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Sample records for high brain iron

  1. PLA2G6, encoding a phospholipase A2, is mutated in neurodegenerative disorders with high brain iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Neil V; Westaway, Shawn K; Morton, Jenny E V; Gregory, Allison; Gissen, Paul; Sonek, Scott; Cangul, Hakan; Coryell, Jason; Canham, Natalie; Nardocci, Nardo; Zorzi, Giovanna; Pasha, Shanaz; Rodriguez, Diana; Desguerre, Isabelle; Mubaidin, Amar; Bertini, Enrico; Trembath, Richard C; Simonati, Alessandro; Schanen, Carolyn; Johnson, Colin A; Levinson, Barbara; Woods, C Geoffrey; Wilmot, Beth; Kramer, Patricia; Gitschier, Jane; Maher, Eamonn R; Hayflick, Susan J

    2007-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders with high brain iron include Parkinson disease, Alzheimer disease and several childhood genetic disorders categorized as neuroaxonal dystrophies. We mapped a locus for infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy (INAD) and neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) to chromosome 22q12-q13 and identified mutations in PLA2G6, encoding a calcium-independent group VI phospholipase A2, in NBIA, INAD and the related Karak syndrome. This discovery implicates phospholipases in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders with iron dyshomeostasis. PMID:16783378

  2. Combined Therapy of Iron Chelator and Antioxidant Completely Restores Brain Dysfunction Induced by Iron Toxicity

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    Sripetchwandee, Jirapas; Pipatpiboon, Noppamas; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn

    2014-01-01

    Background Excessive iron accumulation leads to iron toxicity in the brain; however the underlying mechanism is unclear. We investigated the effects of iron overload induced by high iron-diet consumption on brain mitochondrial function, brain synaptic plasticity and learning and memory. Iron chelator (deferiprone) and antioxidant (n-acetyl cysteine) effects on iron-overload brains were also studied. Methodology Male Wistar rats were fed either normal diet or high iron-diet consumption for 12 weeks, after which rats in each diet group were treated with vehicle or deferiprone (50 mg/kg) or n-acetyl cysteine (100 mg/kg) or both for another 4 weeks. High iron-diet consumption caused brain iron accumulation, brain mitochondrial dysfunction, impaired brain synaptic plasticity and cognition, blood-brain-barrier breakdown, and brain apoptosis. Although both iron chelator and antioxidant attenuated these deleterious effects, combined therapy provided more robust results. Conclusion In conclusion, this is the first study demonstrating that combined iron chelator and anti-oxidant therapy completely restored brain function impaired by iron overload. PMID:24400127

  3. Minocycline Attenuates Iron-Induced Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fan; Xi, Guohua; Liu, Wenqaun; Keep, Richard F; Hua, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Iron plays an important role in brain injury after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Our previous study found minocycline reduces iron overload after ICH. The present study examined the effects of minocycline on the subacute brain injury induced by iron. Rats had an intracaudate injection of 50 μl of saline, iron, or iron + minocycline. All the animals were euthanized at day 3. Rat brains were used for immunohistochemistry (n = 5-6 per each group) and Western blotting assay (n = 4). Brain swelling, blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption, and iron-handling proteins were measured. We found that intracerebral injection of iron resulted in brain swelling, BBB disruption, and brain iron-handling protein upregulation (p minocycline with iron significantly reduced iron-induced brain swelling (n = 5, p Minocycline significantly decreased albumin protein levels in the ipsilateral basal ganglia (p minocycline co-injected animals. In conclusion, the present study suggests that minocycline attenuates brain swelling and BBB disruption via an iron-chelation mechanism.

  4. Iron assessment to protect the developing brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieff, Michael K

    2017-12-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) before the age of 3 y can lead to long-term neurological deficits despite prompt diagnosis of ID anemia (IDA) by screening of hemoglobin concentrations followed by iron treatment. Furthermore, pre- or nonanemic ID alters neurobehavioral function and is 3 times more common than IDA in toddlers. Given the global prevalence of ID and the enormous societal cost of developmental disabilities across the life span, better methods are needed to detect the risk of inadequate concentrations of iron for brain development (i.e., brain tissue ID) before dysfunction occurs and to monitor its amelioration after diagnosis and treatment. The current screening and treatment strategy for IDA fails to achieve this goal for 3 reasons. First, anemia is the final state in iron depletion. Thus, the developing brain is already iron deficient when IDA is diagnosed owing to the prioritization of available iron to red blood cells over all other tissues during negative iron balance in development. Second, brain ID, independently of IDA, is responsible for long-term neurological deficits. Thus, starting iron treatment after the onset of IDA is less effective than prevention. Multiple studies in humans and animal models show that post hoc treatment strategies do not reliably prevent ID-induced neurological deficits. Third, most currently used indexes of ID are population statistical cutoffs for either hematologic or iron status but are not bioindicators of brain ID and brain dysfunction in children. Furthermore, their relation to brain iron status is not known. To protect the developing brain, there is a need to generate serum measures that index brain dysfunction in the preanemic stage of ID, assess the ability of standard iron indicators to detect ID-induced brain dysfunction, and evaluate the efficacy of early iron treatment in preventing ID-induced brain dysfunction. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  5. Iron oxides in human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesnek, M.; Miglierini, M.; Lancok, A.

    2015-01-01

    It was confirmed that Moessbauer spectroscopy is an useful tool for measurement of biological tissues even if the concentration of iron in the samples is very low. Moessbauer spectra revealed a presence of particles with non-magnetic behaviour at room temperature. At temperature 4.2 K almost all particles exhibit magnetic behaviour. The rest of the particles still exhibits superparamagnetic behaviour what indicates that their blocking temperature is lower than 4.2 K. It was suggested that those might be very small haemosiderin particles. Parameters the sextet-like components suggest possible presence of goethite, akaganeit or ferrihydrite. Using synchrotron assisted XRD, it was not possible to reveal any iron relevant structural information due to very low concentration of iron atoms in samples. Atomic pairs with the highest contribution to PDF were revealed. All these atomic pairs are characteristic for biological materials. XRD measurement of extracted ferritin could reveal some helpful information about the iron structure. (authors)

  6. A role for sex and a common HFE gene variant in brain iron uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duck, Kari A; Neely, Elizabeth B; Simpson, Ian A; Connor, James R

    2018-03-01

    HFE (high iron) is an essential protein for regulating iron transport into cells. Mutations of the HFE gene result in loss of this regulation causing accumulation of iron within the cell. The mutated protein has been found increasingly in numerous neurodegenerative disorders in which increased levels of iron in the brain are reported. Additionally, evidence that these mutations are associated with elevated brain iron challenges the paradigm that the brain is protected by the blood-brain barrier. While much has been studied regarding the role of HFE in cellular iron uptake, it has remained unclear what role the protein plays in the transport of iron into the brain. We investigated regulation of iron transport into the brain using a mouse model with a mutation in the HFE gene. We demonstrated that the rate of radiolabeled iron ( 59 Fe) uptake was similar between the two genotypes despite higher brain iron concentrations in the mutant. However, there were significant differences in iron uptake between males and females regardless of genotype. These data indicate that brain iron status is consistently maintained and tightly regulated at the level of the blood-brain barrier.

  7. Iron uptake and transport at the blood-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Annette Burkhart; Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Moos, Torben

    The mechanism by which iron is transported across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) remains controversial, and in this study we aimed to further clarify mechanisms by which iron is transported into the brain. We analyzed and compared the mRNA and protein expression of a variety of proteins involved...... in the transport of iron (transferrin receptor, divalent metal transporter I (DMT1), steap 2, steap 3, ceruloplasmin, hephaestin and ferroportin) in both primary rat brain capillary endothelial cells (BCEC) and immortalized rat brain capillary endothelial cell line (RBE4) grown in co-culture with defined polarity....... The mRNA expression of the iron-related molecules was also investigated in isolated brain capillaries from iron deficiency, iron reversible and normal rats. We also performed iron transport studies to analyze the routes by which iron is transported through the brain capillary endothelial cells: i) We...

  8. Expression of iron-related genes in human brain and brain tumors

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    Britton Robert S

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Defective iron homeostasis may be involved in the development of some diseases within the central nervous system. Although the expression of genes involved in normal iron balance has been intensively studied in other tissues, little is known about their expression in the brain. We investigated the mRNA levels of hepcidin (HAMP, HFE, neogenin (NEO1, transferrin receptor 1 (TFRC, transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2, and hemojuvelin (HFE2 in normal human brain, brain tumors, and astrocytoma cell lines. The specimens included 5 normal brain tissue samples, 4 meningiomas, one medulloblastoma, 3 oligodendrocytic gliomas, 2 oligoastrocytic gliomas, 8 astrocytic gliomas, and 3 astrocytoma cell lines. Results Except for hemojuvelin, all genes studied had detectable levels of mRNA. In most tumor types, the pattern of gene expression was diverse. Notable findings include high expression of transferrin receptor 1 in the hippocampus and medulla oblongata compared to other brain regions, low expression of HFE in normal brain with elevated HFE expression in meningiomas, and absence of hepcidin mRNA in astrocytoma cell lines despite expression in normal brain and tumor specimens. Conclusion These results indicate that several iron-related genes are expressed in normal brain, and that their expression may be dysregulated in brain tumors.

  9. Mechanism and developmental changes in iron transport across the blood-brain barrier.

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    Morgan, Evan H; Moos, Torben

    2002-01-01

    Transferrin and iron uptake by the brain were measured using [(59)Fe-(125)I]transferrin injected intravenously in rats aged from 15 days to 22 weeks. The values for both decreased with age. In rats aged 18 and 70 days the uptake was measured at short time intervals after the injection. When expressed as the volume of distribution (Vd), which represents the volume of plasma from which the transferrin and iron were derived, the results for iron were greater than those of transferrin as early as 7 min after injection and the difference increased rapidly with time, especially in the younger animals. A very similar time course was found for uptake by bone marrow (femurs) where iron uptake involves receptor-mediated endocytosis of Fe-transferrin, release of iron in the cell and recycling of apo-transferrin to the blood. It is concluded that, during transport of transferrin-bound plasma iron into the brain, a similar process occurs in brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) and that transcytosis of transferrin into the brain interstitium is only a minor pathway. Also, the high rate of iron transport into the brain in young animals, when iron requirements are high due to rapid growth of the brain, is a consequence of the level of expression and rate of recycling of transferrin receptors on BCECs. As the animal and brain mature both decrease. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  10. Determinants of iron accumulation in the normal aging brain.

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    Pirpamer, Lukas; Hofer, Edith; Gesierich, Benno; De Guio, François; Freudenberger, Paul; Seiler, Stephan; Duering, Marco; Jouvent, Eric; Duchesnay, Edouard; Dichgans, Martin; Ropele, Stefan; Schmidt, Reinhold

    2016-07-01

    In a recent postmortem study, R2* relaxometry in gray matter (GM) of the brain has been validated as a noninvasive measure for iron content in brain tissue. Iron accumulation in the normal aging brain is a common finding and relates to brain maturation and degeneration. The goal of this study was to assess the determinants of iron accumulation during brain aging. The study cohort consisted of 314 healthy community-dwelling participants of the Austrian Stroke Prevention Study. Their age ranged from 38-82 years. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging was performed on 3T and included R2* mapping, based on a 3D multi-echo gradient echo sequence. The median of R2* values was measured in all GM regions, which were segmented automatically using FreeSurfer. We investigated 25 possible determinants for cerebral iron deposition. These included demographics, brain volume, lifestyle factors, cerebrovascular risk factors, serum levels of iron, and single nucleotide polymorphisms related to iron regulating genes (rs1800562, rs3811647, rs1799945, and rs1049296). The body mass index (BMI) was significantly related to R2* in 15/32 analyzed brain regions with the strongest correlations found in the amygdala (p = 0.0091), medial temporal lobe (p = 0.0002), and hippocampus (p ≤ 0.0001). Further associations to R2* values were found in deep GM for age and smoking. No significant associations were found for gender, GM volume, serum levels of iron, or iron-associated genetic polymorphisms. In conclusion, besides age, the BMI and smoking are the only significant determinants of brain iron accumulation in normally aging subjects. Smoking relates to iron deposition in the basal ganglia, whereas higher BMI is associated with iron content in the neocortex following an Alzheimer-like distribution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Effects of Dietary Fat and Iron Interaction on Brain Regional Iron Contents and Stereotypical Behaviors in Male C57BL/6J Mice

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    Lumei Liu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Adequate brain iron levels are essential for enzyme activities, myelination, and neurotransmitter synthesis in the brain. Although systemic iron deficiency has been found in genetically or dietary-induced obese subjects, the effects of obesity-associated iron dysregulation in brain regions have not been examined. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of dietary fat and iron interaction on brain regional iron contents and regional-associated behavior patterns in a mouse model. Thirty C57BL/6J male weanling mice were randomly assigned to six dietary treatment groups (n=5 with varying fat (control/high and iron (control/high/low contents. The stereotypical behaviors were measured during the 24th week. Blood, liver, and brain tissues were collected at the end of the 24th week. Brains were dissected into the hippocampus, midbrain, striatum, and thalamus regions. Iron contents and ferritin-H (FtH protein and mRNA expressions in these regions were measured. Correlations between stereotypical behaviors and brain regional iron contents were analyzed at the 5% significance level. Results showed that high-fat diet altered the stereotypical behaviors such as inactivity and total distance traveled (P<0.05. The high-fat diet altered brain iron contents and ferritin-H (FtH protein and mRNA expressions in a regional-specific manner: 1 high-fat diet significantly decreased the brain iron content in the striatum (P<0.05, but not other regions; and 2 thalamus has a more distinct change in FtH mRNA expression compared to other regions. Furthermore, high-fat diet resulted in a significant decreased total distance traveled and a significant correlation between iron content and sleeping in midbrain (P<0.05. Dietary iron also decreased brain iron content and FtH protein expression in a regionally specific manner. The effect of interaction between dietary fat and iron was observed in brain iron content and behaviors. All these findings will lay

  12. Impairment of Interrelated Iron- and Copper Homeostatic Mechanisms in Brain Contributes to the Pathogenesis of Neurodegenerative Disorders

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    Skjørringe, Tina; Møller, Lisbeth Birk; Moos, Torben

    2012-01-01

    Iron and copper are important co-factors for a number of enzymes in the brain, including enzymes involved in neurotransmitter synthesis and myelin formation. Both shortage and an excess of iron or copper will affect the brain. The transport of iron and copper into the brain from the circulation is strictly regulated, and concordantly protective barriers, i.e., the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier (BCB) have evolved to separate the brain environment from the circulation. The uptake mechanisms of the two metals interact. Both iron deficiency and overload lead to altered copper homeostasis in the brain. Similarly, changes in dietary copper affect the brain iron homeostasis. Moreover, the uptake routes of iron and copper overlap each other which affect the interplay between the concentrations of the two metals in the brain. The divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) is involved in the uptake of both iron and copper. Furthermore, copper is an essential co-factor in numerous proteins that are vital for iron homeostasis and affects the binding of iron-response proteins to iron-response elements in the mRNA of the transferrin receptor, DMT1, and ferroportin, all highly involved in iron transport. Iron and copper are mainly taken up at the BBB, but the BCB also plays a vital role in the homeostasis of the two metals, in terms of sequestering, uptake, and efflux of iron and copper from the brain. Inside the brain, iron and copper are taken up by neurons and glia cells that express various transporters. PMID:23055972

  13. Visualizing Iron Deposition in Multiple Sclerosis Cadaver Brains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, Charbel A.; Zheng Weili; Mark Haacke, E.; Webb, Sam; Nichol, Helen

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To visualize and validate iron deposition in two cases of multiple sclerosis using rapid scanning X-Ray Fluorescence (RS-XRF) and Susceptibility Weighted Imaging (SWI). Material and Methods: Two (2) coronal cadaver brain slices from patients clinically diagnosed with multiple sclerosis underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), specifically SWI to image iron content. To confirm the presence of iron deposits and the absence of zinc-rich myelin in lesions, iron and zinc were mapped using RS-XRF. Results: MS lesions were visualized using FLAIR and correlated with the absence of zinc by XRF. XRF and SWI showed that in the first MS case, there were large iron deposits proximal to the draining vein of the caudate nucleus as well as iron deposits associated with blood vessels throughout the globus pallidus. Less iron was seen in association with lesions than in the basal ganglia. The presence of larger amounts of iron correlated reasonably well between RS-XRF and SWI. In the second case, the basal ganglia appeared normal and acute perivascular iron deposition was absent. Conclusion: Perivascular iron deposition is seen in some but not all MS cases, giving credence to the use of SWI to assess iron involvement in MS pathology in vivo.

  14. The role of p97 in iron metabolism in human brain glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Chunlin; Chen Guiwen; Qian Zhongming

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of p97 (melanotransferrin) in iron uptake in human brain glioma cells . Methods: Human brain glioma cell lines, GBM and BT325 were incubated in the medium containing 59 Fe-Citrate. The cells were treated with phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C (PI-PLC) and pronase. The iron uptake of the cells was expressed as relative iron uptake level according to the cpm measured by the gamma scintillation counter. Results: 59 Fe uptake of the cells was significantly declined with the certain concentration of PI-PCL. 59 Fe uptake of the cells treated with pronase tended to coincide with that of the cells treated without pronase in the increasing concentration of PI-PLC. Conclusion: p97 expresses a high level and plays an important role in iron uptake in human brain glioma cells

  15. Excessive early-life dietary exposure: a potential source of elevated brain iron and a risk factor for Parkinson's disease.

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    Hare, Dominic J; Cardoso, Bárbara Rita; Raven, Erika P; Double, Kay L; Finkelstein, David I; Szymlek-Gay, Ewa A; Biggs, Beverley-Ann

    2017-01-01

    Iron accumulates gradually in the ageing brain. In Parkinson's disease, iron deposition within the substantia nigra is further increased, contributing to a heightened pro-oxidant environment in dopaminergic neurons. We hypothesise that individuals in high-income countries, where cereals and infant formulae have historically been fortified with iron, experience increased early-life iron exposure that predisposes them to age-related iron accumulation in the brain. Combined with genetic factors that limit iron regulatory capacity and/or dopamine metabolism, this may increase the risk of Parkinson's diseases. We propose to (a) validate a retrospective biomarker of iron exposure in children; (b) translate this biomarker to adults; (c) integrate it with in vivo brain iron in Parkinson's disease; and (d) longitudinally examine the relationships between early-life iron exposure and metabolism, brain iron deposition and Parkinson's disease risk. This approach will provide empirical evidence to support therapeutically addressing brain iron deposition in Parkinson's diseases and produce a potential biomarker of Parkinson's disease risk in preclinical individuals.

  16. Increased brain iron deposition is a risk factor for brain atrophy in patients with haemodialysis: a combined study of quantitative susceptibility mapping and whole brain volume analysis.

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    Chai, Chao; Zhang, Mengjie; Long, Miaomiao; Chu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Tong; Wang, Lijun; Guo, Yu; Yan, Shuo; Haacke, E Mark; Shen, Wen; Xia, Shuang

    2015-08-01

    To explore the correlation between increased brain iron deposition and brain atrophy in patients with haemodialysis and their correlation with clinical biomarkers and neuropsychological test. Forty two patients with haemodialysis and forty one age- and gender-matched healthy controls were recruited in this prospective study. 3D whole brain high resolution T1WI and susceptibility weighted imaging were scanned on a 3 T MRI system. The brain volume was analyzed using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) in patients and to compare with that of healthy controls. Quantitative susceptibility mapping was used to measure and compare the susceptibility of different structures between patients and healthy controls. Correlation analysis was used to investigate the relationship between the brain volume, iron deposition and neuropsychological scores. Stepwise multiple regression analysis was used to explore the effect of clinical biomarkers on the brain volumes in patients. Compared with healthy controls, patients with haemodialysis showed decreased volume of bilateral putamen and left insular lobe (All P brain iron deposition is negatively correlated with the decreased volume of bilateral putamen (P brain iron deposition and dialysis duration was risk factors for brain atrophy in patients with haemodialysis. The decreased gray matter volume of the left insular lobe was correlated with neurocognitive impairment.

  17. Dystonia in neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation : outcome of bilateral pallidal stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermann, L.; Pauls, K. A. M.; Wieland, K.; Jech, R.; Kurlemann, G.; Sharma, N.; Gill, S. S.; Haenggeli, C. A.; Hayflick, S. J.; Hogarth, P.; Leenders, K. L.; Limousin, P.; Malanga, C. J.; Moro, E.; Ostrem, J. L.; Revilla, F. J.; Santens, P.; Schnitzler, A.; Tisch, S.; Valldeoriola, F.; Vesper, J.; Volkmann, J.; Woitalla, D.; Peker, S.

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation encompasses a heterogeneous group of rare neurodegenerative disorders that are characterized by iron accumulation in the brain. Severe generalized dystonia is frequently a prominent symptom and can be very disabling, causing gait impairment, difficulty

  18. Divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) in the brain: implications for a role in iron transport at the blood-brain barrier, and neuronal and glial pathology.

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    Skjørringe, Tina; Burkhart, Annette; Johnsen, Kasper Bendix; Moos, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Iron is required in a variety of essential processes in the body. In this review, we focus on iron transport in the brain and the role of the divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) vital for iron uptake in most cells. DMT1 locates to cellular membranes and endosomal membranes, where it is a key player in non-transferrin bound iron uptake and transferrin-bound iron uptake, respectively. Four isoforms of DMT1 exist, and their respective characteristics involve a complex cell-specific regulatory machinery all controlling iron transport across these membranes. This complexity reflects the fine balance required in iron homeostasis, as this metal is indispensable in many cell functions but highly toxic when appearing in excess. DMT1 expression in the brain is prominent in neurons. Of serious dispute is the expression of DMT1 in non-neuronal cells. Recent studies imply that DMT1 does exist in endosomes of brain capillary endothelial cells denoting the blood-brain barrier. This supports existing evidence that iron uptake at the BBB occurs by means of transferrin-receptor mediated endocytosis followed by detachment of iron from transferrin inside the acidic compartment of the endosome and DMT1-mediated pumping iron into the cytosol. The subsequent iron transport across the abluminal membrane into the brain likely occurs by ferroportin. The virtual absent expression of transferrin receptors and DMT1 in glial cells, i.e., astrocytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes, suggest that the steady state uptake of iron in glia is much lower than in neurons and/or other mechanisms for iron uptake in these cell types prevail.

  19. Interactions of iron, dopamine and neuromelanin pathways in brain aging and Parkinson's disease.

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    Zucca, Fabio A; Segura-Aguilar, Juan; Ferrari, Emanuele; Muñoz, Patricia; Paris, Irmgard; Sulzer, David; Sarna, Tadeusz; Casella, Luigi; Zecca, Luigi

    2017-08-01

    There are several interrelated mechanisms involving iron, dopamine, and neuromelanin in neurons. Neuromelanin accumulates during aging and is the catecholamine-derived pigment of the dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra and norepinephrine neurons of the locus coeruleus, the two neuronal populations most targeted in Parkinson's disease. Many cellular redox reactions rely on iron, however an altered distribution of reactive iron is cytotoxic. In fact, increased levels of iron in the brain of Parkinson's disease patients are present. Dopamine accumulation can induce neuronal death; however, excess dopamine can be removed by converting it into a stable compound like neuromelanin, and this process rescues the cell. Interestingly, the main iron compound in dopamine and norepinephrine neurons is the neuromelanin-iron complex, since neuromelanin is an effective metal chelator. Neuromelanin serves to trap iron and provide neuronal protection from oxidative stress. This equilibrium between iron, dopamine, and neuromelanin is crucial for cell homeostasis and in some cellular circumstances can be disrupted. Indeed, when neuromelanin-containing organelles accumulate high load of toxins and iron during aging a neurodegenerative process can be triggered. In addition, neuromelanin released by degenerating neurons activates microglia and the latter cause neurons death with further release of neuromelanin, then starting a self-propelling mechanism of neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Considering the above issues, age-related accumulation of neuromelanin in dopamine neurons shows an interesting link between aging and neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Regulatory mechanisms for iron transport across the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duck, Kari A; Simpson, Ian A; Connor, James R

    2017-12-09

    Many critical metabolic functions in the brain require adequate and timely delivery of iron. However, most studies when considering brain iron uptake have ignored the iron requirements of the endothelial cells that form the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Moreover, current models of BBB iron transport do not address regional regulation of brain iron uptake or how neurons, when adapting to metabolic demands, can acquire more iron. In this study, we demonstrate that both iron-poor transferrin (apo-Tf) and the iron chelator, deferoxamine, stimulate release of iron from iron-loaded endothelial cells in an in vitro BBB model. The role of the endosomal divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) in BBB iron acquisition and transport has been questioned. Here, we show that inhibition of DMT1 alters the transport of iron and Tf across the endothelial cells. These data support an endosome-mediated model of Tf-bound iron uptake into the brain and identifies mechanisms for local regional regulation of brain iron uptake. Moreover, our data provide an explanation for the disparity in the ratio of Tf to iron transport into the brain that has confounded the field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. HFE gene variants affect iron in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandar, Wint; Connor, James R

    2011-04-01

    Iron accumulation in the brain and increased oxidative stress are consistent observations in many neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, we have begun examination into gene mutations or allelic variants that could be associated with loss of iron homeostasis. One of the mechanisms leading to iron overload is a mutation in the HFE gene, which is involved in iron metabolism. The 2 most common HFE gene variants are C282Y (1.9%) and H63D (8.9%). The C282Y HFE variant is more commonly associated with hereditary hemochromatosis, which is an autosomal recessive disorder, characterized by iron overload in a number of systemic organs. The H63D HFE variant appears less frequently associated with hemochromatosis, but its role in the neurodegenerative diseases has received more attention. At the cellular level, the HFE mutant protein resulting from the H63D HFE gene variant is associated with iron dyshomeostasis, increased oxidative stress, glutamate release, tau phosphorylation, and alteration in inflammatory response, each of which is under investigation as a contributing factor to neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, the HFE gene variants are proposed to be genetic modifiers or a risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases by establishing an enabling milieu for pathogenic agents. This review will discuss the current knowledge of the association of the HFE gene variants with neurodegenerative diseases: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and ischemic stroke. Importantly, the data herein also begin to dispel the long-held view that the brain is protected from iron accumulation associated with the HFE mutations.

  2. Decreased serum hepcidin concentration correlates with brain iron deposition in patients with HBV-related cirrhosis.

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    Dong Lin

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Excessive brain iron accumulation contributes to cognitive impairments in hepatitis B virus (HBV-related cirrhotic patients. The underlying mechanism remains unclear. Hepcidin, a liver-produced, 25-aminoacid peptide, is the major regulator of systemic iron metabolism. Abnormal hepcidin level is a key factor in some body iron accumulation or deficiency disorders, especially in those associated with liver diseases. Our study was aimed to explore the relationship between brain iron content in patients with HBV-related cirrhosis and serum hepcidin level. METHODS: Seventy HBV-related cirrhotic patients and forty age- sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled. Brain iron content was quantified by susceptibility weighted phase imaging technique. Serum hepcidin as well as serum iron, serum transferrin, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, total iron binding capacity, and transferrin saturation were tested in thirty cirrhotic patients and nineteen healthy controls. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to investigate correlation between brain iron concentrations and serum hepcidin, or other iron parameters. RESULTS: Cirrhotic patients had increased brain iron accumulation compared to controls in the left red nuclear, the bilateral substantia nigra, the bilateral thalamus, the right caudate, and the right putamen. Cirrhotic patients had significantly decreased serum hepcidin concentration, as well as lower serum transferring level, lower total iron binding capacity and higher transferrin saturation, compared to controls. Serum hepcidin level negatively correlated with the iron content in the right caudate, while serum ferritin level positively correlated with the iron content in the bilateral putamen in cirrhotic patients. CONCLUSIONS: Decreased serum hepcidin level correlated with excessive iron accumulation in the basal ganglia in HBV-related cirrhotic patients. Our results indicated that systemic iron overload underlined regional

  3. High temperature mechanical properties of iron aluminides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, D. G.; Munoz-Morris, M. A.

    2001-01-01

    Considerable attention has been given to the iron aluminide family of intermetallics over the past years since they offer considerable potential as engineering materials for intermediate to high temperature applications, particularly in cases where extreme oxidation or corrosion resistance is required. Despite efforts at alloy development, however, high temperature strength remains low and creep resistance poor. Reasons for the poor high-temperature strength of iron aluminides will be discussed, based on the ordered crystal structure, the dislocation structure found in the materials, and the mechanisms of dislocation pinning operating. Alternative ways of improving high temperature strength by microstructural modification and the inclusion of second phase particles will also be considered. (Author)

  4. Iron-related gene variants and brain iron in multiple sclerosis and healthy individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper Hagemeier

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain iron homeostasis is known to be disturbed in multiple sclerosis (MS, yet little is known about the association of common gene variants linked to iron regulation and pathological tissue changes in the brain. In this study, we investigated the association of genetic determinants linked to iron regulation with deep gray matter (GM magnetic susceptibility in both healthy controls (HC and MS patients. Four hundred (400 patients with MS and 150 age- and sex-matched HCs were enrolled and obtained 3 T MRI examination. Three (3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with iron regulation were genotyped: two SNPs in the human hereditary hemochromatosis protein gene HFE: rs1800562 (C282Y mutation and rs1799945 (H63D mutation, as well as the rs1049296 SNP in the transferrin gene (C2 mutation. The effects of disease and genetic status were studied using quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM voxel-based analysis (VBA and region-of-interest (ROI analysis of the deep GM. The general linear model framework was used to compare groups. Analyses were corrected for age and sex, and adjusted for false discovery rate. We found moderate increases in susceptibility in the right putamen of participants with the C282Y (+6.1 ppb and H63D (+6.9 ppb gene variants vs. non-carriers, as well as a decrease in thalamic susceptibility of progressive MS patients with the C282Y mutation (left: −5.3 ppb, right: −6.7 ppb, p < 0.05. Female MS patients had lower susceptibility in the caudate (−6.0 ppb and putamen (left: −3.9 ppb, right: −4.6 ppb than men, but only when they had a wild-type allele (p < 0.05. Iron-gene linked increases in putamen susceptibility (in HC and relapsing remitting MS and decreases in thalamus susceptibility (in progressive MS, coupled with apparent sex interactions, indicate that brain iron in healthy and disease states may be influenced by genetic factors.

  5. Brain Iron Homeostasis: From Molecular Mechanisms To Clinical Significance and Therapeutic Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Swati; Tripathi, Ajai K.; Horback, Katharine; Wong, Joseph; Sharma, Deepak; Beserra, Amber; Suda, Srinivas; Anbalagan, Charumathi; Dev, Som; Mukhopadhyay, Chinmay K.; Singh, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Iron has emerged as a significant cause of neurotoxicity in several neurodegenerative conditions, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), and others. In some cases, the underlying cause of iron mis-metabolism is known, while in others, our understanding is, at best, incomplete. Recent evidence implicating key proteins involved in the pathogenesis of AD, PD, and sCJD in cellular iron metabolism suggests that imbalance of brain iron homeostasis associated with these disorders is a direct consequence of disease pathogenesis. A complete understanding of the molecular events leading to this phenotype is lacking partly because of the complex regulation of iron homeostasis within the brain. Since systemic organs and the brain share several iron regulatory mechanisms and iron-modulating proteins, dysfunction of a specific pathway or selective absence of iron-modulating protein(s) in systemic organs has provided important insights into the maintenance of iron homeostasis within the brain. Here, we review recent information on the regulation of iron uptake and utilization in systemic organs and within the complex environment of the brain, with particular emphasis on the underlying mechanisms leading to brain iron mis-metabolism in specific neurodegenerative conditions. Mouse models that have been instrumental in understanding systemic and brain disorders associated with iron mis-metabolism are also described, followed by current therapeutic strategies which are aimed at restoring brain iron homeostasis in different neurodegenerative conditions. We conclude by highlighting important gaps in our understanding of brain iron metabolism and mis-metabolism, particularly in the context of neurodegenerative disorders. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1324–1363. PMID:23815406

  6. Dietary Iron Repletion following Early-Life Dietary Iron Deficiency Does Not Correct Regional Volumetric or Diffusion Tensor Changes in the Developing Pig Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin T. Mudd

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIron deficiency is the most common micronutrient deficiency worldwide and children are at an increased risk due to the rapid growth occurring during early life. The developing brain is highly dynamic, requires iron for proper function, and is thus vulnerable to inadequate iron supplies. Iron deficiency early in life results in altered myelination, neurotransmitter synthesis, neuron morphology, and later-life cognitive function. However, it remains unclear if dietary iron repletion after a period of iron deficiency can recover structural deficits in the brain.MethodTwenty-eight male pigs were provided either a control diet (CONT; n = 14; 23.5 mg Fe/L milk replacer or an iron-deficient diet (ID; n = 14; 1.56 mg Fe/L milk replacer for phase 1 of the study, from postnatal day (PND 2 until 32. Twenty pigs (n = 10/diet from phase 1 were used in phase 2 of the study from PND 33 to 61, all pigs were provided a common iron sufficient diet, regardless of their early-life dietary iron status. All pigs remaining in the study were subjected to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI at PND 32 and again at PND 61 using structural imaging sequences and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI to assess volumetric and microstructural brain development, respectively. Data were analyzed using a two-way ANOVA to assess the main and interactive effects of early-life iron status and time.ResultsAn interactive effect was observed for absolute whole brain volumes, in which whole brain volumes of ID pigs were smaller at PND 32 but were not different than CONT pigs at PND 61. Analysis of brain region volumes relative to total brain volume indicated interactive effects (i.e., diet × day in the cerebellum, olfactory bulb, and putamen-globus pallidus. Main effects of early-life iron status, regardless of imaging time point, were noted for decreased relative volumes of the left hippocampus, right hippocampus, thalamus, and increased relative white matter volume

  7. Iron chalcogenide superconductors at high magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Hechang; Wang, Kefeng; Hu, Rongwei; Ryu, Hyejin; Abeykoon, Milinda; Bozin, Emil S; Petrovic, Cedomir

    2012-01-01

    Iron chalcogenide superconductors have become one of the most investigated superconducting materials in recent years due to high upper critical fields, competing interactions and complex electronic and magnetic phase diagrams. The structural complexity, defects and atomic site occupancies significantly affect the normal and superconducting states in these compounds. In this work we review the vortex behavior, critical current density and high magnetic field pair-breaking mechanism in iron chalcogenide superconductors. We also point to relevant structural features and normal-state properties. PMID:27877518

  8. High rate flame synthesis of highly crystalline iron oxide nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchan-Merchan, W; Taylor, A M; Saveliev, A V

    2008-01-01

    Single-step flame synthesis of iron oxide nanorods is performed using iron probes inserted into an opposed-flow methane oxy-flame. The high temperature reacting environment of the flame tends to convert elemental iron into a high density layer of iron oxide nanorods. The diameters of the iron oxide nanorods vary from 10 to 100 nm with a typical length of a few microns. The structural characterization performed shows that nanorods possess a highly ordered crystalline structure with parameters corresponding to cubic magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) with the [100] direction oriented along the nanorod axis. Structural variations of straight nanorods such as bends, and T-branched and Y-branched shapes are frequently observed within the nanomaterials formed, opening pathways for synthesis of multidimensional, interconnected networks

  9. Acute iron overload and oxidative stress in brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piloni, Natacha E.; Fermandez, Virginia; Videla, Luis A.; Puntarulo, Susana

    2013-01-01

    An in vivo model in rat was developed by intraperitoneally administration of Fe-dextran to study oxidative stress triggered by Fe-overload in rat brain. Total Fe levels, as well as the labile iron pool (LIP) concentration, in brain from rats subjected to Fe-overload were markedly increased over control values, 6 h after Fe administration. In this in vivo Fe overload model, the ascorbyl (A·)/ascorbate (AH − ) ratio, taken as oxidative stress index, was assessed. The A·/AH − ratio in brain was significantly higher in Fe-dextran group, in relation to values in control rats. Brain lipid peroxidation indexes, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) generation rate and lipid radical (LR·) content detected by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR), in Fe-dextran supplemented rats were similar to control values. However, values of nuclear factor-kappaB deoxyribonucleic acid (NFκB DNA) binding activity were significantly increased (30%) after 8 h of Fe administration, and catalase (CAT) activity was significantly enhanced (62%) 21 h after Fe administration. Significant enhancements in Fe content in cortex (2.4 fold), hippocampus (1.6 fold) and striatum (2.9 fold), were found at 6 h after Fe administration. CAT activity was significantly increased after 8 h of Fe administration in cortex, hippocampus and striatum (1.4 fold, 86, and 47%, respectively). Fe response in the whole brain seems to lead to enhanced NF-κB DNA binding activity, which may contribute to limit oxygen reactive species-dependent damage by effects on the antioxidant enzyme CAT activity. Moreover, data shown here clearly indicate that even though Fe increased in several isolated brain areas, this parameter was more drastically enhanced in striatum than in cortex and hippocampus. However, comparison among the net increase in LR· generation rate, in different brain areas, showed enhancements in cortex lipid peroxidation, without changes in striatum and hippocampus LR· generation rate after 6

  10. R2* mapping for brain iron: associations with cognition in normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadery, Christine; Pirpamer, Lukas; Hofer, Edith; Langkammer, Christian; Petrovic, Katja; Loitfelder, Marisa; Schwingenschuh, Petra; Seiler, Stephan; Duering, Marco; Jouvent, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Fazekas, Franz; Mangin, Jean-Francois; Chabriat, Hugues; Dichgans, Martin; Ropele, Stefan; Schmidt, Reinhold

    2015-02-01

    Brain iron accumulates during aging and has been associated with neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease. Magnetic resonance (MR)-based R2* mapping enables the in vivo detection of iron content in brain tissue. We investigated if during normal brain aging iron load relates to cognitive impairment in region-specific patterns in a community-dwelling cohort of 336 healthy, middle aged, and older adults from the Austrian Stroke Prevention Family Study. MR imaging and R2* mapping in the basal ganglia and neocortex were done at 3T. Comprehensive neuropsychological testing assessed memory, executive function, and psychomotor speed. We found the highest iron concentration in the globus pallidus, and pallidal and putaminal iron was significantly and inversely associated with cognitive performance in all cognitive domains, except memory. These associations were iron load dependent. Vascular brain lesions and brain volume did not mediate the relationship between iron and cognitive performance. We conclude that higher R2*-determined iron in the basal ganglia correlates with cognitive impairment during brain aging independent of concomitant brain abnormalities. The prognostic significance of this finding needs to be determined. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A comparison of rapid-scanning X-ray fluorescence mapping and magnetic resonance imaging to localize brain iron distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCrea, Richard P.E.; Harder, Sheri L.; Martin, Melanie; Buist, Richard; Nichol, Helen

    2008-01-01

    The clinical diagnosis of many neurodegenerative disorders relies primarily or exclusively on observed behaviors rather than measurable physical tests. One of the hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD) is the presence of amyloid-containing plaques associated with deposits of iron, copper and/or zinc. Work in other laboratories has shown that iron-rich plaques can be seen in the mouse brain in vivo with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a high-field strength magnet but this iron cannot be visualized in humans using clinical magnets. To improve the interpretation of MRI, we correlated iron accumulation visualized by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, an element-specific technique with T1, T2, and susceptibility weighted MR (SWI) in a mouse model of AD. We show that SWI best shows areas of increased iron accumulation when compared to standard sequences

  12. Transferrin Receptor 2 Dependent Alterations of Brain Iron Metabolism Affect Anxiety Circuits in the Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Rosa Maria; Boda, Enrica; Montarolo, Francesca; Boero, Martina; Mezzanotte, Mariarosa; Saglio, Giuseppe; Buffo, Annalisa; Roetto, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    The Transferrin Receptor 2 (Tfr2) modulates systemic iron metabolism through the regulation of iron regulator Hepcidin (Hepc) and Tfr2 inactivation causes systemic iron overload. Based on data demonstrating Tfr2 expression in brain, we analysed Tfr2-KO mice in order to examine the molecular, histological and behavioural consequences of Tfr2 silencing in this tissue. Tfr2 abrogation caused an accumulation of iron in specific districts in the nervous tissue that was not accompanied by a brain Hepc response. Moreover, Tfr2-KO mice presented a selective overactivation of neurons in the limbic circuit and the emergence of an anxious-like behaviour. Furthermore, microglial cells showed a particular sensitivity to iron perturbation. We conclude that Tfr2 is a key regulator of brain iron homeostasis and propose a role for Tfr2 alpha in the regulation of anxiety circuits. PMID:27477597

  13. Blood to brain iron uptake in one Rhesus monkey using [Fe-52]-citrate and positron emission tomography (PET): influence of haloperidol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leenders, K L [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland); [Neurology Dept., Univ. Hospital, Zuerich (Switzerland); Antonini, A; Schwarzbach, R; Smith-Jones, P; Reist, H [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland); Youdim, M [Pharmacology Dept., Technion, Haifa (Israel); Henn, V [Neurology Dept., Univ. Hospital, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    1994-12-31

    Iron is highly concentrated in the basal ganglia of the brain. The involvement of cerebral iron and its handling systems in neurodegenerative brain diseases like Parkinson`s disease and tardive dyskinesia is currently under close investigation. There is evidence from animal studies that neuroleptics can increase iron uptake into brain. This effect appeared to be due to alteration of blood-brain barrier transport by the neuroleptics, particularly chlorpromazine and haloperidol, but not clozapine. We have investigated one Rhesus monkey using positron emission tomography (PET) and [Fe-52]-citrate before and during haloperidol administration. After drug withdrawal during a period of 1.5 year the investigation procedure was repeated. The results show that in the investigated monkey haloperidol induces a reversible marked increase of iron transport across the blood brain barrier concomitant with a large increase in elimination rate of the tracer from the blood. (author).

  14. Blood to brain iron uptake in one Rhesus monkey using [Fe-52]-citrate and positron emission tomography (PET): influence of haloperidol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leenders, K.L.; Antonini, A.; Schwarzbach, R.; Smith-Jones, P.; Reist, H.; Youdim, M.; Henn, V.

    1994-01-01

    Iron is highly concentrated in the basal ganglia of the brain. The involvement of cerebral iron and its handling systems in neurodegenerative brain diseases like Parkinson's disease and tardive dyskinesia is currently under close investigation. There is evidence from animal studies that neuroleptics can increase iron uptake into brain. This effect appeared to be due to alteration of blood-brain barrier transport by the neuroleptics, particularly chlorpromazine and haloperidol, but not clozapine. We have investigated one Rhesus monkey using positron emission tomography (PET) and [Fe-52]-citrate before and during haloperidol administration. After drug withdrawal during a period of 1.5 year the investigation procedure was repeated. The results show that in the investigated monkey haloperidol induces a reversible marked increase of iron transport across the blood brain barrier concomitant with a large increase in elimination rate of the tracer from the blood. (author)

  15. Minocycline attenuates brain injury and iron overload after intracerebral hemorrhage in aged female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Shuhui; Hua, Ya; Keep, Richard F; Novakovic, Nemanja; Fei, Zhou; Xi, Guohua

    2018-06-05

    Brain iron overload is involved in brain injury after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). There is evidence that systemic administration of minocycline reduces brain iron level and improves neurological outcome in experimental models of hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke. However, there is evidence in cerebral ischemia that minocycline is not protective in aged female animals. Since most ICH research has used male models, this study was designed to provide an overall view of ICH-induced iron deposits at different time points (1 to 28 days) in aged (18-month old) female Fischer 344 rat ICH model and to investigate the neuroprotective effects of minocycline in those rats. According to our previous studies, we used the following dosing regimen (20 mg/kg, i.p. at 2 and 12 h after ICH onset followed by 10 mg/kg, i.p., twice a day up to 7 days). T2-, T2 ⁎ -weighted and T2 ⁎ array MRI was performed at 1, 3, 7 and 28 days to measure brain iron content, ventricle volume, lesion volume and brain swelling. Immunohistochemistry was used to examine changes in iron handling proteins, neuronal loss and microglial activation. Behavioral testing was used to assess neurological deficits. In aged female rats, ICH induced long-term perihematomal iron overload with upregulated iron handling proteins, neuroinflammation, brain atrophy, neuronal loss and neurological deficits. Minocycline significantly reduced ICH-induced perihematomal iron overload and iron handling proteins. It further reduced brain swelling, neuroinflammation, neuronal loss, delayed brain atrophy and neurological deficits. These effects may be linked to the role of minocycline as an iron chelator as well as an inhibitor of neuroinflammation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Gene co-expression networks shed light into diseases of brain iron accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettencourt, Conceição; Forabosco, Paola; Wiethoff, Sarah; Heidari, Moones; Johnstone, Daniel M; Botía, Juan A; Collingwood, Joanna F; Hardy, John; Milward, Elizabeth A; Ryten, Mina; Houlden, Henry

    2016-03-01

    Aberrant brain iron deposition is observed in both common and rare neurodegenerative disorders, including those categorized as Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation (NBIA), which are characterized by focal iron accumulation in the basal ganglia. Two NBIA genes are directly involved in iron metabolism, but whether other NBIA-related genes also regulate iron homeostasis in the human brain, and whether aberrant iron deposition contributes to neurodegenerative processes remains largely unknown. This study aims to expand our understanding of these iron overload diseases and identify relationships between known NBIA genes and their main interacting partners by using a systems biology approach. We used whole-transcriptome gene expression data from human brain samples originating from 101 neuropathologically normal individuals (10 brain regions) to generate weighted gene co-expression networks and cluster the 10 known NBIA genes in an unsupervised manner. We investigated NBIA-enriched networks for relevant cell types and pathways, and whether they are disrupted by iron loading in NBIA diseased tissue and in an in vivo mouse model. We identified two basal ganglia gene co-expression modules significantly enriched for NBIA genes, which resemble neuronal and oligodendrocytic signatures. These NBIA gene networks are enriched for iron-related genes, and implicate synapse and lipid metabolism related pathways. Our data also indicates that these networks are disrupted by excessive brain iron loading. We identified multiple cell types in the origin of NBIA disorders. We also found unforeseen links between NBIA networks and iron-related processes, and demonstrate convergent pathways connecting NBIAs and phenotypically overlapping diseases. Our results are of further relevance for these diseases by providing candidates for new causative genes and possible points for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Kinetics of Transferrin and Transferrin-Receptor during Iron Transport through Blood Brain Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aminul; Liu, Jin; Dutta, Prashanta

    2017-11-01

    Transferrin and its receptors play an important role during the uptake and transcytosis of iron by blood brain barrier (BBB) endothelial cells to maintain iron homeostasis in BBB endothelium and brain. In the blood side of BBB, ferric iron binds with the apo-transferrin to form holo-transferrin which enters the endothelial cell via transferrin receptor mediated endocytosis. Depending on the initial concentration of iron inside the cell endocytosed holo-transferrin can either be acidified in the endosome or exocytosed through the basolateral membrane. Acidification of holo-transferrin in the endosome releases ferrous irons which may either be stored and used by the cell or transported into brain side. Exocytosis of the holo-transferrin through basolateral membrane leads to transport of iron bound to transferrin into brain side. In this work, kinetics of internalization, recycling and exocytosis of transferrin and its receptors are modeled by laws of mass action during iron transport in BBB endothelial cell. Kinetic parameters for the model are determined by least square analysis. Our results suggest that the cell's initial iron content determines the extent of the two possible iron transport pathways, which will be presented in this talk Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number R01GM122081.

  18. Lactoferrin conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles for targeting brain glioma cells in magnetic particle imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomitaka, Asahi; Arami, Hamed; Gandhi, Sonu; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new real-time imaging modality, which promises high tracer mass sensitivity and spatial resolution directly generated from iron oxide nanoparticles. In this study, monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles with median core diameters ranging from 14 to 26 nm were synthesized and their surface was conjugated with lactoferrin to convert them into brain glioma targeting agents. The conjugation was confirmed with the increase of the hydrodynamic diameters, change of zeta potential, and Bradford assay. Magnetic particle spectrometry (MPS), performed to evaluate the MPI performance of these nanoparticles, showed no change in signal after lactoferrin conjugation to nanoparticles for all core diameters, suggesting that the MPI signal is dominated by Néel relaxation and thus independent of hydrodynamic size difference or presence of coating molecules before and after conjugations. For this range of core sizes (14-26 nm), both MPS signal intensity and spatial resolution improved with increasing core diameter of nanoparticles. The lactoferrin conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles (Lf-IONPs) showed specific cellular internalization into C6 cells with a 5-fold increase in MPS signal compared to IONPs without lactoferrin, both after 24 h incubation. These results suggest that Lf-IONPs can be used as tracers for targeted brain glioma imaging using MPI.

  19. Microcapillary Features in Silicon Alloyed High-Strength Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.K. Hasanli

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Present study explores features of silicon micro capillary in alloyed high-strength cast iron with nodular graphite (ductile iron produced in metal molds. It identified the nature and mechanism of micro liquation of silicon in a ductile iron alloyed with Nickel and copper, and demonstrated significant change of structural-quality characteristics. It was concluded that the matrix of alloyed ductile iron has a heterogeneous structure with cross reinforcement and high-silicon excrement areas.

  20. In Vivo MRI Mapping of Brain Iron Deposition across the Adult Lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Cabronero, Julio; Betts, Matthew J; Cardenas-Blanco, Arturo; Yang, Shan; Nestor, Peter J

    2016-01-13

    Disruption of iron homeostasis as a consequence of aging is thought to cause iron levels to increase, potentially promoting oxidative cellular damage. Therefore, understanding how this process evolves through the lifespan could offer insights into both the aging process and the development of aging-related neurodegenerative brain diseases. This work aimed to map, in vivo for the first time with an unbiased whole-brain approach, age-related iron changes using quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM)--a new postprocessed MRI contrast mechanism. To this end, a full QSM standardization routine was devised and a cohort of N = 116 healthy adults (20-79 years of age) was studied. The whole-brain and ROI analyses confirmed that the propensity of brain cells to accumulate excessive iron as a function of aging largely depends on their exact anatomical location. Whereas only patchy signs of iron scavenging were observed in white matter, strong, bilateral, and confluent QSM-age associations were identified in several deep-brain nuclei--chiefly the striatum and midbrain-and across motor, premotor, posterior insular, superior prefrontal, and cerebellar cortices. The validity of QSM as a suitable in vivo imaging technique with which to monitor iron dysregulation in the human brain was demonstrated by confirming age-related increases in several subcortical nuclei that are known to accumulate iron with age. The study indicated that, in addition to these structures, there is a predilection for iron accumulation in the frontal lobes, which when combined with the subcortical findings, suggests that iron accumulation with age predominantly affects brain regions concerned with motor/output functions. This study used a whole--brain imaging approach known as quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) to provide a novel insight into iron accumulation in the brain across the adult lifespan. Validity of the method was demonstrated by showing concordance with ROI analysis and prior knowledge

  1. Reducing iron in the brain: a novel pharmacologic mechanism of huperzine A in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao-Tian; Qian, Zhong-Ming; He, Xuan; Gong, Qi; Wu, Ka-Chun; Jiang, Li-Rong; Lu, Li-Na; Zhu, Zhou-Jing; Zhang, Hai-Yan; Yung, Wing-Ho; Ke, Ya

    2014-05-01

    Huperzine A (HupA), a natural inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase derived from a plant, is a licensed anti-Alzheimer's disease (AD) drug in China and a nutraceutical in the United States. In addition to acting as an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, HupA possesses neuroprotective properties. However, the relevant mechanism is unknown. Here, we showed that the neuroprotective effect of HupA was derived from a novel action on brain iron regulation. HupA treatment reduced insoluble and soluble beta amyloid levels, ameliorated amyloid plaques formation, and hyperphosphorylated tau in the cortex and hippocampus of APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic AD mice. Also, HupA decreased beta amyloid oligomers and amyloid precursor protein levels, and increased A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease Domain 10 (ADAM10) expression in these treated AD mice. However, these beneficial effects of HupA were largely abolished by feeding the animals with a high iron diet. In parallel, we found that HupA decreased iron content in the brain and demonstrated that HupA also has a role to reduce the expression of transferrin-receptor 1 as well as the transferrin-bound iron uptake in cultured neurons. The findings implied that reducing iron in the brain is a novel mechanism of HupA in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Brain transcriptome perturbations in the Hfe(-/-) mouse model of genetic iron loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Daniel; Graham, Ross M; Trinder, Debbie; Delima, Roheeth D; Riveros, Carlos; Olynyk, John K; Scott, Rodney J; Moscato, Pablo; Milward, Elizabeth A

    2012-04-11

    Severe disruption of brain iron homeostasis can cause fatal neurodegenerative disease, however debate surrounds the neurologic effects of milder, more common iron loading disorders such as hereditary hemochromatosis, which is usually caused by loss-of-function polymorphisms in the HFE gene. There is evidence from both human and animal studies that HFE gene variants may affect brain function and modify risks of brain disease. To investigate how disruption of HFE influences brain transcript levels, we used microarray and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to assess the brain transcriptome in Hfe(-/-) mice relative to wildtype AKR controls (age 10 weeks, n≥4/group). The Hfe(-/-) mouse brain showed numerous significant changes in transcript levels (pgenes relating to transcriptional regulation (FBJ osteosarcoma oncogene Fos, early growth response genes), neurotransmission (glutamate NMDA receptor Grin1, GABA receptor Gabbr1) and synaptic plasticity and memory (calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα Camk2a). As previously reported for dietary iron-supplemented mice, there were altered levels of transcripts for genes linked to neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, a disease characterized by excessive lipofuscin deposition. Labile iron is known to enhance lipofuscin generation which may accelerate brain aging. The findings provide evidence that iron loading disorders can considerably perturb levels of transcripts for genes essential for normal brain function and may help explain some of the neurologic signs and symptoms reported in hemochromatosis patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Efficiency analysis of clearance of two types of exogenous iron from the rat brain by Moessbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polikarpov, D. M., E-mail: polikarpov.imp@gmail.com; Cherepanov, V. M.; Gabbasov, R. R. [National Research Centre, ' Kurchatov Institute' (Russian Federation); Chuev, M. A.; Mischenko, I. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Russian Institute of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation); Korshunov, V. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Higher Nervous Activity and Neurophysiology (Russian Federation); Panchenko, V. Y. [National Research Centre, ' Kurchatov Institute' (Russian Federation)

    2013-04-15

    Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} based ferrofluid was injected transcranially in the ventricle of the rat brain. At 3 months after the injection the rat was sacrificed and the brain was investigated by Moessbauer spectroscopy and histological Perls Prussian blue method. Joint analysis of histological and Moessbauer data confirms that superparamagnetic nanoparticles Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, which constituted about 91 % of the iron of the ferrofluid, were cleared from the brain, while the concomitant chemical compound containing ferric ion in the high-spin state, remains intact.

  4. Impairment of interrelated iron- and copper homeostatic mechanisms in brain contributes to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjørringe, Tina; Møller, Lisbeth Birk; Moos, Torben

    2012-01-01

    is strictly regulated, and concordantly protective barriers, i.e., the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier (BCB) have evolved to separate the brain environment from the circulation. The uptake mechanisms of the two metals interact. Both iron deficiency and overload lead...... involved in iron transport. Iron and copper are mainly taken up at the BBB, but the BCB also plays a vital role in the homeostasis of the two metals, in terms of sequestering, uptake, and efflux of iron and copper from the brain. Inside the brain, iron and copper are taken up by neurons and glia cells...

  5. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping Indicates a Disturbed Brain Iron Homeostasis in Neuromyelitis Optica ? A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Doring, Thomas Martin; Granado, Vanessa; Rueda, Fernanda; Deistung, Andreas; Reichenbach, Juergen R.; Tukamoto, Gustavo; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro; Schweser, Ferdinand

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of brain iron homeostasis is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases and can be associated with oxidative stress. The objective of this study was to investigate brain iron in patients with Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO) using quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM), a quantitative iron-sensitive MRI technique. 12 clinically confirmed NMO patients (6 female and 6 male; age 35.4y±14.2y) and 12 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (7 female and 5 male; age 33.9±11.3y) underwen...

  6. Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) as a means to measure brain iron? A post mortem validation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langkammer, Christian; Schweser, Ferdinand; Krebs, Nikolaus; Deistung, Andreas; Goessler, Walter; Scheurer, Eva; Sommer, Karsten; Reishofer, Gernot; Yen, Kathrin; Fazekas, Franz; Ropele, Stefan; Reichenbach, Jürgen R.

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) is a novel technique which allows determining the bulk magnetic susceptibility distribution of tissue in vivo from gradient echo magnetic resonance phase images. It is commonly assumed that paramagnetic iron is the predominant source of susceptibility variations in gray matter as many studies have reported a reasonable correlation of magnetic susceptibility with brain iron concentrations in vivo. Instead of performing direct comparisons, however, all these studies used the putative iron concentrations reported in the hallmark study by Hallgren and Sourander (1958) for their analysis. Consequently, the extent to which QSM can serve to reliably assess brain iron levels is not yet fully clear. To provide such information we investigated the relation between bulk tissue magnetic susceptibility and brain iron concentration in unfixed (in situ) post mortem brains of 13 subjects using MRI and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. A strong linear correlation between chemically determined iron concentration and bulk magnetic susceptibility was found in gray matter structures (r = 0.84, p < 0.001), whereas the correlation coefficient was much lower in white matter (r = 0.27, p < 0.001). The slope of the overall linear correlation was consistent with theoretical considerations of the magnetism of ferritin supporting that most of the iron in the brain is bound to ferritin proteins. In conclusion, iron is the dominant source of magnetic susceptibility in deep gray matter and can be assessed with QSM. In white matter regions the estimation of iron concentrations by QSM is less accurate and more complex because the counteracting contribution from diamagnetic myelinated neuronal fibers confounds the interpretation. PMID:22634862

  7. High-rate behaviour of iron ore pellet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Gustaf; Häggblad, Hans-Åke; Jonsén, Pär; Nishida, Masahiro

    2015-09-01

    Iron ore pellets are sintered, centimetre-sized spheres of ore with high iron content. Together with carbonized coal, iron ore pellets are used in the production of steel. In the transportation from the pelletizing plants to the customers, the iron ore pellets are exposed to different loading situations, resulting in degradation of strength and in some cases fragmentation. For future reliable numerical simulations of the handling and transportation of iron ore pellets, knowledge about their mechanical properties is needed. This paper describes the experimental work to investigate the dynamic mechanical properties of blast furnace iron ore pellets. To study the dynamic fracture of iron ore pellets a number of split Hopkinson pressure bar tests are carried out and analysed.

  8. Neuroprotection of brain-permeable iron chelator VK-28 against intracerebral hemorrhage in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Wan, Jieru; Lan, Xi; Han, Xiaoning; Wang, Zhongyu; Wang, Jian

    2017-09-01

    Iron overload plays a key role in the secondary brain damage that develops after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). The significant increase in iron deposition is associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which leads to oxidative brain damage. In this study, we examined the protective effects of VK-28, a brain-permeable iron chelator, against hemoglobin toxicity in an ex vivo organotypic hippocampal slice culture (OHSC) model and in middle-aged mice subjected to an in vivo, collagenase-induced ICH model. We found that the effects of VK-28 were similar to those of deferoxamine (DFX), a well-studied iron chelator. Both decreased cell death and ROS production in OHSCs and in vivo, decreased iron-deposition and microglial activation around hematoma in vivo, and improved neurologic function. Moreover, compared with DFX, VK-28 polarized microglia to an M2-like phenotype, reduced brain water content, deceased white matter injury, improved neurobehavioral performance, and reduced overall death rate after ICH. The protection of VK-28 was confirmed in a blood-injection ICH model and in aged-male and young female mice. Our findings indicate that VK-28 is protective against iron toxicity after ICH and that, at the dosage tested, it has better efficacy and less toxicity than DFX does.

  9. Bainitic high-strength cast iron with globular graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silman, G. I.; Makarenko, K. V.; Kamynin, V. V.; Zentsova, E. A.

    2013-07-01

    Special features of formation of bainitic structures in grayed cast irons are considered. The influence of the graphite phase and of the special features of chemical composition of the iron on the intermediate transformation in high-carbon alloys is allowed for. The range of application of high-strength cast irons with bainitic structure is determined. The paper is the last and unfinished work of G. I. Silman completed by his disciples as a tribute to their teacher.

  10. Glial cell ceruloplasmin and hepcidin differentially regulate iron efflux from brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Ryan C; Kosman, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    We have used an in vitro model system to probe the iron transport pathway across the brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). This model consists of human BMVEC (hBMVEC) and C6 glioma cells (as an astrocytic cell line) grown in a transwell, a cell culture system commonly used to quantify metabolite flux across a cell-derived barrier. We found that iron efflux from hBMVEC through the ferrous iron permease ferroportin (Fpn) was stimulated by secretion of the soluble form of the multi-copper ferroxidase, ceruloplasmin (sCp) from the co-cultured C6 cells. Reciprocally, expression of sCp mRNA in the C6 cells was increased by neighboring hBMVEC. In addition, data indicate that C6 cell-secreted hepcidin stimulates internalization of hBMVEC Fpn but only when the end-feet projections characteristic of this glia-derived cell line are proximal to the endothelial cells. This hepcidin-dependent loss of Fpn correlated with knock-down of iron efflux from the hBMVEC; this result was consistent with the mechanism by which hepcidin regulates iron efflux in mammalian cells. In summary, the data support a model of iron trafficking across the BBB in which the capillary endothelium induce the underlying astrocytes to produce the ferroxidase activity needed to support Fpn-mediated iron efflux. Reciprocally, astrocyte proximity modulates the effective concentration of hepcidin at the endothelial cell membrane and thus the surface expression of hBMVEC Fpn. These results are independent of the source of hBMVEC iron (transferrin or non-transferrin bound) indicating that the model developed here is broadly applicable to brain iron homeostasis.

