergen (Norway); Aghion, S. [Politecnico of Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); INFN Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Alozy, J. [Physics Department, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Amsler, C.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T. [Laboratory for High Energy Physics, Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, University of Bern, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Bonomi, G. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Brescia, via Branze 38, 25123 Brescia (Italy); INFN Pavia, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Bräunig, P. [Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics, Heidelberg University, Im Neuenheimer Feld 227, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bremer, J. [Physics Department, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Brusa, R.S. [Department of Physics, University of Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); TIFPA/INFN Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Cabaret, L. [Laboratory Aimé Cotton, University of Paris-Sud, ENS Cachan, CNRS, University Paris-Saclay, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Caccia, M. [INFN Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Department of Science, University of Insubria, Via Valleggio 11, 22100 Como (Italy); Campbell, M. [Physics Department, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Caravita, R. [Department of Physics, University of Genova, via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); INFN Genova, via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Castelli, F. [INFN Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Cerchiari, G. [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Chlouba, K. [Czech Technical University, Prague, Brehov 7, 11519 Prague 1 (Czech Republic); and others

    2016-09-21

    We present here the first results obtained employing the Timepix3 for the detection and tagging of annihilations of low energy antiprotons. The Timepix3 is a recently developed hybrid pixel detector with advanced Time-of-Arrival and Time-over-Threshold capabilities and has the potential of allowing precise kinetic energy measurements of low energy charged particles from their time of flight. The tagging of the characteristic antiproton annihilation signature, already studied by our group, is enabled by the high spatial and energy resolution of this detector. In this study we have used a new, dedicated, energy selection beamline (GRACE). The line is symbiotic to the AEgIS experiment at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator and is dedicated to detector tests and possibly antiproton physics experiments. We show how the high resolution of the Timepix3 on the Time-of-Arrival and Time-over-Threshold information allows for a precise 3D reconstruction of the annihilation prongs. The presented results point at the potential use of the Timepix3 in antimatter-research experiments where a precise and unambiguous tagging of antiproton annihilations is required.

  1. High Performance Computing Multicast

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    A History of the Virtual Synchrony Replication Model,” in Replication: Theory and Practice, Charron-Bost, B., Pedone, F., and Schiper, A. (Eds...Performance Computing IP / IPv4 Internet Protocol (version 4.0) IPMC Internet Protocol MultiCast LAN Local Area Network MCMD Dr. Multicast MPI

  2. NGINX high performance

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    System administrators, developers, and engineers looking for ways to achieve maximum performance from NGINX will find this book beneficial. If you are looking for solutions such as how to handle more users from the same system or load your website pages faster, then this is the book for you.

  3. The Antiproton and How It Was Discovered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eades, John

    2005-01-01

    The antiproton celebrates its 50th birthday this year. Although its existence had been suspected since the discovery of the positron in 1932, there was still doubt in some quarters that such a companion particle to the proton could exist. I will try to trace the scientific history of the antiproton from that time to the publication of the definitive paper by Chamberlain, Segre, Wiegand and Ypsilantis in November 1955, with a brief look at what happened next. The narrative will be supplemented with thoughts and opinions of some of the main actors, both at the time and in retrospect

  4. Evaporative Cooling of Antiprotons to Cryogenic Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A; Hydomako, R; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wilding, D; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2010-01-01

    We report the application of evaporative cooling to clouds of trapped antiprotons, resulting in plasmas with measured temperature as low as 9~K. We have modeled the evaporation process for charged particles using appropriate rate equations. Good agreement between experiment and theory is observed, permitting prediction of cooling efficiency in future experiments. The technique opens up new possibilities for cooling of trapped ions and is of particular interest in antiproton physics, where a precise CPT test on trapped antihydrogen is a long-standing goal.

  5. K-shell ionization by antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehler, G.; Mueller, B.; Greiner, W.; Soff, G.

    1987-01-01

    We present first calculations for the impact parameter dependence of K-shell ionization rates in anti pCu and in anti pAg collisions at various projectile energies. We show that the effect of the attractive Coulomb potential on the Rutherford trajectory and the anti-binding effect caused by the negative charge of the antiproton result in a considerable increase of the ionization probability. Total ionization cross-sections for proton and antiproton projectiles are compared with each other and with experimental ionization cross-sections for protons. (orig.)

  6. Collisions involving antiprotons and antihydrogen: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsell, S.

    2018-03-01

    I give an overview of experimental and theoretical results for antiproton and antihydrogen scattering with atoms and molecules (in particular H, He). At low energies (>1 keV) there are practically no experimental data available. Instead I compare the results from different theoretical calculations, of various degrees of sophistication. At energies up to a few tens of eV, I focus on simple approximations that give reasonably accurate results, as these allow quick estimates of collision rates without embarking on a research project. This article is part of the Theo Murphy meeting issue `Antiproton physics in the ELENA era'.

  7. The ASACUSA experiment at CERN's AD antiproton decelerator catches antiprotons in helium, where the antiprotons replace electrons, giving exotics atoms.

    CERN Multimedia

    Loïez, P

    2000-01-01

    Photo 03: Laser beams are prepared for shooting at antiprotonic helium atoms. Left to right: Masaki Hori (Tokyo University) and John Eades (CERN). Photo 01: Dye laser triggered by "YAG" laser. Photo 02: Masaki Hori adjusting optical system of laser beams.

  8. Radiation protection for the antiproton production at the FAIR facility; Strahlenschutz fuer die Antiprotonenproduktion bei FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrad, I.; Gostischev, V.; Helmecke, M.; Kissel, R.; Knie, K.; Lang, R.; Zieser, B. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Fehrenbacher, G. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); FAIR - Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) is an international accelerator centre, which will be constructed at the site of the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt. Antiprotons are produced in a metal cylinder bombarded with high-energy protons (up to 29 GeV). In addition to antiprotons, this interaction creates other secondary particles such as neutrons, pions, muons and gamma rays. The shielding of this radiation field sets high demands on the building design. Necessary radiation protection measures are based on Monte Carlo simulations of the distribution of the spatial dose rate. Furthermore the activation of components, i.e. the transformation of stable nuclei into radioactive isotopes following irradiation, must be considered. The resulting activities of up to 10{sup 11} Bq require a special concept for the handling and transport of affected elements.

  9. Experimental determination of the complete spin structure for anti-proton + proton -> anti-\\Lambda + \\Lambda at anti-proton beam momentum of 1.637 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Paschke, K.D.; Berdoz, A.; Franklin, G.B.; Khaustov, P.; Meyer, C.A.; Bradtke, C.; Gehring, R.; Goertz, S.; Harmsen, J.; Meier, A.; Meyer, W.; Radtke, E.; Reicherz, G.; Dutz, H.; Pluckthun, M.; Schoch, B.; Dennert, H.; Eyrich, W.; Hauffe, J.; Metzger, A.; Moosburger, M.; Stinzing, F.; Wirth, St.; Fischer, H.; Franz, J.; Heinsius, F.H.; Kriegler, E.; Schmitt, H.; Bunker, B.; Hertzog, D.; Jones, T.; Tayloe, R.; Broders, R.; Geyer, R.; Kilian, K.; Oelert, W.; Rohrich, K.; Sachs, K.; Sefzick, T.; Bassalleck, B.; Eilerts, S.; Fields, D.E.; Kingsberry, P.; Lowe, J.; Stotzer, R.; Johansson, T.; Pomp, S.; Wirth, St.

    2006-01-01

    The reaction anti-proton + proton -> anti-\\Lambda + \\Lambda -> anti-proton + \\pi^+ + proton + \\pi^- has been measured with high statistics at anti-proton beam momentum of 1.637 GeV/c. The use of a transversely-polarized frozen-spin target combined with the self-analyzing property of \\Lambda/anti-\\Lambda decay allows access to unprecedented information on the spin structure of the interaction. The most general spin-scattering matrix can be written in terms of eleven real parameters for each bin of scattering angle, each of these parameters is determined with reasonable precision. From these results all conceivable spin-correlations are determined with inherent self-consistency. Good agreement is found with the few previously existing measurements of spin observables in anti-proton + proton -> anti-\\Lambda + \\Lambda near this energy. Existing theoretical models do not give good predictions for those spin-observables that had not been previously measured.

  10. First observation of laser-induced resonant annihilation in metastable antiprotonic helium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, N.; Kumakura, M.; Yamazaki, T.

    1993-11-01

    We have observed the first laser-induced resonant transitions in antiprotonic helium atoms. These occur between metastable states and Auger dominated short lived states, and show that the anomalous longevity of antiprotons previously observed in helium media results from the formation of high-n high-l atomic states of p-barHe + . The observed transition with vacuum wavelength 597.259 ± 0.002 nm and lower-state lifetime 15 ± 1 ns is tentatively assigned to (n,l) = (39,35) → (38,34). (author)

  11. Study of Anti-Hydrogen and Plasma Physics 4.Observation of Antiproton Beams and Nonneutral Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, Masaki; Fujiwara, Makoto; Kuroda, Naofumi

    2004-01-01

    Diagnostics of antiproton beams and nonneutral plasmas are described in this chapter. Parallel plate secondary electron emission detectors are used to non-destructively observe the beam position and intensity without loss. Plastic scintillation tracking detectors are useful in determining the position of annihilations of antiprotons in the trap. Three-dimensional imaging of antiprotons in a Penning trap is discussed. The unique capability of antimatter particle imaging has allowed the observation of the spatial distribution of particle loss in a trap. Radial loss is localized to small spots, strongly breaking the azimuthal symmetry expected for an ideal trap. By observing electrostatic eigen-modes of nonneutral plasmas trapped in the Multi-ring electrode trap, the non-destructive measurement of plasma parameters is performed.

  12. Charge asymmetry in alignment of atoms excited by protons and antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balashov, V.V.; Sokolik, A.A.; Stysin, A.V.

    2007-01-01

    The multichannel diffraction approximation is used to consider excitation of lithium atom by proton and antiproton impact. Calculations are performed for the energy range 100 keV - 1 MeV of incoming proton and anti-proton which should be reliable enough due to the general requirements of the multichannel diffraction approximation. The sign-of-charge effect in the alignment of produced 1s 2 3d excited state and in the linear polarization of the subsequent spontaneous 1s 2 3d → 1s 2 2p radiation is expected to be considerable. The clear sign-of-charge effect in the polarization occurs for projectile energies below 1 MeV and become stronger when going to lower energies and the difference between the proton case and the anti-proton one looks considerable enough for experimental observation

  13. High performance proton accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favale, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    In concert with this theme this paper briefly outlines how Grumman, over the past 4 years, has evolved from a company that designed and fabricated a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) physics and specifications to a company who, as prime contractor, is designing, fabricating, assembling and commissioning the US Army Strategic Defense Commands (USA SDC) Continuous Wave Deuterium Demonstrator (CWDD) accelerator as a turn-key operation. In the case of the RFQ, LANL scientists performed the physics analysis, established the specifications supported Grumman on the mechanical design, conducted the RFQ tuning and tested the RFQ at their laboratory. For the CWDD Program Grumman has the responsibility for the physics and engineering designs, assembly, testing and commissioning albeit with the support of consultants from LANL, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and Brookhaven National laboratory. In addition, Culham Laboratory and LANL are team members on CWDD. LANL scientists have reviewed the physics design as well as a USA SDC review board. 9 figs

  14. Measure of back angle cross sections of antiproton-nucleus elastic scattering at 48 and 180 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berrada, M.

    1986-04-01

    Antiproton-nucleus elastic scattering was studied in the LEAR ring at CERN. The scattering cross section at back angles (θ LAB = 142 to 164 deg inclusive) was measured using plastic scintillation detectors. Analysis of experimental data at 47 MeV for a CH target and at 182 MeV for CH, C12, 016, and 018 targets produces differential cross sections for back angles less than or equal to a few dozen microbarns. These results agree with theoretical microscopic predictions. The analysis improves understanding of antiproton-nucleus interaction and introduces a constraint on the construction of optical potentials. The antiproton-nucleus potential is shown to be highly absorbing, thereby excluding S type potentials, and removing the ambiguity arising from the analysis of antiprotonic atoms. The results also show that there is no attractive pocket in the real potential likely to lead to an increase of the back angle cross sections [fr

  15. The Antiproton-Ion-Collider at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruecken, R.; Fabbietti, L.; Faestemann, T.; Homolka, J.; Kienle, P.; Ring, P.; Suzuki, K.; Bosch, F.; Franzke, B.; Kozhuharov, Ch.; Litvinov, Y.; Nolden, F.; Cargnelli, M.; Fuhrmann, H.; Hirtl, A.; Marton, J.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.; Hayano, R. S.; Lenske, H.

    2006-01-01

    An antiproton-ion collider (AIC) has been proposed for the FAIR Project at Darmstadt to independently determine rms radii for protons and neutrons in stable and short lived nuclei by means of antiproton annihilation at medium energies. The AIC makes use of the ELISe electron ion collider complex to store, cool and collide antiprotons of 30 MeV energy with short lived radioactive ions in the NESR. The exotic nuclei are produced by projectile fragmentation or projectile fission and separated in the Super FRS. By detecting the loss of stored ions using the Schottky method the total absorption cross-section for antiprotons on the stored ions with mass A will be measured. Cross sections for the absorption on protons and neutrons, respectively, will be measured by the detection of residual nuclei with A-1 either by the Schottky method or by detecting them in recoil detectors after the first dipole stage of the NESR following the interaction zone. The absorption cross sections are in first order directly proportional to the mean square radii

  16. Low energy antiproton experiments - A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungmann, KP; Yamazaki, Y; Wada, M

    2005-01-01

    Low energy antiprotons offer excellent opportunities to study properties of fundamental forces and symmetries in nature. Experiments with them can contribute substantially to deepen our fundamental knowledge in atomic, nuclear and particle physics. Searches for new interactions can be carried out by

  17. A naturally occurring trap for antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eades, J.; Morita, N.; Ito, T.M.

    1993-05-01

    The phenomenon of delayed annihilation of antiprotons in helium is the first instance of a naturally occurring trap for antimatter in ordinary matter. Recent studies of this effect at CERN are summarized, and plans are described for laser excitation experiments to test its interpretation in terms of metastable exotic helium atom formation. (author)

  18. Recent results from proton-antiproton colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geer, S.

    1990-03-01

    New results from the CERN and Fermilab proton-antiproton colliders are summarised. The areas covered are jet physics, direct photon production, W and Z production and decay, heavy flavor production, the search for the top quark, and the search for more exotic phenomena. 46 refs., 20 figs., 4 tabs

  19. Limitations on anti p-p luminosity with direct injection and stacking of antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courant, E.D.; Teng, L.C.

    1979-01-01

    If protons of very high energy impinge on a target, a large part of the resulting antiprotons are sufficiently collimated to be injectible into a stacking and accelerating ring. They can then be stacked and injected into the main proton accelerator so as to produce anti p-p collisions without low energy antiproton cooling. A scheme is presented for the VBA, where 20 TeV protons produce 9 x 10 -4 antiprotons per proton at 100 GeV, which are then stacked, accelerated to 1 TeV, and injected into the main ring. With 16 proton pulses of 10 15 protons, one obtains a luminosity of the order of 10 32 cm -2 sec -1 with a beam-beam tune shift of 10 -3 per interaction region. The beams are bunched into 1000 bunches; the orbits are separated by means of relatively modest electostatic electrodes

  20. Investigation of the antiprotonic X-ray spectra of the isotopes 6Li, 7Li and 40Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barth, H.

    1987-04-01

    With the commissioning of the Low-Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN in Geneva a high intensity, high purity antiproton beam became available, enabling precision measurements of antiprotonic X-ray spectra to be carried out. Besides informations about properties of the elementary particle antiproton itself, as for example its mass and its magnetic moment, such measurements provide informations about the strong-interaction potential between antiproton and nucleus at very low energies, which, in turn, can be derived from the elementary antinucleon-nucleon interaction by using microscopic models. This work investigates the antiprotonic X-ray spectra of the isotopes 6 Li, 7 Li and 40 Ca. The data were taken during the experiment PS176 at LEAR. The strong interaction between antiproton and nucleus leads to an energy shift ε and an absorption width Γ of the lower level of the last observable transition and also to intensity reductions, which can be converted to an absorption width for the upper level. For the isotopes 6 Li, 7 Li and 40 Ca the following results were obtained: 6 Li: ε(2p)=(-215±25) eV, Γ(2p)=(660±170) eV and Γ(3d)=(135±16) meV, 7 Li ε(2p)=(-265±20) eV, Γ(2p)=(690±170) eV and Γ(3d)=(129±13) meV, 40 Ca: ε(4f)=(-1060±130) eV, Γ(4f)=(3670±600) eV and Γ(5g)=(34.9±3.3) eV. The results are in fair agreement with theoretical calculations, at the same time showing up the limits of present understanding of antiproton-nucleus interaction. Particularly the spin-orbit part of the strong interaction seems to play a nonnegligible role. (orig.) [de

  1. Possible kaon and antiproton factory designs for TRIUMF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craddock, M K [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver (Canada); Kost, C J; Richardson, J R [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver (Canada). TRIUMF Facility

    1979-12-01

    Two alternative designs based on proton synchrotrons and isochronous ring cyclotrons, respectively are considered for accelerating high currents (<30 ..mu..A) from TRIUMF (0.45 GeV) to energies high enough for the production of high fluxes of kaons (8-10 GeV) and antiprotons (25-30 GeV). The first synchrotron would be fast cycling at 20 Hz, with third harmonic flat-topping to aid in injection and extraction. The cw beam from TRIUMF would be extracted in 100-turn macropulses at 22 ..mu..sec intervals. With 400 ..mu..A in TRIUMF and injection over 8-20 % of the magnet cycle, 30-80 ..mu..A could be accelerated to 10 GeV. A second synchrotron would accelerate 30 ..mu..A to 30 GeV for production of antiprotons. The ring cyclotron option would also be built in two stages, 0.45 to 3 GeV (15 sectors, 10 m radius) and 3 to 8.5 GeV (30 sectors, 20 m radius). With superconducting magnets (5 T) the weight of steel could be kept below 2000 tons for each ring. Large field-free regions between the spiral ium ions, are obtained with an av the polarimetry installation is being carried out.

  2. High Performance Networks for High Impact Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Mary A.; Bair, Raymond A.

    2003-02-13

    This workshop was the first major activity in developing a strategic plan for high-performance networking in the Office of Science. Held August 13 through 15, 2002, it brought together a selection of end users, especially representing the emerging, high-visibility initiatives, and network visionaries to identify opportunities and begin defining the path forward.

  3. Beam position pickup for antiprotons to the ISR

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    The Antiproton Project, launched for proton-antiproton collisions in the SPS (SPS collider), had a side-line for p-pbar collisions in the ISR. A new transfer line, TT6, was constructed to transport antiprotons from the 26 GeV PS to the injection line TT1 of ISR ring 2. Antiprotons were a scarce commodity. For setting up the lines, beam diagnostic devices in the antiproton path had to work reliably and precisely with just a few low-intensity pilot pules: single bunches of about 2x10**9 antiprotons every few hours. Electrostatic pickup electrodes were used to measure beam position. They could be mounted for measurement in the horizontal plane, as in this picture, or at 90 deg, for the vertical plane.

  4. Magnetic horn of the Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1988-01-01

    In the 1960s, the invention of this "current sheet lens" has helped to greatly improve the flux of neutrino beams. It was used again at the AA, collecting antiprotons from the production target at angles too large to fit into the acceptance of the AA. It was machined from aluminium to a thickness of 1.4 mm and pulsed at 400 kA for 15 microseconds (half-sine).

  5. Looking for new gravitational forces with antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieto, M.M.; Bonner, B.E.

    1987-01-01

    Quite general arguments based on the principle of equivalence and modern field theory show that it is possible for the gravitational acceleration of antimatter to be different than that for matter. Further, there is no experimental evidence to rule out the possibility. In fact, some evidence indicates there may be unexpected effects. Thus, the planned experiment to measure the gravitational acceleration of antiprotons is of fundamental importance. 20 refs., 3 figs

  6. Potential kaon and antiproton beams at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarus, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    The AGS at Brookhaven is the worlds most prolific producer of kaons and low energy antiprotons during operations. With the imminent operation of the AGS Booster which will increase intensities by an anticipated factor of six in the next few years, it will become possible to have purified beams of particles containing strange quarks and anti-quarks with intensities comparable to the pion beams which have so successfully dominated precision hadron spectroscopy in the past. 10 refs., 3 figs

  7. Antiproton-hydrogen scattering at low-eV energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan Jr., D.L.

    1993-01-01

    In the scattering of negative particles other than the electron by atoms at lab-frame energies around 10 eV, an elastic process termed 'brickwall scattering' might lead to a high probability for scattering angles around 180deg. For an antiproton slowing in hydrogen, this backward scattering would result in the loss of nearly all of its energy in a single collision, since it and a hydrogen atom have nearly the same mass. Such energy loss would have a significant effect on the energy distribution of antiprotons at energies where capture by the protons of hydrogen is possible and might, thereby, affect the capture rate and the distribution of capture states. In the semiclassical treatment of the problem with an adiabatic potential energy, brickwall scattering is indeed present, and with a substantial cross section. However, this model appears to underestimate inelastic processes. Based on calculations for negative muons on hydrogen atoms, these processes appear to occur for about the same impact parameters as brickwall scattering and thus substantially reduce its effect. (orig.)

  8. The International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutbrod, H. H.

    2008-01-01

    The proposed project FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) is an international accelerator facility of the next generation and will be built as a new company FAIR GmbH next to the site of GSI. About 15 countries have expressed their intention to become shareholders. FAIR builds on the experience and technological developments already made at the existing GSI facility, and at the FAIR partner institutes world wide and incorporates new technological concepts. At its heart is a double ring facility with a circumference of 1100 meters. A system of cooler-storage rings for effective beam cooling at high energies and various experimental halls will be connected to the facility. The existing GSI accelerators - together with the planned proton-linac - serve as injector for the new facility. The double-ring synchrotron will provide ion beams of unprecedented intensities as well as of considerably increased energy. Thereby intense beams of secondary beams - unstable nuclei or antiprotons - can be produced. The system of storage-cooler rings allows the quality of these secondary beams - their energy spread and emittance - to be drastically improved. Moreover, in connection with the double ring synchrotron, an efficient parallel operation of up to four scientific programs can be realized at a time. The project is based on many technological innovations, the most important of which are five beam properties: Highest Beam Intensities, Brilliant Beam Quality, Higher Beam Energies, Highest Beam Power, Parallel Operation

  9. Search for the Higgs Boson Using High-pT Isolated Like-Sign Dil Events in 1.96-TeV Proton-Antiproton Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Hirokazu [Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan)

    2005-03-01

    Our physics objective is to search for the neutral on using events containing a like-sign dilepton pair in the following reaction: q$\\bar{q}$ → W± H → W± W*W* → ℓ±± + X. The relevant Higgs boson mass region is above 160 GeV/c2 for the Standard Model Higgs boson where the branching fraction of H → W*W* supersedes that of H → b$\\bar{b}$. The search for this signature in the region at low mass (less than 135 GeV/c2) is, however, still important because we need to investigate various Higgs boson couplings as an essential test to convince that signals are attributed to the Higgs boson production. This channel also covers the case beyond the Standard Model that the Higgs boson couples only to the gauge bosons, which is referred to as the bosophilic or fermiophobic Higgs boson. The corresponding mass region suitable to our signature is above 110 GeV/c2 where the branching fraction of H → γγ is overtaken by this channel. On the experimental side, the like-sign dilepton event is one of the cleanest signature in hadron collisions. This analysis exploiting such a distinctive signature is therefore expected to have a high potential of the sensitivity for the search of the Higgs boson. The data were collected with the CDF II detector between March 2002 and September 2003, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 193.5 pb-1. At off-line, the central region (|η| < 1.1) is considered for the lepton detection. We require at least one electron with ET > 20 GeV or muon with pT > 20 GeV/c which is considered to be responsible for firing the corresponding trigger, and at least one other electron with E{sub T} > 6 GeV or muon with pT > 6 GeV/c. The leptons are required to be isolated in terms of the calorimeter cone-isolation with a cone size of R = 0.4. We require that the isolation is less than 2 GeV for each lepton. For the events with

  10. High strangeness production in antiproton annihilation at rest on few nucleon systems as a possible signature of quark deconfinement or QGP occurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendiscioli, G.; Bressani, T.; Lavezzi, L.; Panzarasa, A.; Salvini, P.

    2009-01-01

    The dependence of the K + and K - production on the number of nucleons involved in the annihilation process is investigated experimentally in the p-bar annihilation at rest on hydrogen, deuterium, 3 He and 4 He gas targets. Annihilations with any number of prongs (charged pions and kaons, protons and deuterons) are analyzed. Events with and without production of neutral mesons and with and without emission of fast neutrons (that is neutrons involved in the annihilation process) are recognized. The results are consistent with our previous ones on a more restricted sample of annihilation reactions and put in evidence that the strangeness production is lower or higher depending on the reaction channel. As a general trend, the strangeness production is higher in events without neutral mesons and still higher in events with the involvement of a higher number of nucleons. Both K + and K - productions increase with the number of involved nucleons, but K + much more. The maximum K + production is observed in the reaction K + 2π + 2π - 3n on 4 He (with the involvement of 3-4 nucleons); compared with the production on hydrogen in the reaction K + π + 2π - , the production on 4 He is higher by a factor of 31.7±5.5. In the light of some theoretical speculations, this enhancement factor is too high to be explainable in terms of hadronic interactions and could be interpreted as a signature of quark deconfinement and of formation of a quark-gluon plasma

  11. Search for the Higgs Boson Using High-pT Isolated Like-Sign Dil Events in 1.96-TeV Proton-Antiproton Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Tsukuba U.

    2005-01-01

    Our physics objective is to search for the neutral on using events containing a like-sign dilepton pair in the following reaction: q(bar q)' → W ± H → W ± W*W* → (ell) ± (ell) ± + X. The relevant Higgs boson mass region is above 160 GeV/c 2 for the Standard Model Higgs boson where the branching fraction of H → W*W* supersedes that of H → b(bar b). The search for this signature in the region at low mass (less than 135 GeV/c 2 ) is, however, still important because we need to investigate various Higgs boson couplings as an essential test to convince that signals are attributed to the Higgs boson production. This channel also covers the case beyond the Standard Model that the Higgs boson couples only to the gauge bosons, which is referred to as the bosophilic or fermiophobic Higgs boson. The corresponding mass region suitable to our signature is above 110 GeV/c 2 where the branching fraction of H → γγ is overtaken by this channel. On the experimental side, the like-sign dilepton event is one of the cleanest signature in hadron collisions. This analysis exploiting such a distinctive signature is therefore expected to have a high potential of the sensitivity for the search of the Higgs boson

  12. RavenDB high performance

    CERN Document Server

    Ritchie, Brian

    2013-01-01

    RavenDB High Performance is comprehensive yet concise tutorial that developers can use to.This book is for developers & software architects who are designing systems in order to achieve high performance right from the start. A basic understanding of RavenDB is recommended, but not required. While the book focuses on advanced topics, it does not assume that the reader has a great deal of prior knowledge of working with RavenDB.

  13. High-Performance Operating Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharp, Robin

    1999-01-01

    Notes prepared for the DTU course 49421 "High Performance Operating Systems". The notes deal with quantitative and qualitative techniques for use in the design and evaluation of operating systems in computer systems for which performance is an important parameter, such as real-time applications......, communication systems and multimedia systems....

  14. Conceptual Design Report. Antiproton - Proton Collider Upgrade 20 GeV Rings. Technical Components and Civil Construction May, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1988-05-01

    This report contains a description of the design and cost estimate of two new 20 GeV rings which will be required to support the upgrade of the Fermilab Collider with a luminosity goal of 5x10 31 cm-2s-1. The new rings include an antiproton post-accumulator, denoted the Antiproton Super Booster (ASB), and a proton post-booster, denoted the Proton Super Booster (PSB). The siting of the rings is shown in Figure I-1. Both rings are capable of operation at 20 GeV, eliminating the need for ever again injecting beam into the Main Ring below transition, and significantly enhancing Main Ring performance. The Antiproton Super Booster is designed to accept and accumulate up to 4x1012 antiprotons from the existing Antiproton Accumulator, and deliver them to the Main Ring at 20 GeV for acceleration and injection into the Collider. It is also designed to accept diluted antiprotons from the Main Ring at 20 GeV for recooling. The PSB accepts 8.9 GeV protons from the existing Booster and accelerates them to 20 GeV for injection into the Main Ring. The PSB is designed to operate at 5 Hz. The siting shown in Figure I-1 has the attractive feature that it removes all Main Ring injection hardware from the AO straight section, opening the possibility of installing a third proton-antiproton interaction region in the Tevatron Collider.

