WorldWideScience

Sample records for high court answered

  1. Speech Cases Turned Aside by High Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined without comment to take up two major appeals involving student free-speech rights on the Internet. One appeal encompassed two cases decided in favor of students last June by the full U.S. Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit, in Philadelphia. The other appeal stemmed from a decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for…

  2. Speech Cases Turned Aside by High Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined without comment to take up two major appeals involving student free-speech rights on the Internet. One appeal encompassed two cases decided in favor of students last June by the full U.S. Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit, in Philadelphia. The other appeal stemmed from a decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for…

  3. Assisted suicide and assisted voluntary euthanasia: Stransham-Ford High Court case overruled by the Appeal Court – but the door is left open

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    David J McQuoid-Mason

    2017-01-01

    Whether persons wishing to have doctor-assisted suicide or voluntary active euthanasia may make a court application based on their rights in the Constitution has not been answered by the Appeal Court...

  4. Questions and Answers about High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... checked out by a doctor. Am I at risk for high blood pressure? Anyone can develop high blood pressure. But there are several factors that increase your risk: Being overweight or obese Not ... if I have high blood pressure? High blood pressure is often called "the silent ...

  5. Pragmatic meaning in court interpreting: An empirical study of additions in consecutively interpreted question-answer dialogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Bente

    Focusing on additions, my PhD thesis aims to demonstrate that, contrary to the expectation of most legal systems, court interpreters do not function as mere translating devices, but participate actively in the process of negotiating meaning in the courtroom....

  6. Is there a doctor in the court? Focus on parental high conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Jaime Rene

    2013-04-01

    The author, a California Superior Court judge who is currently assigned to family law court, describes certain cases of marital dissolution as "parental civil wars" in which a high level of conflict between parents has deleterious effects on children. He calls on clinicians and social services systems to improve interventions to address high-conflict marital dissolutions and develop collaborations with courts to avoid lifelong negative consequences for the children involved in these cases.

  7. High court says exposure without consent is a crime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-09-18

    The Canadian Supreme Court held that HIV-positive people can be subjected to criminal prosecution for exposing their sex partners to HIV, if the sex partners did not know that the other was HIV-positive. The partner does not need to become infected to establish the existence of significant risk. Based on this conclusion, the Supreme Court of Canada granted a new trial of [name removed] on two counts of aggravated assault. [Name removed] had originally been acquitted of the charges by a trial court. The Supreme Court also suggested that if the use of a condom is shown to reduce the risk of infection, then a defendant may argue that it is not necessary to disclose a person's HIV status when condoms are used.

  8. Assisted suicide and assisted voluntary euthanasia: Stransham-Ford High Court case overruled by the Appeal Court – but the door is left open

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J McQuoid-Mason

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Whether persons wishing to have doctor-assisted suicide or voluntary active euthanasia may make a court application based on their rights in the Constitution has not been answered by the Appeal Court. Therefore, if Parliament does not intervene beforehand, such applications can be made – provided the applicants have legal standing, full arguments are presented regarding local and foreign law, and the application evidence is comprehensive and accurate. The Appeal Court indicated that the question should be answered by Parliament because ‘issues engaging profound moral questions beyond the remit of judges to determine, should be decided by the representatives of the people of the country as a whole’. However, the Government has not implemented any recommendations on doctor-assisted suicide and voluntary active euthanasia made by the South African Law Commission 20 years ago. The courts may still develop the law on doctor-assisted death, which may take into account developments in medical practice. Furthermore, ‘the possibility of a special defence for medical practitioners or carers would arise and have to be explored’.

  9. Affirmative Action Case Queued Up for Airing at High Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The future of affirmative action in education--not just for colleges but potentially for K-12 schools as well--may be on the line when the U.S. Supreme Court takes up a race-conscious admissions plan from the University of Texas next month. That seems apparent to the scores of education groups that have lined up behind the university with…

  10. Nike Court Force High Lux 奢华外衣

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Nike这次将使用在Air Force1中惯用的Lux的处理手法重新包装经典的Court Force High,这两双球鞋分别采用了黑色和灰色的单色顶级绒面革物料制作鞋面。而Lux系列的标志则印制在球鞋的后跟处。这是一款设计简洁的球鞋,与时下流行的色彩潮流截然不同.也许反潮流而行之也是体现纯粹经典的好办法。

  11. Commentary: Factors predicting family court decisions in high-conflict divorce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, Carla Smith

    2013-01-01

    Factors that predict custody and visitation decisions are an important area of research, especially in the context of high-conflict divorce. In these cases, youths are at significantly higher risk for exposure to ongoing conflict, violence, and triangulation in their parents' disputes. What variables courts and evaluation clinics use to make custody decisions and whether they are the most salient requires further study. The work by Raub and colleagues in this issue extends our understanding of important factors considered by the courts and custody evaluators in high-conflict divorce and points to directions for future research in this area.

  12. Abandoning the common law: medical negligence, genetic tests and wrongful life in the Australian High Court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunce, Thomas; Jefferys, Susannah

    2007-05-01

    The Australian High Court recently found that the common law could allow parents to claim tortious damages when medical negligence was proven to have led to the birth of an unplanned, but healthy, baby (Cattanach v Melchior (2003) 215 CLR 1). In Harriton v Stephens (2006) 80 ALJR 791; [2006] HCA 15 and Waller v James; Waller v Hoolahan (2006) 80 ALJR 846; [2006] HCA 16 the High Court in a six-to-one decision (Kirby J dissenting) decided that no such claim could be made by a child when medical negligence in failing to order an in utero genetic test caused the child severe disability. In an era when almost all pregnancies will soon require patented fetal genetic tests as part of the professional standard of care, the High Court, by barring so-called "wrongful life" (better termed "wrongful suffering") claims, may have created a partial immunity from suit for their corporate manufacturers and the doctors who administer them. What lessons can be learnt from this case about how the Australian High Court is, or should be, approaching medical negligence cases and its role as guardian of the Australian common law?

  13. "Forest Grove School District v. T.A.": The Supreme Court and Unilateral Private Placements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yell, Mitchell L.; Katsiyannis, Antonis; Collins, Terri S.

    2010-01-01

    On June 22, 2009, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its decision in the case "Forest Grove School District v. T.A." (hereafter "Forest Grove"). In "Forest Grove," the High Court answered the question of whether the parents of students with disabilities are entitled to reimbursement for the costs associated with placing…

  14. "Forest Grove School District v. T.A.": The Supreme Court and Unilateral Private Placements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yell, Mitchell L.; Katsiyannis, Antonis; Collins, Terri S.

    2010-01-01

    On June 22, 2009, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its decision in the case "Forest Grove School District v. T.A." (hereafter "Forest Grove"). In "Forest Grove," the High Court answered the question of whether the parents of students with disabilities are entitled to reimbursement for the costs associated with placing…

  15. The High Court's lost chance in medical negligence: Tabet v Gett (2010) 240 CLR 537.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunce, Thomas; McEwan, Alexandra

    2010-12-01

    In 2010 the High Court of Australia in Tabet v Gett (2010) 240 CLR 537 determined an appeal in a medical negligence case concerning a six-year-old girl who had presented to a major paediatric hospital with symptoms over several weeks of headaches and vomiting after a recent history of chicken pox. The differential diagnosis was varicella, meningitis or encephalitis and two days later, after she deteriorated neurologically, she received a lumbar puncture. Three days later she suffered a seizure and irreversible brain damage. A CT scan performed at that point showed a brain tumour. As Australia does not have a no-fault system providing compensation to cover the long-term care required for such a condition, the girl (through her parents and lawyers) sued her treating physician. She alleged that, because a cerebral CT scan was not performed when clinically indicated after the diagnosis of meningitis or encephalitis and before the lumbar puncture, she had "lost the chance" to have her brain tumour treated before she sustained permanent brain damage. She succeeded at first instance, but lost on appeal. The High Court also rejected her claim, holding unanimously that there were no policy reasons to allow recovery of damages based on possible (less than 50%) "loss of a chance" of a better medical outcome. The court held that the law of torts in Australia required "all or nothing" proof that physical injury was caused or contributed to by a negligent party. The High Court, however, did not exclude loss of chance as forming the substance of a probable (greater than 50%) claim in medical negligence in some future case. In the meantime, patients injured in Australia as a result of possible medical negligence (particularly in the intractable difficult instances of late diagnosis) must face the injustice of the significant day-to-day care needs of victims being carried by family members and the taxpayer-funded public hospital system. The High Court in Tabet v Gett again provides

  16. Text of High Court's Ruling on Judges' Right to Upset Academic Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, John Paul

    1985-01-01

    The Supreme Court's opinion and concurring opinion in a case limiting the right of courts to overturn academic decisions, based on the case of university's dismissal of a student after his failure of an important examination, are presented. (MSE)

  17. The Royal Courts of Equity in England in the 16-17 centuries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya Strizhakov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available УДК 340.15The subject of research are the courts of England in 16-17 centuries.The purpose of article is to answer the question which courts must be included to a number of "courts of equity".Methodology. Historical analysis of the scientific literature, of the English legislation and judicial practice of the 16-17 centuries.Results. The priority for the Court of Star Chamber was to protect the interests of Royal power and not the rights of people. Moreover, this court did not seek to bridge the gaps of common law. In this regard, his reference to the number of “courts of equity” is incorrect.Star Chamber had a close relationship with the Privy Council. There were no clear boundaries between them during the XVI century. The Star Chamber was the emergency Committee of the Privy CouncilThe purpose of the Court of Requests was to ease social tensions, to create the impression of caring filed emanating from the monarch and the nobility.Despite the fact that the Court of the Requests was conceived as "a court for poor people", it became popular wealthy people under the rule Henry VIII.The Court of High Commission was a court focused on the strengthening of Royal power. In its activities it has been focused on improving the rights of the Kingdom.The Court of Exchequer provided judicial protection for some types of transactions that are not recognized by the common law. In this it is similar to the Chancery Court. Initially, the Court of the Exchequer has been focused on protecting the interests of the crown. Therefore, the function to eliminate the gaps of the common law could not be implemented in full.The Chancery Court, unlike the special courts were required to consider complaints coming from citizens about the inability to get a fair trial.Conclusions. The criteria for judicial institutions to be considered as “courts of equity” are: the purpose of the establishment of the court was to fill gaps in the common law; interference with the

  18. Mini Simulation of a Supreme Court Oral Argument: A Lesson Plan for High School Law-Related Educators To Support "Understanding the Federal Courts."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Administrative Office of the United States Courts, Washington, DC.

    Every year the Supreme Court hears dozens of cases related to key constitutional issues. These cases can be used to teach enduring concepts in government and law. With this lesson plan, students learn about important concepts in Fourth Amendment law and stage a mock Supreme Court oral argument in small groups on a case decided in the 1999-2000…

  19. Legal Regulations of Activities of Vladikavkaz High Court Division VTSIK during the Transition of Extreme-Decretive to Codified Law (1921–1923

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana G. Sudakova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with legal foundations of extreme justice system since 1917 to 1923 and the issues related to organization of Vladikavkaz High Court Division VTSIK. The research states, that after adoption and introduction of the PC and CPC in the judicial practice in 1922, the centralized control over high courts was enhanced.

  20. High Court Rules that Law Bars Bias against Persons with Contagious Ills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Cheryl M.

    1987-01-01

    The Supreme Court has ruled that Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, which protects disabled people from discrimination, covers persons with contagious diseases. This decision is seen as strengthening the rights of people suffering from AIDS as well as other diseases. (MSE)

  1. Chinese court case fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Toft

    2011-01-01

    Western history of crime fiction usually designates Edgar Allan Poe as the undisputed father of the detective story. Crime fiction is, hence, generally associated with incipient modernity and modern societies and cityscapes. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle even asks: Where was the detective story until Poe...... breathed the breath of life into it? The usual answer is that crime fiction, in fact, was invented by Poe, but another counter-view is that China – at that point – had had a long narrative tradition for stories about crime and detection. The socalled gongan genre – court case fiction – was probably...... sinological sources introducing a revised introduction of crime fiction on the world’s literary scene. So to answer Doyle’s question about crime fiction before Poe: Crime fiction may have been in China....

  2. COURT INTERPRETING AT DENPASAR COURT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Ayu Made Puspani

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This is a research on interpreting (oral translation on a criminal case ofdrug user in the court proceedings at Denpasar Court. The study of theinterpreting is concerned with two-ways rendition from Indonesian into Englishand vice-versa. The study is related to: (1 the description of modes of interpretingapplied by the interpreter, (2 the application of translation strategies: shift,addition and deletion of information, (3 factors that underlie the application ofthe strategies, and (4 the impact of the application of those strategies towards thequality of the interpreting.The methodology applied in this study is qualitative based on eclectictheories (translation, syntax, semantics and pragmatics. The utilization of thetheories is in accordance with the type of the data analyzed in regard to thetranslation phenomena as an applied study and its complexity.The interpreting at court applied the consecutive and simultaneous modes.The strategy of shift was applied when there were differences in structure betweenthe source and the target languages. Addition of information was used when theinterpreter emphasized the message of the source language in the target language.The deletion of information applied if the context in the target language has beencovered, and it was not necessary for the interpreter to interpret the same thingbecause the message of the source language was pragmatically implied in thetarget language.The factors which underlie the application of the interpreting strategies incourt interpreting were communication factor and the differences in the languagesystems between the source and the target languages. The impact of the use of thestrategies towards the quality of the interpreting happened when the interpretationof the source language message into the message of the target language and themessage in the source language was not completely render into the targetlanguage.The novelties of the research are: (1 relevance theory and its

  3. Courting the expert: a clash of culture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, P

    2005-06-01

    This article reviews the utility of expert opinion in legal proceedings and the deployment of expert witnesses in adversarial litigation. The use of expert witnesses to assist courts in making just and fair conclusions may be contrasted with the partisan interests of those who call them. An adversarial system is a bad method of scientific enquiry and undermines the court's capacity to reach the 'right' answer. As a consequence, courts may reach the wrong conclusion based on bad science. The role of the expert as a witness places strain on an expert to provide certainty, where in fact there may be none. Recent reforms in the civil courts have changed little and the problem is even more acute in criminal trials. The expert can rely solely on the integrity of his or her own opinion, tempered with a little humility. However, when filtered through the rhetoric and advocacy of a court arena, even this may be compromised.

  4. CONSTITUTIONAL TRADITIONALISM IN THE ROBERTS COURT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis J Virelli III

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The debate over the role of traditionalism in constitutional interpretation has itself become a tradition. It remains a popular and controversial topic among constitutional scholars and presents normative questions that are as divisive, difficult, and important today as at the Founding. Missing from the discussion, however, is a comprehensive account of how the Supreme Court has employed traditionalism-an approach that looks for meaning in present manifestations of longstanding practices or beliefs-in its constitutional jurisprudence. This project is the first to fill this gap by providing an exhaustive and systematic analysis of the Court's use of constitutional traditionalism. This article focuses on the Roberts Court's first five terms to provide an empirical foundation that will not only offer previously unavailable insights into the Court's current traditionalist practices, but will also set forth a useful framework for the ongoing normative debate over traditionalism. This project uses content analysis of key terms to identify every instance in which the Roberts Court employed traditionalism to interpret the Constitution. More specifically, this project set out to answer the following three questions: First, how frequently does the Roberts Court employ traditionalism in its constitutional jurisprudence? Second, how robust is the Court's use of traditionalism (i.e., is it used to interpret a broad or narrow range of constitutional provisions? And finally, how often and in what contexts do individual Justices on the Roberts Court rely on traditionalism in their own constitutional opinions? The research provided here suggests answers to all three of these questions. First, the data indicate that traditionalism has been relied upon regularly by the Roberts Court, appearing in nearly half of the Court's constitutional cases. Second, traditionalism is frequently applied to a wide variety of constitutional provisions: Two-thirds of the

  5. Supreme Court rejects challenge to FACE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-10-25

    On October 7, the US Supreme Court declined to hear Skott vs. US, a case challenging the Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances Act (FACE). The 1994 law makes it a federal crime to use or attempt to use force, threat of force, or physical obstruction to injure, intimidate, or interfere with reproductive health care providers and their patients. The case came to the High Court after the US Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit overturned an earlier district court ruling and upheld the constitutionality of the federal statute in December 1995. Six Wisconsin anti-choice protestors, who had been arrested in September 1994 after participating in a blockade of a Milwaukee women's health facility, had successfully petitioned the US District Court for the Eastern District of Wisconsin to dismiss criminal charges based on FACE. While the district court held that Congress had no authority under the Commerce Clause or under the Fourteenth Amendment of the US Constitution to enact FACE, the appellate panel found that the lower court had not given sufficient consideration to congressional findings that the activities restricted by FACE substantially affect interstate commerce and are subject to the regulatory power of Congress. FACE has been upheld by the US Courts of Appeal for the Fourth, Eighth, and Eleventh Circuits and eleven federal district courts. Two district courts have found the law invalid. This marks the third time the High Court has refused to hear a challenge to the law.

  6. Even Lesbian Youths or Those Presumed to Be Lesbians Are Protected by the Constitution of Uganda--But to a Limited Extent: Rules the High Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujuzi, Jamil Ddamulira

    2009-01-01

    The Ugandan Penal Code criminalizes same-sex relationships. The author analyzes the Ugandan High Court decision where the judge relied on the Constitution and international human rights instruments to hold that law enforcement officers must respect the rights to privacy and human dignity even of those people presumed to be in same-sex…

  7. Even Lesbian Youths or Those Presumed to Be Lesbians Are Protected by the Constitution of Uganda--But to a Limited Extent: Rules the High Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujuzi, Jamil Ddamulira

    2009-01-01

    The Ugandan Penal Code criminalizes same-sex relationships. The author analyzes the Ugandan High Court decision where the judge relied on the Constitution and international human rights instruments to hold that law enforcement officers must respect the rights to privacy and human dignity even of those people presumed to be in same-sex…

  8. Overview of Specialized Courts

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    This Overview has two primary purposes. First, it provides judicial system officials with the arguments in favor of and in opposition to the creation of specialized courts. Second, it offers recommendations for consideration by judicial system officials when they are deliberating whether to establish specialized courts. This Overview also provides a review of types of specialized courts that have been established in court systems in some countries in Europe and the United States. This review ...

  9. Is intensive care the only answer for high risk pregnancies in developing nations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajwa Sukhwinder

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Management of high risk obstetric patients. Aim : The present study was conducted to evaluate the primary causes of the admission of obstetric patients to Intensive Care Unit (ICU, the presence of co-morbid diseases, outcome of such patients, their survival rate as well as the factors which contribute to the maternal mortality. Settings and Design : A retrospective study was conducted in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology and Anaesthesiology/ICU of our Institute. Materials and Methods : Sixty-one obstetric patients, who were admitted to ICU between 20 December 2006 and 31 January 2010, were evaluated for various factors responsible for their admission as well as their outcome. Statistical Analysis : At the end of study, the data were arranged systematically and subjected to statistical analysis using nonparametric tests and P value <0.05 was considered significant. Results : Majority of the 61 patients admitted in ICU were referred from the peripheral health centers, smaller nursing homes/hospitals and some even without proper primary care and mainly comprising uneducated and rural population. Hemorrhage, pregnancy induced hypertension, cardiac diseases, respiratory insufficiency and sepsis were the main causes for admission. A total of 18 patients among 61 died during their ICU stay in the hospital. Conclusions : In the developing countries, high risk pregnancy should be managed at peripheral centers with proper facilities, antenatal visits and timely referral. The intensive care help should be reserved for very high risk pregnancies with co-morbid diseases.

  10. High-sensitivity cardiac troponin assays: answers to frequently asked questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenevier-Gobeaux, Camille; Bonnefoy-Cudraz, Éric; Charpentier, Sandrine; Dehoux, Monique; Lefevre, Guillaume; Meune, Christophe; Ray, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    Cardiac troponin (cTn) assays have quickly gained in analytical sensitivity to become what are termed 'high-sensitivity cardiac troponin' (hs-cTn) assays, bringing a flurry of dense yet incomplete literature data. The net result is that cTn assays are not yet standardized and there are still no consensus-built data on how to use and interpret cTn assay results. To address these issues, the authors take cues and clues from multiple disciplines to bring responses to frequently asked questions. In brief, the effective use of hs-cTn hinges on knowing: specific assay characteristics, particularly precision at the 99th percentile of a reference population; factors of variation at the 99th percentile value; and the high-individuality of hs-cTn assays, for which the notion of individual kinetics is more informative than straight reference to 'normal' values. The significance of patterns of change between two assay measurements has not yet been documented for every hs-cTn assay. Clinicians need to work hand-in-hand with medical biologists to better understand how to use hs-cTn assays in routine practice.

  11. Enhancing Residential Treatment for Drug Court Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koob, Jeff; Brocato, Jo; Kleinpeter, Christine

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the authors describe and evaluate the impact of increased access to residential treatment added to traditional drug court services in Orange County, California, with a goal of increasing program retention, successful completion, and graduation rates for a high-risk drug offender population participating in drug court between January…

  12. The Roberts Court and Academic Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahdert, Mark C.

    2007-01-01

    Since President Bush named Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. to the Supreme Court, speculation has run high as to where the new court may be headed. Citing three recent cases ("Morse v. Frederick", "Rumsfeld v. Forum for Academic and Institutional Rights, Inc." and "Garcetti v. Ceballos"), Rahdert expresses concern…

  13. The Right of Access to Court

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokol Mëngjesi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Every person has the right to address the court in order to protect his legal rights, freedom and interests. Access to justice is an important aspect of due process, the absence of which makes inexistent the discussion for respecting the principle of due legal process. Access to the court is a right guaranteed by the Constitution, international acts and is specifically interpreted by the European Court of Human Rights.The right to address the court is not an absolute right. This right can be restricted in cases when there is a due legal aim and the restriction is proportional between the used tools and the aim required to be achieved. Unlike other rights, the right to justice has a particular nature, requiring the relevant rules (deadlines, different procedures, court fees, etc., which are set by the state. However in any case these rules shouldn’t affect the essence of the law itself. In practice there have often been problems, likewise the set of high court fees, the existence of immunity for some functionaries, several criteria (likewise age, ability to act, which have violated the right to address the court. It is not enough that the right to address the court recognized, but it needs to be also effective. In this paper will analyze the right to address the court, as part of due process, cases when this right can be restricted, which is the practice followed by the domestic courts intertwining with the attitude that keeps the European Court of Human Rights.

  14. Genetics in the courts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coyle, Heather; Drell, Dan

    2000-12-01

    Various: (1)TriState 2000 Genetics in the Courts (2) Growing impact of the new genetics on the courts (3)Human testing (4) Legal analysis - in re G.C. (5) Legal analysis - GM ''peanots'', and (6) Legal analysis for State vs Miller

  15. The International Criminal Court

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Ciara Therése

    This article considers whether acts of international terrorism can and should be prosecuted before the International Criminal Court as crimes against humanity.......This article considers whether acts of international terrorism can and should be prosecuted before the International Criminal Court as crimes against humanity....

  16. Supreme Court's New Term. Supreme Court Roundup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Charles F.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the issues addressed in the 2002 U.S. Supreme Court term, such as the First, Fourth, Eighth, and Fourteenth Amendments, cruel and unusual punishment, sex offender registries, fair housing, cross burning, jury selection, affirmative action, abortion protests, and copyrights and the public domain. (CMK)

  17. Electronic Courts and the Challenges in Managing Evidence. A View From Inside The International Criminal Court

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Patrick Dillon

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Many courts face challenges dealing with large volumes of electronic evidence. Innovative solutions are in place, but challenges remain for those who manage our courts. Some of the international tribunals have embraced new technologies. High staff turnover leads to a knowledge drain and mobile devices which generate a significant amount of meta-data are issues that need to be addressed.

  18. Power Sharing Courts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Graziadei

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I introduce a novel concept, the one of power sharing courts. Scholars of judicial politics look at the reasons behind judicial selection and the patterns of decision making within courts through the lens of ideology (left-right. However, the resulting fertile scholarly analysis has not been extended to divided societies, where the main cleavages are not partisan but ethno-national. In these societies, the liberal model of selecting judges and taking decisions within an apex court is often corrected to specifically include politically salient ascriptive cleavages (such as ethnicity/nationality/language/religion. The main thrust of my argument is that there is a model of selecting judges, taking decisions and sharing posts of influence within apex courts in divided societies that has not yet been conceptually captured: power sharing courts. In analogy to consociationalism in the political system, power sharing in the judiciary aims to solve salient inter-community conflicts by including all relevant groups in these bodies on a basis of parity or proportionality. The paper is of equal interest to scholars of constitutional courts, consociationalists, comparatists, as well as country specialists.

  19. You and the Courts: A Newcomer's Guide. 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Jean

    A bilingual pamphlet containing practical law-related information for recent Russian Jewish immigrants to New York City, this document addresses the court system. Following a brief description of the Newcomer series, 9 questions are listed, each followed by an answer. Questions asked include the difference between criminal and civil law; how the…

  20. Supreme Court refuses to review clinic access law; Second Appeals Court upholds statute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-06-30

    On June 19, the US Supreme Court refused to review "Woodall v. Reno," a challenge to the Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances Act (FACE) filed in Virginia by an anti-choice individual. FACE prohibits the use of force, threat of force, or physical obstruction to intentionally injure, intimidate, or interfere with anyone providing or obtaining reproductive health services. By denying the petition for "certiorari," the High Court let stand the US Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit decision in February. In that ruling, the midlevel federal court affirmed a lower court's dismissal of two of the eight anti-choice lawsuits challenging FACE, "Woodall v. Reno" and "American Life League v. Reno," which were consolidated by the appeals panel. Although plaintiffs in the first case filed a request for review by the High Court within days of the appellate court ruling, plaintiffs in the latter case waited until May to do so. The Department of Justice, which is defending the federal statute, and CRLP and the NOW Legal Defense and Education Fund, who are intervening on behalf of women and health care providers, will file their opposition to the review by July 26. The Justices will then decide to hear the case. On June 23, a three-judge panel for the US Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit affirmed a lower court's decision to dismiss "Cheffer v. Reno," a facial challenge by Florida anti-choice activists seeking to invalidate FACE. The appeals court had ruled the law did not infringe on First Amendment rights, and the panel rejected the argument that Congress had exceeded its authority under the Commerce Clause of the US Constitution by finding that the measure "protects and regulates commercial enterprises." The appeals court accepted an "amicus" brief filed by CRLP and NOW Legal Defense and Education Fund on behalf of the National Abortion Federation, the National Organization of Women, physicians, and women's health clinics, but denied their request to intervene in the

  1. Hippocratic obligation to shareholder profit? Medical treatment patents and the Australian High Court in Apotex Pty Ltd v Sanofi-Aventis Australia Pty Ltd [2013] HCA 50.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vines, Tim

    2014-06-01

    The method of treatment of suffering in patients, including through surgery and the administration of therapeutic drugs, are essential features of medical professionalism. Few, if any practitioners committed to developing the core professional virtue of loyalty to relief of patient suffering through consistently implementing the basic principles of medical ethics, would consider that such beneficial methods of practice are, or should be, the subject of a patent--requiring the practitioner utilising them to pay a royalty or risk infringement proceedings. Indeed a formal opinion of the American Medical Association declares "the use of patents, trade secrets, confidentiality agreements, or other means to limit the availability of medical procedures places significant limitation on the dissemination of medical knowledge, and is therefore unethical". Yet this could be the direction in which Australian patent law is heading. The decision of the High Court of Australia in Apotex Pty Ltd v Sanofi-Aventis Australia Pty Ltd [2013] HCA 50, upholding a patent over a method of using a known drug to prevent or treat psoriasis, may ultimately force practitioners to re-consider whether their basic ethical obligations to patients are secondary to a requirement to maximise profit for shareholders in companies holding medical patents. This column reviews this decision and its possible implications for health practitioners. It places it in context of other recent court decisions that have expanded the intrusion of corporate-owned intellectual property monopolies into Australian medical practices, and how legislative restrictions upon them in the Patents Act 1990 (Cth) places practitioners and patients at risk of more costly, ineffective or restricted health care. This column concludes by cautioning that Australia's scope to address policy problems caused by this case may be limited should it sign up to the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement, particularly if that preferential trade

  2. Court-ordered caesareans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, Elizabeth; Lomri, Sara

    2014-11-01

    Court-ordered caesarean sections are in the news after a number of recent legal decisions authorising surgery for women who lack mental capacity to consent. The decisions have not always been based on good evidence and they raise serious concerns about the protection of the rights of mentally ill women. The authors explain the legal process and question the wisdom of recent judgements.

  3. Court of Public Opinion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguntoyinbo, Lekan

    2011-01-01

    It was late on Election Day 2010 and Vander Plaats, a Sioux City, Iowa, businessman and leader of a campaign to oust three Iowa Supreme Court justices, had just gotten word that he and his team had pulled it off. The voters had rejected the three justices up for a retention vote: David Baker, Michael Streit, and Chief Justice Marsha Ternus.…

  4. Supreme Court Roundup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Charles F.

    2005-01-01

    Reactions to the retirement of Justice Sandra Day O'Connor and debate over the president's replacement nomination, Judge John Roberts, Jr., of the D.C. Circuit, dominated this summer's Supreme Court recess. Subsequently, after Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist's death on September 3, 2005, President Bush nominated Roberts for the chief justice…

  5. A Juvenile Drug Court Model in Southern Arizona: Substance Abuse, Delinquency, and Sexual Risk Outcomes by Gender and Race/Ethnicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Bridget S.; Stevens, Sally J.; Fuhriman, Janet; Bogart, John G.; Korchmaros, Josephine D.

    2009-01-01

    Alcohol and drug use related crimes continue to be processed in juvenile courts at high rates. One approach for addressing substance related issues has been the implementation of juvenile drug courts. Juvenile drug courts were established given the wide-spread success of adult drug courts. However, juvenile drug courts require different components…

  6. Green Courts in India: Strengthening Environmental Governance? - Student Note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghav Sharma

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The Constitution of India has been the bulwark of Indian environmental governance. Right to clean environment, as an incident of 'right to life', has become enshrined under Article 21 through judicial interpretation. The Indian experience, involving easy access to justice through Public Interest Litigation, demonstrates that 'independent' and 'powerful' superior courts are indispensable for securing environmental justice. However, this ideal turns into a mirage when the superior courts fail to satisfactorily resolve environmental disputes involving scientific and technical questions due to lack of permanent expert panels to assist them. To surmount this practical impediment, the Law Commission of India has mooted the idea of specialised Environmental (Green Courts in its 186 th Report which will be structurally modeled on similar courts functioning in Australia and New Zealand . While recognising the significance of a specialised judiciary, this paper criticizes the proposal of the Law Commission as a half hearted attempt in this direction. The proposed structure is utterly unimpressive as it purports to withdraw environmental disputes from the jurisdiction of superior courts while entrusting them to weak Environmental Courts which appear vulnerable to substantial executive interference. It fails to subserve the high aim of efficacious dispute resolution as the proposed courts have been weaned of the wide powers which the superior courts were hitherto exercising in environmental matters. Thus, as an alternative, it is proposed that a more pragmatic course will be to create specialist divisions within the existing Indian High Courts to effectively address the practical problems involved in environmental adjudication.

  7. Presidential Control of High Courts in Latin America: A Long-term View (1904-2006 Control presidencial de las cortes supremas en América Latina. Una mirada histórica (1904-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aníbal Pérez-Liñán

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In many Latin American countries the executive branch manipulatesthe composition of the Supreme Court, and judicial independence hasremained elusive. Because high courts can exercise judicial review and influencelower courts, incoming presidents often force the resignation of adversarialjustices or “pack” the courts with friends. One indicator of this problemhas been the high turnover among members of the high courts. In thispaper we offer systematic evidence to compare this problem across countriesand to place this issue in historical perspective. Our analysis covers 11Latin American countries (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, ElSalvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Panama, and Uruguay between1904 and 2006. We model the entrance of new justices to the SupremeCourt as a function of “natural” (legal and biological factors, political conditionsempowering the president to reshuffle the Court, and institutionalincentives promoting executive encroachment on the judiciary. En muchos países de América Latina el poder ejecutivo manipulala composición de la Corte Suprema, y por ende la independencia del poderjudicial ha resultado difícil de alcanzar. Debido a que las cortes supremaspueden ejercer el control de constitucionalidad e influir en las cortes inferiores,los presidentes entrantes a menudo han forzado la renuncia de jueces adversoso han aumentado el número de miembros en la corte para nombrar a juecesamigos. Un indicador de este problema ha sido la alta tasa de recambio de losmiembros en las cortes. En este trabajo ofrecemos evidencia sistemática paracomparar este problema entre los países así como también para tratar el temadesde una perspectiva histórica. El análisis abarca 11 países de América Latina(Argentina, Brasil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala,Honduras, México, Panamá y Uruguay entre 1904 y 2006. Modelamos laentrada de un nuevo juez a la Corte Suprema como resultado de factores

  8. Timing Students' Answers in CAI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hativa, Nira; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of limiting response time for students' answers focuses on a study of Israeli elementary students that investigated the effects on their performance of increasing the response time in computer-assisted instruction (CAI) for arithmetic drill and practice. Effects on high- versus low-aptitude students, and younger versus older, are…

  9. On court interpreters' visibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dubslaff, Friedel; Martinsen, Bodil

    This paper is part of the initial stage of a larger empirical research project on court interpreting seen as a complex interaction between (at least) three co-participants. The empirical material consists of recordings of interpreted interrogations in court room settings and questionnaires filled...... of the service they receive. Ultimately, the findings will be used for training purposes. Future - and, for that matter, already practising - interpreters as well as the professional users of interpreters ought to take the reality of the interpreters' work in practice into account when assessing the quality...... of the service rendered/received. The paper presents a small-scale case study based on an interpreted witness interrogation. Recent research on the interpreter's role has shown that interpreters across all settings perceive themselves as "visible" (Angelelli 2003, 2004). This has led us to focus...

  10. Question, answer, compare: a cross-category comparison of answers on question and answer websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocepek, Melissa G.; Westbrook, Lynn

    2015-10-01

    Online information seekers make heavy use of websites that accept their natural language questions. This study compared the three types of such websites: social question and answer (Q&A), digital reference services, and ask-an-expert services. Questions reflecting daily life, research, and crisis situations were posed to high use websites of all three types. The resulting answers' characteristics were analyzed in terms of speed, transparency, formality, and intimacy. The results indicate that social Q&A websites excel in speed, ask-an-expert websites in intimacy, and digital reference services in transparency and formality.

  11. The Distribution of Teaching and Learning Resources in California's Middle and High Schools. Issues & Answers. REL 2007-No. 023

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socias, Miguel; Chambers, Jay; Esra, Phil; Shambaugh, Larisa

    2007-01-01

    Access to important educational resources in California's middle and high schools is not equal among schools that serve different student populations. Overall, the most disadvantaged populations of middle and high school students are likely to have the least access to the resources necessary for learning. California policymakers are focusing on…

  12. Educational orders as a diversionary treatment model and their use in the practice of the Higher Public Prosecutor's Office and the High Court in Novi Sad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bugarski Tatjana D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile crime is constantly attracting the attention of the general and professional public and in some way is an indicator of the success or failure of all measures by which a society takes care of the young. As a particularly vulnerable category, juveniles are the focus of special attention in each society which constantly invents always new and more efficient ways of solving criminal matters which will cause a minimum damage to a juvenile offender, and achieve the purpose that is reflected in the strengthening of its personal responsibility for its actions. In this sense, a special place occupies the application of educational orders that can achieve its purpose only if there is a complete legal regulation of their use (law and regulations and systematically provided logistics. Imposition and implementation of educational orders is directly related to the examination of juvenile's personality and a special attention has been paid to this issue. In this work, the author deals with educational orders as a diversionary treatment model against juvenile offenders, as well as the implementation of educational orders in the practice of the Higher Public Prosecutor's Office and the High Court in Novi Sad.

  13. HIV/STI Risk Behavior of Drug Court Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Angela A.; St. Lawrence, Janet S.; McCluskey, D. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Drug abusing offenders have high rates of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI). To date, the HIV/STI prevention needs of offenders in drug court programs have been ignored. This multi-method study employed interviews to assess drug court professionals' perceptions of the need for an HIV risk reduction intervention to be integrated…

  14. HIV/STI Risk Behavior of Drug Court Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Angela A.; St. Lawrence, Janet S.; McCluskey, D. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Drug abusing offenders have high rates of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI). To date, the HIV/STI prevention needs of offenders in drug court programs have been ignored. This multi-method study employed interviews to assess drug court professionals' perceptions of the need for an HIV risk reduction intervention to be integrated…

  15. Matching Judicial Supervision to Clients' Risk Status in Drug Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Douglas B.; Festinger, David S.; Lee, Patricia A.; Dugosh, Karen L.; Benasutti, Kathleen M.

    2006-01-01

    This article reports outcomes from a program of experimental research evaluating the risk principle in drug courts. Prior studies revealed that participants who were high risk and had (a) antisocial personality disorder or (b) a prior history of drug abuse treatment performed better in drug court when scheduled to attend biweekly judicial status…

  16. Employers liability to the international criminal court

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yenifer Yiseth Suárez Díaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The constant changes in the social dynamics due to economic and technological development has brought along the need to dispose of a High Court, with competence over International Crimes. The above was the reason to establish the International Criminal Court, destined to prosecute and punish the maximum responsible for crimes of its jurisdiction. Nonetheless, despite the existence of individual criminal responsibility as an accomplice in the case of entrepreneurs who contribute to the crime, there is not an actual investigation or conviction as such in the Court fase for those individuals. Through a criminological study, the actions in the frame of the criminal policy in international law, in order to hold individual criminal responsibility towards entrepreneurs for international crimes, will be evaluated, from the dogmatic categories established in the international guidelines as well as from international doctrine.

  17. Supreme Court declines to hear California clinic injunction challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-03-21

    On March 17, the United States Supreme Court refused to review "Williams v. Planned Parenthood Shasta-Diablo," a case which challenges a California state court order that requires anti-abortion protestors to remain across the street from a Vallejo clinic. The case first reached the High Court in October 1994, after the California Supreme Court upheld the injunction, and was sent back because of a decision four months earlier in "Madsen v. Women's Health Center," which found that an injunction creating a 36-foot buffer zone around a Florida clinic was constitutional. In July 1995, the California High Court again ruled in favor of the order. Justices Clarence Thomas, Anthony Kennedy, and Antonin Scalia dissented, stating that the Supreme Court should have accepted the case and reversed the state court's decision. Judge Scalia, basing his judgement on a portion of "Madsen" which describes a 300-foot "no-approach" zone around the Florida clinic as an unacceptable restriction on free expression, insisted that the evidence failed to show that the Vallejo protesters were obstructive enough to warrant government interference. Preventing stress and anxiety in patients, a central consideration for the California courts, was not a sufficient reason.

