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Sample records for high compressible flows

  1. Compressibility, turbulence and high speed flow

    CERN Document Server

    Gatski, Thomas B

    2013-01-01

    Compressibility, Turbulence and High Speed Flow introduces the reader to the field of compressible turbulence and compressible turbulent flows across a broad speed range, through a unique complimentary treatment of both the theoretical foundations and the measurement and analysis tools currently used. The book provides the reader with the necessary background and current trends in the theoretical and experimental aspects of compressible turbulent flows and compressible turbulence. Detailed derivations of the pertinent equations describing the motion of such turbulent flows is provided and

  2. Introduction to compressible fluid flow

    CERN Document Server

    Oosthuizen, Patrick H

    2013-01-01

    IntroductionThe Equations of Steady One-Dimensional Compressible FlowSome Fundamental Aspects of Compressible FlowOne-Dimensional Isentropic FlowNormal Shock WavesOblique Shock WavesExpansion Waves - Prandtl-Meyer FlowVariable Area FlowsAdiabatic Flow with FrictionFlow with Heat TransferLinearized Analysis of Two-Dimensional Compressible FlowsHypersonic and High-Temperature FlowsHigh-Temperature Gas EffectsLow-Density FlowsBibliographyAppendices

  3. Lagrangian transported MDF methods for compressible high speed flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlinger, Peter

    2017-06-01

    This paper deals with the application of thermochemical Lagrangian MDF (mass density function) methods for compressible sub- and supersonic RANS (Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes) simulations. A new approach to treat molecular transport is presented. This technique on the one hand ensures numerical stability of the particle solver in laminar regions of the flow field (e.g. in the viscous sublayer) and on the other hand takes differential diffusion into account. It is shown in a detailed analysis, that the new method correctly predicts first and second-order moments on the basis of conventional modeling approaches. Moreover, a number of challenges for MDF particle methods in high speed flows is discussed, e.g. high cell aspect ratio grids close to solid walls, wall heat transfer, shock resolution, and problems from statistical noise which may cause artificial shock systems in supersonic flows. A Mach 2 supersonic mixing channel with multiple shock reflection and a model rocket combustor simulation demonstrate the eligibility of this technique to practical applications. Both test cases are simulated successfully for the first time with a hybrid finite-volume (FV)/Lagrangian particle solver (PS).

  4. A High Resolution Low Dissipation Hybrid Scheme for Compressible Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Jian; YAN Chao; JIANG Zhenhua

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,an efficient hybrid shock capturing scheme is proposed to obtain accurate results both in the smooth region and around discontinuities for compressible flows.The hybrid algorithm is based on a fifth-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme in the finite volume form to solve the smooth part of the flow field,which is coupled with a characteristic-based monotone upstream-centered scheme for conservation laws(MUSCL) to capture discontinuities.The hybrid scheme is intended to combine high resolution of MUSCL scheme and low dissipation of WENO scheme.The two ingredients in this hybrid scheme are switched with an indicator.Three typical indicators are chosen and compared.MUSCL and WENO are both shock capturing schemes making the choice of the indicator parameter less crucial.Several test cases are carried out to investigate hybrid scheme with different indicators in terms of accuracy and efficiency.Numerical results demonstrate that the hybrid scheme in the present work performs well in a broad range of problems.

  5. Shocklets in compressible flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁湘江; 男俊武; 沈清; 李筠

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of shocklets is studied theoretically and numerically for the stationary fluid, uniform compressible flow, and boundary layer flow. The conditions that trigger shock waves for sound wave, weak discontinuity, and Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) wave in compressible flows are investigated. The relations between the three types of waves and shocklets are further analyzed and discussed. Different stages of the shocklet formation process are simulated. The results show that the three waves in compressible flows will transfer to shocklets only when the initial disturbance amplitudes are greater than the certain threshold values. In compressible boundary layers, the shocklets evolved from T-S wave exist only in a finite region near the surface instead of the whole wavefront.

  6. Comparison of high order algorithms in Aerosol and Aghora for compressible flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mbengoue D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article summarizes the work done within the Colargol project during CEMRACS 2012. The aim of this project is to compare the implementations of high order finite element methods for compressible flows that have been developed at ONERA and at INRIA for about one year, within the Aghora and Aerosol libraries.

  7. ADAPTIVE DELAUNAY TRIANGULATION WITH MULTIDIMENSIONAL DISSIPATION SCHEME FOR HIGH-SPEED COMPRESSIBLE FLOW ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Adaptive Delaunay triangulation is combined with the cell-centered upwinding algorithm to analyze inviscid high-speed compressible flow problems. The multidimensional dissipation scheme was developed and included in the upwinding algorithm for unstructured triangular meshes to improve the computed shock wave resolution. The solution accuracy is further improved by coupling an error estimation procedure to a remeshing algorithm that generates small elements in regions with large change of solution gradients, and at the same time, larger elements in other regions. The proposed scheme is further extended to achieve higher-order spatial and temporal solution accuracy. Efficiency of the combined procedure is evaluated by analyzing supersonic shocks and shock propagation behaviors for both the steady and unsteady high-speed compressible flows.

  8. Computation of compressible flows with high density ratio and pressure ratio

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Rong-san

    2008-01-01

    The WENO method, RKDG method, RKDG method with original ghost fluid method, and RKDG method with modified ghost fluid method are applied to single-medium and two-medium air-air, air-liquid compressible flows with high density and pressure ratios. We also provide a numerical comparison and analysis for the above methods. Numerical results show that, compared with the other methods, the RKDG method with modified ghost fluid method can obtain high resolution results and the correct position of the shock, and the computed solutions are converged to the physical solutions as the mesh is refined.

  9. A high-resolution DNS study of compressible flow past an LPT blade in a cascade

    CERN Document Server

    Ranjan, Rajesh; Narasimha, Roddam

    2016-01-01

    Flow past a low pressure turbine blade in a cascade at $Re \\approx 52000$ and angle of incidence $\\alpha = 45.5^{0}$ is solved using a code developed in-house for solving 3D compressible Navier-Stokes equations. This code, named ANUROOP, has been developed in the finite volume framework using kinetic energy preserving second order central differencing scheme for calculating fluxes, and is compatible with hybrid grids. ANUROOP was verified and validated against several test cases with Mach numbers ranging from 0.1 (Taylor-Green vortex) to 1.5 (compressible turbulent channel flow). The code was found to be robust and stable, and the kinetic energy decay obeys the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. A hybrid grid, with a high resolution hexahedral orthogonal mesh in the boundary layer and unstructured (also hexahedral) elements in the rest of the domain, is used for the turbine blade simulation. Total grid size (160 million) is approximately an order of magnitude higher than in previous simulations for the sam...

  10. HIGH-ORDER I-STABLE CENTERED DIFFERENCE SCHEMES FOR VISCOUS COMPRESSIBLE FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weizhu Bao; Shi Jin

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present high-order I-stable centered difference schemes for the numer-ical simulation of viscous compressible flows. Here I-stability refers to time discretizationswhose linear stability regions contain part of the imaginary axis. This class of schemeshas a numerical stability independent of the cell-Reynolds number Rc, thus allows one tosimulate high Reynolds number flows with relatively larger Rc, or coarser grids for a fixedRc. On the other hand, Rc cannot be arbitrarily large if one tries to obtain adequatenumerical resolution of the viscous behavior. We investigate the behavior of high-orderI-stable schemes for Burgers' equation and the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Wedemonstrate that, for the second order scheme, Rc ≤ 3 is an appropriate constraint for nu-merical resolution of the viscous profile, while for the fourth-order schemes the constraintcan be relaxed to Rc ≤ 6. Our study indicates that the fourth order scheme is preferable:better accuracy, higher resolution, and larger cell-Reynolds numbers.

  11. Prediction of flow stress of 7017 aluminium alloy under high strain rate compression at elevated temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ravindranadh BOBBILI; B. RAMAKRISHNA; V. MADHU; A.K. GOGIA

    2015-01-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) constitutive model and JohnsoneCook (JeC) model were developed for 7017 aluminium alloy based on high strain rate data generated from split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) experiments at various temperatures. A neural network configuration consists of both training and validation, which is effectively employed to predict flow stress. Temperature, strain rate and strain are considered as inputs, whereas flow stress is taken as output of the neural network. A comparative study on JohnsoneCook (JeC) model and neural network model was performed. It was observed that the developed neural network model could predict flow stress under various strain rates and tem-peratures. The experimental stressestrain data obtained from high strain rate compression tests using SHPB over a range of temperatures (25?e300 ?C), strains (0.05e0.3) and strain rates (1500e4500 s?1) were employed to formulate JeC model to predict the flow stress behaviour of 7017 aluminium alloy under high strain rate loading. The JeC model and the back-propagation ANN model were developed to predict the flow stress of 7017 aluminium alloy under high strain rates, and their predictability was evaluated in terms of correlation coefficient (R) and average absolute relative error (AARE). R and AARE for the J-C model are found to be 0.8461 and 10.624%, respectively, while R and AARE for the ANN model are 0.9995 and 2.58%, respectively. The predictions of ANN model are observed to be in consistent with the experimental data for all strain rates and temperatures.

  12. Waves and compressible flow

    CERN Document Server

    Ockendon, Hilary

    2016-01-01

    Now in its second edition, this book continues to give readers a broad mathematical basis for modelling and understanding the wide range of wave phenomena encountered in modern applications.  New and expanded material includes topics such as elastoplastic waves and waves in plasmas, as well as new exercises.  Comprehensive collections of models are used to illustrate the underpinning mathematical methodologies, which include the basic ideas of the relevant partial differential equations, characteristics, ray theory, asymptotic analysis, dispersion, shock waves, and weak solutions. Although the main focus is on compressible fluid flow, the authors show how intimately gasdynamic waves are related to wave phenomena in many other areas of physical science.   Special emphasis is placed on the development of physical intuition to supplement and reinforce analytical thinking. Each chapter includes a complete set of carefully prepared exercises, making this a suitable textbook for students in applied mathematics, ...

  13. Review of Fluorescence-Based Velocimetry Techniques to Study High-Speed Compressible Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Johansen, Criag; Inman, Jennifer A.; Jones, Stephen B.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews five laser-induced fluorescence-based velocimetry techniques that have been used to study high-speed compressible flows at NASA Langley Research Center. The techniques discussed in this paper include nitric oxide (NO) molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV), nitrogen dioxide photodissociation (NO2-to-NO) MTV, and NO and atomic oxygen (O-atom) Doppler-shift-based velocimetry. Measurements of both single-component and two-component velocity have been performed using these techniques. This paper details the specific application and experiment for which each technique has been used, the facility in which the experiment was performed, the experimental setup, sample results, and a discussion of the lessons learned from each experiment.

  14. Modeling of Flow Stress of High Titanium Content 6061 Aluminum Alloy Under Hot Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Guan, Yingping; Wang, Zhenhua

    2016-09-01

    Hot compression tests were performed on high titanium content 6061 aluminum alloy (AA 6061-Ti) using a Gleeble-3500 thermomechanical testing system at temperatures from 350 to 510 °C with a constant strain rate in the range of 0.001-10 s-1. Three types of flow stress models were established from the experimental stress-strain curves, the correlation coefficient ( R), mean absolute relative error ( MARE), and root mean square deviation ( RMSD) between the predicted data and the experimental data were also calculated. The results show that the Fields-Backofen model, which includes a softening factor, was the simplest mathematical expression with a level of precision appropriate for the numerical simulations. However, the Arrhenius and artificial neural network (ANN) models were also consistent with the experimental results but they are more limited in their application in terms of their accuracy and the mathematical expression of the models.

  15. Finite-Difference Lattice Boltzmann Scheme for High-Speed Compressible Flow: Two-Dimensional Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Yan-Biao; Xu, Ai-Guo; Zhang, Guang-Cai; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Lei; Li, Ying-Jun

    2008-07-01

    Lattice Boltzmann (LB) modeling of high-speed compressible flows has long been attempted by various authors. One common weakness of most of previous models is the instability problem when the Mach number of the flow is large. In this paper we present a finite-difference LB model, which works for flows with flexible ratios of specific heats and a wide range of Mach number, from 0 to 30 or higher. Besides the discrete-velocity-model by Watari [Physica A 382 (2007) 502], a modified Lax Wendroff finite difference scheme and an artificial viscosity are introduced. The combination of the finite-difference scheme and the adding of artificial viscosity must find a balance of numerical stability versus accuracy. The proposed model is validated by recovering results of some well-known benchmark tests: shock tubes and shock reflections. The new model may be used to track shock waves and/or to study the non-equilibrium procedure in the transition between the regular and Mach reflections of shock waves, etc.

  16. Large scale dynamics in a turbulent compressible rotor/stator cavity flow at high Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachize, C.; Verhille, G.; Le Gal, P.

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports an experimental investigation of a turbulent flow confined within a rotor/stator cavity of aspect ratio close to unity at high Reynolds number. The experiments have been driven by changing both the rotation rate of the disk and the thermodynamical properties of the working fluid. This fluid is sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) whose physical properties are adjusted by imposing the operating temperature and the absolute pressure in a pressurized vessel, especially near the critical point of SF6 reached for T c = 45.58 ◦C, P c = 37.55 bar. This original set-up allows to obtain Reynolds numbers as high as 2 × 107 together with compressibility effects as the Mach number can reach 0.5. Pressure measurements reveal that the resulting fully turbulent flow shows both a direct and an inverse cascade as observed in rotating turbulence and in accordance with Kraichnan conjecture for 2D-turbulence. The spectra are however dominated by low-frequency peaks, which are subharmonics of the rotating disk frequency, involving large scale structures at small azimuthal wavenumbers. These modes appear for a Reynolds number around 105 and experience a transition at a critical Reynolds number Re c ≈ 106. Moreover they show an unexpected nonlinear behavior that we understand with the help of a low dimensional amplitude equations.

  17. Turbulent Flow Physics and Noise in High Reynolds Number Compressible Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glauser, Mark

    2016-11-01

    In this talk I will present a snapshot of our ongoing research in high Reynolds number turbulent compressible jets. The high speed axisymmetric jet work (Mach 0.6 - 1.1) has been jointly performed with Spectral Energies LLC through AFRL support and involves 10 kHz and large window PIV data extracted from the near field jet plume, simultaneously sampled with near field pressure and far field noise. We have learned from the simultaneously sampled 10 kHz PIV near field plume and far field noise data, using POD/OID and Wavelet filtering, that there are certain "loud" velocity modes that have low averaged turbulent kinetic energy content but strongly correlate with the far field noise. From the large window PIV data obtained at Mach 1.0 and 1.1, specific POD modes were found to contain important physics of the problem. For example, the large-scale structure of the jet, shock-related fluctuations, and turbulent mixing regions of the flow were isolated through POD. By computing cross correlations, particular POD modes were found to be related to particular noise spectra. I will conclude with a description of our complex nozzle work which uses the multi-stream supersonic single expansion rectangular nozzle (SERN) recently installed in our large anechoic chamber at SU. This work is funded from both AFOSR (joint with OSU with a primary focus on flow physics) and Spectral Energies LLC (via AFRL funds with a focus on noise). Particular emphasis will be on insight gained into this complex 3D flow field (and its relationship to the far field noise) from applications of POD, Wavelet filtering and DMD to various numerical (LES) and experimental (PIV, high speed schlieren, near and far field pressure) data sets, at a core nozzle Mach number of 1.6 and a second stream Mach number of 1.0.

  18. Navier-Stokes flow field analysis of compressible flow in a high pressure safety relief valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Bruce; Wang, Ten-See; Shih, Ming-Hsin; Soni, Bharat

    1993-12-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the complex three-dimensional flowfield of an oxygen safety pressure relieve valve during an incident, with a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis. Specifically, the analysis will provide a flow pattern that would lead to the expansion of the eventual erosion pattern of the hardware, so as to combine it with other findings to piece together a most likely scenario for the investigation. The CFD model is a pressure based solver. An adaptive upwind difference scheme is employed for the spatial discretization, and a predictor, multiple corrector method is used for the velocity-pressure coupling. The computational result indicated vortices formation near the opening of the valve which matched the erosion pattern of the damaged hardware.

  19. Effect of Friction Models and Parameters on the Lagrangian Flow Fields in High-Temperature Compression Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundalkar, Deepak; Singh, Rajkumar; Tewari, Asim

    2017-07-01

    Friction plays an important role in high-temperature deformation process. Friction affects local displacement field in the tool-workpiece interface region, thus affecting the overall material flow. Under high-temperature compression, macro-indicators like bulge radius and load displacement curves are not sensitive enough to distinguish subtle differences between various friction models. Hence, a new approach to match the experimental Lagrangian flow field with flow field obtained from FE simulation is proposed. For this uniaxial barreling, compression tests at constant temperature were conducted on Gleeble thermo-mechanical simulator. The compression tests were conducted at different strain, strain rate and friction conditions. Finite element simulations employing various friction models and parameters were performed for matching the experimental conditions. Experimental Lagrangian flow fields were obtained from the grain flow lines observed on high-resolution larger area micrographs of the specimen. It was observed that all the investigated friction models provided equally good fit with the macro-experimental indicators (bulge radius and load displacement curves). However, Coulomb friction model was the only friction model that provided the closest fit with the experimentally obtained Lagrangian flow fields. Coulomb friction model provided the best agreement between experimental and numerical simulation for both lubricated and non-lubricated conditions using friction coefficients μ = 0.2993 and μ = 0.3895, respectively.

  20. Analysis of High Order Difference Methods for Multiscale Complex Compressible Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjoegreen, Bjoern; Yee, H. C.; Tang, Harry (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Accurate numerical simulations of complex multiscale compressible viscous flows, especially high speed turbulence combustion and acoustics, demand high order schemes with adaptive numerical dissipation controls. Standard high resolution shock-capturing methods are too dissipative to capture the small scales and/or long-time wave propagations without extreme grid refinements and small time steps. An integrated approach for the control of numerical dissipation in high order schemes with incremental studies was initiated. Here we further refine the analysis on, and improve the understanding of the adaptive numerical dissipation control strategy. Basically, the development of these schemes focuses on high order nondissipative schemes and takes advantage of the progress that has been made for the last 30 years in numerical methods for conservation laws, such as techniques for imposing boundary conditions, techniques for stability at shock waves, and techniques for stable and accurate long-time integration. We concentrate on high order centered spatial discretizations and a fourth-order Runge-Kutta temporal discretizations as the base scheme. Near the bound-aries, the base scheme has stable boundary difference operators. To further enhance stability, the split form of the inviscid flux derivatives is frequently used for smooth flow problems. To enhance nonlinear stability, linear high order numerical dissipations are employed away from discontinuities, and nonlinear filters are employed after each time step in order to suppress spurious oscillations near discontinuities to minimize the smearing of turbulent fluctuations. Although these schemes are built from many components, each of which is well-known, it is not entirely obvious how the different components be best connected. For example, the nonlinear filter could instead have been built into the spatial discretization, so that it would have been activated at each stage in the Runge-Kutta time stepping. We could think

  1. Mathematical theory of compressible fluid flow

    CERN Document Server

    von Mises, Richard

    2004-01-01

    A pioneer in the fields of statistics and probability theory, Richard von Mises (1883-1953) made notable advances in boundary-layer-flow theory and airfoil design. This text on compressible flow, unfinished upon his sudden death, was subsequently completed in accordance with his plans, and von Mises' first three chapters were augmented with a survey of the theory of steady plane flow. Suitable as a text for advanced undergraduate and graduate students - as well as a reference for professionals - Mathematical Theory of Compressible Fluid Flow examines the fundamentals of high-speed flows, with

  2. Neural network modeling to evaluate the dynamic flow stress of high strength armor steels under high strain rate compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ravindranadh BOBBILI; V. MADHU; A.K. GOGIA

    2014-01-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) constitutive model is developed for high strength armor steel tempered at 500 ?C, 600 ?C and 650 ?C based on high strain rate data generated from split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) experiments. A new neural network configuration consisting of both training and validation is effectively employed to predict flow stress. Tempering temperature, strain rate and strain are considered as inputs, whereas flow stress is taken as output of the neural network. A comparative study on JohnsoneCook (JeC) model and neural network model is performed. It was observed that the developed neural network model could predict flow stress under various strain rates and tempering temperatures. The experimental stressestrain data obtained from high strain rate compression tests using SHPB, over a range of tempering temperatures (500e650 ?C), strains (0.05e0.2) and strain rates (1000e5500/s) are employed to formulate JeC model to predict the high strain rate deformation behavior of high strength armor steels. The J-C model and the back-propagation ANN model were developed to predict the high strain rate deformation behavior of high strength armor steel and their predictability is evaluated in terms of correlation coefficient (R) and average absolute relative error (AARE). R and AARE for the JeC model are found to be 0.7461 and 27.624%, respectively, while R and AARE for the ANN model are 0.9995 and 2.58%, respectively. It was observed that the predictions by ANN model are in consistence with the experimental data for all tempering temperatures.

  3. Local Entropy Generation in Compressible Flow through a High Pressure Turbine with Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dun Lin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas turbines are important energy-converting equipment in many industries. The flow inside gas turbines is very complicated and the knowledge about the flow loss mechanism is critical to the advanced design. The current design system heavily relies on empirical formulas or Reynolds Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS, which faces big challenges in dealing with highly unsteady complex flow and accurately predicting flow losses. Further improving the efficiency needs more insights into the loss generation in gas turbines. Conventional Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Simulation (URANS methods have defects in modeling multi-frequency, multi-length, highly unsteady flow, especially when mixing or separation occurs, while Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS and Large Eddy Simulation (LES are too costly for the high-Reynolds number flow. In this work, the Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation (DDES method is used with a low-dissipation numerical scheme to capture the detailed flow structures of the complicated flow in a high pressure turbine guide vane. DDES accurately predicts the wake vortex behavior and produces much more details than RANS and URANS. The experimental findings of the wake vortex length characteristics, which RANS and URANS fail to predict, are successfully captured by DDES. Accurate flow simulation builds up a solid foundation for accurate losses prediction. Based on the detailed DDES results, loss analysis in terms of entropy generation rate is conducted from two aspects. The first aspect is to apportion losses by its physical resources: viscous irreversibility and heat transfer irreversibility. The viscous irreversibility is found to be much stronger than the heat transfer irreversibility in the flow. The second aspect is weighing the contributions of steady effects and unsteady effects. Losses due to unsteady effects account for a large part of total losses. Effects of unsteadiness should not be neglected in the flow physics study and design

  4. Conservative regularization of compressible flow

    CERN Document Server

    Krishnaswami, Govind S; Thyagaraja, Anantanarayanan

    2015-01-01

    Ideal Eulerian flow may develop singularities in vorticity w. Navier-Stokes viscosity provides a dissipative regularization. We find a local, conservative regularization - lambda^2 w times curl(w) of compressible flow and compressible MHD: a three dimensional analogue of the KdV regularization of the one dimensional kinematic wave equation. The regulator lambda is a field subject to the constitutive relation lambda^2 rho = constant. Lambda is like a position-dependent mean-free path. Our regularization preserves Galilean, parity and time-reversal symmetries. We identify locally conserved energy, helicity, linear and angular momenta and boundary conditions ensuring their global conservation. Enstrophy is shown to remain bounded. A swirl velocity field is identified, which transports w/rho and B/rho generalizing the Kelvin-Helmholtz and Alfven theorems. A Hamiltonian and Poisson bracket formulation is given. The regularized equations are used to model a rotating vortex, channel flow, plane flow, a plane vortex ...

  5. Two-dimensional lattice Boltzmann model for compressible flows with high Mach number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Yanbiao; Xu, Aiguo; Zhang, Guangcai; Yu, Xijun; Li, Yingjun

    2008-03-01

    In this paper we present an improved lattice Boltzmann model for compressible Navier-Stokes system with high Mach number. The model is composed of three components: (i) the discrete-velocity-model by M. Watari and M. Tsutahara [Phys. Rev. E 67 (2003) 036306], (ii) a modified Lax-Wendroff finite difference scheme where reasonable dissipation and dispersion are naturally included, (iii) artificial viscosity. The improved model is convenient to compromise the high accuracy and stability. The included dispersion term can effectively reduce the numerical oscillation at discontinuity. The added artificial viscosity helps the scheme to satisfy the von Neumann stability condition. Shock tubes and shock reflections are used to validate the new scheme. In our numerical tests the Mach numbers are successfully increased up to 20 or higher. The flexibility of the new model makes it suitable for tracking shock waves with high accuracy and for investigating nonlinear nonequilibrium complex systems.

  6. A high-order adaptive Cartesian cut-cell method for simulation of compressible viscous flow over immersed bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Balaji; Menon, Suresh

    2016-09-01

    A new adaptive finite volume conservative cut-cell method that is third-order accurate for simulation of compressible viscous flows is presented. A high-order reconstruction approach using cell centered piecewise polynomial approximation of flow quantities, developed in the past for body-fitted grids, is now extended to the Cartesian based cut-cell method. It is shown that the presence of cut-cells of very low volume results in numerical oscillations in the flow solution near the embedded boundaries when standard small cell treatment techniques are employed. A novel cell clustering approach for polynomial reconstruction in the vicinity of the small cells is proposed and is shown to achieve smooth representation of flow field quantities and their derivatives on immersed interfaces. It is further shown through numerical examples that the proposed clustering method achieves the design order of accuracy and is fairly insensitive to the cluster size. Results are presented for canonical flow past a single cylinder and a sphere at different flow Reynolds numbers to verify the accuracy of the scheme. Investigations are then performed for flow over two staggered cylinders and the results are compared with prior data for the same configuration. All the simulations are carried out with both quadratic and cubic reconstruction, and the results indicate a clear improvement with the cubic reconstruction. The new cut-cell approach with cell clustering is able to predict accurate results even at relatively low resolutions. The ability of the high-order cut-cell method in handling sharp geometrical corners and narrow gaps is also demonstrated using various examples. Finally, three-dimensional flow interactions between a pair of spheres in cross flow is investigated using the proposed cut-cell scheme. The results are shown to be in excellent agreement with past studies, which employed body-fitted grids for studying this complex case.

  7. Grid generation and compressible flow computations about a high-speed civil transport configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolhassani, J. S.; Stewart, J. E.; Farr, N.; Smith, R. E.; Kerr, P. W.; Everton, E. L.

    1991-01-01

    Techniques and software are discussed for generating grids about a high-speed civil transport configuration. The configuration is defined by a computer-aided design system in wing, fuselage, tail and engine-nacelle components. Grid topology and the surfaces outlining the blocks of the topology are computed with interactive software. The volume grid is computed using software based on transfinite interpolation and Lagrangian blending functions. Several volume grids for inviscid and viscous flow have been generated using this system of codes. Demonstration flowfields around this vehicle are described.

  8. Isotropic polarization of compressible flows

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Jian-Zhou

    2015-01-01

    The helical absolute equilibrium of a compressible adiabatic flow presents not only the polarization between the two purely helical modes of opposite chiralities but also that between the vortical and acoustic modes, deviating from the equipartition predicted by {\\sc Kraichnan, R. H.} [1955 The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America {\\bf 27}, 438--441.] Due to the existence of the acoustic mode, even if all Fourier modes of one chiral sector in the sharpened Helmholtz decomposition [{\\sc Moses, H. E.} 1971 SIAM ~(Soc. Ind. Appl. Math.) J. Appl. Math. {\\bf 21}, 114--130] are thoroughly truncated, negative temperature and the corresponding large-scale concentration of vortical modes are not allowed, unlike the incompressible case.

  9. Mathematical theory of compressible fluid flow

    CERN Document Server

    Von Mises, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Mathematical Theory of Compressible Fluid Flow covers the conceptual and mathematical aspects of theory of compressible fluid flow. This five-chapter book specifically tackles the role of thermodynamics in the mechanics of compressible fluids. This text begins with a discussion on the general theory of characteristics of compressible fluid with its application. This topic is followed by a presentation of equations delineating the role of thermodynamics in compressible fluid mechanics. The discussion then shifts to the theory of shocks as asymptotic phenomena, which is set within the context of

  10. Turbulent Friction in the Boundary Layer of a Flat Plate in a Two-Dimensional Compressible Flow at High Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankl, F.; Voishel, V.

    1943-01-01

    In the present report an investigation is made on a flat plate in a two-dimensional compressible flow of the effect of compressibility and heating on the turbulent frictional drag coefficient in the boundary layer of an airfoil or wing radiator. The analysis is based on the Prandtl-Karman theory of the turbulent boundary later and the Stodola-Crocco, theorem on the linear relation between the total energy of the flow and its velocity. Formulas are obtained for the velocity distribution and the frictional drag law in a turbulent boundary later with the compressibility effect and heat transfer taken into account. It is found that with increase of compressibility and temperature at full retardation of the flow (the temperature when the velocity of the flow at a given point is reduced to zero in case of an adiabatic process in the gas) at a constant R (sub x), the frictional drag coefficient C (sub f) decreased, both of these factors acting in the same sense.

  11. Characteristic-based and interface-sharpening algorithm for high-order simulations of immiscible compressible multi-material flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiwei; Tian, Baolin; Zhang, Yousheng; Gao, Fujie

    2017-03-01

    The present work focuses on the simulation of immiscible compressible multi-material flows with the Mie-Grüneisen-type equation of state governed by the non-conservative five-equation model [1]. Although low-order single fluid schemes have already been adopted to provide some feasible results, the application of high-order schemes (introducing relatively small numerical dissipation) to these flows may lead to results with severe numerical oscillations. Consequently, attempts to apply any interface-sharpening techniques to stop the progressively more severe smearing interfaces for a longer simulation time may result in an overshoot increase and in some cases convergence to a non-physical solution occurs. This study proposes a characteristic-based interface-sharpening algorithm for performing high-order simulations of such flows by deriving a pressure-equilibrium-consistent intermediate state (augmented with approximations of pressure derivatives) for local characteristic variable reconstruction and constructing a general framework for interface sharpening. First, by imposing a weak form of the jump condition for the non-conservative five-equation model, we analytically derive an intermediate state with pressure derivatives treated as additional parameters of the linearization procedure. Based on this intermediate state, any well-established high-order reconstruction technique can be employed to provide the state at each cell edge. Second, by designing another state with only different reconstructed values of the interface function at each cell edge, the advection term in the equation of the interface function is discretized twice using any common algorithm. The difference between the two discretizations is employed consistently for interface compression, yielding a general framework for interface sharpening. Coupled with the fifth-order improved accurate monotonicity-preserving scheme [2] for local characteristic variable reconstruction and the tangent of hyperbola

  12. Prediction of flow stress of 7017 aluminium alloy under high strain rate compression at elevated temperatures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bobbili, Ravindranadh; Ramakrishna, B; Madhu, V; Gogia, A.K

    2015-01-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) constitutive model and Johnson–Cook (J–C) model were developed for 7017 aluminium alloy based on high strain rate data generated from split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB...

  13. High-order implicit residual smoothing time scheme for direct and large eddy simulations of compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinnella, P.; Content, C.

    2016-12-01

    Restrictions on the maximum allowable time step of explicit time integration methods for direct and large eddy simulations of compressible turbulent flows at high Reynolds numbers can be very severe, because of the extremely small space steps used close to solid walls to capture tiny and elongated boundary layer structures. A way of increasing stability limits is to use implicit time integration schemes. However, the price to pay is a higher computational cost per time step, higher discretization errors and lower parallel scalability. In quest for an implicit time scheme for scale-resolving simulations providing the best possible compromise between these opposite requirements, we develop a Runge-Kutta implicit residual smoothing (IRS) scheme of fourth-order accuracy, based on a bilaplacian operator. The implicit operator involves the inversion of scalar pentadiagonal systems, for which efficient parallel algorithms are available. The proposed method is assessed against two explicit and two implicit time integration techniques in terms of computational cost required to achieve a threshold level of accuracy. Precisely, the proposed time scheme is compared to four-stages and six-stages low-storage Runge-Kutta method, to the second-order IRS and to a second-order backward scheme solved by means of matrix-free quasi-exact Newton subiterations. Numerical results show that the proposed IRS scheme leads to reductions in computational time by a factor 3 to 5 for an accuracy comparable to that of the corresponding explicit Runge-Kutta scheme.

  14. DNS and scaling law analysis of compressible turbulent channel flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Fully developed compressible turbulent channel flow (Ma=0.8,Re=3300) is numerically simulated, and the data base of turbulence is established. The s tatistics such as density_weighted mean velocity and RMS velocity fluctuations i n semi_local coordinates agree well with those from other DNS data. High order s tatistics (skewness and flatness factors) of velocity fluctuations of compressib le turbulence are reported for the first time. Compressibility effects are also discussed. Pressure_dilatation absorbs part of the kinetic energy and makes the streaks of compressible channel flow more smooth. The scaling laws of compressible channel flow are also discussed. The conclusi ons are: (a) Scaling law is found in the center area of the channel. (b) In this area, ESS is also found. (c) When Mach number is not ve ry high, compressibility has little effect on scaling exponents.

  15. Adaptive Lattice Boltzmann Model for Compressible Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new lattice Boltzmann model for compressible flows is presented. The main difference from the standard lattice Boltzmann model is that the particle velocities are no longer constant, but vary with the mean velocity and internal energy. The adaptive nature of the particle velocities permits the mean flow to have a high Mach number. The introduction of a particle potential energy makes the model suitable for a perfect gas with arbitrary specific heat ratio. The Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations are derived by the Chapman-Enskog method from the BGK Boltzmann equation. Two kinds of simulations have been carried out on the hexagonal lattice to test the proposed model. One is the Sod shock-tube simulation. The other is a strong shock of Mach number 5.09 diffracting around a corner.

  16. PDF approach for compressible turbulent reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, A. T.; Tsai, Y.-L. P.; Raju, M. S.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to develop a probability density function (pdf) turbulence model for compressible reacting flows for use with a CFD flow solver. The probability density function of the species mass fraction and enthalpy are obtained by solving a pdf evolution equation using a Monte Carlo scheme. The pdf solution procedure is coupled with a compressible CFD flow solver which provides the velocity and pressure fields. A modeled pdf equation for compressible flows, capable of capturing shock waves and suitable to the present coupling scheme, is proposed and tested. Convergence of the combined finite-volume Monte Carlo solution procedure is discussed, and an averaging procedure is developed to provide smooth Monte-Carlo solutions to ensure convergence. Two supersonic diffusion flames are studied using the proposed pdf model and the results are compared with experimental data; marked improvements over CFD solutions without pdf are observed. Preliminary applications of pdf to 3D flows are also reported.

  17. Schwarz-based algorithms for compressible flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tidriri, M.D. [ICASE, Hampton, VA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    To compute steady compressible flows one often uses an implicit discretization approach which leads to a large sparse linear system that must be solved at each time step. In the derivation of this system one often uses a defect-correction procedure, in which the left-hand side of the system is discretized with a lower order approximation than that used for the right-hand side. This is due to storage considerations and computational complexity, and also to the fact that the resulting lower order matrix is better conditioned than the higher order matrix. The resulting schemes are only moderately implicit. In the case of structured, body-fitted grids, the linear system can easily be solved using approximate factorization (AF), which is among the most widely used methods for such grids. However, for unstructured grids, such techniques are no longer valid, and the system is solved using direct or iterative techniques. Because of the prohibitive computational costs and large memory requirements for the solution of compressible flows, iterative methods are preferred. In these defect-correction methods, which are implemented in most CFD computer codes, the mismatch in the right and left hand side operators, together with explicit treatment of the boundary conditions, lead to a severely limited CFL number, which results in a slow convergence to steady state aerodynamic solutions. Many authors have tried to replace explicit boundary conditions with implicit ones. Although they clearly demonstrate that high CFL numbers are possible, the reduction in CPU time is not clear cut.

  18. Comments on compressible flow through butterfly valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakenship, John G.

    In the flow analysis of process piping systems, it is desirable to treat control valves in the same way as elbow, reducers, expansions, and other pressure loss elements. In a recently reported research program, the compressible flow characteristics of butterfly valves were investigated. Fisher Controls International, Inc., manufacturer of a wide range of control valves, publishes coefficients that can be used to calculate flow characteristics for the full range of valve movement. The use is described of the manufacturer's data to calculate flow parameters as reported by the researchers who investigated compressible flow through butterfly valves. The manufacturer's data produced consistent results and can be used to predict choked flow and the pressure loss for unchoked flow.

  19. Modelling of pressure-strain correlation in compressible turbulent flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siyuan Huang; Song Fu

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies carried out in the early 1990s conjectured that the main compressible effects could be associated with the dilatational effects of velocity fluctuation.Later,it was shown that the main compressibility effect came from the reduced pressure-strain term due to reduced pressure fluctuations.Although better understanding of the compressible turbulence is generally achieved with the increased DNS and experimental research effort,there are still some discrepancies among these recent findings.Analysis of the DNS and experimental data suggests that some of the discrepancies are apparent if the compressible effect is related to the turbulent Mach number,Mt.From the comparison of two classes of compressible flow,homogenous shear flow and inhomogeneous shear flow(mixing layer),we found that the effect of compressibility on both classes of shear flow can be characterized in three categories corresponding to three regions of turbulent Mach numbers:the low-Mt,the moderate-Mt and high-Mt regions.In these three regions the effect of compressibility on the growth rate of the turbulent mixing layer thickness is rather different.A simple approach to the reduced pressure-strain effect may not necessarily reduce the mixing-layer growth rate,and may even cause an increase in the growth rate.The present work develops a new second-moment model for the compressible turbulence through the introduction of some blending functions of Mt to account for the compressibility effects on the flow.The model has been successfully applied to the compressible mixing layers.

  20. Abdominal 4D flow MR imaging in a breath hold: combination of spiral sampling and dynamic compressed sensing for highly accelerated acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyvorne, Hadrien; Knight-Greenfield, Ashley; Jajamovich, Guido; Besa, Cecilia; Cui, Yong; Stalder, Aurélien; Markl, Michael; Taouli, Bachir

    2015-04-01

    To develop a highly accelerated phase-contrast cardiac-gated volume flow measurement (four-dimensional [4D] flow) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging technique based on spiral sampling and dynamic compressed sensing and to compare this technique with established phase-contrast imaging techniques for the quantification of blood flow in abdominal vessels. This single-center prospective study was compliant with HIPAA and approved by the institutional review board. Ten subjects (nine men, one woman; mean age, 51 years; age range, 30-70 years) were enrolled. Seven patients had liver disease. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Two 4D flow acquisitions were performed in each subject, one with use of Cartesian sampling with respiratory tracking and the other with use of spiral sampling and a breath hold. Cartesian two-dimensional (2D) cine phase-contrast images were also acquired in the portal vein. Two observers independently assessed vessel conspicuity on phase-contrast three-dimensional angiograms. Quantitative flow parameters were measured by two independent observers in major abdominal vessels. Intertechnique concordance was quantified by using Bland-Altman and logistic regression analyses. There was moderate to substantial agreement in vessel conspicuity between 4D flow acquisitions in arteries and veins (κ = 0.71 and 0.61, respectively, for observer 1; κ = 0.71 and 0.44 for observer 2), whereas more artifacts were observed with spiral 4D flow (κ = 0.30 and 0.20). Quantitative measurements in abdominal vessels showed good equivalence between spiral and Cartesian 4D flow techniques (lower bound of the 95% confidence interval: 63%, 77%, 60%, and 64% for flow, area, average velocity, and peak velocity, respectively). For portal venous flow, spiral 4D flow was in better agreement with 2D cine phase-contrast flow (95% limits of agreement: -8.8 and 9.3 mL/sec, respectively) than was Cartesian 4D flow (95% limits of agreement: -10.6 and 14.6 m

  1. Slip Effects in Compressible Turbulent Channel Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Skovorodko, P A

    2012-01-01

    The direct numerical simulation of compressible fully developed turbulent Couette flow between two parallel plates with equal temperatures moving in opposite directions with some velocity was performed. The algorithm was tested on well known numerical solution for incompressible Poiseuille channel flow and found to provide its well description. The slip effects in studied flow are found to be negligibly small at the values of accommodation coefficients for velocity and temperature of the order of unity. The considerable increase of mean temperature with decreasing the accommodation coefficient for temperature was discovered. The effect may be important in the problems of heat exchange in compressible turbulent boundary layer for some combinations of flowing gas, surface and adsorbing gas.

  2. Slip effects in compressible turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovorodko, P. A.

    2012-11-01

    The direct numerical simulation of compressible fully developed turbulent Couette flow between two parallel plates with temperature Tw moving with velocities ±Uw was performed. The algorithm was tested on well known numerical solution for incompressible Poiseuille channel flow and found to provide its well description. The slip effects in studied flow are found to be negligibly small at the values of accommodation coefficients αu and αT of the order of unity. The considerable increase of mean temperature with decreasing the accommodation coefficient αT for fixed value of αu = 1 was discovered. The effect may be important in the problems of heat exchange in compressible turbulent boundary layer for some combinations of flowing gas, surface and adsorbing gas.

  3. Theoretical and computational dynamics of a compressible flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Shih-I; Luo, Shijun

    1991-01-01

    An introduction to the theoretical and computational fluid dynamics of a compressible fluid is presented. The general topics addressed include: thermodynamics and physical properties of compressible fluids; 1D flow of an inviscid compressible fluid; shock waves; fundamental equations of the dynamics of a compressible inviscid non-heat-conducting and radiating fluid, method of small perturbations, linearized theory; 2D subsonic steady potential flow; hodograph and rheograph methods, exact solutions of 2D insentropic steady flow equations, 2D steady transonic and hypersonic flows, method of characteristics, linearized theory of 3D potential flow, nonlinear theory of 3D compressibe flow, anisentropic (rotational) flow of inviscid compressible fluid, electromagnetogasdynamics, multiphase flows, flows of a compressible fluid with transport phenomena.

  4. Mode Selection in Compressible Active Flow Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrow, Aden; Woodhouse, Francis G.; Dunkel, Jörn

    2017-07-01

    Coherent, large-scale dynamics in many nonequilibrium physical, biological, or information transport networks are driven by small-scale local energy input. Here, we introduce and explore an analytically tractable nonlinear model for compressible active flow networks. In contrast to thermally driven systems, we find that active friction selects discrete states with a limited number of oscillation modes activated at distinct fixed amplitudes. Using perturbation theory, we systematically predict the stationary states of noisy networks and find good agreement with a Bayesian state estimation based on a hidden Markov model applied to simulated time series data. Our results suggest that the macroscopic response of active network structures, from actomyosin force networks to cytoplasmic flows, can be dominated by a significantly reduced number of modes, in contrast to energy equipartition in thermal equilibrium. The model is also well suited to study topological sound modes and spectral band gaps in active matter.

  5. Implicit compressible flow solvers on unstructured meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Makoto; Horinouchi, Nariaki

    1993-09-01

    An implicit solver for compressible flows using Bi-CGSTAB method is proposed. The Euler equations are discretized with the delta-form by the finite volume method on the cell-centered triangular unstructured meshes. The numerical flux is calculated by Roe's upwind scheme. The linearized simultaneous equations with the irregular nonsymmetric sparse matrix are solved by the Bi-CGSTAB method with the preconditioner of incomplete LU factorization. This method is also vectorized by the multi-colored ordering. Although the solver requires more computational memory, it shows faster and more robust convergence than the other conventional methods: three-stage Runge-Kutta method, point Gauss-Seidel method, and Jacobi method for two-dimensional inviscid steady flows.

  6. Compression of flow can reveal overlapping modular organization in networks

    CERN Document Server

    Esquivel, Alcides Viamontes

    2011-01-01

    To better understand the overlapping modular organization of large networks with respect to flow, here we introduce the map equation for overlapping modules. In this information-theoretic framework, we use the correspondence between compression and regularity detection. The generalized map equation measures how well we can compress a description of flow in the network when we partition it into modules with possible overlaps. When we minimize the generalized map equation over overlapping network partitions, we detect modules that capture flow and determine which nodes at the boundaries between modules should be classified in multiple modules and to what degree. With a novel greedy search algorithm, we find that some networks, for example, the neural network of C. Elegans, are best described by modules dominated by hard boundaries, but that others, for example, the sparse road network of California, have a highly overlapping modular organization. To compare our approach with other clustering algorithms, we sugg...

  7. Characteristics of compressible flow of supercritical kerosene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng-Quan Zhong; Xue-Jun Fan; Jing Wang; Gong Yu; Jian-Guo Li

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,compressible flow of aviation kerosene at supercritical conditions has been studied both numerically and experimentally.The thermophysical properties of supercritical kerosene are calculated using a 10-species surrogate based on the principle of extended corresponding states (ECS).Isentropic acceleration of supercritical kerosene to subsonic and supersonic speeds has been analyzed numerically.It has been found that the isentropic relationships of supercritical kerosene are significantly different from those of ideal gases.A two-stage fuel heating and delivery system is used to heat the kerosene up to a temperature of 820 K and pressure of 5.5 MPa with a maximum mass flow rate of 100 g/s.The characteristics of supercritical kerosene flows in a converging-diverging nozzle (Laval nozzle) have been studied experimentally.The results show that stable supersonic flows of kerosene could be established in the temperature range of 730 K-820 K and the measurements in the wall pressure agree with the numerical calculation.

  8. Subsampling-based compression and flow visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agranovsky, Alexy; Camp, David; Joy, I; Childs, Hank

    2016-01-19

    As computational capabilities increasingly outpace disk speeds on leading supercomputers, scientists will, in turn, be increasingly unable to save their simulation data at its native resolution. One solution to this problem is to compress these data sets as they are generated and visualize the compressed results afterwards. We explore this approach, specifically subsampling velocity data and the resulting errors for particle advection-based flow visualization. We compare three techniques: random selection of subsamples, selection at regular locations corresponding to multi-resolution reduction, and introduce a novel technique for informed selection of subsamples. Furthermore, we explore an adaptive system which exchanges the subsampling budget over parallel tasks, to ensure that subsampling occurs at the highest rate in the areas that need it most. We perform supercomputing runs to measure the effectiveness of the selection and adaptation techniques. Overall, we find that adaptation is very effective, and, among selection techniques, our informed selection provides the most accurate results, followed by the multi-resolution selection, and with the worst accuracy coming from random subsamples.

  9. Flux Limiter Lattice Boltzmann for Compressible Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈峰; 许爱国; 张广财; 李英骏

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a new flux limiter scheme with the splitting technique is successfully incorporated into a multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann (LB) model for shacked compressible flows. The proposed flux limiter scheme is efficient in decreasing the artificial oscillations and numerical diffusion around the interface. Due to the kinetic nature, some interface problems being difficult to handle at the macroscopic level can be modeled more naturally through the LB method. Numerical simulations for the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability show that with the new model the computed interfaces are smoother and more consistent with physical analysis. The growth rates of bubble and spike present a satisfying agreement with the theoretical predictions and other numerical simulations.

  10. Viscous and Gravitational Fingering in Multiphase Compositional and Compressible Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Moortgat, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Viscous and gravitational fingering refer to flow instabilities in porous media that are triggered by adverse mobility or density ratios, respectively. These instabilities have been studied extensively in the past for 1) single-phase flow (e.g., contaminant transport in groundwater, first-contact-miscible displacement of oil by gas in hydrocarbon production), and 2) multi-phase immiscible and incompressible flow (e.g., water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection in oil reservoirs). Fingering in multiphase compositional and compressible flow has received much less attention, perhaps due to its high computational complexity. However, many important subsurface processes involve multiple phases that exchange species. Examples are carbon sequestration in saline aquifers and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by gas or WAG injection below the minimum miscibility pressure. In multiphase flow, relative permeabilities affect the mobility contrast for a given viscosity ratio. Phase behavior can also change local fluid properties, w...

  11. Compression and radiation of high-power short rf pulses. I. Energy accumulation in direct-flow waveguide compressors

    KAUST Repository

    Sirenko, Kostyantyn

    2011-01-01

    Proper design of efficient requires precise understanding of the physics pertinent to energy accumulation and exhaust processes in resonant waveguide cavities. In this paper, practically for the first time these highly non-monotonic transient processes are studied in detail using a rigorous time-domain approach. Additionally, influence of the geometrical design and excitation parameters on the compressor\\'s performance is quantified in detail.

  12. Viscous and gravitational fingering in multiphase compositional and compressible flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moortgat, Joachim

    2016-03-01

    Viscous and gravitational fingering refer to flow instabilities in porous media that are triggered by adverse mobility or density ratios, respectively. These instabilities have been studied extensively in the past for (1) single-phase flow (e.g., contaminant transport in groundwater, first-contact-miscible displacement of oil by gas in hydrocarbon production), and (2) multi-phase immiscible and incompressible flow (e.g., water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection in oil reservoirs). Fingering in multiphase compositional and compressible flow has received much less attention, perhaps due to its high computational complexity. However, many important subsurface processes involve multiple phases that exchange species. Examples are carbon sequestration in saline aquifers and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by gas or WAG injection below the minimum miscibility pressure. In multiphase flow, relative permeabilities affect the mobility contrast for a given viscosity ratio. Phase behavior can also change local fluid properties, which can either enhance or mitigate viscous and gravitational instabilities. This work presents a detailed study of fingering behavior in compositional multiphase flow in two and three dimensions and considers the effects of (1) Fickian diffusion, (2) mechanical dispersion, (3) flow rates, (4) domain size and geometry, (5) formation heterogeneities, (6) gravity, and (7) relative permeabilities. Results show that fingering in compositional multiphase flow is profoundly different from miscible conditions and upscaling techniques used for the latter case are unlikely to be generalizable to the former.

  13. Hybrid Explicit Residual Distribution Scheme for Compressible Multiphase Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacigaluppi, Paola; Abgrall, Rémi; Kaman, Tulin

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this work is the development of a fully explicit scheme in the framework of time dependent hyperbolic problems with strong interacting discontinuities to retain high order accuracy in the context of compressible multiphase flows. A new methodology is presented to compute compressible two-fluid problems applied to the five equation reduced model given in Kapila et al. (Physics of Fluids 2001). With respect to other contributions in that area, we investigate a method that provides mesh convergence to the exact solutions, where the studied non-conservative system is associated to consistent jump relations. The adopted scheme consists of a coupled predictor-corrector scheme, which follows the concept of residual distributions in Ricchiuto and Abgrall (J. Comp. Physics 2010), with a classical Glimm’s scheme (J. Sci. Stat. Comp. 1982) applied to the area where a shock is occurring. This numerical methodology can be easily extended to unstructured meshes. Test cases on a perfect gas for a two phase compressible flow on a Riemann problem have verified that the approximation converges to its exact solution. The results have been compared with the pure Glimm’s scheme and the expected exact solution, finding a good overlap.

  14. Evaluation Study of Pressure-Strain Correlation Models in Compressible Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aicha Hanafi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the second-order closure for compressible turbulent flows with special attention paid to modeling the pressure-strain correlation appearing in the Reynolds stress equation. This term appears as the main one responsible for the changes of the turbulence structures that arise from structural compressibility effects. The structure of the gradient Mach number is similar to that of turbulence, therefore this parameter may be appropriate to study the changes in turbulence structures that arise from structural compressibility effects. Thus, the incompressible model (LRR of the pressure-strain correlation and its corrected form by using the turbulent Mach number, fail to correctly evaluate the compressibility effects at high shear flow. An extension of the widely used incompressible model (LRR on compressible homogeneous shear flow is the major aim of the present work. From this extension the standard coefficients Ci became a function of the compressibility parameters (the turbulent Mach number and the gradient Mach number. Application of the model on compressible homogeneous shear flow by considering various initial conditions shows reasonable agreement with the DNS results of Sarkar. The ability of the models to predict the equilibrium states for the flow in cases A1 and A4 from DNS results of Sarkar is examined, the results appear to be very encouraging. Thus, both parameters Mt and Mg should be used to model significant structural compressibility effects at high-speed shear flow.

  15. Pencil: Finite-difference Code for Compressible Hydrodynamic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Dobler, Wolfgang

    2010-10-01

    The Pencil code is a high-order finite-difference code for compressible hydrodynamic flows with magnetic fields. It is highly modular and can easily be adapted to different types of problems. The code runs efficiently under MPI on massively parallel shared- or distributed-memory computers, like e.g. large Beowulf clusters. The Pencil code is primarily designed to deal with weakly compressible turbulent flows. To achieve good parallelization, explicit (as opposed to compact) finite differences are used. Typical scientific targets include driven MHD turbulence in a periodic box, convection in a slab with non-periodic upper and lower boundaries, a convective star embedded in a fully nonperiodic box, accretion disc turbulence in the shearing sheet approximation, self-gravity, non-local radiation transfer, dust particle evolution with feedback on the gas, etc. A range of artificial viscosity and diffusion schemes can be invoked to deal with supersonic flows. For direct simulations regular viscosity and diffusion is being used. The code is written in well-commented Fortran90.

  16. Simple numerical method for predicting steady compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonlavante, Ernst; Nelson, N. Duane

    1986-01-01

    A numerical method for solving the isenthalpic form of the governing equations for compressible viscous and inviscid flows was developed. The method was based on the concept of flux vector splitting in its implicit form. The method was tested on several demanding inviscid and viscous configurations. Two different forms of the implicit operator were investigated. The time marching to steady state was accelerated by the implementation of the multigrid procedure. Its various forms very effectively increased the rate of convergence of the present scheme. High quality steady state results were obtained in most of the test cases; these required only short computational times due to the relative efficiency of the basic method.

  17. A PDF closure model for compressible turbulent chemically reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmann, W.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research project was the analysis of single point closures based on probability density function (pdf) and characteristic functions and the development of a prediction method for the joint velocity-scalar pdf in turbulent reacting flows. Turbulent flows of boundary layer type and stagnation point flows with and without chemical reactions were be calculated as principal applications. Pdf methods for compressible reacting flows were developed and tested in comparison with available experimental data. The research work carried in this project was concentrated on the closure of pdf equations for incompressible and compressible turbulent flows with and without chemical reactions.

  18. Dynamical compressibility of dense granular shear flows

    OpenAIRE

    Trulsson, Martin; Bouzid, Mehdi; Claudin, Philippe; Andreotti, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    It has been conjectured by Bagnold [1] that an assembly of hard non-deformable spheres could behave as a compressible medium when slowly sheared, as the average density of such a system effectively depends on the confining pressure. Here we use discrete element simulations to show the existence of transverse and sagittal waves associated to this dynamical compressibility. For this purpose, we study the resonance of these waves in a linear Couette cell and compare the results with those predic...

  19. Reevaluation of compressible-flow Preston tube calibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    Revised zero-pressure-gradient, adiabatic wall skin-friction-balance data covering a Mach number range from 1.6 to 4.6 led to a reevaluation of existing compressible flow Preston tube calibration equations.

  20. Three dimensional inviscid compressible calculations around axial flow turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourmaux, Antoine; Petot, Bertrand

    1991-12-01

    The application of a three dimensional (3D) method to the prediction of steady inviscid compressible flows in highly loaded stator bladings is presented. The complete set of Euler equations is solved by a finite difference method using a time marching two step Lax-Wendorff algorithm. The treatment of the boundary conditions is based on the use of the characteristic relations. This technique offers a great versatility and allows to prescribe conditions close to the physics of flows encountered in turbomachines. The code was adapted in order to build a 3D design tool able to run in different types of turbine blade geometries. Two types of multidomain structured meshes were tested (H+0+H and H+C). The H+C type of grid was finally choosen for industrial applications. Two applications to turbine nozzles are presented. The first is a low pressure turbine vane with evolutive flow path outer diameter. The results demonstrate the ability to predict flow features that cannot be computed via the classical two dimensional approach. The second is a high pressure inlet guide vane at transonic conditions. The strong radial evolution of pressure distribution and the trailing edge flow pattern are correctly predicted.

  1. Studies of compressible shear flows and turbulent drag reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orszag, S. A.

    1981-04-01

    Compressible shear flows and drag reduction were examined and three methods are addressed: (1) the analytical and numerical aspects of conformal mapping were summarized and a new method for computation of these maps is presented; (2) the computer code SPECFD for solution of the three dimensional time dependent Navier-Stokes equations for compressible flow on the CYBER 203 computer is described; (3) results of two equation turbulence modeling of turbulent flow over wavy walls are presented. A modified Jones-Launder model is used in two dimensional spectral code for flow in general wavy geometries.

  2. Numerical modeling of a compressible multiphase flow through a nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzielska, Urszula; Rabinovitch, Jason; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2012-11-01

    New thermodynamic cycles developed for more efficient low temperature resource utilization can increase the net power production from geothermal resources and sensible waste heat recovery by 20-40%, compared to the traditional organic Rankine cycle. These improved systems consist of a pump, a liquid heat exchanger, a two-phase turbine, and a condenser. The two-phase turbine is used to extract energy from a high speed multiphase fluid and consists of a nozzle and an axial impulse rotor. In order to model and optimize the fluid flow through this part of the system an analysis of two-phase flow through a specially designed convergent-divergent nozzle has to be conducted. To characterize the flow behavior, a quasi-one-dimensional steady-state model of the multiphase fluid flow through a nozzle has been constructed. A numerical code capturing dense compressible multiphase flow under subsonic and supersonic conditions and the coupling between both liquid and gas phases has been developed. The output of the code delivers data vital for the performance optimization of the two-phase nozzle.

  3. THE BERNOULLI EQUATION AND COMPRESSIBLE FLOW THEORIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The incompressible Bernoulli equation is an analytical relationship between pressure, kinetic energy, and potential energy. As perhaps the simplest and most useful statement for describing laminar flow, it buttresses numerous incompressible flow models that have been developed ...

  4. An interface capturing scheme for modeling atomization in compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick, Daniel P.; Hagen, Wyatt A.; Regele, Jonathan D.

    2017-09-01

    The study of atomization in supersonic flow is critical to ensuring reliable ignition of scramjet combustors under startup conditions. Numerical methods incorporating surface tension effects have largely focused on the incompressible regime as most atomization applications occur at low Mach numbers. Simulating surface tension effects in compressible flow requires robust numerical methods that can handle discontinuities caused by both shocks and material interfaces with high density ratios. In this work, a shock and interface capturing scheme is developed that uses the Harten-Lax-van Leer-Contact (HLLC) Riemann solver while a Tangent of Hyperbola for INterface Capturing (THINC) interface reconstruction scheme retains the fluid immiscibility condition in the volume fraction and phasic densities in the context of the five equation model. The approach includes the effects of compressibility, surface tension, and molecular viscosity. One and two-dimensional benchmark problems demonstrate the desirable interface sharpening and conservation properties of the approach. Simulations of secondary atomization of a cylindrical water column after its interaction with a shockwave show good qualitative agreement with experimentally observed behavior. Three-dimensional examples of primary atomization of a liquid jet in a Mach 2 crossflow demonstrate the robustness of the method.

