WorldWideScience

Sample records for high enery gamma

  1. A Blind Search for Bursts of Very High Enery Gamma Rays with Milagro

    CERN Document Server

    Vasileiou, Vlasios

    2008-01-01

    Milagro is a water-Cherenkov detector that observes the extended air showers produced by cosmic gamma rays of energies E>100GeV. The effective area of Milagro peaks at energies E~10TeV, however it is still large even down to a few hundred GeV (~10m^2 at 100GeV). The wide field of view (~2sr) and high duty cycle (>90%) of Milagro make it ideal for continuously monitoring the overhead sky for transient Very High Energy (VHE) emissions. This study searched the Milagro data for such emissions. Even though the search was optimized primarily for detecting the emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), it was still sensitive to the emission from the last stages of the evaporation of Primordial Black Holes or to any other kind of phenomena that produce bursts of VHE gamma rays. Measurements of the GRB spectra by satellites up to few tens of GeV showed no signs of a cutoff. Even though multiple instruments sensitive to $GeV/TeV$ gamma rays have performed observations of GRBs, there has not yet been a definitive detection ...

  2. High-Resolution Atmospheric Emission Inventory of the Argentine Enery Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puliafito, Salvador Enrique; Castesana, Paula; Allende, David; Ruggeri, Florencia; Pinto, Sebastián; Pascual, Romina; Bolaño Ortiz, Tomás; Fernandez, Rafael Pedro

    2017-04-01

    This study presents a high-resolution spatially disaggregated inventory (2.5 km x 2.5 km), updated to 2014, of the main emissions from energy activities in Argentina. This inventory was created with the purpose of improving air quality regional models. The sub-sectors considered are public electricity and heat production, cement production, domestic aviation, road and rail transportation, inland navigation, residential and commercial, and fugitive emissions from refineries and fuel expenditure. The pollutants considered include greenhouse gases and ozone precursors: CO2, CH4, NOx, N2O VOC; and other gases specifically related to air quality including PM10, PM2.5, SOx, Pb and POPs. The uncertainty analysis of the inventories resulted in a variability of 3% for public electricity generation, 3-6% in the residential, commercial sector, 6-12% terrestrial transportation sector, 10-20% in oil refining and cement production according to the considered pollutant. Aviation and maritime navigation resulted in a higher variability reaching more than 60%. A comparison with the international emission inventory EDGAR shows disagreements in the spatial distribution of emissions, probably due to the finer resolution of the map presented here, particularly as a result of the use of new spatially disaggregated data of higher resolution that is currently available.

  3. High Redshift Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2012-01-01

    The Swift Observatory has been detecting 100 gamma-ray bursts per year for 7 years and has greatly stimulated the field with new findings. Observations are made of the X-ray and optical afterglow from 1 minute after the burst, continuing for days. GRBs are providing a new tool to study the high redshift universe. Swift has detected several events at z>5 and one at z=9.4 giving information on metallicity, star formation rate and reionization. The talk will present the latest results.

  4. Advantages of exclusive \\gamma\\gamma production to probe high mass systems

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, A D

    2016-01-01

    We recall that the exclusive production of high mass objects via \\gamma\\gamma fusion at the LHC is not strongly suppressed in comparison with inclusive \\gamma\\gamma fusion. Therefore it may be promising to study new objects produced by the \\gamma\\gamma subprocess in experiments with exclusive kinematics. We list the main advantages of exclusive experiments.

  5. Gamma-ray bursts at high redshift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A.M.J. Wijers

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are much brighter than supernovae, and could therefore possibly probe the Universe to high redshift. The presently established GRB redshifts range from 0.83 to 5, and quite possibly even beyond that. Since most proposed mechanisms for GRB link them closely to deaths of massive stars

  6. Gamma-ray bursts at high redshift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijers, R.A.M.J.

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are much brighter than supernovae, and could therefore possibly probe the Universe to high redshift. The presently established GRB redshifts range from 0.83 to 5, and quite possibly even beyond that. Since most proposed mechanisms for GRB link them closely to deaths of massive stars

  7. AGNs and microquasars as high energy gamma-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Paredes, J M

    2004-01-01

    The extragalactic analogs of the microquasars, the quasars, are strong gamma-ray emitters at GeV energies. It is expected that microquasars are also gamma-ray sources, because of the analogy with quasars and because theoretical models predict the high-energy emission. There are two microquasars that appear as the possible counterparts for two unidentified high-energy gamma-ray sources.

  8. Gamma-ray bursts at high and very high energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piron, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are extra-galactic and extremely energetic transient emissions of gamma rays, which are thought to be associated with the death of massive stars or the merger of compact objects in binary systems. Their huge luminosities involve the presence of a newborn stellar-mass black hole emitting a relativistic collimated outflow, which accelerates particles and produces non-thermal emissions from the radio domain to the highest energies. In this article, I review recent progresses in the understanding of GRB jet physics above 100 MeV, based on Fermi observations of bright GRBs. I discuss the physical implications of these observations and their impact on GRB modeling, and I present some prospects for GRB observation at very high energies in the near future. xml:lang="fr"

  9. Gamma-Ray Bursts at high and very high energies

    CERN Document Server

    Piron, F

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are extra-galactic and extremely energetic transient emissions of gamma rays, which are thought to be associated with the death of massive stars or the merger of compact objects in binary systems. Their huge luminosities involve the presence a newborn stellar-mass black hole emitting a relativistic collimated outflow, which accelerates particles and produces non-thermal emissions from the radio domain to the highest energies. In this article, I review recent progresses in the understanding of GRB jet physics above 100 MeV, based on Fermi observations of bright GRBs. I discuss the physical implications of these observations and their impact on GRB modeling, and I present some prospects for GRB observation at very high energies in the near future.

  10. Probing cosmic opacity at high redshifts with gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Holanda, R F L

    2014-01-01

    Probing the evolution of the universe at high redshifts with standard candles is a powerful way to discriminate dark energy models, where an open question nowadays is whether this component is constant or evolves with time. One possible source of ambiguity in this kind of analyses comes from cosmic opacity, which can mimick a dark enery behaviour. However, most tests of cosmic opacity have been restricted to the redshift range $z2$) for a flat $\\Lambda$CDM model. A possible degenerescence of the results with the adopted cosmological model is also investigated by considering a flat XCDM model. The limits on cosmic opacity in the redshift range $0

  11. Production of high-energy colliding. gamma gamma. and. gamma. e beams with a high luminosity at VLEPP accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginzburg, I.F.; Kotkin, G.L.; Serbo, V.G.; Tel' nov, V.I.

    1981-11-05

    Colliding ..gamma gamma.. and ..gamma..e beams with an energy and luminosity of the same order of magnitude as for e/sup +/e/sup -/ beams can be produced by scattering a laser light at the accelerators with colliding e/sup +/e/sup -/ beams with an energy > or approx. =100 GeV. Such accelerators are currently in the design stage.

  12. Perspectives of the GAMMA-400 space observatory for high-energy gamma rays and cosmic rays measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topchiev, N. P.; Galper, A. M.; Bonvicini, V.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Bakaldin, A. V.; Bergstrom, L.; Berti, E.; Bigongiari, G.; Bobkov, S. G.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bonechi, S.; Bongi, M.; Bottai, S.; Castellini, G.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cumani, P.; Dalkarov, O. D.; Dedenko, G. L.; De Donato, C.; Dogiel, V. A.; Finetti, N.; Gorbunov, M. S.; Gusakov, Yu V.; Hnatyk, B. I.; Kadilin, V. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kaplun, A. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Korepanov, V. E.; Larsson, J.; Leonov, A. A.; Loginov, V. A.; Longo, F.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Men'shenin, A. L.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Ricciarini, S.; Runtso, M. F.; Ryde, F.; Serdin, O. V.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Yu I.; Suchkov, S. I.; Taraskin, A. A.; Tavani, M.; Tiberio, A.; Tyurin, E. M.; Ulanov, M. V.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Yurkin, Yu T.; Zampa, N.; Zirakashvili, V. N.; Zverev, V. G.

    2016-02-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is intended to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV. Such measurements concern the following scientific tasks: investigation of point sources of gamma-rays, studies of the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, studies of gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun, as well as high precision measurements of spectra of high-energy electrons and positrons. Also the GAMMA- 400 instrument provides the possibility for protons and nuclei measurements up to knee. But the main goal for the GAMMA-400 mission is to perform a sensitive search for signatures of dark matter particles in high-energy gamma-ray emission. To fulfill these measurements the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope possesses unique physical characteristics in comparison with previous and present experiments. The major advantage of the GAMMA-400 instrument is excellent angular and energy resolution for gamma-rays above 10 GeV. The GAMMA-400 experiment will be installed onboard of the Navigator space platform, manufactured by the NPO Lavochkin Association. The expected orbit will be a highly elliptical orbit (with apogee 300.000 km and perigee 500 km) with 7 days orbital period. An important profit of such an orbit is the fact that the full sky coverage will always be available for gamma ray astronomy.

  13. $\\gamma$-Ray Absorption at High Redshifts and the $\\gamma$-Ray Background

    CERN Document Server

    Stecker, F W

    1997-01-01

    We present results of a calculation of absorption of 10-500 GeV gamma-rays at high redshifts. This calculation requires the determination of the high- redshift evolution of the full spectral energy distribution of the intergalactic photon field. For this, we have primarily followed the recent analysis of Fall, Charlot and Pei. We give our results for the gamma-ray opacity as a function of redshift out to a redshift of 3. We then give predicted gamma-ray spectra for selected blazars and also extend our results on the background from unresolved blazars to an energy of 500 GeV. Absorption effects are predicted to significantly steepen the background spectrum above 20 GeV. Our absorption calculations can be used to place limits on the redshifts of gamma-ray bursts. Our background calculations can be used to determine the observability of multi-GeV lines from dark matter neutralino particles.

  14. Fundamental Physics With Cosmic High-Energy Gamma Rays

    CERN Document Server

    De Angelis, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    High-energy photons (above the MeV) are a powerful probe for astrophysics and for fundamental physics under extreme conditions. During the recent years, our knowledge of the high-energy gamma-ray sky has impressively progressed thanks to the advent of new detectors for cosmic gamma rays, at ground (H.E.S.S., MAGIC, VERITAS, HAWC) and in space (AGILE, Fermi). This presentation reviews the present status of the studies of fundamental physics problems with high-energy gamma rays, and discusses the expected experimental developments.

  15. High Energy Neutron Induced Gamma Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, D A; Johnson, M; Navratil, P

    2007-09-28

    N Division has an interest in improving the physics and accuracy of the gamma data it provides to its customers. It was asked to look into major gamma producing reactions for 14 MeV incident neutrons for several low-Z materials and determine whether LLNL's processed data files faithfully represent the current state of experimental and theoretical knowledge for these reactions. To address this, we surveyed the evaluations of the requested materials, made recommendations for the next ENDL release and noted isotopes that will require further experimental study. This process uncovered several major problems in our translation and processing of the ENDF formatted evaluations, most of which have been resolved.

  16. High energy gamma-ray emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts -- before GLAST

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Yi-Zhong

    2008-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short and intense emission of soft gamma-rays, which have fascinated astronomers and astrophysicists since their unexpected discovery in 1960s. The X-ray/optical/radio afterglow observations confirm the cosmological origin of GRBs, support the fireball model, and imply a long-activity of the central engine. The high energy gamma-ray emission (>20 MeV) from GRBs is particularly important because they shed some lights on the radiation mechanisms and can help us to constrain the physical processes giving rise to the early afterglows. In this work, we review observational and theoretical studies of the high energy emission from GRBs. Special attention is given to the expected high energy emission signatures accompanying the canonical early-time X-ray afterglow that was observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope. We also discuss the detection prospect of the upcoming GLAST satellite and the current ground-based Cerenkov detectors.

  17. Recent Topics on Very High Energy Gamma-ray Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Mori, Masaki

    2008-01-01

    With the advent of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes in late 1980's, ground-based observation of TeV gamma-rays came into reality after struggling trials by pioneers for twenty years, and the number of gamma-ray sources detected at TeV energies has increased to be over seventy now. In this review, recent findings from ground-based very-high-energy gamma-ray observations are summarized (as of 2008 March), and up-to-date problems in this research field are presented.

  18. Science with the new generation high energy gamma- ray experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez, M; Agnetta, G; Alberdi, A; Antonelli, A; Argan, A; Assis, P; Baltz, E A; Bambi, C; Barbiellini, G; Bartko, H; Basset, M; Bastieri, D; Belli, P; Benford, G; Bergström, L; Bernabei, R; Bertone, G; Biland, A; Biondo, B; Bocchino, F; Branchini, E; Brigida, M; Bringmann, T; Brogueira, P; Bulgarelli, A; Caballero, J A; Caliandro, G A; Camarri, P; Cappella, F; Caraveo, P; Carbone, R; Carvajal, M; Casanova, S; Castro-Tirado, A J; Catalano, O; Catena, R; Celi, F; Celotti, A; Cerulli, R; Chen, A; Clay, R; Cocco, V; Conrad, J; Costa, E; Cuoco, A; Cusumano, G; Dai, C J; Dawson, B; De Lotto, B; De Paris, G; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Del Monte, E; Delgado, C; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Cocco, G; Di Falco, S; Di Persio, G; Dingus, B L; Dominguez, A; Donato, F; Donnarumma, I; Doro, M; Edsjö, J; Navas, J M Espino; Santo, M C Espirito; Evangelista, Y; Evoli, C; Fargion, D; Favuzzi, C; Feroci, M; Fiorini, M; Foggetta, L; Fornengo, N; Froysland, T; Frutti, M; Fuschino, F; Gómez, J L; Gómez, M; Gaggero, D; Galante, N; Gallardo, M I; Galli, M; García, J E; Garczarczyk, M; Gargano, F; Gaug, M; Gianotti, F; Giarrusso, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Giuliani, A; Glicenstein, J; Gonçalves, P; Grasso, D; Guerriero, M; He, H L; Incicchitti, A; Kirk, J; Kuang, H H; La Barbera, A; La Rosa, G; Labanti, C; Lamanna, G; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Liberati, S; Liello, F; Lipari, P; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lozano, M; De Sanctis, P G Lucentini; Ma, J M; Maccarone, M C; Maccione, L; Malvezzi, V; Mangano, A; Mariotti, M; Marisaldi, M; Martel, I; Masiero, A; Massaro, E; Mastropietro, M; Mattaini, E; Mauri, F; Mazziotta, M N; Mereghetti, S; Mineo, T; Mizobuchi, S; Moiseev, A; Moles, M; Monte, C; Montecchia, F; Morelli, E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I; Nozzoli, F; Ormes, J F; Peres-Torres, M A; Pacciani, L; Pellizzoni, A; Pérez-Bernal, F; Perotti, F; Picozza, P; Pieri, L; Pietroni, M; Pimenta, M; Pina, A; Pittori, C; Pontoni, C; Porrovecchio, G; Prada, F; Prest, M; Prosperi, D; Protheroe, R; Pucella, G; Quesada, J M; Quintana, J M; Quintero, J R; Rainó, S; Rapisarda, M; Rissi, M; Rodríguez, J; Rossi, E; Rowell, G; Rubini, A; Russo, F; Sanchez-Conde, M; Sacco, B; Scapin, V; Schelke, M; Segreto, A; Sellerholm, A; Sheng, X D; Smith, A; Soffitta, P; Sparvoli, R; Spinelli, P; Stamatescu, V; Stark, L S; Tavani, M; Thornton, G; Titarchuk, L G; Tomé, B; Traci, A; Trifoglio, M; Trois, A; Vallania, P; Vallazza, E; Vercellone, S; Vernetto, S; Vitale, V; Wild, N; Ye, Z P; Zambra, A; Zandanel, F; Zanello, D

    2007-01-01

    This Conference is the fifth of a series of Workshops on High Energy Gamma- ray Experiments, following the Conferences held in Perugia 2003, Bari 2004, Cividale del Friuli 2005, Elba Island 2006. This year the focus was on the use of gamma-ray to study the Dark Matter component of the Universe, the origin and propagation of Cosmic Rays, Extra Large Spatial Dimensions and Tests of Lorentz Invariance.

  19. Plutonium characterisation with prompt high energy gamma-rays from (n,gamma) reactions for nuclear warhead dismantlement verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Postelt, Frederik; Gerald, Kirchner [Carl Friedrich von Weizsaecker-Centre for Science and Peace Research, Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Measurements of neutron induced gammas allow the characterisation of fissile material (i.e. plutonium and uranium), despite self- and additional shielding. Most prompt gamma-rays from radiative neutron capture reactions in fissile material have energies between 3 and 6.5 MeV. Such high energy photons have a high penetrability and therefore minimise shielding and self-absorption effects. They are also isotope specific and therefore well suited to determine the isotopic composition of fissile material. As they are non-destructive, their application in dismantlement verification is desirable. Disadvantages are low detector efficiencies at high gamma energies, as well as a high background of gammas which result from induced fission reactions in the fissile material, as well as delayed gammas from both, (n,f) and(n,gamma) reactions. In this talk, simulations of (n,gamma) measurements and their implications are presented. Their potential for characterising fissile material is assessed and open questions are addressed.

  20. ISPA - a high accuracy X-ray and gamma camera Exhibition LEPFest 2000

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    ISPA offers ... Ten times better resolution than Anger cameras High efficiency single gamma counting Noise reduction by sensitivity to gamma energy ...for Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT)

  1. Galactic sources of high energy neutrinos: Expectation from gamma-ray data

    CERN Document Server

    Sahakyan, N

    2015-01-01

    The recent results from ground based $\\gamma$-ray detectors (HESS, MAGIC, VERITAS) provide a population of TeV galactic $\\gamma$-ray sources which are potential sources of High Energy (HE) neutrinos. Since the $\\gamma$-rays and $\

  2. Spectroscopic gamma camera for use in high dose environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Isao; Ishitsu, Takafumi; Tadokoro, Takahiro; Okada, Koichi; Nagumo, Yasushi; Fujishima, Yasutake; Kometani, Yutaka; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Umegaki, Kikuo

    2016-06-01

    We developed a pinhole gamma camera to measure distributions of radioactive material contaminants and to identify radionuclides in extraordinarily high dose regions (1000 mSv/h). The developed gamma camera is characterized by: (1) tolerance for high dose rate environments; (2) high spatial and spectral resolution for identifying unknown contaminating sources; and (3) good usability for being carried on a robot and remotely controlled. These are achieved by using a compact pixelated detector module with CdTe semiconductors, efficient shielding, and a fine resolution pinhole collimator. The gamma camera weighs less than 100 kg, and its field of view is an 8 m square in the case of a distance of 10 m and its image is divided into 256 (16×16) pixels. From the laboratory test, we found the energy resolution at the 662 keV photopeak was 2.3% FWHM, which is enough to identify the radionuclides. We found that the count rate per background dose rate was 220 cps h/mSv and the maximum count rate was 300 kcps, so the maximum dose rate of the environment where the gamma camera can be operated was calculated as 1400 mSv/h. We investigated the reactor building of Unit 1 at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant using the gamma camera and could identify the unknown contaminating source in the dose rate environment that was as high as 659 mSv/h.

  3. Spectroscopic gamma camera for use in high dose environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Yuichiro, E-mail: yuichiro.ueno.bv@hitachi.com [Research and Development Group, Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken 319-1221 (Japan); Takahashi, Isao; Ishitsu, Takafumi; Tadokoro, Takahiro; Okada, Koichi; Nagumo, Yasushi [Research and Development Group, Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken 319-1221 (Japan); Fujishima, Yasutake; Kometani, Yutaka [Hitachi Works, Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd., Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Suzuki, Yasuhiko [Measuring Systems Engineering Dept., Hitachi Aloka Medical, Ltd., Ome-shi, Tokyo (Japan); Umegaki, Kikuo [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo-shi, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2016-06-21

    We developed a pinhole gamma camera to measure distributions of radioactive material contaminants and to identify radionuclides in extraordinarily high dose regions (1000 mSv/h). The developed gamma camera is characterized by: (1) tolerance for high dose rate environments; (2) high spatial and spectral resolution for identifying unknown contaminating sources; and (3) good usability for being carried on a robot and remotely controlled. These are achieved by using a compact pixelated detector module with CdTe semiconductors, efficient shielding, and a fine resolution pinhole collimator. The gamma camera weighs less than 100 kg, and its field of view is an 8 m square in the case of a distance of 10 m and its image is divided into 256 (16×16) pixels. From the laboratory test, we found the energy resolution at the 662 keV photopeak was 2.3% FWHM, which is enough to identify the radionuclides. We found that the count rate per background dose rate was 220 cps h/mSv and the maximum count rate was 300 kcps, so the maximum dose rate of the environment where the gamma camera can be operated was calculated as 1400 mSv/h. We investigated the reactor building of Unit 1 at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant using the gamma camera and could identify the unknown contaminating source in the dose rate environment that was as high as 659 mSv/h.

  4. The alterations in high density polyethylene properties with gamma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, M. F.; Elshaer, Y. H.; Taha, Doaa. H.

    2017-10-01

    In the present investigation, high density polyethylene (HDPE) polymer has been used to study the alterations in its properties under gamma-irradiation. Physico-chemical properties have been investigated with different spectroscopy techniques, Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), biocompatibility properties, as well as, mechanical properties change. The FT-IR analysis shows the formation of new band at 1716 cm-1 that is attributed to the oxidation of irradiated polymer chains, which is due to the formation of carbonyl groups (C˭O). XRD patterns show that a decrease in the crystallite size and increase in the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM). This means that the crystallinity of irradiated samples is decreased with increase in gamma dose. The contact angle measurements show an increase in the surface free energy as the gamma irradiation increases. The measurements of mechanical properties of irradiated HDPE samples were discussed.

  5. High-energy gamma-ray sources of cosmological origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Pierre; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann

    2016-06-01

    The current generation of instruments in gamma-ray astrophysics launched a new era in the search for a dark matter signal in the high-energy sky. Such searches are said indirect, in the sense that the presence of a dark matter particle is inferred from the detection of products of its pair-annihilation or decay. They have recently started to probe the natural domain of existence for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), the favorite dark matter candidates today. In this article, we review the basic framework for indirect searches and we present a status of current limits obtained with gamma-ray observations. We also devote a section to another possible class of cosmological gamma-ray sources, primordial black holes, also considered as a potential constituent of dark matter. xml:lang="fr"

  6. High Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts - Before GLAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Yi-Zhong; Piran, Tsvi

    2011-11-29

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short and intense emission of soft {gamma}-rays, which have fascinated astronomers and astrophysicists since their unexpected discovery in 1960s. The X-ray/optical/radio afterglow observations confirm the cosmological origin of GRBs, support the fireball model, and imply a long-activity of the central engine. The high-energy {gamma}-ray emission (> 20 MeV) from GRBs is particularly important because they shed some lights on the radiation mechanisms and can help us to constrain the physical processes giving rise to the early afterglows. In this work, we review observational and theoretical studies of the high-energy emission from GRBs. Special attention is given to the expected high-energy emission signatures accompanying the canonical early-time X-ray afterglow that was observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope. We also discuss the detection prospect of the upcoming GLAST satellite and the current ground-based Cerenkov detectors.

  7. (Very)-high-energy gamma-ray astrophysics: The future

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Several projects planned or proposed can significantly expand our knowledge of the high-energy Universe in gamma rays. Construction of the Cherenkov telescope array CTA is started, and other detectors are planned which will use the reconstruction of extensive air showers. This report explores the near future, and possible evolutions in a longer term.

  8. (Very)-High-Energy Gamma-Ray Astrophysics: the Future

    CERN Document Server

    De Angelis, Alesandro

    2016-01-01

    Several projects planned or proposed can significantly expand our knowledge of the high-energy Universe in gamma rays. Construction of the Cherenkov telescope array CTA is started, and other detectors are planned which will use the reconstruction of extensive air showers. This report explores the near future, and possible evolutions in a longer term.

  9. (Very-high-energy gamma-ray astrophysics: The future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelis Alessandro De

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Several projects planned or proposed can significantly expand our knowledge of the high-energy Universe in gamma rays. Construction of the Cherenkov telescope array CTA is started, and other detectors are planned which will use the reconstruction of extensive air showers. This report explores the near future, and possible evolutions in a longer term.

  10. THE HIGH ALTITUDE GAMMA RAY OBSERVATORY, HAWC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. González

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available El volcán Sierra Negra en Puebla, México fue seleccionado para albergar a HAWC (High Altitude Water Cherenkov, un observatorio de gran apertura (2Pi sr, único en el mundo, capaz de observar contínuamente el cielo a energías de 0.1 a 100 TeV. HAWC consiste en un arreglo a una altitud de 4100 m sobre el nivel del mar de 300 contenedores de 7.3 m de diámetro y 5 m de altura llenos de agua pura y sensores de luz que observan partículas sumamente energ´eticas provenientes de los eventos más violentos del universo y será 15 veces más sensible que su antecesor Milagro. Las aportaciones científicas de Milagro han demostrado las capacidades únicas de este tipo de observatorios. En este trabajo se presentará HAWC y se discutirá brevemente su caso científico y capacidades.

  11. High-resolution spectroscopy of gamma-ray transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, T.L.

    1988-09-25

    The first high-resolution spectrometer flown to observe gamma-ray bursts was launched on the ISEE-3 spacecraft over nine years ago. It recorded two events before instrument failure, giving results that were suggestive but marginal. Other studies, with coarser energy resolution, also show evidence for spectral features as well as for spectral evolution on short time scales. Absolute source strength calibration will be possible only with source identification, but understanding of the burst emission processes will surely come only from the measurements having the best spectral and temporal precision. The only high- resolution gamma-ray spectrometer now planned, here or abroad, for space flight is an instrument sequel to the ISEE-3 spectrometer, to be flown on the interplanetary 'GGS Wind' mission. Much larger and higher-sensitivity, high-resolution instruments may have their optimum opportunities in conjunction with studies of solar flares in the time frame of the solar maximum of 2002.

  12. PANGU: A High Resolution Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xin; Bravar, Alessandro; Chang, Jin; Fan, Yizhong; Pohl, Martin; Walter, Roland

    2014-01-01

    We describe the instrument concept of a high angular resolution telescope dedicated to the sub-GeV (from $\\gtrsim$10 MeV to $\\gtrsim$1 GeV) gamma-ray photon detection. This mission, named PANGU (PAir-productioN Gamma-ray Unit), has been suggested as a candidate for the joint small mission between the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Chinese Academy of Science (CAS). A wide range of topics of both astronomy and fundamental physics can be attacked with PANGU, covering Galactic and extragalactic cosmic-ray physics, extreme physics of a variety of extended (e.g. supernova remnants, galaxies, galaxy clusters) and compact (e.g. black holes, pulsars, gamma-ray bursts) objects, solar and terrestrial gamma-ray phenomena, and searching for dark matter decay and/or annihilation signature etc. The unprecedented point spread function can be achieved with a pair-production telescope with a large number of thin active tracking layers to precisely reconstruct the pair-produced electron and positron tracks. Scintillating f...

  13. Recent high energy gamma-ray results from SAS-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Bignami, G. F.; Ogelman, H. B.; Ozel, M. E.; Tumer, T.; Lamb, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Recent developments in gamma-ray astronomy due to the results from SAS-2 have focused on two areas. First, the emission from the plane of the Galaxy is the dominant feature in the gamma-ray sky. The galactic latitude and longitude distributions are consistent with the concept that the high-energy radiation originates from cosmic rays interacting with interstellar matter, and the measurements support a galactic origin for cosmic rays. Second, searches of the SAS-2 data for emission from localized sources have shown three strong discrete gamma-ray sources: the Crab nebula and PSR 0531 + 21, the Vela supernova remnant and PSR 0833-45, and a source near galactic coordinates 193 deg longitude, +3 deg latitude, which does not appear to be associated with other known celestial objects. Evidence has also been found for pulsed gamma-ray emission from two other radio pulsars, PSR 1818-04 and PSR 1747-46. A localized source near longitudes 76-80 deg may be associated with the X-ray source Cyg X-3.

  14. New stage in high-energy gamma-ray studies with GAMMA-400 after Fermi-LAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topchiev N.P.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fermi-LAT has made a significant contribution to the study of high-energy gamma-ray diffuse emission and the observations of 3000 discrete sources. However, one third of all gamma-ray sources (both galactic and extragalactic are unidentified, the data on the diffuse gamma-ray emission should be clarified, and signatures of dark matter particles in the high-energy gamma-ray range are not observed up to now. GAMMA-400, the currently developing gamma-ray telescope, will have angular (∼0.01∘ at 100 GeV and energy (∼1% at 100 GeV resolutions in the energy range of 10–1000 GeV which are better than Fermi-LAT (as well as ground gamma-ray telescopes by a factor of 5–10. It will observe some regions of the Universe (such as the Galactic Center, Fermi Bubbles, Crab, Cygnus, etc. in a highly elliptic orbit (without shading the telescope by the Earth continuously for a long time. It will allow us to identify many discrete sources, to clarify the structure of extended sources, to specify the data on the diffuse emission, and to resolve gamma rays from dark matter particles.

  15. Laboratory of High resolution gamma spectrometry; Laboratorio de espectrometria gamma de alta resolucion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendez G, A.; Giber F, J.; Rivas C, I.; Reyes A, B

    1992-01-15

    The Department of Nuclear Experimentation of the Nuclear Systems Management requests the collaboration of the Engineering unit for the supervision of the execution of the work of the High resolution Gamma spectrometry and low bottom laboratory, using the hut of the sub critic reactor of the Nuclear Center of Mexico. This laboratory has the purpose of determining the activity of special materials irradiated in nuclear power plants. In this report the architecture development, concepts, materials and diagrams for the realization of this type of work are presented. (Author)

  16. EXTRAGALACTIC VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA-RAY BACKGROUND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neronov, A. [ISDC Data Center for Astrophysics, Chemin d' Ecogia 16, CH-1290 Versoix (Switzerland); Semikoz, D. V. [APC, 10 rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet, F-75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France)

    2012-09-20

    We study the origin of the extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray background using the data from the Fermi telescope. To estimate the background level, we count photons at high Galactic latitudes |b| > 60 Degree-Sign . Subtracting photons associated with known sources and the residual cosmic-ray and Galactic diffuse backgrounds, we estimate the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGB) flux. We find that the spectrum of EGB in the very high energy band above 30 GeV follows the stacked spectrum of BL Lac objects. Large Area Telescope data reveal the positive (1 + z) {sup k}, 1 < k < 4 cosmological evolution of the BL Lac source population consistent with that of their parent population, Fanaroff-Riley type I radio galaxies. We show that EGB at E > 30 GeV could be completely explained by emission from unresolved BL Lac objects if k {approx_equal} 3.

  17. High Pressure XENON Gamma-Ray Spectrometers for Field Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David K. Wehe; Zong He; Glenn K. Knoll

    2004-02-16

    This project explored a new concept for high-pressure xenon ionization chambers by replacing the Frisch grid with coplanar grid electrodes similar to those used in wide bandgap semiconductor gamma-ray spectrometers. This work is the first attempt to apply the coplanar grid anode design in a gas ionization chamber in order to achieve to improved energy resolution. Three prototype detectors, two cylindrical and one parallel plate configurations, were built and tested. While the detectors did not demonstrate energy resolutions as good as other high pressure xenon gamma-ray spectrometers, the results demonstrated that the concept of single polarity charge sending using coplanar grid electrodes will work in a gas detector.

  18. High energy gamma-rays and hadrons at Mount Fuji

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amenomori, M.; Nanjo, H.; Konishi, E.; Hotta, N.; Mizutani, K.; Kasahara, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Mikumo, E.; Sato, K.; Yuda, T.

    1985-01-01

    The energy spectra of high energy gamma-rays and hadrons were obtained by the emulsion chamber with 40 c.u. thickness at Mt. Fuji (3750 m). These results are compared with the Monte Carlo calculation based on the same model which is used in a family analysis. Our data are compatible with the model of heavy-enriched primary and scaling in the fragmentation region.

  19. Production of high melt strength polypropylene by gamma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugão, A. B.; Artel, B. W. H.; Yoshiga, A.; Lima, L. F. C. P.; Parra, D. F.; Bueno, J. R.; Liberman, S.; Farrah, M.; Terçariol, W. R.; Otaguro, H.

    2007-11-01

    High melt strength polypropylene (HMS-PP) has been recently developed and introduced in the market by the major international producers of polypropylene. Therefore, BRASKEM, the leading Brazilian PP producer, together with EMBRARAD, the leading Brazilian gamma irradiator, and the IPEN (Institute of Nuclear Energy and Research) worked to develop a national technology for the production of HMS-PP. One of the effective approaches to improve melt strength and extensibility is to add chain branches onto polypropylene backbone using gamma radiation. Branching and grafting result from the radical combinations during irradiation process. Crosslinking and main chain scission in the polymer structure are also obtained during this process. In this work, gamma irradiation technique was used to induce chemical changes in commercial polypropylene with two different monomers, Tri-allyl-isocyanurate (TAIC) and Tri-methylolpropane-trimethacrylate (TMPTMA), with concentration ranging from 1.5 to 5.0 mmol/100 g of polypropylene. These samples were irradiated with a 60Co source at dose of 20 kGy. It used two different methods of HMS-PP processing. The crosslinking of modified polymers was studied by measuring gel content melt flow rate and rheological properties like melt strength and drawability. It was observed that the reaction method and the monomer type have influenced the properties. However, the concentration variation of monomer has no effect.

  20. Software developments for gamma-ray data with high multiplicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritsen, T.; Crowell, B.; Ahmad, I. [and others

    1995-08-01

    Software capabilities for angle sort of data from the new powerful gamma detector arrays like Gammasphere and EUROGAM which were developed in preceding years, were enhanced and extended to read new data formats. In addition, we can now sort the data for directional correlation ratios (DCO). This version of the software was exported to a university group. For the analysis of, e.g., the quasi-continuum of gamma-rays it is necessary to angle sort the high multiplicity data and perform a careful background subtraction in order to extract the continuum of gamma rays from the feeding and decay of superdeformed bands. We need to angle sort in order to untangle the parts of the spectra which are of E1 nature from those of quadrupole or of M1/E2 nature. We further developed software running on new fast SUN workstations. We now have two such workstations, each equipped with a stacker and a secondary 8-mm tape drive. We enhanced the software to apply an energy-dependent time gate. We can enhance the events that are in true prompt coincidence, and reject random and signals in the germanium detectors coming from neutrons hitting the detector in coincidence with the gamma-ray burst. By applying energy-dependent time gates, in form of a {open_quotes}reduced time{close_quotes}, we can perform this rejection without the loss of efficiency at low energy. Effort has gone into developing low-level tape reader routines for data from the new EUROGAM array with cluster detectors as well as from the new flexible data format from Gammasphere phase II. In addition, we developed software to read data tapes from the local DAPHNE and MSU data-acquisition systems on the new fast UNIX platforms.

  1. Accessing the population of high redshift Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ghirlanda, G; Ghisellini, G; Mereghetti, S; Tagliaferri, G; Campana, S; Osborne, J P; O'Brien, P; Tanvir, N; Willingale, R; Amati, L; Basa, S; Bernardini, M G; Burlon, D; Covino, S; D'Avanzo, P; Frontera, F; Gotz, D; Melandri, A; Nava, L; Piro, L; Vergani, S D

    2015-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are a powerful probe of the high redshift Universe. We present a tool to estimate the detection rate of high-z GRBs by a generic detector with defined energy band and sensitivity. We base this on a population model that reproduces the observed properties of GRBs detected by Swift, Fermi and CGRO in the hard X-ray and gamma-ray bands. We provide the expected cumulative distributions of the flux and fluence of simulated GRBs in different energy bands. We show that scintillator detectors, operating at relatively high energies (e.g. tens of keV to the MeV), can detect only the most luminous GRBs at high redshifts due to the link between the peak spectral energy and the luminosity (Ep-Liso) of GRBs. We show that the best strategy for catching the largest number of high-z bursts is to go softer (e.g. in the soft X-ray band) but with a very high sensitivity. For instance, an imaging soft X-ray detector operating in the 0.2-5 keV energy band reaching a sensitivity, corresponding to a fluence o...

  2. Development and Characterization of a High Resolution Portable Gamma Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Muhammad

    The recent disaster of Fukushima in Japan combined with the high demand to enhance nuclear safety and to minimize personal exposure to radioactive materials has a significant impact on research and development of radiation detection instrumentation. Currently, there is ample effort worldwide in the pursuit of radiation detection to maximize the accuracy and meet international standards in terms of size and specifications to enable radiation protection decision making. Among the requirements is the development of a portable, light-weight gamma-ray isotope identifier to be used by first responders in nuclear accidents as well as for radiation security and identification of illicit material isotopes. From nuclear security perspective, research into advanced screening technologies has become a high priority in all aspects, while for occupational safety, and environmental radiation protection, the regulatory authorities are requiring specific performance of radiation detection and measuring devices. At the applied radiation laboratory of the University of Ontario Institute of Technology, UOIT, the development of a high resolution spectrometer for medium and high energy gamma ray has been conducted. The spectrometer used a newly developed scintillator based on a LaBr3(Ce) crystal. The detector has been modeled using advanced Monte Carlo code (MCNP/X code) for the response function simulation and parameter characterization. The simulation results have been validated by experimental investigations using a wide range of gamma radiation energies. The developed spectrometer has been characterized in terms of resolution and response in different fields. It has also been compared with other crystals such as NaI(TI) and LiI(Eu).

  3. High-revolution gamma-ray imaging from the moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, William A.

    1990-01-01

    An observatory is suggested for exploiting unique lunar features to perform sensitive, subarcsecond cosmic X-ray and gamma-ray imaging. The observatory would be built in an evolutionary manner and would eventually include several different position-sensitive detector systems which together would cover a broad energy range and address a wide variety of astrophysical problems. High angular resolution would be obtained by using a mobile crane on the flat lunar mare regions to move a coded aperture mask for source tracking with detector/mask separations of up to 5 kilometers.

  4. Enery Efficient Press and Sinter of Titanium Powder for Low-Cost Components in Vehicle Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Zwitter; Phillip Nash; Xiaoyan Xu; Chadwick Johnson

    2011-03-31

    This is the final technical report for the Department of Energy NETL project NT01931 Energy Efficient Press and Sinter of Titanium Powder for Low-Cost Components in Vehicle Applications. Titanium has been identified as one of the key materials with the required strength that can reduce the weight of automotive components and thereby reduce fuel consumption. Working with newly developed sources of titanium powder, Webster-Hoff will develop the processing technology to manufacture low cost vehicle components using the single press/single sinter techniques developed for iron based powder metallurgy today. Working with an automotive or truck manufacturer, Webster-Hoff will demonstrate the feasibility of manufacturing a press and sinter titanium component for a vehicle application. The project objective is two-fold, to develop the technology for manufacturing press and sinter titanium components, and to demonstrate the feasibility of producing a titanium component for a vehicle application. The lowest cost method for converting metal powder into a net shape part is the Powder Metallurgy Press and Sinter Process. The method involves compaction of the metal powder in a tool (usually a die and punches, upper and lower) at a high pressure (up to 60 TSI or 827 MPa) to form a green compact with the net shape of the final component. The powder in the green compact is held together by the compression bonds between the powder particles. The sinter process then converts the green compact to a metallurgically bonded net shape part through the process of solid state diffusion. The goal of this project is to expand the understanding and application of press and sinter technology to Titanium Powder applications, developing techniques to manufacture net shape Titanium components via the press and sinter process. In addition, working with a vehicle manufacturer, demonstrate the feasibility of producing a titanium component for a vehicle. This is not a research program, but rather a

  5. Extragalactic Absorption of High Energy $\\gamma$-Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Stecker, F W

    1999-01-01

    The pair-production absorption of high-energy gamma-rays by intergalactic low-energy photons is expected to produce a high-energy cutoff in the spectra of extragalactic sources which is a sensitive function of redshift. We first discuss the expected absorption coefficient as a function of energy and redshift derived by Stecker and De Jager by making use of a new empirically based calculation of the spectral energy distribution of the intergalactic infrared radiation field as given by Malkan and Stecker. We then discuss the fact that new data on the high energy gamma-ray source Mrk 501 appear to show the amount of intergalactic absorption predicted. The implications of this new HEGRA data, should they be confirmed, are significant for the astrophysics of this source, implying that (1) there is no significant intrinsic absorption inside the source, and (2) the physics of the emission produces a power-law spectrum to energies above 20 TeV. As a further test for intergalactic absorption, we give a predicted spect...

  6. Phoswich scintillator for proton and gamma radiation of high energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tengblad, O.; Borge, M. J. G.; Briz, J. A.; Carmona-Gallardo, M.; Cruz, C.; Gugliermina, V.; Nacher, E.; Perea, A.; Sanchez del Rio, J.; Nieves, M. Turrion [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Nilsson, T.; Johansson, H. T.; Bergstroem, J.; Blomberg, E.; Buelling, A.; Gallneby, E.; Hagdahl, J.; Jansson, L.; Jareteg, K.; Masgren, R. [Department of fundamental Physics, Chalmers Univ. of Technology, S-41296 Goeteborg (Sweden); and others

    2011-11-30

    We present here a Phoswich scintillator design to achieve both high resolution gamma ray detection, and good efficiency for high energy protons. There are recent developments of new high resolution scintillator materials. Especially the LaBr3(Ce) and LaCl3(Ce) crystals have very good energy resolution in the order of 3% for 662 keV gamma radiation. In addition, these materials exhibit a very good light output (63 and 32 photons/keV respectively).A demonstrator detector in the form of an Al cylinder of 24 mm diameter and a total length of 80 mm with 2 mm wall thickness, containing a LaBr3(Ce) crystal of 20 mm diameter and 30 mm length directly coupled to a LaCl3(Ce) crystal of 50 mm length, and closed with a glass window of 5 mm, was delivered by Saint Gobain. To the glass window a Hamamatsu R5380 Photomultiplier tube (PMT) was coupled using silicon optical grease.

  7. Zinc oxide nanowire gamma ray detector with high spatiotemporal resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Daniel C.; Nolen, J. Ryan; Cook, Andrew; Mu, Richard R.; Haglund, Richard F.

    2016-03-01

    Conventional scintillation detectors are typically single crystals of heavy-metal oxides or halides doped with rare-earth ions that record the recombination of electron-hole pairs by photon emission in the visible to ultraviolet. However, the light yields are typically low enough to require photomultiplier detection with the attendant instrumental complications. Here we report initial studies of gamma ray detection by zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires, grown by vapor-solid deposition. The nanowires grow along the c-axis in a wurtzite structure; they are typically 80 nm in diameter and have lengths of 1- 2 μm. The nanowires are single crystals of high quality, with a photoluminescence (PL) yield from band-edge exciton emission in the ultraviolet that is typically one hundred times larger than the PL yield from defect centers in the visible. Nanowire ensembles were irradiated by 662 keV gamma rays from a Cs-137 source for periods of up to ten hours; gamma rays in this energy range interact by Compton scattering, which in ZnO creates F+ centers that relax to form singly-charged positive oxygen vacancies. Following irradiation, we fit the PL spectra of the visible emission with a sum of Gaussians at the energies of the known defects. We find highly efficient PL from the irradiated area, with a figure of merit approaching 106 photons/s/MeV of deposited energy. Over a period of days, the singly charged O+ vacancies relax to the more stable doubly charged O++ vacancies. However, the overall defect PL returns to pre-irradiation values after about a week, as the vacancies diffuse to the surface of these very thin nanowires, indicating that a self-healing process restores the nanowires to their original state.

  8. High-dielectric losses in stabilized {gamma}-iron/graphite nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X.F. [Dalian University of Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian, Liaoning (China); National Research Council of Canada, Industrial Materials Institute, Boucherville, Quebec (Canada); Guan, P.F. [Tohoku University, World Premier International Research Center, Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Sendai (Japan); Medwig, J. [National Research Council of Canada, Industrial Materials Institute, Boucherville, Quebec (Canada); Dong, X.L. [Dalian University of Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian, Liaoning (China)

    2012-03-15

    {gamma}-iron and {gamma}-iron/graphite nanoparticles were synthesized by a non-equilibrium cooling arc-discharge method. Experimental extinction spectra exhibit unexpected dielectric resonance of {gamma}-iron nanoparticles at the microwave frequency, presenting the first metallic nanostructure of the high-dielectric loss. We further construct a multi-dielectric loss structure, with the enhanced dielectric loss factor of 0.7-0.9, by encapsulating the {gamma}-iron into onion-like graphite nanoshells. (orig.)

  9. High resolution {gamma} per-operative imaging; Imagerie {gamma} per-operatoire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charon, Y.; Cohen-Solal, M.; Menard, L.; Laniece, P.; Mastrippolito, R.; Ploux, L.; Valentin, L. [Groupe I.P.B., Experimental Research Division, Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1999-11-01

    The development of hand-held {gamma} imaging probe, for inside body localization of small tumors, is of first interest for radio-guided operative cancer surgery. In that context, we have developed a sub-millimeter spatial resolution, small field of view, {gamma} per-operative compact imager (POCI). (authors)

  10. Higgs Boson Self-Coupling at High Energy $\\gamma \\gamma$ Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Gutierrez-Rodriguez, A; Sampayo, O A

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed the double production and the triple self-coupling of the standard model Higgs boson at future $\\gamma \\gamma$ collider energies, with the reactions $\\gamma\\gamma \\rightarrow f \\bar f HH$ $(f=b, t)$. We evaluated the total cross section for $f\\bar fHH$ and calculated the total number of events considering the complete set of Feynman diagrams at tree-level and for different values of the triple coupling $\\kappa\\lambda_{HHH}$. We have also analyzed the sensitivity for the considered reaction and we show the results as 95% C.L. regions in the $\\kappa-M_H$ plane for different values of the center of mass energy and different levels of background. The numerical computation was done for the energies which are expected to be available at a possible Future Linear $\\gamma\\gamma$ Collider with a center-of-mass energy 500-3000 $GeV$ and luminosities of 1 and $5 ab^{-1}$. We found that the number of events for the process $\\gamma\\gamma \\rightarrow t \\bar t HH$, taking into account the decay products of both $...

  11. Experimental determination of gamma-ray discrimination in pillar-structured thermal neutron detectors under high gamma-ray flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Qinghui [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Conway, Adam M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Voss, Lars F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Radev, Radoslav P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nikolić, Rebecca J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dar, Mushtaq A. [King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Cheung, Chin L. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2015-08-04

    Silicon pillar structures filled with a neutron converter material (10B) are designed to have high thermal neutron detection efficiency with specific dimensions of 50 μm pillar height, 2 μm pillar diameter and 2 μm spacing between adjacent pillars. In this paper, we have demonstrated such a detector has a high neutron-to-gamma discrimination of 106 with a high thermal neutron detection efficiency of 39% when exposed to a high gamma-ray field of 109 photons/cm2s.

  12. Experimental determination of gamma-ray discrimination in pillar-structured thermal neutron detectors under high gamma-ray flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Qinghui [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Conway, Adam M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Voss, Lars F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Radev, Radoslav P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nikolić, Rebecca J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dar, Mushtaq A. [King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Cheung, Chin L. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2015-08-04

    Silicon pillar structures filled with a neutron converter material (10B) are designed to have high thermal neutron detection efficiency with specific dimensions of 50 μm pillar height, 2 μm pillar diameter and 2 μm spacing between adjacent pillars. In this paper, we have demonstrated such a detector has a high neutron-to-gamma discrimination of 106 with a high thermal neutron detection efficiency of 39% when exposed to a high gamma-ray field of 109 photons/cm2s.

  13. High resolution spectroscopy from low altitude satellites. [gamma ray astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, G. H.; Imhof, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    The P 78 1 satellite to be placed in a synchronous polar orbit at an altitude of 550-660 km will carry two identical high resolution spectrometers each consisting of a single (approximately 85 cc) intrinsic germanium IGE detector. The payload also includes a pair of phoswitch scintillators, an array of CdTe detectors and several particle detectors, all of which are mounted on the wheel of the satellite. The intrinsic high purity IGE detectors receive cooling from two Stirling cycle refrigerators and facilitate the assembly of large and complex detector arrays planned for the next generation of high sensitivity instruments such as those planned for the gamma ray observatory. The major subsystems of the spectrometer are discussed as well as its capabilities.

  14. Study of the energy response of high pressure ionization chamber for high energy gamma-ray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUA Zheng-Dong; XU Xun-Jiang; WANG Jian-Hua; LIU Shu-Dong; LI Jian-Ping

    2008-01-01

    The energy response calibration of the commonly used high pressure ionization chamber is very difficult to obtain when the gamma-ray energy is more than 3 MeV.In order to get the calibration of the higher part of the high pressure ionization chamber,we use the Fluka Monte Carlo program to perfclrm the energy response in both the spherical and the cylindrical high pressure ionization chamber which are full of argon gas.The results compared with prior study when the gamma-ray energy is less than 1.25 MeV.Our result of Monte Carlo calculation shows agreement with those obtained by measurement within the uncertainty of the respective methods.The calculation of this study is significant for the high pressure ionization chamber to measure the high energy gamma-ray.

  15. Contributions of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) to the 6th International Symposium on High-Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy (Gamma 2016)

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Abeysekara, U; Abril, Ó; Acero, F; Acharya, B S; Adams, C; Agnetta, G; Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A; Albert, A; Alcubierre, M; Alfaro, J; Alfaro, R; Allafort, A J; Aloisio, R; Amans, J -P; Amato, E; Ambrogi, L; Ambrosi, G; Ambrosio, M; Anderson, J; Anduze, M; Angüner, E O; Antolini, E; Antonelli, L A; Antonucci, M; Antonuccio, V; Antoranz, P; Aramo, C; Aravantinos, A; Araya, M; Arcaro, C; Arezki, B; Argan, A; Armstrong, T; Arqueros, F; Arrabito, L; Arrieta, M; Asano, K; Ashley, M; Aubert, P; Singh, C B; Babic, A; Backes, M; Bais, A; Bajtlik, S; Balazs, C; Balbo, M; Balis, D; Balkowski, C; Ballester, O; Ballet, J; Balzer, A; Bamba, A; Bandiera, R; Barber, A; Barbier, C; Barcelo, M; Barkov, M; Barnacka, A; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; Basso, S; Bastieri, D; Bauer, C; Becciani, U; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Beckmann, V; Bednarek, W; Benbow, W; Ventura, D Benedico; Berdugo, J; Berge, D; Bernardini, E; Bernardini, M G; Bernhard, S; Bernlöhr, K; Bertucci, B; Besel, M -A; Beshley, V; Bhatt, N; Bhattacharjee, P; Bhattacharyya, W; Bhattachryya, S; Biasuzzi, B; Bicknell, G; Bigongiari, C; Biland, A; Bilinsky, A; Bilnik, W; Biondo, B; Bird, R; Bird, T; Bissaldi, E; Bitossi, M; Blanch, O; Blasi, P; Blazek, J; Bockermann, C; Boehm, C; Bogacz, L; Bogdan, M; Bohacova, M; Boisson, C; Boix, J; Bolmont, J; Bonanno, G; Bonardi, A; Bonavolontà, C; Bonifacio, P; Bonnarel, F; Bonnoli, G; Borkowski, J; Bose, R; Bosnjak, Z; Böttcher, M; Bousquet, J -J; Boutonnet, C; Bouyjou, F; Bowman, L; Braiding, C; Brantseg, T; Brau-Nogué, S; Bregeon, J; Briggs, M; Brigida, M; Bringmann, T; Brisken, W; Bristow, D; Britto, R; Brocato, E; Bron, S; Brook, P; Brooks, W; Brown, A M; Brügge, K; Brun, F; Brun, P; Brun, P; Brunetti, G; Brunetti, L; Bruno, P; Buanes, T; Bucciantini, N; Buchholtz, G; Buckley, J; Bugaev, V; Bühler, R; Bulgarelli, A; Bulik, T; Burton, M; Burtovoi, A; Busetto, G; Buson, S; Buss, J; Byrum, K; Cadoux, F; Tovar, J Calvo; Cameron, R; Canelli, F; Canestrari, R; Capalbi, M; Capasso, M; 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Taylor, A; Tejedor, L A; Telezhinsky, I; Temme, F; Temnikov, P; Tenzer, C; Terada, Y; Terrazas, J C; Terrier, R; Terront, D; Terzic, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Teshima, M; Testa, V; Tezier, D; Thayer, J; Thornhill, J; Thoudam, S; Thuermann, D; Tibaldo, L; Tiengo, A; Timpanaro, M C; Tiziani, D; Tluczykont, M; Peixoto, C J Todero; Tokanai, F; Tokarz, M; Toma, K; Tomastik, J; Tomono, Y; Tonachini, A; Tonev, D; Torii, K; Tornikoski, M; Torres, D F; Torres, M; Torresi, E; Toso, G; Tosti, G; Totani, T; Tothill, N; Toussenel, F; Tovmassian, G; Toyama, T; Travnicek, P; Trichard, C; Trifoglio, M; Pujadas, I Troyano; Trzeciak, M; Tsinganos, K; Tsujimoto, S; Tsuru, T; Uchiyama, Y; Umana, G; Umetsu, Y; Upadhya, S S; Uslenghi, M; Vagelli, V; Vagnetti, F; Valdes-Galicia, J; Valentino, M; Vallania, P; Valore, L; van Driel, W; van Eldik, C; van Soelen, B; Vandenbroucke, J; Vanderwalt, J; Vasileiadis, G; Vassiliev, V; Vázquez, J R; Acosta, M L Vázquez; Vecchi, M; Vega, A; Vegas, I; Veitch, P; Venault, P; Venema, L; Venter, C; Vercellone, S; Vergani, S; Verma, K; Verzi, V; Vettolani, G P; Veyssiere, C; Viana, A; Viaux, N; Vicha, J; Vigorito, C; Vincent, P; Vincent, S; Vink, J; Vittorini, V; Vlahakis, N; Vlahos, L; Voelk, H; Voisin, V; Vollhardt, A; Volpicelli, A; von Brand, H; Vorobiov, S; Vovk, I; Vrastil, M; Vu, L V; Vuillaume, T; Wagner, R; Wagner, R; Wagner, S J; Wakely, S P; Walstra, T; Walter, R; Walther, T; Ward, J E; Ward, M; Warda, K; Warren, D; Wassberg, S; Watson, J J; Wawer, P; Wawrzaszek, R; Webb, N; Wegner, P; Weiner, O; Weinstein, A; Wells, R; Werner, F; Wetteskind, H; White, M; White, R; Więcek, M; Wierzcholska, A; Wiesand, S; Wijers, R; Wilcox, P; Wild, N; Wilhelm, A; Wilkinson, M; Will, M; Will, M; Williams, D A; Williams, J T; Willingale, R; Wilson, N; Winde, M; Winiarski, K; Winkler, H; Winter, M; Wischnewski, R; Witt, E; Wojcik, P; Wolf, D; Wood, M; Wörnlein, A; Wu, E; Wu, T; Yadav, K K; Yamamoto, H; Yamamoto, T; Yamane, N; Yamazaki, R; Yanagita, S; Yang, L; Yelos, D; Yoshida, A; Yoshida, M; Yoshida, T; Yoshiike, S; Yoshikoshi, T; Yu, P; Zabalza, V; Zaborov, D; Zacharias, M; Zaharijas, G; Zajczyk, A; Zampieri, L; Zandanel, F; Sanchez, R Zanmar; Zaric, D; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zdziarski, A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H; Zhao, A; Zhdanov, V; Ziegler, A; Ziemann, J; Ziętara, K; Zink, A; Ziółkowski, J; Zitelli, V; Zoli, A; Zorn, J; Żychowski, P

    2016-01-01

    List of contributions from the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) Consortium presented at the 6th International Symposium on High-Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy (Gamma 2016), July 11-15, 2016, in Heidelberg, Germany.

  16. High-Energy Spectral Signatures in $\\gamma$-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G

    1999-01-01

    One of the principal results obtained by the EGRET experiment aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) was the detection of several Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) above 100 MeV. The broad-band spectra obtained for these bursts gave no indication of any high energy spectral attenuation that might preclude detection of bursts by ground-based Cerenkov telescopes (ACTs), thus motivating several TeV observational programs. This paper explores the expectations for the spectral properties in the TeV and sub-TeV bands for bursts, in particular how attenuation of photons by pair creation internal to the source modifies the spectrum to produce distinctive spectral signatures. The energy of spectral breaks and the associated spectral indices provide valuable information that can constrain the bulk Lorentz factor of the GRB outflow at a given time. These characteristics define palpable observational goals for ACT programs, and strongly impact the observability of bursts in the TeV band.

  17. High Energy Gamma-rays from FR I Jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, Marek

    2003-07-22

    Thanks to Hubble and Chandra telescopes, some of the large scale jets in extragalactic radio sources are now being observed at optical and X-ray frequencies. For the FR I objects the synchrotron nature of this emission is surely established, although a lot of uncertainties--connected for example with the particle acceleration processes involved--remain. In this paper we study production of high energy {gamma}-rays in FR I kiloparsec-scale jets by inverse-Compton emission of the synchrotron-emitting electrons. We consider different origin of seed photons contributing to the inverse-Compton scattering, including nuclear jet radiation as well as ambient, stellar and circumstellar emission of the host galaxies. We discuss how future detections or non-detections of the evaluated {gamma}-ray fluxes can provide constraints on the unknown large scale jet parameters, i.e. the magnetic field intensity and the jet Doppler factor. For the nearby sources Centaurus A and M 87, we find measurable fluxes of TeV photons resulting from synchrotron self-Compton process and from comptonization of the galactic photon fields, respectively. In the case of Centaurus A, we also find a relatively strong emission component due to comptonization of the nuclear blazar photons, which could be easily observed by GLAST at energy {approx} 10 GeV, providing important test for the unification of FR I sources with BL Lac objects.

  18. NEW FERMI-LAT EVENT RECONSTRUCTION REVEALS MORE HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA RAYS FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwood, W. B. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Baldini, L. [Universita di Pisa and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bregeon, J.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Sgro, C.; Tinivella, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bruel, P. [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); Chekhtman, A. [Center for Earth Observing and Space Research, College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Cohen-Tanugi, J. [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Universite Montpellier 2, CNRS/IN2P3, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Drlica-Wagner, A.; Omodei, N.; Rochester, L. S.; Usher, T. L. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Granot, J. [Department of Natural Sciences, The Open University of Israel, 1 University Road, P.O. Box 808, Ra' anana 43537 (Israel); Longo, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Razzaque, S. [Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa); Zimmer, S., E-mail: melissa.pesce.rollins@pi.infn.it, E-mail: nicola.omodei@stanford.edu, E-mail: granot@openu.ac.il [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-09-01

    Based on the experience gained during the four and a half years of the mission, the Fermi-LAT Collaboration has undertaken a comprehensive revision of the event-level analysis going under the name of Pass 8. Although it is not yet finalized, we can test the improvements in the new event reconstruction with the special case of the prompt phase of bright gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), where the signal-to-noise ratio is large enough that loose selection cuts are sufficient to identify gamma rays associated with the source. Using the new event reconstruction, we have re-analyzed 10 GRBs previously detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) for which an X-ray/optical follow-up was possible and found four new gamma rays with energies greater than 10 GeV in addition to the seven previously known. Among these four is a 27.4 GeV gamma ray from GRB 080916C, which has a redshift of 4.35, thus making it the gamma ray with the highest intrinsic energy ({approx}147 GeV) detected from a GRB. We present here the salient aspects of the new event reconstruction and discuss the scientific implications of these new high-energy gamma rays, such as constraining extragalactic background light models, Lorentz invariance violation tests, the prompt emission mechanism, and the bulk Lorentz factor of the emitting region.

  19. GAMMA PROPORTIONAL COUNTER CONTAINING HIGH Z GAS AND LOW Z MODERATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, R.

    1963-07-23

    A gamma radiation counter employing a gas proportional counter is described. The radiation counter comprises a cylindrical gas proportional counter which contains a high atomic number gas and is surrounded by a low atomic number gamma radiation moderator material. At least one slit is provided in the moderator to allow accident gamma radiation to enter the moderator in the most favorable manner for moderation, and also to allow low energy gamma radiation to enter the counter without the necessity of passing through the moderator. This radiation counter is capable of detecting and measuring gamma radiation in the energy range of 0.5-5 Mev. (AEC)

  20. High-z Universe with Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouveliotou, C.

    2011-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous explosions in space and trace the cosmic star formation history back to the first generations of stars. Their bright afterglows allow us to trace the abundances of heavy elements to large distances, thereby measuring cosmic chemical evolution. To date GRBs have been detected up to distances of z=8.23 and possibly even beyond z9. This makes GRBs a unique and powerful tool to probe the high-z Universe up to the re-ionization era. We discuss the current status of the field, place it in context with other probes, and also discuss new mission concepts that have been planned to utilize GRBs as probes.

  1. An enhanced high-resolution EMCCD-based gamma camera using SiPM side detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemskerk, J.W.T.; Korevaar, M.A.N.; Huizenga, J.; Kreuger, R.; Schaart, D.R.; Goorden, M.C.; Beekman, F.J.

    2010-01-01

    To improve multi-pinhole single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) devices we are developing a high-resolution gamma detector consisting of a 3-mm-thick scintillation crystal that converts gamma photons to light, on top of an optically coupled high-resolution, high-sensitivity light sensor

  2. An enhanced high-resolution EMCCD-based gamma camera using SiPM side detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemskerk, J.W.T.; Korevaar, M.A.N.; Huizenga, J.; Kreuger, R.; Schaart, D.R.; Goorden, M.C.; Beekman, F.J.

    2010-01-01

    To improve multi-pinhole single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) devices we are developing a high-resolution gamma detector consisting of a 3-mm-thick scintillation crystal that converts gamma photons to light, on top of an optically coupled high-resolution, high-sensitivity light sensor

  3. Very High Energy Gamma Ray Extension of GRO Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weekes, Trevor C.

    1994-01-01

    The membership, progress, and invited talks, publications, and proceedings made by the Whipple Gamma Ray Collaboration is reported for june 1990 through May 1994. Progress was made in the following areas: the May 1994 Markarian Flare at Whipple and EGRET (Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope) energies; AGN's (Active Galactic Nuclei); bursts; supernova remnants; and simulations and energy spectra.

  4. Bursts of the Crab Nebula gamma-ray emission at high and ultra-high energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidvansky A.S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of the flares of gamma rays detected from the Crab Nebula by the AGILE and Fermi-LAT satellite instruments are compared with those of a gamma ray burst recorded by several air shower arrays on February 23, 1989 and with one recent observation made by the ARGO-YBJ array. It is demonstrated that though pulsar-periodicity and energy spectra of emissions at 100 MeV (satellite gamma ray telescopes and 100 TeV (EAS arrays are different, their time structures seem to be similar. Moreover, maybe the difference between “flares” and “waves” recently found in the Crab Nebula emission by the AGILE team also exists at ultra-high energies.

  5. Identifying high-redshift gamma-ray bursts with RATIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littlejohns, O. M.; Butler, N. R. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, AZ 85287 (United States); Cucchiara, A. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Watson, A. M.; Lee, W. H.; Richer, M. G.; De Diego, J. A.; Georgiev, L.; González, J.; Román-Zúñiga, C. G. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 70-264, 04510 México, D. F. (Mexico); Kutyrev, A. S.; Troja, E.; Gehrels, N.; Moseley, H. [NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Klein, C. R.; Fox, O. D.; Bloom, J. S. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Prochaska, J. X.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    We present a template-fitting algorithm for determining photometric redshifts, z {sub phot}, of candidate high-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Using afterglow photometry, obtained by the Reionization and Transients InfraRed (RATIR) camera, this algorithm accounts for the intrinsic GRB afterglow spectral energy distribution, host dust extinction, and the effect of neutral hydrogen (local and cosmological) along the line of sight. We present the results obtained by this algorithm and the RATIR photometry of GRB 130606A, finding a range of best-fit solutions, 5.6 < z {sub phot} < 6.0, for models of several host dust extinction laws (none, the Milky Way, Large Magellanic Clouds, and Small Magellanic Clouds), consistent with spectroscopic measurements of the redshift of this GRB. Using simulated RATIR photometry, we find that our algorithm provides precise measures of z {sub phot} in the ranges of 4 < z {sub phot} ≲ 8 and 9 < z {sub phot} < 10 and can robustly determine when z {sub phot} > 4. Further testing highlights the required caution in cases of highly dust-extincted host galaxies. These tests also show that our algorithm does not erroneously find z {sub phot} < 4 when z {sub sim} > 4, thereby minimizing false negatives and allowing us to rapidly identify all potential high-redshift events.

  6. Production of Medical Radioisotopes with High Specific Activity in Photonuclear Reactions with $\\gamma$ Beams of High Intensity and Large Brilliance

    CERN Document Server

    Habs, D

    2010-01-01

    We study the production of radioisotopes for nuclear medicine in $(\\gamma,x{\\rm n}+y{\\rm p})$ photonuclear reactions or ($\\gamma,\\gamma'$) photoexcitation reactions with high flux [($10^{13}-10^{15}$)$\\gamma$/s], small diameter $\\sim (100 \\, \\mu$m$)^2$ and small band width ($\\Delta E/E \\approx 10^{-3}-10^{-4}$) $\\gamma$ beams produced by Compton back-scattering of laser light from relativistic brilliant electron beams. We compare them to (ion,$x$n$ + y$p) reactions with (ion=p,d,$\\alpha$) from particle accelerators like cyclotrons and (n,$\\gamma$) or (n,f) reactions from nuclear reactors. For photonuclear reactions with a narrow $\\gamma$ beam the energy deposition in the target can be managed by using a stack of thin target foils or wires, hence avoiding direct stopping of the Compton and pair electrons (positrons). $(\\gamma,\\gamma')$ isomer production via specially selected $\\gamma$ cascades allows to produce high specific activity in multiple excitations, where no back-pumping of the isomer to the ground st...

  7. Absorption of High Energy $\\gamma$ Rays by Interactions With Starlight Photons in Extragalactic Space at High Redshifts and the High Energy $\\gamma$-Ray Background

    CERN Document Server

    Salamon, M H

    1998-01-01

    We calculate the absorption of 10-500 GeV gamma-rays at high redshifts. This calculation requires the determination of the high-redshift evolution of the intergalactic starlight photon field, including its IR-UV spectral energy distribution. To estimate this evolution, we have followed a recent analysis of Fall, Charlot and Pei which gives results consistent with recent data. We give our results for the gamma-ray opacity as a function of redshift out to a redshift of 3. We also give predicted gamma-ray spectra for selected blazars and give an extragalactic unresolved blazar background spectrum up to 500 GeV. Our results indicate that this background should steepen significantly above 20 GeV owing to intergalactic absorption. Future observations of this steepening would provide a test for the blazar background origin hypothesis. We have used our results to discuss upper limits on the redshifts of gamma-ray bursts. We note that the 17 Feb. 1994 burst observed by EGRET must have originated at a redshift less tha...

  8. High Resolution Gamma Ray Analysis of Medical Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chillery, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Compton-suppressed high-purity Germanium detectors at the University of Massachusetts Lowell have been used to study medical radioisotopes produced at Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP), in particular isotopes such as Pt-191 used for cancer therapy in patients. The ability to precisely analyze the concentrations of such radio-isotopes is essential for both production facilities such as Brookhaven and consumer hospitals across the U.S. Without accurate knowledge of the quantities and strengths of these isotopes, it is possible for doctors to administer incorrect dosages to patients, thus leading to undesired results. Samples have been produced at Brookhaven and shipped to UML, and the advanced electronics and data acquisition capabilities at UML have been used to extract peak areas in the gamma decay spectra. Levels of Pt isotopes in diluted samples have been quantified, and reaction cross-sections deduced from the irradiation parameters. These provide both cross checks with published work, as well as a rigorous quantitative framework with high quality state-of-the-art detection apparatus in use in the experimental nuclear physics community.

  9. An FEL based high-intensity gamma source at the TESLA Test Facility at DESY

    CERN Document Server

    Pagani, C; Schneidmiller, E A; Yurkov, M V

    1999-01-01

    One possible extension of the FEL activity at DESY is connected with the installation of an additional FEL beamline providing tunable UV radiation with peak and average power of 220 GW and 7 kW, respectively. This report presents the feasibility study of a high-intensity, polarized, monochromatic gamma source at the TESLA Test Facility. Gamma quanta are produced in the process of Compton backscattering of the UV FEL radiation on 1 GeV electrons of the TTF accelerator. The ultimate intensity of the gamma source can reach a value up to 10 sup 1 sup 2 gamma quanta per second with a maximum energy of about 100 MeV. The energy resolution of the gamma source can be reduced down to a value of about 0.2%. Potential applications of the intense gamma source at the TESLA Test Facility are discussed as well.

  10. The opacity of the universe for high and very high energy {gamma}-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Manuel

    2013-08-15

    The flux of high energy (HE, energy 100 MeVhigh energy (VHE, E>or similar 100 GeV) {gamma}-rays originating from cosmological sources is attenuated due to pair production in interactions with photons at ultraviolet to infrared wavelengths of the extragalactic background light (EBL). The main components contributing to the EBL photon density are the starlight integrated over cosmic time and the starlight reprocessed by dust in galaxies. Consequently, the EBL is an integral measure of the cosmic star formation history. Depending on the source distance, the Universe should be opaque to {gamma}-rays above a certain energy. Nevertheless, the number of detected {gamma}-ray sources has increased continuously in recent years. VHE emitting objects beyond redshifts of z>0.5 have been detected with imaging air Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs), while HE {gamma}-rays from active galactic nuclei (AGN) above redshifts z>or similar 3 have been observed with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi satellite. In this work, a large sample of VHE {gamma}-ray spectra will be combined with data of the Fermi-LAT to derive upper limits on the EBL photon density at z = 0. Generic EBL realizations are used to correct AGN spectra for absorption, which are subsequently tested against model assumptions. The evolution of the EBL with redshift is accounted for, and a possible formation of electromagnetic cascades is considered. As a result, the EBL density is constrained over almost three orders of magnitude in wavelength, between 0.4 {mu}m and 100 {mu}m. At optical wavelengths, an EBL intensity above 24 nW m{sup -2}sr{sup -1} is ruled out, and between 8 {mu}m and 31 {mu}m it is limited to be below 5 nW m{sup -2}sr{sup -1}. In the infrared, the constraints are within a factor {proportional_to} 2 of lower limits derived from galaxy number counts. Additionally,the behavior of VHE spectra in the transition from the optical depth regimes {tau

  11. Gamma scattering in condensed matter with high intensity Moessbauer radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    We give a progress report for the work which has been carried out in the last three years with DOE support. A facility for high-intensity Moessbauer scattering is now fully operational at the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) as well as a facility at Purdue, using special isotopes produced at MURR. High precision, fundamental Moessbauer effect studies have been carried out using scattering to filter the unwanted radiation. These have led to a new Fourier transform method for describing Moessbauer effect (ME) lineshape and a direct method of fitting ME data to the convolution integral. These methods allow complete correction for source resonance self absorption (SRSA) and the accurate representation of interference effects that add an asymmetric component to the ME lines. We have begun applying these techniques to attenuated ME sources whose central peak has been attenuated by stationary resonant absorbers, to more precisely determine interference parameters and line-shape behavior in the resonance asymptotic region. This analysis is important to both the fundamental ME studies and to scattering studies for which a deconvolution is essential for extracting the correct recoilless fractions and interference parameters. A number of scattering studies have been successfully carried out including a study of the thermal diffuse scattering in Si, which led to an analysis of the resolution function for gamma-ray scattering. Also studied was the anharmonic motion in Na and the satellite reflection Debye-Waller factor in TaS{sub 2}, which indicate phason rather than phonon behavior. We have begun quasielastic diffusion studies in viscous liquids and current results are summarized. These advances, coupled to our improvements in MIcrofoil Conversion Electron spectroscopy lay the foundation for the proposed research outlined in this request for a three-year renewal of DOE support.

