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Sample records for high corrosion rates

  1. High temperature corrosion in straw-fired power plants: Influence of steam/metal temperature on corrosion rates for TP347H

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Biede, O; Larsen, OH

    2002-01-01

    The corrosion in straw-fired boilers has been investigated at various straw-fired power plants in Denmark. Water/air-cooled probes, a test superheater and test sections removed from the actual superheater have been utilised to characterise corrosion and corrosion rates. This paper describes...... the corrosion rates measured for the TP347H type steel. The corrosion morphology at high temperature consists of grain boundary attack and selective attack of chromium. The corrosion rate increases with calculated metal temperature (based on steam temperature), however there is great variation within....... The difference in the results could be traced back to a lower flue gas temperature on one side of the boiler. Although metal temperature is the most important parameter with respect to corrosion rate, flue gas temperature also plays an important role. Efforts to quantify the effect of flue gas temperature...

  2. Monitoring corrosion rates and localised corrosion in low conductivity water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2006-01-01

    Monitoring of low corrosion rates and localised corrosion in a media with low conductivity is a challenge. In municipal district heating, quality control may be improved by implementing on-line corrosion monitoring if a suitable technique can be identified to measure both uniform and localised...... corrosion. Electrochemical techniques (LPR, EIS, crevice corrosion current) as well as direct measurement techniques (high-sensitive electrical resistance, weight loss) have been applied in operating plants. Changes in the corrosion processes are best monitored in non-aggressive, low conductivity media...

  3. The corrosion rate measurement of Inconel 690 on high temperature and pressure by using CMS100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriyono; Satmoko, Ari; Febrianto; Hidayati, N R; Arifal; Sumarno, Ady; Handoyo, Ismu; Prasetjo, Joko

    1999-01-01

    The corrosion rate measurement of Inconel 690 on high temperature and pressure had been done. By using an Autoclave, and temperature can be simulated. For reducing the pressure on Autoclave so its can be measure by Corrosion Measurement System 100(CMS100), the electrodes placement had designed and fabrication on the cover of Autoclave. The electrodes of CMS100 are reference electrode, working electrodes and counter electrodes. The electrodes placement are made and and designed on two packages, these are Salt bridge and Counter-specimen placement. From the result of testing these both of placement are able to 90 bar (pressure) and 280 C (temperature) operation rate measurement was done on temperature variation from 150 0C, 190 0C, 200 0C, 210 0C, 220 0C and 230 0C, and the solution is 0.1 ppm chloride. The pressure experiment is the pressure, which occurred in Autoclave. From the Tafel analysis, even through very little The corrosion current increased from 150 C to 230 C it is 2,54x10-10 a/cm2 to 1,62x10-9 A/cm2, but the the corrosion rate is still zero

  4. The Corrosion Rate Measurement of Inconel 690 on High Temperature andPressure by Using CMS100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriyono; Febrianto

    2000-01-01

    The corrosion rate measurement of Inconel 690 on high temperature andpressure had been done. By using an Autoclave, pressure and temperature canbe simulated. The environment of this experiment is 0.1 ppm of chloridesolution, which permit to dissolved in secondary cooling of steam generator.The corrosion rate measurement was done on temperature between 150 o C and230 o C with step 10 o C. Pressure experiment is the pressure, which occurredin Autoclave. Corrosion rate is measured by CMS100. From the Tafel analysis,corrosion rate of Inconel 690 linearity increased from 6.548 x 10 -5 mpy to4.331 x 10 -4 mpy. It concludes that Inconel 690 is resist on corrosionenvironment, so it's most using on the fabrication of steam generator tubeson the advanced power plant. (author)

  5. Aqueous Corrosion Rates for Waste Package Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Arthur

    2004-10-08

    The purpose of this analysis, as directed by ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]), is to compile applicable corrosion data from the literature (journal articles, engineering documents, materials handbooks, or standards, and national laboratory reports), evaluate the quality of these data, and use these to perform statistical analyses and distributions for aqueous corrosion rates of waste package materials. The purpose of this report is not to describe the performance of engineered barriers for the TSPA-LA. Instead, the analysis provides simple statistics on aqueous corrosion rates of steels and alloys. These rates are limited by various aqueous parameters such as temperature (up to 100 C), water type (i.e., fresh versus saline), and pH. Corrosion data of materials at pH extremes (below 4 and above 9) are not included in this analysis, as materials commonly display different corrosion behaviors under these conditions. The exception is highly corrosion-resistant materials (Inconel Alloys) for which rate data from corrosion tests at a pH of approximately 3 were included. The waste package materials investigated are those from the long and short 5-DHLW waste packages, 2-MCO/2-DHLW waste package, and the 21-PWR commercial waste package. This analysis also contains rate data for some of the materials present inside the fuel canisters for the following fuel types: U-Mo (Fermi U-10%Mo), MOX (FFTF), Thorium Carbide and Th/U Carbide (Fort Saint Vrain [FSVR]), Th/U Oxide (Shippingport LWBR), U-metal (N Reactor), Intact U-Oxide (Shippingport PWR, Commercial), aluminum-based, and U-Zr-H (TRIGA). Analysis of corrosion rates for Alloy 22, spent nuclear fuel, defense high level waste (DHLW) glass, and Titanium Grade 7 can be found in other analysis or model reports.

  6. Aqueous Corrosion Rates for Waste Package Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, S.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis, as directed by ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]), is to compile applicable corrosion data from the literature (journal articles, engineering documents, materials handbooks, or standards, and national laboratory reports), evaluate the quality of these data, and use these to perform statistical analyses and distributions for aqueous corrosion rates of waste package materials. The purpose of this report is not to describe the performance of engineered barriers for the TSPA-LA. Instead, the analysis provides simple statistics on aqueous corrosion rates of steels and alloys. These rates are limited by various aqueous parameters such as temperature (up to 100 C), water type (i.e., fresh versus saline), and pH. Corrosion data of materials at pH extremes (below 4 and above 9) are not included in this analysis, as materials commonly display different corrosion behaviors under these conditions. The exception is highly corrosion-resistant materials (Inconel Alloys) for which rate data from corrosion tests at a pH of approximately 3 were included. The waste package materials investigated are those from the long and short 5-DHLW waste packages, 2-MCO/2-DHLW waste package, and the 21-PWR commercial waste package. This analysis also contains rate data for some of the materials present inside the fuel canisters for the following fuel types: U-Mo (Fermi U-10%Mo), MOX (FFTF), Thorium Carbide and Th/U Carbide (Fort Saint Vrain [FSVR]), Th/U Oxide (Shippingport LWBR), U-metal (N Reactor), Intact U-Oxide (Shippingport PWR, Commercial), aluminum-based, and U-Zr-H (TRIGA). Analysis of corrosion rates for Alloy 22, spent nuclear fuel, defense high level waste (DHLW) glass, and Titanium Grade 7 can be found in other analysis or model reports

  7. Evaluation of susceptibility of high strength steels to delayed fracture by using cyclic corrosion test and slow strain rate test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Songjie; Zhang Zuogui; Akiyama, Eiji; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki; Zhang Boping

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate susceptibilities of high strength steels to delayed fracture, slow strain rate tests (SSRT) of notched bar specimens of AISI 4135 with tensile strengths of 1300 and 1500 MPa and boron-bearing steel with 1300 MPa have been performed after cyclic corrosion test (CCT). During SSRT the humidity around the specimen was kept high to keep absorbed diffusible hydrogen. The fracture stresses of AISI 4135 steels decreased with increment of diffusible hydrogen content which increased with CCT cycles. Their delayed fracture susceptibilities could be successfully evaluated in consideration of both influence of hydrogen content on mechanical property and hydrogen entry.

  8. Evaluation of susceptibility of high strength steels to delayed fracture by using cyclic corrosion test and slow strain rate test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Songjie [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30 Xueyuan Road, Hidian Zone, Beijing 100083 (China); Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Zhang Zuogui [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Akiyama, Eiji [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)], E-mail: AKIYAMA.Eiji@nims.go.jp; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Zhang Boping [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30 Xueyuan Road, Hidian Zone, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate susceptibilities of high strength steels to delayed fracture, slow strain rate tests (SSRT) of notched bar specimens of AISI 4135 with tensile strengths of 1300 and 1500 MPa and boron-bearing steel with 1300 MPa have been performed after cyclic corrosion test (CCT). During SSRT the humidity around the specimen was kept high to keep absorbed diffusible hydrogen. The fracture stresses of AISI 4135 steels decreased with increment of diffusible hydrogen content which increased with CCT cycles. Their delayed fracture susceptibilities could be successfully evaluated in consideration of both influence of hydrogen content on mechanical property and hydrogen entry.

  9. Strain rate effects in stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkins, R.N. (Newcastle upon Tyne Univ. (UK). Dept. of Metallurgy and Engineering Materials)

    1990-03-01

    Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was initially developed as a rapid, ad hoc laboratory method for assessing the propensity for metals an environments to promote stress corrosion cracking. It is now clear, however, that there are good theoretical reasons why strain rate, as opposed to stress per se, will often be the controlling parameter in determining whether or not cracks are nucleated and, if so, are propagated. The synergistic effects of the time dependence of corrosion-related reactions and microplastic strain provide the basis for mechanistic understanding of stress corrosion cracking in high-pressure pipelines and other structures. However, while this may be readily comprehended in the context of laboratory slow strain tests, its extension to service situations may be less apparent. Laboratory work involving realistic stressing conditions, including low-frequency cyclic loading, shows that strain or creep rates give good correlation with thresholds for cracking and with crack growth kinetics.

  10. Corrosion Rate Monitoring in District Heating Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo; Andersen, A.

    2005-01-01

    be applicable, and if on-line monitoring could improve the quality control. Water quality monitoring was applied as well as corrosion rate monitoring with linear polarization resistance (LPR), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), electrical resistance (ER) technique, mass loss and a crevice corrosion......Quality control in district heating systems to keep uniform corrosion rates low and localized corrosion minimal is based on water quality control. Side-stream units equipped with carbon steel probes for online monitoring were mounted in district heating plants to investigate which techniques would...... cell for localized corrosion risk estimation. Important variations in corrosion rate due to changes in make-up water quality were detected with the continuous monitoring provided by ER and crevice cell, while LPR gave unreliable corrosion rates. The acquisition time of two-three days for EIS...

  11. Development of Copper Corrosion Products and Relation between Surface Appearance and Corrosion Rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan, Tran Thi Ngoc; Binh, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Tru, Nguyen Nhi; Yoshino, Tsujino; Yasuki, Maeda

    2008-01-01

    Copper was exposed unsheltered and sheltered in four humid tropical sites, representing urban, urban-industrial, urban-marine and rural environments. The corrosion rates and the sequence of corrosion product formation are presented and discussed in relation with climatic and atmospheric pollution parameters. Chemical compositions of corrosion products were found to depend on environments and duration of exposure. In all environments, cuprite was the predominating corrosion product that formed first and continuously increased during the exposure. Among the sulphur-containing corrosion products, posnjakite and brochantite were more frequently found and the first formed earlier. Nantokite was the most common chlorine-containing products for most cases, except the high-chloride environment, where atacamite was detected instead. The corrosion rate of copper was well indicated by the colour of patina. The red-purple colour corresponded to the high corrosion rate and the greenish grey colour corresponded to the low corrosion rate. Corrosion rate of sheltered copper in urban-marine environment increased with the exposure time

  12. Effect of Flow Velocity on Corrosion Rate and Corrosion Protection Current of Marine Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seong Jong [Kunsan National University, Kunsan (Korea, Republic of); Han, Min Su; Jang, Seok Ki; Kim, Seong Jong [Mokpo National Maritime University, Mokpo (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In spite of highly advanced paint coating techniques, corrosion damage of marine metal and alloys increase more and more due to inherent micro-cracks and porosities in coatings formed during the coating process. Furthermore, flowing seawater conditions promote the breakdown of the protective oxide of the materials introducing more oxygen into marine environments, leading to the acceleration of corrosion. Various corrosion protection methods are available to prevent steel from marine corrosion. Cathodic protection is one of the useful corrosion protection methods by which the potential of the corroded metal is intentionally lowered to an immune state having the advantage of providing additional protection barriers to steel exposed to aqueous corrosion or soil corrosion, in addition to the coating. In the present investigation, the effect of flow velocity was examined for the determination of the optimum corrosion protection current density in cathodic protection as well as the corrosion rate of the steel. It is demonstrated from the result that the material corrosion under dynamic flowing conditions seems more prone to corrosion than under static conditions.

  13. CORROSION RATE OF STEELS DX51D AND S220GD IN DIFFERENT CORROSION ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Crina CIUBOTARIU

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion in the marine environment is an important issue because the costs causes by marine corrosion increased year upon year. It is necessary a correctly approach to materials selection, protection and corrosion control to reduce this burden of wasted materials, wasted energy and wasted money. Many different types of corrosion attack can be observed to structures, ships and other equipment used in sea water service. Shipping containers are exposed to various corrosive mediums like as airborne salt, industrial pollutants, rain and saltwater. Transport damage during loading onto and unloading off trucks, train beds and ships breaches the paint coating which further contributes to corrosion. The result is shortened container life and high costs for container repair or replacement. The paper intends to evaluate, by gravimetric method, the corrosion rate and corrosion penetration rate of two types of carbon steel DX51D and S220GD. Carbon steel DX51D and hot-dip galvanized steel S220GD are used in marine and industrial applications for buildings cargo vessels, container ships and oil tankers. For testing it was used different corrosive environments: 5% NaOH solution; 5% HCL solution and 0.5M NaCl solution. The samples were immersed in 400mL of testing solution for exposure period of 28 days. Periodically at 3 days, 7 days, 14 days, 21 days and 28 days was measured de mass loss and evaluate the corrosion rate and corrosion stability coefficient. The steel DX51D was stable in 5% NaOH solution for 28 days, the values of corrosion stability coefficient was 7 after 3 days and 6 after 28 days of immersion in corrosive medium. In 5% HCL solution steels DX51D and S220GD was completely corroded in 21 days with a corrosion stability coefficient equal with 9 for 7 days and 8 for 21 days of immersion in corrosive solution. It was observed a good resistance for 3 days in 0.5M NaCl solution with a corrosion stability coefficient equal with 5, but after that

  14. Measurement of very low release rates of corrosion products in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermansson, H.-P.; Falk, I.

    1984-01-01

    A radiotracer technique has been developed for the measurement of release rates from nuclear reactor materials and it has been tested in a number of experiments. THis article, which forms the first part in a series, describes the experimental loop, the experimental technique and the preliminary results. Experiments were carried out on 18Cr8Ni stainless steel and on Inconel X750 in BWR primary system and feed water environments. The result show that a steady state in the release rate is achieved after operation for approximately 600 h. The release rate depends on the elemental concentration in the material and on the chemical and physical environments. Typical release rates for an 18Cr8Ni stainless steel and Inconel X750 in a BWR primary system environment were found to be 5 mdm and 8 mdm respectively. (Authors)

  15. Prediction of corrosion rates of water distribution pipelines according to aggressive corrosive water in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, W S; Yu, M J; Lee, H D

    2004-01-01

    The drinking water network serving Korea has been used for almost 100 years. Therefore, pipelines have suffered various degrees of deterioration due to aggressive environments. The pipe breaks were caused by in-external corrosion, water hammer, surface loading, etc. In this paper, we focused on describing corrosion status in water distribution pipes in Korea and reviewing some methods to predict corrosion rates. Results indicate that corrosive water of lakes was more aggressive than river water and the winter was more aggressive compared to other seasons. The roughness growth rates of Dongbok lake showed 0.23 mm/year. The high variation of corrosion rates is controlled by the aging pipes and smaller diameter. Also the phenolphthalein test on a cementitious core of cement mortar lined ductile cast iron pipe indicated the pipes over 15 years old had lost 50-100% of their lime active cross sectional area.

  16. High temperature corrosion of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadakkers, W.J.; Schuster, H.; Ennis, P.J.

    1988-08-01

    This paper covers three main topics: 1. high temperature oxidation of metals and alloys, 2. corrosion in sulfur containing environments and 3. structural changes caused by corrosion. The following 21 subjects are discussed: Influence of implanted yttrium and lanthanum on the oxidation behaviour of beta-NiA1; influence of reactive elements on the adherence and protective properties of alumina scales; problems related to the application of very fine markers in studying the mechanism of thin scale formation; oxidation behaviour of chromia forming Co-Cr-Al alloys with or without reactive element additions; growth and properties of chromia-scales on high-temperature alloys; quantification of the depletion zone in high temperature alloys after oxidation in process gas; effects of HC1 and of N2 in the oxidation of Fe-20Cr; investigation under nuclear safety aspects of Zircaloy-4 oxidation kinetics at high temperatures in air; on the sulfide corrosion of metallic materials; high temperature sulfide corrosion of Mn, Nb and Nb-Si alloys; corrosion behaviour or NiCrAl-based alloys in air and air-SO2 gas mixtures; sulfidation of cobalt at high temperatures; preoxidation for sulfidation protection; fireside corrosion and application of additives in electric utility boilers; transport properties of scales with complex defect structures; observations of whiskers and pyramids during high temperature corrosion of iron in SO2; corrosion and creep of alloy 800H under simulated coal gasification conditions; microstructural changes of HK 40 cast alloy caused by exploitation in tubes in steam reformer installation; microstructural changes during exposure in corrosive environments and their effect on mechanical properties; coatings against carburization; mathematical modeling of carbon diffusion and carbide precipitation in Ni-Cr-based alloys. (MM)

  17. A review on pipeline corrosion, in-line inspection (ILI), and corrosion growth rate models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanaei, H.R.; Eslami, A.; Egbewande, A.

    2017-01-01

    Pipelines are the very important energy transmission systems. Over time, pipelines can corrode. While corrosion could be detected by in-line inspection (ILI) tools, corrosion growth rate prediction in pipelines is usually done through corrosion rate models. For pipeline integrity management and planning selecting the proper corrosion ILI tool and also corrosion growth rate model is important and can lead to significant savings and safer pipe operation. In this paper common forms of pipeline corrosion, state of the art ILI tools, and also corrosion growth rate models are reviewed. The common forms of pipeline corrosion introduced in this paper are Uniform/General Corrosion, Pitting Corrosion, Cavitation and Erosion Corrosion, Stray Current Corrosion, Micro-Bacterial Influenced Corrosion (MIC). The ILI corrosion detection tools assessed in this study are Magnetic Flux Leakage (MFL), Circumferential MFL, Tri-axial MFL, and Ultrasonic Wall Measurement (UT). The corrosion growth rate models considered in this study are single-value corrosion rate model, linear corrosion growth rate model, non-linear corrosion growth rate model, Monte-Carlo method, Markov model, TD-GEVD, TI-GEVD model, Gamma Process, and BMWD model. Strengths and limitations of ILI detection tools, and also corrosion predictive models with some practical examples are discussed. This paper could be useful for those whom are supporting pipeline integrity management and planning. - Highlights: • Different forms of pipeline corrosion are explained. • Common In-Line Inspection (ILI) tools and corrosion growth rate models are introduced. • Strength and limitations of corrosion growth rate models/ILI tools are discussed. • For pipeline integrity management programs using more than one corrosion growth rate model/ILI tool is suggested.

  18. Corrosion of High Chromium Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in High Temperature Water. a Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    Available literature concerning corrosion of high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steels in high temperature water has been reviewed. The subjects considered are general corrosion, effect of irradiation on corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). In addition some investigations about radiation induced segregation (RIS) are shown in order to know the compositional changes at grain boundaries of these alloys and their influence on corrosion properties. The data on general corrosion indicate moderate corrosion rates in high temperature water up to 350 degree centigree. Considerably larger corrosion rates were observed under neutron irradiation. The works concerning to the behaviour of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking seem to conclude that in these materials is necessary to optimize the temper temperature and to carry out the post-weld heat treatments properly in order to avoid stress corrosion cracking. (Author) 40 refs.

  19. Corrosion of High Chromium Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in High Temperature Water. a Literature Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F.

    2000-01-01

    Available literature concerning corrosion of high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steels in high temperature water has been reviewed. The subjects considered are general corrosion, effect of irradiation on corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). In addition some investigations about radiation induced segregation (RIS) are shown in order to know the compositional changes at grain boundaries of these alloys and their influence on corrosion properties. The data on general corrosion indicate moderate corrosion rates in high temperature water up to 350 degree centigrade. Considerably larger corrosion rates were observed under neutron irradiation. The works concerning to the behaviour of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking seem to conclude that in these materials is necessary to optimize the temper temperature and to carry out the post-weld heat treatments properly in order to avoid stress corrosion cracking. (Author) 40 refs

  20. High Temperature Corrosion in Biomass-Fired Boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels; Montgomery, Melanie; Hede Larsen, Ole

    2002-01-01

    condense on superheater components. This gives rise to specific corrosion problems not previously encountered in coal-fired power plants. The type of corrosion attack can be directly ascribed to the composition of the deposit and the metal surface temperature. To avoid such high corrosion rates, woodchip...... has also been utilised as a fuel. Combustion of woodchip results in a smaller amount of ash, and potassium and chlorine are present in lesser amounts. However, significant corrosion rates were still seen. A case study of a woodchip fired boiler is described. The corrosion mechanisms in both straw-fired...... and woodchip fired boilers are discussed....

  1. High temperature corrosion in gasifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakker Wate

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Several commercial scale coal gasification combined cycle power plants have been built and successfully operated during the last 5-10 years. Supporting research on materials of construction has been carried out for the last 20 years by EPRI and others. Emphasis was on metallic alloys for heat exchangers and other components in contact with hot corrosive gases at high temperatures. In this paper major high temperature corrosion mechanisms, materials performance in presently operating gasifiers and future research needs will be discussed.

  2. Corrosion rate of steel in concrete - Evaluation of confinement techniques for on-site corrosion rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Peter Vagn; Geiker, Mette Rica; Elsener, Bernhard

    2009-01-01

    Earlier on-site investigations and laboratory studies have shown that varying corrosion rates are obtained when different commercially available instruments are used. The different confinement techniques, rather than the different electrochemical techniques used in the instruments, are considered...... to be the main reason for the discrepancies. This paper presents a method for the quantitative assessment of confinement techniques based on monitoring the operation of the corrosion rate instrument and the current distribution between the electrode assembly on the concrete surface and a segmented reinforcement...... bar embedded in the concrete. The applicability of the method was demonstrated on two commercially available corrosion rate instruments based on different confinement techniques. The method provided an explanation of the differences in performance of the two instruments. Correlated measurements...

  3. The Effects of Corrosive Chemicals on Corrosion Rate of Steel Reinforcement Bars: II. Swamp Sludges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henki Ashadi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A polluted environment will influence the building age. The objective of this research was to find out the influence of corrosive chemicals within the sludge swamp area with the corrosion rate of steel concrete. Corrosion in steel concrete usually occur in acid area which contain of SO42-, Cl- and NO3-. The research treatment used by emerging ST 37 andST 60 within 60 days in 'polluted' sludge swamp area. Three variation of 'polluted' swamp sludge were made by increasing the concentration a corrosive unsure up to 1X, 5X and 10X. The corrosion rate measured by using an Immersion Method. The result of Immersion test showed that sulphate had a greatest influence to corrosion rate of ST 37 and ST 60 and followed by chloride and nitrate. Corrosion rate value for ST 37 was 17.58 mpy and for ST 60 was 12.47 mpy.

  4. Corrosion rate of nuclear glass in saturated media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillet, S.; Vernaz, E.; Nogues, J.L.; Jacquet-Francillon, N.

    1986-01-01

    Leaching experiments under a static mode have shown that, after a given time, the concentration of the solubilized elements reaches an apparent steady state which can be detected by a plateau in the curve of cumulated leach rates vs time. Since the real slope of this plateau is a key datum to modernize the source term, works related to the evaluation of this slope and based on a statistical approach have been necessary. Twelve static leaching experiments carried out for one year at 90 0 C were scrutinized. Various glasses, both active and nonactive, akin to the LWR French reference glass were involved. Previously, an abnormally high corrosion rate had been found after 12 months of testing. This feature could have been interpreted as a further leaching step occuring after the plateau period. The corrosion rates at 90 0 C with deionized water are compared to those gained from integral tests at 90 0 C

  5. Sensitivity Analysis of Corrosion Rate Prediction Models Utilized for Reinforced Concrete Affected by Chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siamphukdee, Kanjana; Collins, Frank; Zou, Roger

    2013-06-01

    Chloride-induced reinforcement corrosion is one of the major causes of premature deterioration in reinforced concrete (RC) structures. Given the high maintenance and replacement costs, accurate modeling of RC deterioration is indispensable for ensuring the optimal allocation of limited economic resources. Since corrosion rate is one of the major factors influencing the rate of deterioration, many predictive models exist. However, because the existing models use very different sets of input parameters, the choice of model for RC deterioration is made difficult. Although the factors affecting corrosion rate are frequently reported in the literature, there is no published quantitative study on the sensitivity of predicted corrosion rate to the various input parameters. This paper presents the results of the sensitivity analysis of the input parameters for nine selected corrosion rate prediction models. Three different methods of analysis are used to determine and compare the sensitivity of corrosion rate to various input parameters: (i) univariate regression analysis, (ii) multivariate regression analysis, and (iii) sensitivity index. The results from the analysis have quantitatively verified that the corrosion rate of steel reinforcement bars in RC structures is highly sensitive to corrosion duration time, concrete resistivity, and concrete chloride content. These important findings establish that future empirical models for predicting corrosion rate of RC should carefully consider and incorporate these input parameters.

  6. Potential for erosion corrosion of SRS high level waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapp, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    SRS high-level radioactive waste tanks will not experience erosion corrosion to any significant degree during slurry pump operations. Erosion corrosion in carbon steel structures at reported pump discharge velocities is dominated by electrochemical (corrosion) processes. Interruption of those processes, as by the addition of corrosion inhibitors, sharply reduces the rate of metal loss from erosion corrosion. The well-inhibited SRS waste tanks have a near-zero general corrosion rate, and therefore will be essentially immune to erosion corrosion. The experimental data on carbon steel erosion corrosion most relevant to SRS operations was obtained at the Hanford Site on simulated Purex waste. A metal loss rate of 2.4 mils per year was measured at a temperature of 102 C and a slurry velocity comparable to calculated SRS slurry velocities on ground specimens of the same carbon steel used in SRS waste tanks. Based on these data and the much lower expected temperatures, the metal loss rate of SRS tanks under waste removal and processing conditions should be insignificant, i.e. less than 1 mil per year

  7. Exposure testing of fasteners in preservative treated wood: Gravimetric corrosion rates and corrosion product analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelinka, Samuel L., E-mail: szelinka@fs.fed.u [USDA Forest Products Laboratory, One Gifford Pinchot Drive, Madison, WI 53726 (United States); Sichel, Rebecca J. [College of Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Stone, Donald S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Research highlights: {yields} The composition of the corrosion products was similar for the nail head and shank. {yields} Reduced copper was not detected on any of the fasteners. {yields} Measured corrosion rates were between 1 and 35 {mu}m year{sup -1}. - Abstract: Research was conducted to determine the corrosion rates of metals in preservative treated wood and also understand the mechanism of metal corrosion in treated wood. Steel and hot-dip galvanized steel fasteners were embedded in wood treated with one of six preservative treatments and exposed to 27 {sup o}C at 100% relative humidity for 1 year. The corrosion rate was determined gravimetrically and the corrosion products were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Although the accepted mechanism of corrosion in treated wood involves the reduction of cupric ions from the wood preservative, no reduced copper was found on the corrosion surfaces. The galvanized corrosion products contained sulfates, whereas the steel corrosion products consisted of iron oxides and hydroxides. The possible implications and limitations of this research on fasteners used in building applications are discussed.

  8. Materials corrosion and protection at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balbaud, F.; Desgranges, Clara; Martinelli, Laure; Rouillard, Fabien; Duhamel, Cecile; Marchetti, Loic; Perrin, Stephane; Molins, Regine; Chevalier, S.; Heintz, O.; David, N.; Fiorani, J.M.; Vilasi, M.; Wouters, Y.; Galerie, A.; Mangelinck, D.; Viguier, B.; Monceau, D.; Soustelle, M.; Pijolat, M.; Favergeon, J.; Brancherie, D.; Moulin, G.; Dawi, K.; Wolski, K.; Barnier, V.; Rebillat, F.; Lavigne, O.; Brossard, J.M.; Ropital, F.; Mougin, J.

    2011-01-01

    This book was made from the lectures given in 2010 at the thematic school on 'materials corrosion and protection at high temperatures'. It gathers the contributions from scientists and engineers coming from various communities and presents a state-of-the-art of the scientific and technological developments concerning the behaviour of materials at high temperature, in aggressive environments and in various domains (aerospace, nuclear, energy valorization, and chemical industries). It supplies pedagogical tools to grasp high temperature corrosion thanks to the understanding of oxidation mechanisms. It proposes some protection solutions for materials and structures. Content: 1 - corrosion costs; macro-economical and metallurgical approach; 2 - basic concepts of thermo-chemistry; 3 - introduction to the Calphad (calculation of phase diagrams) method; 4 - use of the thermodynamic tool: application to pack-cementation; 5 - elements of crystallography and of real solids description; 6 - diffusion in solids; 7 - notions of mechanics inside crystals; 8 - high temperature corrosion: phenomena, models, simulations; 9 - pseudo-stationary regime in heterogeneous kinetics; 10 - nucleation, growth and kinetic models; 11 - test experiments in heterogeneous kinetics; 12 - mechanical aspects of metal/oxide systems; 13 - coupling phenomena in high temperature oxidation; 14 - other corrosion types; 15 - methods of oxidized surfaces analysis at micro- and nano-scales; 16 - use of SIMS in the study of high temperature corrosion of metals and alloys; 17 - oxidation of ceramics and of ceramic matrix composite materials; 18 - protective coatings against corrosion and oxidation; 19 - high temperature corrosion in the 4. generation of nuclear reactor systems; 20 - heat exchangers corrosion in municipal waste energy valorization facilities; 21 - high temperature corrosion in oil refining and petrochemistry; 22 - high temperature corrosion in new energies industry. (J.S.)

  9. The Corrosion Inhibition Characteristics of Sodium Nitrite Using an On-line Corrosion Rate Measurement System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Mal-Yong; Kang, Dae-Jin; Moon, Jeon-Soo

    2015-01-01

    An on-line corrosion rate measurement system was developed using a personal computer, a data acquisition board and program, and a 2-electrode corrosion probe. Reliability of the developed system was confirmed with through comparison test. With this system, the effect of sodium nitrite (NaNO 2 ) as a corrosion inhibitor were studied on iron and aluminum brass that were immersed in sodium chloride (NaCl) solution. Corrosion rate was measured based on the linear polarization resistance method. The corrosion rates of aluminum brass and iron in 1% NaCl solutions were measured to be 0.290 mm per year (mmpy) and 0.2134 mmpy, respectively. With the addition of 200 ppm of NO 2 - , the corrosion rates decreased to 0.0470 mmpy and 0.0254 mmpy. The addition of NO 2 - caused a decrease in corrosion rates of both aluminum brass and iron, yet the NO 2 - acted as a more effective corrosion inhibitor for iron. than aluminum brass

  10. Corrosion of high-density sintered tungsten alloys. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batten, J.J.; Moore, B.T.

    1988-12-01

    The behaviour of four high-density sintered tungsten alloys has been evluated and compared with that of pure tungsten. Rates of corrosion during the cyclic humidity and the salt mist tests were ascertained from weight loss measurements. Insight into the corrosion mechanism was gained from the nature of the corrosion products and an examination of the corroded surfaces. In the tests, the alloy 95% W, 2.5% Ni, 1.5% Fe was the most corrosion resistant. The data showed that copper as an alloying element accelerates corrosion of tungsten alloys. Both attack on the tungsten particles and the binder phase were observed together with tungsten grain loss. 6 refs., 3 tabs.,

  11. Exposure testing of fasteners in preservative treated wood : gravimetric corrosion rates and corrosion product analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Rebecca J. Sichel; Donald S. Stone

    2010-01-01

    Research was conducted to determine the corrosion rates of metals in preservative treated wood and also understand the mechanism of metal corrosion in treated wood. Steel and hot-dip galvanized steel fasteners were embedded in wood treated with one of six preservative treatments and exposed to 27oC at 100% relative humidity for 1 year. The...

  12. Corrosion and failure processes in high-level waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahidhara, R.K.; Elleman, T.S.; Murty, K.L.

    1992-11-01

    A large amount of radioactive waste has been stored safely at the Savannah River and Hanford sites over the past 46 years. The aim of this report is to review the experimental corrosion studies at Savannah River and Hanford with the intention of identifying the types and rates of corrosion encountered and indicate how these data contribute to tank failure predictions. The compositions of the High-Level Wastes, mild steels used in the construction of the waste tanks and degradation-modes particularly stress corrosion cracking and pitting are discussed. Current concerns at the Hanford Site are highlighted

  13. High Temperature Corrosion on Biodust Firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi

    The high content of alkali metals and chlorine in biomass gives rise to fouling/slagging and corrosion of heat exchange components, such as superheaters, in biomass fired power plants. Increasing the lifetime of these components, and in addition, preventing unwarranted plant shutdowns due...... to their failure, requires understanding of the complex corrosion mechanisms, as well as development of materials that are resistant to corrosion under biomass firing conditions, thereby motivating the current work. To understand the mechanisms of corrosion attack, comprehensive analysis of corrosion products...... by the combined use of complementary information from microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and various X-ray diffraction characterization techniques. In light of the wide variation in operating conditions in biomass fired power plants, systematic and well-controlled, but realistic laboratory scale...

  14. Corrosion studies on containment materials for vitrified high level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, K.J.; Bland, I.D.; Marsh, G.P.

    1984-01-01

    The general corrosion of carbon steels buried in granite or bentonite beds and saturated with synthetic granitic ground water is investigated. Corrosion rates were measured after 170 and 470 days, and pitting corrosion after 200hrs and 300hrs. Experiments to measure corrosion rates due to radiolysis of γ-radiated argon-purged ground water were also carried out. Results support the feasibility of using carbon steel packs for isolating high-level wastes for 500-1000 yrs. (U.K.)

  15. Corrosion fatigue crack growth in clad low-alloy steels. Part 2: Water flow rate effects in high-sulfur plate steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, L.A.; Lee, H.B.; Wire, G.L.; Novak, S.R.; Cullen, W.H.

    1997-01-01

    Corrosion fatigue crack propagation tests were conducted on a high-sulfur ASTM A302-B plate steel overlaid with weld-deposited Alloy EN82H cladding. The specimens featured semi-elliptical surface cracks penetrating approximately 6.3 mm of cladding into the underlying steel. The initial crack sizes were relatively large with surface lengths of 22.8--27.3 mm, and depths of 10.5--14.1 mm. The experiments were initiated in a quasi-stagnant low-oxygen (O 2 < 10 ppb) aqueous environment at 243 C, under loading conditions (ΔK, R, cyclic frequency) conducive to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) under quasi-stagnant conditions. Following fatigue testing under quasi-stagnant conditions where EAC was observed, the specimens were then fatigue tested under conditions where active water flow of either 1.7 m/s or 4.7 m/s was applied parallel to the crack. Earlier experiments on unclad surface-cracked specimens of the same steel exhibited EAC under quasi-stagnant conditions, but water flow rates at 1.7 m/s and 5.0 m/s parallel to the crack mitigated EAC. In the present experiments on clad specimens, water flow at approximately the same as the lower of these velocities did not mitigate EAC, and a free stream velocity approximately the same as the higher of these velocities resulted in sluggish mitigation of EAC. The lack of robust EAC mitigation was attributed to the greater crack surface roughness in the cladding interfering with flow induced within the crack cavity. An analysis employing the computational fluid dynamics code, FIDAP, confirmed that frictional forces associated with the cladding crack surface roughness reduced the interaction between the free stream and the crack cavity

  16. Lead corrosion evaluation in high activity nuclear waste container (Argentina)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, R.; Lanzani, L.; Bruzzoni, P.; Cufre, W.; Semino, C.J.

    2000-01-01

    This report describes a study of high activity nuclear waste canister corrosion in a deep geological disposal. In this canister design, the vitrified nuclear waste stainless steel container is shielded by a 100 mm thick lead wall. For mechanical resistance, the canister will also have a thin carbon steel external liner. Experimental and mathematical modeling studies are aimed to asses the corrosion kinetics of the carbon steel liner in first instance and then, once this liner has been corroded away, the corrosion kinetics of the main lead barrier. Being that oxygen reduction is the main cathodic reaction that supports the anodic oxidation of iron, a model is described predicting the rate of oxygen consumption in a sealed deep nuclear waste disposal vault as a result of the canister corrosion. Oxidation processes other than container corrosion, and that can account also for oxygen depletion, are not taken into consideration. Corrosion experimental studies on lead and its alloys in groundwater are also reported. These experiments are aimed to improve the corrosion resistance of commercial lead in groundwater. (author)

  17. Corrosion of high-density sintered tungsten alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batten, J.J.; Moore, B.T.

    1989-01-01

    In comparative corrosion tests, the corrosion resistance of an Australian tungsten alloy (95% W, 3.5% Ni, 1.5% Fe) was found to be superior to three other tungsten alloys and, under certain conditions, even more corrosion-resistant than pure tungsten. Corrosion resistance was evaluated after immersion in both distilled water and 5% sodium chloride solutions, and in cyclic humidity and salt mist environments. For all but the Australian alloy, the rate of corrosion in sodium chloride solution was markedly less than that in distilated water. In all cases, alloys containing copper had the greatest corrosion rates. Corrosion mechanisms were investigated using a scanning electron microscope, analysis of corrosion products and galvanic corrosion studies. For the alloys, corrosion was attributed primarily to a galvanic reaction. Whether the tungsten or binder phase of the alloy became anodic, and thus was attacked preferentially, depended upon alloy composition and corrosion environment. 16 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs

  18. The Effects of Corrosive Chemicals on Corrosion Rate of Steel Reinforcement Bars: I. Swamp Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulistyoweni Widanarko

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Most of infrastructures using steel concrete to reinforce the strength of concrete. Steel concrete is so vulnerable to chemical compounds that can cause corrosion. It can happen due to the presence of chemical compounds in acid environment in low pH level. These chemical compounds are SO42-, Cl-, NO3-. There are many swamp area in Indonesia. The acid contents and the concentration of ion sulphate, chlorides, and nitrate are higher in the swamp water than in the ground water .The objective of this research was to find out the influence of corrosive chemicals in the swamp water to the steel concrete corrosion rate. There were two treatment used: (1 emerging ST 37 and ST 60 within 60 days in the 'polluted' swamp water, (2 moving the ST 37 up and down periodically in the ' polluted' swamp water. Three variation of 'polluted' swamp water were made by increasing the concentration of corrosive chemical up to 1X, 5X and 10X respectively. The corrosion rate was measured by using an Immersion Method. The result of Immersion test showed that chloride had the greatest influence to corrosion rate of ST 37 and ST 60 and followed by sulphate and Nitrate. Corrosion rate value for ST 37 is 24.29 mpy and for ST 60 is 22.76 mpy. By moving the sample up and down, the corrosion rate of ST 37 increase up to 37.59 mpy, and chloride still having the greatest influence, followed by sulphate and nitrate.

  19. Advanced Corrosion-Resistant Zr Alloys for High Burnup and Generation IV Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Y. H.; Park, S. Y.; Lee, M. H.; Choi, B. K.; Baek, J. H.; Park, J. Y.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, H. G.; Jung, Y. H.; Bang, B. G.

    2006-08-01

    The systematic study was performed to develop the advanced corrosion-resistant Zr alloys for high burnup and Gen IV application. The corrosion behavior was significantly changed with the alloy composition and the corrosion environment. In general, the model alloys with a higher alloying elements showed a higher corrosion resistance. Among the model alloys tested in this study, Zr-10Cr-0.2Fe showed the best corrosion resistance regardless of the corrosion condition. The oxide on the higher corrosion-resistant alloy such as Zr-1.0Cr-0.2Fe consisted of mainly columnar grains, and it have a higher tetragonal phase stability. In comparison with other alloys being considered for the SCWR, the Zr alloys showed a lower corrosion rate than ferritic-martensitic steels. The results of this study imply that, at least from a corrosion standpoint, Zr alloys deserve consideration as potential cladding or structural materials in supercritical water cooled reactors

  20. The corrosion rate of copper in a bentonite test package measured with electric resistance sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosborg, Bo [Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, KTH, Stockholm (Sweden); Kosec, Tadeja; Kranjc, Andrej; Kuhar, Viljem; Legat, Andraz [Slovenian National Building and Civil Engineering Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2012-12-15

    LOT1 test parcel A2 was exposed for six years in the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, which offers a realistic environment for the conditions that will prevail in a deep repository for high-level radioactive waste disposal in Sweden. The test parcel contained copper electrodes for real-time corrosion monitoring in bentonite ring 36, where the temperature was 24 deg C, and copper coupons in bentonite rings 22 and 30, where the temperature was higher. After retrieval of the test parcel in January 2006, a bentonite test package consisting of bentonite rings 35 - 37 was placed in a container and sealed with a thick layer of paraffin. Later the same year new copper electrodes were installed in the test package. In January 2007 electric resistance (ER) sensors of pure copper with a thickness of 35 {mu}m were also installed in the test package mainly to facilitate the interpretation of the results from the real-time corrosion monitoring with electrochemical techniques. The ER measurements have shown that the corrosion rate of pure copper exposed in an oxic bentonite/ saline groundwater environment at room temperate decreases slowly with time to low but measurable values. The corrosion rates estimated from the regularly performed EIS measurements replicate the ER data. Thus, for this oxic environment in which copper acquires corrosion potentials of the order of 200 mV (SHE) or higher, electrochemical measurements provide believable data. Comparing the recorded ER data with an estimate of the average corrosion rate based on comparing cross-sections from exposed and protected sensor elements, it is obvious that the former overestimates the actual corrosion rate, which is understandable. It seems as if electrochemical measurements can provide a better estimate of the corrosion rate; however, this is quite dependent on the use of proper measuring frequencies and evaluation methods. In this respect ER measurements are more reliable. It has been shown that real-time corrosion

  1. The corrosion rate of copper in a bentonite test package measured with electric resistance sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosborg, Bo; Kosec, Tadeja; Kranjc, Andrej; Kuhar, Viljem; Legat, Andraz

    2012-12-01

    LOT1 test parcel A2 was exposed for six years in the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, which offers a realistic environment for the conditions that will prevail in a deep repository for high-level radioactive waste disposal in Sweden. The test parcel contained copper electrodes for real-time corrosion monitoring in bentonite ring 36, where the temperature was 24 deg C, and copper coupons in bentonite rings 22 and 30, where the temperature was higher. After retrieval of the test parcel in January 2006, a bentonite test package consisting of bentonite rings 35 - 37 was placed in a container and sealed with a thick layer of paraffin. Later the same year new copper electrodes were installed in the test package. In January 2007 electric resistance (ER) sensors of pure copper with a thickness of 35 μm were also installed in the test package mainly to facilitate the interpretation of the results from the real-time corrosion monitoring with electrochemical techniques. The ER measurements have shown that the corrosion rate of pure copper exposed in an oxic bentonite/ saline groundwater environment at room temperate decreases slowly with time to low but measurable values. The corrosion rates estimated from the regularly performed EIS measurements replicate the ER data. Thus, for this oxic environment in which copper acquires corrosion potentials of the order of 200 mV (SHE) or higher, electrochemical measurements provide believable data. Comparing the recorded ER data with an estimate of the average corrosion rate based on comparing cross-sections from exposed and protected sensor elements, it is obvious that the former overestimates the actual corrosion rate, which is understandable. It seems as if electrochemical measurements can provide a better estimate of the corrosion rate; however, this is quite dependent on the use of proper measuring frequencies and evaluation methods. In this respect ER measurements are more reliable. It has been shown that real-time corrosion

  2. Corrosion of silicon nitride in high temperature alkaline solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Liyan, E-mail: liyan.qiu@cnl.ca; Guzonas, Dave A.; Qian, Jing

    2016-08-01

    The corrosion of silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) in alkaline solutions was studied at temperatures from 60 to 300 °C. Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} experienced significant corrosion above 100 °C. The release rates of silicon and nitrogen follow zero order reaction kinetics and increase with increasing temperature. The molar ratio of dissolved silicon and nitrogen species in the high temperature solutions is the same as that in the solid phase (congruent dissolution). The activation energy for silicon and nitrogen release rates is 75 kJ/mol which agrees well with that of silica dissolution. At 300 °C, the release of aluminum is observed and follows first order reaction kinetics while other minor constituents including Ti and Y are highly enriched on the corrosion films due to the low solubility of their oxides.

  3. Aspects of high temperature corrosion of boiler tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiegel, M.; Bendick, W. [Salzgitter-Mannesmann-Forschung GmbH, Duisburg (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The development of new boiler steels for power generation has to consider significant creep strength as well as oxidation and corrosion resistance. High temperature corrosion of boiler materials concerns steam oxidation as well as fireside corrosion of parts, in contact with the flue gas. It will be shown that depending on the quality of the fuel, especially chlorine and sulphur are responsible for most of the fireside corrosion problems. Corrosion mechanisms will be presented for flue gas induced corrosion (HCl) and deposit induced corrosion (chlorides and sulfates). Especially for the 700 C technology, deposit induced corrosion issues have to be considered and the mechanisms of corrosion by molten sulfates 'Hot Corrosion' will be explained. Finally, an overview will be given on the selection of suitable materials in order to minimise corrosion relates failures. (orig.)

  4. Evaluation of corrosion inhibitors for high temperature decontamination applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathyaseelan, V.S.; Rufus, A.L.; Velmurugan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Normally, chemical decontamination of coolant systems of nuclear power reactors is carried out at temperatures less than 90 °C. At these temperatures, though magnetite dissolves effectively, the rate of dissolution of chromium and nickel containing oxides formed over stainless steel and other non-carbon steel coolant system surfaces is not that appreciable. A high temperature dissolution process using 5 mM NTA at 160 °C developed earlier by us was very effective in dissolving the oxides such as ferrites and chromites. However, the corrosion of structural materials such as carbon steel (CS) and stainless steel (SS) also increased beyond the acceptable limits at elevated temperatures. Hence, the control of base metal corrosion during the high temperature decontamination process is very important. In view of this, it was felt essential to investigate and develop a suitable inhibitor to reduce the corrosion that can take place on coolant structural material surfaces during the high temperature decontamination applications with weak organic acids. Three commercial inhibitors viz., Philmplus 5K655, Prosel PC 2116 and Ferroqest were evaluated at ambient and at 160 °C temperature in NTA formulation. Preliminary evaluation of these corrosion inhibitors carried out using electrochemical techniques showed maximum corrosion inhibition efficiency for Philmplus. Hence, it was used for high temperature applications. A concentration of 500 ppm was found to be optimum at 160 °C and at this concentration it showed an inhibition efficiency of 62% for CS. High temperature dissolution of oxides such as Fe 3 O 4 and NiFe 2 O 4 , which are relevant to nuclear reactors, was also carried out and the rate of dissolution observed was less in the presence of Philmplus. Studies were also carried out to evaluate hydrazine as a corrosion inhibitor for high temperature applications. The results revealed that for CS inhibition efficiency of hydrazine is comparable to that of Philmplus, while

  5. High Temperature Corrosion in Biomass Incineration Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Maahn, Ernst emanuel; Gotthjælp, K.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the project is to study the role of ash deposits in high temperature corrosion of superheater materials in biomass and refuse fire combined heat and power plants. The project has included the two main activities: a) A chemical characterisation of ash deposits collected from a major...

  6. Corrosion of structural materials and electrochemistry in high temperature water of nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke

    2014-01-01

    The latest experiences with corrosion in the cooling systems of nuclear power plants are reviewed. High temperature cooling water causes corrosion of structural materials, which often leads to adverse effects in the plants, e.g., generating defects in materials of major components and fuel claddings, increasing shutdown radiation and increasing the volume of radwaste sources. Corrosion behaviors are much affected by water qualities and differ according to the values of water qualities and the materials themselves. In order to establish reliable operation, each plant requires its own unique optimal water chemistry control based on careful consideration of its system, materials and operational history. Electrochemistry is one of key issues that determine corrosion related problems but it is not the only issue. Most phenomena for corrosion related problems, e.g., flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC), intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) and thinning of fuel cladding materials, can be understood based on an electrochemical index, e.g., electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), conductivities and pH. The most important electrochemical index, ECP, can be measured at elevated temperature and applied to in situ sensors of corrosion conditions to detect anomalous conditions of structural materials at their very early stages. In the paper, theoretical models based on electrochemistry to estimate wall thinning rate of carbon steel piping due to flow-accelerated corrosion and corrosive conditions determining IGSCC crack initiation and growth rate are introduced. (author)

  7. Recorded corrosion rates on copper electrodes in the Prototype Repository at the Aespoe HRL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosborg, Bo [Rosborg Consulting, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2013-04-15

    Real-time corrosion monitoring by means of electrochemical methods has been applied in an effort to measure corrosion rates of pure copper in the Prototype Repository at the Aspo Hard Rock Laboratory. Copper electrodes were installed in bentonite blocks on top of the electrically heated copper canisters in two deposition holes (dh). Three nominally identical cylindrical copper electrodes were installed in dh 1 and another three in dh 5 a few days before the heat was turned on to the canisters in September 2001 and in May 2003 respectively. The temperature of the copper electrodes has been around 30 deg C in dh 1 and somewhat below 35 deg C in dh 5. Real-time corrosion monitoring for both electrode setups was first applied in January 2004, and then periodically in 2005, 2006, 2008, and most recently in the end of 2010 just before work to open the outer section of the Prototype Repository was started. The recorded corrosion rates fall below 1.3 {mu}m/year (using a default value of n=2 in the software to convert the corrosion current density to a penetration rate by means of Faraday's law, and with no correction applied for the used measuring frequency of 0.01 Hz; also disregarding highly scattered data obtained for the copper electrodes in dh 1 during 2010). While the recorded rates on the electrodes in dh 5 first increased from about 0.2 {mu}m/year in 2004 up to a maximum of 1.3 {mu}m/year a year later (the drainage of the inner and outer sections was temporary closed in the end of 2004), and then gradually decreased to 0.7 {mu}m/year in the end of 2010, the recorded rates on the electrodes in dh 1 show a quite different picture. The recorded rates fall in the range 0.4-0.7 {mu}m/year and do not reflect any obvious decrease. However, it is anticipated that a similar time dependence as observed for the electrodes in dh 5 could have been present early on in the exposure; the electrodes were installed in 2001 but the first measurements were performed in 2004. Also

  8. Recorded corrosion rates on copper electrodes in the Prototype Repository at the Aespoe HRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosborg, Bo

    2013-04-01

    Real-time corrosion monitoring by means of electrochemical methods has been applied in an effort to measure corrosion rates of pure copper in the Prototype Repository at the Aspo Hard Rock Laboratory. Copper electrodes were installed in bentonite blocks on top of the electrically heated copper canisters in two deposition holes (dh). Three nominally identical cylindrical copper electrodes were installed in dh 1 and another three in dh 5 a few days before the heat was turned on to the canisters in September 2001 and in May 2003 respectively. The temperature of the copper electrodes has been around 30 deg C in dh 1 and somewhat below 35 deg C in dh 5. Real-time corrosion monitoring for both electrode setups was first applied in January 2004, and then periodically in 2005, 2006, 2008, and most recently in the end of 2010 just before work to open the outer section of the Prototype Repository was started. The recorded corrosion rates fall below 1.3 μm/year (using a default value of n=2 in the software to convert the corrosion current density to a penetration rate by means of Faraday's law, and with no correction applied for the used measuring frequency of 0.01 Hz; also disregarding highly scattered data obtained for the copper electrodes in dh 1 during 2010). While the recorded rates on the electrodes in dh 5 first increased from about 0.2 μm/year in 2004 up to a maximum of 1.3 μm/year a year later (the drainage of the inner and outer sections was temporary closed in the end of 2004), and then gradually decreased to 0.7 μm/year in the end of 2010, the recorded rates on the electrodes in dh 1 show a quite different picture. The recorded rates fall in the range 0.4-0.7 μm/year and do not reflect any obvious decrease. However, it is anticipated that a similar time dependence as observed for the electrodes in dh 5 could have been present early on in the exposure; the electrodes were installed in 2001 but the first measurements were performed in 2004. Also, saturation of

  9. Influence of LMFBR fuel pin temperature profiles on corrosion rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiels, S.A.; Bagnall, C.; Schrock, S.L.; Orbon, S.J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes the sodium corrosion behavior of 20 percent cold worked Type 316 stainless steel fuel pin cladding under a simulated reactor thermal environment. A temperature gradient, typical of a fuel pin, was generated in a 0.9 m long heater section by direct resistance heating. Specimens were located in an isothermal test section immediately downstream of the heater. A comparison of the measured corrosion rates with available data showed an enhancement factor of between 1.5 and 2 which was attributed to the severe axial temperature gradient through the heater. Differences in structure and surface chemistry were also noted

  10. An experimental comparison of three wire beam electrode based methods for determining corrosion rates and patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Y.-J.

    2005-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have been carried out to examine the advantages and limitations of three wire beam electrode (WBE) based techniques, including the noise resistance R n -WBE method, the overpotential-galvanic current method, and the galvanic current method, in determining corrosion rates and patterns. These techniques have been applied simultaneously to several selected corrosion systems of different characteristics. It has been found that the R n -WBE method has advantages over other WBE based methods when applying to WBE surfaces under uniform corrosion. However, the R n -WBE method has been found to be unsuitable for low noise level corrosion systems. It has also been found that both R n -WBE and overpotential-galvanic current methods are similarly applicable to WBE surfaces under nonuniform corrosion. However, the galvanic current method has been found to be suitable only for WBE surfaces under highly localised corrosion. Some related issues regarding R n calculation such as trend removal and its effects on corrosion mapping have also been discussed

  11. High temperature cyclic oxidation and hot corrosion behaviours of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    eutectic reaction below 600°C. When the temperature ... blades, consequently corrosion rate rapidly increases due ... the corrosion run. ... Figure 1. Surface macrographs of superalloys subjected to hot corrosion and oxidation .... show the oxide scales of three different chemical compo- .... Li J and Wahi R P 1995 Acta Metall.

  12. Influence of grain structure on quench sensitivity relative to localized corrosion of high strength aluminum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, ShengDan, E-mail: csuliusd@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Key Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Materials Science and Engineering, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410083 (China); Li, ChengBo [Light Alloy Research Institute, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Deng, YunLai; Zhang, XinMing [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Key Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Materials Science and Engineering, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2015-11-01

    The influence of grain structure on quench sensitivity relative to localized corrosion of high strength aluminum alloy 7055 was investigated by electrochemical test, accelerated exfoliation corrosion test, optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The decrease of quench rate led to lower corrosion resistance of both the homogenized and solution heat treated (HS) alloy with equiaxed grains and the hot-rolled and solution heat treated (HRS) alloy with elongated grains, but there was a higher increment in corrosion depth and corrosion current density and a higher decrement in corrosion potential for the latter alloy, which therefore exhibited higher quench sensitivity. It is because in this alloy the larger amount of (sub) grain boundaries led to a higher increment in the amount of quench-induced η phase and precipitates free zone at (sub) grain boundaries with the decrease of quench rate, and there was a larger increment in the content of Zn, Mg and Cu in the η phase at grain boundaries due to slow quenching. The presence of subgrain boundaries in the HRS alloy tended to increase corrosion resistance at high quench rates higher than about 630 °C/min but decrease it at lower quench rates. - Highlights: • (Sub)Grain boundaries increase quench sensitivity relative to localized corrosion. • Subgrain boundaries decrease corrosion resistance below quench rate of 630 °C/min. • More (sub) grain boundaries leads to more GBPs and PFZ with decreasing quench rate.

  13. Corrosion Prevention And Control In High Pressure Oil And Gas Transmission Pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafez, M.T.; Radwan, M.H.; Jones, D.G.

    2004-01-01

    At the start of the 1990s there were concerns over the increasing threat of corrosion to the integrity of high-pressure oil and gas transmission pipelines. For example: corrosion was the major cause of reportable incidents in North America (1]. Corrosion was the major cause of pipeline failure in the Gulf of Mexico [2]. Corrosion in a North American onshore oil pipeline had required over $1 billion in repairs(3]. Internal corrosion along the complete length of pipelines had resulted in replacement[4] . However, the worldwide published failure statistics indicate that the incidents of corrosion are not increasing year on year(5-9]. Indeed, CONCA WE[8,9] statistics (for pipelines In Western Europe) show that the failure rate from corrosion (the most likely failure mode with increasing age) has not increased with pipeline age (Figure 1). In fact the statistics for gas pipelines in Europe

  14. Corrosion product identification and relative rates of corrosion of candidate metals in an irradiated air-steam environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, D.T.; Swayambunathan, V.; Tani, B.S.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Previously reported work by others indicates that dicopper trihydroxide nitrate, Cu 2 NO 3 (OH) 3 , forms on copper and copper alloys subjected to irradiated moist air near room temperature. We have performed experiments over a range of temperature and humidity, and have found that this species is formed at temperatures up to at least 150 degree C if low to intermediate relative humidities are present. At 150 degree C and 100% relative humidity, only Cu 2 O and CuO were observed. The relative general corrosion rates of the copper materials tested in 1-month experiments at dose rates of 0.7 and 2.0 kGy/h were Cu > 70/30 Cu--Ni > Al-bronze. High-nickel alloy 825 showed no observable corrosion. 29 refs., 4 tabs

  15. Corrosion Resistant Coatings for High Temperature Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besman, T.M.; Cooley, K.M.; Haynes, J.A.; Lee, W.Y.; Vaubert, V.M.

    1998-12-01

    Efforts to increase efficiency of energy conversion devices have required their operation at ever higher temperatures. This will force the substitution of higher-temperature structural ceramics for lower temperature materials, largely metals. Yet, many of these ceramics will require protection from high temperature corrosion caused by combustion gases, atmospheric contaminants, or the operating medium. This paper discusses examples of the initial development of such coatings and materials for potential application in combustion, aluminum smelting, and other harsh environments.

  16. Conditions for testing the corrosion rates of ceramics in coal gasification systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, J.P.; Nowok, J.W. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Coal gasifier operating conditions and gas and ash compositions affect the corrosion rates of ceramics used for construction in three ways: (1) through direct corrosion of the materials, (2) by affecting the concentration and chemical form of the primary corrodents, and (3) by affecting the mass transport rate of the primary corrodents. To perform an accurate corrosion test on a system material, the researcher must include all relevant corrodents and simulate conditions in the gasifier as closely as possible. In this paper, the authors present suggestions for conditions to be used in such corrosion tests. Two main types of corrosion conditions are discussed: those existing in hot-gas cleanup systems where vapor and dry ash may contribute to corrosion and those experienced by high-temperature heat exchangers and refractories where the main corrodent will be coal ash slag. Only the fluidized-bed gasification systems such as the Sierra Pacific Power Company Pinon Pine Power Project system are proposing the use of ceramic filters for particulate cleanup. The gasifier is an air-blown 102-MWe unit employing a Westinghouse{trademark} ceramic particle filter system operating at as high as 1100{degrees}F at 300 psia. Expected gas compositions in the filter will be approximately 25% CO, 15% H{sub 2}, 5% CO{sub 2}, 5% H{sub 2}O, and 50% N{sub 2}. Vapor-phase sodium chloride concentrations are expected to be 10 to 100 times the levels in combustion systems at similar temperatures, but in general the concentrations of the minor primary and secondary corrodents are not well understood. Slag corrosiveness will depend on its composition as well as viscosity. For a laboratory test, the slag must be in a thermodynamically stable form before the beginning of the corrosion test to assure that no inappropriate reactions are allowed to occur. Ideally, the slag would be flowing, and the appropriate atmosphere must be used to assure realistic slag viscosity.

  17. The corrosion behavior of hafnium in high-temperature-water environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rishel, D.M.; Smee, J.D.; Kammenzind, B.F.

    1999-10-01

    The high-temperature-water corrosion performance of hafnium is evaluated. Corrosion kinetic data are used to develop correlations that are a function of time and temperature. The evaluation is based on corrosion tests conducted in out-of-pile autoclaves and in out-of-flux locations of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at temperatures ranging from 288 to 360 C. Similar to the corrosion behavior of unalloyed zirconium, the high-temperature-water corrosion response of hafnium exhibits three corrosion regimes: pretransition, posttransition, and spalling. In the pretransition regime, cubic corrosion kinetics are exhibited, whereas in the posttransition regime, linear corrosion kinetics are exhibited. Because of the scatter in the spalling regime data, it is not reasonable to use a best fit of the data to describe spalling regime corrosion. Data also show that neutron irradiation does not alter the corrosion performance of hafnium. Finally, the data illustrate that the corrosion rate of hafnium is significantly less than that of Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4.

  18. Corrosion-Resistant High-Entropy Alloys: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunzhu Shi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion destroys more than three percent of the world’s gross domestic product. Therefore, the design of highly corrosion-resistant materials is urgently needed. By breaking the classical alloy-design philosophy, high-entropy alloys (HEAs possess unique microstructures, which are solid solutions with random arrangements of multiple elements. The particular locally-disordered chemical environment is expected to lead to unique corrosion-resistant properties. In this review, the studies of the corrosion-resistant HEAs during the last decade are summarized. The corrosion-resistant properties of HEAs in various aqueous environments and the corrosion behavior of HEA coatings are presented. The effects of environments, alloying elements, and processing methods on the corrosion resistance are analyzed in detail. Furthermore, the possible directions of future work regarding the corrosion behavior of HEAs are suggested.

  19. High corrosion-resistant fuel spacers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Toshimi; Takase, Iwao; Ikeda, Shinzo; Masaoka, Isao; Nakajima, Junjiro.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To enable manufacturing BWR fuel spacers by prior-art production process, using a zirconium-base alloy having very excellent corrosion resistance. Method: A highly improved nodular-resistant, corrosion-resistant zirconium alloy is devised by adding a slight amount of niobium, titanium and vanadium to zircaloy, of which fuel spacers are produced. That is, there can be obtained an alloy having much more excellent nodular resistance than conventional zircaloy, and free from a large change in plasticity, workability, and weldability, by adding to zirconium about 1.5 % of tin, about 0.15 % of iron, about 0.05 % of chromium, about 0.05 % of nickel, and 0.05 to 0.5 % of at least one or two kinds of niobium, titanium and vanadium. Using this zirconium-base alloy can manufacture fuel spacers by the same manufacturing process, thus improving economy and reliability. (Kamimura, M.)

  20. Prediction of pipeline corrosion rate based on grey Markov models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yonghong; Zhang Dafa; Peng Guichu; Wang Yuemin

    2009-01-01

    Based on the model that combined by grey model and Markov model, the prediction of corrosion rate of nuclear power pipeline was studied. Works were done to improve the grey model, and the optimization unbiased grey model was obtained. This new model was used to predict the tendency of corrosion rate, and the Markov model was used to predict the residual errors. In order to improve the prediction precision, rolling operation method was used in these prediction processes. The results indicate that the improvement to the grey model is effective and the prediction precision of the new model combined by the optimization unbiased grey model and Markov model is better, and the use of rolling operation method may improve the prediction precision further. (authors)

  1. Detrimental role of hydrogen on the corrosion rate of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blat, M.; Noel, D.