  5. Squeezing the muscle: compression clothing and muscle metabolism during recovery from high intensity exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Billy Sperlich

    Full Text Available The purpose of this experiment was to investigate skeletal muscle blood flow and glucose uptake in m. biceps (BF and m. quadriceps femoris (QF 1 during recovery from high intensity cycle exercise, and 2 while wearing a compression short applying ~37 mmHg to the thigh muscles. Blood flow and glucose uptake were measured in the compressed and non-compressed leg of 6 healthy men by using positron emission tomography. At baseline blood flow in QF (P = 0.79 and BF (P = 0.90 did not differ between the compressed and the non-compressed leg. During recovery muscle blood flow was higher compared to baseline in both compressed (P<0.01 and non-compressed QF (P<0.001 but not in compressed (P = 0.41 and non-compressed BF (P = 0.05; effect size = 2.74. During recovery blood flow was lower in compressed QF (P<0.01 but not in BF (P = 0.26 compared to the non-compressed muscles. During baseline and recovery no differences in blood flow were detected between the superficial and deep parts of QF in both, compressed (baseline P = 0.79; recovery P = 0.68 and non-compressed leg (baseline P = 0.64; recovery P = 0.06. During recovery glucose uptake was higher in QF compared to BF in both conditions (P<0.01 with no difference between the compressed and non-compressed thigh. Glucose uptake was higher in the deep compared to the superficial parts of QF (compression leg P = 0.02. These results demonstrate that wearing compression shorts with ~37 mmHg of external pressure reduces blood flow both in the deep and superficial regions of muscle tissue during recovery from high intensity exercise but does not affect glucose uptake in BF and QF.

  6. Near-wall modelling of compressible turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Ronald M. C.

    1990-01-01

    Work was carried out to formulate near-wall models for the equations governing the transport of the temperature-variance and its dissipation rate. With these equations properly modeled, a foundation is laid for their extension together with the heat-flux equations to compressible flows. This extension is carried out in a manner similar to that used to extend the incompressible near-wall Reynolds-stress models to compressible flows. The methodology used to accomplish the extension of the near-wall Reynolds-stress models is examined and the actual extension of the models for the Reynolds-stress equations and the near-wall dissipation-rate equation to compressible flows is given. Then the formulation of the near-wall models for the equations governing the transport of the temperature variance and its dissipation rate is discussed. Finally, a sample calculation of a flat plate compressible turbulent boundary-layer flow with adiabatic wall boundary condition and a free-stream Mach number of 2.5 using a two-equation near-wall closure is presented. The results show that the near-wall two-equation closure formulated for compressible flows is quite valid and the calculated properties are in good agreement with measurements. Furthermore, the near-wall behavior of the turbulence statistics and structure parameters is consistent with that found in incompressible flows.

  7. Filming the invisible - time-resolved visualization of compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleine, H.

    2010-04-01

    Essentially all processes in gasdynamics are invisible to the naked eye as they occur in a transparent medium. The task to observe them is further complicated by the fact that most of these processes are also transient, often with characteristic times that are considerably below the threshold of human perception. Both difficulties can be overcome by combining visualization methods that reveal changes in the transparent medium, and high-speed photography techniques that “stop” the motion of the flow. The traditional approach is to reconstruct a transient process from a series of single images, each taken in a different experiment at a different instant. This approach, which is still widely used today, can only be expected to give reliable results when the process is reproducible. Truly time-resolved visualization, which yields a sequence of flow images in a single experiment, has been attempted for more than a century, but many of the developed camera systems were characterized by a high level of complexity and limited quality of the results. Recent advances in digital high-speed photography have changed this situation and have provided the tools to investigate, with relative ease and in sufficient detail, the true development of a transient flow with characteristic time scales down to one microsecond. This paper discusses the potential and the limitations one encounters when using density-sensitive visualization techniques in time-resolved mode. Several examples illustrate how this approach can reveal and explain a number of previously undetected phenomena in a variety of highly transient compressible flows. It is demonstrated that time-resolved visualization offers numerous advantages which normally outweigh its shortcomings, mainly the often-encountered loss in resolution. Apart from the capability to track the location and/or shape of flow features in space and time, adequate time-resolved visualization allows one to observe the development of deliberately

  8. Integral representation in the hodograph plane of compressible flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Erik Bent; Hsiao, G.C.

    2003-01-01

    Compressible flow is considered in the hodograph plane. The linearity of the equation determining the stream function is exploited to derive a representation formula involving boundary data only, and a fundamental solution to the adjoint equation. For subsonic flow, an efficient algorithm for com...

  9. A κ-ε Turbulence Model Considering Compressibility in Three-Dimensional Transonic Turbulent Flow Calculation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on the standark κ-ε turbulence model,a new compressible κ-ε model considering the pressure expansion influence due to the compressibility of fluid is developed and aplied to the simulation of 3D transonic turbulent flows in a nozzle and a cascade.The Reynolds averaged N-S equations in generalized curvilinear coordinates are solved with implementation of the new model,the high resolution TVD scheme is used to discretize the convective terms.The numerical results show that the compressible κ-ε odel behaves well in the simulation of transonic internal turbulent flows.

  10. Linear Stability Analysis of Compressible Channel Flow with Porous Walls

    CERN Document Server

    Rahbari, Iman

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of permeable walls, modeled by linear acoustic impedance with zero reactance, on compressible channel flow via linear stability analysis (LSA). Base flow profiles are taken from impermeable isothermal-wall laminar and turbulent channel flow simulations at bulk Reynolds number, $Re_b$= 6900 and Mach numbers, $M_b$ = 0.2, 0.5, 0.85. For a sufficiently high value of permeability, two dominant modes are excited: a bulk pressure mode, causing symmetric expulsion and suction of mass from the porous walls (Mode 0); a standing-wave-like mode, with a pressure node at the centerline (Mode 1). In the case of turbulent mean flow profiles, both modes generate additional Reynolds shear stresses augmenting the (base) turbulent ones, but concentrated in the viscous sublayer region; the trajectories of the two modes in the complex phase velocity space follow each other very closely for values of wall permeability spanning two orders of magnitude, suggesting their coexistence. The transition fr...

  11. Smoothness monitors for compressible flow computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjogreen, B; Yee, H C

    2008-09-02

    In [SY04, YS07] and references cited therein, the authors introduced the concept of employing multiresolution wavelet decomposition of computed flow data as smoothness monitors (flow sensors) to indicate the amount and location of built-in numerical dissipation that can be eliminated or further reduced in shock-capturing schemes. Studies indicated that this approach is able to limit the use of numerical dissipation with improved accuracy compared with standard shock-capturing methods. The studies in [SY04, YS07] were limited to low order multiresolution redundant wavelets with low level supports and low order vanishing moments. The objective of this paper is to expand the previous investigation to include higher order redundant wavelets with larger support and higher order vanishing moments for a wider spectrum of flow type and flow speed applications.

  12. Compressible Turbulent Channel Flows: DNS Results and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, P. G.; Coleman, G. N.; Bradshaw, P.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The present paper addresses some topical issues in modeling compressible turbulent shear flows. The work is based on direct numerical simulation of two supersonic fully developed channel flows between very cold isothermal walls. Detailed decomposition and analysis of terms appearing in the momentum and energy equations are presented. The simulation results are used to provide insights into differences between conventional time-and Favre-averaging of the mean-flow and turbulent quantities. Study of the turbulence energy budget for the two cases shows that the compressibility effects due to turbulent density and pressure fluctuations are insignificant. In particular, the dilatational dissipation and the mean product of the pressure and dilatation fluctuations are very small, contrary to the results of simulations for sheared homogeneous compressible turbulence and to recent proposals for models for general compressible turbulent flows. This provides a possible explanation of why the Van Driest density-weighted transformation is so successful in correlating compressible boundary layer data. Finally, it is found that the DNS data do not support the strong Reynolds analogy. A more general representation of the analogy is analysed and shown to match the DNS data very well.

  13. Compressibility effects on the flow past a rotating cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teymourtash, A. R.; Salimipour, S. E.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, laminar flow past a rotating circular cylinder placed in a compressible uniform stream is investigated via a two-dimensional numerical simulation and the compressibility effects due to the combination of the free-stream and cylinder rotation on the flow pattern such as forming, shedding, and removing of vortices and also the lift and drag coefficients are studied. The numerical simulation of the flow is based on the discretization of convective fluxes of the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations by second-order Roe's scheme and an explicit finite volume method. Because of the importance of the time dependent parameters in the solution, the second-order time accurate is applied by a dual time stepping approach. In order to validate the operation of a computer program, some results are compared with previous experimental and numerical data. The results of this study show that the effects due to flow compressibility such as normal shock wave caused the interesting variations on the flow around the cylinder even at a free-stream with a low Mach number. At incompressible flow around the rotating cylinder, increasing the speed ratio, α (ratio of the surface speed to free-stream velocity), causes the ongoing increase in the lift coefficient, but in compressible flow for each free-stream Mach number, increasing the speed ratio results in obtaining a limited lift coefficient (a maximum mean lift coefficient). In addition, results from the compressible flow indicate that by increasing the free-stream Mach number, the maximum mean lift coefficient is decreased, while the mean drag coefficient is increased. It is also found that by increasing the Reynolds number at low Mach numbers, the maximum mean lift coefficient and critical speed ratio are decreased and the mean drag coefficient and Strouhal number are increased. However at the higher Mach numbers, these parameters become independent of the Reynolds number.

  14. Finite-volume WENO scheme for viscous compressible multicomponent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coralic, Vedran; Colonius, Tim

    2014-01-01

    We develop a shock- and interface-capturing numerical method that is suitable for the simulation of multicomponent flows governed by the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The numerical method is high-order accurate in smooth regions of the flow, discretely conserves the mass of each component, as well as the total momentum and energy, and is oscillation-free, i.e. it does not introduce spurious oscillations at the locations of shockwaves and/or material interfaces. The method is of Godunov-type and utilizes a fifth-order, finite-volume, weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for the spatial reconstruction and a Harten-Lax-van Leer contact (HLLC) approximate Riemann solver to upwind the fluxes. A third-order total variation diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta (RK) algorithm is employed to march the solution in time. The derivation is generalized to three dimensions and nonuniform Cartesian grids. A two-point, fourth-order, Gaussian quadrature rule is utilized to build the spatial averages of the reconstructed variables inside the cells, as well as at cell boundaries. The algorithm is therefore fourth-order accurate in space and third-order accurate in time in smooth regions of the flow. We corroborate the properties of our numerical method by considering several challenging one-, two- and three-dimensional test cases, the most complex of which is the asymmetric collapse of an air bubble submerged in a cylindrical water cavity that is embedded in 10% gelatin. PMID:25110358

  15. Lightweight, highly compressible, noncrystalline cellulose capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrick, Christopher; Lindström, Stefan B; Larsson, Per Tomas; Wågberg, Lars

    2014-07-08

    We demonstrate how to prepare extraordinarily deformable, gas-filled, spherical capsules from nonmodified cellulose. These capsules have a low nominal density, ranging from 7.6 to 14.2 kg/m(3), and can be deformed elastically to 70% deformation at 50% relative humidity. No compressive strain-at-break could be detected for these dry cellulose capsules, since they did not rupture even when compressed into a disk with pockets of highly compressed air. A quantitative constitutive model for the large deformation compression of these capsules is derived, including their high-frequency mechanical response and their low-frequency force relaxation, where the latter is governed by the gas barrier properties of the dry capsule. Mechanical testing corroborated these models with good accuracy. Force relaxation measurements at a constant compression rendered an estimate for the gas permeability of air through the capsule wall, calculated to 0.4 mL μm/m(2) days kPa at 50% relative humidity. These properties taken together open up a large application area for the capsules, and they could most likely be used for applications in compressible, lightweight materials and also constitute excellent model materials for adsorption and adhesion studies.

  16. Stability of compressible three-dimensional boundary-layer flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, H. L.; Nayfeh, A. H.

    1982-01-01

    For compressible three-dimensional flow, the method of multiple scales to formulate the three-dimensional stability problem and determine the partial-differential equations governing variations of the amplitude and complex wavenumbers is used. A method for following one specific wave along its trajectory to ascertain the characteristics of the most unstable disturbance is proposed. Numerical results using the flow over the X-21 wing as calculated from the Kaups-Cebeci code will be presented.

  17. Nonmodal Growth Of Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability In Compressible Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Mona; Girimaji, Sharath

    2016-11-01

    Kelvin-helmholtz instability (khi) is central to the vertical mixing in shear flows and is known to be suppressed in compressible flows. To understand the inhibition of mixing under the influence of compressibility, we analyze the linear growth of khi in the short-time limit using initial value analysis. The evolution of perturbations is studied from a nonmodal standpoint. As the underlying suppression mechanism can be understood by considering primarily linear physics, the effect of compressibility on khi is scrutinized by linear analysis. Then its inferences are verified against direct numerical simulations. It has been demonstrated that compressibility forces the dominance of dilatational, rather than shear, dynamics at the interface of two fluids of different velocities. Within the dilatiatonal interface layer, pressure waves cause the velocity perturbation to become oscillatory [karimi and girimaji, 2016]. Thereupon, the focus is to examine the effect of the initial perturbation wavenumber on the formation of this layer and eventually the degree of khi suppression in compressible flows. We demonstrate that the degree of suppression decreases with the increase the wavenumbers of the initial perturbation of dilatational, rather than shear, dynamics at the interface of two fluids of different velocities. Within the dilatiatonal interface layer, pressure waves cause the velocity perturbation to become oscillatory [karimi and girimaji, 2016]. Thereupon, the focus is to examine the effect of the initial perturbation wavenumber on the formation of this layer and eventually the degree of khi suppression in compressible flows. We demonstrate that the degree of suppression decreases with the increase the wavenumbers of the initial perturbation.

  18. A 3-dimensional mass conserving element for compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, G.; Suri, M.

    1985-01-01

    A variety of finite element schemes has been used in the numerical approximation of compressible flows particularly in underwater acoustics. In many instances instabilities have been generated due to the lack of mass conservation. Two- and three-dimensional elements are developed which avoid these problems.

  19. Space-time discontinuous Galerkin method for compressible flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaij, C.M.

    2006-01-01

    The space-time discontinuous Galerkin method allows the simulation of compressible flow in complex aerodynamical applications requiring moving, deforming and locally refined meshes. This thesis contains the space-time discretization of the physical model, a fully explicit solver for the resulting

  20. High SNR Consistent Compressive Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Kallummil, Sreejith; Kalyani, Sheetal

    2017-01-01

    High signal to noise ratio (SNR) consistency of model selection criteria in linear regression models has attracted a lot of attention recently. However, most of the existing literature on high SNR consistency deals with model order selection. Further, the limited literature available on the high SNR consistency of subset selection procedures (SSPs) is applicable to linear regression with full rank measurement matrices only. Hence, the performance of SSPs used in underdetermined linear models ...

  1. A Fractional-Flow Based Compressible Multiphase Flow Model with Newly Proposed Constitutive Retentions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, C.; Yeh, G.

    2011-12-01

    In this investigation, newly proposed constitutive retentions are implemented to a fractional-flow based compressible multiphase-phase flow model. With the new model, a compressible three-phase (water, non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) and air) flow problem is simulated. In fractional-flow approaches, the three mass balance equations written in terms of three phase pressures are transformed to those in terms of the total pressure, saturation of water, and saturation of total liquid. These three governing equations are discretized with the Galerkin finite element method (FEM). The resulted matrix equation is solved with Bi-CGSTAB. Several numerical experiments are presented to examine the accuracy and robustness of the proposed model. The results show the presented fractional-flow based multiphase flow model is feasible and yields physically realistic solutions for compressible three-phase flow problems in porous media.

  2. High-resolution numerical methods for compressible multi-phase flow in hierarchical porous media. Progress report, September 1993--September 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trangenstein, J.A.

    1994-03-15

    This is the second year in the proposed three-year effort to develop high-resolution numerical methods for multi-phase flow in hierarchical porous media. The issues being addressed in this research are: Computational efficiency: Field-scale simulation of enhanced oil recovery, whether for energy production or aquifer remediation, is typically highly under-resolved. This is because rock transport properties vary on many scales, and because current numerical methods have low resolution. Effective media properties: Since porous media are formed through complex geologic processes, they involve significant uncertainty and scale-dependence. Given this uncertainty, knowledge of ensemble averages of flow in porous media can be preferable to knowledge of flow in specific realizations of the reservoir. However, current models of effective properties do not represent the observed behavior very well. Relative permeability models present a good example of this problem. In practice, these models seldom provide realistic representations of hysteresis, interfacial tension effects or three-phase flow; there are no models that represent well all three effects simultaneously.

  3. Study of parameters of a facility generating compressive plasma flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyvi, A. Ya

    2017-05-01

    The prosperity of plasma technologies stimulates making of a facility generating compressive plasma flows at the South Ural State University. The facility is a compact-geometry magnetoplasma compressor with the following parameters: stored energy up to 15 kJ, voltage of a bank from 3 to 5 kV; nitrogen, air, and other gases can serve as its operating gas. The investigation of parameters of the facility showed the following parameters of compressive plasma flows: impulse duration of up to 120 μs, discharge current of 50-120 kA, speed of plasma flow of 15-30 km/s. By contrast to the available facilities, the parameters of the developed facility can be adjusted in a wide range of voltage from 2 kV to 10 kV, its design permits generating CPF in horizontal and vertical positions.

  4. Compressibility Corrections to Closure Approximations for Turbulent Flow Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cloutman, L D

    2003-02-01

    We summarize some modifications to the usual closure approximations for statistical models of turbulence that are necessary for use with compressible fluids at all Mach numbers. We concentrate here on the gradient-flu approximation for the turbulent heat flux, on the buoyancy production of turbulence kinetic energy, and on a modification of the Smagorinsky model to include buoyancy. In all cases, there are pressure gradient terms that do not appear in the incompressible models and are usually omitted in compressible-flow models. Omission of these terms allows unphysical rates of entropy change.

  5. A skin friction law for compressible turbulent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnwell, Richard W.; Wahls, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    An algebraic skin friction law is derived for adiabatic, compressible, equilibrium, turbulent boundary layer flow. An outer solution in terms of the Clauser defect stream function is matched to an inner empirical expression composed of compressible laws of the wall and wake. The modified Crocco temperature-velocity relationship and the Clauser eddy viscousity model are used in the outer solution. The skin friction law pertains for all pressure gradients in the incompressible through supersonic range and for small pressure gradients in the hypersonic range. Excellent comparisons with experiment are obtained in the appropriate parameter ranges. The application to numerical computation is discussed.

  6. Skin blood flow with elastic compressive extravehicular activity space suit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kunihiko; Gotoh, Taro M; Morita, Hironobu; Hargens, Alan R

    2003-10-01

    During extravehicular activity (EVA), current space suits are pressurized with 100% oxygen at approximately 222 mmHg. A tight elastic garment, or mechanical counter pressure (MCP) suit that generates pressure by compression, may have several advantages over current space suit technology. In this study, we investigated local microcirculatory effects produced with negative ambient pressure with an MCP sleeve. The MCP glove and sleeve generated pressures similar to the current space suit. MCP remained constant during negative pressure due to unchanged elasticity of the material. Decreased skin capillary blood flow and temperature during MCP compression was counteracted by greater negative pressure or a smaller pressure differential.

  7. Stable, high-order SBP-SAT finite difference operators to enable accurate simulation of compressible turbulent flows on curvilinear grids, with application to predicting turbulent jet noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Jaeseung; Bodony, Daniel; Pantano, Carlos

    2014-11-01

    Improved order-of-accuracy discretizations often require careful consideration of their numerical stability. We report on new high-order finite difference schemes using Summation-By-Parts (SBP) operators along with the Simultaneous-Approximation-Terms (SAT) boundary condition treatment for first and second-order spatial derivatives with variable coefficients. In particular, we present a highly accurate operator for SBP-SAT-based approximations of second-order derivatives with variable coefficients for Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. These terms are responsible for approximating the physical dissipation of kinetic and thermal energy in a simulation, and contain grid metrics when the grid is curvilinear. Analysis using the Laplace transform method shows that strong stability is ensured with Dirichlet boundary conditions while weaker stability is obtained for Neumann boundary conditions. Furthermore, the benefits of the scheme is shown in the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a Mach 1.5 compressible turbulent supersonic jet using curvilinear grids and skew-symmetric discretization. Particularly, we show that the improved methods allow minimization of the numerical filter often employed in these simulations and we discuss the qualities of the simulation.

  8. Compressive sensing for high resolution radar imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Otten, M.P.G.; Hoogeboom, P.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present some preliminary results on the application of Compressive Sensing (CS) to high resolution radar imaging. CS is a recently developed theory which allows reconstruction of sparse signals with a number of measurements much lower than what is required by the Shannon sampling th

  9. Sieving hydrogen based on its high compressibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hangyan; Sun, Deyan; Gong, Xingao; Liu, Zhifeng

    2011-03-01

    Based on carbon nanotube intramolecular junction and a C60, a molecular sieve for hydrogen is presented. The small interspace between C60 and junction provides a size changeable channel for the permselectivity of hydrogen while blocking Ne and Ar. The sieving mechanism is due to the high compressibility of hydrogen.

  10. Investigation of turbulence models with compressibility corrections for hypersonic boundary flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Tang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The applications of pressure work, pressure-dilatation, and dilatation-dissipation (Sarkar, Zeman, and Wilcox models to hypersonic boundary flows are investigated. The flat plate boundary layer flows of Mach number 5–11 and shock wave/boundary layer interactions of compression corners are simulated numerically. For the flat plate boundary layer flows, original turbulence models overestimate the heat flux with Mach number high up to 10, and compressibility corrections applied to turbulence models lead to a decrease in friction coefficients and heating rates. The pressure work and pressure-dilatation models yield the better results. Among the three dilatation-dissipation models, Sarkar and Wilcox corrections present larger deviations from the experiment measurement, while Zeman correction can achieve acceptable results. For hypersonic compression corner flows, due to the evident increase of turbulence Mach number in separation zone, compressibility corrections make the separation areas larger, thus cannot improve the accuracy of calculated results. It is unreasonable that compressibility corrections take effect in separation zone. Density-corrected model by Catris and Aupoix is suitable for shock wave/boundary layer interaction flows which can improve the simulation accuracy of the peak heating and have a little influence on separation zone.

  11. Predictive simulation of granular flows applied to compressible multiphase flow modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetsch, Ryan J.; Regele, Jonathan D.

    2014-11-01

    Multiphase flows have been an active area of research for decades due to their complex nature and occurrence in many engineering applications. However, little information exists about the dense compressible flow regime. Recent experimental work [Wagner et al., Exp. Fluids 52, 1507 (2012)] using a multiphase shock tube has studied gas-solid flows with high solid volume fractions (α = 0 . 2) by measuring shock wave-particle cloud interactions. It is still unclear what occurs at the particle scale inside and behind the particle cloud during this interaction. The objective of this work is to perform direct numerical simulations to understand this phenomena. With this goal in mind, a discrete element method (DEM) solver was developed to predict the properties of a particle cloud formed by gravity driven granular flow through a slit opening. For validation purposes, the results are compared with experimental channel flow data. It is found that the mean velocity profile and mass flow rates correlate well with the experiment, however the fluctuation velocities are significantly under-predicted for both smooth and rough wall cases.

  12. Conjugate Compressible Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Ducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, M. F.

    2011-01-01

    A computational approach to modeling transient, compressible fluid flow with heat transfer in long, narrow ducts is presented. The primary application of the model is for analyzing fluid flow and heat transfer in solid propellant rocket motor nozzle joints during motor start-up, but the approach is relevant to a wide range of analyses involving rapid pressurization and filling of ducts. Fluid flow is modeled through solution of the spatially one-dimensional, transient Euler equations. Source terms are included in the governing equations to account for the effects of wall friction and heat transfer. The equation solver is fully-implicit, thus providing greater flexibility than an explicit solver. This approach allows for resolution of pressure wave effects on the flow as well as for fast calculation of the steady-state solution when a quasi-steady approach is sufficient. Solution of the one-dimensional Euler equations with source terms significantly reduces computational run times compared to general purpose computational fluid dynamics packages solving the Navier-Stokes equations with resolved boundary layers. In addition, conjugate heat transfer is more readily implemented using the approach described in this paper than with most general purpose computational fluid dynamics packages. The compressible flow code has been integrated with a transient heat transfer solver to analyze heat transfer between the fluid and surrounding structure. Conjugate fluid flow and heat transfer solutions are presented. The author is unaware of any previous work available in the open literature which uses the same approach described in this paper.

  13. Discontinuous Galerkin method analysis and applications to compressible flow

    CERN Document Server

    Dolejší, Vít

    2015-01-01

    The subject of the book is the mathematical theory of the discontinuous Galerkin method (DGM), which is a relatively new technique for the numerical solution of partial differential equations. The book is concerned with the DGM developed for elliptic and parabolic equations and its applications to the numerical simulation of compressible flow. It deals with the theoretical as well as practical aspects of the DGM and treats the basic concepts and ideas of the DGM, as well as the latest significant findings and achievements in this area. The main benefit for readers and the book’s uniqueness lie in the fact that it is sufficiently detailed, extensive and mathematically precise, while at the same time providing a comprehensible guide through a wide spectrum of discontinuous Galerkin techniques and a survey of the latest efficient, accurate and robust discontinuous Galerkin schemes for the solution of compressible flow.

  14. Compressed gas domestic aerosol valve design using high viscous product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Nourian

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Most of the current universal consumer aerosol products using high viscous product such as cooking oil, antiperspirants, hair removal cream are primarily used LPG (Liquefied Petroleum Gas propellant which is unfriendly environmental. The advantages of the new innovative technology described in this paper are: i. No butane or other liquefied hydrocarbon gas is used as a propellant and it replaced with Compressed air, nitrogen or other safe gas propellant. ii. Customer acceptable spray quality and consistency during can lifetime iii. Conventional cans and filling technology There is only a feasible energy source which is inert gas (i.e. compressed air to replace VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds and greenhouse gases, which must be avoided, to improve atomisation by generating gas bubbles and turbulence inside the atomiser insert and the actuator. This research concentrates on using "bubbly flow" in the valve stem, with injection of compressed gas into the passing flow, thus also generating turbulence. The new valve designed in this investigation using inert gases has advantageous over conventional valve with butane propellant using high viscous product (> 400 Cp because, when the valving arrangement is fully open, there are negligible energy losses as fluid passes through the valve from the interior of the container to the actuator insert. The use of valving arrangement thus permits all pressure drops to be controlled, resulting in improved control of atomising efficiency and flow rate, whereas in conventional valves a significant pressure drops occurs through the valve which has a complex effect on the corresponding spray.

  15. Highly compressible fluorescent particles for pressure sensing in liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellini, F.; Peterson, S. D.; Porfiri, M.

    2017-05-01

    Pressure sensing in liquids is important for engineering applications ranging from industrial processing to naval architecture. Here, we propose a pressure sensor based on highly compressible polydimethylsiloxane foam particles embedding fluorescent Nile Red molecules. The particles display pressure sensitivities as low as 0.0018 kPa-1, which are on the same order of magnitude of sensitivities reported in commercial pressure-sensitive paints for air flows. We envision the application of the proposed sensor in particle image velocimetry toward an improved understanding of flow kinetics in liquids.

  16. An Improved Ghost-cell Immersed Boundary Method for Compressible Inviscid Flow Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Chi, Cheng

    2015-05-01

    This study presents an improved ghost-cell immersed boundary approach to represent a solid body in compressible flow simulations. In contrast to the commonly used approaches, in the present work ghost cells are mirrored through the boundary described using a level-set method to farther image points, incorporating a higher-order extra/interpolation scheme for the ghost cell values. In addition, a shock sensor is in- troduced to deal with image points near the discontinuities in the flow field. Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is used to improve the representation of the geometry efficiently. The improved ghost-cell method is validated against five test cases: (a) double Mach reflections on a ramp, (b) supersonic flows in a wind tunnel with a forward- facing step, (c) supersonic flows over a circular cylinder, (d) smooth Prandtl-Meyer expansion flows, and (e) steady shock-induced combustion over a wedge. It is demonstrated that the improved ghost-cell method can reach the accuracy of second order in L1 norm and higher than first order in L∞ norm. Direct comparisons against the cut-cell method demonstrate that the improved ghost-cell method is almost equally accurate with better efficiency for boundary representation in high-fidelity compressible flow simulations. Implementation of the improved ghost-cell method in reacting Euler flows further validates its general applicability for compressible flow simulations.

  17. High reflection mirrors for pulse compression gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmier, S; Neauport, J; Baclet, N; Lavastre, E; Dupuy, G

    2009-10-26

    We report an experimental investigation of high reflection mirrors used to fabricate gratings for pulse compression application at the wavelength of 1.053microm. Two kinds of mirrors are studied: the mixed Metal MultiLayer Dielectric (MMLD) mirrors which combine a gold metal layer with some e-beam evaporated dielectric bilayers on the top and the standard e-beam evaporated MultiLayer Dielectric (MLD) mirrors. Various samples were manufactured, damage tested at a pulse duration of 500fs. Damage sites were subsequently observed by means of Nomarski microscopy and white light interferometer microscopy. The comparison of the results evidences that if MMLD design can offer damage performances rather similar to MLD design, it also exhibits lower stresses; being thus an optimal mirror substrate for a pulse compression grating operating under vacuum.

  18. On the use of wall functions as boundary conditions for two-dimensional separated compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, J. R.; Rubesin, M. W.; Horstman, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    A new and improved wall function method for compressible turbulent flows has been developed and tested. This method is applicable to attached and separated flows, to both high- and low-Reynolds number flows, and to flows with adiabatic and nonadiabatic surfaces. This wall function method has been applied to the Launder-Spalding k-epsilon two-equation model of turbulence. The tests consist of comparisons of calculated and experimental results for: (1) an axisymmetrical transonic shock-wave/boundary-wave interaction flow at low Reynolds number in an adiabatic tube, (2) an axisymmetrical high-Reynolds number transonic flow over a nonadiabatic bump, and (3) a two-dimensional supersonic high-Reynolds number flow on a nonadiabatic deflected flap. Each of these experiments had significant regions of flow separation. The calculations are performed with an implicit algorithm that solves the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. It is shown that the results obtained agree very well with the data for the complex compressible flows tested.

  19. On mathematical modelling and numerical simulation of transient compressible flow across open boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rian, Kjell Erik

    2003-07-01

    In numerical simulations of turbulent reacting compressible flows, artificial boundaries are needed to obtain a finite computational domain when an unbounded physical domain is given. Artificial boundaries which fluids are free to cross are called open boundaries. When calculating such flows, non-physical reflections at the open boundaries may occur. These reflections can pollute the solution severely, leading to inaccurate results, and the generation of spurious fluctuations may even cause the numerical simulation to diverge. Thus, a proper treatment of the open boundaries in numerical simulations of turbulent reacting compressible flows is required to obtain a reliable solution for realistic conditions. A local quasi-one-dimensional characteristic-based open-boundary treatment for the Favre-averaged governing equations for time-dependent three-dimensional multi-component turbulent reacting compressible flow is presented. A k-{epsilon} model for turbulent compressible flow and Magnussen's EDC model for turbulent combustion is included in the analysis. The notion of physical boundary conditions is incorporated in the method, and the conservation equations themselves are applied on the boundaries to complement the set of physical boundary conditions. A two-dimensional finite-difference-based computational fluid dynamics code featuring high-order accurate numerical schemes was developed for the numerical simulations. Transient numerical simulations of the well-known, one-dimensional shock-tube problem, a two-dimensional pressure-tower problem in a decaying turbulence field, and a two-dimensional turbulent reacting compressible flow problem have been performed. Flow- and combustion-generated pressure waves seem to be well treated by the non-reflecting subsonic open-boundary conditions. Limitations of the present open-boundary treatment are demonstrated and discussed. The simple and solid physical basis of the method makes it both favourable and relatively easy to

  20. Compressive sampling for energy spectrum estimation of turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Adalsteinsson, Gudmundur F

    2014-01-01

    Recent results from compressive sampling (CS) have demonstrated that accurate reconstruction of sparse signals often requires far fewer samples than suggested by the classical Nyquist--Shannon sampling theorem. Typically, signal reconstruction errors are measured in the $\\ell^2$ norm and the signal is assumed to be sparse, compressible or having a prior distribution. Our spectrum estimation by sparse optimization (SpESO) method uses prior information about isotropic homogeneous turbulent flows with power law energy spectra and applies the methods of CS to 1-D and 2-D turbulence signals to estimate their energy spectra with small logarithmic errors. SpESO is distinct from existing energy spectrum estimation methods which are based on sparse support of the signal in Fourier space. SpESO approximates energy spectra with an order of magnitude fewer samples than needed with Shannon sampling. Our results demonstrate that SpESO performs much better than lumped orthogonal matching pursuit (LOMP), and as well or bette...

  1. Achieving acoustic cloak by using compressible background flow

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Ruo-Yang; Ge, Mo-Lin

    2016-01-01

    We propose a scheme of acoustic spherical cloaking by means of background irrotational flow in compressible fluid. The background flow forms a virtual curved spacetime and guides the sound waves bypass the cloaked objects. To satisfy the laws of real fluid, we show that spatially distributed mass source and momentum source are necessary to supply. The propagation of sound waves in this system is studied via both geometric acoustics approximation and full wave approach. The analytic solution of sound fields is obtained for plane wave incidence. The results reveal the effect of phase retardation (or lead) in comparison with the ordinary transformation-acoustic cloak. In addition, the ability of cloaking is also evaluated for unideal background flows by analyzing the scattering cross section.

  2. Achieving acoustic cloak by using compressible background flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruo-Yang; Zhao, Qing; Ge, Mo-Lin

    2016-08-01

    We propose a scheme of acoustic spherical cloaking by means of background irrotational flow in compressible fluid. The background flow forms a virtual curved spacetime and directs the sound waves to bypass the cloaked objects. To satisfy the laws of real fluid, we show that spatially distributed mass source and momentum source are necessary to supply. The propagation of sound waves in this system is studied via both geometric acoustics approximation and full wave approach. The analytic solution of sound fields is obtained for plane wave incidence. The results reveal the effect of phase retardation (or lead) in comparison with the ordinary transformation-acoustic cloak. In addition, the ability of cloaking is also evaluated for unideal background flows by analyzing the scattering cross section. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11475088 and 11275024) and the Fund from the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2013YQ030595-3).

  3. Simulation of inviscid compressible multi-phase flow with condensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelleners, P.H.

    2003-01-01

    Condensation of vapours in rapid expansions of compressible gases is investigated. In the case of high temperature gradients the condensation will start at conditions well away from thermodynamic equilibrium of the fluid. In those cases homogeneous condensation is dominant over heterogeneous

  4. An Efficient, Semi-implicit Pressure-based Scheme Employing a High-resolution Finitie Element Method for Simulating Transient and Steady, Inviscid and Viscous, Compressible Flows on Unstructured Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard C. Martineau; Ray A. Berry

    2003-04-01

    A new semi-implicit pressure-based Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) scheme for simulating a wide range of transient and steady, inviscid and viscous compressible flow on unstructured finite elements is presented here. This new CFD scheme, termed the PCICEFEM (Pressure-Corrected ICE-Finite Element Method) scheme, is composed of three computational phases, an explicit predictor, an elliptic pressure Poisson solution, and a semiimplicit pressure-correction of the flow variables. The PCICE-FEM scheme is capable of second-order temporal accuracy by incorporating a combination of a time-weighted form of the two-step Taylor-Galerkin Finite Element Method scheme as an explicit predictor for the balance of momentum equations and the finite element form of a time-weighted trapezoid rule method for the semi-implicit form of the governing hydrodynamic equations. Second-order spatial accuracy is accomplished by linear unstructured finite element discretization. The PCICE-FEM scheme employs Flux-Corrected Transport as a high-resolution filter for shock capturing. The scheme is capable of simulating flows from the nearly incompressible to the high supersonic flow regimes. The PCICE-FEM scheme represents an advancement in mass-momentum coupled, pressurebased schemes. The governing hydrodynamic equations for this scheme are the conservative form of the balance of momentum equations (Navier-Stokes), mass conservation equation, and total energy equation. An operator splitting process is performed along explicit and implicit operators of the semi-implicit governing equations to render the PCICE-FEM scheme in the class of predictor-corrector schemes. The complete set of semi-implicit governing equations in the PCICE-FEM scheme are cast in this form, an explicit predictor phase and a semi-implicit pressure-correction phase with the elliptic pressure Poisson solution coupling the predictor-corrector phases. The result of this predictor-corrector formulation is that the pressure Poisson

  5. Self-sustained oscillation for compressible cylindrical cavity flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kung-Ming CHUNG

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The presence of a cavity changes the mean and fluctuating pressure distributions. Similarities are observed between a cylindrical cavity and a rectangular cavity for a compressible flow. The type of cavity flow field depends on the diameter-to-depth ratio and the length-to-depth ratio. The feedback loop is responsible for the generation of discrete acoustic tones. In this study, the self-sustained oscillation for a compressible cylindrical cavity flow was investigated experimentally. For open-type cavities, the power spectra show that the strength of resonance depends on the diameter-to-depth ratio (4.43–43.0 and the incoming boundary layer thickness-to-depth ratio (0.72–7.0. The effective streamwise length is used as the characteristic length to estimate the Strouhal number. At higher modes, there is a large deviation from Rossiter’s formula for rectangular cavities. The gradient-based searching method was used to evaluate the values of the empirical parameters. Less phase lag and a lower convection velocity are observed.

  6. Adjoint-based Optimal Flow Control for Compressible DNS

    CERN Document Server

    Otero, J Javier; Sandberg, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    A novel adjoint-based framework oriented to optimal flow control in compressible direct numerical simulations is presented. Also, a new formulation of the adjoint characteristic boundary conditions is introduced, which enhances the stability of the adjoint simulations. The flow configuration chosen as a case study consists of a two dimensional open cavity flow with aspect ratio $L/H=3$ and Reynolds number $Re=5000$. This flow configuration is of particular interest, as the turbulent and chaotic nature of separated flows pushes the adjoint approach to its limit. The target of the flow actuation, defined as cost, is the reduction of the pressure fluctuations at the sensor location. To exploit the advantages of the adjoint method, a large number of control parameters is used. The control consists of an actuating sub-domain where a two-dimensional body force is applied at every point within the sub-volume. This results in a total of $2.256 \\cdot 10^6$ control parameters. The final actuation achieved a successful ...

  7. Coherent structures in compressible free-shear-layer flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aeschliman, D.P.; Baty, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Engineering Sciences Center; Kennedy, C.A.; Chen, J.H. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion and Physical Sciences Center

    1997-08-01

    Large scale coherent structures are intrinsic fluid mechanical characteristics of all free-shear flows, from incompressible to compressible, and laminar to fully turbulent. These quasi-periodic fluid structures, eddies of size comparable to the thickness of the shear layer, dominate the mixing process at the free-shear interface. As a result, large scale coherent structures greatly influence the operation and efficiency of many important commercial and defense technologies. Large scale coherent structures have been studied here in a research program that combines a synergistic blend of experiment, direct numerical simulation, and analysis. This report summarizes the work completed for this Sandia Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project.

  8. Reattachment heating upstream of short compression ramps in hypersonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estruch-Samper, David

    2016-05-01

    Hypersonic shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions with separation induce unsteady thermal loads of particularly high intensity in flow reattachment regions. Building on earlier semi-empirical correlations, the maximum heat transfer rates upstream of short compression ramp obstacles of angles 15° ⩽ θ ⩽ 135° are here discretised based on time-dependent experimental measurements to develop insight into their transient nature (Me = 8.2-12.3, Re_h= 0.17× 105-0.47× 105). Interactions with an incoming laminar boundary layer experience transition at separation, with heat transfer oscillating between laminar and turbulent levels exceeding slightly those in fully turbulent interactions. Peak heat transfer rates are strongly influenced by the stagnation of the flow upon reattachment close ahead of obstacles and increase with ramp angle all the way up to θ =135°, whereby rates well over two orders of magnitude above the undisturbed laminar levels are intermittently measured (q'_max>10^2q_{u,L}). Bearing in mind the varying degrees of strength in the competing effect between the inviscid and viscous terms—namely the square of the hypersonic similarity parameter (Mθ )^2 for strong interactions and the viscous interaction parameter bar{χ } (primarily a function of Re and M)—the two physical factors that appear to most globally encompass the effects of peak heating for blunt ramps (θ ⩾ 45°) are deflection angle and stagnation heat transfer, so that this may be fundamentally expressed as q'_max∝ {q_{o,2D}} θ ^2 with further parameters in turn influencing the interaction to a lesser extent. The dominant effect of deflection angle is restricted to short obstacle heights, where the rapid expansion at the top edge of the obstacle influences the relaxation region just downstream of reattachment and leads to an upstream displacement of the separation front. The extreme heating rates result from the strengthening of the reattaching shear layer with the increase in

  9. Local conservative regularizations of compressible MHD and neutral flows

    CERN Document Server

    Krishnaswami, Govind S; Thyagaraja, Anantanarayanan

    2016-01-01

    Ideal systems like MHD and Euler flow may develop singularities in vorticity (w = curl v). Viscosity and resistivity provide dissipative regularizations of the singularities. In this paper we propose a minimal, local, conservative, nonlinear, dispersive regularization of compressible flow and ideal MHD, in analogy with the KdV regularization of the 1D kinematic wave equation. This work extends and significantly generalizes earlier work on incompressible Euler and ideal MHD. It involves a micro-scale cutoff length lambda which is a function of density, unlike in the incompressible case. In MHD, it can be taken to be of order the electron collisionless skin depth c/omega_pe. Our regularization preserves the symmetries of the original systems, and with appropriate boundary conditions, leads to associated conservation laws. Energy and enstrophy are subject to a priori bounds determined by initial data in contrast to the unregularized systems. A Hamiltonian and Poisson bracket formulation is developed and applied ...

  10. A Theory of Unstaggered Airfoil Cascades in Compressible Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurr, Robert A.; Allen, H. Julian

    1947-01-01

    By use of the methods of thin airfoil theory, which include effects of compressibility, rela.tio^as are developed which permit the rapid determination of the pressure distribution over an unstaggered cascade of airfoils of a given profile, and the determination of the profile shape necessary to yield a given pressure distribution for small chord gap ratios, For incompressible flow the results of the theory are compared with available examples obtained by the more exact method of conformal transformation. Although the theory is developed for small chord/gap ratios, these comparisons show that it may be extended to chord/gap ratios of order unity, at least for low speed flows. Choking of cascades, a phenomenon of particular importance in compressor design, is considered.

  11. On the stability of compressible flow past axisymmetric bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, M. R.; Spall, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Compressible linear stability theory for axisymmetric flows is presented. The theory is applied to flow past a cylinder and a sharp cone at a Mach number of 5 with adiabatic wall conditions. The effect of transverse curvature and body divergence is studied. It is found that transverse curvature has a stabilizing influence on axisymmetric (first and second mode) disturbances while it has a destabilizing influence on the asymmetric (oblique first mode) disturbances. The body divergence effects are stabilizing for both symmetric and asymmetric disturbances. Comparisons made with the results of planar stability theory show that, for a cylinder, curvature effects become more pronounced with increasing distance along the cylinder. For a sharp cone, these effects become less significant further away from the cone tip since the body radius increases faster than the growth of the boundary layer. The effect of cone angle on stability is also studied.

  12. High-quality lossy compression: current and future trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Steven W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper is concerned with current and future trends in the lossy compression of real sources such as imagery, video, speech and music. We put all lossy compression schemes into common framework where each can be characterized in terms of three well-defined advantages: cell shape, region shape and memory advantages. We concentrate on image compression and discuss how new entropy constrained trellis-based compressors achieve cell- shape, region-shape and memory gain resulting in high fidelity and high compression.

  13. The Compressible Flow Past Various Plane Profiles Near Sonic Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goethert, B.; Kawalki, K. H.

    1949-01-01

    In an earlier report UM No.1117 by Gothert,the single-source method was applied to the compressible flow around circles, ellipses, lunes, and around an elongated body of revolution at different Mach numbers and the results compared as far as possible with the calculations by Lamla ad Busemann. Essentially, it was found that with favorable source arrangement the single-source method is in good agreement with the calculations of the same degree of approximation by.Lamla and Busemann. Near sonic velocity the number of steps must be increased considerably in order to sufficiently approximate the adiabatic curve. After exceeding a certain Mach number where local supersonic fields occur already, it was no longer possible, in spite of the substantially increased number of steps, to obtain a systematic solution because the calculation diverged. This result,was interpreted to mean that above this point of divergence the symmetrical type of flow ceases to exist and changes into the unsymmetrical type characterized by compressibility shocks.

  14. Efficiency of energy separation at compressible gas flow in a planar duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, M. S.; Makarova, S. N.

    2014-12-01

    The method of energy separation in a high-speed flow proposed by A.I. Leontyev is investigated numerically. The adiabatic compressible gas flow (of a helium-xenon mixture) with a low Prandtl number in a planar narrow duct and a flow with heat exchange in a duct partitioned by a heat-conducting wall are analysed. The temperature recovery factor on the adiabatic wall, degree of cooling the low-speed flow part, temperature efficiency, and the adiabatic efficiency in a duct with heat exchange are estimated. The data are obtained for the first time, which make it possible to compare the efficiency of energy separation in a high-speed flow with the efficiency of similar processes in vortex tubes and other setups of gas-dynamic energy separation.

  15. UNIFIED COMPUTATION OF FLOW WITH COMPRESSIBLE AND INCOMPRESSIBLE FLUID BASED ON ROE'S SCHEME

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Dian-gui

    2006-01-01

    A unified numerical scheme for the solutions of the compressible and incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is investigated based on a time-derivative preconditioning algorithm. The primitive variables are pressure, velocities and temperature. The time integration scheme is used in conjunction with a finite volume discretization. The preconditioning is coupled with a high order implicit upwind scheme based on the definition of a Roe's type matrix. Computational capabilities are demonstrated through computations of high Mach number, middle Mach number, very low Mach number, and incompressible flow. It has also been demonstrated that the discontinuous surface in flow field can be captured for the implementation Roe's scheme.

  16. SONIC SPEED AND SHOCK WAVE IN HIGH VELOCITY AERATED FLOWS FROM HIGH HEAD DISCHARGE STRUCTURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Zhi-yong

    2003-01-01

    The compressible characteristics in aerated flows at the high velocity of about 50m/s were analyzed. Based on the theory of compressible the relations between the sonic speed and shock wave in high-velocity aerated flow were theoretically deduced. And comparisons with measured data were made. The theoretical and experimental results show the sonic speed in aerated flow is merely of the order of several-dozen meters per second, and its minimum value is only 20m/s, which is far much less than that in water or air alone. So high subsonic flow, supersonic flow and transonic flow as well as compression wave, shock wave and expansion wave similarly to aerodnamics may be produced in high velocity aerated flow at the speed of the order of 50m/s. Hence the influences of these compressible characteristics on high head discharge structures can not be neglected, especially on super high dams over 200m high.

  17. Compressible air flow through a collapsing liquid cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Gordillo, Stephan Gekle \\and José Manuel

    2010-01-01

    We present a multiscale approach to simulate the impact of a solid object on a liquid surface: upon impact a thin liquid sheet is thrown upwards all around the rim of the impactor while in its wake a large surface cavity forms. Under the influence of hydrostatic pressure the cavity immediately starts to collapse and eventually closes in a single point from which a thin, needle-like jet is ejected. Existing numerical treatments of liquid impact either consider the surrounding air as an incompressible fluid or neglect air effects altogether. In contrast, our approach couples a boundary-integral method for the liquid with a Roe scheme for the gas domain and is thus able to handle the fully \\emph{compressible} gas stream that is pushed out of the collapsing impact cavity. Taking into account air compressibility is crucial, since, as we show in this work, the impact crater collapses so violently that the air flow through the cavity neck attains supersonic velocities already at cavity diameters larger than 1 mm. Ou...

  18. A Finite Element Method for Simulation of Compressible Cavitating Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Ehsan; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Yu; Sahni, Onkar; Shephard, Mark; Oberai, Assad

    2016-11-01

    This work focuses on a novel approach for finite element simulations of multi-phase flows which involve evolving interface with phase change. Modeling problems, such as cavitation, requires addressing multiple challenges, including compressibility of the vapor phase, interface physics caused by mass, momentum and energy fluxes. We have developed a mathematically consistent and robust computational approach to address these problems. We use stabilized finite element methods on unstructured meshes to solve for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation is used to handle the interface motions. Our method uses a mesh adaptation strategy to preserve the quality of the volumetric mesh, while the interface mesh moves along with the interface. The interface jump conditions are accurately represented using a discontinuous Galerkin method on the conservation laws. Condensation and evaporation rates at the interface are thermodynamically modeled to determine the interface velocity. We will present initial results on bubble cavitation the behavior of an attached cavitation zone in a separated boundary layer. We acknowledge the support from Army Research Office (ARO) under ARO Grant W911NF-14-1-0301.

  19. Axisymmetric compressible flow in a rotating cylinder with axial convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungarish, M.; Israeli, M.

    1985-05-01

    The steady compressible flow of an ideal gas in a rotating annulus with thermally conducting walls is considered for small Rossby number epsilon and Ekman number E and moderate rotational Mach numbers M. Attention is focused on nonlinear effects which show up when sigma and epsilon M-squared are not small (sigma = epsilon/H square root of E, H is the dimensionless height of the container). These effects are not properly predicted by the classical linear perturbation analysis, and are treated here by quasi-linear extensions. The extra work required by these extensions is only the numerical solution of one ordinary differential equation for the pressure. Numerical solutions of the full Navier-Stokes equations in the nonlinear range are presented, and the validity of the present approach is confirmed.

  20. Fluid-plasma interaction in compressible unstable flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Luca

    2014-11-01

    The receptivity of the boundary layer discrete modes to dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) actuation is studied to improve the understanding of the interaction between non-equilibrium plasma and fluid in convectively amplified vortical layers. The momentum transfer induced by a DBD patch at various Reynolds numbers is evaluated using an adaptive mesh refinement computational solver in the Mach number regime 0.8-2.0. The energy of the induced modal perturbation is determined by weighting such a source term with the corresponding adjoint eigenfunctions. Conditions of maximum overlapping between the adjoint and the source term define the regimes of maximum receptivity and the locations of optimal placement of the DBD patch at different Mach and Reynolds numbers. The interaction between non-equilibrium plasma and the jet in cross flow is also being studied to determine the ability of DBD patches to influence mixing in the compressible regime, thus improving flame-holding in plasma assisted ignition and combustion.

  1. A rotational compressible inverse design method for internal flow configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedoussis, V.; Chaviaropoulos, P.; Papailiou, K. D.

    The development of a rotational inviscid compressible inverse design method for two-dimensional internal flow configurations is described. Rotationality is due to an incoming entropy gradient, while total enthalpy is considered to be constant throughout the flowfield. The method is based on the potential function-streamfunction formulation. A novel procedure based on differential geometry arguments is employed to derive the governing equation for velocity by requiring the curvature of the two-dimensional Euclidean space to be zero. The velocity equation solved in conjunction with a transport equation for a thermal drift function provide the flowfield without any geometry feedback. An auxiliary orthogonal computational grid adapted to the solution is employed. Geometry is determined by integrating Frenet equations of the grid lines. Inverse calculation results are compared with results of direct reproduction calculations.

  2. A Simple Immersed Boundary Method for Compressible Flow Simulation around a Stationary and Moving Sphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Mizuno

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is devoted to investigating a flow around a stationary or moving sphere by using direct numerical simulation with immersed boundary method (IBM for the three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations. A hybrid scheme developed to solve both shocks and turbulent flows is employed to solve the flow around a sphere in the equally spaced Cartesian mesh. Drag coefficients of the spheres are compared with reliable values obtained from highly accurate boundary-fitted coordinate (BFC flow solver to clarify the applicability of the present method. As a result, good agreement was obtained between the present results and those from the BFC flow solver. Moreover, the effectiveness of the hybrid scheme was demonstrated to capture the wake structure of a sphere. Both advantages and disadvantages of the simple IBM were investigated in detail.

  3. Well-posed continuum equations for granular flow with compressibility and μ(I)-rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, D. G.; Shearer, M.; Gray, J. M. N. T.

    2017-01-01

    Continuum modelling of granular flow has been plagued with the issue of ill-posed dynamic equations for a long time. Equations for incompressible, two-dimensional flow based on the Coulomb friction law are ill-posed regardless of the deformation, whereas the rate-dependent μ(I)-rheology is ill-posed when the non-dimensional inertial number I is too high or too low. Here, incorporating ideas from critical-state soil mechanics, we derive conditions for well-posedness of partial differential equations that combine compressibility with I-dependent rheology. When the I-dependence comes from a specific friction coefficient μ(I), our results show that, with compressibility, the equations are well-posed for all deformation rates provided that μ(I) satisfies certain minimal, physically natural, inequalities. PMID:28588402

  4. Well-posed continuum equations for granular flow with compressibility and $\\mu(I)$-rheology

    CERN Document Server

    Barker, T; Shearer, M; Gray, J M N T

    2016-01-01

    Continuum modelling of granular flow has been plagued with the issue of ill-posed equations for a long time. Equations for incompressible, two-dimensional flow based on the Coulomb friction law are ill-posed regardless of the deformation, whereas the rate-dependent $\\mu(I)$-rheology is ill-posed when the non-dimensional strain-rate $I$ is too high or too low. Here, incorporating ideas from Critical-State Soil Mechanics, we derive conditions for well-posedness of PDEs that combine compressibility with $I$-dependent rheology. When the $I$-dependence comes from a specific friction coefficient $\\mu(I)$, our results show that, with compressibility, the equations are well-posed for all deformation rates provided that $\\mu(I)$ satisfies certain minimal, physically natural, inequalities.

  5. An improved ghost-cell immersed boundary method for compressible flow simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Chi, Cheng

    2016-05-20

    This study presents an improved ghost-cell immersed boundary approach to represent a solid body in compressible flow simulations. In contrast to the commonly used approaches, in the present work ghost cells are mirrored through the boundary described using a level-set method to farther image points, incorporating a higher-order extra/interpolation scheme for the ghost cell values. A sensor is introduced to deal with image points near the discontinuities in the flow field. Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is used to improve the representation of the geometry efficiently in the Cartesian grid system. The improved ghost-cell method is validated against four test cases: (a) double Mach reflections on a ramp, (b) smooth Prandtl-Meyer expansion flows, (c) supersonic flows in a wind tunnel with a forward-facing step, and (d) supersonic flows over a circular cylinder. It is demonstrated that the improved ghost-cell method can reach the accuracy of second order in L1 norm and higher than first order in L∞ norm. Direct comparisons against the cut-cell method demonstrate that the improved ghost-cell method is almost equally accurate with better efficiency for boundary representation in high-fidelity compressible flow simulations. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. High rate fabrication of compression molded components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsen, Marc R.; Negley, Mark A.; Dykstra, William C.; Smith, Glen L.; Miller, Robert J.

    2016-04-19

    A method for fabricating a thermoplastic composite component comprises inductively heating a thermoplastic pre-form with a first induction coil by inducing current to flow in susceptor wires disposed throughout the pre-form, inductively heating smart susceptors in a molding tool to a leveling temperature with a second induction coil by applying a high-strength magnetic field having a magnetic flux that passes through surfaces of the smart susceptors, shaping the magnetic flux that passes through surfaces of the smart susceptors to flow substantially parallel to a molding surface of the smart susceptors, placing the heated pre-form between the heated smart susceptors; and applying molding pressure to the pre-form to form the composite component.

  7. Effects of the Mach number on the evolution of vortex-surface fields in compressible Taylor-Green flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Naifu; Yang, Yue

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the evolution of vortex-surface fields (VSFs) in viscous compressible Taylor-Green flows. The VSF is applied to the direct numerical simulation of the Taylor-Green flows at a range of Mach numbers from Ma = 0 . 6 to Ma = 2 . 2 for characterizing the Mach-number effects on evolving vortical structures. We find that the dilatation and baroclinic force strongly influence the geometry of vortex surfaces and the energy dissipation rate in the transitional stage. The vortex tubes in compressible flows are less curved than those in incompressible flows, and the maximum dissipation rate occurs earlier in high-Mach-number flows perhaps owing to the conversion of kinetic energy into heat. Moreover, the relations between the evolutionary geometry of vortical structures and flow statistics are discussed. This work has been supported in part by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11522215 and 11521091), and the Thousand Young Talents Program of China.

  8. Flow Stress Behavior and Processing Map of Al-Cu-Mg-Ag Alloy during Hot Compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Sheng; YI Danqing; ZHANG Hong; YAO Sujuan

    2008-01-01

    The hot deformation behavior of Al-Cu-Mg-Ag was studied by isothermal hot compression tests in the temperature range of 573-773 K and strain rate range of 0.001-1 s-1 on a Gleeble 1500 D thermal mechanical simulator. The results show the flow stress of Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloy increases with strain rate and decreases after a peak value, indicating dynamic recovery and recrystallization. A hyperbolic sine relationship is found to correlate well the flow stress with the strain rate and temperature, the flow stress equation is estimated to illustrate the relation of strain rate and stress and temperature during high temperature deformation process. The processing maps exhibit two domains as optimum fields for hot deformation at different strains, including the high strain rate domain in 623-773 K and the low strain rate domain in 573-673 K.

  9. Pressure Drop Control Using Multiple Orifice System in Compressible Pipe Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heuydong Kim; Toshiaki Setoguchi; Shigeru Matsuo; S. R. Raghunathan

    2001-01-01

    In order to investigate the effectiveness of an orifice system in producing pressure drops and the effect of compressibility on the pressure drop, computations using the mass-averaged implicit Navier-Stokes equations were applied to the axisymmetric pipe flows with the operating pressure ratio from 1.5 to 20.0. The standard k- ε turbulence model was employed to close the governing equations. Numerical calculations were carried out for some combinations of the multiple orifice configurations. The present CFD data showed that the orifice systems,which have been applied to incompressible flow regime to date, could not be used for the high operating pressure ratio flows. The orifice interval did not strongly affect the total pressure drop, but the orifice area ratio more than 2.5 led to relatively high pressure drops. The total pressure drop rapidly increased in the range of the operating pressure ratio from 1.5 to 4.0, but it nearly did not increase when the operating pressure ratio was over 4.0. In the compressible pipe flows through double and triple orifice systems, the total pressure drop was largely due to shock losses.

  10. Equations and simulations for multiphase compressible gas-dust flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oran, Elaine; Houim, Ryan

    2014-11-01

    Dust-gas multiphase flows are important in physical scenarios such as dust explosions in coal mines, asteroid impact disturbing lunar regolith, and soft aircraft landings dispersing desert or beach sand. In these cases, the gas flow regime can range from highly subsonic and nearly incompressible to supersonic and shock-laden flow, the grain packing can range from fully packed to completely dispersed, and both the gas and the dust can range from chemically inert to highly exothermic. To cover the necessary parameter range in a single model, we solve coupled sets of Navier-Stokes equations describing the background gas and the dust. As an example, a reactive-dust explosion that results in a type of shock-flame complex is described and discussed. Sponsored by the University of Maryland through Minta Martin Endowment Funds in the Department of Aerospace Engineering, and through the Glenn L. Martin Institute Chaired Professorship at the A. James Clark School of Engineering.