  12. Very-high-energy gamma rays from a distant quasar: how transparent is the universe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, J; Aliu, E; Anderhub, H; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Backes, M; Baixeras, C; Barrio, J A; Bartko, H; Bastieri, D; Becker, J K; Bednarek, W; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Bigongiari, C; Biland, A; Bock, R K; Bonnoli, G; Bordas, P; Bosch-Ramon, V; Bretz, T; Britvitch, I; Camara, M; Carmona, E; Chilingarian, A; Commichau, S; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Costado, M T; Covino, S; Curtef, V; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Cea Del Pozo, E; de Los Reyes, R; De Lotto, B; De Maria, M; De Sabata, F; Mendez, C Delgado; Dominguez, A; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Errando, M; Fagiolini, M; Ferenc, D; Fernández, E; Firpo, R; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Galante, N; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Gaug, M; Goebel, F; Hayashida, M; Herrero, A; Höhne, D; Hose, J; Hsu, C C; Huber, S; Jogler, T; Kneiske, T M; Kranich, D; La Barbera, A; Laille, A; Leonardo, E; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; Lorenz, E; Majumdar, P; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Meucci, M; Meyer, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Mizobuchi, S; Moles, M; Moralejo, A; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Ninkovic, J; Otte, N; Oya, I; Panniello, M; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Pasanen, M; Pascoli, D; Pauss, F; Pegna, R G; Perez-Torres, M A; Persic, M; Peruzzo, L; Piccioli, A; Prada, F; Prandini, E; Puchades, N; Raymers, A; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rissi, M; Robert, A; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, T Y; Salvati, M; Sanchez-Conde, M; Sartori, P; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schmitt, R; Schweizer, T; Shayduk, M; Shinozaki, K; Shore, S N; Sidro, N; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A; Sillanpää, A; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Stamerra, A; Stark, L S; Takalo, L; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Tluczykont, M; Torres, D F; Turini, N; Vankov, H; Venturini, A; Vitale, V; Wagner, R M; Wittek, W; Zabalza, V; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Zapatero, J

    2008-06-27

    The atmospheric Cherenkov gamma-ray telescope MAGIC, designed for a low-energy threshold, has detected very-high-energy gamma rays from a giant flare of the distant Quasi-Stellar Radio Source (in short: radio quasar) 3C 279, at a distance of more than 5 billion light-years (a redshift of 0.536). No quasar has been observed previously in very-high-energy gamma radiation, and this is also the most distant object detected emitting gamma rays above 50 gigaelectron volts. Because high-energy gamma rays may be stopped by interacting with the diffuse background light in the universe, the observations by MAGIC imply a low amount for such light, consistent with that known from galaxy counts.

  13. First bounds on the very high energy gamma-ray emission from Arp 220

    CERN Document Server

    Albert, J

    2006-01-01

    Using the Major Atmospheric Gamma Imaging Cherenkov Telescope (MAGIC), we have observed the nearest ultra-luminous infrared galaxy Arp 220 for about 15 hours. No significant signal was detected within the dedicated amount of observation time. The first upper limits to the very high energy $\\gamma$-ray flux of Arp 220 are herein reported and compared with theoretical expectations.

  14. Gamma-Hadron Separation in Very-High-Energy gamma-ray astronomy using a multivariate analysis method

    CERN Document Server

    Ohm, Stefan; Egberts, Kathrin

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) have discovered a rich diversity of very high energy (VHE, > 100 GeV) gamma-ray emitters in the sky. These instruments image Cherenkov light emitted by gamma-ray induced particle cascades in the atmosphere. Background from the much more numerous cosmic-ray cascades is efficiently reduced by considering the shape of the shower images, and the capability to reduce this background is one of the key aspects that determine the sensitivity of a IACT. In this work we apply a tree classification method to data from the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.). We show the stability of the method and its capabilities to yield an improved background reduction compared to the H.E.S.S. Standard Analysis.

  15. High-energy gamma-ray beams from Compton-backscattered laser light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandorfi, A.M.; LeVine, M.J.; Thorn, C.E.; Giordano, G.; Matone, G.

    1983-01-01

    Collisions of light photons with relativistic electrons have previously been used to produce polarized ..gamma..-ray beams with modest (-10%) resolution but relatively low intensity. In contrast, the LEGS project (Laser + Electron Gamma Source) at Brookhaven will produce a very high flux (>2 x 10/sup 7/ s/sup -1/) of background-free polarized ..gamma.. rays whose energy will be determined to a high accuracy (..delta..E = 2.3 MeV). Initially, 300(420)-MeV ..gamma.. rays will be produced by backscattering uv light from the new 2.5(3.0)-GeV X-ray storage ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The LEGS facility will operate as one of many passive users of the NSLS. In a later stage of the project, a Free Electron Laser is expectred to extend the ..gamma..-ray energy up to 700 MeV.

  16. Exploring Quantum Gravity with Very-High-Energy Gamma-Ray Instruments - Prospects and Limitations

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Some models for quantum gravity (QG) violate Lorentz invariance and predict an energy dependence of the speed of light, leading to a dispersion of high-energy gamma-ray signals that travel over cosmological distances. Limits on the dispersion from short-duration substructures observed in gamma-rays emitted by gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) at cosmological distances have provided interesting bounds on Lorentz invariance violation (LIV). Recent observations of unprecedentedly fast flares in the very-high energy gamma-ray emission of the active galactic nuclei (AGNs) Mkn 501 in 2005 and PKS 2155-304 in 2006 resulted in the most constraining limits on LIV from light-travel observations, approaching the Planck mass scale, at which QG effects are assumed to become important. I review the current status of LIV searches using GRBs and AGN flare events, and discuss limitations of light-travel time analyses and prospects for future instruments in the gamma-ray domain.

  17. Development of a high resolution gamma camera system using finely grooved GAGG scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Kataoka, Jun; Oshima, Tsubasa; Ogata, Yoshimune; Watabe, Tadashi; Ikeda, Hayato; Kanai, Yasukazu; Hatazawa, Jun

    2016-06-01

    High resolution gamma cameras require small pixel scintillator blocks with high light output. However, manufacturing a small pixel scintillator block is difficult when the pixel size becomes small. To solve this limitation, we developed a high resolution gamma camera system using a finely grooved Ce-doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12 (GAGG) plate. Our gamma camera's detector consists of a 1-mm-thick finely grooved GAGG plate that is optically coupled to a 1-in. position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The grooved GAGG plate has 0.2×0.2 mm pixels with 0.05-mm wide slits (between the pixels) that were manufactured using a dicing saw. We used a Hamamatsu PSPMT with a 1-in. square high quantum efficiency (HQE) PSPMT (R8900-100-C12). The energy resolution for the Co-57 gamma photons (122 keV) was 18.5% FWHM. The intrinsic spatial resolution was estimated to be 0.7-mm FWHM. With a 0.5-mm diameter pinhole collimator mounted to its front, we achieved a high resolution, small field-of-view gamma camera. The system spatial resolution for the Co-57 gamma photons was 1.0-mm FWHM, and the sensitivity was 0.0025%, 10 mm from the collimator surface. The Tc-99m HMDP administered mouse images showed the fine structures of the mouse body's parts. Our developed high resolution small pixel GAGG gamma camera is promising for such small animal imaging.

  18. Pair-production opacity at high and very-high gamma-ray energies

    CERN Document Server

    Horns, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    The propagation of high energy (HE, $E_\\gamma>100$ MeV) and very high-energy gamma-rays (VHE, $E_\\gamma>100$ GeV) in the extra-galactic photon field leads to pair-production and consequently energy- and distance-dependent attenuation of the primary intensity. The spectroscopy of an increasing number of extra-galactic objects at HE and VHE energies has demonstrated indeed the presence of such an attenuation which in turn has been used to constrain the photon density in the medium. At large optical depth ($\\tau\\gtrsim 2$) potential modifications of pair-production due to competing but rare processes (as, e.g., the presence of sub-neV axion-like particle) may be found. Indications for a pair-production anomaly have previously been found with VHE-spectra. Here, we present further indications (at the level of $3.68 \\sigma$) for a reduced optical depth at high energies from an analysis of Fermi-\\textit{LAT} data.

  19. Introduction to high-energy gamma-ray astronomy

    OpenAIRE

    Degrange, Bernard; Fontaine, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    The present issue is the first of of a two-volume review devoted to gamma-ray astronomy above 100 MeV which has witnessed considerable progress over the last 20 years. The motivations for research in this area are explained, the follow-on articles of these two thematic issues are introduced and a brief history of the field is given.

  20. Specification of High Activity Gamma-Ray Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, Washington, DC.

    The report is concerned with making recommendations for the specifications of gamma ray sources, which relate to the quantity of radioactive material and the radiation emitted. Primary consideration is given to sources in teletherapy and to a lesser extent those used in industrial radiography and in irradiation units used in industry and research.…

  1. High and low energy gamma beam dump designs for the gamma beam delivery system at ELI-NP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasin, Zafar; Matei, Catalin; Ur, Calin A.; Mitu, Iani-Octavian; Udup, Emil; Petcu, Cristian

    2016-03-01

    The Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) is under construction in Magurele, Bucharest, Romania. The facility will use two 10 PW lasers and a high intensity, narrow bandwidth gamma beam for stand-alone and combined laser-gamma experiments. The accurate estimation of particle doses and their restriction within the limits for both personel and general public is very important in the design phase of any nuclear facility. In the present work, Monte Carlo simulations are performed using FLUKA and MCNPX to design 19.4 and 4 MeV gamma beam dumps along with shielding of experimental areas. Dose rate contour plots from both FLUKA and MCNPX along with numerical values of doses in experimental area E8 of the facility are performed. The calculated doses are within the permissible limits. Furthermore, a reasonable agreement between both codes enhances our confidence in using one or both of them for future calculations in beam dump designs, radiation shielding, radioactive inventory, and other calculations releated to radiation protection. Residual dose rates and residual activity calculations are also performed for high-energy beam dump and their effect is negligible in comparison to contributions from prompt radiation.

  2. A Possible High Altitude High Energy Gamma Ray Observatory in India

    CERN Document Server

    Cowsik, R; Chitnis, V R; Acharya, B S; Vishwanath, P R

    2001-01-01

    Recently an Indian Astronomical Observatory has been set up at Hanle (32$^\\circ$ 46$^\\prime$ 46$^{\\prime\\prime}$ N, 78$^\\circ$ 57$^\\prime$ 51$^{\\prime\\prime}$ E, 4515m amsl) situated in the high altitude cold desert in the Himalayas. The Observatory has 2-m aperture optical-infrared telescope, recently built by the Indian Institute of Astrophysics. We have carried out systematic simulations for this observation level to study the nature of \\v{C}erenkov light pool generated by gamma ray and proton primaries incident vertically at the top of the atmosphere. The differences in the shape of the lateral distributions of \\v{C}erenkov light with respect to that at lower altitudes is striking. This arises primarily due to the proximity of the shower maximum to the observation site. The limited lateral spread of the \\v{C}erenkov light pool and near 90% atmospheric transmission at this high altitude location makes it an ideal site for a gamma ray observatory. This results in a decrease in the gamma ray energy threshold...

  3. Laser-driven hole boring and gamma-ray emission in high-density plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Nerush, Evgeny

    2014-01-01

    Ion acceleration in laser-produced dense plasmas is a key topic of many recent investigations thanks to its potential applications. Besides, at forthcoming laser intensities ($I \\gtrsim 10^{23} \\text{W}\\,\\text{cm}^{-2}$) interaction of laser pulses with plasmas can be accompanied by copious gamma-ray emission. Here we demonstrate the mutual influence of gamma-ray emission and ion acceleration during relativistic hole boring in high-density plasmas with ultra-intense laser pulses. If gamma-ray emission is abundant, laser pulse reflection and hole-boring velocity are lower and gamma-ray radiation pattern is narrower than in the case of low emission. Conservation of energy and momentum allows one to elucidate the effects of gamma-ray emission which are more pronounced at higher hole-boring velocities.

  4. Statistical Issues in High-Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy for GLAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Digel, S

    2004-04-06

    This paper describes the statistical issues involved in analyzing data from high-energy gamma-ray telescopes, at levels from event reconstruction to correlations of populations of astrophysical sources. Some motivation for attempting to do astronomy with high-energy gamma rays is also given, along with some of the constraints implied by operating the instrument in orbit. Specific attention is given to the Large Area Telescope (LAT) under development for launch in late 2006 on the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) mission.

  5. High Energy Gamma-rays from Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Sitarek, W B J

    2007-01-01

    It is expected that specific globular clusters can contain up to a hundred of millisecond pulsars. These pulsars can accelerate leptons at the shock waves originated in collisions of the pulsar winds and/or inside the pulsar magnetospheres. Energetic leptons diffuse gradually through the globular cluster comptonizing stellar and microwave background radiation. We calculate the GeV-TeV $\\gamma$-ray spectra for different models of injection of leptons and parameters of the globular clusters assuming reasonable, of the order of 1%, efficiency of energy conversion from the pulsar winds into the relativistic leptons. It is concluded that leptons accelerated in the globular cluster cores should produce well localized $\\gamma$-ray sources which are concentric with these globular clusters. The results are shown for four specific globular clusters (47 Tuc, Ter 5, M13, and M15), in which significant population of millisecond pulsars have been already discovered. We argue that the best candidates, which might be potenti...

  6. High-Power Laser Pulse Recirculation for Inverse Compton Scattering-Produced Gamma-Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jovanovic, I; Shverdin, M; Gibson, D; Brown, C

    2007-04-17

    Inverse Compton scattering of high-power laser pulses on relativistic electron bunches represents an attractive method for high-brightness, quasi-monoenergetic {gamma}-ray production. The efficiency of {gamma}-ray generation via inverse Compton scattering is severely constrained by the small Thomson scattering cross section. Furthermore, repetition rates of high-energy short-pulse lasers are poorly matched with those available from electron accelerators, resulting in low repetition rates for generated {gamma}-rays. Laser recirculation has been proposed as a method to address those limitations, but has been limited to only small pulse energies and peak powers. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate an alternative method for laser pulse recirculation that is uniquely capable of recirculating short pulses with energies exceeding 1 J. Inverse Compton scattering of recirculated Joule-level laser pulses has a potential to produce unprecedented peak and average {gamma}-ray brightness in the next generation of sources.

  7. SAS-2 high-energy gamma-ray observations of the Vela pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Ogelman, H. B.

    1975-01-01

    The Second Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS-2) high-energy (in excess of 35 MeV) gamma-ray telescope has detected pulsed gamma-ray emission at the radio period from PSR 0833-45, the Vela pulsar, as well as an unpulsed flux from the Vela region. The pulsed emission consists of two peaks following the single radio peak by about 13 ms and 48 ms. The luminosity of the pulsed emission above 100 MeV from Vela is about 0.1 that of the pulsar NP 0532 in the Crab nebula, whereas the pulsed emission from Vela at optical wavelengths is less than 0.0002 that from the Crab. The relatively high intensity of the pulsed gamma-ray emission, and the double peak structure, compared with the single pulse in the radio emission, suggest that the high-energy gamma-ray pulsar emission may be produced under different conditions from those at lower energies.

  8. Damage correlations in semiconductor devices exposed to gamma and high energy swift heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushpa, N.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana

    2015-05-01

    NPN rf power transistors and N-channel depletion MOSFETs are irradiated by different high energy swift heavy ions and 60Co gamma radiation in the dose range of 100 krad to 100 Mrad. The damage created by different heavy ions and 60Co gamma radiation in NPN rf power transistors and N-channel depletion MOSFETs have been correlated and studied in the same dose range. The recoveries in the electrical characteristics of different swift heavy ions and 60Co gamma irradiated devices have been studied after annihilation.

  9. Discovery of High-energy and Very High Energy Gamma-ray Emission from the Blazar RBS 0413

    CERN Document Server

    Aliu, E; Arlen, T; Aune, T; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Boettcher, M; Bouvier, A; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cannon, A; Cesarini, A; Ciupik, L; Collins-Hughes, E; Connolly, M P; Coppi, P; Cui, W; Decerprit, G; Dickherber, R; Dumm, J; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Feng, Q; Finley, J P; Finnegan, G; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gall, D; Godambe, S; Griffin, S; Grube, J; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Hawkins, K; Holder, J; Huan, H; Hughes, G; Humensky, T B; Kaaret, P; Karlsson, N; Kertzman, M; Khassen, Y; Kieda, D; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Lee, K; Madhavan, A S; Maier, G; Majumdar, P; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Orr, M; Otte, A N; Palma, N; Park, N; Perkins, J S; Pichel, A; Pohl, M; Prokoph, H; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, H J; Ruppel, J; Saxon, D B; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Senturk, G D; Smith, A W; Staszak, D; Telezhinsky, I; Tesic, G; Theiling, M; Thibadeau, S; Tsurusaki, K; Varlotta, A; Vivier, M; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Weisgarber, T; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B; Fortin, P; Horan, D

    2012-01-01

    We report on the discovery of high-energy (HE; E > 0.1 GeV) and very high-energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray emission from the high-frequency-peaked BL Lac object RBS 0413. VERITAS, a ground-based gamma-ray observatory, detected VHE gamma rays from RBS 0413 with a statistical significance of 5.5 standard deviations (sigma) and a gamma-ray flux of (1.5 \\pm 0.6stat \\pm 0.7syst) \\times 10^(-8) photons m^(-2) s^(-1) (\\sim 1% of the Crab Nebula flux) above 250 GeV. The observed spectrum can be described by a power law with a photon index of 3.18 \\pm 0.68stat \\pm 0.30syst. Contemporaneous observations with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope detected HE gamma rays from RBS 0413 with a statistical significance of more than 9 sigma, a power-law photon index of 1.57 \\pm 0.12stat +0.11sys -0.12sys and a gamma-ray flux between 300 MeV and 300 GeV of (1.64 \\pm 0.43stat +0.31sys -0.22sys) \\times 10^(-5) photons m^(-2) s^(-1). We present the results from Fermi-LAT and VERITAS, including a...

  10. Superconducting High Energy Resolution Gamma-ray Spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, D T

    2002-02-22

    We have demonstrated that a bulk absorber coupled to a TES can serve as a good gamma-ray spectrometer. Our measured energy resolution of 70 eV at 60 keV is among the best measurements in this field. We have also shown excellent agreement between the noise predictions and measured noise. Despite this good result, we noted that our detector design has shortcomings with a low count rate and vulnerabilities with the linearity of energy response. We addressed these issues by implementation of an active negative feedback bias. We demonstrated the effects of active bias such as additional pulse shortening, reduction of TES change in temperature during a pulse, and linearization of energy response at low energy. Linearization at higher energy is possible with optimized heat capacities and thermal conductivities of the microcalorimeter. However, the current fabrication process has low control and repeatability over the thermal properties. Thus, optimization of the detector performance is difficult until the fabrication process is improved. Currently, several efforts are underway to better control the fabrication of our gamma-ray spectrometers. We are developing a full-wafer process to produce TES films. We are investigating the thermal conductivity and surface roughness of thicker SiN membranes. We are exploring alternative methods to couple the absorber to the TES film for reproducibility. We are also optimizing the thermal conductivities within the detector to minimize two-element phonon noise. We are experimenting with different absorber materials to optimize absorption efficiency and heat capacity. We are also working on minimizing Johnson noise from the E S shunt and SQUID amplifier noise. We have shown that our performance, noise, and active bias models agree very well with measured data from several microcalorimeters. Once the fabrication improvements have been implemented, we have no doubt that our gamma-ray spectrometer will achieve even more spectacular results.

  11. $\\gamma^\\ast N \\to N(1710)$ transition at high momentum transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Ramalho, G

    2014-01-01

    In a relativistic quark model we study the structure of the $N(1710)$ resonance, and the $\\gamma^\\ast N \\to N(1710)$ reaction focusing on the high momentum transfer region, where the valence quark degrees of freedom are expected to be dominant. The $N(1710)$ resonance, a state with spin 1/2 and positive parity ($J^P = \\frac{1}{2}^+$), can possibly be interpreted as the second radial excitation of the nucleon, after the Roper, $N(1440)$. We calculate the $\\gamma^\\ast N \\to N(1710)$ helicity amplitudes, and predict that they are almost identical to those of the $\\gamma^\\ast N \\to N(1440)$ reaction in the high momentum transfer region. Thus, future measurement of the helicity amplitudes for the $\\gamma^\\ast N \\to N(1710)$ reaction can give a significant hint on the internal structure of the $N(1710)$ state.

  12. Measurements of high-energy {gamma}-rays with LaBr{sub 3}:Ce detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciemala, M. [Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland)], E-mail: Michal.Ciemala@ifj.edu.pl; Balabanski, D. [INRNE, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, BG-1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Csatlos, M. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), P.O. Box 51, H-4001 Debrecen (Hungary); Daugas, J.M. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon Cedex (France); Georgiev, G. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse (CSNSM), IN2P3-CNRS and Universite Paris-Sud, Bat 104-108, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Gulyas, J. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), P.O. Box 51, H-4001 Debrecen (Hungary); Kmiecik, M. [Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Krasznahorkay, A. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), P.O. Box 51, H-4001 Debrecen (Hungary); Lalkovski, S. [Faculty of Physics, University of Sofia, BG-1164 (Bulgaria); Lefebvre-Schuhl, A. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse (CSNSM), IN2P3-CNRS and Universite Paris-Sud, Bat 104-108, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Lozeva, R. [Instituut voor Kernen Stralingsfysica (IKS), Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Maj, A. [Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Vitez, A. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), P.O. Box 51, H-4001 Debrecen (Hungary)

    2009-09-01

    The full-energy peak efficiency calibration and the energy resolution measurements of the 2in.x2in.LaBr{sub 3}{gamma}-ray detector are presented for {gamma}-ray energies in the 700 keV-17.6 MeV range. Measurements were done using a combination of proton-capture nuclear reactions on {sup 27}Al, {sup 23}Na, {sup 39}K, {sup 7}Li and {sup 11}B for high-energy {gamma}-rays, and radioactive sources such as {sup 60}Co and {sup 152}Eu for the lowest energies. At high energies, two {gamma}-rays in a cascade from proton resonance capture were employed using Al, Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}, K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and LiBO{sub 2} targets. The obtained results were compared to the simulations performed using a GEANT4 code.

  13. An Analog Gamma Correction Scheme for High Dynamic Range CMOS Logarithmic Image Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Cao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel analog gamma correction scheme with a logarithmic image sensor dedicated to minimize the quantization noise of the high dynamic applications is presented. The proposed implementation exploits a non-linear voltage-controlled-oscillator (VCO based analog-to-digital converter (ADC to perform the gamma correction during the analog-to-digital conversion. As a result, the quantization noise does not increase while the same high dynamic range of logarithmic image sensor is preserved. Moreover, by combining the gamma correction with the analog-to-digital conversion, the silicon area and overall power consumption can be greatly reduced. The proposed gamma correction scheme is validated by the reported simulation results and the experimental results measured for our designed test structure, which is fabricated with 0.35 μm standard complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS process.

  14. Numerical simulations on efficiency and measurement of capabilities of BGO detectors for high energy gamma ray

    CERN Document Server

    Wen Wan Xin

    2002-01-01

    The energy resolution and time resolution of two phi 75 x 100 BGO detectors for high energy gamma ray newly made were measured with sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs and sup 6 sup 0 Co resources. The two characteristic gamma rays of high energy emitted from the thermal neutron capture of germanium in BGO crystal were used for the energy calibration of gamma spectra. The intrinsic photopeak efficiency, single escape probability and double escape probabilities of BGO detectors in photon energy range of 4-30 MeV are numerically calculated with GEANT code. The real count response and count ratio of the uniformly distributed incident photons in energy range of 0-30 MeV are also calculated. The distortion of gamma spectra caused by the photon energy loss extension to lower energy in detection medium is discussed

  15. CELESTE an atmospheric Cherenkov telescope for high energy gamma astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Paré, E; Bazer-Bachi, R; Bergeret, H; Berny, F; Briand, N; Bruel, P; Cerutti, M; Collon, J; Cordier, A; Cornebise, P; Debiais, G; Dezalay, J P; Dumora, D; Durand, E; Eschstruth, P T; Espigat, P; Fabre, B; Fleury, P; Gilly, J; Gouillaud, J C; Gregory, C; Herault, N; Holder, J; Hrabovsky, M; Incerti, S; Jouenne, A; Kalt, L; Legallou, R; Lott, B; Lodygensky, O; Manigot, P; Manseri, H; Manitaz, H; Martin, M; Morano, R; Morineaud, G; Muenz, F; Musquere, A; Naurois, M D; Neveu, J; Noppe, J M; Olive, J F; Palatka, M; Pérez, A; Quebert, J; Rebii, A; Reposeur, T; Rob, L; Roy, P; Sans, J L; Sako, T; Schovanek, P; Smith, D A; Snabre, P; Villard, G

    2002-01-01

    CELESTE is an atmospheric Cherenkov telescope based on the sampling method which makes use of the de-commissioned THEMIS solar electrical plant in the French Pyrenees. A large (2000 m sup 2) mirror surface area from 40 independent heliostats followed by a secondary optic, a trigger system using analog summing techniques and signal digitization with 1 GHz flash ADCs make possible the detection of cosmic gamma-rays down to 30 GeV. This paper provides a detailed technical description of the CELESTE installation.

  16. Ceramic Matrix Composites Performances Under High Gamma Radiation Doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cemmi, A.; Baccaro, S.; Fiore, S.; Gislon, P.; Serra, E.; Fassina, S.; Ferrari, E.; Ghisolfi, E.

    2014-06-01

    Ceramic matrix composites reinforced by continuous ceramic fibers (CMCs) represent a class of advanced materials developed for applications in automotive, aerospace, nuclear fusion reactors and in other specific systems for harsh environments. In the present work, the silicon carbide/silicon carbide (SiCf/SiC) composites, manufactured by Chemical Vapour Infiltration process at FN S.p.A. plant, have been evaluated in term of gamma radiation hardness at three different absorbed doses (up to around 3MGy). Samples behavior has been investigated before and after irradiation by means of mechanical tests (flexural strength) and by surface and structural analyses (X-ray diffraction, SEM, FTIR-ATR, EPR).

  17. Role of 'quasiparticle x phonon' components in gamma-decay of high-lying states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponomarev, V.Yu.; Soloviev, V.G.; Vdovin, A.I.; Stoyanov, C.

    1987-01-15

    The ..gamma.. decay rates of highly excited nuclear states of odd-mass nuclei into the low-lying one-quasiparticle states are calculated in a microscopic way. We conclude that not only the one quasiparticle component but also ''quasiparticle x phonon'' components of the wave function of highly excited states can play an important role in their ..gamma.. decay.

  18. GAMMA-LIGHT: High-Energy Astrophysics above 10 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Morselli, Aldo; Barbiellini, Guido; Bonvicini, Walter; Bulgarelli, Andrea; Cardillo, Martina; Chen, Andrew; Coppi, Paolo; Di Giorgio, Anna Maria; Donnarumma, Immacolata; Del Monte, Ettore; Fioretti, Valentina; Galli, Marcello; Giusti, Manuela; Ferrari, Attilio; Fuschino, Fabio; Giommi, Paolo; Giuliani, Andrea; Labanti, Claudio; Lipari, Paolo; Longo, Francesco; Marisaldi, Martino; Molinari, Sergio; Muñoz, Carlos; Neubert, Torsten; Orleanski, Piotr; Paredes, Josep M; Pérez-García, M Ángeles; Piano, Giovanni; Picozza, Piergiorgio; Pilia, Maura; Pittori, Carlotta; Pucella, Gianluca; Sabatini, Sabina; Striani, Edoardo; Tavani, Marco; Trois, Alessio; Vacchi, Andrea; Vercellone, Stefano; Verrecchia, Francesco; Vittorini, Valerio; Zdziarski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    High-energy phenomena in the cosmos, and in particular processes leading to the emission of gamma- rays in the energy range 10 MeV - 100 GeV, play a very special role in the understanding of our Universe. This energy range is indeed associated with non-thermal phenomena and challenging particle acceleration processes. The technology involved in detecting gamma-rays is challenging and drives our ability to develop improved instruments for a large variety of applications. GAMMA-LIGHT is a Small Mission which aims at an unprecedented advance of our knowledge in many sectors of astrophysical and Earth studies research. The Mission will open a new observational window in the low-energy gamma-ray range 10-50 MeV, and is configured to make substantial advances compared with the previous and current gamma-ray experiments (AGILE and Fermi). The improvement is based on an exquisite angular resolution achieved by GAMMA-LIGHT using state-of-the-art Silicon technology with innovative data acquisition. GAMMA-LIGHT will add...

  19. Application of the image calorimeter in the high energy gamma astronomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casolino, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P. [Rome Univ. `Tor Vergata` (Italy). Dip. di Fisica]|[INFN, Sezione Univ. `Tor Vergata`, Rome (Italy); Carlson, P. [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Fuglesang, C. [ESA-EAC, Cologne (Germany); Ozerov, Yu.V.; Zemskov, V.M.; Zverev, V.G.; Galper, A.M. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-09-01

    The capability of registration of the primary high energy cosmic ray gamma emission by a gamma-telescope made of an image calorimeter is shown in this paper. The problem of triggering and off-line identification of primary particles by the analysis of the electromagnetic showers induced in the calorimeter is under consideration. The estimations of the background flux of delayed secondaries induced by nuclear interactions are presented too.

  20. Characterisation of a high resolution small field of view portable gamma camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugby, S L; Lees, J E; Bhatia, B S; Perkins, A C

    2014-05-01

    A handheld, high-resolution small field of view (SFOV) pinhole gamma camera has been characterised using a new set of protocols adapted from standards previously developed for large field of view (LFOV) systems. Parameters investigated include intrinsic and extrinsic spatial resolution, spatial linearity, uniformity, sensitivity, count rate capability and energy resolution. Camera characteristics are compared to some clinical LFOV gamma cameras and also to other SFOV cameras in development.

  1. High-$\\gamma$ Beta Beams within the LAGUNA design study

    CERN Document Server

    Orme, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Within the LAGUNA design study, seven candidate sites are being assessed for their feasibility to host a next-generation, very large neutrino observatory. Such a detector will be expected to feature within a future European accelerator neutrino programme (Superbeam or Beta Beam), and hence the distance from CERN is of critical importance. In this article, the focus is a $^{18}$Ne and $^{6}$He Beta Beam sourced at CERN and directed towards a 50 kton Liquid Argon detector located at the LAGUNA sites: Slanic (L=1570 km) and Pyh\\"{a}salmi (L=2300 km). To improve sensitivity to the neutrino mass ordering, these baselines are then combined with a concurrent run with the same flux directed towards a large Water \\v{C}erenkov detector located at Canfranc (L=650 km). This degeneracy breaking combination is shown to provide comparable physics reach to the conservative Magic Baseline Beta Beam proposals. For $^{18}$Ne ions boosted to $\\gamma=570$ and $^{6}$He ions boosted to $\\gamma=350$, the correct mass ordering can be...

  2. Establishing a connection between high-power pulsars and very-high-energy gamma-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Carrigan, S; Hofmann, W; Kosack, K; Lohse, T; Reimer, O

    2007-01-01

    In the very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray wave band, pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) represent to date the most populous class of Galactic sources. Nevertheless, the details of the energy conversion mechanisms in the vicinity of pulsars are not well understood, nor is it known which pulsars are able to drive PWNe and emit high-energy radiation. In this paper we present a systematic study of a connection between pulsars and VHE gamma-ray sources based on a deep survey of the inner Galactic plane conducted with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.). We find clear evidence that pulsars with large spin-down energy flux are associated with VHE gamma-ray sources. This implies that these pulsars emit on the order of 1% of their spin-down energy as TeV gamma-rays.

  3. Modeling gamma ray production from proton-proton interactions in high-energy astrophysical environments

    CERN Document Server

    Atri, Dimitra

    2013-01-01

    Gamma rays are the best probes to study high-energy particle interactions occurring in astrophysical environments. Space based instruments such as Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi LAT) and ground based experiments such as VERITAS, H.E.S.S. and MAGIC have provided us with valuable data on various production mechanisms of gamma rays within our Galaxy and beyond. Depending on astronomical conditions, gamma rays can be produced either by hadronic or leptonic interactions. In this paper, we probe the production of gamma rays by the hadronic channel where gamma rays are primarily produced by the decay of secondary neutral pions and $\\eta$ mesons from proton-proton interactions in a wide energy range. We use state of the art high-energy hadronic interaction models, calibrated with the new LHC results and widely used in ground based ultra-high energy air shower experiments. We also compare SIBYLL 2.1, QGSJET-II-04 and EPOS LHC models and provide lookup tables which can be used by researchers to model gamma ray produ...

  4. A new design for a high resolution, high efficiency CZT gamma camera detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestais, C.; Baffert, N.; Bonnefoy, J. P.; Chapuis, A.; Koenig, A.; Monnet, O.; Ouvrier Buffet, P.; Rostaing, J. P.; Sauvage, F.; Verger, L.

    2001-02-01

    We have designed a CZT gamma camera detector that provides an array of CZT pixels and associated front-end electronics - including an ASIC - and permits gamma camera measurements using the method patented by CEA-LETI and reported by Verger et al. [1]. Electron response in each CZT pixel is registered by correcting pulse height for position of interaction based on fast rise-time information. This method brings advantages of high scatter rejection while allowing high detection efficiency. These techniques and the systems approach have been developed at CEA-LETI in an exclusive joint development with BICRON and CRISMATEC who in turn are commercializing the technology. The initial system is implemented in an array framework with 1920 pixels, approximately 180×215 mm 2 in dimension, but the system architecture expands readily to 4096 pixels, and these arrays can be ganged into groups of up to 8 for pixel planes totaling over 32 000 pixels without architecture changes. The overall system design is described and brain phantom images are presented that were obtained by scanning with a small number of pixels.

  5. High-performance gamma spectroscopy for equipment retrieval from Hanford high-level nuclear waste tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, Gary L.; Hillesand, K. E.; Goodwin, S. G.; Kessler, S. F.; Killian, E. W.; Legare, D.; Nelson, Joseph V., Jr.; Richard, R. F.; Nordquist, E. M.

    1999-01-01

    The cleanup of high level defense nuclear waste at the Hanford site presents several progressive challenges. Among these is the removal and disposal of various components from buried active waste tanks to allow new equipment insertion or hazards mitigation. A unique automated retrieval system at the tank provides for retrieval, high pressure washing, inventory measurement, and containment for disposal. Key to the inventory measurement is a three detector HPGe high performance gamma spectroscopy system capable of recovering data at up to ninety per cent saturation (200,000 counts per second). Data recovery is based on a unique embedded electronic pulser and specialized software to report the inventory. Each of the detectors have different shielding specified through Monte Carlo simulation with the MCNP program. This shielding provides performance over a dynamic range of eight orders of magnitude. System description, calibration issues and operational experiences are discussed.

  6. Development of a high resolution gamma camera system using finely grooved GAGG scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Kataoka, Jun; Oshima, Tsubasa [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University (Japan); Ogata, Yoshimune [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Watabe, Tadashi; Ikeda, Hayato; Kanai, Yasukazu; Hatazawa, Jun [Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan)

    2016-06-11

    High resolution gamma cameras require small pixel scintillator blocks with high light output. However, manufacturing a small pixel scintillator block is difficult when the pixel size becomes small. To solve this limitation, we developed a high resolution gamma camera system using a finely grooved Ce-doped Gd{sub 3}Al{sub 2}Ga{sub 3}O{sub 12} (GAGG) plate. Our gamma camera's detector consists of a 1-mm-thick finely grooved GAGG plate that is optically coupled to a 1-in. position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The grooved GAGG plate has 0.2×0.2 mm pixels with 0.05-mm wide slits (between the pixels) that were manufactured using a dicing saw. We used a Hamamatsu PSPMT with a 1-in. square high quantum efficiency (HQE) PSPMT (R8900-100-C12). The energy resolution for the Co-57 gamma photons (122 keV) was 18.5% FWHM. The intrinsic spatial resolution was estimated to be 0.7-mm FWHM. With a 0.5-mm diameter pinhole collimator mounted to its front, we achieved a high resolution, small field-of-view gamma camera. The system spatial resolution for the Co-57 gamma photons was 1.0-mm FWHM, and the sensitivity was 0.0025%, 10 mm from the collimator surface. The Tc-99m HMDP administered mouse images showed the fine structures of the mouse body's parts. Our developed high resolution small pixel GAGG gamma camera is promising for such small animal imaging.

  7. Extended performance gas Cherenkov detector for gamma-ray detection in high-energy density experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, H. W., E-mail: herrmann@lanl.gov; Kim, Y. H.; Young, C. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Batha, S. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Malone, R. M. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J. [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Stoeffl, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Zylstra, A. B. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Shmayda, W. T. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A new Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) with low-energy threshold and high sensitivity, currently known as Super GCD (or GCD-3 at OMEGA), is being developed for use at the OMEGA Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Super GCD is designed to be pressurized to ≤400 psi (absolute) and uses all metal seals to allow the use of fluorinated gases inside the target chamber. This will allow the gamma energy threshold to be run as low at 1.8 MeV with 400 psi (absolute) of C{sub 2}F{sub 6}, opening up a new portion of the gamma ray spectrum. Super GCD operating at 20 cm from TCC will be ∼400 × more efficient at detecting DT fusion gammas at 16.7 MeV than the Gamma Reaction History diagnostic at NIF (GRH-6m) when operated at their minimum thresholds.

  8. Discovery of Very-High-Energy Gamma-Rays from the Galactic Centre Ridge

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonian, F A; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berge, D; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bolz, O; Borrel, V; Braun, I; Breitling, F; Brown, A M; Chadwick, P M; Chounet, L M; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Degrange, B; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ata, A; O'Connor-Drury, L; Dubus, G; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Feinstein, F; Fontaine, G; Fuchs, Y; Funk, S; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Gillessen, S; Glicenstein, J F; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, D; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; De Jager, O C; Khelifi, B; Klages, S; Komin, Nu; Konopelko, A; Latham, I J; Le Gallou, R; Lemiere, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Leroy, N; Lohse, T; Marcowith, A; Martin, J M; Martineau-Huynh, O; Masterson, C; McComb, T J L; De Naurois, Mathieu; Nolan, S J; Noutsos, A; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Ouchrif, M; Panter, M; Pelletier, G; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Raux, J; Rayner, S M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rolland, L; Rowell, G; Sahakian, V V; Sauge, L; Schlenker, S; Schlickeiser, R; Schuster, C; Schwanke, U; Siewert, M; Sol, H; Spangler, D; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Tavernet, J P; Terrier, R; Theoret, C G; Tluczykont, M; Van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Wagner, S J

    2006-01-01

    The origin of Galactic cosmic rays (with energies up to 10^15 eV) remains unclear, though it is widely believed that they originate in the shock waves of expanding supernova remnants. Currently the best way to investigate their acceleration and propagation is by observing the gamma-rays produced when cosmic rays interact with interstellar gas. Here we report observations of an extended region of very high energy (VHE, >100 GeV) gamma-ray emission correlated spatially with a complex of giant molecular clouds in the central 200 pc of the Milky Way. The hardness of the gamma-ray spectrum and the conditions in those molecular clouds indicate that the cosmic rays giving rise to the gamma-rays are likely to be protons and nuclei rather than electrons. The energy associated with the cosmic rays could have come from a single supernova explosion around 10,000 years ago.

  9. Very high energy gamma rays from the composite SNR G0.9+0.1

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonian, F; Aye, K M; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berge, D; Berghaus, P; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bolz, O; Borgmeier, C; Braun, I; Breitling, F; Brown, A M; Bussons-Gordo, J; Chadwick, P M; Chounet, L M; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Degrange, B; Djannati-Ata, A; O'Connor-Drury, L; Dubus, G; Ergin, T; Espigat, P; Feinstein, F; Fleury, P; Fontaine, G; Funk, S; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Gillessen, S; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Horns, D; De Jager, O C; Jung, I; Khelifi, B; Komin, Nu; Konopelko, A; Latham, I J; Le Gallou, R; Lemiere, A; Lemoine, M; Leroy, N; Lohse, T; Marcowith, A; Masterson, C; McComb, T J L; De Naurois, Mathieu; Nolan, S J; Noutsos, A; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Ouchrif, M; Panter, M; Pelletier, G; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Raux, J; Rayner, S M; Redondo, I; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rolland, L; Rowell, G; Sahakian, V V; Sauge, L; Schlenker, S; Schlickeiser, R; Schuster, C; Schwanke, U; Siewert, M; Sol, H; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Tavernet, J P; Terrier, R; Theoret, C G; Tluczykont, M; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vincent, P; Visser, B; Völk, H J; Wagner, S J

    2005-01-01

    Very high energy (> 100 GeV) gamma-ray emission has been detected for the first time from the composite supernova remnant G0.9+0.1 using the H.E.S.S. instrument. The source is detected with a significance of 13 sigma, and a photon flux above 200 GeV of (5.7+/-0.7 stat +/- 1.2 sys) * 10^-12 cm^-2 s^-1, making it one of the weakest sources ever detected at TeV energies. The photon spectrum is compatible with a power law (dN/dE \\propto E^-Gamma) with photon index Gamma = 2.40 +/- 0.11 stat +/- 0.20 sys. The gamma-ray emission appears to originate in the plerionic core of the remnant, rather than the shell, and can be plausibly explained as inverse Compton scattering of relativistic electrons.

  10. A simple method for the absolute determination of uranium enrichment by high-resolution {gamma} spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korob, R.O. [Unidad de Actividad Radioquimica y Quimica de las Radiaciones, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Ezeiza, Presbitero Juan Gonzalez y Aragon No. 15 Partido de Ezeiza, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. E-mail: korob@cae.cnea.gov.ar; Blasiyh Nuno, G.A. [Unidad de Actividad Gestion de Residuos Radiactivos, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Ezeiza, Presbitero Juan Gonzalez y Aragon No. 15 Partido de Ezeiza, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2006-05-15

    A simple method for the determination of uranium enrichment using high-resolution {gamma} spectrometry is presented in this paper. The method relies solely on the {gamma}-ray emission probabilities of {sup 235}U and {sup 234m}Pa, and an iterative procedure for the least squares fit of a polynomial to a set of experimentally determined data. To ensure the reliability of the {sup 234m}Pa {gamma}-ray emission probabilities employed, a new determination of these probabilities was carried out using a combination of {gamma} spectrometry and Cerenkov counting of a purified {sup 234}Th solution. Using these new data, a maximum difference of {approx}5% has been found between the experimental and declared uranium enrichment in a set of solid and liquid samples containing uranium compounds.

  11. Extended performance gas Cherenkov detector for gamma-ray detection in high-energy density experimentsa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. H.; Young, C. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Malone, R. M.; Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Stoeffl, W.; Zylstra, A. B.; Shmayda, W. T.; Batha, S. H.

    2014-11-01

    A new Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) with low-energy threshold and high sensitivity, currently known as Super GCD (or GCD-3 at OMEGA), is being developed for use at the OMEGA Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Super GCD is designed to be pressurized to ≤400 psi (absolute) and uses all metal seals to allow the use of fluorinated gases inside the target chamber. This will allow the gamma energy threshold to be run as low at 1.8 MeV with 400 psi (absolute) of C2F6, opening up a new portion of the gamma ray spectrum. Super GCD operating at 20 cm from TCC will be ˜400 × more efficient at detecting DT fusion gammas at 16.7 MeV than the Gamma Reaction History diagnostic at NIF (GRH-6m) when operated at their minimum thresholds.

  12. Observation of solar high energy gamma and X-ray emission and solar energetic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Struminsky, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    We considered 18 solar flares observed between June 2010 and July 2012, in which high energy >100 MeV {\\gamma}-emission was registered by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard FermiGRO. We examined for these {\\gamma}-events soft X-ray observations by GOES, hard X-ray observations by the Anti-Coincidence Shield of the SPectrometer aboard INTEGRAL (ACS SPI) and the Gamma-Ray burst Monitor (GBM) aboard FermiGRO. Hard X-ray and {\\pi}0-decay {\\gamma}-ray emissions are used as tracers of electron and proton acceleration, respectively. Bursts of hard X-ray were observed by ACS SPI during impulsive phase of 13 events. Bursts of hard X-ray >100 keV were not found during time intervals, when prolonged hard {\\gamma}-emission was registered by LAT/FermiGRO. Those events showing prolonged high-energy gamma-ray emission not accompanied by >100 keV hard X-ray emission are interpreted as an indication of either different acceleration processes for protons and electrons or as the presence of a proton population accelerated du...

  13. Design of a Multi-Channel Ultra-High Resolution Superconducting Gamma-Ray Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, S; Terracol, S F; Miyazaki, T; Drury, O B; Ali, Z A; Cunningham, M F; Niedermayr, T R; Barbee Jr., T W; Batteux, J D; Labov, S E

    2004-11-29

    Superconducting Gamma-ray microcalorimeters operated at temperatures around {approx}0.1 K offer an order of magnitude improvement in energy resolution over conventional high-purity Germanium spectrometers. The calorimeters consist of a {approx}1 mm{sup 3} superconducting or insulating absorber and a sensitive thermistor, which are weakly coupled to a cold bath. Gamma-ray capture increases the absorber temperature in proportion to the Gamma-ray energy, this is measured by the thermistor, and both subsequently cool back down to the base temperature through the weak link. We are developing ultra-high-resolution Gamma-ray spectrometers based on Sn absorbers and superconducting Mo/Cu multilayer thermistors for nuclear non-proliferation applications. They have achieved an energy resolution between 60 and 90 eV for Gamma-rays up to 100 keV. We also build two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators for user-friendly detector operation at 0.1 K. We present recent results on the performance of single pixel Gamma-ray spectrometers, and discuss the design of a large detector array for increased sensitivity.

  14. Two new high energy gamma-ray blazar candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Campana, R; Bernieri, E; Massaro, E

    2016-01-01

    We report the detection of two new gamma-ray sources in the Fermi-LAT sky (Pass 8) at energies higher than 20 GeV, and confirmed at lower energies, using a source detection tool based on the Minimum Spanning Tree algorithm. One of these sources, at a Galactic latitude of about -4{\\deg}, is a new discovery, while the other was previously reported above 50 GeV in the 2FHL catalogue. We searched for archival multi-wavelength data of possible counterparts and found interesting candidates. Both objects are radio sources and their WISE infrared colours are typical of blazars. While for the former source no optical spectra are available, for the latter a puzzling optical spectrum corresponding to a white dwarf star is found in the 6dF database. We discuss the spectral energy distributions of both sources and possible interpretations.

  15. Properties of a large NaI(Tl) spectrometer for the energy measurement of high-energy gamma rays on the Gamma Ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, E. B.; Finman, L. C.; Hofstadter, R.; Lepetich, J. E.; Lin, Y. C.

    1986-01-01

    A large NaI(Tl) spectrometer is expected to play a crucial role in the measurement of the energy spectra from an all-sky survey of high-energy celestial gamma rays on the Gamma Ray Observatory. The crystal size and requirements of space flight have resulted in a novel crystal-packaging and optics combination. The structure of this spectrometer and the operating characteristics determined in a test program using high energy positrons are described.

  16. Detection of high-energy delayed gammas for nuclear waste packages characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrel, F., E-mail: frederick.carrel@cea.fr [CEA, LIST, Gif-sur-Yvette F-91191 (France); Agelou, M.; Gmar, M.; Laine, F. [CEA, LIST, Gif-sur-Yvette F-91191 (France)

    2011-10-01

    Methods based on photon activation analysis (PAA) have been developed by CEA LIST for several years, in order to assay actinides inside nuclear waste packages. These techniques were primarily based on the detection of delayed neutrons emitted by fission products. To overcome some limitations related to neutrons, CEA LIST has worked on the detection of high-energy delayed gammas (E>3 MeV), which are simultaneously emitted by fission products along with delayed neutrons. Since the emission yield is more important for high-energy delayed gammas than delayed neutrons and because they are less sensitive to hydrogenous material, high-energy delayed gammas are a solution of interest in order to improve the accuracy of these techniques. In this article, we present new experimental results demonstrating the feasibility of high-energy delayed gamma detection for nuclear waste packages characterization. Experiments have been carried out in the PAA facility called SAPHIR, which is located in CEA Saclay. The most important part of our work has been carried out on an 870 l mock-up package. Some experimental techniques, initially based on delayed neutron detection (altitude scan, photofission tomography), have been successfully applied for the first time using high-energy delayed gamma detection.

  17. Pulse Rise Time Characterization of a High Pressure Xenon Gamma Detector for use in Resolution Enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Troyer, G L

    2000-01-01

    High pressure xenon ionization chamber detectors are possible alternatives to traditional thallium doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and hyperpure germanium as gamma spectrometers in certain applications. Xenon detectors incorporating a Frisch grid exhibit energy resolutions comparable to cadmium/zinc/telluride (CZT) (e.g. 2% (at) 662keV) but with far greater sensitive volumes. The Frisch grid reduces the position dependence of the anode pulse risetimes, but it also increases the detector vibration sensitivity, anode capacitance, voltage requirements and mechanical complexity. We have been investigating the possibility of eliminating the grid electrode in high-pressure xenon detectors and preserving the high energy resolution using electronic risetime compensation methods. A two-electrode cylindrical high pressure xenon gamma detector coupled to time-to-amplitude conversion electronics was used to characterize the pulse rise time of deposited gamma photons. Time discrimination was used to characterize the pulse r...

  18. High-Latitude Molecular Clouds as (Gamma)-ray Sources for GLAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, D F; Dame, T M; Digel, S W

    2005-01-05

    For about two decades, a population of relative small and nearby molecular clouds has been known to exist at high Galactic latitudes. Lying more than 10{sup o} from the Galactic plane, these clouds have typical distances of {approx}150 pc, angular sizes of {approx}1{sup o}, and masses of order tens of solar masses. These objects are passive sources of high-energy {gamma}-rays through cosmic ray-gas interactions. Using a new wide-angle CO survey of the northern sky, we show that typical high-latitude clouds are not bright enough in {gamma}-rays to have been detected by EGRET, but that of order 100 of them will be detectable by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on GLAST. Thus, we predict a new steady population of {gamma}-ray sources at high Galactic latitudes, perhaps the most numerous after active galactic nuclei.

  19. A simple identification method for spore-forming bacteria showing high resistance against [gamma]-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshikawa, Tomihiko; Sone, Koji; Kobayashi, Toshikazu (Japan Radioisotope Association, Koka, Shiga (Japan). Koka Lab.)

    1993-11-01

    A simple identification method was developed for spore-forming bacteria which are highly resistant against [gamma]-rays. Among 23 species of Bacillus studied, the spores of Bacillus megaterium, B. cereus, B. thuringiensis, B. pumilus and B. aneurinolyticus showed high resistance against [gamma]-rays as compared with other spores of Bacillus species. Combination of the seven kinds of biochemical tests, namely, the citrate utilization test, nitrate reduction test, starch hydrolysis test, Voges-Proskauer reaction test, gelatine hydrolysis test, mannitol utilization test and xylose utilization test showed a characteristic pattern for each species of Bacillus. The combination pattern of each the above tests with a few supplementary test, if necessary, was useful to identify Bacillus species showing high radiation resistance against [gamma]-rays. The method is specific for B. megaterium, B. thuringiensis and B. pumilus, and highly selective for B. aneurinolyticus and B. cereus. (author).

  20. A new population of very high energy gamma-ray sources in the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonian, F A

    2005-01-01

    Very high energy gamma-rays probe the long-standing mystery of the origin of cosmic rays. Produced in the interactions of accelerated particles in astrophysical objects, they can be used to image cosmic particle accelerators. A first sensitive survey of the inner part of the Milky Way with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) reveals a population of eight previously unknown firmly detected sources of very high energy gamma-rays. At least two have no known radio or X-ray counterpart and may be representative of a new class of `dark' nucleonic cosmic ray sources.

  1. DISCOVERY OF HIGH-ENERGY AND VERY HIGH ENERGY {gamma}-RAY EMISSION FROM THE BLAZAR RBS 0413

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliu, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); Archambault, S. [Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Arlen, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Aune, T.; Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Benbow, W. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Boettcher, M. [Astrophysical Institute, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Bradbury, S. M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Byrum, K.; Decerprit, G. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cannon, A.; Collins-Hughes, E. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Coppi, P. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P. O. Box 208101 New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Cui, W., E-mail: gunessenturk@gmail.com, E-mail: fortin@llr.in2p3.fr, E-mail: deirdre@llr.in2p3.fr [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); and others

    2012-05-10

    We report on the discovery of high-energy (HE; E > 0.1 GeV) and very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) {gamma}-ray emission from the high-frequency-peaked BL Lac object RBS 0413. VERITAS, a ground-based {gamma}-ray observatory, detected VHE {gamma} rays from RBS 0413 with a statistical significance of 5.5 standard deviations ({sigma}) and a {gamma}-ray flux of (1.5 {+-} 0.6{sub stat} {+-} 0.7{sub syst}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} photons m{sup -2} s{sup -1} ({approx}1% of the Crab Nebula flux) above 250 GeV. The observed spectrum can be described by a power law with a photon index of 3.18 {+-} 0.68{sub stat} {+-} 0.30{sub syst}. Contemporaneous observations with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope detected HE {gamma} rays from RBS 0413 with a statistical significance of more than 9{sigma}, a power-law photon index of 1.57 {+-} 0.12{sub stat}+{sup 0.11}{sub -0.12sys}, and a {gamma}-ray flux between 300 MeV and 300 GeV of (1.64 {+-} 0.43{sub stat}{sup +0.31}{sub -0.22sys}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} photons m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. We present the results from Fermi-LAT and VERITAS, including a spectral energy distribution modeling of the {gamma}-ray, quasi-simultaneous X-ray (Swift-XRT), ultraviolet (Swift-UVOT), and R-band optical (MDM) data. We find that, if conditions close to equipartition are required, both the combined synchrotron self-Compton/external-Compton and the lepto-hadronic models are preferred over a pure synchrotron self-Compton model.

  2. Parsec-Scale Behavior of Blazars during High Gamma-Ray States

    CERN Document Server

    Jorstad, S; Agudo, I; Harrison, B

    2011-01-01

    We compare the \\gamma-ray light curves of the blazars, constructed with data provided by the Fermi Large Area Telescope, with flux and polarization variations in the VLBI core and bright superluminal knots obtained via monthly monitoring with the Very Long Baseline Array at 43 GHz. For all blazars in the sample that exhibit a high \\gamma-ray state on time scales from several weeks to several months, an increase of the total flux in the mm-wave core is contemporaneous with the \\gamma-ray activity (more than a third of the sample). Here we present the results for quasars with the most extreme \\gamma-ray behavior (3C 454.3, 3C 273, 3C 279, 1222+216, and 1633+382). The sources show that in addition to the total flux intensity behavior, a maximum in the degree of polarization in the core or bright superluminal knot nearest to the core coincides with the time of a \\gamma-ray peak to within the accuracy of the sampling of the radio data. These argue in favor of location of many of \\gamma-ray outbursts in blazars out...

  3. A prototype High Purity Germanium detector for high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at high count rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, R.J., E-mail: rjcooper@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Amman, M.; Luke, P.N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Vetter, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-09-21

    Where energy resolution is paramount, High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors continue to provide the optimum solution for gamma-ray detection and spectroscopy. Conventional large-volume HPGe detectors are typically limited to count rates on the order of ten thousand counts per second, however, limiting their effectiveness for high count rate applications. To address this limitation, we have developed a novel prototype HPGe detector designed to be capable of achieving fine energy resolution and high event throughput at count rates in excess of one million counts per second. We report here on the concept, design, and initial performance of the first prototype device.

  4. Isotopic composition analysis and age dating of uranium samples by high resolution gamma ray spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostol, A. I.; Pantelica, A.; Sima, O.; Fugaru, V.

    2016-09-01

    Non-destructive methods were applied to determine the isotopic composition and the time elapsed since last chemical purification of nine uranium samples. The applied methods are based on measuring gamma and X radiations of uranium samples by high resolution low energy gamma spectrometric system with planar high purity germanium detector and low background gamma spectrometric system with coaxial high purity germanium detector. The "Multigroup γ-ray Analysis Method for Uranium" (MGAU) code was used for the precise determination of samples' isotopic composition. The age of the samples was determined from the isotopic ratio 214Bi/234U. This ratio was calculated from the analyzed spectra of each uranium sample, using relative detection efficiency. Special attention is paid to the coincidence summing corrections that have to be taken into account when performing this type of analysis. In addition, an alternative approach for the age determination using full energy peak efficiencies obtained by Monte Carlo simulations with the GESPECOR code is described.

  5. High-Energy Cosmology: gamma rays and neutrinos from beyond the galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Dermer, C D

    2006-01-01

    Our knowledge of the high-energy universe will change dramatically over the next several years as new astronomical detectors of high-energy radiation reach their design sensitivities. Besides Swift and HESS, which are already making important discoveries, these include the ground-based imaging air-Cherenkov telescopes VERITAS and MAGIC, the gamma-ray space telescopes GLAST and AGILE, and the particle observatories IceCube and Auger. A formalism for calculating statistical properties of cosmological gamma-ray sources is presented. Application is made to model calculations of the statistical distributions of gamma-ray and neutrino emission from beamed sources, specifically, long-duration GRBs, blazars, and extagalactic microquasars, and unbeamed sources, including normal galaxies, starburst galaxies and clusters. Expressions for the integrated intensities of faint beamed and unbeamed high-energy radiation sources are also derived. A toy model for the background intensity of radiation from dark-matter annihilati...

  6. Observations with the High Altitude GAmma Ray (HAGAR) telescope array in the Indian Himalayas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britto, R. J.; Acharya, B. S.; Anupama, G. C.; Bhatt, N.; Bhattacharjee, P.; Bhattacharya, S. S.; Chitnis, V. R.; Cowsik, R.; Dorji, N.; Duhan, S. K.; Gothe, K. S.; Kamath, P. U.; Koul, R.; Mahesh, P. K.; Mitra, A.; Nagesh, B. K.; Parmar, N. K.; Prabhu, T. P.; Rannot, R. C.; Rao, S. K.; Saha, L.; Saleem, F.; Saxena, A. K.; Sharma, S. K.; Shukla, A.; Singh, B. B.; Srinivasan, R.; Srinivasulu, G.; Sudersanan, P. V.; Tickoo, A. K.; Tsewang, D.; Upadhya, S.; Vishwanath, P. R.; Yadav, K. K.

    2010-12-01

    For several decades, it was thought that astrophysical sources emit high energy photons within the energy range of the gamma-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum also. These photons originate from interactions of high energy particles from sources involving violent phenomena in the Universe (supernovae, pulsars, Active Galactic Nuclei, etc.) with gas and radiation fields. Since the first reliable detections of cosmic gamma rays in the 1970's, improvements in instrumentation have led gamma-ray astronomy to an established branch of modern Astrophysics, with a constant increase in the number of detected sources. But the 30-300 GeV energy range remained sparsely explored until the launch of the Fermi space telescope in June 2008. The ground-based gamma-ray telescope array HAGAR is the first array of atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes established at a so high altitude (4270 m a.s.l.), and was designed to reach a relatively low energy threshold with quite a low mirror area (31 m^2). It is located at Hanle in India, in the Ladakh region of the Himalayas. Regular source observations have begun with the complete setup of 7 telescopes on Sept. 2008. We report and discuss our estimation of the systematics through dark region studies, and present preliminary results from gamma-ray sources in this paper.

  7. Gamma-ray binaries : a bridge between Be stars and high energy astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Lamberts, Astrid

    2014-01-01

    Advances in X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy have opened a new window on our universe and revealed a wide variety of binaries composed of a compact object and a Be star. In Be X-ray binaries, a neutron star accretes the Be disk and truncates it through tidal interactions. Such systems have important X-ray outbursts, some related to the disk structure. In other systems, strong gamma ray emission is observed. In gamma-ray binaries, the neutron star is not accreting but driving a highly relativistic wind. The wind collision region presents similarities to colliding wind binaries composed of massive stars. The high energy emission is coming from particles being accelerated at the relativistic shock. I will review the physics of X-ray and gamma-ray binaries, focusing particularly on the recent developments on gamma-ray binaries. I will describe physical mechanisms such as relativistic hydrodynamics, tidal forces and non thermal emission. I will highlight how high energy astrophysics can shed a new light on Be star ph...

  8. The galactic center arc as source of high energy gamma-rays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pohl, M.

    1997-01-01

    of high-energy electrons coincides with the sickle region (G0.18-0.04), as indicated by the radio data, then the ambient far-infrared (FIR) photons can be up-scattered to gamma-rays by inverse-Compton interaction with the young high-energy electrons. We solve the continuity equation for the electrons...

  9. Diffuse emission of high-energy neutrinos from gamma-ray burst fireballs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamborra, I.; Ando, S.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been suggested as possible sources of the high-energy neutrino flux recently detected by the IceCube telescope. We revisit the fireball emission model and elaborate an analytical prescription to estimate the high-energy neutrino prompt emission from pion and kaon decays,

  10. Interferon gamma, interferon-gamma-induced-protein 10, and tuberculin responses of children at high risk of tuberculosis infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrucci, Roberta; Abu Amer, Nabil; Gurgel, Ricardo Queiroz;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children in contact with adults with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) are at risk for infection and disease progression, and chemoprophylaxis may reduce this risk. The identification of infection is based on the tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon-gamma (INF-gamma) release assays....... Other biomarkers such as interferon-gamma-induced-protein 10 (IP-10) may have potential for the diagnosis of latent TB infections. OBJECTIVES: To describe IP-10 concentrations and their association to TST and INF-gamma responses in children recently exposed to adults with smear-positive TB in Brazil...

  11. High energy (gamma)-ray emission from the starburst nucleus of NGC 253

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingo-Santamaria, E; Torres, D F

    2005-06-15

    The high density medium that characterizes the central regions of starburst galaxies and its power to accelerate particles up to relativistic energies make these objects good candidates as {gamma}-rays sources. In this paper, a self-consistent model of the multifrequency emission of the starburst galaxy NGC 253, from radio to gamma-rays, is presented. The model is in agreement with all current measurements and provides predictions for the high energy behavior of the NGC 253 central region. Prospects for observations with the HESS array and GLAST satellite are especially discussed.

  12. Near-field high-energy spectroscopic gamma imaging using a rotation modulation collimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Amy C.; Turkington, Timothy G.; Tourassi, Georgia D.; Floyd, Carey E.

    2008-11-01

    Certain trace elements are vital to the body and elemental imbalances can be indicators of certain diseases including cancer and liver diseases. Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography (NSECT) is being developed as a spectroscopic imaging technique to non-invasively and non-destructively measure and image elemental concentrations within the body. A region of interest is illuminated via a high-energy beam of neutrons that scatter inelastically with elemental nuclei within the body. The excited nuclei then relax by emitting characteristic gamma rays. Acquiring the gamma spectrum in a tomographic manner allows not only the identification of elements, but also the formation of images representing spatial distributions of specific elements. We are developing a high-energy position-sensitive gamma camera that allows full illumination of the entire region of interest. Because current scintillation crystal based position-sensitive gamma cameras operate in too low of an energy range, we are adapting high-energy gamma imaging techniques used in space-based imaging. A high purity germanium (HPGe) detector provides high-resolution energy spectra while a rotating modulation collimator (RMC) placed in front of the detector modulates the incoming signal to provide spatial information. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe the near-field RMC geometry, which varies greatly from the infinite-focus space-based applications and how it modulates the incident gamma flux. A simple geometric model is presented and then used to reconstruct two-dimensional planar images of both simulated point sources and extended sources.

  13. Fermi Observations of high-energy gamma-ray emissions from GRB 080916C

    CERN Document Server

    Abdo, A A; Arimoto, M; Asano, K; Atwood, W B; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Band, D L; Barbiellini, Guido; Baring, Matthew G; Bastieri, Denis; Battelino, M; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellardi, F; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Bhat, P N; Bissaldi, E; Blandford, R D; Bloom, Elliott D; Bogaert, G; Bogart, J R; Bonamente, E; Bonnell, J; Borgland, A W; Bouvier, A; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Briggs, M S; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, Thompson H; Burrows, David N; Busetto, Giovanni; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Ceccanti, M; Cecchi, C; Celotti, Annalisa; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C.C.Teddy; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Cominsky, Lynn R; Connaughton, V; Conrad, J; Costamante, L; Cutini, S; DeKlotz, M; Dermer, C D; De Angelis, Alessandro; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dingus, B L; do Couto e Silva, Eduardo; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Edmonds, Y; Evans, P A; Fabiani, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Finke, Justin D; Fishman, G; Focke, W B; Frailis, M; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Glanzman, Thomas Lynn; Godfrey, Gary L; Goldstein, A; Granot, J; Greiner, J; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M H; Grove, J.Eric; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Haller, G; Hanabata, Y; Harding, Alice K; Hayashida, M; Hays, Elizabeth A; Hernando Morata, J A; Hoover, A; Hughes, R E; Johannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, Tsuneyoshi; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kavelaars, A; Kawai, N; Kelly, H; Kennea, J; Kerr, M; Kippen, R M; Knodlseder, J; Kocevski, D; Kocian, M L; Komin, N; Kouveliotou, C; Kuehn, Frederick Gabriel Ivar; Kuss, Michael; Lande, J; Landriu, D; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Lavalley, C; Lee, B; Lee, S H; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lichti, G G; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, Pasquale; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Marangelli, B; Mazziotta, M N; McBreen, Sheila; McEnery, J E; McGlynn, S; Meegan, C; Miszaros, P; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Minuti, M; Mirizzi, N; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Moretti, E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, Igor Vladimirovich; Murgia, Simona; Nakamori, T; Nelson, D; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, Takashi; Okumura, Akira; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paciesas, W S; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Perri, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Petrosian, Vahe; Pinchera, M; Piron, F; Porter, Troy A; Preece, R; Rainr, S; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Rando, R; Rapposelli, E; Razzano, M; Razzaque, Soebur; Rea, N; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, Thierry; Reyes, Luis C; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Parkinson, P.M.Saz; Scargle, J D; Schalk, T L; Segal, K N; Sgro, C; Shimokawabe, T; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Stamatikos, M; Starck, Jean-Luc; Stecker, Floyd William; Steinle, H; Stephens, T E; Strickman, M S; Suson, Daniel J; Tagliaferri, G.; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Tenze, A; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, Diego F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Turri, M; Tuvi, S; Usher, T L; van der Horst, A J; Vigiani, L; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; von Kienlin, A; Waite, A P; Williams, D A; Wilson-Hodge, C; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wu, X F; Yamazaki, R; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are highly energetic explosions signaling the death of massive stars in distant galaxies. The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi Observatory together record GRBs over a broad energy range spanning about 7 decades of gammaray energy. In September 2008, Fermi observed the exceptionally luminous GRB 080916C, with the largest apparent energy release yet measured. The high-energy gamma rays are observed to start later and persist longer than the lower energy photons. A simple spectral form fits the entire GRB spectrum, providing strong constraints on emission models. The known distance of the burst enables placing lower limits on the bulk Lorentz factor of the outflow and on the quantum gravity mass.

  14. First light at the HAWC high altitude TeV gamma ray detector in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorino, Daniel

    2012-03-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory -- currently under construction at 4100m altitude at Pico de Orizaba in Mexico -- is a high duty cycle, large field of view detector for gamma rays at TeV energies. The HAWC Observatory will locate and provide spectra for extended and point sources of TeV gamma rays, probe the cosmic ray anisotropy, search for gamma ray bursts, and set limits on extragalactic background light. Data taking at our smaller test array (VAMOS) is currently under way. I will present results of a first study of several months of VAMOS data, including a first skymap, performance tests, and a search for the shadow of the moon in cosmic rays.

  15. Diffuse Galactic Gamma Rays at Intermediate and High Latitudes, Constraints on ISM Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Tavakoli, Maryam; Evoli, Carmelo; Ullio, Piero

    2011-01-01

    The spectral data on the diffuse Galactic gamma-rays, at medium and high latitudes (|b| > 10) and energies of 1-100 GeV, recently published by the Fermi Collaboration are used to produce a novel study on the gamma-ray emissivity in the Galaxy. We focus on analyzing the properties of propagation of cosmic rays (CRs), using the publicly available DRAGON code. We critically address some of the models for the interstellar HI and H2 gas distributions commonly used in the literature, as well as test a variety of propagation models. Each model assumes a distinct global profile for the diffusion and the re-acceleration of CRs. Fitting propagation parameters to well measured local CRs such as, the B/C ratio, protons, antiprotons and electron, positron fluxes, we evaluate the gamma-ray spectra at medium and high latitudes in order to place further constraints on these propagation models.

  16. High gamma irradiation doses and long storage times reduce soybean seed quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danúbia Aparecida Costa Nobre

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available High quality seeds are required for soybean production. This study evaluated the effect of gamma irradiation and storage time on seed quality in soybean lines VX04-6828 and VX04-5692. Seeds were gamma irradiated (60Co with 0, 50, 150, and 250 Gy. After the first seed production cycle (M1, the harvested seeds were stored in the laboratory for 0, 2, 4, and 6 months. Moisture content, seed quality (germination rate, dead seeds, and normal and abnormal seedlings, and seed vigor (first germination count, germination index, and seedling length were determined. Data were submitted to analysis of variance for each soybean line using a 4 x 4 factorial design (four storage times x four gamma irradiation doses. Response surfaces were constructed based on the F test significance (p ? 0.05. VX04-5692 seeds were more sensitive to gamma radiation than were VX04-6828 seeds. Soybean seed quality was highest in M2 seeds derived from seeds irradiated with less than 100 Gy and stored for up to two months. High gamma irradiation doses and long storage times reduced soybean seed quality.