    1996-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that hydride precipitation at the metal/oxide interface could play a detrimental role on the waterside corrosion rate. Nevertheless, the mechanism of that detrimental role is not completely understood, and two hypotheses were investigated to understand the mechanism that controls the role of the hydrides. The first hypothesis is based on a mechanical effect: the hydrides precipitate at the metal/oxide interface and destroy the physical integrity of the barrier oxide layer. The second hypothesis is a modification of the transport properties of the oxide grown on the hydrided metal. The detrimental role of hydrides on the corrosion rate was studied by charging unirradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding material with hydrogen to a level higher than the limit of solubility at 400 C. Both gaseous and cathodic charging techniques were used. Static corrosion tests were carried out in autoclave with steam at 400 C on an as-received and hydrided sample. The detrimental role of hydrides is confirmed from the post-transition corrosion rate, and that effect is more significant for high cathodic charging. The results of the metallurgical examinations are discussed to provide an understanding of the mechanism. No relationship between hydrides, physical defects in the oxide, and local corrosion rate enhancement was found. Therefore, the results do not support the hypothesis of a mechanical effect at the scale of the performed examinations, but more detailed work is required to confirm this

  2. Corrosion Performance of Inconel 625 in High Sulphate Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Azzura

    2016-05-01

    Inconel 625 (UNS N06625) is a type of nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy with excellent corrosion resistance in a wide range of corrosive media, being especially resistant to pitting and crevice corrosion. However, in aggressive environment, Inconel 625 will suffer corrosion attack like other metals. This research compared the corrosion performance of Inconel 625 when exposed to higher sulphate content compared to real seawater. The results reveal that Inconel 625 is excellent in resist the corrosion attack in seawater. However, at increasing temperature, the corrosion resistance of this metal decrease. The performance is same in seawater with high sulphate content at increasing temperature. It can be concluded that sulphate promote perforation on Inconel 625 and become aggressive agents that accelerate the corrosion attack.

  3. High temperature aqueous stress corrosion testing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornstein, A.N.; Indig, M.E.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a device for stressing tensile samples contained within a high temperature, high pressure aqueous environment, thereby permitting determination of stress corrosion susceptibility of materials in a simple way. The stressing device couples an external piston to an internal tensile sample via a pull rod, with stresses being applied to the sample by pressurizing the piston. The device contains a fitting/seal arrangement including Teflon and weld seals which allow sealing of the internal system pressure and the external piston pressure. The fitting/seal arrangement allows free movement of the pull rod and the piston

  4. Influence of temperature on corrosion rate and porosity of corrosion products of carbon steel in anoxic bentonite environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoulil, J.; Kaňok, J.; Kouřil, M.; Parschová, H.; Novák, P.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The corrosion rate is not significantly dependent on temperature. •Corrosion products at higher temperatures have different color. •Corrosion products at higher temperatures are more compact. •The change in corrosion products nature is reversible. -- Abstract: The study focuses on the porosity of layers of corrosion products and its impact on corrosion rate of carbon steel in moist bentonite. Measurements were performed in an aggressive Czech type of bentonite – Rokle B75 at temperatures of 90 and 40 °C. Aggressiveness of B75 bentonite consists in low content of chlorides. Presence of chlorides in pore solution allows formation of more protective magnetite. The evaluation was made by electrochemical techniques (red/ox potential, open circuit potential, linear polarization resistance, impedance spectroscopy) and resistometric sensor measurements. The result imply that the higher the temperature the more compact is the layer of corrosion products that slightly decelerates corrosion rate compared to the state at 40 °C. The state of corrosion products at both temperatures is reversible

  5. Influence of temperature on corrosion rate and porosity of corrosion products of carbon steel in anoxic bentonite environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoulil, J., E-mail: jan.stoulil@vscht.cz [Department of Metals and Corrosion Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Kaňok, J.; Kouřil, M. [Department of Metals and Corrosion Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Parschová, H. [Department of Power Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Novák, P. [Department of Metals and Corrosion Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •The corrosion rate is not significantly dependent on temperature. •Corrosion products at higher temperatures have different color. •Corrosion products at higher temperatures are more compact. •The change in corrosion products nature is reversible. -- Abstract: The study focuses on the porosity of layers of corrosion products and its impact on corrosion rate of carbon steel in moist bentonite. Measurements were performed in an aggressive Czech type of bentonite – Rokle B75 at temperatures of 90 and 40 °C. Aggressiveness of B75 bentonite consists in low content of chlorides. Presence of chlorides in pore solution allows formation of more protective magnetite. The evaluation was made by electrochemical techniques (red/ox potential, open circuit potential, linear polarization resistance, impedance spectroscopy) and resistometric sensor measurements. The result imply that the higher the temperature the more compact is the layer of corrosion products that slightly decelerates corrosion rate compared to the state at 40 °C. The state of corrosion products at both temperatures is reversible.

  6. Corrosion resistance testing of high-boron-content stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrman, I.; Safek, V.

    1994-01-01

    Boron steels, i.e. stainless steels with boron contents of 0.2 to 2.25 wt.%, are employed in nuclear engineering for the manufacture of baskets or wells in which radioactive fissile materials are stored, mostly spent nuclear fuel elements. The resistance of such steels to intergranular corrosion and uniform corrosion was examined in the Strauss solution and in boric acid; the dependence of the corrosion rate of the steels on their chemical composition was investigated, and their resistance was compared with that of AISI 304 type steel. Corrosion resistance tests in actual conditions of ''wet'' compact storage (demineralized water or a weak boric acid solution) gave evidence that boron steels undergo nearly no uniform corrosion and, as electrochemical measurements indicated, match standard corrosion-resistant steels. Corrosion resistance was confirmed to decrease slightly with increasing boron content and to increase somewhat with increasing molybdenum content. (Z.S.). 3 tabs., 4 figs., 7 refs

  7. Pitting corrosion resistance of high alloy OCTG in ferric chloride solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masamura, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Matsushima, I.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of alloying elements and precipitated phases on the corrosion rate of high alloy OCTG in the ferric chloride solution have been evaluated. The corrosion rate of Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys without precipitated phases, e.g. carbides and sigma phase, can be estimated from the composition using the following equation: log(C.R.)=-0.144xPRE-7690/(273+T)+28.6 where C.R. is the corrosion rate in g/m/sup 2//hr; PRE is Cr+3Mo+16N in percent and T is the test temperature in 0 C. The activation energies of the ferric chloride test are almost the same regardless of PRE or Ni content when no detrimental phase precipitates. When carbides or the sigma phase precipitate, the corrosion rate is higher and the activation energy is lowered. This suggests that secondary phases give preferential sites for initiation of pitting corrosion

  8. Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  9. Estimation of flow rates through intergranular stress corrosion cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, R.P.; Norris, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental studies of critical two-phase water flow, through simulated and actual intergranular stress corrosion cracks, were performed to obtain data to evaluate a leak flow rate model and investigate acoustic transducer effectiveness in detecting and sizing leaks. The experimental program included a parametric study of the effects of crack geometry, fluid stagnation pressure and temperature, and crack surface roughness on leak flow rate. In addition, leak detection, location, and leak size estimation capabilities of several different acoustic transducers were evaluated as functions of leak rate and transducer position. This paper presents flow rate data for several different cracks and fluid conditions. It also presents the minimum flow rate detected with the acoustic sensors and a relationship between acoustic signal strength and leak flow rate

  10. Container material for the disposal of highly radioactive wastes: corrosion chemistry aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, R.

    1984-08-01

    Prior to disposal in crystalline formations it is planned to enclose vitrified highly radioactive waste from nuclear power plants in metallic containers ensuring their isolation from the groundwater for at least 1,000 years. Appropriate metals can be either thermodynamically stable in the repository environment (such as copper), passive materials with very low corrosion rates (titanium, nickel alloys), or metals such as cast iron or unalloyed cast steels which, although they corrode, can be used in sections thick enough to allow for this corrosion. The first part of the report presents the essentials of corrosion science in order to enable even a non-specialist to follow the considerations and arguments necessary to choose the material and design the container against corrosion. Following this, the principles of the long-term extrapolation of corrosion behaviour are discussed. The second part summarizes and comments upon the literature search carried out to identify published results relevant to corrosion in a repository environment. Results of archeaological studies are included wherever possible. Not only the general corrosion behaviour but also localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking are considered, and the influence of hydrogen on the material behaviour is discussed. Taking the corrosion behaviour as criterion, the author suggests the use either of copper or of cast iron or steel as an appropriate container material. The report concludes with proposals for further studies. (Auth.)

  11. Corrosion rate transients observed by linear polarization techniques at Zr-1%Nb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beran, J.; Cerny, K.

    1997-01-01

    Momentary corrosion rate of Zr-1%Nb alloy during nonisothermal autoclave experiments at temperature up to 328 deg. C in various solutions was determined by T/R p values (T - absolute temperature, R p - polarization resistance), multiplied by temperature independent conversion factor. This factor was found by comparison of conventional corrosion loss evaluation with electrochemical measurements. Corrosion rate transients in boric acid solutions and in lithium hydroxide differed significantly. Great differences were also found in stabilized corrosion rates at the end of experiments. Temperature irregularities caused considerable changes in corrosion rate. (author). 5 refs, 5 figs, 1 tab

  12. Corrosion rate transients observed by linear polarization techniques at Zr-1%Nb alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beran, J; Cerny, K [ZJS SKODA plc., Pelzen (Czech Republic)

    1997-02-01

    Momentary corrosion rate of Zr-1%Nb alloy during nonisothermal autoclave experiments at temperature up to 328 deg. C in various solutions was determined by T/R{sub p} values (T - absolute temperature, R{sub p}- polarization resistance), multiplied by temperature independent conversion factor. This factor was found by comparison of conventional corrosion loss evaluation with electrochemical measurements. Corrosion rate transients in boric acid solutions and in lithium hydroxide differed significantly. Great differences were also found in stabilized corrosion rates at the end of experiments. Temperature irregularities caused considerable changes in corrosion rate. (author). 5 refs, 5 figs, 1 tab.

  13. Effect Mo Addition on Corrosion Property and Sulfide Stress Cracking Susceptibility of High Strength Low Alloy Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Woo Yong; Koh, Seong Ung; Kim, Kyoo Young

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to understand the effect of Mo addition on SSC susceptibility of high strength low alloy steels in terms of microstructure and corrosion property. Materials used in this study are high strength low alloy (HSLA) steels with carbon content of 0.04wt% and Mo content varying from 0.1 to 0.3wt%. The corrosion property of steels was evaluated by immersion test in NACE-TM01-77 solution A and by analyzing the growth behavior of surface corrosion products. SSC resistance of steels was evaluated using constant load test. Electrochemical test was performed to investigate initial corrosion rate. Addition of Mo increased corrosion rate of steels by enhancing the porosity of surface corrosion products. however, corrosion rate was not directly related to SSC susceptibility of steels

  14. The effect of quench rate on the microstructure, mechanical properties, and corrosion behavior of U-6 Wt Pct Nb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckelmeyer, K.H.; Romiy, A.D.; Weirick, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of cooling rate on microstructure, mechanical behavior, corrosion resistance, and subsequent age hardenability is discussed. Cooling rates in excess of 20 Ks -1 cause the parent γ-phase to transform martensitically to a niobium supersaturated variant of the α-phase. This phase exhibits low hardness and strength, high ductility, good corrosion resistance, and age hardenability. As cooling rate decreases from 10 Ks -1 to 0.2 Ks -1 , microstructural changes (consistent with spinodal decomposition) occur to an increasing extent. These changes produce increases in hardness and strength and decreases in ductility, corrosion resistance, and age hardenability. At cooling rates less than 0.2 Ks -1 the parent phase undergoes cellular decomposition to a coarse two-phase lamellar microstructure which exhibits intermediate strength and ductility, reduced corrosion resistance, and no age hardenability. An analysis of the cooling rates indicates that fully martensitic microstructures can be obtained in plates as thick as 50 mm

  15. A finite element modeling method for predicting long term corrosion rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, J.W.; Chan, S.

    1984-01-01

    For the analyses of galvanic corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, which have been identified as possible corrosion processes for nuclear waste isolation, a finite element method has been developed for the prediction of corrosion rates. The method uses a finite element mesh to model the corrosive environment and the polarization curves of metals are assigned as the boundary conditions to calculate the corrosion cell current distribution. A subroutine is used to calculate the chemical change with time in the crevice or the pit environments. In this paper, the finite element method is described along with experimental confirmation

  16. HIGH TEMPERATURE CORROSION RESISTANCE OF METALLIC MATERIALS IN HARSH CONDITIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Novello, Frederic; Dedry, Olivier; De Noose, Vincent; Lecomte-Beckers, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Highly efficient energy recovery from renewable sources and from waste incineration causes new problems of corrosion at high temperature. A similar situation exists for new recycling processes and new energy storage units. These corrosions are generally considered to be caused by ashes or molten salts, the composition of which differs considerably from one plant to another. Therefore, for the assessment of corrosion-resistance of advanced materials, it is essential to precisely evaluate the c...

  17. Mg and Mg alloys: how comparable are in vitro and in vivo corrosion rates? A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Sanchez, Adela Helvia; Luthringer, Bérengère J C; Feyerabend, Frank; Willumeit, Regine

    2015-02-01

    Due to their biodegradability, magnesium and magnesium-based alloys could represent the third generation of biomaterials. However, their mechanical properties and time of degradation have to match the needs of applications. Several approaches, such as choice of alloying elements or tailored microstructure, are employed to tailor corrosion behaviour. Due to the high electrochemical activity of Mg, numerous environmental factors (e.g. temperature and surrounding ion composition) influence its corrosion behaviour, making it unpredictable. Nevertheless, the need of reliable in vitro model(s) to predict in vivo implant degradation is increasing. In an attempt to find a correlation between in vitro and vivo corrosion rates, this review presents a systematic literature survey, as well as an attempt to correlate the different results. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Corrosion resistance of high-performance materials titanium, tantalum, zirconium

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion resistance is the property of a material to resist corrosion attack in a particular aggressive environment. Although titanium, tantalum and zirconium are not noble metals, they are the best choice whenever high corrosion resistance is required. The exceptionally good corrosion resistance of these high–performance metals and their alloys results from the formation of a very stable, dense, highly adherent, and self–healing protective oxide film on the metal surface. This naturally occurring oxide layer prevents chemical attack of the underlying metal surface. This behavior also means, however, that high corrosion resistance can be expected only under neutral or oxidizing conditions. Under reducing conditions, a lower resistance must be reckoned with. Only very few inorganic and organic substances are able to attack titanium, tantalum or zirconium at ambient temperature. As the extraordinary corrosion resistance is coupled with an excellent formability and weldability these materials are very valua...

  19. Corrosion of Zircaloy-clad fuel rods in high-temperature PWRs: Measurement of waterside corrosion in North Anna Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balfour, M.G.; Kilp, G.R.; Comstock, R.J.; McAtee, K.R.; Thornburg, D.R.

    1992-03-01

    Twenty-four peripheral rods and two interior rods from North Anna Unit 1, End-of-Cycle 7, were measured at poolside for waterside corrosion on four-cycle Region 6 assemblies F35 and F66, with rod average burnups of 60 GWD/MTU. Similar measurements were obtained on 24 two-cycle fuel rods from Region 8A assemblies H02 and H10 with average burnups of about 40 GWD/MTU. The Region 6 peripheral rods had been corrosion measured previously after three cycles, at 45 GWD/MTU average burnup. The four-cycle Region 6 fuel rods showed high corrosion, compared to only intermediate corrosion level after three cycles. The accelerated corrosion rate in the fourth cycle was accompanied by extensive laminar cracking and spalling of the oxide film in the thickest regions. The peak corrosion of the two-cycle region 8A rods was 32 μm to 53 μm, with some isolated incipient oxide spalling. In conjunction with the in-reactor corrosion measurements, extensive characterization tests plus long-term autoclave corrosion tests were performed on archive samples of the three major tubing lots represented in the North Anna measurements. The autoclave tests generally showed the same ordering of corrosion by tubing lot as in the reactor; the chief difference between the archive tubing samples was a lower tin content (1.38 percent) for the lot with the lowest corrosion rate compared with a higher tin content (1.58) for the lot with the highest corrosion rate. There was no indication in the autoclave tests of an accelerated rate of corrosion as observed in the reactor

  20. Development and evaluation of an instantaneous atmospheric corrosion rate monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfeld, F.; Jeanjaquet, S. L.; Kendig, M. W.; Roe, D. K.

    1985-06-01

    A research program was carried out in which a new instantaneous atmospheric corrosion rate monitor (ACRM) was developed and evaluated, and equipment was constructed which will allow the use of many sensors in an economical way in outdoor exposures. In the first task, the ACRM was developed and tested in flow chambers in which relative humidity and gaseous and particulate pollutant levels can be controlled. Diurnal cycles and periods of rain were simulated. The effects of aerosols were studied. A computerized system was used for collection, storage, and analysis of the electrochemical data. In the second task, a relatively inexpensive electronics system for control of the ACRM and measurement of atmospheric corrosion rates was designed and built. In the third task, calibration of deterioration rates of various metallic and nonmetallic materials with the response of the ACRMs attached to these materials was carried out under controlled environmental conditions using the system developed in the second task. A Quality Assurance project plan was prepared with inputs from the Rockwell International Environmental Monitoring and Service Center and Quality Assurance System audits were performed.

  1. High temperature corrosion during biomass firing: improved understanding by depth resolved characterisation of corrosion products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Montgomery, Melanie; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    changes within the near surface region (covering both the deposit and the steel surface). Such cross-section analysis was further complemented by plan view investigations (additionally involving X-ray diffraction) combined with removal of the corrosion products. Improved insights into the nature......The high temperature corrosion of an austenitic stainless steel (TP 347H FG), widely utilised as a superheater tube material in Danish power stations, was investigated to verify the corrosion mechanisms related to biomass firing. KCl coated samples were exposed isothermally to 560 degrees C...... of the corrosion products as a function of distance from the deposit surface were revealed through this comprehensive characterisation. Corrosion attack during simulated straw-firing conditions was observed to occur through both active oxidation and sulphidation mechanisms....

  2. Corrosion Inhibition of High Speed Steel by Biopolymer HPMC Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Chen Shi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion inhibition characteristics of the derivatives of biopolymer hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose phthalate (HPMCP, and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS film are investigated. Based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopic measurements and potentiodynamic polarization, the corrosion inhibition performance of high speed steel coated with HPMC derivatives is evaluated. The Nyquist plot and Tafel polarization demonstrate promising anti-corrosion performance of HPMC and HPMCP. With increasing film thickness, both materials reveal improvement in corrosion inhibition. Moreover, because of a hydrophobic surface and lower moisture content, HPMCP shows better anti-corrosion performance than HPMCAS. The study is of certain importance for designing green corrosion inhibitors of high speed steel surfaces by the use of biopolymer derivatives.

  3. Mechanism of Corrosion by Naphthenic Acids and Organosulfur Compounds at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Peng

    Due to the law of supply and demand, the last decade has witnessed a skyrocketing in the price of light sweet crude oil. Therefore, refineries are increasingly interested in "opportunity crudes", characterized by their discounted price and relative ease of procurement. However, the attractive economics of opportunity crudes come with the disadvantage of high acid/organosulfur compound content, which could lead to corrosion and even failure of facilities in refineries. However, it is generally accepted that organosulfur compounds may form protective iron sulfide layers on the metal surface and decrease the corrosion rate. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the corrosive property of crudes at high temperatures, the mechanism of corrosion by acids (naphthenic acids) in the presence of organosulfur compounds, and methods to mitigate its corrosive effect. In 2004, an industrial project was initiated at the Institute for Corrosion and Multiphase Technology to investigate the corrosion by naphthenic acids and organosulfur compounds. In this project, for each experiment there were two experimentation phases: pretreatment and challenge. In the first pretreatment phase, a stirred autoclave was filled with a real crude oil fraction or model oil of different acidity and organosulfur compound concentration. Then, the stirred autoclave was heated to high temperatures to examine the corrosivity of the oil to different materials (specimens made from CS and 5% Cr containing steel were used). During the pretreatment, corrosion product layers were formed on the metal surface. In the second challenge phase, the steel specimens pretreated in the first phase were inserted into a rotating cylinder autoclave, called High Velocity Rig (HVR). The HVR was fed with a high-temperature oil solution of naphthenic acids to attack the iron sulfide layers. Based on the difference of specimen weight loss between the two steps, the net corrosion rate could be calculated and the protectiveness

  4. Effect of diamond-like carbon coating on corrosion rate of machinery steel HQ 805

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slat, Winda Sanni; Malau, Viktor; Iswanto, Priyo Tri; Sujitno, Tjipto; Suprapto

    2018-04-01

    HQ 805 is known as a super strength alloys steel and widely applied in military equipment and, aircraft components, drilling device and so on. It is due to its excellent behavior in wear, fatigue, high temperature and high speed operating conditions. The weakness of this material is the vulnerablality to corrosion when employed in sour environments where hydrogen sulfide and chlorides are present. To overcome the problems, an effort should be made to improve or enhance the surface properties for a longer service life. There are varieties of coatings developed and used to improve surface material properties. There are several kinds of coating methods; chemical vapour deposition (CVD), physical vapour deposition (PVD), thermochemical treatment, oxidation, or plasma spraying. This paper presents the research result of the influence of Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) coating deposited using DC plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (DC-PECVD) on corrosion rate (by potentiodynamic polarization method) of HQ 805 machinery steel. As a carbon sources, a mixture of argon (Ar) and methane (CH4) with ratio 76% : 24% was used in this experiment. The conditions of experiment were 400 °C of temperature, 1.2 mbar, 1.4 mbar, 1.6 mbar and 1.8 mbar of pressure of process. Investigated surface properties were hardness (microhardness tester), roughness (roughness test), chemical composition (Spectrometer), microstructure (SEM) and corrosion rate (potentiodynamic polarization). It has been found that the optimum condition with the lowest corrosion rate is at a pressure of 1.4 mbar with a deposition duration of 4 hours at a constant temperature of 400 °C. In this condition, the corrosion rate decreases from 12.326 mpy to 4.487 mpy.

  5. Monitoring of corrosion rates of Fe-Cu alloys under wet/dry condition in weakly alkaline environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Je Kyoung; Nishikata, Atsushi; Tsuru, Tooru

    2002-01-01

    When the steel, containing scrap elements like copper, is used as reinforcing steel bars for concrete, the steel is exposed to alkaline environments. in this study, AC impedance technique has been applied to the monitoring of corrosion rates of iron and several Fe-Cu (0.4, 10wt%) alloys in a wet-dry cycle condition. The wet-dry cycle was conducted by exposure to alternate conditions of 1 hour-immersion in a simulated pH10 concrete solution (Ca(OH) 2 ) containing 0.01M NaCl and 3 hour-drying at 298K and 50%RH. The corrosion rate of the iron is greatly accelerated by the wet-dry cycles. Because the active FeOOH species, which are produced by the oxidation of Fe(II, III)oxide in air during drying, act as very strong oxidants to the corrosion in the wet condition. As the drying progresses, iron shows a large increase in the corrosion rate and a small shift of the corrosion potential to the positive values. This can be explained by acceleration of oxygen transport through the thin electrolyte layer In contrast to iron, the Fe-Cu alloys show low corrosion rates and the high corrosion potentials in whole cycles

  6. Effect of temperature, of oxygen content and the downstream effect on corrosion rate of structural materials in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilincev, G.

    1988-01-01

    The effects were experimentally tested of temperature and of oxygen content on the corrosion rate of structural materials in liquid sodium and on reducing the corrosion rate down the sodium stream. The results of the experiments are shown in graphs and tables and are discussed in detail. The duration of all tests was standard 1,000 hours. The test parameters were set such as to determine the effect of temperature on corrosion of a quantity of various materials in sodium with a low oxygen content (1.2 to 2 ppm) at temperatures of 500 to 800 degC and in sodium with a high oxygen content (345 ppm) at temperatures of 500 to 700 degC. More experiments served the determination of the effect of a different oxygen content varying between 1.2 and 2 ppm at a constant temperature of 600 degC. The materials being tested included main structural materials used for fast reactor construction and materials allowing to establish the effect of main alloying elements on their corrosion in liquid sodium of different temperatures and purity grades. The relationships showing the effects of temperature and oxygen content in sodium on the rate of corrosion of various structural materials in hot parts of the installation and on the reduction in the rate of corrosion downstream due to sodium saturation with corrosion products were constructed using the experimental results. (Z.M.). 15 figs., 2 tabs., 7 refs

  7. Effects of grain size on the corrosion resistance of pure magnesium by cooling rate-controlled solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yichi; Liu, Debao; You, Chen; Chen, Minfang

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of grain size on the corrosion resistance of pure magnesium developed for biomedical applications. High-purity magnesium samples with different grain size were prepared by the cooling rate-controlled solidification. Electrochemical and immersion tests were employed to measure the corrosion resistance of pure magnesium with different grain size. The electrochemical polarization curves indicated that the corrosion susceptibility increased as the grain size decrease. However, the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and immersion tests indicated that the corrosion resistance of pure magnesium is improved as the grain size decreases. The improvement in the corrosion resistance is attributed to refine grain can produce more uniform and density film on the surface of sample.

  8. Risk Analysis using Corrosion Rate Parameter on Gas Transmission Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasikirono, B.; Kim, S. J.; Haryadi, G. D.; Huda, A.

    2017-05-01

    In the oil and gas industry, the pipeline is a major component in the transmission and distribution process of oil and gas. Oil and gas distribution process sometimes performed past the pipeline across the various types of environmental conditions. Therefore, in the transmission and distribution process of oil and gas, a pipeline should operate safely so that it does not harm the surrounding environment. Corrosion is still a major cause of failure in some components of the equipment in a production facility. In pipeline systems, corrosion can cause failures in the wall and damage to the pipeline. Therefore it takes care and periodic inspections or checks on the pipeline system. Every production facility in an industry has a level of risk for damage which is a result of the opportunities and consequences of damage caused. The purpose of this research is to analyze the level of risk of 20-inch Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline using Risk-based inspection semi-quantitative based on API 581 associated with the likelihood of failure and the consequences of the failure of a component of the equipment. Then the result is used to determine the next inspection plans. Nine pipeline components were observed, such as a straight pipes inlet, connection tee, and straight pipes outlet. The risk assessment level of the nine pipeline’s components is presented in a risk matrix. The risk level of components is examined at medium risk levels. The failure mechanism that is used in this research is the mechanism of thinning. Based on the results of corrosion rate calculation, remaining pipeline components age can be obtained, so the remaining lifetime of pipeline components are known. The calculation of remaining lifetime obtained and the results vary for each component. Next step is planning the inspection of pipeline components by NDT external methods.

  9. Stress corrosion crack growth rate in dissimilar metal welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, M. P.; Lapena, J.; Lancha, A. M.; Perosanz, F. J.; Navas, M.

    2000-01-01

    Dissimilar welds, used to join different sections in light water reactors, are potentially susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in aqueous mediums characteristic of nuclear plants. However, the study of these The ma has been limited to evaluating the weld material susceptibility in these mediums. Little scarce data are available on crack growth rates due, fundamentally, to inadequate testing techniques. In order to address this lack of information the crack growth rate at the interface of ferritic SA 533 B-1 alloy and alloy I-82, in a dissimilar weld (SA533B-1/I-82/316L), was studied. Experiments were conducted in water at 288 degree centigrade, 8 ppm of O 2 and 1 μS/cm conductivity. (Author) 33 refs

  10. Mechanical behavior of precipitation hardenable steels exposed to highly corrosive environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Ferdinand

    1994-01-01

    Unexpected occurrences of failures, due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of structural components, indicate a need for improved characterization of materials and more advanced analytical procedures for reliably predicting structures performance. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to determine the stress corrosion susceptibility of 15 - 5 PH steel over a wide range of applied strain rates in a highly corrosive environment. The selected environment for this investigation was a 3.5 percent NaCl aqueous solution. The material selected for the study was 15 - 5 PH steel in the H 900 condition. The Slow Strain Rate technique was used to test the metallic specimens.

  11. Morphological study of silver corrosion in highly aggressive sulfur environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minzari, Daniel; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Møller, Per

    2011-01-01

    A silicone coated power module, having silver conducting lines, showed severe corrosion, after prolonged use as part of an electronic device in a pig farm environment, where sulfur containing corrosive gasses are known to exist in high amounts. Permeation of sulfur gasses and humidity through...... the silicone coating to the interface has resulted in three corrosion types namely: uniform corrosion, conductive anodic filament type of Ag2S growth, and silver migration with subsequent formation of sulfur compounds. Detailed morphological investigation of new and corroded power modules was carried out...

  12. Corrosion behavior of high purity Fe-Cr-Ni alloys in trans-passive condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayuzumi, Masami; Ohta, Jyoji; Kako, Kenji

    1998-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of high-purity (99.99%) Fe-Cr-Ni alloys was investigated in 13 N nitric acid with/without Ce 4+ ions to clarify the effect of impurities on the trans-passive corrosion of stainless steel. The following results were obtained. (1) Almost no intergranular corrosion was observed in the high-purity alloys, although the corrosion rate of the matrix region was nearly the same as that of a commercial stainless steel with the same Cr and Ni content. (2) Due to the improved intergranular corrosion resistance, the effect of the purification became significant in the corrosion condition with the grain-separation being predominant. (3) The high-purity alloys showed higher susceptivility to intergranular corrosion with aging treatment between 873 K and 1073 K. Although the sulfuric acid/copper sulfate test suggested the formation of Cr-depleted zones, a grain boundary micro-analysis using a FETEM with an EDX did not reveal any change in Cr content or impurity segregain along the grain boundaries. The mechanism of corrosion enhancement resulting from the aging treatment remains nuclear. (author)

  13. Corrosion of Nickel-Based Alloys in Ultra-High Temperature Heat Transfer Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Reddy, Ramana G.

    2017-03-01

    MgCl2-KCl binary system has been proposed to be used as high temperature reactor coolant. Due to its relatively low melting point, good heat capacity and excellent thermal stability, this system can also be used in high operation temperature concentrating solar power generation system as heat transfer fluid (HTF). The corrosion behaviors of nickel based alloys in MgCl2-KCl molten salt system at 1,000 °C were determined based on long-term isothermal dipping test. After 500 h exposure tests under strictly maintained high purity argon gas atmosphere, the weight loss and corrosion rate analysis were conducted. Among all the tested samples, Ni-201 demonstrated the lowest corrosion rate due to the excellent resistance of Ni to high temperature element dissolution. Detailed surface topography and corrosion mechanisms were also determined by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS).

  14. New understanding of the effect of hydrostatic pressure on the corrosion of Ni–Cr–Mo–V high strength steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yange; Zhang, Tao; Shao, Yawei; Meng, Guozhe; Wang, Fuhui

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Stress distributions of pits under different hydrostatic pressures are simulated. •Corrosion model of Ni–Cr–Mo–V steel under hydrostatic pressure is established. •A novel understanding of the effect of hydrostatic pressure is proposed. -- Abstract: Corrosion of Ni–Cr–Mo–V high strength steel at different hydrostatic pressures is investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and finite element analysis (FEA). The results indicate that corrosion pits of Ni–Cr–Mo–V high strength steel originate from inclusions in the steel and high hydrostatic pressures accelerate pit growth rate parallel to steel and the coalescence rate of neighbouring pits, which lead to the fast formation of uniform corrosion. Corrosion of Ni–Cr–Mo–V high strength steel under high hydrostatic pressure is the interaction result between electrochemical corrosion and elastic stress

  15. The Secant Rate of Corrosion: Correlating Observations of the USS Arizona Submerged in Pearl Harbor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Donald L.; DeAngelis, Robert J.; Medlin, Dana J.; Johnson, Jon E.; Carr, James D.; Conlin, David L.

    2018-03-01

    Contrary to previous linear projections of steel corrosion in seawater, analysis of an inert marker embedded in USS Arizona concretion since the 7 December 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor reveals evidence that the effective corrosion rate decreases with time. The secant rate of corrosion, or SRC correlation, derived from this discovery could have a significant impact on failure analysis investigations for concreted shipwrecks or underwater structures. The correlation yields a lower rate of metal thinning than predicted. Development of the correlation is described.

  16. Corrosion of Ferritic-Martensitic steels in high temperature water: A literature Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F.

    2001-01-01

    Available literature concerning corrosion of high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steel in high temperature water as reviewed. The subjects considered are general corrosion, effect of irradiation on corrosion, environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) including stress corrosion cracking (SCC), corrosion fatigue and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). In addition some investigations about radiation induced segregation (RIS). Are shown in order to know the compositional changes at grain boundaries of these alloys and their influence on corrosion properties. (Author)

  17. Exceptionally high cavitation erosion and corrosion resistance of a high entropy alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, R B; Arora, H S; Mukherjee, Sundeep; Singh, S; Singh, H; Grewal, H S

    2018-03-01

    Cavitation erosion and corrosion of structural materials are serious concerns for marine and offshore industries. Durability and performance of marine components are severely impaired due to degradation from erosion and corrosion. Utilization of advanced structural materials can play a vital role in limiting such degradation. High entropy alloys (HEAs) are a relatively new class of advanced structural materials with exceptional properties. In the present work, we report on the cavitation erosion behavior of Al 0.1 CoCrFeNi HEA in two different media: distilled water with and without 3.5wt% NaCl. For comparison, conventionally used stainless steel SS316L was also evaluated in identical test conditions. Despite lower hardness and yield strength, the HEA showed significantly longer incubation period and lower erosion-corrosion rate (nearly 1/4th) compared to SS316L steel. Enhanced erosion resistance of HEA was attributed to its high work-hardening behavior and stable passivation film on the surface. The Al 0.1 CoCrFeNi HEA showed lower corrosion current density, high pitting resistance and protection potential compared to SS316L steel. Further, HEA showed no evidence of intergranular corrosion likely due to the absence of secondary precipitates. Although, the degradation mechanisms (formation of pits and fatigue cracks) were similar for both the materials, the damage severity was found to be much higher for SS316L steel compared to HEA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of yttria surface modification on high temperature corrosion of porous Ni22Cr alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karczewski, Jakub; Dunst, Katarzyna; Jasinski, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Protective coatings for porous alloys for high temperature use are relatively new materials. Their main drawback is high temperature corrosion. In this work protective coatings based the on Y-precursor infiltrated into the sintered Ni22Cr alloys are studied at 700°C. Effects of the amount...... of the protective phase on the resulting corrosion properties are evaluated in air and humidified hydrogen. Weight gain of the samples, their open porosities and microstructures are analyzed and compared. Results show, that by the addition of even a minor amount of the Y-precursor corrosion rates can be decreased...

  19. Controlling corrosion rate of Magnesium alloy using powder mixed electrical discharge machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, M. A.; Rani, A. M. A.; Saad, N. M.; Littlefair, G.; Aliyu, A. A.

    2018-04-01

    Biomedical implant can be divided into permanent and temporary employment. The duration of a temporary implant applied to children and adult is different due to different bone healing rate among the children and adult. Magnesium and its alloys are compatible for the biodegradable implanting application. Nevertheless, it is difficult to control the degradation rate of magnesium alloy to suit the application on both the children and adult. Powder mixed electrical discharge machining (PM-EDM) method, a modified EDM process, has high capability to improve the EDM process efficiency and machined surface quality. The objective of this paper is to establish a formula to control the degradation rate of magnesium alloy using the PM-EDM method. The different corrosion rate of machined surface is hypothesized to be obtained by having different combinations of PM-EDM operation inputs. PM-EDM experiments are conducted using an opened-loop PM-EDM system and the in-vitro corrosion tests are carried out on the machined surface of each specimen. There are four operation inputs investigated in this study which are zinc powder concentration, peak current, pulse on-time and pulse off-time. The results indicate that zinc powder concentration is significantly affecting the response with 2 g/l of zinc powder concentration obtaining the lowest corrosion rate. The high localized temperature at the cutting zone in spark erosion process causes some of the zinc particles get deposited on the machined surface, hence improving the surface characteristics. The suspended zinc particles in the dielectric fluid have also improve the sparking efficiency and the uniformity of sparks distribution. From the statistical analysis, a formula was developed to control the corrosion rate of magnesium alloy within the range from 0.000183 mm/year to 0.001528 mm/year.

  20. Study of stress corrosion cracking initiation of high alloy materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blahetova, Marie; Cihal, Vladimir; Lasek, Stanislav [Department of Materials Engineering, VSB - Technical University of Ostrava, tr. 17. listopadu 15, 708 33 Ostrava - Poruba (Czech Republic)

    2004-07-01

    The stainless steels and related alloys with sufficient resistance to a general corrosion can be susceptible to a localized corrosion (pitting, cracking, intergranular corrosion) in certain environment under specific conditions. The Drop Evaporation Test (DET) was developed for study of stainless materials resistance to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) at elevated temperatures 100 - 300 deg. C under constant external load using a chloride containing water solution. In the contribution the initiation and propagation of short cracks as well as pits were observed during the test. The crack initiation and/or propagation can be influenced by the cyclic thermal stresses, when the diluted water solution drops cool down the hot sample. The coordinates measurement of microscopic pits and sharp corrosion crack tips by the travelling microscope method allowed to derive the crack growth lengths and rates of short cracks. (authors)

  1. Study of stress corrosion cracking initiation of high alloy materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blahetova, Marie; Cihal, Vladimir; Lasek, Stanislav

    2004-01-01

    The stainless steels and related alloys with sufficient resistance to a general corrosion can be susceptible to a localized corrosion (pitting, cracking, intergranular corrosion) in certain environment under specific conditions. The Drop Evaporation Test (DET) was developed for study of stainless materials resistance to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) at elevated temperatures 100 - 300 deg. C under constant external load using a chloride containing water solution. In the contribution the initiation and propagation of short cracks as well as pits were observed during the test. The crack initiation and/or propagation can be influenced by the cyclic thermal stresses, when the diluted water solution drops cool down the hot sample. The coordinates measurement of microscopic pits and sharp corrosion crack tips by the travelling microscope method allowed to derive the crack growth lengths and rates of short cracks. (authors)

  2. Effect of heating rate on caustic stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indig, M.E.; Hoffman, N.J.

    1977-01-01

    To evaluate effects of a large water leak into the sodium side of a steam generator in a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor the Liquid Metal Engineering Center (LMEC) at Canoga Park, California, is performing a series of tests in a Large Leak Test Rig (LLTR). This test series involves heating a large steam generator that possibly contains localized pockets of aqueous caustic retained from a previous sodium-water reaction. Such pockets of caustic solution could be in contact with welds and other components that contain residual stresses up to the yield point. The LMEC and General Electric (GE) ran a series of tests to evaluate the effect of heating rate on caustic stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for alloys either used or considered for the LLTR. A summary of the temperatures and caustic concentration ranges that can result in caustic SCC for carbon steel and Type-304 stainless steel is given

  3. General corrosion of carbon steels in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gras, J.M.

    1994-04-01

    This short paper seeks to provide a summary of the main knowledge about the general corrosion of carbon steels in high temperature water. In pure water or slightly alkaline deaerated water, steels develop a protective coating of magnetite in a double layer (Potter and Mann oxide) or a single layer (Bloom oxide). The morphology of the oxide layer and the kinetics of corrosion depend on the test parameters controlling the solubility of iron. The parameters exercising the greatest influence are partial hydrogen pressure and mass transfer: hydrogen favours the solubilization of the magnetite; the entrainment of the dissolved iron prevents a redeposition of magnetite on the surface of the steel. Cubic or parabolic in static conditions, the kinetics of corrosion tends to be linear in dynamic conditions. In dynamic operation, corrosion is at least one order of magnitude lower in water with a pH of 10 than in pure water with a pH of 7. The activation energy of corrosion is 130 kJ/mol (31 kcal/mol). This results in the doubling of corrosion at around 300 deg C for a temperature increase of 15 deg C. Present in small quantities (100-200 ppb), oxygen decreases general corrosion but increases the risk of pitting corrosion - even for a low chloride content - and stress corrosion cracking or corrosion-fatigue. The steel composition has probably an influence on the kinetics of corrosion in dynamic conditions; further work would be required to clarify the effect of some residual elements. (author). 31 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Slow strain rate corrosion and fracture characteristics of X-52 and X-70 pipeline steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras, A.; Albiter, A.; Salazar, M.; Perez, R.

    2005-01-01

    The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in a NACE solution saturated with H 2 S, of the X-52 and X-70 steels was studied using slow strain rate tests (SSRT) and electrochemical evaluations. SCC tests were performed in samples which include the longitudinal weld bead of the pipeline steels and were carried out in the NACE solution at both room temperature and 50 deg. C. After failure, the fracture surfaces were observed in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the chemical analysis were obtained using X-rays energy dispersive (EDXs) techniques. The specimens tested in air, exhibited a ductile type of failure, and whereas, those tested in the corrosive solution showed a brittle fracture. Specimens tested in the NACE solution saturated with H 2 S presented high susceptibility to SCC. Corrosion was found to be an important factor in the initiation of some cracks. In addition, the effect of the temperature on the corrosion attack was explored. The susceptibility to SCC was manifested as a decrease in the mechanical properties. Potentiodynamic polarization curves and hydrogen permeation measurements were made. The diffusion of atomic hydrogen was related to this fracture forms. The hydrogen permeation flux increased with the increasing of temperature

  5. A study of microbial population dynamics associated with corrosion rates influenced by corrosion control materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Yu Jie; Hung, Chun Hsiung; Lee, Jyh Wei; Chang, Yi Tang; Lin, Fen Yu; Chuang, Chun Jie

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to analyze the variations of microbial community structure under anaerobic corrosive conditions, using molecular fingerprinting method. The effect of adding various materials to the environment on the corrosion mechanism has been discussed. In the initial experiment,

  6. The Corrosion of High Performance Steel in Adverse Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, Desmond C.

    2005-01-01

    The corrosion products that have formed on weathering steel bridges exposed to different weather conditions in the United States have been evaluated. They have been analyzed by spectroscopic techniques to determine the relationship between protective and non-protective rust coatings, and their relationship to the exposure conditions. Bridges constructed recently using High Performance Steel, as well as older bridges built with Type A588B weathering steel, were evaluated for corrosion performance of the rust coatings. In locations where the steel is subjected to regular wet-dry cycling, where the surface is wet for less than about 20% of the time, a protective patina starts to form after a few months exposure, and continues to an adherent, impervious coating after a decade. The protective patina is characterized by the formation of only goethite and lepidocrocite. The goethite makes up about 80% of the rust, and itself consists of a nanophase component, 40%, or infrequent drying cycles (regions close to waterways, fog or having high humidity), the weathering steel forms a rust coating that consists of a large amount of maghemite, and goethite that contains very little of the nanophase component. The rust coating ex-foliates from the steel and is not protective. Under exposure conditions in which chlorides are deposited onto the weathering steel surface (marine or de-icing salt locations), the protective patina also does not form. Instead, the rust coating consists of a large fraction of akaganeite that forms at the expense of the lepidocrocite and nanophase goethite. The bridges exposed to high chloride concentrations, 1.5 wt%, and therefore having no protective patina, have corrosion rates measured to be 6 times larger than expected for weathering steel with the protective patina

  7. A novel high-strength and highly corrosive biodegradable Fe-Pd alloy: Structural, mechanical and in vitro corrosion and cytotoxicity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čapek, Jaroslav; Msallamová, Šárka; Jablonská, Eva; Lipov, Jan; Vojtěch, Dalibor

    2017-10-01

    Recently, iron-based materials have been considered as candidates for the fabrication of biodegradable load-bearing implants. Alloying with palladium has been found to be a suitable approach to enhance the insufficient corrosion rate of iron-based alloys. In this work, we have extensively compared the microstructure, the mechanical and corrosion properties, and the cytotoxicity of an FePd2 (wt%) alloy prepared by three different routes - casting, mechanical alloying and spark plasma sintering (SPS), and mechanical alloying and the space holder technique (SHT). The properties of the FePd2 (wt%) were compared with pure Fe prepared in the same processes. The preparation route significantly influenced the material properties. Materials prepared by SPS possessed the highest values of mechanical properties (CYS~750-850MPa) and higher corrosion rates than the casted materials. Materials prepared by SHT contained approximately 60% porosity; therefore, their mechanical properties reached the lowest values, and they had the highest corrosion rates, approximately 0.7-1.2mm/a. Highly porous FePd2 was tested in vitro according to the ISO 10993-5 standard using L929 cells, and two-fold diluted extracts showed acceptable cytocompatibility. In general, alloying with Pd enhanced both mechanical properties and corrosion rates and did not decrease the cytocompatibility of the studied materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Hot-wall corrosion testing of simulated high level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, G.T.; Zapp, P.E.; Mickalonis, J.I.

    1995-01-01

    Three materials of construction for steam tubes used in the evaporation of high level radioactive waste were tested under heat flux conditions, referred to as hot-wall tests. The materials were type 304L stainless steel alloy C276, and alloy G3. Non-radioactive acidic and alkaline salt solutions containing halides and mercury simulated different high level waste solutions stored or processed at the United States Department of Energy's Savannah River Site. Alloy C276 was also tested for corrosion susceptibility under steady-state conditions. The nickel-based alloys C276 and G3 exhibited excellent corrosion resistance under the conditions studied. Alloy C276 was not susceptible to localized corrosion and had a corrosion rate of 0.01 mpy (0.25 μm/y) when exposed to acidic waste sludge and precipitate slurry at a hot-wall temperature of 150 degrees C. Type 304L was susceptible to localized corrosion under the same conditions. Alloy G3 had a corrosion rate of 0.1 mpy (2.5 μm/y) when exposed to caustic high level waste evaporator solution at a hot-wall temperature of 220 degrees C compared to 1.1 mpy (28.0 μ/y) for type 304L. Under extreme caustic conditions (45 weight percent sodium hydroxide) G3 had a corrosion rate of 0.1 mpy (2.5 μm/y) at a hot-wall temperature of 180 degrees C while type 304L had a high corrosion rate of 69.4 mpy (1.8 mm/y)

  9. Advanced Corrosion-Resistant Zr Alloys for High Burnup and Generation IV Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur Motta; Yong Hwan Jeong; R.J. Comstock; G.S. Was; Y.S. Kim

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this collaboration between four institutions in the US and Korea is to demonstrate a technical basis for the improvement of the corrosion resistance of zirconium-based alloys in more extreme operating environments (such as those present in severe fuel duty, cycles high burnup, boiling, aggressive chemistry) and to investigate the feasibility (from the point of view of corrosion rate) of using advanced zirconium-based alloys in a supercritical water environment

  10. Correlation of flow accelerated corrosion rate with iron solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, K.; Domae, M.; Yoneda, K.; Inada, F.; Ohira, T.; Hisamune, K.; Takiguchi, H.

    2009-01-01

    Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) of carbon steel is one of the most important subjects in coolant systems of power plants. FAC is influenced by material, flow condition, temperature, and water chemistry. It is considered that solubility is the most important factor to determine the effect of water chemistry on FAC. In the present study, effect of specific oxide on FAC rate was studied from the thermodynamic solubility of iron. The effects of temperature and pH on the iron solubility were evaluated by taking into consideration hydrolysis reactions of ferrous iron, dissolution equilibria of Fe 3 O 4 , FeO, and Fe(OH) 2 , and charge balance. The correlation between the iron solubility and FAC behavior was evaluated by using the normalized mass transfer coefficient. It is clarified that the product of iron solubility equilibrated with Fe 3 O 4 and normalized mass transfer coefficient can explain the temperature and pH dependence of FAC. These results indicate presence of magnetite on the surface of carbon steel. Diffusion of iron from the saturated layer determines the FAC rate from water chemistry aspect. (author)

  11. Determination of corrosion rate of reinforcement with a modulated guard ring electrode; analysis of errors due to lateral current distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojtas, H.

    2004-01-01

    The main source of errors in measuring the corrosion rate of rebars on site is a non-uniform current distribution between the small counter electrode (CE) on the concrete surface and the large rebar network. Guard ring electrodes (GEs) are used in an attempt to confine the excitation current within a defined area. In order to better understand the functioning of modulated guard ring electrode and to assess its effectiveness in eliminating errors due to lateral spread of current signal from the small CE, measurements of the polarisation resistance performed on a concrete beam have been numerically simulated. Effect of parameters such as rebar corrosion activity, concrete resistivity, concrete cover depth and size of the corroding area on errors in the estimation of polarisation resistance of a single rebar has been examined. The results indicate that modulated GE arrangement fails to confine the lateral spread of the CE current within a constant area. Using the constant diameter of confinement for the calculation of corrosion rate may lead to serious errors when test conditions change. When high corrosion activity of rebar and/or local corrosion occur, the use of the modulated GE confinement may lead to significant underestimation of the corrosion rate

  12. Stress corrosion cracking of highly irradiated 316 stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Morihito; Fukuya, Koji; Fujii, Katsuhiko; Nakajima, Nobuo; Furutani, Gen [Institute of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Mihama, Fukui (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    Mechanical property tests, grain boundary (GB) composition analysis and slow strain rate test (SSRT) in simulated PWR primary water changing dissolved hydrogen (DH) and dissolved oxygen (DO) content were carried out on cold-worked (CW) 316 stainless steels which were irradiated to 1-8x10{sup 26} n/m{sup 2} (E>0.1 MeV) in a Japanese PWR in order to evaluate irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) susceptibility. Highly irradiated stainless steels were susceptible to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in both hydrogenated water and oxygenated water and to intergranular cracking in inert gas atmosphere. IASCC susceptibility increased with increasing DH content (0-45 ccH{sub 2}/kgH{sub 2}O). Hydrogen content of the section containing fracture surface was higher than that of the section far from fracture surface. These results suggest that hydrogen would have an important role for IASCC. While mechanical property was saturated, GB segregation and IASCC susceptibility increased with an increase in fluence, suggesting that GB segregation would have a dominant role for an increase in IASCC susceptibility at this high fluence region. (author)

  13. Corrosion behavior of stainless steel and zirconium in nitric acid containing highly oxidizing species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayuzumi, Masami; Fujita, Tomonari

    1994-01-01

    Corrosion behavior of 304ELC, 310Nb stainless steels and Zirconium was investigated in the simulated dissolver solution of a reprocessing plant to obtain fundamental data for life prediction. Corrosion of heat transfer surface was also investigated in nitric acid solutions containing Ce ion. The results obtained are as follows: (1) Stainless steels showed intergranular corrosion in the simulated dissolver solution. The corrosion rate increased with time and reached to a constant value after several hundred hours of immersing time. The constant corrosion rate changed depending on potential suggesting that corrosion potential dominates the corrosion process. 310Nb showed superior corrosion resistance to 304ELC. (2) Corrosion rate of stainless steels increased in the heat transfer condition. The causes of corrosion enhancement are estimated to be higher corrosion potential and higher temperature of heat transfer surface. (3) Zirconium showed perfect passivity in all the test conditions employed. (author)

  14. Corrosion behaviour of construction materials for high temperature steam electrolysers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikiforov, Aleksey; Petrushina, Irina; Christensen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    temperature proton exchange membrane (PEM) steam electrolysers. Steady-state voltammetry was used in combination with scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to evaluate the stability of the mentioned materials. It was found that stainless steels were the least resistant...... to corrosion under strong anodic polarisation. Among alloys, Ni-based showed the highest corrosion resistance in the simulated PEM electrolyser medium. In particular, Inconel 625 was the most promising among the tested corrosion-resistant alloys for the anodic compartment in high temperature steam electrolysis...

  15. Localized corrosion information using high resolution measurement devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambat, Rajan

    2005-01-01

    High performance demand for several engineering alloys and components, and miniaturization of electronics and development of MEMS requires better understanding of local corrosion characteristics frequently down to µm scale. This is because in metallic materials corrosion is a sensitive function...... in conjunction with microstructural analysis, using advanced microscopic tools, becomes very important. Corrosion of microelectronics circuits and MEMs is also a recent problem, which demands measurement resolution down to few microns as the components are extremely small, and measurement needs to be carried out...

  16. EFFECT OF RATIO OF SURFACE AREA ON THE CORROSION RATE

    OpenAIRE

    Dody Prayitno; M. Irsyad

    2018-01-01

    Aluminum and steel are used to be a construction for a building outdoor panel. Aluminum and steel are connected by bolt and nut. An atmosphere due to a corrosion of the aluminum. The corrosion possibly to cause the hole diameter of bolt and nut to become larger. Thus the bolt and nut can not enough strong to hold the panel. The panel may collapse. The aim of the research is first to answer a question where does the corrosion starts. The second is to know the effect of ratio surface area of st...

  17. Evaluation of intergranular corrosion rate and microstructure of forged 316L round bar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, H. K.; Kim, Y. S.

    2009-01-01

    When austenitic stainless steels are heat treated in the range of 500∼850 .deg. C, the alloys are sensitized due to the formation of chromium carbide at grain boundaries and then intergranular corrosion occurs. This paper aims to evaluate the intergranular corrosion rate and microstructural change of forged 316L stainless steel. To analyze the microstructure by forging conditions, ferrite phase, sigma phase, intergranular precipitation were observed. In order to evaluate the intergranular corrosion rate. Huey test was performed by ASTM A262. On the base of microstructural observation, ferrite and sigma phases were not detected, and also intergranular precipitation was not revealed in optical microscopic observation. By ASTM A262 Practice A, step structure was shown in all forging conditions. Intergranular corrosion rate gradually increased by Huey test periods but average corrosion rate was under 0.03 mm/month

  18. Evaluation of intergranular corrosion rate and microstructure of forged 316L round bar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, H. K.; Kim, Y. S. [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    When austenitic stainless steels are heat treated in the range of 500{approx}850 .deg. C, the alloys are sensitized due to the formation of chromium carbide at grain boundaries and then intergranular corrosion occurs. This paper aims to evaluate the intergranular corrosion rate and microstructural change of forged 316L stainless steel. To analyze the microstructure by forging conditions, ferrite phase, sigma phase, intergranular precipitation were observed. In order to evaluate the intergranular corrosion rate. Huey test was performed by ASTM A262. On the base of microstructural observation, ferrite and sigma phases were not detected, and also intergranular precipitation was not revealed in optical microscopic observation. By ASTM A262 Practice A, step structure was shown in all forging conditions. Intergranular corrosion rate gradually increased by Huey test periods but average corrosion rate was under 0.03 mm/month.

  19. High temperature corrosion behaviour of a new Ni-30Fe-10Ar-Cr-alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloewer, J.; Sauthoff, G.

    1997-01-01

    The high temperature corrosion behaviour of a new duplex nickel-base alloy containing about 30 mass% iron, 10 mass% aluminium and 8 mass% chromium was determined in both air and hot process gases containing methane/hydrogen, sulphur dioxide and hydrogen sulphide, respectively. It was found that the corrosion resistance against carburisation, sulphidation and oxidation was excellent due to the formation of a dense, protective alumina scale. The adherence of the alumina scale was increased by an addition of 0.1 mass% hafnium. The concentration of chromium was found to have a remarkable impact on the oxidation and high temperature corrosion resistance. Alloys without chromium showed increased corrosion rates in both air and sulphur-containing gas atmospheres due to the initial formation of nickel oxides. In sulphidising SO 2 -and H 2 S- containing gases at least 4 mass% chromium are required to stabilise the formation of alumina and to prevent the formation of nickel/sulphur compounds. (orig.)

  20. Correlation of flow accelerated corrosion rate with iron solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, K.; Domae, M.; Yoneda, K.; Inada, F.; Ohira, T.; Hisamune, K.

    2011-01-01

    Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) of the carbon steel is one of the most important subjects in the coolant systems of the power plants. FAC is influenced by the composition of the material, the flow condition, temperature, and the water chemistry conditions. It is considered that the solubility of iron (Fe) is the most important factor in the water chemistry parameters affecting FAC. In the present study, the effects of temperature and pH on the Fe solubility were evaluated in consideration of the hydrolysis reactions of the ferrous iron, the dissolution equilibria of Fe 3 O 4 , FeO, and Fe(OH) 2 , and the charge balance. The correlation between the Fe solubility and the FAC behavior was discussed. It has been suggested that the product of the Fe solubility equilibrated with Fe 3 O 4 and the mass transfer coefficient can explain the temperature and pH dependence of FAC. These results indicate the presence of the magnetite on the surface of the carbon steel. Diffusion of the Fe from the saturated layer to the bulk solution determines the FAC rate from the water chemistry aspect.

  1. Fundamental corrosion characterization of high-strength titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schutz, R.W.; Grauman, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Many commercially available and several developmental high-strength titanium alloys were evaluated for application in chloride-containing environments with respect to general, crevice, and stress corrosion resistance. Studies in boiling reducing and oxidizing acid chloride media permitted identification of certain high-strength titanium alloys, containing ≥4 weight % molybdenum, which are significantly more resistant than unalloyed titanium with respect to general and crevice attack. Data regression analysis suggests that molybdenum and vanadium impart a significant positive effect on alloy corrosion resistance under reducing acid chloride conditions, whereas aluminum is detrimental. Little effect of metallurgical condition (that is, annealed versus aged) on corrosion behavior of the higher molybdenum-containing alloys was noted. No obvious susceptibility to chloride and sulfide stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was detected utilizing U-bend specimens at 177 0 C

  2. Corrosion measurements on apt prototypic materials in the Lansce high-power proton beam and applicability to other systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lillard, R.S.; Gac, F.D.; James, M.R.; Maloy, S.A.; Paciotti, M.A.; Waters, L.S.; Willcutt, G.J.; Chandler, G.T.; Ferguson, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    The corrosion rates of several corrosion resistant materials behave in a similar manner even under the intense radiation of the LANSCE high-power beam. A second observation was made, showing that the corrosion rates saturated under high instantaneous radiation intensity in corrosion experiments conducted for the accelerator production of tritium (APT) programme. The LANSCE H + beam is not prototypic of the proposed APT production plant in several respects. The instantaneous proton flux in the APT production plant beam is about 10 times that of the LANSCE beam. The small transverse APT beam spot is rastered to spread the power density over the area of the target, and as the beam rasters, it creates a pulsed character to the beam at a specific location. In order to develop correlations that would enable extrapolation of the corrosion data to the proposed APT production plant, the experimental programme included measurements over a range of average beam currents, measurements at high and low instantaneous beam current, and measurements at various combinations of pulse width and repetition rate. The correlations that were developed are based on an approximately linear dependence of corrosion rate on average beam current (average radiation intensity) and the saturation effect observed at high instantaneous radiation intensity. For a given transverse beam profile and for the same average beam current, the correlations predict the highest corrosion rate in a do beam and the lowest corrosion rate in the lowest duty cycle beams. In the case of the APT extrapolation, the predicted corrosion rates were a factor of 5 lower than for a do beam depositing the same average power density. The measured corrosion rates and the formulated extrapolations are applicable to water-cooled targets and components in proton beams. (authors)

  3. Galvanic corrosion evaluation of high activity nuclear waste container metals components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semino, C.J.

    1990-04-01

    The final disposal container for vitrified high-level waste is assumed to have three metallic layers: a stainless steel inner layer, and external one of a metal to be selected and a thick lead layer (10 cm) in the middle. As design limit, the container shall act as an engineering barrier, granting the isolation of the radionuclides for approximately 1000 years. Preliminary titanium-lead galvanic couple tests showed that titanium behaved always as a cathode in the galvanic couple, promoting the galvanic corrosion of lead. This corrosion study focused on the behaviour of lead-AISI 304 stainless steel and lead-carbon steel (SAE 1010 and 1020) galvanic couples with different area relationships, temperature and media composition. High purity lead (99,999%) and commercial lead (99,9%) were used for galvanic couples tests. Tests were performed at 75, 50, 45 and 40 deg. C. Test solution was either synthetic groundwater, a suspension of 10% bentonite in groundwater, or synthetic sea water. The synthetic sea water was used at 100, 50 and 25% concentration by dilution with distilled water. Tests with lead-304 stainless steel galvanic couples showed that lead always behaves as an anode, corroding preferentially. Very low lead corrosion rates were found in lead-carbon steel galvanic couple in 10% bentonite suspension in synthetic groundwater test at 75 deg. C. An increase of carbon content in steel has very little influence on steel corrosion rate. Commercial lead has a higher corrosion rate and presented a more pronounced attack than high purity lead. Its corrosion rate is at least twice when lead-carbon steel area relationship increases from 1:10 to 1:40. There are higher steel corrosion rates in sea water than in groundwater. Lead behaves as a cathode to the end of the test. 8 refs, 85 figs, 10 tabs

  4. Local corrosion of high alloy steels under biodeposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korovyakova, M.D.; Nikitin, V.M.; Speshneva, N.V.

    1999-01-01

    Impact of the bacteriozenosis different structural-functional state under biodeposits on corrosion resistance of the 12Kh18N10T and Kh18N10T high-alloy steels in the natural seawater is studied. It is shown that saturation of natural micro communities by separate aerobic and facultative-anaerobic bacterial monocultures increases corrosion resistance of these steels by their overgrow with biodeposits [ru

  5. Standard practice for calculation of corrosion rates and related information from electrochemical measurements

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1989-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers the providing of guidance in converting the results of electrochemical measurements to rates of uniform corrosion. Calculation methods for converting corrosion current density values to either mass loss rates or average penetration rates are given for most engineering alloys. In addition, some guidelines for converting polarization resistance values to corrosion rates are provided. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard.

  6. Measuring the corrosion rate of steel in concrete – effect of measurement technique, polarisation time and current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Peter Vagn; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2012-01-01

    , are in some studies considered the main reasons for the variations. This paper presents an experimental study on the quantitative effect of polarisation time and current on the measured polarisation resistance – and thus the corrosion current density – of passively and actively corroding steel. Two...... electrochemical techniques often used in instruments for on-site corrosion rate measurements are investigated. On passively corroding reinforcement the measured polarisation resistance was for both techniques found to be highly affected by the polarisation time and current and no plateaus at either short or long...... rate for actively corroding steel. For both techniques guidelines for polarisation times and currents are given for (on-site) non-destructive corrosion rate measurements on reinforcement steel in concrete....

  7. Extremely high resolution corrosion monitoring of pipelines: retrofittable, non-invasive and real-time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltzersen, Oeystein; Tveit, Edd [Sensorlink AS, Trondheim (Norway); Verley, Richard [StatoilHydro ASA, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-07-01

    The Ultramonit unit is a clamp-on tool (removable) that uses an array of sensors to provide online, real-time, reliable and repeatable high accuracy ultrasonic wall thickness measurements and corrosion monitoring at selected locations along the pipeline. The unit can be installed on new or existing pipelines by diver or ROV. The system is based on the well-established ultrasonic pulse-echo method (A-scan). Special processing methods, and the fact that the unit is fixed to the pipeline, enable detection of changes in wall thickness in the micro-meter range. By utilizing this kind of resolution, it is possible to project corrosion rates in hours or days. The tool is used for calibration of corrosion inhibitor programs, verification and calibration of inspection pig data and general corrosion monitoring of new and existing pipelines. (author)

  8. Effect of high temperature filtration on out-core corrosion product activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, G.L.; Bogancs, J.

