WorldWideScience

Sample records for high brightness temperatures

  1. Unexpected High Brightness Temperature 140 PC from the Core in the Jet of 3C 120

    CERN Document Server

    Roca-Sogorb, Mar; Agudo, Ivan; Marscher, Alan P; Jorstad, Svetlana G

    2009-01-01

    We present 1.7, 5, 15, 22 and 43 GHz polarimetric multi--epoch VLBA observations of the radio galaxy 3C 120. The higher frequency observations reveal a new component, not visible before April 2007, located 80 mas from the core (which corresponds to a deprojected distance of 140 pc), with a brightness temperature about 600 times higher than expected at such distances. This component (hereafter C80) is observed to remain stationary and to undergo small changes in its brightness temperature during more than two years of observations. A combination of jet bending, significant flow acceleration, and a very strong shock --for such large distance from the core-- may explain the unusually high Tb of C80, but it seems very unlikely that this corresponds to the usual shock that emerges from the core and travels downstream to the location of C80. It appears that some other intrinsic process in the jet, capable of providing a local burst in particle and/or magnetic field energy, may be responsible for the enhanced bright...

  2. The influence of snow depth and surface air temperature on satellite-derived microwave brightness temperature. [central Russian steppes, and high plains of Montana, North Dakota, and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J. L.; Hall, D. K.; Chang, A. T. C.; Rango, A.; Allison, L. J.; Diesen, B. C., III

    1980-01-01

    Areas of the steppes of central Russia, the high plains of Montana and North Dakota, and the high plains of Canada were studied in an effort to determine the relationship between passive microwave satellite brightness temperature, surface air temperature, and snow depth. Significant regression relationships were developed in each of these homogeneous areas. Results show that sq R values obtained for air temperature versus snow depth and the ratio of microwave brightness temperature and air temperature versus snow depth were not as the sq R values obtained by simply plotting microwave brightness temperature versus snow depth. Multiple regression analysis provided only marginal improvement over the results obtained by using simple linear regression.

  3. Microwave brightness temperature and thermal inertia - towards synergistic method of high-resolution soil moisture retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukowski, Mateusz; Usowicz, Boguslaw; Sagan, Joanna; Szlazak, Radoslaw; Gluba, Lukasz; Rojek, Edyta

    2017-04-01

    Soil moisture is an important parameter in many environmental studies, as it influences the exchange of water and energy at the interface between the land surface and the atmosphere. Accurate assessment of the soil moisture spatial and temporal variations is crucial for numerous studies; starting from a small scale of single field, then catchment, mesoscale basin, ocean conglomeration, finally ending at the global water cycle. Despite numerous advantages, such as fine accuracy (undisturbed by clouds or daytime conditions) and good temporal resolution, passive microwave remote sensing of soil moisture, e.g. SMOS and SMAP, are not applicable to a small scale - simply because of too coarse spatial resolution. On the contrary, thermal infrared-based methods of soil moisture retrieval have a good spatial resolution, but are often disturbed by clouds and vegetation interferences or night effects. The methods that base on point measurements, collected in situ by monitoring stations or during field campaigns, are sometimes called "ground truth" and may serve as a reference for remote sensing, of course after some up-scaling and approximation procedures that are, unfortunately, potential source of error. Presented research concern attempt to synergistic approach that join two remote sensing methods: passive microwave and thermal infrared, supported by in situ measurements. Microwave brightness temperature of soil was measured by ELBARA, the radiometer at 1.4 GHz frequency, installed at 6 meters high tower at Bubnow test site in Poland. Thermal inertia around the tower was modelled using the statistical-physical model whose inputs were: soil physical properties, its water content, albedo and surface temperatures measured by an infrared pyrometer, directed at the same footprint as ELBARA. The results coming from this method were compared to in situ data obtained during several field campaigns and by the stationary agrometeorological stations. The approach seems to be

  4. High Brightness OLED Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spindler, Jeffrey [OLEDWorks LLC; Kondakova, Marina [OLEDWorks LLC; Boroson, Michael [OLEDWorks LLC; Hamer, John [OLEDWorks LLC

    2016-05-25

    In this work we describe the technology developments behind our current and future generations of high brightness OLED lighting panels. We have developed white and amber OLEDs with excellent performance based on the stacking approach. Current products achieve 40-60 lm/W, while future developments focus on achieving 80 lm/W or higher.

  5. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Intersatellite Calibrated Clear-Sky High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) Channel 12 Brightness Temperature Version 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The High-Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) of intersatellite calibrated channel 12 brightness temperature (TB) product is a gridded global monthly time...

  6. Robust fitting of diurnal brightness temperature cycle

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Udahemuka, G

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available for a pixel concerned. Robust fitting of observed Diurnal Temperature Cycle (DTC) taken over a day of a given pixel without cloud cover and other abnormally conditions such as fire can give a data based brightness temperature model for a given pixel...

  7. High brightness semiconductor lasers with reduced filamentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McInerney, John; O'Brien, Peter.; Skovgaard, Peter M. W.;

    1999-01-01

    High brightness semiconductor lasers have applications in spectroscopy, fiber lasers, manufacturing and materials processing, medicine and free space communication or energy transfer. The main difficulty associated with high brightness is that, because of COD, high power requires a large aperture...

  8. High-brightness rf linear accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The issue of high brightness and its ramifications in linacs driven by radio-frequency fields is discussed. A history of the RF linacs is reviewed briefly. Some current applications are then examined that are driving progress in RF linacs. The physics affecting the brightness of RF linacs is then discussed, followed by the economic feasibility of higher brightness machines. (LEW)

  9. High-brightness rf linear accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The issue of high brightness and its ramifications in linacs driven by radio-frequency fields is discussed. A history of the RF linacs is reviewed briefly. Some current applications are then examined that are driving progress in RF linacs. The physics affecting the brightness of RF linacs is then discussed, followed by the economic feasibility of higher brightness machines. (LEW)

  10. Bright upconversion luminescence and increased Tc in CaBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9}:Er high temperature piezoelectric ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng Dengfeng [Functional Materials Research Laboratory, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Kyushu, 807-1 Shuku, Tosu, Saga 841-0052 (Japan); Wang Xusheng; Yao Xi [Functional Materials Research Laboratory, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Xu Chaonan [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Kyushu, 807-1 Shuku, Tosu, Saga 841-0052 (Japan); Lin Jian; Sun Tiantuo [College of Material Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 4800 Cao' an Highway, Shanghai 201804 (China)

    2012-05-15

    Er{sup 3+} doped CaBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9} (CBT) bismuth layered-structure high temperature piezoelectric ceramics were synthesized by the traditional solid state method. The upconversion (UC) emission properties of Er{sup 3+} doped CBT ceramics were investigated as a function of Er{sup 3+} concentration and incident pump power. A bright green upconverted emission was obtained under excitation 980 nm at room temperature. The observed strong green and weak red emission bands corresponded to the transitions from {sup 4}S{sub 3/2} and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} to {sup 4}I{sub 15/2}, respectively. The dependence of UC emission intensity on pumping power indicated that a three-photon process was involved in UC emissions. Studies of dielectric with temperature have also been carried out. Introduction of Er increased the Curie temperature of CBT, thus, making this ceramic suitable for sensor applications at higher temperatures. Because of its strong up-converted emission and increased Tc, the multifunctional high temperature piezoelectric ceramic may be useful in high temperature sensor, fluorescence thermometry, and optical-electro integration applications.

  11. Brightness temperature for 166 radio sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-Hui Fan; Yong Huang; Yu-Hai Yuan; Jiang-He Yang; Yi Liu; Jun Tao; Ying Gao; Tong-Xu Hua; Rui-Guang Lin; Jiang-Shui Zhang; Jing-Yi Zhang; Yi-Ping Qin

    2009-01-01

    Using the database of the University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory (UMRAO) at three radio frequencies (4.8, 8 and 14.5 GHz), we determined the short-term variability timescales for 166 radio sources. The timescales are 0.15d (2007+777) to 176.17d (0528-250) with an average timescale of △tobs=17.1±16.5d for the whole sample. The timescales are used to calculate the brightness temperatures, TB. The value of log TB is in the range of log TB = 10.47 to 19.06 K. In addition, we also estimated the boosting factor for the sources. The correlation between the polarization and the Doppler factor is also discussed.

  12. Observations and diagnostics in high brightness beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cianchi, A., E-mail: alessandro.cianchi@roma2.infn.it [University of Rome Tor Vergata and INFN-Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Anania, M.P.; Bisesto, F.; Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V. [INFN-LNF, Via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2016-09-01

    The brightness is a figure of merit largely used in the light sources, like FEL (Free Electron Lasers), but it is also fundamental in several other applications, as for instance Compton backscattering sources, beam driven plasma accelerators and THz sources. Advanced diagnostics are essential tools in the development of high brightness beams. 6D electron beam diagnostics will be reviewed with emphasis on emittance measurement.

  13. Bright optical centre in diamond with narrow, highly polarised and nearly phonon-free fluorescence at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Roger; Lehnert, Jan; Mensing, Michael; Spemann, Daniel; Pezzagna, Sébastien; Meijer, Jan

    2017-05-01

    Using shallow implantation of ions and molecules with masses centred at 27 atomic mass units (amu) in diamond, a new artificial optical centre with unique properties has been created. The centre shows a linearly polarised fluorescence with a main narrow emission line mostly found at 582 nm, together with a weak vibronic sideband at room temperature. The fluorescence lifetime is ∼2 ns and the brightest centres are more than three times brighter than the nitrogen-vacancy centres. A majority of the centres shows stable fluorescence whereas some others present a blinking behaviour, at faster or slower rates. Furthermore, a second kind of optical centre has been simultaneously created in the same diamond sample, within the same ion implantation run. This centre has a narrow zero-phonon line (ZPL) at ∼546 nm and a broad phonon sideband at room temperature. Interestingly, optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) has been measured on several single 546 nm centres and two resonance peaks are found at 0.99 and 1.27 GHz. In view of their very similar ODMR and optical spectra, the 546 nm centre is likely to coincide with the ST1 centre, reported once (with a ZPL at 550 nm), but of still unknown nature. These new kinds of centres are promising for quantum information processing, sub-diffraction optical imaging or use as single-photon sources.

  14. SMEX03 SSM/I Brightness Temperature Data, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides brightness temperature data acquired during the Soil Moisture Experiment 2003 (SMEX03) by the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I). The...

  15. SMEX03 SSM/I Brightness Temperature Data, Georgia

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides brightness temperature data acquired during the Soil Moisture Experiment 2003 (SMEX03) by the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I). The...

  16. Laser ion source for high brightness heavy ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, M.

    2016-09-01

    A laser ion source is known as a high current high charge state heavy ion source. However we place great emphasis on the capability to realize a high brightness ion source. A laser ion source has a pinpoint small volume where materials are ionized and can achieve quite uniform low temperature ion beam. Those features may enable us to realize very small emittance beams. In 2014, a low charge state high brightness laser ion source was successfully commissioned in Brookhaven National Laboratory. Now most of all the solid based heavy ions are being provided from the laser ion source for regular operation.

  17. High-brightness ultra-cold metastable neon-beam

    CERN Document Server

    Shimizu, Fujio

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents detailed characteristics of an ultra-cold bright metastable neon atomic beam which we have been using for atom-interferometric applications. The basis of the device is an atomic beam released from a magneto-optical trap (MOT) which is operated with a high intensity trapping laser, high magnetic quadrupole field, and large laser detuining. Mainly due to the complex structure of three dimensional magnetic field and laser beams, a bright small spot of atoms is formed near the center of the quadrupole magnetic field under an appropriate operating condition. We obtained the minimum trap diameter of 50 micron meter, the atomic density nearly 10^{13}cm^{-3}, and the atomic temperature slightly less than the Doppler limited temperature of 200 micro-K. By releasing trapped atoms we obtained an bright cold atomic beam which is not far from the collision limited atomic density.

  18. Emittance measurement of high-brightness microbeams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishizuka, Hiroshi; Nakahara, Yuriko (Fukuoka Inst. of Tech. (Japan)); Kawasaki, Sunao; Musyoki, S.; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Akihiko; Shiho, Makoto

    1994-09-01

    Arrays of microtriodes have recently become available due to the development of microfabricated field-emission electron sources. Computer simulation has shown that the brightness of beams emitted by them is significantly higher than that of the common microbeams, and possible application of the accelerated beam to free electron lasers has been discussed. Experimentation on beam generation has started, but methods for diagnosing the beam have not yet been established. Difficulty is predicted, because of the high brightness, in applying the conventional methods of emittance measurement. In this paper we propose a new method that determines the emittance without using apertures. The cross section of a converging beam is elongated by a quadrupole lens, and parameters of the emittance ellipse are obtained from the beam size on a screen when changing either the strength or the axial position of the quadrupole lens. (author).

  19. Microwave Brightness Temperature and Lunar Son Dielectric Property Retrieve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Wu; D.H. Li; A.T. Altyntsev; B.I. Lubyshev

    2005-01-01

    Among many scientific objectives of lunar exploration, investigations on lunar soil become more and more attractive to the scientists duo to the existence of abundant 3He and ilmenite in the lunar soil and their possible utilization. Although the soil composition determination on the lunar surface is available by visible light spectrometer, γ/X-ray spectrometer etc, the evaluations on the total reserves of 3He and ilmenite in the lunar deep and on the thickness of the lunar soil are still impossible so far. In this paper, the authors first give a rough analysis of the microwave brightness temperature images of the lunar disc observed using the NRAO 12 Meter Telescope and Siberian Solar Radio Telescope; then introduce our researches on the microwave dielectric properties of lunar soil simulators; finally, discuss some basic relations between the microwave brightness temperature and lunar soil properties.

  20. Microwave brightness temperature imaging and dielectric properties of lunar soil

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wu Ji; Li Dihui; Zhang Xiaohui; Jiang Jingshan; A T Altyntsev; B I Lubyshev

    2005-12-01

    Among many scientific objectives of lunar exploration, investigations on lunar soil become attractive due to the existence of He3 and ilmenite in the lunar soil and their possible utilization as nuclear fuel for power generation.Although the composition of the lunar surface soil can be determined by optical and /X-ray spectrometers, etc., the evaluation of the total reserves of He3 and ilmenite within the regolith and in the lunar interior are still not available.In this paper,we give a rough analysis of the microwave brightness temperature images of the lunar disc observed using the NRAO 12 meter Telescope and Siberian Solar Radio Telescope.We also present the results of the microwave dielectric properties of terrestrial analogues of lunar soil and,discuss some basic relations between the microwave brightness temperature and lunar soil properties.

  1. The Los Alamos high-brightness photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Shea, P.G.

    1991-01-01

    For a number of years Los Alamos National Laboratory has been developing photocathode RF guns for high-brightness electron beam applications such as free-electron lasers (FELs). Previously thermionic high-voltage guns have been the source of choice for the electron accelerators used to drive FELs. The performance of such FELs is severely limited by the emittance growth produced by the subharmonic bunching process and also by the low peak current of the source. In a photoinjector, a laser driven photocathode is placed directly in a high-gradient RF accelerating cavity. A photocathode allows unsurpassed control over the current, and the spatial and temporal profile of the beam. In addition the electrodeless emission'' avoids many of the difficulties associated with multi-electrode guns, i.e. the electrons are accelerated very rapidly to relativistic energies, and there are no electrodes to distort the accelerating fields. For the past two years we have been integrating a photocathode into our existing FEL facility by replacing our thermionic gun and subharmonic bunchers with a high-gradient 1.3 GHz photoinjector. The photoinjector, which is approximately 0.6 m in length, produces 6 MeV, 300 A, 15 ps linac, and accelerated to a final energy of 40 MeV. We have recently begun lasing at wavelengths near 3 {mu}m. 16 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Considerations for modeling thin cirrus effects via brightness temperature differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, E. O.; Arduini, R. F.; Wielicki, B. A.; Stone, R. S.; Tsay, S.-C.

    1995-01-01

    Brightness temperature difference (BTD) values are calculated for selected Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-6) channels (3.9, 12.7 micrometer) and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer channels (3.7, 12.0 micrometer). Daytime and nighttime discrimination of particle size information is possible given the infrared cloud extinction optical depth and the BTD value. BTD values are presented and compared for cirrus clouds composed of equivalent ice spheres (volume, surface area) versus randomly oriented hexagonal ice crystals. The effect of the hexagonal ice crystals is to increase the magnitude of the BTD values calculated relative to equivalent ice sphere (volume, surface area) BTDs. Equivalent spheres (volume or surface area) do not do a very good job of modeling hexagonal ice crystal effects on BTDs; however, the use of composite spheres improves the simulation and offers interesting prospects. Careful consideration of the number of Legendre polynomial coefficients used to fit the scattering phase functions is crucial to realistic modeling of cirrus BTDs. Surface and view-angle effects are incorporated to provide more realistic simulation.

  3. High Brightness Neutron Source for Radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremer, J. T.; Piestrup, Melvin, A.; Gary, Charles, K.; Harris, Jack, L. Williams, David, J.; Jones, Glenn, E.; Vainionpaa, J. , H.; Fuller, Michael, J.; Rothbart, George, H.; Kwan, J., W.; Ludewigt, B., A.; Gough, R.., A..; Reijonen, Jani; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-12-08

    This research and development program was designed to improve nondestructive evaluation of large mechanical objects by providing both fast and thermal neutron sources for radiography. Neutron radiography permits inspection inside objects that x-rays cannot penetrate and permits imaging of corrosion and cracks in low-density materials. Discovering of fatigue cracks and corrosion in piping without the necessity of insulation removal is possible. Neutron radiography sources can provide for the nondestructive testing interests of commercial and military aircraft, public utilities and petrochemical organizations. Three neutron prototype neutron generators were designed and fabricated based on original research done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The research and development of these generators was successfully continued by LBNL and Adelphi Technology Inc. under this STTR. The original design goals of high neutron yield and generator robustness have been achieved, using new technology developed under this grant. In one prototype generator, the fast neutron yield and brightness was roughly 10 times larger than previously marketed neutron generators using the same deuterium-deuterium reaction. In another generator, we integrate a moderator with a fast neutron source, resulting in a high brightness thermal neutron generator. The moderator acts as both conventional moderator and mechanical and electrical support structure for the generator and effectively mimics a nuclear reactor. In addition to the new prototype generators, an entirely new plasma ion source for neutron production was developed. First developed by LBNL, this source uses a spiral antenna to more efficiently couple the RF radiation into the plasma, reducing the required gas pressure so that the generator head can be completely sealed, permitting the possible use of tritium gas. This also permits the generator to use the deuterium-tritium reaction to produce 14-MeV neutrons with increases

  4. Wave and Wind Direction Effects on SFMR Brightness Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbach, Heather; Uhlhorn, Eric; Bourassa, Mark

    2015-04-01

    Surface winds in a tropical cyclone are essential for determining its strength. Currently the Stepped-Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR) and Global Positioning System (GPS) dropwindsondes are the main instruments used for obtaining in situ surface wind measurements. The platforms for these instruments are the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) P-3 and Air Force C-130J hurricane hunter aircraft. The SFMR measures sea surface microwave brightness temperatures at six frequencies ranging from 4.7 to 7.2 GHz. Surface wind speed estimates are obtained from these brightness temperatures by using a retrieval algorithm that employs a geophysical model function relating surface emissivity and wind speed. The SFMR is designed to obtain a single nadir track of surface wind speeds directly beneath the aircraft during level flight and not when turning because of the complexity of the wave field and foam distribution when the SFMR views the surface off-nadir or during aircraft rolls. However, the effects of the wave field on the measurements can be investigated using measurements obtained during the 2008 and 2014 Atlantic hurricane seasons. An SFMR module was flown in precipitation-free regions of the tropical cyclones to collect data at specified roll angles of 15°, 30°, 45°, and 60° in some cases. Excess brightness temperatures are then calculated with respect to zero wind speed values and independent of wind direction. An asymmetry is found in the resulting excess brightness temperatures. It is hypothesized that this asymmetry is caused by the direction of wave propagation and the angle at which the wave field is viewed by the SFMR. Wind direction may also play a role in the asymmetry. To analyze the asymmetry further measurement from WindSat will be used. Once the relationship is determined between surface wind speed, brightness temperature, and incidence angle a technique will be developed to obtain a surface wind speed when the aircraft is

  5. Method for changing brightness temperature into true temperature based on twice recognition method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Song; Xiaogang Sun; Hong Tang

    2007-01-01

    The channel output of a multi-wavelength pyrometer is the brightness temperature rather than the true temperature. Twice recognition method is put forward to change the brightness temperatures of a multiwavelength pyrometer into the true temperatures of targets. Using the data offered by Dr. F. Righini,the experimental results show that the difference between the calculated true temperature based on twice recognition method and the real true temperature is within ±20 K. The method presented in this paper is feasible and effective for the true temperature measurement of targets.

  6. Recent brightness improvements of 976 nm high power laser bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Alexander; Lauer, Christian; Furitsch, Michael; König, Harald; Müller, Martin; Strauß, Uwe

    2017-02-01

    Pump modules for fiber lasers and fiber-coupled direct diode laser systems require laser diodes with a high beam quality. While in fast axis direction diode lasers exhibit a nearly diffraction limited output beam, the maximum usable output power is usually limited by the slow axis divergence blooming at high power levels. Measures to improve the lateral beam quality are subject of extensive research. Among the many influencing factors are the chip temperature, thermal crosstalk between emitters, thermal lensing, lateral waveguiding and lateral mode structure. We present results on the improvements of the lateral beam divergence and brightness of gain-guided mini-bars for emission at 976 nm. For efficient fiber coupling into a 200 μm fiber with NA 0.22, the upper limit of the lateral beam parameter product is 15.5 mm mrad. Within the last years, the power level at this beam quality has been improved from 44 W to 52 W for the chips in production, enabling more cost efficient pump modules and laser systems. Our work towards further improvements of the beam quality focuses on advanced chip designs featuring reduced thermal lensing and mode shaping. Recent R&D results will be presented, showing a further improvement of the beam quality by 15%. Also, results of a chip design with an improved lateral emitter design for highest brightness levels will be shown, yielding in a record high brightness saturation of 4.8 W/mm mrad.

  7. The Brightness Temperature of the Quiet Solar Chromosphere at 2.6 mm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Kazumasa; Shimojo, Masumi; Asayama, Shinichiro; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; White, Stephen; Bastian, Timothy; Saito, Masao

    2017-01-01

    The absolute brightness temperature of the Sun at millimeter wavelengths is an important diagnostic of the solar chromosphere. Because the Sun is so bright, measurement of this property usually involves the operation of telescopes under extreme conditions and requires a rigorous performance assessment of the telescope. In this study, we establish solar observation and calibration techniques at 2.6 mm wavelength for the Nobeyama 45 m telescope and accurately derive the absolute solar brightness temperature. We tune the superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) receiver by inducing different bias voltages onto the SIS mixer to prevent saturation. Then, we examine the linearity of the receiver system by comparing outputs derived from different tuning conditions. Furthermore, we measure the lunar filled beam efficiency of the telescope using the New Moon, and then derive the absolute brightness temperature of the Sun. The derived solar brightness temperature is 7700 ± 310 K at 115 GHz. The telescope beam pattern is modeled as a summation of three Gaussian functions and derived using the solar limb. The real shape of the Sun is determined via deconvolution of the beam pattern from the observed map. Such well-calibrated single-dish observations are important for high-resolution chromospheric studies because they provide the absolute temperature scale that is lacking from interferometer observations.

  8. Hydrologic applications of Nimbus 5 ESMR data. [observations of low brightness temperatures in aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmugge, T. J.; Rango, A.; Allison, L. J.; Wilheit, T. T.

    1974-01-01

    A region of low brightness temperature lying along the Mississippi River from Cairo, Illinois, to Morganza, Louisiana was observed in early Nimbus 5 Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer images. This region, which generally corresponds to an outwash aquifer in the Mississippi Valley, had brightness temperatures, at times as much as 40 K below the surrounding (drier) older uplands. Fluctuations of as much as 30 K were observed during the time interval 15 December 1972 to 28 February 1973. Comparison images taken from the Earth Resources Technology Satellite indicate that the study area is aligned with the Mississippi River floodplain, a region of potentially high soil moisture content. The brightness temperature fluctuations were compared with variations in precipitation and other hydrologic parameters in order to delineate the causative factors.

  9. Extremely High Current, High-Brightness Energy Recovery Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Beavis, Dana; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Bluem, Hans; Brennan, Joseph M; Burger, Al; Burrill, Andrew; Calaga, Rama; Cameron, Peter; Chang, Xiangyun; Cole, Michael; Connolly, Roger; Delayen, Jean R; Favale, Anthony; Gassner, David M; Grimes, Jacob T; Hahn, Harald; Hershcovitch, Ady; Holmes, Douglas; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Johnson, Peter; Kayran, Dmitry; Kewisch, Jorg; Kneisel, Peter; Lambiase, Robert; Litvinenko, Vladimir N; McIntyre, Gary; Meng, Wuzheng; Nehring, Thomas; Nicoletti, Tony; Oerter, Brian; Pate, David; Phillips, Larry; Preble, Joseph P; Rank, Jim; Rao, Triveni; Rathke, John; Roser, Thomas; Russo, Thomas; Scaduto, Joseph; Schultheiss, Tom; Segalov, Zvi; Smith, Kevin T; Todd, Alan M M; Warren-Funk, L; Williams, Neville; Wu, Kuo-Chen; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Yip, Kin; Zaltsman, Alex; Zhao, Yongxiang

    2005-01-01

    Next generation ERL light-sources, high-energy electron coolers, high-power Free-Electron Lasers, powerful Compton X-ray sources and many other accelerators were made possible by the emerging technology of high-power, high-brightness electron beams. In order to get the anticipated performance level of ampere-class currents, many technological barriers are yet to be broken. BNL's Collider-Accelerator Department is pursuing some of these technologies for its electron cooling of RHIC application, as well as a possible future electron-hadron collider. We will describe work on CW, high-current and high-brightness electron beams. This will include a description of a superconducting, laser-photocathode RF gun and an accelerator cavity capable of producing low emittance (about 1 micron rms normalized) one nano-Coulomb bunches at currents of the order of one ampere average.

  10. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Intersatellite Calibrated Clear-Sky HIRS Channel 12 Brightness Temperature, Version 2.6

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Inter-Satellite Calibrated Clear-Sky High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) Channel 12 brightness temperatures...

  11. HIRS channel 12 brightness temperature dataset and its correlations with major climate indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Shi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A new version of the High-Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS upper tropospheric water vapor channel (channel 12 brightness temperature dataset is developed using intersatellite calibrated data. In this dataset, only those pixels affected by upper tropospheric clouds are discarded. Compared to the previous version that was based on column-clear-sky data, the new version has much better daily spatial coverage. The HIRS observation patterns are compared to microwave sounder measurements. The differences between the two types of sounders vary with respect to brightness temperature with larger differences for higher (dry values. Correlations between the HIRS upper tropospheric water vapor channel brightness temperatures and several major climate indices show strong signals during cold seasons. The selected climate indices track climate variation signals covering regions from the tropics to the poles. Qualitatively, moist signals are correlated with troughs and ascending branches of the circulation, while dry signals occur with ridges and descent. These correlations show the potential of using the upper tropospheric water vapor channel brightness temperature dataset together with a suite of many atmospheric variables to monitor regional climate changes and locate global teleconnection patterns.

  12. Extreme Brightness Temperatures and Refractive Substructure in 3C273 with RadioAstron

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Michael D; Gwinn, Carl R; Gurvits, Leonid I; Narayan, Ramesh; Macquart, Jean-Pierre; Jauncey, David L; Voitsik, Peter A; Anderson, James M; Sokolovsky, Kirill V; Lisakov, Mikhail M

    2016-01-01

    Earth-space interferometry with RadioAstron provides the highest direct angular resolution ever achieved in astronomy at any wavelength. RadioAstron detections of the classic quasar 3C273 on interferometric baselines up to 171,000 km suggest brightness temperatures exceeding expected limits from the "inverse-Compton catastrophe" by two orders of magnitude. We show that at 18 cm, these estimates most probably arise from refractive substructure introduced by scattering in the interstellar medium. We use the scattering properties to estimate an intrinsic brightness temperature of 7*10^12 K, which is consistent with expected theoretical limits, but which is ~15 times lower than estimates that neglect substructure. At 6 cm, the substructure influences the measured values appreciably but gives an estimated brightness temperature that is comparable to models that do not account for the substructure. At 1.3 cm, the substructure does not affect the extremely high inferred brightness temperatures, in excess of 10^13 K....

  13. ECR Ion Source for a High-Brightness Cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeaux, Justin; McIntyre, Peter; Assadi, Saeed

    2011-10-01

    New technology is being developed for high-brightness, high-current cyclotrons with performance benefits for accelerator-driven subcritical fission power, medical isotope production, and proton beam cancer therapy. This paper describes the design for a 65 kV electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source that will provide high-brightness beam for injection into the cyclotron. The ion source is modeled closely upon the one that is used at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Modifications are being made to provide enhanced brightness and compatibility for higher-current operation.

  14. S193 radiometer brightness temperature precision/accuracy for SL2 and SL3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pounds, D. J.; Krishen, K.

    1975-01-01

    The precision and accuracy with which the S193 radiometer measured the brightness temperature of ground scenes is investigated. Estimates were derived from data collected during Skylab missions. Homogeneous ground sites were selected and S193 radiometer brightness temperature data analyzed. The precision was expressed as the standard deviation of the radiometer acquired brightness temperature. Precision was determined to be 2.40 K or better depending on mode and target temperature.

  15. ROLE OF DIAMOND SECONDARY EMITTERS IN HIGH BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON SOURCES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RAO, T.; BEN-ZVI, I.; BURRILL, A.; CHANG, X.; GRIMES, J.; RANK, J.; SEGALOV, Z.; SMEDLEY, J.

    2005-09-20

    In this paper we explore the possibility of using diamond secondary emitter in a high average current electron injector to amplify the current from the photocathode and to isolate the cathode and the injector from each other to increase the life time of the cathode and preserve the performance of the injector. Secondary electron yield of 225 and current density of 0.8 a/cm{sup 2} have been measured in the transmission mode from type 2 a natural diamond. Although the diamond will be heated during normal operation in the injector, calculations indicate that by cryogenically cooling the diamond, the temperature gradient along the diamond can be maintained within the acceptable range. The electron energy and temporal distributions are expected to be narrow from this device resulting in high brightness beams. Plans are underway to measure the SEY in emission mode, fabricate photocathode-diamond capsule and test diamond and capsule in superconducting RF injector.

  16. Room temperature synthesis of ultra-small, near-unity single-sized lead halide perovskite quantum dots with wide color emission tunability, high color purity and high brightness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lucheng; Geng, Jing; Ai, Lisha; Zhang, Ying; Xie, Renguo; Yang, Wensheng

    2016-08-01

    Phosphor with extremely narrow emission line widths, high brightness, and wide color emission tunability in visible regions is required for display and lighting applications, yet none has been reported in the literature so far. In the present study, single-sized lead halide perovskite (APbX 3; A = CH3NH3 and Cs; X = Cl, Br, and I) nanocrystalline (NC) phosphors were achieved for the first time in a one-pot reaction at room temperature (25 °C). The size-dependent samples, which included four families of CsPbBr3 NCs and exhibited sharp excitonic absorption peaks and pure band gap emission, were directly obtained by simply varying the concentration of ligands. The continuity of the optical spectrum can be successively tuned over the entire UV-visible spectral region (360-610 nm) by preparing CsPbCl3, CsPbI3, and CsPb(Y/Br)3 (Y = Cl and I) NCs with the use of CsPbBr3 NCs as templates by anion exchange while maintaining the size of NCs and high quantum yields of up to 80%. Notably, an emission line width of 10-24 nm, which is completely consistent with that of their single particles, indicates the formation of single-sized NCs. The versatility of the synthetic strategy was validated by extending it to the synthesis of single-sized CH3NH3PbX 3 NCs by simply replacing the cesium precursor by the CH3NH3 X precursor.

  17. Room temperature synthesis of ultra-small, near-unity single-sized lead halide perovskite quantum dots with wide color emission tunability, high color purity and high brightness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lucheng; Geng, Jing; Ai, Lisha; Zhang, Ying; Xie, Renguo; Yang, Wensheng

    2016-08-19

    Phosphor with extremely narrow emission line widths, high brightness, and wide color emission tunability in visible regions is required for display and lighting applications, yet none has been reported in the literature so far. In the present study, single-sized lead halide perovskite (APbX 3; A = CH3NH3 and Cs; X = Cl, Br, and I) nanocrystalline (NC) phosphors were achieved for the first time in a one-pot reaction at room temperature (25 °C). The size-dependent samples, which included four families of CsPbBr3 NCs and exhibited sharp excitonic absorption peaks and pure band gap emission, were directly obtained by simply varying the concentration of ligands. The continuity of the optical spectrum can be successively tuned over the entire UV-visible spectral region (360-610 nm) by preparing CsPbCl3, CsPbI3, and CsPb(Y/Br)3 (Y = Cl and I) NCs with the use of CsPbBr3 NCs as templates by anion exchange while maintaining the size of NCs and high quantum yields of up to 80%. Notably, an emission line width of 10-24 nm, which is completely consistent with that of their single particles, indicates the formation of single-sized NCs. The versatility of the synthetic strategy was validated by extending it to the synthesis of single-sized CH3NH3PbX 3 NCs by simply replacing the cesium precursor by the CH3NH3 X precursor.

  18. Ultra-high resolution and high-brightness AMOLED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacyk, Ihor; Ghosh, Amal; Prache, Olivier; Draper, Russ; Fellowes, Dave

    2012-06-01

    As part of its continuing effort to improve both the resolution and optical performance of AMOLED microdisplays, eMagin has recently developed an SXGA (1280×3×1024) microdisplay under a US Army RDECOM CERDEC NVESD contract that combines the world's smallest OLED pixel pitch with an ultra-high brightness green OLED emitter. This development is aimed at next-generation HMD systems with "see-through" and daylight imaging requirements. The OLED pixel array is built on a 0.18-micron CMOS backplane and contains over 4 million individually addressable pixels with a pixel pitch of 2.7 × 8.1 microns, resulting in an active area of 0.52 inches diagonal. Using both spatial and temporal enhancement, the display can provide over 10-bits of gray-level control for high dynamic range applications. The new pixel design also enables the future implementation of a full-color QSXGA (2560 × RGB × 2048) microdisplay in an active area of only 1.05 inch diagonal. A low-power serialized low-voltage-differential-signaling (LVDS) interface is integrated into the display for use as a remote video link for tethered systems. The new SXGA backplane has been combined with the high-brightness green OLED device developed by eMagin under an NVESD contract. This OLED device has produced an output brightness of more than 8000fL with all pixels on; lifetime measurements are currently underway and will presented at the meeting. This paper will describe the operational features and first optical and electrical test results of the new SXGA demonstrator microdisplay.

  19. LCD Projection Display System with High Brightness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A new compact XGA projection is designed with three 0.99" liquid crystal panels. By using 275W UHP lamp, above 3000 ANSI lumens could be achieved with the uniformity of 85%. The color temperature is 6742K.

  20. Development of components for the high brightness laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmire, E.

    1980-10-01

    In 1979 DBR lasers were fabricated and their properties studied. Further investigations were undertaken of the beam expander, to determine its potential for the high brightness laser. From this data it was determined that a design change for the high brightness laser is required. This design change is described. In addition, measurements were made on laser amplification to compare this method of achieving higher power compared to the coupled diode arrays. Finally, as a spin-off of this research, a new design for a single mode laser was discovered, using the active/passive laser, a configuration which was fabricated as a first step toward fabrication of DBR lasers. Each of these research efforts are described in this report. Monolithic integration of the necessary components on one substrate for the high brightness laser has been hindered by problems in material and fabrication uniformity. This will be described, and projections for future development will be outlined.

  1. Brightness temperature - obtaining the physical properties of a non-equipartition plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokhrina, E. E.

    2017-06-01

    The limit on the intrinsic brightness temperature, attributed to `Compton catastrophe', has been established being 1012 K. Somewhat lower limit of the order of 1011.5 K is implied if we assume that the radiating plasma is in equipartition with the magnetic field - the idea that explained why the observed cores of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) sustained the limit lower than the `Compton catastrophe'. Recent observations with unprecedented high resolution by the RadioAstron have revealed systematic exceed in the observed brightness temperature. We propose means of estimating the degree of the non-equipartition regime in AGN cores. Coupled with the core-shift measurements, the method allows us to independently estimate the magnetic field strength and the particle number density at the core. We show that the ratio of magnetic energy to radiating plasma energy is of the order of 10-5, which means the flow in the core is dominated by the particle energy. We show that the magnetic field obtained by the brightness temperature measurements may be underestimated. We propose for the relativistic jets with small viewing angles the non-uniform magnetohydrodynamic model and obtain the expression for the magnetic field amplitude about two orders higher than that for the uniform model. These magnetic field amplitudes are consistent with the limiting magnetic field suggested by the `magnetically arrested disc' model.

  2. A new perspective on the infrared brightness temperature distribution of the deep convective clouds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rakesh Teja Konduru; C M Kishtawal; Shivani Shah

    2013-10-01

    We are proposing a statistical technique to analyze the best fit of the histogram of infrared brightness temperature of convective cloud pixels. For this we have utilized the infrared brightness temperatures (IRTB) of Kalpana-1 (8 km resolution) and globally merged infrared brightness temperatures of Climate Prediction Centre NCEP/NWS (4 km resolution, merged from all the available geostationary satellites GOES-8/10, METEOSAT-7/5 and GMS), for both deep convective and non-deep convective (shallow cloud) cases. It is observed that Johnson SB function is the best continuous distribution function in explaining the histogram of infrared brightness temperatures of the convective clouds. The best fit is confirmed by Kolmogorov–Smirnov statistic. Johnson SB’s distribution of histogram of infrared brightness temperatures clearly discriminates the cloud pixels of deep convective and non-deep convective cases. It also captures the asymmetric nature in histogram of infrared brightness temperatures. We also observed that Johnson SB distribution of infrared brightness temperatures for deep convective systems is different in each of the pre-monsoon, monsoon and post-monsoon seasons. And Johnson SB parameters are observed to be best in discriminating the Johnson SB distribution of infrared brightness temperatures of deep convective systems for each season. Due to these properties of Johnson SB function, it can be utilized in the modelling of the histogram of infrared brightness temperature of deep convective and non-deep convective systems. It focuses a new perspective on the infrared brightness temperature that will be helpful in cloud detection, classification and modelling.

  3. High Brightness, High Average Current Injector Development at Cornell

    CERN Document Server

    Sinclair, C K

    2005-01-01

    Cornell University is constructing a 100 mA average current, high brightness electron injector for a planned Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) hard X-ray synchrotron radiation source. This injector will employ a very high voltage DC gun with a negative electron affinity photoemission cathode. Relatively long duration electron pulses from the photocathode will be drift bunched, and accelerated to 5-15 MeV with five two-cell, 1300 MHz superconducting cavities. The total beam power will be limited to 575 kW by the DC and RF power sources. A genetic algorithm based computational optimization of this injector has resulted in simulated rms normalized emittances of 0.1 mm-mrad at 80 pC/bunch, and 0.7 mm-mrad at 1 nC/bunch. The many technical issues and their design solutions will be discussed. Construction of the gun and the SRF cavities is well underway. The schedule for completion, and the planned measurements, will be presented.

  4. A Compact High-Brightness Heavy-Ion Injector

    CERN Document Server

    Westenskow, Glen; Grote, D P; Halaxa, Erni; Kwan, Joe W

    2005-01-01

    To provide compact high-brightness heavy-ion beams for Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) accelerators, we have been experimenting with merging multi-beamlets in an injector which uses an RF plasma source. In an 80-kV 20-microsecond experiment, the RF plasma source has produced up to 5 mA of Ar+ in a single beamlet. An extraction current density of 100 mA/cm2 was achieved, and the thermal temperature of the ions was below 1 eV. More than 90% of the ions were in the Ar+ state, and the energy spread from charge exchange was found to be small. We have tested at full voltage gradient the first 4 gaps of a 61-beamlet injector design. Einzel lens were used to focus the beamlets while reducing the beamlet to beamlet space charge interaction. We will report on a converging 119 multi-beamlet source. Although the source has the same optics as a full 1.6 MV injector system, the test will be carried out at 400 kV due to the test stand HV limit. We will measure the beam’s emittance after the beamlets are merged and have bee...

  5. A new perspective on the infrared brightness temperature distribution of the deep convective clouds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    KONDURU, RAKESH TEJA; KISHTAWAL, C M; SHAH, SHIVANI

    2013-01-01

    ...), for both deep convective and non-deep convective (shallow cloud) cases. It is observed that Johnson SB function is the best continuous distribution function in explaining the histogram of infrared brightness temperatures of the convective clouds...

  6. Effects of subsurface volume scattering on the lunar microwave brightness temperature spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keihm, S. J.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of volumetric scattering on the lunar microwave brightness temperature are examined for a broad range of feasible lunar rock population distributions. Mie-scattering phase functions and the radiative transfer method are utilized. Surveyor and Apollo data relevant to lunar rock size distributions are discussed, and parameters are chosen for nine scattering models which liberally cover the range of studied rock population distributions. Scattering model brightness temperature predictions are analyzed in terms of the lunar disk center emission averaged over a lunation for wavelengths of 3-30 cm. The effects of scattering on the amplitude of disk center brightness temperature variations and resultant deductions of regolith electrical loss are examined. Constraints on the global scale variability of subsurface scatterers imposed by microwave brightness temperature maps are considered.

  7. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of MSU Level 1c Brightness Temperature, Version 1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains Level 1c inter-calibrated brightness temperatures from the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) sensors onboard nine polar orbiting satellites...

  8. GPM, AMSR2 GCOMW1 Level 1C Common Calibrated Brightness Temperature VV02A

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — 1CAMSR2 contains common calibrated brightness temperature from the AMSR2 passive microwave instrument flown on the GCOMW1 satellite. This products contains 6 swaths....

  9. GPM, AMSR2 GCOMW1 Level 1C Common Calibrated Brightness Temperature VV03A

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — 1CAMSR2 contains common calibrated brightness temperature from the AMSR2 passive microwave instrument flown on the GCOMW1 satellite. This products contains 6 swaths....

  10. Landcover Based Optimal Deconvolution of PALS L-band Microwave Brightness Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Crosson, William L.; Laymon, Charles A.; Njoku, Eni G.

    2004-01-01

    An optimal de-convolution (ODC) technique has been developed to estimate microwave brightness temperatures of agricultural fields using microwave radiometer observations. The technique is applied to airborne measurements taken by the Passive and Active L and S band (PALS) sensor in Iowa during Soil Moisture Experiments in 2002 (SMEX02). Agricultural fields in the study area were predominantly soybeans and corn. The brightness temperatures of corn and soybeans were observed to be significantly different because of large differences in vegetation biomass. PALS observations have significant over-sampling; observations were made about 100 m apart and the sensor footprint extends to about 400 m. Conventionally, observations of this type are averaged to produce smooth spatial data fields of brightness temperatures. However, the conventional approach is in contrast to reality in which the brightness temperatures are in fact strongly dependent on landcover, which is characterized by sharp boundaries. In this study, we mathematically de-convolve the observations into brightness temperature at the field scale (500-800m) using the sensor antenna response function. The result is more accurate spatial representation of field-scale brightness temperatures, which may in turn lead to more accurate soil moisture retrieval.

  11. Effect of temperature on the evolution of bright and dark screening-photovoltaic spatial solitons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘劲松; 郝中华

    2002-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the temperature effects on the evolution of both bright and dark screening-photovoltaicoptical spatial solitons in biased photovoltaic-photorefractive crystals in the case of neglecting the diffusion process. Fora stable bright or dark screening-photovoltaic soliton originally formed in a crystal at a given temperature, when thecrystal temperature changes, it will evolve into another stable screening-photovoltaic soliton if the change is quite small,whereas it will become unstable or break down if the temperature change is large enough. The spatial shape of a stablescreening-photovoltaic soliton can be reshaped by appropriately adjusting the crystal temperature.

  12. The Physics and Applications of High Brightness Electron Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Luigi; Rosenzweig, J.; Serafini, Luca

    2007-09-01

    Plenary sessions. RF deflector based sub-Ps beam diagnostics: application to FEL and advanced accelerators / D. Alesini. Production of fermtosecond pulses and micron beam spots for high brightness electron beam applications / S.G. Anderson ... [et al.]. Wakefields of sub-picosecond electron bunches / K.L.F. Bane. Diamond secondary emitter / I. Ben-Zvi ... [et al.]. Parametric optimization for an X-ray free electron laser with a laser wiggler / R. Bonifacio, N. Piovella and M.M. Cola. Needle cathodes for high-brightness beams / C.H. Boulware ... [et al.]. Non linear evolution of short pulses in FEL cascaded undulators and the FEL harmonic cascade / L. Giannessi and P. Musumeci. High brightness laser induced multi-meV electron/proton sources / D. Giulietti ... [et al.]. Emittance limitation of a conditioned beam in a strong focusing FEL undulator / Z. Huang, G. Stupakov and S. Reiche. Scaled models: space-charge dominated electron storage rings / R.A. Kishek ... [et al.]. High brightness beam applications: energy recovered linacs / G.A. Krafft. Maximizing brightness in photoinjectors / C. Limborg-Deprey and H. Tomizawa. Ultracold electron sources / O.J. Luiten ... [et al.]. Scaling laws of structure-based optical accelerators / A. Mizrahi, V. Karagodsky and L. Schächter. High brightness beams-applications to free-electron lasers / S. Reiche. Conception of photo-injectors for the CTF3 experiment / R. Roux. Superconducting RF photoinjectors: an overview / J. Sekutowicz. Status and perspectives of photo injector developments for high brightness beams / F. Stephan. Results from the UCLA/FNLP underdense plasma lens experiment / M.C. Thompson ... [et al.]. Medical application of multi-beam compton scattering monochromatic tunable hard X-ray source / M. Uesaka ... [et al.]. Design of a 2 kA, 30 fs RF-photoinjector for waterbag compression / S.B. Van Der Geer, O.J. Luiten and M.J. De Loos. Proposal for a high-brightness pulsed electron source / M. Zolotorev ... [et al

  13. GPM GMI Level 1B Brightness Temperatures VV03A

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The 1BGMI algorithm uses a non-linear three-point in-flight calibration to derive antenna temperature (Ta) and convert Ta to Tb using GMI antenna pattern...

  14. GPM GMI Level 1B Brightness Temperatures VV03B

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The 1BGMI algorithm uses a non-linear three-point in-flight calibration to derive antenna temperature (Ta) and convert Ta to Tb using GMI antenna pattern...

  15. RADIOASTRON OBSERVATIONS OF THE QUASAR 3C273: A CHALLENGE TO THE BRIGHTNESS TEMPERATURE LIMIT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalev, Y. Y.; Kardashev, N. S.; Voitsik, P. A.; Kovalev, Yu. A.; Lisakov, M. M.; Sokolovsky, K. V. [Astro Space Center of Lebedev Physical Institute, Profsoyuznaya 84/32, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kellermann, K. I. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States); Lobanov, A. P.; Zensus, J. A.; Anderson, J. M.; Bach, U.; Kraus, A. [Max-Planck-Institute for Radio Astronomy, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 (Germany); Johnson, M. D. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Gurvits, L. I. [Joint Institute for VLBI ERIC, P.O. Box 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Jauncey, D. L. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Sciences, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Ghigo, F. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Rt. 28/92, Green Bank, WV 24944-0002 (United States); Ghosh, T.; Salter, C. J. [Arecibo Observatory, NAIC, HC3 Box 53995, Arecibo, Puerto Rico, PR 00612 (United States); Petrov, L. Yu. [Astrogeo Center, 7312 Sportsman Drive, Falls Church, VA 22043 (United States); Romney, J. D. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801-0387 (United States)

    2016-03-20

    Inverse Compton cooling limits the brightness temperature of the radiating plasma to a maximum of 10{sup 11.5} K. Relativistic boosting can increase its observed value, but apparent brightness temperatures much in excess of 10{sup 13} K are inaccessible using ground-based very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) at any wavelength. We present observations of the quasar 3C 273, made with the space VLBI mission RadioAstron on baselines up to 171,000 km, which directly reveal the presence of angular structure as small as 26 μas (2.7 light months) and brightness temperature in excess of 10{sup 13} K. These measurements challenge our understanding of the non-thermal continuum emission in the vicinity of supermassive black holes and require a much higher Doppler factor than what is determined from jet apparent kinematics.

  16. High-current-density, high brightness cathodes for free electron laser applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, M.C. (Varian Associates, Palo Alto, CA (USA). Palo Alto Microwave Tube Div.)

    1987-06-01

    This report discusses the following topics: brightness and emittance of electron beams and cathodes; general requirements for cathodes in high brightness electron guns; candidate cathode types; plasma and field emission cathodes; true field emission cathodes; oxide cathodes; lanthanum hexaborides cathodes; laser driven thermionic cathodes; laser driven photocathodes; impregnated porous tungsten dispenser cathodes; and choice of best performing cathode types.

  17. Highly Bright White Organic Light-Emitting Diode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ A highly bright white organic light-emitting diode (OLED) was realized by using a highly bright blue emitting layer, 1,7-diphenyl-4-biphenyl-3,5-dimethyl-l,7-dihydrodipyrazolo[3,4-b;4',3'-e]pyridine (PAP-Ph), together with a 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(4-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran (DCM)-doped Alq [tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato) aluminum (Ⅲ)] layer to provide the blue, red and green emission for color mixing. With appropriate thickness control, the white-light OLED has a performance that reaches 24700 cd/m2 at 15 V, 1.93 lm/W at 6.5 V, and >300 cd/m2 at 7.7 mA/em2. The Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of the emitted light vary in a very small range, from (0.35, 0.34) to (0.34, 0.35), when forward voltages change from 6 to 12 V.

  18. Highly Bright White Organic Light-Emitting Diode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KO; C.; W.

    2001-01-01

    A highly bright white organic light-emitting diode (OLED) was realized by using a highly bright blue emitting layer, 1,7-diphenyl-4-biphenyl-3,5-dimethyl-l,7-dihydrodipyrazolo[3,4-b;4',3'-e]pyridine (PAP-Ph), together with a 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(4-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran (DCM)-doped Alq [tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato) aluminum (Ⅲ)] layer to provide the blue, red and green emission for color mixing. With appropriate thickness control, the white-light OLED has a performance that reaches 24700 cd/m2 at 15 V, 1.93 lm/W at 6.5 V, and >300 cd/m2 at 7.7 mA/em2. The Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of the emitted light vary in a very small range, from (0.35, 0.34) to (0.34, 0.35), when forward voltages change from 6 to 12 V.  ……

  19. MODIS BRIGHTNESS TEMPERATURE DATA ASSIMILATION UNDER CLOUDY CONDITIONS: METHODS AND IDEAL TESTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Wei-yu; WAN Qi-lin; ZHANG Chen-zhong; CHEN Zi-tong; HUANG Yan-yan

    2010-01-01

    Clouds have important effects on the infrared radiances transmission in that the inclusion of cloud effects in data assimilation can not only improve the quality of the assimilated atmospheric parameters greatly, but also minimize the initial error of cloud parameters by adjusting part of the infrared radiances data. On the basis of the Grapes-3D-var (Global and Regional Assimilation and Prediction Enhanced System), cloud liquid water, cloud ice water and cloud cover are added as the governing variables in the assimilation. Under the conditions of clear sky, partly cloudy cover and totally cloudy cover, the brightness temperature of 16 MODIS channels are assimilated respectively in ideal tests. Results show that when the simulated background brightness temperatures are lower than the observation, the analyzed field will increase the simulated brightness temperature by increasing its temperature and reducing its moisture, cloud liquid water, cloud ice water, and cloud cover. The simulated brightness temperature can be reduced if adjustment is made in the contrary direction. The adjustment of the temperature and specific humidity under the clear sky conditions conforms well to the design of MODIS channels, but it is weakened for levels under cloud layers. The ideal tests demonstrate that by simultaneously adding both cloud parameters and atmospheric parameters as governing variables during the assimilation of infrared radiances, both the cloud parameters and atmospheric parameters can be adjusted using the observed infrared radiances and conventional meteorological elements to make full use of the infrared observations.

  20. Validation of SMOS Brightness Temperatures During the HOBE Airborne Campaign, Western Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bircher, Simone; Balling, Jan E.; Skou, Niels

    2012-01-01

    of SMOS L1C brightness temperatures $T_{B}$ of the selected node. Data is stepwise compared from point via EMIRAD to SMOS scale. From ground soil moisture samples, $T_{B}$'s are pointwise estimated through the L-band microwave emission of the biosphere model using land cover specific model settings...... accordance on the single day where comparison is not prevented by strong radio-frequency interference (RFI) (May 2, avg. $hbox{RMSE} = 9.7 hbox{K}$). While the advantages of solid data sets of- - high spatial coverage and density throughout spatial scales for SMOS validation could be clearly demonstrated...... vegetation and higher open water fractions at surrounding grid nodes....

  1. Focused ion beams using a high-brightness plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guharay, Samar

    2002-10-01

    High-brightness ion beams, with low energy spread, have merits for many new applications in microelectronics, materials science, and biology. Negative ions are especially attractive for the applications that involve beam-solid interactions. When negative ions strike a surface, especially an electrically isolated surface, the surface charging voltage is limited to few volts [1]. This property can be effectively utilized to circumvent problems due to surface charging, such as device damage and beam defocusing. A compact plasma source, with the capability to deliver either positive or negative ion beams, has been developed. H- beams from this pulsed source showed brightness within an order of magnitude of the value for beams from liquid-metal ion sources. The beam angular intensity is > 40 mAsr-1 and the corresponding energy spread is 1 Acm-2 and a spot size of 100 nm. Such characteristics of focused beam parameters, using a dc source, will immediately open up a large area of new applications. [1] P. N. Guzdar, A. S. Sharma, S. K. Guharay, "Charging of substrates irradiated by particle beams" Appl. Phys. Lett. 71, 3302 (1997). [2] S. K. Guharay, E. Sokolovsky, J. Orloff, "Characteristics of ion beams from a Penning source for focused ion beam applications" J. Vac. Sci Technol. B17, 2779 (1999).

  2. Suggestive correlations between the brightness of Neptune, solar variability, and Earth's temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammel, H. B.; Lockwood, G. W.

    2007-04-01

    Long-term photometric measurements of Neptune show variations of brightness over half a century. Seasonal change in Neptune's atmosphere may partially explain a general rise in the long-term light curve, but cannot explain its detailed variations. This leads us to consider the possibility of solar-driven changes, i.e., changes incurred by innate solar variability perhaps coupled with changing seasonal insolation. Although correlations between Neptune's brightness and Earth's temperature anomaly-and between Neptune and two models of solar variability-are visually compelling, at this time they are not statistically significant due to the limited degrees of freedom of the various time series. Nevertheless, the striking similarity of the temporal patterns of variation should not be ignored simply because of low formal statistical significance. If changing brightnesses and temperatures of two different planets are correlated, then some planetary climate changes may be due to variations in the solar system environment.

  3. Identification and recovery of discontinuous synoptic features in satellite-retrieved brightness temperatures using a radiative transfer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, G. A., III; Mcguirk, J. P.; Thompson, A. H.

    1988-01-01

    An attempt is made to recover and identify discontinuous synoptic features from satellite-retrieved brightness temperatures, with attention to near-discontinuities in temperature and moisture that are typically found in fronts and inversions. Efforts are made to ascertain whether the vectors of satellite channel brightness temperatures can be classified according to synoptic source, and whether those sources are amenable to quantification.

  4. Relationship of magnetic field strength and brightness of fine-structure elements in the solar temperature minimum region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, J. W.; Ewing, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    A quantitative relationship was determined between magnetic field strength (or magnetic flux) from photospheric magnetograph observations and the brightness temperature of solar fine-structure elements observed at 1600 A, where the predominant flux source is continuum emission from the solar temperature minimum region. A Kitt Peak magnetogram and spectroheliograph observations at 1600 A taken during a sounding rocket flight of the High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph from December 11, 1987 were used. The statistical distributions of brightness temperature in the quiet sun at 1600 A, and absolute value of magnetic field strength in the same area were determined from these observations. Using a technique which obtains the best-fit relationship of a given functional form between these two histogram distributions, a quantitative relationship was determined between absolute value of magnetic field strength B and brightness temperature which is essentially linear from 10 to 150 G. An interpretation is suggested, in which a basal heating occurs generally, while brighter elements are produced in magnetic regions with temperature enhancements proportional to B.

  5. Infrared photometry and spectrophotometry of Titan. [for atmospheric brightness temperature model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, D.

    1974-01-01

    The wide variation in infrared brightness temperature of Titan is explained in terms of a greenhouse effect. Radiometric observations in the infrared and microwave frequencies indicate an alternate hot atmospheric model. Methane, ammonia, hydrogen atoms, and nitrogen atoms are suggested as main constituents for the Titan atmosphere.

  6. High Brightness Plasmon-Enhanced Nanostructured Gold Photoemitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G.; Kong, Lingmei; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2014-12-30

    Plasmonic nanohole arrays are fabricated in gold thin films by focused ion beam (FIB) lithography. Subsequent heat treatment creates sub 100 nm nanometric structures including tips, rods and flakes, all localized in the nanohole array region. The combined nanohole array and nanostructured surface comprise an efficient photoemitter. High brightness photoemission is observed from this construct using photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM), following 780 nm femtosecond (fs) laser irradiation. By comparing our observables to results of finite difference time domain (FDTD) calculations, we demonstrate that photoemission from the sub-100 nm structures is enhanced in the region of propagating surface plasmons launched from the nanohole arrays. Additionally, by tuning hole diameter and separation in the nanohole array, the photoemission intensity of nanostructured photoemitters can be controlled. We observe a photoemission enhancement of over 108, relative to photoemission from the flat region of the gold substrate at laser intensities well below the ablation threshold.

  7. Evaluation of brightness temperature from a forward model of ground-based microwave radiometer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Rambabu; J S Pillai; A Agarwal; G Pandithurai

    2014-06-01

    Ground-based microwave radiometers are getting great attention in recent years due to their capability to profile the temperature and humidity at high temporal and vertical resolution in the lower troposphere. The process of retrieving these parameters from the measurements of radiometric brightness temperature () includes the inversion algorithm, which uses the background information from a forward model. In the present study, an algorithm development and evaluation of this forward model for a ground-based microwave radiometer, being developed by Society for Applied Microwave Electronics Engineering and Research (SAMEER) of India, is presented. Initially, the analysis of absorption coefficient and weighting function at different frequencies was made to select the channels. Further the range of variation of for these selected channels for the year 2011, over the two stations Mumbai and Delhi is discussed. Finally the comparison between forward-model simulated s and radiometer measured s at Mahabaleshwar (73.66°E and 17.93°N) is done to evaluate the model. There is good agreement between model simulations and radiometer observations, which suggests that these forward model simulations can be used as background for inversion models for retrieving the temperature and humidity profiles.

  8. Proceedings of the third ICFA mini-workshop on high intensity, high brightness hadron accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roser, T.

    1997-11-01

    The third mini-workshop on high intensity, high brightness hadron accelerators was held at Brookhaven National Laboratory on May 7-9, 1997 and had about 30 participants. The workshop focussed on rf and longitudinal dynamics issues relevant to intense and/or bright hadron synchrotrons. A plenary session was followed by four sessions on particular topics. This document contains copies of the viewgraphs used as well as summaries written by the session chairs.

  9. Proceedings of the third ICFA mini-workshop on high intensity, high brightness hadron accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roser, T.

    1997-11-01

    The third mini-workshop on high intensity, high brightness hadron accelerators was held at Brookhaven National Laboratory on May 7-9, 1997 and had about 30 participants. The workshop focussed on rf and longitudinal dynamics issues relevant to intense and/or bright hadron synchrotrons. A plenary session was followed by four sessions on particular topics. This document contains copies of the viewgraphs used as well as summaries written by the session chairs.