  11. Brain Food at High Altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    Scenic view at high altitude is a pleasure to the eyes, but it has some shortcoming effects as well. High altitude can be divided into different categories, i.e., high altitude (3000-5000 ft), very high altitude (5000-8000 ft), and extreme altitude (above 8000 ft). Much of the population resides at high altitude, and others go there for tourism. Military personnel are also posted there to defend boundaries. As we ascent to high altitude, partial pressure of oxygen reduces, whereas concentration remains the same; this reduces the availability of oxygen to different body parts. This pathophysiological condition is known as hypobaric hypoxia (HH) which leads to oxidative stress and further causes cognitive dysfunction in some cases. Hypoxia causes neurodegeneration in different brain regions; however, the hippocampus is found to be more prone in comparison to other brain regions. As the hippocampus is affected most, therefore, spatial memory is impaired most during such condition. This chapter will give a brief review of the damaging effect of high altitude on cognition and also throw light on possible herbal interventions at high altitude, which can improve cognitive performance as well as provide protection against the deteriorating effect of hypobaric hypoxia at high altitude.

  12. Iron supplement prevents lead-induced disruption of the blood-brain barrier during rat development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qiang; Luo Wenjing; Zheng Wei; Liu Yiping; Xu Hui; Zheng Gang; Dai Zhongming; Zhang Wenbin; Chen Yaoming; Chen Jingyuan

    2007-01-01

    Children are known to be venerable to lead (Pb) toxicity. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) in immature brain is particularly vulnerable to Pb insults. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that Pb exposure damaged the integrity of the BBB in young animals and iron (Fe) supplement may prevent against Pb-induced BBB disruption. Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups. Three groups of rats were exposed to Pb in drinking water containing 342 μg Pb/mL as Pb acetate, among which two groups were concurrently administered by oral gavage once every other day with 7 mg Fe/kg and 14 mg Fe/kg as FeSO 4 solution as the low and high Fe treatment group, respectively, for 6 weeks. The control group received sodium acetate in drinking water. Pb exposure significantly increased Pb concentrations in blood by 6.6-folds (p < 0.05) and brain tissues by 1.5-2.0-folds (p < 0.05) as compared to controls. Under the electron microscope, Pb exposure in young animals caused an extensive extravascular staining of lanthanum nitrate in brain parenchyma, suggesting a leakage of cerebral vasculature. Western blot showed that Pb treatment led to 29-68% reduction (p < 0.05) in the expression of occludin as compared to the controls. Fe supplement among Pb-exposed rats maintained the normal ultra-structure of the BBB and restored the expression of occludin to normal levels. Moreover, the low dose Fe supplement significantly reduced Pb levels in blood and brain tissues. These data suggest that Pb exposure disrupts the structure of the BBB in young animals. The increased BBB permeability may facilitate the accumulation of Pb. Fe supplement appears to protect the integrity of the BBB against Pb insults, a beneficial effect that may have significant clinical implications

  13. Hunger for iron: the alternative siderophore iron scavenging systems in highly virulent Yersinia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eRakin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Low molecular weight siderophores are used by many living organisms to scavenge scarcely available ferric iron. Presence of at least a single siderophore-based iron acquisition system is usually acknowledged as a virulence-associated trait and a prerequisite to become an efficient and successful pathogen. Currently it is assumed that yersiniabactin (Ybt is the solely functional endogenous siderophore iron uptake system in highly virulent Yersinia (Yersinia pestis, Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. enterocolitica biotype 1B. Genes responsible for biosynthesis, transport and regulation of the yersiniabactin (ybt production are clustered on a mobile genetic element, the High Pathogenicity Island (HPI that is responsible for broad dissemination of the ybt genes in Enterobacteriaceae. However, the ybt gene cluster is absent from nearly half of Y. pseudotuberculosis O3 isolates and epidemic Y. pseudotuberculosis O1 isolates responsible for the Far East Scarlet-like Fever. Several potential siderophore-mediated iron uptake gene clusters are documented in Yersinia genomes, however neither of them have been proven to be functional. It has been suggested that at least two siderophores alternative to Ybt may operate in the highly virulent Yersinia pestis / Y. pseudotuberculosis group, and are referred to as pseudochelin (Pch and yersiniachelin (Ych. Furthermore, most sporadic Y. pseudotuberculosis O1 strains possess gene clusters encoding all three iron scavenging systems. Thus, the Ybt system appears not to be the sole endogenous siderophore iron uptake system in the highly virulent yersiniae and may be efficiently substituted and / or supplemented by alternative iron scavenging systems.

  14. Role of brain iron accumulation in cognitive dysfunction: evidence from animal models and human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Nadja; Figueiredo, Luciana Silva; de Lima, Maria Noêmia Martins

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decades, studies from our laboratory and other groups using animal models have shown that iron overload, resulting in iron accumulation in the brain, produces significant cognitive deficits. Iron accumulation in the hippocampus and the basal ganglia has been related to impairments in spatial memory, aversive memory, and recognition memory in rodents. These results are corroborated by studies showing that the administration of iron chelators attenuates cognitive deficits in a variety of animal models of cognitive dysfunction, including aging and Alzheimer's disease models. Remarkably, recent human studies using magnetic resonance image techniques have also shown a consistent correlation between cognitive dysfunction and iron deposition, mostly in the hippocampus, cortical areas, and basal ganglia. These findings may have relevant implications in the light of the knowledge that iron accumulates in brain regions of patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. A better understanding of the functional consequences of iron dysregulation in aging and neurological diseases may help to identify novel targets for treating memory problems that afflict a growing aging population.

  15. Iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized inside highly ordered ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CdS nanoparticles prepared in reverse micellar system was incorporated into ... The molar ratio of various constituents of the hydrothermal gel was ... other synthesis techniques for the preparation of iron oxide nanocomposites using.

  16. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  17. Iron solubility in highly boron-doped silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugo, S.A.; McDonald, R.J.; Smith, A.R.; Hurley, D.L.; Weber, E.R.

    1998-01-01

    We have directly measured the solubility of iron in high and low boron-doped silicon using instrumental neutron activation analysis. Iron solubilities were measured at 800, 900, 1000, and 1100thinsp degree C in silicon doped with either 1.5x10 19 or 6.5x10 14 thinspboronthinspatoms/cm 3 . We have measured a greater iron solubility in high boron-doped silicon as compared to low boron-doped silicon, however, the degree of enhancement is lower than anticipated at temperatures >800thinsp degree C. The decreased enhancement is explained by a shift in the iron donor energy level towards the valence band at elevated temperatures. Based on this data, we have calculated the position of the iron donor level in the silicon band gap at elevated temperatures. We incorporate the iron energy level shift in calculations of iron solubility in silicon over a wide range of temperatures and boron-doping levels, providing a means to accurately predict iron segregation between high and low boron-doped silicon. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  18. Iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized inside highly ordered ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nanosized iron oxide, a moderately large band-gap semiconductor and an essential component of optoelectrical and magnetic devices, has been prepared successfully inside the restricted internal pores of mesoporous silica material through in-situ reduction during impregnation. The samples were characterized by ...

  19. New developments in high quality grey cast irons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulian Riposan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews original data obtained by the present authors, revealed in recent separate publications, describing specific procedures for high quality grey irons, and reflecting the forecast needs of the worldwide iron foundry industry. High power, medium frequency coreless induction furnaces are commonly used in electric melting grey iron foundries. This has resulted in low sulphur (1,500 °C, contributing to unfavourable conditions for graphite nucleation. Thin wall castings are increasingly produced by these electric melt shops with a risk of greater eutectic undercooling during solidification. The paper focused on two groups of grey cast irons and their specific problems: carbides and graphite morphology control in lower carbon equivalent high strength irons (CE=3.4%-3.8%, and austenite dendrite promotion in eutectic and slightly hypereutectic irons (CE=4.1%-4.5%, in order to increase their strength characteristics. There are 3 stages and 3 steps involving graphite formation, iron chemistry and iron processing that appear to be important. The concept in the present paper sustains a threestage model for nucleating flake graphite [(Mn,XS type nuclei]. There are three important groups of elements (deoxidizer, Mn/S, and inoculant and three technological stages in electric melting of iron (superheat, pre-conditioning of base iron, final inoculation. Attention is drawn to a control factor (%Mn x (%S ensuring it equals to 0.03 – 0.06, accompanied by 0.005wt.%–0.010wt.% Al and/or Zr content in inoculated irons. It was found that iron powder addition promotes austenite dendrite formation in eutectic and slightly eutectic, acting as reinforcement for the eutectic cells. But, there is an accompanying possible negative influence on the characteristics of the (Mn,XS type graphite nuclei (change the morphology of nuclei from polygonal compact to irregular polygonal, and therefore promote chill tendency in treated irons. A double addition (iron

  20. Quantitative measurements of brain iron deposition in cirrhotic patients using susceptibility mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Shuang; Zheng, Gang; Shen, Wen; Liu, Saifeng; Zhang, Long Jiang; Haacke, E Mark; Lu, Guang Ming

    2015-03-01

    Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) has been used to detect micro-bleeds and iron deposits in the brain. However, no reports have been published on the application of SWI in studying iron changes in the brain of cirrhotic patients. To compare the susceptibility of different brain structures in cirrhotic patients with that in healthy controls and to evaluate susceptibility as a potential biomarker and correlate the measured susceptibility and cadaveric brain iron concentration for a variety of brain structures. Forty-three cirrhotic patients (27 men, 16 women; mean age, 50 ± 9 years) and 34 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (22 men, 12 women; mean age, 47 ± 7 years) were included in this retrospective study. Susceptibility was measured in the frontal white matter, basal ganglia, midbrain, and dentate nucleus and compared with results gathered from two postmortem brain studies. Correlation between susceptibility and clinical biomarkers and neuropsychiatric tests scores was calculated. In cirrhotic patients, the susceptibility of left frontal white matter, bilateral caudate head, and right substantia nigra was higher than that in healthy controls (P brain study (r = 0.835, P = 0.01) in eight deep grey matter structures and another in five brain structures (r = 0.900, P = 0.03). The susceptibility of right caudate head (r = 0.402) and left caudate head (r = 0.408) correlated with neuropsychological test scores (both P brain regions appears to reflect neurocognitive changes. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  1. Changes in calcium and iron levels in the brains of rats during kainate induced epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Min-Qin; Ong, Wei-Yi; Makjanic, Jagoda; Watt, Frank

    1999-10-01

    Epilepsy is a recurrent disorder of cerebral function characterised by sudden brief attacks of altered consciousness, motor activity or sensory phenomena, and affects approximately 1% of the population. Kainic acid injection induces neuronal degeneration in rats, is associated with glial hypertrophy and proliferation in the CA3-CA4 fields of hippocampal complex, and is a model for temporal lobe epilepsy. In this study we have applied Nuclear Microscopy to the investigation of the elemental changes within the hippocampus and the cortex areas of the rat brain following kainate injection. Analyses of unstained freeze dried tissue sections taken at 1 day and 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks following injection were carried out using the Nuclear Microscopy facility at the Research Centre for Nuclear Microscopy, National University of Singapore. Quantitative analysis and elemental mapping indicates that there are significant changes in the calcium levels and distributions in the hippocampus as early as 1 day following injection. Preliminary results indicate a rapid increase in cellular calcium. High levels of calcium can activate calcium dependent proteins and phospholipases. Activation of phospholipase A 2 can be harmful to surrounding neurons through free radical damage. In addition to observed increases in calcium, there was evidence of increases in iron levels. This is consistent with measurements in other degenerative brain disorders, and may signal a late surge in free radical production.

  2. Changes in calcium and iron levels in the brains of rats during kainate induced epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, M.-Q.; Ong, W.-Y.; Makjanic, Jagoda; Watt, Frank

    1999-01-01

    Epilepsy is a recurrent disorder of cerebral function characterised by sudden brief attacks of altered consciousness, motor activity or sensory phenomena, and affects approximately 1% of the population. Kainic acid injection induces neuronal degeneration in rats, is associated with glial hypertrophy and proliferation in the CA3-CA4 fields of hippocampal complex, and is a model for temporal lobe epilepsy. In this study we have applied Nuclear Microscopy to the investigation of the elemental changes within the hippocampus and the cortex areas of the rat brain following kainate injection. Analyses of unstained freeze dried tissue sections taken at 1 day and 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks following injection were carried out using the Nuclear Microscopy facility at the Research Centre for Nuclear Microscopy, National University of Singapore. Quantitative analysis and elemental mapping indicates that there are significant changes in the calcium levels and distributions in the hippocampus as early as 1 day following injection. Preliminary results indicate a rapid increase in cellular calcium. High levels of calcium can activate calcium dependent proteins and phospholipases. Activation of phospholipase A 2 can be harmful to surrounding neurons through free radical damage. In addition to observed increases in calcium, there was evidence of increases in iron levels. This is consistent with measurements in other degenerative brain disorders, and may signal a late surge in free radical production

  3. Abnormal brain iron metabolism in Irp2 deficient mice is associated with mild neurological and behavioral impairments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly B Zumbrennen-Bullough

    Full Text Available Iron Regulatory Protein 2 (Irp2, Ireb2 is a central regulator of cellular iron homeostasis in vertebrates. Two global knockout mouse models have been generated to explore the role of Irp2 in regulating iron metabolism. While both mouse models show that loss of Irp2 results in microcytic anemia and altered body iron distribution, discrepant results have drawn into question the role of Irp2 in regulating brain iron metabolism. One model shows that aged Irp2 deficient mice develop adult-onset progressive neurodegeneration that is associated with axonal degeneration and loss of Purkinje cells in the central nervous system. These mice show iron deposition in white matter tracts and oligodendrocyte soma throughout the brain. A contrasting model of global Irp2 deficiency shows no overt or pathological signs of neurodegeneration or brain iron accumulation, and display only mild motor coordination and balance deficits when challenged by specific tests. Explanations for conflicting findings in the severity of the clinical phenotype, brain iron accumulation and neuronal degeneration remain unclear. Here, we describe an additional mouse model of global Irp2 deficiency. Our aged Irp2-/- mice show marked iron deposition in white matter and in oligodendrocytes while iron content is significantly reduced in neurons. Ferritin and transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1, Tfrc, expression are increased and decreased, respectively, in the brain from Irp2-/- mice. These mice show impairments in locomotion, exploration, motor coordination/balance and nociception when assessed by neurological and behavioral tests, but lack overt signs of neurodegenerative disease. Ultrastructural studies of specific brain regions show no evidence of neurodegeneration. Our data suggest that Irp2 deficiency dysregulates brain iron metabolism causing cellular dysfunction that ultimately leads to mild neurological, behavioral and nociceptive impairments.

  4. Thermal effects in highly dispersed iron catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, A.M.; Cagnoli, M.V.; Gallegos, N.G.; Marchetti, S.G.; Yeramian, A.A.; Mercader, R.C.

    1994-01-01

    The Moessbauer spectra of three Fe/SiO 2 catalysts with 5 wt% iron content show the presence of several Fe species and display different magnetic behaviours when the precursors are subjected to various thermal treatments. Based on the Moessbauer parameters and CO chemisorption measurements, the average crystal sizes of the catalysts are estimated and discussed in connection with the thermal pretreatment severity and magnetic properties of the samples. (orig.)

  5. Effect of phosphorus on hot ductility of high purity iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abiko, K.; Liu, C.M.; Ichikawa, M..; Suenaga, H.; Tanino, M.

    1995-01-01

    Tensile tests on high purity Fe-P alloys with 0, 0.05 and 0.1 mass%P were carried out at temperatures between 300 K and 1073 K to clarify the intrinsic effect of phosphorus on the mechanical properties of iron at elevated temperatures. Microstructures of as-quenched, interrupted and ruptured specimens were observed. Experimental results show that the addition of phosphorus causes a remarkable increase in proof stress of high purity iron at 300 K, but the increase in proof stress by phosphorus decreases with increasing test temperature. The strengthening effect of phosphorus reduces to zero at 1073 K. High purity iron and Fe-P alloys rupture at almost 100% reduction in area at the whole test temperatures. However, Fe-P alloys show much larger elongation at test temperatures above 773 K than high purity iron. The increased elongation of high purity iron by addition of phosphorus was shown to be related to the effect of phosphorus on dynamic recovery and recrystallization of iron as its intrinsic effect. (orig.)

  6. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping Indicates a Disturbed Brain Iron Homeostasis in Neuromyelitis Optica - A Pilot Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Martin Doring

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of brain iron homeostasis is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases and can be associated with oxidative stress. The objective of this study was to investigate brain iron in patients with Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO using quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM, a quantitative iron-sensitive MRI technique. 12 clinically confirmed NMO patients (6 female and 6 male; age 35.4y±14.2y and 12 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (7 female and 5 male; age 33.9±11.3y underwent MRI of the brain at 3 Tesla. Quantitative maps of the effective transverse relaxation rate (R2* and magnetic susceptibility were calculated and a blinded ROI-based group comparison analysis was performed. Normality of the data and differences between patients and controls were tested by Kolmogorov-Smirnov and t-test, respectively. Correlation with age was studied using Spearman's rank correlation and an ANCOVA-like analysis. Magnetic susceptibility values were decreased in the red nucleus (p0.95; between -15 and -22 ppb depending on reference region with a trend toward increasing differences with age. R2* revealed significantly decreased relaxation in the optic radiations of five of the 12 patients (p<0.0001; -3.136±0.567 s-1. Decreased relaxation in the optic radiation is indicative for demyelination, which is in line with previous findings. Decreased magnetic susceptibility in the red nucleus is indicative for a lower brain iron concentration, a chemical redistribution of iron into less magnetic forms, or both. Further investigations are necessary to elucidate the pathological cause or consequence of this finding.

  7. The role of melatonin on brain iron homeostasis and its relation to Parkinson’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Hien Tet

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is the second most common neurological disorder after Alzheimer’s Disease. The disease will manifest with the loss of up to 70% of the dopaminergic neurons in the Substantia Nigra (SN) region and it mainly affects the elderly. One of the common pathological hallmarks for PD is the excessive iron accumulation within the SN region of the brain. However, the pathogenesis for of the excessive iron levels accumulation in the SN is unclear. The increase in intracellular oxi...

  8. Nitrogen Atom Transfer From High Valent Iron Nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Michael D. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Smith, Jeremy M. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2015-10-14

    This report describes the synthesis and reactions of high valent iron nitrides. Organonitrogen compounds such as aziridines are useful species for organic synthesis, but there are few efficient methods for their synthesis. Using iron nitrides to catalytically access these species may allow for their synthesis in an energy-and atom-efficient manner. We have developed a new ligand framework to achieve these goals as well as providing a method for inducing previously unknown reactivity.

  9. Computer-aided control of high-quality cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The study discusses the possibility of control of the high-quality grey cast iron and ductile iron using the author’s genuine computer programs. The programs have been developed with the help of algorithms based on statistical relationships that are said to exist between the characteristic parameters of DTA curves and properties, like Rp0,2, Rm, A5 and HB. It has been proved that the spheroidisation and inoculation treatment of cast iron changes in an important way the characteristic parameters of DTA curves, thus enabling a control of these operations as regards their correctness and effectiveness, along with the related changes in microstructure and mechanical properties of cast iron. Moreover, some examples of statistical relationships existing between the typical properties of ductile iron and its control process were given for cases of the melts consistent and inconsistent with the adopted technology.A test stand for control of the high-quality cast iron and respective melts has been schematically depicted.

  10. Normal regional brain iron concentration in restless legs syndrome measured by MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Knake

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Susanne Knake1, Johannes T Heverhagen2, Katja Menzler1, Boris Keil2, Wolfgang H Oertel1, Karin Stiasny-Kolster11Department of Neurology, Center of Nervous Diseases, 2Department of Radiology, Philipps University, Marburg, GermanyAbstract: Using a T2* gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI sequence, regional T2 signal intensity (SI values, a surrogate marker for T2 values, were determined in 12 regions of interest (substantia nigra, pallidum, caudate head, thalamus, occipital white matter, and frontal white matter bilaterally and in two reference regions (cerebrospinal fluid and bone in 12 patients suffering from moderate to severe idiopathic restless legs syndrome (RLS; mean age 58.5 ± 8.7 years for 12.1 ± 9.1 years and in 12 healthy control subjects (mean age 56.8 ± 10.6 years. Iron deposits shorten T2 relaxation times on T2-weighted MRI. We used regional T2* SI to estimate regional T2-values. A T2-change ratio was calculated for each region of interest relative to the reference regions. We did not find significant differences in any of the investigated brain regions. In addition, serum measures involved in iron metabolism did not correlate with T2 SI values. We could not replicate earlier findings describing reduced regional brain iron concentrations in patients with RLS. Our results do not support the view of substantially impaired regional brain iron in RLS.Keywords: restless legs syndrome, pathophysiology, iron, MRI, substantia nigra

  11. Prevalence of Iron Deficiency and Iron Deficiency Anemia in High-School Girl Students of Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Noori Shadkam

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is generally assumed that 50% of the cases of anemia are due to iron deficiency. The most severe consequence of iron depletion is iron deficiency anemia (IDA, and it is still considered the most common nutrition deficiency worldwide. The main risk factors for IDA include: inadequate iron intake, impaired absorption or transport, physiologic losses associated with chronological or reproductive age, or acute or chronic blood loss, parasite infections such as hookworms, acute and chronic infections, including malaria, cancer, tuberculosis, HIV and other micronutrient deficiencies, including vitamins A and B12, folate, riboflavin, and copper deficiency. Methods: This work as a cross-sectional study was done in 2007-2008 in Yazd. Two hundred girls who participated in the study were selected randomly from eight girl high schools. Five ml venous blood was collected for determination of serum ferritin and cell blood count (CBC. Serum ferritin was determined by using ECLIA method and CBC by cell counter SYSMEX KX21N. Iron deficiency was defined as having serum ferritin values below 12 μ/l. Anemia was defined as having Hemoglobin levels below12 g/dl. Iron-deficiency anemia was considered to be the combination of both. Results: The3 mean ageyears and body mass index (kg/m2 were 15.19±0.7years and 21.5±4.2, respectively. Distribution in the 14, 15 and 16 years and more age groups were 13, 58.5 and 28.5 percent, respectively. Mean of Hemoglobin(g/dl, Hematocrit(%, MCV (fl, MCH (pg, MCHC (g/dl and ferritin(μ/l were 12.8±0.9, 38.9±3.0, 80.7±4.3, 26.6±1.8, 33.2±3.6 and 23±18.2, respectively. Of the total, 13.5% were anemic, 68% of which had Iron Deficiency Anemia (9.3% of the total. Iron deficiency was present in 34.7% of the population under study. Conclusion: According to world health organization criteria, anemia is a mild public health problem in this region, but iron deficiency is a significant problem and suitable measures for

  12. Development of instant noodles from high-iron rice and iron-fortified rice flour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suparat Reungmaneepaitoon

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Instant high-iron noodles, prepared from wheat flour and high iron brown rice flour, were developed. Three varieties of rice flour, Suphan Buri 90 (SB, Homnin 313 (HW and Homnin 1000 (HP, containing amylose content of 30.40, 19.10 and 15.74% (w/w and iron content of 1.24, 2.04 and 2.22 (mg/100 g respectively, were used to replace wheat flour for instant fried noodle production. To determine the physicochemical properties and acceptability of instant fried noodles,different percentages (30, 40, 50% (w/w of each rice flour sample were used. The instant fried noodles were fortified with ferrous sulphate at levels of 0, 32, 64% iron of RDI per serving. Increasing amount of iron content in the mixtures decreased the L* value, b* value and increased a* value for the color of the instant fried noodle with brown rice flour. The texture characteristic of the noodles with 30, 40, 50% replacement with each variety of brown rice flour were significantly different from those of wheat noodle. Tensile force of the noodles decreased from 11.57±1.30 g to 6.38±1.45 g (SB, 8.36±0.96 g to 5.71±0.57 g (HP and 10.09±1.20 g to 5.46±1.31 g (HW as the rice flour content increased from 30 to 50%. The sensoryacceptability of the noodles made from each variety of 30% brown rice flour fortified with 32% iron of RDI had higher preference scores for elasticity, firmness, color and overall acceptability, than those with 64% iron of RDI. Instant fried noodles with HW and HP brown rice flour were subjected to consumer test using 100 rural primary school children. The frequency percent of the acceptability scores of the noodle with HP and HW were 88 and 84% respectively. Shelf life studyrevealed that the developed products were still acceptable up to 4 months. These products were claimed to be high iron noodle.

  13. High pressure Moessbauer spectroscopy of perovskite iron oxide

    CERN Document Server

    Nasu, S; Morimoto, S; Kawakami, T; Kuzushita, K; Takano, M

    2003-01-01

    High-pressure sup 5 sup 7 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy using a diamond anvil cell has been performed for perovskite iron oxides SrFeO sub 3 , CaFeO sub 3 and La sub 1 sub / sub 3 Sr sub 2 sub / sub 3 O sub 3. The charge states and the magnetic dependency to pressure were determined. Pressure magnetic phase diagrams of these perovskite iron oxides are determined up to about 70 GPa. To be clear the magnetic ordered state, they are measured up to 7.8 T external magnetic fields at 4.5K. The phase transition of these perovskite oxides to ferromagnetisms with high magnetic ordered temperature is observed. In higher pressure, high spin-low spin transition of oxides besides CaFeO sub 3 is generated. The feature of Moessbauer spectroscopy, perovskite iron oxide and Moessbauer spectroscopy under high pressure are explained. (S.Y.)

  14. High pressure Moessbauer spectroscopy of perovskite iron oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasu, Saburo; Suenaga, Tomoya; Morimoto, Shotaro; Kawakami, Takateru; Kuzushita, Kaori; Takano, Mikio

    2003-01-01

    High-pressure 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy using a diamond anvil cell has been performed for perovskite iron oxides SrFeO 3 , CaFeO 3 and La 1/3 Sr 2/3 O 3 . The charge states and the magnetic dependency to pressure were determined. Pressure magnetic phase diagrams of these perovskite iron oxides are determined up to about 70 GPa. To be clear the magnetic ordered state, they are measured up to 7.8 T external magnetic fields at 4.5K. The phase transition of these perovskite oxides to ferromagnetisms with high magnetic ordered temperature is observed. In higher pressure, high spin-low spin transition of oxides besides CaFeO 3 is generated. The feature of Moessbauer spectroscopy, perovskite iron oxide and Moessbauer spectroscopy under high pressure are explained. (S.Y.)

  15. Dielectronic recombination of highly ionized iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, D.C.; Pindzola, M.S.

    1987-01-01

    Dielectronic recombination of the iron ions Fe/sup 15+/, Fe/sup 23+/, and Fe/sup 25+/ has been studied in the isolated-resonance, distorted-wave approximation. The cross-section calculations include the dielec- tronic transitions associated with the 3s→3l and 3s→4l excitations in Fe/sup 15+/, the 2s→2p and 2s→3l excitations in Fe/sup 23+/, and the 1s→2l excitations in Fe/sup 25+/. The effects of external electric fields have been included by employing intermediate-coupled, field-mixed eigenvectors for the doubly excited Rydberg states, determined by diagonalizing a Hamiltonian matrix which includes the internal electrostatic and spin-orbit terms, as well as the Stark matrix elements. The field effects are found to be quite large in Fe/sup 15+/, relatively small in Fe/sup 23+/, and negligible in Fe/sup 25+/. The calculations indicate that there are large resonances near threshold in Fe/sup 23+/ that are unaffected by external fields and may be measurable in new experiments currently being designed. In addition, the contributions of radiative recombination and the possible interference between radiative and dielectronic recombination in low-lying resonances are considered. Even though the radiative recombination cross sections may be appreciable near threshold in Fe/sup 15+/ and Fe/sup 23+/, the interference between these processes appears to be completely negligible

  16. High energy iron ion implantation into sapphire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, W.R.; Pedraza, D.F.

    1990-01-01

    Sapphire specimens of c-axis orientation were implanted at room temperature with iron ions at energies of 1.2 and of 2 MeV to various fluences up to 8 x 10 16 cm -2 . The damage induced by the implantations was assessed by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy in random and channeling geometries. Dechanneling in both sublattices was observed to saturate for all implantation conditions. Disorder in the aluminum sublattice was found to increase with depth at a significantly slower rate than in the oxygen sublattice. In the oxygen sublattice, a relative yield, χ, of 0.80 ± 0.11 was attained at a depth of 0.1 μm and remained constant up to the measured depth of 0.45 μm. In the aluminum sublattice, the disorder increased with depth and the dechanneling asymptotically approached χ =0.70 ± 0.04 at 0.45 μm. These results are discussed and compared with those for shallower Fe implantations obtained by other researchers

  17. The structure of high-quality aluminium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kopyciński

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study presents the analyse of aluminium iron cast structure (as-cast condition which are used in high temperature. While producing the casts of aluminium iron major influence has been preserve the structure of technological process parameters. The addition to Fe-C-Al alloy V, Ti, Cr leads to the improvement of functional and mechanical cast qualities. In this study, a method was investigated to eliminate the presence of undesirable Al4C3 phases in a aluminium cast iron structure and thus improve the production process. V and Ti additions in aluminium cast iron allows to development of FeAl - VC or TiC alloys. In particular, V or Ti contents above 5 wt.% were found to totally eliminate the presence of Al4C3. In addition, preliminary work indicates that the alloy with the FeAl - VC or TiC structure reveals high oxidation resistance. The introduction of 5 wt.% chromium to aluminium cast iron strengthened Al4C3 precipitate. Thus, the resultant alloy can be considered an intermetallic FeAl matrix strengthened by VC and TiC or modified Al4C3 reinforcements.

  18. C19orf12 mutations in neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation mimicking juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschauer, M; Gaul, C; Behrmann, C; Prokisch, H; Zierz, S; Haack, T B

    2012-11-01

    Mutations in C19orf12 have been recently identified as the molecular genetic cause of a subtype of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA). Given the mitochondrial localization of the gene product the new NBIA subtype was designated mitochondrial membrane protein-associated neurodegeneration. Frequent features in the patients described so far included extrapyramidal signs and pyramidal tract involvement. Here, we report three C19orf12-mutant patients from two families presenting with predominant upper and lower motor neuron dysfunction mimicking amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with juvenile onset. While extrapyramidal signs were absent, all patients showed neuropsychological abnormalities with disinhibited or impulsive behavior. Optic atrophy was present in the simplex case. T2-weighted cranial MRI showed hypointensities suggestive of iron accumulation in the globi pallidi and the midbrain in all patients. Sequence analysis of C19orf12 revealed a novel mutation, p.Gly66del, compound heterozygous with known mutations in all patients. These patients highlight that C19orf12 defects should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients with juvenile onset motor neuron diseases. Patients have to be examined carefully for neuropsychological abnormalities, optic neuropathy, and signs of brain iron accumulation in MRI.

  19. Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Moen, I W; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    2014-01-01

    and discuss recent evidence, suggesting that iron is a key pathogenic factor in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes with a focus on inflammatory pathways. Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced β-cell death is not fully understood, but may include iron-induced ROS formation resulting in dedifferentiation by activation...... of transcription factors, activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic machinery or of other cell death mechanisms. The pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β facilitates divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1)-induced β-cell iron uptake and consequently ROS formation and apoptosis, and we propose that this mechanism provides...

  20. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Search the ODS website Submit Search NIH Office of Dietary Supplements Consumer Datos en español Health ... eating a variety of foods, including the following: Lean meat, seafood, and poultry. Iron-fortified breakfast cereals ...

  1. Modeling High-Dimensional Multichannel Brain Signals

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Lechuan; Fortin, Norbert J.; Ombao, Hernando

    2017-01-01

    aspects: first, there are major statistical and computational challenges for modeling and analyzing high-dimensional multichannel brain signals; second, there is no set of universally agreed measures for characterizing connectivity. To model multichannel

  2. Brain iron accumulation affects myelin-related molecular systems implicated in a rare neurogenetic disease family with neuropsychiatric features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, M; Johnstone, D M; Bassett, B; Graham, R M; Chua, A C G; House, M J; Collingwood, J F; Bettencourt, C; Houlden, H; Ryten, M; Olynyk, J K; Trinder, D; Milward, E A

    2016-11-01

    The 'neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation' (NBIA) disease family entails movement or cognitive impairment, often with psychiatric features. To understand how iron loading affects the brain, we studied mice with disruption of two iron regulatory genes, hemochromatosis (Hfe) and transferrin receptor 2 (Tfr2). Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy demonstrated increased iron in the Hfe -/- × Tfr2 mut brain (P=0.002, n ≥5/group), primarily localized by Perls' staining to myelinated structures. Western immunoblotting showed increases of the iron storage protein ferritin light polypeptide and microarray and real-time reverse transcription-PCR revealed decreased transcript levels (Pgross myelin structure and integrity appear unaffected (P>0.05). Overlap (P0.05). These results implicate myelin-related systems involved in NBIA neuropathogenesis in early responses to iron loading. This may contribute to behavioral symptoms in NBIA and hemochromatosis and is relevant to patients with abnormal iron status and psychiatric disorders involving myelin abnormalities or resistant to conventional treatments.

  3. Phototrophs in high-iron-concentration microbial mats: physiological ecology of phototrophs in an iron-depositing hot spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, B. K.; Parenteau, M. N.; Griffin, B. M.

    1999-01-01

    At Chocolate Pots Hot Springs in Yellowstone National Park the source waters have a pH near neutral, contain high concentrations of reduced iron, and lack sulfide. An iron formation that is associated with cyanobacterial mats is actively deposited. The uptake of [(14)C]bicarbonate was used to assess the impact of ferrous iron on photosynthesis in this environment. Photoautotrophy in some of the mats was stimulated by ferrous iron (1.0 mM). Microelectrodes were used to determine the impact of photosynthetic activity on the oxygen content and the pH in the mat and sediment microenvironments. Photosynthesis increased the oxygen concentration to 200% of air saturation levels in the top millimeter of the mats. The oxygen concentration decreased with depth and in the dark. Light-dependent increases in pH were observed. The penetration of light in the mats and in the sediments was determined. Visible radiation was rapidly attenuated in the top 2 mm of the iron-rich mats. Near-infrared radiation penetrated deeper. Iron was totally oxidized in the top few millimeters, but reduced iron was detected at greater depths. By increasing the pH and the oxygen concentration in the surface sediments, the cyanobacteria could potentially increase the rate of iron oxidation in situ. This high-iron-content hot spring provides a suitable model for studying the interactions of microbial photosynthesis and iron deposition and the role of photosynthesis in microbial iron cycling. This model may help clarify the potential role of photosynthesis in the deposition of Precambrian banded iron formations.

  4. Iron-Restricted Diet Affects Brain Ferritin Levels, Dopamine Metabolism and Cellular Prion Protein in a Region-Specific Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M. V. Pino

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential micronutrient for several physiological functions, including the regulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission. On the other hand, both iron, and dopamine can affect the folding and aggregation of proteins related with neurodegenerative diseases, such as cellular prion protein (PrPC and α-synuclein, suggesting that deregulation of iron homeostasis and the consequential disturbance of dopamine metabolism can be a risk factor for conformational diseases. These proteins, in turn, are known to participate in the regulation of iron and dopamine metabolism. In this study, we evaluated the effects of dietary iron restriction on brain ferritin levels, dopamine metabolism, and the expression levels of PrPC and α-synuclein. To achieve this goal, C57BL/6 mice were fed with iron restricted diet (IR or with normal diet (CTL for 1 month. IR reduced iron and ferritin levels in liver. Ferritin reduction was also observed in the hippocampus. However, in the striatum of IR group, ferritin level was increased, suggesting that under iron-deficient condition, each brain area might acquire distinct capacity to store iron. Increased lipid peroxidation was observed only in hippocampus of IR group, where ferritin level was reduced. IR also generated discrete results regarding dopamine metabolism of distinct brain regions: in striatum, the level of dopamine metabolites (DOPAC and HVA was reduced; in prefrontal cortex, only HVA was increased along with the enhanced MAO-A activity; in hippocampus, no alterations were observed. PrPC levels were increased only in the striatum of IR group, where ferritin level was also increased. PrPC is known to play roles in iron uptake. Thus, the increase of PrPC in striatum of IR group might be related to the increased ferritin level. α-synuclein was not altered in any regions. Abnormal accumulation of ferritin, increased MAO-A activity or lipid peroxidation are molecular features observed in several neurological

  5. Solidification structure and abrasion resistance of high chromium white irons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Ö. N.; Hawk, J. A.; Laird, G.

    1997-06-01

    Superior abrasive wear resistance, combined with relatively low production costs, makes high Cr white cast irons (WCIs) particularly attractive for applications in the grinding, milling, and pumping apparatus used to process hard materials. Hypoeutectic, eutectic, and hypereutectic cast iron compositions, containing either 15 or 26 wt pct chromium, were studied with respect to the macrostructural transitions of the castings, solidification paths, and resulting microstructures when poured with varying superheats. Completely equiaxed macrostructures were produced in thick section castings with slightly hypereutectic compositions. High-stress abrasive wear tests were then performed on the various alloys to examine the influence of both macrostructure and microstructure on wear resistance. Results indicated that the alloys with a primarily austenitic matrix had a higher abrasion resistance than similar alloys with a pearlitic/bainitic matrix. Improvement in abrasion resistance was partially attributed to the ability of the austenite to transform to martensite at the wear surface during the abrasion process.

  6. Investigation of sulphides in iron alloys of high purity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyjadlowski, T.

    1973-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of the morphology and composition of sulphides in iron alloys with respect to metal composition and to the nature of impurities. In order to understand the specific action of each addition on inclusion morphology, this work has started with high-purity alloys (binary alloys and then ternary alloys). The author studied whether solubility variations would entail either intergranular or intragranular or hybrid iron sulphide precipitation. He examined whether sulphide morphology is depending on thermal treatment, and whether equilibrium precipitates were different in terms of morphology and composition at high and room temperature. He studied the influence of addition elements on sulphide morphology and composition, an important issue as some elements may reduce brittleness. These elements are classified in terms of affinity with sulphur

  7. A mutation in the HFE gene is associated with altered brain iron profiles and increased oxidative stress in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandar, Wint; Neely, Elizabeth B; Unger, Erica; Connor, James R

    2013-06-01

    Because of the increasing evidence that H63D HFE polymorphism appears in higher frequency in neurodegenerative diseases, we evaluated the neurological consequences of H63D HFE in vivo using mice that carry H67D HFE (homologous to human H63D). Although total brain iron concentration did not change significantly in the H67D mice, brain iron management proteins expressions were altered significantly. The 6-month-old H67D mice had increased HFE and H-ferritin expression. At 12 months, H67D mice had increased H- and L-ferritin but decreased transferrin expression suggesting increased iron storage and decreased iron mobilization. Increased L-ferritin positive microglia in H67D mice suggests that microglia increase iron storage to maintain brain iron homeostasis. The 6-month-old H67D mice had increased levels of GFAP, increased oxidatively modified protein levels, and increased cystine/glutamate antiporter (xCT) and hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression indicating increased metabolic and oxidative stress. By 12 months, there was no longer increased astrogliosis or oxidative stress. The decrease in oxidative stress at 12 months could be related to an adaptive response by nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) that regulates antioxidant enzymes expression and is increased in the H67D mice. These findings demonstrate that the H63D HFE impacts brain iron homeostasis, and promotes an environment of oxidative stress and induction of adaptive mechanisms. These data, along with literature reports on humans with HFE mutations provide the evidence to overturn the traditional paradigm that the brain is protected from HFE mutations. The H67D knock-in mouse can be used as a model to evaluate how the H63D HFE mutation contributes to neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping Reveals an Association between Brain Iron Load and Depression Severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun Yao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have detected abnormal serum ferritin levels in patients with depression; however, the results have been inconsistent. This study used quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM for the first time to examine brain iron concentration in depressed patients and evaluated whether it is related to severity. We included three groups of age- and gender-matched participants: 30 patients with mild-moderate depression (MD, 14 patients with major depression disorder (MDD and 20 control subjects. All participants underwent MR scans with a 3D gradient-echo sequence reconstructing for QSM and performed the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS test. In MDD, the susceptibility value in the bilateral putamen was significantly increased compared with MD or control subjects. In addition, a significant difference was also observed in the left thalamus in MDD patients compared with controls. However, the susceptibility values did not differ between MD patients and controls. The susceptibility values positively correlated with the severity of depression as indicated by the HDRS scores. Our results provide evidence that brain iron deposition may be associated with depression and may even be a biomarker for investigating the pathophysiological mechanism of depression.

  9. Age-related deposition of brain iron in normal adults: an in vivo susceptibility weighted imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qidong; Xu Xiaojun; Zhang Minming

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of age on the iron concentration of the human brain. Methods: The brain iron level was evaluated in vivo in 78 healthy adult volunteers using a noninvasive magnetic resonance method termed susceptibility weighted imaging. The subjects were divided intothree groups due to different ages: young (22-35 years old, n=27), middle- aged (36-55 years old, n=35), and aged (56-78 years old, n=16). The phase values were measured on the corrected phase images in the globus pallidus, putamen, caudate, substantia nigra, red nucleus, thalamus and frontal white matter. The phase values of those regions measured from the subjects over than 30 years old were correlated with published values of brain iron concentration in normal adults to check the validity of the data. Then, the phase values of the three groups were tested for significant age-related differences using one-way ANOVA, followed by post hoc testing using least significant difference (LSD) procedure. Regression analysis was used to further examine age-related effects revealed by group comparisons, and to estimate the rates of age-related changes. Results: A strong negative correlation was found between the phase values and the published values of the brain iron concentration (r=-0.796, P= 0.032), which indicated that the higher the iron deposition level, the greater the negative phase values. In the putamen (F=20.115, P<0.01) and frontal white matter (F=3.536, P=0.034), significant differences were detected in the phase values of the three age groups. Linear regression analysis showed that phase values of the putamen, frontal white matter, and red nucleus decreased with age (The regression coefficients were -0.001, -0.001, and < -0.001 respectively, and the P value were all < 0.05), which indicated that the iron concentration of those brain structures increased with age. No significant age- related changes of the iron concentration were found in the

  10. Carbonate-sensitive phytotransferrin controls high-affinity iron uptake in diatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuaid, Jeffrey B.; Kustka, Adam B.; Oborník, Miroslav; Horák, Aleš; McCrow, John P.; Karas, Bogumil J.; Zheng, Hong; Kindeberg, Theodor; Andersson, Andreas J.; Barbeau, Katherine A.; Allen, Andrew E.

    2018-03-01

    In vast areas of the ocean, the scarcity of iron controls the growth and productivity of phytoplankton. Although most dissolved iron in the marine environment is complexed with organic molecules, picomolar amounts of labile inorganic iron species (labile iron) are maintained within the euphotic zone and serve as an important source of iron for eukaryotic phytoplankton and particularly for diatoms. Genome-enabled studies of labile iron utilization by diatoms have previously revealed novel iron-responsive transcripts, including the ferric iron-concentrating protein ISIP2A, but the mechanism behind the acquisition of picomolar labile iron remains unknown. Here we show that ISIP2A is a phytotransferrin that independently and convergently evolved carbonate ion-coordinated ferric iron binding. Deletion of ISIP2A disrupts high-affinity iron uptake in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, and uptake is restored by complementation with human transferrin. ISIP2A is internalized by endocytosis, and manipulation of the seawater carbonic acid system reveals a second-order dependence on the concentrations of labile iron and carbonate ions. In P. tricornutum, the synergistic interaction of labile iron and carbonate ions occurs at environmentally relevant concentrations, revealing that carbonate availability co-limits iron uptake. Phytotransferrin sequences have a broad taxonomic distribution and are abundant in marine environmental genomic datasets, suggesting that acidification-driven declines in the concentration of seawater carbonate ions will have a negative effect on this globally important eukaryotic iron acquisition mechanism.

  11. High dose intravenous iron, mineral homeostasis and intact FGF23 in normal and uremic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, Eva; Hofman-Bang, Jacob; Mace, Maria L.

    2013-01-01

    High iron load might have a number of toxic effects in the organism. Recently intravenous (iv) iron has been proposed to induce elevation of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), hypophosphatemia and osteomalacia in iron deficient subjects. High levels of FGF23 are associated with increased...

  12. Quantitative T2* magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of iron deposition in the brain of β-thalassemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhlaghpoor, S; Ghahari, A; Morteza, A; Khalilzadeh, O; Shakourirad, A; Alinaghizadeh, M R

    2012-09-01

    Iron overload is a common clinical problem in patients with β-thalassemia major. The purpose of this study was to assess the presence of excess iron in certain areas of the brain (thalamus, midbrain, adenohypophysis and basal ganglia) in patients with β-thalassemia major and evaluate the association with serum ferritin and liver iron content. A cross-sectional study on 53 patients with β-thalassemia major and 40 healthy controls was carried out. All patients and healthy controls underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations of the brain and liver. Multiecho fast gradient echo sequence was used and T2* values were calculated based on the Brompton protocol. Correlations between T2* values in the brain with T2* values in the liver as well as serum ferritin levels were investigated. There were no significant differences between patients and healthy controls with respect to age and sex. Patients had significantly lower T2* values in basal ganglia (striatum), thalamus and adenohypophysis compared to controls while there were no differences in the midbrain (red nucleus). There were no significant correlations between liver T2* values or serum ferritin with T2* values of basal ganglia (striatum), thalamus and adenohypophysis in patients or healthy controls. There were no significant correlations between T2* values of adenohypophysis and thalamus or basal ganglia (striatum) while these variables were significantly correlated in healthy controls. Serum ferritin and liver iron content may not be good indicators of brain iron deposition in patients with β thalassemia major. Nevertheless, the quantitative T2* MRI technique is useful for evaluation of brain iron overload in β thalassemia major patients.

  13. Halide salts accelerate degradation of high explosives by zerovalent iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Sung; Shea, Patrick J.; Yang, Jae E.; Kim, Jang-Eok

    2007-01-01

    Zerovalent iron (Fe 0 , ZVI) has drawn great interest as an inexpensive and effective material to promote the degradation of environmental contaminants. A focus of ZVI research is to increase degradation kinetics and overcome passivation for long-term remediation. Halide ions promote corrosion, which can increase and sustain ZVI reactivity. Adding chloride or bromide salts with Fe 0 (1% w/v) greatly enhanced TNT, RDX, and HMX degradation rates in aqueous solution. Adding Cl or Br salts after 24 h also restored ZVI reactivity, resulting in complete degradation within 8 h. These observations may be attributed to removal of the passivating oxide layer and pitting corrosion of the iron. While the relative increase in degradation rate by Cl - and Br - was similar, TNT degraded faster than RDX and HMX. HMX was most difficult to remove using ZVI alone but ZVI remained effective after five HMX reseeding cycles when Br - was present in solution. - The addition of halide ions promotes the degradation of high explosives by zerovalent iron

  14. T1-T2 dual-modal MRI of brain gliomas using PEGylated Gd-doped iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ning; Gu, Wei; Wang, Hao; Deng, Yunlong; Shi, Xin; Ye, Ling

    2014-03-01

    To overcome the negative contrast limitations of iron oxide-based contrast agents and to improve the biocompatibility of Gd-chelate contrast agents, PEGylated Gd-doped iron oxide (PEG-GdIO) NPs as a T1-T2 dual-modal contrast agent were synthesized by the polyol method. The transverse relaxivity (r2) and longitudinal relaxivity (r1) of PEG-GdIO were determined to be 66.9 and 65.9 mM(-1) s(-1), respectively. The high r1 value and low r2/r1 ratio make PEG-GdIO NPs suitable as a T1-T2 dual-modal contrast agent. The in vivo MRI demonstrated a brighter contrast enhancement in T1-weighted image and a simultaneous darken effect in T2-weighted MR image compared to the pre-contrast image in the region of glioma. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of PEG-GdIO NPs was confirmed by the in vitro MTT cytotoxicity and in vivo histological analyses (H&E). Therefore, PEG-GdIO NPs hold great potential in T1-T2 dual-modal imaging for the diagnosis of brain glioma. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Nicotianamine synthase overexpression positively modulates iron homeostasis-related genes in high iron rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng eWang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Nearly one-third of the world population, mostly women and children, suffer from iron malnutrition and its consequences, such as anemia or impaired mental development. Biofortification of rice, which is a staple crop for nearly half of the world’s population, can significantly contribute in alleviating iron deficiency. NFP rice (transgenic rice expressing nicotianamine synthase, ferritin and phytase genes has a more than six-fold increase in iron content in polished rice grains, resulting from the synergistic action of nicotianamine synthase (NAS and ferritin transgenes. We investigated iron homeostasis in NFP plants by analyzing the expression of 28 endogenous rice genes known to be involved in the homeostasis of iron and other metals, in iron-deficient and iron-sufficient conditions. RNA was collected from different tissues (roots, flag leaves, grains and at three developmental stages during grain filling. NFP plants showed increased sensitivity to iron-deficiency conditions and changes in the expression of endogenous genes involved in nicotianamine (NA metabolism, in comparison to their non-transgenic siblings. Elevated transcript levels were detected in NFP plants for several iron transporters. In contrast, expression of OsYSL2, which encodes a member of Yellow Stripe-like protein family, and a transporter of the NA-Fe(II complex was reduced in NFP plants under low iron conditions, indicating that expression of OsYSL2 is regulated by the endogenous iron status. Expression of the transgenes did not significantly affect overall iron homeostasis in NFP plants, which establishes the engineered push-pull mechanism as a suitable strategy to increase rice endosperm iron content.

  16. The influence of high iron diet on rat lung manganese absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Khristy; Molina, Ramon; Donaghey, Thomas; Brain, Joseph D.; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2006-01-01

    Individuals chronically exposed to manganese are at high risk for neurotoxic effects of this metal. A primary route of exposure is through respiration, although little is known about pulmonary uptake of metals or factors that modify this process. High dietary iron levels inversely affect intestinal uptake of manganese, and a major goal of this study was to determine if dietary iron loading could increase lung non-heme iron levels and alter manganese absorption. Rats were fed a high iron (1% carbonyl iron) or control diet for 4 weeks. Lung non-heme iron levels increased ∼2-fold in rats fed the high iron diet. To determine if iron-loading affected manganese uptake, 54 Mn was administered by intratracheal (it) instillation or intravenous (iv) injection for pharmacokinetic studies. 54 Mn absorption from the lungs to the blood was lower in it-instilled rats fed the 1% carbonyl iron diet. Pharmacokinetics of iv-injected 54 Mn revealed that the isotope was cleared more rapidly from the blood of iron-loaded rats. In situ analysis of divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) expression in lung detected mRNA in airway epithelium and bronchus-associated lymphatic tissue (BALT). Staining of the latter was significantly reduced in rats fed the high iron diet. In situ analysis of transferrin receptor (TfR) mRNA showed staining in BALT alone. These data demonstrate that manganese absorption from the lungs to the blood can be modified by iron status and the route of administration

  17. Shock loading influence on mechanical behavior of high purity iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buy, Francois; Voltz, Christophe

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes the analysis of shock wave effects for high purity iron. The method developed is based on the characterization of the mechanical behavior of as received and shocked material. Shock effect is generated through plate impact tests performed in the range of 4 GPa to 39 GPa on a single stage light gas gun or a powder gun. Therefore, as-received and impacted materials are characterized. A formalism proposed by J.R.Klepaczko and based on physical relations has been adopted to describe stress strain curves

  18. Neutrophilic iron oxidizers adapted to highly oxic environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gülay, Arda; Musovic, Sanin; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    Rapid sand filtration is an economical way to treat anoxic groundwaters and involves aeration followed by particulate and soluble substrate removal via deep bed filtration. The anoxic source groundwater can contain several potential electron donors (CH4, Fe2+, Mn2+, NH4+ and assimilable organic...... of iron oxidizing bacterial in the highly oxic environments found in typical rapid sand filters. The neutrophilic FeOB were enriched by the Fe2+/O2 opposing gradient technique and quantified by MPN methodology. Diversity fingerprints of the enrichment cultures were obtained with a 16S rRNA targeted DGGE...

  19. High solubility pathway for the carbon dioxide free production of iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licht, Stuart; Wang, Baohui

    2010-10-07

    We report a fundamental change in the understanding of iron oxide thermochemistry, opening a facile, new CO(2)-free route to iron production. The resultant process can eliminate a major global source of greenhouse gas emission, producing the staple iron in molten media at high rate and low electrolysis energy.

  20. Modeling high dimensional multichannel brain signals

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Lechuan

    2017-03-27

    In this paper, our goal is to model functional and effective (directional) connectivity in network of multichannel brain physiological signals (e.g., electroencephalograms, local field potentials). The primary challenges here are twofold: first, there are major statistical and computational difficulties for modeling and analyzing high dimensional multichannel brain signals; second, there is no set of universally-agreed measures for characterizing connectivity. To model multichannel brain signals, our approach is to fit a vector autoregressive (VAR) model with sufficiently high order so that complex lead-lag temporal dynamics between the channels can be accurately characterized. However, such a model contains a large number of parameters. Thus, we will estimate the high dimensional VAR parameter space by our proposed hybrid LASSLE method (LASSO+LSE) which is imposes regularization on the first step (to control for sparsity) and constrained least squares estimation on the second step (to improve bias and mean-squared error of the estimator). Then to characterize connectivity between channels in a brain network, we will use various measures but put an emphasis on partial directed coherence (PDC) in order to capture directional connectivity between channels. PDC is a directed frequency-specific measure that explains the extent to which the present oscillatory activity in a sender channel influences the future oscillatory activity in a specific receiver channel relative all possible receivers in the network. Using the proposed modeling approach, we have achieved some insights on learning in a rat engaged in a non-spatial memory task.

  1. Modeling high dimensional multichannel brain signals

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Lechuan; Fortin, Norbert; Ombao, Hernando

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, our goal is to model functional and effective (directional) connectivity in network of multichannel brain physiological signals (e.g., electroencephalograms, local field potentials). The primary challenges here are twofold: first, there are major statistical and computational difficulties for modeling and analyzing high dimensional multichannel brain signals; second, there is no set of universally-agreed measures for characterizing connectivity. To model multichannel brain signals, our approach is to fit a vector autoregressive (VAR) model with sufficiently high order so that complex lead-lag temporal dynamics between the channels can be accurately characterized. However, such a model contains a large number of parameters. Thus, we will estimate the high dimensional VAR parameter space by our proposed hybrid LASSLE method (LASSO+LSE) which is imposes regularization on the first step (to control for sparsity) and constrained least squares estimation on the second step (to improve bias and mean-squared error of the estimator). Then to characterize connectivity between channels in a brain network, we will use various measures but put an emphasis on partial directed coherence (PDC) in order to capture directional connectivity between channels. PDC is a directed frequency-specific measure that explains the extent to which the present oscillatory activity in a sender channel influences the future oscillatory activity in a specific receiver channel relative all possible receivers in the network. Using the proposed modeling approach, we have achieved some insights on learning in a rat engaged in a non-spatial memory task.

  2. An example of the application of Mössbauer spectroscopy for determination of concentration of iron in lyophilized brain tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rzepecka Patrycja

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mössbauer spectroscopy is not routinely used for the determination of the concentration of iron. However, as this method does not need any pre-treatment of samples before measurements, it may be of extreme importance for the assessment of iron in samples, which can then be used for further investigations. Biological samples are a good example, however, as the concentrations of iron are very low in these, it is important to exclude possible artefacts from the background spectrum related to iron present in the counter and cryostat windows. The aim of this study was to compare two methods of determination of the amounts of iron in investigated sample: one, in which the background spectrum was subtracted from the sample spectrum measured, and the other, in which the obtained non-elaborated spectrum was fitted with two doublets - a doublet for the measured sample and a doublet for the background spectrum. Three samples containing known amounts of natural iron (400, 800 and 1600 μg and a sample of lyophilized human brain tissue obtained from globus pallidus were assessed. Both methods led to the creation of a very good calibration curve with a correlation coefficient of 0.99. Although both methods gave similar results for the concentration of iron in the sample, the subtraction of the background spectrum had a significantly lower error of the final result.

  3. Iron overload by Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles is a High Risk Factor in Cirrhosis by a Systems Toxicology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yushuang; Zhao, Mengzhu; Yang, Fang; Mao, Yang; Xie, Hang; Zhou, Qibing

    2016-06-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as a contrast agent have been widely used in magnetic resonance imaging for tumor diagnosis and theranostics. However, there has been safety concern of SPIONs with cirrhosis related to excess iron-induced oxidative stress. In this study, the impact of iron overload by SPIONs was assessed on a mouse cirrhosis model. A single dose of SPION injection at 0.5 or 5 mg Fe/kg in the cirrhosis group induced a septic shock response at 24 h with elevated serum levels of liver and kidney function markers and extended impacts over 14 days including high levels of serum cholesterols and persistent low serum iron level. In contrast, full restoration of liver functions was found in the normal group with the same dosages over time. Analysis with PCR array of the toxicity pathways revealed the high dose of SPIONs induced significant expression changes of a distinct subset of genes in the cirrhosis liver. All these results suggested that excess iron of the high dose of SPIONs might be a risk factor for cirrhosis because of the marked impacts of elevated lipid metabolism, disruption of iron homeostasis and possibly, aggravated loss of liver functions.

  4. Iron concentration in breast milk normalised within one week of a single high-dose infusion of iron isomaltoside in randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Charlotte; Thomsen, Lars Lykke; Nørgaard, Astrid

    2017-01-01

    AIM: We compared the iron concentration in breast milk after a single high-dose of intravenous iron isomaltoside or daily oral iron for postpartum haemorrhage. METHODS: In this randomised controlled trial, the women were allocated a single dose of intravenous 1,200mg iron isomaltoside or oral iron...... deviation) iron concentration in breast milk in the intravenous and oral groups were 0.72 ± 0.27 mg/L and 0.40 ± 0.18 mg/L at three days (p birth. CONCLUSION: A single high...

  5. Nitric oxide induces hypoxia ischemic injury in the neonatal brain via the disruption of neuronal iron metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qing; Harris, Valerie A; Rafikov, Ruslan; Sun, Xutong; Kumar, Sanjiv; Black, Stephen M

    2015-12-01

    We have recently shown that increased hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generation is involved in hypoxia-ischemia (HI)-mediated neonatal brain injury. H2O2 can react with free iron to form the hydroxyl radical, through Fenton Chemistry. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine if there was a role for the hydroxyl radical in neonatal HI brain injury and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Our data demonstrate that HI increases the deposition of free iron and hydroxyl radical formation, in both P7 hippocampal slice cultures exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), and the neonatal rat exposed to HI. Both these processes were found to be nitric oxide (NO) dependent. Further analysis demonstrated that the NO-dependent increase in iron deposition was mediated through increased transferrin receptor expression and a decrease in ferritin expression. This was correlated with a reduction in aconitase activity. Both NO inhibition and iron scavenging, using deferoxamine administration, reduced hydroxyl radical levels and neuronal cell death. In conclusion, our results suggest that increased NO generation leads to neuronal cell death during neonatal HI, at least in part, by altering iron homeostasis and hydroxyl radical generation. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Ice sheets as a significant source of highly reactive nanoparticulate iron to the oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkings, Jon R; Wadham, Jemma L; Tranter, Martyn; Raiswell, Rob; Benning, Liane G; Statham, Peter J; Tedstone, Andrew; Nienow, Peter; Lee, Katherine; Telling, Jon

    2014-05-21

    The Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets cover ~ 10% of global land surface, but are rarely considered as active components of the global iron cycle. The ocean waters around both ice sheets harbour highly productive coastal ecosystems, many of which are iron limited. Measurements of iron concentrations in subglacial runoff from a large Greenland Ice Sheet catchment reveal the potential for globally significant export of labile iron fractions to the near-coastal euphotic zone. We estimate that the flux of bioavailable iron associated with glacial runoff is 0.40-2.54 Tg per year in Greenland and 0.06-0.17 Tg per year in Antarctica. Iron fluxes are dominated by a highly reactive and potentially bioavailable nanoparticulate suspended sediment fraction, similar to that identified in Antarctic icebergs. Estimates of labile iron fluxes in meltwater are comparable with aeolian dust fluxes to the oceans surrounding Greenland and Antarctica, and are similarly expected to increase in a warming climate with enhanced melting.

  7. Selection of common bean lines with high grain yield and high grain calcium and iron concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerinéia Dalfollo Ribeiro

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Genetic improvement of common bean nutritional quality has advantages in marketing and can contribute to society as a food source. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genetic variability for grain yield, calcium and iron concentrations in grains of inbred common bean lines obtained by different breeding methods. For this, 136 F7 inbred lines were obtained using the Pedigree method and 136 F7 inbred lines were obtained using the Single-Seed Descent (SSD method. The lines showed genetic variability for grain yield, and concentrations of calcium and iron independently of the method of advancing segregating populations. The Pedigree method allows obtaining a greater number of lines with high grain yield. Selection using the SSD method allows the identification of a larger number of lines with high concentrations of calcium and iron in grains. Weak negative correlations were found between grain yield and calcium concentration (r = -0.0994 and grain yield and iron concentration (r = -0.3926. Several lines show genetic superiority for grain yield and concentrations of calcium and iron in grains and their selection can result in new common bean cultivars with high nutritional quality.