  11. Advanced Fluid Reduced Order Models for Compressible Flow.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tezaur, Irina Kalashnikova; Fike, Jeffrey A.; Carlberg, Kevin Thomas; Barone, Matthew F.; Maddix, Danielle; Mussoni, Erin E.; Balajewicz, Maciej (UIUC)

    2017-09-01

    This report summarizes fiscal year (FY) 2017 progress towards developing and implementing within the SPARC in-house finite volume flow solver advanced fluid reduced order models (ROMs) for compressible captive-carriage flow problems of interest to Sandia National Laboratories for the design and qualification of nuclear weapons components. The proposed projection-based model order reduction (MOR) approach, known as the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD)/Least- Squares Petrov-Galerkin (LSPG) method, can substantially reduce the CPU-time requirement for these simulations, thereby enabling advanced analyses such as uncertainty quantification and de- sign optimization. Following a description of the project objectives and FY17 targets, we overview briefly the POD/LSPG approach to model reduction implemented within SPARC . We then study the viability of these ROMs for long-time predictive simulations in the context of a two-dimensional viscous laminar cavity problem, and describe some FY17 enhancements to the proposed model reduction methodology that led to ROMs with improved predictive capabilities. Also described in this report are some FY17 efforts pursued in parallel to the primary objective of determining whether the ROMs in SPARC are viable for the targeted application. These include the implemen- tation and verification of some higher-order finite volume discretization methods within SPARC (towards using the code to study the viability of ROMs on three-dimensional cavity problems) and a novel structure-preserving constrained POD/LSPG formulation that can improve the accuracy of projection-based reduced order models. We conclude the report by summarizing the key takeaways from our FY17 findings, and providing some perspectives for future work.

  12. Local conservative regularizations of compressible magnetohydrodynamic and neutral flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswami, Govind S.; Sachdev, Sonakshi; Thyagaraja, A.

    2016-02-01

    Ideal systems like magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and Euler flow may develop singularities in vorticity ( w =∇×v ). Viscosity and resistivity provide dissipative regularizations of the singularities. In this paper, we propose a minimal, local, conservative, nonlinear, dispersive regularization of compressible flow and ideal MHD, in analogy with the KdV regularization of the 1D kinematic wave equation. This work extends and significantly generalizes earlier work on incompressible Euler and ideal MHD. It involves a micro-scale cutoff length λ which is a function of density, unlike in the incompressible case. In MHD, it can be taken to be of order the electron collisionless skin depth c/ωpe. Our regularization preserves the symmetries of the original systems and, with appropriate boundary conditions, leads to associated conservation laws. Energy and enstrophy are subject to a priori bounds determined by initial data in contrast to the unregularized systems. A Hamiltonian and Poisson bracket formulation is developed and applied to generalize the constitutive relation to bound higher moments of vorticity. A "swirl" velocity field is identified, and shown to transport w/ρ and B/ρ, generalizing the Kelvin-Helmholtz and Alfvén theorems. The steady regularized equations are used to model a rotating vortex, MHD pinch, and a plane vortex sheet. The proposed regularization could facilitate numerical simulations of fluid/MHD equations and provide a consistent statistical mechanics of vortices/current filaments in 3D, without blowup of enstrophy. Implications for detailed analyses of fluid and plasma dynamic systems arising from our work are briefly discussed.

  13. Energy-Dependent Octagonal Lattice Boltzmann Modeling for Compressible Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlo, Pavol; Vahala, Linda; Vahala, George

    2000-10-01

    There has been much interest in thermal lattice Boltzmann modeling (TLBM) for compressible flows because of their inherent parallelizeability. Instead of applying CFD techniques to the nonlinear conservation equations, one instead solves a linear BGK kinetic equation. To reduce storage requirements, the velocity space is discretized and lattice geometries are so chosen to minimize the number of degrees of freedom that must be retained in the Chapman-Enskog recovery of the original macroscopic equations. The simplest (and most efficient) TLBM runs at a CFL=1, so that no numerical diffusion or dissipation is introduced. The algorithm involves Lagrangian streaming (shift operator) and purely local operations. Because of the underlying discrete lattice symmetry, the relaxation distributions cannot be Maxwellian and hence the inherent numerical instability problem in TLBM. We are investigating the use of energy-dependent lattices so as to allow simulation of problems of interest in divertor physics, The appeal of TLBM is that it can provide a unified representation for both strongly collisional (‘fluid’) and weakly collisional (‘Monte Carlo’) regimes. Moreover, our TLBM code is more efficiently solved on mulit-PE platforms than the corresponding CFD codes and is readily extended to 3D. MHD can also be handled by TLBM.

  14. High Strain Rate Compression Testing of Ceramics and Ceramic Composites.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumenthal, W. R. (William R.)

    2005-01-01

    The compressive deformation and failure behavior of ceramics and ceramic-metal composites for armor applications has been studied as a function of strain rate at Los Alamos National Laboratory since the late 1980s. High strain rate ({approx}10{sup 3} s{sup -1}) uniaxial compression loading can be achieved using the Kolsky-split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) technique, but special methods must be used to obtain valid strength results. This paper reviews these methods and the limitations of the Kolsky-SHPB technique for this class of materials. The Kolsky-split-Hopkinson pressure bar (Kolsky-SHPB) technique was originally developed to characterize the mechanical behavior of ductile materials such as metals and polymers where the results can be used to develop strain-rate and temperature-dependent constitutive behavior models that empirically describe macroscopic plastic flow. The flow behavior of metals and polymers is generally controlled by thermally-activated and rate-dependent dislocation motion or polymer chain motion in response to shear stresses. Conversely, the macroscopic mechanical behavior of dense, brittle, ceramic-based materials is dominated by elastic deformation terminated by rapid failure associated with the propagation of defects in the material in response to resolved tensile stresses. This behavior is usually characterized by a distribution of macroscopically measured failure strengths and strains. The basis for any strain-rate dependence observed in the failure strength must originate from rate-dependence in the damage and fracture process, since uniform, uniaxial elastic behavior is rate-independent (e.g. inertial effects on crack growth). The study of microscopic damage and fracture processes and their rate-dependence under dynamic loading conditions is a difficult experimental challenge that is not addressed in this paper. The purpose of this paper is to review the methods that have been developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to

  15. Effect of wall suction on the stability of compressible subsonic flows over smooth two-dimensional backward-facing steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Maaitah, Ayman A.; Nayfeh, Ali H.; Ragab, Saad A.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of suction on the stability of compressible flows over backward-facing steps is investigated. Mach numbers up to 0.8 are considered. The results show that continuous suction stabilizes the flow outside the separation bubble, but it destabilizes the flow inside it. Nevertheless, the overall N factor decreases as the suction level increases due to the considerable reduction of the separation bubble. For the same suction flow rate, properly distributed suction strips stabilize the flow more than continuous suction. The size of the separation bubble, and hence its effect on the instability can be considerably reduced by placing strips with high suction velocities in the separation region.

  16. Aerodynamic control in compressible flow using microwave driven discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAndrew, Brendan

    A new aerodynamic control scheme based on heating of the free stream flow is developed. The design, construction, and operation of a unique small scale wind tunnel to perform experiments involving this control scheme is detailed. Free stream heating is achieved by means of microwave driven discharges, and the resulting flow perturbations are used to alter the pressure distribution around a model in the flow. The experimental facility is also designed to allow the injection of an electron beam into the free stream for control of the discharge. Appropriate models for the fluid flow and discharge physics are developed, and comparisons of calculations based on those models are made with experimental results. The calculations have also been used to explore trends in parameters beyond the range possible in the experiments. The results of this work have been (1) the development of an operating facility capable of supporting free stream heat addition experiments in supersonic flow, (2) the development of a compatible instrumented model designed to make lift and drag measurements in a low pressure, high electrical noise environment, (3) a theoretical model to predict the change in breakdown threshold in the presence of an electron beam or other source of ionization, and (4) successful demonstration of aerodynamic control using free stream heat addition.

  17. Evaluation of coronary blood flow velocity during cardiac arrest with circulation maintained through mechanical chest compressions in a porcine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Henrik

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanical chest compressions (CCs have been shown capable of maintaining circulation in humans suffering cardiac arrest for extensive periods of time. Reports have documented a visually normalized coronary blood flow during angiography in such cases (TIMI III flow, but it has never been actually measured. Only indirect measurements of the coronary circulation during cardiac arrest with on-going mechanical CCs have been performed previously through measurement of the coronary perfusion pressure (CPP. In this study our aim was to correlate average peak coronary flow velocity (APV to CPP during mechanical CCs. Methods In a closed chest porcine model, cardiac arrest was established through electrically induced ventricular fibrillation (VF in eleven pigs. After one minute, mechanical chest compressions were initiated and then maintained for 10 minutes upon which the pigs were defibrillated. Measurements of coronary blood flow in the left anterior descending artery were made at baseline and during VF with a catheter based Doppler flow fire measuring APV. Furthermore measurements of central (thoracic venous and arterial pressures were also made in order to calculate the theoretical CPP. Results Average peak coronary flow velocity was significantly higher compared to baseline during mechanical chests compressions and this was observed during the entire period of mechanical chest compressions (12 - 39% above baseline. The APV slowly declined during the 10 min period of mechanical chest compressions, but was still higher than baseline at the end of mechanical chest compressions. CPP was simultaneously maintained at > 20 mmHg during the 10 minute episode of cardiac arrest. Conclusion Our study showed good correlation between CPP and APV which was highly significant, during cardiac arrest with on-going mechanical CCs in a closed chest porcine model. In addition APV was even higher during mechanical CCs compared to baseline. Mechanical

  18. Observation of dual-mode, Kelvin-Helmholtz instability vortex merger in a compressible flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, W. C.; Malamud, G.; Shimony, A.; Di Stefano, C. A.; Trantham, M. R.; Klein, S. R.; Shvarts, D.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.

    2017-05-01

    We report the first observations of Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices evolving from well-characterized, dual-mode initial conditions in a steady, supersonic flow. The results provide the first measurements of the instability's vortex merger rate and supplement data on the inhibition of the instability's growth rate in a compressible flow. These experimental data were obtained by sustaining a shockwave over a foam-plastic interface with a precision-machined seed perturbation. This technique produced a strong shear layer between two plasmas at high-energy-density conditions. The system was diagnosed using x-ray radiography and was well-reproduced using hydrodynamic simulations. Experimental measurements imply that we observed the anticipated vortex merger rate and growth inhibition for supersonic shear flow.

  19. Large eddy simulation of compressible turbulent channel flow with spanwise wall oscillation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Jian; LU LiPeng; SHAO Liang

    2009-01-01

    The influences of the modification of turbulent coherent structures on temperature field and heat transfer in turbulent channel flow are studied using large eddy simulation (LES) of compressible tur-bulent channel flows with spanwise wall oscillation (SWO). The reliability of the LES on such problems is proved by the comparisons of the drag reduction data with those of other researches. The high con-sistency of coherent velocity structures and temperature structures is found based on the analyses of the turbulent flow field. When the coherent velocity structures are suppressed, the transportations of momentum and heat are reduced simultaneously, demonstrating the same trend. This shows that the turbulent coherent structures have the same effects on the transportations of momentum and heat. The averaged wall heat flux can be reduced with appropriate oscillating parameters.

  20. A multiscale method for compressible liquid-vapor flow with surface tension*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaegle Felix

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Discontinuous Galerkin methods have become a powerful tool for approximating the solution of compressible flow problems. Their direct use for two-phase flow problems with phase transformation is not straightforward because this type of flows requires a detailed tracking of the phase front. We consider the fronts in this contribution as sharp interfaces and propose a novel multiscale approach. It combines an efficient high-order Discontinuous Galerkin solver for the computation in the bulk phases on the macro-scale with the use of a generalized Riemann solver on the micro-scale. The Riemann solver takes into account the effects of moderate surface tension via the curvature of the sharp interface as well as phase transformation. First numerical experiments in three space dimensions underline the overall performance of the method.

  1. Large eddy simulation of compressible turbulent channel flow with spanwise wall oscillation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The influences of the modification of turbulent coherent structures on temperature field and heat transfer in turbulent channel flow are studied using large eddy simulation(LES) of compressible turbulent channel flows with spanwise wall oscillation(SWO).The reliability of the LES on such problems is proved by the comparisons of the drag reduction data with those of other researches.The high consistency of coherent velocity structures and temperature structures is found based on the analyses of the turbulent flow field.When the coherent velocity structures are suppressed,the transportations of momentum and heat are reduced simultaneously,demonstrating the same trend.This shows that the turbulent coherent structures have the same effects on the transportations of momentum and heat.The averaged wall heat flux can be reduced with appropriate oscillating parameters.

  2. Analytical skin friction and heat transfer formula for compressible internal flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dechant, Lawrence J.; Tattar, Marc J.

    1994-01-01

    An analytic, closed-form friction formula for turbulent, internal, compressible, fully developed flow was derived by extending the incompressible law-of-the-wall relation to compressible cases. The model is capable of analyzing heat transfer as a function of constant surface temperatures and surface roughness as well as analyzing adiabatic conditions. The formula reduces to Prandtl's law of friction for adiabatic, smooth, axisymmetric flow. In addition, the formula reduces to the Colebrook equation for incompressible, adiabatic, axisymmetric flow with various roughnesses. Comparisons with available experiments show that the model averages roughly 12.5 percent error for adiabatic flow and 18.5 percent error for flow involving heat transfer.

  3. CWICOM: A Highly Integrated & Innovative CCSDS Image Compression ASIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poupat, Jean-Luc; Vitulli, Raffaele

    2013-08-01

    The space market is more and more demanding in terms of on image compression performances. The earth observation satellites instrument resolution, the agility and the swath are continuously increasing. It multiplies by 10 the volume of picture acquired on one orbit. In parallel, the satellites size and mass are decreasing, requiring innovative electronic technologies reducing size, mass and power consumption. Astrium, leader on the market of the combined solutions for compression and memory for space application, has developed a new image compression ASIC which is presented in this paper. CWICOM is a high performance and innovative image compression ASIC developed by Astrium in the frame of the ESA contract n°22011/08/NLL/LvH. The objective of this ESA contract is to develop a radiation hardened ASIC that implements the CCSDS 122.0-B-1 Standard for Image Data Compression, that has a SpaceWire interface for configuring and controlling the device, and that is compatible with Sentinel-2 interface and with similar Earth Observation missions. CWICOM stands for CCSDS Wavelet Image COMpression ASIC. It is a large dynamic, large image and very high speed image compression ASIC potentially relevant for compression of any 2D image with bi-dimensional data correlation such as Earth observation, scientific data compression… The paper presents some of the main aspects of the CWICOM development, such as the algorithm and specification, the innovative memory organization, the validation approach and the status of the project.

  4. Scaling Relations for Viscous and Gravitational Flow Instabilities in Multiphase Multicomponent Compressible Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moortgat, J.; Amooie, M. A.; Soltanian, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    Problems in hydrogeology and hydrocarbon reservoirs generally involve the transport of solutes in a single solvent phase (e.g., contaminants or dissolved injection gas), or the flow of multiple phases that may or may not exchange mass (e.g., brine, NAPL, oil, gas). Often, flow is viscously and gravitationally unstable due to mobility and density contrasts within a phase or between phases. Such instabilities have been studied in detail for single-phase incompressible fluids and for two-phase immiscible flow, but to a lesser extent for multiphase multicomponent compressible flow. The latter is the subject of this presentation. Robust phase stability analyses and phase split calculations, based on equations of state, determine the mass exchange between phases and the resulting phase behavior, i.e., phase densities, viscosities, and volumes. Higher-order finite element methods and fine grids are used to capture the small-scale onset of flow instabilities. A full matrix of composition dependent coefficients is considered for each Fickian diffusive phase flux. Formation heterogeneity can have a profound impact and is represented by realistic geostatistical models. Qualitatively, fingering in multiphase compositional flow is different from single-phase problems because 1) phase mobilities depend on rock wettability through relative permeabilities, and 2) the initial density and viscosity ratios between phases may change due to species transfer. To quantify mixing rates in different flow regimes and for varying degrees of miscibility and medium heterogeneities, we define the spatial variance, scalar dissipation rate, dilution index, skewness, and kurtosis of the molar density of introduced species. Molar densities, unlike compositions, include compressibility effects. The temporal evolution of these measures shows that, while transport at the small-scale (cm) is described by the classical advection-diffusion-dispersion relations, scaling at the macro-scale (> 10 m) shows

  5. Numerical Solution of Compressible Steady Flows around the RAE 2822 Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryštůfek, P.; Kozel, K.

    2014-03-01

    The article presents results of a numerical solution of subsonic, transonic and supersonic flows described by the system of Navier-Stokes equations in 2D laminar compressible flows around the RAE 2822 airfoil. Authors used FVM multistage Runge-Kutta method to numerically solve the flows around the RAE 2822 airfoil.

  6. Radial flow of slightly compressible fluids: A finite element-finite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of the Nigerian Association of Mathematical Physics ... Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access. Radial flow of slightly compressible fluids: A finite element-finite differences approach. JA Akpobi, ED Akpobi ...

  7. Pressure-flow relationships for packed beds of compressible chromatography media at laboratory and production scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, J J; Fotopoulos, A

    2001-01-01

    Pressure drop across chromatography beds employing soft or semirigid media can be a significant problem in the operation of large-scale preparative chromatography columns. The shape or aspect ratio (length/diameter) of a packed bed has a significant effect on column pressure drop due to wall effects, which can result in unexpectedly high pressures in manufacturing. Two types of agarose-based media were packed in chromatography columns at various column aspect ratios, during which pressure drop, bed height, and flow rate were carefully monitored. Compression of the packed beds with increasing flow velocities was observed. An empirical model was developed to correlate pressure drop with the aspect ratio of the packed beds and the superficial velocity. Modeling employed the Blake-Kozeny equation in which empirical relationships were used to predict bed porosity as a function of aspect ratio and flow velocity. Model predictions were in good agreement with observed pressure drops of industrial scale chromatography columns. A protocol was developed to predict compression in industrial chromatography applications by a few laboratory experiments. The protocol is shown to be useful in the development of chromatographic methods and sizing of preparative columns.

  8. Uniaxial Compressive Properties of Ultra High Toughness Cementitious Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Xiangrong; XU Shilang

    2011-01-01

    Uniaxial compression tests were conducted to characterize the main compressive performance of ultra high toughness cementitious composite(UHTCC)in terms of strength and toughness and to obtain its stress-strain relationships.The compressive strength investigated ranges from 30 MPa to 60 MPa.Complete stress-strain curves were directly obtained,and the strength indexes,including uniaxial compressive strength,compressive strain at peak stress,elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio,were calculated.The comparisons between UHTCC and matrix were also carried out to understand the fiber effect on the compressive strength indexes.Three dimensionless toughness indexes were calculated,which either represent its relative improvement in energy absorption capacity because of fiber addition or provide an indication of its behavior relative to a rigid-plastic material.Moreover,two new toughness indexes,which were named as post-crack deformation energy and equivalent compressive strength,were proposed and calculated with the aim at linking up the compressive toughness of UHTCC with the existing design concept of concrete.The failure mode was also given.The study production provides material characteristics for the practical engineering application of UHTCC.

  9. Studies in the Computation of Compressible Viscous Flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-02-01

    singular solutions have been found which may bridge the gap between smooth shock free flow and the flow with embedded shocks. Keywords: Transonic flow; Computational aerodynamics; Viscous inviscid interactions.

  10. Multi-core/GPU accelerated multi-resolution simulations of compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejazialhosseini, Babak; Rossinelli, Diego; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2010-11-01

    We develop a multi-resolution solver for single and multi-phase compressible flow simulations by coupling average interpolating wavelets and local time stepping schemes with high order finite volume schemes. Wavelets allow for high compression rates and explicit control over the error in adaptive representation of the flow field, but their efficient parallel implementation is hindered by the use of traditional data parallel models. In this work we demonstrate that this methodology can be implemented so that it can benefit from the processing power of emerging hybrid multicore and multi-GPU architectures. This is achieved by exploiting task-based parallelism paradigm and the concept of wavelet blocks combined with OpenCL and Intel Threading Building Blocks. The solver is able to handle high resolution jumps and benefits from adaptive time integration using local time stepping schemes as implemented on heterogeneous multi-core/GPU architectures. We demonstrate the accuracy of our method and the performance of our solver on different architectures for 2D simulations of shock-bubble interaction and Richtmeyer-Meshkov instability.

  11. The discontinuous Galerkin method for the numerical simulation of compressible viscous flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Česenek Jan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we deal with numerical simulation of the compressible viscous flow. The mathematical model of flow is represented by the system of non-stationary compressible Navier-Stokes equations. This system of equations is discretized by the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method in space and in time using piecewise polynomial discontinuous approximations. We present some numerical experiments to demonstrate the applicability of the method using own-developed code.

  12. Wake Behavior behind Turbine Cascades in Compressible Two-Dimensional Flows

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The goal of the paper is to describe wake parameters of wakes from turbine cascades in compressible flows especially in planes where the leading edge of the following blade row would be located. Data from experiments with turbine cascades in compressible flow will be used to derive a theoretical approach which describes the wake growth and the recovery of the velocity deficit. The theory is based on similarity assumptions. The derived equations depend on simple and readily available parameter...

  13. Preconditioned characteristic boundary conditions based on artificial compressibility method for solution of incompressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejranfar, Kazem; Parseh, Kaveh

    2017-09-01

    The preconditioned characteristic boundary conditions based on the artificial compressibility (AC) method are implemented at artificial boundaries for the solution of two- and three-dimensional incompressible viscous flows in the generalized curvilinear coordinates. The compatibility equations and the corresponding characteristic variables (or the Riemann invariants) are mathematically derived and then applied as suitable boundary conditions in a high-order accurate incompressible flow solver. The spatial discretization of the resulting system of equations is carried out by the fourth-order compact finite-difference (FD) scheme. In the preconditioning applied here, the value of AC parameter in the flow field and also at the far-field boundary is automatically calculated based on the local flow conditions to enhance the robustness and performance of the solution algorithm. The code is fully parallelized using the Concurrency Runtime standard and Parallel Patterns Library (PPL) and its performance on a multi-core CPU is analyzed. The incompressible viscous flows around a 2-D circular cylinder, a 2-D NACA0012 airfoil and also a 3-D wavy cylinder are simulated and the accuracy and performance of the preconditioned characteristic boundary conditions applied at the far-field boundaries are evaluated in comparison to the simplified boundary conditions and the non-preconditioned characteristic boundary conditions. It is indicated that the preconditioned characteristic boundary conditions considerably improve the convergence rate of the solution of incompressible flows compared to the other boundary conditions and the computational costs are significantly decreased.

  14. On the implicit density based OpenFOAM solver for turbulent compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürst, Jiří

    The contribution deals with the development of coupled implicit density based solver for compressible flows in the framework of open source package OpenFOAM. However the standard distribution of OpenFOAM contains several ready-made segregated solvers for compressible flows, the performance of those solvers is rather week in the case of transonic flows. Therefore we extend the work of Shen [15] and we develop an implicit semi-coupled solver. The main flow field variables are updated using lower-upper symmetric Gauss-Seidel method (LU-SGS) whereas the turbulence model variables are updated using implicit Euler method.

  15. On the implicit density based OpenFOAM solver for turbulent compressible flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fürst Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The contribution deals with the development of coupled implicit density based solver for compressible flows in the framework of open source package OpenFOAM. However the standard distribution of OpenFOAM contains several ready-made segregated solvers for compressible flows, the performance of those solvers is rather week in the case of transonic flows. Therefore we extend the work of Shen [15] and we develop an implicit semi-coupled solver. The main flow field variables are updated using lower-upper symmetric Gauss-Seidel method (LU-SGS whereas the turbulence model variables are updated using implicit Euler method.

  16. On the implicit density based OpenFOAM solver for turbulent compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürst, Jiří

    2016-11-01

    The contribution deals with the development of coupled implicit density based solver for compressible flows in the framework of open source package OpenFOAM. However the standard distribution of OpenFOAM contains several ready-made segregated solvers for compressible flows, the performance of those solvers is rather week in the case of transonic flows. Therefore we extend the work of Shen [15] and we develop an implicit semi-coupled solver. The main flow field variables are updated using lower-upper symmetric Gauss-Seidel method (LU-SGS) whereas the turbulence model variables are updated using implicit Euler method.

  17. The Effect of Water Compressibility on a Rigid Body Movement in Two Phase Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan Wook; Kim, Hak Sun; Lee, Sungsu

    2008-11-01

    The motion of a rigid body in a tube full of water-filled, initiated by a sudden release of highly pressurized air is simulated presuming the flow field as a two dimensional one. The effects of water compressibility on the body movement are investigated, comparing results based on the Fluent VOF model where water is treated as an incompressible medium with those from the presently developed VOF scheme. The present model considers compressibility of both air and water. The Fluent results show that the body moves farther and at higher speeds than the present ones. As time proceeds, the relative difference of speed and displacement between the two results drops substantially, after acoustic waves in water traverse and return the full length of the tube several times. To estimate instantaneous accelerations, however, requires implementation of the water compressibility effect as discrepancies between them do not decrease even after several pressure wave cycles. This work was supported by a research fund granted from Agency for Defense Development, South Korea.

  18. Memory-Assisted Universal Compression of Network Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Sardari, Mohsen; Fekri, Faramarz

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the existence of considerable amount of redundancy in the Internet traffic has stimulated the deployment of several redundancy elimination techniques within the network. These techniques are often based on either packet-level Redundancy Elimination (RE) or Content-Centric Networking (CCN). However, these techniques cannot exploit sub-packet redundancies. Further, other alternative techniques such as the end-to-end universal compression solutions would not perform well either over the Internet traffic, as such techniques require infinite length traffic to effectively remove redundancy. This paper proposes a memory-assisted universal compression technique that holds a significant promise for reducing the amount of traffic in the networks. The proposed work is based on the observation that if a source is to be compressed and sent over a network, the associated universal code entails a substantial overhead in transmission due to finite length traffic. However, intermediate nodes can learn the source sta...

  19. Numerically stable fluid–structure interactions between compressible flow and solid structures

    KAUST Repository

    Grétarsson, Jón Tómas

    2011-04-01

    We propose a novel method to implicitly two-way couple Eulerian compressible flow to volumetric Lagrangian solids. The method works for both deformable and rigid solids and for arbitrary equations of state. The method exploits the formulation of [11] which solves compressible fluid in a semi-implicit manner, solving for the advection part explicitly and then correcting the intermediate state to time tn+1 using an implicit pressure, obtained by solving a modified Poisson system. Similar to previous fluid-structure interaction methods, we apply pressure forces to the solid and enforce a velocity boundary condition on the fluid in order to satisfy a no-slip constraint. Unlike previous methods, however, we apply these coupled interactions implicitly by adding the constraint to the pressure system and combining it with any implicit solid forces in order to obtain a strongly coupled, symmetric indefinite system (similar to [17], which only handles incompressible flow). We also show that, under a few reasonable assumptions, this system can be made symmetric positive-definite by following the methodology of [16]. Because our method handles the fluid-structure interactions implicitly, we avoid introducing any new time step restrictions and obtain stable results even for high density-to-mass ratios, where explicit methods struggle or fail. We exactly conserve momentum and kinetic energy (thermal fluid-structure interactions are not considered) at the fluid-structure interface, and hence naturally handle highly non-linear phenomenon such as shocks, contacts and rarefactions. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  20. Detailed thermodynamic analyses of high-speed compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towery, Colin; Darragh, Ryan; Poludnenko, Alexei; Hamlington, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Interactions between high-speed turbulence and flames (or chemical reactions) are important in the dynamics and description of many different combustion phenomena, including autoignition and deflagration-to-detonation transition. The probability of these phenomena to occur depends on the magnitude and spectral content of turbulence fluctuations, which can impact a wide range of science and engineering problems, from the hypersonic scramjet engine to the onset of Type Ia supernovae. In this talk, we present results from new direct numerical simulations (DNS) of homogeneous isotropic turbulence with turbulence Mach numbers ranging from 0 . 05 to 1 . 0 and Taylor-scale Reynolds numbers as high as 700. A set of detailed analyses are described in both Eulerian and Lagrangian reference frames in order to assess coherent (structural) and incoherent (stochastic) thermodynamic flow features. These analyses provide direct insights into the thermodynamics of strongly compressible turbulence. Furthermore, presented results provide a non-reacting baseline for future studies of turbulence-chemistry interactions in DNS with complex chemistry mechanisms. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) under Award No. FA9550-14-1-0273, and the Department of Defense (DoD) High Performance Computing Modernization Program (HPCMP) under a Frontier project award.

  1. A Riemann problem based method for solving compressible and incompressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haitian; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Chunwu; Wang, Donghong; Zhao, Ning

    2017-02-01

    A Riemann problem based method for solving two-medium flow including compressible and incompressible regions is presented. The material interface is advanced by front tracking method and the material interface boundary conditions are defined by modified ghost fluid method. A coupled compressible and incompressible Riemann problem constructed in the normal direction of the material interface is proposed to predict the interfacial states. With the ghost fluid states, the compressible and incompressible flows are solved by discontinuous Galerkin method. An incompressible discontinuous Galerkin method with nonuniform time step is also deduced. For shock wave formed in compressible flow, the numerical errors for the ghost fluid method in earlier works are analyzed and discussed in the numerical examples. It shows that the proposed method can provide reasonable results including shock wave location.

  2. Wake Behavior behind Turbine Cascades in Compressible Two-Dimensional Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurz Rainer

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the paper is to describe wake parameters of wakes from turbine cascades in compressible flows especially in planes where the leading edge of the following blade row would be located. Data from experiments with turbine cascades in compressible flow will be used to derive a theoretical approach which describes the wake growth and the recovery of the velocity deficit. The theory is based on similarity assumptions. The derived equations depend on simple and readily available parameters such as overall losses, exit angle, and Mach or Laval number. In compressible turbine flows, the influence of the inviscid flow field is of great importance. In this paper, an approach to take this influence into account when determining the behavior of the wake is presented. Correlations for basic characteristics of wakes in compressible flows are not readily available. Such correlations are necessary as input to unsteady flow and heat transfer calculation procedures for turbomachine blades. Based on available data on wake behavior in the compressible flow behind turbine blades, the correlations presented describe the wake behavior from the trailing edge to the confluence of the wakes of adjacent blades.

  3. The semi-discrete Galerkin finite element modelling of compressible viscous flow past an airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, Andrew J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A method is developed to solve the two-dimensional, steady, compressible, turbulent boundary-layer equations and is coupled to an existing Euler solver for attached transonic airfoil analysis problems. The boundary-layer formulation utilizes the semi-discrete Galerkin (SDG) method to model the spatial variable normal to the surface with linear finite elements and the time-like variable with finite differences. A Dorodnitsyn transformed system of equations is used to bound the infinite spatial domain thereby permitting the use of a uniform finite element grid which provides high resolution near the wall and automatically follows boundary-layer growth. The second-order accurate Crank-Nicholson scheme is applied along with a linearization method to take advantage of the parabolic nature of the boundary-layer equations and generate a non-iterative marching routine. The SDG code can be applied to any smoothly-connected airfoil shape without modification and can be coupled to any inviscid flow solver. In this analysis, a direct viscous-inviscid interaction is accomplished between the Euler and boundary-layer codes, through the application of a transpiration velocity boundary condition. Results are presented for compressible turbulent flow past NACA 0012 and RAE 2822 airfoils at various freestream Mach numbers, Reynolds numbers, and angles of attack. All results show good agreement with experiment, and the coupled code proved to be a computationally-efficient and accurate airfoil analysis tool.

  4. Progress Towards a Cartesian Cut-Cell Method for Viscous Compressible Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Marsha; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    The proposed paper reports advances in developing a method for high Reynolds number compressible viscous flow simulations using a Cartesian cut-cell method with embedded boundaries. This preliminary work focuses on accuracy of the discretization near solid wall boundaries. A model problem is used to investigate the accuracy of various difference stencils for second derivatives and to guide development of the discretization of the viscous terms in the Navier-Stokes equations. Near walls, quadratic reconstruction in the wall-normal direction is used to mitigate mesh irregularity and yields smooth skin friction distributions along the body. Multigrid performance is demonstrated using second-order coarse grid operators combined with second-order restriction and prolongation operators. Preliminary verification and validation for the method is demonstrated using flat-plate and airfoil examples at compressible Mach numbers. Simulations of flow on laminar and turbulent flat plates show skin friction and velocity profiles compared with those from boundary-layer theory. Airfoil simulations are performed at laminar and turbulent Reynolds numbers with results compared to both other simulations and experimental data

  5. Laser driven supersonic flow over a compressible foam surface on the Nike lasera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Plewa, T.; Velikovich, A. L.; Gillespie, R. S.; Weaver, J. L.; Visco, A.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Ditmar, J. R.

    2010-05-01

    A laser driven millimeter-scale target was used to generate a supersonic shear layer in an attempt to create a Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) unstable interface in a high-energy-density (HED) plasma. The KH instability is a fundamental fluid instability that remains unexplored in HED plasmas, which are relevant to the inertial confinement fusion and astrophysical environments. In the experiment presented here the Nike laser [S. P. Obenschain et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2098 (1996)] was used to create and drive Al plasma over a rippled foam surface. In response to the supersonic Al flow (Mach=2.6±1.1) shocks should form in the Al flow near the perturbations. The experimental data were used to infer the existence and location of these shocks. In addition, the interface perturbations show growth that has possible contributions from both KH and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities. Since compressible shear layers exhibit smaller growth, it is important to use the KH growth rate derived from the compressible dispersion relation.

  6. Flow Curve Analysis of 17-4 PH Stainless Steel under Hot Compression Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzadeh, Hamed; Najafizadeh, Abbas; Moazeny, Mohammad

    2009-12-01

    The hot compression behavior of a 17-4 PH stainless steel (AISI 630) has been investigated at temperatures of 950 °C to 1150 °C and strain rates of 10-3 to 10 s-1. Glass powder in the Rastegaev reservoirs of the specimen was used as a lubricant material. A step-by-step procedure for data analysis in the hot compression test was given. The work hardening rate analysis was performed to reveal if dynamic recrystallization (DRX) occurred. Many samples exhibited typical DRX stress-strain curves with a single peak stress followed by a gradual fall toward the steady-state stress. At low Zener-Hollomon ( Z) parameter, this material showed a new DRX flow behavior, which was called multiple transient steady state (MTSS). At high Z, as a result of adiabatic deformation heating, a drop in flow stress was observed. The general constitutive equations were used to determine the hot working constants of this material. Moreover, after a critical discussion, the deformation activation energy of 17-4 PH stainless steel was determined as 337 kJ/mol.

  7. Computer solutions of Wu's equations for compressible flow through turbomachines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Two computers programs, known as Matrix Through-Flow and Matrix Blade-To-Blade, for analyzing the meridional and blade-to-blade flow patterns are described. The numerical solutions are obtained by finite difference approximations to the governing Poisson-type differential equations for the stream function. Solutions for several turbomachines, giving flow patterns and velocity distributions, are included.

  8. A Low-Dissipation Technique for Computing Dense Granular Compressible Flows with Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Houim, Ryan W

    2013-01-01

    A low-dissipation numerical method was developed for solving kinetic theory-based granular multiphase models with volume fractions ranging from very dilute to very dense in highly compressible flows containing shock waves. The proposed numerical method takes advantage of particle incompressibility and allows computation of gas-phase and granular-phase hyperbolic fluxes to be decoupled while treating non-conservative terms consistent with their physical meaning. The technique converges under grid refinement even with very high volume fraction granular interfaces and is compatible with high-order numerical algorithms. The method can advect sharp granular interfaces that coincide with multi-species gaseous contacts without violating the pressure non-disturbing conditions. The method also reproduces features from multiphase shock tube problems, granular shocks, transmission angles of compaction waves, and shock wave and dust layer interactions. The proposed scheme is relatively straight-forward to implement and c...

  9. An Embedded Ghost-Fluid Method for Compressible Flow in Complex Geometry

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Marouf, M.

    2016-06-03

    We present an embedded ghost-fluid method for numerical solutions of the compressible Navier Stokes (CNS) equations in arbitrary complex domains. The PDE multidimensional extrapolation approach of Aslam [1] is used to reconstruct the solution in the ghost-fluid regions and impose boundary conditions at the fluid-solid interface. The CNS equations are numerically solved by the second order multidimensional upwind method of Colella [2] and Saltzman [3]. Block-structured adaptive mesh refinement implemented under the Chombo framework is utilized to reduce the computational cost while keeping high-resolution mesh around the embedded boundary and regions of high gradient solutions. Numerical examples with different Reynolds numbers for low and high Mach number flow will be presented. We compare our simulation results with other reported experimental and computational results. The significance and advantages of our implementation, which revolve around balancing between the solution accuracy and implementation difficulties, are briefly discussed as well. © 2016 Trans Tech Publications.

  10. A physical five-equation model for compressible two-fluid flow, and its numerical treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreeft, J.J.; Koren, B.

    2009-01-01

    A novel five-equation model for inviscid, non-heat-conducting, compressible two-fluid flow is derived, together with an appropriate numerical method. The model uses flow equations based on conservation laws and exchange laws only. The two fluids exchange momentum and energy, for which source terms a

  11. Fluctuation diagrams for hot-wire anemometry in subsonic compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stainback, P. C.; Nagabushana, K. A.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of using 'fluctuation diagrams' for describing basic fluctuations in compressible flows was reported by Kovasznay in the 1950's. The application of this technique, for the most part, was restricted to supersonic flows. Recently, Zinovev and Lebiga published reports where they considered the fluctuation diagrams in subsonic compressible flows. For the above studies, the velocity and density sensitivities of the heated wires were equal. However, there are considerable data, much taken in the 1950's, which indicate that under some conditions the velocity and density sensitivities are not equal in subsonic compressible flows. Therefore, possible fluctuation diagrams are described for the cases where the velocity and density sensitivities are equal and the more general cases where they are unequal.

  12. On the convergence of the weakly compressible sharp-interface method for two-phase flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schranner, Felix S.; Hu, Xiangyu; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2016-11-01

    A weakly compressible sharp-interface framework for two-phase flows is presented. Special emphasis is on investigating its convergence properties. For this purpose a well-defined set of benchmark configurations is introduced. These may serve as future references for the verification of sharp-interface methods. Global mass and momentum conservation is ensured by the conservative sharp-interface method. Viscous and capillary stresses are considered directly at the interface. A low-dissipation weakly compressible Roe Riemann solver, in combination with a 5th-order WENO scheme, leads to high spatial accuracy. A wavelet-based adaptive multi-resolution approach permits to combine computational efficiency with physical consistency. The first test configuration is a Rayleigh-Taylor instability at moderate Reynolds number and infinite Eötvös number. A second group of benchmark cases are isolated air bubbles rising in water at high Eötvös numbers, and low to high Reynolds numbers. With these test cases, three distinct types of complex interface evolution, which are typical for a wide range of industrial applications, are realized.

  13. Compressible DNS of transitional and turbulent flow in a low pressure turbine cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Rajesh; Deshpande, Suresh; Narasimha, Roddam

    2015-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of flow in a low pressure turbine cascade at high incidence is performed using a new in-house code ANUROOP. This code solves compressible Navier-Stokes equations in conservative form using finite volume technique and uses kinetic-energy consistent scheme for the flux calculations. ANUROOP is capable of handling flow past complex geometries using hybrid grid approach (separate grid topologies for the boundary layer and rest of the blade passage). This approach offers much more control in mesh spacing and distribution compared to elliptic grid technique, which is used in many previous studies. Also, in contrast to previous studies, focus of the current work is mainly on the boundary layer flow. The flow remains laminar on the pressure side of the blade, but separates in the aft region of the suction side leading to transition. Separation bubbles formed at this region are transient in nature and we notice multiple bubbles merging and breaking in time. In the mean flow however, only one bubble is seen. Velocity profiles very near to the leading edge of the suction side suggest strong curvature effect. Higher-order boundary layer theory that includes effect of curvature is found to be necessary to characterize the flow in this region. Also, the grid convergence study reveals interesting aspects of numerics vital for accurate simulation of this kind of complex flows. We would like to thank the Gas Turbine Enabling Technology (GATET) Program for funding this project. We also thank C-DAC, Pune and CSIR-4PI, Bangalore for providing computational resources.

  14. Pressure, density, temperature and entropy fluctuations in compressible turbulent plane channel flow

    CERN Document Server

    Gerolymos, G A

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the fluctuations of thermodynamic state-variables in compressible aerodynamic wall-turbulence, using results of direct numerical simulation (DNS) of compressible turbulent plane channel flow. The basic transport equations governing the behaviour of thermodynamic variables (density, pressure, temperature and entropy) are reviewed and used to derive the exact transport equations for the variances and fluxes (transport by the fluctuating velocity field) of the thermodynamic fluctuations. The scaling with Reynolds and Mach number of compressible turbulent plane channel flow is discussed. Correlation coefficients and higher-order statistics of the thermodynamic fluctuations are examined. Finally, detailed budgets of the transport equations for the variances and fluxes of the thermodynamic variables from a well-resolved DNS are analysed. Implications of these results both to the understanding of the thermodynamic interactions in compressible wall-turbulence and to possible improvements in statistical...

  15. Canonical fluid thermodynamics. [variational principles of stability for compressible adiabatic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, L. A.

    1974-01-01

    The space-time integral of the thermodynamic pressure plays in a certain sense the role of the thermodynamic potential for compressible adiabatic flow. The stability criterion can be converted into a variational minimum principle by requiring the molar free-enthalpy and temperature to be generalized velocities. In the fluid context, the definition of proper-time differentiation involves the fluid velocity expressed in terms of three particle identity parameters. The pressure function is then converted into a functional which is the Lagrangian density of the variational principle. Being also a minimum principle, the variational principle provides a means for comparing the relative stability of different flows. For boundary conditions with a high degree of symmetry, as in the case of a uniformly expanding spherical gas box, the most stable flow is a rectilinear flow for which the world-trajectory of each particle is a straight line. Since the behavior of the interior of a freely expanding cosmic cloud may be expected to be similar to that of the fluid in the spherical box of gas, this suggests that the cosmic principle is a consequence of the laws of thermodynamics, rather than just an ad hoc postulate.

  16. A wave-envelope of sound propagation in nonuniform circular ducts with compressible mean flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Kaiser, J. E.; Shaker, B. S.

    1979-01-01

    An acoustic theory is developed to determine the sound transmission and attenuation through an infinite, hard-walled or lined circular duct carrying compressible, sheared, mean flows and having a variable cross section. The theory is applicable to large as well as small axial variations, as long as the mean flow does not separate. The technique is based on solving for the envelopes of the quasi-parallel acoustic modes that exist in the duct instead of solving for the actual wave, thereby reducing the computation time and the round-off error encountered in purely numerical techniques. The solution recovers the solution based on the method of multiple scales for slowly varying duct geometry. A computer program was developed based on the wave-envelope analysis for general mean flows. Results are presented for the reflection and transmission coefficients as well as the acoustic pressure distributions for a number of conditions: both straight and variable area ducts with and without liners and mean flows from very low to high subsonic speeds are considered.

  17. Numerical Solution of Inviscid Compressible Steady Flows around the RAE 2822 Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryštůfek, P.; Kozel, K.

    2015-05-01

    The article presents results of a numerical solution of subsonic, transonic and supersonic flows described by the system of Euler equations in 2D compressible flows around the RAE 2822 airfoil. Authors used FVM multistage Runge-Kutta method to numerically solve the flows around the RAE 2822 airfoil. The results are compared with the solution using the software Ansys Fluent 15.0.7.

  18. The CABARET method for a weakly compressible fluid flows in one- and two-dimensional implementations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikov, Yu M.; Son, E. E.

    2016-11-01

    The CABARET method implementation for a weakly compressible fluid flow is in the focus of present paper. Testing both one-dimensional pressure balancing problem and a classical plane Poiseuille flow, we analyze this method in terms of discontinuity resolution, dispersion and dissipation. The method is proved to have an adequate convergence to an analytical solution for a velocity profile. We also show that a flow formation process represents a set of self-similar solutions under varying pressure differential and sound speed.

  19. Free-surface modelling technology for compressible and violent flows

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Heyns, Johan A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available of bench-marked test cases FCSCF is compared to a state-of-the-art higher-resolution scheme. II.B. Evaluation of FCSCF FCSCF is evaluated by applying it to a number of benchmark problems presented in literature. To asses the increased accuracy.... In line with the above a new weakly compressible formulation for the volume-of-fluid free-surface mod- elling approach is presented, where after it is evaluated by considering various bench-marked test cases. 9 of 16 American Institute of Aeronautics...

  20. A near-wall two-equation model for compressible turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H. S.; So, R. M. C.; Speziale, C. G.; Lai, Y. G.

    1992-01-01

    A near-wall two-equation turbulence model of the k-epsilon type is developed for the description of high-speed compressible flows. The Favre-averaged equations of motion are solved in conjunction with modeled transport equations for the turbulent kinetic energy and solenoidal dissipation wherein a variable density extension of the asymptotically consistent near-wall model of So and co-workers is supplemented with new dilatational models. The resulting compressible two-equation model is tested in the supersonic flat plate boundary layer - with an adiabatic wall and with wall cooling - for Mach numbers as large as 10. Direct comparisons of the predictions of the new model with raw experimental data and with results from the K-omega model indicate that it performs well for a wide range of Mach numbers. The surprising finding is that the Morkovin hypothesis, where turbulent dilatational terms are neglected, works well at high Mach numbers, provided that the near wall model is asymptotically consistent. Instances where the model predictions deviate from the experiments appear to be attributable to the assumption of constant turbulent Prandtl number - a deficiency that will be addressed in a future paper.

  1. Near-wall variable-Prandtl-number turbulence model for compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, T. P.; So, R. M. C.; Zhang, H. S.

    1993-01-01

    A near-wall four-equation turbulence model is developed for the calculation of high-speed compressible turbulent boundary layers. The four equations used are the k-epsilon equations and the theta(exp 2)-epsilon (sub theta) equations. These equations are used to define the turbulent diffusivities for momentum and heat fluxes, thus allowing the assumption of dynamic similarity between momentum and heat transport to be relaxed. The Favre-averaged equations of motion are solved in conjunction with the four transport equations. Calculations are compared with measurements and with another model's predictions where the assumption of the constant turbulent Prandtl number is invoked. Compressible flat plate turbulent boundary layers with both adiabatic and constant temperature wall boundary conditions are considered. Results for the range of low Mach numbers and temperature ratios investigated are essentially the same as those obtained using an identical near-wall k-epsilon model. In general, there are significant improvements in the predictions of mean flow properties at high Mach numbers.

  2. Development of a Water Based, Critical Flow, Non-Vapor Compression cooling Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosni, Mohammad H.

    2014-03-30

    Expansion of a high-pressure liquid refrigerant through the use of a thermostatic expansion valve or other device is commonplace in vapor-compression cycles to regulate the quality and flow rate of the refrigerant entering the evaporator. In vapor-compression systems, as the condensed refrigerant undergoes this expansion, its pressure and temperature drop, and part of the liquid evaporates. We (researchers at Kansas State University) are developing a cooling cycle that instead pumps a high-pressure refrigerant through a supersonic converging-diverging nozzle. As the liquid refrigerant passes through the nozzle, its velocity reaches supersonic (or critical-flow) conditions, substantially decreasing the refrigerant’s pressure. This sharp pressure change vaporizes some of the refrigerant and absorbs heat from the surrounding conditions during this phase change. Due to the design of the nozzle, a shockwave trips the supersonic two-phase refrigerant back to the starting conditions, condensing the remaining vapor. The critical-flow refrigeration cycle would provide space cooling, similar to a chiller, by running a secondary fluid such as water or glycol over one or more nozzles. Rather than utilizing a compressor to raise the pressure of the refrigerant, as in a vapor-cycle system, the critical-flow cycle utilizes a high-pressure pump to drive refrigerant liquid through the cooling cycle. Additionally, the design of the nozzle can be tailored for a given refrigerant, such that environmentally benign substances can act as the working fluid. This refrigeration cycle is still in early-stage development with prototype development several years away. The complex multi-phase flow at supersonic conditions presents numerous challenges to fully understanding and modeling the cycle. With the support of DOE and venture-capital investors, initial research was conducted at PAX Streamline, and later, at Caitin. We (researchers at Kansas State University) have continued development

  3. A robust and accurate approach to computing compressible multiphase flow: Stratified flow model and AUSM +-up scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Hao; Liou, Meng-Sing

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a new approach to compute compressible multifluid equations. Firstly, a single-pressure compressible multifluid model based on the stratified flow model is proposed. The stratified flow model, which defines different fluids in separated regions, is shown to be amenable to the finite volume method. We can apply the conservation law to each subregion and obtain a set of balance equations . Secondly, the AUSM + scheme, which is originally designed for the compressible gas flow, is extended to solve compressible liquid flows. By introducing additional dissipation terms into the numerical flux, the new scheme, called AUSM +-up, can be applied to both liquid and gas flows. Thirdly, the contribution to the numerical flux due to interactions between different phases is taken into account and solved by the exact Riemann solver. We will show that the proposed approach yields an accurate and robust method for computing compressible multiphase flows involving discontinuities, such as shock waves and fluid interfaces. Several one-dimensional test problems are used to demonstrate the capability of our method, including the Ransom's water faucet problem and the air-water shock tube problem. Finally, several two dimensional problems will show the capability to capture enormous details and complicated wave patterns in flows having large disparities in the fluid density and velocities, such as interactions between water shock wave and air bubble, between air shock wave and water column(s), and underwater explosion. However, conservative form is lost in these balance equations when considering each individual phase; in fact, the interactions that exist simultaneously in both phases manifest themselves as nonconservative terms.

  4. The high-pressure compressibility of B12P2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Zhou, Mi; Wang, Haiyan; Ji, Cheng; Whiteley, C. E.; Edgar, J. H.; Liu, Haozhe; Ma, Yanzhang

    2017-03-01

    In situ high pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements were performed on icosahedral boron phosphide (B12P2) to 43.2 GPa. No structural phase transition occurs over this pressure range. The bulk modulus of B12P2 is KOT = 207 ± 7 GPa with pressure derivative of K'OT = 6.6 ± 0.8 . The structure is most compressible along the chain formed by phosphorus and boron atoms in the crystal structure. It is believed that the compressibility of boron-rich compounds at close to ambient pressure is determined by the boron icosahedral structure, while the inclusive atoms (both boron and non-boron) between the icosahedra determine the high-pressure compressibility and structure stability.

  5. Quantifying Compressibility and Slip in Multiparticle Collision (MPC Flow Through a Local Constriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahmina Akhter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The flow of a compressible fluid with slip through a cylinder with an asymmetric local constriction has been considered both numerically, as well as analytically. For the numerical work, a particle-based method whose dynamics is governed by the multiparticle collision (MPC rule has been used together with a generalized boundary condition that allows for slip at the wall. Since it is well known that an MPC system corresponds to an ideal gas and behaves like a compressible, viscous flow on average, an approximate analytical solution has been derived from the compressible Navier–Stokes equations of motion coupled to an ideal gas equation of state using the Karman–Pohlhausen method. The constriction is assumed to have a polynomial form, and the location of maximum constriction is varied throughout the constricted portion of the cylinder. Results for centerline densities and centerline velocities have been compared for various Reynolds numbers, Mach numbers, wall slip values and flow geometries.

  6. A meshless method for compressible flows with the HLLC Riemann solver

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Z H; Qian, L

    2014-01-01

    The HLLC Riemann solver, which resolves both the shock waves and contact discontinuities, is popular to the computational fluid dynamics community studying compressible flow problems with mesh methods. Although it was reported to be used in meshless methods, the crucial information and procedure to realise this scheme within the framework of meshless methods were not clarified fully. Moreover, the capability of the meshless HLLC solver to deal with compressible liquid flows is not completely clear yet as very few related studies have been reported. Therefore, a comprehensive investigation of a dimensional non-split HLLC Riemann solver for the least-square meshless method is carried out in this study. The stiffened gas equation of state is adopted to capacitate the proposed method to deal with single-phase gases and/or liquids effectively, whilst direct applying the perfect gas equation of state for compressible liquid flows might encounter great difficulties in correlating the state variables. The spatial der...

  7. Application of Lossless Data Compression Techniques to Radio Astronomy Data flows

    CERN Document Server

    Natusch, Tim

    2014-01-01

    The modern practice of Radio Astronomy is characterized by extremes of data volume and rates, principally because of the direct relationship between the signal to noise ratio that can be achieved and the need to Nyquist sample the RF bandwidth necessary by way of support. The transport of these data flows is costly. By examining the statistical nature of typical data flows and applying well known techniques from the field of Information Theory the following work shows that lossless compression of typical radio astronomy data flows is in theory possible. The key parameter in determining the degree of compression possible is the standard deviation of the data. The practical application of compression could prove beneficial in reducing the costs of data transport and (arguably) storage for new generation instruments such as the Square Kilometer Array.

  8. Research on flow stress of spray formed 70Si30Al ahoy under hot compression deformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Yanguang; XIONG Baiqing; ZHANG Yong'an; LIU Hongwei; ZHU Baohong; WANG feng

    2006-01-01

    The flow stress of spray formed 70Si30Al alloy was studied by hot compression on a Gleeble-1500 test machine.The experimental results indicated that the flow stress depends on the strain rate and the deformation temperature. The flow stress increases with an increase in strain rate at a given deformation temperature. The flow stress decreases with the deformation temperature increasing at a given strain rate. The relational expression among the flow stress, the strain rate, and the deformation temperature satisfies the Arrhenius equation. The deformation activation energy of 70Si30Al alloy during hot deformation is 866.27 kJ/mol from the Arrhenius equation.

  9. Implicit large-eddy simulation of compressible flows using the Interior Embedded Discontinuous Galerkin method

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez, Pablo; Roca, Xevi; Peraire, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    We present a high-order implicit large-eddy simulation (ILES) approach for simulating transitional turbulent flows. The approach consists of an Interior Embedded Discontinuous Galerkin (IEDG) method for the discretization of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations and a parallel preconditioned Newton-GMRES solver for the resulting nonlinear system of equations. The IEDG method arises from the marriage of the Embedded Discontinuous Galerkin (EDG) method and the Hybridizable Discontinuous Galerkin (HDG) method. As such, the IEDG method inherits the advantages of both the EDG method and the HDG method to make itself well-suited for turbulence simulations. We propose a minimal residual Newton algorithm for solving the nonlinear system arising from the IEDG discretization of the Navier-Stokes equations. The preconditioned GMRES algorithm is based on a restricted additive Schwarz (RAS) preconditioner in conjunction with a block incomplete LU factorization at the subdomain level. The proposed approach is applied to...

  10. Hybrid, explicit-implicit, finite-volume schemes on unstructured grids for unsteady compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, Evgeny; Norouzi, Farhang

    2016-06-01

    The motivation for using hybrid, explicit-implicit, schemes rather than fully implicit or explicit methods for some unsteady high-speed compressible flows with shocks is firstly discussed. A number of such schemes proposed in the past are briefly overviewed. A recently proposed hybridization approach is then introduced and used for the development of a hybrid, explicit-implicit, TVD (Total Variation Diminishing) scheme of the second order in space and time on smooth solutions in both, explicit and implicit, modes for the linear advection equation. Further generalizations of this finite-volume method for the Burgers, Euler and Navier-Stokes equations discretized on unstructured grids are mentioned in the concluding remarks.

  11. Nonlinear stability of non-stationary cross-flow vortices in compressible boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajjar, J. S. B.

    1995-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of long wavelength non-stationary cross-flow vortices in a compressible boundary layer is investigated and the work extends that of Gajjar (1994) to flows involving multiple critical layers. The basic flow profile considered in this paper is that appropriate for a fully three-dimensional boundary layer with O(1) Mach number and with wall heating or cooling. The governing equations for the evolution of the cross-flow vortex are obtained and some special cases are discussed. One special case includes linear theory where exact analytic expressions for the growth rate of the vortices are obtained. Another special case is a generalization of the Bassom & Gajjar (1988) results for neutral waves to compressible flows. The viscous correction to the growth rate is derived and it is shown how the unsteady nonlinear critical layer structure merges with that for a Haberman type of viscous critical layer.

  12. Calculation of compressible boundary layer flow about airfoils by a finite element/finite difference method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Stuart L.; Meade, Andrew J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented of a finite element/finite difference method (semidiscrete Galerkin method) used to calculate compressible boundary layer flow about airfoils, in which the group finite element scheme is applied to the Dorodnitsyn formulation of the boundary layer equations. The semidiscrete Galerkin (SDG) method promises to be fast, accurate and computationally efficient. The SDG method can also be applied to any smoothly connected airfoil shape without modification and possesses the potential capability of calculating boundary layer solutions beyond flow separation. Results are presented for low speed laminar flow past a circular cylinder and past a NACA 0012 airfoil at zero angle of attack at a Mach number of 0.5. Also shown are results for compressible flow past a flat plate for a Mach number range of 0 to 10 and results for incompressible turbulent flow past a flat plate. All numerical solutions assume an attached boundary layer.

  13. Lymphoedema management with the LymphFlow Advance pneumatic compression pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Natalie; Wigg, Jane; Pugh, Stacy; Barclay, Janet; Moore, Hayley

    2016-10-01

    There are many intermittent pneumatic compression devices available for use in the management and adjunct treatment of lymphatic, venous and arterial disease. This article discusses the development of a new advanced pneumatic compression device, the LymphFlow Advance, which can perform focussed treatment on the lymphoedematous area using a variety of different cycles. Case studies with therapist and patient feedback are used to demonstrate the use of the LymphFlow Advance in the lymphoedema clinic, with a discussion of the evidence to underpin recommended treatment regimes.

  14. Development of an app for compressible flow “App4Comp”

    OpenAIRE

    Adam Alberdi, Andrés; Gámez Montero, Pedro Javier

    2015-01-01

    In this paper is discussed the development and operation of a new Android App made through Google’s platform App Inventor 2. This App is focused on solving classic problems related to compressible flow, dealing with the typical cases seen in the subject of Fluid Mechanics of a degree in Aeronautics. It is downloadable from [1], or through the QR code at the end of this paper. The main objective of this project was to bring in a new, useful app about compressible flow to the market, but als...

  15. Community detection by label propagation with compression of flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jihui; Li, Wei; Su, Zhu; Zhao, Longfeng; Deng, Weibing

    2016-12-01

    The label propagation algorithm (LPA) has been proved to be a fast and effective method for detecting communities in large complex networks. However, its performance is subject to the non-stable and trivial solutions of the problem. In this paper, we propose a modified label propagation algorithm LPAf to efficiently detect community structures in networks. Instead of the majority voting rule of the basic LPA, LPAf updates the label of a node by considering the compression of a description of random walks on a network. A multi-step greedy agglomerative strategy is employed to enable LPAf to escape the local optimum. Furthermore, an incomplete update condition is also adopted to speed up the convergence. Experimental results on both synthetic and real-world networks confirm the effectiveness of our algorithm.

  16. TRIAXIAL COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH OF ULTRA HIGH PERFORMANCE CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radoslav Sovják

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to describe the strength of Ultra High Performance Concrete (UHPC under triaxial compression. The main goal is to find a trend in the triaxial compressive strength development under various values of confinement pressure. The importance of triaxial tests lies in the spatial loading of the sample, which simulates the real loading of the material in the structure better than conventional uniaxial strength tests. In addition, the authors describe a formulation process for UHPC that has been developed without using heat treatment, pressure or a special mixer. Only ordinary materials available commercially in the Czech Republic were utilized throughout the material design process.