  10. A novel high-brightness broadband light-source technology from the VUV to the IR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Stephen; Smith, Don; Besen, Matthew; Partlow, Matthew; Stolyarov, Daniil; Zhu, Huiling; Holber, William

    2010-04-01

    A novel technology has been developed which enables high-brightness, broadband light output from the VUV to the IR spectral regions. A focused laser is used to sustain a high-pressure xenon discharge inside a bulb, creating a smaller, hotter discharge than can be obtained by using an electrically-driven discharge. This allows for continuous output down to 120 nm wavelength and into the infrared. Application areas include hyperspectral imaging, standoff detection, surveillance, bioanalytical instrumentation, microscopy, and materials studies. Laser-driven optical discharges were first investigated over 30 years ago, providing the initial technical understanding of such discharges. However it took the convergence of two separate elements - the availability of low-cost, high-efficiency CW diode lasers; and a market need for high-brightness, broadband light source - to provide the impetus for further development in this area. Using near-IR CW diode lasers at power levels from 15 W to over 2000 W, we have generated high-pressure xenon discharges having temperatures as high as 10,000 C. The optical brightness of these discharges can be over an order of magnitude higher than those obtainable from the brightest xenon arc lamps, and can be several orders of magnitude brighter than deuterium lamps. Results from modeling of these discharges as well as experimental measurements will be presented.

  11. Controlling excitons. Concepts for phosphorescent organic LEDs at high brightness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reineke, Sebastian

    2009-11-15

    This work focusses on the high brightness performance of phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The use of phosphorescent emitter molecules in OLEDs is essential to realize internal electron-photon conversion efficiencies of 100 %. However, due to their molecular nature, the excited triplet states have orders of magnitude longer time constants compared to their fluorescent counterparts which, in turn, strongly increases the probability of bimolecular annihilation. As a consequence, the efficiencies of phosphorescent OLEDs decline at high brightness - an effect known as efficiency roll-off, for which it has been shown to be dominated by triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA). In this work, TTA of the archetype phosphorescent emitter Ir(ppy){sub 3} is investigated in time-resolved photoluminescence experiments. For the widely used mixed system CBP:Ir(ppy){sub 3}, host-guest TTA - an additional unwanted TTA channel - is experimentally observed at high excitation levels. By using matrix materials with higher triplet energies, this effect is efficiently suppressed, however further studies show that the efficiency roll-off of Ir(ppy)3 is much more pronounced than predicted by a model based on Foerster-type energy transfer, which marks the intrinsic limit for TTA. These results suggest that the emitter molecules show a strong tendency to form aggregates in the mixed film as the origin for enhanced TTA. Transmission electron microscopy images of Ir(ppy){sub 3} doped mixed films give direct proof of emitter aggregates. Based on these results, two concepts are developed that improve the high brightness performance of OLEDs. In a first approach, thin intrinsic matrix interlayers are incorporated in the emission layer leading to a one-dimensional exciton confinement that suppresses exciton migration and, consequently, TTA. The second concept reduces the efficiency roll-off by using an emitter molecule with slightly different chemical structure, i.e. Ir(ppy){sub 2

  12. Low Cost Lithography Tool for High Brightness LED Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew Hawryluk; Emily True

    2012-06-30

    The objective of this activity was to address the need for improved manufacturing tools for LEDs. Improvements include lower cost (both capital equipment cost reductions and cost-ofownership reductions), better automation and better yields. To meet the DOE objective of $1- 2/kilolumen, it will be necessary to develop these highly automated manufacturing tools. Lithography is used extensively in the fabrication of high-brightness LEDs, but the tools used to date are not scalable to high-volume manufacturing. This activity addressed the LED lithography process. During R&D and low volume manufacturing, most LED companies use contact-printers. However, several industries have shown that these printers are incompatible with high volume manufacturing and the LED industry needs to evolve to projection steppers. The need for projection lithography tools for LED manufacturing is identified in the Solid State Lighting Manufacturing Roadmap Draft, June 2009. The Roadmap states that Projection tools are needed by 2011. This work will modify a stepper, originally designed for semiconductor manufacturing, for use in LED manufacturing. This work addresses improvements to yield, material handling, automation and throughput for LED manufacturing while reducing the capital equipment cost.

  13. Melt Patterns and Dynamics in Alaska and Patagonia Derived from Passive Microwave Brightness Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Semmens

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glaciers and icefields are critical components of Earth’s cryosphere to study and monitor for understanding the effects of a changing climate. To provide a regional perspective of glacier melt dynamics for the past several decades, brightness temperatures (Tb from the passive microwave sensor Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I were used to characterize melt regime patterns over large glacierized areas in Alaska and Patagonia. The distinctness of the melt signal at 37V-GHz and the ability to acquire daily data regardless of clouds or darkness make the dataset ideal for studying melt dynamics in both hemispheres. A 24-year (1988–2011 time series of annual Tb histograms was constructed to (1 characterize and assess temporal and spatial trends in melt patterns, (2 determine years of anomalous Tb distribution, and (3 investigate potential contributing factors. Distance from coast and temperature were key factors influencing melt. Years of high percentage of positive Tb anomalies were associated with relatively higher stream discharge (e.g., Copper and Mendenhall Rivers, Alaska, USA and Rio Baker, Chile. The characterization of melt over broad spatial domains and a multi-decadal time period offers a more comprehensive picture of the changing cryosphere and provides a baseline from which to assess future change.

  14. Quantum emitters coupled to circular nanoantennas for high-brightness quantum light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abudayyeh, Hamza A.; Rapaport, Ronen

    2017-09-01

    Engineering the directionality and emission rate of quantum light sources is essential in the development of modern quantum applications. In this work we use numerical calculations to optimise the brightness of a broadband quantum emitter positioned in a hybrid metal-dielectric circular periodic nanoantenna. The optimised structure features a photon collection efficiency of 74 % (82 % ) and a photon flux enhancement of over 10 (6) into a numerical aperture of 0.22 (0.50), respectively, corresponding to a direct coupling into two types of multi-mode fibres. To enhance the emission rate, we present a new circular nanoantenna design where a quantum emitter is attached to a silver nanocone at the centre of the antenna. After optimisation, we find a collection efficiency of 61 % (78 % ) into a numerical aperture of 0.22 (0.50), giving a brightness enhancement of 1000 (600) for an unpolarised emitter. The enhancements in both structures are broadband due to the low-quality factor of the device and are therefore ideal for room-temperature sources. This type of a scalable design can be utilised towards on-chip, high-brightness quantum light sources operating at room temperature.

  15. Ultra High Brightness/Low Cost Fiber Coupled Packaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The focus of the proposed effort is maximizing the brightness of fiber coupled laser diode pump sources at a minimum cost. The specific innovation proposed is to...

  16. High Brightness HDR Projection Using Dynamic Freeform Lensing

    KAUST Repository

    Damberg, Gerwin

    2016-05-03

    Cinema projectors need to compete with home theater displays in terms of image quality. High frame rate and spatial resolution as well as stereoscopic 3D are common features today, but even the most advanced cinema projectors lack in-scene contrast and, more important, high peak luminance, both of which are essential perceptual attributes of images appearing realistic. At the same time, HDR image statistics suggest that the average image intensity in a controlled ambient viewing environment such as the cinema can be as low as 1% for cinematic HDR content and not often higher than 18%, middle gray in photography. Traditional projection systems form images and colors by blocking the source light from a lamp, therefore attenuating between 99% and 82% of light, on average. This inefficient use of light poses significant challenges for achieving higher peak brightness levels. In this work, we propose a new projector architecture built around commercially available components, in which light can be steered to form images. The gain in system efficiency significantly reduces the total cost of ownership of a projector (fewer components and lower operating cost), and at the same time increases peak luminance and improves black level beyond what is practically achievable with incumbent projector technologies. At the heart of this computational display technology is a new projector hardware design using phase modulation in combination with a new optimization algorithm that is capable of on-the-fly computation of freeform lens surfaces. © 2016 ACM.

  17. High-Ti, bright-CL rims in volcanic quartz: a result of very rapid growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamukcu, Ayla S.; Ghiorso, Mark S.; Gualda, Guilherme A. R.

    2016-12-01

    Volcanic quartz commonly contains Ti-enriched zones and CO2-enriched melt inclusions, and crystallization temperatures and pressures derived from Ti-in-quartz geothermobarometry and H2O-CO2 glass geobarometry applied to these compositions are typically high. Consequently, these features are generally interpreted to represent high temperatures and/or pressures. Yet, growth rate estimates from some high-Ti/bright-CL quartz rims suggest they grew at rates orders of magnitude faster than did cores and interiors of the crystals. This observation is notable in light of studies that suggest that fast crystal growth rates can produce a boundary layer in the melt surrounding a growing crystal that is enriched in components that diffuse comparatively slowly in the melt. In these circumstances, the composition of zones or melt inclusions formed from such a boundary layer melt will not accurately represent that of the far-field melt, and temperatures and pressures estimated from these compositions will be anomalous. We use a numerical model based on the coupled growth-diffusion equation of Lasaga (1982) to assess the effect of growth rate on the production of high-Ti/bright-CL zones and high-CO2 melt inclusions in quartz in rhyolitic melts. Simulations span a wide range of growth rates (10-7 to 10-13 m/s) and timescales (1 minute-1 year), and results suggest that quartz growth at 10-10 m/s or faster can produce a boundary layer enriched in these components. This suggests that appropriate application of Ti-in-quartz and H2O-CO2 glass geothermobarometry is contingent upon the verification that the compositions used are not those of boundary layer melts. Applying our model to the Bishop Tuff, which contains quartz displaying high-Ti/bright-CL rims and high-CO2 rim-hosted melt inclusions, we find that growth rates of 10-7 to 10-9 m/s can produce the observed enrichments in these components over the timescales estimated for the growth of the rims (days-weeks); these growth rates

  18. Global Snow Mass Measurements and the Effect of Stratigraphic Detail on Inversion of Microwave Brightness Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Mark; Davenport, Ian; Gurney, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Snow provides large seasonal storage of freshwater, and information about the distribution of snow mass as snow water equivalent (SWE) is important for hydrological planning and detecting climate change impacts. Large regional disagreements remain between estimates from reanalyses, remote sensing and modelling. Assimilating passive microwave information improves SWE estimates in many regions, but the assimilation must account for how microwave scattering depends on snow stratigraphy. Physical snow models can estimate snow stratigraphy, but users must consider the computational expense of model complexity versus acceptable errors. Using data from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Cold Land Processes Experiment and the Helsinki University of Technology microwave emission model of layered snowpacks, it is shown that simulations of the brightness temperature difference between 19 and 37 GHz vertically polarised microwaves are consistent with advanced microwave scanning radiometer-earth observing system and special sensor microwave imager retrievals once known stratigraphic information is used. Simulated brightness temperature differences for an individual snow profile depend on the provided stratigraphic detail. Relative to a profile defined at the 10-cm resolution of density and temperature measurements, the error introduced by simplification to a single layer of average properties increases approximately linearly with snow mass. If this brightness temperature error is converted into SWE using a traditional retrieval method, then it is equivalent to ±13 mm SWE (7 % of total) at a depth of 100 cm. This error is reduced to ±5.6 mm SWE (3 % of total) for a two-layer model.

  19. VELOCITY BUNCHING OF HIGH-BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON BEAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, S G; Musumeci, P; Rosenzweig, J B; Brown, W J; England, R J; Ferrario, M; Jacob, J S; Thompson, M C; Travish, G; Tremaine, A M; Yoder, R

    2004-10-15

    Velocity bunching has been recently proposed as a tool for compressing electron beam pulses in modern high brightness photoinjector sources. This tool is familiar from earlier schemes implemented for bunching dc electron sources, but presents peculiar challenges when applied to high current, low emittance beams from photoinjectors. The main difficulty foreseen is control of emittance oscillations in the beam in this scheme, which can be naturally considered as an extension of the emittance compensation process at moderate energies. This paper presents two scenarios in which velocity bunching, combined with emittance control, is to play a role in nascent projects. The first is termed ballistic bunching, where the changing of relative particle velocities and positions occur in distinct regions, a short high gradient linac, and a drift length. This scenario is discussed in the context of the proposed ORION photoinjector. Simulations are used to explore the relationship between the degree of bunching, and the emittance compensation process. Experimental measurements performed at the UCLA Neptune Laboratory of the surprisingly robust bunching process, as well as accompanying deleterious transverse effects, are presented. An unanticipated mechanism for emittance growth in bends for highly momentum chirped beam was identified and studied in these experiments. The second scenario may be designated as phase space rotation, and corresponds closely to the recent proposal of Ferrario and Serafini. Its implementation for the compression of the electron beam pulse length in the PLEIADES inverse Compton scattering (ICS) experiment at LLNL is discussed. It is shown in simulations that optimum compression may be obtained by manipulation of the phases in low gradient traveling wave accelerator sections. Measurements of the bunching and emittance control achieved in such an implementation at PLEIADES, as well as aspects of the use of velocity-bunched beam directly in ICS experiments

  20. Spatial and Spectral Brightness Enhancement of High Power Semiconductor Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidner, Jordan Palmer

    The performance of high-power broad-area diode lasers is inhibited by beam filamentation induced by free-carrier-based self-focusing. The resulting beam degradation limits their usage in high-brightness, high-power applications such as pumping fiber lasers, and laser cutting, welding, or marking. Finite-difference propagation method simulations via RSoft's BeamPROP commercial simulation suite and a custom-built MATLAB code were used for the study and design of laser cavities that suppress or avoid filamentation. BeamPROP was used to design a tapered, passive, multi-mode interference cavity for the creation of a self-phase-locking laser array, which is comprised of many single-mode gain elements coupled to a wide output coupler to avoid damage from local high optical intensities. MATLAB simulations were used to study the effects of longitudinal and lateral cavity confinement on lateral beam quality in conventional broad-area lasers. This simulation was expanded to design a laser with lateral gain and index prescription that is predicted to operate at or above state-of-the-art powers while being efficiently coupled to conventional telecom single-mode optical fibers. Experimentally, a commercial broad-area laser was coupled in the far-field to a single-mode fiber Bragg grating to provide grating-stabilized single-mode laser feedback resulting in measured spectral narrowing for efficient pump absorption. Additionally a 19 GHz-span, spatially resolved, self-heterodyne measurement was made of a broad-area laser to study the evolution/devolution of the mode content of the emitted laser beam with increasing power levels.

  1. Velocity bunching of high-brightness electron beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Anderson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Velocity bunching has been recently proposed as a tool for compressing electron beam pulses in modern high brightness photoinjector sources. This tool is familiar from earlier schemes implemented for bunching dc electron sources, but presents peculiar challenges when applied to high current, low emittance beams from photoinjectors. The main difficulty foreseen is control of emittance oscillations in the beam in this scheme, which can be naturally considered as an extension of the emittance compensation process at moderate energies. This paper presents two scenarios in which velocity bunching, combined with emittance control, is to play a role in nascent projects. The first is termed ballistic bunching, where the changing of relative particle velocities and positions occur in distinct regions, a short high gradient linac, and a drift length. This scenario is discussed in the context of the proposed ORION photoinjector. Simulations are used to explore the relationship between the degree of bunching, and the emittance compensation process. Experimental measurements performed at the UCLA Neptune Laboratory of the surprisingly robust bunching process, as well as accompanying deleterious transverse effects, are presented. An unanticipated mechanism for emittance growth in bends for highly momentum chirped beam was identified and studied in these experiments. The second scenario may be designated as phase space rotation, and corresponds closely to the recent proposal of Ferrario and Serafini. Its implementation for the compression of the electron beam pulse length in the PLEIADES inverse Compton scattering (ICS experiment at LLNL is discussed. It is shown in simulations that optimum compression may be obtained by manipulation of the phases in low gradient traveling wave accelerator sections. Measurements of the bunching and emittance control achieved in such an implementation at PLEIADES, as well as aspects of the use of velocity-bunched beam directly

  2. Low and High Surface Brightness Galaxies at Void Walls

    CERN Document Server

    Ceccarelli, L; Lambas, D G; Galaz, G; Padilla, N D

    2012-01-01

    We study the relative fraction of low and high surface brightness galaxies (LSBGs and HSBGs) at void walls in the SDSS DR7. We focus on galaxies in equal local density environments. We assume that the host dark-matter halo mass (for which we use SDSS group masses) is a good indicator of local density. This analysis allows to examine the behavior of the abundance of LSBG and HSBG galaxies at a fixed local density and distinguish the large-scale environment defined by the void geometry. We compare galaxies in the field, and in the void walls; the latter are defined as the volume of void shells of radius equal to that of the void. We find a significant decrement, a factor $\\sim 4$, of the relative fraction of blue, active star-forming LSBGs in equal mass groups at the void walls and the field. This decrement is consistent with an increase of the fraction of blue, active star-forming HSBGs. By contrast, red LSBGs and HSBGs show negligible changes. We argue that these results are consistent with a scenario where L...

  3. The impact of melt ponds on summertime microwave brightness temperatures and sea-ice concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kern, Stefan; Rösel, Anja; Pedersen, Leif Toudal

    2016-01-01

    Sea-ice concentrations derived from satellite microwave brightness temperatures are less accurate during summer. In the Arctic Ocean the lack of accuracy is primarily caused by melt ponds, but also by changes in the properties of snow and the sea-ice surface itself. We investigate the sensitivity...... of eight sea-ice concentration retrieval algorithms to melt ponds by comparing sea-ice concentration with the melt-pond fraction. We derive gridded daily sea-ice concentrations from microwave brightness temperatures of summer 2009. We derive the daily fraction of melt ponds, open water between ice floes......, and the ice-surface fraction from contemporary Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) reflectance data. We only use grid cells where the MODIS sea ice concentration, which is the melt-pond fraction plus the ice-surface fraction, exceeds 90 %. For one group of algorithms, e.g., Bristol and Comiso...

  4. Conductively cooled high-power high-brightness bars and fiber-coupled arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hailong; Mondry, Mark; Fouksman, Michael; Weiss, Eli; Anikitchev, Serguei; Kennedy, Keith; Li, Jun; Zucker, Erik; Rudy, Paul; Kongas, Jukka; Haapamaa, Jouko; Lehkonen, Sami

    2005-03-01

    Solid-state-laser and fiber laser pumping, reprographics, medical and materials processing applications require high power, high-brightness bars and fiber-coupled arrays. Conductively cooled laser diode bars allow customers to simplify system design and reduce operational size, weight, and costs. We present results on next generation high brightness, high reliability bars and fiber-coupled arrays at 790-830 nm, 940 nm and 980 nm wavelengths. By using novel epitaxial structures, we have demonstrated highly reliable 808 nm, 30% fill-factor conductively cooled bars operating at 60W CW mode, corresponding to a linear power density (LPD) of 20 mW/&mum. At 25°C, the bars have shown greater than 50% wall-plug-efficiency (WPE) when operating at 60W. Our novel approach has also reduced the fast-axis divergence FWHM from 31° to less than 24°. These bars have a 50% brightness improvement compared to our standard products with this geometry. At 980nm, we have demonstrated greater than 100W CW from 20% fill-factor conductively cooled bars, corresponding to a LPD of 50 mW/μm. At 25°C, the WPE for 976nm bars consistently peaks above 65% and remains greater than 60% at 100W. We coupled the beam output from those high-brightness bars into fiber-array-packages ("FAPs"), and we also achieved high-brightness and high-efficiency FAPs. We demonstrated 60W from a 600μm core-diameter fiber-bundle with a high WPE of 55%, and a low numerical aperture of 0.115. The brightness of such FAPs is four times higher than our standard high-power 40W FAP products at Coherent. Ongoing life test data suggests an extrapolated lifetime greater than 10,000 hours at 80W CW operating-condition based on 30%FF conductively cooled bar geometry.

  5. Understanding Climate Trends Using IR Brightness Temperature Spectra from AIRS, IASI and CrIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslover, D. H.; Nikolla, E.; Knuteson, R. O.; Revercomb, H. E.; Tobin, D. C.

    2016-12-01

    NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) provides a data record that extends from its 2002 launch to the present. The Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) onboard Metop- (A launched in 2006, B in 2012), as well as the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) launched in 2011, complement this data record. Future infrared sounders with similar capabilities will augment these measurements into the near future. We have created a global data set from these infrared measurements, using the nadir-most observations for each of the aforementioned instruments. We can filter the data based upon spatial, diurnal and seasonal properties to discern trends for a given spectral channel and, therefore, a specific atmospheric layer. Subtle differences between spectral sampling among the three instruments can lead significant differences in the resultant probability distribution functions for similar spectral channels. We take advantage of the higher (0.25 cm-1) IASI spectral resolution to subsample the IASI spectra onto AIRS and CrIS spectral grids to better compare AIRS/IASI and CrIS/IASI trends in the brightness temperature anomalies. To better understand the dependance of trace gases on the measured brightness temperature spectral time-series, a companion study has utilized coincident vertical profiles of stratospheric carbon dioxide, water vapor and ozone concentration are used to infer a correlation with the CrIS brightness temperatures. The goal was to investigate the role of ozone heating and carbon dioxide cooling on the observed brightness temperature spectra. Results from that study will be presented alongside the climate trend analysis.

  6. Adapting High Brightness Relativistic Electron Beams for Ultrafast Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoby, Cheyne Matthew

    This thesis explores the use of ultrashort bunches generated by a radiofrequency electron photoinjector driven by a femtosecond laser. Rf photoinjector technology has been developed to generate ultra high brightness beams for advanced accelerators and to drive advanced light source applications. The extremely good quality of the beams generated by this source has played a key role in the development of 4th generation light sources such as the Linac Coherent Light Source, thus opening the way to studies of materials science and biological systems with high temporal and spatial resolution. At the Pegasus Photoinjector Lab, we have developed the application of a BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6-cell rf photoinjector as a tool for ultrafast science in its own right. It is the aim of this work to explore the generation of ultrashort electron bunches, give descriptions of the novel ultrafast diagnostics developed to be able to characterize the electron bunch and synchronize it with a pump laser, and share some of the scientific results that were obtained with this technology at the UCLA Pegasus laboratory. This dissertation explains the requirements of the drive laser source and describes the principles of rf photoinjector design and operation necessary to produce electron bunches with an rms longitudinal length < 100 femtoseconds containing 107 - 108 electrons per bunch. In this condition, when the laser intensity is sufficiently high, multiphoton photoemission is demonstrated to be more efficient in terms of charge yield than single photon photoemission. When a short laser pulse hits the cathode the resulting beam dynamics are dominated by a strong space charge driven longitudinal expansion which leads to the creation of a nearly ideal uniformly filled ellipsoidal distribution. These beam distributions are characterized by linear space charge forces and hence by high peak brightness and small transverse emittances. This regime of operation of the RF photoinjector is also termed the

  7. Aquarius Brightness Temperature Variations at Dome C and Snow Metamorphism at the Surface. [29

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucker, Ludovic; Dinnat, Emmanuel Phillippe; Picard, Ghislain; Champollion, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The Antarctic Plateau is a promising site to monitor microwave radiometers' drift, and to inter-calibrate microwave radiometers, especially 1.4 GHz (L-band) radiometers on board the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), and AquariusSAC-D missions. The Plateau is a thick ice cover, thermally stable in depth, with large dimensions, and relatively low heterogeneities. In addition, its high latitude location in the Southern Hemisphere enables frequent observations by polar-orbiting satellites, and no contaminations by radio frequency interference. At Dome C (75S, 123E), on the Antarctic Plateau, the substantial amount of in-situ snow measurements available allows us to interpret variations in space-borne microwave brightness temperature (TB) (e.g. Macelloni et al., 2007, 2013, Brucker et al., 2011, Champollion et al., 2013). However, to analyze the observations from the Aquarius radiometers, whose sensitivity is 0.15 K, the stability of the snow layers near the surface that are most susceptible to rapidly change needs to be precisely assessed. This study focuses on the spatial and temporal variations of the Aquarius TB over the Antarctic Plateau, and at Dome C in particular, to highlight the impact of snow surface metamorphism on the TB observations at L-band.

  8. L-Band Brightness Temperature Variations at Dome C and Snow Metamorphism at the Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucker, Ludovic; Dinnat, Emmanuel; Picard, Ghislain; Champollion, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The Antarctic Plateau is a promising site to monitor microwave radiometers' drift, and to inter-calibrate microwave radiometers, especially 1.4 GigaHertz (L-band) radiometers on board the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), and AquariusSAC-D missions. The Plateau is a thick ice cover, thermally stable in depth, with large dimensions, and relatively low heterogeneities. In addition, its high latitude location in the Southern Hemisphere enables frequent observations by polar-orbiting satellites, and no contaminations by radio frequency interference. At Dome C (75S, 123E), on the Antarctic Plateau, the substantial amount of in-situ snow measurements available allows us to interpret variations in space-borne microwave brightness temperature (TB) (e.g. Macelloni et al., 2007, 2013, Brucker et al., 2011, Champollion et al., 2013). However, to analyze the observations from the Aquarius radiometers, whose sensitivity is 0.15 K, the stability of the snow layers near the surface that are most susceptible to rapidly change needs to be precisely assessed. This study focuses on the spatial and temporal variations of the Aquarius TB over the Antarctic Plateau, and at Dome C in particular, to highlight the impact of snow surface metamorphism on the TB observations at L-band.

  9. A New Operational Snow Retrieval Algorithm Applied to Historical AMSR-E Brightness Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Tedesco

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Snow is a key element of the water and energy cycles and the knowledge of spatio-temporal distribution of snow depth and snow water equivalent (SWE is fundamental for hydrological and climatological applications. SWE and snow depth estimates can be obtained from spaceborne microwave brightness temperatures at global scale and high temporal resolution (daily. In this regard, the data recorded by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer—Earth Orbiting System (EOS (AMSR-E onboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA AQUA spacecraft have been used to generate operational estimates of SWE and snow depth, complementing estimates generated with other microwave sensors flying on other platforms. In this study, we report the results concerning the development and assessment of a new operational algorithm applied to historical AMSR-E data. The new algorithm here proposed makes use of climatological data, electromagnetic modeling and artificial neural networks for estimating snow depth as well as a spatio-temporal dynamic density scheme to convert snow depth to SWE. The outputs of the new algorithm are compared with those of the current AMSR-E operational algorithm as well as in-situ measurements and other operational snow products, specifically the Canadian Meteorological Center (CMC and GlobSnow datasets. Our results show that the AMSR-E algorithm here proposed generally performs better than the operational one and addresses some major issues identified in the spatial distribution of snow depth fields associated with the evolution of effective grain size.

  10. High Temperature Materials Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The High Temperature Materials Lab provides the Navy and industry with affordable high temperature materials for advanced propulsion systems. Asset List: Arc Melter...

  11. A high-brightness thermionic microwave electron gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borland, Michael [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1991-02-01

    In a collaborative effort by SSRL, AET Associates, and Varian Associates, a high-brightness microwave electron gun using a thermionic cathode has been designed, built, tested, and installed for use with the SSRL 150 MeV linear accelerator. This thesis discusses the physics behind the design and operation of the gun and associated systems, presenting predictions and experimental tests of the gun`s performance. The microwave gun concept is of increasing interest due to its promise of providing higher-current, lower-emittance electron beams than possible from conventional, DC gun technology. In a DC guns, accelerating gradients are less than 8 MV/m, while those in a microwave gun can exceed 100 MV/m, providing much more rapid initial acceleration, thereby reducing the deleterious effects of space-charge. Microwave guns produce higher momentum beams than DC guns, thus lessening space-charge effects during subsequent beam transport. Typical DC guns produce kinetic energies of 80--400 KeV, compared to 2--3 MeV for the SSRL microwave gun. ``State-of-the-art`` microwave gun designs employ laser-driven photocathodes, providing excellent performance but with greater complexity and monetary costs. A thermionic microwave gun with a magnetic bunching system is comparable in cost and complexity to a conventional system, but provides performance that is orders of magnitude better. Simulations of the SSRL microwave gun predict a normalized RMS emittance at the gun exist of < 10 π • mec • μm for a beam consisting of approximately 50% of the particles emitted from the gun, and having a momentum spread ±10%. These emittances are for up to 5 x 109e- per bunch. Chromatic aberrations in the transport line between the gun and linear accelerator increase this to typically < 30 π • me • μm.

  12. High brightness diode lasers controlled by volume Bragg gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glebov, Leonid

    2017-02-01

    Volume Bragg gratings (VBGs) recorded in photo-thermo-refractive (PTR) glass are holographic optical elements that are effective spectral and angular filters withstanding high power laser radiation. Reflecting VBGs are narrow-band spectral filters while transmitting VBGs are narrow-band angular filters. The use of these optical elements in external resonators of semiconductor lasers enables extremely resonant feedback that provides dramatic spectral and angular narrowing of laser diodes radiation without significant power and efficiency penalty. Spectral narrowing of laser diodes by reflecting VBGs demonstrated in wide spectral region from near UV to 3 μm. Commercially available VBGs have spectral width ranged from few nanometers to few tens of picometers. Efficient spectral locking was demonstrated for edge emitters (single diodes, bars, modules, and stacks), vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs), grating coupled surface emitting lasers (GCSELs), and interband cascade lasers (ICLs). The use of multiplexed VBGs provides multiwavelength emission from a single emitter. Spectrally locked semiconductor lasers demonstrated CW power from milliwatts to a kilowatt. Angular narrowing by transmitting VBGs enables single transverse mode emission from wide aperture diode lasers having resonators with great Fresnel numbers. This feature provides close to diffraction limit divergence along a slow axis of wide stripe edge emitters. Radiation exchange between lasers by means of spatially profiled or multiplexed VBGs enables coherent combining of diode lasers. Sequence of VBGs or multiplexed VBGs enable spectral combining of spectrally narrowed diode lasers or laser modules. Thus the use of VBGs for diode lasers beam control provides dramatic increase of brightness.

  13. Implementation of an Ultra-Bright Thermographic Phosphor for Gas Turbine Engine Temperature Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Bencic, Timothy J.; Zhu, Dongming; Cuy, Michael D.; Wolfe, Douglas E.; Allison, Stephen W.; Beshears, David L.; Jenkins, Thomas P.; Heeg, Bauke; Howard, Robert P.; Alexander, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The overall goal of the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) Seedling Phase II effort was to build on the promising temperature-sensing characteristics of the ultrabright thermographic phosphor Cr-doped gadolinium aluminum perovskite (Cr:GAP) demonstrated in Phase I by transitioning towards an engine environment implementation. The strategy adopted was to take advantage of the unprecedented retention of ultra-bright luminescence from Cr:GAP at temperatures over 1000 C to enable fast 2D temperature mapping of actual component surfaces as well as to utilize inexpensive low-power laser-diode excitation suitable for on-wing diagnostics. A special emphasis was placed on establishing Cr:GAP luminescence-based surface temperature mapping as a new tool for evaluating engine component surface cooling effectiveness.

  14. Preliminary study on direct assimilation of cloud-affected satellite microwave brightness temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sibo; Guan, Li

    2017-02-01

    Direct assimilation of cloud-affected microwave brightness temperatures from AMSU-A into the GSI three-dimensional variational (3D-Var) assimilation system is preliminarily studied in this paper. A combination of cloud microphysics parameters retrieved by the 1D-Var algorithm (including vertical profiles of cloud liquid water content, ice water content, and rain water content) and atmospheric state parameters from objective analysis fields of an NWP model are used as background fields. Three cloud microphysics parameters (cloud liquid water content, ice water content, and rain water content) are applied to the control variable. Typhoon Halong (2014) is selected as an example. The results show that direct assimilation of cloud-affected AMSU-A observations can effectively adjust the structure of large-scale temperature, humidity and wind analysis fields due to the assimilation of more AMSU-A observations in typhoon cloudy areas, especially typhoon spiral cloud belts. These adjustments, with temperatures increasing and humidities decreasing in the movement direction of the typhoon, bring the forecasted typhoon moving direction closer to its real path. The assimilation of cloud-affected satellite microwave brightness temperatures can provide better analysis fields that are more similar to the actual situation. Furthermore, typhoon prediction accuracy is improved using these assimilation analysis fields as the initial forecast fields in NWP models.

  15. High-brightness switchable multiwavelength remote laser in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao Jinping; Cheng Ya; Xu Zhizhan [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zeng Bin; Li Guihua; Chu Wei; Ni Jielei; Zhang Haisu [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Xu Huailiang [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Chin, See Leang [Center for Optics, Universite Laval, Quebec City, Quebec G1V 0A6 (Canada)

    2011-11-15

    We demonstrate a harmonic-seeded switchable multiwavelength laser in air driven by intense midinfrared femtosecond laser pulses, in which population inversion occurs at an ultrafast time scale (i.e., less than {approx}200 fs) owing to direct formation of excited molecular nitrogen ions by strong-field ionization of inner-valence electrons. The bright multiwavelength laser in air opens the perspective for remote detection of multiple pollutants based on nonlinear optical spectroscopy.

  16. South African night sky brightness during high aerosol epochs

    CERN Document Server

    Winkler, Hartmut; Marang, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Sky conditions in the remote, dry north-western interior of South Africa are now the subject of considerable interest in view of the imminent construction of numerous solar power plants in this area. Furthermore, the part of this region in which the core of the SKA is to be located (which includes SALT) has been declared an Astronomical Advantage Zone, for which sky brightness monitoring will now be mandatory. In this project we seek to characterise the sky brightness profile under a variety of atmospheric conditions. Key factors are of course the lunar phase and altitude, but in addition the sky brightness is also significantly affected by the atmospheric aerosol loading, as that influences light beam scattering. In this paper we chose to investigate the sky characteristics soon after the Mount Pinatubo volcanic eruption in 1991, which resulted in huge ash masses reaching the stratosphere (where they affected solar irradiance for several years). We re-reduced photometric sky measurements from the South Afric...

  17. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of AMSU-A Level 1c Brightness Temperature, Version 1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains Level 1c inter-calibrated brightness temperatures from the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) sensors onboard six polar orbiting...

  18. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU)-A Brightness Temperature, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) for Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) brightness temperature in "window channels". The data cover a time period from...

  19. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of SSM/I and SSMIS Microwave Brightness Temperatures, CSU Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) from Colorado State University (CSU) contains brightness temperatures that have been improved and quality-controlled over the...

  20. Measurement of nadir and near-nadir 94-GHz brightness temperatures of several tactical-scene clutter types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikner, David A.; Pizzillo, Thomas J.

    1999-07-01

    The authors present 94-GHz radiometric brightness temperatures of various clutter materials at nadir. The clutter materials measured include field vegetation, asphalt pavement, and an asphalt shingle roof and data is presented for each clutter type. We also report measurements that quantify the effect of water on the brightness temperature of metal. These measurements were made by adding calibrated quantities of water to a metal plate while recording the plate's millimeter-wave brightness temperature. Off-nadir data out to 45 deg is also presented for the field vegetation and asphalt pavement. Using a simple rough scattering model for the materials, we made estimates of the emissivity of the field vegetation and asphalt. The emissivity of the roof was determined by measuring its brightness temperature as it was heated.

  1. AMSR-E/Aqua Daily L3 6.25 km 89 GHz Brightness Temperature (Tb) Polar Grids V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The AMSR-E/Aqua Level-3 6.25 km daily sea ice product includes 89.0 GHz brightness temperature averages (daily, ascending, and descending) on a 6.25 km polar...

  2. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of SSM/I and SSMIS Microwave Brightness Temperatures, RSS Version 7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Version 7 NOAA Fundamental Climate Data Record (CDR) from Remote Sensing Systems (RSS) contains brightness temperatures that have been inter-calibrated and...

  3. Short Pulse High Brightness X-ray Production with the PLEIADES Thomson Scattering Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, S G; Barty, C P J; Betts, S M; Brown, W J; Crane, J K; Cross, R R; Fittinghoff, D N; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Kuba, J; LaSage, G P; Rosenzweig, J B; Slaughter, D R; Springer, P T; Tremaine, A M

    2003-07-01

    We describe PLEIADES, a compact, tunable, high-brightness, ultra-short pulse, Thomson x-ray source. The peak brightness of the source is expected to exceed 10{sup 20} photons/s/0.1% bandwidth/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}. Initial results are reported and compared to theoretical calculations.

  4. Single-crystal phosphors for high-brightness white LEDs/LDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Víllora, Encarnación G.; Arjoca, Stelian; Inomata, Daisuke; Shimamura, Kiyoshi

    2016-03-01

    White light-emitting diodes (wLEDs) are the new environmental friendly sources for general lighting purposes. For applications requiring a high-brightness, current wLEDs present overheating problems, which drastically decrease their emission efficiency, color quality and lifetime. This work gives an overview of the recent investigations on single-crystal phosphors (SCPs), which are proposed as novel alternative to conventional ceramic powder phosphors (CPPs). This totally new approach takes advantage of the superior properties of single-crystals in comparison with ceramic materials. SCPs exhibit an outstanding conversion efficiency and thermal stability up to 300°C. Furthermore, compared with encapsulated CPPs, SCPs possess a superior thermal conductivity, so that generated heat can be released efficiently. The conjunction of all these characteristics results in a low temperature rise of SCPs even under high blue irradiances, where conventional CPPs are overheated or even burned. Therefore, SCPs represent the ideal, long-demanded all-inorganic phosphors for high-brightness white light sources, especially those involving the use of high-density laser-diode beams.

  5. Application of satellite microwave remote sensed brightness temperature in the regional soil moisture simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. K. Shi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available As the satellite microwave remote sensed brightness temperature is sensitive to land surface soil moisture (SM and SM is a basic output variable in model simulation, it is of great significance to use the brightness temperature data to improve SM numerical simulation. In this paper, the theory developed by Yan et al. (2004 about the relationship between satellite microwave remote sensing polarization index and SM was used to estimate the land surface SM from AMSR-E (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer – Earth Observing System brightness temperature data. With consideration of land surface soil texture, surface roughness, vegetation optical thickness, and the AMSR-E monthly SM products, the regional daily land surface SM was estimated over the eastern part of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. The results show that the estimated SM is lower than the ground measurements and the NCEP (American National Centers for Environmental Prediction reanalysis data at the Maqu Station (33.85° N, 102.57° E and the Tanglha Station (33.07° N, 91.94° E, but its regional distribution is reasonable and somewhat better than that from the daily AMSR-E SM product, and its temporal variation shows a quick response to the ground daily precipitations. Furthermore, in order to improve the simulating ability of the WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting model to land surface SM, the estimated SM was assimilated into the Noah land surface model by the Newtonian relaxation (NR method. The results indicate that, by fine tuning of the quality factor in NR method, the simulated SM values are improved most in desert area, followed by grassland, shrub and grass mixed zone. At temporal scale, Root Mean Square Error (RMSE values between simulated and observed SM are decreased 0.03 and 0.07 m3/m3 by using the NR method in the Maqu Station and the Tanglha Station, respectively.

  6. Microburst applications of brightness temperature difference between GOES Imager channels 3 and 4

    CERN Document Server

    Pryor, Kenneth L

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new application of brightness temperature difference (BTD) between Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) imager channels 3 and 4. It has been found recently that the BTD between GOES infrared channel 3 (water vapor) and channel 4 (thermal infrared) can highlight regions where severe outflow wind generation (i.e. downbursts, microbursts) is likely due to the channeling of dry mid-tropospheric air into the precipitation core of a deep, moist convective storm. Case studies demonstrating effective operational use of this image product are presented for two significant marine transportation accidents as well as a severe downburst event over the Washington, DC metropolitan area in April 2010.

  7. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Beam Measurements and the Microwave Brightness Temperatures of Uranus and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselfield, Matthew; Moodley, Kavilan; Bond, J. Richard; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; Dunkley, Joanna; Dunner, Rolando; Fowler, Joseph W.; Gallardo, Patricio; Gralla, Megan B.; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Hincks, Adam D.; Marriage, Tobias A.; Marsden, Danica; Niemack, Michael D.; Nolta, Michael R.; Page, Lyman A.; Partridge, Bruce; Schmitt, Benjamin L.; Sehgal, Neelima; Sievers, Jon; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Swetz, Daniel S.; Switzer, Eric R.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the measurement of the beam profiles and window functions for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT), which operated from 2007 to 2010 with kilopixel bolometer arrays centered at 148, 218, and 277 GHz. Maps of Saturn are used to measure the beam shape in each array and for each season of observations. Radial profiles are transformed to Fourier space in a way that preserves the spatial correlations in the beam uncertainty to derive window functions relevant for angular power spectrum analysis. Several corrections are applied to the resulting beam transforms, including an empirical correction measured from the final cosmic microwave background (CMB) survey maps to account for the effects of mild pointing variation and alignment errors. Observations of Uranus made regularly throughout each observing season are used to measure the effects of atmospheric opacity and to monitor deviations in telescope focus over the season. Using the WMAP-based calibration of the ACT maps to the CMB blackbody, we obtain precise measurements of the brightness temperatures of the Uranus and Saturn disks at effective frequencies of 149 and 219 GHz. For Uranus we obtain thermodynamic brightness temperatures T(149/U) = 106.7 +/- 2.2 K and T(219/U) = 100.1 +/- 3.1 K. For Saturn, we model the effects of the ring opacity and emission using a simple model and obtain resulting (unobscured) disk temperatures of T(149/S) = 137.3 +/- 3.2 K and T(219/S) = 137.3 +/- 4.7 K.

  8. An Inter-calibrated Passive Microwave Brightness Temperature Data Record and Ocean Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilburn, K. A.; Wentz, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    Inter-calibration of passive microwave sensors has been the subject of on-going activity at Remote Sensing Systems (RSS) since 1974. RSS has produced a brightness temperature TB data record that spans the last 28 years (1987-2014) from inter-calibrated passive microwave sensors on 14 satellites: AMSR-E, AMSR2, GMI, SSMI F08-F15, SSMIS F16-F18, TMI, WindSat. Accompanying the TB record are a suite of ocean products derived from the TBs that provide a 28-year record of wind speed, water vapor, cloud liquid, and rain rate; and 18 years (1997-2014) of sea surface temperatures, corresponding to the period for which 6 and/or 10 GHz measurements are available. Crucial to the inter-calibration and ocean product retrieval are a highly accurate radiative transfer model RTM. The RSS RTM has been continually refined for over 30 years and is arguably the most accurate model in the 1-100 GHz spectrum. The current generation of TB and ocean products, produced using the latest version of the RTM, is called Version-7. The accuracy of the Version-7 inter-calibration is estimated to be 0.1 K, based on inter-satellite comparisons and validation of the ocean products against in situ measurements. The data record produced by RSS has had a significant scientific impact. Over just the last 14 years (2000-2013) RSS data have been used in 743 peer-reviewed journal articles. This is an average of 4.5 peer-reviewed papers published every month made possible with RSS data. Some of the most important scientific contributions made by RSS data have been to the study of the climate. The AR5 Report "Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis" by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the internationally accepted authority on climate change, references 20 peer-reviewed journal papers from RSS scientists. The report makes direct use of RSS water vapor data, RSS atmospheric temperatures from MSU/AMSU, and 9 other datasets that are derived from RSS data. The RSS TB data record is

  9. Synthetic tests of passive microwave brightness temperature assimilation over snow covered land using machine learning algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    A novel data assimilation framework is evaluated that assimilates passive microwave (PMW) brightness temperature (Tb) observations into an advanced land surface model for the purpose of improving snow depth and snow water equivalent (SWE) estimates across regional- and continental-scales. The multifrequency, multipolarization framework employs machine learning algorithms to predict PMW Tb as a function of land surface model state information and subsequently merges the predicted PMW Tb with observed PMW Tb from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E). The merging procedure is predicated on conditional probabilities computed within a Bayesian statistical framework using either an Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) or an Ensemble Kalman Smoother (EnKS). The data assimilation routine produces a conditioned (updated) estimate of modeled SWE that is more accurate and contains less uncertainty than the model without assimilation. A synthetic case study is presented for select locations in North America that compares model results with and without assimilation against synthetic observations of snow depth and SWE. It is shown that the data assimilation framework improves modeled estimates of snow depth and SWE during both the accumulation and ablation phases of the snow season. Further, it is demonstrated that the EnKS outperforms the EnKF implementation due to its ability to better modulate high frequency noise into the conditioned estimates. The overarching findings from this study demonstrate the feasibility of machine learning algorithms for use as an observation model operator within a data assimilation framework in order to improve model estimates of snow depth and SWE across regional- and continental-scales.

  10. Hurricane Wind Speed Estimation Using WindSat 6 and 10 GHz Brightness Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The realistic and accurate estimation of hurricane intensity is highly desired in many scientific and operational applications. With the advance of passive microwave polarimetry, an alternative opportunity for retrieving wind speed in hurricanes has become available. A wind speed retrieval algorithm for wind speeds above 20 m/s in hurricanes has been developed by using the 6.8 and 10.7 GHz vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures of WindSat. The WindSat measurements for 15 category 4 and category 5 hurricanes from 2003 to 2010 and the corresponding H*wind analysis data are used to develop and validate the retrieval model. In addition, the retrieved wind speeds are also compared to the Remote Sensing Systems (RSS global all-weather product and stepped-frequency microwave radiometer (SFMR measurements. The statistical results show that the mean bias and the overall root-mean-square (RMS difference of the retrieved wind speeds with respect to the H*wind analysis data are 0.04 and 2.75 m/s, respectively, which provides an encouraging result for retrieving hurricane wind speeds over the ocean surface. The retrieved wind speeds show good agreement with the SFMR measurements. Two case studies demonstrate that the mean bias and RMS difference are 0.79 m/s and 1.79 m/s for hurricane Rita-1 and 0.63 m/s and 2.38 m/s for hurricane Rita-2, respectively. In general, the wind speed retrieval accuracy of the new model in hurricanes ranges from 2.0 m/s in light rain to 3.9 m/s in heavy rain.

  11. Factors controlling cloud microphysics, precipitation rate, and brightness temperature of tropical convective and stratiform clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashino, T.; Casella, D.; Mugnai, A.; Sano, P.; Smith, E. A.; Tripoli, G.

    2008-12-01

    This paper discusses factors controlling cloud microphysics, precipitation rate and brightness temperature of tropical convective and stratiform clouds. Tropical convective and stratiform clouds are important in radiative forcing of climates and distribution of precipitation over the ocean. The possible effects of climate change on these clouds are still not well understood. Recent studies show that the higher CCN concentration in a convective cloud can lead to more vigorous updrafts and a higher evaporation/precipitation ratio. The stronger updraft often means stronger downdraft and gust fronts, which can trigger convection nearby. This implies that increases in CCN concentration can result in an increase in area coverage and persistence of tropical cirrus and stratiform clouds. The increased cloudiness would then be expected to lower sensible and latent heat flux from the ocean by lowering sea surface temperature, affecting the future development of convective clouds. The sea surface temperature may also change in a local area due to change of ocean circulation in climate change scenarios. Satellite remote sensing is a powerful tool to study tropical and global precipitation distribution. Many physically-based passive-microwave (MW) satellite precipitation algorithms make use of cloud radiation databases (CRDs), which typically consist of microphysical profiles from cloud resolving model (CRMs) and simulated MW brightness temperature (Tb). Thus, it is important to validate Tb simulated by a CRM against the observed Tb. Also, it is important to study how any changes in the tropical clouds due to aerosols and sea surface temperature translate into the precipitation and brightness temperature. The case study chosen is KWAJEX campaign that took place from 23 July to 14 September 1999. Authors have developed microphysical physical framework (Advanced Microphysics Prediction System) to predict ice particle properties explicitly in a CRM (University of Wisconsin

  12. High cortisol awakening response is associated with an impairment of the effect of bright light therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, Klaus Per Juul; Lunde, Marianne Anita; Undén, M;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We investigated the predictive validity of the cortisol awakening response (CAR) in patients with non-seasonal major depression. METHOD: Patients were treated with sertraline in combination with bright or dim light therapy for a 5-week period. Saliva cortisol levels were measured in 63...... patients, as an awakening profile, before medication and light therapy started. The CAR was calculated by using three time-points: awakening and 20 and 60 min after awakening. RESULTS: Patients with low CAR had a very substantial effect of bright light therapy compared with dim light therapy, whereas...... patients with a high CAR had no effect of bright light therapy compared with dim light therapy. CONCLUSION: High CAR was associated with an impairment of the effect of bright light therapy. This result raises the question of whether bright light acts through a mechanism different from...

  13. Low Latency Workflow Scheduling and an Application of Hyperspectral Brightness Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, P. T.; Chapman, D. R.; Halem, M.

    2012-12-01

    New system analytics for Big Data computing holds the promise of major scientific breakthroughs and discoveries from the exploration and mining of the massive data sets becoming available to the science community. However, such data intensive scientific applications face severe challenges in accessing, managing and analyzing petabytes of data. While the Hadoop MapReduce environment has been successfully applied to data intensive problems arising in business, there are still many scientific problem domains where limitations in the functionality of MapReduce systems prevent its wide adoption by those communities. This is mainly because MapReduce does not readily support the unique science discipline needs such as special science data formats, graphic and computational data analysis tools, maintaining high degrees of computational accuracies, and interfacing with application's existing components across heterogeneous computing processors. We address some of these limitations by exploiting the MapReduce programming model for satellite data intensive scientific problems and address scalability, reliability, scheduling, and data management issues when dealing with climate data records and their complex observational challenges. In addition, we will present techniques to support the unique Earth science discipline needs such as dealing with special science data formats (HDF and NetCDF). We have developed a Hadoop task scheduling algorithm that improves latency by 2x for a scientific workflow including the gridding of the EOS AIRS hyperspectral Brightness Temperatures (BT). This workflow processing algorithm has been tested at the Multicore Computing Center private Hadoop based Intel Nehalem cluster, as well as in a virtual mode under the Open Source Eucalyptus cloud. The 55TB AIRS hyperspectral L1b Brightness Temperature record has been gridded at the resolution of 0.5x1.0 degrees, and we have computed a 0.9 annual anti-correlation to the El Nino Southern oscillation in

  14. Vegetation, land surface brightness, and temperature dynamics after aspen forest die-off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cho-ying; Anderegg, William R. L.

    2014-07-01

    Forest dynamics following drought-induced tree mortality can affect regional climate through biophysical surface properties. These dynamics have not been well quantified, particularly at the regional scale, and are a large uncertainty in ecosystem-climate feedback. We investigated regional biophysical characteristics through time (1995-2011) in drought-impacted (2001-2003), trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) forests by utilizing Landsat time series green and brown vegetation cover, surface brightness (total shortwave albedo), and daytime land surface temperature. We quantified the temporal dynamics and postdrought recovery of these characteristics for aspen forests experiencing severe drought-induced mortality in the San Juan National Forest in southwestern Colorado, USA. We partitioned forests into three categories from healthy to severe mortality (Healthy, Intermediate, and Die-off) by referring to field observations of aspen canopy mortality and live aboveground biomass losses. The vegetation cover of die-off areas in 2011 (26.9% of the aspen forest) was significantly different compared to predrought conditions (decrease of 7.4% of the green vegetation cover and increase of 12.1% of the brown vegetation cover compared to 1999). The surface brightness of the study region 9 years after drought however was comparable to predrought estimates (12.7-13.7%). Postdrought brightness was potentially influenced by understory shrubs, since they became the top layer green canopies in disturbed sites from a satellite's point of view. Satellite evidence also showed that the differences of land surface temperature among the three groups increased substantially (≥45%) after drought, possibly due to the reduction of plant evapotranspiration in the Intermediate and Die-off sites. Our results suggest that the mortality-affected systems have not recovered in terms of the surface biophysical properties. We also find that the temporal dynamics of vegetation cover holds

  15. The High Luminosity Challenge: potential and limitations of High Intensity High Brightness in the LHC and its injectors

    CERN Document Server

    De Maria, R; Banfi, D; Barranco, J; Bartosik, H; Benedetto, E; Bruce, R; Brüning, O; Calaga, R; Cerutti, F; Damerau, H; Esposito, L; Fartoukh, S; Fitterer, M; Garoby, R; Gilardoni, S; Giovannozzi, M; Goddard, B; Gorini, B; Hanke, K; Iadarola, G; Lamont, M; Meddahi, M; Métral, E; Mikulec, B; Mounet, N; Papaphilippou, Y; Pieloni, T; Redaelli, S; Rossi, L; Rumolo, G; Shaposhnikova, E; Sterbini, G; Todesco, E; Tomás, R; Zimmermann, F; Valishev, A

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity and high-brightness beams are key ingredients to maximize the LHC integrated luminosity and to exploit its full potential. This contribution describes the optimization of beam and machine parameters to maximize the integrated luminosity as seen by the LHC experiments, by taking into account the expected intensity and brightness reach of LHC itself and its injector chain as well as the capabilities of the detectors for next run and foreseen upgrade scenarios.

  16. Compact stacking of diode lasers for pulsed light sources of high brightness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahautala, Taito; Lassila, Erkki; Hernberg, Rolf

    2004-07-20

    A compact stacking architecture for high-power diode-laser arrays is proposed and compared with traditional stacks. The objective of compact stacking is to achieve high brightness values without the use of microlenses. The calculated brightness for a compact stack is over 300 W mm(-2) sr(-1), which is approximately 40 times higher than that of a traditional stack made of similar laser emitters. Even higher brightness values of over 600 W mm(-2) sr(-1) were reached in practice. A laser head was manufactured in which the light from several compact laser stacks could be fiber coupled or the light could be transformed to a highly uniform beam.

  17. High Brightness Proton Beams for LHC: Needs and Means

    CERN Document Server

    Benedikt, Michael; High Energy High Intensity Hadron Beams (HHH 2004)

    2005-01-01

    Experiments [1, 2] have proven that the LHC injector chain can deliver a proton beam with the nominal characteristics (bunch intensity Nb=1.15E11 protons per bunch (ppb) in normalised rms transverse emittances of 3.5 mm.mrad), but cannot reach the ultimate performance (1.7E11 ppb in the same emittances). Moreover, in the longer term, an even higher beam brightness is required by all methods considered for increasing the LHC luminosity beyond the present ultimate level. Improvements and/or new processes are therefore needed, especially in the low energy accelerators. A number of solutions have already been imagined for the PS complex that involve new linac(s) or/and sophisticated beam gymnastics. The present capabilities and limitations of the accelerator chain are described. The needs of the possible LHC luminosity upgrades are outlined, the proposed improvements are explained and their features and performance are compared.

  18. Overview on production and dynamics of high brightness beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serafini, L. [INFN-Milano and UCLA Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, 405 Hilgard Ave., Los Angeles, California 90095-1547 (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The advent of laser driven RF Photoinjectors has raised the interest in the beam dynamics associated with intense, quasi-laminar, space charge dominated electron beams: the relevant phenomena observed in such a new regime of beam physics are presented and discussed in this paper. Most of the emphasis is focused on the analysis of the so called emittance correction technique, which is applied in the operation of RF guns in order to enhance the performances of these devices in terms of the attainable beam brightness, i.e., minimizing the beam emittance. A fully analytical description of this process is presented, based on an envelope equation treatment which leads to the concept of {ital invariant envelope}. The implications of such a concept are discussed and specific examples are given to compare the analytical predictions to the results of numerical simulations. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Simulations on the influence of lunar surface temperature profiles on CE-1 lunar microwave sounder brightness temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Surface temperature profile is an important parameter in lunar microwave remote sensing. Based on the analysis of physical properties of the lunar samples brought back by the Apollo and Luna missions, we modeled temporal and spatial variation of lunar surface temperature with the heat conduction equation, and produced temperature distribution in top 6.0 m of lunar regolith of the whole Moon surface. Our simulation results show that the profile of lunar surface temperature varies mainly within the top 20 cm, except at the lunar polar regions where the changes can reach to about 1.0 m depth. The temperature is stable beyond that depth. The variations of lunar surface temperature lead to main changes in brightness temperature (TB) at different channels of the lunar microwave sounder (CELMS) on Chang’E-1 (CE-1). The results of this paper show that the temperature profile influenced CELMS TB, which provides strong validation on the CELMS data, and lays a solid basis for future interpretation and utilization of the CELMS data.

  20. Plasmon-enhanced photocathode for high brightness and high repetition rate x-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyakov, Aleksandr; Senft, Christoph; Thompson, K. F.; Feng, J.; Cabrini, S.; Schuck, P. J.; Padmore, Howard; Peppernick, Samuel J.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2013-02-11

    High brightness electron sources are at the heart of anew generation of x-ray sources based on the Free ElectronLaser (FEL) as well as in Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) and Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) sources.The source of electrons consists of a photoinjector, comprised of a laser-driven photocathode in a high gradient electric field produced by an rf cavity. The function of the rf cavity is to provide a field sufficient for acceleration of electrons to relativistic velocity over a small distance, thus minimizing effects of the space-charge. Even so, the dense electron beam required for high brightness suffers from a space charge field that chirps and reshapes the electron pulse increasing beam emittance and thus reducing the overall brightness. This emittance growth can be avoided if the initial distribution of electrons is pancake shaped, with a semicircular transverse intensity profile. In this case, the electron distribution develops under its space charge field from a pancake into a uniformly filled ellipsoidal beam. This condition, referred to as the blowout regime, requires ultrashort pulses less than 100 fs long and has been successfully demonstrated recently in a high gradient photoinjector.

  1. Stable droplet generator for a high brightness laser produced plasma extreme ultraviolet source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinokhodov, A.; Krivokorytov, M.; Sidelnikov, Yu.; Krivtsun, V.; Medvedev, V.; Bushuev, V.; Koshelev, K.; Glushkov, D.; Ellwi, S.

    2016-10-01

    We present the results of the low-melting liquid metal droplets generation based on excited Rayleigh jet breakup. We discuss on the operation of the industrial and in-house designed and manufactured dispensing devices for the droplets generation. Droplet diameter can be varied in the range of 30-90 μm. The working frequency of the droplets, velocity, and the operating temperature were in the ranges of 20-150 kHz, 4-15 m/s, and up to 250 °C, respectively. The standard deviations for the droplet center of mass position both their diameter σ < 1 μm at the distance of 45 mm from the nozzle. Stable operation in the long-term (over 1.5 h) was demonstrated for a wide range of the droplet parameters: diameters, frequencies, and velocities. Physical factors affecting the stability of the generator operation have been identified. The technique for droplet synchronization, allowing using the droplet as a target for laser produced plasma, has been created; in particular, the generator has been successfully used in a high brightness extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light source. The operation with frequency up to 8 kHz was demonstrated as a result of the experimental simulation, which can provide an average brightness of the EUV source up to ˜1.2 kW/mm2 sr.

  2. A Fundamental Climate Data Record of Intercalibrated Brightness Temperature Data from SSM/I and SSMIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapiano, M. R. P.; Berg, W. K.; McKague, D.; Kummerow, C. D.

    2012-04-01

    The first Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) was launched in June 1987 on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's (DMSP) F08 spacecraft and started what is now a nearly continuous 24-year record of passive microwave imager data that can be used to monitor the climate system. This includes such fields as precipitation (over both land and ocean), the extent of sea ice and snow, sea ice concentration, total precipitable water, cloud liquid water, and surface wind speed over oceans. A total of nine window channel radiometers have been launched to date in the DMSP series including the SSM/I instrument on board F08, F10, F11, F13, F14, and F15 followed by the Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) on board F16, F17, and F18, which is expected to operate for at least the next decade. As a result, this data record provides the best available source of long-term global observations of several hydrological variables for climate applications. Although the DMSP sensors provide a long-term record, because the sensors were developed for operational use there are a number of issues that must be addressed to produce a dataset suitable for use in climate applications. There are a several quality control and calibration issues including, but not limited to, quality control of the original antenna temperatures, geolocation, cross-track bias corrections, solar and lunar intrusion issues and emissive antennas. The goal of producing an FCDR of brightness temperature data involves not only addressing many of these instrument issues, but also developing a well-documented, transparent approach that allows for subsequent improvements as well as a framework for incorporating future sensors. Once the data have been quality controlled and various calibration corrections have been applied, the goal is to adjust the calibration of the various sensors so that they are physically consistent. Such intercalibration does not correct for changes due to local observing time, which

  3. THE ATACAMA COSMOLOGY TELESCOPE: BEAM MEASUREMENTS AND THE MICROWAVE BRIGHTNESS TEMPERATURES OF URANUS AND SATURN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasselfield, Matthew [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Moodley, Kavilan [Astrophysics and Cosmology Research Unit, School of Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4041 (South Africa); Bond, J. Richard; Hajian, Amir; Hincks, Adam D.; Nolta, Michael R. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Das, Sudeep [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Devlin, Mark J.; Marsden, Danica; Schmitt, Benjamin L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Dunkley, Joanna [Department of Astrophysics, Oxford University, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Dünner, Rolando; Gallardo, Patricio [Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificía Universidad Católica, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Fowler, Joseph W.; Niemack, Michael D. [NIST Quantum Devices Group, 325 Broadway Mailcode 817.03, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Gralla, Megan B.; Marriage, Tobias A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-2686 (United States); Halpern, Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Page, Lyman A. [Joseph Henry Laboratories of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Partridge, Bruce [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Haverford College, Haverford, PA 19041 (United States); and others

    2013-11-01

    We describe the measurement of the beam profiles and window functions for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT), which operated from 2007 to 2010 with kilopixel bolometer arrays centered at 148, 218, and 277 GHz. Maps of Saturn are used to measure the beam shape in each array and for each season of observations. Radial profiles are transformed to Fourier space in a way that preserves the spatial correlations in the beam uncertainty to derive window functions relevant for angular power spectrum analysis. Several corrections are applied to the resulting beam transforms, including an empirical correction measured from the final cosmic microwave background (CMB) survey maps to account for the effects of mild pointing variation and alignment errors. Observations of Uranus made regularly throughout each observing season are used to measure the effects of atmospheric opacity and to monitor deviations in telescope focus over the season. Using the WMAP-based calibration of the ACT maps to the CMB blackbody, we obtain precise measurements of the brightness temperatures of the Uranus and Saturn disks at effective frequencies of 149 and 219 GHz. For Uranus we obtain thermodynamic brightness temperatures T{sub U}{sup 149}= 106.7 ± 2.2 K and T{sub U}{sup 219}= 100.1 ± 3.1 K. For Saturn, we model the effects of the ring opacity and emission using a simple model and obtain resulting (unobscured) disk temperatures of T{sub S}{sup 149}= 137.3 ± 3.2 K and T{sub S}{sup 219}= 137.3 ± 4.7 K.