  18. Mathematics year 5 answers

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, Serena; Poggo, Tammy

    2014-01-01

    Features the complete set of answers to the exercises in Mathematics Year 5, to save you time marking work and enable you to identify areas requiring further attention. The book includes diagrams and workings where necessary, to ensure pupils understand how to present their answers. Also available from Galore Park www.galorepark.co.uk :. - Mathematics Year 5. - Mathematics Year 6. - 11+ Maths Practice Exercises. - 11+ Maths Revision Guide. - 10-Minute Maths Tests Workbook Age 8-10. - 10-Minute Maths Tests Workbook Age 9-11. - Mental Arithmetic Workbook Age 8-10. - Mental Arithmetic Workbook Ag

  19. The Answer Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Susan

    2000-01-01

    Discusses information retrieval systems and the need to have them adapt to user needs, integrate information in any format, reveal patterns and trends in information, and answer questions. Topics include statistics and probability; natural language processing; intelligent agents; concept mapping; machine-aided indexing; text mining; filtering;…

  20. No Right Answer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spetz, Steven N.

    1989-01-01

    Argues that the emphasis in law courses on memorizing facts fails to teach the desired concepts of reasoning and problem-solving. Recommends the use of open-book tests. Suggests that because law is an imprecise subject, and there are no right or wrong answers, it should be taught in an open format. (LS)

  1. Flexible Query Answering Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Flexible Query Answering Systems, FQAS 2017, held in London, UK, in June 2017. The 21 full papers presented in this book together with 4 short papers were carefully reviewed and selected from 43 submissions...

  2. Intercultural pragmatics and court interpreting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Bente

    2008-01-01

    . The court interpreters are all state-authorized court interpreters and thus fully competent professionals.   The centrality of pragmatics in triadic speech events has been demonstrated by a number of studies (e.g. Berk-Seligson 2002, Hale 2004, Jacobsen 2002). Thus, conversational implicatures, which...

  3. Discourse Routines in Answering Machine Communication in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddicoat, Anthony

    1994-01-01

    Investigates the conventions that govern telephone communication through answering machines, both domestic and institutional. Finds that talk on answering machines is highly structured and highly routinized. Identifies the internal structures of both callers' contributions and machine contributions. (SR)

  4. High-throughput sample-to-answer detection of DNA/RNA in crude samples within functionalized micro-pipette tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wenjing; Wang, Jidong; Wu, Qiong; Sun, Jiashu; Chen, Yiping; Zhang, Lu; Zheng, Chunsheng; Gao, Wenna; Liu, Yi; Jiang, Xingyu

    2016-01-15

    We develop a micro-pipette tip-based nucleic acid test (MTNT) for high-throughput sample-to-answer detection of both DNA and RNA from crude samples including cells, bacteria, and solid plants, without the need of sample pretreatment and complex operation. MTNT consists of micro-pipette tips and embedded solid phase nucleic acid extraction membranes, and fully integrates the functions of nucleic acid extraction from crude samples, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) of nucleic acids, and visual readout of assays. The total assaying time for DNA or RNA from a variety of crude samples ranges from 90 to 160 min. The limit of detection (LOD) of MTNT is 2 copies of plasmids containing the target nucleic acid fragments of Ebola virus, and 8 CFU of Escherichia coli carrying Ebola virus-derived plasmids. MTNT can also detect CK-19 mRNA from as few as 2 cancer cells without complicated procedures such as RNA extraction and purification. We further demonstrate MTNT in a high-throughput format using an eight-channel pipette and a homemade mini-heater, with a maximum throughput of 40 samples. Compared with other point-of-care (POC) nucleic acid tests (NAT), MTNT could assay both DNA and RNA directly from liquid (cells/bacteria/blood) or solid (plant) samples in a straightforward, sensitive, high-throughput, and containment-free manner, suggesting a considerable promise for low-cost and POC NAT in remote areas.

  5. Performance Assessment in Courts - The Swiss Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Lienhard

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Performance assessments have become commonplace in management, even in the public sector. With the increasing pressure on courts to perform while making efficient use of resources, performance assessments in the justice system are also gaining in importance. However, the need for judicial independence poses special challenges for performance assessments in courts. Against this background, this article conducts a constitutional appraisal, and contrasts the need for judicial independence with the principles governing effectiveness and efficiency, self-government and supervision, and appointment and re-appointment. A duty to guarantee justice can be derived from this that does not in principle exclude the performance assessment of judges, but even renders it essential, subject to compliance with certain requirements. In these circumstances, it seems hardly surprising that numerous countries conduct performance assessments of judges and also that various international institutions have developed principles for this purpose, a summary of which is presented – in Switzerland’s case based on a recently conducted survey. In the field of conflict between the guaranteeing justice and protecting the judiciary, the following key questions arise in particular: What is the purpose of performance assessments and what are the consequences?What is subjected to a performance assessment and what are the assessment criteria?How is performance recorded as the basis for the performance assessment?Who is subjected to a performance assessment, and must a distinction be made between judges in higher and lower courts?Who carries out the performance assessment and what methods of protecting one’s rights are available?Who should receive the results of the performance assessment?The contribution sketches out possible answers to these key questions and aims to encourage academics and practitioners to give further consideration to this subject.

  6. Chinese court case fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Toft

    2011-01-01

    Western history of crime fiction usually designates Edgar Allan Poe as the undisputed father of the detective story. Crime fiction is, hence, generally associated with incipient modernity and modern societies and cityscapes. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle even asks: Where was the detective story until Po...... sinological sources introducing a revised introduction of crime fiction on the world’s literary scene. So to answer Doyle’s question about crime fiction before Poe: Crime fiction may have been in China....

  7. Bias in collegiate courts

    OpenAIRE

    Olowofoyeku, AA

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the issues attending common law collegiate courts’ engagements with allegations of bias within their own ranks. It will be argued that, in such cases, it would be inappropriate to involve the collegiate panel or any member thereof in the decision, since such involvement inevitably encounters difficulties. The common law’s dilemmas require drastic solutions, but the common law arguably is illequipped to implement the required change. The answer, it will be argued, is ...

  8. Evaluating Court Performance: Findings from Two Italian Courts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Lepore

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is part of a wider research project aimed at developing and testing a Performance Measurement System (PMS for courts based on a Balanced Scorecard (BSC framework. The current study represents an initial effort to describe results of a performance measurement attempt that may suggest some challenges in developing a comprehensive PMS for courts. We have tried to assess the performance in two Italian courts focusing on three issues: efficiency measures (clearance rates, case turnover, and disposition time, culture assessment, and Information Systems (IS success. Our findings provide some useful and interesting insight for researchers and practitioners.

  9. A Witty Answer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秀军

    2005-01-01

    One hot summer day, a student in a sweat, fanning himself with a book, asked his teacher, "It's rather hot in the classroom. May I wear shorts while having classes, Sir?" "It doesn't matter whether you wear shorts or not, but I must let you know, when you enter the classroom, you must wear a pair of trousers," he teacher replied.A Witty Answer!河北@王秀军

  10. Competition: the answers

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    The correct answers to the Staff Association Competition are: How many women delegates are there currently in the Staff Council? -14 Who is the current President of the Staff Association? - Alessandro Raimondo Which year was the Nursery School established by the Staff Association at CERN?  -1965 How many CERN clubs are supported by the Staff Association? -44 What is the supreme representative body of the Staff Association ? -The Staff Council   The winners will be informed by email.

  11. Court Remands as a Percentage of New Court Cases Filed

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — Longitudinal report detailing the numbers and percentages of court remand actions received during each Fiscal Year 2010 - onward as compared to the total number of...

  12. Answers to modernity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Karen Bjerg

    2008-01-01

    In his book The consequences of modernity, the British sociologist Giddens predicts e-learning environments. He emphasises that 'modernity is inherently globalising' creating 'disembedded' social relations and tearing 'space away form place by fostering relations between "absent" others...... - teacher, learner or curriculum planner positions - result in different strategies or 'answers to modernity'. The research has taken place as a study of e-learning and virtual teachhing of Danish as a second language for adults. The fact that relations in virtual learning are established between physically...

  13. First Year at Somerset Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgar, Sybil

    1975-01-01

    Twenty-three autistic adolescents are currently being provided with individualized programs of education, social and work experience at Somerset Court, the first British residential center of its kind. (LH)

  14. An Ever More Powerful Court?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsen, Dorte Sindbjerg

    Scholars generally agree that courts are powerful authorities in settling disputes between parties, but the broader political impact of such resolution is disputed. Are courts powerful generators of political change? This book examines the ability of the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU...... on the basis of a careful examination of how judicial–legislative interactions determine the scope and limits of European integration in the daily EU decision-making processes. The legislative impact of Court rulings is traced by the use of original data over time from 1957 to 2014 and through three case...... from a continuous interplay between law and politics, but one where the interpretations, perceptions, and interests of political actors and governing majorities matter for judicial influence on policies. Despite fragmentation of EU politics, politicians can modify and sometimes reject judicial...

  15. "California v. Greenwood" Moot Court Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Diana

    1989-01-01

    Provides a moot court activity in which secondary students re-enact the U.S. Supreme Court case "California v. Greenwood," concerning the exclusionary rule and the privacy of a citizen's trash. Students role-play Supreme Court justices and attorneys to gain an understanding of how appellate courts operate. (LS)

  16. Three Years of Teen Court Offender Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgays, Deborah Kirby

    2008-01-01

    Since 1983, Teen Courts have offered a judicial alternative for many adolescent offenders. In the first year of the Whatcom County Teen Court Program, a small sample of Teen Court offenders had more favorable outcomes than did Court Diversion offenders. In the current study, the results are based on a three-year sample of 84 Whatcom County…

  17. Court interpreting and pragmatic meaning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Bente

    In Denmark, court interpreters are required to deliver verbatim translations of speakers' originals and to refrain from transferring pragmatic meaning. Yet, as this paper demonstrates, pragmatic meaning is central to courtroom interaction.......In Denmark, court interpreters are required to deliver verbatim translations of speakers' originals and to refrain from transferring pragmatic meaning. Yet, as this paper demonstrates, pragmatic meaning is central to courtroom interaction....

  18. Mathematics for common entrance three (extension) answers

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, Serena

    2015-01-01

    This book contains answers to all exercises featured in the accompanying textbook Mathematics for Common Entrance Three (Extension) , which provides essential preparation for Level 3 of the ISEB 13+ Mathematics exam, as well as for CASE and other scholarship exams. - Clean, clear layout for easy marking. - Includes examples of high-scoring answers with diagrams and workings. Also available to purchase from the Galore Park website www.galorepark.co.uk :. - Mathematics for Common Entrance Three (Extension). - Mathematics for Common Entrance One. - Mathematics for Common Entrance One Answers. - M

  19. Alcohol Use and HIV Risk among Juvenile Drug Court Offenders

    OpenAIRE

    Tolou-Shams, Marina; Houck, Christopher D.; Nugent, Nicole; Conrad, Selby M.; REYES, AYANARIS; Brown, Larry K.

    2012-01-01

    Juvenile drug courts (JDC) largely focus on marijuana and other drug use interventions. Yet, JDC offenders engage in other high-risk behaviors, such as alcohol use and sexual risk behaviors, which can compromise their health, safety and drug court success. An examination of alcohol use and sexual risk behaviors among 52 male substance abusing young offenders found that over 50% were using alcohol, 37% reported current marijuana use and one-third of all sexual intercourse episodes were unprote...

  20. The Moderating Influence of International Courts on Social Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieder, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Feminists and religious conservatives across the globe have increasingly turned to courts in their battles over abortion. Yet while a significant literature analyzes legal mobilization on abortion issues, it tends to focus predominantly on domestic scenarios. In this article, we consider the effects of this contentious engagement of pro-choice and anti-abortion movements in international human rights fora, asking what happens to social movement claims when they reach international human rights courts. We answer the question through a detailed description of a single case, Gretel Artavia Murillo et al. v. Costa Rica, decided by the Inter-American Court of Human Rights in 2012 but with ongoing repercussions for abortion rights, given its authoritative interpretation of embryonic right to life. Through our analysis of Artavia Murillo, we show how legal mobilization before international human rights courts moderates social movement claims within the legal arena, as rivals respond to one another and argue within the frame of courts’ norms and language. PMID:28630548

  1. Trial by Jury in Russian Military Courts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolai P. Kovalev

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available One of peculiar features of the military criminal justice system in Russia is that in some cases military defendants may apply for trial by jury. Unlike the existing U.S. court-martial jury and the Russian military jury of the early 1900s (World War I period which were comprised of the members of the armed forces, in modern Russia jurors trying military defendants are civilians. This article aims to provide a brief history of military jury in Russia and identify issues of independence and impartiality in Russian military courts with participation of lay decision-makers. In particular, the article will analyze two high-profile cases which resulted in acquittals of Russian officers accused of killing several Chechen civilians during counter-terrorist operations in Chechnya.

  2. Avoiding the Complex History, Simple Answer Syndrome: A Lesson Plan for Providing Depth and Analysis in the High School History Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Examining history from the perspective of investigators who wrestle with involved scenarios for which no simple answers exist, or from which no obvious conclusions can be drawn, allows students to understand the historiographic process and the complex nature of historical events, while gaining valuable practice in applying analytical and critical…

  3. Teen Court: A National Movement. Technical Assistance Bulletin No. 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nessel, Paula A.

    Teen courts have gained in popularity in the 1990s. These courts include youth courts, peer juries, peer courts, student courts, and other courts using juveniles to determine the sentences of juvenile offenders. The courts issue sentences that are carried out in a school or community setting and generally involve community service, jury duty,…

  4. Teen Courts and Law-Related Education. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nessel, Paula A.

    Teen courts have gained in popularity in the 1990s. These courts include youth courts, peer juries, peer courts, student courts, and other courts using juveniles to determine the sentences of juvenile offenders. The courts issue sentences that are carried out in a school or community setting and generally involve community service, jury duty,…

  5. Supreme Court to hear Florida clinic access case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-04-15

    On April 27, 1994, the US Supreme Court will review a Florida Supreme Court decision ensuring access to women's health clinics that offer abortion services. In October 1993, the Florida High Court determined that an order issued by Brevard/Seminole County Circuit Judge Robert McGregor that requires anti-abortion protestors to remain 36 feet from the clinic grounds, prohibits approaching any clinic patient within 300 feet of the facility, bars excessive noise during clinic hours, and creates a 300 foot safety zone around the homes of clinic staff was reasonable. Anti-abortion activists had challenged Judge McGregor's injunction, maintaining that it violated their First Amendment rights and was overboard. Days before the Florida High Court ruling, however, the US Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit had rejected Judge McGregor's injunction as unconstitutional. Although the appeal to the US Supreme Court, Madsen vs Women's Health Center, was filed by anti-abortion activists, pro-choice groups are supporting the review as a means of resolving the confusion created by conflicting state and federal rulings.

  6. An Ever More Powerful Court?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsen, Dorte Sindbjerg

    ) to foster political change for a European Union (EU) social policy, including healthcare. The conventional assumption is that a strong causal link exists between legal and political integration in the EU, in which Court rulings progress and shape European integration. The book challenges this view...... on the basis of a careful examination of how judicial–legislative interactions determine the scope and limits of European integration in the daily EU decision-making processes. The legislative impact of Court rulings is traced by the use of original data over time from 1957 to 2014 and through three case...

  7. English as a Court Language in Continental Courts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Kern (Cristoph)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Most recently, several countries on the European continent have admitted, or are discussing to admit, English as an optional court language. This article provides some information about the background of these recent initiatives, projects and reforms, clarifies the idea

  8. Crocus sativus Petals: Waste or Valuable Resource? The Answer of High-Resolution and High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righi, Valeria; Parenti, Francesca; Tugnoli, Vitaliano; Schenetti, Luisa; Mucci, Adele

    2015-09-30

    Intact Crocus sativus petals were studied for the first time by high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HR-MAS NMR) spectroscopy, revealing the presence of kinsenoside (2) and goodyeroside A (3), together with 3-hydroxy-γ-butyrolactone (4). These findings were confirmed by HR-NMR analysis of the ethanol extract of fresh petals and showed that, even though carried out rapidly, partial hydrolysis of glucopyranosyloxybutanolides occurs during extraction. On the other hand, kaempferol 3-O-sophoroside (1), which is "NMR-silent" in intact petals, is present in extracts. These results suggest to evaluate the utilization of saffron petals for phytopharmaceutical and nutraceutical purposes to exploit a waste product of massive production of commercial saffron and point to the application of HR-MAS NMR for monitoring bioactive compounds directly on intact petals, avoiding the extraction procedure and the consequent hydrolysis reaction.

  9. Beyond court digitalization with ODR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dory Reiling

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available “I felt so sorry for you, such a lovely tool, and then you have no users!” This was one of the comments after my presentation of the eKantonrechter at ODR2016, organized by HIIL in the Hague in May 2016. ODR, online dispute resolution, was presented as a tool to solve all problems in the 4th Trend Report by HIIL after the conference. A weblog, however, commented that ODR had raised hopes in its early promoters, but had not really taken off. ODR is a tool to help parties in de dispute resolve their problem. There are various examples of ODR tool: supporting double blind bidding to determine a sum of money, working out divorce settlements, negotiating a solution and taking a case to court. Interesting research questions abound in the area of ODR and its users: What paths do people take when trying to resolve a problem? How can people have ownership of their court procedure? How can solutions, ODR and court procedures, best be tailored to the type of problem? The article describes the development of the e-Kantonrechter, a digital small claims procedure, as an example. ODR and its users is a field in which law and society researchers can effectively contribute to improving digital problem solving and dispute resolution procedures in court.

  10. Introduction: Staying Out of Court

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van Swaaningen (René)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe ways court procedures can be avoided is a classical theme in socio-legal studies and criminology. The preface to a book published on that theme by the Erasmus School of Law in 1988, on the occasion of its 25th anniversary, covers the then dominant view very well: ‘They [people who ad

  11. International Justice through Domestic Courts:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Yi Shin

    2015-01-01

    of Human Rights immediately followed with an opposing view in the Araguaia case, declaring that the amnesty law lacks effect under the American Convention on Human Rights. Brazilian society now faces an unprecedented challenge: can it expect its domestic courts to implement such international obligations...

  12. Pragmatics in Court Interpreting: Additions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Bente

    2003-01-01

    Danish court interpreters are expected to follow ethical guidelines, which instruct them to deliver exact verbatim versions of source texts. However, this requirement often clashes with the reality of the interpreting situation in the courtroom. This paper presents and discusses the findings of a...... of an investigation regarding one kind of interpreter modification in particular: additions. The investigation was undertaken for a doctoral thesis....

  13. Juvenile Courts. Creation and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat GONZÁLEZ FERNÁNDEZ

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the creation of Juvenile or Children's Courts in Spain, analysing their reasons and aims, as well as the ethical and political connotations present on their way of acting. Their history and the one of the institutions that complement them is built from the legislation, writings and ideas of their promoters.

  14. The Camera Comes to Court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floren, Leola

    After the Lindbergh kidnapping trial in 1935, the American Bar Association sought to eliminate electronic equipment from courtroom proceedings. Eventually, all but two states adopted regulations applying that ban to some extent, and a 1965 Supreme Court decision encouraged the banning of television cameras at trials as well. Currently, some states…

  15. Introduction: Staying Out of Court

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van Swaaningen (René)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe ways court procedures can be avoided is a classical theme in socio-legal studies and criminology. The preface to a book published on that theme by the Erasmus School of Law in 1988, on the occasion of its 25th anniversary, covers the then dominant view very well: ‘They [people who ad

  16. Student Rights and the Courts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Educational Management, Eugene, OR.

    This chapter of "The Best of the Best of ERIC" contains 17 annotations of documents and journal articles on student rights and the courts, all of which are indexed in the ERIC system. Materials on sex discrimination, suspension and expulsion, due process, mainstreaming, school publications, and other topics are annotated. (DS)

  17. A Ban on Prior Restraint in High Schools: The Aftermath of the "Fujishima" Decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trager, Robert; Dickerson, Donna L.

    After a unique court decision forbidding prior restraint in public high school publications in three states, a study was devised based on the responses to individual questionnaires sent to principals, faculty advisers, and student editors in each of the schools in the judicial district involved in the decision. Respondents answered questions…

  18. Getting an Answer Right

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John W.

    1999-07-01

    really is.) Or we could ask students to make careful observations as an experiment is being carried out and then decide whether the proposed interpretation was correct. (If the only effect of burning a candle in a beaker inverted in a water bath is to use up the oxygen, then the water should rise slowly and steadily into the beaker as long as the candle burns; it does not.) Getting the right answer is not nearly as important as getting an answer right- exploring and experimenting to eliminate alternative hypotheses and finding the best-supported explanation. Diffusion and the fraction of oxygen in air can be studied with simple, inexpensive equipment, and it is easy for students to experiment with them. If we use them appropriately, these two subjects have great potential for enhancing students' skills in critical thinking and experimental design. Many other phenomena reported in these pages provide similar opportunities. Let's apply our ingenuity and effort to making the most of them. Literature Cited 1. Parsons, L. J. Chem. Educ. 1999, 76, 898. 2. Birk, J. P.; Lawson, A. E. J. Chem. Educ. 1999, 76, 914. 3. Mason, E. A.; Kronstadt, B. J. Chem. Educ. 1967, 44, 740. Kirk, A. D. J. Chem. Educ. 1967, 44, 745. 4. Davis, L. C. J. Chem. Educ. 1996, 73, 824. 5. Westbrook, S.; Marek, E. A. J. Res. Sci. Teach. 1991, 28, 649-660 6. Birk, J. P.; McGrath, L.; Gunter, S. K. J. Chem. Educ. 1981, 58, 804.

  19. Drug-Exposed Infant Cases in Juvenile Court: Risk Factors and Court Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagatun-Edwards, Inger; Saylor, Coleen

    2000-01-01

    This longitudinal study of social services and juvenile court files identified factors associated with court outcomes for drug exposed infants (N=118). Regression analysis suggested that mothers' compliance with court orders was the major predictor of court outcomes although chi square analysis found ethnicity, past referrals, and criminal record…

  20. The Court in the Homeric Epos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loginov, Alexandr

    2016-01-01

    The research investigates the court system in Homeric Greece. This period was characterized by a declining culture and scarce works that described those times. Hence, the court procedures of those times remains understudied; therefore, the purpose of this research is to reconstruct theoretically the court procedure in Homeric Greece. Homer's and…

  1. Some considerations of authority of the courts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žaklina Harašić

    2015-06-01

    We are showing that some solutions of Croatian lawmaker means exception from the principle of European-continental law in which decisions of higher courts binds lower courts because of their quality, so there are some types of binding decisions of higher courts which have “de facto” effect of precedents.

  2. Court Decisions Go Online in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    A website has been initiated by the BeijingHigher People's Court to help people search andreview the documents of judicial decisions onintellectual property rights(IPR)cases handled bythe courts in Beijing at various levels.A chief judge from the Beijing Higher People'sCourt said that all of the judicial documents of the

  3. THE MANY FACES OF STRICT SCRUTINY: HOW THE SUPREME COURT CHANGES THE RULES IN RACE CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan Gerstmann

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we argue that there is no single test called strict scrutiny when the Court considers claims of racial discrimination. In fact, the Court changes the rules depending on why and how the government is using race. By examining racial redistricting, remedial affirmative action, and diversity-based affirmative action cases, we show how the Court uses at least three verydifferent versions of strict scrutiny. The costs of maintaining the fiction of unitary strict scrutiny is high. In the area of racial profiling, for example, courts refuse to apply strict scrutiny for fear that it will either overly hamper police or will weaken strict scrutiny in other areas of racial discrimination. An open acknowledgment that the Court is already using different standards of analysis for different types of racial discrimination would allow courts to craft appropriate standards without fear of diminishing protections in other areas.

  4. When Should Neuroimaging be Applied in the Criminal Court?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    When does neuroimaging constitute a sufficiently developed technology to be put into use in the work of determining whether or not a defendant is guilty of crime? This question constitutes the starting point of the present paper. First, it is suggested that an overall answer is provided by what...... is referred to as the “ideal comparative view.” Secondly, it is—on the ground of this view—argued that the answer as to whether neuroimaging technology should be applied presupposes penal theoretical considerations. Thirdly, it is argued that the retributivist theory of punishment is not well......-suited for delivering the sort of theoretical guidance that is required for assessing the desirability of using neuroimaging in the work of the criminal court....

  5. Question Answering for Collaborative Learning with Answer Quality Predictor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Arai

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing advances of Internet Technologies in all application domains have changed life styles and interactions. With the rapid development of E-Learning, collaborative learning is an important for teaching, learning methods and strategies. Studies over the years shown that students had actively and more interactively involved in a classroom discussion to gain their knowledge. Students can ask their questions to the classroom discussion when they want to collaborate with others, asking one another for information, evaluating one another’s ideas. Therein, the activity allowing one question has many answer or information that should be selected. Every answer has a weighting and its very subjective to select it. In this paper, we introduce question answering for collaborative learning with answer quality predictor. By using answer quality predictor the quality of the information could be determined. Through the process of collaborative learning, the knowledge base will be enriched for future question answering. Further, not only the student could get answers form others but also provided by the system.

  6. The Special Court for Sierra Leone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Ciara Therése

    2004-01-01

    The focus of this article is the Special Court for Sierra Leone and the extent to which it can be said that the Special Court has already challenged, or will, in the future, challenge the tradition of impunity for gender-based crimes. In this regard, an analysis is undertaken of the Special Court......'s Statute, Rules of Procedure and Evidence and practice to date, in order to determine its treatment of gender-based crimes and whether it can be said that the Special Court for Sierra Leone challenges the tradition of impunity for gender-based crimes. Udgivelsesdato: december 2004...

  7. Performance evaluation of court in construction claims settlement of litigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayati, Kemala; Latief, Yusuf; Rarasati, Ayomi Dita; Siddik, Arief

    2017-06-01

    Claim construction has a major influence on the implementation of projects, such as the cost and time. The success of the construction project is highly dependent on the effective resolution of claims. Although it has been recognized that litigation or court is not the best way because it may reduce or eliminate profits and damage the relationship, it is a method of resolving claims and disputes that is common in the world of construction. The method of resolving claims and disputes through litigation or court may solve the problem in an alternative method, namely the implementation of the judgment which can be enforced effectively against the losing party and the ruling which has the force of law of the country where the claims and disputes are examined. However, litigation or court may take longer time and require high cost. Thus, it is necessary to identify factors affecting the performance of the court and to develop a system capable of improving an existing system in order to run more effectively and efficiently. Resolution in the claims management of construction projects with the method of litigation is a procedure that can be used by the courts in order to shorten the time in order to reduce the cost. The scope of this research is directed to all parties involved in the construction, both the owners and the contractors as implementers and practitioners, as well as experts who are experienced in construction law.

  8. Science for common entrance physics : answers

    CERN Document Server

    Pickering, W R

    2015-01-01

    This book contains answers to all exercises featured in the accompanying textbook Science for Common Entrance: Physics , which covers every Level 1 and 2 topic in the ISEB 13+ Physics Common Entrance exam syllabus. - Clean, clear layout for easy marking. - Includes examples of high-scoring answers with diagrams and workings. - Suitable for ISEB 13+ Mathematics Common Entrance exams taken from Autumn 2017 onwards. Also available to purchase from the Galore Park website www.galorepark.co.uk :. - Science for Common Entrance: Physics. - Science for Common Entrance: Biology. - Science for Common En

  9. Mathematics for common entrance one answers

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, Serena

    2015-01-01

    Enables efficient assessment of pupils' performance at Levels 1 and 2 of the ISEB 13+ Common Entrance syllabus. Clear layout saves time marking work and identifies areas requiring further attention. Includes diagrams and working where necessary, to demonstrate how to present high-scoring answers in Level 1 and 2 exams

  10. Mathematics for common entrance two answers

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, Serena

    2015-01-01

    Enables efficient assessment of pupils' performance at Levels 1 and 2 of the ISEB 13+ Common Entrance syllabus. Clear layout saves time marking work and identifies areas requiring further attention. Includes diagrams and working where necessary, to demonstrate how to present high-scoring answers in Level 1 and 2 exams.

  11. National Courts and EU Law

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    approaches and theories originating from law, political science, sociology and economics. The first section addresses issues relating to judicial dialogue and EU legal mandates, the second looks at the topic of EU law in national courts and the third considers national courts’ roles in protecting fundamental...... rights in the area of freedom, security and justice. The analysis of each is enriched through diverse research methods such as case-law analysis, citation network analysis, interviews, surveys and statistics. With its new legal and empirical assessment covering the newest member states of the EU......, National Courts and EU Law will hold strong appeal for scholars and students in the fields of EU law, social sciences and humanities. It will also be of use to legal practitioners interested in the issue of judicial application of EU law....

  12. An Ever More Powerful Court?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsen, Dorte Sindbjerg

    ) to foster political change for a European Union (EU) social policy, including healthcare. The conventional assumption is that a strong causal link exists between legal and political integration in the EU, in which Court rulings progress and shape European integration. The book challenges this view...... on the basis of a careful examination of how judicial–legislative interactions determine the scope and limits of European integration in the daily EU decision-making processes. The legislative impact of Court rulings is traced by the use of original data over time from 1957 to 2014 and through three case...... studies: EU working time regulation, patients’ rights in cross-border healthcare, and regulation of the posting of workers. The book finds that EU legislative politics has the capacity to condition the more general impact of legal integration. It demonstrates how the broader reach of jurisprudence results...

  13. IS YES the ANSWER???

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Do you want to teach English in a non-English-speaking country?Do you want to find a highly paid job? Do you want to experience life in a different culture? Do you want to have everlasting memories? A TEFL certificate can make your dreams come true!!!

  14. Chinese Judge At WTO Court

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    China had its first judge appointed to the World Trade Organization (WTO) when the world body recently selected four senior jus- tices to its seven-people Appellate Body—top court.Lawyer Zhang Yuejiao was one of the four appointed on November 27 by the Dispute Settlement Body (DSB) for a four-year term.Her tenure will commence on June 1,2008.

  15. [Urology facing the courts. The basis of professional responsibility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haertig, A; Haillot, O; Chopin, G

    1989-01-01

    The liability of the urologist can be involved according to 3 procedures: The civil procedure is that of the Tribunal de Grande Instance (High Court) then the Cour d'Appel (Court of Appeal). Financial compensations are claimed from the surgeon for not respecting the medical contact. This contract is tacit, oral and carries obligations for the surgeon. The administrative procedure is that of the Tribunal Administratif (Administrative Court) then the Conseil d'Etat (Council of State). This only concerns the salaried surgeon in his salaried activities. The penal procedure is that of the Tribunal Correctionnel (Criminal Court) then the Cour d'Appel (Court of Appeal). The surgeon is then charged with a crime, usually unintensional injuries or through negligence. Although the harlm is easy to prove, the reality of the fault of the surgeon and the relation between fault and damage are far less so. It is the plaintiff (Civil Course, Administrative Cours) or the State Prosecutor (Penal Course) who must prove the fault and causality by the help of an expert's report. So, the responsibility of the surgeon can be committed. However, the development of the insurance system has allowed more widespread compensation without any fault found on the surgeon's part and increasingly frequent conciliatory procedures.

  16. Antibiotic Resistance Questions and Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on the Farm Get Smart About Antibiotics Week Antibiotic Resistance Questions and Answers Language: English (US) Español ( ... Many ear infections Top of Page Questions about Antibiotic Resistance Examples of How Antibiotic Resistance Spreads Click for ...

  17. Cooperative Answering of Fuzzy Queries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Narjes Hachani; Mohamed Ali Ben Hassine; Hanène Chettaoui; Habib Ounelli

    2009-01-01

    The majority of existing information systems deals with crisp data through crisp database systems. Traditional Database Management Systems (DBMS) have not taken into account imprecision so one can say there is some sort of lack of flexibility. The reason is that queries retrieve only elements which precisely match to the given Boolean query. That is, an element belongs to the result if the query is true for this element; otherwise, no answers are returned to the user. The aim of this paper is to present a cooperative approach to handling empty answers of fuzzy conjunctive queries by referring to the Formal Concept Analysis (FCA) theory and fuzzy logic. We present an architecture which combines FCA and databases. The processing of fuzzy queries allows detecting the minimal reasons of empty answers. We also use concept lattice in order to provide the user with the nearest answers in the case of a query failure.

  18. HPV Vaccine - Questions and Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Media Resources News Newsletters Events Redirect for HPV Vaccine FAQ Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... to the address below. http://www.cdc.gov/hpv/parents/questions-answers.html File Formats Help: How ...

  19. Instance-Based Question Answering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    included factoid questions grouped around a set of target entities. For example, for the target entity “ Franz Kafka ”, associated questions included: “Where...from Franz Schubert. A year later he did on Dec 5th.”). Depending on the task, an answer extractor may identify very small, factoid candidates which...IWP): Paraphrase Ac- quisition and Applications, 2003. [55] A. Ittycheriah, M. Franz , and S. Roukos. Ibm’s statistical question answering system - trec

  20. Data logger device applicability for wheelchair tennis court movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindall, Paul; Lenton, John; Cooper, Rory; Tolfrey, Keith; Goosey-Tolfrey, Vicky

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of movement logging devices is required to ensure suitability for the determination of court-movement variables during competitive sports performance and allow for practical recommendations to be made. Hence, the purpose was to examine wheelchair tennis speed profiles to assess data logger device applicability for court-movement quantification, with match play stratified by rank (HIGH, LOW), sex (male, female) and format (singles, doubles). Thirty-one wheelchair tennis players were monitored during competitive match play. Mixed sampling was employed (male = 23, female = 8). Friedman's test with Wilcoxon signed-rank post hoc testing revealed a higher percentage of time below 2.5 m · s(-1) [tennis match play are consistent with data logger accuracy. Hence, data logging is appropriate for court-movement quantification.

  1. The privileges and immunities of international organizations in domestic courts

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    International organizations are increasingly operating across borders and engaging in legal transactions in virtually all jurisdictions. This makes, familiarity with the applicable law and practice imperative for both international organizations and those who engage in legal relations with them. Furthermore, the issue of whether, how, and to what extent domestic courts take into account decisions of foreign and international courts and tribunals in their own decision-making has become increasingly important in recent years. This book provides a comprehensive empirical study of this transnational judicial dialogue, focusing on the law and practice of domestic jurisdictions concerning the legal personality, privileges, and immunities of international organizations. It presents a selection of detailed country-by-country studies, examining the manner of judicial dialogue across domestic jurisdictions, and between national and international courts. The approach taken in this book intersects with three highly topi...

  2. Will the International Criminal Court Investigate Mexico's "Drug War"?

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Caballero, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    The violence of Mexico's so-called "war on drugs" has caught the attention of the international community, with calls for the International Criminal Court (ICC) to turn its attention to the country. If they're successful, high-level government officials - or even leaders of drug trafficking organizations - may be prosecuted in the Hague. But it's a difficult road ahead.

  3. International organizations before national courts

    CERN Document Server

    Reinisch, August

    2000-01-01

    This book presents a radical, empirical investigation of how national courts "react" to disputes involving international organizations, analyzing in particular whether such organizations should be immune to national jurisdictions. Under the headings "domestic legal personality" and "immunity" of international organizations, some of the issues covered have already been treated in international legal scholarship, mostly in the form of short articles or case notes. This study, however, provides a thorough comparative analysis and the largest compilation of relevant decisions on the subject, making it indispensable for practitioners as well as academics in the field.

  4. The handy astronomy answer book

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, PhD, Charles

    2013-01-01

    From planetary movements and the exploration of our solar system to black holes and dark matter, this comprehensive reference simplifies all aspects of astronomy with an approachable question-and-answer format. With chapters broken into various astronomical studies—including the universe, galaxies, planets, and space exploration—this fully updated resource is an ideal companion for students, teachers, and amateur astronomers, answering more than 1,00 questions, such as Is the universe infinite? What would happen to you if you fell onto a black hole? What are the basic concepts of Einstein''s s

  5. The Impact of Teen Court on Young Offenders. Research Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butts, Jeffrey A.; Buck, Janeen; Coggeshall, Mark B.

    This paper reports findings from the Evaluation of Teen Courts Project, which studied teen courts in Alaska, Arizona, Maryland, and Missouri. Researchers measured pre-court attitudes and post-court (6-month) recidivism among more than 500 juveniles referred to teen court for nonviolent offenses. The study compared recidivism outcomes for teen…

  6. Victimological aspects of court judgments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bačanović Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this paper is the review of the results of the research: „Analysis of judgments form the victimological aspect“ of the Basic court Skopje I in Skopje. It is the first research of it’s kind in the Republic of Macedonia, conducted by the project team of the Faculty of Security in Skopje in the period from January to April 2011. By using the content analysis (for this purpose a special instrument was developed 172 irrevocable court judgment brought in the period 2005-2010 were analyzed, for the following criminal offences: murder, crimes against sexual freedom and sexual morality (sexual assault, severe bodily injuries and insult. The aim of the research was to highlight the victimological dimensions of mentioned criminal offences, while special attention was paid to the role of a victim in a crime, victim‘ s interaction with the perpetrator, individual characteristics of the victim, as well as the characteristics of the time when and the space where the crime occurred.

  7. Status of Court Management in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Lienhard

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available At an international level, and in particular in the Anglo-American region, there is a long tradition of scientific study of court management. Thus in Australia there has for quite some time been the Australasian Institution of Judicial Administration (AIJA, which concerns itself with every aspect of court administration. In the USA too, research and education in the field of court management has been institutionalized for a long time, in particular by the National Center for State Courts (NCSC and the related Institute for Court Management (ICM. In Europe, a working group known as the European Commission for the Efficiency of Justice (CEPEJ deals with issues of court management as part of the activities of the Council of Europe. The fact that court management is also increasingly becoming an important topic in the European area was demonstrated by the establishment, in 2008, of a new professional journal that focuses on court management, the International Journal for Court Administration (IJCA. In Switzerland, the issue of court management was discussed for the first time in the course of the New Public Management (NPM projects in the cantons, but was often limited to the question of whether to include the courts in the relevant cantonal NPM model. Generally speaking, court management was a matter that was only sporadically raised, such as at a symposium of the Swiss Society of Administrative Sciences (SSAS in 2003 or more recently in an article in which theses on good court management are formulated. In Switzerland even today there is a general dearth of empirical and other theoretical findings on the mode of operation of the justice system and its interaction with society, or with specific social target groups. For example, it was only in 2009 that the first indications were obtained of how cases in various categories were handled by the highest administrative and social insurance courts in Switzerland. In the fields of criminal and civil

  8. Hydroelectricity - An Answer To Energy Needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francois-Xausa, Maryse; Havard, David; Czerwinski, Francois; Teller, Olivier

    2010-09-15

    The energy challenges of the next 30 years appear daunting and, in certain cases, in conflict with one another. Their complexity is such that one solution alone cannot provide a full answer. It is nevertheless equally clear that hydro-electricity, being renewable, proven, highly efficient, storable and with still very significant resource potential, possesses a unique combination of attributes which will aid decision-makers to plan and execute energy development with confidence.

  9. Supreme Court Biographies as a Classroom Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, John Paul

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author goes beyond Supreme Court decisions to investigate the upbringing and personalities of three Supreme Court justices who left their mark on history: Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., Thurgood Marshall, and Sandra Day O'Connor. His interviews with their biographers, G. Edward White for Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., Juan Williams…

  10. The Supreme Court in the Culture Wars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabkin, Jeremy

    1996-01-01

    Argues that the U.S. Supreme Court has been an active and liberally biased participant in the U.S. culture war. Historical evidence is presented, including areas of tuition tax credit and segregated private schools, abortion and the Right-to-Life movement, and prayer in public schools. The author discusses how the Supreme Court has strengthened…

  11. 28 JURISDICTION OF THE INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fr. Ikenga

    Page | 29. EBOIBI: Jurisdiction of The International Criminal Court: Analysis, Loopholes and Challenges ... as it may be affected by the effects or passage of time. The right to ... force, the Court may exercise its jurisdiction only with ..... Statute that core criminal cases will be decided by a political body, the Security Council.