  17. EGRET upper limits on the high-energy gamma-ray emission of galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, O; Sreekumar, P; Mattox, J R

    2003-01-01

    We report EGRET upper limits on the high-energy gamma-ray emission from clusters of galaxies. EGRET observations between 1991 and 2000 were analyzed at positions of 58 individual clusters from a flux-limited sample of nearby X-ray bright galaxy clusters. Subsequently, a coadded image from individual galaxy clusters has been analyzed using an adequately adapted diffuse gamma-ray foreground model. The resulting 2 sigma upper limit for the average cluster is \\~ 6 x 10^{-9} cm^{-2} s^{-1} for E > 100 MeV. Implications of the non--detection of prominent individual clusters and of the general inability to detect the X-ray brightest galaxy clusters as a class of gamma-ray emitters are discussed. We compare our results with model predictions on the high-energy gamma-ray emission from galaxy clusters as well as with recent claims of an association between unidentified or unresolved gamma-ray sources and Abell clusters of galaxies and find these contradictory.

  18. Gamma-gamma coincidence performance of LaBr3:Ce scintillation detectors vs HPGe detectors in high count-rate scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drescher, A; Yoho, M; Landsberger, S; Durbin, M; Biegalski, S; Meier, D; Schwantes, J

    2017-04-01

    A radiation detection system consisting of two cerium doped lanthanum bromide (LaBr3:Ce) scintillation detectors in a gamma-gamma coincidence configuration has been used to demonstrate the advantages that coincident detection provides relative to a single detector, and the advantages that LaBr3:Ce detectors provide relative to high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. Signal to noise ratios of select photopeak pairs for these detectors have been compared to high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors in both single and coincident detector configurations in order to quantify the performance of each detector configuration. The efficiency and energy resolution of LaBr3:Ce detectors have been determined and compared to HPGe detectors. Coincident gamma-ray pairs from the radionuclides (152)Eu and (133)Ba have been identified in a sample that is dominated by (137)Cs. Gamma-gamma coincidence successfully reduced the Compton continuum from the large (137)Cs peak, revealed several coincident gamma energies characteristic of these nuclides, and improved the signal-to-noise ratio relative to single detector measurements. LaBr3:Ce detectors performed at count rates multiple times higher than can be achieved with HPGe detectors. The standard background spectrum consisting of peaks associated with transitions within the LaBr3:Ce crystal has also been significantly reduced. It is shown that LaBr3:Ce detectors have the unique capability to perform gamma-gamma coincidence measurements in very high count rate scenarios, which can potentially benefit nuclear safeguards in situ measurements of spent nuclear fuel. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Interferon gamma, interferon-gamma-induced-protein 10, and tuberculin responses of children at high risk of tuberculosis infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrucci, Roberta; Abu Amer, Nabil; Gurgel, Ricardo Queiroz

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children in contact with adults with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) are at risk for infection and disease progression, and chemoprophylaxis may reduce this risk. The identification of infection is based on the tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon-gamma (INF-gamma) release assays. Ot...

  20. Scattering-absorbing method for the detection of 16.7 MeV high-energy pulse gamma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tan Xinjian; Ouyang Xiaoping; Wang Qunshu

    2009-01-01

    Based on theoretical calculation and Monte Carlo simulation, this paper proposes a new method for the diagno-sing of 16.7 MeV high-energy pulse gamma, named "scattering absorption method". The ratio of the sensitivity of high-energy gamma to that of the low-energy background gamma can reach 106 to 108 by this new method. The sensitivity of 16.7 McV high-energy gamma ranges from 10-21 to 10-16 C·cm2. It's better than the traditional method which is based on the magnetic analyzer and Chcrankov detector on some aspects.

  1. Gamma-ray astronomy: From Fermi up to the HAWC high-energy {gamma}-ray observatory in Sierra Negra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carraminana, Alberto [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica Luis Enrique Erro 1, Tonantzintla, Puebla 72840 (Mexico); Collaboration: HAWC Collaboration

    2013-06-12

    Gamma-rays represent the most energetic electromagnetic window for the study of the Universe. They are studied both from space at MeV and GeV energies, with instruments like the Fermi{gamma}-ray Space Telescope, and at TeV energies with ground based instruments profiting of particle cascades in the atmosphere and of the Cerenkov radiation of charged particles in the air or in water. The Milagro gamma-ray observatory represented the first instrument to successfully implement the water Cerenkov technique for {gamma}-ray astronomy, opening the ground for the more sensitive HAWC {gamma}-ray observatory, currently under development in the Sierra Negra site and already providing early science results.

  2. Proof of principle of a high-spatial-resolution, resonant-response gamma-ray detector for Gamma Resonance Absorption in 14N

    CERN Document Server

    Brandis, M; Vartsky, D; Friedman, E; Kreslo, I; Mardor, I; Dangendorf, V; Levi, S; Mor, I; Bar, D

    2011-01-01

    The development of a mm-spatial-resolution, resonant-response detector based on a micrometric glass capillary array filled with liquid scintillator is described. This detector was developed for Gamma Resonance Absorption (GRA) in 14N. GRA is an automatic-decision radiographic screening technique that combines high radiation penetration (the probe is a 9.17 MeV gamma ray) with very good sensitivity and specificity to nitrogenous explosives. Detailed simulation of the detector response to electrons and protons generated by the 9.17 MeV gamma-rays was followed by a proof-of-principle experiment, using a mixed gamma-ray and neutron source. Towards this, a prototype capillary detector was assembled, including the associated filling and readout systems. Simulations and experimental results indeed show that proton tracks are distinguishable from electron tracks at relevant energies, on the basis of a criterion that combines track length and light intensity per unit length.

  3. Search for High Energy Gamma Rays from an X-ray Selected Blazar Sample

    CERN Document Server

    La Perez, I C; Boyle, P J; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Carter-Lewis, D A; Celik, O; Cui, W; Dowdall, C; Duke, C; Falcone, A; Fegan, D J; Fegan, S J; Finley, J P; Fortson, L F; Gaidos, J A; Gibbs, K; Gammell, S; Hall, J; Hall, T A; Hillas, A M; Holder, J; Horan, D; Jordan, M; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D; Kildea, J; Knapp, J; Kosack, K; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Le Bohec, S; Linton, E T; Lloyd-Evans, J; Moriarty, P; Müller, D; Nagai, T N; Ong, R A; Page, M; Pallassini, R; Petry, D; Power-Mooney, B; Quinn, J; Rebillot, P; Reynolds, P T; Rose, H J; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Swordy, S P; Vasilev, V V; Wakely, S P; Walker, G; Weekes, T C

    2003-01-01

    Our understanding of blazars has been greatly increased in recent years by extensive multi-wavelength observations, particularly in the radio, X-ray and gamma-ray regions. Over the past decade the Whipple 10m telescope has contributed to this with the detection of 5 BL Lacertae objects at very high gamma-ray energies. The combination of multi-wavelength data has shown that blazars follow a well-defined sequence in terms of their broadband spectral properties. Together with providing constraints on emission models, this information has yielded a means by which potential sources of TeV emission may be identified and predictions made as to their possible gamma-ray flux. We have used the Whipple telescope to search for TeV gamma-ray emission from eight objects selected from a list of such candidates. No evidence has been found for VHE emission from the objects in our sample, and upper limits have been derived for the mean gamma-ray flux above 390GeV. These flux upper limits are compared with the model predictions...

  4. The Escape of High-Energy Photons from Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G; Baring, Matthew G.; Harding, Alice K.

    1997-01-01

    Eleven bright gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by BATSE have also been seen at much higher energies by EGRET, six at energies above 10 MeV. Such observations imply that these bursts are optically thin to photon-photon pair production at all observed energies. For bursts more than about 30pc away, internal transparency can be achieved only if the source is moving with a relativistic bulk Lorentz factor $\\Gamma\\gg 1$, or if the radiation is highly beamed. Early calculations of $\\gamma\\gamma\\to e^+e^-$ considerations for GRBs were limited to cases of a beam with opening half-angle $\\Thetab\\sim 1/\\Gamma$, or expansions of infinitely thin spherical shells. This paper presents our extension of pair production optical depth calculations in relativistically expanding sources to more general geometries, including shells of finite thickness and arbitrary opening angle. The problem is reduced analytically to a single integral in the broadly applicable case of observing photons along the axis of the expansion. We find th...

  5. Simulation experiments for gamma-ray mapping of planetary surfaces: Scattering of high-energy neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueckner, J.; Englert, P.; Reedy, R. C.; Waenke, H.

    1986-01-01

    The concentration and distribution of certain elements in surface layers of planetary objects specify constraints on models of their origin and evolution. This information can be obtained by means of remote sensing gamma-ray spectroscopy, as planned for a number of future space missions, i.e., Mars, Moon, asteroids, and comets. To investigate the gamma-rays made by interactions of neutrons with matter, thin targets of different composition were placed between a neutron-source and a high-resolution germanium spectrometer. Gamma-rays in the range of 0.1 to 8 MeV were accumulated. In one set of experiments a 14-MeV neutron generator using the T(d,n) reaction as neutron-source was placed in a small room. Scattering in surrounding walls produced a spectrum of neutron energies from 14 MeV down to thermal. This complex neutron-source induced mainly neutron-capture lines and only a few scattering lines. As a result of the set-up, there was a considerable background of discrete lines from surrounding materials. A similar situation exists under planetary exploration conditions: gamma-rays are induced in the planetary surface as well as in the spacecraft. To investigate the contribution of neutrons with higher energies, an experiment for the measurement of prompt gamma radiation was set up at the end of a beam-line of an isochronous cyclotron.

  6. Identification of hidden fissile materials using high-pressure xenon gamma-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulin, Sergey E.; Dmitrenko, Valery V.; Grachev, V. M.; Sokolov, D. V.; Uteshev, Z. M.; Chernysheva, I. V.; Vlasik, K. F.

    2001-12-01

    The description of the High Pressure Xenon Gamma-Ray Detector (HPXeD) and its main characteristics are considered in the context of the search for hidden fissile materials. The results of HPXeD measurements of gamma-radiation from radioactive sources, which are covered by lead, iron and aluminium shields, are analyzed and discussed. The use of special software for processing data is shown to improve the potential of radioactive material detection, including the identification and estimation of the main protective shield parameters.

  7. Very high energy gamma rays from the direction of Sagittarius A*

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonian, F; Aye, K M; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berge, D; Berghaus, P; Bernlöhr, K; Bolz, O; Boisson, C; Borgmeier, C; Breitling, F; Brown, A M; Bussons-Gordo, J; Chadwick, P M; Chitnis, V R; Chounet, L M; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Degrange, B; Djannati-Ata, A; O'Connor-Drury, L; Ergin, T; Espigat, P; Feinstein, F; Fleury, P; Fontaine, G; Funk, S; Gallant, Y; Giebels, B; Gillessen, S; Goret, P; Guy, J; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Horns, D; De Jager, O C; Jung, I; Khelifi, B; Komin, Nu; Konopelko, A; Latham, I J; Le Gallou, R; Lemoine, M; Lemiere, A; Leroy, N; Lohse, T; Marcowith, A; Masterson, C; McComb, T J L; De Naurois, Mathieu; Nolan, S J; Noutsos, A; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Ouchrif, M; Panter, M; Pelletier, G; Pita, S; Pohl, M; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Raux, J; Rayner, S M; Redondo, I; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ripken, J; Rivoal, M; Rob, L; Rolland, L; Rowell, G; Sahakian, V V; Sauge, L; Schlenker, S; Schlickeiser, R; Schuster, C; Schwanke, U; Siewert, M; Sol, H; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Tavernet, J P; Theoret, C G; Tluczykont, M; Van der Walt, D J; Vasileiadis, G; Vincent, P; Visser, B; Völk, H J; Wagner, S J

    2004-01-01

    We report the detection of a point-like source of very high energy (VHE) gamma-rays coincident within 1' of Sgr A*, obtained with the H.E.S.S. array of Cherenkov telescopes. The gamma-rays exhibit a power-law energy spectrum with a spectral index of -2.2 +/- 0.09 +/- 0.15 and a flux above the 165 GeV threshold of (1.82 +/- 0.22) \\times 10^{-7} m^{-2} s^{-1}. The measured flux and spectrum differ substantially from recent results reported in particular by the CANGAROO collaboration.

  8. The COS-B experiment and mission. [high energy extraterrestrial gamma radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    The COS-B satellite carries a single experiment, capable of detecting gamma rays with energies greater than 30 MeV to study the spatial, energy, and time characteristics of high-energy radiation of galactic and extragalactic origin. The capability to search for gamma ray pulsations is enhanced by the inclusion in the payload of a proportional counter sensitive of X-rays of 2 to 12 keV. The experiment was calibrated using particle accelerators. The results of these measurements are presented, and the performance of the system in orbit is discussed.

  9. SAS-2 observations of high energy gamma rays from discrete sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniffen, D. A.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Lamb, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    The SAS-2 identified six localized high energy (greater than 35 MeV) gamma ray sources. Four of these are the radio pulsars, PSR 0531+21, PSR 0833-45, PSR 1818-04, and PSR 1717-46 discovered in a search of 75 radio pulsars. The fact that only one of these is observed in X-rays, and the significant differences in pulse profiles in the gamma ray and radio observations, leads to the speculation that different mechanisms are involved.

  10. Constraints on the Extragalactic Background Light from Very High Energy Gamma-Ray Observations of Blazars

    OpenAIRE

    Finke, Justin D.; Razzaque, Soebur

    2009-01-01

    The extragalactic background light (EBL) from the infrared to the ultraviolet is difficult to measure directly, but can be constrained with a variety of methods. EBL photons absorb gamma-rays from distant blazars, allowing one to use blazar spectra from atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (ACTs) to put upper limits on the EBL by assuming a blazar source spectrum. Here we apply a simple technique, similar to the one developed by Schroedter (2005), to the most recent very-high energy (VHE) gamma-r...

  11. High-energy {gamma}-irradiation effect on physical ageing in Ge-Se glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovchak, R. [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska Str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine); Kozdras, A. [Department of Physics of Opole University of Technology, 75 Ozimska Str., Opole, PL-45370 (Poland); Department of Economy of Academy of Management and Administration in Opole, 18 Niedzialkowski Str., Opole, PL-45085 (Poland); Kozyukhin, S. [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of RAS, Leninsky Pr. 31, Moscow 199991 (Russian Federation); Shpotyuk, O. [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska Str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine); Institute of Physics of Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15 al. Armii Krajowej, Czestochowa, PL-42201 (Poland)], E-mail: shpotyuk@novas.lviv.ua

    2009-09-01

    Effect of Co{sup 60} {gamma}-irradiation on physical ageing in binary Ge{sub x}Se{sub 100-x} glasses (5 {<=} x {<=} 27) is studied using conventional differential scanning calorimetry method. It is shown, that high-energy irradiation leads to additional increase in the glass transition temperature and endothermic peak area near the glass transition region over the one induced by isochronal storage of these glasses at normal conditions. This {gamma}-induced physical ageing is shown to be well-pronounced in Se-rich glasses (x < 20), while only negligible changes are recorded for glasses of 20 {<=} x {<=} 27 compositions. The effect under consideration is supposed to be associated with {gamma}-activated structural relaxation of the glass network towards thermodynamic equilibrium of supercooled liquid.

  12. SAS-2 observations of the high energy gamma radiation from the Vela region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    Data from a scan of the galactic plane by the SAS-B high energy gamma ray experiment in the region 250 deg smaller than 12 smaller than 290 deg show a statistically significant excess over the general radiation from the galactic plane for gamma radiation of energy larger than 100 MeV. If the enhanced gamma radiation results from interactions of cosmic rays with galactic matter, as the energy spectrum suggests, it seems reasonable to associate the enhancement with large scale galactic features, such as spiral arm segments in that direction, or with the region surrounding the Vela supernova remnant with which PSR 0833-45 is associated. If the excess is attributed to cosmic rays released from the supernova interacting with the interstellar matter in that region, than on the order of 3 x 10 to the 50th power ergs would have been released by that supernova in the form of cosmic rays.

  13. Monitoring performance of the cameras under the high dose-rate gamma ray environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jai Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Jeong, Kyung Min

    2014-05-01

    CCD/CMOS cameras, loaded on a robot system, are generally used as the eye of the robot and monitoring unit. A major problem that arises when dealing with images provided by CCD/CMOS cameras under severe accident situations of a nuclear power plant is the presence of speckles owing to the high dose-rate gamma irradiation fields. To use a CCD/CMOS camera as a monitoring unit in a high radiation area, the legibility of the camera image in such intense gamma-radiation fields should therefore be defined. In this paper, the authors describe the monitoring index as a figure of merit of the camera's legibleness under a high dose-rate gamma ray irradiation environment. From a low dose-rate (10 Gy h) to a high dose-rate (200 Gy h) level, the legible performances of the cameras owing to the speckles are evaluated. The numbers of speckles generated by gamma ray irradiation in the camera image are calculated by an image processing technique. The legibility of the sensor indicator (thermo/hygrometer) owing to the number of speckles is also presented.

  14. Expression of interferon gamma by a highly virulent Newcastle disease virus decreases its pathogenicity in chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infection of chickens with highly virulent NDV results in rapid death, which is preceded by increased expression of interferon gamma (IFN-g) in target tissues. IFN-g is a cytokine that has pleiotropic biological effects including intrinsic antiviral activity and immunomodulatory effects. Here we a...

  15. High gamma-ray measurement using optical emission of ceramic material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakuta, Tsunemi; Sakasai, Kaoru; Yamagishi, Hideshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Nakazawa, Masaharu

    1996-07-01

    This paper describes the fluorescence phenomena in Zr-O ceramic under expose to high gamma-ray and fission neutron source. In addition, the paper also discusses the possibility of ionizing radiation detection in the core region of reactor. (J.P.N.)

  16. High affinity, bioavailable 3-amino-1,4-benzodiazepine-based gamma-secretase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Andrew P; Nadin, Alan; Talbot, Adam C; Clarke, Earl E; Harrison, Timothy; Lewis, Huw D; Reilly, Michael; Wrigley, Jonathan D J; Castro, José L

    2003-11-17

    In this paper, we describe the development of a novel series of high affinity, orally bioavailable 3-amino-1,4 benzodiazepine-based gamma-secretase inhibitors for the potential treatment of Alzheimer's disease. We disclose structure-activity relationships based around the 1, 3 and 5 positions of the benzodiazepine core structure.

  17. COS-B observations of the high energy gamma radiation from the galactic disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, J.

    1976-01-01

    During the first months of operation, COS-B has observed galactic high energy gamma rays from the galactic disc. In the galactic center and Vela regions the disc emission distribution was measured. From these data the existence of a local ( 1 kpc) and a distant ( 3 kpc) emitting region is apparent in the general direction of the inner galaxy.

  18. High spatial resolution X-ray and gamma ray imaging system using diffraction crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smither, Robert K.

    2011-05-17

    A method and a device for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation are provided. The device comprises a plurality of arrays, with each array comprising a plurality of elements comprising a first collimator, a diffracting crystal, a second collimator, and a detector.

  19. High energy neutrino and gamma ray transients from relativistic supernova shock breakouts

    CERN Document Server

    Kashiyama, Kazumi; Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Gao, Shan; Mészáros, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Relativistic shocks that accompany supernovae (SNe) produce X-ray burst emissions as they break out in the dense circumstellar medium around the progenitors. This phenomenon is sometimes associated with peculiar low-luminosity gamma-ray bursts (LL GRBs). Here, we investigate the high energy neutrino and gamma-ray counterparts of such a class of SNe. Just beyond the shock breakout radius, particle acceleration in the collisionless shock starts to operate in the presence of breakout photons. We show that protons may be accelerated to sufficiently high energies and produce high energy neutrinos and gamma rays via the photomeson interaction. These neutrinos and gamma rays may be detectable from 10 Mpc away by IceCube/KM3Net as multi-TeV transients almost simultaneously with the X-ray burst emission, and even from 100 Mpc away with follow-up observations by CTA using a wide-field sky monitor like Swift as a trigger. A statistical technique using a stacking approach could also be possible for the detection, with th...

  20. High-frequency gravitational waves from magnetars and gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Wen, Hao; Li, Jin; Fang, Zhenyun

    2016-01-01

    Extremely powerful astrophysical electromagnetic (EM) system could lead to significant energy-momentum tensor as possible source of high-frequency gravitational waves (HFGWs). Here based on properties of magnetars and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), we address 'Gamma-HFGWs' caused by ultra-strong EM radiations (in the radiation-dominated phase of GRBs fireball) interacting with super-high magnetar surface magnetic fields (10^{11}Tesla). By certain parameters of distance and power, the Gamma-HFGWs would have amplitude of 10^{-41} at 10^{20}Hz, and such very high frequency effectively compensate their weak amplitude and thus would cause perturbed EM waves of 10^{-20}Watt/m^2 in proposed HFGW detection system based on EM response to GWs. Particularly, predicted Gamma-HFGWs can possess distinctive pulse-like envelopes with characteristic shapes, which could be exclusive features helpful to distinguish them from background noise. Results obtained suggest that magnetars could involve in possible astrophysical EM sources o...

  1. SAS-2 High energy gamma-ray observations of the Vela pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Oegelman, H. B.

    1975-01-01

    The second Small Astronomy Satellite high-energy (35 MeV) gamma-ray telescope detected pulsed gamma-ray emission at the radio period from PSR 0833-45, the Vela pulsar, as well as an unpulsed flux from the Vela region. The pulsed emission consists of two peaks, one following the radio peak by about 13 msec, and the other 0.4 period after the first. The luminosity of the pulsed emission above 100 MeV from Vela is about 0.1 that of the pulsar NP0532 in the Crab nebula, whereas the pulsed emission from Vela at optical wavelengths is less than 0.0004 that from the Crab. The relatively high intensity of the pulsed gamma-ray emission and the double peak structure, compared to the single pulse in the radio emission, suggests that the high energy gamma-ray pulsar emission may be produced under different conditions from those found at lower energies.

  2. Neutron detection in a high-gamma field using solution-grown stilbene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourne, M.M., E-mail: mmbourne@umich.edu [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Clarke, S.D., E-mail: clarkesd@umich.edu [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Adamowicz, N., E-mail: nicka@umich.edu [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Pozzi, S.A., E-mail: pozzisa@umich.edu [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Zaitseva, N., E-mail: zaitseva1@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Carman, L., E-mail: carman1@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2016-01-11

    A solution-based technique for growing large-volume stilbene scintillators was developed in 2013; crystals up to diameters of 10 cm, or larger, have been grown while preserving excellent pulse shape discrimination (PSD) properties. The goal of this study is to evaluate the PSD capabilities of 5.08 by 5.08-cm stilbene crystals grown by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Inrad Optics when exposed to a 1000 to 1 gamma ray-neutron ratio and operating at a 100-kHz count rate. Results were compared to an equivalent EJ-309 liquid scintillation detector. {sup 252}Cf neutron pulses were recorded in two experiments where {sup 60}Co and {sup 137}Cs sources created the high-gamma field. The high count rate created numerous double pulses that were cleaned using fractional and template approaches designed to remove double pulses while preserving neutron counts. PSD was performed at a threshold of 42 keVee (440-keV proton) for stilbene and 60 keVee (610-keV proton) for EJ-309 liquid. The lower threshold in stilbene resulted in a neutron intrinsic efficiency of approximately 14.5%, 10% higher than EJ-309 liquid, for bare {sup 252}Cf and 13% for {sup 252}Cf in the high-gamma field. Despite the lower threshold, the gamma misclassification rate in stilbene was approximately 3×10{sup −6}, nearly a factor-of-five lower than what we found with the EJ-309 liquid.

  3. A new very high energy gamma ray detector using two 11 meter diameter parabolic mirrors in coincidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuemer, O. T.; Siemieniewski, J.; Zych, A. D.; Akerlof, C. W.; Horner, S. D.; Arbic, B.; Meyer, D., I.; Tschirhart, R. S.; Wheaton, W. A.; MacCallum, C.

    Gamma Star, a new Very High Energy (VHE) gamma ray detector has been constructed at the Solar Thermal Test Facility of Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The detector is based on three large parabolic solar concentrators with a total collection area of 228 square meters. The goal of this experiment is to find ways of significantly improving current techniques of ground-based gamma ray observations. Initial tests, performed in the fall of 1986, are reported here.

  4. Neutron detection in a high gamma-ray background with EJ-301 and EJ-309 liquid scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevanato, L., E-mail: luca.stevanato@pd.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia dell' Universita di Padova, Fisica ' Galileo Galilei' , Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Cester, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia dell' Universita di Padova, Fisica ' Galileo Galilei' , Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Nebbia, G. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Viesti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia dell' Universita di Padova, Fisica ' Galileo Galilei' , Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2012-10-21

    Using a fast digitizer, the neutron-gamma discrimination capability of the new liquid scintillator EJ-309 is compared with that obtained using standard EJ-301. Moreover the capability of both the scintillation detectors to identify a weak neutron source in a high gamma-ray background is demonstrated. The probability of neutron detection is PD=95% at 95% confidence level for a gamma-ray background corresponding to a dose rate of 100 {mu}Sv/h.

  5. Very-high energy gamma-ray astronomy: A 23-year success story in high-energy astroparticle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Lorenz, Eckart; 10.1140/epjh/e2012-30016-x

    2012-01-01

    Very-high energy (VHE) gamma quanta contribute only a minuscule fraction - below one per million - to the flux of cosmic rays. Nevertheless, being neutral particles they are currently the best "messengers" of processes from the relativistic/ultra-relativistic Universe because they can be extrapolated back to their origin. The window of VHE gamma rays was opened only in 1989 by the Whipple collaboration, reporting the observation of TeV gamma rays from the Crab nebula. After a slow start, this new field of research is now rapidly expanding with the discovery of more than 150 VHE gamma-ray emitting sources. Progress is intimately related with the steady improvement of detectors and rapidly increasing computing power. We give an overview of the early attempts before and around 1989 and the progress after the pioneering work of the Whipple collaboration. The main focus of this article is on the development of experimental techniques for Earth-bound gamma-ray detectors; consequently, more emphasis is given to thos...

  6. Phase Stability of Epsilon and Gamma Hniw (CL-20) at High-Pressure and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gump, Jared C.; Stoltz, Chad A.; Peiris, Suhithi M.

    2007-12-01

    Hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) is one of the few ingredients developed since World War II to be considered for transition to military use. Five polymorphs have been identified for CL-20 by FTIR measurements (α, β, γ, ɛ, ζ). As CL-20 is transitioned into munitions it will become necessary to predict its response under conditions of detonation, for performance evaluation. Such predictive modeling requires a phase diagram and basic thermodynamic properties of the various phases at high pressure and temperature. Therefore, the epsilon and gamma phases of CL-20 at static high-pressure and temperature were investigated using synchrotron angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction experiments. The samples were compressed and heated using diamond anvil cells (DAC). Pressures and temperatures achieved were around 5 GPa and 240 °C, respectively. The epsilon phase was stable to 6.3 GPa at ambient temperature. When heated at ambient pressure the epsilon phase was sustained to a temperature of 120 °C then underwent a transition to the gamma phase above 125 °C and then thermal decomposition occurred above 150 °C. Upon compression, the gamma phase underwent a phase transition at both ambient temperature and 140 °C. Pressure—volume data for the epsilon and gamma phase at ambient temperature and the epsilon phase at 75 °C were fit to the Birch-Murnaghan formalism to obtain isothermal equations of state.

  7. High-resolution gamma ray attenuation density measurements on mining exploration drill cores, including cut cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, P.-S.; Bourke, A.

    2017-01-01

    Physical property measurements are increasingly important in mining exploration. For density determinations on rocks, one method applicable on exploration drill cores relies on gamma ray attenuation. This non-destructive method is ideal because each measurement takes only 10 s, making it suitable for high-resolution logging. However calibration has been problematic. In this paper we present new empirical, site-specific correction equations for whole NQ and BQ cores. The corrections force back the gamma densities to the "true" values established by the immersion method. For the NQ core caliber, the density range extends to high values (massive pyrite, 5 g/cm3) and the correction is thought to be very robust. We also present additional empirical correction factors for cut cores which take into account the missing material. These "cut core correction factors", which are not site-specific, were established by making gamma density measurements on truncated aluminum cylinders of various residual thicknesses. Finally we show two examples of application for the Abitibi Greenstone Belt in Canada. The gamma ray attenuation measurement system is part of a multi-sensor core logger which also determines magnetic susceptibility, geochemistry and mineralogy on rock cores, and performs line-scan imaging.

  8. X-ray Shield for High Energy Gamma Spectrometry using a n-type HPGe Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Jong In; Yun, Ju Yong [University of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Row, Jeong Hwan; Lee, Ji Yun [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-04-15

    In the last several decades HPGe detectors have been used popularly because of good energy resolution and high efficiency. And HPGe detectors to measure low energy gamma rays also have been developed by several companies. The detectors are generally called as a n-type HPGe detector or LEGe. The commercial n-type HPGe detectors have the front window made from carbonate or beryllium to increase the detection efficiency for low energy photons. For that reason, cascade coincidence summing effects by X- and Gamma rays can be produced. In order to use the n-type HPGe detector for high energy gamma rays, therefore, we should eliminate incidence of X-rays or correct the effects. The correction for X- and Gamma rays might be so complicate and difficult. On the other hand, the summing effects can be terminated by additional X-ray shields at the end cap. In this study, we optimized the thickness of shielding material selected for the purpose. This paper demonstrates the optimization process and the shield' s applicability for detection efficiency calibration and radioactivity analysis.

  9. Aging of magnesium stearate under high doses gamma irradiation and oxidative conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebeau, D.; Beuvier, L.; Cornaton, M. [CEA, DEN, DPC, SECR, LRMO, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Miserque, F. [CEA, DEN, DPC, SCCME, LECA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Tabarant, M. [CEA, DEN, DPC, SEARS, LISL, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Esnouf, S. [CEA, DEN, DPC, SECR, LRMO, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ferry, M., E-mail: muriel.ferry@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DPC, SECR, LRMO, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Magnesium stearate was radio-oxidized at very high doses using gamma-rays. • H{sub 2} emission was estimated as a function of the integrated dose. • Modifications in the organic solid were followed as a function of the integrated dose. • A non-exhaustive degradation mechanism of magnesium stearate was proposed. - Abstract: In nuclear waste packages conditioning processes, magnesium stearate is widely used because of its high lubricating properties. For safety purposes, the radiolytic degradation of these organic materials has to be better understood to be able to predict their aging in repository conditions. This study reports the radiolytic degradation of magnesium stearate, using gamma-rays at room temperature and under air. Modifications were followed using different analytical tools (XPS, ATR-FTIR, ICP-AES, ATG and mass spectrometry). It has been observed that molecules mainly formed up to 1000 kGy of gamma irradiation dose under radio-oxidation are alkanes, hydroperoxides, double bonds in the aliphatic chain, carboxylates with aliphatic chain shorter than the one of stearate and ketones. At a dose of 4000 kGy, dicarboxylic acids are observed: the formation of these molecules needs a dose of at least 1000 kGy to be created under radio-oxidation. These observations allow us to propose a non-exhaustive degradation mechanism of magnesium stearate under gamma-irradiation at room temperature and under air.

  10. Constraining Dark Matter and Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Ray Sources with Fermi-LAT Diffuse Gamma Ray Background

    CERN Document Server

    Kalashev, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    We use the recent measurement of the isotropic $\\gamma$-ray background (IGRB) by Fermi LAT and analysis of the contribution of unresolved point $\\gamma$-ray sources to IGRB to build constraints on the models of ultra-high cosmic rays (UHECR) origin. We also calculate the minimal expected diffuse $\\gamma$-ray flux produced by UHECR interactions with an interstellar photon background. Finally, for the subclass of dark matter (DM) models with decaying weakly interacting massive particles (WIMP), we build constraints on the particle decay time using minimal expected contributions to the IGRB from unresolved point $\\gamma$-ray sources and UHECR.

  11. High-Z Nanoparticle/Polymer Nanocomposites for Gamma-Ray Scintillation Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao

    An affordable and reliable solution for spectroscopic gamma-ray detection has long been sought after due to the needs from research, defense, and medical applications. Scintillators resolve gamma energy by proportionally converting a single high-energy photon into a number of photomultiplier-tube-detectable low-energy photons, which is considered a more affordable solution for general purposes compared to the delicate semiconductor detectors. An ideal scintillator should simultaneously exhibit the following characteristics: 1) high atomic number (Z) for high gamma stopping power and photoelectron production; 2) high light yield since the energy resolution is inversely proportional to the square root of light yield; 3) short emission decay lifetime; and 4) low cost and scalable production. However, commercial scintillators made from either inorganic single crystals or plastics fail to satisfy all requirements due to their intrinsic material properties and fabrication limitations. The concept of adding high-Z constituents into plastic scintillators to harness high Z, low cost, and fast emission in the resulting nanocomposite scintillators is not new in and of itself. Attempts have been made by adding organometallics, quantum dots, and scintillation nanocrystals into the plastic matrix. High-Z organometallics have long been used to improve the Z of plastic scintillators; however, their strong spin-orbit coupling effect entails careful triplet energy matching using expensive triplet emitters to avoid severe quenching of the light yield. On the other hand, reported quantum dot- and nanocrystal-polymer nanocomposites suffer from moderate Z and high optical loss due to aggregation and self-absorption at loadings higher than 10 wt%, limiting their potential for practical application. This dissertation strives to improve the performance of nanoparticle-based nanocomposite scintillators. One focus is to synthesize transparent nanocomposites with higher loadings of high

  12. Search for Very-high-energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts Using the First 18 Months of Data from the HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro, R.; Alvarez, C.; Álvarez, J. D.; Arceo, R.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Avila Rojas, D.; Ayala Solares, H. A.; Barber, A. S.; Bautista-Elivar, N.; Becerril, A.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Bernal, A.; Braun, J.; Brisbois, C.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Capistrán, T.; Carramiñana, A.; Casanova, S.; Castillo, M.; Cotti, U.; Cotzomi, J.; Coutiño deLeón, S.; De la Fuente, E.; De León, C.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz Hernandez, R.; Dingus, B. L.; DuVernois, M. A.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Engel, K.; Fiorino, D. W.; Fraija, N.; García-González, J. A.; Garfias, F.; Gerhardt, M.; González Muñoz, A.; González, M. M.; Goodman, J. A.; Hampel-Arias, Z.; Harding, J. P.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Hernandez, S.; Hona, B.; Hui, C. M.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Iriarte, A.; Jardin-Blicq, A.; Joshi, V.; Kaufmann, S.; Kieda, D.; Lauer, R. J.; Lee, W. H.; Lennarz, D.; León Vargas, H.; Linnemann, J. T.; Longinotti, A. L.; Raya, G. Luis; Luna-García, R.; López-Coto, R.; Malone, K.; Marinelli, S. S.; Martinez, O.; Martinez-Castellanos, I.; Martínez-Castro, J.; Martínez-Huerta, H.; Matthews, J. A.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P.; Moreno, E.; Mostafá, M.; Nellen, L.; Newbold, M.; Noriega-Papaqui, R.; Pelayo, R.; Pérez-Pérez, E. G.; Pretz, J.; Ren, Z.; Rho, C. D.; Rivière, C.; Rosa-González, D.; Rosenberg, M.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Sandoval, A.; Schneider, M.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Sinnis, G.; Smith, A. J.; Springer, R. W.; Surajbali, P.; Taboada, I.; Tibolla, O.; Tollefson, K.; Torres, I.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Vianello, G.; Weisgarber, T.; Westerhoff, S.; Wood, J.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P. W.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, H.; HAWC Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-ray Observatory is an extensive air shower detector operating in central Mexico that has recently completed its first two years of full operations. If for a burst like GRB 130427A at a redshift of 0.34 and a high-energy component following a power law with index 1.66, the high-energy component is extended to higher energies with no cutoff other than that from extragalactic background light attenuation, HAWC would observe gamma-rays with a peak energy of ˜300 GeV. This paper reports the results of HAWC observations of 64 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by Swift and Fermi, including 3 GRBs that were also detected by the Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT). An ON/OFF analysis method is employed, searching on the timescale given by the observed light curve at keV-MeV energies and also on extended timescales. For all GRBs and timescales, no statistically significant excess of counts is found and upper limits on the number of gamma-rays and the gamma-ray flux are calculated. GRB 170206A, the third brightest short GRB detected by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor on board the Fermi satellite (Fermi-GBM) and also detected by the LAT, occurred very close to zenith. The LAT measurements can neither exclude the presence of a synchrotron self-Compton component nor constrain its spectrum. Instead, the HAWC upper limits constrain the expected cutoff in an additional high-energy component to be less than 100 {GeV} for reasonable assumptions about the energetics and redshift of the burst.

  13. Dust in High Redshift Gamma Ray Burst Host Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shunlin; Li, A.

    2009-12-01

    The discovery of high-redshift GRBs opens a new window into the nature of dust in the early universe. We explore the dust properties of the host galaxies of a large sample (32 objects) of long-GRBs at 2.0≤ z ≤ 6.7, with a mean redshift of z=3.34 (corresponding to a look-back time of 1.94 Gyr), by fitting their optical-near-IR afterglow spectra. The average dust extinction in the visual band is AV=0.3. The EB-V/NHI and AV/NHI ratios decrease linearly with the dust-to-gas ratio, suggesting that the dust properties remain unchanged at the epoch of 2.0≤ z ≤ 6.7. The inferred extinction curves are closely reproduced in terms of a mixture of amorphous silicate and graphite. The quanities of amorphous silicate and graphite (relative to H) both appear to decrease with, while their cut-off grain sizes show no significant evolution in the interval 2.0≤ z ≤ 6.7.

  14. Very High Energy Observations of Gamma-Ray Burst Locations with the Whipple Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Horan, D; Badran, H M; Blaylock, G; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Byrum, K L; Celik, O; Chow, Y C K; Cogan, P; Cui, W; Daniel, M K; Perez, I de la Calle; Dowdall, C; Falcone, A D; Fegan, D J; Fegan, S J; Finley, J P; Fortin, P; Fortson, L F; Gillanders, G H; Grube, J; Gutíerrez, K J; Hall, J; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Hughes, S B; Humensky, T B; Kenny, G E; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D B; Kildea, J; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Le Bohec, S; Maier, G; Moriarty, P; Nagai, T; Ong, R A; Perkins, J S; Petry, D; Quinn, J; Quinn, M; Ragan, K; Reynolds, P T; Rose, H J; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Steele, D; Swordy, S P; Toner, J A; Valcarcel, L; Vasilev, V V; Wagner, R G; Wakely, S P; Weekes, T C; White, R J; Williams, D A; 10.1086/509567

    2008-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) observations at very high energies (VHE, E > 100 GeV) can impose tight constraints on some GRB emission models. Many GRB afterglow models predict a VHE component similar to that seen in blazars and plerions, in which the GRB spectral energy distribution has a double-peaked shape extending into the VHE regime. VHE emission coincident with delayed X-ray flare emission has also been predicted. GRB follow-up observations have had high priority in the observing program at the Whipple 10m Gamma-ray Telescope and GRBs will continue to be high priority targets as the next generation observatory, VERITAS, comes on-line. Upper limits on the VHE emission, at late times (>~4 hours), from seven GRBs observed with the Whipple Telescope are reported here.

  15. Discovery of very high energy gamma-rays associated with an X-ray binary

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonian, F; Aye, K M; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berge, D; Berghaus, P; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bolz, O; Borrel, V; Braun, I; Breitling, F; Brown, A M; Bussons-Gordo, J; Chadwick, P M; Chounet, L M; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Degrange, B; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ata, A; O'Connor-Drury, L; Dubus, G; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Feinstein, F; Fleury, P; Fontaine, G; Fuchs, Y; Funk, S; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Gillessen, S; Glicenstein, J F; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; De Jager, O C; Khelifi, B; Komin, Nu; Konopelko, A; Latham, I J; Le Gallou, R; Lemiere, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Leroy, N; Lohse, T; Marcowith, A; Martin, J M; Martineau-Huynh, O; Masterson, C; McComb, T J L; De Naurois, Mathieu; Nolan, S J; Noutsos, A; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Ouchrif, M; Panter, M; Pelletier, G; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Raux, J; Rayner, S M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rolland, L; Rowell, G; Sahakian, V V; Sauge, L; Schlenker, S; Schlickeiser, R; Schuster, C; Schwanke, U; Siewert, M; Sol, H; Spangler, D; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Tavernet, J P; Terrier, R; Theoret, C G; Tluczykont, M; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Wagner, S J

    2005-01-01

    X-ray binaries are composed of a normal star in orbit around a neutron star or stellar-mass black hole. Radio and X-ray observations have led to the presumption that some X-ray binaries called microquasars behave as scaled down active galactic nuclei. Microquasars have resolved radio emission that is thought to arise from a relativistic outflow akin to active galactic nuclei jets, in which particles can be accelerated to large energies. Very high energy gamma-rays produced by the interactions of these particles have been observed from several active galactic nuclei. Using the High Energy Stereoscopic System, we find evidence for gamma-ray emission >100 GeV from a candidate microquasar, LS 5039, showing that particles are also accelerated to very high energies in these systems.

  16. Amorphous and crystalline optical materials used as instruments for high gamma radiation doses estimations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ioan, M-R., E-mail: razvan.ioan@nipne.ro

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • The damage induced by gamma rays to optical materials was highlighted and quantified, using laser techniques. • Polarized light and the particularities of the laser light (monochromaticity, directionality and coherence) were used. • The correlation between the damage and the gamma rays absorbed dose was made. • The comparison between different types of optical materials and their dose related calibrations were made. • The uncertainty associated to the technique was determined. - Abstract: Nuclear radiation induce some changes to the structure of exposed materials. The main effect of ionizing radiation when interacting with optical materials is the occurrence of color centers, which are quantitatively proportional to the up-taken doses. In this paper, a relation between browning effect magnitude and dose values was found. Using this relation, the estimation of a gamma radiation dose can be done. By using two types of laser wavelengths (532 nm and 633 nm), the optical powers transmitted thru glass samples irradiated to different doses between 0 and 59.1 kGy, were measured and the associated optical browning densities were determined. The use of laser light gives the opportunity of using its particularities: monochromaticity, directionality and coherence. Polarized light was also used for enhancing measurements quality. These preliminary results bring the opportunity of using glasses as detectors for the estimation of the dose in a certain point in space and for certain energy, especially in particles accelerators experiments, where the occurred nuclear reactions are involving the presence of high gamma rays fields.

  17. High-Energy $\\gamma$-Ray Observations of Two Young, Energetic Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Kaspi, V M; Mattox, J R; Manchester, R N; Bailes, M; Pace, R

    1999-01-01

    We present results of Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory EGRET observations of the unidentified high-energy gamma-ray sources 2EG J1049-5847 (GEV J1047-5840, 3EG J1048-5840) and 2EG J1103-6106 (3EG J1102-6103). These sources are spatially coincident with the young, energetic radio pulsars PSRs B1046-58 and J1105-6107, respectively. We find evidence for an association between PSR B1046-58 and 2EG J1049-5847. The gamma-ray pulse profile, obtained by folding time-tagged photons having energies above 400 MeV using contemporaneous radio ephemerides, has probability of arising by chance of 1.2E-4 according to the binning-independent H-test. A spatial analysis of the on-pulse photons reveals a point source of equivalent significance 10.2 sigma. Off-pulse, the significance drops to 5.8 sigma. Archival ASCA data show that the only hard X-ray point source in the 95% confidence error box of the gamma-ray source is spatially coincident with the pulsar within the 1' uncertainty (Pivovaroff, Kaspi & Gotthelf 1999). The doub...

  18. Scaling analysis of high-frequency time series of gamma-ray counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Susana; Azevedo, Eduardo

    2017-04-01

    Gamma radiation is being monitored in a dedicated campaign set-up at the Eastern North Atlantic (ENA) facility located in the Graciosa island (Azores), a fixed site of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement programme (ARM), established and supported by the Department of Energy (DOE) of the United States of America with the collaboration of the Government of the Autonomous Region of the Azores and University of the Azores. The temporal variability of gamma radiation is mainly determined by the time-varying concentration of radon progeny, which in turn is influenced by meteorological conditions and precipitation scavenging. The resulting time series of high-frequency (1-minute) gamma-ray counts displays therefore a complex temporal structure on multiple time scales, including long-range dependent behavior. This work addresses the scaling properties of the time series of gamma-ray counts from the ENA site (data freely available from the ARM data archive) using both wavelet and model-based methods for the estimation of the scaling exponent. The time series is dominated by sharp peaks associated with events of strong precipitation. The effect of these peaks on the estimation of the scaling exponent, as well as the effect of temporal aggregation (1-minute versus 15-minute aggregated data) is further addressed.

  19. High temperature thermal analysis of Ni-Al alloys around the {gamma}{prime} composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battezzati, L.; Baricco, M.; Pascale, L. [Univ. di Torino (Italy)

    1998-06-05

    The region of the Ni-Al phase diagram close to the Ni{sub 3}Al ({gamma}{prime}) compound has been analyzed several times recognizing that {gamma}{prime} has an incongruent melting and its field of existence is narrow, bounded by the equilibria with the {gamma} terminal solid solution and the NiAl ({beta}) phase. With the availability of High Temperature Differential Scanning Calorimetry (HTDSC) as a sensitive technique for quantitative thermal analysis, it appeared useful to re-examine the portion of the phase diagram around {gamma}{prime}. In this paper the authors report data confirming Hilpert`s version of the phase diagram. In addition, the HTDSC analysis provides information on the enthalpy change during fusion not yet available in the literature, which also has implications in the analysis of the order-disorder transition in Ni{sub 3}Al. Furthermore, a detailed knowledge of the DSC behaviour of these alloys on melting and solidification is relevant as a reference basis to interpret data on analogous transformations in superalloys and intermetallics.

  20. A new generation gamma-ray camera for planetary science applications : High pressure xenon time projection chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kobayashi, S; Hasebe, N; Hosojima, T; Igarashi, T; Kobayashi, MN; Mimura, M; Miyachi, T; Miyajima, M; Pushkin, KN; Sakaba, H; Tezuka, C; Doke, T; Shibamura, E; Ehrenfreund, P; Foing, B; Cellino, A

    2006-01-01

    A new gamma-ray imaging camera based on High-pressure Xe Time-Projection-Chamber (HPXe-TPC) allows us to simultaneously determine arrival direction and its energy of individual incident gamma rays. HPXe-TPC is a promising y-ray detector for planetary science which provides means of global mapping of

  1. Search for high-energy gamma-ray emissionand upgrade of the GAMMA experiment on Mt. Aragats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Procureur J.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We present the current status of the search for possible diffuse orlocalized gamma-ray emission at energies above about 100 TeV with the GAMMA air shower detector which is located at 3200 m a.s.l. on Mt. Aragats, Armenia. For this search we select muon-poor extensive air showers detected by GAMMA.We discuss ongoing studies of improved criteria for the selection ofmuon-poor showers, taking into account the geometry of the muon underground detector array in 2004–2011. A modernization of the muon array was completed between October 2011 and February 2012. Sixty additional muon scintillation detectors were installed and are now taking data. They will improvethe the selection of muon-poor showers, the primary energy estimation, and should also yield improved information on the mass composition.

  2. Relative thermoluminescent efficiencies proton/gamma and helium/gamma of peaks of high temperature in TLD-100 dosemeters; Eficiencias termoluminiscentes relativas proton/gamma y helio/gamma de picos de alta temperatura en dosimetros TLD-100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores M, E. [UNAM, Facultad de Ciencias, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    The increase of the applications of ion beams in radiotherapy treatments has generated interest in the study of the thermoluminescent materials (TL) that allow to determine the applied doses. A way to quantify the TL response from these materials to ions is by means of the relative thermoluminescent efficiency. In the group of Thermoluminescent dosimetry of the Institute of Physics of the UNAM (IFUNAM) the thermoluminescent response of the TLD-100 dosemeters has been studied, which present a glow curve characteristic with several peaks that correspond to traps and luminescent centers in the material. The stable peaks know each other as 4, 5, 6a, 6b, 7, 8, 9 and 10. The efficiencies should be measured using the response so much to the radiation of interest (in this case protons and helium ions) as the response to gamma radiation. In previous works with ions of low energy taken place in the Pelletron accelerator of the IFUNAM was only measured the TL efficiency for the peak 5 and the total signal. It had not been possible to measure the efficiency of the peaks of high temperature (6a-10) because, for the gamma radiation, the peaks of high temperature show very small signals; however, recently Massillon carries out measures of efficiency TL of peaks of high temperature for ions of intermediate energy using a protocol special of reading and of deconvolution that allows to measure the signals coming from the peaks of high temperature. In this work is implemented this same protocol to complete the study of TL efficiencies at low energy of protons and helium and to determine if the values of efficiency depend on the used reading protocol. For it is reported it measures of the relative efficiency of the peaks of high temperature from the TLD-100 exposed to protons of 1.5 MeV and nuclei of helium of 3 and 7.5 MeV. (Author)

  3. Pulse Rise Time Characterization of a High Pressure Xenon Gamma Detector for use in Resolution Enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TROYER, G.L.

    2000-08-25

    High pressure xenon ionization chamber detectors are possible alternatives to traditional thallium doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and hyperpure germanium as gamma spectrometers in certain applications. Xenon detectors incorporating a Frisch grid exhibit energy resolutions comparable to cadmium/zinc/telluride (CZT) (e.g. 2% {at} 662keV) but with far greater sensitive volumes. The Frisch grid reduces the position dependence of the anode pulse risetimes, but it also increases the detector vibration sensitivity, anode capacitance, voltage requirements and mechanical complexity. We have been investigating the possibility of eliminating the grid electrode in high-pressure xenon detectors and preserving the high energy resolution using electronic risetime compensation methods. A two-electrode cylindrical high pressure xenon gamma detector coupled to time-to-amplitude conversion electronics was used to characterize the pulse rise time of deposited gamma photons. Time discrimination was used to characterize the pulse rise time versus photo peak position and resolution. These data were collected to investigate the effect of pulse rise time compensation on resolution and efficiency.

  4. Effect of high gamma-doses in the sensitization of natural quartz for thermoluminescence dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoury, H.J.; Guzzo, P.L.; Brito, S.B. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50740-540 Recife PE (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    Sensitization is an important effect in radiation dosimetry using thermoluminescent (TL materials where the enhancement of sensitivity is a desirable feature. Until known, the investigation of sensitization in quartz has been restricted to its first glow peak appearing around 110 C. In addition, the sensitization process has been essentially produced by heat-treatments in powdered quartz. The aim of this study is to investigate the sensitization process in the second glow peak of crystalline quartz using high doses of gamma irradiation. For this, five lots of samples were prepared from quartz single crystals issued from different geologies in Brazil. Chips of 5 x 5 x 1 mm{sup 3} (60 mg) were cut and lapped parallel to the (0001) plane. The specimens were initially irradiated with doses of gamma radiation of {sup 137} Cs in the range of 10 mGy to 10 Gy in order to determine its TL response curve. After that, the specimens were submitted to successive high doses of gamma-irradiation with {sup 60} Co from 25 kGy to 350 kGy. After each irradiation, the TL response curves to gamma radiation of {sup 137} Cs were determined for each quartz lot irradiated in the range of 2 to 20 mGy. The TL measurements were carried out with a 2800M Victoreen reader using the step mode. The step parameters were set in 10 s from 30 to 160 C (first region) and in 20 s from 160 to 320 C (second region). The absolute TL signal used to obtain the calibration curves represented the sum of electric charges under the glow peak appearing in the second region. The results showed that the TL response of the quartz studied increased with the dose sensitization, so that the TL response for 10mGy of {sup 137} Cs radiation varied from 0.05 nC/mg for the quartz without sensitization to 10 nC/mg after a sensitization with 50 kGy of gamma radiation of {sup 60} Co. The effect of sensitization with high doses of gamma irradiation was clearly observed for three quartz lots and it was observed that the high

  5. Modeling high-energy gamma-rays from the Fermi Bubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Splettstoesser, Megan

    2015-09-17

    In 2010, the Fermi Bubbles were discovered at the galactic center of the Milky Way. These giant gamma-ray structures, extending 55° in galactic latitude and 20°-30° in galactic longitude, were not predicted. We wish to develop a model for the gamma-ray emission of the Fermi Bubbles. To do so, we assume that second order Fermi acceleration requires charged particles and irregular magnetic fields- both of which are present in the disk of the Milky Way galaxy. By solving the steady-state case of the transport equation, I compute the proton spectrum due to second order Fermi acceleration. I compare the analytical solutions of the proton spectrum to a numerical solution. I find that the numerical solution to the transport equation converges to the analytical solution in all cases. The gamma-ray spectrum due to proton-proton interaction is compared to Fermi Bubble data (from Ackermann et al. 2014), and I find that second order Fermi acceleration is a good fit for the gamma-ray spectrum of the Fermi Bubbles at low energies with an injection source term of S = 1.5 x 10⁻¹⁰ GeV⁻¹cm⁻³yr⁻¹. I find that a non-steady-state solution to the gamma-ray spectrum with an injection source term of S = 2 x 10⁻¹⁰ GeV⁻¹cm⁻³yr⁻¹ matches the bubble data at high energies.

  6. High brightness gamma-ray production at Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalcea, D.; Jacobson, B.; Murokh, A.; Piot, P.; Ruan, J.

    2017-03-01

    Electron beams with energies of the order of a few 100's of MeV and low transverse emittance, in combination with powerful infrared lasers, allow for the production of high quality gamma rays through Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS). At Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility, a 300 MeV beam will be used to generate gamma rays with maximum photon energies of up to ˜1.5 MeV and brightness of the order of 1021 photons/[s-(mm-mrad)2- 0.1%BW]. Due to the low electron-beam transverse emittance, the relative bandwidth of the scattered radiation is expected to be ≤ 1%. A key challenge toward the production of high radiation dose and brightness is to enhance the energy of the infrared 3 ps laser pulses to the joule level. In this contribution, we present the plans for the experimental setup, along with comprehensive numerical simulations of the ICS process.

  7. Search for Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts using Milagro

    CERN Document Server

    Saz-Parkinson, P M

    2007-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) have been detected at GeV energies by EGRET and models predict emission at > 100 GeV. Milagro is a wide field (2 sr) high duty cycle (> 90 %) ground based water Cherenkov detector that records extensive air showers in the energy range 100 GeV to 100 TeV. We have searched for very high energy emission from a sample of 106 gamma-ray bursts (GRB) detected since the beginning of 2000 by BATSE, BeppoSax, HETE-2, INTEGRAL, Swift or the IPN. No evidence for emission from any of the bursts has been found and we present upper limits from these bursts.

  8. Perspectives for neutron and gamma spectroscopy in high power laser driven experiments at ELI-NP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negoita, F.; Gugiu, M.; Petrascu, H.; Petrone, C.; Pietreanu, D.; Fuchs, J.; Chen, S.; Higginson, D.; Vassura, L.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Antici, P.; Balabanski, D.; Balascuta, S.; Cernaianu, M.; Dancus, I.; Gales, S.; Neagu, L.; Petcu, C.; Risca, M.; Toma, M.; Turcu, E.; Ursescu, D.

    2015-02-01

    The measurement of energy spectra of neutrons and gamma rays emitted by nuclei, together with charge particles spectroscopy, are the main tools for understanding nuclear phenomena occurring also in high power laser driven experiments. However, the large number of particles emitted in a very short time, in particular the strong X-rays flash produced in laser-target interaction, impose adaptation of technique currently used in nuclear physics experiment at accelerator based facilities. These aspects are discussed (Section 1) in the context of proposed studies at high power laser system of ELI-NP. Preliminary results from two experiments performed at Titan (LLNL) and ELFIE (LULI) facilities using plastic scintillators for neutron detection (Section 2) and LaBr3(Ce) scintillators for gamma detection (Section 3) are presented demonstrating the capabilities and the limitations of the employed methods. Possible improvements of these spectroscopic methods and their proposed implementation at ELI-NP will be discussed as well in the last section.

  9. Design of a high-resolution gamma-ray detector module for tomography applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieberle, A. [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e. V., Institute of Safety Research, P.O. BOX 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany) and AREVA NP GmbH, P.O. Box 3220, 91050 Erlangen (Germany)]. E-mail: A.Bieberle@fzd.de; Kronenberg, J. [AREVA NP GmbH, P.O. Box 3220, 91050 Erlangen (Germany); Schleicher, E. [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e. V., Institute of Safety Research, P.O. BOX 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Hampel, U. [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e. V., Institute of Safety Research, P.O. BOX 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2007-03-11

    We present a modular gamma-ray detector design for gamma-ray tomography applications. As a key electronic component we use the APD array S8550 of Hamamatsu Corp. with 4x8 single APD elements each of 1.6 mmx1.6 mm size. For this APD array we tested and evaluated different configurations of 2 mm wide lutetium yttrium orthosilicate scintillation crystals. Emphasize was given to high counting efficiency and low dead time in order to secure applicability of the detector to tomography of objects with highly attenuating materials. For electronic processing, we designed a low-cost low-power charge-sensitive preamplifier circuit using commercially available operational amplifier ICs. The modular design of the detectors allows us to build up larger line or arc detectors.

  10. Radiosensitivity and Induction of Apoptosis by High LET Carbon Ion Beam and Low LET Gamma Radiation: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atanu Ghorai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer treatment with high LET heavy ion beam, especially, carbon ion beam (12C, is becoming very popular over conventional radiotherapy like low LET gamma or X-ray. Combination of Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitor with xenotoxic drugs or conventional radiation (gamma or X-ray is the newer approach for cancer therapy. The aim of our study was to compare the radiosensitivity and induction of apoptosis by high LET 12C and low LET gamma radiation in HeLa and PARP-1 knocked down cells. We did comet assay to detect DNA breaks, clonogenic survival assay, and cell cycle analysis to measure recovery after DNA damage. We measured apoptotic parameters like nuclear fragmentation and caspase-3 activation. DNA damage, cell killing, and induction of apoptosis were significantly higher for 12C than gamma radiation in HeLa. Cell killing and apoptosis were further elevated upon knocking down of PARP-1. Both 12C and gamma induced G2/M arrest although the 12C had greater effect. Unlike the gamma, 12C irradiation affects DNA replication as detected by S-phase delay in cell cycle analysis. So, we conclude that high LET 12C has greater potential over low LET gamma radiation in killing cells and radiosensitization upon PARP-1 inhibition was several folds greater for 12C than gamma.

  11. Biological dose estimation for accidental supra-high dose gamma-ray exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y., E-mail: yingchen29@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, 27 Taiping Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100850 (China); Yan, X.K. [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, 27 Taiping Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100850 (China); Department of Radiation Safety, Beijing Institute of Nuclear and Chemical Safety, 14 Guan-cun, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100077 (China); Du, J.; Wang, Z.D.; Zhang, X.Q.; Zeng, F.G.; Zhou, P.K. [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, 27 Taiping Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100850 (China)

    2011-09-15

    To correctly estimate the biological dose of victims accidentally exposed to a very high dose of {sup 60}Co gamma-ray, a new dose-effect curve of chromosomal dicentrics/multicentrics and rings in the supra-high dose range was established. Peripheral blood from two healthy men was irradiated in vitro with doses of {sup 60}Co gamma-rays ranging from 6 to 22 Gy at a dose rate of 2.0 Gy/min. Lymphocytes were concentrated, cultured and harvested at 52 h, 68 h and 72 h. The numbers of dic + r were counted. The dose-effect curves were established and validated using comparisons with doses from the Tokai-mura accident and were then applied to two victims of supra-high dose exposure accident. The results indicated that there were no significant differences in chromosome aberration frequency among the different culture times from 52 h to 72 h. The 6-22 Gy dose-effect curve was fitted to a linear quadratic model Y = -2.269 + 0.776D - 7.868 x l0{sup -3}D{sup 2}. Using this mathematic model, the dose estimates were similar to data from Tokai-mura which were estimated by PCC ring. Whole body average doses of 9.7 Gy and 18.1 Gy for two victims in the Jining accident were satisfactorily given. We established and successfully applied a new dose-effect curve of chromosomal dicentrics plus ring (dic + r) after 6-22 Gy {gamma}-irradiation from a supra-high dose {sup 60}Co gamma-ray accident.

  12. Diffractive $J/\\psi$ production in high energy $\\gamma\\gamma$ collisions as a probe of the QCD pomeron

    CERN Document Server

    Kwiecinski, J; Kwiecinski, Jan; Motyka, Leszek

    1998-01-01

    The reaction gamma gamma --> J/Psi J/Psi is discussed assuming dominance of the QCD BFKL pomeron exchange. We give prediction for the cross-section of this process for LEP2 and TESLA energies. We solve the BFKL equation in the non-forward configuration taking into account dominant non-leading effects which come from the requirement that the virtuality of the exchanged gluons along the gluon ladder is controlled by their transverse momentum squared. We compare our results with those corresponding to the simple two gluon exchange mechanism and with the BFKL pomeron exchange in the leading logarithmic approximation. The BFKL effects are found to generate steeper t-dependence than the two gluon exchange. The cross-section is found to increase with increasing CM energy W as (W^2)^(2*lambda). The parameter lambda is slowly varying with W and takes the values lambda \\sim 0.23 - 0.28. The magnitude of the total cross-section for the process gamma gamma --> J/Psi J/Psi is found to increase from 4 to 26 pb within the e...

  13. Modeling High-energy and Very-high-energy gamma-rays from the Terzan 5 Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Venter, C; Kopp, A; Büsching, I

    2011-01-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has recently detected a population of globular clusters (GCs) in high-energy (HE) gamma-rays. Their spectral properties and energetics are consistent with cumulative emission from a population of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) hosted by these clusters. For example, the HE spectra exhibit fairly hard power-law indices and cutoffs around a few GeV, typical of pulsed spectra measured for the gamma-ray pulsar population. The energetics may be used to constrain the number of visible MSPs in the cluster (N_vis), assuming canonical values for the average gamma-ray efficiency and spin-down power. This interpretation is indeed strengthened by the fact that the first gamma-ray MSP has now been identified in the GC NGC 6624, and this MSP is responsible for almost all of the HE emission from this cluster. On the other hand, it has been argued that the MSPs are also sources of relativistic leptons which may be reaccelerated in shocks originating in collisions of stellar winds in the cluste...

  14. Gamma glutamyltransferase levels and its association with high sensitive C-reactive protein in patients with acute coronary syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emiroglu, Mehmet Yunus; Esen, Özlem Batukan; Bulut, Mustafa; Karapinar, Hekim; Kaya, Zekeriya; Akcakoyun, Mustafa; Kargin, Ramazan; Aung, Soe Moe; Alızade, Elnur; Pala, Selcuk; Esen, Ali Metin

    2010-01-01

    Background: Elevated Gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) level is independently correlated with conditions associatedwith increased atherosclerosis, such as obesity, elevated serum cholesterol, high blood pressure and myocardial infarction. It is also demonstrated that serum gamma-glutamyltransferase activity is an independent risk factor for myocardial infarction and cardiac death in patients with coronary artery disease. Although the relationship between gamma-glutamyltransferase and coronary artery disease has been reported, not many studies have shown the relationship between changes ofgamma-glutamyltransferase in acute coronary syndromes and a well established coronary risk factor high sensitive C-reactive protein. (hs-CRP). Aims: In this study, how gamma-glutamyltransferase levels changed in acute coronary syndromes and its relationship with high sensitive C-reactive protein if any were studied. Patients & Methods: This trial was carried out at Kosuyolu Cardiovascular Training and Research Hospital and Van Yuksek Ihtisas Hospital, Turkey. 219 patients (177 males and 42 females) presenting with acute coronary syndrome, and 51 control subjects between September 2007 and September 2008 were included in the study. Serum gamma-glutamyltransferase, high sensitive C-reactive protein, serum lipoprotein levels and troponin I were determined. Results: Serum gamma-glutamyltransferase and high sensitive C-reactive protein levels were higher in acute coronary syndrome patients compared to control. There was also correlation between gamma-glutamyltransferase and high sensitive C-reactive protein levels. Conclusion: Serum gamma-glutamyltransferase and high sensitive C-reactive protein levels were higher in acute coronary syndrome patients. In subgroup analyses, the higher difference with Non-ST elevation myocardial infarction and ST elevation myocardial infarction groups than unstable angina oectoris group proposes a relationship between gamma-glutamyltransferase and severity

  15. Gamma glutamyltransferase levels and its association with high sensitive C-reactive protein in patients with acute coronary syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Yunus Emiroglu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Elevated Gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT level is independently correlated with conditions associatedwith increased atherosclerosis, such as obesity, elevated serum cholesterol, high blood pressure and myocardial infarction. It is also demonstrated that serum gamma-glutamyltransferase activity is an independent risk factor for myocardial infarction and cardiac death in patients with coronary artery disease. Although the relationship between gamma-glutamyltransferase and coronary artery disease has been reported, not many studies have shown the relationship between changes ofgamma-glutamyltransferase in acute coronary syndromes and a well established coronary risk factor high sensitive C-reactive protein. (hs-CRP. Aims: In this study, how gamma-glutamyltransferase levels changed in acute coronary syndromes and its relationship with high sensitive C-reactive protein if any were studied. Patients & Methods:This trial was carried out at Kosuyolu Cardiovascular Training and Research Hospital and Van Yuksek Ihtisas Hospital, Turkey. 219 patients (177 males and 42 females presenting with acute coronary syndrome, and 51 control subjects between September 2007 and September 2008 were included in the study. Serum gamma-glutamyltransferase, high sensitive C-reactive protein, serum lipoprotein levels and troponin I were determined. Results: Serum gamma-glutamyltransferase and high sensitive C-reactive protein levels were higher in acute coronary syndrome patients compared to control. There was also correlation between gamma-glutamyltransferase and high sensitive C-reactive protein levels. Conclusion: Serum gamma-glutamyltransferase and high sensitive C-reactive protein levels were higher in acute coronary syndrome patients. In subgroup analyses, the higher difference with Non-ST elevation myocardial infarction and ST elevation myocardial infarction groups than unstable angina oectoris group proposes a relationship between gamma

  16. Gamma glutamyltransferase levels and its association with high sensitive C-reactive protein in patients with acute coronary syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Yunus Emiroglu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Elevated Gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT level is independently correlated with conditions associatedwith increased atherosclerosis, such as obesity, elevated serum cholesterol, high blood pressure and myocardial infarction. It is also demonstrated that serum gamma-glutamyltransferase activity is an independent risk factor for myocardial infarction and cardiac death in patients with coronary artery disease. Although the relationship between gamma-glutamyltransferase and coronary artery disease has been reported, not many studies have shown the relationship between changes ofgamma-glutamyltransferase in acute coronary syndromes and a well established coronary risk factor high sensitive C-reactive protein. (hs-CRP. Aims: In this study, how gamma-glutamyltransferase levels changed in acute coronary syndromes and its relationship with high sensitive C-reactive protein if any were studied. Patients & Methods: This trial was carried out at Kosuyolu Cardiovascular Training and Research Hospital and Van Yuksek Ihtisas Hospital, Turkey. 219 patients (177 males and 42 females presenting with acute coronary syndrome, and 51 control subjects between September 2007 and September 2008 were included in the study. Serum gamma-glutamyltransferase, high sensitive C-reactive protein, serum lipoprotein levels and troponin I were determined. Results: Serum gamma-glutamyltransferase and high sensitive C-reactive protein levels were higher in acute coronary syndrome patients compared to control. There was also correlation between gamma-glutamyltransferase and high sensitive C-reactive protein levels. Conclusion: Serum gamma-glutamyltransferase and high sensitive C-reactive protein levels were higher in acute coronary syndrome patients. In subgroup analyses, the higher difference with Non-ST elevation myocardial infarction and ST elevation myocardial infarction groups than unstable angina oectoris group proposes a relationship between gamma

  17. High resolution x-ray and gamma ray imaging using diffraction lenses with mechanically bent crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smither, Robert K.

    2008-12-23

    A method for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation is provided. High quality mechanically bent diffracting crystals of 0.1 mm radial width are used for focusing the radiation and directing the radiation to an array of detectors which is used for analyzing their addition to collect data as to the location of the source of radiation. A computer is used for converting the data to an image. The invention also provides for the use of a multi-component high resolution detector array and for narrow source and detector apertures.

  18. Changes in mechanical properties due to gamma irradiation of high-density polyethylene (HDPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Cota

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental analysis of the effect of dose and dose rate parameters during gamma irradiation of high-density polyethylene (HDPE samples. Considerations concerning the influence of these parameters on HDPE mechanical strength properties as a result of the predominance of oxidative degradation or of cross-linking are presented. The experimental results show an improvement of HDPE mechanical strength as dose increases, indicating the predominance of cross-linking over oxidative degradation and that lower doses are necessary to obtain a similar change in resistance parameters when radiation is applied at lower dose rates, showing that gamma radiation affects the HDPE in a more efficient way at lower dose rates.

  19. Changes in mechanical properties due to gamma irradiation of high-density polyethylene (HDPE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cota, S.S.; Vasconcelos, V.; Senne Junior, M.; Carvalho, L.L.; Rezende, D.B.; Correa, R.F. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: sdsc@cdtn.br

    2007-04-15

    This paper presents an experimental analysis of the effect of dose and dose rate parameters during gamma irradiation of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) samples. Considerations concerning the influence of these parameters on HDPE mechanical strength properties as a result of the predominance of oxidative degradation or of cross-linking are presented. The experimental results show an improvement of HDPE mechanical strength as dose increases, indicating the predominance of cross-linking over oxidative degradation and that lower doses are necessary to obtain a similar change in resistance parameters when radiation is applied at lower dose rates, showing that gamma radiation affects the HDPE in a more efficient way at lower dose rates. (author)

  20. Design and expected performance of a novel hybrid detector for very-high-energy gamma astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Assis, P; Blanco, A; Conceição, R; Piazzoli, B D'Ettore; De Angelis, A; Doro, M; Fonte, P; Lopes, L; Matthiae, G; Pimenta, M; Shellard, R; Tomé, B

    2016-01-01

    Current detectors for Very-High-Energy $\\gamma$-ray astrophysics are either pointing instruments with a small field of view (Cherenkov telescopes), or large field-of-view instruments with relatively large energy thresholds (extensive air shower detectors). In this article we propose a new hybrid extensive air shower detector sensitive in an energy region starting from about 100 GeV, allowing to detect with a $5\\sigma$ significance a source as faint as 10% of the Crab Nebula in one year, and able to survey half of the sky. The instrument can detect a source with the luminosity of 25 Crab at $3\\sigma$ in 1 minute, making it a very powerful tool to trigger observations of variable sources and to detect transients coupled to gravitational waves and gamma-ray bursts.