  4. The impact of melt ponds on summertime microwave brightness temperatures and sea-ice concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Stefan; Rösel, Anja; Toudal Pedersen, Leif; Ivanova, Natalia; Saldo, Roberto; Tage Tonboe, Rasmus

    2016-09-01

    Sea-ice concentrations derived from satellite microwave brightness temperatures are less accurate during summer. In the Arctic Ocean the lack of accuracy is primarily caused by melt ponds, but also by changes in the properties of snow and the sea-ice surface itself. We investigate the sensitivity of eight sea-ice concentration retrieval algorithms to melt ponds by comparing sea-ice concentration with the melt-pond fraction. We derive gridded daily sea-ice concentrations from microwave brightness temperatures of summer 2009. We derive the daily fraction of melt ponds, open water between ice floes, and the ice-surface fraction from contemporary Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) reflectance data. We only use grid cells where the MODIS sea-ice concentration, which is the melt-pond fraction plus the ice-surface fraction, exceeds 90 %. For one group of algorithms, e.g., Bristol and Comiso bootstrap frequency mode (Bootstrap_f), sea-ice concentrations are linearly related to the MODIS melt-pond fraction quite clearly after June. For other algorithms, e.g., Near90GHz and Comiso bootstrap polarization mode (Bootstrap_p), this relationship is weaker and develops later in summer. We attribute the variation of the sensitivity to the melt-pond fraction across the algorithms to a different sensitivity of the brightness temperatures to snow-property variations. We find an underestimation of the sea-ice concentration by between 14 % (Bootstrap_f) and 26 % (Bootstrap_p) for 100 % sea ice with a melt-pond fraction of 40 %. The underestimation reduces to 0 % for a melt-pond fraction of 20 %. In presence of real open water between ice floes, the sea-ice concentration is overestimated by between 26 % (Bootstrap_f) and 14 % (Bootstrap_p) at 60 % sea-ice concentration and by 20 % across all algorithms at 80 % sea-ice concentration. None of the algorithms investigated performs best based on our investigation of data from summer 2009. We suggest that those algorithms which are

  5. HIGH TEMPERATURE DISPLACEMENT SENSOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Longxiang; Zhang Jinyu; Schweitzer Gerhard

    2005-01-01

    A high temperature displacement sensor based on the principle of eddy-current is investigated. A new temperature compensation technique by using eddy-current effect is presented to satisfy the special requirement at high temperature up to 550℃. The experiment shows that the temperature compensation technique leads to good temperature stability for the sensors. The variation of the sensitivity as well as the temperature drift of the sensor with temperature compensation technique is only about 7.4% and 90~350 mV at 550℃ compared with that at room temperature, and that of the sensor without temperature compensation technique is about 31.2% and 2~3 V at 550℃ compared with that at room temperature. A new dynamic calibration method for the eddy-current displacement sensor is presented, which is very easy to be realized especially in high frequency and at high temperatures. The high temperature displacement sensors developed are successfully used at temperature up to 550℃ in a magnetic bearing system for more than 100 h.

  6. The Improved NRL Tropical Cyclone Monitoring System with a Unified Microwave Brightness Temperature Calibration Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Yang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The near real-time NRL global tropical cyclone (TC monitoring system based on multiple satellite passive microwave (PMW sensors is improved with a new inter-sensor calibration scheme to correct the biases caused by differences in these sensor’s high frequency channels. Since the PMW sensor 89 GHz channel is used in multiple current and near future operational and research satellites, a unified scheme to calibrate all satellite PMW sensor’s ice scattering channels to a common 89 GHz is created so that their brightness temperatures (TBs will be consistent and permit more accurate manual and automated analyses. In order to develop a physically consistent calibration scheme, cloud resolving model simulations of a squall line system over the west Pacific coast and hurricane Bonnie in the Atlantic Ocean are applied to simulate the views from different PMW sensors. To clarify the complicated TB biases due to the competing nature of scattering and emission effects, a four-cloud based calibration scheme is developed (rain, non-rain, light rain, and cloudy. This new physically consistent inter-sensor calibration scheme is then evaluated with the synthetic TBs of hurricane Bonnie and a squall line as well as observed TCs. Results demonstrate the large TB biases up to 13 K for heavy rain situations before calibration between TMI and AMSR-E are reduced to less than 3 K after calibration. The comparison stats show that the overall bias and RMSE are reduced by 74% and 66% for hurricane Bonnie, and 98% and 85% for squall lines, respectively. For the observed hurricane Igor, the bias and RMSE decrease 41% and 25% respectively. This study demonstrates the importance of TB calibrations between PMW sensors in order to systematically monitor the global TC life cycles in terms of intensity, inner core structure and convective organization. A physics-based calibration scheme on TC’s TB corrections developed in this study is able to significantly reduce the

  7. Relationships between evaprorative fraction and remotely sensed vegetation index and microwave brightness temperature for semiarid rangelands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustas, W. P.; Schimugge, T. J.; Humes, K. S.; Jackson, T. J.; Parry, R.; Weltz, M. A.; Moran, M. S.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of the microwave brightness temperature (TB) with the Pushbroom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR) over the Walnut Gulch Experiment Watershed were made on selected days during the MONSOON 90 field campaign. The PBMR is an L-band instrument (21-cm wavelength) that can provide estimates of near-surface soil moisture over a variety of surfaces. Aircraft observations in the visible and near-infrared wavelengths collected on selected days also were used to compute a vegetation index. Continuous micrometeorological measurements and daily soil moisture samples were obtained at eight locations during experimental period. Two sites were instrumented with time domain reflectometry probes to monitor the soil moisture profile. The fraction of available energy used for evapotranspiration was computed by taking the ratio of latent heat flux (LE) to the sum of net radiation (Rn) and soil heat flux (G). This ratio is commonly called the evaporative fraction (EF) and normally varies between 0 and 1 under daytime convective conditions with minimal advection. A wide range of environmental conditions existed during the field campaign, resulting in average EF values for the study area varying from 0.4 to 0.8 and values of TB ranging from 220 to 280 K. Comparison between measured TB and EF for the eight locations showed an inverse relationship. Other days were included in the analysis by estimating TB with the soil moisture data. Because transpiration from the vegetation is more strongly coupled to root zone soil moisture, significant scatter in this relationship existed at high values of TB or dry near-surface soil moisture conditions. The variation in EF under dry near-surface soil moisture conditions was correlated to the amount of vegetation cover estimated with a remotely sensed vegetation index. These findings indicate that information obtained from optical and microwave data can be used for quantifying the energy balance of semiarid areas. The microwave data can indicate

  8. Relationships between Evaporative Fraction and Remotely Sensed Vegetation Index and Microwave Brightness Temperature for Semiarid Rangelands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustas, W. P.; Schmugge, T. J.; Humes, K. S.; Jackson, T. J.; Parry, R.; Weltz, M. A.; Moran, M. S.

    1993-12-01

    Measurements of the microwave brightness temperature (TB) with the Pushbroom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR) over the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed were made on selected days during the MONSOON 90 field campaign. The PBMR is an L-band instrument (21-cm wavelength) that can provide estimates of near-surface soil moisture over a variety of surfaces. Aircraft observations in the visible and near-infrared wavelengths collected on selected days also were used to compute a vegetation index. Continuous micrometeorological measurements and daily soil moisture samples were obtained at eight locations during the experimental period. Two sites were instrumented with time domain reflectometry probes to monitor the soil moisture profile. The fraction of available energy used for evapotranspiration was computed by taking the ratio of latent heat flux (LE) to the sum of net radiation (Rn) and soil heat flux (G). This ratio is commonly called the evaporative fraction (EF) and normally varies between 0 and 1 under daytime convective conditions with minimal advection. A wide range of environmental conditions existed during the field campaign, resulting in average EF values for the study area varying from 0.4 to 0.8 and values of TB ranging from 220 to 280 K. Comparison between measured TB and EF for the eight locations showed an inverse relationship with a significant correlation (r2 = 0.69). Other days were included in the analysis by estimating TB with the soil moisture data. Because transpiration from the vegetation is more strongly coupled to root zone soil moisture, significant scatter in this relationship existed at high values of TB or dry near-surface soil moisture conditions. It caused a substantial reduction in the correlation with r2 = 0.40 or only 40% of the variation in EF being explained by TB. The variation in EF under dry near-surface soil moisture conditions was correlated to the amount of vegetation cover estimated with a remotely sensed vegetation index. These

  9. Sea-surface temperature and salinity mapping from remote microwave radiometric measurements of brightness temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans-Juergen, C. B.; Kendall, B. M.; Fedors, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    A technique to measure remotely sea surface temperature and salinity was demonstrated with a dual frequency microwave radiometer system. Accuracies in temperature of 1 C and in salinity of part thousand for salinity greater than 5 parts per thousand were attained after correcting for the influence of extraterrestrial background radiation, atmospheric radiation and attenuation, sea-surface roughness, and antenna beamwidth. The radiometers, operating at 1.43 and 2.65 GHz, comprise a third-generation system using null balancing and feedback noise injection. Flight measurements from an aircraft at an altitude of 1.4 km over the lower Chesapeake Bay and coastal areas of the Atlantic Ocean resulted in contour maps of sea-surface temperature and salinity with a spatial resolution of 0.5 km.

  10. Vertical-structure effects on planetary microwave brightness temperature measurements - Applications to the lunar regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keihm, S. J.; Cutts, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    An attempt to constrain the effects of vertical variations in dielectric properties on lunar microwave observations is presented. A numerical approach for deriving the reflectivity and microwave weighting function of a vertically varying half-space is used, assuming variance in the dielectric properties with depth only, and negligible magnetic effects. The cases of continuous and stratified models of vertical structures are discussed, and a concentration of emitted energy in upper layers is found. The total emitted energy oscillates, varying with the thickness of the upper soil layer, but averaging out interference effects due to random variations in the substrate depth. Consideration is also given to the vertical structure effects on the lunation-mean disk-center brightness temperature, its variations, and the regolith electrical loss, and predicted reflectivity effects by feasible models of the lunar regolith dielectric profile.

  11. Coronal temperature profiles obtained from kinetic models and from coronal brightness measurements obtained during solar eclipses

    CERN Document Server

    Pierrard, V; Lemaire, J F

    2012-01-01

    Coronal density, temperature and heat flux distributions for the equatorial and polar corona have been deduced by Lemaire [2012] from Saito's model of averaged coronal white light (WL) brightness and polarization observations. They are compared with those determined from a kinetic collisionless/exospheric model of the solar corona. This comparison indicates rather similar distributions at large radial distances (> 7 Rs) in the collisionless region. However, rather important differences are found close to the Sun in the acceleration region of the solar wind. The exospheric heat flux is directed away from the Sun, while that inferred from all WL coronal observations is in the opposite direction, i.e., conducting heat from the inner corona toward the chromosphere. This could indicate that the source of coronal heating rate extends up into the inner corona where it maximizes at r > 1.5 Rs well above the transition region.

  12. Radio Brightness Temperatures and Angular Dimensions of Recently Predicted Vl-Bi Small-Scale Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opher, R.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Muestro que analisis recientes publicados de fuentes de radio galacticas y extragalacticas predicen estructuras en pequera escala en fuentes de radio extendidas, remanentes de supernova, vientos protoestelares, nubes moleculares, distorsiones del fondo de 3 K, enanas blancas magnetizadas, estrellas de tipo tardio y el Sol. Discuto las temperatu- ras de brillo de radio de estas estructuras y sus ditnensiones. Muestro que estas estructuras son detectables con las sensibilidades actuales de VLBI (o en el futuro cercano). ABSTRACT. I show that recently published analysis of galactic and extragalactic radio sources make predictions of small-scale structures in extended radio sources, supernovae remnants, protostellar winds, molecu- lar clouds, distortions of the 3 K background, magnetized white dwarf binaries, late-type stars and the sun. I discuss the radio brightness temperatures of these structures and their dimensions. I show that these structures are detectable with present (or near future) VLBI sensitivities. : RADIO SOURCES-EXTENDED

  13. Soil moisture estimation by assimilating L-band microwave brightness temperature with geostatistics and observation localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xujun; Li, Xin; Rigon, Riccardo; Jin, Rui; Endrizzi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The observation could be used to reduce the model uncertainties with data assimilation. If the observation cannot cover the whole model area due to spatial availability or instrument ability, how to do data assimilation at locations not covered by observation? Two commonly used strategies were firstly described: One is covariance localization (CL); the other is observation localization (OL). Compared with CL, OL is easy to parallelize and more efficient for large-scale analysis. This paper evaluated OL in soil moisture profile characterizations, in which the geostatistical semivariogram was used to fit the spatial correlated characteristics of synthetic L-Band microwave brightness temperature measurement. The fitted semivariogram model and the local ensemble transform Kalman filter algorithm are combined together to weight and assimilate the observations within a local region surrounding the grid cell of land surface model to be analyzed. Six scenarios were compared: 1_Obs with one nearest observation assimilated, 5_Obs with no more than five nearest local observations assimilated, and 9_Obs with no more than nine nearest local observations assimilated. The scenarios with no more than 16, 25, and 36 local observations were also compared. From the results we can conclude that more local observations involved in assimilation will improve estimations with an upper bound of 9 observations in this case. This study demonstrates the potentials of geostatistical correlation representation in OL to improve data assimilation of catchment scale soil moisture using synthetic L-band microwave brightness temperature, which cannot cover the study area fully in space due to vegetation effects.

  14. A soil moisture assimilation scheme based on the ensemble Kalman filter using microwave brightness temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA BingHao; XIE ZhengHui; TIAN XiangJun; SHI ChunXiang

    2009-01-01

    This study presents a soil moisture assimilation scheme,which could assimilate microwave brightness temperature directly,based on the ensemble Kalman filter and the shuffled complex evolution method (SCE-UA).It uses the soil water model of the land surface model CLM3.0 as the forecast operator,and a radiative transfer model (RTM) as the observation operator in the assimilation system.The assimilation scheme is implemented in two phases:the parameter calibration phase and the pure soil moisture assimilation phase.The vegetation optical thickness and surface roughness parameters in the RTM are calibrated by SCE-UA method and the optimal parameters are used as the final model parameters of the observation operator in the assimilation phase.The ideal experiments with synthetic data indicate that this scheme could significantly improve the simulation of soil moisture at the surface layer.Furthermore,the estimation of soil moisture in the deeper layers could also be improved to a certain extent.The real assimilation experiments with AMSR-E brightness temperature at 10.65 GHz (vertical polarization) show that the root mean square error (RMSE) of soil moisture in the top layer (0-10 cm) by asms.msimilation is 0.03355 m~3·m~(-3),which is reduced by 33.6% compared with that by simulation (0.05052m~3·m~(-3)).The mean RMSE by assimilation for the deeper layers (10-50 cm) is also reduced by 20.9%.All these experiments demonstrate the reasonability of the assimilation scheme developed in this study.

  15. A soil moisture assimilation scheme based on the ensemble Kalman filter using microwave brightness temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This study presents a soil moisture assimilation scheme, which could assimilate microwave brightness temperature directly, based on the ensemble Kalman filter and the shuffled complex evolution method (SCE-UA). It uses the soil water model of the land surface model CLM3.0 as the forecast operator, and a radiative transfer model (RTM) as the observation operator in the assimilation system. The assimilation scheme is implemented in two phases: the parameter calibration phase and the pure soil moisture assimilation phase. The vegetation optical thickness and surface roughness parameters in the RTM are calibrated by SCE-UA method and the optimal parameters are used as the final model parameters of the observation operator in the assimilation phase. The ideal experiments with synthetic data indicate that this scheme could significantly improve the simulation of soil moisture at the surface layer. Further- more, the estimation of soil moisture in the deeper layers could also be improved to a certain extent. The real assimilation experiments with AMSR-E brightness temperature at 10.65 GHz (vertical polariza- tion) show that the root mean square error (RMSE) of soil moisture in the top layer (0―10 cm) by as- similation is 0.03355 m3·m-3, which is reduced by 33.6% compared with that by simulation (0.05052 m3·m-3). The mean RMSE by assimilation for the deeper layers (10―50 cm) is also reduced by 20.9%. All these experiments demonstrate the reasonability of the assimilation scheme developed in this study.

  16. Analysis of SMOS brightness temperature and vegetation optical depth data with coupled land surface and radiative transfer models in Southern Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Schlenz

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS L1c brightness temperature and L2 optical depth data are analysed with a coupled land surface (PROMET and radiative transfer model (L-MEB. The coupled models are validated with ground and airborne measurements under contrasting soil moisture, vegetation and land surface temperature conditions during the SMOS Validation Campaign in May and June 2010 in the SMOS test site Upper Danube Catchment in southern Germany. The brightness temperature root-mean-squared errors are between 6 K and 9 K. The L-MEB parameterisation is considered appropriate under local conditions even though it might possibly be further optimised. SMOS L1c brightness temperature data are processed and analysed in the Upper Danube Catchment using the coupled models in 2011 and during the SMOS Validation Campaign 2010 together with airborne L-band brightness temperature data. Only low to fair correlations are found for this comparison (R between 0.1–0.41. SMOS L1c brightness temperature data do not show the expected seasonal behaviour and are positively biased. It is concluded that RFI is responsible for a considerable part of the observed problems in the SMOS data products in the Upper Danube Catchment. This is consistent with the observed dry bias in the SMOS L2 soil moisture products which can also be related to RFI. It is confirmed that the brightness temperature data from the lower SMOS look angles and the horizontal polarisation are less reliable. This information could be used to improve the brightness temperature data filtering before the soil moisture retrieval. SMOS L2 optical depth values have been compared to modelled data and are not considered a reliable source of information about vegetation due to missing seasonal behaviour and a very high mean value. A fairly strong correlation between SMOS L2 soil moisture and optical depth was found (R = 0.65 even though the two variables are considered independent in the

  17. Next Generation High Brightness Electron Beams From Ultra-High Field Cryogenic Radiofrequency Photocathode Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenzweig, J B; Dolgashev, V; Emma, C; Fukusawa, A; Li, R; Limborg, C; Maxson, J; Musumeci, P; Nause, A; Pakter, R; Pompili, R; Roussel, R; Spataro, B; Tantawi, S

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies of the performance of radio-frequency (RF) copper structures operated at cryogenic temperatures have shown a dramatic increase in the maximum surface electric field that may be reached. We propose to utilize this development to enable a new generation of photoinjectors operated at cryogenic temperatures that may attain, through enhancement of the launch field at the photocathode by a factor of four, well over an order of magnitude increase in peak electron beam brightness. We present detailed studies of the beam dynamics associated with such a system, concentrating on an emittance-compensated S-band photoinjector that may directly substitute that of the LCLS X-ray free-electron laser. We show in this case that the increase in brightness leads directly to a factor of two reduction in gain length, with attendant increase in X-ray radiative efficiency. Extreme low emittance scenarios obtained at low operating charge, appropriate for dramatically pushing performance limits of ultrafast electron dif...

  18. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shoji

    2006-12-01

    A general review on high-temperature superconductivity was made. After prehistoric view and the process of discovery were stated, the special features of high-temperature superconductors were explained from the materials side and the physical properties side. The present status on applications of high-temperature superconductors were explained on superconducting tapes, electric power cables, magnets for maglev trains, electric motors, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and single flux quantum (SFQ) devices and circuits.

  19. RadioAstron Observations of the Quasar 3C273: a Challenge to the Brightness Temperature Limit

    CERN Document Server

    Kovalev, Y Y; Kellermann, K I; Lobanov, A P; Johnson, M D; Gurvits, L I; Voitsik, P A; Zensus, J A; Anderson, J M; Bach, U; Jauncey, D L; Ghigo, F; Ghosh, T; Kraus, A; Kovalev, Yu A; Lisakov, M M; Petrov, L Yu; Romney, J D; Salter, C J; Sokolovsky, K V

    2016-01-01

    Inverse Compton cooling limits the brightness temperature of the radiating plasma to a maximum of $10^{11.5}$ K. Relativistic boosting can increase its observed value, but apparent brightness temperatures much in excess of $10^{13}$ K are inaccessible using ground-based very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) at any wavelength. We present observations of the quasar 3C273, made with the space VLBI mission RadioAstron on baselines up to 171,000 km, which directly reveal the presence of angular structure as small as 26 $\\mu$as (2.7 light months) and brightness temperature in excess of $10^{13}$ K. These measurements challenge our understanding of the non-thermal continuum emission in the vicinity of supermassive black holes and require much higher jet speeds than are observed.

  20. Ultra High Brightness/Low Cost Fiber Coupled Packaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High peak power, high efficiency, high reliability lightweight, low cost QCW laser diode pump modules with up to 1000W of QCW output become possible with nLight's...

  1. Design of high-brightness TEM00-mode solar-pumped laser for renewable material processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, D.; Almeida, J.

    2014-08-01

    The conversion of sunlight into laser light by direct solar pumping is of ever-increasing importance because broadband, temporally constant, sunlight is converted into laser light, which can be a source of narrowband, collimated, rapidly pulsed, radiation with the possibility of obtaining extremely high brightness and intensity. Nonlinear processes, such as harmonic generation, might be used to obtain broad wavelength coverage, including the ultraviolet wavelengths, where the solar flux is very weak. The direct excitation of large lasers by sunlight offers the prospect of a drastic reduction in the cost of coherent optical radiation for high average power materials processing. This renewable laser has a large potential for many applications such as high-temperature materials processing, renewable magnesium-hydrogen energy cycle and so on. We propose here a scalable TEM00 mode solar laser pumping scheme, which is composed of four firststage 1.13 m diameter Fresnel lenses with its respective folding mirrors mounted on a two-axis automatic solar tracker. Concentrated solar power at the four focal spots of these Fresnel lenses are focused individually along a common 3.5 mm diameter, 70 mm length Nd:YAG rod via four pairs of second-stage fused-silica spherical lenses and third-stage 2D-CPCs (Compound Parabolic Concentrator), sitting just above the laser rod which is also double-pass pumped by four V-shaped pumping cavities. Distilled water cools both the rod and the concentrators. 15.4 W TEM00 solar laser power is numerically calculated, corresponding to 6.7 times enhancement in laser beam brightness.

  2. Comparison between linear and nonlinear trends in NOAA-15 AMSU-A brightness temperatures during 1998-2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Z. [Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Center of Data Assimilation for Research and Application, Nanjing (China); Zou, X. [Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Center of Data Assimilation for Research and Application, Nanjing (China); Florida State University, Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Weng, F. [NOAA/NESDIS, Center for Satellite Applications and Research, Camp Springs, MD (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Brightness temperature observations from Microwave Sounding Unit and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) on board National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellites have been widely utilized for estimating the global climate trend in the troposphere and stratosphere. A common approach for deriving the trend is linear regression, which implicitly assumes the trend being a straight line over the whole length of a time series and is often highly sensitive to the data record length. This study explores a new adaptive and temporally local data analysis method - Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) - for estimating the global trends. In EEMD, a non-stationary time series is decomposed adaptively and locally into a sequence of amplitude-frequency modulated oscillatory components and a time-varying trend. The AMSU-A data from the NOAA-15 satellite over the time period from October 26, 1998 to August 7, 2010 are employed for this study. Using data over Amazon rainforest areas, it is shown that channel 3 is least sensitive to the orbital drift among four AMSU-A surface sensitive channels. The decadal trends of AMSU-A channel 3 and other eight channels in the troposphere and stratosphere are deduced and compared using both methods. It is shown that the decadal climate trends of most AMSU-A channels are nonlinear except for channels 3-4 in Northern Hemisphere only and channels 12-13. Although the decadal trend variation of the global average brightness temperature is no more than 0.2 K, the regional decadal trend variation could be more (less) than 3 K (-3 K) in high latitudes and over high terrains. (orig.)

  3. Highly efficient high temperature electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauch, Anne; Ebbesen, Sune; Jensen, Søren Højgaard;

    2008-01-01

    High temperature electrolysis of water and steam may provide an efficient, cost effective and environmentally friendly production of H-2 Using electricity produced from sustainable, non-fossil energy sources. To achieve cost competitive electrolysis cells that are both high performing i.e. minimum...... internal resistance of the cell, and long-term stable, it is critical to develop electrode materials that are optimal for steam electrolysis. In this article electrolysis cells for electrolysis of water or steam at temperatures above 200 degrees C for production of H-2 are reviewed. High temperature...... electrolysis is favourable from a thermodynamic point of view, because a part of the required energy can be supplied as thermal heat, and the activation barrier is lowered increasing the H-2 production rate. Only two types of cells operating at high temperature (above 200 degrees C) have been described...

  4. A high brightness proton injector for the Tandetron accelerator at Jožef Stefan Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelicon, Primož, E-mail: primoz.pelicon@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, Association EURATOM-MHEST, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Podaru, Nicolae C., E-mail: info@highvolteng.com [High Voltage Engineering Europa B.V., P.O. Box 99, Amersfoort 3800AB (Netherlands); Vavpetič, Primož; Jeromel, Luka [Jožef Stefan Institute, Association EURATOM-MHEST, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Ogrinc Potocnik, Nina [Jožef Stefan Institute, Association EURATOM-MHEST, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); LOTRIČ Metrology ltd, Selca 163, SI-4227 Selca (Slovenia); Ondračka, Simon [Jožef Stefan Institute, Association EURATOM-MHEST, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Gottdang, Andreas; Mous, Dirk J.M. [High Voltage Engineering Europa B.V., P.O. Box 99, Amersfoort 3800AB (Netherlands)

    2014-08-01

    Jožef Stefan Institute recently commissioned a high brightness H{sup −} ion beam injection system for its existing tandem accelerator facility. Custom developed by High Voltage Engineering Europa, the multicusp ion source has been tuned to deliver at the entrance of the Tandetron™ accelerator H{sup −} ion beams with a measured brightness of 17.1 A m{sup −2} rad{sup −2} eV{sup −1} at 170 μA, equivalent to an energy normalized beam emittance of 0.767 π mm mrad MeV{sup 1/2}. Upgrading the accelerator facility with the new injection system provides two main advantages. First, the high brightness of the new ion source enables the reduction of object slit aperture and the reduction of acceptance angle at the nuclear microprobe, resulting in a reduced beam size at selected beam intensity, which significantly improves the probe resolution for micro-PIXE applications. Secondly, the upgrade strongly enhances the accelerator up-time since H and He beams are produced by independent ion sources, introducing a constant availability of {sup 3}He beam for fusion-related research with NRA. The ion beam particle losses and ion beam emittance growth imply that the aforementioned beam brightness is reduced by transport through the ion optical system. To obtain quantitative information on the available brightness at the high-energy side of the accelerator, the proton beam brightness is determined in the nuclear microprobe beamline. Based on the experience obtained during the first months of operation for micro-PIXE applications, further necessary steps are indicated to obtain optimal coupling of the new ion source with the accelerator to increase the normalized high-energy proton beam brightness at the JSI microprobe, currently at 14 A m{sup −2} rad{sup −2} eV{sup −1}, with the output current at 18% of its available maximum.

  5. Modelling of the L-band brightness temperatures measured with ELBARA III radiometer on Bubnow wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluba, Lukasz; Sagan, Joanna; Lukowski, Mateusz; Szlazak, Radoslaw; Usowicz, Boguslaw

    2017-04-01

    Microwave radiometry has become the main tool for investigating soil moisture (SM) with remote sensing methods. ESA - SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) satellite operating at L-band provides global distribution of soil moisture. An integral part of SMOS mission are calibration and validation activities involving measurements with ELBARA III which is an L-band microwave passive radiometer. It is done in order to improve soil moisture retrievals - make them more time-effective and accurate. The instrument is located at Bubnow test-site, on the border of cultivated field, fallow, meadow and natural wetland being a part of Polesie National Park (Poland). We obtain both temporal and spatial dependences of brightness temperatures for varied types of land covers with the ELBARA III directed at different azimuths. Soil moisture is retrieved from brightness temperature using L-band Microwave Emission of the Biosphere (L-MEB) model, the same as currently used radiative transfer model for SMOS. Parametrization of L-MEB, as well as input values are still under debate. We discuss the results of SM retrievals basing on data obtained during first year of the radiometer's operation. We analyze temporal dependences of retrieved SM for one-parameter (SM), two-parameter (SM, τ - optical depth) and three-parameter (SM, τ, Hr - roughness parameter) retrievals, as well as spatial dependences for specific dates. Special case of Simplified Roughness Parametrization, combining the roughness parameter and optical depth, is considered. L-MEB processing is supported by the continuous measurements of soil moisture and temperature obtained from nearby agrometeorological station, as well as studies on the soil granulometric composition of the Bubnow test-site area. Furthermore, for better estimation of optical depth, the satellite-derived Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) was employed, supported by measured in situ vegetation parameters (such as Leaf Area Index and Vegetation

  6. The XXL Survey III. Luminosity-temperature relation of the Bright Cluster Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Giles, P A; Pacaud, F; Lieu, M; Clerc, N; Pierre, M; Adami, C; Chiappetti, L; Démoclés, J; Ettori, S; Févre, J P Le; Ponman, T; Sadibekova, T; Smith, G P; Willis, J P; Ziparo, F

    2015-01-01

    The XXL Survey is the largest homogeneous survey carried out with XMM-Newton. Covering an area of 50 deg$^{2}$, the survey contains several hundred galaxy clusters out to a redshift of $\\approx$2 above an X-ray flux limit of $\\sim$5$\\times10^{-15}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. This paper belongs to the first series of XXL papers focusing on the bright cluster sample. We investigate the luminosity-temperature (LT) relation for the brightest clusters detected in the XXL Survey, taking fully into account the selection biases. We investigate the form of the LT relation, placing constraints on its evolution. We have classified the 100 brightest clusters in the XXL Survey based on their measured X-ray flux. These 100 clusters have been analysed to determine their luminosity and temperature to evaluate the LT relation. We used three methods to fit the LT relation, with two of these methods providing a prescription to fully take into account the selection effects of the survey. We measure the evolution of the LT relation ...

  7. The Highly Perturbed X-ray Bright Group NGC 5044

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Laurence

    2014-09-01

    The NGC 5044 group is the X-ray brightest group in the sky and hosts many small X-ray cavities that were inflated by weak AGN outbursts. The cumulative effect of many weak AGN outbursts may be the dominant reheating mechanism in cooling flows. While AGN feedback probably prevents the bulk of gas from cooling in NGC 5044, the presence of molecular structures, Halpha filaments, [CII] emission and star formation indicates that at least some gas is able to condense out of the hot phase. The near by 5044 group is the best target for detecting small X-ray cavities with Chandra and investigating the cumulative effect of repeated weak AGN outbursts. The wealth of multi-frequency data also makes NGC 5044 an ideal target for studying gas over a broad range of temperatures in a cooling flow.

  8. High brightness 50 MeV Cyclotron for Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assadi, Saeed; Badgley, Karie; Mann, Thomas; McIntyre, Peter; Pogue, Nathaniel; Sattarov, Akhdiyor

    2011-10-01

    The Accelerator Research Lab at Texas A&M University is developing new accelerator technology for a high-brightness, high-current cyclotron with capabilities that will be beneficial for applications to accelerator-driven subcritical fission, medical isotope production, and proton therapy. As a first embodiment of the technology, we are developing a detailed design for TAMU-50, a 50 MeV, 5 mA proton cyclotron with high beam brightness. In this presentation we present devices and beamline components for injection, extraction, controls and diagnostics. We emphasize the system integration and implementation of TAMU-50 for production of medical radioisotopes.

  9. The global SMOS Level 3 daily soil moisture and brightness temperature maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitar, Ahmad Al; Mialon, Arnaud; Kerr, Yann H.; Cabot, François; Richaume, Philippe; Jacquette, Elsa; Quesney, Arnaud; Mahmoodi, Ali; Tarot, Stéphane; Parrens, Marie; Al-Yaari, Amen; Pellarin, Thierry; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Nemesio; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to present the multi-orbit (MO) surface soil moisture (SM) and angle-binned brightness temperature (TB) products for the SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) mission based on a new multi-orbit algorithm. The Level 3 algorithm at CATDS (Centre Aval de Traitement des Données SMOS) makes use of MO retrieval to enhance the robustness and quality of SM retrievals. The motivation of the approach is to make use of the longer temporal autocorrelation length of the vegetation optical depth (VOD) compared to the corresponding SM autocorrelation in order to enhance the retrievals when an acquisition occurs at the border of the swath. The retrieval algorithm is implemented in a unique operational processor delivering multiple parameters (e.g. SM and VOD) using multi-angular dual-polarisation TB from MO. A subsidiary angle-binned TB product is provided. In this study the Level 3 TB V310 product is showcased and compared to SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) TB. The Level 3 SM V300 product is compared to the single-orbit (SO) retrievals from the Level 2 SM processor from ESA with aligned configuration. The advantages and drawbacks of the Level 3 SM product (L3SM) are discussed. The comparison is done on a global scale between the two datasets and on the local scale with respect to in situ data from AMMA-CATCH and USDA ARS Watershed networks. The results obtained from the global analysis show that the MO implementation enhances the number of retrievals: up to 9 % over certain areas. The comparison with the in situ data shows that the increase in the number of retrievals does not come with a decrease in quality, but rather at the expense of an increased time lag in product availability from 6 h to 3.5 days, which can be a limiting factor for applications like flood forecast but reasonable for drought monitoring and climate change studies. The SMOS L3 soil moisture and L3 brightness temperature products are delivered using an open licence and

  10. Development of components for the high brightness laser. Final report May 77-Jun 80

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garmire, E.

    1980-10-01

    In 1979 DBR lasers were fabricated and their properties studied. Further investigations were undertaken of the beam expander, to determine its potential for the high brightness laser. From this data it was determined that a design change for the high brightness laser is required. This design change is described. In addition, measurements were made on laser amplification to compare this method of achieving higher power compared to the coupled diode arrays. Finally, as a spin-off of this research, a new design for a single mode laser was discovered, using the active/passive laser, a configuration which was fabricated as a first step toward fabrication of DBR lasers. Each of these research efforts are described in this report. Monolithic integration of the necessary components on one substrate for the high brightness laser has been hindered by problems in material and fabrication uniformity. This will be described, and projections for future development will be outlined.

  11. High-Brightness High-Energy Electron Beams from a Laser Wakefield Accelerator via Energy Chirp Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W. T.; Li, W. T.; Liu, J. S.; Zhang, Z. J.; Qi, R.; Yu, C. H.; Liu, J. Q.; Fang, M.; Qin, Z. Y.; Wang, C.; Xu, Y.; Wu, F. X.; Leng, Y. X.; Li, R. X.; Xu, Z. Z.

    2016-09-01

    By designing a structured gas density profile between the dual-stage gas jets to manipulate electron seeding and energy chirp reversal for compressing the energy spread, we have experimentally produced high-brightness high-energy electron beams from a cascaded laser wakefield accelerator with peak energies in the range of 200-600 MeV, 0.4%-1.2% rms energy spread, 10-80 pC charge, and ˜0.2 mrad rms divergence. The maximum six-dimensional brightness B6 D ,n is estimated as ˜6.5 ×1 015 A /m2/0.1 % , which is very close to the typical brightness of e beams from state-of-the-art linac drivers. These high-brightness high-energy e beams may lead to the realization of compact monoenergetic gamma-ray and intense coherent x-ray radiation sources.

  12. Comparison of measured brightness temperatures from SMOS with modelled ones from ORCHIDEE and H-TESSEL over the Iberian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barella-Ortiz, Anaïs; Polcher, Jan; de Rosnay, Patricia; Piles, Maria; Gelati, Emiliano

    2017-01-01

    L-band radiometry is considered to be one of the most suitable techniques to estimate surface soil moisture (SSM) by means of remote sensing. Brightness temperatures are key in this process, as they are the main input in the retrieval algorithm which yields SSM estimates. The work exposed compares brightness temperatures measured by the SMOS mission to two different sets of modelled ones, over the Iberian Peninsula from 2010 to 2012. The two modelled sets were estimated using a radiative transfer model and state variables from two land-surface models: (i) ORCHIDEE and (ii) H-TESSEL. The radiative transfer model used is the CMEM. Measured and modelled brightness temperatures show a good agreement in their temporal evolution, but their spatial structures are not consistent. An empirical orthogonal function analysis of the brightness temperature's error identifies a dominant structure over the south-west of the Iberian Peninsula which evolves during the year and is maximum in autumn and winter. Hypotheses concerning forcing-induced biases and assumptions made in the radiative transfer model are analysed to explain this inconsistency, but no candidate is found to be responsible for the weak spatial correlations at the moment. Further hypotheses are proposed and will be explored in a forthcoming paper. The analysis of spatial inconsistencies between modelled and measured TBs is important, as these can affect the estimation of geophysical variables and TB assimilation in operational models, as well as result in misleading validation studies.

  13. Innovative Facet Passivation for High-Brightness Laser Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-05

    views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not contrued as an official Department of the Army...factor bar) desired for military high energy lasers (HELs). COD of the front facet (laser mirror) is the main failure mechanism that constrains scaling...TOTAL: Books Number of Manuscripts: Patents Submitted Patents Awarded Awards Graduate Students Names of Post Doctorates Received Book TOTAL: Received

  14. Current State of the Art in High Brightness LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craford, George

    2007-03-01

    LED's have been commercially available since the 1960's. For many years they were used primarily for indicator applications. The remarkable increase in materials technology and efficiency that has been achieved since the early 1990's for AlInGaP red and amber LEDs, and InGaN green and blue LEDs, has enabled the penetration of markets such as outdoor display, signaling, and automotive brake light and turn signal applications. White LEDs, which are either blue LEDs combined with a phosphor, or a combination of red, green, and blue LEDs, are being used in emerging applications such as cell phone flash, television backlights, projection, and automotive headlights. In addition, to efficiency improvements these applications have required the development of higher power packages and, in some of these applications which are etendue limited, higher luminance devices. High power devices are commercially available which are capable of 140 lumens output and have an efficacy of around 70 lm/W for white emission. New package and chip technologies have been demonstrated which have a luminance of 38 mega nits (Mcd/m^2), approximately 50% more luminance than that of an automotive headlamp halogen bulb (˜25 mega nits). The recent progress in materials technology, packaging, and chip technology makes it clear that LED's will become important for general illumination applications. The rate of LED penetration of this market will depend upon continued increases in performance and lower costs as well as better control of the white spectral emission. Efficiency, current density, and costs are closely linked because the cost in dollars/lumen is inversely proportional to how many lumens can be realized from each unit of device area for a given device type. Performance as high as 138 lm/W, and over 40% wall plug efficiency, has been reported for low power research devices and over 90 lm/W for high power research devices. It is clear that high power commercial products with performance in

  15. Beam shaping design for compact and high-brightness fiber-coupled laser-diode system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junhong; Guo, Linui; Wu, Hualing; Wang, Zhao; Tan, Hao; Gao, Songxin; Wu, Deyong; Zhang, Kai

    2015-06-20

    Fiber-coupled laser diodes have become essential sources for fiber laser pumping and direct energy applications. A compact and high-brightness fiber-coupled system has been designed based on a significant beam shaping method. The laser-diode stack consists of eight mini-bars and is effectively coupled into a standard 100 μm core diameter and NA=0.22 fiber. The simulative result indicates that the module will have an output power over 440 W. Using this technique, compactness and high-brightness production of a fiber-coupled laser-diode module is possible.

  16. Planned High-brightness Channeling Radiation Experiment at Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomberg, Ben [NICADD, DeKalb; Mihalcea, Daniel [NICADD, DeKalb; Panuganti, Harsha [NICADD, DeKalb; Piot, Philippe [Fermilab; Brau, Charles [Vanderbilt U.; Choi, Bo [Vanderbilt U.; Gabella, William [Vanderbilt U.; Ivanov, Borislav [Vanderbilt U.; Mendenhall, Marcus [Vanderbilt U.; Lynn, Christopher [Swarthmore Coll.; Sen, Tanaji [Fermilab; Wagner, Wolfgang [Forschungszentrum Dresden Rossendorf

    2014-07-01

    In this contribution we describe the technical details and experimental setup of our study aimed at producing high-brightness channeling radiation (CR) at Fermilab’s new user facility the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA). In the ASTA photoinjector area electrons are accelerated up to 40-MeV and focused to a sub-micron spot on a ~40 micron thick carbon diamond, the electrons channel through the crystal and emit CR up to 80-KeV. Our study utilizes ASTA’s long pulse train capabilities and ability to preserve ultra-low emittance, to produce the desired high average brightness.

  17. The Impact of Florida's Bright Futures Scholarship Program on High School Performance and College Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkreader, Steve; Hughes, John; Tozzi, Melanie Hicks; Vanlandingham, Gary

    2008-01-01

    Florida's Bright Futures program is one of the nation's largest merit-based scholarship initiatives. This study used high school transcript and college enrollment data to examine the program's impact on high school course-taking patterns, school grades, college entrance exam scores, and rates of college attendance over time. The study indicates…

  18. High temperature battery. Hochtemperaturbatterie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulling, M.

    1992-06-04

    To prevent heat losses of a high temperature battery, it is proposed to make the incoming current leads in the area of their penetration through the double-walled insulating housing as thermal throttle, particularly spiral ones.

  19. Compact high brightness diode laser emitting 500W from a 100μm fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Stefan; Fritsche, Haro; Kruschke, Bastian; Schmidt, Torsten; Gries, Wolfgang

    2013-02-01

    High power, high brightness diode lasers are beginning to compete with solid state lasers, i.e. disk and fiber lasers. The core technologies for brightness scaling of diode lasers are optical stacking and dense spectral combining (DSC), as well as improvements of the diode material. Diode lasers have the lowest cost of ownership, highest efficiency and most compact design among all lasers. Multiple Single Emitter (MSE) modules allow highest power and highest brightness diode lasers based on standard broad area diodes. Multiple single emitters, each rated at 12 W, are stacked in the fast axis with a monolithic slow axis collimator (SAC) array. Volume Bragg Gratings (VBG) stabilizes the wavelength and narrow the linewidth to less than 1 nm. Dichroic mirrors are used for dense wavelength multiplexing of 4 channels within 12 nm. Subsequently polarization multiplexing generates 450 W with a beam quality of 4.5 mm*mrad. Fast control electronics and miniaturized switched power supplies enable pulse rise times of less than 10 μs, with pulse widths continuously adjustable from 20 μs to cw. Further power scaling up to multi-kilowatts can be achieved by multiplexing up to 16 channels. The power and brightness of these systems enables the use of direct diode lasers for cutting and welding. The technologies can be transferred to other wavelengths to include 793 nm and 1530 nm. Optimized spectral combining enables further improvements in spectral brightness and power.

  20. High Temperature Capacitor Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Kosek

    2009-06-30

    The absence of high-temperature electronics is an obstacle to the development of untapped energy resources (deep oil, gas and geothermal). US natural gas consumption is projected to grow from 22 trillion cubic feet per year (tcf) in 1999 to 34 tcf in 2020. Cumulatively this is 607 tcf of consumption by 2020, while recoverable reserves using current technology are 177 tcf. A significant portion of this shortfall may be met by tapping deep gas reservoirs. Tapping these reservoirs represents a significant technical challenge. At these depths, temperatures and pressures are very high and may require penetrating very hard rock. Logistics of supporting 6.1 km (20,000 ft) drill strings and the drilling processes are complex and expensive. At these depths up to 50% of the total drilling cost may be in the last 10% of the well depth. Thus, as wells go deeper it is increasingly important that drillers are able to monitor conditions down-hole such as temperature, pressure, heading, etc. Commercial off-the-shelf electronics are not specified to meet these operating conditions. This is due to problems associated with all aspects of the electronics including the resistors and capacitors. With respect to capacitors, increasing temperature often significantly changes capacitance because of the strong temperature dependence of the dielectric constant. Higher temperatures also affect the equivalent series resistance (ESR). High-temperature capacitors usually have low capacitance values because of these dielectric effects and because packages are kept small to prevent mechanical breakage caused by thermal stresses. Electrolytic capacitors do not operate at temperatures above 150oC due to dielectric breakdown. The development of high-temperature capacitors to be used in a high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) drilling environment was investigated. These capacitors were based on a previously developed high-voltage hybridized capacitor developed at Giner, Inc. in conjunction with a

  1. High-temperature superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Saxena, Ajay Kumar

    2010-01-01

    The present book aims at describing the phenomenon of superconductivity and high-temperature superconductors discovered by Bednorz and Muller in 1986. The book covers the superconductivity phenomenon, structure of high-Tc superconductors, critical currents, synthesis routes for high Tc materials, superconductivity in cuprates, the proximity effect and SQUIDs, theories of superconductivity and applications of superconductors.

  2. An Updated Geophysical Model for AMSR-E and SSMIS Brightness Temperature Simulations over Oceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizaveta Zabolotskikh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we considered the geophysical model for microwave brightness temperature (BT simulation for the Atmosphere-Ocean System under non-precipitating conditions. The model is presented as a combination of atmospheric absorption and ocean emission models. We validated this model for two satellite instruments—for Advanced Microwave Sounding Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E onboard Aqua satellite and for Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS onboard F16 satellite of Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP series. We compared simulated BT values with satellite BT measurements for different combinations of various water vapor and oxygen absorption models and wind induced ocean emission models. A dataset of clear sky atmospheric and oceanic parameters, collocated in time and space with satellite measurements, was used for the comparison. We found the best model combination, providing the least root mean square error between calculations and measurements. A single combination of models ensured the best results for all considered radiometric channels. We also obtained the adjustments to simulated BT values, as averaged differences between the model simulations and satellite measurements. These adjustments can be used in any research based on modeling data for removing model/calibration inconsistencies. We demonstrated the application of the model by means of the development of the new algorithm for sea surface wind speed retrieval from AMSR-E data.

  3. High Temperature ESP Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack Booker; Brindesh Dhruva

    2011-06-20

    The objective of the High Temperature ESP Monitoring project was to develop a downhole monitoring system to be used in wells with bottom hole well temperatures up to 300°C for measuring motor temperature, formation pressure, and formation temperature. These measurements are used to monitor the health of the ESP motor, to track the downhole operating conditions, and to optimize the pump operation. A 220 ºC based High Temperature ESP Monitoring system was commercially released for sale with Schlumberger ESP motors April of 2011 and a 250 ºC system with will be commercially released at the end of Q2 2011. The measurement system is now fully qualified, except for the sensor, at 300 °C.

  4. High-Precision Measurements of Brightness Variation of Nereid

    CERN Document Server

    Terai, Tsuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Nereid, a satellite of Neptune, has a highly eccentric prograde orbit with a semi-major axis larger than 200 Neptune radius and is classified as an irregular satellite. Although the capture origin of irregular satellites has been widely accepted, several previous studies suggest that Nereid was formed in the circumplanetary disk of Neptune and was ejected outward to the present location by Triton. Our time-series photometric observations confirm that the spin is stable and non-chaotic with a period of 11.5 hr as indicated by Grav et al. (2003). The optical colors of Nereid are indistinguishable from those of trans-Neptunian objects and Centaurs, especially those with neutral colors. We also find the consistency of Nereid's rotation with the size-rotation distribution of small outer bodies. It is more likely that Nereid originates in an immigrant body captured from a heliocentric orbit which was 4-5 AU away from Neptune's orbit.

  5. Search for high energy neutrinos from bright GRBs with ANTARES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanguineti M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-ray bursts are a possible site of hadronic acceleration, thus neutrinos are expected in correspondence of a GRB event. The brightest GRB observed between 2008 and 2013 (GRB080916C, GRB110918A, GRB130427A and GRB130505A have been investigated using the data of the ANTARES high energy neutrino telescope. In this paper two of most promising models of the GRB neutrino emission will be studied: the internal shock model and the photospheric model. No muons have been measured in space and time correlation with the selected GRBs and upper limits at 90% C.L. on the expected neutrino fluxes have been derived. This measure allows also setting constraints on some parameters used in the modeling of the neutrino flux: the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet Г and the baryon loading fp.

  6. High brightness diode-pumped organic solid-state laser

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Zhuang; Nafa, Malik; Chénais, Sébastien; Forget, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    High-power, diffraction-limited organic solid-state laser operation has been achieved in a vertical external cavity surface-emitting organic laser (VECSOL), pumped by a low-cost compact blue laser diode. The diode-pumped VECSOLs were demonstrated with various dyes in a polymer matrix, leading to laser emissions from 540 nm to 660 nm. Optimization of both the pump pulse duration and output coupling leads to a pump slope efficiency of 11% for a DCM based VECSOLs. We report output pulse energy up to 280 nJ with 100 ns long pump pulses, leading to a peak power of 3.5 W in a circularly symmetric, diffraction-limited beam.

  7. High brightness diode-pumped organic solid-state laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhuang; Mhibik, Oussama; Nafa, Malik; Chénais, Sébastien; Forget, Sébastien

    2015-02-01

    High-power, diffraction-limited organic solid-state laser operation has been achieved in a vertical external cavity surface-emitting organic laser (VECSOL), pumped by a low-cost compact blue laser diode. The diode-pumped VECSOLs were demonstrated with various dyes in a polymer matrix, leading to laser emissions from 540 nm to 660 nm. Optimization of both the pump pulse duration and output coupling leads to a pump slope efficiency of 11% for a DCM based VECSOLs. We report output pulse energy up to 280 nJ with 100 ns long pump pulses, leading to a peak power of 3.5 W in a circularly symmetric, diffraction-limited beam.

  8. Calibration and brightness temperature algorithm of CE-1 Lunar Microwave Sounder (CELMS)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    CE-1 Lunar Microwave Sounder (CELMS) is the first passive microwave radiometer in the world to sound the surface of the Moon in the lunar orbit at altitude of 200 km. The scientific objective of CELMS is to obtain global brightness temperature (TB) of the Moon, to retrieve information on lunar regolith, and to evaluate the distribution of helium-3 on the Moon implanted by solar wind. Before launch of CELMS, a series of experiments were carried out in laboratories to test the performances of the systems, and to calibrate the responses between the input of TB and the output of voltage from the receivers. However, the thermal condition exposed to CELMS is more complicated in lunar orbit than on the Earth, which makes the temperatures of different parts of CELMS wave vary greatly, and the cosmic background is not very clean due to the pointing of cold space antenna to the direction of the satellite running, which brings uncertainties into data-processing of CELMS when the temperature of cold space is used as a calibrator. Furthermore, the lack of knowledge on the lunar ingredients and compositions, distributions of physical temperatures, and properties on lunar microwave radiation leads to difficulties in validating the measurements and retrievals of CELMS. By analyzing the results of ground experiments and the measurements of CELMS in-orbit, along with our knowledge of the properties of lunar surface, here we give algorithms on calibration and antenna pattern correction (APC) of CELMS. We also describe in detail the principle of microwave transfer among the elements of CELMS, and discuss the method on testing calibration parameters of the system. In addition, the theory and model on correction antenna pattern of CELMS are developed by comparing antenna temperatures by CELMS with those simulated by microwave radiative transfer models. The global distribution of TB is given and the features of TB are analyzed. Our results show rich information included in TB on the

  9. High Temperature Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elder, Rachael; Cumming, Denis; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2015-01-01

    High temperature electrolysis of carbon dioxide, or co-electrolysis of carbon dioxide and steam, has a great potential for carbon dioxide utilisation. A solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC), operating between 500 and 900. °C, is used to reduce carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide. If steam is also...... input to the cell then hydrogen is produced giving syngas. This syngas can then be further reacted to form hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals. Operating at high temperature gives much higher efficiencies than can be achieved with low temperature electrolysis. Current state of the art SOECs utilise a dense...

  10. Brightness temperatures of the lunar surface: Calibration and analysis of Clementine long-wave infrared camera images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Stefanie Lyn

    2000-10-01

    This dissertation presents the calibration and analysis of the Clementine long-wave infrared (LWIR) camera images. The scientific payload on the Clementine spacecraft included a LWIR camera with a single passband centered at a wavelength of 8.75 μm. The Clementine orbit deviated by +/-30° from Sun synchronous, and for two lunar months, dayside nadir-looking images were obtained near local noon. During the systematic mapping phase of the Clementine mission, approximately 220,000 thermal-infrared images of the lunar surface were obtained. I have completed the calibration of the LWIR camera. Here I present the various steps involved in the calibration routine and the associated uncertainty analysis. The LWIR calibration routine can be outlined as follows: convert measured data number values to radiance via a calibration equation; subtract a zero-flux background image from each lunar image; divide by a flatfield frame; identify bad pixels; smooth over only bad pixels; adjust radiances to reflect the absolute calibration; and convert radiances to brightness temperatures via the Planck function. Observed LWIR radiances can be converted to brightness temperatures, which provide information on various physical properties of the lunar surface. I also present here the LWIR global data set. The LWIR data from noontime orbits demonstrate that the Lambertian temperature model of cos1/4 (i) is a fair approximation for nadir-looking temperatures, rather than the cos1/6(i) behavior observed for ground-based measurements of the full Moon. Deviations from the Lambertian model are likely due to surface roughness effects. In an effort to understand the influence of large-scale topography on remote lunar surface measurements, I constructed a model which calculates the correlation between reflectance and temperature for a macroscopically rough surface with varying albedo. In this dissertation, LWIR temperatures are directly compared to Clementine ultraviolet-visible (UVVIS) camera 750

  11. Designing and optimizing highly efficient grating for high-brightness laser based on spectral beam combining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ying-Ying, E-mail: xclin@semi.ac.cn, E-mail: yangyy@semi.ac.cn; Zhao, Ya-Ping; Wang, Li-Rong; Zhang, Ling; Lin, Xue-Chun, E-mail: xclin@semi.ac.cn, E-mail: yangyy@semi.ac.cn [Laboratory of All Solid State Light Sources, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2015-03-14

    A highly efficient nano-periodical grating is theoretically investigated for spectral beam combining (SBC) and is experimentally implemented for attaining high-brightness laser from a diode laser array. The rigorous coupled-wave analysis with the S matrix method is employed to optimize the parameters of the grating. According the optimized parameters, the grating is fabricated and plays a key role in SBC cavity. The diffraction efficiency of this grating is optimized to 95% for the output laser which is emitted from the diode laser array. The beam parameter product of 3.8 mm mrad of the diode laser array after SBC is achieved at the output power of 46.3 W. The optical-to-optical efficiency of SBC cavity is measured to be 93.5% at the maximum operating current in the experiment.

  12. High Temperature Piezoelectric Drill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Scott, James; Boudreau, Kate; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Shrout, Tom; Zhang, Shujun

    2009-01-01

    The current NASA Decadal mission planning effort has identified Venus as a significant scientific target for a surface in-situ sampling/analyzing mission. The Venus environment represents several extremes including high temperature (460 deg C), high pressure (9 MPa), and potentially corrosive (condensed sulfuric acid droplets that adhere to surfaces during entry) environments. This technology challenge requires new rock sampling tools for these extreme conditions. Piezoelectric materials can potentially operate over a wide temperature range. Single crystals, like LiNbO3, have a Curie temperature that is higher than 1000 deg C and the piezoelectric ceramics Bismuth Titanate higher than 600 deg C. A study of the feasibility of producing piezoelectric drills that can operate in the temperature range up to 500 deg C was conducted. The study includes the high temperature properties investigations of engineering materials and piezoelectric ceramics with different formulas and doping. The drilling performances of a prototype Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corer (USDC) using high temperate piezoelectric ceramics and single crystal were tested at temperature up to 500 deg C. The detailed results of our study and a discussion of the future work on performance improvements are presented in this paper.

  13. High-brightness beamline for x-ray spectroscopy at the ALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, R.C.C.; Jones, G. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Lindle, D.W. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range, designed to achieve the goals of high energy resolution, high flux, and high brightness at the sample. When completed later this year, it will be the first ALS monochromatic hard x-ray beamline, and its brightness will be an order of magnitude higher than presently available in this energy range. In addition, it will provide flux and resolution comparable to any other beamline now in operation. To achieve these goals, two technical improvements, relative to existing x-ray beamlines, were incorporated. First, a somewhat novel optical design for x-rays, in which matched toroidal mirrors are positioned before and after the double-crystal monochromator, was adopted. This configuration allows for high resolution by passing a collimated beam through the monochromator, and for high brightness by focusing the ALS source on the sample with unit magnification. Second, a new {open_quotes}Cowan type{close_quotes} double-crystal monochromator based on the design used at NSLS beamline X-24A was developed. The measured mechanical precision of this new monochromator shows significant improvement over existing designs, without using positional feedback available with piezoelectric devices. Such precision is essential because of the high brightness of the radiation and the long distance (12 m) from the source (sample) to the collimating (focusing) mirror. This combination of features will provide a bright, high resolution, and stable x-ray beam for use in the x-ray spectroscopy program at the ALS.

  14. Strangeness at high temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Christian

    2013-01-01

    We use up to fourth order cumulants of net strangeness fluctuations and their correlations with net baryon number fluctuations to extract information on the strange meson and baryon contribution to the low temperature hadron resonance gas, the dissolution of strange hadronic states in the crossover region of the QCD transition and the quasi-particle nature of strange quark contributions to the high temperature quark-gluon plasma phase.

  15. Percentage Contributions from Atmospheric and Surface Features to Computed Brightness Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, G. S.

    2006-12-01

    Over the past few years, there has become an increasing interest in the use of millimeter-wave (mm-wave) and sub-millimeter-wave (submm-wave) radiometer observations to investigate the properties of ice particles in clouds. Passive radiometric channels respond to both the integrated particle mass throughout the volume and field of view, and to the amount, location, and size distribution of the frozen (and liquid) particles with the sensitivity varying for different frequencies and hydrometeor types. One methodology used since the 1960's to discern the relationship between the physical state observed and the brightness temperature (TB) is through the temperature weighting function profile. In this research, the temperature weighting function concept is exploited to analyze the sensitivity of various characteristics of the cloud profile, such as relative humidity, ice water path, liquid water path, and surface emissivity. In our numerical analysis, we compute the contribution (in Kelvin) from each of these cloud and surface characteristics, so that the sum of these various parts equals the computed TB. Furthermore, the percentage contribution from each of these characteristics is assessed. There is some intermingling/contamination of the contributions from various components due to the integrated nature of passive observations and the absorption and scattering between the vertical layers, but all in all the knowledge gained is useful. This investigation probes the sensitivity over several cloud classifications, such as cirrus, blizzards, light snow, anvil clouds, and heavy rain. The focus is on mm-wave and submm-wave frequencies, however discussions of the effects of cloud variations to frequencies as low as 10 GHz and up to 874 GHz will also be presented. The results show that nearly 60% of the TB value at 89 GHz comes from the earth's surface for even the heaviest blizzard snow rates. On the other hand, a significant percentage of the TB value comes from the snow

  16. Comparison Between AQUARIUS and SMOS brightness temperatures for Heterogeneous Land Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benlloch, Amparo; Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto; Tenjo, Carolina; Navarro, Enrique

    2016-07-01

    Intercomparison between Aquarius and SMOS brightness temperatures (TBs) over land surfaces is more challenging than over oceans because land footprints are more heterogeneous. In this work we are comparing Aquarius and SMOS TBs under coherente conditions obtained both by considering similar areas, according to land uses and by stratifying by means of TVDI (Temperature Vegetation Dryness Index) that accounts for the dynamics of the vegetation instead of assuming static characteristics as in the previous approches. The area of study was chosen in central Spain where we could get a significant number of matches between both instruments. The study period corresponded to 2012-2014. SMOS level-3 data were obtained from the Centre Aval de Traitement des Données SMOS (CATDS) and Aquarius' from the Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PODAAC). Land uses were obtained from the Spanish SIOSE facility (Sistema de Informacion de Ocupacion del Suelo en España) that uses a scale of 1:25.000 and polygon geometrical structure layer. SIOSE is based on panchromatic and multispectral 2.5 m resolution SPOT-5 images together with Landsat-5 images and orthophotos from the Spanish Nacional Plan of Aerial Orthophotography (PNOA). TVDI values were obtained from MODIS operational products of land surface temperature and NDVI. SMOS ascending TBs were compared to inner-beam Aquarius descending half-orbit TBs coinciding over the study area at 06:00 h. The Aquarius inner beam has an incidence angle of 28,7º and SMOS data were considered for the 27,5º incidence angle. The SMOS products corresponded to version 2.6x (data before 31st Oct 2013) and version 2.7x (data after 1st Jan 2014). Intersections between both footprints were analysed under conditions of similar areas, land uses and TVDI values. For the latter (land uses/TVDI), a linear combination of SMOS land uses/TVDI was obtained to match the larger Aquarius footprint. A more physical approach is also under way

  17. A Brightness-Temperature-Variance-Based Passive Microwave Algorithm for Monitoring Soil Freeze/Thaw State on the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, M.; Yang, K.; Qin, J.; Jin, R.; Ma, Y.; Wen, J.; Chen, Y.; Zhao, L.; La, Z.; Tang, W.