  8. Antioxidant mechanism of milk mineral-high-affinity iron binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, K; Cornforth, D

    2007-01-01

    Milk mineral (MM), a by-product of whey processing, is an effective antioxidant in meat systems, but the antioxidant mechanism has not been established. MM has been postulated to chelate iron and prevent iron-catalysis of lipid oxidation. The objective of this research was to examine this putative mechanism. MM was compared to sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP), calcium phosphate monobasic (CPM), and calcium pyrophosphate (CPP) to determine iron-binding capacity, sample solubility, and eluate soluble phosphorus after treating samples with a ferrous chloride standard. Scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis was used to localize minerals on iron-treated MM particle surfaces. Histochemical staining for calcium was performed on raw and cooked ground beef samples with added MM. MM bound more iron per gram (P compounds, and was much less soluble (P iron across the MM particle surface, directly demonstrating iron binding to MM particles. Unlike other common chelating agents, such as STPP and citrate, histochemical staining demonstrated that MM remained insoluble in ground beef, even after cooking. The ability of MM to bind iron and remain insoluble may enhance its antioxidant effect by removing iron ions from solution. However, MM particles must be small and well distributed in order to adequately bind iron throughout the food system.

  9. Modeling High-Dimensional Multichannel Brain Signals

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Lechuan

    2017-12-12

    Our goal is to model and measure functional and effective (directional) connectivity in multichannel brain physiological signals (e.g., electroencephalograms, local field potentials). The difficulties from analyzing these data mainly come from two aspects: first, there are major statistical and computational challenges for modeling and analyzing high-dimensional multichannel brain signals; second, there is no set of universally agreed measures for characterizing connectivity. To model multichannel brain signals, our approach is to fit a vector autoregressive (VAR) model with potentially high lag order so that complex lead-lag temporal dynamics between the channels can be captured. Estimates of the VAR model will be obtained by our proposed hybrid LASSLE (LASSO + LSE) method which combines regularization (to control for sparsity) and least squares estimation (to improve bias and mean-squared error). Then we employ some measures of connectivity but put an emphasis on partial directed coherence (PDC) which can capture the directional connectivity between channels. PDC is a frequency-specific measure that explains the extent to which the present oscillatory activity in a sender channel influences the future oscillatory activity in a specific receiver channel relative to all possible receivers in the network. The proposed modeling approach provided key insights into potential functional relationships among simultaneously recorded sites during performance of a complex memory task. Specifically, this novel method was successful in quantifying patterns of effective connectivity across electrode locations, and in capturing how these patterns varied across trial epochs and trial types.

  10. Fractionated exposure of high energy iron ions has a sparing effect in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, P. Y.; Bakke, J.; Puey, A.

    The radiation environment in deep space is complex and includes a broad spectrum of charged and highly energetic particle radiations. Exposure to these types of radiations may pose potential health risks in manned space missions. The detection of particle radiation-induced genomic alterations in vivo, particularly in slow or non-dividing tissues, is therefore important to provide relevant information in estimating risks. We are using a plasmid-based lacZ transgenic mouse model system to rapidly measure, in a statistically reliable way, the mutagenic potential of charged particle radiations relevant in the space environment. The lacZ transgenic mouse has been constructed so that every cell of the animal contains multiple copies of an integrated target reporter gene, allowing us to measure tissue-specific radiation-induced changes as a function of dosing regime. The nature of these mutations can also be characterized by restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP). To examine the impact of dose protraction, animals were exposed to a single dose or daily fractions of 1 GeV/n iron ions. Cytotoxicity in the peripheral blood was measured by enumerating the frequency of circulating micronucleated reticulocytes (fMN-RET) in a time course from 24 h up to 1 week after completion of the radiation protocol. Brain and spleen tissues were harvested at 8 weeks after exposure and mutant frequencies (MF) in the transgene in these tissues were measured. Results from the fractionated protocol were compared to the responses obtained after the animals were exposed to the single dose treatment. We noted significantly lower levels of micronucleated reticulocytes in peripheral blood at 48 h after fractionated doses of iron ions when compared to the same total dose delivered in a single exposure demonstrating that protracted exposures of particle radiation resulted in an overall sparing effect in cytogenetic toxicity in the hematopoietic system in animals. Transgene mutation analysis

  11. Pure-iron/iron-based-alloy hybrid soft magnetic powder cores compacted at ultra-high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Tatsuya; Tsuruta, Hijiri; Watanabe, Asako; Ishimine, Tomoyuki; Ueno, Tomoyuki

    2018-04-01

    We developed Fe/FeSiAl soft magnetic powder cores (SMCs) for realizing the miniaturization and high efficiency of an electromagnetic conversion coil in the high-frequency range (˜20 kHz). We found that Fe/FeSiAl SMCs can be formed with a higher density under higher compaction pressure than pure-iron SMCs. These SMCs delivered a saturation magnetic flux density of 1.7 T and iron loss (W1/20k) of 158 kW/m3. The proposed SMCs exhibited similar excellent characteristics even in block shapes, which are closer to the product shapes.

  12. Pure-iron/iron-based-alloy hybrid soft magnetic powder cores compacted at ultra-high pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Saito

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We developed Fe/FeSiAl soft magnetic powder cores (SMCs for realizing the miniaturization and high efficiency of an electromagnetic conversion coil in the high-frequency range (∼20 kHz. We found that Fe/FeSiAl SMCs can be formed with a higher density under higher compaction pressure than pure-iron SMCs. These SMCs delivered a saturation magnetic flux density of 1.7 T and iron loss (W1/20k of 158 kW/m3. The proposed SMCs exhibited similar excellent characteristics even in block shapes, which are closer to the product shapes.

  13. Bubble formation upon crystallization of high nitrogen iron base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svyazhin, A.G.; Sivka, E.; Skuza, Z.

    2000-01-01

    A study is made into the conditions of nitrogen bubble formation during crystallization of unalloyed iron, alloys of Fe-O, Fe-O-S systems, steels 1Kh13, 0Kh18N9 and a two-phase Fe-11%Cr-1%Mo-0.2%V steel. It is revealed that the amount of bubbles in a high nitrogen steel casting increases with a degree of nitrogen supersaturation and decreases with a cooling rate growth and with a rise of surfactant concentration in the metal. In sound castings a nitrogen content can be increased due to a cooling rate growth, nitrogen dilution with inert gas, an increase of nitrogen pressure during crystallization as well as due to the introduction of such surfactants as sulphur, selenium, tellurium, tin [ru

  14. Voltammetric determination of arsenic in high iron and manganese groundwaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbon-Walsh, Kristoff; Salaün, Pascal; Uroic, M Kalle; Feldmann, Joerg; McArthur, John M; van den Berg, Constant M G

    2011-09-15

    Determination of the speciation of arsenic in groundwaters, using cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV), is severely hampered by high levels of iron and manganese. Experiments showed that the interference is eliminated by addition of EDTA, making it possible to determine the arsenic speciation on-site by CSV. This work presents the CSV method to determine As(III) in high-iron or -manganese groundwaters in the field with only minor sample treatment. The method was field-tested in West-Bengal (India) on a series of groundwater samples. Total arsenic was subsequently determined after acidification to pH 1 by anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). Comparative measurements by ICP-MS as reference method for total As, and by HPLC for its speciation, were used to corroborate the field data in stored samples. Most of the arsenic (78±0.02%) was found to occur as inorganic As(III) in the freshly collected waters, in accordance with previous studies. The data shows that the modified on-site CSV method for As(III) is a good measure of water contamination with As. The EDTA was also found to be effective in stabilising the arsenic speciation for longterm sample storage at room temperature. Without sample preservation, in water exposed to air and sunlight, the As(III) was found to become oxidised to As(V), and Fe(II) oxidised to Fe(III), removing the As(V) by adsorption on precipitating Fe(III)-hydroxides within a few hours. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Iron supplementation at high altitudes induces inflammation and oxidative injury to lung tissues in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salama, Samir A., E-mail: salama.3@buckeyemail.osu.edu [High Altitude Research Center, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Al-Azhar University, Cairo 11751 (Egypt); Department of Pharmacology and GTMR Unit, College of Clinical Pharmacy, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); Omar, Hany A. [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef 62514 (Egypt); Maghrabi, Ibrahim A. [Department of Clinical Pharmacy, College of Clinical Pharmacy, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); AlSaeed, Mohammed S. [Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); EL-Tarras, Adel E. [High Altitude Research Center, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to high altitudes is associated with hypoxia and increased vulnerability to oxidative stress. Polycythemia (increased number of circulating erythrocytes) develops to compensate the high altitude associated hypoxia. Iron supplementation is, thus, recommended to meet the demand for the physiological polycythemia. Iron is a major player in redox reactions and may exacerbate the high altitudes-associated oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to explore the potential iron-induced oxidative lung tissue injury in rats at high altitudes (6000 ft above the sea level). Iron supplementation (2 mg elemental iron/kg, once daily for 15 days) induced histopathological changes to lung tissues that include severe congestion, dilatation of the blood vessels, emphysema in the air alveoli, and peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α), lipid peroxidation product and protein carbonyl content in lung tissues were significantly elevated. Moreover, the levels of reduced glutathione and total antioxidant capacity were significantly reduced. Co-administration of trolox, a water soluble vitamin E analog (25 mg/kg, once daily for the last 7 days of iron supplementation), alleviated the lung histological impairments, significantly decreased the pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the oxidative stress markers. Together, our findings indicate that iron supplementation at high altitudes induces lung tissue injury in rats. This injury could be mediated through excessive production of reactive oxygen species and induction of inflammatory responses. The study highlights the tissue injury induced by iron supplementation at high altitudes and suggests the co-administration of antioxidants such as trolox as protective measures. - Highlights: • Iron supplementation at high altitudes induced lung histological changes in rats. • Iron induced oxidative stress in lung tissues of rats at high altitudes. • Iron

  16. Iron supplementation at high altitudes induces inflammation and oxidative injury to lung tissues in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salama, Samir A.; Omar, Hany A.; Maghrabi, Ibrahim A.; AlSaeed, Mohammed S.; EL-Tarras, Adel E.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to high altitudes is associated with hypoxia and increased vulnerability to oxidative stress. Polycythemia (increased number of circulating erythrocytes) develops to compensate the high altitude associated hypoxia. Iron supplementation is, thus, recommended to meet the demand for the physiological polycythemia. Iron is a major player in redox reactions and may exacerbate the high altitudes-associated oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to explore the potential iron-induced oxidative lung tissue injury in rats at high altitudes (6000 ft above the sea level). Iron supplementation (2 mg elemental iron/kg, once daily for 15 days) induced histopathological changes to lung tissues that include severe congestion, dilatation of the blood vessels, emphysema in the air alveoli, and peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α), lipid peroxidation product and protein carbonyl content in lung tissues were significantly elevated. Moreover, the levels of reduced glutathione and total antioxidant capacity were significantly reduced. Co-administration of trolox, a water soluble vitamin E analog (25 mg/kg, once daily for the last 7 days of iron supplementation), alleviated the lung histological impairments, significantly decreased the pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the oxidative stress markers. Together, our findings indicate that iron supplementation at high altitudes induces lung tissue injury in rats. This injury could be mediated through excessive production of reactive oxygen species and induction of inflammatory responses. The study highlights the tissue injury induced by iron supplementation at high altitudes and suggests the co-administration of antioxidants such as trolox as protective measures. - Highlights: • Iron supplementation at high altitudes induced lung histological changes in rats. • Iron induced oxidative stress in lung tissues of rats at high altitudes. • Iron

  17. Biological Signatures of Brain Damage Associated with High Serum Ferritin Levels in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke and Thrombolytic Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Millán

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Increased body iron stores have been related to greater oxidative stress and brain injury in clinical and experimental cerebral ischemia and reperfusion. We aimed to investigate the biological signatures of excitotoxicity, inflammation and blood brain barrier disruption potentially associated with high serum ferritin levels-related damage in acute stroke patients treated with i.v. t-PA.

  18. [Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of brain iron deposition: comparison between quantitative susceptibility mapping and transverse relaxation rate (R2*) mapping].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Ji-Jing; Feng, Yan-Qiu

    2018-03-20

    To evaluate the accuracy and sensitivity of quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) and transverse relaxation rate (R2*) mapping in the measurement of brain iron deposition. Super paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) phantoms and mouse models of Parkinson's disease (PD) related to iron deposition in the substantia nigra (SN) underwent 7.0 T magnetic resonance (MR) scans (Bruker, 70/16) with a multi-echo 3D gradient echo sequence, and the acquired data were processed to obtain QSM and R2*. Linear regression analysis was performed for susceptibility and R2* in the SPIO phantoms containing 5 SPIO concentrations (30, 15, 7.5, 3.75 and 1.875 µg/mL) to evaluate the accuracy of QSM and R2* in quantitative iron analysis. The sensitivities of QSM and R2* mapping in quantitative detection of brain iron deposition were assessed using mouse models of PD induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahy-dropyridine (MPTP) in comparison with the control mice. In SPIO phantoms, QSM provided a higher accuracy than R2* mapping and their goodness-of-fit coefficients (R 2 ) were 0.98 and 0.89, respectively. In the mouse models of PD and control mice, the susceptibility of the SN was significantly higher in the PD models (5.19∓1.58 vs 2.98∓0.88, n=5; Pbrain iron deposition than R2*, and the susceptibility derived by QSM can be a potentially useful biomarker for studying PD.

  19. High Neonatal Blood Iron Content Is Associated with the Risk of Childhood Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Nyholm Kyvsgaard

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: Iron requirement increases during pregnancy and iron supplementation is therefore recommended in many countries. However, excessive iron intake may lead to destruction of pancreatic β-cells. Therefore, we aim to test if higher neonatal iron content in blood is associated with the risk of developing type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D in childhood; (2 Methods: A case-control study was conducted, including 199 children diagnosed with T1D before the age of 16 years from 1991 to 2005 and 199 controls matched on date of birth. Information on confounders was available in 181 cases and 154 controls. Iron was measured on a neonatal single dried blood spot sample and was analyzed by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate if iron content in whole blood was associated with the risk of T1D; (3 Results: A doubling of iron content increased the odds of developing T1D more than two-fold (odds ratio (95% CI, 2.55 (1.04; 6.24. Iron content increased with maternal age (p = 0.04 and girls had higher content than boys (p = 0.01; (4 Conclusions: Higher neonatal iron content associates to an increased risk of developing T1D before the age of 16 years. Iron supplementation during early childhood needs further investigation, including the causes of high iron in neonates.

  20. High speed turning of compacted graphite iron using controlled modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalbaum, Tyler Paul

    Compacted graphite iron (CGI) is a material which emerged as a candidate material to replace cast iron (CI) in the automotive industry for engine block castings. Its thermal and mechanical properties allow the CGI-based engines to operate at higher cylinder pressures and temperatures than CI-based engines, allowing for lower fuel emissions and increased fuel economy. However, these same properties together with the thermomechanical wear mode in the CGI-CBN system result in poor machinability and inhibit CGI from seeing wide spread use in the automotive industry. In industry, machining of CGI is done only at low speeds, less than V = 200 m/min, to avoid encountering rapid wear of the cutting tools during cutting. Studies have suggested intermittent cutting operations such as milling suffer less severe tool wear than continuous cutting. Furthermore, evidence that a hard sulfide layer which forms over the cutting edge in machining CI at high speeds is absent during machining CGI is a major factor in the difference in machinability of these material systems. The present study addresses both of these issues by modification to the conventional machining process to allow intermittent continuous cutting. The application of controlled modulation superimposed onto the cutting process -- modulation-assisted machining (MAM) -- is shown to be quite effective in reducing the wear of cubic boron nitride (CBN) tools when machining CGI at high machining speeds (> 500 m/min). The tool life is at least 20 times greater than found in conventional machining of CGI. This significant reduction in wear is a consequence of reduction in the severity of the tool-work contact conditions with MAM. The propensity for thermochemical wear of CBN is thus reduced. It is found that higher cutting speed (> 700 m/min) leads to lower tool wear with MAM. The MAM configuration employing feed-direction modulation appears feasible for implementation at high speeds and offers a solution to this challenging

  1. Brain iron overload, insulin resistance, and cognitive performance in obese subjects: a preliminary MRI case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Gerard; Puig, Josep; Daunis-I-Estadella, Josep; Molina, Xavier; Xifra, Gemma; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Pedraza, Salvador; Ricart, Wifredo; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Fernández-Real, José Manuel

    2014-11-01

    The linkage among the tissue iron stores, insulin resistance (IR), and cognition remains unclear in the obese population. We aimed to identify the factors that contribute to increased hepatic iron concentration (HIC) and brain iron overload (BIO), as evaluated by MRI, and to evaluate their impact on cognitive performance in obese and nonobese subjects. We prospectively recruited 23 middle-aged obese subjects without diabetes (13 women; age 50.4 ± 7.7 years; BMI 43.7 ± 4.48 kg/m2) and 20 healthy nonobese volunteers (10 women; age 48.8 ± 9.5 years; BMI 24.3 ± 3.54 kg/m2) in whom iron load was assessed in white and gray matter and the liver by MRI. IR was measured from HOMA-IR and an oral glucose tolerance test. A battery of neuropsychological tests was used to evaluate the cognitive performance. Multivariate regression analysis was used to identify the independent associations of BIO and cognitive performance. A significant increase in iron load was detected at the caudate nucleus (P cognitive performance. Obesity and IR may contribute to increased HIC and BIO being associated with worse cognitive performance. BIO could be a potentially useful MRI biomarker for IR and obesity-associated cognitive dysfunction. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  2. Exogenous iron redistribution between brain and spleen after the administration of the {sup 57}Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} ferrofluid into the ventricle of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabbasov, Raul, E-mail: gabbasov_rr@nrcki.ru [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Polikarpov, Dmitry [Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, Macquarie University, NSW (Australia); Cherepanov, Valery [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Chuev, Michael; Mischenko, Ilya [Institute of Physics and Technology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Loginiva, Nadezhda; Loseva, Elena [Institute of Higher Nervous Activity and Neurophysiology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Nikitin, Maxim [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Panchenko, Vladislav [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-01

    Iron clearance pathways after the injection of {sup 57}Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-based dextran-stabilized ferrofluid into the brain ventricles were studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy and histologically. The nanoparticles appeared in spleen tissues within 3 h after transcranial injection. We separated and independently estimated concentrations of iron encapsulated in nanoparticles and iron encapsulated in proteins in the all rat organs. It was found that the dextran coated initial nanoparticles of the ferrofluid disintegrated in the brain into separate superparamagnetic nanoparticles within a week after the injection.The nanoparticles completely exited from the brain in a few weeks. The exogenous iron appeared in the spleen in 3 h after the injection and remained in the spleen for more than month. The appearance of additional component in Mössbauer spectra of spleen samples revealed a fundamental difference in the mechanisms of processing of iron nanoparticles in this organ, which was also confirmed by histological examination.

  3. High frequency oscillations in brain hemodynamic response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Ata; Bolay, Hayrunnisa

    2007-07-01

    Tight autoregulation of vessel tone guarantees proper delivery of nutrients to the tissues. This regulation is maintained at a more delicate level in the brain since any decrease in the supply of glucose and oxygen to neuronal tissues might lead to unrecoverable injury. Functional near infrared spectroscopy has been proposed as a new tool to monitor the cerebrovascular response during cognitive activity. We have observed that during a Stroop task three distinct oscillatory patterns govern the control of the cerebrovascular reactivity: very low frequency (0.02-0.05 Hz), low frequency (0.08-0.12 Hz) and high frequency (0.12-0.18 Hz). High frequency oscillations have been shown to be related to stress level of the subjects. Our findings indicate that as the stress level is increased so does the energy of the high frequency component indicating a higher stimulation from the autonomic nervous system.

  4. Thermodynamic data for iron (II) in high-saline solutions at temperatures up to 90 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, Andres G.; Scharge, Tina; Moog, Helge C.

    2013-12-15

    For natural aqueous systems in general and for the near field of underground nuclear waste repositories in particular thermodynamic properties of iron species and solid phases are of predominant importance. Regardless of the question of the host rock, nuclear waste containment in Germany will be based on massive steel canisters. The total mass of iron present in a repository can be, dependent on the applied variant, sum up to more than 100 000 tons. The overall geochemical milieu including pH and EH will be dominated by the overall abundance of metallic, ferrous, and ferric iron, their aqueous speciation and solid iron-phases. This milieu is imposed on all other equilibria of interest, including those which determine radionuclide solubility. In addition to this, iron bearing corrosion phases due to their shear mass may exhibit a significant sink for radionuclides in terms of incorporation or sorption. As to the evolution of EH it is important to note that application of the Nernst equation requires knowing the electrochemical activities of the involved reactants. Iron is present in aqueous solutions in two oxidation states: +II (ferrous iron) and +III (ferric iron). Ferric iron exhibits a much more complex speciation behavior than ferrous iron, where from a conceptual point of view many species may be neglected. Ferric iron, on the contrary, is subject to considerable complex formation with chloride, sulfate, and - most importantly - with hydroxide. For this reason, experimental and theoretical treatment of ''iron'' at GRS in high saline solutions proceeded along two strings, one for each oxidation state, with the ultimate goal to deliver a thermodynamic model for ''iron'' in high saline solutions.

  5. A Powerful Mitochondria-Targeted Iron Chelator Affords High Photoprotection against Solar Ultraviolet A Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Reelfs, Olivier; Abbate, Vincenzo; Hider, Robert C.; Pourzand, Charareh

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are the principal destination for labile iron, making these organelles particularly susceptible to oxidative damage on exposure to ultraviolet A (UVA, 320?400 nm), the oxidizing component of sunlight. The labile iron-mediated oxidative damage caused by UVA to mitochondria leads to necrotic cell death via adenosine triphosphate depletion. Therefore, targeted removal of mitochondrial labile iron via highly specific tools from these organelles may be an effective approach to protect...

  6. Brain inspired high performance electronics on flexible silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Sevilla, Galo T.; Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Brain's stunning speed, energy efficiency and massive parallelism makes it the role model for upcoming high performance computation systems. Although human brain components are a million times slower than state of the art silicon industry components

  7. Iron from nanocompounds containing iron and zinc is highly bioavailable in rats without tissue accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilty, Florentine M; Arnold, Myrtha; Hilbe, Monika; Teleki, Alexandra; Knijnenburg, Jesper T N; Ehrensperger, Felix; Hurrell, Richard F; Pratsinis, Sotiris E; Langhans, Wolfgang; Zimmermann, Michael B

    2010-05-01

    Effective iron fortification of foods is difficult, because water-soluble compounds that are well absorbed, such as ferrous sulphate (FeSO(4)), often cause unacceptable changes in the colour or taste of foods. Poorly water-soluble compounds, on the other hand, cause fewer sensory changes, but are not well absorbed. Here, we show that poorly water-soluble nanosized Fe and Fe/Zn compounds (specific surface area approximately 190 m(2) g(-1)) made by scalable flame aerosol technology have in vivo iron bioavailability in rats comparable to FeSO(4) and cause less colour change in reactive food matrices than conventional iron fortificants. The addition of Zn to FePO(4) and Mg to Fe/Zn oxide increases Fe absorption from the compounds, and doping with Mg also improves their colour. After feeding rats with nanostructured iron-containing compounds, no stainable Fe was detected in their gut wall, gut-associated lymphatics or other tissues, suggesting no adverse effects. Nanosizing of poorly water-soluble Fe compounds sharply increases their absorption and nutritional value.

  8. Melter Throughput Enhancements for High-Iron HLW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, A. A. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Gan, Hoa [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Joseph, Innocent [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Matlack, Keith S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Chaudhuri, Malabika [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Kot, Wing [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-12-26

    This report describes work performed to develop and test new glass and feed formulations in order to increase glass melting rates in high waste loading glass formulations for HLW with high concentrations of iron. Testing was designed to identify glass and melter feed formulations that optimize waste loading and waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work included preparation and characterization of crucible melts to assess melt rate using a vertical gradient furnace system and to develop new formulations with enhanced melt rate. Testing evaluated the effects of waste loading on glass properties and the maximum waste loading that can be achieved. The results from crucible-scale testing supported subsequent DuraMelter 100 (DM100) tests designed to examine the effects of enhanced glass and feed formulations on waste processing rate and product quality. The DM100 was selected as the platform for these tests due to its extensive previous use in processing rate determination for various HLW streams and glass compositions.

  9. Formation of poorly crystalline iron monosulfides: Surface redox reactions on high purity iron, spectroelectrochemical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansson, E.B. [Geological Institute, University of Copenhagen, Oster Voldgade 10, Copenhagen K, DK-1350 (Denmark); Odziemkowski, M.S. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ont., N2L 3G1 (Canada)]. E-mail: marek@sciborg.uwaterloo.ca; Gillham, R.W. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ont., N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2006-11-15

    In the use of iron for reductive dehalogenation of chlorinated solvents in ground water, due to presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria the formation of hydrogen sulfide is expected. To simulate those processes the interface between 99.99% pure iron and 0.1 M NaHCO{sub 3} deoxygenated solution with 3.1 x 10{sup -5}-7.8 x 10{sup -3} M Na{sub 2}S . 9H{sub 2}O added was studied. The surface processes were characterised by the in situ normal Raman spectroscopy (NRS) and ex situ techniques; X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). The open circuit potential (OCP) was monitored during in situ NRS measurements, and potentiodynamic anodic polarization measurements were carried out to reveal electrochemical behaviour of iron electrode. Open circuit potential-time transients indicated that the native oxide is unstable in deaerated bicarbonate solution and undergoes reductive dissolution (i.e. autoreduction) leaving the metallic Fe covered by Fe(OH){sub 2}, adsorbed OH{sup -}, and patches of 'magnetite-like' oxide. Immediately upon injection of the Na{sub 2}S-solution the iron interface undergoes complex redox surface processes and a poorly crystalline FeS film forms. Potentiodynamic anodic polarization measurements indicated a mechanical breakdown of the FeS film. The origin and initiation of this breakdown process is not clear but is probably a result of internal stress developed during film growth. Based on surface studies supported by electrochemical measurements, a conceptual model for the complex redox processes occurring at the iron interface is proposed. This model describes the structural development of a poorly crystalline FeS, which breaks down, allowing further dissolution of the Fe and formation of FeOOH at the interface. Simultaneously and despite the existence of thick layer of FeS the entrance of hydrogen was evident as the typical hydrogen cracks in bulk of the

  10. Lead iron phosphate glass as a containment medium for disposal of high-level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boatner, L.A.; Sales, B.C.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes lead-iron phosphate glasses containing a high level of Fe 2 O 3 for use as a storage medium for high-level radioactive nuclear waste. By combining lead-iron phosphate glass with various types of simulated high-level nuclear waste, a highly corrosion resistant, homogeneous, easily processed glass can be formed. For corroding solutions at 90 0 C, with solution pH values in the range between 5 and 9, the corrosion rate of the lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glass is at least 10 2 to 10 3 times lower than the corrosion rate of a comparable borosilicate nuclear waste glass. The presence of Fe 2 O 3 in forming the lead-iron phosphate glass is critical. The lead-iron phosphate waste glasses can be prepared with minimal modification of the technology developed for processing borosilicate glass nuclear wasteforms

  11. Iron content and solubility in dust from high-alpine snow along a north-south transect of High Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangjian Wu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the dissolved and insoluble iron fraction of dust (mineral aerosol in high-alpine snow samples collected along a north-south transect across High Asia (Eastern Tien Shan, Qilian Shan, and Southern Tibetan Plateau. This dust provides the basic chemical properties of mid- and high-level tropospheric Asian dust that can supply the limiting iron nutrient for phytoplankton growth in the North Pacific. The iron content in Asian dust averages 4.95% in Eastern Tien Shan, 3.38–5.41% along Qilian Shan and 3.85% in the Southern Tibetan Plateau. The iron fractional solubility averages about 0.25% in Eastern Tien Shan, 0.05–2% along Qilian Shan and 1.5% in the Southern Tibetan Plateau. Among the controlling factors that can affect iron solubility in Asian dust, such as dust composition and particle grain size, acidity seems to be the most significant and can increase the iron solubility by one or two orders of magnitude with acidification of pH=0.66. Our results reveal that iron solubility of dust in the remote downwind sites is higher than that in high-alpine snow, confirming the strong pH-dependence of iron solubility, and indicating that Asian dust shows a large variation in iron solubility on a regional scale.

  12. Determination of iron in highly-saline matrices by FIA-ICP-MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    Analysis of iron by inductively-coupled-plasma mass-spectrometry (ICP-MS) may be significantly improved by applying a protocol of flow-injection analysis. The iron species of the sample was preconcentrated by an ammonia buffer at pH = 9.2 on a filterless nylon-knotted reactor, and the adsorbed...... species were subsequently eluted by hydrochloric acid and analysed by ICP-MS. During the FIA step of preconcentration, a high degree of salinity did not influence the adsorption mechanism of iron, which may be related to formation of iron-hydroxide complexes at the sites of amide moieties of the nylon...

  13. Iron-free moving coil high temperature displacement transducer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grindrod, A

    1976-07-01

    A unique, iron free, moving coil linear displacement transducer system is described, which is suitable for continuously monitoring linear movements, at varying temperatures up to 750/sup 0/C, in operational nuclear reactors. Although this device has been primarily developed for Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Systems, it also has uses where long term measurements on conventional high temperature plant are required. Furthermore it could be particularly useful in material creep laboratories where precise linear changes in specimen length need to be monitored at elevated temperatures, over several years. Since individual transducer installations demand specific mounting arrangements to suit particular component geometries, evaluations have been made only on standard operational modules or capsules which are designed for containment in a range of housing or fixtures to suit particular applications. The behaviour of these devices has been studied at temperatures up to 750/sup 0/C for periods of over 10,000 h. An evaluation is also included of a commercially designed sensor assembly employing the same principle, for monitoring the boiler-shield wall movement at Hinkley Point 'B' AGR Station.

  14. Evidence for low molecular weight, non-transferrin-bound iron in rat brain and cerebrospinal fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moos, Torben; Morgan, Evan H.

    1998-01-01

    Neuroscience, blood-brain barrier, choroid plexus, interstitial fluid, transferrin receptor, uptake......Neuroscience, blood-brain barrier, choroid plexus, interstitial fluid, transferrin receptor, uptake...

  15. USE OF HIGH-STRENGTH BAINITIC CAST IRON FOR PRODUCING GEAR WHEELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Pokrovskiy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The advantages and drawbacks of high-strength cast irons with bainitic structure are reviewed basing on the authors’ own experience in the production of critical partsfrom this material and on the analysis of world trends. A possibility of the replacement of alloy steels by bainitic cast iron in manufacturing critical machine parts is discussed.

  16. Synthesis of hydroxide type sorbents from industry high-iron wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanenko, E.K.; Smirnov, A.L.

    1986-01-01

    Article presents the results of studies on possibility of using of technological iron containing wastes for the obtaining of hydroxide type sorbents in granular form. The scheme of technology of synthesis of hydroxide type sorbents from high-iron wastes is elaborated.

  17. XPS and FTIR spectroscopic study on microwave treated high phosphorus iron ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omran, Mamdouh; Fabritius, Timo; Elmahdy, Ahmed M.; Abdel-Khalek, Nagui A.; El-Aref, Mortada; Elmanawi, Abd El-Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The effect of microwave radiation on structure and chemical state of high phosphorus iron ore was studied. • FTIR analyses showed that after microwave radiation the functional chemical groups of phosphorus bearing minerals (fluorapatite) dissociated. • High resolution XPS analyses of Fe 2p peaks showed that after microwave radiation a portion of Fe(+III) was reduced to Fe(+II). • Microwave radiation had a positive effect on the magnetic properties of iron oxide, through formation of ferromagnetic phases. - Abstract: A growing interest in microwave heating has emerged recently. Several potential microwave applications regarding minerals’ processing have been investigated. This paper investigates the effect of microwave radiation on Egyptian high phosphorus iron ore. Three different iron ore samples have varying Fe 2 O 3 and P 2 O 5 contents and mineralogical textures were studied. A comparative study has been carried out between untreated and microwave treated iron ore. XRD and FTIR analyses showed that after microwave radiation the crystallinity of iron bearing minerals (hematite) increased, while the functional chemical groups of phosphorus bearing minerals (fluorapatite) and other gangues dissociated. High resolution XPS analyses of Fe 2p peaks showed that after microwave radiation a portion of Fe(+III) was reduced to Fe(+II). This means that after microwave radiation iron oxide (hematite, Fe 3+ ) transformed into more magnetic phase. The results indicated that microwave radiation had a positive effect on the magnetic properties of iron oxide, through formation of ferromagnetic phases

  18. Studies on high iron content in water resources of Moradabad district (UP, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipin Kumar

    2017-04-01

    The overload of iron may cause severe health problems such as liver cancer, diabetes, cirrhosis of liver, diseases related to heart and central nervous system, infertility etc. The presence of high concentration of iron leads to adverse changes in colour, odour and taste of water and it also stains clothes and utensils. However, the local health authority's records are not available.

  19. Treatment of highly polluted groundwater by novel iron removal process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, S J; Kang, C D; Lee, J W; Kim, W S

    2001-01-01

    The removal of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) in groundwater has been generally achieved by simple aeration, or the addition of an oxidizing agent. Aeration has been shown to be very efficient in insolubilization ferrous iron at a pH level greater than 6.5. In this study, pH was maintained over 6.5 using limestone granules under constant aeration to oxidize ferrous iron in groundwater in a limestone packed column. A sedimentation unit coupled with a membrane filtration was also developed to precipitate and filtrate the oxidized ferric compound simultaneously. Several bench-scale studies, including the effects of the limestone granule sizes, amounts and hydraulic retention time on iron removal in the limestone packed column were investigated. It was found that 550 g/L of the 7-8 mesh size limestone granules, and 20 min of hydraulic retention time in the limestone packed column, were necessary for the sufficient oxidation of 40 mg/L of iron(II) in groundwater. Long-term operation was successfully achieved in contaminated waters by removing the iron deposits on the surface of the limestone granule by continuous aeration from the bottom of the column. Periodic reverse flow helped to remove caking and fouling of membrane surface caused by the continuous filtration. Recycling of the treated water from the membrane right after reverse flow operation made possible an admissible limit of iron concentration of the treated water for drinking. The pilot-scale process was constructed and has been tested in the rural area of Korea.

  20. Thermal migration of iron implanted in aluminium at high doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asundi, V.K.; Joshi, M.C.; Deb, S.K.; Soud, D.K.; Kulkarni, V.N.; Sundararaman, M.

    1978-01-01

    The anneal behaviour of the Fe-Al metastable system produced by implantation of Fe + ions at 30 keV has been reported. The implant concentrations between 18-42 at percent have been chosen, in order to exceed the normal solid solubility of Fe in Al by about three orders of magnitude. Isothermal annealing has been done under vacuum (55 x 10 -6 Torr) at 400deg C and 570 deg C. The iron depth profiles have been determined, by Rutherford backscattering of 2 MeV He + ions. It has been found that 1) as annealing proceeds, all specimens show rapid enhanced diffusion initially (upto about 30 m), followed by a much slower diffusion as iron ions migrate inwards (2) at implant concentrations 23 at percent, double peaks appear in iron depth profiles, followed by rapid migration of diffused iron towards surface and (3) at still higher anneal times, the out-diffused iron moves inward again. This kind of out-diffusion behaviour in a metallic system has not been reported earlier in the literature. Also, the presence of Fe 4 Al 13 has been identified as terminal phase, using x-ray diffraction techniques. (K.B.)

  1. Mössbauer study of exogenous iron redistribution between the brain and the liver after administration of {sup 57}Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} ferrofluid in the ventricle of the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polikarpov, Dmitry, E-mail: polikarpov.imp@gmail.com [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Russian National Research Medical University named after N.I.Pirogov, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gabbasov, Raul; Cherepanov, Valery [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Loginova, Natalia; Loseva, Elena [Institute of Higher Nervous Activity and Neurophysiology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Nikitin, Maxim [Shemyakin-Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Yurenia, Anton; Panchenko, Vladislav [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-15

    Iron clearance pathways after the injection of {sup 57}Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-based ferrofluid into the brain ventricles were studied histologically and by Mössbauer spectroscopy. It was found that the dextran coated initial nanobeads of the ferrofluid disintegrated in the brain into separate superparamagnetic nanoparticles within a week after the injection. The exogenous iron completely exited all ventricular cavities of the brain within a week after the injection but remained in the white matter for months. Kupffer cells with the exogenous iron appeared in the rat liver 2 hours after the injection. Their concentration reached its maximum on the third day and dropped to zero within a week. The exogenous iron appeared in the spleen a week after the injection and remained in the spleen for months.

  2. High energy argon ion irradiations of polycrystalline iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunlop, A.; Lesueur, D.; Lorenzelli, N.; Boulanger, L.

    1986-09-01

    We present here the results of our recent irradiations of polycrystalline iron targets with very energetic (1.76 GeV) Ar ions. The targets consist of piles of thin iron samples, the total thickness of each target being somewhat greater than the theoretical range (450 μm) of the ions. We can thus separate the phenomena which occur at different average energies of the ions and study during the slowing-down process: the different types of induced nuclear reactions. They allow us to determine the experimental range of the ions, the defect profiles in the targets, the structure of the displacement cascades (electron microscopy) and their stability

  3. The presence of serum alters the properties of iron oxide nanoparticles and lowers their accumulation by cultured brain astrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geppert, Mark; Petters, Charlotte; Thiel, Karsten; Dringen, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) are considered for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Such particles are able to cross the blood–brain barrier and are taken up into brain cells. To test whether serum components affect the properties of IONPs and/or their uptake into brain cells, we have incubated dimercaptosuccinate-coated magnetic IONPs without and with fetal calf serum (FCS) and have exposed cultured brain astrocytes with IONPs in the absence or presence of FCS. Incubation with FCS caused a concentration-dependent increase in the average hydrodynamic diameter of the particles and of their zeta-potential. In the presence of 10 % FCS, the diameter of the IONPs increased from 57 ± 2 to 107 ± 6 nm and the zeta-potential of the particles from −22 ± 5 to −9 ± 1 mV. FCS affected also strongly the uptake of IONPs by cultured astrocytes. The efficient time- and temperature-dependent cellular accumulation of IONPs was lowered with increasing concentration of FCS by up to 90 %. In addition, in the absence of serum, endocytosis inhibitors did not alter the IONP accumulation by astrocytes, while chlorpromazine or wortmannin lowered significantly the accumulation of IONPs in the presence of FCS, suggesting that clathrin-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis are involved in astrocytic IONP uptake from serum-containing medium. These data demonstrate that the presence of FCS strongly affects the properties of IONPs as well as their accumulation by cultured brain cells.

  4. High-fluence implantation of iron into polyimide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macková, Anna; Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Peřina, Vratislav; Popok, V. N.; Khaibullin, R. I.; Bazarov, V. V.; Odzhaev, V. B.

    158/159, - (2002), s. 395-398 ISSN 0257-8972 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/99/1626; GA ČR GA102/01/1324 Keywords : polyimide * ion implantation * iron * Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.267, year: 2002

  5. High energy spin waves in iron measured by neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boothroyd, A.T.; Paul, D.M.; Mook, H.A.

    1991-01-01

    We present new results for the spin were dispersion relation measured along the [ζζ0] direction in bcc iron (12% silicon) by time-of-flight, neutron inelastic scattering. The excitations were followed to the zone boundary, where they are spread over a range of energies around 300meV. 6 refs., 2 figs

  6. Iron content and solubility in dust from high-alpine snow along a north-south transect of High Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Guangjian; Zhang, Chenglong; Li, Zhongqin; Zhang, Xuelei; Gao, Shaopeng

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the dissolved and insoluble iron fraction of dust (mineral aerosol) in high-alpine snow samples collected along a north-south transect across High Asia (Eastern Tien Shan, Qilian Shan, and Southern Tibetan Plateau). This dust provides the basic chemical properties of mid- and high-level tropospheric Asian dust that can supply the limiting iron nutrient for phytoplankton growth in the North Pacific. The iron content in Asian dust averages 4.95% in Eastern Tien Shan, 3.38–5...

  7. Void swelling in fast reactor irradiated high purity binary iron-chromium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, E.A.; Stow, D.A.

    The void swelling characteristics of a series of high purity binary iron-chromium alloys containing 0 - 615 0 C. The void swelling behaviour can be qualitatively rationalized in terms of point defect trapping and precipitation processes involving chromium atoms

  8. Iron-niobium-aluminum alloy having high-temperature corrosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Huey S.

    1988-04-14

    An alloy for use in high temperature sulfur and oxygen containing environments, having aluminum for oxygen resistance, niobium for sulfur resistance and the balance iron, is discussed. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Characterization of a tricationic trigonal bipyramidal iron(IV) cyanide complex, with a very high reduction potential, and its iron(II) and iron(III) congeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Jason; Farquhar, Erik R; Guo, Yisong; Cranswick, Matthew A; Ray, Kallol; Münck, Eckard; Que, Lawrence

    2011-04-04

    Currently, there are only a handful of synthetic S = 2 oxoiron(IV) complexes. These serve as models for the high-spin (S = 2) oxoiron(IV) species that have been postulated, and confirmed in several cases, as key intermediates in the catalytic cycles of a variety of nonheme oxygen activating enzymes. The trigonal bipyramidal complex [Fe(IV)(O)(TMG(3)tren)](2+) (1) was both the first S = 2 oxoiron(IV) model complex to be generated in high yield and the first to be crystallographically characterized. In this study, we demonstrate that the TMG(3)tren ligand is also capable of supporting a tricationic cyanoiron(IV) unit, [Fe(IV)(CN)(TMG(3)tren)](3+) (4). This complex was generated by electrolytic oxidation of the high-spin (S = 2) iron(II) complex [Fe(II)(CN)(TMG(3)tren)](+) (2), via the S = 5/2 complex [Fe(III)(CN)(TMG(3)tren)](2+) (3), the progress of which was conveniently monitored by using UV-vis spectroscopy to follow the growth of bathochromically shifting ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) bands. A combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), Mössbauer and NMR spectroscopies was used to establish that 4 has a S = 0 iron(IV) center. Consistent with its diamagnetic iron(IV) ground state, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of 4 indicated a significant contraction of the iron-donor atom bond lengths, relative to those of the crystallographically characterized complexes 2 and 3. Notably, 4 has an Fe(IV/III) reduction potential of ∼1.4 V vs Fc(+/o), the highest value yet observed for a monoiron complex. The relatively high stability of 4 (t(1/2) in CD(3)CN solution containing 0.1 M KPF(6) at 25 °C ≈ 15 min), as reflected by its high-yield accumulation via slow bulk electrolysis and amenability to (13)C NMR at -40 °C, highlights the ability of the sterically protecting, highly basic peralkylguanidyl donors of the TMG(3)tren ligand to support highly charged high-valent complexes.

  10. Nanocrystalline Iron-Cobalt Alloys for High Saturation Indutance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-24

    film deposited just like the pick-up of a turn-table music player. The contact pads provide the electrical contacts to the starting and end point of...anisotropy using the geometry of the thin toroid. We have shown experimentally that the thin film toroid calculations may be applicable to up to millimeter...thin film as well as bulk devices. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Micromagnetic Calculations, Nanocrystalline cobalt-iron, Thin Film Toroids 16. SECURITY

  11. High purity Fe3O4 from Local Iron Sand Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunanto, Y. E.; Izaak, M. P.; Jobiliong, E.; Cahyadi, L.; Adi, W. A.

    2018-04-01

    Indonesia has a long coastline and is rich with iron sand. The iron sand is generally rich in various elements such as iron and titanium. One of the products processing of the iron sand mineral is iron (II) (III) oxide (magnetite Fe3O4). The stages of purification process to extracting magnetite phase and discarding the other phases has been performed. Magnetite phase analysis of ironsand extraction retrieved from Indonesia have been investigated. The result of analysis element of iron sand shows that it consists of majority Fe around 65 wt%. However, there are still 17 impurities such as Ti, Al, Ce, Co, Cr, Eu, La, Mg, Mn, Na, Sc, Sm, Th, V, Yb, and Zn. After extraction process, Fe element content increases up to 94%. The iron sand powder after milling for 10 hours and separating using a magnetic separator, the iron sand powders are dissolved in acid chloride solution to form a solution of iron chloride, and this solution is sprinkled with sodium hydroxide to obtain fine powders of Fe3O4. The fine powders which formed were washed with de-mineralization water. The X-ray diffraction pattern shows that the fine powders have a single phase of Fe3O4. The analysis result shows that the sample has the chemical formula: Fe3O4 with a cubic crystal system, space group: Fd-3m and lattice parameters: a = b = c = 8.3681 (1) Å, α = β = γ = 90°. The microstructure analysis shows that the particle of Fe3O4 homogeneously shaped like spherical. The magnetic properties using vibrating sample magnetometer shows that Fe3O4 obtained have ferromagnetic behavior with soft magnetic characteristics. We concluded that this purification of iron sand had been successfully performed to obtain fine powders of Fe3O4 with high purity.

  12. Lead iron phosphate glass as a containment medium for disposal of high-level nuclear waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boatner, Lynn A.; Sales, Brian C.

    1989-01-01

    Lead-iron phosphate glasses containing a high level of Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 for use as a storage medium for high-level radioactive nuclear waste. By combining lead-iron phosphate glass with various types of simulated high-level nuclear waste, a highly corrosion resistant, homogeneous, easily processed glass can be formed. For corroding solutions at 90.degree. C., with solution pH values in the range between 5 and 9, the corrosion rate of the lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glass is at least 10.sup.2 to 10.sup.3 times lower than the corrosion rate of a comparable borosilicate nuclear waste glass. The presence of Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 in forming the lead-iron phosphate glass is critical. Lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glass can be prepared at temperatures as low as 800.degree. C., since they exhibit very low melt viscosities in the 800.degree. to 1050.degree. C. temperature range. These waste-loaded glasses do not readily devitrify at temperatures as high as 550.degree. C. and are not adversely affected by large doses of gamma radiation in H.sub.2 O at 135.degree. C. The lead-iron phosphate waste glasses can be prepared with minimal modification of the technology developed for processing borosilicate glass nuclear wasteforms.

  13. Abrasion Resistance of as-Cast High-Chromium Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pokusová Marcela

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available High chromium cast irons are widely used as abrasion resistant materials. Their properties and wear resistance depend on carbides and on the nature of the matrix supporting these carbides. The paper presents test results of irons which contain (in wt.% 18-22 Cr and 2-5 C, and is alloyed by 1.7 Mo + 5 Ni + 2 Mn to improve the toughness. Tests showed as-cast irons with mostly austenitic matrix achieved hardness 36-53 HRC but their relative abrasion-resistance was higher than the tool steel STN 19436 heat treated on hardness 60 HRC.

  14. Preparation of iron metal nano solution by anodic dissolution with high voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Duc Hung; Do Thanh Tuan

    2012-01-01

    Iron nano metal solution is prepared from anodic dissolution process with ultra- high Dc voltage. The size and shape of iron nanoparticles determined by Tem images and particle size distribution on the device LA-950 Laser Scattering Particle Distribution Analyzer V2. The concentration of nano-iron solution was determined by the analytical methods AAS atomic absorption spectrometry and Faraday's law. The difference in concentration of both methods demonstrated outside the anodic dissolution process has created the water electrolysis to form H 2 and O 2 gases and heating the solution. (author)

  15. The study of high-boron steel and high-boron cast iron used for shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Xuerong; Lu Jixin; Wen Yaozeng; Wang Zhaishu; Cheng Jiantin; Cheng Wen; Shun Danqi; Yu Jinmu

    1996-12-01

    The smelting, forging, heat-treatment technology and the mechanical properties of three kinds of high-boron steels (type 1: 0.5% boron; type 2: 0.5% boron and 4% or 2% nickel; type 3: 0.5% boron, 0.5% nickel and 0.5% molybdenum) were studied. The test results show that the technology for smelting, forging and heat-treatment (1050 degree C/0.5 h water cooled + 810 degree C/1 h oil cooled) in laboratory is feasible. Being sensitive to notch, the impact toughness of high-boron steel type 1 is not steady and can not meet the technology requirements on mechanical properties. The mechanical properties of both high-boron steel type 2 and type 3 can meet the technological requirements. The smelting technology of high-boron casting iron containing 0.5% boron was researched. The tests show that this casting iron can be smelted in laboratory and its properties can basically satisfy the technology requirements. (10 refs., 6 figs., 11 tab.)

  16. Polyethyleneimine-modified iron oxide nanoparticles for brain tumor drug delivery using magnetic targeting and intra-carotid administration

    OpenAIRE

    Chertok, Beata; David, Allan E.; Yang, Victor C.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the applicability of polyethyleneimine (PEI)-modified magnetic nanoparticles (GPEI) as a potential vascular drug/gene carrier to brain tumors. In vitro, GPEI exhibited high cell association and low cell toxicity – properties which are highly desirable for intracellular drug/gene delivery. In addition, a high saturation magnetization of 93 emu/g Fe was expected to facilitate magnetic targeting of GPEI to brain tumor lesions. However, following intravenous administra...

  17. Cannabidiol normalizes caspase 3, synaptophysin, and mitochondrial fission protein DNM1L expression levels in rats with brain iron overload: implications for neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Vanessa Kappel; de Freitas, Betânia Souza; da Silva Dornelles, Arethuza; Nery, Laura Roesler; Falavigna, Lucio; Ferreira, Rafael Dal Ponte; Bogo, Maurício Reis; Hallak, Jaime Eduardo Cecílio; Zuardi, Antônio Waldo; Crippa, José Alexandre S; Schröder, Nadja

    2014-02-01

    We have recently shown that chronic treatment with cannabidiol (CBD) was able to recover memory deficits induced by brain iron loading in a dose-dependent manner in rats. Brain iron accumulation is implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's, and has been related to cognitive deficits in animals and human subjects. Deficits in synaptic energy supply have been linked to neurodegenerative diseases, evidencing the key role played by mitochondria in maintaining viable neural cells and functional circuits. It has also been shown that brains of patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases have increased expression of apoptosisrelated proteins and specific DNA fragmentation. Here, we have analyzed the expression level of brain proteins involved with mitochondrial fusion and fission mechanisms (DNM1L and OPA1), the main integral transmembrane protein of synaptic vesicles (synaptophysin), and caspase 3, an apoptosis-related protein, to gain a better understanding of the potential of CBD in restoring the damage caused by iron loading in rats. We found that CBD rescued iron-induced effects, bringing hippocampal DNM1L, caspase 3, and synaptophysin levels back to values comparable to the control group. Our results suggest that iron affects mitochondrial dynamics, possibly trigging synaptic loss and apoptotic cell death and indicate that CBD should be considered as a potential molecule with memory-rescuing and neuroprotective properties to be used in the treatment of cognitive deficits observed in neurodegenerative disorders.

  18. Phosphorylation of Akt by SC79 Prevents Iron Accumulation and Ameliorates Early Brain Injury in a Model of Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuangying Hao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated that activation of Akt may alleviate early brain injury (EBI following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. This study is undertaken to determine whether iron metabolism is involved in the beneficial effect of Akt activation after SAH. Therefore, we used a novel molecule, SC79, to activate Akt in an experimental Sprague–Dawley rat model of SAH. Rats were randomly divided into four groups as follows: sham, SAH, SAH + vehicle, SAH + SC79. The results confirmed that SC79 effectively enhanced the defense against oxidative stress and alleviated EBI in the temporal lobe after SAH. Interestingly, we found that phosphorylation of Akt by SC79 reduced cell surface transferrin receptor-mediated iron uptake and promoted ferroportin-mediated iron transport after SAH. As a result, SC79 administration diminished the iron content in the brain tissue. Moreover, the impaired Fe-S cluster biogenesis was recovered and loss of the activities of the Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes were regained, indicating that injured mitochondrial functions are restored to healthy levels. These findings suggest that disrupted iron homeostasis could contribute to EBI and Akt activation may regulate iron metabolism to relieve iron toxicity, further protecting neurons from EBI after SAH.

  19. Sulfur Removal by Adding Iron During the Digestion Process of High-sulfur Bauxite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhanwei, Liu; Hengwei, Yan; Wenhui, Ma; Keqiang, Xie; Dunyong, Li; Licong, Zheng; Pengfei, Li

    2018-04-01

    This paper proposes a novel approach to sulfur removal by adding iron during the digestion process. Iron can react with high-valence sulfur (S2O3 2-, SO3 2-, SO4 2-) to generate S2- at digestion temperature, and then S2- enter red mud in the form of Na3FeS3 to be removed. As iron dosage increases, high-valence sulfur concentration decreases, but the concentration of S2- increases; sulfur digestion rate decreases while sulfur content in red mud markedly increases; the alumina digestion rate, conversely, remains fairly stable. So sulfur can be removed completely by adding iron in digestion process, which provide a theoretical basis for the effective removal of sulfur in alumina production process.

  20. XPS and FTIR spectroscopic study on microwave treated high phosphorus iron ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omran, Mamdouh, E-mail: mamdouh.omran@oulu.fi [Process Metallurgy Research Group, Faculty of Technology, University of Oulu (Finland); Mineral Processing and Agglomeration Lab, Central Metallurgical Research and Development Institute, Cairo (Egypt); Fabritius, Timo [Process Metallurgy Research Group, Faculty of Technology, University of Oulu (Finland); Elmahdy, Ahmed M.; Abdel-Khalek, Nagui A. [Mineral Processing and Agglomeration Lab, Central Metallurgical Research and Development Institute, Cairo (Egypt); El-Aref, Mortada; Elmanawi, Abd El-Hamid [Geology Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza 12613 (Egypt)

    2015-08-01

    Highlights: • The effect of microwave radiation on structure and chemical state of high phosphorus iron ore was studied. • FTIR analyses showed that after microwave radiation the functional chemical groups of phosphorus bearing minerals (fluorapatite) dissociated. • High resolution XPS analyses of Fe 2p peaks showed that after microwave radiation a portion of Fe(+III) was reduced to Fe(+II). • Microwave radiation had a positive effect on the magnetic properties of iron oxide, through formation of ferromagnetic phases. - Abstract: A growing interest in microwave heating has emerged recently. Several potential microwave applications regarding minerals’ processing have been investigated. This paper investigates the effect of microwave radiation on Egyptian high phosphorus iron ore. Three different iron ore samples have varying Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and P{sub 2}O{sub 5} contents and mineralogical textures were studied. A comparative study has been carried out between untreated and microwave treated iron ore. XRD and FTIR analyses showed that after microwave radiation the crystallinity of iron bearing minerals (hematite) increased, while the functional chemical groups of phosphorus bearing minerals (fluorapatite) and other gangues dissociated. High resolution XPS analyses of Fe 2p peaks showed that after microwave radiation a portion of Fe(+III) was reduced to Fe(+II). This means that after microwave radiation iron oxide (hematite, Fe{sup 3+}) transformed into more magnetic phase. The results indicated that microwave radiation had a positive effect on the magnetic properties of iron oxide, through formation of ferromagnetic phases.

  1. Redistribution of Iron and Titanium in High-Pressure Ultramafic Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, Rosalind J.; Evans, Katy A.; Reddy, Steven M.; Lester, Gregory W.

    2017-11-01

    The redox state of iron in high-pressure serpentinites, which host a significant proportion of Fe3+ in subduction zones, can be used to provide an insight into iron cycling and constrain the composition of subduction zone fluids. In this study, we use oxide and silicate mineral textures, interpretation of mineral parageneses, mineral composition data, and whole rock geochemistry of high-pressure retrogressed ultramafic rocks from the Zermatt-Saas Zone to constrain the distribution of iron and titanium, and iron oxidation state. These data provide an insight on the oxidation state and composition of fluids at depth in subduction zones. Oxide minerals host the bulk of iron, particularly Fe3+. The increase in mode of magnetite and observation of magnetite within antigorite veins in the investigated ultramafic samples during initial retrogression is most consistent with oxidation of existing iron within the samples during the infiltration of an oxidizing fluid since it is difficult to reconcile addition of Fe3+ with the known limited solubility of this species. However, high Ti contents are not typical of serpentinites and also cannot be accounted for by simple mixing of a depleted mantle protolith with the nearby Allalin gabbro. Titanium-rich phases coincide with prograde metamorphism and initial exhumation, implying the early seafloor and/or prograde addition and late mobilization of Ti. If Ti addition has occurred, then the introduction of Fe3+, also generally considered to be immobile, cannot be disregarded. We explore possible transport vectors for Ti and Fe through mineral texture analysis.

  2. High density Gd-substituted yttrium iron garnets by coprecipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamastra, Francesca Romana; Bianco, Alessandra; Leonardi, Federica; Montesperelli, Giampiero; Nanni, Francesca; Gusmano, Gualtiero

    2008-01-01

    Gadolinium-substituted yttrium iron garnets are ferrite materials of primary importance in microwave engineering. Stoichiometric powders of nominal composition Y 2.6 Gd 0.4 Fe 5 O 12 (i.e. Fe/(Y + Gd) = 1.67) were prepared by reverse strike coprecipitation of metal nitrates. In order to investigate the influence of composition on phase formation, non-stoichiometric powders were also synthesised. On the basis of DTA/TGA analysis, dried coprecipitates were calcined between 600 deg. C and 1200 deg. C and then characterised by ICP, XRD and HT-XRD. Amorphous coprecipitates crystallise around 700 deg. C in cubic garnet phase along with small amounts of YFeO 3 and/or α-Fe 2 O 3 . Only iron-rich garnets, either pure or Gd-substituted, calcined at 1200 deg. C or above display a single-phase cubic garnet. According to thermal dilatometry results, calcined powders were sintered in air up to 1470 deg. C. The microstructure of sintered ceramics is made up of fine grains, the average size ranging between 3 μm and 13 μm. Density of sintered bodies ranged from 88% to 98%. Ferromagnetic resonance linewidth (ΔH -3dB ) ranged between 4352.9 A m -1 and 4392.7 A m -1 , depending on composition and microstructure

  3. Scalable high-affinity stabilization of magnetic iron oxide nanostructures by a biocompatible antifouling homopolymer

    KAUST Repository

    Luongo, Giovanni

    2017-10-12

    Iron oxide nanostructures have been widely developed for biomedical applications, due to their magnetic properties and biocompatibility. In clinical application, the stabilization of these nanostructures against aggregation and non-specific interactions is typically achieved using weakly anchored polysaccharides, with better-defined and more strongly anchored synthetic polymers not commercially adopted due to complexity of synthesis and use. Here, we show for the first time stabilization and biocompatibilization of iron oxide nanoparticles by a synthetic homopolymer with strong surface anchoring and a history of clinical use in other applications, poly(2-methacryloyloxyethy phosphorylcholine) (poly(MPC)). For the commercially important case of spherical particles, binding of poly(MPC) to iron oxide surfaces and highly effective individualization of magnetite nanoparticles (20 nm) are demonstrated. Next-generation high-aspect ratio nanowires (both magnetite/maghemite and core-shell iron/iron oxide) are furthermore stabilized by poly(MPC)-coating, with nanowire cytotoxicity at large concentrations significantly reduced. The synthesis approach is exploited to incorporate functionality into the poly(MPC) chain is demonstrated by random copolymerization with an alkyne-containing monomer for click-chemistry. Taking these results together, poly(MPC) homopolymers and random copolymers offer a significant improvement over current iron oxide nanoformulations, combining straightforward synthesis, strong surface-anchoring and well-defined molecular weight.

  4. Scalable high-affinity stabilization of magnetic iron oxide nanostructures by a biocompatible antifouling homopolymer

    KAUST Repository

    Luongo, Giovanni; Campagnolo, Paola; Perez, Jose E.; Kosel, Jü rgen; Georgiou, Theoni K.; Regoutz, Anna; Payne, David J; Stevens, Molly M.; Ryan, Mary P.; Porter, Alexandra E; Dunlop, Iain E

    2017-01-01

    Iron oxide nanostructures have been widely developed for biomedical applications, due to their magnetic properties and biocompatibility. In clinical application, the stabilization of these nanostructures against aggregation and non-specific interactions is typically achieved using weakly anchored polysaccharides, with better-defined and more strongly anchored synthetic polymers not commercially adopted due to complexity of synthesis and use. Here, we show for the first time stabilization and biocompatibilization of iron oxide nanoparticles by a synthetic homopolymer with strong surface anchoring and a history of clinical use in other applications, poly(2-methacryloyloxyethy phosphorylcholine) (poly(MPC)). For the commercially important case of spherical particles, binding of poly(MPC) to iron oxide surfaces and highly effective individualization of magnetite nanoparticles (20 nm) are demonstrated. Next-generation high-aspect ratio nanowires (both magnetite/maghemite and core-shell iron/iron oxide) are furthermore stabilized by poly(MPC)-coating, with nanowire cytotoxicity at large concentrations significantly reduced. The synthesis approach is exploited to incorporate functionality into the poly(MPC) chain is demonstrated by random copolymerization with an alkyne-containing monomer for click-chemistry. Taking these results together, poly(MPC) homopolymers and random copolymers offer a significant improvement over current iron oxide nanoformulations, combining straightforward synthesis, strong surface-anchoring and well-defined molecular weight.