  17. A compression scheme for radio data in high performance computing

    CERN Document Server

    Masui, Kiyoshi; Connor, Liam; Deng, Meiling; Fandino, Mateus; Höfer, Carolin; Halpern, Mark; Hanna, David; Hincks, Adam D; Hinshaw, Gary; Parra, Juan Mena; Newburgh, Laura B; Shaw, J Richard; Vanderlinde, Keith

    2015-01-01

    We present a procedure for efficiently compressing astronomical radio data for high performance applications. Integrated, post-correlation data are first passed through a nearly lossless rounding step which compares the precision of the data to a generalized and calibration-independent form of the radiometer equation. This allows the precision of the data to be reduced in a way that has an insignificant impact on the data. The newly developed Bitshuffle lossless compression algorithm is subsequently applied. When the algorithm is used in conjunction with the HDF5 library and data format, data produced by the CHIME Pathfinder telescope is compressed to 28% of its original size and decompression throughputs in excess of 1 GB/s are obtained on a single core.

  18. Possible flow regimes of adiabatic one-dimensional compressible fluid flow with friction in convergent and divergent ducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shouman, A. R.; Garcia, C. E.

    1971-01-01

    An analytical solution for the compressible one-dimensional flow in convergent and divergent ducts with friction is obtained. It is found that a nondimensional parameter, N, can be formed using the friction factor, duct half-angle and the ratio of specific heats of the gas. Seven flow regimes are describable with the solution, based on certain bounds on the magnitude of N. The regimes are discussed and corollary data are presented graphically.

  19. Local and global stability analysis of compressible channel flow over wall impedance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbari, Iman; Scalo, Carlo

    2016-11-01

    The stability properties of compressible channel flow over porous walls is investigated via Local (LSA) and Global Stability Analysis (GSA) for laminar and turbulent base flows at Reb = 6900 and Mb = 0 . 85 , 1 . 5 , 3 . 5 . Linearized Navier-Stokes equations are discretized via a sixth-order fully collocated Padé scheme leading to a Generalized Eigenvalue Problem (GEVP) solved using a parallel sparse eigenvalue solver based on the shift-invert Arnoldi method. The adopted discretization guarantees spectral-like spatial resolution. Fully sparsity of the system is retained via implicit calculation of the numerical derivatives ensuring computational efficiency on multi-processor platforms. The global eigen-spectrum exhibits various sets of modes grouped by streamwise wave-numbers, which are captured via LSA, as well as global acoustic modes. Consistently with the findings of C. Scalo et al., two unstable local modes are found for sufficiently high wall permeability: one standing-wave-like and one representing a bulk pressure mode, both generating additional Reynolds shear stresses concentrated in the viscous sublayer region. Stability properties of the flow over non-modal streamwise impedance distributions are also discussed.

  20. BEHAVIOR OF FLOW STRESS OF ALUMINUM SHEETS USED FOR PRESSURE CAN DURING COMPRESSION AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.S. Fu; W.Z. Chen; K.W. Qian

    2005-01-01

    The behavior of flow stress of Al sheets used for pressure can prepared by different melt-treatment during plastic deformation at elevated temperature was studied by isothermal compression testusing Gleeble1500 dynamic hot-simulation testing machine. The results show that the A1 sheets possess the remarkable characteristic of steady state flow stress when they are deformed in the temperature range of 350-500℃ at strain rates within the range of 0.01-10.0s-1. A hyperbolic sine relationship is found to correlate well the flow stress with the strain rate, and an Arrhenius relationship with the temperature, which implies that the process of plastic deformation at elevated temperature for this material is thermally activated. Compared with the Al pieces prepared by no or conventional melt-treatment, hot deformation activation energy of Al sheets prepared by high-efficient melt-treatment is the smallest (Q = 168.0kJ/mol), which reveals that the hot working formability of this material is very better, and has directly to do with the effective improvement of its metallurgical quality.

  1. Control volume based modelling of compressible flow in reciprocating machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Kildegård; Thomsen, Per Grove; Carlsen, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    conservation laws for mass, energy, and momentum applied to a staggered mesh consisting of two overlapping strings of control volumes. Loss mechanisms can be included directly in the governing equations of models by including them as terms in the conservation laws. Heat transfer, flow friction......, and multidimensional effects must be calculated using empirical correlations; correlations for steady state flow can be used as an approximation. A transformation that assumes ideal gas is presented for transforming equations for masses and energies in control volumes into the corresponding pressures and temperatures...

  2. Compressible Turbulent Flow Numerical Simulations of Tip Vortex Cavitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khatami, F.; Weide, van der E.T.A.; Hoeijmakers, H.W.M.

    2015-01-01

    For an elliptic Arndt’s hydrofoil numerical simulations of vortex cavitation are presented. An equilibrium cavitation model is employed. This single-fluid model assumes local thermodynamic and mechanical equilibrium in the mixture region of the flow, is employed. Furthermore, for characterizing the

  3. Control volume based modelling of compressible flow in reciprocating machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Kildegård; Thomsen, Per Grove; Carlsen, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    , and multidimensional effects must be calculated using empirical correlations; correlations for steady state flow can be used as an approximation. A transformation that assumes ideal gas is presented for transforming equations for masses and energies in control volumes into the corresponding pressures and temperatures...

  4. Hot-Wire Probe for Compressible Subsonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stainback, P. C.; Johnson, C. B.; Basnett, C. B.

    1985-01-01

    Probe measures velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations. Three-wire probe used with each wire operating at different overheat ratio. Technique extendable into transonic and low supersonic flow regimes without difficulty except for those problems usually associated with lengthy calibration and possible wire breaking.

  5. Progress at SLAC on high-power rf pulse compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, P.B.; Farkas, Z.D.; Lavine, T.L.; Menegat, A.; Nantista, C.; Ruth, R.D. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kroll, N.M. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)]|[California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1992-06-01

    Rf pulse compression is a technique for augmenting the peak power output of a klystron (typically 50--100 MW) to obtain the high peak power required to drive a linear collider at a high accelerating gradient (typically 200 MW/m is required for a gradient of 100 MV/m). The SLED pulse compression system, with a power gain of about 2.6, has been operational on the SLAC linac for more than a decade. Recently, a binary pulse-compression system with a power gain of about 5.2 has been tested up to an output power of 120 MW. Further high-power tests are in progress. Our current effort is focused on prototyping a so-called SLED-II pulse-compression system with a power gain of four. Over-moded TE{sub 01}-mode circular waveguide components, some with novel technical features, are used to reduce losses at the 11.4-GHz operating frequency.

  6. Progress at SLAC on high-power rf pulse compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, P.B.; Farkas, Z.D.; Lavine, T.L.; Menegat, A.; Nantista, C.; Ruth, R.D. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)); Kroll, N.M. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States) California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics)

    1992-06-01

    Rf pulse compression is a technique for augmenting the peak power output of a klystron (typically 50--100 MW) to obtain the high peak power required to drive a linear collider at a high accelerating gradient (typically 200 MW/m is required for a gradient of 100 MV/m). The SLED pulse compression system, with a power gain of about 2.6, has been operational on the SLAC linac for more than a decade. Recently, a binary pulse-compression system with a power gain of about 5.2 has been tested up to an output power of 120 MW. Further high-power tests are in progress. Our current effort is focused on prototyping a so-called SLED-II pulse-compression system with a power gain of four. Over-moded TE[sub 01]-mode circular waveguide components, some with novel technical features, are used to reduce losses at the 11.4-GHz operating frequency.

  7. Nonequilibrium thermohydrodynamic effects on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Huilin; Xu, Aiguo; Zhang, Guangcai; Gan, Yanbiao; Ying, Yangjun; Succi, Sauro

    2016-08-01

    The effects of compressibility on Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) are investigated by inspecting the interplay between thermodynamic and hydrodynamic nonequilibrium phenomena (TNE, HNE, respectively) via a discrete Boltzmann model. Two effective approaches are presented, one tracking the evolution of the local TNE effects and the other focusing on the evolution of the mean temperature of the fluid, to track the complex interfaces separating the bubble and the spike regions of the flow. It is found that both the compressibility effects and the global TNE intensity show opposite trends in the initial and the later stages of the RTI. Compressibility delays the initial stage of RTI and accelerates the later stage. Meanwhile, the TNE characteristics are generally enhanced by the compressibility, especially in the later stage. The global or mean thermodynamic nonequilibrium indicators provide physical criteria to discriminate between the two stages of the RTI.

  8. Spectral Element Method for the Simulation of Unsteady Compressible Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diosady, Laslo Tibor; Murman, Scott M.

    2013-01-01

    This work uses a discontinuous-Galerkin spectral-element method (DGSEM) to solve the compressible Navier-Stokes equations [1{3]. The inviscid ux is computed using the approximate Riemann solver of Roe [4]. The viscous fluxes are computed using the second form of Bassi and Rebay (BR2) [5] in a manner consistent with the spectral-element approximation. The method of lines with the classical 4th-order explicit Runge-Kutta scheme is used for time integration. Results for polynomial orders up to p = 15 (16th order) are presented. The code is parallelized using the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The computations presented in this work are performed using the Sandy Bridge nodes of the NASA Pleiades supercomputer at NASA Ames Research Center. Each Sandy Bridge node consists of 2 eight-core Intel Xeon E5-2670 processors with a clock speed of 2.6Ghz and 2GB per core memory. On a Sandy Bridge node the Tau Benchmark [6] runs in a time of 7.6s.

  9. 1D compressible flow with temperature dependent transport coefficients

    CERN Document Server

    Jenssen, Helge Kristian

    2009-01-01

    We establish existence of global-in-time weak solutions to the one dimensional, compressible Navier-Stokes system for a viscous and heat conducting ideal polytropic gas (pressure $p=K\\theta/\\tau$, internal energy $e=c_v \\theta$), when the viscosity $\\mu$ is constant and the heat conductivity $\\kappa$ depends on the temperature $\\theta$ according to $\\kappa(\\theta) = \\bar \\kappa \\theta^\\beta$, with $0\\leq\\beta<{3/2}$. This choice of degenerate transport coefficients is motivated by the kinetic theory of gasses. Approximate solutions are generated by a semi-discrete finite element scheme. We first formulate sufficient conditions that guarantee convergence to a weak solution. The convergence proof relies on weak compactness and convexity, and it applies to the more general constitutive relations $\\mu(\\theta) = \\bar \\mu \\theta^\\alpha$, $\\kappa(\\theta) = \\bar \\kappa \\theta^\\beta$, with $\\alpha\\geq 0$, $0 \\leq \\beta < 2$ ($\\bar \\mu, \\bar \\kappa$ constants). We then verify the sufficient conditions in the case...

  10. Symmetries of the Euler compressible flow equations for general equation of state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, Zachary M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ramsey, Scott D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Baty, Roy S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-15

    The Euler compressible flow equations exhibit different Lie symmetries depending on the equation of state (EOS) of the medium in which the flow occurs. This means that, in general, different types of similarity solution will be available in different flow media. We present a comprehensive classification of all EOS’s to which the Euler equations apply, based on the Lie symmetries admitted by the corresponding flow equations, restricting to the case of 1-D planar, cylindrical, or spherical geometry. The results are conveniently summarized in tables. This analysis also clarifies past work by Axford and Ovsiannikov on symmetry classification.

  11. A Numerical Study of Methods for Moist Atmospheric Flows: Compressible Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte, Max; Balakrishnan, Kaushik; Bell, John B; Romps, David M

    2013-01-01

    We investigate different numerical techniques for evolving moist atmospheric flows within a fully compressible framework. In the standard numerical approach, the choice of variables is motivated by those that remain invariant in dry adiabatic flow, phase transitions are treated as an external energy source, and the physically-irrelevant fast acoustic modes are decoupled during the numerical integration. For the purposes of this study, we consider the compressible Euler equations in terms of the primitive thermodynamic variables, namely density, momentum, and total energy of moist air, without any special numerical treatment of the fast acoustic dynamics. This allows us to incorporate consistent moist thermodynamic properties throughout the numerical solution, and to thoroughly investigate both the standard two-step splitting approach for moist atmospheric flows as well as a fully coupled technique based on the use of variables that are conserved in moist flows, i.e. total energy of moist air and total water c...

  12. Flow Instability and Its Control in Compression Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingyi Chen

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the development in the research of flow instability and its control over the recent ten or more years. This development was largely stimulated by the novel idea of active control of the aerodynamic instability in compressors. Three topics are covered in the paper, which appeared as the major themes towards the goal of stability enhancement. The first topic is the pre-stall behavior of rotating stall, which plays a vital role in designing the control scheme and discovering the convenient route to find the causal factors of flow disturbances potentially leading to stall. The second topic is the mechanism of blade passage flow during stall and its inception, which is the basic knowledge needed to manipulate the blade design for the stability improvement and eventually to predict the unsteady performance of the compressor system. The third topic is the recent trend of the control strategy based on the learning of active vs. passive methods. To introduce to the discussion of these topics, a brief description of the history of the recent development is given at the beginning of the paper. In discussing each topic, future works are also highlighted to enhance the further development of this long-standing problem in turbomachinery research and application.

  13. A versatile embedded boundary adaptive mesh method for compressible flow in complex geometry

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Marouf, M.

    2017-02-25

    We present an embedded ghost-fluid method for numerical solutions of the compressible Navier Stokes (CNS) equations in arbitrary complex domains. A PDE multidimensional extrapolation approach is used to reconstruct the solution in the ghost-fluid regions and imposing boundary conditions on the fluid-solid interface, coupled with a multi-dimensional algebraic interpolation for freshly cleared cells. The CNS equations are numerically solved by the second order multidimensional upwind method. Block-structured adaptive mesh refinement, implemented with the Chombo framework, is utilized to reduce the computational cost while keeping high resolution mesh around the embedded boundary and regions of high gradient solutions. The versatility of the method is demonstrated via several numerical examples, in both static and moving geometry, ranging from low Mach number nearly incompressible flows to supersonic flows. Our simulation results are extensively verified against other numerical results and validated against available experimental results where applicable. The significance and advantages of our implementation, which revolve around balancing between the solution accuracy and implementation difficulties, are briefly discussed as well.

  14. Compressible Flow Produced by Distributed Sources of Mass: An Exact Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    The paper considers the case of a one-dimensional isentropic unsteady compressible flow that is driven entirely by a distribution of sources in the left-hand half space of an unbounded domain. The right-hand half-space contains no sources, so that source-strength drops discontinuously to zero as one crosses from left to right-hand space. Exact solutions are obtained for those parts of the flow that remain isentropic.

  15. Control volume based modelling in one space dimension of oscillating, compressible flow in reciprocating machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Kildegård; Carlsen, Henrik; Thomsen, Per Grove

    2006-01-01

    We present an approach for modelling unsteady, primarily one-dimensional, compressible flow. The conservation laws for mass, energy, and momentum are applied to a staggered mesh of control volumes and loss mechanisms are included directly as extra terms. Heat transfer, flow friction......, and multidimensional effects are calculated using empirical correlations. Transformations of the conservation equations into new variables, artificial dissipation for dissipating acoustic phenomena, and an asymmetric interpolation method for minimising numerical diffusion and non physical temperature oscillations...

  16. Numerical simulation of compressible Navier-Stokes flow in a double throat nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, James N.; Visbal, Miguel R.

    The flow through a double-throat nozzle is computed using the complete time-dependent compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The computations were performed by using an existing working code with no special modifications for this particular application. The computations were performed on a Cyber 845 computer and a CRAY XMP-48 computer using three different grid sizes.

  17. Applications of Taylor-Galerkin finite element method to compressible internal flow problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Jeong L.; Kim, Yongmo; Chung, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    A two-step Taylor-Galerkin finite element method with Lapidus' artificial viscosity scheme is applied to several test cases for internal compressible inviscid flow problems. Investigations for the effect of supersonic/subsonic inlet and outlet boundary conditions on computational results are particularly emphasized.

  18. Prediction of mean flow data for adiabatic 2-D compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Motallebi, F.

    1997-01-01

    This book presents a method for the prediction of mean flow data (i.e. skin friction, velocity profile and shape parameter) for adiabatic two-dimensional compressible turbulent boundary layers at zero pressure gradient. The transformed law of the wall, law of the lake, the van Driest model for the

  19. Prediction of mean flow data for adiabatic 2-D compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Motallebi, F.

    1997-01-01

    This book presents a method for the prediction of mean flow data (i.e. skin friction, velocity profile and shape parameter) for adiabatic two-dimensional compressible turbulent boundary layers at zero pressure gradient. The transformed law of the wall, law of the lake, the van Driest model for the c

  20. Computational turbulent stress closure for large-eddy simulation of compressible flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Bos, F.; Geurts, Bernardus J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper studies the computation of stress tensors for turbulent compressible flow for purposes of subgrid modeling for LES (large eddy simulation) methods in an effort to provide a model closure. The method uses and compares a variety of filters and special decomposition methods on the velocity

  1. Simulation techniques for spatially evolving instabilities in compressible flow over a flat plate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wasistho, B.; Geurts, B.J.; Kuerten, J.G.M.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we present numerical techniques suitable for a direct numerical simulation in the spatial setting. We demonstrate the application to the simulation of compressible flat plate flow instabilities. We compare second and fourth order accurate spatial discretization schemes in combination w

  2. Global smooth flows for compressible Navier-Stokes-Maxwell equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiang; Cao, Hongmei

    2016-08-01

    Umeda et al. (Jpn J Appl Math 1:435-457, 1984) considered a rather general class of symmetric hyperbolic-parabolic systems: A0zt+sum_{j=1}nAjz_{xj}+Lz=sum_{j,k=1}nB^{jk}z_{xjxk} and showed optimal decay rates with certain dissipative assumptions. In their results, the dissipation matrices {L} and {B^{jk}(j,k=1,ldots,n)} are both assumed to be real symmetric. So far there are no general results in case that {L} and {B^{jk}} are not necessarily symmetric, which is left open now. In this paper, we investigate compressible Navier-Stokes-Maxwell (N-S-M) equations arising in plasmas physics, which is a concrete example of hyperbolic-parabolic composite systems with non-symmetric dissipation. It is observed that the Cauchy problem for N-S-M equations admits the dissipative mechanism of regularity-loss type. Consequently, extra higher regularity is usually needed to obtain the optimal decay rate of {L1({mathbb{R}}^3)}-{L^2({mathbb{R}}^3)} type, in comparison with that for the global-in-time existence of smooth solutions. In this paper, we obtain the minimal decay regularity of global smooth solutions to N-S-M equations, with aid of {L^p({mathbb{R}}^n)}-{Lq({mathbb{R}}^n)}-{Lr({mathbb{R}}^n)} estimates. It is worth noting that the relation between decay derivative orders and the regularity index of initial data is firstly found in the optimal decay estimates.

  3. Numerical Investigation of Vortex Generator Flow Control for External-Compression Supersonic Inlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baydar, Ezgihan

    Vortex generators (VGs) within external-compression supersonic inlets for Mach 1.6 were investigated to determine their ability to increase total pressure recovery and reduce total pressure distortion. Ramp and vane-type VGs were studied. The geometric factors of interest included height, length, spacing, angle-of-incidence, and positions upstream and downstream of the inlet terminal shock. The flow through the inlet was simulated numerically through the solution of the steady-state, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations on multi-block, structured grids using the Wind-US flow solver. The inlet performance was characterized by the inlet total pressure recovery and the radial and circumferential total pressure distortion indices at the engine face. Previous research of downstream VGs in the low-boom supersonic inlet demonstrated improvement in radial distortion up to 24% while my work on external-compression supersonic inlets improved radial distortion up to 86%, which is significant. The design of experiments and statistical analysis methods were applied to quantify the effect of the geometric factors of VGs and search for optimal VG arrays. From the analysis, VG angle-of-incidence and VG height were the most influential factors in increasing total pressure recovery and reducing distortion. The study on the two-dimensional external-compression inlet determined which passive flow control devices, such as counter-rotating vanes or ramps, reduce high distortion levels and improve the health of the boundary layer, relative to the baseline. Downstream vanes demonstrate up to 21% improvement in boundary layer health and 86% improvement in radial distortion. Upstream vanes demonstrated up to 3% improvement in boundary layer health and 9% improvement in radial distortion. Ramps showed no improvement in boundary layer health and radial distortion. Micro-VGs were preferred for their reduced viscous drag and improvement in total pressure recovery at the AIP. Although

  4. Numerical model of compressible gas flow in soil pollution control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on the theory of fluid dynamics in porous media, a numerical model of gas flow in unsaturated zone is developed with the consideration of gas density change due to variation of air pressure. This model is characterized of its wider range of availability. The accuracy of this numerical model is analyzed through comparison with modeling results by previous model with presumption of little pressure variation and the validity of this numerical model is shown. Thus it provides basis for the designing and management of landfill gas control system or soil vapor ex.action system in soil pollution control.

  5. On the Preconditioning of a Newton-Krylov Solver for a High-Order reconstructed Discontinuous Galerkin Discretization of All-Speed Compressible Flow with Phase Change for Application in Laser-Based Additive Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weston, Brian T. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2017-05-17

    This dissertation focuses on the development of a fully-implicit, high-order compressible ow solver with phase change. The work is motivated by laser-induced phase change applications, particularly by the need to develop large-scale multi-physics simulations of the selective laser melting (SLM) process in metal additive manufacturing (3D printing). Simulations of the SLM process require precise tracking of multi-material solid-liquid-gas interfaces, due to laser-induced melting/ solidi cation and evaporation/condensation of metal powder in an ambient gas. These rapid density variations and phase change processes tightly couple the governing equations, requiring a fully compressible framework to robustly capture the rapid density variations of the ambient gas and the melting/evaporation of the metal powder. For non-isothermal phase change, the velocity is gradually suppressed through the mushy region by a variable viscosity and Darcy source term model. The governing equations are discretized up to 4th-order accuracy with our reconstructed Discontinuous Galerkin spatial discretization scheme and up to 5th-order accuracy with L-stable fully implicit time discretization schemes (BDF2 and ESDIRK3-5). The resulting set of non-linear equations is solved using a robust Newton-Krylov method, with the Jacobian-free version of the GMRES solver for linear iterations. Due to the sti nes associated with the acoustic waves and thermal and viscous/material strength e ects, preconditioning the GMRES solver is essential. A robust and scalable approximate block factorization preconditioner was developed, which utilizes the velocity-pressure (vP) and velocity-temperature (vT) Schur complement systems. This multigrid block reduction preconditioning technique converges for high CFL/Fourier numbers and exhibits excellent parallel and algorithmic scalability on classic benchmark problems in uid dynamics (lid-driven cavity ow and natural convection heat transfer) as well as for laser

  6. Feature preserving compression of high resolution SAR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhigao; Hu, Fuxiang; Sun, Tao; Qin, Qianqing

    2006-10-01

    Compression techniques are required to transmit the large amounts of high-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image data over the available channels. Common Image compression methods may lose detail and weak information in original images, especially at smoothness areas and edges with low contrast. This is known as "smoothing effect". It becomes difficult to extract and recognize some useful image features such as points and lines. We propose a new SAR image compression algorithm that can reduce the "smoothing effect" based on adaptive wavelet packet transform and feature-preserving rate allocation. For the reason that images should be modeled as non-stationary information resources, a SAR image is partitioned to overlapped blocks. Each overlapped block is then transformed by adaptive wavelet packet according to statistical features of different blocks. In quantifying and entropy coding of wavelet coefficients, we integrate feature-preserving technique. Experiments show that quality of our algorithm up to 16:1 compression ratio is improved significantly, and more weak information is reserved.

  7. A high-dynamic range transimpedance amplifier with compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mičušík, D.; Zimmermann, H.

    2007-02-01

    This paper presents a transimpedance amplifier (TIA) with the logarithmic compression of the input current signal. The presented TIA has two regions of operation: a linear one for small input current signals and a compression one for high input currents, that could otherwise saturate the TIA. The measured -3dB bandwidth in the linear region of operation is 102MHz. The measured maximum input current overdrive is 20.5mA. However, the maximum of the monotonic compression is approx. 8mA. Using the compression technique we could achieve low rms equivalent input noise current (~20.2nA) within the measured bandwidth and with approx. 2pF capacitance at the input. Thus the dynamic range at the input of the TIA is approx. 120dB considering the maximal current overdrive. The proposed TIA represents the input stage of a optical receiver with integrated differential 50Ω output driver. The optical receiver occupies approx. 1.24mm2 in 0.35 μm SiGe BiCMOS technology and consumes 78mA from 5V supply.

  8. Offshore compression system design for low cost high and reliability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Carlos J. Rocha de O.; Carrijo Neto, Antonio Dias; Cordeiro, Alexandre Franca [Chemtech Engineering Services and Software Ltd., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Special Projects Div.], Emails: antonio.carrijo@chemtech.com.br, carlos.rocha@chemtech.com.br, alexandre.cordeiro@chemtech.com.br

    2010-07-01

    In the offshore oil fields, the oil streams coming from the wells usually have significant amounts of gas. This gas is separated at low pressure and has to be compressed to the export pipeline pressure, usually at high pressure to reduce the needed diameter of the pipelines. In the past, this gases where flared, but nowadays there are a increasing pressure for the energy efficiency improvement of the oil rigs and the use of this gaseous fraction. The most expensive equipment of this kind of plant are the compression and power generation systems, being the second a strong function of the first, because the most power consuming equipment are the compressors. For this reason, the optimization of the compression system in terms of efficiency and cost are determinant to the plant profit. The availability of the plants also have a strong influence in the plant profit, specially in gas fields where the products have a relatively low aggregated value, compared to oil. Due this, the third design variable of the compression system becomes the reliability. As high the reliability, larger will be the plant production. The main ways to improve the reliability of compression system are the use of multiple compression trains in parallel, in a 2x50% or 3x50% configuration, with one in stand-by. Such configurations are possible and have some advantages and disadvantages, but the main side effect is the increase of the cost. This is the offshore common practice, but that does not always significantly improve the plant availability, depending of the previous process system. A series arrangement and a critical evaluation of the overall system in some cases can provide a cheaper system with equal or better performance. This paper shows a case study of the procedure to evaluate a compression system design to improve the reliability but without extreme cost increase, balancing the number of equipment, the series or parallel arrangement, and the driver selection. Two cases studies will be

  9. Spanwise effects on instabilities of compressible flow over a long rectangular cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y.; Taira, K.; Cattafesta, L. N.; Ukeiley, L. S.

    2016-11-01

    The stability properties of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) compressible flows over a rectangular cavity with length-to-depth ratio of L/D=6 are analyzed at a free-stream Mach number of M_∞ =0.6 and depth-based Reynolds number of Re_D=502 . In this study, we closely examine the influence of three-dimensionality on the wake mode that has been reported to exhibit high-amplitude fluctuations from the formation and ejection of large-scale spanwise vortices. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) and bi-global stability analysis are utilized to study the stability characteristics of the wake mode. Using the bi-global stability analysis with the time-averaged flow as the base state, we capture the global stability properties of the wake mode at a spanwise wavenumber of β =0 . To uncover spanwise effects on the 2D wake mode, 3D DNS are performed with cavity width-to-depth ratio of W/D=1 and 2. We find that the 2D wake mode is not present in the 3D cavity flow with W/D=2 , in which spanwise structures are observed near the rear region of the cavity. These 3D instabilities are further investigated via bi-global stability analysis for spanwise wavelengths of λ /D=0.5{-}2.0 to reveal the eigenspectra of the 3D eigenmodes. Based on the findings of 2D and 3D global stability analysis, we conclude that the absence of the wake mode in 3D rectangular cavity flows is due to the release of kinetic energy from the spanwise vortices to the streamwise vortical structures that develops from the spanwise instabilities.

  10. Compressive Sensing Based Machine Learning Strategy For Characterizing The Flow Around A Cylinder With Limited Pressure Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bright, Ido; Lin, Guang; Kutz, Nathan

    2013-12-05

    Compressive sensing is used to determine the flow characteristics around a cylinder (Reynolds number and pressure/flow field) from a sparse number of pressure measurements on the cylinder. Using a supervised machine learning strategy, library elements encoding the dimensionally reduced dynamics are computed for various Reynolds numbers. Convex L1 optimization is then used with a limited number of pressure measurements on the cylinder to reconstruct, or decode, the full pressure field and the resulting flow field around the cylinder. Aside from the highly turbulent regime (large Reynolds number) where only the Reynolds number can be identified, accurate reconstruction of the pressure field and Reynolds number is achieved. The proposed data-driven strategy thus achieves encoding of the fluid dynamics using the L2 norm, and robust decoding (flow field reconstruction) using the sparsity promoting L1 norm.

  11. Impact of compression on gas transport in non-woven gas diffusion layers of high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froning, Dieter; Yu, Junliang; Gaiselmann, Gerd; Reimer, Uwe; Manke, Ingo; Schmidt, Volker; Lehnert, Werner

    2016-06-01

    Gas transport in non-woven gas diffusion layers of a high-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell was calculated with the Lattice Boltzmann method. The underlying micro structure was taken from two sources. A real micro structure was analyzed in the synchrotron under the impact of a compression mask mimicking the channel/rib structure of a flow field. Furthermore a stochastic geometry model based on synchrotron X-ray tomography studies was applied. The effect of compression is included in the stochastic model. Gas transport in these micro structures was simulated and the impact of compression was analyzed. Fiber bundles overlaying the micro structure were identified which affect the homogeneity of the gas flow. There are significant deviations between the impact of compression on effective material properties for this type of gas diffusion layers and the Kozeny-Carman equation.

  12. Central upwind scheme for a compressible two-phase flow model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munshoor Ahmed

    Full Text Available In this article, a compressible two-phase reduced five-equation flow model is numerically investigated. The model is non-conservative and the governing equations consist of two equations describing the conservation of mass, one for overall momentum and one for total energy. The fifth equation is the energy equation for one of the two phases and it includes source term on the right-hand side which represents the energy exchange between two fluids in the form of mechanical and thermodynamical work. For the numerical approximation of the model a high resolution central upwind scheme is implemented. This is a non-oscillatory upwind biased finite volume scheme which does not require a Riemann solver at each time step. Few numerical case studies of two-phase flows are presented. For validation and comparison, the same model is also solved by using kinetic flux-vector splitting (KFVS and staggered central schemes. It was found that central upwind scheme produces comparable results to the KFVS scheme.

  13. CFD Simulations of the IHF Arc-Jet Flow: Compression-Pad/Separation Bolt Wedge Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokcen, Tahir; Skokova, Kristina A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports computational analyses in support of two wedge tests in a high enthalpy arc-jet facility at NASA Ames Research Center. These tests were conducted using two different wedge models, each placed in a free jet downstream of a corresponding different conical nozzle in the Ames 60-MW Interaction Heating Facility. Panel test articles included a metallic separation bolt imbedded in the compression-pad and heat shield materials, resulting in a circular protuberance over a flat plate. As part of the test calibration runs, surface pressure and heat flux measurements on water-cooled calibration plates integrated with the wedge models were also obtained. Surface heating distributions on the test articles as well as arc-jet test environment parameters for each test configuration are obtained through computational fluid dynamics simulations, consistent with the facility and calibration measurements. The present analysis comprises simulations of the non-equilibrium flow field in the facility nozzle, test box, and flow field over test articles, and comparisons with the measured calibration data.

  14. Bilateral high radial nerve compressions: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuangsuwanich, A; Muangsombut, S; Sangruchi, T

    2000-06-01

    A 40-year-old woman with bilateral high radial nerve compressions by non-traumatic cause was reported. It occurred first at the right radial nerve which was explored after a period of investigation and conservative treatment. Two constricted sites 2.0 cm apart of the right radial nerve crossed by branches of the radial collateral artery beneath the lateral head of the triceps were found. The constricted sites including tissue in between was resected and replaced with a sural nerve graft. One year later the patient had the same episode on the left side. The operative finding was the same as the previous one. Sural nerve graft was performed after neurolysis had failed. The patient's normal radial nerve function returned in one year. This is the first reported case in the literature of bilateral high radial nerve compressions by branches of the radial collateral artery.

  15. The Turbulent Dynamo in Highly Compressible Supersonic Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Federrath, Christoph; Bovino, Stefano; Schleicher, Dominik R G

    2014-01-01

    The turbulent dynamo may explain the origin of cosmic magnetism. While the exponential amplification of magnetic fields has been studied for incompressible gases, little is known about dynamo action in highly-compressible, supersonic plasmas, such as the interstellar medium of galaxies and the early Universe. Here we perform the first quantitative comparison of theoretical models of the dynamo growth rate and saturation level with three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of supersonic turbulence with grid resolutions of up to 1024^3 cells. We obtain numerical convergence and find that dynamo action occurs for both low and high magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm = nu/eta = 0.1-10 (the ratio of viscous to magnetic dissipation), which had so far only been seen for Pm >= 1 in supersonic turbulence. We measure the critical magnetic Reynolds number, Rm_crit = 129 (+43, -31), showing that the compressible dynamo is almost as efficient as in incompressible gas. Considering the physical conditions of the present a...

  16. Lift and drag in three-dimensional steady viscous and compressible flow

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Luoqin; Kang, Linlin; Wu, Jiezhi

    2016-01-01

    In a recent paper, Liu, Zhu & Wu (2015, J. Fluid Mech. 784: 304; LZW for short) present a far-field theory for the aerodynamic force experienced by a body in a two-dimensional, viscous, compressible and steady flow. In this companion theoretical paper we do the same for three-dimensional flow. By a rigorous fundamental solution method of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations, we not only improve the far-field force formula for incompressible flow originally derived by Goldstein in 1931 and summarized by Milne-Thomson in 1968, both being far from complete, to its perfect final form, but also prove that this final form holds universally true in a wide range of compressible flow, from subsonic to supersonic flows. We call this result the unified force theorem (UF theorem for short) and state it as a theorem, which is exactly the counterpart of the two-dimensional compressible Joukowski-Filon theorem obtained by LZW. Thus, the steady lift and drag are always exactly determined by the values of vector circula...

  17. Applications of weakly compressible model to turbulent flow problem towards adaptive turbulence simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Takuya; Yokomine, Takehiko; Shimizu, Akihiko

    2002-11-01

    We have been engaged in the development of multi-scale adaptive simulation technique for incompressible turbulent flow. This is designed as that important scale components in the flow field are detected automatically by lifting wavelet and solved selectively. In conventional incompressible scheme, it is very common to solve Poisson equation of pressure to meet the divergence free constraints of incompressible flow. It may be not impossible to solve the Poisson eq. in the adaptive way, but this is very troublesome because it requires generation of control volume at each time step. We gave an eye on weakly compressible model proposed by Bao(2001). This model was derived from zero Mach limit asymptotic analysis of compressible Navier-Stokes eq. and does not need to solve the Poisson eq. at all. But it is relatively new and it requires demonstration study before the combination with the adaptation by wavelet. In present study, 2-D and 3-D Backstep flow were selected as test problems and applicability to turbulent flow is verified in detail. Besides, combination of adaptation by wavelet with weakly compressible model towards the adaptive turbulence simulation is discussed.

  18. Toward compressed DMD: spectral analysis of fluid flows using sub-Nyquist-rate PIV data

    CERN Document Server

    Tu, Jonathan H; Kutz, J Nathan; Shang, Jessica K

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) is a powerful and increasingly popular tool for performing spectral analysis of fluid flows. However, it requires data that satisfy the Nyquist-Shannon sampling criterion. In many fluid flow experiments, such data are impossible to capture. We propose a new approach that combines ideas from DMD and compressed sensing. Given a vector-valued signal, we take measurements randomly in time (at a sub-Nyquist rate) and project the data onto a low-dimensional subspace. We then use compressed sensing to identify the dominant frequencies in the signal and their corresponding modes. We demonstrate this method using two examples, analyzing both an artificially constructed test dataset and particle image velocimetry data collected from the flow past a cylinder. In each case, our method correctly identifies the characteristic frequencies and oscillatory modes dominating the signal, proving the proposed method to be a capable tool for spectral analysis using sub-Nyquist-rate sampling.

  19. Two Phase Compressible Flow Fields in One Dimensional and Eulerian Grid Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungsu; Park, Chan Wook

    2008-11-01

    Numerical investigation for two phase compressible flow fields of air-water in one dimensional tube are performed in the fixed Eulerian grid framework. Using an equation of states of Tait's type for a multiphase cell, the two phase compressible flow is modeled as equivalent single phase which is discretized using the Roe`s approximate Riemann solver, while the phase interface is captured via volume fractions of each phase. The most common problem found in the computational approaches in compressible multiphase flow is occurrence of the pressure oscillation at the phase interface. In order to suppress that phenomenon, tried are two approaches; a passive advection of volume fraction and a direct pressure relaxation with the compressible form of volume fraction equation. The results show that the direct pressure equalizing method suppresses pressure oscillation successfully and generates sharp discontinuities, transmitting and reflecting acoustic waves naturally at the phase interface. This work was supported by a research fund granted from Agency for Defense Development, South Korea

  20. Uniqueness of weak solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations of compressible flow

    OpenAIRE

    Ariane Piovezan Entringer

    2009-01-01

    Resumo: Este trabalho consiste de uma exposição detalhada do resultado provado no artigo Uniqueness of Weak Solutions of the Navier-Stokes Equations of Multidimensional, Compressible Flow de D. Hoff (SIAM J. Math. Anal - 2006) sobre a unicidade de solução fraca e a dependência contínua da solução fraca nos dados iniciais para as equações de Navier-Stokes para fluídos compressíveis...Observação: O resumo, na integra, podera ser visualizado no texto completo da tese digital Abstract: Uniquen...

  1. Low cryogen inventory, forced flow Ne cooling system with room temperature compression stage and heat recuperation

    CERN Document Server

    Shornikov, A; Wolf, A

    2014-01-01

    We present design and commissioning results of a forced flow cooling system utilizing neon at 30 K. The cryogen is pumped through the system by a room-temperature compression stage. To decouple the cold zone from the compression stage a recuperating counterflow tube-in-tube heat exchanger is used. Commissioning demonstrated successful condensation of neon and transfer of up to 30 W cooling power to the load at 30 K using only 30 g of the cryogen circulating in the system at pressures below 170 kPa.

  2. High-Frequency Chest Compression: A Summary of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Dosman, Cara F; Jones, Richard L

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present literature summary is to describe high-frequency chest compression (HFCC), summarize its history and outline study results on its effect on mucolysis, mucus transport, pulmonary function and quality of life. HFCC is a mechanical method of self-administered chest physiotherapy, which induces rapid air movement in and out of the lungs. This mean oscillated volume is an effective method of mucolysis and mucus clearance. HFCC can increase independence. Some studies have...

  3. IMPACT OF TONE MAPPING IN HIGH DYNAMIC RANGE IMAGE COMPRESSION

    OpenAIRE

    Narwaria, Manish; Perreira Da Silva, Matthieu; Le Callet, Patrick; Pépion, Romuald

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Tone mapping or range reduction is often used in High Dynamic Range (HDR) visual signal compression to take advantage of the existing image/video coding architectures. Thus, it is important to study the impact of tone mapping on the visual quality of decompressed HDR visual signals. To our knowledge, most of the existing studies focus only on the quality loss in the resultant low dynamic range (LDR) signal (obtained via tone mapping) and typically employ LDR displays f...

  4. Compressive mechanical of high strength concrete (HSC) after different high temperature history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dongfu; Liu, Yuchen; Gao, Haijing; Han, Xiao

    2017-08-01

    The compression strength test of high strength concrete under different high-temperature conditions was carried out by universal testing machine. The friction surface of the pressure bearing surface of the specimen was composed of three layers of plastic film and glycerol. The high temperature working conditions were the combination of different heating temperature and different constant temperature time. The characteristics of failure modes and the developments of cracks were observed; the residual compressive strength and stress-strain curves were measured; the effect of different temperature and heating time on the strength and deformation of high strength concrete under uniaxial compression were analyzed; the failure criterion formula of the high strength concrete after high temperature under uniaxial compression was established. The formula of the residual compressive strength of high strength concrete under the influence of heating temperature and constant temperature time was put forward. The relationship between the residual elastic modulus and the peak strain and residual compressive strength of high strength concrete and different high temperature conditions is established. The quantitative relationship that the residual compressive strength decreases the residual elastic modulus decreases and the peak strain increases with the increase of heating temperature and the constant temperature time was given, which provides a reference for the detection and evaluation of high strength concrete structures after fire.

  5. Flow of Compressible Fluids through Pipes with constant cross section: Calculation Algorithms for Ideal Gases

    OpenAIRE

    Armijo C., Javier; Facultad de Química e Ingeniería Química, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    We are proposing algoritms to solve problems of flow of an ideal gas in a pipe of constant section. With the compressible flow equations we have determined the pressure and velocity profile for both isothermal and adiabatic flow of air and methane. Se presentan algoritmos para resolver los problemas de flujo de fluidos de gases ideales a través de tubos de sección transversal constante. Con las ecuaciones de flujo compresible se determinan los perfiles de presión y velocidad, en flujo isot...

  6. High Efficiency, Low Emissions Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gravel, Roland [U.S. Department of Energy' s Vehicle Technologies Office, Washington, DC (United States); Maronde, Carl [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Gehrke, Chris [Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States); Fiveland, Scott [Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States)

    2010-10-30

    This is the final report of the High Efficiency Clean Combustion (HECC) Research Program for the U.S. Department of Energy. Work under this co-funded program began in August 2005 and finished in July 2010. The objective of this program was to develop and demonstrate a low emission, high thermal efficiency engine system that met 2010 EPA heavy-duty on-highway truck emissions requirements (0.2g/bhp-hr NOx, 0.14g/bhp-hr HC and 0.01g/bhp-hr PM) with a thermal efficiency of 46%. To achieve this goal, development of diesel homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion was the chosen approach. This report summarizes the development of diesel HCCI combustion and associated enabling technologies that occurred during the HECC program between August 2005 and July 2010. This program showed that although diesel HCCI with conventional US diesel fuel was not a feasible means to achieve the program objectives, the HCCI load range could be increased with a higher volatility, lower cetane number fuel, such as gasoline, if the combustion rate could be moderated to avoid excessive cylinder pressure rise rates. Given the potential efficiency and emissions benefits, continued research of combustion with low cetane number fuels and the effects of fuel distillation are recommended. The operation of diesel HCCI was only feasible at part-load due to a limited fuel injection window. A 4% fuel consumption benefit versus conventional, low-temperature combustion was realized over the achievable operating range. Several enabling technologies were developed under this program that also benefited non-HCCI combustion. The development of a 300MPa fuel injector enabled the development of extended lifted flame combustion. A design methodology for minimizing the heat transfer to jacket water, known as precision cooling, will benefit conventional combustion engines, as well as HCCI engines. An advanced combustion control system based on cylinder pressure measurements was developed. A Well

  7. Film Cooling Optimization Using Numerical Computation of the Compressible Viscous Flow Equations and Simplex Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Elsayed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Film cooling is vital to gas turbine blades to protect them from high temperatures and hence high thermal stresses. In the current work, optimization of film cooling parameters on a flat plate is investigated numerically. The effect of film cooling parameters such as inlet velocity direction, lateral and forward diffusion angles, blowing ratio, and streamwise angle on the cooling effectiveness is studied, and optimum cooling parameters are selected. The numerical simulation of the coolant flow through flat plate hole system is carried out using the “CFDRC package” coupled with the optimization algorithm “simplex” to maximize overall film cooling effectiveness. Unstructured finite volume technique is used to solve the steady, three-dimensional and compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The results are compared with the published numerical and experimental data of a cylindrically round-simple hole, and the results show good agreement. In addition, the results indicate that the average overall film cooling effectiveness is enhanced by decreasing the streamwise angle for high blowing ratio and by increasing the lateral and forward diffusion angles. Optimum geometry of the cooling hole on a flat plate is determined. In addition, numerical simulations of film cooling on actual turbine blade are performed using the flat plate optimal hole geometry.

  8. Compressive behaviour at High Temperatures of Fibre Reinforced Concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. O. Santos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the research that is being carried out at the Universities of Coimbra and Rio de Janeiro, on fibre reinforced concretes at high temperatures. Several high strength concrete compositions reinforced with fibres (polypropylene, steel and glass fibres were developed. The results of compressive tests at high temperatures (300 °C, 500 °C and 600 °C and after heating and cooling down of the concrete are presented in the paper. In both research studies, the results indicated that polypropylene fibers prevent concrete spalling. 

  9. Development of discrete gas kinetic scheme for simulation of 3D viscous incompressible and compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L. M.; Shu, C.; Wang, Y.; Sun, Y.

    2016-08-01

    The sphere function-based gas kinetic scheme (GKS), which was presented by Shu and his coworkers [23] for simulation of inviscid compressible flows, is extended to simulate 3D viscous incompressible and compressible flows in this work. Firstly, we use certain discrete points to represent the spherical surface in the phase velocity space. Then, integrals along the spherical surface for conservation forms of moments, which are needed to recover 3D Navier-Stokes equations, are approximated by integral quadrature. The basic requirement is that these conservation forms of moments can be exactly satisfied by weighted summation of distribution functions at discrete points. It was found that the integral quadrature by eight discrete points on the spherical surface, which forms the D3Q8 discrete velocity model, can exactly match the integral. In this way, the conservative variables and numerical fluxes can be computed by weighted summation of distribution functions at eight discrete points. That is, the application of complicated formulations resultant from integrals can be replaced by a simple solution process. Several numerical examples including laminar flat plate boundary layer, 3D lid-driven cavity flow, steady flow through a 90° bending square duct, transonic flow around DPW-W1 wing and supersonic flow around NACA0012 airfoil are chosen to validate the proposed scheme. Numerical results demonstrate that the present scheme can provide reasonable numerical results for 3D viscous flows.

  10. Computer modeling of flow and transport interactions for compressible Navier-Stokes equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mohamed Mizanur

    A unified numerical algorithm to simulate viscous flow with heat transfer over a wide range of Mach number and Reynolds number is developed. The governing equations used to model the numerical simulations are the 2-D compressible viscous Navier-Stokes equations. The numerical procedure is based on MacCormack's explicit 'predictor corrector' time dependent finite difference scheme. For an explicit scheme, a great number of iterations is required to get a converged steady solution because of a small time step. Vectorizing and parallelizing the code greatly alleviates this problem by reducing the total job running time manifold. The numerical algorithm, thus developed, is used to simulate such demanding and interacting flow problems as convection heat transfer in a cavity flow heat transfer enhancement by eddy-promoters, laminar/turbulent shock boundary layer interactions and unsteady shock boundary layer interactions over a compression corner. A detailed analysis of all important flow features that characterize such flows and the mechanisms that are involved, is performed for each individual case. The flow physics are discussed and new insights are provided. Results are compared with experimental data where available and the empirical relations between different flow properties or parameters are either established or verified where possible. Apart from these, some algorithm related questions, such as grid sensitivity, boundary conditions, convergence criteria, effects of artificial viscosity and the numerical stability are investigated.

  11. Equation of State for Shock Compression of High Distension Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Dennis

    2013-06-01

    Shock Hugoniot data for full-density and porous compounds of boron carbide, silicon dioxide, tantalum pentoxide, uranium dioxide and playa alluvium are investigated for the purpose of equation-of-state representation of intense shock compression. Complications of multivalued Hugoniot behavior characteristic of highly distended solids are addressed through the application of enthalpy-based equations of state of the form originally proposed by Rice and Walsh in the late 1950's. Additivity of cold and thermal pressure intrinsic to the Mie-Gruneisen EOS framework is replaced by isobaric additive functions of the cold and thermal specific volume components in the enthalpy-based formulation. Additionally, experimental evidence supports acceleration of shock-induced phase transformation on the Hugoniot with increasing levels of initial distention for silicon dioxide, uranium dioxide and possibly boron carbide. Methods for addressing this experimentally observed facet of the shock compression are introduced into the EOS model.

  12. Viscosity and compressibility of diacylglycerol under high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanowski, Aleksander; Rostocki, A. J.; Kiełczyński, P.; Szalewski, M.; Balcerzak, A.; Kościesza, R.; Tarakowski, R.; Ptasznik, S.; Siegoczyński, R. M.

    2013-03-01

    The influence of high pressure on viscosity and compressibility of diacylglycerol (DAG) oil has been presented in this paper. The investigated DAG oil was composed of 82% of DAGs and 18% TAGs (triacylglycerols). The dynamic viscosity of DAG was investigated as a function of the pressure up to 400 MPa. The viscosity was measured by means of the surface acoustic wave method, where the acoustic waveguides were used as sensing elements. As the pressure was rising, the larger ultrasonic wave attenuation was observed, whereas amplitude decreased with the liquid viscosity augmentation. Measured changes of physical properties were most significant in the pressure range near the phase transition. Deeper understanding of DAG viscosity and compressibility changes versus pressure could shed more light on thermodynamic properties of edible oils.

  13. A high-power SLED 2 pulse compression system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroll, N.M. [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Farkas, Z.D.; Lavine, T.L.; Menegat, A.; Ruth, R.D.; Wilson, P.B. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Nantista, C. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1992-03-01

    The enhancement of peak power by means of RF pulse compression has found important application for driving high energy electron linacs, the SLAC linac in particular. The SLAC Energy Doubler (SLED), however, yields a pulse shape in the form of a decaying exponential which limits the applicability of the method. Two methods of improving this situation have been suggested: binary pulse compression (BPC), in which the pulse is compressed by successive factors of two, and SLED II in which the pair of resonant cavities of SLED are replaced by long resonant delay lines (typically waveguides). Intermediate schemes in which the cavity pair is replaced by sequences of coupled cavities have also been considered. In this paper we describe our efforts towards the design and construction of high-power SLED II systems, which are intended to provide drivers for various advanced accelerator test facilities and potentially for the Next Linear Collider itself. The design path we have chosen requires the development of a number of microwave components in overmoded waveguide, and the bulk of this paper will be devoted to reporting our progress.

  14. Compression of structured high-throughput sequencing data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Campagne

    Full Text Available Large biological datasets are being produced at a rapid pace and create substantial storage challenges, particularly in the domain of high-throughput sequencing (HTS. Most approaches currently used to store HTS data are either unable to quickly adapt to the requirements of new sequencing or analysis methods (because they do not support schema evolution, or fail to provide state of the art compression of the datasets. We have devised new approaches to store HTS data that support seamless data schema evolution and compress datasets substantially better than existing approaches. Building on these new approaches, we discuss and demonstrate how a multi-tier data organization can dramatically reduce the storage, computational and network burden of collecting, analyzing, and archiving large sequencing datasets. For instance, we show that spliced RNA-Seq alignments can be stored in less than 4% the size of a BAM file with perfect data fidelity. Compared to the previous compression state of the art, these methods reduce dataset size more than 40% when storing exome, gene expression or DNA methylation datasets. The approaches have been integrated in a comprehensive suite of software tools (http://goby.campagnelab.org that support common analyses for a range of high-throughput sequencing assays.

  15. High-resolution three-dimensional imaging with compress sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingyi; Ke, Jun

    2016-10-01

    LIDAR three-dimensional imaging technology have been used in many fields, such as military detection. However, LIDAR require extremely fast data acquisition speed. This makes the manufacture of detector array for LIDAR system is very difficult. To solve this problem, we consider using compress sensing which can greatly decrease the data acquisition and relax the requirement of a detection device. To use the compressive sensing idea, a spatial light modulator will be used to modulate the pulsed light source. Then a photodetector is used to receive the reflected light. A convex optimization problem is solved to reconstruct the 2D depth map of the object. To improve the resolution in transversal direction, we use multiframe image restoration technology. For each 2D piecewise-planar scene, we move the SLM half-pixel each time. Then the position where the modulated light illuminates will changed accordingly. We repeat moving the SLM to four different directions. Then we can get four low-resolution depth maps with different details of the same plane scene. If we use all of the measurements obtained by the subpixel movements, we can reconstruct a high-resolution depth map of the sense. A linear minimum-mean-square error algorithm is used for the reconstruction. By combining compress sensing and multiframe image restoration technology, we reduce the burden on data analyze and improve the efficiency of detection. More importantly, we obtain high-resolution depth maps of a 3D scene.

  16. Suppression mechanism of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in compressible fluid flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Mona; Girimaji, Sharath S

    2016-04-01

    The transformative influence of compressibility on the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) at the interface between two fluid streams of different velocities is explicated. When the velocity difference is small (subsonic), shear effects dominate the interface flow dynamics causing monotonic roll-up of vorticity and mixing between the two streams leading to the KHI. We find that at supersonic speed differentials, compressibility forces the dominance of dilatational (acoustic) rather than shear dynamics at the interface. Within this dilatational interface layer, traveling pressure waves cause the velocity perturbations to become oscillatory. We demonstrate that the oscillatory fluid motion reverses vortex roll-up and segregates the two streams leading to KHI suppression. Analysis and illustrations of the compressibility-induced suppression mechanism are presented.

  17. Intermittency and universality in fully-developed inviscid and weakly-compressible turbulent flows

    OpenAIRE

    Benzi, R; Biferale, L Luca; Fisher, RT; Kadanoff, LP; Lamb, DQ; Toschi, F Federico

    2008-01-01

    We performed high resolution numerical simulations of homogenous and isotropic compressible turbulence, with an average 3D Mach number close to 0.3. We study the statistical properties of intermittency for velocity, density and entropy. For the velocity field, which is the primary quantity that can be compared to the isotropic incompressible case, we find no statistical differences in its behavior in the inertial range due either to the slight compressibility or to the different dissipative m...

  18. Nonlinear theory of magnetohydrodynamic flows of a compressible fluid in the shallow water approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimachkov, D. A.; Petrosyan, A. S.

    2016-09-01

    Shallow water magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory describing incompressible flows of plasma is generalized to the case of compressible flows. A system of MHD equations is obtained that describes the flow of a thin layer of compressible rotating plasma in a gravitational field in the shallow water approximation. The system of quasilinear hyperbolic equations obtained admits a complete simple wave analysis and a solution to the initial discontinuity decay problem in the simplest version of nonrotating flows. In the new equations, sound waves are filtered out, and the dependence of density on pressure on large scales is taken into account that describes static compressibility phenomena. In the equations obtained, the mass conservation law is formulated for a variable that nontrivially depends on the shape of the lower boundary, the characteristic vertical scale of the flow, and the scale of heights at which the variation of density becomes significant. A simple wave theory is developed for the system of equations obtained. All self-similar discontinuous solutions and all continuous centered self-similar solutions of the system are obtained. The initial discontinuity decay problem is solved explicitly for compressible MHD equations in the shallow water approximation. It is shown that there exist five different configurations that provide a solution to the initial discontinuity decay problem. For each configuration, conditions are found that are necessary and sufficient for its implementation. Differences between incompressible and compressible cases are analyzed. In spite of the formal similarity between the solutions in the classical case of MHD flows of an incompressible and compressible fluids, the nonlinear dynamics described by the solutions are essentially different due to the difference in the expressions for the squared propagation velocity of weak perturbations. In addition, the solutions obtained describe new physical phenomena related to the dependence of the

  19. Development of a three dimensional compressible flow calibration facility for thermal anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Evan Samson Sprung

    Measurements of unsteady, three-dimensional turbomachinery flowfields are needed to improve the computational models in predictive tools used in the design process of new turbomachines. Hot-wire anemometers, which offer a high frequency response for a relatively low cost, are one of the most common methods for investigating turbulent flows. Triple-wire sensors provide a means of obtaining simultaneous measurements of all three velocity components but require a significantly more complicated calibration scheme than single-wire sensors. In addition, the heat transfer from a hot-wire is dependent not only on the flow velocity but also the temperature and density, which must be accounted for through calibration and correction factors. To enable triple-wire hot-wire measurements in the Purdue 3-Stage Axial Compressor Facility, a new compressible flow calibration facility has been developed which can position the probe through a range of pitch and yaw angles and provide a means to derive temperature and density correction factors specific to each probe. A lookup table method is used to convert the voltage signals back to velocities and angles. The calibration facility can reach velocities in excess of 500 ft/s, temperatures up to 155°F and densities up to 0.090 lbm/ft3. The velocity is accurate to within 3.5 ft/s, temperature control accurate to within 1°F and density to within 5.5x10-5 lbm/ft3. A triple-wire fiber-film probe was used to validate the calibration method, and was able to resolve the three-dimensional flowfield downstream of a rotor.

  20. Modelling compressible multiphase flows Quelques résultats concernant la modélisation des écoulements multiphasiques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coquel Frédéric

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We give in this paper a short review of some recent achievements within the framework of multiphase flow modeling. We focus first on a class of compressible two-phase flow models, detailing closure laws and their main properties. Next we briefly summarize some attempts to model two-phase flows in a porous region, and also a class of compressible three-phase flow models. Some of the main difficulties arising in the numerical simulation of solutions of these complex and highly non-linear systems of PDEs are then discussed, and we eventually show some numerical results when tackling two-phase flows with mass transfer. Nous présentons dans cet article quelques résultats récents concernant la modélisation et la simulation numérique des écoulements multiphasiques. Nous nous concentrons tout d’abord sur une classe de modèles diphasiques compressibles, en détaillant les lois de fermeture et les principales propriétés du sytème. Nous résumons ensuite brièvement les propositions de modélisation d’écoulements diphasiques en milieu poreux et d’écoulements triphasiques. Quelques difficultés apparaissant dans la simulation numérique de ces modèles sont présentées, et des résultats récents comportant un transfert de masse entre phases sont finalement décrits.

  1. Nonaffine deformation under compression and decompression of a flow-stabilized solid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Carlos P.; Riehn, Robert; Daniels, Karen E.

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the particle-scale transition from elastic deformation to plastic flow is central to making predictions about the bulk material properties and response of disordered materials. To address this issue, we perform experiments on flow-stabilized solids composed of micron-scale spheres within a microfluidic channel, in a regime where particle inertia is negligible. Each solid heap exists within a stress field imposed by the flow, and we track the positions of particles in response to single impulses of fluid-driven compression or decompression. We find that the resulting deformation field is well-decomposed into an affine field, with a constant strain profile throughout the solid, and a non-affine field. The magnitude of this non-affine response decays with the distance from the free surface in the long-time limit, suggesting that the distance from jamming plays a significant role in controlling the length scale of plastic flow. Finally, we observe that compressive pulses create more rearrangements than decompressive pulses, an effect that we quantify using the D\\text{min}2 statistic for non-affine motion. Unexpectedly, the time scale for the compression response is shorter than for decompression at the same strain (but unequal pressure), providing insight into the coupling between deformation and cage-breaking.

  2. Turbulence models and Reynolds analogy for two-dimensional supersonic compression ramp flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chi R.; Bidek, Maleina C.

    1994-01-01

    Results of the application of turbulence models and the Reynolds analogy to the Navier-Stokes computations of Mach 2.9 two-dimensional compression ramp flows are presented. The Baldwin-Lomax eddy viscosity model and the kappa-epsilon turbulence transport equations for the turbulent momentum flux modeling in the Navier-Stokes equations are studied. The Reynolds analogy for the turbulent heat flux modeling in the energy equation was also studied. The Navier-Stokes equations and the energy equation were numerically solved for the flow properties. The Reynolds shear stress, the skin friction factor, and the surface heat transfer rate were calculated and compared with their measurements. It was concluded that with a hybrid kappa-epsilon turbulence model for turbulence modeling, the present computations predicted the skin friction factors of the 8 deg and 16 deg compression ramp flows and with the turbulent Prandtl number Pr(sub t) = 0.93 and the ratio of the turbulent thermal and momentum transport coefficients mu(sub q)/mu(sub t) = 2/Prt, the present computations also predicted the surface heat transfer rates beneath the boundary layer flow of the 16 compression ramp.