  15. Identifying High Performance ERP Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Stensrud, Erik; Myrtveit, Ingunn

    2002-01-01

    Learning from high performance projects is crucial for software process improvement. Therefore, we need to identify outstanding projects that may serve as role models. It is common to measure productivity as an indicator of performance. It is vital that productivity measurements deal correctly with variable returns to scale and multivariate data. Software projects generally exhibit variable returns to scale, and the output from ERP projects is multivariate. We propose to use Data Envelopment ...

  16. INL High Performance Building Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennifer D. Morton

    2010-02-01

    High performance buildings, also known as sustainable buildings and green buildings, are resource efficient structures that minimize the impact on the environment by using less energy and water, reduce solid waste and pollutants, and limit the depletion of natural resources while also providing a thermally and visually comfortable working environment that increases productivity for building occupants. As Idaho National Laboratory (INL) becomes the nation’s premier nuclear energy research laboratory, the physical infrastructure will be established to help accomplish this mission. This infrastructure, particularly the buildings, should incorporate high performance sustainable design features in order to be environmentally responsible and reflect an image of progressiveness and innovation to the public and prospective employees. Additionally, INL is a large consumer of energy that contributes to both carbon emissions and resource inefficiency. In the current climate of rising energy prices and political pressure for carbon reduction, this guide will help new construction project teams to design facilities that are sustainable and reduce energy costs, thereby reducing carbon emissions. With these concerns in mind, the recommendations described in the INL High Performance Building Strategy (previously called the INL Green Building Strategy) are intended to form the INL foundation for high performance building standards. This revised strategy incorporates the latest federal and DOE orders (Executive Order [EO] 13514, “Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance” [2009], EO 13423, “Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management” [2007], and DOE Order 430.2B, “Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy, and Transportation Management” [2008]), the latest guidelines, trends, and observations in high performance building construction, and the latest changes to the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design

  17. Serach for polarization effects in the antiproton production process

    CERN Multimedia

    It is proposed to study polarization effects in the production of antiprotons at the PS test beam line T11 at 3.5 GeV/c momentum. A polarization in the production process has never been studied but if existing it would allow for a rather simple and cheap way to generate a polarized antiproton beam with the existing facilities at CERN.

  18. Antiproton impact ionization of atomic hydrogen and helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGovern, M; Walters, H R J [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen' s University, Belfast BT7 INN (United Kingdom); Assafrao, D; Mohallem, J R [Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, P.O Box 702, 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Whelan, Colm T, E-mail: mmcgovern06@qub.ac.u [Department of Physics, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529-0116 (United States)

    2009-11-01

    We shall present results for antiproton ionization of H and He ranging from fully differential cross sections to total ionization. The calculations have been made in a coupled pseudostate impact parameter approximation. It will be shown that the interaction between the antiproton and the target nucleus is very important at low energies.

  19. Antiproton-nucleus experiments at LEAR and KAON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavin, A.I.

    1989-12-01

    Antimatter and matter-antimatter systems are briefly discussed. Results of the antiproton-nucleus scattering experiments at LEAR are described, with the emphasis on unfinished experiments and on proposed experiments yet untouched. A few remarks on antiproton and antideuteron experiments at KAON are then presented

  20. Experiment to measure the gravitational force on the antiproton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    A collaboration has been formed to measure the acceleration of antiprotons in the earth's gravitational field. The technique is to produce, decelerate, and trap quantities of antiprotons, to cool them to untralow energy, and to measure their acceleration in a time-of-flight experiment. Present plans and the results of initial efforts toward this end are presented

  1. Low-energy antiprotons physics and the FLAIR facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widmann, E

    2015-01-01

    FLAIR, the Facility for low-energy antiproton and ion research has been proposed in 2004 as an extension of the planned FAIR facility at Darmstadt, Germany. FLAIR was not included into the modularized start version of FAIR, but the recent installation of the CRYRING storage ring at GSI Darmstadt has opened new perspectives for physics with low-energy antiprotons at FAIR. (paper)

  2. Antiproton acceleration in the Fermilab Main Ring and Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.; Dinkel, J.; Ducar, R.

    1987-01-01

    The operation of the Fermilab Main Ring and Tevatron rf systems for colliding beams physics is discussed. The changes in the rf feedback system required for acceleration of antiprotons, and the methods for achieving proper transfer of both protons and antiprotons are described. Data on acceleration and transfer efficiencies are presented

  3. Measurement of strong interaction effects in antiprotonic helium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, J.D.; Gorringe, T.P.; Lowe, J.; Nelson, J.M.; Playfer, S.M.; Pyle, G.J.; Squier, G.T.A.

    1984-01-01

    The strong interaction shift and width for the 2 p level and the width for the 3d level have been measured for antiprotonic helium atoms. The results are compared with optical model calculations. The possible existence of strongly bound antiproton states in nuclei is discussed. (orig.)

  4. Measurement of strong interaction parameters in antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Augsburger, M A; Borchert, G L; Chatellard, D; Egger, J P; El-Khoury, P; Gorke, H; Gotta, D; Hauser, P R; Indelicato, P J; Kirch, K; Lenz, S; Siems, T; Simons, L M

    1999-01-01

    In the PS207 experiment at CERN, X-rays from antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at low pressure. The strong interaction shift and the broadening of the K/sub alpha / transition in antiprotonic hydrogen were $9 determined. Evidence was found for the individual hyperfine components of the protonium ground state. (7 refs).

  5. High performance fuel technology development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koon, Yang Hyun; Kim, Keon Sik; Park, Jeong Yong; Yang, Yong Sik; In, Wang Kee; Kim, Hyung Kyu [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    {omicron} Development of High Plasticity and Annular Pellet - Development of strong candidates of ultra high burn-up fuel pellets for a PCI remedy - Development of fabrication technology of annular fuel pellet {omicron} Development of High Performance Cladding Materials - Irradiation test of HANA claddings in Halden research reactor and the evaluation of the in-pile performance - Development of the final candidates for the next generation cladding materials. - Development of the manufacturing technology for the dual-cooled fuel cladding tubes. {omicron} Irradiated Fuel Performance Evaluation Technology Development - Development of performance analysis code system for the dual-cooled fuel - Development of fuel performance-proving technology {omicron} Feasibility Studies on Dual-Cooled Annular Fuel Core - Analysis on the property of a reactor core with dual-cooled fuel - Feasibility evaluation on the dual-cooled fuel core {omicron} Development of Design Technology for Dual-Cooled Fuel Structure - Definition of technical issues and invention of concept for dual-cooled fuel structure - Basic design and development of main structure components for dual- cooled fuel - Basic design of a dual-cooled fuel rod.

  6. Multiplicity dependence of charged pion, kaon, and (antiproton production at large transverse momentum in p–Pb collisions at sNN=5.02 TeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Adam

    2016-09-01

    At intermediate pT the (antiproton RpPb shows a Cronin-like enhancement, while pions and kaons show little or no nuclear modification. At high pT the charged pion, kaon and (antiproton RpPb are consistent with unity within statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  7. High Performance Bulk Thermoelectric Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Zhifeng [Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA (United States)

    2013-03-31

    Over 13 plus years, we have carried out research on electron pairing symmetry of superconductors, growth and their field emission property studies on carbon nanotubes and semiconducting nanowires, high performance thermoelectric materials and other interesting materials. As a result of the research, we have published 104 papers, have educated six undergraduate students, twenty graduate students, nine postdocs, nine visitors, and one technician.

  8. High performance in software development

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Haapio, Petri; Liukkonen, Juha-Matti

    2015-01-01

    What are the ingredients of high-performing software? Software development, especially for large high-performance systems, is one the most complex tasks mankind has ever tried. Technological change leads to huge opportunities but challenges our old ways of working. Processing large data sets, possibly in real time or with other tight computational constraints, requires an efficient solution architecture. Efficiency requirements span from the distributed storage and large-scale organization of computation and data onto the lowest level of processor and data bus behavior. Integrating performance behavior over these levels is especially important when the computation is resource-bounded, as it is in numerics: physical simulation, machine learning, estimation of statistical models, etc. For example, memory locality and utilization of vector processing are essential for harnessing the computing power of modern processor architectures due to the deep memory hierarchies of modern general-purpose computers. As a r...

  9. Fermilab Antiproton source, Recycler ring and Main Injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaitsev, Sergei [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2013-03-22

    The antiproton source for a proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab was proposed in 1976 [1]. The proposal argued that the requisite luminosity (~1029 cm-2sec-1) could be achieved with a facility that would produce and cool approximately 1011 antiprotons per day. Funding for the Tevatron I project (to construct the Antiproton source) was initiated in 1981 and the Tevatron ring itself was completed, as a fixed target accelerator, in the summer of 1983 and the Antiproton Source was completed in 1985. At the end of its operations in 2011, the Fermilab antiproton production complex consisted of a sophisticated target system, three 8-GeV storage rings (namely the Debuncher, Accumulator and Recycler), 25 independent multi-GHz stochastic cooling systems, the world’s only relativistic electron cooling system and a team of technical experts equal to none. Sustained accumulation of antiprotons was possible at the rate of greater than 2.5×1011 per hour. Record-size stacks of antiprotons in excess of 3×1012 were accumulated in the Accumulator ring and 6×1012 in the Recycler. In some special cases, the antiprotons were stored in rings for more than 50 days. Note, that over the years, some 1016 antiprotons were produced and accumulated at Fermilab, which is about 17 nanograms and more than 90% of the world’s total man-made quantity of nuclear antimatter. The accelerator complex at Fermilab supported a broad physics program including the Tevatron Collider Run II [2], neutrino experiments using 8 GeV and 120 GeV proton beams, as well as a test beam facility and other fixed target experiments using 120 GeV primary proton beams. The following sections provide a brief description of Fermilab accelerators as they operated at the end of the Collider Run II (2011).

  10. Possible kaon and antiproton factory designs for TRIUMF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craddock, M.K.; Kost, C.J.; Richardson, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    Two alternative designs based on proton synchrotrons and isochronous ring cyclotrons, respectively are considered for accelerating high currents (<30 μA) from TRIUMF (0.45 GeV) to energies high enough for the production of high fluxes of kaons (8-10 GeV) and antiprotons (25-30 GeV). The first synchrotron would be fast cycling at 20 Hz, with third harmonic flat-topping to aid in injection and extraction. The cw beam from TRIUMF would be extracted in 100-turn macropulses at 22 μsec intervals. With 400 μA in TRIUMF and injection over 8-20 % of the magnet cycle, 30-80 μA could be accelerated to 10 GeV. A second synchrotron would accelerate 30 μA to 30 GeV for production of antiprotons. The ring cyclotron option would also be built in two stages, 0.45 to 3 GeV (15 sectors, 10 m radius) and 3 to 8.5 GeV (30 sectors, 20 m radius). With superconducting magnets (5 T) the weight of steel could be kept below 2000 tons for each ring. Large field-free regions between the spiral sector magnets allow room for multiple SIN-style accelerating cavities, permitting energy gains of many MeV/turn. Second or third harmonic cavities and the phase compression effect help in achieving separated turn extraction. Up to 100 % of the beam in TRIUMF could be accelerated to 8.5 GeV. (auth)

  11. Possible kaon and antiproton factory designs for TRIUMF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craddock, M.K.; Kost, C.J.; Richardson, J.R.

    1979-11-01

    Two alternative designs based on proton synchrotrons and isochronous ring cyclotrons, respectively are considered for accelerating high currents (>=30 μA) from TRIUMF (0.45 GeV) to energies high enough for the production of high fluxes of kaons (8-10 GeV) and antiprotons (25-30 GeV). The first synchrotron would be fast cycling at 20 Hz, with third harmonic flat-topping to aid in injection and extraction. The cw beam from TRIUMF would be extracted in 100-turn macropulses at 22 μsec intervals. With 400 μA in TRIUMF and injection over 8-20% of the magnet cycle, 30-80 μA could be accelerated to 10 GeV. A second synchrotron would accelerate 30 μA to 30 GeV for production of antiprotons. The ring cyclotron option would also be built in two stages, 0.45 to 3 GeV (15 sectors, 10 m radius) and 3 to 8.5 GeV (30 sectors, 20 m radius). With superconducting magnets (5 T) the weight of steel could be kept below 2000 tons for each ring. Large field-free regions between the spiral sector magnets allow room for multiple SIN-style accelerating cavities, permitting energy gains of many MeV/turn. Second or third harmonic cavities and the phase compression effect help in achieving separated turn extraction. Up to 100% of the beam in TRIUMF could be accelerated to 8.5 GeV. (auth)

  12. Exploring antihyperons potentials in nuclei by antiproton-nucleon reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez Lorente, Alicia [Helmholtz Institut Mainz (Germany); Collaboration: PANDA-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The exclusive production of hyperon-Antihyperon pairs close to their production threshold in antiproton-nucleus collisions offers a unique and hitherto unexplored opportunity to study the behaviour of Antihyperons in nuclei. For the first time we analyse these reactions in a microscopic transport model using the Giessen Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck Transportmodel (GiBUU). We find a substantial sensitivity of transverse momentum correlations of coincident AntiLambda-Lambda-pairs to the assumed depth of the AntiLambda potential. Rather than diminishing this effect, secondary scattering effects which are more pronounced at deeper AntiLambda potentials enhance this sensitivity. Because of the high cross section for this process and the simplicity of this method our results pave the way for experimental studies at the FAIR facility.

  13. What can an antiproton and a nucleus learn from each other

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garreta, D.

    1982-05-01

    Simple features which make a low-energy antiproton an interesting probe of the nucleus, and a nucleus an interesting target for an antiproton are presented. Then antiproton-nucleus inelastic and elastic scattering, proton knock-out reactions on nuclei, annihilation of the antiproton in nuclei are reviewed. The aims of the experiment PS184 at LEAR are given

  14. Stochastic Cooling at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Carli, Christian

    2000-01-01

    When transforming the CERN Antiproton Collector (AC) into the Antiproton Decelerator (AD), the stochastic cooling systems were rebuilt to cope with the new requirements. Instead of using the original three frequency bands, (0.9-1.6 GHz, 1.6-2.45 GHz and 2.4-3.2 GHz) only the first of these was used due to lattice limitations and other constraints. The same pick-ups and kickers are in use at two different energies. As in the AC, simultaneous cooling in all three phase planes is required. Switching between two transmission paths (at 3.5 GeV/c and 2.0 GeV/c) became necessary, including separate notch filters and delay compensation for the kicker sections. The tanks has to be rendered bakeable (150 C) to make the vacuum properties (<10-10 Torr) compatible with deceleration to low energies. Further improvements included programmable, phase-invariant electronic attenuators and amplitude-invariant delays. Experience during commissioning showed that careful optimization (depth and periodicity) of the notch filters...

  15. Laser Spectroscopy of Antiprotonic Helium Atoms

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %PS205 %title\\\\ \\\\Following the discovery of metastable antiprotonic helium atoms ($\\overline{p}He^{+} $) at KEK in 1991, systematic studies of their properties were made at LEAR from 1991 to 1996. In the first two years the lifetime of $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ in liquid and gaseous helium at various temperatures and pressures was measured and the effect of foreign gases on the lifetime of these atoms was investigated. Effects were also discovered which gave the antiproton a 14\\% longer lifetime in $^4$He than in $^3$He, and resulted in important differences in the shape of the annihilation time spectra in the two isotopes.\\\\ \\\\Since 1993 laser spectroscopy of the metastable $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atoms became the main focus of PS205. Transitions were stimulated between metastable and non-metastable states of the $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atom by firing a pulsed dye laser beam into the helium target every time an identified metastable atom was present (Figure 1). If the laser frequency matched the transition energy, the...

  16. The antiproton ion collider at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabbietti, L.; Faestermann, T.; Homolka, J.; Kienle, P.; Kruecken, R.; Ring, P.; Suziki, K.; Beller, P.; Bosch, F.; Frankze, B.; Kozhuharov, C.; Nolden, F.; Cargnelli, M.; Fuhrmann, H.; Hirtl, A.; Marton, J.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.; Hayano, R.S.; Yamaguchi, T.; Lenske, H.; Litvinov, Y.; Shatunov, Y.; Skrinsky, A.N.; Vostrikov, V.A.; Wycech, S.

    2005-01-01

    A novel method is proposed to determine the charge and the matter radii instable and short lived nuclei using an pBar-A collider. The experiment makes use of the appropriately modified electron-ion collider Elise, to collide 30 MeV anti-protons with 740 AMeV ions. The anti-protons are first collected in the CR ring with 3 GeV energy and then cooled in the RESR ring to 30 MeV. The heavy ions produced in the SFRS are precooled in the CR ring, cooled in the RESR ring to 740 AMeV and fed to the NESR ring. The total pBar-nucleon annihilation cross-section is measured detecting the loss of stored ions and the pBar-n, pBar-p cross-sections detecting the A - 1 (Z - 1 or N - 1) nuclei left over after the annihilation, using the Schottcky method. Theoretical predictions show that the annihilation cross-section is proportional to the mean squared radius. (author)

  17. Neo4j high performance

    CERN Document Server

    Raj, Sonal

    2015-01-01

    If you are a professional or enthusiast who has a basic understanding of graphs or has basic knowledge of Neo4j operations, this is the book for you. Although it is targeted at an advanced user base, this book can be used by beginners as it touches upon the basics. So, if you are passionate about taming complex data with the help of graphs and building high performance applications, you will be able to get valuable insights from this book.

  18. Antiproton-Proton Glory Scattering

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment measures @*p and K|-p backwards scattering between 8 and 16 GeV/c in the Omega spectrometer using the S1 beam, with sensitivities of several events per nanobarn. The mechanism responsible for backward scattering in channels not mediated by particle exchange is not understood, and could be almost energy-independent glory scattering, especially since relatively high cross sections of 190~(@*p) and 120~(K|-p)nb have been measured earlier at 5~GeV/c. @p|-p backwards scattering is measured for monitoring purposes. The trigger requires a forward particle of momentum close to the beam momentum. Absence of light in the two forward Cerenkov counters indicates that the particle is a proton. Combinations of an incident @p|- and an outgoing K|+, or an incident K|- or @* and an outgoing @p|+, cover the following byproducts: @*p~@A~@p|+@p|- which is an (allowed) baryon exchange reaction, and the exotic exchange reactions @p|-p~@A~K|+Y K|-p~@A~@p|+Y|-, where Y|- may be the @S|- or the Y*|-(1385).

  19. High performance MEAs. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-15

    The aim of the present project is through modeling, material and process development to obtain significantly better MEA performance and to attain the technology necessary to fabricate stable catalyst materials thereby providing a viable alternative to current industry standard. This project primarily focused on the development and characterization of novel catalyst materials for the use in high temperature (HT) and low temperature (LT) proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). New catalysts are needed in order to improve fuel cell performance and reduce the cost of fuel cell systems. Additional tasks were the development of new, durable sealing materials to be used in PEMFC as well as the computational modeling of heat and mass transfer processes, predominantly in LT PEMFC, in order to improve fundamental understanding of the multi-phase flow issues and liquid water management in fuel cells. An improved fundamental understanding of these processes will lead to improved fuel cell performance and hence will also result in a reduced catalyst loading to achieve the same performance. The consortium have obtained significant research results and progress for new catalyst materials and substrates with promising enhanced performance and fabrication of the materials using novel methods. However, the new materials and synthesis methods explored are still in the early research and development phase. The project has contributed to improved MEA performance using less precious metal and has been demonstrated for both LT-PEM, DMFC and HT-PEM applications. New novel approach and progress of the modelling activities has been extremely satisfactory with numerous conference and journal publications along with two potential inventions concerning the catalyst layer. (LN)

  20. Muon, positron and antiproton interactions with atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armour, Edward A G, E-mail: edward.armour@nottingham.ac.u [School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, a description is given of some interesting processes involving the interaction of a muon, a positron, or an antiproton with atoms and molecules. The process involving a muon is the resonant formation of the muonic molecular ion, dt{mu}, in the muon catalyzed fusion cycle. In the case of a positron, the process considered is positron annihilation in low-energy positron scattering by the hydrogen molecule. The antiproton is considered as the nucleus of an antihydrogen atom interacting with simple atoms. Attention is given to antiproton annihilation through the strong interaction. An outline is given of proposed tests of fundamental physics to be carried out using antihydrogen.

  1. High Performance Proactive Digital Forensics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alharbi, Soltan; Traore, Issa; Moa, Belaid; Weber-Jahnke, Jens

    2012-01-01

    With the increase in the number of digital crimes and in their sophistication, High Performance Computing (HPC) is becoming a must in Digital Forensics (DF). According to the FBI annual report, the size of data processed during the 2010 fiscal year reached 3,086 TB (compared to 2,334 TB in 2009) and the number of agencies that requested Regional Computer Forensics Laboratory assistance increasing from 689 in 2009 to 722 in 2010. Since most investigation tools are both I/O and CPU bound, the next-generation DF tools are required to be distributed and offer HPC capabilities. The need for HPC is even more evident in investigating crimes on clouds or when proactive DF analysis and on-site investigation, requiring semi-real time processing, are performed. Although overcoming the performance challenge is a major goal in DF, as far as we know, there is almost no research on HPC-DF except for few papers. As such, in this work, we extend our work on the need of a proactive system and present a high performance automated proactive digital forensic system. The most expensive phase of the system, namely proactive analysis and detection, uses a parallel extension of the iterative z algorithm. It also implements new parallel information-based outlier detection algorithms to proactively and forensically handle suspicious activities. To analyse a large number of targets and events and continuously do so (to capture the dynamics of the system), we rely on a multi-resolution approach to explore the digital forensic space. Data set from the Honeynet Forensic Challenge in 2001 is used to evaluate the system from DF and HPC perspectives.

  2. Information on antiprotonic atoms and the nuclear periphery from the PS209 experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Trzcinska, A.; Czosnyka, T.; von Egidy, T.; Gulda, K.; Hartmann, F.J.; Iwanicki, J.; Ketzer, B.; Kisielinski, M.; Klos, B.; Kurcewicz, W.; Lubinski, P.; Napiorkowski, P.J.; Pienkowski, L.; Schmidt, R.; Widmann, E.

    2001-01-01

    In the PS209 experiments at CERN two kinds of measurements were performed: the in-beam measurement of X-rays from antiprotonic atoms and the radiochemical, off-line determination of the yield of annihilation products with mass number A_t -1 (less by 1 than the target mass). Both methods give observables which allows to study the peripheral matter density composition and distribution.

  3. Measurement of the Antiprotonic Lyman- and Balmer X-rays of $\\overline{p}H$ and $\\overline{p}D$ Atoms at Very Low Target Pressures

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is to measure the energies and intensities of the n @A 1 (Lyman) and n @A 2 (Balmer) tansitions with high accuracy in both @*H and @*D, from which the strong interaction effects of the 1s- and 2p-level can be extracted. These observables may be related to the antiproton-proton and antiproton-neutron scattering length. \\\\ \\\\ Since in these targets collisional Stark effect occurs, we will stop the antiprotons in extreme thin gaseous targets (pressure as low as 10 Torr), where no Stark effect occurs and the 2-1 transition is favoured. In order to use antiprotons with high efficiency despite of the low target density, we will trap antiprotons of a momentum of 100 MeV/c in a magnetic field of cyclotron characteristics. The antiprotons are decelerated by their energy loss in the target gas. The focusing properties of the magnetic field serve to compensate the multiple scattering and we will end up with a concentrated stopping distribution at the centre. Due to the long orbiting time, back...

  4. Dynamic studies of multiple configurations of CERN's Antiproton Decelerator Target core under proton beam impact

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2248381

    Antiprotons, like many other exotic particles, are produced by impacting high energy proton beams onto fixed targets. At the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), this is done in the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) Facility. The engineering challenges related to the design of an optimal configuration of the AD-Target system derive from the extremely high energy depositions reached in the very thin target core as a consequence of each proton beam impact. A new target design is foreseen for operation after 2021, triggering multiple R&D activities since 2013 for this purpose. The goal of the present Master Thesis is to complement these activities with analytical and numerical calculations, delving into the phenomena associated to the dynamic response of the target core. In this context, two main studies have been carried out. First, the experimental data observed in targets subjected to low intensity proton pulses was cross-checked with analytical and computational methods for modal analysis, applie...

  5. The international Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research FAIR: Challenges and Opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoehne, C.

    2009-01-01

    The status of FAIR, the planned 'Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research', is presented in this contribution. FAIR will be a world unique particle accelerator facility to be built as a joint project by - as of today - 16 member countries. FAIR, which is planned for construction adjacent to the GSI site in Germany, is an integrated system of particle accelerators, 2 superconducting synchrotrons and 8 storage rings, which will provide high energy and high intensity beams of ions from hydrogen to uranium with unprecedented quality and in full parallel mode. In addition highest luminosity secondary beams of rare isotopes and beams of antiprotons will be available. FAIR will combine physics research topics from different communities, i.e. nuclear physics, hadron physics, heavy-ion physics, plasma physics, atomic physics and accelerator development. Details of FAIR and the physics projects will be presented in this contribution.

  6. Prospects for antiproton physics, my perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oelert, Walter

    2012-01-01

    These closing remarks are not supposed to be a summary talk, for this please have a look to the individual contributions to be published in the proceedings, but rather some considerations on future prospects for antiproton physics. However, first I would like to appreciate the organizers idea for giving me the opportunity to thank them for a well balanced, exciting and interesting conference LEAP-2011 in this marvelous city of Vancouver. I am sure we all loved to be here and enjoyed the hospitality and the bond of friendship we could experience during these days. We appreciate the patience and help of all the local organizers where I especially would like to mention Jana Thomson for her endless and helpful assignment. Thank you all—the participants, the speakers, the conference chair, the sponsors—for making this conference a success and we are looking forward to the next occasion in this series of meetings which will be celebrated in Uppsala.

  7. Prospects for antiproton physics, my perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oelert, Walter, E-mail: w.oelert@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    These closing remarks are not supposed to be a summary talk, for this please have a look to the individual contributions to be published in the proceedings, but rather some considerations on future prospects for antiproton physics. However, first I would like to appreciate the organizers idea for giving me the opportunity to thank them for a well balanced, exciting and interesting conference LEAP-2011 in this marvelous city of Vancouver. I am sure we all loved to be here and enjoyed the hospitality and the bond of friendship we could experience during these days. We appreciate the patience and help of all the local organizers where I especially would like to mention Jana Thomson for her endless and helpful assignment. Thank you all-the participants, the speakers, the conference chair, the sponsors-for making this conference a success and we are looking forward to the next occasion in this series of meetings which will be celebrated in Uppsala.

  8. Antiproton-nucleon physics at LEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duclos, J.

    1985-02-01

    Antiproton beams from LEAR have been supplied in 1984 to 16 experiments about 10 12 particules at 200, 300, 600 and 1500 MeV/c have been delivered during 60 days of machine time. In nuclear physics, anti p-nuclei scattering and atomic X rays have been measured. In hydrogen, atomic L and K transitions have been detected. Searches have been made for baryonia with rather negative results. The p anti p annihilation at rest in various meson channels, selecting the initial anti p-wave, has been observed. The annihilation in electron-positron pair at rest and in flight has been measured and a value of the proton form factor is derived [fr

  9. The CERN SPS proton–antiproton collider

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Rudiger

    2016-01-01

    One of CERN's most ambitious and successful projects was the search for the intermediate bosons, W and Z [1]. The accelerator part of the project relied on a number of innovations in accelerator physics and technology. The invention of the method of stochastic cooling and the extension by many orders of magnitude beyond the initial proof of principle demonstration allowed the construction of the Antiproton Accumulator. Major modifications to the 26 GeV PS complex and the conversion of the 300 GeV SPS, which had just started up as an accelerator, to a collider were required. The SPS collider had to master the beam–beam effect far beyond limits reached before and had to function in a tight symbiosis with the UA1 and UA2 experiments.