  5. Spin dynamics on cyclic iron wheels in high magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnelzer, Lars

    2008-01-01

    In the present thesis the spin dynamics of cyclic spin-cluster compounds, the so called ''ferric wheels'' were studied by means of the NMR. In the iron wheels Li/Na rate at Fe 6 (tea) 6 and Cs rate at Fe 8 (tea) 8 as probes of NMR both the protons and the centrally lying alkali atoms 7 Li, 23 Na, and 133 Cs were available. For this purpose measurements in the magnetic field region up to B=20 T and at temperatures between room temperature and T=50 mK were performed. The longitudinal relaxation rate was temperature dependently studied at two field values on the lithium cluster and a frequency independent maximum of the relaxation rate at a temperature of T∼30 K resulted. Different behaviour showed the measurement on the sodium cluster. the longitudinal relaxation rate slopes linearly with the temperature and shows no maximum. The two quadrupole satellites of the 23 Na could be resolved. From the distance of the satellites to the central transition both on the field gradient of the iron ring and on the orientation of the symmetry axis to the external magnetic field could be concluded. The determined field gradient of the Na rate at Fe 6 (tea) 6 of eq=4.78(11).10 20 V/m 2 was in very good agreement with the present theoretically calculated value. The orientation of the crystal was determined to θ(c,B)=62.8 . The very low splitting of the 7 Li NMR spectrum of the lithium cluster allows to give as upper limit for the value of the field gradient eq=1.82(11).10 20 V/m 2 . From the seven lines of the cesium spectrum theoretically to be expected five were resolved. The evaluation yielded for the cesium ring a value of eq=-1.3(1).10 21 V/m 2 . The study of the field-dependent line position of the 23 Na NMR line led to the determination of the parameter of the transferred hyperfine interaction to A tHf /2π=140 kHz. For the first time on a cyclic iron cluster a level crossing could be studied by means of the central ion. The temperature dependence of the longitudinal

  6. TO SELECTION OF TECHNOLOGICAL SCHEME OF SOFTENING HEAT TREATMENT FOR HIGH CHROMIUM CAST IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Efremenko

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. High chromium cast irons with austenitic matrix have low machinability. The aim of work is search of new energy-saving modes of preliminary softening heat treatment enhancing the machinability of castings by forming an optimum microstructure. Methodology. Metallographic analysis, hardness testing and machinability testing are applied. Findings. It was found out that high temperature annealing with continuous cooling yields to martensite-austenite matrix in cast iron 270Х15Г2Н1MPhT, which abruptly affects the machinability of cast iron. Significant improvement of machinability is achieved by forming of structure "ferrite + granular carbides" and by decline of hardness to 37-39 HRC in the case of two-stage isothermal annealing in the subcritical temperature range or by the use of quenching and tempering (two-step or cyclic. Originality. It was found that the formation of the optimal structure of the matrix and achievement of desired hardness level needed for improving machinability of high chromium cast iron containing 3 % austenite-forming elements, can be obtained: 1 due to pearlite original austenite followed by spherodization eutectoid carbides, and 2 by getting predominantly martensite structure followed by the decay of martensite and carbides coagulation at high-temperature tempering. Practical value. The new energy-saving schemes of softening heat treatment to ensure the growth of machinability of high chromium cast iron, alloyed by higher quantity of austenite forming elements, are proposed.

  7. A Powerful Mitochondria-Targeted Iron Chelator Affords High Photoprotection against Solar Ultraviolet A Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reelfs, Olivier; Abbate, Vincenzo; Hider, Robert C; Pourzand, Charareh

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondria are the principal destination for labile iron, making these organelles particularly susceptible to oxidative damage on exposure to ultraviolet A (UVA, 320-400 nm), the oxidizing component of sunlight. The labile iron-mediated oxidative damage caused by UVA to mitochondria leads to necrotic cell death via adenosine triphosphate depletion. Therefore, targeted removal of mitochondrial labile iron via highly specific tools from these organelles may be an effective approach to protect the skin cells against the harmful effects of UVA. In this work, we designed a mitochondria-targeted hexadentate (tricatechol-based) iron chelator linked to mitochondria-homing SS-like peptides. The photoprotective potential of this compound against UVA-induced oxidative damage and cell death was evaluated in cultured primary skin fibroblasts. Our results show that this compound provides unprecedented protection against UVA-induced mitochondrial damage, adenosine triphosphate depletion, and the ensuing necrotic cell death in skin fibroblasts, and this effect is fully related to its potent iron-chelating property in the organelle. This mitochondria-targeted iron chelator has therefore promising potential for skin photoprotection against the deleterious effects of the UVA component of sunlight. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Oxidative stress and damage in liver, but not in brain, of Fischer 344 rats subjected to dietary iron supplementation with lipid-soluble[(3,5,5-Trimethylhexanoyl)ferrocene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Morgan, Evan; Christen, Stephan

    2007-01-01

    Accumulation of iron probably predisposes the aging brain to progressive neuronal loss. We examined various markers of oxidative stress and damage in the brain and liver of 3- and 24-month old rats following supplementationwith the lipophilic iron derivative [(3,5,5-trimethylhexanoyl)ferrocene] (......, they also demonstrated that the brain is well protected against dietary iron overload by using iron in a lipid-soluble formulation.......Accumulation of iron probably predisposes the aging brain to progressive neuronal loss. We examined various markers of oxidative stress and damage in the brain and liver of 3- and 24-month old rats following supplementationwith the lipophilic iron derivative [(3,5,5-trimethylhexanoyl......)ferrocene] (TMHF), which is capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier. At both ages, iron concentration increased markedly in the liver but failed to increase in the brain. In the liver of TMHF-treated young rats, levels of a- and ¿-tocopherols and glutathione (GSH) were also higher. In contrast, the brain...

  9. A Synchrotron Mössbauer Spectroscopy Study of a Hydrated Iron-Sulfate at High Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, T. M.; Finkelstein, G. J.; Solomatova, N. V.; Jackson, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    Szomolnokite is a monohydrated ferrous iron sulfate mineral, FeSO4*H2O, where the ferrous iron atoms are in octahedral coordination with four corners shared with SO4 and two with H2O. While somewhat rare on Earth, szomolnokite has been detected on the surface of Mars along with several other hydrated sulfates and suggested to occur near the surface of Venus [1,2]. It is not clear if these sulfates are a result of reactions occurring at depth driven by changes in the behavior of iron in the sulfate. To date, only a few high-pressure studies have been conducted on hydrated iron sulfates using Mössbauer spectroscopy. Our study represents a first step towards understanding of the electronic environment of iron in a monohydrated sulfate at pressure. Using a hydrostatic helium pressure-transmitting medium, the pressure dependence of iron's site-specific behavior in a synthetic szomolnokite powdered sample was explored up to about 100 GPa with time-resolved synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy at the Advanced Photon Source of Argonne National Laboratory. At 1 bar, the Mössbauer spectrum is well described by three Fe2+-like sites, consistent with conventional Mössbauer spectra reported in Dyar et al. [3]. At pressures up to 20 GPa, changes in the hyperfine parameters are most likely due to a structural phase transition. Above this pressure, a fourth site is required to explain the time-spectra. Changes in the electronic configuration of iron, such as those due to a phase transition and/or a spin crossover, will affect the material's compressibility and transport properties. We will compare our high-pressure trends with those of other iron-bearing phases and discuss the relative influence on the dynamics of terrestrial planetary interiors. 1. Bishop et al. (2014) What Lurks in the Martian Rocks and Soil? Investigations of Sulfates, Phosphates, and Perchlorates. Spectral and thermal properties of perchlorate salts and implications for Mars. Am. Min. 99(8-9), 1580

  10. Analysis of thermal expansivity of iron (Fe) metal at ultra high ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    structure are unlikely to be successful for predicting the high temperature properties of transition metals due to the complicated many-body nature of the interactions. Wasserman et al [3] have recently studied the thermal properties of iron at high pressures and temperatures within the framework of shell model [7,8], which is ...

  11. Iron transport in a confined high-temperature plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demokan, O.; Waelbroeck, F.

    1981-06-01

    The neo-classical flux, GAMMAsub(n.c), of Fe XXIII is calculated for the experimental conditions produced in PLT by using the data on the iron density profiles and the plasma parameters. The actual flux of Fe XXIII, GAMMAsub(c.e), is then evaluated from the continuity equation, by using the same data. GAMMAsub(c.e) is on the average two orders of magnitude larger than GAMMAsub(n.c), the neo-classical prediction. These results are further tested by introducing the neo-classical coefficients which are multiplied by various anomaly factors into the continuity equation and solving for the density profile of Fe XXIII, using the experimental profiles of Fe XXII and Fe XXIV as given. The results of this section indicate that the first and the second terms in the neo-classical flux expression, GAMMAsub(n.c) = -D 1 (dn/dr) + D 2 n, should be multiplied approximately by the factors (100) and (25), respectively in order to yield the experimentally observed profile of Fe XXIII. (orig./HT)

  12. Lead-iron phosphate glass: a stable storage medium for high-level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sales, B.C.; Boatner, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented which show that lead-iron phosphate glasses are a promising new waste form for the safe immobilization of both high-level defense and high-level commercial radioactive waste. Relative to the borosilicate nuclear waste glasses that are currently the ''reference'' waste form for the long-term disposal of nuclear waste, lead-iron phosphate glasses have several distinct advantages: (1) an aqueous corrosion rate that is about 1000 times lower, (2) a processing temperature that is 100 0 to 250 0 C lower and, (3) a much lower melt viscosity in the temperature range from 800 0 to 1000 0 C. Most significantly, the lead-iron phosphate waste form can be processed using a technology similar to that developed for borosilicate nuclear waste glasses

  13. THE INFLUENCE OF CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF HIGH-CHROMIUM CAST IRONS ON THE MACHINABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Netrebko

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This research is aimed to obtain the regression dependence of the machinability on the chemical composition of pig iron (C, Cr, Mn and Ni in cast state. Methodology. The method of active experiment planning was used to build a mathematical model. Cast irons of composition 1.09…3.91 % С; 11.43…25.57 % Cr; 0.6…5.4 % Mn; 0.19…3.01 % Ni were studied. Cutting tools with plates 10х10 mm out of ВК8 according to State Standard 19051-80 were used for turning. Cutting modes: cutting depth – 0.8 mm, longitudinal feed – 0.15 mm/rot., spindle’s rotation frequency during turning – 200…360 rot./min. Lubricating and cooling liquids were not applied. Evaluation of iron workability was produced by determining the linear tool flank wear per unit length of the cutting path. Findings. Mathematically probabilistic equation of the regression dependence of the cutting tool’s wear on the C, Cr, Mn and Ni content in the machined cast iron were obtained. It was established that with the increase of Cr content in the cast iron to 14.8 % the cutting tool’s wear decreased as a result of formation of carbide eutectic which destroyed the doped ledeburite continuous frame. Further increase of chromium content promoted appearing of chromic carbides with high microhardness which considerably increased the tool’s wear. The conducted research shown that the minimum cutting tool’s wear 0,18 mkm/m was observed during the machining of cast iron containing: 1.09 % C, 14.8 % Cr, 2.3 % Mn and 1.2 % Ni; and the maximum wear is 48,96 mkm/m – when the content was: 3.91 % C, 11.43 % Cr, 5.4 % Mn and 0.19 % Ni. The tool’s wear reached 47.61 mkm/m during the treatment of cast iron containing 3.91 % C, 25.57 % Cr, 5.4 % Mn and 0.19 % Ni. Originality. Mathematically probabilistic model of the dependence of the cutting tool’s wear on the C, Cr, Mn and Ni content in the machined cast iron has been elaborated by the author. Practical value. The model

  14. Lead-iron phosphate glass as a containment medium for the disposal of high-level nuclear wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boatner, L.A.; Sales, B.C.

    1984-04-11

    Disclosed are lead-iron phosphate glasses containing a high level of Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ for use as a storage medium for high-level radioactive nuclear waste. By combining lead-iron phosphate glass with various types of simulated high-level nuclear waste

  15. Excessive Iron Availability Caused by Disorders of Interleukin-10 and Interleukin-22 Contributes to High Altitude Polycythemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Sheng Liu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Because the pathogenesis of high altitude polycythemia (HAPC is unclear, the aim of the present study was to explore whether abnormal iron metabolism is involved in the pathogenesis of HAPC and the possible cause.Methods: We examined the serum levels of iron, total iron binding capacity, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR, ferritin, and hepcidin as well as erythropoietin (EPO and inflammation-related cytokines in 20 healthy volunteers at sea level, 36 healthy high-altitude migrants, and 33 patients with HAPC. Mice that were exposed to a simulated hypoxic environment at an altitude of 5,000 m for 4 weeks received exogenous iron or intervention on cytokines, and the iron-related and hematological indices of peripheral blood and bone marrow were detected. The in vitro effects of some cytokines on hematopoietic cells were also observed.Results: Iron mobilization and utilization were enhanced in people who had lived at high altitudes for a long time. Notably, both the iron storage in ferritin and the available iron in the blood were elevated in patients with HAPC compared with the healthy high-altitude migrants. The correlation analysis indicated that the decreased hepcidin may have contributed to enhanced iron availability in HAPC, and decreased interleukin (IL-10 and IL-22 were significantly associated with decreased hepcidin. The results of the animal experiments confirmed that a certain degree of iron redundancy may promote bone marrow erythropoiesis and peripheral red blood cell production in hypoxic mice and that decreased IL-10 and IL-22 stimulated iron mobilization during hypoxia by affecting hepcidin expression.Conclusion: These data demonstrated, for the first time, that an excess of obtainable iron caused by disordered IL-10 and IL-22 was involved in the pathogenesis of some HAPC patients. The potential benefits of iron removal and immunoregulation for the prevention and treatment of HAPC deserve further research.

  16. Synthesis of high saturation magnetic iron oxide nanomaterials via low temperature hydrothermal method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhavani, P.; Rajababu, C.H. [Department of Materials Science & Nanotechnology, Yogivemana University, Vemanapuram 516003, Kadapa (India); Arif, M.D. [Environmental Magnetism Laboratory, Indian Institute of Geomagnetism (IIG), Navi Mumbai 410218, Mumbai (India); Reddy, I. Venkata Subba [Department of Physics, Gitam University, Hyderabad Campus, Rudraram, Medak 502329 (India); Reddy, N. Ramamanohar, E-mail: manoharphd@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science & Nanotechnology, Yogivemana University, Vemanapuram 516003, Kadapa (India)

    2017-03-15

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) were synthesized through a simple low temperature hydrothermal approach to obtain with high saturation magnetization properties. Two series of iron precursors (sulfates and chlorides) were used in synthesis process by varying the reaction temperature at a constant pH. The X-ray diffraction pattern indicates the inverse spinel structure of the synthesized IONPs. The Field emission scanning electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy studies revealed that the particles prepared using iron sulfate were consisting a mixer of spherical (16–40 nm) and rod (diameter ~20–25 nm, length <100 nm) morphologies that synthesized at 130 °C, while the IONPs synthesized by iron chlorides are found to be well distributed spherical shapes with size range 5–20 nm. On other hand, the IONPs synthesized at reaction temperature of 190 °C has spherical (16–46 nm) morphology in both series. The band gap values of IONPs were calculated from the obtained optical absorption spectra of the samples. The IONPs synthesized using iron sulfate at temperature of 130 °C exhibited high saturation magnetization (M{sub S}) of 103.017 emu/g and low remanant magnetization (M{sub r}) of 0.22 emu/g with coercivity (H{sub c}) of 70.9 Oe{sub ,} which may be attributed to the smaller magnetic domains (d{sub m}) and dead magnetic layer thickness (t). - Highlights: • Comparison of iron oxide materials prepared with Fe{sup +2}/Fe{sup +3} sulfates and chlorides at different temperatures. • We prepared super-paramagnetic and soft ferromagnetic magnetite nanoparticles. • We report higher saturation magnetization with lower coercivity.

  17. Highly efficient Cu-decorated iron oxide nanocatalyst for low pressure CO 2 conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halder, Avik; Kilianová, Martina; Yang, Bing; Tyo, Eric C.; Seifert, Soenke; Prucek, Robert; Panáček, Aleš; Suchomel, Petr; Tomanec, Ondřej; Gosztola, David J.; Milde, David; Wang, Hsien-Hau; Kvítek, Libor; Zbořil, Radek; Vajda, Stefan

    2018-06-01

    We report a nanoparticulate iron oxide based catalyst for CO2 conversion with high efficiency at low pressures and on the effect of the presence of copper on the catalyst's restructuring and its catalytic performance. In situ X-ray scattering reveals the restructuring of the catalyst at the nanometer scale. In situ X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) shows the evolution of the composition and oxidation state of the iron and copper components under reaction conditions along with the promotional effect of copper on the chemical transformation of the iron component. X-ray diffraction (XRD), XANES and Raman spectroscopy proved that the starting nano catalyst is composed of iron oxides differing in chemical nature (alpha-Fe2O3, Fe3O4, FeO(OH)) and dimensionality, while the catalyst after CO2 conversion was identified as a mixture of alpha-Fe, Fe3C, and traces of Fe5C2. The significant increase of the rate CO2 is turned over in the presence of copper nanoparticles indicates that Cu nanoparticles activate hydrogen, which after spilling over to the neighbouring iron sites, facilitate a more efficient conversion of carbon dioxide.

  18. A microbial-mineralization approach for syntheses of iron oxides with a high specific surface area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagita, Naoki; Oaki, Yuya; Imai, Hiroaki

    2013-04-02

    Of minerals and microbes: A microbial-mineralization-inspired approach was used to facilitate the syntheses of iron oxides with a high specific surface area, such as 253 m(2)g(-1) for maghemite (γ-Fe(2)O(3)) and 148 m(2)g(-1) for hematite (α-Fe(2)O(3)). These iron oxides can be applied to electrode material of lithium-ion batteries, adsorbents, and catalysts. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Effects of structure and defect on fatigue limit in high strength ductile irons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Hak; Kim, Min Gun

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, the influence of several factors such as hardness, internal defect and non-propagating crack on fatigue limits was investigated with three kinds of ductile iron specimens. From the experimental results the fatigue limits were examined in relation with hardness and tensile strength in case of high strength specimens under austempering treatment; in consequence the marked improvement of fatigue limits were not showed. The maximum defect size was an important factor to predict and to evaluate the fatigue limits of ductile irons. And, the quantitative relationship between the fatigue limits(σ ω ) and the maximum defect size(√area max ) was expressed as σ ω n · √area max =C 2 . Also, it was possible to explain the difference for the fatigue limits in three ductile irons by introduction of the non-propagating crack rates

  20. Expression and Characterisation of Recombinant Rhodocyclus tenuis High Potential Iron-Sulphur Protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caspersen, Michael Bjerg; Bennet, K.; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2000-01-01

    The high potential iron-sulfur protein (HiPIP) from Rhodocyclus tenuis strain 2761 has been overproduced in Escherichia coli from its structural gene, purified to apparent homogeneity, and then characterized by an array of methods. UV-visible spectra of the reduced and oxidized recombinant protein...

  1. Leptothrix sp sheaths modified with iron oxide particles: Magnetically responsive, high aspect ratio functional material

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šafařík, Ivo; Angelova, R.; Baldíková, E.; Pospíšková, K.; Šafaříková, Miroslava

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 71, February (2017), s. 1342-1346 ISSN 0928-4931 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Leptothrix * magnetic modification * iron oxide * high aspect ratio material Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Materials engineering Impact factor: 4.164, year: 2016

  2. Novel, high-activity hydroprocessing catalysts: Iron group phosphides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianqin

    A series of iron, cobalt and nickel transition metal phosphides was synthesized by means of temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) of the corresponding phosphates. The same materials, Fe2P, CoP and NO, were also prepared on a silica (SiO2) support. The phase purity of these catalysts was established by x-ray diffraction (XRD), and the surface properties were determined by N2 BET specific surface area (Sg) measurements and CO chemisorption. The activities of the silica-supported catalysts were tested in a three-phase trickle bed reactor for the simultaneous hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) of quinoline and hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of dibenzothiophene using a model liquid feed at realistic conditions (30 atm, 370°C). The reactivity studies showed that the nickel phosphide (Ni2P/SiO2) was the most active of the catalysts. Compared with a commercial Ni-Mo-S/gamma-Al 2O3 catalyst at the same conditions, Ni2P/silica had a substantially higher HDS activity (100% vs. 76%) and HDN activity (82% vs. 38%). Because of their good hydrotreating activity, an extensive study of the preparation of silica supported nickel phosphides, Ni2P/SiO 2, was carried out. The parameters investigated were the phosphorus content and the weight loading of the active phase. The most active composition was found to have a starting synthesis Ni/P ratio close to 1/2, and the best loading of this sample on silica was observed to be 18 wt.%. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) measurements were employed to determine the structures of the supported samples. The main phase before and after reaction was found to be Ni2P, but some sulfur was found to be retained after reaction. A comprehensive scrutiny of the HDN reaction mechanism was also made over the Ni2P/SiO2 sample (Ni/P = 1/2) by comparing the HDN activity of a series of piperidine derivatives of different structure. It was found that piperidine adsorption involved an alpha-H activation

  3. Characteristics and treatment mechanism of mine water with high concentration of iron and manganese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, F.; Yang, J.; He, X.; Yang, J.; Tian, T. [Hebei University of Engineering, Handan (China)

    2006-12-15

    The characteristics and treatment of mine water with high concentration or iron and manganese were studied with mine water produced in Jiukuang and Siwan belonging to Hebi Coal Industry Group Co., Ltd. Analysis shows that the mine water is abundant in dissolved oxygen and has high TDS and high turbidity so the mine water does not need aeration. The effect of removal of iron and manganese by coagulation-sedimentation and the influence of filter material and influent water flow rate on effluent quality were investigated. It is shown that the removal rate of iron can reach 90% while removal of manganese can only reach about 20%. The concentration of iron and manganese in the effluent is lower than 0.1 mg/L with filter material of manganese sand which was immersed in KMnO{sub 4} solution at a filtration rate of 7 - 9 m/h. The results show that the layer of activated compound substance membrane formed on the surface of the manganese sand plays an important role in the removal of manganese. 7 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Short time synthesis of high quality carbon nanotubes with high rates by CVD of methane on continuously emerged iron nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahrami, Behnam; Khodadadi, Abasali; Mortazavi, Yadollah; Esmaieli, Mohamad

    2011-01-01

    We report the variation of yield and quality of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of methane on iron oxide-MgO at 900-1000 deg. C for 1-60 min. The catalyst was prepared by impregnation of MgO powder with iron nitrate, dried, and calcined at 300 deg. C. As calcined and unreduced catalyst in quartz reactor was brought to the synthesis temperature in helium flow in a few minutes, and then the flow was switched to methane. The iron oxide was reduced to iron nanoparticles in methane, while the CNTs were growing. TEM micrographs, in accordance with Raman RBM peaks, indicate the formation of mostly single wall carbon nanotubes of about 1.0 nm size. High quality CNTs with I G /I D Raman peak ratio of 14.5 are formed in the first minute of CNTs synthesis with the highest rate. Both the rate and quality of CNTs degrades with increasing CNTs synthesis time. Also CNTs quality sharply declines with temperature in the range of 900-1000 deg. C, while the CNTs yield passes through a maximum at 950 deg. C. About the same CNTs lengths are formed for the whole range of the synthesis times. A model of continuous emergence of iron nanoparticle seeds for CNTs synthesis may explain the data. The data can also provide information for continuous production of CNTs in a fluidized bed reactor.

  5. Short time synthesis of high quality carbon nanotubes with high rates by CVD of methane on continuously emerged iron nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahrami, Behnam, E-mail: bahrami@email.sc.edu [Catalysis and Nanostructured Materials Research Laboratory, School of Chemical Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nanoelectronics Centre of Excellence, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khodadadi, Abasali [Catalysis and Nanostructured Materials Research Laboratory, School of Chemical Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mortazavi, Yadollah, E-mail: mortazav@ut.ac.ir [Nanoelectronics Centre of Excellence, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Esmaieli, Mohamad [Nanoelectronics Centre of Excellence, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    We report the variation of yield and quality of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of methane on iron oxide-MgO at 900-1000 deg. C for 1-60 min. The catalyst was prepared by impregnation of MgO powder with iron nitrate, dried, and calcined at 300 deg. C. As calcined and unreduced catalyst in quartz reactor was brought to the synthesis temperature in helium flow in a few minutes, and then the flow was switched to methane. The iron oxide was reduced to iron nanoparticles in methane, while the CNTs were growing. TEM micrographs, in accordance with Raman RBM peaks, indicate the formation of mostly single wall carbon nanotubes of about 1.0 nm size. High quality CNTs with I{sub G}/I{sub D} Raman peak ratio of 14.5 are formed in the first minute of CNTs synthesis with the highest rate. Both the rate and quality of CNTs degrades with increasing CNTs synthesis time. Also CNTs quality sharply declines with temperature in the range of 900-1000 deg. C, while the CNTs yield passes through a maximum at 950 deg. C. About the same CNTs lengths are formed for the whole range of the synthesis times. A model of continuous emergence of iron nanoparticle seeds for CNTs synthesis may explain the data. The data can also provide information for continuous production of CNTs in a fluidized bed reactor.

  6. Brain inspired high performance electronics on flexible silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Sevilla, Galo T.

    2014-06-01

    Brain\\'s stunning speed, energy efficiency and massive parallelism makes it the role model for upcoming high performance computation systems. Although human brain components are a million times slower than state of the art silicon industry components [1], they can perform 1016 operations per second while consuming less power than an electrical light bulb. In order to perform the same amount of computation with today\\'s most advanced computers, the output of an entire power station would be needed. In that sense, to obtain brain like computation, ultra-fast devices with ultra-low power consumption will have to be integrated in extremely reduced areas, achievable only if brain folded structure is mimicked. Therefore, to allow brain-inspired computation, flexible and transparent platform will be needed to achieve foldable structures and their integration on asymmetric surfaces. In this work, we show a new method to fabricate 3D and planar FET architectures in flexible and semitransparent silicon fabric without comprising performance and maintaining cost/yield advantage offered by silicon-based electronics.

  7. Production of low-silicon molten iron from high-silica hematite using biochar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-qing Tang∗; Xiu-feng Fu; Yan-qi Qin; Shi-yu Zhao; Qing-guo Xue

    2017-01-01

    A new method of utilizing high-silica hematite to produce low-silicon molten iron was proposed.In this method, FASTMELT, which comprised direct reduction and melt separation processes, was applied, with highly reactive biochar as the reductant in the direct reduction stage.The proposed method was ex-perimentally investigated and the results show that the method is feasible.In the direct reduction stage, ore-char briquette could achieve a metallization rate of 84%-88% and residual carbon of 0.27-0.89 mass% at temperature of 1 373 K, biochar mixing ratio of 0.8-0.9, and reduction time of 15 min.Some silica particles remained embedded in the iron phase after the reduction.In the melting separation stage, molten iron with a carbon content of 0.02-0.03 mass% and silicon content of 0.02-0.18 mass% could be obtained from the metallic briquettes under the above-mentioned conditions; the iron recovery rate was 83%-91% and impurities in the obtained metal were negligible.

  8. Preparation of iron sulphides by high energy ball milling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, R.; Jiang, Jianzhong; Larsen, R.K.

    1998-01-01

    The reaction of a powder mixture consisting of 50 a.% Fe and 50 a.% S during high energy ball milling has been studied by x-ray diffraction and Mossbauer spectroscopy. After around 19 h of milling FeS2 and FeS havebeen formed. By further milling the FeS compound becomes dominating and only Fe......S with an average crystallite size of about 10 nm was observed after milling times longer than 67 h. Mossbauer spectra obtained with applied fields show that the particles are antiferromagnetic or have a strongly canted spin structure....

  9. Ribbon scanning confocal for high-speed high-resolution volume imaging of brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan M Watson

    Full Text Available Whole-brain imaging is becoming a fundamental means of experimental insight; however, achieving subcellular resolution imagery in a reasonable time window has not been possible. We describe the first application of multicolor ribbon scanning confocal methods to collect high-resolution volume images of chemically cleared brains. We demonstrate that ribbon scanning collects images over ten times faster than conventional high speed confocal systems but with equivalent spectral and spatial resolution. Further, using this technology, we reconstruct large volumes of mouse brain infected with encephalitic alphaviruses and demonstrate that regions of the brain with abundant viral replication were inaccessible to vascular perfusion. This reveals that the destruction or collapse of large regions of brain micro vasculature may contribute to the severe disease caused by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. Visualization of this fundamental impact of infection would not be possible without sampling at subcellular resolution within large brain volumes.

  10. Polyethyleneimine-modified iron oxide nanoparticles for brain tumor drug delivery using magnetic targeting and intra-carotid administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertok, Beata; David, Allan E; Yang, Victor C

    2010-08-01

    This study aimed to examine the applicability of polyethyleneimine (PEI)-modified magnetic nanoparticles (GPEI) as a potential vascular drug/gene carrier to brain tumors. In vitro, GPEI exhibited high cell association and low cell toxicity--properties which are highly desirable for intracellular drug/gene delivery. In addition, a high saturation magnetization of 93 emu/g Fe was expected to facilitate magnetic targeting of GPEI to brain tumor lesions. However, following intravenous administration, GPEI could not be magnetically accumulated in tumors of rats harboring orthotopic 9L-gliosarcomas due to its poor pharmacokinetic properties, reflected by a negligibly low plasma AUC of 12 +/- 3 microg Fe/ml min. To improve "passive" GPEI presentation to brain tumor vasculature for subsequent "active" magnetic capture, we examined the intra-carotid route as an alternative for nanoparticle administration. Intra-carotid administration in conjunction with magnetic targeting resulted in 30-fold (p=0.002) increase in tumor entrapment of GPEI compared to that seen with intravenous administration. In addition, magnetic accumulation of cationic GPEI (zeta-potential = + 37.2 mV) in tumor lesions was 5.2-fold higher (p=0.004) than that achieved with slightly anionic G100 (zeta-potential= -12 mV) following intra-carotid administration, while no significant accumulation difference was detected between the two types of nanoparticles in the contra-lateral brain (p=0.187). These promising results warrant further investigation of GPEI as a potential cell-permeable, magnetically-responsive platform for brain tumor delivery of drugs and genes. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Properties and solubility of chrome in iron alumina phosphate glasses containing high level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, W.; Day, D.E.; Ray, C.S.; Kim, C.W.; Reis, S.T.D.

    2004-01-01

    Chemical durability, glass formation tendency, and other properties of iron alumina phosphate glasses containing 70 wt% of a simulated high level nuclear waste (HLW), doped with different amounts of Cr 2 O 3 , have been investigated. All of the iron alumina phosphate glasses had an outstanding chemical durability as measured by their small dissolution rate (1 . 10 -9 g/(cm 2 . min)) in deionized water at 90 C for 128 d, their low normalized mass release as determined by the product consistency test (PCT) and a barely measurable corrosion rate of 2 . d) after 7 d at 200 C by the vapor hydration test (VHT). The solubility limit for Cr 2 O 3 in the iron phosphate melts was estimated at 4.1 wt%, but all of the as-annealed melts contained a few percent of crystalline Cr 2 O 3 that had no apparent effect on the chemical durability. The chemical durability was unchanged after deliberate crystallization, 48 h at 650 C. These iron phosphate waste forms, with a waste loading of at least 70 wt%, can be readily melted in commercial refractory crucibles at 1250 C for 2 to 4 h, are resistant to crystallization, meet all current US Department of Energy requirements for chemical durability, and have a solubility limit for Cr 2 O 3 which is at least three times larger than that for borosilicate glasses. (orig.)

  12. Three-dimensional iron sulfide-carbon interlocked graphene composites for high-performance sodium-ion storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Wei; Sun, Hongyu; Shangguan, Huihui

    2018-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) carbon-wrapped iron sulfide interlocked graphene (Fe7S8@C-G) composites for high-performance sodium-ion storage are designed and produced through electrostatic interactions and subsequent sulfurization. The iron-based metal–organic frameworks (MOFs, MIL-88-Fe) interact with...

  13. High-pressure Moessbauer study of perovskite iron oxides

    CERN Document Server

    Kawakami, T; Sasaki, T; Kuzushita, K; Morimoto, S; Endo, S; Kawasaki, S; Takano, M

    2002-01-01

    The perovskite oxides CaFeO sub 3 and La sub 1 sub / sub 3 Sr sub 2 sub / sub 3 FeO sub 3 have been investigated by high-pressure sup 5 sup 7 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. The critical temperatures of the charge disproportionation (CD) and the magnetic order (MO) have been determined as a function of pressure. In CaFeO sub 3 the CD (2Fe sup 4 sup + -> Fe sup 3 sup + + Fe sup 5 sup +) occurs at an almost constant temperature of 290 K in the pressure range of 0-17 GPa. Above 20 GPa, the CD is suppressed. The MO temperature of 125 K at an ambient pressure rises to 300 K at 34 GPa. In La sub 1 sub / sub 3 Sr sub 2 sub / sub 3 FeO sub 3 the CD (3Fe sup 1 sup 1 sup / sup 3 sup + -> 2Fe sup 3 sup + + Fe sup 5 sup +) and the MO occur at the same temperature up to 21 GPa, which decreases from 207 to 165 K with increasing pressure. Above 25 GPa, however, the MO temperature rises above 400 K.

  14. Biological Signatures of Brain Damage Associated with High Serum Ferritin Levels in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke and Thrombolytic Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán, Mónica; Sobrino, Tomás; Arenillas, Juan Francisco; Rodríguez-Yáñez, Manuel; García, María; Nombela, Florentino; Castellanos, Mar; de la Ossa, Natalia Pérez; Cuadras, Patricia; Serena, Joaquín; Castillo, José; Dávalos, Antoni

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Increased body iron stores have been related to greater oxidative stress and brain injury in clinical and experimental cerebral ischemia and reperfusion. We aimed to investigate the biological signatures of excitotoxicity, inflammation and blood brain barrier disruption potentially associated with high serum ferritin levels-related damage in acute stroke patients treated with i.v. t-PA. Methods: Serum levels of ferritin (as index of increased cellular iron stores), glutamate, interleukin-6, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and cellular fibronectin were determined in 134 patients treated with i.v. t-PA within 3 hours from stroke onset in blood samples obtained before t-PA treatment, at 24 and 72 hours. Results: Serum ferritin levels before t-PA infusion correlated to glutamate (r = 0.59, p < 0.001) and interleukin-6 (r = 0.55, p <0.001) levels at baseline, and with glutamate (r = 0.57,p <0.001), interleukin-6 (r = 0.49,p <0.001), metalloproteinase-9 (r = 0.23, p = 0.007) and cellular fibronectin (r = 0.27, p = 0.002) levels measured at 24 hours and glutamate (r = 0.415, p < 0.001), interleukin-6 (r = 0.359, p < 0.001) and metalloproteinase-9 (r = 0.261, p = 0.004) at 72 hours. The association between ferritin and glutamate levels remained after adjustment for confounding factors in generalized linear models. Conclusions: Brain damage associated with increased iron stores in acute ischemic stroke patients treated with iv. tPA may be mediated by mechanisms linked to excitotoxic damage. The role of inflammation, blood brain barrier disruption and oxidative stress in this condition needs further research. PMID:19096131

  15. Li4FeH6: Iron-containing complex hydride with high gravimetric hydrogen density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Saitoh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Li4FeH6, which has the highest gravimetric hydrogen density of iron-containing complex hydrides reported so far, is synthesized by hydrogenation of a powder mixture of iron and LiH above 6.1 GPa at 900 °C. In situ synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction measurements reveal that while kinetics require high temperature and thus high pressure for the synthesis, Li4FeH6 is expected to be thermodynamically stable slightly below room temperature at ambient pressure; further synthetic studies to suppress the kinetic effects may enable us to synthesize Li4FeH6 at moderate pressures. Li4FeH6 can be recovered at ambient conditions where Li4FeH6 is metastable.

  16. Analyses of residual iron in carbon nanotubes produced by camphor/ferrocene pyrolysis and purified by high temperature annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antunes, E.F., E-mail: ericafa@las.inpe.br [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), Praca Marechal Eduardo Gomes, 50, CEP 12.228-900, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Av. dos Astronautas, 1758, CEP 12.227-010, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Resende, V.G. de; Mengui, U.A. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Av. dos Astronautas, 1758, CEP 12.227-010, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Cunha, J.B.M. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Av. Bento Goncalves, 9500, CEP 91.501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Corat, E.J.; Massi, M. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Av. dos Astronautas, 1758, CEP 12.227-010, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    A detailed analysis of iron-containing phases in multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) powder was carried out. The MWCNTs were produced by camphor/ferrocene and purified by high temperature annealing in an oxygen-free atmosphere (N{sub 2} or VC). Thermogravimetric analysis, Moessbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy enabled the evaluation of the residual iron in MWCNTs after purification. The VC treatments provided MWCNTs with a purity degree higher than 99%. Moreover, Raman spectroscopy revealed a significant improvement in graphitic ordering after thermal annealing. A brief description of the mechanism of iron removal was included. We highlight the mobility of iron atoms through graphitic sheets and the large contact angle of iron clusters formed on MWCNT surfaces at high temperatures.

  17. Brain Network Analysis from High-Resolution EEG Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vico Fallani, Fabrizio; Babiloni, Fabio

    Over the last decade, there has been a growing interest in the detection of the functional connectivity in the brain from different neuroelectromagnetic and hemodynamic signals recorded by several neuro-imaging devices such as the functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scanner, electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) apparatus. Many methods have been proposed and discussed in the literature with the aim of estimating the functional relationships among different cerebral structures. However, the necessity of an objective comprehension of the network composed by the functional links of different brain regions is assuming an essential role in the Neuroscience. Consequently, there is a wide interest in the development and validation of mathematical tools that are appropriate to spot significant features that could describe concisely the structure of the estimated cerebral networks. The extraction of salient characteristics from brain connectivity patterns is an open challenging topic, since often the estimated cerebral networks have a relative large size and complex structure. Recently, it was realized that the functional connectivity networks estimated from actual brain-imaging technologies (MEG, fMRI and EEG) can be analyzed by means of the graph theory. Since a graph is a mathematical representation of a network, which is essentially reduced to nodes and connections between them, the use of a theoretical graph approach seems relevant and useful as firstly demonstrated on a set of anatomical brain networks. In those studies, the authors have employed two characteristic measures, the average shortest path L and the clustering index C, to extract respectively the global and local properties of the network structure. They have found that anatomical brain networks exhibit many local connections (i.e. a high C) and few random long distance connections (i.e. a low L). These values identify a particular model that interpolate between a regular

  18. Leptothrix sp sheaths modified with iron oxide particles: Magnetically responsive, high aspect ratio functional material

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šafařík, Ivo; Angelova, R.; Baldíková, Eva; Pospišková, K.; Šafaříková, Miroslava

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 71, FEB (2017), s. 1342-1346 ISSN 0928-4931 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-11516S; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14075 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : removal * Leptothrix * Magnetic modification * Iron oxide * High aspect ratio material Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7) Impact factor: 4.164, year: 2016

  19. Concept of a Prestressed Cast Iron Pressure Vessel for a Modular High Temperature Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinwarz, Wolfgang; Bounin, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    High Temperature Reactors (HTR) are representing one of the most interesting solutions for the upcoming generation of nuclear technology, especially with view to their inherent safety characteristics. To complete the safety concept of such plants already in the first phase of the technical development, Prestressed Cast Iron Pressure Vessels (PCIV) instead of the established forged steel reactor pressure vessels have been considered under the aspect of safety against bursting. A longterm research and development work, mainly performed in Germany, showed the excellent features of this technical solution. Diverse prototypic vessels were tested and officially proven. Design studies confirmed the feasibility of such a vessel concept also for Light Water Reactor types, too. The main concept elements of such a burst-proof vessel are: Strength and tightness functions are structurally separated. The tensile forces are carried by the prestressing systems consisting of a large number of independent wires. Compressive forces are applied to the vessel walls and heads. These are segmented into blocks of ductile cast iron. All cast iron blocks are prestressed to high levels of compression. The sealing function is assigned to a steel liner fixed to the cast iron blocks. The prestressing system is designed for an ultimate pressure of 2.3 times the design pressure. The prestress of the lids is designed for gapping at a much smaller pressure. Therefore, a drop of pressure will always occur before loss of strength (“leakage before failure”). In addition to these safety features further technical as well as economic aspects generate favorable assessment criteria: high design flexibility, feasibility of large vessel diameters; advantageous conditions for transport, assembly and decommissioning due to the segmented construction; advantage of workshop manufacturing; high-level quality control of components. Nowadays, considering the globally newly standardized safety requirements

  20. Corrosion of high-level radioactive waste iron-canisters in contact with bentonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufhold, Stephan; Hassel, Achim Walter; Sanders, Daniel; Dohrmann, Reiner

    2015-03-21

    Several countries favor the encapsulation of high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) in iron or steel canisters surrounded by highly compacted bentonite. In the present study the corrosion of iron in contact with different bentonites was investigated. The corrosion product was a 1:1 Fe layer silicate already described in literature (sometimes referred to as berthierine). Seven exposition test series (60 °C, 5 months) showed slightly less corrosion for the Na-bentonites compared to the Ca-bentonites. Two independent exposition tests with iron pellets and 38 different bentonites clearly proved the role of the layer charge density of the swelling clay minerals (smectites). Bentonites with high charged smectites are less corrosive than bentonites dominated by low charged ones. The type of counterion is additionally important because it determines the density of the gel and hence the solid/liquid ratio at the contact to the canister. The present study proves that the integrity of the multibarrier-system is seriously affected by the choice of the bentonite buffer encasing the metal canisters in most of the concepts. In some tests the formation of a patina was observed consisting of Fe-silicate. Up to now it is not clear why and how the patina formed. It, however, may be relevant as a corrosion inhibitor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of cutting force and surface roughness in high-speed milling of compacted graphite iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azlan Suhaimi Mohd

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Compacted Graphite Iron, (CGI is known to have outstanding mechanical strength and weight-to-strength ratio as compared to conventional grey cast iron, (CI. The outstanding characteristics of CGI is due to its graphite particle shape, which is presented as compacted vermicular particle. The graphite is interconnected with random orientation and round edges, which results in higher mechanical strength. Whereas, graphite in the CI consists of a smooth-surfaced flakes that easily propagates cracks which results in weaker and brittle properties as compared to CGI. Owing to its improved properties, CGI is considered as the best candidate material in substituting grey cast iron that has been used in engine block applications for years. However, the smooth implementation of replacing CI with CGI has been hindered due to the poor machinability of CGI especially at high cutting speed. The tool life is decreased by 20 times when comparing CGI with CI under the same cutting condition. This study investigates the effect of using cryogenic cooling and minimum quantity lubrication (MQL during high-speed milling of CGI (grade 450. Results showed that, the combination of internal cryogenic cooling and enhanced MQL improved the tool life, cutting force and surface quality as compared to the conventional flood coolant strategy during high-speed milling of CGI.

  2. Cast irons

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Cast iron offers the design engineer a low-cost, high-strength material that can be easily melted and poured into a wide variety of useful, and sometimes complex, shapes. This latest handbook from ASM covers the entire spectrum of one of the most widely used and versatile of all engineered materials. The reader will find the basic, but vital, information on metallurgy, solidification characteristics, and properties. Extensive reviews are presented on the low-alloy gray, ductile, compacted graphite, and malleable irons. New and expanded material has been added covering high-alloy white irons used for abrasion resistance and high-alloy graphitic irons for heat and corrosion resistance. Also discussed are melting furnaces and foundry practices such as melting, inoculation, alloying, pouring, gating and rising, and molding. Heat treating practices including stress relieving, annealing, normalizing, hardening and tempering, autempering (of ductile irons), and surface-hardening treatments are covered, too. ASM Spec...

  3. Brain MR imaging in patients with hepatic cirrhosis: relationship between high intensity signal in basal ganglia on T1-weighted images and elemental concentrations in brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, H.; Sato, M.; Yoshikawa, A.; Kimura, M.; Sonomura, T.; Terada, M.; Kishi, K.

    1997-01-01

    In patients with hepatic cirrhosis, the globus pallidus and putamen show high intensity on T1-weighted MRI. While the causes of this high signal have been thought to include paramagnetic substances, especially manganese, no evidence for this has been presented. Autopsy in four cases of hepatic cirrhosis permitted measurement of metal concentrations in brain and histopathological examination. In three cases the globus pallidus showed high intensity on T1-weighted images. Mean manganese concentrations in globus pallidus, putamen and frontal white matter were 3.03 ± 0.38, 2.12 ± 0.37, and 1.38 ± 0.24 (μg/g wet weight), respectively, being approximately four- to almost ten-fold the normal values. Copper concentrations in globus pallidus and putamen were also high, 50 % more than normal. Calcium, iron, zinc and magnesium concentrations were all normal. The fourth case showed no abnormal intensity in the basal ganglia and brain metal concentrations were all normal. Histopathologically, cases with showing high signal remarkable atrophy, necrosis, and deciduation of nerve cells and proliferation of glial cells and microglia in globus pallidus. These findings were similar to those in chronic manganese poisoning. On T1-weighted images, copper deposition shows no abnormal intensity. It is therefore inferred that deposition of highly concentrations of manganese may caused high signal on T1-weighted images and nerve cell death in the globus pallidus. (orig.). With 2 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Time-efficient, high-resolution, whole brain three-dimensional macromolecular proton fraction mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnykh, Vasily L

    2016-05-01

    Macromolecular proton fraction (MPF) mapping is a quantitative MRI method that reconstructs parametric maps of a relative amount of macromolecular protons causing the magnetization transfer (MT) effect and provides a biomarker of myelination in neural tissues. This study aimed to develop a high-resolution whole brain MPF mapping technique using a minimal number of source images for scan time reduction. The described technique was based on replacement of an actually acquired reference image without MT saturation by a synthetic one reconstructed from R1 and proton density maps, thus requiring only three source images. This approach enabled whole brain three-dimensional MPF mapping with isotropic 1.25 × 1.25 × 1.25 mm(3) voxel size and a scan time of 20 min. The synthetic reference method was validated against standard MPF mapping with acquired reference images based on data from eight healthy subjects. Mean MPF values in segmented white and gray matter appeared in close agreement with no significant bias and small within-subject coefficients of variation (maps demonstrated sharp white-gray matter contrast and clear visualization of anatomical details, including gray matter structures with high iron content. The proposed synthetic reference method improves resolution of MPF mapping and combines accurate MPF measurements with unique neuroanatomical contrast features. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Heat capacity of iron, aluminum, and chromium vanadates at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheshnitskii, S.M.; Fotiev, A.A.; Ignashin, V.P.; Kesler, Y.A.

    1985-09-01

    The thermodynamic characteristics of compounds participating in the processing of vanadium-containing raw materials have not been sufficiently investigated. In this paper the authors report on measurements of the heat capacities of the compounds FeVO/sub 4/, CrVO/sub 4/, AIVO/sub 4/, Fe/sub 2/V/sub 4/O/sub 13/ and FeCr(VO/sub 4/)/sub 2/ at high temperatures. The obtained experimental data on the high-temperature heat capacity of iron, aluminum, and chromium vanadates makes it possible to calculate the thermodynamic functions of these compounds at high temperatures.

  6. Method for preparing high cure temperature rare earth iron compound magnetic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuhong; Wei, Qiang; Zheng, Haixing

    2002-01-01

    Insertion of light elements such as H,C, or N in the R.sub.2 Fe.sub.17 (R=rare earth metal) series has been found to modify the magnetic properties of these compounds, which thus become prospective candidates for high performance permanent magnets. The most spectacular changes are increases of the Curie temperature, T.sub.c, of the magnetization, M.sub.s, and of coercivity, H.sub.c, upon interstitial insertion. A preliminary product having a component R--Fe--C,N phase is produced by a chemical route. Rare earth metal and iron amides are synthesized followed by pyrolysis and sintering in an inert or reduced atmosphere, as a result of which, the R--Fe--C,N phases are formed. Fabrication of sintered rare earth iron nitride and carbonitride bulk magnet is impossible via conventional process due to the limitation of nitridation method.

  7. Novel iron oxide nanotube arrays as high-performance anodes for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yuan; Fan, Huiqing; Chang, Ling; Shao, Haibo; Wang, Jianming; Zhang, Jianqing; Cao, Chu-nan

    2015-11-01

    Nanostructured iron oxides can be promising anode materials for lithium ion batteries (LIBs). However, improvement on the rate capability and/or electrochemical cycling stability of iron oxide anode materials remains a key challenge because of their poor electrical conductivities and large volume expansion during cycling. Herein, the vertically aligned arrays of one-dimensional (1D) iron oxide nanotubes with 5.8 wt% carbon have been fabricated by a novel surfactant-free self-corrosion process and subsequent thermal treatment. The as-fabricated nanotube array electrode delivers a reversible capacity of 932 mAh g-1 after 50 charge-discharge cycles at a current of 0.6 A g-1. The electrode still shows a reversible capacity of 610 mAh g-1 even at a very high rate (8.0 A g-1), demonstrating its prominent rate capability. Furthermore, the nanotube array electrode also exhibits the excellent electrochemical cycling stability with a reversible capacity of 880 mAh g-1 after 500 cycles at a current of 4 A g-1. The nanotube array electrode with superior lithium storage performance reveals the promising potential as a high-performance anode for LIBs.

  8. Corrosion of high-level radioactive waste iron-canisters in contact with bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufhold, Stephan, E-mail: s.kaufhold@bgr.de [BGR, Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover (Germany); Hassel, Achim Walter [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Straße 1, D-40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Institute for Chemical Technology of Inorganic Materials, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Sanders, Daniel [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Straße 1, D-40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Dohrmann, Reiner [BGR, Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover (Germany); LBEG, Landesamt für Bergbau, Energie und Geologie, Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover (Germany)

    2015-03-21

    Graphical abstract: Corrosion at the bentonite iron interface proceeds unaerobically with formation of an 1:1 Fe silicate mineral. A series of exposure tests with different types of bentonites showed that Na–bentonites are slightly less corrosive than Ca–bentonites and highly charges smectites are less corrosive compared to low charged ones. The formation of a patina was observed in some cases and has to be investigated further. - Highlights: • At the iron bentonite interface a 1:1 Fe layer silicate forms upon corrosion. • A series of iron–bentonite corrosion products showed slightly less corrosion for Na-rich and high-charged bentonites. • In some tests the formation of a patina was observed consisting of Fe–silicate, which has to be investigated further. - Abstract: Several countries favor the encapsulation of high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) in iron or steel canisters surrounded by highly compacted bentonite. In the present study the corrosion of iron in contact with different bentonites was investigated. The corrosion product was a 1:1 Fe layer silicate already described in literature (sometimes referred to as berthierine). Seven exposition test series (60 °C, 5 months) showed slightly less corrosion for the Na–bentonites compared to the Ca–bentonites. Two independent exposition tests with iron pellets and 38 different bentonites clearly proved the role of the layer charge density of the swelling clay minerals (smectites). Bentonites with high charged smectites are less corrosive than bentonites dominated by low charged ones. The type of counterion is additionally important because it determines the density of the gel and hence the solid/liquid ratio at the contact to the canister. The present study proves that the integrity of the multibarrier-system is seriously affected by the choice of the bentonite buffer encasing the metal canisters in most of the concepts. In some tests the formation of a patina was observed consisting of Fe

  9. Highly Crumpled All-Carbon Transistors for Brain Activity Recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Long; Zhao, Yan; Xu, Wenjing; Shi, Enzheng; Wei, Wenjing; Li, Xinming; Cao, Anyuan; Cao, Yanping; Fang, Ying

    2017-01-11

    Neural probes based on graphene field-effect transistors have been demonstrated. Yet, the minimum detectable signal of graphene transistor-based probes is inversely proportional to the square root of the active graphene area. This fundamentally limits the scaling of graphene transistor-based neural probes for improved spatial resolution in brain activity recording. Here, we address this challenge using highly crumpled all-carbon transistors formed by compressing down to 16% of its initial area. All-carbon transistors, chemically synthesized by seamless integration of graphene channels and hybrid graphene/carbon nanotube electrodes, maintained structural integrity and stable electronic properties under large mechanical deformation, whereas stress-induced cracking and junction failure occurred in conventional graphene/metal transistors. Flexible, highly crumpled all-carbon transistors were further verified for in vivo recording of brain activity in rats. These results highlight the importance of advanced material and device design concepts to make improvements in neuroelectronics.

  10. In-situ Characterization and Mapping of Iron Compounds in Alzheimer's Tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collingwood, J.F.; Mikhaylova, A.; Davidson, M.; Batich, C.; Streit, W.J.; Terry, J.; Dobson, J.

    2005-01-01

    There is a well-established link between iron overload in the brain and pathology associated with neurodegeneration in a variety of disorders such as Alzheimer's (AD), Parkinson's (PD) and Huntington's (HD) diseases. This association was first discovered in AD by Goodman in 1953, where, in addition to abnormally high concentrations of iron in autopsy brain tissue, iron has also been shown to accumulate at sites of brain pathology such as senile plaques. However, since this discovery, progress in understanding the origin, role and nature of iron compounds associated with neurodegeneration has been slow. Here we report, for the first time, the location and characterization of iron compounds in human AD brain tissue sections. Iron fluorescence was mapped over a frontal-lobe tissue section from an Alzheimer's patient, and anomalous iron concentrations were identified using synchrotron X-ray absorption techniques at 5 (micro)m spatial resolution. Concentrations of ferritin and magnetite, a magnetic iron oxide potentially indicating disrupted brain-iron metabolism, were evident. These results demonstrate a practical means of correlating iron compounds and disease pathology in-situ and have clear implications for disease pathogenesis and potential therapies.

  11. Investigation of effects of boron additives and heat treatment on carbides and phase transition of highly alloyed duplex cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasgin, Yahya; Kaplan, Mehmet; Yaz, Mehmet

    2009-01-01

    The effect of boron additives and heat treatment on the microstructural morphology of the transition zone in a duplex cast iron, which has an outer shell of white cast iron (with a high Cr-content and containing boron additives) and an inner side composed of normal gray cast iron, has been investigated. For this purpose, two experimental materials possessing different compositions of white-gray duplex cast iron were produced. Subsequently, metallographic investigations were carried out to study the effect of heat treatment applied to the experimental materials by using the scanning electron microscopy technique, along with optical microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Moreover, the formation of various phases and carbide composites in the samples and their effects on the hardness were also investigated using X-ray diffraction techniques. The results of investigations, and hardness showed that addition of the elements Cr and B to high-alloyed white cast iron affected carbide formation significantly, while simultaneously hardening the microstructure, and consequently the carbide present in the transition area of white-gray cast iron was spread out and became thinner. However, B additives and heat treatment did not cause any damage to the transition region of high Cr-content duplex cast iron.

  12. Monitoring of newborns at high risk for brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Pisani, Francesco; Spagnoli, Carlotta

    2016-01-01

    Due to the increasing number of surviving preterm newborns and to the recognition of therapeutic hypothermia as the current gold standard in newborns with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy, there has been a growing interest in the implementation of brain monitoring tools in newborns at high risk for neurological disorders. Among the most frequent neurological conditions and presentations in the neonatal period, neonatal seizures and neonatal status epilepticus, paroxysmal non-epileptic motor p...

  13. Methods of synthesis and performance improvement of lithium iron phosphate for high rate Li-ion batteries: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V.S.L. Satyavani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Lithium ion battery technology has the potential to meet the requirements of high energy density and high power density applications. A continuous search for novel materials is pursued continually to exploit the latent potential of this technology. In this review paper, methods for preparation of Lithium Iron Phosphate are discussed which include solid state and solution based synthesis routes. The methods to improve the electrochemical performance of lithium iron phosphate are presented in detail.

  14. FEATURES OF SPHEROIDIZING MODIFICATION OF HIGH-STRENGTH CAST IRON WITH MASTER ALLOYS BASED ON COPPER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Kalinichenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase of efficiency of modification process for ductile iron is topically, thereby increasing its mechanical and operational properties. For these purposes, in practice, various magnesium containing alloys are used, including «heavy» ones on the basis of Copper and Nickel. The analysis has shown that the application of bulk inoculating alloys based on copper basis were not effectively due to long dissolution period. From this point of view, the interest is high-speed casting, allowing the production of inoculating alloys in the form of strips – chips that are characterized by a low dissolution time and low piroeffekt. The aim of this work is to study the features of structure formation in nodular cast iron using different spheroidizing alloys based on copper. Studies have shown that the transition from the use of briquetted form alloys based on copper and magnesium to the «chips-inoculating alloys» allowed increasing the efficiency of the spheroidizing process. Further improvement in the quality of ductile iron can be achieved by the use in «chip-inoculating alloys» additives of nanosized yttrium oxide powder. 

  15. Gluten-Free Foods in Rural Maritime Provinces: Limited Availability, High Price, and Low Iron Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Jennifer A; Gougeon, Laura

    2017-12-01

    We investigated the price difference between gluten-free (GF) and gluten-containing (GC) foods available in rural Maritime stores. GF foods and comparable GC items were sampled through random visits to 21 grocery stores in nonurban areas of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island, Canada. Wilcoxon rank tests were conducted on price per 100 g of product, and on the price relative to iron content; 2226 GF foods (27.2% staple items, defined as breads, cereals, flours, and pastas) and 1625 GC foods were sampled, with an average ± SD of 66 ± 2.7 GF items per store in rural areas and 331 ± 12 in towns. The median price of GF items ($1.76/100 g) was more expensive than GC counterparts ($1.05/100 g) and iron density was approximately 50% less. GF staple foods were priced 5% higher in rural stores than in town stores. Although the variety of GF products available to consumers has improved, higher cost and lower nutrient density remain issues in nonurban Maritime regions. Dietitians working in nonurban areas should consider the relative high price, difficult access, and low iron density of key GF items, and work together with clients to find alternatives and enhance their food literacy.

  16. The advantage of high relaxivity contrast agents in brain perfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotton, F.; Hermier, M.

    2006-01-01

    Accurate MRI characterization of brain lesions is critical for planning therapeutic strategy, assessing prognosis and monitoring response to therapy. Conventional MRI with gadolinium-based contrast agents is useful for the evaluation of brain lesions, but this approach primarily depicts areas of disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) rather than tissue perfusion. Advanced MR imaging techniques such as dynamic contrast agent-enhanced perfusion MRI provide physiological information that complements the anatomic data available from conventional MRI. We evaluated brain perfusion imaging with gadobenate dimeglumine (Gd-BOPTA, MultiHance; Bracco Imaging, Milan, Italy). The contrast-enhanced perfusion technique was performed on a Philips Intera 1.5-T MR system. The technique used to obtain perfusion images was dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced MRI, which is highly sensitive to T2* changes. Combined with PRESTO perfusion imaging, SENSE is applied to double the temporal resolution, thereby improving the signal intensity curve fit and, accordingly, the accuracy of the derived parametric images. MultiHance is the first gadolinium MR contrast agent with significantly higher T1 and T2 relaxivities than conventional MR contrast agents. The higher T1 relaxivity, and therefore better contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging, leads to significantly improved detection of BBB breakdown and hence improved brain tumor conspicuity and delineation. The higher T2 relaxivity allows high-quality T2*-weighted perfusion MRI and the derivation of good quality relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) maps. We determined the value of MultiHance for enhanced T2*-weighted perfusion imaging of histologically proven (by surgery or stereotaxic biopsy) intraaxial brain tumors (n=80), multiple sclerosis lesions (n=10), abscesses (n=4), neurolupus (n=15) and stroke (n=16). All the procedures carried out were safe and no adverse events occurred. The acquired perfusion images were of good quality in

  17. Effects of Radiation and a High Iron Load on Bone Mineral Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, E.; Morgan, J. L. L.; Zwart, S. R.; Gonzales, E.; Camp, K.; Smith, S. M.; Bloomfield, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    Astronauts on long duration space flight missions to the moon or mars are exposed to radiation and have increase iron (Fe) stores, both of which can independently induce oxidative stress and may exacerbate bone mass loss and strength. We hypothesize a high Fe diet and a fractionated gamma radiation exposure would increase oxidative stress and lower bone mass. Three mo-old, SD rats (n=32) were randomized to receive an adequate Fe diet (45 mg Fe/kg diet) or a high Fe diet (650 mg Fe/kg diet) for 4 wks and either a cumulative 3 Gy dose (fractionated 8 x 0.375 Gy) of gamma radiation (Cs-137) or sham exposure starting on day 14. Elisa kit assessed serum catalase, clinical analyzer assessed serum Fe status and ex vivo pQCT scans measured bone parameters in the proximal/midshaft tibia and femoral neck. Mechanical strength was assessed by 3-pt bending and femoral neck test. There is a significant decrease in trabecular bone mineral density (BMD) from radiation (p less than 0.05) and a trend in diet (p=0.05) at the proximal tibia. There is a significant interaction in cortical BMD from the combined treatments at the midshaft tibia (p less than 0.05). There is a trending decrease in total BMD from diet (p=0.07) at the femoral neck. In addition, high serum Fe was correlated to low trabecular BMD (p less than 0.05) and high serum catalase was correlated to low BMD at all 3 bone sites (p less than 0.05). There was no difference in the max load of the tibia or femoral neck. Radiation and a high iron diet increases iron status and catalase in the serum and decreases BMD.

  18. Versatile and biomass synthesis of iron-based nanoparticles supported on carbon matrix with high iron content and tunable reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Dongmao; Shi, Sheldon Q.; Pittman, Charles U.; Jiang Dongping; Che Wen; Gai Zheng; Howe, Jane Y.; More, Karren L.; Antonyraj, Arockiasamy

    2012-01-01

    Iron-based nanoparticles supported on carbon (FeNPs-C) have enormous potential for environmental applications. Reported is a biomass-based method for FeNP-C synthesis that involves pyrolysis of bleached wood fiber pre-mixed with Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles. This method allows synthesis of iron-based nanoparticles with tunable chemical reactivity by changing the pyrolysis temperature. The FeNP-C synthesized at a pyrolysis temperature of 500 °C (FeNP-C-500) reacts violently (pyrophoric) when exposed to air, while FeNP-C prepared at 800 °C (FeNP-C-800) remains stable in ambient condition for at least 3 months. The FeNPs in FeNP-C-800 are mostly below 50 nm in diameter and are surrounded by carbon. The immediate carbon layer (within 5–15 nm radius) on the FeNPs is graphitized. Proof-of-concept environmental applications of FeNPs-C-800 were demonstrated by Rhodamine 6G and arsenate (V) removal from water. This biomass-based method provides an effective way for iron-based nanoparticle fabrication and biomass utilization.