    2014-12-01

    The land surface on the Tibetan Plateau experiences typical diurnal and seasonal freeze/thaw processes that play important roles in the regional water and energy exchanges, and recent passive microwave satellites provide opportunities to detect the soil state for the unique region. With the support of three soil moisture and temperature networks in the Tibetan Plateau, a dual-index microwave algorithm with AMSR-E (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System) data is developed for the detection of soil surface freeze/thaw state. One index is the standard deviation index (SDI) of brightness temperature (TB), which is defined as the standard deviation of horizontally polarized brightness temperatures at all AMSR-E frequencies. It is the major index and is used to reflect the reduction of liquid water content after soils get frozen. The other index is the 36.5 GHz vertically-polarized brightness temperature, which is linearly correlated with ground temperature and thus is utilized to detect it. The threshold values of the two indices (SDI and the brightness temperature at 36.5 GHz vertically-polarized) are determined based on a part of in situ data from the network located in a semi-arid climate, and the algorithm was validated against other in situ data from this network. Further validations were conducted based on the other two networks located in different climates (semi-humid and arid, respectively). Results show that this algorithm has accuracy of more than 90% for the semi-humid and semi-arid regions, and misclassifications mainly occur at the transition period between unfrozen and frozen seasons. Nevertheless, the microwave signals have limited capability in identifying the soil surface freeze/thaw state in the arid region, because they can penetrate deep dry soils and thus embody the bulk information beneath the surface.

  18. Surface and Atmospheric Contributions to Passive Microwave Brightness Temperatures for Falling Snow Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Johnson, Benjamin T.

    2011-01-01

    Physically based passive microwave precipitation retrieval algorithms require a set of relationships between satellite -observed brightness temperatures (TBs) and the physical state of the underlying atmosphere and surface. These relationships are nonlinear, such that inversions are ill ]posed especially over variable land surfaces. In order to elucidate these relationships, this work presents a theoretical analysis using TB weighting functions to quantify the percentage influence of the TB resulting from absorption, emission, and/or reflection from the surface, as well as from frozen hydrometeors in clouds, from atmospheric water vapor, and from other contributors. The percentage analysis was also compared to Jacobians. The results are presented for frequencies from 10 to 874 GHz, for individual snow profiles, and for averages over three cloud-resolving model simulations of falling snow. The bulk structure (e.g., ice water path and cloud depth) of the underlying cloud scene was found to affect the resultant TB and percentages, producing different values for blizzard, lake effect, and synoptic snow events. The slant path at a 53 viewing angle increases the hydrometeor contributions relative to nadir viewing channels. Jacobians provide the magnitude and direction of change in the TB values due to a change in the underlying scene; however, the percentage analysis provides detailed information on how that change affected contributions to the TB from the surface, hydrometeors, and water vapor. The TB percentage information presented in this paper provides information about the relative contributions to the TB and supplies key pieces of information required to develop and improve precipitation retrievals over land surfaces.

  19. Assimilation of SMOS brightness temperatures or soil moisture retrievals into a land surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lannoy, Gabriëlle J. M.; Reichle, Rolf H.

    2016-12-01

    Three different data products from the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission are assimilated separately into the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, version 5 (GEOS-5) to improve estimates of surface and root-zone soil moisture. The first product consists of multi-angle, dual-polarization brightness temperature (Tb) observations at the bottom of the atmosphere extracted from Level 1 data. The second product is a derived SMOS Tb product that mimics the data at a 40° incidence angle from the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission. The third product is the operational SMOS Level 2 surface soil moisture (SM) retrieval product. The assimilation system uses a spatially distributed ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) with seasonally varying climatological bias mitigation for Tb assimilation, whereas a time-invariant cumulative density function matching is used for SM retrieval assimilation. All assimilation experiments improve the soil moisture estimates compared to model-only simulations in terms of unbiased root-mean-square differences and anomaly correlations during the period from 1 July 2010 to 1 May 2015 and for 187 sites across the US. Especially in areas where the satellite data are most sensitive to surface soil moisture, large skill improvements (e.g., an increase in the anomaly correlation by 0.1) are found in the surface soil moisture. The domain-average surface and root-zone skill metrics are similar among the various assimilation experiments, but large differences in skill are found locally. The observation-minus-forecast residuals and analysis increments reveal large differences in how the observations add value in the Tb and SM retrieval assimilation systems. The distinct patterns of these diagnostics in the two systems reflect observation and model errors patterns that are not well captured in the assigned EnKF error parameters. Consequently, a localized optimization of the EnKF error parameters is needed to further improve Tb or SM retrieval

  20. Soil moisture deficit estimation using satellite multi-angle brightness temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Lu; Han, Dawei; Dai, Qiang

    2016-08-01

    Accurate soil moisture information is critically important for hydrological modelling. Although remote sensing soil moisture measurement has become an important data source, it cannot be used directly in hydrological modelling. A novel study based on nonlinear techniques (a local linear regression (LLR) and two feedforward artificial neural networks (ANNs)) is carried out to estimate soil moisture deficit (SMD), using the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) multi-angle brightness temperatures (Tbs) with both horizontal (H) and vertical (V) polarisations. The gamma test is used for the first time to determine the optimum number of Tbs required to construct a reliable smooth model for SMD estimation, and the relationship between model input and output is achieved through error variance estimation. The simulated SMD time series in the study area is from the Xinanjiang hydrological model. The results have shown that LLR model is better at capturing the interrelations between SMD and Tbs than ANNs, with outstanding statistical performances obtained during both training (NSE = 0.88, r = 0.94, RMSE = 0.008 m) and testing phases (NSE = 0.85, r = 0.93, RMSE = 0.009 m). Nevertheless, both ANN training algorithms (radial BFGS and conjugate gradient) have performed well in estimating the SMD data and showed excellent performances compared with those derived directly from the SMOS soil moisture products. This study has also demonstrated the informative capability of the gamma test in the input data selection for model development. These results provide interesting perspectives for data-assimilation in flood-forecasting.

  1. High temperature storage loop :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.

    2013-07-01

    A three year plan for thermal energy storage (TES) research was created at Sandia National Laboratories in the spring of 2012. This plan included a strategic goal of providing test capability for Sandia and for the nation in which to evaluate high temperature storage (>650ÀC) technology. The plan was to scope, design, and build a flow loop that would be compatible with a multitude of high temperature heat transfer/storage fluids. The High Temperature Storage Loop (HTSL) would be reconfigurable so that it was useful for not only storage testing, but also for high temperature receiver testing and high efficiency power cycle testing as well. In that way, HTSL was part of a much larger strategy for Sandia to provide a research and testing platform that would be integral for the evaluation of individual technologies funded under the SunShot program. DOEs SunShot program seeks to reduce the price of solar technologies to 6/kWhr to be cost competitive with carbon-based fuels. The HTSL project sought to provide evaluation capability for these SunShot supported technologies. This report includes the scoping, design, and budgetary costing aspects of this effort

  2. High temperature storage loop :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.

    2013-07-01

    A three year plan for thermal energy storage (TES) research was created at Sandia National Laboratories in the spring of 2012. This plan included a strategic goal of providing test capability for Sandia and for the nation in which to evaluate high temperature storage (>650ÀC) technology. The plan was to scope, design, and build a flow loop that would be compatible with a multitude of high temperature heat transfer/storage fluids. The High Temperature Storage Loop (HTSL) would be reconfigurable so that it was useful for not only storage testing, but also for high temperature receiver testing and high efficiency power cycle testing as well. In that way, HTSL was part of a much larger strategy for Sandia to provide a research and testing platform that would be integral for the evaluation of individual technologies funded under the SunShot program. DOEs SunShot program seeks to reduce the price of solar technologies to 6/kWhr to be cost competitive with carbon-based fuels. The HTSL project sought to provide evaluation capability for these SunShot supported technologies. This report includes the scoping, design, and budgetary costing aspects of this effort

  3. Heat dissipation performance of a high-brightness LED package assembly using high-thermal conductivity filler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, K C; Liem, H; Choy, H S

    2013-12-10

    This paper presents a thermal analysis and experimental validation of natural convective heat transfer of a high-brightness light-emitting diode (LED) package assembly. The substrate materials used in the LED package assembly were filled and doped using boron nitride (BN) filler. The thermal conductivity of the BN-filled substrate was measured. The temperature distribution and heat flow of the LED package were assessed by thermal profile measurement using an infrared (IR) camera and thermocouples. In addition, the heat transfer process of the LED package assembly in natural convection was also simulated using the computational fluid dynamics method. The optical performance of the LED package was monitored and investigated with various filler contents. The heat conduction mechanism in the substrate was analyzed. IR thermogram showed that the BN-doped substrate could effectively lower the surface temperature of the LED package by 21.5°C compared with the traditional FR4 substrate. According to the IESNA LM 80 lifetime testing method, reduction in LED temperature can prolong the LED's lifetime by 19,000 h. The optical performance of the LED package assembly was also found to be improved significantly in lighting power by 10%. As a result, the overall heat dissipation capability of the LED package to the surrounding is enhanced, which improves the LED's efficacy.

  4. Low environmental impact bleaching sequences for attaining high brightness level with eucalyptus SPP pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Costa

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The alternatives used for minimizing the usage of chlorine dioxide in bleaching sequences included a hot acid hydrolysis (Ahot stage, the use of hot chlorine dioxide (Dhot and ozone stages at medium consistency and high consistency (Zmc and Zhc, in addition to stages with atmospheric hydrogen peroxide (P and pressurized hydrogen peroxide (PO. The results were interpreted based on the cost of the chemical products, bleaching process yields and on minimizing the environmental impact of the bleaching process. In spite of some process restrictions, high ISO brightness levels were kept around 90 % brightness. Additionally, the inclusion of stages like acid hydrolysis, pressurized peroxide and ozone in the bleaching sequences provided an increase in operating flexibility, aimed at reducing environmental impact (ECF Light. The Dhot(EOPD(PO sequence presented lower operating cost for ISO brightness above 92 %. However, this kind of sequence was not allowed for closing the wastewater circuit, even partially. For ISO brightness level around 91%, the AhotZhcDP sequence presented a lower operating cost than the others.

  5. Desulfurization at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panula-Nikkilae, E.; Kurkela, E.; Mojtahedi, W.

    1987-01-01

    Two high-temperature desulfurization methods, furnace injection and gasification-desulfurization are presented. In furnace injection, the efficiency of desulfurization is 50-60%, but this method is applied in energy production plants, where flue gas desulfurization cannot be used. Ca-based sorbents are used as desulfurization material. Factors affecting desulfurization and the effect of injection on the boiler and ash handling are discussed. In energy production based on gasification, very low sulfur emissions can be achieved by conventional low-temperature cleanup. However, high-temperature gas cleaning leads to higher efficiency and can be applied to smaller size classes. Ca-, Fe-, or Zn-based sorbents or mixed metals can be used for desulfurization. Most of the methods under development are based on the use of regenerative sorbents in a cleanup reactor located outside the gasifier. So far, only calcium compounds have been used for desulfurization inside the gasifier.

  6. An Increasing Stellar Baryon Fraction in Bright Galaxies at High Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Finkelstein, Steven L; Behroozi, Peter; Somerville, Rachel S; Papovich, Casey; Milosavljevic, Milos; Dekel, Avishai; Narayanan, Desika; Ashby, Matthew L N; Cooray, Asantha; Fazio, Giovanni G; Ferguson, Henry C; Koekemoer, Anton M; Salmon, Brett W; Willner, S P

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations have shown that the characteristic luminosity of the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function does not significantly evolve at 4 < z < 7 and is approximately M*_UV ~ -21. We investigate this apparent non-evolution by examining a sample of 190 bright, M_UV < -21 galaxies at z=4 to 7, analyzing their stellar populations and host halo masses. Including deep Spitzer/IRAC imaging to constrain the rest-frame optical light, we find that M*_UV galaxies at z=4-7 have similar stellar masses of log(M/Msol)=9.8-9.9 and are thus relatively massive for these high redshifts. However, bright galaxies at z=4-7 are less massive and have younger inferred ages than similarly bright galaxies at z=2-3, even though the two populations have similar star formation rates and levels of dust attenuation. We match the abundances of these bright z=4-7 galaxies to halo mass functions from the Bolshoi Lambda-CDM simulation to estimate the halo masses. We find that the typical halo masses in ~M*_UV galaxie...

  7. Simulations of a Canadian snowpack brightness temperatures using SURFEX-Crocus for Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larue, Fanny; Royer, Alain; De Sève, Danielle; Langlois, Alexandre; Roy, Alexandre; Saint-Jean-Rondeau, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    In Quebec, the water associated to snowmelt represents 30% of the annual electricity production so that the snow cover evaluation in real time is of primary interest. The key variable is snow water equivalent (SWE) which describes the evolution of a global seasonal snow cover. However, the sparse distribution of meteorological stations in northern Québec generates great uncertainty in the extrapolation of SWE. On the contrary, the spatial and temporal coverage of satellite data offer a source of information with a high potential when considered as an alternative to the poor spatial distribution of in-situ information. Thus, this project aims to improve the prediction of SWE by assimilation of satellite passive microwave brightness temperatures (Tb) observations, independently of any ground observations. The snowpack evolution is simulated by the French snow model SURFEX-Crocus, driven by the Canadian atmospheric model GEM with a spatial resolution of 10 km. The bias of the atmospheric model and the impact of initialization errors on the simulated SWE were quantified from our ground measurements. To assimilate satellite observations, the multi-layered snow model is first coupled with a radiative transfer model using the Dense Media Radiative transfer theory (the DMRT-ML model) to estimate the microwave snow emission of the simulated snowpack. In order to retrieve simulated Tb in frequencies of interest (i.e. sensitive to snow dielectric properties), the snow microstructure needs to be well parameterized. It was shown in previous studies that the specific surface area (SSA) of snow grains is a well-defined parameter to describe the size and the shape of snow grains and which allows reproducible field measurements. SURFEX-Crocus estimates a SSA for each simulated snow layer, however, the snow microstructure in DMRT-ML is defined per layer by monodisperse optical radius of grain (~ 1/SSA) and by the stickiness which is not known. It thus becomes necessary to introduce

  8. Brightness Temperature and Soil Moisture Validation at Different Scales During the SMOS Validation Campaign in the Rur and Erft Catchments, Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montzka, Carsten; Bogena, Heye R.; Weihermüller, Lutz

    2013-01-01

    -band Microwave Emission of the Biosphere model. Measurements of the airborne L-band sensors EMIRAD and HUT-2D on-board a Skyvan aircraft as well as ground-based mobile measurements performed with the truck mounted JÜLBARA L-band radiometer were analyzed for calibration of the simulated brightness temperature...... developed an approach to validate spatial and temporal SMOS brightness temperature products. An area-wide brightness temperature reference was generated by using an area-wide modeling of top soil moisture and soil temperature with the WaSiM-ETH model and radiative transfer calculation based on the L...

  9. NH3, H2S, and the Radio Brightness Temperature Spectra of the Giant Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, Thomas R.

    1995-01-01

    Recent radio interferometer observations of Neptune enable comparisons of the radio brightness temperature (T(sub B)) spectra of all four giant planets. This comparison reveals evidence for fundamental differences in the compositions of Uranus' and Neptune's upper tropospheres, particularly in their ammonia (NH3) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) mixing ratios, despite those planets' outward similarities. The tropospheric abundances of these constituents yield information about their deep abundances, and ultimately about the formation of the planets from the presolar nebula (Atreya et al.). Figures 1, 2, 3, and 4 show the T(sub B) spectra of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, respectively, from 0.1 to tens of cm wavelength. The data shown are collected from many observers. Data for Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus are those cataloged by de Pater and Massie (1985), plus the Saturn Very Large Array (VLA) data by Grossman et al. Figure 3, Uranus, shows only data acquired since 1973. Before 1973 Uranus' T(sub B) increased steadily as its pole moved into view, causing significant scatter in those data. Neptune data at greater than 1 cm, all taken at the VLA, are collected from de Pater and Richmond, de Pater et al., and Hofstadter. For a variety of reasons, such as susceptibility to source confusion, single-dish data at those wavelengths are much noisier than the more reliable VLA data and have been ignored. Single-dish data by Griffin and Orton shortward of 0.4 cm are shown, along with the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (interferometer) datum at 0.266 cm by Muhleman and Berge. Spectra of Jupiter, Saturn, and Neptune share certain gross characteristics. In each spectrum, T(sub B) at 1.3 cm is approximately 120-140 K, less than approximately 30 K different from that at 0.1 cm. All three spectra show a break in slope at or near 1.3 cm, with T(sub B) increasing fairly rapidly with wavelength longward of 1.3 cm. Visible and IR spectroscopy show that NH3, whose strong inversion

  10. High brightness, high current injector design for the ATF upgrade at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2015-04-01

    Brookhaven National Accelerator Test Facility (BNL ATF) is in the process of moving to a new place and upgrading its major capabilities: The electron beam energy and CO2 laser power. Specifically, the maximum electron beam energy will be first projected to 100-150 MeV and then upgraded to 500 MeV while at the same time the laser power will increase 100 fold, thus making the new ATF a powerful tool in advanced accelerator concept research. The bright electron bunch produced by the new state-of-the-art photocathode rf gun will be accelerated and optionally delivered to multiple beamlines. The injector is a key element of this accelerator upgrade. It must deliver a high average current beam with very small transverse and longitudinal emittances, at a sufficiently high energy that space charge effects are under control. We review here the detailed injector design and present first results from beam dynamics simulations. We give emphasis in the production of compressed flat beams which have important applications in novel light-source concepts and could possibly alleviate the need for damping rings in lepton colliders. We present a theoretical model and with the aid of simulation examine the influence of space charge, bunch compression and suggest a operating regime with minimal phase space dilutions.

  11. Building a Learning Database for the Neural Network Retrieval of Sea Surface Salinity from SMOS Brightness Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Ammar, Adel; Obligis, Estelle; Crépon, Michel; Thiria, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    This article deals with an important aspect of the neural network retrieval of sea surface salinity (SSS) from SMOS brightness temperatures (TBs). The neural network retrieval method is an empirical approach that offers the possibility of being independent from any theoretical emissivity model, during the in-flight phase. A Previous study [1] has proven that this approach is applicable to all pixels on ocean, by designing a set of neural networks with different inputs. The present study focuses on the choice of the learning database and demonstrates that a judicious distribution of the geophysical parameters allows to markedly reduce the systematic regional biases of the retrieved SSS, which are due to the high noise on the TBs. An equalization of the distribution of the geophysical parameters, followed by a new technique for boosting the learning process, makes the regional biases almost disappear for latitudes between 40{\\deg}S and 40{\\deg}N, while the global standard deviation remains between 0.6 psu (at t...

  12. Retrieving soil surface temperature under snowpack using special sensor microwave/imager brightness temperature in forested areas of Heilongjiang, China: an improved method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xingming; Li, Xiaofeng; Jiang, Tao; Ding, Yanling; Wu, Lili; Zhang, Shiyi; Zhao, Kai

    2016-04-01

    Soil surface temperature (Ts) is an important indicator of global temperature change and a key input parameter for retrieving land surface variables using remote sensing techniques. Due to the masking in the thermal infrared band and the scattering in the microwave band of snow, the temperature of soil surfaces covered by snow is difficult to infer from remote sensing data. We attempted to estimate Ts under snow cover using brightness temperature data from the special sensor microwave/imager. Ts under snow cover was underestimated due to the strong scattering effect of snow on upward soil microwave emissions at 37 GHz. The underestimated portion of Ts is related to snow properties, such as depth, grain size, and moisture. Based on the microwave emission model of layered snowpacks, the simulated results revealed a linear relationship between the underestimated Ts and the brightness temperature difference (TBD) at 19 and 37 GHz. When TBDs at 19 and 37 GHz were introduced to the Ts estimation method, accuracy improved, i.e., the root mean square error and bias of the estimated Ts decreased greatly, especially for dry snow. This improvement allows Ts estimation of snow-covered surfaces from 37 GHz microwave brightness temperature.

  13. High brightness gamma-ray production at Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalcea, D.; Jacobson, B.; Murokh, A.; Piot, P.; Ruan, J.

    2017-03-01

    Electron beams with energies of the order of a few 100's of MeV and low transverse emittance, in combination with powerful infrared lasers, allow for the production of high quality gamma rays through Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS). At Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility, a 300 MeV beam will be used to generate gamma rays with maximum photon energies of up to ˜1.5 MeV and brightness of the order of 1021 photons/[s-(mm-mrad)2- 0.1%BW]. Due to the low electron-beam transverse emittance, the relative bandwidth of the scattered radiation is expected to be ≤ 1%. A key challenge toward the production of high radiation dose and brightness is to enhance the energy of the infrared 3 ps laser pulses to the joule level. In this contribution, we present the plans for the experimental setup, along with comprehensive numerical simulations of the ICS process.

  14. Initial observations of high-charge, low-emittance electron beams at HIBAF (High Brightness Accelerator FEL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Feldman, R.B.; Carsten, B.E.; Feldman, D.W.; Sheffield, R.L.; Stein, W.E.; Johnson, W.J.; Thode, L.E.; Bender, S.C.; Busch, G.E.

    1990-01-01

    We report our initial measurements of bright (high-charge, low-emittance) electron beams generated at the Los Alamos High Brightness Accelerator FEL (HIBAF) Facility. Normalized emittance values of less than 50 {pi} mm-mrad for charges ranging from 0.7 to 8.7 nC were obtained for single micropulses at a y-waist and at an energy of 14.7 MeV. These measurements were part of the commissioning campaign on the HIBAF photoelectric injector. Macropulse measurements have also been performed and are compared with PARMELA simulations. 5 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Volume-scalable high-brightness three-dimensional visible light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramania, Ganapathi; Fischer, Arthur J; Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2014-02-18

    A volume-scalable, high-brightness, electrically driven visible light source comprises a three-dimensional photonic crystal (3DPC) comprising one or more direct bandgap semiconductors. The improved light emission performance of the invention is achieved based on the enhancement of radiative emission of light emitters placed inside a 3DPC due to the strong modification of the photonic density-of-states engendered by the 3DPC.

  16. High temperature superconducting compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Allen M.

    1992-11-01

    The major accomplishment of this grant has been to develop techniques for the in situ preparation of high-Tc superconducting films involving the use of ozone-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The techniques are generalizable to the growth of trilayer and multilayer structures. Films of both the DyBa2Cu3O(7-x) and YBa2Cu3O(7-x) compounds as well as the La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 compound have been grown on the usual substrates, SrTiO3, YSZ, MgO, and LaAlO3, as well as on Si substrates without any buffer layer. A bolometer has been fabricated on a thermally isolated SiN substrate coated with YSZ, an effort carried out in collaboration with Honeywell Inc. The deposition process facilitates the fabrication of very thin and transparent films creating new opportunities for the study of superconductor-insulator transitions and the investigation of photo-doping with carriers of high temperature superconductors. In addition to a thin film technology, a patterning technology has been developed. Trilayer structures have been developed for FET devices and tunneling junctions. Other work includes the measurement of the magnetic properties of bulk single crystal high temperature superconductors, and in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory, measurement of electric transport properties of T1-based high-Tc films.

  17. High Temperature Piezoelectric Drill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Shrout, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Venus is one of the planets in the solar systems that are considered for potential future exploration missions. It has extreme environment where the average temperature is 460 deg C and its ambient pressure is about 90 atm. Since the existing actuation technology cannot maintain functionality under the harsh conditions of Venus, it is a challenge to perform sampling and other tasks that require the use of moving parts. Specifically, the currently available electromagnetic actuators are limited in their ability to produce sufficiently high stroke, torque, or force. In contrast, advances in developing electro-mechanical materials (such as piezoelectric and electrostrictive) have enabled potential actuation capabilities that can be used to support such missions. Taking advantage of these materials, we developed a piezoelectric actuated drill that operates at the temperature range up to 500 deg C and the mechanism is based on the Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corer (USDC) configuration. The detailed results of our study are presented in this paper

  18. High temperature materials and mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    The use of high-temperature materials in current and future applications, including silicone materials for handling hot foods and metal alloys for developing high-speed aircraft and spacecraft systems, has generated a growing interest in high-temperature technologies. High Temperature Materials and Mechanisms explores a broad range of issues related to high-temperature materials and mechanisms that operate in harsh conditions. While some applications involve the use of materials at high temperatures, others require materials processed at high temperatures for use at room temperature. High-temperature materials must also be resistant to related causes of damage, such as oxidation and corrosion, which are accelerated with increased temperatures. This book examines high-temperature materials and mechanisms from many angles. It covers the topics of processes, materials characterization methods, and the nondestructive evaluation and health monitoring of high-temperature materials and structures. It describes the ...

  19. 3C 286: a bright, compact, stable, and highly polarized calibrator for millimeter-wavelength observations

    CERN Document Server

    Agudo, Ivan; Wiesemeyer, Helmut; Molina, Sol N; Casadio, Carolina; Gomez, Jose L; Emmanoulopoulos, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    Context. A number of millimeter and submillimeter facilities with linear polarization observing capabilities have started operating during last years. These facilities, as well as other previous millimeter telescopes and interferometers, require bright and stable linear polarization calibrators to calibrate new instruments and to monitor their instrumental polarization. The current limited number of adequate calibrators implies difficulties in the acquisition of these calibration observations. Aims. Looking for additional linear polarization calibrators in the millimeter spectral range, in mid-2006 we started monitoring 3C 286, a standard and highly stable polarization calibrator for radio observations. Methods. Here we present the 3 and 1mm monitoring observations obtained between September 2006 and October 2011 with the XPOL polarimeter on the IRAM 30m Millimeter Telescope. Results. Our observations show that 3C 286 is a bright source of constant total flux with 3mm flux density S_3mm = (0.90 \\pm 0.02) Jy. ...

  20. Femtosecond laser pumped by high-brightness coherent polarization locked diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnawirman; Phua, P B

    2011-08-01

    We demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, the use of a coherent polarization locked diode as the high-brightness pump source for a femtosecond laser. Four diode emitters are coherently locked to produce more than 5 W linearly polarized, narrow linewidth, and single-lobed pump beam. This gives >10× brightness improvement over the conventional diode array. The diode beam is then used to pump a Yb:KYW laser to obtain 2 W output with 57% slope efficiency in cw laser operation. By using a saturable absorber mirror, we achieved cw mode-locking operation with a 177 fs pulse width at an average power of 0.55 W.

  1. A Multi-Wavelength Study of the High Surface Brightness Hotspot in PKS1421-490

    CERN Document Server

    Godfrey, L E H; Lovell, J E J; Jauncey, D L; Gelbord, J; Schwartz, D A; Marshall, H L; Birkinshaw, M; Georganopoulos, M; Murphy, D W; Perlman, E S; Worrall, D M

    2009-01-01

    Long Baseline Array imaging of the z=0.663 broad line radio galaxy PKS1421-490 reveals a 400 pc diameter high surface brightness hotspot at a projected distance of approximately 40kpc from the active galactic nucleus. The isotropic X-ray luminosity of the hotspot, L_{2-10 keV} = 3 10^{44} ergs/s, is comparable to the isotropic X-ray luminosity of the entire X-ray jet of PKS0637-752, and the peak radio surface brightness is hundreds of times greater than that of the brightest hotspot in Cygnus A. We model the radio to X-ray spectral energy distribution using a one-zone synchrotron self Compton model with a near equipartition magnetic field strength of 3 mG. There is a strong brightness asymmetry between the approaching and receding hotspots and the hot spot spectrum remains flat (alpha ~ 0.5) well beyond the predicted cooling break for a 3 mG magnetic field, indicating that the hotspot emission may be Doppler beamed. A high plasma velocity beyond the terminal jet shock could be the result of a dynamically impo...

  2. High temperature superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Paranthaman, Parans

    2010-01-01

    This essential reference provides the most comprehensive presentation of the state of the art in the field of high temperature superconductors. This growing field of research and applications is currently being supported by numerous governmental and industrial initiatives in the United States, Asia and Europe to overcome grid energy distribution issues. The technology is particularly intended for densely populated areas. It is now being commercialized for power-delivery devices, such as power transmission lines and cables, motors and generators. Applications in electric utilities include current limiters, long transmission lines and energy-storage devices that will help industries avoid dips in electric power.

  3. Phenomena Elucidation of High Brightness Fiber Laser Welding of Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahito, Yousuke; Mizutani, Masami; Katayama, Seiji

    A high-brigthness fiber laser can produce an ultra-high peak power density of MW/mm2 level corresponding to a focused electron beam, and is promising as one of the desirable heat sources for deep-penetration welding. The objectives of this research are to elucidate the factors affecting weld penetration and defects formation mechanisms, to obtain a fundamental knowledge of interaction between a fiber laser beam and the laser-induced plume, and to assess laser absorption with water-calorimetric method in bead-on-plate welding of Type 304 austenitic stainless steel plates with a 10 kW fiber laser beam. Concerning the weldablity and defects, the penetration depth reached 18 mm at the maximum. At 50 mm/s or lower welding speeds, porosity was generated under the conventionally-focused and tightly-focused conditions. X-ray transmission in-site observation images demonstrated that pores were formed not only at the tip of the keyhole but also near the upper part. The keyhole behavior was stabilized by using nitrogen shielding gas, which led to the porosity prevention. As for the interaction under the normal Ar shielding gas conditions, the temperature and ionization degree of the laser-induced plumes were calculated to be 6,000 K and 0.02, respectively, by the Bolzman plots and Saha's equation. It was also found that the attenuation and the refraction between the 10-kW fiber laser beam and the short weakly-ionized plume were too small to exert the reduction in weld penetration. The laser absorption of the stainless steel plate was approximately 85 % high at 10 kW laser power and 50 mm/s welding speed. Compared X-ray transmission observation images of the keyhole with the focusing feature of the fiber laser beam, most of the incident laser passed through the keyhole inlet, and the center part of the beam was delivered directly to the tip of the deep keyhole. Consequently, as far as the adquate welding procedures were utilized on the basis of eclucidation of the welding

  4. High-brightness, fiber-coupled pump modules in fiber laser applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemenway, Marty; Urbanek, Wolfram; Hoener, Kylan; Kennedy, Keith W.; Bao, Ling; Dawson, David; Cragerud, Emily S.; Balsley, David; Burkholder, Gary; Reynolds, Mitch; Price, Kirk; Haden, Jim; Kanskar, Manoj; Kliner, Dahv A.

    2014-03-01

    High-power, high-brightness, fiber-coupled pump modules enable high-performance industrial fiber lasers with simple system architectures, multi-kW output powers, excellent beam quality, unsurpassed reliability, and low initial and operating costs. We report commercially available (element™), single-emitter-based, 9xx nm pump sources with powers up to 130 W in a 105 μm fiber and 250 W in a 200 μm fiber. This combination of high power and high brightness translates into improved fiber laser performance, e.g., simultaneously achieving high nonlinear thresholds and excellent beam quality at kW power levels. Wavelength-stabilized, 976 nm versions of these pumps are available for applications requiring minimization of the gain-fiber length (e.g., generation of high-peak-power pulses). Recent prototypes have achieved output powers up to 300 W in a 200 μm fiber. Extensive environmental and life testing at both the chip and module level under accelerated and real-world operating conditions have demonstrated extremely high reliability, with innovative designs having eliminated package-induced-failure mechanisms. Finally, we report integrated Pump Modules that provide conveniently formatted for fiber-laser pumping or direct-diode applications; these 19" rack-mountable, 2U units combine the outputs of up to 14 elements™ using fused-fiber combiners, and they include high-efficiency diode drivers and safety sensors.

  5. Effects of high-order dispersions on dark-bright vector soliton propagation and interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Li; Dongning Wang

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of dark-bright vector solitons is investigated in a birefringent fiber with the high-order dispersions, and their effects on vector soliton propagation and interaction are analyzed using the numerical method. The combined role of the high-order dispersions, such as the third-order dispersion (TOD) and the fourth-order dispersion (FOD), may cause various deformation of the vector soliton and enhance interaction. These effects depend strictly on the sign of the high-order dispersions. Results indicate that the disadvantageous effects can be reduced effectively via proper mapping of the high-order dispersions.%@@ The dynamics of dark-bright vector solitons is investigated in a birefringent fiber with the high-order dispersions, and their effects on vector soliton propagation and interaction are analyzed using the numerical method.The combined role of the high-order dispersions, such as the third-order dispersion (TOD) and the fourth-order dispersion (FOD), may cause various deformation of the vector soliton and enhance interaction.These effects depend strictly on the sign of the high-order dispersions.Results indicate that the disadvantageous effects can be reduced effectively via proper mapping of the high-order dispersions.

  6. New high-brightness monochrome monitor based on color CRT technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spekowius, Gerhard; Weibrecht, Martin; D'Adda, Carlo; Antonini, Antonio; Casale, Carlo; Blume, Hartwig R.

    1997-05-01

    With increasing availability of medical image communication infrastructures, medical images are more and more displayed as soft-copies rather than as hard-copies. Often however, the image viewing environment is characterized by high ambient light, such as in surgery rooms or offices illuminated by daylight. We are describing a very-high- brightness cathode-ray-tube (CRT) monitor which accommodates these viewing conditions without the typical deterioration in resolution due to electron focal spot blooming. The three guns of a standard color CRT are used to create a high brightness monochrome monitor. The CRT has no shadow-mask, and a homogeneous P45 phosphor layer has been deposited instead of the structured red-green-blue color phosphor screen. The electron spots of the three guns are dynamically matched by applying appropriate waveforms to four additional multiple magnetic fields around the gun assembly. We evaluated the image quality of the triple-gun CRT monitor concerning parameters which are especially relevant for medical imaging applications. We have measured characteristic curves, dynamic range, veiling glare, resolution, spot profiles, and screen noise. The monitor can provide a high luminance of more than 200 fL. Due to nearly perfect matching of the three spots, the resolution is mainly determined by the beam profile of a single gun and is remarkably high even at these high luminance values. The P45 phosphor shows very little structure noise, which is an advantage for medical desktop applications. Since all relevant monitor parameters are digitally controlled, the status of the monitor can be fully characterized at any time. This feature particularly facilitates the reproduction of brightness and contrast values and hence allows easy implementation of a display function standard or to return to a desired display function that has been found useful for a given application in the past.

  7. High Temperature Aquifer Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueckert, Martina; Niessner, Reinhard; Baumann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Combined heat and power generation (CHP) is highly efficient because excess heat is used for heating and/or process energy. However, the demand of heat energy varies considerably throughout the year while the demand for electrical energy is rather constant. It seems economically and ecologically highly beneficial for municipalities and large power consumers such as manufacturing plants to store excess heat in groundwater aquifers and to recuperate this energy at times of higher demand. Within the project High Temperature Aquifer Storage, scientists investigate storage and recuperation of excess heat energy into the bavarian Malm aquifer. Apart from high transmissivity and favorable pressure gradients, the hydrochemical conditions are crucial for long-term operation. An enormous technical challenge is the disruption of the carbonate equilibrium - modeling results indicated a carbonate precipitation of 10 - 50 kg/d in the heat exchangers. The test included five injection pulses of hot water (60 °C up to 110 °C) and four tracer pulses, each consisting of a reactive and a conservative fluorescent dye, into a depth of about 300 m b.s.l. resp. 470 m b.s.l. Injection and production rates were 15 L/s. To achieve the desired water temperatures, about 4 TJ of heat energy were necessary. Electrical conductivity, pH and temperature were recorded at a bypass where also samples were taken. A laboratory container at the drilling site was equipped for analysing the concentration of the dyes and the major cations at sampling intervals of down to 15 minutes. Additional water samples were taken and analysed in the laboratory. The disassembled heat exchanger prooved that precipitation was successfully prevented by adding CO2 to the water before heating. Nevertheless, hydrochemical data proved both, dissolution and precipitation processes in the aquifer. This was also suggested by the hydrochemical modelling with PhreeqC and is traced back to mixture dissolution and changing

  8. Development of high-brightness high-power fiber laser pump sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, J. A.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Swint, Reuel B.; Coleman, James J.; Forbes, David V.; Zediker, Mark S.

    2004-06-01

    High power fiber lasers have strong potential for use in both commercial and military applications. Improved wall plug efficiency over Nd:YAG and CO2 lasers combined with up to a 10-fold improvement in beam quality, make fiber lasers extremely attractive for industrial applications such as welding and cutting. In military applications, fiber lasers offer a simplified logistic train, a deep magazine limited only by electric power, and a compact footprint, allowing theater defense and self-protection of combat platforms with speed of light engagement and flexible response. Commercial viability of these systems, however, is limited by the availability of compact, cost effective, and reliable diode laser pump sources in the multi-kilowatt regime. The relatively low brightness of diode laser sources has complicated the task of building high power pumps at a reasonable cost. In response to this need, Nuvonyx, Inc. in conjunction with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been developing a new technology for producing high power, single lateral mode devices which do not suffer form the instabilities mentioned above. The waveguide consists of a narrow section, approximately 2 μm wide, which flares to approximately 12 μm wide at the output facet. The flaring of the waveguide increases the gain volume and reduces the optical power density at the facet allowing for higher output power capability. The index guide is defined using an epitaxial process which allows the confinement of the mode to be reduced as the width of the guide expands. Thus, the mode is confined in a single mode waveguide throughout the cavity maintaining stability of the mode to the emitting facet. In November 2002, Nuvonyx, Inc. was awarded a contract with the Air Force Research Lab, Kirtland AFB, Albuquerque, NM, to transition these devices to production quality for use in high-power fiber laser pumps. Partnered with Alfalight, Inc. and the University of Illinois, we have begun initial

  9. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Reflectance and Brightness Temperatures from AVHRR Pathfinder Atmospheres - Extended (PATMOS-x), Version 5.3

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of AVHRR reflectance and brightness temperatures was produced by the University of Wisconsin using the AVHRR Pathfinder...

  10. High temperature interface superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gozar, A., E-mail: adrian.gozar@yale.edu [Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Bozovic, I. [Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Highlight: • This review article covers the topic of high temperature interface superconductivity. • New materials and techniques used for achieving interface superconductivity are discussed. • We emphasize the role played by the differences in structure and electronic properties at the interface with respect to the bulk of the constituents. - Abstract: High-T{sub c} superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-T{sub c} Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both ‘passive’ hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. We conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.

  11. Advanced high brightness ion rf accelerator applications in the nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    The capability of modern rf linear accelerators to provide intense high quality beams of protons, deuterons, or heavier ions is opening new possibilities for transmuting existing nuclear wastes, for generating electricity from readily available fuels with minimal residual wastes, for building intense neutron sources for materials research, for inertial confinement fusion using heavy ions, and for other new applications. These are briefly described, couched in a perspective of the advances in the understanding of the high brightness beams that has enabled these new programs. 32 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Generation of bright circularly-polarized extreme ultraviolet high harmonics for magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kfir, Ofer; Turgut, Emrah; Knut, Ronny; Zusin, Dmitriy; Popmintchev, Dimitar; Popmintchev, Tenio; Nembach, Hans; Shaw, Justin M; Fleicher, Avner; Kapteyn, Henry; Murnane, Margaret; Cohen, Oren

    2014-01-01

    Circularly-polarized extreme UV and X-ray radiation provides valuable access to the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of materials. To date, such experiments have been possible only using large-scale free-electron lasers or synchrotrons. Here we demonstrate the first bright extreme UV circularly-polarized high harmonics and use this new light source for magnetic circular dichroism measurements at the M-shell absorption edges of cobalt. This work paves the way towards element-specific imaging and spectroscopy of multiple elements simultaneously in magnetic and other chiral media with very high spatio-temporal resolution, all on a tabletop.

  13. A Numerical Study of the Effect of GOES Sounder Cloud-Cleared Brightness Temperatures on the Prediction of Hurricane Felix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xiaolei; Xiao, Qingnong; Lipton, Alan E.; Modica, George D.

    2001-01-01

    The influence of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) brightness temperature data on the numerical simulations of Hurricane Felix is investigated. Satellite data are included as an augmentation to a bogus data assimilation (BDA) procedure using a mesoscale adjoint modeling system. The assimilation of satellite data modified not only the environmental flow but also the structure of the initial vortex, which is located over a region devoid of satellite data. This modification resulted in a reduction of the 12-h forecast errors verified by radiosonde data. Despite the fact that the forecast using only the bogus surface low at the initial time was very good, track and intensity forecasts beyond 2 days of model integration were shown to be improved further by including satellite data in the initialization procedure. Differences in the prediction of Hurricane Felix with and without satellite data were also found in the prediction of the upper-level jet, the cold temperature trough ahead of the hurricane, the size of the hurricane eye, and the location of the maximum hydrometeor. Although the focus of this study is to assess the effect of the direct use of satellite brightness temperature data on hurricane prediction, it is also noted that the BDA experiment including only the bogus data shows a positive effect of the BDA vortex on the environmental flow during the forecast period, as verified by satellite observations.

  14. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozovic, Ivan [Mount Sinai, NY; Logvenov, Gennady [Port Jefferson Station, NY; Gozar, Adrian Mihai [Port Jefferson, NY

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  15. Generation of a high-brightness pulsed positron beam for the Munich scanning positron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piochacz, Christian

    2009-11-20

    Within the present work the prerequisites for the operation of the Munich scanning positron microscope (SPM) at the high intense neutron induced positron source Munich (NEPOMUC) were established. This was accomplished in two steps: Firstly, a re-moderation device was installed at the positron beam facility NEPOMUC, which enhances the brightness of the positron beam for all connected experiments. The second step was the design, set up and initial operation of the SPM interface for the high efficient conversion of the continuous beam into a bunched beam. The in-pile positron source NEPOMUC creates a positron beam with a diameter of typically 7 mm, a kinetic energy of 1 keV and an energy spread of 50 eV. The NEPOMUC re-moderator generates from this beam a low energy positron beam (20 - 200 eV) with a diameter of less than 2 mm and an energy spread well below 2.5 eV. This was achieved with an excellent total efficiency of 6.55{+-}0.25 %. The re-moderator was not only the rst step to implement the SPM at NEPOMUc, it enables also the operation of the pulsed low energy positron beam system (PLEPS). Within the present work, at this spectrometer rst positron lifetime measurements were performed, which revealed the defect types of an ion irradiated uranium molybdenum alloy. Moreover, the instruments which were already connected to the positron beam facility bene ts considerably of the high brightness enhancement. In the new SPM interface an additional re-moderation stage enhances the brightness of the beam even more and will enable positron lifetime measurements at the SPM with a lateral resolution below 1 {mu}m. The efficiency of the re-moderation process in this second stage was 24.5{+-}4.5 %. In order to convert high efficiently the continuous positron beam into a pulsed beam with a repetition rate of 50 MHz and a pulse duration of less than 50 ps, a sub-harmonic pre-bucher was combined with two sine wave bunchers. Furthermore, the additional re-moderation stage of the

  16. High brightness beam shaping and fiber coupling of laser-diode bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junhong; Guo, Linui; Wu, Hualing; Wang, Zhao; Tan, Hao; Gao, Songxin; Wu, Deyong; Zhang, Kai

    2015-04-10

    The strong beam quality mismatch in the fast and slow axes of laser-diode bars requires a significant beam shaping method to reach the parameters needed for fiber coupling. An effective solution to this problem is proposed that is based on a right-angle prism array and a distributed cylinder-lens stack. Coupling 12 mini-bars into a standard 100 μm core diameter and 0.15 numerical aperture fiber is achieved, and the output power can reach 400 W. Using this technique, production of compact and high brightness fiber-coupled laser-diode modules is possible.

  17. Growth of highly bright-white silica nanowires as diffusive reflection coating in LED lighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Shuang; Shi, Tielin; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Dan; Lai, Wuxing; Tang, Zirong

    2011-12-19

    Large quantities of silica nanowires were synthesized through thermal treatment of silicon wafer in the atmosphere of N(2)/H(2)(5%) under 1200 °C with Cu as catalyst. These nanowires grew to form a natural bright-white mat, which showed highly diffusive reflectivity over the UV-visible range, with more than 60% at the whole range and up to 88% at 350 nm. The utilization of silica nanowires in diffusive coating on the reflector cup of LED is demonstrated, which shows greatly improved light distribution comparing with the specular reflector cup. It is expected that these nanowires can be promising coating material for optoelectronic applications.

  18. Report of the working group on production and dynamics of high brightness beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheffield, R.L. [MS H851I, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Bisognano, J.; Brau, C.; Hogan, M.; Kim, K.; Milton, S.; Nuhn, H.; Pagani, C.; Pierini, P.; Reiser, M.; Schmerge, J.; Serafini, L.; Teng, L.; Winick, H.; Cornacchia, M.

    1997-02-01

    This paper summarizes the main discussions of the Working Group on the Production and Dynamics of High Brightness Beams. The following topics are covered in this paper: proposed new electron sources and needed research on existing sources, discussions on issues relating to the description of phase space on non-thermalized electron beam distributions and the theoretical modeling on non-thermalized electron beam distributions, and the present status of the theoretical modeling of beam transport in bends. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. First results from the high-brightness x-ray spectroscopy beamline at ALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, R.C.C.; Ng, W.; Jones, G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range, designed to achieve the goal of high brightness at the sample for use in the X-ray Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy (XAMS) science, surface and interface science, biology and x-ray optical development programs at ALS. X-ray absorption and time of flight photo emission measurements in 2 - 5 keV photon energy in argon along with the flux, resolution, spot size and stability of the beamline will be discussed. Prospects for future XAMS measurements will also be presented.

  20. Beam emittance investigation in high brightness injector using different driver laser profiles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Beam emittance plays an important role in any accelerator, and it is a main parameter to judge the performance of an accelerator. Emittance optimization is an indispensable part in conditioning and operation of the facility. For a laser-driven high brightness injector, different time structure of the laser pulse has different effects on transverse emittance. In order to compare Gaussian and flat-top laser pulse, systematic simulations of 500 pC have been done. From the simulation results, one can see that flat-top pulse laser will yield smaller minimal transverse beam size and transverse beam emittance than Gaussian pulse laser.

  1. Neutron Spectral Brightness of Cold Guide 4 at the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winn, B L; Robertson, J L; Iverson, E B; Selby, D L, E-mail: winnbl@ornl.gov

    2010-11-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor resumed operation in June of 2007 with a supercritical hydrogen cold source in horizontal beam tube 4. Cold guide 4 is a guide system designed to deliver neutrons from this source with a reasonable flux at wavelengths greater than 4 A to several instruments, and includes a 15-m, 96-section, 4-channel bender. A time-of-flight spectrum with calibrated detector was recorded at port C of cold guide 4, and compared to McStas simulations, to generate a brightness spectrum.

  2. Neutron Spectral Brightness of Cold Guide 4 at the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winn, B. L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Neutron Scattering Group; Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Neutron Facilities Development Div.; Robertson, J. L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Neutron Facilities Development Div.; Iverson, Erik B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Neutron Facilities Development Div.; Selby, D. L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Neutron Facilities Development Div.

    2009-05-03

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor resumed operation in June of 2007 with a super-critical hydrogen cold source in horizontal beam tube 4. Cold guide 4 is a guide system designed to deliver neutrons from this source at reasonable flux at wavelengths greater than 4 Å to several instruments, and includes a 15-m, 96-section, 4-channel bender. A time-of-flight spectrum with calibrated detector was recorded at port C of cold guide 4, and compared to McStas simulations, to generate a brightness spectrum.

  3. Neutron Spectral Brightness of Cold Guide 4 at the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winn, B. L.; Robertson, J. L.; Iverson, E. B.; Selby, D. L.

    2010-11-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor resumed operation in June of 2007 with a supercritical hydrogen cold source in horizontal beam tube 4. Cold guide 4 is a guide system designed to deliver neutrons from this source with a reasonable flux at wavelengths greater than 4 Å to several instruments, and includes a 15-m, 96-section, 4-channel bender. A time-of-flight spectrum with calibrated detector was recorded at port C of cold guide 4, and compared to McStas simulations, to generate a brightness spectrum.

  4. Graded Heterojunction of AlGaInP High-brightness Light Emitting Diodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Lu; FAN Guang-han; LIAO Chang-jun

    2004-01-01

    A simple model of the graded heterojunction in AlGaInP compound semiconductors was introduced to analyze the band profile. The band profiles are analyzed with the different grading ways but the same grading length and under the different doping densities. The effect of the different grading lengths on the surplus of the potential of the spike to the potential of N region are also analyzed under the different doping densities.Through the experiments,it proves that the performances of high brightness light emitting diodes can be improved by the effects of the graded heterojunction.

  5. InGaN micro-LED-pillar as the building block for high brightness emitters

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chao

    2013-01-01

    In summary, we confirmed the improved electrical and optical characteristics, with reduced efficiency droop in InGaN μLED-pillars when these devices were scaled down in size. We demonstrated that strain relief contributed to further improvement in EQE characteristics in small InGaN μLED-pillars (D < 50 μm), apart from the current spreading effect. The μLED-pillar can be deployed as the building block for large effective-area, high brightness emitter. © 2013 IEEE.

  6. Droplet-based, high-brightness extreme ultraviolet laser plasma source for metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinokhodov, A. Yu.; Krivokorytov, M. S.; Sidelnikov, Yu. V.; Krivtsun, V. M.; Medvedev, V. V.; Koshelev, K. N.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the development of a high brightness source of extreme ultraviolet radiation (EUV) with a working wavelength of 13.5 nm. The source is based on a laser-produced plasma driven by pulsed radiation of a Nd:YAG laser system. Liquid droplets of Sn-In eutectic alloy were used as the source fuel. The droplets were created by a droplet generator operating in the jet break-up regime. The EUV emission properties of the plasma, including the emission spectrum, time profile, and conversion efficiency of laser radiation into useful 13.5 nm photons, have been characterized. Using the shadowgraphy technique, we demonstrated the production of corpuscular debris by the plasma source and the influence of the plasma on the neighboring droplet targets. The high-frequency laser operation was simulated by usage of the dual pulse regime. Based on the experimental results, we discuss the physical phenomena that could affect the source operation at high repetition rates. Finally, we estimate that an average source brightness of 1.2 kW/mm2 sr is feasible at a high repetition rate.

  7. Assimilation of Global Radar Backscatter and Radiometer Brightness Temperature Observations to Improve Soil Moisture and Land Evaporation Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lievens, H.; Martens, B.; Verhoest, N. E. C.; Hahn, S.; Reichle, R. H.; Miralles, D. G.

    2017-01-01

    Active radar backscatter (s?) observations from the Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) and passive radiometer brightness temperature (TB) observations from the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission are assimilated either individually or jointly into the Global Land Evaporation Amsterdam Model (GLEAM) to improve its simulations of soil moisture and land evaporation. To enable s? and TB assimilation, GLEAM is coupled to the Water Cloud Model and the L-band Microwave Emission from the Biosphere (L-MEB) model. The innovations, i.e. differences between observations and simulations, are mapped onto the model soil moisture states through an Ensemble Kalman Filter. The validation of surface (0-10 cm) soil moisture simulations over the period 2010-2014 against in situ measurements from the International Soil Moisture Network (ISMN) shows that assimilating s? or TB alone improves the average correlation of seasonal anomalies (Ran) from 0.514 to 0.547 and 0.548, respectively. The joint assimilation further improves Ran to 0.559. Associated enhancements in daily evaporative flux simulations by GLEAM are validated based on measurements from 22 FLUXNET stations. Again, the singular assimilation improves Ran from 0.502 to 0.536 and 0.533, respectively for s? and TB, whereas the best performance is observed for the joint assimilation (Ran = 0.546). These results demonstrate the complementary value of assimilating radar backscatter observations together with brightness temperatures for improving estimates of hydrological variables, as their joint assimilation outperforms the assimilation of each observation type separately.

  8. Assimilation of Global Radar Backscatter and Radiometer Brightness Temperature Observations to Improve Soil Moisture and Land Evaporation Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lievens, H.; Martens, B.; Verhoest, N. E. C.; Hahn, S.; Reichle, R. H.; Miralles, D. G.

    2017-01-01

    Active radar backscatter (s?) observations from the Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) and passive radiometer brightness temperature (TB) observations from the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission are assimilated either individually or jointly into the Global Land Evaporation Amsterdam Model (GLEAM) to improve its simulations of soil moisture and land evaporation. To enable s? and TB assimilation, GLEAM is coupled to the Water Cloud Model and the L-band Microwave Emission from the Biosphere (L-MEB) model. The innovations, i.e. differences between observations and simulations, are mapped onto the model soil moisture states through an Ensemble Kalman Filter. The validation of surface (0-10 cm) soil moisture simulations over the period 2010-2014 against in situ measurements from the International Soil Moisture Network (ISMN) shows that assimilating s? or TB alone improves the average correlation of seasonal anomalies (Ran) from 0.514 to 0.547 and 0.548, respectively. The joint assimilation further improves Ran to 0.559. Associated enhancements in daily evaporative flux simulations by GLEAM are validated based on measurements from 22 FLUXNET stations. Again, the singular assimilation improves Ran from 0.502 to 0.536 and 0.533, respectively for s? and TB, whereas the best performance is observed for the joint assimilation (Ran = 0.546). These results demonstrate the complementary value of assimilating radar backscatter observations together with brightness temperatures for improving estimates of hydrological variables, as their joint assimilation outperforms the assimilation of each observation type separately.

  9. Bright circularly polarized soft X-ray high harmonics for X-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Tingting; Grychtol, Patrik; Knut, Ronny; Hernández-García, Carlos; Hickstein, Daniel D.; Zusin, Dmitriy; Gentry, Christian; Dollar, Franklin J.; Mancuso, Christopher A.; Hogle, Craig W.; Kfir, Ofer; Legut, Dominik; Carva, Karel; Ellis, Jennifer L.; Dorney, Kevin M.; Chen, Cong; Shpyrko, Oleg G.; Fullerton, Eric E.; Cohen, Oren; Oppeneer, Peter M.; Milošević, Dejan B.; Becker, Andreas; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A.; Popmintchev, Tenio; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate, to our knowledge, the first bright circularly polarized high-harmonic beams in the soft X-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum, and use them to implement X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements in a tabletop-scale setup. Using counterrotating circularly polarized laser fields at 1.3 and 0.79 µm, we generate circularly polarized harmonics with photon energies exceeding 160 eV. The harmonic spectra emerge as a sequence of closely spaced pairs of left and right circularly polarized peaks, with energies determined by conservation of energy and spin angular momentum. We explain the single-atom and macroscopic physics by identifying the dominant electron quantum trajectories and optimal phase-matching conditions. The first advanced phase-matched propagation simulations for circularly polarized harmonics reveal the influence of the finite phase-matching temporal window on the spectrum, as well as the unique polarization-shaped attosecond pulse train. Finally, we use, to our knowledge, the first tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements at the N4,5 absorption edges of Gd to validate the high degree of circularity, brightness, and stability of this light source. These results demonstrate the feasibility of manipulating the polarization, spectrum, and temporal shape of high harmonics in the soft X-ray region by manipulating the driving laser waveform. PMID:26534992

  10. Bright circularly polarized soft X-ray high harmonics for X-ray magnetic circular dichroism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Tingting; Grychtol, Patrik; Knut, Ronny; Hernández-García, Carlos; Hickstein, Daniel D; Zusin, Dmitriy; Gentry, Christian; Dollar, Franklin J; Mancuso, Christopher A; Hogle, Craig W; Kfir, Ofer; Legut, Dominik; Carva, Karel; Ellis, Jennifer L; Dorney, Kevin M; Chen, Cong; Shpyrko, Oleg G; Fullerton, Eric E; Cohen, Oren; Oppeneer, Peter M; Milošević, Dejan B; Becker, Andreas; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A; Popmintchev, Tenio; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C

    2015-11-17

    We demonstrate, to our knowledge, the first bright circularly polarized high-harmonic beams in the soft X-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum, and use them to implement X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements in a tabletop-scale setup. Using counterrotating circularly polarized laser fields at 1.3 and 0.79 µm, we generate circularly polarized harmonics with photon energies exceeding 160 eV. The harmonic spectra emerge as a sequence of closely spaced pairs of left and right circularly polarized peaks, with energies determined by conservation of energy and spin angular momentum. We explain the single-atom and macroscopic physics by identifying the dominant electron quantum trajectories and optimal phase-matching conditions. The first advanced phase-matched propagation simulations for circularly polarized harmonics reveal the influence of the finite phase-matching temporal window on the spectrum, as well as the unique polarization-shaped attosecond pulse train. Finally, we use, to our knowledge, the first tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements at the N4,5 absorption edges of Gd to validate the high degree of circularity, brightness, and stability of this light source. These results demonstrate the feasibility of manipulating the polarization, spectrum, and temporal shape of high harmonics in the soft X-ray region by manipulating the driving laser waveform.

  11. High resolution spectroscopy of bright subdwarf B stars - I. Radial velocity variables

    CERN Document Server

    Edelmann, H; Altmann, M; Karl, C; Lisker, T

    2005-01-01

    Radial velocity curves for 15 bright subdwarf B binary systems have been measured using high precision radial velocity measurements from high S/N optical high-resolution spectra. In addition, two bright sdB stars are discovered to be radial velocity variable but the period could not yet be determined. The companions for all systems are unseen. The periods range from about 0.18 days up to more than ten days. The radial velocity semi amplitudes are found to lie between 15 and 130 km/s. Using the mass functions, the masses of the unseen companions have been constrained to lower limits of 0.03 up to 0.55 M_sun, and most probable values of 0.03 up to 0.81 M_sun. The invisible companions for three of our program stars are undoubtedly white dwarfs. In the other cases they could be either white dwarfs or main sequence stars. For two stars the secondaries could possibly be brown dwarfs. As expected, the orbits are circular for most of the systems. However, for one third of the program stars we find slightly eccentric ...

  12. HIGH TEMPERATURE VACUUM MIXER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D. Chertov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The work is devoted to the creation of a new type of mixer to produce homogeneous mixtures of dissimilar materials applied to recycling of housing and communal services waste. The article describes the design of a dual-chamber device of the original high-temperature vacuum mixer, there investigated the processes occurring in the chambers of such devices. The results of theoretical and experimental research of the process of mixing recycled polyethylene with a mixture of "grinded food waste – Eco wool” are presented. The problem of the optimum choice of bending the curvilinear blades in the working volume of the seal, which is achieved by setting their profile in the form of involute arc of several circles of different radii, is examined . The dependences, allowing to define the limits of the changes of the main mode parameters the angular velocity of rotation of the working body of the mixer using two ways of setting the profile of the curvilinear blade mixer are obtained. Represented design of the mixer is proposed to use for a wide range of tasks associated with the mixing of the components with a strongly pronounced difference of physic al chemical properties and, in particular, in the production of composites out of housing and communal services waste.

  13. High Brightness Gamma-Ray Production at Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihalcea, Daniel [Northern Illinois U.; Jacobson, B. [RadiaBeam Tech.; Murokh, A. [RadiaBeam Tech.; Piiot, P. [Northern Illinois U.; Ruan, J. [Fermilab

    2016-10-10

    Electron beams with energies of the order of a few 100’s of MeV and low transverse emittance, in combination with powerful infrared lasers, allow for the production of high quality gamma rays through Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS). At Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility, a 300 MeV beam will be used to generate gamma rays with maximum photon energies of up to ∼ 1.5 MeV and brightness of the order of 1021 photons/[s-(mm-mrad)2- 0.1%BW]. Due to the low electron-beam transverse emittance, the relative bandwidth of the scattered radiation is expected to be ≤ 1%. A key challenge toward the production of high radiation dose and brightness is to enhance the energy of the infrared 3 ps laser pulses to the joule level. In this contribution, we present the plans for the experimental setup, along with comprehensive numerical simulations of the ICS process.