  10. Elementary design of a 30 TeV on 30 TeV proton antiproton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Takahiko

    1984-01-01

    A crude conceptual design was made for a 30TeV on 30TeV antiproton-proton collider. The choice of energy and antiproton-proton (instead of PP) are somewhat arbitrary. The basic parameters of the main ring are listed in a table; the bending radius, ring radius and circumference are 11.1km, 14.4km, and 90.6km, respectively; 7680 dipole magnets with maximum field of 9 Tesla; 1280 quadrupole magnets with maximum gradient of 200Tesla/m. The development of high-field, low-heat loss dipoles and quadrupoles are essential, together with the consideration for their mass production method. On the other hand, the possibility of obtaining antiproton-proton luminosity exceeding 10 32 /cm 2 sec is suggested without any fundamental limitation. With such high luminosity, however, it should be pointed out that particle detectors must face their limitation due to extremely high rate, high multiplicity interaction, requiring large steps of detector research and development efforts. (Aoki, K.)

  11. High performance light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squarer, D.; Schulenberg, T.; Struwe, D.; Oka, Y.; Bittermann, D.; Aksan, N.; Maraczy, C.; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, R.; Souyri, A.; Dumaz, P.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the high performance light water reactor (HPLWR) project is to assess the merit and economic feasibility of a high efficiency LWR operating at thermodynamically supercritical regime. An efficiency of approximately 44% is expected. To accomplish this objective, a highly qualified team of European research institutes and industrial partners together with the University of Tokyo is assessing the major issues pertaining to a new reactor concept, under the co-sponsorship of the European Commission. The assessment has emphasized the recent advancement achieved in this area by Japan. Additionally, it accounts for advanced European reactor design requirements, recent improvements, practical design aspects, availability of plant components and the availability of high temperature materials. The final objective of this project is to reach a conclusion on the potential of the HPLWR to help sustain the nuclear option, by supplying competitively priced electricity, as well as to continue the nuclear competence in LWR technology. The following is a brief summary of the main project achievements:-A state-of-the-art review of supercritical water-cooled reactors has been performed for the HPLWR project.-Extensive studies have been performed in the last 10 years by the University of Tokyo. Therefore, a 'reference design', developed by the University of Tokyo, was selected in order to assess the available technological tools (i.e. computer codes, analyses, advanced materials, water chemistry, etc.). Design data and results of the analysis were supplied by the University of Tokyo. A benchmark problem, based on the 'reference design' was defined for neutronics calculations and several partners of the HPLWR project carried out independent analyses. The results of these analyses, which in addition help to 'calibrate' the codes, have guided the assessment of the core and the design of an improved HPLWR fuel assembly. Preliminary selection was made for the HPLWR scale

  12. The GSI plans for an international accelerator facility for beams of ions and antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suemmerer, K.

    2003-01-01

    GSI proposes to build a next-generation facility for research with relativistic beams of ions and antiprotons. This facility allows a broad range of topics in nuclear and astrophysics, plasma and atomic physics to be addressed. The topic most interesting in the context of this conference is physics with high-intensity beams of exotic nuclei. In addition, a short overview of the opportunities in the other fields of nuclear physics is given

  13. Do positrons and antiprotons respect the weak equivalence principle?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    We resolve the difficulties which Morrison identified with energy conservation and the gravitational red-shift when particles of antimatter, such as the positron and antiproton, do not respect the weak equivalence principle. 13 refs

  14. Antiproton cell experiment: antimatter is a better killer

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "European Organization for Nuclear Research is reporting that results from a three year study of antiprotons for neoplasm irrdiation showed a better cellular killer with a smaller lethal dose." (1,5 page)

  15. New results on strong-interaction effects in antiprotonic hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Gotta, D; Augsburger, M A; Borchert, G L; Castelli, C M; Chatellard, D; El-Khoury, P; Egger, J P; Gorke, H; Hauser, P R; Indelicato, P J; Kirch, K; Lenz, S; Nelms, N; Rashid, K; Schult, O W B; Siems, T; Simons, L M

    1999-01-01

    Lyman and Balmer transitions of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at the low-energy antiproton ring LEAR at CERN in order to determine the strong interaction effects. The X-rays were detected using charge-coupled devices (CCDs) and a reflection type crystal spectrometer. The results of the measurements support the meson-exchange models describing the medium and long range part of the nucleon-antinucleon interaction. (33 refs).

  16. New results on strong-interaction effects in antiprotonic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anagnostopoulos, D. F.; Augsburger, M.; Borchert, G.; Castelli, C.; Chatellard, D.; El-Khoury, P.; Egger, J.-P.; Gorke, H.; Gotta, D.; Hauser, P.; Indelicato, P.; Kirch, K.; Lenz, S.; Nelms, N.; Rashid, K.; Schult, O. W. B.; Siems, Th.; Simons, L. M.

    1999-01-01

    Lyman and Balmer transitions of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at the Low-Energy Antiproton Ring LEAR at CERN in order to determine the strong interaction effects. The X-rays were detected using Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs) and a reflection type crystal spectrometer. The results of the measurements support the meson-exchange models describing the medium and long range part of the nucleon-antinucleon interaction

  17. Development of high performance cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Kiyoshi

    2003-01-01

    The developments of superior next-generation light water reactor are requested on the basis of general view points, such as improvement of safety, economics, reduction of radiation waste and effective utilization of plutonium, until 2030 year in which conventional reactor plants should be renovate. Improvements of stainless steel cladding for conventional high burn-up reactor to more than 100 GWd/t, developments of manufacturing technology for reduced moderation-light water reactor (RMWR) of breeding ratio beyond 1.0 and researches of water-materials interaction on super critical pressure-water cooled reactor are carried out in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Stable austenite stainless steel has been selected for fuel element cladding of advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR). The austenite stain less has the superiority for anti-irradiation properties, corrosion resistance and mechanical strength. A hard spectrum of neutron energy up above 0.1 MeV takes place in core of the reduced moderation-light water reactor, as liquid metal-fast breeding reactor (LMFBR). High performance cladding for the RMWR fuel elements is required to get anti-irradiation properties, corrosion resistance and mechanical strength also. Slow strain rate test (SSRT) of SUS 304 and SUS 316 are carried out for studying stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Irradiation tests in LMFBR are intended to obtain irradiation data for damaged quantity of the cladding materials. (M. Suetake)

  18. A measurement of the gravitational acceleration of the antiproton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzscheiter, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    A fundamental experiment in gravity proposed by us, is the measurement of the gravitational force on antimatter. This measurement would constitute the first direct test of the Weak Equivalence Principle (WEP) for antimatter. The availability of low-energy antiprotons at CERN has made such an experiment feasible, and a proposal to carry out such a measurement has been accepted by the CERN Program Committee. We plan to use a time-of-flight technique similar to that pioneered by Fairbank and Witteborn in their measurement of the gravitational force on an electron. Very slow particles are launched into a vertical drift tube and the time-of-flight spectrum of these particles is recorded. This spectrum will exhibit a cut-off point directly related to the gravitational acceleration of the particles. Obtaining very slow antiprotons involves several stages of deceleration. Antiprotons from LEAR will be initially decelerated from 2 MeV to tens of kilovolts by passing them through a thin foil. After capture and cooling in a series of ion traps, the antiprotons will be in a thermal distribution with a temperature of a few degrees Kelvin. These ultra-cold antiprotons will then be released a few at a time into the drift tube. A detector will measure the arrival time of the particles at the exit of the drift tube. H - -ion, which have almost identical electromagnetic properties to the antiprotons, will be used for comparison and as a calibration standard. 7 refs., 1 fig

  19. Simplified dark matter models in the light of AMS-02 antiproton data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Tong

    2017-01-01

    In this work we perform an analysis of the recent AMS-02 antiproton flux and the antiproton-to-proton ratio in the framework of simplified dark matter models. To predict the AMS-02 observables we adopt the propagation and injection parameters determined by the observed fluxes of nuclei. We assume that the dark matter particle is a Dirac fermionic dark matter, with leptophobic pseudoscalar or axialvector mediator that couples only to Standard Model quarks and dark matter particles. We find that the AMS-02 observations are consistent with the dark matter framework within the uncertainties. The antiproton data prefer a dark matter (mediator) mass in the 700 GeV–5 TeV region for the annihilation with pseudoscalar mediator and greater than 700 GeV (200 GeV–1 TeV) for the annihilation with axialvector mediator, respectively, at about 68% confidence level. The AMS-02 data require an effective dark matter annihilation cross section in the region of 1×10 −25 –1×10 −24 (1×10 −25 –4×10 −24 ) cm 3 /s for the simplified model with pseudoscalar (axialvector) mediator. The constraints from the LHC and Fermi-LAT are also discussed.

  20. Simplified dark matter models in the light of AMS-02 antiproton data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tong [ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Tera-scale,School of Physics and Astronomy, Monash University,Melbourne, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2017-04-19

    In this work we perform an analysis of the recent AMS-02 antiproton flux and the antiproton-to-proton ratio in the framework of simplified dark matter models. To predict the AMS-02 observables we adopt the propagation and injection parameters determined by the observed fluxes of nuclei. We assume that the dark matter particle is a Dirac fermionic dark matter, with leptophobic pseudoscalar or axialvector mediator that couples only to Standard Model quarks and dark matter particles. We find that the AMS-02 observations are consistent with the dark matter framework within the uncertainties. The antiproton data prefer a dark matter (mediator) mass in the 700 GeV–5 TeV region for the annihilation with pseudoscalar mediator and greater than 700 GeV (200 GeV–1 TeV) for the annihilation with axialvector mediator, respectively, at about 68% confidence level. The AMS-02 data require an effective dark matter annihilation cross section in the region of 1×10{sup −25}–1×10{sup −24} (1×10{sup −25}–4×10{sup −24}) cm{sup 3}/s for the simplified model with pseudoscalar (axialvector) mediator. The constraints from the LHC and Fermi-LAT are also discussed.

  1. Antiproton production in heavy-ion collisions at energies below the threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeter, A.

    1993-08-01

    In the framework of this thesis the antiproton production in heavy ion collisions at projectile energies far below the threshold for anti p production in nucleon-nucleon collisions (5.63 GeV/u) was studied. A suited detection apparature was developed and constructed at the fragment separator-magnet spectrometer at the Society for Heavy Ion Research (GSI). For the identification of the antiprotons the momentum of the particles emitted in beam direction was measured and their velocity multiple-redundantly determined by means of time-of-flight measurements and threshold Cherenkov detectors. By this way the antiprotons could be in spite of low anti p production cross sections and high production rates for lighter particles (R anti p: R K - -:R π - -∼1:5*10 3 :10 7 ) background-freely determined. By this experiment for Ne+NaF, Cu, Sn, and Bi as well ass Ni+Ni collisions at incident energies between 1.6 GeV/u and 2.0 GeV/u production cross sections for antiprotons in the momentum range between 1.0 GeV/c and 2.2 GeV/c and for kaons and pions between 0.5 GeV/c and 2.8 GeV/c were measured, in order to study the influence of collisional-system size, incident energy, and secondary-particle momentum on the production probabilities and to contribute in comparison with the prognoses of theoretical models to the explanation of the particle production mechanisms. (HSI)

  2. Multiplicity dependence of charged pion, kaon, and (anti)proton production at large transverse momentum in p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$= 5.02 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, Jaroslav; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Shakeel; Ahn, Sang Un; Aiola, Salvatore; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Millan Almaraz, Jesus Roberto; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Arnaldi, Roberta; Arnold, Oliver Werner; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Audurier, Benjamin; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Balasubramanian, Supraja; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Barth, Klaus; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Bartsch, Esther; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batista Camejo, Arianna; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont Iii, Ronald John; Belmont Moreno, Ernesto; Belyaev, Vladimir; Benacek, Pavel; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biro, Gabor; Biswas, Rathijit; Biswas, Saikat; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blair, Justin Thomas; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Bossu, Francesco; Botta, Elena; Bourjau, Christian; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Bashir Butt, Jamila; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calero Diaz, Liliet; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carnesecchi, Francesca; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Cerkala, Jakub; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chauvin, Alex; Chelnokov, Volodymyr; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Cho, Soyeon; Chochula, Peter; Choi, Kyungeon; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Albino, Rigoberto; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dahms, Torsten; Dainese, Andrea; Danisch, Meike Charlotte; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Conti, Camila; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Deisting, Alexander; Deloff, Andrzej; Denes, Ervin Sandor; Deplano, Caterina; Dhankher, Preeti; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Drozhzhova, Tatiana; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Endress, Eric; Engel, Heiko; Epple, Eliane; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erdemir, Irem; Erhardt, Filip; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Eum, Jongsik; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabbietti, Laura; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Feldkamp, Linus; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigorii; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Feuillard, Victor Jose Gaston; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Fleck, Martin Gabriel; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fronze, Gabriele Gaetano; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Furs, Artur; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Gao, Chaosong; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gasik, Piotr Jan; Gauger, Erin Frances; Germain, Marie; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Giubilato, Piero; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Coral, Diego Mauricio; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Gonzalez, Victor; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Grachov, Oleg Anatolievich; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Graham, Katie Leanne; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grynyov, Borys; Grion, Nevio; Gronefeld, Julius Maximilian; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Haake, Rudiger; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hamon, Julien Charles; Harris, John William; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hillemanns, Hartmut; Hippolyte, Boris; Horak, David; Hosokawa, Ritsuya; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Huang, Meidana; Humanic, Thomas; Hussain, Nur; Hussain, Tahir; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ilkaev, Radiy; Inaba, Motoi; Incani, Elisa; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Izucheev, Vladimir; Jacazio, Nicolo; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jadhav, Manoj Bhanudas; Jadlovska, Slavka; Jadlovsky, Jan; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jakubowska, Monika Joanna; Jang, Haeng Jin; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Chitrasen; Jena, Satyajit; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jusko, Anton; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kamin, Jason Adrian; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karayan, Lilit; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Keijdener, Darius Laurens; Keil, Markus; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Daehyeok; Kim, Hyeonjoong; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Carsten; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Boesing, Christian; Klewin, Sebastian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Kofarago, Monika; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolozhvari, Anatoly; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Kondratyuk, Evgeny; Konevskikh, Artem; Kopcik, Michal; Kostarakis, Panagiotis; Kour, Mandeep; Kouzinopoulos, Charalampos; Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kralik, Ivan; Kravcakova, Adela; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kubera, Andrew Michael; Kucera, Vit; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Jitendra; Lokesh, Kumar; Kumar, Shyam; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Ladron De Guevara, Pedro; Lagana Fernandes, Caio; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lattuca, Alessandra; Laudi, Elisa; Lea, Ramona; Leardini, Lucia; Lee, Graham Richard; Lee, Seongjoo; Lehas, Fatiha; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenti, Vito; Leogrande, Emilia; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Leon Vargas, Hermes; Leoncino, Marco; Levai, Peter; Li, Shuang; Li, Xiaomei; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Lonne, Per-Ivar; Loginov, Vitaly; Loizides, Constantinos; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lowe, Andrew John; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Lutz, Tyler Harrison; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahajan, Sanjay; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Margutti, Jacopo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martin Blanco, Javier; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-Garcia, Gines; Martinez Pedreira, Miguel; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Mcdonald, Daniel; Meddi, Franco; Melikyan, Yuri; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Mieskolainen, Matti Mikael; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Minervini, Lazzaro Manlio; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Montes Prado, Esther; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Perez Moreno, Luis Alberto; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Mulligan, James Declan; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Munzer, Robert Helmut; Murakami, Hikari; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Naik, Bharati; Nair, Rahul; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Naru, Muhammad Umair; Ferreira Natal Da Luz, Pedro Hugo; Nattrass, Christine; Rosado Navarro, Sebastian; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Ranjit; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nellen, Lukas; Ng, Fabian; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Niedziela, Jeremi; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Cabanillas Noris, Juan Carlos; Norman, Jaime; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Oh, Sun Kun; Ohlson, Alice Elisabeth; Okatan, Ali; Okubo, Tsubasa; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oliver, Michael Henry; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Orava, Risto; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Ozdemir, Mahmut; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Pan, Jinjin; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Woojin; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Patra, Rajendra Nath; Paul, Biswarup; Pei, Hua; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petrov, Viacheslav; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Ozelin De Lima Pimentel, Lais; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Poonsawat, Wanchaloem; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Porter, R Jefferson; Pospisil, Jan; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puccio, Maximiliano; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Raha, Sibaji; Rajput, Sonia; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Rami, Fouad; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Read, Kenneth Francis; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reed, Rosi Jan; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reidt, Felix; Ren, Xiaowen; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Ristea, Catalin-Lucian; Rocco, Elena; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roeed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Ronflette, Lucile; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Ankhi; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahlmuller, Baldo; Sahoo, Pragati; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahoo, Sarita; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakai, Shingo; Saleh, Mohammad Ahmad; Salzwedel, Jai Samuel Nielsen; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Sarkar, Debojit; Sarma, Pranjal; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schulc, Martin; Schuster, Tim Robin; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca Michelle; Sefcik, Michal; Seger, Janet Elizabeth; Sekiguchi, Yuko; Sekihata, Daiki; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senosi, Kgotlaesele; Senyukov, Serhiy; Serradilla Rodriguez, Eulogio; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabanov, Arseniy; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shadura, Oksana; Shahoyan, Ruben; Shahzad, Muhammed Ikram; Shangaraev, Artem; Sharma, Ankita; Sharma, Mona; Sharma, Monika; Sharma, Natasha; Shigaki, Kenta; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Sibiryak, Yury; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Sielewicz, Krzysztof Marek; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine Micaela; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singha, Subhash; Singhal, Vikas; Sinha, Bikash; Sarkar - Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Slupecki, Maciej; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Snellman, Tomas Wilhelm; Soegaard, Carsten; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Song, Zixuan; Soramel, Francesca; Sorensen, Soren Pontoppidan; Derradi De Souza, Rafael; Sozzi, Federica; Spacek, Michal; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Sputowska, Iwona Anna; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stankus, Paul; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Strmen, Peter; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, Alexandre; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Suleymanov, Mais Kazim Oglu; Suljic, Miljenko; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Szabo, Alexander; Szanto De Toledo, Alejandro; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; Tabassam, Uzma; Takahashi, Jun; Tambave, Ganesh Jagannath; Tanaka, Naoto; Tangaro, Marco-Antonio; Tarhini, Mohamad; Tariq, Mohammad; Tarzila, Madalina-Gabriela; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terasaki, Kohei; Terrevoli, Cristina; Teyssier, Boris; Thaeder, Jochen Mathias; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Timmins, Anthony Robert; Toia, Alberica; Trogolo, Stefano; Trombetta, Giuseppe; Trubnikov, Victor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ullaland, Kjetil; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Utrobicic, Antonija; Vajzer, Michal; Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vallero, Sara; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Van Leeuwen, Marco; Vanat, Tomas; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Varga, Dezso; Diozcora Vargas Trevino, Aurora; Vargyas, Marton; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vauthier, Astrid; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veen, Annelies Marianne; Veldhoen, Misha; Velure, Arild; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Villatoro Tello, Abraham; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Yury; Virgili, Tiziano; Vislavicius, Vytautas; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Jan; Wang, Hongkai; Wang, Mengliang; Watanabe, Daisuke; Watanabe, Yosuke; Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Weiser, Dennis Franz; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Whitehead, Andile Mothegi; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Winn, Michael Andreas; Yang, Hongyan; Yang, Ping; Yano, Satoshi; Yasin, Zafar; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yoon, Jin Hee; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Yushmanov, Igor; Zaborowska, Anna; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Correia Zanoli, Henrique Jose; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zardoshti, Nima; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Chunhui, Zhang; Zhang, Zuman; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zyzak, Maksym

    2016-09-10

    The production of charged pions, kaons and (anti)protons has been measured at mid-rapidity ($-0.5 10$ GeV/$c$), the particle ratios are consistent with those reported for pp and Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC energies. At intermediate $p_{\\rm T}$ the (anti)proton $R_{\\rm pPb}$ shows a Cronin-like enhancement, while pions and kaons show little or no nuclear modification. At high $p_{\\rm T}$ the charged pion, kaon and (anti)proton $R_{\\rm pPb}$ are consistent with unity within statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  3. The Floor's the Limit (Antiproton energies to hit new low)

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Celebrating the success of the RFQ in Aarhus. Left to right: Alessanda Lombardi (CERN), Iouri Bylinskii (CERN), Alex Csete (Aarhus), Ulrik Uggerhøj (Aarhus), Ryu Hayano (Tokyo, spokesman ASACUSA), Helge Knudsen (Aarhus), Werner Pirkl (CERN), Ryan Thompson (Aarhus), Søren P. Møller (Aarhus). Although in particle physics we are accustomed to strive for higher and higher energies, this is not always the most interesting thing to do with antiprotons. Indeed, as recent issues of the Bulletin have suggested, the signpost on the road to a closer look at the antiproton points towards ever-lower energies. The CERN Antiproton Decelerator decelerates antipro-tons emerging from a target placed in the path of a 26 GeV/c proton beam from 90 % of to about 10 % of the speed of light. However, even this is far too fast for many of the most interesting experiments on antiprotons planned by Danish and Japanese members of the ASACUSA collaboration. Tokyo University has therefore financed the con...

  4. Learning Apache Solr high performance

    CERN Document Server

    Mohan, Surendra

    2014-01-01

    This book is an easy-to-follow guide, full of hands-on, real-world examples. Each topic is explained and demonstrated in a specific and user-friendly flow, from search optimization using Solr to Deployment of Zookeeper applications. This book is ideal for Apache Solr developers and want to learn different techniques to optimize Solr performance with utmost efficiency, along with effectively troubleshooting the problems that usually occur while trying to boost performance. Familiarity with search servers and database querying is expected.

  5. High-performance composite chocolate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Julian; Thomson, Katrin; Hollands, Lisa; Bates, Joanna; Carter, Melvyn; Freeman, Colin; Kapranos, Plato; Goodall, Russell

    2013-07-01

    The performance of any engineering component depends on and is limited by the properties of the material from which it is fabricated. It is crucial for engineering students to understand these material properties, interpret them and select the right material for the right application. In this paper we present a new method to engage students with the material selection process. In a competition-based practical, first-year undergraduate students design, cost and cast composite chocolate samples to maximize a particular performance criterion. The same activity could be adapted for any level of education to introduce the subject of materials properties and their effects on the material chosen for specific applications.

  6. High-Performance Composite Chocolate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Julian; Thomson, Katrin; Hollands, Lisa; Bates, Joanna; Carter, Melvyn; Freeman, Colin; Kapranos, Plato; Goodall, Russell

    2013-01-01

    The performance of any engineering component depends on and is limited by the properties of the material from which it is fabricated. It is crucial for engineering students to understand these material properties, interpret them and select the right material for the right application. In this paper we present a new method to engage students with…

  7. Toward High-Performance Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, Edward E., III

    2002-01-01

    Reviews management changes that companies have made over time in adopting or adapting four approaches to organizational performance: employee involvement, total quality management, re-engineering, and knowledge management. Considers future possibilities and defines a new view of what constitutes effective organizational design in management.…

  8. Spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms and its contribution to the fundamental physical constants

    CERN Document Server

    Hayano, R S

    2010-01-01

    Antiprotonic helium atom, a metastable neutral system consisting of an antiproton, an electron and a helium nucleus, was serendipitously discovered, and has been studied at CERN’s antiproton decelerator facility. Its transition frequencies have recently been measured to nine digits of precision by laser spectroscopy. By comparing these experimental results with three-body QED calculations, the antiproton-to-electron massratio was determined as 1836.152674(5). This result contributed to the CODATA recommended values of the fundamental physical constants.

  9. The design and performance of the FNAL high-energy polarized-beam facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosnick, D P; Hill, D A; Laghai, M R; Lopiano, D; Ohashi, Y; Shima, T; Spinka, H; Stanek, R W; Underwood, D G; Yokosawa, A [Argonne National Lab. (USA); Lehar, F; Lesquen, A de; Rossum, L van [CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. de Physique des Particules Elementaires; Carey, D C; Coleman, R N; Cossairt, J D; Read, A L; Schailey, R [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA); Derevschikov, A A; Matulenko, Yu A; Meschanin, A P; Nurushev, S B; Rzaev, R A; Solovyanov, V L; Vasiliev, A N [Institut Fiziki Vysokikh Ehnergij, Serpukhov (USSR); Akchurin, N; Onel, Y [Iowa Univ., Iowa City (USA). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Imai, K; Makino, S; Masaike, A; Miyake, K; Nagamine, T; Tamura, N; Yoshida, T [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Takashima, R [Kyoto Univ. of Education, Fushimi (Japan); Takeutchi, F [Kyoto Sangyo Univ. (Japan); Maki, T [University of Occupational and Environmental; FNAL-E581/704 Collaboration

    1990-05-10

    A new polarized-proton and -antiproton beam with 185 GeV/c momentum has been built at Fermilab. The design uses the parity-nonconserving decays of lambda and antilambda hyperons to produce polarized protons and antiprotons, respectively, a beam-transport system that minimizes depolarization effects, and a set of twelve dipole magnets that rotate the beam-particle spin direction. A beam-tagging system determines the momentum and polarization of individual beam particles. This allows a selection of particles in definite intervals of momentum and polarization. Measurements performed by two different polarimeters showed that the beam is polarized and the determination of polarization by beam-particle tagging is verified. A new measurement of the analyzing power of large-x{sub F} {pi}{sup 0} production may lead to another beam polarimeter.

  10. Functional High Performance Financial IT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthold, Jost; Filinski, Andrzej; Henglein, Fritz

    2011-01-01

    at the University of Copenhagen that attacks this triple challenge of increased performance, transparency and productivity in the financial sector by a novel integration of financial mathematics, domain-specific language technology, parallel functional programming, and emerging massively parallel hardware. HIPERFIT......The world of finance faces the computational performance challenge of massively expanding data volumes, extreme response time requirements, and compute-intensive complex (risk) analyses. Simultaneously, new international regulatory rules require considerably more transparency and external...... auditability of financial institutions, including their software systems. To top it off, increased product variety and customisation necessitates shorter software development cycles and higher development productivity. In this paper, we report about HIPERFIT, a recently etablished strategic research center...

  11. High performance Mo adsorbent PZC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon,

    1998-10-01

    We have developed Mo adsorbents for natural Mo(n, {gamma}){sup 99}Mo-{sup 99m}Tc generator. Among them, we called the highest performance adsorbent PZC that could adsorb about 250 mg-Mo/g. In this report, we will show the structure, adsorption mechanism of Mo, and the other useful properties of PZC when you carry out the examination of Mo adsorption and elution of {sup 99m}Tc. (author)

  12. Indoor Air Quality in High Performance Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    High performance schools are facilities that improve the learning environment while saving energy, resources, and money. The key is understanding the lifetime value of high performance schools and effectively managing priorities, time, and budget.

  13. Metastable states in antiprotonic helium atoms an island stability in a sea of continuum

    CERN Document Server

    Korobov, V I

    2002-01-01

    In this contribution we consider a phenomenon of metastable states in antiprotonic helium atoms, precise spectroscopy of these states and a present-day study of the electromagnetic properties of antiprotons. Calculation of nonrelativistic energies, relativistic and QED corrections as well as the fine and hyperfine structure and the magnetic moment of an antiproton are the main parts of this study. Refs. 22 (nevyjel)

  14. The magnetic moments of the proton and the antiproton

    CERN Document Server

    Ulmer, S.; Blaum, K.; Braeuninger, S.; Franke, K.; Kracke, H.; Leiteritz, C.; Matsuda, Y.; Nagahama, H.; Ospelkaus, C.; Rodegheri, C.C.; Quint, W.; Schneider, G.; Smorra, C.; Van Gorp, S.; Walz, J.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Recent exciting progress in the preparation and manipulation of the motional quantum states of a single trapped proton enabled the first direct detection of the particle's spin state. Based on this success the proton magnetic moment $\\mu_p$ was measured with ppm precision in a Penning trap with a superimposed magnetic field inhomogeneity. An improvement by an additional factor of 1000 in precision is possible by application of the so-called double Penning trap technique. In a recent paper we reported the first demonstration of this method with a single trapped proton, which is a major step towards the first direct high-precision measurement of $\\mu_p$. The techniques required for the proton can be directly applied to measure the antiproton magnetic moment $\\mu_{\\bar{p}}$. An improvement in precision of $\\mu_{\\bar{p}}$ by more than three orders of magnitude becomes possible, which will provide one of the most sensitive tests of CPT invariance. To achieve this research goal we are currently setting up the Baryo...