  12. 28 CFR 902.7 - Court action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Court action. 902.7 Section 902.7 Judicial Administration NATIONAL CRIME PREVENTION AND PRIVACY COMPACT COUNCIL DISPUTE ADJUDICATION PROCEDURES § 902.7 Court action. Pursuant to Section (c) of Article XI of the Compact, a decision by...

  13. The Supreme Court as a Small Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownlee, Don

    The application of small group interaction and decision making assessment methods has demonstrated many of the interpersonal preferences, understandings, and attitudes of the Supreme Court. Six terms of the Supreme Court, from October 1969 through October 1974 were chosen for evaluation. Only those cases in which the formal opinion of the Court…

  14. The Juvenile Court: Changes and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feld, Barry C.

    2000-01-01

    Explores the changes in the juvenile court system, in particular, the juvenile waiver and sentencing laws, as it transformed from a social welfare agency into a type of criminal court system for young offenders. Addresses whether states should create an integrated juvenile and criminal justice system. (CMK)

  15. Court Seen Balky on Religion Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Mark

    2010-01-01

    When Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. reached his fifth anniversary on the U.S. Supreme Court in late September, observers took note of the court's rightward shift during his tenure in a number of areas, including corporate spending on federal elections and the ways school districts may consider race in assigning students. But at least one…

  16. The Supreme Court upholds parental notice requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    On June 25, 1990 the US Supreme Court ruled in 2 cases concerned with the constitutionally of 2 state law that required parental notification of minors seeking an abortion. In Hodgson v Minnesota the Court ruled that states may not require 2 parent notification. They can however require that both biological parents be notified if a judicial bypass is provided for minors wishing to keep the matter private. In Ohio v. Akron Center for Reproductive Health the Court upheld a 1 parent notification law which included a judicial bypass clause. The Court however did refuse to decide whether the state must provide the bypass option it is mandates 1 parent notification. In the Hodgson case the courts opinion stated that the state did not have the right to require that family members talk to each other. Also the Court upheld that states may require a 48-hour waiting period between notification and the procedure to give parents time to provide medical records and to check the doctor's competency. In Ohio the court ruled that states do not have to guarantee absolute anonymity of the minor as long as they make a reasonable effort to keep her name from beginning public. The Court also ruled that states can require a minor to provide "clear and compelling" evidence, the most difficult legal standard of proof, when she is petitioning the court that she is sufficiently mature to consent to the procedure or that parental notification is not in her best interest. Also, the Court ruled that the state may require doctors to notify the parents personally concerning the procedure.

  17. Pursuing transparency through science courts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Thomas G. Jr. [Franklin Pierce Law Center, Concord, NH (United States)

    1999-12-01

    Many, disappointed with traditional ways to assess and manage health, safety and environmental risks, have sought alternatives that might better serve democratic values and truth. Arthur Kantrowitz proposed one in 1967. Named the 'Science Court' by the media, it sought to air opposing viewpoints publicly before an independent, neutral and technically competent panel of scientists. The idea has received considerable attention over the years, but some see it as too opaque and elitist. Ironically, others may view it as too transparent. Beyond that, as proposed it might have been too time-consuming and expensive, and few scientists would have welcomed a suggestion for cross-examination. Yet, its key features still offer promise for resolving difficult policy disputes and might be usefully integrated with notions since leading to the creation and endorsement of advisory science boards.

  18. 17 CFR 9.23 - Answering brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Answering brief. 9.23 Section... Appeals § 9.23 Answering brief. (a) Time for filing answering brief. Within thirty days after service of the appeal brief, the exchange must file with the Commission an answering brief. (b) Contents...

  19. New Hybrid Algorithm for Question Answering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaspreet Kaur

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available With technical advancement, Question Answering has emerged as the main area for the researchers. User is provided with specific answers instead of large number of documents or passages in question answering. Question answering proposes the solution to acquire efficient and exact answers to user question asked in natural language rather than language query. The major goal of this paper is to develop a hybrid algorithm for question answering. For this task different question answering systems for different languages were studied. After deep study, we are able to develop an algorithm that comprises the best features from excellent systems. An algorithm developed by us performs well.

  20. Facilities Management Service Delivery in Public and Private High Rise Residential Buildings in Nigeria: A case study of Eko Court Complex and Niger Towers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olanrele O. O.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed and compared the delivery of Facilities Management (FM services in public and private high rise residential buildings in Lagos, Nigeria. While some facilities or services may not be available in some public estates, the efficiency of the available ones is inadequate in comparison with the adequacy and efficiency of services provided in private estates. The objectives set for the study include identification of services that are provided in the case studies, service delivery method, and an assessment of the residents’ satisfaction of the services. This study adopted questionnaire survey for collection of data. 127 questionnaires were distributed to the residents of the case studies and 93 were returned. Three of which were discarded for incompleteness, thus 90 were analysed. The study found that most but not all of the facilities services expected in high rise buildings are available in the case studies and the services are outsourced under a standard Service Level Agreement. The service delivery in private high rise residential building is better than the public residential high rise buildings as revealed by the study. The study recommends improved standardization of services, customized services and meeting customer’s expectation for improved service delivery.

  1. Flexible Query Answering Systems 2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    submissions, relating to the topic of users posing queries and systems producing answers. The papers cover the fields: Database Management, Information Retrieval, Domain Modeling, Knowledge Representation and Ontologies, Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining, Artificial Intelligence, Classical and Non......-classical Logics, Computational Linguistics and Natural Language Processing, Multimedia Information Systems, and Human--Computer Interaction, including reports of interesting applications. We wish to thank the contributors for their excellent papers and the referees, publisher, and sponsors for their effort...

  2. The International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme in U.S. Catholic High Schools: An Answer to the Church's Call to Global Solidarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, John

    2012-01-01

    The International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme provides an academically challenging curriculum that when combined with moral and religious formation prepares graduates of Catholic secondary schools to succeed in college and to live as Christian citizens in an interconnected global society. Although the financial cost of the program is high,…

  3. THEORETICAL AND JURISPRUDENTIAL ASPECTS CONCERNING THE CONSTITUTIONALITY OF THE COURT APPEAL ON POINTS OF LAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius ANDREESCU

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The institution of the appeal on points of law has the role to ensure a unitary law interpretation and enforcing by the law courts. The legal nature of this procedure is determined not only by the civil and criminal normative dispositions that regulate it. In this study we bring arguments according to which this institution is of a constitutional nature, because according to the Constitution, the High Court of Cassation and Justice has the attribution to ensure the unitary interpretation of the law by the law courts. Thus are analyzed the constitutional nature consequences of this institution, the limits of compulsoriness of law interpretations given by the Supreme Court through the decisions ruled on this procedure, and also the relationship between the decisions of the Constitutional Court, respectively the decisions of the High Court of Cassation and Justice given for resolving the appeals on points of law. The recent jurisprudence of the Constitutional Court reveals new aspects regarding the possibility to verify the constitutionality of the decisions given in this matter.

  4. THEORETICAL AND JURISPRUDENTIAL ASPECTS CONCERNING THE CONSTITUTIONALITY OF THE COURT APPEAL ON POINTS OF LAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius ANDREESCU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The institution of the appeal on points of law has the role to ensure a unitary law interpretation and enforcing by the law courts. The legal nature of this procedure is determined not only by the civil and criminal normative dispositions that regulate it. In this study we bring arguments according to which this institution is of a constitutional nature, because according to the Constitution, the High Court of Cassation and Justice has the attribution to ensure the unitary interpretation of the law by the law courts. Thus are analysed the constitutional nature consequences of this institution, the limits of compulsoriness of law interpretations given by the Supreme Court through the decisions ruled on this procedure, and also the relationship between the decisions of the Constitutional Court, respectively the decisions of the High Court of Cassation and Justice given for resolving the appeals on points of law. The recent jurisprudence of the Constitutional Court reveals new aspects regarding the possibility to verify the constitutionality of the decisions given in this matter.

  5. The Future Of Court Interpreting In Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobrić Katja

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Court interpreting in Croatia is a very unregulated field especially regarding the training and the skills that are to be acquired in order to pro- vide accurate translation at courts. One of the prerequisites according to the Regulations on Court Interpreters in Croatia is knowledge of the structure of judicial power, state government and legal terminology. Although the Regulations prescribe that the training should last no longer than two months, the organisations providing such training shorten this to three or four days. Taking into account all that has been said one realizes that in such short time a per- son cannot be properly qualified to practice as a court interpreter. According to the EU Directive on the right to interpretation and translation in criminal proceedings member states should provide adequate training in order to ensure the quality of interpretation and to avoid that suspected or accused persons complain that the quality of interpretation was not good enough to secure the fairness of the proceeding, which according to Article 2 of the Directive they have the right to. Since Croatia joined the European Union on 1 July 2013, it will have to change its Regulations on Court Interpreters in order to com- ply with this Directive. This paper will try to analyze the problems within the scope of court interpreter’s profession in Croatia both in civil and in criminal proceedings. Several examples will be suggested as the possible model for modifying court interpreting in Croatia. Since this profession is often underrated by the national courts, the paper will suggest ways to prevent such views and point out the importance of good court interpretation

  6. How quickly do High Arctic coastal environments respond to rapid deglaciation and the paraglacial transformation of proglacial areas? - Answers from Spitsbergen, Svalbard Archipelago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzelecki, Matt; Long, Antony; Lloyd, Jerry; Zagórski, Piotr

    2014-05-01

    The coastal zone is one of the most important storage systems for sediments that are eroded and transported by rivers, wind and slope processes from deglacierised valleys and proglacial areas before reaching their final sediment sink (fjords or the open sea. The Svalbard archipelago provides an excellent location to quantify how High Arctic coasts are responding to climate warming and the associated paraglacial landscape transformations. In this paper we summarize the results of several coastal surveys carried out by our research teams along the paraglacial coasts of Spitsbergen during the last decade. We reconstruct the post-Little Ice Age development of selected coastlines in Spitsbergen to illustrate the variable coastal response to paraglacial and periglacial processes activated following the recent retreat of glaciers. Our surveys use aerial photogrammetric and GIS analyses, sedimentological classification of coastal deposits and field-based geomorphological mapping in Kongsfjorden, Billefjorden, Bellsund, Hornsund and Sørkappland. Our results document dramatic changes in sediment flux and coastal response under intervals characterized by a warming climate, retreating local ice masses, a shortened winter sea-ice season and thawing permafrost. The study highlights the need for a greater understanding of the controls on High Arctic coastal geomorphology, especially given the potential for future accelerated warming and sea-level rise.

  7. Questions and Answers about Treating Arterial Stenosis and Preventing Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Answers About Treating Arterial Stenosis and Preventing Stroke A stroke is any sudden event affecting the ... and high cholesterol. How does stenosis contribute to stroke? Atherosclerosis can activate cells involved in blood clotting. ...

  8. Hearing children in court disputes between parents.

    OpenAIRE

    Mackay, Kirsteen

    2013-01-01

    The Children (Scotland) Act 1995 gives children the right to have their views taken into account when their parents take a dispute over the child to court. This is consistent with Article 12 of the United Nations Convention of the Rights of the Child (UNCRC). The most common dispute concerning children which comes before the court is over the amount of contact a child should have with the non-resident parent. This briefing reports key findings from a recent study that examined court cas...

  9. Energy challenges. A European answer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berge, Hans ten [EURELECTRIC, Brussels (Belgium)

    2013-02-01

    The European electricity sector is facing four main challenges: a very challenging investment climate, relatively low electricity demand, the continued expansion of electricity from subsidised renewable energy sources, and the unexpected weakness of the EU Emissions Trading System (ETS). EURELECTRIC's answers to these challenges revolve around a more consistent framework with the ETS as the key driver of decarbonisation, the integration of renewables into the market and a less distortive approach to their development, a renewed focus on energy infrastructure as a means of completing the internal energy market, and an improved strategy for RD and D.

  10. National 5 maths with answers

    CERN Document Server

    Alcorn, David

    2013-01-01

    Teach lessons that suit the individual needs of your classroom with this SQA endorsed and flexibly structured resource that provides a suggested approach through all three units. This 'with answers' version textbook completely covers the latest National 5 syllabus. Each chapter includes summaries of key points and worked examples with explanatory notes showing how skills are applied. Section Reviews presented in non-calculator and calculator formats provide students with the opportunity to consolidate skills acquired over a number of chapters. There are plenty of exercises and invaluable exam

  11. National 5 maths with answers

    CERN Document Server

    Alcorn, David

    2013-01-01

    Teach lessons that suit the individual needs of your classroom with this SQA endorsed and flexibly structured resource that provides a suggested approach through all three units.- Covers the new specification with all the new topics in the SQA examinations- Provides thorough exam preparation, with graded Practice Exercises- Organised to make it easy to plan, manage and monitor student progressThis 'with answers' version textbook completely covers the latest National 5 syllabus. Each chapter includes summaries of key points and worked examples with explanatory not

  12. What Defines an International Criminal Court?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldgaard-Pedersen, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    that only criminal tribunals deriving their authority from international law should be labelled ‘international’, while the term ‘national criminal court’ should apply to tribunals set up under national law. This terminology would underline that issues concerning jurisdiction and applicable law must......Since the post-World War II tribunals, only few scholars have attempted to draw a definitional distinction between international and national criminal courts. Remarkable exceptions include Robert Woetzel, who in 1962 categorized criminal courts according to ‘the involvement of the international...... community’, and Sarah Williams, who 50 years later relied on the same factor in her definitions of ‘hybrid’ and ‘internationalized’ criminal tribunals. Through examples of rulings by the Special Court for Sierra Leone and the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia, this article will demonstrate...

  13. 20 CFR 416.1485 - Application of circuit court law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Application of circuit court law. 416.1485... Determinations and Decisions Court Remand Cases § 416.1485 Application of circuit court law. The procedures which... circuit court decision that we determine contains a holding that conflicts with our interpretation of...

  14. The Roles of Judicial Officers and Court Administrators in the UK Supreme Court

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Arnold

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a brief historical summary of the process that culminated in the creation of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom (SCUK, highlighting important changes in the relevant laws and regulations and the institutional framework within which authority for final appellate review of lower court decisions was and currently is vested.  It also examines the administrative organization of the SCUP and where authority for key elements of court administration at that court is vested and how, for practical purposes, the SCUK is administered.

  15. RHETORICAL STRUCTURE OF ARGUMENTATIVE ANSWER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Desiderato ANTONIO

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to describe the rhetorical structure of the argumentative answer genre in a corpus formed by 15 compositions of the winter vestibular of Universidade Estadual de Maringá. The instrument of analysis used in the investigation was RST (Rhetorical Structure Theory. The initial statement was considered the central unit of the argumentative answer. Most of the writers held evidence relation between the central unit (nucleus and the expansion (satellite. Evidence relation is interpersonal and the aim of the writers is to convince their addressees (in this case the compositions evaluation committee that their point is correct. Within the initial statement, the relation with higher frequency was contrast. Our hypothesis is that the selection of texts of the test influenced the applicants to present positive and negative aspects of the internet. In the higher level of the expansion text span, list is the most frequent relation because the applicants present various arguments with the same status. Contrast was the second relation with highest frequency in this same level. Our hypothesis is that the selection of texts of the test influenced the applicants to present positive and negative aspects of the internet as it happened in the initial statement. Within the 15 compositions, 12 had a conclusion. This part was considered a satellite of the span formed by the initial statement and its expansion. The relation held was homonymous.

  16. The Development and Role of the Court Administrator in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Ryder-Lahey

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available By the turn of the millennium most courts in Canada had court administrators managing their operations and their staff. As a rule, the court administrators worked in a partnership with the chairmen of their courts, who typically delegated some of their official responsibilities. But the mere presence of court administrators, not to speak of their broad range of functions, was still relatively new. Only in the 1970s did most courts acquire administrators, and it took at least another decade before they were fully accepted by judges and entered into a position of equality with some, if not many, chairs of courts.

  17. How do the Constitutional Courts decide?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Pasquino

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to explore the mode of production of judicial sentences drafted by constitutional courts in Europe. The natural object of study of the constitutional theory is the analysis of this final product of judicial creation of Law by Constitutional Courts. However, the doctrine has not given sufficient attention –from a comparative law perspective– to the mechanisms and procedures that lead to the decisions of these institutions. Thus, this document will classify the different types of decision-making processes in the courts, analyzing the stages that make up the «mode of production», from the study of the decisions of the Supreme Court of the United States, the Constitutional Council of the French Republic, The Constitutional Court of Italy and the Federal Constitutional Court of Germany. At the end of the paper, some conclusions are made about the period of the magistrates, their party affiliation, the temporary restrictions of deliberation and institutional factors such as the number of attendees or the personalization of its members.

  18. High court orders Lavents retrial / Ib Alken

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Alken, Ib

    2003-01-01

    Pärast Euroopa Inimõiguste Kohtu otsust, mille kohaselt rikkus Läti riik Banka Baltija endise juhi Aleksandrs Lavents'i kohtuasja menetlemisel tema põhiõigusi, mõistis Läti Riigikohus asja uuesti läbivaatamisele

  19. High court orders Lavents retrial / Ib Alken

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Alken, Ib

    2003-01-01

    Pärast Euroopa Inimõiguste Kohtu otsust, mille kohaselt rikkus Läti riik Banka Baltija endise juhi Aleksandrs Lavents'i kohtuasja menetlemisel tema põhiõigusi, mõistis Läti Riigikohus asja uuesti läbivaatamisele

  20. FVQA: Fact-based Visual Question Answering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Wu, Qi; Shen, Chunhua; Dick, Anthony; Hengel, Anton van den

    2017-09-19

    Visual Question Answering (VQA) has attracted much attention in both computer vision and natural language processing communities, not least because it offers insight into the relationships between two important sources of information. Current datasets, and the models built upon them, have focused on questions which are answerable by direct analysis of the question and image alone. The set of such questions that require no external information to answer is interesting, but very limited. It excludes questions which require common sense, or basic factual knowledge to answer, for example. Here we introduce FVQA (Fact-based VQA), a VQA dataset which requires, and supports, much deeper reasoning. FVQA primarily contains questions that require external information to answer. We thus extend a conventional visual question answering dataset, which contains image-question-answer triplets, through additional image-question-answer-supporting fact tuples. Each supporting-fact is represented as a structural triplet, such as .

  1. Yahoo! Answers as a Space for Informal Language Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliana Dettori

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Online social spaces, where users can exchange information, opinions and resources, have achieved wide popularity and are gaining attention in many research fields, including education. Their actual potential support to learning, however, still requires investigation, especially because portals can widely differ as concerns purpose and internal structure. This paper aims to contribute in this respect, by concentrating on question answering, a kind of social space not yet widely discussed in education. We analyzed a small corpus of posts from the Languages section of Yahoo! Answers Italy, checking if the questions reveal some inclination to learning or just the desire to obtain a service and if the answers provided by the community members can be considered as reliable sources of knowledge. Our analysis highlights the presence of a variety of question/answer types, from mere information exchange or help for task completion, up to language-related questions prompting valuable short lessons. The quality of answers may widely vary as concerns pertinence, correctness and richness of supporting elements. We found a high number of purely task-oriented questions and answers, but also a higher number of learning-oriented questions and correct, informative answers. This suggests that this kind of social space actually has valuable potential for informal learning.

  2. A Study on the Standardization of Court Interpretation and Suggestions in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张慧

    2016-01-01

    In order to safeguard the legitimate rights and interests of all parties, ensure the justice of legal proceedings and main-tain the Chinese judicial system's positive international image, high quality interpretation of legal proceedings is extremely im-portant. This paper will analyze the nature of court interpreting and draw lessons from successful foreign practices. Moreover, some thoughts and suggestions will be presented for the establishment of national court interpreting standards in China.

  3. Applicants' Perspectives on Paternity Testing in Court Cases: The Influence of Gender

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we analyse the gender differences in the assessment of paternity testing ordered by courts of law in Portugal. A representative sample of 146 men and women who undergo paternity testing ordered by the courts per year was chosen. The results show that both women and men attributed high importance to the scientific evidence of paternity, although women ascribed less importance to paternity testing than men. With regard to the reasons justifying paternity tests, 98.5% of men value...

  4. 24 CFR 1720.610 - Answering brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Answering brief. 1720.610 Section... Proceedings Appeals § 1720.610 Answering brief. Within 20 days after service of an appeal brief upon a party, such party may file an answering brief conforming to the requirements of § 1720.620....

  5. 17 CFR 171.26 - Answering brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Answering brief. 171.26... Denial and Registration Actions § 171.26 Answering brief. (a) Time for filing answering brief. Within thirty days after service of the apeal brief, the National Futures Association shall file with...

  6. Question Answering for Dutch: Simple does it

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, A.H.; Hiemstra, Djoerd; van der Vet, P.E.; Huibers, Theo W.C.

    2006-01-01

    When people pose questions in natural language to search for information on the web, the role of question answering (QA) systems becomes important. In this paper the QAsystem simpleQA, capable of answering Dutch questions on which the answer is a person or a location, is described. The system's

  7. Modeling Answer Changes on Test Items

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Wim J.; Jeon, Minjeong

    2012-01-01

    The probability of test takers changing answers upon review of their initial choices is modeled. The primary purpose of the model is to check erasures on answer sheets recorded by an optical scanner for numbers and patterns that may be indicative of irregular behavior, such as teachers or school administrators changing answer sheets after their…

  8. Law on the Market? Evaluating the Securities Market Impact of Supreme Court Decisions

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Daniel Martin; Soellinger, Tyler; Chen, James Ming

    2015-01-01

    Do judicial decisions affect the securities markets in discernible and perhaps predictable ways? In other words, is there "law on the market" (LOTM)? This is a question that has been raised by commentators, but answered by very few in a systematic and financially rigorous manner. Using intraday data and a multiday event window, this large scale event study seeks to determine the existence, frequency and magnitude of equity market impacts flowing from Supreme Court decisions. We demonstrate that, while certainly not present in every case, "law on the market" events are fairly common. Across all cases decided by the Supreme Court of the United States between the 1999-2013 terms, we identify 79 cases where the share price of one or more publicly traded company moved in direct response to a Supreme Court decision. In the aggregate, over fifteen years, Supreme Court decisions were responsible for more than 140 billion dollars in absolute changes in wealth. Our analysis not only contributes to our understanding of ...

  9. To whom are we answerable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Julian Tudor

    1983-11-12

    In comments stimulated by Erica Bates' book Health System and Public Scrutiny: Australia, Britain, and the United States (New York: St. Martin's; 1983), the author discusses medicine's lack of responsiveness to criticism from patients and peers. Lay critics focus on observable medical behavior and seldom delve into the "heart of medicine," the clinical consultation. Because of centuries of an overcrowded market, the consultation has been designed to "mystify rather than educate, to disguise spontaneous improvement as the effect of treatment, and iatrogenic illness as the effect of disease." Before 1935 medicine was cheap and relatively harmless; however, now it is expensive and potentially destructive and therefore demands discriminate use. Unfortunately, the retention of brief consultations hinders accountability. If practitioners were answerable to their patients, a beginning could be made toward satisfying a demand for public scrutiny.

  10. Questions and Answers about BSP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.B. Skillicorn

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Bulk Synchronous Parallelism (BSP is a parallel programming model that abstracts from low-level program structures in favour of supersteps. A superstep consists of a set of independent local computations, followed by a global communication phase and a barrier synchronisation. Structuring programs in this way enables their costs to be accurately determined from a few simple architectural parameters, namely the permeability of the communication network to uniformly-random traffic and the time to synchronise. Although permutation routing and barrier synch ronisations are widely regarded as inherently expensive, this is not the case. As a result, the structure imposed by BSP does not reduce performance, while bringing considerable benefits for application building. This paper answers the most common questions we are asked about BSP and justifies its claim to be a major step forward in parallel programming.

  11. Comparative study of victims' participation in special international criminal tribunals and the International Criminal Court

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Lal alizadeh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In special criminal tribunals before the establishment of the Court, in the first generation of tribunals, Nuremberg and Tokyo, Unfortunately, not only is there any notes to the rights and protections of victims, but also no mention of the term "victim" is seen. In the second generation trials, the former Yugoslavia, Rwanda and Sierra Leone, although there were some improvements compared to previous courts, but they did not dedicate a place more than witnesses to victims. International Criminal Court, influenced by the developments and experiences from previous international tribunals, has considered relatively broad participatory rights for victims in different stages and with different forms. Despite high limitations in victims' participation, the court jurisprudence has supported a broad interpretation of participatory rights. However, the judges are generally determining the deadlines, procedures and participation.

  12. The Warren Court and the Burger Court: Some Comparisons of Education-Related Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Charles F.

    1981-01-01

    Compares the records of the Warren Court and the Burger Court on education-related cases concerning religion and the schools, teachers' loyalty, due process and racial segregation, freedom of expression, civil rights, and equal protection under the law. Reports the voting record of individual justices. (Author/MLF)

  13. Constitutional Court of South Africa overturns lower court's decision on the right to "sufficient water".

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    On 8 October 2009, the Constitutional Court of South Africa overturned the judgment of the Supreme Court of Appeal, which addressed the proper interpretation of Section 27(1)(b) of the Constitution of South Africa (Constitution)--namely, everyone's right to have access to sufficient water.

  14. Is the Inhibition of Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 (DDP-4) Enzyme Route Dependent and/or Driven by High Peak Concentration?- Seeking Answers with ZYDPLA1, a Novel Long Acting DPP-4 Inhibitor, in a Rodent Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Harilal; Joharapurkar, Amit A; Bahekar, Rajesh; Patel, Prakash; Kshirsagar, Samadhan G; Modi, Nirav; Ghoghari, Ashok; Patel, Vishal J; Jain, Mukul R; Srinivas, Nuggehally R; Patel, Pankaj R; Desai, Ranjit C

    2017-04-01

    ZYDPLA1 is a long acting enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor. The comparative effect of DPP-4 inhibition after intravenous (IV) and oral administration of ZYDPLA1 in a rat model was evaluated to answer the question of route dependency and/or the need of high plasma levels of ZYDPLA1. The study was conducted using parallel design in male Wistar rats for IV/oral route (n=9 and 6, for IV and oral respectively). A single 30 mg/kg dose of ZYDPLA1 was administered. Plasma samples were analysed for ZYDPLA1 concentration and DPP-4 inhibition. Pharmacokinetic analysis was carried out to assess peak concentration, area under the concentration-time curve, total body clearance, elimination half-life, and mean residence time. The PK/PD correlation was performed using standard sigmoidal Emax modelling to derive; maximum effect (Emax) and concentration to exert 50% Emax effect (EC50). ZYDPLA1 showed rapid absorption, high volume of distribution, low clearance, and complete oral bioavailability. The Emax derived after both routes and corresponding PK/PD profile showed comparable DDP-4 inhibition. The EC50 for IV (0.021 µg/mL) was comparable to the oral route (0.019 µg/mL). ZYDPLA1 showed full DPP-4 inhibition without regard to the route of administration. Higher systemic peak levels showed no bearing on the DDP-4 inhibition. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. RACISM OR RACIAL INSULTS? How the minas gerais court of justice stands beyond the race riots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Franco Lima e Silva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present an analysis of the judgments released by the Court of Appeal of the state of Minas Gerais, regarding claims that have as their central point practices identified as racism, discrimination or prejudice on the basis of race or skin color. By doing so, we aim to answer the following questions: which type of conflict related to race or skin color is judged, and in the second instance, with regards to the Court of Appeal; which acts, words or expressions are present in these cases; which type of arguments are used and which discursive strategies are applied by defendants, victims and judges to manage the conflict. Our results indicate that the legal system tends to decontextualize expressions historically considered as racist, denying that the root of the observed conflicts is racial prejudice.

  16. Egyptian court overturns ban on genital mutilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-07-04

    The ban on female genital mutilation (FGM) performed by health professionals in Egypt was overturned by a June 24 [1997] ruling of Judge Abdul Aziz Hamade of a mid-level administrative court in Cairo. The judge determined that the ministerial decree, which had been implemented last July by Health Minister Ismail Sallam, inappropriately restricted the practice of doctors. According to news reports, the court cited research purporting to show that failure to perform FGM harmed children, as well as quotes from Mohammed, which FGM advocates said endorsed the procedure under Islamic law. Although the court overturned the ministerial decree, it did acknowledge that Parliament could outlaw the practice; however, human rights groups believe the practice is too popular for Parliament to do so. The suit against the ban had been filed by Sheik Youssef al-Badry, a conservative Islamic cleric, and Munir Fawzi, a Cairo gynecologist. In May, Egypt's highest court had recommended to the mid-level court that FGM should be legal. The decision does not effect a ban on the performance of surgery by those without a medical license, including barbers and midwives. It is estimated that 80% of girls in Egypt undergo FGM. Egypt's highest Sunni Moslem authority contests the endorsement of FGM under Islamic law.

  17. HOW TO ANSWER CHILDREN QUESTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Brenifier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is to disclose the possible philosophicalconversation with the child.Methods. The author uses general scientific research methods, including observation and interviews, philosophical analysis.Results and scientific novelty. The author reveals the essence of philosophical conversations with the child, calls the main reasons for the extinction of the children’s curiosity, illustrating examples of incorrect behavior of adults to communicate with children. It is recommended how to be responsible for children’s issues. The article discusses the main reasons for the extinction of the children’s curiosity by illustrating examples of an erroneous behaviour of adults in dealing with children. It is shown that if the teacher does not find a systematic way to engage children in the essential discussion, the children most likely will not learn how to contemplate seriously. The author gives detailed guidance how to answer children’s questions.Practical significance. The article may be of interest to parents, teachers, experts in the field of psychology of creativity, post-graduates and organizers of independent activity of students of higher education institutions.

  18. Protein Electrochemistry: Questions and Answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourmond, V; Léger, C

    This chapter presents the fundamentals of electrochemistry in the context of protein electrochemistry. We discuss redox proteins and enzymes that are not photoactive. Of course, the principles described herein also apply to photobioelectrochemistry, as discussed in later chapters of this book. Depending on which experiment is considered, electron transfer between proteins and electrodes can be either direct or mediated, and achieved in a variety of configurations: with the protein and/or the mediator free to diffuse in solution, immobilized in a thick, hydrated film, or adsorbed as a sub-monolayer on the electrode. The experiments can be performed with the goal to study the protein or to use it. Here emphasis is on mechanistic studies, which are easier in the configuration where the protein is adsorbed and electron transfer is direct, but we also explain the interpretation of signals obtained when diffusion processes affect the response.This chapter is organized as a series of responses to questions. Questions 1-5 are related to the basics of electrochemistry: what does "potential" or "current" mean, what does an electrochemical set-up look like? Questions 6-9 are related to the distinction between adsorbed and diffusive redox species. The answers to questions 10-13 explain the interpretation of slow and fast scan voltammetry with redox proteins. Questions 14-19 deal with catalytic electrochemistry, when the protein studied is actually an enzyme. Questions 20, 21 and 22 are general.

  19. The International Criminal Court. reflections for a stress test on its foundations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus Kowalski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The constitution of the ICC in 2002 represents the ultimate example of the evolution of international criminal justice. The Court is referred to as a paradigmatic institution of the universalist concept of International Law, which envisages an enhanced international public order and which falls within the broader framework of the dominant liberal construct that currently characterizes both International Law and International Relations. However, the criticisms of universalism, in particular as regards the impositions of global liberal institutions and regulatory standards, are also reflected on the ICC. In particular, it has been met with several essential criticisms, such as its dependence on the Security Council, suggesting political interference in a criminal court, or the fact that until now only issues pertaining to Africa have been submitted to the Court, which in turn leads to suspicion about their selectivity. These are the criticisms that undermine the foundations of the ICC.At a time when the Court has not yet concluded any trial, and when there is still some scepticism about the success of its mission, knowing what to expect from the ICC in its task of crime preventing and retribution and building peace depends largely on the strength of its theoretical foundations. It is argued that despite the seemingly solid support discourse rooted in universalism, the answers advanced by this theory are not fully satisfactory due largely to the structural weaknesses that characterise it. This article seeks to offer food for thought on the subject and starts by gauging the competence of legal universalism to support “its” ICC with regard to these issues. It then identifies the aspects that can be addressed in within a more complex context, such as critical theory, which may contribute to the development of a discourse that grants the Court greater theoretical sustainability.

  20. Treatment Services in Adult Drug Courts: Report on the 1999 National Drug Court Treatment Survey. Drug Courts Resource Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pexton, Elizabeth A.; Gossweiler, Robert

    In October 1999, National Treatment Accountability for Safer Communities (TASC), in cooperation with the Office of Justice Programs, Drug Courts Program Office and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, developed and distributed a questionnaire designed to describe substance abuse…

  1. From Question Answering to Visual Exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McColgin, Dave W.; Gregory, Michelle L.; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Turner, Alan E.

    2006-08-11

    Research in Question Answering has focused on the quality of information retrieval or extraction using the metrics of precision and recall to judge success; these metrics drive toward finding the specific best answer(s) and are best supportive of a lookup type of search. These do not address the opportunity that users? natural language questions present for exploratory interactions. In this paper, we present an integrated Question Answering environment that combines a visual analytics tool for unstructured text and a state-of-the-art query expansion tool designed to compliment the cognitive processes associated with an information analysts work flow. Analysts are seldom looking for factoid answers to simple questions; their information needs are much more complex in that they may be interested in patterns of answers over time, conflicting information, and even related non-answer data may be critical to learning about a problem or reaching prudent conclusions. In our visual analytics tool, questions result in a comprehensive answer space that allows users to explore the variety within the answers and spot related information in the rest of the data. The exploratory nature of the dialog between the user and this system requires tailored evaluation methods that better address the evolving user goals and counter cognitive biases inherent to exploratory search tasks.

  2. Can neurological evidence help courts assess criminal responsibility? Lessons from law and neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharoni, Eyal; Funk, Chadd; Sinnott-Armstrong, Walter; Gazzaniga, Michael

    2008-03-01

    Can neurological evidence help courts assess criminal responsibility? To answer this question, we must first specify legal criteria for criminal responsibility and then ask how neurological findings can be used to determine whether particular defendants meet those criteria. Cognitive neuroscience may speak to at least two familiar conditions of criminal responsibility: intention and sanity. Functional neuroimaging studies in motor planning, awareness of actions, agency, social contract reasoning, and theory of mind, among others, have recently targeted a small assortment of brain networks thought to be instrumental in such determinations. Advances in each of these areas bring specificity to the problems underlying the application of neuroscience to criminal law.

  3. Domestic violence and dependency courts: the Greenbook demonstration experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Neena M; Silverman, Jerry; Wang, Kathleen; Janczewski, Colleen

    2008-07-01

    This field study reports on a cross-site evaluation of dependency courts in communities receiving federal funding to implement the Greenbook initiative, a multisite demonstration for community improvement of coordinated responses to families victimized by domestic violence and child maltreatment. This article focuses on the dependency court, where child maltreatment cases are heard, specifically court participation in collaborative activities and court practice improvements. Findings indicate that perceptions of judicial leadership varied considerably by site. Cross-training appeared to increase over time, particularly with court staff. Collaborative efforts emerged across the Greenbook initiative with regard to the courts, and some innovative practices appeared within Greenbook sites, such as separate case plans for perpetrators and victims of violence in families, reducing the likelihood of controversial failure to protect charges. Results also highlight challenges inherent in changing court practices. Research and practice implications are discussed, focusing on relevance to other communities attempting to work collaboratively with the court system.

  4. Supreme Court Ruling on Chinese Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Integrated Education, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Presents the text of a unanimous Supreme Court opinion delivered by Justice Douglas, as well as two separate concurring opinions, which granted non-English speaking Chinese students' petition for relief from unequal and unconstitutional educational opportunities resulting from an absence of English language instruction. (Author/SF)

  5. Children, Special Needs and the Courts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowicz, Jack

    1992-01-01

    This article discusses legal developments relating to the 1981 Education Act in Great Britain, focusing on court interpretation in the areas of parental rights and participation, wider integration of students with special needs into ordinary schools, defining a special educational need, reassessments, and repayment of fees. Possible future trends…

  6. The Unified Patent Court (UPC) in Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Clement Salung; Schovsbo, Jens Hemmingsen; Riis, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The new common judiciary for European patents (UPC) will play a crucial role in the future European patent system. The UPC will be a very specialised court that i.a. recruits judges from specialists’ circles and has as part of its mission to develop a coherent and autonomous body of case law...

  7. The Courts and Student Rights -- Procedural Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phay, Robert E.

    This paper traces the evolution of student rights and the judicial protection of these rights through numerous court cases. The author outlines the minimum standards of due process required in disciplinary proceedings and discusses cases that point up (1) the required specificity of rules on student conduct, (2) the requirements of notice to…

  8. An International Criminal Court of Public Opinion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwknegt, Thijs Bastiaan

    2012-01-01

    In recent months, South Africa, Burundi and the Gambia have terminated their membership of the International Criminal Court (ICC). Observers and academics alike have narrowly portrayed this walkout as an ‘African’ exodus and an ‘African’ problem. But what about Vladimir Putin’s ‘unsigning’ of the Ro

  9. The Supreme Court and Public Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Scott

    1989-01-01

    Uses recent freedom of expression cases to explore the effect of public opinion and pressure on U.S. Supreme Court rulings, through a simulation for secondary students. Students are assigned a pressure group to represent, discuss the facts in small groups, and formulate their decisions and arguments for class discussion. (LS)

  10. Supreme Court Signals Caution on Affirmative Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Describes how, during oral arguments at the U.S. Supreme Court over the University of Michigan's race-conscious admissions policy, several justices indicated that they did not see any viable alternatives to the use of affirmative action in college admissions. (EV)

  11. Supreme Court Upholds Religious Liberty: Educational Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawdsley, Ralph D.; Russo, Charles J.

    1994-01-01

    Reviews a set of Supreme Court rulings that may dramatically alter the landscape of First Amendment jurisprudence: "Church of the Lukumi Babalu Aye v. City of Hialeah"; "Jones v. Clear Creek Independent School District"; "Lambs Chapel v. Center Moriches Union Free School District"; and Zobrest v. Catalina Foothills…

  12. World’s Eyes on Center Court

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    One of the most watched matches in history takes basketball to a whole new level Thousands of spectators cheered when Yao Ming left the court with 4:41 minutes left in China’s 70-101 loss to the United States at the basketball

  13. Status of Cases in the Supreme Court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronicle of Higher Education, 1986

    1986-01-01

    The status as of October 9, 1986 of higher education-related Supreme Court litigation is outlined concerning: accreditation, affirmative action, asbestos, bar examinations, collective bargaining, creationism, racial discrimination, infectious disease, liquor sales, pensions, pregnancy benefits, revocation of degree, sexual harassment, and student…

  14. Abortion 1982: the Supreme Court once again.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, J M

    1982-11-01

    Clearly, abortion in the US continues to be a major medico-legal issue which will not go away. 5 major abortion cases are scheduled for review by the US Supreme Court during its 1982-83 term. Taken together, these 5 cases challenge several of the key conclusions of the Court's review of the abortion question. The primary focus of the cases is the state's power to regulate the abortion decision during the 1st and 2nd trimester of the pregnancy. 2 cases involve ordinances passed by the City of Akron regulating access to abortion in areas such as consent and notification requirements and the location of abortions after the 1st trimester. 2 of the cases involve a Missouri statute also dealing with the requirement that abortions after the 1st trimester be performed in a hospital. The final case involves a Virginia criminal prosecution of a physician accused of violating the state's requirement of in-hospital performance of a 2nd trimester abortion. In the case of Roe v. Wade, the Court had established the "trimester trilogy" governing state regulation of the abortion procedure. For the stage of the pregnancy prior to the end of the 1st trimester, the Court held that the abortion decision and its effectuation must be left to the medical judgment of the pregnant women's attending physician. For the stage of the pregnancy subsequent to the end of the 1st trimester, the Court ruled that the state may promote its interest in the health of the mother by regulating the abortion procedure in ways reasonably related to maternal health. For the stage of pregnancy subsequent to viability, the state may promote its interest in the potentiality of human life by regulation, even prohibiting abortion, except where it is necessary to preserve the mother's life or health. These 5 cases challenge the role of the Court in determining the scope of appropriate state regulation at various stages of the pregnancy. Suffering a loss of prestige in the 10 years since the Roe v. Wade and Doe v

  15. 20 CFR 404.985 - Application of circuit court law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Application of circuit court law. 404.985... and Decisions Court Remand Cases § 404.985 Application of circuit court law. The procedures which... release an Acquiescence Ruling for publication in the Federal Register for any precedential circuit...