  3. On the unsteady inviscid force on cylinders and spheres in subcritical compressible flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, M; Haselbacher, A; Balachandar, S

    2008-06-28

    The unsteady inviscid force on cylinders and spheres in subcritical compressible flow is investigated. In the limit of incompressible flow, the unsteady inviscid force on a cylinder or sphere is the so-called added-mass force that is proportional to the product of the mass displaced by the body and the instantaneous acceleration. In compressible flow, the finite acoustic propagation speed means that the unsteady inviscid force arising from an instantaneously applied constant acceleration develops gradually and reaches steady values only for non-dimensional times c(infinity)t/R approximately >10, where c(infinity) is the freestream speed of sound and R is the radius of the cylinder or sphere. In this limit, an effective added-mass coefficient may be defined. The main conclusion of our study is that the freestream Mach number has a pronounced effect on both the peak value of the unsteady force and the effective added-mass coefficient. At a freestream Mach number of 0.5, the effective added-mass coefficient is about twice as large as the incompressible value for the sphere. Coupled with an impulsive acceleration, the unsteady inviscid force in compressible flow can be more than four times larger than that predicted from incompressible theory. Furthermore, the effect of the ratio of specific heats on the unsteady force becomes more pronounced as the Mach number increases.

  4. Ensemble Averaged Probability Density Function (APDF) for Compressible Turbulent Reacting Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present a concept of the averaged probability density function (APDF) for studying compressible turbulent reacting flows. The APDF is defined as an ensemble average of the fine grained probability density function (FG-PDF) with a mass density weighting. It can be used to exactly deduce the mass density weighted, ensemble averaged turbulent mean variables. The transport equation for APDF can be derived in two ways. One is the traditional way that starts from the transport equation of FG-PDF, in which the compressible Navier- Stokes equations are embedded. The resulting transport equation of APDF is then in a traditional form that contains conditional means of all terms from the right hand side of the Navier-Stokes equations except for the chemical reaction term. These conditional means are new unknown quantities that need to be modeled. Another way of deriving the transport equation of APDF is to start directly from the ensemble averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The resulting transport equation of APDF derived from this approach appears in a closed form without any need for additional modeling. The methodology of ensemble averaging presented in this paper can be extended to other averaging procedures: for example, the Reynolds time averaging for statistically steady flow and the Reynolds spatial averaging for statistically homogeneous flow. It can also be extended to a time or spatial filtering procedure to construct the filtered density function (FDF) for the large eddy simulation (LES) of compressible turbulent reacting flows.

  5. Strength Regularity and Failure Criterion of High-Strength High-Performance Concrete under Multiaxial Compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Zhen-jun; SONG Yu-pu

    2008-01-01

    Multiaxial compression tests were performed on 100 mm × 100 mm × 100 nun high-strength high-performance concrete (HSHPC) cubes and normal strength concrete (NSC) cubes. The failure modes of specimens were presented, the static compressive strengths in principal directions were measured, the influence of the stress ratios was analyzed. The experimental results show that the ultimate strengths for HSHPC and NSC under multiaxial compression are greater than the uniaxial compressive strengths at all stress ratios, and the multiaxial strength is dependent on the brittleness and stiffness of concrete, the stress state and the stress ratios. In addition, the Kupfer-Gerstle and Ottosen's failure criteria for plain HSHPC and NSC under multiaxial compressive loading were modified.

  6. A new limiting procedure for discontinuous Galerkin methods applied to compressible multiphase flows with shocks and interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry de Frahan, Marc T.; Varadan, Sreenivas; Johnsen, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Although the Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method has seen widespread use for compressible flow problems in a single fluid with constant material properties, it has yet to be implemented in a consistent fashion for compressible multiphase flows with shocks and interfaces. Specifically, it is challenging to design a scheme that meets the following requirements: conservation, high-order accuracy in smooth regions and non-oscillatory behavior at discontinuities (in particular, material interfaces). Following the interface-capturing approach of Abgrall [1], we model flows of multiple fluid components or phases using a single equation of state with variable material properties; discontinuities in these properties correspond to interfaces. To represent compressible phenomena in solids, liquids, and gases, we present our analysis for equations of state belonging to the Mie-Grüneisen family. Within the DG framework, we propose a conservative, high-order accurate, and non-oscillatory limiting procedure, verified with simple multifluid and multiphase problems. We show analytically that two key elements are required to prevent spurious pressure oscillations at interfaces and maintain conservation: (i) the transport equation(s) describing the material properties must be solved in a non-conservative weak form, and (ii) the suitable variables must be limited (density, momentum, pressure, and appropriate properties entering the equation of state), coupled with a consistent reconstruction of the energy. Further, we introduce a physics-based discontinuity sensor to apply limiting in a solution-adaptive fashion. We verify this approach with one- and two-dimensional problems with shocks and interfaces, including high pressure and density ratios, for fluids obeying different equations of state to illustrate the robustness and versatility of the method. The algorithm is implemented on parallel graphics processing units (GPU) to achieve high speedup.

  7. Turbulent Compressible Convection with Rotation. Part 1; Flow Structure and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummell, Nicholas H.; Hurlburt, Neal E.; Toomre, Juri

    1996-01-01

    The effects of Coriolis forces on compressible convection are studied using three-dimensional numerical simulations carried out within a local modified f-plane model. The physics is simplified by considering a perfect gas occupying a rectilinear domain placed tangentially to a rotating sphere at various latitudes, through which a destabilizing heat flux is driven. The resulting convection is considered for a range of Rayleigh, Taylor, and Prandtl (and thus Rossby) numbers, evaluating conditions where the influence of rotation is both weak and strong. Given the computational demands of these high-resolution simulations, the parameter space is explored sparsely to ascertain the differences between laminar and turbulent rotating convection. The first paper in this series examines the effects of rotation on the flow structure within the convection, its evolution, and some consequences for mixing. Subsequent papers consider the large-scale mean shear flows that are generated by the convection, and the effects of rotation on the convective energetics and transport properties. It is found here that the structure of rotating turbulent convection is similar to earlier nonrotating studies, with a laminar, cellular surface network disguising a fully turbulent interior punctuated by vertically coherent structures. However, the temporal signature of the surface flows is modified by inertial motions to yield new cellular evolution patterns and an overall increase in the mobility of the network. The turbulent convection contains vortex tubes of many scales, including large-scale coherent structures spanning the full vertical extent of the domain involving multiple density scale heights. Remarkably, such structures align with the rotation vector via the influence of Coriolis forces on turbulent motions, in contrast with the zonal tilting of streamlines found in laminar flows. Such novel turbulent mechanisms alter the correlations which drive mean shearing flows and affect the

  8. Finite volume - space-time discontinuous Galerkin method for the solution of compressible turbulent flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Česenek Jan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we deal with numerical simulation of the non-stationary compressible turbulent flow. Compressible turbulent flow is described by the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations. This RANS system is equipped with two-equation k-omega turbulence model. These two systems of equations are solved separately. Discretization of the RANS system is carried out by the space-time discontinuous Galerkin method which is based on piecewise polynomial discontinuous approximation of the sought solution in space and in time. Discretization of the two-equation k-omega turbulence model is carried out by the implicit finite volume method, which is based on piecewise constant approximation of the sought solution. We present some numerical experiments to demonstrate the applicability of the method using own-developed code.

  9. Global existence and incompressible limit in critical spaces for compressible flow of liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bie, Qunyi; Cui, Haibo; Wang, Qiru; Yao, Zheng-An

    2017-10-01

    The Cauchy problem for the compressible flow of nematic liquid crystals in the framework of critical spaces is considered. We first establish the existence and uniqueness of global solutions provided that the initial data are close to some equilibrium states. This result improves the work by Hu and Wu (SIAM J Math Anal 45(5):2678-2699, 2013) through relaxing the regularity requirement of the initial data in terms of the director field. Based on the global existence, we then consider the incompressible limit problem for ill prepared initial data. We prove that as the Mach number tends to zero, the global solution to the compressible flow of liquid crystals converges to the solution to the corresponding incompressible model in some function spaces. Moreover, the accurate converge rates are obtained.

  10. A parallel and matrix free framework for global stability analysis of compressible flows

    CERN Document Server

    Henze, O; Sesterhenn, J

    2015-01-01

    An numerical iterative framework for global modal stability analysis of compressible flows using a parallel environment is presented. The framework uses a matrix-free implementation to allow computations of large scale problems. Various methods are tested with regard to convergence acceleration of the framework. The methods consist of a spectral Cayley transformation used to select desired Eigenvalues from a large spectrum, an improved linear solver and a parallel block-Jacobi preconditioning scheme.

  11. Integrated LTCC Pressure/Flow/Temperature Multisensor for Compressed Air Diagnostics†

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolas Craquelin; Aurélie Barras; Peter Ryser; Grégoire Boutinard-Rouelle; Yannick Fournier; Thomas Maeder

    2010-01-01

    We present a multisensor designed for industrial compressed air diagnostics and combining the measurement of pressure, flow, and temperature, integrated with the corresponding signal conditioning electronics in a single low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) package. The developed sensor may be soldered onto an integrated electro-fluidic platform by using standard surface mount device (SMD) technology, e.g., as a standard electronic component would be on a printed circuit board, obviating th...

  12. High Strain Rate Compressive Tests on Woven Graphite Epoxy Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allazadeh, Mohammad Reza; Wosu, Sylvanus N.

    2011-08-01

    The behavior of composite materials may be different when they are subjected to high strain rate load. Penetrating split Hopkinson pressure bar (P-SHPB) is a method to impose high strain rate on specimen in the laboratory experiments. This research work studied the response of the thin circular shape specimens, made out of woven graphite epoxy composites, to high strain rate impact load. The stress-strain relationships and behavior of the specimens were investigated during the compressive dynamic tests for strain rates as high as 3200 s-1. One dimensional analysis was deployed for analytical calculations since the experiments fulfilled the ratio of diameter to length of bars condition in impact load experiments. The mechanics of dynamic failure was studied and the results showed the factors which govern the failure mode in high strain deformation via absorbed energy by the specimen. In this paper, the relation of particle velocity with perforation depth was discussed for woven graphite epoxy specimens.

  13. A tabulation of pipe length to diameter ratios as a function of Mach number and pressure ratios for compressible flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, G. V.; Barringer, S. R.; Gray, C. E.; Leatherman, A. D.

    1975-01-01

    Computer programs and resulting tabulations are presented of pipeline length-to-diameter ratios as a function of Mach number and pressure ratios for compressible flow. The tabulations are applicable to air, nitrogen, oxygen, and hydrogen for compressible isothermal flow with friction and compressible adiabatic flow with friction. Also included are equations for the determination of weight flow. The tabulations presented cover a wider range of Mach numbers for choked, adiabatic flow than available from commonly used engineering literature. Additional information presented, but which is not available from this literature, is unchoked, adiabatic flow over a wide range of Mach numbers, and choked and unchoked, isothermal flow for a wide range of Mach numbers.

  14. Propagation of Shock on NREL Phase VI Wind Turbine Airfoil under Compressible Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A. Hossain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The work is focused on numeric analysis of compressible flow around National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL phase VI wind turbine blade airfoil S809. Although wind turbine airfoils are low Reynolds number airfoils, a reasonable investigation of compressible flow under extreme condition might be helpful. A subsonic flow (mach no. M=0.8 has been considered for this analysis and the impacts of this flow under seven different angles of attack have been determined. The results show that shock takes place just after the mid span at the top surface and just before the mid span at the bottom surface at zero angle of attack. Slowly the shock waves translate their positions as angle of attack increases. A relative translation of the shock waves in upper and lower face of the airfoil are presented. Variation of Turbulent viscosity ratio and surface Y+ have also been determined. A k-ω SST turbulent model is considered and the commercial CFD code ANSYS FLUENT is used to find the pressure coefficient (Cp as well as the lift (CL and drag coefficients (CD. A graphical comparison of shock propagation has been shown with different angle of attack. Flow separation and stream function are also determined.

  15. Integrating a compressible multicomponent two-phase flow into an existing reactive transport simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Irina; Lagneau, Vincent; Corvisier, Jérôme

    2017-02-01

    This work aims to incorporate compressible multiphase flow into the conventional reactive transport framework using an operator splitting approach. This new approach would allow us to retain the general paradigm of the flow module independent of the geochemical processes and to model complex multiphase chemical systems, conserving the versatile structure of conventional reactive transport. The phase flow formulation is employed to minimize the number of mass conservation nonlinear equations arising from the flow module. Applying appropriate equations of state facilitated precise descriptions of the compressible multicomponent phases, their thermodynamic properties and relevant fluxes. The proposed flow coupling method was implemented in the reactive transport software HYTEC. The entire framework preserves its flexibility for further numerical developments. The verification of the coupling was achieved by modeling a problem with a self-similar solution. The simulation of a 2D CO2-injection problem demonstrates the pertinent physical results and computational efficiency of this method. The coupling method was employed for modeling injection of acid gas mixture in carbonated reservoir.

  16. High frequency chest compression therapy: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, S; O'Neill, B

    1995-01-01

    A new device, the ThAIRapy Bronchial Drainage System, enables patients with cystic fibrosis to self-administer the technique of high frequency chest compression (HFCC) to assist with mucociliary clearance. We review the literature on HFCC and outline a case study of a patient currently using the ThAIRapy Bronchial Drainage System. While mucociliary clearance and lung function may be enhanced by HFCC therapy, more research is needed to determine its efficacy, cost benefits, and optimum treatment guidelines. Although our initial experience with the patient using this device has been positive, we were unable to accurately evaluate the ThAIRapy Bronchial Drainage System.

  17. Dynamic High-Temperature Characterization of an Iridium Alloy in Compression at High Strain Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Bo [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Experimental Environment Simulation Dept.; Nelson, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Mechanics of Materials Dept.; Lipinski, Ronald J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology Dept.; Bignell, John L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Structural and Thermal Analysis Dept.; Ulrich, G. B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Radioisotope Power Systems Program; George, E. P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Radioisotope Power Systems Program

    2014-06-01

    Iridium alloys have superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures, making them useful as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications. However, experimental data on their high-temperature high-strain-rate performance are needed for understanding high-speed impacts in severe elevated-temperature environments. Kolsky bars (also called split Hopkinson bars) have been extensively employed for high-strain-rate characterization of materials at room temperature, but it has been challenging to adapt them for the measurement of dynamic properties at high temperatures. Current high-temperature Kolsky compression bar techniques are not capable of obtaining satisfactory high-temperature high-strain-rate stress-strain response of thin iridium specimens investigated in this study. We analyzed the difficulties encountered in high-temperature Kolsky compression bar testing of thin iridium alloy specimens. Appropriate modifications were made to the current high-temperature Kolsky compression bar technique to obtain reliable compressive stress-strain response of an iridium alloy at high strain rates (300 – 10000 s-1) and temperatures (750°C and 1030°C). Uncertainties in such high-temperature high-strain-rate experiments on thin iridium specimens were also analyzed. The compressive stress-strain response of the iridium alloy showed significant sensitivity to strain rate and temperature.

  18. Flow stress and tribology size effects in scaled down cylinder compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Bin; GONG Feng; WANG Chun-ju; SHAN De-bin

    2009-01-01

    Microforming is an effective method to manufacture small metal parts. However, macro forming can not be transferred to microforming directly because of size effects. Flow stress and tribology size effects were studied. Scaled down copper T2 cylinder compression was carried out with the lubrication of castor oil and without lubrication. The results show that the flow stress decreases with decreasing the initial specimen diameter in both lubrication conditions, and the flow stress decreases by 30 MPa with the initial specimen diameter decreasing from 8 mm to 1 mm. The friction factor increases obviously with decreasing the initial specimen diameter in the case of lubricating with castor oil, and the friction factor increases by 0.11 with the initial specimen diameter decreasing from 8mm to 1mm. However, the tribology size effect is not found in the case without lubrication. The reasons of the flow stress and tribology size effects were also discussed.

  19. Amplification, attenuation, and dispersion of sound in inhomogeneous flows. [of compressible gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentzer, C. P.

    1975-01-01

    First order effects of gradients in nonuniform potential flows of a compressible gas are included in a dispersion relation for sound waves. Three nondimensional numbers, the ratio of the change in the kinetic energy in one wavelength to the thermal energy of the gas, the ratio of the change in the total energy in one wavelength to the thermal energy, and the ratio of the dilatation frequency (the rate of expansion per unit volume) to the acoustic frequency, play the dominant role permitting the separation of the effects of flow gradients into isotropic and anisotropic effects. Dispersion and attenuation (or amplification) of sound are proportional to the wavelength for small wavelength and depend on the direction of wave propagation relative to flow gradients. Modification of ray acoustics for the effects of flow gradients is suggested and conditions for amplification and attenuation of sound are discussed.

  20. Numerical simulations on the flow fields of dynamic axial compression columns in chromatography processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien Liang, Ru; Che Liu, Cheng; Tsai Liang, Ming; Chen, Jiann Lin

    2017-02-01

    Dynamic axial compression (DAC) columns are key elements in Simulated Moving Bed, which is a chromatography process in drug industry and chemical engineering. In this study, we apply the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique to analyze the flow fields in the DAC column and propose rules for distributor design based on mass conservation in fluid dynamics. Computer aided design (CAD) is used in constructing the numerical 3D modelling for the mesh system. The laminar flow fields with Darcy’s law to model the porous zone are governed by the Navier-Stokes equations and employed to describe the porous flow fields. Experimental works have been conducted as the benchmark for us to choose feasible porous parameters for CFD. Besides, numerical treatments are elaborated to avoid calculation divergence resulting from large source terms. Results show that CFD combined with CAD is a good approach to investigate detailed flow fields in DAC columns and the design for distributors is straightforward.

  1. Near Continuum Velocity and Temperature Coupled Compressible Boundary Layer Flow over a Flat Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xin; Cai, Chunpei

    2017-04-01

    The problem of a compressible gas flows over a flat plate with the velocity-slip and temperature-jump boundary conditions are being studied. The standard single- shooting method is applied to obtain the exact solutions for velocity and temperature profiles when the momentum and energy equations are weakly coupled. A double-shooting method is applied if these two equations are closely coupled. If the temperature affects the velocity directly, more significant velocity slip happens at locations closer to the plate's leading edge, and inflections on the velocity profiles appear, indicating flows may become unstable. As a consequence, the temperature-jump and velocity-slip boundary conditions may trigger earlier flow transitions from a laminar to a turbulent flow state.

  2. A finite-volume HLLC-based scheme for compressible interfacial flows with surface tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrick, Daniel P. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Owkes, Mark [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT (United States); Regele, Jonathan D., E-mail: jregele@iastate.edu [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Shock waves are often used in experiments to create a shear flow across liquid droplets to study secondary atomization. Similar behavior occurs inside of supersonic combustors (scramjets) under startup conditions, but it is challenging to study these conditions experimentally. In order to investigate this phenomenon further, a numerical approach is developed to simulate compressible multiphase flows under the effects of surface tension forces. The flow field is solved via the compressible multicomponent Euler equations (i.e., the five equation model) discretized with the finite volume method on a uniform Cartesian grid. The solver utilizes a total variation diminishing (TVD) third-order Runge–Kutta method for time-marching and second order TVD spatial reconstruction. Surface tension is incorporated using the Continuum Surface Force (CSF) model. Fluxes are upwinded with a modified Harten–Lax–van Leer Contact (HLLC) approximate Riemann solver. An interface compression scheme is employed to counter numerical diffusion of the interface. The present work includes modifications to both the HLLC solver and the interface compression scheme to account for capillary force terms and the associated pressure jump across the gas–liquid interface. A simple method for numerically computing the interface curvature is developed and an acoustic scaling of the surface tension coefficient is proposed for the non-dimensionalization of the model. The model captures the surface tension induced pressure jump exactly if the exact curvature is known and is further verified with an oscillating elliptical droplet and Mach 1.47 and 3 shock-droplet interaction problems. The general characteristics of secondary atomization at a range of Weber numbers are also captured in a series of simulations.

  3. A finite-volume HLLC-based scheme for compressible interfacial flows with surface tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick, Daniel P.; Owkes, Mark; Regele, Jonathan D.

    2017-06-01

    Shock waves are often used in experiments to create a shear flow across liquid droplets to study secondary atomization. Similar behavior occurs inside of supersonic combustors (scramjets) under startup conditions, but it is challenging to study these conditions experimentally. In order to investigate this phenomenon further, a numerical approach is developed to simulate compressible multiphase flows under the effects of surface tension forces. The flow field is solved via the compressible multicomponent Euler equations (i.e., the five equation model) discretized with the finite volume method on a uniform Cartesian grid. The solver utilizes a total variation diminishing (TVD) third-order Runge-Kutta method for time-marching and second order TVD spatial reconstruction. Surface tension is incorporated using the Continuum Surface Force (CSF) model. Fluxes are upwinded with a modified Harten-Lax-van Leer Contact (HLLC) approximate Riemann solver. An interface compression scheme is employed to counter numerical diffusion of the interface. The present work includes modifications to both the HLLC solver and the interface compression scheme to account for capillary force terms and the associated pressure jump across the gas-liquid interface. A simple method for numerically computing the interface curvature is developed and an acoustic scaling of the surface tension coefficient is proposed for the non-dimensionalization of the model. The model captures the surface tension induced pressure jump exactly if the exact curvature is known and is further verified with an oscillating elliptical droplet and Mach 1.47 and 3 shock-droplet interaction problems. The general characteristics of secondary atomization at a range of Weber numbers are also captured in a series of simulations.

  4. Data Compression on Zero Suppressed High Energy Physics Data

    CERN Document Server

    Schindler, M; CERN. Geneva

    1996-01-01

    Future High Energy Physics experiments will produce unprecedented data volumes (up to 1 GB/s [1]). In most cases it will be impossible to analyse these data in real time and they will have to be stored on durable mostly magnetic linear media (e.g. tapes) for later analysis. This threatens to become a major cost factor for the running of these experiments. Here we present some ideas developed together with the Institute of Computer Graphics, Department for Algorithms and Programming on how this volume and the related cost can be reduced significantly. The algorithms presented are not general ones but aimed in particular to physics experiments data. Taking advantage of the knowledge of the data they are highly superior to general ones (Huffman, LZW, arithmetic coding) both in compression rate but more importantly in speed as to keep up with the output rate to modern tape drives. Above standard algorithms are, however, used after the data have been transferred in a more 'compressible' data space. These algorithm...

  5. THE TURBULENT DYNAMO IN HIGHLY COMPRESSIBLE SUPERSONIC PLASMAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federrath, Christoph [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Schober, Jennifer [Universität Heidelberg, Zentrum für Astronomie, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Strasse 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bovino, Stefano; Schleicher, Dominik R. G., E-mail: christoph.federrath@anu.edu.au [Institut für Astrophysik, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2014-12-20

    The turbulent dynamo may explain the origin of cosmic magnetism. While the exponential amplification of magnetic fields has been studied for incompressible gases, little is known about dynamo action in highly compressible, supersonic plasmas, such as the interstellar medium of galaxies and the early universe. Here we perform the first quantitative comparison of theoretical models of the dynamo growth rate and saturation level with three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of supersonic turbulence with grid resolutions of up to 1024{sup 3} cells. We obtain numerical convergence and find that dynamo action occurs for both low and high magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm = ν/η = 0.1-10 (the ratio of viscous to magnetic dissipation), which had so far only been seen for Pm ≥ 1 in supersonic turbulence. We measure the critical magnetic Reynolds number, Rm{sub crit}=129{sub −31}{sup +43}, showing that the compressible dynamo is almost as efficient as in incompressible gas. Considering the physical conditions of the present and early universe, we conclude that magnetic fields need to be taken into account during structure formation from the early to the present cosmic ages, because they suppress gas fragmentation and drive powerful jets and outflows, both greatly affecting the initial mass function of stars.

  6. Design of High Compressive Strength Concrete Mix without Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akasha, N, M

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the crashed Basalt and uncrushed granite is used in concrete mixes as coarse aggregate. The selected materials, with high specification using special production techniques, the properties ,the mix design procedure and mix proportion of the high strength concrete (HSC were discussed. Different proportions of Ordinary Portland cement (410,430 and 450 kg/m3 with different crashed Basalt and uncrushed Granite coarse aggregate amount (1120 and 1050 kg/m3 and fine aggregate with fine modulus of 3.65 were used. Eight concrete mixes were prepared: two as control mix for crashed Basalt and uncrushed Granite, three with crashed Basalt and three with uncrushed Granite coarse aggregate with mix amount(410:680:1120,430:610:1050 and 450:550:1050 kg/m3,(cement: fine aggregate: coarse aggregaterespectively. The study showed that the use of granite coarse aggregate in concrete mixes has a clear effect in mix proportion. The compressive strength of concrete was measured at ages of 7, 28 and 56 days and it was found that the granite (Mix3 of (450:550:1050 kg/m3 with w/c of 0.46 give the highest of strength in 28 and 56 days among the abovementioned mixes its 56 and 64 N/mm2 respectively. The paper shows that good results of compressive strength and workability of concrete were obtained when using granite coarse aggregate.

  7. Initial Results on Neutralized Drift Compression Experiments (NDCX-IA) for High Intensity Ion Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Prabir K; Baca, David; Bieniosek, Frank; Coleman, Joshua E; Davidson, Ronald C; Efthimion, Philip; Eylon, Shmuel; Gilson, Erik P; Grant Logan, B; Greenway, Wayne; Henestroza, Enrique; Kaganovich, Igor D; Leitner, Matthaeus; Rose, David; Sefkow, Adam; Sharp, William M; Shuman, Derek; Thoma, Carsten H; Vanecek, David; Waldron, William; Welch, Dale; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    Ion beam neutralization and compression experiments are designed to determine the feasibility of using compressed high intensity ion beams for high energy density physics (HEDP) experiments and for inertial fusion power. To quantitatively ascertain the various mechanisms and methods for beam compression, the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) facility is being constructed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). In the first compression experiment, a 260 KeV, 25 mA, K+ ion beam of centimeters size is radially compressed to a mm size spot by neutralization in a meter-long plasma column and beam peak current is longitudinally compressed by an induction velocity tilt core. Instrumentation, preliminary results of the experiments, and practical limits of compression are presented. These include parameters such as emittance, degree of neutralization, velocity tilt time profile, and accuracy of measurements (fast and spatially high resolution diagnostic) are discussed.

  8. High strain rate compression testing of glass fibre reinforced polypropylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cloete T.J.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper details an investigation of the high strain rate compression testing of GFPP with the Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB in the through-thickness and in-plane directions. GFPP posed challenges to SHPB testing as it fails at relatively high stresses, while having relatively low moduli and hence mechanical impedance. The modifications to specimen geometry and incident pulse shaping in order to gather valid test results, where specimen equilibrium was achieved for SHPB tests on GFPP are presented. In addition to conventional SHPB tests to failure, SHPB experiments were designed to achieve specimen equilibration at small strains, which permitted the capture of high strain rate elastic modulus data. The strain rate dependency of GFPP’s failure strengths in the in-plane and through-thickness direction is modelled using a logarithmic law.

  9. Three-dimensional supersonic flow around double compression ramp with finite span

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. H.; Park, G.; Park, S. H.; Byun, Y. H.

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional flows of Mach number 3 around a double-compression ramp with finite span have been investigated numerically. Shadowgraph visualisation images obtained in a supersonic wind tunnel are used for comparison. A three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver was used to obtain steady numerical solutions. Two-dimensional numerical results are also compared. Four different cases were studied: two different second ramp angles of 30° and 45° in configurations with and without sidewalls, respectively. Results showed that there is a leakage of mass and momentum fluxes heading outwards in the spanwise direction for three-dimensional cases without sidewalls. The leakage changed the flow characteristics of the shock-induced boundary layer and resulted in the discrepancy between the experimental data and two-dimensional numerical results. It is found that suppressing the flow leakage by attaching the sidewalls enhances the two-dimensionality of the experimental data for the double-compression ramp flow.

  10. A Simple and Efficient Diffuse Interface Method for Compressible Two-Phase Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray A. Berry; Richard Saurel; Fabien Petitpas

    2009-05-01

    In nuclear reactor safety and optimization there are key issues that rely on in-depth understanding of basic two-phase flow phenomena with heat and mass transfer. For many reasons, to be discussed, there is growing interest in the application of two-phase flow models to provide diffuse, but nevertheless resolved, simulation of interfaces between two immiscible compressible fluids – diffuse interface method (DIM). Because of its ability to dynamically create interfaces and to solve interfaces separating pure media and mixtures for DNS-like (Direct Numerical Simulation) simulations of interfacial flows, we examine the construction of a simple, robust, fast, and accurate numerical formulation for the 5-equation Kapila et al. [1] reduced two-phase model. Though apparently simple, the Kapila et al. model contains a volume fraction differential transport equation containing a nonlinear, non-conservative term which poses serious computational challenges. To circumvent the difficulties encountered with the single velocity and single pressure Kapila et al. [1] multiphase flow model, a 6-equation relaxation hyperbolic model is built to solve interface problems with compressible fluids. In this approach, pressure non-equilibrium is first restored, followed by a relaxation to an asymptotic solution which is convergent to the solutions of the Kapila et al. reduced model. The apparent complexity introduced with this extended hyperbolic model actually leads to considerable simplifications regarding numerical resolution, and the various ingredients used by this method are general enough to consider future extensions to problems involving complex physics.

  11. High-Compression-Ratio; Atkinson-Cycle Engine Using Low-Pressure Direct Injection and Pneumatic-Electronic Valve Actuation Enabled by Ionization Current and Foward-Backward Mass Air Flow Sensor Feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harold Schock; Farhad Jaberi; Ahmed Naguib; Guoming Zhu; David Hung

    2007-12-31

    This report describes the work completed over a two and one half year effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy. The goal was to demonstrate the technology needed to produce a highly efficient engine enabled by several technologies which were to be developed in the course of the work. The technologies included: (1) A low-pressure direct injection system; (2) A mass air flow sensor which would measure the net airflow into the engine on a per cycle basis; (3) A feedback control system enabled by measuring ionization current signals from the spark plug gap; and (4) An infinitely variable cam actuation system based on a pneumatic-hydraulic valve actuation These developments were supplemented by the use of advanced large eddy simulations as well as evaluations of fuel air mixing using the KIVA and WAVE models. The simulations were accompanied by experimental verification when possible. In this effort a solid base has been established for continued development of the advanced engine concepts originally proposed. Due to problems with the valve actuation system a complete demonstration of the engine concept originally proposed was not possible. Some of the highlights that were accomplished during this effort are: (1) A forward-backward mass air flow sensor has been developed and a patent application for the device has been submitted. We are optimistic that this technology will have a particular application in variable valve timing direct injection systems for IC engines. (2) The biggest effort on this project has involved the development of the pneumatic-hydraulic valve actuation system. This system was originally purchased from Cargine, a Swedish supplier and is in the development stage. To date we have not been able to use the actuators to control the exhaust valves, although the actuators have been successfully employed to control the intake valves. The reason for this is the additional complication associated with variable back pressure on the exhaust valves when

  12. High speed turbulent reacting flows: DNS and LES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givi, Peyman

    1990-01-01

    Work on understanding the mechanisms of mixing and reaction in high speed turbulent reacting flows was continued. Efforts, in particular, were concentrated on taking advantage of modern computational methods to simulate high speed turbulent flows. In doing so, two methodologies were used: large eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS). In the work related with LES the objective is to study the behavior of the probability density functions (pdfs) of scalar properties within the subgrid in reacting turbulent flows. The data base obtained by DNS for a detailed study of the pdf characteristics within the subgrid was used. Simulations are performed for flows under various initializations to include the effects of compressibility on mixing and chemical reactions. In the work related with DNS, a two-dimensional temporally developing high speed mixing layer under the influence of a second-order non-equilibrium chemical reaction of the type A + B yields products + heat was considered. Simulations were performed with different magnitudes of the convective Mach numbers and with different chemical kinetic parameters for the purpose of examining the isolated effects of the compressibility and the heat released by the chemical reactions on the structure of the layer. A full compressible code was developed and utilized, so that the coupling between mixing and chemical reactions is captured in a realistic manner.

  13. A pseudo-compressible variational multiscale solver for turbulent incompressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liang; Badia, Santiago; Codina, Ramon

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we design an explicit time-stepping solver for the simulation of the incompressible turbulent flow through the combination of VMS methods and artificial compressibility. We evaluate the effect of the artificial compressibility on the accuracy of the explicit formulation for under-resolved LES simulations. A set of benchmarks have been solved, e.g., the 3D Taylor-Green vortex problem in turbulent regimes. The resulting method is proven to be an effective alternative to implicit methods in some application ranges (in terms of problem size and computational resources), providing comparable results with very low memory requirements. As an example, with the explicit approach, we are able to solve accurately the Taylor-Green vortex benchmark in a fine mesh with 512^3 cells on a 12 cores 64 GB ram machine.

  14. High frequency chest compression effects heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongwon; Lee, Yong W; Warwick, Warren J

    2007-01-01

    High frequency chest compression (HFCC) supplies a sequence of air pulses through a jacket worn by a patient to remove excessive mucus for the treatment or prevention of lung disease patients. The air pulses produced from the pulse generator propagates over the thorax delivering the vibration and compression energy. A number of studies have demonstrated that the HFCC system increases the ability to clear mucus and improves lung function. Few studies have examined the change in instantaneous heart rate (iHR) and heart rate variability (HRV) during the HFCC therapy. The purpose of this study is to measure the change of HRV with four experimental protocols: (a) without HFCC, (b) during Inflated, (c)HFCC at 6Hz, and (d) HFCC at 21Hz. The nonlinearity and regularity of HRV was assessed by approximate entropy (ApEn), a method used to quantify the complexities and randomness. To compute the ApEn, we sectioned with a total of eight epochs and displayed the ApEn over the each epoch. Our results show significant differences in the both the iHR and HRV between the experimental protocols. The iHR was elevated at both the (c) 6Hz and (d) 21Hz condition from without HFCC (10%, 16%, respectively). We also found that the HFCC system tends to increase the HRV. Our study suggests that monitoring iHR and HRV are very important physiological indexes during HFCC therapy.

  15. A very high speed lossless compression/decompression chip set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venbrux, Jack; Liu, Norley; Liu, Kathy; Vincent, Peter; Merrell, Randy

    1991-01-01

    A chip is described that will perform lossless compression and decompression using the Rice Algorithm. The chip set is designed to compress and decompress source data in real time for many applications. The encoder is designed to code at 20 M samples/second at MIL specifications. That corresponds to 280 Mbits/second at maximum quantization or approximately 500 Mbits/second under nominal conditions. The decoder is designed to decode at 10 M samples/second at industrial specifications. A wide range of quantization levels is allowed (4...14 bits) and both nearest neighbor prediction and external prediction are supported. When the pre and post processors are bypassed, the chip set performs high speed entropy coding and decoding. This frees the chip set from being tied to one modeling technique or specific application. Both the encoder and decoder are being fabricated in a 1.0 micron CMOS process that has been tested to survive 1 megarad of total radiation dosage. The CMOS chips are small, only 5 mm on a side, and both are estimated to consume less than 1/4 of a Watt of power while operating at maximum frequency.

  16. Intermittency and universality in fully developed inviscid and weakly compressible turbulent flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzi, Roberto; Biferale, Luca; Fisher, Robert T; Kadanoff, Leo P; Lamb, Donald Q; Toschi, Federico

    2008-06-13

    We perform high-resolution numerical simulations of homogenous and isotropic compressible turbulence, with an average 3D Mach number close to 0.3. We study the statistical properties of intermittency for velocity, density, and entropy. For the velocity field, which is the only quantity that can be compared to the isotropic incompressible case, we find no statistical differences in its behavior in the inertial range due either to the slight compressibility or to the different dissipative mechanism. For the density field, we find evidence of "frontlike" structures, although no shocks are produced by the simulation.

  17. An efficient semi-implicit solver for direct numerical simulation of compressible flows at all speeds

    CERN Document Server

    Modesti, Davide

    2016-01-01

    We develop a semi-implicit algorithm for time-accurate simulation of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, with special reference to wall-bounded flows. The method is based on linearization of the partial convective fluxes associated with acoustic waves, in such a way to suppress, or at least mitigate the acoustic time step limitation. Together with replacement of the total energy equation with the entropy transport equation, this approach avoids the inversion of block-banded matrices involved in classical methods, which is replaced by less demanding inversion of standard banded matrices. The method is extended to deal with implicit integration of viscous terms and to multiple space dimensions through approximate factorization, and used as a building block of third-order Runge-Kutta time stepping scheme. Numerical experiments are carried out for isotropic turbulence, plane channel flow, and flow in a square duct. All available data support higher computational efficiency than existing methods, and saving ...

  18. Modeling the Plasma Flow in the Inner Heliosheath with a Spatially Varying Compression Ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaou, G.; Livadiotis, G.

    2017-03-01

    We examine a semi-analytical non-magnetic model of the termination shock location previously developed by Exarhos & Moussas. In their study, the plasma flow beyond the shock is considered incompressible and irrotational, thus the flow potential is analytically derived from the Laplace equation. Here we examine the characteristics of the downstream flow in the heliosheath in order to resolve several inconsistencies existing in the Exarhos & Moussas model. In particular, the model is modified in order to be consistent with the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions and the geometry of the termination shock. It is shown that a shock compression ratio varying along the latitude can lead to physically correct results. We describe the new model and present several simplified examples for a nearly spherical, strong termination shock. Under those simplifications, the upstream plasma is nearly adiabatic for large (˜100 AU) heliosheath thickness.

  19. Uncertainties in hot-wire measurements of compressible turbulent flows implied by comparisons with laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckenzie, R. L.; Logan, P.

    1986-01-01

    A hot-wire anemometer and a new nonintrusive laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique are used to survey a Mach 2 turbulent boundary layer. The hot-wire anemometer's ability to accurately measure mass flux, temperature, and density fluctuations in a compressible flow is examined by comparing its results with those obtained using LIF. Several methods of hot-wire calibration are used, and the uncertainties in their measurements of various fluctuating flow parameters are determined. The results show that although a hot-wire operated at high overheat can measure mass flux fluctuations, temperature and density fluctuations are not determined accurately from such measurements. However, a hot-wire operated at multiple overheats can be used to measure static and total temperature fluctuations. The presence of pressure fluctuations and their correlation with density can prevent the use of hot-wire data to determine density fluctuations.

  20. Compressible flow in front of an axisymmetric blunt object: analytic approximation and astrophysical implications

    CERN Document Server

    Keshet, Uri

    2016-01-01

    Compressible flows around blunt objects have diverse applications, but current analytic treatments are inaccurate and limited to narrow parameter regimes. We show that the gas-dynamic flow in front of an axisymmetric blunt body is accurately derived analytically using a low order expansion of the perpendicular gradients in terms of the parallel velocity. This reproduces both subsonic and supersonic flows measured and simulated for a sphere, including the transonic regime and the bow shock properties. Some astrophysical implications are outlined, in particular for planets in the solar wind and for clumps and bubbles in the intergalactic medium. The bow shock standoff distance normalized by the obstacle curvature is $\\sim 2/(3g)$ in the strong shock limit, where $g$ is the compression ratio. For a subsonic Mach number $M$ approaching unity, the thickness $\\delta$ of an initially weak, draped magnetic layer is a few times larger than in the incompressible limit, with amplification $\\sim ({1+1.3M^{2.6}})/({3\\delt...

  1. Multigrid Acceleration of Time-Accurate DNS of Compressible Turbulent Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeze, Jan; Geurts, Bernard; Kuerten, Hans; Streng, Martin

    1996-01-01

    An efficient scheme for the direct numerical simulation of 3D transitional and developed turbulent flow is presented. Explicit and implicit time integration schemes for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations are compared. The nonlinear system resulting from the implicit time discretization is solved with an iterative method and accelerated by the application of a multigrid technique. Since we use central spatial discretizations and no artificial dissipation is added to the equations, the smoothing method is less effective than in the more traditional use of multigrid in steady-state calculations. Therefore, a special prolongation method is needed in order to obtain an effective multigrid method. This simulation scheme was studied in detail for compressible flow over a flat plate. In the laminar regime and in the first stages of turbulent flow the implicit method provides a speed-up of a factor 2 relative to the explicit method on a relatively coarse grid. At increased resolution this speed-up is enhanced correspondingly.

  2. A NOVEL SLIGHTLY COMPRESSIBLE MODEL FOR LOW MACH NUMBER PERFECT GAS FLOW CALCULATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓小刚; 庄逢甘

    2002-01-01

    By analyzing the characteristics of low Mach number perfect gas flows, a novel Slightly Compressible Model (SCM) for low Mach number perfect gas flows is derived. In view of numerical calculations, this model is proved very efficient,for it is kept within the p-v frame but does not have to satisfy the time consuming divergence-free condition in order to get the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation solutions. Writing the equations in the form of conservation laws, we have derived the characteristic systems which are necessary for numerical calculations. A cellcentered finite-volume method with flux difference upwind-biased schemes is used for the equation solutions and a new Exact Newton Relaxation (ENR) implicit method is developed. Various computed results are presented to validate the present model.Laminar flow solutions over a circular cylinder with wake developing and vortex shedding are presented. Results for inviscid flow over a sphere are compared in excellent agreement with the exact analytic incompressible solution. Three-dimensional viscous flow solutions over sphere and prolate spheroid are also calculated and compared well with experiments and other incompressible solutions. Finally, good convergent performaces are shown for sphere viscous flows.

  3. Extension of Finite Volume Compressible Flow Solvers to Multi-dimensional, Variable Density Zero Mach Number Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, T.; Botta, N.; Geratz, K. J.; Klein, R.

    1999-11-01

    When attempting to compute unsteady, variable density flows at very small or zero Mach number using a standard finite volume compressible flow solver one faces at least the following difficulties: (i) Spatial pressure variations vanish as the Mach number M→0, but they do affect the velocity field at leading order; (ii) the resulting spatial homogeneity of the leading order pressure implies an elliptic divergence constraint for the energy flux; (iii) violations of this constraint crucially affect the transport of mass, preventing a code to properly advect even a constant density distribution. We overcome these difficulties through a new algorithm for constructing numerical fluxes in the context of multi-dimensional finite volume methods in conservation form. The construction of numerical fluxes involves: (1) An explicit upwind step yielding predictions for the nonlinear convective flux components. (2) A first correction step that introduces pressure gradients which guarantee compliance of the convective fluxes with a divergence constraint. This step requires the solution of a first Poisson-type equation. (3) A second projection step which provides the yet unknown (non-convective) pressure contribution to the total flux of momentum. This second projection requires the solution of another Poisson-type equation and yields the cell centered velocity field at the new time. This velocity field exactly satisfies a divergence constraint consistent with the asymptotic limit. Step (1) can be done by any standard finite volume compressible flow solver. The input to steps (2) and (3) involves solely the fluxes from step (1) and is independent of how these were obtained. Thus, our approach allows any such solver to be extended to compute variable density incompressible flows.

  4. Compressed Sensing ISAR Reconstruction Considering Highly Maneuvering Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Shaharyar Khwaja

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this report, we propose compressed sensing inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR imaging in the presence of highly maneuvering motion using a modified orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP reconstruction algorithm. Unlike existing methods where motion is limited to first- or second-order phase terms, we take into account realistic motion of a maneuvering target that can involve a third-order phase term corresponding to the rate of rotational acceleration. In addition, unlike existing fixed dictionary-based methods, which require designing a large dictionary that needs to take into account all of the possible motion parameters, we propose a modified OMP reconstruction method that requires a dictionary only based on the first-order phase term and estimates the secondand third-order phase terms using an optimization algorithm. Simulation examples and comparison with existing methods show the viability of our approach for imaging moving targets consisting of higher order motion.

  5. Size effect of sandstone after high temperature under uniaxial compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Hai-jian; JING Hong-wen; MAO Xian-biao; ZHAO Hong-hui; YIN Qian; WANG Chen

    2015-01-01

    Uniaxial compression tests on sandstone samples with five different sizes after high temperature processes were performed in order to investigate the size effect and its evolution. The test results show that the density, longitudinal wave velocity, peak strength, average modulus and secant modulus of sandstone decrease with the increase of temperature, however, peak strain increases gradually. With the increase of ratio of height to diameter, peak strength of sandstone decreases, which has an obvious size effect. A new theoretical model of size effect of sandstone material considering the influence of temperature is put forward, and with the increase of temperature, the size effect is more apparent. The threshold decreases gradually with the increase of temperature, and the deviations of the experimental values and the theoretical values are between 0.44% and 6.06%, which shows quite a credibility of the theoretical model.

  6. Highly compressible 3D periodic graphene aerogel microlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Cheng; Han, T Yong-Jin; Duoss, Eric B; Golobic, Alexandra M; Kuntz, Joshua D; Spadaccini, Christopher M; Worsley, Marcus A

    2015-04-22

    Graphene is a two-dimensional material that offers a unique combination of low density, exceptional mechanical properties, large surface area and excellent electrical conductivity. Recent progress has produced bulk 3D assemblies of graphene, such as graphene aerogels, but they possess purely stochastic porous networks, which limit their performance compared with the potential of an engineered architecture. Here we report the fabrication of periodic graphene aerogel microlattices, possessing an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The 3D printed graphene aerogels are lightweight, highly conductive and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90% compressive strain). Moreover, the Young's moduli of the 3D printed graphene aerogels show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials with comparable geometric density and possess large surface areas. Adapting the 3D printing technique to graphene aerogels realizes the possibility of fabricating a myriad of complex aerogel architectures for a broad range of applications.

  7. Novel Efficient De-blocking Method for Highly Compressed Images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Min; YI Qing-ming; YANG Liang

    2007-01-01

    Due to coarse quantization,block-based discrete cosine transform(BDCT) compression methods usually suffer from visible blocking artifacts at the block boundaries.A novel efficient de-blocking method in DCT domain is proposed.A specific criterion for edge detection is given,one-dimensional DCT is applied on each row of the adjacent blocks and the shifted block in smooth region,and the transform coefficients of the shifted block are modified by weighting the average of three coefficients of the block.Mean square difference of slope criterion is used to judge the efficiency of the proposed algorithm.Simulation results show that the new method not only obtains satisfactory image quality,but also maintains high frequency information.

  8. Advanced plasma flow simulations of cathodic-arc and ferroelectric plasma sources for neutralized drift compression experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam B. Sefkow

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Large-space-scale and long-time-scale plasma flow simulations are executed in order to study the spatial and temporal evolution of plasma parameters for two types of plasma sources used in the neutralized drift compression experiment (NDCX. The results help assess the charge neutralization conditions for ion beam compression experiments and can be employed in more sophisticated simulations, which previously neglected the dynamical evolution of the plasma. Three-dimensional simulations of a filtered cathodic-arc plasma source show the coupling efficiency of the plasma flow from the source to the drift region depends on geometrical factors. The nonuniform magnetic topology complicates the well-known general analytical considerations for evaluating guiding-center drifts, and particle-in-cell simulations provide a self-consistent evaluation of the physics in an otherwise challenging scenario. Plasma flow profiles of a ferroelectric plasma source demonstrate that the densities required for longitudinal compression experiments involving ion beams are provided over the drift length, and are in good agreement with measurements. Simulations involving azimuthally asymmetric plasma creation conditions show that symmetric profiles are nevertheless achieved at the time of peak on-axis plasma density. Also, the ferroelectric plasma expands upstream on the thermal expansion time scale, and therefore avoids the possibility of penetration into the acceleration gap and transport sections, where partial neutralization would increase the beam emittance. Future experiments on NDCX will investigate the transverse focusing of an axially compressing intense charge bunch to a sub-mm spot size with coincident focal planes using a strong final-focus solenoid. In order to fill a multi-tesla solenoid with the necessary high-density plasma for beam charge neutralization, the simulations predict that supersonically injected plasma from the low-field region will penetrate and

  9. VNAP2: a computer program for computation of two-dimensional, time-dependent, compressible, turbulent flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, M.C.

    1981-08-01

    VNAP2 is a computer program for calculating turbulent (as well as laminar and inviscid), steady, and unsteady flow. VNAP2 solves the two-dimensional, time-dependent, compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The turbulence is modeled with either an algebraic mixing-length model, a one-equation model, or the Jones-Launder two-equation model. The geometry may be a single- or a dual-flowing stream. The interior grid points are computed using the unsplit MacCormack scheme. Two options to speed up the calculations for high Reynolds number flows are included. The boundary grid points are computed using a reference-plane-characteristic scheme with the viscous terms treated as source functions. An explicit artificial viscosity is included for shock computations. The fluid is assumed to be a perfect gas. The flow boundaries may be arbitrary curved solid walls, inflow/outflow boundaries, or free-jet envelopes. Typical problems that can be solved concern nozzles, inlets, jet-powered afterbodies, airfoils, and free-jet expansions. The accuracy and efficiency of the program are shown by calculations of several inviscid and turbulent flows. The program and its use are described completely, and six sample cases and a code listing are included.

  10. Integrated LTCC Pressure/Flow/Temperature Multisensor for Compressed Air Diagnostics†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Yannick; Maeder, Thomas; Boutinard-Rouelle, Grégoire; Barras, Aurélie; Craquelin, Nicolas; Ryser, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We present a multisensor designed for industrial compressed air diagnostics and combining the measurement of pressure, flow, and temperature, integrated with the corresponding signal conditioning electronics in a single low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) package. The developed sensor may be soldered onto an integrated electro-fluidic platform by using standard surface mount device (SMD) technology, e.g., as a standard electronic component would be on a printed circuit board, obviating the need for both wires and tubes and thus paving the road towards low-cost integrated electro-fluidic systems. Several performance aspects of this device are presented and discussed, together with electronics design issues. PMID:22163518

  11. Integrated LTCC pressure/flow/temperature multisensor for compressed air diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Yannick; Maeder, Thomas; Boutinard-Rouelle, Grégoire; Barras, Aurélie; Craquelin, Nicolas; Ryser, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We present a multisensor designed for industrial compressed air diagnostics and combining the measurement of pressure, flow, and temperature, integrated with the corresponding signal conditioning electronics in a single low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) package. The developed sensor may be soldered onto an integrated electro-fluidic platform by using standard surface mount device (SMD) technology, e.g., as a standard electronic component would be on a printed circuit board, obviating the need for both wires and tubes and thus paving the road towards low-cost integrated electro-fluidic systems. Several performance aspects of this device are presented and discussed, together with electronics design issues.

  12. Mach Number Dependence of Turbulent Magnetic Field Amplification: Solenoidal versus Compressive Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Federrath, Christoph; Schober, Jennifer; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S; Schleicher, Dominik R G; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.114504

    2011-01-01

    We study the growth rate and saturation level of the turbulent dynamo in magnetohydrodynamical simulations of turbulence, driven with solenoidal (divergence-free) or compressive (curl-free) forcing. For models with Mach numbers ranging from 0.02 to 20, we find significantly different magnetic field geometries, amplification rates, and saturation levels, decreasing strongly at the transition from subsonic to supersonic flows, due to the development of shocks. Both extreme types of turbulent forcing drive the dynamo, but solenoidal forcing is more efficient, because it produces more vorticity.

  13. A model and numerical method for compressible flows with capillary effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidmayer, Kevin; Petitpas, Fabien; Daniel, Eric; Favrie, Nicolas; Gavrilyuk, Sergey

    2017-04-01

    A new model for interface problems with capillary effects in compressible fluids is presented together with a specific numerical method to treat capillary flows and pressure waves propagation. This new multiphase model is in agreement with physical principles of conservation and respects the second law of thermodynamics. A new numerical method is also proposed where the global system of equations is split into several submodels. Each submodel is hyperbolic or weakly hyperbolic and can be solved with an adequate numerical method. This method is tested and validated thanks to comparisons with analytical solutions (Laplace law) and with experimental results on droplet breakup induced by a shock wave.

  14. Preliminary measurements of velocity, density and total temperature fluctuations in compressible subsonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stainback, P. C.; Johnson, C. B.; Basnett, C. B.

    1983-01-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of a three-wire hot-wire probe operated with a constant temperature anemometer were investigated in the subsonic compressible flow regime. The sensitivity coefficients, with respect to velocity, density and total temperature, were measured and the results were used to calculate the velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations in the test section of the Langley 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT). These results were extended to give estimates for fluctuations due to vorticity, sound, and entropy. In addition, attempts were made to determine the major source of disturbances in the 0.3-m TCT.

  15. A Functional Equation Governing the Motion of a Compressible Fluid Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The fundamental problem of the statistical dynamics of a turbulent flow, formulated in terms of characteristic functionals, has already been pointed out in the work of E. Hopf. In his work he deduced a functional equation governing the evolution of the characteristic functional of a turbulent velocity field in an incompressible field. In this paper we present a derivation of a dynamical equation governing the evolution of the characteristic functional of a turbulent velocity field in a compressible field. However, the characteristic functional equations we derived are governing the motions of an ideal gas and van der Waals gas.

  16. Variational Formulation of 1-D Unsteady Compressible Flow in a Deforming Tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gaolian Liu; Yi Tao; Yingxue Liu

    2003-01-01

    The variational principles for 1-D unsteady compressible flow in a deforming tube derived in a previous paper are improved essentially by reconstructing the initial/final-integral terms according to a new method suggested in a recent paper. As a result, the inherent shortcoming of variational principles of being unable to admit physically rational initial/final-value conditions in initial/boundary-value problems is successfully eliminated. Thus, a new theoretical basis for the time-space finite-element analysis is provided.

  17. High-frequency chest compression: effect of the third generation compression waveform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milla, Carlos E; Hansen, Leland G; Weber, Adam; Warwick, Warren J

    2004-01-01

    High-frequency chest compression (HFCC) therapy has become the prevailing form of airway clearance for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) in the United States. The original square waveform was replaced in 1995 with a sine waveform without published evidence of an equality of effectiveness. The recent development of a triangle waveform for HFCC provided the opportunity to compare the functional and therapeutic effects of different waveforms. Clinical testing was done in patients at home with therapy times recorded with all sputum collected in preweighed sealable vials. The eight study patients with CF were regular users of a sine waveform device. They produced sputum consistently and were clinically stable. They used their optimum frequencies for therapy for each waveform and, for one week for each waveform, collected all sputum during their twice-daily timed HFCC therapies. After collection, these vials were reweighed, desiccated, and reweighed to calculate wet and dry weights of sputum per minute of therapy time. Frequency associated vest pressures transmitted to the mouth, and induced airflows at the mouth were measured in healthy volunteers. The pressure waveforms produced in the vest were, in shape, faithfully demonstrable at the mouth. In the healthy subject the transmission occurred in 2 ms and was attenuated to about 75% of the vest pressure for the triangle waveform and 60% for the sine waveform. All patients produced more sputum with the triangle waveform than with the sine waveform. The mean increase was 20%+ range of 4% to 41%. P value was HFCC should investigate the other effects of the sine and triangle waveforms, as well as the neglected square waveform, on mucus clearance and determine the best frequencies for each waveform, disease, and patient.

  18. Highly Compressed Ion Beams for High Energy Density Science

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Alex; Briggs, Richard J; Callahan, Debra; Caporaso, George; Celata, C M; Davidson, Ronald C; Faltens, Andy; Grant-Logan, B; Grisham, Larry; Grote, D P; Henestroza, Enrique; Kaganovich, Igor D; Lee, Edward; Lee, Richard; Leitner, Matthaeus; Nelson, Scott D; Olson, Craig; Penn, Gregory; Reginato, Lou; Renk, Tim; Rose, David; Sessler, Andrew M; Staples, John W; Tabak, Max; Thoma, Carsten H; Waldron, William; Welch, Dale; Wurtele, Jonathan; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory (HIF-VNL) is developing the intense ion beams needed to drive matter to the High Energy Density (HED) regimes required for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) and other applications. An interim goal is a facility for Warm Dense Matter (WDM) studies, wherein a target is heated volumetrically without being shocked, so that well-defined states of matter at 1 to 10 eV are generated within a diagnosable region. In the approach we are pursuing, low to medium mass ions with energies just above the Bragg peak are directed onto thin target "foils," which may in fact be foams or "steel wool" with mean densities 1% to 100% of solid. This approach complements that being pursued at GSI, wherein high-energy ion beams deposit a small fraction of their energy in a cylindrical target. We present the requirements for warm dense matter experiments, and describe suitable accelerator concepts, including novel broadband traveling wave pulse-line, drift-tube linac, RF, and single-gap approa...

  19. Mixed DPPC/DPPG monolayers at very high film compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Sameh M I; Policova, Zdenka; Acosta, Edgar J; Hair, Michael L; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2009-09-15

    A drop shape technique using a constrained sessile drop constellation (ADSA-CSD) has been introduced as a superior technique for studying spread films specially at high collapse pressures [Saad et al. Langmuir 2008, 24, 10843-10850]. It has been shown that ADSA-CSD has certain advantages including the need only for small quantities of liquid and insoluble surfactants, the ability to measure very low surface tension values, easier deposition procedure, and leak-proof design. Here, this technique was applied to investigate mixed DPPC/DPPG monolayers to characterize the role of such molecules in maintaining stable film properties and surface activity of lung surfactant preparations. Results of compression isotherms were obtained for different DPPC/DPPG mixture ratios: 90/10, 80/20, 70/30, 60/40, and 50/50 in addition to pure DPPC and pure DPPG at room temperature of 24 degrees C. The ultimate collapse pressure of DPPC/DPPG mixtures was found to be 70.5 mJ/m2 (similar to pure DPPC) for the cases of low DPPG content (up to 20%). Increasing the DPPG content in the mixture (up to 40%) caused a slight decrease in the ultimate collapse pressure. However, further increase of DPPG in the mixture (50% or more) caused a sharp decrease in the ultimate collapse pressure to a value of 59.9 mJ/m2 (similar to pure DPPG). The change in film elasticity was also tracked for the range of mixture ratios studied. The physical reasons for such changes and the interaction between DPPC and DPPG molecules are discussed. The results also show a change in the film hysteresis upon successive compression and expansion cycles for different mixture ratios.

  20. High speed digital holographic interferometry for hypersonic flow visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, G. M.; Jagdeesh, G.; Reddy, K. P. J.

    2013-06-01

    Optical imaging techniques have played a major role in understanding the flow dynamics of varieties of fluid flows, particularly in the study of hypersonic flows. Schlieren and shadowgraph techniques have been the flow diagnostic tools for the investigation of compressible flows since more than a century. However these techniques provide only the qualitative information about the flow field. Other optical techniques such as holographic interferometry and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) have been used extensively for extracting quantitative information about the high speed flows. In this paper we present the application of digital holographic interferometry (DHI) technique integrated with short duration hypersonic shock tunnel facility having 1 ms test time, for quantitative flow visualization. Dynamics of the flow fields in hypersonic/supersonic speeds around different test models is visualized with DHI using a high-speed digital camera (0.2 million fps). These visualization results are compared with schlieren visualization and CFD simulation results. Fringe analysis is carried out to estimate the density of the flow field.

  1. Fracture Energy of High-Strength Concrete in Compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, H.; Brincker, Rune

    1989-01-01

    is essential for understanding the fracture mechanism of concrete in compression. In this paper a series of tests is reported, carried out for the purpose of studying the fracture mechanical properties of concrete in compression. Including the measurement and study of the descending branch, a new experimental...