  15. High performance inertial fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuckolls, J.H.; Bangerter, R.O.; Lindl, J.D.; Mead, W.C.; Pan, Y.L.

    1977-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) designs are considered which may have very high gains (approximately 1000) and low power requirements (<100 TW) for input energies of approximately one megajoule. These include targets having very low density shells, ultra thin shells, central ignitors, magnetic insulation, and non-ablative acceleration

  16. High performance inertial fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuckolls, J.H.; Bangerter, R.O.; Lindl, J.D.; Mead, W.C.; Pan, Y.L.

    1978-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target designs are considered which may have very high gains (approximately 1000) and low power requirements (< 100 TW) for input energies of approximately one megajoule. These include targets having very low density shells, ultra thin shells, central ignitors, magnetic insulation, and non-ablative acceleration

  17. High performance nuclear fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mordarski, W.J.; Zegler, S.T.

    1980-01-01

    A fuel-pellet composition is disclosed for use in fast breeder reactors. Uranium carbide particles are mixed with a powder of uraniumplutonium carbides having a stable microstructure. The resulting mixture is formed into fuel pellets. The pellets thus produced exhibit a relatively low propensity to swell while maintaining a high density

  18. Energy and energy width measurement in the FNAL antiproton accumulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Church, M.; Hsueh, S.; Rapidis, P.; Werkema, S.

    1991-10-01

    The Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator has recently been used to produce Charmonium resonances (charm quark, anti-charm quark bound states) in proton-antiproton annihilations using an internal H 2 gas jet target. A measurement of the resonance mass and width may be obtained from a precise knowledge of the antiproton beam energy and energy spread. The beam energy is measured to an accuracy of 1 part in 10 4 in the range 6.3 Gev to 4.1 Gev by measuring the orbit length and revolution frequency of the beam. The beam momentum spread is measured to an accuracy of 10% by measuring the beam frequency spread and the parameter η = (P beam /F rev )·(dF rev /dP beam ). These two measurement techniques are described in this report

  19. Energy and energy width measurement in the FNAL antiproton accumulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, M.; Hsueh, S.; Rapidis, P.; Werkema, S.

    1991-10-01

    The Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator has recently been used to produce Charmonium resonances (charm quark, anti-charm quark bound states) in proton-antiproton annihilations using an internal H{sub 2} gas jet target. A measurement of the resonance mass and width may be obtained from a precise knowledge of the antiproton beam energy and energy spread. The beam energy is measured to an accuracy of 1 part in 10{sup 4} in the range 6.3 Gev to 4.1 Gev by measuring the orbit length and revolution frequency of the beam. The beam momentum spread is measured to an accuracy of 10% by measuring the beam frequency spread and the parameter {eta} = (P{sub beam}/F{sub rev}){center_dot}(dF{sub rev}/dP{sub beam}). These two measurement techniques are described in this report.

  20. High Performance JavaScript

    CERN Document Server

    Zakas, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    If you're like most developers, you rely heavily on JavaScript to build interactive and quick-responding web applications. The problem is that all of those lines of JavaScript code can slow down your apps. This book reveals techniques and strategies to help you eliminate performance bottlenecks during development. You'll learn how to improve execution time, downloading, interaction with the DOM, page life cycle, and more. Yahoo! frontend engineer Nicholas C. Zakas and five other JavaScript experts -- Ross Harmes, Julien Lecomte, Steven Levithan, Stoyan Stefanov, and Matt Sweeney -- demonstra

  1. Carpet Aids Learning in High Performance Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, Frank

    2009-01-01

    The Healthy and High Performance Schools Act of 2002 has set specific federal guidelines for school design, and developed a federal/state partnership program to assist local districts in their school planning. According to the Collaborative for High Performance Schools (CHPS), high-performance schools are, among other things, healthy, comfortable,…

  2. Relativistic hydrodynamics, heavy ion reactions and antiproton annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strottman, D.

    1985-01-01

    The application of relativistic hydrodynamics to relativistic heavy ions and antiproton annihilation is summarized. Conditions for validity of hydrodynamics are presented. Theoretical results for inclusive particle spectra, pion production and flow analysis are given for medium energy heavy ions. The two-fluid model is introduced and results presented for reactions from 800 MeV per nucleon to 15 GeV on 15 GeV per nucleon. Temperatures and densities attained in antiproton annihilation are given. Finally, signals which might indicate the presence of a quark-gluon plasma are briefly surveyed

  3. Antiproton-decelerating Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQD), inner structure.

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    The inner structure of the RFQD, withdrawn from its tank. In picture _06, the upstream end is in the back and the view is on the downstream exit. The RFQD has a length of 3.5 m and operates at a frequency of 202.4 MHz. It further decelerates antiprotons from the Antiproton Decelerator (3.5 MeV/c to 100 MeV/c, or 5.3 MeV) to very low energies around 50 keV.

  4. Antiprotons from spallation of cosmic rays on ISM

    CERN Document Server

    Donato, F

    2002-01-01

    We provide the first evaluation of the secondary interstellar cosmic antiproton flux that is fully consistent with cosmic ray nuclei in the framework of a two-zone diffusion model. We also study and conservatively quantify all possible sources of uncertainty that may affect that antiproton flux. Uncertainties related to propagation are shown to range between 10% and 25%, depending on which part of the spectrum is considered, while the ones related to nuclear physics stand around 22-25 % over all the energy spectrum.

  5. 1-4 Strangeness Production in Antiproton Induced Nuclear Reactions.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng; Zhaoqing[1

    2014-01-01

    More localized energy deposition is able to be produced in antiproton-nucleus collisions in comparison withheavy-ion collisions due to annihilation reactions. Searching for the cold quark-gluon plasma (QGP) with antiprotonbeamshas been considered as a hot topic both in experiments and in theretical calculations over the past severaldecades. Strangeness production and hypernucleus formation in antiproton-induced nuclear reactions are importancein exploring the hyperon (antihyperon)-nucleon (HN) potential and the antinucleon-nucleon interaction, whichhave been hot topics in the forthcoming experiments at PANDA in Germany.

  6. High performance electromagnetic simulation tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedney, Stephen D.; Whites, Keith W.

    1994-10-01

    Army Research Office Grant #DAAH04-93-G-0453 has supported the purchase of 24 additional compute nodes that were installed in the Intel iPsC/860 hypercube at the Univesity Of Kentucky (UK), rendering a 32-node multiprocessor. This facility has allowed the investigators to explore and extend the boundaries of electromagnetic simulation for important areas of defense concerns including microwave monolithic integrated circuit (MMIC) design/analysis and electromagnetic materials research and development. The iPSC/860 has also provided an ideal platform for MMIC circuit simulations. A number of parallel methods based on direct time-domain solutions of Maxwell's equations have been developed on the iPSC/860, including a parallel finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm, and a parallel planar generalized Yee-algorithm (PGY). The iPSC/860 has also provided an ideal platform on which to develop a 'virtual laboratory' to numerically analyze, scientifically study and develop new types of materials with beneficial electromagnetic properties. These materials simulations are capable of assembling hundreds of microscopic inclusions from which an electromagnetic full-wave solution will be obtained in toto. This powerful simulation tool has enabled research of the full-wave analysis of complex multicomponent MMIC devices and the electromagnetic properties of many types of materials to be performed numerically rather than strictly in the laboratory.

  7. High-Performance Data Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steensgaard-Madsen, Jesper

    -resolution internal D/A converters are required. Unit-element mismatch-shaping D/A converters are analyzed, and the concept of mismatch-shaping is generalized to include scaled-element D/A converters. Several types of scaled-element mismatch-shaping D/A converters are proposed. Simulations show that, when implemented...... in a standard CMOS technology, they can be designed to yield 100 dB performance at 10 times oversampling. The proposed scaled-element mismatch-shaping D/A converters are well suited for use as the feedback stage in oversampled delta-sigma quantizers. It is, however, not easy to make full use of their potential......-order difference of the output signal from the loop filter's first integrator stage. This technique avoids the need for accurate matching of analog and digital filters that characterizes the MASH topology, and it preserves the signal-band suppression of quantization errors. Simulations show that quantizers...

  8. High performance soft magnetic materials

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book provides comprehensive coverage of the current state-of-the-art in soft magnetic materials and related applications, with particular focus on amorphous and nanocrystalline magnetic wires and ribbons and sensor applications. Expert chapters cover preparation, processing, tuning of magnetic properties, modeling, and applications. Cost-effective soft magnetic materials are required in a range of industrial sectors, such as magnetic sensors and actuators, microelectronics, cell phones, security, automobiles, medicine, health monitoring, aerospace, informatics, and electrical engineering. This book presents both fundamentals and applications to enable academic and industry researchers to pursue further developments of these key materials. This highly interdisciplinary volume represents essential reading for researchers in materials science, magnetism, electrodynamics, and modeling who are interested in working with soft magnets. Covers magnetic microwires, sensor applications, amorphous and nanocrystalli...

  9. High performance polyethylene nanocomposite fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dorigato

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A high density polyethylene (HDPE matrix was melt compounded with 2 vol% of dimethyldichlorosilane treated fumed silica nanoparticles. Nanocomposite fibers were prepared by melt spinning through a co-rotating twin screw extruder and drawing at 125°C in air. Thermo-mechanical and morphological properties of the resulting fibers were then investigated. The introduction of nanosilica improved the drawability of the fibers, allowing the achievement of higher draw ratios with respect to the neat matrix. The elastic modulus and creep stability of the fibers were remarkably improved upon nanofiller addition, with a retention of the pristine tensile properties at break. Transmission electronic microscope (TEM images evidenced that the original morphology of the silica aggregates was disrupted by the applied drawing.

  10. HIGH-PERFORMANCE COATING MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01

    Corrosion, erosion, oxidation, and fouling by scale deposits impose critical issues in selecting the metal components used at geothermal power plants operating at brine temperatures up to 300 C. Replacing these components is very costly and time consuming. Currently, components made of titanium alloy and stainless steel commonly are employed for dealing with these problems. However, another major consideration in using these metals is not only that they are considerably more expensive than carbon steel, but also the susceptibility of corrosion-preventing passive oxide layers that develop on their outermost surface sites to reactions with brine-induced scales, such as silicate, silica, and calcite. Such reactions lead to the formation of strong interfacial bonds between the scales and oxide layers, causing the accumulation of multiple layers of scales, and the impairment of the plant component's function and efficacy; furthermore, a substantial amount of time is entailed in removing them. This cleaning operation essential for reusing the components is one of the factors causing the increase in the plant's maintenance costs. If inexpensive carbon steel components could be coated and lined with cost-effective high-hydrothermal temperature stable, anti-corrosion, -oxidation, and -fouling materials, this would improve the power plant's economic factors by engendering a considerable reduction in capital investment, and a decrease in the costs of operations and maintenance through optimized maintenance schedules.

  11. Delivering high performance BWR fuel reliably

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schardt, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    Utilities are under intense pressure to reduce their production costs in order to compete in the increasingly deregulated marketplace. They need fuel, which can deliver high performance to meet demanding operating strategies. GE's latest BWR fuel design, GE14, provides that high performance capability. GE's product introduction process assures that this performance will be delivered reliably, with little risk to the utility. (author)

  12. Status of the anti-proton production beam in the CERN PS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cappi, R.; Evans, B.J.; Garoby, R.

    1990-01-01

    A new scheme was put into operation in November 1988 to upgrade the proton beam delivered by the 26 GeV Proton Synchrotron (PS) for anti-proton production. It makes use of quasi-adiabatic manipulations of the RF parameters to squeeze a beam filling 1/2 of the PS circumference into a 1/4 turn and can in theory preserve the longitudinal emittance. A maximum intensity of 1.68 e 13 ppp in 5 bunches at 26 GeV has been reached in the course of 22 weeks of operation. The limitations of the performance are analysed together with possible improvements. (author) 6 refs., 9 figs

  13. The FLUKA study of the secondary particles fluence in the AD-Antiproton Decelerator target area

    CERN Document Server

    Calviani, M

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present Monte Carlo FLUKA simulations [1, 2] carried out to investigate the secondary particles fluence emerging from the antiproton production target and their spatial distribution in the AD target area. The detailed quantitative analysis has been performed for different positions along the magnet dog-leg as well as after the main collimator. These results allow tuning the position of the new beam current transformers (BCT) in the target area, in order to have a precise pulse-by-pulse evaluation of the intensity of negative particles injected in the AD-ring before the deceleration phase.

  14. Measurement of (anti)deuteron and (anti)proton production in DIS at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2007-05-01

    The first observation of (anti)deuterons in deep inelastic scattering at HERA has been made with the ZEUS detector at a centre-of-mass energy of 300-318 GeV using an integrated luminosity of 120 pb -1 . The measurement was performed in the central rapidity region for transverse momentum per unit of mass in the range 0.3 T /M<0.7. The particle rates have been extracted and interpreted in terms of the coalescence model. The (anti)deuteron production yield is smaller than the (anti)proton yield by approximately three orders of magnitude, consistent with the world measurements. (orig.)

  15. Annihilation of antiprotons stopped in liquid hydrogen and deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalkarov, O.D.; Kerbikov, B.O.; Markushin, V.E.

    1976-01-01

    Detailed analysis is given of stopping antiproton annihilation in liquid hydrogen and deuterium. Connection between capture schedule and properties of bound states in nucleon-antinucleon system is established. The theoretical predictions are compared with experimental data which appeared in 1971-75

  16. Outer casing of the AA antiproton production target

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1979-01-01

    The first version of the antiproton production target was a tungsten rod, 11 cm long (actually a row of 11 rods, each 1 cm long) and 3 mm in diameter. The rod was embedded in graphite, pressure-seated into an outer casing made of stainless steel. The casing had fins for forced-air cooling.

  17. Hyperfine Structure Measurements of Antiprotonic $^3$He using Microwave Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Friedreich, Susanne

    The goal of this project was to measure the hyperfine structure of $\\overline{\\text{p}}^3$He$^+$ using the technique of laser-microwave-laser spectroscopy. Antiprotonic helium ($\\overline{\\text{p}}$He$^+$) is a neutral exotic atom, consisting of a helium nucleus, an electron and an antiproton. The interactions of the angular momenta of its constituents cause a hyperfine splitting ({HFS}) within the energy states of this new atom. The 3\\% of formed antiprotonic helium atoms which remain in a metastable, radiative decay-dominated state have a lifetime of about 1-3~$\\mu$s. This time window is used to do spectroscopic studies. The hyperfine structure of $\\overline{\\text{p}}^4$He$^+$ was already extensively investigated before. From these measurements the spin magnetic moment of the antiproton can be determined. A comparison of the result to the proton magnetic moment provides a test of {CPT} invariance. Due to its higher complexity the new exotic three-body system of $\\overline{\\text{p}}^3$He$^+$ is a cross-check...

  18. Relative Biological Effectiveness and Peripheral Damage of Antiproton Annihilation

    CERN Multimedia

    Kavanagh, J N; Kaiser, F; Tegami, S; Schettino, G; Kovacevic, S; Hajdukovic, D; Knudsen, H; Currell, F J; Toelli, H T; Doser, M; Holzscheiter, M; Herrmann, R; Timson, D J; Alsner, J; Landua, R; Comor, J; Moller, S P; Beyer, G

    2002-01-01

    The use of ions to deliver radiation to a body for therapeutic purposes has the potential to be significant improvement over the use of low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation because of the improved energy deposition profile and the enhanced biological effects of ions relative to photons. Proton therapy centers exist and are being used to treat patients. In addition, the initial use of heavy ions such as carbon is promising to the point that new treatment facilities are planned. Just as with protons or heavy ions, antiprotons can be used to deliver radiation to the body in a controlled way; however antiprotons will exhibit additional energy deposition due to annihilation of the antiprotons within the body. The slowing down of antiprotons in matter is similar to that of protons except at the very end of the range beyond the Bragg peak. Gray and Kalogeropoulos estimated the additional energy deposited by heavy nuclear fragments within a few millimeters of the annihilation vertex to be approximately 30 MeV (...

  19. Basic physics program for a low energy antiproton source in North America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonner, B.E.; Nieto, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    We summarize much of the important science that could be learned at a North American low energy antiproton source. It is striking that there is such a diverse and multidisciplinary program that would be amenable to exploration. Spanning the range from high energy particle physics to nuclear physics, atomic physics, and condensed matter physics, the program promises to offer many new insights into these disparate branches of science. It is abundantly clear that the scientific case for rapidly proceeding towards such a capability in North America is both alluring and strong. 38 refs., 2 tabs

  20. High performance carbon nanocomposites for ultracapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wen

    2012-10-02

    The present invention relates to composite electrodes for electrochemical devices, particularly to carbon nanotube composite electrodes for high performance electrochemical devices, such as ultracapacitors.

  1. Strategies and Experiences Using High Performance Fortran

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shires, Dale

    2001-01-01

    .... High performance Fortran (HPF) is a relative new addition to the Fortran dialect It is an attempt to provide an efficient high-level Fortran parallel programming language for the latest generation of been debatable...

  2. Constraints on particle dark matter from cosmic-ray antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornengo, N.; Vittino, A.; Maccione, L.

    2014-01-01

    Cosmic-ray antiprotons represent an important channel for dark matter indirect-detection studies. Current measurements of the antiproton flux at the top of the atmosphere and theoretical determinations of the secondary antiproton production in the Galaxy are in good agreement, with no manifest deviation which could point to an exotic contribution in this channel. Therefore, antiprotons can be used as a powerful tool for constraining particle dark matter properties. By using the spectrum of PAMELA data from 50 MV to 180 GV in rigidity, we derive bounds on the dark matter annihilation cross section (or decay rate, for decaying dark matter) for the whole spectrum of dark matter annihilation (decay) channels and under different hypotheses of cosmic-rays transport in the Galaxy and in the heliosphere. For typical models of galactic propagation, the constraints are strong, setting a lower bound on the dark matter mass of a ''thermal'' relic at about 40–80 GeV for hadronic annihilation channels. These bounds are enhanced to about 150 GeV on the dark matter mass, when large cosmic-rays confinement volumes in the Galaxy are considered, and are reduced to 3–4 GeV for annihilation to light quarks (no bound for heavy-quark production) when the confinement volume is small. Bounds for dark matter lighter than few tens of GeV are due to the low energy part of the PAMELA spectrum, an energy region where solar modulation is relevant: to this aim, we have implemented a detailed solution of the transport equation in the heliosphere, which allowed us not only to extend bounds to light dark matter, but also to determine the uncertainty on the constraints arising from solar modulation modelling. Finally, we estimate the impact of soon-to-come AMS-02 data on the antiproton constraints

  3. High Performance Grinding and Advanced Cutting Tools

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, Mark J

    2013-01-01

    High Performance Grinding and Advanced Cutting Tools discusses the fundamentals and advances in high performance grinding processes, and provides a complete overview of newly-developing areas in the field. Topics covered are grinding tool formulation and structure, grinding wheel design and conditioning and applications using high performance grinding wheels. Also included are heat treatment strategies for grinding tools, using grinding tools for high speed applications, laser-based and diamond dressing techniques, high-efficiency deep grinding, VIPER grinding, and new grinding wheels.

  4. Strategy Guideline: High Performance Residential Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holton, J.

    2012-02-01

    The Strategy Guideline: High Performance Residential Lighting has been developed to provide a tool for the understanding and application of high performance lighting in the home. The high performance lighting strategies featured in this guide are drawn from recent advances in commercial lighting for application to typical spaces found in residential buildings. This guide offers strategies to greatly reduce lighting energy use through the application of high quality fluorescent and light emitting diode (LED) technologies. It is important to note that these strategies not only save energy in the home but also serve to satisfy the homeowner's expectations for high quality lighting.

  5. Carbon nanomaterials for high-performance supercapacitors

    OpenAIRE

    Tao Chen; Liming Dai

    2013-01-01

    Owing to their high energy density and power density, supercapacitors exhibit great potential as high-performance energy sources for advanced technologies. Recently, carbon nanomaterials (especially, carbon nanotubes and graphene) have been widely investigated as effective electrodes in supercapacitors due to their high specific surface area, excellent electrical and mechanical properties. This article summarizes the recent progresses on the development of high-performance supercapacitors bas...

  6. Team Development for High Performance Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermerhorn, John R., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The author examines a team development approach to management that creates shared commitments to performance improvement by focusing the attention of managers on individual workers and their task accomplishments. It uses the "high-performance equation" to help managers confront shared beliefs and concerns about performance and develop realistic…

  7. The BESS Search for Cosmic-Ray Antiproton Origins and for Cosmological Antimatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, John; Yamamoto, Akira

    2009-01-01

    The apex of the Balloon-borne Experiment with a Superconducting Spectrometer (BESS) program was reached with the Antarctic flight of BESS-Polar II, during the 2007-2008 Austral Summer, that obtained 24.5 days of data on over 4.7 billion cosmic-ray events. The US-Japan BESS Collaboration uses elementary particle measurements to study the early Universe and provides fundamental data on the spectra of light cosmic-ray elements and isotopes. BESS measures the energy spectra of cosmic-ray antiprotons to investigate signatures of possible exotic sources, such as dark-matter candidates, and searches for heavier antinuclei that might reach Earth from antimatter domains formed during symmetry breaking processes in the early Universe. Since 1993, BESS has carried out eleven high-latitude balloon flights, two of long duration, that together have defined the study of antiprotons below about 4 GeV, provided standard references for light element and isotope spectra, and set the most sensitive limits on the existence of antideuterons and antihelium. The BESS-Polar II flight took place at Solar Minimum, when the sensitivity of the low-energy antiproton measurements to a primary source is greatest. The rich BESS-Polar II dataset more than doubles the combined data from all earlier BESS flights and has 10-20 times the statistics of BESS data from the previous Solar Minimum. Here, we summarize the scientific results of BESS program, focusing on the results obtained using data from the long-duration flights of BESS-Polar I (2004) and BESS-Polar II.

  8. CERN antiproton target: Hydrocode analysis of its core material dynamic response under proton beam impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Torregrosa Martin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Antiprotons are produced at CERN by colliding a 26  GeV/c proton beam with a fixed target made of a 3 mm diameter, 55 mm length iridium core. The inherent characteristics of antiproton production involve extremely high energy depositions inside the target when impacted by each primary proton beam, making it one of the most dynamically demanding among high energy solid targets in the world, with a rise temperature above 2000 °C after each pulse impact and successive dynamic pressure waves of the order of GPa’s. An optimized redesign of the current target is foreseen for the next 20 years of operation. As a first step in the design procedure, this numerical study delves into the fundamental phenomena present in the target material core under proton pulse impact and subsequent pressure wave propagation by the use of hydrocodes. Three major phenomena have been identified, (i the dominance of a high frequency radial wave which produces destructive compressive-to-tensile pressure response (ii The existence of end-of-pulse tensile waves and its relevance on the overall response (iii A reduction of 44% in tensile pressure could be obtained by the use of a high density tantalum cladding.

  9. Delivering high performance BWR fuel reliably

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schardt, J.F. [GE Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Utilities are under intense pressure to reduce their production costs in order to compete in the increasingly deregulated marketplace. They need fuel, which can deliver high performance to meet demanding operating strategies. GE's latest BWR fuel design, GE14, provides that high performance capability. GE's product introduction process assures that this performance will be delivered reliably, with little risk to the utility. (author)

  10. HPTA: High-Performance Text Analytics

    OpenAIRE

    Vandierendonck, Hans; Murphy, Karen; Arif, Mahwish; Nikolopoulos, Dimitrios S.

    2017-01-01

    One of the main targets of data analytics is unstructured data, which primarily involves textual data. High-performance processing of textual data is non-trivial. We present the HPTA library for high-performance text analytics. The library helps programmers to map textual data to a dense numeric representation, which can be handled more efficiently. HPTA encapsulates three performance optimizations: (i) efficient memory management for textual data, (ii) parallel computation on associative dat...

  11. The New Digital-Receiver-Based System for Antiproton Beam Diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, Maria Elena; Ludwig, M; Marqversen, O; Pedersen, F

    2001-01-01

    An innovative system to measure antiproton beam intensity, momentum spread and mean momentum in CERN's Antiproton Decelerator (AD) is described. This system is based on a state-of-the-art Digital Receiver (DRX) board, consisting of 8 Digital Down-Converter (DDC) chips and one Digital Signal Processor (DSP). An ultra-low-noise, wide-band AC beam transformer (0.2 MHz - 30 MHz) is used to measure AC beam current modulation. For bunched beams, the intensity is obtained by measuring the amplitude of the fundamental and second RF Fourier components. On the magnetic plateaus the beam is debunched for stochastic or electron cooling and longitudinal beam properties (intensity, momentum spread and mean momentum) are measured by FFT-based spectral analysis of Schottky signals. The system thus provides real time information characterising the machine performance; it has been used for troubleshooting and to fine-tune the AD, thus achieving further improved performances. This system has been operating since May 2000 and ty...

  12. The CERN antiproton target: hydrocode analysis of its core material dynamic response under proton beam impact

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Claudio Torregrosa; Calviani, Marco; Muñoz-Cobo, José-Luis

    2016-01-01

    Antiprotons are produced at CERN by colliding a 26 GeV/c proton beam with a fixed target made of a 3 mm diameter, 55 mm length iridium core. The inherent characteristics of antiproton production involve extremely high energy depositions inside the target when impacted by each primary proton beam, making it one of the most dynamically demanding among high energy solid targets in the world, with a rise temperature above 2000 {\\deg}C after each pulse impact and successive dynamic pressure waves of the order of GPa's. An optimized redesign of the current target is foreseen for the next 20 years of operation. As a first step in the design procedure, this numerical study delves into the fundamental phenomena present in the target material core under proton pulse impact and subsequent pressure wave propagation by the use of hydrocodes. Three major phenomena have been identified, (i) the dominance of a high frequency radial wave which produces destructive compressive-to-tensile pressure response (ii) The existence of...

  13. Strategy Guideline. Partnering for High Performance Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prahl, Duncan [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    High performance houses require a high degree of coordination and have significant interdependencies between various systems in order to perform properly, meet customer expectations, and minimize risks for the builder. Responsibility for the key performance attributes is shared across the project team and can be well coordinated through advanced partnering strategies. For high performance homes, traditional partnerships need to be matured to the next level and be expanded to all members of the project team including trades, suppliers, manufacturers, HERS raters, designers, architects, and building officials as appropriate. This guide is intended for use by all parties associated in the design and construction of high performance homes. It serves as a starting point and features initial tools and resources for teams to collaborate to continually improve the energy efficiency and durability of new houses.

  14. High-performance ceramics. Fabrication, structure, properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petzow, G.; Tobolski, J.; Telle, R.

    1996-01-01

    The program ''Ceramic High-performance Materials'' pursued the objective to understand the chaining of cause and effect in the development of high-performance ceramics. This chain of problems begins with the chemical reactions for the production of powders, comprises the characterization, processing, shaping and compacting of powders, structural optimization, heat treatment, production and finishing, and leads to issues of materials testing and of a design appropriate to the material. The program ''Ceramic High-performance Materials'' has resulted in contributions to the understanding of fundamental interrelationships in terms of materials science, which are summarized in the present volume - broken down into eight special aspects. (orig./RHM)

  15. High Burnup Fuel Performance and Safety Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Je Keun; Lee, Chan Bok; Kim, Dae Ho (and others)

    2007-03-15

    The worldwide trend of nuclear fuel development is to develop a high burnup and high performance nuclear fuel with high economies and safety. Because the fuel performance evaluation code, INFRA, has a patent, and the superiority for prediction of fuel performance was proven through the IAEA CRP FUMEX-II program, the INFRA code can be utilized with commercial purpose in the industry. The INFRA code was provided and utilized usefully in the universities and relevant institutes domesticallly and it has been used as a reference code in the industry for the development of the intrinsic fuel rod design code.