  16. 19 CFR 176.31 - Reliquidation following decision of court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... decision of the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit which involve the same issue, or which are based... is the subject of a decision of the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit shall be reliquidated at... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reliquidation following decision of court....

  17. The New York Court Review of Children in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festinger, Trudy Bradley

    1975-01-01

    Presents a study which investigated three areas: (1) factors related to the court's determination of foster care status or availability of children for adoption; (2) the extent of agreement between agency recommendations and court orders; and (3) the impact of the court review on moving children out of foster care. (SDH)

  18. Highway Safety Program Manual: Volume 7: Traffic Courts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    Volume 7 of the 19-volume Highway Safety Program Manual (which provides guidance to State and local governments on preferred highway safety practices) focuses on traffic courts, their purpose and objectives. Federal authority in the area of traffic courts are described. Program development and operations (a study of courts trying traffic cases, a…

  19. Human Dignity: incorporation of the case law of the European Court of Human Rights by the Colombian Constitutional Court

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Silvana Insignares Cera; Viridiana Molinares Hassan

    2011-01-01

      This paper analyzes how the Colombian Constitutional Court in its jurisprudence includes references to case law of the European Court of Human Rights, in exercising its constitutional oversight and...

  20. Questions and Answers About Nuclear Power Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This pamphlet is designed to answer many of the questions that have arisen about nuclear power plants and the environment. It is organized into a question and answer format, with the questions taken from those most often asked by the public. Topics include regulation of nuclear power sources, potential dangers to people's health, whether nuclear…

  1. 12 CFR 308.508 - Answer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Answer. 308.508 Section 308.508 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION PROCEDURE AND RULES OF PRACTICE RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Program Fraud Civil Remedies and Procedures § 308.508 Answer. (a) The defendant may request a...

  2. A Hybrid Approach to Clinical Question Answering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    paraphrasing and textual entailment) for better clinical reasoning and question answering. References O. Bodenreider. 2008. Biomedical Ontologies in...this track was to retrieve relevant biomedical articles to answer generic clini- cal questions about medical case reports. As part of our maiden...techniques to improve patient care through provid- ing pertinent biomedical information related to med- ical case reports. The primary motivation for

  3. Hydrology and Ecology Go to Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, W. R.; Crisman, T. L.

    2009-04-01

    The authors were involved in a high profile case in the United States District Court involving Lake Okeechobee and the Everglades Agricultural Area in the State of Florida. One of the central issues of the case rested on a theory that all navigable waters of the United States comprised one "unitary" water body, and as such, transfer of water from one navigable water to another did not require any permitting action. Should this theory have prevailed, great precedent would be set regarding inter-basin transfer of volumes of water capable of significantly impact to the ecologic structure and function of all involved basins. Furthermore, the impact would certainly have had demographic implications of great significance. We were asked to serve as an expert witnesses in the case charged with developing a strategy to demonstrate that three large irrigation canals were "meaningfully hydrologically distinct" (language from the U.S. Supreme Court opinion on a related case) from Lake Okeechobee, the second largest freshwater lake wholly in the continental U.S. Although a totally hydrologic approach could have been taken easily, it was thought better for the legal team to include an aquatic ecologic perspective, a true example of the linkage of the two disciplines into ecohydrology. Together, an argument was crafted to explain to the judge how, in fact, the waters could in no way be "unitary" in character and that they were "meaningfully hydrologically distinct." The fundamentals of the arguments rested on well known and established principles of physics, chemistry, and biology. It was incumbent upon the authors to educate the judge on how to think about hydrologic and ecologic principles. Issues of interest to the judge included a forensic assessment of the hydrologic and ecologic regime of the lake and the original Everglades system when the State of Florida first joined the U.S. While there are anecdotal archives that describe some elements of the system, there are few

  4. I Want It All, and I Want It Now: The Political Manipulation of Argentina’s Provincial High Courts I Want It All, and I Want It Now: La manipulación política de las Cortes Supremas provinciales en Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Castagnola

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Provincial supreme courts are important players in local politics because justices can affect the interest of the ruling governors; however, no research has addressed the factors that affect judicial turnover in provincial high courts in new democracies. This research attempts to fill this gap by using original data on the 525 departures of all provincial high court justices in Argentina from 1983 to 2009. My guiding hypothesis is that the stability of a justice on the bench depends on the political proximity of the justice to the ruling governor rather than on the executive’s institutional capacity to impeach. This study reveals that being aligned with the faction of the ruling governor is a major factor in accounting for judicial turnover not only in single-party provinces, as expected, but also in multi-party provinces. Because provincial politics have proven to be a major source of power for national politicians, governors would prefer to have a friendly court during their administration.Las Cortes Supremas provinciales son importantes actores políticos en la política local porque los jueces pueden afectar los intereses de los gobernantes, no obstante no exite investigación que analice los factores que afectan la inestabilidad de las cortes provinciales en las nuevas democracias. Este trabajo tiene por objetivo llenar este vacio analizando las salidas de los 525 jueces de las Cortes Supremas provinciales en Argentina desde 1983 al 2009. La principal hipótesis propone que la estabilidad de los jueces en el cargo depende de la proximidad política del juez con el gobernador de turno mas que con la capacidad institucional del gobernador para relalizar juicio político. Este estudio revela que estar alineado con la facción del gobernador es una factor determinante para explicar la inestabilidad de los jueces en el cargo tanto en provincias con único partido como en provincias con competencia partidaria. La política provicial ha

  5. Differences between Expected Answers and the Answers Given by Computer Algebra Systems to School Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonisson, Eno

    2015-01-01

    Sometimes Computer Algebra Systems (CAS) offer an answer that is somewhat different from the answer that is probably expected by the student or teacher. These (somewhat unexpected) answers could serve as a catalyst for rich mathematical discussion. In this study, over 120 equations from school mathematics were solved using 8 different CAS. Many…

  6. Supreme Court issues limited ruling in challenge to Utah abortion ban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-06-28

    A law passed in Utah in 1991 which prohibited abortion except in cases of life endangerment, rape, incest, risk of grave damage to a woman's medical health, or grave fetal defects. The exceptions for women who had been sexually abused were eliminated after 20 weeks gestation. In December 1992, US District Court Judge J. Thomas Greene found the ban unconstitutional as applied to abortions prior to 20 weeks but upheld it as applied to procedures after that point in pregnancy. A three-judge appellate panel later reversed the district court decision in August 1995 on the argument that the prohibition on post-20-week abortions could not stand independent of the ban on earlier procedures. The appeals court also struck down a requirement that physicians performing those abortions allowed after viability use the method most likely to give the fetus the best chance of survival, unless it would endanger a woman's life or cause grave damage to her medical health. In an unsigned opinion issued on June 17, 1996, the US Supreme Court reversed the appeals court decision which struck down Utah's original 1991 ban on abortions. Five justices ruling in Leavitt v. Jane L. found that the US Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit misapplied Utah precedent when it found that the criminal abortion statute could not be divided into two separate abortion bans, one before and one after 20 weeks gestation. Health care providers will now argue that the ban on post-20-week abortions should be struck down on constitutional grounds. This is the first challenge to a state abortion law to come under High Court review since Planned Parenthood v. Casey in 1992.

  7. Exploring the relationship between criminogenic risk assessment and mental health court program completion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfine, Natalie; Ritter, Christian; Munetz, Mark R

    2016-01-01

    The two primary goals of mental health courts are to engage individuals with severe mental illness in the criminal justice system with clinical mental health services and to prevent future involvement with the criminal justice system. An important factor in helping to achieve both goals is to identify participants' level of clinical needs and criminogenic risk/needs. This study seeks to better understand how criminogenic risk affects outcomes in a mental health court. Specifically, we explore if high criminogenic risk is associated with failure to complete mental health court. Our subjects are participants of a municipal mental health court (MHC) who completed the Level of Services Inventory-Revised (LSI-R) upon entry to the program (N=146). We used binary logistic regression to determine the association between termination from the program with the total LSI-R. Our findings suggest that, net of prior criminal history, time in the program and clinical services received, high criminogenic risk/need is associated with failure to complete mental health court. In addition to providing clinical services, our findings suggest the need for MHCs to include criminogenic risk assessment to identify criminogenic risk. For participants to succeed in MHCs, both their clinical and criminogenic needs should be addressed.

  8. Level of occupational stress of court probation officers and style of coping with stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Wirkus

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background The relationship between a court probation officer and their ward is a specific one and is frequently connected with enormous individuals costs. This fact is connected with the character of the job, and with the conditions determining its character. Psychosocial threats may influence both mental and somatic health, directly or indirectly, by means of the influence exerted by stress. Participants and procedure The main study was conducted at the offices of the teams of the Court Probation Service. The teams of the Court Probation Service are part of the structure of the following 9, randomly selected, district courts (DCs: DC Wrocław, DC Bydgoszcz, DC Szczecin, DC Poznań, DC Łódź, DC Lublin, DC Kraków, DC Katowice and DC Białystok. Participation in the research was voluntary and anonymous; the tools were arranged in sets, and the sequence of those sets was random. The sets of research tools were received by 1,000 individuals altogether. Results The conducted research confirmed the need to verify the significance of the feeling of occupational stress of court probation officers at the workplace and the correlations between it and a number of variables. Below, I present statistical analyses concerning various aspects of occupational stress experienced in the studied group, including correlations between the general level of occupational stress and the dimensions of it, and organizational predictors. The objective of the research was to indicate the styles of coping with stress and the correlations of them with the stress felt by court probation officers. Conclusions The research confirms a significant influence exerted by organizational determinants upon the general level of felt occupational stress. Professional court probation officers experience a higher level of felt occupational stress; what is conducive to that is high encumbrance with occupational responsibilities, and also functioning directly in structures of the court of

  9. The Urgency Of Ijtihad By Judges In Effort Law Invention At The Religion Court In Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiljamilawati

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The presence of renewals in Islamic law resulting in the emergence of various changes in the social order of Muslims either in relation to ideology political social cultural and so on. It later brings new challenges that must be answered and therefore ijtihad must be continuously made to find a solution to the various problems of new law which is required by Muslims. The type of research is a normative-juridical and empirical research. Normative research is trying to examine the problem of law invention by the judge in the Religion Courts with a case approach. Ijtihad has a very urgent role in efforts to carry out duties as law enforcer and justice by digging follow and understand the legal values that live and develop in the peoples and accommodate the developments of Islamic law. The method of ijtihad by judges in the Religion Court use maqashid al-sharia and maslahah and istihsan method. At the practical level so characteristic inherent in the religion courts persists then should any verdict must include argument of Islamic law sources.

  10. TrustQ: a category reputation based question and answer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuhua; Shen, Haiying

    2014-06-01

    Question and Answering (Q/A) systems aggregate the collected intelligence of all users to provide satisfying answers for questions. A well-developed Q/A system should provide high question response rate, low response delay and good answer quality. Previous works use reputation systems to achieve the goals. However, these reputation systems evaluate a user with an overall rating for all questions the user has answered regardless of the question categories, thus the reputation score cannot accurately reflect the user's ability to answer a question in a specific category. In this paper, we propose TtustQ, a category reputation based Q/A System. TtustQ evaluates users' willingness and capability to answer questions in different categories. Considering a user has different willingness to answer questions from different users, TtustQ lets each node evaluate the reputation of other nodes answering its own questions. User a calculates user b's final reputation by considering both user a's direct rating and the indirect ratings on user b from other nodes. The reputation values facilitate forwarding a question to potential answerers, which improves the question response rate, response delay and answer quality. Our trace-driven simulation on PeerSim demonstrates the effectiveness of TtustQ in providing good user experience in terms of response rate and latency, and the answer quality.

  11. Courts, Experts and Interest Groups: Mobilization and Location of Expert Knowledge in the Sentence C 355/2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Javier Maldonado Castañeda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the interactions between courts, experts and interest groups present in the sentence C 355/2006, through which abortion is partially decriminalized in Colombia. A detailed review of this paper allows to track the role that interest groups and social movements have in the mobilization of expert discourses in the high courts as a strategy to influence their decisions. The use of disciplines and fields of knowledge is articulated to the general structure of the sentence as literary technology that makes visible the role of the court as administrator of justice.

  12. Extracting Answer in QA System: Learning Based

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megha Mishra

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Converting questions to effective queries is crucial to open-domain question answering systems. In this paper, we present a web-based unsupervised learning approach for transforming a given natural-language question to an effective query. The method involves querying a search engine for web passages that contain the answer to the question, extracting patterns that characterize fine-grained classification for answers. Independent evaluation on a set of questions shows that the proposed approach outperforms a naive keyword based approach.

  13. Smart Query Answering for Marine Sensor Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo de Souza

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We review existing query answering systems for sensor data. We then propose an extended query answering approach termed smart query, specifically for marine sensor data. The smart query answering system integrates pattern queries and continuous queries. The proposed smart query system considers both streaming data and historical data from marine sensor networks. The smart query also uses query relaxation technique and semantics from domain knowledge as a recommender system. The proposed smart query benefits in building data and information systems for marine sensor networks.

  14. The People’s Court

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The first Western documentary toexplore the ongoing legal revolutionin China opens in the U.S. High in the hillside village of Longjiacun in Gongxian County, Sichuan Province, southwest China, four somber people dressed in dark- blue uniforms sit in a ro

  15. Advertising, a Distributive Education Manual and Answer Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Charles H.; Cyrus, Cinda L.

    This revised manual for individualized instruction of distributive education trainees at the high school or junior college level in basic advertising and sales promotion activities includes 15 self-study assignments, teaching suggestions, and a bibliography. Together with a separate answer key, each assignment provides student questions and…

  16. QUESTION ANSWERING SYSTEM DAN PENERAPANNYA PADA ALKITAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunawan Gunawan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Question answering system is a system that allows user to state his or her information need in the form of natural language question, and return short text excerpts or even phrases as an answer. The availability of a wide and various information source and improvements in the techniques of natural language processing, information extraction (wrapper, and information retrieval give a big effect on the development of question answering system, from just answering questions in a specific domain by consulting to structured information source such as database, and like in this research, answering any questions based on information stored in an unstructured text collection. A general architecture of question answering system based on text consists of six processing stages, i.e. question analysis, document collection preprocessing, candidate document selection, candidate document analysis, answer extraction, and response generation. Application of question answering system like AnswerBus, Mulder, and Webclopedia that are developed with its own characteristics has similar processing steps as in the general architecture. Answers returned by a question answering system need to be evaluated for performance measure. This research completed with a simple question answering system application using english Bible in World English Bible (WEB version as the source of information to answer some questions. Because specific domain is selected: Bible, questions that can be posed by user could ask about information in the Bible itself only. Question is also limited to three types of answers that can be supported by the application: person (who, location (where, and date (when. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Question answering system (QA system adalah sistem yang mengijinkan user menyatakan kebutuhan informasinya dalam bentuk natural language question (pertanyaan dalam bahasa alami, dan mengembalikan kutipan teks singkat atau bahkan frase sebagai jawaban. Ketersediaan

  17. Courts, Scheduled Damages, and Medical Malpractice Insurance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertoli, Paola; Grembi, Veronica

    We assess the impact of the introduction of schedules of non-economic damages (i.e. tiered caps systems) on the behavior of insurers operating in the medical liability market for hospitals while controlling the performance of the judicial system, measured as court backlog. Using a difference......-in-differences strategy on Italian data, we find that the introduction of schedules increases the presence of insurers (i.e. medical liability market attractiveness) only in inefficient judicial districts. In the same way, court inefficiency is attractive to insurers for average values of schedules penetration...... of the market, with an increasing positive impact of inefficiency as the territorial coverage of schedules increases. Finally, no significant impact is registered on paid premiums. Our analysis sheds light on a complex set of elements affecting the decisions of insurers in malpractice markets. The analysis...

  18. Sociomateriality at the Royal Court of IS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kautz, Karlheinz; Jensen, Tina Blegind

    2013-01-01

    The notion of ‘sociomateriality’ has recently gained in popularity among information systems (IS) scholars in their search for providing new ways of investigating and theorizing about IS in organizations and society at large. While some scholars put forward arguments and research accounts that lead...... for progressing the theorizing of ‘man–machine’ reconfigurations, we point to the necessity of a deeper exploration of the term. Inspired by the Alternative Genres Track at the European Conference on Information Systems 2012, the purpose here is to take a fresh look, to evoke new insights and to gain deeper...... understanding of the notion of sociomateriality and its use in the IS discipline. We invite the reader to attend a prolonged monologue – characterized by honesty, frank observations and wit – at the royal court of IS. The monologue is delivered by the court jester and directed to the two sovereigns who, based...

  19. A Parrot’s Answer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢新

    2004-01-01

    <正> A boy goes to a pet shop to buy a parrot.There he sees a parrot with a red string tied to itsleft leg and a green string tied to its right leg. He asks the owner the significance of thestrings. "Well.this is a highly trained parrot.Ifyou pull the red string he speaks French; if you

  20. Developmental Math: What's the Answer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafarella, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Developmental mathematics has been under the radar within higher education for some time. The reality is that there are many proven best practices in developmental math. Unfortunately, there are many obstacles that prevent student success. Moreover, the high rates of attrition and failure have led state legislators and college administrators to…

  1. What Defines an International Criminal Court?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldgaard-Pedersen, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    that ‘the involvement of the international community’ is at best an unhelpful criterion when it comes to resolving questions, e.g. regarding the immunity of state officials and the relevance of domestic law, that require a determination of the legal system in which the court operates. Instead, it is argued...... be settled according to each court’s constituent document and other relevant sources of law, depending on the legal system to which this document belongs....

  2. Republic of science and court on chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Wan Sang

    2001-05-15

    This book introduces the such a bizarre science class through our life, which is comprised of ten chapters. The contents of this book are case by gas, case by solubility, case by change of state, case by metal, case by density, case by oxidize, case by pressure, case by electrochemistry, case by heat. Each chapter has a few cases related chemical reaction and solution with interesting titles. It revels the birth of court for chemistry and becoming intimate with chemistry in the epilogue.

  3. Framework for Analysis of Mitigation in Courts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    examinations in six Swedish (Andenaes, 1968; Inger, 1986) and five Bulgarian (Terziev, 1987) court trials. Altogether the bilingual corpus consists of 46 000...not be mitigated because they do not have unwelcome effect, which is problematic to apply especially in intercultural communication perspective...Acknowledgements I express my gratitude to Jens Allwood and The Swedish Foundation of International Cooperation in Research and Higher Education (STINT) for

  4. Do Melt Inclusions Answer Big Questions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, A. W.; Sobolev, A. V.

    2009-12-01

    In a pioneering paper, Sobolev and Shimizu (1993) demonstrated the existence of ultra-depleted melt inclusions in olivine phenocrysts in MORB. They interpreted these as evidence for the preservation of parental melts formed by progressive near-fractional melting. Subsequently many cases have been described where melt inclusions from single basalt samples display enormous chemical and isotopic heterogeneity. The interpretation of these observations hinges critically on whether such melt inclusions can faithfully preserve primary or parental melt composition. If they do, melt inclusion data can truly answer big questions from small-scale observations. If they do not, they answer rather small questions. Favoring the second possibility, Danyushevsky et al. (2004) have suggested that much of the observed variability of highly incompatible trace elements in melt inclusions “may not represent geologically significant melts, but instead reflect localized, grain-scale reaction processes within the magmatic plumbing system.” We disagree and show that this mechanism cannot, for example, explain isotopic heterogeneity measured in several suites of melt inclusions, nor does it not account for the presence of ultra-depleted melts and "ghost" plagioclase signatures in other inclusions. More recently, Spandler et al. (2007) have suggested on the basis of experimental evidence that diffusion rates for REE in olivine are so rapid that parental melt compositions in melt inclusions are rapidly falsified by diffusional exchange with (evolved) host lava. We show that the very fact that extreme chemical and isotopic heterogeneities are routinely preserved in melt inclusions demonstrates that this conclusion is unwarranted, either because residence times of the olivine phenocrysts are much shorter than assumed by Spandler et al. or because the high experimental diffusion rates are caused by an unknown experimental artifact. Although there is no obvious flaw in design and execution of

  5. The Effect of Urban Neighborhood Disorder on Evaluations of the Police and Courts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprott, Jane B.; Doob, Anthony N.

    2009-01-01

    Are people dissatisfied with the courts as well as the police when they perceive high levels of disorder in their neighborhoods? Consistent with previous research, this study, using a representative sample of Canadian adults, demonstrates that people are significantly more negative about the police when they perceive high levels of disorder. They…

  6. Procedural Justice in Dutch Administrative Court Proceedings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Verburg

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss recent developments in administrative court proceedings in the Netherlands, called the New Approach. Along with developments leading to the New Approach, it became clear that the insights from research on procedural justice deserve particular attention. The goals of the judge's actions in this respect are both that the proceedings are fair and just and that parties perceive the way they are being treated during proceedings as fair and just.Within the New Approach we discern five procedural justice elements: (1 respect, (2 voice and due consideration, (3 some influence on how proceedings will continue, (4 an explanation of how the proceedings will continue and (5 direct interpersonal contact.The introduction of the New Approach shows two important bottlenecks in Dutch administrative court proceedings, which are (i the possible or supposed collision between legally right outcomes and  procedural justice and (ii the lack of uniformity and predictability.Although what we describe and discuss in this paper focuses on the Dutch situation, many of these considerations apply to administrative court proceedings in other countries. The themes and difficulties that face the administrative law judge seem to be common to many countries.

  7. Hodgkin lymphoma: answers take time!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, Jonathan W

    2011-05-19

    In this issue of Blood, Straus and colleagues on behalf of the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) present the outcome of a phase 2 trial of doxorubicin, vinblastine,and gemcitabine for patients with early-stage, non-bulky, Hodgkin lymphoma.The complete response rate and progression-free survival were inferior to comparable series, emphasizing the challenges of improving outcome in this highly curable population.

  8. Justice blocks and predictability of U.S. Supreme Court votes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Guimerà

    Full Text Available Successful attempts to predict judges' votes shed light into how legal decisions are made and, ultimately, into the behavior and evolution of the judiciary. Here, we investigate to what extent it is possible to make predictions of a justice's vote based on the other justices' votes in the same case. For our predictions, we use models and methods that have been developed to uncover hidden associations between actors in complex social networks. We show that these methods are more accurate at predicting justice's votes than forecasts made by legal experts and by algorithms that take into consideration the content of the cases. We argue that, within our framework, high predictability is a quantitative proxy for stable justice (and case blocks, which probably reflect stable a priori attitudes toward the law. We find that U.S. Supreme Court justice votes are more predictable than one would expect from an ideal court composed of perfectly independent justices. Deviations from ideal behavior are most apparent in divided 5-4 decisions, where justice blocks seem to be most stable. Moreover, we find evidence that justice predictability decreased during the 50-year period spanning from the Warren Court to the Rehnquist Court, and that aggregate court predictability has been significantly lower during Democratic presidencies. More broadly, our results show that it is possible to use methods developed for the analysis of complex social networks to quantitatively investigate historical questions related to political decision-making.

  9. Design and implementation of a caustic flooding EOR pilot at Court Bakken heavy oil reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, J.; Chung, B.; Leung, L. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Canadian Section, Calgary, AB (Canada)]|[Nexen Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    Successful waterflooding has been ongoing since 1988 at the Court Bakken heavy oil field in west central Saskatchewan. There are currently 20 injectors and 28 active oil producers in the Court main unit which is owned by Nexen and Pengrowth. The Court pool has an estimated 103.8 mmbbl of original oil in place (OOIP), of which 24 per cent has been successfully recovered after 20 years of waterflooding. A high-level enhanced oil recovery (EOR) screening study was conducted to evaluate other EOR technologies for a heavy oil reservoir of this viscosity range (17 degrees API). Laboratory studies showed that caustic flooding may enhance oil recovery after waterflooding at the Court Bakken heavy oil pool. A single well test demonstrated that caustic injection effectively reduced residual oil saturation. A sector model reservoir simulation revealed that caustic flood could achieve 9 per cent incremental oil recovery in the pilot area. Following the promising laboratory results, a successful caustic flood pilot was implemented at Court heavy oil pool where the major challenges encountered were low reservoir pressure and water channeling. 6 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs.

  10. Courts and health care rationing: the case of the Brazilian Federal Supreme Court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Daniel W L

    2013-01-01

    The recognition that access to health care is a constitutional right in Brazil has resulted in a situation in which citizens denied treatments by the public health care system have brought lawsuits against health authorities, claiming that their right to health was violated. This litigation forces the courts to decide between a patient-centred and a population-centred approach to public health - a choice that forces the courts to assess health care rationing decisions. This article analyses the judgments of the Brazilian Federal Supreme Court in right to health cases, arguing that the Court's recent decisions have been contrary to their long-standing stance against rationing. In 2009, the Court organized a public hearing to discuss this topic with civil society and established criteria to determine when rationing would be legal. However, I argue that these criteria for health care rationing do not adequately address the most difficult health care distribution dilemmas. They force the health care system to keep their rationing criteria implicit and make population-centred concerns secondary to individual-centred ones.

  11. Questions and Answers: Apple Juice and Arsenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Food Resources for You Consumers Questions & Answers: Apple Juice and Arsenic Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... MMA), may also be a health concern. Are apple and other fruit juices safe to drink? The ...

  12. One Answer to "What Is Calculus?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilgalis, Thomas W.

    1979-01-01

    A number of questions are posed that can be answered with the aid of calculus. These include best value problems, best shape problems, problems involving integration, and growth and decay problems. (MP)

  13. Why doctors do not answer referral letters

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the obvious benefits to patient care, answers to referral letters .... value on brevity and educational value than specialists.9 As brevity is preferred, PHC doctors ... suggested that personal contact plays an important role in the decision.

  14. Mobile Information Access with Spoken Query Answering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndsted, Tom; Larsen, Henrik Legind; Larsen, Lars Bo

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of information and service accessibility in mobile devices with limited resources. A solution is developed and tested through a prototype that applies state-of-the-art Distributed Speech Recognition (DSR) and knowledge-based Information Retrieval (IR) processing...... for spoken query answering. For the DSR part, a configurable DSR system is implemented on the basis of the ETSI-DSR advanced front-end and the SPHINX IV recognizer. For the knowledge-based IR part, a distributed system solution is developed for fast retrieval of the most relevant documents, with a text...... window focused over the part which most likely contains an answer to the query. The two systems are integrated into a full spoken query answering system. The prototype can answer queries and questions within the chosen football (soccer) test domain, but the system has the flexibility for being ported...

  15. Symmetry Breaking for Answer Set Programming

    CERN Document Server

    Drescher, Christian

    2010-01-01

    In the context of answer set programming, this work investigates symmetry detection and symmetry breaking to eliminate symmetric parts of the search space and, thereby, simplify the solution process. We contribute a reduction of symmetry detection to a graph automorphism problem which allows to extract symmetries of a logic program from the symmetries of the constructed coloured graph. We also propose an encoding of symmetry-breaking constraints in terms of permutation cycles and use only generators in this process which implicitly represent symmetries and always with exponential compression. These ideas are formulated as preprocessing and implemented in a completely automated flow that first detects symmetries from a given answer set program, adds symmetry-breaking constraints, and can be applied to any existing answer set solver. We demonstrate computational impact on benchmarks versus direct application of the solver. Furthermore, we explore symmetry breaking for answer set programming in two domains: firs...

  16. More superconductivity questions than answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, A L

    1987-07-17

    Although making liquid nitrogen-temperature superconductors is easy enough that high school science projects already feature them, researchers still have little idea how the new ceramic oxides work and therefore little guidance for improving them. At the International Workshop on Novel Mechanisms of Superconductivity, held from 22 to 26 June in Berkeley, California, theorists reviewed a host of competing explanations of how these materials come by their remarkable properties, but they could not, get far in sifting through the candidates for the best one. One cause of the unsettled situation is that theorists have not yet pushed their models far enough to make many specific predictions about physical properties and therefore to provide a reason to choose one theory over another. But experimental data for comparison with theory are lacking, too. For example, experimentalists are just now succeeding in being able to grow single crystals and thin films of the ceramic oxide superconductors, whose properties were shown at the workshop to be highly anisotropic. Measurements already made on the polycrystalline sintered material available up to now are difficult to interpret and therefore need to be repeated on good-quality crystals and films, where the variation of properties with crystallographic orientation can be mapped out. Given the high level of Japanese activity in the field, it was surprising that no researchers from industrial laboratories in Japan presented their findings at the workshop. In the light of a budding international competition in commercializing superconductors, some American scientists interpreted the absence as an attempt to protect proprietary advances. A more pleasant surprise was the attendance of a delegation of six Soviet scientists, although one of the fathers of superconductivity theory, Vitaly Ginzburg of the P.N.Lebedev Institute of Physics in Moscow, who was expected, did not come.

  17. Open-ended visual question answering

    OpenAIRE

    Masuda Mora, Issey

    2016-01-01

    Wearable cameras generate a large amount of photos which are, in many cases, useless or redundant. On the other hand, these devices are provide an excellent opportunity to create automatic questions and answers for reminiscence therapy. This is a follow up of the BSc thesis developed by Ricard Mestre during Fall 2014, and MSc thesis developed by Aniol Lidon. This thesis studies methods to solve Visual Question-Answering (VQA) tasks with a Deep Learning framework. As a preliminary step, we ...

  18. Problems and Answers in Wave Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Ryabukho, Vladimir P

    2011-01-01

    Looking for a deeper understanding of electromagnetic wave propagation? Need a resource of practice problems to hone your skills? With 272 selected problems and answers, this study aid is a powerful supplement to the study of wave optics. This question-and-answer collection covers the basics of wave propagation, reflection, refraction, anisotropic media, interference, diffraction, and coherence, written by a mentor with decades of experience instructing students.

  19. Is Local Community the Answer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Ole; Olwig, Mette Fog

    2015-01-01

    in a broader context. The article specifically questions approaches to disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation that see “local community knowledge” as a vital means to achieving resilience in socio-ecological systems. We argue that rural villages in Central Vietnam are characterised by highly......, it is found to be anthropocentric, externally oriented, sometimes opportunistic, and ultimately oriented towards an urban lifestyle—traits that are strongly rewarded by the Vietnamese state. We conclude that, at present, local aspirations may not necessarily be part of the solution, but may form part...

  20. DISPARITY OF PUNISHMENT AT THE COURT OF THE CRIME OF CORRUPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arifuddin -

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Research on the judge's ruling against the disparity of offender criminal acts of corruption as well as the factors that influence the occurrence of the judge's verdict, the disparity was held in the Court of a criminal offence, Corruption in the courts, the courts of Makassar Tipikor Tipikor Bandung, with this type of problem identification research perskriptif-shaped, with the descriptive nature of the use of legal normative approach. Primary data obtained through interviews with as many as 15 judges and prosecutors as well as 7 5 academics 3 advocates determination technique done with a sample of secondary data and sampling purporsiv acquired through the study of librarianship is analyzed then qualitatively.The research results showed that determination of the disparity, mistakes and condemnation to the perpetrator of the criminal offence of corruption in the courts, the courts of Makassar Tipikor Ti [ikor Jakarta and Bandung Tipikor Court as well as in the great Mahkama occurs because positive Indonesia corruption criminal law that gives broad freedom to determine fault and criminal type (strafsoort both weighs criminal ringannya or (strafmaat to the perpetrator of the criminal offence of corruption all not under the minimum standard of judgment and memlampaui the maximum punishment standards defined in legislation the eradication of criminal acts of corruption. Factors that cause the occurrence of an error or judgment determining the disparity to the perpetrator of the criminal offence of corruption in the courts, the courts of Makassar Tipikor Ti [ikor Jakarta and Bandung Tipikor Court as well as in legal substance Agungadalah Mahkama factor, which gives freedom to the judge in deciding guilt and punishment inflicted to the defendant, politics and power, because the perpetrator of the criminal offence of corruption involves many officials or former officials of the regional social stratification, which is strong in the Association

  1. A Pilot Test of a Mobile App for Drug Court Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kimberly; Richards, Stephanie; Chih, Ming-Yuan; Moon, Tae Joon; Curtis, Hilary; Gustafson, David H

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. criminal justice system refers more people to substance abuse treatment than any other system. Low treatment completion rates and high relapse rates among addicted offenders highlight the need for better substance use disorder treatment and recovery tools. Mobile health applications (apps) may fill that need by providing continuous support. In this pilot test, 30 participants in a Massachusetts drug court program used A-CHESS, a mobile app for recovery support and relapse prevention, over a four-month period. Over the course of the study period, participants opened A-CHESS on average of 62% of the days that they had the app. Social networking tools were the most utilized services. The study results suggest that drug court participants will make regular use of a recovery support app. This pilot study sought to find out if addicted offenders in a drug court program would use a mobile application to support and manage their recovery.

  2. India: Court upholds patent law denying patents for slightly modified versions of existing drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swamy, Madhavi

    2007-12-01

    In August 2007, the Madras High Court struck down a petition by the Swiss pharmaceutical company Novartis to declare the anti-evergreening provision in Indian patent law invalid. Evergreening is the practice of effectively extending the patent on a drug by filing a new patent for a marginal modification to that drug, such as a change in its shape, dosing range or color. The Court's decision is critical for global access to essential medicines in the form of affordable generic drugs from India

  3. Justice blocks and predictability of US Supreme Court votes

    CERN Document Server

    Guimera, Roger; 10.1371/journal.pone.0027188

    2012-01-01

    Successful attempts to predict judges' votes shed light into how legal decisions are made and, ultimately, into the behavior and evolution of the judiciary. Here, we investigate to what extent it is possible to make predictions of a justice's vote based on the other justices' votes in the same case. For our predictions, we use models and methods that have been developed to uncover hidden associations between actors in complex social networks. We show that these methods are more accurate at predicting justice's votes than forecasts made by legal experts and by algorithms that take into consideration the content of the cases. We argue that, within our framework, high predictability is a quantitative proxy for stable justice (and case) blocks, which probably reflect stable a priori attitudes toward the law. We find that U. S. Supreme Court justice votes are more predictable than one would expect from an ideal court composed of perfectly independent justices. Deviations from ideal behavior are most apparent in di...

  4. Cooperation between national administrative courts- the Court of the European Union and the European Court for the Protection of Fundamental Rights and Freedoms in implementing administrative court decisions after the Lisabon Treaty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosiljka Britvić Vetma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few decades, national administrative courts have been faced with several Copernican twists. Among them has been the ratification of the European Convention for the protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms as well as accession to the EU legal order. The authors of this paper believe it is necessary to mark the most recent changes, which have occurred as a result of Croatia gaining full membership to the EU. This includes in the cooperation among the national administrative courts, the Court of the European Union and the European Court for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms in the implementation of the decisions by administrative courts. The aim of this cooperation is to avoid the conflicting court practice for the same case or the same legal problem. The authors here concisely examine the period “after” the Lisbon Treaty, noting certain difficulties and sources of conflict in implementation.

  5. THE JURISDICTION OF THE COURT OF JUSTICE OF THE EUROPEAN UNION TO DELIVER A CANCELLATION JUDGMENT REGARDING THE INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS TO WHICH THE EU IS PARTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana-Mariana POPESCU

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the case where international agreements are treated as legal acts of EU institutions, they may be subject to judicial review exercised by the Court in Luxembourg. Given the fact that we assimilate international agreements to legal acts of the European Union, we would be tempted to ask ourselves the following questions: to what extent declaring an agreement, by a judgment of the Court of Justice of the EU delivered in the action for cancellation, as being inapplicable to the EU legal order, affects the security of international relationships? If these relationships are affected, is it possible to exclude the subsequent verification conducted by the Court? In the study below, our purpose is to find answer to these questions.

  6. Introduction. National Courts vis-à-vis EU Law

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayoral, Juan A.; Wind, Marlene

    2016-01-01

    National Courts and EU Law examines both how and why national courts and judges are involved in the process of legal integration within the European Union. As well as reviewing conventional thinking, the book presents new legal and empirical insights into the issue of judicial behaviour...... in this process. The expert contributors provide a critical analysis of the key questions, examining the role of national courts in relation to the application of various EU legal instruments....

  7. Structured mayhem: personal experiences of the Crown Court

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobson, Jessica; Hunter, G.; Kirby, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis: A CJA briefing on the sometimes harrowing experiences of victims, witnesses and defendants in a wide-ranging series of Crown Court cases. Structured Mayhem is a digest of a remarkable piece of research carried by the Institute for Criminal Policy Research. Featuring extensive interviews with court users it furnishes a stark reminder that, for all the progress made in recent years, our courts all too often still cause huge frustration and distress to victims and witnesses, and also d...

  8. Estimation of damping for one of the new European court towers in Luxembourg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Brandt, Anders; Georgakis, Christos T.

    2011-01-01

    The two new high rise buildings for the European Court of Justice in Luxembourg have been tested by harmonic shakers and by Operational Modal Analysis. The background for the tests is to estimate the influence on the damping of one of the towers from an array of Tuned Liquid Dampers (TLDs) placed...

  9. Estimation of Damping for one of the new European Court Towers in Luxembourg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Brandt, Anders; Georgakis, Christos

    2011-01-01

    The two new high rise buildings for the European court in Luxembourg have been tested by a harmonic shaker and by Operational Modal Analysis. The background for the tests is to estimate the influence on the damping of one of the towers from a series of Tuned Liquid Dampers (TLDs) placed on top of...

  10. Arms and the man: the US Supreme Court anno domine 2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Kurzbauer

    2008-01-01

    Commas and other grammatical inflections are more often associated with the basics of legal English than with the lofty decisions of a high court. Yet as every eager law student knows, a grammatical interpretation of legal documents is one of the most important tools for juridical analysis. The lace

  11. The CISG in Denmark and Danish Courts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lookofsky, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    In this article the author explores key aspects of Denmark’s reception and implementation of the 1980 United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sales of Goods (CISG). Placing the treaty within its larger private law context, the author explains the complexity and confusion...... the problematical relationship between these international obligations and the Danish judicial tradition of formulating premises so brief that they shed little light on the decision’s underlying rationale ( ratio decidendi ). Following analysis and critique of three Danish CISG court judgments which help illustrate...

  12. THE RIGHT TO AN INDEPENDENT COURT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALIN-GHEORGHE GAVRILESCU

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The independence of the court is essential of state of rule, to maintain the stability in juridical intercourse, for the existence of a constitutional democracy achieved through a warranty of the necessary objectivity for the steady and legal settlement of the causes deducted to the trial and the achievement of a fair trial. The article emphasizes the main international juridical tools in which independence of justice is reflected, achieving an examination of judicial practice of European instance as well as an analysis of this principle as it is regulated by Romanian justice.