  19. Iron and iron oxide nanoparticles are highly toxic to Culex quinquefasciatus with little non-target effects on larvivorous fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, Kadarkarai; Dinesh, Devakumar; Nataraj, Devaraj; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Amuthavalli, Pandiyan; Madhavan, Jagannathan; Rajasekar, Aruliah; Rajan, Mariappan; Thiruppathi, Kulandhaivel Palani; Kumar, Suresh; Higuchi, Akon; Nicoletti, Marcello; Benelli, Giovanni

    2018-04-01

    The control of filariasis vectors has been enhanced in several areas, but there are main challenges, including increasing resistance to insecticides and lack of cheap and eco-friendly products. The toxicity of iron (Fe 0 ) and iron oxide (Fe 2 O 3 ) nanoparticles has been scarcely investigated yet. We studied the larvicidal and pupicidal activity of Fe 0 and Fe 2 O 3 nanoparticles against Culex quinquefasciatus. Fe 0 and Fe 2 O 3 nanoparticles produced by green (using a Ficus natalensis aqueous extract) and chemical nanosynthesis, respectively, were analyzed by UV-Vis spectrophotometry, FT-IR spectroscopy, XRD analysis, SEM, and EDX assays. In larvicidal and pupicidal experiments on Cx. quinquefasciatus, LC 50 of Fe 0 nanoparticles ranged from 20.9 (I instar larvae) to 43.7 ppm (pupae) and from 4.5 (I) to 22.1 ppm (pupae) for Fe 2 O 3 nanoparticles synthesized chemically. Furthermore, the predation efficiency of the guppy fish, Poecilia reticulata, after a single treatment with sub-lethal doses of Fe 0 and Fe 2 O 3 nanoparticles was magnified. Overall, this work provides new insights about the toxicity of Fe 0 and Fe 2 O 3 nanoparticles against mosquito vectors; we suggested that green and chemical fabricated nano-iron may be considered to develop novel and effective pesticides.

  20. Advances in Glass Formulations for Hanford High-Alumimum, High-Iron and Enhanced Sulphate Management in HLW Streams-13000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, Albert A.

    2013-01-01

    The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Contract terms. The WTP's overall mission will require the immobilization of tank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulphur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings and higher throughput efficiencies. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste loading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. In view of the importance of aluminum limited waste streams at Hanford (and also Savannah River), the ability to achieve high waste loadings without adversely impacting melt rates has the potential for enormous cost savings from reductions in canister count and the potential for schedule acceleration. Consequently, the potential return on the investment made in the development of these enhancements is extremely favorable. Glass composition development for one of the latest Hanford HLW projected compositions with sulphate concentrations high enough to limit waste loading have been successfully tested and show tolerance for previously unreported tolerance for sulphate. Though a significant increase in waste loading for high-iron wastes has been achieved, the magnitude of the increase is not as substantial as those achieved for high-aluminum, high-chromium, high-bismuth or sulphur

  1. Estimating brain age using high-resolution pattern recognition: Younger brains in long-term meditation practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luders, Eileen; Cherbuin, Nicolas; Gaser, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Normal aging is known to be accompanied by loss of brain substance. The present study was designed to examine whether the practice of meditation is associated with a reduced brain age. Specific focus was directed at age fifty and beyond, as mid-life is a time when aging processes are known to become more prominent. We applied a recently developed machine learning algorithm trained to identify anatomical correlates of age in the brain translating those into one single score: the BrainAGE index (in years). Using this validated approach based on high-dimensional pattern recognition, we re-analyzed a large sample of 50 long-term meditators and 50 control subjects estimating and comparing their brain ages. We observed that, at age fifty, brains of meditators were estimated to be 7.5years younger than those of controls. In addition, we examined if the brain age estimates change with increasing age. While brain age estimates varied only little in controls, significant changes were detected in meditators: for every additional year over fifty, meditators' brains were estimated to be an additional 1month and 22days younger than their chronological age. Altogether, these findings seem to suggest that meditation is beneficial for brain preservation, effectively protecting against age-related atrophy with a consistently slower rate of brain aging throughout life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Calcium, potassium, iron, copper and zinc concentrations in the white and gray matter of the cerebellum and corpus callosum in brain of four genetic mouse strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergeant, C. [CNRS-Universite de Bordeaux I, UMR 5084, Chimie Nucleaire Analytique et Bio environnementale, Le Haut Vigneau, BP120, 33175 Bordeaux-Gradignan (France)]. E-mail: sergeant@cenbg.in2p3.fr; Vesvres, M.H. [CNRS-Universite de Bordeaux I, UMR 5084, Chimie Nucleaire Analytique et Bio environnementale, Le Haut Vigneau, BP120, 33175 Bordeaux-Gradignan (France); Deves, G. [CNRS-Universite de Bordeaux I, UMR 5084, Chimie Nucleaire Analytique et Bio environnementale, Le Haut Vigneau, BP120, 33175 Bordeaux-Gradignan (France); Guillou, F. [INRA-CNRS-Universite de Tours-Haras nationaux, UMR 6175, Physiologie de la Reproduction et des Comportements, 37380 Nouzilly (France)

    2005-04-01

    In the central nervous system, metallic cations are involved in oligodendrocyte maturation and myelinogenesis. Moreover, the metallic cations have been associated with pathogenesis, particularly multiple sclerosis and malignant gliomas. The brain is vulnerable to either a deficit or an excess of available trace elements. Relationship between trace metals and myelinogenesis is important in understanding a severe human pathology : the multiple sclerosis, which remains without efficient treatment. One approach to understand this disease has used mutant or transgenic mice presenting myelin deficiency or excess. But to date, the concentration of trace metals and mineral elements in white and gray matter areas in wild type brain is unknown. The aim of this study is to establish the reference concentrations of trace metals (iron, copper and zinc) and minerals (potassium and calcium) in the white and gray matter of the mouse cerebellum and corpus callosum. The brains of four different genetic mouse strains (C57Black6/SJL, C57Black6/D2, SJL and C3H) were analyzed. The freeze-dried samples were prepared to allow PIXE (Proton-induced X-ray emission) and RBS (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry) analyses with the nuclear microprobe in Bordeaux. The results obtained give the first reference values. Furthermore, one species out of the fours testes exhibited differences in calcium, iron and zinc concentrations in the white matter.

  3. Calcium, potassium, iron, copper and zinc concentrations in the white and gray matter of the cerebellum and corpus callosum in brain of four genetic mouse strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergeant, C.; Vesvres, M.H.; Deves, G.; Guillou, F.

    2005-01-01

    In the central nervous system, metallic cations are involved in oligodendrocyte maturation and myelinogenesis. Moreover, the metallic cations have been associated with pathogenesis, particularly multiple sclerosis and malignant gliomas. The brain is vulnerable to either a deficit or an excess of available trace elements. Relationship between trace metals and myelinogenesis is important in understanding a severe human pathology : the multiple sclerosis, which remains without efficient treatment. One approach to understand this disease has used mutant or transgenic mice presenting myelin deficiency or excess. But to date, the concentration of trace metals and mineral elements in white and gray matter areas in wild type brain is unknown. The aim of this study is to establish the reference concentrations of trace metals (iron, copper and zinc) and minerals (potassium and calcium) in the white and gray matter of the mouse cerebellum and corpus callosum. The brains of four different genetic mouse strains (C57Black6/SJL, C57Black6/D2, SJL and C3H) were analyzed. The freeze-dried samples were prepared to allow PIXE (Proton-induced X-ray emission) and RBS (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry) analyses with the nuclear microprobe in Bordeaux. The results obtained give the first reference values. Furthermore, one species out of the fours testes exhibited differences in calcium, iron and zinc concentrations in the white matter

  4. Effect of Titanium Inoculation on Tribological Properties of High Chromium Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siekaniec D.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation focuses on the study of the influence of titanium inoculation on tribological properties of High Chromium Cast Iron. Studies of tribological properties of High Chromium Cast Iron, in particularly the wear resistance are important because of the special application of this material. High Chromium Cast Iron is widely used for parts that require high wear resistance for example the slurry pumps, brick dies, several pieces of mine drilling equipment, rock machining equipment, and similar ones. Presented research described the effects of various amounts of Fe-Ti as an inoculant for wear resistance. The results of wear resistance were collated with microstructural analysis. The melts were conducted in industrial conditions. The inoculation was carried out on the stream of liquid metal. The following amount of inoculants have been used; 0.17% Fe-Ti, 0.33% Fe-Ti and 0.66% Fe-Ti. The tests were performed on the machine type MAN. The assessment of wear resistance was made on the basis of the weight loss. The experimental results indicate that inoculation improve the wear resistance. In every sample after inoculation the wear resistance was at least 20% higher than the reference sample. The best result, thus the smallest wear loss was achieved for inoculation by 0.66% Fe-Ti. There is the correlation between the changing in microstructure and wear resistance. With greater amount of titanium the microstructure is finer. More fine carbides do not crumbling so quickly from the matrix, improving the wear resistance.

  5. Arsenic removal with iron(II) and iron(III) in waters with high silicate and phosphate concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Linda C; Hug, Stephan J; Ruettimann, Thomas; Billah, Morsaline; Khan, Abdul Wahab; Rahman, Mohammad Tariqur

    2004-01-01

    Arsenic removal by passive treatment, in which naturally present Fe(II) is oxidized by aeration and the forming iron(III) (hydr)oxides precipitate with adsorbed arsenic, is the simplest conceivable water treatment option. However, competing anions and low iron concentrations often require additional iron. Application of Fe(II) instead of the usually applied Fe(III) is shown to be advantageous, as oxidation of Fe(II) by dissolved oxygen causes partial oxidation of As(III) and iron(III) (hydr)oxides formed from Fe(II) have higher sorption capacities. In simulated groundwater (8.2 mM HCO3(-), 2.5 mM Ca2+, 1.6 mM Mg2+, 30 mg/L Si, 3 mg/L P, 500 ppb As(III), or As(V), pH 7.0 +/- 0.1), addition of Fe(II) clearly leads to better As removal than Fe(III). Multiple additions of Fe(II) further improved the removal of As(II). A competitive coprecipitation model that considers As(III) oxidation explains the observed results and allows the estimation of arsenic removal under different conditions. Lowering 500 microg/L As(III) to below 50 microg/L As(tot) in filtered water required > 80 mg/L Fe(III), 50-55 mg/L Fe(II) in one single addition, and 20-25 mg/L in multiple additions. With As(V), 10-12 mg/L Fe(II) and 15-18 mg/L Fe(III) was required. In the absence of Si and P, removal efficiencies for Fe(II) and Fe(III) were similar: 30-40 mg/L was required for As(II), and 2.0-2.5 mg/L was required for As(V). In a field study with 22 tubewells in Bangladesh, passive treatment efficiently removed phosphate, but iron contents were generally too low for efficient arsenic removal.

  6. 192Ir high dose rate (HDR) interstitial brain implant: optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyagi, Anuj; Singh, Dinesh; Chitra, S.; Gupta, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    The new modality of stepping source dosimetry system (SSDs) illustrates a remarkable improvement in attaining the uniform and homogeneous dose distribution within the target volume. The technique enables the physicist to correct for a certain amount of misplacement or curvature of implant geometry. The short course of brachytherapy provides good palliation in terms of functional improvements with low and acceptable toxicity in high-grade glioma. With continual refinements of the technique, brachytherapy performed by a skilled brachytherapy team offers an opportunity to improve patient survival and quality of life. Since 1997, micro selectron HDR 192 Ir treatments are done including gynecological, oesophageal, breast, surface mould, soft tissue sarcoma (STS) and brain in our hospital. In this paper, procedure of interstitial brain implant in glioma as implant technique, simulation and treatment planning will be discussed

  7. Formation of microstructure and properties on hot working and heat treatment of high strength modular cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trajno, A.I.; Yusupov, V.S.; Kugushin, A.A.

    1999-01-01

    The possibility of plastic deformation of high strength modular cast iron (HSNCI) is under study. The microstructure and mechanical properties of hot worked and heat treated cast iron are investigated for the composition, %: Fe - 2.9 C - 2.4 Si - 0.7 Ni - 0.05 Mg - 0.04 Ce. It is stated that HSNCI can withstand various types of hot working without fracturing. Graphite inclusions lose their modular shape irreversibly during plastic deformation. Subsequent heat treatment affects the metal matrix only. The heating in oxidizing environment is noted to result in cast iron surface decarbonization [ru

  8. Brain catalase in the streptozotocin-rat model of sporadic Alzheimer's disease treated with the iron chelator-monoamine oxidase inhibitor, M30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofic, E; Salkovic-Petrisic, M; Tahirovic, I; Sapcanin, A; Mandel, S; Youdim, M; Riederer, P

    2015-04-01

    Low intracerebroventricular (icv) doses of streptozotocin (STZ) produce regionally specific brain neurochemical changes in rats that are similar to those found in the brain of patients with sporadic Alzheimer's disease (sAD). Since oxidative stress is thought to be one of the major pathologic processes in sAD, catalase (CAT) activity was estimated in the regional brain tissue of animals treated intracerebroventricularly with STZ and the multitarget iron chelator, antioxidant and MAO-inhibitor M30 [5-(N-methyl-N-propargylaminomethyl)-8-hydroxyquinoline]. Five-day oral pre-treatment of adult male Wistar rats with 10 mg/kg/day M30 dose was followed by a single injection of STZ (1 mg/kg, icv). CAT activity was measured colorimetrically in the hippocampus (HPC), brain stem (BS) and cerebellum (CB) of the control, STZ-, M30- and STZ + M30-treated rats, respectively, 4 weeks after the STZ treatment. STZ-treated rats demonstrated significantly lower CAT activity in all three brain regions in comparison to the controls (p effects in this non-transgenic sAD model.

  9. Unveiling the high-activity origin of single-atom iron catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Cheng, Daojian; Xu, Haoxiang; Zeng, Xiaofei; Wan, Xin; Shui, Jianglan; Xiang, Zhonghua; Cao, Dapeng

    2018-06-26

    It is still a grand challenge to develop a highly efficient nonprecious-metal electrocatalyst to replace the Pt-based catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Here, we propose a surfactant-assisted method to synthesize single-atom iron catalysts (SA-Fe/NG). The half-wave potential of SA-Fe/NG is only 30 mV less than 20% Pt/C in acidic medium, while it is 30 mV superior to 20% Pt/C in alkaline medium. Moreover, SA-Fe/NG shows extremely high stability with only 12 mV and 15 mV negative shifts after 5,000 cycles in acidic and alkaline media, respectively. Impressively, the SA-Fe/NG-based acidic proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) exhibits a high power density of 823 mW cm -2 Combining experimental results and density-functional theory (DFT) calculations, we further reveal that the origin of high-ORR activity of SA-Fe/NG is from the Fe-pyrrolic-N species, because such molecular incorporation is the key, leading to the active site increase in an order of magnitude which successfully clarifies the bottleneck puzzle of why a small amount of iron in the SA-Fe catalysts can exhibit extremely superior ORR activity.

  10. Solubility Measurements and Modeling of Zinc, Lead and Iron Sulfides at High Temperatures and High Pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carolina Figueroa Murcia, Diana; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Thomsen, Kaj

    Solubility measurements of sulfides in aqueous solutions are necessary to understand the behaviour of these scaling minerals in geothermal and oil reservoirs. The low solubility levels of Zinc Sulfide (ZnS), Lead Sulfide (PbS) and Iron Sulfide (FeS) make the solubility measurements a challenging...... oxygen atmosphere to avoid the risk of oxidation of sulfide minerals. The solution is kept in an equilibrium cell at constant temperature and pressure with continuous stirring. The concentration of Zn2+, Pb2+, Fe2+ and S2- are measured using Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission spectrometry (ICP...

  11. A Potential Biomarker in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Can Assessment of Brain Iron Deposition with SWI and Corticospinal Tract Degeneration with DTI Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheelakumari, R; Madhusoodanan, M; Radhakrishnan, A; Ranjith, G; Thomas, B

    2016-02-01

    Iron-mediated oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. This study aimed to assess iron deposition qualitatively and quantitatively by using SWI and microstructural changes in the corticospinal tract by using DTI in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Seventeen patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and 15 age- and sex-matched controls underwent brain MR imaging with SWI and DTI. SWI was analyzed for both signal-intensity scoring and quantitative estimation of iron deposition in the anterior and posterior banks of the motor and sensory cortices and deep gray nuclei. The diffusion measurements along the corticospinal tract at the level of pons and medulla were obtained by ROI analysis. Patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis showed reduced signal-intensity grades in the posterior bank of the motor cortex bilaterally. Quantitative analysis confirmed significantly higher iron content in the posterior bank of the motor cortex in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In contrast, no significant differences were noted for the anterior bank of the motor cortex, anterior and posterior banks of the sensory cortex, and deep nuclei. Receiver operating characteristic comparison showed a cutoff of 35μg Fe/g of tissue with an area under the curve of 0.78 (P = .008) for the posterior bank of the motor cortex in discriminating patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis from controls. Fractional anisotropy was lower in the pyramidal tracts of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis at the pons and medulla on either side, along with higher directionally averaged mean diffusivity values. The combination of SWI and DTI revealed an area under the curve of 0.784 for differentiating patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis from controls. Measurements of motor cortex iron deposition and diffusion tensor parameters of the corticospinal tract may be useful biomarkers for the diagnosis of clinically suspected

  12. Sphagnum-dominated bog systems are highly effective yet variable sources of bio-available iron to marine waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krachler, Regina; Krachler, Rudolf F.; Wallner, Gabriele; Steier, Peter; El Abiead, Yasin; Wiesinger, Hubert; Jirsa, Franz; Keppler, Bernhard K.

    2016-01-01

    Iron is a micronutrient of particular interest as low levels of iron limit primary production of phytoplankton and carbon fluxes in extended regions of the world's oceans. Sphagnum-peatland runoff is extraordinarily rich in dissolved humic-bound iron. Given that several of the world's largest wetlands are Sphagnum-dominated peatlands, this ecosystem type may serve as one of the major sources of iron to the ocean. Here, we studied five near-coastal creeks in North Scotland using freshwater/seawater mixing experiments of natural creek water and synthetic seawater based on a "5"9Fe radiotracer technique combined with isotopic characterization of dissolved organic carbon by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. Three of the creeks meander through healthy Sphagnum-dominated peat bogs and the two others through modified peatlands which have been subject to artificial drainage for centuries. The results revealed that, at the time of sampling (August 16–24, 2014), the creeks that run through modified peatlands delivered 11–15 μg iron per liter creek water to seawater, whereas the creeks that run through intact peatlands delivered 350–470 μg iron per liter creek water to seawater. To find out whether this humic-bound iron is bio-available to marine algae, we performed algal growth tests using the unicellular flagellated marine prymnesiophyte Diacronema lutheri and the unicellular marine green alga Chlorella salina, respectively. In both cases, the riverine humic material provided a highly bio-available source of iron to the marine algae. These results add a new item to the list of ecosystem services of Sphagnum-peatlands. - Highlights: • We report that peat-bogs are sources of bio-available iron to marine algae. • This iron is effectively chelated with aquatic humic acids. • The radiocarbon age of the iron-carrying aquatic humic acids was up to 550 years. • Analysis was focused on mixing experiments of iron-rich creek water with seawater. • Drained peatlands with

  13. Sphagnum-dominated bog systems are highly effective yet variable sources of bio-available iron to marine waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krachler, Regina, E-mail: regina.krachler@univie.ac.at [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Vienna, Währingerstraße 42, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Krachler, Rudolf F.; Wallner, Gabriele [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Vienna, Währingerstraße 42, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Steier, Peter [Isotope Research and Nuclear Physics, University of Vienna, Währingerstraße 17, 1090 Vienna (Austria); El Abiead, Yasin; Wiesinger, Hubert [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Vienna, Währingerstraße 42, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Jirsa, Franz [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Vienna, Währingerstraße 42, 1090 Vienna (Austria); University of Johannesburg, Department of Zoology, P. O. Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa); Keppler, Bernhard K. [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Vienna, Währingerstraße 42, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2016-06-15

    Iron is a micronutrient of particular interest as low levels of iron limit primary production of phytoplankton and carbon fluxes in extended regions of the world's oceans. Sphagnum-peatland runoff is extraordinarily rich in dissolved humic-bound iron. Given that several of the world's largest wetlands are Sphagnum-dominated peatlands, this ecosystem type may serve as one of the major sources of iron to the ocean. Here, we studied five near-coastal creeks in North Scotland using freshwater/seawater mixing experiments of natural creek water and synthetic seawater based on a {sup 59}Fe radiotracer technique combined with isotopic characterization of dissolved organic carbon by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. Three of the creeks meander through healthy Sphagnum-dominated peat bogs and the two others through modified peatlands which have been subject to artificial drainage for centuries. The results revealed that, at the time of sampling (August 16–24, 2014), the creeks that run through modified peatlands delivered 11–15 μg iron per liter creek water to seawater, whereas the creeks that run through intact peatlands delivered 350–470 μg iron per liter creek water to seawater. To find out whether this humic-bound iron is bio-available to marine algae, we performed algal growth tests using the unicellular flagellated marine prymnesiophyte Diacronema lutheri and the unicellular marine green alga Chlorella salina, respectively. In both cases, the riverine humic material provided a highly bio-available source of iron to the marine algae. These results add a new item to the list of ecosystem services of Sphagnum-peatlands. - Highlights: • We report that peat-bogs are sources of bio-available iron to marine algae. • This iron is effectively chelated with aquatic humic acids. • The radiocarbon age of the iron-carrying aquatic humic acids was up to 550 years. • Analysis was focused on mixing experiments of iron-rich creek water with seawater. • Drained

  14. Generation of drugs coated iron nanoparticles through high energy ball milling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radhika Devi, A.; Murty, B. S. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Chelvane, J. A. [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Hyderabad 500058 (India); Prabhakar, P. K.; Padma Priya, P. V.; Doble, Mukesh [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2014-03-28

    The iron nanoparticles coated with oleic acid and drugs such as folic acid/Amoxicillin were synthesized by high energy ball milling and characterized by X-ray diffraction, Transmission electron microscope, zeta potential, dynamic light scattering, Fourier Transform Infra red (FT-IR) measurements, and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). FT-IR and TGA measurements show good adsorption of drugs on oleic acid coated nanoparticles. Magnetic measurements indicate that saturation magnetization is larger for amoxicillin coated particles compared to folic acid coated particles. The biocompatibility of the magnetic nanoparticles prepared was evaluated by in vitro cytotoxicity assay using L929 cells as model cells.

  15. Creep-rupture behavior of iron superalloys in high-pressure hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Peterman, W.

    1984-01-01

    The creep-rupture properties of five iron-base and one cobalt-base high temperature alloys were investigated to assess the feasibility of using the alloys as construction materials in a Stirling engine. The alloys were heat treated and hardness measurements were taken. Typical microstructures of the alloys are shown. The creep-rupture properties of the alloys were determined at 760 and 815 C in 15.0 MPa H2 for 200 to 1000 hours. Plots of rupture life versus stress for the six superalloys are presented along with creep strain-time plots.

  16. Template synthesis of highly crystalline and monodisperse iron oxide pigments of nanosize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreeram, Kalarical Janardhanan; Indumathy, Ramasamy; Rajaram, Ananthanarayanan; Nair, Balachandran Unni; Ramasami, Thirumalachari

    2006-01-01

    Synthesis of highly crystalline and monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles is reported. The separation of Fe centers through site-specific binding to a polysaccharide-alginate matrix enables the generation of particles with a monodisperse or narrow size distribution character, resulting in transparent pigments. Site-specific interactions coupled with gel like character of alginate is proposed as the mechanism behind generation of lower particle sizes. Alginate-Fe complexes developed were subjected to heat treatment to provide for crystalline character and development of hematite (α-Fe 2 O 3 ). Conditions most ideal for achieving monodispersity and lower sizes have been optimized and confirmed through microscopic and photon correlation spectroscopic measurements

  17. Internal friction in iron-aluminium alloys having a high aluminium content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillairet, J.; Delaplace, J.; Silvent, A.

    1966-01-01

    By using a torsion pendulum to measure the internal friction of iron-aluminium alloys containing between 25 and 50 atom per cent of aluminium, it has been possible to show the existence of three damping peaks due to interstitial carbon. Their evolution is followed as a function of the carbon content, of the thermal treatment and of the aluminium content. A model based on the preferential occupation of tetrahedral sites is proposed as an interpretation of the results. A study of the Zener peak in these substitution alloys shows also that a part of the short distance disorder existing at high temperatures can be preserved by quenching. (author) [fr

  18. Electrical properties of single crystal Yttrium Iron Garnet ultra-thin films at high temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Thiery, Nicolas; Naletov, Vladimir V.; Vila, Laurent; Marty, Alain; Brenac, Ariel; Jacquot, Jean-François; de Loubens, Grégoire; Viret, Michel; Anane, Abdelmadjid; Cros, Vincent; Youssef, Jamal Ben; Demidov, Vladislav E.; Demokritov, Sergej O.; Klein, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    We report a study on the electrical properties of 19 nm thick Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) films grown by liquid phase epitaxy. The electrical conductivity and Hall coefficient are measured in the high temperature range [300,400]~K using a Van der Pauw four-point probe technique. We find that the electrical resistivity decreases exponentially with increasing temperature following an activated behavior corresponding to a band-gap of $E_g\\approx 2$ eV, indicating that epitaxial YIG ultra-thin film...

  19. Geoarchaeota: a new candidate phylum in the Archaea from high-temperature acidic iron mats in Yellowstone National Park

    OpenAIRE

    Kozubal, Mark A; Romine, Margaret; Jennings, Ryan deM; Jay, Zack J; Tringe, Susannah G; Rusch, Doug B; Beam, Jacob P; McCue, Lee Ann; Inskeep, William P

    2012-01-01

    Geothermal systems in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) provide an outstanding opportunity to understand the origin and evolution of metabolic processes necessary for life in extreme environments including low pH, high temperature, low oxygen and elevated concentrations of reduced iron. Previous phylogenetic studies of acidic ferric iron mats from YNP have revealed considerable diversity of uncultivated and undescribed archaea. The goal of this study was to obtain replicate de novo genome assem...

  20. High vulnerability of the developing brain to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inouye, Minoru

    1991-01-01

    The developing mammalian brain is highly susceptible to environmental teratogenic insults, because of its long-lasting sensitive period extending from the beginning of embryonic organogenesis to the postnatal infantile period, the great vulnerability of undifferentiated neural cells to wide range of environmental agents including ionizing radiation, and the lack of further reproductive capacity of neurons. Disturbances in the production of neurons, and their migration to the cerebral and cerebellar cortices, give rise to malformations of the brain, such as an absent corpus callosum, disorganized cortical architecture, abnormal fissuring of the cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres, heterotopic cortical gray matter, ectopic cerebellar granule cells, microcephaly, etc. The critical developmental stage for the induction of histogenetic disorders of the cerebral cortex in humans is 8 weeks of pregnancy and following some weeks. This corresponds to day 13 of pregnancy for mice and day 15 for rats, i.e., the ventricular cells of fetal telencephalon are most susceptible to radiation-induced cell death in this stage of development. The lowest doses of X- and gamma-radiations which induce detectable biological effects in rats and mice are around 0.02 Gy in increasing acute cell death. Reduced brain weight and abnormal dendritic arborization are induced by 0.25 Gy and more. Histological abnormalities are produced by 0.5 Gy and more, and microcephaly and cerebellar malformations are by 1 Gy and more. (author)

  1. The effects of uranium oxide high-level waste on the structure of iron phosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badyal, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Because of their unusually good chemical durability, iron phosphate glasses are a natural candidate for a nuclear waste disposal glass. We have studied the effects of UO 2 high-level waste on the structure of iron phosphate glasses with both neutron and high-energy x-ray diffraction using the GLAD instrument of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source and the 1-BM bending magnet beamline of the Advanced Photon Source, respectively. The results of neutron scattering, which is mostly sensitive to correlations involving light atoms i.e. O-O, Fe-O and P-O, suggest the main structural features of the base glass are largely unaffected by the addition of UO 2 . The nearest-neighbor P-O, Fe-O and O-O peaks remain at the same position in real space and their intensities scale approximately with concentration. These findings are consistent with the earlier results of Raman scattering and EXAFS on the Fe-K edge wherein both cases the spectra remain similar to the base glass. High-energy x-ray scattering which is sensitive to correlations involving the heavier atoms and thus complements the neutron measurements, is also consistent with uranium occupying interstitial sites in the relatively undisturbed base glass structure. However, important questions remain as to the precise local structure and oxidation state of uranium in these glasses

  2. A reliable and consistent production technology for high volume compacted graphite iron castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jincheng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The demands for improved engine performance, fuel economy, durability, and lower emissions provide a continual challenge for engine designers. The use of Compacted Graphite Iron (CGI has been established for successful high volume series production in the passenger vehicle, commercial vehicle and industrial power sectors over the last decade. The increased demand for CGI engine components provides new opportunities for the cast iron foundry industry to establish efficient and robust CGI volume production processes, in China and globally. The production window range for stable CGI is narrow and constantly moving. Therefore, any one step single addition of magnesium alloy and the inoculant cannot ensure a reliable and consistent production process for complicated CGI engine castings. The present paper introduces the SinterCast thermal analysis process control system that provides for the consistent production of CGI with low nodularity and reduced porosity, without risking the formation of flake graphite. The technology is currently being used in high volume Chinese foundry production. The Chinese foundry industry can develop complicated high demand CGI engine castings with the proper process control technology.

  3. Synthesis, spectroscopy, and hydrogen/deuterium exchange in high-spin iron(II) hydride complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, Thomas R; Bill, Eckhard; MacLeod, K Cory; Brennessel, William W; Holland, Patrick L

    2014-03-03

    Very few hydride complexes are known in which the metals have a high-spin electronic configuration. We describe the characterization of several high-spin iron(II) hydride/deuteride isotopologues and their exchange reactions with one another and with H2/D2. Though the hydride/deuteride signal is not observable in NMR spectra, the choice of isotope has an influence on the chemical shifts of distant protons in the dimers through the paramagnetic isotope effect on chemical shift. This provides the first way to monitor the exchange of H and D in the bridging positions of these hydride complexes. The rate of exchange depends on the size of the supporting ligand, and this is consistent with the idea that H2/D2 exchange into the hydrides occurs through the dimeric complexes rather than through a transient monomer. The understanding of H/D exchange mechanisms in these high-spin iron hydride complexes may be relevant to postulated nitrogenase mechanisms.

  4. Convergent evolution of complex brains and high intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Gerhard

    2015-12-19

    Within the animal kingdom, complex brains and high intelligence have evolved several to many times independently, e.g. among ecdysozoans in some groups of insects (e.g. blattoid, dipteran, hymenopteran taxa), among lophotrochozoans in octopodid molluscs, among vertebrates in teleosts (e.g. cichlids), corvid and psittacid birds, and cetaceans, elephants and primates. High levels of intelligence are invariantly bound to multimodal centres such as the mushroom bodies in insects, the vertical lobe in octopodids, the pallium in birds and the cerebral cortex in primates, all of which contain highly ordered associative neuronal networks. The driving forces for high intelligence may vary among the mentioned taxa, e.g. needs for spatial learning and foraging strategies in insects and cephalopods, for social learning in cichlids, instrumental learning and spatial orientation in birds and social as well as instrumental learning in primates. © 2015 The Author(s).

  5. Preparation of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles in high yield by DC arc discharge and their characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Fan; Cui, Lan; Lin, Kui; Jin, Feng-min; Wang, Bin; Shi, Shu-xiu; Yang, De-an; Wang, Hui; He, Fei; Chen, Xiao-ping; Cui, Shen

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► CEINPs with core–shell structure and high Fe content were prepared in high yield by DC arc discharge. ► The anode II with a mass ratio of total iron to carbon 8:1 was used in DC arc discharge. ► The possible process of formation of CEINPs is briefly discussed. ► The uniformity of composition of anode is very important for the formation of CEINPs. ► The MEF and MMF of iron element may also play an important role in the formation of CEINPs. -- Abstract: Carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles (CEINPs) were prepared by DC arc discharge under nitrogen atmosphere of high temperature. The products were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscope, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS), and their magnetic properties were measured by physical property measurement system (PPMS). The product B I , obtained from the anode I, contains the nanoparticles of iron and iron carbide, and carbon coating with imperfect and disordered layer structure. The product B II , obtained from the anode II, mainly consists of CEINPs, whose cores mainly consist of iron and iron carbide and shells contain about 3–7 graphitic layers. The iron contents in the products B I and B II are 44.8 and 82.6 wt.%, respectively. The products B I and B II have similar phase composition which includes carbon, iron, iron carbide, ferrous and ferric oxide, iron nitride, and carbon nitride. The saturation magnetization (Ms) of the products B I and B II are 29.35 and 88.66 emu/g and their coercivity (Hc) are 220 and 240 Oe, respectively. The total yields of all the products formed in the arc discharge chamber from anodes I and II, except for the cylinder-shaped deposits formed on the top of the cathode, are 25.8 and 22.3 wt.%, respectively. The possible process of formation of CEINPs is briefly discussed on the foundation of our results and other

  6. Role of the NMDA receptor and iron on free radical production and brain damage following transient middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Doo Soon; Jeon, Jeong Wook; Lee, Jin Soo; Won, Seok Joon; Cho, Sung Ig; Lee, Yong Beom; Gwag, Byoung Joo

    2012-05-21

    Excess activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors and iron is believed to contribute to free radical production and neuronal death following hypoxic ischemia. We examined the possibility that both NMDA receptor activation and iron overload determine spatial and temporal patterns of free radical production after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Mitochondrial free radical (MFR) levels were maximally increased in neurons in the core at 1 h and 24 h after tMCAO. Early MFR production was blocked by administration of MK-801, an NMDA receptor antagonist, but not deferoxamine, an iron chelator. Neither MK-801 nor deferoxamine attenuated late MFR production in the core. Increased MFRs were observed in penumbral neurons within 6 h and gradually increased over 24 h after tMCAO. Slowly-evolving MFRs in the core and penumbra were accompanied by iron overload. Deferoxamine blocked iron overload but reduced MFR production only in the penumbra. Combined MK-801/deferoxamine reduced late MFR production in both core and penumbra in an additive manner. Combination therapy significantly ameliorated infarction compared with monotherapy. These findings suggest that the NMDA receptor activation and iron overload mediate late MFR production and infarction after tMCAO. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Reduction of 3-methoxytyramine concentrations in the caudate nucleus of rats after exposure to high-energy iron particles: evidence for deficits in dopaminergic neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, W.A.; Dalton, T.K.; Joseph, J.A.; Rabin, B.M.

    1990-01-01

    Exposure to low doses of high-energy iron particles can alter motor behavior. The ability of rats to hang from a wire has been reported to be significantly degraded after exposure to doses as low as 0.5 Gy. In addition, deficits in the ability of acetylcholine to regulate dopamine release in the caudate nucleus (an area in the brain important for motor function) have been found. The concentrations of 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT), a metabolite of dopamine whose concentrations reflect dopamine release in vivo, were measured after rats were exposed to different doses of high-energy iron particles to gain further information about the effect of radiation on the dopaminergic system. Concentrations of 3-MT were significantly reduced 3 days after exposure to 5 Gy but returned to control values by 8 days. After 6 months, concentrations were again less than control values. Exposure to 5 Gy of high-energy electrons or gamma photons had no effect 3 days after exposure. Very high doses of electrons were needed to alter 3-MT concentrations. One hundred grays of electrons decreased 3-MT 30 min after irradiation but levels returned to control values by 60 min. Gamma photons had no effect after doses up to 200 Gy. These results provide further evidence that exposure to heavy particles can degrade motor behavior through an action on dopaminergic mechanisms and that this can occur after doses much lower than those needed for low-LET radiation

  8. Kinetics of iron redox reaction in silicate melts: A high temperature Xanes study on an alkali basalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochain, B; Neuville, D R; Roux, J; Strukelj, E; Richet, P [Physique des Mineraux et Magmas, Geochimie-Cosmochimie, CNRS-IPGP, 4 place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Ligny, D de [Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, LPCML, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Baudelet, F, E-mail: cochain@ipgp.jussieu.f [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint Aubin (France)

    2009-11-15

    In Earth and Materials sciences, iron is the most important transition element. Glass and melt properties are strongly affected by iron content and redox state with the consequence that some properties (i.e. viscosity, heat capacity, crystallization...) depend not only on the amounts of Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+}, but also on the coordination state of these ions. In this work we investigate iron redox reactions through XANES experiments at the K-edge of iron. Using a high-temperature heating device, pre-edge of XANES spectra exhibits definite advantages to make in-situ measurements and to determine the evolution of redox state with time, temperature and composition of synthetic silicate melts. In this study, new kinetics measurements are presented for a basalt melt from the 31,000-BC eruption of the Puy de Lemptegy Volcano in France. These measurements have been made between 773 K and at superliquidus temperatures up to 1923 K.

  9. Kinetics of iron redox reaction in silicate melts: A high temperature Xanes study on an alkali basalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochain, B; Neuville, D R; Roux, J; Strukelj, E; Richet, P; Ligny, D de; Baudelet, F

    2009-01-01

    In Earth and Materials sciences, iron is the most important transition element. Glass and melt properties are strongly affected by iron content and redox state with the consequence that some properties (i.e. viscosity, heat capacity, crystallization...) depend not only on the amounts of Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ , but also on the coordination state of these ions. In this work we investigate iron redox reactions through XANES experiments at the K-edge of iron. Using a high-temperature heating device, pre-edge of XANES spectra exhibits definite advantages to make in-situ measurements and to determine the evolution of redox state with time, temperature and composition of synthetic silicate melts. In this study, new kinetics measurements are presented for a basalt melt from the 31,000-BC eruption of the Puy de Lemptegy Volcano in France. These measurements have been made between 773 K and at superliquidus temperatures up to 1923 K.

  10. High-performing mesoporous iron oxalate anodes for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Wei An; Gupta, Nutan; Prasanth, Raghavan; Madhavi, Srinivasan

    2012-12-01

    Mesoporous iron oxalate (FeC(2)O(4)) with two distinct morphologies, i.e., cocoon and rod, has been synthesized via a simple, scalable chimie douce precipitation method. The solvent plays a key role in determining the morphology and microstructure of iron oxalate, which are studied by field-emission scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Crystallographic characterization of the materials has been carried out by X-ray diffraction and confirmed phase-pure FeC(2)O(4)·2H(2)O formation. The critical dehydration process of FeC(2)O(4)·2H(2)O resulted in anhydrous FeC(2)O(4), and its thermal properties are studied by thermogravimetric analysis. The electrochemical properties of anhydrous FeC(2)O(4) in Li/FeC(2)O(4) cells are evaluated by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge cycling, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The studies showed that the initial discharge capacities of anhydrous FeC(2)O(4) cocoons and rods are 1288 and 1326 mA h g(-1), respectively, at 1C rate. Anhydrous FeC(2)O(4) cocoons exhibited stable capacity even at high C rates (11C). The electrochemical performance of anhydrous FeC(2)O(4) is found to be greatly influenced by the number of accessible reaction sites, morphology, and size effects.

  11. Preparation of Highly Pure Vanadyl Sulfate from Sulfate Solutions Containing Impurities of Iron and Aluminum by Solvent Extraction Using EHEHPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The preparation of highly pure vanadyl sulfate from sulfate solutions containing impurities of iron and aluminumwas investigated by solvent extraction with 2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (EHEHPA and tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP as the phase modifier. The extraction and stripping conditions of vanadium (IV and its separation from iron and aluminum were optimized. Under the optimal extraction conditions, the extraction of vanadium (IV and iron were 68% and 53%, respectively, while only 2% aluminum was extracted in a single contact, suggesting good separation of vanadium (IV from aluminum. Sulfuric acid solution was used for the stripping. Nearly 100% vanadium (IV and 95% aluminum were stripped, while only 10% iron was stripped under the optimal stripping conditions in a single contact, suggesting good separation of vanadium (IV from iron. After five stages of extraction and stripping, highly pure vanadyl sulfate containing 76.5 g/L V (IV with the impurities of 12 mg/L Fe and 10 mg/L Al was obtained, which is suitable for the electrolyte of a vanadium redox flow battery. Organic solution was well regenerated after stripping by oxalic acid solution to remove the remaining iron. The mechanism of vanadium (IV extraction using EHEHPA was also discussed based on the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR analysis.

  12. The role of equilibrium volume and magnetism on the stability of iron phases at high pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnemrat, S; Hooper, J P; Vasiliev, I; Kiefer, B

    2014-01-29

    The present study provides new insights into the pressure dependence of magnetism by tracking the hybridization between crystal orbitals for pressures up to 600 GPa in the known hcp, bcc and fcc iron. The Birch-Murnaghan equation of state parameters are; bcc: V0 = 11.759 A(3)/atom, K0 = 177.72 GPa; hcp: V0 = 10.525 A(3)/atom, K0 = 295.16 GPa; and fcc: V0 = 10.682 A(3)/atom, K0 = 274.57 GPa. These parameters compare favorably with previous studies. Consistent with previous studies we find that the close-packed hcp and fcc phases are non-magnetic at pressures above 50 GPa and 60 GPa, respectively. The principal features of magnetism in iron are predicted to be invariant, at least up to ∼6% overextension of the equilibrium volume. Our results predict that magnetism for overextended fcc iron disappears via an intermediate spin state. This feature suggests that overextended lattices can be used to stabilize particular magnetic states. The analysis of the orbital hybridization shows that the magnetic bcc structure at high pressures is stabilized by splitting the majority and minority spin bands. The bcc phase is found to be magnetic at least up to 600 GPa; however, magnetism is insufficient to stabilize the bcc phase itself, at least at low temperatures. Finally, the analysis of the orbital contributions to the total energy provides evidence that non-magnetic hcp and fcc phases are likely more stable than bcc at core earth pressures.

  13. US evaluation of volume brain lesions produced by high-intensity focused US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chua, R.V.; Chua, G.T.; Fry, F.J.; Franklin, T.D.; Wills, E.R.; Hastings, J.S.; Sanghui, N.T.

    1987-01-01

    Eighteen volume brain lesions produced by high-intensity focused US in the right cerebral hemispheres of research canines were evaluated by diagnostic US from immediately after ablation up to 62 days later. Animals were killed and perfused for whole-brain recovery. US evaluation of whole-brain specimens was performed. Histologic analysis of brain sections verified lesion placement, size, and tissue response to US. These sections were compared with US studies for correlation data. Correlation data suggest that US visualization may aid in accurate placement of volume brain lesions and in evaluation of effects of high-intensity focuses US in normal brain

  14. Iron deficiency in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijterschout, L.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common micronutrient deficiency in the world. Iron is involved in oxygen transport, energy metabolism, immune response, and plays an important role in brain development. In infancy, ID is associated with adverse effects on cognitive, motor, and behavioral development

  15. Global estimates of high-level brain drain and deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidis, John P A

    2004-06-01

    Brain drain, the international migration of scientists in search of better opportunities, has been a long-standing concern, but quantitative measurements are uncommon and limited to specific countries or disciplines. We need to understand brain drain at a global level and estimate the extent to which scientists born in countries with low opportunities never realize their potential. Data on 1523 of the most highly cited scientists for 1981-1999 are analyzed. Overall, 31.9% of these scientists did not reside in the country where they were born (range 18.1-54.6% across 21 different scientific fields). There was great variability across developed countries in the proportions of foreign-born resident scientists and emigrating scientists. Countries without a critical mass of native scientists lost most scientists to migration. This loss occurred in both developed and developing countries. Adjusting for population and using the U.S. as reference, the number of highly cited native-born scientists was at least 75% of the expected number in only 8 countries other than the U.S. It is estimated that approximately 94% of the expected top scientists worldwide have not been able to materialize themselves due to various adverse conditions. Scientific deficit is only likely to help perpetuate these adverse conditions.

  16. Early amplitude‐integrated electroencephalography for monitoring neonates at high risk for brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Fernando Todeschi Variane

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: This study supports previous results and demonstrates the utility of amplitude‐integrated electroencephalography for monitoring brain function and predicting early outcome in the studied groups of infants at high risk for brain injury.

  17. High-precision determination of the isotopic composition of dissolved iron in iron depleted seawater by double spike multicollector-ICPMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacan, Francois; Radic, Amandine; Labatut, Marie; Jeandel, Catherine; Poitrasson, Franck; Sarthou, Geraldine; Pradoux, Catherine; Chmeleff, Jerome; Freydier, Remi

    2010-09-01

    This work demonstrates the feasibility of the measurement of the isotopic composition of dissolved iron in seawater for an iron concentration range, 0.05-1 nmol L(-1), allowing measurements in most oceanic waters, including Fe depleted waters of high nutrient low chlorophyll areas. It presents a detailed description of our previously published protocol, with significant improvements on detection limit and blank contribution. Iron is preconcentrated using a nitriloacetic acid superflow resin and purified using an AG 1-x4 anion exchange resin. The isotopic ratios are measured with a multicollector-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICPMS) Neptune, coupled with a desolvator (Aridus II or Apex-Q), using a (57)Fe-(58)Fe double spike mass bias correction. A Monte Carlo test shows that optimum precision is obtained for a double spike composed of approximately 50% (57)Fe and 50% (58)Fe and a sample to double spike quantity ratio of approximately 1. Total procedural yield is 91 +/- 25% (2SD, n = 55) for sample sizes from 20 to 2 L. The procedural blank ranges from 1.4 to 1.1 ng, for sample sizes ranging from 20 to 2 L, respectively, which, converted into Fe concentrations, corresponds to blank contributions of 0.001 and 0.010 nmol L(-1), respectively. Measurement precision determined from replicate measurements of seawater samples and standard solutions is 0.08 per thousand (delta(56)Fe, 2SD). The precision is sufficient to clearly detect and quantify isotopic variations in the oceans, which so far have been observed to span 2.5 per thousand and thus opens new perspectives to elucidate the oceanic iron cycle.

  18. Enhanced high-solids anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge by the addition of scrap iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaobin; Feng, Yinghong; Yu, Qilin; Xu, Zibin; Quan, Xie

    2014-05-01

    Anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge usually requires pretreatment procedure to improve the bioavailability of sludge, which involves considerable energy and high expenditures. This study proposes a cost-effective method for enhanced anaerobic digestion of sludge without a pretreatment by directly adding iron into the digester. The results showed that addition of Fe(0) powder could enhance 14.46% methane yield, and Fe scrap (clean scrap) could further enhance methane yield (improving rate 21.28%) because the scrap has better mass transfer efficiency with sludge and liquid than Fe(0) powder. The scrap of Fe with rust (rusty scrap) could induce microbial Fe(III) reduction, which resulted in achieving the highest methane yield (improving rate 29.51%), and the reduction rate of volatile suspended solids (VSS) was also highest (48.27%) among Fe powder, clean scrap and rusty scrap. PCR-DGGE proved that the addition of rusty scrap could enhance diversity of acetobacteria and enrich iron-reducing bacteria to enhance degradation of complex substrates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Iron based superconductors and related compounds synthesized by solid state metathesis and high temperature reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankovsky, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    The results of this thesis can be divided into three major topics, which can also be seen as different approaches of solid state chemistry to reveal interesting features of known and unknown compounds and to develop alternative synthesis routes. Firstly, known compounds with related structural motifs to the superconducting iron-arsenides were investigated regarding their structural and physical properties. In case of La 3 Pd 4 Ge 4 the influence of Fe doping on the properties was studied, whereas in the series ZrMAs (M=Ti,V) the physical properties have not yet been reported at all and were investigated for the first time. Secondly, an alternative synthesis route has been developed for the synthesis of superconducting LaFeAsO 1-x F x . This solid state metathesis reaction distinctly increased the quality of the samples compared to conventionally prepared products. Furthermore, the reaction pathway was investigated and clarified, which helps to understand the processes during high temperature solid state metathesis reactions in general. Thirdly, this alternative synthesis route was expanded to other systems and new compounds like co-substituted LaFe 1-x Mn x AsO 1-y F y were prepared and thoroughly investigated. This led to a complex study of the interplay of magnetism, electronic and structural conditions and the occurrence of superconducting properties. The investigation and understanding of such complex coherences will probably be decisive for the further understanding of the superconducting mechanism in iron based superconductors.

  20. High density tungsten-nickel-iron-cobalt alloys having improved hardness and method for making same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penrice, T.W.; Bost, J.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes the process of making high density alloy containing about 85 to 98 weight percent tungsten and the balance of the alloy being essentially a binder of nickel, iron and cobalt, and wherein the cobalt is present in an amount within the range of about 5 to 47.5 weight percent of the binder, comprising: blending powders of the tungsten, nickel, iron and cobalt into a homogeneous composition, compacting the homogeneous composition into a shaped article, heating the shaped article to a temperature and for a time sufficient to sinter the article, subjecting the sintered article to a temperature sufficient to enable the intermetallic phase formed at the matrix to tungsten interface to diffuse into the gamma austenitic phase whereby the alpha tungsten/gamma austenite boundaries are essentially free of such intermetallic phase, quenching the article, and swaging the article to a reduction in area of about 5 to 40 percent, the article having improved mechanical properties, including improved tensile strength and hardness while maintaining suitable ductility for subsequent working thereof

  1. Synthesis, characterization, and in vitro biological evaluation of highly stable diversely functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, Dipsikha; Sahu, Sumanta K.; Banerjee, Indranil; Das, Manasmita; Mishra, Debashish; Maiti, Tapas K.; Pramanik, Panchanan

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we report the design and synthesis of a series of well-dispersed superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) using chitosan as a surface modifying agent to develop a potential T 2 contrast probe for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The amine, carboxyl, hydroxyl, and thiol functionalities were introduced on chitosan-coated magnetic probe via simple reactions with small reactive organic molecules to afford a series of biofunctionalized nanoparticles. Physico-chemical characterizations of these functionalized nanoparticles were performed by TEM, XRD, DLS, FTIR, and VSM. The colloidal stability of these functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles was investigated in presence of phosphate buffer saline, high salt concentrations and different cell media for 1 week. MRI analysis of human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cell lines treated with nanoparticles elucidated that the amine-functionalized nanoparticles exhibited higher amount of signal darkening and lower T 2 relaxation in comparison to the others. The cellular internalization efficacy of these functionalized SPIONs was also investigated with HeLa cancer cell line by magnetically activated cell sorting (MACS) and fluorescence microscopy and results established selectively higher internalization efficacy of amine-functionalized nanoparticles to cancer cells. These positive attributes demonstrated that these nanoconjugates can be used as a promising platform for further in vitro and in vivo biological evaluations.

  2. Structural investigations of amorphised iron and nickel by high-fluence metalloid ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauschenbach, B.; Otto, G.; Hohmuth, K.; Heera, V.

    1987-01-01

    Boron, phosphorus and arsenic ions have been implanted into evaporated iron and nickel thin films at room temperature, and the implantation-induced microstructure has been investigated by high-voltage electron microscopy and transmission high energy electron diffraction. The metal films were implanted with ions to a constant dose of 1 x 10 17 and 5 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 respectively at energy of 50 keV. An amorphous layer was produced by boron and phosphorus ion implantation. Information on the atomic structure of the amorphous layers was obtained from the elastically diffracted electron intensity. On the basis of the correct scattering curves, the total interference function and the pair correlation function were determined. Finally, the atomic arrangement of the implantation-induced amorphous layers is discussed and structure produced by ion irradiation is compared with amorphous structures formed with other techniques. (author)

  3. High pressure-temperature electrical conductivity of magnesiowustite as a function of iron oxide concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyuan; Jeanloz, Raymond

    1990-01-01

    The electrical conductivity of (Mg, Fe)O magnesiowustite containing 9 and 27.5 mol pct FeO has been measured at simultaneously high pressures (30-32 GPa) and temperatures using a diamond anvil cell heated with a continuous wave Nd:YAG laser and an external resistance heater. The conductivity depends strongly on the FeO concentration at both ambient and high pressures. At the pressures and temperatures of about 30 GPa and 2000 K, conditions expected in the lower mantle, the magnesiowustite containing 27.5 percent FeO is 3 orders of magnitude more conductive than that containing 9 percent FeO. The activation energy of magnesiowustite decreases with increasing iron concentration from 0.38 (+ or - 0.09) eV at 9 percent FeO to 0.29 (+ or - 0.05) eV at 27.5 percent FeO.

  4. Sphagnum-dominated bog systems are highly effective yet variable sources of bio-available iron to marine waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krachler, Regina; Krachler, Rudolf F; Wallner, Gabriele; Steier, Peter; El Abiead, Yasin; Wiesinger, Hubert; Jirsa, Franz; Keppler, Bernhard K

    2016-06-15

    Iron is a micronutrient of particular interest as low levels of iron limit primary production of phytoplankton and carbon fluxes in extended regions of the world's oceans. Sphagnum-peatland runoff is extraordinarily rich in dissolved humic-bound iron. Given that several of the world's largest wetlands are Sphagnum-dominated peatlands, this ecosystem type may serve as one of the major sources of iron to the ocean. Here, we studied five near-coastal creeks in North Scotland using freshwater/seawater mixing experiments of natural creek water and synthetic seawater based on a (59)Fe radiotracer technique combined with isotopic characterization of dissolved organic carbon by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. Three of the creeks meander through healthy Sphagnum-dominated peat bogs and the two others through modified peatlands which have been subject to artificial drainage for centuries. The results revealed that, at the time of sampling (August 16-24, 2014), the creeks that run through modified peatlands delivered 11-15μg iron per liter creek water to seawater, whereas the creeks that run through intact peatlands delivered 350-470μg iron per liter creek water to seawater. To find out whether this humic-bound iron is bio-available to marine algae, we performed algal growth tests using the unicellular flagellated marine prymnesiophyte Diacronema lutheri and the unicellular marine green alga Chlorella salina, respectively. In both cases, the riverine humic material provided a highly bio-available source of iron to the marine algae. These results add a new item to the list of ecosystem services of Sphagnum-peatlands. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Advances in Glass Formulations for Hanford High-Aluminum, High-Iron and Enhanced Sulphate Management in HLW Streams - 13000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A. [WTP Engineering Division, United States Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Post Office Box 450, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Contract terms. The WTP's overall mission will require the immobilization of tank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulphur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings and higher throughput efficiencies. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste loading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. In view of the importance of aluminum limited waste streams at Hanford (and also Savannah River), the ability to achieve high waste loadings without adversely impacting melt rates has the potential for enormous cost savings from reductions in canister count and the potential for schedule acceleration. Consequently, the potential return on the investment made in the development of these enhancements is extremely favorable. Glass composition development for one of the latest Hanford HLW projected compositions with sulphate concentrations high enough to limit waste loading have been successfully tested and show tolerance for previously unreported tolerance for sulphate. Though a significant increase in waste loading for high-iron wastes has been achieved, the magnitude of the increase is not as substantial as those achieved for high-aluminum, high-chromium, high-bismuth or

  6. Interaction genotype by season and its influence on the identification of beans with high content of zinc and iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Andrade Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The mineral contents in common bean seeds are influenced, in addition to genetic variation, by environmental crop conditions, especially by the soil type and chemical composition and by the genotype x environment interaction. This study was carried out to verify if the zinc and iron contents are affected by the crop growing period. Ten lines with high iron and zinc contents and ten with low contents were assessed in three seasons: "wet season" of 2009/2010 (sowing in November; "dry season" of 2010 (sowing in February and "winter season" of 2010 (sowing in July, in Lavras, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The experimental design used was randomized blocks with three replications and plots consisting of two rows of two meters, with a spacing of 0.50 m. The seeds harvested were assessed in regard to iron and zinc mineral contents. The greatest contents were observed in the winter season and the smallest ones in the dry season, with sowing in February. It was observed that in the mean of the three harvests, the lines classified as having high iron and zinc content exhibited an iron quantity 11.0% and a zinc quantity 6.8% above those of low content. The lines by seasons interaction occurs. However, its interference in identification of the groups with high and low content of the two nutrients is not great.

  7. Nitrogen-doped graphene-wrapped iron nanofragments for high-performance oxygen reduction electrocatalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jang Yeol [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Photo-Electronic Hybrid Research Center (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Na Young [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Fuel Cell Research Center (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Dong Yun [Chungbuk National University, Department of Environmental Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hee-Young [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Fuel Cell Research Center (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang-Soo [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Photo-Electronic Hybrid Research Center (Korea, Republic of); Joon Kwon, S. [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Nanophotonics Research Center (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Dong-Hee [Chungbuk National University, Department of Environmental Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Bong, Ki Wan [Korea University, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Son, Jeong Gon, E-mail: jgson@kist.re.kr [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Photo-Electronic Hybrid Research Center (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Young, E-mail: jinykim@kist.re.kr [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Fuel Cell Research Center (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Transition metals, such as iron (Fe)- or cobalt (Co)-based nanomaterials, are promising electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) in fuel cells due to their high theoretical activity and low cost. However, a major challenge to using these metals in place of precious metal catalysts for ORR is their low efficiency and poor stability, thus new concepts and strategies should be needed to address this issue. Here, we report a hybrid aciniform nanostructures of Fe nanofragments embedded in thin nitrogen (N)-doped graphene (Fe@N-G) layers via a heat treatment of graphene oxide-wrapped iron oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) microparticles with melamine. The heat treatment leads to transformation of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} microparticles to nanosized zero-valent Fe fragments and formation of core-shell structures of Fe nanofragments and N-doped graphene layers. Thin N-doped graphene layers massively promote electron transfer from the encapsulated metals to the graphene surface, which efficiently optimizes the electronic structure of the graphene surface and thereby triggers ORR activity at the graphene surface. With the synergistic effect arising from the N-doped graphene and Fe nanoparticles with porous aciniform nanostructures, the Fe@N-G hybrid catalyst exhibits high catalytic activity, which was evidenced by high E{sub 1/2} of 0.82 V, onset potential of 0.93 V, and limiting current density of 4.8 mA cm{sup −2} indicating 4-electron ORR, and even exceeds the catalytic stability of the commercial Pt catalyst.

  8. Quantum oscillations in the parent magnetic phase of an iron arsenide high temperature superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastian, Suchitra E; Gillett, J; Lau, P H C; Lonzarich, G G; Harrison, N; Mielke, C H; Singh, D J

    2008-01-01

    We report measurements of quantum oscillations in SrFe 2 As 2 -which is an antiferromagnetic parent of the iron arsenide family of superconductors-known to become superconducting under doping and the application of pressure. The magnetic field and temperature dependences of the oscillations between 20 and 55 T in the liquid helium temperature range suggest that the electronic excitations are those of a Fermi liquid. We show that the observed Fermi surface comprising small pockets is consistent with the formation of a spin-density wave. Our measurements thus demonstrate that high T c superconductivity can occur on doping or pressurizing a conventional metallic spin-density wave state. (fast track communication)

  9. Radiation losses from oxygen and iron impurities in a high temperature plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breton, C.; Michelis, C. de; Mattioli, M.

    1976-06-01

    Radiation and ionization losses due to impurities present in a high temperature plasma have been calculated for a light element (oxygen), which is completely stripped in the core of existing Tokamak discharges, and a heavy one (iron), which is only partially stripped. Two extreme cases have been treated: in the first one coronal equilibrium is reached; the radiated power is then equal to the product of the electron density, the impurity density, and a function of the electron temperature; in the second one impurities recycle with a constant radial velocity v 0 in a background plasma; radiation and ionization losses are proportional to the impurity flux and are a decreasing function of the diffusion velocity. The results presented can be used to evaluate losses in a practical case [fr

  10. Fatigue of Austempered Ductile Iron with Two Strength Grades in Very High Cycle Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiwang; Li, Wei; Song, Qingpeng; Zhang, Ning; Lu, Liantao

    2016-03-01

    In this study, Austempered ductile irons (ADIs) with two different strength grades were produced and the fatigue properties were measured at 109 cycles. The results show that the S-N curves give a typical step-wise shape and there is no fatigue limit in the very high cycle fatigue regime. The two grades ADI have the similar fracture behaviors and fatigue failure can initiate from defects at specimen surface and subsurface zone. On the fracture surfaces of some specimens, the `granular-bright-facet' area with rich carbon distribution is observed in the vicinity of the defect. The microstructure affects the crack behaviors at the early propagation stage. The ADI with upper and lower bainite shows higher fatigue strength compared with the ADI with coarse upper bainite.

  11. Microstructure and wear resistance of high chromium cast iron containing niobium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zhiguo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, the effect of niobium addition on the microstructure, mechanical properties and wear resistance of high chromium cast iron has been studied. The results show that the microstructure of the heat-treated alloys is composed of M7C3 and M23C6 types primary carbide, eutectic carbide, secondary carbide and a matrix of martensite and retained austenite. NbC particles appear both inside and on the edge of the primary carbides. The hardness of the studied alloys maintains around 66 HRC, not significantly affected by the Nb content within the selected range of 0.48%-0.74%. The impact toughness of the alloys increases with increasing niobium content. The wear resistance of the specimens presents little variation in spite of the increase of Nb content under a light load of 40 N. However, when heavier loads of 70 and 100 N are applied, the wear resistance increases with increasing Nb content.