  1. The Multi-Messenger Approach to High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Paredes, Josep M; Torres, Diego F

    2008-01-01

    This book provides a theoretical and observational overview of the state of the art of gamma-ray astrophysics, and their impact and connection with the physics of cosmic rays and neutrinos. With the aim of shedding new and fresh light on the problem of the nature of the gamma-ray sources, particularly those yet unidentified, this book summarizes contributions to a workshop that continues with the series initiated by the meeting held at Tonantzintla in October 2000, and Hong-Kong in May 2004. This books will be of interest for all active researchers in the field of high energy astrophysics and astroparticle physics, as well as for graduate students entering into the subject.

  2. A covariant model for the gamma N -> N(1535) transition at high momentum transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Ramalho, G

    2011-01-01

    A relativistic constituent quark model is applied to the gamma N -> N(1535) transition. The N(1535) wave function is determined by extending the covariant spectator quark model, previously developed for the nucleon, to the S11 resonance. The model allows us to calculate the valence quark contributions to the gamma N -> N(1535) transition form factors. Because of the nucleon and N(1535) structure the model is valid only for Q^2> 2.3 GeV^2. The results are compared with the experimental data for the electromagnetic form factors F1* and F2* and the helicity amplitudes A_1/2 and S_1/2, at high Q^2.

  3. A covariant model for the gamma N -> N(1535) transition at high momentum transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ramalho, M.T. Pena

    2011-08-01

    A relativistic constituent quark model is applied to the gamma N -> N(1535) transition. The N(1535) wave function is determined by extending the covariant spectator quark model, previously developed for the nucleon, to the S11 resonance. The model allows us to calculate the valence quark contributions to the gamma N -> N(1535) transition form factors. Because of the nucleon and N(1535) structure the model is valid only for Q^2> 2.3 GeV^2. The results are compared with the experimental data for the electromagnetic form factors F1* and F2* and the helicity amplitudes A_1/2 and S_1/2, at high Q^2.

  4. SONGS - A high resolution imaging gamma-ray spectrometer for the Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, G. H.; Chase, L. F.; Kilner, J. R.; Sandie, W. G.; Fishman, G. J.; Paciesas, W. S.

    1989-11-01

    The overall design and the instrumental features of the Space-Station Observer for Nuclear Gamma-ray Spectroscopy (SONGS) instrument are described. SONGS comprises an array of 19 two-segment n-type Ge detectors, which have the capability of determining the interaction site in either the upper or the lower segment or in both segments. The detectors provide high energy resolution of 1 keV at 100 keV and of 2 keV at 1 MeV. The close-packed Ge sensor array provides a natural sensitivity for the measurement of gamma ray polarization in the 100 keV to 1 MeV energy range, making it possible to obtain information on the structure of the magnetosphere of neutron stars and of the accretion disk of black holes.

  5. The transparency of the universe for very high energy gamma-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Horns, D

    2016-01-01

    The propagation of very high energy gamma-rays ($E>100$~GeV) over cosmological distances is suppressed by pair-production processes with the ubiquitous extra-galactic soft photon background, mainly in the optical to near infra-red. The detailed spectroscopy of gamma-ray emitting blazars has revealed the signature of this absorption process leading to a meaningful measurement of the background photon field which is linked to the star-forming history of the universe. Deviations from the expected absorption have been claimed in the past. Here the status of the observations is summarized, an update on the search for the persisting anomalous transparency is given and discussed.

  6. Reduction of phorbol ester content in jatropha cake using high energy gamma radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runumi Gogoi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an attempt has been made to remove phorbol ester present in jatropha cake by exposing it to gamma radiation. A sensitizer was also used to accelerate the degradation of phorbol esters. The phorbol ester content in the cake was estimated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. It was observed that gamma irradiation of the jatropha seed cake was effective in reducing the phorbol ester content. Originally, the phorbol ester content in the cake was found as 0.29 mg/g, which on exposure to radiation was reduced by 33.4% and 96% with radiation dose of 30 and 125 kGy respectively. The presence of a sensitizer was found to enhances the susceptibility of phorbol esters degradation by oxidative degradation on exposure to ionizing radiation.

  7. A data acquisition and control system for high-speed gamma-ray tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjertaker, B. T.; Maad, R.; Schuster, E.; Almås, O. A.; Johansen, G. A.

    2008-09-01

    A data acquisition and control system (DACS) for high-speed gamma-ray tomography based on the USB (Universal Serial Bus) and Ethernet communication protocols has been designed and implemented. The high-speed gamma-ray tomograph comprises five 500 mCi 241Am gamma-ray sources, each at a principal energy of 59.5 keV, which corresponds to five detector modules, each consisting of 17 CdZnTe detectors. The DACS design is based on Microchip's PIC18F4550 and PIC18F4620 microcontrollers, which facilitates an USB 2.0 interface protocol and an Ethernet (IEEE 802.3) interface protocol, respectively. By implementing the USB- and Ethernet-based DACS, a sufficiently high data acquisition rate is obtained and no dedicated hardware installation is required for the data acquisition computer, assuming that it is already equipped with a standard USB and/or Ethernet port. The API (Application Programming Interface) for the DACS is founded on the National Instrument's LabVIEW® graphical development tool, which provides a simple and robust foundation for further application software developments for the tomograph. The data acquisition interval, i.e. the integration time, of the high-speed gamma-ray tomograph is user selectable and is a function of the statistical measurement accuracy required for the specific application. The bandwidth of the DACS is 85 kBytes s-1 for the USB communication protocol and 28 kBytes s-1 for the Ethernet protocol. When using the iterative least square technique reconstruction algorithm with a 1 ms integration time, the USB-based DACS provides an online image update rate of 38 Hz, i.e. 38 frames per second, whereas 31 Hz for the Ethernet-based DACS. The off-line image update rate (storage to disk) for the USB-based DACS is 278 Hz using a 1 ms integration time. Initial characterization of the high-speed gamma-ray tomograph using the DACS on polypropylene phantoms is presented in the paper.

  8. The intriguing nature of the high energy gamma ray source XSSJ12270-4859

    CERN Document Server

    de Martino, D; Bonnet-Bidaud, J -M; Belloni, T; Mouchet, M; Masetti, N; Andruchow, I; Cellone, S A; Mukai, K; Matt, G

    2010-01-01

    The nature of the hard X-ray source XSSJ12270-4859 is still unclear though it was claimed to be a magnetic Cataclysmic Variable. We here present a broad-band X-ray and gamma ray study based on a recent XMM-Newton observation and archival INTEGRAL and RXTE data. From the Fermi/LAT 1-year point source catalogue, we tentatively associate XSSJ12270-4859 with 1FGLJ1227.9-4852, a source of high energy gamma rays with emission up to 10GeV. We complement the study with UV photometry from XMM-Newton and ground-based optical and near-IR photometry. The X-ray emission is highly variable showing flares and intensity dips. The X-ray flares consist of flare-dip pairs. Flares are also detected in the UV range but not the dips. Aperiodic dipping behaviour is also observed during X-ray quiescence but not in the UV. The 0.2-100keV spectrum is featureless and described by a power law model with Gamma=1.7. The 100MeV-10GeV spectrum is instead represented by a power law index of 2.45. The luminosity ratio between 0.1-100GeV and 0...

  9. Active neutron and gamma-ray imaging of highly enriched uranium for treaty verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Michael C; Polack, J Kyle; Ruch, Marc L; Marcath, Matthew J; Clarke, Shaun D; Pozzi, Sara A

    2017-08-11

    The detection and characterization of highly enriched uranium (HEU) presents a large challenge in the non-proliferation field. HEU has a low neutron emission rate and most gamma rays are low energy and easily shielded. To address this challenge, an instrument known as the dual-particle imager (DPI) was used with a portable deuterium-tritium (DT) neutron generator to detect neutrons and gamma rays from induced fission in HEU. We evaluated system response using a 13.7-kg HEU sphere in several configurations with no moderation, high-density polyethylene (HDPE) moderation, and tungsten moderation. A hollow tungsten sphere was interrogated to evaluate the response to a possible hoax item. First, localization capabilities were demonstrated by reconstructing neutron and gamma-ray images. Once localized, additional properties such as fast neutron energy spectra and time-dependent neutron count rates were attributed to the items. For the interrogated configurations containing HEU, the reconstructed neutron spectra resembled Watt spectra, which gave confidence that the interrogated items were undergoing induced fission. The time-dependent neutron count rate was also compared for each configuration and shown to be dependent on the neutron multiplication of the item. This result showed that the DPI is a viable tool for localizing and confirming fissile mass and multiplication.

  10. Effects of high dose rate gamma radiation on survival and reproduction of Biomphalaria glabrata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Nakano, Eliana [Instituto Butantan, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Parasitologia], e-mail: rebecanuclear@gmail.com, e-mail: eliananakano@butantan.gov.br; Borrely, Sueli I. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia das Radiacoes], e-mail: sborrely@ipen.br; Amaral, Ademir; Melo, Ana M.M.A. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear. Grupo de Estudos em Radioprotecao e Radioecologia (GERAR)], e-mail: amaral@ufpe.br; Silva, Luanna R.S. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Biofisica e Radiobiologia. Lab. de Radiobiologia], e-mail: amdemelo@hotmail.com, e-mail: luannaribeiro_lua@hotmail.com

    2009-07-01

    Ionizing radiations are known as mutagenic agents, causing lethality and infertility. This characteristic has motivated its application on animal biological control. In this context, the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata can be considered an excellent experimental model to study effects of ionizing radiations on lethality and reproduction. This work was designed to evaluate effects of {sup 60}Co gamma radiation at high dose rate (10.04 kGy/h) on B. glabrata. For this purpose, adult snails were selected and exposed to doses ranging from 20 to 100 Gy, with 10 Gy intervals; one group was kept as control. There was not effect of dose rate in the lethality of gamma radiation; the value of 64,3 Gy of LD{sub 50} obtained in our study was similar to that obtained by other authors with low dose rates. Nevertheless, our data suggest that there was a dose rate effect in the reproduction. On all dose levels, radiation improved the production of embryos for all exposed individuals. However, viability indexes were below 6% and, even 65 days after irradiation, fertility was not recovered. These results are not in agreement with other studies using low dose rates. Lethality was obtained in all groups irradiated, and the highest doses presented percentiles of dead animals above 50%. The results demonstrated that doses of 20 and 30 Gy were ideal for population control of B. glabrata. Further studies are needed; nevertheless, this research evidenced great potential of high dose rate gamma radiation on B. glabrata reproductive control. (author)

  11. The Third EGRET Catalog of High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, R. C.; Bertsch, D. L.; Bloom, S. D.; Chen, A. W.; Deines-Jones, P.; Esposito, J. A.; Fichtel, C. E.; Friedlander, D. P.; Hunter, S. D.; McDonald, L. M.; Sreekumar, P.; Thompson, D. J.; Jones, B. B.; Lin, Y. C.; Michelson, P. F.; Nolan, P. L.; Tompkins, W. F.; Kanbach, G.; Mayer-Hasselwander, A.; Muecke, A.

    1998-01-01

    The third catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the EGRET telescope on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory includes data from 1991 April 22 to 1995 October 3 (Cycles 1, 2, 3, and 4 of the mission). In addition to including more data than the second EGRET catalog and its supplement, this catalog uses completely reprocessed data (to correct a number of mostly minimal errors and problems). The 271 sources (E greater than 100 MeV) in the catalog include the single 1991 solar flare bright enough to be detected as a source, the Large Magellanic Cloud, five pulsars, one probable radio galaxy detection (Cen A), and 66 high-confidence identifications of blazars (BL Lac objects, flat-spectrum radio quasars, or unidentified flat-spectrum radio sources). In addition, 27 lower-confidence potential blazar identifications are noted. Finally, the catalog contains 170 sources not yet identified firmly with known objects, although potential identifications have been suggested for a number of those. A figure is presented that gives approximate upper limits for gamma-ray sources at any point in the sky, as well as information about sources listed in the second catalog and its supplement which do not appear in this catalog.

  12. Are gamma-ray bursts the sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays?

    CERN Document Server

    Baerwald, Philipp; Winter, Walter

    2014-01-01

    We reconsider the possibility that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the sources of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) within the internal shock model, assuming a pure proton composition of the UHECRs. For the first time, we combine the information from gamma-rays, cosmic rays, prompt neutrinos, and cosmogenic neutrinos quantitatively in a joint cosmic ray production and propagation model, and we show that the information on the cosmic energy budget can be obtained as a consequence. In addition to the neutron model, we consider alternative scenarios for the cosmic ray escape from the GRBs, i.e., that cosmic rays can leak from the sources. We find that the dip model, which describes the ankle in UHECR observations by the pair production dip, is strongly disfavored in combination with the internal shock model because a) unrealistically high baryonic loadings (energy in protons versus energy in electrons/gamma-rays) are needed for the individual GRBs and b) the prompt neutrino flux easily overshoots the corres...

  13. Open high-level data formats and software for gamma-ray astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Deil, Christoph; Kosack, Karl; Perkins, Jeremy; King, Johannes; Eger, Peter; Mayer, Michael; Wood, Matthew; Zabalza, Victor; Knödlseder, Jürgen; Hassan, Tarek; Mohrmann, Lars; Ziegler, Alexander; Khelifi, Bruno; Dorner, Daniela; Maier, Gernot; Pedaletti, Giovanna; Rosado, Jaime; Contreras, José Luis; Lefaucheur, Julien; Brügge, Kai; Servillat, Mathieu; Terrier, Régis; Walter, Roland; Lombardi, Saverio

    2016-01-01

    In gamma-ray astronomy, a variety of data formats and proprietary software have been traditionally used, often developed for one specific mission or experiment. Especially for ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs), data and software are mostly private to the collaborations operating the telescopes. However, there is a general movement in science towards the use of open data and software. In addition, the next-generation IACT instrument, the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), will be operated as an open observatory. We have created a Github organisation at https://github.com/open-gamma-ray-astro where we are developing high-level data format specifications. A public mailing list was set up at https://lists.nasa.gov/mailman/listinfo/open-gamma-ray-astro and a first face-to-face meeting on the IACT high-level data model and formats took place in April 2016 in Meudon (France). This open multi-mission effort will help to accelerate the development of open data formats and open-source software...

  14. Effects of high dose gamma irradiation on ITO thin film properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alyamani, A. [National Nanotechnology Center, King Abdul-Aziz City for Science and Technology (KACST), Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Mustapha, N., E-mail: nazirmustapha@hotmail.com [Dept. of Physics, College of Sciences, Al Imam Mohammad Ibn Saud Islamic University, P.O. Box 90950, Riyadh 11623 (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-07-29

    Transparent thin-film Indium Tin Oxides (ITO) were prepared on 0.7 mm thick glass substrates using a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) process with average thickness of 150 nm. The samples were then exposed to high gamma γ radiation doses by {sup 60}Co radioisotope. The films have been irradiated by performing exposure cycles up to 250 kGy total doses at room temperature. The surface structures before and after irradiation were analysed by x-ray diffraction. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was performed on all samples before and after irradiation to investigate any change in the grain sizes, and also in the roughness of the ITO surface. We investigated the influence of γ irradiation on the spectra of transmittance T, in the ultraviolet-visible-near infrared spectrum using spectrophotometer measurements. Energy band gap E{sub g} was then calculated from the optical spectra for all ITO films. It was found that the optical band gap values decreased as the radiation dose was increased. To compare the effect of the irradiation on refractive index n and extinction coefficient k properties, additional measurements were done on the ITO samples before and after gamma irradiation using an ellipsometer. The optical constants n and k increased by increasing the irradiation doses. Electrical properties such as resistivity and sheet resistance were measured using the four-point probe method. The good optical, electrical and morphological properties maintained by the ITO films even after being exposed to high gamma irradiation doses, made them very favourable to be used as anodes for solar cells and as protective coatings in space windows. - Highlights: • Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) thin films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition. • Effects of Gamma irradiation were investigated. • Changes of optical transmission and electrical properties of ITO films were studied. • Intensity of the diffraction peaks and the film's structure changed with increasing irradiation doses.

  15. Thermal, tensile and rheological properties of high density polyethylene (HDPE) processed and irradiated by gamma-ray in different atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreto, H. F. R., E-mail: hferreto@ipen.br, E-mail: ana-feitoza@yahoo.com.br; Oliveira, A. C. F., E-mail: hferreto@ipen.br, E-mail: ana-feitoza@yahoo.com.br; Parra, D. F., E-mail: dfparra@ipen.br, E-mail: ablugao@ipen.br; Lugão, A. B., E-mail: dfparra@ipen.br, E-mail: ablugao@ipen.br [Center of Chemistry and Environment, Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research - IPEN (Brazil); Gaia, R., E-mail: renan-gaia7@hotmail.com [Faculdades Oswaldo Cruz (Brazil)

    2014-05-15

    The aim of this paper is to investigate structural changes of high density polyethylene (HDPE) modified by ionizing radiation (gamma rays) in different atmospheres. The gamma radiation process for modification of commercial polymers is a widely applied technique to promote new physical-chemical and mechanical properties. Gamma irradiation originates free radicals which can induce chain scission or recombination, providing its annihilation, branching or crosslinking. This polymer was irradiated with gamma source of {sup 60}Co at doses of 5, 10, 20, 50 or 100 kGy at a dose rate of 5 kGy/h. The changes in molecular structure of HDPE, after gamma irradiations were evaluated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and tensile machine and oscillatory rheology. The results showed the variations of the properties depending on the dose at each atmosphere.

  16. Thermal, tensile and rheological properties of high density polyethylene (HDPE) processed and irradiated by gamma-ray in different atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreto, H. F. R.; Oliveira, A. C. F.; Gaia, R.; Parra, D. F.; Lugão, A. B.

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate structural changes of high density polyethylene (HDPE) modified by ionizing radiation (gamma rays) in different atmospheres. The gamma radiation process for modification of commercial polymers is a widely applied technique to promote new physical-chemical and mechanical properties. Gamma irradiation originates free radicals which can induce chain scission or recombination, providing its annihilation, branching or crosslinking. This polymer was irradiated with gamma source of 60Co at doses of 5, 10, 20, 50 or 100 kGy at a dose rate of 5 kGy/h. The changes in molecular structure of HDPE, after gamma irradiations were evaluated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and tensile machine and oscillatory rheology. The results showed the variations of the properties depending on the dose at each atmosphere.

  17. Gamma ray heating rates due to chromium isotopes in stellar core during late stages of high mass stars (>10M⊙

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabi Jameel-Un

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma ray heating rates are thought to play a crucial role during the pre-supernova stage of high mass stars. Gamma ray heating rates, due to β±-decay and electron (positron capture on chromium isotopes, are calculated using proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation theory. The electron capture significantly affects the lepton fraction (Ye and accelerates the core contraction. The gamma rays emitted as a result of weak processes heat the core and tend to hinder the cooling and contraction due to electron capture and neutrino emission. The emitted gamma rays tend to produce enormous entropy and set the convection to play its role at this stage. The gamma heating rates, on 50-60Cr, are calculated for the density range 10 < ρ (g.cm-3 < 1011 and temperature range 107 < T (K < 3.0×1010.

  18. Gadolinium-doped water cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma-ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dazeley, Steven A; Svoboda, Robert C; Bernstein, Adam; Bowden, Nathaniel

    2013-02-12

    A water Cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system using water doped with a Gadolinium (Gd)-based compound as the Cerenkov radiator. An optically opaque enclosure is provided surrounding a detection chamber filled with the Cerenkov radiator, and photomultipliers are optically connected to the detect Cerenkov radiation generated by the Cerenkov radiator from incident high energy gamma rays or gamma rays induced by neutron capture on the Gd of incident neutrons from a fission source. The PMT signals are then used to determine time correlations indicative of neutron multiplicity events characteristic of a fission source.

  19. Thin film CdTe based neutron detectors with high thermal neutron efficiency and gamma rejection for security applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.; Murphy, J. W.; Kim, J.; Rozhdestvenskyy, S.; Mejia, I.; Park, H.; Allee, D. R.; Quevedo-Lopez, M.; Gnade, B.

    2016-12-01

    Solid-state neutron detectors offer an alternative to 3He based detectors, but suffer from limited neutron efficiencies that make their use in security applications impractical. Solid-state neutron detectors based on single crystal silicon also have relatively high gamma-ray efficiencies that lead to false positives. Thin film polycrystalline CdTe based detectors require less complex processing with significantly lower gamma-ray efficiencies. Advanced geometries can also be implemented to achieve high thermal neutron efficiencies competitive with silicon based technology. This study evaluates these strategies by simulation and experimentation and demonstrates an approach to achieve >10% intrinsic efficiency with <10-6 gamma-ray efficiency.

  20. Final report: VHE [very high energy] gamma-ray astronomy at Iowa State University, 1991-2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter-Lewis, D.

    2001-01-30

    A brief summary of the important results and a listing of publications which have resulted from the Iowa State University Very High Energy Gamma-ray Astrophysics Program for the decade 1991-2000 are given.

  1. High irradiation and ageing properties of resistive Micromegas detectors at the new CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Andreou, Dimitra

    2016-01-01

    Resistive Micromegas have been developed in recent years with the aim of making this technology usable in HEP experiments where the high sparking rate of classical Micromegas is not tolerable. A resistive Micromegas with four layers and an active surface of 0.5 m2 each, has been designed and built at CERN as prototype of the detectors to be used for the upgrade of the ATLAS experiment. The detector has been exposed to an intense gamma source of 16 TBq in order to study the effects of ageing and evaluate the detector behavior under high irradiation.

  2. High energy radiation from black holes gamma rays, cosmic rays, and neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Dermer, Charles D

    2009-01-01

    Bright gamma-ray flares observed from sources far beyond our Milky Way Galaxy are best explained if enormous amounts of energy are liberated by black holes. The highest- energy particles in nature--the ultra-high-energy cosmic rays--cannot be confined by the Milky Way's magnetic field, and must originate from sources outside our Galaxy. Understanding these energetic radiations requires an extensive theoretical framework involving the radiation physics and strong-field gravity of black holes. In High Energy Radiation from Black Holes, Charles Dermer and Govind Menon present a systemat

  3. Status of Very High Energy gamma-ray Astronomy as of early 2008

    CERN Document Server

    Djannati-Atai, Arache

    2008-01-01

    Data obtained in the very high energy gamma-ray band with the new generation of imaging telescopes, in particular through the galactic plane survey undertaken by H.E.S.S., low threshold observations with MAGIC and more recently by operation of VERITAS, have revealed dozens of galactic and extragalactic sources, providing a wealth of information on a variety of high energy acceleration sites in our universe. Also, the water Cherenkov instrument Milagro has provided several extended sources after seven years of data integration. An overview of these results with focus on some of the most recent highlights is given.

  4. Soft gamma-ray repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars as highly magnetized white dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2016-01-01

    We show that the soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) and anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) can be explained as recently proposed highly magnetized white dwarfs (B-WDs). The radius and magnetic field of B-WDs are perfectly adequate to explain energies in SGRs/AXPs as the rotationally powered energy. While the highly magnetized neutron stars require an extra, observationally not well established yet, source of energy, the magnetized white dwarfs, yet following Chandrasekhar's theory (C-WDs), exhibit large ultra-violet luminosity which is observationally constrained from a strict upper limit.

  5. Detection of very high energy gamma-ray emission from NGC 1275 by the MAGIC telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksić, J; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Asensio, M; Backes, M; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; Bastieri, D; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Berdyugin, A; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bock, R K; Boller, A; Bonnoli, G; Tridon, D Borla; Braun, I; Bretz, T; Cañellas, A; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Cossio, L; Covino, S; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Caneva, G; del Pozo, E De Cea; De Lotto, B; Mendez, C Delgado; Ortega, A Diago; Doert, M; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Eisenacher, D; Elsaesser, D; Ferenc, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Fruck, C; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Garrido, D; Giavitto, G; Godinović, N; Gozzini, S R; Hadasch, D; Häfner, D; Herrero, A; Hildebrand, D; Höhne-Mönch, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Jogler, T; Kellermann, H; Klepser, S; Krähenbühl, T; Krause, J; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Leonardo, E; Lewandowska, N; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Makariev, M; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Meucci, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moldón, J; Moralejo, A; Munar-Adrover, P; Niedzwiecki, A; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Nowak, N; Orito, R; Paiano, S; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Pardo, S; Paredes, J M; Partini, S; Perez-Torres, M A; Persic, M; Peruzzo, L; Pilia, M; Pochon, J; Prada, F; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Gimenez, I Puerto; Puljak, I; Reichardt, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, K; Saito, T Y; Salvati, M; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shayduk, M; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Spiro, S; Stamatescu, V; Stamerra, A; Steinke, B; Storz, J; Strah, N; Sun, S; Surić, T; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Treves, A; Uellenbeck, M; Vankov, H; Vogler, P; Wagner, R M; Weitzel, Q; Zabalza, V; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Pfrommer, C; Pinzke, A

    2011-01-01

    We report on the detection of very high energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray emission from NGC 1275, the central radio galaxy of the Perseus cluster of galaxies. The source has been detected by the MAGIC telescopes with a statistical significance of 6.6 sigma above 100 GeV in 46 hr of stereo observations carried out between August 2010 and February 2011. The measured differential energy spectrum between 70 GeV and 500 GeV can be described by a power-law with a steep spectral index of Gamma = -4.1 +- 0.7stat +- 0.3syst, and the average flux above 100 GeV is F = (1.3 +- 0.2stat +- 0.3syst) x 10-11 cm-2 s-1. These results, combined with the power-law spectrum measured in the first two years of observations by the Fermi-LAT above 100 MeV, with a spectral index of Gamma ~= -2.1, strongly suggest the presence of a break or a cut-off around tens of GeV in the NGC 1275 spectrum. The light curve of the source above 100 GeV does not show hints of variability on month time-scale. Finally, we report on the non-detection i...

  6. Modeling High-Energy Gamma-Rays from the Fermi Bubbles - Oral Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Splettstoesser, Megan [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-25

    In 2010, the Fermi Bubbles were discovered at the galactic center of the Milky Way. These giant gamma-ray structures, extending 50 degrees in galactic latitude and 20-30 degrees in galactic longitude, were not predicted. We wish to develop a model for the gamma-ray emission of the Fermi Bubbles. To do so, we assume that second order Fermi acceleration is responsible for the high-energy emission of the bubbles. Second order Fermi acceleration requires charged particles and irregular magnetic fields—both of which are present in the disk of the Milky Way galaxy. I use the assumption of second order Fermi acceleration in the transport equation, which describes the diffusion of particles. By solving the steady-state case of the transport equation, I compute the proton spectrum due to Fermi second order acceleration and compare this analytical solution to a numerical solution provided by Dr. P. Mertsch. Analytical solutions to the transport equation are taken from Becker, Le, & Dermer and are used to further test the numerical solution. I find that the numerical solution converges to the analytical solution in all cases. Thus, we know the numerical solution accurately calculates the proton spectrum. The gamma-ray spectrum follows the proton spectrum, and will be computed in the future.

  7. Void measurement using high-resolution gamma-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieberle, Andre, E-mail: a.bieberle@hzdr.de [Institute of Safety Research, Helmholz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstrasse 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Hoppe, Dietrich; Schleicher, Eckhard; Hampel, Uwe [Institute of Safety Research, Helmholz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstrasse 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > We present a CT system determining void distributions in thermo hydraulic facilities. > The system has been carefully designed for harsh operating conditions. > To increase measurement accuracy a scattered correction algorithm was developed. > First results of laboratory measurements on a bundle mock-up are presented. - Abstract: We present a high-resolution gamma-ray computed tomography (CT) measurement system for the determination of cross-sectional time-averaged void distributions in thermo hydraulic facilities. The system has been carefully designed for harsh operating conditions, such as varying temperature fields and strong magnetic fields, typically produced by thermal hydraulic test loops with direct electric bundle heating. Measurements are non invasive, thus the two-phase flow in the test section is not influenced. The gamma-ray CT system consists of a collimated {sup 137}Cs isotopic source, a gamma radiation detector arc including 320 single elements, a pulse processing unit and a thermal stabilisation unit. The spatial resolution of the CT system is about 2 mm in plane. Recently, the thermal design of the detector arc is improved to secure maintenance of constant temperature of thermally sensitive components under changing environmental conditions. This turned out to be a key issue for achieving accurate quantitative measurements. First results of laboratory measurements on a bundle mock-up with this improved system are presented.

  8. High-resolution observations of gamma-ray line emission from SN 1987A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandie, W. G.; Nakano, G. H.; Chase, L. F., Jr.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Wilson, R. B.; Paciesas, W. S.; Lasche, G. P.

    1988-11-01

    A balloon-borne gamma-ray spectrometer was flown from Alice springs, Australia, 1987 October 29 - 31, nominally 250 days after the supernova event. High-resolution data, typically 2.5 keV at 1.33 MeV, were obtained for two transits of the supernova. A significant net flux of gamma rays with energy 847 keV was observed from the direction of SN 1987A on each transit. No prominent gamma-ray features were seen at other energies. A preliminary estimate of the line flux is (5.1±1.7)×10-4photons cm-2s-1. The net flux observed in the first supernova transit extends from 838 keV to 850 keV and may be evidence of dynamical broadening of the 847 keV line. The total excess flux from 838 keV to 850 keV corresponds to (1.0±0.28)×10-3photons cm-2s-1. This line may be interpreted as emission from the first excited state of 56Fe due to the radioactive decay of 56Co.

  9. Diffuse galactic gamma rays at intermediate and high latitudes. Pt. 1. Constraints on the ISM properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cholis, Ilias; Tavakoli, Maryam; Ullio, Piero [SISSA, Trieste (Italy); INFN, Trieste (Italy); Evoli, Carmelo [SISSA, Trieste (Italy); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). National Astronomical Observatories; Maccione, Luca [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    We study the high latitude (vertical stroke b vertical stroke >10 ) diffuse {gamma}-ray emission in the Galaxy in light of the recently published data from the Fermi collaboration at energies between 100 MeV and 100 GeV. The unprecedented accuracy in these measurements allows to probe and constrain the properties of sources and propagation of cosmic rays (CRs) in the Galaxy, as well as confirming conventional assumptions made on the interstellar medium (ISM). Using the publicly available DRAGON code, that has been shown to reproduce local measurements of CRs, we study assumptions made in the literature on HI and H2 gas distributions in the ISM, and non spatially uniform models of diffusion in the Galaxy. By performing a combined analysis of CR and {gamma}-ray spectra, we derive constraints on the properties of the ISM gas distribution and the vertical scale height of galactic CR diffusion, which may have implications also on indirect Dark Matter detection. We also discuss some of the possible interpretations of the break at {proportional_to}230 GeV in CR protons and helium spectra, recently observed by PAMELA and their impact on {gamma}-rays. (orig.)

  10. BiI3 Crystals for High Energy Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nino, Juan C. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Baciak, James [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Johns, Paul [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Sulekar, Soumitra [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Totten, James [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Nimmagadda, Jyothir [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2017-04-12

    BiI3 had been investigated for its unique properties as a layered compound semiconductor for many decades. However, despite the exceptional atomic, physical, and electronic properties of this material, good resolution gamma ray spectra had never been reported for BiI3. The shortcomings that previously prevented BiI3 from reaching success as a gamma ray sensor were, through this project, identified and suppressed to unlock the performance of this promising compound. Included in this work were studies on a number of methods which have, for the first time, enabled BiI3 to exhibit spectral performance rivaling many other candidate semiconductors for room temperature gamma ray sensors. New approaches to crystal growth were explored that allow BiI3 spectrometers to be fabricated with up to 2.2% spectral resolution at 662 keV. Fundamental studies on trap states, dopant incorporation, and polarization were performed to enhance performance of this compound. Additionally, advanced detection techniques were applied to display the capabilities of high quality BiI3 spectrometers. Overall, through this work, BiI3 has been revealed as a potentially transformative material for nuclear security and radiation detection sciences.

  11. High-mass microquasars and low-latitude gamma-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Bosch-Ramon, V; Paredes, J M

    2004-01-01

    Population studies of unidentified EGRET sources suggest that there exist at least three different populations of galactic gamma-ray sources. One of these populations is formed by young objects distributed along the galactic plane with a strong concentration toward the inner spiral arms of the Galaxy. Variability, spectral and correlation analysis indicate that this population is not homogeneous. In particular, there is a subgroup of sources that display clear variability in their gamma-ray fluxes on timescales from days to months. Following the proposal by Kaufman Bernad\\'o et al. (2002), we suggest that this group of sources might be high-mass microquasars, i.e. accreting black holes or neutron stars with relativistic jets and early-type stellar companions. We present detailed inhomogeneous models for the gamma-ray emission of these systems that include both external and synchrotron self-Compton interactions. We have included effects of interactions between the jet and all external photon fields to which it...

  12. Signatures of special nuclear material: High-energy gamma rays following fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, Eric B.; Prussin, Stanley G.; Larimer, Ruth-Mary; Shugart, Howard; Browne, Edgardo; Smith, Alan R.; McDonald, Rchard J.; Nitsche, Heino; Gupta, Puja; Frank, Michael I.; Gosnell, Thomas B.

    2003-05-29

    Since September 11, 2001, much effort has been devoted to the development of new and improved means for the detection and prevention of the clandestine transport of special nuclear material (SNM, i.e. {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu) and other materials for producing weapons of mass destruction. In a recent Brief Communication, Borozdin et al. showed that cosmic-ray muons could be used to image dense objects inside containers. Here we describe a method for unequivocally identifying SNM in large seagoing containers. Our method is based on the fact that neutron-induced fission of {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu is followed by {beta} decays of short-lived fission fragments during which large numbers of high-energy {gamma} rays (above 3000 keV) are emitted. These {gamma} rays have energies above those of natural {gamma} background, are emitted with significantly greater intensity per fission than {beta}-delayed neutrons, have much higher probabilities of escaping hydrogenous cargo loadings than neutrons, and their energy spectra and time dependencies provide a unique signature of SNM. To demonstrate the main properties of high-energy delayed {gamma} rays, we produced neutrons by bombarding a 1-inch thick water-cooled Be target with 16-MeV deuterons from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88-Inch Cyclotron. Neutrons were moderated using steel and polyethylene. We employed a pneumatic transfer system to shuttle targets from the irradiation location inside the polyethylene moderator to a remote shielded counting station. We irradiated {sup 235}U (93% isotopic content), {sup 239}Pu (95% isotopic content), wood, polyethylene, aluminum, sandstone, and steel targets for 30 seconds (in a thermal-neutron flux of 1.5 x 10{sup 6}/cm{sup 2}-sec) and acquired 10 sequential {gamma}-ray spectra, each of 3 sec. duration starting 3 sec. after the end of bombardment. We used an 80% relative efficiency coaxial germanium detector and a 30-cm x 30-cm x 10-cm plastic scintillator to detect

  13. Experimental comparison of high-density scintillators for EMCCD-based gamma ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heemskerk, Jan W T; Kreuger, Rob; Goorden, Marlies C; Korevaar, Marc A N; Salvador, Samuel; Seeley, Zachary M; Cherepy, Nerine J; van der Kolk, Erik; Payne, Stephen A; Dorenbos, Pieter; Beekman, Freek J

    2012-07-21

    Detection of x-rays and gamma rays with high spatial resolution can be achieved with scintillators that are optically coupled to electron-multiplying charge-coupled devices (EMCCDs). These can be operated at typical frame rates of 50 Hz with low noise. In such a set-up, scintillation light within each frame is integrated after which the frame is analyzed for the presence of scintillation events. This method allows for the use of scintillator materials with relatively long decay times of a few milliseconds, not previously considered for use in photon-counting gamma cameras, opening up an unexplored range of dense scintillators. In this paper, we test CdWO₄ and transparent polycrystalline ceramics of Lu₂O₃:Eu and (Gd,Lu)₂O₃:Eu as alternatives to currently used CsI:Tl in order to improve the performance of EMCCD-based gamma cameras. The tested scintillators were selected for their significantly larger cross-sections at 140 keV ((99m)Tc) compared to CsI:Tl combined with moderate to good light yield. A performance comparison based on gamma camera spatial and energy resolution was done with all tested scintillators having equal (66%) interaction probability at 140 keV. CdWO₄, Lu₂O₃:Eu and (Gd,Lu)₂O₃:Eu all result in a significantly improved spatial resolution over CsI:Tl, albeit at the cost of reduced energy resolution. Lu₂O₃:Eu transparent ceramic gives the best spatial resolution: 65 µm full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) compared to 147 µm FWHM for CsI:Tl. In conclusion, these 'slow' dense scintillators open up new possibilities for improving the spatial resolution of EMCCD-based scintillation cameras.

  14. Effects of gamma irradiation on polypropylene, polypropylene + high density polyethylene and polypropylene + high density polyethylene + wood flour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, J.; Albano, C.; Davidson, E.; Poleo, R. [Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas (Venezuela). Escuela de Quimica; Gonzalez, J.; Ichazo, M. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Dept. de Mecanica, Caracas (Venezuela); Chipara, M. [Research Institute for Electrotechnics, Bucharest (Romania)

    2001-04-01

    The effect of the gamma-irradiation on the mechanical properties of the composites, Polypropylene (PP), PP+high density Polyethylene (HDPE), PP+ HDPE+wood flour, where HDPE is virgin and recycled, was studied. This paper discusses the behavior of the composites after exposure to various doses of gamma irradiation (1-7 MRads) in the presence of oxygen. The dependence of mechanical properties on the integral dose for a constant dose rate of 0.48 MRads/h confirms the influence of the irradiation. Strong effects on the elongation at break and break strength is noticed. The mathematical analysis suggests for the PP+r-HDPE a bimolecular process of the elongation at break. On the order hand, for the PP+HDPE a complex process is represented for a three exponential equation. (orig.)

  15. I Search of Narrow Proton-Antiproton Bound States: High Resolution Gamma and Charged Flow Pion Spectra from Protonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petridou, Chariclia I.

    We studied the pp annihilations at rest looking for narrow bound states in the proton-antiproton system. We looked, with high energy resolution, for radiative and pionic transitions in the gamma and charged pion spectra. The detector for the (gamma)(--->)e+e- and the (pi)('(+OR-)) was a magnetic pair spectrometer. The directions of the incident particles (e(+OR-) and (pi)(+OR-)) were determined by a drift chamber module in front of the magnet and the final directions of the particles, if reflected in the magnet, by the same chamber; if transversing the magnet, by an identical module at the rear of the magnet. The momentum was calculated from the directions of the particle. The following gamma spectra were obtained. Gammas with both e+, e- reflected in the magnet at a field of about 6 Kgauss (RR-gammas). That covers the region between 80 and 180 MeV, corresponding to a missing mass 1794 to 1686 MeV/c. The energy resolution is about 2.5 MeV ((sigma)) at 129 MeV (confirmed by the observed Panofsky gammas from stopping (pi)('-)p data) and 5 MeV ((sigma)) at 80 MeV. We have no evidence for narrow peaks except for the Panofsky gamma produced with a branching ratio of 3.3 x 10('-3) from (pi)('-) stops in the target. Upper limits for (gamma) -transitions in the region between 80 to 180 MeV were set at about 10('-3). Gammas with one e+(e-) reflected and the other transversing the magnet (RP-gammas) for fields of about 6 and 12 Kgauss, covering the region (GREATERTHEQ) 200 MeV, which corresponds to missing mass (LESSTHEQ) 1664 MeV/c('2). The gamma energy resolution in MeV is 51(.)E('2) (GeV) and 25.5(.)E('2)(GeV) for the low and high field respectively. Finally the charged pion spectra for those transversing the magnet are given for both magnet settings and as a function of charge multiplicity, covering the momentum region from (GREATERTHEQ) 150 MeV/c. The momentum resolution is the same as that for the RP-gammas. The two body annihilations (pi)('+)(pi)('-) and (pi

  16. Clinical outcomes of gamma knife radiosurgery in the salvage treatment of patients with recurrent high-grade glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elaimy, Ameer L; Mackay, Alexander R; Lamoreaux, Wayne T; Demakas, John J; Fairbanks, Robert K; Cooke, Barton S; Lamm, Andrew F; Lee, Christopher M

    2013-12-01

    Previously published randomized evidence did not report a survival advantage for patients diagnosed with grade IV glioma who were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery followed by external beam radiation therapy and chemotherapy when compared to patients treated with external beam radiation therapy and chemotherapy alone. In recent years, gamma knife radiosurgery has become increasingly popular as a salvage treatment modality for patients diagnosed with recurrent high-grade glioma. The purpose of this article is to review the efficacy of gamma knife radiosurgery for patients who suffer from this malignancy. Retrospective, prospective, and randomized clinical studies published between the years 2000 and 2012 analyzing gamma knife radiosurgery for patients with high-grade glioma were reviewed. After assessing patient age, Karnofsky performance status, tumor histology, and extent of resection, gamma knife radiosurgery is a viable, minimally invasive treatment option for patients diagnosed with recurrent high-grade glioma. The available prospective and retrospective evidence suggests that gamma knife radiosurgery provides patients with a high local tumor control rate and a median survival after tumor recurrence ranging from 13 to 26 months. Gamma knife radiosurgery followed by chemotherapy for recurrent high-grade glioma may provide select patients with increased levels of survival. However, further investigation into this matter is needed due to the limited number of published reports. Additional clinical research is also needed to analyze the efficacy and radiation-related toxicities of fractionated gamma knife radiosurgery due to its potential to limit treatment-associated morbidity. Gamma knife radiosurgery is a safe and effective treatment option for select patients diagnosed with recurrent high-grade glioma. Although treatment outcomes have improved, further evidence in the form of phase III randomized trials is needed to assess the durability of treating

  17. Direct transitions from high-K isomers to low-K bands -- {gamma} softness or coriolis coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Yoshifumi R.; Narimatsu, Kanako; Ohtsubo, Shin-Ichi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Recent measurements of direct transitions from high-K isomers to low-K bands reveal severe break-down of the K-selection rule and pose the problem of how to understand the mechanism of such K-violation. The authors recent systematic calculations by using a simple {gamma}-tunneling model reproduced many of the observed hindrances, indicating the importance of the {gamma} softness. However, there are some data which cannot be explained in terms of the {gamma}-degree of freedom. In this talk, the authors also discuss the results of conventional Coriolis coupling calculations, which is considered to be another important mechanism.

  18. Discovery of two candidate pulsar wind nebulae in very-high-energy gamma rays

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonian, F; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Behera, B; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berge, D; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bolz, O; Borrel, V; Braun, I; Brion, E; Brown, A M; Buhler, R; Büsching, I; Boutelier, T; Carrigan, S; Chadwick, P M; Chounet, L M; Coignet, G; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Degrange, B; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ata:, A; Domainko, W; O'Connor-Drury, L; Dubus, G; Egberts, K; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Feinstein, F; Fiasson, A; Förster, A; Fontaine, G; Funk, Seb; Funk, S; Fuling, M; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, D; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hoffmann, A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Hoppe, S; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; De Jager, O C; Kendziorra, E; Kerschhaggl, M; Khelifi, B; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Lamanna, G; Latham, I J; Le Gallou, R; Lemiere, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lohse, T; Martin, J M; Martineau-Huynh, O; Marcowith, A; Masterson, C; Maurin, G; McComb, T J L; Moulin, E; De Naurois, Mathieu; Nedbal, D; Nolan, S J; Noutsos, A; Olive, J P; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Panter, M; Pedaletti, G; Pelletier, G; Petrucci, P O; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Ranchon, S; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rolland, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Ruppel, J; Sahakian, V V; Santangelo, A; Sauge, L; Schlenker, S; Schlickeiser, R; Schroder, R; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Shalchi, A; Sol, H; Spangler, D; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Superina, G; Tam, P H; Tavernet, J P; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vialle, J P; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Wagner, S J; Ward, M

    2007-01-01

    We present the discovery of two very-high-energy gamma-ray sources in an ongoing systematic search for emission above 100 GeV from pulsar wind nebulae in survey data from the H.E.S.S. telescope array. Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes are ideal tools for searching for extended emission from pulsar wind nebulae in the very-high-energy regime. H.E.S.S., with its large field of view of 5 degrees and high sensitivity, gives new prospects for the search for these objects. An ongoing systematic search for very-high-energy emission from energetic pulsars over the region of the Galactic plane between -60 degrees < l < 30 degrees, -2 degrees < b < 2 degrees is performed. For the resulting candidates, the standard H.E.S.S. analysis was applied and a search for multi-wavelength counterparts was performed. We present the discovery of two new candidate gamma-ray pulsar wind nebulae, HESS J1718-385 and HESS J1809-193. H.E.S.S. has proven to be a suitable instrument for pulsar wind nebula searches.

  19. On The Origin Of High Energy Correlations in Gamma-ray Bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocevski, Daniel

    2012-04-03

    I investigate the origin of the observed correlation between a gamma-ray burst's {nu}F{sub {nu}} spectral peak E{sub pk} and its isotropic equivalent energy E{sub iso} through the use of a population synthesis code to model the prompt gamma-ray emission from GRBs. By using prescriptions for the distribution of prompt spectral parameters as well as the population's luminosity function and co-moving rate density, I generate a simulated population of GRBs and examine how bursts of varying spectral properties and redshift would appear to a gamma-ray detector here on Earth. I find that a strong observed correlation can be produced between the source frame Epk and Eiso for the detected population despite the existence of only a weak and broad correlation in the original simulated population. The energy dependance of a gamma-ray detector's flux-limited detection threshold acts to produce a correlation between the source frame E{sub pk} and E{sub iso} for low luminosity GRBs, producing the left boundary of the observed correlation. Conversely, very luminous GRBs are found at higher redshifts than their low luminosity counterparts due to the standard Malquest bias, causing bursts in the low E{sub pk}, high E{sub iso} regime to go undetected because their E{sub pk} values would be redshifted to energies at which most gamma-ray detectors become less sensitive. I argue that it is this previously unexamined effect which produces the right boundary of the observed correlation. Therefore, the origin of the observed correlation is a complex combination of the instrument's detection threshold, the intrinsic cutoff in the GRB luminosity function, and the broad range of redshifts over which GRBs are detected. Although the GRB model presented here is a very simplified representation of the complex nature of GRBs, these simulations serve to demonstrate how selection effects caused by a combination of instrumental sensitivity and the cosmological nature of an

  20. EJ-309 pulse shape discrimination performance with a high gamma-ray-to-neutron ratio and low threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, A.C., E-mail: Alexis.C.Kaplan@gmail.com [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Blvd., Ann Arbor, MI 48104 (United States); Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Flaska, M.; Enqvist, A.; Dolan, J.L.; Pozzi, S.A. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Blvd., Ann Arbor, MI 48104 (United States)

    2013-11-21

    Measuring neutrons in the presence of high gamma-ray fluence is a challenge with multi-particle detectors. Organic liquid scintillators such as the EJ-309 are capable of accurate pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) but the chance for particle misclassification is not negligible for some applications. By varying the distance from an EJ-309 scintillator to a strong-gamma-ray source and keeping a weak-neutron source at a fixed position, various gamma-to-neutron ratios can be measured and PSD performance can be quantified. Comparing neutron pulse-height distributions allows for pulse-height specific PSD evaluation, and quantification and visualization of deviation from {sup 252}Cf alone. Even with the addition of the misclassified gamma-rays, the PSD is effective in separating particles so that neutron count rate can be predicted with less than 10% error up to a gamma-to-neutron ratio of almost 650. For applications which can afford a reduction in neutron detection efficiency, PSD can be sufficiently effective in discriminating particles to measure a weak neutron source in a high gamma-ray background. -- Highlights: •We measure neutrons in a high photon background with EJ-309 liquid scintillators. •A low threshold is used to test the limits of particle discrimination. •A weak neutron signal is detectable with a gamma/neutron ratio as high as 770. •Photon pileup most commonly adds to error in classification of neutrons. •Neutron count rates are within 10% of expected rate under high gamma background.

  1. Search for a high mass $Z\\gamma$ resonance using the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Marchiori, Giovanni; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Searches are presented for high mass resonances, not predicted by the Standard Model, decaying to a $Z$ boson and a photon. The searches are performed using up to 13.3 fb$^{−1}$ of $\\sqrt{s} = 13$ TeV proton–proton collision data collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Both leptonic and hadronic decays of the $Z$ boson are considered. No significant excess with respect to the expected background is observed in the data in the whole mass range investigated, and upper limits are set on the production cross section times decay branching ratio to $Z\\gamma$ of a narrow scalar boson.

  2. On the origin of very high energy gamma-rays from radio galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Rieger, Frank M

    2012-01-01

    Radio galaxies have emerged as a new gamma-ray emitting source class on the extragalactic sky. With their jets misaligned, i.e. not directly pointing towards us, they offer a unique tool to probe some of the fundamental (and otherwise hidden) non-thermal processes in AGN. This contribution briefly summarizes the observed characteristics of the four radio galaxies detected so far at very high energies (VHE). Given its prominence, particular attention is given to the origin of the variable VHE emission in M87. We discuss some of the theoretical progress achieved for this source within recent years highlighting, amongst others, the relevance of magnetospheric particle acceleration and emission models.

  3. Combined Effects of Gamma Radiation and High Dietary Iron on Peripheral Leukocyte Distribution and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, Brian E.; Morgan, Jennifer L. L.; Quiriarte, Heather A.; Sams, Clarence F.; Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2012-01-01

    Both radiation and increased iron stores can independently increase oxidative damage, resulting in protein, lipid and DNA oxidation. Oxidative stress increases the risk of many health problems including cancer, cataracts, and heart disease. This study, a subset of a larger interdisciplinary investigation of the combined effect of iron overload on sensitivity to radiation injury, monitored immune parameters in the peripheral blood of rats subjected to gamma radiation, high dietary iron or both. Specific immune measures consisted of: (1) peripheral leukocyte distribution, (2) plasma cytokine levels and (3) cytokine production profiles following whole blood mitogenic stimulation

  4. Effects of conversions for high energy neutrinos originating from cosmological $\\gamma$-ray burst fireballs

    CERN Document Server

    Athar, H

    1999-01-01

    We study neutrino conversions in the recently envisaged source of high energy ($E \\geq 10^{6}$ GeV) neutrinos, that is, in the vicinity of cosmological gamma-ray burst fireballs (GRB). We consider mainly the possibility of neutrino conversions due to an interplay of neutrino transition magnetic moment, $\\mu$, and the violation of equivalence principle (VEP), parameterized by $\\Delta f$, in a reasonable strength of magnetic field in the vicinity of the GRB. We point out that for $\\Delta f \\sim 10^{-25}(\\delta m^2/1 {eV}^2)$, a resonant spin-flavour precession between $\\bar{\

  5. A Monte Carlo study of a high resolution $\\gamma$-detector for small organ imaging in Nuclear Medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Ortigão, C

    2004-01-01

    A reliable Monte Carlo simulation study is of significance importance to evaluate the performance of a gamma-ray detector and the search for compromises between spatial resolution, sensitivity and energy resolution. The development of a simulation package for a new compact gamma camera based on GEANT3 is described in this report. This simulation takes into account the interaction of gamma-rays in the crystal, the production and transport of scintillation photons and allows an accurate radiation transport description of photon attenuation in high-Z collimators, for SPECT applications. In order to achieve the best setup configuration different detector arrangements were explored, namely different scintillation crystals, coatings, reflector properties and polishing types. The conventional detector system, based on PMT light readout, was compared with an HPD system. Different collimators were studied for high resolution applications with compact gamma-cameras.

  6. Search for high-frequency periodicities in time-tagged event data from gamma ray bursts and soft gamma repeaters

    CERN Document Server

    Kruger, A T; Wasserman, I M; Kruger, Adam T.; Loredo, Thomas J.; Wasserman, Ira

    2002-01-01

    We analyze the Time-Tagged Event (TTE) data from observations of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) and soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE). These data provide the best available time resolution for GRBs and SGRs. We have performed an extensive search for weak periodic signals in the frequency range 400 Hz to 2500 Hz using the burst records for 2203 GRBs and 152 SGR flares. The study employs the Rayleigh power as a test statistic to evaluate the evidence for periodic emissions. We find no evidence of periodic emissions from these events at these frequencies. In all but a very few cases the maximum power values obtained are consistent with what would be expected by chance from a non-periodic signal. In those few instances where there is marginal evidence for periodicity there are problems with the data that cast doubt on the reality of the signal. For classical GRBs, the largest Rayleigh power occurs in bursts whose TTE data appear to be corrupted. For SGRs, our largest Raylei...

  7. Stacked search for time shifted high energy neutrinos from gamma ray bursts with the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Adrián-Martínez; Albert; André; Anghinolfi; Anton; Ardid; Aubert,; Baret; Barrios-Marti; Basa; Bertin; Biagi; Bormuth; Bouwhuis; Bruijn, de, M.E.

    2017-01-01

    A search for high-energy neutrino emission correlated with gamma-ray bursts outside the electromagnetic prompt-emission time window is presented. Using a stacking approach of the time delays between reported gamma-ray burst alerts and spatially coincident muon-neutrino signatures, data from the Antares neutrino telescope recorded between 2007 and 2012 are analysed. One year of public data from the IceCube detector between 2008 and 2009 have been also investigated. The respective timing profil...

  8. Enhanced high-energy gamma-ray emission from the microquasar Cygnus X-3 detected by Fermi/LAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Alan; Corbel, Stephane

    2017-02-01

    Following the recent decrease of the hard X-ray emission from the high-mass X-ray binary Cygnus X-3 as seen by the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (https://swift.gsfc.nasa.gov/results/transients/CygX-3/), the Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed significant gamma-ray emission originating from the microquasar.

  9. High-level expression of a chemically synthesized gene for human interferon-gamma using a prokaryotic expression vector.

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    A chemically synthesized gene for human interferon-gamma has been cloned into a prokaryotic expression vector under the regulation of a synthetic constitutive transcriptional-translational control unit that contains a strong bacteriophage T5 early promoter and a strong ribosome-binding site. Cells harboring the recombinant plasmid express high levels (4 X 10(9) units per liter of culture) of antiviral activity specific for interferon-gamma. Analysis of total cell lysates on NaDodSO4/polyacryl...

  10. High-precision gamma-ray spectroscopy for enhancing production and application of medical isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutchan, E. A.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Smith, S. V.; Muench, L.; Nino, M.; Greene, J. P.; Carpenter, M. P.; Zhu, S.; Chillery, T.; Chowdhury, P.; Harding, R.; Lister, C. J.

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear medicine is a field which requires precise decay data for use in planning radionuclide production and in imaging and therapeutic applications. To address deficiencies in decay data, sources of medical isotopes were produced and purified at the Brookhaven Linear Isotope Producer (BLIP) then shipped to Argonne National Laboratory where high-precision, gamma-ray measurements were performed using Gammasphere. New decay schemes for a number of PET isotopes and the impact on dose calculations will be presented. To investigate the production of next-generation theranostic or radiotherapeutic isotopes, cross section measurements with high energy protons have also been explored at BLIP. The 100-200 MeV proton energy regime is relatively unexplored for isotope production, thus offering high discovery potential but at the same time a challenging analysis due to the large number of open channels at these energies. Results of cross sections deduced from Compton-suppressed, coincidence gamma-ray spectroscopy performed at Lowell will be presented, focusing on the production of platinum isotopes by irradiating natural platinum foils with 100 to 200 MeV protons. DOE Isotope Program is acknowledged for funding ST5001030. Work supported by the US DOE under Grant DE-FG02-94ER40848 and Contracts DE-AC02-98CH10946 and DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  11. A clinical gamma camera-based pinhole collimated system for high resolution small animal SPECT imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mejia

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the present study was to upgrade a clinical gamma camera to obtain high resolution tomographic images of small animal organs. The system is based on a clinical gamma camera to which we have adapted a special-purpose pinhole collimator and a device for positioning and rotating the target based on a computer-controlled step motor. We developed a software tool to reconstruct the target’s three-dimensional distribution of emission from a set of planar projections, based on the maximum likelihood algorithm. We present details on the hardware and software implementation. We imaged phantoms and heart and kidneys of rats. When using pinhole collimators, the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the imaging system depend on parameters such as the detector-to-collimator and detector-to-target distances and pinhole diameter. In this study, we reached an object voxel size of 0.6 mm and spatial resolution better than 2.4 and 1.7 mm full width at half maximum when 1.5- and 1.0-mm diameter pinholes were used, respectively. Appropriate sensitivity to study the target of interest was attained in both cases. Additionally, we show that as few as 12 projections are sufficient to attain good quality reconstructions, a result that implies a significant reduction of acquisition time and opens the possibility for radiotracer dynamic studies. In conclusion, a high resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT system was developed using a commercial clinical gamma camera, allowing the acquisition of detailed volumetric images of small animal organs. This type of system has important implications for research areas such as Cardiology, Neurology or Oncology.

  12. A clinical gamma camera-based pinhole collimated system for high resolution small animal SPECT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia, J.; Galvis-Alonso, O.Y., E-mail: mejia_famerp@yahoo.com.b [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia Molecular; Castro, A.A. de; Simoes, M.V. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Clinica Medica; Leite, J.P. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Dept. de Neurociencias e Ciencias do Comportamento; Braga, J. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Astrofisica

    2010-11-15

    The main objective of the present study was to upgrade a clinical gamma camera to obtain high resolution tomographic images of small animal organs. The system is based on a clinical gamma camera to which we have adapted a special-purpose pinhole collimator and a device for positioning and rotating the target based on a computer-controlled step motor. We developed a software tool to reconstruct the target's three-dimensional distribution of emission from a set of planar projections, based on the maximum likelihood algorithm. We present details on the hardware and software implementation. We imaged phantoms and heart and kidneys of rats. When using pinhole collimators, the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the imaging system depend on parameters such as the detector-to-collimator and detector-to-target distances and pinhole diameter. In this study, we reached an object voxel size of 0.6 mm and spatial resolution better than 2.4 and 1.7 mm full width at half maximum when 1.5- and 1.0-mm diameter pinholes were used, respectively. Appropriate sensitivity to study the target of interest was attained in both cases. Additionally, we show that as few as 12 projections are sufficient to attain good quality reconstructions, a result that implies a significant reduction of acquisition time and opens the possibility for radiotracer dynamic studies. In conclusion, a high resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system was developed using a commercial clinical gamma camera, allowing the acquisition of detailed volumetric images of small animal organs. This type of system has important implications for research areas such as Cardiology, Neurology or Oncology. (author)

  13. The Hard VHE Gamma-ray Emission in High-Redshift TeV Blazars: Comptonization of Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation in an Extended Jet?

    CERN Document Server

    Boettcher, Markus; Finke, Justin D

    2008-01-01

    Observations of very-high-energy (VHE, E > 250 GeV) gamma-ray emission from several blazars at z > 0.1 have placed stringent constraints on the elusive spectrum and intensity of the intergalactic infrared background radiation (IIBR). Correcting their observed VHE spectrum for gamma-gamma absorption even by the lowest plausible level of the IIBR provided evidence for a very hard (photon spectral index Gamma_{ph} 4 X 10^6) on kiloparsec scales along the jet.

  14. High Brightness Gamma-Ray Production at Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihalcea, Daniel [Northern Illinois U.; Jacobson, B. [RadiaBeam Tech.; Murokh, A. [RadiaBeam Tech.; Piiot, P. [Northern Illinois U.; Ruan, J. [Fermilab

    2016-10-10

    Electron beams with energies of the order of a few 100’s of MeV and low transverse emittance, in combination with powerful infrared lasers, allow for the production of high quality gamma rays through Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS). At Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility, a 300 MeV beam will be used to generate gamma rays with maximum photon energies of up to ∼ 1.5 MeV and brightness of the order of 1021 photons/[s-(mm-mrad)2- 0.1%BW]. Due to the low electron-beam transverse emittance, the relative bandwidth of the scattered radiation is expected to be ≤ 1%. A key challenge toward the production of high radiation dose and brightness is to enhance the energy of the infrared 3 ps laser pulses to the joule level. In this contribution, we present the plans for the experimental setup, along with comprehensive numerical simulations of the ICS process.

  15. Milagro Search for Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Swift Era

    CERN Document Server

    Parkinson, P M S

    2006-01-01

    The recently launched Swift satellite is providing an unprecedented number of rapid and accurate Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) localizations, facilitating a flurry of follow-up observations by a large number of telescopes at many different wavelengths. The Very High Energy (VHE, >100 GeV) regime has so far been relatively unexplored. Milagro is a wide field of view (2 sr) and high duty cycle (> 90%) ground-based gamma-ray telescope which employs a water Cherenkov detector to monitor the northern sky almost continuously in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range. We have searched the Milagro data for emission from the most recent GRBs identified within our field of view. These include three Swift bursts which also display late-time X-ray flares. We have searched for emission coincident with these flares. No significant detection was made. A 99% confidence upper limit is provided for each of the GRBs, as well as the flares.

  16. New constraints on hidden photons using very high energy gamma-rays from the Crab Nebula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zechlin, Hannes-Sebastian; Horns, Dieter [Universitaet Hamburg, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Hamburg (Germany); Redondo, Javier [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Extensions of the current standard model of particle physics, in particular those based on string theory, typically predict a new U(1) gauge symmetry in a hidden sector. The corresponding gauge boson, often called hidden photon, naturally interacts with the ordinary photon via gauge kinetic mixing, leading to photon - hidden photon oscillations. In this framework, one expects photon disappearance as a function of the mass of the hidden photon and the mixing angle, loosely constrained from theory. Several experiments have been carried out or are planned to provide constraints on the mass-mixing plane. In this contribution we derive new constraints on the hidden photon parameters, using very high energy {gamma}-rays detected from the Crab Nebula, whose broad-band spectral characteristics are well understood. The very high energy {gamma}-ray observations offer the possibility to provide bounds in a broad mass range at a previously unexplored energy and distance scale. Using existing data that were taken with the HEGRA, H.E.S.S., MAGIC, and Whipple Cherenkov telescopes, we discuss our results in the context of current constraints and consider the possibilities of using astrophysical data to search for hidden photon signatures.

  17. Toward a next-generation high-energy gamma-ray telescope. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, E.D.; Evans, L.L. [eds.

    1997-03-01

    It has been some time between the time of the first Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) workshop, Towards a Next Generation High-Energy Gamma-Ray Telescope, in late August 1994, and the publication of a partial proceedings of that meeting. Since then there has been considerable progress in both the technical and project development of GLAST. From its origins at SLAC/Stanford in early 1992, the collaboration has currently grown to more than 20 institutions from France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the US, and is still growing. About half of these are astrophysics/astronomy institutions; the other half are high-energy physics institutions. About 100 astronomers, astrophysicists, and particle physicists are currently spending some fraction of their time on the GLAST R and D program. The late publication date of this proceedings has resulted in some additions to the original content of the meeting. The first paper is actually a brochure prepared for NASA by Peter Michelson in early 1996. Except for the appendix, the other papers in the proceedings were presented at the conference, and written up over the following two years. Some presentations were never written up.

  18. Automatic Quenching of High Energy gamma-ray Sources by Synchrotron Photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stawarz, Lukasz; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.; Kirk, John; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.

    2007-02-02

    Here we investigate evolution of a magnetized system, in which continuously produced high energy emission undergoes annihilation on a soft photon field, such that the synchrotron radiation of the created electron-positron pairs increases number density of the soft photons. This situation is important in high energy astrophysics, because, for an extremely wide range of magnetic field strengths (nano to mega Gauss), it involves {gamma}-ray photons with energies between 0.3GeV and 30TeV. We derive and analyze the conditions for which the system is unstable to runaway production of soft photons and ultrarelativistic electrons, and for which it can reach a steady state with an optical depth to photon-photon annihilation larger than unity, as well those for which efficient pair loading of the emitting volume takes place. We also discuss the application of our analysis to a realistic situation involving astrophysical sources of a broad-band {gamma}-ray emission and briefly consider the particular case of sources close to active supermassive black holes.

  19. High Purity Germanium Gamma-PHA Assay of Uranium Scrap Cans Used in 321-M Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaymeh, S. R.; Dewberry, R. A.; Casella, V.

    2001-12-01

    The Analytical Development Section of SRTC was requested by the Facilities Disposition Division (FDD) to determine the holdup of enriched uranium in the 321-M facility as part of an overall deactivation project of the facility. The 321-M facility was used to fabricate enriched uranium fuel assemblies, lithium-aluminum target tubes, neptunium assemblies, and miscellaneous components for the production reactors. The facility also includes the 324-M storage building and the passageway connecting it to 321-M. The results of the holdup assays are essential for determining compliance with the Solid Waste's Waste Acceptance Criteria, Material Control & Accountability, and to meet criticality safety controls. This report describes and documents the use of a portable HPGe detector and EG&G DART system that contains a high voltage power supply, signal processing electronics, a personal computer with Gamma-Vision software, and space to store and manipulate multiple 4096-channel gamma-ray spectra to assay for 235U content. The system was used to assay a large number of scrap cans used to store highly enriched uranium (HEU) chips and filings. This report includes a description of two efficiency calibration configurations and also the results of the assay. A description of the quality control checks is included as well.

  20. High-energy gamma-rays in the hard spectral state of Cyg X-1

    CERN Document Server

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A; Chernyakova, Maria; Pooley, Guy G

    2016-01-01

    We have obtained a firm detection of Cyg X-1 during its hard and intermediate spectral states in the energy range of 40 MeV--60 GeV based on observations by Fermi Large Area Telescope, confirming the independent results at $\\geq$60 MeV of Zanin et al. The detection significance is $\\simeq\\! 8\\sigma$ in the 0.1--10 GeV range. In the soft state, we have found upper limits on the emission at energies $\\geq$0.2 MeV, also in agreement with Zanin et al. However, we have found emission with a very soft spectrum in the 40--80 MeV range, not detected previously. This is likely to represent the high-energy cutoff of the high-energy power-law tail observed in the soft state. Similarly, we have detected a $\\gamma$-ray soft excess in the hard state, which appears to be of similar origin. We have also confirmed the presence of an orbital modulation of the detected emission in the hard state, expected if the $\\gamma$-rays are from Compton upscattering of stellar blackbody photons. However, the observed modulation is signifi...

  1. The high resolution gamma imager (HRGI): a CCD based camera for medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, John. E.; Fraser, George. W.; Keay, Adam; Bassford, David; Ott, Robert; Ryder, William

    2003-11-01

    We describe the High Resolution Gamma Imager (HRGI): a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) based camera for imaging small volumes of radionuclide uptake in tissues. The HRGI is a collimated, scintillator-coated, low cost, high performance imager using low noise CCDs that will complement whole-body imaging Gamma Cameras in nuclear medicine. Using 59.5 keV radiation from a 241Am source we have measured the spatial resolution and relative efficiency of test CCDs from E2V Technologies (formerly EEV Ltd.) coated with Gadox (Gd 2O 2S(Tb)) layers of varying thicknesses. The spatial resolution degrades from 0.44 to 0.6 mm and the detection efficiency increases (×3) as the scintillator thickness increases from 100 to 500 μm. We also describe our first image using the clinically important isotope 99mTc. The final HRGI will have intrinsic sub-mm spatial resolution (˜0.7 mm) and good energy resolution over the energy range 30-160 keV.

  2. Laser-driven high-power X- and gamma-ray ultra-short pulse source

    CERN Document Server

    Esirkepov, Timur Zh; Zhidkov, Alexei G; Pirozhkov, Alexander S; Kando, Masaki

    2008-01-01

    A novel ultra-bright high-intensity source of X-ray and gamma radiation is suggested. It is based on the double Doppler effect, where a relativistic flying mirror reflects a counter-propagating electromagnetic radiation causing its frequency multiplication and intensification, and on the inverse double Doppler effect, where the mirror acquires energy from an ultra-intense co-propagating electromagnetic wave. The role of the flying mirror is played by a high-density thin plasma slab accelerating in the radiation pressure dominant regime. Frequencies of high harmonics generated at the flying mirror by a relativistically strong counter-propagating radiation undergo multiplication with the same factor as the fundamental frequency of the reflected radiation, approximately equal to the quadruple of the square of the mirror Lorentz factor.

  3. Stacked search for time shifted high energy neutrinos from gamma ray bursts with the Antares neutrino telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J.-J.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Marti, J.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bormuth, R.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Carr, J.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; De Bonis, G.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Dumas, A.; Eberl, T.; Elsässer, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Fehn, K.; Felis, I.; Fermani, P.; Folger, F.; Fusco, L. A.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Geißelsöder, S.; Geyer, K.; Giordano, V.; Gleixner, A.; Gracia-Ruiz, R.; Graf, K.; Hallmann, S.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Hößl, J.; Hofestädt, J.; Hugon, C.; James, C. W.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.; Kießling, D.; Kooijman, P.; Kouchner, A.; Kreter, M.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lefèvre, D.; Leonora, E.; Loucatos, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Marinelli, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Mathieu, A.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Moussa, A.; Müller, C.; Nezri, E.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Racca, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richter, R.; Roensch, K.; Saldaña, M.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Schüssler, F.; Seitz, T.; Sieger, C.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Trovato, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Tönnis, C.; Vallage, B.; Vallée, C.; Van Elewyck, V.; Visser, E.; Vivolo, D.; Wagner, S.; Wilms, J.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2017-01-01

    A search for high-energy neutrino emission correlated with gamma-ray bursts outside the electromagnetic prompt-emission time window is presented. Using a stacking approach of the time delays between reported gamma-ray burst alerts and spatially coincident muon-neutrino signatures, data from the Antares neutrino telescope recorded between 2007 and 2012 are analysed. One year of public data from the IceCube detector between 2008 and 2009 have been also investigated. The respective timing profiles are scanned for statistically significant accumulations within 40 days of the Gamma Ray Burst, as expected from Lorentz Invariance Violation effects and some astrophysical models. No significant excess over the expected accidental coincidence rate could be found in either of the two data sets. The average strength of the neutrino signal is found to be fainter than one detectable neutrino signal per hundred gamma-ray bursts in the Antares data at 90% confidence level.