  16. ADVANCED HIGH PERFORMANCE SOLID WALL BLANKET CONCEPTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WONG, CPC; MALANG, S; NISHIO, S; RAFFRAY, R; SAGARA, S

    2002-01-01

    OAK A271 ADVANCED HIGH PERFORMANCE SOLID WALL BLANKET CONCEPTS. First wall and blanket (FW/blanket) design is a crucial element in the performance and acceptance of a fusion power plant. High temperature structural and breeding materials are needed for high thermal performance. A suitable combination of structural design with the selected materials is necessary for D-T fuel sufficiency. Whenever possible, low afterheat, low chemical reactivity and low activation materials are desired to achieve passive safety and minimize the amount of high-level waste. Of course the selected fusion FW/blanket design will have to match the operational scenarios of high performance plasma. The key characteristics of eight advanced high performance FW/blanket concepts are presented in this paper. Design configurations, performance characteristics, unique advantages and issues are summarized. All reviewed designs can satisfy most of the necessary design goals. For further development, in concert with the advancement in plasma control and scrape off layer physics, additional emphasis will be needed in the areas of first wall coating material selection, design of plasma stabilization coils, consideration of reactor startup and transient events. To validate the projected performance of the advanced FW/blanket concepts the critical element is the need for 14 MeV neutron irradiation facilities for the generation of necessary engineering design data and the prediction of FW/blanket components lifetime and availability

  17. High performance liquid chromatographic determination of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-02-08

    ) high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) grade .... applications. These are important requirements if the reagent is to be applicable to on-line pre or post column derivatisation in a possible automation of the analytical.

  18. Analog circuit design designing high performance amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Feucht, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    The third volume Designing High Performance Amplifiers applies the concepts from the first two volumes. It is an advanced treatment of amplifier design/analysis emphasizing both wideband and precision amplification.

  19. High-performance computing using FPGAs

    CERN Document Server

    Benkrid, Khaled

    2013-01-01

    This book is concerned with the emerging field of High Performance Reconfigurable Computing (HPRC), which aims to harness the high performance and relative low power of reconfigurable hardware–in the form Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs)–in High Performance Computing (HPC) applications. It presents the latest developments in this field from applications, architecture, and tools and methodologies points of view. We hope that this work will form a reference for existing researchers in the field, and entice new researchers and developers to join the HPRC community.  The book includes:  Thirteen application chapters which present the most important application areas tackled by high performance reconfigurable computers, namely: financial computing, bioinformatics and computational biology, data search and processing, stencil computation e.g. computational fluid dynamics and seismic modeling, cryptanalysis, astronomical N-body simulation, and circuit simulation.     Seven architecture chapters which...

  20. Embedded High Performance Scalable Computing Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ngo, David

    2003-01-01

    The Embedded High Performance Scalable Computing Systems (EHPSCS) program is a cooperative agreement between Sanders, A Lockheed Martin Company and DARPA that ran for three years, from Apr 1995 - Apr 1998...

  1. Gradient High Performance Liquid Chromatography Method ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop a gradient high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for the simultaneous determination of phenylephrine (PHE) and ibuprofen (IBU) in solid ..... nimesulide, phenylephrine. Hydrochloride, chlorpheniramine maleate and caffeine anhydrous in pharmaceutical dosage form. Acta Pol.

  2. Observation of Ultra-Slow Antiprotons using Micro-channel Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imao, H.; Torii, H. A.; Nagata, Y.; Toyoda, H.; Shimoyama, T.; Enomoto, Y.; Higaki, H.; Kanai, Y.; Mohri, A.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2008-08-01

    Our group ASACUSA-MUSASHI has succeeded in accumulating several million antiprotons and extracting them as monochromatic ultra-slow antiproton beams (10 eV-1 keV) at CERN AD. We have observed ultra-slow antiprotons using micro-channel plates (MCP). The integrated pulse area of the output signals generated when the MCP was irradiated by ultra-slow antiprotons was 6 times higher than that by electrons. As a long-term effect, we also observed an increase in the background rate presumably due to the radioactivation of the MCP surface. Irradiating the antiproton beams on the MCP induces antiproton-nuclear annihilations only on the first layer of the surface. Low-energy and short-range secondary particles like charged nuclear fragments caused by the "surface nuclear reactions" would be the origin of our observed phenomena.

  3. Highlighting High Performance: Whitman Hanson Regional High School; Whitman, Massachusetts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2006-06-01

    This brochure describes the key high-performance building features of the Whitman-Hanson Regional High School. The brochure was paid for by the Massachusetts Technology Collaborative as part of their Green Schools Initiative. High-performance features described are daylighting and energy-efficient lighting, indoor air quality, solar and wind energy, building envelope, heating and cooling systems, water conservation, and acoustics. Energy cost savings are also discussed.

  4. Dark matter for excess of AMS-02 positrons and antiprotons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Hung Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose a dark matter explanation to simultaneously account for the excess of antiproton-to-proton and positron power spectra observed in the AMS-02 experiment while having the right dark matter relic abundance and satisfying the current direct search bounds. We extend the Higgs triplet model with a hidden gauge symmetry of SU(2X that is broken to Z3 by a quadruplet scalar field, rendering the associated gauge bosons stable weakly-interacting massive particle dark matter candidates. By coupling the complex Higgs triplet and the SU(2X quadruplet, the dark matter candidates can annihilate into triplet Higgs bosons each of which in turn decays into lepton or gauge boson final states. Such a mechanism gives rise to correct excess of positrons and antiprotons with an appropriate choice of the triplet vacuum expectation value. Besides, the model provides a link between neutrino mass and dark matter phenomenology.

  5. Pionic annihilation of antiprotons stopped on sup 3 He

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bendiscioli, G.; Filippini, V.; Rotondi, A.; Salvini, P.; Venaglioni, A. (Pavia Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pavia (Italy)); Bossolasco, S.; Bussa, M.P.; Busso, L.; Fava, L.; Ferrero, L.; Maggiora, A.; Panzieri, D.; Piragino, G.; Piragino, R.; Tosello, F. (Turin Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica Generale Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Turin (Italy)); Batusov, Yu.A.; Falomkin, I.V.; Pontecorvo, G.B.; Rozhdestvensky, A.M.; Sapozhnikov, M.G.; Tretyak, V.I. (Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (USSR)); Guaraldo, C. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati (Italy). Lab. Nazionale di Frascati); Lodi Rizzini, E. (Brescia Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Automazione Industriale Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Turin (Italy)); Haatuft, A.; Halsteinslid, A.; Myklebost, K.; Olsen, J.M. (Bergen Univ. (Norway). Dept. of Physics); Breivik, F.O.; Jacobsen, T.; Soerensen, S.O. (Oslo Univ. (Norway). Physics Dept.); Balestra

    1990-11-26

    The pionic annihilation of antiprotons stopped on {sup 3}He nuclei in a self-shunted streamer chamber exposed to the antiproton beam of LEAR is studied. The data concern charged-particle multiplicity distributions, branching ratios for different final states, the probability of final-state interaction, {pi}{sup -}, {pi}{sup +}, p and d momentum spectra, like and unlike pion angular correlations, {pi} and other charged-particle angular correlations. The comparison of the {sup 3}He data with those obtained on {sup 1}H, {sup 2}H and {sup 4}He does not reveal relevant effects due to the increase of the nucleon number; the small differences can be seen as due to a weak final-state interaction. (orig.).

  6. Pionic annihilation of antiprotons stopped on 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendiscioli, G.; Filippini, V.; Rotondi, A.; Salvini, P.; Venaglioni, A.; Bossolasco, S.; Bussa, M.P.; Busso, L.; Fava, L.; Ferrero, L.; Maggiora, A.; Panzieri, D.; Piragino, G.; Piragino, R.; Tosello, F.; Batusov, Yu.A.; Falomkin, I.V.; Pontecorvo, G.B.; Rozhdestvensky, A.M.; Sapozhnikov, M.G.; Tretyak, V.I.; Guaraldo, C.; Haatuft, A.; Halsteinslid, A.; Myklebost, K.; Olsen, J.M.; Zenoni, A.

    1990-01-01

    The pionic annihilation of antiprotons stopped on 3 He nuclei in a self-shunted streamer chamber exposed to the antiproton beam of LEAR is studied. The data concern charged-particle multiplicity distributions, branching ratios for different final states, the probability of final-state interaction, π - , π + , p and d momentum spectra, like and unlike pion angular correlations, π and other charged-particle angular correlations. The comparison of the 3 He data with those obtained on 1 H, 2 H and 4 He does not reveal relevant effects due to the increase of the nucleon number; the small differences can be seen as due to a weak final-state interaction. (orig.)

  7. Testing quantum chromodynamics in anti-proton reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1987-10-01

    An experimental program with anti-protons at intermediate energy can serve as an important testing ground for QCD. Detailed predictions for exclusive cross sections at large momentum transfer based on perturbative QCD and the QCD sum rule form of the proton distribution amplitude are available for anti p p → γγ for both real and virtual photons. Meson-pair and lepton-pair final states also give sensitive tests of the theory. The production of charmed hadrons in exclusive anti p p channels may have a non-negligible cross section. Anti-proton interactions in a nucleus, particularly J/psi production, can play an important role in clarifying fundamental QCD issues, such as color transparency, critical length phenomena, and the validity of the reduced nuclear amplitude phenomenology

  8. The CERN Antiproton Collider Programme Accelerators and Accumulation Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Koziol, Heribert

    2004-01-01

    One of CERN's most daring and successful undertakings was the quest for the intermediate bosons, W and Z. In this paper, we describe the accelerator part of the venture which relied on a number of innovations: an extension of the budding method of stochastic cooling by many orders of magnitude; the construction of the Antiproton Accumulator, depending on several novel accelerator methods and technologies; major modifications to the 26 GeV PS Complex; and the radical conversion of the 300 GeV SPS, which just had started up as an accelerator, to a protonâ€"antiproton collider. The SPS Collider had to master the beamâ€"beam effect far beyond limits reached ever before and had to function in a tight symbiosis with the huge detectors UA1 and UA2.

  9. High performance computing in Windows Azure cloud

    OpenAIRE

    Ambruš, Dejan

    2013-01-01

    High performance, security, availability, scalability, flexibility and lower costs of maintenance have essentially contributed to the growing popularity of cloud computing in all spheres of life, especially in business. In fact cloud computing offers even more than this. With usage of virtual computing clusters a runtime environment for high performance computing can be efficiently implemented also in a cloud. There are many advantages but also some disadvantages of cloud computing, some ...

  10. High-performance computing — an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marksteiner, Peter

    1996-08-01

    An overview of high-performance computing (HPC) is given. Different types of computer architectures used in HPC are discussed: vector supercomputers, high-performance RISC processors, various parallel computers like symmetric multiprocessors, workstation clusters, massively parallel processors. Software tools and programming techniques used in HPC are reviewed: vectorizing compilers, optimization and vector tuning, optimization for RISC processors; parallel programming techniques like shared-memory parallelism, message passing and data parallelism; and numerical libraries.

  11. Governance among Malaysian high performing companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asri Marsidi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Well performed companies have always been linked with effective governance which is generally reflected through effective board of directors. However many issues concerning the attributes for effective board of directors remained unresolved. Nowadays diversity has been perceived as able to influence the corporate performance due to the likelihood of meeting variety of needs and demands from diverse customers and clients. The study therefore aims to provide a fundamental understanding on governance among high performing companies in Malaysia.

  12. High-performance OPCPA laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuegel, J.D.; Bagnoud, V.; Bromage, J.; Begishev, I.A.; Puth, J.

    2006-01-01

    Optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification (OPCPA) is ideally suited for amplifying ultra-fast laser pulses since it provides broadband gain across a wide range of wavelengths without many of the disadvantages of regenerative amplification. A high-performance OPCPA system has been demonstrated as a prototype for the front end of the OMEGA Extended Performance (EP) Laser System. (authors)

  13. High-performance OPCPA laser system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuegel, J.D.; Bagnoud, V.; Bromage, J.; Begishev, I.A.; Puth, J. [Rochester Univ., Lab. for Laser Energetics, NY (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification (OPCPA) is ideally suited for amplifying ultra-fast laser pulses since it provides broadband gain across a wide range of wavelengths without many of the disadvantages of regenerative amplification. A high-performance OPCPA system has been demonstrated as a prototype for the front end of the OMEGA Extended Performance (EP) Laser System. (authors)

  14. Comparing Dutch and British high performing managers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waal, A.A. de; Heijden, B.I.J.M. van der; Selvarajah, C.; Meyer, D.

    2016-01-01

    National cultures have a strong influence on the performance of organizations and should be taken into account when studying the traits of high performing managers. At the same time, many studies that focus upon the attributes of successful managers show that there are attributes that are similar

  15. Search for Cosmic-Ray Antiproton Origins and for Cosmological Antimatter with BESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, A.; Mitchell, J. W.; Yoshimura, K.; Abe, K.; Fuke, H.; Haino, S.; Hams, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Horikoshi, A.; Itazaki, A.; hide

    2011-01-01

    The balloon-borne experiment with a superconducting spectrometer (BESS) has performed cosmic-ray observations as a US-Japan cooperative space science program, and has provided fundamental data on cosmic rays to study elementary particle phenomena in the early Universe. The BESS experiment has measured the energy spectra of cosmic-ray antiprotons to investigate signatures of possible exotic origins such as dark matter candidates or primordial black holes. and searched for heavier antinuclei that might reach Earth from antimatter domains formed in the early Universe. The apex of the BESS program was reached with the Antarctic flight of BESS-Polar II, during the 2007- 2008 Austral Summer, that obtained over 4.7 billion cosmic-ray events from 24.5 days of observation. The flight took place at the expected solar minimum, when the sensitivity of the low-energy antiproton measurements to a primary source is greatest. Here, we report the scientific restults, focusing on the long-duration flights of BESS-Polar I (2004) and BESS-Polar II (2007-2008).

  16. Antiprotons from dark matter annihilation in the Galaxy. Astrophysical uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evoli, Carmelo [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). National Astronomical Observatories; Cholis, Ilias; Ullio, Piero [SISSA, Sezione di Trieste (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Trieste (Italy); Grasso, Dario [INFN, Sezione di Pisa (Italy); Maccione, Luca [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    The latest years have seen steady progresses in WIMP dark matter (DM) searches, with hints of possible signals suggested by both direct and indirect detection experiments. Antiprotons can play a key role validating those interpretations since they are copiously produced by WIMP annihilations in the Galactic halo, and the secondary antiproton background produced by Cosmic Ray (CR) interactions is predicted with fair accuracy and matches the observed spectrum very well. Using the publicly available numerical DRAGON code, we reconsider antiprotons as a tool to constrain DM models discussing its power and limitations. We provide updated constraints on a wide class of annihilating DM models by comparing our predictions against the most up-to-date anti p measurements, taking also into account the latest spectral information on the p, He and other CR nuclei fluxes. Doing that, we probe carefully the uncertainties associated to both secondary and DM originated antiprotons, by using a variety of distinctively different assumptions for the propagation of CRs and for the DM distribution in the Galaxy. We find that the impact of the astrophysical uncertainties on constraining the DM properties can be much stronger, up to a factor of {proportional_to}50, than the one due to uncertainties on the DM distribution ({proportional_to}2-6). Remarkably, even reducing the uncertainties on the propagation parameters derived by local observables, non-local effects can still change DM model constraints even by 50%. Nevertheless, current anti p data place tight constraints on DM models, excluding some of those suggested in connection with indirect and direct searches. Finally we discuss the power of upcoming CR spectral data from the AMS-02 observatory to drastically reduce the uncertainties discussed in this paper and estimate the expected sensitivity of this instrument to some sets of DM models. (orig.)

  17. Physics at the Fermilab Tevatron Proton-Antiproton Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geer, S.

    1994-08-01

    These lectures discuss a selection of QCD and Electroweak results from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron Proton-Antiproton Collider. Results are presently based on data samples of about 20 pb -1 at a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV. Results discussed include jet production, direct photon production, W mass and width measurements, the triboson coupling, and most exciting of all, evidence for top quark production

  18. Antiproton-helium annihilation around 45 MeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balestra, F.; Bassolasco, S.; Bussa, M.P.; Busso, L.; Ferrero, L.; Panzieri, D.; Piragino, G.; Tosello, F.; Barbieri, R.; Bendiscioli, G.; Filippini, V.; Rotondi, A.; Salvini, P.; Zenoni, A.; Batusov, Yu.A.; Falomkin, I.V.; Pontecorvo, G.B.; Rozhdestvensky, A.M.; Sapozhnikov, M.G.; Tretyak, V.I.; Breivik, F.O.; Jacobsen, T.; Soerensen, S.O.

    1989-01-01

    The anti p 4 He annihilation cross section averaged over the interval 40-50 MeV/c has been measured using a streamer chamber in a magnetic field. The measured value is 1342±250 mb. It agrees with a behaviour like 1/p of the annihilation cross section. Our result has been obtained at the lowest momentum achieved till now in measurements of antiproton annihilation in flight. (orig.)

  19. Antiproton-helium annihilation around 45 MeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balestra, F.; Bassolasco, S.; Bussa, M.P.; Busso, L.; Ferrero, L.; Panzieri, D.; Piragino, G.; Tosello, F. (Turin Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica Generale; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Turin (Italy)); Barbieri, R.; Bendiscioli, G.; Filippini, V.; Rotondi, A.; Salvini, P.; Zenoni, A. (Pavia Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pavia (Italy)); Batusov, Yu.A.; Falomkin, I.V.; Pontecorvo, G.B.; Rozhdestvensky, A.M.; Sapozhnikov, M.G.; Tretyak, V.I. (Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (USSR)); Breivik, F.O.; Jacobsen, T.; Soerensen, S.O. (Oslo Univ. (Norway). Fysisk Inst.); Guaraldo, C.; Maggiora, A. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati (Italy). Lab. Nazionale di Frascati); Haatuft, A.; Halsteinslid, A.; Myklebost, K.; Olsen, J.M. (Bergen Univ. (Norway). Dept. of Physics); Lodi Rizzini, E. (Brescia Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Automazione Industriale); Masala, M. (Brescia Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Automazione Ind

    1989-10-26

    The anti p{sup 4}He annihilation cross section averaged over the interval 40-50 MeV/c has been measured using a streamer chamber in a magnetic field. The measured value is 1342+-250 mb. It agrees with a behaviour like 1/p of the annihilation cross section. Our result has been obtained at the lowest momentum achieved till now in measurements of antiproton annihilation in flight. (orig.).

  20. Evidence of isospin effects in antiproton-nucleus annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balestra, F.; Bossolasco, S.; Bussa, M.P.; Busso, L.; Ferrero, L.; Panzieri, D.; Piragino, G.; Tosello, F.; Barbieri, R.; Bendiscioli, G.; Rotondi, A.; Salvini, P.; Venaglioni, A.; Zenoni, A.; Batusov, Yu.A.; Falomkin, I.V.; Pontecorvo, G.B.; Rozhdestvensky, A.M.; Sapozhnikov, M.G.; Tretyak, V.I.; Guaraldo, C.; Maggiora, A.; Haatuft, A.; Halsteinslid, A.; Myklebost, K.; Olsen, J.M.; Breivik, F.O.; Jacobsen, T.; Soerensen, S.O.

    1989-01-01

    Antiproton- 3 He annihilation events at rest have been detected using a self-shunted streamer chamber. The ratio of the cross section for annihilation on neutrons and on protons has been measured (0.467±0.035). It is compared with other results from annihilation on free nucleons, deuterium, 3 He and 4 He. The low value of the ratio seems to indicate a strong isospin dependence of the antinucleon-nucleon P-wave amplitude. (orig.)

  1. Polarization of antiprotons by the Stern-Gerlach effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kewisch, J.; Rossmanith, R.; Onel, Y.; Penzo, A.; Kreiser, H.

    1988-01-01

    A method to obtain polarized antiprotons in the low energy storage ring LEAR via spatial separation of opposite spin states is described in earlier papers (Y. Onel et al., 1986). We will discuss here in more detail a) the integration of the special magnets (spin splitter) into the LEAR optics and b) some first tracking results of particle and spin motion in these optics. (orig./HSI)

  2. Prospects for testing Lorentz and CPT symmetry with antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Arnaldo J.

    2018-03-01

    A brief overview of the prospects of testing Lorentz and CPT symmetry with antimatter experiments is presented. The models discussed are applicable to atomic spectroscopy experiments, Penning-trap experiments and gravitational tests. Comments about the sensitivity of the most recent antimatter experiments to the models reviewed here are included. This article is part of the Theo Murphy meeting issue `Antiproton physics in the ELENA era'.

  3. Prospects for testing Lorentz and CPT symmetry with antiprotons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Arnaldo J

    2018-03-28

    A brief overview of the prospects of testing Lorentz and CPT symmetry with antimatter experiments is presented. The models discussed are applicable to atomic spectroscopy experiments, Penning-trap experiments and gravitational tests. Comments about the sensitivity of the most recent antimatter experiments to the models reviewed here are included.This article is part of the Theo Murphy meeting issue 'Antiproton physics in the ELENA era'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  4. Commissioning of Fermilab's Electron Cooling System for 8-GeV Antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Nagaitsev, Sergei; Burov, Alexey; Carlson, Kermit; Gai, Wei; Gattuso, Consolato; Hu, Martin; Kazakevich, Grigory; Kramper, Brian J; Kroc, Thomas K; Leibfritz, Jerry; Prost, Lionel; Pruss, Stanley M; Saewert, Greg W; Schmidt, Chuck; Seletsky, Sergey; Shemyakin, Alexander V; Sutherland, Mary; Tupikov, Vitali; Warner, Arden

    2005-01-01

    A 4.3-MeV electron cooling system has been installed at Fermilab in the Recycler antiproton storage ring and is being currently commissioned. The cooling system is designed to assist accumulation of 8.9-GeV/c antiprotons for the Tevatron collider operations. This paper will report on the progress of the electron beam commissioning effort as well as on detailed plans of demonstrating the cooling of antiprotons.

  5. Bubble detector measurements of a mixed radiation field from antiproton annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassler, Niels; Knudsen, Helge; Moller, Soren Pape; Petersen, Jorgen B.; Rahbek, Dennis; Uggerhoj, Ulrik I.

    2006-01-01

    In the light of recent progress in the study of the biological potential of antiproton tumour treatment it is important to be able to characterize the neutron intensity arising from antiproton annihilation using simple, compact and reliable detectors. The intensity of fast neutrons from antiproton annihilation on polystyrene has been measured with bubble detectors and a multiplicity has been derived as well as an estimated neutron equivalent dose. Additionally the sensitivity of bubble detectors towards protons was measured

  6. Evaporative cooling of antiprotons and efforts to trap antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, Gorm Bruun

    Evaporative cooling has proven to be an invaluable technique in atomic physics, allowing for the study of effects such as Bose-Einstein condensation. One main topic of this thesis is the first application of evaporative cooling to cold non-neutral plasmas stored in an ion trap. We (the ALPHA collaboration) have achieved cooling of a cloud of antiprotons to a temperature as low as 9 K, two orders of magnitude lowerthan ever directly measured previously. The measurements are well-described by appropriate rate equations for the temperature and number of particles. The technique has direct application to the ongoing attempts to produce trapped samples of antihydrogen. In these experiments the maximum trap depths are ex tremely shallow (~0.6 K for ground state atoms), and careful control of the trapped antiprotons and positrons used to form the (anti)atoms is essential to succes. Since 2006 powerful tools to diagnose and manipulate the antiproton and positron plasmas in the ALPHA apparatus have been developed and ...

  7. High Performance Work Systems for Online Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contacos-Sawyer, Jonna; Revels, Mark; Ciampa, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify the key elements of a High Performance Work System (HPWS) and explore the possibility of implementation in an online institution of higher learning. With the projected rapid growth of the demand for online education and its importance in post-secondary education, providing high quality curriculum, excellent…

  8. Teacher Accountability at High Performing Charter Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Moises G.

    2016-01-01

    This study will examine the teacher accountability and evaluation policies and practices at three high performing charter schools located in San Diego County, California. Charter schools are exempted from many laws, rules, and regulations that apply to traditional school systems. By examining the teacher accountability systems at high performing…

  9. Advanced high performance solid wall blanket concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Malang, S.; Nishio, S.; Raffray, R.; Sagara, A.

    2002-01-01

    First wall and blanket (FW/blanket) design is a crucial element in the performance and acceptance of a fusion power plant. High temperature structural and breeding materials are needed for high thermal performance. A suitable combination of structural design with the selected materials is necessary for D-T fuel sufficiency. Whenever possible, low afterheat, low chemical reactivity and low activation materials are desired to achieve passive safety and minimize the amount of high-level waste. Of course the selected fusion FW/blanket design will have to match the operational scenarios of high performance plasma. The key characteristics of eight advanced high performance FW/blanket concepts are presented in this paper. Design configurations, performance characteristics, unique advantages and issues are summarized. All reviewed designs can satisfy most of the necessary design goals. For further development, in concert with the advancement in plasma control and scrape off layer physics, additional emphasis will be needed in the areas of first wall coating material selection, design of plasma stabilization coils, consideration of reactor startup and transient events. To validate the projected performance of the advanced FW/blanket concepts the critical element is the need for 14 MeV neutron irradiation facilities for the generation of necessary engineering design data and the prediction of FW/blanket components lifetime and availability

  10. Antiproton and positron signal enhancement in dark matter mini-spikes scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brun, Pierre; Bertone, Gianfranco; Lavalle, Julien; Salati, Pierre; Taillet, Richard

    2007-04-01

    The annihilation of dark matter (DM) in the Galaxy could produce specific imprints on the spectra of antimatter species in Galactic cosmic rays, which could be detected by upcoming experiments such as PAMELA and AMS02. Recent studies show that the presence of substructures can enhance the annihilation signal by a 'boost factor' that not only depends on energy, but that is intrinsically a statistical property of the distribution of DM substructures inside the Milky Way. We investigate a scenario in which substructures consist of ∼100 'mini-spikes' around intermediate-mass black holes. Focusing on primary positrons and antiprotons, we find large boost factors, up to a few thousand, that exhibit a large variance at high energy in the case of positrons and at low energy in the case of antiprotons. As a consequence, an estimate of the DM particle mass based on the observed cut-off in the positron spectrum could lead to a substantial underestimate of its actual value. (authors)

  11. Measurement of cosmic ray antiprotons from 3.7 to 19 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hof, M.; Pfeifer, C.; Menn, W.; Simon, M.; Golden, R.L.; Stochaj, S.J.; Basini, G.; Ricci, M.

    1996-02-01

    The antiproton to proton ratio in the cosmic rays has been measured in the energy range from 3.7 to 19 GeV. This measurement was carried out using a balloon-borne superconducting magnetic spectrometer along with a gas Cherenkov counter, an imaging calorimeter and a time of flight scintillator system. The measured antiproton to proton ratio was determined to be 1.24 (+0.68, -0.51)X 10 -4 . The present result along with other recent observations show that the observed abundances of antiprotons are consistent with models, in which antiprotons are produced as secondaries during the propagation of cosmic rays in the galaxy

  12. Time-dependent density functional calculation of the energy loss of antiprotons colliding with metallic nanoshells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quijada, M.; Borisov, A.G.; Muino, R.D.

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory is used to study the interaction between antiprotons and metallic nanoshells. The ground state electronic properties of the nanoshell are obtained in the jellium approximation. The energy lost by the antiproton during the collision is calculated and compared to that suffered by antiprotons traveling in metal clusters. The resulting energy loss per unit path length of material in thin nanoshells is larger than the corresponding quantity for clusters. It is shown that the collision process can be interpreted as the antiproton crossing of two nearly bi-dimensional independent metallic systems. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. A novel antiproton radial diagnostic based on octupole induced ballistic loss

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G.B.; Bowe, P.D.; Bray, C.C.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C.L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Fajans, J.; Fujiwara, M.C.; Funakoshi, R.; Gill, D.R.; Hangst, J.S.; Hardy, W.N.; Hayano, R.S.; Hayden, M.E.; Humphries, A.J.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M.J.; Jorgensen, L.V.; Kurchaninov, L.; Lambo, R.; Madsen, N.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Page, R.D.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Seif El Nasr, S.; Silveira, D.M.; Storey, J.W.; Thompson, R.I.; van der Werf, D.P.; Wurtele, J.S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2008-01-01

    We report results from a novel diagnostic that probes the outer radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds. The diagnostic allows us to determine the profile by monitoring the time-history of antiproton losses that occur as an octupole field in the antiproton confinement region is increased. We show several examples of how this diagnostic helps us to understand the radial dynamics of antiprotons in normal and nested Penning-Malmberg traps. Better understanding of these dynamics may aid current attempts to trap antihydrogen atoms.