    1983-01-01

    Investigation of the effect of high temperature filtration on corrosion product transport and out-core corrosion product activity has been carried out for VVER-440 plants. In the physico-chemical model applied particulate and dissolved corrosion products were taken into account. We supposed 100% effectivity for the particulate filter. It was found that about 0,5% 160 t/h/ of the main flow would result in an approx.50% reduction of the out-core corrosion product activity. Investigation of the details of the physico-chemical model in Nuclear Power Plant Paks showed a particle deposition rate measured during power transients fairly agreeing with other measurements and data used in the calculations. (author)

  9. Corrosion monitoring using high-frequency guided ultrasonic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromme, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Corrosion develops due to adverse environmental conditions during the life cycle of a range of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Both pitting corrosion and generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the degradation of the structural integrity. The nondestructive detection and monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic transducers with single sided access to the structure, guided wave modes were generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. The wave propagation and interference of the different guided wave modes depends on the thickness of the structure. Laboratory experiments were conducted and the wall thickness reduced by consecutive milling of the steel structure. Further measurements were conducted using accelerated corrosion in a salt water bath and the damage severity monitored. From the measured signal change due to the wave mode interference the wall thickness reduction was monitored. The high frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  10. Corrosion assessment of refractory materials for high temperature waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marra, J.C.; Congdon, J.W.; Kielpinski, A.L.

    1995-01-01

    A variety of vitrification technologies are being evaluated to immobilize radioactive and hazardous wastes following years of nuclear materials production throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The compositions and physical forms of these wastes are diverse ranging from inorganic sludges to organic liquids to heterogeneous debris. Melt and off-gas products can be very corrosive at the high temperatures required to melt many of these waste streams. Ensuring material durability is required to develop viable treatment processes. Corrosion testing of materials in some of the anticipated severe environments is an important aspect of the materials identification and selection process. Corrosion coupon tests on typical materials used in Joule heated melters were completed using glass compositions with high salt contents. The presence of chloride in the melts caused the most severe attack. In the metal alloys, oxidation was the predominant corrosion mechanism, while in the tested refractory material enhanced dissolution of the refractory into the glass was observed. Corrosion testing of numerous different refractory materials was performed in a plasma vitrification system using a surrogate heterogeneous debris waste. Extensive corrosion was observed in all tested materials

  11. Evaluation of the flow-accelerated corrosion downstream of an orifice. 2. Measurement of corrosion rate and evaluation on the effects of the flow field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaya, Yukinori; Utanohara, Yoichi; Nakamura, Akira; Murase, Michio

    2008-01-01

    In this study, in order to evaluate the effects of flow field on corrosion rate due to flow accelerated corrosion (FAC), a corrosion rate downstream of an orifice was measured using the electric resistance method. The diameter of the pipe is 50 mm and that of the orifice is 24.3 mm, and flow velocity of the experimental loop was set at 5m/s, and the temperature of water was controlled within ±1 at 150deg-C. There were no significant circumferential difference in measured corrosion rate, and the maximum corrosion rate was observed at 1D or 2D downstream from the orifice. The ratios of the measured corrosion rate and the calculated wall shear stress at the 1D downstream from the orifice to the value at upstream under well developed flow agreed well. (author)

  12. Hydrofluoric Acid Corrosion Study of High-Alloy Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, P.E.

    2002-01-01

    A corrosion study involving high-alloy materials and concentrated hydrofluoric acid (HF) was conducted in support of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Conversion Project (CP). The purpose of the test was to obtain a greater understanding of the corrosion rates of materials of construction currently used in the CP vs those of proposed replacement parts. Results of the study will help formulate a change-out schedule for CP parts. The CP will convert slightly less than 40 kg of 233 U from a gas (UF 6 ) sorbed on sodium fluoride pellets to a more stable oxide (U 3 O 8 ). One by-product of the conversion is the formation of concentrated HF. Six moles of highly corrosive HF are produced for each mole of UF 6 converted. This acid is particularly corrosive to most metals, elastomers, and silica-containing materials. A common impurity found in 233 U is 232 U. This impurity isotope has several daughters that make the handling of the 233 U difficult. Traps of 233 U may have radiation fields of up to 400 R at contact, a situation that makes the process of changing valves or working on the CP more challenging. It is also for this reason that a comprehensive part change-out schedule must be established. Laboratory experiments involving the repeated transfer of HF through 1/2-in. metal tubing and valves have proven difficult due to the corrosivity of the HF upon contact with all wetted parts. Each batch of HF is approximately 1.5 L of 33 wt% HF and is transferred most often as a vapor under vacuum and at temperatures of up to 250 C. Materials used in the HF side of the CP include Hastelloy C-276 and Monel 400 tubing, Haynes 230 and alloy C-276 vessels, and alloy 400 valve bodies with Inconel (alloy 600) bellows. The chemical compositions of the metals discussed in this report are displayed in Table 1. Of particular concern are the almost 30 vendor-supplied UG valves that have the potential for exposure to HF. These valves have been proven to have a finite life due to failure

  13. Hydrofluoric Acid Corrosion Study of High-Alloy Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne, P.E.

    2002-09-11

    A corrosion study involving high-alloy materials and concentrated hydrofluoric acid (HF) was conducted in support of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Conversion Project (CP). The purpose of the test was to obtain a greater understanding of the corrosion rates of materials of construction currently used in the CP vs those of proposed replacement parts. Results of the study will help formulate a change-out schedule for CP parts. The CP will convert slightly less than 40 kg of {sup 233}U from a gas (UF{sub 6}) sorbed on sodium fluoride pellets to a more stable oxide (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}). One by-product of the conversion is the formation of concentrated HF. Six moles of highly corrosive HF are produced for each mole of UF{sub 6} converted. This acid is particularly corrosive to most metals, elastomers, and silica-containing materials. A common impurity found in {sup 233}U is {sup 232}U. This impurity isotope has several daughters that make the handling of the {sup 233}U difficult. Traps of {sup 233}U may have radiation fields of up to 400 R at contact, a situation that makes the process of changing valves or working on the CP more challenging. It is also for this reason that a comprehensive part change-out schedule must be established. Laboratory experiments involving the repeated transfer of HF through 1/2-in. metal tubing and valves have proven difficult due to the corrosivity of the HF upon contact with all wetted parts. Each batch of HF is approximately 1.5 L of 33 wt% HF and is transferred most often as a vapor under vacuum and at temperatures of up to 250 C. Materials used in the HF side of the CP include Hastelloy C-276 and Monel 400 tubing, Haynes 230 and alloy C-276 vessels, and alloy 400 valve bodies with Inconel (alloy 600) bellows. The chemical compositions of the metals discussed in this report are displayed in Table 1. Of particular concern are the almost 30 vendor-supplied UG valves that have the potential for exposure to HF. These valves have been

  14. Studies of Corrosion Resistant Materials Being Considered for High-Level Nuclear Waste Containment in Yucca Mountain Relevant Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCright, R.D.; Ilevbare, G.; Estill, J.; Rebak, R.

    2001-01-01

    Containment of spent nuclear fuel and vitrified forms of high level nuclear waste require use of materials that are highly corrosion resistant to all of the anticipated environmental scenarios that can occur in a geological repository. Ni-Cr-Mo Alloy 22 (UNS N60622) is proposed for the corrosion resistant outer barrier of a two-layer waste package container at the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain. A range of water compositions that may contact the outer barrier is under consideration, and a testing program is underway to characterize the forms of corrosion and to quantify the corrosion rates. Results from the testing support models for long term prediction of the performance of the container. Results obtained to date indicate a very low general corrosion rate for Alloy 22 and very high resistance to all forms of localized and environmentally assisted cracking in environments tested to date

  15. Study on applicability of highly corrosion-resistant amorphous coating techniques to components of reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebata, Makoto; Okuyama, Gen; Chiba, Shigeru; Matsunaga, Tsunebumi

    1991-01-01

    In view of the growing need for prolongation of lives of reprocessing plant installations, we recently investigated the applicability of highly corrosion-resistant amorphous coating techniques to such plant components as to be subjected to a badly corrosive environment created by high temperatures, boiling nitric acid (HNO 3 ), etc. As the result, giving a preference to the Ta-based amorphous alloys exhibiting high corrosion-resistance in HNO 3 solutions, we made specimens of stainless steel plates coated with the above amorphous alloys through the sputtering process thereof. To our satisfaction, these specimens successfully passed various HNO 3 corrosion tests as described later on. Ta-based amorphous films give cathodic protection to 310 Nb stainless steel plates, and that with extremely low corrosion rates of themselves as protecting agents. For these reasons, we are confident that there will be no practical problems at all, in case we adopt stainless steel plates partially coated with such amorphous alloys for use in a nitric-acid environment. In this paper, we explain the comparative tests for various amorphous alloys with different compositions, referring also to the thus-selected Ta-based amorphous alloy along with several kinds of corrosion tests specially arranged for the same alloy. (author)

  16. Effectiveness of Ti-micro alloying in relation to cooling rate on corrosion of AZ91 Mg alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candan, S.; Celik, M.; Candan, E.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, micro Ti-alloyed AZ91 Mg alloys (AZ91 + 0.5wt.%Ti) have been investigated in order to clarify effectiveness of micro alloying and/or cooling rate on their corrosion properties. Molten alloys were solidified under various cooling rates by using four stage step mold. The microstructural investigations were carried out by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Corrosion behaviors of the alloys were evaluated by means of immersion and electrochemical polarization tests in 3.5% NaCl solution. Results showed that the Mg 17 Al 12 (β) intermetallic phase in the microstructure of AZ91 Mg alloy formed as a net-like structure. The Ti addition has reduced the distribution and continuity of β intermetallic phase and its morphology has emerged as fully divorced eutectic. Compared to AZ91 alloy, the effect of the cooling rate in Ti-added alloy on the grain size was less pronounced. When AZ91 and its Ti-added alloys were compared under the same cooling conditions, the Ti addition showed notably high corrosion resistance. Electrochemical test results showed that while I corr values of AZ91 decrease with the increase in the cooling rate, the effect of the cooling rate on I corr values was much lower in the Ti-added alloy. The corrosion resistance of AZ91 Mg alloy was sensitive towards the cooling rates while Ti-added alloy was not affected much from the cooling conditions. - Highlights: • Effect the cooling rate on grain size was less pronounced in the Ti-added alloy. • The morphology of the β phase transformed into fully divorced eutectics. • Ti addition exhibited significantly higher corrosion resistance. • Ti micro alloying is more effective than faster cooling of the alloy on corrosion.

  17. Pre-oxidation and its effect on reducing high-temperature corrosion of superheater tubes during biomass firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Kvisgaard, M.; Montgomery, Melanie

    2017-01-01

    Superheater tubes in biomass-fired power plants experience high corrosion rates due to condensation of corrosive alkali chloride-rich deposits. To explore the possibility of reducing the corrosion attack by the formation of an initial protective oxide layer, the corrosion resistance of pre......-oxidised Al and Ti-containing alloys (Kanthal APM and Nimonic 80A, respectively) was investigated under laboratory conditions mimicking biomass firing. The alloys were pre-oxidised at 900°C for 1 week. Afterwards, pre-oxidised samples, and virgin non-pre-oxidised samples as reference, were coated...... with a synthetic deposit of KCl and exposed at 560°C for 1 week to a gas mixture typical of biomass firing. Results show that pre-oxidation could hinder the corrosion attack; however, the relative success was different for the two alloys. While corrosion attack was observed on the pre-oxidised Kanthal APM, the pre...

  18. Corrosion behaviour of construction materials for high temperature water electrolysers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikiforov, A.; Petruchina, I.; Christensen, E.; Bjerrum, N.J.; Tomas-Garcya, A.L. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Dept. of Chemistry, Materials Science Group

    2010-07-01

    This presentation reported on a study in which the feasibility of using different corrosion resistant stainless steels as a possible metallic bipolar plate and construction material was evaluated in terms of corrosion resistance under conditions corresponding to the conditions in high temperature proton exchange membrane (PEM) water electrolysers (HTPEMWE). PEM water electrolysis technology has been touted as an effective alternative to more conventional alkaline water electrolysis. Although the energy efficiency of this technology can be increased considerably at temperatures above 100 degrees C, this increases the demands to all the used materials with respect to corrosion stability and thermal stability. In this study, Ni-based alloys as well as titanium and tantalum samples were exposed to anodic polarization in 85 per cent phosphoric acid electrolyte solution. Tests were performed at 80 and 120 degrees C to determine the dependence of corrosion speed and working temperature. Platinum and gold plates were also tested for a comparative evaluation. Steady-state voltammetry was used along with scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Titanium showed the poorest corrosion resistance, while Ni-based alloys showed the highest corrosion resistance, with Inconel R 625 being the most promising alloy for the bipolar plate of an HTPEMWE. 3 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  19. Nanoscale coatings for erosion and corrosion protection of copper microchannel coolers for high powered laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Matthew; Fan, Angie; Desai, Tapan G.

    2014-03-01

    High powered laser diodes are used in a wide variety of applications ranging from telecommunications to industrial applications. Copper microchannel coolers (MCCs) utilizing high velocity, de-ionized water coolant are used to maintain diode temperatures in the recommended range to produce stable optical power output and control output wavelength. However, aggressive erosion and corrosion attack from the coolant limits the lifetime of the cooler to only 6 months of operation. Currently, gold plating is the industry standard for corrosion and erosion protection in MCCs. However, this technique cannot perform a pin-hole free coating and furthermore cannot uniformly cover the complex geometries of current MCCs involving small diameter primary and secondary channels. Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc., presents a corrosion and erosion resistant coating (ANCERTM) applied by a vapor phase deposition process for enhanced protection of MCCs. To optimize the coating formation and thickness, coated copper samples were tested in 0.125% NaCl solution and high purity de-ionized (DIW) flow loop. The effects of DIW flow rates and qualities on erosion and corrosion of the ANCERTM coated samples were evaluated in long-term erosion and corrosion testing. The robustness of the coating was also evaluated in thermal cycles between 30°C - 75°C. After 1000 hours flow testing and 30 thermal cycles, the ANCERTM coated copper MCCs showed a corrosion rate 100 times lower than the gold plated ones and furthermore were barely affected by flow rates or temperatures thus demonstrating superior corrosion and erosion protection and long term reliability.

  20. Determination of the corrosion rate of zinc by measuring the polarization resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeschenbleck, B.; Koenig, W.

    1982-01-01

    Zinc is an important common metal. It should be noticeably attacked just by water as a result of its basic character. However, this is not the case, firstly because it tends to form protective layers and furthermore pure zinc has a high hydrogen overpressure. Zinc is often used as cathodic protection of iron. In order to assess the protective effect, the corrosion rate depending on the pH-value is important. A report is given here on the problems involved in determining these values. (orig./RW) [de

  1. Effect of water chemistry on corrosion of stainless steel and deposition of corrosion products in high temperature pressurised water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, Jonathan; Cooper, Christopher; Ponton, Clive; Connolly, Brian; Banks, Andrew

    2012-09-01

    In any water-cooled nuclear reactor, the corrosion of the structural materials in contact with the coolant and the deposition of the resulting oxidised species has long been an operational concern within the power generation industry. Corrosion of the structural materials at all points in the reactor leads to low concentrations of oxidised metal species in the coolant water. The oxidised metal species can subsequently be deposited out as CRUD deposits at various points around the reactor's primary and secondary loops. The deposition of soluble oxidised material at any location in the reactor cooling system is undesirable due to several effects; deposits have a porous structure, capable of incorporating radiologically active material (forming out of core radiation fields) and concentrating aggressively corrosive chemicals, which exacerbate environmental degradation of structural and fuel-cladding materials. Deposits on heat transfer surfaces also limit efficiency of the system as a whole. The work in this programme is an attempt to determine and understand the fundamental corrosion and deposition behaviour under controlled, simulated reactor conditions. The rates of corrosion of structural materials within pressurised water reactors are heavily dependent on the condition of the exposed surface. The effect of mechanical grinding and of electropolishing on the corrosion rate and structure of the resultant oxide film formed on grade 316L stainless steel exposed to high purity water, modified to pH 9.5 and 10.5 at temperatures between 200 and 300 deg. C and pressures of up to 100 bar will be investigated. The corrosion of stainless steel in water via electrochemical oxidation leads to the formation of surface iron, nickel and chromium based spinels. Low concentrations of these spinels can be found dissolved in the coolant water. The solubility of magnetite, stainless steels' major corrosion product, in high purity water will be studied at pH 9.5 to 10.5 at

  2. Experimental study on stress corrosion crack propagation rate of FV520B in carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ming; Li, Jianfeng; Chen, Songying; Qu, Yanpeng

    FV520B steel is a kind of precipitation hardening Martensitic stainless steel, it has high-strength, good plasticity and good corrosion resistance. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is one of the main corrosion failure mode for FV520B in industrial transportation of natural gas operation. For a better understanding the effect on SCC of FV520B, the improved wedge opening loading (WOL) specimens and constant displacement loading methods were employed in experimental research in carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide solution. The test results showed that the crack propagation rate is 1.941 × 10-7-5.748 × 10-7 mm/s, the stress intensity factor KISCC is not more than 36.83 MPa √{ m } . The rate increases with the increasing of the crack opening displacement. Under the condition of different initial loading, KISCC generally shows a decreasing tendency with the increase in H2S concentration, and the crack propagation rate showed an increasing trend substantially. For the enrichment of sulfur ion in the crack tip induced the generation of pitting corrosion, promoting the surrounding metal formed the corrosion micro batteries, the pit defects gradually extended and connected with the adjacent pit to form a small crack, leading to further propagation till cracking happened. Fracture microscopic morphology displayed typical brittle fracture phenomena, accompanying with trans-granular cracking, river shape and sector, many second cracks on the fracture surface.

  3. Analysis of the corrosion of carbon steels in simulated salt repository brines and acid chloride solutions at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diercks, D.R.; Kassner, T.F.

    1988-04-01

    An analysis of literature data on the corrosion of carbon steels in anoxic brines and acid chloride solutions was performed, and the results were used to assess the expected life of high-level nuclear waste package containers in a salt repository environment. The corrosion rate of carbon steels in moderately acidic aqueous chloride environments obeys an Arrhenius dependence on temperature and a (pH 2 ) -1/2 dependence on hydrogen partial pressure. The cathodic reduction of water to produce hydrogen is the rate-controlling step in the corrosion process. An expression for the corrosion rate incorporating these two dependencies was used to estimate the corrosion life of several proposed waste package configurations. 42 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Experimental Investigation into Corrosion Effect on Mechanical Properties of High Strength Steel Bars under Dynamic Loadings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The tensile behaviors of corroded steel bars are important in the capacity evaluation of corroded reinforced concrete structures. The present paper studies the mechanical behavior of the corroded high strength reinforcing steel bars under static and dynamic loading. High strength reinforcing steel bars were corroded by using accelerated corrosion methods and the tensile tests were carried out under different strain rates. The results showed that the mechanical properties of corroded high strength steel bars were strain rate dependent, and the strain rate effect decreased with the increase of corrosion degree. The decreased nominal yield and ultimate strengths were mainly caused by the reduction of cross-sectional areas, and the decreased ultimate deformation and the shortened yield plateau resulted from the intensified stress concentration at the nonuniform reduction. Based on the test results, reduction factors were proposed to relate the tensile behaviors with the corrosion degree and strain rate for corroded bars. A modified Johnson-Cook strength model of corroded high strength steel bars under dynamic loading was proposed by taking into account the influence of corrosion degree. Comparison between the model and test results showed that proposed model properly describes the dynamic response of the corroded high strength rebars.

  5. Materials and coatings to resist high temperature oxidation and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Object of the given papers are the oxidation and corrosion behaviour of several materials (such as stainless steels, iron-, or nickel-, or cobalt-base alloys, Si-based ceramics) used at high temperatures and various investigations on high-temperature protective coatings. (IHoe) [de

  6. MODELING THE CORROSION OF HIGH-LEVEL WASTE CONTAINERS CAM-CRM INTERFACE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JOSEPH C. FARMER, PETER J. BEDROSSIAN, R. DANIEL MCCRIGHT

    1998-01-01

    A key component of the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) being designed for containment of spent-fuel and high-level waste at the proposed geological repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada is a two-layer canister. In this particular design, the inner barrier is made of a corrosion resistant material (CRM) such as Alloy 625 or C-22, while the outer barrier is made of a corrosion-allowance material (CAM) such as carbon steel or Monel400. Initially, the containers will be hot and dry due to the heat generated by radioactive decay. However, the temperature will eventually drop to levels where both humid air and aqueous phase corrosion will be possible. As the outer barrier is penetrated, uniform corrosion of the CRM will be possible in exfoliated areas. The possibility for crevice formation between the CAM and CRM will also exist. In the case of either Alloy 625 or C-22, a crevice will have to form before significant penetration of the CRM can occur. Crevice corrosion of the CRMs has been well documented. Lillard and Scully have induced crevice corrosion in Alloy 625 during exposure to artificial sea water. Jones and Wilde have prepared simulated crevice solutions of FeCl 2 , NiCl 2 and CrCl 3 , and measured substantial pH suppression. Asphahani measured the dissolution rates of Alloys 625 and C-22 in such artificial crevice solutions at various temperatures. Others have observed no significant localized attack in less severe environments

  7. Corrosion of carbon steel in saturated high-level waste salt solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiersma, B.J.; Parish, W.R.

    1997-01-01

    High level waste stored as crystallized salts is to be removed from carbon steel tanks by water dissolution. Dissolution of the saltcake must be performed in a manner which will not impact the integrity of the tank. Corrosion testing was performed to determine the amount of corrosion inhibitor that must be added to the dissolution water in order to ensure that the salt solution formed would not induce corrosion degradation of the tank materials. The corrosion testing performed included controlled potential slow strain rate, coupon immersion, and potentiodynamic polarization tests. These tests were utilized to investigate the susceptibility of the cooling coil material to stress corrosion cracking in the anticipated environments. No evidence of SCC was observed in any of the tests. Based on these results, the recommended corrosion requirements were that the temperature of the salt solution be less than 50 degrees C and that the minimum hydroxide concentration be 0.4 molar. It was also recommended that the hydroxide concentration not stay below 0.4 molar for longer than 45 days

  8. Effect of Chromium on Corrosion Behavior of P110 Steels in CO2-H2S Environment with High Pressure and High Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianbo; Sun, Chong; Lin, Xueqiang; Cheng, Xiangkun; Liu, Huifeng

    2016-01-01

    The novel Cr-containing low alloy steels have exhibited good corrosion resistance in CO2 environment, mainly owing to the formation of Cr-enriched corrosion film. In order to evaluate whether it is applicable to the CO2 and H2S coexistence conditions, the corrosion behavior of low-chromium steels in CO2-H2S environment with high pressure and high temperature was investigated using weight loss measurement and surface characterization. The results showed that P110 steel suffered localized corrosion and both 3Cr-P110 and 5Cr-P110 steels exhibited general corrosion. However, the corrosion rate of 5Cr-P110 was the highest among them. The corrosion process of the steels was simultaneously governed by CO2 and H2S. The outer scales on the three steels mainly consisted of FeS1−x crystals, whereas the inner scales on Cr-containing steels comprised of amorphous FeS1−x, Cr(OH)3 and FeCO3, in contrast with the amorphous FeS1−x and FeCO3 mixture film of P110 steel. The more chromium the steel contains, the more chromium compounds the corrosion products contain. The addition of chromium in steels increases the uniformity of the Cr-enriched corrosion scales, eliminates the localized corrosion, but cannot decrease the general corrosion rates. The formation of FeS1−x may interfere with Cr-enriched corrosion scales and lowering the corrosion performance of 3Cr-P110 and 5Cr-P110 steels. PMID:28773328

  9. Effect of Chromium on Corrosion Behavior of P110 Steels in CO2-H2S Environment with High Pressure and High Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbo Sun

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The novel Cr-containing low alloy steels have exhibited good corrosion resistance in CO2 environment, mainly owing to the formation of Cr-enriched corrosion film. In order to evaluate whether it is applicable to the CO2 and H2S coexistence conditions, the corrosion behavior of low-chromium steels in CO2-H2S environment with high pressure and high temperature was investigated using weight loss measurement and surface characterization. The results showed that P110 steel suffered localized corrosion and both 3Cr-P110 and 5Cr-P110 steels exhibited general corrosion. However, the corrosion rate of 5Cr-P110 was the highest among them. The corrosion process of the steels was simultaneously governed by CO2 and H2S. The outer scales on the three steels mainly consisted of FeS1−x crystals, whereas the inner scales on Cr-containing steels comprised of amorphous FeS1−x, Cr(OH3 and FeCO3, in contrast with the amorphous FeS1−x and FeCO3 mixture film of P110 steel. The more chromium the steel contains, the more chromium compounds the corrosion products contain. The addition of chromium in steels increases the uniformity of the Cr-enriched corrosion scales, eliminates the localized corrosion, but cannot decrease the general corrosion rates. The formation of FeS1−x may interfere with Cr-enriched corrosion scales and lowering the corrosion performance of 3Cr-P110 and 5Cr-P110 steels.

  10. Corrosion fatigue of high strength fastener materials in seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, D. G.

    1983-12-01

    Environmental effects which significantly reduce the fatigue life of metals are discussed. Corrosion fatigue is a major concern in the engineering application of high strength fasteners in marine environments. The corrosion fatigue failure of an AISI 41L4O high strength steel blade to hub attachment bolt at the MOD-OA 200 kW wind turbine generator was investigated. The reduction of fatigue strength of AISI 41L4O in marine environments and to obtain similar corrosion fatigue data for candidate replacement materials was studied. The AISI 4140, PH 13-8Mo stainless steel, alloy 718 and alloy MP-35N were tested in axial fatigue at a frequency of 20 Hz in dry air and natural seawater. The fatigue data are fitted by regression equations to allow determination of fatigue strength for a given number of cycles to failure.

  11. When can Electrochemical Techniques give Reliable Corrosion Rates on Carbon Steel in Sulfide Media?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Hemmingsen, Tor; Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo

    2005-01-01

    in combination with ferrous sulfide corrosion products cover the steel surface. Corrosion rates can be overestimated by a factor of 10 to 100 with electrochemical techniques - both by linear polarization resistance (LPR) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Oxygen entering the system accelerates......Effects of film formation on carbon steel in hydrogen sulfide media may corrupt corrosion rate monitoring by electrochemical techniques. Electrochemical data from hydrogen sulfide solutions, biological sulfide media and natural sulfide containing geothermal water have been collected and the process...... of film formation in sulfide solutions was followed by video. It can be shown that capacitative and diffusional effects due to porous reactive deposits tend to dominate the data resulting in unreliable corrosion rates measured by electrochemical techniques. The effect is strongly increased if biofilm...

  12. Reliability of Electrochemical Techniques for Determining Corrosion Rates on Carbon Steel in Sulfide Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Hemmingsen, T.; Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo

    2007-01-01

    if the biofilm in combination with ferrous sulfide corrosion products cover the steel surface. Corrosion rates can be overestimated by a factor of 10 to 100 with electrochemical techniques - both by linear polarization resistance (LPR) and electrochemicel impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Oxygen entering the system......Effects of film formation on carbon steel in hydrogen sulfide (H2S) media may corrupt corrosion rate monitoring by electrochemical techniques. Electrochemical data from H2S solutions, biological sulfide media, and natural sulfide containing geothermal water have been collected, and the process...... of film formation in sulfide solutins was followed by video. It can be shown that capacitative and diffusional effects due to porous reactive deposits tend to dominate the data, resulting in unreliable corrosion rates measured using electrochemical techniques. The effect is strongly increased...

  13. The effect of texture, heat treatment and elongation rate on stress corrosion cracking in irradiated zircaloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, K.; Stany, W.; Hellstrand, E.

    1979-03-01

    Irradiated zircaloy samples with different textures and heat treatments have been tested concerning stress corrosion. Irradiated samples of Zr-1Nb, pure Zr and beta quenched zircaloy have also been investigated. Stress-relieve annealled zircaloy is even after irradiation more sensitive to stress corrosion than recrystallized zircaloy. Zr-1Nb and beta quenched zircaloy are much more sinsitive to stress corrosion than the samples with different textures. As a rule irradiated zircaloy is sensitive to stress corrosion at stresses far below the yield point. The breaking stress decreases with the elongation rate. The extension of cracks is much faster in irradiated zircaloy than in unirradiated zircaloy. There is no simple failure criterium for irradiated zircaloy. However for a certain stress and a certain elongation rate the probability for a failure before this stress is reached with a constant elongation rate can be given. (E.R.)

  14. Corrosion resistance of stainless steels and high Ni-Cr alloys to acid fluoride wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.D.; Mackey, D.B.; Pool, K.H.; Schwenk, E.B.

    1992-04-01

    TRUEX processing of Hanford Site waste will utilize potentially corrosive acid fluoride processing solutions. Appropriate construction materials for such a processing facility need to be identified. Toward this objective, candidate stainless steels and high Ni-Cr alloys have been corrosion tested in simulated acid fluoride process solutions at 333K. The high Ni-Cr alloys exhibited corrosion rates as low as 0.14 mm/y in a solution with an HF activity of about 1.2 M, much lower than the 19 to 94 mm/y observed for austenitic stainless steels. At a lower HF activity (about 0.008 M), stainless steels display delayed passivation while high Ni-Cr alloys display essentially no reaction

  15. An Electrochemical Method to Predict Corrosion Rates in Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dafter, M. R. [Hunter Water Australia Pty Ltd, Newcastle (Australia)

    2016-10-15

    Linear polarization resistance (LPR) testing of soils has been used extensively by a number of water utilities across Australia for many years now to determine the condition of buried ferrous water mains. The LPR test itself is a relatively simple, inexpensive test that serves as a substitute for actual exhumation and physical inspection of buried water mains to determine corrosion losses. LPR testing results (and the corresponding pit depth estimates) in combination with proprietary pipe failure algorithms can provide a useful predictive tool in determining the current and future conditions of an asset{sup 1)}. A number of LPR tests have been developed on soil by various researchers over the years{sup 1)}, but few have gained widespread commercial use, partly due to the difficulty in replicating the results. This author developed an electrochemical cell that was suitable for LPR soil testing and utilized this cell to test a series of soil samples obtained through an extensive program of field exhumations. The objective of this testing was to examine the relationship between short-term electrochemical testing and long-term in-situ corrosion of buried water mains, utilizing an LPR test that could be robustly replicated. Forty-one soil samples and related corrosion data were obtained from ad hoc condition assessments of buried water mains located throughout the Hunter region of New South Wales, Australia. Each sample was subjected to the electrochemical test developed by the author, and the resulting polarization data were compared with long-term pitting data obtained from each water main. The results of this testing program enabled the author to undertake a comprehensive review of the LPR technique as it is applied to soils and to examine whether correlations can be made between LPR testing results and long-term field corrosion.

  16. FUNDAMENTAL MECHANISMS OF CORROSION OF ADVANCED LIGHT WATER REACTOR FUEL CLADDING ALLOYS AT HIGH BURNUP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lott, Randy G.

    2003-01-01

    OAK (B204) The corrosion behavior of nuclear fuel cladding is a key factor limiting the performance of nuclear fuel elements, improved cladding alloys, which resist corrosion and radiation damage, will facilitate higher burnup core designs. The objective of this project is to understand the mechanisms by which alloy composition, heat treatment and microstructure affect corrosion rate. This knowledge can be used to predict the behavior of existing alloys outside the current experience base (for example, at high burn-up) and predict the effects of changes in operation conditions on zirconium alloy behavior. Zirconium alloys corrode by the formation f a highly adherent protective oxide layer. The working hypothesis of this project is that alloy composition, microstructure and heat treatment affect corrosion rates through their effect on the protective oxide structure and ion transport properties. The experimental task in this project is to identify these differences and understand how they affect corrosion behavior. To do this, several microstructural examination techniques including transmission electron microscope (TEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and a selection of fluorescence and diffraction techniques using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) were employed

  17. High population increase rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    In addition to its economic and ethnic difficulties, the USSR faces several pressing demographic problems, including high population increase rates in several of its constituent republics. It has now become clear that although the country's rigid centralized planning succeeded in covering the basic needs of people, it did not lead to welfare growth. Since the 1970s, the Soviet economy has remained sluggish, which as led to increase in the death and birth rates. Furthermore, the ideology that held that demography could be entirely controlled by the country's political and economic system is contradicted by current Soviet reality, which shows that religion and ethnicity also play a significant role in demographic dynamics. Currently, Soviet republics fall under 2 categories--areas with high or low natural population increase rates. Republics with low rates consist of Christian populations (Armenia, Moldavia, Georgia, Byelorussia, Russia, Lithuania, Estonia, Latvia, Ukraine), while republics with high rates are Muslim (Tadzhikistan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Kirgizia, Azerbaijan Kazakhstan). The later group has natural increase rates as high as 3.3%. Although the USSR as a whole is not considered a developing country, the later group of republics fit the description of the UNFPA's priority list. Another serious demographic issue facing the USSR is its extremely high rate of abortion. This is especially true in the republics of low birth rates, where up to 60% of all pregnancies are terminated by induced abortions. Up to 1/5 of the USSR's annual health care budget is spent on clinical abortions -- money which could be better spent on the production of contraceptives. Along with the recent political and economic changes, the USSR is now eager to deal with its demographic problems.

  18. Highly corrosion resistant zirconium based alloy for reactor structural material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yoichi.

    1996-01-01

    The alloy of the present invention is a zirconium based alloy comprising tin (Sn), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and iron (Fe) in zirconium (Zr). The amount of silicon (Si) as an impurity is not more than 60ppm. It is preferred that Sn is from 0.9 to 1.5wt%, that of Cr is from 0.05 to 0.15wt%, and (Fe + Ni) is from 0.17 to 0.5wt%. If not less than 0.12wt% of Fe is added, resistance against nodular corrosion is improved. The upper limit of Fe is preferably 0.40wt% from a view point of uniform suppression for the corrosion. The nodular corrosion can be suppressed by reducing the amount of Si-rich deposition product in the zirconium based alloy. Accordingly, a highly corrosion resistant zirconium based alloy improved for the corrosion resistance of zircaloy-2 and usable for a fuel cladding tube of a BWR type reactor can be obtained. (I.N.)

  19. High temperature corrosion of separator materials for MCFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagida, Masahiro; Tanimoto, Kazumi; Kojima, Toshikatsu [Osaka National Research Institute (Japan)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    The Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) is one of promising high efficiency power generation devices with low emission. Molten carbonate used for its electrolyte plays an important role in MCFC. It separates between anode and cathode gas environment and provides ionic conductivity on MCFC operation. Stainless steel is conventionally used as separator/current collector materials in MCFC cathode environment. As corrosion of the components of MCFC caused by the electrolyte proceeds with the electrolyte consumption, the corrosion in the MCFC is related to its performance and life. To understand and inhibit the corrosion in the MCFC is important to realize MCFC power generation system. We have studied the effect of alkaline earth carbonate addition into carbonate on corrosion of type 316L stainless steel. In this paper, we describe the effect of the temperature on corrosion behavior of type 316L stainless steel with carbonate mixture, (Li{sub 0.62}K{sub 0.38}){sub 2}CO{sub 3}, under the cathode environment in out-of-cell test.

  20. Simulation of corrosion product activity in ion- exchanger of PWR under acceleration of corrosion and flow rate perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, N.M.; Mirza, S.M.; Rafique, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper computer code developed earlier by the authors (CPAIR-P) has been employed to compute corrosion product activity in PWRs for flow rate perturbations. The values of radioactivity in ion exchanger of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) under normal and flow rate perturbation conditions have been calculated. For linearly accelerating corrosion rates, activity saturates for removal rate of 600 cm/sup 3// s in primary coolant of PWR. A higher removal rate of 750 cm/sup 3// s was selected for which the saturation value is sufficiently low (0. 28 micro Ci/cm/sup 3/). Simulation results shows that the Fe/sup 59/ Na/sup 24/, Mo/sup 99/, Mn/sup 56/ reaches saturation values with in about 700 hours of reactor operation. However, Co/sup 58/ and Co/sup 60/ keep on accumulating and do not saturate with in 2000 hours of these simulation time. When flow rate is decreased by 10% of rated flow rate after 500 hours of reactor operation, a dip in activity is seen, which reaches to the value of 0.00138 micro Ci cm/sup -3/ then again it begins to rise and reaches saturation value of 0.00147 cm/sup 3//s. (author)

  1. The Effect of Low-Quantity Cr Addition on the Corrosion Behaviour of Dual-Phase High Carbon Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Handoko

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Industrial application of high carbon low alloy steel with the dual-phase structure of martensite and austenite has increased drastically in recent years. Due to its excellent compression strength and its high abrasion resistance, this grade of steel has used as a high performance cutting tool and in press machinery applications. By increasing the usage of more corrosive media in industrial practice and increasing the demand for reducing the production cost, it is crucial to understand the effect of the small addition of Cr on the corrosion behaviour of this grade of steel. In this study, this effect was investigated using Secondary Electron Microscopy (SEM and in-situ Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM in the sodium chloride solution. Also, the corrosion rate was measured using the Tafel polarisation curve. It has been found that the small addition of Cr increased the stability of retained austenite, thus improving its corrosion resistance and reducing its corrosion rate. This effect has been acquired through in-situ high resolution topography images in which the samples were submerged in a corrosive solution. It has been demonstrated that the corrosion rate was reduced when the stability of austenite enhanced.

  2. PM alloy 625M for high strength corrosion resistant applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzo, F.J.; Floreen, S.

    1997-06-01

    In applications where the combination of high strength and good corrosion resistance are required, there have been only a few alloys of choice. A new powder metallurgy alloy has been developed, PM 625M, a niobium modification of Alloy 625, as a material to fill this need. One area of particular interest is the nuclear power industry, where many problems have been encountered with bolts, springs, and guidepins. Mechanical properties and stress corrosion cracking data of PM 625M are presented in this paper

  3. Investigation of high temperature corrosion behavior on 304L austenite stainless steel in corrosive environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahri, M. I.; Othman, N. K.; Samsu, Z.; Daud, A. R. [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    In this work, 304L stainless steel samples were exposed at 700 °C for 10hrs in different corrosive environments; dry oxygen, molten salt, and molten salt + dry oxygen. The corrosion behavior of samples was analyzed using weight change measurement technique, optical microscope (OM) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) equipped with Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX). The existence phases of corroded sample were determined using X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The lowest corrosion rate was recorded in dry oxygen while the highest was in molten salt + dry oxygen environments with the value of 0.0062 mg/cm{sup 2} and −13.5225 mg/cm{sup 2} respectively. The surface morphology of sample in presence of salt mixture showed scale spallation. Oxide scales of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were the main phases developed and detected by XRD technique. Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} was not developed in every sample as protective layers but chromate-rich oxide was developed. The cross-section analysis found the oxide scales were in porous, thick and non-adherent that would not an effective barrier to prevent from further degradation of alloy. EDX analysis also showed the Cr-element was low compared to Fe-element at the oxide scale region.

  4. Importance of temperature, pH, and boric acid concentration on rates of hydrogen production from galvanized steel corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loyola, V.M.

    1982-01-01

    One of the known sources of hydrogen gas within a nuclear plant containment building during a LOCA is the high temperature corrosion of galvanized steel yielding hydrogen gas. The importance of this source of hydrogen will vary depending on the severity of the accident. In an accident which resulted in core degradation, for example, the major source of hydrogen would probably be the metal-water reaction of the zircaloy cladding, and the corrosion of galvanized steel would then become a relatively minor source of hydrogen. However, in an accident in which core degradation is avoided or limited to minor damage, the corrosion of galvanized steel, and presumably of other materials as well, would then become a major contributor to the buildup of hydrogen within containment. The purpose of this paper is to present the overall effects of temperature, pH, and boric acid concentration on the rate of hydrogen generation over a broad range of each parameter

  5. NDT method in determining the rate of corrosion applicable to risk based inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed Hairul Hasmoni; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail; Ab Razak Hamzah

    2004-01-01

    Corrosion is a major problem in oil and gas industries, refineries and chemical process plants as the equipment is often exposed to corrosive environments or elevated temperature. Important equipment need to operate safely and reliably to avoid injuries to personnel and the public, and to prevent loss time and cost incurred due to loss of production and shutdown. The paper assess the approach in evaluating the technique of non-destructive testing (NDT) using Ultrasonic Testing (UT) in determining the rate of corrosion and remaining life of equipment applicable to Risk Based Inspection (RBI). Methods in determining the corrosion rate are presented using analytical method. Examples and data from MINT chiller water pipeline are presented to illustrate the application of these methods. (Author)

  6. A High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal - The Effects of Composition, Structure and Environment on Corrosion Resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, J.; Haslam, J.; Day, D.; Lian, T.; Saw, C.; Hailey, P.; Choi, J.S.; Rebak, R.; Yang, N.; Bayles, R.; Aprigliano, L.; Payer, J.; Perepezko, J.; Hildal, K.; Lavernia, E.; Ajdelsztajn, L.; Branagan, D.; Beardsley, B.

    2007-01-01

    The passive film stability of several Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found to be comparable to that of high-performance Ni-based alloys, and superior to that of stainless steels, based on electrochemical measurements of the passive film breakdown potential and general corrosion rates. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provide corrosion resistance; boron (B) enables glass formation; and rare earths such as yttrium (Y) lower critical cooling rate (CCR). The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal also makes it an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications, as discussed in companion publications. Corrosion data for SAM2X5 (Fe 49.7 Cr 17.7 Mn 1.9 Mo 7.4 W 1.6 B 15.2 C 3.8 Si 2.4 ) is discussed here. (authors)

  7. Corrosion behavior of low energy, high temperature nitrogen ion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Corrosion behavior of low energy, high temperature nitrogen ion-implanted AISI 304 stainless steel. M GHORANNEVISS1, A SHOKOUHY1,∗, M M LARIJANI1,2,. S H HAJI HOSSEINI 1, M YARI1, A ANVARI4, M GHOLIPUR SHAHRAKI1,3,. A H SARI1 and M R HANTEHZADEH1. 1Plasma Physics Research Center, Science ...

  8. Corrosion properties of plasma deposited high-alloy steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Voleník, Karel; Pražák, M.; Kalabisová, E.; Kreislová, K.; Neufuss, Karel

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 47, - (2002), s. 243-254 ISSN 0001-7043 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/99/0298 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : plasma deposits, high-alloy steel, polarization curves, corrosion test Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  9. Experimental study on stress corrosion crack propagation rate of FV520B in carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Qin

    Full Text Available FV520B steel is a kind of precipitation hardening Martensitic stainless steel, it has high-strength, good plasticity and good corrosion resistance. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC is one of the main corrosion failure mode for FV520B in industrial transportation of natural gas operation. For a better understanding the effect on SCC of FV520B, the improved wedge opening loading (WOL specimens and constant displacement loading methods were employed in experimental research in carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide solution. The test results showed that the crack propagation rate is 1.941 × 10−7–5.748 × 10−7 mm/s, the stress intensity factor KISCC is not more than 36.83 MPa m. The rate increases with the increasing of the crack opening displacement. Under the condition of different initial loading, KISCC generally shows a decreasing tendency with the increase in H2S concentration, and the crack propagation rate showed an increasing trend substantially. For the enrichment of sulfur ion in the crack tip induced the generation of pitting corrosion, promoting the surrounding metal formed the corrosion micro batteries, the pit defects gradually extended and connected with the adjacent pit to form a small crack, leading to further propagation till cracking happened. Fracture microscopic morphology displayed typical brittle fracture phenomena, accompanying with trans-granular cracking, river shape and sector, many second cracks on the fracture surface. Keywords: FV520B, Wedge opening loading specimen, Stress corrosion cracking, Hydrogen sulfide

  10. Electrochemical Corrosion Studies for Modeling Metallic Waste Form Release Rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poineau, Frederic; Tamalis, Dimitri

    2016-01-01

    The isotope 99 Tc is an important fission product generated from nuclear power production. Because of its long half-life (t 1/2 = 2.13 ∙ 105 years) and beta-radiotoxicity (β - = 292 keV), it is a major concern in the long-term management of spent nuclear fuel. In the spent nuclear fuel, Tc is present as an alloy with Mo, Ru, Rh, and Pd called the epsilon-phase, the relative amount of which increases with fuel burn-up. In some separation schemes for spent nuclear fuel, Tc would be separated from the spent fuel and disposed of in a durable waste form. Technetium waste forms under consideration include metallic alloys, oxide ceramics and borosilicate glass. In the development of a metallic waste form, after separation from the spent fuel, Tc would be converted to the metal, incorporated into an alloy and the resulting waste form stored in a repository. Metallic alloys under consideration include Tc–Zr alloys, Tc–stainless steel alloys and Tc–Inconel alloys (Inconel is an alloy of Ni, Cr and iron which is resistant to corrosion). To predict the long-term behavior of the metallic Tc waste form, understanding the corrosion properties of Tc metal and Tc alloys in various chemical environments is needed, but efforts to model the behavior of Tc metallic alloys are limited. One parameter that should also be considered in predicting the long-term behavior of the Tc waste form is the ingrowth of stable Ru that occurs from the radioactive decay of 99 Tc ( 99 Tc → 99 Ru + β - ). After a geological period of time, significant amounts of Ru will be present in the Tc and may affect its corrosion properties. Studying the effect of Ru on the corrosion behavior of Tc is also of importance. In this context, we studied the electrochemical behavior of Tc metal, Tc-Ni alloys (to model Tc-Inconel alloy) and Tc-Ru alloys in acidic media. The study of Tc-U alloys has also been performed in order to better understand the nature of Tc in metallic spent fuel. Computational modeling

  11. Electrochemical Corrosion Studies for Modeling Metallic Waste Form Release Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poineau, Frederic [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Tamalis, Dimitri [Florida Memorial Univ., Miami Gardens, FL (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The isotope 99Tc is an important fission product generated from nuclear power production. Because of its long half-life (t1/2 = 2.13 ∙ 105 years) and beta-radiotoxicity (β⁻ = 292 keV), it is a major concern in the long-term management of spent nuclear fuel. In the spent nuclear fuel, Tc is present as an alloy with Mo, Ru, Rh, and Pd called the epsilon-phase, the relative amount of which increases with fuel burn-up. In some separation schemes for spent nuclear fuel, Tc would be separated from the spent fuel and disposed of in a durable waste form. Technetium waste forms under consideration include metallic alloys, oxide ceramics and borosilicate glass. In the development of a metallic waste form, after separation from the spent fuel, Tc would be converted to the metal, incorporated into an alloy and the resulting waste form stored in a repository. Metallic alloys under consideration include Tc–Zr alloys, Tc–stainless steel alloys and Tc–Inconel alloys (Inconel is an alloy of Ni, Cr and iron which is resistant to corrosion). To predict the long-term behavior of the metallic Tc waste form, understanding the corrosion properties of Tc metal and Tc alloys in various chemical environments is needed, but efforts to model the behavior of Tc metallic alloys are limited. One parameter that should also be considered in predicting the long-term behavior of the Tc waste form is the ingrowth of stable Ru that occurs from the radioactive decay of 99Tc (99Tc → 99Ru + β⁻). After a geological period of time, significant amounts of Ru will be present in the Tc and may affect its corrosion properties. Studying the effect of Ru on the corrosion behavior of Tc is also of importance. In this context, we studied the electrochemical behavior of Tc metal, Tc-Ni alloys (to model Tc-Inconel alloy) and Tc-Ru alloys in acidic media. The study of Tc-U alloys has also been performed in order to better understand the

  12. Chromium steel corrosion rates and mechanisms in aqueous nickel chloride at 300C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrest, J.E.; Broomfield, J.P.; Mitra, P.K.

    1985-01-01

    Rapid corrosion of PWR steam generator carbon steel support structures and consequential denting of steam generator tubes led to investigation of alternative support designs and materials. In recent designs of steam generators the carbon steel drilled hole tube support plate has been replaced by one of quatrefoil or trefoil shape to minimize the contact area. These plates are now made of more corrosion resistant chromium steel (approx. 12%Cr) to ensure that they are less vulnerable to attack in the event of adverse boiler water chemistry. This study was initiated to examine the corrosion behavior of a range of chromium steels in the acid chloride environments characteristic of tube/support plate crevices under adverse boiler water conditions. Objectives of the study were to: 1) determine the relative susceptibility of candidate tube support plate steels to acid chloride corrosion; 2) investigate the corrosion product morphology and its relationship to the corrosion mechanism; 3) determine the effect of environment aggressiveness on 12%Cr (A405) steel corrosion rates and mechanisms; and 4) investigate the effect of restraint stress/environment on denting potential of A405. Experimental method and results are discussed

  13. Electrochemical corrosion potential and noise measurement in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, Clinton; Chen, Yaw-Ming; Chu, Fang; Huang, Chia-Shen

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) is one of the most important methods in boiling water reactor(BWR) system to mitigate and prevent stress corrosion cracking (SCC) problems of stainless steel components. Currently, the effectiveness of HWC in each BWR is mainly evaluated by the measurement of electrochemical corrosion potentials (ECP) and on-line monitoring of SCC behaviors of stainless steels. The objective of this work was to evaluate the characteristics and performance of commercially available high temperature reference electrodes. In addition, SCC monitoring technique based on electrochemical noise analysis (ECN) was also tested to examine its crack detection capability. The experimental work on electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) measurements reveals that high temperature external Ag/AgCl reference electrode of highly dilute KCl electrolyte can adequately function in both NWC and HWC environments. The high dilution external Ag/AgCl electrode can work in conjunction with internal Ag/AgCl reference electrode, and Pt electrode to ensure the ECP measurement reliability. In simulated BWR environment, the electrochemical noise tests of SCC were carried out with both actively and passively loaded specimens of type 304 stainless steel with various electrode arrangements. From the coupling current and corrosion potential behaviors of the passive loading tests during immersion test, it is difficult to interpret the general state of stress corrosion cracking based on the analytical results of overall current and potential variations, local pulse patterns, statistical characteristics, or power spectral density of electrochemical noise signals. However, more positive SCC indication was observed in the power spectral density analysis. For aqueous environments of high solution impedance, successful application of electrochemical noise technique for SCC monitoring may require further improvement in specimen designs and analytical methods to enhance detection sensitivity

  14. Studies of the corrosion and cracking behavior of steels in high temperature water by electrochemical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Y.F.; Bullerwell, J.; Steward, F.R.

    2003-01-01

    Electrochemical methods were used to study the corrosion and cracking behavior of five Fe-Cr alloy steels and 304L stainless steel in high temperature water. A layer of magnetite film forms on the metal surface, which decreases the corrosion rate in high temperature water. Passivity can be achieved on A-106 B carbon steel with a small content of chromium, which cannot be passivated at room temperature. The formation rate and the stability of the passive film (magnetite film) increased with increasing Cr-content in the steels. A mechanistic model was developed to simulate the corrosion and cracking processes of steels in high temperature water. The crack growth rate on steels was calculated from the maximum current of the repassivation current curves according to the slip-oxidation model. The highest crack growth rate was found for 304L stainless steel in high temperature water. Of the four Fe-Cr alloys, the crack growth rate was lower on 0.236% Cr- and 0.33% Cr-steels than on 0.406% Cr-steel and 2.5% Cr-1% Mo steel. The crack growth rate on 0.33% Cr-steel was the smallest over the tested potential range. A higher temperature of the electrolyte led to a higher rate of electrochemical dissolution of steel and a higher susceptibility of steel to cracking, as shown by the positive increase of the electrochemical potential. An increase in Cr-content in the steel is predicted to reduce the corrosion rate of steel at high temperatures. However, this increase in Cr-content is predicted not to reduce the susceptibility of steel to cracking at high temperatures. (author)

  15. Corrosion of metallic materials by uranium hexafluoride at high temperatures (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langlois, G.

    1963-01-01

    The corrosion of the following metals or alloys by UF 6 : nickel, monel, Inconel, gold, platinum, stainless steel, is studied in the temperature range from 300 to 1000 deg. C. The test method, designed to avoid heating the apparatus containing the corrosive fluid to a high temperature, consists in using threadlike samples heated by the Joule effect, the rest of the apparatus being maintained close to room temperature. This technique makes it possible also to determine continuously the penetration of the corrosion by measuring the electrical resistance of the sample with a double Thomson bridge. A series of rapid comparison tests shows that stainless steel, precious metals and Inconel are attacked far too rapidly to be used above 500 deg. C; only monel and especially nickel appear capable of resisting at high temperatures. The detailed examination of the behaviour of nickel shows that the metallic fluoride is volatilized and that this influences the corrosion rate. It shows also the existence of a temperature zone situated between 550 and 700 deg. C in which occurs A strong intergranular corrosion the cause of which appears to be the presence of impurities in the metal. (author) [fr

  16. Corrosion monitoring using high-frequency guided waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromme, P.

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion can develop due to adverse environmental conditions during the life cycle of a range of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the reduction of the strength and thus degradation of the structural integrity. The monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic wedge transducers with single sided access to the structure, guided wave modes were selectively generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. The wave propagation and interference of the different guided wave modes depends on the thickness of the structure. Laboratory experiments were conducted for wall thickness reduction due to milling of the steel structure. From the measured signal changes due to the wave mode interference the reduced wall thickness was monitored. Good agreement with theoretical predictions was achieved. The high frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  17. Corrosion behaviour of high temperature alloys in impure helium environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindo, Masami; Quadakkers, W.J.; Schuster, H.

    1986-01-01

    Corrosion tests with Ni-base high temperature alloys were carried out at 900 and 950 0 C in simulated high temperature reactor helium environments. It is shown that the carburization and decarburization behaviour is strongly affected by the Cr and Ti(Al) contents of the alloys. In carburizing environments, additions of Ti, alone or in combination with Al, significantly improve the carburization resistance. In oxidizing environment, the alloys with high Cr and Al(Ti) contents are the most resistant against decarburization. In this environment alloys with additions of Ti and Al show poor oxidation resistance. The experimental results obtained are compared with a recently developed theory describing corrosion of high temperature alloys in high temperature reactor helium environments. (orig.)

  18. The corrosion rate and the hydrogen absorption behavior of titanium under reducing condition-III. Research document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, H.; Taniguchi, N.; Kawakami, S.

    2005-03-01

    Titanium is one of the candidate materials for overpacks as a high corrosion resistance metal. At the initial stage of repository, oxidizing condition will be given around the overpack because oxygen will be brought from the ground. The oxygen will be consumed by the reaction with impurities in buffer material or corrosion of overpack, and reducing condition will be achieved around the overpack. With the changing of redox condition, the water reduction becomes to dominate the cathodic reaction accompanying hydrogen generation. Crevice corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement are main causes of the damage of long term integrity of titanium overpack. However, it is not known about the corrosion resistance and hydrogen absorption behavior of titanium under reduction condition. In this study, the completely sealed ampoule test and the immersion test of titanium in aqueous solution and bentonite was carried out. In order to obtain reliable data about the hydrogen generation rate and the ratio of hydrogen absorption in titanium. From the result of 3 years immersion tests, corrosion rate of titanium were estimated to be in the order of 10 -2 ∼10 -1 μm/y in the aqueous solution, and 10 -3 ∼10 -2 μm/y in bentonite. This value is almost the same as the last report. Almost all the hydrogen generated by corrosion was absorbed in titanium in the immersion tests in completely sealed ampoule. In the examination that changed each parameter, it was suggested that the amount of the hydrogen absorption become 2∼3 times in 1M HCO 3- and pH13. (author)

  19. The importance of the strain rate and creep on the stress corrosion cracking mechanisms and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, Omar F.; Mattar Neto, Miguel; Schvartzman, Monica M.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is a nuclear, power, petrochemical, and other industries equipment and components (like pressure vessels, nozzles, tubes, accessories) life degradation mode, involving fragile fracture. The stress corrosion cracking failures can produce serious accidents, and incidents which can put on risk the safety, reliability, and efficiency of many plants. These failures are of very complex prediction. The stress corrosion cracking mechanisms are based on three kinds of factors: microstructural, mechanical and environmental. Concerning the mechanical factors, various authors prefer to consider the crack tip strain rate rather than stress, as a decisive factor which contributes to the process: this parameter is directly influenced by the creep strain rate of the material. Based on two KAPL-Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory experimental studies in SSRT (slow strain rate test) and CL (constant load) test, for prediction of primary water stress corrosion cracking in nickel based alloys, it has done a data compilation of the film rupture mechanism parameters, for modeling PWSCC of Alloy 600 and discussed the importance of the strain rate and the creep on the stress corrosion cracking mechanisms and models. As derived from this study, a simple theoretical model is proposed, and it is showed that the crack growth rate estimated with Brazilian tests results with Alloy 600 in SSRT, are according with the KAPL ones and other published literature. (author)

  20. Corrosion rate of construction materials in hot phosphoric acid with the contribution of anodic polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouril, M. [Institute of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Christensen, E. [Technical University of Denmark, Kemitorvet, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Eriksen, S.; Gillesberg, B. [Tantaline A/S, Nordborgvej 81, 6430 Nordborg (Denmark)

    2012-04-15

    The paper is focused on selection of a proper material for construction elements of water electrolysers, which make use of a 85% phosphoric acid as an electrolyte at temperature of 150 C and which might be loaded with anodic polarization up to 2.5 V versus a saturated Ag/AgCl electrode (SSCE). Several grades of stainless steels were tested as well as tantalum, niobium, titanium, nickel alloys and silicon carbide. The corrosion rate was evaluated by means of mass loss at free corrosion potential as well as under various levels of polarization. The only corrosion resistant material in 85% phosphoric acid at 150 C and at polarization of 2.5 V/SSCE is tantalum. In that case, even a gentle cathodic polarization is harmful in such an acidic environment. Hydrogen reduction leads to tantalum hydride formation, to loss of mechanical properties and to complete disintegration of the metal. Contrary to tantalum, titanium is free of any corrosion resistance in hot phosphoric acid. Its corrosion rate ranges from tens of millimetres to metres per year depending on temperature of the acid. Alloy bonded tantalum coating was recognized as an effective corrosion protection for both titanium and stainless steel. Its serviceability might be limited by slow dissolution of tantalum that is in order of units of mm/year. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Corrosion aspects of high-level waste disposal in salt domes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roerbo, K.

    1979-12-01

    In the ELSAM/ELKRAT waste management project it is planned that the high-level waste is glassified, encapsuled in canisters and finally deposited in a deep hole drilled in a salt dome. In the present report corrosion aspects of the canisters after deposition are discussed. The chemical environment will probably be a limited amount of brine coming from brine inclusions in the surrounding salt and moving up against the temperature gradient, the temperature at the canister surface being in the range of 100-150degC. The possible types of corrosion and the expected corrosion rates for a number of potential canister materials (mild steel, austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, Ni-base alloys, copper, titanium and a few combinations of materials) are discussed. Mild steel (possibly combined with an inner layer of copper or titanium) might possibly be an appropriate choice of material for the canister. (author)

  2. Corrosion of steel structures in sea-bed sediment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    corrosion mechanism, measurement of metal corrosion rate, corrosion ... cables, steel rigs, pipelines and other marine facilities, is ..... make high strength steel material to crack with stress ... of SBS has yet been very limited, and selection of.

  3. Preliminary Simulation of the Corrosion Rate of Archaeological Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steefel, Carl

    2014-01-06

    In this study, we make use of a micro-continuum modeling approach (the Kinetic-Microscopic-Continuum Model or K{micro}C model) to capture the spatial distribution and identity of reaction products developing over time as a result of the archaeological glass corrosion, while also matching the time scales of alteration where possible. Since the glass blocks sat on the Mediterranean seafloor for 1800 years, the physical and chemical boundary conditions are largely constant. We focus on a fracture within the glass block identified by Verney-Carron et al. (2008) and simulate it as a 1D system, with a fixed concentration (Dirichlet) boundary corresponding to the interior of the fracture.

  4. Effect of temperature on corrosion of steels in high purity water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Takashi; Kashimura, Eiji; Ohashi, Kenya; Furutani, Yasumasa; Ohsumi, Katsumi; Aizawa, Motohiro; Matsubayashi, Hideo.

    1987-01-01

    Effect of temperature on corrosion behavior of steels was evaluated in the range of 150 - 300 deg C in high purity water containing about 200 ppb oxygen. The exposure tests were carried out in actual and simulated reactor water of BWR plants. Through X-ray diffractometry, SIMS, XPS and chemical analyses, it was clarified that the chemical composition and morphology of oxide films formed on austenitic stainless steel changed above about 250 deg C. Chromium dissolved easily through corrosion above this temperature, and the oxide films primarily consisted of spinel type oxides containing high concentration of nickel. Further, as the protectivety of oxide films increased with temperature, the corrosion rate had a peak around 250 deg C after a long exposure period. A major phase of oxide films on carbon steel was magnetite in the whole temperature range. However, as the oxide films formed at high temperatures had very compact structures, the effect of temperature on the corrosion rate was similar to that observed on stainless steel. (author)

  5. Elevated corrosion rates and hydrogen sulfide in homes with ‘Chinese Drywall’

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, Joseph G.; MacIntosh, David L.; Saltzman, Lori E.; Baker, Brian J.; Matheson, Joanna M.; Recht, Joel R.; Minegishi, Taeko; Fragala, Matt A.; Myatt, Theodore A.; Spengler, John D.; Stewart, James H.; McCarthy, John F.