  4. Stacked search for time shifted high energy neutrinos from gamma ray bursts with the Antares neutrino telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adrian-Martinez, S.; Ardid, M.; Felis, I.; Martinez-Mora, J.A.; Saldana, M. [Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, Institut d' Investigacio per a la Gestio Integrada de les Zones Costaneres (IGIC), Gandia (Spain); Albert, A.; Drouhin, D.; Racca, C. [GRPHE-Institut Universitaire de Technologie de Colmar, 34 rue du Grillenbreit, BP 50568, Colmar (France); Andre, M. [Technical University of Catalonia, Laboratory of Applied Bioacoustics, Vilanova i la Geltru, Barcelona (Spain); Anghinolfi, M. [INFN-Sezione di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Anton, G.; Eberl, T.; Enzenhoefer, A.; Fehn, K.; Folger, F.; Geisselsoeder, S.; Geyer, K.; Gleixner, A.; Graf, K.; Hallmann, S.; Hoessl, J.; Hofestaedt, J.; James, C.W.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.; Kiessling, D.; Lahmann, R.; Richter, R.; Roensch, K.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Seitz, T.; Sieger, C.; Tselengidou, M.; Wagner, S. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erlangen (Germany); Aubert, J.J.; Bertin, V.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Carr, J.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Dornic, D.; Mathieu, A.; Vallee, C. [CPPM, Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille (France); Baret, B.; Barrios-Marti, J.; Hernandez-Rey, J.J.; Sanchez-Losa, A.; Toennis, C.; Zornoza, J.D.; Zuniga, J. [CSIC-Universitat de Valencia, IFIC-Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Edificios Investigacion de Paterna, Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Basa, S.; Marcelin, M.; Nezri, E. [Pole de l' Etoile Site de Chateau-Gombert, LAM-Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille, Marseille Cedex 13 (France); Biagi, S.; Coniglione, R.; Distefano, C.; Piattelli, P.; Riccobene, G.; Sapienza, P.; Trovato, A. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS), Catania (Italy); Bormuth, R.; Jong, M. de; Samtleben, D.F.E. [Nikhef, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Universiteit Leiden, Leids Instituut voor Onderzoek in Natuurkunde, Leiden (Netherlands); Bouwhuis, M.C.; Heijboer, A.J.; Michael, T.; Steijger, J.J.M.; Visser, E. [Nikhef, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bruijn, R. [Nikhef, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Universiteit van Amsterdam, Instituut voor Hoge-Energie Fysica, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Capone, A.; De Bonis, G.; Fermani, P.; Perrina, C. [INFN-Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita La Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Caramete, L.; Pavalas, G.E.; Popa, V. [Institute for Space Sciences, Bucharest, Magurele (Romania); Chiarusi, T. [INFN-Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Circella, M. [INFN-Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Creusot, A.; Galata, S.; Gracia-Ruiz, R.; Van Elewyck, V. [APC, Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Dekeyser, I.; Lefevre, D.; Tamburini, C. [Aix-Marseille University, Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography (MIO), Marseille Cedex 9 (France); Universite du Sud Toulon-Var, CNRS-INSU/IRD UM 110, La Garde Cedex (France); Deschamps, A.; Hello, Y. [Geoazur, Universite Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS/INSU, IRD, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, Sophia Antipolis (France); Donzaud, C. [APC, Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Universite Paris-Sud, Orsay Cedex (France); Dumas, A.; Gay, P. [Clermont Universite, Universite Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Elsaesser, D.; Kadler, M.; Kreter, M.; Mueller, C. [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Wuerzburg (Germany); Fusco, L.A.; Margiotta, A.; Pellegrino, C.; Spurio, M. [INFN-Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Bologna (Italy); Giordano, V. [INFN-Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Haren, H. van [Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ), ' t Horntje, Texel (Netherlands); Hugon, C.; Taiuti, M. [INFN-Sezione di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Genoa (Italy); Kooijman, P. [Nikhef, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Universiteit Utrecht, Faculteit Betawetenschappen, Utrecht (Netherlands); Universiteit van Amsterdam, Instituut voor Hoge-Energie Fysica, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kouchner, A. [APC, Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Institut Universitaire de France, Paris (France); Kreykenbohm, I.; Wilms, J. [Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Bamberg (Germany); Kulikovskiy, V. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS), Catania (Italy); Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Leonora, E. [INFN-Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia dell' Universita, Catania (Italy); Loucatos, S. [APC, Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); CEA Saclay, Direction des Sciences de la Matiere, Institut de recherche sur les lois fondamentales de l' Univers, Service de Physique des Particules, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Marinelli, A. [INFN-Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Pisa (Italy); Migliozzi, P. [INFN-Sezione di Napoli, Naples (IT); Moussa, A. [University Mohammed I, Laboratory of Physics of Matter and Radiations, Oujda (MA); Pradier, T. [Universite de Strasbourg et CNRS/IN2P3, IPHC-Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, 23 rue du Loess, BP 28, Strasbourg Cedex 2 (FR); Sanguineti, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Genoa (IT); Schuessler, F.; Stolarczyk, T.; Vallage, B. [CEA Saclay, Direction des Sciences de la Matiere, Institut de recherche sur les lois fondamentales de l' Univers, Service de Physique des Particules, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (FR); Vivolo, D. [INFN-Sezione di Napoli, Naples (IT); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita Federico II di Napoli, Naples (IT)

    2017-01-15

    A search for high-energy neutrino emission correlated with gamma-ray bursts outside the electromagnetic prompt-emission time window is presented. Using a stacking approach of the time delays between reported gamma-ray burst alerts and spatially coincident muon-neutrino signatures, data from the Antares neutrino telescope recorded between 2007 and 2012 are analysed. One year of public data from the IceCube detector between 2008 and 2009 have been also investigated. The respective timing profiles are scanned for statistically significant accumulations within 40 days of the Gamma Ray Burst, as expected from Lorentz Invariance Violation effects and some astrophysical models. No significant excess over the expected accidental coincidence rate could be found in either of the two data sets. The average strength of the neutrino signal is found to be fainter than one detectable neutrino signal per hundred gamma-ray bursts in the Antares data at 90% confidence level. (orig.)

  5. Stacked search for time shifted high energy neutrinos from gamma ray bursts with the \\ANTARES neutrino telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Adrian-Martínez, S; André, M; Anton, G; Ardid, M; Aubert, J -J; Baret, B; Barrios-Marti, J; Basa, S; Bertin, V; Biagi, S; Bormuth, R; Bouwhuis, M C; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Busto, J; Capone, A; Caramete, L; Carr, J; Chiarusi, T; Circella, M; Coniglione, R; Costantini, H; Coyle, P; Creusot, A; Dekeyser, I; Deschamps, A; De Bonis, G; Distefano, C; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Drouhin, D; Dumas, A; Eberl, T; Elsasser, D; Enzenhofer, A; Fehn, K; Felis, I; Fermani, P; Folger, F; Fusco, L A; Galatà, S; Gay, P; Geisselsoeder, S; Geyer, K; Giordano, V; Gleixner, A; Gracia-Ruiz, R; Graf, K; Hallmann, S; van Haren, H; Heijboer, A J; Hello, Y; Hernàndez-Rey, J J; Hoessl, J; Hofestadt, J; Hugon, C; James, C W; de Jong, M; Kadler, M; Kadler, M; Kalekin, O; Katz, U; Kiessling, D; Kooijman, P; Kouchner, A; Kreter, M; Kreykenbohm, I; Kulikovskiy, V; Lahmann, R; Lefèvre, D; Leonora, E; Marcelin, M; Margiotta, A; Marinelli, A; Martínez-Mora, J A; Mathieu, A; Michael, T; Migliozzi, P; Moussa, A; Muller, C; Nezri, E; Pavalas, G E; Pellegrino, C; Perrina, C; Piattelli, P; Popa, V; Pradier, T; Racca, C; Riccobene, G; Richter, R; Roensch, K; Saldaña, M; Samtleben, D F E; Sánchez-Losa, A; Sanguineti, M; Sapienza, P; Schmid, J; Schnabel, J; Schussler, F; Seitz, T; Sieger, C; Spurio, M; Steijger, J J M; Stolarczyk, Th; Taiuti, M; Tamburini, C; Trovato, A; Tselengidou, M; Tonnis, C; Vallage, B; Vallée, C; Van Elewyck, V; Visser, E; Vivolo, D; Wagner, S; Wilms, J; Zornoza, J D; Zúñiga, J

    2016-01-01

    A search for high-energy neutrino emission correlated with gamma-ray bursts outside the electromagnetic prompt-emission time window is presented. Using a stacking approach of the time delays between reported gamma-ray burst alerts and spatially coincident muon-neutrino signatures, data from the Antares neutrino telescope recorded between 2007 and 2012 are analysed. One year of public data from the IceCube detector between 2008 and 2009 have been also investigated. The respective timing pro?les are scanned for statistically significant accumulations within 40 days of the Gamma Ray Burst, as expected from Lorentz Invariance Violation effects and some astrophysical models. No significant excess over the expected accidental coincidence rate could be found in either of the two data sets. The average strength of the neutrino signal is found to be fainter than one detectable neutrino signal per hundred gamma-ray bursts in the Antares data at 90% confidence level.

  6. HAND-HELD GAMMA-RAY SPECTROMETER BASED ON HIGH-EFFICIENCY FRISCH-RING CdZnTe DETECTORS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CUI,Y.

    2007-05-01

    Frisch-ring CdZnTe detectors have demonstrated good energy resolution, el% FWHM at 662 keV, and good efficiency for detecting gamma rays. This technique facilitates the application of CdZnTe materials for high efficiency gamma-ray detection. A hand-held gamma-ray spectrometer based on Frisch-ring detectors is being designed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It employs an 8x8 CdZnTe detector array to achieve a high volume of 19.2 cm3, so that detection efficiency is significantly improved. By using the front-end ASICs developed at BNL, this spectrometer has a small profile and high energy resolution. The spectrometer includes signal processing circuit, digitization and storage circuit, high-voltage module, and USB interface. In this paper, we introduce the details of the system structure and report our test results with it.

  7. Absorption of Very High Energy Gamma Rays in the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Vernetto, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Galactic Gamma ray astronomy at very high energy (E > 30 TeV) is a vital tool in the study of the non-thermal universe. The interpretation of the observations in this energy region requires the precise modeling of the attenuation of photons due to pair production interactions, where the targets are the radiation fields present in interstellar space. For gamma rays with energy E > 300 TeV the attenuation is mostly due to the photons of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR). At lower energy the most important target are infrared photons with wavelengths in the range 50-500 micron emitted by dust. The evaluation of the attenuation requires a good knowledge of the density, and energy and angular distributions of the target photons for all positions in the Galaxy. In this work we discuss a simple model for the infrared radiation that depends on only few parameters associated to the space and temperature distributions of the emitting dust. The model allows to compute with good accuracy the effects of abs...

  8. Modeling Gamma-Ray Attenuation in High-Redshift GeV Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Gilmore, Rudy C; Primack, Joel R; Somerville, Rachel S

    2008-01-01

    We present two models for the cosmological UV background light, and calculate the opacity of GeV gamma--rays out to redshift 9. The contributors to the background include 2 possible quasar emissivities, and output from star--forming galaxies as determined by recent a semi--analytic model (SAM) of structure formation. The SAM used in this work is based upon a hierarchical build-up of structure in a $\\Lambda$CDM universe and is highly successful in reproducing a variety of observational parameters. Above 1 Rydberg energy, ionizing radiation is subject to reprocessing by the IGM, which we treat using our radiative transfer code, CUBA. The two models for quasar emissivity differing above z = 2.3 are chosen to match the ionization rates observed using flux decrement analysis and the higher values of the line-of-sight proximity effect. We also investigate the possibility of a flat star formation rate density at z $>5$. We conclude that observations of gamma--rays from 10 to 100 GeV by Fermi (GLAST) and the next gen...

  9. Milagro Constraints on Very High Energy Emission from Short Duration Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Abdo, A A; Berley, D; Blaufuss, E; Casanova, S; Dingus, B L; Ellsworth, R W; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Hays, E; Hoffman, C M; Kolterman, B E; Lansdell, C P; Linnemann, J T; McEnery, J E; Mincer, A I; Némethy, P; Noyes, D; Ryan, J M; Samuelson, F W; Parkinson, P M Saz; Shoup, A; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Vasileiou, V; Walker, G P; Williams, D A; Xu, X W; Yodh, G B

    2007-01-01

    Recent rapid localizations of short, hard gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) by the Swift and HETE satellites have led to the observation of the first afterglows and the measurement of the first redshifts from this type of burst. Detection of >100 GeV counterparts would place powerful constraints on GRB mechanisms. Seventeen short duration (100 GeV counterparts to these GRBs and find no significant emission correlated with these bursts. Due to the absorption of high-energy gamma rays by the extragalactic background light (EBL), detections are only expected for redshifts less than ~0.5. While most long duration GRBs occur at redshifts higher than 0.5, the opposite is thought to be true of short GRBs. Lack of a detected VHE signal thus allows setting meaningful fluence limits. One GRB in the sample (050509b) has a likely association with a galaxy at a redshift of 0.225, while another (051103) has been tentatively linked to the nearby galaxy M81. Fluence limits are corrected for EBL absorption, either using the known measu...

  10. Modelling the high-energy emission from gamma-ray binaries using numerical relativistic hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Dubus, Guillaume; Fromang, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    Detailed modeling of the high-energy emission from gamma-ray binaries has been propounded as a path to pulsar wind physics. Fulfilling this ambition requires a coherent model of the flow and its emission in the region where the pulsar wind interacts with the stellar wind of its companion. We developed a code that follows the evolution and emission of electrons in the shocked pulsar wind based on inputs from a relativistic hydrodynamical simulation. The code is used to model the well-documented spectral energy distribution and orbital modulations from LS 5039. The pulsar wind is fully confined by a bow shock and a back shock. The particles are distributed into a narrow Maxwellian, emitting mostly GeV photons, and a power law radiating very efficiently over a broad energy range from X-rays to TeV gamma rays. Most of the emission arises from the apex of the bow shock. Doppler boosting shapes the X-ray and VHE lightcurves, constraining the system inclination to $i\\approx 35^{\\rm o}$. There is a tension between th...

  11. PoGOLite - A High Sensitivity Balloon-Borne Soft Gamma-ray Polarimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Arimoto, Makoto; Axelsson, Magnus; Bettolo, Cecilia Marini; Björnsson, Claes-Ingvar; Bogaert, Gilles; Carlson, Per; Craig, William; Ekeberg, Tomas; Engdegård, Olle; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Gunji, Shuichi; Hjalmarsdotter, Linnea; Iwan, Bianca; Kanai, Yoshikazu; Kataoka, Jun; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kazejev, Jaroslav; Kiss, Mózsi; Klamra, Wlodzimierz; Larsson, Stefan; Madejski, Grzegorz; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Ng, Johnny; Pearce, Mark; Ryde, Felix; Suhonen, Markus; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tanaka, Takuya; Thurston, Timothy; Ueno, Masaru; Varner, Gary; Yamamoto, Kazuhide; Yamashita, Yuichiro; Ylinen, Tomi; Yoshida, Hiroaki

    2007-01-01

    We describe a new balloon-borne instrument (PoGOLite) capable of detecting 10% polarisation from 200mCrab point-like sources between 25 and 80keV in one 6 hour flight. Polarisation measurements in the soft gamma-ray band are expected to provide a powerful probe into high-energy emission mechanisms as well as the distribution of magnetic fields, radiation fields and interstellar matter. At present, only exploratory polarisation measurements have been carried out in the soft gamma-ray band. Reduction of the large background produced by cosmic-ray particles has been the biggest challenge. PoGOLite uses Compton scattering and photo-absorption in an array of 217 well-type phoswich detector cells made of plastic and BGO scintillators surrounded by a BGO anticoincidence shield and a thick polyethylene neutron shield. The narrow FOV (1.25msr) obtained with well-type phoswich detector technology and the use of thick background shields enhance the detected S/N ratio. Event selections based on recorded phototube wavefor...

  12. Diffuse Galactic Gamma Rays at intermediate and high latitudes. I. Constraints on the ISM properties

    CERN Document Server

    Cholis, I; Evoli, C; Maccione, L; Ullio, P

    2011-01-01

    We study the high latitude (|b|>10) diffuse gamma-ray emission in the Galaxy in light of the recently published data from the Fermi collaboration at energies between 100 MeV and 100 GeV. The unprecedented accuracy in these measurements allows to probe and constrain the properties of sources and propagation of cosmic rays (CRs) in the Galaxy, as well as confirming conventional assumptions made on the interstellar medium (ISM). Using the publicly available DRAGON code, that has been shown to reproduce local measurements of CRs, we study assumptions made in the literature on HI and H2 gas distributions in the ISM, and non spatially uniform models of diffusion in the Galaxy. By performing a combined analysis of CR and gamma-ray spectra, we derive constraints on the properties of the ISM gas distribution and the vertical scale height of galactic CR diffusion, which may have implications also on indirect Dark Matter detection. We also discuss some of the possible interpretations of the break at ~230 GV in CR proton...

  13. Very high-energy gamma ray astronomy. [using the atmospheric cerenkov technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindlay, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Recent results in ground-based very high-energy (less than 10 to the eleventh power eV) gamma-ray astronomy are reviewed. The various modes of the atmospheric Cerenkov technique are described, and the importance of cosmic ray rejection methods is stressed. The positive detections (at approximately less than 10 to the 12th power eV) of the Crab pulsar that suggest a very flat spectrum and time-variable pulse phase are discussed. Observations of other pulsars (particularly Vela) suggest that these features may be general. The steady flux upper limits for the Crab Nebula are thus reconsidered, and a new value of the implied (Compton-synchrotron) magnetic field in the Nebula is reported. Evidence that a 4.8-hour modulated effect was detected at E sub gamma is less than 10 to the 12th power eV from Cyg X-3 is strengthened in that the exact period originally proposed agrees well with a recent determination of the X-ray period. The southern sky observations are reviewed, and the significance of the detection of an active galaxy (NGC 5128) is considered for source models and future observations.

  14. Tests of Quantum Gravity and Large Extra Dimensions Models Using High Energy Gamma Ray Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Stecker, F W

    2004-01-01

    Observations of the multi-TeV spectra of the nearby BL Lac objects Mkn 421 and Mkn 501 exhibit the high energy cutoffs predicted to be the result of intergalactic annihilation interactions, primarily with IR photons having a flux level as determined by various astronomical observations. After correcting for such intergalactic absorption, these spectra can be explained within the framework of synchrotron self-Compton emission models. Stecker & Glashow have shown that the existence of this annihilation via electron-positron pair production puts strong constraints on Lorentz violation. Such constraints have important implications for quantum gravity models and large extra dimension models. We also discuss the implications of observations of high energy gamma-rays from the Crab Nebula on constraining quantum gravity models.

  15. Prompt high-energy emission from gamma-ray bursts in the internal shock model

    CERN Document Server

    Bosnjak, Z; Dubus, G

    2008-01-01

    The prompt GRB emission is thought to arise from electrons accelerated in internal shocks propagating within a highly relativistic outflow. The launch of Fermi offers the prospect of observations with unprecedented sensitivity in high-energy (>100 MeV) gamma-rays. The aim is to explore the predictions for HE emission from internal shocks, taking into account both dynamical and radiative aspects, and to deduce how HE observations constrain the properties of the relativistic outflow. The emission is modeled by combining a time-dependent radiative code with a dynamical code giving the evolution of the physical conditions in the shocked regions.Synthetic lightcurves and spectra are compared to observations. The HE emission deviates significantly from analytical estimates, which tend to overpredict the IC component, when the time dependence and full cross-sections are included. The exploration of the parameter space favors the case where the dominant process in the BATSE range is synchrotron emission. The HE compo...

  16. Gamma irradiation route to synthesis of highly re-dispersible natural polymer capped silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Y.N. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Kolkata Centre, III/LB-8 Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 098 (India); Banerjee, D. [Radiochemistry Division, Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Datta, A. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Kolkata Centre, III/LB-8 Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 098 (India); Das, S.K.; Guin, R. [Radiochemistry Division, Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Saha, A., E-mail: abhijit@alpha.iuc.res.i [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Kolkata Centre, III/LB-8 Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 098 (India)

    2010-12-15

    Aqueous dispersions of highly stable, redispersible silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were synthesized using gamma radiolysis with gum acacia as a protecting agent. The formation of nanosized silver was confirmed by its characteristic surface plasmon absorption peak at around 405 nm in UV-vis spectra. The size of the silver nanoparticles can be tuned by controlling the radiation dose, ratio of gum acacia to silver ions and also the ionic strength of the medium. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurement of the as-synthesized nanoparticles indicated the size less than 3 nm at higher dose of radiation and this also corroborated the size measurement from the width of the corresponding X-ray diffraction (XRD) peak. The face centered cubic (fcc) crystallinity of the nanoparticles was evident from XRD and high resolution transmission electron microscopic (HRTEM) measurements. Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopic data indicate a bonding of Ag NPs with COO{sup -} group of acacia through bridging bidentate linkage.

  17. MCz diode response as a high-dose gamma radiation dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo, F. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares-IPEN-CNEN/SP, Caixa Postal 11049 - 05422 970 Sao Paulo/SP (Brazil); Goncalves, J.A.C. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares-IPEN-CNEN/SP, Caixa Postal 11049 - 05422 970 Sao Paulo/SP (Brazil); Depto. de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Sao Paulo-PUC/SP, Rua Marques de Paranagua no 111-01303 050 Sao Paulo/SP (Brazil); Khoury, H.J. [Nuclear Energy Department, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco-UFPE, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire no 1000-50740 540 Recife/PE (Brazil); Napolitano, C.M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares-IPEN-CNEN/SP, Caixa Postal 11049 - 05422 970 Sao Paulo/SP (Brazil); Haerkoenen, J. [Helsinki Institute of Physics-HIP, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki (Finland); Bueno, C.C. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares-IPEN-CNEN/SP, Caixa Postal 11049 - 05422 970 Sao Paulo/SP (Brazil); Depto. de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Sao Paulo-PUC/SP, Rua Marques de Paranagua no 111-01303 050 Sao Paulo/SP (Brazil)], E-mail: ccbueno@ipen.br

    2008-02-15

    This work presents the preliminary results obtained with a high-resistivity magnetic Czochralski (MCz) silicon diode processed at the Helsinki Institute of Physics as a high-dose gamma dosimeter in radiation processing. The irradiation was performed using a {sup 60}Co source (Gammacell 220, MDS Nordion) within total doses from 100 Gy up to 3 kGy at a dose rate of 3 kGy/h. In this interval, the dosimetric response of the diode is linear with a correlation coefficient (r{sup 2}) higher than 0.993. However, without any irradiation procedure, the device showed a small sensitivity dependence on the accumulated dose. For total dose of 3 kGy, the observed decrease was about 2%. To clarify the origin of this possible radiation damage effect, some studies are under way.

  18. High-resolution profiling of gammaH2AX around DNA double strand breaks in the mammalian genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovoni, Jason S; Caron, Pierre; Lassadi, Imen; Nicolas, Estelle; Massip, Laurent; Trouche, Didier; Legube, Gaëlle

    2010-04-21

    Chromatin acts as a key regulator of DNA-related processes such as DNA damage repair. Although ChIP-chip is a powerful technique to provide high-resolution maps of protein-genome interactions, its use to study DNA double strand break (DSB) repair has been hindered by the limitations of the available damage induction methods. We have developed a human cell line that permits induction of multiple DSBs randomly distributed and unambiguously positioned within the genome. Using this system, we have generated the first genome-wide mapping of gammaH2AX around DSBs. We found that all DSBs trigger large gammaH2AX domains, which spread out from the DSB in a bidirectional, discontinuous and not necessarily symmetrical manner. The distribution of gammaH2AX within domains is influenced by gene transcription, as parallel mappings of RNA Polymerase II and strand-specific expression showed that gammaH2AX does not propagate on active genes. In addition, we showed that transcription is accurately maintained within gammaH2AX domains, indicating that mechanisms may exist to protect gene transcription from gammaH2AX spreading and from the chromatin rearrangements induced by DSBs.

  19. Effect of gamma irradiation on the optical properties of UHMWPE (Ultra-high-molecular-weight-polyethylene) polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghuvanshi, S.K., E-mail: sraghu06@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Natural Science, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110025 (India); Ahmad, Bashir; Siddhartha [Department of Physics, Faculty of Natural Science, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110025 (India); Srivastava, A.K. [Department of Applied Science, Sharda University, Plot No. 32-34, Knowledge Park-III, Greater Noida, Uttar Pradesh 201306 (India); Krishna, J.B.M. [UGC-DAEF Consortium for Scientific Research, Kolkata Center, III/LB-8 Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700098 (India); Wahab, M.A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Natural Science, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110025 (India)

    2012-01-15

    The UV-Visible absorption spectra of virgin and high dose gamma irradiated (up to 2000 kGy) UHMWPE polymer have been studied by using UV-Visible spectrophotometer (JASCO, V-570). The existence of the peaks, their shifting and broadening as a result of gamma irradiation has been observed. In the present work the Urbach energy is calculated by using Urbach edge method. Also the direct and indirect energy band gap in virgin and gamma irradiated UHMWPE polymer has been calculated. The values of indirect energy band gap have been found to be lower than the corresponding values of direct energy band gap. A decrease in the optical energy band gap with increasing gamma irradiation has been discussed on the basis of gamma-irradiation-induced modification in the UHMWPE polymer. The correlation between optical energy band gap and the number of carbon atoms in a cluster with modified Tauc's equation has been discussed in this polymer. We have also observed the color formation which became more and more prominent with increasing dose and at the highest dose the fully transparent sample became completely opaque. Looking at the trend of the absorption curve this polymer can be used as a very good dosimeter for the gamma ray irradiation.

  20. High flux polarized gamma rays production: first measurements with a four-mirror cavity at the ATF

    CERN Document Server

    Delerue, Nicolas; Chaikovska, Iryna; Chiche, R; Cizeron, R; Cohen, M; Colin, J; Cornebise, P; Jehanno, D; Labaye, F; Lacroix, M; Marie, R; Peinaud, Y; Soskov, V; Variola, A; Zomer, F; Cormier, E; Flaminio, R; Pinard, L; Araki, S; Funahashi, S; Honda, Y; Omori, T; Shimizu, H; Terunuma, T; Urakawa, J; Akagi, T; Miyoshi, S; Nagata, S; Takahashi, T

    2011-01-01

    The next generation of e+/e- colliders will require a very intense flux of gamma rays to allow high current polarized positrons to be produced. This can be achieved by converting polarized high energy photons in polarized pairs into a target. In that context, an optical system consisting of a laser and a four-mirror passive Fabry-Perot cavity has recently been installed at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at KEK to produce a high flux of polarized gamma rays by inverse Compton scattering. In this contribution, we describe the experimental system and present preliminary results. An ultra-stable four-mirror non planar geometry has been implemented to ensure the polarization of the gamma rays produced. A fiber amplifier is used to inject about 10W in the high finesse cavity with a gain of 1000. A digital feedback system is used to keep the cavity at the length required for the optimal power enhancement. Preliminary measurements show that a flux of about $4\\times10^6 \\gamma$/s with an average energy of about 2...

  1. Sound identification in human auditory cortex: Differential contribution of local field potentials and high gamma power as revealed by direct intracranial recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourski, Kirill V; Steinschneider, Mitchell; Rhone, Ariane E; Oya, Hiroyuki; Kawasaki, Hiroto; Howard, Matthew A; McMurray, Bob

    2015-09-01

    High gamma power has become the principal means of assessing auditory cortical activation in human intracranial studies, albeit at the expense of low frequency local field potentials (LFPs). It is unclear whether limiting analyses to high gamma impedes ability of clarifying auditory cortical organization. We compared the two measures obtained from posterolateral superior temporal gyrus (PLST) and evaluated their relative utility in sound categorization. Subjects were neurosurgical patients undergoing invasive monitoring for medically refractory epilepsy. Stimuli (consonant-vowel syllables varying in voicing and place of articulation and control tones) elicited robust evoked potentials and high gamma activity on PLST. LFPs had greater across-subject variability, yet yielded higher classification accuracy, relative to high gamma power. Classification was enhanced by including temporal detail of LFPs and combining LFP and high gamma. We conclude that future studies should consider utilizing both LFP and high gamma when investigating the functional organization of human auditory cortex. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Imaging of radiocesium uptake dynamics in a plant body by using a newly developed high-resolution gamma camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawachi, Naoki; Yin, Yong-Gen; Suzui, Nobuo; Ishii, Satomi; Yoshihara, Toshihiro; Watabe, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Fujimaki, Shu

    2016-01-01

    We developed a new gamma camera specifically for plant nutritional research and successfully performed live imaging of the uptake and partitioning of (137)Cs in intact plants. The gamma camera was specially designed for high-energy gamma photons from (137)Cs (662 keV). To obtain reliable images, a pinhole collimator made of tungsten heavy alloy was used to reduce penetration and scattering of gamma photons. A single-crystal scintillator, Ce-doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12, with high sensitivity, no natural radioactivity, and no hygroscopicity was used. The array block of the scintillator was coupled to a high-quantum efficiency position sensitive photomultiplier tube to obtain accurate images. The completed gamma camera had a sensitivity of 0.83 count s(-1) MBq(-1) for (137)Cs with an energy window from 600 keV to 730 keV, and a spatial resolution of 23.5 mm. We used this gamma camera to study soybean plants that were hydroponically grown and fed with 2.0 MBq of (137)Cs for 6 days to visualize and investigate the transport dynamics in aerial plant parts. (137)Cs gradually appeared in the shoot several hours after feeding, and then accumulated preferentially and intensively in growing pods and seeds; very little accumulation was observed in mature leaves. Our results also suggested that this gamma-camera method may serve as a practical analyzing tool for breeding crops and improving cultivation techniques resulting in low accumulation of radiocesium into the consumable parts of plants.

  3. High-energy neutrino production from photo-hadronic interactions of gamma rays from Active Galactic Nuclei at source

    CERN Document Server

    Arteaga-Velazquez, J C

    2013-01-01

    Recent astronomical observations reveal that Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are sources of high-energy radiation. For example, the Fermi-LAT and Hess telescopes have detected gamma-ray emissions from the cores of several types of AGN's. Even more, the Pierre Auger observatory has found a correlation of ultra-high energy cosmic ray events with the position of Active Galactic Nuclei, such as Centaurus A. In this way, according to particle physics, a flux of high-energy neutrinos should be expected from the interactions of cosmic and gamma-rays with the ambient matter and radiation at the source. In this work, estimations of the diffuse neutrino flux from AGN's arising from interactions of the gamma radiation with the gas and dust of the sources will be presented.

  4. Limits on the high-energy gamma and neutrino fluxes from the SGR 1806-20 giant flare of 27 December 2004 with the AMANDA-II detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achterberg, A; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Ahrens, J; Andeen, K; Atlee, D W; Bahcall, J N; Bai, X; Baret, B; Bartelt, M; Barwick, S W; Bay, R; Beattie, K; Becka, T; Becker, J K; Becker, K-H; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Blaufuss, E; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bolmont, J; Böser, S; Botner, O; Bouchta, A; Braun, J; Burgess, C; Burgess, T; Castermans, T; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clem, J; Cowen, D F; D'Agostino, M V; Davour, A; Day, C T; De Clercq, C; Demirörs, L; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; Deyoung, T; Diaz-Velez, J C; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Duvoort, M R; Edwards, W R; Ehrlich, R; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Feser, T; Filimonov, K; Fox, B D; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Ganugapati, R; Geenen, H; Gerhardt, L; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Gozzini, R; Grullon, S; Gross, A; Gunasingha, R M; Gurtner, M; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hanson, K; Hardtke, D; Hardtke, R; Harenberg, T; Hart, J E; Hauschildt, T; Hays, D; Heise, J; Helbing, K; Hellwig, M; Herquet, P; Hill, G C; Hodges, J; Hoffman, K D; Hommez, B; Hoshina, K; Hubert, D; Hughey, B; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hundertmark, S; Hülss, J-P; Ishihara, A; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jones, A; Joseph, J M; Kampert, K-H; Karle, A; Kawai, H; Kelley, J L; Kestel, M; Kitamura, N; Klein, S R; Klepser, S; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Krasberg, M; Kuehn, K; Landsman, H; Leich, H; Liubarsky, I; Lundberg, J; Madsen, J; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McCauley, T; McParland, C P; Meli, A; Messarius, T; Mészáros, P; Miyamoto, H; Mokhtarani, A; Montaruli, T; Morey, A; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Münich, K; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Niessen, P; Nygren, D R; Ogelman, H; Olbrechts, Ph; Olivas, A; Patton, S; Peña-Garay, C; Pérez de Los Heros, C; Piegsa, A; Pieloth, D; Pohl, A C; Porrata, R; Pretz, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Razzaque, S; Refflinghaus, F; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Rizzo, A; Robbins, S; Roth, P; Rott, C; Rutledge, D; Ryckbosch, D; Sander, H-G; Sarkar, S; Schlenstedt, S; Schmidt, T; Schneider, D; Seckel, D; Seo, S H; Seunarine, S; Silvestri, A; Smith, A J; Solarz, M; Song, C; Sopher, J E; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Steffen, P; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stoufer, M C; Stoyanov, S; Strahler, E A; Straszheim, T; Sulanke, K-H; Sullivan, G W; Sumner, T J; Taboada, I; Tarasova, O; Tepe, A; Thollander, L; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Turcan, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; Van Overloop, A; Voigt, B; Wagner, W; Walck, C; Waldmann, H; Walter, M; Wang, Y-R; Wendt, C; Wiebusch, C H; Wikström, G; Williams, D R; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Woschnagg, K; Xu, X W; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zornoza, J D

    2006-12-01

    On 27 December 2004, a giant gamma flare from the Soft Gamma-Ray Repeater 1806-20 saturated many satellite gamma-ray detectors, being the brightest transient event ever observed in the Galaxy. AMANDA-II was used to search for down-going muons indicative of high-energy gammas and/or neutrinos from this object. The data revealed no significant signal, so upper limits (at 90% C.L.) on the normalization constant were set: 0.05(0.5) TeV-1 m;{-2} s;{-1} for gamma=-1.47 (-2) in the gamma flux and 0.4(6.1) TeV-1 m;{-2} s;{-1} for gamma=-1.47 (-2) in the high-energy neutrino flux.

  5. Low and high gamma oscillations in rat ventral striatum have distinct relationships to behavior, reward, and spiking activity on a learned spatial decision task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthijs A A Van Der Meer

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Local field potential (LFP oscillations in the brain reflect organization thought to be important for perception, attention, movement, and memory. In the basal ganglia, including dorsal striatum, dysfunctional LFP states are associated with Parkinson’s disease, while in healthy subjects, dorsal striatal LFPs have been linked to decision-making processes. However, LFPs in ventral striatum have been less studied. We report that in rats running a spatial decision task, prominent gamma-50 (45-55 Hz and gamma-80 (70-85 Hz oscillations in ventral striatum had distinct relationships to behavior, task events, and spiking activity. Gamma-50 power increased sharply following reward delivery and before movement initiation, while in contrast, gamma-80 power ramped up gradually to reward locations. Gamma-50 power was low and contained little structure during early learning, but rapidly developed a stable pattern, while gamma-80 power was initially high before returning to a stable level within a similar timeframe. Putative fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs showed phase, firing rate, and coherence relationships with gamma-50 and gamma-80, indicating that the observed LFP patterns are locally relevant. Furthermore, in a number of FSIs such relationships were specific to gamma-50 or gamma-80, suggesting that partially distinct FSI populations mediate the effects of gamma-50 and gamma-80.

  6. GAMMA-400 gamma-ray observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Topchiev, N P; Bonvicini, V; Adriani, O; Aptekar, R L; Arkhangelskaja, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Bakaldin, A V; Bergstrom, L; Berti, E; Bigongiari, G; Bobkov, S G; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bonechi, L; Bongi, M; Bottai, S; Castellini, G; Cattaneo, P W; Cumani, P; Dalkarov, O D; Dedenko, G L; De Donato, C; Dogiel, V A; Finetti, N; Gascon, D; Gorbunov, M S; Gusakov, Yu V; Hnatyk, B I; Kadilin, V V; Kaplin, V A; Kaplun, A A; Kheymits, M D; Korepanov, V E; Larsson, J; Leonov, A A; Loginov, V A; Longo, F; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P S; Martinez, M; Menshenin, A L; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Moiseev, A A; Mori, N; Moskalenko, I V; Naumov, P Yu; Papini, P; Paredes, J M; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Rappoldi, A; Ricciarini, S; Runtso, M F; Ryde, F; Serdin, O V; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stozhkov, Yu I; Suchkov, S I; Taraskin, A A; Tavani, M; Tiberio, A; Tyurin, E M; Ulanov, M V; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Ward, J E; Yurkin, Yu T; Zampa, N; Zirakashvili, V N; Zverev, V G

    2015-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope with excellent angular and energy resolutions is designed to search for signatures of dark matter in the fluxes of gamma-ray emission and electrons + positrons. Precision investigations of gamma-ray emission from Galactic Center, Crab, Vela, Cygnus, Geminga, and other regions will be performed, as well as diffuse gamma-ray emission, along with measurements of high-energy electron + positron and nuclei fluxes. Furthermore, it will study gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun during periods of solar activity. The energy range of GAMMA-400 is expected to be from ~20 MeV up to TeV energies for gamma rays, up to 20 TeV for electrons + positrons, and up to 10E15 eV for cosmic-ray nuclei. For high-energy gamma rays with energy from 10 to 100 GeV, the GAMMA-400 angular resolution improves from 0.1{\\deg} to ~0.01{\\deg} and energy resolution from 3% to ~1%; the proton rejection factor is ~5x10E5. GAMMA-400 will be installed onboard the Russian space observatory.

  7. Gamma delta T cells promote inflammation and insulin resistance during high fat diet-induced obesity in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamma delta T cells are resident in adipose tissue and increase during diet-induced obesity. Their possible contribution to the inflammatory response that accompanies diet-induced obesity was investigated in mice after a 5-10 week high milk fat diet. The high milk fat diet resulted in significant in...

  8. Common haplotype dependency of high G gamma-globin gene expression and high Hb F levels in beta-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Labie, D; Pagnier, J.; Lapoumeroulie, C; Rouabhi, F; Dunda-Belkhodja, O; Chardin, P; Beldjord, C; Wajcman, H; Fabry, M E; Nagel, R L

    1985-01-01

    We have studied 42 homozygous beta-thalassemia patients from Algeria and 34 sickle cell anemia patients from Senegal and Benin, determining the relationship between haplotypes, Hb F, and G gamma-globin/A gamma-globin ratios. Populations selected have a high frequency of haplotype homozygotes because of consanguinity (Algeria) and geographic homogeneity (West Africa). We find in beta-thalassemia patients, that haplotype IX in haplotypic homozygotes and heterozygotes, haplotype III in heterozyg...

  9. Nuclear structure at high spin using multidetector gamma array and ancillary detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Muralithar

    2014-04-01

    A multidetector gamma array (GDA), for studying nuclear structure was built with ancillary devices namely gamma multiplicity filter and charged particle detector array. This facility was designed for in-beam gamma spectroscopy measurements in fusion evaporation reactions at Inter-University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi. Description of the facility and in-beam performance with two experimental studies done are presented. This array was used in a number of nuclear spectroscopic and reaction investigations.

  10. LONG-TERM MONITORING OF MRK 501 FOR ITS VERY HIGH ENERGY {gamma} EMISSION AND A FLARE IN 2011 OCTOBER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartoli, B.; Catalanotti, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' , Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant' Angelo, via Cinthia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Bernardini, P.; Bleve, C. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica ' E. De Giorgi' dell' Universita del Salento, via per Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Bi, X. J.; Cao, Z.; Chen, S. Z.; Chen, Y. [Key Laboratory of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 918, 100049 Beijing (China); Bolognino, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica dell' Universita di Pavia, via Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Branchini, P.; Budano, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Roma Tre, via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Roma (Italy); Calabrese Melcarne, A. K. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-CNAF, Viale Berti-Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Camarri, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Roma ' Tor Vergata' , via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Cardarelli, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Roma Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Cattaneo, C. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pavia, via Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Chen, T. L. [Tibet University, 850000 Lhasa, Xizang (China); Creti, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Lecce, via per Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Cui, S. W. [Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050016, Hebei (China); Dai, B. Z. [Yunnan University, 2 North Cuihu Rd., 650091 Kunming, Yunnan (China); D' Ali Staiti, G., E-mail: chensz@ihep.ac.cn [Dipartimento di Fisica e Tecnologie Relative, Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, I-90128 Palermo (Italy); Collaboration: ARGO-YBJ Collaboration; and others

    2012-10-10

    As one of the brightest active blazars in both X-ray and very high energy {gamma}-ray bands, Mrk 501, is very useful for physics associated with jets from active galactic nuclei. The ARGO-YBJ experiment has monitored Mrk 501 for {gamma}-rays above 0.3 TeV since 2007 November. The largest flare since 2005 was observed from 2011 October and lasted until about 2012 April. In this paper, a detailed analysis of this event is reported. During the brightest {gamma}-ray flaring episodes from 2011 October 17 to November 22, an excess of the event rate over 6{sigma} is detected by ARGO-YBJ in the direction of Mrk 501, corresponding to an increase of the {gamma}-ray flux above 1 TeV by a factor of 6.6 {+-} 2.2 from its steady emission. In particular, the {gamma}-ray flux above 8 TeV is detected with a significance better than 4{sigma}. Based on time-dependent synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) processes, the broadband energy spectrum is interpreted as the emission from an electron energy distribution parameterized with a single power-law function with an exponential cutoff at its high-energy end. The average spectral energy distribution for the steady emission is well described by this simple one-zone SSC model. However, the detection of {gamma}-rays above 8 TeV during the flare challenges this model due to the hardness of the spectra. Correlations between X-rays and {gamma}-rays are also investigated.

  11. Gamma Ray Bursts: recent results and connections to very high energy Cosmic Rays and Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Mészáros, Péter; Veres, Péter

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are the most concentrated explosions in the Universe. They have been detected electromagnetically at energies up to tens of GeV, and it is suspected that they could be active at least up to TeV energies. It is also speculated that they could emit cosmic rays and neutrinos at energies reaching up to the $10^{18}-10^{20}$ eV range. Here we review the recent developments in the photon phenomenology in the light of \\swift and \\fermi satellite observations, as well as recent IceCube upper limits on their neutrino luminosity. We discuss some of the theoretical models developed to explain these observations and their possible contribution to a very high energy cosmic ray and neutrino background.

  12. MAGIC detects activity from PKS 1424+240 at very-high-energy gamma rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzoyan, Razmik

    2017-03-01

    The MAGIC telescopes have observed an increase in the very-high-energy (VHE; > 50 GeV) gamma-ray flux from PKS 1424+240, RA: 14:27:00.4 and DEC: +23:48:00, J2000.0 (Wenger, M. et al., 2000, A & AS, v.143, 9). The preliminary analysis of the MAGIC data taken on 2017/03/09, indicates an integral photon flux of (7.6 +/- 2.3) x 10^-11 [cm^-2/s] above 70 GeV. The estimated flux corresponds to 10+/-3 % of the Crab Nebula integral flux above the same energy threshold (70 GeV), and shows a hint of elevated flux in comparison with the previous detections (Archambault, S. et al., 2014, ApJL, 785,1, L16 and the references therein).

  13. Experimental and Simulation of Gamma Radiation Dose Rate for High Exposure Building Material

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Natural radioactivity concentrations in high exposure building materials are commonly used in Iran, which is measured a direct exposure by using {\\gamma}-ray spectrometry. The values for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K were in the ranges 3.8 - 94.2, 6.5 - 172.2 and 556.9 - 1539.2 Bqkg-1, respectively. The absorbed dose rates in the standard dwelling room due to 238U, 232Th series and 40K were calculated with MCNPX code. The simulation and experimental results were between 7.95 - 41.74 and 8.36 - 39.99 nGy h-1, respectively. These results were compared with experimental outing and there was overlap closely. The simulation results are able to develop for any kind of dwelling places.

  14. Lightweight High Temperature Beta Gamma Alloy/Process Development for Disk and Blade Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The primary material and manufacturing limitations of gamma TiAl alloys include processing difficulties, requiring costly non-conventional processing requirements,...

  15. A Search for Very High Energy Gamma Rays from the Missing Link Binary Pulsar J1023+0038 with VERITAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Archer, A.; Benbow, W.; Bird, R.; Biteau, J.; Buchovecky, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cardenzana, J. V.; Cerruti, M.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dickinson, H. J.; Eisch, J. D.; Falcone, A.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fleischhack, H.; Flinders, A.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Gillanders, G. H.; Griffin, S.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Hütten, M.; Håkansson, N.; Holder, J.; Humensky, T. B.; Johnson, C. A.; Kaaret, P.; Kar, P.; Kelley-Hoskins, N.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Krause, M.; Lang, M. J.; Loo, A.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Meagher, K.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nguyen, T.; Nieto, D.; O'Faoláin de Bhróithe, A.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Pandel, D.; Park, N.; Pelassa, V.; Petrashyk, A.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Pueschel, E.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reynolds, P. T.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Rulten, C.; Santander, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Shahinyan, K.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Tucci, J. V.; Tyler, J.; Varlotta, A.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Weiner, O. M.; Weinstein, A.; Wilhelm, A.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.; Chernyakova, M.; Roberts, M. S. E.

    2016-11-01

    The binary millisecond radio pulsar PSR J1023+0038 exhibits many characteristics similar to the gamma-ray binary system PSR B1259-63/LS 2883, making it an ideal candidate for the study of high-energy nonthermal emission. It has been the subject of multiwavelength campaigns following the disappearance of the pulsed radio emission in 2013 June, which revealed the appearance of an accretion disk around the neutron star. We present the results of very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray observations carried out by the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System before and after this change of state. Searches for steady and pulsed emission of both data sets yield no significant gamma-ray signal above 100 GeV, and upper limits are given for both a steady and pulsed gamma-ray flux. These upper limits are used to constrain the magnetic field strength in the shock region of the PSR J1023+0038 system. Assuming that VHE gamma rays are produced via an inverse Compton mechanism in the shock region, we constrain the shock magnetic field to be greater than ˜2 G before the disappearance of the radio pulsar and greater than ˜10 G afterward.

  16. A Study of Optimization of Alpha-Beta-Gamma-Eta Filter for Tracking a High Dynamic Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Gweon Jeong

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The tracking filter plays a key role in accurate estimation and prediction of maneuvering vessel’s position and velocity. Different methods are used for tracking. However, the most commonly used method is the Kalman filter and its modifications. The Alpha-Beta-Gamma filter is one of the special cases of the general solution pro-vided by the Kalman filter. It is a third order filter that computes the smoothed estimates of position, velocity and acceleration for the nth observation, and also predicts the next position and velocity. Although found to track a maneuvering target with a good accuracy than the constant velocity, Alpha-Beta filter, the Alpha-Beta-Gamma filter does not perform impressively under high maneuvers such as when the target is undergoing changing accelerations. This study, therefore, aims to track a highly maneuvering target experiencing jerky motions due to changing accelerations. The Alpha-Beta-Gamma filter is extended to include the fourth state that is, constant jerk to correct the sudden change of acceleration in order to improve the filter’s performance. Results obtained from simulations of the input model of the target dynamics under consideration indicate an improvement in performance of the jerky model, Alpha-Beta-Gamma-Eta, algorithm as compared to the constant acceleration model, Alpha-Beta-Gamma in terms of error reduction and stability of the filter during target maneuver.

  17. A Performance Evaluation of a Notebook PC under a High Dose-Rate Gamma Ray Irradiation Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jai Wan Cho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the performance of a notebook PC under a high dose-rate gamma ray irradiation test. A notebook PC, which is small and light weight, is generally used as the control unit of a robot system and loaded onto the robot body. Using TEPCO’s CAMS (containment atmospheric monitoring system data, the gamma ray dose rate before and after a hydrogen explosion in reactor units 1–3 of the Fukushima nuclear power plant was more than 150 Gy/h. To use a notebook PC as the control unit of a robot system entering a reactor building to mitigate the severe accident situation of a nuclear power plant, the performance of the notebook PC under such intense gamma-irradiation fields should be evaluated. Under a similar dose-rate (150 Gy/h gamma ray environment, the performances of different notebook PCs were evaluated. In addition, a simple method for a performance evaluation of a notebook PC under a high dose-rate gamma ray irradiation test is proposed. Three notebook PCs were tested to verify the method proposed in this paper.

  18. Application of FEL technique for constructing high-intensity, monochromatic, polarized gamma-sources at storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Ulyanov, Yu.N. [Automatic Systems Corporation, Samara (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    A possibility to construct high-intensity tunable monochromatic{gamma}-source at high energy storage rings is discussed. It is proposed to produce {gamma}-quanta by means of Compton backscattering of laser photons on electrons circulating in the storage. The laser light wavelength is chosen in such a way that after the scattering, the electron does not leave the separatrix. So as the probability of the scattering is rather small, energy oscillations are damped prior the next scattering. As a result, the proposed source can operate in {open_quotes}parasitic{close_quote} mode not interfering with the main mode of the storage ring operation. Analysis of parameters of existent storage rings (PETRA, ESRF, Spring-8, etc) shows that the laser light wavelength should be in infrared, {lambda}{approximately} 10 - 400 {mu}m, wavelength band. Installation at storage rings of tunable free-electron lasers with the peak and average output power {approximately} 10 MW and {approximately} 1 kW, respectively, will result in the intensity of the {gamma}-source up to {approximately} 10{sup 14}s{sup -1} with tunable {gamma}-quanta energy from several MeV up to several hundreds MeV. Such a {gamma}-source will reveal unique possibilities for precision investigations in nuclear physics.

  19. Simulations on High-z Long Gamma-Ray Burst Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, Shu-Fu; Lu, Rui-Jing; Wei, Jian-Yan; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2009-01-01

    Since the launch of Swift satellite, detections of high-z (z>4 and up to about 8.3 currently) long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) have been rapidly growing up, even approaching the very early Universe. The observed high-z LGRB rate shows significant excess over that estimated from the star formation history. We investigate what may be responsible for this high productivity of GRBs at high-z through Monte Carlo simulations based on current Swift LGRB sample. Elaborated effective Swif/BAT trigger probability and redshift detection probability for LGRBs are estimated with current Swift/BAT sample and CGRO/BATSE LGRB sample. We compare our simulations to the Swift observations via log N-\\log P and L-z distributions. In the case that LGRB rate is purely proportional to the star formation rate (SFR), our simulations poorly reproduce the LGRB rate at z>4, although the simulated \\log N-\\log P distribution is in good agreement with the observed one. Assuming that the excess of high-z GRB rate is due to the cosmic metallicit...

  20. Topics in High-Energy Astrophysics: X-ray Time Lags and Gamma-ray Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, John J.

    The Universe is host to a wide variety of high-energy processes that convert gravitational potential energy or rest-mass energy into non-thermal radiation such as bremsstrahlung and synchrotron. Prevailing models of X-ray emission from accreting Black Hole Binaries (BHBs) struggle to simultaneously fit the quiescent X-ray spectrum and the transients which result in the phenomenon known as X-ray time lags. And similarly, classical models of diffusive shock acceleration in pulsar wind nebulae fail to explain the extreme particle acceleration in very short timescales as is inferred from recent gamma-ray flares from the Crab nebula. In this dissertation, I develop new exact analytic models to shed light on these intriguing processes. I take a fresh look at the formation of X-ray time lags in compact sources using a new mathematical approach in which I obtain the exact Green's function solution. The resulting Green's function allows one to explore a variety of injection scenarios, including both monochromatic and broadband (bremsstrahlung) seed photon injection. I obtain the exact solution for the dependence of the time lags on the Fourier frequency, for both homogeneous and inhomogeneous clouds. The model can successfully reproduce both the observed time lags and the quiescent X-ray spectrum using a single set of coronal parameters. I show that the implied coronal radii in the new model are significantly smaller than those obtained in the Monte Carlo simulations, hence greatly reducing the coronal heating problem. Recent bright gamma-ray flares from the Crab nebula observed by AGILE and Fermi reaching GeV energies and lasting several days challenge the contemporary model for particle acceleration in pulsar wind nebulae, specifically the diffusive shock acceleration model. Simulations indicate electron/positron pairs in the Crab nebula pulsar wind must be accelerated up to PeV energies in the presence of ambient magnetic fields with strength B ~100 microG. No

  1. High Energy Electrons and Gamma Rays from the ATIC-2 Balloon Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbert, J. B.; ATIC Collaboration

    2004-08-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) Balloon Experiment is primarily designed to measure the spectra of nuclear cosmic rays (protons to nickel). It is composed of a segmented BGO calorimeter (18 radiation lengths deep) following a carbon target (0.75 nuclear interaction lengths) interleaved with scintillator tracking layers. A Silicon matrix detector at the entrance identifies the incident particle charge. Utilizing simulations such as Fluka and Geant we have investigated the ability of this design to differentiate electron (gamma) initiated showers from hadronic showers. The differences in shower development between the two populations are sufficient to differentiate them for measurements of electron spectra into the TeV region, as confirmed by accelerator tests at CERN and by the ATIC-1 test flight in 2000-01. ATIC had a successful science flight in 2002-03 from McMurdo, Antarctica returning about 19 days of flight data. This exposure is sufficient to record electrons into the TeV region and measure gamma rays at 100's of GeV. The majority of gamma rays are of atmospheric origin and provide a test for this technique. The preliminary electron spectrum from the ATIC-2 flight is presented and compared to previous high energy measurements, principally from emulsion chambers. Possible astrophysical interpretations of the results are discussed. The ATIC Collaboration: J.H. Adams,2 H.S. Ahn,3 G.L. Bashindzhagyan,4 K.E. Batkov,4 J. Chang,6,7 M. Christl,2 A.R. Fazely,5, O. Ganel,3 R.M. Gunasingha,5 T.G. Guzik,1 J. Isbert,1 K.C. Kim,3 E.N. Kouznetsov,4 M.I. Panasyuk,4 A.D. Panov,4 W.K.H. Schmidt,6 E.S. Seo,3 N.V. Sokolskaya,4 J.Z. Wang,3 J.P. Wefel,1 J. Wu,3 V.I. Zatsepin,4 (1) Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA (2) Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, USA (3) University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA (4) Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia (5) Southern University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA (6

  2. Imaging of radiocesium uptake dynamics in a plant body using a newly developed high-resolution gamma camera for radiocesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawachi, Naoki; Yin, Yong-Gen; Suzui, Nobuo; Ishii, Satomi; Fujimaki, Shu [Radiotracer Imaging Gr., Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Yoshihara, Toshihiro [Plant Molecular Biology, Laboratory of Environmental Science, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), 1646 Abiko, Chiba 270-1194 (Japan); Watabe, Hiroshi [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University, 6-3Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi, 980-8578 (Japan); Yamamoto, Seiichi [Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-20 Daiko-Minami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    Vast agricultural and forest areas around the Tokyo Electric Power Company Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station in Japan were contaminated with radiocesium (Cs-134 and Cs-137) after the accident following the earthquake and tsunami in March 2011. A variety of agricultural studies, such as fertilizer management and plant breeding, have been undertaken intensively for reduction of radiocesium uptake in crops, or, enhancement of uptake in phyto-remediation. In this study, we newly developed a gamma camera specific for plant nutritional research, and performed quantitative analyses on uptake and partitioning of radiocesium in intact plant bodies. In general, gamma camera is a common technology in medical imaging, but it is not applicable to high-energy gamma rays such as emissions from Cs-137 (662 keV). Therefore, we designed our new gamma camera to prevent the penetration and scattering of the high-energy gamma rays. A single-crystal scintillator, Ce-doped Gd{sub 3}Al{sub 2}Ga{sub 3}O{sub 12} (Ce:GAGG), was employed, which has a relatively high density, a large light output, no natural radioactivity and no hygroscopicity. A 44 x 44 matrix of the Ce:GAGG pixels, with dimensions of 0.85 mm x 0.85 mm x 10 mm for each pixel, was coupled to a high-quantum efficiency position sensitive photomultiplier tube. This gamma detector unit was encased in a 20-mm-thick tungsten container with a tungsten pinhole collimator on the front. By using this gamma camera, soybean plants (Glycine max), grown in hydroponic solutions and fed with 1-2 MBq of Cs-137, were imaged for 6.5 days in maximum to investigate and visualize the uptake dynamics into/within the areal part. As a result, radiocesium gradually appeared in the shoot several hours after feeding of Cs-137, and then accumulated intensively in the maturing pods and seeds in a characteristic pattern. Our results also demonstrated that this gamma-camera method enables quantitative evaluation of plant ability to absorb, transport

  3. {gamma}-spectroscopy and radioactive beams: search for highly deformed exotic nuclei; Detection {gamma} et faisceaux radioactifs: recherche de noyaux exotiques tres deformes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosse, B

    2006-07-15

    This work is devoted to the search for highly deformed nuclei under extreme conditions of isospin, located near the proton drip-line, around A {approx} 130. The experiment was performed at GANIL (Caen) with the SPIRAL radioactive beam facility. The nuclei of interest were produced by fusion-evaporation reactions induced by the neutron deficient Kr{sup 76} radioactive beam (T1/2 = 14.8 h). {gamma}-rays were detected by the EXOGAM array, composed of 11 segmented germanium clover detectors, for which a new segment calibration method has been developed. To extract fusion-evaporation events of a overwhelming background due to the radioactivity of the beam, the EXOGAM array was coupled with the light charged particle detector DIAMANT and the high acceptance VAMOS spectrometer. The latter was used for the first time to detect fusion-evaporation residues. The detailed data analysis allowed us to demonstrate that the EXOGAM + DIAMANT + VAMOS coupling is operational and essential to investigate the structure of these nuclei. Furthermore, the first {gamma} transition was observed in the very exotic odd-odd Pm{sup 130} nucleus. The results have been interpreted with static and dynamic self-consistent microscopic calculations in collaboration with the Theoretical Physicists of the IPN Lyon. (author)

  4. Semi-automated structural analysis of high resolution magnetic and gamma-ray spectrometry airborne surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debeglia, N.; Martelet, G.; Perrin, J.; Truffert, C.; Ledru, P.; Tourlière, B.

    2005-08-01

    A user-controlled procedure was implemented for the structural analysis of geophysical maps. Local edge segments are first extracted using a suitable edge detector function, then linked into straight discontinuities and, finally, organised in complex boundary lines best delineating geophysical features. Final boundary lines may be attributed by a geologist to lithological contacts and/or structural geological features. Tests of some edge detectors, (i) horizontal gradient magnitude (HGM), (ii) various orders of the analytic signal ( An), reduced to the pole or not, (iii) enhanced horizontal derivative (EHD), (iv) composite analytic signal (CAS), were performed on synthetic magnetic data (with and without noise). As a result of these comparisons, the horizontal gradient appears to remain the best operator for the analysis of magnetic data. Computation of gradients in the frequency domain, including filtering and upward continuation of noisy data, is well-suited to the extraction of magnetic gradients associated to deep sources, while space-domain smoothing and differentiation techniques is generally preferable in the case of shallow magnetic sources, or for gamma-ray spectrometry analysis. Algorithms for edge extraction, segment linking, and line following can be controlled by choosing adequate edge detector and processing parameters which allows adaptation to a desired scale of interpretation. Tests on synthetic and real case data demonstrate the adaptability of the procedure and its ability to produce basic layer for multi-data analysis. The method was applied to the interpretation of high-resolution airborne magnetic and gamma-ray spectrometry data collected in northern Namibia. It allowed the delineation of dyke networks concealed by superficial weathering and demonstrated the presence of lithological variations in alluvial flows. The output from the structural analysis procedure are compatible with standard GIS softwares and enable the geologist to (i) compare

  5. Managing NIF safety equipment in a high neutron and gamma radiation environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datte, Philip; Eckart, Mark; Jackson, Mark; Khater, Hesham; Manuel, Stacie; Newton, Mark

    2013-06-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192 laser beam facility that supports the Inertial Confinement Fusion program. During the ignition experimental campaign, the NIF is expected to perform shots with varying fusion yield producing 14 MeV neutrons up to 20 MJ or 7.1 × 10(18) neutrons per shot and a maximum annual yield of 1,200 MJ. Several infrastructure support systems will be exposed to varying high yield shots over the facility's 30-y life span. In response to this potential exposure, analysis and testing of several facility safety systems have been conducted. A detailed MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code) model has been developed for the NIF facility, and it includes most of the major structures inside the Target Bay. The model has been used in the simulation of expected neutron and gamma fluences throughout the Target Bay. Radiation susceptible components were identified and tested to fluences greater than 10(13) (n cm(-2)) for 14 MeV neutrons and γ-ray equivalent. The testing includes component irradiation using a 60Co gamma source and accelerator-based irradiation using 4- and 14- MeV neutron sources. The subsystem implementation in the facility is based on the fluence estimates after shielding and survivability guidelines derived from the dose maps and component tests results. This paper reports on the evaluation and implementation of mitigations for several infrastructure safety support systems, including video, oxygen monitoring, pressure monitors, water sensing systems, and access control interfaces found at the NIF.

  6. Improvement of high-fold gamma-ray data processing: the spherical gate method

    CERN Document Server

    Theisen, C; Stezowski, O; Vivien, J P

    1999-01-01

    A new method for optimizing the processing of events from a highly efficient large array gamma-ray detector is described in this article. The spherical gates technique, developed to project high-fold events, consists of optimizing n-dimensional gate shape as a function of peak width and shape of each detector. Formulas in closed form are proposed for determining the projected statistics from coincidence fold and peak shape and for estimating the increased quality of projected spectra. This procedure has been tested on high-fold, high statistics data sets including superdeformed cascades. Compared to the classical 'square-gate' technique, better peak-to-background ratios as well as a reduction in fluctuations are observed. A quality parameter is defined to characterize the optimal parameter set. This method leads roughly to a gain in spectral quality equivalent of one fold. It is also shown that the efficiency of the method increases with coincidence fold. This should be particularly suited for future higher-f...

  7. Neutron interrogation system using high gamma ray signature to detect contraband special nuclear materials in cargo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaughter, Dennis R.; Pohl, Bertram A.; Dougan, Arden D.; Bernstein, Adam; Prussin, Stanley G.; Norman, Eric B.

    2008-04-15

    A system for inspecting cargo for the presence of special nuclear material. The cargo is irradiated with neutrons. The neutrons produce fission products in the special nuclear material which generate gamma rays. The gamma rays are detecting indicating the presence of the special nuclear material.

  8. A Multi-Contact, Low Capacitance HPGe Detector for High Rate Gamma Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, Christopher [XIA LLC, Hayward, CA (United States)

    2014-12-04

    The detection, identification and non-destructive assay of special nuclear materials and nuclear fission by-products are critically important activities in support of nuclear non-proliferation programs. Both national and international nuclear safeguard agencies recognize that current accounting methods for spent nuclear fuel are inadequate from a safeguards perspective. Radiation detection and analysis by gamma-ray spectroscopy is a key tool in this field, but no instrument exists that can deliver the required performance (energy resolution and detection sensitivity) in the presence of very high background count rates encountered in the nuclear safeguards arena. The work of this project addresses this critical need by developing a unique gamma-ray detector based on high purity germanium that has the previously unachievable property of operating in the 1 million counts-per-second range while achieving state-of-the-art energy resolution necessary to identify and analyze the isotopes of interest. The technical approach was to design and fabricate a germanium detector with multiple segmented electrodes coupled to multi-channel high rate spectroscopy electronics. Dividing the germanium detector’s signal electrode into smaller sections offers two advantages; firstly, the energy resolution of the detector is potentially improved, and secondly, the detector is able to operate at higher count rates. The design challenges included the following; determining the optimum electrode configuration to meet the stringent energy resolution and count rate requirements; determining the electronic noise (and therefore energy resolution) of the completed system after multiple signals are recombined; designing the germanium crystal housing and vacuum cryostat; and customizing electronics to perform the signal recombination function in real time. In this phase I work, commercial off-the-shelf electrostatic modeling software was used to develop the segmented germanium crystal geometry

  9. Search for Nonstandard Higgs Bosons Using High Mass Photon Pairs in p{ovr p} {r_arrow} {gamma}{gamma} + 2 Jets at {radical} (s) =1.8 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grinstein, S.; Mostafa, M.; Piegaia, R. [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Alves, G.A.; Carvalho, W.; Maciel, A.K.; da Motta, H.; Santoro, A. [LAFEX, Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lima, J.G.; Oguri, V. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Gomez, B.; Hoeneisen, B.; Mooney, P.; Negret, J.P. [Universidad de los Andes, Bogota (Colombia); Ducros, Y. [DAPNIA/Service de Physique des Particules, CEA, Saclay (France); Beri, S.B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Kohli, J.M.; Singh, J.B. [Panjab University, Chandigarh (India); Shivpuri, R.K. [Delhi University, Delhi (India); Acharya, B.S.; Banerjee, S.; Dugad, S.R.; Gupta, A.; Krishnaswamy, M.R.; Mondal, N.K.; Narasimham, V.S.; Parua, N.; Shankar, H.C. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (India); Park, Y.M. [Kyungsung University, Pusan (Korea); Choi, S.; Kim, S.K. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea); Castilla-Valdez, H.; Gonzalez Solis, J.L.; Hernandez-Montoya, R.; Magana-Mendoza, L.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A. [CINVESTAV, Mexico City (Mexico); Pawlik, B. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Gavrilov, V.; Gershtein, Y.; Kuleshov, S. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russia); Belyaev, A.; Dudko, L.V.; Ermolov, P.; Karmanov, D.; Leflat, A.; Manankov, V.; Merkin, M.; Shabalina, E. [Moscow State University, Moscow (Russia); Abramov, V.; Babintsev, V.V.; Bezzubov, V.A.; Bojko, N.I.; Burtovoi, V.S.; Chekulaev, S.V.; Denisov, S.P.; Dyshkant, A.; Eroshin, O.V.; Evdokimov, V.N.; Galyaev, A.N.; Goncharov, P.I.; Gurzhiev, S.N.; Kostritskiy, A.V.; Kozelov, A.V.; Kozlovsky, E.A.; Mayorov, A.A. [Institute for High Energy Physics, Protvino (Russia); Babukhadia, L.; Davis, K.; Fein, D.; Forden, G.E.; Guida, J.A.; Johns, K.; Nang, F.; Narayanan, A.; Rutherfoord, J.; Shupe, M. [University of Arizona, Tuscon, Arizona 85721 (United States); Barberis, E.; Clark, A.R.; Dahl, O.I.; Grudberg, P.; and others

    1999-03-01

    A search has been carried out for events in the channel p{ovr p}{r_arrow}{gamma}{gamma}+2 jets . Such a signature can characterize the production of a nonstandard Higgs boson together with a W or Z boson. We refer to this nonstandard Higgs, having standard model couplings to vector bosons but no coupling to fermions, as a {open_quotes}bosonic Higgs.{close_quotes} With the requirement of two high transverse energy photons and two jets, the diphoton mass (m{sub {gamma}{gamma}}) distribution is consistent with expected background. A 90 (95){percent} confidence level (C.L.) upper limit on the cross section as a function of mass is calculated, ranging from 0.60 (0.80)thinspthinsppb for m{sub {gamma}{gamma}}=65 GeV/c{sup 2} to 0.26 (0.34)thinspthinsppb for m{sub {gamma}{gamma}}=150 GeV/c{sup 2} , corresponding to a 95{percent} thinspthinspC.L. lower limit on the mass of a bosonic Higgs of 78.5 GeV/c{sup 2} . {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Search for Very-high-energy \\gamma-ray emission from Galactic globular clusters with H.E.S.S

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Acero, F; Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Anton, G; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Biteau, J; Bochow, A; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Cerruti, M; Chadwick, P M; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; deWilt, P; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Fallon, L; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fernandez, D; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Gast, H; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Göring, D; Grondin, M -H; Grudzińska, M; Häffner, S; Hague, J D; Hahn, J; Hampf, D; Harris, J; Heinz, S; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Kossakowski, R; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lefaucheur, J; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Lennarz, D; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Masbou, J; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Méhault, J; Menzler, U; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Moulin, E; Naumann, C L; Naumann-Godo, M; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nguyen, N; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Raue, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sheidaei, F; Skilton, J L; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Szostek, A; Tavernet, J -P; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorobiov, S; Vorster, M; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Wouters, D; Zacharias, M; Zajczyk, A; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S

    2013-01-01

    Globular clusters (GCs) are established emitters of high-energy (HE, 100 MeV100 GeV) \\gamma-ray regime, judging from the recent detection of a signal from the direction of Terzan 5 with the H.E.S.S. telescope array. We searched for point-like and extended VHE \\gamma-ray emission from 15 GCs serendipitously covered by H.E.S.S observations and also performed a stacking analysis combining the data from all GCs to investigate the hypothesis of a population of faint emitters. Assuming IC emission as the origin of the VHE \\gamma-ray signal from the direction of Terzan 5, we calculated the expected \\gamma-ray flux from each of the 15 GCs, based on their number of millisecond pulsars, their optical brightness and the energy density of background photon fields. We did not detect significant VHE \\gamma-ray emission from any of the 15 GCs in either of the two analyses. Given the uncertainties related to the parameter determinations, the obtained flux upper limits allow to rule out the simple IC/msPSR scaling model for N...

  11. Effects of gamma-ray and high energy carbon ion irradiation on swimming velocity of Euglena gracilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakashita, T.; Doi, M.; Yasuda, H.; Fuma, S.; Häder, D.-P.

    The effects of gamma-ray and high energy carbon ion irradiation on the swimming velocity of the photosynthetic flagellate Euglena gracilis strain Z were studied, focusing on a dose-effect relationship. Cells were exposed to 60Co gamma-rays at 6 doses of 10, 15, 20, 40, 100 and 200 Gy for water, and also to 290 MeV/amu carbon ions from the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba at 7 doses (5, 10, 15, 20, 50, 100 and 200 Gy for water). The swimming velocity was measured by a biomonitoring system, called ECOTOX. The swimming velocities of Euglena gracilis cells were significantly decreased by >40 Gy gamma-rays and >5 Gy carbon ions, respectively. The 50% effective doses for inhibition, 34±4 Gy (gamma-rays) and 13±1 Gy (290 MeV/amu carbon ions), were estimated from the best fit to data of the logistic model. The relative biological effectiveness (2.6±0.4) was calculated by the ratio of 50% effective doses. The inhibition of the swimming velocity of the cells irradiated with gamma-rays was still present after 3 days, while recovery of the swimming velocity was shown in the cells exposed to 290 MeV/amu carbon ions. It is suggested that ionizing radiation inhibits ATP production and/or increases frictional drag on beating of the flagellum, thus decreasing swimming velocity.

  12. Search for a correlation between very-high-energy gamma rays and giant radio pulses in the Crab pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Aliu, E; Arlen, T; Aune, T; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bouvier, A; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cesarini, A; Ciupik, L; Collins-Hughes, E; Connolly, M P; Cui, W; Dickherber, R; Duke, C; Dumm, J; Falcone, A; Federici, S; Feng, Q; Finley, J P; Finnegan, G; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gall, D; Gillanders, G H; Godambe, S; Griffin, S; Grube, J; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Huan, H; Hughes, G; Humensky, T B; Kaaret, P; Karlsson, N; Khassen, Y; Kieda, D; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; LeBohec, S; Lee, K; Lyutikov, M; Madhavan, A S; Maier, G; Majumdar, P; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nelson, T; de Bhroithe, A O'Faolain; Ong, R A; Orr, M; Otte, A N; Park, N; Perkins, J S; Pohl, M; Prokoph, H; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Saxon, D B; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Senturk, G D; Smith, A W; Staszak, D; Telezhinsky, I; Tesic, G; Theiling, M; Thibadeau, S; Tsurusaki, K; Varlotta, A; Vincent, S; Vivier, M; Wagner, R G; Wakely, S P; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Welsing, R; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B; Kondratiev, V

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a joint observational campaign between the Green Bank radio telescope and the VERITAS gamma-ray telescope, which searched for a correlation between the emission of very-high-energy (VHE) gamma rays ($E_{\\gamma} >$ 150 GeV) and Giant Radio Pulses (GRPs) from the Crab pulsar at 8.9 GHz. A total of 15366 GRPs were recorded during 11.6 hours of simultaneous observations, which were made across four nights in December 2008 and in November and December 2009. We searched for an enhancement of the pulsed gamma-ray emission within time windows placed around the arrival time of the GRP events. In total, 8 different time windows with durations ranging from 0.033 ms to 72 s were positioned at three different locations relative to the GRP to search for enhanced gamma-ray emission which lagged, led, or was concurrent with, the GRP event. Further, we performed separate searches on main pulse GRPs and interpulse GRPs and on the most energetic GRPs in our data sample. No significant enhancement of pu...