  14. Generation and propagation of high-brightness electron beams from a magnetically crowbarred injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, S., Jr.; Len, L. K.; Allen, C. B.

    1987-05-01

    Tests of a 300-keV electrostatic electron beam injector with a magnetic crowbar switch are described. The saturable ferrite core switch allows generation of a constant voltage, 80-ns pulse directly from a Marx generator. Inductive isolation in the switch permits direct access to the high-voltage electrode for thermionic or active plasma cathode experiments. The pulse modulator can drive a 1.5-kA load. A high brightness 290-A beam from a felt plasma-emission cathode was extracted and propagated in vacuum. Because of the reliability of the magnetic crowbar switch, more than 500 shots were accumulated on the cathode at over 1 kA/sq cm with no degradation of the output. The output beam had a normalized brightness of 2.6 x 10 to the 8th A/(m rad) sq. A solenoidal lens was used to match the space-charge-dominated beam into a 1-m-long periodic focusing system with 25 reversing solenoidal coils. A beam current of 150 A was successfully transported through the 1.7-cm radius tube.

  15. Sliding Mode Pulsed Averaging IC Drivers for High Brightness Light Emitting Diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Anatoly Shteynberg, PhD

    2006-08-17

    This project developed new Light Emitting Diode (LED) driver ICs associated with specific (uniquely operated) switching power supplies that optimize performance for High Brightness LEDs (HB-LEDs). The drivers utilize a digital control core with a newly developed nonlinear, hysteretic/sliding mode controller with mixed-signal processing. The drivers are flexible enough to allow both traditional microprocessor interface as well as other options such as “on the fly” adjustment of color and brightness. Some other unique features of the newly developed drivers include • AC Power Factor Correction; • High power efficiency; • Substantially fewer external components should be required, leading to substantial reduction of Bill of Materials (BOM). Thus, the LED drivers developed in this research : optimize LED performance by increasing power efficiency and power factor. Perhaps more remarkably, the LED drivers provide this improved performance at substantially reduced costs compared to the present LED power electronic driver circuits. Since one of the barriers to market penetration for HB-LEDs (in particular “white” light LEDs) is cost/lumen, this research makes important contributions in helping the advancement of SSL consumer acceptance and usage.

  16. High brightness MEMS mirror based head-up display (HUD) modules with wireless data streaming capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanovic, Veljko; Kasturi, Abhishek; Hachtel, Volker

    2015-02-01

    A high brightness Head-Up Display (HUD) module was demonstrated with a fast, dual-axis MEMS mirror that displays vector images and text, utilizing its ~8kHz bandwidth on both axes. Two methodologies were evaluated: in one, the mirror steers a laser at wide angles of phone applications is demonstrated, utilizing the mobile device both for content generation based on various messages or data, and for content streaming to the MEMS controller via Bluetooth interface. The display unit is highly resistant to vibrations and shock, and requires only ~1.5W to operate, even with content readable in sunlit outdoor conditions. The low power requirement is in part due to a vector graphics approach, allowing the efficient use of laser power, and also due to the use of a single, relatively high efficiency laser and simple optics.

  17. In-situ Microwave Brightness Temperature Variability from Ground-based Radiometer Measurements at Dome C in Antarctica Induced by Wind-formed Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, A.; Picard, G.; Arnaud, L.; Brucker, L.; Fily, M..

    2014-01-01

    Space-borne microwave radiometers are among the most useful tools to study snow and to collect information on the Antarctic climate. They have several advantages over other remote sensing techniques: high sensitivity to snow properties of interest (temperature, grain size, density), subdaily coverage in the polar regions, and their observations are independent of cloud conditions and solar illumination. Thus, microwave radiometers are widely used to retrieve information over snow-covered regions. For the Antarctic Plateau, many studies presenting retrieval algorithms or numerical simulations have assumed, explicitly or not, that the subpixel-scale heterogeneity is negligible and that the retrieved properties were representative of whole pixels. In this presentation, we investigate the spatial variations of brightness temperature over arange of a few kilometers in the Dome C area (Antarctic Plateau).

  18. High brightness direct diode laser with kW output power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsche, Haro; Kruschke, Bastian; Koch, Ralf; Ferrario, Fabio; Kern, Holger; Pahl, Ulrich; Pflueger, Silke; Gries, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    High power, high brightness diode lasers are beginning to challenge solid state lasers, i.e. disk and fiber lasers. The core technologies for brightness scaling of diode lasers are optical stacking and dense spectral combining (DSC), as well as improvements of the diode material. Diode lasers will have the lowest cost of ownership, highest efficiency and most compact design among all lasers. In our modular product design tens of single emitters are combined in a compact package and launched into a 200 μm fiber with 0.08 NA. Dense spectral combining enables power scaling from 80 W to kilowatts. Volume Bragg Gratings and dichroic filters yield high optical efficiencies of more than 80% at low cost. Each module emits up to 500 W with a beam quality of 5.5 mm*mrad and less than 20 nm linewidth. High speed switching power supplies are integrated into the module and rise times as short as 6 μs have been demonstrated. Fast control algorithms based on FPGA and embedded microcontroller ensure high wall plug efficiency with a unique control loop time of only 30 μs. Individual modules are spectrally combined to result in direct diode laser systems with kilowatts of output power at identical beam quality. For low loss fiber coupling a 200 μm fiber is used and the NA is limited to 0.08 corresponding to a beam quality of 7.5 mm*mrad. The controller architecture is fully scalable without sacrificing loop time. We leverage automated manufacturing for cost effective, high yield production. A precision robotic system handles and aligns the individual fast axis lenses and tracks all quality relevant data. Similar technologies are also deployed for dense spectral combining aligning the VBG and dichroic filters. Operating at wavelengths between 900 nm and 1100 nm, these systems are mainly used in cutting and welding, but the technology can also be adapted to other wavelength ranges, such as 793 nm and 1530 nm. Around 1.5 μm the diodes are already successfully used for resonant

  19. High-power, high-efficiency, high-brightness long-wavelength laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Steve; Crump, Paul; Wang, Jun; Dong, Weimin; Grimshaw, Mike; Zhang, Shiguo; Elim, Sandrio; Das, Suhit; Bougher, Mike; Patterson, Jason; Kuang, Guokui; Bell, Jake; Farmer, Jason; DeVito, Mark

    2006-05-01

    Interest is rapidly growing in solid-state lasers emitting from 1500-nm to 2100-nm with applications in eye-safe range finding, LIDAR, infrared countermeasures, medicine, dentistry, and others. Traditionally, these solid-state lasers have been pumped by flash lamps or more recently, by semiconductor diode lasers. In the case of the latter, the diodes of choice have been those emitting below 1-μm. The sub-micron class of semiconductor diode lasers is highly mature and has enjoyed recent rapid advances in power and efficiency. Unfortunately, the quantum defect generated when converting to the desired wavelengths results in large amounts of excess heat generation leading to costly and heavy, expensive cooling systems and performance problems related to thermal lensing. System complexity adds further cost and weight when intermediaries, such as optical parametric oscillators, are required to reach the desired longer wavelengths. Recent advances in laser diodes emitting from 1400-nm to over 1900-nm now enable the near resonant pumping of such solid state media as Er:YAG, Ho:YAG and Cr:ZnSe. Record results in the peak output power and electrical-to-optical conversion efficiency of diode lasers emitting around 1470-nm, 1700-nm and 1900-nm are presented here.

  20. Bright Room-Temperature Single Photon Emission from Defects in Gallium Nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Berhane, Amanuel M; Bodrog, Zoltán; Fiedler, Saskia; Schröder, Tim; Triviño, Noelia Vico; Palacios, Tomás; Gali, Adam; Toth, Milos; Englund, Dirk; Aharonovich, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Single photon emitters play a central role in many photonic quantum technologies. A promising class of single photon emitters consists of atomic color centers in wide-bandgap crystals, such as diamond silicon carbide and hexagonal boron nitride. However, it is currently not possible to grow these materials as sub-micron thick films on low-refractive index substrates, which is necessary for mature photonic integrated circuit technologies. Hence, there is great interest in identifying quantum emitters in technologically mature semiconductors that are compatible with suitable heteroepitaxies. Here, we demonstrate robust single photon emitters based on defects in gallium nitride (GaN), the most established and well understood semiconductor that can emit light over the entire visible spectrum. We show that the emitters have excellent photophysical properties including a brightness in excess of 500x10^3 counts/s. We further show that the emitters can be found in a variety of GaN wafers, thus offering reliable and s...

  1. Advances in high temperature chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Eyring, Leroy

    1969-01-01

    Advances in High Temperature Chemistry, Volume 2 covers the advances in the knowledge of the high temperature behavior of materials and the complex and unfamiliar characteristics of matter at high temperature. The book discusses the dissociation energies and free energy functions of gaseous monoxides; the matrix-isolation technique applied to high temperature molecules; and the main features, the techniques for the production, detection, and diagnosis, and the applications of molecular beams in high temperatures. The text also describes the chemical research in streaming thermal plasmas, as w

  2. Ultra-High Temperature Gratings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John Canning; Somnath Bandyopadhyay; Michael Stevenson; Kevin Cook

    2008-01-01

    Regenerated gratings seeded by type-Ⅰ gratings are shown to withstand temperatures beyond 1000 ℃. The method of regeneration offers a new approach to increasing temperature resistance of stable fibre Bragg and other gratings. These ultra-high temperature (UHT) gratings extend the applicability of silicate based components to high temperature applications such as monitoring of smelters and vehicle and aircraft engines to high power fibre lasers.

  3. High temperature nanoplasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabastri, Alessandro; Toma, Andrea; Malerba, Mario; De Angelis, Francesco; Proietti Zaccaria, Remo

    2016-09-01

    Metallic nanostructures can be utilized as heat nano-sources which can find application in different areas such as photocatalysis, nanochemistry or sensor devices. Here we show how the optical response of plasmonic structures is affected by the increase of temperature. In particular we apply a temperature dependent dielectric function model to different nanoparticles finding that the optical responses are strongly dependent on shape and aspect-ratio. The idea is that when metallic structures interact with an electromagnetic field they heat up due to Joule effect. The corresponding temperature increase modifies the optical response of the particle and thus the heating process. The key finding is that, depending on the structures geometry, absorption efficiency can either increase or decrease with temperature. Since absorption relates to thermal energy dissipation and thus to temperature increase, the mechanism leads to positive or negative loops. Consequently, not only an error would be made by neglecting temperature but it would be not even possible to know, a priori, if the error is towards higher or lower values.

  4. High Density Molecular Gas in the IR-bright Galaxy System VV114

    CERN Document Server

    Iono, D; Yun, M S; Matsushita, S; Peck, A B; Sakamoto, K

    2004-01-01

    New high resolution CO(3-2) interferometric map of the IR-bright interacting galaxy system VV114 observed with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) reveal a substantial amount of warm and dense gas in the IR-bright but optically obscured galaxy, VV114E, and the overlap region connecting the two nuclei. A 1.8 x 1.4 kpc concentration of CO(3-2) emitting gas with a total mass of 4 x 10^9 Msun coincides with the peaks of NIR, MIR, and radio continuum emission found previously by others, identifying the dense fuel for the AGN and/or the starburst activity there. Extensive CO(2-1) emission is also detected, revealing detailed distribution and kinematics that are consistent with the earlier CO(1-0) results. The widely distributed molecular gas traced in CO(2-1) and the distributed discrete peaks of CO(3-2) emission suggest that a spatially extended intense starbursts may contribute significantly to its large IR luminosity. These new observations further support the notion that VV114 is approaching its final stage of merger...

  5. High-energy Neutrino Flares from X-Ray Bright and Dark Tidal Disruption Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senno, Nicholas; Murase, Kohta; Mészáros, Peter

    2017-03-01

    X-ray and γ-ray observations by the Swift satellite revealed that a fraction of tidal disruption events (TDEs) have relativistic jets. Jetted TDEs have been considered to be potential sources of very-high-energy cosmic-rays and neutrinos. In this work, using semi-analytical methods, we calculate neutrino spectra of X-ray bright TDEs with powerful jets and dark TDEs with possible choked jets, respectively. We estimate their neutrino fluxes and find that non-detection would give us an upper limit on the baryon loading of the jet luminosity contained in cosmic-rays ξ cr ≲ 20–50 for Sw J1644+57. We show that X-ray bright TDEs make a sub-dominant (≲5%–10%) contribution to IceCube’s diffuse neutrino flux, and study possible contributions of X-ray dark TDEs given that particles are accelerated in choked jets or disk winds. We discuss future prospects for multi-messenger searches of the brightest TDEs.

  6. Efficient Pumping Schemes for High Average Brightness Collisional X-ray Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keenan, R; Dunn, J; Shlyaptsev, V N; Smith, R F; Patel, P K; Price, D F

    2003-10-07

    Advances in transient collisional x-ray lasers have been demonstrated over the last 5 years as a technique for achieving tabletop soft x-ray lasers using 2-10 J of laser pump energy. The high peak brightness of these sources operating in the high output saturation regime, in the range of 10{sup 24}-10{sup 25} ph. mm{sup -2} mrad{sup -2} s-1 (0.1% BW){sup -1}, is ideal for many applications requiring high photon fluence in a single short burst. However, the pump energy required for these x-ray lasers is still relatively high and limits the x-ray laser repetition rate to 1 shot every few minutes. Higher repetition rate collisional schemes have been reported and show some promise for high output in the future. We report a novel technique for enhancing the coupling efficiency of the laser pump into the gain medium that could lead to enhanced x-ray inversion with a factor of ten reduction in the drive energy. This has been applied to the collisional excitation scheme for Ni-like Mo at 18.9 nm and x-ray laser output has been demonstrated. Preliminary results show lasing on a single shot of the optical laser operating at 10 Hz and with 70 mJ in the short pulse. Such a proposed source would have higher average brightness, {approx}10{sup 14} ph. mm{sup -2} mrad{sup -2} s{sup -1} (0.1% BW){sup -1}, than present bending magnet 3rd generation synchrotron sources operating at the same spectral range.

  7. High-Temperature Piezoelectric Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoning Jiang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric sensing is of increasing interest for high-temperature applications in aerospace, automotive, power plants and material processing due to its low cost, compact sensor size and simple signal conditioning, in comparison with other high-temperature sensing techniques. This paper presented an overview of high-temperature piezoelectric sensing techniques. Firstly, different types of high-temperature piezoelectric single crystals, electrode materials, and their pros and cons are discussed. Secondly, recent work on high-temperature piezoelectric sensors including accelerometer, surface acoustic wave sensor, ultrasound transducer, acoustic emission sensor, gas sensor, and pressure sensor for temperatures up to 1,250 °C were reviewed. Finally, discussions of existing challenges and future work for high-temperature piezoelectric sensing are presented.

  8. High temperature superconductor accelerator magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nugteren, J.

    2016-01-01

    For future particle accelerators bending dipoles are considered with magnetic fields exceeding 20T. This can only be achieved using high temperature superconductors (HTS). These exhibit different properties from classical low temperature superconductors and still require significant research and dev

  9. Effects of Laser Pulse Heating of Copper Photocathodes on High-brightness Electron Beam Production at Blowout Regime

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Lianmin; Tang, Chuanxiang; Gai, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Producing high-brightness and high-charge (>100 pC) electron bunches at blowout regime requires ultrashort laser pulse with high fluence. The effects of laser pulse heating of the copper photocathode are analyzed in this paper. The electron and lattice temperature is calculated using an improved two-temperature model, and an extended Dowell-Schmerge model is employed to calculate the thermal emittance and quantum efficiency. A time-dependent growth of the thermal emittance and the quantum efficiency is observed. For a fixed amount of charge, the projected thermal emittance increases with the decreasing laser radius, and this effect should be taken into account in the laser optimization at blowout regime. Moreover, laser damage threshold fluence is simulated, showing that the maximum local fluence should be less than 40 mJ/cm^2 to prevent damage to the cathode. The cryogenic effect on the laser pulse heating is studied, showing that the hazards caused by the laser pulse heating will be significantly mitigated ...

  10. Scale Dependence of Cirrus Horizontal Heterogeneity Effects on TOA Measurements. Part I; MODIS Brightness Temperatures in the Thermal Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauchez, Thomas; Platnick, Steven; Meyer, Kerry; Cornet, Celine; Szczap, Frederic; Varnai, Tamas

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a study on the impact of cirrus cloud heterogeneities on MODIS simulated thermal infrared (TIR) brightness temperatures (BTs) at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) as a function of spatial resolution from 50 meters to 10 kilometers. A realistic 3-D (three-dimensional) cirrus field is generated by the 3DCLOUD model (average optical thickness of 1.4, cloudtop and base altitudes at 10 and 12 kilometers, respectively, consisting of aggregate column crystals of D (sub eff) equals 20 microns), and 3-D thermal infrared radiative transfer (RT) is simulated with the 3DMCPOL (3-D Monte Carlo Polarized) code. According to previous studies, differences between 3-D BT computed from a heterogenous pixel and 1-D (one-dimensional) RT computed from a homogeneous pixel are considered dependent at nadir on two effects: (i) the optical thickness horizontal heterogeneity leading to the plane-parallel homogeneous bias (PPHB); and the (ii) horizontal radiative transport (HRT) leading to the independent pixel approximation error (IPAE). A single but realistic cirrus case is simulated and, as expected, the PPHB mainly impacts the low-spatial resolution results (above approximately 250 meters), with averaged values of up to 5-7 K (thousand), while the IPAE mainly impacts the high-spatial resolution results (below approximately 250 meters) with average values of up to 1-2 K (thousand). A sensitivity study has been performed in order to extend these results to various cirrus optical thicknesses and heterogeneities by sampling the cirrus in several ranges of parameters. For four optical thickness classes and four optical heterogeneity classes, we have found that, for nadir observations, the spatial resolution at which the combination of PPHB and HRT effects is the smallest, falls between 100 and 250 meters. These spatial resolutions thus appear to be the best choice to retrieve cirrus optical properties with the smallest cloud heterogeneity-related total bias in the thermal

  11. GPM Level 1BASE Common Calibrated Brightness Temperatures VV03B

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GMI BASE Product, GMIBASE, GMI Antenna Temperatures, is written as a multi-Swath Structure. Swath S1 has channels 1-9: 10V 10H 19V 19H 23V 37V 37H 89V89H. Swath...

  12. The Statistics of Radio Astronomical Polarimetry: Bright Sources and High Time Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Van Straten, W

    2008-01-01

    A four-dimensional statistical description of electromagnetic radiation is developed and applied to the analysis of radio pulsar polarization. The new formalism provides an elementary statistical explanation of the modal broadening phenomenon in single pulse observations. It is also used to argue that the degree of polarization of giant pulses has been poorly defined in past studies. Single and giant pulse polarimetry typically involves sources with large flux densities and observations with high time resolution, factors that necessitate consideration of source-intrinsic noise and small-number statistics. Self noise is shown to fully explain the excess polarization dispersion previously noted in single pulse observations of bright pulsars, obviating the need for additional randomly polarized radiation. Rather, these observations are more simply interpreted as an incoherent sum of covariant, orthogonal, partially polarized modes. Based on this premise, the four-dimensional covariance matrix of the Stokes param...

  13. A study on materials of steels by high brightness X-ray

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuzaki, K; Umezawa, O; Hara, T; Takahashi, T; Omura, T; Hayakawa, M; Yamauchi, Y

    2001-01-01

    As the survey study on materials analysis of steels using high brightness X-ray, under aiming to clarify direct experimental facts on deformations, failure phenomena, and metal textures forming at interior portions of bulk materials, feasibility on materials research and development using SPring-8 was surveyed. Its concrete items were summarized to fields shown as follows: 1) acquirement of foundation on synchrotron X-ray, 2) visualization of cracks and artificial cracks in metal bulk samples by using refraction imaging (point light source topography), 3) visualization of the second phase in the metal bulk samples by using refraction imaging, and 4) speciation of carbon elements in steel cords by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Together with clarifying problems more and more by the survey and some experiments, subjects and understandings vacantly considered at standpoints of materials researchers could be arranged and defined. (G.K.)

  14. Research on the high-brightness traffic variable message sign based on laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Li-li; Huang, Hai-tao; Ruan, Chi

    2015-10-01

    Researches indicate that foggy weather is one of the most critical factors that restrict human's traffic activities and cause traffic accidents. It will reduce the visibility of traffic message board, which could cause the insecurity of transportation. Commonly, light-emitting diodes (LEDs) were used as light source for variable message sign, which could not be seen clearly in the foggy low visibility condition. A high-brightness light source which could be used for variable information board was firstly put forward in this paper. And a new type of variable message sign used in low visibility condition was also introduced. Besides, the attenuation characteristics of laser diode (LD) and light-emitting diode (LED) were analyzed respectively. Calculation and simulation show that the attenuation of red light source is fastest, and the yellow LED light has the better transmittance property. In the experiment, LDs were used to make variable message board for verifying image definition. A 16*16 array structure composed of LDs was designed and could display Chinese characters. By comparing the display effect of LDs and LEDs driven with same power, they were placed in fog chamber of the visibility less than 5 meters. And experiment results show that the penetrability of red LD light is better than that of red LED. So traffic variable message sign based on LDs could improve the image definition and the information could be seen more clearly in the foggy weather. In addition to the high-brightness, good coherence, good direction, experimental results show that traffic variable message board based on LD has better visual effect in low visibility condition.

  15. The complex evolutionary paths of local infrared bright galaxies: a high angular resolution mid-infrared view

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso-Herrero, A; Roche, P F; Hernan-Caballero, A; Aretxaga, I; Martinez-Paredes, M; Almeida, C Ramos; Pereira-Santaella, M; Diaz-Santos, T; Levenson, N A; Packham, C; Colina, L; Esquej, P; Gonzalez-Martin, O; Ichikawa, K; Imanishi, M; Espinosa, J M Rodriguez; Telesco, C

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the evolutionary connection between local IR-bright galaxies ($\\log L_{\\rm IR}\\ge 11.4\\,L_\\odot$) and quasars. We use high angular resolution ($\\sim$ 0.3-0.4 arcsec $\\sim$ few hundred parsecs) $8-13\\,\\mu$m ground-based spectroscopy to disentangle the AGN mid-IR properties from those of star formation. The comparison between the nuclear $11.3\\,\\mu$m PAH feature emission and that measured with Spitzer/IRS indicates that the star formation is extended over a few kpc in the IR-bright galaxies. The AGN contribution to the total IR luminosity of IR-bright galaxies is lower than in quasars. Although the dust distribution is predicted to change as IR-bright galaxies evolve to IR-bright quasars and then to optical quasars, we show that the AGN mid-IR emission of all the quasars in our sample is not significantly different. In contrast, the nuclear emission of IR-bright galaxies with low AGN contributions appears more heavily embedded in dust although there is no clear trend with the interaction stage or...

  16. High temperature materials; Materiaux a hautes temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this workshop is to share the needs of high temperature and nuclear fuel materials for future nuclear systems, to take stock of the status of researches in this domain and to propose some cooperation works between the different research organisations. The future nuclear systems are the very high temperature (850 to 1200 deg. C) gas cooled reactors (GCR) and the molten salt reactors (MSR). These systems include not only the reactor but also the fabrication and reprocessing of the spent fuel. This document brings together the transparencies of 13 communications among the 25 given at the workshop: 1) characteristics and needs of future systems: specifications, materials and fuel needs for fast spectrum GCR and very high temperature GCR; 2) high temperature materials out of neutron flux: thermal barriers: materials, resistance, lifetimes; nickel-base metal alloys: status of knowledge, mechanical behaviour, possible applications; corrosion linked with the gas coolant: knowledge and problems to be solved; super-alloys for turbines: alloys for blades and discs; corrosion linked with MSR: knowledge and problems to be solved; 3) materials for reactor core structure: nuclear graphite and carbon; fuel assembly structure materials of the GCR with fast neutron spectrum: status of knowledge and ceramics and cermets needs; silicon carbide as fuel confinement material, study of irradiation induced defects; migration of fission products, I and Cs in SiC; 4) materials for hydrogen production: status of the knowledge and needs for the thermochemical cycle; 5) technologies: GCR components and the associated material needs: compact exchangers, pumps, turbines; MSR components: valves, exchangers, pumps. (J.S.)

  17. High-power high-brightness solar laser approach for renewable Mg recovery from MgO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Joana; Liang, Dawei

    2014-08-01

    Hydrogen and heat energy from the reaction of magnesium with water can be used for engines and fuel cells. However, at least 4000 K is necessary for magnesium oxide reduction. Ultra high brightness solar-pumped lasers become essential to make this renewable process technology efficient and economically competitive. 2.3 mg/kJ solar laser - induced magnesium production efficiency has been achieved by T. Yabe et al., in 2012, by focusing a 53 W solar laser beam on a mixture of MgO with Si as reducing agent. This result is however far from the 12.1 mg/kJ attained with 2 kW/mm2 CO2 laser beam. To improve substantially the solar laser - induced Mg production efficiency, a simple high-power, high brightness Nd:YAG solar laser pumping approach is proposed. The solar radiation is both collected and concentrated by four Fresnel lenses, and redirected towards a Nd:YAG laser head by four plane folding mirrors. A fused-silica secondary concentrator is used to compress the highly concentrated solar radiation to a laser rod. Optimum pumping conditions and laser resonator parameters are found through ZEMAXand LASCADnumerical analysis. High-record solar laser beam brightness figure of merit - defined as the ratio between laser power and the product of Mx 2 and My 2 - of 10.5 W is numerically achieved, being 5.5 times higher than the previous record and about 1600 times more than that of the most powerful Nd:YAG solar laser. 8340 W/mm2 is numerically achieved at its focal region, which can quadruple the magnesium production efficiency with clean energy.

  18. High Temperature Superconductor Machine Prototype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijatovic, Nenad; Jensen, Bogi Bech; Træholt, Chresten

    2011-01-01

    A versatile testing platform for a High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) machine has been constructed. The stationary HTS field winding can carry up to 10 coils and it is operated at a temperature of 77K. The rotating armature is at room temperature. Test results and performance for the HTS field...

  19. Sea Ice Brightness Temperature as a Function of Ice Thickness: Computed curves for AMSR-E and SMOS (frequencies from 1.4 to 89 GHz)

    CERN Document Server

    Mills, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between sea ice thickness and microwave brightness temperature is explored. Parameterized ice profiles are fed to a radiative-transfer-based sea ice emissivity model (Microwave Emmission of Layered Snowpack, MEMLS). Complex permittivities, required as input for the simulation, are determined using a semi-empirical mixture model. Since the thickness-radiance relation is not fixed but can vary significantly depending upon past and current weather conditions, we determine a range of brightness temperature values for each thickness. This is done using a bootstrap model in which the salinities are varied based on variances supplied with the thickness-salinity curve and the complex permittivities are varied based on variance supplied by the mixture model. The results suggest that scattering is one of the most important parameters determining sea ice brightness temperature, especially for new and forming ice. Further work must be done to accurately model both scattering and complex permittivities in...

  20. CHLORINE DIOXIDE BLEACHING OF SODA-ANTHRAQUINONE JUTE PULP TO A VERY HIGH BRIGHTNESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sarwar Jahan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Bleaching of soda-anthraquinone jute pulp by chlorine dioxide (ClO2 was studied to reach a target brightness of above 88% for the purpose of using less bleaching chemicals. The performance of either chlorine dioxide or peroxide in the final bleaching to boost brightness was also studied. The experimental results revealed that the final brightness depended on ClO2 charge in the Do and D1 stages. The brightness reversion was lower when the final stage brightening was done by peroxide. The use of Mg(OH2 in the D1 and D2 stages improved the final brightness due to the formation of less chlorate and chlorite during the Mg(OH2- based ClO2 brightening stages. The strength properties of pulp bleached by peroxide in the final stage was slightly better than that from ClO2 as the final ClO2 bleaching stage.

  1. Characterizing Near-Infrared Sky Brightness in the Canadian High Arctic

    CERN Document Server

    Sivanandam, Suresh; Abraham, Roberto; Tekatch, Anthony; Steinbring, Eric; Ngan, Wayne; Welch, Doug L; Law, Nicholas M

    2012-01-01

    We present the first measurements of the near-infrared (NIR), specifically the J-band, sky background in the Canadian High Arctic. There has been considerable recent interest in the development of an astronomical observatory in Ellesmere Island; initial site testing has shown promise for a world-class site. Encouragement for our study came from sky background measurements on the high Antarctic glacial plateau in winter that showed markedly lower NIR emission when compared to good mid-latitude astronomical sites due to reduced emission from OH airglow lines. This is possibly a Polar effect and may also be present in the High Arctic. To test this hypothesis, we carried out an experiment which measured the the J-band sky brightness in the High Arctic during winter. We constructed a zenith-pointing, J-band photometer, and installed it at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) near Eureka, Nunavut (latitude: 80 degrees N). We present the design of our photometer and our results from our shor...

  2. High Temperature Electrostrictive Ceramics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TRS Technologies proposes to develop high temperature electrostrictors from bismuth-based ferroelectrics. These materials will exhibit high strain and low loss in...

  3. Researching the 915 nm high-power and high-brightness semiconductor laser single chip coupling module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Cuiluan; Wu, Xia; Zhu, Lingni; Jing, Hongqi; Ma, Xiaoyu; Liu, Suping

    2017-02-01

    Based on the high-speed development of the fiber laser in recent years, the development of researching 915 nm semiconductor laser as main pumping sources of the fiber laser is at a high speed. Because the beam quality of the laser diode is very poor, the 915 nm laser diode is generally based on optical fiber coupling module to output the laser. Using the beam-shaping and fiber-coupling technology to improve the quality of output beam light, we present a kind of high-power and high-brightness semiconductor laser module, which can output 13.22 W through the optical fiber. Based on 915 nm GaAs semiconductor laser diode which has output power of 13.91 W, we describe a thoroughly detailed procedure for reshaping the beam output from the semiconductor laser diode and coupling the beam into the optical fiber of which the core diameter is 105 μm and the numerical aperture is 0.18. We get 13.22 W from the output fiber of the module at 14.5 A, the coupling efficiency of the whole module is 95.03% and the brightness is 1.5 MW/cm2 -str. The output power of the single chip semiconductor laser module achieves the advanced level in the domestic use.

  4. Remote sensing-based study on the relationship between land brightness temperature and vegetation abundance in Wuhan city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunling; Yu, Hua; Gong, Peng; Ju, Weimin; Pei, Huan

    2008-10-01

    Vegetation abundance is an important indicator of urban heat island (UHI), because it influences the partitioning of sensible and latent heat fluxes. In order to reveal the effect of vegetation abundance on UHI of Wuhan city, one of the fast changing urban area in China, we classified land use/land cover types and calculated land brightness temperature (LBT) from a Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM +) image acquired on July 9, 2002. The vegetation fraction derived from a linear spectral mixture analysis (LSMA) model was used as an alternative indicator of vegetation abundance. The fractal analysis of LBT and vegetation abundance was also conducted on 20 transects. Results showed that the spatial pattern of LBT changed with vegetation abundance and higher temperature was located in the area of lower vegetation abundance. Unmixed vegetation fraction was more negatively correlated with UHI than NDVI for most land cover types, except for water. Fractal analysis of image texture showed that transects comprised of larger number of different land cover types exhibited higher fractal dimension. On the contrary, the fractal dimension was lower in transects that covered mostly by built-up land. In addition, the fractal dimension correlation between LBT and vegetation abundance was higher than that between LBT and NDVI.

  5. High brightness sub-nanosecond Q-switched laser using volume Bragg gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brian M.; Hale, Evan; Venus, George; Ott, Daniel; Divliansky, Ivan; Glebov, Leonid

    2016-03-01

    The design of Q-switched lasers capable of producing pulse widths of 100's of picoseconds necessitates the cavity length be shorter than a few centimeters. Increasing the amount of energy extracted per pulse requires increasing the mode area of the resonator that for the same cavity length causes exciting higher order transverse modes and decreasing the brightness of the output radiation. To suppress the higher order modes of these multimode resonators while maintaining the compact cavity requires the use of intra-cavity angular filters. A novel Q-switched laser design is presented using transmitting Bragg gratings (TBGs) as angular filters to suppress the higher order transverse modes. The laser consists of a 5 mm thick slab of Nd:YAG, a 3 mm thick slab of Cr:YAG with a 20% transmission, one TBG aligned to suppress the higher order modes along the x-axis, and a 40% output coupler. The gratings are recorded in photo-thermo-refractive (PTR) glass, which has a high damage threshold that can withstand both the high peak powers and high average powers present within the resonator. Using a 4.1 mrad TBG in a 10.8 mm long resonator with an 800μm x 400 μm pump beam, a nearly diffraction limited beam quality of M2 = 1.3 is obtained in a 0.76 mJ pulse with a pulse width of 614 ps.

  6. Strain relief InGaN/GaN MQW micro-pillars for high brightness LEDs

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chao

    2013-01-01

    Micro-structured group-III-nitrides are considered as promising strain relief structures for high efficiency solid state lighting. In this work, the strain field in InGaN/GaN multi-quantum wells (MQWs) micro-pillars is investigated using micro-Raman spectroscopy and the design of micro-pillars were studied experimentally. We distinguished the strained and strain-relieved signatures of the GaN layer from the E2 phonon peak split from the Raman scattering signatures at 572 cm-1 and 568 cm-1, respectively. The extent of strain relief is examined considering the height and size of micro-pillars fabricated using focused ion beam (FIB) micro-machining technique. A significant strain relief can be achieved when one micro-machined through the entire epi-layers, 3 μm in our study. The dependence of strain relief on micro-pillar diameter (D) suggested that micro-pillar with D < 3 μm showed high degree of strain relief. Our results shed new insights into designing strain-relieved InGaN/GaN microstructures for high brightness light emitting diode arrays. © 2013 IEEE.

  7. High-power one-, two-, and three-dimensional photonic crystal edge-emitting laser diodes for ultra-high brightness applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeev, N. Yu.; Maximov, M. V.; Shernyakov, Y. M.; Novikov, I. I.; Karachinsky, L. Ya.; Shchukin, V. A.; Kettler, T.; Posilovic, K.; Ledentsov, N. N.; Bimberg, D.; Duboc, R.; Sharon, A.; Arbiv, D. B.; Ben-Ami, U.

    2008-02-01

    Direct laser diodes can typically provide only a limited single mode power, while ultrahigh-brightness is required for many of the market-relevant applications. Thus, multistage power conversion schemes are applied, when the laser diodes are used just as a pumping source. In this paper we review the recent advances in ultra-large output aperture edge-emitting lasers based on the photonic band crystal (PBC) concept. The concept allows near- and far-field engineering robust to temperature and strain gradients and growth nonuniformities. High-order modes are selectively filtered and the effective optical confinement of the fundamental mode can be dramatically enhanced. At first, we show that robust ultra-narrow vertical beam divergence (operation by processing of the multistripe arrays along their lengths. The concept opens a way for 3D photonic crystal edge emitting lasers potentially allowing scalable single mode power increase to arbitrary high levels.

  8. Inferring Land Surface Model Parameters for the Assimilation of Satellite-Based L-Band Brightness Temperature Observations into a Soil Moisture Analysis System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.

    2012-01-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite mission provides global measurements of L-band brightness temperatures at horizontal and vertical polarization and a variety of incidence angles that are sensitive to moisture and temperature conditions in the top few centimeters of the soil. These L-band observations can therefore be assimilated into a land surface model to obtain surface and root zone soil moisture estimates. As part of the observation operator, such an assimilation system requires a radiative transfer model (RTM) that converts geophysical fields (including soil moisture and soil temperature) into modeled L-band brightness temperatures. At the global scale, the RTM parameters and the climatological soil moisture conditions are still poorly known. Using look-up tables from the literature to estimate the RTM parameters usually results in modeled L-band brightness temperatures that are strongly biased against the SMOS observations, with biases varying regionally and seasonally. Such biases must be addressed within the land data assimilation system. In this presentation, the estimation of the RTM parameters is discussed for the NASA GEOS-5 land data assimilation system, which is based on the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and the Catchment land surface model. In the GEOS-5 land data assimilation system, soil moisture and brightness temperature biases are addressed in three stages. First, the global soil properties and soil hydraulic parameters that are used in the Catchment model were revised to minimize the bias in the modeled soil moisture, as verified against available in situ soil moisture measurements. Second, key parameters of the "tau-omega" RTM were calibrated prior to data assimilation using an objective function that minimizes the climatological differences between the modeled L-band brightness temperatures and the corresponding SMOS observations. Calibrated parameters include soil roughness parameters, vegetation structure parameters

  9. Non-uniform DFB-surface-etched gratings for enhanced performance high power, high brightness broad area lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, J.; Fricke, J.; Maaßdorf, A.; Erbert, G.; Tränkle, G.; Crump, P.

    2017-02-01

    Monolithic spectral stabilization is demonstrated in narrow-stripe broad-area lasers (NBA) with high power (5W), conversion efficiency (50%) and high brightness, by using optimized high-order surface-etched DFB gratings. However, surface etched gratings introduce a high index contrast into the semiconductor, leading to the scattering losses increasing rapidly with groove etch depth, limiting efficiency and yield. We therefore review progress in the exploitation of novel, non-uniform grating configurations for improved performance. Devices with non-uniform gratings whose groove etch depth decreases toward the front facet (apodized grating) are shown to operate with enhanced spectrally stable power (6W) compared to devices with uniform gratings.

  10. A time-dependent search for high-energy neutrinos from bright GRBs with ANTARES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celli Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Astrophysical point-like neutrino sources, like Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs, are one of the main targets for neutrino telescopes, since they are among the best candidates for Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR acceleration. From the interaction between the accelerated protons and the intense radiation fields of the source jet, charged mesons are produced, which then decay into neutrinos. The methods and the results of a search for high-energy neutrinos in spatial and temporal correlation with the detected gamma-ray emission are presented for four bright GRBs observed between 2008 and 2013: a time-dependent analysis, optimised for each flare of the selected bursts, is performed to predict detailed neutrino spectra. The internal shock scenario of the fireball model is investigated, relying on the neutrino spectra computed through the numerical code NeuCosmA. The analysis is optimized on a per burst basis, through the maximization of the signal discovery probability. Since no events in ANTARES data passed the optimised cuts, 90% C.L. upper limits are derived on the expected neutrino fluences.

  11. Using SMOS brightness temperature and derived surface-soil moisture to characterize surface conditions and validate land surface models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polcher, Jan; Barella-Ortiz, Anaïs; Piles, Maria; Gelati, Emiliano; de Rosnay, Patricia

    2017-04-01

    The SMOS satellite, operated by ESA, observes the surface in the L-band. On continental surface these observations are sensitive to moisture and in particular surface-soil moisture (SSM). In this presentation we will explore how the observations of this satellite can be exploited over the Iberian Peninsula by comparing its results with two land surface models : ORCHIDEE and HTESSEL. Measured and modelled brightness temperatures show a good agreement in their temporal evolution, but their spatial structures are not consistent. An empirical orthogonal function analysis of the brightness temperature's error identifies a dominant structure over the south-west of the Iberian Peninsula which evolves during the year and is maximum in autumn and winter. Hypotheses concerning forcing-induced biases and assumptions made in the radiative transfer model are analysed to explain this inconsistency, but no candidate is found to be responsible for the weak spatial correlations. The analysis of spatial inconsistencies between modelled and measured TBs is important, as these can affect the estimation of geophysical variables and TB assimilation in operational models, as well as result in misleading validation studies. When comparing the surface-soil moisture of the models with the product derived operationally by ESA from SMOS observations similar results are found. The spatial correlation over the IP between SMOS and ORCHIDEE SSM estimates is poor (ρ 0.3). A single value decomposition (SVD) analysis of rainfall and SSM shows that the co-varying patterns of these variables are in reasonable agreement between both products. Moreover the first three SVD soil moisture patterns explain over 80% of the SSM variance simulated by the model while the explained fraction is only 52% of the remotely sensed values. These results suggest that the rainfall-driven soil moisture variability may not account for the poor spatial correlation between SMOS and ORCHIDEE products. Other reasons have to

  12. Advanced Concepts for Ultrahigh Brightness and Low Temperature Beams. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurtele, Jonathan S. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Fajans, Joel [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-06-01

    This grant supported research on techniques to manipulate and combine positrons and antiprotons to synthesize, and to probe, antihydrogen. The majority of the research was conducted as part of the ALPHA Collaboration at CERN. Using ideas and techniques from accelerator physics, we proposed a new method for measuring the the gravitational attraction of antihydrogen to the Earth's field. ALPHA reported the first precision charge measurement on antihydrogen and a crude bound on its gravitational dynamics in the Earth's field. We proposed using a stochastic acceleration method to measure any putative charge of antihydrogen and built numerical models of the mixing of antiprotons and positrons. Further research included proposing the radiator-first concept for operating an X-ray free electron laser driven by a high repetition rate bunch source and studying scattering in passive foil-based ion focusing systems.

  13. New methodology to estimate Arctic sea ice concentration from SMOS combining brightness temperature differences in a maximum-likelihood estimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabarro, Carolina; Turiel, Antonio; Elosegui, Pedro; Pla-Resina, Joaquim A.; Portabella, Marcos

    2017-08-01

    Monitoring sea ice concentration is required for operational and climate studies in the Arctic Sea. Technologies used so far for estimating sea ice concentration have some limitations, for instance the impact of the atmosphere, the physical temperature of ice, and the presence of snow and melting. In the last years, L-band radiometry has been successfully used to study some properties of sea ice, remarkably sea ice thickness. However, the potential of satellite L-band observations for obtaining sea ice concentration had not yet been explored. In this paper, we present preliminary evidence showing that data from the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission can be used to estimate sea ice concentration. Our method, based on a maximum-likelihood estimator (MLE), exploits the marked difference in the radiative properties of sea ice and seawater. In addition, the brightness temperatures of 100 % sea ice and 100 % seawater, as well as their combined values (polarization and angular difference), have been shown to be very stable during winter and spring, so they are robust to variations in physical temperature and other geophysical parameters. Therefore, we can use just two sets of tie points, one for summer and another for winter, for calculating sea ice concentration, leading to a more robust estimate. After analysing the full year 2014 in the entire Arctic, we have found that the sea ice concentration obtained with our method is well determined as compared to the Ocean and Sea Ice Satellite Application Facility (OSI SAF) dataset. However, when thin sea ice is present (ice thickness ≲ 0.6 m), the method underestimates the actual sea ice concentration. Our results open the way for a systematic exploitation of SMOS data for monitoring sea ice concentration, at least for specific seasons. Additionally, SMOS data can be synergistically combined with data from other sensors to monitor pan-Arctic sea ice conditions.

  14. Control of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation and Micro-Bunching Effects During Transport of High Brightness Electron Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Douglas, D R; Hutton, A; Krafft, G A; Li, R; Neil, G R; Roblin, Y; Tennant, C D; Tsai, C -Y

    2014-01-01

    Beam quality preservation during transport of high-brightness electron beams is of general concern in the design of modern accelerators. Methods to manage incoherent synchrotron radiation (ISR) have been in place for decades; as beam brightness has improved coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) and the microbunching instability (uBI) have emerged as performance limitations. We apply the compensation analysis of diMitri, Cornacchia, and Spampinati - as previously used by Borland - to the design of transport systems for use with low-emittance beams, and find that appropriately configured second order achromats will suppress transverse emittance growth due to CSR and appear to limit uBI gain.

  15. HIGH TEMPERATURE POLYMER FUEL CELLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf; Qingfeng, Li; He, Ronghuan

    2003-01-01

    This paper will report recent results from our group on polymer fuel cells (PEMFC) based on the temperature resistant polymer polybenzimidazole (PBI), which allow working temperatures up to 200°C. The membrane has a water drag number near zero and need no water management at all. The high working...

  16. Determining contrast sensitivity functions for monochromatic light emitted by high-brightness LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamurthy, Vasudha; Narendran, Nadarajah; Freyssinier, Jean Paul; Raghavan, Ramesh; Boyce, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Light-emitting diode (LED) technology is becoming the choice for many lighting applications that require monochromatic light. However, one potential problem with LED-based lighting systems is uneven luminance patterns. Having a uniform luminance distribution is more important in some applications. One example where LEDs are becoming a viable alternative and luminance uniformity is an important criterion is backlighted monochromatic signage. The question is how much uniformity is required for these applications. Presently, there is no accepted metric that quantifies luminance uniformity. A recent publication proposed a method based on digital image analysis to quantify beam quality of reflectorized halogen lamps. To be able to employ such a technique to analyze colored beams generated by LED systems, it is necessary to have contrast sensitivity functions (CSFs) for monochromatic light produced by LEDs. Several factors including the luminance, visual field size, and spectral power distribution of the light affect the CSFs. Although CSFs exist for a variety of light sources at visual fields ranging from 2 degrees to 20 degrees, CSFs do not exist for red, green, and blue light produced by high-brightness LEDs at 2-degree and 10-degree visual fields and at luminances typical for backlighted signage. Therefore, the goal of the study was to develop a family of CSFs for 2-degree and 10-degree visual fields illuminated by narrow-band LEDs at typical luminances seen in backlighted signs. The details of the experiment and the results are presented in this manuscript.

  17. Production of quasi ellipsoidal laser pulses for next generation high brightness photoinjectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rublack, T., E-mail: Tino.Rublack@desy.de [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Good, J.; Khojoyan, M.; Krasilnikov, M.; Stephan, F. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Hartl, I.; Schreiber, S. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Andrianov, A.; Gacheva, E.; Khazanov, E.; Mironov, S.; Potemkin, A.; Zelenogorskii, V.V. [IAP/RAS, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Syresin, E. [JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-01

    The use of high brightness electron beams in Free Electron Laser (FEL) applications is of increasing importance. One of the most promising methods to generate such beams is the usage of shaped photocathode laser pulses. It has already demonstrated that temporal and transverse flat-top laser pulses can produce very low emittance beams [1]. Nevertheless, based on beam simulations further improvements can be achieved using quasi-ellipsoidal laser pulses, e.g. 30% reduction in transverse projected emittance at 1 nC bunch charge. In a collaboration between DESY, the Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Science (IAP RAS) in Nizhny Novgorod and the Joint Institute of Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna such a laser system capable of producing trains of laser pulses with a quasi-ellipsoidal distribution, has been developed. The prototype of the system was installed at the Photo Injector Test facility at DESY in Zeuthen (PITZ) and is currently in the commissioning phase. In the following, the laser system will be introduced, the procedure of pulse shaping will be described and the last experimental results will be shown.

  18. Transverse Laser Beam Shaping in High Brightness Electron Gun at ATF

    CERN Document Server

    Roychowdhury, S

    2005-01-01

    The brightness of electron beams from a photo injector is influenced by the transverse and longitudinal distribution of the laser beam illuminating the cathode. Previous studies at Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility have shown that formation of an ideal e-beam with lowest transverse emittance requires uniform circular distribution of the emitted electrons. The use of the uniformly distributed power of the laser beam may not lead to that of the emitted electrons because of the non-uniform quantum efficiency. A proper shaping of the laser beam can compensate for this non-uniformity. In this paper we describe the use of digital light processing (DLP) technique based on digital mirror device (DMD) for spatial modulation of the laser beam, for measurements of the quantum efficiency map, and for creating the desirable e-beam density profiles. A DMD is aμelectronic mechanical system (MEMS) comprising of millions of highly reflectiveμmirrors controlled by underlying electronics. We present exper...

  19. Three-dimensional quasistatic model for high brightness beam dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Ji; Lidia, Steve; Ryne, Robert D.; Limborg-Deprey, Cecile

    2006-04-01

    In this paper, we present a three-dimensional quasistatic model for high brightness beam dynamics simulation in rf/dc photoinjectors, rf linacs, and similar devices on parallel computers. In this model, electrostatic space-charge forces within a charged particle beam are calculated self-consistently at each time step by solving the three-dimensional Poisson equation in the beam frame and then transforming back to the laboratory frame. When the beam has a large energy spread, it is divided into a number of energy bins or slices so that the space-charge forces are calculated from the contribution of each bin and summed together. Image-charge effects from conducting photocathode are also included efficiently using a shifted-Green function method. For a beam with large aspect ratio, e.g., during emission, an integrated Green function method is used to solve the three-dimensional Poisson equation. Using this model, we studied beam transport in one Linac Coherent Light Sources photoinjector design through the first traveling wave linac with initial misalignment with respect to the accelerating axis.

  20. High Temperature Bell Motor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The National Research Council (NRC) has identified the need for motors and actuators that can operate in extreme high and low temperature environments as a technical...

  1. High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The six user centers in the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML), a DOE User Facility, are dedicated to solving materials problems that limit the efficiency...

  2. Comparisons of Brightness Temperatures of Landsat-7/ETM+ and Terra/MODIS around Hotien Oasis in the Taklimakan Desert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinari Oguro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The brightness temperature (BT of Taklimakan Desert retrieved from the data of Landsat-7/ETM+ band 6 and Terra/MODIS band 31 and 32 indicates the following features: (1 good linear relationship between the BT of ETM+ and that of MODIS, (2 the observation time adjusted BT of ETM+ is almost equal to that of MODIS, (3 the BT of Terra/MODIS band 31 is slightly higher than that of band 32 over a reservoir while opposite feature is recognized over desert area, (4 the statistical analysis of 225 sample data of ETM+ in one pixel of MODIS for different landcovers indicates that the standard deviation and range of BT of ETM+ corresponding to one pixel of MODIS are 0.45∘C, 2.25∘C for a flat area of desert, while respective values of the oasis farmland and shading side of rocky hill amount to 2.88∘C, 14.04∘C, and 2.80∘C, 16.04∘C.

  3. Benchmark Transiting Brown Dwarf LHS 6343 C: Spitzer Secondary Eclipse Observations Yield Brightness Temperature and mid-T Spectral Class

    CERN Document Server

    Montet, Benjamin T; Fortney, Jonathan J; Desert, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    There are no field brown dwarf analogs with measured masses, radii, and luminosities, precluding our ability to connect the population of transiting brown dwarfs with measurable masses and radii and field brown dwarfs with measurable luminosities and atmospheric properties. LHS 6343 C, a weakly-irradiated brown dwarf transiting one member of an M+M binary in the Kepler field, provides the first opportunity to probe the atmosphere of a non-inflated brown dwarf with a measured mass and radius. Here, we analyze four Spitzer observations of secondary eclipses of LHS 6343 C behind LHS 6343 A. Jointly fitting the eclipses with a Gaussian process noise model of the instrumental systematics, we measure eclipse depths of 1.06 \\pm 0.21 ppt at 3.6 microns and 2.09 \\pm 0.08 ppt at 4.5 microns, corresponding to brightness temperatures of 1026 \\pm 57 K and 1249 \\pm 36 K, respectively. We then apply brown dwarf evolutionary models to infer a bolometric luminosity log(L_star / L_sun) = -5.16 \\pm 0.04. Given the known physica...

  4. Brightness temperature and attenuation diversity statistics at 20.6 and 31.65 GHz for the Colorado Research Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westwater, Ed R.; Falls, M. J.; Fionda, E.

    1992-01-01

    A limited network of four dual-channel microwave radiometers, with frequencies of 20.6 and 31.65 GHz, was operated in the front range of eastern Colorado from 1985 to 1988. Data, from November 1987 through October 1988 are analyzed to determine both single-station and joint-station brightness temperature and attenuation statistics. Only zenith observations were made. The spatial separations of the stations varied from 50 km to 190 km. Before the statistics were developed, the data were screened by rigorous quality control methods. One such method, that of 20.6 vs. 31.65 GHz scatter plots, is analyzed in detail, and comparisons are made of measured vs calculated data. At 20.6 and 31.65 GHz, vertical attenuations of 5 and 8 dB are exceeded 0.01 percent of the time. For these four stations and at the same 0.01 percent level, diversity gains from 6 to 8 dB are possible with the 50 to 190 km separations.

  5. EOS Aqua AMSR-E Arctic Sea Ice Validation Program: Intercomparison Between Modeled and Measured Sea Ice Brightness Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroeve, J.; Markus, T.; Cavalieri, D. J.; Maslanik, J.; Sturm, M.; Henrichs, J.; Gasiewski, A.; Klein, M.

    2004-01-01

    During March 2003, an extensive field campaign was conducted near Barrow, Alaska to validate AQUA Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR) sea ice products. Field, airborne and satellite data were collected over three different types of sea ice: 1) first year ice with little deformation, 2) first year ice with various amounts of deformation and 3) mixed first year ice and multi-year ice with various degrees of deformation. The validation plan relies primarily on comparisons between satellite, aircraft flights and ground-based measurements. Although these efforts are important, key aspects such as the effects of atmospheric conditions, snow properties, surface roughness, melt processes, etc on the sea ice algorithms are not sufficiently well understood or documented. To improve our understanding of these effects, we combined the detailed, in-situ data collection from the 2003 field campaign with radiance modeling using a radiative transfer model to simulate the top of the atmosphere AMSR brightness temperatures. This study reports on the results of the simulations for a variety of snow and ice types and compares the results with the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer (NOAA) (ETL) (PSR) microwave radiometer that was flown on the NASA P-3.

  6. Soil hydraulic parameters and surface soil moisture of a tilled bare soil plot inversely derived from l-band brightness temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Dimitrov, Marin

    2014-01-01

    We coupled a radiative transfer model and a soil hydrologic model (HYDRUS 1D) with an optimization routine to derive soil hydraulic parameters, surface roughness, and soil moisture of a tilled bare soil plot using measured brightness temperatures at 1.4 GHz (L-band), rainfall, and potential soil evaporation. The robustness of the approach was evaluated using five 28-d data sets representing different meteorological conditions. We considered two soil hydraulic property models: the unimodal Mualem-van Genuchten and the bimodal model of Durner. Microwave radiative transfer was modeled by three different approaches: the Fresnel equation with depth-averaged dielectric permittivity of either 2-or 5-cm-thick surface layers and a coherent radiative transfer model (CRTM) that accounts for vertical gradients in dielectric permittivity. Brightness temperatures simulated by the CRTM and the 2-cm-layer Fresnel model fitted well to the measured ones. L-band brightness temperatures are therefore related to the dielectric permittivity and soil moisture in a 2-cm-thick surface layer. The surface roughness parameter that was derived from brightness temperatures using inverse modeling was similar to direct estimates from laser profiler measurements. The laboratory-derived water retention curve was bimodal and could be retrieved consistently for the different periods from brightness temperatures using inverse modeling. A unimodal soil hydraulic property function underestimated the hydraulic conductivity near saturation. Surface soil moisture contents simulated using retrieved soil hydraulic parameters were compared with in situ measurements. Depth-specific calibration relations were essential to derive soil moisture from near-surface installed sensors. © Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison, WI 53711 USA.

  7. Thermal Inertia Determination of C-type Asteroid Ryugu from in-situ Surface Brightness Temperature Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Maximilian; Grott, Matthias; Knollenberg, Jörg; Kührt, Ekkehard; Pelivan, Ivanka

    2016-10-01

    The Japanese Hayabusa-2 mission is a sample-return mission currently on its way to the C-type asteroid Ryugu. Hayabusa-2 carries the small lander MASCOT (Mobile Asteroid Surface Scout), whose scientific payload includes the infrared radiometer MARA. The primary science goal of MARA is to determine Ryugu's surface brightness temperatures at the landing site for a full asteroid rotation, which will be measured using a long-pass filter, an 8 to 12 µm bandpass, as well as four narrow bandpasses centered at wavelengths between 5 and 15 µm. From these measurements, surface thermal inertia will be derived, but because MARA performs single pixel measurements, heterogeneity in the field of view cannot be resolved. Yet, the surface will likely exhibit different surface textures, and thermal inertia in the field of view could vary from 600 (small rocks) to 50 Jm-2s-0.5K-1 (fine regolith grains). Sub-pixel heterogeneity is a common problem when interpreting radiometer data, since the associated ambiguities cannot be resolved without additional information on surface texture. For MARA, this information will be provided by the MASCOT camera, and in the present paper we have investigated to what extent different thermal inertias can be retrieved from MARA data. To test the applied approach, we generated synthetic MARA data using a thermal model of Ryugu, assuming different thermal inertias for sections of the field of view. We find that sub-pixel heterogeneity systematically deforms the diurnal temperature curve so that it is not possible to fit the data using a single thermal inertia value. However, including the area fractions of the different surface sections enables us to reconstruct the different thermal inertias to within 10% assuming appropriate measurement noise. The presented approach will increase robustness of the Ryugu thermal inertia determination and results will serve as a ground truth for the global measurements performed by the thermal infrared mapper (TIR) on

  8. Validation of brightness and physical temperature from two scanning microwave radiometers in the 60 GHz O2 band using radiosonde measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas-Guzmán, Francisco; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Haefele, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we address the assessment of the tropospheric performance of a new temperature radiometer (TEMPERA) at 60 GHz. With this goal, an intercomparison campaign was carried out at the aerological station of MeteoSwiss in Payerne (Switzerland). The brightness temperature and the tropospheric temperature were assessed by means of a comparison with simultaneous and collocated radiosondes that are launched twice a day at this station. In addition, the TEMPERA performances are compared with the ones from a commercial microwave radiometer (HATPRO), which has some different instrumental characteristics and uses a different inversion algorithm. Brightness temperatures from both radiometers were compared with the ones simulated using a radiative transfer model and atmospheric profiles from radiosondes. A total of 532 cases were analyzed under all weather conditions and evidenced larger brightness temperature deviations between the two radiometers and the radiosondes for the most transparent channels. Two different retrievals for the TEMPERA radiometer were implemented in order to evaluate the effect of the different channels on the temperature retrievals. The comparison with radiosondes evidenced better results very similar to the ones from HATPRO, when the eight more opaque channels were used. The study shows the good performance of TEMPERA to retrieve temperature profiles in the troposphere. The inversion method of TEMPERA is based on the optimal estimation method. The main advantage of this algorithm is that there is no necessity for radiosonde information to achieve good results in contrast to conventional methods as neural networks or lineal regression. Finally, an assessment of the effect of instrumental characteristics as the filter response and the antenna pattern on the brightness temperature showed that they can have an important impact on the most transparent channels.

  9. High brightness, quantum-defect-limited conversion efficiency in cladding-pumped Raman fiber amplifiers and oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heebner, John E; Sridharan, Arun K; Dawson, Jay W; Messerly, Michael J; Pax, Paul H; Shverdin, Miro Y; Beach, Raymond J; Barty, Chris P J

    2010-07-05

    We present a detailed theoretical investigation of cladding-pumped Raman fiber amplification in an unexplored parameter space of high conversion efficiency (> 60%) and high brightness enhancement (> 1000). Fibers with large clad-to-core diameter ratios can provide a promising means for Raman-based brightness enhancement of diode pump sources. Unfortunately, the diameter ratio cannot be extended indefinitely since the intensity generated in the core can greatly exceed that in the cladding long before the pump is fully depleted. If left uncontrolled, this leads to the generation of parasitic second-order Stokes wavelengths in the core, limiting the conversion efficiency and as we will show, clamping the achievable brightness enhancement. Using a coupled-wave formalism, we present the upper limit on brightness enhancement as a function of diameter ratio for conventionally guided fibers. We further present strategies for overcoming this limit based upon depressed well core designs. We consider two configurations: 1) pulsed cladding-pumped Raman fiber amplifier (CPRFA) and 2) cw cladding-pumped Raman fiber laser (CPRFL).

  10. Sunspot Bright Points

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhary, Debi Prasad

    2010-01-01

    We used the flux calibrated images through the Broad Band Filter Imager and Stokes Polarimeter data obtained with the Solar Optical Telescope onboard the Hinode spacecraft to study the properties of bright points in and around the sunspots. The well isolated bright points were selected and classified as umbral dot, peripheral umbral dot, penumbral grains and G-band bright point depending on their location. Most of the bright points are smaller than about 150 km. The larger points are mostly associated with the penumbral features. The bright points are not uniformly distributed over the umbra but preferentially located around the penumbral boundary and in the fast decaying parts of umbra. The color temperature of the bright points, derived using the continuum irradiance, are in the range of 4600 K to 6600 K with cooler ones located in the umbra. The temperature increases as a function of distance from the center to outside. The G-band, CN-band and CaII H flux of the bright points as a function of their blue ba...

  11. Cesium telluride cathodes for the next generation of high-average current high-brightness photoinjectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippetto, D., E-mail: dfilippetto@lbl.gov; Qian, H.; Sannibale, F. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-07-27

    We report on the performances of a Cs{sub 2}Te photocathode under extreme conditions of high peak time-dependent accelerating fields, continuous wave operations, and MHz pulse extraction with up to 0.3 mA average current. The measurements, performed in a normal conducting cavity, show extended lifetime and robustness, elucidate the main mechanisms for cathode degradation, and set the required system vacuum performance for compatibility with the operations of a high average power X-ray free electron laser user facility, opening the doors to the next generation of MHz-scale ultrafast scientific instruments.