    2012-01-01

    In December 2008, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) began receiving reports about odors, corrosion, and health concerns related to drywall originating from China. In response, a detailed environmental health and engineering evaluation was conducted of 41 complaint and 10 non-complaint homes in the Southeast U.S. Each home investigation included characterization of: 1) drywall composition; 2) indoor and outdoor air quality; 3) temperature, moisture, and building ventilation; and 4) copper and silver corrosion rates. Complaint homes had significantly higher hydrogen sulfide concentrations (mean 0.82 vs. 3 , p 2 S: 476 vs. 2 S: 1472 vs. 389 Å/30 d, p < 0.01). The abundance of carbonate and strontium in drywall was also elevated in complaint homes, and appears to be useful objective marker of problematic drywall in homes that meet other screening criteria (e.g., constructed or renovated in 2006–2007, reports of malodor and accelerated corrosion). This research provides empirical evidence of the direct association between homes constructed with ‘Chinese Drywall’ in 2006–2007 and elevated corrosion rates and hydrogen sulfide concentrations in indoor air. - Highlights: ► Environmental measurements in homes with and without “Chinese Drywall” ► Homes with “Chinese Drywall” had higher hydrogen sulfide concentrations ► Homes with “Chinese Drywall” had elevated corrosion rates ► Study provides empirical evidence of reported associations

  6. Prediction on corrosion rate of pipe in nuclear power system based on optimized grey theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yonghong; Zhang Dafa; Chen Dengke; Jiang Wei

    2007-01-01

    For the prediction of corrosion rate of pipe in nuclear power system, the pre- diction error from the grey theory is greater, so a new method, optimized grey theory was presented in the paper. A comparison among predicted results from present and other methods was carried out, and it is seem that optimized grey theory is correct and effective for the prediction of corrosion rate of pipe in nuclear power system, and it provides a fundamental basis for the maintenance of pipe in nuclear power system. (authors)

  7. ASSET, An Information System for Alloy Corrosion in High Temperature Gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R. C. John; A. D. Pelton; A. L. Young; W. T. Thompson; I. G. Wright

    2001-01-01

    A large database for corrosion data and a corrosion prediction information system for metals and alloys corroding in high-temperature gases have been created. Corrosion data for about 75 commercial alloys, 4600 corrosion data measurements, and six million exposure hours have been compiled into an information system, ASSET. ASSET allows prediction of sound metal thickness losses for metals and alloys corroding by several common corrosion mechanisms at high-temperatures as functions of gas composition, temperature, time, and alloy. This paper presents examples of predicted metal losses of alloys corroding in standard conditions for several corrosion mechanisms expected in high-temperature gases. ASSET also provides a comprehensive capability to analyze the thermochemical interactions between alloys, corrosion products and exposure conditions. Some of the uses of the data compilation and the corrosion prediction feature are illustrated for oxidizing, sulfidizing, sulfidizing/oxidizing , and carburizing conditions

  8. High Temperature Corrosion under Laboratory Conditions Simulating Biomass-Firing: A Comprehensive Characterization of Corrosion Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Montgomery, Melanie; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    characterization of the corrosion products. The corrosion products consisted of three layers: i) the outermost layer consisting of a mixed layer of K2SO4 and FexOy on a partly molten layer of the initial deposit, ii) the middle layer consists of spinel (FeCr2O4) and Fe2O3, and iii) the innermost layer is a sponge......-like Ni3S2 containing layer. At the corrosion front, Cl-rich protrusions were observed. Results indicate that selective corrosion of Fe and Cr by Cl, active oxidation and sulphidation attack of Ni are possible corrosion mechanisms....

  9. Solubility of corrosion products in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, M.P.; Narasimhan, S.V.

    1995-01-01

    A short review of solubility of corrosion products at high temperature in either neutral or alkaline water as encountered in BWR, PHWR and PWR primary coolant reactor circuits is presented in this report. Based on the available literature, various experimental techniques involved in the study of the solubility, theory for fitting the solubility data to the thermodynamic model and discussion of the published results with a scope for future work have been brought out. (author). 17 refs., 7 figs

  10. Elevated corrosion rates and hydrogen sulfide in homes with 'Chinese Drywall'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Joseph G.; MacIntosh, David L. [Environmental Health and Engineering, Inc., 117 Fourth Avenue, Needham, MA (United States); Harvard School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA (United States); Saltzman, Lori E. [U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, Bethesda, MD (United States); Baker, Brian J. [Environmental Health and Engineering, Inc., 117 Fourth Avenue, Needham, MA (United States); Matheson, Joanna M.; Recht, Joel R. [U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, Bethesda, MD (United States); Minegishi, Taeko; Fragala, Matt A.; Myatt, Theodore A. [Environmental Health and Engineering, Inc., 117 Fourth Avenue, Needham, MA (United States); Spengler, John D.; Stewart, James H. [Environmental Health and Engineering, Inc., 117 Fourth Avenue, Needham, MA (United States); Harvard School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA (United States); McCarthy, John F., E-mail: jmcccarthy@eheinc.com [Environmental Health and Engineering, Inc., 117 Fourth Avenue, Needham, MA (United States)

    2012-06-01

    In December 2008, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) began receiving reports about odors, corrosion, and health concerns related to drywall originating from China. In response, a detailed environmental health and engineering evaluation was conducted of 41 complaint and 10 non-complaint homes in the Southeast U.S. Each home investigation included characterization of: 1) drywall composition; 2) indoor and outdoor air quality; 3) temperature, moisture, and building ventilation; and 4) copper and silver corrosion rates. Complaint homes had significantly higher hydrogen sulfide concentrations (mean 0.82 vs. < LOD {mu}g/m{sup 3}, p < 0.05), and significantly greater rates of copper sulfide and silver sulfide corrosion compared to non-complaint homes (Cu{sub 2}S: 476 vs. < 32 A/30 d, p < 0.01; Ag{sub 2}S: 1472 vs. 389 A/30 d, p < 0.01). The abundance of carbonate and strontium in drywall was also elevated in complaint homes, and appears to be useful objective marker of problematic drywall in homes that meet other screening criteria (e.g., constructed or renovated in 2006-2007, reports of malodor and accelerated corrosion). This research provides empirical evidence of the direct association between homes constructed with 'Chinese Drywall' in 2006-2007 and elevated corrosion rates and hydrogen sulfide concentrations in indoor air. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmental measurements in homes with and without 'Chinese Drywall' Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homes with 'Chinese Drywall' had higher hydrogen sulfide concentrations Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homes with 'Chinese Drywall' had elevated corrosion rates Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study provides empirical evidence of reported associations.

  11. Corrosion tests of high temperature alloys in impure helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berka, Jan; Kalivodova, Jana; Vilemova, Monika; Skoumalova, Zuzana; Brabec, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Czech research organizations take part several projects concerning technologies and materials for advanced gas cooled reactors, as an example international project ARCHER supported by EU within FP7, also several national projects supported by Technology Agency of the Czech Republic are solved in cooperation with industrial and research organization. Within these projects the material testing program is performed. The results presented in these paper concerning high temperature corrosion and degradation of alloys (800 H, SS 316 and P91) in helium containing minor impurities (H_2, CO, CH_4, HZO) at temperatures up to 760°C. After corrosion tests (up to 1500 hours) the specimens was investigated by several methods (gravimetry, SEM-EDX, optical microscopy, hardness and micro-hardness testing etc. (author)

  12. Influence of cooling rate on the microstructure and corrosion behavior of Al–Fe alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorin, T.; Stanford, N.; Birbilis, N.; Gupta, R.K.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Increasing the cooling rate from 0.1 to 500 °C/s, mass loss rate decreased by 6 times. • Increase in corrosion resistance was attributed to the refined Fe-intermetallics. • Increased cooling rate resulted in increased Fe content in solid solution. • Direct strip casting can produce alloys with higher acceptable content of impurities. • Direct Strip Casting is a potential candidate to improve recyclability of Al alloys - Abstract: The effect of Fe in Al is technologically important for commercial Al-alloys, and in recycled Al. This work explores the use of the novel rapid solidification technology, known as direct strip casting, to improve the recyclability of Al-alloys. We provide a comparison between the corrosion and microstructure of Al–Fe alloys prepared with wide-ranging cooling rates (0.1 °C/s to 500 °C/s). Rapid cooling was achieved via direct strip casting, while slow cooling was achieved using sand casting. Corrosion was studied via polarisation and immersion tests, followed by surface analysis using scanning electron microscopy and optical profilometry. It was shown that the corrosion resistance of Al–Fe alloys is improved with increased cooling rates, attributed to the reduced size and number of Fe-containing intermetallics.

  13. Localized corrosion of high alloyed austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morach, R.; Schmuki, P.; Boehni, H.

    1992-01-01

    The susceptibility of several high alloyed stainless steels against localized corrosion was investigated by traditional potentiostatic and -kinetic methods and the current transient technique. Different test cells, proposed in literature, were evaluated for use in testing of plate materials. The AVESTA-cell showed to be not useful for potentiokinetic current density potential curves, but useable for pitting experiments. After pickling and prepassivation epoxy embedded materials proved to be resistant to crevice corrosion at the metal-resin interface. The electrode in form of a wire was the most reliable crevice free cell design. The grinding of the samples in the pretreatment procedure was found to have a large effect on the pitting corrosion behaviour. Using different paper types with varying grit, a drop in pitting potential for rougher surfaces and an increase in metastable pitting activity was found. Increasing surface roughness led also to changes in the electronic structure of the passive film reflected by a lower bandgap energy. High alloyed stainless steels showed no breakdown potential within the examined potential range. Compared to 18/8 type stainless steels significantly less transients were found. The number of transients decreases with increasing molybdenum and chromium content

  14. Monitoring of corrosion damage using high-frequency guided ultrasonic waves

    OpenAIRE

    Chew, D.; Fromme, P.

    2014-01-01

    Due to adverse environmental conditions corrosion can develop during the life cycle of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Both pitting corrosion and generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the degradation of the integrity and load bearing capacity of the structure. Structural health monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can in principle be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along...

  15. Corrosion of high purity Fe-Cr-Ni alloys in 13 N boiling nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Joji; Mayuzumi, Masami; Kusanagi, Hideo; Takaku, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion in boiling nitric acid was investigated for high purity Fe-18%Cr-12%Ni alloys and type 304L stainless steels (SS). Owing to very low impurity concentration, the solution treated high purity alloys show almost no intergranular corrosion while the type 304L SS show severe intergranular corrosion. Both in the high purity alloys and type 304L SS, aging treatments ranging from 873 K to 1073 K for 1 h enhance intergranular corrosion. During the aging treatments, impurities should be segregated to the grain boundaries. The corrosion behaviors were discussed from a standpoint of impurity segregation to grain boundaries. This study is of importance for purex reprocessing of spent fuels

  16. Predicting Effects of Corrosion Erosion of High Strength Steel Pipelines Elbow on CO2-Acetic Acid (HAc) Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asmara, Y. P.; Ismail, M. F.; Chui, L. Giok; Halimi, Jamiludin

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneously effect of erosion combined with corrosion becomes the most concern in oil and gas industries. It is due to the fast deterioration of metal as effects of solid particles mixed with corrosive environment. There are many corrosion software to investigate possible degradation mechanisms developed by researchers. They are using many combination factors of chemical reactions and physical process. However effects of CO 2 and acid on pipelines orientations are still remain uncovered in their simulation. This research will investigate combination effects of CO 2 and HAc on corrosion and erosion artificial environmental containing sands particles in 45°, 90° and 180° elbow pipelines. The research used theoretical calculations combined with experiments for verification. The main concerns are to investigate the maximum erosion corrosion rate and maximum shear stress at the surface. Methodology used to calculate corrosion rate are Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) and weight loss. The results showed that at 45°, erosion rate is the more significant effects in contributing degradation of the metal. The effects of CO 2 and HAc gave significant effects when flow rate of the solution are high which reflect synergism effects of solid particles and those chemical compositions. (paper)

  17. Corrosion and corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, A.S.; Totlani, M.K.

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion has always been associated with structures, plants, installations and equipment exposed to aggressive environments. It effects economy, safety and product reliability. Monitoring of component corrosion has thus become an essential requirement for the plant health and safety. Protection methods such as appropriate coatings, cathodic protection and use of inhibitors have become essential design parameters. High temperature corrosion, especially hot corrosion, is still a difficult concept to accommodate in corrosion allowance; there is a lack of harmonized system of performance testing of materials at high temperatures. In order to discuss and deliberate on these aspects, National Association for Corrosion Engineers International organised a National Conference on Corrosion and its Control in Bombay during November 28-30, 1995. This volume contains papers presented at the symposium. Paper relevant to INIS is indexed separately. refs., figs., tabs

  18. High temperature corrosion behavior of different grain size specimens of 2.25 Cr-1 Mo steel in SO2+O2 environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, D.; Mitra, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    The investigation is primarily aimed at the high temperature corrosion behavior of different grain sizes of 2.25 Cr-1 Mo steel at SO 2 +O 2 (mixed oxidation and sulfidation). The various grain sizes (18 μm,26 μm, 48 μm, and 72 μm) are obtained by different annealing treatment. Isothermal corrosion studies are carried out in different grain size specimens at 973K for 8 hours. The corrosion growth rate and the reaction kinetics are studied by weight gain method. The external scales of the post corroded specimen are studied in Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) to examine the corrosion products morphology on the scale. X-ray mapping analysis of the different elements (Fe, O, Cr and S) is carried out by Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) attached with SEM. The X-ray Diffraction Analysis (XRD) is also carried out to identify the corrosion products in the external scale. Finally, it is concluded that that the corrosion rate of 2.25 Cr-1 Mo steel strongly depend on grain sizes of the specimens. The corrosion rate increases with the decreases of grain size. The finer grain (18 μm) show higher corrosion rate than the coarse grains (72 μm). The weight gain kinetics follows the parabolic growth rate which further indicates that the corrosion process is diffusion controlled. The scale analysis shows the thicker scale and extensive scale cracking and spallations in case of finer grain size specimen (18 μm), whereas the coarse grain specimen (72 μm) shows compact and adherent layer. The XRD analysis shows that the corrosion products consist of mixtures of iron oxides( Fe 3 O 4 and Fe 2 O 3 ) and iron sulfides (FeS). The details mechanism of the corrosion is discussed to explain the difference in corrosion rate for different grain sizes. (author)

  19. Phase Stability Diagrams for High Temperature Corrosion Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Ramos-Hernandez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion phenomena of metals by fused salts depend on chemical composition of the melt and environmental conditions of the system. Detail knowledge of chemistry and thermodynamic of aggressive species formed during the corrosion process is essential for a better understanding of materials degradation exposed to high temperature. When there is a lack of kinetic data for the corrosion processes, an alternative to understand the thermodynamic behavior of chemical species is to utilize phase stability diagrams. Nowadays, there are several specialized software programs to calculate phase stability diagrams. These programs are based on thermodynamics of chemical reactions. Using a thermodynamic data base allows the calculation of different types of phase diagrams. However, sometimes it is difficult to have access to such data bases. In this work, an alternative way to calculate phase stability diagrams is presented. The work is exemplified in the Na-V-S-O and Al-Na-V-S-O systems. This system was chosen because vanadium salts is one of the more aggressive system for all engineering alloys, especially in those processes where fossil fuels are used.

  20. Slow strain rate stress corrosion cracking under multiaxial deformation conditions: technique and application to admiralty brass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, W.K.; Heldt, L.A.; Koss, D.

    1984-01-01

    A set of straightforward experimental techniques are described for the examination of slow strain rate stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of sheet deforming under nearly all multiaxial deformation conditions which result in sheet thinning. Based on local fracture strain as a failure criterion, the results contrast stress corrosion susceptibility in uniaxial tension with those in both plane strain and balanced biaxial tension. These results indicate that the loss of ductility of the brass increases as the stress state changes from uniaxial toward balanced biaxial tension

  1. Corrosion Behavior of the Stressed Sensitized Austenitic Stainless Steels of High Nitrogen Content in Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Almubarak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of high nitrogen content on corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steels in seawater under severe conditions such as tensile stresses and existence of sensitization in the structure. A constant tensile stress has been applied to sensitized specimens types 304, 316L, 304LN, 304NH, and 316NH stainless steels. Microstructure investigation revealed various degrees of stress corrosion cracking. SCC was severe in type 304, moderate in types 316L and 304LN, and very slight in types 304NH and 316NH. The electrochemical polarization curves showed an obvious second current peak for the sensitized alloys which indicated the existence of second phase in the structure and the presence of intergranular stress corrosion cracking. EPR test provided a rapid and efficient nondestructive testing method for showing passivity, degree of sensitization and determining IGSCC for stainless steels in seawater. A significant conclusion was obtained that austenitic stainless steels of high nitrogen content corrode at a much slower rate increase pitting resistance and offer an excellent resistance to stress corrosion cracking in seawater.

  2. Corrosion of metallic materials by uranium hexafluoride at high temperatures (1963); Corrosion de materiaux metalliques par l'hexafluorure d'uranium a haute temperature (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langlois, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    The corrosion of the following metals or alloys by UF{sub 6}: nickel, monel, Inconel, gold, platinum, stainless steel, is studied in the temperature range from 300 to 1000 deg. C. The test method, designed to avoid heating the apparatus containing the corrosive fluid to a high temperature, consists in using threadlike samples heated by the Joule effect, the rest of the apparatus being maintained close to room temperature. This technique makes it possible also to determine continuously the penetration of the corrosion by measuring the electrical resistance of the sample with a double Thomson bridge. A series of rapid comparison tests shows that stainless steel, precious metals and Inconel are attacked far too rapidly to be used above 500 deg. C; only monel and especially nickel appear capable of resisting at high temperatures. The detailed examination of the behaviour of nickel shows that the metallic fluoride is volatilized and that this influences the corrosion rate. It shows also the existence of a temperature zone situated between 550 and 700 deg. C in which occurs A strong intergranular corrosion the cause of which appears to be the presence of impurities in the metal. (author) [French] La corrosion par l'UF{sub 6} des metaux ou alliages suivants: lickel, monel, inconel, or, platine, acier inoxydable, est etudiee dans le un domaine de temperature compris entre 300 et 1000 deg. C. La methode d'essai, destinee a eviter le chauffage de l'enceinte contenant le fluide corrosif a temperature elevee, consiste a utiliser des eprouvettes filiformes, echauffees par effet Joule, le reste de l'appareillage etant maintenu a une temperature proche de l'ambiance. Cette technique permet en outre de determiner en continu la penetration de la corrosion, par mesure de la resistance electrique de l'eprouvette, au moyen d'un pont double de Thomson. Une serie d'essais comparatifs, assez sommaires, montre que l'acier inoxydable, les metaux precieux et l'inconel sont attaques beaucoup

  3. Corrosion of metallic materials by uranium hexafluoride at high temperatures (1963); Corrosion de materiaux metalliques par l'hexafluorure d'uranium a haute temperature (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langlois, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    The corrosion of the following metals or alloys by UF{sub 6}: nickel, monel, Inconel, gold, platinum, stainless steel, is studied in the temperature range from 300 to 1000 deg. C. The test method, designed to avoid heating the apparatus containing the corrosive fluid to a high temperature, consists in using threadlike samples heated by the Joule effect, the rest of the apparatus being maintained close to room temperature. This technique makes it possible also to determine continuously the penetration of the corrosion by measuring the electrical resistance of the sample with a double Thomson bridge. A series of rapid comparison tests shows that stainless steel, precious metals and Inconel are attacked far too rapidly to be used above 500 deg. C; only monel and especially nickel appear capable of resisting at high temperatures. The detailed examination of the behaviour of nickel shows that the metallic fluoride is volatilized and that this influences the corrosion rate. It shows also the existence of a temperature zone situated between 550 and 700 deg. C in which occurs A strong intergranular corrosion the cause of which appears to be the presence of impurities in the metal. (author) [French] La corrosion par l'UF{sub 6} des metaux ou alliages suivants: lickel, monel, inconel, or, platine, acier inoxydable, est etudiee dans le un domaine de temperature compris entre 300 et 1000 deg. C. La methode d'essai, destinee a eviter le chauffage de l'enceinte contenant le fluide corrosif a temperature elevee, consiste a utiliser des eprouvettes filiformes, echauffees par effet Joule, le reste de l'appareillage etant maintenu a une temperature proche de l'ambiance. Cette technique permet en outre de determiner en continu la penetration de la corrosion, par mesure de la resistance electrique de l'eprouvette, au moyen d'un pont double de Thomson. Une serie d'essais comparatifs, assez sommaires, montre que l'acier inoxydable, les metaux

  4. M.A. Streicher findings regarding high-level waste tank corrosion issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husa, E.I.

    1994-01-01

    Dr. Michael A. Streicher is a nationally recognized metallurgist and corrosion scientist. He has served on the Department of Energy, Headquarters Tank Structural Integrity panel as the primary corrosion technical expert since the panel's inception in October 1991. Attachments 3 through 13 are Dr. Streicher's correspondence and presentations to the panel between November 1991 and May 1994. This compilation addresses Dr. Streicher's findings on High-Level Waste tank corrosion issues such as: corrosion mechanisms in carbon steels; hydrogen generation from waste tank corrosion; stress corrosion cracking in carbon steel tanks; water line attack in Hanford's single-shell tanks; stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels; and materials selection for new Hanford waste tanks. These papers discuss both generic and specific corrosion issues associated with waste tanks and transfer systems at Hanford, Savannah River, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and West Valley Demonstration Project

  5. Failure analysis of high strength pipeline with single and multiple corrosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yanfei; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Juan; Li, Xin; Zhou, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We study failure of high strength pipelines with single corrosion. • We give regression equations for failure pressure prediction. • We propose assessment procedure for pipelines with multiple corrosions. - Abstract: Corrosion will compromise safety operation of oil and gas pipelines, accurate determination of failure pressure finds importance in residual strength assessment and corrosion allowance design of onshore and offshore pipelines. This paper investigates failure pressure of high strength pipeline with single and multiple corrosions using nonlinear finite element analysis. On the basis of developed regression equations for failure pressure prediction of high strength pipeline with single corrosion, the paper proposes an assessment procedure for predicting failure pressure of high strength pipeline with multiple corrosions. Furthermore, failure pressures predicted by proposed solutions are compared with experimental results and various assessment methods available in literature, where accuracy and versatility are demonstrated

  6. An expert system for corrosion rate monitoring and diagnosis in the heating circuits of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balducelli, C.; Conte, E.; Federico, A.G.; Tripi, A.; Ronchetti, C.

    1988-01-01

    The radiation field of out of core components of a water reactor primary plant depends on corrosion product equilibria. The computer programs that try to simulate the behaviour of the corrosion products and the radiation build up didn't provide good results, especially in describing several different plants with the same program. In order to obtain better results the authors decided to use a different approach, building an expert system, which performs on-line corrosion rate monitoring by means of a number of probes connected to an automatic corrosimeter, evaluates expected corrosion rate values and behaviours, and, if there are discrepancies, performs a diagnosis, providing suggestions to overcome the difficulty. (author)

  7. Corrosion behaviour of high temperature alloys in the cooling gas of high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadakkers, W.J.; Schuster, H.

    1989-01-01

    The reactive impurities in the primary cooling helium of advanced high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR) can cause oxidation, carburization or decarburization of the heat exchanging metallic components. By studies of the fundamental aspects of the corrosion mechanisms it became possible to define operating conditions under which the metallic construction materials show, from the viewpoint of technical application, acceptable corrosion behaviour. By extensive test programmes with exposure times of up to 30,000 hours, a data base has been obtained which allows a reliable extrapolation of the corrosion effects up to the envisaged service lives of the heat exchanging components. (author). 6 refs, 7 figs

  8. Analysis of corrosion data for carbon steels in simulated salt repository brines and acid chloride solutions at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diercks, D.R.; Hull, A.B.; Kassner, T.F.

    1988-03-01

    Carbon steel is currently the leading candidate material for fabrication of a container for isolation of high level nuclear waste in a salt repository. Since brine entrapped in the bedded salt can migrate to the container by several transport processes, corrosion is an important consideration in the long-term performance of the waste package. A detailed literature search was performed to compile relevant corrosion data for carbon steels in anoxic acid chloride solutions, and simulated salt repository brines at temperatures between ∼ 20 and 400 0 C. The hydrolysis of Mg 2+ ions in simulated repository brines containing high magnesium concentrations causes acidification at temperatures above 25 0 C, which, in turn, influences the protective nature of the magnetite corrosion product layer on carbon steel. The corrosion data for the steels were analyzed, and an analytical model for general corrosion was developed to calculate the amount of penetration (i.e., wall thinning) as a function of time, temperature, and the pressure of corrosion product hydrogen than can build up during exposure in a closed system (e.g., a sealed capsule). Both the temperature and pressure dependence of the corrosion rate of steels in anoxic acid chloride solutions indicate that the rate-controlling partial reaction is the cathodic reduction of water to form hydrogen. Variations in the composition and microstructure of the steels or the concentration of the ionic species in the chloride solutions (provided that they do not change the pH significantly) do not appear to strongly influence the corrosion rate

  9. Volatile amines treatment: Corrosion rates and Atucha I nuclear power plant experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias, Alberto M.; Jimenez Rebagliati, Raul; Raffo Calderon, Maria C.; Manzi, Ricardo

    2000-01-01

    Steam generators water treatment with volatile amines in place of ammonia is usual today. This option seems an acceptable alternative to the generalize use of ammonia-sodium phosphate and has advantages when copper alloys are present. There are several amines that can work as corrosion inhibitor but the most useful for plant applications are: morpholine, ethanolamine and cyclohexylamine. In this work, are present the obtained results of corrosion rates measurements by electrochemical methods. The hydrothermal conditions of our experiences were similar to that of the Atucha I nuclear power plant (CNA I). pH, conductivity and dissolved oxygen measures were correlated with corrosion rates of the CNA I materials as carbon steel and admiralty brass. The faradaic impedance spectroscopy techniques allows a more detailed interpretation of corrosion rates process. Morpholine and ammonia behavior can be evaluated under power plant operations conditions with the accumulated experience of CNA I. Results are present throughout material release and his effects over heat transfer parameters. (author)

  10. Corrosion considerations of high-nickel alloys and titanium alloys for high-level radioactive waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gdowski, G.E.; McCright, R.D.

    1991-07-01

    Corrosion resistant materials are being considered for the metallic barrier of the Yucca Mountain Project's high-level radioactive waste disposal containers. High nickel alloys and titanium alloys have good corrosion resistance properties and are considered good candidates for the metallic barrier. The localized corrosion phenomena, pitting and crevice corrosion, are considered as potentially limiting for the barrier lifetime. An understanding of the mechanisms of localized corrosion of how various parameters affect it will be necessary for adequate performance assessments of candidate container materials. Examples of some of the concerns involving candidate container materials. Examples of some of the concerns of involving localized corrosion are discussed. The effects of various parameters, such as temperature and concentration of halide species, on localized corrosion are given. In addition concerns about aging of the protective oxide layer in the expected service temperature range (50 to 250 degrees C) are presented. Also some mechanistic considerations of localized corrosion are given. 31 refs., 1 tab

  11. High temperature electrochemistry related to light water reactor corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, Gabor; Kerner, Zsolt; Balog, Janos; Schiller, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The present work deals with corrosion problems related to conditions which prevail in a WWER primary circuit. We had a two-fold aim: (A) electrochemical methods were applied to characterise the hydrothermally produced oxides of the cladding material (Zr-1%Nb) of nuclear fuel elements used in Russian made power reactors of WWER type, and (B) a number of possible reference electrodes were investigated with a view to high temperature applications. (A) Test specimens made of the cladding material, Zr-1%Nb, were immersed into an autoclave, filled with an aqueous solution typical to a WWER primary circuit, and were treated for different periods of time up to 28 weeks. The electrode potentials were measured and electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) were taken regularly both as a function of oxidation time and temperature. This rendered information on the overall kinetics of oxide growth. By combining in situ and ex situ impedance measurements, with a particular view of the temperature dependence of EIS, we concluded that the high frequency region of impedance spectra is relevant to the presence of oxide layer on the alloy. This part of the spectra was treated in terms of a parallel CPE||R ox equivalent circuit (CPE denoting constant phase element, R ox ohmic resistor). The CPE element was understood as a dispersive resistance in terms of the continuous time random walk theory by Scher and Lax. This enabled us to tell apart electrical conductance and oxide growth with a model of charge transfer and recombination within the oxide layer as rate determining steps. (B) Three types of reference electrodes were tested within the framework of the LIRES EU5 project: (i) external Ag/AgCl, (ii) Pt/Ir alloy and (iii) Pd(Pt) double polarised active electrode. The most stable of the electrodes was found to be the Pt/Ir one. The Ag/AgCl electrode showed good stability after an initial period of some days, while substantial drifts were found for the Pd(Pt) electrode. EIS spectra of the

  12. On researching erosion-corrosion wear in pipelines: the rate and residual lifetime estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranenko, V.I.; Yanchenko, Yu.A.; Gulina, O.M.; Dokukin, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    To base the normative document on calculation of pipelines erosive-corrosive wear (ECW) rate and residual lifetime this research of ECW regularities for pearlitic steel NPP pipelines was performed. The estimates of control data treatment statistical procedures efficiency were presented. The influence of the scheme of piping control on the ECW rate and residual lifetime estimation results was demonstrated. The simplified scheme is valid only in case of complete information. It's usage under data uncertainties leads to essential residual lifetime overstating [ru

  13. Lifetime evaluation of superheater tubes exposed to steam oxidation, high temperature corrosion and creep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriksen, N [Elsamprojekt A/S, Faelleskemikerne, Fredericia (Denmark); Hede Larsen, O; Blum, R [I/S Fynsvaerket, Faelleskemikerne, Odense (Denmark)

    1996-12-01

    Advanced fossil fired plants operating at high steam temperatures require careful design of the superheaters. The German TRD design code normally used in Denmark is not precise enough for the design of superheaters with long lifetimes. The authors have developed a computer program to be used in the evaluation of superheater tube lifetime based on input related to tube dimensions, material, pressure, steam temperature, mass flux, heat flux and estimated corrosion rates. The program is described in the paper. As far as practically feasible, the model seems to give a true picture of the reality. For superheaters exposed to high heat fluxes or low internal heat transfer coefficients as is the case for superheaters located in fluidized bed environments or radiant environments, the program has been extremely useful for evaluation of surface temperature, oxide formation and lifetime. The total uncertainty of the method is mainly influenced by the uncertainty of the determination of the corrosion rate. More precise models describing the corrosion rate as a function of tube surface temperature, fuel parameters and boiler parameters need to be developed. (au) 21 refs.

  14. Parameters of straining-induced corrosion cracking in low-alloy steels in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenz, E.; Liebert, A.; Stellwag, B.; Wieling, N.

    Tensile tests with slow deformation speed determine parameters of corrosion cracking at low strain rates of low-alloy steels in high-temperature water. Besides the strain rate the temperature and oxygen content of the water prove to be important for the deformation behaviour of the investigated steels 17MnMoV64, 20 MnMoNi55 and 15NiCuMoNb 5. Temperatures about 240 0 C, increased oxygen contents in the water and low strain rates cause a decrease of the material ductility as against the behaviour in air. Tests on the number of stress cycles until incipient cracking show that the parameters important for corrosion cracking at low strain velocities apply also to low-frequency cyclic loads with high strain amplitude. In knowledge of these influencing parameters the strain-induced corrosion cracking is counteracted by concerted measures taken in design, construction and operation of nuclear power stations. Essential aims in this matter are to avoid as far as possible inelastic strains and to fix and control suitable media conditions. (orig.) [de

  15. Corrosion of high-density sintered tungsten alloys. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batten, J.J.; McDonald, I.G.; Moore, B.T.; Silva, V.M.

    1988-10-01

    The corrosion behaviour of four tungsten alloys has been evaluated through weight loss measurements after total immersion in both distilled water insight into the mechanism of corrosion was afforded by an examination of the and 5% sodium chloride solutions. Some insight the mechanism of corrosion was afforded by using the Scanning Electron Microscopy and through an analysis of the corrosion products. Pure tungsten and all the alloys studied underwent corrosion during the tests, and in each case the rare of corrosion in sodium chloride solution was markedly less than that in distilled water. A 95% W, 3.5% Ni, 1.5% Fe alloy was found to be the most corrosion resistant of the alloys under the experimental conditions. Examination of the data shows that for each of the tests, copper as an alloying element accelerates corrosion of tungsten alloys. 9 refs., 7 tabs., 12 figs

  16. Laboratory investigations on the corrosion rate of A42 carbon steel in various secondary circuit chemistries representative of hydraulic tests conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brussieux, C.; Clinard, M.H.; Guillodo, M.; Alos-Ramos, O.

    2014-01-01

    the impact of hydrazine on the corrosion rate of passive carbon steel and to explain the high hydrazine consumption rate observed during our tests, a mechanism involving a coupled magnetite crystal growth and hydrazine dismutation or oxidation was proposed. However, the hypothesis proposed in this paper has to be studied in greater details. (author)

  17. Simulation of corrosion product activity in pressurized water reactors under flow rate transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, Anwar M.; Mirza, Nasir M.; Mir, Imran

    1998-01-01

    Simulation of coolant activation due to corrosion products and impurities in a typical pressurized water reactor has been done under flow rate transients. Employing time dependent production and losses of corrosion products in the primary coolant path an approach has been developed to calculate the coolant specific activity. Results for 24 Na, 56 Mn, 59 Fe, 60 Co and 99Mo show that the specific activity in primary loop approaches equilibrium value under normal operating conditions fairly rapidly. Predominant corrosion product activity is due to Mn-56. Parametric studies at full power for various ramp decreases in flow rate show initial decline in the activity and then a gradual rise to relatively higher saturation values. The minimum value and the time taken to reach the minima are strong functions of the slope of linear decrease in flow rate. In the second part flow rate coastdown was allowed to occur at different flow half-times. The reactor scram was initiated at 90% of the normal flow rate. The results show that the specific activity decreases and the rate of decrease depends on pump half time and the reactor scram conditions

  18. Intergranular corrosion of 13Cr and 17Cr martensitic stainless steels in accelerated corrosive solution and high-temperature, high-purity water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Toshinori; Ishikawa, Yuichi

    1988-01-01

    Intergranular corrosion behavior of 13Cr and 17Cr martensitic stainless steels was studied by electrochemical and immersing corrosion tests. Effects of the mEtallurgical and environmental conditions on the intergranular corrosion of various tempered steels were examined by the following tests and discussed. (a) Anodic polarization measurement and electrolytical etching test in 0.5 kmol/m 3 H 2 SO 4 solution at 293 K. (b) Immersion corrosion test in 0.88 kmol/m 3 HNO 3 solution at 293 K. (c) Long-time immersion test for specimens with a crevice in a high purity water at 473 K∼561 K. It was found from the anodic polarization curves in 0.5 kmol/m 3 H 2 SO 4 solution-at 293 K that the steels tempered at 773∼873 K had susceptibility to intergranular corrosion in the potential region indicating a second current maximum (around-0.1 V. vs. SCE). But the steel became passive in the more noble potential region than the second current peak potential, while in the less noble potential region general corrosion occurred independent of its microstructure. The intergranular corrosion occurred due to the localized dissolution along the pre-austenitic grain boundary and the martensitic lath boundary. It could be explained by the same dissolution model of the chromium depleted zone as proposed for the intergranular corrosion of austenitic and ferritic stainless steels. The intergranular corrosion occurred entirely at the free surface in 0.88 kmol/m 3 HNO 3 solution, while in the high temperature and high purity water only the entrance of the crevice corroded. It was also suggested that this intergranular corrosion might serve as the initiation site for stress corrosion cracking of the martensitic stainless steel. (author)

  19. Acoustic emission analysis coupled with thermogravimetric experiments dedicated to high temperature corrosion studies on metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serris, Eric; Al Haj, Omar; Peres, Veronique; Cournil, Michel; Kittel, Jean; Grosjean, Francois; Ropital, Francois

    2014-01-01

    High temperature corrosion of metallic alloys (like iron, nickel, zirconium alloys) can damage equipment of many industrial fields (refinery, petrochemical, nuclear..). Acoustic emission (AE) is an interesting method owing to its sensitivity and its non-destructive aspect to quantify the level of damage in use of these alloys under various environmental conditions. High temperature corrosive phenomena create stresses in the materials; the relaxation by cracks of these stresses can be recorded and analyzed using the AE system. The goal of our study is to establish an acoustic signals database which assigns the acoustic signals to the specific corrosion phenomena. For this purpose, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) is coupled with acoustic emission (AE) devices. The oxidation of a zirconium alloy, zircaloy-4, is first studied using thermogravimetric experiment coupled to acoustic emission analysis at 900 C. An inward zirconium oxide scale, preliminary dense, then porous, grow during the isothermal isobaric step. The kinetic rate increases significantly after a kinetic transition (breakaway). This acceleration occurs with an increase of acoustic emission activity. Most of the acoustic emission bursts are recorded after the kinetic transition. Acoustic emission signals are also observed during the cooling of the sample. AE numerical treatments (using wavelet transform) completed by SEM microscopy characterizations allows us to distinguish the different populations of cracks. Metal dusting represents also a severe form of corrosive degradation of metal alloy. Iron metal dusting corrosion is studied by AE coupled with TGA at 650 C under C 4 H 10 + H 2 + He atmosphere. Acoustic emission signals are detected after a significant increase of the sample mass.

  20. Corrosion issues in high-level nuclear waste containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asl, Samin Sharifi

    In this dissertation different aspects of corrosion and electrochemistry of copper, candidate canister material in Scandinavian high-level nuclear waste disposal program, including the thermodynamics and kinetics of the reactions that are predicted to occur in the practical system have been studied. A comprehensive thermodynamic study of copper in contact with granitic groundwater of the type and composition that is expected in the Forsmark repository in Sweden has been performed. Our primary objective was to ascertain whether copper would exist in the thermodynamically immune state in the repository, in which case corrosion could not occur and the issue of corrosion in the assessment of the storage technology would be moot. In spite of the fact that metallic copper has been found to exist for geological times in granitic geological formations, copper is well-known to be activated from the immune state to corrode by specific species that may exist in the environment. The principal activator of copper is known to be sulfur in its various forms, including sulfide (H2S, HS-, S2-), polysulfide (H2Sx, HSx -, Sx 2-), poly sulfur thiosulfate ( SxO3 2-), and polythionates (SxO6 2-). A comprehensive study of this aspect of copper chemistry has never been reported, and yet an understanding of this issue is vital for assessing whether copper is a suitable material for fabricating canisters for the disposal of HLNW. Our study identifies and explores those species that activate copper; these species include sulfur-containing entities as well as other, non-sulfur species that may be present in the repository. The effects of temperature, solution pH, and hydrogen pressure on the kinetics of the hydrogen electrode reaction (HER) on copper in borate buffer solution have been studied by means of steady-state polarization measurements, including electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). In order to obtain electrokinetic parameters, such as the exchange current density and the

  1. Corrosion and runoff rates of Cu and three Cu-alloys in marine environments with increasing chloride deposition rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odnevall Wallinder, Inger; Zhang, Xian; Goidanich, Sara; Le Bozec, Nathalie; Herting, Gunilla; Leygraf, Christofer

    2014-02-15

    Bare copper sheet and three commercial Cu-based alloys, Cu15Zn, Cu4Sn and Cu5Al5Zn, have been exposed to four test sites in Brest, France, with strongly varying chloride deposition rates. The corrosion rates of all four materials decrease continuously with distance from the coast, i.e. with decreasing chloride load, and in the following order: Cu4Sn>Cu sheet>Cu15Zn>Cu5Al5Zn. The patina on all materials was composed of two main layers, Cu2O as the inner layer and Cu2(OH)3Cl as the outer layer, and with a discontinuous presence of CuCl in between. Additional minor patina constituents are SnO2 (Cu4Sn), Zn5(OH)6(CO3)2 (Cu15Zn and Cu5Al5Zn) and Zn6Al2(OH)16CO3·4H2O/Zn2Al(OH)6Cl·2H2O/Zn5Cl2(OH)8·H2O and Al2O3 (Cu5Al5Zn). The observed Zn- and Zn/Al-containing corrosion products might be important factors for the lower sensitivity of Cu15Zn and Cu5Al5Zn against chloride-induced atmospheric corrosion compared with Cu sheet and Cu4Sn. Decreasing corrosion rates with exposure time were observed for all materials and chloride loads and attributed to an improved adherence with time of the outer patina to the underlying inner oxide. Flaking of the outer patina layer was mainly observed on Cu4Sn and Cu sheet and associated with the gradual transformation of CuCl to Cu2(OH)3Cl of larger volume. After three years only Cu5Al5Zn remains lustrous because of a patina compared with the other materials that appeared brownish-reddish. Significantly lower release rates of metals compared with corresponding corrosion rates were observed for all materials. Very similar release rates of copper from all four materials were observed during the fifth year of marine exposure due to an outer surface patina that with time revealed similar constituents and solubility properties. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Modelling of zircaloy-4 corrosion in nitrogen and oxygen mixtures at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasserre, M.; Peres, V.; Pijolat, M.; Coindreau, O.; Duriez, C.; Mardon, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies of zircaloy-4 corrosion in air have shown accelerated corrosion in the 600-1000 Celsius degrees temperature range with Zr nitrides precipitating near the metal/oxide surface. The aim of this series of slides is to assess the influence of N 2 and O 2 partial pressures on the kinetic rate of growth of a new phase and to propose a kinetic modelling of zircaloy-4 corrosion

  3. In-situ electrochemical study of Zr1nb alloy corrosion in high temperature Li{sup +} containing water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krausová, Aneta [University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 3, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Macák, Jan, E-mail: macakj@vscht.cz [University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 3, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Sajdl, Petr [University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 3, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Novotný, Radek [JRC-IET, Westerduinveg 3, 1755 LE Petten (Netherlands); Renčiuková, Veronika [University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 3, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Vrtílková, Věra [ÚJP a.s., Nad Kamínkou 1345, 156 10 Prague 5 (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-15

    Long-term in-situ corrosion tests were performed in order to evaluate the influence of lithium ions on the corrosion of zirconium alloy. Experiments were carried out in a high-pressure high-temperature loop (280 °C, 8 MPa) in a high concentration water solution of LiOH (70 and 200 ppm Li{sup +}) and in a simulated WWER primary coolant environment. The kinetic parameters characterising the oxidation process have been explored using in-situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and slow potentiodynamic polarization. Also, a suitable equivalent circuit was suggested, which would approximate the impedance characteristics of the corrosion of Zr–1Nb alloy. The Mott–Schottky approach was used to determine the semiconducting character of the passive film. - Highlights: • Zr1Nb alloy was tested in WWER coolant and in LiOH solutions at 280 °C. • Corrosion rates were estimated in-situ from electrochemical data. • Electrochemical data agreed well with weight gains and metallography data. • Increase of corrosion rate in LiOH appeared after short exposure (300–500 h). • Very high donor densities (1.1–1.2 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3}) of Zr oxide grown in LiOH were found.

  4. Influence of irradiation and radiolysis on the corrosion rates and mechanisms of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verlet, Romain

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear fuel of pressurized water reactors (PWR) in the form of uranium oxide UO 2 pellets (or MOX) is confined in a zirconium alloy cladding. This cladding is very important because it represents the first containment barrier against the release of fission products generated by the nuclear reaction to the external environment. Corrosion by the primary medium of zirconium alloys, particularly the Zircaloy-4, is one of the factors limiting the reactor residence time of the fuel rods (UO 2 pellets + cladding). To optimize core management and to extend the lifetime of the fuel rods in reactor, new alloys based on zirconium-niobium (M5) have been developed. However, the corrosion mechanisms of these are not completely understood because of the complexity of these materials, corrosion environment and the presence of radiation from the nuclear fuel. Therefore, this thesis specifically addresses the effects of radiolysis and defects induced by irradiation with ions in the matrix metal and the oxide layer on the corrosion rate of Zircaloy-4 and M5. The goal is to separate the influence of radiation damage to the metal, that relating to defects created in the oxide and that linked to radiolysis of the primary medium on the oxidation rate of zirconium alloys in reactor. 1) Regarding effect of irradiation of the metal on the oxidation rate: type dislocation loops appear and increase the oxidation rate of the two alloys. For M5, in addition to the first effect, a precipitation of fines needles of niobium reduced the solid solution of niobium concentration in the metal and ultimately in the oxide, which strongly reduces the oxidation rate of the alloy. 2) Regarding the effect of irradiation of the oxide layer on the oxidation rate: defects generated by the nuclear cascades in the oxide increase the oxidation rate of the two materials. For M5, germination of niobium enriched zones in irradiated oxide also causes a decrease of the niobium concentration in solid solution

  5. Probability distribution of pitting corrosion depth and rate in underground pipelines: A Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caleyo, F.; Velazquez, J.C.; Valor, A.; Hallen, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The probability distributions of external-corrosion pit depth and pit growth rate were investigated in underground pipelines using Monte Carlo simulations. The study combines a predictive pit growth model developed by the authors with the observed distributions of the model variables in a range of soils. Depending on the pipeline age, any of the three maximal extreme value distributions, i.e. Weibull, Frechet or Gumbel, can arise as the best fit to the pitting depth and rate data. The Frechet distribution best fits the corrosion data for long exposure periods. This can be explained by considering the long-term stabilization of the diffusion-controlled pit growth. The findings of the study provide reliability analysts with accurate information regarding the stochastic characteristics of the pitting damage in underground pipelines.

  6. Probability distribution of pitting corrosion depth and rate in underground pipelines: A Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caleyo, F. [Departamento de Ingenieria Metalurgica, ESIQIE, IPN, UPALM Edif. 7, Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: fcaleyo@gmail.com; Velazquez, J.C. [Departamento de Ingenieria Metalurgica, ESIQIE, IPN, UPALM Edif. 7, Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Valor, A. [Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de La Habana, San Lazaro y L, Vedado, 10400, La Habana (Cuba); Hallen, J.M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Metalurgica, ESIQIE, IPN, UPALM Edif. 7, Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-09-15

    The probability distributions of external-corrosion pit depth and pit growth rate were investigated in underground pipelines using Monte Carlo simulations. The study combines a predictive pit growth model developed by the authors with the observed distributions of the model variables in a range of soils. Depending on the pipeline age, any of the three maximal extreme value distributions, i.e. Weibull, Frechet or Gumbel, can arise as the best fit to the pitting depth and rate data. The Frechet distribution best fits the corrosion data for long exposure periods. This can be explained by considering the long-term stabilization of the diffusion-controlled pit growth. The findings of the study provide reliability analysts with accurate information regarding the stochastic characteristics of the pitting damage in underground pipelines.

  7. The optimization of CNT-PVA nanocomposite for mild steel coating: Effect of CNTs concentration on the corrosion rate of mild steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryam, M.; Ibrahim, N. M. A. A.; Eswar, K. A.; Guliling, M.; Suhaimi, M. H. F.; Khusaimi, Z.; Abdullah, S.; Rusop, M.

    2018-05-01

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) are molecular-scale tubes of graphitic carbon which have outstanding mechanical and magnetic properties with extraordinary strength. It can be said that CNTs can be used in coating application to prevent corrosion and lower the rate of corrosion on steel. However, CNT alone cannot be used for coating purposes. Therefore, by combining it with polymer to produce a nanocomposite thin film, it can be used for nanocoating on mild steel substrate. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) was chosen due to its high strength and high modulus polymer fibers and has the possibilities of improving the physicochemical properties of carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes and polyvinyl alcohol (CNT-PVA) nanocomposite were prepared by using sol-gel method and coated as thin film on mild steel substrate by using spin coating. Sol-gel is a convenient technique used for the production of nanocomposite aqueous solution. Five samples were prepared at the different concentration of CNTs-PVA to verify the corrosion rate application. The samples were then characterized by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) obtaining the structural properties, surface morphology and topography of samples. Raman spectroscopy was used to determine the microraman spectra of CNTs which showed the quality and purity of samples. Finally, corrosion test was done to measure the corrosion rate of samples at the different concentration of CNTs/PVA nanocomposite.

  8. Stress corrosion cracking of several high strength ferrous and nickel alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, E. E.

    1971-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance of several high strength ferrous and nickel base alloys has been determined in a sodium chloride solution. Results indicate that under these test conditions Multiphase MP35N, Unitemp L605, Inconel 718, Carpenter 20Cb and 20Cb-3 are highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking. AISI 410 and 431 stainless steels, 18 Ni maraging steel (250 grade) and AISI 4130 steel are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking under some conditions.

  9. Chemistry of glass corrosion in high saline brines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grambow, B.; Mueller, R.

    1990-01-01

    Corrosion data obtained in laboratory tests can be used for the performance assessment of nuclear waste glasses in a repository if the data are quantitatively described in the frame of a geochemical model. Experimental data were obtained for conventional pH values corrected for liquid junction, amorphous silica solubility and glass corrosion in concentrated salt brines. The data were interpreted with a geochemical model. The brine chemistry was described with the Pitzer formalism using a data base which allows calculation of brine compositions in equilibrium with salt minerals at temperatures up to 200C. In MgCl 2 dominated brines Mg silicates form and due to the consumption of Mg the pH decreases with proceeding reaction. A constant pH (about 4) and composition of alteration products is achieved, when the alkali release from the glass balances the Mg consumption. The low pH results in high release of rare earth elements REE (rare earth elements) and U from the glass. In the NaCl dominated brine MgCl 2 becomes exhausted by Mg silicate formation. As long as there is still Mg left in solution the pH decreases. After exhaustion of Mg the pH rises with the alkali release from the glass and analcime is formed

  10. High temperature corrosion control and monitoring for processing acidic crudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, C. [Betz/GE Water and Process Technologies, Woodlands, TX (United States)

    2009-07-01

    The challenge of processing heavy crudes and bitumen in a reliable and economical way was discussed. Many refiners use a conservative approach regarding the rate at which they use discounted crudes or depend upon capital-intensive upgrades to equipment. New strategies based on data-driven decisions are needed in order to obtain the greatest benefit from heavy feedstock. The feasibility of successfully processing more challenging feed can be estimated more accurately by better understanding the interactions between a particular feed and a particular crude unit. This presentation reviewed newly developed techniques that refiners can use to determine the feeds corrosion potential and the probability for this potential to manifest itself in a given crude unit. tabs., figs.

  11. Effect of steam corrosion on core post strength loss: I. Low, chronic steam ingress rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wichner, R.P.

    1976-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the effect of chronic, low levels of steam ingress into the primary system of the HTGR on the corrosion, and consequent strength loss of the core support posts. The assessment proceeded through the following three steps: (1) The impurity composition in the primary system was estimated as a function of a range of steady ingress rates of from 0.001 to 1.0 g/sec, both by means of an analysis of the Dragon steam ingress experiment and a computer code, TIMOX, which treats the primary system as a well-mixed pot. (2) The core post burnoffs which result from 40-year exposures to these determined impurity atmospheres were then estimated using a corrosion rate expression derived from published ATJ-graphite corrosion rate data. Burnoffs were determined for both the core posts at the nominal and the maximum sustained temperature, estimated to be 90 0 C above nominal. (3) The final step involved assessment of the degree of strength loss resulting from the estimated burnoffs. An empirical equation was developed for this purpose which compares reasonably well with strength loss data for a number of different graphites and specimen geometries

  12. A study on the corrosion rate for metal nuclear fuel by the soxhlet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, S. J.; Lee, Y. R.; Lee, D. B.; Park, J. M.; Kim, K. H.; Lee, Y. S.; Park, H. D.; Kim, C. K.

    2002-01-01

    In order to compare in-pile performance of nuclear fuel candidates for HANARO, corrosion test with the Soxhlet apparatus for rare-earth-oxide added U-Mo alloy fuels has been carried out by measuring a leaching rate. It appeared from the result that the leaching rate of the U-Mo fuel specimen became decreased as a rare-earth-oxide added, and there was a little difference in the leaching rate depending on the kind of the rare-earth-oxide

  13. Evaluation of flow accelerated corrosion by coupled analysis of corrosion and flow dynamics. Relationship of oxide film thickness, hematite/magnetite ratio, ECP and wall thinning rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Naitoh, Masanori; Okada, Hidetoshi; Uehara, Yasushi; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2011-01-01

    Systematic approaches to evaluate flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) are desired before discussing application of countermeasures for FAC. First, future FAC occurrence should be evaluated to identify locations where a higher possibility of FAC occurrence exists, and then, wall thinning rate at the identified FAC occurrence zone is evaluated to obtain the preparation time for applying countermeasures. Wall thinning rates were calculated with two coupled models: 1.static electrochemical analysis and 2.dynamic oxide layer growth analysis. The anodic current density and the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) were calculated with the static electrochemistry model based on an Evans diagram. The ferrous ion release rate, determined by the anodic current density, was applied as input for the dynamic double oxide layer model. Some of the dissolved ferrous ion was removed to the bulk water and others precipitated on the surface as magnetite particles. The thickness of oxide layer was calculated with the dynamic oxide layer growth model and then its value was used as input in the electrochemistry model. It was confirmed that the calculated results (corrosion rate and ECP) based on the coupled models were in good agreement with the measured ones. Higher ECP was essential for preventing FAC rate. Moderated conditions due to lower mass transfer coefficients resulted in thicker oxide layer thickness and then higher ECP, while moderated corrosion conditions due to higher oxidant concentrations resulted in larger hematite/magnetite rate and then higher ECP.

  14. Copper canisters for nuclear high level waste disposal. Corrosion aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werme, L.; Sellin, P.; Kjellbert, N.

    1992-10-01

    A corrosion analysis of a thick-walled copper canister for spent fuel disposal is discussed. The analysis has shown that there are no rapid mechanisms that may lead to canister failure, indicating an anticipated corrosion service life of several millions years. If further analysis of the copper canister is considered, it should be concentrated on identifying and evaluating processes other than corrosion, which may have a potential for leading to canister failure. (au)

  15. Integrating Mobile Phones into Science Teaching to Help Students Develop a Procedure to Evaluate the Corrosion Rate of Iron in Simulated Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Edgar P.; Confessor, Mario R.; Gasparotto, Luiz H. S.

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes an indirect method to evaluate the corrosion rate of iron nail in simulated seawater. The official procedure is based on the direct measurement of the specimen's weight loss over time; however, a highly precise scale is required and such equipment may not be easily available. On the other hand, mobile phones equipped with…

  16. Stress corrosion in high-strength aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorward, R. C.; Hasse, K. R.

    1980-01-01

    Report describes results of stress-corrosion tests on aluminum alloys 7075, 7475, 7050, and 7049. Tests compare performance of original stress-corrosion-resistant (SCR) aluminum, 7075, with newer, higher-strength SCR alloys. Alloys 7050 and 7049 are found superior in short-transverse cross-corrosion resistance to older 7075 alloy; all alloys are subject to self-loading effect caused by wedging of corrosion products in cracks. Effect causes cracks to continue to grow, even at very-low externally applied loads.

  17. Surface treatments for controlling corrosion rate of biodegradable Mg and Mg-based alloy implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uddin, M S; Hall, Colin; Murphy, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Due to their excellent biodegradability characteristics, Mg and Mg-based alloys have become an emerging material in biomedical implants, notably for repair of bone as well as coronary arterial stents. However, the main problem with Mg-based alloys is their rapid corrosion in aggressive environments such as human bodily fluids. Previously, many approaches such as control of alloying materials, composition and surface treatments, have been attempted to regulate the corrosion rate. This article presents a comprehensive review of recent research focusing on surface treatment techniques utilised to control the corrosion rate and surface integrity of Mg-based alloys in both in vitro and in vivo environments. Surface treatments generally involve the controlled deposition of thin film coatings using various coating processes, and mechanical surfacing such as machining, deep rolling or low plasticity burnishing. The aim is to either make a protective thin layer of a material or to change the micro-structure and mechanical properties at the surface and sub-surface levels, which will prevent rapid corrosion and thus delay the degradation of the alloys. We have organised the review of past works on coatings by categorising the coatings into two classes—conversion and deposition coatings—while works on mechanical treatments are reviewed based on the tool-based processes which affect the sub-surface microstructure and mechanical properties of the material. Various types of coatings and their processing techniques under two classes of coating and mechanical treatment approaches have been analysed and discussed to investigate their impact on the corrosion performance, biomechanical integrity, biocompatibility and cell viability. Potential challenges and future directions in designing and developing the improved biodegradable Mg/Mg-based alloy implants were addressed and discussed. The literature reveals that no solutions are yet complete and hence new and innovative approaches

  18. Surface treatments for controlling corrosion rate of biodegradable Mg and Mg-based alloy implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, M S; Hall, Colin; Murphy, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Due to their excellent biodegradability characteristics, Mg and Mg-based alloys have become an emerging material in biomedical implants, notably for repair of bone as well as coronary arterial stents. However, the main problem with Mg-based alloys is their rapid corrosion in aggressive environments such as human bodily fluids. Previously, many approaches such as control of alloying materials, composition and surface treatments, have been attempted to regulate the corrosion rate. This article presents a comprehensive review of recent research focusing on surface treatment techniques utilised to control the corrosion rate and surface integrity of Mg-based alloys in both in vitro and in vivo environments. Surface treatments generally involve the controlled deposition of thin film coatings using various coating processes, and mechanical surfacing such as machining, deep rolling or low plasticity burnishing. The aim is to either make a protective thin layer of a material or to change the micro-structure and mechanical properties at the surface and sub-surface levels, which will prevent rapid corrosion and thus delay the degradation of the alloys. We have organised the review of past works on coatings by categorising the coatings into two classes—conversion and deposition coatings—while works on mechanical treatments are reviewed based on the tool-based processes which affect the sub-surface microstructure and mechanical properties of the material. Various types of coatings and their processing techniques under two classes of coating and mechanical treatment approaches have been analysed and discussed to investigate their impact on the corrosion performance, biomechanical integrity, biocompatibility and cell viability. Potential challenges and future directions in designing and developing the improved biodegradable Mg/Mg-based alloy implants were addressed and discussed. The literature reveals that no solutions are yet complete and hence new and innovative approaches

  19. Ultrasonic Measurement of Erosion/corrosion Rates in Industrial Piping Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, A. N.; Safavi, V.; Honarvar, F.

    2011-06-01

    Industrial piping systems that carry aggressive corrosion or erosion agents may suffer from a gradual wall thickness reduction that eventually threatens pipe integrity. Thinning rates could be estimated from the very small change in wall thickness values measured by conventional ultrasound over a time span of at least a few months. However, measurements performed over shorter time spans would yield no useful information—minor signal distortions originating from grain noise and ultrasonic equipment imperfections prevent a meaningful estimate of the minuscule reduction in echo travel time. Using a Model-Based Estimation (MBE) technique, a signal processing scheme has been developed that enables the echo signals from the pipe wall to be separated from the noise. This was implemented in a laboratory experimental program, featuring accelerated erosion/corrosion on the inner wall of a test pipe. The result was a reduction in the uncertainty in the wall thinning rate by a factor of four. This improvement enables a more rapid response by system operators to a change in plant conditions that could pose a pipe integrity problem. It also enables a rapid evaluation of the effectiveness of new corrosion inhibiting agents under plant operating conditions.

  20. Corrosion of structural materials and electrochemistry in high temperature water of nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke

    2008-01-01

    The latest experiences with corrosion in the cooling systems of nuclear power plants are reviewed. High temperature cooling water causes corrosion of structural materials, which often leads to adverse effects in the plants, e.g., increased shutdown radiation, generation of defects in materials of major components and fuel claddings, and increased volume of radwaste sources. Corrosion behavior is greatly affected by water quality and differs according to the water quality values and the materials themselves. In order to establish reliable operation, each plant requires its own unique optimal water chemistry control based on careful consideration of its system, materials and operational history. Electrochemistry is one of the key issues that determine corrosion-related problems, but it is not the only issue. Most corrosion-related phenomena, e.g., flow accelerated corrosion (FAC), intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) and thinning of fuel cladding materials, can be understood based on an electrochemical index, e.g., the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), conductivities and pH. The most important electrochemical index, the ECP, can be measured at elevated temperature and applied to in situ sensors of corrosion conditions to detect anomalous conditions of structural materials at their very early stages. (orig.)

  1. AFM study of the early corrosion of a high strength steel in a diluted sodium chloride solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Javier; Fullea, Jose; Andrade, Carmen; Gaitero, Juan J.; Porro, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    The high strength steels employed as reinforcement in pre-stressed concrete structures are drawn wire steels of eutectoid composition with a pearlitic microstructure. This work is focused on the study, by atomic force microscopy, of the early stages of the corrosion of such steels as a consequence of their exposition to a sodium chloride solution. The obtained images show the pearlitic microstructure of the steel, with a preferential attack of the ferrite phase and the cementite acting as a cathode. The corrosion rate was determined by calculating the amount of material lost from a roughness analysis. The obtained results are in good agreement with the predictions of Galvelel's theory, according to which the corrosion rate slows down as the pit depth increases

  2. Corrosion fatigue behavior of high strength brass in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, A.S.; Kassem, M.A.; Ramadan, R.M.; El-Zeky, M.A. [Suez Canal Univ., Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering (Egypt)

    2000-07-01

    Corrosion fatigue behavior of British Standard high strength brass, CZ 127 has been studied in various environments, 3.5%NaC1 solution and 3.5%NaC1 containing 1000ppm ammonia by applying the reverse bending technique, strain-controlled cyclic, at 67 cycles/min. Characteristics of the produced alloy were studied using differential thermal analysis with applying its results in heat treating of the alloy; metallographic examinations; hardness measurements; X-ray; and electrochemical behavior of the unstressed alloy. CZ 127 was fatigued at three different conditions, solution treated, peak aged, and over aged at a fixed strain amplitude, 0.03 5. Solution treated alloy gave the best fatigue properties in all environments tested among the other materials. Results of the alloy studied were compared with that obtained of 70/30 {alpha}-brass. Fracture surface of the fatigued alloy was examined using optical microscope and scanning electron microscope equipped with EDX. (author)

  3. Corrosion fatigue behavior of high strength brass in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, A.S.; Kassem, M.A.; Ramadan, R.M.; El-Zeky, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Corrosion fatigue behavior of British Standard high strength brass, CZ 127 has been studied in various environments, 3.5%NaC1 solution and 3.5%NaC1 containing 1000ppm ammonia by applying the reverse bending technique, strain-controlled cyclic, at 67 cycles/min. Characteristics of the produced alloy were studied using differential thermal analysis with applying its results in heat treating of the alloy; metallographic examinations; hardness measurements; X-ray; and electrochemical behavior of the unstressed alloy. CZ 127 was fatigued at three different conditions, solution treated, peak aged, and over aged at a fixed strain amplitude, 0.03 5. Solution treated alloy gave the best fatigue properties in all environments tested among the other materials. Results of the alloy studied were compared with that obtained of 70/30 α-brass. Fracture surface of the fatigued alloy was examined using optical microscope and scanning electron microscope equipped with EDX. (author)

  4. Effect of water chemistry on flow accelerated corrosion rate of carbon steel measured by on-line corrosion-monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, K.; Domae, M.; Yoneda, K.; Inada, F.

    2010-01-01

    Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) of carbon steel is one of the most important subjects in coolant systems of power plants. FAC is influenced by material, flow condition, temperature, and water chemistry. Iron and chromium solubility should be the most effective factor to determine the effect of water chemistry on the FAC. It is very important to evaluate the correlation between the solubility and the FAC rate of the carbon steel. In the present study, the effects of pH and Cr concentration of material on the FAC rate of carbon steel were evaluated by using high temperature loop equipment with on-line corrosion-monitoring system. Effect of dissolved oxygen concentration at pH 7 was also evaluated. The experimental FAC rates were compared with the calculation result, which was obtained from a FAC model developed previously by the authors' group. The tube specimens made of STPT 480 carbon steel were used for the FAC tests. The Cr concentration of STPT 480 was specially adjusted to 0.001 and 0.08 %. The inner diameters of the tubes were 1.6, 2.4, and 3.2 mm. The solutions were fed to the specimens with the flow rate of 1.5 l/min. The temperature of the solution at the specimen was controlled at 140 o C. Test solutions were demineralized water or NH 3 solutions of pH 8.0, 9.2, and 10.0. The increase in pH more than 9 decreased the FAC rates of both 0.001 and 0.08 % Cr specimens at 140 o C. Increase of the Cr concentration of the material decreased the FAC rate in the solution of pH 7.0, 8.0, 9.2, and 10.0. The FAC model reproduced well dependence of the experimental FAC behavior on water chemistry. It was confirmed that effect of pH and Cr concentration of material on the FAC rate were closely related to the solubility and diffusion of iron and chromium. (author)

  5. The effects of time, temperature and rotation of water on the corrosion rate of different types of steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhamad Daud; Jamaliah Shariff.