  14. A novel antiproton radial diagnostic based on octupole induced ballistic loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Humphries, A. J.; Jenkins, M. J.; Joergensen, L. V.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Bray, C. C.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; Wurtele, J. S.; Cesar, C. L.; Lambo, R.; Silveira, D. M.; Fujiwara, M. C.

    2008-01-01

    We report results from a novel diagnostic that probes the outer radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds. The diagnostic allows us to determine the profile by monitoring the time history of antiproton losses that occur as an octupole field in the antiproton confinement region is increased. We show several examples of how this diagnostic helps us to understand the radial dynamics of antiprotons in normal and nested Penning-Malmberg traps. Better understanding of these dynamics may aid current attempts to trap antihydrogen atoms

  15. Spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms and its contribution to the fundamental physical constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayano, Ryugo S.

    2010-01-01

    Antiprotonic helium atom, a metastable neutral system consisting of an antiproton, an electron and a helium nucleus, was serendipitously discovered, and has been studied at CERN’s antiproton decelerator facility. Its transition frequencies have recently been measured to nine digits of precision by laser spectroscopy. By comparing these experimental results with three-body QED calculations, the antiproton-to-electron massratio was determined as 1836.152674(5). This result contributed to the CODATA recommended values of the fundamental physical constants. PMID:20075605

  16. Investigation of the antiprotonic X-ray spectrum of the lithium isotopes 6Li and 7Li

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guigas, R.

    1981-09-01

    Antiprotons of the low-energy separated anti p-beam K 23 at CERN in Geneva have been stopped in thin (0.6 g/cm 2 ) targets of the Lithium isotopes 6 Li and 7 Li. The characteristic X-rays of the formed antiprotonic atoms were measured with four identical high-resolution Si (Li) detectors. Three lines of the N- series, four lines of the M-series and the 3d-2p transition of the Balmer series were observed. The measured relative intensities of the M- and N-series transitions are well described by the simple cascade model of Eisenberg and Kessler. The 3d-2p transition is considerably influenced by the strong interaction between antiproton and nucleus and thus drastically reduced in intensity. The analysis of this transition yields the shift and width of the 2p level, whereas the width of the 3d level is deduced from intensity considerations. (orig./HSI)

  17. Precision Measurement of the Energies and Line Shapes of Antiprotonic Lyman and Balmer Transitions From Hydrogen and Helium Isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS207 \\\\ \\\\ For the study of the antiproton-proton and antiproton-nuclear spin-spin and spin-orbital interaction at threshold a high resolution measurement is proposed of the line shapes and energy shifts of antiprotonic K$\\alpha$ and L$\\alpha$ transitions of hydrogen and helium isotopes. The intense LEAR beam, stopped in the cyclotron trap at low gas pressure, provides a unique~X-ray~source with sufficient brightness. Charge coupled devices with their excellent background rejection and energy resolution allow a precise determination of the strong shifts and widths of the 1s hyperfine states of protonium, in addition the detection of the $\\bar{p}$D K$\\alpha$ transition should be possible. A focussing crystal spectrometer with a resolution $\\Delta$E/E of about l0$ ^- ^{4} $, which is superior in the accuracy of the energy determination by two orders of magnitude as compared to the present detection methods, will be used to measure the energies of the L$\\alpha$ transitions. This permits a first direct measure...

  18. Capture, Electron-Cooling and Compression of Antiprotons in a Large Penning-Trap for Physics Experiments with an Ultra-Low Energy Extracted Antiproton Beam

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS200 \\\\ \\\\The availability of ultra-low energy antiprotons is a crucial ingredient for the execution of the gravity measurements PS200. We have developed a method to provide such low energy antiprotons based on a large Penning trap (the PS200 catching trap). This system can accept a fast-extracted pulse from LEAR, reduce the energy of the antiprotons in the pulse from 5.9~MeV to several tens of kilovolts using a degrading foil, and then capture the antiprotons in a large Penning trap. These antiprotons are cooled by electrons previously admitted to the trap and are collected in a small region at the center of the trap. We have demonstrated our capability to capture up to 1~million antiprotons from LEAR in a single shot, electron cool these antiprotons, and transfer up to 95\\% of them into the inner, harmonic region. A storage time in excess of 1 hour was observed. These results have been obtained with the cryogenic trap vacuum coupled to a room temperature vacuum at about l0$ ^- ^{1} ^0 $ Torr, which is an...

  19. High performance bio-integrated devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Lee, Jongha; Park, Minjoon

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, personalized electronics for medical applications, particularly, have attracted much attention with the rise of smartphones because the coupling of such devices and smartphones enables the continuous health-monitoring in patients' daily life. Especially, it is expected that the high performance biomedical electronics integrated with the human body can open new opportunities in the ubiquitous healthcare. However, the mechanical and geometrical constraints inherent in all standard forms of high performance rigid wafer-based electronics raise unique integration challenges with biotic entities. Here, we describe materials and design constructs for high performance skin-mountable bio-integrated electronic devices, which incorporate arrays of single crystalline inorganic nanomembranes. The resulting electronic devices include flexible and stretchable electrophysiology electrodes and sensors coupled with active electronic components. These advances in bio-integrated systems create new directions in the personalized health monitoring and/or human-machine interfaces.

  20. Designing a High Performance Parallel Personal Cluster

    OpenAIRE

    Kapanova, K. G.; Sellier, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Today, many scientific and engineering areas require high performance computing to perform computationally intensive experiments. For example, many advances in transport phenomena, thermodynamics, material properties, computational chemistry and physics are possible only because of the availability of such large scale computing infrastructures. Yet many challenges are still open. The cost of energy consumption, cooling, competition for resources have been some of the reasons why the scientifi...

  1. vSphere high performance cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkar, Prasenjit

    2013-01-01

    vSphere High Performance Cookbook is written in a practical, helpful style with numerous recipes focusing on answering and providing solutions to common, and not-so common, performance issues and problems.The book is primarily written for technical professionals with system administration skills and some VMware experience who wish to learn about advanced optimization and the configuration features and functions for vSphere 5.1.

  2. High performance parallel I/O

    CERN Document Server

    Prabhat

    2014-01-01

    Gain Critical Insight into the Parallel I/O EcosystemParallel I/O is an integral component of modern high performance computing (HPC), especially in storing and processing very large datasets to facilitate scientific discovery. Revealing the state of the art in this field, High Performance Parallel I/O draws on insights from leading practitioners, researchers, software architects, developers, and scientists who shed light on the parallel I/O ecosystem.The first part of the book explains how large-scale HPC facilities scope, configure, and operate systems, with an emphasis on choices of I/O har

  3. The High Momentum Particle IDentification (HMPID) detector PID performance and its contribution to the ALICE physics program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Giacomo; ALICE Collaboration

    2017-12-01

    The ALICE apparatus is dedicated to study the properties of strongly interacting matter under extremely high temperature and energy density conditions. For this, enhanced particle identification (PID) capabilities are required. Among the PID ALICE detectors, the ALICE-HMPID (High Momentum Particle IDentification) detector is devoted to the identification of charged hadrons, exploiting the Cherenkov effect. It consists of seven identical RICH modules, with liquid C6F14 as Cherenkov radiator (n ≈1.298 at λ=175 nm). Photon and charged particle detection is performed by a MWPC, coupled with a pad segmented CsI coated photo-cathode. The total CsI active area is 10.3 m2. The HMPID provides 3 sigma separation for pions and kaons up to pT = 3 GeV / c and for kaons and (anti-)protons up to pT = 5 GeV / c . A review of the HMPID PID performance, in particular in the challenging central Pb-Pb collisions, and its contribution to the ALICE physics program, using the LHC RUN1 (2010-2013) and RUN2 (2015) data, are presented.

  4. View of the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) and portrait of Prof. Tommy Eriksson, in charge of the AD machine.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    The Antiproton Decelerator (AD) is a storage ring at the CERN laboratory in Geneva. It started operation in 2000. It decelerates antiprotons before sending them to several experiments studying antimatter : ALPHA, ASACUSA, ATRAP and ACE.

  5. Strategy Guideline: Partnering for High Performance Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prahl, D.

    2013-01-01

    High performance houses require a high degree of coordination and have significant interdependencies between various systems in order to perform properly, meet customer expectations, and minimize risks for the builder. Responsibility for the key performance attributes is shared across the project team and can be well coordinated through advanced partnering strategies. For high performance homes, traditional partnerships need to be matured to the next level and be expanded to all members of the project team including trades, suppliers, manufacturers, HERS raters, designers, architects, and building officials as appropriate. In an environment where the builder is the only source of communication between trades and consultants and where relationships are, in general, adversarial as opposed to cooperative, the chances of any one building system to fail are greater. Furthermore, it is much harder for the builder to identify and capitalize on synergistic opportunities. Partnering can help bridge the cross-functional aspects of the systems approach and achieve performance-based criteria. Critical success factors for partnering include support from top management, mutual trust, effective and open communication, effective coordination around common goals, team building, appropriate use of an outside facilitator, a partnering charter progress toward common goals, an effective problem-solving process, long-term commitment, continuous improvement, and a positive experience for all involved.

  6. Long-term bridge performance high priority bridge performance issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Bridge performance is a multifaceted issue involving performance of materials and protective systems, : performance of individual components of the bridge, and performance of the structural system as a whole. The : Long-Term Bridge Performance (LTBP)...

  7. Validated High Performance Liquid Chromatography Method for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop a simple, rapid and sensitive high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for the determination of cefadroxil monohydrate in human plasma. Methods: Schimadzu HPLC with LC solution software was used with Waters Spherisorb, C18 (5 μm, 150mm × 4.5mm) column. The mobile phase ...

  8. An Introduction to High Performance Fortran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Merlin

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available High Performance Fortran (HPF is an informal standard for extensions to Fortran 90 to assist its implementation on parallel architectures, particularly for data-parallel computation. Among other things, it includes directives for specifying data distribution across multiple memories, and concurrent execution features. This article provides a tutorial introduction to the main features of HPF.

  9. High performance computing on vector systems

    CERN Document Server

    Roller, Sabine

    2008-01-01

    Presents the developments in high-performance computing and simulation on modern supercomputer architectures. This book covers trends in hardware and software development in general and specifically the vector-based systems and heterogeneous architectures. It presents innovative fields like coupled multi-physics or multi-scale simulations.

  10. High Performance Electronics on Flexible Silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Sevilla, Galo T.

    2016-09-01

    Over the last few years, flexible electronic systems have gained increased attention from researchers around the world because of their potential to create new applications such as flexible displays, flexible energy harvesters, artificial skin, and health monitoring systems that cannot be integrated with conventional wafer based complementary metal oxide semiconductor processes. Most of the current efforts to create flexible high performance devices are based on the use of organic semiconductors. However, inherent material\\'s limitations make them unsuitable for big data processing and high speed communications. The objective of my doctoral dissertation is to develop integration processes that allow the transformation of rigid high performance electronics into flexible ones while maintaining their performance and cost. In this work, two different techniques to transform inorganic complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor electronics into flexible ones have been developed using industry compatible processes. Furthermore, these techniques were used to realize flexible discrete devices and circuits which include metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors, the first demonstration of flexible Fin-field-effect-transistors, and metal-oxide-semiconductors-based circuits. Finally, this thesis presents a new technique to package, integrate, and interconnect flexible high performance electronics using low cost additive manufacturing techniques such as 3D printing and inkjet printing. This thesis contains in depth studies on electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties of the fabricated devices.

  11. Debugging a high performance computing program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Thomas M.

    2013-08-20

    Methods, apparatus, and computer program products are disclosed for debugging a high performance computing program by gathering lists of addresses of calling instructions for a plurality of threads of execution of the program, assigning the threads to groups in dependence upon the addresses, and displaying the groups to identify defective threads.

  12. Technology Leadership in Malaysia's High Performance School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yieng, Wong Ai; Daud, Khadijah Binti

    2017-01-01

    Headmaster as leader of the school also plays a role as a technology leader. This applies to the high performance schools (HPS) headmaster as well. The HPS excel in all aspects of education. In this study, researcher is interested in examining the role of the headmaster as a technology leader through interviews with three headmasters of high…

  13. Toward High Performance in Industrial Refrigeration Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, C.; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh; Niemann, H.

    2002-01-01

    Achieving high performance in complex industrial systems requires information manipulation at different system levels. The paper shows how different models of same subsystems, but using different quality of information/data, are used for fault diagnosis as well as robust control design...

  14. Towards high performance in industrial refrigeration systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, C.; Izadi-Zamanabadi, R.; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2002-01-01

    Achieving high performance in complex industrial systems requires information manipulation at different system levels. The paper shows how different models of same subsystems, but using different quality of information/data, are used for fault diagnosis as well as robust control design...

  15. Validated high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-02-22

    Feb 22, 2010 ... specific and accurate high performance liquid chromatographic method for determination of ZER in micro-volumes ... tional medicine as a cure for swelling, sores, loss of appetite and ... Receptor Activator for Nuclear Factor κ B Ligand .... The effect of ... be suitable for preclinical pharmacokinetic studies. The.

  16. Validated High Performance Liquid Chromatography Method for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop a simple, rapid and sensitive high performance liquid ... response, tailing factor and resolution of six replicate injections was < 3 %. ... Cefadroxil monohydrate, Human plasma, Pharmacokinetics Bioequivalence ... Drug-free plasma was obtained from the local .... Influence of probenicid on the renal.

  17. Integrated plasma control for high performance tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, D.A.; Deranian, R.D.; Ferron, J.R.; Johnson, R.D.; LaHaye, R.J.; Leuer, J.A.; Penaflor, B.G.; Walker, M.L.; Welander, A.S.; Jayakumar, R.J.; Makowski, M.A.; Khayrutdinov, R.R.

    2005-01-01

    Sustaining high performance in a tokamak requires controlling many equilibrium shape and profile characteristics simultaneously with high accuracy and reliability, while suppressing a variety of MHD instabilities. Integrated plasma control, the process of designing high-performance tokamak controllers based on validated system response models and confirming their performance in detailed simulations, provides a systematic method for achieving and ensuring good control performance. For present-day devices, this approach can greatly reduce the need for machine time traditionally dedicated to control optimization, and can allow determination of high-reliability controllers prior to ever producing the target equilibrium experimentally. A full set of tools needed for this approach has recently been completed and applied to present-day devices including DIII-D, NSTX and MAST. This approach has proven essential in the design of several next-generation devices including KSTAR, EAST, JT-60SC, and ITER. We describe the method, results of design and simulation tool development, and recent research producing novel approaches to equilibrium and MHD control in DIII-D. (author)

  18. Project materials [Commercial High Performance Buildings Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2001-01-01

    The Consortium for High Performance Buildings (ChiPB) is an outgrowth of DOE'S Commercial Whole Buildings Roadmapping initiatives. It is a team-driven public/private partnership that seeks to enable and demonstrate the benefit of buildings that are designed, built and operated to be energy efficient, environmentally sustainable, superior quality, and cost effective.

  19. High performance structural ceramics for nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujari, Vimal K.; Faker, Paul

    2006-01-01

    A family of Saint-Gobain structural ceramic materials and products produced by its High performance Refractory Division is described. Over the last fifty years or so, Saint-Gobain has been a leader in developing non oxide ceramic based novel materials, processes and products for application in Nuclear, Chemical, Automotive, Defense and Mining industries

  20. A new high performance current transducer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Lijun; Lu Songlin; Li Deming

    2003-01-01

    A DC-100 kHz current transducer is developed using a new technique on zero-flux detecting principle. It was shown that the new current transducer is of high performance, its magnetic core need not be selected very stringently, and it is easy to manufacture

  1. Strategy Guideline. High Performance Residential Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holton, J. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2012-02-01

    This report has been developed to provide a tool for the understanding and application of high performance lighting in the home. The strategies featured in this guide are drawn from recent advances in commercial lighting for application to typical spaces found in residential buildings. This guide offers strategies to greatly reduce lighting energy use through the application of high quality fluorescent and light emitting diode (LED) technologies. It is important to note that these strategies not only save energy in the home but also serve to satisfy the homeowner’s expectations for high quality lighting.

  2. Architecting Web Sites for High Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Iyengar

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Web site applications are some of the most challenging high-performance applications currently being developed and deployed. The challenges emerge from the specific combination of high variability in workload characteristics and of high performance demands regarding the service level, scalability, availability, and costs. In recent years, a large body of research has addressed the Web site application domain, and a host of innovative software and hardware solutions have been proposed and deployed. This paper is an overview of recent solutions concerning the architectures and the software infrastructures used in building Web site applications. The presentation emphasizes three of the main functions in a complex Web site: the processing of client requests, the control of service levels, and the interaction with remote network caches.

  3. High performance anode for advanced Li batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lake, Carla [Applied Sciences, Inc., Cedarville, OH (United States)

    2015-11-02

    The overall objective of this Phase I SBIR effort was to advance the manufacturing technology for ASI’s Si-CNF high-performance anode by creating a framework for large volume production and utilization of low-cost Si-coated carbon nanofibers (Si-CNF) for the battery industry. This project explores the use of nano-structured silicon which is deposited on a nano-scale carbon filament to achieve the benefits of high cycle life and high charge capacity without the consequent fading of, or failure in the capacity resulting from stress-induced fracturing of the Si particles and de-coupling from the electrode. ASI’s patented coating process distinguishes itself from others, in that it is highly reproducible, readily scalable and results in a Si-CNF composite structure containing 25-30% silicon, with a compositionally graded interface at the Si-CNF interface that significantly improve cycling stability and enhances adhesion of silicon to the carbon fiber support. In Phase I, the team demonstrated the production of the Si-CNF anode material can successfully be transitioned from a static bench-scale reactor into a fluidized bed reactor. In addition, ASI made significant progress in the development of low cost, quick testing methods which can be performed on silicon coated CNFs as a means of quality control. To date, weight change, density, and cycling performance were the key metrics used to validate the high performance anode material. Under this effort, ASI made strides to establish a quality control protocol for the large volume production of Si-CNFs and has identified several key technical thrusts for future work. Using the results of this Phase I effort as a foundation, ASI has defined a path forward to commercialize and deliver high volume and low-cost production of SI-CNF material for anodes in Li-ion batteries.

  4. NINJA: Java for High Performance Numerical Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José E. Moreira

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available When Java was first introduced, there was a perception that its many benefits came at a significant performance cost. In the particularly performance-sensitive field of numerical computing, initial measurements indicated a hundred-fold performance disadvantage between Java and more established languages such as Fortran and C. Although much progress has been made, and Java now can be competitive with C/C++ in many important situations, significant performance challenges remain. Existing Java virtual machines are not yet capable of performing the advanced loop transformations and automatic parallelization that are now common in state-of-the-art Fortran compilers. Java also has difficulties in implementing complex arithmetic efficiently. These performance deficiencies can be attacked with a combination of class libraries (packages, in Java that implement truly multidimensional arrays and complex numbers, and new compiler techniques that exploit the properties of these class libraries to enable other, more conventional, optimizations. Two compiler techniques, versioning and semantic expansion, can be leveraged to allow fully automatic optimization and parallelization of Java code. Our measurements with the NINJA prototype Java environment show that Java can be competitive in performance with highly optimized and tuned Fortran code.

  5. The PS 200 catching trap: A new tool for ultra-low energy antiproton physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzscheiter, M.H.; Dyer, P.L.; King, N.S.P.; Lizon, D.C.; Morgan, G.L.; Schauer, M.M.; Schecker, J.A.; Hoibraten, S.; Lewis, R.A.; Otto, T.

    1994-01-01

    Approximately one million antiprotons have been trapped and electron cooled in the PS200 catching trap from a single fast extracted pulse from LEAR. The system is described in detail, different extraction schemes are discussed, and possible applications of this instrument to ultra-low energy atomic and nuclear physics with antiprotons are mentioned

  6. What can an antiproton and a nucleus learn from each other

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garreta, D.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter attempts to show that the - p-nucleus interaction may provide very useful information, both about the elementary - NN interaction and about nuclear structure. Topics covered include simple features which make a low-energy antiproton an interesting probe of the nucleus; simple features which make a nucleus an interesting target for an antiproton; antiproton-nucleus elastic scattering; antiproton-nucleus inelastic scattering; proton knock-out reactions on nuclei; and annihilation of the antiprotons in nuclei. The aim of experiment PS184 at the Low-Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) is to provide accurate data with regard to the - p-nucleus interaction in the following areas: the angular distribution of antiprotons elastically scattered from 12 C, 40 Ca, and 208 Pb; the excitation energy spectra and some angular distributions of antiprotons inelastically scattered from 12 C, 40 Ca, and 208 Pb; and the excitation energy spectra for proton knock-out reaction on 6 Li, 45 Sc, 123 Sb, and 209 B; at forward angles

  7. Trapping of antiprotons -- a first step on the way to antihydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzscheiter, M.H.

    1993-01-01

    A first step towards producing and effectively utilizing antihydrogen atoms consists of trapping antiprotons. The immediate next step must then be to control, i.e. trap the produced antihydrogen. The current state of the art in trapping antiprotons and positrons is reviewed, and the challenges in trapping the resulting neutral particles are discussed

  8. Bubble detector measurements of a mixed radiation field from antiproton annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Knudsen, Helge; Møller, Søren Pape

    2006-01-01

    In the light of recent progress in the study of the biological potential of antiproton tumour treatment it is important to be able to characterize the neutron intensity arising from antiproton annihilation using simple, compact and reliable detectors. The intensity of fast neutrons from antiproto...

  9. Constraints on Exotic Spin-Dependent Interactions Between Matter and Antimatter from Antiprotonic Helium Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficek, Filip; Fadeev, Pavel; Flambaum, Victor V.; Jackson Kimball, Derek F.; Kozlov, Mikhail G.; Stadnik, Yevgeny V.; Budker, Dmitry

    2018-05-01

    Heretofore undiscovered spin-0 or spin-1 bosons can mediate exotic spin-dependent interactions between standard model particles. Here, we carry out the first search for semileptonic spin-dependent interactions between matter and antimatter. We compare theoretical calculations and spectroscopic measurements of the hyperfine structure of antiprotonic helium to constrain exotic spin- and velocity-dependent interactions between electrons and antiprotons.

  10. Development of high performance cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Yong; Jeong, Y. H.; Park, S. Y.

    2010-04-01

    The irradiation test for HANA claddings conducted and a series of evaluation for next-HANA claddings as well as their in-pile and out-of pile performances tests were also carried out at Halden research reactor. The 6th irradiation test have been completed successfully in Halden research reactor. As a result, HANA claddings showed high performance, such as corrosion resistance increased by 40% compared to Zircaloy-4. The high performance of HANA claddings in Halden test has enabled lead test rod program as the first step of the commercialization of HANA claddings. DB has been established for thermal and LOCA-related properties. It was confirmed from the thermal shock test that the integrity of HANA claddings was maintained in more expanded region than the criteria regulated by NRC. The manufacturing process of strips was established in order to apply HANA alloys, which were originally developed for the claddings, to the spacer grids. 250 kinds of model alloys for the next-generation claddings were designed and manufactured over 4 times and used to select the preliminary candidate alloys for the next-generation claddings. The selected candidate alloys showed 50% better corrosion resistance and 20% improved high temperature oxidation resistance compared to the foreign advanced claddings. We established the manufacturing condition controlling the performance of the dual-cooled claddings by changing the reduction rate in the cold working steps

  11. A Linux Workstation for High Performance Graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Robert; Westall, James

    2000-01-01

    The primary goal of this effort was to provide a low-cost method of obtaining high-performance 3-D graphics using an industry standard library (OpenGL) on PC class computers. Previously, users interested in doing substantial visualization or graphical manipulation were constrained to using specialized, custom hardware most often found in computers from Silicon Graphics (SGI). We provided an alternative to expensive SGI hardware by taking advantage of third-party, 3-D graphics accelerators that have now become available at very affordable prices. To make use of this hardware our goal was to provide a free, redistributable, and fully-compatible OpenGL work-alike library so that existing bodies of code could simply be recompiled. for PC class machines running a free version of Unix. This should allow substantial cost savings while greatly expanding the population of people with access to a serious graphics development and viewing environment. This should offer a means for NASA to provide a spectrum of graphics performance to its scientists, supplying high-end specialized SGI hardware for high-performance visualization while fulfilling the requirements of medium and lower performance applications with generic, off-the-shelf components and still maintaining compatibility between the two.

  12. The path toward HEP High Performance Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Apostolakis, John; Carminati, Federico; Gheata, Andrei; Wenzel, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    High Energy Physics code has been known for making poor use of high performance computing architectures. Efforts in optimising HEP code on vector and RISC architectures have yield limited results and recent studies have shown that, on modern architectures, it achieves a performance between 10% and 50% of the peak one. Although several successful attempts have been made to port selected codes on GPUs, no major HEP code suite has a 'High Performance' implementation. With LHC undergoing a major upgrade and a number of challenging experiments on the drawing board, HEP cannot any longer neglect the less-than-optimal performance of its code and it has to try making the best usage of the hardware. This activity is one of the foci of the SFT group at CERN, which hosts, among others, the Root and Geant4 project. The activity of the experiments is shared and coordinated via a Concurrency Forum, where the experience in optimising HEP code is presented and discussed. Another activity is the Geant-V project, centred on th...

  13. High Performance Commercial Fenestration Framing Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mike Manteghi; Sneh Kumar; Joshua Early; Bhaskar Adusumalli

    2010-01-31

    A major objective of the U.S. Department of Energy is to have a zero energy commercial building by the year 2025. Windows have a major influence on the energy performance of the building envelope as they control over 55% of building energy load, and represent one important area where technologies can be developed to save energy. Aluminum framing systems are used in over 80% of commercial fenestration products (i.e. windows, curtain walls, store fronts, etc.). Aluminum framing systems are often required in commercial buildings because of their inherent good structural properties and long service life, which is required from commercial and architectural frames. At the same time, they are lightweight and durable, requiring very little maintenance, and offer design flexibility. An additional benefit of aluminum framing systems is their relatively low cost and easy manufacturability. Aluminum, being an easily recyclable material, also offers sustainable features. However, from energy efficiency point of view, aluminum frames have lower thermal performance due to the very high thermal conductivity of aluminum. Fenestration systems constructed of aluminum alloys therefore have lower performance in terms of being effective barrier to energy transfer (heat loss or gain). Despite the lower energy performance, aluminum is the choice material for commercial framing systems and dominates the commercial/architectural fenestration market because of the reasons mentioned above. In addition, there is no other cost effective and energy efficient replacement material available to take place of aluminum in the commercial/architectural market. Hence it is imperative to improve the performance of aluminum framing system to improve the energy performance of commercial fenestration system and in turn reduce the energy consumption of commercial building and achieve zero energy building by 2025. The objective of this project was to develop high performance, energy efficient commercial

  14. Fracture toughness of ultra high performance concrete by flexural performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manolova Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the fracture toughness of the innovative structural material - Ultra High Performance Concrete (UHPC, evaluated by flexural performance. For determination the material behaviour by static loading are used adapted standard test methods for flexural performance of fiber-reinforced concrete (ASTM C 1609 and ASTM C 1018. Fracture toughness is estimated by various deformation parameters derived from the load-deflection curve, obtained by testing simple supported beam under third-point loading, using servo-controlled testing system. This method is used to be estimated the contribution of the embedded fiber-reinforcement into improvement of the fractural behaviour of UHPC by changing the crack-resistant capacity, fracture toughness and energy absorption capacity with various mechanisms. The position of the first crack has been formulated based on P-δ (load- deflection response and P-ε (load - longitudinal deformation in the tensile zone response, which are used for calculation of the two toughness indices I5 and I10. The combination of steel fibres with different dimensions leads to a composite, having at the same time increased crack resistance, first crack formation, ductility and post-peak residual strength.