  2. Peak compression technique in high-performance liquid chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI YuXia; WANG Lin; XlAO ShengYuan; QING Hong; ZHU Yong; HU GaoFei; DENG YuLin

    2009-01-01

    Peak compression technique based on the difference of the solute migration velocity in two different mobile phases was described theoretically and confirmed using benzaldehyde and 4-hydroxyquinoline (4-HQ) as model compounds.After peak compression,the peak compression factors (the ratio of peak width at half-height under non-compression and that under compression condition) of benzaldehyde and 4-HQ were 0.19 and 0.13,respectively.By this application of the peak compression technique to the mixture,both enhanced peak height and good separation were obtained in one run cycle.This peak compression technique was introduced to determine benzaldehyde from semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase-catalyzed enzymetic reaction in order to illustrate the applicability of this technique to the real sample.As a result,the peak was compressed effectively,and 4.94-fold,19.3-fold and 5.74-fold enhancement in peak height,plate number and signal to noise ratio were also achieved,respectively.

  3. A Gas-Kinetic Scheme For The Simulation Of Compressible Turbulent Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Righi, Marcello

    2013-01-01

    A gas-kinetic scheme for the continuum regime is applied to the simulation of turbu- lent compressible flow, by replacing the molecular relaxation time with a turbulent relaxation time in the BGK model. The turbulence dynamics is modelled on the basis of a standard, linear two-equation turbulence model. The hydrodynamic limit of the resulting turbulence model is linear in smooth flow and non-linear in the presence of stronger flow gradients. The non-linear correction terms in the numerical flux are weighed as a function of "rarefaction" - referred to turbulence dynamics and not to molecular dynamics, i.e. measured by the ratio of turbulence to mean flow scales of motion. Even though no assumptions on the nature of the turbulence have been made and a linear two-equation turbulence model is used, the turbulence gas-kinetic scheme seems able to correct the turbulent stress tensor in an effective way; on the basis of a number of turbulence modelling benchmark flow cases, characterized by strong shock - boundary l...

  4. Effect of intermolecular potential on compressible Couette flow in slip and transitional regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Andrew B.; Venkattraman, A.; Alexeenko, Alina A.

    2014-10-01

    The effect of intermolecular potentials on compressible, planar flow in slip and transitional regimes is investigated using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. Two intermolecular interaction models, the variable hard sphere (VHS) and the Lennard-Jones (LJ) models, are first compared for subsonic and supersonic Couette flows of argon at temperatures of 40, 273, and 1,000 K, and then for Couette flows in the transitional regime ranging from Knudsen numbers (Kn) of 0.0051 to 1. The binary scattering model for elastic scattering using the Lennard-Jones (LJ) intermolecular potential proposed recently [A. Venkattraman and A. Alexeenko, "Binary scattering model for Lennard-Jones potential: Transport coefficients and collision integrals for non-equilibrium gas flow simulations," Phys. Fluids 24, 027101 (2012)] is shown to accurately reproduce both the theoretical collision frequency in an equilibrium gas as well as the theoretical viscosity variation with temperature. The use of a repulsive-attractive instead of a purely repulsive potential is found to be most important in the continuum and slip regimes as well as in flows with large temperature variations. Differences in shear stress of up to 28% between the VHS and LJ models is observed at Kn=0.0051 and is attributed to differences in collision frequencies, ultimately affecting velocity gradients at the wall. For Kn=1 where the Knudsen layer expands the entire domain, the effect of the larger collision frequency in the LJ model relative to VHS diminishes, and a 7% difference in shear stress is observed.

  5. Variational energy principle for compressible, baroclinic flow. 2: Free-energy form of Hamilton's principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, L. A.

    1977-01-01

    The first and second variations are calculated for the irreducible form of Hamilton's Principle that involves the minimum number of dependent variables necessary to describe the kinetmatics and thermodynamics of inviscid, compressible, baroclinic flow in a specified gravitational field. The form of the second variation shows that, in the neighborhood of a stationary point that corresponds to physically stable flow, the action integral is a complex saddle surface in parameter space. There exists a form of Hamilton's Principle for which a direct solution of a flow problem is possible. This second form is related to the first by a Friedrichs transformation of the thermodynamic variables. This introduces an extra dependent variable, but the first and second variations are shown to have direct physical significance, namely they are equal to the free energy of fluctuations about the equilibrium flow that satisfies the equations of motion. If this equilibrium flow is physically stable, and if a very weak second order integral constraint on the correlation between the fluctuations of otherwise independent variables is satisfied, then the second variation of the action integral for this free energy form of Hamilton's Principle is positive-definite, so the action integral is a minimum, and can serve as the basis for a direct trail and error solution. The second order integral constraint states that the unavailable energy must be maximum at equilibrium, i.e. the fluctuations must be so correlated as to produce a second order decrease in the total unavailable energy.

  6. Transmission of sound through nonuniform circular ducts with compressible mean flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Shaker, B. S.; Kaiser, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    An acoustic theory is developed to determine the sound transmission and attenuation through an infinite hard-walled or lined circular duct carrying compressible, sheared mean flows and having a variable cross section. The theory is applicable to large as well as small axial variations, as long as the mean flow does not separate. The technique is based on solving for the envelopes of the quasi-parallel acoustic modes that exist in the duct instead of solving for the actual wave, thereby reducing the computation time and the round-off error encountered in purely numerical techniques. A number of test cases that demonstrate the flexibility of the program are included. Convergence of the transmission coefficients and the acoustic pressure profiles with an increasing number of modes is illustrated.

  7. Extension of the pressure correction method to zero-Mach number compressible flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In the present paper,the classical pressure correction method was extended into low Mach number compressible flow regime by integrating equation of state into SIMPLE algorithm.The self-developed code based on this algorithm was applied to predicting the lid-driven cavity flow and shock tube prob-lems,and the results showed good agreement with benchmark solutions and the Mach number can reach the magnitude of as low as 10-5.The attenuation of sound waves in viscous medium was then simulated.The results agree well with the analytical solutions given by theoretical acoustics.This demonstrated that the present method could also be implemented in acoustics field simulation,which is crucial for thermoacoustic simulation.

  8. Extension of the pressure correction method to zero-Mach number compressible flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE YaLing; HUANG Jing; TAO YuBing; TAO WenQuan

    2009-01-01

    In the present paper, the classical pressure correction method was extended into low Mach number compressible flow regime by integrating equation of state into SIMPLE algorithm. The self-developed code based on this algorithm was applied to predicting the lid-driven cavity flow and shock tube prob-lems, and the results showed good agreement with benchmark solutions and the Mach number can reach the magnitude of as low as 10-5. The attenuation of sound waves in viscous medium was then simulated. The results agree well with the analytical solutions given by theoretical acoustics. This demonstrated that the present method could also be implemented in acoustics field simulation, which is crucial for thermoacoustic simulation.

  9. Simulation of Free Surface Compressible Flows Via a Two Fluid Model

    CERN Document Server

    Dias, Frederic; Ghidaglia, Jean-Michel

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this communication is to discuss the simulation of a free surface compressible flow between two fluids, typically air and water. We use a two fluid model with the same velocity, pressure and temperature for both phases. In such a numerical model, the free surface becomes a thin three dimensional zone. The present method has at least three advantages: (i) the free-surface treatment is completely implicit; (ii) it can naturally handle wave breaking and other topological changes in the flow; (iii) one can easily vary the Equation of States (EOS) of each fluid (in principle, one can even consider tabulated EOS). Moreover, our model is unconditionally hyperbolic for reasonable EOS.

  10. An adaptive semi-implicit scheme for simulations of unsteady viscous compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinthorsson, Erlendur; Modiano, David; Crutchfield, William Y.; Bell, John B.; Colella, Phillip

    1995-11-01

    A numerical scheme for simulation of unsteady, viscous, compressible flows is considered. The scheme employs an explicit discretization of the inviscid terms of the Navier-Stokes equations and an implicit discretization of the viscous terms. The discretization is second order accurate in both space and time. Under appropriate assumptions, the implicit system of equations can be decoupled into two linear systems of reduced rank. These are solved efficiently using a Gauss-Seidel method with multigrid convergence acceleration. When coupled with a solution-adaptive mesh refinement technique, the hybrid explicit-implicit scheme provides an effective methodology for accurate simulations of unsteady viscous flows. The methodology is demonstrated for both body-fitted structured grids and for rectangular (Cartesian) grids.

  11. A characteristic based volume penalization method for general evolution problems applied to compressible viscous flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Dymkoski, Eric; Kasimov, Nurlybek; Vasilyev, Oleg V.

    2014-04-01

    In order to introduce solid obstacles into flows, several different methods are used, including volume penalization methods which prescribe appropriate boundary conditions by applying local forcing to the constitutive equations. One well known method is Brinkman penalization, which models solid obstacles as porous media. While it has been adapted for compressible, incompressible, viscous and inviscid flows, it is limited in the types of boundary conditions that it imposes, as are most volume penalization methods. Typically, approaches are limited to Dirichlet boundary conditions. In this paper, Brinkman penalization is extended for generalized Neumann and Robin boundary conditions by introducing hyperbolic penalization terms with characteristics pointing inward on solid obstacles. This Characteristic-Based Volume Penalization (CBVP) method is a comprehensive approach to conditions on immersed boundaries, providing for homogeneous and inhomogeneous Dirichlet, Neumann, and Robin boundary conditions on hyperbolic and parabolic equations. This CBVP method can be used to impose boundary conditions for both integrated and non-integrated variables in a systematic manner that parallels the prescription of exact boundary conditions. Furthermore, the method does not depend upon a physical model, as with porous media approach for Brinkman penalization, and is therefore flexible for various physical regimes and general evolutionary equations. Here, the method is applied to scalar diffusion and to direct numerical simulation of compressible, viscous flows. With the Navier-Stokes equations, both homogeneous and inhomogeneous Neumann boundary conditions are demonstrated through external flow around an adiabatic and heated cylinder. Theoretical and numerical examination shows that the error from penalized Neumann and Robin boundary conditions can be rigorously controlled through an a priori penalization parameter η. The error on a transient boundary is found to converge as O

  12. Non-isothermal, compressible gas flow for the simulation of an enhanced gas recovery application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Böttcher, N.; Singh, Ashok; Kolditz, O.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we present a framework for numerical modeling of CO 2 injection into porous media for enhanced gas recovery (EGR) from depleted reservoirs. Physically, we have to deal with non-isothermal, compressible gas flows resulting in a system of coupled non-linear PDEs. We describe the mathe......In this work, we present a framework for numerical modeling of CO 2 injection into porous media for enhanced gas recovery (EGR) from depleted reservoirs. Physically, we have to deal with non-isothermal, compressible gas flows resulting in a system of coupled non-linear PDEs. We describe...... the mathematical framework for the underlying balance equations as well as the equations of state for mixing gases. We use an object-oriented finite element method implemented in C++. The numerical model has been tested against an analytical solution for a simplified problem and then applied to CO 2 injection...... into a real reservoir. Numerical modeling allows to investigate physical phenomena and to predict reservoir pressures as well as temperatures depending on injection scenarios and is therefore a useful tool for applied numerical analysis. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  13. Modeling compressible multiphase flows with dispersed particles in both dense and dilute regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, T.; St. Clair, J.; Balachandar, S.

    2017-06-01

    Many important explosives and energetics applications involve multiphase formulations employing dispersed particles. While considerable progress has been made toward developing mathematical models and computational methodologies for these flows, significant challenges remain. In this work, we apply a mathematical model for compressible multiphase flows with dispersed particles to existing shock and explosive dispersal problems from the literature. The model is cast in an Eulerian framework, treats all phases as compressible, is hyperbolic, and satisfies the second law of thermodynamics. It directly applies the continuous-phase pressure gradient as a forcing function for particle acceleration and thereby retains relaxed characteristics for the dispersed particle phase that remove the constituent material sound velocity from the eigenvalues. This is consistent with the expected characteristics of dispersed particle phases and can significantly improve the stable time-step size for explicit methods. The model is applied to test cases involving the shock and explosive dispersal of solid particles and compared to data from the literature. Computed results compare well with experimental measurements, providing confidence in the model and computational methods applied.

  14. Progress in the Development of Compressible, Multiphase Flow Modeling Capability for Nuclear Reactor Flow Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. A. Berry; R. Saurel; F. Petitpas; E. Daniel; O. Le Metayer; S. Gavrilyuk; N. Dovetta

    2008-10-01

    In nuclear reactor safety and optimization there are key issues that rely on in-depth understanding of basic two-phase flow phenomena with heat and mass transfer. Within the context of multiphase flows, two bubble-dynamic phenomena – boiling (heterogeneous) and flashing or cavitation (homogeneous boiling), with bubble collapse, are technologically very important to nuclear reactor systems. The main difference between boiling and flashing is that bubble growth (and collapse) in boiling is inhibited by limitations on the heat transfer at the interface, whereas bubble growth (and collapse) in flashing is limited primarily by inertial effects in the surrounding liquid. The flashing process tends to be far more explosive (and implosive), and is more violent and damaging (at least in the near term) than the bubble dynamics of boiling. However, other problematic phenomena, such as crud deposition, appear to be intimately connecting with the boiling process. In reality, these two processes share many details.

  15. The comparison of three high-frequency chest compression devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong W; Lee, Jongwon; Warwick, Warren J

    2008-01-01

    High-frequency chest compression (HFCC) is shown to enhance clearance of pulmonary airway secretions. Several HFCC devices have been designed to provide this therapy. Standard equipment consists of an air pulse generator attached by lengths of tubing to an adjustable, inflatable vest/jacket (V/J) garment. In this study, the V/Js were fitted over a mannequin. The three device air pulse generators produced characteristic waveform patterns. The variations in the frequency and pressure setting of devices were consistent with specific device design features. These studies suggest that a better understanding of the effects of different waveform, frequency, and pressure combinations may improve HFCC therapeutic efficacy of three different HFCC machines. The V/J component of HFCC devices delivers the compressive pulses to the chest wall to produce both airflow through and oscillatory effects in the airways. The V/J pressures of three HFCC machines were measured and analyzed to characterize the frequency, pressure, and waveform patterns generated by each of three device models. The dimensions of all V/Js were adjusted to a circumference of approximately 110% of the chest circumference. The V/J pressures were measured, and maximum, minimum, and mean pressure, pulse pressure, and root mean square of three pulse generators were calculated. Jacket pressures ranged between 2 and 34 mmHg. The 103 and 104 models' pulse pressures increased with the increase in HFCC frequency at constant dial pressure. With the ICS the pulse pressure decreased when the frequency increased. The waveforms of models 103 and 104 were symmetric sine wave and asymmetric sine wave patterns, respectively. The ICS had a triangular waveform. At 20 Hz, both the 103 and 104 were symmetric sine waveform but the ICS remained triangular. Maximum crest factors emerged in low-frequency and high-pressure settings for the ICS and in the high-frequency and low-pressure settings for models 103 and 104. Recognizing the

  16. Accelerated high-resolution photoacoustic tomography via compressed sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arridge, Simon; Beard, Paul; Betcke, Marta; Cox, Ben; Huynh, Nam; Lucka, Felix; Ogunlade, Olumide; Zhang, Edward

    2016-12-01

    Current 3D photoacoustic tomography (PAT) systems offer either high image quality or high frame rates but are not able to deliver high spatial and temporal resolution simultaneously, which limits their ability to image dynamic processes in living tissue (4D PAT). A particular example is the planar Fabry-Pérot (FP) photoacoustic scanner, which yields high-resolution 3D images but takes several minutes to sequentially map the incident photoacoustic field on the 2D sensor plane, point-by-point. However, as the spatio-temporal complexity of many absorbing tissue structures is rather low, the data recorded in such a conventional, regularly sampled fashion is often highly redundant. We demonstrate that combining model-based, variational image reconstruction methods using spatial sparsity constraints with the development of novel PAT acquisition systems capable of sub-sampling the acoustic wave field can dramatically increase the acquisition speed while maintaining a good spatial resolution: first, we describe and model two general spatial sub-sampling schemes. Then, we discuss how to implement them using the FP interferometer and demonstrate the potential of these novel compressed sensing PAT devices through simulated data from a realistic numerical phantom and through measured data from a dynamic experimental phantom as well as from in vivo experiments. Our results show that images with good spatial resolution and contrast can be obtained from highly sub-sampled PAT data if variational image reconstruction techniques that describe the tissues structures with suitable sparsity-constraints are used. In particular, we examine the use of total variation (TV) regularization enhanced by Bregman iterations. These novel reconstruction strategies offer new opportunities to dramatically increase the acquisition speed of photoacoustic scanners that employ point-by-point sequential scanning as well as reducing the channel count of parallelized schemes that use detector arrays.

  17. Turbulent Compressible Convection with Rotation. 2; Mean Flows and Differential Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummell, Nicholas H.; Hurlburt, Neal E.; Toomre, Juri

    1998-01-01

    The effects of rotation on turbulent, compressible convection within stellar envelopes are studied through three-dimensional numerical simulations conducted within a local f-plane model. This work seeks to understand the types of differential rotation that can be established in convective envelopes of stars like the Sun, for which recent helioseismic observations suggest an angular velocity profile with depth and latitude at variance with many theoretical predictions. This paper analyzes the mechanisms that are responsible for the mean (horizontally averaged) zonal and meridional flows that are produced by convection influenced by Coriolis forces. The compressible convection is considered for a range of Rayleigh, Taylor, and Prandtl (and thus Rossby) numbers encompassing both laminar and turbulent flow conditions under weak and strong rotational constraints. When the nonlinearities are moderate, the effects of rotation on the resulting laminar cellular convection leads to distinctive tilts of the cell boundaries away from the vertical. These yield correlations between vertical and horizontal motions that generate Reynolds stresses that can drive mean flows, interpretable as differential rotation and meridional circulations. Under more vigorous forcing, the resulting turbulent convection involves complicated and contorted fluid particle trajectories, with few clear correlations between vertical and horizontal motions, punctuated by an evolving and intricate downflow network that can extend over much of the depth of the layer. Within such networks are some coherent structures of vortical downflow that tend to align with the rotation axis. These yield a novel turbulent alignment mechanism, distinct from the laminar tilting of cellular boundaries, that can provide the principal correlated motions and thus Reynolds stresses and subsequently mean flows. The emergence of such coherent structures that can persist amidst more random motions is a characteristic of turbulence

  18. High-degree pulse compression and high-coherence supercontinuum generation in a convex dispersion profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Kutz, J. Nathan; Wai, P. K. A.

    2013-08-01

    We consider the non-adiabatic pulse compression of cascaded soliton propagating in three consecutive optical fiber segments, each of which has a convex dispersion profile with two zero-dispersion wavelengths. The convex dispersion profile provides an accurate description of the chromatic dispersion over the whole frequency range, thus allowing for a comprehensive theoretical treatment of the cascaded third order soliton compression when ultrashort pulses (DFDF) has a convex curvature in its dispersion profile which varies along length of fiber. Compared to DFDF, the cascading of fiber segments with convex dispersion that stays constant along the fiber length greatly reduces the manufacture difficulties and provides a much simpler engineering design in practice. High-degree pulse compression and high-coherence supercontinuum generation are demonstrated.

  19. MacCormack's technique-based pressure reconstruction approach for PIV data in compressible flows with shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shun; Xu, Jinglei; Yu, Kaikai

    2017-06-01

    This paper proposes an improved approach for extraction of pressure fields from velocity data, such as obtained by particle image velocimetry (PIV), especially for steady compressible flows with strong shocks. The principle of this approach is derived from Navier-Stokes equations, assuming adiabatic condition and neglecting viscosity of flow field boundaries measured by PIV. The computing method is based on MacCormack's technique in computational fluid dynamics. Thus, this approach is called the MacCormack method. Moreover, the MacCormack method is compared with several approaches proposed in previous literature, including the isentropic method, the spatial integration and the Poisson method. The effects of velocity error level and PIV spatial resolution on these approaches are also quantified by using artificial velocity data containing shock waves. The results demonstrate that the MacCormack method has higher reconstruction accuracy than other approaches, and its advantages become more remarkable with shock strengthening. Furthermore, the performance of the MacCormack method is also validated by using synthetic PIV images with an oblique shock wave, confirming the feasibility and advantage of this approach in real PIV experiments. This work is highly significant for the studies on aerospace engineering, especially the outer flow fields of supersonic aircraft and the internal flow fields of ramjets.

  20. Twin Interactions in Pure Ti Under High Strain Rate Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ping; Xiao, Dawu; Jiang, Chunli; Sang, Ge; Zou, Dongli

    2017-01-01

    Twin interactions associated with {11 overline{2} 1} (E2) twins in titanium deformed by high strain rate ( 2600 s-1) compression were studied using electron backscatter diffraction technique. Three types of twins, {10 overline{1} 2} (E1), {11 overline{2} 2} (C1), and {11 overline{2} 4} (C3), were observed to interact with the preformed E2 twins in four parent grains. The E1 variants nucleated at twin boundaries of some E2 variants. And the C3 twins were originated from the intersection of C1 and E2. The selection of twin variant was investigated by the Schmid factors (SFs) and the twinning shear displacement gradient tensors (DGTs) calculations. The results show that twin variants that did not follow the Schmid law were more frequently observed under high strain rate deformation than quasi-static deformation. Among these low-SF active variants, 73 pct (8 out of 11) can be interpreted by DGT. Besides, 26 variants that have SF values close to or higher than their active counterparts were absent. Factors that may affect the twin variant selections were discussed.

  1. Investigation of the compressible flow through the tip-section turbine blade cascade with supersonic inlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxa, Martin; Příhoda, Jaromír; Šimurda, David; Straka, Petr; Synáč, Jaroslav

    2016-04-01

    The contribution deals with the experimental and numerical investigation of compressible flow through the tip-section turbine blade cascade with the blade 54″ long. Experimental investigations by means of optical (interferometry and schlieren method) and pneumatic measurements provide more information about the behaviour and nature of basic phenomena occurring in the profile cascade flow field. The numerical simulation was carried out by means of the EARSM turbulence model according to Hellsten [5] completed by the bypass transition model with the algebraic equation for the intermittency coefficient proposed by Straka and Příhoda [6] and implemented into the in-house numerical code. The investigation was focused particularly on the effect of shock waves on the shear layer development including the laminar/turbulent transition. Interactions of shock waves with shear layers on both sides of the blade result usually in the transition in attached and/ or separated flow and so to the considerable impact to the flow structure and energy losses in the blade cascade.

  2. Thermodynamic bounds for existence of normal shock in compressible fluid flow in pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SERGIO COLLE

    Full Text Available Abstract The present paper is concerned with the thermodynamic theory of the normal shock in compressible fluid flow in pipes, in the lights of the pioneering works of Lord Rayleigh and G. Fanno. The theory of normal shock in pipes is currently presented in terms of the Rayleigh and Fanno curves, which are shown to cross each other in two points, one corresponding to a subsonic flow and the other corresponding to a supersonic flow. It is proposed in this paper a novel differential identity, which relates the energy flux density, the linear momentum flux density, and the entropy, for constant mass flow density. The identity so obtained is used to establish a theorem, which shows that Rayleigh and Fanno curves become tangent to each other at a single sonic point. At the sonic point the entropy reaches a maximum, either as a function of the pressure and the energy density flux or as a function of the pressure and the linear momentum density flux. A Second Law analysis is also presented, which is fully independent of the Second Law analysis based on the Rankine-Hugoniot adiabatic carried out by Landau and Lifshitz (1959.

  3. Thermodynamic bounds for existence of normal shock in compressible fluid flow in pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colle, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    The present paper is concerned with the thermodynamic theory of the normal shock in compressible fluid flow in pipes, in the lights of the pioneering works of Lord Rayleigh and G. Fanno. The theory of normal shock in pipes is currently presented in terms of the Rayleigh and Fanno curves, which are shown to cross each other in two points, one corresponding to a subsonic flow and the other corresponding to a supersonic flow. It is proposed in this paper a novel differential identity, which relates the energy flux density, the linear momentum flux density, and the entropy, for constant mass flow density. The identity so obtained is used to establish a theorem, which shows that Rayleigh and Fanno curves become tangent to each other at a single sonic point. At the sonic point the entropy reaches a maximum, either as a function of the pressure and the energy density flux or as a function of the pressure and the linear momentum density flux. A Second Law analysis is also presented, which is fully independent of the Second Law analysis based on the Rankine-Hugoniot adiabatic carried out by Landau and Lifshitz (1959).

  4. Control of high power pulse extracted from the maximally compressed pulse in a nonlinear optical fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Guangye; Jia, Suotang; Mihalache, Dumitru

    2013-01-01

    We address the possibility to control high power pulses extracted from the maximally compressed pulse in a nonlinear optical fiber by adjusting the initial excitation parameters. The numerical results show that the power, location and splitting order number of the maximally compressed pulse and the transmission features of high power pulses extracted from the maximally compressed pulse can be manipulated through adjusting the modulation amplitude, width, and phase of the initial Gaussian-type perturbation pulse on a continuous wave background.

  5. Development of ultra-short high voltage pulse technology using magnetic pulse compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Byung Heon; Kim, S. G.; Nam, S. M.; Lee, B. C.; Lee, S. M.; Jeong, Y. U.; Cho, S. O.; Jin, J. T.; Choi, H. L

    1998-01-01

    The control circuit for high voltage switches, the saturable inductor for magnetic assist, and the magnetic pulse compression circuit were designed, constructed, and tested. The core materials of saturable inductors in magnetic pulse compression circuit were amorphous metal and ferrite and total compression stages were 3. By the test, in high repetition rate, high pulse compression were certified. As a result of this test, it became possible to increase life-time of thyratrons and to replace thyratrons by solid-state semiconductor switches. (author). 16 refs., 16 tabs.

  6. High-performance JPEG image compression chip set for multimedia applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Abbas; Shenberg, Isaac; Seltz, Danny; Fronczak, Dave

    1993-04-01

    By its very nature, multimedia includes images, text and audio stored in digital format. Image compression is an enabling technology essential to overcoming two bottlenecks: cost of storage and bus speed limitation. Storing 10 seconds of high resolution RGB (640 X 480) motion video (30 frames/sec) requires 277 MBytes and a bus speed of 28 MBytes/sec (which cannot be handled by a standard bus). With high quality JPEG baseline compression the storage and bus requirements are reduced to 12 MBytes of storage and a bus speed of 1.2 MBytes/sec. Moreover, since consumer video and photography products (e.g., digital still video cameras, camcorders, TV) will increasingly use digital (and therefore compressed) images because of quality, accessibility, and the ease of adding features, compressed images may become the bridge between the multimedia computer and consumer products. The image compression challenge can be met by implementing the discrete cosine transform (DCT)-based image compression algorithm defined by the JPEG baseline standard. Using the JPEG baseline algorithm, an image can be compressed by a factor of about 24:1 without noticeable degradation in image quality. Because motion video is compressed frame by frame (or field by field), system cost is minimized (no frame or field memories and interframe operations are required) and each frame can be edited independently. Since JPEG is an international standard, the compressed files generated by this solution can be readily interchanged with other users and processed by standard software packages. This paper describes a multimedia image compression board utilizing Zoran's 040 JPEG Image Compression chip set. The board includes digitization, video decoding and compression. While the original video is sent to the display (`video in a window'), it is also compressed and transferred to the computer bus for storage. During playback, the system receives the compressed sequence from the bus and displays it on the screen.

  7. Penetrating annulus fibrosus injuries affect dynamic compressive behaviors of the intervertebral disc via altered fluid flow: an analytical interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalek, Arthur J; Iatridis, James C

    2011-08-01

    Extensive experimental work on the effects of penetrating annular injuries indicated that large injuries impact axial compressive properties of small animal intervertebral discs, yet there is some disagreement regarding the sensitivity of mechanical tests to small injury sizes. In order to understand the mechanism of injury size sensitivity, this study proposed a simple one dimensional model coupling elastic deformations in the annulus with fluid flow into and out of the nucleus through both porous boundaries and through a penetrating annular injury. The model was evaluated numerically in dynamic compression with parameters obtained by fitting the solution to experimental stress-relaxation data. The model predicted low sensitivity of mechanical changes to injury diameter at both small and large sizes (as measured by low and high ratios of injury diameter to annulus thickness), with a narrow range of high sensitivity in between. The size at which axial mechanics were most sensitive to injury size (i.e., critical injury size) increased with loading frequency. This study provides a quantitative hypothetical model of how penetrating annulus fibrosus injuries in discs with a gelatinous nucleus pulposus may alter disc mechanics by changing nucleus pulposus fluid pressurization through introduction of a new fluid transport pathway though the annulus. This model also explains how puncture-induced biomechanical changes depend on both injury size and test protocol.

  8. High-performance compression and double cryptography based on compressive ghost imaging with the fast Fourier transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leihong, Zhang; Zilan, Pan; Luying, Wu; Xiuhua, Ma

    2016-11-01

    To solve the problem that large images can hardly be retrieved for stringent hardware restrictions and the security level is low, a method based on compressive ghost imaging (CGI) with Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is proposed, named FFT-CGI. Initially, the information is encrypted by the sender with FFT, and the FFT-coded image is encrypted by the system of CGI with a secret key. Then the receiver decrypts the image with the aid of compressive sensing (CS) and FFT. Simulation results are given to verify the feasibility, security, and compression of the proposed encryption scheme. The experiment suggests the method can improve the quality of large images compared with conventional ghost imaging and achieve the imaging for large-sized images, further the amount of data transmitted largely reduced because of the combination of compressive sensing and FFT, and improve the security level of ghost images through ciphertext-only attack (COA), chosen-plaintext attack (CPA), and noise attack. This technique can be immediately applied to encryption and data storage with the advantages of high security, fast transmission, and high quality of reconstructed information.

  9. A practical discrete-adjoint method for high-fidelity compressible turbulence simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishnampet, Ramanathan [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Bodony, Daniel J. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Freund, Jonathan B., E-mail: jbfreund@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Methods and computing hardware advances have enabled accurate predictions of complex compressible turbulence phenomena, such as the generation of jet noise that motivates the present effort. However, limited understanding of underlying physical mechanisms restricts the utility of such predictions since they do not, by themselves, indicate a route to design improvements. Gradient-based optimization using adjoints can circumvent the flow complexity to guide designs, though this is predicated on the availability of a sufficiently accurate solution of the forward and adjoint systems. These are challenging to obtain, since both the chaotic character of the turbulence and the typical use of discretizations near their resolution limits in order to efficiently represent its smaller scales will amplify any approximation errors made in the adjoint formulation. Formulating a practical exact adjoint that avoids such errors is especially challenging if it is to be compatible with state-of-the-art simulation methods used for the turbulent flow itself. Automatic differentiation (AD) can provide code to calculate a nominally exact adjoint, but existing general-purpose AD codes are inefficient to the point of being prohibitive for large-scale turbulence simulations. Here, we analyze the compressible flow equations as discretized using the same high-order workhorse methods used for many high-fidelity compressible turbulence simulations, and formulate a practical space–time discrete-adjoint method without changing the basic discretization. A key step is the definition of a particular discrete analog of the continuous norm that defines our cost functional; our selection leads directly to an efficient Runge–Kutta-like scheme, though it would be just first-order accurate if used outside the adjoint formulation for time integration, with finite-difference spatial operators for the adjoint system. Its computational cost only modestly exceeds that of the flow equations. We confirm that

  10. Wellhead compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, Joe [Sertco Industries, Inc., Okemah, OK (United States); Vazquez, Daniel [Hoerbiger Service Latin America Inc., Deerfield Beach, FL (United States); Jacobs, Denis Richard [Hoerbiger do Brasil Industria de Equipamentos, Cajamar, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Over time, all wells experience a natural decline in oil and gas production. In gas wells, the major problems are liquid loading and low downhole differential pressures which negatively impact total gas production. As a form of artificial lift, wellhead compressors help reduce the tubing pressure resulting in gas velocities above the critical velocity needed to surface water, oil and condensate regaining lost production and increasing recoverable reserves. Best results come from reservoirs with high porosity, high permeability, high initial flow rates, low decline rates and high total cumulative production. In oil wells, excessive annulus gas pressure tends to inhibit both oil and gas production. Wellhead compression packages can provide a cost effective solution to these problems by reducing the system pressure in the tubing or annulus, allowing for an immediate increase in production rates. Wells furthest from the gathering compressor typically benefit the most from wellhead compression due to system pressure drops. Downstream compressors also benefit from higher suction pressures reducing overall compression horsepower requirements. Special care must be taken in selecting the best equipment for these applications. The successful implementation of wellhead compression from an economical standpoint hinges on the testing, installation and operation of the equipment. Key challenges and suggested equipment features designed to combat those challenges and successful case histories throughout Latin America are discussed below.(author)

  11. High Temperature Behavior of Isothermally Compressed M50 Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-xing SUN; Miao-quan LI

    2015-01-01

    The isothermal compression of M50 steel is carried out on a Gleeble-3500 thermo-mechanical simulator in temperature range of 1 223—1 423 K and strain rates range of 10—70 s—1. The results show that the carbides play a signiifcant role in the lfow be-havior and microstructure evolution during isothermal compression of M50 steel. The average apparent activation energy for defor-mation in isothermal compression of M50 steel is (281.1±42.6) kJ∙mol—1 at the strains of 0.4—0.8. The dynamic recrystallization of austenite grains occurs in isothermal compression of M50 steel at 1 363 K and 1 393 K, enhancing with the increase of strain rate and/or strain. The volume fraction of the carbides decreases with the increase of deformation temperature during isothermal com-pression of M50 steel and the ifne carbides inhibit the dynamic recrystallization of austenite grain. With the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization, the austenite grains are reifned, leading to a minor increase in the lfow stress and apparent activation energy for deformation in isothermal compression of M50 steel. The austenite grains begin to coarsen at 1 423 K and dynamic recrystalliza-tion is limited. Hot working of M50 steel should not be performed above 1 393 K in order to achieve good workability.

  12. High-frequency chest compression: a summary of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosman, Cara F; Jones, Richard L

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present literature summary is to describe high-frequency chest compression (HFCC), summarize its history and outline study results on its effect on mucolysis, mucus transport, pulmonary function and quality of life. HFCC is a mechanical method of self-administered chest physiotherapy, which induces rapid air movement in and out of the lungs. This mean oscillated volume is an effective method of mucolysis and mucus clearance. HFCC can increase independence. Some studies have shown that HFCC leads to more mucus clearance and better lung function compared with conventional chest physiotherapy. However, HFCC also decreases end-expiratory lung volume, which can lead to increased airway resistance and a decreased oscillated volume. Adding positive end-expiratory pressure to HFCC has been shown to prevent this decrease in end-expiratory lung volume and to increase the oscillated volume. It is possible that the HFCC-induced decrease in end-expiratory lung volume may result in more mucus clearance in airways that remain open by reducing airway size. Adjunctive methods, such as positive end-expiratory pressure, may not always be needed to make HFCC more effective.

  13. High-Frequency Chest Compression: A Summary of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara F Dosman

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present literature summary is to describe high-frequency chest compression (HFCC, summarize its history and outline study results on its effect on mucolysis, mucus transport, pulmonary function and quality of life. HFCC is a mechanical method of self-administered chest physiotherapy, which induces rapid air movement in and out of the lungs. This mean oscillated volume is an effective method of mucolysis and mucus clearance. HFCC can increase independence. Some studies have shown that HFCC leads to more mucus clearance and better lung function compared with conventional chest physiotherapy. However, HFCC also decreases end-expiratory lung volume, which can lead to increased airway resistance and a decreased oscillated volume. Adding positive end-expiratory pressure to HFCC has been shown to prevent this decrease in end-expiratory lung volume and to increase the oscillated volume. It is possible that the HFCC-induced decrease in end-expiratory lung volume may result in more mucus clearance in airways that remain open by reducing airway size. Adjunctive methods, such as positive end-expiratory pressure, may not always be needed to make HFCC more effective.

  14. Influence of compression-expansion effect on oscillating-flow heat transfer in a finned heat exchanger

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke TANG; Juan YU; Tao JIN; Zhi-hua GAN

    2013-01-01

    Compression and expansion of a working gas due to the pressure oscillation of an oscillating flow can lead to a temperature variation of the working gas,which will affect the heat transfer in the oscillating flow.This study focuses on the impact of the compression-expansion effect,indicated by the pressure ratio,on the heat transfer in a finned heat exchanger under practical operating conditions of the ambient-temperature heat exchangers in Stirling-type pulse tube refrigerators.The experimental results summarized as the Nusselt number are presented for analysis.An increase in the pressure ratio can result in a marked rise in the Nussclt number,which indicates that the compression-expansion effect should be considered in characterizing the heat transfer of the oscillating flow,especially in the cases with a higher Valensi number and a lower maximum Reynolds number.

  15. Cascaded quadratic soliton compression of high-power femtosecond fiber lasers in Lithium Niobate crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Moses, Jeffrey; Wise, Frank W.

    2008-01-01

    The output of a high-power femtosecond fiber laser is typically 300 fs with a wavelength around $\\lambda=1030-1060$ nm. Our numerical simulations show that cascaded quadratic soliton compression in bulk LiNbO$_3$ can compress such pulses to below 100 fs.......The output of a high-power femtosecond fiber laser is typically 300 fs with a wavelength around $\\lambda=1030-1060$ nm. Our numerical simulations show that cascaded quadratic soliton compression in bulk LiNbO$_3$ can compress such pulses to below 100 fs....

  16. Positivity-preserving cell-centered Lagrangian schemes for multi-material compressible flows: From first-order to high-orders. Part II: The two-dimensional case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, François; Shu, Chi-Wang; Maire, Pierre-Henri

    2016-05-01

    This paper is the second part of a series of two. It follows [44], in which the positivity-preservation property of methods solving one-dimensional Lagrangian gas dynamics equations, from first-order to high-orders of accuracy, was addressed. This article aims at extending this analysis to the two-dimensional case. This study is performed on a general first-order cell-centered finite volume formulation based on polygonal meshes defined either by straight line edges, conical edges, or any high-order curvilinear edges. Such formulation covers the numerical methods introduced in [6,32,5,41,43]. This positivity study is then extended to high-orders of accuracy. Through this new procedure, scheme robustness is highly improved and hence new problems can be tackled. Numerical results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of these methods. It is important to point out that even if this paper is concerned with purely Lagrangian schemes, the theory developed is of fundamental importance for any methods relying on a purely Lagrangian step, as ALE methods or non-direct Euler schemes.

  17. Wall interference in a two-dimensional-flow wind tunnel, with consideration of the effect of compressibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, H Julian; Vincenti, Walter G

    1944-01-01

    Theoretical tunnel-wall corrections are derived for an airfoil of finite thickness and camber in a two-dimensional-flow wind tunnel. The theory takes account of the effects of the wake of the airfoil and of the compressibility of the fluid, and is based upon the assumption that the chord of the airfoil is small in comparison with the height of the tunnel. Consideration is given to the phenomenon of choking at high speeds and its relation to the tunnel-wall corrections. The theoretical results are compared with the small amount of low-speed experimental data available and the agreement is seen to be satisfactory, even for relatively large values of the chord-height ratio.

  18. Wall-function boundary conditions in the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for complex compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, J. R.; Rubesin, M. W.

    1983-01-01

    To make computer codes for two-dimensional compressible flows more robust and economical, wall functions for these flows, under adiabatic conditions, have been developed and tested. These wall functions have been applied to three two-equation models of turbulence. The tests consist of comparisons of calculated and experimental results for transonic and supersonic flow over a flat plate and for two-dimensional and axisymmetrical transonic shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction flows with and without separation. The calculations are performed with an implicit algorithm that solves the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. It is shown that results obtained agree very well with the data for the complex compressible flows tested, provided criteria for use of the wall functions are followed. The expected savings in cost of the computations and improved robustness of the code were achieved.

  19. Homogenization of immiscible compressible two-phase flow in double porosity media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latifa Ait Mahiout

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A double porosity model of multidimensional immiscible compressible two-phase flow in fractured reservoirs is derived by the mathematical theory of homogenization. Special attention is paid to developing a general approach to incorporating compressibility of both phases. The model is written in terms of the phase formulation, i.e. the saturation of one phase and the pressure of the second phase are primary unknowns. This formulation leads to a coupled system consisting of a doubly nonlinear degenerate parabolic equation for the pressure and a doubly nonlinear degenerate parabolic diffusion-convection equation for the saturation, subject to appropriate boundary and initial conditions. The major difficulties related to this model are in the doubly nonlinear degenerate structure of the equations, as well as in the coupling in the system. Furthermore, a new nonlinearity appears in the temporal term of the saturation equation. The aim of this paper is to extend the results of [9] to this more general case. With the help of a new compactness result and uniform a priori bounds for the modulus of continuity with respect to the space and time variables, we provide a rigorous mathematical derivation of the upscaled model by means of the two-scale convergence and the dilatation technique.

  20. A sharp interface method for compressible liquid–vapor flow with phase transition and surface tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fechter, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.fechter@iag.uni-stuttgart.de [Institut für Aerodynamik und Gasdynamik, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 21, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Munz, Claus-Dieter, E-mail: munz@iag.uni-stuttgart.de [Institut für Aerodynamik und Gasdynamik, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 21, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Rohde, Christian, E-mail: Christian.Rohde@mathematik.uni-stuttgart.de [Institut für Angewandte Analysis und Numerische Simulation, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Zeiler, Christoph, E-mail: Christoph.Zeiler@mathematik.uni-stuttgart.de [Institut für Angewandte Analysis und Numerische Simulation, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2017-05-01

    The numerical approximation of non-isothermal liquid–vapor flow within the compressible regime is a difficult task because complex physical effects at the phase interfaces can govern the global flow behavior. We present a sharp interface approach which treats the interface as a shock-wave like discontinuity. Any mixing of fluid phases is avoided by using the flow solver in the bulk regions only, and a ghost-fluid approach close to the interface. The coupling states for the numerical solution in the bulk regions are determined by the solution of local two-phase Riemann problems across the interface. The Riemann solution accounts for the relevant physics by enforcing appropriate jump conditions at the phase boundary. A wide variety of interface effects can be handled in a thermodynamically consistent way. This includes surface tension or mass/energy transfer by phase transition. Moreover, the local normal speed of the interface, which is needed to calculate the time evolution of the interface, is given by the Riemann solution. The interface tracking itself is based on a level-set method. The focus in this paper is the description of the two-phase Riemann solver and its usage within the sharp interface approach. One-dimensional problems are selected to validate the approach. Finally, the three-dimensional simulation of a wobbling droplet and a shock droplet interaction in two dimensions are shown. In both problems phase transition and surface tension determine the global bulk behavior.

  1. A sharp interface method for compressible liquid-vapor flow with phase transition and surface tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechter, Stefan; Munz, Claus-Dieter; Rohde, Christian; Zeiler, Christoph

    2017-05-01

    The numerical approximation of non-isothermal liquid-vapor flow within the compressible regime is a difficult task because complex physical effects at the phase interfaces can govern the global flow behavior. We present a sharp interface approach which treats the interface as a shock-wave like discontinuity. Any mixing of fluid phases is avoided by using the flow solver in the bulk regions only, and a ghost-fluid approach close to the interface. The coupling states for the numerical solution in the bulk regions are determined by the solution of local two-phase Riemann problems across the interface. The Riemann solution accounts for the relevant physics by enforcing appropriate jump conditions at the phase boundary. A wide variety of interface effects can be handled in a thermodynamically consistent way. This includes surface tension or mass/energy transfer by phase transition. Moreover, the local normal speed of the interface, which is needed to calculate the time evolution of the interface, is given by the Riemann solution. The interface tracking itself is based on a level-set method. The focus in this paper is the description of the two-phase Riemann solver and its usage within the sharp interface approach. One-dimensional problems are selected to validate the approach. Finally, the three-dimensional simulation of a wobbling droplet and a shock droplet interaction in two dimensions are shown. In both problems phase transition and surface tension determine the global bulk behavior.

  2. GPU computing of compressible flow problems by a meshless method with space-filling curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Z. H.; Wang, H.; Pu, S. H.

    2014-04-01

    A graphic processing unit (GPU) implementation of a meshless method for solving compressible flow problems is presented in this paper. Least-square fit is used to discretize the spatial derivatives of Euler equations and an upwind scheme is applied to estimate the flux terms. The compute unified device architecture (CUDA) C programming model is employed to efficiently and flexibly port the meshless solver from CPU to GPU. Considering the data locality of randomly distributed points, space-filling curves are adopted to re-number the points in order to improve the memory performance. Detailed evaluations are firstly carried out to assess the accuracy and conservation property of the underlying numerical method. Then the GPU accelerated flow solver is used to solve external steady flows over aerodynamic configurations. Representative results are validated through extensive comparisons with the experimental, finite volume or other available reference solutions. Performance analysis reveals that the running time cost of simulations is significantly reduced while impressive (more than an order of magnitude) speedups are achieved.

  3. Discrete unified gas kinetic scheme for all Knudsen number flows: II. Compressible case

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Zhaoli; Xu, Kun

    2014-01-01

    This paper is a continuation of our earlier work [Z.L. Guo {\\it et al.}, Phys. Rev. E {\\bf 88}, 033305 (2013)] where a multiscale numerical scheme based on kinetic model was developed for low speed isothermal flows with arbitrary Knudsen numbers. In this work, a discrete unified gas-kinetic scheme (DUGKS) for compressible flows with the consideration of heat transfer and shock discontinuity is developed based on the Shakhov model with an adjustable Prandtl number. The method is an explicit finite-volume scheme where the transport and collision processes are coupled in the evaluation of the fluxes at cell interfaces, so that the nice asymptotic preserving (AP) property is retained, such that the time step is limited only by the CFL number, the distribution function at cell interface recovers to the Chapman-Enskog one in the continuum limit while reduces to that of free-transport for free-molecular flow, and the time and spatial accuracy is of second-order accuracy in smooth region. These features make the DUGK...

  4. A ghost fluid method for sharp interface simulations of compressible multiphase flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majidi, Sahand; Afshari, Asghar [University of Tehran, Teheran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    A ghost fluid based computational tool is developed to study a wide range of compressible multiphase flows involving strong shocks and contact discontinuities while accounting for surface tension, viscous stresses and gravitational forces. The solver utilizes constrained reinitialization method to predict the interface configuration at each time step. Surface tension effect is handled via an exact interface Riemann problem solver. Interfacial viscous stresses are approximated by considering continuous velocity and viscous stress across the interface. To assess the performance of the solver several benchmark problems are considered: One-dimensional gas-water shock tube problem, shock-bubble interaction, air cavity collapse in water, underwater explosion, Rayleigh-Taylor Instability, and ellipsoidal drop oscillations. Results obtained from the numerical simulations indicate that the numerical methodology performs reasonably well in predicting flow features and exhibit a very good agreement with prior experimental and numerical observations. To further examine the accuracy of the developed ghost fluid solver, the obtained results are compared to those by a conventional diffuse interface solver. The comparison shows the capability of our ghost fluid method in reproducing the experimentally observed flow characteristics while revealing more details regarding topological changes of the interface.

  5. Blocking of Snow/Water Slurry Flow in Pipeline Caused by Compression-Strengthening of Snow Column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masataka Shirakashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In earlier works by the present authors, two systems for sustainable energy were proposed: (i a system for urban snow removal in winter and storage for air conditioning in summer, applied to Nagaoka City, which suffers heavy snow fall every winter, and (ii a district cooling system utilizing latent heat of ice to reduce the size of storage reservoir and transportation pipeline system. In these systems, the hydraulic conveying of snow or ice through pump-and-pipeline is the key technique to be developed, since characteristics of snow (ice/ water slurry is largely different from those of conventional non-cohesive solid particle slurries. In this study, the blocking of pipeline of snow/water slurry is investigated experimentally. While the blocking of conventional slurry occurs due to deposition of heavy particles at low flow velocity or arching of large rigid particles, that of snow/water slurry is caused by a compressed plug of snow formed due to cohesive nature of snow particles. This is because the strength of snow plug formed at a high resistance piping element, such as an orifice, becomes higher when the compression velocity is lower, resulting in a solid-like plug filling the whole channel upstream the element.

  6. [The development of the system of blood flow block by using magnetic compression abdominal large vascular].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiaopeng; Lv, Yi; Ma, Feng; Ma, Jia; Wang, Haohua; Wang, Shanpei; Li, Dichen; Liu, Yaxiong; Jia, Shenli; Shi, Zongqian; Luo, Ruixue

    2014-03-01

    A new system of blood flow block for control of bleeding in abdominal operation is composed of an abdominal magnetic blocking unit, an abdominal external electromagnet unit and other non-magnetic operation instrument. The abdominal external electromagnetic unit is placed in advance in the operation bed. The abdominal magnetic blocking unit can be placed directly on the ventral of the large vessels when need to blocking the abdominal large vessels during the operation. According to the non-contact suction characteristics of magnetic materials, the two magnetic units will attract each other and compression the vessels. Using this system for vascular occlusion does not need clear exposure and without separating vessel. There is the advantage of rapid, accurate and reliable for the system.

  7. Symmetric flows for compressible heat-conducting fluids with temperature dependent viscosity coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Ling; Wang, Tao

    2017-06-01

    We consider the Navier-Stokes equations for compressible heat-conducting ideal polytropic gases in a bounded annular domain when the viscosity and thermal conductivity coefficients are general smooth functions of temperature. A global-in-time, spherically or cylindrically symmetric, classical solution to the initial boundary value problem is shown to exist uniquely and converge exponentially to the constant state as the time tends to infinity under certain assumptions on the initial data and the adiabatic exponent γ. The initial data can be large if γ is sufficiently close to 1. These results are of Nishida-Smoller type and extend the work (Liu et al. (2014) [16]) restricted to the one-dimensional flows.

  8. Integrated LTCC Pressure/Flow/Temperature Multisensor for Compressed Air Diagnostics†

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Craquelin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a multisensor designed for industrial compressed air diagnostics and combining the measurement of pressure, flow, and temperature, integrated with the corresponding signal conditioning electronics in a single low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC package. The developed sensor may be soldered onto an integrated electro-fluidic platform by using standard surface mount device (SMD technology, e.g., as a standard electronic component would be on a printed circuit board, obviating the need for both wires and tubes and thus paving the road towards low-cost integrated electro-fluidic systems. Several performance aspects of this device are presented and discussed, together with electronics design issues.

  9. PDF methods for combustion in high-speed turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Stephen B.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the research performed during the second year of this three-year project. The ultimate objective of the project is extend the applicability of probability density function (pdf) methods from incompressible to compressible turbulent reactive flows. As described in subsequent sections, progress has been made on: (1) formulation and modelling of pdf equations for compressible turbulence, in both homogeneous and inhomogeneous inert flows; and (2) implementation of the compressible model in various flow configurations, namely decaying isotropic turbulence, homogeneous shear flow and plane mixing layer.

  10. Material Compressing Test of the High Polymer Part Used in Draft Gear of Heavy Load Locomotive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yangang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the actual load cases of heavy load locomotive, the material compressing tests of the high polymer parts used in the locomotive are researched. The relationship between stress and strain during the material compressing are acquired by means of comparing the many results of the material compressing tests under different test condition. The relationship between stress and strain during the material compressing is nonlinear in large range of strain, but the relationship is approximately linear in small range of strain. The material of the high polymer made in China and the material of the high polymer imported are compared through the tests. The results show that the compressing property of the material of the high polymer made in China and the material of the high polymer imported are almost same. The research offers the foundation to study the structure elasticity of the draft gear.

  11. Flux Limiter Lattice Boltzmann Scheme Approach to Compressible Flows with Flexible Specific-Heat Ratio and Prandtl Number

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    甘延标; 许爱国; 张广财; 李英骏

    2011-01-01

    We further develop the lattice Boltzmann (LB) model [Physica A 382 (2007) 502] for compressible flows from two aspects. Firstly, we modify the Bhatnagar Gross Krook (BGK) collision term in the LB equation, which makes the model suitable for simulating flows with different Prandtl numbers. Secondly, the flux limiter finite difference (FLFD) scheme is employed to calculate the convection term of the LB equation, which makes the unphysical oscillations at discontinuities be effectively suppressed and the numerical dissipations be significantly diminished. The proposed model is validated by recovering results of some well-known benchmarks, including (i) The thermal Couette flow; (ii) One- and two-dlmenslonal FLiemann problems. Good agreements are obtained between LB results and the exact ones or previously reported solutions. The flexibility, together with the high accuracy of the new model, endows the proposed model considerable potential for tracking some long-standing problems and for investigating nonlinear nonequilibrium complex systems.

  12. A Semi-Implicit, Fourier-Galerkin/B-Spline Collocation Approach for DNS of Compressible, Reacting, Wall-Bounded Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Todd; Ulerich, Rhys; Topalian, Victor; Malaya, Nick; Moser, Robert

    2013-11-01

    A discretization of the Navier-Stokes equations appropriate for efficient DNS of compressible, reacting, wall-bounded flows is developed and applied. The spatial discretization uses a Fourier-Galerkin/B-spline collocation approach. Because of the algebraic complexity of the constitutive models involved, a flux-based approach is used where the viscous terms are evaluated using repeated application of the first derivative operator. In such an approach, a filter is required to achieve appropriate dissipation at high wavenumbers. We formulate a new filter source operator based on the viscous operator. Temporal discretization is achieved using the SMR91 hybrid implicit/explicit scheme. The linear implicit operator is chosen to eliminate wall-normal acoustics from the CFL constraint while also decoupling the species equations from the remaining flow equations, which minimizes the cost of the required linear algebra. Results will be shown for a mildly supersonic, multispecies boundary layer case inspired by the flow over the ablating surface of a space capsule entering Earth's atmosphere. This work is supported by the Department of Energy [National Nuclear Security Administration] under Award Number [DE-FC52-08NA28615].

  13. Adaptivity with near-orthogonality constraint for high compression rates in lifting scheme framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwa, Tadeusz; Voisin, Yvon; Diou, Alain

    2004-01-01

    Since few years, Lifting Scheme has proven its utility in compression field. It permits to easily create fast, reversible, separable or no, not necessarily linear, multiresolution analysis for sound, image, video or even 3D graphics. An interesting feature of lifting scheme is the ability to build adaptive transforms for compression, more easily than with other decompositions. Many works have already be done in this subject, especially in lossless or near-lossless compression framework : better compression than with usually used methods can be obtained. However, most of the techniques used in adaptive near-lossless compression can not be extended to higher lossy compression rates, even in the simplest cases. Indeed, this is due to the quantization error introduced before coding, which has not controlled propagation through inverse transform. Authors have put their interest to the classical Lifting Scheme, with linear convolution filters, but they studied criterions to maintain a high level of adaptivity and a good error propagation through inverse transform. This article aims to present relatively simple criterion to obtain filters able to build image and video compression with high compression rate, tested here with the Spiht coder. For this, upgrade and predict filters are simultaneously adapted thanks to a constrained least-square method. The constraint consists in a near-orthogonality inequality, letting sufficiently high level of adaptivity. Some compression results are given, illustrating relevance of this method, even with short filters.

  14. Highly efficient frequency conversion with bandwidth compression of quantum light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allgaier, Markus; Ansari, Vahid; Sansoni, Linda; Eigner, Christof; Quiring, Viktor; Ricken, Raimund; Harder, Georg; Brecht, Benjamin; Silberhorn, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid quantum networks rely on efficient interfacing of dissimilar quantum nodes, as elements based on parametric downconversion sources, quantum dots, colour centres or atoms are fundamentally different in their frequencies and bandwidths. Although pulse manipulation has been demonstrated in very different systems, to date no interface exists that provides both an efficient bandwidth compression and a substantial frequency translation at the same time. Here we demonstrate an engineered sum-frequency-conversion process in lithium niobate that achieves both goals. We convert pure photons at telecom wavelengths to the visible range while compressing the bandwidth by a factor of 7.47 under preservation of non-classical photon-number statistics. We achieve internal conversion efficiencies of 61.5%, significantly outperforming spectral filtering for bandwidth compression. Our system thus makes the connection between previously incompatible quantum systems as a step towards usable quantum networks. PMID:28134242

  15. Highly efficient frequency conversion with bandwidth compression of quantum light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allgaier, Markus; Ansari, Vahid; Sansoni, Linda; Eigner, Christof; Quiring, Viktor; Ricken, Raimund; Harder, Georg; Brecht, Benjamin; Silberhorn, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid quantum networks rely on efficient interfacing of dissimilar quantum nodes, as elements based on parametric downconversion sources, quantum dots, colour centres or atoms are fundamentally different in their frequencies and bandwidths. Although pulse manipulation has been demonstrated in very different systems, to date no interface exists that provides both an efficient bandwidth compression and a substantial frequency translation at the same time. Here we demonstrate an engineered sum-frequency-conversion process in lithium niobate that achieves both goals. We convert pure photons at telecom wavelengths to the visible range while compressing the bandwidth by a factor of 7.47 under preservation of non-classical photon-number statistics. We achieve internal conversion efficiencies of 61.5%, significantly outperforming spectral filtering for bandwidth compression. Our system thus makes the connection between previously incompatible quantum systems as a step towards usable quantum networks.

  16. Highly efficient frequency conversion with bandwidth compression of quantum light

    CERN Document Server

    Allgaier, Markus; Sansoni, Linda; Quiring, Viktor; Ricken, Raimund; Harder, Georg; Brecht, Benjamin; Silberhorn, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid quantum networks rely on efficient interfacing of dissimilar quantum nodes, since elements based on parametric down-conversion sources, quantum dots, color centres or atoms are fundamentally different in their frequencies and bandwidths. While pulse manipulation has been demonstrated in very different systems, to date no interface exists that provides both an efficient bandwidth compression and a substantial frequency translation at the same time. Here, we demonstrate an engineered sum-frequency-conversion process in Lithium Niobate that achieves both goals. We convert pure photons at telecom wavelengths to the visible range while compressing the bandwidth by a factor of 7.47 under preservation of non-classical photon-number statistics. We achieve internal conversion efficiencies of 75.5%, significantly outperforming spectral filtering for bandwidth compression. Our system thus makes the connection between previously incompatible quantum systems as a step towards usable quantum networks.