  13. SOLIDIFICATION TESTING FOR A HIGH ACTIVITY WASTESTREAM FROM THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE USING GROUT AND GAMMA RADIATION SHEILDING MATERIALS - 10017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, H.

    2009-11-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tasked MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) with evaluating grouts that include gamma radiation shielding materials to solidify surrogates of liquid aqueous radioactive wastes from across the DOE Complex. The Savannah River Site (SRS) identified a High Activity Waste (HAW) that will be treated and solidified at the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) for surrogate grout testing. The HAW, which is produced at the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF), is an acidic aqueous wastestream generated by the alkaline treatment process and the aqueous purification process. The HAW surrogate was solidified using Portland cement with and without the inclusion of different gamma radiation shielding materials to determine the shielding material that is the most effective to attenuate gamma radiation for this application.

  14. High-energy γ-ray emission from gamma-raybursts-before GLAST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Zhong FAN; Tsvi PIRAN

    2008-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short and intense emission of soft γ-rays,which have fascinated astronomers and astrophysicists since their unexpected discovery in 1960s.The X-ray/optical/radio afterglow observations confirm the cosmological origin of GRBs,support the fireball model,and imply a long-activity of the central engine.The high-energy γ-ray emission (>20 MeV) from GRBs is particularly important because they shed some lights on the radiation mechanisms and can help us to constrain the physical processes giving rise to the early afterglows. In this work,we review observational and theoretical studies of the high-energy emission from GRBs.Special attention is given to the expected high-energy emission signatures accompanying the canonical early-time X-ray afterglow that was observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope.We also discuss the detection prospect of the upcoming GLAST satellite and the current ground-based Cerenkov detectors.

  15. Soft gamma-ray repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars as highly magnetized white dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2016-01-01

    We explore the possibility that soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) and anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) are powered by highly magnetized white dwarfs (B-WDs). We take a sample of SGRs and AXPs and provide the possible parameter space in mass, radius, and surface magnetic field based on their observed properties (period and its derivative) and the assumption that these sources obey the mass-radius relation derived for the B-WDs. The radius and magnetic field of B-WDs are adequate to explain energies in SGRs/AXPs as the rotationally powered energy. In addition, B-WDs also adequately explain the perplexing radio transient GCRT J1745-3009 as a white dwarf pulsar. Note that the radius and magnetic fields of B-WDs are neither extreme (unlike of highly magnetized neutron stars) nor ordinary (unlike of magnetized white dwarfs, yet following the Chandrasekhar's mass-radius relation (C-WDs)). In order to explain SGRs/AXPs, while the highly magnetized neutron stars require an extra, observationally not well established yet, ...

  16. Multiscale Aspects of Generation of High-Gamma Activity during Seizures in Human Neocortex123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuccilli, Charles J.; Ben-Mabrouk, Faiza; Lew, Sean M.; Goodman, Robert R.; McKhann, Guy M.; Frim, David M.; Kohrman, Michael H.; Schevon, Catherine A.; van Drongelen, Wim

    2016-01-01

    High-gamma (HG; 80-150 Hz) activity in macroscopic clinical records is considered a marker for critical brain regions involved in seizure initiation; it is correlated with pathological multiunit firing during neocortical seizures in the seizure core, an area identified by correlated multiunit spiking and low frequency seizure activity. However, the effects of the spatiotemporal dynamics of seizure on HG power generation are not well understood. Here, we studied HG generation and propagation, using a three-step, multiscale signal analysis and modeling approach. First, we analyzed concurrent neuronal and microscopic network HG activity in neocortical slices from seven intractable epilepsy patients. We found HG activity in these networks, especially when neurons displayed paroxysmal depolarization shifts and network activity was highly synchronized. Second, we examined HG activity acquired with microelectrode arrays recorded during human seizures (n = 8). We confirmed the presence of synchronized HG power across microelectrode records and the macroscale, both specifically associated with the core region of the seizure. Third, we used volume conduction-based modeling to relate HG activity and network synchrony at different network scales. We showed that local HG oscillations require high levels of synchrony to cross scales, and that this requirement is met at the microscopic scale, but not within macroscopic networks. Instead, we present evidence that HG power at the macroscale may result from harmonics of ongoing seizure activity. Ictal HG power marks the seizure core, but the generating mechanism can differ across spatial scales. PMID:27257623

  17. Soft gamma-ray repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars as highly magnetized white dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata; Rao, A. R.

    2016-05-01

    We explore the possibility that soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) and anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) are powered by highly magnetized white dwarfs (B-WDs). We take a sample of SGRs and AXPs and provide the possible parameter space in mass, radius, and surface magnetic field based on their observed properties (period and its derivative) and the assumption that these sources obey the mass-radius relation derived for the B-WDs. The radius and magnetic field of B-WDs are adequate to explain energies in SGRs/AXPs as the rotationally powered energy. In addition, B-WDs also adequately explain the perplexing radio transient GCRT J1745-3009 as a white dwarf pulsar. Note that the radius and magnetic fields of B-WDs are neither extreme (unlike of highly magnetized neutron stars) nor ordinary (unlike of magnetized white dwarfs, yet following the Chandrasekhar's mass-radius relation (C-WDs)). In order to explain SGRs/AXPs, while the highly magnetized neutron stars require an extra, observationally not well established yet, source of energy, the C-WDs predict large ultra-violet luminosity which is observationally constrained from a strict upper limit. Finally, we provide a set of basic differences between the magnetar and B-WD hypotheses for SGRs/AXPs.

  18. Stacked search for time shifted high energy neutrinos from gamma ray bursts with the Antares neutrino telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J.-J.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Marti, J.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bormuth, R.; Bouwhuis, M.C.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Carr, J.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; De Bonis, G.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Dumas, A.; Eberl, T.; Elsässer, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Fehn, K.; Felis, I.; Fermani, P.; Folger, F.; Fusco, L.A.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Geißelsöder, S.; Geyer, K.; Giordano, V.; Gleixner, A.; Gracia-Ruiz, R.; Graf, K.; Hallmann, S.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A.J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J.J.; Hößl, J.; Hofestädt, J.; Hugon, C.; James, C.W.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.; Kießling, D.; Kooijman, P.; Kouchner, A.; Kreter, M.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lefèvre, D.; Leonora, E.; Loucatos, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Marinelli, A.; Martínez-Mora, J.A.; Mathieu, A.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Moussa, A.; Müller, C.; Nezri, E.; Pavalas, G.E.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Racca, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richter, R.; Roensch, K.; Saldaña, M.; Samtleben, D.F.E.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Schüssler, F.; Seitz, T.; Sieger, C.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J.J.M.; Stolarczyk, T.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Trovato, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Tönnis, C.; Vallage, B.; Vallée, C.; Van Elewyck, V.; Visser, E.; Vivolo, D.; Wagner, S.; Wilms, J.; Zornoza, J.D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2017-01-01

    A search for high-energy neutrino emission correlatedwith gamma-ray bursts outside the electromagneticprompt-emission time window is presented. Using a stackingapproach of the time delays between reported gammarayburst alerts and spatially coincident muon-neutrino signatures,data from the Antares

  19. High performing and stable supported nano-alloys for the catalytic hydrogenation of levulinic acid to gamma-valerolactone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luo, Wenhao|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341385972; Meenakshisundaram, Sankar; Beale, Andrew M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325802068; He, Qian; Kiely, Christopher J.; Bruijnincx, Pieter C. A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/33799529X; Weckhuysen, Bert M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    The catalytic hydrogenation of levulinic acid, a key platform molecule in many biorefinery schemes, into gamma-valerolactone is considered as one of the pivotal reactions to convert lignocellulose-based biomass into renewable fuels and chemicals. Here we report on the development of highly active,

  20. High performing and stable supported nano-alloys for the catalytic hydrogenation of levulinic acid to gamma-valerolactone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luo, Wenhao; Meenakshisundaram, Sankar; Beale, Andrew M.; He, Qian; Kiely, Christopher J.; Bruijnincx, Pieter C. A.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic hydrogenation of levulinic acid, a key platform molecule in many biorefinery schemes, into gamma-valerolactone is considered as one of the pivotal reactions to convert lignocellulose-based biomass into renewable fuels and chemicals. Here we report on the development of highly active, s

  1. Inactivation of Staphylococcus saprophyticus in chicken meat and exudate using high pressure processing, gamma radiation, and ultraviolet light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapylococcus saprophyticus is a common contaminant in foods and causes urinary tract infections in humans. Three nonthermal food safety intervention technologies used to improve the safety foods include high pressure processing (HPP), ionizing (gamma) radiation (GR), and ultraviolet light (UV-C). A...

  2. Gamma-ray, neutron, and hard X-ray studies and requirements for a high-energy solar physics facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaty, R.; Dennis, B. R.; Emslie, A. G.

    1988-01-01

    The requirements for future high-resolution spatial, spectral, and temporal observation of hard X-rays, gamma rays and neutrons from solar flares are discussed in the context of current high-energy flare observations. There is much promise from these observations for achieving a deep understanding of processes of energy release, particle acceleration and particle transport in a complicated environment such as the turbulent and highly magnetized atmosphere of the active sun.

  3. IN-SITU ASSAY OF TRANSURANIC RADIONUCLIDES IN THE VADOSE ZONE USING HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTRAL GAMMA LOGGING - A HANFORD CASE STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ROHAY VJ; HENWOOD P; MCCAIN R

    2009-11-30

    High-resolution spectral gamma logging in steel-cased boreholes is used to detect and quantify transuranic radionuclides in the subsurface. Pu-239, Pu-241, Am-241, and Np-237 are identified based on characteristic decay gammas. Typical minimum detectable levels are on the order of 20 to 40 nCi/g. In intervals of high transuranic concentrations, gamma rays from other sources may complicate analysis and interpretation. Gamma rays detected in the borehole may originate from three sources: decay of the parent transuranic radionuclide or a daughter; alpha interactions; and interactions with neutrons resulting from either spontaneous fission or alpha particle interactions.

  4. Cross Sections for proton induced high energy $\\gamma$-ray emission (PIGE) in reaction $^{19}$F(p,$\\alpha\\gamma$)$^{16}$O at incident proton energies between 1.5 and 4 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Cabanelas, P; Fonseca, M; Galaviz, D; Henriques, A; Jesus, A P; Luís, H; Sánchez-Benítez, A; Santos, C; Silva, H; Teubig, P; Velho, P

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the high energy gamma-rays produced in the reaction $^{19}$F(p,$\\alpha\\gamma$)$^{16}$O for incident proton energies from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV over NaF/Ag and CaF$_2$/Ag thin targets in two different sets of data. Gamma-rays were detected with a High Purity Ge detector with an angle of 130$^{o}$ with respect to the beam axis. The cross-sections for the high energy gamma-rays of 6.129, 6.915 and 7.115 MeV have been measured for the whole group between 5 and 7.2 MeV with accuracy better than 10%. A new energy range was covered and more points are included in the cross-sections data base. Results are in agreement with previous measurements in similar conditions.

  5. Gamma-ray Bursts as a Probe of the Very High Redshift Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Lamb, D Q; Lamb, Donald Q.; Reichart, Daniel E.

    1999-01-01

    There is increasingly strong evidence that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are associated with star-forming galaxies, and occur near or in the star-forming regions of these galaxies. These associations provide indirect evidence that at least the long GRBs detected by BeppoSAX are a result of the collapse of massive stars. The recent evidence that the light curves and the spectra of the afterglows of GRB 980326 and GRB 970228 appear to contain a supernova component, in addition to a relativistic shock wave component, provide more direct clues that this is the case. We show that, if many GRBs are indeed produced by the collapse of massive stars, GRBs and their afterglows provide a powerful probe of the very high redshift (z > 5) universe. We first establish that GRBs and their afterglows are both detectable out to very high redshifts. We then show that one expects GRBs to occur out to at least z ~ 10 and possibly z ~ 15-20, redshifts that are far larger than those expected for the most distant quasars. This implies tha...

  6. TARGET: A multi-channel digitizer chip for very-high-energy gamma-ray telescopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtol, K.; Funk, S.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Okumura, A.; /JAXA, Sagamihara /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Ruckman, L.; /Hawaii U.; Simons, A.; Tajima, H.; Vandenbroucke, J.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Varner, G.; /Hawaii U.

    2011-08-11

    The next-generation very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray observatory, the Cherenkov Telescope Array, will feature dozens of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs), each with thousands of pixels of photosensors. To be affordable and reliable, reading out such a mega-channel array requires event recording technology that is highly integrated and modular, with a low cost per channel. We present the design and performance of a chip targeted to this application: the TeV Array Readout with GSa/s sampling and Event Trigger (TARGET). This application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) has 16 parallel input channels, a 4096-sample buffer for each channel, adjustable input termination, self-trigger functionality, and tight window-selected readout. We report the performance of TARGET in terms of sampling frequency, power consumption, dynamic range, current-mode gain, analog bandwidth, and cross talk. The large number of channels per chip allows a low cost per channel ($10 to $20 including front-end and back-end electronics but not including photosensors) to be achieved with a TARGET-based IACT readout system. In addition to basic performance parameters of the TARGET chip itself, we present a camera module prototype as well as a second-generation chip (TARGET 2), both of which have been produced.

  7. Model-dependent high-energy neutrino flux from gamma-ray bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bing; Kumar, Pawan

    2013-03-22

    The IceCube Collaboration recently reported a stringent upper limit on the high energy neutrino flux from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which provides a meaningful constraint on the standard internal shock model. Recent broadband electromagnetic observations of GRBs also challenge the internal shock paradigm for GRBs, and some competing models for γ-ray prompt emission have been proposed. We describe a general scheme for calculating the GRB neutrino flux, and compare the predicted neutrino flux levels for different models. We point out that the current neutrino flux upper limit starts to constrain the standard internal shock model. The dissipative photosphere models are also challenged if the cosmic ray luminosity from GRBs is at least 10 times larger than the γ-ray luminosity. If the neutrino flux upper limit continues to go down in the next few years, then it would suggest the following possibilities: (i) the photon-to-proton luminosity ratio in GRBs is anomalously high for shocks, which may be achieved in some dissipative photosphere models and magnetic dissipation models; or (ii) the GRB emission site is at a larger radius than the internal shock radius, as expected in some magnetic dissipation models such as the internal collision-induced magnetic reconnection and turbulence model.

  8. Z/gamma* plus Multiple Hard Jets in High Energy Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, Jeppe R; Smillie, Jennifer M

    2016-01-01

    We present a description of the production of di-lepton pair production (through Z boson and virtual photon) in association with at least two jets. This calculation adds to the fixed-order accuracy the dominant logarithms in the limit of large partonic centre-of-mass energy to all orders in the strong coupling. This is achieved within the framework of High Energy Jets. This calculation is made possible by extending the high energy treatment to take into account the multiple t-channel exchanges arising from Z and gamma*-emissions off several quark lines. The correct description of the interference effects from the various t-channel exchanges requires an extension of the subtraction terms in the all-order calculation. We describe this construction and compare the resulting predictions to a number of recent analyses of LHC data. The description of a wide range of observables is good, and, as expected, stands out from other approaches in particular in the regions of large dijet invariant mass and large dijet rapi...

  9. The Large Aperture Gamma Ray Observatory as an Observational Alternative at High Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, M.

    2011-10-01

    Although satellite observations have revealed some mysteries about the origin and location of cosmic rays at low energies, questions remain to be resolved in higher energy ranges (>1 GeV). However, the flow of particles at high energies is very low, large sensitive areas are necessary, so that the detection of secondary particles from observatories on the surface of the earth is a technically viable solution. While the Pierre Auger Observatory has such capacity given its 16000 m^2 of detectors, low height above sea level greatly reduces its detection capability. The Large Aperture Gamma Ray Observatory (LAGO) is an observational alternative that attempts to overcome this limitation. This project was started in 2005, placing water Cherenkov Detectors at high altitude. Observation sites have been selected with some basic requirements: altitude, academic and technical infrastructure, existence of a research group responsible for assembly and maintenance of the detectors and the analysis, visualization, divulgation and data storage. This paper presents the general status of the observatories of Sierra Negra-México, Chacaltaya-Bolívia, Marcapomacocha-Perú, Mérida-Venezuela and Bucaramanga-Colombia.

  10. Probing Pre-galactic Metal Enrichment with High-Redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, F Y; Greif, Thomas H; Stacy, Athena; Dai, Z G; Loeb, Abraham; Cheng, K S

    2012-01-01

    We explore high-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) as promising tools to probe pre-galactic metal enrichment. We utilize the bright afterglow of a Pop III GRB exploding in a primordial dwarf galaxy as a luminous background source, and calculate the strength of metal absorption lines that are imprinted by the first heavy elements in the intergalactic medium (IGM). To derive the GRB absorption line diagnostics, we use an existing highly-resolved simulation of the formation of a first galaxy which is characterized by the onset of atomic hydrogen cooling in a halo with virial temperature >10^4 K. We explore the unusual circumburst environment inside the systems that hosted Pop III stars, modeling the density evolution with the self-similar solution for a champagne flow. For minihalos close to the cooling threshold, the circumburst density is roughly proportional to (1+z) with values of about a few cm^{-3}. In more massive halos, corresponding to the first galaxies, the density may be larger, n>100 cm^{-3}. The resu...

  11. High doses of gamma radiation suppress allergic effect induced by food lectin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Antônio F. M.; Souza, Marthyna P.; Vieira, Leucio D.; Aguiar, Jaciana S.; Silva, Teresinha G.; Medeiros, Paloma L.; Melo, Ana M. M. A.; Silva-Lucca, Rosemeire A.; Santana, Lucimeire A.; Oliva, Maria L. V.; Perez, Katia R.; Cuccovia, Iolanda M.; Coelho, Luana C. B. B.; Correia, Maria T. S.

    2013-04-01

    One of the most promising areas for the development of functional foods lies in the development of effective methods to reduce or eliminate food allergenicity, but few reports have summarized information concerning the progress made with food irradiation. In this study, we investigated the relationship between allergenicity and molecular structure of a food allergen after gamma irradiation and evaluate the profile of the allergic response to irradiated allergens. Cramoll, a lectin isolated from a bean and used as a food allergen, was irradiated and the possible structural changes were accompanied by spectrofluorimetry, circular dichroism and microcalorimetry. Subsequently, sensitized animals subjected to intragastric administration of non-irradiated and irradiated Cramoll were treated for 7 days. Then, body weight, leukocytes, cytokine profiles and histological parameters were also determined. Cramoll showed complete inhibition of intrinsic activity after high radiation doses. Changes in fluorescence and CD spectra with a simultaneous collapse of the tertiary structure followed by a pronounced decrease of native secondary structure were observed after irradiation. After oral challenge, sensitized mice demonstrate an association between Cramoll intake, body weight loss, eosinophilia, lymphocytic infiltrate in the gut and Eotaxin secretion. Irradiation significantly reduces, according to the dose, the effects observed by non-irradiated food allergens. We confirm that high-dose radiation may render protein food allergens innocuous by irreversibly compromising their molecular structure.

  12. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy and the fascinating angular momentum realm of the atomic nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, M. A.; Simpson, J.; Paul, E. S.

    2016-12-01

    In 1974 Aage Bohr and Ben Mottelson predicted the different ‘phases’ that may be expected in deformed nuclei as a function of increasing angular momentum and excitation energy all the way up to the fission limit. While admitting their picture was highly conjectural they confidently stated ‘...with the ingenious experimental approaches that are being developed, we may look forward with excitement to the detailed spectroscopic studies that will illuminate the behaviour of the spinning quantised nucleus’. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy has indeed been a major tool in studying the structure of atomic nuclei and has witnessed numerous significant advances over the last four decades. This article will select highlights from investigations at the Niels Bohr Institute, Denmark, and Daresbury Laboratory, UK, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, some of which have continued at other national laboratories in Europe and the USA to the present day. These studies illustrate the remarkable diversity of phenomena and symmetries exhibited by nuclei in the angular momentum-excitation energy plane that continue to surprise and fascinate scientists.

  13. New frontiers in nuclear physics with high-power lasers and brilliant monochromatic gamma beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gales, S.; Balabanski, D. L.; Negoita, F.; Tesileanu, O.; Ur, C. A.; Ursescu, D.; Zamfir, N. V.

    2016-09-01

    The development of high power lasers and the combination of such novel devices with accelerator technology has enlarged the science reach of many research fields, in particular particle and nuclear physics, astrophysics as well as societal applications in material science, nuclear energy and applications for medicine. The European Strategic Forum for Research Infrastructures has selected a proposal based on these new premises called the Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI). The ELI will be built as a network of three complementary pillars at the frontier of laser technologies. The ELI-NP pillar (NP for nuclear physics) is under construction near Bucharest (Romania) and will develop a scientific program using two 10 PW lasers and a Compton back-scattering high-brilliance and intense low-energy gamma beam, a combination of laser and accelerator technology at the frontier of knowledge. This unique combination of beams that are unique worldwide allows us to develop an experimental program in nuclear physics at the frontiers of present-day knowledge as well as society driven applications. In the present paper, the technical description of the facility as well as the new perspectives in nuclear structure, nuclear reactions and nuclear astrophysics will be presented.

  14. Development of GAMMA Code and Evaluation for a Very High Temperature gas-Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Chang H; Lim, H.S.; Kim, E.S.; NO, H.C.

    2007-06-01

    The very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is envisioned as a single- or dual-purpose reactor for electricity and hydrogen generation. The concept has average coolant temperatures above 9000C and operational fuel temperatures above 12500C. The concept provides the potential for increased energy conversion efficiency and for high-temperature process heat application in addition to power generation. While all the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) concepts have sufficiently high temperature to support process heat applications, such as coal gasification, desalination or cogenerative processes, the VHTR’s higher temperatures allow broader applications, including thermochemical hydrogen production. However, the very high temperatures of this reactor concept can be detrimental to safety if a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) occurs. Following the loss of coolant through the break and coolant depressurization, air will enter the core through the break by molecular diffusion and ultimately by natural convection, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heatup of the reactor core and the release of toxic gasses (CO and CO2) and fission products. Thus, without any effective countermeasures, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release. Prior to the start of this Korean/United States collaboration, no computer codes were available that had been sufficiently developed and validated to reliably simulate a LOCA in the VHTR. Therefore, we have worked for the past three years on developing and validating advanced computational methods for simulating LOCAs in a VHTR. This paper will also include what improvements will be made in the Gamma code for the VHTR.

  15. Application of Gamma code coupled with turbomachinery models for high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang Oh

    2008-02-01

    The very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is envisioned as a single- or dual-purpose reactor for electricity and hydrogen generation. The concept has average coolant temperatures above 9000C and operational fuel temperatures above 12500C. The concept provides the potential for increased energy conversion efficiency and for high-temperature process heat application in addition to power generation. While all the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) concepts have sufficiently high temperature to support process heat applications, such as coal gasification, desalination or cogenerative processes, the VHTR’s higher temperatures allow broader applications, including thermochemical hydrogen production. However, the very high temperatures of this reactor concept can be detrimental to safety if a loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) occurs. Following the loss of coolant through the break and coolant depressurization, air will enter the core through the break by molecular diffusion and ultimately by natural convection, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heatup of the reactor core and the release of a toxic gas, CO, and fission products. Thus, without any effective countermeasures, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release. Prior to the start of this Korean/United States collaboration, no computer codes were available that had been sufficiently developed and validated to reliably simulate a LOCA in the VHTR. Therefore, we have worked for the past three years on developing and validating advanced computational methods for simulating LOCAs in a VHTR. GAMMA code is being developed to implement turbomachinery models in the power conversion unit (PCU) and ultimately models associated with the hydrogen plant. Some preliminary results will be described in this paper.

  16. High-Speed, Low Power 256 Channel Gamma Radiation Array Detector ASIC Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Building on prior success in detector electronics, we propose to design and fabricate a 256 channel readout ASIC for solid state gamma radiation array detectors...

  17. On-Line High Dose-Rate Gamma Ray Irradiation Test of the CCD/CMOS Cameras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jai Wan; Jeong, Kyung Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    In this paper, test results of gamma ray irradiation to CCD/CMOS cameras are described. From the CAMS (containment atmospheric monitoring system) data of Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant station, we found out that the gamma ray dose-rate when the hydrogen explosion occurred in nuclear reactors 1{approx}3 is about 160 Gy/h. If assumed that the emergency response robot for the management of severe accident of the nuclear power plant has been sent into the reactor area to grasp the inside situation of reactor building and to take precautionary measures against releasing radioactive materials, the CCD/CMOS cameras, which are loaded with the robot, serve as eye of the emergency response robot. In the case of the Japanese Quince robot system, which was sent to carry out investigating the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor situation, 7 CCD/CMOS cameras are used. 2 CCD cameras of Quince robot are used for the forward and backward monitoring of the surroundings during navigation. And 2 CCD (or CMOS) cameras are used for monitoring the status of front-end and back-end motion mechanics such as flippers and crawlers. A CCD camera with wide field of view optics is used for monitoring the status of the communication (VDSL) cable reel. And another 2 CCD cameras are assigned for reading the indication value of the radiation dosimeter and the instrument. In the preceding assumptions, a major problem which arises when dealing with CCD/CMOS cameras in the severe accident situations of the nuclear power plant is the presence of high dose-rate gamma irradiation fields. In the case of the DBA (design basis accident) situations of the nuclear power plant, in order to use a CCD/CMOS camera as an ad-hoc monitoring unit in the vicinity of high radioactivity structures and components of the nuclear reactor area, a robust survivability of this camera in such intense gamma-radiation fields therefore should be verified. The CCD/CMOS cameras of various types were gamma irradiated at a

  18. Searches for correlation between UHECR events and high-energy gamma-ray Fermi-LAT data

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez, Ezequiel; Mirabal, Nestor; Zaharijas, Gabrijela

    2016-01-01

    The astrophysical sources responsible for ultra high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) continue to be one of the most intriguing mysteries in astrophysics. We present a comprehensive search for correlations between high-energy ($\\gtrapprox 1$ GeV) gamma-ray events from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and UHECRs ($\\gtrapprox 60$ EeV) detected by the Telescope Array and the Pierre Auger Observatory. We perform two separate searches. First, we conduct a standard cross-correlation analysis between the arrival directions of 148 UHECRs and 360 gamma-ray sources in the Second Catalog of Hard Fermi-LAT sources (2FHL). Second, we search for a possible correlation between UHECR directions and unresolved Fermi-LAT gamma-ray emission. For the latter, we use three different methods: a stacking technique with both a model-dependent and model-independent background estimate, and a cross-correlation function analysis. We also test for statistically significant excesses in gamma rays from signal regions centered on Cen A and t...

  19. Pre-clinical and Clinical Evaluation of High Resolution, Mobile Gamma Camera and Positron Imaging Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    S. Majewski, R. Wojcik, A.G. Weisenberger, B. Kross, V. Popov, “Correction for the Effects of Accidental Coincidences , Compton Scatter and Object... Coincidence Imaging with a Gamma Camera ”, IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science, Vol. 48, No. 1, Feb. 2001, Pg. 98-105. [14] R.S. Miyaoka, S.K...Coleman, “Attenuation Effects in Gamma Camera Coincidence Imaging”, IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science, Vol. 45, No. 6, Dec. 1998, Pg. 3115-3121

  20. PKS 1510-089 in high gamma-ray state as detected by AGILE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minervini, G.; Piano, G.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Verrecchia, F.; Pittori, C.; Lucarelli, F.; Tavani, M.; Donnarumma, I.; Bulgarelli, A.; Fioretti, V.; Zoli, A.; Vercellone, S.; Striani, E.; Cardillo, M.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Giuliani, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Caraveo, P.; Perotti, F.; Chen, A.; Argan, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lapshov, I.; Pacciani, L.; Soffitta, P.; Sabatini, S.; Vittorini, V.; Pucella, G.; Rapisarda, M.; Di Cocco, G.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pilia, M.; Trois, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Vallazza, E.; Longo, F.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Prest, M.; Lipari, P.; Zanello, D.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Rappoldi, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Parmiggiani, N.; Ferrari, A.; Antonelli, A.; Giommi, P.; Salotti, L.; Valentini, G.; D'Amico, F.

    2016-09-01

    The AGILE-GRID is detecting transient gamma-ray emission above 100 MeV from the blazar PKS 1510-089. Integrating from 2016-09-19 UT 01:00:00 to 2016-09-21 UT 01:00:00, a preliminary likelihood analysis provides a gamma-ray flux F( > 100 MeV) = (3.7 +/- 1.2) x 10^-6 photons/cm^2/s with a significance above 5 sigma.

  1. High energy gamma rays in the decay of 27h Ho166

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P.Gregers; Wilsky, K.; Horen, D.J.;

    1961-01-01

    The gamma-ray spectrum of 27th Ho166 was re-investigated by means of a three-crystal pair-spectrometer and coincidence techniques. Two new gamma rays with energies of 1747 plusmn 5 and 1825 plusmn 5 keV establish a new level at 1826 keV in Er166. The log ft value for the beta-decay to this state...

  2. SAS 2 observation of pulsed high-energy gamma radiation from Geminga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattox, J. R.; Bertsch, D. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Following the detection of pulsed X-rays and gamma rays from Geminga, the 1972-1973 SAS 2 data which first revealed this source have been reanalyzed. The 237 ms periodicity is visible in those observations. The phase of the SAS 2 periodicity is consistent with that of COS B suggesting that the gamma-ray data allow an accounting for every revolution of the Geminga pulsar between 1972 and 1982.

  3. High resolution {gamma}-spectroscopy at the big-bite spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savran, D.; Ramspeck, K.; Zilges, A. [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Berg, A.M. van den; Harakeh, M.N.; Woertche, H.J. [Kernfysisch Versneller Inst. (KVI), Groningen (Netherlands)

    2006-04-05

    An array of HPGe detectors has been set up at the Big-Bite Spectrometer at AGOR cyclotron of KVI Groningen to allow coincident measurements of the {gamma}-decay of nuclei excited in inelastic hadron scattering at 100-400 MeV incident energies. Compared to previous experiments, where NaI detectors have been used, the energy resolution of the {gamma}-detection could be improved by more than one order of magnitude to about {delta}E{sub {gamma}}/E{sub {gamma}}=0.2 % in the energy region of interest. The coincident measurement of the {gamma}-decay in inelastic hadron scattering experiments is very useful for the separation of nearby excitations, the assignment of multipolarities, the determination of branching ratios and to study the isospin character of bound excitations. The experimental setup and the results of a first ({alpha},{alpha}'{gamma}) test experiment at E{sub {alpha}}=136 MeV on {sup 58}Ni are presented. (orig.)

  4. PKS 2123-463: a confirmed gamma-ray blazar at high redshift

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ammando, F; Schady, P; Finke, J; Orienti, M; Greiner, J; Kann, D A; Ojha, R; Foley, A R; Stevens, J; Blanchard, J M; Edwards, P G; Kadler, M; Lovell, J E J

    2012-01-01

    The flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) PKS 2123-463 was associated in the First Fermi-LAT source catalog with the gamma-ray source 1FGL J2126.1-4603, but when considering the full first two years of Fermi observations, no gamma-ray source at a position consistent with this FSRQ was detected, and thus PKS 2123-463 was not reported in the Second Fermi-LAT source catalog. On 2011 December 14 a gamma-ray source positionally consistent with PKS 2123-463 was detected in flaring activity by Fermi-LAT. This activity triggered radio-to-X-ray observations by the Swift, GROND, ATCA, Ceduna, and KAT-7 observatories. Results of the localization of the gamma-ray source over 41 months of Fermi-LAT operation are reported here in conjunction with the results of the analysis of radio, optical, UV and X-ray data collected soon after the gamma-ray flare. The strict spatial association with the lower energy counterpart together with a simultaneous increase of the activity in optical, UV, X-ray and gamma-ray bands led to a firm ide...

  5. Can life survive Gamma-Ray Bursts in the high-redshift universe?

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Nearby Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) have been proposed as a possible cause of mass extinctions on Earth. Due to the higher event rate of GRBs at higher redshifts, it has been speculated that life as we know it may not survive above a certain redshift (e.g. $z>0.5$). We examine the duty cycle of lethal (life-threatening) GRBs in the solar neighborhood, in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies and GRB host galaxies, with the dependence of the long GRB rate on star formation and metallicity properly taken into account. We find that the number of lethal GRBs attacking Earth within the past 500 Myr ($\\sim$ epoch of the Ordovician mass extinction) is $0.93$. The number of lethal GRBs hitting a certain planet increases with redshift, thanks to the increasing star formation rate and decreasing metallicity in high-$z$ galaxies. Taking 1 per 500 Myr as a conservative duty cycle for life to survive, as evidenced by our existence, we find that there are still a good fraction of SDSS galaxies beyond $z=0.5$ where the GR...

  6. Galactic sources of high energy neutrinos: Expectation from gamma-ray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahakyan N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent results from ground based γ-ray detectors (HESS, MAGIC, VERITAS provide a population of TeV galactic γ-ray sources which are potential sources of High Energy (HE neutrinos. Since the γ-rays and ν-s are produced from decays of neutral and charged pions, the flux of TeV γ-rays can be used to estimate the upper limit of ν flux and vice versa; the detectability of ν flux implies a minimum flux of the accompanying γ-rays (assuming the internal and the external absorption of γ-rays is negligible. Using this minimum flux, it is possible to find the sources which can be detected with cubic-kilometer telescopes. I will discuss the possibility to detect HE neutrinos from powerful galactic accelerators, such as Supernova Remnants (SNRs and Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe and show that likely only RX J1713.7-3946, RX J0852.0-4622 and Vela X can be detected by current generation of instruments (IceCube and Km3Net. It will be shown also, that galactic binary systems could be promising sources of HE ν-s. In particular, ν-s and γ-rays from Cygnus X-3 will be discussed during recent gamma-ray activity, showing that in the future such kind of activities could produce detectable flux of HE ν-s.

  7. High-resolution measurement of the {sup 16}O({gamma},pn) reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaksson, L.

    1996-10-01

    The {sup 16}O({gamma},pn) reaction has been measured with a resolution high enough to resolve individual low-lying states in the residual {sup 14}N nucleus. Partial cross-sections, available to the acceptance of the detector system, have been extracted for the individual states, and compared to a recent calculation based on absorption on one-pion exchange currents and the {Delta} resonance current. The experiment was performed at the Maxlab accelerator laboratory in Lund, Sweden, using tagged photons at an energy of 67 - 76 MeV. The proton detector angular range was 60 - 100 deg and the corresponding for the neutron detector 81 - 103 deg. A missing energy resolution of 1.5 MeV was obtained. The relative population of the states in the residual {sup 14}N nucleus indicates that the reaction takes place predominantly on proton-neutron pairs coupled to (J{sup {pi}},T) = (1{sup +},0). The cross-section for absorption on (0{sup +},1) pairs is strongly suppressed. Furthermore, the relative population of the states indicates that both L=0 and L=2 pairs participate in the reaction. 45 refs.

  8. High energy gamma-radiation from the galactic center due to neutralino annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Berezinsky, Veniamin Sergeevich; Mignola, G

    1994-01-01

    We study the NGS (Non-dissipative Gravitational Singularity) model, which successfully describes the non-linear stage of evolution of perturbations (see [1], [2] and references therein). This model predicts DM density distribution $\\rho(r) \\sim r^{-\\alpha}$ with $\\alpha \\simeq 1.8$ which holds from very small distances $r_{\\rm min} \\simeq 0.01~{\\rm pc}$ up to very large distances $r_{\\rm max} \\simeq 5~{\\rm Mpc}$. Assuming the neutralino to be a CDM particle, we calculate the annihilation of neutralinos in the vicinity of the singularity (Galactic Center). If neutralinos are the dominant component of DM in our Galaxy, the produced energy is enough to provide the whole observed activity of the GC. Neutralinos of the most general composition and of mass in the range $20~{\\rm GeV} \\leq m_\\c \\leq 1~{\\rm TeV}$ are considered. We find the neutralino compositions which give the relic density needed for the Mixed Dark Matter (MDM) model and we evaluate for these compositions the high-energy ($E_{\\gamma} > 100 ~{\\rm Me...

  9. Galactic sources of high energy neutrinos: Expectation from gamma-ray data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahakyan, N.

    2016-07-01

    The recent results from ground based γ-ray detectors (HESS, MAGIC, VERITAS) provide a population of TeV galactic γ-ray sources which are potential sources of High Energy (HE) neutrinos. Since the γ-rays and ν-s are produced from decays of neutral and charged pions, the flux of TeV γ-rays can be used to estimate the upper limit of ν flux and vice versa; the detectability of ν flux implies a minimum flux of the accompanying γ-rays (assuming the internal and the external absorption of γ-rays is negligible). Using this minimum flux, it is possible to find the sources which can be detected with cubic-kilometer telescopes. I will discuss the possibility to detect HE neutrinos from powerful galactic accelerators, such as Supernova Remnants (SNRs) and Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe) and show that likely only RX J1713.7-3946, RX J0852.0-4622 and Vela X can be detected by current generation of instruments (IceCube and Km3Net). It will be shown also, that galactic binary systems could be promising sources of HE ν-s. In particular, ν-s and γ-rays from Cygnus X-3 will be discussed during recent gamma-ray activity, showing that in the future such kind of activities could produce detectable flux of HE ν-s.

  10. High performance liquid chromatography determination of theobromine and caffeine in cocoa beans gamma irradiated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Anderson D.B. [Faculdade de Engenharia de Varginha, MG (Brazil); Mansur Neto, Elias [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    1997-12-01

    Irradiation is a processing technology that has been shown to be a wholesome process by many scientific studies conducted worldwide during the past 40 years, which has been approved by 37 countries. Irradiated foods have been studied so extensively, that the effects on foods are better understood than any other preservation process, including food freezing and dehydration. Cocoa beans has been commercially irradiated in countries such as Ivory Coast and Argentina. The alkaloids theobromine and caffeine are responsible for the mildly stimulating properties and bitter taste of cocoa and chocolate products. Previously fermented dried and nonfumigated cocoa beans were irradiated at doses of 0, 5.0, 10.0 and 20.0 kGy using Co-60 gamma rays. The samples were analysed for determining theobromine and caffeine contents in the cocoa beans by TIMBIE et al. (1978) high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. Boiling water extracts were cooled, centrifuged and injected into the chromatograph. Theobromine and caffeine were quantitated at 273 nm and showed the tendency of decreasing as the dose of radiation increases. Theobromine and caffeine ranged from 42.3 to 37.1 mg/g and from 7.60 to 6.13 mg/g. respectively from 0 to 20.0 kGy. These results were discussed in relation to the possible acceptance of radiosterization of cocoa beans commercially up to the dose of 20.0 kGy. (author). 10 refs., 1 tab.

  11. Comparative dosimetry of GammaMed Plus high-dose rate 192 Ir brachytherapy source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel N

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The comparative dosimetry of GammaMed (GM Plus high-dose rate brachytherapy source was performed by an experiment using 0.1-cc thimble ionization chamber and simulation-based study using EGSnrc code. In-water dose measurements were performed with 0.1-cc chamber to derive the radial dose function (r = 0.8 to 20.0 cm and anisotropy function (r = 5.0 cm with polar angle from 10° to 170°. The nonuniformity correction factor for 0.1-cc chamber was applied for in-water measurements at shorter distances from the source. The EGSnrc code was used to derive the dose rate constant (L, radial dose function g L (r and anisotropy function F(r, q of GM Plus source. The dosimetric data derived using EGSnrc code in our study were in very good agreement relative to published data for GM Plus source. The radial dose function up to 12 cm derived from measured dose using 0.1-cc chamber was in agreement within ±3% of data derived by the simulation study.

  12. Long Gamma-Ray Bursts and Their Host Galaxies at High Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Lapi, A; Bosnjak, Z; Celotti, A; Bressan, A; Granato, G L; Danese, L

    2008-01-01

    Motivated by the recent observational and theoretical evidence that long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are likely associated with low metallicity, rapidly rotating massive stars, we examine the cosmological star formation rate (SFR) below a critical metallicity Z_crit~Z_sun/10 - Z_sun/5, to estimate the event rate of high-redshift long GRB progenitors. To this purpose, we exploit a galaxy formation scenario already successfully tested on a wealth of observational data on (proto)spheroids, Lyman break galaxies, Lyman alpha emitters, submm galaxies, quasars, and local early-type galaxies. We find that the predicted rate of long GRBs amounts to about 300 events/yr/sr, of which about 30 per cent occur at z>~6. Correspondingly, the GRB number counts well agree with the bright SWIFT data, without the need for an intrinsic luminosity evolution. Moreover, the above framework enables us to predict properties of the GRB host galaxies. Most GRBs are associated with low mass galaxy halos M_H~10^12 M_sun have larger extinction ...

  13. Gamma watermarking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Muriel Y.; Wood, Lowell L.; Lougheed, Ronald W.; Moody, Kenton J.; Wang, Tzu-Fang

    2004-05-25

    A covert, gamma-ray "signature" is used as a "watermark" for property identification. This new watermarking technology is based on a unique steganographic or "hidden writing" digital signature, implemented in tiny quantities of gamma-ray-emitting radioisotopic material combinations, generally covertly emplaced on or within an object. This digital signature may be readily recovered at distant future times, by placing a sensitive, high energy-resolution gamma-ray detecting instrument reasonably precisely over the location of the watermark, which location may be known only to the object's owner; however, the signature is concealed from all ordinary detection means because its exceedingly low level of activity is obscured by the natural radiation background (including the gamma radiation naturally emanating from the object itself, from cosmic radiation and material surroundings, from human bodies, etc.). The "watermark" is used in object-tagging for establishing object identity, history or ownership. It thus may serve as an aid to law enforcement officials in identifying stolen property and prosecuting theft thereof. Highly effective, potentially very low cost identification-on demand of items of most all types is thus made possible.

  14. Gamma watermarking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Muriel Y.; Wood, Lowell L.; Lougheed, Ronald W.; Moody, Kenton J.; Wang, Tzu-Fang

    2004-05-25

    A covert, gamma-ray "signature" is used as a "watermark" for property identification. This new watermarking technology is based on a unique steganographic or "hidden writing" digital signature, implemented in tiny quantities of gamma-ray-emitting radioisotopic material combinations, generally covertly emplaced on or within an object. This digital signature may be readily recovered at distant future times, by placing a sensitive, high energy-resolution gamma-ray detecting instrument reasonably precisely over the location of the watermark, which location may be known only to the object's owner; however, the signature is concealed from all ordinary detection means because its exceedingly low level of activity is obscured by the natural radiation background (including the gamma radiation naturally emanating from the object itself, from cosmic radiation and material surroundings, from human bodies, etc.). The "watermark" is used in object-tagging for establishing object identity, history or ownership. It thus may serve as an aid to law enforcement officials in identifying stolen property and prosecuting theft thereof. Highly effective, potentially very low cost identification-on demand of items of most all types is thus made possible.

  15. Colliding. gamma. e- and. gamma gamma. -beams on the basis of electron-positron linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginzburg, I.F.; Kotkin, G.L.; Serbo, V.G.; Tel' nov, V.I.

    1983-08-01

    Main properties of the ..gamma..e and ..gamma gamma.. collisions are discussed in some detail with application to the generation of colliding ..gamma..e and ..gamma gamma.. beams basing on the designed linear accelerators with colliding e/sup +/e/sup -/ beams, VLEEP and SLC, as it was proposed in a previous work. Intensive ..gamma.. beams with the energy 50 GeV would be produced from scattering of the laser light focused to the electron beams of the accelerators. Laser radiation is focused to the electron beam in the conversion region at a distance of about 10 cm from the place of collision. After scattering on electrons high-energy photons move practically along the electron primary trajectories and are focused in the collision region. The electrons are deflected from the collision region by means of approximately 1 T magnetic field. Then the produced ..gamma..-beam collides with an electron beam or a similar ..gamma..-beam. In the case when the maximum luminosity (L) is attained, the luminosity distribution in the invariant mass of the ..gamma..e or ..gamma gamma.. systems is wide. A monochromatization of the collisions up to the level of 5-10% is possible. That will entail a decrease in the luminosity, the procedure is most effective if one uses the electrons and the laser photons with opposite helicities. Examples of physically interesting problems to be investigated with the proposed ..gamma..e and ..gamma gamma.. beams are suggested.

  16. Crystal growth and thermoluminescence response of NaZr{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} at high gamma radiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordóñez-Regil, E., E-mail: eduardo.ordonez@inin.gob.mx [Depto. de Química, Gerencia de Ciencias Básicas, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, CP 11801 México D.F. (Mexico); Contreras-Ramírez, A., E-mail: aida.contreras@inin.gob.mx [Depto. de Química, Gerencia de Ciencias Básicas, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, CP 11801 México D.F. (Mexico); Depto. de Tecnología de Materiales, Gerencia de Ciencias Aplicadas, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, CP 11801 México D.F. (Mexico); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Unidad Académica el Cerrillo, Piedras Blancas, AP 2-139, CP 50000 Toluca Estado de México (Mexico); Fernández-Valverde, S.M., E-mail: suilma.fernandez@inin.gob.mx [Depto. de Química, Gerencia de Ciencias Básicas, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, CP 11801 México D.F. (Mexico); González-Martínez, P.R., E-mail: pedro.gonzalez@inin.gob.mx [Depto. de Física, Gerencia de Ciencias Básicas, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, CP 11801 México D.F. (Mexico); Carrasco-Ábrego, H., E-mail: hector.carrasco@inin.gob.mx [Depto. Aceleradores, Gerencia de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, CP 11801 México D.F. (Mexico)

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •NaZr{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} exposed to gamma doses of 10, 30 and 50 MGy. •Gamma radiation produced growth of the crystal size of the NZP. •Morphology changes were reversible by heating. •Linear relationship between the thermoluminescence and the applied gamma dose. •This property could be useful for high-level gamma dosimetry. -- Abstract: This work describes the synthesis and characterization of NaZr{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}. The stability of this material under high doses of gamma radiation was investigated in the range of 10–50 MGy. Samples of unaltered and gamma irradiated NaZr{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} were characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and thermoluminescence. The results showed that while functional groups were not affected by the gamma irradiation, morphology changes were observed with increasing doses of gamma irradiation. The morphology of the non-irradiated compound is agglomerated flakes; however, irradiation at 10 MGy splits the flakes inducing the formation of well-defined cubes. Gamma irradiation induced the crystal size of the NaZr{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} to grow. The heat treatment (973 K) of samples irradiated at 50 MGy resulted in the recovery of the original morphology. Furthermore, the thermoluminescence analysis of the irradiated compound is reported.

  17. Hot-Electron Tunneling sensors for high-resolution x-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mears, C.A.; Labov, S.E.; Frank, M.; Netel, H.

    1997-02-07

    Over the past 2 years, we have been studying the use of Hot Electron Tunneling sensors for use in high-energy-resolution x-ray and gamma-ray spectrometers. These sensors promise several advantages over existing cryogenic sensors, including simultaneous high count rate and high resolution capability, and relative ease of use. Using simple shadow mask lithography, we verified the basic principles of operation of these devices and discovered new physics in their thermal behavior as a function applied voltage bias. We also began to develop ways to use this new sensor in practical x-ray and gamma-ray detectors based on superconducting absorbers. This requires the use of quasiparticle trapping to concentrate the signal in the sensing elements.

  18. PKS 2123-463: A Confirmed Gamma-ray Blazar at High Redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    DAmmando, F.; Rau, A.; Schady, P.; Finke, J.; Orienti, M.; Greiner, J.; Kann, D. A.; Ojha, R.; Foley, A. R.; Stevens, J.; Blanchard, J. M.; Edwards, P. G.; Kadler, M.; Lovell, J. E. J.

    2012-01-01

    The flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) PKS 2123-463 was associated in the First Fermi-LAT source catalog with the gamma-ray source 1FGL J2126.1-4603, but when considering the full first two years of Fermi observations, no gamma-ray source at a position consistent with this FSRQ was detected, and thus PKS 2123-463 was not reported in the Second Fermi-LAT source catalog. On 2011 December 14 a gamma-ray source positionally consistent with PKS 2123-463 was detected in flaring activity by Fermi-LAT. This activity triggered radio-to-X-ray observations by the Swift, GROND, ATCA, Ceduna, and KAT-7 observatories. Results of the localization of the gamma-ray source over 41 months of Fermi-LAT operation are reported here in conjunction with the results of the analysis of radio, optical, UV and X-ray data collected soon after the gamma-ray flare. The strict spatial association with the lower energy counterpart together with a simultaneous increase of the activity in optical, UV, X-ray and gamma-ray bands led to a firm identification of the gamma-ray source with PKS 2123-463. A new photometric redshift has been estimated as z = 1.46 +/- 0.05 using GROND and Swift/UVOT observations, in rough agreement with the disputed spectroscopic redshift of z = 1.67. We fit the broadband spectral energy distribution with a synchrotron/external Compton model. We find that a thermal disk component is necessary to explain the optical/UV emis- sion detected by Swift/UVOT. This disk has a luminosity of 1.8x1046 erg s-1, and a fit to the disk emission assuming a Schwarzschild (i.e., nonrotating) black hole gives a mass of 2 x 109 M(solar mass). This is the first black hole mass estimate for this source.

  19. The 2010 very high energy gamma-ray flare & 10 years of multi-wavelength observations of M 87

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowski, A; Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Anton, G; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; de Almeida, U Barres; Becherini, Y; Becker, J; Behera, B; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Biteau, J; Bochow, A; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Büsching, I; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Cerruti, M; Chadwick, P M; Charbonnier, A; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Clapson, A C; Coignet, G; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Fallon, L; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gallant, Y A; Gast, H; Gérard, L; Gerbig, D; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Goret, P; Göring, D; Häffner, S; Hague, J D; Hampf, D; Hauser, M; Heinz, S; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hoffmann, A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; de Jager, O C; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Keogh, D; Khangulyan, D; Khélifi, B; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Kossakowski, R; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lennarz, D; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Masbou, J; Maurin, D; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Méhault, J; Moderski, R; Moulin, E; Naumann, C L; Naumann-Godo, M; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nekrassov, D; Nguyen, N; Nicholas, B; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Arribas, M Paz; Pedaletti, G; Pelletier, G; Petrucci, P -O; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Ruppel, J; Sahakian, V; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schöck, F M; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sheidaei, F; Skilton, J L; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Szostek, A; Tavernet, J -P; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vialle, J P; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorobiov, S; Vorster, M; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Zacharias, M; Zajczyk, A; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S; Aleksić, J; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Backes, M; Barrio, J A; Bastieri, D; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Berdyugin, A; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bock, R K; Boller, A; Bonnoli, G; Tridon, D Borla; Braun, I; Bretz, T; Cañellas, A; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Cossio, L; Covino, S; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; del Pozo, E De Cea; De Lotto, B; Mendez, C Delgado; Ortega, A Diago; Doert, M; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Elsaesser, D; Ferenc, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Fruck, C; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Garrido, D; Giavitto, G; Godinović, N; Hadasch, D; Häfner, D; Herrero, A; Hildebrand, D; Höhne-Mönch, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Huber, B; Jogler, T; Klepser, S; Krähenbühl, T; Krause, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Leonardo, E; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; López, M; Lorenz, E; Makariev, M; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Meucci, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Miyamoto, H; Moldón, J; Moralejo, A; Munar, P; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Orito, R; Oya, I; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Pardo, S; Paredes, J M; Partini, S; Pasanen, M; Pauss, F; Perez-Torres, M A; Persic, M; Peruzzo, L; Pilia, M; Pochon, J; Prada, F; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Puljak, I; Reichardt, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, K; Saito, T Y; Salvati, M; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shayduk, M; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Spiro, S; Stamerra, A; Steinke, B; Storz, J; Strah, N; Surić, T; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thom, M; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Treves, A; Vankov, H; Vogler, P; Wagner, R M; Weitzel, Q; Zabalza, V; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Arlen, T; Aune, T; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bouvier, A; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cannon, A; Cesarini, A; Ciupik, L; Connolly, M P; Cui, W; Dickherber, R; Duke, C; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Finley, J P; Finnegan, G; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gall, D; Godambe, S; Griffin, S; Grube, J; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Huan, H; Hui, C M; Kaaret, P; Karlsson, N; Kertzman, M; Khassen, Y; Kieda, D; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; LeBohec, S; Maier, G; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nuñez, P D; Ong, R A; Orr, M; Otte, A N; Park, N; Perkins, J S; Pichel, A; Pohl, M; Prokoph, H; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, H J; Ruppel, J; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Şentürk, G D; Telezhinsky, I; Tešić, G; Theiling, M; Thibadeau, S; Varlotta, A; Vassiliev, V V; Vivier, M; Wakely, S P; Weekes, T C; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B; de Almeida, U Barres; Cara, M; Casadio, C; Cheung, C C; McConville, W; Davies, F; Doi, A; Giovannini, G; Giroletti, M; Hada, K; Hardee, P; Harris, D E; Junor, W; Kino, M; Lee, N P; Ly, C; Madrid, J; Massaro, F; Mundell, C G; Nagai, H; Perlman, E S; Steele, I A; Walker, R C; Wood, D L

    2011-01-01

    Abridged: The giant radio galaxy M 87 with its proximity, famous jet, and very massive black hole provides a unique opportunity to investigate the origin of very high energy (VHE; E>100 GeV) gamma-ray emission generated in relativistic outflows and the surroundings of super-massive black holes. M 87 has been established as a VHE gamma-ray emitter since 2006. The VHE gamma-ray emission displays strong variability on timescales as short as a day. In this paper, results from a joint VHE monitoring campaign on M 87 by the MAGIC and VERITAS instruments in 2010 are reported. During the campaign, a flare at VHE was detected triggering further observations at VHE (H.E.S.S.), X-rays (Chandra), and radio (43 GHz VLBA). The excellent sampling of the VHE gamma-ray light curve enables one to derive a precise temporal characterization of the flare: the single, isolated flare is well described by a two-sided exponential function with significantly different flux rise and decay times. While the overall variability pattern of...

  20. Very-high-energy gamma radiation from supernova remnants as seen with H.E.S.S

    CERN Document Server

    Bochow, Anne; Gast, Henning; Marandon, Vincent; Renaud, Matthieu; Hofmann, Werner

    2011-01-01

    Very-high-energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) gamma radiation has already been detected from several supernova remnants (SNRs). These objects, which are well-studied in radio, optical and X-ray wavelengths, constitute one of the most intriguing source classes in VHE astronomy. H.E.S.S., an array of four imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes in Namibia, has recorded an extensive dataset of VHE gamma-ray observations covering the central region of the Milky Way, both from pointed observations as well as from the Galactic Plane Survey conducted in the inner region of the Galaxy. From radio observations, several hundred SNRs are known in the Milky Way, but until now only few of them have been identified as VHE gamma-ray emitters. Using the H.E.S.S. dataset and a large ensemble of radio SNRs localized in the inner region of the Galaxy, the standard framework that links the origin of cosmic rays to the gamma-ray visibility of SNRs can now be tested. Here we present the ensemble of investigated SNRs and discuss constraints...

  1. Very high-energy gamma-ray observations of the Crab nebula and other potential sources with the GRAAL experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Arqueros, F; Berenguel, M; Borque, D M; Camacho, E F; Díaz, M; Gebauer, H J; Enriquez, R P; Plaga, R

    2001-01-01

    The ``Gamma Ray Astronomy at ALmeria'' (GRAAL) experiment uses 63 heliostat-mirrors with a total mirror area of ~ 2500 m2 from the CESA-1 field at the ``Plataforma Solar de Almeria'' (PSA) to collect Cherenkov light from air showers. The detector is located in a central solar tower and detects photon-induced showers with an energy threshold of 250 +- 110 GeV and an asymptotic effective detection area of about 15000 m2. A comparison between the results of detailed Monte-Carlo simulations and data is presented. Data sets taken in the period September 1999 - September 2000 in the direction of the Crab pulsar, the active galaxy 3C 454.3, the unidentified gamma-ray source 3EG 1835+35 and a ``pseudo source'' were analyzed for high energy gamma-ray emission.Evidence for a gamma-ray flux from the Crab pulsar with an integral flux of 2.2 +- 0.4 (stat) ^+1.7_-1.3 (syst) x 10^-9 cm^-2 sec^-1 above threshold and a significance of 4.5 sigma in a total measuring time of 7 hours and 10 minutes on source was found. No eviden...

  2. Very-high-energy {\\gamma}-ray observations of novae and dwarf novae with the MAGIC telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Ahnen, M L; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Banerjee, B; Bangale, P; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Bernardini, E; Biasuzzi, B; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Chatterjee, A; Clavero, R; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Caneva, G; De Lotto, B; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Mendez, C Delgado; Di Pierro, F; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Glawion, D Eisenacher; Elsaesser, D; Fernández-Barral, A; Fidalgo, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; Galindo, D; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Giammaria, P; Godinović, N; Muñoz, A González; Guberman, D; Hanabata, Y; Hayashida, M; Herrera, J; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Hughes, G; Idec, W; Kellermann, H; Kodani, K; Konno, Y; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lewandowska, N; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Majumdar, P; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Manganaro, M; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Nakajima, D; Neustroev, V; Niedzwiecki, A; Rosillo, M Nievas; Nilsson, K; Nishijima, K; Noda, K; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palacio, J; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Persic, M; Poutanen, J; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Puljak, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Garcia, J Rodriguez; Saito, T; Saito, K; Satalecka, K; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Strzys, M; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Verguilov, V; Vovk, I; Will, M; Zanin, R; Desiante, R; Hays, E

    2015-01-01

    Context. In the last five years the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument detected GeV {\\gamma}-ray emission from five novae. The GeV emission can be interpreted in terms of an inverse Compton process of electrons accelerated in a shock. In this case it is expected that protons in the same conditions can be accelerated to much higher energies. Consequently they may produce a second component in the {\\gamma}-ray spectrum at TeV energies. Aims. We aim to explore the very-high-energy domain to search for {\\gamma}-ray emission above 50 GeV and to shed light on the acceleration process of leptons and hadrons in nova explosions. Methods. We have performed observations with the MAGIC telescopes of the classical nova V339 Del shortly after the 2013 outburst, triggered by optical and subsequent GeV {\\gamma}-ray detec- tions. We also briefly report on VHE observations of the symbiotic nova YY Her and the dwarf nova ASASSN-13ax. We complement the TeV MAGIC observations with the analysis of con- temporaneous Fermi-...

  3. High-Resolution Timing Observations of Spin-Powered Pulsars with the AGILE Gamma-Ray Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Pellizzoni, A; Possenti, A; Fornari, F; Caraveo, P; Del Monte, E; Mereghetti, S; Tavani, M; Argan, A; Trois, A; Burgay, M; Chen, A; Cognard, I; Costa, E; D'Amico, N; Esposito, P; Evangelista, Y; Feroci, M; Fuschino, F; Giuliani, A; Halpern, J; Hobbs, G; Hotan, A; Johnston, S; Krämer, M; Longo, F; Manchester, R N; Marisaldi, M; Palfreyman, J; Weltevrede, P; Barbiellini, G; Boffelli, F; Bulgarelli, A; Cattaneo, P W; Cocco, V; D'Ammando, F; De Paris, G; Di Cocco, G; Donnarumma, I; Fiorini, M; Froysland, T; Galli, M; Gianotti, F; Harding, A; Labanti, C; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Lipari, P; Mauri, F; Morselli, A; Pacciani, L; Perotti, F; Picozza, P; Prest, M; Pucella, G; Rapisarda, M; Rappoldi, A; Soffitta, P; Trifoglio, M; Vallazza, E; Vercellone, S; Vittorini, V; Zambra, A; Zanello, D; Pittori, C; Verrecchia, F; Preger, B; Santolamazza, P; Giommi, P; Salotti, L

    2008-01-01

    AGILE is a small gamma-ray astronomy satellite mission of the Italian Space Agency dedicated to high-energy astrophysics launched in 2007 April. Its 1 microsecond absolute time tagging capability coupled with a good sensitivity in the 30 MeV-30 GeV range, with simultaneous X-ray monitoring in the 18-60 keV band, makes it perfectly suited for the study of gamma-ray pulsars following up on the CGRO/EGRET heritage. In this paper we present the first AGILE timing results on the known gamma-ray pulsars Vela, Crab, Geminga and B 1706-44. The data were collected from 2007 July to 2008 April, exploiting the mission Science Verification Phase, the Instrument Timing Calibration and the early Observing Pointing Program. Thanks to its large field of view, AGILE collected a large number of gamma-ray photons from these pulsars (about 10,000 pulsed counts for Vela) in only few months of observations. The coupling of AGILE timing capabilities, simultaneous radio/X-ray monitoring and new tools aimed at precise photon phasing,...

  4. Non-invasive detection of high gamma band activity during motor imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa M Smith

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available High gamma oscillations (70-150 Hz; HG are rapidly evolving, spatially localized neurophysiological signals that are believed to be the best representative signature of engaged neural populations. The HG band has been best characterized from invasive electrophysiological approaches such as electrocorticography (ECoG because of the increased signal-to-noise ratio that results when by-passing the scalp and skull. Despite the recent observation that HG activity can be detected non-invasively by electroencephalography (EEG, it is unclear to what extent EEG can accurately resolve the spatial distribution of HG signals during active task engagement. We have overcome some of the limitations inherent to acquiring HG signals across the scalp by utilizing individual head anatomy in combination with an inverse modeling method. We applied a linearly constrained minimum variance beamformer (LCMV method on EEG data during a motor imagery paradigm to extract a time-frequency spectrogram at every voxel location on the cortex. To confirm spatially distributed patterns of HG responses, we contrasted overlapping maps of the EEG HG signal with BOLD fMRI data acquired from the same set of neurologically normal subjects during a separate session. We show that scalp-based HG band activity detected by EEG during motor imagery spatially co-localizes with BOLD fMRI data. Taken together, these results suggest that EEG can accurately resolve spatially specific estimates of local cortical high frequency signals, potentially opening an avenue for non-invasive measurement of HG potentials from diverse sets of neurologically impaired populations for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes

  5. Burn-Up Determination by High Resolution Gamma Spectrometry: Axial and Diametral Scanning Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsyth, R.S.; Blackadder, W.H.; Ronqvist, N.

    1967-02-15

    In the gamma spectrometric determination of burn-up the use of a single fission product as a monitor of the specimen fission rate is subject to errors caused by activity saturation or, in certain cases, fission product migration. Results are presented of experiments in which all the resolvable gamma peaks in the fission product spectrum have been used to calculate the fission rate; these results form a pattern which reflect errors in the literature values of the gamma branching ratios, fission yields etc., and also represent a series of empirical correction factors. Axial and diametral scanning experiments on a long-irradiated low-enrichment fuel element are also described and demonstrate that it is possible to differentiate between fissions in U-235 and in Pu-239 respectively by means of the ratios of the Ru-106 activity to the activities of the other fission products.

  6. Search for a Correlation Between Very-High-Energy Gamma Rays and Giant Radio Pulses in the Crab Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Bouvier, A.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dickherber, R.; Duke, C.; Dumm, J.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortson, L.; Perkins, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a joint observational campaign between the Green Bank radio telescope and the VERITAS gamma-ray telescope, which searched for a correlation between the emission of very-high-energy (VHE) gamma rays ( E(sub Gamma) > 150 GeV) and giant radio pulses (GRPs) from the Crab pulsar at 8.9 GHz. A total of 15,366 GRPs were recorded during 11.6 hr of simultaneous observations, which were made across four nights in 2008 December and in 2009 November and December. We searched for an enhancement of the pulsed gamma-ray emission within time windows placed around the arrival time of the GRP events. In total, eight different time windows with durations ranging from 0.033 ms to 72 s were positioned at three different locations relative to the GRP to search for enhanced gamma-ray emission which lagged, led, or was concurrent with, the GRP event. Furthermore, we performed separate searches on main pulse GRPs and interpulse GRPs and on the most energetic GRPs in our data sample. No significant enhancement of pulsed VHE emission was found in any of the preformed searches. We set upper limits of 5-10 times the average VHE flux of the Crab pulsar on the flux simultaneous with interpulse GRPs on single-rotation-period timescales. On approx. 8 s timescales around interpulse GRPs, we set an upper limit of 2-3 times the average VHE flux. Within the framework of recent models for pulsed VHE emission from the Crab pulsar, the expected VHE-GRP emission correlations are below the derived limits.

  7. Survey of Gamma Dose and Radon Exhalation Rate from Soil Surface of High Background Natural Radiation Areas in Ramsar, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouhollah Dehghani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Radon is a radioactive gas and the second leading cause of death due to lung cancer after smoking. Ramsar is known for having the highest levels of natural background radiation on earth. Materials and Methods: In this research study, 50 stations of high radioactivity areas of Ramsar were selected in warm season of the year. Then gamma dose and radon exhalation rate were measured.Results: Results showed that gamma dose and radon exhalation rate were in the range of 51-7100 nSv/hr and 9-15370 mBq/m2s, respectively.Conclusion: Compare to the worldwide average 16 mBq/m2s, estimated average annual effective of Radon exhalation rate in the study area is too high.

  8. DETERMINATION OF GAMMA - AMINOBUTYRIC ACID BY HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Qujeq

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-aminobutyric acid is the main inhibitory amino acid neurotransmitter in several areas of the brain. Measurement of gamma-aminobutyric acid in the brain will help elucidate its metabolic rote and diagnostic value. The liquid chromatography (LC system consisted of a delivery pump. Male rats (150-250g were used in this study. The brain was rapidly removed from decapitated animals. Trie chromatograms showed satisfactory resolution and symmetrical peak shapes, both with the standard and tissue extracts. the retention lime was 4.60 min. it was constant in repeated analyses and exactly the same for the standard and tissue samples.

  9. A large high-energy gamma-ray flare from the blazar 3C 273

    OpenAIRE

    Collmar, W.; Reimer, O.; Bennett, K.; Bloemen, H.; Hermsen, W.; Lichti, G. G.; Ryan, J.; Schoenfelder, V.; Steinle, H.; Williams, O. R.; Boettcher, M.

    2000-01-01

    The Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) experiments EGRET and COMPTEL observed the Virgo sky region continuously for 7 weeks between December 10, 1996 and January 28, 1997. The prominent quasar 3C~273 was found to be the brightest source in gamma-rays and was significantly detected by EGRET and COMPTEL. The EGRET experiment observed a time-variable flux at energies above 100 MeV, which reached in a 2-week flaring period (December 30, 1996 to January 14, 1997) its highest flux level observed ...

  10. Constraining heavy decaying dark matter with the high energy gamma-ray limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalashev, O. E.; Kuznetsov, M. Yu.

    2016-09-01

    We consider decaying dark matter with masses 1 07≲M ≲1 016 GeV as a source of ultrahigh energy (UHE) gamma rays. Using recent limits on UHE gamma-ray flux for energies Eγ>2 ×1 014 eV , provided by extensive air shower observatories, we put limits on masses and lifetimes of the dark matter. We also discuss possible dark matter decay origin of tentative 100 PeV photon flux detected with the EAS-MSU experiment.

  11. PKS 2123-463: A Confirmed Gamma-ray Blazar at High Redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ammando, F.; Rau, A.; Schady, P.; Finke, J.; Orienti, M.; Greiner, J.; Kann, D. A.; Ojha, R.; Foley, A. R.; Stevens, J.; Blanchard, J. M.; Edwards, P. G.; Kadler, M.; Lovell, J. E.

    2013-01-01

    The flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) PKS 2123-463 was associated in the first Fermi- Large Area Telescope (LAT) source catalogue with the gamma-ray source 1FGL J2126.1-4603, but when considering the full first two years of Fermi observations, no gamma-ray source at a position consistent with this FSRQ was detected, and thus PKS 2123-463 was not reported in the second Fermi-LAT source catalogue. On 2011 December 14 a gamma-ray source positionally consistent with PKS 2123-463 was detected in flaring activity by Fermi-LAT. This activity triggered radio-to-X-ray observations by the Swift,Gamma-ray Optical/Near-Infrared Detector (GROND), Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), Ceduna and Seven Dishes Karoo Array Telescope (KAT-7) observatories. Results of the localization of the gamma-ray source over 41 months of Fermi-LAT operation are reported here in conjunction with the results of the analysis of radio, optical, ultraviolet (UV) and X-ray data collected soon after the gamma-ray flare. The strict spatial association with the lower energy counterpart together with a simultaneous increase of the activity in optical, UV, X-ray and gamma-ray bands led to a firm identification of the gamma-ray source with PKS 2123-463. A new photometric redshift has been estimated as z = 1.46 plus or minus 0.05 using GROND and Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) observations, in rough agreement with the disputed spectroscopic redshift of z = 1.67.We fit the broad-band spectral energy distribution with a synchrotron/external Compton model. We find that a thermal disc component is necessary to explain the optical/UV emission detected by Swift/UVOT. This disc has a luminosity of approximately 1.8 x 10(exp 46) erg s(exp -1), and a fit to the disc emission assuming a Schwarzschild (i.e. non-rotating) black hole gives a mass of approximately 2 x 10(exp 9) solar mass. This is the first black hole mass estimate for this source.

  12. Can Life Survive Gamma-Ray Bursts in the High-redshift Universe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Zhang, Bing

    2015-09-01

    Nearby gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been proposed as a possible cause of mass extinctions on Earth. Due to the higher event rate of GRBs at higher redshifts, it has been speculated that life as we know it may not survive above a certain redshift (e.g., z\\gt 0.5). We examine the duty cycle of lethal (life-threatening) GRBs in the solar neighborhood, in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies, and GRB host galaxies, with the dependence of the long GRB rate on star formation and metallicity properly taken into account. We find that the number of lethal GRBs attacking Earth within the past 500 Myr (˜epoch of the Ordovician mass extinction) is 0.93. The number of lethal GRBs hitting a certain planet increases with redshift, as a result of the increasing star formation rate (SFR) and decreasing metallicity in high-z galaxies. Taking 1 per 500 Myr as a conservative duty cycle for life to survive, as evidenced by our existence, we find that there is still a good fraction of SDSS galaxies beyond z=0.5 where the GRB rate at half-mass radius is lower than this value. We derive the fraction of such benign galaxies as a function of redshift through Monte Carlo simulations, and we find that the fraction is ˜ 50% at z˜ 1.5 and ˜ 10% even at z˜ 3. The mass distribution of benign galaxies is dominated by Milky Way-like ones, due to their commonness, relatively large mass, and low SFR. GRB host galaxies are among the most dangerous ones.