    1984-01-01

    By using hot plate/magnetic stirrer and immersion technique, the steel corroded uniformly and their corrosion rates vary due to type of steel, time of immersion, temperature and rotation of water. Therefore the rate of general corrosion, or sealing, of steel alloys is influenced by a number of factors, those best established being the composition of the metal, time, temperature, velocity, cleanliness or roughness of the metal surface and direct contact with solutions of the other materials. (author)

  6. Corrosion of titanium alloys in high temperature near anaerobic seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, Jianjun; Blackwood, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • In absence of CO 2 Ti grades 2 and 5 suffer crevice corrosion at temperatures 80 °C and 200 °C. • For Ti grade 5 crevice corrosion can occur as low as 80 °C in the presence of CO 2 . • Ti grade 7 is immune to crevice corrosion in test conditions. • All grades resistant to SCC and pitting in presence of CO 2 . • Rare earth yttrium additions below 0.2 wt%. for improved mechanical properties are detrimental to corrosions performance. • Analysis of threat of hydrogen induced cracking suggest this is not a threat at a deepsea well head. - Abstract: Grades 2, 5 and Grade 7 were investigated in near anaerobic (<1 ppm oxygen) seawater up to 200 °C with and without CO 2 . All three grades were found to resist stress corrosion cracking and pitting corrosion. Grades 2 and 5 suffer crevice corrosion at temperatures 80 °C and 200 °C respectively. In the presence of CO 2 Grade 5 becomes more vulnerable to crevice corrosion, with attack starting at 80 °C with preferential dissolution of the beta phase. An analysis of the threat of hydrogen induced cracking leads to the conclusion that this was not a likely threat to any of the Ti alloys investigated.

  7. A method for measuring the corrosion rate of materials in spallation neutron source target/blanket cooling loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lillard, R.S.; Butt, D.P.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes the ongoing evaluation of the susceptibility of materials in accelerator target/blanket cooling loops to corrosion. To simulate the exposure environment in a target/blanket cooling loop, samples were irradiated by an 800 MeV proton beam at the A6 Target Station of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). To accomplish this, a cooling water loop capable of exposing corrosion samples to an 800 MeV proton beam at currents upwards of 1 mA was constructed. This loop allowed control and evaluation hydrogen water chemistry, water conductivity, and solution pH. Specially designed ceramic sealed samples were used to measure the real-time corrosion rates of materials placed directly in the proton beam using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). EIS was also used to measure real-time corrosion rates of samples that were out of the proton beam and downstream from the in-beam samples. These out-of-beam probes primarily examined the effects of long lived water radiolysis products from proton irradiation on corrosion rates. An overview of the LANSCE corrosion loop, the corrosion probes, and data from an in-beam alloy 718 probe are presented

  8. High temperature corrosion under conditions simulating biomass firing: depth-resolved phase identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Montgomery, Melanie; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    ) were coated with KCl and is o-thermally exposed at 560 o C for 168 h under a flue gas corresponding to straw firing. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) characterization techniques were employed for comprehensive characterization......Both cross-sectional and plan view, ‘top-down’ characterization methods were employed , for a depth-resolved characterization of corrosion products resulting from high temperature corrosion under laboratory conditions simulating biomass firing. Samples of an austenitic stainless steel (TP 347H FG...... of the corrosion product. Results from this comprehensive characterization revealed more details on the morphology and composition of the corrosion product....

  9. Corrosion rates of fasteners in treated wood exposed to 100% relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer

    2009-01-01

    In the past, gravimetric corrosion data for fasteners exposed to treated wood has been reported as a percent weight loss. Although percent weight loss is a valid measure of corrosion for comparing identical fasteners, it can distort the corrosion performance of fasteners with different geometries and densities. This report reevaluates a key report on the corrosiveness...

  10. Annual report, spring 2015. Alternative chemical cleaning methods for high level waste tanks-corrosion test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrwas, R. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-07-06

    The testing presented in this report is in support of the investigation of the Alternative Chemical Cleaning program to aid in developing strategies and technologies to chemically clean radioactive High Level Waste tanks prior to tank closure. The data and conclusions presented here were the examination of the corrosion rates of A285 carbon steel and 304L stainless steel when interacted with the chemical cleaning solution composed of 0.18 M nitric acid and 0.5 wt. % oxalic acid. This solution has been proposed as a dissolution solution that would be used to remove the remaining hard heel portion of the sludge in the waste tanks. This solution was combined with the HM and PUREX simulated sludge with dilution ratios that represent the bulk oxalic cleaning process (20:1 ratio, acid solution to simulant) and the cumulative volume associated with multiple acid strikes (50:1 ratio). The testing was conducted over 28 days at 50°C and deployed two methods to invest the corrosion conditions; passive weight loss coupon and an active electrochemical probe were used to collect data on the corrosion rate and material performance. In addition to investigating the chemical cleaning solutions, electrochemical corrosion testing was performed on acidic and basic solutions containing sodium permanganate at room temperature to explore the corrosion impacts if these solutions were to be implemented to retrieve remaining actinides that are currently in the sludge of the tank.

  11. High temperature corrosion of nickel-base alloys in environments containing alkali sulphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, Rachel; Flyg, Jesper; Caddeo, Sophie [Corrosion and Metals Research Institute, KIMAB, Stockholm (Sweden); Karlsson, Fredrik [Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery, Finspong (Sweden)

    2007-02-15

    This work is directed towards producing data to assist in lifetime assessment of components in gas turbines run in severely polluted industrial environments where the main corrosive species is SO{sub 2}, which can condense to form alkali sulphates. Corrosion rates have been measured for the base materials, in order to assess the worst-case scenario, in which cracks or other damage has occurred to the protective coating. The information is expected to be of value to manufacturers, owners and inspectors of gas turbines. Six nickel-base superalloys were subject to thermal cycles of 160 hours duration, and 0.8mg/cm{sup 2} of 20 mol % Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 80mol% K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was applied before each cycle. The test temperatures were 850 deg C and 900 deg C, with maximum test durations of 24 cycles and 12 cycles respectively. The metal loss was assessed by metallography of cross sections and the sulphidation attack was found to be very uneven. Mass change data indicated that the corrosion process was largely linear in character, and probability plots and estimations of the propagation rate of corrosion based on the linear growth assumption were produced. The performance of the alloys increased with increasing chromium content. The single crystal materials CMSX4 and MD2 showed such high corrosion rates that their use in severely contaminated industrial environments is considered inadvisable. The best performance was shown by Inconel 939 and Inconel 6203, so that even if cracks occur in the protective coating, a reasonable remaining lifetime can be expected for these materials. Sulphide formation occurred at the reaction front in all cases and mixed sulphides such as Ta-Ni or Ti-Nb sulphides were often present. The work has news value since very little long-term data is currently available for materials performance in severely sulphidising environments. The project goals in terms of exposures and metrology have been fully realised. Contributions have been made to the

  12. Synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion in crude oil distillation unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, B. S.; Yin, W. F.; Sang, D. H.; Jiang, Z. Y.

    2012-10-01

    The synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion at high temperature in crude oil distillation unit was studied using Q235 carbon-manganese steel and 316 stainless steel. The corrosion of Q235 and 316 in corrosion media containing sulfur and/or naphthenic acid at 280 °C was investigated by weight loss, scanning electron microscope (SEM), EDS and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analysis. The results showed that in corrosion media containing only sulfur, the corrosion rate of Q235 and 316 first increased and then decreased with the increase of sulfur content. In corrosion media containing naphthenic acid and sulfur, with the variations of acid value or sulfur content, the synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion has a great influence on the corrosion rate of Q235 and 316. It was indicated that the sulfur accelerated naphthenic acid corrosion below a certain sulfur content but prevented naphthenic acid corrosion above that. The corrosion products on two steels after exposure to corrosion media were investigated. The stable Cr5S8 phases detected in the corrosion products film of 316 were considered as the reason why 316 has greater corrosion resistance to that of Q235.

  13. Corrosion kinetics of alloy Ni-22Cr-13Mo-3W as structural material in high level nuclear waste containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Martin A.

    2004-01-01

    Alloy Ni-22Cr-13Mo-3W (also known as C-22) is one of the candidates to fabricate high level nuclear waste containers. These containers are designed to maintain isolation of the waste for a minimum of 10,000 years. In this period, the material must be resistant to corrosion. If the containers were in contact with water, it is assumed that alloy C-22 may undergo three different corrosion mechanisms: general corrosion, localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. This thesis discusses only the first two types of degradation. Electrochemical techniques such as amperometry, potentiometry, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and non-electrochemical techniques such as microscopic observation, X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were applied to study the corrosion behavior of alloy C-22 in 1 M NaCl, 25 C degrees saturated NaF (approximately 1 M) and 0,5 M NaCl + 0,5 M NaF solutions. Effects of temperature, pH and alloy thermal aging were analyzed. The corrosion rates obtained at 90 C degrees were low ranging from 0.04 μm/year to 0.48 μm /year. They increased with temperature and decreased with solution pH. Most of the impedance measurements showed a simply capacitive behavior. A second high-frequency time constant was detected in some cases. It was attributed to the formation of a nickel oxide and/or hydroxide at potentials near the reversible potential for this reaction. The active/passive transition detected in some potentiodynamic polarization curves was attributed to the same process. The corrosion potential showed an important increase after 24 hours of immersion. This increase in the corrosion potential was associated with an improvement of the passive film. The corrosion potential was always lower than the re-passivation potential for the corresponding media. The trans passive behavior of alloy C-22 was mainly influenced by temperature and solution chemistry. A clear trans passive peak

  14. Chloride-induced corrosion mechanism and rate of enamel- and epoxy-coated deformed steel bars embedded in mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Fujian; Chen, Genda; Brow, Richard K.

    2016-01-01

    The chloride-induced corrosion mechanisms of uncoated, pure enamel (PE)-coated, mixed enamel (ME)-coated, double enamel (DE)-coated, and fusion bonded epoxy (FBE)-coated deformed steel bars embedded in mortar cylinders are investigated in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution and compared through electrochemical tests and visual inspection. Corrosion initiated after 29 or 61 days of tests in all uncoated and enamel-coated steel bars, and after 244 days of tests in some FBE-coated steel bars. In active stage, DE- and FBE-coated steel bars are subjected to the highest and lowest corrosion rates, respectively. The uncoated and ME-coated steel bars revealed relatively uniform corrosion while the PE-, DE-, and FBE-coated steel bars experienced pitting corrosion around damaged coating areas. Due to the combined effect of ion diffusion and capillary suction, wet–dry cyclic immersion caused more severe corrosion than continuous immersion. Both exposure conditions affected the corrosion rate more significantly than the water–cement ratio in mortar design.

  15. High-temperature corrosion of metals in the salt and metallic melts containing rare earths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, V. V.; Abramov, A. V.; Zhilyakov, A. Yu.; Belikov, S. V.; Volkovich, V. A.; Polovov, I. B.; Rebrin, O. I.

    2016-09-01

    A complex of independent methods was employed to study the corrosion resistance of molybdenum, zirconium, tantalum and tungsten in chloride, chloride-fluoride and fluoride-oxide melts based on LiCl, CaCl2, NaCl- KCl, LiF, and containing rare earths. Tests were conducted for 30 h at 750-1050 °C. The metals showed excellent corrosion resistance in fused chlorides (the corrosion rates were below 0.0005 g/(m2 h). Despite the presence of chemically active fluoride ions in the chloride-fluoride melts, the metals studied also showed very low corrosion rates, except molybdenum, for which the rate of corrosion was 0,8 g/(m2 h). The corrosion resistance of tantalum was considerably reduced in the fluoride-oxide melts; the corrosion rate was over 1 g/(m2 h) corresponding to the 8-th grade of stability and placing tantalum to the group of "low stability" materials.

  16. High Velocity Oxidation and Hot Corrosion Resistance of Some ODS Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, C. E.; Deadmore, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    Several oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys were tested for cyclic, high velocity, oxidation, and hot corrosion resistance. These results were compared to the resistance of an advanced, NiCrAl coated superalloy. An ODS FeCrAl were identified as having sufficient oxidation and hot corrosion resistance to allow potential use in an aircraft gas turbine without coating.

  17. Potential high temperature corrosion problems due to co-firing of biomass and fossil fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Vilhelmsen, T.; Jensen, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past years, considerable high temperature corrosion problems have been encountered when firing biomass in power plants due to the high content of potassium chloride in the deposits. Therefore to combat chloride corrosion problems co-firing of biomass with a fossil fuel has been undertaken....... This results in potassium chloride being converted to potassium sulphate in the combustion chamber and it is sulphate rich deposits that are deposited on the vulnerable metallic surfaces such as high temperature superheaters. Although this removes the problem of chloride corrosion, other corrosion mechanisms...... appear such as sulphidation and hot corrosion due to sulphate deposits. At Studstrup power plant Unit 4, based on trials with exposure times of 3000 hours using 0-20% straw co-firing with coal, the plant now runs with a fuel of 10% straw + coal. After three years exposure in this environment...

  18. Potential high temperature corrosion problems due to co-firing of biomass and fossil fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Vilhelmsen, T.; Jensen, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past few years, considerable high temperature corrosion problems have been encountered when firing biomass in power plants due to the high content of potassium chloride in the deposits. Therefore, to combat chloride corrosion problems cofiring of biomass with a fossil fuel has been...... undertaken. This results in potassium chloride being converted to potassium sulphate in the combustion chamber and it is sulphate rich deposits that are deposited on the vulnerable metallic surfaces such as high temperature superheaters. Although this removes the problem of chloride corrosion, other...... corrosion mechanisms appear such as sulphidation and hot corrosion due to sulphate deposits. At Studstrup power plant Unit 4, based on trials with exposure times of 3000 h using 0–20% straw co-firing with coal, the plant now runs with a fuel mix of 10% strawþcoal. Based on results from a 3 years exposure...

  19. Synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion in crude oil distillation unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, B.S., E-mail: yinwenfeng2010@163.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Sichuan, Chengdu, 610500 (China); Yin, W.F. [College of Mechatronic Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Sichuan, Chengdu, 610500 (China); Sang, D.H. [Sheng Li Construction Group International Engineering Department, Shandong, Dongying, 257000 (China); Jiang, Z.Y. [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Sichuan, Chengdu, 610500 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The corrosion of a carbon-manganese steel and a stainless steel in sulfur and/or naphthenic acid media was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The corrosion rate of the carbon-manganese steel increased with the increase of the acid value and sulfur content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The critical values of the concentration of sulfur and acid for corrosion rate of the stainless steel were ascertained respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The stainless steel is superior to the carbon-manganese steel in corrosion resistance because of the presence of stable Cr{sub 5}S{sub 8} phases. - Abstract: The synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion at high temperature in crude oil distillation unit was studied using Q235 carbon-manganese steel and 316 stainless steel. The corrosion of Q235 and 316 in corrosion media containing sulfur and/or naphthenic acid at 280 Degree-Sign C was investigated by weight loss, scanning electron microscope (SEM), EDS and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analysis. The results showed that in corrosion media containing only sulfur, the corrosion rate of Q235 and 316 first increased and then decreased with the increase of sulfur content. In corrosion media containing naphthenic acid and sulfur, with the variations of acid value or sulfur content, the synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion has a great influence on the corrosion rate of Q235 and 316. It was indicated that the sulfur accelerated naphthenic acid corrosion below a certain sulfur content but prevented naphthenic acid corrosion above that. The corrosion products on two steels after exposure to corrosion media were investigated. The stable Cr{sub 5}S{sub 8} phases detected in the corrosion products film of 316 were considered as the reason why 316 has greater corrosion resistance to that of Q235.

  20. Deposition and high temperature corrosion in a 10 MW straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Hanne Philbert; Frandsen, Flemming; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1998-01-01

    Deposition and corrosion measurements were conducted at a 10 MW wheat straw fired stoker boiler used for combined power and heat production. The plant experiences major problems with deposits on the heat transfer surfaces, and test probes have shown enhanced corrosion due to selective corrosion...... for metal temperatures above 520 C. Deposition measurements carried out at a position equal to the secondary superheater showed deposits rich in potassium and chlorine and to a lesser extent in silicon, calcium, and sulfur. Potassium and chlorine make up 40-80 wt% of the deposits. Mechanisms of deposit...

  1. Study on Increasing High Temperature pH(t) to Reduce Iron Corrosion Products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Dong Man; Hur, Nam Yong; Kim, Waang Bae

    2011-01-01

    The transportation and deposition of iron corrosion products are important elements that affect both the steam generator (SG) integrity and secondary system in pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants. Most of iron corrosion products are generated on carbon steel materials due to flow accelerated corrosion (FAC). The several parameters like water chemistry, temperature, hydrodynamic, and steel composition affect FAC. It is well established that the at-temperature pH of the deaerated water system has a first order effect on the FAC rate of carbon steels through nuclear industry researches. In order to reduce transportation and deposition of iron corrosion products, increasing pH(t) tests were applied on secondary system of A, B units. Increasing pH(t) successfully reduced flow accelerated corrosion. The effect of increasing pH(t) to inhibit FAC was identified through the experiment and pH(t) evaluation in this paper

  2. Inorganic Corrosion-Inhibitive Pigments for High-Temperature Alkali-activated Well Casing Foam Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pyatina, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-11-14

    This study evaluates inorganic pigments for improving carbon steel (CS) brine-corrosion protection by the sodium metasilicate-activated calcium aluminate cement/Fly Ash blend at 300°C. Calcium borosilicate (CBS) and zinc phosphate, significantly improved CS corrosion-protection by decreasing cement’s permeability for corrosive ions and inhibiting anodic corrosion. An amorphous Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O phase tightly attached to CS surface formed at 300oC in CBS-modified cement pore solution. The corrosion rate of the CS covered with this phase was nearly 4-fold lower than in the case of nonmodified cement pore solution where the major phase formed on the surface of CS was crystalline analcime.

  3. Inorganic Corrosion-Inhibitive Pigments for High-Temperature Alkali-activated Well Casing Foam Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pyatina, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-11-01

    This study evaluates inorganic pigments for improving carbon steel (CS) brine-corrosion protection by the sodium metasilicate-activated calcium aluminate cement/Fly Ash blend at 300°C. Calcium borosilicate (CBS) and zinc phosphate, significantly improved CS corrosion-protection by decreasing cement’s permeability for corrosive ions and inhibiting anodic corrosion. An amorphous Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O phase tightly attached to CS surface formed at 300oC in CBS-modified cement pore solution. The corrosion rate of the CS covered with this phase was nearly 4-fold lower than in the case of nonmodified cement pore solution where the major phase formed on the surface of CS was crystalline analcime.

  4. Assessment of risk associated with long-term corrosion of alloy 22 and Ti-7 in the potential yucca mountain high-level nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, T.M.; Pensado, O.; Dunn, D.

    2004-01-01

    period of the repository. The evaporation of groundwater or of a thin film of water adsorbed on the WP surface mixing with dust would form mixed salts on the WP surface. High temperature deliquescence relative humidity from the mixed salts was evaluated using speciation calculations to determine whether pH and the concentrations of chloride and nitrate effect localized corrosion. Assuming localized corrosion would occur, credit is given to the remaining WP surface area in the evaluation of radionuclide release. NRC's Total-system performance assessment (TPA) Code was exercised to assess the risk associated with the partial WP failure by localized corrosion. These TPA exercises are extended to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) to evaluate the effect of cracks in the radionuclide release. Also, in localized corrosion and SCC, existing models for the initiation times are exercised to understand the model behavior in a geologic time scale. Lastly, the fluoride-induced fast corrosion of DS is evaluated. Although fluoride is known to accelerate Ti corrosion, the corrosion products, Ti-F complexes, may limit Ti corrosion controlled by fluoride supply rates. A mass balance of fluoride under the various repository conditions is used to determine realistic DS corrosion rates. (authors)

  5. Establishing empirical relationships to predict porosity level and corrosion rate of atmospheric plasma-sprayed alumina coatings on AZ31B magnesium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Thirumalaikumarasamy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma sprayed ceramic coatings are successfully used in many industrial applications, where high wear and corrosion resistance with thermal insulation are required. In this work, empirical relationships were developed to predict the porosity and corrosion rate of alumina coatings by incorporating independently controllable atmospheric plasma spray operational parameters (input power, stand-off distance and powder feed rate using response surface methodology (RSM. A central composite rotatable design with three factors and five levels was chosen to minimize the number of experimental conditions. Within the scope of the design space, the input power and the stand-off distance appeared to be the most significant two parameters affecting the responses among the three investigated process parameters. A linear regression relationship was also established between porosity and corrosion rate of the alumina coatings. Further, sensitivity analysis was carried out and compared with the relative impact of three process parameters on porosity level and corrosion rate to verify the measurement errors on the values of the uncertainty in estimated parameters.

  6. The composition effect on the long-term corrosion of high-level waste glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrma, P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Waste glass can be optimized for long-term corrosion behavior if the key parameters that control the rate of corrosion are identified, measured, and modeled as functions of glass composition. Second-order polynomial models have been used to optimize glass with respect to a set of requirements on glass properties, such as viscosity and outcomes of standard corrosion tests. Extensive databases exist for the 7-day Product Consistency Test and the 28-day Materials Characterization Center tests, which have been used for nuclear waste glasses in the United States. Models based on these tests are reviewed and discussed to demonstrate the compositional effects on the extent of corrosion under specified conditions. However, modeling the rate of corrosion is potentially more useful for predicting long-term behavior than modeling the extent of corrosion measured by standard tests. Based on an experimental study of two glasses, it is shown that the rate of corrosion can be characterized by simple functions with physically meaningful coefficients. (author)

  7. High temperature (salt melt) corrosion tests with ceramic-coated steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schütz, Adelheid [University Bayreuth, Metals and Alloys, Ludwig-Thoma-Str. 36b, D-95447 Bayreuth (Germany); Günthner, Martin; Motz, Günter [University Bayreuth, Ceramic Materials Engineering, L.-Thoma-Str. 36b, D-95447 Bayreuth (Germany); Greißl, Oliver [EnBW Kraftwerke AG, Schelmenwasenstraße 13-15, D-70567 Stuttgart (Germany); Glatzel, Uwe, E-mail: uwe.glatzel@uni-bayreuth.de [University Bayreuth, Metals and Alloys, Ludwig-Thoma-Str. 36b, D-95447 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2015-06-01

    Thermal recycling of refuse in waste-to-energy plants reduces the problems connected to waste disposal, and is an alternative source of electric energy. However, the combustion process in waste incinerators results in a fast degradation of the steam-carrying superheater steel tubes by corrosive attack and abrasive wear. Higher firing temperatures are used to increase their efficiency but lead to higher corrosion rates. It is more economical to apply protective coatings on the superheater steel tubes than to replace the base material. In-situ tests were conducted in a waste-to-energy plant first in order to identify and quantify all involved corrosive elements. Laboratory scale experiments with salt melts were developed accordingly. The unprotected low-alloyed steel displayed substantial local corrosion. Corrosion was predominant along the grain boundaries of α-ferrite. The corrosion rate was further increased by FeCl{sub 3} and a mixture of HCL and FeCl{sub 3}. Coatings based on pre-ceramic polymers with specific filler particles were engineered to protect superheater tubes. Tests proved their suitability to protect low-alloYed steel tubes from corrosive attack under conditions typical for superheaterS in waste incinerators, rendering higher firing temperatures in waste-to-energy plants possible. - Highlights: • Corrosion wall thickness losses of 400 μm/2 weeks occurred in a waste incinerator. • Abrasion is a major problem on superheater tubes in waste incinerators. • Laboratory salt melt tests can simulate metal corrosion in waste incinerators. • Corrosion protection coatings for steel (temperature: max. 530 °C) were developed. • Higher steam temperatures are possible in WIs with the developed coatings.

  8. High-Temperature Ceramic Matrix Composite with High Corrosion Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-02

    description of high temperature oxidation processes of composite ceramic materials of ZrB2 - SiC and ZrB2-SiC-Zr(Mo)Si2 systems up to high (~1300 °C...analysis was applied using MІN-7 mineralogical microscope and a set of standard immersion liquids with the known values of refraction coefficients...2.0 V) corresponds to the simultaneous formation of ZrO2 zirconium dioxide of monoclinic modification and Zr(OH)4 zirconium hydroxide which is

  9. Investigation of corrosion resistance of alloys with high mechanical characteristics in some environments of food industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tremoureux, Yves

    1978-01-01

    This research thesis aimed at improving knowledge in the field of stress-free corrosion of alloys with high mechanical characteristics in aqueous environments, at highlighting some necessary aspects of their behaviour during cleaning or disinfection, and at selecting alloys which possess a good stress-free corrosion resistance in view of a later investigation of their stress corrosion resistance. After a presentation of the metallurgical characteristics of high mechanical strength alloys and the report of a bibliographical study on corrosion resistance of these alloys, the author presents and discusses the results obtained in the study of a possible migration of metallic ions in a milk product which is submitted to a centrifugation, and of the corrosion resistance of selected alloys with respect to the different media they will be in contact with during ultra-centrifugation. The following alloys have been used in this research: Marval 18, Marphynox, Marval X12, 17-4PH steel, Inconel 718 [fr

  10. Natural compounds as corrosion inhibitors for highly cycled systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quraishi, M.A.; Farooqi, I.H.; Saini, P.A. [Corrosion Research Lab., Aligarh (India)

    1999-11-01

    Strict environmental legislations have led to the development of green inhibitors in recent years. In continuation of the authors` research work on development of green inhibitors, they have investigated the aqueous extracts of three plants namely: Azadirachta indica, Punica Granatum and Momordica charantia as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in 3% NaCl using weight loss and electrochemical methods. All the investigated compounds exhibited excellent corrosion inhibition properties comparable to that of HEDP. Azadirachta showed better scale inhibition effect than HEDP.

  11. Mass transfer of corrosion products in high temperature, high pressure water circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodd, J.T.; Nicholson, F.D.

    1976-01-01

    The CWL-3 loop is used to study the mass transfer of corrosion products in water at 270 0 C for pressures up to 6.9 MPa. Two parallel Zircaloy-2 test sections are heated directly by a low voltage a.c. electrical current to give a heat flux up to 500 W cm -2 and a heat rating up to 1500 W cm -1 . Coolant flow rates can be varied up to 0.4 kg cm -2 s -1 with or without boiling. A tracer technique has been developed to monitor continuously the deposition of corrosion products in the test sections during operation of the loop. Magnetite deposits 2.6 nm thick can be readily detected. (author)

  12. Corrosion behaviour of high chromium ferritic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiesheyer, H.; Lennartz, G.; Brandis, H.

    1976-01-01

    Ferritic steels developed for seawater desalination and containing 20 to 28% chromium, up to 5% Mo and additions of nickel and copper have been tested with respect to their corrosion behaviour, in particular in chloride containing media. The materials in the sensibilized state were tested for intercrystalline corrosion susceptibility in the Strauss-, Streicher-, nitric acid hydrofluoric acid- and Huey-Tests. No intercrystalline corrosion was encountered in the case of the steels with 28% Cr and 2% Mo. The resistance to pitting was assessed on the basis of rupture potentials determined by potentiokinetic tests. The resistance of the steels with 20% Cr and 5% Mo or 28% Cr and 2% Mo is superior to that of the molybdenum containing austenitic types. Addition of nickel yields a significant increase in crevice corrosion resistance; the same applies to resistance in sulfuric acid. In boiling seawater all the materials tested are resistant to stress corrosion cracking. No sign of any type of corrosion was found on nickel containing steels after about 6,000 hours exposure to boiling 50% seawater brine even under salt deposits. (orig.) [de

  13. Corrosion Behavior of Nickel-Plated Alloy 600 in High Temperature Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Hwang, Il Soon

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, electrochemical and microstructural characteristics of nickel-plated Alloy 600 wee investigated in order to identify the performance of electroless Ni-plating on Alloy 600 in high-temperature aqueous condition with the comparison of electrolytic nickel-plating. For high temperature corrosion test of nickel-plated Alloy 600, specimens were exposed for 770 hours to typical PWR primary water condition. During the test, open circuit potentials (OCP's) of all specimens were measured using a reference electrode. Also, resistance to flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) test was examined in order to check the durability of plated layers in high-velocity flow environment at high temperature. After exposures to high flow rate aqueous condition, the integrity of surfaces was confirmed by using both scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). For the field application, a remote process for electroless nickel-plating was demonstrated using a plate specimen with narrow gap on a laboratory scale. Finally, a practical seal design was suggested for more convenient application

  14. Contribution of archaeological analogs to the estimation of average corrosion rates and long term corrosion mechanisms of low carbon steel in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neff, D.

    2003-11-01

    . This corrosion form, constituted among others by a siderite layer is due to a particular environment: waterlogged soil containing wood. In the whole, analyses conducted in the TM show that it is composed of goethite badly crystallized in comparison with those of the DPL. Moreover, in this zone, the average elemental iron amount decreases progressively from the metal to the soil in which it stabilizes. In order to know the behaviour of the identified phases in soil water, some thermodynamic data have been involved to calculate their solubility in function of pH, potential and various water composition. The first conclusion concerns the influence of the composition and the structure of the material which is not important for the corrosion behaviour. From the results, some hypothesis have been formulated on the long term corrosion mechanisms of hypo-eutectoids steels in the considered environment. The role of the cracks formed in the DPL during the burial was evidenced. Moreover, these corrosion products undertake a dissolution in the soil water and a reprecipitation, explaining the progressive decrease of the iron amount in the TM. Lastly, some average corrosion rates have been measured with the help of the analytical and thermodynamic results: they do not exceed 4 μm/year. (author)

  15. High Rate Digital Demodulator ASIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghuman, Parminder; Sheikh, Salman; Koubek, Steve; Hoy, Scott; Gray, Andrew

    1998-01-01

    The architecture of High Rate (600 Mega-bits per second) Digital Demodulator (HRDD) ASIC capable of demodulating BPSK and QPSK modulated data is presented in this paper. The advantages of all-digital processing include increased flexibility and reliability with reduced reproduction costs. Conventional serial digital processing would require high processing rates necessitating a hardware implementation in other than CMOS technology such as Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) which has high cost and power requirements. It is more desirable to use CMOS technology with its lower power requirements and higher gate density. However, digital demodulation of high data rates in CMOS requires parallel algorithms to process the sampled data at a rate lower than the data rate. The parallel processing algorithms described here were developed jointly by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The resulting all-digital receiver has the capability to demodulate BPSK, QPSK, OQPSK, and DQPSK at data rates in excess of 300 Mega-bits per second (Mbps) per channel. This paper will provide an overview of the parallel architecture and features of the HRDR ASIC. In addition, this paper will provide an over-view of the implementation of the hardware architectures used to create flexibility over conventional high rate analog or hybrid receivers. This flexibility includes a wide range of data rates, modulation schemes, and operating environments. In conclusion it will be shown how this high rate digital demodulator can be used with an off-the-shelf A/D and a flexible analog front end, both of which are numerically computer controlled, to produce a very flexible, low cost high rate digital receiver.

  16. Corrosion rate of API 5L Gr. X60 multipurpose steel pipeline under combined effect of water and crude oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Jian; Wang, Qiang

    2016-09-01

    Multipurpose pipeline is often seriously corroded during its service life, and the phenomenon is more prominent once the transportation medium is changed. Electrochemical polarization curves and impedance spectroscopy of the API 5L Gr. X60 steel pipeline's corrosion process in sedimentary water with different ion types and their concentrations have been studied in this work. The results showed that the corrosion rates were found to be 0.00418 and 0.00232 mm/a for pure water and crude oil, respectively. However, for the mixtures of water and crude oil (with water content increased from 0.2 vol% to 10 vol%), the corrosion rate increased consistently and reached a maximum value of 0.15557 mm/a for 10 vol% water in crude oil. The effect of the concentration of various ions, namely, chloride, bicarbonate and sulfate in (oil/water) mixtures on the corrosion rate was characterized by weight-loss method. The results showed that with increasing the ions' concentrations, the corresponding exchange current density increased significantly. The results were further supported by the observations of corrosion morphology using scanning electron microscopy and are helpful in devising guidelines which would help in reducing corrosion in multipurpose transport pipelines involving a change of transported medium during their service life.

  17. Evaluation of flow accelerated corrosion by coupled analysis of corrosion and flow dynamics (3), relationship of oxide film thickness, hematite/magnetite ratio, ECP and wall thinning rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Naitoh, Masanori; Okada, Hidetoshi; Uehara, Yasushi; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2009-01-01

    Systematic approaches for evaluating flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) are desired before discussing application of countermeasures for FAC. Firstly, future FAC occurrence should be evaluated to identify locations where a higher possibility of FAC occurrence exists, and then, wall thinning rate at the identified FAC occurrence zone is evaluated to obtain the preparation time for applying countermeasures. Wall thinning rates were calculated with the coupled models of static electrochemical analysis and dynamic double oxide layer analysis. Anodic current density and electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) were calculated with the static electrochemistry model based on an Evans diagram and ferrous ion release rate determined by the anodic current density was applied as input for the dynamic double oxide layer model. Some of the dissolved ferrous ion was removed to the bulk water and others precipitated on the surface as magnetite particles. The thickness of oxide layer was calculated with the dynamic double oxide layer model and then was applied as input for the electrochemistry model. It was confirmed that the calculated results based on the coupled models resulted good agreement with the measured ones. Higher ECP was essential for preventing FAC rate. Moderated conditions due to lower mass transfer coefficients resulted in thicker oxide layer thickness and then higher ECP, while moderated corrosion conditions due to higher oxidant concentrations resulted in larger hematite/magnetite rate and then higher ECP. (author)

  18. High temperature filtration of radioactivable corrosion products in the primary circuit of PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolle, L.

    1976-01-01

    A effective limitation to the deposition of radioactive corrosion products in the core of a reactor at power operation, is to be obtained by filtering the water of the primary circuit at a flow rate upper than 1% of the coolant flow rate. However, in view of accounting for more important release of corrosion products during the reactor start-up and also for some possible variations in the efficiency of the system, it is better that the flow rate to be treated by the cleaning circuit is stated at 5%. Filtration must be effected at the temperature of the primary circuit and preferably on each loop. To this end, the feasibility of electromagnetic filtration or filtration through a deep bed of granulated graphite has been studied. The on-loop tests effected on each filter gave efficiencies and yields respectively upper than 90% and 99% for magnetite and ferrite particles in suspension in water at 250 deg C. Such results confirm the interest lying in high temperature filtration and lead to envisage its application to reactors [fr

  19. Development of models and online diagnostic monitors of the high-temperature corrosion of refractories in oxy/fuel glass furnaces : final project report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, Stewart K.; Gupta, Amul (Monofrax Inc., Falconer, NY); Walsh, Peter M.; Rice, Steven F.; Velez, Mariano (University of Missouri, Rolla, MO); Allendorf, Mark D.; Pecoraro, George A. (PPG Industries, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA); Nilson, Robert H.; Wolfe, H. Edward (ANH Refractories, Pittsburgh, PA); Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Bugeat, Benjamin () American Air Liquide, Countryside, IL); Spear, Karl E. (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA); Marin, Ovidiu () American Air Liquide, Countryside, IL); Ghani, M. Usman (American Air Liquide, Countryside, IL)

    2005-02-01

    This report summarizes the results of a five-year effort to understand the mechanisms and develop models that predict the corrosion of refractories in oxygen-fuel glass-melting furnaces. Thermodynamic data for the Si-O-(Na or K) and Al-O-(Na or K) systems are reported, allowing equilibrium calculations to be performed to evaluate corrosion of silica- and alumina-based refractories under typical furnace operating conditions. A detailed analysis of processes contributing to corrosion is also presented. Using this analysis, a model of the corrosion process was developed and used to predict corrosion rates in an actual industrial glass furnace. The rate-limiting process is most likely the transport of NaOH(gas) through the mass-transport boundary layer from the furnace atmosphere to the crown surface. Corrosion rates predicted on this basis are in better agreement with observation than those produced by any other mechanism, although the absolute values are highly sensitive to the crown temperature and the NaOH(gas) concentration at equilibrium and at the edge of the boundary layer. Finally, the project explored the development of excimer laser induced fragmentation (ELIF) fluorescence spectroscopy for the detection of gas-phase alkali hydroxides (e.g., NaOH) that are predicted to be the key species causing accelerated corrosion in these furnaces. The development of ELIF and the construction of field-portable instrumentation for glass furnace applications are reported and the method is shown to be effective in industrial settings.

  20. Corrosion Behavior of High Pressure Die Cast Al-Ni and Al-Ni-Ca Alloys in 3.5% NaCl Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthanari, Srinivasan; Jang, Jae Cheol; Shin, Kwang Seon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    In this investigation corrosion behavior of newly developed high-pressure die cast Al-Ni (N15) and Al-Ni-Ca (NX1503) alloys was studied in 3.5% NaCl solution. The electrochemical corrosion behavior was evaluated using open circuit potential (OCP) measurement, potentiodynamic polarization, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. Potentiodynamic polarization results validated that NX1503 alloy exhibited lower corrosion current density (i{sub corr}) value (5.969 μA/cm{sup 2}) compared to N15 (7.387 μA/cm{sup 2}). EIS-Bode plots revealed a higher impedance (|Z|) value and maximum phase angle value for NX1503 than N15 alloy. Equivalent circuit curve fitting analysis revealed that surface layer (R{sub 1}) and charge transfer resistance (R{sub ct}) values of NX1503 alloy was higher compared to N15 alloy. Immersion corrosion studies were also conducted for alloys using fishing line specimen arrangement to simultaneously measure corrosion rates from weight loss (P{sub W}) and hydrogen volume (P{sub H}) after 72 hours and NX1503 alloy had lower corrosion rate compared to N15 alloy. The addition of Ca to N15 alloy significantly reduced the Al{sub 3}Ni intermetallic phase and further grain refinement may be attributed for reduction in the corrosion rate.

  1. Mobile evaporator corrosion test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozeveld, A.; Chamberlain, D.B.

    1997-05-01

    Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted on eight candidates to select a durable and cost-effective alloy for use in mobile evaporators to process radioactive waste solutions. Based on an extensive literature survey of corrosion data, three stainless steel alloys (304L, 316L, AL-6XN), four nickel-based alloys (825, 625, 690, G-30), and titanium were selected for testing. The corrosion tests included vapor phase, liquid junction (interface), liquid immersion, and crevice corrosion tests on plain and welded samples of candidate materials. Tests were conducted at 80 degrees C for 45 days in two different test solutions: a nitric acid solution. to simulate evaporator conditions during the processing of the cesium ion-exchange eluant and a highly alkaline sodium hydroxide solution to simulate the composition of Tank 241-AW-101 during evaporation. All of the alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the alkaline test solution. Corrosion rates were very low and localized corrosion was not observed. Results from the nitric acid tests showed that only 316L stainless steel did not meet our performance criteria. The 316L welded interface and crevice specimens had rates of 22.2 mpy and 21.8 mpy, respectively, which exceeds the maximum corrosion rate of 20 mpy. The other welded samples had about the same corrosion resistance as the plain samples. None of the welded samples showed preferential weld or heat-affected zone (HAZ) attack. Vapor corrosion was negligible for all alloys. All of the alloys except 316L exhibited either open-quotes satisfactoryclose quotes (2-20 mpy) or open-quotes excellentclose quotes (<2 mpy) corrosion resistance as defined by National Association of Corrosion Engineers. However, many of the alloys experienced intergranular corrosion in the nitric acid test solution, which could indicate a susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in this environment

  2. Corrosion Resistance and Pitting Behaviour of Low-Carbon High-Mn Steels in Chloride Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grajcar A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion resistance of the X4MnSiAlNbTi27-4-2 and X6MnSiAlNbTi26-3-3 type austenitic steels, after hot deformation as well as after cold rolling, were evaluated in 3.5% NaCl solution using potentiodynamic polarization tests. A type of nonmetallic inclusions and their pitting corrosion behaviour were investigated. Additionally, the effect of cold deformation on the corrosion resistance of high-Mn steels was studied. The SEM micrographs revealed that corrosion damage formed in both investigated steels is characterized by various shapes and an irregular distribution at the metallic matrix, independently on the steel state (thermomechanically treated or cold worked. Corrosion pits are generated both in grain interiors, grain boundaries and along the deformation bands. Moreover, corrosion damage is stronger in cold deformed steels in comparison to the thermomechanically treated specimens. EDS analysis revealed that corrosion pits preferentially nucleated on MnS and AlN inclusions or complex oxysulphides. The morphology of corrosion damage in 3.5% NaCl supports the data registered in potentiodynamic tests.

  3. Corrosion of container materials for disposal of high-level radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, K.S.; Park, H.S.; Yeon, J.W.; Ha, Y.K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-01-01

    In the corrosion aspect of container for the deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, disposal concepts and the related container materials, which have been developed by advanced countries, have been reviewed. The disposal circumstances could be divided into the saturated and the unsaturated zones. The candidate materials in the countries, which consider the disposal in the unsaturated zone, are the corrosion resistant materials such as supper alloys and stainless steels, but those in the saturated zone is cupper, one of the corrosion allowable materials. By the results of the pitting corrosion test of sensitized stainless steels (such as 304, 304L, 316 and 316L), pitting potential is decreased with the degree of sensitization and the pitting corrosion resistance of 316L is higher than others. And so, the long-term corrosion experiment with 316L stainless steel specimens, sebsitized and non-sensitized, under the compacted bentonite and synthetic granitic groundwater has been being carried out. The results from the experiment for 12 months indicate that no evidence of pitting corrosion of the specimens has been observed but the crevice corrosion has occurred on the sensitized specimens even for 3 months. (author). 33 refs., 19 figs., 10 tabs.

  4. The influence of loading on the corrosion of steel in cracked ordinary Portland cement and high performance concretes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffer, Shahzma Jafferali

    Most studies that have examined chloride-induced corrosion of steel in concrete have focused on sound concrete. However, reinforced concrete is seldom uncracked and very few studies have investigated the influence of cracked concrete on rebar corrosion. Furthermore, the studies that have examined the relationship between cracks and corrosion have focused on unloaded or statically loaded cracks. However, in practice, reinforced concrete structures (e.g. bridges) are often dynamically loaded. Hence, the cracks in such structures open and close which could influence the corrosion of the reinforcing steel. Consequently, the objectives of this project were (i) to examine the effect of different types of loading on the corrosion of reinforcing steel, (ii) the influence of concrete mixture design on the corrosion behaviour and (iii) to provide data that can be used in service-life modelling of cracked reinforced concretes. In this project, cracked reinforced concrete beams made with ordinary Portland cement concrete (OPCC) and high performance concrete (HPC) were subjected to no load, static loading and dynamic loading. They were immersed in salt solution to just above the crack level at their mid-point for two weeks out of every four (wet cycle) and, for the remaining two weeks, were left in ambient laboratory conditions to dry (dry cycle). The wet cycle led to three conditions of exposure for each beam: (i) the non-submerged region, (ii) the sound, submerged region and (iii) the cracked mid-section, which was also immersed in the solution. Linear polarization resistance and galvanostatic pulse techniques were used to monitor the corrosion in the three regions. Potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical current noise and concrete electrical resistance measurements were also performed. These measurements illustrated that (i) rebar corroded faster at cracks than in sound concrete, (ii) HPC was more protective towards the rebar than OPCC even at cracks and (iii) there

  5. Corrosion potential detection method, potential characteristic simulation method for reaction rate and plant monitoring system using the same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Masanori; Onaka, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Tatsuya; Yamanaka, Hiroshi.

    1995-01-01

    In a calculation controlling device for a plant monitoring system, concentrations of materials concerning reaction materials in a certain state of a reaction process, and an actually measured value for the potential of a material in this state are substituted into a reaction rate equation obtained in accordance with a reaction process model. With such procedures, a relation between the reaction rate (current value) and the potential of the material can be obtained. A potential at which the reaction rates of an anode reaction and a cathode reaction contained in a corrosion reaction are made equal is determined by a numerical value calculation, based on an electrochemical hybrid potential logic by using the reaction rate equation, the reaction rate information relative to the corrosion reaction of the material and the concentration of the material concerning the corrosion reaction is obtained by a numerical value calculation. Then, simulation for the corrosion potential is enabled based on the handling corresponding to the actual reaction. Further, even for a portion which can not be measured actually, the corrosion potential can be recognized by simulation. (N.H.)

  6. High temperature corrosion of nickel alloys by molten calcium chloride in an oxidising environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, Roger; Gittos, Mike

    2012-09-01

    A series of nickel alloys was submerged in molten calcium chloride (a molten salt proposed for and used in the nuclear industry for a variety of applications), at 850 deg. C for 72 hours under an oxidising environment. The samples were analysed in detail, in order to determine their corrosion behaviour and suitability for use under these conditions. 310 stainless steel was used as a reference material. Extensive corrosion occurred and the observed attack on the metal substrates was general and massive with corrosion rates ranging from 1.17 mm/year, for Haynes 214, to 13.3 mm/year, for 310 stainless steel. All materials showed selective leaching of chromium from the samples but the oxide layer formed was not protective, spalling away easily. The severity of the attack was not immediately visible from the corrosion rate alone: samples showed a friable scale on the surface and deep penetration of the attack beneath, up to 0.63 mm for 310 stainless steel. In some cases, the attack was clearly intergranular with chromium being depleted along the grain boundaries, whereas in others, the attack was more general. No simple correlation between alloying elements and corrosion rate was apparent, with additions of aluminium and silicon appearing to have little or no protective effect. Alloys 600 and Haynes HR-160 showed promise, with relatively low corrosion rates and penetration depths. (authors)

  7. High performance polypyrrole coating for corrosion protection and biocidal applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nautiyal, Amit; Qiao, Mingyu; Cook, Jonathan Edwin; Zhang, Xinyu; Huang, Tung-Shi

    2018-01-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) coating was electrochemically synthesized on carbon steel using sulfonic acids as dopants: p-toluene sulfonic acid (p-TSA), sulfuric acid (SA), (±) camphor sulfonic acid (CSA), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS). The effect of acidic dopants (p-TSA, SA, CSA) on passivation of carbon steel was investigated by linear potentiodynamic and compared with morphology and corrosion protection performance of the coating produced. The types of the dopants used were significantly affecting the protection efficiency of the coating against chloride ion attack on the metal surface. The corrosion performance depends on size and alignment of dopant in the polymer backbone. Both p-TSA and SDBS have extra benzene ring that stack together to form a lamellar sheet like barrier to chloride ions thus making them appropriate dopants for PPy coating in suppressing the corrosion at significant level. Further, adhesion performance was enhanced by adding long chain carboxylic acid (decanoic acid) directly in the monomer solution. In addition, PPy coating doped with SDBS displayed excellent biocidal abilities against Staphylococcus aureus. The polypyrrole coatings on carbon steels with dual function of anti-corrosion and excellent biocidal properties shows great potential application in the industry for anti-corrosion/antimicrobial purposes.

  8. Research and development on is process components for hydrogen production. (2) Corrosion resistance of glass lining in high temperature sulfuric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Iwatsuki, Jin; Kubo, Shinji; Terada, Atsuhiko; Onuki, Kaoru

    2009-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency has been conducting a research and development on hydrogen production system using High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor. As a part of this effort, thermochemical water-splitting cycle featuring iodine- and sulfur-compounds (IS process) is under development considering its potential of large-scale economical hydrogen production. The IS process constitutes very severe environments on the materials of construction because of the corrosive nature of process chemicals, especially of the high temperature acidic solution of sulfuric acid and hydriodic acid dissolving iodine. Therefore, selection of the corrosion-resistant materials and development of the components has been studied as a crucial subject of the process development. This paper discusses corrosion resistance of commercially available glass-lining material in high temperature sulfuric acid. Corrosion resistance of a soda glass used for glass-lining was examined by immersion tests. The experiments were performed in 47-90wt% sulfuric acids at temperatures of up to 400degC and for the maximum immersion time of 100 hours using an autoclave designed for the concerned tests. In every condition tested, no indication of localized corrosion such as defect formation or pitting corrosion was observed. Also, the corrosion rates decreased with the progress of immersion, and were low enough (≅0.1 mm/year) after 60-90 hours of immersion probably due to formation of a silica rich surface. (author)

  9. Corrosion mechanism of 13Cr stainless steel in completion fluid of high temperature and high concentration bromine salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yan; Xu, Lining; Lu, Minxu; Meng, Yao; Zhu, Jinyang; Zhang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The corrosion behavior of 13Cr steel exposed to bromine salt completion fluid containing high concentration bromine ions was investigated. • There are passive circles around pits on the 13Cr steel surface after 7 d of exposure. • Macroscopic galvanic corrosion formed between the passive halo and the pit. • The mechanism of pitting corrosion on 13Cr stainless steel exposed to heavy bromine brine was established. - Abstract: A series of corrosion tests of 13Cr stainless steel were conducted in a simulated completion fluid environment of high temperature and high concentration bromine salt. Corrosion behavior of specimens and the component of corrosion products were investigated by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that 13Cr steel suffers from severe local corrosion and there is always a passive halo around every pit. The formation mechanism of the passive halo is established. OH − ligand generates and adsorbs in a certain scale because of abundant OH − on the surface around the pits. Passive film forms around each pit, which leads to the occurrence of passivation in a certain region. Finally, the dissimilarities in properties and morphologies of regions, namely the pit and its corresponding passive halo, can result in different corrosion sensitivities and may promote the formation of macroscopic galvanic pairs

  10. Monitoring of corrosion damage using high-frequency guided ultrasonic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, D.; Fromme, P.

    2015-03-01

    Due to adverse environmental conditions corrosion can develop during the life cycle of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Both pitting corrosion and generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the degradation of the integrity and load bearing capacity of the structure. Structural health monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can in principle be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic transducers with single sided access to the structure, high frequency guided wave modes were generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. Wall thickness reduction was induced using accelerated corrosion in a salt water bath. The corrosion damage was monitored based on the effect on the wave propagation and interference of the different modes. The change in the wave interference was quantified based on an analysis in the frequency domain (Fourier transform) and was found to match well with theoretical predictions for the wall thickness loss. High frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  11. Burner rig alkali salt corrosion of several high temperature alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    The hot corrosion of five alloys was studied in cyclic tests in a Mach 0.3 burner rig into whose combustion chamber various aqueous salt solutions were injected. Three nickel-based alloys, a cobalt-base alloy, and an iron-base alloy were studied at temperatures of 700, 800, 900, and 1000 C with various salt concentrations and compositions. The relative resistance of the alloys to hot corrosion attack was found to vary with temperature and both concentration and composition of the injected salt solution. Results indicate that the corrosion of these alloys is a function of both the presence of salt condensed as a liquid on the surface and of the composition of the gas phases present.

  12. The precious metal effect in high temperature corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wit, J.H.W. de (Lab. for Materials Science, Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)); Manen, P.A. van (Lab. for Materials Science, Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands))

    1994-01-01

    Additions of platinum and to a smaller extent rhodium, to aluminium oxide forming alloys are known to improve the high temperature corrosion resistance of the alloys. This effect is known as the ''precious metal effect''. The expensive Pt-additions are used because of the increased lifetime of turbine-vanes especially in marine environments. Only a limited number of coating systems is commercially available, as JML-1, LDC-2 and RT22. Normally Pt is deposited electrochemically or by a fused salt method. After deposition the high or low activity pack-cementation-process is applied to obtain a PtNiAl-coating. In this paper the effect of platinum on the oxidation mechanism is discussed by comparing the oxidation mechanism of [beta]-NiAl and Pt20Ni30Al50. This composition agrees with the average composition of a platinum modified aluminide coating. The alloys were oxidized at temperatures from 1000 to 1200 C. The growth of the oxide scale on the NiAl alloy proceeds both by aluminium and by oxygen diffusion through the scale resulting in growth within the scale. On Pt20Ni30Al50 the growth of the scale is limited to the oxide/gas interface due to a predominant aluminium transport through the scale. The morphology of the oxide scales did not show large differences. However, the extensive void formation at the [beta]-NiAl/oxide interface was not observed on the Pt20Ni30Al50 samples. The absence of voids at the interface and the reduction of growth stresses, as a result of the outward growth of the scale, are the two likely reasons for the improved oxide scale adherence and can thus be considered, to be two elements of the ''precious metal effect''. (orig.)

  13. A study on structural analysis of highly corrosive melts at high temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Ohtori, N

    2002-01-01

    When sodium is burned at high temperature in the atmosphere, it reacts simultaneously with H sub 2 O in the atmosphere so that it can produce high temperature melt of sodium hydroxide as a solvent. If this melt includes peroxide ion (O sub 2 sup 2 sup -), it will be a considerably active and corrosive for iron so that several sodium iron double oxides will be produced as corrosion products after the reaction with steel structures. The present study was carried out in order to investigate the ability of presence of peroxide ion in sodium hydroxide solvent at high temperature and that of identification of the several corrosion products using laser Raman spectroscopy. The measurement system with ultraviolet laser was developed simultaneously in the present work to improve the ability of the measurement at high temperature. As results from the measurements, the possibility of the presence of peroxide ion was shown up to 823K in sodium peroxide and 823K in the melt of sodium hydroxide mixed with sodium peroxide. A...

  14. High Temperature Corrosion Problem of Boiler Components in presence of Sulfur and Alkali based Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Debashis; Mitra, Swapan Kumar

    2011-04-01

    Material degradation and ageing is of particular concern for fossil fuel fired power plant components. New techniques/approaches have been explored in recent years for Residual Life assessment of aged components and material degradation due to different damage mechanism like creep, fatigue, corrosion and erosion etc. Apart from the creep, the high temperature corrosion problem in a fossil fuel fired boiler is a matter of great concern if the fuel contains sulfur, chlorine sodium, potassium and vanadium etc. This paper discusses the material degradation due to high temperature corrosion in different critical components of boiler like water wall, superheater and reheater tubes and also remedial measures to avoid the premature failure. This paper also high lights the Residual Life Assessment (RLA) methodology of the components based on high temperature fireside corrosion. of different critical components of boiler.

  15. Markov chain model helps predict pitting corrosion depth and rate in underground pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caleyo, F.; Velazquez, J.C.; Hallen, J. M. [ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Esquivel-Amezcua, A. [PEMEX PEP Region Sur, Villahermosa, Tabasco (Mexico); Valor, A. [Universidad de la Habana, Vedado, La Habana (Cuba)

    2010-07-01

    Recent reports place pipeline corrosion costs in North America at seven billion dollars per year. Pitting corrosion causes the higher percentage of failures among other corrosion mechanisms. This has motivated multiple modelling studies to be focused on corrosion pitting of underground pipelines. In this study, a continuous-time, non-homogenous pure birth Markov chain serves to model external pitting corrosion in buried pipelines. The analytical solution of Kolmogorov's forward equations for this type of Markov process gives the transition probability function in a discrete space of pit depths. The transition probability function can be completely identified by making a correlation between the stochastic pit depth mean and the deterministic mean obtained experimentally. The model proposed in this study can be applied to pitting corrosion data from repeated in-line pipeline inspections. Case studies presented in this work show how pipeline inspection and maintenance planning can be improved by using the proposed Markovian model for pitting corrosion.

  16. High temperature corrosion studies on friction welded low alloy steel and stainless steel in air and molten salt environment at 650 oC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arivazhagan, N.; Narayanan, S.; Singh, Surendra; Prakash, Satya; Reddy, G.M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → Thermogravimetric analysis on friction welded AISI 304 with AISI 4140 exposed in air and molten salt environment. → Comparative study on friction welded AISI 4140 with AISI 304 exposed in air, Na 2 SO 4 -60%V 2 O 5 and NaCl-50%Na 2 SO 4 at 650 o C. → SEM/EDAX, XRD analysis on corroded dissimilar AISI 304 and AISI 4140 materials. -- Abstract: The investigation on high-temperature corrosion resistance of the weldments is necessary for prolonged service lifetime of the components used in corrosive environments. This paper reports on the performance of friction welded low alloy steel AISI 4140 and stainless steel AISI 304 in air as well as molten salt environment of Na 2 SO 4 -60%V 2 O 5 and NaCl-50%Na 2 SO 4 at 650 o C. This paper reports several studies carried out for characterizing the weldments corrosion behavior. Initially thermogravimetric technique was used to establish the kinetics of corrosion. For analyzing the corrosion products, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive analysis and electron probe micro analysis techniques were used. From the results of the experiments, it is observed that the weldments suffered accelerated corrosion in NaCl-Na 2 SO 4 environment and showed spalling/sputtering of the oxide scale. Furthermore, corrosion resistance of weld interface was found to be lower than that of parent metals in molten salt environment. Weight gain kinetics in air oxidation studies reveals a steady-state parabolic rate law while the kinetics with salt deposits displays multi-stage growth rates. Moreover NaCl is the main corrosive species in high temperature corrosion, involving mixtures of NaCl and Na 2 SO 4 which is responsible for formation of internal attack.

  17. Localized corrosion of high performance metal alloys in an acid/salt environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdowell, L. G.; Ontiveros, C.

    1991-01-01

    Various vacuum jacketed cryogenic supply lines at the Space Shuttle launch site at Kennedy Space Center use convoluted flexible expansion joints. The atmosphere at the launch site has a very high salt content, and during a launch, fuel combustion products include hydrochloric acid. This extremely corrosive environment has caused pitting corrosion failure in the thin walled 304L stainless steel flex hoses. A search was done to find a more corrosion resistant replacement material. The study focussed on 19 metal alloys. Tests which were performed include electrochemical corrosion testing, accelerated corrosion testing in a salt fog chamber, and long term exposure at a beach corrosion testing site. Based on the results of these tests, several nickel based alloys were found to have very high resistance to this corrosive environment. Also, there was excellent agreement between the electrochemical tests and the actual beach exposure tests. This suggests that electrochemical testing may be useful for narrowing the field of potential candidate alloys before subjecting samples to long term beach exposure.

  18. High temperature corrosion investigations at AW2-bio. Final report; Biomass boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, U.

    2011-01-15

    The measured corrosion rates in the test superheaters and ordinary superheaters of Avedoere 2 biomass boiler reveal that the corrosion rate increases with metal temperature and is significantly accelerated above steam temperatures of 540 deg. C. For the boiler with a live steam temperature of 540 deg. C, the measured corrosion rates in superheater 2 and 3 were up to 1mm pr. 10000 hours. It was observed that the flue gas temperature and heat flux had a significant effect on the corrosion rates through the surface metal temperature. Thus, the highest corrosion rates in the ordinary superheaters were not found at the position of the highest steam temperature in the outlet of superheater 3, but at the outlet of superheater 2. A steam temperature of approximately 580 deg. C at the outlet of one of the test superheater loops caused a tube fracture after a few months. A HVOF coating was applied to a section of superheater 2 and at a higher temperature in the test superheater loop. Analyses of the tube section after exposure showed that parts of the coating were not present and corrosion of the underlying TP347H FG was apparent. This indicates that the coating had spalled during operation. Furthermore, chlorine diffusion through the coating was observed causing attack at the coating-alloy interface. The project work has shown that it is not possible to increase the live steam temperature of the biomass fired boiler to more than 540 deg. C without a significant increase in superheater corrosion rates for the applied tube materials and coatings. (Author)

  19. Effect of corrosion potential on the corrosion fatigue crack growth behaviour of low-alloy steels in high-temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, S.; Seifert, H.P.

    2008-01-01

    The low-frequency corrosion fatigue (CF) crack growth behaviour of different low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steels was characterized under simulated boiling water reactor conditions by cyclic fatigue tests with pre-cracked fracture mechanics specimens. The experiments were performed in the temperature range of 240-288 deg. C with different loading parameters at different electrochemical corrosion potentials (ECPs). Modern high-temperature water loops, on-line crack growth monitoring (DCPD) and fractographical analysis by SEM were used to quantify the cracking response. In this paper the effect of ECP on the CF crack growth behaviour is discussed and compared with the crack growth model of General Electric (GE). The ECP mainly affected the transition from fast ('high-sulphur') to slow ('low-sulphur') CF crack growth, which appeared as critical frequencies ν crit = f(ΔK, R, ECP) and ΔK-thresholds ΔK EAC f(ν, R, ECP) in the cycle-based form and as a critical air fatigue crack growth rate da/dt Air,crit in the time-domain form. The critical crack growth rates, frequencies, and ΔK EAC -thresholds were shifted to lower values with increasing ECP. The CF crack growth rates of all materials were conservatively covered by the 'high-sulphur' CF line of the GE-model for all investigated temperatures and frequencies. Under most system conditions, the model seems to reasonably well predict the experimentally observed parameter trends. Only under highly oxidizing conditions (ECP ≥ 0 mV SHE ) and slow strain rates/low loading frequencies the GE-model does not conservatively cover the experimentally gathered crack growth rate data. Based on the GE-model and the observed cracking behaviour a simple time-domain superposition-model could be used to develop improved reference CF crack growth curves for codes

  20. Savannah River Site Tank Cleaning: Corrosion Rate For One Versus Eight Percent Oxalic Acid Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketusky, E.; Subramanian, K.

    2011-01-01

    Until recently, the use of oxalic acid for chemically cleaning the Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive waste tanks focused on using concentrated 4 and 8-wt% solutions. Recent testing and research on applicable dissolution mechanisms have concluded that under appropriate conditions, dilute solutions of oxalic acid (i.e., 1-wt%) may be more effective. Based on the need to maximize cleaning effectiveness, coupled with the need to minimize downstream impacts, SRS is now developing plans for using a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution. A technology gap associated with using a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution was a dearth of suitable corrosion data. Assuming oxalic acid's passivation of carbon steel was proportional to the free oxalate concentration, the general corrosion rate (CR) from a 1-wt% solution may not be bound by those from 8-wt%. Therefore, after developing the test strategy and plan, the corrosion testing was performed. Starting with the envisioned process specific baseline solvent, a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution, with sludge (limited to Purex type sludge-simulant for this initial effort) at 75 C and agitated, the corrosion rate (CR) was determined from the measured weight loss of the exposed coupon. Environmental variations tested were: (a) Inclusion of sludge in the test vessel or assuming a pure oxalic acid solution; (b) acid solution temperature maintained at 75 or 45 C; and (c) agitation of the acid solution or stagnant. Application of select electrochemical testing (EC) explored the impact of each variation on the passivation mechanisms and confirmed the CR. The 1-wt% results were then compared to those from the 8-wt%. The immersion coupons showed that the maximum time averaged CR for a 1-wt% solution with sludge was less than 25-mils/yr for all conditions. For an agitated 8-wt% solution with sludge, the maximum time averaged CR was about 30-mils/yr at 50 C, and 86-mils/yr at 75 C. Both the 1-wt% and the 8-wt% testing demonstrated that if the sludge was removed from

  1. High strength corrosion-resistant zirconium aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulson, E.M.; Cameron, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    A zirconium-aluminum alloy is described possessing superior corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. This alloy, preferably 7.5-9.5 wt% aluminum, is cast, worked in the Zr(Al)-Zr 2 Al region, and annealed to a substantially continuous matrix of Zr 3 Al. (E.C.B.)