  12. High-energy xenon ion irradiation effects on the electrical properties of yttrium iron garnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costantini, J.M.; Flament, J.L.; Sinopoli, L.; Trochon, J.; Uzureau, J.L.; Groult, D.; Studer, F.; Toulemonde, M.

    1989-01-01

    Thin monocristalline samples of yttrium iron garnet Y 3 Fe 5 O 12 (YIG) were irradiated at room temperature with 27 MeV/A 132 Xe ions at varying fluences up to 3.5 x 10 12 ions cm -2 . Sample thickness (100 μm) was smaller than the mean projected range of ions (170 μm) so that we were able to study the effects of irradiation damage solely. At such a high ion energy the nuclear energy loss is negligible and damage is mainly due to electronic excitation energy loss. YIG d.c conductivity is found to rise by a factor 40 for the highest dose while the permittivity increases only slightly after irradiation (40% max.). The dielectric losses are also enhanced as the ion fluence increases especially at lower frequencies (by a factor 6 at 10 KHz). No dielectric relaxation peak is observed in the frequency range explored here (10 KHz - 10 MHz)

  13. Magnetic anisotropy in iron thin films evaporated under ultra-high vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinhut, J.F.; Eymery, J.P.; Krishnan, R.

    1992-01-01

    α-iron thin films with thickness ranging between 20 and 1500 nm have been evaporated using an electron gun under ultra-high vacuum conditions (5.10 -7 P). The columnar structure observed in cross-sectional TEM is related to the large surface diffusion. From Moessbauer spectra the spin orientation is deduced and found to be influenced by the column axis. Spins can be obtained perpendicularly to the film plane by rotating the substrte during the deposition. The magnetization of the samples is reduced by about 30% and the reduction attributed to the interstitial space which increases with the incident angle. The substrate rotation also decreases Ku( parallel ) by a factor 2 and increases Ku( perpendicular to ). (orig.)

  14. Contribution to the study of iron-manganese alloy oxidation in oxygen at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivier, Francoise

    1972-01-01

    This research thesis reports a systematic investigation of the oxidation of three relatively pure iron-manganese alloys in oxygen, under atmospheric pressure, and between 400 and 1000 C, these alloys being annealed as well as work-hardened. It also compares their behaviour with that of non-alloyed iron oxidized under the same conditions. The author describes the experimental techniques and installations, discusses the morphology of oxide films formed under the experimental conditions, discusses the film growth kinetics which is studied by thermogravimetry, proposes interpretations of results, and outlines the influence of manganese addition to iron on iron oxidation

  15. High sensitivity tracer imaging of iron oxides using magnetic particle imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwill, Patrick [University of California, Dept. of Bioengineering, Berkeley, CA (United States); Konkle, Justin; Lu, Kuan; Zheng, Bo [UC Berkeley (UCSF), Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, CA (United States); Conolly, Steven [University of California, Berkeley Bioengineering, Electrical Engineering, and Computer Science, CA (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Full text: Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new tracer imaging modality that is gaining significant interest from NMR and MRI researchers. While the physics of MPI differ substantially from MRI, it employs hardware and imaging concepts that are familiar to MRI researchers, such as magnetic excitation and detection, pulse sequences, and relaxation effects. Furthermore, MPI employs the same superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) contrast agents that are sometimes used for MR angiography and are often used for MRI cell tracking studies. These SPIOs are much safer for humans than iodine or gadolinium, especially for Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) patients. The weak kidneys of CKD patients cannot safely excrete iodine or gadolinium, leading to increased morbidity and mortality after iodinated X-ray or CT angiograms, or after gadolinium-MRA studies. Iron oxides, on the other hand, are processed in the liver, and have been shown to be safe even for CKD patients. Unlike the 'black blood' contrast generated by SPIOs in MRI due to increased T2 dephasing, SPIOs in MPI generate positive, 'bright blood' contrast. With this ideal contrast, even prototype MPI scanners can already achieve fast, high-sensitivity, and high-contrast angiograms with millimeter-scale resolutions in phantoms and in animals. Moreover, MPI shows great potential for an exciting array of applications, including stem cell tracking in vivo, first-pass contrast studies to diagnose or stage cancer, and inflammation imaging in vivo. So far, only a handful of prototype small-animal MPI scanners have been constructed worldwide. Hence, MPI is open to great advances, especially in hardware, pulse sequence, and nanoparticle improvements, with the potential to revolutionize the biomedical imaging field. (author)

  16. High sensitivity tracer imaging of iron oxides using magnetic particle imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwill, Patrick; Konkle, Justin; Lu, Kuan; Zheng, Bo; Conolly, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Full text: Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new tracer imaging modality that is gaining significant interest from NMR and MRI researchers. While the physics of MPI differ substantially from MRI, it employs hardware and imaging concepts that are familiar to MRI researchers, such as magnetic excitation and detection, pulse sequences, and relaxation effects. Furthermore, MPI employs the same superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) contrast agents that are sometimes used for MR angiography and are often used for MRI cell tracking studies. These SPIOs are much safer for humans than iodine or gadolinium, especially for Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) patients. The weak kidneys of CKD patients cannot safely excrete iodine or gadolinium, leading to increased morbidity and mortality after iodinated X-ray or CT angiograms, or after gadolinium-MRA studies. Iron oxides, on the other hand, are processed in the liver, and have been shown to be safe even for CKD patients. Unlike the 'black blood' contrast generated by SPIOs in MRI due to increased T2 dephasing, SPIOs in MPI generate positive, 'bright blood' contrast. With this ideal contrast, even prototype MPI scanners can already achieve fast, high-sensitivity, and high-contrast angiograms with millimeter-scale resolutions in phantoms and in animals. Moreover, MPI shows great potential for an exciting array of applications, including stem cell tracking in vivo, first-pass contrast studies to diagnose or stage cancer, and inflammation imaging in vivo. So far, only a handful of prototype small-animal MPI scanners have been constructed worldwide. Hence, MPI is open to great advances, especially in hardware, pulse sequence, and nanoparticle improvements, with the potential to revolutionize the biomedical imaging field. (author)

  17. High-Cycle Fatigue Resistance of Si-Mo Ductile Cast Iron as Affected by Temperature and Strain Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteis, Paolo; Scavino, Giorgio; Castello, Alessandro; Firrao, Donato

    2015-09-01

    Silicon-molybdenum ductile cast irons are used to fabricate exhaust manifolds of internal combustion engines of large series cars, where the maximum pointwise temperature at full engine load may be higher than 973 K (700 °C). In this application, high-temperature oxidation and thermo-mechanical fatigue (the latter being caused by the engine start and stop and by the variation of its power output) have been the subject of several studies and are well known, whereas little attention has been devoted to the high-cycle fatigue, arising from the engine vibration. Therefore, the mechanical behavior of Si-Mo cast iron is studied here by means of stress-life fatigue tests up to 10 million cycles, at temperatures gradually increasing up to 973 K (700 °C). The mechanical characterization is completed by tensile and compressive tests and ensuing fractographic examinations; the mechanical test results are correlated with the cast iron microstructure and heat treatment.

  18. Safety implications of high-field MRI: actuation of endogenous magnetic iron oxides in the human body.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Dobson

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance Imaging scanners have become ubiquitous in hospitals and high-field systems (greater than 3 Tesla are becoming increasingly common. In light of recent European Union moves to limit high-field exposure for those working with MRI scanners, we have evaluated the potential for detrimental cellular effects via nanomagnetic actuation of endogenous iron oxides in the body.Theoretical models and experimental data on the composition and magnetic properties of endogenous iron oxides in human tissue were used to analyze the forces on iron oxide particles.Results show that, even at 9.4 Tesla, forces on these particles are unlikely to disrupt normal cellular function via nanomagnetic actuation.

  19. High-field proton MRS of human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Costanzo, Alfonso E-mail: alfonso.dicostanzo@unina2.it; Trojsi, F.; Tosetti, M.; Giannatempo, G.M.; Nemore, F.; Piccirillo, M.; Bonavita, S.; Tedeschi, G.; Scarabino, T

    2003-11-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS) of the brain reveals specific biochemical information about cerebral metabolites, which may support clinical diagnoses and enhance the understanding of neurological disorders. The advantages of performing {sup 1}H-MRS at higher field strengths include better signal to noise ratio (SNR) and increased spectral, spatial and temporal resolution, allowing the acquisition of high quality, easily quantifiable spectra in acceptable imaging times. In addition to improved measurement precision of N-acetylaspartate, choline, creatine and myo-inositol, high-field systems allow the high-resolution measurement of other metabolites, such as glutamate, glutamine, {gamma}-aminobutyric acid, scyllo-inositol, aspartate, taurine, N-acetylaspartylglutamate, glucose and branched amino acids, thus extending the range of metabolic information. However, these advantages may be hampered by intrinsic field-dependent technical difficulties, such as decreased T2 signal, chemical shift dispersion errors, J-modulation anomalies, increased magnetic susceptibility, eddy current artifacts, limitations in the design of homogeneous and sensitive radiofrequency (RF) coils, magnetic field instability and safety issues. Several studies demonstrated that these limitations could be overcome, suggesting that the appropriate optimization of high-field {sup 1}H-MRS would expand the application in the fields of clinical research and diagnostic routine.

  20. Excess iron: considerations related to development and early growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2017-12-01

    What effects might arise from early life exposures to high iron? This review considers the specific effects of high iron on the brain, stem cells, and the process of erythropoiesis and identifies gaps in our knowledge of what molecular damage may be incurred by oxidative stress that is imparted by high iron status in early life. Specific areas to enhance research on this topic include the following: longitudinal behavioral studies of children to test associations between iron exposures and mood, emotion, cognition, and memory; animal studies to determine epigenetic changes that reprogram brain development and metabolic changes in early life that could be followed through the life course; and the establishment of human epigenetic markers of iron exposures and oxidative stress that could be monitored for early origins of adult chronic diseases. In addition, efforts to understand how iron exposure influences stem cell biology could be enhanced by establishing platforms to collect biological specimens, including umbilical cord blood and amniotic fluid, to be made available to the research community. At the molecular level, there is a need to better understand stress erythropoiesis and changes in iron metabolism during pregnancy and development, especially with respect to regulatory control under high iron conditions that might promote ineffective erythropoiesis and iron-loading anemia. These investigations should focus not only on factors such as hepcidin and erythroferrone but should also include newly identified interactions between transferrin receptor-2 and the erythropoietin receptor. Finally, despite our understanding that several key micronutrients (e.g., vitamin A, copper, manganese, and zinc) support iron's function in erythropoiesis, how these nutrients interact remains, to our knowledge, unknown. It is necessary to consider many factors when formulating recommendations on iron supplementation. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  1. High-temperature superconductivity from fine-tuning of Fermi-surface singularities in iron oxypnictides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnukha, A.; Evtushinsky, D. V.; Matt, C. E.; Xu, N.; Shi, M.; Büchner, B.; Zhigadlo, N. D.; Batlogg, B.; Borisenko, S. V.

    2015-12-01

    In the family of the iron-based superconductors, the REFeAsO-type compounds (with RE being a rare-earth metal) exhibit the highest bulk superconducting transition temperatures (Tc) up to 55 K and thus hold the key to the elusive pairing mechanism. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the intrinsic electronic structure of SmFe0.92Co0.08AsO (Tc = 18 K) is highly nontrivial and consists of multiple band-edge singularities in close proximity to the Fermi level. However, it remains unclear whether these singularities are generic to the REFeAsO-type materials and if so, whether their exact topology is responsible for the aforementioned record Tc. In this work, we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to investigate the inherent electronic structure of the NdFeAsO0.6F0.4 compound with a twice higher Tc = 38 K. We find a similarly singular Fermi surface and further demonstrate that the dramatic enhancement of superconductivity in this compound correlates closely with the fine-tuning of one of the band-edge singularities to within a fraction of the superconducting energy gap Δ below the Fermi level. Our results provide compelling evidence that the band-structure singularities near the Fermi level in the iron-based superconductors must be explicitly accounted for in any attempt to understand the mechanism of superconducting pairing in these materials.

  2. Interaction of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol with high carbon iron filings: Reaction and sorption mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Alok [Environmental Engineering and Management Programme, Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India); Bose, Purnendu [Environmental Engineering and Management Programme, Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India)], E-mail: pbose@iitk.ac.in

    2009-05-15

    Reductive dehalogenation of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP) by two types of high carbon iron filings (HCIF), HCIF-1 and HCIF-2 was studied in batch reactors. While the iron, copper, manganese and carbon content of the two types of HCIF was similar, the specific surface area of HCIF-1 and HCIF-2 were 1.944 and 3.418 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}, respectively. During interaction with HCIF-1, 2,4,6-TCP adsorbed on HCIF-1 surface resulting in rapid reduction of aqueous phase 2,4,6-TCP concentration. However, reductive dehalogenation of 2,4,6-TCP was negligible. During interaction between 2,4,6-TCP and HCIF-2, both 2,4,6-TCP adsorption on HCIF-2, and 2,4,6,-TCP dechlorination was observed. 2,4,6-TCP partitioning between solid and aqueous phase could be described by a Freundlich isotherm, while 2,4,6-TCP dechlorination could be described by an appropriate rate expression. A mathematical model was developed for describing the overall interaction of 2,4,6-TCP with HCIF-2, incorporating simultaneous adsorption/desorption and dechlorination reactions of 2,4,6-TCP with the HCIF surface. 2,4-Dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) and minor amounts of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) evolved as 2,4,6-TCP dechlorination by-products. The evolved 2,4-DCP partitioned strongly to the HCIF surface. 4-CP and 2-CP accumulated in the aqueous phase. No transformation of 2-CP or 4-CP to phenol was observed.

  3. Scaling-up biofortified beans high in iron and zinc through the school-feeding program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beintema, Joni J.S.; Gallego-Castillo, Sonia; Londoño-Hernandez, Luis F.; Restrepo-Manjarres, José; Talsma, Elise F.

    2018-01-01

    Iron and zinc deficiencies are global health problems, affecting mostly pregnant women and young children. In 2016, biofortified iron and zinc beans were introduced in Colombia. The incorporation of biofortified beans into the national school-feeding program could facilitate adoption and potentially

  4. High Prevalence but Insufficient Treatment of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Results of a Population-Based Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Claudia; Liebold, Anne; Takses, Angela; Strauch, Ulrike G.; Obermeier, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Background. Iron-deficiency anemia is described to be a common problem in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which is frequently associated with a reduced quality of life. Therefore, the aim of this study is to assess the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in a population-based cohort at time of first diagnosis and during the early course of the disease. Methods. As far as available, lab values of patients registered in the population-based “Oberpfalz cohort” were screened. In anemic patients, we further investigated all laboratory results to differentiate between iron deficiency and other reasons for anemia. All patients with any kind of anemia were interviewed separately according to symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia and administration of iron. Results. In total, we evaluated hemoglobin values of 279 patients (183 Crohn's disease, 90 ulcerative colitis, and 6 indeterminate colitis). Lab data which allowed further differentiation of the type of anemia were available in 70% of anemic patients, in 34.4% values of iron, ferritin and transferrin saturation had been measured. At time of first diagnosis, an iron-deficiency anemia was diagnosed in 26 of 68 patients with anemia (38.2%, 20 CD, 4 UC, and 2 IC patients), but only 9 patients (34.6%) received subsequent iron therapy. After one year, 27 patients were identified to have an iron-deficiency anemia (19 CD, 8 UC), 20 of them were treated with iron (71.4%). Of 9 patients with proven iron-deficiency anemia at time of first diagnosis and subsequent administration of iron, 5 (55.5%) had iron-deficiency anemia despite permanent treatment after one year. In total, 38 patients (54.3%) did not receive any iron substitution at all despite of proven iron-deficiency anemia, and only 13 patients of 74 patients were treated with intravenous iron (17.6%). Conclusion. We found a high prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia at different points during the early course of disease in this population-based cohort of

  5. Isolation, Characterization, and Functional Role of the High-Potential Iron-Sulfur Protein (HiPIP) from Rhodoferax fermentans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hochkoeppler, A.; Kofod, P.; Ferro, G.

    1995-01-01

    A new high-potential iron-sulfur protein (HiPIP) has been isolated and purified to homogeneity from the soluble fraction obtained from light-grown cells of the facultative photoheterotrophic bacterium Rhodoferax fermentans. The new protein was identified as a HiPIP by virtue of its molecular...... other sources and, in particular, the iron content is consistent with the presence of one [Fe4S4] cubane cluster per molecule. The isoelectric pH values of the two redox forms are consistent with a basic protein. Kinetic studies of HiPIP oxidation, performed by monitoring the absorbance changes induced...

  6. Rice and Bean Targets for Biofortification Combined with High Carotenoid Content Crops Regulate Transcriptional Mechanisms Increasing Iron Bioavailability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Desirrê Morais; de Castro Moreira, Maria Eliza; Gomes, Mariana Juste Contin; Lopes Toledo, Renata Celi; Nutti, Marilia Regini; Pinheiro Sant’Ana, Helena Maria; Martino, Hércia Stampini Duarte

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency affects thousands of people worldwide. Biofortification of staple food crops aims to support the reduction of this deficiency. This study evaluates the effect of combinations of common beans and rice, targets for biofortification, with high carotenoid content crops on the iron bioavailability, protein gene expression, and antioxidant effect. Iron bioavailability was measured by the depletion/repletion method. Seven groups were tested (n = 7): Pontal bean (PB); rice + Pontal bean (R + BP); Pontal bean + sweet potato (PB + SP); Pontal bean + pumpkin (PB + P); Pontal bean + rice + sweet potato (PB + R + P); Pontal bean + rice + sweet potato (PB + R + SP); positive control (Ferrous Sulfate). The evaluations included: hemoglobin gain, hemoglobin regeneration efficiency (HRE), gene expression of divalente metal transporter 1 (DMT-1), duodenal citocromo B (DcytB), ferroportin, hephaestin, transferrin and ferritin and total plasma antioxidant capacity (TAC). The test groups, except the PB, showed higher HRE (p bioavailability and antioxidant capacity. PMID:26610564

  7. Atomistic simulation of the premelting of iron and aluminum : Implications for high-pressure melting-curve measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Starikov, Sergey V.; Stegailov, Vladimir V.

    2009-01-01

    Using atomistic simulations we show the importance of the surface premelting phenomenon for the melting-curve measurements at high pressures. The model under consideration mimics the experimental conditions deployed for melting studies with diamond-anvil cells. The iron is considered in this work

  8. Ab Initio Study of the Structure and Stability of High-Pressure Iron-Bearing Dolomite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomatova, N. V.; Asimow, P. D.

    2016-12-01

    Carbon is subducted into the mantle primarily in the form of metasomatically calcium-enriched basaltic rock, calcified serpentinites and carbonaceous ooze, all of which often contain dolomite. End-member CaMg(CO3)2 dolomite typically breaks down upon compression into two carbonates at 5-6 GPa in the temperature range of 800-1200 K [1]. However, high-pressure X-ray diffraction experiments have recently shown that the presence of iron may be sufficient to stabilize high-pressure dolomite over single-cation carbonates above 35 GPa [2,3]. The structure and equation of state of high-pressure dolomite phases have been debated, creating a need for theoretical calculations. Using density functional theory interfaced with a genetic algorithm that predicts crystal structures (USPEX), we have found a monoclinic phase with space group C2/c. The C2/c structure has a lower energy than previously reported dolomite structures at relevant pressures. It is possible that this phase is not achieved experimentally due to a large energy barrier and a correspondingly large required volume drop, resulting in the transformation to metastable dolomite II. We calculate the equation of state of trigonal dolomite, dolomite III and monoclinic C2/c dolomite to 80 GPa with 0 and 50 mol% CaFe(CO3)2 and compare their enthalpies to single-carbonate assemblages. Although end-member C2/c CaMg(CO3)2 dolomite is not stable relative to single-cation carbonates, C2/c CaMg0.5Fe0.5(CO3)2 is preferred over single-cation carbonates at high pressures. Thus, iron-bearing C2/c dolomite may be an important host phase for carbon in slabs subducted into the lower mantle. [1] Shirasaka, M., et al. (2002) American Mineralogist, 87, 922-930. [2] Mao, Z. et al. (2011) Geophysical Research Letters, 38. [3] Merlini, M. et al. (2012) Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 109, 13509-13514.

  9. High temperature chlorosilane corrosion of iron and AISI 316L stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, Joshua Loren

    Chlorosilane gas streams are used at high temperatures (>500°C) throughout the semiconductor, polycrystalline silicon, and fumed silica industries, primarily as a way to refine, deposit, and produce silicon and silicon containing materials. The presence of both chlorine and silicon in chlorosilane species creates unique corrosion environments due to the ability of many metals to form both metal-chlorides and metal-silicides, and it is further complicated by the fact that many metal-chlorides are volatile at high-temperatures while metal-silicides are generally stable. To withstand the uniquely corrosive environments, expensive alloys are often utilized, which increases the cost of final products. This work focuses on the corrosion behavior of iron, the primary component of low-cost alloys, and AISI 316L, a common low-cost stainless steel, in environments representative of industrial processes. The experiments were conducted using a customized high temperature chlorosilane corrosion system that exposed samples to an atmospheric pressure, high temperature, chlorosilane environment with variable input amounts of hydrogen, silicon tetrachloride, and hydrogen chloride plus the option of embedding samples in silicon during the exposure. Pre and post exposure sample analysis including scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and gravimetric analysis showed the surface corrosion products varied depending on the time, temperature, and environment that the samples were exposed to. Most commonly, a volatile chloride product formed first, followed by a stratified metal silicide layer. The chlorine and silicon activities in the corrosion environment were changed independently and were found to significantly alter the corrosion behavior; a phenomenon supported by computational thermodynamic equilibrium simulations. It was found that in comparable environments, the stainless steel corroded significantly less than the pure iron. This

  10. High-resolution whole-brain DCE-MRI using constrained reconstruction: Prospective clinical evaluation in brain tumor patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Yi; Zhu, Yinghua; Lingala, Sajan Goud; Nayak, Krishna; Lebel, R. Marc; Shiroishi, Mark S.; Law, Meng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To clinically evaluate a highly accelerated T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI technique that provides high spatial resolution and whole-brain coverage via undersampling and constrained reconstruction with multiple sparsity constraints. Methods: Conventional (rate-2 SENSE) and experimental DCE-MRI (rate-30) scans were performed 20 minutes apart in 15 brain tumor patients. The conventional clinical DCE-MRI had voxel dimensions 0.9 × 1.3 × 7.0 mm 3 , FOV 22 × 22 × 4.2 cm 3 , and the experimental DCE-MRI had voxel dimensions 0.9 × 0.9 × 1.9 mm 3 , and broader coverage 22 × 22 × 19 cm 3 . Temporal resolution was 5 s for both protocols. Time-resolved images and blood–brain barrier permeability maps were qualitatively evaluated by two radiologists. Results: The experimental DCE-MRI scans showed no loss of qualitative information in any of the cases, while achieving substantially higher spatial resolution and whole-brain spatial coverage. Average qualitative scores (from 0 to 3) were 2.1 for the experimental scans and 1.1 for the conventional clinical scans. Conclusions: The proposed DCE-MRI approach provides clinically superior image quality with higher spatial resolution and coverage than currently available approaches. These advantages may allow comprehensive permeability mapping in the brain, which is especially valuable in the setting of large lesions or multiple lesions spread throughout the brain.

  11. A Rechargeable High-Temperature Molten Salt Iron-Oxygen Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cheng; Guan, Chengzhi; Lin, Jun; Zhang, Shiyu; Bao, Hongliang; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Guoping; Chen, George Zheng; Wang, Jian-Qiang

    2018-06-11

    The energy and power density of conventional batteries are far lower than their theoretical expectations, primarily because of slow reaction kinetics that are often observed under ambient conditions. Here we describe a low-cost and high-temperature rechargeable iron-oxygen battery containing a bi-phase electrolyte of molten carbonate and solid oxide. This new design merges the merits of a solid-oxide fuel cell and molten metal-air battery, offering significantly improved battery reaction kinetics and power capability without compromising the energy capacity. The as-fabricated battery prototype can be charged at high current density, and exhibits excellent stability and security in the highly charged state. It typically exhibits specific energy, specific power, energy density, and power density of 129.1 Wh kg -1 , 2.8 kW kg -1 , 388.1 Wh L -1 , and 21.0 kW L -1 , respectively, based on the mass and volume of the molten salt. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. High temperature cathodic charging of hydrogen in zirconium alloys and iron and nickel base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, J.T.; De, P.K.; Gadiyar, H.S.

    1990-01-01

    These investigations lead to the development of a new technique for charging hydrogen into metals and alloys. In this technique a mixture of sulfates and bisulfates of sodium and potassium is kept saturated with water at 250-300degC in an open pyrex glass beaker and electrolysed using platinum anode and the material to be charged as the cathode. Most of the studies were carried out on Zr alloys. It is shown that because of the high hydrogen flux available at the surface and the high diffusivity of hydrogen in metals at these temperatures the materials pick up hydrogen faster and more uniformly than the conventional electrolytic charging at room temperature and high temperature autoclaving in LiOH solutions. Chemical analysis, metallographic examination and XRD studies confirm this. This technique has been used to charge hydrogen into many iron and nickel base austentic alloys, which are very resistant to hydrogen pick up and to H-embrittlement. Since this involved a novel method of electrolysing water, the hydrogen/deuterium isotopic ratio has been studied. At this temperatures the D/H ratio in the evolved hydrogen gas was found to be closer to the value in the liquid water, which means a smaller separation factor. This confirm the earlier observation that separation factor decreases with increase of temperature. (author). 16 refs., 21 fi gs., 6 tabs

  13. High brain serotonin levels in migraine between attacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deen, Marie; Hansen, Hanne D; Hougaard, Anders

    2018-01-01

    Migraine has been hypothesized to be a syndrome of chronic low serotonin (5-HT) levels, but investigations of brain 5-HT levels have given equivocal results. Here, we used positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of the 5-HT4receptor as a proxy for brain 5-HT levels. Given that the 5-HT4receptor...

  14. Cellular iron transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick, Michael D; Garrick, Laura M

    2009-05-01

    Iron has a split personality as an essential nutrient that also has the potential to generate reactive oxygen species. We discuss how different cell types within specific tissues manage this schizophrenia. The emphasis in enterocytes is on regulating the body's supply of iron by regulating transport into the blood stream. In developing red blood cells, adaptations in transport manage the body's highest flux of iron. Hepatocytes buffer the body's stock of iron. Macrophage recycle the iron from effete red cells among other iron management tasks. Pneumocytes provide a barrier to prevent illicit entry that, when at risk of breaching, leads to a need to handle the dangers in a fashion essentially shared with macrophage. We also discuss or introduce cell types including renal cells, neurons, other brain cells, and more where our ignorance, currently still vast, needs to be removed by future research.

  15. Reversible formation of high-valent-iron-oxo-porphyrin intermediate in heme-based catalysis: revisiting the kinetic model for horseradish peroxidase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haandel, van M.J.H.; Primus, J.L.; Teunis, C.; Boersma, M.G.; Osman, A.M.; Veeger, C.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    1998-01-01

    Many heme-containing biocatalysts exert their catalytic action through the initial formation of so-called high-valent-iron-oxo porphyrin intermediates. For horseradish peroxidase the initial intermediate formed has been identified as a high-valent-iron-oxo porphyrin π-radical cation, called compound

  16. High-Temperature Wide Thermal Hysteresis of an Iron(II Dinuclear Double Helicate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiori Hora

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Two new dinuclear iron(II complexes (1·PF6 and 1·AsF6 of the general formula [FeII2(L2C32](X4·nH2O·mMeCN (X = PF6, n = m = 1.5 for 1·PF6 and X = AsF6, n = 3, m = 1 for 1·AsF6 have been prepared and structurally characterized, where L2C3 is a bis-1,2,3-triazolimine type Schiff-base ligand, 1,1′-[propane-1,3-diylbis(1H-1,2,3-triazole-1,4-diyl]bis{N-[2-(pyridin-2-ylethyl]methanimine}. Single crystal X-ray structure analyses revealed that 1·PF6 and 1·AsF6 are isostructural. The complex-cation [FeII2(L2C32]4+ of both has the same dinuclear double helicate architecture, in which each iron(II center has an N6 octahedral coordination environment. Neighboring helicates are connected by intermolecular π–π interactions to give a chiral one-dimensional (1D structure, and cationic 1D chains with the opposite chirality exist in the crystal lattice to give a heterochiral crystal. Magnetic and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC studies were performed only for 1·AsF6, since the thermal stability in a high-temperature spin crossover (SCO region of 1·PF6 is poorer than that of 1·AsF6. 1·AsF6 shows an unsymmetrical hysteretic SCO between the low-spin–low-spin (LS–LS and high-spin–high-spin (HS–HS states at above room temperature. The critical temperatures of warming (Tc↑ and cooling (Tc↓ modes in the abrupt spin transition area are 485 and 401 K, respectively, indicating the occurrence of 84 K-wide thermal hysteresis in the first thermal cycle.

  17. A highly sensitive amperometric sensor for oxygen based on iron(II) tetrasulfonated phthalocyanine and iron(III) tetra-(N-methyl-pyridyl)-porphyrin multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, Juliana C.; Luz, Rita C.S.; Damos, Flavio S.; Tanaka, Auro A.; Kubota, Lauro T.

    2008-01-01

    The development of a highly sensitive sensor for oxygen is proposed using a glassy carbon (GC) electrode modified with alternated layers of iron(II) tetrasulfonated phthalocyanine (FeTsPc) and iron(III) tetra-(N-methyl-pyridyl)-porphyrin (FeT4MPyP). The modified electrode showed excellent catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction. The reduction potential of the oxygen was shifted about 330 mV toward less negative values with this modified electrode, presenting a peak current much higher than those observed on a bare GC electrode. Cyclic voltammetry and rotating disk electrode (RDE) experiments indicated that the oxygen reduction reaction involves 4 electrons with a heterogenous rate constant (k obs ) of 3 x 10 5 mol -1 L s -1 . A linear response range from 0.2 up to 6.4 mg L -1 , with a sensitivity of 4.12 μA L mg -1 (or 20.65 μA cm -2 L mg -1 ) and a detection limit of 0.06 mg L -1 were obtained with this sensor. The repeatability of the proposed sensor, evaluated in terms of relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) was 2.0% for 10 measurements of a solution of 6.4 mg L -1 oxygen. The sensor was applied to determine oxygen in pond and tap water samples showing to be a promising tool for this purpose

  18. Homologous recombination contributes to the repair of DNA double-strand breaks induced by high-energy iron ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zafar, Faria; Seidler, Sara B.; Kronenberg, Amy; Schild, David; Wiese, Claudia

    2010-06-29

    To test the contribution of homologous recombinational repair (HRR) in repairing DNA damaged sites induced by high-energy iron ions, we used: (1) HRR-deficient rodent cells carrying a deletion in the RAD51D gene and (2) syngeneic human cells impaired for HRR by RAD51D or RAD51 knockdown using RNA interference. We show that in response to iron ions, HRR contributes to cell survival in rodent cells, and that HRR-deficiency abrogates RAD51 foci formation. Complementation of the HRR defect by human RAD51D rescues both enhanced cytotoxicity and RAD51 foci formation. For human cells irradiated with iron ions, cell survival is decreased, and, in p53 mutant cells, the levels of mutagenesis are increased when HRR is impaired. Human cells synchronized in S phase exhibit more pronounced resistance to iron ions as compared with cells in G1 phase, and this increase in radioresistance is diminished by RAD51 knockdown. These results implicate a role for RAD51-mediated DNA repair (i.e. HRR) in removing a fraction of clustered lesions induced by charged particle irradiation. Our results are the first to directly show the requirement for an intact HRR pathway in human cells in ensuring DNA repair and cell survival in response to high-energy high LET radiation.

  19. Rice and Bean Targets for Biofortification Combined with High Carotenoid Content Crops Regulate Transcriptional Mechanisms Increasing Iron Bioavailability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desirrê Morais Dias

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency affects thousands of people worldwide. Biofortification of staple food crops aims to support the reduction of this deficiency. This study evaluates the effect of combinations of common beans and rice, targets for biofortification, with high carotenoid content crops on the iron bioavailability, protein gene expression, and antioxidant effect. Iron bioavailability was measured by the depletion/repletion method. Seven groups were tested (n = 7: Pontal bean (PB; rice + Pontal bean (R + BP; Pontal bean + sweet potato (PB + SP; Pontal bean + pumpkin (PB + P; Pontal bean + rice + sweet potato (PB + R + P; Pontal bean + rice + sweet potato (PB + R + SP; positive control (Ferrous Sulfate. The evaluations included: hemoglobin gain, hemoglobin regeneration efficiency (HRE, gene expression of divalente metal transporter 1 (DMT-1, duodenal citocromo B (DcytB, ferroportin, hephaestin, transferrin and ferritin and total plasma antioxidant capacity (TAC. The test groups, except the PB, showed higher HRE (p < 0.05 than the control. Gene expression of DMT-1, DcytB and ferroportin increased (p < 0.05 in the groups fed with high content carotenoid crops (sweet potato or pumpkin. The PB group presented lower (p < 0.05 TAC than the other groups. The combination of rice and common beans, and those with high carotenoid content crops increased protein gene expression, increasing the iron bioavailability and antioxidant capacity.

  20. Homologous recombination contributes to the repair of DNA double-strand breaks induced by high-energy iron ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, Faria; Seidler, Sara B.; Kronenberg, Amy; Schild, David; Wiese, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    To test the contribution of homologous recombinational repair (HRR) in repairing DNA damaged sites induced by high-energy iron ions, we used: (1) HRR-deficient rodent cells carrying a deletion in the RAD51D gene and (2) syngeneic human cells impaired for HRR by RAD51D or RAD51 knockdown using RNA interference. We show that in response to iron ions, HRR contributes to cell survival in rodent cells, and that HRR-deficiency abrogates RAD51 foci formation. Complementation of the HRR defect by human RAD51D rescues both enhanced cytotoxicity and RAD51 foci formation. For human cells irradiated with iron ions, cell survival is decreased, and, in p53 mutant cells, the levels of mutagenesis are increased when HRR is impaired. Human cells synchronized in S phase exhibit more pronounced resistance to iron ions as compared with cells in G1 phase, and this increase in radioresistance is diminished by RAD51 knockdown. These results implicate a role for RAD51-mediated DNA repair (i.e. HRR) in removing a fraction of clustered lesions induced by charged particle irradiation. Our results are the first to directly show the requirement for an intact HRR pathway in human cells in ensuring DNA repair and cell survival in response to high-energy high LET radiation.

  1. The effect on haemoglobin of the use of iron cooking pots in rural Malawian households in an area with high malaria prevalence: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerligs, Paul Prinsen; Brabin, Bernard; Mkumbwa, Albert; Broadhead, Robin; Cuevas, Luis E

    2003-04-01

    Innovative low-cost sustainable strategies are required to reduce the high prevalence of iron-deficiency anaemia in developing countries. We undertook a community-based randomized controlled intervention trial to assess the effects of cooking in iron or aluminium cooking pots in Malawian households in an area with high malaria prevalence. Analysis was by intention to treat and consistency of use. The primary outcomes were change in haemoglobin and iron status. The study population comprised 164 participants eating from aluminium cooking pots and 158 from iron cooking pots. The mean haemoglobin change was significantly increased after 6 weeks in adults who consistently ate from an iron cooking pot (+3.6 g/l compared to -3.2 g/l, mean difference between groups 6.8 g/l, 95% CI +0.86, +12.74). In children, no significant haemoglobin change was observed in consistent pot users, although they showed a significant reduction in iron deficiency (iron 8.6 ZP/g and aluminium 10.8 ZP/g, mean difference 2.2 ZP/g, 95% CI +1.08, +3.32). Rural Malawian adults in a high malaria transmission area who consistently consume food prepared in iron cooking pots show a significant rise in haemoglobin after 6 weeks use. Children showed a reduction in iron deficiency, but no significant improvement in haemoglobin, possibly because of their high malaria parasite prevalence. Using iron cooking pots in developing countries could provide an innovative way to prevent iron deficiency and anaemia in malarious areas where regular iron supplementation is problematic.

  2. Synthesis and morphology of iron-iron oxide core-shell nanoparticles produced by high pressure gas condensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xing, Lijuan; ten Brink, Gert H.; Chen, Bin; Schmidt, Franz P.; Haberfehlner, Georg; Hofer, Ferdinand; Kooi, Bart J.; Palasantzas, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Core-shell structured Fe nanoparticles (NPs) produced by high pressure magnetron sputtering gas condensation were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, electron diffraction, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), tomographic reconstruction, and Wulff shape construction

  3. The plasma membrane proteome of maize roots grown under low and high iron conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopff, David; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Lüthje, Sabine

    2013-10-08

    Iron (Fe) homeostasis is essential for life and has been intensively investigated for dicots, while our knowledge for species in the Poaceae is fragmentary. This study presents the first proteome analysis (LC-MS/MS) of plasma membranes isolated from roots of 18-day old maize (Zea mays L.). Plants were grown under low and high Fe conditions in hydroponic culture. In total, 227 proteins were identified in control plants, whereas 204 proteins were identified in Fe deficient plants and 251 proteins in plants grown under high Fe conditions. Proteins were sorted by functional classes, and most of the identified proteins were classified as signaling proteins. A significant number of PM-bound redox proteins could be identified including quinone reductases, heme and copper-containing proteins. Most of these components were constitutive, and others could hint at an involvement of redox signaling and redox homeostasis by change in abundance. Energy metabolism and translation seem to be crucial in Fe homeostasis. The response to Fe deficiency includes proteins involved in development, whereas membrane remodeling and assembly and/or repair of Fe-S clusters is discussed for Fe toxicity. The general stress response appears to involve proteins related to oxidative stress, growth regulation, an increased rigidity and synthesis of cell walls and adaption of nutrient uptake and/or translocation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics in Europe. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Electrical resistivity of liquid iron with high concentration of light element impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagle, F.; Steinle-Neumann, G.

    2017-12-01

    The Earth's outer core mainly consists of liquid iron, enriched with several weight percent of lighter elements, such as silicon, oxygen, sulfur or carbon. Electrical resistivities of alloys of this type determine the stability of the geodynamo. Both computational and experimental results show that resistivites of Fe-based alloys deviate significantly from values of pure Fe. Using optical conductivity values computed with the Kubo-Greenwood formalism for DFT-based molecular dynamics results, we analyze the high-P and T behavior of resitivities for Fe-alloys containing various concentrations of sulfur, oxygen and silicon. As the electron mean free path length in amorphous and liquid material becomes comparable to interatomic distances at high P and T, electron scattering is expected to be dominated by the short-range order, rather than T-dependent vibrational contributions, and we describe such correlations in our results. In analogy to macroscopic porous media, we further show that resistivity of a liquid metal-nonmetal alloy is determined to first order by the resistivity of the metallic matrix and the volume fraction of non-metallic impurities.

  5. Linking carbon and iron cycles by investigating transport, fate and mineralogy of iron-bearing colloids from peat-draining rivers - Scotland as model for high-latitude rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Deborah; Crocket, Kirsty; Brand, Tim; Stutter, Marc; Wilson, Clare; Schröder, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Linking carbon and iron cycles by investigating transport, fate and mineralogy of iron-bearing colloids from peat-draining rivers - Scotland as model for high-latitude rivers Wood, D.A¹, Crocket, K², Brand, T², Stutter, M³, Wilson, C¹ & Schröder, C¹ ¹Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA ²Scottish Association for Marine Science, University of the Highlands and Islands, Dunbeg, Oban, PA37 1QA ³James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen, AB15 8QH The biogeochemical iron cycle exerts significant control on the carbon cycle¹. Iron is a limiting nutrient in large areas of the world's oceans and its bioavailability controls CO2 uptake by marine photosynthesizing microorganisms. While atmospheric iron inputs to the open ocean have been extensively measured, global river inputs have likely been underestimated because most major world rivers exhibit extensive iron removal by flocculation and sedimentation during seawater mixing. Iron minerals and organic matter mutually stabilise each other², which results in a 'rusty carbon sink' in sediments³ on the one hand but may also enhance transport beyond the salinity gradient on the other. Humic-rich, high latitude rivers have a higher iron-carrying capacity⁴-⁶ but are underrepresented in iron flux calculations. The West Coast sea lochs in Scotland are fed by predominantly peatland drainage catchments, and the rivers entering the sea lochs carry a high load of organic matter. The short distance between many of these catchments and the coastal ocean facilitates source-to-sea research investigating transport, fate and mineralogy of iron-bearing colloids providing a good analogue for similar high latitude fjordic systems. We use SeaFAST+ICP-MS and Mössbauer spectroscopy to survey trace metal concentrations, with emphasis on iron concentrations, speciation and mineralogy, across salinity gradients. In combination with ultra-filtration techniques, this allows

  6. Solubilities of iron and nickel oxides under high temperature and high pressure conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Ke-Chon; Jung, Yong-Ju; Yeon, Jei-Won; Jee, Kwang-Yong

    2007-01-01

    The purposes of primary coolant chemistry are to assure fuel and material integrity and to minimize out of core radiation fields. During the PWR operation, crud deposits are expected on the cladding, leading to cladding failure and raising the radioactivity. Such deposits come from the corrosion products of system surface. To achieve optimal conditions for primary coolant, basic researches on mass transfer, deposition and solubility of corrosion products are needed. The initial stage of crud formation could be the studies on the solubility of a structural material. It has been known that the solubility of metal oxides in boric acid under high temperature and high pressure condition depends on the pH and dissolved hydrogen. Thus, the effect of various pH on the solubility of metal oxide in boric acid solution was investigated in this work

  7. INFLUENCE OF IMPULSE MAGNETIC FIELD ON GRAPHITE MORPHOLOGY OF HIGH-ALLOY IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Anisovich

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of researches of change of microstructure of heavily alloyed austenitic cast-iron ChN1507 subjected to magnetoimpulse processing are given. It is established that microhardness rises on all section of the sample.

  8. Current understanding of iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gregory J; Frazer, David M

    2017-12-01

    Iron is an essential trace element, but it is also toxic in excess, and thus mammals have developed elegant mechanisms for keeping both cellular and whole-body iron concentrations within the optimal physiologic range. In the diet, iron is either sequestered within heme or in various nonheme forms. Although the absorption of heme iron is poorly understood, nonheme iron is transported across the apical membrane of the intestinal enterocyte by divalent metal-ion transporter 1 (DMT1) and is exported into the circulation via ferroportin 1 (FPN1). Newly absorbed iron binds to plasma transferrin and is distributed around the body to sites of utilization with the erythroid marrow having particularly high iron requirements. Iron-loaded transferrin binds to transferrin receptor 1 on the surface of most body cells, and after endocytosis of the complex, iron enters the cytoplasm via DMT1 in the endosomal membrane. This iron can be used for metabolic functions, stored within cytosolic ferritin, or exported from the cell via FPN1. Cellular iron concentrations are modulated by the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) IRP1 and IRP2. At the whole-body level, dietary iron absorption and iron export from the tissues into the plasma are regulated by the liver-derived peptide hepcidin. When tissue iron demands are high, hepcidin concentrations are low and vice versa. Too little or too much iron can have important clinical consequences. Most iron deficiency reflects an inadequate supply of iron in the diet, whereas iron excess is usually associated with hereditary disorders. These disorders include various forms of hemochromatosis, which are characterized by inadequate hepcidin production and, thus, increased dietary iron intake, and iron-loading anemias whereby both increased iron absorption and transfusion therapy contribute to the iron overload. Despite major recent advances, much remains to be learned about iron physiology and pathophysiology. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  9. Cp/Heph mutant mice have iron-induced neurodegeneration diminished by deferiprone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liangliang; Hadziahmetovic, Majda; Wang, Chenguang; Xu, Xueying; Song, Ying; Jinnah, H.A.; Wodzinska, Jolanta; Iacovelli, Jared; Wolkow, Natalie; Krajacic, Predrag; Weissberger, Alyssa Cwanger; Connelly, John; Spino, Michael; Lee, Michael K.; Connor, James; Giasson, Benoit; Harris, Z. Leah; Dunaief, Joshua L.

    2016-01-01

    Brain iron accumulates in several neurodegenerative diseases and can cause oxidative damage, but mechanisms of brain iron homeostasis are incompletely understood. Patients with mutations in the cellular iron-exporting ferroxidase ceruloplasmin (Cp) have brain iron accumulation causing neurodegeneration. Here, we assessed the brains of mice with combined mutation of Cp and its homolog hephaestin. Compared to single mutants, brain iron accumulation was accelerated in double mutants in the cerebellum, substantia nigra, and hippocampus. Iron accumulated within glia, while neurons were iron deficient. There was loss of both neurons and glia. Mice developed ataxia and tremor, and most died by 9 months. Treatment with the oral iron chelator deferiprone diminished brain iron levels, protected against neuron loss, and extended lifespan. Ferroxidases play important, partially overlapping roles in brain iron homeostasis by facilitating iron export from glia, making iron available to neurons. PMID:26303407

  10. Single Additive Enables 3D Printing of Highly Loaded Iron Oxide Suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodaei, Amin; Akhlaghi, Omid; Khani, Navid; Aytas, Tunahan; Sezer, Dilek; Tatli, Buse; Menceloglu, Yusuf Z; Koc, Bahattin; Akbulut, Ozge

    2018-03-21

    A single additive, a grafted copolymer, is designed to ensure the stability of suspensions of highly loaded iron oxide nanoparticles (IOPs) and to facilitate three-dimensional (3D) printing of these suspensions in the filament form. This poly (ethylene glycol)-grafted copolymer of N-[3(dimethylamino)propyl]methacrylamide and acrylic acid harnesses both electrostatic and steric repulsion to realize an optimum formulation for 3D printing. When used at 1.15 wt % (by the weight of IOPs), the suspension attains ∼81 wt % solid loading-96% of the theoretical limit as calculated by the Krieger-Dougherty equation. Rectangular, thick-walled toroidal, and thin-walled toroidal magnetic cores and a porous lattice structure are fabricated to demonstrate the utilization of this suspension as an ink for 3D printing. The electrical and magnetic properties of the magnetic cores are characterized through impedance spectroscopy (IS) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), respectively. The IS indicates the possibility of utilizing wire-wound 3D printed cores as the inductive coils. The VSM verifies that the magnetic properties of IOPs before and after the ink formulation are kept almost unchanged because of the low dosage of the additive. This particle-targeted approach for the formulation of 3D printing inks allows embodiment of a fully aqueous system with utmost target material content.

  11. Composite nanofibers prepared from metallic iron nanoparticles and polyaniline: high performance for water treatment applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaumik, Madhumita; Choi, Hyoung J; McCrindle, Rob I; Maity, Arjun

    2014-07-01

    Presented here is a simple preparation of metallic iron nanoparticles, supported on polyaniline nanofibers at room temperature. The preparation is based on polymerization of interconnected nanofibers by rapid mixing of the aniline monomer with Fe(III) chloride as the oxidant, followed by reductive deposition of Fe(0) nanoparticles, using the polymerization by-products as the Fe precursor. The morphology and other physico-chemical properties of the resulting composite were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and vibrating-sample magnetometry. The composite fibers were 80-150 nm in diameter and exhibited the expected ferromagnetic behavior. The composite rapidly and efficiently removed As(V), Cr(VI), and also Congo red dye, from aqueous solutions suggesting their usefulness for removal of toxic materials from wastewater. The composite fibers have high capacity for toxin removal: 42.37 mg/g of As(V), 434.78 mg/g of Cr(VI), and 243.9 mg/g of Congo red. The fibers are easily recovered from fluids by exploiting their ferromagnetic properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Iron and iron derived radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fast! Think small! In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  13. Iron deficiency is uncommon among lactating women in urban Nepal, despite a high risk of inadequate dietary iron intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henjum, Sigrun; Manger, Mari; Skeie, Eli; Ulak, Manjeswori; Thorne-Lyman, Andrew L; Chandyo, Ram; Shrestha, Prakash S; Locks, Lindsey; Ulvik, Rune J; Fawzi, Wafaie W; Strand, Tor A

    2014-07-14

    The main objective of the present study was to examine the association between dietary Fe intake and dietary predictors of Fe status and Hb concentration among lactating women in Bhaktapur, Nepal. We included 500 randomly selected lactating women in a cross-sectional survey. Dietary information was obtained through three interactive 24 h recall interviews including personal recipes. Concentrations of Hb and plasma ferritin and soluble transferrin receptors were measured. The daily median Fe intake from food was 17·5 mg, and 70% of the women were found to be at the risk of inadequate dietary Fe intake. Approximately 90% of the women had taken Fe supplements in pregnancy. The prevalence of anaemia was 20% (Hb levels < 123 g/l) and that of Fe deficiency was 5% (plasma ferritin levels < 15 μg/l). In multiple regression analyses, there was a weak positive association between dietary Fe intake and body Fe (β 0·03, 95% CI 0·014, 0·045). Among the women with children aged < 6 months, but not those with older infants, intake of Fe supplements in pregnancy for at least 6 months was positively associated with body Fe (P for interaction < 0·01). Due to a relatively high dietary intake of non-haem Fe combined with low bioavailability, a high proportion of the women in the present study were at the risk of inadequate intake of Fe. The low prevalence of anaemia and Fe deficiency may be explained by the majority of the women consuming Fe supplements in pregnancy.

  14. Geoarchaeota: a new candidate phylum in the Archaea from high-temperature acidic iron mats in Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozubal, Mark A; Romine, Margaret; Jennings, Ryan deM; Jay, Zack J; Tringe, Susannah G; Rusch, Doug B; Beam, Jacob P; McCue, Lee Ann; Inskeep, William P

    2013-03-01

    Geothermal systems in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) provide an outstanding opportunity to understand the origin and evolution of metabolic processes necessary for life in extreme environments including low pH, high temperature, low oxygen and elevated concentrations of reduced iron. Previous phylogenetic studies of acidic ferric iron mats from YNP have revealed considerable diversity of uncultivated and undescribed archaea. The goal of this study was to obtain replicate de novo genome assemblies for a dominant archaeal population inhabiting acidic iron-oxide mats in YNP. Detailed analysis of conserved ribosomal and informational processing genes indicates that the replicate assemblies represent a new candidate phylum within the domain Archaea referred to here as 'Geoarchaeota' or 'novel archaeal group 1 (NAG1)'. The NAG1 organisms contain pathways necessary for the catabolism of peptides and complex carbohydrates as well as a bacterial-like Form I carbon monoxide dehydrogenase complex likely used for energy conservation. Moreover, this novel population contains genes involved in the metabolism of oxygen including a Type A heme copper oxidase, a bd-type terminal oxidase and a putative oxygen-sensing protoglobin. NAG1 has a variety of unique bacterial-like cofactor biosynthesis and transport genes and a Type3-like CRISPR system. Discovery of NAG1 is critical to our understanding of microbial community structure and function in extant thermophilic iron-oxide mats of YNP, and will provide insight regarding the evolution of Archaea in early Earth environments that may have important analogs active in YNP today.

  15. Hemoglobin correction factors for estimating the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in pregnant women residing at high altitudes in Bolivia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Hadary Cohen

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available This study had two primary objectives: 1 to derive a method to determine hemoglobin cutoffs that could be used to better estimate the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy at high altitudes and 2 to estimate the prevalence of anemia in a sample of pregnant women residing in two cities in Bolivia, La Paz (3 600 meters and El Alto (4 000 meters. We derived a hemoglobin-altitude curve from previously published data on the mean hemoglobin concentrations of nonanemic women of childbearing age at various altitudes. In addition, we abstracted data on hemoglobin concentration during pregnancy from medical records of women from La Paz and El Alto who had given birth at a maternity hospital in La Paz between January and June of 1996. Using our approach and two other previously published, currently used methods, we calculated and compared prevalences of iron deficiency anemia in this population using hemoglobin cutoffs determined from a hemoglobin-altitude curve corrected for pregnancy. The hemoglobin-altitude curve derived in this study provided a better fit to data for women of childbearing age than the two other models. Those models used cutoffs based on non-iron-replete populations of children or men, both of which were residing below 4 000 m, and then extrapolated to women and higher altitudes. The estimated prevalences of iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy using the hemoglobin cutoffs determined in this study were higher than those estimated by the two other approaches.

  16. Geoarchaeota: a new candidate phylum in the Archaea from high-temperature acidic iron mats in Yellowstone National Park

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozubal, Mark; Romine, Margaret F.; Jennings, Ryan; Jay, Z.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Rusch, Douglas B.; Beam, Jake; McCue, Lee Ann; Inskeep, William P.

    2013-03-01

    Geothermal systems in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) provide an outstanding opportunity to understand the origin and evolution of metabolic processes necessary for life in extreme environments including low pH, high temperature, low oxygen and elevated concentrations of reduced iron. Previous phylogenetic studies of acidic ferric iron mats from YNP have revealed considerable diversity of uncultivated and undescribed archaea. The goal of this study was to obtain replicate de novo genome assemblies for a dominant archaeal population inhabiting acidic iron oxide mats in YNP. Detailed analysis of conserved ribosomal and informational processing genes indicate that the replicate assemblies represent a new phylum-level lineage referred to here as 'novel archaeal group 1 (NAG1)'. The NAG1 organisms contain pathways necessary for the catabolism of peptides and complex carbohydrates as well as a bacterial-like Form I CO dehydrogenase complex likely used for energy conservation. Moreover, this novel population contains genes involved in metabolism of oxygen including a Type A heme copper oxidase, a bd-type terminal oxidase and a putative oxygen sensing protoglobin. NAG1 has a variety of unique bacterial-like cofactor biosynthesis and transport genes and a Type3-like CRISPR system. Discovery of NAG1 is critical to our understanding of microbial community structure and function in extant thermophilic iron mats of YNP, and will provide insight regarding the evolution of Archaea in early Earth environments that may have important analogues active in YNP today.

  17. The effect on haemoglobin of the use of iron cooking pots in rural Malawian households in an area with high malaria prevalence: a randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerligs, Paul Prinsen; Brabin, Bernard; Mkumbwa, Albert; Broadhead, Robin; Cuevas, Luis E.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND Innovative low-cost sustainable strategies are required to reduce the high prevalence of iron-deficiency anaemia in developing countries. METHODS We undertook a community-based randomized controlled intervention trial to assess the effects of cooking in iron or aluminium cooking pots in

  18. A Low-Cost Neutral Zinc-Iron Flow Battery with High Energy Density for Stationary Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Congxin; Duan, Yinqi; Xu, Wenbin; Zhang, Huamin; Li, Xianfeng

    2017-11-20

    Flow batteries (FBs) are one of the most promising stationary energy-storage devices for storing renewable energy. However, commercial progress of FBs is limited by their high cost and low energy density. A neutral zinc-iron FB with very low cost and high energy density is presented. By using highly soluble FeCl 2 /ZnBr 2 species, a charge energy density of 56.30 Wh L -1 can be achieved. DFT calculations demonstrated that glycine can combine with iron to suppress hydrolysis and crossover of Fe 3+ /Fe 2+ . The results indicated that an energy efficiency of 86.66 % can be obtained at 40 mA cm -2 and the battery can run stably for more than 100 cycles. Furthermore, a low-cost porous membrane was employed to lower the capital cost to less than $ 50 per kWh, which was the lowest value that has ever been reported. Combining the features of low cost, high energy density and high energy efficiency, the neutral zinc-iron FB is a promising candidate for stationary energy-storage applications. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. High bioavailablilty iron maize (Zea mays L.) developed through molecular breeding provides more absorbable iron in vitro (Caco-2 model) and in vivo (Gallus gallus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Iron (Fe) deficiency is the most common micronutrient deficiency worldwide. Iron biofortification is a preventative strategy that alleviates Fe deficiency by improving the amount of absorbable Fe in crops. In the present study, we used an in vitro digestion/Caco 2 cell culture model as the guiding tool for breeding and development of two maize (Zea mays L.) lines with contrasting Fe bioavailability (ie. Low and High). Our objective was to confirm and validate the in vitro results and approach. Also, to compare the capacities of our two maize hybrid varieties to deliver Fe for hemoglobin (Hb) synthesis and to improve the Fe status of Fe deficient broiler chickens. Methods We compared the Fe-bioavailability between these two maize varieties with the presence or absence of added Fe in the maize based-diets. Diets were made with 75% (w/w) maize of either low or high Fe-bioavailability maize, with or without Fe (ferric citrate). Chicks (Gallus gallus) were fed the diets for 6 wk. Hb, liver ferritin and Fe related transporter/enzyme gene-expression were measured. Hemoglobin maintenance efficiency (HME) and total body Hb Fe values were used to estimate Fe bioavailability from the diets. Results DMT-1, DcytB and ferroportin expressions were higher (P < 0.05) in the "Low Fe" group than in the "High Fe" group (no added Fe), indicating lower Fe status and adaptation to less Fe-bioavailability. At times, Hb concentrations (d 21,28,35), HME (d 21), Hb-Fe (as from d 14) and liver ferritin were higher in the "High Fe" than in the "Low Fe" groups (P < 0.05), indicating greater Fe absorption from the diet and improved Fe status. Conclusions We conclude that the High Fe-bioavailability maize contains more bioavailable Fe than the Low Fe-bioavailability maize, presumably due to a more favorable matrix for absorption. Maize shows promise for Fe biofortification; therefore, human trials should be conducted to determine the efficacy of consuming the high bioavailable

  20. Hemorrhagic brain metastases with high signal intensity on diffusion-weighted MR images. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, H.; Abe, O.; Aoki, S.; Masumoto, T.; Yoshikawa, T.; Kunimatsu, A; Hayashi, N.; Ohtomo, K. [Graduate School of Medicine, Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiology

    2002-11-01

    Diffusion-weighted MR imaging has been applicable to the differential diagnosis of abscesses and necrotic or cystic brain tumors. However, restricted water diffusion is not necessarily specific for brain abscess. We describe ring-enhancing metastases of lung carcinoma characterized by high signal intensity on diffusion-weighted MR images. The signal pattern probably reflected intralesional hemorrhage. The present report adds to the growing literature regarding the differential diagnosis of ring-enhancing brain lesions.

  1. Preservation strategies for inorganic arsenic species in high iron, low-Ehgroundwater from West Bengal, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gault, Andrew G.; Polya, David A. [University of Manchester, Department of Earth Sciences and Williamson Research Centre for Molecular Environmental Science, Manchester (United Kingdom); Jana, Joydeb; Chakraborty, Sudipto; Mukherjee, Partha; Sarkar, Mitali; Nath, Bibash; Chatterjee, Debashis [University of Kalyani, Department of Chemistry, Kalyani, (India)

    2005-01-01

    Despite the importance of accurately determining inorganic arsenic speciation in natural waters to predicting bioavailability and environmental and health impacts, there remains considerable debate about the most appropriate species preservation strategies to adopt. In particular, the high-iron, low-Eh(redox potential) shallow groundwaters in West Bengal, Bangladesh and SE Asia, the use of which for drinking and irrigation purposes has led to massive international concerns for human health, are particularly prone to changes in arsenic speciation after sampling. The effectiveness of HCl and EDTA preservation strategies has been compared and used on variably arsenic-rich West Bengali groundwater samples, analysed by ion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (IC-ICP-MS). Immediate filtration and acidification with HCl followed by refrigerated storage was found to be the most effective strategy for minimizing the oxidation of inorganic As(III) during storage. The use of a PRP-X100 (Hamilton) column with a 20 mmol L{sup -1} NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} as mobile phase enabled the separation of Cl{sup -} from As(III), monomethylarsonic acid, dimethylarsinic acid and As(V), thereby eliminating any isobaric interference between {sup 40}Ar{sup 35}Cl{sup +} and {sup 75}As{sup +}. The use of EDTA as a preservative, whose action is impaired by the high calcium concentrations typical of these types of groundwater, resulted in marked oxidation during storage. The use of HCl is therefore indicated for analytical methods in which chloride-rich matrices are not problematical. The groundwaters analysed by IC-ICP-MS were found to contain between 5 and 770 ng As mL{sup -1} exclusively as inorganic arsenic species. As(III)/total-As varied between 0 and 0.94. (orig.)