  13. Who can monitor the court interpreter's performance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsen, Bodil

    2009-01-01

    to assume that they are able to monitor and thus evaluate the interpreting if the foreign language used in court belongs to the major ones within the Danish educational system, like English or French, contrary to "exotic" migrant languages. This paper highlights the problem that the interpreted proceedings...... are far less transparent for the legal participants than they normally assume. This problem, in turn, stresses the importance of a) the interpreter's competence and self-awareness and b) the use of check interpreters.  ...

  14. Indigenous Partner Violence, Indigenous Sentencing Courts, and Pathways to Desistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Elena; Daly, Kathleen

    2016-09-13

    Mainstream sentencing courts do little to change the behavior of partner violence offenders, let alone members of more socially marginal groups. Indigenous offenders face a court system that has little relevance to the complexity of their relations and lived experiences. Assisted by respected Elders and Community Representatives, Australian Indigenous sentencing courts seek to create a more meaningful sentencing process that has a deeper impact on Indigenous offenders' attitudes and, ultimately, their behavior. Drawing from interviews with 30 Indigenous offenders, we explore the ways in which the courts can motivate Indigenous partner violence offenders on pathways to desistence.

  15. Clinton asks court to rule against assisted suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-11-29

    The U.S. Supreme Court has been urged by the Clinton Administration to overturn two appeals court rulings that bar States from enforcing laws that prohibit doctor-assisted suicide. Solicitor General Walter Dellinger asked the court to reverse rulings by the 2nd and 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals blocking New York and Washington States from arresting doctors who hasten the death of patients. In both cases, the plaintiff included people with AIDS and their caregivers. President Clinton previously stated that he opposes euthanasia. AIDS policy advocates generally support legalizing assisted suicide and were disappointed in the administration's involvement in these cases.

  16. Regional International Courts in Search of Relevance - Adjudicating Politically Sensitive Disputes in Central America and the Caribbean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caserta, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    integration. The article posits that the scholarship on delegation to ICs is only partially able to provide an answer to this question. It, hence, suggests an alternative theoretical framework by relying on transnational field theory and reflexive sociology. The article demonstrates that, despite the rhetoric...... of their founding documents, both the CACJ and the CCJ were only partially established to pursue regional economic integration. Instead, both Courts were fashioned at the crossroad of several – and at times even conflicting – forms of legality, power battles, professional interests, and visions of the world...... that shaped the Central American and Caribbean legal fields over time. Seen through the diachronic lens of the interests, ideologies, professional practices, and visions of the world of the actors inhabiting the Central American and Caribbean legal fields, the involvement of the two Courts in politically...

  17. Reasoning about Actions with Temporal Answer Sets

    CERN Document Server

    Giordano, Laura; Dupré, Daniele Theseider

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we combine Answer Set Programming (ASP) with Dynamic Linear Time Temporal Logic (DLTL) to define a temporal logic programming language for reasoning about complex actions and infinite computations. DLTL extends propositional temporal logic of linear time with regular programs of propositional dynamic logic, which are used for indexing temporal modalities. The action language allows general DLTL formulas to be included in domain descriptions to constrain the space of possible extensions. We introduce a notion of Temporal Answer Set for domain descriptions, based on the usual notion of Answer Set. Also, we provide a translation of domain descriptions into standard ASP and we use Bounded Model Checking techniques for the verification of DLTL constraints.

  18. Do Specialty Courts Achieve Better Outcomes for Children in Foster Care than General Courts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Frank A.; Gifford, Elizabeth J.; Eldred, Lindsey M.; Acquah, Kofi F.; Blevins, Claire E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed the effects of unified family and drug treatment courts (DTCs) on the resolution of cases involving foster care children and the resulting effects on school performance. Method: The first analytic step was to assess the impacts of presence of unified and DTCs in North Carolina counties on time children spent in…

  19. Court Interpreting in Denmark - the role of court interpreters in Danish courtrooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Bente

    1999-01-01

    that Danish court interpreters regularly fail to adhere to one of the rules stipulated under accuracy and completeness: the rule regarding additions. The contention is one of the hypotheses of a recently undertaken PhD project which aims at demonstrating the presence of additions in interpreter renditions...

  20. Obamacare's (3) Day(s) in Court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncrieff, Abigail R

    2012-06-01

    Before the oral arguments in late March, the vast majority of legal scholars felt confident that the Supreme Court of the United States would uphold the individual mandate against the constitutional challenge that 26 states have levied against it. Since the oral arguments, that confidence has been severely shaken. This article asks why legal scholars were so confident before the argument and what has made us so concerned since the argument. The article posits that certain fundamental characteristics of health insurance, particularly its unusual role in steering health-care consumption decisions, which distinguishes health insurance from standard kinds of indemnity insurance, should make the constitutional question easy, but the Obama Administration's legal team was understandably hesitant to highlight those unique characteristics in its arguments. Because the Supreme Court justices seemed not to understand the uniqueness of health insurance without the government's help and because the justices seemed unusually willing to adopt a new constitutional constraint in this case, the individual mandate appears to be in far greater jeopardy than we legal scholars anticipated.

  1. South African court rejects country's new constitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-09-20

    Fundamental principles designed to ensure that South Africa's new constitution upholds a wide range of individual rights and freedoms and establishes a responsive government with a balanced separation of powers, including recognition of the role of traditional tribal leadership, were adopted into the current interim constitution shortly before the 1994 free elections which brought Nelson Mandela and the African National Congress to power. In a judgement issued on September 6, 1996, South Africa's Constitutional Court rejected the country's new draft constitution, arguing that it failed to meet the standards of nine of the 34 principles established at the Kempton Park negotiations. The Constitutional Assembly is comprised of a joint meeting of the National Assembly and Senate. One of the court's major objections to the constitution concerned the proposed structure of rule, which was seen to give inadequate power to South Africa's nine provinces as compared with the national government. However, the bill of rights was almost entirely upheld. The bill would create a favorable environment for legalized abortion and guarantee a universal right of access to health care, including reproductive health services

  2. Trustworthiness and relevance in web-based clinical question answering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruchet, Sarah; Boyer, Célia; van der Plas, Lonneke

    2012-01-01

    Question answering systems try to give precise answers to a user's question posed in natural language. It is of utmost importance that the answers returned are relevant to the user's question. For clinical QA, the trustworthiness of answers is another important issue. Limiting the document collection to certified websites helps to improve the trustworthiness of answers. On the other hand, limited document collections are known to harm the relevancy of answers. We show, however, in a comparative evaluation, that promoting trustworthiness has no negative effect on the relevance of the retrieved answers in our clinical QA system. On the contrary, the answers found are in general more relevant.

  3. A topic clustering approach to finding similar questions from large question and answer archives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Nan Zhang

    Full Text Available With the blooming of Web 2.0, Community Question Answering (CQA services such as Yahoo! Answers (http://answers.yahoo.com, WikiAnswer (http://wiki.answers.com, and Baidu Zhidao (http://zhidao.baidu.com, etc., have emerged as alternatives for knowledge and information acquisition. Over time, a large number of question and answer (Q&A pairs with high quality devoted by human intelligence have been accumulated as a comprehensive knowledge base. Unlike the search engines, which return long lists of results, searching in the CQA services can obtain the correct answers to the question queries by automatically finding similar questions that have already been answered by other users. Hence, it greatly improves the efficiency of the online information retrieval. However, given a question query, finding the similar and well-answered questions is a non-trivial task. The main challenge is the word mismatch between question query (query and candidate question for retrieval (question. To investigate this problem, in this study, we capture the word semantic similarity between query and question by introducing the topic modeling approach. We then propose an unsupervised machine-learning approach to finding similar questions on CQA Q&A archives. The experimental results show that our proposed approach significantly outperforms the state-of-the-art methods.

  4. Natural Language Question Answering in Open Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Tufis

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available With the ever-growing volume of information on the web, the traditional search engines, returning hundreds or thousands of documents per query, become more and more demanding on the user patience in satisfying his/her information needs. Question Answering in Open Domains is a top research and development topic in current language technology. Unlike the standard search engines, based on the latest Information Retrieval (IR methods, open domain question-answering systems are expected to deliver not a list of documents that might be relevant for the user's query, but a sentence or a paragraph answering the question asked in natural language. This paper reports on the construction and testing of a Question Answering (QA system which builds on several web services developed at the Research Institute for Artificial Intelligence (ICIA/RACAI. The evaluation of the system has been independently done by the organizers of the ResPubliQA 2009 exercise and has been rated the best performing system with the highest improvement due to the natural language processing technology over a baseline state-of-the-art IR system. The system was trained on a specific corpus, but its functionality is independent on the linguistic register of the training data.

  5. Zika Virus and Complications: Questions and Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... WHO Language عربي 中文 English Français Русский Español Zika virus and complications: Questions and answers Online Q& ... mosquitoes are present that can transmit the virus. Zika virus How do people catch Zika virus? Zika ...

  6. Understanding the Minimum Wage: Issues and Answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Employment Policies Inst. Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This booklet, which is designed to clarify facts regarding the minimum wage's impact on marketplace economics, contains a total of 31 questions and answers pertaining to the following topics: relationship between minimum wages and poverty; impacts of changes in the minimum wage on welfare reform; and possible effects of changes in the minimum wage…

  7. Fouled Anchors: The CONSTELLATION Question Answered

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    1711804 87AU 73 89-1-3401 11. TITLE (kcn e S.cE) Caut,.cawn) Fouled Anchors: The Constellation Question Answered IL. PERSONA .. AUTHOPS) Wegner, Dana M...was familia , with the unaltered Constellation in Newport and, unknown to the Committee, had indeed visited the ship once in Baltimore (see p. 45). It is

  8. Question and Answer Guide to OCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Sidney S. C.

    The purpose of this guide is to provide basic factual information about the Ohio College Library Center (OCLC), its data base, its operation, and its functions. It is intended for libraries which have not yet participated in OCLC, but would be useful as a reference guide in all libraries. Presented in question and answer form, the guide consists…

  9. 20 CFR 901.37 - Answer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Answer. 901.37 Section 901.37 Employees' Benefits JOINT BOARD FOR THE ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE PERFORMANCE OF ACTUARIAL SERVICES UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 Suspension or Termination of...

  10. Questions & Answers about...Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This fact sheet answers general questions about Marfan syndrome, a heritable condition that affects the connective tissue. It describes the characteristics of the disorder, the diagnostic process, and ways to manage symptoms. Characteristics include: (1) people with Marfan syndrome are typically very tall, slender, and loose jointed; (2) more than…

  11. Test Theory Without an Answer Key.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelder, William H.; Romney, A. Kimball

    1988-01-01

    A general model is presented for homogeneous, dichotomous items when the answer key is unknown. The model is related to the two-class latent structure model with the roles of respondents and items interchanged. Iterative maximum likelihood estimates of parameters and Monte Carlo assessment of estimation methods are described. (TJH)

  12. 41 CFR 105-70.009 - Answer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Answer. 105-70.009 Section 105-70.009 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION Regional Offices-General Services Administration...

  13. Answering Wh- Questions About Sentences and Text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Murray

    1986-01-01

    Describes a study designed to identify the mental operations that contribute to people's ability to answer wh- questions, that is, questions which request information that plays a particular role in relation to some action or event. Wh- questions are signaled by interrogative pronouns and adverbs like who, what, when, and where. (SED)

  14. Conscience in Childhood: Old Questions, New Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksan, Nazan; Kochanska, Grazyna

    2005-01-01

    Although conscience has been the focus of reflection for centuries, fundamental questions regarding its organization have not been fully answered. To address those questions, the authors applied structural equation modeling techniques to longitudinal data comprising multiple behavioral measures of children's conscience, obtained in parallel…

  15. 12 CFR 308.19 - Answer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... and must admit, deny, or state that the party lacks sufficient information to admit or deny each allegation of fact. A statement of lack of information has the effect of a denial. Denials must fairly meet... the failure to file a timely answer, the administrative law judge shall file with the Board...

  16. Conn. hospital's conduct violated labor law--court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burda, D

    1992-01-20

    A federal appeals court in New York has ruled that Waterbury (Conn.) Hospital violated federal labor law in 1986 when it hired replacement nurses rather than returning striking nurses to fill certain hospital jobs. The court said the hospital didn't meet all the conditions under which it is allowable to hire permanent replacements during a strike.

  17. Assisted Reproduction and the Courts: The Case of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maule, Linda S.; Schmid, Karen

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors analyze appellate court cases heard in California between 1960 and 2000 that focus on the status of children conceived through reproductive technology in an effort to examine the role of the courts in defining parentage and family in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. In the absence of legislation, the primary…

  18. 20 CFR 405.515 - Application of circuit court law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Application of circuit court law. 405.515 Section 405.515 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATIVE REVIEW PROCESS FOR ADJUDICATING INITIAL DISABILITY CLAIMS Judicial Review § 405.515 Application of circuit court law. We...

  19. Finding Vredo: the Dutch Supreme Court decision on escitalopram

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsoutsanis, A.

    2014-01-01

    This article is about the pharma patent litigation sparked by Lundbeck's blockbuster drug for escitalopram. The article focuses on the trials and tribulations before the Dutch Patent Court of Appeal and the Supreme Court, while also briefly contrasting and comparing this with the decisions in German

  20. Abused and Neglected Children in Court: Knowledge and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Stephanie D.; Oran, Howard; Oran, Diane; Baumrind, Nikki; Goodman, Gail S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: After maltreated children are taken into protective custody, dependency courts determine the children's placements. Many, if not most, maltreated children never attend their dependency court hearings. We had the rare opportunity to interview children in a jurisdiction where children regularly attend their detention hearings in…

  1. 78 FR 14271 - Manual for Courts-Martial; Proposed Amendments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    ... of the Secretary Manual for Courts-Martial; Proposed Amendments AGENCY: Joint Service Committee on... amendments to the Manual for Courts-Martial, United States (2012 ed.)(MCM). SUMMARY: The Joint Service Committee on Military Justice (JSC) is publishing final proposed amendments to the Manual for...

  2. 22 CFR 19.6 - Court orders and divorce decrees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Court orders and divorce decrees. 19.6 Section 19.6 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PERSONNEL BENEFITS FOR SPOUSES AND FORMER SPOUSES OF PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.6 Court orders and divorce decrees....

  3. Teen Courts: A Focus on Research. OJJDP Bulletin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butts, Jeffrey A.; Buck, Janeen

    The teen court concept has gained popularity in recent years as juvenile courts have had to deal with increased numbers of serious, violent, and chronic juvenile offenders. Its acceptance has been fueled, in part, by positive anecdotal reports from those involved with this peer-centered approach. Growing from a handful of programs in the 1960s,…

  4. Smells Like Teen Spirit: Evaluating a Midwestern Teen Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Michael; Twill, Sarah; Kim, Chigon

    2011-01-01

    Teen courts have grown rapidly in the United States despite little evidence of their effectiveness. A survival analysis of 635 teen court and 186 regular diversion participants showed no significant differences in recidivism, although program completers were half as likely to reoffend as noncompleters. Older offenders survived significantly better…

  5. Abused and Neglected Children in Court: Knowledge and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Stephanie D.; Oran, Howard; Oran, Diane; Baumrind, Nikki; Goodman, Gail S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: After maltreated children are taken into protective custody, dependency courts determine the children's placements. Many, if not most, maltreated children never attend their dependency court hearings. We had the rare opportunity to interview children in a jurisdiction where children regularly attend their detention hearings in…

  6. Perceived Masculinity Predicts U.S. Supreme Court Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Daniel; Halberstam, Yosh; Yu, Alan C L

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies suggest a significant role of language in the court room, yet none has identified a definitive correlation between vocal characteristics and court outcomes. This paper demonstrates that voice-based snap judgments based solely on the introductory sentence of lawyers arguing in front of the Supreme Court of the United States predict outcomes in the Court. In this study, participants rated the opening statement of male advocates arguing before the Supreme Court between 1998 and 2012 in terms of masculinity, attractiveness, confidence, intelligence, trustworthiness, and aggressiveness. We found significant correlation between vocal characteristics and court outcomes and the correlation is specific to perceived masculinity even when judgment of masculinity is based only on less than three seconds of exposure to a lawyer's speech sample. Specifically, male advocates are more likely to win when they are perceived as less masculine. No other personality dimension predicts court outcomes. While this study does not aim to establish any causal connections, our findings suggest that vocal characteristics may be relevant in even as solemn a setting as the Supreme Court of the United States.

  7. The Extra-Curricular Perspective: The Moot Court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouse, Janice Shaw; Thorpe, Judie Mosier

    At Ball State (Indiana) University, the moot court format's replication of real-world advocacy has been found far more conducive to teaching ethics and values than debate because it provides internal monitoring devices and instantaneous feedback. Of course, the main purpose of the moot court is to polish communication skills. Still, even with this…

  8. Domestic Violence and Dependency Courts: The "Greenbook" Demonstration Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Neena M.; Silverman, Jerry; Wang, Kathleen; Janczewski, Colleen

    2008-01-01

    This field study reports on a cross-site evaluation of dependency courts in communities receiving federal funding to implement the "Greenbook" initiative, a multisite demonstration for community improvement of coordinated responses to families victimized by domestic violence and child maltreatment. This article focuses on the dependency court,…

  9. 38 CFR 3.214 - Court decisions; unremarried surviving spouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...; unremarried surviving spouses. 3.214 Section 3.214 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF... Requirements § 3.214 Court decisions; unremarried surviving spouses. Effective July 15, 1958, a decision rendered by a Federal court in an action to which the United States was a party holding that a...

  10. Individual Factors Predicting Mental Health Court Diversion Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaaff, Ashley; Scott, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study examined which individual factors predict mental health court diversion outcome among a sample of persons with mental illness participating in a postcharge diversion program. Method: The study employed secondary analysis of existing program records for 419 persons with mental illness in a court diversion program. Results:…

  11. Smells Like Teen Spirit: Evaluating a Midwestern Teen Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Michael; Twill, Sarah; Kim, Chigon

    2011-01-01

    Teen courts have grown rapidly in the United States despite little evidence of their effectiveness. A survival analysis of 635 teen court and 186 regular diversion participants showed no significant differences in recidivism, although program completers were half as likely to reoffend as noncompleters. Older offenders survived significantly better…

  12. Brandeis Lawsuit Puts Campus Courts in the Dock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gose, Ben

    2000-01-01

    Analyzes the case of a Brandeis University student found guilty of "unwanted sexual activity" by a university judicial panel. The student sued Brandeis, and the Massachusets Appeals Court ruled against Brandeis despite the court's customary deference to the decision making of private institutions. Ten other colleges are supporting…

  13. APLIKASI QUESTION ANSWERING SYSTEM DENGAN METODE RULE-BASED QUESTION ANSWERING SYSTEM PADA ALKITAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Handojo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Bible as the holy book of Christians who are very close to the religious life and as a moral guide for Christians. So the Bible become a necessity when a christians want to search for for specific data or information. But sometimes to find the answer to a question people sometimes having a trouble, because people did not know how to find the answer that they are looking for at the verses in the Bible that’s relatively large of amount. Therefore an application that have an ability to provide answers from the Bible verses that have the possibility of answers to questions raised by the user is needed. Where users can enter questions using keyword when, where, why, whom and what. Question Answering System Application will operate on a digital Bible in Indonesian language by using Rule-Based Question Answering System and created using Visual Basic 6.0 and Microsoft Access 2003 database. Based on application testing that made, the aplication has been able to find answers to the questions that asked according to the keywords. Meanwhile, based on testing with the questionnaire, the application obtained an average percentage of 77.2% from the respondents.

  14. The Constitutional Court and the Imperative of its Reform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Gilia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent debates on the upcoming review of the Constitution have determined us to pay close attention to the basic institution in a democratic state, that is the Constitutional Court. Being caught in the crossfire between power and opposition, the Constitutional Court had a hard time lately, facing severe attacks. The aim of our study is to analyze the evolution of the Constitutional Court within the inland constitutional system, particularly bringing up the flaws describing the Court’s activity. We have also analyzed the proposals put forth by several bodies or experts regarding the constitutional contentious court. At the end of our study, following an analysis of different constitutional types of constitutional review, used by a number of states in Europe, we introduced several resolutions that may improve the role, the course and, last but not least, the activity of the Romanian Constitutional Court.

  15. DEFINITION OF TYPOS IN ANSWER OF STUDENT IN KNOWN CORRECT ANSWER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria V. Biryukova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes method of typo detection in the answers for the questions with open answers. In such questions we know one or several correct answers defining relatively small dictionary of correct words contrasting the usual case of looking for typos in arbitrary text. This fact allows using more complex analysis methods and finding more possible typos, such as extra or missing separators. A typo correction module for the Correct Writing question type (for Moodle LMS was developed using proposed methods. 

  16. Implementation of the forced answering option within online surveys: Do higher item response rates come at the expense of participation and answer quality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Décieux Jean Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Online surveys have become a popular method for data gathering for many reasons, including low costs and the ability to collect data rapidly. However, online data collection is often conducted without adequate attention to implementation details. One example is the frequent use of the forced answering option, which forces the respondent to answer each question in order to proceed through the questionnaire. The avoidance of missing data is often the idea behind the use of the forced answering option. However, we suggest that the costs of a reactance effect in terms of quality reduction and unit nonresponse may be high because respondents typically have plausible reasons for not answering questions. The objective of the study reported in this paper was to test the influence of forced answering on dropout rates and data quality. The results show that requiring participants answer every question increases dropout rates and decreases quality of answers. Our findings suggest that the desire for a complete data set has to be balanced against the consequences of reduced data quality.

  17. The wicked in court: a neuroscientific primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobeña, Adolf

    2013-09-01

    The criminal cases of Anders Breivik, the Norwegian shooter, and Bernard Madoff, the fraudulent American financier, are used as prominent examples of the complexity that courts have to explore when judging the severity and responsibility of felonies performed by different types of psychopaths. I outline the brain circuits subserving morally charged decisions in ordinary citizens and in patients with gross lesions in the same areas, along with singularities in these brain systems that have been detected in psychopaths. These neural signatures, combined with thorough neuropsychological examination, will hopefully improve the diagnoses and prognoses of criminals with dangerous psychopathic traits. In this respect, the profiles of incarcerated members of gangs are used to exemplify and distinguish among typical niches and varieties of psychopathy within criminal organizations. A discussion follows, presenting the complexities of novel research that is increasing the sophistication of these challenging but key intersections between neuroscience and law.

  18. Private international Law in Chinese Courts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jin; DU Huanfang

    2006-01-01

    After the entry of China into World Trade Organization,there are problems such as jurisdiction,application of law,and judicial assistance,which need to be resolved step by step in judicial practice on foreign-related civil and commercial matters.As for private and international law problems in the Chinese courts,this paper analyses some general issues,including renovi,inter-temporal conflicts,and proof of foreign laws;reviews jurisdiction problems,for example,common jurisdiction versus special jurisdiction,selective jurisdiction versus presumptive jurisdiction and exclusive jurisdiction;discusses the choice of law problems such as the principle of party autonomy,the principle of the most significant judgment and international commercial arbitral award.

  19. Statistical mechanics of the US Supreme Court

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Edward D; Bialek, William

    2013-01-01

    We build simple models for the distribution of voting patterns in a group, using the Supreme Court of the United States as an example. The least structured, or maximum entropy, model that is consistent with the observed pairwise correlations among justices' votes is equivalent to an Ising spin glass. While all correlations (perhaps surprisingly) are positive, the effective pairwise interactions in the spin glass model have both signs, recovering some of our intuition that justices on opposite sides of the ideological spectrum should have a negative influence on one another. Despite the competing interactions, a strong tendency toward unanimity emerges from the model, and this agrees quantitatively with the data. The model shows that voting patterns are organized in a relatively simple "energy landscape," correctly predicts the extent to which each justice is correlated with the majority, and gives us a measure of the influence that justices exert on one another. These results suggest that simple models, groun...

  20. The Unified Patent Court (UPC) in Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Clement Salung; Schovsbo, Jens Hemmingsen; Riis, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The new common judiciary for European patents (UPC) will play a crucial role in the future European patent system. The UPC will be a very specialised court that i.a. recruits judges from specialists’ circles and has as part of its mission to develop a coherent and autonomous body of case law....... The article points out that the UPC because of this design will be biased towards technology based values and uniformity at the expense of other values and interests e.g. non-economic public interests, and values associated with diversity. The practical effects of these biases are analysed regarding cases...... involving ordre public and morality and scope of protection. The article shows that the biases will affect the law in all the areas discussed and that if unchecked they will reduce some of the “wriggling room” which the current system has provided. To maintain that room a focused effort by the UPC...

  1. Who can monitor the court interpreter's performance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsen, Bodil

    2009-01-01

    and the conflict about her competence was negotiated. Because of this unusual constellation, combined with a multi-method approach, this single case study can shed some light on the question of the participants' ability to monitor the interpreter's performance. Legal professional users of interpreters tend...... to assume that they are able to monitor and thus evaluate the interpreting if the foreign language used in court belongs to the major ones within the Danish educational system, like English or French, contrary to "exotic" migrant languages. This paper highlights the problem that the interpreted proceedings...... are far less transparent for the legal participants than they normally assume. This problem, in turn, stresses the importance of a) the interpreter's competence and self-awareness and b) the use of check interpreters.  ...

  2. Brain death: legal obligations and the courts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkle, Christopher M; Pope, Thaddeus M

    2015-04-01

    Brain death, or death determined by neurologic criteria, has been legally adopted in all U.S. states for decades. Despite its long-established history, a lack of clear understanding has led to disputes requiring a legal forum for resolution. Recently, physicians and hospitals across the country have been impacted by a growing number of disputes about brain death. The authors offer clinicians a historical perspective on the evolution of brain death as a legal cause of death in the United States. They then review the more common legal categories of disputes encountered, including representative court cases for each. This overview provides physicians with a general legal perspective on brain death so they may better appreciate the pertinent issues if and when later confronted.

  3. HIV Prevention for Juvenile Drug Court Offenders: A Randomized Controlled Trial Focusing on Affect Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolou-Shams, Marina; Houck, Christopher D.; Conrad, Selby M.; Tarantino, Nicholas; Stein, L.A.R.; Brown, Larry K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Juvenile drug court offenders have benefited from evidence-based interventions addressing antisocial behavior, mental health and/or substance use; however, interventions addressing HIV risk behavior are lacking. This study presents pilot findings and lessons learned from a group-based HIV prevention intervention delivered to juvenile drug court offenders. Methods Participants were randomized to a 5-session HIV Prevention (n =29) or Health Promotion (n=28) condition and completed measures of sexual risk taking and substance use at baseline and 3 month post-intervention. Results No between-group differences by time emerged on measures of sexual risk-taking or other HIV-related behaviors and attitudes. Both groups improved their rates of HIV testing and decreased their substance use during sex over time. Conclusions Delivering an HIV prevention intervention to drug court offenders is feasible; however, more intensive interventions that incorporate multiple systems and address co-occurring mental health difficulties may be needed to affect sexual behavioral change among these high-risk court-involved youth. PMID:21474529

  4. Finding Question-Answer Pairs from Online Forums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cong, Gao; Wang, Long; Lin, Chin-Yew;

    2008-01-01

    Online forums contain a huge amount of valuable user generated content. In this paper we address the problem of extracting question-answer pairs from forums. Question-answer pairs extracted from forums can be used to help Question Answering services (e.g. Yahoo! Answers) among other applications....

  5. Sustainable Questions: Determining the Expiration Date of Answers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Goede, B.; Schuth, A.; de Rijke, M.

    2012-01-01

    Community question answering platforms have large repositories of already answered questions. Reusing these answers for new questions is tempting. However, not all stored answers will still be relevant. In this study, we define a new and challenging problem concerning the sustainability of questions

  6. Domain and Intelligence Based Multimedia Question Answering System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K. Magesh; Valarmathie, P.

    2016-01-01

    Multimedia question answering systems have become very popular over the past few years. It allows users to share their thoughts by answering a given question or obtain information from a set of answered questions. However, existing QA systems support only textual answer which is not so instructive for many users. The user's discussion can be…

  7. Finding Question-Answer Pairs from Online Forums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cong, Gao; Wang, Long; Lin, Chin-Yew

    2008-01-01

    Online forums contain a huge amount of valuable user generated content. In this paper we address the problem of extracting question-answer pairs from forums. Question-answer pairs extracted from forums can be used to help Question Answering services (e.g. Yahoo! Answers) among other applications...

  8. The Hellenistic Royal Court. Court Culture, Ceremonial and Ideology in Greece, Egypt and the Near East, 336-30 BCE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strootman, R.

    2007-01-01

    In the Hellenistic empires of Alexander the Great and his successors in Greece, Egypt and the Near East, new forms of court culture and political ideology developed during the last three centuries BCE. Appropriated by Parthian kings and Roman emperors alike, the culture of these Macedonian courts ev

  9. A derivational rephrasing experiment for question answering

    CERN Document Server

    Jacquemin, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    In Knowledge Management, variations in information expressions have proven a real challenge. In particular, classical semantic relations (e.g. synonymy) do not connect words with different parts-of-speech. The method proposed tries to address this issue. It consists in building a derivational resource from a morphological derivation tool together with derivational guidelines from a dictionary in order to store only correct derivatives. This resource, combined with a syntactic parser, a semantic disambiguator and some derivational patterns, helps to reformulate an original sentence while keeping the initial meaning in a convincing manner This approach has been evaluated in three different ways: the precision of the derivatives produced from a lemma; its ability to provide well-formed reformulations from an original sentence, preserving the initial meaning; its impact on the results coping with a real issue, ie a question answering task . The evaluation of this approach through a question answering system shows...

  10. Backdoors to Tractable Answer-Set Programming

    CERN Document Server

    Fichte, Johannes Klaus

    2011-01-01

    We present a unifying approach to the efficient evaluation of propositional answer-set programs. Our approach is based on backdoors which are small sets of atoms that represent "clever reasoning shortcuts" through the search space. The concept of backdoors is widely used in the areas of propositional satisfiability and constraint satisfaction. We show how this concept can be adapted to the nonmonotonic setting and how it allows to augment various known tractable subproblems, such as the evaluation of Horn and acyclic programs. In order to use backdoors we need to find them first. We utilize recent advances in fixed-parameter algorithmics to detect small backdoors. This implies fixed-parameter tractability of the evaluation of propositional answer-set programs, parameterized by the size of backdoors. Hence backdoor size provides a structural parameter similar to the treewidth parameter previously considered. We show that backdoor size and treewidth are incomparable, hence there are instances that are hard for ...

  11. Searching for a question and an answer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Le Roux

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This article focusses on Eckart Otto’s theory of the Pentateuch, his contribution to Pro Pent (the “Project for the study of the Pentateuch” and his influence on our understanding of the first five books of the Hebrew Bible. There was something in his thinking that appealed to many South African scholars; an appeal that softened down the harsh criticism and blunted the sharp edges of Pentateuch study of the past two centuries. And this was accomplished by turning the focus to the theological and ethical issues, which were the driving forces behind the formation of the Pentateuch. Put differently: to show the Pentateuch as an answer to a question and Pentateuch criticism as a constant search for the questions to which the Pentateuch is answer.

  12. Crimes against humanity: the role of international courts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eder Milton Schneider

    Full Text Available We study the role of international tribunals, like the International Criminal Court (ICC, as an effective way of reducing the number and/or gravity of crimes against humanity. The action of the ICC is directed against leaders that promote or tolerate these kinds of crimes, that is, political authorities, army commanders, civil leaders, etc. In order to simulate the action of the ICC we build a hierarchical society where the most important leaders have the highest connectivity and can spread their points of view, or their orders, through a chain of less but still highly connected deputy chiefs or opinion chieftains. In this way, if they practice misconduct, corruption, or any kind of discriminatory or criminal actions against individuals or groups, it would very difficult and improbable that they will be prosecuted by the courts of their own country. It is to alleviate this situation that the ICC was created. Its mission is to process and condemn crimes against humanity though a supranational organism that can act on criminal leaders in any country. In this study, the action of the ICC is simulated by removing the corrupt leader and replacing it by a "decent" one. However, as the action of the corrupt leader could have spread among the population by the time the ICC acts, we try to determine if a unique action of the ICC is sufficient or if further actions are required, depending on the degree of deterioration of the human rights in the hypothetical country. The results evidence the positive effect of the ICC action with a relatively low number of interventions. The effect of the ICC is also compared with the action of the local national judiciary system.

  13. Crimes against humanity: the role of international courts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Eder Milton; Iglesias, José Roberto; Hallberg, Karen; Kuperman, Marcelo Néstor

    2014-01-01

    We study the role of international tribunals, like the International Criminal Court (ICC), as an effective way of reducing the number and/or gravity of crimes against humanity. The action of the ICC is directed against leaders that promote or tolerate these kinds of crimes, that is, political authorities, army commanders, civil leaders, etc. In order to simulate the action of the ICC we build a hierarchical society where the most important leaders have the highest connectivity and can spread their points of view, or their orders, through a chain of less but still highly connected deputy chiefs or opinion chieftains. In this way, if they practice misconduct, corruption, or any kind of discriminatory or criminal actions against individuals or groups, it would very difficult and improbable that they will be prosecuted by the courts of their own country. It is to alleviate this situation that the ICC was created. Its mission is to process and condemn crimes against humanity though a supranational organism that can act on criminal leaders in any country. In this study, the action of the ICC is simulated by removing the corrupt leader and replacing it by a "decent" one. However, as the action of the corrupt leader could have spread among the population by the time the ICC acts, we try to determine if a unique action of the ICC is sufficient or if further actions are required, depending on the degree of deterioration of the human rights in the hypothetical country. The results evidence the positive effect of the ICC action with a relatively low number of interventions. The effect of the ICC is also compared with the action of the local national judiciary system.

  14. Answers at your fingertips: Access to the Internet influences willingness to answer questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Amanda M; McLean, David; Risko, Evan F

    2015-12-01

    Recent technological advances have given rise to an information-gathering tool unparalleled by any in human history-the Internet. Understanding how access to such a powerful informational tool influences how we think represents an important question for psychological science. In the present investigation we examined the impact of access to the Internet on the metacognitive processes that govern our decisions about what we "know" and "don't know." Results demonstrated that access to the Internet influenced individuals' willingness to volunteer answers, which led to fewer correct answers overall but greater accuracy when an answer was offered. Critically, access to the Internet also influenced feeling-of-knowing, and this accounted for some (but not all) of the effect on willingness to volunteer answers. These findings demonstrate that access to the Internet can influence metacognitive processes, and contribute novel insights into the operation of the transactive memory system formed by people and the Internet.

  15. Probability Aggregates in Probability Answer Set Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Saad, Emad

    2013-01-01

    Probability answer set programming is a declarative programming that has been shown effective for representing and reasoning about a variety of probability reasoning tasks. However, the lack of probability aggregates, e.g. {\\em expected values}, in the language of disjunctive hybrid probability logic programs (DHPP) disallows the natural and concise representation of many interesting problems. In this paper, we extend DHPP to allow arbitrary probability aggregates. We introduce two types of p...

  16. ANSWER: A man with foot ulcer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prathibha Parampalli SUBRAHAMANYA

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available (Refer to page 210Answer: Eumycetoma (Madurella mycetoma or MaduramycosisMycetoma is an uncommon localised chronic infection of the skin and subcutaneous tissue that can be due to fungus (eumycetoma or bacteria (actinomycetoma. It is characterised by a triad of tumefaction, draining sinuses (usually in late stage and presence of the exudates containing colonial grains. Mycetoma infection is classified based on the aetiological agents and colour of the grains (Refer to supplementary text. 1

  17. Reserve Component Personnel Issues: Questions and Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-18

    to Handle Domestic Emergencies? The Posse Comitatus Act (18 U.S.C. 1385), along with other related laws and administrative provisions, prohibits...the use of the military to execute civilian laws unless expressly authorized by the Constitution or an act of Congress. As a part of the military, the...Questions and Answers Congressional Research Service Summary The Constitution provides Congress with broad powers over the Armed Forces, including the

  18. Structured Attentions for Visual Question Answering

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Chen; Zhao, Yanpeng; Huang, Shuaiyi; Tu, Kewei; Ma, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Visual attention, which assigns weights to image regions according to their relevance to a question, is considered as an indispensable part by most Visual Question Answering models. Although the questions may involve complex relations among multiple regions, few attention models can effectively encode such cross-region relations. In this paper, we demonstrate the importance of encoding such relations by showing the limited effective receptive field of ResNet on two datasets, and propose to mo...

  19. Safety Day Prize Competition: results and answers

    CERN Multimedia

    HSE Unit

    2014-01-01

    The three winners of the Safety Day Prize Competition are...   • 1st Prize: Fernando LEITE PEREIRA – smoke detector • 2nd Prize: Thomas DE BORTOLI – water filter jug • 3rd Prize: Matti KALLIOKOSKI – safety goggles Please see the image below for the answers to the questionnaire. If you have any questions regarding the Safety Day, please contact: safety.communication@cern.ch. And again, thank you to all the participants!

  20. The stormy waters of the International Criminal Court: universal fight against impunity or liberal universalization?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus Kowalski

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The universalistic dimension of the International Criminal Court's (ICC nature and function is clear. Yet, this dimension must be thoroughly defined. We must ask ‘what universalism’? A rational approach to international social relations is different from an ethical one. While the rational approach may lead to universalization of localized specific moral models (e.g. the liberal Western model promoting its hegemony, the ethical approach promotes diversity through considering non-reducible differences and common human phenomena in which only a minimal common ethics is universal. This paper argues that the answer to this structural question is crucial to understand if the ICC is essentially a hegemonic tool to expand the predominant Western liberal model or rather a mechanism to fight impunity acknowledging diversity and rooted on an ethical concern. We contend that the ICC is immersed in troubled waters where it is not always possible to separate a universalizing Western liberal approach from an ethical universal approach. Nevertheless, we conclude that the Court, even if partially and at times serves as tool for hegemony, is essentially defined by the universalization of the fight against impunity through reference to a minimal common ethics.

  1. Management of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) questions & answers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    This {open_quotes}Management of PCBs Questions and Answers{close_quotes} has been developed from a presentation given by Dr. John Smith of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the transcribed question and answer session which followed the presentation. Dr. Smith was featured at the first DOE complex-wide PCB Focus Group meeting held in San Francisco, California in December 1992. The meeting was attended by representatives from field elements who were actively involved in the management of PCBs. The meeting served as a forum for the exchange of information and discussion of PCB management issues. This document has been prepared as one of several guidance documents developed by the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance (EH-41) (formerly the Office of Environmental Guidance, EH-23) to assist DOE elements in their PCB management programs. This document is organized into three parts: (1) an introduction describing the conception and development of this document, (2) a summary of Dr. Smith`s presentation, and (3) the question and answer session.

  2. Expressiveness of Communication in Answer Set Programming

    CERN Document Server

    Bauters, Kim; Schockaert, Steven; Vermeir, Dirk; De Cock, Martine

    2011-01-01

    Answer set programming (ASP) is a form of declarative programming that allows to succinctly formulate and efficiently solve complex problems. An intuitive extension of this formalism is communicating ASP, in which multiple ASP programs collaborate to solve the problem at hand. However, the expressiveness of communicating ASP has not been thoroughly studied. In this paper, we present a systematic study of the additional expressiveness offered by allowing ASP programs to communicate. First, we consider a simple form of communication where programs are only allowed to ask questions to each other. For the most part, we deliberately only consider simple programs, i.e. programs for which computing the answer sets is in P. We find that the problem of deciding whether a literal is in some answer set of a communicating ASP program using simple communication is NP-hard. In other words: we move up a step in the polynomial hierarchy due to the ability of these simple ASP programs to communicate and collaborate. Second, w...