  2. Structural Characterization of Highly Corrosion-resistant Steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lančok, Adriana; Kmječ, T.; Štefánik, M.; Sklenka, L.; Miglierini, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 4 (2015), s. 355-361 ISSN 0011-1643 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12449S Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Mossbauer spectroscopy * corrosion-resistant steel * LC200 * CEMS Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.732, year: 2015

  3. Corrosion investigations of high-alloyed steels carried out in different marine area organized by European Federation of Corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birn, J.; Skalski, I.

    1999-01-01

    Research works arranged by EFC Working Party on Marine Corrosion are described. The research was performed in sea areas of Norway, Finland, Sweden, France, Italy, Poland and Netherlands. Subjected to test were three corrosion resistant steel grades; 316, 904 and UNS S 31524. Two corrosion tests were carried out in the years 1993 and 1994 each of min. 6 month duration. The results show that chemical composition of water at salinity level of more than 0.7% has not great effect on corrosion aggressivity in relation to corrosion resistant steels. On the other hand temperature of sea water has great influence on corrosion process. (author)

  4. High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunnane, J.C.

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II

  5. Corrosion models for predictions of performance of high-level radioactive-waste containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J.C.; McCright, R.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Gdowski, G.E. [KMI Energy Services, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1991-11-01

    The present plan for disposal of high-level radioactive waste in the US is to seal it in containers before emplacement in a geologic repository. A proposed site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is being evaluated for its suitability as a geologic repository. The containers will probably be made of either an austenitic or a copper-based alloy. Models of alloy degradation are being used to predict the long-term performance of the containers under repository conditions. The models are of uniform oxidation and corrosion, localized corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking, and are applicable to worst-case scenarios of container degradation. This paper reviews several of the models.

  6. High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunnane, J.C. [comp.; Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II.

  7. High resolution estimates of the corrosion risk for cultural heritage in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Marco, Alessandra; Screpanti, Augusto; Mircea, Mihaela; Piersanti, Antonio; Proietti, Chiara; Fornasier, M. Francesca

    2017-01-01

    Air pollution plays a pivotal role in the deterioration of many materials used in buildings and cultural monuments causing an inestimable damage. This study aims to estimate the impacts of air pollution (SO 2 , HNO 3 , O 3 , PM 10 ) and meteorological conditions (temperature, precipitation, relative humidity) on limestone, copper and bronze based on high resolution air quality data-base produced with AMS-MINNI modelling system over the Italian territory over the time period 2003–2010. A comparison between high resolution data (AMS-MINNI grid, 4 × 4 km) and low resolution data (EMEP grid, 50 × 50 km) has been performed. Our results pointed out that the corrosion levels for limestone, copper and bronze are decreased in Italy from 2003 to 2010 in relation to decrease of pollutant concentrations. However, some problem related to air pollution persists especially in Northern and Southern Italy. In particular, PM 10 and HNO 3 are considered the main responsible for limestone corrosion. Moreover, the high resolution data (AMS-MINNI) allowed the identification of risk areas that are not visible with the low resolution data (EMEP modelling system) in all considered years and, especially, in the limestone case. Consequently, high resolution air quality simulations are suitable to provide concrete benefits in providing information for national effective policy against corrosion risk for cultural heritage, also in the context of climate changes that are affecting strongly Mediterranean basin. - Highlights: • Air pollution plays a pivotal role in the deterioration of cultural materials. • Limestone, copper and bronze corrosion levels decreased in Italy from 2003 to 2010. • PM 10 is considered the main responsible for limestone corrosion in Northern Italy. • HNO3 is considered the main responsible for limestone corrosion in all analyzed years. • High-resolution data are particularly useful to define area at risk for corrosion. - Importance of the high

  8. Corrosion behaviour of Mg/Al alloys in high humidity atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrabal, R.; Pardo, A.; Merino, M.C.; Mohedano, M.; Casajus, P. [Facultad de Quimicas, Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Merino, S. [Departamento de Tecnologia Industrial, Universidad Alfonso X El Sabio, Villanueva de la Canada, 28691 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-04-15

    The influence of relative humidity (80-90-98% RH) and temperature (25 and 50 C) on the corrosion behaviour of AZ31, AZ80 and AZ91D magnesium alloys was evaluated using gravimetric measurements. The results were compared with the data obtained for the same alloys immersed in Madrid tap water. The corrosion rates of AZ alloys increased with the RH and temperature and were influenced by the aluminium content and alloy microstructure for RH values above 90%. The initiation of corrosion was localised around the Al-Mn inclusions in the AZ31 alloy and at the centre of the {alpha}-Mg phase in the AZ80 and AZ91D alloys. The {beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phase acted as a barrier against corrosion. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. FY05 HPCRM Annual Report: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal Coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, J; Choi, J; Haslam, J; Day, S; Yang, N; Headley, T; Lucadamo, G; Yio, J; Chames, J; Gardea, A; Clift, M; Blue, G; Peters, W; Rivard, J; Harper, D; Swank, D; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E; Brown, R; Wolejsza, T; Aprigliano, L; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Aprigliano, L; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Lavernia, E; Schoenung, J; Ajdelsztajn, L; Dannenberg, J; Graeve, O; Lewandowski, J; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Boudreau, J

    2007-01-01

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Two Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found that appear to have corrosion resistance comparable to, or better than that of Ni-based Alloy C-22, based on breakdown potential and corrosion rate. Both Cr and Mo provide corrosion resistance, B enables glass formation, and Y lowers critical cooling rate (CCR). SAM1651 has yttrium added, and has a nominal critical cooling rate of only 80 Kelvin per second, while SAM2X7 (similar to SAM2X5) has no yttrium, and a relatively high critical cooling rate of 610 Kelvin per second. Both amorphous metal formulations have strengths and weaknesses. SAM1651 (yttrium added) has a low critical cooling rate (CCR), which enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous thermal spray coating. Unfortunately, it is relatively difficult to atomize, with powders being irregular in shape. This causes the powder to be difficult to pneumatically convey during thermal spray deposition. Gas atomized SAM1651 powder has required cryogenic milling to eliminate irregularities that make flow difficult. SAM2X5 (no yttrium) has a high critical cooling rate, which has caused problems associated with devitrification. SAM2X5 can be gas atomized to produce spherical powders of SAM2X5, which enable more facile thermal spray deposition. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer

  10. FY05 HPCRM Annual Report: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J; Choi, J; Haslam, J; Day, S; Yang, N; Headley, T; Lucadamo, G; Yio, J; Chames, J; Gardea, A; Clift, M; Blue, G; Peters, W; Rivard, J; Harper, D; Swank, D; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E; Brown, R; Wolejsza, T; Aprigliano, L; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Aprigliano, L; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Lavernia, E; Schoenung, J; Ajdelsztajn, L; Dannenberg, J; Graeve, O; Lewandowski, J; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Boudreau, J

    2007-09-20

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Two Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found that appear to have corrosion resistance comparable to, or better than that of Ni-based Alloy C-22, based on breakdown potential and corrosion rate. Both Cr and Mo provide corrosion resistance, B enables glass formation, and Y lowers critical cooling rate (CCR). SAM1651 has yttrium added, and has a nominal critical cooling rate of only 80 Kelvin per second, while SAM2X7 (similar to SAM2X5) has no yttrium, and a relatively high critical cooling rate of 610 Kelvin per second. Both amorphous metal formulations have strengths and weaknesses. SAM1651 (yttrium added) has a low critical cooling rate (CCR), which enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous thermal spray coating. Unfortunately, it is relatively difficult to atomize, with powders being irregular in shape. This causes the powder to be difficult to pneumatically convey during thermal spray deposition. Gas atomized SAM1651 powder has required cryogenic milling to eliminate irregularities that make flow difficult. SAM2X5 (no yttrium) has a high critical cooling rate, which has caused problems associated with devitrification. SAM2X5 can be gas atomized to produce spherical powders of SAM2X5, which enable more facile thermal spray deposition. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer

  11. Research on Inhibition for Corrosion Fatigue of High Strength Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-12-15

    4140 , $740 1225-1275 1600-1675 1525-1575 1100 1000.. 925 850 725 4340 1225-1275 1600-1650 1500-1550 1100 1045 921. 875 72531 0 0 85 7 0 (I43 7-.22...1 0 le -kI Io o CRACK GROWTH RATE PJamOC Figure 24. Factors that Affect the Crack Growth Rate of High- Strength AISI 4340 Steels in Aqueous

  12. Thermo chemical calculations applied to the study of ceramic corrosion at high temperature - Steel-making applications; Apport de la thermodynamique a l'etude de la corrosion des ceramiques a haute temperature - Applications siderurgiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, J. [Orleans Univ., Polytechnique, 45 (France); Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS/CEMHTI), 45 - Orleans-la-Source (France)

    2008-05-15

    At high temperature, corrosion by gas, slag or metal is recognized in many cases as the essential degradation mode of ceramics. The reaction between the ceramic and the corrosive agent should be described taking into account both the kinetic aspects (rates and mechanisms of the reactions) and the thermodynamic aspects (equilibrium conditions). After a short description of the thermodynamic tools, we will show how some thermo chemical calculations, involving complex multi-component systems at high temperature, can be applied to explain some practical situations. Different examples, from steel making, will be considered: effects of composition changes upon the stability of the refractories and reactions of corrosion between the refractories, the gas and the liquid oxides. (author)

  13. Corrosion of high purity copper as engineering barrier in deep geological repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochoa, Maité; Rodríguez Martín, A.; Farina Silvia, B.

    2013-01-01

    Pure copper with oxygen content below 5 ppm (to minimize segregation at grain boundaries) and doped with phosphorus (to increase creep resistance) is the chosen material for the corrosion-resistant barrier of the High Level Radioactive 2 Wastecontainers in the Swedish and Finnish repository models. These models include the construction of the repository below the water table, which is a reducing environment in which copper has excellent resistance to general and localized corrosion in aqueous electrolytes. The aim of this work is contribute to determine the durability of the material, given that deep geological repositories of HLW are designed to ensure the protection of the environment for periods of hundreds of thousands years. As a first step in a more general analysis the effects of chloride, one of the main aggressive species of corrosion, are evaluated. To this purpose corrosion potential was determined and anodic polarization curves were performed in deaerated solutions varying the chloride concentration between 0.01 and 1M and the temperature between 30 and 90°C. Several electrochemical techniques were used: the evolution of corrosion potential was measured, anodic polarization curves were obtained and electrochemical impedance tests were performed. The analysis was complemented with microscopic observations of the type of corrosive attack, as well as determinations of the eventual corrosion products formed using Energy-Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDS). Results show that the corrosion potential decreases with the increase of temperature and with the increase of chloride concentration. A correlation of the corrosion potential as a function of temperature and chloride concentration was obtained, with the purpose of making predictions in variable conditions.The current density increases both with temperature and with chloride concentration. A pitting potential is observed in certain conditions. (author)

  14. Corrosion of high-level radioactive waste iron-canisters in contact with bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufhold, Stephan, E-mail: s.kaufhold@bgr.de [BGR, Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover (Germany); Hassel, Achim Walter [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Straße 1, D-40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Institute for Chemical Technology of Inorganic Materials, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Sanders, Daniel [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Straße 1, D-40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Dohrmann, Reiner [BGR, Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover (Germany); LBEG, Landesamt für Bergbau, Energie und Geologie, Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover (Germany)

    2015-03-21

    Graphical abstract: Corrosion at the bentonite iron interface proceeds unaerobically with formation of an 1:1 Fe silicate mineral. A series of exposure tests with different types of bentonites showed that Na–bentonites are slightly less corrosive than Ca–bentonites and highly charges smectites are less corrosive compared to low charged ones. The formation of a patina was observed in some cases and has to be investigated further. - Highlights: • At the iron bentonite interface a 1:1 Fe layer silicate forms upon corrosion. • A series of iron–bentonite corrosion products showed slightly less corrosion for Na-rich and high-charged bentonites. • In some tests the formation of a patina was observed consisting of Fe–silicate, which has to be investigated further. - Abstract: Several countries favor the encapsulation of high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) in iron or steel canisters surrounded by highly compacted bentonite. In the present study the corrosion of iron in contact with different bentonites was investigated. The corrosion product was a 1:1 Fe layer silicate already described in literature (sometimes referred to as berthierine). Seven exposition test series (60 °C, 5 months) showed slightly less corrosion for the Na–bentonites compared to the Ca–bentonites. Two independent exposition tests with iron pellets and 38 different bentonites clearly proved the role of the layer charge density of the swelling clay minerals (smectites). Bentonites with high charged smectites are less corrosive than bentonites dominated by low charged ones. The type of counterion is additionally important because it determines the density of the gel and hence the solid/liquid ratio at the contact to the canister. The present study proves that the integrity of the multibarrier-system is seriously affected by the choice of the bentonite buffer encasing the metal canisters in most of the concepts. In some tests the formation of a patina was observed consisting of Fe

  15. Influence of heating rate on corrosion behavior of Ni-base heat resistant alloys in simulated VHTR helium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata, Yuji; Kondo, Tatsuo

    1985-04-01

    The influence of heating rate on corrosion and carbon transfer was studied for Ni-base heat resistant alloys exposed to simulated VHTR(very high temperature reactor) coolant environment. Special attention was focused to relationship between oxidation and carburization at early stage of exposure. Tests were conducted on two heats of Hastelloy XR with different boron(B) content and the developmental alloys, 113MA and KSN. Two kinds of heating rates, i.e. 80 0 C/min and 2 0 C/min, were employed. Corrosion tests were carried out at 900 0 C up to 500 h in JAERI Type B helium, one of the simulated VHTR primary coolant specifications. Under higher heating rate, oxidation resistance of both heats of Hastelloy XR(2.8 ppmB and 40 ppmB) were equivalent and among the best, then KSN and 113MA followed in the order. Under lower heating rate only alloy, i.e. Hastelloy XR with 2.8 ppmB, showed some deteriorated oxidation resistance while all others being unaffected by the heating rate. On the other hand the carbon transfer behavior showed strong dependence on the heating rate. In case of higher heating rate, significant carburization occured at early stage of exposure and thereafter the progress of carburization was slow in all the alloys. On the other hand only slow carburization was the case throughout the exposure in case of lower heating rate. The carburization in VHTR helium environment was interpreted as to be affected by oxide film formation in the early stage of exposure. The carbon pick-up was largest in Hastelloy XR with 40 ppmB and it was followed by Hastelloy XR with 2.8 ppmB. 113MA and KSN were carburized only slightly. The observed difference of carbon pick-up among the alloys tested was interpreted to be attributed mainly to the difference of the carbon activity, the carbide precipitation characteristics among the alloys tested. (author)

  16. Comparison between the corrosion forecast based on the potential measurement and the determination of the corrosion rate of the reinforcement bar by means of electrochemical techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castaneda, A.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The ASTA4 876-91 standard establishes a corrosion forecast of concrete reinforced bar by measuring the electrochemical potential. This forecast is based on thermodynamic considerations without taking into account the kinetic of the corrosion process. A comparison was made between the results obtained based on this standard and others using electrochemical techniques (Tafel, Rp, EIS, Electrochemical Noise. These techniques allows to obtain the corrosion rate in samples having 0.4, 0.5 and 0.66 water/cement ratios submitted to salt spray outdoors and by immersion in 3% saline solution during a test time of 20 months. Differences were detected between the results obtained using the ASTM standard and the electrochemical techniques used. The main difference is that samples submitted to immersion shows a higher probability of corrosion than samples submitted to salt spray; however, the electrochemical techniques showed the contrary concerning the corrosion kinetic process .A comparison respecting corrosion rate was also made between the results obtained by the different electrochemical techniques. It is very well known that all electrochemical techniques supposed always general corrosion except electrochemical noise. Using the technique the pitting index can be calculated. It shows that localized corrosion is the most predominant

    La norma ASTM 876-91 establece un pronóstico de corrosión de la barra de refuerzo del hormigón armado mediante la determinación de potenciales electroquímicos. Este pronóstico se basa en consideraciones termodinámicas, sin tener en cuenta la cinética del proceso de corrosión. Se comparan los resultados obtenidos aplicando esta norma con técnicas electroquímicas (Tafel, Rp, EIS, Ruido Electroquímico que permiten calcular la velocidad de corrosión en probetas con relaciones agua/cemento 0,4, 0,5 y 0,66 sometidas a niebla salina en condiciones naturales y en inmersión en solución salina al 3% durante un

  17. High temperature corrosion investigation in an oxyfuel combustion test rig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Bjurman, M.; Hjörnhede, A

    2014-01-01

    Oxyfuel firing and subsequent capture of CO2 is a way to reduce CO2 emissions from coal‐fired boilers. Literature is summarized highlighting results which may contribute to understanding of the corrosion processes in an oxyfuel boiler.Tests were conducted in a 500 kWth oxyfuel test facility...... constructed by Brandenburg Technical University to gain understanding into oxyfuel firing. Two air‐cooled corrosion probes were exposed in this oxyfuel combustion chamber where the fuel was lignite. Gas composition was measured at the location of testing. Various alloys from a 2½ Cr steel, austenitic steels...... to nickel alloys were exposed at set metal temperatures of 570 and 630 °C for 287 h. The specimens were investigated using light optical and scanning electron microscopy and X‐ray diffraction.The deposit on the probe contained predominantly CaSO4 and Fe2O3. Oxide thickness and depth of the precipitated...

  18. High temperature corrosion studies on friction-welded dissimilar metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arivazhagan, N.; Singh, Surendra; Prakash, Satya; Reddy, G.M.

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the behaviour of weldment at elevated temperatures and especially their corrosion behaviour has become an object of scientific investigation recently. Investigation has been carried out on friction-welded AISI 4140 and AISI 304 under molten salt of Na 2 SO 4 + V 2 O 5 (60%) environment at 500 and 550 deg. C under cyclic condition. The influences of welding parameters on the hot corrosion have been discussed. The resulting oxide scales in the weldment have been characterized systematically using surface analytical techniques. Scale thickness on low alloy steel side was found to be more and was prone to spalling. Weld region has been found to be more prone to degradation than base metals due to inter diffusion of element across the interface and the formation of intermetallic compound

  19. High temperature corrosion studies on friction-welded dissimilar metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arivazhagan, N. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India)]. E-mail: arivadmt@iitr.ernet.in; Singh, Surendra [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India); Prakash, Satya [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India); Reddy, G.M. [Defense Metallurgical and Research Laboratory, Hyderabad (India)

    2006-07-25

    Understanding the behaviour of weldment at elevated temperatures and especially their corrosion behaviour has become an object of scientific investigation recently. Investigation has been carried out on friction-welded AISI 4140 and AISI 304 under molten salt of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + V{sub 2}O{sub 5} (60%) environment at 500 and 550 deg. C under cyclic condition. The influences of welding parameters on the hot corrosion have been discussed. The resulting oxide scales in the weldment have been characterized systematically using surface analytical techniques. Scale thickness on low alloy steel side was found to be more and was prone to spalling. Weld region has been found to be more prone to degradation than base metals due to inter diffusion of element across the interface and the formation of intermetallic compound.

  20. High-Confidence Flow Accelerated Corrosion Screening Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Kyung Ha; Kim, Ji Hak; Hwang, Il Soon; Lee, Na Young; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2008-01-01

    All carbon steel pipes with fluid traveling through it could potentially be threatened by flowing fluid have a potential threat of Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC). FAC in a nuclear power plant (NPP) could cause not only pipe failure leading but fatalities sometimes. It is almost impossible to inspect all carbon steel pipes in NPPs, and FAC prediction programs such as CHECWORKS, WATHEC, and BRT-CICERO have limited capability to in predicting FAC area

  1. Corrosion of Alloy 690 process pot by sulfate containing high level radioactive waste at feed stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengupta, P.; Soudamini, N.; Kaushik, C.P.; Jagannath; Mishra, R.K.; Kale, G.B.; Raj, K.; Das, D.; Sharma, B.P.

    2008-01-01

    Prolonged exposure of Alloy 690 process pot to sulfate containing high level radioactive waste leads to (a) depletion of Cr from the alloy, (b) intergranular attack and (c) building up of Cr 2 O 3 -Ni 2 O 3 -Fe 2 O 3 mixed oxide surface layer containing Na and Cs sulfate precipitates. Time dependence of material loss from Alloy 690 is found to follow a linear relationship of the type Δw (material loss) = -7.05 + 0.05t. Corrosion rate calculated for 2400 h exposure is 3.66 mpy. Cr and Ni leach rates obtained for the same sample are 1.61 g m -2 d -1 and 2.52 g m -2 d -1 , respectively. Ni leach rates followed a linear time dependence relationship of the type dNL Ni /dt (leach rate) = -0.09 + 0.027t, whereas Cr leach rates obeyed a non-linear relationship of the type dNL Cr /dt (leach rate) = 0.241 + 0.027t - 1.33 x 10 -4 t 1/2

  2. Studies of corrosion in metallic container for storage of high level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azkarate, I.; Madina, V.; Insausti, M.

    1999-01-01

    The metallic container is one of the most important barriers that, along with engineered and natural barriers, will isolate high level nuclear waste in saline and granite geological formations from the geosphere. However, general and localized corrosion modes such as stress corrosion cracking (SCC), pitting, crevice corrosion and hydrogen damage can be active under disposal conditions, so the corrosion behaviour of the metal container material must be carefully studied. Several metals and their alloys have been proposed for the fabrication of nuclear waste containers including carbon steels, stainless steels, titanium and titanium alloys and copper and copper-base alloys. Carbon steels and copper alloys are considered for the two rock formations, titanium is considered for salt environments and the stainless steel only in the case of a granite formation. (Author)

  3. Corrosion/95 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The papers in this conference represent the latest technological advances in corrosion control and prevention. The following subject areas are covered: cathodic protection in natural waters; materials for fossil fuel combustion and conversion systems; modern problems in atmospheric corrosion; innovative ideas for controlling the decaying infrastructure; deposits and their effects on corrosion in industry; volatile high temperature and non aqueous corrosion inhibitors; corrosion of light-weight and precoated metals for automotive application; refining industry corrosion; corrosion in pulp and paper industry; arctic/cold weather corrosion; materials selection for waste incinerators and associated equipment; corrosion measurement technology; environmental cracking of materials; advancing technology in the coating industry; corrosion in gas treating; green inhibition; recent advances in corrosion control of rail equipment; velocity effects and erosion corrosion in oil and gas production; marine corrosion; corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; underground corrosion control; corrosion in potable and industrial water systems in buildings and its impact on environmental compliance; deposit related boiler tube failures; boiler systems monitoring and control; recent developments and experiences in reactive metals; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion and corrosion control for steel reinforced concrete; international symposium on the use of 12 and 13 Cr stainless steels in oil and gas production environments; subsea corrosion /erosion monitoring in production facilities; fiberglass reinforced pipe and tubulars in oilfield service; corrosion control technology in power transmission and distribution; mechanisms and methods of scale and deposit control; closing the loop -- results oriented cooling system monitoring and control; and minimization of aqueous discharge

  4. Tensile stress corrosion cracking of type 304 stainless steel irradiated to very high dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. M.; Ruther, W. E.; Strain, R. V.; Shack, W. J.

    2001-09-01

    Certain safety-related core internal structural components of light water reactors, usually fabricated from Type 304 or 316 austenitic stainless steels (SSs), accumulate very high levels of irradiation damage (20--100 displacement per atom or dpa) by the end of life. The data bases and mechanistic understanding of, the degradation of such highly irradiated components, however, are not well established. A key question is the nature of irradiation-assisted intergranular cracking at very high dose, i.e., is it purely mechanical failure or is it stress-commotion cracking? In this work, hot-cell tests and microstructural characterization were performed on Type 304 SS from the hexagonal fuel can of the decommissioned EBR-11 reactor after irradiation to {approximately}50 dpa at {approximately}370 C. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests were conducted at 289 C in air and in water at several levels of electrochemical potential (ECP), and microstructural characteristics were analyzed by scanning and transmission electron microcopies. The material deformed significantly by twinning and exhibited surprisingly high ductility in air, but was susceptible to severe intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) at high ECP. Low levels of dissolved O and ECP were effective in suppressing the susceptibility of the heavily irradiated material to IGSCC, indicating that the stress corrosion process associated with irradiation-induced grain-boundary Cr depletion, rather than purely mechanical separation of grain boundaries, plays the dominant role. However, although IGSCC was suppressed, the material was susceptible to dislocation channeling at low ECP, and this susceptibility led to poor work-hardening capability and low ductility.

  5. Annual Report, Fall 2016: Alternative Chemical Cleaning of Radioactive High Level Waste Tanks - Corrosion Test Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyrwas, R. B.

    2016-01-01

    The testing presented in this report is in support of the investigation of the Alternative Chemical Cleaning program to aid in developing strategies and technologies to chemically clean radioactive High Level Waste tanks prior to tank closure. The data and conclusions presented here were the examination of the corrosion rates of A285 carbon steel and 304L stainless steel exposed to two proposed chemical cleaning solutions: acidic permanganate (0.18 M nitric acid and 0.05M sodium permanganate) and caustic permanganate. (10 M sodium hydroxide and 0.05M sodium permanganate). These solutions have been proposed as a chemical cleaning solution for the retrieval of actinides in the sludge in the waste tanks, and were tested with both HM and PUREX sludge simulants at a 20:1 ratio.

  6. Annual Report, Fall 2016: Alternative Chemical Cleaning of Radioactive High Level Waste Tanks - Corrosion Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrwas, R. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-01

    The testing presented in this report is in support of the investigation of the Alternative Chemical Cleaning program to aid in developing strategies and technologies to chemically clean radioactive High Level Waste tanks prior to tank closure. The data and conclusions presented here were the examination of the corrosion rates of A285 carbon steel and 304L stainless steel exposed to two proposed chemical cleaning solutions: acidic permanganate (0.18 M nitric acid and 0.05M sodium permanganate) and caustic permanganate. (10 M sodium hydroxide and 0.05M sodium permanganate). These solutions have been proposed as a chemical cleaning solution for the retrieval of actinides in the sludge in the waste tanks, and were tested with both HM and PUREX sludge simulants at a 20:1 ratio.

  7. Experiences with high temperature corrosion at straw‐firing power plants in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Jensen, S. A.; Borg, U.

    2011-01-01

    to enable better lifetime prediction of vulnerable components in straw‐firing plants since the corrosion rates are so much faster than in coal firing plants. Therefore, there are continued investigations in recently commissioned plants with test tubes installed into actual superheaters. In addition...... temperature is measured on the specific tube loops where there are test tube sections. Thus a corrosion rate can be coupled to a temperature histogram. This is important since although a superheater has a defined steam outlet temperature, there is variation in the tube bundle due to variations of heat flux...

  8. Effect of caffeine inhibitor in corrosion rate and microstructure of KS01 carbon steel and AISI 1045 at media sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulistioso Giat S; Setyo Purwanto; Deswita; Ari Handayani; Berta Vidyananda

    2013-01-01

    Many synthetic materials are good inhibitors for the prevention of corrosion . Many inhibitors are toxic, because of the influence of these toxic properties, recently use organic materials as corrosion inhibitors, that are not hazardous and environmentally friendly. In this study caffeine compounds used as corrosion inhibitors. This compound could be used as corrosion inhibitor because of the existence of their chemical groups that containing free electron pair, that is nitrogen. Corrosion rate testing conducted in sea water medium taken from the Northern region of Indramayu with variations of the concentration of caffeine 0, 50, 100, 150, and 200 ppm to determine the optimum concentration of caffeine in corrosion rate of carbon steel AISI 1045 and KS01 that a widely used on the cooling system in the industry. Corrosion rate of KS-01 steel before used in inhibitor media is 25,07 mpy that less than corrosion rate of carbon steel AISI 1045, is 45,82 mpy . The results of this study indicate that caffeine is able to inhibit the corrosion rate of both of samples with optimum efficiency KS01 for 64.38%, and AISI 1045 of 66.63%. The optimum concentration of caffeine to inhibited AISI 1045 is 150 ppm and for KS01 is 100 ppm,. Beside that analysis of microstructure for both samples have done, for media before and after inhibitor addition. (author)

  9. General and localized corrosion of carbon and low-alloy steels in oxygenated high-temperature water. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, D.D.; Smialowska, S.; Pednekar, S.

    1983-02-01

    The susceptibilities to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of two carbon steels, SA106-grB and SA333-gr6, which are used in seamless BWR piping, and a low-alloy pressure vessel steel, A508-C12, were studied in high purity water as a function of oxygen concentration (0.16 to 8 ppM) and temperature (50 to 288 0 C) . The susceptibility to SCC was measured using the slow strain rate technique. The fracture surfaces of the test specimens were also examined using SEM to determine the mode of failure. In water containing 1 and 8 ppM oxygen and at temperatures above 135 0 C, transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC) was observed to occur in A508-C12, SA333-gr6 and SA106grB steels at very high stresses. The susceptibility to SCC increased with temperature

  10. Corrosion Cost and Corrosion Map of Korea - Based on the Data from 2005 to 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. S.; Lim, H. K.; Kim, J. J.; Hwang, W. S.; Park, Y. S.

    2011-01-01

    Corrosion of metallic materials occurs by the reaction with corrosive environment such as atmosphere, marine, soil, urban, high temperature etc. In general, reduction of thickness and cracking and degradation are resulted from corrosion. Corrosion in all industrial facilities and infrastructure causes large economic losses as well as a large number of accidents. Economic loss by corrosion has been reported to be nearly 1-6% of GNP or GDP. In order to reduce corrosion damage of industrial facilities, corrosion map as well as a systematic investigation of the loss of corrosion in each industrial sector is needed. The Corrosion Science Society of Korea in collaboration with 15 universities and institutes has started to survey on the cost of corrosion and corrosion map of Korea since 2005. This work presents the results of the survey on cost of corrosion by Uhlig, Hoar, and input-output methods, and the evaluation of atmospheric corrosion rate of carbon steel, weathering steel, galvanized steel, copper, and aluminum in Korea. The total corrosion cost was estimated in terms of the percentage of the GDP of industry sectors and the total GDP of Korea. According to the result of Input/output method, corrosion cost of Korea was calculated as 2.9% to GDP (2005). Time of wetness was shown to be categories 3 to 4 in all exposure areas. A definite seasonal difference was observed in Korea. In summer and fall, time of wetness was higher than in other seasons. Because of short exposure period (12 months), significant corrosion trends depending upon materials and exposure corrosion environments were not revealed even though increased mass loss and decreased corrosion rate by exposure time

  11. Evaluation of flow accelerated corrosion by coupled analysis of corrosion and flow dynamics (1), major features of coupled analysis and application for evaluation of wall thinning rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naitoh, Masanori; Uchida, Shunsuke; Okada, Hidetoshi; Uehara, Yasushi; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2009-01-01

    Six calculation steps have been prepared for predicting flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) occurrence and evaluating wall thinning rate. (1) Flow pattern and temperature in each elemental volume along the flow path are obtained with a 1D plant system code, (2) Corrosive conditions, e.g., oxygen concentration and electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) along the flow path are calculated with a hydrazine-oxygen reaction code, (3) Precise flow patterns and mass transfer coefficients at the structure surface are calculated with a 3D CFD code, (4) Danger zones are evaluated by combining major FAC parameters, (5) Wall thinning rates are calculated with the coupled models of static electrochemical analysis and dynamic double oxide layer analysis at the identified danger zone, and then, (6) Residual life and effects of countermeasures can be evaluated. Anodic and cathodic current densities and ECPs were calculated with the static electrochemistry model, and ferrous ion release rate determined by the anodic current density was used as input for the dynamic double oxide layer model. Thickness of the oxide film and its characteristics determined by the dynamic double oxide layer model were used for the electrochemistry model to determine the resistances of cathodic current from the bulk to the surface and anodic current from the surface to the bulk. The calculated results of the coupled models had been compared with the data measured at operating Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) plants and it was demonstrated that the calculated results had good agreements with the measured ones. 6 step-evaluation procedures for liquid droplet impingement (LDI) were also proposed. (author)

  12. Ash deposition and high temperature corrosion at combustion of aggressive fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hede Larsen, O [I/S Fynsvaerket, Faelleskemikerne, Odense (Denmark); Henriksen, N [Elsamprojekt A/S, Faelleskemikerne, Fredericia (Denmark)

    1996-12-01

    In order to reduce CO{sub 2} emission, ELSAM is investigating the possibilities of using biomass - mainly straw - for combustion in high efficiency power plants. As straw has very high contents of chlorine and potassium, a fuel with high corrosion and ash deposition propensities has been introduced. ELSAM has investigated 3 ultra supercritical boiler concepts for combustion of straw alone or together with coal: (1) PF boilers with a relatively low share of straw, (2) CFB boilers with low to high share of straw and (3) vibrating grate boilers with 100% straw. These investigations has mainly been full-scale tests with straw fed into existing boilers. Corrosion tests have been performed in these boilers using temperature regulated probes and in-plant test tubes in existing superheaters. The corrosion has been determined by detailed measurements of wall thickness reduction and light optical microscopic measurements of the material degradation due to high temperature corrosion. Corrosion mechanisms have been evaluated using SEM/EDX together with thermodynamical considerations based on measurements of the chemical environment in the flue gas. Ash deposition is problematic in CFB boilers and in straw fired boilers, especially in years with high potassium and chlorine content of the straw. This ash deposition also is related to condensation of KCl and can probably only be handled by improved cleaning devices. (EG)

  13. Stress Corrosion Cracking of alloy 600 in high temperature water: a study of mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boursier, J.M.; Bouvier, O. de; Gras, J.M.; Noel, D.; Vaillant, F.; Rios, R.

    1992-12-01

    Investigations of the stress corrosion cracking behaviour of Alloy 600 tubing in high temperature water were performed in order to get a precise knowledge of the different stages of the cracking and their dependence on various parameters. The compatibility of the results with the main mechanisms to be considered was examined. Results showed three stages in the cracking: a true incubation time, a slow-rate propagation period followed by a rapid-propagation stage. Tests separating stress and strain rate contributions show that the strain rate is the main parameter which controls the crack propagation. The hydrogen overpressure was found to increase the crack growth rate up to 1-4 bar, but a strong decrease is observed from 4 to 20 bar. Analysis of the hydrogen ingress in the metal showed that it is neither correlated to the hydrogen overpressure nor to the severity of cracking; so cracking resulting from an hydrogen-model is unlikely. No detrimental effect of oxygen (4 bar) was noticed both in the mill-annealed and the sensitized conditions. Finally, none of the classical mechanisms, neither hydrogen-assisted cracking nor slip-step dissolution, can correctly describe the observed behaviour. Some fractographic examinations, and an influence of primary water on the creep rate of Alloy 600, lead to consider that other recent mechanisms, involving an interaction between dissolution and plasticity, have to be considered

  14. Performance of surrogate high-level waste glass in the presence of iron corrosion products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, V.; Pan, Y.M.

    2004-01-01

    Radionuclide release from a waste package (WP) is a series of processes that depend upon the composition and flux of groundwater contacting the waste-forms (WF); the corrosion rate of WP containers and internal components made of Alloy 22, 316L SS, 304L SS and carbon steel; the dissolution rate of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) glass and spent nuclear fuel (SNF); the solubility of radionuclides; and the retention of radionuclides in secondary mineral phases. In this study, forward reaction rate measurements were made on a surrogate HLW glass in the presence of FeCl 3 species. Results indicate that the forward reaction rate increases with an increase in the FeCl 3 concentration. The addition of FeCl 3 causes the drop in the pH due to hydrolysis of Fe 3+ ions in the solution. Results based on the radionuclide concentrations and dissolution rates for HLW glass and SNF indicate that the contribution from glass is similar to SNF at 75 deg C. (authors)

  15. Assessment of high performance concrete containing fly ash and calcium nitrite based corrosion inhibitor as a mean to prevent the corrosion of reinforcing steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes-García, P; Jiménez-Quero, V; López-Calvo, H

    2015-01-01

    This research analyses the effectiveness of the water-to-cement ratio (w/c), fly ash and a calcium nitrite based corrosion inhibitor to prevent the corrosion of reinforcing steel embedded in high performance concrete. The interactive effect between the inhibitor and fly ash was evaluated because the occurrence of a negative effect when both ingredients are added together in a concrete mixture has been reported. All the concrete mixtures studied in this investigation had 8.2% of silica fume. Twenty seven prismatic concrete specimens were fabricated with dimensions of 55 × 230 × 300 mm each containing two steel rods embedded for the purpose of corrosion monitoring. The specimens were exposed to a simulated marine environment with two daily cycles of wetting and drying for one year. To evaluate the deterioration of the specimens corrosion potentials and linear polarization resistance tests were carried out. The results indicate that the use of a low w/c, the addition of fly ash and the addition of the corrosion inhibitor contributed to the reduction of the corrosion of steel in the concrete specimens. The results further suggest that the combination of fly ash and corrosion inhibitor does not promote the deterioration of the concrete matrix

  16. Improvement of corrosion resistance of vanadium alloys in high-temperature pressurized water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Mitsuhiro; Sakamoto, Toshiya; Satou, Manabu; Hasegawa, Akira; Abe, Katsunori; Kaiuchi, Kazuo; Furuya, Takemi

    2005-01-01

    Corrosion tests in pressurized and vaporized water were conducted for V-based high Cr and Ti alloys and V-4Cr-4Ti type alloys containing minor elements such as Si, Al and Y. Weight losses were observed for every alloy after corrosion tests in pressurized water. It was apparent that addition of Cr effectively reduced the weight change in pressurized water. The weight loss of V-4Cr-4Ti type alloys in corrosion tests in vaporized water was also reduced as Cr content increased. The V-20Cr-4Ti alloy had a slight weight gain, almost same as that of SUS316, which had the best corrosion properties in the tested alloys. The elongation of alloys with in excess of 10% Cr was reduced as Cr content increased. The elongations of the V-12Cr-4Ti and the V-15Cr-4Ti alloys were significantly reduced by corrosion and cleavage fracture was observed reflecting hydrogen embrittlement. The reduced elongations of the alloys of the alloys were recovered to the same level of as annealed conditions after hydrogen degassing. After corrosion, the V-15Cr-4Ti-0.5Y alloy still kept enough elongation, suggesting that the addition of Y is effective to reduce the hydrogen embrittlement. (author)

  17. High temperature corrosion of silicon carbide and silicon nitride in the presence of chloride compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNallan, M.

    1993-01-01

    Silicon carbide and silicon nitride are resistant to oxidation because a protective silicon dioxide films on their surfaces in most oxidizing environments. Chloride compounds can attack the surface in two ways: 1) chlorine can attack the silicon directly to form a volatile silicon chloride compound or 2) alkali compounds combined with the chlorine can be transported to the surface where they flux the silica layer by forming stable alkali silicates. Alkali halides have enough vapor pressure that a sufficient quantity of alkali species to cause accelerated corrosion can be transported to the ceramic surface without the formation of a chloride deposit. When silicon carbide is attacked simultaneously by chlorine and oxygen, the corrosion products include both volatile and condensed spices. Silicon nitride is much more resistance to this type of attack than silicon carbide. Silicon based ceramics are exposed to oxidizing gases in the presence of alkali chloride vapors, the rate of corrosion is controlled primarily by the driving force for the formation of alkali silicate, which can be quantified as the activity of the alkali oxide in equilibrium with the corrosive gas mixture. In a gas mixture containing a fixed partial pressure of KCl, the rate of corrosion is accelerated by increasing the concentration of water vapor and inhibited by increasing the concentration of HCl. Similar results have been obtained for mixtures containing other alkalis and halogens. (Orig./A.B.)

  18. Advanced nickel base alloys for high strength, corrosion applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinn, J.E.

    1998-11-03

    Improved nickel-base alloys of enhanced strength and corrosion resistance, produced by atomization of an alloy melt under an inert gas atmosphere and of composition 0--20Fe, 10--30Cr, 2--12Mo, 6 max. Nb, 0.05--3 V, 0.08 max. Mn, 0.5 max. Si, less than 0.01 each of Al and Ti, less than 0.05 each of P and S, 0.01--0.08C, less than 0.2N, 0.1 max. 0, bal. Ni. 3 figs.

  19. A combined neural network and mechanistic approach for the prediction of corrosion rate and yield strength of magnesium-rare earth alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birbilis, N., E-mail: nick.birbilis@monash.ed [ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, Monash University (Australia); CAST Co-operative Research Centre, Monash University (Australia); Cavanaugh, M.K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University (United States); Sudholz, A.D. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, Monash University (Australia); Zhu, S.M.; Easton, M.A. [CAST Co-operative Research Centre, Monash University (Australia); Gibson, M.A. [CSIRO Division of Process Science and Engineering (Australia)

    2011-01-15

    Research highlights: This study presents a body of corrosion data for a set of custom alloys and displays this in multivariable space. These alloys represent the next generation of Mg alloys for auto applications. The data is processed using an ANN model, which makes it possible to yield a single expression for prediction of corrosion rate (and strength) as a function of any input composition (of Ce, La or Nd between 0 and 6 wt.%). The relative influence of the various RE elements on corrosion is assessed, with the outcome that Nd additions can offer comparable strength with minimal rise in corrosion rate. The morphology and solute present in the eutectic region itself (as opposed to just the intermetallic presence) was shown - for the first time - to also be a key contributor to corrosion. The above approach sets the foundation for rational alloy design of alloys with corrosion performance in mind. - Abstract: Additions of Ce, La and Nd to Mg were made in binary, ternary and quaternary combinations up to {approx}6 wt.%. This provided a dataset that was used in developing a neural network model for predicting corrosion rate and yield strength. Whilst yield strength increased with RE additions, corrosion rates also systematically increased, however, this depended on the type of RE element added and the combination of elements added (along with differences in intermetallic morphology). This work is permits an understanding of Mg-RE alloy performance, and can be exploited in Mg alloy design for predictable combinations of strength and corrosion resistance.

  20. Task 20 - Prevention of Chloride Corrosion in High-Temperature Waste Treatment Systems (Corrosives Removals from Vitrification Slurries)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timpe, R.C.; Aulich, T.R.

    1998-01-01

    GTS Duratek is working with BNFL Incorporated on a US Department of Energy (DOE) contract to develop a facility to treat and immobilize radioactive waste at the Hanford site in southeast Washington. Development of the 10-ton/day Hanford facility will be based on findings from work at Duratek's 3.3-ton/day pilot plant in Columbia, Maryland, which is in the final stage of construction and scheduled for shakedown testing in early 1999. In prior work with the Catholic University of America Vitreous State Laboratory, Duratek has found that slurrying is the most efficient way to introduce low-level radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes into vitrification melters. However, many of the Hanford tank wastes to be vitrified contain species (primarily chloride and sulfate) that are corrosive to the vitrifier or the downstream air pollution control equipment, especially under the elevated temperature conditions existent in these components. Removal of these corrosives presents a significant challenge because most tank wastes contain high (up to 10-molar) concentrations of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) along with significant levels of nitrate, nitrite, and other anions, which render standard ion-exchange, membrane filtration, and other separation technologies relatively ineffective. In Task 20, the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) will work with Duratek to develop and optimize a vitrification pretreatment process for consistent, quantitative removal of chloride and sulfate prior to vitrifier injection

  1. Alkali activated slag mortars provide high resistance to chloride-induced corrosion of steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criado, Maria; Provis, John L.

    2018-06-01

    The pore solutions of alkali-activated slag cements and Portland-based cements are very different in terms of their chemical and redox characteristics, particularly due to the high alkalinity and high sulfide content of alkali-activated slag cement. Therefore, differences in corrosion mechanisms of steel elements embedded in these cements could be expected, with important implications for the durability of reinforced concrete elements. This study assesses the corrosion behaviour of steel embedded in alkali-activated blast furnace slag (BFS) mortars exposed to alkaline solution, alkaline chloride-rich solution, water, and standard laboratory conditions, using electrochemical techniques. White Portland cement (WPC) mortars and blended cement mortars (white Portland cement and blast furnace slag) were also tested for comparative purposes. The steel elements embedded in immersed alkali-activated slag mortars presented very negative redox potentials and high apparent corrosion current values; the presence of sulfide reduced the redox potential, and the oxidation of the reduced sulfur-containing species within the cement itself gave an electrochemical signal that classical electrochemical tests for reinforced concrete durability would interpret as being due to steel corrosion processes. However, the actual observed resistance to chloride-induced corrosion was very high, as measured by extraction and characterisation of the steel at the end of a 9-month exposure period, whereas the steel embedded in white Portland cement mortars was significantly damaged under the same conditions.

  2. High temperature corrosion of superheater materials for power production through biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotthjaelp, K.; Broendsted, P. [Forskningscenter Risoe (Denmark); Jansen, P. [FORCE Institute (Denmark); Montgomery, M.; Nielsen, K.; Maahn, E. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Corrosion and Surface Techn. Inst. of Manufacturing Engineering (Denmark)

    1996-08-01

    The aim of the present study has been to establish a fundamental knowledge of the corrosion mechanisms acting on materials for use in biomass fired power plants. The knowledge is created based on laboratory exposures of selected materials in well-defined corrosive gas environments. The experiments using this facility includes corrosion studies of two types of high temperature resistant steels, Sanvik 8LR30 (18Cr 10Ni Ti) and Sanicro 28 (27Cr 31Ni 4Mo), investigated at 600 deg. C in time intervals up to 300 hours. The influence of HCl (200 ppm) and of SO{sub 2} (300 ppm) on the corrosion progress has been investigated. In addition the corrosion behaviour of the same materials was investigated after having been exposed under a cover of ash in air in a furnace at temperatures of 525 deg. C, 600 deg. C, and 700 deg. C. The ashes utilised are from a straw fired power plant and a synthetic ash composed of potassium chloride (KCl) and potassium sulphate (K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}). Different analysis techniques to characterise the composition of the ash coatings have been investigated in order to judge the reliability and accuracy of the SEM-EDX method. The results are considered as an important step towards a better understanding of the high temperature corrosion under the conditions found in biomass fired power plants. One of the problems to solve in a suggested subsequent project is to combine the effect of the aggressive gases (SO{sub 2} and HCl) and the active ash coatings on high temperature corrosion of materials. (EG) 20 refs.

  3. Application of electromagnetic fields to improve the removal rate of radioactive corrosion products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Tae Young; Lee, Kun Jai; Song, Min Chul

    2004-01-01

    To comply with increasingly strict regulations for protection against radiation exposure, many nuclear power plants have been working ceaselessly to reduce and control both the radiation sources within power plants and the radiation exposure experienced by operational and maintenance personnel. Many research studies have shown that deposits of irradiated corrosion products on the surfaces of coolant systems are the main cause of occupational radiation exposure in nuclear power plants. These corrosion product deposits on the fuel-clad surface are also known to be main factors in the onset of Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA). Hence, there is a great deal of ongoing research on water chemistry and corrosion processes. In this study, a magnetic filter with permanent magnets was devised to remove the corrosion products in the coolant stream by taking advantage of the magnetic properties of the corrosion particles. Experiments using permanent magnets to filter the corrosion products demonstrated a removal efficiency of over 90% for particles above 5 μm. This finding led to the construction of an electromagnetic device that causes the metallic particulates to flocculate into larger aggregates of about 5 μm in diameter by using a novel application of electromagnetic flocculation on radioactive corrosion products

  4. Integrated Corrosion Facility for long-term testing of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estill, J.C.; Dalder, E.N.C.; Gdowski, G.E.; McCright, R.D.

    1994-10-01

    A long-term-testing facility, the Integrated Corrosion Facility (I.C.F.), is being developed to investigate the corrosion behavior of candidate construction materials for high-level-radioactive waste packages for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Corrosion phenomena will be characterized in environments considered possible under various scenarios of water contact with the waste packages. The testing of the materials will be conducted both in the liquid and high humidity vapor phases at 60 and 90 degrees C. Three classes of materials with different degrees of corrosion resistance will be investigated in order to encompass the various design configurations of waste packages. The facility is expected to be in operation for a minimum of five years, and operation could be extended to longer times if warranted. A sufficient number of specimens will be emplaced in the test environments so that some can be removed and characterized periodically. The corrosion phenomena to be characterized are general, localized, galvanic, and stress corrosion cracking. The long-term data obtained from this study will be used in corrosion mechanism modeling, performance assessment, and waste package design. Three classes of materials are under consideration. The corrosion resistant materials are high-nickel alloys and titanium alloys; the corrosion allowance materials are low-alloy and carbon steels; and the intermediate corrosion resistant materials are copper-nickel alloys

  5. Corrosion of high-level radioactive waste iron-canisters in contact with bentonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufhold, Stephan; Hassel, Achim Walter; Sanders, Daniel; Dohrmann, Reiner

    2015-03-21

    Several countries favor the encapsulation of high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) in iron or steel canisters surrounded by highly compacted bentonite. In the present study the corrosion of iron in contact with different bentonites was investigated. The corrosion product was a 1:1 Fe layer silicate already described in literature (sometimes referred to as berthierine). Seven exposition test series (60 °C, 5 months) showed slightly less corrosion for the Na-bentonites compared to the Ca-bentonites. Two independent exposition tests with iron pellets and 38 different bentonites clearly proved the role of the layer charge density of the swelling clay minerals (smectites). Bentonites with high charged smectites are less corrosive than bentonites dominated by low charged ones. The type of counterion is additionally important because it determines the density of the gel and hence the solid/liquid ratio at the contact to the canister. The present study proves that the integrity of the multibarrier-system is seriously affected by the choice of the bentonite buffer encasing the metal canisters in most of the concepts. In some tests the formation of a patina was observed consisting of Fe-silicate. Up to now it is not clear why and how the patina formed. It, however, may be relevant as a corrosion inhibitor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. High Temperature Corrosion of Nickel in NaVO3-V2O5 Melts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Porcayo-Calderon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Many alloys used at high temperature in industrial processes are Ni-based and many others contain it in appreciable quantities, so it is of interest to evaluate the performance of pure nickel in order to determine the behavior of its alloys once the elements responsible for their protection have been depleted due to accelerated corrosion processes in the presence of vanadium-rich molten salts. Due to this, this work presents the study of Ni behavior in NaVO3-V2O5 mixtures at different temperatures. The behavior of pure nickel was determined by both electrochemical and mass loss measurements. The results show that the aggressiveness of the vanadium salts is increased by increasing both the V2O5 content and temperature. V2O5 addition considerably increases the current densities of the anodic and cathodic reactions. The corrosion process of Ni is modified due to the presence of its corrosion products, and its presence increases the activation energy by at least one order of magnitude. Although nickel shows a high reactivity in vanadium-rich salts, its reaction products are highly stable and protect it from the corrosive medium because the corrosion reactions trap the vanadium and block the migration of nickel ions.

  7. Studies of corrosion in metallic container for storage of high level radioactive wastes; Estudios de corrosion de materiales metalicos para capsulas de almacenamiento de residuos de alta actividad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azkarate, I; Madina, V; Insausti, M

    1999-11-01

    The metallic container is one of the most important barriers that, along with engineered and natural barriers, will isolate high level nuclear waste in saline and granite geological formations from the geosphere. However, general and localized corrosion modes such as stress corrosion cracking (SCC), pitting, crevice corrosion and hydrogen damage can be active under disposal conditions, so the corrosion behaviour of the metal container material must be carefully studied. Several metals and their alloys have been proposed for the fabrication of nuclear waste containers including carbon steels, stainless steels, titanium and titanium alloys and copper and copper-base alloys. Carbon steels and copper alloys are considered for the two rock formations, titanium is considered for salt environments and the stainless steel only in the case of a granite formation. (Author)

  8. Localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste disposal containers in the US: A literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, J.C.; McCright, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    Container materials may undergo any of several modes of degradation in this environment, including: undesirable phase transformations due to lack of phase stability; atmospheric oxidation; general aqueous corrosion; pitting; crevice corrosion; intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC); and transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC). This paper is an analysis of data from the literature relevant to the pitting, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of these alloys. Though all three austenitic candidates have demonstrated pitting and crevice corrosion in chloride-containing environments, Alloy 825 has the greatest resistance to these forms of localized attack. Both types 304L and 316L stainless steels are susceptible to SCC in acidic chloride media. In contrast, SCC has not been documented for Alloy 825 under comparable conditions. Gamma irradiation has been found to enhance SCC of Types 304 and 304L stainless steels, but it has no detectable effect on the resistance of Alloy 825 to SCC. Furthermore, while microbiologically induced corrosion effects have been observed for 300-series stainless steels, nickel-based alloys such as Alloy 825 seem to be immune to such problems. Of the copper-based alloys, CDA 715 has the best overall resistance to localized attack. Its resistance to pitting is comparable to that of CDA 613 and superior to that of CDA 102. Observed rates of dealloying in CDA 715 are less than those observed in CDA 613 by orders of magnitude. The resistance of CDA 715 to SCC in tarnishing ammonical environments is comparable to that of CDA 102 and superior to that of CDA 613. Its resistance to SCC in nontarnishing ammonical environments is comparable to that of CDA 613 and superior to that of CDA 102. 22 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs

  9. High-temperature corrosion of lanthanum in equimole mixture of sodium and potassium chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochergin, V.P.; Obozhina, R.N.; Dragoshanskaya, T.I.; Startsev, B.P.

    1984-01-01

    Results of investigation into the process of lanthanum corrosion in the molted equimole NaCl-KCl mixture after the change of test time, temperature and lanthanum trichloride were summarized. It was shown that polarization of lanthanum anode in equimole NaCl-KCl melt is controlled by La 3+ diffusion from near-electrode layer to electrolyte depth, which results in decrease of corrosion rate in time. The established electrochemical properties of metallic lanthanum in equimole NaCl-KCl mixture must be considered when improving the technology of electrochemical production of lanthanum or its alloys of molten chlorides of lanthanum and alkaline metals

  10. Electron microscopy studies in a high corrosion resistant Ti-Ta-Nb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mythili, R.; Saroja, S.; Vijayalakshmi, M.

    2010-01-01

    Electron microscopy has played an important role in the indigenous development of Ti-5Ta-1.8Nb, an α+β alloy, for reprocessing applications. TEM was used to study the Widmanstatten, martensitic, and the omega phase transformations in the system. A wide spectrum of phase transformations could be introduced into the system, by modifying the composition of the β phase and the cooling rate. PEELS was used to understand the corrosion mechanism, by characterizing the passive film after the corrosion reactions

  11. Determination of the corrosion mechanisms of high level waste containing glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conradt, R.; Roggendorf, H.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of the reported work was to determine the corrosion behaviour of the inactive HLW glass SM 58 LW 11 in Q-solution at temperatures up to 200 0 C and elevated pressures up to 13 MPa. In particular, a parametric study on the effects of time, temperature, pressure, crystallization, metallic impurities a.o. was performed. Further tests helped to identify the rate determining steps in the entire process and the most likely long-term corrosion law. (orig./RB)

  12. Localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste disposal containers in U.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, J.C.; McCright, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    Three ion-based to nickel-based austenitic alloys and three copper-based alloys are being considered in the United States as candidate materials for the fabrication of high-level radioactive waste containers. The austenitic alloys are Types 304L and 316L stainless steels as well as the high-nickel material Alloy 825. The copper-based alloys are CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper) CDA 613 (Cu7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni). Waste in the forms of spent fuel assemblies from reactors and borosilicate glass will be sent to a proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The decay of radionuclides will result in the generation of substantial heat and in gamma radiation. Container materials may undergo any of several modes of degradation in this environment, including: undesirable phase transformations due to a lack of phase stability; atmospheric oxidation; general aqueous corrosion; pitting; crevice corrosion; intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC); and transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC). This paper is an analysis of data from the literature relevant to the pitting, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of these alloys

  13. The effect of Co-firing with Straw and Coal on High Temperature Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Frandsen, Flemming; Larsen, OH

    2001-01-01

    As a part of ELSAMS development programme into alternative energy sources, various concepts of straw-firing have been investigated. This paper concerns co-firing of straw with coal to reduce the corrosion rate observed in straw-fired power plants. Co-firing with coal reduces the amount of potassium......: a) the exposure of metal rings on water/air cooled probes, and b) the exposure of a range of materials built into the existing superheaters. A range of austenitic and ferritic steels was exposed in the steam temperature region of 520-580°C. The flue gas temperature ranged from 925-1100°C....... The corrosion products for the various steel types were investigated using light optical and scanning electron microscopy. Corrosion mechanisms for the austenitic and ferritic steels are presented. These are discussed in relation to temperature and deposit composition. Co-firing with coal has removed potassium...

  14. Laboratory Study of High Temperature Corrosion in Straw-fired Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Maahn, Ernst emanuel

    1997-01-01

    The components contributing to corrosion, HCl(g)SO2(g), KCl and K2SO4 were studied in the laboratory for Sandvik 8LR30 and Sanicro 28. The influence of HCl and SO2 was investigated at 600C material temperature and 600/800C flue gas temperature at time intervals up to 300 hours. The influence of ash...... deposits in air was examined at 525C-700C. Finally exposures were undertaken combining the aforementioned aggressive gas environment with the ash deposits. Thus the corrosion potential of individual components were evaluated and also whether they had a synergistic, antagonistic or additive effect on one...... another to influence the overall corrosion rate....

  15. Consequences of corrosion of the high flux reactor channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The effects of corrosion can increase the probability of the channel losing its seal. In case of a slow leak, the phenomena happening can be considered as quasi-static. The closing of the safety valve takes place even before the leak water reaches the level of the exit window. In case of a fast leak in the case of helium filled channels, the dynamic effects are limited to the front part of the plug. As for the back part of the plug and the housing/safety valve unit, the consequences of a fast leak can be assimilated to those of a slow leak. This paper evaluates the results of an incident such as this for the reactor and the surrounding experimental zones

  16. Studies on Fusion Welding of High Nitrogen Stainless Steel: Microstructure, Mechanical and corrosion Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Srinivasa Rao, K.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2018-03-01

    An attempt has been made in the present investigation to weld high nitrogen steel of 5mm thick plates using various process i.e., shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and autogenous electron beam welding (EBW) process. Present work is aimed at studying the microstructural changes and its effects on mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Microstructure is characterized by optical, scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattered diffraction technique. Vickers hardness, tensile properties, impact toughness and face bend ductility testing of the welds was carried out. Pitting corrosion resistance of welds was determined using potentio-dynamic polarization testing in 3.5%NaCl solution. Results of the present investigation established that SMA welds made using Cr-Mn-N electrode were observed to have a austenite dendritic grain structure in the weld metal and is having poor mechanical properties but good corrosion resistance. GTA welds made using 18Ni (MDN 250) filler wire were observed to have a reverted austenite in martensite matrix of the weld metal and formation of unmixed zone at the fusion boundary which resulted in better mechanical properties and poor corrosion resistance. Fine grains and uniform distribution of delta ferrite in the austenite matrix and narrow width of weld zone are observed in autogeneous electron beam welds. A good combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance was achieved for electron beam welds of high nitrogen steel when compared to SMA and GTA welds.

  17. Resistance to Corrosion of Reinforcement of High Volume Fly Ash Concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S. O.; Bae, S. H.; Lee, H. J.; Lee, K. M.; Jung, S. H.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the increasing of interest about the eco-friendly concrete, it is increased to use concretes containing by-products of industry such as fly ash(FA), ground granulated blast furnace slag(GGBFS), silica fume(SF), and etc. Especially, these are well known for improving the resistances to reinforcement corrosion in concrete and decreasing chloride ion penetration. The purpose of this experimental research is to evaluate the resistance against corrosion of reinforcement of high volume fly ash(HVFA) concrete which is replaced with high volume fly ash for cement volume. For this purpose, the concrete test specimens were made for various strength level and replacement ratio of FA, and then the compressive strength and diffusion coefficient for chloride ion of them were measured for 28, 91, and 182 days, respectively. Also, corrosion monitoring by half cell potential method was carried out for the made lollypop concrete test specimens to detect the time of corrosion initiation for reinforcement in concrete. As a result, it was observed from the test results that the compressive strength of HVFA concrete was decreased with increasing replacement ratio of FA but long-term resistances against reinforcement corrosion and chloride ion penetration of that were increased

  18. High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunnane, J.C.

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion.This document is organized into three volumes. Volumes I and II represent a tiered set of information intended for somewhat different audiences. Volume I is intended to provide an overview of waste glass corrosion, and Volume 11 is intended to provide additional experimental details on experimental factors that influence waste glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II. Volume I is intended for managers, decision makers, and modelers, the combined set of Volumes I, II, and III is intended for scientists and engineers working in the field of high-level waste

  19. High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunnane, J.C. [comp.; Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion.This document is organized into three volumes. Volumes I and II represent a tiered set of information intended for somewhat different audiences. Volume I is intended to provide an overview of waste glass corrosion, and Volume 11 is intended to provide additional experimental details on experimental factors that influence waste glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II. Volume I is intended for managers, decision makers, and modelers, the combined set of Volumes I, II, and III is intended for scientists and engineers working in the field of high-level waste.

  20. Effects of environmental variables on the crack initiation stages of corrosion fatigue of high strength aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poteat, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    Fatigue initiation in six aluminum alloys used in the aircraft industry was investigated. Cyclic loading superimposed on a constant stress was alternated with atmospheric corrosion. Tests made at different stress levels revealed that a residual stress as low as 39% of the yield strength caused stress corrosion cracking in some of the alloys. An atmospheric corrosion rate meter developed to measure the corrosivity of the atmosphere is described. An easily duplicated hole in the square test specimen with a self-induced residual stress was developed.

  1. Analysis of Gamma Dose Rate Caused by Corrosion Products inside the Containment Building of Yonngwang Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3 During Shutdown Period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Wi Ho; Kim, Jae Cheon; Kim, Soon Young; Kim, Jong Kyung [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Occupational radiation exposure(ORE) of nuclear power plant(NPP) workers mainly occurs during the shutdown period. Major radioactive sources are the corrosion products released from the reactor coolant system(RCS). The corrosion products consist of circulating crud and deposited crud. Major radioactive corrosion products, {sup 58}Co and {sup 60}Co, are known to contribute approximately more than 70% of the total ORE. In this study, the corrosion products regarding cobalt were evaluated during the shutdown period, and gamma dose rates caused by them were calculated at the main working area inside the containment building of the Yonggwang NPP Unit 3.