  12. Gallium phosphide high temperature diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffin, R. J.; Dawson, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    High temperature (300 C) diodes for geothermal and other energy applications were developed. A comparison of reverse leakage currents of Si, GaAs, and GaP was made. Diodes made from GaP should be usable to 500 C. A Liquid Phase Epitaxy (LPE) process for producing high quality, grown junction GaP diodes is described. This process uses low vapor pressure Mg as a dopant which allows multiple boat growth in the same LPE run. These LPE wafers were cut into die and metallized to make the diodes. These diodes produce leakage currents below ten to the -9th power A/sq cm at 400 C while exhibiting good high temperature rectification characteristics. High temperature life test data is presented which shows exceptional stability of the V-I characteristics.

  13. RPC operation at high temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Aielli, G; Cardarelli, R; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Stante, L; Liberti, B; Paoloni, A; Pastori, E; Santonico, R

    2003-01-01

    The resistive electrodes of RPCs utilised in several current experiments (ATLAS, CMS, ALICE, BABAR and ARGO) are made of phenolic /melaminic polymers, with room temperature resistivities ranging from 10**1**0 Omega cm, for high rate operation in avalanche mode, to 5 multiplied by 10**1**1 Omega cm, for streamer mode operation at low rate. The resistivity has however a strong temperature dependence, decreasing exponentially with increasing temperature. We have tested several RPCs with different electrode resistivities in avalanche as well as in streamer mode operation. The behaviours of the operating current and of the counting rate have been studied at different temperatures. Long-term operation has also been studied at T = 45 degree C and 35 degree C, respectively, for high and low resistivity electrodes RPCs.

  14. Temperature optimization of high con

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sabry

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Active cooling is essential for solar cells operating under high optical concentration ratios. A system comprises four solar cells that are in thermal contact on top of a copper tube is proposed. Water is flowing inside the tube in order to reduce solar cells temperature for increasing their performance. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD simulation of such system has been performed in order to investigate the effect of water flow rate, tube internal diameter, and convective heat transfer coefficient on the temperature of the solar cells. It is found that increasing convective heat transfer coefficient has a significant effect on reducing solar cells temperatures operating at low flow rates and high optical concentration ratios. Also, a further increase of water flow rate has no effect on reducing cells temperatures.

  15. HIgh Temperature Photocatalysis over Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westrich, Thomas A.

    Due in large part to in prevalence of solar energy, increasing demand of energy production (from all sources), and the uncertain future of petroleum energy feedstocks, solar energy harvesting and other photochemical systems will play a major role in the developing energy market. This dissertation focuses on a novel photochemical reaction process: high temperature photocatalysis (i.e., photocatalysis conducted above ambient temperatures, T ≥ 100°C). The overarching hypothesis of this process is that photo-generated charge carriers are able to constructively participate in thermo-catalytic chemical reactions, thereby increasing catalytic rates at one temperature, or maintaining catalytic rates at lower temperatures. The photocatalytic oxidation of carbon deposits in an operational hydrocarbon reformer is one envisioned application of high temperature photocatalysis. Carbon build-up during hydrocarbon reforming results in catalyst deactivation, in the worst cases, this was shown to happen in a period of minutes with a liquid hydrocarbon. In the presence of steam, oxygen, and above-ambient temperatures, carbonaceous deposits were photocatalytically oxidized over very long periods (t ≥ 24 hours). This initial experiment exemplified the necessity of a fundamental assessment of high temperature photocatalytic activity. Fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that affect photocatalytic activity as a function of temperatures was achieved using an ethylene photocatalytic oxidation probe reaction. Maximum ethylene photocatalytic oxidation rates were observed between 100 °C and 200 °C; the maximum photocatalytic rates were approximately a factor of 2 larger than photocatalytic rates at ambient temperatures. The loss of photocatalytic activity at temperatures above 200 °C is due to a non-radiative multi-phonon recombination mechanism. Further, it was shown that the fundamental rate of recombination (as a function of temperature) can be effectively modeled as a

  16. HIGH TEMPERATURE POLYMER FUEL CELLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf; Qingfeng, Li; He, Ronghuan

    2003-01-01

    This paper will report recent results from our group on polymer fuel cells (PEMFC) based on the temperature resistant polymer polybenzimidazole (PBI), which allow working temperatures up to 200°C. The membrane has a water drag number near zero and need no water management at all. The high working...... temperature allows for utilization of the excess heat for fuel processing. Moreover, it provides an excellent CO tolerance of several percent, and the system needs no purification of hydrogen from a reformer. Continuous service for over 6 months at 150°C has been demonstrated....

  17. Development of a High- Brightness, Quasi- Monoenergetic Neutron Source at LLNL for Nuclear Physics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M. S.; Anderson, S. G.; Bleuel, D.; Fitsos, P. J.; Gibson, D.; Hall, J. M.; Marsh, R.; Rusnak, B.

    2016-09-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is developing a high-brightness, quasi-monoenergetic neutron source. The intensity of the neutron source is expected to be 1011 n/s/sr with energies between 7 MeV and 10 MeV at 5% bandwidth at 0-degrees. This energy region is important for the study of neutron-induced reactions, nuclear astrophysics, and nuclear structure. For example, for neutrons between 1 and 10 MeV, the capturing states are below the GDR in many nuclei and the dominant reactions are compound and direct capture. The intensity and energy selection of the source makes it appealing for measurements of sparse targets at specific energies. We will present an array of nuclear physics measurements that will benefit from this source. The source is also of interest to generating activated targets for decay-out studies or for target production for other reaction-based measurements, e.g. fusion-evaporation reactions. Other usage examples include practical applications for imaging of very dense objects such as machine parts. For this presentation, we will discuss our method to use (d,n) production reaction on deuterium in a windowless gas target system. This approach is required because of the large power of the 7 MeV, 300 μA deuteron beams. We will discuss our facility and its capabilities. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. High-brightness electron beam evolution following laser-based cleaning of a photocathode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Zhou

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Laser-based techniques have been widely used for cleaning metal photocathodes to increase quantum efficiency (QE. However, the impact of laser cleaning on cathode uniformity and thereby on electron beam quality are less understood. We are evaluating whether this technique can be applied to revive photocathodes used for high-brightness electron sources in advanced x-ray free-electron laser (FEL facilities, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The laser-based cleaning was applied to two separate areas of the current LCLS photocathode on July 4 and July 26, 2011, respectively. The QE was increased by 8–10 times upon the laser cleaning. Since the cleaning, routine operation has exhibited a slow evolution of the QE improvement and comparatively rapid improvement of transverse emittance, with a factor of 3 QE enhancement over five months, and a significant emittance improvement over the initial 2–3 weeks following the cleaning. Currently, the QE of the LCLS photocathode is holding constant at about 1.2×10^{-4}, with a normalized injector emittance of about 0.3  μm for a 150-pC bunch charge. With the proper procedures, the laser-cleaning technique appears to be a viable tool to revive the LCLS photocathode. We present observations and analyses for the QE and emittance evolution in time following the laser-based cleaning of the LCLS photocathode, and comparison to the previous studies, the measured thermal emittance versus the QE and comparison to the theoretical model.

  19. High cortisol awakening response is associated with an impairment of the effect of bright light therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, Klaus Per Juul; Lunde, Marianne Anita; Undén, M

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We investigated the predictive validity of the cortisol awakening response (CAR) in patients with non-seasonal major depression. METHOD: Patients were treated with sertraline in combination with bright or dim light therapy for a 5-week period. Saliva cortisol levels were measured in 63...

  20. A high-resolution spectroscopy survey of beta Cephei pulsations in bright stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telting, J.H.; Schrijvers, C.; Ilyin, I.V.; Uytterhoeven, K.; Ridder, J. de; Aerts, C.C.; Henrichs, H.F.

    2006-01-01

    We present a study of absorption line-profile variations in early-B type near-main-sequence stars without emission lines. We have surveyed a total of 171 bright stars using the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOTSA), William Herschel Telescope (ING) and Coud�uxiliary Telescope (ESO). Our sample contains 7

  1. Relationship Between Solar Coronal X-Ray Brightness and Active Region Magnetic Fields: A Study Using High Resolution Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Hazra, Soumitra; Ravindra, B

    2014-01-01

    By utilizing high resolution observations of nearly co-temporal and co-spatial SOT spectropolarimeter and XRT coronal X-ray data onboard Hinode, we revisit the contentious issue of the relationship between global magnetic quantities and coronal X-ray intensity. Co-aligned vector magnetogram and X-ray data are used for this study. We find that there is no pixel-to-pixel correlation between the observed loop brightness and magnetic quantities. However, the X-ray brightness is well correlated with the integrated magnetic quantities such as total unsigned magnetic flux, total unsigned vertical current, area integrated square of the vertical magnetic field and horizontal magnetic fields. Comparing all these quantities we find that the total magnetic flux correlates well with the observed integrated X-ray brightness, though there is some differences in the strength of the correlation when we use the X-ray data from different filters. While we get a good correlation between X-ray brightness and total unsigned vertic...

  2. Interface high-temperature superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lili; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-12-01

    Cuprate high-temperature superconductors consist of two quasi-two-dimensional (2D) substructures: CuO2 superconducting layers and charge reservoir layers. The superconductivity is realized by charge transfer from the charge reservoir layers into the superconducting layers without chemical dopants and defects being introduced into the latter, similar to modulation-doping in the semiconductor superlattices of AlGaAs/GaAs. Inspired by this scheme, we have been searching for high-temperature superconductivity in ultra-thin films of superconductors epitaxially grown on semiconductor/oxide substrates since 2008. We have observed interface-enhanced superconductivity in both conventional and unconventional superconducting films, including single atomic layer films of Pb and In on Si substrates and single unit cell (UC) films of FeSe on SrTiO3 (STO) substrates. The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity with a superconducting gap of ∼20 meV in 1UC-FeSe/STO has stimulated tremendous interest in the superconductivity community, for it opens a new avenue for both raising superconducting transition temperature and understanding the pairing mechanism of unconventional high-temperature superconductivity. Here, we review mainly the experimental progress on interface-enhanced superconductivity in the three systems mentioned above with emphasis on 1UC-FeSe/STO, studied by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and transport experiments. We discuss the roles of interfaces and a possible pairing mechanism inferred from these studies.

  3. High-Temperature Optical Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Juergens, Jeffrey R.; Varga, Donald J.; Floyd, Bertram M.

    2010-01-01

    A high-temperature optical sensor (see Figure 1) has been developed that can operate at temperatures up to 1,000 C. The sensor development process consists of two parts: packaging of a fiber Bragg grating into a housing that allows a more sturdy thermally stable device, and a technological process to which the device is subjected to in order to meet environmental requirements of several hundred C. This technology uses a newly discovered phenomenon of the formation of thermally stable secondary Bragg gratings in communication-grade fibers at high temperatures to construct robust, optical, high-temperature sensors. Testing and performance evaluation (see Figure 2) of packaged sensors demonstrated operability of the devices at 1,000 C for several hundred hours, and during numerous thermal cycling from 400 to 800 C with different heating rates. The technology significantly extends applicability of optical sensors to high-temperature environments including ground testing of engines, flight propulsion control, thermal protection monitoring of launch vehicles, etc. It may also find applications in such non-aerospace arenas as monitoring of nuclear reactors, furnaces, chemical processes, and other hightemperature environments where other measurement techniques are either unreliable, dangerous, undesirable, or unavailable.

  4. Optimization of a Radiative Transfer Forward Operator for Simulating SMOS Brightness Temperatures over the Upper Mississippi Basin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lievens, H.; Verhoest, N. E. C.; Martens, B.; VanDenBerg, M. J.; Bitar, A. Al; Tomer, S. Kumar; Merlin, O.; Cabot, F.; Kerr, Y.; DeLannoy, G. J. M.; Drusch, M.; Hendricks-Franssen, H.-J.; Vereecken, H.; Pan, M.; Wood, E. F.; Dumedah, G.; Walker, J. P.; Pauwels, V. R. N.

    2014-01-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite mission is routinely providing global multi-angular observations of brightness temperature (TB) at both horizontal and vertical polarization with a 3-day repeat period. The assimilation of such data into a land surface model (LSM) may improve the skill of operational flood forecasts through an improved estimation of soil moisture (SM). To accommodate for the direct assimilation of the SMOS TB data, the LSM needs to be coupled with a radiative transfer model (RTM), serving as a forward operator for the simulation of multi-angular and multi-polarization top of atmosphere TBs. This study investigates the use of the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) LSM coupled with the Community Microwave Emission Modelling platform (CMEM) for simulating SMOS TB observations over the Upper Mississippi basin, USA. For a period of 2 years (2010-2011), a comparison between SMOS TBs and simulations with literature-based RTM parameters reveals a basin averaged bias of 30K. Therefore, time series of SMOS TB observations are used to investigate ways for mitigating these large biases. Specifically, the study demonstrates the impact of the LSM soil moisture climatology in the magnitude of TB biases. After CDF matching the SM climatology of the LSM to SMOS retrievals, the average bias decreases from 30K to less than 5K. Further improvements can be made through calibration of RTM parameters related to the modeling of surface roughness and vegetation. Consequently, it can be concluded that SM rescaling and RTM optimization are efficient means for mitigating biases and form a necessary preparatory step for data assimilation.

  5. Spatial Variability of L-Band Brightness Temperature during Freeze/Thaw Events over a Prairie Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Roy

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Passive microwave measurements from space are known to be sensitive to the freeze/thaw (F/T state of the land surface. These measurements are at a coarse spatial resolution (~15–50 km and the spatial variability of the microwave emissions within a pixel can have important effects on the interpretation of the signal. An L-band ground-based microwave radiometer campaign was conducted in the Canadian Prairies during winter 2014–2015 to examine the spatial variability of surface emissions during frozen and thawed periods. Seven different sites within the Kenaston soil monitoring network were sampled five times between October 2014 and April 2015 with a mobile ground-based L-band radiometer system at approximately monthly intervals. The radiometer measurements showed that in a seemingly homogenous prairie landscape, the spatial variability of brightness temperature (TB is non-negligible during both frozen and unfrozen soil conditions. Under frozen soil conditions, TB was negatively correlated with soil permittivity (εG. This correlation was related to soil moisture conditions before the main freezing event, showing that the soil ice volumetric content at least partly affects TB. However, because of the effect of snow on L-Band emission, the correlation between TB and εG decreased with snow accumulation. When compared to satellite measurements, the average TB of the seven plots were well correlated with the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS TB with a root mean square difference of 8.1 K and consistent representation of the strong F/T signal (i.e., TB increases and decreases when soil freezing and thawing, respectively. This study allows better quantitative understanding of the spatial variability in L-Band emissions related to landscape F/T, and will help the calibration and validation of satellite-based F/T retrieval algorithms.

  6. Analytic Models of High-Temperature Hohlraums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stygar, W.A.; Olson, R.E.; Spielman, R.B.; Leeper, R.J.

    2000-11-29

    A unified set of high-temperature-hohlraum models has been developed. For a simple hohlraum, P{sub s} = [A{sub s}+(1{minus}{alpha}{sub W})A{sub W}+A{sub H}]{sigma}T{sub R}{sup 4} + (4V{sigma}/c)(dT{sub R}{sup r}/dt) where P{sub S} is the total power radiated by the source, A{sub s} is the source area, A{sub W} is the area of the cavity wall excluding the source and holes in the wall, A{sub H} is the area of the holes, {sigma} is the Stefan-Boltzmann constant, T{sub R} is the radiation brightness temperature, V is the hohlraum volume, and c is the speed of light. The wall albedo {alpha}{sub W} {triple_bond} (T{sub W}/T{sub R}){sup 4} where T{sub W} is the brightness temperature of area A{sub W}. The net power radiated by the source P{sub N} = P{sub S}-A{sub S}{sigma}T{sub R}{sup 4}, which suggests that for laser-driven hohlraums the conversion efficiency {eta}{sub CE} be defined as P{sub N}/P{sub LASER}. The characteristic time required to change T{sub R}{sup 4} in response to a change in P{sub N} is 4V/C[(l{minus}{alpha}{sub W})A{sub W}+A{sub H}]. Using this model, T{sub R}, {alpha}{sub W}, and {eta}{sub CE} can be expressed in terms of quantities directly measurable in a hohlraum experiment. For a steady-state hohlraum that encloses a convex capsule, P{sub N} = {l_brace}(1{minus}{alpha}{sub W})A{sub W}+A{sub H}+[(1{minus}{alpha}{sub C})(A{sub S}+A{sub W}{alpha}{sub W})A{sub C}/A{sub T}]{r_brace}{sigma}T{sub RC}{sup 4} where {alpha}{sub C} is the capsule albedo, A{sub C} is the capsule area, A{sub T} {triple_bond} (A{sub S}+A{sub W}+A{sub H}), and T{sub RC} is the brightness temperature of the radiation that drives the capsule. According to this relation, the capsule-coupling efficiency of the baseline National-Ignition-Facility (NIF) hohlraum is 15% higher than predicted by previous analytic expressions. A model of a hohlraum that encloses a z pinch is also presented.

  7. High temperature superconductor current leads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Poeppel, Roger B. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

    1995-01-01

    An electrical lead having one end for connection to an apparatus in a cryogenic environment and the other end for connection to an apparatus outside the cryogenic environment. The electrical lead includes a high temperature superconductor wire and an electrically conductive material distributed therein, where the conductive material is present at the one end of the lead at a concentration in the range of from 0 to about 3% by volume, and at the other end of the lead at a concentration of less than about 20% by volume. Various embodiments are shown for groups of high temperature superconductor wires and sheaths.

  8. High temperature polymer matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Tito T. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites Conference held at the NASA Lewis Research Center on March 16 to 18, 1983. The purpose of the conference is to provide scientists and engineers working in the field of high temperature polymer matrix composites an opportunity to review, exchange, and assess the latest developments in this rapidly expanding area of materials technology. Technical papers are presented in the following areas: (1) matrix development; (2) adhesive development; (3) Characterization; (4) environmental effects; and (5) applications.

  9. High temperature corrosion in gasifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakker Wate

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Several commercial scale coal gasification combined cycle power plants have been built and successfully operated during the last 5-10 years. Supporting research on materials of construction has been carried out for the last 20 years by EPRI and others. Emphasis was on metallic alloys for heat exchangers and other components in contact with hot corrosive gases at high temperatures. In this paper major high temperature corrosion mechanisms, materials performance in presently operating gasifiers and future research needs will be discussed.

  10. Comparison of Local Scale Measured and Modeled Brightness Temperatures and Snow Parameters from the CLPX 2003 by Means of a Dense Medium Radiative Transfer Theory Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedescol, Marco; Kim, Edward J.; Cline, Don; Graf, Tobias; Koike, Toshio; Armstrong, Richard; Brodzik, Mary J.; Hardy, Janet

    2004-01-01

    Microwave remote sensing offers distinct advantages for observing the cryosphere. Solar illumination is not required, and spatial and temporal coverage are excellent from polar-orbiting satellites. Passive microwave measurements are sensitive to the two most useful physical quantities for many hydrological applications: physical temperature and water content/state. Sensitivity to the latter is a direct result of the microwave sensitivity to the dielectric properties of natural media, including snow, ice, soil (frozen or thawed), and vegetation. These considerations are factors motivating the development of future cryospheric satellite remote sensing missions, continuing and improving on a 26-year microwave measurement legacy. Perhaps the biggest issues regarding the use of such satellite measurements involve how to relate parameter values at spatial scales as small as a hectare to observations with sensor footprints that may be up to 25 x 25 km. The NASA Cold-land Processes Field Experiment (CLPX) generated a dataset designed to enhance understanding of such scaling issues. CLPX observations were made in February (dry snow) and March (wet snow), 2003 in Colorado, USA, at scales ranging from plot scale to 25 x 25 km satellite footprints. Of interest here are passive microwave observations from ground-based, airborne, and satellite sensors, as well as meteorological and snowpack measurements that will enable studies of the effects of spatial heterogeneity of surface conditions on the observations. Prior to performing such scaling studies, an evaluation of snowpack forward modelling at the plot scale (least heterogeneous scale) is in order. This is the focus of this paper. Many forward models of snow signatures (brightness temperatures) have been developed over the years. It is now recognized that a dense medium radiative transfer (DMRT) treatment represents a high degree of physical fidelity for snow modeling, yet dense medium models are particularly sensitive to

  11. Nonlinear plasmonics at high temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Sivan, Yonatan

    2016-01-01

    We solve the Maxwell and heat equations self-consistently for metal nanoparticles under intense continuous wave (CW) illumination. Unlike previous studies, we rely on {\\em experimentally}-measured data for the metal permittivity for increasing temperature and for the visible spectral range. We show that the thermal nonlinearity of the metal can lead to substantial deviations from the predictions of the linear model for the temperature and field distribution, and thus, can explain qualitatively the strong nonlinear scattering from such configurations observed experimentally. We also show that the incompleteness of existing data of the temperature dependence of the thermal properties of the system prevents reaching a quantitative agreement between the measured and calculated scattering data. This modelling approach is essential for the identification of the underlying physical mechanism responsible for the thermo-optical nonlinearity of the metal and should be adopted in all applications of high temperature non...

  12. Nonlinear plasmonics at high temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivan Yonatan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We solve the Maxwell and heat equations self-consistently for metal nanoparticles under intense continuous wave (CW illumination. Unlike previous studies, we rely on experimentally-measured data for metal permittivity for increasing temperature and for the visible spectral range. We show that the thermal nonlinearity of the metal can lead to substantial deviations from the predictions of the linear model for the temperature and field distribution and, thus, can explain qualitatively the strong nonlinear scattering from such configurations observed experimentally. We also show that the incompleteness of existing data of the temperature dependence of the thermal properties of the system prevents reaching a quantitative agreement between the measured and calculated scattering data. This modeling approach is essential for the identification of the underlying physical mechanism responsible for the thermo-optical nonlinearity of the metal and should be adopted in all applications of high-temperature nonlinear plasmonics, especially for refractory metals, for both CW and pulsed illumination.

  13. Nonlinear plasmonics at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivan, Yonatan; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2017-01-01

    We solve the Maxwell and heat equations self-consistently for metal nanoparticles under intense continuous wave (CW) illumination. Unlike previous studies, we rely on experimentally-measured data for metal permittivity for increasing temperature and for the visible spectral range. We show that the thermal nonlinearity of the metal can lead to substantial deviations from the predictions of the linear model for the temperature and field distribution and, thus, can explain qualitatively the strong nonlinear scattering from such configurations observed experimentally. We also show that the incompleteness of existing data of the temperature dependence of the thermal properties of the system prevents reaching a quantitative agreement between the measured and calculated scattering data. This modeling approach is essential for the identification of the underlying physical mechanism responsible for the thermo-optical nonlinearity of the metal and should be adopted in all applications of high-temperature nonlinear plasmonics, especially for refractory metals, for both CW and pulsed illumination.

  14. Novel high refractive index, thermally conductive additives for high brightness white LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Richard Stephen

    In prior works the inclusion of nanoparticle fillers has typically been shown to increase the thermal conductivity or refractive index of polymer nanocomposites separately. High refractive index zirconia nanoparticles have already proved their merit in increasing the optical efficiency of encapsulated light emitting diodes. However, the thermal properties of zirconia-silicone nanocomposites have yet to be investigated. While phosphor-converted light emitting diodes are at the forefront of solid-state lighting technologies for producing white light, they are plagued by efficiency losses due to excessive heating at the semiconductor die and in and around the phosphor particles, as well as photon scattering losses in the phosphor layer. It would then be of great interest if the high refractive index nanoparticles were found to both be capable of increasing the refractive index, thus reducing the optical scattering, and also the thermal conductivity, channeling more heat away from the LED die and phosphors, mitigating efficiency losses from heat. Thermal conductance measurements on unfilled and nanoparticle loaded silicone samples were conducted to quantify the effect of the zirconia nanoparticle loading on silicone nanocomposite thermal conductivity. An increase in thermal conductivity from 0.27 W/mK to 0.49 W/mK from base silicone to silicone with 33.5 wt% zirconia nanoparticles was observed. This trend closely mirrored a basic rule of mixtures prediction, implying a further enhancement in thermal conductivity could be achieved at higher nanoparticle loadings. The optical properties of transparency and light extraction efficiency of these composites were also investigated. While overall the zirconia nanocomposite showed good transparency, there was a slight decrease at the shorter wavelengths with increasing zirconia content. For longer wavelength LEDs, such as green or red, this might not matter, but phosphor-converted white LEDs use a blue LED as the photon source

  15. Towards the implementation of L-band Soil Moisture Brightness Temperatures in the Canadian Land Data Assimilation System (CaLDAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Marco; Bilodeau, Bernard; Russell, Albert; Wang, Xihong; Belair, Stephane

    2016-04-01

    The Canadian Land Data Assimilation System (CaLDAS) currently runs in Environment Canada (EC) operations and provides the initial conditions for soil moisture and soil temperature to the High-Resolution Regional Deterministic Prediction System (HRDPS). Errors in screen-level temperature and dew-point temperature are used to analyze soil moisture and soil temperature. The observational gap in soil moisture is being alleviated by significant advances in remote sensing technologies specifically dedicated to the measurement of soil moisture. The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite was launched by the European Space Agency (ESA) in November 2009 and has been providing global coverage of near-surface soil moisture every 3 days. In January 2015, the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite was launched by NASA, and similar to SMOS, is equipped with a passive radiometer measuring the soil emission in the highly sensitive L-band frequency. The land-surface modeling component within CaLDAS has been coupled to the CMEM (Community Microwave Emission Modeling Platform) microwave radiative transfer model to allow for the assimilation of L-band brightness temperatures (TB). This study reports upon a series of pre-operational experiments exploring how best to combine the traditional screen-level variables with the more direct measurements of soil moisture provided by SMOS and SMAP for a better analysis of the soil moisture state. The study period will be the warm season periods for 2014 and 2015 over North America. Analyzed soil moistures will be compared against in-situ monitoring networks, but the principal focus will be upon the impacts in numerical weather prediction (NWP) mode. EC's Regional Deterministic Prediction System (RDPS), with 10 km grid spacing, is the principal NWP guidance used by Meteorological Service of Canada forecasters in the 1-2 day range. CaLDAS will be run assimilating different configurations of screen-level data and SMOS/SMAP TBs to

  16. High-temperature Titanium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K. Gogia

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of high-temperature titanium alloys has contributed significantly to the spectacular progress in thrust-to-weight ratio of the aero gas turbines. This paper presents anoverview on the development of high-temperature titanium alloys used in aero engines and potential futuristic materials based on titanium aluminides and composites. The role of alloychemistry, processing, and microstructure, in determining the mechanical properties of titanium alloys is discussed. While phase equilibria and microstructural stability consideration haverestricted the use of conventional titanium alloys up to about 600 "C, alloys based on TiPl (or,, E,AINb (0, TiAl (y, and titaniumltitanium aluminides-based composites offer a possibility ofquantum jump in the temperature capability of titanium alloys.

  17. Dark current studies on a normal-conducting high-brightness very-high-frequency electron gun operating in continuous wave mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on measurements and analysis of a field-emitted electron current in the very-high-frequency (VHF gun, a room temperature rf gun operating at high field and continuous wave (CW mode at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL. The VHF gun is the core of the Advanced Photo-injector Experiment (APEX at LBNL, geared toward the development of an injector for driving the next generation of high average power x-ray free electron lasers. High accelerating fields at the cathode are necessary for the high-brightness performance of an electron gun. When coupled with CW operation, such fields can generate a significant amount of field-emitted electrons that can be transported downstream the accelerator forming the so-called “dark current.” Elevated levels of a dark current can cause radiation damage, increase the heat load in the downstream cryogenic systems, and ultimately limit the overall performance and reliability of the facility. We performed systematic measurements that allowed us to characterize the field emission from the VHF gun, determine the location of the main emitters, and define an effective strategy to reduce and control the level of dark current at APEX. Furthermore, the energy spectra of isolated sources have been measured. A simple model for energy data analysis was developed that allows one to extract information on the emitter from a single energy distribution measurement.

  18. Chemistry of high temperature superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    1991-01-01

    This review volume contains the most up-to-date articles on the chemical aspects of high temperature oxide superconductors. These articles are written by some of the leading scientists in the field and includes a comprehensive list of references. This is an essential volume for researchers working in the fields of ceramics, materials science and chemistry.

  19. Properties of high temperature SQUIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falco, C. M.; Wu, C. T.

    1978-01-01

    A review is given of the present status of weak links and dc and rf biased SQUIDs made with high temperature superconductors. A method for producing reliable, reproducible devices using Nb/sub 3/Sn is outlined, and comments are made on directions future work should take.

  20. Characteristics of a high brightness gaseous field ion source employing tungsten-carbon doped NiAl needles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousa, Marwan S., E-mail: mmousa@mutah.edu.jo [Department of Physics, Mu' tah University, P.O. Box 7, Al-Karak (Jordan)

    2011-05-15

    We report on the characterization of a high brightness gaseous field ion source using an emitter made of a NiAl needle containing tiny spherical tungsten-carbon precipitates. By field evaporation of such a multiphase alloy, a surface protrusion is formed out of a precipitate, which can act as a small source size field ion emitter. The emission current-voltage characteristics of this emitter were recorded for a variety of parameters. The results obtained suggest that its application as a stable ion source is possible even on long term operation. -- Research highlights: {yields} High brightness gaseous field ion source of precipitation hardened NiAl+W+C emitter. {yields} Emission current-voltage characteristics are recorded for a variety of parameters. {yields} Very small virtual source sizes and energy spreads can be attained. {yields} Results suggest that application as long term stable ion source is possible.

  1. High brightness laser-diode device emitting 500 W from a 200 μm/NA0.22 fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junhong, Yu; Linhui, Guo; Hualing, Wu; Zhao, Wang; Hao, Tan; Songxin, Gao; Deyong, Wu; Kai, Zhang

    2016-06-01

    A practical method of achieving high brightness and high power fiber-coupled laser-diode device is demonstrated both by experiment and ZEMAX software simulation, which is obtained by technologies of precision beam collimation, free space beam combining and polarization beam combining based on mini-bar diode laser chip. Using this method, fiber-coupled laser-diode module output power from the multimode fiber with 200 μm core diameter and 0.22 numerical aperture (NA) could reach 528 W, equalizing brightness is 11.0 MW/(cm2 sr) and electro-optical efficiency (defined as fiber output power divided by voltage and current of the module) is 43.0%. By this method, much wider applications of fiber-coupled laser-diode are anticipated.

  2. High temperature, high power piezoelectric composite transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart

    2014-08-08

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined.

  3. High Temperature, High Power Piezoelectric Composite Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeong Jae Lee

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined.

  4. High Temperature Sorbents for Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A sorbent capable of removing trace amounts of oxygen (ppt) from a gas stream at a high temperature above 200 C is introduced. The sorbent comprises a porous alumina silicate support such as zeolite containing from 1 to 10 percent by weight of ion exchanged transition metal such as copper or cobalt ions and 0.05 to 1.0 percent by weight of an activator selected from a platinum group metal such as platinum. The activation temperature, oxygen sorption and reducibility are all improved by the presence of the platinum activator.

  5. High-temperature beryllium embrittlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokrovsky, A.S. [Scientific Research Inst. of Atomic Reactors, Dimitrovgrad (Russian Federation); Fabritsiev, S.A. [D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute, 189631 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bagautdinov, R.M. [Scientific Research Inst. of Atomic Reactors, Dimitrovgrad (Russian Federation); Goncharenko, Yu.D. [Scientific Research Inst. of Atomic Reactors, Dimitrovgrad (Russian Federation)

    1996-10-01

    The neutron irradiation effect on the mechanical properties, swelling and fracture surface structure of various beryllium grades was studied in the BOR-60 reactor at 340 to 350 C up to a fluence of 7.2 x 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2}. At a mechanical testing temperature of 400 C there was observed a strong anisotropy of plastic beryllium deformation depending on the direction of sample cutting relative to the pressing direction. An increase of the testing temperature up to 700 C resulted in an abrupt embrittlement of all irradiated samples. In the most part of the surface structure the intercrystallite fracture along the grain boundaries was covered entirely with large pores, 1 to 4 {mu}m in size. It was suggested that the increased rate of pore formation along the grain boundaries resulted from a high-temperature embrittlement under irradiation. (orig.).

  6. High temperature structural sandwich panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papakonstantinou, Christos G.

    High strength composites are being used for making lightweight structural panels that are being employed in aerospace, naval and automotive structures. Recently, there is renewed interest in use of these panels. The major problem of most commercial available sandwich panels is the fire resistance. A recently developed inorganic matrix is investigated for use in cases where fire and high temperature resistance are necessary. The focus of this dissertation is the development of a fireproof composite structural system. Sandwich panels made with polysialate matrices have an excellent potential for use in applications where exposure to high temperatures or fire is a concern. Commercial available sandwich panels will soften and lose nearly all of their compressive strength temperatures lower than 400°C. This dissertation consists of the state of the art, the experimental investigation and the analytical modeling. The state of the art covers the performance of existing high temperature composites, sandwich panels and reinforced concrete beams strengthened with Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP). The experimental part consists of four major components: (i) Development of a fireproof syntactic foam with maximum specific strength, (ii) Development of a lightweight syntactic foam based on polystyrene spheres, (iii) Development of the composite system for the skins. The variables are the skin thickness, modulus of elasticity of skin and high temperature resistance, and (iv) Experimental evaluation of the flexural behavior of sandwich panels. Analytical modeling consists of a model for the flexural behavior of lightweight sandwich panels, and a model for deflection calculations of reinforced concrete beams strengthened with FRP subjected to fatigue loading. The experimental and analytical results show that sandwich panels made with polysialate matrices and ceramic spheres do not lose their load bearing capability during severe fire exposure, where temperatures reach several

  7. High Temperature Heat Exchanger Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony E. Hechanova, Ph.D.

    2008-09-30

    The UNLV Research Foundation assembled a research consortium for high temperature heat exchanger design and materials compatibility and performance comprised of university and private industry partners under the auspices of the US DOE-NE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative in October 2003. The objectives of the consortium were to conduct investigations of candidate materials for high temperature heat exchanger componets in hydrogen production processes and design and perform prototypical testing of heat exchangers. The initial research of the consortium focused on the intermediate heat exchanger (located between the nuclear reactor and hydrogen production plan) and the components for the hydrogen iodine decomposition process and sulfuric acid decomposition process. These heat exchanger components were deemed the most challenging from a materials performance and compatibility perspective

  8. Motor for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roopnarine (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A high temperature motor has a stator with poles formed by wire windings, and a rotor with magnetic poles on a rotor shaft positioned coaxially within the stator. The stator and rotor are built up from stacks of magnetic-alloy laminations. The stator windings are made of high temperature magnet wire insulated with a vitreous enamel film, and the wire windings are bonded together with ceramic binder. A thin-walled cylinder is positioned coaxially between the rotor and the stator to prevent debris from the stator windings from reaching the rotor. The stator windings are wound on wire spools made of ceramic, thereby avoiding need for mica insulation and epoxy/adhesive. The stator and rotor are encased in a stator housing with rear and front end caps, and rear and front bearings for the rotor shaft are mounted on external sides of the end caps to keep debris from the motor migrating into the bearings' races.

  9. Gravimetric Vegetation Water Content Estimation for Corn Using L-Band Bi-Angular, Dual-Polarized Brightness Temperatures and Leaf Area Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an algorithm to retrieve the gravimetric vegetation water content (GVWC, % of corn was developed. First, the method for obtaining the optical depth from L-band (1.4 GHz bi-angular, dual-polarized brightness temperatures (TB for short vegetation was investigated. Then, the quantitative relationship between the corn optical depth, corn GVWC and corn leaf area index (LAI was constructed. Finally, using the Polarimetric L-band Microwave Radiometer (PLMR airborne data in the 2012 Heihe Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research (HiWATER project, the Global Land Surface Satellite (GLASS LAI product, the height and areal density of the corn stalks, the corn GVWC was estimated (corn GLASS-GVWC. Both the in situ measured corn GVWC and the corn GVWC retrieved based on the in situ measured corn LAI (corn LAINET-GVWC were used to validate the accuracy of the corn GLASS-GVWC. The results show that the GVWC retrieval method proposed in this study is feasible for monitoring the corn GVWC. However, the accuracy of the retrieval results is highly sensitive to the accuracy of the LAI input parameters.

  10. High temperature catalytic membrane reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-03-01

    Current state-of-the-art inorganic oxide membranes offer the potential of being modified to yield catalytic properties. The resulting modules may be configured to simultaneously induce catalytic reactions with product concentration and separation in a single processing step. Processes utilizing such catalytically active membrane reactors have the potential for dramatically increasing yield reactions which are currently limited by either thermodynamic equilibria, product inhibition, or kinetic selectivity. Examples of commercial interest include hydrogenation, dehydrogenation, partial and selective oxidation, hydrations, hydrocarbon cracking, olefin metathesis, hydroformylation, and olefin polymerization. A large portion of the most significant reactions fall into the category of high temperature, gas phase chemical and petrochemical processes. Microporous oxide membranes are well suited for these applications. A program is proposed to investigate selected model reactions of commercial interest (i.e. dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene and dehydrogenation of butane to butadiene) using a high temperature catalytic membrane reactor. Membranes will be developed, reaction dynamics characterized, and production processes developed, culminating in laboratory-scale demonstration of technical and economic feasibility. As a result, the anticipated increased yield per reactor pass economic incentives are envisioned. First, a large decrease in the temperature required to obtain high yield should be possible because of the reduced driving force requirement. Significantly higher conversion per pass implies a reduced recycle ratio, as well as reduced reactor size. Both factors result in reduced capital costs, as well as savings in cost of reactants and energy.

  11. Very High Temperature Sound Absorption Coating Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Phase I demonstrated experimentally a very high temperature acoustically absorbing coating for ducted acoustics applications. High temperature survivability at 3500...

  12. Beam dynamics in an initial part of a high Brightness electron linac

    CERN Document Server

    Ayzatsky, M I; Dovbnya-Kushnir, V A

    2001-01-01

    The paper is focused on problems of obtained a bright electron beam in a system that includes a grid-controlled electron gun,a klystron type type subharmonical buncher, a standing wave fundamental buncher with increasing accelerating field and a short travelling wave accelerating section. Beam focusing is provided by a longitudinal solenoidal magnetic field.It was shown that the proposed system can provide electron bunches with a peak current more than 100 A and normalized r.m.s. emittance no more than phi centre dot mm centre dot mrad.

  13. Smart light random memory sprays Retinex: a fast Retinex implementation for high-quality brightness adjustment and color correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banić, Nikola; Lončarić, Sven

    2015-11-01

    Removing the influence of illumination on image colors and adjusting the brightness across the scene are important image enhancement problems. This is achieved by applying adequate color constancy and brightness adjustment methods. One of the earliest models to deal with both of these problems was the Retinex theory. Some of the Retinex implementations tend to give high-quality results by performing local operations, but they are computationally relatively slow. One of the recent Retinex implementations is light random sprays Retinex (LRSR). In this paper, a new method is proposed for brightness adjustment and color correction that overcomes the main disadvantages of LRSR. There are three main contributions of this paper. First, a concept of memory sprays is proposed to reduce the number of LRSR's per-pixel operations to a constant regardless of the parameter values, thereby enabling a fast Retinex-based local image enhancement. Second, an effective remapping of image intensities is proposed that results in significantly higher quality. Third, the problem of LRSR's halo effect is significantly reduced by using an alternative illumination processing method. The proposed method enables a fast Retinex-based image enhancement by processing Retinex paths in a constant number of steps regardless of the path size. Due to the halo effect removal and remapping of the resulting intensities, the method outperforms many of the well-known image enhancement methods in terms of resulting image quality. The results are presented and discussed. It is shown that the proposed method outperforms most of the tested methods in terms of image brightness adjustment, color correction, and computational speed.

  14. Much Ado about Microbunching: Coherent Bunching in High Brightness Electron Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratner, Daniel [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2011-05-01

    The push to provide ever brighter coherent radiation sources has led to the creation of correspondingly bright electron beams. With billions of electrons packed into normalized emittances (phase space) below one micron, collective effects may dominate both the preservation and use of such ultra-bright beams. An important class of collective effects is due to density modulations within the bunch, or microbunching. Microbunching may be deleterious, as in the case of the Microbunching Instability (MBI), or it may drive radiation sources of unprecedented intensity, as in the case of Free Electron Lasers (FELs). In this work we begin by describing models of microbunching due to inherent beam shot noise, which sparks both the MBI as well as SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source, the world's first hard X-ray laser. We first use this model to propose a mechanism for reducing the inherent beam shot noise as well as for predicting MBI effects. We then describe experimental measurements of the resulting microbunching at LCLS, including optical radiation from the MBI, as well as the first gain length and harmonic measurements from a hard X-ray FEL. In the final chapters, we describe schemes that use external laser modulations to microbunch light sources of the future. In these sections we describe coherent light source schemes for both both linacs and storage rings.

  15. Temperature uniformity mapping in a high pressure high temperature reactor using a temperature sensitive indicator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grauwet, T.; Plancken, van der I.; Vervoort, L.; Matser, A.M.; Hendrickx, M.; Loey, van A.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the first prototype ovomucoid-based pressure–temperature–time indicator (pTTI) for high pressure high temperature (HPHT) processing was described. However, for temperature uniformity mapping of high pressure (HP) vessels under HPHT sterilization conditions, this prototype needs to be optim

  16. Comparison and evaluation of the Chang'E microwave radiometer data based on theoretical computation of brightness temperatures at the Apollo 15 and 17 sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guo-Ping; Chan, Kwing L.; Zheng, Yong-Chun; Tsang, Kang T.; Xu, Ao-Ao

    2017-09-01

    There are significant differences (in the order of 3 to 20 K) between the lunar brightness temperatures (TBs) as measured by the microwave radiometers (MRM) onboard Chang'E (CE)-1 and -2. To determine which set is more accurate, we have carried out a dataset comparison using theoretical calculations of the TBs (four frequency channels) versus local time at the Apollo 15 and 17 landing sites, where the thermal parameters are well-constrained by the in-situ measurements. Based on these parameters, we sought to constrain fits between theory and observation, as uncertainties still exist in parameters involved in the microwave transfer computation. We found that: (i) CE-1/2 TBs have almost constant biases (negative, different for different channels) from the theoretical TBs. The averaged biases for each channel are smaller for CE-1; (ii) TBs of the high frequency channels (19.35/37 GHz) show a better fit with theory than the low frequency channels. The channel 4 (37 GHz) TBs from CE-1 are consistently shifted by about 1 K from the theoretical values. Adjustments in the order of 20 K are instead needed for the two CE-2 low frequency channels (3/7.8 GHz). Based on this comparison, we conclude that the CE-1 dataset to be more accurate than CE-2 one in terms of temperature accuracy (not spatial resolution). We also offer a possible explanation for the significant TB differences between CE-1 and CE-2, and propose a possible recalibration method as a starting point towards the realignment of the two datasets.

  17. Passivation of high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The surface of high temperature superconductors such as YBa2Cu3O(7-x) are passivated by reacting the native Y, Ba and Cu metal ions with an anion such as sulfate or oxalate to form a surface film that is impervious to water and has a solubility in water of no more than 10(exp -3) M. The passivating treatment is preferably conducted by immersing the surface in dilute aqueous acid solution since more soluble species dissolve into the solution. The treatment does not degrade the superconducting properties of the bulk material.

  18. Liquid crystal displays with high brightness of visualization versus active displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olifierczuk, Marek; Zieliński, Jerzy

    2007-05-01

    Nowadays Liquid Crystal Displays (LCD) takes the very important place among different visualization devices. It's are used in many standard applications such as computer or video screens. In May 2006, 100" LCD TV monitor had been shown by LG. But beside of this main direction of display development, very interesting - because of insignificant electro-magnetic disturbances - is the possibility of it's applications in motorization and aviation. An example of it can be a glass cockpit of U2 , Boeing 777 or many different car dashboards. On this field beside LCD we have now many another display technologies, but interesting for us are 3 of them: FEDs (Field Emission Displays), OLEDs (Organic Light Emitting Diode), PLEDs (Polymer Light Emitting Diode). The leading position of LCD is a result of LCD unique advantages of flat form, weight, power consumption, and reliability, higher (than CRT) luminance, luminance uniformity, sunlight readability, wide dimming range, fault tolerance and a large active display area with a small border. The basis of starting our investigation was the comparison of passive LCD and the other technology, which can be theoretically used on motorization and aviation field. The following parameters are compared: contrast ratio, luminance level, temperature stability, life-time, operating temperature range, color performance, and depth, viewing cone, technology maturity, availability and cost. In our work an analysis of Liquid Crystal Displays used in specific applications is done. The possibilities of the applications such a display under high lighting level are presented. The presented results of this analysis are obtained from computer program worked by authors, which makes it possible to calculate the optical parameters of transmissive and reflective LCD working in quasi-real conditions. The base assumption of this program are shown. This program calculate the transmission and reflection coefficient of a display taking into account the

  19. High Temperature Radio Frequency Loads

    CERN Document Server

    Federmann, S; Grudiev, A; Montesinos, E; Syratchev, I

    2011-01-01

    In the context of energy saving and recovery requirements the design of reliable and robust RF power loads which permit a high outlet temperature and high pressure of the cooling water is desirable. Cooling water arriving at the outlet withmore than 150 ◦C and high pressure has a higher value than water with 50 ◦C under low pressure. Conventional RF power loads containing dielectric and magnetic materials as well as sensitive ceramic windows usually do not permit going much higher than 90 ◦C. Here we present and discuss several design concepts for "metal only" RF high power loads. One concept is the application of magnetic steel corrugated waveguides near cutoff – this concept could find practical use above several GHz. Another solution are resonant structures made of steel to be installed in large waveguides for frequencies of 500 MHz or lower. Similar resonant structures above 100 MHz taking advantage of the rather high losses of normal steel may also be used in coaxial line geometries with large di...

  20. The SPARC project: a high-brightness electron beam source at LNF to drive a SASE-FEL experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alesini, D.; Bertolucci, S.; Biagini, M.E.; Biscari, C.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Castellano, M.; Clozza, A.; Di Pirro, G.; Drago, A.; Esposito, A.; Ferrario, M. E-mail: massimo.ferrario@lnf.infn.it; Fusco, V.; Gallo, A.; Ghigo, A.; Guiducci, S.; Incurvati, M.; Laurelli, P.; Ligi, C.; Marcellini, F.; Migliorati, M.; Milardi, C.; Palumbo, L.; Pellegrino, L.; Preger, M.; Raimondi, P.; Ricci, R.; Sanelli, C.; Sgamma, F.; Spataro, B.; Serio, M.; Stecchi, A.; Stella, A.; Tazzioli, F.; Vaccarezza, C.; Vescovi, M.; Vicario, C.; Zobov, M.; Acerbi, E.; Alessandria, F.; Barni, D.; Bellomo, G.; Boscolo, I.; Broggi, F.; Cialdi, S.; DeMartinis, C.; Giove, D.; Maroli, C.; Petrillo, V.; Rome' , M.; Serafini, L.; Chiadroni, E.; Felici, G.; Levi, D.; Mastrucci, M.; Mattioli, M.; Medici, G.; Petrarca, G.S.; Catani, L.; Cianchi, A.; D' Angelo, A.; Di Salvo, R.; Fantini, A.; Moricciani, D.; Schaerf, C.; Bartolini, R.; Ciocci, F.; Dattoli, G.; Doria, A.; Flora, F.; Gallerano, G.P.; Giannessi, L.; Giovenale, E.; Messina, G.; Mezi, L.; Ottaviani, P.L.; Picardi, L.; Quattromini, M.; Renieri, A.; Ronsivalle, C.; Avaldi, L.; Carbone, C.; Cricenti, A.; Pifferi, A.; Perfetti, P.; Prosperi, T.; Albertini, V. Rossi; Quaresima, C.; Zema, N

    2003-07-11

    The Project Sorgente Pulsata e Amplificata di Radiazione Coerente (SPARC), proposed by a collaboration among ENEA-INFN-CNR-Universita' di Tor Vergata-INFM-ST, was recently approved by the Italian Government and will be built at LNF. The aim of the project is to promote an R and D activity oriented to the development of a coherent ultra-brilliant X-ray source in Italy. This collaboration has identified a program founded on two main issues: the generation of ultra-high peak brightness electron beams and of resonant higher harmonics in the SASE-FEL process, as presented in this paper.

  1. Electro-optical characteristics of a chiral hybrid in-plane switching liquid crystal mode for high brightness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwag, Jin Seog; Sohn, Kyunghwa; Kim, Young-Ki; Kim, Jae-Hoon

    2008-08-04

    We propose a new in-plane switching (IPS) nematic liquid crystal (LC) mode which uses a twist effect with a hybrid LC alignment and interdigitated electrodes as an approach for a high brightness. This is optimized to a normally white mode to minimize loss of transmittance at the electrode compared to the conventional IPS mode. The proposed mode shows an excellent dark state because the bulk LCs are aligned in parallel to the optic axis of the polarizer under low electric fields. Consequently, this proposed mode exhibits a much higher contrast ratio (980:1) than that of the conventional IPS mode (550:1).

  2. Operational experience on the generation and control of high brightness electron bunch trains at SPARC-LAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostacci, A.; Alesini, D.; Anania, M. P.; Bacci, A.; Bellaveglia, M.; Biagioni, A.; Cardelli, F.; Castellano, Michele; Chiadroni, Enrica; Cianchi, Alessandro; Croia, M.; Di Giovenale, Domenico; Di Pirro, Giampiero; Ferrario, Massimo; Filippi, Francesco; Gallo, Alessandro; Gatti, Giancarlo; Giribono, Anna; Innocenti, L.; Marocchino, A.; Petrarca, M.; Piersanti, L.; Pioli, S.; Pompili, Riccardo; Romeo, Stefano; Rossi, Andrea Renato; Shpakov, V.; Scifo, J.; Vaccarezza, Cristina; Villa, Fabio; Weiwei, L.

    2015-05-01

    Sub-picosecond, high-brightness electron bunch trains are routinely produced at SPARC-LAB via the velocity bunching technique. Such bunch trains can be used to drive multi-color Free Electron Lasers (FELs) and plasma wake field accelerators. In this paper we present recent results at SPARC-LAB on the generation of such beams, highlighting the key points of our scheme. We will discuss also the on-going machine upgrades to allow driving FELs with plasma accelerated beams or with short electron pulses at an increased energy.

  3. Crystal structures at high pressures and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Wendel Alexander

    2000-10-01

    The diamond anvil cell (DAC) is a unique instrument that can generate pressures equivalent to those inside planetary interiors (pressures on the order of 1 million atmospheres) under sustained conditions. When combined with a bright source of collimated x-rays, the DAC can be used to probe the structure of materials in-situ at ultra-high pressures. An understanding of the high-pressure structure of materials is important in determining what types of processes may take place in the Earth at great depths. Motivated by previous studies showing that xenon becomes metallic at pressures above ˜1 megabar (100 GPa), we examined the stable structures and reactivity of xenon at pressures approaching that of the core-mantle boundary in the Earth. Our findings indicate the transformation of xenon from face-centered cubic (fcc) to hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structures is kinetically hindered at room temperature, with the equilibrium fcc--hcp phase boundary at 21 (+/-3) gigapascals, a pressure lower than was previously thought. Additionally, we find no tendency on the part of xenon to form a metal alloy with iron or platinum to at least 100 to 150 gigapascals, making it unlikely that the Earth's core serves as a reservoir for primordial xenon. Measurements of the compressibility of natural (Mg.75,Fe .25)2SiO4 gamma-spinel at pressures of the Earth's transition zone yield a pressure derivative of the bulk modulus K0 ' = 6.3 (+/-0.3). As gamma-spinel is considered to be a dominant mineral phase of the transition-zone of the Earth's mantle (400--670 km depth), the relatively high value of K0' for gamma-spinel may help explain the rapid increase with depth of seismic velocities through the transition zone. The thermodynamics, mechanisms and kinetics of pressure-induced amorphization are not well understood. We report here new studies indicating little or no entropy difference between the crystalline and glassy states of Ca(OH) 2 (portlandite). Additional work on the pressure

  4. Through the Looking Glass: Bright, Highly Magnified Galaxy Candidates at z ~ 7 behind A1703

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, L. D.; Bouwens, R. J.; Zitrin, A.; Smit, R.; Coe, D.; Ford, H. C.; Zheng, W.; Illingworth, G. D.; Benítez, N.; Broadhurst, T. J.

    2012-03-01

    We report the discovery of seven strongly lensed Lyman-break galaxy (LBG) candidates at z ~ 7 detected in Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging of A1703. The brightest candidate, called A1703-zD1, has an observed (lensed) magnitude of 24.0 AB (26σ) in the WFC3/IR F160W band, making it 0.2 mag brighter than the z 850-dropout candidate recently reported behind the Bullet Cluster and 0.7 mag brighter than the previously brightest known z ~ 7.6 galaxy, A1689-zD1. With a cluster magnification of ~9, this source has an intrinsic magnitude of H 160 = 26.4 AB, a strong z 850 - J 125 break of 1.7 mag, and a photometric redshift of z ~ 6.7. Additionally, we find six other bright LBG candidates with H 160-band magnitudes of 24.9-26.4, photometric redshifts z ~ 6.4 - 8.8, and magnifications μ ~ 3-40. Stellar population fits to the Advanced Camera for Surveys, WFC3/IR, and Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera data for A1703-zD1 and A1703-zD4 yield stellar masses (0.7 - 3.0) × 109 M ⊙, stellar ages 5-180 Myr, and star formation rates ~7.8 M ⊙ yr-1, and low reddening with AV <= 0.7. The source-plane reconstruction of the exceptionally bright candidate A1703-zD1 exhibits an extended structure, spanning ~4 kpc in the z ~ 6.7 source plane, and shows three resolved star-forming knots of radius r ~ 0.4 kpc. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy under NASA contract NAS5-26555. Based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under NASA contract 1407.

  5. High Temperature Superconductor Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2079328; de Rijk, Gijs; Dhalle, Marc

    2016-11-10

    For future particle accelerators bending dipoles are considered with magnetic fields exceeding $20T$. This can only be achieved using high temperature superconductors (HTS). These exhibit different properties from classical low temperature superconductors and still require significant research and development before they can be applied in a practical accelerator magnet. In order to study HTS in detail, a five tesla demonstrator magnet named Feather-M2 is designed and constructed. The magnet is based on ReBCO coated conductor, which is assembled into a $10kA$ class Roebel cable. A new and optimized Aligned Block layout is used, which takes advantage of the anisotropy of the conductor. This is achieved by providing local alignment of the Roebel cable in the coil windings with the magnetic field lines. A new Network Model capable of analyzing transient electro-magnetic and thermal phenomena in coated conductor cables and coils is developed. This model is necessary to solve critical issues in coated conductor ac...

  6. Lunar surface dielectric constant,regolith thickness, and ~3He abundance distributions retrieved from the microwave brightness temperatures of CE-1 Lunar Microwave Sounder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Lunar regolith parameters, such as physical temperature, thickness and dielectric constant, are important in studying regolith features, distribution of lunar resources and evolution of the Moon. There had been no measurement obtained by lunar-orbit-borne microwave radiometer applied to evaluate the properties of lunar regolith before CE-1 Lunar Microwave Sounder (CELMS) being launched. CEMLS is the first passive microwave radiometer in the world to sound the surface of the Moon. The brightness temperatures (TB) sensed by CELMS include complicated information on the above geophysical parameters. In this paper, algorithms of retrieving dielectric constant, regolith thickness, and 3He content from CELMS brightness temperatures are developed, and the results are compared with those from literature. The results show that the regolith thicknesses are mostly in the range of 4.0-6.0 m, and 43% of them are bigger than 5.0 m. The content of 3He evaluated by retrieved regolith thickness is about 1.03 million tons.

  7. Production, formation, and transport of high-brightness atomic hydrogen beam studies for the relativistic heavy ion collider polarized source upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolmogorov, A., E-mail: anton.kolmogorov@gmail.com; Stupishin, N. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Atoian, G.; Ritter, J.; Zelenski, A. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-15

    The RHIC polarized H{sup −} ion source had been successfully upgraded to higher intensity and polarization by using a very high brightness fast atomic beam source developed at BINP, Novosibirsk. In this source the proton beam is extracted by a four-grid multi-aperture ion optical system and neutralized in the H{sub 2} gas cell downstream from the grids. The proton beam is extracted from plasma emitter with a low transverse ion temperature of ∼0.2 eV which is formed by plasma jet expansion from the arc plasma generator. The multi-hole grids are spherically shaped to produce “geometrical” beam focusing. Proton beam formation and transport of atomic beam were experimentally studied at test bench.

  8. High-brightness semipolar (2021¯) blue InGaN/GaN superluminescent diodes for droop-free solid-state lighting and visible-light communications

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chao

    2016-05-25

    A high-brightness, droop-free, and speckle-free InGaN/GaN quantum well blue superluminescent diode (SLD) was demonstrated on a semipolar (2021) GaN substrate. The 447-nm emitting SLD has a broad spectral linewidth of 6.3 nm at an optical power of 123 mW. A peak optical power of 256 mW was achieved at 700 mA CW injection current. By combining YAG:Ce phosphor, SLD-generated white light shows a color-rendering index (CRI) of 68.9 and a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 4340 K. The measured frequency response of the SLD revealed a -3 dB bandwidth of 560 MHz, thus demonstrating the feasibility of the device for both solid-state lighting (SSL) and visible-light communication (VLC) applications. © 2016 Optical Society of America.

  9. Faraday imaging at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Reichert, Patrick

    1997-01-01

    A Faraday filter rejects background light from self-luminous thermal objects, but transmits laser light at the passband wavelength, thus providing an ultra-narrow optical bandpass filter. The filter preserves images so a camera looking through a Faraday filter at a hot target illuminated by a laser will not see the thermal radiation but will see the laser radiation. Faraday filters are useful for monitoring or inspecting the uranium separator chamber in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. Other uses include viewing welds, furnaces, plasma jets, combustion chambers, and other high temperature objects. These filters are can be produced at many discrete wavelengths. A Faraday filter consists of a pair of crossed polarizers on either side of a heated vapor cell mounted inside a solenoid.

  10. Through the Looking Glass: Bright, Highly Magnified Galaxies at z~7 Behind Abell 1703

    CERN Document Server

    Bradley, L D; Zitrin, A; Smit, R; Coe, D; Ford, H C; Zheng, W; Illingworth, G D; Benítez, N; Broadhurst, T J

    2011-01-01

    We report the discovery of eight strongly lensed Lyman break galaxy (LBG) candidates at z~7 detected in Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging of Abell 1703. The brightest candidate, called A1703-zD1, has an observed (lensed) magnitude of 24.0 AB (26 sigma) in the WFC3/IR F160W band, making it 0.2 magnitudes brighter than the z_850-band dropout recently found behind the Bullet Cluster and 0.7 magnitudes brighter than the previously brightest known z~7.5 galaxy, A1689-zD1. With a cluster magnification of 9.0, this source has an intrinsic magnitude of H_160 = 26.4 AB, a strong J_125 - H_160 break of 1.7 magnitudes, and a photometric redshift of z~6.7. Additionally, we find seven other bright LBG candidates with H_160-band magnitudes of 24.9-26.4, photometric redshifts z~6.4 - 8.8, and magnifications mu~3-40. Stellar population fits to the ACS, WFC3/IR, and \\Spitzer/IRAC data for A1703-zD1 and A1703-zD4 yield stellar masses (0.7 - 3.0) x 10^{9} M_sun, stellar ages 5-180 Myr, and star-for...

  11. The LEGUE high latitude bright survey design for the LAMOST pilot survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-Yang Zhang; Shuang Gao; Norbert Christlieb; Zhan-Wen Han; Jin-Liang Hou; Hsu-Tai Lee; Xiao-Wei Liu; Kai-Ke Pan; Hong-Chi Wang; Jeffrey L.Carlin; Fan Yang; Chao Liu; Li-Cai Deng; Heidi Jo Newberg; Hao-Tong Zhang; Sébastien Lépine; Yan Xu

    2012-01-01

    We describe the footprint and input catalog for bright nights in the LAMOST Pilot Survey,which began in October 2011.Targets are selected from two stripes in the north and south Galactic Cap regions,centered at δ =29°,with 10° width in declination,covering right ascensions of 135°to 290°and-30°to 30°respectively.We selected spectroscopic targets from a combination of the SDSS and 2MASS point source catalogs.The catalog of stars defining the field centers(as required by the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor at the center of the LAMOST field)consists of all V < 8m stars from the Hipparcos catalog.We employ a statistical selection algorithm that assigns priorities to targets based on their positions in multidimensional color/magnitude space.This scheme overemphasizes rare objects and de-emphasizes more populated regions of magnitude and color phase space,while ensuring a smooth,well-understood selection function.A demonstration of plate design is presented based on the Shack-Hartmann star catalog and an input catalog that was generated by our target selection routines.