  17. Highly compressed nanosolution restricted in cylindrical carbon nanospaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Masayasu; Ohkubo, Takahiro; Tsurusaki, Kazuma; Itadani, Atsushi; Ahmmad, Bashir; Urita, Koki; Moriguchi, Isamu; Kittaka, Shigeharu; Kuroda, Yasushige

    2013-02-01

    We shed light on the specific hydration structure around a zinc ion of nanosolution restricted in a cylindrical micropore of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) by comparison with the structure restricted in a cylindrical mesopore of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWNT) and that of bulk aqueous solution. The average micropore width of open-pore SWNT was 0.87 nm which is equivalent to the size of a hydrated zinc ion having 6-hydrated water molecules. We could impregnate the zinc ions into the micropore of SWNT with negligible amounts of ion-exchanged species on surface functional groups by the appropriate oxidation followed by heat treatment under an inert condition. The results of X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra confirmed that the proportion of dissolved species in nanospaces against the total adsorbed amounts of zinc ions on the open-pore SWNT and MWNT were 44 and 61%, respectively, indicating the formation of a dehydrated structure in narrower nanospaces. The structure parameters obtained by the analysis of XAFS spectra also indicate that the dehydrated and highly compressed hydration structure can be stably formed inside the cylindrical micropore of SWNT where the structure is different from that inside the slit-shaped micropore whose pore width is less than 1 nm. Such a unique structure needs not only a narrow micropore geometry which is equivalent to the size of a hydrated ion but also the cylindrical nature of the pore.We shed light on the specific hydration structure around a zinc ion of nanosolution restricted in a cylindrical micropore of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) by comparison with the structure restricted in a cylindrical mesopore of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWNT) and that of bulk aqueous solution. The average micropore width of open-pore SWNT was 0.87 nm which is equivalent to the size of a hydrated zinc ion having 6-hydrated water molecules. We could impregnate the zinc ions into the micropore of SWNT with negligible amounts of

  18. A Time-Accurate Upwind Unstructured Finite Volume Method for Compressible Flow with Cure of Pathological Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Ching Y.; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    2007-01-01

    A time-accurate, upwind, finite volume method for computing compressible flows on unstructured grids is presented. The method is second order accurate in space and time and yields high resolution in the presence of discontinuities. For efficiency, the Roe approximate Riemann solver with an entropy correction is employed. In the basic Euler/Navier-Stokes scheme, many concepts of high order upwind schemes are adopted: the surface flux integrals are carefully treated, a Cauchy-Kowalewski time-stepping scheme is used in the time-marching stage, and a multidimensional limiter is applied in the reconstruction stage. However even with these up-to-date improvements, the basic upwind scheme is still plagued by the so-called "pathological behaviors," e.g., the carbuncle phenomenon, the expansion shock, etc. A solution to these limitations is presented which uses a very simple dissipation model while still preserving second order accuracy. This scheme is referred to as the enhanced time-accurate upwind (ETAU) scheme in this paper. The unstructured grid capability renders flexibility for use in complex geometry; and the present ETAU Euler/Navier-Stokes scheme is capable of handling a broad spectrum of flow regimes from high supersonic to subsonic at very low Mach number, appropriate for both CFD (computational fluid dynamics) and CAA (computational aeroacoustics). Numerous examples are included to demonstrate the robustness of the methods.

  19. Effects of chest wall compression on expiratory flow rates in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Nozoe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Manual chest wall compression (CWC during expiration is a technique for removing airway secretions in patients with respiratory disorders. However, there have been no reports about the physiological effects of CWC in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Objective: To compare the effects of CWC on expiratory flow rates in patients with COPD and asymptomatic controls. Method: Fourteen subjects were recruited from among patients with COPD who were receiving pulmonary rehabilitation at the University Hospital (COPD group. Fourteen age-matched healthy subjects were also consecutively recruited from the local community (Healthy control group. Airflow and lung volume changes were measured continuously with the subjects lying in supine position during 1 minute of quiet breathing (QB and during 1 minute of CWC by a physical therapist. Results: During CWC, both the COPD group and the healthy control group showed significantly higher peak expiratory flow rates (PEFRs than during QB (mean difference for COPD group 0.14 L/sec, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.04 to 0.24, p<0.01, mean difference for healthy control group 0.39 L/sec, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.57, p<0.01. In the between-group comparisons, PEFR was significantly higher in the healthy control group than in the COPD group (-0.25 L/sec, 95% CI -0.43 to -0.07, p<0.01. However, the expiratory flow rates at the lung volume at the PEFR during QB and at 50% and 25% of tidal volume during QB increased in the healthy control group (mean difference for healthy control group 0.31 L/sec, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.47, p<0.01: 0.31 L/sec, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.47, p<0.01: 0.27 L/sec, 95% CI 0.13 to 0.41, p<0.01, respectively but not in the COPD group (0.05 L/sec, 95% CI -0.01 to 0.12: -0.01 L/sec, 95% CI -0.11 to 0.08: 0.02 L/sec, 95% CI -0.05 to 0.90 with the application of CWC. Conclusion: The effects of chest wall compression on expiratory flow rates was different between COPD patients and

  20. ADAPTIVE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR HIGH-SPEED FLOW-STRUCTURE INTERACTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wiroj LIMTRAKARN; Pramote DECHAUMPHAI

    2004-01-01

    An adaptive finite element method for high-speed flow-structure interaction is presented. The cell-centered finite element method is combined with an adaptive meshing technique to solve the Navier-Stokes equations for high-speed compressible flow behavior. The energy equation and the quasi-static structural equations for aerodynamically heated structures are solved by applying the Galerkin finite element method. The finite element formulation and computational procedure are described. Interactions between the high-speed flow, structural heat transfer, and deformation are studied by two applications of Mach 10 flow over an inclined plate, and Mach 4 flow in a channel.

  1. Multigrid diagonal implicit solutions for compressible turbulent flows and their evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Rama Rajaraja

    A numerical scheme to solve the two dimensional Navier-Stokes equations is developed and applied to several compressible turbulent flows over airfoils. A method for evaluating the quality of these solutions is then developed and illustrated with representative examples. The distinguishing features of the numerical scheme are its implicitness for improving stability, the diagonalization of the matrices in the implicit operator for computational efficiency, and the implementation within a multigrid procedure for convergence acceleration. A finite volume approximation is used for spatial discretization of the governing equations to handle complicated geometries. Artificial dissipation is added in the form of an adaptive blend of second and fourth differences of the solution to maintain robustness and stability. The viscous terms are treated explicitly to maintain the diagonal form. Results of simulations of viscous transonic flows past airfoils are presented. The computed flow field quantities are compared with those from other computations and experiments to confirm the accuracy of the method. Comparisons of convergence rates are made to demonstrate the efficiency of the method. In solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations it is important that the added numerical dissipation does not overwhelm the real viscous dissipation. In order to verify this, it is necessary to be able to estimate quantitatively the effect of numerical dissipation. A method for estimating the integrated effect of numerical dissipation on solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations is developed in this dissertation. The method is based on integration of the momentum equations and the computation of corrections due to numerical dissipation to the drag integral. These corrections can then be considered as estimates of the error due to dissipation. Solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations for laminar and turbulent flows over airfoils are used to illustrate the method. The errors due to numerical

  2. Finite-time Lyapunov exponent-based analysis for compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, D. R.; Speth, R. L.; Gaitonde, D. V.; Lewis, M. J.

    2016-08-01

    The finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) technique has shown substantial success in analyzing incompressible flows by capturing the dynamics of coherent structures. Recent applications include river and ocean flow patterns, respiratory tract dynamics, and bio-inspired propulsors. In the present work, we extend FTLE to the compressible flow regime so that coherent structures, which travel at convective speeds, can be associated with waves traveling at acoustic speeds. This is particularly helpful in the study of jet acoustics. We first show that with a suitable choice of integration time interval, FTLE can extract wave dynamics from the velocity field. The integration time thus acts as a pseudo-filter separating coherent structures from waves. Results are confirmed by examining forward and backward FTLE coefficients for several simple, well-known acoustic fields. Next, we use this analysis to identify events associated with intermittency in jet noise pressure probe data. Although intermittent events are known to be dominant causes of jet noise, their direct source in the turbulent jet flow has remained unexplained. To this end, a Large-Eddy Simulation of a Mach 0.9 jet is subjected to FTLE to simultaneously examine, and thus expose, the causal relationship between coherent structures and the corresponding acoustic waves. Results show that intermittent events are associated with entrainment in the initial roll up region and emissive events downstream of the potential-core collapse. Instantaneous acoustic disturbances are observed to be primarily induced near the collapse of the potential core and continue propagating towards the far-field at the experimentally observed, approximately 30° angle relative to the jet axis.

  3. Finite-time Lyapunov exponent-based analysis for compressible flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, D R; Speth, R L; Gaitonde, D V; Lewis, M J

    2016-08-01

    The finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) technique has shown substantial success in analyzing incompressible flows by capturing the dynamics of coherent structures. Recent applications include river and ocean flow patterns, respiratory tract dynamics, and bio-inspired propulsors. In the present work, we extend FTLE to the compressible flow regime so that coherent structures, which travel at convective speeds, can be associated with waves traveling at acoustic speeds. This is particularly helpful in the study of jet acoustics. We first show that with a suitable choice of integration time interval, FTLE can extract wave dynamics from the velocity field. The integration time thus acts as a pseudo-filter separating coherent structures from waves. Results are confirmed by examining forward and backward FTLE coefficients for several simple, well-known acoustic fields. Next, we use this analysis to identify events associated with intermittency in jet noise pressure probe data. Although intermittent events are known to be dominant causes of jet noise, their direct source in the turbulent jet flow has remained unexplained. To this end, a Large-Eddy Simulation of a Mach 0.9 jet is subjected to FTLE to simultaneously examine, and thus expose, the causal relationship between coherent structures and the corresponding acoustic waves. Results show that intermittent events are associated with entrainment in the initial roll up region and emissive events downstream of the potential-core collapse. Instantaneous acoustic disturbances are observed to be primarily induced near the collapse of the potential core and continue propagating towards the far-field at the experimentally observed, approximately 30° angle relative to the jet axis.

  4. Compressive sensing for high resolution profiles with enhanced Doppler performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Hoogeboom, P.; Chevalier, F. Le; Otten, M.P.G.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate how Compressive Sensing (CS) can be used in pulse-Doppler radars to improve the Doppler performance while preserving range resolution. We investigate here two types of stepped frequency waveforms, the coherent frequency bursts and successive frequency ramps, which can be

  5. Computational Analysis of the Compressible Flow Driven by a Piston in a Ballistic Range

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G. Rajesh; R. Mishra; H. G. Kang; H. D. Kim

    2007-01-01

    The ballistic range has long been employed in a variety of engineering fields such as high-velocity impact engineering, projectile aerodynamics and aeroballistics, since it can create an extremely high-pressure state in very short time. Since the operation of the ballistic range includes many complicated phenomena, each process should be understood in detail for the performance enhancement of the device. One of the main processes which have significant influence on the device performance is the compression process of the driver gas. Most of the studies available in this field hardly discuss this phenomenon in detail and thus lack a proper understanding of its effect on the whole system performance. In the present study, a computational analysis has been made to investigate the fluid dynamic aspects of the compression process in the pump tube of a ballistic range and to assess how it affects the performance of the ballistic range, The results obtained are validated with the available experimental data. In order to evaluate the system performance, several performance parameters are defined. Effect of a shock tube added in between the pump tube and launch tube on the performance of the ballistic range is also studied analytically. Performance of the ballistic range could be significantly improved by the proper selection of the pump tube and high-pressure tube parameters and the addition of the shock tube.

  6. Highly deformable nanofilaments in flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawłowska, S.

    2016-10-01

    Experimental analysis of hydrogel nanofilaments conveyed by flow is conducted to help in understanding physical phenomena responsible for transport properties and shape deformations of long bio-objects, like DNA or proteins. Investigated hydrogel nanofilaments exhibit typical macromolecules-like behavior, as spontaneous conformational changes and cross-flow migration. Results of the experiments indicate critical role of thermal fluctuations behavior of single filaments.

  7. Syntectonic fluid flow and fluid compartmentalization in a compressive basin: Example of the Jaca basin (Southwest Pyrenees, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, Brice; Travé, Anna; Buatier, Martine; Labaume, Pierre

    2013-04-01

    During compressive events, deformation in sedimentary basins is mainly accommodated by thrust faults emplacement and related fold growth. In such a structure, thrust faults are generally rooted in the basement and may act as conduits or barriers for crustal fluid flow. However, most of recent studies suggest that fluid flow through such discontinuities is not so evident and depends on the structural levels of the thrust inside the fold-and-thrust belt. In order to constrain the paleofluid flow through the Jaca thrust-sheet-top basin (Paleogene southwest-Pyrenean fold-and-thrust belt) we focus our study on different thrust faults located at different structural levels. The microstructures observed in the different studied fault zones are similar and consist of pervasive cleavage, calcite shear and extension veins and late dilatation veins. In order to constrain the nature and the source of fluids involved in fluid-rock interactions in fault zones, a geochemical approach, based on oxygen and carbon stable isotopes and trace elements on calcite, was adopted on the different vein generations and host rocks. The results suggest a high complexity in the paleo-hydrological behaviors of thrust faults evidencing a fluid-flow compartmentalization of the basin. North of the Jaca basin, previous studies in the southern part of the Axial Zones showed the contribution of deep metamorphic water, probably derived from the Paleozoic basement, along along fault zones related the major Gavarnie thrust. Contrarily, in the northern part of the Jaca basin, we evidence the contribution of formation water during the Monte Perdido thrust fault activity. These data suggest a closed hydrological fluid system where distance of fluid flow did not exceeded 70 m. On the other hand, the Jaca and Cotiella thrust faults, both located more to the south in the basin, are characterized by a composite fluid flow system. Indeed, stable isotopes and trace elements compositions of the first generation of

  8. On Exact Solutions of Rarefaction-Rarefaction Interactions in Compressible Isentropic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenssen, Helge Kristian

    2016-12-01

    Consider the interaction of two centered rarefaction waves in one-dimensional, compressible gas flow with pressure function p(ρ )=a^2ρ ^γ with γ >1 . The classic hodograph approach of Riemann provides linear 2nd order equations for the time and space variables t, x as functions of the Riemann invariants r, s within the interaction region. It is well known that t(r, s) can be given explicitly in terms of the hypergeometric function. We present a direct calculation (based on works by Darboux and Martin) of this formula, and show how the same approach provides an explicit formula for x(r, s) in terms of Appell functions (two-variable hypergeometric functions). Motivated by the issue of vacuum and total variation estimates for 1-d Euler flows, we then use the explicit t-solution to monitor the density field and its spatial variation in interactions of two centered rarefaction waves. It is found that the variation is always non-monotone, and that there is an overall increase in density variation if and only if γ >3 . We show that infinite duration of the interaction is characterized by approach toward vacuum in the interaction region, and that this occurs if and only if the Riemann problem defined by the extreme initial states generates a vacuum. Finally, it is verified that the minimal density in such interactions decays at rate O(1)/t.

  9. Application of Gridless Method to Simulation of Compressible Multi-Material Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Wang; Houqian Xu; Wei Wu; Rui Xue

    2015-01-01

    The least⁃square gridless method was extended to simulate the compressible multi⁃material flows. The algorithm was accomplished to solve the Arbitrary Lagrange⁃Euler ( ALE ) formulation. The local least⁃square curve fits was adopted to approximate the spatial derivatives of a point on the base of the points in its circular support domain, and the basis function was linear. The HLLC ( Harten⁃Lax⁃van Leer⁃Contact) scheme was used to calculate the inviscid flux. On the material interfaces, the gridless points were endued with a dual definition corresponding to different materials. The moving velocity of the interface points was updated by solving the Riemann problem. The interface boundary condition was built by using the Ghost Fluid Method ( GFM ) . Computations were performed for several one and two dimensional typical examples. The numerical results show that the interface and the shock wave are well captured, which proves the effectiveness of gridless method in dealing with multi⁃material flow problems.

  10. Numerical analysis of a non equilibrium two-component two-compressible flow in porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Saad, Bilal Mohammed

    2013-09-01

    We propose and analyze a finite volume scheme to simulate a non equilibrium two components (water and hydrogen) two phase flow (liquid and gas) model. In this model, the assumption of local mass non equilibrium is ensured and thus the velocity of the mass exchange between dissolved hydrogen and hydrogen in the gas phase is supposed finite. The proposed finite volume scheme is fully implicit in time together with a phase-by-phase upwind approach in space and it is discretize the equations in their general form with gravity and capillary terms We show that the proposed scheme satisfies the maximum principle for the saturation and the concentration of the dissolved hydrogen. We establish stability results on the velocity of each phase and on the discrete gradient of the concentration. We show the convergence of a subsequence to a weak solution of the continuous equations as the size of the discretization tends to zero. At our knowledge, this is the first convergence result of finite volume scheme in the case of two component two phase compressible flow in several space dimensions.

  11. 3D reconstruction of a compressible flow by synchronized multi-camera BOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, F.; Donjat, D.; Léon, O.; Le Besnerais, G.; Champagnat, F.; Micheli, F.

    2017-05-01

    This paper investigates the application of a 3D density reconstruction from a limited number of background-oriented schlieren (BOS) images as recently proposed in Nicolas et al. (Exp Fluids 57(1):1-21, 2016), to the case of compressible flows, such as underexpanded jets. First, an optimization of a 2D BOS setup is conducted to mitigate the intense local blurs observed in raw BOS images and caused by strong density gradients present in the jets. It is demonstrated that a careful choice of experimental conditions enables one to obtain sharp deviation fields from 2D BOS images. Second, a 3DBOS experimental bench involving 12 synchronized cameras is specifically designed for the present study. It is shown that the 3DBOS method can provide physically consistent 3D reconstructions of instantaneous and mean density fields for various underexpanded jet flows issued into quiescent air. Finally, an analysis of the density structure of a moderately underexpanded jet is conducted through phase-averaging, highlighting the development of a large-scale coherent structure associated with a jet shear layer instability.

  12. Numerical Study of Water Production from Compressible Moist-Air Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    sabah hamidi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research a numerical study of water production from compressible moist-air flow by condensing of the vapor component of the atmospheric air through a converging-diverging nozzle is performed. The atmospheric air can be sucked by a vacuum compressor. The geographical conditions represent a hot and humid region, for example Bandar Abbas, Iran, with coordinates, 270 11 ’ N and 560 16’ E and summer climate conditions of about 40℃and relative humidity above 80%. Parametric studies are performed for the atmospheric-air temperature between, 40℃ to 50℃, and relative humidity between49.6% to 100.%. For these ranges of operating conditions and a nozzle with the area ratio of 1.17, the liquid mass flow rates falls in the range 0.272 to 0.376 kg/s. The results show that, the energy consumed by the compressor for production 1 kg of water will be 1.279 kWh. The price of 1 kWh is 372 Rials, therefore the price for the production of 1 kg liquid water will be 475.8 Rials, therefore, the scheme is economically suitable.

  13. Human respiration at rest in rapid compression and at high pressures and gas densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, R.; Lambertsen, C. J.; Strauss, R.; Clark, J. M.; Puglia, C. D.

    1983-01-01

    The ventilation (V), end-tidal PCO2 (PACO2), and CO2 elimination rate were determined in men at rest breathing CO2-free gas over the pressure range 1-50 ATA and the gas density range 0.4-25 g/l, during slow and rapid compressions, at stable elevated ambient pressures and during slow decompressions. Progressive increase in pulmonary gas flow resistance due to elevation of ambient pressure and inspired gas density to the He-O2 equivalent of 5000 feet of seawater was found to produce a complex pattern of change in PACO2. It was found that as both ambient pressure and pulmonary gas flow resistance were progressively raised, PACO2 at first increased, went through a maximum, and then declined towards values near the 1 ATA level. It is concluded that this pattern of PACO2 change results from the interaction on ventilation of the increase in pulmonary resistance due to the elevation of gas density with the increase in respiratory drive postulated as due to generalized central nervous system excitation associated with exposure to high hydrostatic pressure. It is suggested that a similar interaction exists between increased gas flow resistance and the increase in respiratory drive related to nitrogen partial pressure and the resulting narcosis.

  14. Global existence of strong solutions to the micro-polar, compressible flow with density-dependent viscosities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Mingtao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article is concerned with global strong solutions of the micro-polar, compressible flow with density-dependent viscosity coefficients in one-dimensional bounded intervals. The important point in this article is that the initial density may vanish in an open subset.

  15. High Order Finite Difference Methods for Multiscale Complex Compressible Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjoegreen, Bjoern; Yee, H. C.

    2002-01-01

    The classical way of analyzing finite difference schemes for hyperbolic problems is to investigate as many as possible of the following points: (1) Linear stability for constant coefficients; (2) Linear stability for variable coefficients; (3) Non-linear stability; and (4) Stability at discontinuities. We will build a new numerical method, which satisfies all types of stability, by dealing with each of the points above step by step.

  16. High-Fidelity Numerical Modeling of Compressible Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT: SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 215 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON (Monitor) a. REPORT... DNS ) and the turbulent statistics were found to be essentially independent of the domain width for values greater than twice the maximum boundary layer...methods can be used in design. Here DNS designates an approach where all fluid length scales are resolved in the simulation. Implicit large-eddy

  17. Development of High Speed Imaging and Analysis Techniques Compressible Dynamics Stall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhara, M. S.; Carr, L. W.; Wilder, M. C.; Davis, Sanford S. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Dynamic stall has limited the flight envelope of helicopters for many years. The problem has been studied in the laboratory as well as in flight, but most research, even in the laboratory, has been restricted to surface measurement techniques such as pressure transducers or skin friction gauges, except at low speed. From this research, it became apparent that flow visualization tests performed at Mach numbers representing actual flight conditions were needed if the complex physics associated with dynamic stall was to be properly understood. However, visualization of the flow field during compressible conditions required carefully aligned and meticulously reconstructed holographic interferometry. As part of a long-range effort focused on exposing of the physics of compressible dynamic stall, a research wind tunnel was developed at NASA Ames Research Center which permits visual access to the full flow field surrounding an oscillating airfoil during compressible dynamic stall. Initially, a stroboscopic schlieren technique was used for visualization of the stall process, but the primary research tool has been point diffraction interferometry(PDI), a technique carefully optimized for use in th is project. A review of the process of development of PDI will be presented in the full paper. One of the most valuable aspects of PDI is the fact that interferograms are produced in real time on a continuous basis. The use of a rapidly-pulsed laser makes this practical; a discussion of this approach will be presented in the full paper. This rapid pulsing(up to 40,000 pulses/sec) produces interferograms of the rapidly developing dynamic stall field in sufficient resolution(both in space and time) that the fluid physics of the compressible dynamic stall flowfield can be quantitatively determined, including the gradients of pressure in space and time. This permits analysis of the influence of the effect of pitch rate, Mach number, Reynolds number, amplitude of oscillation, and other

  18. On the flow of a compressible fluid by the hodograph method II : fundamental set of particular flow solutions of the Chaplygin differential equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick, I E; Kaplan, Carl

    1944-01-01

    The differential equation of Chaplygin's jet problem is utilized to give a systematic development of particular solutions of the hodograph flow equations, which extends the treatment of Chaplygin into the supersonic range and completes the set of particular solutions. The particular solutions serve to place on a reasonable basis the use of velocity correction formulas for the comparison of incompressible and compressible flows. It is shown that the geometric-mean type of velocity correction formula introduced in part I has significance as an over-all type of approximation in the subsonic range. A brief review of general conditions limiting the potential flow of an adiabatic compressible fluid is given and application is made to the particular solutions, yielding conditions for the existence of singular loci in the supersonic range. The combining of particular solutions in accordance with prescribed boundary flow conditions is not treated in the present paper.

  19. On the Flow of a Compressible Fluid by the Hodograph Method. II - Fundamental Set of Particular Flow Solutions of the Chaplygin Differential Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick, I. E.; Kaplan, Carl

    1944-01-01

    The differential equation of Chaplygin's jet problem is utilized to give a systematic development of particular solutions of the hodograph flow equations, which extends the treatment of Chaplygin into the supersonic range and completes the set of particular solutions. The particular solutions serve to place on a reasonable basis the use of velocity correction formulas for the comparison of incompressible and compressible flows. It is shown that the geometric-mean type of velocity correction formula introduced in part I has significance as an over-all type of approximation in the subsonic range. A brief review of general conditions limiting the potential flow of an adiabatic compressible fluid is given and application is made to the particular solutions, yielding conditions for the existence of singular loci in the supersonic range. The combining of particular solutions in accordance with prescribed boundary flow conditions is not treated in the present paper.

  20. Predicting the influence of compressibility and thermal and flow distribution asymmetry on the frequency-response characteristics of multitube two-phase condensing flow systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobus, C.J.; Wedekind, G.L.; Bhatt, B.L.

    2000-02-01

    An equivalent single-tube model concept was extended to predict the frequency-response characteristics of multitube two-phase condensing flow systems, complete with the ability to predict the influence of compressibility and thermal and flow distribution asymmetry. The predictive capability of the equivalent single-tube model was verified experimentally with extensive data that encompassed a three-order-of-magnitude range of frequencies, and a wide range of operating parameters.

  1. A Semi-Hydrostatic Theory of Gravity-Dominated Compressible Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubos, T.; Voitus, F.

    2014-12-01

    Compressible Euler equations support the propagation of acoustic waves. Although much progress has been achieved towards efficient and accurate solutions to the resulting numerical difficulties, it can still be desirable to identify "unified" equations of motion that would not support acoustic waves while retaining accuracy at large and small scales. Even if such equations are eventually not chosen as the basis of a numerical model, they may help identifying the independent degrees of freedom of the atmospheric flow to be modeled and how the dependent fields are related to the independent fields. From Hamilton's least action principle (HP), "semi-hydrostatic" compressible equations of motion with density diagnosed from potential temperature through hydrostatic balance are derived. Energy, potential vorticity and momentum are conserved. Slaving density to potential temperature suppresses the degrees of freedom supporting the propagation of acoustic waves and results in a sound-proof system. Scale analysis and linear normal modes analysis for an isothermal state of rest suggest that the semy-hydrostatic system is accurate from hydrostatic to non-hydrostatic scales, except for deep internal gravity waves (Figure : decimal logarithm of relative error of the frequency of internal normal modes of a non-rotating isothermal atmosphere as a function of horizontal and vertical wavenumbers k,m normalized by the scale height H). Especially the Lamb wave and long Rossby waves are not distorted, unlike with anelastic or pseudo-incompressible systems. Compared to similar equations derived by Arakawa and Konor (2009), the semi-hydrostatic system possesses an additional term in the horizontal momentum budget. This term is an apparent force resulting from the vertical coordinate not being the actual height of an air parcel, but its hydrostatic height, i.e. the hypothetical height it would have after the atmospheric column it belongs to has reached hydrostatic balance through

  2. Preprocessing Techniques for High-Efficiency Data Compression in Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junho Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have proposed preprocessing techniques for high-efficiency data compression in wireless multimedia sensor networks. To do this, we analyzed the characteristics of multimedia data under the environment of wireless multimedia sensor networks. The proposed preprocessing techniques consider the characteristics of sensed multimedia data to perform the first stage preprocessing by deleting the low priority bits that do not affect the image quality. The second stage preprocessing is also performed for the undeleted high priority bits. By performing these two-stage preprocessing techniques, it is possible to reduce the multimedia data size in large. To show the superiority of our techniques, we simulated the existing multimedia data compression scheme with/without our preprocessing techniques. Our experimental results show that our proposed techniques increase compression ratio while reducing compression operations compared to the existing compression scheme without preprocessing techniques.

  3. Multi-scale Modeling of Compressible Single-phase Flow in Porous Media using Molecular Simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Saad, Ahmed Mohamed

    2016-05-01

    In this study, an efficient coupling between Monte Carlo (MC) molecular simulation and Darcy-scale flow in porous media is presented. The cell-centered finite difference method with a non-uniform rectangular mesh were used to discretize the simulation domain and solve the governing equations. To speed up the MC simulations, we implemented a recently developed scheme that quickly generates MC Markov chains out of pre-computed ones, based on the reweighting and reconstruction algorithm. This method astonishingly reduces the required computational time by MC simulations from hours to seconds. In addition, the reweighting and reconstruction scheme, which was originally designed to work with the LJ potential model, is extended to work with a potential model that accounts for the molecular quadrupole moment of fluids with non-spherical molecules such as CO2. The potential model was used to simulate the thermodynamic equilibrium properties for single-phase and two-phase systems using the canonical ensemble and the Gibbs ensemble, respectively. Comparing the simulation results with the experimental data showed that the implemented model has an excellent fit outperforming the standard LJ model. To demonstrate the strength of the proposed coupling in terms of computational time efficiency and numerical accuracy in fluid properties, various numerical experiments covering different compressible single-phase flow scenarios were conducted. The novelty in the introduced scheme is in allowing an efficient coupling of the molecular scale and Darcy scale in reservoir simulators. This leads to an accurate description of the thermodynamic behavior of the simulated reservoir fluids; consequently enhancing the confidence in the flow predictions in porous media.

  4. Spatiotemporal reshaping and compression of high intensity femtosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trunov, V. I.; Pestryakov, E. V.; Petrov, V. V.; Kirpichnikov, A. V.; Frolov, S. A.; Harenko, D. S.; Bagayev, S. N.

    2007-06-01

    Experimental results of self-compression of femtosecond pulses under filamentation in argon and xenon are presented. The mode of a self-compression in xenon is realized for the first time. The dependence of the spectrum broadening from pressure of these gases, input energy and focusing parameters are studied in detail. The spectral and temporary profiles of the first and the second filaments at multiple filamentation are analyzed. Features of multiple filamentation are revealed in xenon. For the first time experimentally the effect of restriction a number of filaments and effective swapping of energy from one filament to another (more than 70 % of energy in two-filament mode without increasing of their amount is founded). The possible mechanism of the phenomenon related with the saturation of the third order nonlinearity in xenon and influence of the higher fifth-order susceptibility χ (5) are discussed.

  5. Evaluation of interface models for 3D-1D coupling of compressible Euler methods for the application on cavitating flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deininger Martina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations of complete hydraulic systems (e.g. diesel injectors can, due to high computational costs, currently not be done entirely in three dimensions. Our aim is to substitute the 3D solver by a corresponding 1D method in some parts of the system and develop a solver coupling with suitable interface models. Firstly, we investigate an interface model for non-cavitating flow passing the interface. A flux-coupling with a thin interface approach is considered and the jump in dimensions at the interface is transferred to an additional variable φ, which switches between the 3D and the 1D domain. As shown in two testcases, the error introduced in the vicinity of the interface is quite small. Two numerical flux formulations for the flux over the 3D-1D interface are compared and the Roe-type flux formulation is recommended. Secondly, extending the first method to cavitating flows passing the interface, we divide the density equation in two equations - one for liquid and one for vapor phase of the two-phase fluid - and couple the two equations by source terms depending on the free enthalpy. We propose two interface models for coupling 3D and 1D compressible density-based Euler methods that have potential for considering the entire (non- cavitating hydraulic system behaviour by a 1D method in combination with an embedded detailed 3D simulation at much lower computational costs than the pure 3D simulation.

  6. High energy density Z-pinch plasmas using flow stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shumlak, U., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Golingo, R. P., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Nelson, B. A., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Bowers, C. A., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Doty, S. A., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Forbes, E. G., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Hughes, M. C., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Kim, B., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Knecht, S. D., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Lambert, K. K., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Lowrie, W., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Ross, M. P., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Weed, J. R., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu [Aerospace and Energetics Research Program, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, 98195-2250 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch research project[1] at the University of Washington investigates the effect of sheared flows on MHD instabilities. Axially flowing Z-pinch plasmas are produced that are 100 cm long with a 1 cm radius. The plasma remains quiescent for many radial Alfvén times and axial flow times. The quiescent periods are characterized by low magnetic mode activity measured at several locations along the plasma column and by stationary visible plasma emission. Plasma evolution is modeled with high-resolution simulation codes – Mach2, WARPX, NIMROD, and HiFi. Plasma flow profiles are experimentally measured with a multi-chord ion Doppler spectrometer. A sheared flow profile is observed to be coincident with the quiescent period, and is consistent with classical plasma viscosity. Equilibrium is determined by diagnostic measurements: interferometry for density; spectroscopy for ion temperature, plasma flow, and density[2]; Thomson scattering for electron temperature; Zeeman splitting for internal magnetic field measurements[3]; and fast framing photography for global structure. Wall stabilization has been investigated computationally and experimentally by removing 70% of the surrounding conducting wall to demonstrate no change in stability behavior.[4] Experimental evidence suggests that the plasma lifetime is only limited by plasma supply and current waveform. The flow Z-pinch concept provides an approach to achieve high energy density plasmas,[5] which are large, easy to diagnose, and persist for extended durations. A new experiment, ZaP-HD, has been built to investigate this approach by separating the flow Z-pinch formation from the radial compression using a triaxial-electrode configuration. This innovation allows more detailed investigations of the sheared flow stabilizing effect, and it allows compression to much higher densities than previously achieved on ZaP by reducing the linear density and increasing the pinch current. Experimental results and

  7. Resonant frequency does not predict high-frequency chest compression settings that maximize airflow or volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthy, Sarah K; Marinkovic, Aleksandar; Weiner, Daniel J

    2011-06-01

    High-frequency chest compression (HFCC) is a therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF). We hypothesized that the resonant frequency (f(res)), as measured by impulse oscillometry, could be used to determine what HFCC vest settings produce maximal airflow or volume in pediatric CF patients. In 45 subjects, we studied: f(res), HFCC vest frequencies that subjects used (f(used)), and the HFCC vest frequencies that generated the greatest volume (f(vol)) and airflow (f(flow)) changes as measured by pneumotachometer. Median f(used) for 32 subjects was 14 Hz (range, 6-30). The rank order of the three most common f(used) was 15 Hz (28%) and 12 Hz (21%); three frequencies tied for third: 10, 11, and 14 Hz (5% each). Median f(res) for 43 subjects was 20.30 Hz (range, 7.85-33.65). Nineteen subjects underwent vest-tuning to determine f(vol) and f(flow). Median f(vol) was 8 Hz (range, 6-30). The rank order of the three most common f(vol) was: 8 Hz (42%), 6 Hz (32%), and 10 Hz (21%). Median f(flow) was 26 Hz (range, 8-30). The rank order of the three most common f(flow) was: 30 Hz (26%) and 28 Hz (21%); three frequencies tied for third: 8, 14, and 18 Hz (11% each). There was no correlation between f(used) and f(flow) (r(2)  = -0.12) or f(vol) (r(2) = 0.031). There was no correlation between f(res) and f(flow) (r(2)  = 0.19) or f(vol) (r(2) = 0.023). Multivariable analysis showed no independent variables were predictive of f(flow) or f(vol). Vest-tuning may be required to optimize clinical utility of HFCC. Multiple HFCC frequencies may need to be used to incorporate f(flow) and f(vol).

  8. Experimental investigation on high temperature anisotropic compression properties of ceramic-fiber-reinforced SiO{sub 2} aerogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Duoqi; Sun, Yantao [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Beihang University, P.O. Box 405, Beijing 100191 (China); Feng, Jian [National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites, College of Aerospace Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Yang, Xiaoguang, E-mail: yxg@buaa.edu.cn [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Beihang University, P.O. Box 405, Beijing 100191 (China); Han, Shiwei; Mi, Chunhu [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Beihang University, P.O. Box 405, Beijing 100191 (China); Jiang, Yonggang [National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites, College of Aerospace Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Qi, Hongyu [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Beihang University, P.O. Box 405, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2013-11-15

    Compression tests were conducted on a ceramic-fiber-reinforced SiO{sub 2} aerogel at high temperature. Anisotropic mechanical property was found. In-plane Young's modulus is more than 10 times higher than that of out-of-plane, but fracture strain is much lower by a factor of 100. Out-of-plane Young's modulus decreases with increasing temperature, but the in-plane modulus and fracture stress increase with temperature. The out-of-plane property does not change with loading rates. Viscous flow at high temperature is found to cause in-plane shrinkage, and both in-plane and out-of-plane properties change. Compression induced densification of aerogel matrix was also found by Scanning Electron Microscope analysis.

  9. Developments in time-resolved high pressure x-ray diffraction using rapid compression and decompression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jesse S.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Lin, Chuanlong; Rod, Eric; Bai, Ligang; Shen, Guoyin [High Pressure Collaborative Access Team, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Complementary advances in high pressure research apparatus and techniques make it possible to carry out time-resolved high pressure research using what would customarily be considered static high pressure apparatus. This work specifically explores time-resolved high pressure x-ray diffraction with rapid compression and/or decompression of a sample in a diamond anvil cell. Key aspects of the synchrotron beamline and ancillary equipment are presented, including source considerations, rapid (de)compression apparatus, high frequency imaging detectors, and software suitable for processing large volumes of data. A number of examples are presented, including fast equation of state measurements, compression rate dependent synthesis of metastable states in silicon and germanium, and ultrahigh compression rates using a piezoelectric driven diamond anvil cell.

  10. Twin stability in highly nanotwinned Cu under compression, torsion and tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hodge, A.M.; Furnish, T.A.; Shute, C.J.;

    2012-01-01

    Twin stability under four distinct mechanical loading states has been investigated for highly nanotwinned Cu containing parallel nanotwins 40 nm thick. Observed deformation-induced microstructural changes under tension, compression, tension–tension fatigue and torsion are qualitatively compared...

  11. Simulation investigation of flow field inside the rotary engine : during intake and compression stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poojitganont, T.; Berg, H.P.; Izweik, H.T. [Brandenburg Univ. of Technology Cottbus, Cottbus (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    As a result of continuously increasing oil prices, automotive industries are looking for alternative power sources for their automobiles. An excellent solution is the hybrid system. However due to the additional weight of its batteries, this causes the total weight of the car to increase. This higher battery weight can be compensated by reducing the weight of the engine. A rotary engine, such as the Wankel rotary engine, has a more attractive power to weight ratio than the normal reciprocating engine. The rotary engine can be treated and evaluated with respect to performance characteristics as a displacement type, four-stroke internal combustion engine, one-cycle similar to the reciprocating engine. For any combustion engine to reach the maximum power output, the mixture formation inside the engine should be considered. The flow phenomenon inside the engine is a key parameter which involves the mixture formation mechanism. This paper investigated the spray characteristic from the injector and the flow phenomena inside the combustion chamber. Its behaviours were studied using computational fluid dynamics simulation. The simulation setup was described in detail, with reference to meshes; initial condition; and boundary condition. Verification of the calculation was also presented. A comparison of the temperature during compression stroke from the analytical calculation and the adiabetic system simulation were also illustrated. Simulation results showed that the speed of the engine provides a proportional effect on the magnitude of air velocity inside the engine, whereas the circulation region can be expanded by increasing the intake pressure during the intake stroke. 9 refs., 1 tab., 13 figs.

  12. Direct numerical simulation of a compressible multiphase flow through the fast Eulerian approach

    CERN Document Server

    Cerminara, Matteo; Ongaro, Tomaso Esposti; Salvetti, Maria Vittoria

    2014-01-01

    Our work is motivated by the analysis of ash plume dynamics, arising in the study of volcanic eruptions. Such phenomena are characterized by large Reynolds number (exceeding $10^7$) and a large number of polydispersed particles~[1]. Thus, the choice of the methodology to be used is straightforward: we need LES of a multiphase gas-particles flow. Since the simulation of the behavior of a large number of dispersed particles is very difficult with Lagrangian methods, we model the particles as a continuum, Eulerian fluid (dust), by using reduced models involving two fluids, as proposed in Ref.~[2,3,4]. Moreover, we need a robust numerical scheme to simultaneously treat compressibility, buoyancy effects and turbulent dispersal dynamics. We analyze the turbulence properties of such models in a homogeneous and isotropic setting, with the aim of formulating a LES model. In particular, we examine the development of freely decaying homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in subsonic regime (the r.m.s. Mach number either 0...

  13. On the modelling of compressible inviscid flow problems using AUSM schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajžman M.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available During last decades, upwind schemes have become a popular method in the field of computational fluid dynamics. Although they are only first order accurate, AUSM (Advection Upstream Splitting Method schemes proved to be well suited for modelling of compressible flows due to their robustness and ability of capturing shock discontinuities. In this paper, we review the composition of the AUSM flux-vector splitting scheme and its improved version noted AUSM+, proposed by Liou, for the solution of the Euler equations. Mach number splitting functions operating with values from adjacent cells are used to determine numerical convective fluxes and pressure splitting is used for the evaluation of numerical pressure fluxes. Both versions of the AUSM scheme are applied for solving some test problems such as one-dimensional shock tube problem and three dimensional GAMM channel. Features of the schemes are discussed in comparison with some explicit central schemes of the first order accuracy (Lax-Friedrichs and of the second order accuracy (MacCormack.

  14. An implicit numerical model for multicomponent compressible two-phase flow in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidane, Ali; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a new implicit approach to model multicomponent compressible two-phase flow in porous media with species transfer between the phases. In the implicit discretization of the species transport equation in our formulation we calculate for the first time the derivative of the molar concentration of component i in phase α (cα, i) with respect to the total molar concentration (ci) under the conditions of a constant volume V and temperature T. The species transport equation is discretized by the finite volume (FV) method. The fluxes are calculated based on powerful features of the mixed finite element (MFE) method which provides the pressure at grid-cell interfaces in addition to the pressure at the grid-cell center. The efficiency of the proposed model is demonstrated by comparing our results with three existing implicit compositional models. Our algorithm has low numerical dispersion despite the fact it is based on first-order space discretization. The proposed algorithm is very robust.

  15. Group Invariance Properties of the Inviscid Compressible Flow Equations for a Modified Tait Equation of State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Scott; Baty, Roy

    2015-11-01

    This work considers the group invariance properties of the inviscid compressible flow equations (Euler equations) under the assumptions of one-dimensional symmetry and a modified Tait equation of state (EOS) closure model. When written in terms of an adiabatic bulk modulus, a transformed version of these equations is found to be identical to that for an ideal gas EOS. As a result, the Lie group invariance structure of these equations - and their subsequent reduction to a lower-order system - is identical to the published results for the ideal gas case. Following the reduction of the Euler equations to a system of ordinary differential equations, a variety of elementary closed-form solutions are derived. These solutions are then used in conjunction with the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions to construct discontinuous shock wave and free surface solutions that are analogous to the classical Noh, Sedov, Guderley, and Hunter similarity solutions of the Euler equations for an ideal gas EOS. The versions of these problems for the modified Tait EOS are found to be semi-analytic in that a transcendental root extraction (and in some cases numerical integration of ordinary differential equations) enables solution of the relevant equations.

  16. Generalized adjoint consistent treatment of wall boundary conditions for compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Ralf; Leicht, Tobias

    2015-11-01

    In this article, we revisit the adjoint consistency analysis of Discontinuous Galerkin discretizations of the compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes equations with application to the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and k- ω turbulence equations. Here, particular emphasis is laid on the discretization of wall boundary conditions. While previously only one specific combination of discretizations of wall boundary conditions and of aerodynamic force coefficients has been shown to give an adjoint consistent discretization, in this article we generalize this analysis and provide a discretization of the force coefficients for any consistent discretization of wall boundary conditions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a related evaluation of the cp- and cf-distributions is required. The freedom gained in choosing the discretization of boundary conditions without loosing adjoint consistency is used to devise a new adjoint consistent discretization including numerical fluxes on the wall boundary which is more robust than the adjoint consistent discretization known up to now. While this work is presented in the framework of Discontinuous Galerkin discretizations, the insight gained is also applicable to (and thus valuable for) other discretization schemes. In particular, the discretization of integral quantities, like the drag, lift and moment coefficients, as well as the discretization of local quantities at the wall like surface pressure and skin friction should follow as closely as possible the discretization of the flow equations and boundary conditions at the wall boundary.

  17. High precision Hugoniot measurements of D2 near maximum compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benage, John; Knudson, Marcus; Desjarlais, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The Hugoniot response of liquid deuterium has been widely studied due to its general importance and to the significant discrepancy in the inferred shock response obtained from early experiments. With improvements in dynamic compression platforms and experimental standards these results have converged and show general agreement with several equation of state (EOS) models, including quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) calculations within the Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA). This approach to modeling the EOS has also proven quite successful for other materials and is rapidly becoming a standard approach. However, small differences remain among predictions obtained using different local and semi-local density functionals; these small differences show up in the deuterium Hugoniot at ~ 30-40 GPa near the region of maximum compression. Here we present experimental results focusing on that region of the Hugoniot and take advantage of advancements in the platform and standards, resulting in data with significantly higher precision than that obtained in previous studies. These new data may prove to distinguish between the subtle differences predicted by the various density functionals. Results of these experiments will be presented along with comparison to various QMD calculations. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Real-time distortionless high-factor compression scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liénard, J

    1989-01-01

    Nowadays, digital subtraction angiography systems must be able to sustain real-time acquisition (30 frames per second) of 512 x 512 x 8 bit images and store several sequences of such images on low cost and general-purpose mass memories. Concretely, that means a 7.8 Mbytes per second rate and about 780 Mbytes disk space to hold a 100-s cardiac examination. To fulfill these requirements at competitive cost, a distortionless compressor/decompressor system can be designed: during acquisition, the real-time compressor transforms the input images into a lower quantity of coded information through a predictive coder and a variable-length Huffman code. The process is fully reversible because during review, the real-time decompressor exactly recovers the acquired images from the stored compressed data. Test results on many raw images demonstrate that real-time compression is feasible and takes place with absolutely no loss of information. The designed system indifferently works on 512 or 1024 formats, and 256 or 1024 gray levels.

  19. Different frequencies should be prescribed for different high frequency chest compression machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milla, Carlos E; Hansen, Leland G; Warwick, Warren J

    2006-01-01

    High frequency chest compression (HFCC) is used for treatment and prevention of the lung diseases characterized by impaired mucus clearance and/or cough, where patients are at risk for acquiring acute bronchitis or pneumonia. The HFCC treatment frequencies may be prescribed according to the manufacturers' generic guidelines or may be determined for each individual patient by a "tuning" method that measures, at the mouth, the air volume displacement and the associated airflows produced at each frequency. Tuning is performed while the patient is breathing normally during the HFCC system operation. After measurements for several breaths at one frequency have been collected, the program randomly selects and measures another frequency until the entire frequency range of the machine being tuned has been sampled. Frequencies range from 6 to 21 Hz for the sine waveform machines and from 6 to 25 Hz for the square waveform machines. Each group of flow signals is digitized and analyzed by the program. For each frequency, the HFCC flow velocities and volumes are computed and averaged. These average flows and volumes are rank ordered; the three frequencies with the highest flows and the three frequencies producing the largest volumes are selected for prescription. If the same frequency is selected as one of the three best frequencies for both flow and volume, the next ranked frequency is selected randomly for flow or volume. Significant differences exist between patients and HFCC machines. In a series of 100 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with varying degrees of lung disease, we found that the best-ranked frequencies varied from patient to patient and did not correlate with patients' age, gender, height, weight, or spirometry parameters. With the sine waveform, the highest HFCC airflows were between 13 and 20 Hz 82% of the time and the largest HFCC volumes were between 6 and 10 Hz 83% of the time. With the square waveform, both the highest average HFCC flow rates and the largest

  20. Induced respiratory system modeling by high frequency chest compression using lumped system identification method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongwon; Lee, Yong Wan; O'Clock, George; Zhu, Xiaoming; Parhi, Keshab K; Warwick, Warren J

    2009-01-01

    High frequency chest compression (HFCC) treatment systems are used to promote mucus transport and mitigate pulmonary system clearance problems to remove sputum from the airways in patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) and at risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Every HFCC system consists of a pump generator, one or two hoses connected to a vest, to deliver the pulsation. There are three different waveforms in use; symmetric sine, the asymmetric sine and the trapezoid waveforms. There have been few studies that compared the efficacy of a sine waveform with the HFCC pulsations. In this study we present a model of the respiratory system for a young normal subject who is one of co-authors. The input signal is the pressure applied by the vest to chest, at a frequency of 6Hz. Using the system model simulation, the effectiveness of different source waveforms is evaluated and compared by observing the waveform response associated with air flow at the mouth. Also the study demonstrated that the ideal rectangle wave produced the maximum peak air flow, and followed by the trapezoid, triangle and sine waveform. The study suggests that a pulmonary system evaluation or modeling effort for CF patient might be useful as a method to optimize frequency and waveform structure choices for HFCC therapeutic intervention.

  1. Transient flow characteristics of a high speed rotary valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Patrick H.

    were experimentally mapped as a function of valve speed, inter-cylinder pressure ratios and volume ratios and the results were compared to compressible flow theoretical models. Specifically, the transient behavior suggested a short-lived loss-mode initiation closely resembled by shock tube theory followed by a quasi-steady flow regime resembling choked flow behavior. An empirical model was then employed to determine the useful range of the CCV design as applied to a four-stroke CIBAI engine cycle modeled using a 1-D quasi-steady numerical method, with particular emphasis on the cyclic timing of the CCV opening. Finally, a brief discussion of a high-temperature version of the CCV design is presented.

  2. RELAP-7 Progress Report: A Mathematical Model for 1-D Compressible, Single-Phase Flow Through a Branching Junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, R. A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-08-14

    In the literature, the abundance of pipe network junction models, as well as inclusion of dissipative losses between connected pipes with loss coefficients, has been treated using the incompressible flow assumption of constant density. This approach is fundamentally, physically wrong for compressible flow with density change. This report introduces a mathematical modeling approach for general junctions in piping network systems for which the transient flows are compressible and single-phase. The junction could be as simple as a 1-pipe input and 1-pipe output with differing pipe cross-sectional areas for which a dissipative loss is necessary, or it could include an active component, between an inlet pipe and an outlet pipe, such as a pump or turbine. In this report, discussion will be limited to the former. A more general branching junction connecting an arbitrary number of pipes with transient, 1-D compressible single-phase flows is also presented. These models will be developed in a manner consistent with the use of a general equation of state like, for example, the recent Spline-Based Table Look-up method [1] for incorporating the IAPWS-95 formulation [2] to give accurate and efficient calculations for properties for water and steam with RELAP-7 [3].

  3. Dynamic relaxation processes in compressible multiphase flows. Application to evaporation phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Métayer O.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Phase changes and heat exchanges are examples of physical processes appearing in many industrial applications involving multiphase compressible flows. Their knowledge is of fundamental importance to reproduce correctly the resulting effects in simulation tools. A fine description of the flow topology is thus required to obtain the interfacial area between phases. This one is responsible for the dynamics and the kinetics of heat and mass transfer when evaporation or condensation occurs. Unfortunately this exchange area cannot be obtained easily and accurately especially when complex mixtures (drops, bubbles, pockets of very different sizes appear inside the transient medium. The natural way to solve this specific trouble consists in using a thin grid to capture interfaces at all spatial scales. But this possibility needs huge computing resources and can be hardly used when considering physical systems of large dimensions. A realistic method is to consider instantaneous exchanges between phases by the way of additional source terms in a full non-equilibrium multiphase flow model [2,15,17]. In this one each phase obeys its own equation of state and has its own set of equations and variables (pressure, temperature, velocity, energy, entropy,.... When enabling the relaxation source terms the multiphase mixture instantaneously tends towards a mechanical or thermodynamic equilibrium state at each point of the flow. This strategy allows to mark the boundaries of the real flow behavior and to magnify the dominant physical effects (heat exchanges, evaporation, drag,... inside the medium. A description of the various relaxation processes is given in the paper. Les changements de phase et les transferts de chaleur sont des exemples de phénomènes physiques présents dans de nombreuses applications industrielles faisant intervenir des écoulements compressibles multiphasiques. La connaissance des mécanismes associés est primordiale afin de reproduire

  4. Modeling of drag reduction in turbulent channel flow with hydrophobic walls by FVM method and weakly-compressible flow equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Li; Ming-Shun Yuan

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the effects of hydrophobic wall on skin-friction drag in the channel flow are investigated through large eddy simulation on the basis of weaklycompressible flow equations with the MacCormack's scheme on collocated mesh in the FVM framework. The slip length model is adopted to describe the behavior of the slip velocities in the streamwise and spanwise directions at the interface between the hydrophobic wall and turbulent channel flow. Simulation results are presented by analyzing flow behaviors over hydrophobic wall with the Smagorinky subgrid-scale model and a dynamic model on computational meshes of different resolutions. Comparison and analysis are made on the distributions of timeaveraged velocity, velocity fluctuations, Reynolds stress as well as the skin-friction drag. Excellent agreement between the present study and previous results demonstrates the accuracy of the simple classical second-order scheme in representing turbulent vertox near hydrophobic wall. In addition, the relation of drag reduction efficiency versus time-averaged slip velocity is established. It is also found that the decrease of velocity gradient in the close wall region is responsible for the drag reduction. Considering its advantages of high calculation precision and efficiency, the present method has good prospect in its application to practical projects.

  5. A Study on Compressive Anisotropy and Nonassociated Flow Plasticity of the AZ31 Magnesium Alloy in Hot Rolling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of anisotropy in compression is studied on hot rolling of AZ31 magnesium alloy with a three-dimensional constitutive model based on the quadratic Hill48 yield criterion and nonassociated flow rule (non-AFR. The constitutive model is characterized by compressive tests of AZ31 billets since plastic deformations of materials are mostly caused by compression during rolling processes. The characterized plasticity model is implemented into ABAQUS/Explicit as a user-defined material subroutine (VUMAT based on semi-implicit backward Euler's method. The subroutine is employed to simulate square-bar rolling processes. The simulation results are compared with rolled specimens and those predicted by the von Mises and the Hill48 yield function under AFR. Moreover, strip rolling is also simulated for AZ31 with the Hill48 yield function under non-AFR. The strip rolling simulation demonstrates that the lateral spread generated by the non-AFR model is in good agreement with experimental data. These comparisons between simulation and experiments validate that the proposed Hill48 yield function under non-AFR provides satisfactory description of plastic deformation behavior in hot rolling for AZ31 alloys in case that the anisotropic parameters in the Hill48 yield function and the non-associated flow rule are calibrated by the compressive experimental results.

  6. High temperature absorption compression heat pump for industrial waste heat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinholdt, Lars; Horntvedt, B.; Nordtvedt, S. R.

    2016-01-01

    Heat pumps are currently receiving extensive interest because they may be able to support the integration of large shares of fluctuating electricity production based on renewable sources, and they have the potential for the utilization of low temperature waste heat from industry. In most industries......, the needed temperature levels often range from 100°C and up, but until now, it has been quite difficult to find heat pump technologies that reach this level, and thereby opening up the large-scale heat recovery in the industry. Absorption compression heat pumps can reach temperatures above 100°C......, and they have proved themselves a very efficient and reliable technology for applications that have large temperature changes on the heat sink and/or heat source. The concept of Carnot and Lorenz efficiency and its use in the analysis of system integration is shown. A 1.25 MW system having a Carnot efficiency...

  7. CFD Simulation of Transonic Flow in High-Voltage Circuit Breaker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyang Ye

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A high-voltage circuit breaker is an indispensable piece of equipment in the electric transmission and distribution systems. Transonic flow typically occurs inside breaking chamber during the current interruption, which determines the insulating characteristics of gas. Therefore, accurate compressible flow simulations are required to improve the prediction of the breakdown voltages in various test duties of high-voltage circuit breakers. In this work, investigation of the impact of the solvers on the prediction capability of the breakdown voltages in capacitive switching is presented. For this purpose, a number of compressible nozzle flow validation cases have been presented. The investigation is then further extended for a real high-voltage circuit breaker geometry. The correlation between the flow prediction accuracy and the breakdown voltage prediction capability is identified.

  8. Stability of compressible reacting mixing layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, D. S.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    Linear instability of compressible reacting mixing layers is analyzed with emphasis on the effects of heat release and compressibility. Laminar solutions of the compressible boundary-layer equations are used as the base flows. The parameters of this study are the adiabatic flame temperature, the Mach number of the upper stream, frequency, wavenumber, and the direction of propagation of the disturbance wave. Stability characteristics of the flow are presented. Three groups of unstable modes are found when the Mach number and/or heat release are large. Finally, it is shown that the unstable modes are two-dimensional for large heat release even in highly compressible flow.

  9. Numerical algorithm conjugating steady and transient, separated, compressible flow and a solid body having arbitrarily distributed heat sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degani, D.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical algorithm that is second-order accurate in time has been developed for the conjugated problem of a separated, compressible flow field and a conductive solid body. The full two-dimensional time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations are coupled with the time-dependent energy equation for the solid body and are solved simultaneously. using implicit algorithms. The energy equation for the solid body may include arbitrarily distributed heat sources. The algorithm has been exmined for the case of two-dimensional supersonic compression-corner interaction, with a heat source embedded in the wall in the vicinity of the separation bubble and the attached boundary layer. The effect of the heat source on the flow field is studied for steady and transient cases.

  10. Lossy compression of floating point high-dynamic range images using JPEG2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Dominic; Kaup, Andre

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, a new technique called High Dynamic Range (HDR) has gained attention in the image processing field. By representing pixel values with floating point numbers, recorded images can hold significantly more luminance information than ordinary integer images. This paper focuses on the realization of a lossy compression scheme for HDR images. The JPEG2000 standard is used as a basic component and is efficiently integrated into the compression chain. Based on a detailed analysis of the floating point format and the human visual system, a concept for lossy compression is worked out and thoroughly optimized. Our scheme outperforms all other existing lossy HDR compression schemes and shows superior performance both at low and high bitrates.

  11. High pressure, quasi-isentropic compression experiments on the Omega laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, K; Edwards, M; Jankowski, A; Pollaine, S; Smith, R; Remington, B

    2006-05-26

    The high energy density of pulsed lasers can be used to generate shockless loading in solids to high pressures and compressions but low temperatures. We have used the Omega laser to extend the capabilities of this technique to multi-Mbar pressures and compressions approaching a factor of 2 in aluminum foils. The energy from a 3.7 ns laser pulse is used to drive a strong shock through a 200 {micro}m polystyrene disc. The disc material unloads from a high-pressure state and expands across a 300 {micro}m vacuum gap where it stagnates against the sample to produce a smooth, monotonically increasing load with rise times from a few to {approx} 20 ns. Ramped compression reasing waves having peak pressures of 14-200 GPa (0.14-2.0 Mbar) and peak compressions {rho}/{rho}{sub 0} of 1.1-2.0 were generated in the aluminum samples using laser pulse energies of 400 J to 2 kJ. Wave profiles from a series of successively thicker targets loaded to 120 GPa show the evolution of the high-pressure compression wave within the sample. The initial loading in the sample is shockless, and develops into a shock at a depth of 20-25 {micro}m. We compare these wave profiles with hydrodynamic simulations from which we extract material temperatures and plastic strain rates behind the compression wave. Limitations and future prospects for this new shockless loading technique are discussed.

  12. Penetrating Annulus Fibrosus Injuries Affect Dynamic Compressive Behaviors of the Intervertebral Disc Via Altered Fluid Flow: An Analytical Interpretation

    OpenAIRE

    Michalek, Arthur J.; Iatridis, James C.

    2011-01-01

    Extensive experimental work on the effects of penetrating annular injuries indicated that large injuries impact axial compressive properties of small animal intervertebral discs, yet there is some disagreement regarding the sensitivity of mechanical tests to small injury sizes. In order to understand the mechanism of injury size sensitivity, this study proposed a simple one dimensional model coupling elastic deformations in the annulus with fluid flow into and out of the nucleus through both ...

  13. GLOBAL EXISTENCE AND BLOW-UP PHENOMENA OF CLASSICAL SOLUTIONS FOR THE SYSTEM OF COMPRESSIBLE ADIABATIC FLOW THROUGH POROUS MEDIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘法贵; 孔德兴

    2004-01-01

    By means of maximum principle for nonlinear hyperbolic systems,the results given by HSIAO Ling and D.Serre was improved for Cauchy problem of compressible adiabatic flow through porous media,and a complete result on the global existence and the blow-up phenomena of classical solutions of these systems.These results show that the dissipation is strong enough to preserve the smoothness of 'small ' solution.