  2. Coal-fired power plants and the causes of high temperature corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oakey, J E; Simms, N J [British Coal Corporation, Coal Technology Development Div., Cheltenham, Glos (United Kingdom); Tomkings, A B [ERA Technology Ltd., Leatherhead, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-01

    The heat exchangers in all types of coal-fired power plant operate in aggressive, high temperature environments where high temperature corrosion can severely limit their service lives. The extent of this corrosion is governed by the combined effects of the operating conditions of the heat exchanger and the presence of corrosive species released from the coal during operation. This paper reviews the coal-related factors, such as ash deposition, which influence the operating environments of heat exchangers in three types of coal-fired power plant - conventional pulverized coal boilers, fluidized bed boilers and coal gasification systems. The effects on the performance of the materials used for these heat exchangers are then compared. (au) 35 refs.

  3. Corrosion behaviour of container materials for geological disposal of high level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accary, A.

    1985-01-01

    The disposal of high level radioactive waste in geological formations, based on the multibarrier concept, may include the use of a container as one of the engineered barriers. In this report the requirements imposed on this container and the possible degradation processes are reviewed. Further on an overview is given of the research being carried out by various research centres in the European Community on the assessment of the corrosion behaviour of candidate container materials. The results obtained on a number of materials under various testing conditions are summarized and evaluated. As a result, three promising materials have been selected for a detailed joint testing programme. It concerns two highly corrosion resistant alloys, resp. Ti-Pd (0.2 Pd%) and Hastelloy C4 and one consumable material namely a low carbon steel. Finally the possibilities of modelling the corrosion phenomena are discussed

  4. The oxidation and corrosion of ODS alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, Carl E.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    The oxidation and hot corrosion of high temperature oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys are reviewed. The environmental resistance of such alloys are classified by oxide growth rate, oxide volatility, oxide spalling, and hot corrosion limitations. Also discussed are environmentally resistant coatings for ODS materials. It is concluded that ODS NiCrAl and FeCrAl alloys are highly oxidation and corrosion resistant and can probably be used uncoated.

  5. Oxidation And Hot Corrosion Of ODS Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, Carl E.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1993-01-01

    Report reviews oxidation and hot corrosion of oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys, intended for use at high temperatures. Classifies environmental resistances of such alloys by rates of growth of oxides, volatilities of oxides, spalling of oxides, and limitations imposed by hot corrosion. Also discusses environmentally resistant coatings for ODS materials. Concludes ODS NICrAl and FeCrAl alloys highly resistant to oxidation and corrosion and can be used uncoated.

  6. The Effect of superficial cracks of the concrete on the behavior and corrosion rate of steel rebars in Persian Golf (Booshehr)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afshar, A.; Rajabi, A.

    2001-01-01

    The presence of superficial cracks in concrete increases the diffusion of destructive agents into concrete and the corrosion of rebars will take place. In the present work, the effects of cracks width on the behavior and corrosion rate of steel rebars in the concrete containing cements type I and II at Persian Gulf water have been studied. The results show that the corrosion rate of steel rebars in the concrete with cracks width less than 0.4 mm is negligible, but with increasing the cracks width to 0.7 mm, the corrosion rate increase rapidly. Also, the corrosion gate of gebars in the concrete containing cement type I is more than that of cement type II. The visual inspection of the surface area of gebars shows that the corroded area is 6-7 times of the crack width and length

  7. In-situ corrosion studies on selected high-level waste packaging materials under simulated disposal conditions in rock salt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarzkopf, W.; Smailos, E.; Koester, R.

    1988-01-01

    This work reports about in situ corrosion experiments on unalloyed steels, Ti 99,8-Pd, Hastelloy C4, and iron-base alloys, as modular cast iron, Ni-Resist D4 and Si-cast iron, under simulated disposal conditions. The experiments were carried out in the frame of the German/US Brine Migration Test in heated tubed boreholes in the Asse salt mine at T = 150 0 C to 210 0 C, both in the absence and in the presence of a γ-radiation field of 3x10 2 Gy/h (Co-60 source). In addition, the material used to protect the tubing from corrosion (Inconel 600) as well as the backfill material for the annular gap (Al 2 O 3 spheres) were investigated for possible corrosion attack. All materials investigate exhibited high resistance to corrosion under the conditions prevailing in the Brine Migration Test. All material specimens corroded at much lower rates than determined in the previous laboratory-scale tests. All materials and above all the materials with passivating oxide layers such as Ti 99.8-Pd and Hastelloy C4 which may corrode selectively already in the presence of minor amounts of brine had been resistant with respect to any type of local corrosion attack. The γ-radiation of 3x10 2 Gy/h did not exert an influence on the corrosion behaviour of the materials. No corrosion attacks were observed on the Al 2 O 3 spheres. In the case of Inconel 600 traces of sulphur were detected probably resulting from the reaction of Ni with H 2 S to NiS. Measurable general and local corrosion, however, have not been observed. (orig./IHOE) [de

  8. Corrosion of graphite composites in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christner, L. G.; Dhar, H. P.; Farooque, M.; Kush, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Polymers, polymer-graphite composites and different carbon materials are being considered for many of the fuel cell stack components. Exposure to concentrated phosphoric acid in the fuel cell environment and to high anodic potential results in corrosion. Relative corrosion rates of these materials, failure modes, plausible mechanisms of corrosion and methods for improvement of these materials are investigated.

  9. Ionic Liquid (1-Butyl-3-Metylimidazolium Methane Sulphonate Corrosion and Energy Analysis for High Pressure CO2 Absorption Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aqeel Ahmad Taimoor

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the possible use of ionic liquids as a solvent in a commercial high-pressure CO2 removal process, to gain environmental and energy benefits. There are two main constraints in realizing this: ionic liquids can be corrosive, specifically when mixed with a water/amine solution with dissolved O2 & CO2; and CO2 absorption within this process is not very well understood. Therefore, scavenging CO2 to ppm levels from process gas comes with several risks. We used 1-butyl-3-methylimidazoium methane sulphonate [bmim][MS] as an ionic liquid because of its high corrosiveness (due to its acidic nature to estimate the ranges of expected corrosion in the process. TAFEL technique was used to determine these rates. Further, the process was simulated based on the conventional absorption–desorption process using ASPEN HYSYS v 8.6. After preliminary model validation with the amine solution, [bmim][MS] was modeled based on the properties found in the literature. The energy comparison was then provided and the optimum ratio of the ionic liquid/amine solution was calculated.

  10. Thermal Spray Coatings for High-Temperature Corrosion Protection in Biomass Co-Fired Boilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksa, M.; Metsäjoki, J.; Kärki, J.

    2015-01-01

    There are over 1000 biomass boilers and about 500 plants using waste as fuel in Europe, and the numbers are increasing. Many of them encounter serious problems with high-temperature corrosion due to detrimental elements such as chlorides, alkali metals, and heavy metals. By HVOF spraying, it is possible to produce very dense and well-adhered coatings, which can be applied for corrosion protection of heat exchanger surfaces in biomass and waste-to-energy power plant boilers. Four HVOF coatings and one arc sprayed coating were exposed to actual biomass co-fired boiler conditions in superheater area with a probe measurement installation for 5900 h at 550 and 750 °C. The coating materials were Ni-Cr, IN625, Fe-Cr-W-Nb-Mo, and Ni-Cr-Ti. CJS and DJ Hybrid spray guns were used for HVOF spraying to compare the corrosion resistance of Ni-Cr coating structures. Reference materials were ferritic steel T92 and nickel super alloy A263. The circulating fluidized bed boiler burnt a mixture of wood, peat and coal. The coatings showed excellent corrosion resistance at 550 °C compared to the ferritic steel. At higher temperature, NiCr sprayed with CJS had the best corrosion resistance. IN625 was consumed almost completely during the exposure at 750 °C.

  11. Straining electrode behavior and corrosion resistance of nickel base alloys in high temperature acidic solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Kazuo

    1992-01-01

    Repassivation behavior and IGA resistance of nickel base alloys containing 0∼30 wt% chromium was investigated in high temperature acid sulfate solution. (1) The repassivation rate was increased with increasing chromium content. And so the amounts of charge caused by the metal dissolution were decreased with increasing chromium content. (2) Mill-annealed Alloy 600 suffered IGA at low pH environment below about 3.5 at the fixed potentials above the corrosion potential in 10%Na 2 SO 4 +H 2 SO 4 solution at 598K. On the other hand, thermally-treated Alloy 690 was hard to occur IGA at low pH environments which mill-annealed Alloy 600 occurred IGA. (3) It was considered that the reason, why nickel base alloys containing high chromium content such as Alloy 690 (60%Ni-30%Cr-10%Fe) had high IGA/SCC resistance in high temperature acidic solution containing sulfate ion, is due to both the promotion of the repassivation and the suppression of the film dissolution by the formation of the dense chromium oxide film

  12. Corrosion behavior in high heat input welded heat-affected zone of Ni-free high-nitrogen Fe–18Cr–10Mn–N austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Joonoh; Ha, Heon-Young; Lee, Tae-Ho

    2013-01-01

    The pitting corrosion and interphase corrosion behaviors in high heat input welded heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a metastable high-nitrogen Fe–18Cr–10Mn–N austenitic stainless steel were explored through electrochemical tests. The HAZs were simulated using Gleeble simulator with high heat input welding condition of 300 kJ/cm and the peak temperature of the HAZs was changed from 1200 °C to 1350 °C, aiming to examine the effect of δ-ferrite formation on corrosion behavior. The electrochemical test results show that both pitting corrosion resistance and interphase corrosion resistance were seriously deteriorated by δ-ferrite formation in the HAZ and their aspects were different with increasing δ-ferrite fraction. The pitting corrosion resistance was decreased by the formation of Cr-depleted zone along δ-ferrite/austenite (γ) interphase resulting from δ-ferrite formation; however it didn't depend on δ-ferrite fraction. The interphase corrosion resistance depends on the total amount of Cr-depleted zone as well as ferrite area and thus continuously decreased with increasing δ-ferrite fraction. The different effects of δ-ferrite fraction on pitting corrosion and interphase corrosion were carefully discussed in terms of alloying elements partitioning in the HAZ based on thermodynamic consideration. - Highlights: • Corrosion behavior in the weld HAZ of high-nitrogen austenitic alloy was studied. • Cr 2 N particle was not precipitated in high heat input welded HAZ of tested alloy. • Pitting corrosion and interphase corrosion show a different behavior. • Pitting corrosion resistance was affected by whether or not δ-ferrite forms. • Interphase corrosion resistance was affected by the total amount of δ-ferrite

  13. Recent improvements in the filtration of corrosion products in high temperature water and application to reactor circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darras, R.; Dolle, L.; Chenouard, J.; Laylavoix, F.

    1977-01-01

    The nature and physico-chemical behavior of corrosion products released by structural materials into high temperature water flowing in power reactor circuits have been investigated in test loops and different power plants. The results improve more particularly the knowledge of probable rate constants governing their disappearance through deposition of crud on the fuel cladding. It appears that a considerable limitation of radioactivity transportation in the primary circuit components of pressurized water reactors is in a general way only possible through extraction of the corrosion products by filtration at a rate adequate to minimize the amount of crud deposited in the core. This extraction rate has been estimated; its magnitude implicates a filtration operating on the high temperature water in the primary circuit which allows the necessary high flows. The application of magnetic and electromagnetic so as deep granular graphite bed filters has been studied. The results concerning efficiencies and limiting yields at high temperatures are given. Estimates concerning technological feasibility and corresponding investments are discussed

  14. Evaluation of High Temperature Corrosion Resistance of Finned Tubes Made of Austenitic Steel And Nickel Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turowska A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper was to evaluate the resistance to high temperature corrosion of laser welded joints of finned tubes made of austenitic steel (304,304H and nickel alloys (Inconel 600, Inconel 625. The scope of the paper covered the performance of corrosion resistance tests in the atmosphere of simulated exhaust gases of the following chemical composition: 0.2% HCl, 0.08% SO2, 9.0% O2 and N2 in the temperature of 800°C for 1000 hours. One found out that both tubes made of austenitic steel and those made of nickel alloy displayed good resistance to corrosion and could be applied in the energy industry.

  15. Modeling the corrosion of high-level waste containers: CAM-CRM interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, J.C.; Bedrossian, P.J.; McCright, R.D.

    1998-06-01

    A key component of the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) being designed for containment of spent-fuel and high-level waste at the proposed geological respository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada is a two-layer canister. In this particular design, the inner barrier is made of a corrosion resistant material (CRM) such as Alloy 825, 625 or C-22, while the outer barrier is made of a corrosion-allowance material (CAM) such as A516 or Monel 400. At the present time, Alloy C-22 and A516 are favored. This publication addresses the development of models to account for corrosion of Alloy C-22 surfaces exposed directly to the Near Field Environmental (NFE), as well as to the exacerbated conditions in the CAM-CRM crevice

  16. Corrosion resistance of high performance stainless steels in cooling water and other refinery environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovach, C.W.; Redmerski, L.S.

    1984-01-01

    The recent successful introduction of high performance stainless steels as tubing for seawater cooled electric utility condensers suggests that these alloys can also provide useful service in refinery heat exchanger applications. Since many of these applications involve higher temperature exposure than steam condensers, a study was conducted to evaluate crevice corrsion resistance over a range of cooling water temperature and chloride concentrations, and also to evaluate general corrosion resistance in some strong chemical and refinery environments. These stainless steels display excellent crevice corrosion resistance as well as good resistance to a variety of chemical environments that may be encountered in refinery, petrochemical and chemical plant service

  17. Crevice corrosion ampersand pitting of high-level waste containers: integration of deterministic ampersand probabilistic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, J.C.; McCright, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    A key component of the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) being designed for containment of spent-fuel and high-level waste at the proposed geological repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada is a two-layer canister. In this particular design, the inner barrier is made of a corrosion resistant material (CRM) such as Alloy 625 or C-22, while the outer barrier is made of a corrosion-allowance material (CAM) such as carbon steel or Monel 400. An integrated predictive model is being developed to account for the effects of localized environmental conditions in the CRM-CAM crevice on the initiation and propagation of pits through the CRM

  18. Corrosion behaviour of high manganese austenitic stainless steels: positive and negative aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raja, V.S.

    1999-01-01

    Stainless steel 304 has found use as a most versatile engineering material in many industrial applications. Recently, the Indian industries have developed high Mn stainless steels with low C and Ni contents and simultaneously introduced N and Cu in the system. Composition of some of the alloys which are prevalent in the market are given. Individually, the effect of Ni, C, Mn, N and Cu on various forms of corrosion is reasonably understood. However, it will be worthwhile to review the response of these alloys, containing all these elements, towards various forms of corrosion. The objective of this paper is preciously to do this

  19. High temperature chlorosilane corrosion of iron and AISI 316L stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, Joshua Loren

    Chlorosilane gas streams are used at high temperatures (>500°C) throughout the semiconductor, polycrystalline silicon, and fumed silica industries, primarily as a way to refine, deposit, and produce silicon and silicon containing materials. The presence of both chlorine and silicon in chlorosilane species creates unique corrosion environments due to the ability of many metals to form both metal-chlorides and metal-silicides, and it is further complicated by the fact that many metal-chlorides are volatile at high-temperatures while metal-silicides are generally stable. To withstand the uniquely corrosive environments, expensive alloys are often utilized, which increases the cost of final products. This work focuses on the corrosion behavior of iron, the primary component of low-cost alloys, and AISI 316L, a common low-cost stainless steel, in environments representative of industrial processes. The experiments were conducted using a customized high temperature chlorosilane corrosion system that exposed samples to an atmospheric pressure, high temperature, chlorosilane environment with variable input amounts of hydrogen, silicon tetrachloride, and hydrogen chloride plus the option of embedding samples in silicon during the exposure. Pre and post exposure sample analysis including scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and gravimetric analysis showed the surface corrosion products varied depending on the time, temperature, and environment that the samples were exposed to. Most commonly, a volatile chloride product formed first, followed by a stratified metal silicide layer. The chlorine and silicon activities in the corrosion environment were changed independently and were found to significantly alter the corrosion behavior; a phenomenon supported by computational thermodynamic equilibrium simulations. It was found that in comparable environments, the stainless steel corroded significantly less than the pure iron. This

  20. CREVICE CORROSION and PITTING OF HIGH-LEVEL WASTE CONTAINERS: INTEGRATION OF DETERMINISTIC and PROBABILISTIC MODELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JOSEPH C. FARMER AND R. DANIEL MCCRIGHT

    1997-01-01

    A key component of the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) being designed for containment of spent-fuel and high-level waste at the proposed geological repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada is a two-layer canister. In this particular design, the inner barrier is made of a corrosion resistant material (CRM) such as Alloy 625 or C-22, while the outer barrier is made of a corrosion-allowance material (CAM) such as carbon steel or Monel 400. An integrated predictive model is being developed to account for the effects of localized environmental conditions in the CRM-CAM crevice on the initiation and propagation of pits through the CRM

  1. Fractographic investigation of stress corrosion cracking of steels for high-strength bolts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladshtejn, L.I.; Goritskij, V.M.; Evtushenko, N.A.; Sokolov, S.P.; Panfilova, L.M.

    1980-01-01

    By the methods of quantitative fractography studied is the effect of chemical composition on stress corrosion cracking resistance in the mean agressive medium (pH=2.2) and the fracture structure of cylindrical delta samples with the notch (K=2.75) of high-strength chromium steel. It is shown that the alloying of the 40 steel with Cr, Si, V increases its strength under short-time loading but leads to forming of brittle areas in fracture under long time effect of corrosion medium

  2. Effect of Molybdenum on the Corrosion Behavior of High-Entropy Alloys CoCrFeNi2 and CoCrFeNi2Mo0.25 under Sodium Chloride Aqueous Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro A. Rodriguez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of high-entropy alloys (HEAs CoCrFeNi2 and CoCrFeNi2Mo0.25 was investigated in 3.5 wt. percent sodium chloride (NaCl at 25°C by electrochemical methods. Their corrosion parameters were compared to those of HASTELLOY® C-276 (UNS N10276 and stainless steel 316L (UNS 31600 to assess the suitability of HEAs for potential industrial applications in NaCl simulating seawater type environments. The corrosion rates were calculated using corrosion current determined from electrochemical experiments for each of the alloys. In addition, potentiodynamic polarization measurements can indicate active, passive, and transpassive behavior of the metal as well as potential susceptibility to pitting corrosion. Cyclic voltammetry (CV can confirm the alloy susceptibility to pitting corrosion. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS elucidates the corrosion mechanism under studied conditions. The results of the electrochemical experiments and scanning electron microscopy (SEM analyses of the corroded surfaces revealed general corrosion on alloy CoCrFeNi2Mo0.25 and HASTELLOY C-276 and pitting corrosion on alloy CoCrFeNi2 and stainless steel 316L.

  3. Tests on dynamic corrosion by water. Influence of the passage of a heat flux on the corrosion kinetics. pH measurement in water at high temperature; Essais de corrosion dynamique par l'eau. Influence du passage d'un flux thermique sur la cinetique de corrosion. Mesure du pH dans l'eau a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coriou, H.; Grall, L.; Hure, J.; Saint-James, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Berthod [Societe Grenobloise d' Etudes et d' Applications Hydrauliques, 38 (France); Le peintre [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1958-07-01

    The passage of a heat flux through the surface of a metal placed in a corrosive medium influences the rate of corrosion, these being higher than under adiabatic conditions. The apparatus developed for corrosion tests is described, it is possible to obtain with this equipment: 1) Heat fluxes greater than 200 W/cm{sup 2}, across aluminium canning, which is cooled by water (temperature 50 deg. C), circulating with flow rates of the order of 5 to 6 m/s. 2) Heat fluxes which can go up to 150 W/cm{sup 2}, across canning of zircaloy or stainless steel. The cooling fluid is pressurized water at a temperature around 280 deg. C, the flow-rate of circulation reaching 6 m/s. The results obtained on aluminium canning are studied from the viewpoint of corrosion, paying particular attention to cavitation phenomena which can cause serious damage in certain special circumstances. After developing a glass electrode system capable of supporting high pressures, the authors have investigated materials capable of functioning as a hydrogen electrode and of resisting satisfactorily corrosion by water at 200 deg. C. Various possibilities have been examined: electrodes of special glasses, quartz, metals, with a membrane etc... The results of the various tests and the practical limits of utilisation are given. (author)Fren. [French] Le passage d'un flux thermique a travers la surface d'un metal place dans un milieu corrosif influence les vitesses de corrosion, celles-ci etant plus elevees que dans des conditions adiabatiques. On decrit les appareils mis au point, pour essais de corrosion. Ils permettent d'obtenir: 1) A travers des gaine aluminium des flux thermiques depassant 200 W /cm{sup 2}. Les gaines sont refroidies par l'eau (temperature 50 deg. C), circulant a des vitesses de l'ordre de 5 a 6 m/s. 2) A travers des gaines en zircaloy ou acier inoxydable des flux thermiques pouvant s'elever a 150 W/cm{sup 2}. Le fluide de refroidissement est de l

  4. Tests on dynamic corrosion by water. Influence of the passage of a heat flux on the corrosion kinetics. pH measurement in water at high temperature; Essais de corrosion dynamique par l'eau. Influence du passage d'un flux thermique sur la cinetique de corrosion. Mesure du pH dans l'eau a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coriou, H; Grall, L; Hure, J; Saint-James, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Berthod, [Societe Grenobloise d' Etudes et d' Applications Hydrauliques, 38 (France); peintre, Le [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1958-07-01

    The passage of a heat flux through the surface of a metal placed in a corrosive medium influences the rate of corrosion, these being higher than under adiabatic conditions. The apparatus developed for corrosion tests is described, it is possible to obtain with this equipment: 1) Heat fluxes greater than 200 W/cm{sup 2}, across aluminium canning, which is cooled by water (temperature 50 deg. C), circulating with flow rates of the order of 5 to 6 m/s. 2) Heat fluxes which can go up to 150 W/cm{sup 2}, across canning of zircaloy or stainless steel. The cooling fluid is pressurized water at a temperature around 280 deg. C, the flow-rate of circulation reaching 6 m/s. The results obtained on aluminium canning are studied from the viewpoint of corrosion, paying particular attention to cavitation phenomena which can cause serious damage in certain special circumstances. After developing a glass electrode system capable of supporting high pressures, the authors have investigated materials capable of functioning as a hydrogen electrode and of resisting satisfactorily corrosion by water at 200 deg. C. Various possibilities have been examined: electrodes of special glasses, quartz, metals, with a membrane etc... The results of the various tests and the practical limits of utilisation are given. (author)Fren. [French] Le passage d'un flux thermique a travers la surface d'un metal place dans un milieu corrosif influence les vitesses de corrosion, celles-ci etant plus elevees que dans des conditions adiabatiques. On decrit les appareils mis au point, pour essais de corrosion. Ils permettent d'obtenir: 1) A travers des gaine aluminium des flux thermiques depassant 200 W /cm{sup 2}. Les gaines sont refroidies par l'eau (temperature 50 deg. C), circulant a des vitesses de l'ordre de 5 a 6 m/s. 2) A travers des gaines en zircaloy ou acier inoxydable des flux thermiques pouvant s'elever a 150 W/cm{sup 2}. Le fluide de refroidissement est de l'eau sous pression a une temperature

  5. Corrosion/94 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    The approximately 500 papers from this conference are divided into the following sections: Rail transit systems--stray current corrosion problems and control; Total quality in the coatings industry; Deterioration mechanisms of alloys at high temperatures--prevention and remediation; Research needs and new developments in oxygen scavengers; Computers in corrosion control--knowledge based system; Corrosion and corrosivity sensors; Corrosion and corrosion control of steel reinforced concrete structures; Microbiologically influenced corrosion; Practical applications in mitigating CO 2 corrosion; Mineral scale deposit control in oilfield-related operations; Corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; Testing nonmetallics for life prediction; Refinery industry corrosion; Underground corrosion control; Mechanisms and applications of deposit and scale control additives; Corrosion in power transmission and distribution systems; Corrosion inhibitor testing and field application in oil and gas systems; Decontamination technology; Ozone in cooling water applications, testing, and mechanisms; Corrosion of water and sewage treatment, collection, and distribution systems; Environmental cracking of materials; Metallurgy of oil and gas field equipment; Corrosion measurement technology; Duplex stainless steels in the chemical process industries; Corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; Advances in cooling water treatment; Marine corrosion; Performance of materials in environments applicable to fossil energy systems; Environmental degradation of and methods of protection for military and aerospace materials; Rail equipment corrosion; Cathodic protection in natural waters; Characterization of air pollution control system environments; and Deposit-related problems in industrial boilers. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  6. The synergy of corrosion and fretting wear process on Inconel 690 in the high temperature high pressure water environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zihao; Xu, Jian; Li, Jie; Xin, Long; Lu, Yonghao; Shoji, Tetsuo; Takeda, Yoichi; Otsuka, Yuichi; Mutoh, Yoshiharu

    2018-04-01

    The synergistic effect of corrosion and fretting process of the steam generator (SG) tube was investigated by using a self-designed high temperature test rig in this paper. The experiments were performed at 100°C , 200°C and 288°C , respectively. The fretting corrosion damage was studied by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), Raman spectroscopy and auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The results demonstrated that the corrosion process in high temperature high pressure (HTHP) water environment had a distinct interaction with the fretting process of Inconel 690. With the increment of temperature, the damage mechanism changed from a simple mechanical process to a mechanochemical process.

  7. Effect of heat treatment conditions on stress corrosion cracking resistance of alloy X-750 in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, Toshio; Onimura, Kichiro; Sakamoto, Naruo; Sasaguri, Nobuya; Susukida, Hiroshi; Nakata, Hidenori.

    1984-01-01

    In order to improve the resistance of the Alloy X-750 in high temperature and high purity water, the authors investigated the influence of heat treatment condition on the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the alloy. This paper describes results of the stress corrosion cracking test and some discussion on the mechanism of the stress corrosion cracking of Alloy X-750 in deaerated high temperature water. The following results were obtained. (1) The stress corrosion cracking resistance of Alloy X-750 in deaerated high temperature water remarkably depended upon the heat treatment condition. The materials solution heat treated and aged within temperature ranges from 1065 to 1100 0 C and from 704 to 732 0 C, respectively, have a good resistance to the stress corrosion cracking in deaerated high temperature water. Especially, water cooling after the solution heat treatment gives an excellent resistance to the stress corrosion cracking in deaerated high temperature water. (2) Any correlations were not observed between the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of Alloy X-750 in deaerated high temperature water and grain boundary chromium depleted zones, precipitate free zones and the grain boundary segregation of impurity elements and so on. It appears that there are good correlations between the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the alloy in the environment and the kinds, morphology and coherency of precipitates along the grain boundaries. (author)

  8. FY05 HPCRM Annual Report: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal Coatings Evaluation of Corrosion Resistance FY05 HPCRM Annual Report No. Rev. 1DOE-DARPA Co-Sponsored Advanced Materials Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, J C; Haslam, J J; Day, S D

    2007-01-01

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Two Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found that appear to have corrosion resistance comparable to, or better than that of Ni-based Alloy C-22, based on breakdown potential and corrosion rate. Both Cr and Mo provide corrosion resistance, B enables glass formation, and Y lowers critical cooling rate (CCR). SAM1651 has yttrium added, and has a nominal critical cooling rate of only 80 Kelvin per second, while SAM2X7 (similar to SAM2X5) has no yttrium, and a relatively high critical cooling rate of 610 Kelvin per second. Both amorphous metal formulations have strengths and weaknesses. SAM1651 (yttrium added) has a low critical cooling rate (CCR), which enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous thermal spray coating. Unfortunately, it is relatively difficult to atomize, with powders being irregular in shape. This causes the powder to be difficult to pneumatically convey during thermal spray deposition. Gas atomized SAM1651 powder has required cryogenic milling to eliminate irregularities that make flow difficult. SAM2X5 (no yttrium) has a high critical cooling rate, which has caused problems associated with devitrification. SAM2X5 can be gas atomized to produce spherical powders of SAM2X5, which enable more facile thermal spray deposition. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer

  9. Application of aluminum diffusion coatings to mitigate the KCl-induced high-temperature corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiamehr, Saeed; Lomholt, T. N.; Dahl, Kristian Vinter

    2017-01-01

    Pack cementation was used to produce Fe1−xAl and Fe2Al5 diffusion coatings on ferritic-martensitic steel P91 and a Ni2Al3 diffusion coating on pure nickel. The performance of diffusion coatings against high-temperature corrosion induced by potassium chloride (KCl) was evaluated by exposing...

  10. Corrosion behaviour of selected high-level waste packaging materials under gamma irradiation and in-situ disposal conditions in rock salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smailos, E.; Schwarzkopf, W.; Koester, R.

    1988-07-01

    Corrosion studies performed until now on a number of materials have shown that unalloyed steels, Hastelloy C4 and Ti 99.8-Pd are the most promising materials for a long-term resistant packaging to be used in high-level waste (HLW) canister disposal in rock salt formations. To characterize their corrosion behaviour in more detail, additional studies have been performed. The influence has been examined which is exerted by the gamma dose rate (1 Gy/h to 100 Gy/h) on the corrosion of three preselected steels and Hastelloy C4 at 90 0 C in a salt brine (Q-brine) rich in MgCl 2 , i.e., conditions relevant to accident scenarios in a repository. In addition, in-situ corrosion experiments have been carried out in the Asse salt mine at elevated temperatures (120 0 C to 210 0 C) in the absence and in the presence of a gamma radiation field of 3 x 10 2 Gy/h, within the framework of the German/US Brine Migration Test. Under the test conditions the gamma radiation did not exert a significant influence on the corrosion of the steels investigated, whereas Hastelloy C4, exposed to dose rates of 10 Gy/h and 100 Gy/h, underwent pitting and crevice corrosion (20 μm/a at the maximum).The low amounts of migrated salt brine (140 ml after 900 days) in the in-situ- experiment did not produce noticeable corrosion of the materials. (orig./RB) [de

  11. The corrosion resistance of Zr-Nb and Zr-Nb-Sn alloys in high-temperature water and steam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalgaard, S B

    1960-03-15

    An alloy of reactor-grade sponge zirconium-2.5 wt. % niobium was exposed to water and steam at high temperature. The corrosion was twice that of Zircaloy-2 while hydrogen pickup was found to be equal to that of Zircaloy-2. Ternary additions of tin to this alloy in the range 0.5-1.5 had no effect on the corrosion resistance in water at 315{sup o}C up to 100 days. At higher temperatures, tin increased the corrosion, the effect varying with temperature. Heat treatment of the alloys was shown to affect corrosion resistance. (author)

  12. The corrosion resistance of Zr-Nb and Zr-Nb-Sn alloys in high-temperature water and steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalgaard, S.B.

    1960-03-01

    An alloy of reactor-grade sponge zirconium-2.5 wt. % niobium was exposed to water and steam at high temperature. The corrosion was twice that of Zircaloy-2 while hydrogen pickup was found to be equal to that of Zircaloy-2. Ternary additions of tin to this alloy in the range 0.5-1.5 had no effect on the corrosion resistance in water at 315 o C up to 100 days. At higher temperatures, tin increased the corrosion, the effect varying with temperature. Heat treatment of the alloys was shown to affect corrosion resistance. (author)

  13. Experimental Investigation of Sulfuric Acid Condensation and Corrosion Rate in Motored Bukh DV24 Diesel Engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjemtrup, Lars; Cordtz, Rasmus Faurskov; Meyer, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The work conducted in this paper presents a novel experimental setup to study sulfuric acid cold corrosion of cylinder liners in large two-stroke marine diesel engines. The process is simulated in a motored light duty BUKH DV24 diesel engine where the charge air contain known amounts of H2SO4 and H......2O vapor. Liner corrosion is measured as iron accumulation in the lubeoil. Similarly sulfuric acid condensation is assessed by measuring the accumulation of sulfur in the lube oil. To clarify the corrosive effect of sulfuric acid the lube oil utilized for experiments is a sulfur free neutral oil...... without alkaline additives (Chevron Neutral Oil 600R). Iron and sulfur accumulation in the lube oil is analyzed withan Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (ED-XRF) apparatus. Three test cases with different H2SO4 concentrations are run. Results reveal good agreement between sulfuric acid injection flow...

  14. An X-ray diffraction study of corrosion products from low carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, A. L.

    2003-01-01

    It was found in earlier work a decrease in the corrosion rate from low carbon steel when it was subjected to the action of a combined pollutant concentration (SO 4 ''2-=10''-4 M+Cl=1.5x 10''-3 M). It was also found that large magnetic content of the rust was related to higher corrosion rates. In the present study corrosion products are further analyzed by means of X-ray diffraction to account for composition changes during the corrosion process. it is found that lepidocrocite and goethite are the dominant components for the short-term corrosion in all batches considered while for log-term corrosion lepidocrite and goethite dominates if the corrosion rates is low and magnetite dominates if the corrosion rate is high. The mechanism for decreasing the corrosion rate is related to the inhibition of magnetite production at this particular concentration. (Author) 15 refs

  15. Effects of zinc injection on electrochemical corrosion and cracking behavior of stainless steels in borated and lithiated high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xinqiang; Liu Xiahe; Han Enhou; Ke Wei

    2014-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) injection water chemistry (ZWC) adopted in primary coolant system in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) is to reduce the radiation buildup as well as retard the corrosion degradation in high temperature pressurized water through improving the characteristics of oxide scales formed on components materials. However, Zn injection involved corrosion and cracking behavior and related mechanisms are still under discussion. The understanding of Zn-bearing oxide scale characteristics and their protective property is of significance to clarify the environmentally assisted material failure problems in PWRs power plants. In the present work, in-situ potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectra measurements in high temperature borated and lithiated water as well as ex-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses have been done to investigate the effects of temperature (R.T.-603 K), pH T value at 573 K (6.9-7.4) and Zn-injection concentration (0-150 ppb) on electrochemical corrosion behavior and oxide scale characteristics of nuclear-grade stainless steels. The protective property of oxide scales under Zn-free and Zn-injected conditions degraded with increasing temperature, with Cr-rich oxide layer playing a key role on retarding further corrosion. The composition of oxide scales appeared slightly pH T dependent: rich in chromites and ferrites at pH T =6.9 and pH T =7.4, respectively. The corrosion rate decreased significantly in the high pH T value solution with Zn injection due to the formation of thin and compact oxide scales. The ≤50 ppb Zn injection could significantly affect the formation of Zn-bearing oxides on the surfaces, while >50 ppb Zn injection showed no obvious influence on the oxide scales. A modified point defect model was proposed to discuss the effects of injected Zn concentrations on the oxide scales in high temperature water. A 10 ppb Zn injection obviously decreased the intergranular cracking susceptibility of

  16. The probability distribution of intergranular stress corrosion cracking life for sensitized 304 stainless steels in high temperature, high purity water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akashi, Masatsune; Kenjyo, Takao; Matsukura, Shinji; Kawamoto, Teruaki

    1984-01-01

    In order to discuss the probability distribution of intergranular stress corrsion carcking life for sensitized 304 stainless steels, a series of the creviced bent beem (CBB) and the uni-axial constant load tests were carried out in oxygenated high temperature, high purity water. The following concludions were resulted; (1) The initiation process of intergranular stress corrosion cracking has been assumed to be approximated by the Poisson stochastic process, based on the CBB test results. (2) The probability distribution of intergranular stress corrosion cracking life may consequently be approximated by the exponential probability distribution. (3) The experimental data could be fitted to the exponential probability distribution. (author)

  17. Laboratory corrosion tests on candidate high-level waste container materials: Results from the Belgian programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druyts, F.; Kursten, B.; Iseghem, P. Van

    2004-01-01

    The Belgian SAFIR-2 concept foresees the geological disposal of conditioned high-level radioactive waste in stainless steel containers and overpacks placed in a concrete gallery backfilled with Boom clay or a bentonite-type backfill. In addition to earlier in situ experiments, we used a laboratory approach to investigate the corrosion properties of selected stainless steels in Boom clay and bentonite environments. In the SAFIR-2 concept, AISI 316L hMo is the main candidate overpack material. As an alternative, we also investigated the higher alloyed stainless steel UHB 904L. Our study focused on localised corrosion and in particular pitting. We used cyclic potentiodynamic polarisation measurements to determine the pit nucleation potential E NP and the protection potential E PP . The evolution of the corrosion potential with time was determined by monitoring the open circuit potential in synthetic clay-water over extended periods. In this paper we present and discuss some results from our laboratory programme, focusing on long-term interactions between the stainless steel overpack and the backfill materials. We describe in particular the influence of chloride and thio-sulphate ions on the pitting corrosion behaviour. The results show that, under geochemical conditions typical for geological disposal, i.e. [Cl-] ∼ 30 mg/L for a Boom clay backfill and [Cl-] ∼ 90 mg/L for a bentonite backfill, neither AISI 316L hMo nor UHB 904L is expected to present pitting problems. An important factor in the long-term prediction of the corrosion behaviour however, is the robustness of the model for the evolution of the geochemistry of the backfill. Indeed, at chloride levels higher than 1000 mg/L, we predict pitting corrosion for AISI 316L hMo. (authors)

  18. Flow-induced corrosion of absorbable magnesium alloy: In-situ and real-time electrochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Jang, Yongseok; Wan, Guojiang; Giridharan, Venkataraman; Song, Guang-Ling; Xu, Zhigang; Koo, Youngmi; Qi, Pengkai; Sankar, Jagannathan; Huang, Nan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2016-03-01

    An in-situ and real-time electrochemical study in a vascular bioreactor was designed to analyze corrosion mechanism of magnesium alloy (MgZnCa) under mimetic hydrodynamic conditions. Effect of hydrodynamics on corrosion kinetics, types, rates and products was analyzed. Flow-induced shear stress (FISS) accelerated mass and electron transfer, leading to an increase in uniform and localized corrosions. FISS increased the thickness of uniform corrosion layer, but filiform corrosion decreased this layer resistance at high FISS conditions. FISS also increased the removal rate of localized corrosion products. Impedance-estimated and linear polarization-measured polarization resistances provided a consistent correlation to corrosion rate calculated by computed tomography.

  19. High temperature corrosion in a biomass-fired power boiler : Reducing furnace wall corrosion in a waste wood-fired power plant with advanced steam data

    OpenAIRE

    Alipour, Yousef

    2013-01-01

    The use of waste (or recycled) wood as a fuel in heat and power stations is becoming more widespread in Sweden (and Europe), because it is CO2 neutral with a lower cost than forest fuel. However, it is a heterogeneous fuel with a high amount of chlorine, alkali and heavy metals which causes more corrosion than fossil fuels or forest fuel. A part of the boiler which is subjected to a high corrosion risk is the furnace wall (or waterwall) which is formed of tubes welded together. Waterwalls are...

  20. High strain rate mechanical response of buttress-grooved tensile specimens which have undergone environmental exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weirick, L.J.

    1976-07-01

    The purpose of the corrosion compatibility program was to identify the effect of corrosion on the mechanical performance of the buttress-grooved section of the 105-mm penetrator, a section which must sustain a load during launch. It is important that the environment not deteriorate the mechanical integrity of these grooves during long-term storage. Both coated and uncoated test specimens which simulate both geometrical shape and residual stress patterns were exposed to corrosive environments of moist air, distilled water, and salt water. Some of these tests also incorporated the galvanic coupling caused by the aluminum sabot. After exposure to the corrosive environments, the specimens were pulled on a high strain rate tensile machine which simulated launch conditions. Results show that the galvanic coupling due to the aluminum sabot caused no deterioration of mechanical properties. Results do indicate that the coating applied caused a significant reduction in the fracture load. There was a dichotomy in the results as affected by the environment. Uncoated test specimens showed no change in fracture load with increasing severity of corrosion environment, whereas the coated specimens indicated a trend of decreasing load-bearing ability with increasing corrosion

  1. High-Temperature Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 617 in Helium Environment of Very High Temperature Gas Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gyeong-Geun; Jung, Sujin; Kim, Daejong; Jeong, Yong-Whan; Kim, Dong-Jin

    2012-01-01

    Alloy 617 is a Ni-base superalloy and a candidate material for the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) of a very high temperature gas reactor (VHTR) which is one of the next generation nuclear reactors under development. The high operating temperature of VHTR enables various applications such as mass production of hydrogen with high energy efficiency. Alloy 617 has good creep resistance and phase stability at high temperatures in an air environment. However, it was reported that the mechanical properties decreased at a high temperature in an impure helium environment. In this study, high-temperature corrosion tests were carried out at 850°C-950°C in a helium environment containing the impurity gases H_2, CO, and CH_4, in order to examine the corrosion behavior of Alloy 617. Until 250 h, Alloy 617 specimens showed a parabolic oxidation behavior at all temperatures. The activation energy for oxidation in helium environment was 154 kJ/mol. The SEM and EDS results elucidated a Cr-rich surface oxide layer, Al-rich internal oxides and depletion of grain boundary carbides. The thickness and depths of degraded layers also showed a parabolic relationship with time. A normal grain growth was observed in the Cr-rich surface oxide layer. When corrosion tests were conducted in a pure helium environment, the oxidation was suppressed drastically. It was elucidated that minor impurity gases in the helium would have detrimental effects on the high temperature corrosion behavior of Alloy 617 for the VHTR application.

  2. In-situ corrosion measurements of WWII shipwrecks in Chuuk Lagoon, quantification of decay mechanisms and rates of deterioration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Donald Macleod

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on a series of measurements taken on WWII historic shipwrecks that resulted from the effects of Operation Hailstone in February 1944 on the Japanese merchant fleet which was assembled in Chuuk lagoon, Federated States of Micronesia. More than 65 shipwrecks and 250 aircraft were sunk during two main bombing raids. The vessels lost covered a wide range of underwater orientation and water depths and so provided a perfect suite of corrosion experiments. Since the fuel on board the aircraft was either readily burnt at the time or was lost through volatilisation, the wrecked planes present no pollution problems today. However the bunker fuel kept inside on-board storage tanks does present a real conservation management crisis. In-situ measurements on many vessels have determined how water depth, the localised wreck topography, dissolved oxygen levels, temperature and salinity affects the corrosion rate of cast iron and mild steel. Thus corrosion rates can be calculated with confidence.

  3. Stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel under deaerated high-temperature water. Influence of cold work and processing orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terachi, Takumi; Yamada, Takuyo; Chiba, Goro; Arioka, Koji

    2006-01-01

    The influence of cold work and processing orientation on the propagation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of stainless steel under hydrogenated high-temperature water was examined. It was shown that (1) the crack growth rates increased with heaviness of cold work, and (2) processing orientation affected crack growth rate with cracking direction. Crack growth rates showed anisotropy of T-L>>T-S>L-S, with T-S and L-S branches representing high shear stress direction. Geometric deformation of crystal grains due to cold work caused the anisotropy and shear stress also assisted the SCC propagation. (3) The step intervals of slip like patterns observed on intergranular facets increased cold work. (4) Nano-indentation hardness of the crack tip together with EBSD measurement indicated that the change of hardness due to crack propagation was less than 5% cold-work, even though the distance from the crack tip was 10μm. (author)

  4. THE EFFECT OF HIGH OVERVOLTAGES AT ELECTROCRYSTALLIZATION ON THE CORROSION RESISTANCE OF THE FILMS CO-P

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. O. Zabludovskyi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical and gravimetric methods are used in order to research the influence of high overvoltages during electroplating on corrosive and electrochemical behavior of amorphous Co-P films, which were made using deposition from water solution of an electrolyte. It is obtained that alloys, which were plated using higher overvoltages on cathode, are more corrosion-resistant.

  5. An assessment of thermal spray coating technologies for high temperature corrosion protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heath, G.R.; Heimgartner, P.; Gustafsson, S.; Irons, G.; Miller, R.

    1997-01-01

    The use of thermally sprayed coatings in combating high temperature corrosion continues to grow in the major industries of chemical, waste incineration, power generation and pulp and paper. This has been driven partially by the development of corrosion resistant alloys, improved knowledge and quality in the thermal spray industry and continued innovation in thermal spray equipment. There exists today an extensive range of thermal spray process options, often with the same alloy solution. In demanding corrosion applications it is not sufficient to just specify alloy and coating method. For the production of reliable coatings the whole coating production envelope needs to be considered, including alloy selection, spray parameters, surface preparation, base metal properties, heat input etc. Combustion, arc-wire, plasma, HVOF and spray+fuse techniques are reviewed and compared in terms of their strengths and limitations to provide cost-effective solutions for high temperature corrosion protection. Arc wire spraying, HP/HVOF and spray+fuse are emerging as the most promising techniques to optimise both coating properties and economic/practical aspects. (orig.)

  6. A high-voltage and non-corrosive ionic liquid electrolyte used in rechargeable aluminum battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huali; Gu, Sichen; Bai, Ying; Chen, Shi; Wu, Feng; Wu, Chuan

    2016-10-03

    As a promising post-lithium battery, rechargeable aluminum battery has the potential to achieve a three-electron reaction with fully use of metal aluminum. Alternative electrolytes are strongly needed for further development of rechargeable aluminum batteries, since typical AlCl3-contained imidazole-based ionic liquids are moisture sensitive, corrosive, and with low oxidation voltage. In this letter, a kind of non-corrosive and water-stable ionic liquid obtained by mixing 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate ([BMIM]OTF) with the corresponding aluminum salt (Al(OTF)3) is studied. This ionic liquid electrolyte has a high oxidation voltage (3.25V vs Al3+/Al) and high ionic conductivity, and a good electrochemical performance is also achieved. A new strategy, which first use corrosive AlCl3-based electrolyte to construct a suitable passageway on the Al anode for Al3+, and then use non-corrosive Al(OTF)3-based electrolyte to get stable Al/electrolyte interface, is put forward.

  7. Measurement of Localized Corrosion Rates at Inclusion Particles in AA7075 by In Situ Three Dimensional (3D) X-ray Synchrotron Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Sudhanshu S.; Williams, Jason J.; Stannard, Tyler J.; Xiao, Xianghui; De Carlo, Francesco; Chawla, Nikhilesh

    2016-03-01

    In situ X-ray synchrotron tomography was used to measure the localized corrosion rate of Mg2Si particles present in 7075 aluminum alloys in deionized ultra-filtered (DIUF) water. The evolution of hydrogen bubbles was captured as a function of time and the measured volume was used to calculate the local corrosion rate of Mg2Si particles. It was shown that in the absence of chloride ions, stress was needed to create fresh particle surfaces, either by fracture or debonding, to initiate corrosion at the particles.

  8. New corrosion issues in gas sweetening plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asperger, R.G. (CLI International and Asperger Technologies, Houston, TX (United States))

    Gas treating plants are experiencing corrosion problems which impact on efficiency and safety. While general corrosion is not particularly hazardous in the gas processing industry, local corrosion is very dangerous since it has several different mechanisms, all of which have dangerously high rates, and it occurs at locations which are hard to find and hard to predict. A newly discovered, velocity-dependent type of corrosion is reported. It is related to yet-undefined species which cause excessively high corrosion in areas of turbulence. This accelerated corrosion is not due to erosion or cavitation, but to a diffusion-limited reaction accelerated by turbulence. A full-flow test loop was built to evaluate the corrosiveness of gas plant solutions at their normal temperature and flow rates. Test runs were conducted with Co[sub 2]-loaded amine solutions for periods of 12 days. Carbon steel specimens mounted in the test loop were examined and corrosion rates calculated. Chromium alloys were shown to be attacked by corrodents in the low-velocity part of the loop and very aggressively attacked in the high-velocity part. The tests demonstrate the need for rigorous monitoring of corrosion in areas of higher velocity such as piping elbows and other points of turbulence. 5 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Grain boundary segregation and intergranular stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, T.; Yamaki, K.; Ballinger, R.G.; Hwang, I.S.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of grain boundary segregation on intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels in high temperature water have been examined as a function of heat treatment. The materials investigated were: (1) two commercial purity Type 304; (2) low sulfur Type 304; (3) nuclear grade Type 304; (4) ultra high purity Type 304L; and (5) Type 316L and Type 347L. Specimens were solution treated at 1050 degrees C for 0.5 hour and given a sensitization heat treatment at 650 degrees C for 50 hours. Some of the specimens were then subjected to an aging heat treatment at 850 degrees C for from one to ten hours to cause Cr recovery at the grain boundaries. The effects of heat treatments on degree of sensitization and grain boundary segregation were evaluated by Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation (EPR) and Coriou tests, respectively. The susceptibility to stress corrosion (SCC) was evaluated using slow strain rate tests technique (SSRT) in high temperature water. SSRT tests were performed in an aerated pure water (8 ppm dissolved oxygen) at 288 degrees C at a strain rate of 1.33 x 10 -6 /sec. Susceptibility to intergranular stress corrosion cracking was compared with degree of sensitization and grain boundary segregation. The results of the investigation indicate that EPR is not always an accurate indicator of SCC susceptibility. The Coriou test provides a more reliable measure of SCC susceptibility especially for 304L, 304NG, 316L, and 347L stainless steels. The results also indicate that grain boundary segregation as well as degree of sensitization must be considered in the determination of SCC susceptibility

  10. Supercritical water corrosion of high Cr steels and Ni-base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Jin Sung; Han, Chang Hee; Hwang, Seong Sik

    2004-01-01

    High Cr steels (9 to 12% Cr) have been widely used for high temperature high pressure components in fossil power plants. Recently the concept of SCWR (supercritical water-cooled reactor) has aroused a keen interest as one of the next generation (Generation IV) reactors. Consequently Ni-base (or high Ni) alloys as well as high Cr steels that have already many experiences in the field are among the potential candidate alloys for the cladding or reactor internals. Tentative inlet and outlet temperatures of the anticipated SCWR are 280 and 510 .deg. C respectively. Among many candidate alloys there are austenitic stainless steels, Ni base alloys, ODS alloys as well as high Cr steels. In this study the corrosion behavior of the high Cr steels and Ni base (or high Ni) alloys in the supercritical water were investigated. The corrosion behavior of the unirradiated base metals could be used in the near future as a guideline for the out-of-pile or in-pile corrosion evaluation tests

  11. Study on corrosion resistance of high - entropy alloy in medium acid liquid and chemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florea, I; Buluc, G; Florea, R M; Carcea, I; Soare, V

    2015-01-01

    High-entropy alloy is a new alloy which is different from traditional alloys. The high entropy alloys were started in Tsing Hua University of Taiwan since 1995 by Yeh et al. Consisting of a variety of elements, each element occupying a similar compared with other alloy elements to form a high entropy. We could define high entropy alloys as having approximately equal concentrations, made up of a group of 5 to 11 major elements. In general, the content of each element is not more than 35% by weight of the alloy. During the investigation it turned out that this alloy has a high hardness and is also corrosion proof and also strength and good thermal stability. In the experimental area, scientists used different tools, including traditional casting, mechanical alloying, sputtering, splat-quenching to obtain the high entropy alloys with different alloying elements and then to investigate the corresponding microstructures and mechanical, chemical, thermal, and electronic performances. The present study is aimed to investigate the corrosion resistance in a different medium acid and try to put in evidence the mechanical properties. Forasmuch of the wide composition range and the enormous number of alloy systems in high entropy alloys, the mechanical properties of high entropy alloys can vary significantly. In terms of hardness, the most critical factors are: hardness/strength of each composing phase in the alloy, distribution of the composing phases. The corrosion resistance of an high entropy alloy was made in acid liquid such as 10%HNO 3 -3%HF, 10%H 2 SO 4 , 5%HCl and then was investigated, respectively with weight loss experiment. Weight loss test was carried out by put the samples into the acid solution for corrosion. The solution was maintained at a constant room temperature. The liquid formulations used for tests were 3% hydrofluoric acid with 10% nitric acid, 10% sulphuric acid, 5% hydrochloric acid. Weight loss of the samples was measured by electronic scale. (paper)

  12. Tensile and stress corrosion cracking properties of type 304 stainless steel irradiated to a very high dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.; Strain, R.V.; Shack, W.J.

    2001-01-01

    Certain safety-related core internal structural components of light water reactors, usually fabricated from Type 304 or 316 austenitic stainless steels (SSs), accumulate very high levels of irradiation damage (20-100 displacement per atom or dpa) by the end of life. Our databases and mechanistic understanding of the degradation of such highly irradiated components, however, are not well established. A key question is the nature of irradiation-assisted intergranular cracking at very high doses, i.e. is it purely mechanical failure or is it stress-corrosion cracking? In this work, hot-cell tests and microstructural characterization were performed on Type 304 SS from the hexagonal fuel can of the decommissioned EBR-II reactor after irradiation to ∼50 dpa at ∼370 deg. C. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests were conducted at 289 degree sign C in air and in water at several levels of electrochemical potential (ECP), and microstructural characteristics were analyzed by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. The material deformed significantly by twinning and exhibited surprisingly high ductility in air, but was susceptible to severe intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) at high ECP. Low levels of dissolved O and ECP were effective in suppressing the susceptibility of the heavily irradiated material to IGSCC, indicating that the stress corrosion process associated with irradiation-induced grain-boundary Cr depletion, rather than purely mechanical separation of grain boundaries, plays the dominant role. However, although IGSCC was suppressed, the material was susceptible to dislocation channeling at a low ECP, and this susceptibility led to a poor work-hardening capability and low ductility

  13. Prediction equations for corrosion rates of a A-537 and A-516 steels in Double Shell Slurry, Future PUREX, and Hanford Facilities Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divine, J.R.; Bowen, W.M.; Mackey, D.B.; Bates, D.J.; Pool, K.H.

    1985-06-01

    Even though the interest in the corrosion of radwaste tanks goes back to the mid-1940's when waste storage was begun, and a fair amount of corrosion work has been done since then, the changes in processes and waste types have outpaced the development of new data pertinent to the new double shell tanks. As a consequence, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) began a development of corrosion data on a broad base of waste compositions in 1980. The objective of the program was to provide operations personnel with corrosion rate data as a function of waste temperature and composition. The work performed in this program examined A-537 tank steel in Double Shell Slurry and Future PUREX Wastes, at temperatures between 40 and 180 0 C as well as in Hanford Facilities Waste at 25 and 50 0 C. In general, the corrosion rates were less than 1 mpy (0.001 in./y) and usually less than 0.5 mpy. Excessive corrosion rates (>1 mpy) were only found in dilute waste compositions or in concentrated caustic compositions at temperatures above 140 0 C. Stress corrosion cracking was only observed under similar conditions. The results are presented as polynomial prediction equations with examples of the output of existing computer codes. The codes are not provided in the text but are available from the authors. 12 refs., 5 figs., 19 tabs

  14. Stress corrosion of very high purity stainless steels in alkaline media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hechmat-Dehcordi, Ebrahim

    1981-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of stress corrosion resistance of stainless steels in caustic environments. It notably concerns the electronuclear industrial sector, the production of soda by electrolysis, and the preparation of hydrogen as energy vector. After a presentation of the experimental conditions, the author highlights the influence of purity on stress corrosion cracking of 20Cr-25Ni-type austenitic alloys. The specific action of a high number of addition metallic and non-metallic elements has been studied. Stress corrosion tests have been also performed in autoclave on austeno-ferritic (21 to 25 pc Cr - 6 to 10 pc Ni) as well as ferritic (26 pc Cr) grades. The author reports the study of electrochemical properties of stainless steel in soda by means of potentiostatic techniques with an application of Pourbaix thermodynamic equilibrium diagrams, and the study of the chemical composition of passivation thin layers by Auger spectroscopy. He more particularly studies the influence of electrode potential and of some addition elements on the chemical characteristics of oxides developed at the surface of austenite. Then, the author tries to establish correlations between strain hardening microstructure of the various steels and their sensitivity to stress corrosion [fr

  15. KCl-induced high temperature corrosion of selected commercial alloys. Part I: chromia-formers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiamehr, Saeed; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Montgomery, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    -grained), Sanicro 28 and the nickel-based alloys 625, 263 and C276. Exposure was performed at 600 °C for 168 h in flowing N2(g)+5%O2(g)+15% H2O(g) (vol.%). Samples were covered with KCl powder prior to exposure. A salt-free exposure was also performed for comparison. Corrosion morphology and products were studied......Laboratory testing of selected chromia-forming alloys was performed to rank the materials and gain further knowledge on the mechanism of KCl-induced high temperature corrosion. The investigated alloys were stainless steels EN1.4021, EN1.4057, EN1.4521, TP347H (coarse-grained), TP347HFG (fine....... In the presence of solid KCl, all the alloys showed significant corrosion. Measurement of corrosion extent indicated that alloys EN1.4057, Sanicro 28 and 625 show a better performance compared to the industrial state of the art material TP347HFG under laboratory conditions. An additional test was performed...

  16. The effect lead impurities on the corrosion resistance of alloy 600 and alloy 690 in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, T.; Nakagomi, N.; Kikuchi, T.; Aoki, K.; Nakayasu, F.; Yamakawa, K.

    1998-01-01

    Degradation of nickel-based alloy steam generator (SG) tubing caused by lead-induced corrosion has been reported recently in some PWR plants. Several laboratory studies also have shown that lead causes intergranular or transgranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC or TGSCC) of the tubing materials. Information from previous studies suggests two possible explanations for the mechanism of lead-induced corrosion. One is selective dissolution of tube metal elements, resulting in formation of a lead-containing nickel-depleted oxide film as observed in mildly acidic environments. The other explanation is an increase in potential, as has been observed in lead-contaminated caustic environments, although not in all volatile treatment (AVT) water such as the ammonium-hydrazine water chemistry. These observation suggest that an electrochemical reaction between metal elements and dissolved lead might be the cause of lead-induced corrosion. The present work was undertaken to clarify the lead-induced corrosion mechanism of nickel-based alloys from an electrochemical viewpoint, focusing on mildly acidic and basic environments. These are the probable pH conditions in the crevice region between the tube and tube support plate of the SG where corrosion damage could occur. Measurements of corrosion potential and electrochemical polarization of nickel-based alloys were performed to investigate the effect of lead on electrochemical behavior of the alloys. Then, constant extension rate tests (CERT) were carried out to determine the corrosion susceptibility of the alloys in a lead-contaminated environment. (J.P.N.)

  17. Cyclic fatigue of a high-strength corrosion-resistant sheet TRIP steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terent'ev, V. F.; Alekseeva, L. E.; Korableva, S. A.; Prosvirnin, D. V.; Pankova, M. N.; Filippov, G. A.

    2014-04-01

    The mechanical properties of 0.3- and 0.8-mm-thick high-strength corrosion-resistant TRIP steel having various levels of strength properties are studied during static and cyclic loading in the high-cycle fatigue range. The fatigue fracture surface is analyzed by fractography, and the obtained results demonstrate ductile and quasi-brittle fracture mechanisms of this steel depending on the strength properties of the steel and the content of deformation martensite in it.

  18. A combined neural network and mechanistic approach for the prediction of corrosion rate and yield strength of magnesium-rare earth alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birbilis, N.; Cavanaugh, M.K.; Sudholz, A.D.; Zhu, S.M.; Easton, M.A.; Gibson, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → This study presents a body of corrosion data for a set of custom alloys and displays this in multivariable space. These alloys represent the next generation of Mg alloys for auto applications. → The data is processed using an ANN model, which makes it possible to yield a single expression for prediction of corrosion rate (and strength) as a function of any input composition (of Ce, La or Nd between 0 and 6 wt.%). → The relative influence of the various RE elements on corrosion is assessed, with the outcome that Nd additions can offer comparable strength with minimal rise in corrosion rate. → The morphology and solute present in the eutectic region itself (as opposed to just the intermetallic presence) was shown - for the first time - to also be a key contributor to corrosion. → The above approach sets the foundation for rational alloy design of alloys with corrosion performance in mind. - Abstract: Additions of Ce, La and Nd to Mg were made in binary, ternary and quaternary combinations up to ∼6 wt.%. This provided a dataset that was used in developing a neural network model for predicting corrosion rate and yield strength. Whilst yield strength increased with RE additions, corrosion rates also systematically increased, however, this depended on the type of RE element added and the combination of elements added (along with differences in intermetallic morphology). This work is permits an understanding of Mg-RE alloy performance, and can be exploited in Mg alloy design for predictable combinations of strength and corrosion resistance.

  19. High temperature oxidation and corrosion in marine environments of thermal spray deposited coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaliampalias, D.; Vourlias, G.; Pavlidou, E.; Stergioudis, G.; Skolianos, S.; Chrissafis, K.

    2008-01-01

    Flame spraying is a widely used technique for depositing a great variety of materials in order to enforce the mechanical or the anticorrosion characteristics of the substrate. Its high rate application is due to the rapidity of the process, its effectiveness and its low cost. In this work, flame-sprayed Al coatings are deposited on low carbon steels in order to enhance their anticorrosion performance. The main adhesion mechanism of the coating is mechanical anchorage, which can provide the necessary protection to steel used in several industrial and constructive applications. To evaluate the corrosion resistance of the coating, the as-coated samples are subjected in a salt spray chamber and in elevated temperature environments. The examination and characterization of the corroded samples is done by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The as-formed coatings are extremely rough and have a lamellic homogeneous morphology. It is also found that Al coatings provide better protection in marine atmospheres, while at elevated temperatures a thick oxide layer is formed, which can delaminate after long oxidation periods due to its low adherence to the underlying coating, thus eliminating the substrate protection

  20. The stress corrosion cracking of type 316 stainless steel in oxygenated and chlorinated high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Congleton, J.; Shih, H.C.; Shoji, T.; Parkins, R.N.

    1985-01-01

    Slow strain rate stress corrosion tests have been performed on Type 316 stainless steel in 265 C water containing from 0 to 45 ppm oxygen and from < 0.1 to 1000 ppm chloride. The main difference between the present data and previously published results, the latter mainly for Type 304 stainless steel, is that as well as cracking occurring in water containing high oxygen and chloride, it is shown that a cracking regime exists at very low oxygen contents for a wide range of chloride contents. The type of cracking varies with the oxygen and chloride content of the water and the most severe cracking was of comparable extent in both the gauge length and the necked region of the specimen. The least severe cracking only caused cracks to occur in the necked region of the specimen and there was a range of oxygen and chloride contents in which no cracking occurred. The rest potential for annealed Type 316 stainless steel has been mapped for a wide range of oxygen and chloride content waters and it is shown that at 265 C the 'no-cracking' regime of the oxygen-chloride diagram corresponds to potentials in the range -200 to +150 mV(SHE). (author)

  1. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibilities of various stainless steels in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, Saburo; Ohnaka, Noriyuki; Kikuchi, Eiji; Minato, Akira; Tanno, Kazuo.