  12. Production and quality assurance of bright steel products for high performance components in fuel injection systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, P.; Bodenstein, F. [Mittal Steel Ruhrort GmbH, Duisburg (Germany); Engineer, S. [EZM Edelstahlzieherei Mark, Wetter (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    In the last years the demands on the technological properties of steels in fuel injection systems are constantly increasing. There has been for instance a significant increase in the pressure of fuel injections systems. This means even small imperfections in steels can lead to field failures. The grades 47Pb2 and 42CrMo4 for fuel injection systems have stringent requirements regarding the production and application of the components. In order to obtain the best possible quality all stages of the production system have to be monitored very carefully. The steel making process in the steel plant has to follow strict rules to avoid detrimental oxide inclusions, reduce segregation, improve lead distribution, provide a good surface quality and homogeneous structure. The process of manufacturing bright steel bars from the hot rolled wire rods also involves capable processes with intensive 100% testing of all the bars supplied to the customer. The wire rods are drawn to bars and ground to narrow tolerances. The bars undergo an eddy current test to determine surface defects and also a sophisticated ultra sonic test at a flat bottom hole of 0.7. In spite of all the process monitoring and tests carried out from the melting up to grinding the bars there is still a chance of certain imperfection or defects remaining on the bars, which are more likely detectable on processing the bars to components. Therefore is also a necessity to carry out a test during the stage of component manufacturing. (orig.)

  13. Active Detection and Imaging of Nuclear Materials with High-Brightness Gamma Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barty, C J; Gibson, D J; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Anderson, G G; Betts, S M; Berry, R D; Fisher, S E; Hagmann, C A; Johnson, M S; Messerly, M J; Phan, H H; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Tremaine, A M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P

    2009-02-26

    A Compton scattering {gamma}-ray source, capable of producing photons with energies ranging from 0.1 MeV to 0.9 MeV has been commissioned and characterized, and then used to perform nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) experiments. The performances of the two laser systems (one for electron production, one for scattering), the electron photoinjector, and the linear accelerator are also detailed, and {gamma}-ray results are presented. The key source parameters are the size (0.01 mm{sup 2}), horizontal and vertical divergence (6 x 10 mrad{sup 2}), duration (10 ps), spectrum and intensity (10{sup 5} photons/shot). These parameters are summarized by the peak brightness, 1.5 x 10{sup 15} photons/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/s/0.1% bandwidth, measured at 478 keV. Additional measurements of the flux as a function of the timing difference between the drive laser pulse and the relativistic photo-electron bunch, {gamma}-ray beam profile, and background evaluations are presented. These results are systematically compared to theoretical models and computer simulations. NRF measurements performed on {sup 7}Li in LiH demonstrate the potential of Compton scattering photon sources to accurately detect isotopes in situ.

  14. Search for high-energy neutrinos from bright GRBs with ANTARES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J.-J.; Avgitas, T.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Martí, J.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bormuth, R.; Bourret, S.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Carr, J.; Celli, S.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Coleiro, A.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Deschamps, A.; De Bonis, G.; Distefano, C.; di Palma, I.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; El Bojaddaini, I.; Elsässer, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Felis, I.; Fusco, L. A.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Geißelsöder, S.; Geyer, K.; Giordano, V.; Gleixner, A.; Glotin, H.; Gregoire, T.; Gracia-Ruiz, R.; Graf, K.; Hallmann, S.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Hößl, J.; Hofestädt, J.; Hugon, C.; Illuminati, G.; James, C. W.; de Jong, M.; Jongen, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.; Kießling, D.; Kouchner, A.; Kreter, M.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lachaud, C.; Lahmann, R.; Lefèvre, D.; Leonora, E.; Lotze, M.; Loucatos, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Marinelli, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Mathieu, A.; Mele, R.; Melis, K.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Moussa, A.; Mueller, C.; Nezri, E.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Quinn, L.; Racca, C.; Riccobene, G.; Roensch, K.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Saldaña, M.; Salvadori, I.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Schnabel, J.; Schüssler, F.; Seitz, T.; Sieger, C.; Spurio, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Trovato, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Turpin, D.; Tönnis, C.; Vallage, B.; Vallée, C.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vivolo, D.; Vizzocca, A.; Wagner, S.; Wilms, J.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2017-07-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are thought to be sites of hadronic acceleration, thus neutrinos are expected from the decay of charged particles, produced in pγ interactions. The methods and results of a search for muon neutrinos in the data of the ANTARES neutrino telescope from four bright GRBs (GRB 080916C, GRB 110918A, GRB 130427A and GRB 130505A) observed between 2008 and 2013 are presented. Two scenarios of the fireball model have been investigated: the internal shock scenario, leading to the production of neutrinos with energies mainly above 100 TeV, and the photospheric scenario, characterized by a low-energy component in neutrino spectra due to the assumption of neutrino production closer to the central engine. Since no neutrino events have been detected in temporal and spatial coincidence with these bursts, upper limits at 90 per cent confidence level on the expected neutrino fluxes are derived. The non-detection allows for directly constraining the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet Γ and the baryon loading fp.

  15. High temperature control rod assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollman, Russell E. (Solana Beach, CA)

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature nuclear control rod assembly comprises a plurality of substantially cylindrical segments flexibly joined together in succession by ball joints. The segments are made of a high temperature graphite or carbon-carbon composite. The segment includes a hollow cylindrical sleeve which has an opening for receiving neutron-absorbing material in the form of pellets or compacted rings. The sleeve has a threaded sleeve bore and outer threaded surface. A cylindrical support post has a threaded shaft at one end which is threadably engaged with the sleeve bore to rigidly couple the support post to the sleeve. The other end of the post is formed with a ball portion. A hollow cylindrical collar has an inner threaded surface engageable with the outer threaded surface of the sleeve to rigidly couple the collar to the sleeve. the collar also has a socket portion which cooperates with the ball portion to flexibly connect segments together to form a ball and socket-type joint. In another embodiment, the segment comprises a support member which has a threaded shaft portion and a ball surface portion. The threaded shaft portion is engageable with an inner threaded surface of a ring for rigidly coupling the support member to the ring. The ring in turn has an outer surface at one end which is threadably engageably with a hollow cylindrical sleeve. The other end of the sleeve is formed with a socket portion for engagement with a ball portion of the support member. In yet another embodiment, a secondary rod is slidably inserted in a hollow channel through the center of the segment to provide additional strength. A method for controlling a nuclear reactor utilizing the control rod assembly is also included.

  16. Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) Observations of Brightness Temperatures and Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate During NASA's GRIP and HS3 Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Roberts, J. B.; Jones, W. L.; Biswas, S.; Ruf, C. S.; Uhlhorn, E. W.; Atlas, R.; Black, P.; Albers, C.

    2012-01-01

    HIRAD flew on high-altitude aircraft over Earl and Karl during NASA s GRIP (Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes) campaign in August - September of 2010, and plans to fly over Atlantic tropical cyclones in September of 2012 as part of the Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) mission. HIRAD is a new C-band radiometer using a synthetic thinned array radiometer (STAR) technology to obtain spatial resolution of approximately 2 km, out to roughly 30 km each side of nadir. By obtaining measurements of emissions at 4, 5, 6, and 6.6 GHz, observations of ocean surface wind speed and rain rate can be retrieved. The physical retrieval technique has been used for many years by precursor instruments, including the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which has been flying on the NOAA and USAF hurricane reconnaissance aircraft for several years to obtain observations within a single footprint at nadir angle. Results from the flights during the GRIP and HS3 campaigns will be shown, including images of brightness temperatures, wind speed, and rain rate. Comparisons will be made with observations from other instruments on the campaigns, for which HIRAD observations are either directly comparable or are complementary. Features such as storm eye and eye-wall, location of storm wind and rain maxima, and indications of dynamical features such as the merging of a weaker outer wind/rain maximum with the main vortex may be seen in the data. Potential impacts on operational ocean surface wind analyses and on numerical weather forecasts will also be discussed.

  17. High-brightness X-ray free-electron laser with an optical undulator by pulse shaping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chao; Liang, Jinyang; Hei, Dongwei; Becker, Michael F; Tang, Kelei; Feng, Yiping; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Pellegrini, Claudio; Wu, Juhao

    2013-12-30

    A normal-incident flattop laser with a tapered end is proposed as an optical undulator to achieve a high-gain and high-brightness X-ray free electron laser (FEL). The synchronic interaction of an electron bunch with the normal incident laser is realized by tilting the laser pulse front. The intensity of the flattop laser is kept constant during the interaction time of the electron bunch and the laser along the focal plane of a cylindrical lens. Optical shaping to generate the desired flattop pulse with a tapered end from an original Gaussian pulse distribution is designed and simulated. The flattop laser with a tapered end can enhance the X-ray FEL beyond the exponential growth saturation power by one order to reach 1 Gigawatt as compared to that without a tapered end. The peak brightness can reach 1030 photons/mm2/mrad2/s/0.1% bandwidth, more than 10 orders brighter than the conventional incoherent Thompson Scattering X-ray source.

  18. High temperature autoclave vacuum seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, J. R.; Simpson, W. G.; Walker, H. M.

    1971-01-01

    Aluminum sheet forms effective sealing film at temperatures up to 728 K. Soft aluminum wire rings provide positive seal between foil and platen. For applications at temperatures above aluminum's service temperature, stainless steel is used as film material and copper wire as sealant.

  19. Temperature Dependent Residual Stress Models for Ultra-High-Temperature Ceramics on High Temperature Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruzhuan; Li, Weiguo

    2016-11-01

    The strength of SiC-depleted layer of ultra-high-temperature ceramics on high temperature oxidation degrades seriously. The research for residual stresses developed within the SiC-depleted layer is important and necessary. In this work, the residual stress evolutions in the SiC-depleted layer and the unoxidized substrate in various stages of oxidation are studied by using the characterization models. The temperature and oxidation time dependent mechanical/thermal properties of each phase in SiC-depleted layer are considered in the models. The study shows that the SiC-depleted layer would suffer from large tensile stresses due to the great temperature changes and the formation of pores on high temperature oxidation. The stresses may lead to the cracking and even the delamination of the oxidation layer.

  20. Temperature Dependent Residual Stress Models for Ultra-High-Temperature Ceramics on High Temperature Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruzhuan; Li, Weiguo

    2017-08-01

    The strength of SiC-depleted layer of ultra-high-temperature ceramics on high temperature oxidation degrades seriously. The research for residual stresses developed within the SiC-depleted layer is important and necessary. In this work, the residual stress evolutions in the SiC-depleted layer and the unoxidized substrate in various stages of oxidation are studied by using the characterization models. The temperature and oxidation time dependent mechanical/thermal properties of each phase in SiC-depleted layer are considered in the models. The study shows that the SiC-depleted layer would suffer from large tensile stresses due to the great temperature changes and the formation of pores on high temperature oxidation. The stresses may lead to the cracking and even the delamination of the oxidation layer.

  1. Our Sun. V. A Bright Young Sun Consistent with Helioseismology and Warm Temperatures on Ancient Earth and Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Sackmann, I J; Boothroyd, Arnold I.

    2003-01-01

    The relatively warm temperatures required on early Earth and Mars have been difficult to account for via warming from greenhouse gases. We tested whether this problem can be resolved for both Earth and Mars by a young Sun that is brighter than predicted by the standard solar model. We computed high-precision solar evolutionary models with slightly increased initial masses of M_i = 1.01 to 1.07 M_sun; for each mass, we considered three different mass loss scenarios. We then tested whether these models were consistent with the current high-precision helioseismic observations. The relatively modest mass loss rates in these models are consistent with observational limits from young stars and estimates of the past solar wind obtained from lunar rocks, and do not significantly affect the solar lithium depletion. For appropriate initial masses, all three mass loss scenarios are capable of yielding a solar flux 3.8 Gyr ago high enough to be consistent with water on ancient Mars. We find that all of our mass-losing so...

  2. Tailored bars at 976 nm for high-brightness fiber-coupled modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissel, Heiko; Wolf, Paul; Bachmann, Alexander; Lauer, Christian; König, Harald; Tomm, Jens W.; Köhler, Bernd; Strauß, Uwe; Biesenbach, Jens

    2017-02-01

    In 2007, DILAS proposed the approach to tailor the output beam characteristics of laser diodes to match the required beam quality of a desired target fiber, thus, drastically simplifying the coupling optics to basically only fast and slow axis collimation lenses. Over the last years, we developed and improved this tailored bar (T-Bar) concept together with the tooling for fully automated mass production of fiber-coupled T-Bar modules for fiber laser pumping as well as for direct applications. We present results on the improvement of T-Bars tailored for optimized coupling into fibers with a diameter of 200 μm with NA 0.22 corresponding to a beam parameter product of 22 mm·mrad. Cost efficient coupling to this fiber requires a tailored beam parameter product smaller than 15.5 mm·mrad in slow axis direction corresponding to a slow axis beam divergence of 7° (full angle, 95% power content) for five 100 μm wide emitters. The improved T-Bars fulfil this requirement up to an output power of 52 W with a brightness of 3.1 W/mm·mrad and a power conversion efficiency achieving 69%. This progress in the T-Bar performance together with modifications in the module design led to the increase of the reliable output power from 135 W in 2009 to 360 W in 2017 for a T-Bar module with one baseplate. We will also give a review of the main development steps and further R and D improvements.

  3. High-temperature thermocouples and related methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempe, Joy L.; Knudson, Darrell L.; Condie, Keith G.; Wilkins, S. Curt

    2011-01-18

    A high-temperature thermocouple and methods for fabricating a thermocouple capable of long-term operation in high-temperature, hostile environments without significant signal degradation or shortened thermocouple lifetime due to heat induced brittleness.

  4. High brightness imaging system using vertical cavity surface-emitting laser micro-arrays- results and proposed enhancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentzer, Mark A.; Ghosh, Chuni L.

    2011-05-01

    Laser illumination systems for high brightness imaging through the self-luminosity of explosive events, at Aberdeen Proving Ground and elsewhere, required complex pulse timing, extensive cooling, large-scale laser systems (frequencydoubled flash-pumped Nd:YAG, Cu-vapor, Q-switched ruby), making them difficult to implement for range test illumination in high speed videography. A Vertical Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser (VCSEL) array was designed and implemented with spectral filtering to effectively remove self-luminosity and the fireball from the image, providing excellent background discrimination in a variety of range test scenarios. Further improvements to the system are proposed for applications such as imaging through murky water or dust clouds with optimal penetration of obscurants.

  5. High Temperature Superconducting Underground Cable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrell, Roger, A.

    2010-02-28

    The purpose of this Project was to design, build, install and demonstrate the technical feasibility of an underground high temperature superconducting (HTS) power cable installed between two utility substations. In the first phase two HTS cables, 320 m and 30 m in length, were constructed using 1st generation BSCCO wire. The two 34.5 kV, 800 Arms, 48 MVA sections were connected together using a superconducting joint in an underground vault. In the second phase the 30 m BSCCO cable was replaced by one constructed with 2nd generation YBCO wire. 2nd generation wire is needed for commercialization because of inherent cost and performance benefits. Primary objectives of the Project were to build and operate an HTS cable system which demonstrates significant progress towards commercial progress and addresses real world utility concerns such as installation, maintenance, reliability and compatibility with the existing grid. Four key technical areas addressed were the HTS cable and terminations (where the cable connects to the grid), cryogenic refrigeration system, underground cable-to-cable joint (needed for replacement of cable sections) and cost-effective 2nd generation HTS wire. This was the world’s first installation and operation of an HTS cable underground, between two utility substations as well as the first to demonstrate a cable-to-cable joint, remote monitoring system and 2nd generation HTS.

  6. High temperature suppression of dioxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Ming-Xiu; Chen, Tong; Fu, Jian-Ying; Lin, Xiao-Qing; Lu, Sheng-Yong; Li, Xiao-Dong; Yan, Jian-Hua; Buekens, Alfons

    2016-03-01

    Combined Sulphur-Nitrogen inhibitors, such as sewage sludge decomposition gases (SDG), thiourea and amidosulphonic acid have been observed to suppress the de novo synthesis of dioxins effectively. In this study, the inhibition of PCDD/Fs formation from model fly ash was investigated at unusually high temperatures (650 °C and 850 °C), well above the usual range of de novo tests (250-400 °C). At 650 °C it was found that SDG evolving from dried sewage sludge could suppress the formation of 2,3,7,8-substituted PCDD/Fs with high efficiency (90%), both in weight units and in I-TEQ units. Additionally, at 850 °C, three kinds of sulphur-amine or sulphur-ammonium compounds were tested to inhibit dioxins formation during laboratory-scale tests, simulating municipal solid waste incineration. The suppression efficiencies of PCDD/Fs formed through homogeneous gas phase reactions were all above 85% when 3 wt. % of thiourea (98.7%), aminosulphonic acid (96.0%) or ammonium thiosulphate (87.3%) was added. Differences in the ratio of PCDFs/PCDDs, in weight average chlorination level and in the congener distribution of the 17 toxic PCDD/Fs indicated that the three inhibitors tested followed distinct suppression pathways, possibly in relation to their different functional groups of nitrogen. Furthermore, thiourea reduced the (weight) average chlorinated level. In addition, the thermal decomposition of TUA was studied by means of thermogravimetry-fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (TG-FTIR) and the presence of SO2, SO3, NH3 and nitriles (N≡C bonds) was shown in the decomposition gases; these gaseous inhibitors might be the primary dioxins suppressants.

  7. High temperature power electronics for space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoud, Ahmad N.; Baumann, Eric D.; Myers, Ira T.; Overton, Eric

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature electronics program at NASA Lewis Research Center focuses on dielectric and insulating materials research, development and testing of high temperature power components, and integration of the developed components and devices into a demonstrable 200 C power system, such as inverter. An overview of the program and a description of the in-house high temperature facilities along with experimental data obtained on high temperature materials are presented.

  8. High Temperature Chemistry at NASA: Hot Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.

    2014-01-01

    High Temperature issues in aircraft engines Hot section: Ni and Co based Superalloys Oxidation and Corrosion (Durability) at high temperatures. Thermal protection system (TPS) and RCC (Reinforced Carbon-Carbon) on the Space Shuttle Orbiter. High temperatures in other worlds: Planets close to their stars.

  9. High temperature vapors science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Hastie, John

    2012-01-01

    High Temperature Vapors: Science and Technology focuses on the relationship of the basic science of high-temperature vapors to some areas of discernible practical importance in modern science and technology. The major high-temperature problem areas selected for discussion include chemical vapor transport and deposition; the vapor phase aspects of corrosion, combustion, and energy systems; and extraterrestrial high-temperature species. This book is comprised of seven chapters and begins with an introduction to the nature of the high-temperature vapor state, the scope and literature of high-temp

  10. High-energy emission from bright gamma-ray bursts using Fermi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissaldi, Elisabetta

    2010-05-25

    mainly based on the brightest bursts detected by GBM inside the LAT field-of-view. The determination of a consistent sample for upper-limit calculations can be established by selecting those bursts which have a strong signal in the GBM BGO detectors. The structure of this thesis can be summarized as follows: The first chapter introduces the basic concepts and scientific background of GRB physics. Afterwards, instrumental details about the Fermi instruments LAT and GBM, as well as LAT performance and capabilities for GRB science are presented in chapter 2. Chapter 3 focuses on the detector-level calibration of the GBM instrument, and in particular on the analysis methods and results, which crucially support the development of a consistent GBM instrument response. The main GBM scientific results collected during the first year of operation are then presented in chapter 4. Particular emphasis is given to the description of joint GBM-LAT and GBM-Swift observations and analysis results. The last chapter presents the selection methodology and detailed spectral analysis of a sample of well-defined BGO-bright bursts detected by GBM during its first year. Using these results, correlations among spectral parameters are finally discussed. (orig.)

  11. The SMOS Validation Campaign 2010 in the Upper Danube Catchment: A Data Set for Studies of Soil Moisture, Brightness Temperature, and Their Spatial Variability Over a Heterogeneous Land Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    T. dall' Amico, Johanna; Schlenz, Florian; Loew, Alexander;

    2013-01-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity mission has been launched by the European Space Agency (ESA) in November 2009. It is the worldwide first satellite dedicated to retrieve soil moisture information at the global scale, with a high temporal resolution, and from spaceborne L-band radiometry...... as of meteorological parameters such as air temperature and humidity, precipitation, wind speed, and radiation. All data have undergone thorough postprocessing and quality checking. Their values and trends fit well among each other and with the theoretically expected behavior. The aim of this paper is to present...... these data which may contribute to potential further studies of soil moisture, brightness temperature, and their spatial variability. The presented data are available to the scientific community upon request to ESA....

  12. Conceptual design of a high-brightness linac for soft X-ray SASE-FEL source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alesini, D.; Bertolucci, S.; Biagini, M.E.; Biscari, C.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Castellano, M.; Clozza, A.; Pirro, G.D.G. Di; Drago, A.; Esposito, A.; Ferrario, M. E-mail: massimo.ferrario@lnf.infn.it; Fusco, V.; Gallo, A.; Ghigo, A.; Guiducci, S.; Incurvati, M.; Laurelli, P.; Ligi, C.; Marcellini, F.; Migliorati, M.; Milardi, C.; Palumbo, L.; Pellegrino, L.; Preger, M.; Raimondi, P.; Ricci, R.; Sanelli, C.; Sgamma, F.; Spataro, B.; Serio, M.; Stecchi, A.; Stella, A.; Tazzioli, F.; Vaccarezza, C.; Vescovi, M.; Vicario, C.; Zobov, M.; Acerbi, E.; Alessandria, F.; Barni, D.; Bellomo, G.; Birattari, C.; Bonardi, M.; Boscolo, I.; Bosotti, A.; Broggi, F.; Cialdi, S.; DeMartinis, C.; Giove, D.; Maroli, C.; Michelato, P.; Monaco, L.; Pagani, C.; Petrillo, V.; Pierini, P.; Serafini, L.; Sertore, D.; Volpini, G.; Chiadroni, E.; Felici, G.; Levi, D.; Mastrucci, M.; Mattioli, M.; Medici, G.; Petrarca, G.S.; Catani, L.; Cianchi, A.; D' Angelo, A.; Salvo, R.D.R. Di; Fantini, A.; Moricciani, D.; Schaerf, C.; Bartolini, R.; Ciocci, F.; Dattoli, G.; Doria, A.; Flora, F.; Gallerano, G.P.; Giannessi, L.; Giovenale, E.; Messina, G.; Mezi, L.; Ottaviani, P.L.; Picardi, L.; Quattromini, M.; Renieri, A.; Ronsivalle, C.; Avaldi, L.; Carbone, C.; Cricenti, A.; Pifferi, A.; Perfetti, P.; Prosperi, T.; Albertini, V.R.V. Rossi; Quaresima, C.; Zema, N

    2003-07-11

    FELs based on SASE are believed to be powerful tools to explore the frontiers of basic sciences, from physics to chemistry to biology. Intense R and D programs have started in the USA and Europe in order to understand the SASE physics and to prove the feasibility of these sources. The allocation of considerable resources in the Italian National Research Plan (PNR) brought about the formation of a CNR-ENEA-INFN-University of Roma 'Tor Vergata' study group. A conceptual design study has been developed and possible schemes for linac sources have been investigated, leading to the SPARX proposal. We report in this paper the results of a preliminary start to end simulation concerning one option we are considering based on an S-band normal conducting linac with high-brightness photoinjector integrated in an RF compressor.

  13. Nonlinear Dynamics of High-Brightness Electron Beams and Beam-Plasma Interactions: Theories, Simulations, and Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. L. Bohn (deceased), P. Piot and B. Erdelyi

    2008-05-31

    According to its original Statement of Work (SOW), the overarching objective of this project is: 'To enhance substantially the understanding of the fundamental dynamics of nonequilibrium high-brightness beams with space charge.' Our work and results over the past three and half years have been both intense and fruitful. Inasmuch as this project is inextricably linked to a larger, growing research program - that of the Beam Physics and Astrophysics Group (BPAG) - the progress that it has made possible cannot easily be separated from the global picture. Thus, this summary report includes major sections on 'global' developments and on those that can be regarded as specific to this project.

  14. Thermodynamics of High Temperature Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ettore Minardi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we discuss how and to what extent the thermodynamic concepts and the thermodynamic formalism can be extended to the description of high temperature states of the plasma not necessarily associated with a Boltzmann distribution and with thermal equilibrium.The discussion is based on the “magnetic or electrostatic entropy concept”, an interpretative and predictive tool based on probability and information, defined in a suitably coarse-grained possibility space of all current density or of all electric charge density distributions under testable constraints, and whose variation properties are proven to be related under certain conditions to the equilibrium and the stability of the system. In the case of magnetic equilibrium the potentiality of the magnetic entropy concept is illustrated by comparing the predictions of the current density and pressure profiles with the observations in different tokamak machines and different tokamak regimes, as well as by showing how the equilibrium and the stability in devices as different as the reversed field pinch or the magnetic well are described by the variation properties of the same entropy functional applied to the different situations. In fact it emerges that the maximum of the entropy can be seen in these different cases as an optimization constraint for the minimum of the magnetic energy. The application of the entropy concept to the electrostatic processes shows in particular that the so-called reactive instabilities (non-dissipative, non-resonant instabilities with a marginal point admit a neighboring state with higher entropy and are therefore of special relevance from the point of view of the physical evolution of the system. In this case the thermodynamic formalism allows the introduction of the concept of “thermodynamic fluctuations” of the macroscopic charge density and provides a method for the calculation of the “thermodynamic” fluctuation levels both on the stable as

  15. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1997-01-01

    A fault current limiter (10) for an electrical circuit (14). The fault current limiter (10) includes a high temperature superconductor (12) in the electrical circuit (14). The high temperature superconductor (12) is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter (10).

  16. High-Energy Density science with an ultra-bright x-ray laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-11-01

    This talk will review recent progress in high-energy density physics using the world's brightest x-ray source, the Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC's free electron x-ray laser. These experiments investigate laser-driven matter in extreme conditions where powerful x-ray scattering and imaging techniques have been applied to resolve ionic interactions at atomic (Ångstrom) scale lengths and to visualize the formation of dense plasma states. Major research areas include dynamic compression experiments of solid targets to determine structural properties and to discover and characterize phase transitions at mega-bar pressures. A second area studies extreme fields produced by high-intensity radiation where fundamental questions of laboratory plasmas can be related to cosmological phenomena. Each of these areas takes advantage of the unique properties of the LCLS x-ray beam. They include small foci for achieving high intensity or high spatial resolution, high photon flux for dynamic structure factor measurements in single shots, and high spectral bandwidth to resolve plasmon (Langmuir) waves or ion acoustic waves in dense plasmas. We will further describe new developments of ultrafast pump-probe technique at high repetition rates. These include studies on dense cryogenic hydrogen that have begun providing fundamental insights into the physical properties of matter in extreme conditions that are important for astrophysics, fusion experiments and generation of radiation sources. This work was supported by DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science under FWP 100182.

  17. The millimeter wave radiometric brightness temperatures of target and calculation for the parameters of stealth materials%毫米波装甲目标辐射亮温解及隐身材料主要参数计算

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪先平; 聂建英

    2013-01-01

    在毫米波辐射探测中,为得到真实目标的辐射亮温,采用BFGS方法从测得的天线温度数据反演出较稳定的毫米波装甲目标的辐射亮温.根据反演出的亮温,给出一种求得装甲涂层隐身材料的反射率和发射率的简单方法.%To make precise measurements of the radiometric brightness temperature of a target, in the millimeter wave radiation detection. BFGS is applied to recovery of the millimeter wave radiation target ' s brightness temperatures from the measurement of the temperature data antenna. And according to the bright temperature performance, a simple method to calculate the reflectance and emissivity of the stealth coating armored were given.

  18. (Krauss) at constant high temperatures

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the various physical and chemical factors that may affect freshwater snails. However ... order to assess the effect of temperature on the organism, it is essential to ..... of snails by parasites is of cardinal importance to shed light on the population ...

  19. Deep Trek High Temperature Electronics Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce Ohme

    2007-07-31

    This report summarizes technical progress achieved during the cooperative research agreement between Honeywell and U.S. Department of Energy to develop high-temperature electronics. Objects of this development included Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) wafer process development for high temperature, supporting design tools and libraries, and high temperature integrated circuit component development including FPGA, EEPROM, high-resolution A-to-D converter, and a precision amplifier.

  20. High-quality electron beam generation and bright betatron radiation from a cascaded laser wakefield accelerator (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiansheng; Wang, Wentao; Li, Wentao; Qi, Rong; Zhang, Zhijun; Yu, Changhai; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Jiaqi; Qing, Zhiyong; Ming, Fang; Xu, Yi; Leng, Yuxin; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2017-05-01

    One of the major goals of developing laser wakefiled accelerators (LWFAs) is to produce compact high-energy electron beam (e-beam) sources, which are expected to be applied in developing compact x-ray free-electron lasers and monoenergetic gamma-ray sources. Although LWFAs have been demonstrated to generate multi-GeV e-beams, to date they are still failed to produce high quality e beams with several essential properties (narrow energy spread, small transverse emittance and high beam charge) achieved simultaneously. Here we report on the demonstration of a high-quality cascaded LWFA experimentally via manipulating electron injection, seeding in different periods of the wakefield, as well as controlling energy chirp for the compression of energy spread. The cascaded LWFA was powered by a 1-Hz 200-TW femtosecond laser facility at SIOM. High-brightness e beams with peak energies in the range of 200-600 MeV, 0.4-1.2% rms energy spread, 10-80 pC charge, and 0.2 mrad rms divergence are experimentally obtained. Unprecedentedly high 6-dimensional (6-D) brightness B6D,n in units of A/m2/0.1% was estimated at the level of 1015-16, which is very close to the typical brightness of e beams from state-of-the-art linac drivers and several-fold higher than those of previously reported LWFAs. Furthermore, we propose a scheme to minimize the energy spread of an e beam in a cascaded LWFA to the one-thousandth-level by inserting a stage to compress its longitudinal spatial distribution via velocity bunching. In this scheme, three-segment plasma stages are designed for electron injection, e-beam length compression, and e-beam acceleration, respectively. A one-dimensional theory and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations have demonstrated this scheme and an e beam with 0.2% rms energy spread and low transverse emittance could be generated without loss of charge. Based on the high-quality e beams generated in the LWFA, we have experimentally realized a new scheme to enhance the

  1. Generation of Bright Phase-matched Circularly-polarized Extreme Ultraviolet High Harmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-08

    relation to local moments. Phys. Scr . 1993, 302 (1993). 7. Stöhr, J. et al. Element-specific magnetic microscopy with circularly polarized X-rays...Becker, W. & Kopold, R. Generation of circularly polarized high-order harmonics by two-color coplanar field mixing . Phys. Rev. A 61, 063403 (2000). 38...1995). 42. Eichmann, H. et al. Polarization-dependent high-order two-color mixing . Phys. Rev. A 51, R3414–R3417 (1995). 43. Fleischer, A., Kfir, O

  2. Long-term ground-based microwave radiometric measurements of atmospheric brightness temperature in SKYNET Hefei (31.90N, 117.17E) site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenzhu; Liu, Dong; Xie, Chenbo; Wang, Bangxin; Zhong, Zhiqing; Wang, Yingjian; Chen, Bin

    2017-02-01

    A dual-frequency, ground-based microwave radiometer (WVR-1100) is used to investigate the behavior of the atmosphere in terms of zenith brightness temperature (TB) at 23.8 and 31.4 GHz respectively. Some experimental findings in SKYNET Hefei site from September 2002 to August 2012 are presented. The cumulative distributions of TB at both frequencies for all sky conditions show four different regions, while only two regions can be identified for clear, lightly cloudy and cloudy condition. Annual cycle of TB at 23.8 GHz is apparently remarkable, indicating the large annual cycle of atmospheric water vapor. Regular seasonal variations of TB are observed with the strongest value in summer and the weakest in winter.

  3. Sun L-Band Brightness Temperature Estimate from Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) Mission: A Potential New Space Weather Applications for SMOS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crapolicchio, Raffaele; Capolongo, Emiliano; Bigazzi, Alberto

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents the results of a validation study to assess the potentiality of the Level-1b (L1b) Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) Sun Brightness Temperature (BT) as a valuable L-band radio signal useful in the space weather context. The validation exercise, done for both eruptive and quite/active Sun, focused on SMOS data availability, coverage and statistical analysis with respect to the United States Air Force (USAF) Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN) recorded data. In both cases the comparison of the two data sets has shown a strong timing correlation and an impressive burst amplitude correspondence. The paper also presents main advantages and some caveats in the use of the SMOS dataset. The results obtained encourage to pursue further studies both on the SMOS L1 processing algorithm refinement and on the usage of SMOS BT as an additional, independent and important source of information for space weather applications.

  4. 1.9 W yellow, CW, high-brightness light from a high efficiency semiconductor laser-based system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, A. K.; Christensen, M.; Noordegraaf, D.; Heist, P.; Papastathopoulos, E.; Loyo-Maldonado, V.; Jensen, O. B.; Stock, M. L.; Skovgaard, P. M. W.

    2017-02-01

    Semiconductor lasers are ideal sources for efficient electrical-to-optical power conversion and for many applications where their small size and potential for low cost are required to meet market demands. Yellow lasers find use in a variety of bio-related applications, such as photocoagulation, imaging, flow cytometry, and cancer treatment. However, direct generation of yellow light from semiconductors with sufficient beam quality and power has so far eluded researchers. Meanwhile, tapered semiconductor lasers at near-infrared wavelengths have recently become able to provide neardiffraction- limited, single frequency operation with output powers up to 8 W near 1120 nm. We present a 1.9 W single frequency laser system at 562 nm, based on single pass cascaded frequency doubling of such a tapered laser diode. The laser diode is a monolithic device consisting of two sections: a ridge waveguide with a distributed Bragg reflector, and a tapered amplifier. Using single-pass cascaded frequency doubling in two periodically poled lithium niobate crystals, 1.93 W of diffraction-limited light at 562 nm is generated from 5.8 W continuous-wave infrared light. When turned on from cold, the laser system reaches full power in just 60 seconds. An advantage of using a single pass configuration, rather than an external cavity configuration, is increased stability towards external perturbations. For example, stability to fluctuating case temperature over a 30 K temperature span has been demonstrated. The combination of high stability, compactness and watt-level power range means this technology is of great interest for a wide range of biological and biomedical applications.

  5. Bright high-repetition-rate source of narrowband extreme-ultraviolet harmonics beyond 22 eV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, He [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Xu, Yiming [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Ulonska, Stefan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Robinson, Joseph S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Ranitovic, Predrag [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Kaindl, Robert A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division

    2015-06-11

    Novel table-top sources of extreme-ultraviolet light based on high-harmonic generation yield unique insight into the fundamental properties of molecules, nanomaterials or correlated solids, and enable advanced applications in imaging or metrology. Extending high-harmonic generation to high repetition rates portends great experimental benefits, yet efficient extreme-ultraviolet conversion of correspondingly weak driving pulses is challenging. In this article, we demonstrate a highly-efficient source of femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulses at 50-kHz repetition rate, utilizing the ultraviolet second-harmonic focused tightly into Kr gas. In this cascaded scheme, a photon flux beyond ≈3 × 1013 s-1 is generated at 22.3 eV, with 5 × 10-5 conversion efficiency that surpasses similar harmonics directly driven by the fundamental by two orders-of-magnitude. The enhancement arises from both wavelength scaling of the atomic dipole and improved spatio-temporal phase matching, confirmed by simulations. Finally, spectral isolation of a single 72-meV-wide harmonic renders this bright, 50-kHz extreme-ultraviolet source a powerful tool for ultrafast photoemission, nanoscale imaging and other applications.

  6. Highly surface functionalized carbon nano-onions for bright light bioimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasconi, Marco; Maffeis, Viviana; Bartelmess, Juergen; Echegoyen, Luis; Giordani, Silvia

    2015-12-01

    Carbon-based nanomaterials functionalized with fluorescent and water-soluble groups have emerged as platforms for biological imaging because of their low toxicity and ability to be internalized by cells. The development of imaging probes based on carbon nanomaterials for biomedical studies requires the understanding of their biological response as well as the efficient and safety exposition of the nanomaterial to the cell compartment where it is designed to operate. Here, we present a fluorescent probe based on surface functionalized carbon nano-onions (CNOs) for biological imaging. The modification of CNOs by chemical oxidation of the defects on the outer shell of these carbon nanoparticles results in an extensive surface functionalization with carboxyl groups. We have obtained fluorescently labelled CNOs by a reaction involving the amide bond formation between fluoresceinamine and the carboxylic acids groups on the surface of the CNOs. The functionalized CNOs display high emission properties and dispersability in water due to the presence of high surface coverage of carboxylic acid groups that translate in an efficient fluorescent probe for in vitro imaging of HeLa cells, without significant cytotoxicity. The resulting nanomaterial represents a promising platform for biological imaging applications due to the high dispersability in water, its efficient internalization by cancer cells and localization in specific cell compartments.

  7. Micro-structure Engineering of InGaN/GaN Quantum Wells for High Brightness Light Emitting Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chao

    2013-05-01

    With experimental realization of micro-structures, the feasibility of achieving high brightness, low efficiency droop blue LED was implemented based on InGaN/GaN micro-LED-pillar design. A significantly high current density of 492 A/cm2 in a 20 μm diameter (D) micro-LED-pillar was achieved, compared to that of a 200 μm diameter LED (20 A/cm2), both at 10 V bias voltage. In addition, an increase in sustained quantum efficiency from 70.2% to 83.7% at high injection current density (200 A/cm2) was observed in micro-LED-pillars in conjunction with size reduction from 80 μm to 20 μm. A correlation between the strain relief and the electrical performance improvement was established for micro-LED-pillars with D < 50 μm, apart from current spreading effect. The degree of strain relief and its distribution were further studied in micro-LED-pillars with D ranging from 1 μm to 15 μm. Significant wavenumbers down-shifts for E2 and A1 Raman peaks, together with the blue shifted PL peak emission, were observed in as-prepared pillars, reflecting the degree of strain relief. A sharp transition from strained to relaxed epitaxy region was discernible from the competing E2 phonon peaks at 572 cm-1 and 568 cm-1, which were attributed to strain residue and strain relief, respectively. A uniform strain relief at the center of micro-pillars was achieved, i.e. merging of the competing phonon peaks, after Rapid Thermal Annealing (RTA) at 950℃ for 20 seconds, 4 phenomenon of which was observed for the first time. The transition from maximum strain relief to a uniform strain relief was found along the narrow circumference (< 2.5 μm) of the pillars from the line-map of Raman spectroscopy. The extent of strain relief is also examined considering the height (L) of micro-LED-pillars fabricated using FIB micro-machining technique. The significant strain relief of up to 70% (from -1.4 GPa to -0.37 GPa), with a 71 meV PL peak blue shift, suggested that micro-LED-pillar with D < 3 μm and

  8. High Temperature and Pressure Alkaline Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allebrod, Frank

    and oxygen with a new type of alkaline electrolysis cell at high temperatures and pressures. To perform measurements under high pressure and at elevated temperatures it was necessary to build a measurement system around an autoclave which could stand high temperatures up to 250 °C and pressures up to 200 bar...... as well as extremely caustic environments. Based on a literature study to identify resistant materials for these conditions, Inconel 600 was selected among the metals which are available for autoclave construction. An initial single atmosphere high temperature and pressure measurement setup was build...... comprising this autoclave. A second high temperature and pressure measurement setup was build based on experiences from the first setup in order to perform automatized measurements. The conductivity of aqueous KOH at elevated temperatures and high concentrations was investigated using the van der Pauw method...

  9. Development of a low-energy, high-brightness $\\mu^+$ beam line

    CERN Document Server

    Eggenberger, A; Wichmann, G

    2016-01-01

    We are developing a beam line which compresses the phase space of a standard surface $\\mu^+$ beam by 10 orders of magnitude with an efficiency of $10^{-3}$. Phase space compression occurs in a He gas target and consists of three consecutive stages: Transverse (perpendicular to the beam axis) compression, longitudinal compression and re-extraction into vacuum. Transverse compression was observed for the first time and longitudinal compression has been measured to occur within 2.5 $\\mu$s with high efficiency.

  10. A high-brightness source of polarization-entangled photons optimized for applications in free space

    CERN Document Server

    Steinlechner, Fabian; Jofre, Marc; Weier, Henning; Perez, Daniel; Jennewein, Thomas; Ursin, Rupert; Rarity, John; Mitchell, Morgan W; Torres, Juan P; Weinfurter, Harald; Pruneri, Valerio; 10.1364/OE.20.009640

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple but highly efficient source of polarization-entangled photons based on spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) in bulk periodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate crystals (PPKTP) pumped by a 405 nm laser diode. Utilizing one of the highest available nonlinear coefficients in a non-degenerate, collinear type-0 phase-matching configuration, we generate polarization entanglement via the crossed-crystal scheme and detect 0.64 million photon pair events/s/mW, while maintaining an overlap fidelity with the ideal Bell state of 0.98 at a pump power of 0.025 mW.

  11. Deep-red polymer dots with bright two-photon fluorescence and high biocompatibility for in vivo mouse brain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alifu, Nuernisha; Sun, Zezhou; Zebibula, Abudureheman; Zhu, Zhenggang; Zhao, Xinyuan; Wu, Changfeng; Wang, Yalun; Qian, Jun

    2017-09-01

    With high contrast and deep penetration, two-photon fluorescence (2PF) imaging has become one of the most promising in vivo fluorescence imaging techniques. To obtain good imaging contrast, fluorescent nanoprobes with good 2PF properties are highly needed. In this work, bright 2PF polymer dots (P dots) were applied for in vivo mouse brain imaging. Deep-red emissive P dots with PFBT as the donor and PFDBT5 as the acceptor were synthesized and used as a contrast agent. P dots were further encapsulated by poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride) (PSMA) and grafted with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). The P dots-PEG exhibit large two-photon absorption (2PA) cross-sections (δ≥8500 g), good water dispersibility, and high biocompatibility. P dots-PEG was further utilized first time for in vivo vascular imaging of mouse ear and brain, under 690-900 nm femtosecond (fs) laser excitation. Due to the large 2PA cross-section and deep-red emission, a large imaging depth ( 720 μm) was achieved.

  12. Development of Deep Penetration Welding Technology with High Brightness Laser under Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Seiji; Yohei, Abe; Mizutani, Masami; Kawahito, Yousuke

    The authors have developed a new chamber for laser welding under the low vacuum conditions achieved by using rotary pumps. High-power disk laser bead-on-plate welding was performed on Type 304 stainless steel or A5052 aluminium alloy plate at the powers of 10, 16 and 26 kW at various welding speeds under low vacuum. The sound welds of more than 50 and 70 mm in penetration depth could be produced in Type 304 at the pressure of 0.1 kPa, the speed of 0.3 m/min and the power of 16 kW and 26 kW, respectively. Similar penetration was achieved in A 5052 aluminum alloy. Welding phenomena under low vacuum were also understood by observing the behavior of a keyhole inlet, a molten pool, melt flows and a plume ejected from a keyhole through high speed video cameras. Low interaction between a laser beam and a plume under low vacuum was confirmed by using probe laser beam method.

  13. High-temperature protective coatings on superalloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘培生; 梁开明; 周宏余

    2002-01-01

    Protective coatings are essential for superalloys to serve as blades of gas turb ines at high temperatures, and they primarily include aluminide coating, MCrAlY overlay coating, thermal barrier coating and microcrystalline coating. In this paper, all these high-temperature coatings are reviewed as well as their preparing techniques. Based on the most application and the main failure way, the importance is then presented for further deepgoing study on the high-temperature oxidation law of aluminide coatings.

  14. High Temperature Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-04-15

    2700 cmW/V-s at room temperature, a far higher value than ever found for GaN or AlGaN. Thus a GaN/ InGaN HEMT would be analogous to InP/InGaAs HEMTs...Spire’s ECR plasma source modif led as a crystal growth reactor. 8 The substrate for the film deposition is mounted on a sample holder which is...The three samples from the second growth run were also characterized. One sample was found to have a very even frosty white haze on it. The other

  15. A high temperature fuel element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekido, A.; Nakai, M.; Ninomiya, Y.

    1982-12-21

    A solid electrolyte which conducts electricity with heating by oxygen ions and operates at a temperature of 1,000C is used in the element. The cathode, besides the ionic conductivity in oxygen, has an electron conductivity. The anode has electron conductivity. Substances such as Bi203, into which oxides of alkaline earth metals are added, are used for making the cathode. The electrolyte consists of ZrO2 and Y2O3, to which CaO is added. WC, to which an H2 type fuel is fed, serves as the anode. The element has a long service life.

  16. High brightness laser source based on polarization coupling of two diode lasers with asymmetric feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thestrup, B.; Chi, M.; Sass, B.

    2003-01-01

    In this letter, we show that polarization coupling and asymmetric diode-laser feedback can be used to combine two diode-laser beams with low spatial coherence into a single beam with high spatial coherence. The coupled laser source is based on two similar laser systems each consisting of a 1 mumx......200 mum broad area laser diode applied with a specially designed feedback circuit. When operating at two times threshold, 50% of the freely running system output power is obtained in a single beam with an M-2 beam quality factor of 1.6+/-0.1, whereas the M-2 values of the two freely running diode...... lasers are 29+/-1 and 34+/-1, respectively. (C) 2003 American Institute of Physics....

  17. Ultrasonic Sensors for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittmann, Bernhard; Aslan, Mustafa

    1999-05-01

    Many processes take place under conditions other than ambient, and chief among these is high temperature. Examples of high temperature industrial processes are resin transfer molding, molten metal infiltration and rheocasting of composite metals alloys. The interaction of waves with viscous fluids is an additional complication adding to an already complicated problem of operating a sensor at high temperature for extended periods of time. This report attempts to provide an insight into the current state of the art of sensor techniques for in-situ high temperature monitoring.

  18. Advances in high temperature chemistry 1

    CERN Document Server

    Eyring, Leroy

    2013-01-01

    Advances in High Temperature Chemistry, Volume 1 describes the complexities and special and changing characteristics of high temperature chemistry. After providing a brief definition of high temperature chemistry, this nine-chapter book goes on describing the experiments and calculations of diatomic transition metal molecules, as well as the advances in applied wave mechanics that may contribute to an understanding of the bonding, structure, and spectra of the molecules of high temperature interest. The next chapter provides a summary of gaseous ternary compounds of the alkali metals used in

  19. High Temperature Capacitors for Venus Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this SBIR program, TRS Technologies has developed several new dielectrics for high temperature applications including signal conditioning, filtering and energy...

  20. High temperature phase equilibria and phase diagrams

    CERN Document Server

    Kuo, Chu-Kun; Yan, Dong-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    High temperature phase equilibria studies play an increasingly important role in materials science and engineering. It is especially significant in the research into the properties of the material and the ways in which they can be improved. This is achieved by observing equilibrium and by examining the phase relationships at high temperature. The study of high temperature phase diagrams of nonmetallic systems began in the early 1900s when silica and mineral systems containing silica were focussed upon. Since then technical ceramics emerged and more emphasis has been placed on high temperature

  1. Alloys developed for high temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basuki, Eddy Agus; Prajitno, Djoko Hadi; Muhammad, Fadhli

    2017-01-01

    Alloys used for high temperatures applications require combinations of mechanical strength, microstructural stability and corrosion/oxidation resistance. Nickel base superalloys have been traditionally the prime materials utilized for hot section components of aircraft turbine engines. Nevertheless, due to their limited melting temperatures, alloys based on intermetallic compounds, such as TiAl base alloys, have emerged as high temperature materials and intensively developed with the main aim to replace nickel based superalloys. For applications in steam power plants operated at lower temperatures, ferritic high temperature alloys still attract high attention, and therefore, development of these alloys is in progress. This paper highlights the important metallurgical parameters of high temperature alloys and describes few efforts in the development of Fe-Ni-Al based alloys containing B2-(Fe,Ni)Al precipitates, oxide dispersion strengthening (ODS) ferritic steels and titanium aluminide based alloys include important protection system of aluminide coatings.

  2. High-brightness switchable multi-wavelength remote laser in air

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Jinping; Xu, Huailiang; Li, Guihua; Chu, Wei; Ni, Jielei; Zhang, Haisu; Chin, See Leang; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan

    2011-01-01

    Remote laser in air based on amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) has produced rather well-collimated coherent beams in both backward and forward propagation directions, opening up possibilities for new remote sensing approaches. The remote ASE-based lasers were shown to enable operation either at ~391 and 337 nm using molecular nitrogen or at ~845 nm using molecular oxygen as gain medium, depending on the employed pump lasers. To date, a multi-wavelength laser in air that allows for dynamically switching the operating wavelength has not yet been achieved, although this type of laser is certainly of high importance for detecting multiple hazard gases. In this Letter, we demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, a harmonic-seeded switchable multi-wavelength laser in air driven by intense mid-infrared femtosecond laser pulses. Furthermore, population inversion in the multi-wavelength remote laser occurs at an ultrafast time-scale (i.e., less than ~200 fs) owing to direct formation of excited molecular n...

  3. Investigations into High Temperature Components and Packaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlino, L.D.; Seiber, L.E.; Scudiere, M.B.; M.S. Chinthavali, M.S.; McCluskey, F.P.

    2007-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to document the work that was performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in support of the development of high temperature power electronics and components with monies remaining from the Semikron High Temperature Inverter Project managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). High temperature electronic components are needed to allow inverters to operate in more extreme operating conditions as required in advanced traction drive applications. The trend to try to eliminate secondary cooling loops and utilize the internal combustion (IC) cooling system, which operates with approximately 105 C water/ethylene glycol coolant at the output of the radiator, is necessary to further reduce vehicle costs and weight. The activity documented in this report includes development and testing of high temperature components, activities in support of high temperature testing, an assessment of several component packaging methods, and how elevated operating temperatures would impact their reliability. This report is organized with testing of new high temperature capacitors in Section 2 and testing of new 150 C junction temperature trench insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBTs) in Section 3. Section 4 addresses some operational OPAL-GT information, which was necessary for developing module level tests. Section 5 summarizes calibration of equipment needed for the high temperature testing. Section 6 details some additional work that was funded on silicon carbide (SiC) device testing for high temperature use, and Section 7 is the complete text of a report funded from this effort summarizing packaging methods and their reliability issues for use in high temperature power electronics. Components were tested to evaluate the performance characteristics of the component at different operating temperatures. The temperature of the component is determined by the ambient temperature (i.e., temperature surrounding the device) plus the

  4. High temperature skin friction measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tcheng, Ping; Holmes, Harlan K.; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Skin friction measurement in the NASA Langley hypersonic propulsion facility is described. The sensor configuration utilized an existing balance, modified to provide thermal isolation and an increased standoff distance. For test run times of about 20 sec and ambient-air cooling of the test section and balance, the modified balance performed satisfactorily, even when it was subjected to acoustic and structural vibration. The balance is an inertially balanced closed-loop servo system where the current to a moving-coil motor needed to restore or null the output from the position sensor is a measure of the force or skin friction tending to displace the moving element. The accuracy of the sensor is directly affected by the position sensor in the feedback loop, in this case a linear-variable differential transformer which has proven to be influenced by temperature gradients.

  5. Systematic search for VHE gamma-ray emission from X-ray bright high-frequency BL Lac objects

    CERN Document Server

    Albert, J

    2007-01-01

    Motivated by the fact that all but two (M87, BL Lac) extragalactic sources detected so far at VHE energies belong to the so-called HBL class of high-frequency peaked BL Lac objects, a systematic scan of the compilation of X-ray blazars by Donato et al. (2001) has been performed using the MAGIC telescope. The observations took place from December 2004 to March 2006 and cover sources on the northern sky visible under small zenith distances zd 2uJy) sources emitting at least the same energy flux at 200GeV as at 1keV. In order to avoid strong gamma-ray attenuation close to the energy threshold, the redshift of the sources was constrained to values z < 0.3. Of the 14 sources observed, 1ES 1218+30.4 (for the first time at very high energies) and 1ES 2344+51.4 (strong detection in a low flux state) have been detected in addition to the known bright TeV blazars Mrk 421 and Mrk 501. For the remaining sources, we present here the 99% confidence level upper limits on the integral flux above ~200GeV. A marginal exces...

  6. Corrosion Resistant Coatings for High Temperature Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besman, T.M.; Cooley, K.M.; Haynes, J.A.; Lee, W.Y.; Vaubert, V.M.

    1998-12-01

    Efforts to increase efficiency of energy conversion devices have required their operation at ever higher temperatures. This will force the substitution of higher-temperature structural ceramics for lower temperature materials, largely metals. Yet, many of these ceramics will require protection from high temperature corrosion caused by combustion gases, atmospheric contaminants, or the operating medium. This paper discusses examples of the initial development of such coatings and materials for potential application in combustion, aluminum smelting, and other harsh environments.

  7. High-Temperature Passive Power Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    In many future NASA missions - such as deep-space exploration, the National AeroSpace Plane, minisatellites, integrated engine electronics, and ion or arcjet thrusters - high-power electrical components and systems must operate reliably and efficiently in high-temperature environments. The high-temperature power electronics program at the NASA Lewis Research Center focuses on dielectric and insulating material research, the development and characterization of high-temperature components, and the integration of the developed components into a demonstrable 200 C power system - such as an inverter. NASA Lewis has developed high-temperature power components through collaborative efforts with the Air Force Wright Laboratory, Northrop Grumman, and the University of Wisconsin. Ceramic and film capacitors, molypermalloy powder inductors, and a coaxially wound transformer were designed, developed, and evaluated for high-temperature operation.

  8. A Road Towards High Temperature Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2013-0040 A Road Towards High Temperature Superconductors Guy Deutscher Tel Aviv University Research... Superconductors 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8655-10-1-3011 5b. GRANT NUMBER Grant 10-3011 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S...issue in trying to make useful high temperature superconductors is obviously to discover superconductivity at higher temperatures. But there is also

  9. High Temperature Rechargeable Battery Development Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This small business innovation research is intended to develop and proof the concept of a highly efficient, high temperature rechargeable battery for supporting...

  10. Lightweight, High-Temperature Radiator Panels Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Lightweight, high-temperature radiators are needed for future, high-efficiency power conversion systems for Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP). Creare has developed...

  11. High Temperature Solid State Lithium Battery Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Reliable energy systems with high energy density capable of operating at high temperatures, pressures and radiation levels are needed for certain NASA missions....

  12. Lightweight, High-Temperature Radiator Panels Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Lightweight, high-temperature radiators are needed for future, high-efficiency power conversion systems for Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP). Creare has developed...

  13. Ceramic fibres for high temperature insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padgett, G.C.

    1986-03-01

    Traditionally, refractory linings for high temperature plant and furnaces have comprised either brick or some form of concrete. In recent years, energy conservation has encouraged the greater use of high temperature insulation which is also available in either brick or a lightweight concrete. As an alternative, insulation can also be achieved using fibrous products or fibres combining low heat transfer with low heat capacity.

  14. High brightness microwave lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Dolan, James T.; MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Simpson, James E.

    2003-09-09

    An electrodeless microwave discharge lamp includes a source of microwave energy, a microwave cavity, a structure configured to transmit the microwave energy from the source to the microwave cavity, a bulb disposed within the microwave cavity, the bulb including a discharge forming fill which emits light when excited by the microwave energy, and a reflector disposed within the microwave cavity, wherein the reflector defines a reflective cavity which encompasses the bulb within its volume and has an inside surface area which is sufficiently less than an inside surface area of the microwave cavity. A portion of the reflector may define a light emitting aperture which extends from a position closely spaced to the bulb to a light transmissive end of the microwave cavity. Preferably, at least a portion of the reflector is spaced from a wall of the microwave cavity. The lamp may be substantially sealed from environmental contamination. The cavity may include a dielectric material is a sufficient amount to require a reduction in the size of the cavity to support the desired resonant mode.

  15. High brightness three-dimensional light field display based on the aspheric substrate Fresnel-lens-array with eccentric pupils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin; Sang, Xinzhu; Yu, Xunbo; Cao, Xuemei; Chen, Zhidong; Yan, Binbin; Yuan, Jinhui; Wang, Kuiru; Yu, Chongxiu; Dou, Wenhua; Xiao, Liquan

    2016-02-01

    The brightness and viewing field of the reproductive three-dimensional (3D) image are crucial factors to realize a comfortable 3D perception for the light field display based on the liquid crystal device (LCD). To improve the illuminance of 3D image with sub-image-units with small aperture angles and enlarge the viewing field, the illuminance of the Fresnel-lens combining with the sub-images on LCD is analyzed and designed. Theoretical and experimental results show that the Fresnel-lens-array with eccentric pupil(FAEP) can address above problems. A 3D light field display based on LCD with FAEP and directional diffuser screen are used to reconstruct the target 3D field. 25 parallax sub-images are projected to the directional diffuser screen to verify the improvement of illuminance and viewing field. To reduce eccentric aberration introduced by eccentric pupil, a novel structure of Fresnel-lens-array is presented to reduce the aberration. The illuminance and viewing field are well promoted at the same time. 3D image with the high quality can be achieved.

  16. Sea Ice Brightness Temperature as a Function of Ice Thickness, Part II: Computed curves for thermodynamically modelled ice profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Mills, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Ice thickness is an important variable for climate scientists and is still an unsolved problem for satellite remote sensing specialists. There has been some success detecting the thickness of thin ice from microwave radiometers, and with this in mind this study attempts to model the thickness-radiance relation of sea ice at frequencies employed by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) radiometer and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR): between 1.4 and 89 GHz. In the first part of the study, the salinity of the ice was determined by a pair of empirical relationships, while the temperature was determined by a thermodynamic model. Because the thermodynamic model can be used as a simple ice growth model, in this, second part, the salinities are determined by the growth model. Because the model uses two, constant-weather scenarios representing two extremes ("fall freeze-up" and "winter cold snap"), brine expulsion is modelled with a single correction-step founded on mass conservation. The growt...

  17. Application of High Temperature Superconductors to Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Ballarino, A

    2000-01-01

    Since the discovery of high temperature superconductivity, a large effort has been made by the scientific community to investigate this field towards a possible application of the new oxide superconductors to different devices like SMES, magnetic bearings, flywheels energy storage, magnetic shielding, transmission cables, fault current limiters, etc. However, all present day large scale applications using superconductivity in accelerator technology are based on conventional materials operating at liquid helium temperatures. Poor mechanical properties, low critical current density and sensitivity to the magnetic field at high temperature are the key parameters whose improvement is essential for a large scale application of high temperature superconductors to such devices. Current leads, used for transferring currents from the power converters, working at room temperature, into the liquid helium environment, where the magnets are operating, represent an immediate application of the emerging technology of high t...

  18. Thermoelastic properties of minerals at high temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sanjay Upadhyay; Hem Chandra; Meenakashi Joshi; Deepika P Joshi

    2011-01-01

    The knowledge of elasticity of the minerals is useful for interpreting the structure and composition of the lower mantle and also in seismic studies. The purpose of the present study is to discuss a simple and straightforward method for evaluating thermoelastic properties of minerals at high temperatures. We have extended the Kumar’s formulation by taking into the account the concept of anharmonicity in minerals above the Debye temperature (D). In our present study, we have investigated the thermophysical properties of two minerals (pyrope-rich garnet and MgAl2O4) under high temperatures and calculated the second-order elastic constant () and bulk modulus (T) of the above minerals, in two cases first by taking Anderson–Gruneisen parameter (T) as temperature-independent and then by treating T as temperature-dependent parameter. The results obtained when T is temperature-dependent are in close agreement with experimental data.