  2. High-BTU gas production from tar-bearing hot coke oven gas over iron catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L.Y. Li; K. Morishita; T. Takarada [Gunma University, Gunma (Japan). Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering

    2005-07-01

    To utilize the tar-bearing hot coke oven gas (the by-product of coke making process) more effectively, a process was developed by converting the hot coke oven gas into a methane rich high-BTU gas over iron-bearing catalysts. The catalytic behaviour of Indonesian limonite ore was mainly discussed. For a reference, a conventional nickel catalyst (Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) was employed. Laboratory scale tests were carried out in a two-stage fixed-bed reactor at ambient pressure. A bituminous coal sample was heated at first stage, the volatiles was carried by feed gas and decomposed at second stage. The limonite promoted hydropyrolysis of coal volatiles similar to Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. High yields of total product gas and methane were obtained at 50 vol.% hydrogen atmosphere with a feed gas of 60 ml min{sup -1} hydrogen and 60 ml min{sup -1} nitrogen. After experiments, hydrocarbons heavier than ethane were not observed. Also that, carbon balance was more than 99.8% in coal char, product gases and carbon deposits. It was considered that coal volatiles converted into light gases and carbon almost completely in catalyst bed. Yields of product gas and methane depended upon catalytic temperature. At 923 K, the maximum yield of product gas was achieved at 74.3% for limonite catalyst on carbon balance with methane 83.2 vol.% of the carbonaceous gas products. Comparing with limonite, Fe/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and BOF dust samples showed low activities on coal volatiles catalytic decomposition. 21 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Economically attractive route for the preparation of high quality magnetic nanoparticles by the thermal decomposition of iron(III) acetylacetonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effenberger, Fernando B; Couto, Ricardo A; Kiyohara, Pedro K; Machado, Giovanna; Masunaga, Sueli H; Jardim, Renato F; Rossi, Liane M

    2017-03-17

    The thermal decomposition (TD) methods are among the most successful in obtaining magnetic nanoparticles with a high degree of control of size and narrow particle size distribution. Here we investigated the TD of iron(III) acetylacetonate in the presence of oleic acid, oleylamine, and a series of alcohols in order to disclose their role and also investigate economically attractive alternatives for the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles without compromising their size and shape control. We have found that some affordable and reasonably less priced alcohols, such as 1,2-octanediol and cyclohexanol, may replace the commonly used and expensive 1,2-hexadecanediol, providing an economically attractive route for the synthesis of high quality magnetic nanoparticles. The relative cost for the preparation of Fe 3 O 4 NPs is reduced to only 21% and 9% of the original cost when using 1,2-octanediol and cyclohexanol, respectively.

  4. High neonatal blood iron content is associated with the risk of childhood type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyvsgaard, Julie Nyholm; Overgaard, Anne Julie; Thorsen, Steffen Ullitz

    2017-01-01

    with the risk of developing type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) in childhood; (2) Methods: A case-control study was conducted, including 199 children diagnosed with T1D before the age of 16 years from 1991 to 2005 and 199 controls matched on date of birth. Information on confounders was available in 181 cases......: A doubling of iron content increased the odds of developing T1D more than two-fold (odds ratio (95% CI), 2.55 (1.04; 6.24)). Iron content increased with maternal age (p = 0.04) and girls had higher content than boys (p = 0.01); (4) Conclusions: Higher neonatal iron content associates to an increased risk...

  5. Study on Increasing High Temperature pH(t) to Reduce Iron Corrosion Products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Dong Man; Hur, Nam Yong; Kim, Waang Bae

    2011-01-01

    The transportation and deposition of iron corrosion products are important elements that affect both the steam generator (SG) integrity and secondary system in pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants. Most of iron corrosion products are generated on carbon steel materials due to flow accelerated corrosion (FAC). The several parameters like water chemistry, temperature, hydrodynamic, and steel composition affect FAC. It is well established that the at-temperature pH of the deaerated water system has a first order effect on the FAC rate of carbon steels through nuclear industry researches. In order to reduce transportation and deposition of iron corrosion products, increasing pH(t) tests were applied on secondary system of A, B units. Increasing pH(t) successfully reduced flow accelerated corrosion. The effect of increasing pH(t) to inhibit FAC was identified through the experiment and pH(t) evaluation in this paper

  6. Evaluation of lead-iron-phosphate glass as a high-level waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chick, L.A.; Bunnell, L.R.; Strachan, D.M.; Kissinger, H.E.; Hodges, F.N.

    1986-01-01

    The lead-iron-phosphate nuclear waste glass developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was evaluated for its potential as an improvement over the current reference waste form, borosilicate glass. Vitreous lead-iron-phosphate glass appears to have substantially better chemical durability than borosilicate glass. However, severe crystallization leading to deteriorated chemical durability would result if this glass were poured into large canisters as is presently done with borosilicate glass. Cesium leach rates from this crystallized material are orders of magnitude greater than those from borosilicate glass. Therefore, in order to realize the performance advantages of the lead-iron-phosphate material in a nuclear waste form, it would be necessary to process it so that it is rapidly cooled, thus retaining its vitreous structure. 22 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  7. Influence of reactive oxygen species during deposition of iron oxide films by high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Straňák, V.; Hubička, Zdeněk; Čada, Martin; Bogdanowicz, R.; Wulff, H.; Helm, C.A.; Hippler, R.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 9 (2018), s. 1-12, č. článku 095205. ISSN 0022-3727 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-08389S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) * iron oxide thin films * wüstite * magnetite * maghemite * hematite Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics ) Impact factor: 2.588, year: 2016

  8. EFFECTIVENESS OF USING DILUTE OXALIC ACID TO DISSOLVE HIGH LEVEL WASTE IRON BASED SLUDGE SIMULANT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketusky, E

    2008-01-01

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken South Carolina, there is a crucial need to remove residual quantities of highly radioactive iron-based sludge from large select underground storage tanks (e.g., 19,000 liters of sludge per tank), in order to support tank closure. The use of oxalic acid is planned to dissolve the residual sludge, hence, helping in the removal. Based on rigorous testing, primarily using 4 and 8 wt% oxalic acid solutions, it was concluded that the more concentrated the acid, the greater the amount of residual sludge that would be dissolved; hence, a baseline technology on using 8 wt% oxalic acid was developed. In stark contrast to the baseline technology, reports from other industries suggest that the dissolution will most effectively occur at 1 wt% oxalic acid (i.e., maintaining the pH near 2). The driver for using less oxalic acid is that less (i.e., moles) would decrease the severity of the downstream impacts (i.e., required oxalate solids removal efforts). To determine the initial feasibility of using 1 wt% acid to dissolve > 90% of the sludge solids, about 19,000 liters of representative sludge was modeled using about 530,000 liters of 0 to 8 wt% oxalic acid solutions. With the chemical thermodynamic equilibrium based software results showing that 1 wt% oxalic acid could theoretically work, simulant dissolution testing was initiated. For the dissolution testing, existing simulant was obtained, and an approximate 20 liter test rig was built. Multiple batch dissolutions of both wet and air-dried simulant were performed. Overall, the testing showed that dilute oxalic acid dissolved a greater fraction of the stimulant and resulted in a significantly larger acid effectiveness (i.e., grams of sludge dissolved/mole of acid) than the baseline technology. With the potential effectiveness confirmed via simulant testing, additional testing, including radioactive sludge testing, is planned

  9. Removing arsenic from groundwater in Cambodia using high performance iron adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Y; Takeda, R; Nada, A; Thavarith, L; Tang, S; Nuki, K; Sakurai, K

    2014-09-01

    In Cambodia, groundwater has been contaminated with arsenic, and purification of the water is an urgent issue. From 2010 to 2012, an international collaborative project between Japan and Cambodia for developing arsenic-removing technology from well water was conducted and supported by the foundation of New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization, Japan. Quality of well water was surveyed in Kandal, Prey Veng, and Kampong Cham Provinces, and a monitoring trial of the arsenic removal equipment using our patented amorphous iron (hydr)oxide adsorbent was performed. Of the 37 wells surveyed, arsenic concentration of 24 exceeded the Cambodian guideline value (50 μg L(-1)), and those of 27 exceeded the WHO guideline for drinking water (10 μg L(-1)). Levels of arsenic were extremely high in some wells (>1,000-6,000 μg L(-1)), suggesting that arsenic pollution of groundwater is serious in these areas. Based on the survey results, 16 arsenic removal equipments were installed in six schools, three temples, two health centers, four private houses, and one commune office. Over 10 months of monitoring, the average arsenic concentrations of the treated water were between 0 and 10 μg L(-1) at four locations, 10-50 μg L(-1) at eight locations, and >50 μg L(-1) at four locations. The arsenic removal rate ranged in 83.1-99.7%, with an average of 93.8%, indicating that the arsenic removal equipment greatly lower the risk of arsenic exposure to the residents. Results of the field trial showed that As concentration of the treated water could be reduced to condition. This is one of the succeeding As removal techniques that could reduce As concentration of water below the WHO guideline value for As in situ.

  10. Iron oxides alter methanogenic pathways of acetate in production water of high-temperature petroleum reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Pan; Hong, Bo; Mbadinga, Serge Maurice; Wang, Li-Ying; Liu, Jin-Feng; Yang, Shi-Zhong; Gu, Ji-Dong; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2017-09-01

    Acetate is a key intermediate in anaerobic crude oil biodegradation and also a precursor for methanogenesis in petroleum reservoirs. The impact of iron oxides, viz. β-FeOOH (akaganéite) and magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ), on the methanogenic acetate metabolism in production water of a high-temperature petroleum reservoir was investigated. Methane production was observed in all the treatments amended with acetate. In the microcosms amended with acetate solely about 30% of the acetate utilized was converted to methane, whereas methane production was stimulated in the presence of magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) resulting in a 48.34% conversion to methane. Methane production in acetate-amended, β-FeOOH (akaganéite)-supplemented microcosms was much faster and acetate consumption was greatly improved compared to the other conditions in which the stoichiometric expected amounts of methane were not produced. Microbial community analysis showed that Thermacetogenium spp. (known syntrophic acetate oxidizers) and hydrogenotrophic methanogens closely related to Methanothermobacter spp. were enriched in acetate and acetate/magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) microcosms suggesting that methanogenic acetate metabolism was through hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis fueled by syntrophic acetate oxidizers. The acetate/β-FeOOH (akaganéite) microcosms, however, differed by the dominance of archaea closely related to the acetoclastic Methanosaeta thermophila. These observations suggest that supplementation of β-FeOOH (akaganéite) accelerated the production of methane further, driven the alteration of the methanogenic community, and changed the pathway of acetate methanogenesis from hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis fueled by syntrophic acetate oxidizers to acetoclastic.

  11. Effect of molybdenum, vanadium, boron on mechanical properties of high chromium white cast iron in as-cast condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurjaman, F.; Sumardi, S.; Shofi, A.; Aryati, M.; Suharno, B.

    2016-02-01

    In this experiment, the effect of the addition carbide forming elements on high chromium white cast iron, such as molybdenum, vanadium and boron on its mechanical properties and microstructure was investigated. The high chromium white cast iron was produced by casting process and formed in 50 mm size of grinding balls with several compositions. Characterization of these grinding balls was conducted by using some testing methods, such as: chemical and microstructure analysis, hardness, and impact test. From the results, the addition of molybdenum, vanadium, and boron on high chromium white cast iron provided a significant improvement on its hardness, but reduced its toughness. Molybdenum induced fully austenitic matrix and Mo2C formation among eutectic M7C3 carbide. Vanadium was dissolved in the matrix and carbide. While boron was played a role to form fine eutectic carbide. Grinding balls with 1.89 C-13.1 Cr-1.32 Mo-1.36 V-0.00051 B in as-cast condition had the highest hardness, which was caused by finer structure of eutectic carbide, needle like structure (upper bainite) matrix, and martensite on its carbide boundary.

  12. The green alga Zygogonium ericetorum (Zygnematophyceae, Charophyta) shows high iron and aluminium tolerance: protection mechanisms and photosynthetic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herburger, Klaus; Remias, Daniel; Holzinger, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Streptophyte green algae, ancestors of Embryophytes, occur frequently in terrestrial habitats being exposed to high light intensities, water scarcity and potentially toxic metal cations under acidic conditions. The filamentous Zygogonium ericetorum synthesizes a purple vacuolar ferrous pigment, which is lost after aplanospore formation. However, it is unknown whether this cellular reorganization also removes excessive iron from the protoplast and how Z. ericetorum copes with high concentrations of aluminium. Here we show that aplanospore formation shifts iron into the extracellular space of the algal filament. Upon germination of aplanospores, aluminium is bound in the parental cell wall. Both processes reduce iron and aluminium in unpigmented filaments. Comparison of the photosynthetic oxygen production in response to light and temperature gradients in two different Z. ericetorum strains from an Austrian alpine and a Scottish highland habitat revealed lower values in the latter strain. In contrast, the Scottish strain showed a higher optimum quantum yield of PSII during desiccation stress followed by rehydration. Furthermore, pigmented filaments of both strains exhibited a higher light and temperature dependent oxygen production when compared to the unpigmented phenotype. Our results demonstrate a high metal tolerance of Z. ericetorum, which is crucial for surviving in acidic terrestrial habitats. © FEMS 2016.

  13. Clinical and Imaging Presentation of a Patient with Beta-Propeller Protein-Associated Neurodegeneration, a Rare and Sporadic form of Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation (NBIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattingen, Elke; Handke, Nikolaus; Cremer, Kirsten; Hoffjan, Sabine; Kukuk, Guido Matthias

    2017-12-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) is a heterogeneous group of inherited neurologic disorders with iron accumulation in the basal ganglia, which share magnetic resonance (MR) imaging characteristics, histopathologic and clinical features. According to the affected basal nuclei, clinical features include extrapyramidal movement disorders and varying degrees of intellectual disability status. The most common NBIA subtype is caused by pathogenic variants in PANK2. The hallmark of MR imaging in patients with PANK2 mutations is an eye-of-the-tiger sign in the globus pallidus. We report a 33-year-old female with a rare subtype of NBIA, called beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration (BPAN) with a hitherto unknown missense variant in WDR45. She presented with BPAN's particular biphasic course of neurological symptoms and with a dominant iron accumulation in the midbrain that enclosed a spotty T2-hyperintensity.

  14. Effect of iron on the production of high electrocatalytic activity carbons from ferrocene - PFA mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cashion, J.D.; Brown, L.J.; Ozaki, J.; Yamada, K.; Nozawa, K.; Matsui, K.; Oya, A.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: We have previously studied the carbonisation of mixtures of ferrocene and poly(furfury 1 alcohol) (PFA) which, after heating at 700 deg C, produces electrodes with an electrocatalytic activity comparable to that of platinum. The carbons have a distinctive furry structure under the SEM and an XRD profile characteristic of turbostratic carbon. The iron had been converted to a mixture of α- and γiron and cementite, Fe 3 C and we conjectured that the furry carbon could be formed by the exsolution of carbon from the γ iron on cooling. The present experiments have shown that changing the cooling rate has only a small effect so exsolution is not the cause. However, the increased conductivity correlates well with the proportion of turbostratic carbon which, in turn, correlates with the percentage of cementite. The turbostratic carbon forms cages surrounding an iron phase, presumably the cementite. The conductivity data can be fitted well to either a power law or logarithmic behaviour above the percolation theory critical concentration. The normal percolation theory model for conductivity assumes a growing volume of good conductor in an insulating matrix. However, our system has a good conductor in a matrix of moderate conductor, the conductivity of which is not constant but is increasing under heat treatment at the same time as the good conductor volume is increasing. Some possible analyses will be given

  15. Propellant Improvement Program. Volume 2. Iron Contamination Effect in HDA (High Density Acid)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Density Acid ( HDA ) and the effect of iron impurity level up to 100 parts per million as Fe2O3 on HDA heat transfer. Thirty tests were conducted using...resistance heated, circular, 6061T6 aluminum tubes. Results showed that normal nucleate boiling did not occur with either of the HDA compositions. The

  16. Perception of iron deficiency from oral mucosa alterations that show a high prevalence of Candida infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-Yu Lu

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: The study demonstrates that oral mucosa alterations accompanying oral candidosis are a sensitive indicator of ID. All oral changes can be successfully ameliorated by iron therapy plus antifungals when candidosis exists. Investigating the origin of IDA is necessary, because it may be the first sign of a more serious disease, particularly malignancy.

  17. Iron oxide inside SBA-15 modified with amino groups as reusable adsorbent for highly efficient removal of glyphosate from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorilli, Sonia; Rivoira, Luca; Calì, Giada; Appendini, Marta; Bruzzoniti, Maria Concetta; Coïsson, Marco; Onida, Barbara

    2017-07-01

    Iron oxide clusters were incorporated into amino-functionalized SBA-15 in order to obtain a magnetically recoverable adsorbent. The physical-chemical properties of the material were characterized by FE-SEM, STEM, XRD, TGA, XPS, FT-IR and acid-base titration analysis. Iron oxide nanoparticles were uniformly dispersed into the pore of mesoporous silica and that the adsorbent is characterized high specific surface area (177 m2/g) and accessible porosity. The sorbent was successfully tested for the removal of glyphosate in real water matrices. Despite the significant content of inorganic ions, a quantitative removal of the contaminant was found. The complete regeneration of the sorbent after the adsorption process through diluted NaOH solution was also proved.

  18. High performance liquid chromatographic determination of vanadium in crude oils and cobalt and iron in pharmaceutical preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khuhawar, M.Y.; Lanjwani, S.N.; Khaskhely, G.Q.

    1993-01-01

    High performance liquid Chromatographic (HPLC) method has ben developed for the determination of vanadium in crude oils, based on acid decomposition of oils, followed by complexation with bis (salicylaldehyde) tetramethyl ethylenediamine (H2SA2Ten). The complex is extracted in organic phase and is separated from copper and nickel using normal phase HPLC column. Detection is achieved using spectrophtmetric detector. The vanadium in oil is obtained at sub microgram/g level. Similarly cobalt(II), cobalt(III) and iron(II) are separated on reversed phase HPLC column. Pre column derivatization is used to develop HPLC method for the determination of cobalt and iron in pharmaceutical preparations. Finally results are compared using atomic absorption spectrometer. (author)

  19. Effects of high temperature surface oxides on room temperature aqueous corrosion and environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, R.A.; Perrin, R.L.

    1996-09-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the effects of high-temperature surface oxides, produced during thermomechanical processing, heat treatment (750 {degrees}C in air, one hour) or simulated in-service-type oxidation (1000{degrees}C in air, 24 hours) on the room-temperature aqueous-corrosion and environmental-embrittlement characteristics of iron aluminides. Materials evaluated included the Fe{sub 3}Al-based iron aluminides, FA-84, FA-129, FAL and FAL-Mo, a FeAl-based iron aluminide, FA-385, and a disordered low-aluminum Fe-Al alloy, FAPY. Tests were performed in a mild acid-chloride solution to simulate aggressive atmospheric corrosion. Cyclic-anodic-polarization tests were employed to evaluate resistances to localized aqueous corrosion. The high-temperature oxide surfaces consistently produced detrimental results relative to mechanically or chemically cleaned surfaces. Specifically, the pitting corrosion resistances were much lower for the as-processed and 750{degrees} C surfaces, relative to the cleaned surfaces, for FA-84, FA-129, FAL-Mo, FA-385 and FAPY. Furthermore, the pitting corrosion resistances were much lower for the 1000{degrees}C surfaces, relative to cleaned surfaces, for FA-129, FAL and FAL-Mo.

  20. FTIR and Mössbauer spectroscopic study of sodium–aluminum–iron phosphate glassy materials for high level waste immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanovsky, S.V., E-mail: serge.stefanovsky@yandex.ru [Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Radioecology and Radiation Problems, Moscow (Russian Federation); Stefanovsky, O.I. [Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Radioecology and Radiation Problems, Moscow (Russian Federation); Remizov, M.B.; Belanova, E.A.; Kozlov, P.V. [FSUE PA Mayak, Central Plant Laboratory, Ozersk, Chelyabinsk Reg. (Russian Federation); Glazkova, Ya.S.; Sobolev, A.V.; Presniakov, I.A. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Radiochemistry (Russian Federation); Kalmykov, S.N. [Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Radioecology and Radiation Problems, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Radiochemistry (Russian Federation); Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Radiochemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation); Myasoedov, B.F. [Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Radioecology and Radiation Problems, Moscow (Russian Federation); Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Radiochemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    Complex sodium-aluminum-iron phosphate glassy materials with various Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratio containing high level waste (HLW) surrogate were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy and studied in details by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The samples with high Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content and not containing Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were predominantly amorphous but subjected to devitrification under annealing. Addition of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and partial Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} substitution for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the materials increases their resistance to devitrification whereas further substitution and NiO incorporation significantly increase the tendency to devitrification. FTIR spectra demonstrate changes in the structure of glassy materials caused by both structural variations in the anionic motif and occurrence of crystalline phases in the materials. According to Mössbauer spectroscopy data, iron in the glassy samples is present as octahedrally coordinated Fe{sup 3+} ions while in the partly devitrified samples iron is partitioned among vitreous and crystalline phases entering the vitreous phase mainly as Fe{sup 3+}O{sub 6} units and crystalline phases as major Fe{sup 3+} and minor Fe{sup 2+} ions in a magnetically ordered state and participating in a “fast” electronic exchange.

  1. A High-Resolution In Vivo Atlas of the Human Brain's Serotonin System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beliveau, Vincent; Ganz-Benjaminsen, Melanie; Feng, Ling

    2017-01-01

    The serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) system modulates many important brain functions and is critically involved in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, we present a high-resolution, multidimensional, in vivo atlas of four of the human brain's 5-HT receptors (5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT4...... with postmortem human brain autoradiography outcomes showed a high correlation for the five 5-HT targets and this enabled us to transform the atlas to represent protein densities (in picomoles per milliliter). We also assessed the regional association between protein concentration and mRNA expression in the human...... brain by comparing the 5-HT density across the atlas with data from the Allen Human Brain atlas and identified receptor- and transporter-specific associations that show the regional relation between the two measures. Together, these data provide unparalleled insight into the serotonin system...

  2. High brain serotonin levels in migraine between attacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deen, Marie; Hansen, Hanne D.; Hougaard, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To investigate brain 5-HT4-receptor binding with positron emission tomography (PET) as a proxy of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) levels in migraine patients between attacks. Methods Brain 5-HT4-receptor binding, assessed with PET imaging of the specific 5-HT4-receptor radioligand......, [11C]SB207145, is inversely related to long-term changes in brain 5-HT-levels. Eighteen migraine patients without aura (≥48 hours migraine free) and 16 age- and sex-matched controls underwent PET-scanning after injection of [11C]SB207145. Patients who reported a migraine attack ≤48 hours after...... the scan were excluded. The mean neocortical [11C]SB207145 binding potential (BPND) was calculated in a blinded manner. Results Fifteen patients (age 29.6 ± 10.2 years, 2 men) and 16 controls (28.9 ± 10.2 years, 3 men) completed the study. Migraine patients had significantly lower neocortical 5-HT4...

  3. Study of the rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution: Implication for the analysis of ferritin-like iron cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alenkina, I. V.; Oshtrakh, M. I.; Tugarova, A. V.; Biró, B.; Semionkin, V. A.; Kamnev, A. A.

    2014-09-01

    The results of a comparative study of two samples of the rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense (strain Sp245) prepared in different conditions and of human liver ferritin using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution demonstrated the presence of ferritin-like iron (i.e. iron similar to that found in ferritin-like proteins) in the bacterium. Mössbauer spectra of these samples were fitted in two ways: as a rough approximation using a one quadrupole doublet fit (the homogeneous iron core model) and using a superposition of quadrupole doublets (the heterogeneous iron core model). Both results demonstrated differences in the Mössbauer parameters for mammalian ferritin and for bacterial ferritin-like iron. Moreover, some differences in the Mössbauer parameters were observed between the two samples of A. brasilense Sp245 related to the differences in their preparation conditions.

  4. Application of magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the differentiation of high-grade brain neoplasm and inflammatory brain lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraz-Filho, Jose Roberto Lopes; Santana-Netto, Pedro Vieira; Sgnolf, Aline [FAMERP Medical School, Sao Jose do Rio Preto SP (Brazil). Image Dept.], e-mail: jrl.ferraz@terra.com.br; Rocha-Filho, Jose Alves; Mauad, Fernando [FAMERP Medical School, Sao Jose do Rio Preto SP (Brazil). Radiology Dept.; Sanches, Rafael Angelo [FAMERP Medical School, Sao Jose do Rio Preto SP (Brazil). Imaging Dept.

    2009-06-15

    This study aims at evaluating the application of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in the differential diagnosis of brain tumors and inflammatory brain lesions. The examinations of 81 individuals, who performed brain MRS and were retrospectively analyzed. The patients with ages between 10 and 80 years old, were divided into two groups. Group A consisted of 42 individuals with diagnoses of cerebral toxoplasmosis and Group B was formed of 39 individuals with diagnosis of glial neoplasms. On analyzing the ROC curve, the discriminatory boundary for the Cho/Cr ratio between inflammatory lesions and tumors was 1.97 and for the NAA/Cr ratio it was 1.12. RMS is an important method useful in the distinction of inflammatory brain lesions and high-degree tumors when the Cho/Cr ratio is greater than 1.97 and the NAA/Cr ratio is less than 1.12. And so this method is important in the planning of treatment and monitoring of the therapeutic efficiency. (author)

  5. Application of magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the differentiation of high-grade brain neoplasm and inflammatory brain lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferraz-Filho, Jose Roberto Lopes; Santana-Netto, Pedro Vieira; Sgnolf, Aline; Rocha-Filho, Jose Alves; Mauad, Fernando; Sanches, Rafael Angelo

    2009-01-01

    This study aims at evaluating the application of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in the differential diagnosis of brain tumors and inflammatory brain lesions. The examinations of 81 individuals, who performed brain MRS and were retrospectively analyzed. The patients with ages between 10 and 80 years old, were divided into two groups. Group A consisted of 42 individuals with diagnoses of cerebral toxoplasmosis and Group B was formed of 39 individuals with diagnosis of glial neoplasms. On analyzing the ROC curve, the discriminatory boundary for the Cho/Cr ratio between inflammatory lesions and tumors was 1.97 and for the NAA/Cr ratio it was 1.12. RMS is an important method useful in the distinction of inflammatory brain lesions and high-degree tumors when the Cho/Cr ratio is greater than 1.97 and the NAA/Cr ratio is less than 1.12. And so this method is important in the planning of treatment and monitoring of the therapeutic efficiency. (author)

  6. Pituitary gland levels of mercury, selenium, iron, and zinc in an Alzheimer`s disease study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornett, C.R.; Markesbery, W.R.; Wekstein, D.R.; Ehmann, W.D. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Mercury, iron, selenium, and zinc imbalances have been observed in comparisons between Alzheimer`s disease (AD) and control subject brains. Analyses of the pituitary gland have demonstrated that this organ retains relatively high concentrations of trace elements, including mercury, iron, and zinc. Our previous work has shown that the pituitary glands of AD and control subjects are typically higher in these trace elements than brain samples from the same subject. Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was used to compare the pituitary trace element levels of AD and control subjects. This study also describes the intrasubject relationships of brain trace element levels to those in the pituitary gland of AD and control subjects.

  7. Iron-borosilicate soft magnetic composites: The correlation between processing parameters and magnetic properties for high frequency applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gheiratmand, T., E-mail: t.gheiratmand@yahoo.com; Madaah Hosseini, H.R., E-mail: Madaah@sharif.edu; Seyed Reihani, S.M.

    2017-05-01

    Iron-borosilicate soft magnetic composites are suitable magnetic materials for high temperature and high frequency applications. In this research two different techniques have been applied to fabricate these composites: uniaxial pressing following by sintering and spark plasma sintering. Different processing parameters including the content of borosilicate, the amount of compaction pressure and the size of iron particles have been evaluated through the study of microstructure and magnetic properties. The microstructural observations showed that the borosilicate is distributed on the iron grain boundaries enhancing the resistivity and causing the loss of eddy currents. Increasing the compaction pressure was led to the decrease of electrical resistivity. By increasing the frequency both real and imaginary parts of permeability decreased. The use of higher content of borosilicate resulted in the lower decreasing slop of permeability. Best combination of density, permeability and electrical resistivity was obtained in the sample with 2 wt% of borosilicate. In addition, the densification of powders with fine particles was more difficult than coarse particles due to the inter particles friction and bridging effects. Furthermore, as the particles size increases the size of open porosities before sintering where the borosilicate could aggregate enhances. This could yields to the increase in the electrical resistivity. The high ratio of surface to the volume in the powders with fine particles results in the developing the demagnetizing fields and subsequently, decreasing the permeability. The highest relative density (99.99% of theoretical density) with best distribution of borosilicate was achieved in the composites produced by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The relaxation frequency, obtained from imaginary part of permeability, was found as 340 Hz in the composites made by SPS. - Highlights: • Iron-borosilicate SMC was produced for high temperature and frequency

  8. Fabp1 gene ablation inhibits high-fat diet-induced increase in brain endocannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gregory G; Landrock, Danilo; Chung, Sarah; Dangott, Lawrence J; Seeger, Drew R; Murphy, Eric J; Golovko, Mikhail Y; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2017-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system shifts energy balance toward storage and fat accumulation, especially in the context of diet-induced obesity. Relatively little is known about factors outside the central nervous system that may mediate the effect of high-fat diet (HFD) on brain endocannabinoid levels. One candidate is the liver fatty acid binding protein (FABP1), a cytosolic protein highly prevalent in liver, but not detected in brain, which facilitates hepatic clearance of fatty acids. The impact of Fabp1 gene ablation (LKO) on the effect of high-fat diet (HFD) on brain and plasma endocannabinoid levels was examined and data expressed for each parameter as the ratio of high-fat diet/control diet. In male wild-type mice, HFD markedly increased brain N-acylethanolamides, but not 2-monoacylglycerols. LKO blocked these effects of HFD in male mice. In female wild-type mice, HFD slightly decreased or did not alter these endocannabinoids as compared with male wild type. LKO did not block the HFD effects in female mice. The HFD-induced increase in brain arachidonic acid-derived arachidonoylethanolamide in males correlated with increased brain-free and total arachidonic acid. The ability of LKO to block the HFD-induced increase in brain arachidonoylethanolamide correlated with reduced ability of HFD to increase brain-free and total arachidonic acid in males. In females, brain-free and total arachidonic acid levels were much less affected by either HFD or LKO in the context of HFD. These data showed that LKO markedly diminished the impact of HFD on brain endocannabinoid levels, especially in male mice. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  9. The Aging of Iron Man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azhaar Ashraf

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Brain iron is tightly regulated by a multitude of proteins to ensure homeostasis. Iron dyshomeostasis has become a molecular signature associated with aging which is accompanied by progressive decline in cognitive processes. A common theme in neurodegenerative diseases where age is the major risk factor, iron dyshomeostasis coincides with neuroinflammation, abnormal protein aggregation, neurodegeneration, and neurobehavioral deficits. There is a great need to determine the mechanisms governing perturbations in iron metabolism, in particular to distinguish between physiological and pathological aging to generate fruitful therapeutic targets for neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of the present review is to focus on the age-related alterations in brain iron metabolism from a cellular and molecular biology perspective, alongside genetics, and neuroimaging aspects in man and rodent models, with respect to normal aging and neurodegeneration. In particular, the relationship between iron dyshomeostasis and neuroinflammation will be evaluated, as well as the effects of systemic iron overload on the brain. Based on the evidence discussed here, we suggest a synergistic use of iron-chelators and anti-inflammatories as putative anti-brain aging therapies to counteract pathological aging in neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. The Aging of Iron Man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Azhaar; Clark, Maryam; So, Po-Wah

    2018-01-01

    Brain iron is tightly regulated by a multitude of proteins to ensure homeostasis. Iron dyshomeostasis has become a molecular signature associated with aging which is accompanied by progressive decline in cognitive processes. A common theme in neurodegenerative diseases where age is the major risk factor, iron dyshomeostasis coincides with neuroinflammation, abnormal protein aggregation, neurodegeneration, and neurobehavioral deficits. There is a great need to determine the mechanisms governing perturbations in iron metabolism, in particular to distinguish between physiological and pathological aging to generate fruitful therapeutic targets for neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of the present review is to focus on the age-related alterations in brain iron metabolism from a cellular and molecular biology perspective, alongside genetics, and neuroimaging aspects in man and rodent models, with respect to normal aging and neurodegeneration. In particular, the relationship between iron dyshomeostasis and neuroinflammation will be evaluated, as well as the effects of systemic iron overload on the brain. Based on the evidence discussed here, we suggest a synergistic use of iron-chelators and anti-inflammatories as putative anti-brain aging therapies to counteract pathological aging in neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Novel spin transition between S = 5/2 and S = 3/2 in highly saddled iron(III) porphyrin complexes at extremely low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohgo, Yoshiki; Chiba, Yuya; Hashizume, Daisuke; Uekusa, Hidehiro; Ozeki, Tomoji; Nakamura, Mikio

    2006-05-14

    A novel spin transition between S = 5/2 and S = 3/2 has been observed for the first time in five-coordinate, highly saddled iron(III) porphyrinates by EPR and SQUID measurements at extremely low temperatures.

  12. Micro-Intertexture Carbon-Free Iron Sulfides as Advanced High Tap Density Anodes for Rechargeable Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ying; Hwang, Jang-Yeon; Sun, Yang-Kook

    2017-11-15

    Numerous materials have been considered as promising electrode materials for rechargeable batteries; however, developing efficient materials to achieving good cycling performance and high volumetric energy capacity simultaneously remains a great challenge. Considering the appealing properties of iron sulfides, which include low cost, high theoretical capacity, and favorable electrochemical conversion mechanism, in this work, we demonstrate the feasibility of carbon-free microscale Fe 1-x S as high-efficiency anode materials for rechargeable batteries by designing hierarchical intertexture architecture. The as-prepared intertexture Fe 1-x S microspheres constructed from nanoscale units take advantage of both the long cycle life of nanoscale units and the high tap density (1.13 g cm -3 ) of the micro-intertexture Fe 1-x S. As a result, high capacities of 1089.2 mA h g -1 (1230.8 mA h cm -3 ) and 624.7 mA h g -1 (705.9 mA h cm -3 ) were obtained after 100 cycles at 1 A g -1 in Li-ion and Na-ion batteries, respectively, demonstrating one of the best performances for iron sulfide-based electrodes. Even after deep cycling at 20 A g -1 , satisfactory capacities could be retained. Related results promote the practical application of metal sulfides as high-capacity electrodes with high rate capability for next-generation rechargeable batteries.

  13. From Big Data to Big Displays High-Performance Visualization at Blue Brain

    KAUST Repository

    Eilemann, Stefan; Abdellah, Marwan; Antille, Nicolas; Bilgili, Ahmet; Chevtchenko, Grigory; Dumusc, Raphael; Favreau, Cyrille; Hernando, Juan; Nachbaur, Daniel; Podhajski, Pawel; Villafranca, Jafet; Schü rmann, Felix

    2017-01-01

    Blue Brain has pushed high-performance visualization (HPV) to complement its HPC strategy since its inception in 2007. In 2011, this strategy has been accelerated to develop innovative visualization solutions through increased funding and strategic

  14. Ceruloplasmin deficiency reduces levels of iron and BDNF in the cortex and striatum of young mice and increases their vulnerability to stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J Texel

    Full Text Available Ceruloplasmin (Cp is an essential ferroxidase that plays important roles in cellular iron trafficking. Previous findings suggest that the proper regulation and subcellular localization of iron are very important in brain cell function and viability. Brain iron dyshomeostasis is observed during normal aging, as well as in several neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, coincident with areas more susceptible to insults. Because of their high metabolic demand and electrical excitability, neurons are particularly vulnerable to ischemic injury and death. We therefore set out to look for abnormalities in the brain of young adult mice that lack Cp. We found that iron levels in the striatum and cerebral cortex of these young animals are significantly lower than wild-type (WT controls. Also mRNA levels of the neurotrophin brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, known for its role in maintenance of cell viability, were decreased in these brain areas. Chelator-mediated depletion of iron in cultured neural cells resulted in reduced BDNF expression by a posttranscriptional mechanism, suggesting a causal link between low brain iron levels and reduced BDNF expression. When the mice were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion, a model of focal ischemic stroke, we found increased brain damage in Cp-deficient mice compared to WT controls. Our data indicate that lack of Cp increases neuronal susceptibility to ischemic injury by a mechanism that may involve reduced levels of iron and BDNF.

  15. 2D sandwich-like sheets of iron oxide grown on graphene as high energy anode material for supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Qunting; Yang, Shubin; Feng, Xinliang

    2011-12-08

    2D sandwich-like sheets of iron oxide grown on graphene as high energy anode material for supercapacitors are prepared from the direct growth of FeOOH nanorods on the surface of graphene and the subsequent electrochemical transformation of FeOOH to Fe(3)O(4). The Fe(3)O(4) @RGO nanocomposites exhibit superior capacitance (326 F g(-1)), high energy density (85 Wh kg(-1)), large power, and good cycling performance in 1 mol L(-1) LiOH solution. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. On the rolling of hard-to-work iron-cobalt alloys with application of electric current of high density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimov, K.M.; Mordukhovich, A.M.; Glezer, A.M.; Molotilov, B.V.

    1981-01-01

    Results on experimental fabrication of thin sheets of commercial iron-cobalt 49KF alloy (Se-Co-2%V) without preliminary quenching and intermediate annealings by rolling with application of high-density electric current are considered. It is shown that rolling with application of high-density electric current in the deformation zone permits to obtain thin sheets of difficult-to-form magnetically soft materials without preliminary thermal treatments. Electric current effect on metal in the deformation zone results in the increase of dislocation mobility and facilitates the cross glide [ru

  17. Influence of reactive oxygen species during deposition of iron oxide films by high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranak, V.; Hubicka, Z.; Cada, M.; Bogdanowicz, R.; Wulff, H.; Helm, C. A.; Hippler, R.

    2018-03-01

    Iron oxide films were deposited using high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) of an iron cathode in an argon/oxygen gas mixture at different gas pressures (0.5 Pa, 1.5 Pa, and 5.0 Pa). The HiPIMS system was operated at a repetition frequency f  =  100 Hz with a duty cycle of 1%. A main goal is a comparison of film growth during conventional and electron cyclotron wave resonance-assisted HiPIMS. The deposition plasma was investigated by means of optical emission spectroscopy and energy-resolved mass spectrometry. Active oxygen species were detected and their kinetic energy was found to depend on the gas pressure. Deposited films were characterized by means of spectroscopic ellipsometry and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction. Optical properties and crystallinity of as-deposited films were found to depend on the deposition conditions. Deposition of hematite iron oxide films with the HiPIMS-ECWR discharge is attributed to the enhanced production of reactive oxygen species.

  18. Determination of trace impurities in high-purity iron using salting-out of polyoxyethylene-type surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumiya, Hiroaki, E-mail: h-matsu@numse.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Design and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Sakane, Yuto; Hiraide, Masataka [Department of Molecular Design and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2009-10-19

    To an iron sample solution was added polyoxyethylene-4-isononylphenoxy ether (PONPE, nonionic surfactant, average number of ethylene oxides 7.5) and the surfactant was aggregated by the addition of lithium chloride. The iron(III) matrix was collected into the condensed surfactant phase in >99.9% yields, leaving trace metals [e.g., Ti(IV), Cr(III), Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), and Bi(III)] in the aqueous phase. After removing the surfactant phase by centrifugation, the remaining trace metals were concentrated onto an iminodiacetic acid-type chelating resin. The trace metals were desorbed with dilute nitric acid for the determination by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry or graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The proposed separation method allowed the analysis of high-purity iron metals for trace impurities at low {mu}g g{sup -1} to ng g{sup -1} levels.

  19. Early brain development in infants at high risk for autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazlett, Heather Cody; Gu, Hongbin; Munsell, Brent C; Kim, Sun Hyung; Styner, Martin; Wolff, Jason J; Elison, Jed T; Swanson, Meghan R; Zhu, Hongtu; Botteron, Kelly N; Collins, D Louis; Constantino, John N; Dager, Stephen R; Estes, Annette M; Evans, Alan C; Fonov, Vladimir S; Gerig, Guido; Kostopoulos, Penelope; McKinstry, Robert C; Pandey, Juhi; Paterson, Sarah; Pruett, John R; Schultz, Robert T; Shaw, Dennis W; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Piven, Joseph

    2017-02-15

    Brain enlargement has been observed in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but the timing of this phenomenon, and the relationship between ASD and the appearance of behavioural symptoms, are unknown. Retrospective head circumference and longitudinal brain volume studies of two-year olds followed up at four years of age have provided evidence that increased brain volume may emerge early in development. Studies of infants at high familial risk of autism can provide insight into the early development of autism and have shown that characteristic social deficits in ASD emerge during the latter part of the first and in the second year of life. These observations suggest that prospective brain-imaging studies of infants at high familial risk of ASD might identify early postnatal changes in brain volume that occur before an ASD diagnosis. In this prospective neuroimaging study of 106 infants at high familial risk of ASD and 42 low-risk infants, we show that hyperexpansion of the cortical surface area between 6 and 12 months of age precedes brain volume overgrowth observed between 12 and 24 months in 15 high-risk infants who were diagnosed with autism at 24 months. Brain volume overgrowth was linked to the emergence and severity of autistic social deficits. A deep-learning algorithm that primarily uses surface area information from magnetic resonance imaging of the brain of 6-12-month-old individuals predicted the diagnosis of autism in individual high-risk children at 24 months (with a positive predictive value of 81% and a sensitivity of 88%). These findings demonstrate that early brain changes occur during the period in which autistic behaviours are first emerging.

  20. Neutron activation analysis of high-purity iron in comparison with chemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinomura, Atsushi; Horino, Yuji; Takaki, Seiichi; Abiko, Kenji

    2000-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis of iron samples of three different purity levels has been performed and compared with chemical analysis for 30 metallic and metalloid impurity elements. The concentration of As, Cl, Cu, Sb and V detected by neutron activation analysis was mostly in agreement with that obtained by chemical analysis. The sensitivity limits of neutron activation analysis of three kinds of iron samples were calculated and found to be reasonable compared with measured values or detection limits of chemical analysis; however, most of them were above the detection limits of chemical analysis. Graphite-shielded irradiation to suppress fast neutron reactions was effective for Mn analysis without decreasing sensitivity to the other impurity elements. (author)

  1. An ultra­high field Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy study of post exercise brain lactate, glutamate and glutamine change in the human brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eDennis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available During strenuous exercise there is a progressive increase in lactate uptake and metabolism into the brain as workload and plasma lactate levels increase. Although it is now widely accepted that the brain can metabolise lactate, few studies have directly measured brain lactate following vigorous exercise. Here, we used ultra-high field Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of the brain to obtain static measures of brain lactate, as well as brain glutamate and glutamine after vigorous exercise. The aims of our experiment were to (a track the changes in brain lactate following recovery from exercise and, (b to simultaneously measure the signals from brain glutamate and glutamine. The results of our experiment showed that vigorous exercise resulted in a significant increase in brain lactate. Furthermore, both glutamate and glutamine were successfully resolved, and as expected, although contrary to some previous reports, we did not observe any significant change in either amino acid after exercise. We did however observe a negative correlation between glutamate and a measure of fitness. These results support the hypothesis that peripherally-derived lactate is taken up by the brain when available. Our data additionally highlight the potential of ultra-high field magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a non-invasive way of measuring multiple brain metabolite changes with exercise.

  2. Initial Stage of Oxidation of Iron and Steels Heated at High Temperatures Ambient

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adamaszek, K.; Kučera, Jaroslav

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2001), s. 419-423 ISSN 1335-1532. [International Symposium on Metallography /11./. Stará Lesná, 25.04.2001-27.04.2001] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/01/0379; GA ČR GA106/01/0382 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : iron * steels * oxidation Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy

  3. Stabilization of iron and molybdenum amorphous state with interstitials under high rates of cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barmin, Yu.V.; Vavilova, V.V.; Verevkin, A.G.; Gertsen, A.T.; Kovneristyj, Yu.K.; Kotyurgin, E.A.; Mirkin, B.V.; Palij, N.A.

    1993-01-01

    Amorphous solidification of iron and molybdenum is investigated in thin films and on surface laser irradiated on air at 10 12 and 10 8 /Ks cooling rates correspondingly. Amorphous solidification occurs during ion plasma spraying in thin films of 50 nm at saturation of carbon and oxygen atoms in the ratio of C:0=2.3, but amorphous state is absent at room temperature. Metastable fcc phase, among bcc, is formed by crystallization

  4. High Temperature Magneto-Elastic Instability of Dislocations in bcc Iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudarev, S.; Bullough, R.; Gilbert, M.; Derlet, P.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Density functional calculations show that the low temperature structure of self-interstitial defects in iron is fundamentally different from the structure of self-interstitial defects in all the other bcc metals. The origin of this anomaly is associated with the magnetic part of the cohesive energy of iron, where the Stoner exchange term stabilizes the body centred cubic phase, and where the magnetic part of energy is strongly affected by the large strain associated with the core region of an interstitial defect. At elevated temperatures magnetic excitations erode the stability of the bcc phase, giving rise to the gradual softening of the 110 transverse acoustic phonon modes and to the α-γ bcc-fcc martensitic phase transition occurring at 912 deg. C at normal pressure. Elastic moduli of bcc iron vary as a function of temperature with c' = (C 11 - c 12 )/2 vanishing at the α-γ transition point. This has significant effects on the magnitude of both the elastic interactions between dislocations and other defects in the material and on the intrinsic structural stability of the dislocations and other defects themselves. To evaluate structural stability of defects at elevated temperatures we investigate elastic self-energies of dislocations in the continuum anisotropic elasticity approximation. We also develop atomistic models of dislocations and point defects based on a generalised form of the magnetic potential. By varying the magnetic part of the potential we are able to reproduce the experimentally observed variation of elastic moduli as a function of temperature, and assess relative stability of various types of defect structures. Our analysis shows that, in complete contrast to other straight dislocations, the elastic self-energy of straight 100 edge dislocations actually sharply decreases as we approach the α-γ transition, indicating that this surprising fact is a probable explanation of the frequent observation of the 100

  5. Iron, transferrin and myelinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergeant, C. E-mail: sergeant@cenbg.in2p3.fr; Vesvres, M.H.; Deves, G.; Baron, B.; Guillou, F

    2003-09-01

    Transferrin (Tf), the iron binding protein of vertebrates serum, is known to be synthesized by oligodendrocytes (Ols) in the central nervous system. It has been postulated that Tf is involved in Ols maturation and myelinogenesis. This link is particularly important in the understanding of a severe human pathology: the multiple sclerosis, which remains without efficient treatment. We generated transgenic mice containing the complete human Tf gene and extensive regulatory sequences from the 5{sup '} and 3{sup '} untranslated regions that specifically overexpress Tf in Ols. Brain cytoarchitecture of the transgenic mice appears to be normal in all brain regions examined, total myelin content is increased by 30% and motor coordination is significantly improved when compared with non-transgenic littermates. Tf role in the central nervous system may be related to its affinity for metallic cations. Normal and transgenic mice were used for determination of trace metals (iron, copper and zinc) and minerals (potassium and calcium) concentration in cerebellum and corpus callosum. The freeze-dried samples were prepared to allow proton-induced X-ray emission and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry analyses with the nuclear microprobe in Bordeaux. Preliminary results were obtained and carbon distribution was revealed as a very good analysis to distinguish precisely the white matter region. A comparison of metallic and mineral elements contents in brain between normal and transgenic mice shows that iron, copper and zinc levels remained constant. This result provides evidence that effects of Tf overexpression in the brain do not solely relate to iron transport.

  6. Iron, transferrin and myelinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergeant, C.; Vesvres, M.H.; Deves, G.; Baron, B.; Guillou, F.

    2003-01-01

    Transferrin (Tf), the iron binding protein of vertebrates serum, is known to be synthesized by oligodendrocytes (Ols) in the central nervous system. It has been postulated that Tf is involved in Ols maturation and myelinogenesis. This link is particularly important in the understanding of a severe human pathology: the multiple sclerosis, which remains without efficient treatment. We generated transgenic mice containing the complete human Tf gene and extensive regulatory sequences from the 5 ' and 3 ' untranslated regions that specifically overexpress Tf in Ols. Brain cytoarchitecture of the transgenic mice appears to be normal in all brain regions examined, total myelin content is increased by 30% and motor coordination is significantly improved when compared with non-transgenic littermates. Tf role in the central nervous system may be related to its affinity for metallic cations. Normal and transgenic mice were used for determination of trace metals (iron, copper and zinc) and minerals (potassium and calcium) concentration in cerebellum and corpus callosum. The freeze-dried samples were prepared to allow proton-induced X-ray emission and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry analyses with the nuclear microprobe in Bordeaux. Preliminary results were obtained and carbon distribution was revealed as a very good analysis to distinguish precisely the white matter region. A comparison of metallic and mineral elements contents in brain between normal and transgenic mice shows that iron, copper and zinc levels remained constant. This result provides evidence that effects of Tf overexpression in the brain do not solely relate to iron transport

  7. Measurement of total alpha activity of neptunium, plutonium, and americium in highly radioactive Hanford waste by iron hydroxide precipitation and 2-heptanone solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiti, T.C.; Kaye, J.H.

    1992-06-01

    An improved method has been developed to concentrate the major alpha-emitting actinide elements neptunium, plutonium, and americium from samples with high salt content such as those resulting from efforts to characterize Hanford storage tank waste. Actinide elements are concentrated by coprecipitation of their hydroxides using iron carrier. The iron is removed by extraction from 8M HCI with 2-heptanone. The actinide elements remain in the aqueous phase free from salts, iron, and long-lived fission products. Recoveries averaged 98 percent

  8. Pathways of coupled arsenic and iron cycling in high arsenic groundwater of the Hetao basin, Inner Mongolia, China: an iron isotope approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huaming; Liu, Chen; Lu, Hai; Wanty, Richard B.; Wang, Jun; Zhou, Yinzhu

    2013-01-01

    High As groundwater is widely distributed all over the world, which has posed a significant health impact on millions of people. Iron isotopes have recently been used to characterize Fe cycling in aqueous environments, but there is no information on Fe isotope characteristics in the groundwater. Since groundwater As behavior is closely associated with Fe cycling in the aquifers, Fe isotope signatures may help to characterize geochemical processes controlling As concentrations of shallow groundwaters. This study provides the first observation of Fe isotope fractionation in high As groundwater and evaluation of Fe cycling and As behaviors in shallow aquifers in terms of Fe isotope signatures. Thirty groundwater samples were taken for chemical and isotopic analysis in the Hetao basin, Inner Mongolia. Thirty-two sediments were sampled as well from shallow aquifers for Fe isotope analysis. Results showed that groundwater was normally enriched in isotopically light Fe with δ56Fe values between −3.40‰ and 0.58‰ and median of −1.14‰, while heavier δ56Fe values were observed in the sediments (between −1.10‰ and 0.75‰, median +0.36‰). In reducing conditions, groundwaters generally had higher δ56Fe values, in comparison with oxic conditions. High As groundwaters, generally occurring in reducing conditions, had high δ56Fe values, while low As groundwaters normally had low δ56Fe values. Although sediment δ56Fe values were generally independent of lithological conditions, a large variation in sediment δ56Fe values was observed in the oxidation–reduction transition zone. Three pathways were identified for Fe cycling in shallow groundwater, including dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) oxides, re-adsorption of Fe(II), and precipitation of pyrite and siderite. Dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) oxides resulted in light δ56Fe values (around −1.0‰) and high As concentration (>50 μg/L) in groundwater in anoxic conditions. Re-adsorption of isotopically

  9. Intravenous iron isomaltoside 1000 administered by high single-dose infusions or standard medical care for the treatment of fatigue in women after postpartum haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Charlotte; Thomsen, Lars Lykke; Norgaard, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    1000 with standard medical care on physical fatigue in women with postpartum haemorrhage. METHODS/DESIGN: In a single centre, open-labelled, randomised trial, women with postpartum haemorrhage exceeding 700 mL will be allocated to either a single dose of 1,200 mg of iron isomaltoside 1000 or standard...... Inventory. The primary objective will be considered to have been met if an intravenous high single dose of iron isomaltoside 1000 is shown to be superior to standard medical care in women after postpartum haemorrhage regarding physical fatigue.For claiming superiority, we set the minimal clinically relevant...... randomised controlled studies have compared the clinical efficacy and safety of standard medical care with intravenous administration of iron supplementation after postpartum haemorrhage.The primary objective of this study is to compare the efficacy of an intravenous high single-dose of iron isomaltoside...

  10. High-precision surface formation and the 3-D shaded display of the brain obtained from CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niki, Noboru; Higuti, Kiyofumi; Takahashi, Yoshizo

    1986-01-01

    High-precision reconstruction of surface and 3-D shaded display of the target organ and lesions, obtained from CT images, aid in medical recognition. Firstly, this paper points out some problems of using a conventional method, in which brain surface is reconstructed from the known contour of brain slices, in 3-D shaded display of the brain in a dog. Secondly, a new high-precision technique for reconstructing complex brain surface from brain contour is proposed. The principle of the technique consists of extracting data of outline surface and fissures, smoothing of brain contour, and recomposition of the data of outline surface and fissures into a composite surface image. Finally, the validity of the method was verified by successfully reconstructing complex brain surface from the contour of dog brain slices. In addition, it was possible to cut brain surface, obtained by the newly developed technique, in any voluntary plane and to display CT values on the sections. (Namekawa, K.)

  11. Hypoadiponectinemia, elevated iron and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels and their relation with prostate size in benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandeesha, H; Eldhose, A; Dorairajan, L N; Anandhi, B

    2017-09-01

    Elevated iron, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) and hypoadiponectinemia are known to initiate tumour development. There is paucity of data regarding the above-mentioned parameters and their relation with prostate size in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The present study was designed to assess the levels of iron, hs-CRP and adiponectin levels and their association with prostate size in BPH patients. A total of 37 BPH cases and 36 controls were enrolled in the study. Iron, hs-CRP and adiponectin were estimated in both the groups. Iron and hs-CRP were significantly increased and adiponectin was significantly reduced in BPH cases when compared with controls. Iron (r = .397, p = .015), hs-CRP (r = .341, p = .039) and adiponectin (r = -.464, p = .004) were significantly associated with prostate size in BPH cases. Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that iron acts as predictor of prostate size in BPH (R 2  = 0.395, β = 0.526, p = .001). We conclude that iron and hs-CRP are elevated and adiponectin is reduced in BPH cases and associated with prostate size. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Trend overtime of total haemoglobin, iron metabolism and trace minerals in veal calves fed high amounts of two different solid feeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Lisa Stefani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fifty Polish Friesian veal calves were administrated high amounts of two different solid feeds (maize grain and a mix diet containing 10% of straw and 8% of soy in addition to the traditional milk replacer diet. Compared to the mix diet, maize grain had a lower content of iron, copper and zinc and a minor fibre level. Effects of the two diets on calves’ blood haemoglobin, iron, iron metabolism parameters, copper and zinc concentrations were studied. Haemoglobin concentration resulted higher at the end of the fattening for calves fed the mix diet, as expected. Values remained, however, within ranges that allowed acceptable carcass paleness. Haematic iron, unsaturated iron binding capacity (UIBC and total iron binding capacity (TIBC levels were not significantly different between the two solid feeds. Lower copper and zinc blood concentrations resulted for calves fed the mix diet were likely due to the feed fibre interfering with the bioavailability of the two minerals, according to what happens for iron.

  13. Briquetting properties of sponge iron at high temperature; Das Heissbrikettierverhalten von Eisenschwamm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naundorf, W. [TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany); Trommer, D. [TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany); Guenter, H. [Koeppern Aufbereitungstechnik GmbH und Co. KG (Germany); Kuschel, M. [TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    In the briquetting laboratory of the TU Bergakademie Freiberg hot briquetting of sponge iron was investigated. It was found that on increasing the pressing temperature in the range of 600 C to 1000 C a sudden improvement of briquette quality occurs. Applying a pressure of p = 200 MPa and a pressing temperature of above 700 C practically all kinds of sponge iron can be densified into briquettes with a density of {>=} 5 g/cm{sup 3}. As the pressing temperature increases the thickness expansion of the briquettes decreases, turning into a shrinkage process above 600 C. As regards the effect of grain size of sponge iron on briquette quality it was found that coarser fractions of the raw material lead to more dense and harder briquetts under the same briquetting conditions. Fine material with a grain size < 6 mm deteriorates briquette quality. Further more, it has been established that there is a order of rank in the briquettability. (orig.) [Deutsch] Im Brikettierlabor der TU Bergakademie Freiberg wude das Heissbrikettierverhalten von Eisenschwaemmen untersucht. Es wurde gefunden, dass mit steigender Verpressungstemperatur der Eisenschwaemme im Bereich 600 C bis 1000 C eine sprunghafte Verbesserung der Brikettqualitaet erreicht wird. Bei Anwendung eines Pressdruckes von p = 200 MPa und einer Verpressungstemperatur oberhalb 700 C lassen sich faktisch alle Eisenschwaemme zu Briketts mit einer Rohdichte {>=} 5 g/cm{sup 3} verdichten. Mit steigender Verpressungstemperatur vermindert sich die Dickenexpansion der Briketts. Oberhalb 600 C setzt eine Schrumpfung der Briketts ein. Zum Einfluss der Koernung der Eisenschwaemme auf die Brikettqualitaet wurde festgestellt, dass sich groebere Produktfraktionen unter gleichen Brikettierbedingungen zu dichteren und festeren Briketts verpressen lassen. Feingut mit der Korngroesse < 6 mm verschlechtert die Qualitaet der Briketts. Es konnte weiter festgestellt werden, dass eine Rangfolge im Brikettiercharakter der Eisenschwaemme besteht

  14. Effect of small additions of silicon, iron, and aluminum on the room-temperature tensile properties of high-purity uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Eleven binary and ternary alloys of uranium and very low concentrations of iron, silicon, and aluminum were prepared and tested for room-temperature tensile properties after various heat treatments. A yield strength approximately double that of high-purity derby uranium was obtained from a U-400 ppM Si-200 ppM Fe alloy after beta solution treatment and alpha aging. Higher silicon plus iron alloy contents resulted in increased yield strength, but showed an unacceptable loss of ductility

  15. Dielectronic recombination of carbon, oxygen and iron in low-density and high-temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yukiharu; Kasai, Satoshi; Tazima, Teruhiko

    1977-03-01

    The coefficient of dielectronic recombination, which is one of the important atomic processes in tokamak plasmas, is evaluated by a semiclassical method neglecting the effects of the density and the radiation fields. Those of carbon, oxygen and iron, which play important roles in such as plasma resistivity and energy losses, are calculated numerically in the range of the electron temperature of 10 eV - 10 keV. Compared with the results obtained from Burgess equation, which is most useful for the ions with effective nuclear charge z 25 such as molybdenum. (auth.)

  16. Effects of carbon and molybdenum on the microstructures of high chromium white cast irons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinatora, Amilton; Ambrosio Filho, Francisco; Goldenstein, Helio; Fuoco, Ricardo; Albertin, Eduardo; Mei, Paulo Roberto

    1992-01-01

    The effects of 3 levels of carbon and 1.5% Mo addition on the solidification structures of a 15% chromium white cast iron were studied. The volume fraction of primary austenite and of eutectic carbides, as well as the number of carbide particles per unit length and the mean secondary dendrite arm spacing were measured. By means of thermal analysis, thermal arrest corresponding to the formation of the primary austenite and of the eutectic were determined. The increase in the carbon content and the addition of Mo led to lowering of the thermal arrests and to coarsening of the particles. (author)

  17. Homing and Tracking of Iron Oxide Labelled Mesenchymal Stem Cells After Infusion in Traumatic Brain Injury Mice: a Longitudinal In Vivo MRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sushanta Kumar; Khushu, Subash; Singh, Ajay K; Gangenahalli, Gurudutta

    2018-06-17

    Stem cells transplantation has emerged as a promising alternative therapeutic due to its potency at injury site. The need to monitor and non-invasively track the infused stem cells is a significant challenge in the development of regenerative medicine. Thus, in vivo tracking to monitor infused stem cells is especially vital. In this manuscript, we have described an effective in vitro labelling method of MSCs, a serial in vivo tracking of implanted stem cells at traumatic brain injury (TBI) site through 7 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Proper homing of infused MSCs was carried out at different time points using histological analysis and Prussian blue staining. Longitudinal in vivo tracking of infused MSCs were performed up to 21 days in different groups through MRI using relaxometry technique. Results demonstrated that MSCs incubated with iron oxide-poly-L-lysine complex (IO-PLL) at a ratio of 50:1.5 μg/ml and a time period of 6 h was optimised to increase labelling efficiency. T2*-weighted images and relaxation study demonstrated a significant signal loss and effective decrease in transverse relaxation time on day-3 at injury site after systemic transplantation, revealed maximum number of stem cells homing to the lesion area. MRI results further correlate with histological and Prussian blue staining in different time periods. Decrease in negative signal and increase in relaxation times were observed after day-14, may indicate damage tissue replacement with healthy tissue. MSCs tracking with synthesized negative contrast agent represent a great advantage during both in vitro and in vivo analysis. The proposed absolute bias correction based relaxometry analysis could be extrapolated for stem cell tracking and therapies in various neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. High-resolution photoacoustic tomography of resting-state functional connectivity in the mouse brain

    OpenAIRE

    Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Xia, Jun; Wan, Hanlin; Bauer, Adam Quentin; Culver, Joseph P.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing use of mouse models for human brain disease studies presents an emerging need for a new functional imaging modality. Using optical excitation and acoustic detection, we developed a functional connectivity photoacoustic tomography system, which allows noninvasive imaging of resting-state functional connectivity in the mouse brain, with a large field of view and a high spatial resolution. Bilateral correlations were observed in eight functional regions, including the olfactory bu...

  19. Ab Initio Predictions of K, He and Ar Partitioning Between Silicate Melt and Liquid Iron Under High Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Z.; Tsuchiya, T.