    1980-01-01

    The intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) behaviors of several austenitic stainless steels in high temperature water were evaluated using three types of SCC tests, i.e., single U-bend test in chloride containing water, uniaxial constant load and constant extension rate tests (CERT) in pure water. The steels used were SUS 304, 304L, 316, 316L, 321 and 347 and several heats of them to examine heat to heat variations. The three test methods gave the same relative ranking of the steels. The CERT is the most sensitive method to detect the relative IGSCC susceptibilities. The CERT result for relative ranking from poor to good is: SUS 304 - 0.07% C, 304 - 0.06% C, 304L - 0.028% C, 316 - 0.07% C. The IGSCC susceptibilities of SUS 304L - 0.020% C, 316L - 0.023% C, 321 and 347 were not detected. These test results suggest that the use of the low carbon, molybdenum bearing, or stabilized austenitic stainless steel is beneficial for eliminating the IGSCC problem in boiling water reactor environment. (author)

  2. Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel in high temperature and high pressure water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uragami, Ken

    1977-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels used in for equipment in chemical plants have failed owing to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). These failures brought about great problems in some cases. The failures were caused by chloride, sulfide and alkali solution environment, in particular, by chloride solution environment. It was known that SCC was caused not only by high content chloride solution such as 42% MgCl 2 solution but also by high temperature water containing Cl - ions as NaCl. In order to estimate quantitatively the effects of some factors on SCC in high temperature water environment, the effects of Cl - ion contents, oxygen partial pressure (increasing in proportion to dissolved oxygen), pH and temperature were investigated. Moreover SCC sensitivity owing to the difference of materials and heat treatments was also investigated. The experimental results obtained are summarized as follows: (1) Regarding the effect of contaminant Cl - ions in proportion as Cl - ion contents increased, the material life extremely decreased owing to SCC. The tendency of decreasing was affected by the level of oxygen partial pressure. (2) Three regions of SCC sensitivity existed and they depended upon oxygen partial pressure. These were a region that did not show SCC sensitivity, a region of the highest SCC sensitivity and a region of somewhat lower SCC sensitivity. (3) In the case of SUS304 steel and 500 ppm Cl - ion contents SCC did not occur at 150 0 C, but it occurred and caused failures at 200 0 C and 250 0 C. (auth.)

  3. Corrosion-Activated Micro-Containers for Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Protective Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, J. W.; Zhang, X.; Johnsey, M. N.; Pearman, B. P.; Jolley, S. T.; Calle, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    This work concerns the development of environmentally friendly encapsulation technology, specifically designed to incorporate corrosion indicators, inhibitors, and self-healing agents into a coating, in such a way that the delivery of the indicators and inhibitors is triggered by the corrosion process, and the delivery of self-healing agents is triggered by mechanical damage to the coating. Encapsulation of the active corrosion control ingredients allows the incorporation of desired autonomous corrosion control functions such as: early corrosion detection, hidden corrosion detection, corrosion inhibition, and self-healing of mechanical damage into a coating. The technology offers the versatility needed to include one or several corrosion control functions into the same coating.The development of the encapsulation technology has progressed from the initial proof-of-concept work, in which a corrosion indicator was encapsulated into an oil-core (hydrophobic) microcapsule and shown to be delivered autonomously, under simulated corrosion conditions, to a sophisticated portfolio of micro carriers (organic, inorganic, and hybrid) that can be used to deliver a wide range of active corrosion ingredients at a rate that can be adjusted to offer immediate as well as long-term corrosion control. The micro carriers have been incorporated into different coating formulas to test and optimize the autonomous corrosion detection, inhibition, and self-healing functions of the coatings. This paper provides an overview of progress made to date and highlights recent technical developments, such as improved corrosion detection sensitivity, inhibitor test results in various types of coatings, and highly effective self-healing coatings based on green chemistry. The NASA Kennedy Space Centers Corrosion Technology Lab at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, U.S.A. has been developing multifunctional smart coatings based on the microencapsulation of environmentally friendly corrosion

  4. Corrosion and protection of magnesium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghali, E. [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Mining and Metallurgy

    2000-07-01

    The oxide film on magnesium offers considerable surface protection in rural and some industrial environments and the corrosion rate lies between that of aluminum and low carbon steels. Galvanic coupling of magnesium alloys, high impurity content such as Ni, Fe, Cu and surface contamination are detrimental for corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys. Alloying elements can form secondary particles which are noble to the Mg matrix, thereby facilitating corrosion, or enrich the corrosion product thereby possibly inhibiting the corrosion rate. Bimetallic corrosion resistance can be increased by fluxless melt protection, choice of compatible alloys, insulating materials, and new high-purity alloys. Magnesium is relatively insensible to oxygen concentration. Pitting, corrosion in the crevices, filiform corrosion are observed. Granular corrosion of magnesium alloys is possible due to the cathodic grain-boundary constituent. More homogeneous microstructures tend to improve corrosion resistance. Under fatigue loading conditions, microcrack initiation in Mg alloys is related to slip in preferentially oriented grains. Coating that exclude the corrosive environments can provide the primary defense against corrosion fatigue. Magnesium alloys that contain neither aluminum nor zinc are the most SCC resistant. Compressive surface residual stresses as that created by short peening increase SCC resistance. Cathodic polarization or cladding with a SCC resistant sheet alloy are good alternatives. Effective corrosion prevention for magnesium alloy components and assemblies should start at the design stage. Selective surface preparation, chemical treatment and coatings are recommended. Oil application, wax coating, anodizing, electroplating, and painting are possible alternatives. Recently, it is found that a magnesium hydride layer, created on the magnesium surface by cathodic charging in aqueous solution is a good base for painting. (orig.)

  5. Slow strain rate stress corrosion tests on A508-III and A533B steel in de-ionized and PWR water at 563K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, P.; Appleton, D.A.; Banks, P.; Raffel, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental programme is being undertaken to assess the extent to which PWR pressure vessel steels, including weldments, may be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking under relevant water chemistry and flow rate conditions. Initial results from slow strain rate tests on parent A533B and A508-III steels together with a weldment are described. No susceptibility to stress corrosion was observed for either steel, when tested in the rolling (L) direction, at a potential characteristic of normal quality PWR water. For cracking to occur on such specimens the potential must be displaced by 400 to 500 mV in the positive direction, requiring (in the case of high flow de-ionized water) the presence of ca 200 ppb oxygen. Some cracking was observed on transverse (S) direction specimens in water containing 2 , indicating that there may be micro-structural features which can cause cracking even in low oxygen water. This orientation is not directly relevant to pressure vessels and the cracking may only arise as a consequence of the deformation encountered in the slow strain rate test. (author)

  6. Improving corrosion resistance of post-tensioned substructures emphasizing high performance grouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schokker, Andrea Jeanne

    The use of post-tensioning in bridges can provide durability and structural benefits to the system while expediting the construction process. When post-tensioning is combined with precast elements, traffic interference can be greatly reduced through rapid construction. Post-tensioned concrete substructure elements such as bridge piers, hammerhead bents, and straddle bents have become more prevalent in recent years. Chloride induced corrosion of steel in concrete is one of the most costly forms of corrosion each year. Coastal substructure elements are exposed to seawater by immersion or spray, and inland bridges may also be at risk due to the application of deicing salts. Corrosion protection of the post-tensioning system is vital to the integrity of the structure because loss of post-tensioning can result in catastrophic failure. Documentation for durability design of the grout, ducts, and anchorage systems is very limited. The objective of this research is to evaluate the effectiveness of corrosion protection measures for post-tensioned concrete substructures by designing and testing specimens representative of typical substructure elements using state-of-the-art practices in aggressive chloride exposure environments. This was accomplished through exposure testing of twenty-seven large-scale beam specimens and ten large-scale column specimens. High performance grout for post-tensioning tendon injection was also developed through a series of fresh property tests, accelerated exposure tests, and a large-scale pumping test to simulate field conditions. A high performance fly ash grout was developed for applications with small vertical rises, and a high performance anti-bleed grout was developed for applications involving large vertical rises such as tall bridge piers. Long-term exposure testing of the beam and column specimens is ongoing, but preliminary findings indicate increased corrosion protection with increasing levels of post-tensioning, although traditional

  7. Field Testing of High Current Electrokinetic Nanoparticle Treatment for Corrosion Mitigation in Reinforced Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Henry; Alexander, Joshua; Kupwade-Patil, Kunal; Calle, Luz marina

    2010-01-01

    Electrokinetic Nanoparticle (EN) treatment was used as a rapid repair measure to mitigate chloride induced corrosion of reinforced concrete in the field. EN treatment uses an electric field to transport positively charged nanoparticles to the reinforcement through the concrete capillary pores. Cylindrical reinforced concrete specimens were batched with 4.5 wt % salt content (based on cement mass). Three distinct electrokinetic treatments were conducted using high current density (up to 5 A/m2) to form a chloride penetration barrier that was established in 5 days, as opposed to the traditional 6-8 weeks, generally required for electrochemical chloride extraction (ECE). These treatments included basic EN treatment, EN with additional calcium treatment, and basic ECE treatment. Field exposures were conducted at the NASA Beachside Corrosion Test Site, Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA. The specimens were subjected to sea water immersion at the test site as a posttreatment exposure. Following a 30-day post-treatment exposure period, the specimens were subjected to indirect tensile testing to evaluate treatment impact. The EN treated specimens exhibited 60% and 30% increases in tensile strength as compared to the untreated controls and ECE treated specimens respectively. The surfaces of the reinforcement bars of the control specimens were 67% covered by corrosion products. In contrast, the EN treated specimens exhibited corrosion coverage of only 4%. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed a dense concrete microstructure adjacent to the bars of the treated specimens as compared to the control and ECE specimens. Energy dispersive spectroscopic (EDS) analysis of the polished EN treated specimens showed a reduction in chloride content by a factor of 20 adjacent to the bars. This study demonstrated that EN treatment was successful in forming a chloride penetration barrier rapidly. This work also showed that the chloride barrier was effective when samples were exposed to

  8. Composition and corrosion properties of high-temperature oxide films on steel type 18-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vakulenko, B.F.; Morozov, O.N.; Chernysheva, M.V.

    1985-01-01

    The composition and propeties of oxide films, formed in the process of tube production of steel type 18-10, as well as the behaviour of the steels coated with oxide films under operating conditions of NPP heat-exchange equipment at the 20-300 deg C temperatures are determined. It is found, that the films have a good adhesion to the steel surface and repeat the metal structure without interfering with, the surface defect determination. Introduction of the NaNO 2 corrosion inhibitor decreases the film destruction rate to the level of the base metal corrosion. It is found acceptable to use tubes of steel 18-10 coated with dense oxide films in the heat-exchange and water supply systems of NPP

  9. Study of the Effect of Sulfide Ions on the Corrosion Resistance of Copper for Use in Containers for High Level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbal Espinoza, Andrea Elizabeth

    2000-01-01

    The work 'Study of sulfide ion on Resisting Copper Corrosion' is part of the project 'Study of Copper Corrosion in Underground Water Solution in Reducer Conditions', which the Department of Nuclear Materials, Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission is carrying out. These activities are important because of this metal's potential applications for handling and controlling contaminating wastes that are a product of using nuclear energy in electric generation. Copper has important mechanical properties and is also resistant to disintegration in corrosive environments, which is an important condition for its use in manufacturing of high level radioactive waste containers. This work is based on a study of cyclic volta metric curves, anodic and cathodic polarization and potentiostatic measurements, with which the potential range, sweep speed system, electrochemical reactions involved and corrosion speed could be defined. The microstructural characterization of the films was done by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and the chemical composition and surface contamination of the film were studied by photoelectron spectroscopy induced by X- rays (XPS), and the crystalline structure by X- ray Diffraction (XRD). Some noticeable results, such as low potentials (less than .7 V, in cathode direction) and high concentrations of sulfur make the formation of copper sulfides (I) and (II) possible; unlike the potential over .6 V, in anodic direction, where copper oxides (I) and (II) are formed, but they are inhibited by high sulfur concentrations. The morphological study of the copper surface has shown that the film that forms is more abundant and granular at higher cathodic potentials, forming small pits on the surface. The effect of the presence of sulfur ions is minimal, and the metal's deterioration is inhibited by other ions in the groundwater. The corrosion rate is greater as the sulfur concentration rises, and a time period of 20,000 years can be predicted for the total corrosion of

  10. Strengthening mechanisms and mechanical properties of high interstitial stainless steel for drill collar and its corrosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunkyung

    Two types (CN66, CN71) of high interstitial stainless steels (HISSs) were investigated for down-hole application in sour gas well environments. Experiments were designed to identify factors that have a significant effect on mechanical properties. The three factors examined in the study were carbon + nitrogen content (0.66 or 0.71 mass %), cooling rate in quenching (air or water), and heat treatment time (2 or 4 hours). The results showed that the cooling rate, C+N content, and the two-factor interaction of these variables have a significant effect on the mechanical properties of HISSs. Based on the statistical analysis results on mechanical properties, extensive analyses were undertaken to understand the strengthening mechanisms of HISSs. Microstructure analysis revealed that a pearlite phase with a high carbide and/or nitride content is dissolved in the matrix by heat treatment at 1,200 ºC which is considered the dissolution to increase the concentration of interstitial elements in steels. The distribution of elements in HISSs was investigated by quantitative mapping using EPMA, which showed that the high carbon concentration (carbide/cementite) area was decreased by increases in both the cooling rate and C+N content. The ferrite volume fraction of each specimen is increased by an increase in cooling rate, because there is insufficient time to form austenite from retained ferrite. The lattice expansion of HISS was investigated by the calculation of lattice parameters under various conditions, and these investigations confirm the solid solution strengthening effect on HISSs. CN66 with heat treatment at fast cooling has the highest wear resistance; a finding that was consistent with hardening mechanisms that occur due to an increased ferrite volume fraction. In addition, precipitates on the surface and the chemical bonding of chromium were investigated. As the amount of CrN bonding increased, the wear resistance also increased. This study also assessed the

  11. High corrosion resistance of magnesium coated with hydroxyapatite directly synthesized in an aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiromoto, Sachiko; Yamamoto, Akiko

    2009-01-01

    Anticorrosion coatings are crucial for practical applications of magnesium alloys, which are used to reduce the weight of vehicles, aircraft, electronics enclosures etc. Hydroxyapatite (HAp) potentially offers high corrosion resistance and no environmental toxicity because its thermodynamic structural stability is high and it is a basic component of bone. However, direct synthesis of HAp on magnesium in aqueous solutions has been a scientific challenge because Mg ions prevent HAp crystallization. A new method of direct synthesis of HAp on magnesium was developed using a Ca chelate compound, which can maintain a sufficiently high concentration of Ca ions on the magnesium surface to overcome prevention of HAp crystallization with Mg ions. Highly crystallized HAp coatings were successfully formed on pure magnesium and AZ series alloys. Corrosion behavior of HAp-coated pure magnesium was examined by cyclic dry and wet tests with 1 g m -2 NaCl on the surface and polarization tests in a 3.5 wt% NaCl solution. A HAp-coated pure magnesium showed no noticeable corrosion pits after the dry and wet test. HAp-coated specimens showed 10 3 -10 4 times lower anodic current density than as-polished specimen in the polarization test. The results demonstrate the remarkable anticorrosion performance of HAp coatings on magnesium for the first time.

  12. High resolution estimates of the corrosion risk for cultural heritage in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marco, Alessandra; Screpanti, Augusto; Mircea, Mihaela; Piersanti, Antonio; Proietti, Chiara; Fornasier, M Francesca

    2017-07-01

    Air pollution plays a pivotal role in the deterioration of many materials used in buildings and cultural monuments causing an inestimable damage. This study aims to estimate the impacts of air pollution (SO 2 , HNO 3 , O 3 , PM 10 ) and meteorological conditions (temperature, precipitation, relative humidity) on limestone, copper and bronze based on high resolution air quality data-base produced with AMS-MINNI modelling system over the Italian territory over the time period 2003-2010. A comparison between high resolution data (AMS-MINNI grid, 4 × 4 km) and low resolution data (EMEP grid, 50 × 50 km) has been performed. Our results pointed out that the corrosion levels for limestone, copper and bronze are decreased in Italy from 2003 to 2010 in relation to decrease of pollutant concentrations. However, some problem related to air pollution persists especially in Northern and Southern Italy. In particular, PM 10 and HNO 3 are considered the main responsible for limestone corrosion. Moreover, the high resolution data (AMS-MINNI) allowed the identification of risk areas that are not visible with the low resolution data (EMEP modelling system) in all considered years and, especially, in the limestone case. Consequently, high resolution air quality simulations are suitable to provide concrete benefits in providing information for national effective policy against corrosion risk for cultural heritage, also in the context of climate changes that are affecting strongly Mediterranean basin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. High corrosion resistance of magnesium coated with hydroxyapatite directly synthesized in an aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiromoto, Sachiko [Biomaterials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan)], E-mail: hiromoto.sachiko@nims.go.jp; Yamamoto, Akiko [Biomaterials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan)

    2009-11-30

    Anticorrosion coatings are crucial for practical applications of magnesium alloys, which are used to reduce the weight of vehicles, aircraft, electronics enclosures etc. Hydroxyapatite (HAp) potentially offers high corrosion resistance and no environmental toxicity because its thermodynamic structural stability is high and it is a basic component of bone. However, direct synthesis of HAp on magnesium in aqueous solutions has been a scientific challenge because Mg ions prevent HAp crystallization. A new method of direct synthesis of HAp on magnesium was developed using a Ca chelate compound, which can maintain a sufficiently high concentration of Ca ions on the magnesium surface to overcome prevention of HAp crystallization with Mg ions. Highly crystallized HAp coatings were successfully formed on pure magnesium and AZ series alloys. Corrosion behavior of HAp-coated pure magnesium was examined by cyclic dry and wet tests with 1 g m{sup -2} NaCl on the surface and polarization tests in a 3.5 wt% NaCl solution. A HAp-coated pure magnesium showed no noticeable corrosion pits after the dry and wet test. HAp-coated specimens showed 10{sup 3}-10{sup 4} times lower anodic current density than as-polished specimen in the polarization test. The results demonstrate the remarkable anticorrosion performance of HAp coatings on magnesium for the first time.

  14. Literature Survey on the Stress Corrosion Cracking of Low-Alloy Steels in High Temperature Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, H.P

    2002-02-01

    The present report is a summary of a literature survey on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour/ mechanisms in low-alloy steels (LAS) in high-temperature water with special emphasis to primary-pressure-boundary components of boiling water reactors (BWR). A brief overview on the current state of knowledge concerning SCC of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel and piping steels under BWR conditions is given. After a short introduction on general aspects of SCC, the main influence parameter and available quantitative literature data concerning SCC of LAS in high-temperature water are discussed on a phenomenological basis followed by a summary of the most popular SCC models for this corrosion system. The BWR operating experience and service cracking incidents are discussed with respect to the existing laboratory data and background knowledge. Finally, the most important open questions and topics for further experimental investigations are outlined. (author)

  15. A fundamental study on stress corrosion cracking of SUS 304 steel in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Yoshihiko; Murata, Masato

    1985-01-01

    SCC susceptibility of sensitized SUS 304 stainless steel in high temperature water was studied. The results obtained are as follows. SCC susceptibility was increased by adding crevices to the tensile specimen surface, for the corrodent became acidified by hydrolysis in crevices. SCC susceptibility was best fit to TTS curve obtained by EPR test, not by other corrosion tests such as Strauss test or the grain boundary corrosion test in high temperature water. In addition, by giving a simulated weld thermal cycle before the sensitizing heat treatment, the sensitization was clearly promoted. This seemed to be caused by the reason that nucleation of carbide occured in the simulated weld thermal cycle process and it promoted the carbide growth and the formation of Cr poor layer around carbide in the subsequent sensitization process. (author)

  16. Corrosion properties of HLW and spent fuel overpacks in highly alkaline environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kursten, B.

    2009-01-01

    Throughout the world, deep geological disposal in stable rocks with low groundwater flow is considered for the long-term management of long-lived radioactive waste (vitrified high-level waste - VHLW - and spent fuel - SF).The main advantage of the SC design, with respect to corrosion, is that under the predicted conditions (i.e. highly alkaline concrete buffer), the carbon steel overpack is expected to undergo uniform corrosion (passive dissolution). The key objective of this study is to demonstrate that the carbon steel overpack will be able to ensure complete containment of the radioactivity at least during the thermal phase, this is the period during which the temperature of the host rock is expected to lie above the range of temperatures within which nominal radionuclide migration properties can be relied upon

  17. Investigation on the corrosion behavior of physical vapor deposition coated high speed steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Ravi Raja Malarvannan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This work emphasizes on the influence of the TiN and AlCrN coatings fabricated on high speed steel form tool using physical vapor deposition technique. The surface microstructure of the coatings was studied using scanning electron microscope. Hardness and corrosion studies were also performed using Vickers hardness test and salt spray testing, respectively. The salt spray test results suggested that the bilayer coated (TiN- bottom layer and AlCrN- top layer substrate has undergone less amount of corrosion, and this is attributed to the dense microstructure. In addition to the above, the influence of the above coatings on the machining performance of the high speed steel was also evaluated and compared with that of the uncoated material and the results suggested that the bilayered coating has undergone very low weight loss when compared with that of the uncoated substrate depicting enhanced wear resistance.

  18. Corrosion Assessment Guidance for High Strength Steels (Phase 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    The continuing worldwide demand for natural gas presents major challenges to pipeline operators. There is increasing need to construct long distance, high capacity transmission pipelines, particularly in the more remote areas of Arctic North America,...

  19. Approach to mitigate intergranular stress corrosion cracking and dose rate reduction rate by water chemistry control in Tokai-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisamune, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) had been working on material replacement and measures to mitigate stress in order to maintain the integrity of the structural material of Tokai-Daini nuclear power plant (Tokai-2, BWR, 1,100 MWe; commercial operation started on November 28, 1978). In addition, as Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) environmental mitigation measures, we have been reducing the sulfate ion concentration in the reactor water by improving the regeneration method of the ion exchange resin at condensate purification system. Furthermore, in conducting the SCC environmental mitigation measures by applying hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) and HWC during start-up (HDS), we have been reducing the oxidizing agent concentration in the reactor water. On the other hand, as a plant that has not installed condensate filters, we have been working on feed water iron concentration reduction measures in Tokai-2 as part of the dose reduction measures. Therefore, we have improved condensate demineralizer's ion exchange resin and the ion exchange resin cleaning method using the ARCS (Advanced Resin Cleaning System) in order to improve the iron removal performance of condensate demineralizer. This document reports the improvement effect of the SCC environmental mitigation measures and the dose reduction measures by water chemistry management at Tokai-2. In addition, the dose reduction effect of the recently applied zinc injection, and the Electrochemical Corrosion Potential (ECP) monitoring plan under the On-Line Noble Chemical Addition (OLNC™) to be implemented later shall be introduced. (author)

  20. Understanding High Rate Behavior Through Low Rate Analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-28

    challenges in high rate character- isation of polymers. The most important is that, owing to their low stress wavespeed, the structural response of...box’ tool, to provide supporting date for the rate dependent mechanical character- isation . Experiments were performed on a TA instruments Q800

  1. The mode of stress corrosion cracking in Ni-base alloys in high temperature water containing lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, S.S.; Kim, H.P.; Lee, D.H.; Kim, U.C.; Kim, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    The mode of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in Ni-base alloys in high temperature aqueous solutions containing lead was studied using C-rings and slow strain rate testing (SSRT). The lead concentration, pH and the heat treatment condition of the materials were varied. TEM work was carried out to observe the dislocation behavior in thermally treated (TT) and mill annealed (MA) materials. As a result of the C-ring test in 1M NaOH+5000 ppm lead solution, intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) was found in Alloy 600MA, whereas transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC) was found in Alloy 600TT and Alloy 690TT. In most solutions used, the SCC resistance increased in the sequence Alloy 600MA, Alloy 600TT and Alloy 690TT. The number of cracks that was observed in alloy 690TT was less than in Alloy 600TT. However, the maximum crack length in Alloy 690TT was much longer than in Alloy 600TT. As a result of the SSRT, at a nominal strain rate of 1 x 10 -7 /s, it was found that 100 ppm lead accelerated the SCC in Alloy 600MA (0.01%C) in pH 10 at 340 C. IGSCC was found in a 100 ppm lead condition, and some TGSCC was detected on the fracture surface of Alloy 600MA cracked in the 10000 ppm lead solution. The mode of cracking for Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 changed from IGSCC to TGSCC with increasing grain boundary carbide content in the material and lead concentration in the solution. IGSCC seemed to be retarded by stress relaxation around the grain boundaries, and TGSCC in the TT materials seemed to be a result of the crack blunting at grain boundary carbides and the enhanced Ni dissolution with an increase of the lead concentration. (orig.)

  2. Influence of tannin content in Terminalia catappa leaves extracts resulted from maceration extraction on decreasing corrosion rate for mild steel in 1M H2SO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramudita, M.; Sukirno; Nasikin, M.

    2018-04-01

    The ability of natural compounds as corrosion inhibitors is necessary to obtain safe corrosion inhibitors for the environment. The tannin compounds derived from plant extract has the ability to decrease the corrosion rate. The purpose of this research is to find the ability of tannin compounds in Terminalia catappa leaves extracts to decrease corrosion rate on mild steel. Terminalia catappa leaves that have been mashed in ethanol solvent extraction using maceration with the variable time 2.4 and 6 days. Mild steel that has been on the sandpaper and cleaned then soak into the 1 M H2SO4. Terminalia catappa leaves extract concentration used is 0, 250, 500, 500, 750, 1000 ppm, the immersion time is 3.6 and 9 hours. Calculating of corrosion rate is used the weight loss method, the analysis of the tannin concentration using GC-MS. The results indicate that highest tannin content equal to 7.23% in 6 days maceration time. The result showed that the corrosion rate was reduced in the presence of tannin content in Terminalia catappa leaves extract.

  3. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.G. Mon

    2004-10-01

    The waste package design for the License Application is a double-wall waste package underneath a protective drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169480]). The purpose and scope of this model report is to document models for general and localized corrosion of the waste package outer barrier (WPOB) to be used in evaluating waste package performance. The WPOB is constructed of Alloy 22 (UNS N06022), a highly corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy. The inner vessel of the waste package is constructed of Stainless Steel Type 316 (UNS S31600). Before it fails, the Alloy 22 WPOB protects the Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel from exposure to the external environment and any significant degradation. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel provides structural stability to the thinner Alloy 22 WPOB. Although the waste package inner vessel would also provide some performance for waste containment and potentially decrease the rate of radionuclide transport after WPOB breach before it fails, the potential performance of the inner vessel is far less than that of the more corrosion-resistant Alloy 22 WPOB. For this reason, the corrosion performance of the waste package inner vessel is conservatively ignored in this report and the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). Treatment of seismic and igneous events and their consequences on waste package outer barrier performance are not specifically discussed in this report, although the general and localized corrosion models developed in this report are suitable for use in these scenarios. The localized corrosion processes considered in this report are pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion. Stress corrosion cracking is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]).

  4. Online, real-time corrosion monitoring in district heating systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Thorarinsdottir, R.I.

    2005-01-01

    The corrosion control in district heating systems is today performed primarily with control of the water quality. The corrosion rate is kept low by assuring low dissolved oxygen concentration, high pH and low conductivity. Corrosion failures can occur, e.g. as a result of unknown oxygen ingress, ......, precipitation of deposits or crevices. The authors describe methods used for on-line monitoring of corrosion, cover the complications and the main results of a Nordic project.......The corrosion control in district heating systems is today performed primarily with control of the water quality. The corrosion rate is kept low by assuring low dissolved oxygen concentration, high pH and low conductivity. Corrosion failures can occur, e.g. as a result of unknown oxygen ingress...

  5. On-line Corrosion Monitoring in District Heating Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Sonja; Thorarinsdottir, R.I.; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2005-01-01

    The corrosion control in district heating systems is today performed primarily with control of the water quality. The corrosion rate is kept low by assuring low dissolved oxygen concentration, high pH and low conductivity. Corrosion failures can occur, e.g. as a result of unknown oxygen ingress, ......, precipitation of deposits or crevices. The authors describe methods used for on-line monitoring of corrosion, cover the complications and the main results of a Nordic project.......The corrosion control in district heating systems is today performed primarily with control of the water quality. The corrosion rate is kept low by assuring low dissolved oxygen concentration, high pH and low conductivity. Corrosion failures can occur, e.g. as a result of unknown oxygen ingress...

  6. Microstructure and corrosion properties of CrMnFeCoNi high entropy alloy coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Qingfeng [Shanghai Key laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Ship and Deep-Sea Exploration, Shanghai, 200240 (China); Feng, Kai, E-mail: fengkai@sjtu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Ship and Deep-Sea Exploration, Shanghai, 200240 (China); Li, Zhuguo, E-mail: lizg@sjtu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Ship and Deep-Sea Exploration, Shanghai, 200240 (China); Lu, Fenggui [Shanghai Key laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Ship and Deep-Sea Exploration, Shanghai, 200240 (China); Li, Ruifeng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University of Science and Technology, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu, 212003 (China); Huang, Jian; Wu, Yixiong [Shanghai Key laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Ship and Deep-Sea Exploration, Shanghai, 200240 (China)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Equimolar CrMnFeCoNi high entropy alloy coating are prepared by laser cladding. • The cladding layer forms a simple FCC phase solid solution with identical dendritic structure. • The cladding layer exhibits a noble corrosion resistance in both 3.5 wt.% NaCl and 0.5 M sulfuric acid. • Element segregation makes Cr-depleted interdendrites the starting point of corrosion reaction. - Abstract: Equimolar CrMnFeCoNi high entropy alloy (HEA) is one of the most notable single phase multi-component alloys up-to-date with promising mechanical properties at cryogenic temperatures. However, the study on the corrosion behavior of CrMnFeCoNi HEA coating has still been lacking. In this paper, HEA coating with a nominal composition of CrMnFeCoNi is fabricated by laser surface alloying and studied in detail. Microstructure and chemical composition are determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) are used to investigate the corrosion behavior. The coating forms a simple FCC phase with an identical dendritic structure composed of Fe/Co/Ni-rich dendrites and Mn/Ni-rich interdendrites. Both in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution and 0.5 M sulfuric acid the coating exhibits nobler corrosion resistance than A36 steel substrate and even lower i{sub corr} than 304 stainless steel (304SS). EIS plots coupled with fitted parameters reveal that a spontaneous protective film is formed and developed during immersion in 0.5 M sulfuric acid. The fitted R{sub t} value reaches its maximum at 24 h during a 48 h’ immersion test, indicating the passive film starts to break down after that. EDS analysis conducted on a corroded surface immersed in 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} reveals that corrosion starts from Cr-depleted interdendrites.

  7. Using high throughput experimental data and in silico models to discover alternatives to toxic chromate corrosion inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, D.A.; Breedon, M.; White, P.; Hughes, A.E.; Sapper, E.D.; Cole, I.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We screened a large library of organic compounds as replacements for toxic chromates. • High throughput automated corrosion testing was used to assess inhibitor performance. • Robust, predictive machine learning models of corrosion inhibition were developed. • Models indicated molecular features contributing to performance of organic inhibitors. • We also showed that quantum chemistry descriptors do not correlate with performance. - Abstract: Restrictions on the use of toxic chromate-based corrosion inhibitors have created important issues for the aerospace and other industries. Benign alternatives that offer similar or superior performance are needed. We used high throughput experiments to assess 100 small organic molecules as potential inhibitors of corrosion in aerospace aluminium alloys AA2024 and AA7075. We generated robust, predictive, quantitative computational models of inhibitor efficiency at two pH values using these data. The models identified molecular features of inhibitor molecules that had the greatest impact on corrosion inhibition. Models can be used to discover better corrosion inhibitors by screening libraries of organic compounds for candidates with high corrosion inhibition.

  8. Methodology to evaluate the crack growth rate by stress corrosion cracking in dissimilar metals weld in simulated environment of PWR nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paula, Raphael G.; Figueiredo, Celia A.; Rabelo, Emerson G.

    2013-01-01

    Inconel alloys weld metal is widely used to join dissimilar metals in nuclear reactors applications. It was recently observed failures of weld components in plants, which have triggered an international effort to determine reliable data on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of this material in reactor environment. The objective of this work is to develop a methodology to determine the crack growth rate caused by stress corrosion in Inconel alloy 182, using the specimen (Compact Tensile) in simulated PWR environment. (author)

  9. Corrosion behavior of 321 stainless steel in low-acidity uranium nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Junsheng; Sun Ying; Zhang Wanglin; Ding Ping; Yang Jiangrong; Wu Lunqiang

    2003-01-01

    Weighing and electrochemical methods have been used to investigate the high-temperature uniform corrosion and electrochemical corrosion behavior of lCr18Ni9Ti (321) stainless steel in uranium nitrate solution at different concentrations and pH values. The uniform corrosion results showed that the corrosion rate of 321 stainless steel was less than 0.04 g/m 2 .h, and the visible change of surface smoothness was not observed through 960 h. It was perfect corrosion-resisting in obtained conditions. The electro-chemical corrosion behavior study has been performed to investigate 321 stainless steel in uranium nitrate solutions of the dissolved and saturated oxygen. The corrosion potential and corrosion current density were obtained. Auger photoelectron spectroscopy for measurement of uranium in specimen was used to indicate that uranium is in corrosion product. The corrosion film was measured by Ar ion gun sputter, and the thickness is 10-15 nm. (authors)

  10. Electrochemical corrosion testing of metal waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, D. P.; Peterson, J. J.; Katyal, H. K.; Keiser, D. D.; Hilton, B. A.

    1999-01-01

    Electrochemical corrosion tests have been conducted on simulated stainless steel-zirconium (SS-Zr) metal waste form (MWF) samples. The uniform aqueous corrosion behavior of the samples in various test solutions was measured by the polarization resistance technique. The data show that the MWF corrosion rates are very low in groundwaters representative of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. Galvanic corrosion measurements were also conducted on MWF samples that were coupled to an alloy that has been proposed for the inner lining of the high-level nuclear waste container. The experiments show that the steady-state galvanic corrosion currents are small. Galvanic corrosion will, hence, not be an important mechanism of radionuclide release from the MWF alloys

  11. Stress corrosion cracking of 316 SS and Incoloy-800 in high temperature aqueous containing sulfate and chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Weiguo; Lin Fangliang; Gao Fengqin; Zhou Hongyi; Cao Xiaoning

    1992-03-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of 316 stainless steel (SS) which was welded for primary pipe and Incoloy-800 (shot peening) for steam generator (SG) tube have been investigated by a slow strain rate test (SSRT) at a strain rate of 4.2 x 10 -6 /s. Tests were conducted at 315 C degree for 316 SS and 270 C degree for In-800 in the oxygenated simulated resin intrusion environment (acidic sulfate). Tests of the effect of combination of SO 4 2- and Cl - on SCC of Incoloy-800 were also carried out. The results indicate that Incoloy-800 is unsusceptible to SCC either in the environment with SO 4 2- (from a few ppm to 1000 ppm, pH 3 ∼ 4) or in the environment of combination of SO 4 2- (1000 ppm) and Cl - (from 2 to 1000 ppm). The 316 NG SS is susceptible to transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC) in the resin intrusion environment with SO 4 2- in high temperature water

  12. A STUDY OF CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOOMER, K.D.

    2007-01-01

    The Hanford reservation Tank Farms in Washington State has 177 underground storage tanks that contain approximately 50 million gallons of liquid legacy radioactive waste from cold war plutonium production. These tanks will continue to store waste until it is treated and disposed. These nuclear wastes were converted to highly alkaline pH wastes to protect the carbon steel storage tanks from corrosion. However, the carbon steel is still susceptible to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. The waste chemistry varies from tank to tank, and contains various combinations of hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, chloride, carbonate, aluminate and other species. The effect of each of these species and any synergistic effects on localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of carbon steel have been investigated with electrochemical polarization, slow strain rate, and crack growth rate testing. The effect of solution chemistry, pH, temperature and applied potential are all considered and their role in the corrosion behavior will be discussed

  13. Anodic Oxidation of Carbon Steel at High Current Densities and Investigation of Its Corrosion Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattah-Alhosseini, Arash; Khan, Hamid Yazdani

    2017-06-01

    This work aims at studying the influence of high current densities on the anodization of carbon steel. Anodic protective coatings were prepared on carbon steel at current densities of 100, 125, and 150 A/dm2 followed by a final heat treatment. Coatings microstructures and morphologies were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The corrosion resistance of the uncoated carbon steel substrate and the anodic coatings were evaluated in 3.5 wt pct NaCl solution through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The results showed that the anodic oxide coatings which were prepared at higher current densities had thicker coatings as a result of a higher anodic forming voltage. Therefore, the anodized coatings showed better anti-corrosion properties compared to those obtained at lower current densities and the base metal.

  14. High temperature corrosion in the service environments of a nuclear process heat plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadakkers, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    In a nuclear process heat plant the heat-exchanging components fabricated from nickel- and Fe-Ni-based alloys are subjected to corrosive service environments at temperatures up to 950 0 C for service lives of up to 140 000 h. In this paper the corrosion behaviour of the high temperature alloys in the different service environments will be described. It is shown that the degree of protection provided by Cr 2 O 3 -based surface oxide scales against carburization and decarburization of the alloys is primarily determined not by the oxidation potential of the atmospheres but by a dynamic process involving, on the one hand, the oxidizing gas species and the metal and, on the other hand, the carbon in the alloy and the oxide scale. (orig.)

  15. Stress corrosion cracking tests on high-level-waste container materials in simulated tuff repository environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, T.; Jain, H.; Soo, P.

    1986-06-01

    Types 304L, 316L, and 321 austenitic stainless steel and Incoloy 825 are being considered as candidate container materials for emplacing high-level waste in a tuff repository. The stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of these materials under simulated tuff repository conditions was evaluated by using the notched C-ring method. The tests were conducted in boiling synthetic groundwater as well as in the steam/air phase above the boiling solutions. All specimens were in contact with crushed Topopah Spring tuff. The investigation showed that microcracks are frequently observed after testing as a result of stress corrosion cracking or intergranular attack. Results showing changes in water chemistry during test are also presented

  16. Microstructure and pitting corrosion of shielded metal arc welded high nitrogen stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffi Mohammed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work is aimed at studying the microstructure and pitting corrosion behaviour of shielded metal arc welded high nitrogen steel made of Cromang-N electrode. Basis for selecting this electrode is to increase the solubility of nitrogen in weld metal due to high chromium and manganese content. Microscopic studies were carried out using optical microscopy (OM and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM. Energy back scattered diffraction (EBSD method was used to determine the phase analysis, grain size and orientation image mapping. Potentio-dynamic polarization testing was carried out to study the pitting corrosion resistance in aerated 3.5% NaCl environment using a GillAC electrochemical system. The investigation results showed that the selected Cr–Mn–N type electrode resulted in a maximum reduction in delta-ferrite and improvement in pitting corrosion resistance of the weld zone was attributed to the coarse austenite grains owing to the reduction in active sites of the austenite/delta ferrite interface and the decrease in galvanic interaction between austenite and delta-ferrite.

  17. Studies on microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties of high nitrogen stainless steel shielded metal arc welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    The present work is aimed at studying the microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties of high nitrogen stainless steel shielded metal arc (SMA) welds made with Cromang-N electrode. Basis for selecting this electrode is to increase the solubility of nitrogen in weld metal due to high chromium and manganese content. Microstructures of the welds were characterized using optical microscopy (OM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) mainly to determine the morphology, phase analysis, grain size and orientation image mapping. Hardness, tensile and ductility bend tests were carried out to determine mechanical properties. Potentio-dynamic polarization testing was carried out to study the pitting corrosion resistance using a GillAC basic electrochemical system. Constant load type testing was carried out to study stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour of welds. The investigation results shown that the selected Cr–Mn–N type electrode resulted in favourable microstructure and completely solidified as single phase coarse austenite. Mechanical properties of SMA welds are found to be inferior when compared to that of base metal and is due to coarse and dendritic structure.

  18. Optimization of Arc-Sprayed Ni-Cr-Ti Coatings for High Temperature Corrosion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, S.; Schweizer, M.

    2013-04-01

    High Cr content Ni-Cr-Ti arc-spray coatings have proven successful in resisting the high temperature sulfidizing conditions found in black liquor recovery boilers in the pulp and paper industry. The corrosion resistance of the coatings is dependent upon the coating composition, to form chromium sulfides and oxides to seal the coating, and on the coating microstructure. Selection of the arc-spray parameters influences the size, temperature and velocity of the molten droplets generated during spraying, which in turn dictates the coating composition and formation of the critical coating microstructural features—splat size, porosity and oxide content. Hence it is critical to optimize the arc-spray parameters in order to maximize the corrosion resistance of the coating. In this work the effect of key spray parameters (current, voltage, spray distance and gas atomizing pressure) on the coating splat thickness, porosity content, oxide content, microhardness, thickness, and surface profile were investigated using a full factorial design of experiment. Based on these results a set of oxidized, porous and optimized coatings were prepared and characterized in detail for follow-up corrosion testing.

  19. High-Temperature, Dual-Atmosphere Corrosion of Solid-Oxide Fuel Cell Interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, Paul; Amendola, Roberta

    2012-12-01

    High-temperature corrosion of ferritic stainless steel (FSS) surfaces can be accelerated and anomalous when it is simultaneously subjected to different gaseous environments, e.g., when separating fuel (hydrogen) and oxidant (air) streams, in comparison with single-atmosphere exposures, e.g., air only. This so-called "dual-atmosphere" exposure is realized in many energy-conversion systems including turbines, boilers, gasifiers, heat exchangers, and particularly in intermediate temperature (600-800°C) planar solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks. It is generally accepted that hydrogen transport through the FSS (plate or tube) and its subsequent integration into the growing air-side surface oxide layer can promote accelerated and anomalous corrosion—relative to single-atmosphere exposure—via defect chemistry changes, such as increased cation vacancy concentrations, decreased oxygen activity, and steam formation within the growing surface oxide layers. Establishment of a continuous and dense surface oxide layer on the fuel side of the FSS can inhibit hydrogen transport and the associated effects on the air side. Minor differences in FSS composition, microstructure, and surface conditions can all have dramatic influences on dual-atmosphere corrosion behaviors. This article reviews high-temperature, dual-atmosphere corrosion phenomena and discusses implications for SOFC stacks, related applications, and future research.

  20. Passive Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R.B. Rebak; J.H. Payer

    2006-01-01

    Alloy 22 (NO6022) was designed to stand the most aggressive industrial applications, including both reducing and oxidizing acids. Even in the most aggressive environments, if the temperature is lower than 150 F (66 C) Alloy 22 would remain in the passive state having particularly low corrosion rates. In multi-ionic solutions that may simulate the behavior of concentrated ground water, even at near boiling temperatures, the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 is only a few nano-meters per year because the alloy is in the complete passive state. The corrosion rate of passive Alloy 22 decreases as the time increases. Immersion corrosion testing also show that the newer generation of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys may offer a better corrosion resistance than Alloy 22 only in some highly aggressive conditions such as in hot acids

  1. Effects of metallurgical factors on stress corrosion cracking of Ni-base alloys in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, T.; Sasaguri, N.; Onimura, K.

    1988-01-01

    Nickel-base Alloy 600 is the principal material used for the steam generator tubes of PWRs. Generally, this alloy has been proven to be satisfactory for this application, however when it is subjected to extremely high stress level in PWR primary water, it may suffer from stress corrosion cracking. The authors have systematically studied the effects of test temperature and such metallurgical factors as cold working, chemical composition and heat treatment on the stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in high temperature water, and also on that of Alloy 690 which is a promising material for the tubes and may provide improved crrosion resistance for steam generators. The test materials, the stress corrosion cracking test and the test results are reported. When the test temperature was raise, the stress corrosion cracking of the nickel-base alloys was accelerated. The time of stress corrosion cracking occurrence decreased with increasing applied stress, and it occurred at the stress level higher than the 0.2 % offset proof stress of Alloy 600. In Alloy 690, stress corrosion cracking was not observed at such stress level. Cold worked Alloy 600 showed higher resistance to stress corrosion cracking than the annealed alloy. (Kako, I.)

  2. Microstructural investigation of vintage pipeline steels highly susceptible to stress corrosion cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Monica

    The use of pipelines for the transmission of gas offers not only efficiency, but a number of economic advantages. Nevertheless, pipelines are subject to aggressive operating conditions and environments which can lead to in-service degradation [1] and thus to failures. These failures can have catastrophic consequences, such as environmental damage and loss of life [2]. One of the most dangerous threats to pipeline integrity is stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Despite the substantial progress that has been achieved in the field, due to the complex nature of this phenomenon there is still not a complete understanding of this form of external corrosion. This makes its detection and prevention a challenge and therefore a risk to pipeline integrity, and most importantly, to the safety of the population. SCC cracks are the result of the interaction between a corrosive environment, applied stresses, and a susceptible microstructure. To date, what defines a susceptible microstructure remains ambiguous, as SCC has been observed in a range of steel grades, microstructures, chemical composition, and grain sizes. Therefore, in order to be able to accurately predict and prevent this hazardous form of corrosion, it is imperative to advance our knowledge on the subject and gain a better understanding on the microstructural features of highly susceptible pipeline materials, especially in the subsurface zone where crack nucleation must take place. Therefore, a microstructural characterization of the region near the surface layer was carried-out utilizing TEM. TEM analysis revealed the dislocation character, ferrite morphology, and apparent carbide precipitation in some grain boundaries. Furthermore, light microscopy, SEM, and hardness testing were performed to expand our knowledge on the microscopical features of highly SCC susceptible service components. This investigation presents a new approach to SCC characterization, which exposed the sub-surface region microscopical

  3. Corrosion Behaviors of Structural Materials in High Temperature S-CO{sub 2} Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Jung; Kim, Hyunmyung; Jang, Changheui [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    The isothermal corrosion tests of several types of stainless steels, Ni-based alloys, and ferritic-martensitic steels (FMS) were carried out at the temperature of 550 and 650 .deg. C in SFR S-CO{sub 2} environment (200 bar) for 1000 h. The weight gain was greater in the order of FMSs, stainless steels, and Ni-based alloys. For the FMSs (Fe-based with low Cr content), a thick outer Fe oxide, a middle (Fe,Cr)-rich oxide, and an inner (Cr,Fe)-rich oxide were formed. They showed significant weight gains at both 550 and 650 .deg. C. In the case of austenitic stainless steels (Fe-based) such as SS 316H and 316LN (18 wt.% Cr), the corrosion resistance was dependent on test temperatures except SS 310S (25 wt.% Cr). After corrosion test at 650 .deg. C, a large increase in weight gain was observed with the formation of outer thick Fe oxide and inner (Cr,Fe)-rich oxide. However, at 550 .deg. C, a thin Cr-rich oxide was mainly developed along with partially distributed small and nodular shaped Fe oxides. Meanwhile, for the Ni-based alloys (16-28 wt.% Cr), a very thin Cr-rich oxide was developed at both test temperatures. The superior corrosion resistance of high Cr or Ni-based alloys in the high temperature S-CO{sub 2} environment was attributed to the formation of thin Cr-rich oxide on the surface of the materials.

  4. Microstructure, mechanical and corrosion behavior of high strength AA7075 aluminium alloy friction stir welds – Effect of post weld heat treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Vijaya Kumar

    2015-12-01

    It was observed that the hardness and strength of weld were observed to be comparatively high in peak aged (T6 condition but the welds showed poor corrosion resistance. The resistance to pitting corrosion was improved and the mechanical properties were maintained by RRA treatment. The resistance to pitting corrosion was improved in RRA condition with the minimum loss of weld strength.

  5. Aqueous corrosion of phosphide minerals from iron meteorites: a highly reactive source of prebiotic phosphorus on the surface of the early Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasek, Matthew A; Lauretta, Dante S

    2005-08-01

    We present the results of an experimental study of aqueous corrosion of Fe-phosphide under conditions relevant to the early Earth. The results strongly suggest that iron meteorites were an important source of reactive phosphorus (P), a requirement for the formation of P-based life. We further demonstrate that iron meteorites were an abundant source of phosphide minerals early in Earth history. Phosphide corrosion was studied in five different solutions: deionized water, deionized water buffered with sodium bicarbonate, deionized water with dissolved magnesium and calcium chlorides, deionized water containing ethanol and acetic acid, and deionized water containing the chlorides, ethanol, and acetic acid. Experiments were performed in the presence of both air and pure Ar gas to evaluate the effect of atmospheric chemistry. Phosphide corrosion in deionized water results in a metastable mixture of mixed-valence, P-bearing ions including pyrophosphate and triphosphate, key components for metabolism in modern life. In a pH-buffered solution of NaHCO(3), the condensed and reduced species diphosphonate is an abundant corrosion product. Corrosion in ethanol- and acetic acid-containing solutions yields additional P-bearing organic molecules, including acetyl phosphonate and a cyclic triphosphorus molecule. Phosphonate is a major corrosion product of all experiments and is the only P-bearing molecule that persists in solutions with high concentrations of magnesium and calcium chlorides, which suggests that phosphonate may have been a primitive oceanic source of P. The stability and reactivity of phosphonate and hypophosphite in solution were investigated to elucidate reaction mechanisms and the role of mineral catalysts on P-solution chemistry. Phosphonate oxidation is rapid in the presence of Fe metal but negligible in the presence of magnetite and in the control sample. The rate of hypophosphite oxidation is independent of reaction substrate.

  6. High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials: Iron-Based Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, J C; Haslam, J J; Wong, F; Ji, X; Day, S D; Branagan, D J; Marshall, M C; Meacham, B E; Buffa, E J; Blue, C A; Rivard, J K; Beardsley, M B; Weaver, D T; Aprigliano, L F; Kohler, L; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E J; Wolejsza, T M; Martin, F J; Yang, N; Lucadamo, G; Perepezko, J H; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Heuer, A H; Ernst, F; Michal, G M; Kahn, H; Lavernia, E J

    2004-01-01

    The multi-institutional High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Team is cosponsored by the Defense Advanced Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Science Office (DSO) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), and has developed new corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals that can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The Fe-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove of importance for applications on ships. Such coatings could be used as an ''integral drip shield'' on spent fuel containers, as well as protective coatings that could be applied over welds, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking. In the future, such new high-performance iron-based materials could be substituted for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling a reduction in the $58-billion life cycle cost for the long-term storage of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel by tens of percent

  7. Corrosion/96 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    Topics covered by this conference include: cathodic protection in natural waters; cleaning and repassivation of building HVAC systems; worldwide opportunities in flue gas desulfurization; advancements in materials technology for use in oil and gas service; fossil fuel combustion and conversion; technology of corrosion inhibitors; computers in corrosion control--modeling and information processing; recent experiences and advances of austenitic alloys; managing corrosion with plastics; corrosion measurement technology; corrosion inhibitors for concrete; refining industry; advances in corrosion control for rail and tank trailer equipment; CO 2 corrosion--mechanisms and control; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion in nuclear systems; role of corrosion in boiler failures; effects of water reuse on monitoring and control technology in cooling water applications; methods and mechanisms of scale and deposit control; corrosion detection in petroleum production lines; underground corrosion control; environmental cracking--relating laboratory results and field behavior; corrosion control in reinforced concrete structures; corrosion and its control in aerospace and military hardware; injection and process addition facilities; progress reports on the results of reinspection of deaerators inspected or repaired per RP0590 criteria; near 100% volume solids coating technology and application methods; materials performance in high temperature environments containing halides; impact of toxicity studies on use of corrosion/scale inhibitors; mineral scale deposit control in oilfield related operations; corrosion in gas treating; marine corrosion; cold climate corrosion; corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; gaseous chlorine alternatives in cooling water systems; practical applications of ozone in recirculating cooling water systems; and water reuse in industry. Over 400 papers from this conference have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  8. Corrosion analysis in mooring chain links; Analise de corrosao em elos de amarras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal, Silvia N.; Pereira, Marcos V. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencia dos Materiais e Metalurgia; Costa, Luis C. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas; Motta, Sergio H. [Brasilamarras - Companhia Brasileira de Amarras, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to characterize the localized corrosion phenomenon in the weld region of offshore mooring chain links type ORQ. In this sense, a number of chain links were selected after finishing their projected life time without corrosion signs (chains without corrosion) as well as chain links which showed a reduced life time caused by localized corrosion (chains with corrosion). In the sequence, electrochemistry tests evaluated the corrosion susceptibility of the different regions of the weld joint. The results showed that the heat affected zone concerning the chains with corrosion was the anodic region, with high corrosion rate, while the same region on the not corroded chains was the cathodic one, with low corrosion rate. (author)

  9. Corrosion Behavior and Oxide Properties of Zr-Nb-Cu and Zr-Nb-Sn Alloy in High Dissolved Hydrogen Primary Water Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yun Ju; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Ji Hyun [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The water-metal interface is regarded as rate-controlling site governing the rapid oxidation transition in high burn-up fuel. And the zirconium oxide is made in water-metal interface and its structure and phase do an important role in terms of oxide properties. During oxidation process, the protective tetragonal oxide layer develops at the interface due to accumulated high stress during oxide growth, and it turns into non-protective monoclinic oxide with increasing oxide thickness, thus decreasing the stress. It has been reported that Nb addition was proven to be very beneficial for increasing the corrosion resistance of the zirconium alloys. From a more recent study, Cu addition in Nb containing Zirconium alloy was reported to be effective for increasing corrosion resistance in water containing B and Li. According to the previous research conducted, Zr-Nb-Cu shows better corrosion resistance than Zircaloy-4. The dissolved hydrogen (DH) concentration is the key issue of primary water chemistry, and the effect of DH concentration on the corrosion rate of nickel based alloy has been researched. However, the effect of DH on the zirconium alloy corrosion mechanism was not fully investigated. In this study, the weight gain measurement, FIB-SEM analysis, and Raman spectroscopic measurement were conducted to investigate the effects of dissolved hydrogen concentration and the chemical composition on the corrosion resistance and oxide phase of Zr-Nb-Cu alloy and Zr-Nb-Sn alloy after oxidizing in a primary water environment for 20 d. The corrosion rate of Zr-Nb-Cu alloy is slow, when it is compared to Zr-Nb-Sn alloy. In SEM images, the oxide thickness of Zr-Nb-Cu alloy is measured to be around 1.06 μm it of Zr-Nb-Sn alloy is measured to be 1.15 μm. It is because of the Segregation made by Sn solute element when Sn solute element oxidized. And according to ex situ Raman spectra, Zr-Nb-Cu alloy oxide has more tetragonal zirconium oxide fraction than Zr-Nb-Sn alloy oxide.

  10. Methods for protection of high-strength welded stainless steel from corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lashchevskij, V.B.; Gurvich, L.Ya.; Batrakov, V.P.; Kozheurova, N.S.; Molotova, V.A.; Shvarts, M.M.

    1978-01-01

    The efficiency of protection from corrosion cracking under a bending stress of 100 kgf/mm 2 in a salt mist and in a sulphur dioxide atmosphere, of welded joints of steel 08Kh15N5D2T with metallizing, galvanic and varnish coatings and lubricants, and of steel 1Kh15N4AM3 with sealing compounds has been investigated. Metallization of welded joints with aluminium and zinc efficiently increases corrosion resistance in a salt mist. Galvanic coatings of Cd, Zn, and Cr increase the time to cracking in a salt mist from 2-3 to 60-80 days. The protective properties of varnishes under the effect of a salt mist decrease in the following sequence: epoxy-polyamide enamel EP-140, acrylic enamel C-38, silicone enamels KO-834, KO-811, and KO-814. In an atmosphere containing SO 2 0.15 vol.% at 100% relative humidity, the varnishes investigated, with the exception of the inhibited coating XC-596, show lower protective properties than in a salt mist. The high efficiency of protection from corrosion cracking in a salt mist of slots of steel 1Kh15N4AM3 when using organic sealing compounds U4-21 and U5-21, and also slushing lubricants and oils PVK, TsIATIM-201, K17, and AMS3 was established

  11. Analysis of corrosion layers in ancient Roman silver coins with high resolution surface spectroscopic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keturakis, Christopher J. [Operando Molecular Spectroscopy and Catalysis Research Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Notis, Ben [Brandeis University, Waltham, MA 02453 (United States); Blenheim, Alex [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, College Park, PA 16802 (United States); Miller, Alfred C.; Pafchek, Rob [Zettlemoyer Center for Surface Studies, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Notis, Michael R., E-mail: mrn1@lehigh.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Wachs, Israel E., E-mail: iew0@lehigh.edu [Operando Molecular Spectroscopy and Catalysis Research Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Five ancient silver alloy coins (225 BCE–244 CE) were analyzed using surface characterization techniques. • Both destructive and non-destructive surface characterization methods were developed. • Alloying with copper, even in small amounts, leads to the formation of an outer Cu{sub 2}O corrosion layer. - Abstract: Determination of the microchemistry of surface corrosion layers on ancient silver alloy coins is important both in terms of understanding the nature of archaeological environmental conditions to which these ancient coins were exposed and also to help in their conservation. In this present study, five ancient silver alloy coins (225 BCE–244 CE) were used as test vehicles to measure their immediate surface microchemistry and evaluate the appropriateness and limitations of High Sensitivity-Low Energy Ion Scattering Spectroscopy (HS-LEIS, 0.3 nm depth analysis), High Resolution-X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (HR-XPS, 1–3 nm depth analysis) and High Resolution-Raman Spectroscopy (HR-Raman, ∼1000 nm depth analysis). Additional information about the deeper corrosion layers, up to ∼300–1000 nm, was provided by dynamic HS-LEIS and HR-Raman spectroscopy. While not archeologically significant, the use of these coins of small commercial value provides data that is more representative of the weaker signals typically obtained from ancient corroded objects, which can be in stark contrast to pristine data often obtained from carefully prepared alloys of known composition. The oldest coins, from 225 to 214 BCE, possessed an outermost surface layer containing Cu{sub 2}O, Na, Al, Pb, and adsorbed hydrocarbons, while the more recent coins, from 98 to 244 CE, contained Cu{sub 2}O, Ag, N, F, Na, Al, S, Cl, and adsorbed hydrocarbons in similar corresponding surface layers. It thus appears that alloying with copper, even in small amounts, leads to the formation of an outer Cu{sub 2}O layer. Depth profiling revealed the presence of K, Na, Cl, and

  12. Analysis of corrosion layers in ancient Roman silver coins with high resolution surface spectroscopic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keturakis, Christopher J.; Notis, Ben; Blenheim, Alex; Miller, Alfred C.; Pafchek, Rob; Notis, Michael R.; Wachs, Israel E.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Five ancient silver alloy coins (225 BCE–244 CE) were analyzed using surface characterization techniques. • Both destructive and non-destructive surface characterization methods were developed. • Alloying with copper, even in small amounts, leads to the formation of an outer Cu 2 O corrosion layer. - Abstract: Determination of the microchemistry of surface corrosion layers on ancient silver alloy coins is important both in terms of understanding the nature of archaeological environmental conditions to which these ancient coins were exposed and also to help in their conservation. In this present study, five ancient silver alloy coins (225 BCE–244 CE) were used as test vehicles to measure their immediate surface microchemistry and evaluate the appropriateness and limitations of High Sensitivity-Low Energy Ion Scattering Spectroscopy (HS-LEIS, 0.3 nm depth analysis), High Resolution-X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (HR-XPS, 1–3 nm depth analysis) and High Resolution-Raman Spectroscopy (HR-Raman, ∼1000 nm depth analysis). Additional information about the deeper corrosion layers, up to ∼300–1000 nm, was provided by dynamic HS-LEIS and HR-Raman spectroscopy. While not archeologically significant, the use of these coins of small commercial value provides data that is more representative of the weaker signals typically obtained from ancient corroded objects, which can be in stark contrast to pristine data often obtained from carefully prepared alloys of known composition. The oldest coins, from 225 to 214 BCE, possessed an outermost surface layer containing Cu 2 O, Na, Al, Pb, and adsorbed hydrocarbons, while the more recent coins, from 98 to 244 CE, contained Cu 2 O, Ag, N, F, Na, Al, S, Cl, and adsorbed hydrocarbons in similar corresponding surface layers. It thus appears that alloying with copper, even in small amounts, leads to the formation of an outer Cu 2 O layer. Depth profiling revealed the presence of K, Na, Cl, and S as key

  13. Aqueous stress-corrosion cracking of high-toughness D6AC steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbreath, W. P.; Adamson, M. J.

    1976-01-01

    The crack growth behavior of D6AC steel as a function of stress intensity, stress and corrosion history, and test technique, under sustained load in filtered natural seawater, 3.3 per cent sodium chloride solution, and distilled water, was investigated. Reported investigations of D6AC were considered in terms of the present study with emphasis on thermal treatment, specimen configuration, fracture toughness, crack-growth rates, initiation period, and threshold. Both threshold and growth kinetics were found to be relatively insensitive to these test parameters. The apparent incubation period was dependent on technique, both detection sensitivity and precracking stress intensity level.

  14. Corrosion problems related to the containment of high-level nuclear waste for disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothwell, G.P.

    1981-01-01

    The subject is examined under the headings: introduction (nature of problem; system of barriers which will initially contain the wasteform and subsequently limit the rate of transport of products from the wasteform to the external environment); environmental data (disposal in land-based repositories; disposal on or in the deep seabed); design philosophies and materials data (design; criteria for materials selection (kinetics of corrosion)); specific materials considerations (environmental parameters -temperature, pressure, heat transfer and radiation effects; single metals and alloys - steels, nickel based alloys, copper, lead, titanium, aluminium oxide); alternative approaches; an overview - information needs; summary. (U.K.)

  15. Corrosion problems related to the containment of high-level nuclear waste for disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothwell, G P

    1981-10-01

    The subject is examined under the headings: introduction (nature of problem; system of barriers which will initially contain the wasteform and subsequently limit the rate of transport of products from the wasteform to the external environment); environmental data (disposal in land-based repositories; disposal on or in the deep seabed); design philosophies and materials data (design; criteria for materials selection (kinetics of corrosion)); specific materials considerations (environmental parameters -temperature, pressure, heat transfer and radiation effects; single metals and alloys - steels, nickel based alloys, copper, lead, titanium, aluminium oxide); alternative approaches; an overview - information needs; summary.

  16. Surface composition, microstructure and corrosion resistance of AZ31 magnesium alloy irradiated by high-intensity pulsed ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, P.; Lei, M.K.; Zhu, X.P.

    2011-01-01

    High-intensity pulsed ion beam (HIPIB) irradiation of AZ31 magnesium alloy is performed and electrochemical corrosion experiment of irradiated samples is carried out by using potentiodynamic polarization technology in order to explore the effect of HIPIB irradiation on corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy. The surface composition, cross-sectional morphology and microstructure are characterized by using electron probe microanalyzer, optical microscope and transmission electron microscope, respectively. The results indicated that HIPIB irradiation leads to a significant improvement in corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy, in terms of the considerable increase in both corrosion potential and pitting breakdown potential. The microstructural refinement and surface purification induced by HIPIB irradiation are responsible for the improved corrosion resistance. - Research Highlights: → A modified layer about 30 μm thick is obtained by HIPIB irradiation. → Selective ablation of element/impurity phase having lower melting point is observed. → More importantly, microstructural refinement occurred on the irradiated surface. → The modified layer exhibited a significantly improved corrosion resistance. → Improved corrosion resistance is ascribed to the combined effect induced by HIPIB.

  17. Erosion and erosion-corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isomoto, Yoshinori

    2008-01-01

    It is very difficult to interpret the technical term of erosion-corrosion' which is sometimes encountered in piping systems of power plants, because of complicated mechanisms and several confusing definitions of erosion-corrosion phenomena. 'FAC (flow accelerated corrosion)' is recently introduced as wall thinning of materials in power