  19. Evolution and constrains in the star formation histories of IR-bright star forming galaxies at high redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklias, Panos; Schaerer, Daniel; Elbaz, David

    2015-08-01

    Understanding and constraining the early cosmic star formation history of the Universe is a key question of galaxy evolution. A large fraction of star formation is dust obscured, so it is crucial to have access to the IR emission of galaxies to properly study them.Utilizing the multi-wavelength photometry from GOODS-Herschel, we perform SED fitting with different variable star formation histories (SFHs), which we constrain thanks to the observed IR luminosities, on a large sample of individually IR-detected sources from z~1 to 4. We explore how (and to which extent) constraining dust attenuation thanks to the IR luminosities allows to reduce the scatter (expected when using variable SFHs, in contrast to IR+UV standard calibrations) in physical properties and relations such as mass-SFR and the so-called star-forming Main Sequence (MS).Although limited at the high-z end, our analysis shows a change of trends in SFHs between low and high z, that follows the established cosmic SFR density, with galaxies found to prefer rising SFRs at z~3-4, and declining SFRs at z≤1. We show that a fraction of galaxies (~20%), mainly at z≤2, can have lower SFRs than IR-inferred, but still being compatible with the observations, indicative of being post-starbursts/undergoing quenching while bright in the IR, in agreement with theoretical work. The IR-constrained stellar population models we obtain also indicate that the two main modes of star formation - MS and starburst - evolve differently with time, with the former being mostly slow evolving and lying on the MS for long lasting periods, and the latter being very recent, rapidly increasing bursts (or on the decline, when belonging to the aforementioned "quenched" category). Finally, we illustrate how spectroscopic observation of nebular emission lines further enables as to constrain effectively the SFHs of galaxies.

  20. Low to high temperature energy conversion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C. G. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method for converting heat energy from low temperature heat sources to higher temperature was developed. It consists of a decomposition chamber in which ammonia is decomposed into hydrogen and nitrogen by absorbing heat of decomposition from a low temperature energy source. A recombination reaction then takes place which increases the temperature of a fluid significantly. The system is of use for the efficient operation of compact or low capital investment turbine driven electrical generators, or in other applications, to enable chemical reactions that have a critical lower temperature to be used. The system also recovers heat energy from low temperature heat sources, such as solar collectors or geothermal sources, and converts it to high temperatures.

  1. Sandia_HighTemperatureComponentEvaluation_2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cashion, Avery T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform independent evaluation of high temperature components to determine their suitability for use in high temperature geothermal tools. Development of high temperature components has been increasing rapidly due to demand from the high temperature oil and gas exploration and aerospace industries. Many of these new components are at the late prototype or first production stage of development and could benefit from third party evaluation of functionality and lifetime at elevated temperatures. In addition to independent testing of new components, this project recognizes that there is a paucity of commercial-off-the-shelf COTS components rated for geothermal temperatures. As such, high-temperature circuit designers often must dedicate considerable time and resources to determine if a component exists that they may be able to knead performance out of to meet their requirements. This project aids tool developers by characterization of select COTS component performances beyond published temperature specifications. The process for selecting components includes public announcements of project intent (e.g., FedBizOps), direct discussions with candidate manufacturers,and coordination with other DOE funded programs.

  2. An observational correlation between stellar brightness variations and surface gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bastien, Fabienne A; Basri, Gibor; Pepper, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Surface gravity is one of a star's basic properties, but it is difficult to measure accurately, with typical uncertainties of 25-50 per cent if measured spectroscopically and 90-150 per cent photometrically. Asteroseismology measures gravity with an uncertainty of about two per cent but is restricted to relatively small samples of bright stars, most of which are giants. The availability of high-precision measurements of brightness variations for >150,000 stars provides an opportunity to investigate whether the variations can be used to determine surface gravities. The Fourier power of granulation on a star's surface correlates physically with surface gravity; if brightness variations on timescales of hours arise from granulation, then such variations should correlate with surface gravity. Here we report an analysis of archival data that reveals an observational correlation between surface gravity and the root-mean-square brightness variations on timescales of less than eight hours for stars with temperatures ...

  3. Mechanical design and fabrication of the VHF-gun, the Berkeley normal-conducting continuous-wave high-brightness electron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, R. P.; Ghiorso, W.; Staples, J.; Huang, T. M.; Sannibale, F.; Kramasz, T. D.

    2016-02-01

    A high repetition rate, MHz-class, high-brightness electron source is a key element in future high-repetition-rate x-ray free electron laser-based light sources. The VHF-gun, a novel low frequency radio-frequency gun, is the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) response to that need. The gun design is based on a normal conducting, single cell cavity resonating at 186 MHz in the VHF band and capable of continuous wave operation while still delivering the high accelerating fields at the cathode required for the high brightness performance. The VHF-gun was fabricated and successfully commissioned in the framework of the Advanced Photo-injector EXperiment, an injector built at LBNL to demonstrate the capability of the gun to deliver the required beam quality. The basis for the selection of the VHF-gun technology, novel design features, and fabrication techniques are described.

  4. Mechanical design and fabrication of the VHF-gun, the Berkeley normal-conducting continuous-wave high-brightness electron source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, R P; Ghiorso, W; Staples, J; Huang, T M; Sannibale, F; Kramasz, T D

    2016-02-01

    A high repetition rate, MHz-class, high-brightness electron source is a key element in future high-repetition-rate x-ray free electron laser-based light sources. The VHF-gun, a novel low frequency radio-frequency gun, is the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) response to that need. The gun design is based on a normal conducting, single cell cavity resonating at 186 MHz in the VHF band and capable of continuous wave operation while still delivering the high accelerating fields at the cathode required for the high brightness performance. The VHF-gun was fabricated and successfully commissioned in the framework of the Advanced Photo-injector EXperiment, an injector built at LBNL to demonstrate the capability of the gun to deliver the required beam quality. The basis for the selection of the VHF-gun technology, novel design features, and fabrication techniques are described.

  5. Dimensionality of high temperature superconductivity in oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, C. W.

    1989-01-01

    Many models have been proposed to account for the high temperature superconductivity observed in oxide systems. Almost all of these models proposed are based on the uncoupled low dimensional carrier Cu-O layers of the oxides. Results of several experiments are presented and discussed. They suggest that the high temperature superconductivity observed cannot be strictly two- or one-dimensional, and that the environment between the Cu-O layers and the interlayer coupling play an important role in the occurrence of such high temperature superconductivity. A comment on the very short coherence length reported is also made.

  6. Aeronautical applications of high-temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, George E.; Luidens, Roger W.; Uherka, Kenneth; Hull, John

    1989-01-01

    The successful development of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) could have a major impact on future aeronautical propulsion and aeronautical flight vehicle systems. A preliminary examination of the potential application of HTS for aeronautics indicates that significant benefits may be realized through the development and implementation of these newly discovered materials. Applications of high-temperature superconductors (currently substantiated at 95 k) were envisioned for several classes of aeronautical systems, including subsonic and supersonic transports, hypersonic aircraft, V/STOL aircraft, rotorcraft, and solar, microwave and laser powered aircraft. Introduced and described are the particular applications and potential benefits of high-temperature superconductors as related to aeronautics and/or aeronautical systems.

  7. Aeronautical applications of high-temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, George E.; Luidens, Roger W.; Uherka, Kenneth; Hull, John

    1989-01-01

    The successful development of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) could have a major impact on future aeronautical propulsion and aeronautical flight vehicle systems. A preliminary examination of the potential application of HTS for aeronautics indicates that significant benefits may be realized through the development and implementation of these newly discovered materials. Applications of high-temperature superconductors (currently substantiated at 95 K) were envisioned for several classes of aeronautical systems, including subsonic and supersonic transports, hypersonic aircraft, V/STOL aircraft, rotorcraft, and solar, microwave and laser powered aircraft. Introduced and described are the particular applications and potential benefits of high-temperature superconductors as related to aeronautics and/or aeronautical systems.

  8. High temperature and pressure alkaline electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allebrod, Frank; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2013-01-01

    the operational temperature and pressure to produce pressurized hydrogen at high rate (m3 H2·h-1·m-2 cell area) and high electrical efficiency. This work describes an exploratory technical study of the possibility to produce hydrogen and oxygen with a new type of alkaline electrolysis cell at high temperatures...... for immobilization of aqueous KOH solutions. Electrolysis cells with this electrolyte and metal foam based gas diffusion electrodes were successfully demonstrated at temperatures up to 250 °C at 40 bar. Different electro-catalysts were tested in order to reduce the oxygen and hydrogen overpotentials. Current...

  9. Symposium on high temperature and materials chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-10-01

    This volume contains the written proceedings of the Symposium on High Temperature and Materials Chemistry held in Berkeley, California on October 24--25, 1989. The Symposium was sponsored by the Materials and Chemical Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and by the College of Chemistry of the University of California at Berkeley to discuss directions, trends, and accomplishments in the field of high temperature and materials chemistry. Its purpose was to provide a snapshot of high temperature and materials chemistry and, in so doing, to define status and directions.

  10. Silicon Carbide Nanotube Oxidation at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlborg, Nadia; Zhu, Dongming

    2012-01-01

    Silicon Carbide Nanotubes (SiCNTs) have high mechanical strength and also have many potential functional applications. In this study, SiCNTs were investigated for use in strengthening high temperature silicate and oxide materials for high performance ceramic nanocomposites and environmental barrier coating bond coats. The high · temperature oxidation behavior of the nanotubes was of particular interest. The SiCNTs were synthesized by a direct reactive conversion process of multiwall carbon nanotubes and silicon at high temperature. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to study the oxidation kinetics of SiCNTs at temperatures ranging from 800degC to1300degC. The specific oxidation mechanisms were also investigated.

  11. Development of high temperature capable piezoelectric sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suprock, Andrew D.; Tittmann, Bernhard R.

    2017-02-01

    The objective of the project was to investigate the influence of the temperature effect on ultrasonic transducers based on a comparison of the effects of high temperature conditions versus those of high temperature and irradiation on the transducer system. There was also a preliminary move towards the establishment of the means for optimizing the bulk single crystal transducer fabrication process in order to achieve peak efficiency and maximum effectiveness in both irradiated and non-irradiated high temperature applications. Optimization of the material components within the transducer will greatly increase non-destructive testing abilities for industry, structural health monitoring. Here is presented a progress report on the testing of several different piezoelectric materials under high temperature conditions. The viability of aluminum nitride (AlN) as a transducer material in high temperature conditions has been previously explored [1] and has been further tested to ensure reliability. Bistmuth Titanate (BiT) has also been tested and has displayed excellent effectiveness for high temperature application.

  12. Browning of clarified lemon juices treated at high temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Ibarz-Martínez

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work a study of effect of high temperature treatments (70, 80, 90 and 95ºC on color evolution in clarified lemon juices (10, 20, 35, 50 and 64.6ºBrix has been carried out. The evolution of the color with the treatment time has been continued measuring the absorbance at 420 nm (A420 and the parameters CIELab (L*, a* and b* and color increment dE *. The increase of A420 and of the decrease of the brightness L * with the time of treatment it has been observed that they are fitted to a zero order kinetic, what has allowed to obtain the corresponding ones constant kinetic of color deterioration. The evolution of dE* has been described by a kinetic model in two steps. The effect of the temperature on these kinetic constants can be quantified by means of the Arrhenius equation, what allows obtaining the corresponding values of activation energy. For the A420 and L* activation energy values tends to decrease with the increase of concentration while for dE* variation hardly exists. For the treatments to a certain temperature, the effect of the soluble solids content on the kinetic constants can be described by means of a model exponential type equation.

  13. Broadband, High-Temperature Ultrasonic Transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, F. Raymond; Winfree, William P.; Barrows, Danny A.

    1995-01-01

    Materials chosen for endurance at high temperatures and acoustic coupling and damping. Acoustic transducer designed to exhibit broad frequency response and to survive temperatures close to melting points of brazing alloys. Attached directly and continuously to hot object monitored ultrasonically: for example, it can be attached to relatively cool spot on workpiece during brazing for taking ultrasonic quality-control measurements.

  14. Copper bromide vapor brightness amplifiers with 100 kHz pulse repetition frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigub, M. V.; Evtushenko, G. S.; Torgaev, S. N.; Shiyanov, D. V.; Evtushenko, T. G.

    2016-10-01

    The paper presents a laser monitor with 10 μs time-resolution based on a high-frequency copper bromide vapor brightness amplifier. A sync circuit has been designed for single-pulse imaging. The analysis of amplifying characteristics of the active elements and active optical system (laser monitor) parameters allowed to determine the optimal concentration of HBr at which the images can be obtained with minimum distortions. For the active element operating at high frequencies (more than 50 kHz) as a brightness amplifier, the concentration of HBr must be lower than that needed for obtaining the maximum output power. The limiting brightness temperature of the background radiation which does not affect the image quality is determined. The potential feasibility of using a proposed brightness amplifier for visualizing processes blocked from viewing by the background radiation with the brightness temperature up to 8000 K is demonstrated.

  15. High Temperature Fiberoptic Thermal Imaging System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed Phase 1 program will fabricate and demonstrate a small diameter single fiber endoscope that can perform high temperature thermal imaging in a jet engine...

  16. High Temperature Self-Healing Metallic Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutelia, E. R.; Bakhtiyarov, S. I.; Tsurtsumia, O. O.; Bakhtiyarov, A. S.; Eristavi, B.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents the possibility to realize the self healing mechanisms for heterogeneous architectural metal/ceramic high temperature sandwich thermal barrier coating systems on the surfaces refractory metals by analogy of wound healing in the skin.

  17. High Temperature Capacitors for Venus Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High temperature power electronics have become a vital aspect of future designs for power converters in spacecraft, battle zone electric power, satellite power...

  18. Panel report on high temperature ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolet, T C [ed.

    1979-01-01

    Fundamental research is reported concerning high temperature ceramics for application in turbines, engines, batteries, gasifiers, MHD, fuel cells, heat exchangers, and hot wall combustors. Ceramics microstructure and behavior are included. (FS)

  19. Application Fields of High-Temperature Superconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Hott, Roland

    2003-01-01

    Potential application fields for cuprate high-temperature superconductors (HTS) and the status of respective projects are reviewed. The availability of a reliable and inexpensive cooling technique will be essential for a future broad acceptance of HTS applications.

  20. Measuring Moduli Of Elasticity At High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfenden, Alan

    1993-01-01

    Shorter, squatter specimens and higher frequencies used in ultrasonic measurement technique. Improved version of piezo-electric ultrasonic composite oscillator technique used to measure moduli of elasticity of solid materials at high temperatures.

  1. Silicon carbide, an emerging high temperature semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Powell, J. Anthony

    1991-01-01

    In recent years, the aerospace propulsion and space power communities have expressed a growing need for electronic devices that are capable of sustained high temperature operation. Applications for high temperature electronic devices include development instrumentation within engines, engine control, and condition monitoring systems, and power conditioning and control systems for space platforms and satellites. Other earth-based applications include deep-well drilling instrumentation, nuclear reactor instrumentation and control, and automotive sensors. To meet the needs of these applications, the High Temperature Electronics Program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. Research is focussed on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of silicon carbide electronic devices and integrated sensors. The progress made in developing silicon carbide is presented, and the challenges that lie ahead are discussed.

  2. Novel High Temperature Strain Gauge Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced high-temperature sensor technology and bonding methods are of great interests in designing and developing advanced future aircraft. Current state-of-the-art...

  3. Understanding Discrepancies between Simulated and Measured Upwelling Microwave Brightness Temperatures: A Sensitivity Study on the Impact of Cloud Ice Microphysical and Scattering Parameterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, D.; Hashino, T.; Mugnai, A.; Sanò, P.; Smith, E. A.; Tripoli, G. J.

    2009-09-01

    Most physically-based Bayesian algorithms for precipitation retrieval from satellite-borne microwave (MW) radiometers use cloud-radiation databases (CRD’s) that are composed of numerous detailed microphysical cloud profiles obtained from cloud resolving model (CRM) simulations, coupled with the simulated upwelling brightness temperatures (TB’s) at several MW frequencies. These TB’s are computed by applying radiative transfer (RT) schemes to the CRM profiles for the same frequencies and polarizations of the satellite MW radiometer measurements in use. Then, the ensemble of simulations is compared with the measurements to estimate the precipitation rate. A good agreement between simulations and measurements is obviously needed. Nevertheless, depending on frequency, there are several sources of discrepancy between simulated and measured TB’s. Here, we show the results of a sensitivity study on the impact of several different parameterizations that are used to compute the radiative properties of ice particles, as well as on the CRM skill in providing realistic descriptions of the microphysical structures of precipitating clouds. To this end, we use 2D-simulations of a case study of the KWAJEX campaign (that took place from 23 July to 14 September 1999), that were performed by the University of Wisconsin - Nonhydrostatic Modeling System (UW-NMS) using both a bulk microphysics scheme, as well as a new microphysical scheme called Advanced Microphysical Prediction System (AMPS) that explicitly predicts ice particle properties (such as size, particle density, and crystal habits).

  4. High temperature superconductors and other superfluids

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrov, A S

    2017-01-01

    Written by eminent researchers in the field, this text describes the theory of superconductivity and superfluidity starting from liquid helium and a charged Bose-gas. It also discusses the modern bipolaron theory of strongly coupled superconductors, which explains the basic physical properties of high-temperature superconductors. This book will be of interest to fourth year graduate and postgraduate students, specialist libraries, information centres and chemists working in high-temperature superconductivity.

  5. PLA recycling by hydrolysis at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristina, Annesini Maria; Rosaria, Augelletti; Sara, Frattari; Fausto, Gironi

    2016-05-01

    In this work the process of PLA hydrolysis at high temperature was studied, in order to evaluate the possibility of chemical recycling of this polymer bio-based. In particular, the possibility to obtain the monomer of lactic acid from PLA degradation was investigated. The results of some preliminary tests, performed in a laboratory batch reactor at high temperature, are presented: the experimental results show that the complete degradation of PLA can be obtained in relatively low reaction times.

  6. Recent developments in high temperature organic polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergenrother, P. M.

    1991-01-01

    Developments in high temperature organic polymers during the last 5 years with major emphasis on polyimides and poly(arylene ether)s are discussed. Specific polymers or series of polymers have been selected to demonstrate unique properties or the effect chemical structure has upon certain properties. This article is not intended to be a comprehensive review of high temperature polymer advancements during the last 5 years.

  7. High-temperature discontinuously reinforced aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zedalis, M. S.; Bryant, J. D.; Gilman, P. S.; Das, S. K.

    1991-08-01

    High-temperature discontinuously reinforced aluminum (HTDRA) composites have been developed for elevated-temperature applications by incorporating SiC particulate reinforcement into a rapidly solidified, high-temperature Al-Fe-V-Si (alloy 8009) matrix. HTDRA combines the superior elevated-temperature strength, stability and corrosion resistance of the 8009 matrix with the excellent specific stiffness and abrasion resistance of the discontinuous SiC particulate reinforcement. On a specific stiffness basis, HTDRA is competitive with Ti-6-Al-4V and 17-4 PH stainless steel to temperatures approaching 480°C. Potential aerospace applications being considered for HTDRA include aircraft wing skins, missile bodies, and miscellaneous engine, spacecraft and hypersonic vehicle components.

  8. Simultaneous fluorescence and high-resolution bright-field imaging with aberration correction over a wide field-of-view with Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jaebum; Kim, Jinho; Ou, Xiaoze; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-03-01

    We present a method to acquire both fluorescence and high-resolution bright-field images with correction for the spatially varying aberrations over a microscope's wide field-of-view (FOV). First, the procedure applies Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) to retrieve the amplitude and phase of a sample, at a resolution that significantly exceeds the cutoff frequency of the microscope objective lens. At the same time, FPM algorithm is able to leverage on the redundancy within the set of acquired FPM bright-field images to estimate the microscope aberrations, which usually deteriorate in regions further away from the FOV's center. Second, the procedure acquires a raw wide-FOV fluorescence image within the same setup. Lack of moving parts allows us to use the FPM-estimated aberration map to computationally correct for the aberrations in the fluorescence image through deconvolution. Overlaying the aberration-corrected fluorescence image on top of the high-resolution bright-field image can be done with accurate spatial correspondence. This can provide means to identifying fluorescent regions of interest within the context of the sample's bright-field information. An experimental demonstration successfully improves the bright-field resolution of fixed, stained and fluorescently tagged HeLa cells by a factor of 4.9, and reduces the error caused by aberrations in a fluorescence image by 31%, over a field of view of 6.2 mm by 9.3 mm. For optimal deconvolution, we show the fluorescence image needs to have a signal-to-noise ratio of ~18.

  9. Laser Plasma Coupling for High Temperature Hohlraums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruer, W.

    1999-11-04

    Simple scaling models indicate that quite high radiation temperatures can be achieved in hohlraums driven with the National Ignition Facility. A scaling estimate for the radiation temperature versus pulse duration for different size NIF hohlraums is shown in Figure 1. Note that a radiation temperature of about 650 ev is projected for a so-called scale 1 hohlraum (length 2.6mm, diameter 1.6mm). With such high temperature hohlraums, for example, opacity experiments could be carried out using more relevant high Z materials rather than low Z surrogates. These projections of high temperature hohlraums are uncertain, since the scaling model does not allow for the very strongly-driven laser plasma coupling physics. Lasnex calculations have been carried out to estimate the plasma and irradiation conditions in a scale 1 hohlraum driven by NIF. Linear instability gains as high as exp(100) have been found for stimulated Brillouin scattering, and other laser-driven instabilities are also far above their thresholds. More understanding of the very strongly-driven coupling physics is clearly needed in order to more realistically assess and improve the prospects for high temperature hohlraums. Not surprisingly, this regime has been avoided for inertial fusion applications and so is relatively unexplored.

  10. Relativistic QED Plasma at Extremely High Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Masood, Samina S

    2016-01-01

    Renormalization scheme of QED (Quantum Electrodynamics) at high temperatures is used to calculate the effective parameters of relativistic plasma in the early universe. Renormalization constants of QED play role of effective parameters of the theory and can be used to determine the collective behavior of the medium. We explicitly show that the dielectric constant, magnetic reluctivity, Debye length and the plasma frequency depend on temperature in the early universe. Propagation speed, refractive index, plasma frequency and Debye shielding length of a QED plasma are computed at extremely high temperatures in the early universe. We also found the favorable conditions for the relativistic plasma from this calculations.

  11. Melt processed high-temperature superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    The achievement of large critical currents is critical to the applications of high-temperature superconductors. Recent developments have shown that melt processing is suitable for producing high J c oxide superconductors. Using magnetic forces between such high J c oxide superconductors and magnets, a person could be levitated.This book has grown largely out of research works on melt processing of high-temperature superconductors conducted at ISTEC Superconductivity Research Laboratory. The chapters build on melt processing, microstructural characterization, fundamentals of flux pinning, criti

  12. High Temperature, Wireless Seismometer Sensor for Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponchak, George E.; Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Taylor, Brandt; Beard, Steve; Meredith, Roger D.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Hunter Gary W.; Kiefer, Walter S.

    2012-01-01

    Space agency mission plans state the need to measure the seismic activity on Venus. Because of the high temperature on Venus (462? C average surface temperature) and the difficulty in placing and wiring multiple sensors using robots, a high temperature, wireless sensor using a wide bandgap semiconductor is an attractive option. This paper presents the description and proof of concept measurements of a high temperature, wireless seismometer sensor for Venus. A variation in inductance of a coil caused by the movement of an aluminum probe held in the coil and attached to a balanced leaf-spring seismometer causes a variation of 700 Hz in the transmitted signal from the oscillator/sensor system at 426? C. This result indicates that the concept may be used on Venus.

  13. High-temperature granulites and supercontinents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.L.R. Touret; M. Santosh; J.M. Huizenga

    2016-01-01

    The formation of continents involves a combination of magmatic and metamorphic processes. These processes become indistinguishable at the crust-mantle interface, where the pressure-temperature (P-T) conditions of (ultra) high-temperature granulites and magmatic rocks are similar. Continents grow laterally, by magmatic activity above oceanic subduction zones (high-pressure metamorphic setting), and vertically by accumulation of mantle-derived magmas at the base of the crust (high-temperature metamorphic setting). Both events are separated from each other in time; the vertical accretion post-dating lateral growth by several tens of millions of years. Fluid inclusion data indicate that during the high-temperature metamorphic episode the granulite lower crust is invaded by large amounts of low H2O-activity fluids including high-density CO2 and concentrated saline solutions (brines). These fluids are expelled from the lower crust to higher crustal levels at the end of the high-grade metamorphic event. The final amalgamation of supercontinents corresponds to episodes of ultra-high temperature metamorphism involving large-scale accumulation of these low-water activity fluids in the lower crust. This accumulation causes tectonic instability, which together with the heat input from the sub-continental lithospheric mantle, leads to the disruption of supercontinents. Thus, the fragmentation of a supercontinent is already programmed at the time of its amalgamation.

  14. High-temperature granulites and supercontinents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L.R. Touret

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of continents involves a combination of magmatic and metamorphic processes. These processes become indistinguishable at the crust-mantle interface, where the pressure-temperature (P-T conditions of (ultra high-temperature granulites and magmatic rocks are similar. Continents grow laterally, by magmatic activity above oceanic subduction zones (high-pressure metamorphic setting, and vertically by accumulation of mantle-derived magmas at the base of the crust (high-temperature metamorphic setting. Both events are separated from each other in time; the vertical accretion postdating lateral growth by several tens of millions of years. Fluid inclusion data indicate that during the high-temperature metamorphic episode the granulite lower crust is invaded by large amounts of low H2O-activity fluids including high-density CO2 and concentrated saline solutions (brines. These fluids are expelled from the lower crust to higher crustal levels at the end of the high-grade metamorphic event. The final amalgamation of supercontinents corresponds to episodes of ultra-high temperature metamorphism involving large-scale accumulation of these low-water activity fluids in the lower crust. This accumulation causes tectonic instability, which together with the heat input from the sub-continental lithospheric mantle, leads to the disruption of supercontinents. Thus, the fragmentation of a supercontinent is already programmed at the time of its amalgamation.

  15. Building block diode laser concept for high brightness laser output in the kW range and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario, Fabio; Fritsche, Haro; Grohe, Andreas; Hagen, Thomas; Kern, Holger; Koch, Ralf; Kruschke, Bastian; Reich, Axel; Sanftleben, Dennis; Steger, Ronny; Wallendorf, Till; Gries, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    The modular concept of DirectPhotonics laser systems is a big advantage regarding its manufacturability, serviceability as well as reproducibility. By sticking to identical base components an economic production allows to serve as many applications as possible while keeping the product variations minimal. The modular laser design is based on single emitters and various combining technics. In a first step we accept a reduction of the very high brightness of the single emitters by vertical stacking several diodes in fast axis. This can be theoretically done until the combined fast axis beam quality is on a comparable level as the individual diodes slow axis beam quality without loosing overall beam performance after fiber coupling. Those stacked individual emitters can be wavelength stabilized by an external resonator, providing the very same feedback to each of those laser diodes which leads to an output power of about 100 W with BPP of stacking those building blocks using the very same dense spectral combing technique up to multi kW Systems without further reduction of the BPP. The 500 W building blocks are consequently designed in a way that they feature a high flexibility with regard to their emitting wavelength bandwidth. Therefore, new wavelengths can be implemented by only exchanging parts and without any additional change of the production process. This design principal theoretically offers the option to adapt the wavelength of those blocks to any applications, from UV, visible into the far IR as long as there are any diodes commercially available. This opens numerous additional applications like laser pumping, scientific applications, materials processing such as cutting and welding of copper aluminum or steel and also medical application. Typical operating at wavelengths in the 9XX nm range, these systems are designed for and mainly used in cutting and welding applications, but adapted wavelength ranges such as 793 nm and 1530 nm are also offered. Around 15

  16. High-entropy alloys as high-temperature thermoelectric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafeie, Samrand [Surface and Microstructure Engineering Group, Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Guo, Sheng, E-mail: sheng.guo@chalmers.se [Surface and Microstructure Engineering Group, Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Hu, Qiang [Institute of Applied Physics, Jiangxi Academy of Sciences, Nanchang 330029 (China); Fahlquist, Henrik [Bruker AXS Nordic AB, 17067 Solna (Sweden); Erhart, Paul [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Palmqvist, Anders, E-mail: anders.palmqvist@chalmers.se [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2015-11-14

    Thermoelectric (TE) generators that efficiently recycle a large portion of waste heat will be an important complementary energy technology in the future. While many efficient TE materials exist in the lower temperature region, few are efficient at high temperatures. Here, we present the high temperature properties of high-entropy alloys (HEAs), as a potential new class of high temperature TE materials. We show that their TE properties can be controlled significantly by changing the valence electron concentration (VEC) of the system with appropriate substitutional elements. Both the electrical and thermal transport properties in this system were found to decrease with a lower VEC number. Overall, the large microstructural complexity and lower average VEC in these types of alloys can potentially be used to lower both the total and the lattice thermal conductivity. These findings highlight the possibility to exploit HEAs as a new class of future high temperature TE materials.

  17. High-entropy alloys as high-temperature thermoelectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafeie, Samrand; Guo, Sheng; Hu, Qiang; Fahlquist, Henrik; Erhart, Paul; Palmqvist, Anders

    2015-11-01

    Thermoelectric (TE) generators that efficiently recycle a large portion of waste heat will be an important complementary energy technology in the future. While many efficient TE materials exist in the lower temperature region, few are efficient at high temperatures. Here, we present the high temperature properties of high-entropy alloys (HEAs), as a potential new class of high temperature TE materials. We show that their TE properties can be controlled significantly by changing the valence electron concentration (VEC) of the system with appropriate substitutional elements. Both the electrical and thermal transport properties in this system were found to decrease with a lower VEC number. Overall, the large microstructural complexity and lower average VEC in these types of alloys can potentially be used to lower both the total and the lattice thermal conductivity. These findings highlight the possibility to exploit HEAs as a new class of future high temperature TE materials.

  18. Long-Term High-Latitude Sea and Ice Surface Temperature Record from AVHRR GAC Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis, C. S.; Dybkjær, G.; Eastwood, S.; Tonboe, R. T.; Høyer, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Surface temperature is among the most important variables in the surface energy balance equation and it significantly affects the atmospheric boundary layer structure, the turbulent heat exchange and, over ice, the ice growth rate. Here we measure the surface temperature using thermal infrared sensors from 10-12 μm wavelength, a method whose primary limitation over sea ice is the detection of clouds. However, in the Arctic and around Antarctica there are very few conventional observations of surface temperature from buoys, and it is sometimes difficult to determine if the temperature is measured at the surface or within the snowpack, the latter of which often results in a warm bias. To reduce this bias, much interest is being paid to alternative remote sensing methods for monitoring high latitude surface temperature. We used Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) global area coverage (GAC) data to produce a high latitude sea surface temperature (SST), ice surface temperature (IST) and ice cap skin temperature dataset spanning 27 years (1982-2009). This long-term climate record is the first of its kind for IST. In this project we used brightness temperatures from the infrared channels of AVHRR sensors aboard NOAA and Metop polar-orbiting satellites. Surface temperatures were calculated using separate split window algorithms for day SST, night SST, and IST. The snow surface emissivity across all angles of the swath were simulated specifically for all sensors using an emission model. Additionally, all algorithms were tuned to the Arctic using simulated brightness temperatures from a radiative transfer model with atmospheric profiles and skin temperatures from European Centre for Medium-Range Forecasts (ECMWF) re-analysis data (ERA-Interim). Here we present the results of product quality as compared to in situ measurements from buoys and infrared radiometers, as well as a preliminary analysis of climate trends revealed by the record.

  19. High-temperature superconducting conductors and cables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, D.E.; Maley, M.P.; Boulaevskii, L.; Willis, J.O.; Coulter, J.Y.; Ullmann, J.L.; Cho, Jin; Fleshler, S.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a 3-year LDRD project at LANL. High-temperature superconductivity (HTS) promises more efficient and powerful electrical devices such as motors, generators, and power transmission cables; however this depends on developing HTS conductors that sustain high current densities J{sub c} in high magnetic fields at temperatures near liq. N2`s bp. Our early work concentrated on Cu oxides but at present, long wire and tape conductors can be best made from BSCCO compounds with high J{sub c} at low temperatures, but which are degraded severely at temperatures of interest. This problem is associated with thermally activated motion of magnetic flux lines in BSCCO. Reducing these dc losses at higher temperatures will require a high density of microscopic defects that will pin flux lines and inhibit their motion. Recently it was shown that optimum defects can be produced by small tracks formed by passage of energetic heavy ions. Such defects result when Bi is bombarded with high energy protons. The longer range of protons in matter suggests the possibility of application to tape conductors. AC losses are a major limitation in many applications of superconductivity such as power transmission. The improved pinning of flux lines reduces ac losses, but optimization also involves other factors. Measuring and characterizing these losses with respect to material parameters and conductor design is essential to successful development of ac devices.

  20. Proposal for Research on High-Brightness Cathodes for High-Power Free-Electron Lasers (FEL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-09

    diamond field-emitter array (DFEA). The second is the gridded thermionic cathode, based on the development of gridded cathodes for high-power microwave ...possible as a method of increasing current density in exchange for higher turn-on field. Oxidation and deposition Diamond seeding : We now utilize...atmosphere or vacuum (~107 Torr) after the initial heat treatment results in performance that is slightly lower than that for operation at 450°C. This

  1. High Temperature VARTM of Phenylethynyl Terminated Imides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Sayata; Watson, Kent A.; Cano, Roberto J.; Britton, Sean M.; Jensen, Brian J.; Connell, John W.; Herring, Helen M.; Linberry, Quentin J.

    2009-01-01

    LaRC phenylethynyl terminated imide (PETI) resins were processed into composites using high temperature vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM). Although initial runs yielded composites with high void content, process modifications reduced voids to <3%. Photomicrographs were taken and void contents and T(sub g)s of the panels were determined.

  2. Reactive Plasticizers for High Temperature Quinoxaline Thermoplastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-06-01

    involves essentially two steps, consolidation of boardy prepreg into sheet stock and thermoforming the sheet stock into structural components. A...problem associated with the fabrication process is the high temperatures required in both the consolidation and thermoforming operations. High processing

  3. Fluctuations and correlations in high temperature QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Bellwied, R; Fodor, Z; Katz, S D; Pasztor, A; Ratti, C; Szabo, K K

    2015-01-01

    We calculate second- and fourth-order cumulants of conserved charges in a temperature range stretching from the QCD transition region towards the realm of (resummed) perturbation theory. We perform lattice simulations with staggered quarks; the continuum extrapolation is based on $N_t=10\\dots24$ in the crossover-region and $N_t=8\\dots16$ at higher temperatures. We find that the Hadron Resonance Gas model predictions describe the lattice data rather well in the confined phase. At high temperatures (above $\\sim$250 MeV) we find agreement with the three-loop Hard Thermal Loop results.

  4. Multi-kW high-brightness fiber coupled diode laser based on two dimensional stacked tailored diode bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Andreas; Unger, Andreas; Köhler, Bernd; Küster, Matthias; Dürsch, Sascha; Kissel, Heiko; Irwin, David A.; Bodem, Christian; Plappert, Nora; Kersten, Maik; Biesenbach, Jens

    2016-03-01

    The demand for high brightness fiber coupled diode laser devices in the multi kW power region is mainly driven by industrial applications for materials processing, like brazing, cladding and metal welding, which require a beam quality better than 30 mm x mrad and power levels above 3kW. Reliability, modularity, and cost effectiveness are key factors for success in the market. We have developed a scalable and modular diode laser architecture that fulfills these requirements through use of a simple beam shaping concept based on two dimensional stacking of tailored diode bars mounted on specially designed, tap water cooled heat sinks. The base element of the concept is a tailored diode laser bar with an epitaxial and lateral structure designed such that the desired beam quality in slow-axis direction can be realized without using sophisticated beam shaping optics. The optical design concept is based on fast-axis collimator (FAC) and slow-axis collimator (SAC) lenses followed by only one additional focusing optic for efficient coupling into a 400 μm fiber with a numerical aperture (NA) of 0.12. To fulfill the requirements of scalability and modularity, four tailored bars are populated on a reduced size, tap water cooled heat sink. The diodes on these building blocks are collimated simply via FAC and SAC. The building blocks can be stacked vertically resulting in a two-dimensional diode stack, which enables a compact design of the laser source with minimum beam path length. For a single wavelength, up to eight of these building blocks, implying a total of 32 tailored bars, can be stacked into a submodule, polarization multiplexed, and coupled into a 400 μm, 0.12NA fiber. Scalability into the multi kW region is realized by wavelength combining of replaceable submodules in the spectral range from 900 - 1100 nm. We present results of a laser source based on this architecture with an output power of more than 4 kW and a beam quality of 25 mm x mrad.

  5. Ultra High Temperature Ceramics for aerospace applications

    OpenAIRE

    Jankowiak, A.; Justin, J.F.

    2014-01-01

    Après relecture une erreur est apparue dans le document et doit être retiré; International audience; The Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTCs) are of great interest for different engineering sectors and notably the aerospace industry. Indeed, hypersonic flights, re-entry vehicles, propulsion applications and so on, require new materials that can perform in oxidizing or corrosive atmospheres at temperatures higher than 2000°C and sometimes, for long life-time. To fulfil these requirements, U...

  6. Effects of High Temperature on Collector Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Report reveals electroplated black chrome is good coating for concentrating collectors in which temperatures are in the 650 degrees-800 degrees F (340 degrees - 430 degrees C) range. Black chrome thermal emittance is low and solar-absorption properties are not seriously degraded at high temperatures. Black coatings are used to increase absorption of solar energy by base metal while decreasing emission of infrared energy. Coatings are intended to improve efficiency of solar collectors.

  7. Low Temperature Heating and High Temperature Cooling in Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazanci, Ongun Berk

    , a single-family house designed for plus-energy targets and equipped with a radiant water-based floor heating and cooling system was studied by means of full-scale measurements, dynamic building simulations and thermodynamic evaluation tools. Thermal indoor environment and energy performance of the house...... performance of heating and cooling systems for achieving the same thermal indoor environment. The results show that it is crucial to minimize the heating and cooling demands in the design phase since these demands determine the terminal units and heat sources and sinks that could be used. Low temperature...... heating and high temperature cooling systems (a radiant water-based floor heating and cooling system in this study) proved to be superior to compared systems, evaluated with different system analysis tools; energy, exergy, and entransy. Radiant systems should be coupled to appropriate heating and cooling...

  8. Steps toward a high precision solar rotation profile: Results from SDO/AIA coronal bright point data

    CERN Document Server

    Sudar, Davor; Brajša, Roman; Saar, Steven H

    2015-01-01

    Coronal bright points (CBP) are ubiquitous small brightenings in the solar corona associated with small magnetic bipoles. We derive the solar differential rotation profile by tracing the motions of CBPs detected by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We also investigate problems related to detection of coronal bright points resulting from instrument and detection algorithm limitations. To determine the positions and identification of coronal bright points we used a segmentation algorithm. A linear fit of their central meridian distance and latitude versus time was utilised to derive velocities. We obtained 906 velocity measurements in a time interval of only 2 days. The differential rotation profile can be expressed as $\\omega_{rot} = (14.47\\pm 0.10 + (0.6\\pm 1.0)\\sin^{2}(b) + (-4.7\\pm 1.7)\\sin^{4}(b))$\\degr day$^{-1}$. Our result is in agreement with other work and it comes with reasonable errors in spite of the very short time interval used. This wa...

  9. Integrating SMOS brightness temperatures with a new conceptual spatially distributed hydrological model for improving flood and drought predictions at large scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostache, Renaud; Rains, Dominik; Chini, Marco; Lievens, Hans; Verhoest, Niko E. C.; Matgen, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    , SUPERFLEX is capable of predicting runoff, soil moisture, and SMOS-like brightness temperature time series. Such a model is traditionally calibrated using only discharge measurements. In this study we designed a multi-objective calibration procedure based on both discharge measurements and SMOS-derived brightness temperature observations in order to evaluate the added value of remotely sensed soil moisture data in the calibration process. As a test case we set up the SUPERFLEX model for the large scale Murray-Darling catchment in Australia ( 1 Million km2). When compared to in situ soil moisture time series, model predictions show good agreement resulting in correlation coefficients exceeding 70 % and Root Mean Squared Errors below 1 %. When benchmarked with the physically based land surface model CLM, SUPERFLEX exhibits similar performance levels. By adapting the runoff routing function within the SUPERFLEX model, the predicted discharge results in a Nash Sutcliff Efficiency exceeding 0.7 over both the calibration and the validation periods.

  10. Joining of ultra-high temperature ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Silvestroni, Laura; Sciti, Diletta; Esposito, Laura; Glaeser, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, ultra-high temperature ceramics raised renewed interest after the first studies in the 60's. Thanks to their high melting point, superior to any group of materials, and to their set of interesting physical and engineering properties, they find application in aerospace industry, propulsion field, as cladding materials in generation IV nuclear reactors and solar absorbers in novel HT CSP systems. Recent efforts were devoted to the achievement of high strength and toughness m...

  11. High temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book is a comprehensive review of high-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). PEMFCs are the preferred fuel cells for a variety of applications such as automobiles, cogeneration of heat and power units, emergency power and portable electronics. The first 5 chapters...... of the book describe rationalization and illustration of approaches to high temperature PEM systems. Chapters 6 - 13 are devoted to fabrication, optimization and characterization of phosphoric acid-doped polybenzimidazole membranes, the very first electrolyte system that has demonstrated the concept...... of and motivated extensive research activity in the field. The last 11 chapters summarize the state-of-the-art of technological development of high temperature-PEMFCs based on acid doped PBI membranes including catalysts, electrodes, MEAs, bipolar plates, modelling, stacking, diagnostics and applications....

  12. Low toxicity high temperature PMR polyimide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pater, Ruth H. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    In-situ polymerization of monomer reactants (PMR) type polyimides constitute an important class of ultra high performance composite matrix resins. PMR-15 is the best known and most widely used PMR polyimide. An object of the present invention is to provide a substantially improved high temperature PMR-15 system that exhibits better processability, toughness, and thermo-oxidative stability than PMR-15, as well as having a low toxicity. Another object is to provide new PMR polyimides that are useful as adhesives, moldings, and composite matrices. By the present invention, a new PMR polyimide comprises a mixture of the following compounds: 3,4'-oxydianiline (3,4'-ODA), NE, and BTDE which are then treated with heat. This PMR was designated LaRC-RP46 and has a broader processing window, better reproducibility of high quality composite parts, better elevated temperature mechanical properties, and higher retention of mechanical properties at an elevated temperature, particularly, at 371 C.

  13. High temperature superconductivity the road to higher critical temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Uchida, Shin-ichi

    2015-01-01

    This book presents an overview of material-specific factors that influence Tc and give rise to diverse Tc values for copper oxides and iron-based high- Tc superconductors on the basis of more than 25 years of experimental data, to most of which the author has made important contributions. The book then explains why both compounds are distinct from others with similar crystal structure and whether or not one can enhance Tc, which in turn gives a hint on the unresolved pairing mechanism. This is an unprecedented new approach to the problem of high-temperature superconductivity and thus will be inspiring to both specialists and non-specialists interested in this field.   Readers will receive in-depth information on the past, present, and future of high-temperature superconductors, along with special, updated information on what the real highest Tc values are and particularly on the possibility of enhancing Tc for each member material, which is important for application. At this time, the highest Tc has not been...

  14. High temperature and pressure alkaline electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allebrod, Frank; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2013-01-01

    and pressures. Two measurement systems were built to perform measurements under high pressures and at elevated temperatures of up to 95 bar and 250 °C, respectively. The conductivity of aqueous KOH and aqueous KOH immobilized in a porous SrTiO3 structure were investigated at elevated temperatures and high...... the operational temperature and pressure to produce pressurized hydrogen at high rate (m3 H2·h-1·m-2 cell area) and high electrical efficiency. This work describes an exploratory technical study of the possibility to produce hydrogen and oxygen with a new type of alkaline electrolysis cell at high temperatures...... concentrations of the electrolyte using the van der Pauw method in combination with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Conductivity values as high as 2.9 S cm-1 for 45 wt% KOH aqueous KOH and 0.84 S cm-1 for the immobilized KOH of the same concentration were measured at 200 °C. Porous SrTiO3 was used...

  15. Materials for high-temperature fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, San Ping; Lu, Max

    2013-01-01

    There are a large number of books available on fuel cells; however, the majority are on specific types of fuel cells such as solid oxide fuel cells, proton exchange membrane fuel cells, or on specific technical aspects of fuel cells, e.g., the system or stack engineering. Thus, there is a need for a book focused on materials requirements in fuel cells. Key Materials in High-Temperature Fuel Cells is a concise source of the most important and key materials and catalysts in high-temperature fuel cells with emphasis on the most important solid oxide fuel cells. A related book will cover key mater

  16. High Temperature Protonic Conductors by Melt Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    ceramic materials of BaCe1 -xNdxO3-a and Ba3(CaNb2)O9 that exhibit high temperature protonic conductance and superior mechanical properties at elevated...TEM). The mechanical behavior BaCe1 -xNdxO3-a (x=0 to 0.2) and Ba3(CaNb2)O9 ceramics in the elastic, brittle and plastic regime will be studied...spatial variations of compositions in BaCe1 -xNdxO3-a and Ba3(CaNb2)O9 following high temperature wet atmosphere treatment will be measured using a

  17. Transform-Limited X-Ray Pulse Generation from a High Brightness Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission Free-Electron Laser

    CERN Document Server

    McNeil, B W J; Dunning, D J

    2012-01-01

    A method to achieve High-Brightness Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (HB-SASE) in the Free Electron Laser (FEL) is described. The method uses repeated non-equal electron beam delays to de-localise the collective FEL interaction and break the radiation coherence length dependence on the FEL cooperation length. The method requires no external seeding or photon optics and so is applicable at any wavelength or repetition rate. It is demonstrated using linear theory and numerical simulations that the radiation coherence length can be increased by approximately two orders of magnitude over SASE with a corresponding increase in spectral brightness. Examples are shown of HB-SASE generating transform-limited FEL pulses in the soft X-ray and near transform-limited pulses in the hard X-ray. Such pulses may greatly benefit existing applications and may also open up new areas of scientific research.

  18. High-temperature MAS-NMR at high spinning speeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhain, Holger; Holzinger, Julian; Mainka, Adrian; Spörhase, Andreas; Venkatachalam, Sabarinathan; Wixforth, Achim; van Wüllen, Leo

    2016-09-01

    A low cost version to enable high temperature MAS NMR experiments at temperatures of up to 700°C and spinning speeds of up to 10kHz is presented. The method relies on inductive heating using a metal coated rotor insert. The metal coating is accomplished via a two step process involving physical vapor deposition and galvanization.

  19. High Temperature Mechanisms for Venus Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jerri; Narine, Roop; Kumar, Nishant; Singh, Sase; Gorevan, Steven

    Future Venus missions, including New Frontiers Venus In-Situ Explorer and three Flagship Missions - Venus Geophysical Network, Venus Mobile Explorer and Venus Surface Sample Return all focus on searching for evidence of past climate change both on the surface and in the atmospheric composition as well as in the interior dynamics of the planet. In order to achieve these goals and objectives, many key technologies need to be developed for the Venus extreme environment. These key technologies include sample acquisition systems and other high-temperature mechanisms and mobility systems capable of extended operation when directly exposed to the Venus surface or lower atmosphere environment. Honeybee Robotics has developed two types of high temperature motors, the materials and components in both motors were selected based on the requirement to survive temperatures above a minimum of 460° C, at earth atmosphere. The prototype Switched Reluctance Motor (SRM) has been operated non-continuously for over 20 hours at Venus-like conditions (460° C temperature, mostly CO2 gas environment) and it remains functional. A drilling system, actuated by two SRMs was tested in Venus-like conditions, 460° C temperature and mostly CO2 gas environment, for more than 15 hours. The drill successfully completed three tests by drilling into chalk up to 6 inches deep in each test. A first generation Brushless DC (BLDC) Motor and high temperature resolver were also tested and the feasibility of the designs was demonstrated by the extended operation of both devices under Venus-like condition. Further development of the BLDC motor and resolver continues and these devices will, ultimately, be integrated into the development of a high temperature sample acquisition scoop and high temperature joint (awarded SBIR Phase II in October, 2007). Both the SR and BLDC motors will undergo extensive testing at Venus temperature and pressure (TRL6) and are expected to be mission ready before the next New

  20. High temperature reactors for cogeneration applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verfondern, Karl [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). IEK-6; Allelein, Hans-Josef [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). IEK-6; RWTH Aachen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Reaktorsicherheit und -technik (LRST)

    2016-05-15

    There is a large potential for nuclear energy also in the non-electric heat market. Many industrial sectors have a high demand for process heat and steam at various levels of temperature and pressure to be provided for desalination of seawater, district heating, or chemical processes. The future generation of nuclear plants will be capable to enter the wide field of cogeneration of heat and power (CHP), to reduce waste heat and to increase efficiency. This requires an adjustment to multiple needs of the customers in terms of size and application. All Generation-IV concepts proposed are designed for coolant outlet temperatures above 500 C, which allow applications in the low and medium temperature range. A VHTR would even be able to cover the whole temperature range up to approx. 1 000 C.

  1. On-wafer high temperature characterization system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodorescu, L.; ǎghici, F., Dr; Rusu, I.; Brezeanu, G.

    2016-12-01

    In this work a on-wafer high temperature characterization system for wide bandgap semiconductor devices and circuits has been designed, implemented and tested. The proposed system can perform the wafer temperature adjustment in a large domain, from the room temperature up to 3000C with a resolution better than +/-0.50C. In order to obtain both low-noise measurements and low EMI, the heating element of the wafer chuck is supplied in two ways: one is from a DC linear power supply connected to the mains electricity, another one is from a second DC unit powered by batteries. An original temperature control algorithm, different from classical PID, is used to modify the power applied to the chuck.

  2. High-Temperature Shape Memory Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoonessi, Mitra; Weiss, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    physical conformation changes when exposed to an external stimulus, such as a change in temperature. Such materials have a permanent shape, but can be reshaped above a critical temperature and fixed into a temporary shape when cooled under stress to below the critical temperature. When reheated above the critical temperature (Tc, also sometimes called the triggering or switching temperature), the materials revert to the permanent shape. The current innovation involves a chemically treated (sulfonated, carboxylated, phosphonated, or other polar function group), high-temperature, semicrystalline thermoplastic poly(ether ether ketone) (Tg .140 C, Tm = 340 C) mix containing organometallic complexes (Zn++, Li+, or other metal, ammonium, or phosphonium salts), or high-temperature ionic liquids (e.g. hexafluorosilicate salt with 1-propyl-3- methyl imidazolium, Tm = 210 C) to form a network where dipolar or ionic interactions between the polymer and the low-molecular-weight or inorganic compound forms a complex that provides a physical crosslink. Hereafter, these compounds will be referred to as "additives". The polymer is semicrystalline, and the high-melt-point crystals provide a temporary crosslink that acts as a permanent crosslink just so long as the melting temperature is not exceeded. In this example case, the melting point is .340 C, and the shape memory critical temperature is between 150 and 250 C. PEEK is an engineering thermoplastic with a high Young fs modulus, nominally 3.6 GPa. An important aspect of the invention is the control of the PEEK functionalization (in this example, the sulfonation degree), and the thermal properties (i.e. melting point) of the additive, which determines the switching temperature. Because the compound is thermoplastic, it can be formed into the "permanent" shape by conventional plastics processing operations. In addition, the compound may be covalently cross - linked after forming the permanent shape by S-PEEK by applying ionizing

  3. High-Temperature Capacitor Polymer Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Daniel; Zhang, Lili; Chen, Qin; Irwin, Patricia

    2014-12-01

    Film capacitor technology has been under development for over half a century to meet various applications such as direct-current link capacitors for transportation, converters/inverters for power electronics, controls for deep well drilling of oil and gas, direct energy weapons for military use, and high-frequency coupling circuitry. The biaxially oriented polypropylene film capacitor remains the state-of-the-art technology; however, it is not able to meet increasing demand for high-temperature (>125°C) applications. A number of dielectric materials capable of operating at high temperatures (>140°C) have attracted investigation, and their modifications are being pursued to achieve higher volumetric efficiency as well. This paper highlights the status of polymer dielectric film development and its feasibility for capacitor applications. High-temperature polymers such as polyetherimide (PEI), polyimide, and polyetheretherketone were the focus of our studies. PEI film was found to be the preferred choice for high-temperature film capacitor development due to its thermal stability, dielectric properties, and scalability.

  4. High temperature fatigue behaviour of intermetallics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Bhanu Sankara Rao

    2003-06-01

    There would be considerable benefits in developing new structural materials where high use temperatures and strength coupled with low density are minimum capabilities. Nickel and titanium aluminides exhibit considerable potential for near-term application in various branches of modern industry due to the number of property advantages they possess including low density, high melting temperature, high thermal conductivity, and excellent environmental resistance, and their amenability for significant improvment in creep and fatigue resistance through alloying. Reliability of intermetallics when used as engineering materials has not yet been fully established. Ductility and fracture toughness at room and intermediate temperatures continue to be lower than the desired values for production implementation. In this paper, progress made towards improving strain-controlled fatigue resistance of nickel and titanium aluminides is outlined. The effects of manufacturing processes and micro alloying on low cycle fatigue behaviour of NiAl are addressed. The effects of microstructure, temperature of testing, section thickness, brittle to ductile transition temperature, mean stress and environment on fatigue behaviour of same -TiAl alloys are discussed.

  5. High Accuracy, Miniature Pressure Sensor for Very High Temperatures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SiWave proposes to develop a compact, low-cost MEMS-based pressure sensor for very high temperatures and low pressures in hypersonic wind tunnels. Most currently...

  6. High Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleige, Michael

    This thesis presents the development and application of electrochemical half-cell setups to study the catalytic reactions taking place in High Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells (HTPEM-FCs): (i) a pressurized electrochemical cell with integrated magnetically coupled rotating disk electrode...... of dissolved oxygen. A potential step method (hydrodynamic chronocoulometry) is evaluated for simultaneous measurement of diffusivity and solubility of oxygen by means of RDE. Finally, the ORR tests are extended to conc. H3PO4 at more relevant working temperatures and under increased oxygen pressure. Direct...... of platinumphosphoric acid. At room temperature, a relative slow ORR hindering process is active, which requires using a fast method (cyclic voltammetry with high scan rate / hydrodynamic chronocoulometry) to accurately measure the diffusion limited currents, and thus, oxygen diffusivity and solubility. In conc. H3PO4...

  7. Gravimeter using high-temperature superconductor bearing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, J. R.

    1998-09-11

    We have developed a sensitive gravimeter concept that uses an extremely low-friction bearing based on a permanent magnet (PM) levitated over a high-temperature superconductor (HTS). A mass is attached to the PM by means of a cantilevered beam, and the combination of PM and HTS forms a bearing platform that has low resistance to rotational motion but high resistance to horizontal, vertical, or tilting motion. The combination acts as a low-loss torsional pendulum that can be operated in any orientation. Gravity acts on the cantilevered beam and attached mass, accelerating them. Variations in gravity can be detected by time-of-flight acceleration, or by a control coil or electrode that would keep the mass stationary. Calculations suggest that the HTS gravimeter would be as sensitive as present-day superconducting gravimeters that need cooling to liquid helium temperatures, but the HTS gravimeter needs cooling only to liquid nitrogen temperatures.

  8. Nuclear and Quark Matter at High Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Biro, T S; Schram, Z

    2016-01-01

    We review important ideas on nuclear and quark matter description on the basis of high- temperature field theory concepts, like resummation, dimensional reduction, interaction scale separation and spectral function modification in media. Statistical and thermodynamical concepts are spotted in the light of these methods concentrating on the - partially still open - problems of the hadronization process.

  9. Technology of high temperature organic coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makin, R.S.; Vorobei, M.P.; Kuprienko, V.A.; Starkov, V.A.; Tsykanov, V.A.; Checketkin, Y.V. [Research Institute of Atomic Reactors, Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation)

    1993-12-31

    Research has been performed on the problems related to the use of high temperature organic coolants in small and medium nuclear power plants. The work performed and also the experience of operating the ARBUS reactor confirmed the inherent safety features, reliability, and enhanced safety margins of the plants with this type of coolants. The advantages of this system and research highlights are presented.

  10. Enamel for high-temperature superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, H.; Lent, W. E.

    1977-01-01

    Desired optical and high temperature enamel properties are obtained with glasses prepared from the system Li2O-ZrO2-nSiO2. Molar compositions range from n=4 to n=1.3, to which are added minor amounts in varying combinations of alumina, alkali fluorides, boric oxide, alkali oxides, and akaline earth oxides.

  11. Nuclear and quark matter at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biro, Tamas S. [H.A.S. Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Budapest (Hungary); Jakovac, Antal [Roland Eotvos University, Budapest (Hungary); Schram, Zsolt [University of Debrecen, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Debrecen (Hungary)

    2017-03-15

    We review important ideas on nuclear and quark matter description on the basis of high-temperature field theory concepts, like resummation, dimensional reduction, interaction scale separation and spectral function modification in media. Statistical and thermodynamical concepts are spotted in the light of these methods concentrating on the -partially still open- problems of the hadronization process. (orig.)

  12. Analysis of iron oxidation at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slattery, J.C.; Peng, K.Y.; Gadalla, A.M.; Gadalla, N. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1995-10-01

    A new theory for the high-temperature oxidation of iron is proposed, in which the rate-limiting step is ternary diffusion of ferric, ferrous, and oxygen ions in the iron oxides that are formed. The predictions of this theory are compared with previously published experimental data. The only thermodynamic information required is a phase diagram.

  13. Dynamics of Gauge Fields at High Temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, B.J.

    2000-01-01

    An effective description of dynamical Bose fields is provided by the classical (high-temperature) limit of thermal field theory. The main subject of this thesis is to improve the ensuing classical field theory, that is, to include the dominant quantum corrections and to add counter terms for the Ray

  14. Photoemission studies of high-temperature superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margaritondo, G. (Inst. de Physique Appliquee, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (CH))

    1990-11-01

    Photoemission spectroscopy has recently emerged as one of the leading techniques in the study of high-temperature superconductors. Relevant successes include the direct detection of the superconductivity gap, tests for departure from Fermi-liquid behavior, and many interface chemical studies with technological interest. The authors present a review of the fundamental and applied aspects of this technique.

  15. High-temperature carbidization of carboniferous rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldin, B. A.; Grass, V. E.; Nadutkin, A. V.; Nazarova, L. Yu.

    2009-08-01

    Processes of thermal metamorphism of carboniferous rocks have been studied experimentally. The conditions of high-temperature interaction of shungite carbon with components of the contained rocks, leading to formation of carbide compounds, have been determined. The results of this investigation contribute to the works on searching for new raw material for prospective material production.

  16. 10.3 High-temperature Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes high temperature instrumentation development from 1960-1970, 1980-1990 and 2000-present. The contents include: 1) Background; 2) Objective; 3) Application and Sensor; 4) Attachment Techniques; 5) Evaluation/Characterization Testing; and 6) Future testing.

  17. Anharmonic phonons and high-temperature superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespi, V.H.; Cohen, M.L. (Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, and Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States))

    1993-07-01

    We examine a simple model of anharmonic phonons with application to the superconducting isotope effect. Linear and quadratic electron-phonon coupling are considered for various model potentials. The results of the model calculations are compared with the high-temperature superconductors La[sub 2[minus][ital x

  18. High-temperature langasite SAW oxygen sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Peng; Chin, Tao-Lun; Greve, David; Oppenheim, Irving; Malone, Vanessa; Cao, Limin

    2011-08-01

    High-temperature langasite SAW oxygen sensors using sputtered ZnO as a resistive gas-sensing layer were fabricated and tested. Sensitivity to oxygen gas was observed between 500°C to 700°C, with a sensitivity peak at about 625°C, consistent with the theoretical predictions of the acoustoelectric effect.

  19. Dynamics of Gauge Fields at High Temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, B.J.

    2000-01-01

    An effective description of dynamical Bose fields is provided by the classical (high-temperature) limit of thermal field theory. The main subject of this thesis is to improve the ensuing classical field theory, that is, to include the dominant quantum corrections and to add counter terms for the Ray

  20. Solar-driven high temperature radiant cooling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG ZhaoPei; WANG RuZhu; ZHAI XiaoQiang

    2009-01-01

    Solar energy is widely used as one of the most important renewable energy. In addition to the growing applications of solar PV and solar water heater, solar cooling is also considered very valuable and the related researches are developing fast because of the synchronism between solar irradiance and building cooling load. Current studies mainly focus on the high temperature solar collector technique and heat-driven cooling technique, while little concern has been paid to the transport process of cooling power. In this paper, the high temperature radiant cooling is studied as an alternative way for transporting cooling power, and the performance of the combination of radiant ceiling and solar cooling is also studied. From simulation and theoretical analysis results, high temperature radiant cooling terminal shows better cooling power transportation ability against conventional air-conditioning terminal, and its thermal comfort is improved. Experiment results indicate that radiant cooling can enhance the chiller's COP (Coefficient of Performance) by 17% and cooling power regeneration by 50%.According to analysis in this paper, high temperature radiant cooling is proved to be suitable for solar cooling system, and out work can serve as a reference for later system design and promotion.