  3. Students' Comparison of Their Trigonometric Answers with the Answers of a Computer Algebra System in Terms of Equivalence and Correctness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonisson, Eno; Lepp, Marina

    2015-01-01

    The answers offered by computer algebra systems (CAS) can sometimes differ from those expected by the students or teachers. The comparison of the students' answers and CAS answers could provide ground for discussion about equivalence and correctness. Investigating the students' comparison of the answers gives the possibility to study different…

  4. Public Health and Law Collaboration: The Philadelphia Lead Court Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracely, Ed; Pan, Sarah; Cummings, Curtis; Palermo, Peter; Gould, George

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We determined whether Philadelphia Lead Court is effective in enforcing lead hazard remediation in the homes of children with elevated blood lead levels. Methods. We created a deidentified data set for properties with an initial failed home inspection (IFHI) for lead hazards from January 1, 1998, through December 31, 2008, and compared compliance rates within the first year and time to compliance for lead hazard remediation between 1998 and 2002 (precourt period) and between 2003 and 2008 (court period). We evaluated predictors of time to compliance. Results. Within 1 year of the IFHI, 6.6% of the precourt and 76.8% of the court cases achieved compliance (P < .001) for the 3764 homes with data. Four years after the IFHI, 18% had attained compliance in the precourt period compared with 83.1% for the court period (P < .001). A proportional hazard analysis found that compliance was 8 times more likely in the court than the precourt period (P < .001). Conclusions. Lead court was more effective than precourt enforcement strategies. Most properties were remediated within 1 year of the IFHI, and time to compliance was significantly reduced. This model court could be replicated in other cities with similar enforcement problems. PMID:23678927

  5. Manual for Courts-Martial, United States, 1984. Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    the case of general courts-martial, the law of war. Discussion -- (a) In generat, Courts-martial have power to, Irv any of courts-martial was...grant immunity. This subsection is based on paragraph 68h of MCM, 1969 (Rev.) and on United States v. Kirsch . 15 U.S.C.M.A. ., -’,,* " 84,35 C.M.R. 56...1964). See also UnitedStates v. Villines, supra. Kirsch recognized codal authority fora convening authority to grant immunity - . .-- .’. (see Articles

  6. The Supreme Court's surprising decision on the Medicaid expansion: how will the federal government and states proceed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Sara; Westmoreland, Timothy M

    2012-08-01

    In National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius, the US Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of the requirement that all Americans have affordable health insurance coverage. But in an unprecedented move, seven justices first declared the mandatory Medicaid eligibility expansion unconstitutional. Then five justices, led by Chief Justice John Roberts, prevented the outright elimination of the expansion by fashioning a remedy that simply limited the federal government's enforcement powers over its provisions and allowed states not to proceed with expanding Medicaid without losing all of their federal Medicaid funding. The Court's approach raises two fundamental issues: First, does the Court's holding also affect the existing Medicaid program or numerous other Affordable Care Act Medicaid amendments establishing minimum Medicaid program requirements? And second, does the health and human services secretary have the flexibility to modify the pace or scope of the expansion as a negotiating strategy with the states? The answers to these questions are key because of the foundational role played by Medicaid in health reform.

  7. IMPROVISATION OF SEEKER SATISFACTION IN YAHOO! COMMUNITY QUESTION ANSWERING PORTAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Latha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One popular Community question answering (CQA site, Yahoo! Answers, had attracted 120 million users worldwide, and had 400 million answers to questions available. A typical characteristic of such sites is that they allow anyone to post or answer any questions on any subject. Question Answering Community has emerged as popular, and often effective, means of information seeking on the web. By posting questions, for other participants to answer, information seekers can obtain specific answers to their questions. However, CQA is not always effective: in some cases, a user may obtain a perfect answer within minutes, and in others it may require hours and sometimes days until a satisfactory answer is contributed. We investigate the problem of predicting information seeker satisfaction in yahoo collaborative question answering communities, where we attempt to predict whether a question author will be satisfied with the answers submitted by the community participants. Our experimental results, obtained from a large scale evaluation over thousands of real questions and user ratings, demonstrate the feasibility of modeling and predicting asker satisfaction. We complement our results with a thorough investigation of the interactions and information seeking patterns in question answering communities that correlate with information seeker satisfaction. We also explore automatic ranking, creating abstract from retrieved answers, and history updation, which aims to provide users with what they want or need without explicitly ask them for user satisfaction. Our system could be useful for a variety of applications, such as answer selection, user feedback analysis, and ranking.

  8. Automatic Question Answering from Web Documents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xin; HU Dawei; LI Huan; HAO Tianyong; CHEN Enhong; LIU Wenyin

    2007-01-01

    A passage retrieval strategy for web-based question answering (QA) systems is proposed in our QA system. It firstly analyzes the question based on semantic patterns to obtain its syntactic and semantic information and then form initial queries. The queries are used to retrieve documents from the World Wide Web (WWW) using the Google search engine. The queries are then rewritten to form queries for passage retrieval in order to improve the precision. The relations between keywords in the question are employed in our query rewrite method. The experimental result on the question set of the TREC-2003 passage task shows that our system performs well for factoid questions.

  9. Did Darwin really answer Paley's question?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunnander, Björn

    2013-09-01

    It is commonly thought that natural selection explains the rise of adaptive complexity. Razeto-Barry and Frick (2011) have recently argued in favour of this view, dubbing it the Creative View. I argue that the Creative View is mistaken if it claims that natural selection serves to answer Paley's question. This is shown by a case that brings out the contrastive structure inherent in this demand for explanation. There is, however, a rather trivial sense in which specific environmental conditions are crucial for the rise of specific adaptations, but this is hardly what opponents of the Creative View are denying.

  10. Your business in court: 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, John B; Hall, Christopher R; Wartman, Gregory J

    2011-01-01

    During this period, FDA focused considerable effort on its transparency initiative, which is likely to continue into the coming year, as well as continuing to ramp up its enforcement activities, as we predicted last year. The scope of the agency's ability to pre-empt state laws in product liability litigation involving pharmaceutical products still is developing post-Levine, and we are likely to see new decisions in the coming year. Fraud and abuse enforcement still is a major factor facing the industry, with the added threat of personal exposure to criminal sentences, fines and debarment from participation in federal and state programs under the Responsible Corporate Officer doctrine, or under the authorities exercised by the Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Inspector General. Consequently, it is increasingly important that senior corporate officers ensure active oversight of an effective compliance program which should mitigate these risks. The Federal Trade Commission continues to battle consumer fraud, particularly respecting weight loss programs, and it appears to be fighting a losing battle in its effort to prevent "reverse" payments to generic manufacturers by Innovator Manufacturers to delay the introduction of generics to the market. The Securities and Exchange Commission continues to be actively enforcing the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. The Supreme Court gave shareholders more leeway in bringing stockholder suits in situations where a company conceals information that, if revealed, could have a negative effect on stock prices.

  11. Statistical Mechanics of US Supreme Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Edward; Broedersz, Chase; Bialek, William; Biophysics Theory Group Team

    2014-03-01

    We build simple models for the distribution of voting patterns in a group, using the Supreme Court of the United States as an example. The least structured, or maximum entropy, model that is consistent with the observed pairwise correlations among justices' votes is equivalent to an Ising spin glass. While all correlations (perhaps surprisingly) are positive, the effective pairwise interactions in the spin glass model have both signs, recovering some of our intuition that justices on opposite sides of the ideological spectrum should have a negative influence on one another. Despite the competing interactions, a strong tendency toward unanimity emerges from the model, and this agrees quantitatively with the data. The model shows that voting patterns are organized in a relatively simple ``energy landscape,'' correctly predicts the extent to which each justice is correlated with the majority, and gives us a measure of the influence that justices exert on one another. These results suggest that simple models, grounded in statistical physics, can capture essential features of collective decision making quantitatively, even in a complex political context. Funded by National Science Foundation Grants PHY-0957573 and CCF-0939370, WM Keck Foundation, Lewis-Sigler Fellowship, Burroughs Wellcome Fund, and Winston Foundation.

  12. Statistical Mechanics of the US Supreme Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Edward D.; Broedersz, Chase P.; Bialek, William

    2015-07-01

    We build simple models for the distribution of voting patterns in a group, using the Supreme Court of the United States as an example. The maximum entropy model consistent with the observed pairwise correlations among justices' votes, an Ising spin glass, agrees quantitatively with the data. While all correlations (perhaps surprisingly) are positive, the effective pairwise interactions in the spin glass model have both signs, recovering the intuition that ideologically opposite justices negatively influence each another. Despite the competing interactions, a strong tendency toward unanimity emerges from the model, organizing the voting patterns in a relatively simple "energy landscape." Besides unanimity, other energy minima in this landscape, or maxima in probability, correspond to prototypical voting states, such as the ideological split or a tightly correlated, conservative core. The model correctly predicts the correlation of justices with the majority and gives us a measure of their influence on the majority decision. These results suggest that simple models, grounded in statistical physics, can capture essential features of collective decision making quantitatively, even in a complex political context.

  13. the admissibility of subregional courts' decisions before the african ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AbdiJA

    (III). Art 7 empowers the African Court to apply the provisions of the African Charter .... November 1950 at Rome, entered into force on 3 September 1953. ..... admissibility criteria has been taken as one of the steps to reform the European.

  14. Communicating across cultures in South African law courts: Towards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    language lives "...in the minds and on the tongues of its users" (Ting-Toomey 1999: 5). ... scripted situations, we must become 'mindful' of our thought processes" (Gudykunst ... differences", often contribute to miscommunication in the courts.

  15. The South African Constitutional Court's Use Of Foreign Precedent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MJM Venter

    Empirical Study of the Use of Foreign Precedents by the South African .... empirical survey follows both a quantitative and a qualitative approach by ..... purposes.77 The Court compared some of the approaches in the judgments of the US.

  16. Withdrawal from the International Criminal Court: Does Africa have ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    has published a number of peer-reviewed articles on military law, international law and ... Keywords: ICC, African Union, African Court of Justice and Human. Rights ... Tobago's motion to combat drugs and trafficking through the establishment.

  17. Florida court asked to decide legality of limiting suits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-06-14

    The state Supreme Court of Florida will rule on the legitimacy of a statute that restricts the ability of a plaintiff to sue for damages arising from HIV-contaminated blood transfusion. Under the malpractice law, patients have 4 years from the time of injury to file suit. In most HIV and AIDS cases, however, symptoms do not appear within the 4-year period. The Broward County Circuit Court recently dismissed a contaminated blood transfusion suit based on the expiration of the 4-year statute of repose. The Court of Appeals held the trial judge's application of the law correct, but found the statute uniquely unfair and harsh in HIV/AIDS cases. The State Supreme Court has been asked to rule on the issue.

  18. US Supreme Court decisions, expert testimony, and implant dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    There have been 3 US Supreme Court decisions in the last 8 years that have established new rules of admissibility of expert witness testimony. These will have great bearing on the practice of oral implantology now and in the future.

  19. From the Bench -- Juvenile Courts: How and Why They Have Changed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nuys, Heather; Blitzman, Jay; Hibbler, William; Wakefield, Dana

    2000-01-01

    Offers four judges' perspectives on the various changes in the juvenile court system focusing on the increased violence among juveniles as having the greatest effect on the courts; includes issues such as juveniles being tried in adult courts, the need to improve juvenile courts, and the role of public interest. (CMK)

  20. The Effectiveness of Idaho DUI and Misdemeanor/DUI Courts: Outcome Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronan, Scott M.; Collins, Peter A.; Rosky, Jeffrey W.

    2009-01-01

    As DUI Courts continue to expand through the United States, research needs to match the growth to inform administrators and the public on the effectiveness of these courts. The current study found that participation in a DUI or Misdemeanor/DUI Drug Court (23%) reduced recidivism compared to a comparison group (37%) with court filing records that…

  1. Defendants with Intellectual Disabilities and Mental Health Diagnoses: Faring in a Mental Health Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, M. M.; Griggs, M.; Dykens, E. M.; Hodapp, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Begun in the late 1990s, mental health courts are specialty criminal courts developed to address the needs of persons with mental illness. Methods: As many persons with intellectual disabilities (IDs) may overlap in the mental health court system, we used mental health court records to examine the phenomenology and outcomes of 224…

  2. Defendants with Intellectual Disabilities and Mental Health Diagnoses: Faring in a Mental Health Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, M. M.; Griggs, M.; Dykens, E. M.; Hodapp, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Begun in the late 1990s, mental health courts are specialty criminal courts developed to address the needs of persons with mental illness. Methods: As many persons with intellectual disabilities (IDs) may overlap in the mental health court system, we used mental health court records to examine the phenomenology and outcomes of 224…

  3. Introduction: domestic courts as agents of development of international law

    OpenAIRE

    Tzanakopoulos, A.; Tams, C.J.

    2013-01-01

    This introductory paper to the symposium hosted by the Leiden Journal of International Law, and edited by the authors, deals with the function of domestic courts as agents for the development of international law. The paper ‘sets the scene’ for the contributions to the symposium, which seek to trace the impact of domestic courts in the development of canonical areas of international law, such as jurisdiction, immunity, state responsibility, the law of international organizations/human rights,...

  4. 100 commonly asked questions in math class answers that promote mathematical understanding, grades 6-12

    CERN Document Server

    Posamentier, Alfred S (Steven); Germain-Williams, Terri L (Lynn); Paris, Elaine S; Lehmann, Ingmar H (Horst)

    2013-01-01

    100 ways to get students hooked on math! That one question got you stumped? Or maybe you have the answer, but it's not all that compelling. Al Posamentier and his coauthors to the rescue with this handy reference containing fun answers to students'100 most frequently asked math questions. Even if you already have the answers, Al's explanations are certain to keep kids hooked. The big benefits? You'll discover high-interest ways to Teach to the Common Core's math content standards Promote inquiry and process in mathematical thinking Build procedural skills and conceptual understanding Encourage

  5. Dialogue in mathematics classrooms: Beyond question-and- answer methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Brodie

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores different kinds of interaction observed in South African mathematics classrooms in order to unpack the notion of participation in mathematics learning. It argues that conventional question-and-answer methods do not promote the kind of interaction that the new South African curriculum calls for. It presents more appropriate kinds of interactions, where teachers maintain high task demands, respond to genuine learner questions and support conversations among learners. The paper argues that combinations of different kinds of interaction are  most likely to support learner participation and mathematical thinking in classrooms.

  6. Mapping crime levels and court efficiency per magisterial district in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schmitz, Peter MU

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available magisterial district. By mapping crime categories such as sexual offences, it is possible to identify magisterial districts with high occurrences of these crimes, and hence districts that need courts specializing in sexual offences. 1... function will be created. This function will assume responsibility for the ongoing monitoring and management of resources within the Department in order to ensure that justice at a local level is dispensed effectively and efficiently, through...

  7. Mapping crime levels and court efficiency per magisterial district in South Africa.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schmitz, Peter MU

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available magisterial district. By mapping crime categories such as sexual offences, it is possible to identify magisterial districts with high occurrences of these crimes, and hence districts that need courts specializing in sexual offences. 1... function will be created. This function will assume responsibility for the ongoing monitoring and management of resources within the Department in order to ensure that justice at a local level is dispensed effectively and efficiently, through...

  8. Grounds for the Specialization of Courts and Judges in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Terekhova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article touches upon the different ways of specialization of courts and judges that exist under the legislation of the Russian Federation. The lack of a unified and circumspect approach is noted. The formation of specialized courts, according to the national legislation, takes the form of their establishing within the existing subsystems of regular and arbitration courts. As for the specialization of judges, it is more diversified and is presented by either creation of separate types of procedure (special proceedings, proceedings on cases arising from public relations and some other, or by introduction of special rules on jurisdiction that establish competence of specific courts to consider cases of a particular category: on the compensation for the excessive time taken to consider a case, on the adoption of a child by a foreign national and others.An analysis of existing literature on the issue in question shows that Russian scholars support the idea of judges’ specialization. Against specialization of courts the following arguments are brought: significant material costs, not being in accordance with the small number of cases decided by specialized courts; problems with access to justice; and the necessity to give special training to narrowly specialized judges.

  9. The Role of Courts in Shaping Health Equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Mark A

    2017-10-01

    United States' courts have played a limited, yet key, role in shaping health equity in three areas of law: racial discrimination, disability discrimination, and constitutional rights. Executive and administrative action has been much more instrumental than judicial decisions in advancing racial equality in health care. Courts have been reluctant to intervene on racial justice because overt discrimination has largely disappeared, and the Supreme Court has interpreted civil rights laws in a fashion that restricts judicial authority to address more subtle or diffused forms of disparate impact. In contrast, courts have been more active in limiting disability discrimination by expanding the conditions that are considered disabling and by articulating and applying the operative concepts "reasonable accommodation" and "other qualified" in the context of both treatment and insurance coverage decisions. Finally, regarding constitutional rights, courts have had limited opportunity to intervene because, outside of specially protected arenas such as reproduction, constitutional law gives government wide discretion to define health and safety goals and methods. Thus, courts have had only a limited role in shaping health equity in the United States. It remains to be seen whether this will change under the Affordable Care Act or whatever health reform measure might replace it. Copyright © 2017 by Duke University Press.

  10. A Critique of Kosovo’s Internationalized Constitutional Court

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Lorenzo Capussela

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The quality and the sustainability of the democratic institutions established in post-independence Kosovo under the guidance of the international community depend to a large extent on the performance of its constitutional court. The considerable international investment in that court reflects this assessment. One of the reasons why Kosovo’s international supervision has recently been terminated is that such court has been deemed to be functioning well. But its performance has not yet adequately been scrutinized. This essay reviews its most significant judgments, including decisions that deposed a president, annulled a presidential election, prevented a general election, and abolished the inviolability of parliament. The analysis of the reasons and effects of such rulings leads to the conclusion that the court gravely lacks independence and is subject to heavy political interference, which also the international judges do not seem immune from. The performance of the court is both a manifestation and a cause of Kosovo’s acute governance problems, which its international supervision has failed to remedy. The international community’s approach towards the court is also an illustration of the reasons why statebuilding in Kosovo led to unsatisfactory results, despite unprecedented investment.

  11. Information Presentation in Decision and Risk Analysis: Answered, Partly Answered, and Unanswered Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, L Robin; Wang, Yitong

    2016-09-21

    For the last 30 years, researchers in risk analysis, decision analysis, and economics have consistently proven that decisionmakers employ different processes for evaluating and combining anticipated and actual losses, gains, delays, and surprises. Although rational models generally prescribe a consistent response, people's heuristic processes will sometimes lead them to be inconsistent in the way they respond to information presented in theoretically equivalent ways. We point out several promising future research directions by listing and detailing a series of answered, partly answered, and unanswered questions.

  12. 27 CFR 71.65 - Answer admitting facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Answer admitting facts. 71... Hearing Procedure Answers § 71.65 Answer admitting facts. If the respondent desires to waive the hearing on the allegations of fact set forth in the order to show cause, and does not contest the facts,...

  13. Can Courts Make Federalism Work? A Game Theory Approach to Court-Induced Compliance and Defection in Federal Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Sala

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Few studies on federalism analyze the role of courts as safeguards of the federal arrangement, and those that do tend to be too optimistic about what courts can do. This article analyzes the effect of judicial review on the interaction between the central and a regional government in a federation in order to understand the conditions under which courts may or may not enforce compliance with federalism. It argues that politicians of either level of government anticipate the likelihood of a judicial challenge and an eventual veto, and it finds distinct equilibria in the interaction between central and regional governments (imposition, auto-limitation, negotiation and litigation. Only under auto-limitation do courts effectively prevent transgressions to the federal arrangement. In all other scenarios, defection may take place despite the presence of courts. These findings show that as the court’s jurisprudence becomes more solid and defined, the chances for governments to successfully exceed their powers increase. Not only do transgressions take place despite the presence of the court, but because of it.

  14. Getting the right answers: understanding metabolomics challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisken, Stephan; Eiden, Michael; Salek, Reza M

    2015-01-01

    Small molecules within biological systems provide powerful insights into the biological roles, processes and states of organisms. Metabolomics is the study of the concentrations, structures and interactions of these thousands of small molecules, collectively known as the metabolome. Metabolomics is at the interface between chemistry, biology, statistics and computer science, requiring multidisciplinary skillsets. This presents unique challenges for researchers to fully utilize the information produced and to capture its potential diagnostic power. A good understanding of study design, sample preparation, analysis methods and data analysis is essential to get the right answers for the right questions. We outline the current state of the art, benefits and challenges of metabolomics to create an understanding of metabolomics studies from the experimental design to data analysis.

  15. Automatic Music Composition using Answer Set Programming

    CERN Document Server

    Boenn, Georg; De Vos, Marina; ffitch, John

    2010-01-01

    Music composition used to be a pen and paper activity. These these days music is often composed with the aid of computer software, even to the point where the computer compose parts of the score autonomously. The composition of most styles of music is governed by rules. We show that by approaching the automation, analysis and verification of composition as a knowledge representation task and formalising these rules in a suitable logical language, powerful and expressive intelligent composition tools can be easily built. This application paper describes the use of answer set programming to construct an automated system, named ANTON, that can compose melodic, harmonic and rhythmic music, diagnose errors in human compositions and serve as a computer-aided composition tool. The combination of harmonic, rhythmic and melodic composition in a single framework makes ANTON unique in the growing area of algorithmic composition. With near real-time composition, ANTON reaches the point where it can not only be used as a ...

  16. What questions can a placebo answer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hey, Spencer Phillips; Weijer, Charles

    2016-03-01

    The concept of clinical equipoise restricts the use of placebo controls in clinical trials when there already exists a proven effective treatment. Several critics of clinical equipoise have put forward alleged counter-examples to this restriction-describing instances of ethical placebo-controlled trials that apparently violate clinical equipoise. In this essay, we respond to these examples and show that clinical equipoise is not as restrictive of placebos as these authors assume. We argue that a subtler appreciation for clinical equipoise-in particular the distinction between de facto and de jure interpretations of the concept-allows the concept to explain when and why a placebo control may be necessary to answer a question of clinical importance.

  17. What is Morality? Pascal's Heartfelt Answer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Baruchello

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite his enduring fame as a scientist and a thinker, Blaise Pascal's moral philosophy has received very little attention by modern Anglophone ethicists, who have written instead endless volumes on the epistemology of his wager—itself a piece of apologetics and an early example of game theory. They have labelled Pascal a ‘philosopher of religion’ and pretty much left him there, as marginal as religion itself seems to be these days. Yet, Pascal did have a moral philosophy of his own and one that can help us answer the question ‘what is morality?’ from the perspective of lived personal experience. It is not an easy one to detect, for it is scattered across his unsystematic maxims, short reflections and aphorisms, themselves scattered across a number of differing manuscripts. Reconstructing and outlining it is the chief aim of my paper.

  18. Beyond the answer: post-error processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiter, G D; Schwarzenbacher, K

    1989-08-01

    When you suspect that you just gave an erroneous answer to a question you stop and rethink. Suspected errors lead to a shift in the control and content of cognitive processes. In the present experiment we investigated the influence of errors upon heart rates and response latencies. Sixty-four subjects participated in an experiment in which each subject solved a sequence of 60 verbal analogies. The results demonstrated increased latencies after errors and decelerated heart rates during the post-error period. The results were explained by a psychophysiological model in which the septo-hippocampal system functions as a control system which coordinates the priority and selection of cognitive processes. Error detection suppresses strategies which otherwise prevent looping and iterative reanalyses of old material. The inhibition is also responsible for the cardiac slowing during the post-error period.

  19. Final PSD Permit Extension Letter - Energy Answers Arecibo, LLC/Energy Answers Arecibo Puerto Rico Renewable Energy Project, PR

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains the Final PSD Permit Extension Letter for Energy Answers Arecibo Puerto Rico Renewable Energy Project, issued on April 10, 2017 and the EPA Public Announcement for Final PSD Permit Extension for Energy Answers Arecibo, PR.

  20. A deep learning approach for predicting the quality of online health expert question-answering services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ze; Zhang, Zhan; Yang, Haiqin; Chen, Qing; Zuo, Decheng

    2017-07-01

    Recently, online health expert question-answering (HQA) services (systems) have attracted more and more health consumers to ask health-related questions everywhere at any time due to the convenience and effectiveness. However, the quality of answers in existing HQA systems varies in different situations. It is significant to provide effective tools to automatically determine the quality of the answers. Two main characteristics in HQA systems raise the difficulties of classification: (1) physicians' answers in an HQA system are usually written in short text, which yields the data sparsity issue; (2) HQA systems apply the quality control mechanism, which refrains the wisdom of crowd. The important information, such as the best answer and the number of users' votes, is missing. To tackle these issues, we prepare the first HQA research data set labeled by three medical experts in 90days and formulate the problem of predicting the quality of answers in the system as a classification task. We not only incorporate the standard textual feature of answers, but also introduce a set of unique non-textual features, i.e., the popular used surface linguistic features and the novel social features, from other modalities. A multimodal deep belief network (DBN)-based learning framework is then proposed to learn the high-level hidden semantic representations of answers from both textual features and non-textual features while the learned joint representation is fed into popular classifiers to determine the quality of answers. Finally, we conduct extensive experiments to demonstrate the effectiveness of including the non-textual features and the proposed multimodal deep learning framework. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Exercise related cardiac arrest in amateur athletes on the tennis court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratil, Peter; Sterz, Fritz; Haugk, Moritz; Wallmüller, Christian; Schober, Andreas; Hörburger, David; Weiser, Christoph; Stöckl, Matthias; Testori, Christoph; Krizanac, Danica; Havel, Christof

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to study exercise-related cardiac arrests on the tennis court and investigate the impact of early initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation on survival rate and outcome. This study was based on the cardiac arrest registry of the Department of Emergency Medicine at the General Hospital Vienna in Austria. Between February 1993 and April 2010 non-professional athletes were identified, who experienced exercise-related cardiac arrest on the tennis court. The analysis was accomplished using descriptive statistics. Results are presented as mean±standard-deviation or median and interquartile range (IQR). The subjects (n=27) were predominantly male (96%) with a median age of 58 years; 52% of all patients had underlying cardiovascular risk factors. All cardiac arrests were witnessed. Bystander CPR was documented in 17 cases (63%). Median time from collapse to initiation of CPR was 1(IQR 0-2) minute. Ventricular fibrillation was the initial rhythm in 25 patients (93%) and in 3 an automated external defibrillator was used by bystanders. Twenty-four patients (89%) had return of spontaneous circulation before admission to the hospital and four (15%) followed verbal commands thereafter. The survival rate at 6 months was 82% with 20 patients (74%) having favourable neurologic outcome. Cardiac arrest on the tennis court is a predominantly witnessed event with a respectively high rate of bystander CPR, which reflects in a high successful survival rate. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Influencing factors of answer adoption in social Q&A communities from users’ perspective: Taking Zhihu as an example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoyu; CHEN; Shengli; DENG

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Taking Zhihu as the object for a case study, we intend to analyze the key factors that have affected users on adopting answers in social Q&A(SQA) websites.Design/methodology/approach: With information adoption model(IAM) as the theoretical foundation and widely accepted evaluation criteria for answer quality in SQA sites as variables, we constructed a factor model that has influenced SQA community users to adopt offered answers. With the partial least squares(PLS) technique, our model was then empirically tested through a sample of 311 Zhihu users.Findings: Our results showed that answer usefulness is the most effective variable, and answer interactivity and answer entertainment both have positive and significant impacts on users’ attitude to adopt answers in an SQA community. Except for novelty, other three components of answer quality, i.e. knowledge, reliability, and solution to the problem have all significant effect on answer usefulness.Research limitations: First, due to the limited sample size, it is still questionable if our research results based on Zhihu could be applied to other SQA communities. Second, our questionnaires were mainly designed to investigate how users felt about the answers in an SQA site, but did not differentiate the content of the answer itself.Practical implications: As a three-year-old SQA platform, Zhihu has developed very quickly with its high-quality answers and public intellectual users, and has been regarded as one of the representatives of fast emerging Chinese SQA communities in recent years. Our studycould help shed light on users’ information sharing and knowledge adoption behaviors in a Chinese SQA site, such as Zhihu. Originality/value: Compared with previous studies on answer quality assessments in SQA sites and on information adoption model, to the best of our knowledge, this is one of the pioneer studies which combined answer qualities with users’ intention of adopting SQA answers. Our study on user

  3. THE INFLUENCE OF BALL VELOCITY AND COURT ILLUMINATION ON REACTION TIME FOR TENNIS VOLLEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-hung Tu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The he purpose of this study is to examine the effects of ball velocity, court illumination, and volley type on the reaction time (RT of a tennis athlete for a volley stroke. Eights cases with two different ball velocities (high and low, two volley types (forehand and backhand and two court illumination levels (dark and bright were studied. The 30 participating subjects consisted of 18 male and 12 female college tennis athletes (age: 24 ± 3.2 yr, with a United States Tennis Association (USTA ranking above 2.5. In order to ensure the validity of real-world correlations, the experiments were designed to simulate real competition situations. Reaction times were measured for volley strokes in response to different approaching ball velocities (high: 25.05 ± 0.37 m/s and low: 17.56 ± 0.92 m·s-1 for several volley types (forehand and backhand and court illumination levels (55649 ± 4292 lux and 363.24 ± 6.53 lux on the court. During the tests, the signals from an electromyogram sensor and a 3-axis accelerometer (± 50 g were recorded using an NI DAQ card (NI PXI-6251 and then analyzed to determine reaction time (RT, premotor reaction time (PRT, and motor reaction time (MRT through the LabVIEW system. Subsequent 3-way ANOVA analysis indicated no RT, PRT, or MRT interaction between ball velocity, volley type and illumination. The ball velocity and illumination parameters did affect RT and PRT values significantly with p < 0.05, no significant variation in MRT was observed across any implemented experimental conditions. All experimental results indicate that ball velocity and illumination levels strongly affect the value of PRT, but have no significant effect on the value of MRT, the changes in RT were dominated by PRT

  4. Question Answering System for an Effective Collaborative Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof. Kohei Arai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing advances of Internet Technologies in all application domains have changed life styles and interactions. With the rapid development of E-Learning, collaborative learning is an important for teaching, learning methods and strategies. Interaction between the students also student with the teacher is important for student to gain knowledge. Based on the four basic teaching styles formal authority, demonstrator or personal model, facilitator and delegator, today combined between facilitator and delegator style is responsible for student learning. It is student centered and the teacher as facilitates the material and activities, but learning becomes part of valuable and effective when they collaborate with each other, and as the teacher who will delegates and facilitates the responsibility of learning to the students. In this paper, we introduce an effective question answering Q&A system for collaborative learning, which can act not just like a virtual teacher, but also virtual discussion for student. With the proposed system, brings a new Q&A system, student can attach their question when they want collaborate using collaborative learning capitalize on one another’s resources and skills. Students can ask their questions to the group when they want to collaborate with others, asking one another for information, evaluating one another’s ideas, then each of the answer will compare with encyclopedia data base. In this research, the Q&A system for the Senior High School in Indonesia, in this subject of Information Communication Technology implemented. From the the 40 question and 120 answer, the result is 90,48% precision 50% recall.

  5. A characterization of answer sets for logic programs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG MingYi; ZHANG Ying; FangZhen LIN

    2007-01-01

    Checking if a program has an answer set, and if so, compute its answer sets are just some of the important problems in answer set logic programming. Solving these problems using Gelfond and Lifschitz's original definition of answer sets is not an easy task. Alternative characterizations of answer sets for nested logic programs by Erdem and Lifschitz, Lee and Lifschitz, and You et al. are based on the completion semantics and various notions of tightness. However, the notion of tightness is a local notion in the sense that for different answer sets there are, in general, different level mappings capturing their tightness. This makes it hard to be used in the design of algorithms for computing answer sets. This paper proposes a characterization of answer sets based on sets of generating rules. From this characterization new algorithms are derived for computing answer sets and for performing some other reasoning tasks. As an application of the characterization a sufficient and necessary condition for the equivalence between answer set semantics and completion semantics has been proven, and a basic theorem is shown on computing answer sets for nested logic programs based on an extended notion of loop formulas. These results on tightness and loop formulas are more general than that in You and Lin's work.

  6. Harvesting Collective Intelligence: Temporal Behavior in Yahoo Answers

    CERN Document Server

    Aperjis, Christina; Wu, Fang

    2010-01-01

    When harvesting collective intelligence, a user wishes to maximize the accuracy and value of the acquired information without spending too much time collecting it. We empirically study how people behave when facing these conflicting objectives using data from Yahoo Answers, a community driven question-and-answer site. We take two complementary approaches. We first study how users behave when trying to maximize the amount of the acquired information, while minimizing the waiting time. We identify and quantify how question authors at Yahoo Answers trade off the number of answers they receive and the cost of waiting. We find that users are willing to wait more to obtain an additional answer when they have only received a small number of answers; this implies decreasing marginal returns in the amount of collected information. We also estimate the user's utility function from the data. Our second approach focuses on how users assess the qualities of the individual answers without explicitly considering the cost of...

  7. Kara: A System for Visualising and Visual Editing of Interpretations for Answer-Set Programs

    CERN Document Server

    Kloimüllner, Christian; Pührer, Jörg; Tompits, Hans

    2011-01-01

    In answer-set programming (ASP), the solutions of a problem are encoded in dedicated models, called answer sets, of a logical theory. These answer sets are computed from the program that represents the theory by means of an ASP solver and returned to the user as sets of ground first-order literals. As this type of representation is often cumbersome for the user to interpret, tools like ASPVIZ and IDPDraw were developed that allow for visualising answer sets. The tool Kara, introduced in this paper, follows these approaches, using ASP itself as a language for defining visualisations of interpretations. Unlike existing tools that position graphic primitives according to static coordinates only, Kara allows for more high-level specifications, supporting graph structures, grids, and relative positioning of graphical elements. Moreover, generalising the functionality of previous tools, Kara provides modifiable visualisations such that interpretations can be manipulated by graphically editing their visualisations. ...

  8. Lessons on Judicial Interpretation: How Immigrants Takao Ozawa and Yick Wo Searched the Courts for a Place in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teel, Steven C.

    1998-01-01

    Presents two lessons designed to counter textbook images of minorities merely as victims, by introducing high school students to two federal court cases involving Asian immigrants' efforts to guarantee their rights. Includes lesson objectives, background on lesson organization, procedural outline, primary documents necessary for each lesson, and…

  9. Social Media Use--and Misuse--by Teachers: Looking to the Courts for Human Resource Policy Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bon, Susan C.; Bathon, Justion; Balzano, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    School districts are facing a sensationalized and alarming trend of unprofessional conduct and social media misuse by public school teachers. Likewise, recent court cases as well as highly publicized scandals raise concern that inappropriate relationships between teachers and students can be initiated through online social media. These emergent…

  10. Social Media Use--and Misuse--by Teachers: Looking to the Courts for Human Resource Policy Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bon, Susan C.; Bathon, Justion; Balzano, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    School districts are facing a sensationalized and alarming trend of unprofessional conduct and social media misuse by public school teachers. Likewise, recent court cases as well as highly publicized scandals raise concern that inappropriate relationships between teachers and students can be initiated through online social media. These emergent…

  11. Effect of Court Dimensions on Players' External and Internal Load during Small-Sided Handball Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvino, Matteo; Tessitore, Antonio; Minganti, Carlo; Sibila, Marko

    2014-05-01

    training methodologies have been developed in many sport games.Specific game exercises may provide a useful conditioning stimulus, together with technical and tactical training components.Changing court dimensions during small-sided handball games can be used to manipulate both external and internal loads on the players.The high ratio of cyclic activity per minute and the high HR values recorded during SSHGs make this type of drills extremely useful for aerobic power training.

  12. Court Reconstruction for Camera Calibration in Broadcast Basketball Videos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Pei-Chih; Cheng, Wei-Chih; Wang, Yu-Shuen; Chu, Hung-Kuo; Tang, Nick C; Liao, Hong-Yuan Mark

    2016-05-01

    We introduce a technique of calibrating camera motions in basketball videos. Our method particularly transforms player positions to standard basketball court coordinates and enables applications such as tactical analysis and semantic basketball video retrieval. To achieve a robust calibration, we reconstruct the panoramic basketball court from a video, followed by warping the panoramic court to a standard one. As opposed to previous approaches, which individually detect the court lines and corners of each video frame, our technique considers all video frames simultaneously to achieve calibration; hence, it is robust to illumination changes and player occlusions. To demonstrate the feasibility of our technique, we present a stroke-based system that allows users to retrieve basketball videos. Our system tracks player trajectories from broadcast basketball videos. It then rectifies the trajectories to a standard basketball court by using our camera calibration method. Consequently, users can apply stroke queries to indicate how the players move in gameplay during retrieval. The main advantage of this interface is an explicit query of basketball videos so that unwanted outcomes can be prevented. We show the results in Figs. 1, 7, 9, 10 and our accompanying video to exhibit the feasibility of our technique.

  13. Using the level of Service Inventory-Revised to improve assessment and treatment in drug court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastaferro, Wendy P

    2012-08-01

    More than 2,000 drug courts in the United States provide supervision and substance-abuse treatment to thousands of offenders. Yet the treatment continuum from assessment to aftercare is underexplored. The effectiveness of the Level of Service Inventory-Revised (LSI-R) as a risk assessment tool is well established. However, fewer studies have considered its use in guiding treatment strategies. In using the LSI-R, the drug court program relied on the structured interview protocol (not the risk classification scores) to identify criminogenic needs that then helped determine placement in a high- or low-needs treatment track. To evaluate the effectiveness of these treatment placement decisions, this research used the LSI-R scores to examine individual and group differences (N = 182). Significant and substantive differences at the individual and group levels were found thus providing empirical support for using the LSI-R as a link between assessment and treatment. Implications for developing standards and practice protocols for drug courts are discussed.

  14. HIV prevention for juvenile drug court offenders: a randomized controlled trial focusing on affect management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolou-Shams, Marina; Houck, Christopher; Conrad, Selby M; Tarantino, Nicholas; Stein, L A R; Brown, Larry K

    2011-07-01

    Juvenile drug court (JDC) offenders have benefited from evidence-based interventions addressing antisocial behavior, mental health, and substance use; however, interventions addressing HIV risk behavior are lacking. This study presents pilot findings and lessons learned from a group-based HIV prevention intervention delivered to JDC offenders. Participants were randomized to a five-session HIV prevention (n = 29) or health promotion (n = 28) condition and completed measures of sexual risk taking and substance use at baseline and 3 months postintervention. No between-group differences by time emerged on measures of sexual risk taking or other HIV-related behaviors and attitudes. Both groups improved their rates of HIV testing and decreased their substance use during sex over time. Delivering an HIV prevention intervention to drug court offenders is feasible; however, more intensive interventions that incorporate multiple systems and address co-occurring mental health difficulties may be needed to effect sexual behavioral change among these high-risk court-involved youth.