  14. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E. [eds.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  15. High Strain Rate Compression of Martensitic NiTi Shape Memory Alloy at Different Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Ying; Young, Marcus L.; Nie, Xu

    2017-02-01

    The compressive response of martensitic NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) rods has been investigated using a modified Kolsky compression bar at various strain rates (400, 800, and 1200 s-1) and temperatures [room temperature and 373 K (100 °C)], i.e., in the martensitic state and in the austenitic state. SEM, DSC, and XRD were performed on NiTi SMA rod samples after high strain rate compression in order to reveal the influence of strain rate and temperature on the microstructural evolution, phase transformation, and crystal structure. It is found that at room temperature, the critical stress increases slightly as strain rate increases, whereas the strain-hardening rate decreases. However, the critical stress under high strain rate compression at 373 K (100 °C) increase first and then decrease due to competing strain hardening and thermal softening effects. After high rate compression, the microstructure of both martensitic and austenitic NiTi SMAs changes as a function of increasing strain rate, while the phase transformation after deformation is independent of the strain rate at room temperature and 373 K (100 °C). The preferred crystal plane of the martensitic NiTi SMA changes from ( 1bar{1}1 )M before compression to (111)M after compression, while the preferred plane remains the same for austenitic NiTi SMA before and after compression. Additionally, dynamic recovery and recrystallization are also observed to occur after deformation of the austenitic NiTi SMA at 373 K (100 °C). The findings presented here extend the basic understanding of the deformation behavior of NiTi SMAs and its relation to microstructure, phase transformation, and crystal structure, especially at high strain rates.

  16. Modeling of high-explosive driven plasma compression opening switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, A. E.; Lindemuth, I. R.; Goforth, J. H.

    The initial path of the current through a plasma compression switch is through a thin (500-nm thick) metal foil. The current explodes the foil to form the seed for the conducting plasma. The behavior of the foil at this point is the same as an exploding metal fuse for which we have a simple model. We have, therefore, chosen this model as our starting point. The fuse model assumes that the foil material is homogeneous and is characterized by a single temperature and density. The thickness of the foil is assumed to be much less than the magnetic diffusion skin depth so that the magnetic field varies linearly across the foil. For the present application we assume that the side of the foil away from the channel is fixed in space while the side by the channel is untamped. The foil/plasma will, therefore, cross the channel at the expansion velocity as the foil explodes. Equations for the electrical resistance of the foil, the magnetic fields, the motion of the foil, and the kinetic and internal energies are all solved selfconsistantly. The electrical resistivity, the pressure, and the specific energy of aluminum are taken from the Los Alamos SESAME EOS library. In the case of aluminum we have created a SESAME-style table based on the theory of More and Lee which we have modified to agree with experiment where possible.

  17. A high-resolution SWIR camera via compressed sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMackin, Lenore; Herman, Matthew A.; Chatterjee, Bill; Weldon, Matt

    2012-06-01

    Images from a novel shortwave infrared (SWIR, 900 nm to 1.7 μm) camera system are presented. Custom electronics and software are combined with a digital micromirror device (DMD) and a single-element sensor; the latter are commercial off-the-shelf devices, which together create a lower-cost imaging system than is otherwise available in this wavelength regime. A compressive sensing (CS) encoding schema is applied to the DMD to modulate the light that has entered the camera. This modulated light is directed to a single-element sensor and an ensemble of measurements is collected. With the data ensemble and knowledge of the CS encoding, images are computationally reconstructed. The hardware and software combination makes it possible to create images with the resolution of the DMD while employing a substantially lower-cost sensor subsystem than would otherwise be required by the use of traditional focal plane arrays (FPAs). In addition to the basic camera architecture, we also discuss a technique that uses the adaptive functionality of the DMD to search and identify regions of interest. We demonstrate adaptive CS in solar exclusion experiments where bright pixels, which would otherwise reduce dynamic range in the images, are automatically removed.

  18. Effects of strain rate and elevated temperature on compressive flow stress and absorbed energy of polyimide foam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horikawa K.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, at first, the effect of strain rate on the strength and the absorbed energy of polyimide foam was experimentally examined by carrying out a series of compression tests at various strain rates, from 10−3 to 103 s−1. This polyimide foam has open cell structure with small cell size of 0.3 ∼ 0.6 mm. In the measurement of impact load, a special load cell with a small part for sensing load was adopted. For the measurement of the displacement, a high-speed camera was used. It was found that the flow stress of polyimide foam and the absorbed energy up to a strain of 0.4 increased with the increase of the strain rates. Secondly, the effect of ambient temperature on the strength and absorbed energy of polyimide foam was also investigated by using a sprit Hopkinson pressure bar apparatus and testing at elevated temperatures of 100 and 200 ∘C. With the increase of temperature, the strength and absorbed energy decreased and the effect is smaller in dynamic tests than static tests.

  19. Effects of viscosity and conductivity stratification on the linear stability and transient growth within compressible Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Bijaylakshmi; Ramachandran, Ashwin; Sinha, Krishnendu; Govindarajan, Rama

    2017-02-01

    Accurate prediction of laminar to turbulent transition in compressible flows is a challenging task, as it can be affected by a combination of factors. Compressibility causes large variations in thermodynamic as well as transport properties of a gas, which in turn are known to affect flow stability. We study the stratification of individual transport properties and their combined behavior. We also examine the effect of a change in the magnitude of viscosity and conductivity on flow stability. The Couette flow of a perfect gas is our model problem and both modal and non-modal analyses are carried out. We notice a large destabilizing role of the increase in the conductivity value and a dramatic stabilizing effect of mean viscosity stratification, over a range of free-stream Mach number, Reynolds number, Prandtl number, and disturbance wavenumber. In the combined case, viscosity stratification plays a dominant role. We find this to be the case for finite-time transient growth in the parameter regime below linear instability as well as asymptotically at large time. A budget of the transient growth energy amplification is also shown to identify the effects of transport properties on the constituents of perturbation energy. The extensive results presented in this paper, we believe should motivate those studying more realistic flows to examine how these contrasting effects of stratification come together.

  20. Compressive loading at the end plate directly regulates flow and deformation of the basivertebral vein: an analytical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Hsiang-Ho

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metastatic diseases and infections frequently involve the spine. This is the result of seeding of the vertebral body by tumor cells or bacteria delivered by venous blood from Batson's plexus, which is hypothesized to enter the vertebral body via the epidural veins. Isolated spinal segments deform significantly at the bony end plate when under compression. This deformation could cause a volume change of the vertebral body and may be accompanied by retrograde flow of venous blood. To date, this process has not been investigated quantitatively. The purpose of this study was to determine the volume changes of the vertebral body and basivertebral vein for a vertebral body under compression. Methods A three-dimensional finite element mesh model of the L4 segment with both adjacent discs was modified from a 3-D computed tomography scan image. An octagon representing the basivertebral vein was introduced into the center of the vertebral body in the model. Four compressive orientations (1500 N were applied on the top disc. The volume change of the vertebral body model and the basivertebral vein were then computed. Results The volume change of the vertebral body was about 0.1 cm3 (16.3% of the basivertebral vein for the four loading conditions. The maximum cross-sectional area reductions of the basivertebral vein and volume reduction were 1.54% and 1.02%, for uniform compression. Conclusion Our study quantified the small but significant volume change of a modeled vertebral body and cross-sectional areas and that of the basivertebral vein, due to the inward bulging of the end plate under compression. This volume change could initiate the reverse flow of blood from the epidural venous system and cause seeding of tumors or bacterial cells.

  1. Dynamic recrystallization and precipitation in high manganese austenitic stainless steel during hot compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amir Momeni; Shahab Kazemi; Golam Ebrahimi; Alireza Maldar

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic recrystallization and precipitation in a high manganese austenitic stainless steel were investigated by hot compression tests over temperatures of 950-1150°C at strain rates of 0.001 s-1-1 s-1. All the flow curves within the studied deformation regimes were typ-ical of dynamic recrystallization. A window was constructed to determine the value of apparent activation energy as a function of strain rate and deformation temperature. The kinetics of dynamic recrystallization was analyzed using the Avrami kinetics equation. A range of apparent activation energy for hot deformation from 303 kJ/mol to 477 kJ/mol is obtained at different deformation regimes. Microscopic characterization confirms that under a certain deformation condition (medium Zener-Hollomon parameter (Z) values), dynamic recrystalliza-tion appears at first, but large particles can not inhibit the recrystallization. At low or high Z values, dynamic recrystallization may occur be-fore dynamic precipitation and proceeds faster. In both cases, secondary phase precipitation is observed along prior austenite grain bounda-ries. Stress relaxation tests at the same deformation temperatures also confirm the possibility of dynamic precipitation. Unexpectedly, the Avrami's exponent value increases with the increase of Z value. It is associated with the priority of dynamic recrystallization to dynamic pre-cipitation at higher Z values.

  2. Audiovisual focus of attention and its application to Ultra High Definition video compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rerabek, Martin; Nemoto, Hiromi; Lee, Jong-Seok; Ebrahimi, Touradj

    2014-02-01

    Using Focus of Attention (FoA) as a perceptual process in image and video compression belongs to well-known approaches to increase coding efficiency. It has been shown that foveated coding, when compression quality varies across the image according to region of interest, is more efficient than the alternative coding, when all region are compressed in a similar way. However, widespread use of such foveated compression has been prevented due to two main conflicting causes, namely, the complexity and the efficiency of algorithms for FoA detection. One way around these is to use as much information as possible from the scene. Since most video sequences have an associated audio, and moreover, in many cases there is a correlation between the audio and the visual content, audiovisual FoA can improve efficiency of the detection algorithm while remaining of low complexity. This paper discusses a simple yet efficient audiovisual FoA algorithm based on correlation of dynamics between audio and video signal components. Results of audiovisual FoA detection algorithm are subsequently taken into account for foveated coding and compression. This approach is implemented into H.265/HEVC encoder producing a bitstream which is fully compliant to any H.265/HEVC decoder. The influence of audiovisual FoA in the perceived quality of high and ultra-high definition audiovisual sequences is explored and the amount of gain in compression efficiency is analyzed.

  3. A Parallel Implicit Reconstructed Discontinuous Galerkin Method for Compressible Flows on Hybrid Grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yidong

    a computer program. By using an AD tool, the manpower can be significantly reduced for deriving the flux Jacobians, which can be quite complicated, tedious, and error-prone if done by hand or symbolic arithmetic software, depending on the complexity of the numerical flux scheme. In addition, the workload for code maintenance can also be largely reduced in case the underlying flux scheme is updated. The approximate system of linear equations arising from the Newton linearization is solved by the general minimum residual (GMRES) algorithm with lower-upper symmetric gauss-seidel (LUSGS) preconditioning. This GMRES+LU-SGS linear solver is the most robust and efficient for implicit time integration of the discretized Navier-Stokes equations when the AD-based flux Jacobians are provided other than the other two approaches. The developed HWENO(P1P2) method is used to compute a variety of well-documented compressible inviscid and viscous flow test cases on 3D hybrid grids, including some standard benchmark test cases such as the Sod shock tube, flow past a circular cylinder, and laminar flow past a at plate. The computed solutions are compared with either analytical solutions or experimental data, if available to assess the accuracy of the HWENO(P 1P2) method. Numerical results demonstrate that the HWENO(P 1P2) method is able to not only enhance the accuracy of the underlying HWENO(P1) method, but also ensure the linear and non-linear stability at the presence of strong discontinuities. An extensive study of grid convergence analysis on various types of elements: tetrahedron, prism, hexahedron, and hybrid prism/hexahedron, for a number of test cases indicates that the developed HWENO(P1P2) method is able to achieve the designed third-order accuracy of spatial convergence for smooth inviscid flows: one order higher than the underlying second-order DG(P1) method without significant increase in computing costs and storage requirements. The performance of the the developed

  4. The role of flow-independent viscoelasticity in the biphasic tensile and compressive responses of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C Y; Mow, V C; Ateshian, G A

    2001-10-01

    articular cartilage, under stress-relaxation and dynamic loading, can be achieved when properly taking into account both flow-dependent and flow-independent viscoelasticity effects, as well as tension-compression nonlinearity.

  5. Computation and comparison of the installation effects of compression pylons for a high wing transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, B.

    1988-01-01

    The three-dimensional transonic Euler method with boundary layer interaction is used to study the flow about a transport aircraft equipped with NASA-developed compression pylons. The results show that the present pylons perform well under the installed conditions, reducing the wing/pylon junction velocities and thus reducing the installed loft loss and drag. The predicted theoretical results are found to agree moderately well with experimental wind tunnel results.

  6. A quiet flow Ludwieg tube for study of transition in compressible boundary layers: Design and feasibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Steven P.

    1991-01-01

    Laminar-turbulent transition in high speed boundary layers is a complicated problem which is still poorly understood, partly because of experimental ambiguities caused by operating in noisy wind tunnels. The NASA Langley experience with quiet tunnel design has been used to design a quiet flow tunnel which can be constructed less expensively. Fabrication techniques have been investigated, and inviscid, boundary layer, and stability computer codes have been adapted for use in the nozzle design. Construction of such a facility seems feasible, at a reasonable cost. Two facilities have been proposed: a large one, with a quiet flow region large enough to study the end of transition, and a smaller and less expensive one, capable of studying low Reynolds number issues such as receptivity. Funding for either facility remains to be obtained, although key facility elements have been obtained and are being integrated into the existing Purdue supersonic facilities.

  7. Reserve, flowing electrolyte, high rate lithium battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puskar, M.; Harris, P.

    Flowing electrolyte Li/SOCl2 tests in single cell and multicell bipolar fixtures have been conducted, and measurements are presented for electrolyte flow rates, inlet and outlet temperatures, fixture temperatures at several points, and the pressure drop across the fixture. Reserve lithium batteries with flowing thionyl-chloride electrolytes are found to be capable of very high energy densities with usable voltages and capacities at current densities as high as 500 mA/sq cm. At this current density, a battery stack 10 inches in diameter is shown to produce over 60 kW of power while maintaining a safe operating temperature.

  8. High temperature flow behaviour of SiC reinforced lithium aluminosilicate composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Santanu Das; V S R Murthy; G S Murty

    2001-04-01

    The compressive flow behaviour of lithium aluminosilicate (LAS) glass, with and without SiC particulate reinforcements, was studied. The LAS glass crystallized to spodumene during high-temperature testing. The flow behaviour of LAS glass changed from Newtonian to non-Newtonian due to the presence of crystalline phase. Further, with the addition of 40 vol.% SiC additions, the strain rate sensitivity of flow stress decreased. While the activation energy for flow in LAS was 300 kJ/mole, it increased to 995 kJ/mole with the addition of 40 vol.% SiC reinforcements.

  9. Steady Secondary Flows Generated by Periodic Compression and Expansion of an Ideal Gas in a Pulse Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeffrey M.

    1999-01-01

    This study establishes a consistent set of differential equations for use in describing the steady secondary flows generated by periodic compression and expansion of an ideal gas in pulse tubes. Also considered is heat transfer between the gas and the tube wall of finite thickness. A small-amplitude series expansion solution in the inverse Strouhal number is proposed for the two-dimensional axisymmetric mass, momentum and energy equations. The anelastic approach applies when shock and acoustic energies are small compared with the energy needed to compress and expand the gas. An analytic solution to the ordered series is obtained in the strong temperature limit where the zeroth-order temperature is constant. The solution shows steady velocities increase linearly for small Valensi number and can be of order I for large Valensi number. A conversion of steady work flow to heat flow occurs whenever temperature, velocity or phase angle gradients are present. Steady enthalpy flow is reduced by heat transfer and is scaled by the Prandtl times Valensi numbers. Particle velocities from a smoke-wire experiment were compared with predictions for the basic and orifice pulse tube configurations. The theory accurately predicted the observed steady streaming.

  10. Type-I cascaded quadratic soliton compression in lithium niobate: Compressing femtosecond pulses from high-power fiber lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Wise, Frank W.

    2010-01-01

    using second-harmonic generation in a type-I phase-matching configuration. We find that because of competing cubic material nonlinearities, compression can only occur in the nonstationary regime, where group-velocity-mismatch–induced Raman-like nonlocal effects prevent compression to less than 100 fs...

  11. An efficient conservative cut-cell method for rigid bodies interacting with viscous compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiders, Lennart; Günther, Claudia; Meinke, Matthias; Schröder, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    A Cartesian cut-cell method for viscous flows interacting with freely moving boundaries is presented. The method enables a sharp resolution of the embedded boundaries and strictly conserves mass, momentum, and energy. A new explicit Runge-Kutta scheme (PC-RK) is introduced by which the overall computational time is reduced by a factor of up to 2.5. The new scheme is a predictor-corrector type reformulation of a popular class of Runge-Kutta methods which substantially reduces the computational effort for tracking the moving boundaries and subsequently reinitializing the solver impairing neither stability nor accuracy. The structural motion is computed by an implicit scheme with good stability properties due to a strong-coupling strategy and the conservative discretization of the flow solver at the material interfaces. A new formulation for the treatment of small cut cells is proposed with high accuracy and robustness for arbitrary geometries based on a weighted Taylor-series approach solved via singular-value decomposition. The efficiency and the accuracy of the new method are demonstrated for several three-dimensional cases of laminar and turbulent particulate flow. It is shown that the new method remains fully conservative even for large displacements of the boundaries leading to a fast convergence of the fluid-solid coupling while spurious force oscillations inherent to this class of methods are effectively suppressed. The results substantiate the good stability and accuracy properties of the scheme even on relatively coarse meshes.

  12. Computational simulation of coupled nonequilibrium discharge and compressible flow phenomena in a microplasma thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deconinck, Thomas; Mahadevan, Shankar; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2009-09-01

    The microplasma thruster (MPT) concept is a simple extension of a cold gas micronozzle propulsion device, where a direct-current microdischarge is used to preheat the gas stream to improve the specific impulse of the device. Here we study a prototypical MPT device using a detailed, self-consistently coupled plasma and flow computational model. The model describes the microdischarge power deposition, plasma dynamics, gas-phase chemical kinetics, coupling of the plasma phenomena with high-speed flow, and overall propulsion system performance. Compared to a cold gas micronozzle, a significant increase in specific impulse is obtained from the power deposition in the diverging section of the MPT nozzle. For a discharge voltage of 750 V, a power input of 650 mW, and an argon mass flow rate of 5 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP), the specific impulse of the device is increased by a factor of ˜1.5 to about 74 s. The microdischarge remains mostly confined inside the micronozzle and operates in an abnormal glow discharge regime. Gas heating, primarily due to ion Joule heating, is found to have a strong influence on the overall discharge behavior. The study provides a validation of the MPT concept as a simple and effective approach to improve the performance of micronozzle cold gas propulsion devices.

  13. High-power radio-frequency binary pulse-compression experiment at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavine, T.L.; Farkas, Z.D.; Menegat, A.; Miller, R.H.; Nantista, C.; Spalek, G.; Wilson, P.B.

    1991-05-01

    Using rf pulse compression it will be possible to boost the 50- to 100-MW output expected from high-power microwave tubes operating in the 10- to 20-GHz frequency range to the 300- to 1000-MW level required by the next generation of high-gradient linacs for linear colliders. A high-power X-band three-stage binary rf pulse compressor has been implemented and operated at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). In each of three successive stages, the rf pulse-length is compressed by half, and the peak power is approximately doubled. The experimental results presented here have been obtained at power levels up to 25-MW input (from an X-Band klystron) and up to 120-MW output (compressed to 60 nsec). Peak power gains greater than 5.2 have been measured. 5 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Compressible Air Entrapment in High-Speed Drop Impacts on Solid Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yuan; Xu, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Using high-speed photography coupled with optical interference, we experimentally study the air entrapment during a liquid drop impacting a solid substrate. We observe the formation of a compressed air film before the liquid touches the substrate, with internal pressure considerably higher than the atmospheric value. The degree of compression highly depends on the impact velocity, as explained by balancing the liquid deceleration with the large pressure of compressed air. After contact, the air film expands vertically at the edge, reducing its pressure within a few tens of microseconds and producing a thick rim on the perimeter. This thick-rimmed air film subsequently contracts into an air bubble, governed by the complex interaction between surface tension, inertia and viscous drag. Such a process is universally observed for impacts above a few centimeters high.

  15. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION ON SOUND SPEED PROPAGATING THROUGH HIGH SPEED AERATED FLOW IN OPEN CHANNEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    An experiment concerning the sound propaga-tion in aerated open channel flow was designed and conductedin a variable slope chute. The acquisition of sound data wasdone by the hydro-phones installed into the bottom wall of thechute. The data were analyzed and processed by the tape re-corder and a 3562A analyzer. The primary experimetal resultsindicated that the sound speed in aerated flow is varied with the air concentration and highly lower than each of the soundspeed in pure water or air. As released by the derived theoryformula, the minimum sound of 24m/s in aerated flow hap-pened when the air concentration achieved to 50%. This resultshows that the compressibility of high speed aerated flowshould be considered when the air concentration is near to50%. A criterion of compressibility of high speed aerated flowwas also giv. En in this paper.

  16. High Definition Video Streaming Using H.264 Video Compression

    OpenAIRE

    Bechqito, Yassine

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents high definition video streaming using H.264 codec implementation. The experiment carried out in this study was done for an offline streaming video but a model for live high definition streaming is introduced, as well. Prior to the actual experiment, this study describes digital media streaming. Also, the different technologies involved in video streaming are covered. These include streaming architecture and a brief overview on H.264 codec as well as high definition t...

  17. Response analysis of a laminar premixed M-flame to flow perturbations using a linearized compressible Navier-Stokes solver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, M., E-mail: mathieu.blanchard@ladhyx.polytechnique.fr [LadHyX, CNRS and Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Schuller, T. [CNRS, UPR 288, Laboratoire d’Energétique Moléculaire et Macroscopique Combustion (EM2C), Grande Voie des Vignes, 92290 Châtenay-Malabry (France); Centrale-Supélec, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92290 Châtenay-Malabry (France); Sipp, D. [ONERA-DAFE, 8 rue des Vertugadins, 92190 Meudon (France); Schmid, P. J. [Department of Mathematics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-15

    The response of a laminar premixed methane-air flame subjected to flow perturbations around a steady state is examined experimentally and using a linearized compressible Navier-Stokes solver with a one-step chemistry mechanism to describe combustion. The unperturbed flame takes an M-shape stabilized both by a central bluff body and by the external rim of a cylindrical nozzle. This base flow is computed by a nonlinear direct simulation of the steady reacting flow, and the flame topology is shown to qualitatively correspond to experiments conducted under comparable conditions. The flame is then subjected to acoustic disturbances produced at different locations in the numerical domain, and its response is examined using the linearized solver. This linear numerical model then allows the componentwise investigation of the effects of flow disturbances on unsteady combustion and the feedback from the flame on the unsteady flow field. It is shown that a wrinkled reaction layer produces hydrodynamic disturbances in the fresh reactant flow field that superimpose on the acoustic field. This phenomenon, observed in several experiments, is fully interpreted here. The additional perturbations convected by the mean flow stem from the feedback of the perturbed flame sheet dynamics onto the flow field by a mechanism similar to that of a perturbed vortex sheet. The different regimes where this mechanism prevails are investigated by examining the phase and group velocities of flow disturbances along an axis oriented along the main direction of the flow in the fresh reactant flow field. It is shown that this mechanism dominates the low-frequency response of the wrinkled shape taken by the flame and, in particular, that it fully determines the dynamics of the flame tip from where the bulk of noise is radiated.

  18. A VLSI Processor Design of Real-Time Data Compression for High-Resolution Imaging Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, W.

    1994-01-01

    For the high-resolution imaging radar systems, real-time data compression of raw imaging data is required to accomplish the science requirements and satisfy the given communication and storage constraints. The Block Adaptive Quantizer (BAQ) algorithm and its associated VLSI processor design have been developed to provide a real-time data compressor for high-resolution imaging radar systems.

  19. High-resolution PIV analysis of compressibility effects in turbulent jets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceglia, G.; Violato, D.; Tuinstra, M.; Scarano, F.

    An investigation on the compressibility effects arising into the near field of turbulent jets operated at high Reynolds number at Mach numbers M=0.3, 0.9 and 1.1 (under-expanded regime) is carried out with two-components planar PIV experiments with high resolution cameras. The arrangement of the PIV

  20. Simulation of 2-D Compressible Flows on a Moving Curvilinear Mesh with an Implicit-Explicit Runge-Kutta Method

    KAUST Repository

    AbuAlSaud, Moataz

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to solve unsteady two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations for a moving mesh using implicit explicit (IMEX) Runge- Kutta scheme. The moving mesh is implemented in the equations using Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) formulation. The inviscid part of the equation is explicitly solved using second-order Godunov method, whereas the viscous part is calculated implicitly. We simulate subsonic compressible flow over static NACA-0012 airfoil at different angle of attacks. Finally, the moving mesh is examined via oscillating the airfoil between angle of attack = 0 and = 20 harmonically. It is observed that the numerical solution matches the experimental and numerical results in the literature to within 20%.

  1. Thermomechanical process optimization of U-10 wt% Mo - Part 1: high-temperature compressive properties and microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Vineet V.; Nyberg, Eric A.; Lavender, Curt A.; Paxton, Dean; Garmestani, Hamid; Burkes, Douglas E.

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear power research facilities require alternatives to existing highly enriched uranium alloy fuel. One option for a high density metal fuel is uranium alloyed with 10 wt% molybdenum (U-10Mo). Fuel fabrication process development requires specific mechanical property data that, to date has been unavailable. In this work, as-cast samples were compression tested at three strain rates over a temperature range of 400-800 °C to provide data for hot rolling and extrusion modeling. The results indicate that with increasing test temperature the U-10Mo flow stress decreases and becomes more sensitive to strain rate. In addition, above the eutectoid transformation temperature, the drop in material flow stress is prominent and shows a strain-softening behavior, especially at lower strain rates. Room temperature X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis of the as-cast and compression tested samples were conducted. The analysis revealed that the as-cast samples and the samples tested below the eutectoid transformation temperature were predominantly γ phase with varying concentration of molybdenum, whereas the ones tested above the eutectoid transformation temperature underwent significant homogenization.

  2. Accelerated High-Resolution Photoacoustic Tomography via Compressed Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Arridge, Simon; Betcke, Marta; Cox, Ben; Huynh, Nam; Lucka, Felix; Ogunlade, Olumide; Zhang, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Current 3D photoacoustic tomography (PAT) systems offer either high image quality or high frame rates but are not able to deliver high spatial and temporal resolution simultaneously, which limits their ability to image dynamic processes in living tissue. A particular example is the planar Fabry-Perot (FP) scanner, which yields high-resolution images but takes several minutes to sequentially map the photoacoustic field on the sensor plane, point-by-point. However, as the spatio-temporal complexity of many absorbing tissue structures is rather low, the data recorded in such a conventional, regularly sampled fashion is often highly redundant. We demonstrate that combining variational image reconstruction methods using spatial sparsity constraints with the development of novel PAT acquisition systems capable of sub-sampling the acoustic wave field can dramatically increase the acquisition speed while maintaining a good spatial resolution: First, we describe and model two general spatial sub-sampling schemes. Then...

  3. Reaching High-Yield Fusion with a Slow Plasma Liner Compressing a Magnetized Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryutov, D D; Parks, P B

    2008-03-18

    Dynamics of the compression of a magnetized plasma target by a heavy liner made of partially ionized high high-Z material is discussed. A 'soft-landing' (shockless) mode of the liner deceleration is analyzed. Conclusion is drawn that such mode is possible for the liners whose thickness at the time of the first contact with the target is smaller than, roughly, 10% of the initial (un-compressed) target radius. A combination of the plasma liner with one or two glide cones allows for a direct access to the area near the center of the reactor chamber. One can then generate plasma target inside the plasma liner at the optimum time. The other advantage of the glide cones is that they can be used to deliver additional fuel to the center of the target near the point of a maximum compression and thereby increase the fusion yield.

  4. NGC: lossless and lossy compression of aligned high-throughput sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popitsch, Niko; von Haeseler, Arndt

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge of current high-throughput sequencing experiments is not only the generation of the sequencing data itself but also their processing, storage and transmission. The enormous size of these data motivates the development of data compression algorithms usable for the implementation of the various storage policies that are applied to the produced intermediate and final result files. In this article, we present NGC, a tool for the compression of mapped short read data stored in the wide-spread SAM format. NGC enables lossless and lossy compression and introduces the following two novel ideas: first, we present a way to reduce the number of required code words by exploiting common features of reads mapped to the same genomic positions; second, we present a highly configurable way for the quantization of per-base quality values, which takes their influence on downstream analyses into account. NGC, evaluated with several real-world data sets, saves 33-66% of disc space using lossless and up to 98% disc space using lossy compression. By applying two popular variant and genotype prediction tools to the decompressed data, we could show that the lossy compression modes preserve >99% of all called variants while outperforming comparable methods in some configurations.

  5. Subpicosecond pulse compression in nonlinear photonic crystal waveguides based on the formation of high-order optical solitons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Xiong-Wen; Lin Xu-Sheng; Lan Sheng

    2005-01-01

    We investigate by numerical simulation the compression of subpicosecond pulses in two-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystal (PC) waveguides. The compression originates from the generation of high-order optical solitons through the interplay of the huge group-velocity dispersion and the enhanced self-phase modulation in nonlinear PC waveguides.Both the formation of Bragg grating solitons and gap solitons can lead to efficient pulse compression. The compression factors under different excitation power densities and the optimum length for subpicosecond pulse compression have been determined. As a compressor, the total length of the nonlinear PC waveguide is only ten micrometres and therefore can be easily incorporated into PC integrated circuits.

  6. An explicit Lagrangian finite element method for free-surface weakly compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremonesi, Massimiliano; Meduri, Simone; Perego, Umberto; Frangi, Attilio

    2017-07-01

    In the present work, an explicit finite element approach to the solution of the Lagrangian formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations for weakly compressible fluids or fluid-like materials is investigated. The introduction of a small amount of compressibility is shown to allow for the formulation of a fast and robust explicit solver based on a particle finite element method. Newtonian and Non-Newtonian Bingham laws are considered. A barotropic equation of state completes the model relating pressure and density fields. The approach has been validated through comparison with experimental tests and numerical simulations of free surface fluid problems involving water and water-soil mixtures.

  7. High-Throughput Contact Flow Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Goff, Gaelle C; Lee, Jiseok; Gupta, Ankur; Hill, William Adam; Doyle, Patrick S

    2015-10-01

    High-throughput fabrication of graphically encoded hydrogel microparticles is achieved by combining flow contact lithography in a multichannel microfluidic device and a high capacity 25 mm LED UV source. Production rates of chemically homogeneous particles are improved by two orders of magnitude. Additionally, the custom-built contact lithography instrument provides an affordable solution for patterning complex microstructures on surfaces.

  8. Fabrication of high gradient insulators by stack compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, John Richardson; Sanders, Dave; Hawkins, Steven Anthony; Norona, Marcelo

    2014-04-29

    Individual layers of a high gradient insulator (HGI) are first pre-cut to their final dimensions. The pre-cut layers are then stacked to form an assembly that is subsequently pressed into an HGI unit with the desired dimension. The individual layers are stacked, and alignment is maintained, using a sacrificial alignment tube that is removed after the stack is hot pressed. The HGI's are used as high voltage vacuum insulators in energy storage and transmission structures or devices, e.g. in particle accelerators and pulsed power systems.

  9. A Numerical Scheme Based on an Immersed Boundary Method for Compressible Turbulent Flows with Shocks: Application to Two-Dimensional Flows around Cylinders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun Takahashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A computational code adopting immersed boundary methods for compressible gas-particle multiphase turbulent flows is developed and validated through two-dimensional numerical experiments. The turbulent flow region is modeled by a second-order pseudo skew-symmetric form with minimum dissipation, while the monotone upstream-centered scheme for conservation laws (MUSCL scheme is employed in the shock region. The present scheme is applied to the flow around a two-dimensional cylinder under various freestream Mach numbers. Compared with the original MUSCL scheme, the minimum dissipation enabled by the pseudo skew-symmetric form significantly improves the resolution of the vortex generated in the wake while retaining the shock capturing ability. In addition, the resulting aerodynamic force is significantly improved. Also, the present scheme is successfully applied to moving two-cylinder problems.

  10. Post-compression of high energy terawatt-level femtosecond pulses and application to high order harmonic generation

    CERN Document Server

    Hort, Ondřej; Cabasse, Amélie; Petit, Stéphane; Mével, Eric; Descamps, Dominique; Constant, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We perform a post-compression of high energy pulses by using optical-field ionization of low pressure helium gas in a guided geometry. We apply this approach to a TW chirped-pulse-amplification based Ti:Sapphire laser chain and show that spectral broadening can be controlled both with the input pulse energy and gas pressure. Under optimized conditions, we generate 10 fs pulses at TW level directly under vacuum and demonstrate a high stability of the post compressed pulse duration. These high energy post-compressed pulses are thereafter used to perform high harmonic generation in a loose focusing geometry. The XUV beam is characterized both spatially and spectrally on a single shot basis and structured continuous XUV spectra are observed.

  11. High-fidelity numerical simulations of compressible turbulence and mixing generated by hydrodynamic instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movahed, Pooya

    High-speed flows are prone to hydrodynamic interfacial instabilities that evolve to turbulence, thereby intensely mixing different fluids and dissipating energy. The lack of knowledge of these phenomena has impeded progress in a variety of disciplines. In science, a full understanding of mixing between heavy and light elements after the collapse of a supernova and between adjacent layers of different density in geophysical (atmospheric and oceanic) flows remains lacking. In engineering, the inability to achieve ignition in inertial fusion and efficient combustion constitute further examples of this lack of basic understanding of turbulent mixing. In this work, my goal is to develop accurate and efficient numerical schemes and employ them to study compressible turbulence and mixing generated by interactions between shocked (Richtmyer-Meshkov) and accelerated (Rayleigh-Taylor) interfaces, which play important roles in high-energy-density physics environments. To accomplish my goal, a hybrid high-order central/discontinuity-capturing finite difference scheme is first presented. The underlying principle is that, to accurately and efficiently represent both broadband motions and discontinuities, non-dissipative methods are used where the solution is smooth, while the more expensive and dissipative capturing schemes are applied near discontinuous regions. Thus, an accurate numerical sensor is developed to discriminate between smooth regions, shocks and material discontinuities, which all require a different treatment. The interface capturing approach is extended to central differences, such that smooth distributions of varying specific heats ratio can be simulated without generating spurious pressure oscillations. I verified and validated this approach against a stringent suite of problems including shocks, interfaces, turbulence and two-dimensional single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability simulations. The three-dimensional code is shown to scale well up to 4000 cores

  12. A unified approach for numerical simulation of viscous compressible and incompressible flows over adiabatic and isothermal walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, M.; Soliman, M.; White, S.

    1992-01-01

    A new formulation (including the choice of variables, their non-dimensionalization, and the form of the artificial viscosity) is proposed for the numerical solution of the full Navier-Stokes equations for compressible and incompressible flows with heat transfer. With the present approach, the same code can be used for constant as well as variable density flows. The changes of the density due to pressure and temperature variations are identified and it is shown that the low Mach number approximation is a special case. At zero Mach number, the density changes due to the temperature variation are accounted for, mainly through a body force term in the momentum equation. It is also shown that the Boussinesq approximation of the buoyancy effects in an incompressible flow is a special case. To demonstrate the new capability, three examples are tested. Flows in driven cavities with adiabatic and isothermal walls are simulated with the same code as well as incompressible and supersonic flows over a wall with and without a groove. Finally, viscous flow simulations of an oblique shock reflection from a flat plate are shown to be in good agreement with the solutions available in literature.

  13. An artificial compressibility CBS method for modelling heat transfer and fluid flow in heterogeneous porous materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Malan, AG

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This work is concerned with the development of an artificial compressibility version of the characteristicbased split (CBS) method proposed by Zienkiewicz and Codina (Int. J. Numer. Meth. Fluids 1995; 20:869–885). The technique is applied...

  14. Numerical analysis of temperature and flow effects in a dry, one-dimensional aquifer used for compressed air energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, G.C.; Wiles, L.E.; Loscutoff, W.V.

    1979-02-01

    A detailed description of the method of analysis and the results obtained for an investigation of the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic response of a model of a dry porous media reservoir used for compressed air energy storage (CAES) is presented. Results were obtained from a one-dimensional simulation of the cycling of heated air to and from a radial flow field surrounding a single well in a porous rock. It was assumed that the performance of the bulk of the reservoir could be characterized by the performance of a single well.

  15. Jump dynamics due to jump datum of compressible viscous Navier-Stokes flows in a bounded plane domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kweon, Jae Ryong

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, when the initial density has a jump across an interior curve in a bounded domain, we show unique existence, piecewise regularity and jump discontinuity dynamics for the density and the velocity vector governed by the Navier-Stokes equations of compressible viscous barotropic flows. A critical difficulty is in controlling the gradient of the pressure across the jump curve. This is resolved by constructing a vector function associated with the pressure jump value on the convecting curve and extending it to the whole domain.

  16. Asymptotic Behaviour of Solutions to the Navier-stokes Equations of a Two-dimensional Compressible Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-hui ZHANG; Zhong TAN

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,we are concerned with the asymptotic behaviour of a weak solution to the NavierStokes equations for compressible barotropic flow in two space dimensions with the pressure function satisfying p(ρ) =a(ρ)logd(ρ) for large (ρ).Here d > 2,a > 0.We introduce useful tools from the theory of Orlicz spaces and construct a suitable function which approximates the density for time going to infinity.Using properties of this function,we can prove the strong convergence of the density to its limit state.The behaviour of the velocity field and kinetic energy is also briefly discussed.

  17. The long-term effect of high-frequency chest compression therapy on pulmonary complications of cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, W J; Hansen, L G

    1991-01-01

    A high-frequency chest compression (HFCC) device for clearance of mucous secretions from airways was tested in 16 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with significant improvement in pulmonary function for the HFCC period, which averaged 22 months per patient. The device consists of a variable air pulse delivery system and a non-stretch inflatable vest worn by the patient to cover the entire torso. The patients perform 30 minute therapy sessions divided into 5 minute periods at each of six frequencies. Individual patient therapy time per day ranged from 30 to 240 minutes. Frequencies used by each patient were determined by measuring air flow at the mouth and calculated volume expired per chest compression during tidal breathing while receiving HFCC at frequencies between 5 and 22 Hz at 1 Hz increments. The frequencies that produced the three highest flows and the three largest volumes were selected for each patient's therapy. Ninety-four percent of patients' regression line slopes for percent predicted forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) became more positive during self-administered HFCC therapy as compared to slopes before HFCC therapy, when manual chest physical therapy was used. Two-sided t-test showed that the mean slopes were more positive for FVC and FEV1 during HFCC therapy than for the manual chest physical therapy period before HFCC therapy. The significance level for both FVC and FEV1 was at P less than 0.001.

  18. Turbulent Poiseuille & Couette flows at high Re

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myoungkyu; Moser, Robert D.

    2016-11-01

    We present the results of direct numerical simulation (DNS) of high Re turbulent Poiseuille and Couette flows. Couette flow has been simulated with a streamwise (x) domain that is 100 πδ long at Reynolds number up to Reτ 500 . In addition Poiseuille flow simulations up to Reτ 5200 were performed. In Couette flow, extremely large scale motions, which are approximately 50 πδ long in the x-direction with very strong intensity, have been observed. In this presentation we will focus on a comparison between these two flows in terms of the vorticity-velocity co-spectra, which are interesting because of the relationship between the Reynolds stress and the velocity-vorticity correlation (∂y = - ). Also considered will be the spectra of the turbulent transport term in the evolution equation for the turbulent kinetic energy. In both (co)-spectra it is shown that the difference between the two flows at high Re are primarily at large scales. This work was supported by NSF (OCI-0749223 and PRAC Grant 0832634), and computation resources were provided by the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility through the Early Science, INCITE 2013 and Directors Discretionary Programs.

  19. Multi-Dimensional, Compressible Viscous Flow on a Moving Voronoi Mesh

    CERN Document Server

    Muñoz, Diego; Marcus, Robert; Vogelsberger, Mark; Hernquist, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Numerous formulations of finite volume schemes for the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations exist, but in the majority of cases they have been developed for structured and stationary meshes. In many applications, more flexible mesh geometries that can dynamically adjust to the problem at hand and move with the flow in a (quasi) Lagrangian fashion would, however, be highly desirable, as this can allow a significant reduction of advection errors and an accurate realization of curved and moving boundary conditions. Here we describe a novel formulation of viscous continuum hydrodynamics that solves the equations of motion on a Voronoi mesh created by a set of mesh-generating points. The points can move in an arbitrary manner, but the most natural motion is that given by the fluid velocity itself, such that the mesh dynamically adjusts to the flow. Owing to the mathematical properties of the Voronoi tessellation, pathological mesh-twisting effects are avoided. Our implementation considers the full Navier-Stokes equat...

  20. High compressive resistance drainage geo composites; Geocompuestos de drenaje de alta resistencia a compresion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castelo Nolla, J.; Gutierrez Cuevas, J.

    2014-02-01

    There are several typologies of drainage geo composites available in the market which can be classified according to their structures as: cus pated, mono filaments, geo nets and those products formed by the combination of a draining blanket with a series of mini-pipes. Each one of them has its own range of compressive resistances. There are applications, such as are the new cells of landfills or mines and roads or railways over large embankments, where the pressure exerted on the geo composite exceeds the compressive resistance of the majority of these typologies. For all this applications, besides providing and adequate flow capacity, it must be ensured that the chosen typology is able to withstand the required loading without collapsing and guaranteeing an adequate factor of safety. This article will expose that, currently, the only typology of drainage geo composites that can bear these loadings while maintaining its drainage properties is the tri-planar geo net. (Author)

  1. Inlfuence of Specimen Size on Compression Behavior of Cement Paste and Mortar under High Strain Rates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xudong; CHEN Chen; QIAN Pingping; XU Lingyu

    2016-01-01

    Static and dynamic compression tests were carried out on mortar and paste specimens of three sizes (f68 mm×32 mm,f59 mm×29.5 mm andf32 mm×16 mm) to study the inlfuence of specimen size on the compression behavior of cement-based materials under high strain rates. The static tests were applied using a universal servo-hydraulic system, and the dynamic tests were applied by a spilt Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. The experimental results show that for mortar and paste specimens, the dynamic compressive strength is greater than the quasi-static one, and the dynamic compressive strength for specimens of large size is lower than those of small size. However, the dynamic increase factors (DIF) has an opposite trend. Obviously, both strain rate and size effect exist in mortar and paste. The test results were then analyzed using Weibull, Carpinteri and Bažant’s size effect laws. A good agreement between these three laws and the test results was reached on the compressive strength. However, for the experimental results of paste and cement mortar, the size effect is not evident for the peak strain and elastic modulus of paste and cement mortar.

  2. Chaotic behaviour of high Mach number flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varvoglis, H.; Ghosh, S.

    1985-01-01

    The stability of the super-Alfvenic flow of a two-fluid plasma model with respect to the Mach number and the angle between the flow direction and the magnetic field is investigated. It is found that, in general, a large scale chaotic region develops around the initial equilibrium of the laminar flow when the Mach number exceeds a certain threshold value. After reaching a maximum the size of this region begins shrinking and goes to zero as the Mach number tends to infinity. As a result high Mach number flows in time independent astrophysical plasmas may lead to the formation of 'quasi-shocks' in the presence of little or no dissipation.

  3. An Efficient Framework for Compressed Sensing Reconstruction of Highly Accelerated Dynamic Cardiac MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Samuel T.

    The research presented in this work seeks to develop, validate, and deploy practical techniques for improving diagnosis of cardiovascular disease. In the philosophy of biomedical engineering, we seek to identify an existing medical problem having significant societal and economic effects and address this problem using engineering approaches. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in the United States, accounting for more deaths than any other major cause of death in every year since 1900 with the exception of the year 1918. Cardiovascular disease is estimated to account for almost one-third of all deaths in the United States, with more than 2150 deaths each day, or roughly 1 death every 40 seconds. In the past several decades, a growing array of imaging modalities have proven useful in aiding the diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular disease, including computed tomography, single photon emission computed tomography, and echocardiography. In particular, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is an excellent diagnostic tool that can provide within a single exam a high quality evaluation of cardiac function, blood flow, perfusion, viability, and edema without the use of ionizing radiation. The scope of this work focuses on the application of engineering techniques for improving imaging using cardiac magnetic resonance with the goal of improving the utility of this powerful imaging modality. Dynamic cine imaging, or the capturing of movies of a single slice or volume within the heart or great vessel region, is used in nearly every cardiac magnetic resonance imaging exam, and adequate evaluation of cardiac function and morphology for diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular disease depends heavily on both the spatial and temporal resolution as well as the image quality of the reconstruction cine images. This work focuses primarily on image reconstruction techniques utilized in cine imaging; however, the techniques discussed are also relevant to

  4. High capacity image steganography method based on framelet and compressive sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Moyan; He, Zhibiao

    2015-12-01

    To improve the capacity and imperceptibility of image steganography, a novel high capacity and imperceptibility image steganography method based on a combination of framelet and compressive sensing (CS) is put forward. Firstly, SVD (Singular Value Decomposition) transform to measurement values obtained by compressive sensing technique to the secret data. Then the singular values in turn embed into the low frequency coarse subbands of framelet transform to the blocks of the cover image which is divided into non-overlapping blocks. Finally, use inverse framelet transforms and combine to obtain the stego image. The experimental results show that the proposed steganography method has a good performance in hiding capacity, security and imperceptibility.

  5. Development of Wavelet Image Compression Technique to Particle Image Velocimetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuiLi

    2000-01-01

    In order to reduce the noise in the images and the physical storage,the wavelet-based image compression technique was applied to PIV processing in this paper,To study the effect of the wavelet bases,the standard PIV images were compressed by some known wavelet families,Daubechies,Coifman and Baylkin families with various compression ratios.It was found that a higher order wavelet base provided good compression performance for compressing PIV images,The error analysis of velocity field obtained indicated that the high compression ratio even up to 64:1,can be realized without losing significant flow information in PIV processing.The wavelet compression technique of PIV was applied to the experimental images of jet flow and showed excellent performance,A reduced number of erroneous vectors can be realized by varying compression ratio.It can say that the wavelet image compression technique is very effective in PIV system.

  6. Laser-driven magnetic-flux compression in high-energy-density plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotchev, O V; Chang, P Y; Knauer, J P; Meyerhofer, D D; Polomarov, O; Frenje, J; Li, C K; Manuel, M J-E; Petrasso, R D; Rygg, J R; Séguin, F H; Betti, R

    2009-11-20

    The demonstration of magnetic field compression to many tens of megagauss in cylindrical implosions of inertial confinement fusion targets is reported for the first time. The OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly, Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)10.1016/S0030-4018(96)00325-2] was used to implode cylindrical CH targets filled with deuterium gas and seeded with a strong external field (>50 kG) from a specially developed magnetic pulse generator. This seed field was trapped (frozen) in the shock-heated gas fill and compressed by the imploding shell at a high implosion velocity, minimizing the effect of resistive flux diffusion. The magnetic fields in the compressed core were probed via proton deflectrometry using the fusion products from an imploding D3He target. Line-averaged magnetic fields between 30 and 40 MG were observed.

  7. Edge Polynomial Fractal Compression Algorithm for High Quality Video Transmission. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Freddie

    1999-06-01

    In this final report, Physical Optics Corporation (POC) provides a review of its Edge Polynomial Autonomous Compression (EPAC) technology. This project was undertaken to meet the need for low bandwidth transmission of full-motion video images. In addition, this report offers a synopsis of the logical data representation study that was performed to compress still images and video. The mapping singularities and polynomial representation of 3-D surfaces were found to be ideal for very high image compression. Our efforts were then directed to extending the EPAC algorithm for the motion of singularities by tracking the 3-D coordinates of characteristic points and the development of system components. Finally, we describe the integration of the software with the hardware components. This process consists of acquiring and processing each separate camera view, combining the information from different cameras to calculate the location of an object in three dimensions, and tracking the information history and the behavior of the objects.

  8. A high capacity text steganography scheme based on LZW compression and color coding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna Malik

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, capacity and security issues of text steganography have been considered by employing LZW compression technique and color coding based approach. The proposed technique uses the forward mail platform to hide the secret data. This algorithm first compresses secret data and then hides the compressed secret data into the email addresses and also in the cover message of the email. The secret data bits are embedded in the message (or cover text by making it colored using a color coding table. Experimental results show that the proposed method not only produces a high embedding capacity but also reduces computational complexity. Moreover, the security of the proposed method is significantly improved by employing stego keys. The superiority of the proposed method has been experimentally verified by comparing with recently developed existing techniques.

  9. Vascular compression in glossopharyngeal neuralgia: demonstration by high-resolution MRI at 3 tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischbach, F.; Ricke, J.; Bruhn, H. [Department of Radiology, Charite, Campus Virchow Klinikum, Humboldt-University, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13352, Berlin (Germany); Lehmann, T.N. [Department of Neurosurgery, Charite, Campus Virchow Klinikum, Humboldt-University, Augustenberger Platz 1, 13353, Berlin (Germany)

    2003-11-01

    We report a case of glossopharyngeal neuralgia with vascular compression. High-resolution MRI at 3 tesla demonstrated the posterior inferior cerebellar artery to be closely related to the rootlets of the left glossopharyngeal nerve in a patient who suffered attacks of burning sensation in the left side of the throat. The MRI findings were confirmed at curative surgery. (orig.)

  10. Sugar Determination in Foods with a Radially Compressed High Performance Liquid Chromatography Column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondrus, Martin G.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Advocates use of Waters Associates Radial Compression Separation System for high performance liquid chromatography. Discusses instrumentation and reagents, outlining procedure for analyzing various foods and discussing typical student data. Points out potential problems due to impurities and pump seal life. Suggests use of ribose as internal…

  11. On the development of high temperature ammonia-water hybrid absorption-compression heat pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas Kjær; Markussen, Wiebke Brix; Reinholdt, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia-water hybrid absorption-compression heat pumps (HACHP) are a promising technology for development of ecient high temperature industrial heat pumps. Using 28 bar components HACHPs up to 100 °C are commercially available. Components developed for 50 bar and 140 bar show that these pressure...

  12. 3D organization of high-speed compressible jets by tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Violato, D.; Ceglia, G.; Tuinstra, M.; Scarano, F.

    2013-01-01

    This work investigates the three dimensional organization of compressible jets at high-speed regime by tomographic particle image velocimetry (TOMO PIV). Experiments are conducted at Mach numbers 0.3, 0.9 and 1.1 (underexpanded regime) across the end of the potential core within a large cylindrica

  13. A Unified View of Global Instability of Compressible Flow over Open Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-28

    predict instability in Hagen- Poiseuille (pipe) flow , aggravated by the erroneous predictions of BiGlobal theory of stability of pressure-gradient driven... flow in a square duct (Tatsumi and Yoshimura 1990) and wall-bounded Couette flow . It thus becomes of interest, before investing efforts in the... Couette flow at φ = π / 2 which is (erroneously predicted by BiGlobal analysis to be) stable. The introduction of a third velocity component by the lid

  14. Numerical Simulation of Flow Instabilities in High Speed Multistage Compressors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JunHu; ThomasPeters; 等

    1999-01-01

    In the present paper,a nonlinear multi“actuator disk” model is proposed to analyze the dynamic behavior of flow instabilities,including rotating stall and surge,in high speed multistage axial compressors.The model describes the duct flow fields using two dimensional,compressible and unsteady Euler equations,and accounts for the influences of downstream plenum and throttle in the system as well.It replaces each blade row of multistage compressore with a disk.For numerical calculations,the time marching procedure,using MacCormack two steps scheme,is used.The main pupose of this paper is to predict the mechanism of two dimensional short wavelength rotating stall inception and the interation between blade rows in high speed multistage compressors.It has been demonstrated that the model has the ability to predict those phenomena,and the results show that some system parameters have a strong effect on the stall features as well.Results for a five stage high speed compressor are analyzed in detail,and comparison with the experimental data demonstrates that the model and calculating results are reliable.

  15. High-Power Multimode X-Band RF Pulse Compression System for Future Linear Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; Dolgashev, V.A.; Pearson, C.; Nelson, J.; Jobe, K.; Chan, J.; Fant, K.; Frisch, J.; /SLAC; Atkinson, D.; /LLNL, Livermore

    2005-08-10

    We present a multimode X-band rf pulse compression system suitable for a TeV-scale electron-positron linear collider such as the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The NLC main linac operating frequency is 11.424 GHz. A single NLC rf unit is required to produce 400 ns pulses with 475 MW of peak power. Each rf unit should power approximately 5 m of accelerator structures. The rf unit design consists of two 75 MW klystrons and a dual-moded resonant-delay-line pulse compression system that produces a flat output pulse. The pulse compression system components are all overmoded, and most components are designed to operate with two modes. This approach allows high-power-handling capability while maintaining a compact, inexpensive system. We detail the design of this system and present experimental cold test results. We describe the design and performance of various components. The high-power testing of the system is verified using four 50 MW solenoid-focused klystrons run off a common 400 kV solid-state modulator. The system has produced 400 ns rf pulses of greater than 500 MW. We present the layout of our system, which includes a dual-moded transmission waveguide system and a dual-moded resonant line (SLED-II) pulse compression system. We also present data on the processing and operation of this system, which has set high-power records in coherent and phase controlled pulsed rf.

  16. [Blood flow measurement in arteriovenous fistula. Comparison of 2 ultrasonic methods, direct and indirect by compression of the fistula].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deklunder, G; Goullard, L; Lecroart, J L; Foulard, M; Houdas, Y

    1990-05-19

    Measuring blood flow in arteriovenous fistulae in patients under chronic dialysis is of interest to evaluate the repercussions of the fistula on the heart. The apparently simplest method is direct measurement of the mean blood flow velocity by the pulsed doppler technique and ot the cross-section area by ultrasonography, the product of these two values being the blood flow rate. Another method has been proposed, which consists of measuring the cardiac output before and after compression of the fistula, the difference between the two values being supposed to represent the blood flow rate in the fistula. A comparative study of these two methods was conducted in 17 patients aged from 2 to 21 years (mean: 14 years). The direct method gave a figure of 475 ml.min-1.m-2 (SD = 240), while the figure obtained with the indirect method was 471 ml.min-1.m-2 (SD = 227); the difference was statistically not significant. In terms of concept, however, the indirect method is open to much more severe criticism than the direct method, and whenever possible the latter should be preferred when measuring blood flow in arteriovenous fistulae.

  17. Adaptive uniform grayscale coded aperture design for high dynamic range compressive spectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Nelson; Rueda, Hoover; Arguello, Henry

    2016-05-01

    Imaging spectroscopy is an important area with many applications in surveillance, agriculture and medicine. The disadvantage of conventional spectroscopy techniques is that they collect the whole datacube. In contrast, compressive spectral imaging systems capture snapshot compressive projections, which are the input of reconstruction algorithms to yield the underlying datacube. Common compressive spectral imagers use coded apertures to perform the coded projections. The coded apertures are the key elements in these imagers since they define the sensing matrix of the system. The proper design of the coded aperture entries leads to a good quality in the reconstruction. In addition, the compressive measurements are prone to saturation due to the limited dynamic range of the sensor, hence the design of coded apertures must consider saturation. The saturation errors in compressive measurements are unbounded and compressive sensing recovery algorithms only provide solutions for bounded noise or bounded with high probability. In this paper it is proposed the design of uniform adaptive grayscale coded apertures (UAGCA) to improve the dynamic range of the estimated spectral images by reducing the saturation levels. The saturation is attenuated between snapshots using an adaptive filter which updates the entries of the grayscale coded aperture based on the previous snapshots. The coded apertures are optimized in terms of transmittance and number of grayscale levels. The advantage of the proposed method is the efficient use of the dynamic range of the image sensor. Extensive simulations show improvements in the image reconstruction of the proposed method compared with grayscale coded apertures (UGCA) and adaptive block-unblock coded apertures (ABCA) in up to 10 dB.

  18. Multi-dimensional flow-preserving compressed sensing (MuFloCoS) for time-resolved velocity-encoded phase contrast MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Jana; Schmitt, Peter; Saake, Marc; Stubinger, Axel; Grimm, Robert; Forman, Christoph; Greiser, Andreas; Hornegger, Joachim; Maier, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    4-D time-resolved velocity-encoded phase-contrast MRI (4-D PCI) is a fully non-invasive technique to assess hemodynamics in vivo with a broad range of potential applications in multiple cardiovascular diseases. It is capable of providing quantitative flow values and anatomical information simultaneously. The long acquisition time, however, still inhibits its wider clinical use. Acceleration is achieved at present using parallel MRI (pMRI) techniques which can lead to substantial loss of image quality for higher acceleration factors. Both the high-dimensionality and the significant degree of spatio-temporal correlation in 4-D PCI render it ideally suited for recently proposed compressed sensing (CS) techniques. We propose the Multi-Dimensional Flow-preserving Compressed Sensing (MuFloCoS) method to exploit these properties. A multi-dimensional iterative reconstruction is combined with an interleaved sampling pattern (I-VT), an adaptive masked and weighted temporal regularization (TMW) and fully automatically obtained vessel-masks. The performance of the novel method was analyzed concerning image quality, feasibility of acceleration factors up to 15, quantitative flow values and diagnostic accuracy in phantom experiments and an in vivo carotid study with 18 volunteers. Comparison with iterative state-of-the-art methods revealed significant improvements using the new method, the temporal normalized root mean square error of the peak velocity was reduced by 45.32% for the novel MuFloCoS method with acceleration factor 9. The method was furthermore applied to two patient cases with diagnosed high-grade stenosis of the ICA, which confirmed the performance of MuFloCoS to produce valuable results in the presence of pathological findings in 56 s instead of over 8 min (full sampling).

  19. A three-dimensional turbulent compressible flow model for ejector and fluted mixers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushmore, W. L.; Zelazny, S. W.

    1978-01-01

    A three dimensional finite element computer code was developed to analyze ejector and axisymmetric fluted mixer systems whose flow fields are not significantly influenced by streamwise diffusion effects. A two equation turbulence model was used to make comparisons between theory and data for various flow fields which are components of the ejector system, i.e., (1) turbulent boundary layer in a duct; (2) rectangular nozzle (free jet); (3) axisymmetric nozzle (free jet); (4) hypermixing nozzle (free jet); and (5) plane wall jet. Likewise, comparisons of the code with analytical results and/or other numerical solutions were made for components of the axisymmetric fluted mixer system. These included: (1) developing pipe flow; (2) developing flow in an annular pipe; (3) developing flow in an axisymmetric pipe with conical center body and no fluting and (4) developing fluted pipe flow. Finally, two demonstration cases are presented which show the code's ability to analyze both the ejector and axisymmetric fluted mixers.

  20. High power microwave system based on power combining and pulse compression of conventional klystrons

    CERN Document Server

    Xiong, Zheng-Feng; Cheng, Cheng; Ning, Hui; Tang, Chuan-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    A high power microwave system based on power combining and pulse compression of conventional klystrons is introduced in this paper. This system mainly consists of pulse modulator, power combiner, driving source of klystrons and pulse compressor. A solid state induction modulator and pulse transformer were used to drive two 50 MW S-band klystrons with pulse widths 4 {\\mu}s in parallel, after power combining and pulse compression, the tested peak power had reached about 210 MW with pulse widths nearly 400 ns at 25 Hz, while the experimental maximum output power was just limited by the power capacity of loads. This type of high power microwave system has widely application prospect in RF system of large scale particle accelerators, high power radar transmitters and high level electromagnetic environment generators.