  15. CERN: LEP delivers; Looking deeper at spin; Handling low energy antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1990-03-15

    One year ago, with the world catalogue of Z particles - the electrically neutral carrier of the weak nuclear force - containing a few hundred examples, it sounded extravagant when proponents of CERN's new LEP electron-positron collider promised a hundred thousand Zs by Christmas 1989. The first round of experiments in the North Area of CERN's SPS proton synchrotron included a considerable investment in studies using high energy muon beams. This paid off with important contribuions to physics, particularly in the measurement of the quark/gluon content (structure functions) of nucleons. ; The LEAR low energy antiproton ring at CERN takes its antimatter beams down to very low kinetic energies - less than 10 MeV - for a unique range of physics studies. However even these modest energies are too high for a series of experiments aiming to explore the effects of gravity on antimatter.

  16. CERN: LEP delivers; Looking deeper at spin; Handling low energy antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    One year ago, with the world catalogue of Z particles - the electrically neutral carrier of the weak nuclear force - containing a few hundred examples, it sounded extravagant when proponents of CERN's new LEP electron-positron collider promised a hundred thousand Zs by Christmas 1989. The first round of experiments in the North Area of CERN's SPS proton synchrotron included a considerable investment in studies using high energy muon beams. This paid off with important contribuions to physics, particularly in the measurement of the quark/gluon content (structure functions) of nucleons. ; The LEAR low energy antiproton ring at CERN takes its antimatter beams down to very low kinetic energies - less than 10 MeV - for a unique range of physics studies. However even these modest energies are too high for a series of experiments aiming to explore the effects of gravity on antimatter

  17. Discriminating between antihydrogen and mirror-trapped antiprotons in a minimum-B trap

    CERN Document Server

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Kurchaninov, L; Jonsell, S; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-01-01

    Recently, antihydrogen atoms were trapped at CERN in a magnetic minimum (minimum-B) trap formed by superconducting octupole and mirror magnet coils. The trapped antiatoms were detected by rapidly turning off these magnets, thereby eliminating the magnetic minimum and releasing any antiatoms contained in the trap. Once released, these antiatoms quickly hit the trap wall, whereupon the positrons and antiprotons in the antiatoms annihilated. The antiproton annihilations produce easily detected signals; we used these signals to prove that we trapped antihydrogen. However, our technique could be confounded by mirror-trapped antiprotons, which would produce seemingly-identical annihilation signals upon hitting the trap wall. In this paper, we discuss possible sources of mirror-trapped antiprotons and show that antihydrogen and antiprotons can be readily distinguished, often with the aid of applied electric fields, by analyzing the annihilation locations and times. We further discuss the general properties of antipr...

  18. Slowing down of 100 keV antiprotons in Al foils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nordlund

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Using energy degrading foils to slow down antiprotons is of interest for producing antihydrogen atoms. I consider here the slowing down of 100 keV antiprotons, that will be produced in the ELENA storage ring under construction at CERN, to energies below 10 keV. At these low energies, they are suitable for efficient antihydrogen production. I simulate the antihydrogen motion and slowing down in Al foils using a recently developed molecular dynamics approach. The results show that the optimal Al foil thickness for slowing down the antiprotons to below 5 keV is 910 nm, and to below 10 keV is 840 nm. Also the lateral spreading of the transmitted antiprotons is reported and the uncertainties discussed. Keywords: Antiprotons, Stopping power, Slowing down, Molecular dynamics

  19. Operational experience with bunch rotation momentum reduction in the Fermilab antiproton source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bharadwaj, V.; Griffin, J.E.; MacLachlan, J.A.; Martin, P.S.; Meisner, K.G.; Wildman, D.

    1987-01-01

    In the Fermilab antiproton accumulation system antiprotons are produced by the delivery of trains of 120 GeV proton bunches to a production target from which antiprotons are collected with mean energy 8 GeV (kinetic) and momentum spread Δrho/rho > 3%. The antiproton beam has the time structure of the incident protons. The proton bunch spacing-to-length ratio is made as large as possible (> 20:1) so that the resulting antiproton momentum spread may be reduced by ''bunch rotation'' in a ''debunching'' ring where time spread is exchanged for momentum spread. Details of these procedures are described elsewhere; in this paper the authors report on the efficacy of these procedures during routine operation

  20. Segmented scintillation detectors with silicon photomultiplier readout for measuring antiproton annihilations

    CERN Document Server

    Sótér, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Barna, D.; Horváth, D.; Hori, M.

    2014-01-01

    The Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons (ASACUSA) experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility of CERN constructed segmented scintillators to detect and track the charged pions which emerge from antiproton annihilations in a future superconducting radiofrequency Paul trap for antiprotons. A system of 541 cast and extruded scintillator bars were arranged in 11 detector modules which provided a spatial resolution of 17 mm. Green wavelength-shifting fibers were embedded in the scintillators, and read out by silicon photomultipliers which had a sensitive area of 1 x 1 mm^2. The photoelectron yields of various scintillator configurations were measured using a negative pion beam of momentum p ~ 1 GeV/c. Various fibers and silicon photomultipliers, fiber end terminations, and couplings between the fibers and scintillators were compared. The detectors were also tested using the antiproton beam of the AD. Nonlinear effects due to the saturation of the silicon photomultiplier were seen a...

  1. Top Production at the Tevatron: The Antiproton Awakens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, Kenneth [Nebraska U.

    2017-07-01

    A long time ago, at a laboratory far, far away, the Fermilab Tevatron collided protons and antiprotons at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV. The CDF and D0 experiments each recorded datasets of about 10 fb$^{-1}$. As such experiments may never be repeated, these are unique datasets that allow for unique measurements. This presentation describes recent results from the two experiments on top-quark production rates, spin orientations, and production asymmetries, which are all probes of the $p\\bar{p}$ initial state.

  2. Pontecorvo reactions of two-body antiproton annihilation in deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondratyuk, L.A.; Sapozhnikov, M.G.

    1988-01-01

    Rare annihilation reactions for stopped antiprotons in deuterium, p-bard→π - p; K + Σ - ; K 0 Λ, are considered using the two-step model described by the triangle diagram. It was found that the probabilities, W, of these processes are very sensitive to the behaviour of the deuteron wave function at small distances as well as to the meson form factors. It appears that the ratios R(KX)=W(KX)/W(π - p) are much less model-dependent and are about 10 -2 for R(K 0 λ) and 10 -4 for R(K + Σ - ). 17 refs.; 1 fig.; 3 tabs

  3. Evaporative cooling of antiprotons for the production of trappable antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, D. M.; Cesar, C. L. [Instituto de Fisica - Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21941-972, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Ashkezari, M. D.; Hayden, M. E. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby BC, V5A 1S6 (Canada); Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; So, C.; Wurtele, J. S. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-7300 (United States); Bertsche, W. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom) and Cockroft Institute, WA4 4AD Warrington (United Kingdom); Butler, E. [CERN, PH Department, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Charlton, M.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Friesen, T.; Hydomako, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary AB, T2N 1N4 (Canada); and others

    2013-03-19

    We describe the implementation of evaporative cooling of charged particles in the ALPHA apparatus. Forced evaporation has been applied to cold samples of antiprotons held in Malmberg-Penning traps. Temperatures on the order of 10 K were obtained, while retaining a significant fraction of the initial number of particles. We have developed a model for the evaporation process based on simple rate equations and applied it succesfully to the experimental data. We have also observed radial re-distribution of the clouds following evaporation, explained by simple conservation laws. We discuss the relevance of this technique for the recent demonstration of magnetic trapping of antihydrogen.

  4. Commissioning of polarized-proton and antiproton beams at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokosawa, A.

    1988-01-01

    The author described the polarized-proton and polarized-antiproton beams up to 200 GeV/c at Fermilab. The beam line, called MP, consists of the 400-m long primary and 350-m long secondary beam line followed by 60-m long experimental hall. We discuss the characteristics of the polarized beams. The Fermilab polarization projects are designated at E-581/704 initiated and carried out by an international collaboration, Argonne (US), Fermilab (US), Kyoto-Kyushu-Hiroshima-KEK (Japan), LAPP (France), Northwestern University (US), Los Alamos Laboratory (US), Rice (US), Saclay (France), Serpukhov (USSR), INFN Trieste (Italy), and University of Texas (US)

  5. The antiproton depth–dose curve measured with alanine detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, Niels; Palmans, Hugo; Holzscheiter, Michael H; Kovacevic, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    n this paper we report on the measurement of the antiproton depth–dose curve, with alanine detectors. The results are compared with simulations using the particle energy spectrum calculated by FLUKA, and using the track structure model of Hansen and Olsen for conversion of calculated dose into response. A good agreement is observed between the measured and calculated relative effectiveness although an underestimation of the measured values beyond the Bragg-peak remains unexplained. The model prediction of response of alanine towards heavy charged particles encourages future use of the alanine detectors for dosimetry of mixed radiation fields.

  6. The Antiproton Depth Dose Curve Measured with Alanine Detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Hansen, Johnny Witterseh; Palmans, Hugo

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we report on the measurement of the antiproton depth dose curve, with alanine detectors. The results are compared with simulations using the particle energy spectrum calculated by FLUKA, and using the track structure model of Hansen et Olsen for conversion of calculated dose...... into response. A good agreement was observed between the measured and calculated relative effectiveness although a slight underestimation of the calculated values in the Bragg peak remains unexplained. The model prediction of response of alanine towards heavy charged particles encourages future use...... of the alanine detectors for dosimetry of mixed radiation fields....

  7. Electrodes for stochastic cooling of the FNAL antiproton source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voelker, F.

    1982-11-01

    AN electrode array for stochastic cooling is being developed for use on the FNAL antiproton source. With minor power handling modifications, the same electrodes can function as pickups or as kickers. When used as pickups, a large array is needed to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. Each electrode is one element of a pair of directional coupler loops that are mounted flush with the upper and lower walls of the beam chamber. The loops, fabricated from flat metal plates, are supported by specially shaped legs

  8. HIGH PERFORMANCE CERIA BASED OXYGEN MEMBRANE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The invention describes a new class of highly stable mixed conducting materials based on acceptor doped cerium oxide (CeO2-8 ) in which the limiting electronic conductivity is significantly enhanced by co-doping with a second element or co- dopant, such as Nb, W and Zn, so that cerium and the co......-dopant have an ionic size ratio between 0.5 and 1. These materials can thereby improve the performance and extend the range of operating conditions of oxygen permeation membranes (OPM) for different high temperature membrane reactor applications. The invention also relates to the manufacturing of supported...

  9. Playa: High-Performance Programmable Linear Algebra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria E. Howle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces Playa, a high-level user interface layer for composing algorithms for complex multiphysics problems out of objects from other Trilinos packages. Among other features, Playa provides very high-performance overloaded operators implemented through an expression template mechanism. In this paper, we give an overview of the central Playa objects from a user's perspective, show application to a sequence of increasingly complex solver algorithms, provide timing results for Playa's overloaded operators and other functions, and briefly survey some of the implementation issues involved.

  10. Optimizing the design of very high power, high performance converters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, R.J.; Tiagha, E.A.; Ganetis, G.; Nawrocky, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes how various technologies are used to achieve the desired performance in a high current magnet power converter system. It is hoped that the discussions of the design approaches taken will be applicable to other power supply systems where stringent requirements in stability, accuracy and reliability must be met

  11. Robust High Performance Aquaporin based Biomimetic Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helix Nielsen, Claus; Zhao, Yichun; Qiu, C.

    2013-01-01

    on top of a support membrane. Control membranes, either without aquaporins or with the inactive AqpZ R189A mutant aquaporin served as controls. The separation performance of the membranes was evaluated by cross-flow forward osmosis (FO) and reverse osmosis (RO) tests. In RO the ABM achieved a water......Aquaporins are water channel proteins with high water permeability and solute rejection, which makes them promising for preparing high-performance biomimetic membranes. Despite the growing interest in aquaporin-based biomimetic membranes (ABMs), it is challenging to produce robust and defect...... permeability of ~ 4 L/(m2 h bar) with a NaCl rejection > 97% at an applied hydraulic pressure of 5 bar. The water permeability was ~40% higher compared to a commercial brackish water RO membrane (BW30) and an order of magnitude higher compared to a seawater RO membrane (SW30HR). In FO, the ABMs had > 90...

  12. Evaluation of high-performance computing software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browne, S.; Dongarra, J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Rowan, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The absence of unbiased and up to date comparative evaluations of high-performance computing software complicates a user`s search for the appropriate software package. The National HPCC Software Exchange (NHSE) is attacking this problem using an approach that includes independent evaluations of software, incorporation of author and user feedback into the evaluations, and Web access to the evaluations. We are applying this approach to the Parallel Tools Library (PTLIB), a new software repository for parallel systems software and tools, and HPC-Netlib, a high performance branch of the Netlib mathematical software repository. Updating the evaluations with feed-back and making it available via the Web helps ensure accuracy and timeliness, and using independent reviewers produces unbiased comparative evaluations difficult to find elsewhere.

  13. High performance cloud auditing and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Baek-Young; Song, Sejun

    2014-01-01

    This book mainly focuses on cloud security and high performance computing for cloud auditing. The book discusses emerging challenges and techniques developed for high performance semantic cloud auditing, and presents the state of the art in cloud auditing, computing and security techniques with focus on technical aspects and feasibility of auditing issues in federated cloud computing environments.   In summer 2011, the United States Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) CyberBAT Cloud Security and Auditing Team initiated the exploration of the cloud security challenges and future cloud auditing research directions that are covered in this book. This work was supported by the United States government funds from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), the AFOSR Summer Faculty Fellowship Program (SFFP), the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Visiting Faculty Research Program (VFRP), the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institute of Health (NIH). All chapters were partially suppor...

  14. Monitoring SLAC High Performance UNIX Computing Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lettsome, Annette K.

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge of the effectiveness and efficiency of computers is important when working with high performance systems. The monitoring of such systems is advantageous in order to foresee possible misfortunes or system failures. Ganglia is a software system designed for high performance computing systems to retrieve specific monitoring information. An alternative storage facility for Ganglia's collected data is needed since its default storage system, the round-robin database (RRD), struggles with data integrity. The creation of a script-driven MySQL database solves this dilemma. This paper describes the process took in the creation and implementation of the MySQL database for use by Ganglia. Comparisons between data storage by both databases are made using gnuplot and Ganglia's real-time graphical user interface

  15. High performance parallel computers for science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, T.; Areti, H.; Atac, R.; Biel, J.; Cook, A.; Deppe, J.; Edel, M.; Fischler, M.; Gaines, I.; Hance, R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports that Fermilab's Advanced Computer Program (ACP) has been developing cost effective, yet practical, parallel computers for high energy physics since 1984. The ACP's latest developments are proceeding in two directions. A Second Generation ACP Multiprocessor System for experiments will include $3500 RISC processors each with performance over 15 VAX MIPS. To support such high performance, the new system allows parallel I/O, parallel interprocess communication, and parallel host processes. The ACP Multi-Array Processor, has been developed for theoretical physics. Each $4000 node is a FORTRAN or C programmable pipelined 20 Mflops (peak), 10 MByte single board computer. These are plugged into a 16 port crossbar switch crate which handles both inter and intra crate communication. The crates are connected in a hypercube. Site oriented applications like lattice gauge theory are supported by system software called CANOPY, which makes the hardware virtually transparent to users. A 256 node, 5 GFlop, system is under construction

  16. Probing dark matter annihilation in the Galaxy with antiprotons and gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuoco, Alessandro; Heisig, Jan; Korsmeier, Michael; Krämer, Michael, E-mail: cuoco@physik.rwth-aachen.de, E-mail: heisig@physik.rwth-aachen.de, E-mail: korsmeier@physik.rwth-aachen.de, E-mail: mkraemer@physik.rwth-aachen.de [Institute for Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology, RWTH Aachen University, 52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2017-10-01

    A possible hint of dark matter annihilation has been found in Cuoco, Korsmeier and Krämer (2017) from an analysis of recent cosmic-ray antiproton data from AMS-02 and taking into account cosmic-ray propagation uncertainties by fitting at the same time dark matter and propagation parameters. Here, we extend this analysis to a wider class of annihilation channels. We find consistent hints of a dark matter signal with an annihilation cross-section close to the thermal value and with masses in range between 40 and 130 GeV depending on the annihilation channel. Furthermore, we investigate in how far the possible signal is compatible with the Galactic center gamma-ray excess and recent observation of dwarf satellite galaxies by performing a joint global fit including uncertainties in the dark matter density profile. As an example, we interpret our results in the framework of the Higgs portal model.

  17. Measurement of (anti)deuteron and (anti)proton production in DIS at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2007-05-15

    The first observation of (anti)deuterons in deep inelastic scattering at HERA has been made with the ZEUS detector at a centre-of-mass energy of 300-318 GeV using an integrated luminosity of 120 pb{sup -1}. The measurement was performed in the central rapidity region for transverse momentum per unit of mass in the range 0.3anti)proton yield by approximately three orders of magnitude, consistent with the world measurements. (orig.)

  18. Simulation of antiproton-nucleus interactions in the framework of the UrQMD model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galoyan, A.S.; Polanski, A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper proposes to apply the Ultra-Relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD) approach to implement the PANDA project (GSI, Germany). Simulation of p bar A interactions has been performed at antiproton energies from 1 to 200 GeV by using the UrQMD model. We have studied average multiplicities, multiplicity distributions of various types of secondary particles, correlations between the multiplicities, rapidity, and transverse momentum distributions of the particles. The UrQMD model predictions on inelastic p bar A collisions have been found to reproduce qualitatively the experimental data. However, to reach the quantitative agreement, especially, in fragmentation regions, it is needed to modify the UrQMD model

  19. Toward a theory of high performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Julia

    2005-01-01

    What does it mean to be a high-performance company? The process of measuring relative performance across industries and eras, declaring top performers, and finding the common drivers of their success is such a difficult one that it might seem a fool's errand to attempt. In fact, no one did for the first thousand or so years of business history. The question didn't even occur to many scholars until Tom Peters and Bob Waterman released In Search of Excellence in 1982. Twenty-three years later, we've witnessed several more attempts--and, just maybe, we're getting closer to answers. In this reported piece, HBR senior editor Julia Kirby explores why it's so difficult to study high performance and how various research efforts--including those from John Kotter and Jim Heskett; Jim Collins and Jerry Porras; Bill Joyce, Nitin Nohria, and Bruce Roberson; and several others outlined in a summary chart-have attacked the problem. The challenge starts with deciding which companies to study closely. Are the stars the ones with the highest market caps, the ones with the greatest sales growth, or simply the ones that remain standing at the end of the game? (And when's the end of the game?) Each major study differs in how it defines success, which companies it therefore declares to be worthy of emulation, and the patterns of activity and attitude it finds in common among them. Yet, Kirby concludes, as each study's method incrementally solves problems others have faced, we are progressing toward a consensus theory of high performance.

  20. High-performance phase-field modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Vignal, Philippe; Sarmiento, Adel; Cortes, Adriano Mauricio; Dalcin, L.; Collier, N.; Calo, Victor M.

    2015-01-01

    and phase-field crystal equation will be presented, which corroborate the theoretical findings, and illustrate the robustness of the method. Results related to more challenging examples, namely the Navier-Stokes Cahn-Hilliard and a diusion-reaction Cahn-Hilliard system, will also be presented. The implementation was done in PetIGA and PetIGA-MF, high-performance Isogeometric Analysis frameworks [1, 3], designed to handle non-linear, time-dependent problems.

  1. AHPCRC - Army High Performance Computing Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    computing. Of particular interest is the ability of a distrib- uted jamming network (DJN) to jam signals in all or part of a sensor or communications net...and reasoning, assistive technologies. FRIEDRICH (FRITZ) PRINZ Finmeccanica Professor of Engineering, Robert Bosch Chair, Department of Engineering...High Performance Computing Research Center www.ahpcrc.org BARBARA BRYAN AHPCRC Research and Outreach Manager, HPTi (650) 604-3732 bbryan@hpti.com Ms

  2. Performance concerns for high duty fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, V.J.; Gutierrez, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    One of the goals of the nuclear industry is to achieve economic performance such that nuclear power plants are competitive in a de-regulated market. The manner in which nuclear fuel is designed and operated lies at the heart of economic viability. In this sense reliability, operating flexibility and low costs are the three major requirements of the NPP today. The translation of these three requirements to the design is part of our work. The challenge today is to produce a fuel design which will operate with long operating cycles, high discharge burnup, power up-rating and while still maintaining all design and safety margins. European Fuel Group (EFG) understands that to achieve the required performance high duty/energy fuel designs are needed. The concerns for high duty design includes, among other items, core design methods, advanced Safety Analysis methodologies, performance models, advanced material and operational strategies. The operational aspects require the trade-off and evaluation of various parameters including coolant chemistry control, material corrosion, boiling duty, boron level impacts, etc. In this environment MAEF is the design that EFG is now offering based on ZIRLO alloy and a robust skeleton. This new design is able to achieve 70 GWd/tU and Lead Test Programs are being executed to demonstrate this capability. A number of performance issues which have been a concern with current designs have been resolved such as cladding corrosion and incomplete RCCA insertion (IRI). As the core duty becomes more aggressive other new issues need to be addressed such as Axial Offset Anomaly. These new issues are being addressed by combination of the new design in concert with advanced methodologies to meet the demanding needs of NPP. The ability and strategy to meet high duty core requirements, flexibility of operation and maintain acceptable balance of all technical issues is the discussion in this paper. (authors)

  3. DURIP: High Performance Computing in Biomathematics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-10

    Mathematics and Statistics (AMS) at the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) to conduct research and research-related education in areas of...Computing in Biomathematics Applications Report Title The goal of this award was to enhance the capabilities of the Department of Applied Mathematics and...DURIP: High Performance Computing in Biomathematics Applications The goal of this award was to enhance the capabilities of the Department of Applied

  4. High Performance Computing Operations Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cupps, Kimberly C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-12-19

    The High Performance Computing Operations Review (HPCOR) meeting—requested by the ASC and ASCR program headquarters at DOE—was held November 5 and 6, 2013, at the Marriott Hotel in San Francisco, CA. The purpose of the review was to discuss the processes and practices for HPC integration and its related software and facilities. Experiences and lessons learned from the most recent systems deployed were covered in order to benefit the deployment of new systems.

  5. Planning for high performance project teams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, W.; Keeney, J.; Westney, R.

    1997-01-01

    Both industry-wide research and corporate benchmarking studies confirm the significant savings in cost and time that result from early planning of a project. Amoco's Team Planning Workshop combines long-term strategic project planning and short-term tactical planning with team building to provide the basis for high performing project teams, better project planning, and effective implementation of the Amoco Common Process for managing projects

  6. Computational Biology and High Performance Computing 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Horst D.; Zorn, Manfred D.; Spengler, Sylvia J.; Shoichet, Brian K.; Stewart, Craig; Dubchak, Inna L.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2000-10-19

    The pace of extraordinary advances in molecular biology has accelerated in the past decade due in large part to discoveries coming from genome projects on human and model organisms. The advances in the genome project so far, happening well ahead of schedule and under budget, have exceeded any dreams by its protagonists, let alone formal expectations. Biologists expect the next phase of the genome project to be even more startling in terms of dramatic breakthroughs in our understanding of human biology, the biology of health and of disease. Only today can biologists begin to envision the necessary experimental, computational and theoretical steps necessary to exploit genome sequence information for its medical impact, its contribution to biotechnology and economic competitiveness, and its ultimate contribution to environmental quality. High performance computing has become one of the critical enabling technologies, which will help to translate this vision of future advances in biology into reality. Biologists are increasingly becoming aware of the potential of high performance computing. The goal of this tutorial is to introduce the exciting new developments in computational biology and genomics to the high performance computing community.

  7. High performance separation of lanthanides and actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivaraman, N.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    2011-01-01

    The major advantage of High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) is its ability to provide rapid and high performance separations. It is evident from Van Deemter curve for particle size versus resolution that packing materials with particle sizes less than 2 μm provide better resolution for high speed separations and resolving complex mixtures compared to 5 μm based supports. In the recent past, chromatographic support material using monolith has been studied extensively at our laboratory. Monolith column consists of single piece of porous, rigid material containing mesopores and micropores, which provide fast analyte mass transfer. Monolith support provides significantly higher separation efficiency than particle-packed columns. A clear advantage of monolith is that it could be operated at higher flow rates but with lower back pressure. Higher operating flow rate results in higher column permeability, which drastically reduces analysis time and provides high separation efficiency. The above developed fast separation methods were applied to assay the lanthanides and actinides from the dissolver solutions of nuclear reactor fuels

  8. High Performance OLED Panel and Luminaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spindler, Jeffrey [OLEDWorks LLC, Rochester, NY (United States)

    2017-02-20

    In this project, OLEDWorks developed and demonstrated the technology required to produce OLED lighting panels with high energy efficiency and excellent light quality. OLED panels developed in this program produce high quality warm white light with CRI greater than 85 and efficacy up to 80 lumens per watt (LPW). An OLED luminaire employing 24 of the high performance panels produces practical levels of illumination for general lighting, with a flux of over 2200 lumens at 60 LPW. This is a significant advance in the state of the art for OLED solid-state lighting (SSL), which is expected to be a complementary light source to the more advanced LED SSL technology that is rapidly replacing all other traditional forms of lighting.

  9. The path toward HEP High Performance Computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apostolakis, John; Brun, René; Gheata, Andrei; Wenzel, Sandro; Carminati, Federico

    2014-01-01

    High Energy Physics code has been known for making poor use of high performance computing architectures. Efforts in optimising HEP code on vector and RISC architectures have yield limited results and recent studies have shown that, on modern architectures, it achieves a performance between 10% and 50% of the peak one. Although several successful attempts have been made to port selected codes on GPUs, no major HEP code suite has a 'High Performance' implementation. With LHC undergoing a major upgrade and a number of challenging experiments on the drawing board, HEP cannot any longer neglect the less-than-optimal performance of its code and it has to try making the best usage of the hardware. This activity is one of the foci of the SFT group at CERN, which hosts, among others, the Root and Geant4 project. The activity of the experiments is shared and coordinated via a Concurrency Forum, where the experience in optimising HEP code is presented and discussed. Another activity is the Geant-V project, centred on the development of a highperformance prototype for particle transport. Achieving a good concurrency level on the emerging parallel architectures without a complete redesign of the framework can only be done by parallelizing at event level, or with a much larger effort at track level. Apart the shareable data structures, this typically implies a multiplication factor in terms of memory consumption compared to the single threaded version, together with sub-optimal handling of event processing tails. Besides this, the low level instruction pipelining of modern processors cannot be used efficiently to speedup the program. We have implemented a framework that allows scheduling vectors of particles to an arbitrary number of computing resources in a fine grain parallel approach. The talk will review the current optimisation activities within the SFT group with a particular emphasis on the development perspectives towards a simulation framework able to profit

  10. Full two-electron calculations of antiproton collisions with molecular hydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    Total cross sections for single ionization and excitation of molecular hydrogen by antiproton impact are presented over a wide range of impact energies from 1 keV to 6.5 MeV. A nonperturbative time-dependent close-coupling method is applied to fully treat the correlated dynamics of the electrons....... Good agreement is obtained between the present calculations and experimental measurements of single-ionization cross sections at high energies, whereas some discrepancies with the experiment are found around the maximum. The importance of the molecular geometry and a full two-electron description...... is demonstrated. The present findings provide benchmark results which might be useful for the development of molecular models....

  11. Sixfold improved single particle measurement of the magnetic moment of the antiproton

    CERN Document Server

    Nagahama, H; Sellner, S; Harrington, J; Higuchi, T; Borchert, M J; Tanaka, T; Besirli, M; Mooser, A; Schneider, G; Blaum, K; Matsuda, Y; Ospelkaus, C; Quint, W; Walz, J; Yamazaki, Y; Ulmer, S

    2017-01-01

    Our current understanding of the Universe comes, among others, from particle physics and cosmology. In particle physics an almost perfect symmetry between matter and antimatter exists. On cosmological scales, however, a striking matter/antimatter imbalance is observed. This contradiction inspires comparisons of the fundamental properties of particles and antiparticles with high precision. Here we report on a measurement of the g-factor of the antiproton with a fractional precision of 0.8 parts per million at 95% confidence level. Our value /2=2.7928465(23) outperforms the previous best measurement by a factor of 6. The result is consistent with our proton g-factor measurement gp/2=2.792847350(9), and therefore agrees with the fundamental charge, parity, time (CPT) invariance of the Standard Model of particle physics. Additionally, our result improves coefficients of the standard model extension which discusses the sensitivity of experiments with respect to CPT violation by up to a factor of 20.