  15. Estimating the differential costs of criminal activity for juvenile drug court participants: challenges and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollister, Kathryn E; French, Michael T; Sheidow, Ashli J; Henggeler, Scott W; Halliday-Boykins, Colleen A

    2009-01-01

    Juvenile drug court (JDC) programs have expanded rapidly over the past 20 years and are an increasingly popular option for rehabilitating juvenile offenders with substance use problems. Given the high cost of crime to society, an important economic question is whether and to what extent JDC programs reduce criminal activity among juvenile offenders. To address this question, the present study added an economic cost analysis to an ongoing randomized trial of JDC conducted in Charleston, South Carolina. Four treatment conditions were included in the parent study: Family Court with usual community-based treatment (FC, the comparison group), Drug Court with usual community-based treatment (DC), DC with Multisystemic Therapy (DC/MST), and DC/MST enhanced with Contingency Management (DC/MST/CM). The economic study estimated the cost of criminal activity for nine specific crimes at baseline (pretreatment) and 4 and 12 months thereafter. A number of methodological challenges were encountered, suggesting that it may be more difficult to economically quantify frequency and type of criminal activity for adolescents than for adults. The present paper addresses methodological approaches and challenges, and proposes guidelines for future economic evaluations of adolescent substance abuse and crime prevention programs.

  16. [Parental alienation syndrome (PAS): unknown in medical settings, endemic in courts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignotti, Maria Serenella

    2013-02-01

    A purposed syndrome of so-called parental alienation (PAS), unsupported by any evidence-based data, unknown in medical settings, unquoted in medical books, absent in DSM and ICD, never demonstrated by controlled studies published in high scientific level journals, is rampant in Courts where it can lead to loose parental custody. During a divorce trial, almost always the mothers and the children, become joint in a sort of folie au deux, in a denigration campaign of ex-husband/father. From a review on this issue it seems evident its theoretical roots lie on a theory that justify gender violence and children sexual abuse. The bias that both of them are layers and that he children have not autonomy block their possibility of any defence in front of a Court. In severe cases, PAS becomes a new and efficient tool of intra-familiar violence. The treatment of severe cases is to stop any contact between mother and children. The resort to PAS in Courts must be strongly rejected.

  17. Lac Courte Oreilles Energy Analysis Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leslie Isham; Denise Johnson

    2009-04-01

    The Lac Courte Oreilles Tribe applied for first step funding in 2007 and was awarded in October of that year. We wanted to perform an audit to begin fulfilling two commitments we made to our membership and resolutions that we adopted. One was the Kyoto Protocol and reduce our carbon emissions by 25% and to produce 25% of our energy by sustainable means. To complete these goals we needed to begin with first assessing what our carbon emissions are and begin taking the steps to conserve on the energy we currently use. The First Step Grant gave us the opportunity to do this. Upon funding the Energy Project was formed under the umbrella of the LCO Public Works Department and Denise Johnson was hired as the coordinator. She quickly began fulfilling the objectives of the project. Denise began by contact the LCO College and hiring interns who were able to go to each Tribal entity and perform line logging to read and document the energy used for each electrical appliance. Data was also gathered for one full year from each entity for all their utility bills (gasoline, electric, natural gas, fuel oil, etc.). Relationships were formed with the Green Team and other Green Committees in the area that could assist us in this undertaking. The Energy Task Force was of great assistance as well recommending other committees and guidance to completing our project. The data was gathered, compiled and placed into spreadsheets that would be understandable for anyone who didn't have a background in Renewable Resources. While gathering the data Denise was also looking for ways to conserve energy usage, policies changes to implement and any possible viable renewable energy resources. Changes in the social behaviors of our members and employees will require further education by workshops, energy fairs, etc.. This will be looked into and done in coordination with our schools. The renewable resources seem most feasible are wind resources as well as Bio Mass both of which need further

  18. Sink or Swim: Evolving a Broader Definition of Courts through the Multi-Door Approach to Dispute Resolution and the Implications it has for Traditional Court Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.H. Gummi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This article comprises three parts. The first part addresses the Nigerian Court system, detailing the hierarchy of courts that make up our legal system or as the topic suggests the traditional court system. The second predominantly dwells on the introduction of the Multi- Door court system into our judicial landscape, and the uniqueness of its operation. The third offers my analysis, based on my experience as a court administrator on whether, with the introduction of the Multi-Door system we have swam or sank, and my advice to other judicial systems that are yet to imbibe the ADR culture.

  19. Single best answer question-writing tips for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, J L; Harris, B H L; Smith, P E

    2017-02-01

    Assessment is essential for progression in medical careers. Thus, an important aspect of developing as a clinical teacher is the ability to produce high-quality assessments for junior colleagues. The single best answer (SBA) question format is becoming ubiquitous in the assessment of the application of knowledge in clinical medicine; writing this style of examination question can be a challenge. This concise guide highlights key SBA question-writing tips, aiming to help aspiring clinical teachers set high-quality knowledge assessments. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. PrimeAnswers: A practical interface for answering primary care questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketchell, Debra S; St Anna, Leilani; Kauff, David; Gaster, Barak; Timberlake, Diane

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes an institutional approach taken to build a primary care reference portal. The objective for the site is to make access to and use of clinical reference faster and easier and to facilitate the use of evidence-based answers in daily practice. Reference objects were selected and metadata applied to a core set of sources. Metadata were used to search, sort, and filter results and to define deep-linked queries and structure the interface. User feedback resulted in an expansion in the scope of reference objects to meet the broad spectrum of information needs, including patient handouts and interactive risk management tools. RESULTS of a user satisfaction survey suggest that a simple interface to customized content makes it faster and easier for primary care clinicians to find information during the clinic day and to improve care to their patients. The PrimeAnswers portal is a first step in creating a fast search of a customized set of reference objects to match a clinician's patient care questions in the clinic. The next step is developing methods to solve the problem of matching a clinician's question to a specific answer through precise retrieval from reference sources; however, lack of internal structure and Web service standards in most clinical reference sources is an unresolved problem.

  1. THE REFERRAL BACK TO COURT IN CASE OF EXTRADITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SIMONA TACHE

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Article 522 ind.1 Criminal procedure code, governing the referral back to court in case of extradition, refers to article 405-408 provisions review applicable to appeal, but this reference is limited to retrial procedure and solutions that can be pronounced by the court.The review procedure and the retrial procedure after extradition have a distinct finality: if the review involves removal of essential errors to the facts withheld in a final decision, the purpose of referral back to court in case of extradition is to guarantee the right of of extradited person, who was tried and convicted in the absence, to have a fair trial and, mainly, to exercise the right to defence in a new procedural cycle, which implies the possibility for the person to be heard, to question the witnesses or other parts of the process and to administer favorable evidence, both on the facts, as well as circumstantial.

  2. California court to rule on insurer's denial of AIDS benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-04-16

    California Insurance Commissioner Chuck Quakenbush is asking the California Supreme Court to overturn a lower court ruling that bars policyholders from receiving disability payments because of AIDS. The State Court of Appeals ruled that Paul Revere Life Insurance Co. could deny coverage to [name removed] because his HIV infection amounted to a pre-existing condition. [Name removed] applied for the policy in 1988. He paid premiums for 5 years, longer than the 2 years the company had to confirm his medical condition. When he became unable to work because of AIDS, he applied for disability. The Commissioner says the intent behind the incontestability clause is to protect consumers from having claims denied after 2 years because of pre-existing conditions. One of [name removed]'s lawyers noted that the company's practice of offering insurance without any medical qualifications is not in line with industry standards. No date has been scheduled for oral arguments in the case.

  3. Courts and open spaces in the Late Helladic III Argolid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siennicka, Malgorzata

    2015-01-01

    and significance of courts and other open spaces in the Mycenaean settlements in the Argolid during the Palatial and Post-Palatial periods (c. 15th–11th centuries BC). Various categories of areas, like courts, open spaces and open-air areas are discussed, with an emphasis on their functions and status. Courts......While space remains a neglected subject in research on Mycenaean settlements, archaeological and ethnographical studies devoted to social meaning of places and areas used by the inhabitants of the prehistoric and other communities increase in number. This paper aims to review the use...... and open spaces are considered as reflecting patterns of spatial organization in the settlements and of the diverse activities of their residents. The differences between the use of open areas in the acropoleis and in the lower towns are pointed out, as well as changes in the use patterns after the fall...

  4. The Impact of an Indiana (United States Drug Court on Criminal Recidivism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Gallagher

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated a drug court located in a metropolitan area of Indiana (United States, focusing specifically on identifying variables that predicted recidivism among drug court participants and comparing criminal recidivism patterns among drug court and probation participants. Drug court participants were most likely to recidivate if they were younger, had a violation within the first 30 days of the program, had a previous criminal record, and were terminated unsuccessfully from the program. Furthermore, drug court participants were less likely to recidivate than probationers who had similar offense and demographic characteristics. Implications for drug court practice, policy advocacy, and future research are discussed.

  5. THE RIGHT TO AN INDEPENDENT COURT OF LAW. THEORETICAL ASPECTS. THE EUROPEAN COURT OF HUMAN RIGHTS CASE-LAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIRCEA DAMASCHIN

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available International specialized literature approaches the concept of court of law from two perspectives: on the one hand, this concept refers to the court of law, regarded as a key linking element within the unitary judicial system, and, on the other hand, to the panel of judges, regarded as the main subject of the criminal procedure, i.e. thejudges who take part in trying a criminal case. In a criminal case, the court of law plays the most important role and its main attribute is the function of jurisdiction, which represents the sum of powers granted to a magistrate for the administration of justice1. The court of law plays a significant role in the rule of law state; thus, both at national and international level, attempts are made in order to set up a legal framework consisting of norms issued by national lawmakers or by official international institutions or by some magistrate associations or NGOs. All these efforts are meant to underline the significant role that the judiciary plays in a rule of law democratic society. In this study we shall try to analyse the concept of “independent court of law”, as this is presented in the national system of law, in its specific norms that are provided by international normative acts and in the principles deriving from the ECHR case-law.

  6. THE RIGHT TO AN INDEPENDENT COURT OF LAW. THEORETICAL ASPECTS. THE EUROPEAN COURT OF HUMAN RIGHTS CASE-LAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea DAMASCHIN

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available International specialized literature approaches the concept of court of law from two perspectives: on the one hand, this concept refers to the court of law, regarded as a key linking element within the unitary judicial system, and, on the other hand, to the panel of judges, regarded as the main subject of the criminal procedure, i.e. the judges who take part in trying a criminal case. In a criminal case, the court of law plays the most important role and its main attribute is the function of jurisdiction, which represents the sum of powers granted to a magistrate for the administration of justice. The court of law plays a significant role in the rule of law state; thus, both at national and international level, attempts are made in order to set up a legal framework consisting of norms issued by national lawmakers or by official international institutions or by some magistrate associations or NGOs. All these efforts are meant to underline the significant role that the judiciary plays in a rule of law democratic society. In this study we shall try to analyse the concept of “independent court of law”, as this is presented in the national system of law, in its specific norms that are provided by international normative acts and in the principles deriving from the ECHR case-law.

  7. Assessing the Courts in Russia: Parameters of Progress under Putin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H. Solomon

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The Soviet legacy included courts that were dependent and weak, and whose reform had only just begun. The Yeltsin era witnessed considerable progress in making judges more independent and powerful, but the efforts were seriously constrained by budgetary shortcomings and paralysis in the legislative approval of needed procedural changes. As we shall see, the Putin administration overcame both of these obstacles and at the same time began addressing the thorny question of how to make courts and judges accountable without undue harm to their independence. It also started to address the scepticism about the courts among a significant part of the public, through efforts to improve media coverage, make information about courts more available, and make courts user friendly. While praiseworthy and bound to improve the reality and the perception of the administration of justice overall, these initiatives did not end attempts to exert influence on judges and case outcomes by powerful people (in the public and private sectors or the mechanisms that facilitated their efforts. This essay begins by identifying criteria for assessing the quality of the administration of justice in any country, including in the post-soviet world and suggesting specific markers (usually qualitative connected to each of the criteria developed above. Then, the essay provides an account of relevant policy initiatives in judicial reform undertaken first under Yeltsin and then in the Putin years. The essay goes to provide an assessment of the state of the courts in the Russian federation in 2007 in the light of the criteria and markers supplied in the first section. It concludes with a look to the future, and the identification of crucial markers of change for the post-Putin era.

  8. Abortion and the law: the Supreme Court, privacy, and abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, F H

    1997-01-01

    This article examines the impact of the continuing politicization of the abortion issue in the US on the rights of women and on the emerging concept of fetal rights. The introduction 1) attributes the "final and total politicization" of a woman's right to control her reproduction to the "undue burden" standard introduced by the Supreme Court in its 1992 Casey decision and 2) claims that, if unchecked, the concept of fetal rights may give the state's interest in protecting potential life supremacy over women's rights. The next section presents an in-depth discussion of the politicization of the right to abortion that covers such topics as how the courts before Casey became the forum for debating abortion policy, how the "undue burden" standard fails to set definite parameters of acceptable state behavior, how the Casey decision in effect abandons the trimester-based framework of reference provided in Roe vs. Wade, how Casey allows states to subtly coerce women seeking abortions, how the Casey decision failed to reduce the intense politicization of abortion, and how the court failed to protect individual rights to health care and abortion funding from states. Part 3 of the article begins its exploration of the concept of "fetal rights" with a sketch of the history of this concept in the US courts starting in 1884 when damages for miscarriage were denied. Ways in which fetal rights compete with the rights of a pregnant woman are described, the Supreme Court is blamed for allowing states to develop this concept, and issues of patient confidentiality versus reporting requirements are considered. It is concluded that the Supreme Court will have to act to limit fetal rights.

  9. Researching Justification Texts of a First Instance Court: from Assignment to Results and Reporting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Langbroek

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Court decisions are reasoned to legitimize them. Lay people seem to understand little of the work of the courts. One of the questions for court administrators and judges is: for whom do judges write their judgments? Is it possible to analyze judicial justification texts with a view to the audiences they address? We answered that question by developing a methodology for the analysis of judgment justification texts, investigating judicial writing behavior. This paper focuses on the methodological hurdles we had to take and the mistakes we made and had to correct. Research reports in all articles on socio-legal research offer a positive and linear description of the research. This article wants to show that trial and error during the research process were inevitable and maybe could have been avoided if we would have had more experience with this type of research. We hope students and other researchers may profit from our experience. Las decisiones judiciales se razonan para legitimarlas. Los profanos en la materia parecen entender poco de la labor de los tribunales. Una de las preguntas a administradores de tribunales y jueces es: ¿para quién redactan los jueces sus sentencias? ¿Es posible analizar los textos de justificación judiciales desde la perspectiva del público a quien se dirigen? Hemos respondido a esta pregunta mediante el desarrollo de una metodología para el análisis de textos de justificación judiciales, investigando el comportamiento de la escritura judicial. Este artículo se centra en los obstáculos metodológicos que tuvimos que sortear y los errores que cometimos y tuvimos que corregir. Los informes de investigación en todos los artículos de investigación sociojurídica ofrecen una descripción positiva y lineal de la investigación. Este artículo quiere demostrar que la prueba y el error eran inevitables durante el proceso de investigación eran inevitables, y podrían haberse evitado si hubiéramos tenido mayor

  10. Commentary (Victim Participation in the International Criminal Court)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchuk, Iryna

    2014-01-01

    Victim participation is one of the most innovative aspects introduced in the legal framework of the International Criminal Court (hereinafter – ICC), which has not featured in the practices of other international criminal courts and tribunals. The approach of the ad hoc tribunals to victims...... was very ‘consumer like’ because victims were solely used as witnesses to testify about the crimes attributed to the accused, but they were not granted broad participatory rights in the proceedings. The drafters of the Rome Statute acknowledged wide-ranging interests of victims who, apart from seeking...

  11. The Virtual Court Action: procedural facilitation in law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Barton

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available When they learn procedural law, students need to understand and memorize the forms of legal court action which can be carried out by parties to a case. A large proportion of this body of law is descriptive and factual, but complex too; and the constraints of academic curricula do not allow students to learn procedural law in the real environment of the court. As a result, even with the inclusion of case law, and with examples to contextualize the procedural principles, the subject can be perceived as an exercise in knowledge acquisition alone (Vaughn, 1995.

  12. A Social Worker’s Role in Drug Court

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda R. Roberts

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Drug Courts offer alternative sentencing for individuals with drug-related criminal charges, and although there is no mandate requiring a social worker to be a member of the team, this case study concludes that social workers have a unique purpose on the professional team resulting from their generalist and specialist knowledge and skills. The use of this knowledge and skill is illustrated in this descriptive account of the role of a social worker in a midwestern county in the United States. The implication of this case study suggests social workers should be included on drug court teams.

  13. Civilians in Russian Military Courts, 1881-1904

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. Fuller

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This article was previously published in the Russian Review, Vol. 41, No. 3. (Jul., 1982, pp. 288-305. It is reprinted in our journal with the Blackwell Publishing’s authorization.Clemenceau is supposed to have remarked once that "military justice is to justice as military music is to music." This salty analogy encapsulates the popular conception of military courts in Europe at the turn of the century. In the public mind the courts were presumed to be arbitrary tribunals in which due process...

  14. Have the Answers to Common Legal Questions Concerning Nutrition Support Changed Over the Past Decade? 10 Questions for 10 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrocas, Albert; Cohen, Michael L

    2016-06-01

    Clinical nutrition specialists (CNSs) are often confronted with technological, ethical, and legal questions, that is, what can be done technologically, what should be done ethically, and what must be done legally, which conflict at times. The conflict represents a "troubling trichotomy" as discussed in the lead article of this issue of Nutrition in Clinical Practice (NCP). During Clinical Nutrition Week in 2006, a symposium covering these 3 topics was presented, and later that year, an article covering the same topic was published in NCP In this article, we revisit several legal questions/issues that were raised 10 years ago and discuss current answers and approaches. Some of the answers remain unchanged. Other answers have been modified by additional legislation, court decisions, or regulations. In addition, new questions/issues have arisen. Some of the most common questions regarding nutrition support involve the following: liability, informed consent, medical decisional incapacity vs legal competence, advance directive specificity, surrogate decision making, physician orders for life-sustaining treatment and electronic medical orders for life-sustaining treatment, legal definition of death, patient vs family decision making, the noncompliant patient, and elder abuse obligations. In the current healthcare environment, these questions and issues are best addressed via a transdisciplinary team that focuses on function rather than form. The CNS can play a pivotal role in dealing with these challenges by applying the acronym ACT: being Accountable and Communicating with all stakeholders while actively participating as an integral part of the transdisciplinary Team.

  15. Organizational Learning: Some Basic Questions and Answers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Mihelčič

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The term “organizational learning” raises a broad range of questions, specifically with regard to its contents. Following the thoughts of eminent philosophers, such as Aristotle and Confucius, the contribution of scientists in any research field to the corpus of human knowledge should also be based on the proper governing of the use of language. Therefore it is, first, of serious importance to be aware that organizational learning is just one dimension or element of the learning organization and not vice versa; second, a good comprehension of basic categories related to the organizational side of (formal social units’ functioning is an imperative part of organizational learning process. In writing this paper, the author started from his experiences acquired in his role as a lecturer on the subject “Theory of Organization”, in which the goal of lecturing was explained to students as gaining knowledge about cooperation and competition of people in the entities of rational production of goods. To generalize the presented questions and answers regarding the use of term “organization” in the field of management, certain similarities and comparisons were sought and found in other fields of science and, more generally, in life itself. After more detailed explanations of other relevant categories for the organizational learning process, the process itself is defined by its goals and steps where the overlapping of the learning process with the organizational change process and the process of increasing organizational capital is shown. Finally, it is also emphasized that the idea of improving internal relationships – as the substance of organization – between employees in a formal social unit through organizational learning could and should be exploited in external relationships between formal social units.

  16. Study on consistent query answering in inconsistent databases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Dong; YANG Luming

    2007-01-01

    Consistent query answering is an approach to retrieving consistent answers over databases that might be inconsistent with respect to some given integrity constraints The approach is based on a concept of repair.This paper surveys several recent researches on obtaining consistent information from inconsistent databases,such as the underlying semantic model,a number of approaches to computing consistent query answers and the computational complexity of this problem.Furthermore,the work outlines potential research directions in this area.

  17. The question answer system based on natural language understanding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Qing-lin; FAN Xiao-zhong

    2007-01-01

    Automatic Question Answer System(QAS) is a kind of high-powered software system based on Internet. Its key technology is the interrelated technology based on natural language understanding, including the construction of knowledge base and corpus, the Word Segmentation and POS Tagging of text, the Grammatical Analysis and Semantic Analysis of sentences etc. This thesis dissertated mainly the denotation of knowledge-information based on semantic network in QAS, the stochastic syntax-parse model named LSF of knowledge-information in QAS, the structure and constitution of QAS. And the LSF model's parameters were exercised, which proved that they were feasible. At the same time, through "the limited-domain QAS" which was exploited for banks by us, these technologies were proved effective and propagable.

  18. NUFACT11 round table discussion questions and answers

    CERN Document Server

    Blondel, A

    2013-01-01

    This presents the response to questions formulated by a round table discussion panel to the NUFACT11 participants. The main points made were as follows. Neutrino mass is physics beyond the Standard Model, it presents a very deep puzzle to solve, with the answers to several fundamental questions as potential reward. Precision measurement of oscillation parameters is one essential way to access information needed to solve this puzzle and there is a relatively clear (but not easy) way forward. Large θ(13) makes the appearance signals larger, but does not allow to relax the requirements on high beam intensity and large detector masses, it creates a difficult challenge on systematic errors, which will require dedicated ancillary experiments. Of particular interest is a low intensity muon storage ring for required cross-section measurements. There exist already extended bottom-up international collaboration in both physics and R&D experiments. All three main regions have plans for upgraded super-beams and asso...

  19. High Court Hesitant to Bar Pledge in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrie, Caroline

    2004-01-01

    This article reports on a lawsuit filed by Michael A. Newdow, a California atheist, on behalf of his daughter, against inclusion of the words "under God" in public schools' recitals of the United States Pledge of Allegiance. He said that the words "under God" represent "religious dogma" that is needlessly divisive.…

  20. Colleges Await High-Stakes Court Verdict in Patent Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    The long-awaited showdown between Blackboard Inc. and Desire2Learn Inc. began this month in a federal courtroom here as lawyers described the humble beginnings of two of the fiercest competitors in the classroom-software industry. The presidents of both companies, flanked by teams of lawyers, listened intently as their lawyers described how young…

  1. The Impact of the New York Court Review of Children in Foster Care: A Followup Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festinger, Trudy Bradley

    1976-01-01

    Examines the data on children studied in a 1974 investigation. Proposes that court review speed movement of children out of foster care, and suggests steps necessary for both court and agencies to make the procedures more effective. (Author/SB)

  2. 5 CFR Appendix A to Subpart F of... - Recommended Language for Court Orders Dividing Employee Annuities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) COURT ORDERS AFFECTING RETIREMENT BENEFITS Terminology Used in Court Orders Affecting Employee Annuities or Refunds of Employee Contributions... has considered the requirements and standard terminology provided in part 838 of Title 5, Code...

  3. Court Culture during the Reign of Christian IV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olden-Jørgensen, Sebastian

    2007-01-01

    coronation in 1596, reaching a climax with the "great wedding" (of crown prince Christian) in 1634 and at last colapsing during the military and political crisis in the last years of his long reign (1588/96-1648). Danish court culture during the reign of Christian IV decidedly was on an European level...

  4. Natural Law, Santa Clara, and the Supreme Court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Raymond S.; Lujan, Phillip

    The court case, "Santa Clara Pueblo, et al. v. Julia Martinez, et al.," is the subject of this paper. It gives the background of the case of a woman whose children were refused admittance to tribal rolls because of an ordinance prohibiting the enrollment of children whose father is not a tribal member. The paper gives the arguments of…

  5. Court Decisions Specific to Public School Responses to Student Concussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an up-to-date and comprehensive canvassing of the judicial case law concerning the responses to students with concussions in the public school context. The two categories of court decisions are (a) those concerning continued participation in interscholastic athletics, referred to under the rubric of "return to play"…

  6. Ambient Response Analysis of the Heritage Court Tower Building Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Andersen, P.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper an ambient response analysis of the Heritage Court Building structure is presented. The work is a part of a blind test organised by Professor Carlos Ventura, University of British Columbia. The response data were analysed using two different techniques: a non-parametric based on Fre...

  7. Supreme Court Upholds Cal. Law Requiring Maternity Leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Cheryl M.

    1987-01-01

    A recent United State Supreme Court ruling upheld a California law requiring employers to grant female employees up to four months of unpaid maternity leave and make reasonable efforts to reinstate them when they return to work. The decision and its implications are discussed. (MSE)

  8. Challenging Sex Discrimination Through the Courts: Maternity Leave Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottker, Janice

    This study attempted to determine the extent to which school districts had brought their maternity leave policies into compliance with the latest Supreme Court ruling. The study also analyzed the maternity leave requirements of the Equal Employment Opportunities Commission (EEOC), and sought to determine which variables were associated with…

  9. Predicting Drug Court Treatment Completion Using the MMPI-2-RF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, Curtis; Powers, Bradley; Halfaker, Dale; Akeson, Steven; Ben-Porath, Yossef

    2012-01-01

    We examined the ability of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF; Ben-Porath & Tellegen, 2008) substantive scales to predict Drug Court treatment completion in a sample of individuals identified as being at risk for failure to complete the program. Higher scores on MMPI-2-RF scales…

  10. Supreme Court Actions Push a Wrenching Controversy Straight at You.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington-Lueker, Donna

    1989-01-01

    The Supreme Court's past and expected future rulings on abortion cases will add controversy and costs to schools. Estimates the costs of teenage pregnancy; reviews the legal history of abortion; and offers guidelines on how schools can help reduce teenage pregnancy. (MLF)

  11. Creativity in Court-Connected Mediation: Myth or Reality?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adrian, Lin; Mykland, Solfrid

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examined creativity in court-connected mediation. We analyzed 129 mediated agreements from civil cases in Norway and Denmark and compared the outcomes with the parties' original claims to determine whether the agreement addressed only the disputants' demands or contained other...

  12. A Court Case Analysis of Administrative versus Faculty Grading Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Homer L.; Waldrup, Bobby E.

    2010-01-01

    Since 1940, when the AAUP formally defined academic freedom (AAUP, 1984), most faculty members believe they have the final authority in assigning course grades to their students. Faculty members may be surprised that several recent court decisions have concluded that college and university administrators have the right to change grades initially…

  13. Wind-induced Vibrations in the European Court Towers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jannick B.; Brincker, Rune; Andersen, Ken G.

    2012-01-01

    Issues regarding occupancy comfort in vibration-sensitive structures are the motivation of this study concerning windinduced vibrations in the European Court Towers in Luxembourg. In one of the two identical towers tuned liquid dampers (TLD) have been installed. Recent studies investigate the cha...

  14. A Comprehensive Evaluation of the Supreme Court's "Forest Grove" Decision?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2013-01-01

    The article by Dixon, Eusebio, Turton, Wright, and Hale is entitled "Forest Grove School District v. T.A. Supreme Court Case: Implications for School Psychology Practice." Its implications are that a "comprehensive evaluation" under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) requires assessment of the child's…

  15. 8 CFR 1003.11 - Administrative control Immigration Courts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administrative control Immigration Courts. 1003.11 Section 1003.11 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL PROVISIONS EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW Office of the Chief Immigration...

  16. Always "Outsiders": Asians, Naturalization, and the Supreme Court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, Jeff H.

    1986-01-01

    Focuses on Supreme Court naturalization rulings in relation to Asian immigrants. Asserts that an ethos of racial exclusion set the stage for internment of Japanese Americans in World War II and continues to discriminate against Asian immigrants in the United States today. (GC)

  17. Nosocomial infection and civil liability in Brazilian courts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARVALHO DA SILVA, José Marcio

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infection is notoriously one of the primary problems faced by healthcare insti-tutions and by professionals who work for them. This fact is demonstrated by the growing number of legal actions proposed in the legal system by patients and users of the health care system. Because of this scenario, the phenomenon of civil liability has arisen in cases of noso-comial infection. The legal implications of this phenomenon are varied and involve issues of the institutional environment and of professional conduct. Thus, the current study seeks to analyze the literature on the decisions taken by Brazilian courts regarding civil liability in cases of nosocomial infection. Conceptual aspects that define this healthcare problem are listed, as are the types of civil liability, the legal directives that guide conduct regarding this topic, and the decisions of Brazilian courts that consider civil liability in these cases. It was determined that the courts have been supported by the distinction between objective civil liability and subjective civil liability; additionally, it was determined that these courts are guided by the understanding of the existing service relationship between the institution or health care professional and the patient or user of the health care system.

  18. legal pluralism, sharia courts, and constitutional issues in ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eliasn

    analysis of the relevant provisions of the law and literature, it is argued that ... light on the exercise of their jurisdiction and on their relationship with courts of .... Ethiopia, and it had a significant influence in the political and legal traditions of ...... a reaction of identity group's active resistance to external forces of change and.

  19. The Effects of Computerized Information Systems on Juvenile Courts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Gary L.

    1976-01-01

    Organizational theorists alternatively hypothesized that computerized information systems (CIS) will produce no necessary changes, centralization, or decentralization in juvenile courts. This hypothesis is supported by the results of a four year study on the phenomenon. Suggestions are offered for improving the juvenile judicial system through…

  20. 77 FR 64853 - Manual for Courts-Martial; Proposed Amendments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] Vol. 77 Tuesday, No. 205 October 23, 2012 Part II Defense Department Manual for Courts-Martial; Proposed Amendments; Notice #0;#0... piracy of an aircraft or vessel; or while the accused was engaged in the commission or...

  1. Russia: district court upholds legal ban on opioid substitution treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golichenko

    2011-10-01

    On 27 May 2011, the Leninsky district court of Kaliningrad Region upheld the refusal of the Ministry of Health of Kaliningrad Region to ensure access to opioid substitution therapy (OST) as an effective treatment for opioid dependence and an effective intervention for HIV prevention among people who inject drugs.

  2. Definition of Intellectual Disability in Criminal Court Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olley, J. Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Definitions and associated descriptions of the condition now commonly known as "intellectual disability" serve many functions. The "Atkins v. Virginia" U.S. Supreme Court decision (2002) has called attention to the importance of clear, objective, and measureable wording of the definition. This article discusses the potential for misunderstanding…

  3. Press Releases vs. Newspaper Coverage of California Supreme Court Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, F. Dennis

    1978-01-01

    A study comparing the coverage in newspapers and press releases regarding one year's decisions of the California Supreme Court revealed that the press releases influenced the kinds of decisions that were reported but not the quantity of coverage by the newspapers. (GT)

  4. Supreme Court eases restriction on group homes for disabled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-06-16

    The Supreme Court ruled, in a six to three decision, that municipalities may not use occupancy limits to bar the establishment of group homes in residential settings if those limits do not apply to families as well. This ruling has made it harder for municipalities to prevent group homes for people with disabilities from locating in single-family neighborhoods. The court held that single-family zoning laws in Edmonds, WA, which forbid occupancy by more than five unrelated people, are not exempt from coverage under the Fair Housing Amendment Act (FHAA) because they do not apply to all people. The case which spurred the court ruling began when the City of Edmonds issued criminal citations against Oxford House-Edmonds, an alcohol and drug addiction treatment group home for ten to twelve adults, for violating the zoning law limiting to five the number of unrelated people allowed to live in a single-family home. The decision establishes a rule for the lower courts that local ordinances are not automatically exempt and must be measured against the anti-discrimination provisions of the Fair Housing Act.

  5. Higher Regional Court vs. clearinghouse; OLG gegen Clearingstelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, Michael; Gottwald, Thorsten [Luther Nierer Rechtsanwaelte Partnerschaft, Berlin (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    What exactly is a biogas plant? Should several small-scale plants located in a single site be counted as one? A recent ruling of the Higher Regional Court of the German state of Brandenburg reflected this opinion, but only resulted in still greater uncertainty of definitions. (orig.)

  6. Wind-induced Vibrations in the European Court Towers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jannick B.; Brincker, Rune; Andersen, Ken G.

    2012-01-01

    Issues regarding occupancy comfort in vibration-sensitive structures are the motivation of this study concerning windinduced vibrations in the European Court Towers in Luxembourg. In one of the two identical towers tuned liquid dampers (TLD) have been installed. Recent studies investigate the cha...

  7. 32 CFR 700.1101 - Demand for court-martial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Demand for court-martial. 700.1101 Section 700.1101 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS General Regulations Standards of Conduct § 700.1101 Demand for...

  8. Adaptive Interventions in Drug Court: A Pilot Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Douglas B; Festinger, David S; Arabia, Patricia L; Dugosh, Karen L; Benasutti, Kathleen M; Croft, Jason R; McKay, James R

    2008-01-01

    This pilot study (N = 30) experimentally examined the effects of an adaptive intervention in an adult misdemeanor drug court. The adaptive algorithm adjusted the frequency of judicial status hearings and clinical case-management sessions according to pre-specified criteria in response to participants' ongoing performance in the program. Results revealed the adaptive algorithm was acceptable to both clients and staff, feasible to implement with greater than 85% fidelity, and showed promise for eliciting clinically meaningful improvements in drug abstinence and graduation rates. Estimated effect sizes ranged from 0.40 to 0.60 across various dependent measures. Compared to drug court as-usual, participants in the adaptive condition were more likely to receive responses from the drug court team for inadequate performance in the program and received those responses after a substantially shorter period of time. This suggests the adaptive algorithm may have more readily focused the drug court team's attention on poorly-performing individuals, thus allowing the team to "nip problems in the bud" before they developed too fully. These preliminary data justify additional research evaluating the effects of the adaptive algorithm in a fully powered experimental trial.

  9. An Appreciative Inquiry into an Urban Drug Court: Cultural Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Raymond; Cohen, Erik

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use an appreciative inquiry (AI) theoretical research perspective and change methodology to transform the working relationships and cultural expectations of members through the discovery of their positive core leading to an optimistic and confidence-based future for an urban drug court. This study describes how…

  10. 5 CFR 1604.9 - Court orders and legal processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... described at 5 CFR part 1653, with the following exceptions: (a) Separate accounts. To qualify for... made pro rata from all sources. (c) Trustee-to-trustee transfers. The current or former spouse of a TSP... request the TSP to transfer the court-ordered payment to the payee's TSP account; the pro rata...

  11. A Citizen Court in the Recombinant DNA debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krinsky, Sheldon

    1978-01-01

    Harvard scientists were planning DNA experiments which required special facilities. A citizen panel was formed to look into the adequacy of federal safety guidelines for the community. Describes the review process and discusses the concept of a citizen court to resolve such technical controversies. (GA)

  12. 75 FR 54698 - Sentencing Guidelines for United States Courts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-08

    ... promulgate sentencing guidelines and policy statements for Federal courts. Section 994 also directs the... ``, and Crime Victims' Rights'' after ``Agreements''; and in Note 3 by redesignating subdivisions (a... criminal history score. A conforming change is made in Sec. 2P1.1 (Escape, Instigating or Assisting...

  13. National courts and the international rule of law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Nollkaemper

    2011-01-01

    This book explores how domestic courts contribute to the maintenance of the rule of international law by providing judicial control over the exercises of public powers that may conflict with international law. The main focus of the book is on judicial control of exercise of public powers by states.

  14. The Specialist Court for Kosovo: continuity or departure from the hybrid courts model?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shkёlzen Selimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue of whether to establish Specialist Chambers within the Kosovo justice system for alleged war crimes committed in Kosovo has been, arguably, one of the most heated debates not only from a political and social point of view, but also from a legal one. While the required amendments in the Constitution and several laws of Kosovo necessary to establish the Specialist Chambers in furtherance of the agreement dated 14 April 2014 between the Republic of Kosovo and the European Union on the Mission of the European Union Rule of Law Mission in Kosovo (“EULEX” will certainly create heated debates in the political level, one may argue that the legal issues that are expected to be encountered when the Specialist Chambers will be operational, may be even more pressing. This is in consideration of the peculiar nature of the Specialist Chambers, which are meant to have their basis within the laws of Kosovo, but at the same time, be independent from them and from control of Kosovo authorities. The purpose of this article is to delineate the possible legal issues that might confront the Specialist Chambers of Kosovo. Its main argument is that, while the Specialist Chambers seem to follow the experience of other hybrid internationalised courts, it still differs from them in some aspects. The challenges that the new Specialist Chambers may need to tackle deal with its jurisdiction and position within the Kosovo Judicial system, and its legitimacy and legal basis.

  15. Supreme Court Coverage in Canada: A Case Study of Media Coverage of the Whatcott Decision

    OpenAIRE

    Lydia Anita Miljan

    2014-01-01

    Do Canadian media outlets report Supreme Court decisions in a legal or political frame? Starting with a review of how the media amplify court decisions, the study focuses on a case study regarding a freedom of speech decision of the Court. This study finds that although the media critically evaluated the freedom of speech case of William Whatcott, it did so from a legal frame. Unlike American research that shows the media increasingly interprets Supreme Court decisions from a political frame,...

  16. The Jurisdiction of The Constitutional Court In Controlling The Constitutionality of Criminal Judgments: Kosovo Case

    OpenAIRE

    BRAHA, Florentina Shala; BYTYQI, Vilard; VUNIQI, Dardan; Berisha, Fadil

    2016-01-01

    This paper will deal with individual requests that are submitted at the Constitutional Court in order to assess the constitutionality of criminal judicial decisions. The right to submit issues for assessing the constitutionality of criminal court decisions is a constitutionally guaranteed right. Many individuals who are dissatisfied with the decisions of the judicial instances use their right to oppose such a decision even at the Constitutional Court.Not all the cases submitted to the Court a...

  17. The Benefit of a Switch: Answer-Changing on Multiple-Choice Exams by First-Year Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagni, Sarah E; Bak, Anna G; Eisen, Steven E; Murphy, Jennipher L; Finkelman, Matthew D; Kugel, Gerard

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if dental students would benefit from changing their initial responses to what they have deemed to be more suitable answers during high-stakes multiple-choice examinations. Students are often advised to stay with their first answers despite evidence from other fields suggesting this is not the best course for obtaining optimal final exam scores. Data were collected for 160 first-year DMD students in fall 2013 for three operative dentistry and four biochemistry exams at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine. As students take all of their exams through ExamSoft, a test-taking software application that tracks and records all changes students make during the exam period, the subjective nature of previous studies on answer changing was eliminated. The results showed that all students changed their answers on a minimum of nine questions over the seven exams, with an average of 26.55 (SD=8.8) questions changed per student. Answers changed from an incorrect to a correct response comprised nearly 65% of total answer changes, while changes from a correct to an incorrect answer encompassed slightly above 10% of answer changes. Nearly all students (99.4%) benefitted from answer-changing with a net gain of at least two correct questions, with only one student not increasing the final score. Overall, the students greatly benefitted from changing their answer choice, suggesting that dental students could be advised to change their answers from their first choice if they identify a better option when taking multiple-choice exams.