  13. Movement-Related Sensorimotor High-Gamma Activity Mainly Represents Somatosensory Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seokyun Ryun

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Somatosensation plays pivotal roles in the everyday motor control of humans. During active movement, there exists a prominent high-gamma (HG >50 Hz power increase in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1, and this provides an important feature in relation to the decoding of movement in a brain-machine interface (BMI. However, one concern of BMI researchers is the inflation of the decoding performance due to the activation of somatosensory feedback, which is not elicited in patients who have lost their sensorimotor function. In fact, it is unclear as to how much the HG component activated in S1 contributes to the overall sensorimotor HG power during voluntary movement. With regard to other functional roles of HG in S1, recent findings have reported that these HG power levels increase before the onset of actual movement, which implies neural activation for top-down movement preparation or sensorimotor interaction, i.e., an efference copy. These results are promising for BMI applications but remain inconclusive. Here, we found using electrocorticography (ECoG from eight patients that HG activation in S1 is stronger and more informative than it is in the primary motor cortex (M1 regardless of the type of movement. We also demonstrate by means of electromyography (EMG that the onset timing of the HG power in S1 is later (49 ms than that of the actual movement. Interestingly, we show that the HG power fluctuations in S1 are closely related to subtle muscle contractions, even during the pre-movement period. These results suggest the following: (1 movement-related HG activity in S1 strongly affects the overall sensorimotor HG power, and (2 HG activity in S1 during voluntary movement mainly represents cortical neural processing for somatosensory feedback.

  14. Oxide phase development upon high temperature oxidation of {gamma}-NiCrAl alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nijdam, T.J.; Pers, N.M. van der; Sloof, W.G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Rotterdamseweg 137, 2628 AL Delft (Netherlands)

    2006-03-15

    The amount of each oxide phase developed upon thermal oxidation of a {gamma}-Ni-27Cr-9Al (at.%) alloy at 1353 K and 1443 K and a partial oxygen pressure of 20 kPa is determined with in-situ high temperature X-ray Diffractometry (XRD). The XRD results are compared with microstructural observations from Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) backscattered electron images, and model calculations using a coupled thermodynamic-kinetic oxidation model. It is shown that for short oxidation times, the oxide scale consists of an outer layer of NiO on top of an intermediate layer of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and an inner zone of isolated {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} precipitates in the alloy. The amounts of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and NiO in the oxide scale attain their maximum values when successively continuous Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers are formed. Then a transition from very fast to slow parabolic growth kinetics occurs. During the slow parabolic growth, the total amount of non-protective oxide phases (i.e. all oxide phases excluding {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in the oxide scale maintain at an approximately constant value. The formation of NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} and subsequently NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} happens as a result of solid-state reactions between the oxide phases within the oxide scale. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  15. HESS upper limits on very high energy gamma-ray emission from the microquasar GRS 1915+105

    Science.gov (United States)

    H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Acero, F.; Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Anton, G.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Bazer-Bachi, A. R.; Becherini, Y.; Behera, B.; Bernlöhr, K.; Bochow, A.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Borrel, V.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bulik, T.; Büsching, I.; Boutelier, T.; Chadwick, P. M.; Charbonnier, A.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Conrad, J.; Chounet, L.-M.; Clapson, A. C.; Coignet, G.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Drury, L. O'c.; Dubois, F.; Dubus, G.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Fallon, L.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fiasson, A.; Förster, A.; Fontaine, G.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gallant, Y. A.; Gérard, L.; Gerbig, D.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Glück, B.; Goret, P.; Göring, D.; Hauser, M.; Heinz, S.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hinton, J. A.; Hoffmann, A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holleran, M.; Hoppe, S.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; de Jager, O. C.; Jahn, C.; Jung, I.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Khangulyan, D.; Khélifi, B.; Keogh, D.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Kossakowski, R.; Lamanna, G.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lohse, T.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Masbou, J.; Maurin, D.; McComb, T. J. L.; Medina, M. C.; Méhault, J.; Moderski, R.; Moulin, E.; Naumann-Godo, M.; de Naurois, M.; Nedbal, D.; Nekrassov, D.; Nicholas, B.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Ohm, S.; Olive, J.-F.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Orford, K. J.; Ostrowski, M.; Panter, M.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pedaletti, G.; Pelletier, G.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Pita, S.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raubenheimer, B. C.; Raue, M.; Rayner, S. M.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de Los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Ripken, J.; Rob, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Ruppel, J.; Ryde, F.; Sahakian, V.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schöck, F. M.; Schönwald, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Shalchi, A.; Sushch, I.; Sikora, M.; Skilton, J. L.; Sol, H.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Superina, G.; Szostek, A.; Tam, P. H.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Terrier, R.; Tibolla, O.; Tluczykont, M.; van Eldik, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Venter, L.; Vialle, J. P.; Vincent, P.; Vivier, M.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorobiov, S.; Wagner, S. J.; Ward, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.

    2009-12-01

    Context: High energy particles reside in the relativistic jets of microquasars, making them possible sources of very high energy radiation (VHE, >100 GeV). Detecting this emission would provide a new handle on jet physics. Aims: Observations of the microquasar GRS 1915+105 with the HESS telescope array were undertaken in 2004-2008 to search for VHE emission. Methods: Stereoscopic imaging of Cherenkov radiation from extensive air showers is used to reconstruct the energy and direction of the incident gamma rays. Results: There is no evidence for a VHE gamma-ray signal either from the direction of the microquasar or its vicinity. An upper limit of 6.1× 10-13 ph cm-2 s-1 (99.9% confidence level) is set on the photon flux above 410 GeV, equivalent to a VHE luminosity of ˜ 1034 erg s-1 at 11 kpc. Conclusions: The VHE to X-ray luminosity ratio in GRS 1915+105 is at least four orders of magnitude lower than the ratio observed in gamma-ray binaries. The VHE radiative efficiency of the compact jet is less than 0.01% based on its estimated total power of 1038 erg s-1. Particle acceleration in GRS 1915+105 is not efficient at high energies and/or the magnetic field is too strong. It is also possible that VHE gamma-rays are produced by GRS 1915+105, but the emission is highly time-dependent. Supported by CAPES Foundation, Ministry of Education of Brazil.

  16. Comparative toxicity and micronuclei formation in Tribolium castaneum, Callosobruchus maculatus and Sitophilus oryzae exposed to high doses of gamma radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Mehrdad; Mozdarani, Hossein; Abd-Alla, Adly M M

    2015-07-01

    The effects of gamma radiation on mortality and micronucleus formation in Tribolium castaneum Herbst, Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) and Sitophilus oryzae (L.) genital cells were evaluated. Two groups of healthy and active adult insects 1-3 and 8-10 days old were irradiated with various doses (50-200 Gy) gamma ray. Seven days post-irradiation; mortality rates and micronucleus formation were assessed in genital cells of the irradiated insects. The results show that with increasing gamma doses, the mortality rate of each species increased and T. castaneum and S. oryzae showed the low and high sensitivity respectively. It was shown that the micronucleus appearance in the tested insects had correlation with amount and intensity of radiation doses. Moreover our results indicate different levels in the genotoxicity of gamma radiation among the insects' genital cells under study. The frequency of micronuclei in genital cells of 1-3 days old insects exposed to 50 and 200 Gy were 12.6 and 38.8 Mn/1000 cells in T. castaneum, 20.8 and 46.8 Mn/1000 cells in C. maculatus and 16.8 and 57.2 Mn/1000 cells in S. oryzae respectively. A high sensitivity of the genital cells to irradiation exposure was seen in S. oryzae correlated with its high mortality rate compared with the other two species. These results might be indicative of inflicting chromosomal damage expressed as micronucleus in high mortality rates observed in the pest population; an indication of genotoxic effects of radiation on the studied species.

  17. NOTE: Changes in the energy response of a dedicated gamma camera after exposure to a high-flux irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheoud, Roberta; Zito, Felicia; Canzi, Cristina; Voltini, Franco; Gerundini, Paolo

    1999-06-01

    This work reports the effects of the gain variation of the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) observed on a cardiac dedicated gamma camera after accidental high-flux irradiation. One detector of this dual-headed 90°-fixed gamma camera was accidentally left uncollimated during a quality assurance procedure on the other detector with a 57Co flood source (259 MBq) and received a non-uniform high flux of 1.9-0.6 Mcps over 25 000 mm2 areas for about 30 min. To evaluate the severity and the duration of the perturbation effect on the energy response of the detector, the photopeak position was monitored for about 1 month with a 99mTc point source. The 140 keV photopeak shifted to 158 keV soon after irradiation, reached the correct position after 9 days and moved to a stable value of 132 keV after 15 days. Afterwards, a new energy calibration reset the photopeak position at 140 keV and the correct energy response of the gamma camera. This experience suggests that particular care should be taken to avoid exposures to high radiation fluxes that induce persistent gain shifts on the PMTs of this system.

  18. A New Paradigm for Identification of Classes of High Energy Gamma-Ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, D F; Reimer, O

    2005-04-08

    A large fraction of the expected number of source detections of the forthcoming observatory Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will be initially unidentified. We argue that traditional methodological approaches to identify individual detections and/or populations of gamma-ray sources present procedural limitations. These limitations will hamper our ability to classify the populations lying in the anticipated dataset with the required degree of confidence, in particular for those for which no member has yet been detected convincingly with the predecessor experiment EGRET. Here we suggest a new paradigm for achieving the classification of gamma-ray source populations that is based on implementing an a priori protocol to search for theoretically-motivated candidates. It is essential that such paradigm will be defined before the data is unblinded, in order to protect the discovery potential of the sample. Key to the new procedure is a quantitative assessment of the confidence level by which new populations can be claimed to have been discovered. When needed, small number statistics is applied for population studies in gamma-ray astronomy. Although we refer here explicitly only to the case of GLAST, the scheme we present can certainly be adapted to other experiments confronted with a similar combination of problems.

  19. Dust extinction in high-z galaxies with gamma-ray burst afterglow spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elíasdóttir, Á.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Hjorth, J.

    2009-01-01

    We report the clear detection of the 2175 Å dust absorption feature in the optical afterglow spectrum of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) GRB 070802 at a redshift of z = 2.45. This is the highest redshift for a detected 2175 Å dust bump to date, and it is the first clear detection of the 2175 Å bump in ...

  20. Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays, The Diffuse High Energy Gamma Ray Background and Anti-protons

    CERN Document Server

    Eichler, David; Gavish, Eyal

    2016-01-01

    Theories for the origin of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECR) may imply a significant diffuse background in secondary $\\gamma$-rays from the pair cascads the UHECR initiate when interacting with background light. It is shown that, because the spectrum of these secondary $\\gamma$-rays is softer than the measured diffuse $\\gamma$-ray background in the 10-1000 GeV range, the addition of a hard component from the decay of TeV dark matter particles, subject to the implied constraints on its parameters, improves the fit. It is further argued that any compact astrophysical source of $\\bar p$s is unlikely to be as strong as decay of TeV dark matter particles, given bounds set by neutrino observations. The diffuse $\\gamma$-ray background presently sets the strongest lower bound on the lifetime of TeV dark matter particles, and hence on attendant anti-proton production, and further identification of other contributors to this background will further tighten these constraints.

  1. Gamma-ray bursts from stellar remnants - Probing the universe at high redshift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A.M.J. Wijers; J.S. Bloom; J.S. Bagla; P. Natarajan

    1998-01-01

    A gamma-ray burst (GRB) releases an amount of energy similar to that of a supernova explosion, which combined with its rapid variability suggests an origin related to neutron stars or black holes. Since these compact stellar remnants form from the most massive stars not long after their birth, GRBs

  2. The Signature of Large Scale Structures on the Very High Energy Gamma-Ray Sky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuoco, A.; /Naples U. /INFN, Naples; Hannestad, S.; Haugbolle, T.; /Aarhus U.; Miele, G.; /Naples U. /INFN, Naples; Serpico, P.D.; /Fermilab; Tu, H.; /Aarhus U. /UC, Irvine

    2006-12-01

    If the diffuse extragalactic gamma ray emission traces the large scale structures of the universe, peculiar anisotropy patterns are expected in the gamma ray sky. In particular, because of the cutoff distance introduced by the absorption of 0.1-10 TeV photons on the infrared/optical background, prominent correlations with the local structures within a range of few hundreds Mpc should be present. We provide detailed predictions of the signal based on the PSCz map of the local universe. We also use mock N-body catalogues complemented with the halo model of structures to study some statistical features of the expected signatures. The results are largely independent from cosmological details, and depend mostly on the index of correlation (or bias) of the sources with respect to the large scale distribution of galaxies. For instance, the predicted signal in the case of a quadratic correlation (as it may happen for a dark matter annihilation contribution to the diffuse gamma flux) differs substantially from a linear correlation case, providing a complementary tool to unveil the nature of the sources of the diffuse gamma ray emission. The chances of the present and future space and ground based observatories to measure these features are discussed.

  3. SAS-2 high-energy gamma-ray observations of the Vela pulsar. II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Ogelman, H. B.

    1977-01-01

    Analysis of additional data from SAS-2 experiment and improvements in the orbit-attitude data and analysis procedures have produced revised values for the flux from the Vela gamma-ray source. The pulsar phase plot shows two peaks, neither of which is in phase with the single radio pulse.

  4. VERITAS Observations of a Very High Energy Gamma-ray Flare from the Blazar 3C 66A

    CERN Document Server

    Acciari, V A; Arlen, T; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Böttcher, M; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Butt, Y; Byrum, K; Cannon, A; Celik, O; Cesarini, A; Chow, Y C; Ciupik, L; Cogan, P; Cui, W; Daniel, M K; Dickherber, R; Ergin, T; Falcone, A; Fegan, S J; Finley, J P; Fortin, P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Gall, D; Gibbs, K; Gillanders, G H; Godambe, S; Grube, J; Guenette, R; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Hays, E; Holder, J; Horan, D; Hui, C M; Humensky, T B; Imran, A; Kaaret, Philip; Karlsson, N; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D; Kildea, J; Konopelko, A; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Le Bohec, S; Maier, G; McCann, A; McCutcheon, M; Millis, J; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nagai, T; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Pandel, D; Perkins, J S; Petry, D; Pizlo, F; Pohl, M; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, H J; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Smith, A W; Steele, D; Swordy, S P; Theiling, M; Toner, J A; Varlotta, A; Vasilev, V V; Wagner, R G; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Williams, D A; Wissel, S; Wood, M; Zitzer, B

    2009-01-01

    The intermediate-frequency peaked BL Lacertae (IBL) object 3C 66A is detected during 2007 - 2008 in VHE (very high energy: E > 100 GeV) gamma-rays with the VERITAS stereoscopic array of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. An excess of 1791 events is detected, corresponding to a significance of 21.2 standard deviations (sigma), in these observations (32.8 hours live time). The observed integral flux above 200 GeV is 6% of the Crab Nebula's flux and shows evidence for variability on the time-scale of days. The measured energy spectrum is characterized by a soft power law with photon index Gamma = 4.1 +- 0.4_stat +- 0.6_sys. The radio galaxy 3C 66B is excluded as a possible source of the VHE emission.

  5. On forbidden high-energy electrons as a source of background in X-ray and gamma-ray observations

    CERN Document Server

    Suvorova, Alla V

    2014-01-01

    The study is devoted to a problem of electron-induced contaminant to X-ray and gamma-ray astrophysical measurements on board low-orbiting satellites. We analyzed enhancements of electron fluxes in energy range 100 - 300 keV observed at equatorial and low latitudes by a fleet of NOAA/POES low-orbiting satellites over the time period from 2003 to 2005. It was found that 100-300 keV electron fluxes in the forbidden zone below the inner radiation belt enhanced by several orders of magnitude during geomagnetic storms and/or under strong compressions of the magnetosphere. The enhancements are related to high substorm activity and occurred at any local time. Intense fluxes of the energetic electrons in the forbidden zone can be considered as an essential contaminant to X-ray and gamma-ray measurements at low-latitude and low-altitude orbits.

  6. Lateral distribution of high energy hadrons and gamma ray in air shower cores observed with emulsion chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matano, T.; Machida, M.; Kawasumi, N.; Tsushima, I.; Honda, K.; Hashimoto, K.; Navia, C. E.; Matinic, N.; Aquirre, C.

    1985-01-01

    A high energy event of a bundle of electrons, gamma rays and hadronic gamma rays in an air shower core were observed. The bundles were detected with an emulsion chamber with thickness of 15 cm lead. This air shower is estimated to be initiated with a proton with energy around 10 to the 17th power to 10 to the 18th power eV at an altitude of around 100 gmc/2. Lateral distributions of the electromagnetic component with energy above 2 TeV and also the hadronic component of energy above 6 TeV of this air shower core were determined. Particles in the bundle are produced with process of the development of the nuclear cascade, the primary energy of each interaction in the cascade which produces these particles is unknown. To know the primary energy dependence of transverse momentum, the average products of energy and distance for various average energies of secondary particles are studied.

  7. Gamma-ray observations of SN 1987A with an array of high-purity germanium detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandie, W. G.; Nakano, G. H.; Chase, L. F., Jr.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Wilson, R. B.; Paciesas, W.

    A balloonborne gamma-ray spectrometer comprising an array of high-purity n-type germanium detectors was flown from Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia, on May 29 - 30, 1987, 96 days after the observed neutrino pulse. SN 1987A was within the 22-deg field of view for about 3300 s during May 29.9 - 30.3 UT. No excess gamma rays were observed at energies appropriate to the Ni(56) - Co(56) decay chain or from other lines in the energy region from 0.1 to 3.0 MeV. The data imply that there was less than 2.5×10-4 solar masses of Co(56) exposed to the Earth at the time of the observation. Additional balloon-borne observations are planned.

  8. Extended free-volume defects in chalcogenide glassy semiconductors induced by high-energy {gamma}-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balitska, Valentina [Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC (Ukraine); State University of Vital Activity Safety, Lviv 79007 (Ukraine); Filipecki, Jacek; Shpotyuk, Oleh [Institute of Physics, Jan Dlugosz University, Czestochowa (Poland)

    2009-08-15

    It was shown that under-coordinated topological defects induced by high-energy {gamma}-irradiation can be a reason for significant changes in positron annihilation lifetime spectra of multicomponent chalcogenide glassy semiconductors within ternary Ge-As(Sb)-S systems. In the case of negatively-charged sulphur and arsenic atoms, the excess of free volume is quite enough to produce additional input in the second defect-related channel of positron trapping, while under-coordinated germanium atoms are practically non-detectable with this technique because of low associated free volume. Despite radiation-induced densification, the average positron lifetime demonstrate both growing and decaying tendencies after {gamma}-irradiation depending on glass composition. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Very-high-energy gamma-ray emission from the direction of the Galactic globular cluster Terzan 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Abramowski, A.; Acero, F.; Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Anton, G.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Becherini, Y.; Becker, J.; Behera, B.; Bernlöhr, K.; Bochow, A.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bulik, T.; Büsching, I.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chadwick, P. M.; Charbonnier, A.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Chounet, L.-M.; Clapson, A. C.; Coignet, G.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dubois, F.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Fallon, L.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Gast, H.; Gérard, L.; Gerbig, D.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Glück, B.; Goret, P.; Göring, D.; Häffner, S.; Hague, J. D.; Hampf, D.; Hauser, M.; Heinz, S.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hinton, J. A.; Hoffmann, A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; de Jager, O. C.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Keogh, D.; Khangulyan, D.; Khélifi, B.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Kossakowski, R.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lennarz, D.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Masbou, J.; Maurin, D.; Maxted, N.; McComb, T. J. L.; Medina, M. C.; Méhault, J.; Moderski, R.; Moulin, E.; Naumann, C. L.; Naumann-Godo, M.; de Naurois, M.; Nedbal, D.; Nekrassov, D.; Nguyen, N.; Nicholas, B.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Ohm, S.; de Oña Wilhelmi, D.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pedaletti, G.; Pelletier, G.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Pita, S.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raue, M.; Rayner, S. M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Ripken, J.; Rob, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Ruppel, J.; Ryde, F.; Sahakian, V.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schöck, F. M.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Sikora, M.; Skilton, J. L.; Sol, H.; Spengler, G.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Szostek, A.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Vialle, J. P.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorobiov, S.; Vorster, M.; Wagner, S. J.; Ward, M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Zacharias, M.; Zajczyk, A.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.

    2011-07-01

    The HESS very-high-energy (VHE, E > 0.1 TeV) gamma-ray telescope system has discovered a new source, HESS J1747-248. The measured integral flux is (1.2 ± 0.3) × 10-12 cm-2 s-1 above 440 GeV for a power-law photon spectral index of 2.5 ± 0.3stat ± 0.2sys. The VHE gamma-ray source is located in the close vicinity of the Galactic globular cluster Terzan 5 and extends beyond the HESS point spread function (0.07°). The probability of a chance coincidence with Terzan 5 and an unrelated VHE source is quite low (~10-4). With the largest population of identified millisecond pulsars (msPSRs), a very high core stellar density and the brightest GeV range flux as measured by Fermi-LAT, Terzan 5 stands out among Galactic globular clusters. The properties of the VHE source are briefly discussed in the context of potential emission mechanisms, notably in relation to msPSRs. Interpretation of the available data accommodates several possible origins for this VHE gamma-ray source, although none of them offers a satisfying explanation of its peculiar morphology.

  10. Status of the GILDA project for the 30 MeV-100 GeV high energy gamma ray astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casolino, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P. [Rome Univ. `Tor Vergata` (Italy)]|[INFN, Rome (Italy); Barbiellini, G. [Trieste Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Trieste (Italy); Fuglesang, C. [ESA-EAC, Cologne (Germany); Ozerov, Yu.V.; Zemskov, V.M.; Zverev, V.G.; Galper, A.M. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-09-01

    High energy gamma-ray astrophysics has greatly developed in the last few years because of the results of EGRET, on the Compton gamma ray observatory. The satellite observations have shown the importance of continuing the investigation of high energy gamma radiation but the emerging of new astrophysical and cosmological problems require for future experiments the realization of telescopes with parameters significatively improved with respect to the previous missions. In a traditional point of view, this is achieved with the increase of the length L of the device and, consequently, the mass of the telescope and satellite (growing as L{sup 3}). Such kinds of experiments are becoming rather expensive and are approaching the maximum value in cost, satellite mass and consuming resources. The telescope project GILDA presented in this paper is based on the use of silicon strip detectors. The silicon technique consents to obtain a much wider solid angle aperture; in this way there is more sensitivity without a growing in the size of the

  11. Very-high-energy gamma-ray emission from the direction of the Galactic globular cluster Terzan 5

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2011-01-01

    The H.E.S.S. very-high-energy (VHE, E > 0.1 TeV) gamma-ray telescope system has discovered a new source, HESS J1747-248. The measured integral flux is (1.2 +/- 0.3) \\times 10^-12 cm-2 s-1 above 440 GeV for a power-law photon spectral index of 2.5 +/- 0.3 stat +/- 0.2 sys. The VHE gamma-ray source is located in the close vicinity of the Galactic globular cluster Terzan 5 and extends beyond the H.E.S.S. point spread function (0.07 degree). The probability of a chance coincidence with Terzan 5 and an unrelated VHE source is quite low (~ 10^-4). With the largest population of identified millisecond pulsars (msPSRs), a very high core stellar density and the brightest GeV range flux as measured by Fermi-LAT, Terzan 5 stands out among Galactic globular clusters. The properties of the VHE source are briefly discussed in the context of potential emission mechanisms, notably in relation to msPSRs. Interpretation of the available data accommodates several possible origins for this VHE gamma-ray source, although none of ...

  12. The effects of {gamma}-radiation on model vitreous wasteforms intended for the disposal of intermediate and high level radioactive wastes in the United Kingdom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGann, O.J.; Bingham, P.A.; Hand, R.J.; Gandy, A.S. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Kavcic, M.; Zitnik, M.; Bucar, K. [J. Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Edge, R. [Dalton Cumbrian Facility, University of Manchester, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); Hyatt, N.C., E-mail: n.c.hyatt@sheffield.ac.uk [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-15

    The effect of {gamma}-radiation on a variety of model vitreous wasteforms applied to, or conceived for, immobilisation of UK intermediate and high level radioactive wastes was studied up to a dose of 8 MGy. It was determined that {gamma}-irradiation up to this dose had no significant effect upon the mechanical properties of the wasteforms and there was no evidence of residual structural defects. FTIR and Raman spectroscopy showed no evidence of radiation directly affecting the silicate network of the glasses. The negligible impact of this {gamma}-irradiation dose on the physical properties of the glass was attributed to the presence of multivalent ions, particularly Fe, and a mechanism by which the electron-hole pairs generated by {gamma}-irradiation were annihilated by the Fe{sup 2+}-Fe{sup 3+} redox mechanism. However, reduction of sulphur species in response to {gamma}-radiation was demonstrated by S K-edge XANES and XES data.

  13. Impact parameter dependence of high-energy gamma-ray production in argon induced reaction at 85 MeV/nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwato Njock, M.; Maurel, M.; Monnand, E.; Perrin, P.; Nifenecker, H.; Pinston, J.A.; Schussler, F.; Shutz, Y.

    1988-11-21

    The double-differential cross sections for high-energy ..gamma..-rays were measured for collisions of /sup 36/Ar on C, Al, Cu, Ag, Tb, and Au at 85 MeV/nucleon. The system /sup 36/Ar+/sup 27/Al has been studied in more detail in an exclusive experiment where the charged-particle multiplicity was measured in coincidence with high-energy ..gamma..-rays. A clear correlation between the hardness of the ..gamma..-spectra and the overlap distance of the two ions is observed. This correlation is interpreted as due to the spatial dependence of the Fermi momentum of the nucleons.

  14. Characterization of gamma-crystallin from a catfish: structural characterization of one major isoform with high methionine by cDNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, F M; Chang, W C; Lin, C H; Hsu, A L; Chiou, S H

    1995-04-01

    gamma-Crystallin is the major and most abundant lens protein present in the eye lens of most teleostean fishes. To facilitate structural characterization of gamma-crystallins isolated from the lens of the catfishes (Clarias fuscus), a cDNA mixture was synthesized from the poly(A)+mRNA isolated from fresh eye lenses, and amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was adopted to obtain cDNAs encoding various gamma-crystallins. Plasmids of transformed E. coli strain JM109 containing amplified gamma-crystallin cDNAs were purified and prepared for nucleotide sequencing by the dideoxynucleotide chain-termination method. Sequencing more than five clones containing DNA inserts of 0.52 kb revealed the presence of one major isoform with a complete reading frame of 534 base pairs, covering a gamma-crystallin (gamma M1) with a deduced protein sequence of 177 amino acids excluding the initiating methionine. It was of interest to find that this crystallin of pI 9.1 contains a high-methionine content of 15.3% in contrast to those gamma-crystallins of low-methionine content from most mammalian lenses. Sequence comparisons of catfish gamma M1-crystallin with those published sequences of gamma-crystallins from carp, bovine and mouse lenses indicate that there is approx. an 82% sequence homology between the catfish and the carp species of piscine class whereas only 51-58% homology is found between mammals and the catfish. Moreover the differences in the hydropathy profiles for these two groups of gamma-crystallins, i.e. one with a high-methionine content from teleostean fishes and the other with a low-methionine content from mammalian species, reflect a distinct variance in the polarity distributions of surface amino acids in these crystallins.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Understanding nature's particle accelerators using high energy gamma-ray survey instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeysekara, Anushka Udara

    Nature's particle accelerators, such as Pulsars, Pulsar Wind Nebulae, Active Galactic Nuclei and Supernova Remnants accelerate charged particles to very high energies that then produce high energy photons. The particle acceleration mechanisms and the high energy photon emission mechanisms are poorly understood phenomena. These mechanisms can be understood either by studying individual sources in detail or, alternatively, using the collective properties of a sample of sources. Recent development of GeV survey instruments, such as Fermi-LAT, and TeV survey instruments, such as Milagro, provides a large sample of high energy gamma-ray flux measurements from galactic and extra-galactic sources. In this thesis I provide constraints on GeV and TeV radiation mechanisms using the X-ray-TeV correlations and GeV-TeV correlations. My data sample was obtained from three targeted searches for extragalactic sources and two targeted search for galactic sources, using the existing Milagro sky maps. The first extragalactic candidate list consists of Fermi-LAT GeV extragalactic sources, and the second extragalactic candidate list consists of TeVCat extragalactic sources that have been detected by Imaging Atmospheric Cerenkov Telescopes (IACTs). In both extragalactic candidate lists Markarian 421 was the only source detected by Milagro. A comparison between the Markarian 421 time-averaged flux, measured by Milagro, and the flux measurements of transient states, measured by IACTs, is discussed. The third extragalactic candidate list is a list of potential TeV emitting BL Lac candidates that was synthesized using X-ray observations of BL Lac objects and a Synchrotron Self-Compton model. Milagro's sensitivity was not sufficient to detect any of those candidates. However, the 95% confidence flux upper limits of those sources were above the predicted flux. Therefore, these results provide evidence to conclude that the Synchrotron Self-Compton model for BL Lac objects is still a viable

  16. The {gamma}-decay of the GDR in highly excited Ce nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieland, O [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano and INFN Milano (Italy); Barlini, S [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, INFN (Italy); Kravchuk, V L [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, INFN (Italy)] [and others

    2005-10-01

    The {gamma}-decay of the GDR in the {sup 132}Ce compound nuclei produced by the reaction {sup 64}Ni+{sup 68}Zn at E{sub beam} = 300 MeV, 400 MeV, 500 MeV (E* of 100 MeV, 150 MeV and 200 MeV) has been measured. We have detected heavy recoil nuclei, light charged particles and {gamma}-rays. The data obtained with the symmetric reaction {sup 64}Ni+{sup 68}Zn indicate emission from a fully equilibrated compound nucleus as deduced from the analysis of charged particle spectra. The GDR parameters are found to be consistent with the predictions of the thermal fluctuation model.

  17. Computed tomography of scintillators with muons: Understanding the response to high energy gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowell, D.H.; Sandorfi, A.M.; Baron, A.Q.R.; Fineman, B.J.; Kistner, O.C.; Matone, G.; Thorn, C.E. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA). Physics Dept.); Sealock, R.M. (Virginia Univ., Charlottesville (USA). Inst. of Nuclear and Particle Physics)

    1990-01-01

    A procedure is described for determining, for any point within the volume of a scintillating detector, the relative amount of light collected as the result of the deposition of a known amount of energy at that point. The response to muons traversing many well defined paths through the scintillator is combined with Fourier reconstruction techniques of computed tomography to produce three-dimensional images of the nonuniformities in light generation and collection. This information can be combined with a Monte Carlo simulation of energy deposition in electromagnetic showers to accurately predict the resolution for the detection of {gamma}-rays of any energy. This has been applied to two large NaI(Tl) detectors and the calculated resolutions agree with measured spectra over the full range for which data are available, E{sub {gamma}}=6-45 MeV. (orig.).

  18. Absorption of Very High Energy $\\gamma$-Rays by Intergalactic Infrared Radiation A New Determination

    CERN Document Server

    Stecker, F W

    1998-01-01

    We present a new calculation of the intergalactic gamma-ray absorption coefficient as a function of both energy and redshift. In reexamining this problem, we make use of a new, empirically based calculation (as opposed to previous model calculations) of the intergalactic infrared radiation field. We find smaller opacities than those given previously (Stecker & De Jager 1997). We apply our results to the new observations of the flaring gamma-ray spectra of Mrk421 and Mrk501, both at a redshift of apx. 0.03. Our new calculations indicate that there should be no significant curvature in the spectra of these sources for energies below 10 TeV, as indicated by recent observations. However, the intrinsic spectra of these sources should be harder by apx. 0.2 to 0.45 in the spectral index in the 1 to 10 TeV range with an intergalactic absorption cutoff above apx. 20 TeV.

  19. Study of the Melting Latent Heat of Semicrystalline PVDF applied to High Gamma Dose Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista, Adriana S.M. [Departamento de Anatomia e Imagem - IMA, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Prof. Alfredo Balena, 190, 30130-100, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Gual, Maritza R.; Faria, Luiz O. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear - CDTN, Av. Antonio Carlos 6627, C.P. 941, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Lima, Claubia P.B. [Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear - DEN, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais - UFMG, Av. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) homopolymers [PVDF] homopolymers were irradiated with gamma doses ranging from 0.5 to 2.75 MGy. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and FTIR spectrometry were used in order to study the effects of gamma radiation in the amorphous and crystalline polymer structures. The FTIR data revealed absorption bands at 1730 and 1853 cm{sup -1} which were attributed to the stretch of C=O bonds, at 1715 and 1754 cm{sup -1} which were attributed to the C=C stretching and at 3518, 3585 and 3673 cm{sup -1} which were associated with NH stretch of NH{sub 2} and OH. The melting latent heat (LM) measured by DSC was used to construct an unambiguous relationship with the delivered dose. Regression analyses revealed that the best mathematical function that fits the experimental calibration curve is a 4-degree polynomial function, with an adjusted Rsquare of 0.99817. (authors)

  20. Very-High-Energy Solar Gamma Rays From Cosmic-Ray Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bei; Ng, Kenny; Beacom, John; Peter, Annika; Rott, Cartsen

    2017-01-01

    Cosmic-ray induced gamma rays from the Sun has been observed up to 100 GeV. However, there are no theoretical predictions beyond 10 GeV. We provide the first calculation of the hadronic disk component in TeV-PeV, where solar magnetic fields can be ignored. We also consider the leptonic gamma-ray halo, taking into account electrons from local pulsars. With Fermi and soon HAWC & LHAASO observations, our results provide new insights on local cosmic rays, solar magnetic fields, and solar dark matter studies. BZ is supported by OSU Fowler Fellowship. KN and FB are supported by NSF Grant PHY-1404311. AK is supported by NSF GRFP Grant No. DGE-1321846. CR is supported by the Korea Neutrino Research Center. KN is also supported by the OSU Presidential Fellowship.

  1. Influence of triallyl cyanurate as co-agent on gamma irradiation cured high density polyethylene/reclaimed tire rubber blend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, Manoj N.; Arakh, Amar A.; Dubey, K. A.; Mhaske, S. T.

    2017-02-01

    Utilization of waste from tire industry as reclaimed tire rubber (RTR) by formation of blends with high density polyethylene (HDPE) is great area to be focused. Enhancement of properties by the addition of triallyl cyanurate (TAC) as a co-agent with 1%, 3% and 5% to blend of HDPE 50 wt% and RTR 50 wt% in presence of gamma irradiation curing were investigated. Specifically, mechanical and thermal properties were studied as a function of amount of TAC and gamma irradiation dose in range of 50-200 kGy. The resultant blends were evaluated for the values of impact strength, gel content, thermal stability, tensile properties, rheological properties and morphological properties with increasing irradiation dosage and TAC loading. The mechanical properties tensile strength, hardness, impact strength of blend containing 3% of TAC were substantially increased with increasing irradiation dosage up to 150 KGy. Rheological analysis has shown increase in viscosity with increase in TAC loading up to 3% and 150 KGy irradiation dosages. 3% loading of TAC lead to better set of properties with150 KGy gamma irradiation dosage.

  2. Influence of high-dose gamma radiation and particle size on antioxidant properties of Maize ( Zea mays L.) flour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nawaz, Haq; Shad, Muhammad Aslam; Rehman, Tanzila; Ramzan, Ayesha, E-mail: haqnawaz@bzu.edu.pk [Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan (Pakistan)

    2016-10-15

    Influence of high-dose gamma radiation and particle size on antioxidant properties of maize (Zea mays L.) flour was studied using response surface methodology. A central composite design based on three levels of each of particle size, in terms of mesh number (40, 60 and 80 meshes), and gamma radiation dose (25, 50 and 75 kGy) was constructed. A statistically significant dose-dependent decrease (p<0.05) in antioxidant properties of gamma irradiated flour was observed. However, an increase in the mesh number (decrease in particle size of flour) resulted in an increase in antioxidant properties. The optimum level of radiation dose to achieve maximum value of responses was found to be 50 kGy for Trolox equivalent total antioxidant activity (TETAOA), 25 kGy for iron chelating ability (ICA), 25 kGy for reducing power (RP) and 75 kGy for linoleic acid reduction capacity (LARC). However, the optimum level of mesh number to achieve desired levels of TETAOA, ICA, RP and LARC was found to be 80 meshes. (author)

  3. Study of the very high energy gamma-ray spectrum from the Galactic Center and future prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Belikov, Alexander V; Silk, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Ground-based gamma ray observations of the Galactic Center region have revealed a high energy gamma ray source spatially coincident with the gravitational centroid of our Galaxy. The pointlike emission detected by H.E.S.S. exhibits an energy cut-off at about 10 TeV. We identify the parameters of the best fit of the exponential and the super-exponential cutoff models to the spectrum of the pointlike source and find that super-exponential one provides a similar quality of the fit to the spectrum of the pointlike source as the best-fit exponential cutoff model, while a dark matter interpretation does not provide as good a fit in the whole energy range of the signal. Based on the magnitude of the flux we derive constraints in the plane of the slope of the density profile $\\gamma$ and the critical radius, below which the density is assumed to be constant, $r_c$. Motivated by recent results on the spectrum and morphology from H.E.S.S. and by the possible observation of a super-exponential cutoff, we forecast the ob...

  4. Monte Carlo assessment of soil moisture effect on high-energy thermal neutron capture gamma-ray by 14N.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazirandeh, Ali; Azizi, Maryam; Farhad Masoudi, S

    2006-01-01

    Among many conventional techniques, nuclear techniques have shown to be faster, more reliable, and more effective in detecting explosives. In the present work, neutrons from a 5 Ci Am-Be neutron source being in water tank are captured by elements of soil and landmine (TNT), namely (14)N, H, C, and O. The prompt capture gamma-ray spectrum taken by a NaI (Tl) scintillation detector indicates the characteristic photo peaks of the elements in soil and landmine. In the high-energy region of the gamma-ray spectrum, besides 10.829 MeV of (15)N, single escape (SE) and double escape (DE) peaks are unmistakable photo peaks, which make the detection of concealed explosive possible. The soil has the property of moderating neutrons as well as diffusing the thermal neutron flux. Among many elements in soil, silicon is more abundant and (29)Si emits 10.607 MeV prompt capture gamma-ray, which makes 10.829 MeV detection difficult. The Monte Carlo simulation was used to adjust source-target-detector distances and soil moisture content to yield the best result. Therefore, we applied MCNP4C for configuration very close to reality of a hidden landmine in soil.

  5. High-energy gamma-ray observations of the accreting black hole V404 Cygni during its June 2015 outburst

    CERN Document Server

    Loh, A; Dubus, G; Rodriguez, J; Grenier, I; Hovatta, T; Pearson, T; Readhead, A; Fender, R; Mooley, K

    2016-01-01

    We report on Fermi/Large Area Telescope observations of the accreting black hole low-mass X-ray binary V404 Cygni during its outburst in June-July 2015. Detailed analyses reveal a possible excess of $\\gamma$-ray emission on 26 June 2015, with a very soft spectrum above $100$ MeV, at a position consistent with the direction of V404 Cyg (within the $95\\%$ confidence region and a chance probability of $4 \\times 10^{-4}$). This emission cannot be associated with any previously-known Fermi source. Its temporal coincidence with the brightest radio and hard X-ray flare in the lightcurve of V404 Cyg, at the end of the main active phase of its outburst, strengthens the association with V404 Cyg. If the $\\gamma$-ray emission is associated with V404 Cyg, the simultaneous detection of $511\\,$keV annihilation emission by INTEGRAL requires that the high-energy $\\gamma$ rays originate away from the corona, possibly in a Blandford-Znajek jet. The data give support to models involving a magnetically-arrested disk where a brig...

  6. 4{\\pi}{\\beta} (LS)-{\\gamma} (HPGe) Digital Coincidence System Based on Synchronous High-Speed Multichannel Data Acquisition

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Jifeng; Liang, Juncheng; Liu, Jiacheng

    2015-01-01

    A dedicated 4{\\pi}{\\beta} (LS)-{\\gamma} (HPGe)digital coincidence system has been developed in this work, which includes five acquisition channels. Three analog-to-digital converter (ADC) acquisition channels with an acquisition resolution of 8 bits and acquisition rate of 1GSPS (sample per second) are utilized to collect the signals from three Photo multiplier tubes (PMTs) which are adopted to detect {\\beta} decay, and two acquisition channels with an acquisition resolution of 16 bits and acquisition rate of 50MSPS are utilized to collect the signals from high-purity germanium (HPGe) which are adopted to detect {\\gamma} decay. In order to increase the accuracy of the coincidence system, all the five acquisition channels are synchronous within 500ps. The data collected by the five acquisition channels will be transmitted to the host PC through PCI bus and saved as a file. Off-line software is applied for the 4{\\pi}{\\beta} (LS)-{\\gamma} (HPGe) coincidence and data analysis as needed in practical application. W...

  7. High Energy Gamma-Ray Observations of the Crab Nebula and Pulsar with the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Oser, S; Boone, L M; Chantell, M C; Conner, Z; Covault, C E; Dragovan, M; Fortin, P; Gregorich, D T; Hanna, D S; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Ragan, K; Scalzo, R A; Schuette, D R; Theoret, C G; Tumer, T O; Williams, D A; Zweerink, J A

    2015-01-01

    The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is a new ground-based atmospheric Cherenkov telescope for gamma-ray astronomy. STACEE uses the large mirror area of a solar heliostat facility to achieve a low energy threshold. A prototype experiment which uses 32 heliostat mirrors with a total mirror area of ~ 1200\\unit{m^2} has been constructed. This prototype, called STACEE-32, was used to search for high energy gamma-ray emission from the Crab Nebula and Pulsar. Observations taken between November 1998 and February 1999 yield a strong statistical excess of gamma-like events from the Crab, with a significance of $+6.75\\sigma$ in 43 hours of on-source observing time. No evidence for pulsed emission from the Crab Pulsar was found, and the upper limit on the pulsed fraction of the observed excess was E_{th}) = (2.2 \\pm 0.6 \\pm 0.2) \\times 10^{-10}\\unit{photons cm^{-2} s^{-1}}. The observed flux is in agreement with a continuation to lower energies of the power law spectrum seen at TeV energies...

  8. Search for High-mass Resonances in Z(ll)gamma Final State at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Nam, Kyungwook

    2016-01-01

    A search for a heavy resonance decaying to Zgamma, with the Z boson further decaying to pairs of electrons or muons is presented. The search strategy is to look for an excess above the non-resonant background on the ll+gamma invariant mass spectrum. The search is based on the data collected with the CMS detector during Large Hadron Collider (LHC) 13 TeV run.

  9. Very-high-energy gamma-ray observations of the Type Ia Supernova SN 2014J with the MAGIC telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnen, M. L.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Arcaro, C.; Babic, A.; Banerjee, B.; Bangale, P.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Berti, A.; Biasuzzi, B.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Carosi, R.; Carosi, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Cumani, P.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Lotto, B.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Di Pierro, F.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Eisenacher Glawion, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Engelkemeier, M.; Fallah Ramazani, V.; Fernández-Barral, A.; Fidalgo, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Frantzen, K.; Fruck, C.; Galindo, D.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido Terrats, D.; Gaug, M.; Giammaria, P.; Godinović, N.; Gora, D.; Guberman, D.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, A.; Hayashida, M.; Herrera, J.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Hughes, G.; Idec, W.; Kodani, K.; Konno, Y.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Manganaro, M.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Moretti, E.; Nakajima, D.; Neustroev, V.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nievas Rosillo, M.; Nilsson, K.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Nogués, L.; Paiano, S.; Palacio, J.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Pedaletti, G.; Peresano, M.; Perri, L.; Persic, M.; Poutanen, J.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Garcia, J. R.; Reichardt, I.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Saito, T.; Satalecka, K.; Schroeder, S.; Schweizer, T.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Stamerra, A.; Strzys, M.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Torres, D. F.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Vanzo, G.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Vovk, I.; Ward, J. E.; Will, M.; Wu, M. H.; Zanin, R.

    2017-06-01

    Context. In this work we present data from observations with the MAGIC telescopes of SN 2014J detected on January 21 2014, the closest Type Ia supernova since Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes started to operate. Aims: We aim to probe the possibility of very-high-energy (VHE; E ≥ 100 GeV) gamma rays produced in the early stages of Type Ia supernova explosions. Methods: We performed follow-up observations after this supernova (SN) explosion for five days, between January 27 and February 2 2014. We searched for gamma-ray signals in the energy range between 100 GeV and several TeV from the location of SN 2014J using data from a total of 5.5 h of observations. Prospects for observing gamma rays of hadronic origin from SN 2014J in the near future are also being addressed. Results: No significant excess was detected from the direction of SN 2014J. Upper limits at 95% confidence level on the integral flux, assuming a power-law spectrum, dF/dE ∝ E- Γ, with a spectral index of Γ = 2.6, for energies higher than 300 GeV and 700 GeV, are established at 1.3 × 10-12 and 4.1 × 10-13 photons cm-2 s-1, respectively. Conclusions: For the first time, upper limits on the VHE emission of a Type Ia supernova are established. The energy fraction isotropically emitted into TeV gamma rays during the first 10 days after the supernova explosion for energies greater than 300 GeV is limited to 10-6 of the total available energy budget ( 1051 erg). Within the assumed theoretical scenario, the MAGIC upper limits on the VHE emission suggest that SN 2014J will not be detectable in the future by any current or planned generation of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes.

  10. Gamma-ray bursts from stellar remnants probing the Universe at high redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Wijers, R A M J; Bagla, J S; Natarajan, P; Wijers, Ralph A.M.J.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Bagla, Jasjeet S.; Natarajan, Priyamvada

    1997-01-01

    A gamma-ray burst (GRB) releases an amount of energy similar to that of a supernova explosion, which combined with its rapid variability suggests an origin related to neutron stars or black holes. Since these compact stellar remnants form from the most massive stars not long after their birth, gamma-ray bursts should trace the star formation rate in the Universe; we show that the GRB flux distribution is consistent with this. Because of the strong evolution of the star formation rate with redshift, it follows that the dimmest known bursts have $z\\sim6$, much above the value usually quoted and beyond the most distant quasars. This explains the absence of bright galaxies in well-studied gamma-ray burst error boxes. The increased distances imply a peak luminosity of $8.3 \\times 10^{51} erg/s$ and a rate density of 0.025 per million years per galaxy. These values are 20 times higher and 150 times lower, respectively, than follow from fits with non-evolving GRB rates. This means that GRBs are either caused by a mu...

  11. Active Detection and Imaging of Nuclear Materials with High-Brightness Gamma Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barty, C J; Gibson, D J; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Anderson, G G; Betts, S M; Berry, R D; Fisher, S E; Hagmann, C A; Johnson, M S; Messerly, M J; Phan, H H; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Tremaine, A M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P

    2009-02-26

    A Compton scattering {gamma}-ray source, capable of producing photons with energies ranging from 0.1 MeV to 0.9 MeV has been commissioned and characterized, and then used to perform nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) experiments. The performances of the two laser systems (one for electron production, one for scattering), the electron photoinjector, and the linear accelerator are also detailed, and {gamma}-ray results are presented. The key source parameters are the size (0.01 mm{sup 2}), horizontal and vertical divergence (6 x 10 mrad{sup 2}), duration (10 ps), spectrum and intensity (10{sup 5} photons/shot). These parameters are summarized by the peak brightness, 1.5 x 10{sup 15} photons/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/s/0.1% bandwidth, measured at 478 keV. Additional measurements of the flux as a function of the timing difference between the drive laser pulse and the relativistic photo-electron bunch, {gamma}-ray beam profile, and background evaluations are presented. These results are systematically compared to theoretical models and computer simulations. NRF measurements performed on {sup 7}Li in LiH demonstrate the potential of Compton scattering photon sources to accurately detect isotopes in situ.

  12. Calibration of the EGRET high-energy gamma-ray telescope in the range 20-10,000 MeV with a tunable beam of quasi-monoenergetic gamma rays at SLAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. J.; Bertsch, D. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Favale, A.

    1987-01-01

    The EGRET telescope, one of the instruments to be carried on NASA's Gamma Ray Observatory, is designed to explore the high-energy portion (20-24,000 MeV) of the electromagnetic spectrum. A calibration source of gamma-rays over this wide energy range has been used together with an appropriate set of intensity-monitoring instruments, to conduct a calibration of the EGRET telescope over this energy range for the full telescope aperture. The calibration method and an overview of the results are described.

  13. A Search for Very High Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from Scorpius X-1 with the Magic Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksić, J.; Alvarez, E. A.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Asensio, M.; Backes, M.; Barrio, J. A.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Berdyugin, A.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Boller, A.; Bonnoli, G.; Bordas, P.; Borla Tridon, D.; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Cañellas, A.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Cossio, L.; Covino, S.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Cea del Pozo, E.; De Lotto, B.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Diago Ortega, A.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Elsaesser, D.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Fruck, C.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido, D.; Giavitto, G.; Godinović, N.; Hadasch, D.; Häfner, D.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Höhne-Mönch, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Huber, B.; Jogler, T.; Klepser, S.; Krähenbühl, T.; Krause, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Leonardo, E.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López, M.; Lorenz, E.; Makariev, M.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Miyamoto, H.; Moldón, J.; Moralejo, A.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Nieto, D.; Nilsson, K.; Orito, R.; Oya, I.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Pardo, S.; Paredes, J. M.; Partini, S.; Pasanen, M.; Pauss, F.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Persic, M.; Peruzzo, L.; Pilia, M.; Pochon, J.; Prada, F.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, K.; Saito, T. Y.; Salvati, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shayduk, M.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Spiro, S.; Stamerra, A.; Steinke, B.; Storz, J.; Strah, N.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Thom, M.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Treves, A.; Vankov, H.; Vogler, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Weitzel, Q.; Zabalza, V.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.

    2011-07-01

    The acceleration of particles up to GeV or higher energies in microquasars has been the subject of considerable theoretical and observational efforts in the past few years. Sco X-1 is a microquasar from which evidence of highly energetic particles in the jet has been found when it is in the so-called Horizontal Branch (HB), a state when the radio and hard X-ray fluxes are higher and a powerful relativistic jet is present. Here we present the first very high energy gamma-ray observations of Sco X-1, obtained with the MAGIC telescopes. An analysis of the whole data set does not yield a significant signal, with 95% CL flux upper limits above 300 GeV at the level of 2.4 × 10-12 cm-2 s-1. Simultaneous RXTE observations were conducted to provide the X-ray state of the source. A selection of the gamma-ray data obtained during the HB based on the X-ray colors did not yield a signal either, with an upper limit of 3.4 × 10-12 cm-2 s-1. These upper limits place a constraint on the maximum TeV luminosity to non-thermal X-ray luminosity of L VHE/L ntX <~ 0.02 that can be related to a maximum TeV luminosity to jet power ratio of L VHE/L j <~ 10-3. Our upper limits indicate that the underlying high-energy emission physics in Sco X-1 must be inherently different from that of the hitherto detected gamma-ray binaries.

  14. Ultra-high Energy Cosmic Rays and Neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Bursts, Hypernovae and Galactic Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Mészáros, P

    2014-01-01

    I review gamma-ray burst models (GRBs) and observations, and discuss the possible production of ultra-high energy cosmic rays and neutrinos in both the standard internal shock models and the newer generation of photospheric and hadronic GRB models, in the light of current constraints imposed by IceCube, Auger and TA observations. I then discuss models that have been proposed to explain the recent astrophysical PeV neutrino observations, including star-forming and star-burst galaxies, hypernovae and galaxy accretion and merger shocks.

  15. Characterization of an INVS Model IV Neutron Counter for High Precision ($\\gamma,n$) Cross-Section Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, C W; Karwowski, H J; Rich, G C; Tompkins, J R; Howell, C R

    2010-01-01

    A neutron counter designed for assay of radioactive materials has been adapted for beam experiments at TUNL. The cylindrical geometry and 64% maximum efficiency make it well suited for ($\\gamma,n$) cross-section measurements near the neutron emission threshold. A high precision characterization of the counter has been made using neutrons from several sources. Using a combination of measurements and simulations, the absolute detection efficiency of the neutron counter was determined to an accuracy of $\\pm$ 3% in the neutron energy range between 0.1 and 1 MeV. It is shown that this efficiency characterization is generally valid for a wide range of targets.

  16. Tl2LaCl5:Ce, high performance scintillator for gamma-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawrami, R.; Ariesanti, E.; Wei, H.; Finkelstein, J.; Glodo, J.; Shah, K. S.

    2017-10-01

    This paper reports on a new Ce-doped Tl-based scintillator, Tl2LaCl5 (TLC), for gamma-ray detection. 10 mm diameter crystals have been successfully grown using the vertical Bridgman method. The emission peak of TLC is detected at 383 nm under X-ray excitation. The light yield of TLC is 76,000 ph/MeV. The samples show excellent energy resolution of 3.4% (FWHM) at 662 keV. The non-proportionality is less than 1%, from 32 keV to 1275 keV. The major scintillation decay time is 36 ns.

  17. In situ quantitative determination of transuranic elements in areas of high-level gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodzinski, R.L.; Wogman, N.A.

    1978-01-01

    A technique is described for passive neutron monitoring of transuranic elements. The method provides quantitative determinations of transuranic element concentrations in a variety of field situations where no other measurement method is possible. The technique can measure concentrations of transuranic oxides as low as 8 nCi/cm/sup 3/ and is capable of operating in gamma radiation fields up to megarads per hour. Information on chemical and isotopic composition can also be obtained from the data. Several successful applications of the technique are discussed.

  18. COS-B observations of the high-energy gamma radiation from the galactic disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    The COS-B experiment has observed approximately one-fourth of the galactic disk, including the galactic-center region, the galactic anticenter, and the Vela region. A completely automatic analysis of the events recorded during these observations reveals a galactic gamma ray emission from the three regions. In the galactic center and Vela regions, the disk emission distribution was measured. From these data, the existence of a local (less than 1 kpc) and a distant (greater than 3 kpc) emitting region is apparent in the general direction of the inner galaxy.

  19. A 3D high-resolution gamma camera for radiopharmaceutical studies with small animals

    CERN Document Server

    Loudos, G K; Giokaris, N D; Styliaris, E; Archimandritis, S C; Varvarigou, A D; Papanicolas, C N; Majewski, S; Weisenberger, D; Pani, R; Scopinaro, F; Uzunoglu, N K; Maintas, D; Stefanis, K

    2003-01-01

    The results of studies conducted with a small field of view tomographic gamma camera based on a Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tube are reported. The system has been used for the evaluation of radiopharmaceuticals in small animals. Phantom studies have shown a spatial resolution of 2 mm in planar and 2-3 mm in tomographic imaging. Imaging studies in mice have been carried out both in 2D and 3D. Conventional radiopharmaceuticals have been used and the results have been compared with images from a clinically used system.

  20. Renewable enery-the path to sustainability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tan Xiaomei; Brett Rose

    2008-01-01

    This article seeks to address some lingering debates within sustainability studies by revealing the connections between renewable energy,consumption and sustainability.Using data from 30 OECD countries,the article amines the connections via regression and geospatial analysis Findings from the quantitative analysis indicate that about 50% of the variation in sustainability is accounted for by the degree of renewables consumption.The geospatial analysis visually illustrates the intimate connections between the two variables.Theoreticallv,renewable energy,relates to sustainability in three dimensions.The first dimension is economic.Relying on traditional fossil fuels eventually will bring our economy to a stop.Renewable energies,however,are able to secure our energy supply into an indefinite future.The second dimension links to ethics.To leave an intact planet to future generations is a moral responsibility of our generation.The current energy supply system is built on depletion of natural resources,while the sources of renewable energy are vast and constantlv replenished The last dimension is ecologic.How to allocate a porper apportionment of the global hiosphere between humankind and the other life on the earth is a critical issue related to sustainability.By using renewable energv,we can greatly reduce our impact on biodiversity and therefore strike a balance between humankind and other life.Overall the research suggests that developing renewables can and in many cases does sustain a nation's economic growth while simultaneously protecting the environment.It is a win-win situation.This finding undoubtedly points out a practical and realistic path for sudtainable development.

  1. Saving energy: bringing down Europe's enery prices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenbroek, E.; Blok, K.

    2012-01-01

    In June 2011 the European Commission proposed a new Directive on Energy Efficiency. Its purpose is to put forward a framework to deliver the EU’s target of reducing its energy consumption by 20% by 2020. Currently, the EU is only on track to achieve half of those savings. Apart from the environmenta

  2. Tityus gamma toxin, a high affinity effector of the Na+ channel in muscle, with a selectivity for channels in the surface membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhanin, J; Ildefonse, M; Rougier, O; Sampaio, S V; Giglio, J R; Lazdunski, M

    1984-01-01

    Toxin gamma from the venom of Tityus serrulatus scorpion produces a partial block of the surface Na+ channel in frog muscle. This block occurs with no change in the voltage-dependence or in the kinetics of the remaining surface Na+ current. The partial blockade of Na+ channel activity occurs with no change in tubular Na+ currents nor in twitch tension. The maximum effect of the toxin is attained at concentrations as low as 3 X 10(-10) M. Hyperpolarization to potentials more negative than the resting potential (E = -90 mV) reduces or abolishes the effect of the toxin. Radioiodinated toxin gamma binds to frog muscle membranes with a very high affinity corresponding to a dissociation constant of about 1 X 10(-11) M. Data obtained with both rabbit and frog muscle indicate that toxin gamma is specific for Na+ channels in surface membranes. Toxin gamma does not seem to bind to Na+ channels in T-tubule membranes. The biochemical data are in good agreement with electrophysiological studies and data on contraction. There is one Tityus gamma toxin binding site per tetrodotoxin binding site in surface membranes. Competition experiments have confirmed that Tityus gamma toxin binds to a new toxin receptor site on the Na+ channel structure. This site is the same that the toxin II from Centruroides suffusus binding site, but this toxin has 100 times less affinity for the Na+ channel than Tityus gamma toxin.

  3. Search for Very-High-Energy Gamma Rays from the z = 0.896 Quasar 4C +55.17 with the MAGIC telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksić, J; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Bangale, P; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bock, R K; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Fidalgo, D Carreto; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Caneva, G; De Lotto, B; Mendez, C Delgado; Doert, M; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Eisenacher, D; Elsaesser, D; Farina, E; Ferenc, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Giavitto, G; Godinović, N; noz, A González Mu\\; Gozzini, S R; Hadasch, D; Hayashida, M; Herrero, A; Hildebrand, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Idec, W; Kadenius, V; Kellermann, H; Knoetig, M L; Kodani, K; Konno, Y; Krause, J; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lewandowska, N; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Lozano, I; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Meucci, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Munar-Adrover, P; Nakajima, D; Niedzwiecki, A; Nilsson, K; Nishijima, K; Nowak, N; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Partini, S; Persic, M; Prada, F; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Preziuso, S; Puljak, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Garcia, J Rodriguez; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, T; Saito, K; Salvati, M; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Stamatescu, V; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Storz, J; Sun, S; Surić, T; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Vogler, P; Wagner, R M; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R

    2014-01-01

    The bright gamma-ray quasar 4C +55.17 is a distant source ($z = 0.896$) with a hard spectrum at GeV energies as observed by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the {{\\it Fermi}} satellite. This source is identified as a good source candidate for very-high-energy (VHE; $> 30$ GeV) gamma rays. In general VHE gamma rays from distant sources provide an unique opportunity to study the extragalactic background light (EBL) and underlying astrophysics. The flux intensity of this source in the VHE range is investigated. Then, constraints on the EBL are derived from the attenuation of gamma-ray photons coming from the distant blazar. We searched for a gamma-ray signal from this object using the 35-hour observations taken by the MAGIC telescopes between November 2010 and January 2011. No significant VHE gamma-ray signal was detected. We computed the upper limits of the integrated gamma-ray flux at $95\\%$ confidence level of $9.4 \\times 10^{-12}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ and $2.5 \\times 10^{-12}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ above $...

  4. Magnetic Microcalorimeter Gamma Detectors for High-Precision Non-Destructive Analysis, FY14 Extended Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-02-06

    Cryogenic gamma (γ) detectors with operating temperatures of ~0.1 K or below offer 10× better energy resolution than conventional high-purity germanium detectors that are currently used for non-destructive analysis (NDA) of nuclear materials. This can greatly increase the accuracy of NDA, especially at low-energies where gamma rays often have similar energies and cannot be resolved by Ge detectors. We are developing cryogenic γ–detectors based on metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs), which have the potential of higher resolution, faster count rates and better linearity than other cryogenic detector technologies. High linearity is essential to add spectra from different pixels in detector arrays that are needed for high sensitivity. Here we discuss the fabrication of a new generation of MMC γ–detectors in FY2014, and the resulting improvements in energy resolution and linearity of the new design. As an example of the type of NDA that cryogenic detectors enable, we demonstrate the direct detection of Pu-242 emissions with our MMC γ–detectors in the presence of Pu-240, and show that a quantitative NDA analysis agrees with the mass spectrometry

  5. A high speed digital data acquisition system for the Indian National Gamma Array at Tata Institute of Fundamental Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palit, R., E-mail: palit@tifr.res.in [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Saha, S.; Sethi, J.; Trivedi, T.; Sharma, S.; Naidu, B.S.; Jadhav, S.; Donthi, R.; Chavan, P.B. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Tan, H.; Hennig, W. [XIA LLC, Hayward, CA 94544 (United States)

    2012-07-11

    A digital data acquisition system for the Compton suppressed clover detector array has been implemented at the TIFR-BARC accelerator facility for the high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy using the Pixie-16 Digital Gamma Finder modules by XIA LLC. This system has a provision for simultaneous digitization of 96 preamplifier signals of high purity germanium crystals. The energy and timing characteristics of the clover detectors have been investigated in detail. In-beam data has been collected both in singles and in the coincidence mode. The system has been tested with 64 channels with each of the 64 crystals having an event rate up to 5 kHz and 2-fold clover coincidence rate up to 15 kHz. The use of the digital data acquisition system has improved the high counting rate handling capabilities for the clover array. Conventional systems with analog shaping are being replaced by digital system that provides higher throughput, better energy resolution and better stability for the multi-detector Compton suppressed clover array.

  6. Search for high energy gamma-ray emission from tidal disruption events with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Feng-Kun; Wang, Xiang-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Massive black holes at galaxy center may tear apart a star when the star passes occasionally within the disruption radius, which is the so-called tidal disruption event(TDE). Most TDEs radiate with thermal emission resulted from the acceleration disk, but three TDEs have been detected in bright non-thermal X-ray emission, which is interpreted as arising from the relativistic jets. Search for high-energy gamma-ray emission from one relativistic TDE (Swift J164449.3+573451) with the \\textsl{Fermi} Large Area Telescope (LAT) has yielded non-detection. In this paper, we report the search for high energy emission from the other two relativistic TDEs (Swift J2058.4+0516 Swift J1112.2-8238) during the flare period. No significant GeV emission is found, with an upper limit fluence in LAT energy range being less than $1\\%$ of that in X-rays. Compared with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and blazars, these TDEs have the lowest flux ratio between GeV emission and X-ray emission. The non-detection of high-energy emission from re...

  7. Mechanism of action for anti-radiation vaccine in reducing the biological impact of high-dose gamma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliev, Vladislav; Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Casey, Rachael C.

    Ionizing radiation is a major health risk of long-term space travel, the biological consequences of which include genetic and oxidative damage. In this study, we propose an original mechanism by which high doses of ionizing radiation induce acute toxicity. We identified biological components that appear in the lymphatic vessels shortly after high-dose gamma irradiation. These radiation-induced toxins, which we have named specific radiation determinants (SRD), were generated in the irradiated tissues and then circulated throughout the body via the lymph circulation and bloodstream. Depending on the type of SRD elicited, different syndromes of acute radiation sickness (ARS) were expressed. The SRDs were developed into a vaccine used to confer active immunity against acute radiation toxicity in immunologically naïve animals. Animals that were pretreated with SRDs exhibited resistance to lethal doses of gamma radiation, as measured by increased survival times and survival rates. In comparison, untreated animals that were exposed to similar large doses of gamma radiation developed acute radiation sickness and died within days. This phenomenon was observed in a number of mammalian species. Initial analysis of the biochemical characteristics indicated that the SRDs were large molecular weight (200-250 kDa) molecules that were comprised of a mixture of protein, lipid, carbohydrate, and mineral. Further analysis is required to further identify the SRD molecules and the biological mechanism by which they mediate the toxicity associated with acute radiation sickness. By doing so, we may develop an effective specific immunoprophylaxis as a countermeasure against the acute effects of ionizing radiation.

  8. VLBI OBSERVATIONS OF THE JET IN M 87 DURING THE VERY HIGH ENERGY {gamma}-RAY FLARE IN 2010 APRIL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hada, Kazuhiro; Giroletti, Marcello; Giovannini, Gabriele [INAF Istituto di Radioastronomia, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Kino, Motoki; Nagai, Hiroshi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Doi, Akihiro [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo, Sagamihara 252-5210 (Japan); Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Honma, Mareki; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki [Department of Astronomical Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2012-11-20

    We report on the detailed radio status of the M 87 jet during the very high energy (VHE) {gamma}-ray flaring event in 2010 April, obtained from high-resolution, multi-frequency, phase-referencing Very Long Baseline Array observations. We especially focus on the properties of the jet base (the radio core) and the peculiar knot HST-1, which are currently favored as the {gamma}-ray emitting sites. During the VHE flaring event, the HST-1 region remains stable in terms of its structure and flux density in the optically thin regime above 2 GHz, being consistent with no signs of enhanced activities reported at X-ray for this feature. The radio core shows an inverted spectrum at least up to 43 GHz during this event. Astrometry of the core position, which is specified as {approx}20 R {sub s} from the central engine in our previous study, shows that the core position is stable on a level of 4 R {sub s}. The core at 43 and 22 GHz tends to show slightly ({approx}10%) higher flux level near the date of the VHE flux peak compared with the epochs before/after the event. The size of the 43 GHz core is estimated to be {approx}17 R {sub s}, which is close to the size of the emitting region suggested from the observed timescale of rapid variability at VHE. These results tend to favor the scenario that the VHE {gamma}-ray flare in 2010 April is associated with the radio core.

  9. Recent progress of MPPC-based scintillation detectors in high precision X-ray and gamma-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, J.; Kishimoto, A.; Fujita, T.; Nishiyama, T.; Kurei, Y.; Tsujikawa, T.; Oshima, T.; Taya, T.; Iwamoto, Y.; Ogata, H.; Okochi, H.; Ohsuka, S.; Ikeda, H.; Yamamoto, S.

    2015-06-01

    The multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) is a promising light sensor for various applications, not only in physics experiments but also in nuclear medicine, industry, and even high-energy astrophysics. In this paper, we present the current status and most recent progress of the MPPC-based scintillation detectors, such as (1) a high-precision X-ray and gamma-ray spectral image sensor, (2) next-generation PET detectors with MRI, TOF, and DOI measurement capabilities, and (3) a compact gamma camera for environmental radiation surveys. We first present a new method of fabricating a Ce:GAGG scintillator plate (1 or 2 mm thick) with ultra-fine resolution (0.2 mm/pixel), cut using a dicing saw to create 50 μm wide micro-grooves. When the plate is optically coupled with a large-area MPPC array, excellent spatial resolution of 0.48 mm (FWHM) and energy resolution of 14% (FWHM) are obtained for 122 keV gamma rays. Hence, the detector can act as a convenient "multi-color" imaging device that can potentially be used for future SPECT and photon-counting CT. We then show a prototype system for a high-resolution MPPC-based PET scanner that can realize ≃1 mm (FWHM) spatial resolution, even under a strong magnetic field of 4.7 T. We develop a front-end ASIC intended for future TOF-PET scanner with a 16-channel readout that achieves a coincidence time resolution of 489 ps (FWHM). A novel design for a module with DOI-measurement capability for gamma rays is also presented by measuring the pulse height ratio of double-sided MPPCs coupled at both ends of scintillation crystal block. Finally, we present the concept of a two-plane Compton camera consisting of Ce:GAGG scintillator arrays coupled with thin MPPC arrays. As a result of the thin and compact features of the MPPC device, the camera not only achieves a small size (14×14×15 cm3) and light weight (1.9 kg) but also excellent sensitivity, compared to the conventional PMT-based pinhole camera used in Fukushima. Finally, we briefly

  10. Highly Sensitive Gamma-Spectrometers of GERDA for Material Screening: Part 2

    CERN Document Server

    Budjá?, D; Heisel, M; Heusser, G; Keillor, M; Laubenstein, M; Maneschg, W; Rugel, G; Schönert, S; Simgen, H; Strecker, H

    2008-01-01

    The previous article about material screening for GERDA points out the importance of strict material screening and selection for radioimpurities as a key to meet the aspired background levels of the GERDA experiment. This is directly done using low-level gamma-spectroscopy. In order to provide sufficient selective power in the mBq/kg range and below, the employed gamma-spectrometers themselves have to meet strict material requirements, and make use of an elaborate shielding system. This article gives an account of the setup of two such spectrometers. Corrado is located in a depth of 15 m w.e. at the MPI-K in Heidelberg (Germany), GeMPI III is situated at the Gran-Sasso underground laboratory at 3500 m w.e. (Italy). The latter one aims at detecting sample activities of the order ~0.01 mBq/kg, which is the current state-of-the-art level. The applied techniques to meet the respective needs are discussed and demonstrated by experimental results.

  11. The Flux Variability of Markarian 501 in Very High Energy Gamma Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Quinn, J; Boyle, P J; Bradbury, S M; Breslin, A C; Buckley, J H; Burdett, A M; Gordo, J B; Carter-Lewis, D A; Catanese, M; Cawley, M F; Fegan, D J; Finley, J P; Gaidos, J A; Hall, T; Hillas, A M; Krennrich, F; Lamb, R C; Lessard, R W; Masterson, C; McEnery, J E; Moriarty, P; Rodgers, A J; Rose, H J; Samuelson, F W; Sembroski, G H; Srinivasan, R; Vasilev, V; Weekes, T C

    1999-01-01

    The BL Lacertae object Markarian 501 was identified as a source of gamma-ray emission at the Whipple Observatory in March 1995. Here we present a flux variability analysis on several times-scales of the 233 hour data set accumulated over 213 nights (from March 1995 to July 1998) with the Whipple Observatory 10 m atmospheric Cherenkov imaging telescope. In 1995, with the exception of a single night, the flux from Markarian 501 was constant on daily and monthly time-scales and had an average flux of only 10% that of the Crab Nebula, making it the weakest VHE source detected to date. In 1996, the average flux was approximately twice the 1995 flux and showed significant month-to-month variability. No significant day-scale variations were detected. The average gamma-ray flux above ~350 GeV in the 1997 observing season rose to 1.4 times that of the Crab Nebula -- 14 times the 1995 discovery level -- allowing a search for variability on time-scales shorter than one day. Significant hour-scale variability was present...