  12. Planetary physics research programme at the Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research at Darmstadt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahir, N.A.; Neumayer, P.; Bagnoud, V. [Department of Plasma Physics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Lomonosov, I.V. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Tomsk University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Borm, B. [Department of Physics, Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany); Piriz, A.R.; Piriz, S.A. [E.T.S.I. Industrials, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Ciudad Real (Spain); Shutov, A. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation)

    2017-11-15

    Planetary physics research is an important part of the high energy density (HED) physics programme at the Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt. In this paper, we report numerical simulations of a proposed experiment named LAboratory PLAnetary Sciences (LAPLAS). These simulations show that in such experiments, an Fe sample can be imploded to extreme physical conditions that are expected to exist in the interior of the Earth and in the interior of more massive rocky planets named, super-Earths. The LAPLAS experiments will thus provide very valuable information on the equation-of-state (EOS) and transport properties of HED Fe, which will help the scientists to understand the structure and evolution of the planets in our solar system and of the extrasolar system planets. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Planetary physics research programme at the Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research at Darmstadt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, N.A.; Neumayer, P.; Bagnoud, V.; Lomonosov, I.V.; Borm, B.; Piriz, A.R.; Piriz, S.A.; Shutov, A.

    2017-01-01

    Planetary physics research is an important part of the high energy density (HED) physics programme at the Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt. In this paper, we report numerical simulations of a proposed experiment named LAboratory PLAnetary Sciences (LAPLAS). These simulations show that in such experiments, an Fe sample can be imploded to extreme physical conditions that are expected to exist in the interior of the Earth and in the interior of more massive rocky planets named, super-Earths. The LAPLAS experiments will thus provide very valuable information on the equation-of-state (EOS) and transport properties of HED Fe, which will help the scientists to understand the structure and evolution of the planets in our solar system and of the extrasolar system planets. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Atomic physics at the future facility for antiproton and ion research: a status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gumberidze, A

    2013-01-01

    The new international accelerator Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) which is currently under construction in Darmstadt has key features that offer a wide range of exciting new opportunities in the field of atomic physics and related fields. The facility will provide highest intensities of relativistic beams of both stable and unstable heavy nuclei, in combination with the strong electromagnetic fields generated by high-power lasers, thus allowing to widen atomic physics research into completely new domains. In the current contribution, a short overview of the SPARC (Stored Particle Atomic physics Research Collaboration) research programme at the FAIR facility is given. Furthermore, we present the current strategy for the realization of the envisioned SPARC physics programme at the modularized start version of the FAIR facility. (paper)

  15. A High Performance COTS Based Computer Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patte, Mathieu; Grimoldi, Raoul; Trautner, Roland

    2014-08-01

    Using Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) electronic components for space applications is a long standing idea. Indeed the difference in processing performance and energy efficiency between radiation hardened components and COTS components is so important that COTS components are very attractive for use in mass and power constrained systems. However using COTS components in space is not straightforward as one must account with the effects of the space environment on the COTS components behavior. In the frame of the ESA funded activity called High Performance COTS Based Computer, Airbus Defense and Space and its subcontractor OHB CGS have developed and prototyped a versatile COTS based architecture for high performance processing. The rest of the paper is organized as follows: in a first section we will start by recapitulating the interests and constraints of using COTS components for space applications; then we will briefly describe existing fault mitigation architectures and present our solution for fault mitigation based on a component called the SmartIO; in the last part of the paper we will describe the prototyping activities executed during the HiP CBC project.

  16. Management issues for high performance storage systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louis, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Burris, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Managing distributed high-performance storage systems is complex and, although sharing common ground with traditional network and systems management, presents unique storage-related issues. Integration technologies and frameworks exist to help manage distributed network and system environments. Industry-driven consortia provide open forums where vendors and users cooperate to leverage solutions. But these new approaches to open management fall short addressing the needs of scalable, distributed storage. We discuss the motivation and requirements for storage system management (SSM) capabilities and describe how SSM manages distributed servers and storage resource objects in the High Performance Storage System (HPSS), a new storage facility for data-intensive applications and large-scale computing. Modem storage systems, such as HPSS, require many SSM capabilities, including server and resource configuration control, performance monitoring, quality of service, flexible policies, file migration, file repacking, accounting, and quotas. We present results of initial HPSS SSM development including design decisions and implementation trade-offs. We conclude with plans for follow-on work and provide storage-related recommendations for vendors and standards groups seeking enterprise-wide management solutions.

  17. Proton-antiproton colliding beam electron cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derbenev, Ya.S.; Skrinskij, A.N.

    1981-01-01

    A possibility of effective cooling of high-energy pp tilde beams (E=10 2 -10 3 GeV) in the colliding mode by accompanying radiationally cooled electron beam circulating in an adjacent storage ring is studied. The cooling rate restrictions by the pp tilde beam interaction effects while colliding and the beam self-heating effect due to multiple internal scattering are considered. Some techniques permitting to avoid self-heating of a cooling electron beam or suppress its harmful effect on a heavy particle beam cooling are proposed. According to the estimations the cooling time of 10 2 -10 3 s order can be attained [ru

  18. Automatic Energy Schemes for High Performance Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundriyal, Vaibhav [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Although high-performance computing traditionally focuses on the efficient execution of large-scale applications, both energy and power have become critical concerns when approaching exascale. Drastic increases in the power consumption of supercomputers affect significantly their operating costs and failure rates. In modern microprocessor architectures, equipped with dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS) and CPU clock modulation (throttling), the power consumption may be controlled in software. Additionally, network interconnect, such as Infiniband, may be exploited to maximize energy savings while the application performance loss and frequency switching overheads must be carefully balanced. This work first studies two important collective communication operations, all-to-all and allgather and proposes energy saving strategies on the per-call basis. Next, it targets point-to-point communications to group them into phases and apply frequency scaling to them to save energy by exploiting the architectural and communication stalls. Finally, it proposes an automatic runtime system which combines both collective and point-to-point communications into phases, and applies throttling to them apart from DVFS to maximize energy savings. The experimental results are presented for NAS parallel benchmark problems as well as for the realistic parallel electronic structure calculations performed by the widely used quantum chemistry package GAMESS. Close to the maximum energy savings were obtained with a substantially low performance loss on the given platform.

  19. High-performance computing in seismology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    The scientific, technical, and economic importance of the issues discussed here presents a clear agenda for future research in computational seismology. In this way these problems will drive advances in high-performance computing in the field of seismology. There is a broad community that will benefit from this work, including the petroleum industry, research geophysicists, engineers concerned with seismic hazard mitigation, and governments charged with enforcing a comprehensive test ban treaty. These advances may also lead to new applications for seismological research. The recent application of high-resolution seismic imaging of the shallow subsurface for the environmental remediation industry is an example of this activity. This report makes the following recommendations: (1) focused efforts to develop validated documented software for seismological computations should be supported, with special emphasis on scalable algorithms for parallel processors; (2) the education of seismologists in high-performance computing technologies and methodologies should be improved; (3) collaborations between seismologists and computational scientists and engineers should be increased; (4) the infrastructure for archiving, disseminating, and processing large volumes of seismological data should be improved.

  20. A high performance architecture for accelerator controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M.; Hunt, S.M; Lue, H.; Saltmarsh, C.G.; Parker, C.R.C.B.

    1991-01-01

    The demands placed on the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) control system due to large distances, high bandwidth and fast response time required for operation will require a fresh approach to the data communications architecture of the accelerator. The prototype design effort aims at providing deterministic communication across the accelerator complex with a response time of < 100 ms and total bandwidth of 2 Gbits/sec. It will offer a consistent interface for a large number of equipment types, from vacuum pumps to beam position monitors, providing appropriate communications performance for each equipment type. It will consist of highly parallel links to all equipment: those with computing resources, non-intelligent direct control interfaces, and data concentrators. This system will give each piece of equipment a dedicated link of fixed bandwidth to the control system. Application programs will have access to all accelerator devices which will be memory mapped into a global virtual addressing scheme. Links to devices in the same geographical area will be multiplexed using commercial Time Division Multiplexing equipment. Low-level access will use reflective memory techniques, eliminating processing overhead and complexity of traditional data communication protocols. The use of commercial standards and equipment will enable a high performance system to be built at low cost

  1. A high performance architecture for accelerator controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M.; Hunt, S.M.; Lue, H.; Saltmarsh, C.G.; Parker, C.R.C.B.

    1991-03-01

    The demands placed on the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) control system due to large distances, high bandwidth and fast response time required for operation will require a fresh approach to the data communications architecture of the accelerator. The prototype design effort aims at providing deterministic communication across the accelerator complex with a response time of <100 ms and total bandwidth of 2 Gbits/sec. It will offer a consistent interface for a large number of equipment types, from vacuum pumps to beam position monitors, providing appropriate communications performance for each equipment type. It will consist of highly parallel links to all equipments: those with computing resources, non-intelligent direct control interfaces, and data concentrators. This system will give each piece of equipment a dedicated link of fixed bandwidth to the control system. Application programs will have access to all accelerator devices which will be memory mapped into a global virtual addressing scheme. Links to devices in the same geographical area will be multiplexed using commercial Time Division Multiplexing equipment. Low-level access will use reflective memory techniques, eliminating processing overhead and complexity of traditional data communication protocols. The use of commercial standards and equipment will enable a high performance system to be built at low cost. 1 fig

  2. High performance computing in linear control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, B.N.

    1993-01-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in both theory and applications of all important areas of control. The theory is rich and very sophisticated. Some beautiful applications of control theory are presently being made in aerospace, biomedical engineering, industrial engineering, robotics, economics, power systems, etc. Unfortunately, the same assessment of progress does not hold in general for computations in control theory. Control Theory is lagging behind other areas of science and engineering in this respect. Nowadays there is a revolution going on in the world of high performance scientific computing. Many powerful computers with vector and parallel processing have been built and have been available in recent years. These supercomputers offer very high speed in computations. Highly efficient software, based on powerful algorithms, has been developed to use on these advanced computers, and has also contributed to increased performance. While workers in many areas of science and engineering have taken great advantage of these hardware and software developments, control scientists and engineers, unfortunately, have not been able to take much advantage of these developments

  3. Building Trust in High-Performing Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aki Soudunsaari

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Facilitation of growth is more about good, trustworthy contacts than capital. Trust is a driving force for business creation, and to create a global business you need to build a team that is capable of meeting the challenge. Trust is a key factor in team building and a needed enabler for cooperation. In general, trust building is a slow process, but it can be accelerated with open interaction and good communication skills. The fast-growing and ever-changing nature of global business sets demands for cooperation and team building, especially for startup companies. Trust building needs personal knowledge and regular face-to-face interaction, but it also requires empathy, respect, and genuine listening. Trust increases communication, and rich and open communication is essential for the building of high-performing teams. Other building materials are a shared vision, clear roles and responsibilities, willingness for cooperation, and supporting and encouraging leadership. This study focuses on trust in high-performing teams. It asks whether it is possible to manage trust and which tools and operation models should be used to speed up the building of trust. In this article, preliminary results from the authors’ research are presented to highlight the importance of sharing critical information and having a high level of communication through constant interaction.

  4. A parts-per-billion measurement of the antiproton magnetic moment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smorra, C; Sellner, S; Borchert, M J; Harrington, J A; Higuchi, T; Nagahama, H; Tanaka, T; Mooser, A; Schneider, G; Bohman, M; Blaum, K; Matsuda, Y; Ospelkaus, C; Quint, W; Walz, J; Yamazaki, Y; Ulmer, S

    2017-10-18

    Precise comparisons of the fundamental properties of matter-antimatter conjugates provide sensitive tests of charge-parity-time (CPT) invariance, which is an important symmetry that rests on basic assumptions of the standard model of particle physics. Experiments on mesons, leptons and baryons have compared different properties of matter-antimatter conjugates with fractional uncertainties at the parts-per-billion level or better. One specific quantity, however, has so far only been known to a fractional uncertainty at the parts-per-million level: the magnetic moment of the antiproton, . The extraordinary difficulty in measuring with high precision is caused by its intrinsic smallness; for example, it is 660 times smaller than the magnetic moment of the positron. Here we report a high-precision measurement of in units of the nuclear magneton μ N with a fractional precision of 1.5 parts per billion (68% confidence level). We use a two-particle spectroscopy method in an advanced cryogenic multi-Penning trap system. Our result  = -2.7928473441(42)μ N (where the number in parentheses represents the 68% confidence interval on the last digits of the value) improves the precision of the previous best measurement by a factor of approximately 350. The measured value is consistent with the proton magnetic moment, μ p  = 2.792847350(9)μ N , and is in agreement with CPT invariance. Consequently, this measurement constrains the magnitude of certain CPT-violating effects to below 1.8 × 10 -24 gigaelectronvolts, and a possible splitting of the proton-antiproton magnetic moments by CPT-odd dimension-five interactions to below 6 × 10 -12 Bohr magnetons.

  5. Improving UV Resistance of High Performance Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanin, Ahmed

    High performance fibers are characterized by their superior properties compared to the traditional textile fibers. High strength fibers have high modules, high strength to weight ratio, high chemical resistance, and usually high temperature resistance. It is used in application where superior properties are needed such as bulletproof vests, ropes and cables, cut resistant products, load tendons for giant scientific balloons, fishing rods, tennis racket strings, parachute cords, adhesives and sealants, protective apparel and tire cords. Unfortunately, Ultraviolet (UV) radiation causes serious degradation to the most of high performance fibers. UV lights, either natural or artificial, cause organic compounds to decompose and degrade, because the energy of the photons of UV light is high enough to break chemical bonds causing chain scission. This work is aiming at achieving maximum protection of high performance fibers using sheathing approaches. The sheaths proposed are of lightweight to maintain the advantage of the high performance fiber that is the high strength to weight ratio. This study involves developing three different types of sheathing. The product of interest that need be protected from UV is braid from PBO. First approach is extruding a sheath from Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE) loaded with different rutile TiO2 % nanoparticles around the braid from the PBO. The results of this approach showed that LDPE sheath loaded with 10% TiO2 by weight achieved the highest protection compare to 0% and 5% TiO2. The protection here is judged by strength loss of PBO. This trend noticed in different weathering environments, where the sheathed samples were exposed to UV-VIS radiations in different weatheromter equipments as well as exposure to high altitude environment using NASA BRDL balloon. The second approach is focusing in developing a protective porous membrane from polyurethane loaded with rutile TiO2 nanoparticles. Membrane from polyurethane loaded with 4

  6. Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor high performance programming

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffers, James

    2013-01-01

    Authors Jim Jeffers and James Reinders spent two years helping educate customers about the prototype and pre-production hardware before Intel introduced the first Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor. They have distilled their own experiences coupled with insights from many expert customers, Intel Field Engineers, Application Engineers and Technical Consulting Engineers, to create this authoritative first book on the essentials of programming for this new architecture and these new products. This book is useful even before you ever touch a system with an Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor. To ensure that your applications run at maximum efficiency, the authors emphasize key techniques for programming any modern parallel computing system whether based on Intel Xeon processors, Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors, or other high performance microprocessors. Applying these techniques will generally increase your program performance on any system, and better prepare you for Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors and the Intel MIC architecture. It off...

  7. Development of high-performance blended cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zichao

    2000-10-01

    This thesis presents the development of high-performance blended cements from industrial by-products. To overcome the low-early strength of blended cements, several chemicals were studied as the activators for cement hydration. Sodium sulfate was discovered as the best activator. The blending proportions were optimized by Taguchi experimental design. The optimized blended cements containing up to 80% fly ash performed better than Type I cement in strength development and durability. Maintaining a constant cement content, concrete produced from the optimized blended cements had equal or higher strength and higher durability than that produced from Type I cement alone. The key for the activation mechanism was the reaction between added SO4 2- and Ca2+ dissolved from cement hydration products.

  8. Inelastic scattering of antiprotons from 12C and 18O at 50 and 180 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaire, M.C.; Birien, P.; Bruge, G.; Drake, D.M.; Garreta, D.; Janouin, S.; Legrand, D.; Mayer, B.; Pain, J.; Peng, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    The angular distributions of the inelastic scattering of antiprotons for a few collective states of 12 C and 18 O have been measured. They exhibit a diffractive pattern, typical of strong absorption. Coupled channel analysis of these data has been carried out. The derived multipole moments agree fairly well with those obtained with other probes. Microscopic calculations performed in the framework of the DWIA formalism, using either the Paris or the Dover-Richard Nanti N interaction are in good agreement with the data for the low-lying collective states. The present status of the experimental study of the unnatural parity levels is discussed. (orig.)

  9. Utilities for high performance dispersion model PHYSIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazawa, Hiromi

    1992-09-01

    The description and usage of the utilities for the dispersion calculation model PHYSIC were summarized. The model was developed in the study of developing high performance SPEEDI with the purpose of introducing meteorological forecast function into the environmental emergency response system. The procedure of PHYSIC calculation consists of three steps; preparation of relevant files, creation and submission of JCL, and graphic output of results. A user can carry out the above procedure with the help of the Geographical Data Processing Utility, the Model Control Utility, and the Graphic Output Utility. (author)

  10. An integrated high performance fastbus slave interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, J.; Ljuslin, C.

    1992-01-01

    A high performance Fastbus slave interface ASIC is presented. The Fastbus slave integrated circuit (FASIC) is a programmable device, enabling its direct use in many different applications. The FASIC acts as an interface between Fastbus and a 'standard' processor/memory bus. It can work stand-alone or together with a microprocessor. A set of address mapping windows can map Fastbus addresses to convenient memory addresses and at the same time act as address decoding logic. Data rates of 100 MBytes/s to Fastbus can be obtained using an internal FIFO buffer in the FASIC. (orig.)

  11. High performance visual display for HENP detectors

    CERN Document Server

    McGuigan, M; Spiletic, J; Fine, V; Nevski, P

    2001-01-01

    A high end visual display for High Energy Nuclear Physics (HENP) detectors is necessary because of the sheer size and complexity of the detector. For BNL this display will be of special interest because of STAR and ATLAS. To load, rotate, query, and debug simulation code with a modern detector simply takes too long even on a powerful work station. To visualize the HENP detectors with maximal performance we have developed software with the following characteristics. We develop a visual display of HENP detectors on BNL multiprocessor visualization server at multiple level of detail. We work with general and generic detector framework consistent with ROOT, GAUDI etc, to avoid conflicting with the many graphic development groups associated with specific detectors like STAR and ATLAS. We develop advanced OpenGL features such as transparency and polarized stereoscopy. We enable collaborative viewing of detector and events by directly running the analysis in BNL stereoscopic theatre. We construct enhanced interactiv...

  12. High-Performance Vertical Organic Electrochemical Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Mary J; Williamson, Adam; Strakosas, Xenofon; Friedlein, Jacob T; McLeod, Robert R; Gleskova, Helena; Malliaras, George G

    2018-02-01

    Organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) are promising transducers for biointerfacing due to their high transconductance, biocompatibility, and availability in a variety of form factors. Most OECTs reported to date, however, utilize rather large channels, limiting the transistor performance and resulting in a low transistor density. This is typically a consequence of limitations associated with traditional fabrication methods and with 2D substrates. Here, the fabrication and characterization of OECTs with vertically stacked contacts, which overcome these limitations, is reported. The resulting vertical transistors exhibit a reduced footprint, increased intrinsic transconductance of up to 57 mS, and a geometry-normalized transconductance of 814 S m -1 . The fabrication process is straightforward and compatible with sensitive organic materials, and allows exceptional control over the transistor channel length. This novel 3D fabrication method is particularly suited for applications where high density is needed, such as in implantable devices. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. High Performance Data Distribution for Scientific Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirado, Juan M.; Higuero, Daniel; Carretero, Jesus

    2010-05-01

    Institutions such as NASA, ESA or JAXA find solutions to distribute data from their missions to the scientific community, and their long term archives. This is a complex problem, as it includes a vast amount of data, several geographically distributed archives, heterogeneous architectures with heterogeneous networks, and users spread around the world. We propose a novel architecture (HIDDRA) that solves this problem aiming to reduce user intervention in data acquisition and processing. HIDDRA is a modular system that provides a highly efficient parallel multiprotocol download engine, using a publish/subscribe policy which helps the final user to obtain data of interest transparently. Our system can deal simultaneously with multiple protocols (HTTP,HTTPS, FTP, GridFTP among others) to obtain the maximum bandwidth, reducing the workload in data server and increasing flexibility. It can also provide high reliability and fault tolerance, as several sources of data can be used to perform one file download. HIDDRA architecture can be arranged into a data distribution network deployed on several sites that can cooperate to provide former features. HIDDRA has been addressed by the 2009 e-IRG Report on Data Management as a promising initiative for data interoperability. Our first prototype has been evaluated in collaboration with the ESAC centre in Villafranca del Castillo (Spain) that shows a high scalability and performance, opening a wide spectrum of opportunities. Some preliminary results have been published in the Journal of Astrophysics and Space Science [1]. [1] D. Higuero, J.M. Tirado, J. Carretero, F. Félix, and A. de La Fuente. HIDDRA: a highly independent data distribution and retrieval architecture for space observation missions. Astrophysics and Space Science, 321(3):169-175, 2009

  14. High-performance laboratories and cleanrooms; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschudi, William; Sartor, Dale; Mills, Evan; Xu, Tengfang

    2002-01-01

    The California Energy Commission sponsored this roadmap to guide energy efficiency research and deployment for high performance cleanrooms and laboratories. Industries and institutions utilizing these building types (termed high-tech buildings) have played an important part in the vitality of the California economy. This roadmap's key objective to present a multi-year agenda to prioritize and coordinate research efforts. It also addresses delivery mechanisms to get the research products into the market. Because of the importance to the California economy, it is appropriate and important for California to take the lead in assessing the energy efficiency research needs, opportunities, and priorities for this market. In addition to the importance to California's economy, energy demand for this market segment is large and growing (estimated at 9400 GWH for 1996, Mills et al. 1996). With their 24hr. continuous operation, high tech facilities are a major contributor to the peak electrical demand. Laboratories and cleanrooms constitute the high tech building market, and although each building type has its unique features, they are similar in that they are extremely energy intensive, involve special environmental considerations, have very high ventilation requirements, and are subject to regulations-primarily safety driven-that tend to have adverse energy implications. High-tech buildings have largely been overlooked in past energy efficiency research. Many industries and institutions utilize laboratories and cleanrooms. As illustrated, there are many industries operating cleanrooms in California. These include semiconductor manufacturing, semiconductor suppliers, pharmaceutical, biotechnology, disk drive manufacturing, flat panel displays, automotive, aerospace, food, hospitals, medical devices, universities, and federal research facilities

  15. Transport in JET high performance plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Two type of high performance scenarios have been produced in JET during DTE1 campaign. One of them is the well known and extensively used in the past ELM-free hot ion H-mode scenario which has two distinct regions- plasma core and the edge transport barrier. The results obtained during DTE-1 campaign with D, DT and pure T plasmas confirms our previous conclusion that the core transport scales as a gyroBohm in the inner half of plasma volume, recovers its Bohm nature closer to the separatrix and behaves as ion neoclassical in the transport barrier. Measurements on the top of the barrier suggest that the width of the barrier is dependent upon isotope and moreover suggest that fast ions play a key role. The other high performance scenario is a relatively recently developed Optimised Shear Scenario with small or slightly negative magnetic shear in plasma core. Different mechanisms of Internal Transport Barrier (ITB) formation have been tested by predictive modelling and the results are compared with experimentally observed phenomena. The experimentally observed non-penetration of the heavy impurities through the strong ITB which contradicts to a prediction of the conventional neo-classical theory is discussed. (author)

  16. High-performance computing for airborne applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, Heather M.; Manuzatto, Andrea; Fairbanks, Tom; Dallmann, Nicholas; Desgeorges, Rose

    2010-01-01

    Recently, there has been attempts to move common satellite tasks to unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). UAVs are significantly cheaper to buy than satellites and easier to deploy on an as-needed basis. The more benign radiation environment also allows for an aggressive adoption of state-of-the-art commercial computational devices, which increases the amount of data that can be collected. There are a number of commercial computing devices currently available that are well-suited to high-performance computing. These devices range from specialized computational devices, such as field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) and digital signal processors (DSPs), to traditional computing platforms, such as microprocessors. Even though the radiation environment is relatively benign, these devices could be susceptible to single-event effects. In this paper, we will present radiation data for high-performance computing devices in a accelerated neutron environment. These devices include a multi-core digital signal processor, two field-programmable gate arrays, and a microprocessor. From these results, we found that all of these devices are suitable for many airplane environments without reliability problems.

  17. Transport in JET high performance plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Two type of high performance scenarios have been produced in JET during DTE1 campaign. One of them is the well known and extensively used in the past ELM-free hot ion H-mode scenario which has two distinct regions- plasma core and the edge transport barrier. The results obtained during DTE-1 campaign with D, DT and pure T plasmas confirms our previous conclusion that the core transport scales as a gyroBohm in the inner half of plasma volume, recovers its Bohm nature closer to the separatrix and behaves as ion neoclassical in the transport barrier. Measurements on the top of the barrier suggest that the width of the barrier is dependent upon isotope and moreover suggest that fast ions play a key role. The other high performance scenario is a relatively recently developed Optimised Shear Scenario with small or slightly negative magnetic shear in plasma core. Different mechanisms of Internal Transport Barrier (ITB) formation have been tested by predictive modelling and the results are compared with experimentally observed phenomena. The experimentally observed non-penetration of the heavy impurities through the strong ITB which contradicts to a prediction of the conventional neo-classical theory is discussed. (author)

  18. High-performance vertical organic transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleemann, Hans; Günther, Alrun A; Leo, Karl; Lüssem, Björn

    2013-11-11

    Vertical organic thin-film transistors (VOTFTs) are promising devices to overcome the transconductance and cut-off frequency restrictions of horizontal organic thin-film transistors. The basic physical mechanisms of VOTFT operation, however, are not well understood and VOTFTs often require complex patterning techniques using self-assembly processes which impedes a future large-area production. In this contribution, high-performance vertical organic transistors comprising pentacene for p-type operation and C60 for n-type operation are presented. The static current-voltage behavior as well as the fundamental scaling laws of such transistors are studied, disclosing a remarkable transistor operation with a behavior limited by injection of charge carriers. The transistors are manufactured by photolithography, in contrast to other VOTFT concepts using self-assembled source electrodes. Fluorinated photoresist and solvent compounds allow for photolithographical patterning directly and strongly onto the organic materials, simplifying the fabrication protocol and making VOTFTs a prospective candidate for future high-performance applications of organic transistors. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Performance of the CMS High Level Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Perrotta, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a 2-level trigger system. The first level is implemented using custom-designed electronics. The second level is the so-called High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. For Run II of the Large Hadron Collider, the increases in center-of-mass energy and luminosity will raise the event rate to a level challenging for the HLT algorithms. The increase in the number of interactions per bunch crossing, on average 25 in 2012, and expected to be around 40 in Run II, will be an additional complication. We present here the expected performance of the main triggers that will be used during the 2015 data taking campaign, paying particular attention to the new approaches that have been developed to cope with the challenges of the new run. This includes improvements in HLT electron and photon reconstruction as well as better performing muon triggers. We will also present the performance of the improved trac...

  20. Development of a High Performance Spacer Grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kee Nam; Song, K. N.; Yoon, K. H. (and others)

    2007-03-15

    A spacer grid in a LWR fuel assembly is a key structural component to support fuel rods and to enhance the heat transfer from the fuel rod to the coolant. In this research, the main research items are the development of inherent and high performance spacer grid shapes, the establishment of mechanical/structural analysis and test technology, and the set-up of basic test facilities for the spacer grid. The main research areas and results are as follows. 1. 18 different spacer grid candidates have been invented and applied for domestic and US patents. Among the candidates 16 are chosen from the patent. 2. Two kinds of spacer grids are finally selected for the advanced LWR fuel after detailed performance tests on the candidates and commercial spacer grids from a mechanical/structural point of view. According to the test results the features of the selected spacer grids are better than those of the commercial spacer grids. 3. Four kinds of basic test facilities are set up and the relevant test technologies are established. 4. Mechanical/structural analysis models and technology for spacer grid performance are developed and the analysis results are compared with the test results to enhance the reliability of the models.