  18. Anti-localization Reform in China's Judicial System---From the perspective of "the Circuit Court of the Supreme Court"and"the New Intermediate Court"%论我国司法系统“去地方化”改革--以“最高院巡回法庭”与“地方新中级法院”为视角

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李云洲

    2015-01-01

    设立最高院巡回法庭和地方层面的新中级法院是我国司法系统“去地方化”改革的两项最新举措。最高院巡回法庭的设立确实能够在“案件分流”“便利当事人”以及“最高院本部的重新定位”等方面发挥作用,但就“去地方化”这一首要目标而言,其效果却微乎其微。对于地方层面的新中级人民法院,虽在省级框架内确实能起到去地方化的效果,但首批选择北京、上海两个直辖市作为试点并不具有示范效应。我国司法系统去地方化的关键在于省一级,因此,我国应当在地方层面推广新中级人民法院、在省级新设大区制高级人民法院、在国家级完善最高院巡回法庭等方面继续深化改革。%The establishments of Circuit Court of the Supreme Court and new Intermediate Court are two meas-ures in the anti-localization reform in China's judicial system.Circuit Court can play an active role in diverting ca-ses, facilitating the parties and the reposition of the headquarter of Supreme Court.It may not be effective, howev-er, in terms of avoiding localization, which is the primary aim of the establishment of the Circuit Court.As for the new Intermediate Court, on the one hand, it can avoid localization in the provincial administrative division;on the other hand, as two direct-controlled municipalities, Beijing and Shanghai may not be appropriate pilot cities. Therefore, since the key issue of the anti-localization reform lies in the provincial level, China shall deepen its judi-cial reform in three aspects:(1) promoting the new Intermediate Court in the municipal level;(2) establishing the cross-boundary High Court in the provincial level;(3) improving the Circuit Court in the national level.

  19. NL-Netherlands: Court applies Google Spain: no right to be forgotten for convicted criminal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breemen, V.

    2014-01-01

    On 18 September 2014, the Amsterdam Court handed down the first national application of the EU Court of Justice’s Google Spain judgment. The case was initiated by a convicted criminal after Google had not fully granted his online removal requests. The court rejected the claim, but it should be noted

  20. 37 CFR 2.145 - Appeal to court and civil action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... (a) Appeal to U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. An applicant for registration, or any....S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (paragraph (a) of this section), may have remedy by... appeal to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit waives any right to proceed under section...

  1. 20 CFR 410.670c - Application of circuit court law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Application of circuit court law. 410.670c... involving the application of circuit court law. (a) The Administration will apply a holding in a United... determination or decision between the date of a circuit court decision and the date an Acquiescence Ruling...

  2. 19 CFR 176.11 - Transmission of records to Court of International Trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEEDINGS IN THE COURT OF INTERNATIONAL TRADE Transmission of Records § 176.11 Transmission of records to Court of International Trade. Upon receipt of service of a summons in an action initiated in the Court of International Trade the following items shall...

  3. 76 FR 65061 - Manual for Courts-Martial; Proposed Evidence Amendments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    ... October 19, 2011 Part III Department of Defense Office of the Secretary Manual for Courts-Martial..., 2011 / Notices#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Manual for Courts-Martial... of Proposed Amendments to the Military Rules of Evidence in the Manual for Courts-Martial,...

  4. Characteristics of the People's Court's Order to Compensate Damages for Copyright Infringement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Lumin; Zhang Xuesong

    2005-01-01

    @@ The issue of damages has long been a hard nut to crack in court hearings of cases of dispute over copyright infringement. Recently, the Beijing Higher People's Court has found out, while conducing a study of 206 copyright infringement cases (162 cases of first instance and 44 cases of second instance), the following eight characteristics of the People's Court's ruling on compensation of damages.

  5. 8 CFR 1003.46 - Protective orders, sealed submissions in Immigration Courts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Immigration Courts. 1003.46 Section 1003.46 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL PROVISIONS EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW Immigration Court-Rules of Procedure § 1003.46 Protective orders, sealed submissions in Immigration Courts. (a) Authority. In...

  6. 8 CFR 1003.23 - Reopening or reconsideration before the Immigration Court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Immigration Court. 1003.23 Section 1003.23 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL PROVISIONS EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW Immigration Court-Rules of Procedure § 1003.23 Reopening or reconsideration before the Immigration Court. (a) Pre-decision...

  7. Giving Back: A Community Service-Learning Manual for Youth Courts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degelman, Charles

    Youth courts are among the fastest-growing crime intervention in the nation. Youth courts divert minor offenders from overloaded juvenile courts and hold them responsible for their actions. They educate young people about the impact their actions have on others, teach about the legal system, and provide opportunities and a forum to develop and…

  8. Supreme Court Hearing in Texas Admissions Case Exposes Gaps in Affirmative-Action Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The author reports on the U.S. Supreme Court hearing regarding the Texas admissions case that exposes gaps in the affirmative-action law. As the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in a lawsuit challenging race-conscious admissions at the University of Texas at Austin, it became evident that the court's past rulings on such policies have failed to…

  9. Researching Justification Texts of a First Instance Court from Assignment to Results and Reporting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langbroek, Philip; van der Linden - Smith, Tina

    2014-01-01

    Court decisions are reasoned to legitimize them. Lay people seem to understand little of the work of the courts. One of the questions for court administrators and judges is: for whom do judges write their judgments? Is it possible to analyze judicial justification texts with a view to the audiences

  10. 22 CFR 71.9 - Presentation of Americans at foreign courts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Presentation of Americans at foreign courts. 71... Presentation of Americans at foreign courts. The chief of the mission concerned may exercise his discretion in the matter of procuring the presentation of American citizens at the court of the country to which...

  11. Researching Justification Texts of a First Instance Court from Assignment to Results and Reporting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langbroek, Philip; van der Linden - Smith, Tina

    2014-01-01

    Court decisions are reasoned to legitimize them. Lay people seem to understand little of the work of the courts. One of the questions for court administrators and judges is: for whom do judges write their judgments? Is it possible to analyze judicial justification texts with a view to the audiences

  12. The European Court of Human Rights, Secular Education and Public Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, James; Holdsworth, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Since 9/11 the European Court of Human Rights (the European Court) has raised anew the question of the relationship between religion and public education. In its reasoning, the European Court has had to consider competing normative accounts of the secular, either to accept or deny claims to religious liberty within Europe's public education…

  13. 25 CFR 11.118 - What are the jurisdictional limitations of the Court of Indian Offenses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the jurisdictional limitations of the Court of... the jurisdictional limitations of the Court of Indian Offenses? (a) A Court of Indian Offenses may... Offenses unless its tribal governing body explicitly waives its tribal immunity by tribal resolution or...

  14. Secondary Prevention Services for Clients Who Are Low Risk in Drug Court: A Conceptual Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMatteo, David S.; Marlowe, Douglas B.; Festinger, David S.

    2006-01-01

    The drug court model assumes that most drug offenders are addicts, and that drug use fuels other criminal activity. As a result, drug court clients must satisfy an intensive regimen of treatment and supervisory obligations. However, research suggests that roughly one third of drug court clients do not have a clinically significant substance use…

  15. Adapting to Bad News: Lessons from the Harlem Parole Reentry Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Zachary K.

    2011-01-01

    The reentry court model was created to address the risks and needs of offenders returning to the community during the period immediately following release. While there is growing interest in reentry courts, research to date has been limited. This study utilized a quasi-experimental design, comparing reentry court participants with traditional…

  16. The European Courts and the Law of Treaties: The Continuing Story

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijper, P.J.; Cannizzaro, E.

    2011-01-01

    This chapter presents a critical analysis of the case law of the European Court of Justice and of the General Court relating to the application of the international law of treaties. It covers the some forty cases in which the Courts have referred explicitly to the Vienna Convention on the Law of Tre

  17. [Infanticide in the light of post-mortem findings and court files from the period 1990-2000 (selected problems)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kołowski, Janusz; Nowak, Klaudia Magdalena

    2005-01-01

    Drawing upon 28 court files of the District Court in Poznań and 30 post-mortem protocols--from the Department of Forensic Medicine at Poznań Medical Academy. This article tackles the issue of infanticide in the period from 1990 to 2000. The aim of this paper was to find answers to the following questions: what was the social background and mental state of female offenders? How was infanticide committed? In order to solve certain research problems, a document examination technique was employed to analyse the contents of the documents available. Female offenders were aged between 17 to 42 years. In the majority of cases (56.7%), perpetrators were occupationally active, single young women with a low level of education and having a working-class background. In the majority of cases (80%), active infanticide was committed. Most frequently, infanticide was committed by shutting a child into a tight space, and tamponade of throat and larynx. Passive infanticide was committed in 20% of cases, with infants left without care at the place of birth. No case of psychosis was determined in the examined material.

  18. Scientific profile and professional responsibility of Court-appointed Medical Technical Consultants in Italy: time for a specific educational curriculum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Andrea Alberto

    2014-08-20

    Court-appointed Technical Consultants (CTCs) are fundamental figures in the Italian judicial system. CTCs are experts appointed by judges in order to supplement their activities by ascertaining, collecting and analyzing facts concerning the specific subject of a lawsuit. These experts formulate opinions, gather motivations and perform checks to provide clear, objective and irrefutable answers to the questions posed by judges. With direct reference to the medical field, while police doctors (specialists in forensic medicine) follow an academic, dedicated, well-structured educational curriculum, the University specialty school in Forensic Medicine, other medical CTCs, though not infrequently luminaries with one or many medical specialties and professional acknowledgments, may have no specific legal-medicine and juridical expertise, precisely because a similar expertise is not formally required of them. In the light of these considerations, in Italy some professionals of the legal world, and of the health context too, have proposed for medical CTCs targeted educational pathways, which would provide these experts with formal specific qualifications. In synthesis and in conclusion, a full knowledge and a rigorous respect of the rules of legal proceedings emerge as increasingly important characteristics for current and future Court-appointed Technical Consultants, together with a specific educational curriculum.

  19. Overview of the CLEF 2005 Multilingual Question Answering Track

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vallin, A.; Magnini, B.; Giampiccolo, D.; Aunimo, L.; Ayache, C.; Osenova, P.; Penas, A.; de Rijke, M.; Sacaleanu, B.; Santos, D.; Sutcliffe, R.

    2005-01-01

    The general aim of the third CLEF Multilingual Question Answering Track was to set up a common and replicable evaluation framework to test both monolingual and cross-language Question Answering (QA) systems that process queries and documents in several European languages. Nine target languages and

  20. 15 CFR 280.207 - Answer and demand for hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... this part. (d) English language required. The answer, all other papers, and all documentary evidence... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Answer and demand for hearing. 280.207 Section 280.207 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade...

  1. Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978: Questions and Answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Administration for Native Americans (DHEW/OHDS), Washington, DC.

    The question and answer booklet highlights the provisions of the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978 which was designed to protect the best interests of Indian children and to promote the stability and security of Indian tribes and families. The booklet attempts to answer 28 important questions concerning title I of the Act. Examples of questions…

  2. Learning Basic Addition Facts from Choosing between Alternative Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Galen, Mirte S.; Reitsma, Pieter

    2010-01-01

    The acquisition of addition facts was investigated in a practice study. Participants were 103 Grade 1 children who practiced simple addition problems with three different methods: (a) writing down the answer, (b) choosing between two alternative answers, and (c) filling in the second missing addend. On a test with simple addition problems,…

  3. Learning to rank for why-question answering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberne, S.; Halteren, H. van; Theijssen, D.; Raaijmakers, S.A.; Boves, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we evaluate a number of machine learning techniques for the task of ranking answers to why-questions. We use TF-IDF together with a set of 36 linguistically motivated features that characterize questions and answers. We experiment with a number of machine learning techniques (among

  4. Overview of the CLEF 2005 Multilingual Question Answering Track

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vallin, A.; Magnini, B.; Giampiccolo, D.; Aunimo, L.; Ayache, C.; Osenova, P.; Penas, A.; de Rijke, M.; Sacaleanu, B.; Santos, D.; Sutcliffe, R.

    2005-01-01

    The general aim of the third CLEF Multilingual Question Answering Track was to set up a common and replicable evaluation framework to test both monolingual and cross-language Question Answering (QA) systems that process queries and documents in several European languages. Nine target languages and t

  5. 47 CFR 6.19 - Answers to informal complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Answers to informal complaints. 6.19 Section 6..., TELECOMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT AND CUSTOMER PREMISES EQUIPMENT BY PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES Enforcement § 6.19 Answers to informal complaints. Any manufacturer or provider to whom an informal complaint is directed by...

  6. Addressing challenges to MMPI-2-RF-based testimony: questions and answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Porath, Yossef S

    2012-11-01

    Introduction of a new version of a psychological test brings with it challenges that can be accentuated by the adversarial nature of the legal process. In the case of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF), these challenges can be addressed by becoming familiar with the rationale for and the methods used in revising the inventory, the information contained in the test manuals, and the growing peer-reviewed literature on the test. Potential challenges to MMPI-2-RF-based testimony are identified in this article and discussed in question and answer format. The questions guiding this discussion are based on the Daubert factors, established in 1993 by the US Supreme Court as criteria for gauging the scientific validity of proffered expert testimony. The answers to these questions apply more broadly to testimony in depositions, pre-trial hearings, and at trial. Consideration of the MMPI-2-RF in light of the Daubert factors indicates that the instrument has been subjected to extensive empirical testing and that a substantial peer-reviewed literature is available to guide and support its use. Information about the known and potential rate of error associated with MMPI-2-RF scores is available, and standard procedures for administration, scoring, and interpretation of the inventory are detailed in the test administration manual. Indicators of MMPI-2-RF acceptance can be cited, and criticisms of the MMPI-2-RF can be addressed with information available in the test documents and an extensive, modern, and actively growing peer-reviewed literature.

  7. Trust and Confidence in the Courts: Does the Quality of Treatment Young Offenders Receive Affect Their Views of the Courts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprott, Jane B.; Greene, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    It is assumed that legitimacy of the legal system is important, yet almost nothing is known about how young offenders view this institution. A sample of youths were interviewed at their first appearance in court and asked about their feelings regarding how they have been treated (procedural justice) by their lawyer, by the crown attorney, and by…

  8. Trust and Confidence in the Courts: Does the Quality of Treatment Young Offenders Receive Affect Their Views of the Courts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprott, Jane B.; Greene, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    It is assumed that legitimacy of the legal system is important, yet almost nothing is known about how young offenders view this institution. A sample of youths were interviewed at their first appearance in court and asked about their feelings regarding how they have been treated (procedural justice) by their lawyer, by the crown attorney, and by…

  9. The role of answer fluency and perceptual fluency as metacognitive cues for initiating analytic thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Valerie A; Turner, Jamie A Prowse; Pennycook, Gordon; Ball, Linden J; Brack, Hannah; Ophir, Yael; Ackerman, Rakefet

    2013-08-01

    Although widely studied in other domains, relatively little is known about the metacognitive processes that monitor and control behaviour during reasoning and decision-making. In this paper, we examined the conditions under which two fluency cues are used to monitor initial reasoning: answer fluency, or the speed with which the initial, intuitive answer is produced (Thompson, Prowse Turner, & Pennycook, 2011), and perceptual fluency, or the ease with which problems can be read (Alter, Oppenheimer, Epley, & Eyre, 2007). The first two experiments demonstrated that answer fluency reliably predicted Feeling of Rightness (FOR) judgments to conditional inferences and base rate problems, which subsequently predicted the amount of deliberate processing as measured by thinking time and answer changes; answer fluency also predicted retrospective confidence judgments (Experiment 3b). Moreover, the effect of answer fluency on reasoning was independent from the effect of perceptual fluency, establishing that these are empirically independent constructs. In five experiments with a variety of reasoning problems similar to those of Alter et al. (2007), we found no effect of perceptual fluency on FOR, retrospective confidence or accuracy; however, we did observe that participants spent more time thinking about hard to read stimuli, although this additional time did not result in answer changes. In our final two experiments, we found that perceptual disfluency increased accuracy on the CRT (Frederick, 2005), but only amongst participants of high cognitive ability. As Alter et al.'s samples were gathered from prestigious universities, collectively, the data to this point suggest that perceptual fluency prompts additional processing in general, but this processing may results in higher accuracy only for the most cognitively able. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Therapeutic jurisprudent analysis: A study of intersex from the rulings of the Constitutional Court

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Lucia Camacho Gutiérrez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available From the perspective of therapeutic jurisprudence in the study of judicial cases, a review was made of the nine judgments that the High Court of the Colombian Constitutional Jurisdiction has issued up to now on the most important legal problem related to intersexuality, that is, obtaining informed consent in sex reassignment or standardization procedures. The legal rule adopted as judicial precedent generates possible therapeutic or antitherapeutic effects depending on how the obtaining of informed consent privileges the exercise of the autonomy of the intersex minor, or that of the legal representatives

  11. Abortion and infant mortality before and after the 1973 US Supreme Court decision on abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, L S

    1981-07-01

    The 50 states of the US were compared in 1971-72 and 1974-75 with respect to percentage apparent conceptions aborted and infant mortality rates attributed to various causes. Only nonvehicle accidental deaths were consistently related to abortion. The correlation is nonlinear; nonvehicle accidental deaths were especially high in states with little or no abortion. A decline in nonvehicle accidental deaths from before to after the Supreme Court decision was most pronounced in states where there were fewest abortions before the decision and where increases in abortion followed the decision.

  12. Congressional Statutory Responses to Supreme Court Precedent: Comparing the Breadth and Potency of Statutes Invalidated by the Rehnquist Court and Analogous Statutes Subsequently Repassed by Congress

    OpenAIRE

    Goldberger, Justin Nathaniel

    2016-01-01

    Many people assume that when the U.S. Supreme Court invalidates a federal statute as unconstitutional, the Court's decision establishes binding precedent that narrows the U.S. Congress's available options. This thesis examines whether Congress has in practice been able to effectively circumvent Supreme Court precedents while still acting consistently with such precedents in a narrow sense by not repassing an identical statute. More specifically, this work explores whether the U.S. Congress w...

  13. Frequently Asked Questions and Answers on Smallpox

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... protect anyone else judged to have a high risk of exposure to smallpox. The vaccine cannot be used in ... only to those persons who have a high risk of coming into contact with the virus which ... health workers and hospital personnel around the world have been trained to ...

  14. Dispute resolution by Courts and Dispute resolution in court. Partners or rivals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Hero

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This session of the workshop was dedicated to alternative dispute resolutions (ADR, which consists of dispute resolution processes and techniques through which disagreeing parties come to an agreement without having to litigate. Despite historic resistance, over the years ADR has gained widespread acceptance among both the general public and the legal profession. In the discussion there was a specific emphasis on mediation and arbitration. Kathrin Nitschmann, a lawyer and mediator from Saarbruecken, Germany, talked about “Professionalisation in mediation”. In addition to participation aspects she determined both the risks and the perspectives of professionalization in mediation. Luigi Cominelli, Assistant Professor of Sociology of Law at the University of Milan, Italy, reported on “Regulating Mediation in the EU”. He described the history of regulating mediation in the EU as well as domestic regulations since the beginning of modern mediation movement in the western world since the 1970s. Claude Witz, a French civil law professor at the University of Saarland, Germany, referred to “His experience in arbitration.” After highlighting some aspects of his experience, he pointed out the importance of arbitration in international commercial disputes. Alec Stone Sweet, Leitner Professor of Law, Politics, and International Studies, Yale Law School, United States, was reporting on “Arbitration and judicialization.” Initially, he presented arbitration as a triadic dispute resolution and then focused on judizialization in arbitration. Sir David Edward, former Judge of the Court of Justice of the European Communities and Professor Emeritus of the School of Law of the University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom, spoke about “The view of an arbitrator.” While elaborating on multiple reasons for ADR, he honed focus on mediation and arbitration. Finally Heike Jung, Professor Emeritus of Penal Law of the University of the Saarland, Germany

  15. Question Processing and Clustering in INDOC: A Biomedical Question Answering System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankush Mittal

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The exponential growth in the volume of publications in the biomedical domain has made it impossible for an individual to keep pace with the advances. Even though evidence-based medicine has gained wide acceptance, the physicians are unable to access the relevant information in the required time, leaving most of the questions unanswered. This accentuates the need for fast and accurate biomedical question answering systems. In this paper we introduce INDOC—a biomedical question answering system based on novel ideas of indexing and extracting the answer to the questions posed. INDOC displays the results in clusters to help the user arrive the most relevant set of documents quickly. Evaluation was done against the standard OHSUMED test collection. Our system achieves high accuracy and minimizes user effort.

  16. An Evaluation of Three Driving-Under-the-Influence Courts in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fell, James C; Tippetts, A Scott; Ciccel, J Decarlo

    2011-01-01

    Following the model of Drug Courts, three Georgia Driving-Under-the-Influence (DUI) Courts (established in Chatham, Clarke, and Hall Counties in 2003) were designed to address the underlying alcohol problems of repeat DUI offenders through continuous and frequent judicially supervised treatment, periodic alcohol and other drug testing, the use of graduated sanctions, and other appropriate rehabilitative services. A team comprised of a judge, court personnel, probation officials, and treatment providers met regularly to assess offender progress, and offenders met biweekly with the judge to report their progress. An impact evaluation showed after 4 years of exposure that when the DUI Court graduates were combined with the DUI Court terminated offenders (Intent to Treat Group), the DUI Court offenders had significantly lower recidivism rates: 38 percent lower than a Contemporary Group of offenders and 65 percent lower than a Retrospective Group of offenders. The DUI Court Intent to Treat Group had a significantly lower recidivism rate: 15 percent compared to 24 percent for a group of matched offenders from three similar counties in Georgia (Contemporary Group) and a 35 percent rate for matched offenders from the same counties as the DUI Court who would have been eligible for the DUI Court had it been in existence (Retrospective Group). Offenders who were terminated from the DUI Courts for various reasons had a recidivism rate of 26 percent. It is estimated that the DUI Courts prevented between 47 and 112 repeat arrests during a four year period due to the reduced recidivism associated with them.

  17. Ontologies and adaptivity in dialogue for question answering

    CERN Document Server

    Sonntag, D

    2010-01-01

    Question answering (QA) has become one of the fastest growing topics in computational linguistics and information access. To advance research in the area of dialogue-based question answering, we propose a combination of methods from different scientific fields (i.e., Information Retrieval, Dialogue Systems, Semantic Web, and Machine Learning). This book sheds light on adaptable dialogue-based question answering. We demonstrate the technical and computational feasibility of the proposed ideas, the introspective methods in particular, by beginning with an extensive introduction to the dialogical

  18. A Semi-Supervised Learning Approach to Enhance Health Care Community–Based Question Answering: A Case Study in Alcoholism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klabjan, Diego; Jonnalagadda, Siddhartha Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Background Community-based question answering (CQA) sites play an important role in addressing health information needs. However, a significant number of posted questions remain unanswered. Automatically answering the posted questions can provide a useful source of information for Web-based health communities. Objective In this study, we developed an algorithm to automatically answer health-related questions based on past questions and answers (QA). We also aimed to understand information embedded within Web-based health content that are good features in identifying valid answers. Methods Our proposed algorithm uses information retrieval techniques to identify candidate answers from resolved QA. To rank these candidates, we implemented a semi-supervised leaning algorithm that extracts the best answer to a question. We assessed this approach on a curated corpus from Yahoo! Answers and compared against a rule-based string similarity baseline. Results On our dataset, the semi-supervised learning algorithm has an accuracy of 86.2%. Unified medical language system–based (health related) features used in the model enhance the algorithm’s performance by proximately 8%. A reasonably high rate of accuracy is obtained given that the data are considerably noisy. Important features distinguishing a valid answer from an invalid answer include text length, number of stop words contained in a test question, a distance between the test question and other questions in the corpus, and a number of overlapping health-related terms between questions. Conclusions Overall, our automated QA system based on historical QA pairs is shown to be effective according to the dataset in this case study. It is developed for general use in the health care domain, which can also be applied to other CQA sites. PMID:27485666

  19. From text to talk : Answers and their uptake in standardised survey interviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, S. van 't

    2006-01-01

    The standardised survey interview is a highly structured form of interaction. Interviewers ask questions from a script, and respondents select one of the pre-formulated answers. However, interviewers and respondents do more than just their pre-allocated tasks. This study approaches survey interviews

  20. Court lets stand ruling barring lawsuit by plaintiff on SSDI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-03-01

    The U.S. Supreme Court let stand a ruling barring a plaintiff from suing his former employer for AIDS discrimination because his acceptance of disability benefits indicated that he was no longer covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The appeal was brought by [name removed], an assistant store manager who sued the Disney Stores after he was fired. The 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said that [name removed] was judicially estopped from suing because he cannot be a qualified individual with a disability under the ADA if he accepts Social Security disability benefits. This case means that persons with AIDS could forfeit their legal rights under the ADA unless they are careful how they apply for disability benefits. The ruling prevented [name removed] from obtaining a trial on his claim that he was fired on a charge of theft as a pretext for AIDS discrimination.

  1. Court upholds prison term for fraud against life insurers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-15

    The 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago upheld the lower court conviction of [name removed] for fraud and mail fraud. [Name removed] enrolled seven critically ill persons under employee group life insurance through his travel agency, Corporate Travel Consultants Corp. in a scheme to collect $2.4 million. None of the people were employees of his company. The deaths of an HIV-infected man and [name removed]'s 95-year-old mother paid him $600,000 in benefits before the plot was discovered. He was sentenced to a jail term, fined $50,000, and ordered to make restitution in the amount of $600,000. The three-judge panel said that in spite of some errors, the sentence was appropriate.

  2. Commentary (Victim Participation in the International Criminal Court)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchuk, Iryna

    2014-01-01

    was very ‘consumer like’ because victims were solely used as witnesses to testify about the crimes attributed to the accused, but they were not granted broad participatory rights in the proceedings. The drafters of the Rome Statute acknowledged wide-ranging interests of victims who, apart from seeking......Victim participation is one of the most innovative aspects introduced in the legal framework of the International Criminal Court (hereinafter – ICC), which has not featured in the practices of other international criminal courts and tribunals. The approach of the ad hoc tribunals to victims...... that have firmly established practices in dealing with victims and were largely followed by other chambers. Although the jurisprudence has received a mixed bag of reviews in professional and academic circles, it is important to highlight the contribution of the judges to the interpretation of the victim...

  3. Court of the Eurasian Economic Community welcome Note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sokolovskaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As the President of the Court of the Eurasian Economic Community I am very proud to appear on the pages of Russian Law Journal, a new promising project initiated by leading Russian scholars. The RLJ is of a particular interest for the Court of the Eurasian Economic Community, a body hearing cases involving companies from all over the world in relation to the Customs Union of Belarus, Kazakhstan and Russia, since its’ main purpose is to expand cross-fertilization between the legal cultures. This purpose is very important in course of the Eurasian integration which will culminate in 2015 with creation of the Eurasian Union, transforming markets of the member states into the large single one. I am wishing the RLJ’s Editorial Council and Board productive work in establishing this forum for discussion.

  4. THE ROMANIAN COURT OF ACCOUNTS, TRADITION AND ACTUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena – Carmen Bragadirean

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is an analysis of the financial control/audit activity organization and conduct inRomania, al the level of the Romanian Court of Accounts as of set up date and until now.The financial control/audit activity is conducted by virtue of the right of society to have thefundamental general interest defended. The necessity to organize and conduct financialcontrol results from the fact that financial resources established and available to publicadministration belong to the overall society. Society is directly interested to ensurefinancial resources for the common needs, as well as their allotment in relation to prioritiesset by competent bodies for the use of public funds with maximum economic and socialefficiency, harmonizing interests, sizing financial resources and, last but not least, theirorientation towards various programmed destinations. In Romania, the institutionhabilitated based on legal provisions to implement the above mentioned object is theRomanian Court of Accounts.

  5. Prometheus: the Supreme Court redefines the patentability of diagnostic inventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumamoto, Andrew; Schmid, Cora L

    2012-12-01

    The United States Supreme Court recently issued an opinion regarding the patentability of claims directed to diagnostic methods in Mayo Collab. Service v. Prometheus Lab., Inc. In this opinion, the Supreme Court held that correlations between metabolite levels in the human body and either therapeutic efficacy or adverse effects are unpatentable laws of nature. It further found that a patent claim to a method including such a correlation is unpatentable if the remainder of the claim contains only conventional and well-known steps. The Prometheus decision creates uncertainty regarding the scope of patentable subject matter, particularly in the fields of diagnostic and personalized medicine, that will remain until future cases apply this new doctrine.

  6. [The Cagliari (Italy) Court authorizes the preimplantation genetic diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorqui Azofra, María

    2007-01-01

    Today, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) has been greatly accepted within the framework of positive law of many European countries. Nevertheless, in other countries, such as Italy, it is forbidden by law. The ruling of the Civil Court of Cagliari which has authorized its use to a Sardinian couple, has opened, in this way, a small crack to be able to asses possible modifications to the Italian regulation on this matter. This article analyses the ruling of the Civil Court of Cagliari (Italy) from an ethical and legal perspective. The criteria which is used to analyse the legitimacy or illegitimacy of the practice of PGD is analysed. That is, on reasons which could justify or not the transfer of embryos in vitro to the woman. With this objective in mind, the Italian and Spanish normative models which regulates this controversial subject are looked at. As a conclusion, a critical evaluation of the arguments presented is made.

  7. Japan’s Supreme Court Discourse and Lifetime Employment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tackney, Charles T.; Sato, Toyoko

    to employee participation in managerial prerogative. The comparative social policy aim is to examine and account for observed employment relations variance in the U.S. and Japan, given their similar labor legislation. Japan’s Supreme Court recognizes lifetime employment as an institutionalized practice and we......'s participatory employee relations system contrasts sharply with recent U.S. state-based legislative assaults on long-standing collective bargaining, particularly for public sector unions. The concept of cultural cognition, recently deployed in legal studies to account for domestic U.S. risk, public policy......Our study explores cultural cognition in comparative U.S. – Japan employment relations through interdisciplinary analysis of Japanese Supreme Court regulation of the post-World War II lifetime employment system and the latest data available on Japan's collective bargaining-based approach...

  8. Supreme Court rejects another anti-choice appeal in racketeering suit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-12-16

    Without comment on December 12, the US Supreme Court denied two requests for review from anti-choice activists in Scheidler vs Delaware Women's Health Organization and Miller vs Delaware Women's Health Organization, which grew out of a class action suit filed by women's health clinics under the federal anti-racketeering statute. Since the US Supreme Court decision in NOW vs Scheidler last January (see RFN III/2), the anti-choice defendants have made at least a dozen attempts to prevent a trial that would determine whether they violated the Racketeering Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO). In NOW vs Scheidler, the High Court rejected their claim that RICO cannot be applied to organized, illegal anti-choice activities because the defendants are not motivated by an economic gain. In this latest round, the two petitions asserted that unlawful actions, including blockades and property destruction, do not constitute extortion and are protected by the First Amendment. Under RICO, private plaintiffs can file suit against individuals who conspire to use an organization to engage in a pattern of racketeering, including acts of extortion. Extortion is defined under the Hobbs Act as the use of force, threats, or other wrongful means to deprive the plaintiff of a property interest, such as engaging in a legal business. Plaintiffs in these cases are the National Organization for Women (NOW) and two women's health facilities--Delaware Women's Health Organization and Summit Women's Health Organization (Milwaukee)--which represent a class of clinics across the country. Defendants Operation Rescue, Project Life, and Pro-Life Action League, are also joined by several anti-choice activists including Joseph Scheidler and Randall Terry. full text

  9. The Problem of Emergency in the American Supreme Court

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartz, Emily; ugilt, rasmus

    2011-01-01

    Sixty years before Carl Schmitt wrote his Political Theology, and more than a 100 years before President Bush announced a ‘war on terrorism’ the American Supreme Court grappled with the difficult issue of emergency powers in connection with issues arising out of the American Civil War (1861...... on terrorism. This article engages the theoretical framework of Locke, Schmitt and Agamben in order to come to a better understanding of this important set of cases....

  10. Toward next generation coaching tools for court based racquet sports

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Even with today’s advances in automatic indexing of multimedia content, existing coaching tools for court sports lack the ability to automatically index a competitive match into key events. This paper proposes an automatic event indexing and event retrieval system for tennis, which can be used to coach from beginners upwards. Event indexing is possible using either visual or inertial sensing, with the latter potentially providing system portability. To achieve maximum performance in eve...

  11. A History of Court and Commoner Clothing in Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liam C. Kelley

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Trần Quang Đức. Ngàn năm áo mũ: Lich sử trang phục Việt Nam giai đoạn 1009–1945 [One thousand years of caps and robes: A history of Vietnamese clothing in the period 1009–1945]. TP Hồ Chí Minh: Nhã Nam, 2013. ISBN: 1467557900. Đức documents in incredible detail the history of the sartorial decisions made at various Vietnamese courts, from Quyền’s time until the end of the Nguyễn dynasty. Based on an extensive examination of Vietnamese, Chinese, European, and even Korean sources—most of which only briefly mention clothing in various periods—Đức has succeeded in producing a comprehensive overview of the clothing of Vietnamese rulers and their officials; when possible, he also comments on the dress of other segments of society, such as the military and commoners. One Thousand Years of Caps and Robes devotes a chapter to each Vietnamese dynasty: the Lý, the Trần, the Lê, the Tây Sơn, and the Nguyễn. Đức begins each chapter with an overview of the history of that dynasty’s styles of court dress and then goes into a detailed description of exactly which types of cap and robe the ruler and his officials wore, and in what ways these caps and robes extended previous practices or were innovations. He follows his examination of court dress with a discussion of military and commoner attire. The chapter introductions provide a concise history of changes in court clothing across time, while the detailed discussions of the caps and robes from each period offer a deeper level of understanding...

  12. The Moderating Influence of International Courts on Social Movements

    OpenAIRE

    Lemaitre, Julieta; Rachel SIEDER

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Feminists and religious conservatives across the globe have increasingly turned to courts in their battles over abortion. Yet while a significant literature analyzes legal mobilization on abortion issues, it tends to focus predominantly on domestic scenarios. In this article, we consider the effects of this contentious engagement of pro-choice and anti-abortion movements in international human rights fora, asking what happens to social movement claims when they reach international hu...

  13. Japan’s Supreme Court Discourse and Lifetime Employment

    OpenAIRE

    Tackney, Charles T.; Sato, Toyoko

    2012-01-01

    Our study explores cultural cognition in comparative U.S. – Japan employment relations through interdisciplinary analysis of Japanese Supreme Court regulation of the post-World War II lifetime employment system and the latest data available on Japan's collective bargaining-based approach to employee participation in managerial prerogative. The comparative social policy aim is to examine and account for observed employment relations variance in the U.S. and Japan, given their similar labor leg...

  14. Establishing Sentencing Guidelines for Military Courts-Martial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    of the offender and the offense, leading to a moral judgment imposed by judges with skill, experience, and wisdom [instead of] judges mechanically...good order and discipline, a convening authority (who had never met me) thought I was up for the job . After we found the defendant guilty, both...Sentencing Guidelines by Courts-Martial,” 17. 9 Luna , “Misguided Guidelines: A Critique of Federal Sentencing,” 1. 10 USSC, Annual Reports 1995-2013

  15. Ontario courts reaffirm right to marijuana for therapeutic purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Rémi

    2011-10-01

    In a judgment dated 11 April 20 11, the Ontario Superior Court declared that the Medical Marijuana Access Regulations (MMAR), and Sections 4 and 7 of the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA), that prohibit the possession and production of cannabis, are unconstitutional because, in practice, they prevent effective access to marijuana for therapeutic purposes, and therefore violate Section 7 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms (Charter).

  16. Symbolic Communication as Speech in United States Supreme Court Jurisprudence

    OpenAIRE

    Łukasz Machaj

    2011-01-01

    The First Amendment to the United States Constitution forbids government to pass any law which abridges freedom of speech. Notwithstanding the absolute tenor of the clause, this guarantee is clearly not limitless; its boundaries are established mainly in the course of Constitutional adjudication. The United States Supreme Court has extended free speech guarantees to so-called symbolic speech, i.e. to nonverbal expression of ideas, views or emotions. The article analyzes basic criteria and lim...

  17. Cramers Court Nursing Home, Belgooly, Cork.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Singan, Vasanth R

    2012-06-08

    AbstractBackgroundThe localization of proteins to specific subcellular structures in eukaryotic cells provides important information with respect to their function. Fluorescence microscopy approaches to determine localization distribution have proved to be an essential tool in the characterization of unknown proteins, and are now particularly pertinent as a result of the wide availability of fluorescently-tagged constructs and antibodies. However, there are currently very few image analysis options able to effectively discriminate proteins with apparently similar distributions in cells, despite this information being important for protein characterization.FindingsWe have developed a novel method for combining two existing image analysis approaches, which results in highly efficient and accurate discrimination of proteins with seemingly similar distributions. We have combined image texture-based analysis with quantitative co-localization coefficients, a method that has traditionally only been used to study the spatial overlap between two populations of molecules. Here we describe and present a novel application for quantitative co-localization, as applied to the study of Rab family small GTP binding proteins localizing to the endomembrane system of cultured cells.ConclusionsWe show how quantitative co-localization can be used alongside texture feature analysis, resulting in improved clustering of microscopy images. The use of co-localization as an additional clustering parameter is non-biased and highly applicable to high-throughput image data sets.

  18. Does the justice concur witn court adjudication of criminal case?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berova D.M.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Two formulas are confronted in the article: “justice in the Russian Federation is administered only by court” and “court adjudicates criminal cases”. Different scientific standpoints are analyzed. The viewpoint on justice as any court procedural activity (including pre-trial control of preliminary investigation bodies and arguments justifying it are studied, notably justice is not only judicial proceeding and conclusion on guilt and liability, but also deciding issues on arrest, search, taking other measures of criminal procedure constraint. The author proposes to consider justice in its direct meaning and in the narrow sense as the court activity on trying and adjudicating criminal cases. The rest of the court’s functions including the function of pre-trial control of preliminary investigation bodies cannot be considered as justice. The criminal case adjudication totally concurs with justice, and “justice” remains the priority legislative term. It is proved that justice as criminal case adjudication begins in the stage of preparing for judicial sitting, but it is executed in all the following degrees of jurisdiction and also when reopening the case due to newly discovered facts. In such cases reversal and revision of a sentence are possible, which is court’s prerogative forming a justice function. The judicial proceeding in the stage of executing a sentence is not considered as justice because in this case the sentence is not reversed or revised, its legality and validity are not examined and questioned, but execution of punishment can be amended.

  19. Circuit courts clash over HIV in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-19

    Some of the major differences of opinions between the circuit courts on issues affecting HIV and employment are examined. In the seven years since the passing of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), there has been disagreement among the circuits relative to the interpretation of the law. At the heart of the debate is whether or not HIV infection, without symptoms of AIDS, actually qualifies for a disability under the meaning and intent of the ADA. Another fundamental issue is whether or not reproduction is considered a major life activity under the ADA. Federal circuit courts have also considered what happens to patients in the latter stages of HIV diseases, when symptoms are so pronounced that he or she qualifies for disability benefits including Social Security or private disability plans. There is disagreement among the circuits as to whether insurance products, including those provided through an employee benefit program, are covered under the ADA. As of this date, the U.S. Supreme Court has not intervened on any of the HIV/ADA-related cases.

  20. WOMEN, CRIME AND THE SECULAR COURT IN EIGHTEENTH CENTURY CLUJ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Fehér

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this presentation is to address the issue of female criminality in early modern Cluj, and to analyze women’s position before the law. Our investigation is based on the records of the secular Court from the town Cluj, where we have identified more than 250 cases of women accused of fornication, adultery, witchcraft, infanticide, theft and drunkenness, poisoning, swearing and slander. There were a significant number of female convictions during the century, from which most ended with light sentences, such as banishment, corporal punishments, stigmatizations with hot iron, mutilations and only occasionally death. We would like to analyze in detail the types of crime and their punishments presenting the legal background, the jurisdiction and the habitual practices of the Court. We would also like to underline the importance of the narrative strategies used in these inquisitorial trials, since our documents reveal female criminality from a male perspective, as in these times men ran the legal system, consequently the Court records, in our reading contain moral, legal and sexual elements of a male discourse on female crime.