  12. High-energy emission from non-relativistic radiative shocks: application to gamma-ray novae

    CERN Document Server

    Vurm, Indrek

    2016-01-01

    Multiwavelength radiation from relativistic particles accelerated at shocks in novae and other astrophysical sources carries a wealth of information about the outflow properties and the microphysical processes at work near the shocks. The observation of GeV gamma-rays from novae by Fermi/LAT demonstrates that the shocks in these systems can accelerate particles to energies of at least $\\sim 10$ GeV. The low-energy extension of the same non-thermal particle distribution inevitably gives rise to emission extending into the X-ray band. Above $\\gtrsim 10$ keV this radiation can escape the system without significant absorption/attenuation, and can potentially be detected by NuSTAR. We present theoretical models for hard X-ray and gamma-ray emission from radiative shocks in both leptonic and hadronic scenarios, accounting for the rapid evolution of the downstream properties due to the fast cooling of thermal plasma. Due to strong Coulomb cooling of the mildly relativistic electrons nominally responsible for produci...

  13. Can gamma ray bursts be used as effective tracers of star formation to high Z?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, John; Giammanco, Corrado

    Long duration gamma ray bursts (GRB's) have been identified as originating in type II SNa explosions, produced during the late stage evolution of massive stars. As the lifetimes of their progenitors are so short the GRB rate per unit (comoving) volume of space, on scales which include significant numbers of galaxies, could be proportional to the star formation rate (SFR), at least to the formation rate of massive stars. Unfortunately both theory and observation imply that those SNe which give rise to gamma ray bursts occur in stars of low metallicity, less than half an order of magnitude lower than solar. Here we examine the evidence and show that although some workers believe that it is possible to use local galaxies with GRB's to calibrate the SFR in more distant galaxies others claim that this may be possible given independent ways of determining the metallicities of the distant galaxies, while others suggest that it is too difficult, at least with present measurements, to use GRB's to determine the SFR at values of redshift higher than 5. We conclude that although their intrinsic power gives GRB's the facility to guide observers towards star forming galaxies, only by also using complementary indicators will we be able to make plausible determinations of the SFR as a function of epoch beyond z = 5, i.e. during the first 2 Gyr after the Big Bang.

  14. High energy neutron and pion-decay gamma-ray emissions from solar flares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edward L. Chupp; James M. Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Solar flare gamma-ray emissions from energetic ions and electrons have been detected and measured to GeV energies since 1980. In addition, neutrons produced in solar flares with 100 MeV to GeV energies have been observed at the Earth. These emis-sions are produced by the highest energy ions and electrons accelerated at the Sun and they provide our only direct (albeit secondary) knowledge about the properties of the acceler-ator(s) acting in a solar flare. The solar flares, which have direct evidence for pion-decaygamma-rays, are unique and are the focus of this paper. We review our current knowl-edge of the highest energy solar emissions, and how the characteristics of the acceleration process are deduced from the observations. Results from the RHESSI, INTEGRAL and CORONAS missions will also be covered. The review will also cover the solar flare ca-pabilities of the new mission, FERMI GAMMA RAY SPACE TELESCOPE, launched on 2008 June 11. Finally, we discuss the requirements for future missions to advance this vital area of solar flare physics.

  15. Very high energy gamma ray astrophysics. Technical progress report, May 1, 1992--April 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, R C; Lewis, D A

    1993-02-01

    The Crab-Nebula continues to be the standard candle'' of TeV gamma-ray astronomy. The Whipple Collaboration's observations of it are now confirmed by two French groups. Application of the supercuts'' technique, developed on the Crab database, has resulted in the observation of a distant, active galaxy, Markarian 421. Markarian 421 is one of 16 active galactic nuclei (AGN's) observed by the EGRET instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. The EGRET observations and the expected attenuation of TeV photons from very distant AGN's gives added impetus to efforts in upgrading the present steoscopic detection system. The upgrade not only improves the sensitivity of the twin telescopes, but also reduces the energy threshold to 100 GeV, at which energy attenuation effects for distant sources are greatly reduced. During the past year the llm reflector was operated as a 37-pixel camera, with its performance matching design expectations. During the coming year, its camera will be upgraded to 109 pixels, the 10m camera electronics made to conform to the llm electronics, and both systems interfaced to a single, faster computer. Observations of Markarian 421, simultaneous with EGRET, are scheduled for May, 1993.

  16. High-energy emissions from the gamma-ray binary LS 5039

    CERN Document Server

    Takata, J; Tam, P H T; Kong, A K H; Hui, C Y; Cheng, K S

    2014-01-01

    We study mechanisms of multi-wavelength emissions (X-ray, GeV and TeV gamma-rays) from the gamma-ray binary LS~5039. This paper is composed of two parts. In the first part, we report on results of observational analysis using four year data of \\fermi\\ Large Area Telescope. Due to the improvement of instrumental response function and increase of the statistics, the observational uncertainties of the spectrum in $\\sim$100-300 MeV bands and $>10$GeV bands are significantly improved. The present data analysis suggests that the 0.1-100GeV emissions from LS~5039 contain three different components; (i) the first component contributes to $<$1GeV emissions around superior conjunction, (ii) the second component dominates in 1-10GeV energy bands and (iii) the third component is compatible to lower energy tail of the TeV emissions. In the second part, we develop an emission model to explain the properties of the phase-resolved emissions in multi-wavelength observations. Assuming that LS~5039 includes a pulsar, we argu...

  17. High-energy gamma-ray emission from the Galactic Center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer-Hasselwander, H.A.; Bertsch, D.L.; Dingus, B.L.

    1998-01-01

    interactions within 85 pc from the center of the Galaxy at 8.5 kpc distance. The spatial distribution of the emission does not correlate with the details of the CO-line surveys. Thus, in spite of the existence of a strong emission peak, earlier conclusions based on an apparent 'gamma-ray deficit', postulating......The EGRET instrument on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory has observed the Galactic Center (GC) region with good coverage at a number of epochs. A strong excess of emission is observed, peaking at energies > 500 MeV in an error circle of 0.2 degree radius including the position l = 0 degrees and b...... = 0 degrees. The close coincidence of this excess with the GC direction and the fact that it is the strongest emission maximum within 15 degrees from the GC is taken as compelling evidence for the source's location in the GC region. The history of the emission intensity, observed over 5 years, leaves...

  18. Relative thermoluminescent efficiencies proton/gamma and helium/gamma of high temperature peaks in TLD-100 dosemeters; Eficiencias termoluminiscentes relativas proton/gamma y helio/gamma de picos de alta temperatura en dosimetros TLD-100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores M, E.; Avila, O.; Rodriguez V, M. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Massillon, J.L.G.; Buenfil A, E.; Ruiz T, C.; Brandan, M.E. [IFUNAM, 04500 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Gamboa De Buen, I. [ICN-UNAM, 04500 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    This work presents measures of relative thermoluminescent efficiency of those high temperature peaks of TLD-100 dosemeters exposed to protons of 1.5 MeV and to helium nuclei of 3 and 7.5 MeV. A rigorous reading and of deconvolution protocol was used for the calculation of the TL efficiencies. Additionally an Excel program that facilitated the deconvolution adjustment process of the glow curves was elaborated. (Author)

  19. Feasibility study of performing high precision gamma spectroscopy of {lambda}{lambda} hypernuclei in the anti PANDA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Lorente, Alicia

    2010-09-30

    Hypernuclear research will be one of the main topics addressed by the anti PANDA experiment at the planned Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research anti FAIR. Thanks to the use of stored anti p beams, copious production of double {lambda} hypernuclei is expected at the anti PANDA experiment, which will enable high precision {gamma} spectroscopy of such nuclei for the first time. At anti PANDA excited states of {xi}{sup -} hypernuclei will be used as a basis for the formation of double {lambda} hypernuclei. For their detection, a devoted hypernuclear detector setup is planned. This setup consists of a primary nuclear target for the production of {xi}{sup -}+ anti {xi} pairs, a secondary active target for the hypernuclei formation and the identification of associated decay products and a germanium array detector to perform {gamma} spectroscopy. In the present work, the feasibility of performing high precision {gamma} spectroscopy of double {lambda} hypernuclei at the anti PANDA experiment has been studied by means of a Monte Carlo simulation. For this issue, the designing and simulation of the devoted detector setup as well as of the mechanism to produce double {lambda} hypernuclei have been optimized together with the performance of the whole system. In addition, the production yields of double hypernuclei in excitedparticle stable states have been evaluated within a statistical decay model. A strategy for the unique assignment of various newly observed {gamma}-transitions to specific double hypernuclei has been successfully implemented by combining the predicted energy spectra of each target with the measurement of two pion momenta from the subsequent weak decays of a double hypernucleus. Indeed, based on these Monte Carlo simulation, the analysis of the statistical decay of {sup 13}{sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}B has been performed. As result, three {gamma}-transitions associated to the double hypernuclei {sup 11}{sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}Be and to the single

  20. A search for Very High Energy gamma-ray emission from Sco X-1 with the MAGIC telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksić, J; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Asensio, M; Backes, M; Barrio, J A; Bastieri, D; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Berdyugin, A; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bock, R K; Boller, A; Bonnoli, G; Bordas, P; Tridon, D Borla; Bosch-Ramon, V; Braun, I; Bretz, T; Cañellas, A; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Cossio, L; Covino, S; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; del Pozo, E De Cea; De Lotto, B; Mendez, C Delgado; Ortega, A Diago; Doert, M; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Elsaesser, D; Ferenc, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Fruck, C; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Garrido, D; Giavitto, G; Godinović, N; Hadasch, D; Häfner, D; Herrero, A; Hildebrand, D; Höhne-Mönch, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Huber, B; Jogler, T; Klepser, S; Krähenbühl, T; Krause, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Leonardo, E; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; López, M; Lorenz, E; Makariev, M; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Meucci, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Miyamoto, H; Moldón, J; Moralejo, A; Munar-Adrover, P; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Orito, R; Oya, I; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Pardo, S; Paredes, J M; Partini, S; Pasanen, M; Pauss, F; Perez-Torres, M A; Persic, M; Peruzzo, L; Pilia, M; Pochon, J; Prada, F; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Puljak, I; Reichardt, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, K; Saito, T Y; Salvati, M; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shayduk, M; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Spiro, S; Stamerra, A; Steinke, B; Storz, J; Strah, N; Surić, T; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thom, M; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Treves, A; Vankov, H; Vogler, P; Wagner, R M; Weitzel, Q; Zabalza, V; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R

    2011-01-01

    The acceleration of particles up to GeV or higher energies in microquasars has been the subject of considerable theoretical and observational efforts in the past few years. Sco X-1 is a microquasar from which evidence of highly energetic particles in the jet has been found when it is in the so-called Horizontal Branch, a state when accretion is lower and a powerful relativistic jet is present. Here we present the first very high energy gamma-ray observations of Sco X-1 obtained with the MAGIC telescopes. An analysis of the whole dataset does not yield a significant signal, with 95% CL flux upper limits above 300 GeV at the level of 2.4x10^{-12} ph/cm^2/s. Simultaneous RXTE observations were conducted to search for TeV emission during particular X-ray states of the source. A selection of the gamma-ray data obtained during the Horizontal Branch based on the X-ray colors did not yield a signal either, with an upper limit of 3.4x10^{-12} ph/cm^2/s. These upper limits place a constraint on the maximum TeV luminosi...

  1. Sensitivity of the High Altitude Water Cherenkov Detector to Sources of Multi-TeV Gamma Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Carramiñana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Diaz-Velez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garcia-Luna, J L; Garcia-Torales, G; Garfias, F; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-Garc\\'\\ia, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, O; Mart\\'\\inez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2013-01-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is an array of large water Cherenkov detectors sensitive to gamma rays and hadronic cosmic rays in the energy band between 100 GeV and 100 TeV. The observatory will be used to measure high-energy protons and cosmic rays via detection of the energetic secondary particles reaching the ground when one of these particles interacts in the atmosphere above the detector. HAWC is under construction at a site 4100 meters above sea level on the northern slope of the volcano Sierra Negra, which is located in central Mexico at 19 degrees N latitude. It is scheduled for completion in 2014. In this paper we estimate the sensitivity of the HAWC instrument to point-like and extended sources of gamma rays. The source fluxes are modeled using both unbroken power laws and power laws with exponential cutoffs. HAWC, in one year, is sensitive to point sources with integral power-law spectra as low as 5x10^-13 cm^-2 sec^-1 above 2 TeV (approximately 50 mCrab) over 5 sr of the sky...

  2. Very High-Energy Gamma-Ray Follow-Up Program Using Neutrino Triggers from IceCube

    CERN Document Server

    Aartsen, M G; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Ahrens, M; Altmann, D; Andeen, K; Anderson, T; Ansseau, I; Anton, G; Archinger, M; Arguelles, C; Auffenberg, J; Axani, S; Bai, X; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beatty, J J; Becker-Tjus, J; Becker, K -H; BenZvi, S; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blot, S; Bohm, C; Borner, M; Bos, F; Bose, D; Boser, S; Botner, O; Braun, J; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H -P; Bron, S; Burgman, A; Carver, T; Casier, M; Cheung, E; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Clark, K; Classen, L; Coenders, S; Collin, G H; Conrad, J M; Cowen, D F; Cross, R; Day, M; de Andre, J P A M; De Clercq, C; Rosendo, E del Pino; Dembinski, H; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries, K D; de Wasseige, G; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Diaz-Velez, J C; di Lorenzo, V; Dujmovic, H; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eberhardt, B; Ehrhardt, T; Eichmann, B; Eller, P; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fahey, S; Fazely, A R; Feintzeig, J; Felde, J; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Flis, S; Fosig, C -C; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Friedman, E; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Ghorbani, K; Giang, W; Gladstone, L; Glauch, T; Glusenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Grant, D; Griffith, Z; Haack, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hansen, E; Hansmann, T; Hanson, K; Hebecker, D; Heereman, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hignight, J; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Holzapfel, K; Hoshina, K; Huang, F; Huber, M; Hultqvist, K; In, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Japaridze, G S; Jeong, M; Jero, K; Jones, B J P; Jurkovic, M; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Katz, U; Kauer, M; Keivani, A; Kelley, J L; Kheirandish, A; Kim, M; Kintscher, T; Kiryluk, J; Kittler, T; Klein, S R; Kohnen, G; Koirala, R; Kolanoski, H; Konietz, R; Kopke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krings, K; Kroll, M; Kruckl, G; Kruger, C; Kunnen, J; Kunwar, S; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lanfranchi, J L; Larson, M J; Lauber, F; Lennarz, D; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Lu, L; Lunemann, J; Madsen, J; Maggi, G; Mahn, K B M; Mancina, S; Mandelartz, M; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Maunu, R; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Medici, M; Meier, M; Meli, A; Menne, T; Merino, G; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Moulai, M; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Neer, G; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Pollmann, A Obertacke; Olivas, A; O'Murchadha, A; Palczewski, T; Pandya, H; Pankova, D V; Peiffer, P; Penek, O; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Perez de los; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Quinnan, M; Raab, C; Radel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Reimann, R; Relethford, B; Relich, M; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Robertson, S; Rongen, M; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ryckbosch, D; Rysewyk, D; Sabbatini, L; Sanchez-Herrera, S E; Sandrock, A; Sandroos, J; Sarkar, S; Satalecka, K; Schlunder, P; Schmidt, T; Schoenen, S; Schoneberg, S; Schumacher, L; Seckel, D; Seunarine, S; Soldin, D; Song, M; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Stettner, J; Steuer, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stossl, A; Strom, R; Strotjohann, N L; Sullivan, G W; Sutherland, M; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tatar, J; Tenholt, F; Ter-Antonyan, S; Terliuk, A; Tevsic, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Tobin, M N; Toscano, S; Tosi, D; Tselengidou, M; Turcati, A; Unger, E; Usner, M; Vandenbroucke, J; van Eijndhoven, N; Vanheule, S; van Rossem, M; van Santen, J; Veenkamp, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vogel, E; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Wallace, A; Wallraff, M; Wandkowsky, N; Weaver, Ch; Weiss, M J; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Wickmann, S; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Wille, L; Williams, D R; Wills, L; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woolsey, E; Woschnagg, K; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Xu, Y; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zoll, M; :,; Ahnen, M L; Ansoldi, S; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Banerjee, B; Bangale, P; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; Gonzalez, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Bernardini, E; Berti, A; Biasuzzi, B; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Buson, S; Carosi, A; Chatterjee, A; Clavero, R; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Lotto, B; Wilhelmi, E de Ona; Di Pierro, F; Doert, M; Dominguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Glawion, D Eisenacher; Elsaesser, D; Engelkemeier, M; Ramazani, V Fallah; Fernandez-Barral, A; Fidalgo, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; Galindo, D; Lopez, R J Garcia; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Giammaria, P; Godinovic, N; Munoz, A Gonzalez; Gora, D; Guberman, D; Hadasch, D; Hahn, A; Hanabata, Y; Hayashida, M; Herrera, J; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Hughes, G; Idec, W; Kodani, K; Konno, Y; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; Lopez, M; Lopez-Coto, R; Majumdar, P; Makariev, M; Mallot, K

    2016-01-01

    We describe and report the status of a neutrino-triggered program in IceCube that generates real-time alerts for gamma-ray follow-up observations by atmospheric-Cherenkov telescopes (MAGIC and VERITAS). While IceCube is capable of monitoring the whole sky continuously, high-energy gamma-ray telescopes have restricted fields of view and in general are unlikely to be observing a potential neutrino-flaring source at the time such neutrinos are recorded. The use of neutrino-triggered alerts thus aims at increasing the availability of simultaneous multi-messenger data during potential neutrino flaring activity, which can increase the discovery potential and constrain the phenomenological interpretation of the high-energy emission of selected source classes (e.g. blazars). The requirements of a fast and stable online analysis of potential neutrino signals and its operation are presented, along with first results of the program operating between 14 March 2012 and 31 December 2015.

  3. Very high-energy gamma-ray follow-up program using neutrino triggers from IceCube

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    We describe and report the status of a neutrino-triggered program in IceCube that generates real-time alerts for gamma-ray follow-up observations by atmospheric-Cherenkov telescopes (MAGIC and VERITAS). While IceCube is capable of monitoring the whole sky continuously, high-energy gamma-ray telescopes have restricted fields of view and in general are unlikely to be observing a potential neutrino-flaring source at the time such neutrinos are recorded. The use of neutrino-triggered alerts thus aims at increasing the availability of simultaneous multi-messenger data during potential neutrino flaring activity, which can increase the discovery potential and constrain the phenomenological interpretation of the high-energy emission of selected source classes (e.g. blazars). The requirements of a fast and stable online analysis of potential neutrino signals and its operation are presented, along with first results of the program operating between 14 March 2012 and 31 December 2015.

  4. In-situ Thermal Annealing of On-Membrane SOI Semiconductor-Based Devices After High Gamma Dose Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, Sedki; André, Nicolas; Kilchytska, Valeriya; Tounsi, Fares; Mezghani, Brahim; Gérard, Pierre; Ali, S Z; Udrea, Florin; Flandre, Denis; Francis, Laurent A

    2017-03-14

    In this paper, we investigate the recovery of some semiconductor-based components, such as N/P-type field-effect transistors (FETs) and a Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) inverter, after being exposed to a high total dose of gamma rays radiation. The employed method consists mainly in a rapid, low power and in-situ annealing mitigation technique by Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) micro-hotplates. Due to the ionizing effect of the gamma irradiation, the threshold voltages showed an average shift of 580 mV for N-channel transistors, and -360 mV for P-MOSFETs. A 4 min double-cycles annealing of components with a temperature of the heater up to 465°C, corresponding to a maximum power of 38 mW, ensured a partial recovery but was not sufficient for a full recovery. The degradation has been completely recovered after the use of a built-in high temperature annealing process, up to 975 °C for 8 min corresponding to a maximum power of 112 mW, which restored the normal operating characteristics for all devices after their irradiation.

  5. High IFN-gamma production of individual CD8 T lymphocytes is controlled by CD152 (CTLA-4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandiyan, Pushpa; Hegel, J Kolja E; Krueger, Manuela; Quandt, Dagmar; Brunner-Weinzierl, Monika C

    2007-02-15

    CD8 T cell expansion and cytokine production is needed to generate an effective defense against viral invasion of the host. These features of CD8 T lymphocytes are regulated, especially during primary responses, by positive and negative costimulation. We show in this study that surface expression of CD152 is highly up-regulated on activated CD8 T lymphocytes during primary immune responses, suggesting a prominent regulatory role. Indeed, production of the proinflammatory cytokine IFN-gamma, but not TNF-alpha, by CD8 T cells was inhibited by CD152 engagement. The inhibition was regulated independent of proliferation and IL-2 production, but dependent on the quality of the TCR signaling. We show that signals induced by CD152 on activated CD8 T lymphocytes reduce the frequency of IFN-gamma(high)-expressing cells. Our data also show that in activated CD8 T cells, the CD152-mediated inhibition of cytokine production is more pronounced than inhibition of their proliferation.

  6. Test of a four-gap resistive plate chamber with cosmic muons and high-rate gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.K.; Shin, S.S.; Hong, B.; Jhang, G.; Jeong, M.S.; Jo, M.; Cho, S.W.; Joo, E.; Kim, C.; Kim, H.C. [Department of Physics and Korea Detector Laboratory, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, K.S., E-mail: kslee0421@korea.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Korea Detector Laboratory, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, K.S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S.K.; Lim, J.K.; Moon, D.H.; Shim, H.H.; Sim, K.S. [Department of Physics and Korea Detector Laboratory, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-11

    We report a new development of a phenolic four-gap resistive plate chamber (RPC) for use as a high-rate particle trigger in high-energy physics experiments. In the current study, a prototype RPC equipped with four 1-mm-thick gaps made from high-pressure-laminated (HPL) resistive plates has been designed and built. The current detector R and D aims to reduce the probability of radiation-induced degradation of the core detector components of the RPCs, the gas gaps, as well as to improve the detection rate capability. The detector characteristics of the four-gap RPC were obtained though a series of tests with cosmic muons and gamma rays and were compared with those of the typical 2-mm thick double-gap RPCs currently used in the CMS experiment at the LHC and in the PHENIX experiment at the RHIC.

  7. High-power laser-driven source of ultra-short X-ray and gamma-ray pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esirkepov, T.Zh.; Bulanov, S.V.; Pirozhkov, A.S.; Kando, M. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kyoto (Japan); Zhidkov, A.G. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Yokosuka-shi, Kanagawa-Ken (Japan)

    2009-11-15

    A novel ultra-bright high-intensity source of X-ray and gamma radiation is suggested. It is based on the double Doppler effect, where a relativistic flying mirror reflects a counter-propagating electromagnetic radiation causing its frequency multiplication and intensification, and on the inverse double Doppler effect, where the mirror acquires energy from an ultra-intense co-propagating electromagnetic wave. The role of the flying mirror is played by a high-density thin plasma slab accelerating in the radiation pressure dominant regime. Frequencies of high harmonics generated at the flying mirror by a relativistically strong counter-propagating radiation undergo multiplication with the same factor as the fundamental frequency of the reflected radiation, approximately equal to the quadruple of the square of the mirror Lorentz factor. (authors)

  8. High-power laser-driven source of ultra-short X-ray and gamma-ray pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Bulanov, S. V.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Kando, M.

    2009-11-01

    A novel ultra-bright high-intensity source of X-ray and gamma radiation is suggested. It is based on the double Doppler effect, where a relativistic flying mirror reflects a counter-propagating electromagnetic radiation causing its frequency multiplication and intensification, and on the inverse double Doppler effect, where the mirror acquires energy from an ultra-intense co-propagating electromagnetic wave. The role of the flying mirror is played by a high-density thin plasma slab accelerating in the radiation pressure dominant regime. Frequencies of high harmonics generated at the flying mirror by a relativistically strong counter-propagating radiation udergo multiplication with the same factor as the fundamental frequency of the reflected radiation, approximately equal to the quadruple of the square of the mirror Lorentz factor.

  9. Gamma Knife

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Gamma Knife Gamma Knife® is a radiation therapy that uses computerized treatment planning software to help ... sparing surrounding tissue. If you're scheduled for radiation therapy using Gamma Knife®, a treatment team consisting of a radiation ...

  10. Gamma Knife

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Gamma Knife Gamma Knife® is a radiation therapy that uses computerized treatment ... If you're scheduled for radiation therapy using Gamma Knife®, a treatment team consisting of a radiation oncologist, ...

  11. Star-forming galaxies as the origin of diffuse high-energy backgrounds: Gamma-ray and neutrino connections, and implications for starburst history

    CERN Document Server

    Tamborra, Irene; Murase, Kohta

    2014-01-01

    Star-forming galaxies have been predicted to contribute considerably to the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray background as they are guaranteed reservoirs of cosmic rays. Recent Fermi observations have reported the possible correlation between their gamma-ray and infrared luminosities from several galaxies identified with their gamma-ray emission. Relying on this correlation, we here compute the diffuse gamma-ray background from star-forming galaxies adopting the Herschel PEP/HerMES luminosity function up to z ~ 4. Thanks to contributions from star-forming galaxies at z > 2, we find that star-forming galaxies can explain the diffuse gamma-ray background in the 0.3-30 GeV range. We also find this result agrees with the one obtained with a simple semi-analytic model based on the star-formation rate and on templates of the Milky Way and the starbursts M82 and NGC 253. The hadronic interactions responsible for high-energy gamma rays also produce high-energy neutrinos. Assuming that at least 100 PeV cosmic rays can be p...

  12. Cesium hafnium chloride: A high light yield, non-hygroscopic cubic crystal scintillator for gamma spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, Arnold, E-mail: aburger@fisk.edu [Department of Life and Physical Sciences, Fisk University, Nashville, Tennessee 37208 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Rowe, Emmanuel; Groza, Michael; Morales Figueroa, Kristle [Department of Life and Physical Sciences, Fisk University, Nashville, Tennessee 37208 (United States); Cherepy, Nerine J.; Beck, Patrick R.; Hunter, Steven; Payne, Stephen A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2015-10-05

    We report on the scintillation properties of Cs{sub 2}HfCl{sub 6} (cesium hafnium chloride or CHC) as an example of a little-known class of non-hygroscopic compounds having the generic cubic crystal structure of K{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6}. The crystals are easily growable from the melt using the Bridgman method with minimal precursor treatments or purification. CHC scintillation is centered at 400 nm, with a principal decay time of 4.37 μs and a light yield of up to 54 000 photons/MeV when measured using a silicon CCD photodetector. The light yield is the highest ever reported for an undoped crystal, and CHC also exhibits excellent light yield nonproportionality. These desirable properties allowed us to build and test CHC gamma-ray spectrometers providing energy resolution of 3.3% at 662 keV.

  13. High performance gamma-ray spectrometer for runaway electron studies on the FT-2 tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevelev, A. E.; Khilkevitch, E. M.; Lashkul, S. I.; Rozhdestvensky, V. V.; Altukhov, A. B.; Chugunov, I. N.; Doinikov, D. N.; Esipov, L. A.; Gin, D. B.; Iliasova, M. V.; Naidenov, V. O.; Nersesyan, N. S.; Polunovsky, I. A.; Sidorov, A. V.; Kiptily, V. G.

    2016-09-01

    A gamma-ray spectrometer based on LaBr3(Ce) scintillator has been used for measurements of hard X-ray emission generated by runaway electrons in the FT-2 tokamak plasmas. Using of the fast LaBr3(Ce) has allowed extending count rate range of the spectrometer by a factor of 10. A developed digital processing algorithm of the detector signal recorded with a digitizer sampling rate of 250 MHz has provided a pulse height analysis at count rates up to 107 s-1. A spectrum deconvolution code DeGaSum has been applied for inferring the energy distribution of runaway electrons escaping from the plasma and interacting with materials of the FT-2 limiter in the vacuum chamber. The developed digital signal processing technique for LaBr3(Ce) spectrometer has allowed studying the evolution of runaways energy distribution in the FT-2 plasma discharges with time resolution of 1-5 ms.

  14. High-energy emission from bright gamma-ray bursts using Fermi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissaldi, Elisabetta

    2010-05-25

    Among the scientific objectives of one of the present NASA missions, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (FGST), is the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Fermi's payload comprises two science instruments, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM). GBM was designed to detect and localize bursts for the Fermi mission. By means of an array of 12 NaI(Tl) (8 keV to 1 MeV) and two BGO (0.2 to 40 MeV) scintillation detectors, GBM extends the energy range (20 MeV to > 300 GeV) of the LAT instrument into the traditional range of current GRB databases. The physical detector response of the GBM instrument to GRBs has been determined with the help of Monte Carlo simulations, which are supported and verified by on-ground individual detector calibration measurements. The GBM detectors have been calibrated from 10 keV to 17.5 MeV using various gamma sources, and the detector response has been derived by simulations over the entire energy range (8 keV to 40 MeV) using GEANT. The GBM instrument has been operating successfully in orbit since June 11, 2008. The total trigger count from the time GBM triggering was enabled in July 2008 through December 2009 is 655, and about 380 of these triggers were classified as GRBs. Moreover, GBM detected several bursts in common with the LAT. These amazing detections mainly fulfill the primary science goal of GBM, which is the joint analysis of spectra and time histories of GRBs observed by both Fermi instruments. For every trigger, GBM provides near-real time on-board burst locations to permit repointing of the spacecraft and to obtain LAT observations of delayed emission from bursts. GBM and LAT refined locations are rapidly disseminated to the scientific community, often permitting extensive multiwavelength follow-up observations by NASA's Swift mission or other space- based observatories, and by numerous ground-based telescopes, thus allowing redshift determinations. Calculations of LAT upper limits are

  15. Development of a compact high resolution gamma-ray detector for E-CT applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Jie; MA Hongguang; MA Wenyan; ZENG Hui; WANG Zhaomin; XU Zizhong

    2007-01-01

    A compact gamma-ray detector with good spatial resolution for emission computed tomography (E-CT) applications has been developed. The detector is composed of NaI(T1) scintillation pixels array and Hamamastu R2486-05 PSPMT. Having a pixel size of 2 mm × 2 mm and an overall dimension of 48.2 mm × 48.2mm × 5 mm, it has 484 pixels in a 22×22 matrix. An average spatial resolution of 2.5mm (FWHM) was achieved. The slope of position linearity is constant within 10% in a range of 40mm. After corrections, the average value of differential non-linearity and absolute non-linearity were 0.16mm and 0.535mm respectively, and a 17% at FWHM of total energy resolution for 241Am was obtained.

  16. Lifshitz-scaling to Lorentz-violating high derivative operator and gamma-ray busts

    CERN Document Server

    Passos, E; Anacleto, M A; Brito, F A; Wotzasek, C; Zarro, C A D

    2016-01-01

    In this work we have used a Hovrava-Lifshitz scaling to rewrite a Lorentz-violating higher-order derivative electrodynamics controlled by a background four-vector $n_{\\mu}$. The photon propagator was obtained and we have analyzed the dispersion relation and the observational results of gamma-ray burst (GRB) experiments were used. The limits of the critical exponent were discussed in the light of the GRB data and the physical implications were compared with the current GRB-Lorentz-invariance-violation literature. We show that the bound for the Lorentz-violating coupling for dimension-six operators, obtained from a Hovrava-Lifshitz scaling, is eight orders of magnitude better than the result found without considering a Hovrava-Lifshitz scaling, also this bound is nearby one, which is expected to be relevant phenomenologically.

  17. gamma* N --> Delta at JLab: Exploring the High Q2 Regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurizio Ungaro; Kyungseon Jo; Paul Stoler

    2007-04-01

    We report a new measurement of the exclusive electroproduction reaction gamma* p --> pi0 p to explore the evolution from soft non-perturbative physics to hard processes via the Q2 dependence of the magnetic (M1+), electric (E1+) and scalar (S1+) multipoles in the N --> Delta transition. 9000 differential cross section data points cover W from threshold to 1.4 GeV/c2, 4pi center-of-mass solid angle, and Q2 from 3 to 6 GeV2/c2, the highest yet achieved. It is found that the magnetic form factor GM* decreases with Q2 more steeply than the proton magnetic form factor, the ratio E1+/M1+ is small and negative, indicating strong helicity non-conservation, and the ratio S1+/M1+ is negative, while its magnitude increases with Q2.

  18. High-energy gamma-ray and hard X-ray observations of Cyg X-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermsen, W.; Bloemen, J. B. G. M.; Jansen, F. A.; Bennett, K.; Buccheri, R.; Mastichiadis, A.; Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.; Strong, A. W.; Oezel, M. E.; Pollock, A. M. T.

    1987-01-01

    COS-B viewed the Cyg X-3 region seven times between November, 1975, and February, 1982; a search for steady gamma-ray emission pulsed at the characteristic 4.8-hour period did not reveal its source. Leiden-MIT balloon experiment observations of Cyg X-3 in May, 1979 show the 4.8-hour modulation with sinusoidal light curve and modulation depth of 0.30, for energies of up to about 140 keV. The strong variability of Cyg X-3 over more than one order of magnitude at energies below 20 keV does not emerge in the data collected at hard X-ray energies.

  19. Cyg X-3: Not seen in high-energy gamma rays by COS-B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermsen, W.; Bennett, K.; Bignami, G. F.; Bloemen, J. B. G. M.; Buccheri, R.; Caraveo, P. A.; Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.; Oezel, M. E.; Pollock, A. M. T.; Strong, A. W.

    1985-01-01

    COS-B had Cyg X-3 within its field of view during 7 observation periods between 1975 and 1982 for in total approximately 300 days. In the skymaps (70 meV E 5000 meV) of the Cyg-X region produced for each of these observations and in the summed map, a broad complex structure is visible in the region 72 deg approximately less than 1 approximately less than 85 deg, approximately less than 5 deg. No resolved source structure is visible at the position of Cyg X-3, but a weak signal from Cyg X-3 could be hidden in the structured gamma-ray background. Therefore, the data has been searched for a 4.8 h timing signature, as well as for a source signal in the sky map in addition to the diffuse background structure as estimated from tracers of atomic and molecular gas.

  20. A study of the process $e^+ +e^- \\to e^+ +e^- p \\bar {p}$ by the two-photon mechanism $\\gamma \\gamma \\to p \\bar {p}$ at high energies

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmadov, Azad I

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we consider the exclusive production of proton-antiproton pairs in the interaction between two quasireal photons in $e^+e^-$ collision. The differential and total cross section of the process $\\gamma \\gamma \\to p\\bar {p}$ at a beam energy of photons from 2.1 GeV to 4.5 GeV in the center-of-mass and for different values of $|cos\\theta^{\\ast}|$ is calculated. At energy $$=197 \\,\\,GeV the total cross section process o0f the $e^+ +e^- \\to e^+ +e^- +p +\\bar {p}$ is calculated by the two-photon mechanism. The results are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data.

  1. Studies of Avalanche Photodiodes (APDS) as Readout Devices for Scintillating Fibers for High Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasile, Stefan; Shera, Suzanne; Shamo, Denis

    1998-01-01

    New gamma ray and charged particle telescope designs based on scintillating fiber arrays could provide low cost, high resolution, lightweight, very large area and multi radiation length instrumentation for planned NASA space exploration. The scintillating fibers low visible light output requires readout sensors with single photon detection sensitivity and low noise. The sensitivity of silicon Avalanche Photodiodes (APDS) matches well the spectral output of the scintillating fibers. Moreover, APDs have demonstrated single photon capability. The global aim of our work is to make available to NASA a novel optical detector concept to be used as scintillating fiber readouts and meeting the requirements of the new generations of space-borne gamma ray telescopes. We proposed to evaluate the feasibility of using RMD's small area APDs ((mu)APD) as scintillating fiber readouts and to study possible alternative (mu)APD array configurations for space borne readout scintillating fiber systems, requiring several hundred thousand to one million channels. The evaluation has been conducted in accordance with the task description and technical specifications detailed in the NASA solicitation "Studies of Avalanche Photodiodes (APD as readout devices for scintillating fibers for High Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy Telescopes" (#8-W-7-ES-13672NAIS) posted on October 23, 1997. The feasibility study we propose builds on recent developments of silicon APD arrays and light concentrators advances at RMD, Inc. and on more than 5 years of expertise in scintillating fiber detectors. In a previous program we carried out the initial research to develop a high resolution, small pixel, solid-state, silicon APD array which exhibited very high sensitivity in the UV-VIS spectrum. This (mu)APD array is operated in Geiger mode and results in high gain (greater than 10(exp 8)), extremely low noise, single photon detection capability, low quiescent power (less than 10 (mu)W/pixel for 30 micrometers sensitive

  2. A new regime for highly robust gamma oscillation with co-exist of accurate and weak synchronization in excitatory-inhibitory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhijie; Fan, Hong; Han, Fang

    2014-08-01

    A great number of biological experiments show that gamma oscillation occurs in many brain areas after the presentation of stimulus. The neural systems in these brain areas are highly heterogeneous. Specifically, the neurons and synapses in these neural systems are diversified; the external inputs and parameters of these neurons and synapses are heterogeneous. How the gamma oscillation generated in such highly heterogeneous networks remains a challenging problem. Aiming at this problem, a highly heterogeneous complex network model that takes account of many aspects of real neural circuits was constructed. The network model consists of excitatory neurons and fast spiking interneurons, has three types of synapses (GABAA, AMPA, and NMDA), and has highly heterogeneous external drive currents. We found a new regime for robust gamma oscillation, i.e. the oscillation in inhibitory neurons is rather accurate but the oscillation in excitatory neurons is weak, in such highly heterogeneous neural networks. We also found that the mechanism of the oscillation is a mixture of interneuron gamma (ING) and pyramidal-interneuron gamma (PING). We explained the mixture ING and PING mechanism in a consistent-way by a compound post-synaptic current, which has a slowly rising-excitatory stage and a sharp decreasing-inhibitory stage.

  3. A new method of reconstructing very-high-energy gamma-ray spectra: the Template Background Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes, M V; Kosack, K; Raue, M; Rowell, G

    2014-01-01

    Very-high-energy (VHE, E>0.1 TeV) gamma-ray emission regions with angular extents comparable to the field-of-view of current imaging air-Cherenkov telescopes (IACT) require additional observations of source-free regions to estimate the background contribution to the energy spectrum. This reduces the effective observation time and deteriorates the sensitivity. A new method of reconstructing spectra from IACT data without the need of additional observations of source-free regions is developed. Its application is not restricted to any specific IACT or data format. On the basis of the template background method, which defines the background in air-shower parameter space, a new spectral reconstruction method from IACT data is developed and studied, the Template Background Spectrum (TBS); TBS is tested on published H.E.S.S. data and H.E.S.S. results. Good agreement is found between VHE gamma-ray spectra reported by the H.E.S.S. collaboration and those re-analysed with TBS. This includes analyses of point-like sourc...

  4. Correlated X-ray and Very High Energy emission in the gamma-ray binary LS I +61 303

    CERN Document Server

    Anderhub, H; Antoranz, P; Backes, M; Baixeras, C; Balestra, S; Barrio, J A; Bastieri, D; González, J Becerra; Becker, J K; Bednarek, W; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Biland, A; Bigas, O Blanch; Bock, R K; Bonnoli, G; Bordas, P; Tridon, D Borla; Bosch-Ramon, V; Bose, D; Braun, I; Bretz, T; Britzger, D; Camara, M; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Colin, P; Commichau, S; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Costado, M T; Covino, S; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; del Pozo, E de Cea; Reyes, R De los; De Lotto, B; De Maria, M; De Sabata, F; Mendez, C Delgado; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Elsaesser, D; Errando, M; Ferenc, D; Fernández, E; Firpo, R; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Galante, N; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Gaug, M; Godinovic, N; Göbel, F; Hadasch, D; Herrero, A; Hildebrand, D; Höhne-Mönch, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Hsu, C C; Jogler, T; Klepser, S; Kranich, D; La Barbera, A; Laille, A; Leonardo, E; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; Lorenz, E; Majumdar, P; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Meucci, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Miyamoto, H; Moldón, J; Moles, M; Moralejo, A; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Ninkovic, J; Orito, R; Oya, I; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Pasanen, M; Pascoli, D; Pauss, F; Pegna, R G; Pérez-Torres, M A; Persic, M; Peruzzo, L; Prada, F; Prandini, E; Puchades, N; Puljak, I; Reichardt, I; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rissi, M; Robert, A; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, T Y; Salvati, M; Sánchez-Conde, M; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schweizer, T; Shayduk, M; Shore, S N; Sidro, N; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Spiro, S; Stamerra, A; Stark, L S; Suric, T; Takalo, L; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Torres, D F; Turini, N; Vankov, H; Wagner, R M; Zabalza, V; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Zapatero, J; Falcone, A; Vetere, L; Gehrels, N; Trushkin, S; Dhawan, V; Reig, P

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray emitting X-ray binaries has triggered an intense effort to better understand the particle acceleration, absorption, and emission mechanisms in compact binary systems, which provide variable conditions along eccentric orbits. Despite this, the nature of some of these systems, and of the accelerated particles producing the VHE emission, is unclear. To answer some of these open questions, we conducted a multiwavelength campaign of the VHE gamma-ray emitting X-ray binary LS I +61 303 including the MAGIC telescope, XMM-Newton, and Swift during 60% of an orbit in 2007 September. We detect a simultaneous outburst at X-ray and VHE bands, with the peak at phase 0.62 and a similar shape at both wavelengths. A linear fit to the simultaneous X-ray/VHE pairs obtained during the outburst yields a correlation coefficient of r=0.97, while a linear fit to all simultaneous pairs provides r=0.81. Since a variable absorption of the VHE emission towards the observer is not expecte...

  5. A Search for Prompt Very High Energy Emission from Satellite-detected Gamma-ray Bursts using Milagro

    CERN Document Server

    Parkinson, P M Saz

    2007-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been detected up to GeV energies and are predicted by many models to emit in the very high energy (VHE, > 100 GeV) regime too. Detection of such emission would allow us to constrain GRB models. Since its launch, in late 2004, the Swift satellite has been locating GRBs at a rate of approximately 100 per year. The rapid localization and follow-up in many wavelengths has revealed new and unexpected phenomena, such as delayed emission in the form of bright X-ray flares. The Milagro gamma-ray observatory is a wide field of view (2 sr) instrument employing a water Cherenkov detector to continuously ($>$ 90% duty cycle) observe the overhead sky in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range. Over 100 GRBs are known to have been in the field of view of Milagro since January 2000, including 57 since the launch of Swift (through May 2007). We discuss the results of the searches for prompt emission from these bursts, as well as for delayed emission from the X-ray flares observed in some of the Swift...

  6. Fermi Large Area Telescope Observations of High-Energy Gamma-ray Emission From Behind-the-limb Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omodei, Nicola; Pesce-Rollins, Melissa; Petrosian, Vahe; Liu, Wei; Rubio da Costa, Fatima; Golenetskii, Sergei; Kashapova, Larisa; Krucker, Sam; Palshin, Valentin; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Fermi LAT >30 MeV observations of the active Sun have increased the number of detected solar flares by almost a factor of 10 with respect to previous space observations. Of particular interest are the recent detections of three solar flares whose position behind the limb was confirmed by the STEREO-B spacecraft. These observations sample flares from active regions originating from behind both the eastern and western limbs and include an event associated with the second ground level enhancement event (GLE) of the 24th Solar Cycle. While gamma-ray emission up to tens of MeV resulting from proton interactions has been detected before from occulted solar flares, the significance of these particular events lies in the fact that these are the first detections of >100 MeV gamma-ray emission from footpoint-occulted flares. These detections present an unique opportunity to diagnose the mechanisms of high-energy emission and particle acceleration and transport in solar flares. We will present the Fermi-LAT, RHESSI and STEREO observations of these flares and discuss the various emission scenarios for these sources.

  7. Very High Energy Gamma-ray Radiation from the Stellar-mass Black Hole Cygnus X-1

    CERN Document Server

    Albert, J; Anderhub, H; Antoranz, P; Armada, A; Baixeras, C; Barrio, J A; Bartko, H; Bastieri, D; Becker, J K; Bednarek, W; Berger, K; Bigongiari, C; Biland, A; Böck, R K; Bordas, P; Bosch-Ramon, V; Bretz, T; Britvitch, I; Camara, M; Carmona, E; Chilingarian, A; Coarasa, J A; Commichau, S; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Costado, M T; Curtef, V; Danielyan, V; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; Delgado, C; De Los Reyes, R; Delotto, B; Domingo-Santamaria, E; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Errando, M; Fagiolini, M; Ferenc, D; Fernández, E; Firpo, R; Flix, J; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Fuchs, M; Galante, N; Garcia-Lopez, R J; Garczarczyk, M; Gaug, M; Giller, M; Göbel, F; Hakobyan, D; Hayashida, M; Hengstebeck, T; Herrero, A; Hohn, D; Hose, J; Hsu, C C; Jacon, P; Jogler, T; Kosyra, R; Kranich, D; Kritzer, R; Laille, A; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, J; López, M; Lorenz, E; Majumdar, P; Maneva, G; Mannheim, K; Mansutti, O; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Merck, C; Meucci, M; Meyer, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Mizobuchi, S; Moralejo, A; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Ninkovic, J; Ona-Wilhelmi, E; otte, N; Oya, I; Paneque, D; Panniello, M; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Pasanen, M; Pascoli, D; Pauss, F; Pegna, R; Persic, M; Peruzzo, L; Piccioli, A; Prandini, E; Puchades, N; Raymers, A; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rissi, M; Robert, A; Rugamer, S; Saggion, A; Saitô, T; Sánchez, A; Sartori, P; Scalzotto, V; SCAPIN, V; Schmitt, R; Schweizer, T; Shayduk, M; Shinozaki, K; Shore, S N; Sidro, N; Sillanpää, A; Sobczynska, D; Stamerra, A; Stark, L S; Takalo, L; Temnikov, P; Tescaro, D; teshima, M; Torres, D F; Turini, N; Vankov, H; Vitale, V; Wagner, R M; Wibig, T; Wittek, W; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Zapatero, J

    2007-01-01

    We report on the results from the observations in very high energy band (VHE, E>100 GeV) of the black hole X-ray binary (BHXB) Cygnus X-1. The observations were performed with the MAGIC telescope, for a total of 40 hours during 26 nights, spanning the period between June and November 2006. Searches for steady gamma-ray signals yielded no positive result and upper limits to the integral flux ranging between 1 and 2% of the Crab nebula flux, depending on the energy, have been established. We also analyzed each observation night independently, obtaining evidence of gamma-ray signals at the 4.0 standard deviations (sigma) significance level (3.2 sigma after trial correction) for 154 minutes effective on-time (EOT) between MJD 54002.875 and 54002.987, coinciding with an X-ray flare seen by RXTE, Swift and INTEGRAL. A search for faster-varying signals within a night resulted in an excess with a significance of 4.9 sigma (4.1 sigma after trial correction) for 79 minutes EOT between MJD 54002.928 and 54002.987. The m...

  8. Contemporaneous observations of the radio galaxy NGC 1275 from radio to very high energy gamma-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksić, J; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Bangale, P; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bock, R K; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Fidalgo, D Carreto; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Caneva, G; De Lotto, B; Mendez, C Delgado; Doert, M; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Eisenacher, D; Elsaesser, D; Farina, E; Ferenc, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Giavitto, G; Godinović, N; Muñoz, A González; Gozzini, S R; Hadamek, A; Hadasch, D; Herrero, A; Hildebrand, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Idec, W; Kadenius, V; Kellermann, H; Knoetig, M L; Krause, J; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lewandowska, N; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Lozano, I; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Meucci, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Munar-Adrover, P; Nakajima, D; Niedzwiecki, A; Nilsson, K; Nowak, N; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Partini, S; Persic, M; Prada, F; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Preziuso, S; Puljak, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Garcia, J Rodriguez; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, K; Salvati, M; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Stamatescu, V; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Storz, J; Sun, S; Surić, T; Takalo, L; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Uellenbeck, M; Vogler, P; Wagner, R M; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Balmaverde, B; Kataoka, J; Rekola, R; Takahashi, Y; .,

    2013-01-01

    The radio galaxy NGC 1275, recently identified as a very high energy (VHE, >100 GeV) gamma-ray emitter by MAGIC, is one of the few non-blazar AGN detected in the VHE regime. In order to better understand the origin of the gamma-ray emission and locate it within the galaxy, we study contemporaneous multi-frequency observations of NGC 1275 and model the overall spectral energy distribution (SED). We analyze unpublished MAGIC observations carried out between Oct. 2009 and Feb. 2010, and the already published ones taken between Aug. 2010 and Feb. 2011. We study the multi-band variability and correlations analyzing data of Fermi-LAT (0.1 - 100 GeV), Chandra (X-ray), KVA (optical) and MOJAVE (radio) taken during the same period. Using custom Monte Carlo simulations corresponding to early MAGIC stereo data, we detect NGC 1275 also in the earlier MAGIC campaign. The flux level and energy spectra are similar to the results of the second campaign. The monthly light curve above 100 GeV shows a hint of variability at the...

  9. Compositional variability on the surface of 4 Vesta revealed through GRaND measurements of high-energy gamma rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peplowski, Patrick N.; Lawrence, David J.; Prettyman, Thomas H.; Yamashita, Naoyuki; Bazell, Dave; Feldman, William C.; Le Corre, Lucille; McCoy, Timothy J.; Reddy, Vishnu; Reedy, Robert C.; Russell, Chris T.; Toplis, Michael J.

    2013-11-01

    Measurements of the high-energy gamma-ray flux emanating from asteroid 4 Vesta by the Dawn Gamma-Ray and Neutron Detector (GRaND) have revealed variability in the near-surface elemental composition of the Vestan surface. These observations are consistent with the presence of large (≥8 × 104 km2) regions with distinct, HED-like elemental compositions. The results agree broadly with other global measurements, such as the macroscopic neutron absorption cross section and spectral reflectance-derived mineralogic maps. Two distinct regions with eucrite-like elemental compositions have been identified, the first located primarily within the Lucaria and Marcia quadrangles and the second within Oppia quadrangle. The former region is collocated with some of the oldest, most heavily cratered terrain on Vesta. The interior of the 500 km diameter Rheasilvia impact basin is found to have a composition that is consistent with diogenite-like material. Taken together, these observations support the hypothesis that Vesta's original crust was composed of basaltic outflows in the form of eucritic-like material and that the Rheasilvia-basin-forming impact exposed lower-crustal, diogenite-like material. These measurements also constrain the maximum amount of mesosiderite-like material to <10% for each 15 × 15° surface element.

  10. Discovery of Very High Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from 1FGL J2001.1 4351 by MAGIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Karsten; /IAC, La Laguna /Laguna U., Tenerife; Paneque, David; /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /SLAC; Giavitto, Gianluca; /Barcelona, IFAE

    2012-05-07

    We report the discovery of Very High Energy (VHE; >100 GeV) gamma-ray emission from the source 1FGL J2001.1+4351, (RA 20 01 13.5, dec 43 53 02.8, J2000), which is positionally consistent with the location of the flat spectrum radio source MG4 J200112+4352 (RA 20 01 12.9, dec 43 52 52.8, J2000). The VHE detection is based on a 1.5 hour-long observation performed on July 16th in stereoscopic mode with the two 17m diameter imaging Cherenkov telescopes on La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain. The preliminary analysis of the MAGIC data using the standard cuts optimized for soft energy spectra sources yields a detection of 125 gamma-rays above 90 GeV, corresponding to a pre-trail statistical significance of 7.6 standard deviations. The observed flux is estimated to be {approx}20% of the Crab nebula flux above 100 GeV. Earlier MAGIC observations indicated a substantially lower flux; hence indicating that the source is variable on a few days timescale.

  11. Performance studies under high irradiation of resistive bulk-micromegas chambers at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Bortfeldt, J; Farina, E; Iengo, P; Longo, L; Sidiropoulou, O; Wotschack, J

    2017-01-01

    Radiation studies on several resistive bulk-Micromegas chambers produced at CERN will be viewed in this document. Two resistive bulk-Micromegas chambers have been installed at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF++) exposed to an intense gamma irradiation with the aim of evaluating the detector behaviour under high irradiation and carrying out a long-term age- ing study. The chambers under study have an active area of 10 x 10 cm 2 , a strip pitch of 400 m m , an ampli- fication gap of 128 m m , and a drift gap of 5 mm. The results on the detector performance as a function of the photon flux up to 44 MHz/cm 2 will be shown as well as the ageing properties as function of the integrated charge and the current intensity and its stability with time. In addition, the results of the efficiency measurements before, during, and after the irradiation will also be presented as a function of the amplification voltage at which the chambers are operated.

  12. SkyFACT: high-dimensional modeling of gamma-ray emission with adaptive templates and penalized likelihoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Emma; Weniger, Christoph; Calore, Francesca

    2017-08-01

    We present SkyFACT (Sky Factorization with Adaptive Constrained Templates), a new approach for studying, modeling and decomposing diffuse gamma-ray emission. Like most previous analyses, the approach relies on predictions from cosmic-ray propagation codes like GALPROP and DRAGON. However, in contrast to previous approaches, we account for the fact that models are not perfect and allow for a very large number (gtrsim 105) of nuisance parameters to parameterize these imperfections. We combine methods of image reconstruction and adaptive spatio-spectral template regression in one coherent hybrid approach. To this end, we use penalized Poisson likelihood regression, with regularization functions that are motivated by the maximum entropy method. We introduce methods to efficiently handle the high dimensionality of the convex optimization problem as well as the associated semi-sparse covariance matrix, using the L-BFGS-B algorithm and Cholesky factorization. We test the method both on synthetic data as well as on gamma-ray emission from the inner Galaxy, |l|model that removes most of the residual emission from the inner Galaxy, based on conventional diffuse emission components as well as components for the Fermi bubbles, the Fermi Galactic center excess, and extended sources along the Galactic disk. Variants of this reference model can serve as basis for future studies of diffuse emission in and outside the Galactic disk.

  13. CRPropa 2.0. A public framework for propagating high energy nuclei, secondary gamma rays and neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kampert, Karl-Heinz [Wuppertal Univ. (Germany); Kulbartz, Joerg; Schiffer, Peter; Sigl, Guenter; Vliet, Arjen Rene van [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Maccione, Luca [Muenchen Univ. (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Nierstenhoefer, Nils [Wuppertal Univ. (Germany); Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2012-06-15

    Version 2.0 of CRPropa is public software to model the extra-galactic propagation of ultra-high energy nuclei of atomic number Z{<=}26 through structured magnetic fields and ambient photon backgrounds taking into account all relevant particle interactions. CRPropa covers the energy range 6 x 10{sup 16} < E/eV < A x 10{sup 22} where A is the nuclear mass number. CRPropa can also be used to track secondary {gamma}-rays and neutrinos which allows the study of their link with the charged primary nuclei - the so called multi-messenger connection. After a general introduction we present several sample applications of current interest concerning the physics of extragalactic ultra-high energy radiation.

  14. Characterization of gaseous detectors at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility: GEM performance in presence of high background radiation

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2097588

    Muon detection is an efficient tool to recognize interesting physics events over the high background rate expected at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The muon systems of the LHC experiments are based on gaseous ionization detectors. In view of the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) upgrade program, the increasing of background radiation could affect the gaseous detector performance, especially decreasing the efficiency and shortening the lifetime through ageing processes. The effects of charge multiplication, materials and gas composition on the ageing of gaseous detectors have been studied for decades, but the future upgrade of LHC requires additional studies on this topic. At the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF++), a radioactive source of cesium-137 with an activity of 14 TBq is used to reproduce reasonably well the expected background radiation at HL-LHC. A muon beam has been made available to study detector performance. The characterization of the beam trigger will be discussed in the present w...

  15. Constraints on Lorentz Invariance Violating Quantum Gravity and Large Extra Dimensions Models using High Energy Gamma Ray Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Stecker, F W

    2003-01-01

    Observations of the multi-TeV spectra of the nearby BL objects Mkn 421 and Mkn 501 exhibit the high energy cutoffs predicted to be the result of intergalactic annihilation interactions, primarily with infrared photons having a flux level as determined by various astronomical observations. After correction for this absorption effect, the derived intrinsic spectra of these multi-TeV sources can be explained within the framework of simple synchrotron self-Compton emission models. Stecker and Glashow have shown that the existence of such annihilations via electron-positron pair production interactions up to an energy of 20 TeV puts strong constraints on Lorentz invariance violation. Such constraints have important implications for Lorentz invariance violating (LIV) quantum gravity models as well as LIV models involving large extra dimensions. We also discuss the implications of observations of high energy gamma-rays from the Crab Nebula on constraining quantum gravity models.

  16. Gamma rays from Galactic pulsars

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Gamma rays from young pulsars and milli-second pulsars are expected to contribute to the diffuse gamma-ray emission measured by the {\\it Fermi} Large Area Telescope (LAT) at high latitudes. We derive the contribution of the pulsars undetected counterpart by using information from radio to gamma rays and we show that they explain only a small fraction of the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray background.

  17. Tityus serrulatus venom contains two classes of toxins. Tityus gamma toxin is a new tool with a very high affinity for studying the Na+ channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhanin, J; Giglio, J R; Léopold, P; Schmid, A; Sampaio, S V; Lazdunski, M

    1982-11-10

    The interaction of TiTx gamma, the major toxin in the venom of the scorpion Tityus serrulatus, with its receptor in excitable membranes was studied with the use of 125I-TiTx gamma. This derivative retains biological activity, and its specific binding to both brain synaptosomes and electroplaque membranes from Electrophorus electricus is characterized by a dissociation constant equal to that of the native toxin-receptor complex, about 2 to 5 pM. This very high affinity results mainly from a very slow rate of dissociation, equivalent to a half-life longer than 10 h at 4 degrees C. There is a 1:1 stoichiometry between TiTx gamma binding and tetrodotoxin binding to the membranes, but neither tetrodotoxin nor any of 7 other neurotoxins that are representative of 4 different classes of effectors of the Na+ channel interfere with TiTx gamma binding. Similarly, local anesthetics and other molecules that affect other types of ionic channels or neurotransmitter receptors have no effect on TiTx gamma binding. However, toxin II from Centruroides suffusus suffusus does compete with TiTx gamma, though its affinity for the receptor is much lower. Since the Centruroides toxin II is known to affect Na+ channel function, these two scorpion toxins must be put into a fifth class of Na+ channel effectors.

  18. Morphology of {gamma}' precipitates of nickel-based superalloy serviced as first stage high pressure turbine nozzle guide vane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, Nobuhiro; Nakada, Kouji; Kondo, Yoshihiro [National Defense Academy, Yokosuka, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    The morphology of {gamma}' precipitates of the nickel-based superalloy serviced as the first stage high pressure turbine nozzle guide vane of the jet engine was examined. The aim of this work was to estimate the temperature and the stress distribution, and the stress direction of the vane in service. The vane was cut into four parts perpendicular to the longitudinal direction of the vane at 5, 25, 35 and 45mm from the root. These parts were designated as the root, 25mm, 35mm and tip parts. Microstructure observations by a FE-SEM were carried out on the forty-six portions at the vicinity of the interface between the coating layer and the matrix on the suction and pressure sides. At the root parts of the pressure and suction sides, most of the {gamma}' precipitates kept cuboidal in shape, and the secondary {gamma}' precipitates were observed in the {gamma} matrix channels. On the contrary, at the trailing edge side of the pressure and suction sides of the 25 and 35mm parts and at the leading edge of the pressure side of the tip part, well aligned rafted {gamma}/{gamma}' structures were appeared in the direction parallel to the surface at the vicinity of the interface of the vane. Furthermore, at the trailing edge of the pressure side of the middle parts, the rafted {gamma}/{gamma}' structures start to collapse. Consequently, the vane in service, at the trailing edge sides of the pressure side the 25 and 35mm parts were exposed to the highest temperature and stress conditions. And this microstructure evidence indicated that the multi-axial compressive stress parallel to the nozzle surface was expected to act on the vane in service. (orig.)

  19. First limits on the very-high energy gamma-ray afterglow emission of a fast radio burst. H.E.S.S. observations of FRB 150418

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. E. S. S. Collaboration; Abdalla, H.; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Andersson, T.; Angüner, E. O.; Arakawa, M.; Arrieta, M.; Aubert, P.; Backes, M.; Balzer, A.; Barnard, M.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Büchele, M.; Bulik, T.; Capasso, M.; Carr, J.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Chevalier, J.; Chrétien, M.; Coffaro, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Condon, B.; Conrad, J.; Cui, Y.; Davids, I. D.; Decock, J.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Devin, J.; Dewilt, P.; Dirson, L.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O.'c.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Eschbach, S.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Funk, S.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Goyal, A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Hahn, J.; Haupt, M.; Hawkes, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hoischen, C.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Iwasaki, H.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jankowsky, F.; Jingo, M.; Jogler, T.; Jouvin, L.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katsuragawa, M.; Katz, U.; Kerszberg, D.; Khangulyan, D.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; King, J.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Kraus, M.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Leser, E.; Lohse, T.; Lorentz, M.; Liu, R.; López-Coto, R.; Lypova, I.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mariaud, C.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Mohrmann, L.; Morå, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Nakashima, S.; de Naurois, M.; Niederwanger, F.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P.; Odaka, H.; Öttl, S.; Ohm, S.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Padovani, M.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perennes, C.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Piel, Q.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Prokhorov, D.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de Los Reyes, R.; Richter, S.; Rieger, F.; Romoli, C.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Saito, S.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Seglar-Arroyo, M.; Settimo, M.; Seyffert, A. S.; Shafi, N.; Shilon, I.; Simoni, R.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Takahashi, T.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tibaldo, L.; Tiziani, D.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tsuji, N.; Tuffs, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; van der Walt, D. J.; van Eldik, C.; van Rensburg, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zanin, R.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zefi, F.; Ziegler, A.; Żywucka, N.; Superb Collaboration; Jankowski, F.; Keane, E. F.; Petroff, E.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Following the detection of the fast radio burst FRB150418 by the SUPERB project at the Parkes radio telescope, we aim to search for very-high energy gamma-ray afterglow emission. Methods: Follow-up observations in the very-high energy gamma-ray domain were obtained with the H.E.S.S. imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope system within 14.5 h of the radio burst. Results: The obtained 1.4 h of gamma-ray observations are presented and discussed. At the 99% C.L. we obtained an integral upper limit on the gamma-ray flux of Φγ(E > 350 GeV) energy were derived and used to constrain the intrinsic high-energy afterglow emission of FRB 150418. Conclusions: No hints for high-energy afterglow emission of FRB 150418 were found. Taking absorption on the extragalactic background light into account and assuming a distance of z = 0.492 based on radio and optical counterpart studies and consistent with the FRB dispersion, we constrain the gamma-ray luminosity at 1 TeV to L < 5.1 × 1047 erg/s at 99% C.L.

  20. High performance gamma-ray spectrometer for runaway electron studies on the FT-2 tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevelev, A.E., E-mail: Shevelev@cycla.ioffe.ru [Ioffe Institute, Politekhnicheskaya 26, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Khilkevitch, E.M.; Lashkul, S.I.; Rozhdestvensky, V.V.; Altukhov, A.B.; Chugunov, I.N.; Doinikov, D.N.; Esipov, L.A.; Gin, D.B.; Iliasova, M.V.; Naidenov, V.O.; Nersesyan, N.S.; Polunovsky, I.A.; Sidorov, A.V. [Ioffe Institute, Politekhnicheskaya 26, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Kiptily, V.G. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon X14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-11

    A gamma-ray spectrometer based on LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillator has been used for measurements of hard X-ray emission generated by runaway electrons in the FT-2 tokamak plasmas. Using of the fast LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) has allowed extending count rate range of the spectrometer by a factor of 10. A developed digital processing algorithm of the detector signal recorded with a digitizer sampling rate of 250 MHz has provided a pulse height analysis at count rates up to 10{sup 7} s{sup −1}. A spectrum deconvolution code DeGaSum has been applied for inferring the energy distribution of runaway electrons escaping from the plasma and interacting with materials of the FT-2 limiter in the vacuum chamber. The developed digital signal processing technique for LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) spectrometer has allowed studying the evolution of runaways energy distribution in the FT-2 plasma discharges with time resolution of 1–5 ms.

  1. A New Population of High Redshift Short-Duration Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, E; Price, P A; Nakar, E; Gal-Yam, A; Holz, D E; Schmidt, B P; Cucchiara, A; Cenko, S B; Kulkarni, S R; Soderberg, A M; Frail, D A; Penprase, B E; Rau, A; Ofek, E; Burnell, S J B; Cameron, P B; Cowie, L L; Dopita, M A; Hook, I; Peterson, B A; Podsiadlowski, P; Roth, K C; Rutledge, R E; Sheppard, S S; Songaila, A; Podsiadlowski, Ph.

    2006-01-01

    The redshift distribution of the short-duration GRBs is a crucial, but currently fragmentary, clue to the nature of their progenitors. Here we present optical observations of seven short GRBs obtained with Gemini, Magellan, and HST. We detect the afterglows and host galaxies of two short bursts, and host galaxies for two additional bursts with known optical afterglow positions, and three with X-ray positions (0.7 (97% confidence level), suggesting that 1/4-2/3 of all short GRBs originate at higher redshifts than previously determined. This has two important implications: (i) We constrain the acceptable age distributions to a wide lognormal (sigma~1) with tau~4-8 Gyr, or to a power law, P(tau)~tau^n, with -1gamma,iso}~10^{50}-10^{52} erg, are significantly larger than 10^{48}-10^{49} erg for the low redshift short GRBs, indicating a large spread in energy release or jet opening angles. Finally, we re-iterate the importance of short GRBs as potential grav...

  2. Two high-redshift DLAs towards a z~5 gamma-ray burst

    CERN Document Server

    Sparre, M; Krühler, T; Fynbo, J P U; Watson, D J; Wiersema, K; D'Elia, V; De Cia, A; Afonso, P M J; Covino, S; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Flores, H; Goldoni, P; Greiner, J; Hjorth, J; Jakobsson, P; Kaper, L; Klose, S; Malesani, D; Milvang-Jensen, B; Nardini, M; Piranomonte, S; Sollerman, J; Ramirez, R Sanchez; Schulze, S; Tanvir, N R; Vergani, S D; Wijers, R A M J; Zafar, T

    2013-01-01

    Observations of the afterglows of long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) allow the study of star-forming galaxies across most of cosmic history. Here we present observations of GRB 111008A from which we can measure abundance patterns, metallicity, dust content and extinction of the GRB host galaxy (z=5.0) as well as a Damped Lyman-alpha Absorber (DLA) galaxy along the line of sight (z=4.6). These systems have column densities of log N =22.30 +/- 0.06 and 21.34 +/- 0.10, respectively. The GRB host galaxy has a metallicity of 2% solar (based on sulfur), and a lower limit of the metallicity for the intervening DLA is 3% (based on silicon). For the intervening absorber we also measure -1.73<[Fe/H]<-1.09, but the true metallicity can be higher, because it is unclear how much the abundances are affected by dust depletion. The presence and variability of fine-structure lines confirms the z=5.0 system as the GRB host. This is the highest redshift where Fe II fine-structure lines have been detected. The afterglow is only ...

  3. The high energy gamma-ray emission expected from Tycho's supernova remnant

    CERN Document Server

    Völk, H J; Ksenofontov, L T; Rowell, G P

    2002-01-01

    A nonlinear kinetic model of cosmic ray (CR) acceleration in supernova remnants (SNRs) is used to describe the properties of Tycho's SNR. Observations of the expansion characteristics and of the nonthermal radio and X-ray emission spectra, assumed to be of synchrotron origin, are used to constrain the overall dynamical evolution and the particle acceleration parameters of the system, in addition to what is known from independent estimates of the distance and thermal X-ray observations. It is shown that a very efficient production of nuclear cosmic rays, leading to strong shock modification, and a large downstream magnetic field strength B_d approx 240muG are required to reproduce the observed synchrotron emission from radio to X-ray frequencies. This field strength is still well within the upper bound for the effective magnetic field, consistent with the acceleration process. The pi^0-decay gamma-ray flux turns out to be somewhat greater than the inverse Compton (IC) flux off the Cosmic Microwave Background a...

  4. Discovery of Very High Energy Gamma Rays from 1ES 1440+122

    CERN Document Server

    Archambault, S; Barnacka, A; Behera, B; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berger, K; Bird, R; Boettcher, M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Cardenzana, J V; Cerruti, M; Chen, X; Christiansen, J L; Ciupik, L; Collins-Hughes, E; Connolly, M P; Cui, W; Dickinson, H J; Dumm, J; Eisch, J D; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Federici, S; Feng, Q; Finley, J P; Fleischhack, H; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Gillanders, G H; Godambe, S; Griffin, S; Griffiths, S T; Grube, J; Gyuk, G; Haakansson, N; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Hughes, G; Johnson, C A; Kaaret, P; Kar, P; Kertzman, M; Khassen, Y; Kieda, D; Krawczynski, H; Kumar, S; Lang, M J; Madhavan, A S; Maier, G; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Meagher, K; Millis, J; Moriarty, P; Nelson, T; Nieto, D; de Bhroithe, A O'Faolain; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Park, N; Perkins, J S; Pohl, M; Popkow, A; Prokoph, H; Pueschel, E; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Rajotte, J; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Richards, G T; Roache, E; Sembroski, G H; Shahinyan, K; Smith, A W; Staszak, D; Sweeney, K; Telezhinsky, I; Tucci, J V; Tyler, J; Varlotta, A; Vassiliev, V V; Wakely, S P; Welsing, R; Wilhelm, A; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B

    2016-01-01

    The BL Lacertae object 1ES 1440+122 was observed in the energy range from 85 GeV to 30 TeV by the VERITAS array of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. The observations, taken between 2008 May and 2010 June and totalling 53 hours, resulted in the discovery of $\\gamma$-ray emission from the blazar, which has a redshift $z$=0.163. 1ES 1440+122 is detected at a statistical significance of 5.5 standard deviations above the background with an integral flux of (2.8$\\pm0.7_{\\mathrm{stat}}\\pm0.8_{\\mathrm{sys}}$) $\\times$ 10$^{-12}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ (1.2\\% of the Crab Nebula's flux) above 200 GeV. The measured spectrum is described well by a power law from 0.2 TeV to 1.3 TeV with a photon index of 3.1 $\\pm$ 0.4$_{\\mathrm{stat}}$ $\\pm$ 0.2$_{\\mathrm{sys}}$. Quasi-simultaneous multi-wavelength data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (0.3--300 GeV) and the Swift X-ray Telescope (0.2--10 keV) are additionally used to model the properties of the emission region. A synchrotron self-Compton model produces a good repr...

  5. Gamma-ray emission from globular clusters. Shock high energy emission from the Be-Star/Pulsar System PSR 1