    2017-12-01

    Element partitioning is an important property in recording geochemical processes during the core-mantle differentiation. However, experimental measurements of element partitioning coefficients under extreme temperature and pressure condition are still challenging. Theoretical modeling is also not easy, because it requires estimation of high temperature Gibbs free energy, which is not directly accessible by the standard molecular dynamics method. We recently developed an original technique to simulate Gibbs free energy based on the thermodynamics integration method[1]. We apply it to element partitioning of geochemical intriguing trace elements between molten silicate and liquid iron such as potassium, helium and argon as starting examples. Radiogenic potassium in the core can provide energy for Earth's magnetic field, convection in the mantle and outer core[2]. However, its partitioning behavior between silicate and iron remains unclear under high pressure[3,4]. Our calculations suggest that a clear positive temperature dependence of the partitioning coefficient but an insignificant pressure effect. Unlike sulfur and silicon, oxygen dissolved in the metals considerably enhances potassium solubility. Calculated electronic structures reveal alkali-metallic feature of potassium in liquid iron, favoring oxygen with strong electron affinity. Our results suggest that 40K could serve as a potential radiogenic heat source in the outer core if oxygen is the major light element therein.­­ We now further extend our technique to partitioning behaviors of other elements, helium and argon, to get insides into the `helium paradox' and `missing argon' problems. References [1] T. Taniuchi, and T. Tsuchiya, Phys.Rev.B. In press [2] B.A. Buffett, H.E. Huppert, J.R. Lister, and A.W. Woods, Geophys.Res.Lett. 29 (1996) 7989-8006. [3] V.R. Murthy, W. Westrenen, and Y. Fei, Nature. 426 (2003) 163-165. [4] A. Corgne, S.Keshav, Y. Fei, and W.F. McDonough, Earth.Planet.Sci.Lett. 256 (2007

  20. Structural phase transitions in Iron - based superconductors BaFe2-xCrxAs2 under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhoya, W.O.; Montgomery, J.M.; Samudrala, G.K.; Tsoi, G.M.; Vohra, Y.K.; Sefar, A.S.

    2011-01-01

    Pure BaFe 2 As 2 with the ThCr 2 Si 2 -type crystal structure under ambient conditions is known to superconduct under high pressure and undergo an isostructural phase transition from tetragonal to collapsed tetragonal phase which is accompanied by anomalous compressibility effects. Presently, there is no reported work on the crystal structure on any of the chemically doped 122- iron based superconductors under high pressure. We have carried out the electrical resistance measurements and high pressure X-ray diffraction studies on Chromium doped samples of BaFe 2-x Cr x As 2 (x = 0, 0.05, 0.15, 0.4, 0.61) to a pressure of 75 GPa and a temperature of 10K using a synchrotron source and designer diamond anvils, so as to investigate the influence of chemical doping and high pressure on crystal structure and superconductivity

  1. Synthesis of iron oxides nanoparticles with very high saturation magnetization form TEA-Fe(III) complex via electrochemical deposition for supercapacitor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrouby, Mahmoud; Abdel-Mawgoud, A. M.; El-Rahman, Rehab Abd

    2017-11-01

    This work is devoted to the synthesis of magnetic iron oxides nanoparticles with very high saturation magnetization to be qualified for supercapacitor applications using, a simple electrodeposition technique. It is found that the electrochemical reduction process depends on concentration, temperature, deposition potential and the scan rate of potential. The nature of electrodeposition process has been characterized via voltammetric and chronoamperometric techniques. The morphology of the electrodeposits has been investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The structure and phase content of these investigated electrodeposits have been examined and calculated. The obtained iron oxides show a high saturation magnetization (Ms) of about 229 emu g-1. The data exhibited a relation between Ms of electrodeposited iron oxide and specific capacitance. This relation exhibits that the highest Ms value of electrodeposited iron oxides gives also highest specific capacitance of about 725 Fg-1. Moreover, the electrodeposited iron oxides exhibit a very good stability. The new characteristics of the electro synthesized iron oxides at our optimized conditions, strongly qualify them as a valuable material for high-performance supercapacitor applications.

  2. High resolution micro-XRF maps of iron oxides inside sensory dendrites of putative avian magnetoreceptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falkenberg, G; Fleissner, G E; Fleissner, G U E; Schuchardt, K; Kuehbacher, M; Chalmin, E; Janssens, K

    2009-01-01

    Iron mineral containing sensory dendrites in the inner lining of the upper beak of homing pigeons and various bird species are the first candidate structures for an avian magnetic field receptor. A new concept of magnetoreception is based on detailed ultra-structural optical and electron microscopy analyses in combination with synchrotron radiation microscopic X-ray fluorescence analysis (micro-XRF) and microscopic X-ray absorption near edge structures (micro-XANES). Several behavioral experiments and first mathematical simulations affirm our avian magnetoreceptor model. The iron minerals inside the dendrites are housed in three different subcellular compartments (bullets, platelets, vesicles), which could be clearly resolved and identified by electron microscopy on ultrathin sections. Micro-XRF and micro-XANES data obtained at HASYLAB beamline L added information about the elemental distribution and Fe speciation, but are averaged over the complete dendrite due to limited spatial resolution. Here we present recently performed micro-XRF maps with sub-micrometer resolution (ESRF ID21), which reveal for the first time subcellular structural information from almost bulk-like dendrite sample material. Due to the thickness of 30 μm the microarchitecture of the dendrites can be considered as undisturbed and artefacts introduced by sectioning might be widely reduced.

  3. New Atomic Data for Doubly Ionized Iron Group Atoms by High Resolution UV Fourier Transform Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter L.; Pickering, Juliet C.; Thorne, A. P.

    2002-01-01

    Currently available laboratory spectroscopic data of doubly ionized iron-group element were obtained about 50 years ago using spectrographs of modest dispersion, photographic plates, and eye estimates of intensities. The accuracy of the older wavelength data is about 10 mAngstroms at best, whereas wavelengths are now needed to an accuracy of 1 part in 10(exp 6) to 10(exp 7) (0.2 to 2 mAngstroms at 2000 Angstroms). The Fourier transform (FT) spectroscopy group at Imperial College, London, and collaborators at the Harvard College Observatory have used a unique VUV FT spectrometer in a program focussed on improving knowledge of spectra of many neutral and singly and doubly ionized, astrophysically important, iron group elements. Spectra of Fe II and Fe III have been recorded at UV and VUV wavelengths with signal-to-noise ratios of several hundred for the stronger lines. Wavelengths and energy levels for Fe III are an order of magnitude more accurate than previous work; analysis is close to completion. f-values for Fe II have been published.

  4. The Proportion of Anemia Associated with Iron Deficiency in Low, Medium, and High Human Development Index Countries: A Systematic Analysis of National Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Nicolai; Olofin, Ibironke; Hurrell, Richard F.; Boy, Erick; Wirth, James P.; Moursi, Mourad; Donahue Angel, Moira; Rohner, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency is commonly assumed to cause half of all cases of anemias, with hereditary blood disorders and infections such as hookworm and malaria being the other major causes. In countries ranked as low, medium, and high by the Human Development Index, we conducted a systematic review of nationally representative surveys that reported the prevalence of iron deficiency, iron deficiency anemia, and anemia among pre-school children and non-pregnant women of reproductive age. Using random effects meta-analyses techniques, data from 23 countries for pre-school children and non-pregnant women of reproductive age was pooled, and the proportion of anemia attributable to iron deficiency was estimated by region, inflammation exposure, anemia prevalence, and urban/rural setting. For pre-school children and non-pregnant women of reproductive age, the proportion of anemia associated with iron deficiency was 25.0% (95% CI: 18.0, 32.0) and 37.0% (95% CI: 28.0, 46.0), respectively. The proportion of anemia associated with iron deficiency was lower in countries where anemia prevalence was >40%, especially in rural populations (14% for pre-school children; 16% for non-pregnant women of reproductive age), and in countries with very high inflammation exposure (20% for pre-school children; 25% for non-pregnant women of reproductive age). Despite large heterogeneity, our analyses suggest that the proportion of anemia associated with iron deficiency is lower than the previously assumed 50% in countries with low, medium, or high Human Development Index ranking. Anemia-reduction strategies and programs should be based on an analysis of country-specific data, as iron deficiency may not always be the key determinant of anemia. PMID:27827838

  5. The Proportion of Anemia Associated with Iron Deficiency in Low, Medium, and High Human Development Index Countries: A Systematic Analysis of National Surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolai Petry

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency is commonly assumed to cause half of all cases of anemias, with hereditary blood disorders and infections such as hookworm and malaria being the other major causes. In countries ranked as low, medium, and high by the Human Development Index, we conducted a systematic review of nationally representative surveys that reported the prevalence of iron deficiency, iron deficiency anemia, and anemia among pre-school children and non-pregnant women of reproductive age. Using random effects meta-analyses techniques, data from 23 countries for pre-school children and non-pregnant women of reproductive age was pooled, and the proportion of anemia attributable to iron deficiency was estimated by region, inflammation exposure, anemia prevalence, and urban/rural setting. For pre-school children and non-pregnant women of reproductive age, the proportion of anemia associated with iron deficiency was 25.0% (95% CI: 18.0, 32.0 and 37.0% (95% CI: 28.0, 46.0, respectively. The proportion of anemia associated with iron deficiency was lower in countries where anemia prevalence was >40%, especially in rural populations (14% for pre-school children; 16% for non-pregnant women of reproductive age, and in countries with very high inflammation exposure (20% for pre-school children; 25% for non-pregnant women of reproductive age. Despite large heterogeneity, our analyses suggest that the proportion of anemia associated with iron deficiency is lower than the previously assumed 50% in countries with low, medium, or high Human Development Index ranking. Anemia-reduction strategies and programs should be based on an analysis of country-specific data, as iron deficiency may not always be the key determinant of anemia.

  6. The Proportion of Anemia Associated with Iron Deficiency in Low, Medium, and High Human Development Index Countries: A Systematic Analysis of National Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Nicolai; Olofin, Ibironke; Hurrell, Richard F; Boy, Erick; Wirth, James P; Moursi, Mourad; Donahue Angel, Moira; Rohner, Fabian

    2016-11-02

    Iron deficiency is commonly assumed to cause half of all cases of anemias, with hereditary blood disorders and infections such as hookworm and malaria being the other major causes. In countries ranked as low, medium, and high by the Human Development Index, we conducted a systematic review of nationally representative surveys that reported the prevalence of iron deficiency, iron deficiency anemia, and anemia among pre-school children and non-pregnant women of reproductive age. Using random effects meta-analyses techniques, data from 23 countries for pre-school children and non-pregnant women of reproductive age was pooled, and the proportion of anemia attributable to iron deficiency was estimated by region, inflammation exposure, anemia prevalence, and urban/rural setting. For pre-school children and non-pregnant women of reproductive age, the proportion of anemia associated with iron deficiency was 25.0% (95% CI: 18.0, 32.0) and 37.0% (95% CI: 28.0, 46.0), respectively. The proportion of anemia associated with iron deficiency was lower in countries where anemia prevalence was >40%, especially in rural populations (14% for pre-school children; 16% for non-pregnant women of reproductive age), and in countries with very high inflammation exposure (20% for pre-school children; 25% for non-pregnant women of reproductive age). Despite large heterogeneity, our analyses suggest that the proportion of anemia associated with iron deficiency is lower than the previously assumed 50% in countries with low, medium, or high Human Development Index ranking. Anemia-reduction strategies and programs should be based on an analysis of country-specific data, as iron deficiency may not always be the key determinant of anemia.

  7. Fluorescent-protein stabilization and high-resolution imaging of cleared, intact mouse brains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin K Schwarz

    Full Text Available In order to observe and quantify long-range neuronal connections in intact mouse brain by light microscopy, it is first necessary to clear the brain, thus suppressing refractive-index variations. Here we describe a method that clears the brain and preserves the signal from proteinaceous fluorophores using a pH-adjusted non-aqueous index-matching medium. Successful clearing is enabled through the use of either 1-propanol or tert-butanol during dehydration whilst maintaining a basic pH. We show that high-resolution fluorescence imaging of entire, structurally intact juvenile and adult mouse brains is possible at subcellular resolution, even following many months in clearing solution. We also show that axonal long-range projections that are EGFP-labelled by modified Rabies virus can be imaged throughout the brain using a purpose-built light-sheet fluorescence microscope. To demonstrate the viability of the technique, we determined a detailed map of the monosynaptic projections onto a target cell population in the lateral entorhinal cortex. This example demonstrates that our method permits the quantification of whole-brain connectivity patterns at the subcellular level in the uncut brain.

  8. Predicting the heat of vaporization of iron at high temperatures using time-resolved laser-induced incandescence and Bayesian model selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipkens, Timothy A.; Hadwin, Paul J.; Grauer, Samuel J.; Daun, Kyle J.

    2018-03-01

    Competing theories have been proposed to account for how the latent heat of vaporization of liquid iron varies with temperature, but experimental confirmation remains elusive, particularly at high temperatures. We propose time-resolved laser-induced incandescence measurements on iron nanoparticles combined with Bayesian model plausibility, as a novel method for evaluating these relationships. Our approach scores the explanatory power of candidate models, accounting for parameter uncertainty, model complexity, measurement noise, and goodness-of-fit. The approach is first validated with simulated data and then applied to experimental data for iron nanoparticles in argon. Our results justify the use of Román's equation to account for the temperature dependence of the latent heat of vaporization of liquid iron.

  9. Effect of vibration frequency on microstructure and performance of high chromium cast iron prepared by lost foam casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-qi Zou

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present research, high chromium cast irons (HCCIs were prepared using the lost foam casting (LFC process. To improve the wear resistance of the high chromium cast irons (HCCIs, mechanical vibration was employed during the solidification of the HCCIs. The effects of vibration frequency on the microstructure and performance of the HCCIs under as-cast, as-quenched and as-tempered conditions were investigated. The results indicated that the microstructures of the LFC-produced HCCIs were refined due to the introduction of mechanical vibration, and the hardness was improved compared to that of the alloy without vibration. However, only a slight improvement in hardness was found in spite of the increase of vibration frequency. In contrast, the impact toughness of the as-tempered HCCIs increased with an increase in the vibration frequency. In addition, the wear resistance of the HCCIs was improved as a result of the introduction of vibration and increased with an increase in the vibration frequency.

  10. Determination of trace amounts of lead, arsenic, nickel and cobalt in high-purity iron oxide pigment by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry after iron matrix removal with extractant-contained resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yuyu; Zhou Jianfeng; Wang Guoxin; Zhou Jinfan; Tao Guanhong

    2007-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was applied to the determination of lead, arsenic, nickel and cobalt in high-purity iron oxide pigment. Samples were dissolved with hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The digest was passed through a column, which was packed with a polymer resin containing a neutral organophosphorus extractant, tri-n-butylphosphate. Iron was sorbed selectively on the resin and the analytes of interest passed through the column, allowing the effective separation of them from the iron matrix. Conditions of separation were optimized. The detection limits (3σ) in solution were 10, 40, 7 and 5 μg L -1 , and in pigment were 0.2, 0.8, 0.14 and 0.1 mg kg -1 for lead, arsenic, cobalt and nickel, respectively. The recoveries ranged from 95% to 107% when sample digests were spiked with 5 μg of the analytes of interest, and relative standard deviations (n = 6) were 1.5-17.6% for the determination of the spiked samples. The method was successfully applied to the determination of trace amounts of these elements in high-purity iron oxide pigment samples

  11. High Prevalence of Inadequate Calcium and Iron Intakes by Mexican Population Groups as Assessed by 24-Hour Recalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Pimienta, Tania G; López-Olmedo, Nancy; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Sonia; García-Guerra, Armando; Rivera, Juan A; Carriquiry, Alicia L; Villalpando, Salvador

    2016-09-01

    A National Health and Nutrition Survey (ENSANUT) conducted in Mexico in 1999 identified a high prevalence of inadequate mineral intakes in the population by using 24-h recall questionnaires. However, the 1999 survey did not adjust for within-person variance. The 2012 ENSANUT implemented a more up-to-date 24-h recall methodology to estimate usual intake distributions and prevalence of inadequate intakes. We examined the distribution of usual intakes and prevalences of inadequate intakes of calcium, iron, magnesium, and zinc in the Mexican population in groups defined according to sex, rural or urban area, geographic region of residence, and socioeconomic status (SES). We used dietary intake data obtained through the 24-h recall automated multiple-pass method for 10,886 subjects as part of ENSANUT 2012. A second measurement on a nonconsecutive day was obtained for 9% of the sample. Distributions of usual intakes of the 4 minerals were obtained by using the Iowa State University method, and the prevalence of inadequacy was estimated by using the Institute of Medicine's Estimated Average Requirement cutoff. Calcium inadequacy was 25.6% in children aged 1-4 y and 54.5-88.1% in subjects >5 y old. More than 45% of subjects >5 y old had an inadequate intake of iron. Less than 5% of children aged 12 y had inadequate intakes of magnesium, whereas zinc inadequacy ranged from <10% in children aged <12 y to 21.6% in men aged ≥20 y. Few differences were found between rural and urban areas, regions, and tertiles of SES. Intakes of calcium, iron, magnesium, and zinc are inadequate in the Mexican population, especially among adolescents and adults. These results suggest a public health concern that must be addressed. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  12. Plasma dynamic synthesis and obtaining ultrafine powders of iron oxides with high content of ε-Fe2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivkov, Alexander; Naiden, Evgenii; Ivashutenko, Alexander; Shanenkov, Ivan

    2016-05-01

    The ultrafine iron oxide powders were successfully synthesized using the plasma dynamic synthesis method, based on the use of a coaxial magnetoplasma accelerator with the iron electrode system. The synthesis was implemented in the high-speed iron-containing plasma jet, flowing into the space of the sealed chamber, filled with the gaseous mixture of oxygen and argon at different ratios. The XRD investigations showed that the synthesized products were heterophase and consisted of three main phases such as magnetite Fe3O4, hematite α-Fe2O3 and ε-Fe2O3. The SEM data confirmed the presence of three particle types: the hollow spheroids with sizes about hundreds of micrometers (magnetite), the particles with sizes up to 100 μm from the porous material of sintered submicron particles (hematite), and nanoscale particles (ε-phase). We found that at the higher oxygen concentration the content of ε-Fe2O3 is increased up to 50% at the same time with decreasing the Fe3O4 phase. The magnetic properties of the products are mainly determined by magnetite characteristics and are significantly reduced with decreasing its content in the powder. In order to investigate the synthesized ε-Fe2O3 on the ability to absorb the electromagnetic radiation in the millimeter wavelength range, we separated the product with the higher ε-phase concentration. The fraction mainly, consisting of ε-Fe2O3, showed the occurrence of the natural resonance at frequencies of 8.3 GHz and 130 GHz.

  13. Analysis on three-sublattice model of magnetic properties in rare-earth iron garnets under high magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wei; Chen Ri; Qi Xin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► An improved three-sublattice model is provided. ► The magnetic properties of the rare-earth ions show great importance to the magnetic behaviors of rare-earth iron garnets. ► The coefficients α i associated with λ and χ are the functions of H e and T. ► The changes of M with H e at different temperatures are revealed. - Abstract: In this paper, based on the molecular field theory, a new and improved three-sublattice model on studying the magnetic properties of ferrimagnetic rare-earth iron garnet in high magnetic fields is introduced. Here, the effective exchange field is described as H i = λM = λχH e , where λ is the coefficient associated with the molecular field, χ is the effective magnetic susceptibility, and H e is external magnetic fields. As is known, the magnetic sublattices in rare-earth iron garnets can be classified three kinds labeled as a, c and d, in our calculations, whose magnetizations are defined as M a , M c and M d , respectively. Then, using this model, the temperature and field dependences of the total magnetization in Dy 3 Fe 5 O 12 (DyIG) are discussed. Meanwhile, the magnetizations of the three kinds of magnetic sublattices are analyzed. Furthermore, our theory suggests that the coefficients α i associated with λ and χ in DyIG show obvious anisotropic, temperature-dependence and field-dependence characteristics. And, the theoretical calculations exactly fit the experimental data.

  14. High-resolution photoacoustic tomography of resting-state functional connectivity in the mouse brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Xia, Jun; Wan, Hanlin; Bauer, Adam Quentin; Culver, Joseph P.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing use of mouse models for human brain disease studies presents an emerging need for a new functional imaging modality. Using optical excitation and acoustic detection, we developed a functional connectivity photoacoustic tomography system, which allows noninvasive imaging of resting-state functional connectivity in the mouse brain, with a large field of view and a high spatial resolution. Bilateral correlations were observed in eight functional regions, including the olfactory bulb, limbic, parietal, somatosensory, retrosplenial, visual, motor, and temporal regions, as well as in several subregions. The borders and locations of these regions agreed well with the Paxinos mouse brain atlas. By subjecting the mouse to alternating hyperoxic and hypoxic conditions, strong and weak functional connectivities were observed, respectively. In addition to connectivity images, vascular images were simultaneously acquired. These studies show that functional connectivity photoacoustic tomography is a promising, noninvasive technique for functional imaging of the mouse brain. PMID:24367107

  15. Digital atlas of the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) brain: a high-resolution photo atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karten, Harvey J; Brzozowska-Prechtl, Agnieszka; Lovell, Peter V; Tang, Daniel D; Mello, Claudio V; Wang, Haibin; Mitra, Partha P

    2013-11-01

    We describe a set of new comprehensive, high-quality, high-resolution digital images of histological sections from the brain of male zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) and make them publicly available through an interactive website (http://zebrafinch.brainarchitecture.org/). These images provide a basis for the production of a dimensionally accurate and detailed digital nonstereotaxic atlas. Nissl- and myelin-stained brain sections are provided in the transverse, sagittal, and horizontal planes, with the transverse plane approximating the more traditional Frankfurt plane. In addition, a separate set of brain sections in this same plane is stained for tyrosine hydroxylase, revealing the distribution of catecholaminergic neurons (dopaminergic, noradrenergic, and adrenergic) in the songbird brain. For a subset of sagittal sections we also prepared a corresponding set of drawings, defining and annotating various nuclei, fields, and fiber tracts that are visible under Nissl and myelin staining. This atlas of the zebra finch brain is expected to become an important tool for birdsong research and comparative studies of brain organization and evolution. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Highly adaptive tests for group differences in brain functional connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junghi Kim

    2015-01-01

    The proposed tests combine statistical evidence against a null hypothesis from multiple sources across a range of plausible tuning parameter values reflecting uncertainty with the unknown truth. These highly adaptive tests are not only easy to use, but also high-powered robustly across various scenarios. The usage and advantages of these novel tests are demonstrated on an Alzheimer's disease dataset and simulated data.

  17. A High-Resolution In Vivo Atlas of the Human Brain's Serotonin System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beliveau, Vincent; Ganz, Melanie; Feng, Ling; Ozenne, Brice; Højgaard, Liselotte; Fisher, Patrick M; Svarer, Claus; Greve, Douglas N; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2017-01-04

    The serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) system modulates many important brain functions and is critically involved in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, we present a high-resolution, multidimensional, in vivo atlas of four of the human brain's 5-HT receptors (5-HT 1A , 5-HT 1B , 5-HT 2A , and 5-HT 4 ) and the 5-HT transporter (5-HTT). The atlas is created from molecular and structural high-resolution neuroimaging data consisting of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans acquired in a total of 210 healthy individuals. Comparison of the regional PET binding measures with postmortem human brain autoradiography outcomes showed a high correlation for the five 5-HT targets and this enabled us to transform the atlas to represent protein densities (in picomoles per milliliter). We also assessed the regional association between protein concentration and mRNA expression in the human brain by comparing the 5-HT density across the atlas with data from the Allen Human Brain atlas and identified receptor- and transporter-specific associations that show the regional relation between the two measures. Together, these data provide unparalleled insight into the serotonin system of the human brain. We present a high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET)- and magnetic resonance imaging-based human brain atlas of important serotonin receptors and the transporter. The regional PET-derived binding measures correlate strongly with the corresponding autoradiography protein levels. The strong correlation enables the transformation of the PET-derived human brain atlas into a protein density map of the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) system. Next, we compared the regional receptor/transporter protein densities with mRNA levels and uncovered unique associations between protein expression and density at high detail. This new in vivo neuroimaging atlas of the 5-HT system not only provides insight in the human brain's regional protein

  18. Iron fertilization and the structure of planktonic communities in high nutrient regions of the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quéguiner, Bernard

    2013-06-01

    In this review article, plankton community structure observations are analyzed both for artificial iron fertilization experiments and also for experiments dedicated to the study of naturally iron-fertilized systems in the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific sectors of the Southern Ocean in the POOZ (Permanently Open Ocean Zone) and the PFZ (Polar Frontal Zone). Observations made in natural systems are combined with those from artificially perturbed systems, in order to evaluate the seasonal evolution of pelagic communities, taking into account controlling factors related to the life cycles and the ecophysiology of dominant organisms. The analysis considers several types of planktonic communities, including both autotrophs and heterotrophs. These communities are spatially segregated owing to different life strategies. A conceptual general scheme is proposed to account for these observations and their variability, regardless of experiment type. Diatoms can be separated into 2 groups: Group 1 has slightly silicified fast growing cells that are homogeneously distributed in the surface mixed layer, and Group 2 has strongly silicified slowly growing cells within discrete layers. During the growth season, Group 1 diatoms show a typical seasonal succession of dominant species, within time windows of development that are conditioned by physical factors (light and temperature) as well as endogenous specific rhythms (internal clock), and biomass accumulation is controlled by the availability of nutrients. Group 1 diatoms are not directly grazed by mesozooplankton which is fed by protozooplankton, linking the microbial food web to higher trophic levels. Instead, successive dominant species of Group 1 are degraded via bacterial activity at the end of their growth season. Organic detritus fragments feed protozooplankton and mesozooplankton. The effective silicon pump leads to the progressive disappearance of silicic acid in surface waters. In contrast, Group 2 is resistant to grazing

  19. Brain tumor magnetic targeting and biodistribution of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles linked with 70-kDa heat shock protein study by nonlinear longitudinal response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevtsov, Maxim A.; Nikolaev, Boris P.; Ryzhov, Vyacheslav A.; Yakovleva, Ludmila Y.; Dobrodumov, Anatolii V.; Marchenko, Yaroslav Y.; Margulis, Boris A.; Pitkin, Emil; Guzhova, Irina V.

    2015-01-01

    Brain tumor targeting efficiency and biodistribution of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles conjugated with heat shock protein Hsp70 (SPION–Hsp70) were evaluated in experimental glioma model. Synthesized conjugates were characterized using the method of longitudinal nonlinear response of magnetic nanoparticles to a weak ac magnetic field with measurements of second harmonic of magnetization (NLR-M 2 ). Cellular interaction of magnetic conjugates was analyzed in 9L glioma cell culture. The biodistribution of the nanoparticles and their accumulation in tumors was assessed by the latter approach as well. The efficacy of Hsp70-conjugates for contrast enhancement in the orthotopic model of 9L glioma was assessed by MR imaging (11 T). Magnetic nanoparticles conjugated with Hsp70 had the relaxivity properties of the MR-negative contrast agents. Morphological observation and cell viability test demonstrated good biocompatibility of Hsp70-conjugates. Analysis of the T 2 -weighted MR scans in tumor-bearing rats demonstrated the high efficacy of Hsp70-conjugates in contrast enhancement of the glioma in comparison to non-conjugated nanoparticles. High contrast enhancement of the glioma was provided by the accumulation of the SPION–Hsp70 particles in the glioma tissue (as shown by the histological assay). Biodistribution analysis by NLR-M 2 measurements evidenced the many-fold increase (~40) in the tumor-to-normal brain uptake ratio in the Hsp70-conjugates treated animals. Biodistribution pattern of Hsp70-decorated nanoparticles differed from that of non-conjugated SPIONs. Coating of the magnetic nanoparticles with Hsp70 protein enhances the tumor-targeting ability of the conjugates that could be applied in the MR imaging of the malignant brain tumors. - Highlights: • Second-harmonic nonlinear magnetic response is used for biodistribution analysis. • NLR-M 2 ensures high sensibility in detection of SPIONs in tissue. • SPION–Hsp70 conjugates effectively target the

  20. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy ameliorates acute brain injury after porcine intracerebral hemorrhage at high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hai-tao; Bian, Chen; Yuan, Ji-chao; Liao, Xiao-jun; Liu, Wei; Zhu, Gang; Feng, Hua; Lin, Jiang-kai

    2015-06-15

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) at high altitude is not well understood to date. This study investigates the effects of high altitude on ICH, and examines the acute neuroprotection of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy against high-altitude ICH. Minipigs were placed in a hypobaric chamber for 72 h before the operation. ICH was induced by an infusion of autologous arterial blood (3 ml) into the right basal ganglia. Animals in the high-altitude ICH group received HBO therapy (2.5 ATA for 60 min) 30 min after ICH. Blood gas, blood glucose and brain tissue oxygen partial pressure (PbtO2) were monitored continuously for animals from all groups, as were microdialysis products including glucose, lactate, pyruvate and glutamate in perihematomal tissue from 3 to 12 h post-ICH. High-altitude ICH animals showed significantly lower PbtO2, higher lactate/pyruvate ratio (LPR) and glutamate levels than low-altitude ICH animals. More severe neurological deficits, brain edema and neuronal damage were also observed in high-altitude ICH. After HBO therapy, PbtO2 was significantly increased and LPR and glutamate levels were significantly decreased. Brain edema, neurological deficits and neuronal damage were also ameliorated. The data suggested a more serious disturbance of tissue oxygenation and cerebral metabolism in the acute stage after ICH at high altitude. Early HBO treatment reduced acute brain injury, perhaps through a mechanism involving the amelioration of the derangement of cerebral oxygenation and metabolism following high-altitude ICH.

  1. Hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning protects against traumatic brain injury at high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S L; Hu, R; Li, F; Liu, Z; Xia, Y Z; Cui, G Y; Feng, H

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that preconditioning with hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) can reduce ischemic and hemorrhagic brain injury. We investigated effects of HBO preconditioning on traumatic brain injury (TBI) at high altitude and examined the role of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in such protection. Rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: HBO preconditioning group (HBOP; n = 13), high-altitude group (HA; n = 13), and high-altitude sham operation group (HASO; n = 13). All groups were subjected to head trauma by weight-drop device, except for HASO group. HBOP rats received 5 sessions of HBO preconditioning (2.5 ATA, 100% oxygen, 1 h daily) and then were kept in hypobaric chamber at 0.6 ATA (to simulate pressure at 4000m altitude) for 3 days before operation. HA rats received control pretreatment (1 ATA, room air, 1 h daily), then followed the same procedures as HBOP group. HASO rats were subjected to skull opening only without brain injury. Twenty-four hours after TBI, 7 rats from each group were examined for neurological function and brain water content; 6 rats from each group were killed for analysis by H&E staining and immunohistochemistry. Neurological outcome in HBOP group (0.71 +/- 0.49) was better than HA group (1.57 +/- 0.53; p < 0.05). Preconditioning with HBO significantly reduced percentage of brain water content (86.24 +/- 0.52 vs. 84.60 +/- 0.37; p < 0.01). Brain morphology and structure seen by light microscopy was diminished in HA group, while fewer pathological injuries occurred in HBOP group. Compared to HA group, pretreatment with HBO significantly reduced the number of MMP-9-positive cells (92.25 +/- 8.85 vs. 74.42 +/- 6.27; p < 0.01). HBO preconditioning attenuates TBI in rats at high altitude. Decline in MMP-9 expression may contribute to HBO preconditioning-induced protection of brain tissue against TBI.

  2. High temperature Moessbauer study of order-disorder transformation in iron-aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oki, Kensuke; Yamamura, Akihiko; Kudo, Kazunao; Eguchi, Tetsuo

    1979-01-01

    Ordering process of iron rich Fe-Al alloys has been investigated at elevated temperatures by mean of Moessbauer spectroscopy. The observed spectra are analyzed to obtain the temperature dependences of the internal field, isomer shift and line width, and the results are discussed in connection with the ordering process. The alloy with 24.7 at% Al exhibits spectra, which are characteristic of the superposition of a single-line spectrum and a six-line one, originating from the ordered paramagnetic B2 or DO 3 state and disordered ferromagnetic α, respectively, and the results confirm the coexistence of α phase with B2 or DO 3 . The isomer shift of the paramagnetic component of the spectra shows discontinuous changes at the temperatures of transformation α reversible B2 and B2 reversible DO 3 . (author)

  3. Evaluation of lead-iron-phosphate glass as a high-level waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chick, L.A.; Bunnell, L.R.; Strachan, D.M.; Kissinger, H.E.; Hodges, F.N.

    1986-01-01

    The lead-iron-phosphate (Pb-Fe-P) nuclear waste glass developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was evaluated for its potential as an improvement over the current reference waste form, borosilicate (B-Si) glass. Vitreous Pb-Fe-P glass appears to have substantially better chemical durability than B-Si glass. However, severe crystallization leading to deteriorated chemical durability would result if this glass were poured into large canisters, as is presently done with B-Si glass. Cesium leach rates from this crystallized material are orders of magnitude greater than those from B-Si glass. Therefore, to realize the performance advantages of the Pb-Fe-P material in a nuclear waste form, it would be necessary to process it so that it is cooled rapidly, thus retaining its vitreous structure

  4. Relating Magnetic Properties and High Hyperthermia Performance of Iron Oxide Nanoflowers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bender, Philipp; Fock, Jeppe; Frandsen, Cathrine

    2018-01-01

    We investigated in depth the interrelations among structure, magnetic properties, relaxation dynamics and magnetic hyperthermia performance of magnetic nanoflowers. The nanoflowers are about 39 nm in size, and consist of densely packed iron oxide cores. They display a remanent magnetization, which...... we explain by the exchange coupling between the cores, but we observe indications for internal spin disorder. By polarized small angle neutron scattering we unambiguously confirm that on average the nanoflowers are preferentially magnetized along one direction. The extracted discrete relaxation time...... distribution of the colloidally dispersed particles indicates the presence of three distinct relaxation contributions. We can explain the two slower processes by Brownian and classical Néel relaxation, respectively. The additionally observed very fast relaxation contributions are attributed by us...

  5. Prediction of reducible soil iron content from iron extraction data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodegom, van P.M.; Reeven, van J.; Denier van der Gon, H.A.C.

    2003-01-01

    Soils contain various iron compounds that differ in solubility, reducibility and extractability. Moreover, the contribution of the various iron compounds to total iron (Fe) and total Fe concentrations differs highly among soils. As a result, the total reducible Fe content can also differ among

  6. Combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy for high-grade brain tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barazzuol, Lara

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumour in adults and among the most aggressive of all tumours. For several decades, the standard care of GBM was surgical resection followed by radiotherapy alone. In 2005, a landmark phase III clinical trial coordinated by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and the National Cancer Institute of Canada (NCIC) demonstrated the benefit of radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy. With TMZ, the median life expectancy in optimally managed patients is still only 12-14 months, with only 25% surviving 24 months. There is an urgent need for new therapies in particular in those patients whose tumour has an unmethylated methylguanine methyltransferase gene (MGMT) promoter, which is a predictive factor of benefit from TMZ. In this dissertation, the nature of the interaction between TMZ and radiation is investigated using both a mathematical model, based on in vivo population statistics of survival, and in vitro experimentation on a panel of human GBM cell lines. The results show that TMZ has an additive effect in vitro and that the population-based model may be insufficient in predicting TMZ response. The combination of TMZ with particle therapy is also investigated. Very little preclinical data exists on the effects of charged particles on GBM cell lines as well as on the concomitant application of chemotherapy. In this study, human GBM cells are exposed to 3 MeV protons and 6 MeV alpha particles in concomitance with TMZ. The results suggest that the radiation quality does not affect the nature of the interaction between TMZ and radiation, showing reproducible additive cytotoxicity. Since TMZ and radiation cause DNA damage in cancer cells, there has been increased attention to the use of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. PARP is a family of enzymes that play a key role in the repair of DNA breaks. In this study, a novel PARP inhibitor, ABT-888

  7. Synthesis of Highly Reactive Subnano-sized Zero-valent Iron using Smectite Clay Templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Cheng; Jia, Hanzhang; Li, Hui; Teppen, Brian J.; Boyd, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    A novel method was developed for synthesizing subnano-sized zero-valent iron (ZVI) using smectite clay layers as templates. Exchangeable Fe(III) cations compensating the structural negative charges of smectites were reduced with NaBH4, resulting in the formation of ZVI. The unique structure of smectite clay, in which isolated exchangeable Fe(III) cations reside near the sites of structural negative charges, inhibited the agglomeration of ZVI resulting in the formation of discrete regions of subnanoscale ZVI particles in the smectite interlayer regions. X-ray diffraction revealed an interlayer spacing of ~ 5 Å. The non-structural iron content of this clay yields a calculated ratio of two atoms of ZVI per three cation exchange sites, in full agreement with the XRD results since the diameter of elemental Fe is 2.5 Å. The clay-templated ZVI showed superior reactivity and efficiency compared to other previously reported forms of ZVI as indicated by the reduction of nitrobenzene; structural Fe within the aluminosilicate layers was nonreactive. At a 1:3 molar ratio of nitrobenzene:non-structural Fe, a reaction efficiency of 83% was achieved, and over 80% of the nitrobenzene was reduced within one minute. These results confirm that non-structural Fe from Fe(III)-smectite was reduced predominantly to ZVI which was responsible for the reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline. This new form of subnano-scale ZVI may find utility in the development of remediation technologies for persistent environmental contaminants, e.g. as components of constructed reactive domains such as reactive caps for contaminated sediments. PMID:20446730

  8. High-temperature low cycle fatigue behavior of a gray cast iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, K.L., E-mail: 12klfan@tongji.edu.cn; He, G.Q.; She, M.; Liu, X.S.; Lu, Q.; Yang, Y.; Tian, D.D.; Shen, Y.

    2014-12-15

    The strain controlled low cycle fatigue properties of the studied gray cast iron for engine cylinder blocks were investigated. At the same total strain amplitude, the low cycle fatigue life of the studied material at 523 K was higher than that at 423 K. The fatigue behavior of the studied material was characterized as cyclic softening at any given total strain amplitude (0.12%–0.24%), which was attributed to fatigue crack initiation and propagation. Moreover, this material exhibited asymmetric hysteresis loops due to the presence of the graphite lamellas. Transmission electron microscopy analysis suggested that cyclic softening was also caused by the interactions of dislocations at 423 K, such as cell structure in ferrite, whereas cyclic softening was related to subgrain boundaries and dislocation climbing at 523 K. Micro-analysis of specimen fracture appearance was conducted in order to obtain the fracture characteristics and crack paths for different strain amplitudes. It showed that the higher the temperature, the rougher the crack face of the examined gray cast iron at the same total strain amplitude. Additionally, the microcracks were readily blunted during growth inside the pearlite matrix at 423 K, whereas the microcracks could easily pass through pearlite matrix along with deflection at 523 K. The results of fatigue experiments consistently showed that fatigue damage for the studied material at 423 K was lower than that at 523 K under any given total strain amplitude. - Highlights: • The low cycle fatigue behavior of the HT250 for engine cylinder blocks was investigated. • TEM investigations were conducted to explain the cyclic deformation response. • The low cycle fatigue cracks of HT250 GCI were studied by SEM. • The fatigue life of the examined material at 523 K is higher than that at 423 K.

  9. Synthesis of highly reactive subnano-sized zero-valent iron using smectite clay templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Cheng; Jia, Hanzhong; Li, Hui; Teppen, Brian J; Boyd, Stephen A

    2010-06-01

    A novel method was developed for synthesizing subnano-sized zero-valent iron (ZVI) using smectite clay layers as templates. Exchangeable Fe(III) cations compensating the structural negative charges of smectites were reduced with NaBH(4), resulting in the formation of ZVI. The unique structure of smectite clay, in which isolated exchangeable Fe(III) cations reside near the sites of structural negative charges, inhibited the agglomeration of ZVI resulting in the formation of subnanoscale ZVI particles in the smectite interlayer regions. X-ray diffraction revealed an interlayer spacing of approximately 5 A. The non-structural iron content of this clay yields a calculated ratio of two atoms of ZVI per three cation exchange sites, in full agreement with the X-ray diffraction (XRD) results since the diameter of elemental Fe is 2.5 A. The clay-templated ZVI showed superior reactivity and efficiency compared to other previously reported forms of ZVI as indicated by the reduction of nitrobenzene; structural Fe within the aluminosilicate layers was nonreactive. At a 1:3 molar ratio of nitrobenzene/non-structural Fe, a reaction efficiency of 83% was achieved, and over 80% of the nitrobenzene was reduced within one minute. These results confirm that non-structural Fe from Fe(III)-smectite was reduced predominantly to ZVI which was responsible for the reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline. This new form of subnanoscale ZVI may find utility in the development of remediation technologies for persistent environmental contaminants, for example, as components of constructed reactive domains such as reactive caps for contaminated sediments.

  10. Tissue levels of iron, copper, zinc and magnesium in iron deficient rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of iron deficiency on the levels of iron, copper, zinc and magnesium in the brain, liver, kidney, heart and lungs of albino rats (Rattus novergicus) was investigated. Forty rats were divided into two groups and the first group was fed a control diet containing 1.09g iron/kg diet while the test group was fed diet ...

  11. Iron in neurodegenerative disorders: being in the wrong place at the wrong time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolakis, Sotirios; Kypraiou, Anna-Maria

    2017-11-27

    Brain iron deposits have been reported consistently in imaging and histologic examinations of patients with neurodegenerative disorders. While the origins of this finding have not been clarified yet, it is speculated that impaired iron homeostasis or deficient transport mechanisms result in the accumulation of this highly toxic metal ultimately leading to formation of reactive oxygen species and cell death. On the other hand, there are also those who support that iron is just an incidental finding, a by product of neuronal loss. A literature review has been performed in order to present the key findings in support of the iron hypothesis of neurodegeneration, as well as to identify conditions causing or resulting from iron overload and compare and contrast their features with the most prominent neurodegenerative disorders. There is an abundance of experimental and observational findings in support of the hypothesis in question; however, as neurodegeneration is a rare incident of commonly encountered iron-associated disorders of the nervous system, and this metal is found in non-neurodegenerative disorders as well, it is possible that iron is the result or even an incidental finding in neurodegeneration. Understanding the underlying processes of iron metabolism in the brain and particularly its release during cell damage is expected to provide a deeper understanding of the origins of neurodegeneration in the years to come.

  12. 1H NMR of High-Potential Iron-Sulfur Protein from the Purple Non-Sulfur Bacterium Rhodoferax fermentans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciurli, Stefano; Cremonini, Mauro Andrea; Kofod, Pauli

    1996-01-01

    residues bound to the [4Fe-4S]3+/2+ cluster have been performed using one-dimensional NOE and exchange spectroscopy experiments. 1H-NMR hyperfine shifts and relaxation rates of cluster-bound Cys β-CH2 protons indicate that in the [4Fe-4S]3+ cluster one iron ion can be formally described as Fe(III), while......Oxidized and reduced forms of high-potential iron-sulfur protein (HiPIP) from the purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Rhodoferux fermentans have been characterized using 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Pairwise and sequence-specific assignments of hyperfine-shifted 1H-NMR signals to protons of cysteine...... longitudinal relaxation rates of Cys β-CH2 protons in HiPIPs from six different sources as a function of the Fe-S-Cβ-Cα dihedral angle, indicate that the major contribution is due to a dipolar metal-centered mechanism, with a non-negligeable contribution from a ligand-centered dipolar mechanism which involves...

  13. High-solid mesophilic methane fermentation of food waste with an emphasis on Iron, Cobalt, and Nickel requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Hong; Lang, Dong-Li; Li, Yu-You

    2012-01-01

    The effect of trace metals on the mesophilic methane fermentation of high-solid food waste was investigated using both batch and continuous experiments. The continuous experiment was conducted by using a CSTR-type reactor with three run. During the first run, the HRT of the reactor was stepwise decreased from 100 days to 30 days. From operation day 50, the reactor efficiency deteriorated due to the lack of trace metals. The batch experiment showed that iron, cobalt, and nickel combinations had a significant effect on food waste. According to the results of the batch experiment, a combination of iron, cobalt, and nickel was added into the CSTR reactor by two different methods at run II, and III. Based on experimental results and theoretical calculations, the most suitable values of Fe/COD, Co/COD, and Ni/COD in the substrate were identified as 200, 6.0, and 5.7 mg/kg COD, respectively. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Production of High-purity Magnetite Nanoparticles from a Low-grade Iron Ore via Solvent Extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Yong Jae; Kil, Dae Sup; Jang, Hee Dong [Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Do, Thi May [Korea University of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kuk [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    We produced magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) and a Mg-rich solution as a nano-adsorbent and a coagulant for water treatment, respectively, using a low-grade iron ore. The ore was leached with aqueous hydrochloric acid and its impurities were removed by solvent extraction of the leachate using tri-n-butyl phosphate as an extractant. The content of Si and Mg, which inhibit the formation of MNPs, was reduced from 10.3 wt% and 15.5 wt% to 28.1 mg/L and < 1.4 mg/L, respectively. Consequently, the Fe content increased from 68.6 wt% to 99.8 wt%. The high-purity Fe{sup 3+} solution recovered was used to prepare 5-15-nm MNPs by coprecipitation. The wastewater produced contained a large amount of Mg{sup 2+} and can be used to precipitate struvite in sewage treatment. This process helps reduce the cost of both sewage and iron-ore-wastewater treatments, as well as in the economic production of the nano-adsorbent.

  15. Estimation of residual stress in cold rolled iron-disks from strain measurements on the high resolution Fourier diffractometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksenov, V.L.; Balagurov, A.M.; Taran, Yu.V.

    1995-01-01

    The results of estimating residual stresses in cold rolled iron disks by measurements with the high resolution Fourier diffractometer (HRFD) at the IBR-2 pulsed reactor are presented. These measurements were made for calibration of magnetic and ultrasonic measurements carried out at the Fraunhofer-Institute for Nondestructive Testing in Saarbrucken (Germany). The tested objects were cold rolled steel disks of 2.5 mm thickness and diameter of about 500 mm used for forming small, gas pressure tanks. Neutron diffraction experiments were carried out at the scattering angle 2θ=+152 d eg with resolution Δd/d=1.5·10 -3 . The gauge volume was chosen according to the magnetic measurements lateral resolution 20x20 mm 2 . In the nearest future the neutron diffraction measurements with cold rolled iron disks at the scattering angle 2θ=±90 0 are planned. Also the texture analysis will be included in the Rietveld refinement procedure for more correct calculation of residual stress fields in the cold rolled materials. 8 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  16. Two classes of superconductors discovered in our material research: Iron-based high temperature superconductor and electride superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosono, Hideo

    2009-01-01

    We discovered two new classes of superconductors in the course of material exploration for electronic-active oxides. One is 12CaO . 7Al 2 O 3 crystal in which electrons accomodate in the crystallographic sub-nanometer-sized cavities. This material exhibiting metal-superconductor transition at 0.2 K is the first electride superconductor. The other is iron oxypnicitides with a layered structure. This superconductor is rather different from high T c cuprates in several respects. The high T c is emerged by doping carriers to the metallic parent phases which undergo crystallographic transition (tetra to ortho) and Pauli para to antiferromagnetic transition at ∼150 K. The T c is robust to impurity doping to the Fe sites or is induced by partial substitution of the Fe 2+ sites with Co 2+ or Ni 2+ . This article gives a brief summary of these discoveries and recent advances.

  17. 2D sandwich-like sheets of iron oxide grown on graphene as high energy anode material for supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Qunting; Feng, Xinliang [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai, 200240 (China); Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Yang, Shubin [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2011-12-08

    2D sandwich-like sheets of iron oxide grown on graphene as high energy anode material for supercapacitors are prepared from the direct growth of FeOOH nanorods on the surface of graphene and the subsequent electrochemical transformation of FeOOH to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} rate at RGO nanocomposites exhibit superior capacitance (326 F g{sup -1}), high energy density (85 Wh kg{sup -1}), large power, and good cycling performance in 1 mol L{sup -1} LiOH solution. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Theoretical Modeling for the X-ray Spectroscopy of Iron-bearing MgSiO3 under High Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Tsuchiya, T.

    2012-12-01

    The behaviors of iron (Fe) in MgSiO3 perovskite, including valence state, spin state, and chemical environments, at high pressures are of fundamental importance for more detailed understanding the properties of the Earth's lower mantle. The pressure induced spin transition of Fe-bearing MgO and MgSiO3 are detected often by using high-resolution K-edge X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) [1,2,3] and confirmed by theoretical simulations. [4,5] Since the Fe K-edge XES is associated to the 3p orbital, which is far from the valence orbitals (3d and 4s), it provides no information about its coordination environments. However, the Fe L-edge XES and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) can directly present the distribution and intensity of Fe-3d character. To identify both the spin states and the coordination environments of iron-bearing MgSiO3, we systematically investigate the L-edge XAS, XES and X-ray photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopy of Fe2+- and Fe3+-bearing MgSiO3 under high pressure by using the first-principles density functional method combined with the slater-transition method. Our results show that Fe2+ and Fe3+ can be distinguished easily by taking the XPS spectra. The spin transition of Fe2+ and Fe3+ can also be clearly certified by XAS and XES. Interestingly, the broadness of L-edge XES of Fe changes depending on the iron position, meaning that its coordination environment might also be distinguishable by using high-resolution XES measurements. Research supported by the Ehime University G-COE program and KAKENHI. [1] James Badro, Guillaume Fiquet, FranÇois Guyot, Jean-Pascal Rueff, Viktor V. Struzhkin, György VankÓ, and Giulio Monaco. Science 300, 789 (2003), [2] James Badro, Jean-Pascal Rueff, György VankÓ, Giulio Monaco, Guillaume Fiquet, and FranÇois Guyot, Science 305, 383 (2004), [3] Jung-Fu Lin, Viktor V. Struzhkin, Steven D. Jacobsen, Michael Y. Hu, Paul Chow, Jennifer Kung, Haozhe Liu, Ho-kwang Mao, and Gussell J. Hemley, Nature 436, 377 (2005). [4

  19. Effects of anesthetic agents on brain blood oxygenation level revealed with ultra-high field MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Ciobanu

    Full Text Available During general anesthesia it is crucial to control systemic hemodynamics and oxygenation levels. However, anesthetic agents can affect cerebral hemodynamics and metabolism in a drug-dependent manner, while systemic hemodynamics is stable. Brain-wide monitoring of this effect remains highly challenging. Because T(2*-weighted imaging at ultra-high magnetic field strengths benefits from a dramatic increase in contrast to noise ratio, we hypothesized that it could monitor anesthesia effects on brain blood oxygenation. We scanned rat brains at 7T and 17.2T under general anesthesia using different anesthetics (isoflurane, ketamine-xylazine, medetomidine. We showed that the brain/vessels contrast in T(2*-weighted images at 17.2T varied directly according to the applied pharmacological anesthetic agent, a phenomenon that was visible, but to a much smaller extent at 7T. This variation is in agreement with the mechanism of action of these agents. These data demonstrate that preclinical ultra-high field MRI can monitor the effects of a given drug on brain blood oxygenation level in the absence of systemic blood oxygenation changes and of any neural stimulation.

  20. Effects of anesthetic agents on brain blood oxygenation level revealed with ultra-high field MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciobanu, Luisa; Reynaud, Olivier; Le Bihan, Denis; Uhrig, Lynn; Jarraya, Bechir

    2012-01-01

    During general anesthesia it is crucial to control systemic hemodynamics and oxygenation levels. However, anesthetic agents can affect cerebral hemodynamics and metabolism in a drug-dependent manner, while systemic hemodynamics is stable. Brain-wide monitoring of this effect remains highly challenging. Because T2'*-weighted imaging at ultra-high magnetic field strengths benefits from a dramatic increase in contrast to noise ratio, we hypothesized that it could monitor anesthesia effects on brain blood oxygenation. We scanned rat brains at 7 T and 17.2 T under general anesthesia using different anesthetics (isoflurane, ketamine-xylazine, medetomidine). We showed that the brain/vessels contrast in T2'*- weighted images at 17.2 T varied directly according to the applied pharmacological anesthetic agent, a phenomenon that was visible, but to a much smaller extent at 7 T. This variation is in agreement with the mechanism of action of these agents. These data demonstrate that preclinical ultra-high field MRI can monitor the effects of a given drug on brain blood oxygenation level in the absence of systemic blood oxygenation changes and of any neural stimulation. (authors)

  1. Irradiation of meningioma: a prototype circumscribed tumor for planning high-dose irradiation of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, M.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide specific data concerning the radiation dose required to destroy meningioma, and to demonstrate that radiation doses much greater than the alleged tolerance dose, can be administered to the brain in some patients. Most meninglomas are not responsive to irradiation, but, some surgically incurable lesions benefit from irradiation with radically high doses to small volumes of tissue. The arrest of 7 of 12 consecutive meningiomas in adults for periods of 2 to 17 years following maximum tumor doses up to 8800 R in 40 days is reported in this paper. All patients, when irradiated, had active tumor in the form of inoperable primary tumor, recurrence, or known postoperative residual tumor. Three of the successful results were achieved with orthovoltage radiation. The incidence of brain damage may be acceptable to the patient when it is related to arrest of tumor growth but he must be forewarned of possible brain damage. The factors influencing the radioresponsiveness of meningioma are: the required tumor lethal dose, histology and vascularity of the tumor, anatomical site in the brain, treatment technique for each tumor site, small size of the treated volume, growth rate of the tumor, displacement of normal brain tissue by tumor, inherent individual variations of tumor and normal tissues, quality of the radiation, and tolerance of normal brain tissues. The role of these factors is discussed in the light of modern radiobiological concepts

  2. The Migration of Highly Educated Asians: Brain Drain Boomerang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Paul M.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    The heavy migration of highly educated Asians to the United States since the early 1970s is examined, noting advantages and disadvantages to the countries of origin and to the United States as well as the historical, educational, and economic factors causing this migration. It is concluded that, despite considerable loss, developing countries do…

  3. High prevalence of brain pathology in violent prisoners: a qualitative CT and MRI scan study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiltz, Kolja; Witzel, Joachim G; Bausch-Hölterhoff, Josef; Bogerts, Bernhard

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and extent of brain anomalies in a large sample of incarcerated violent offenders not previously considered neuropsychiatrically ill, in comparison with non-violent offenders and non-offending controls. MRI and CT brain scans from 287 male prison inmates (162 violent and 125 non-violent) not diagnosed as mentally ill before that were obtained due to headache, vertigo or psychological complaints during imprisonment were assessed and compared to 52 non-criminal controls. Brain scans were rated qualitatively with respect to evidence of structural brain damage. Each case received a semiquantitative rating of "normal" (=0), "questionably abnormal" (=1) or "definitely abnormal" (=2) for the lateral ventricles, frontal/parietal cortex and medial temporal structures bilaterally as well as third ventricle. Overall, offenders displayed a significantly higher rate of morphological abnormality, with the violent offenders scoring significantly higher than non-violent offenders and controls. This difference was statistically detectable for frontal/parietal cortex, medial temporal structures, third ventricle and the left but not the right lateral ventricle. The remarkable prevalence of brain pathology in convicted violent prisoners detectable by neuroradiological routine assessment not only highlights the importance of frontal and temporal structures in the control of social, and specifically of violent behaviour, but also raises questions on the legal culpability of violent offenders with brain abnormalities. The high proportion of undetected presence of structural brain damage emphasizes the need that in violent criminals, the comprehensive routine neuropsychiatric assessment usually performed in routine forensic psychiatric expertises should be complemented with brain imaging.

  4. Adsorptive Iron Removal from Groundwater

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, S.K.

    2001-01-01

    Iron is commonly present in groundwater worldwide. The presence of iron in the water supply is not harmful to human health, however it is undesirable. Bad taste, discoloration, staining, deposition in the distribution system leading to aftergrowth, and incidences of high turbidity are some of the aesthetic and operational problems associated with iron in water supplies. Iron removal from groundwater is, therefore, a major concern for water supply companies using groundwater sources....

  5. MRI measurements of the brain stem and cerebellum in high functioning autistic children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Toshiaki; Tayama, Masanobu; Miyazaki, Masahito; Murakawa, Kazuyoshi; Kuroda, Yasuhiro

    1994-01-01

    To determine involvements of the brain stem and/or cerebellum in autism, we compared midsagittal magnetic resonance images of the brains of high functioning autistic children with those of normal controls. We found that the midbrain and medulla oblongata were significantly smaller in these autistic children than in the control children. The pons area did not differ between the two groups, nor was there any difference in the cerebellar vermis area. The ratio of the brain stem and cerebellum to the posterior fossa area did not differ significantly between the high functioning autistic and the control children. The development of the cerebellar vermis area was delayed in autistic children as compared with that in the control children. Thus, it was suggested that significant anatomical changes in the midbrain and medulla oblongata existed in the autistic children. (author)

  6. MRI measurements of the brain stem and cerebellum in high functioning autistic children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Toshiaki; Tayama, Masanobu; Miyazaki, Masahito; Murakawa, Kazuyoshi; Kuroda, Yasuhiro [Tokushima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1994-01-01

    To determine involvements of the brain stem and/or cerebellum in autism, we compared midsagittal magnetic resonance images of the brains of high functioning autistic children with those of normal controls. We found that the midbrain and medulla oblongata were significantly smaller in these autistic children than in the control children. The pons area did not differ between the two groups, nor was there any difference in the cerebellar vermis area. The ratio of the brain stem and cerebellum to the posterior fossa area did not differ significantly between the high functioning autistic and the control children. The development of the cerebellar vermis area was delayed in autistic children as compared with that in the control children. Thus, it was suggested that significant anatomical changes in the midbrain and medulla oblongata existed in the autistic children. (author).

  7. Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or occupational therapy, exercise physiology, and/or speech pathology. Many medications are available to treat the primary symptoms of dystonia and spasticity, including oral medications, intrathecal baclofen pump (in which a small ...

  8. Registration-based approach for reconstruction of high-resolution in utero fetal MR brain images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Francois; Glenn, Orit A; Iordanova, Bistra; Rodriguez-Carranza, Claudia; Vigneron, Daniel B; Barkovich, James A; Studholme, Colin

    2006-09-01

    This paper describes a novel approach to forming high-resolution MR images of the human fetal brain. It addresses the key problem of fetal motion by proposing a registration-refined compounding of multiple sets of orthogonal fast two-dimensional MRI slices, which are currently acquired for clinical studies, into a single high-resolution MRI volume. A robust multiresolution slice alignment is applied iteratively to the data to correct motion of the fetus that occurs between two-dimensional acquisitions. This is combined with an intensity correction step and a super-resolution reconstruction step, to form a single high isotropic resolution volume of the fetal brain. Experimental validation on synthetic image data with known motion types and underlying anatomy, together with retrospective application to sets of clinical acquisitions, are included. Results indicate that this method promises a unique route to acquiring high-resolution MRI of the fetal brain in vivo allowing comparable quality to that of neonatal MRI. Such data provide a highly valuable window into the process of normal and abnormal brain development, which is directly applicable in a clinical setting.

  9. Topographic distribution of brain iron deposition and small cerebrovascular lesions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and in frontotemporal lobar degeneration: a post-mortem 7.0-tesla magnetic resonance imaging study with neuropathological correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Reuck, Jacques; Devos, David; Moreau, Caroline; Auger, Florent; Durieux, Nicolas; Deramecourt, Vincent; Pasquier, Florence; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Leys, Didier; Bordet, Regis

    2017-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) in 15% of the cases. A neuropathological continuity between ALS and FTLD-TDP is suspected. The present post-mortem 7.0-tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study compares the topographic distribution of iron (Fe) deposition and the incidence of small cerebrovascular lesions in ALS and in FTLD brains. Seventy-eight post-mortem brains underwent 7.0-tesla MRI. The patients consisted of 12 with ALS, 38 with FTLD, and 28 controls. Three ALS brains had minor FTLD features. Three coronal sections of a cerebral hemisphere were submitted to T2 and T2* MRI sequences. The amount of Fe deposition in the deep brain structures and the number of small cerebrovascular lesions was determined in ALS and the subtypes of FTLD compared to control brains, with neuropathological correlates. A significant increase of Fe deposition was observed in the claustrum, caudate nucleus, globus pallidus, thalamus, and subthalamic nucleus of the FTLD-FUS and FTLD-TDP groups, while in the ALS one, the Fe increase was only observed in the caudate and the subthalamic nuclei. White matter changes were only significantly more severe in the FTLD compared to those in ALS and in controls brains. Cortical micro-bleeds were increased in the frontal and temporal lobes of FTLD as well as of ALS brains compared to controls. Cortical micro-infarcts were, on the other hand, more frequent in the control compared to the ALS and FTLD groups. The present study supports the assumption of a neuropathological continuity between ALS and FTLD and illustrates the favourable vascular risk profile in these diseases.

  10. Lithium iron phosphate with high-rate capability synthesized through hydrothermal reaction in glucose solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Guangchuan; Wang, Li; Ou, Xiuqin; Zhao, Xia; Xu, Shengzhao [Institute of Power Source and Ecomaterials Science, Box 1055, Hebei University of Technology, 300130 Tianjin (China)

    2008-10-01

    Carbon-coated lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO{sub 4}/C) was hydrothermally synthesized from commercial LiOH, FeSO{sub 4} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} as raw materials and glucose as carbon precursor in aqueous solution at 180 C for 6 h followed by being fired at 750 C for 6 h. The samples were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and constant current charge-discharge cycling test. The results show that the synthesized powders are in situ coated with carbon precursor produced from glucose. At ambient temperature (25{+-}2 C), the specific discharge capacities are 154 mAh g{sup -1} at 0.2C and 136 mAh g{sup -1} at 5 C rate, and the cycling capacity retention rate reaches 98% over 90 cycles. The excellent electrochemical performance can be correlated with the in situ formation of carbon precursor/carbon, thus leading to the even distribution of carbon and the enhancement of conductibility of individual grains. (author)

  11. Evaluation of lead-iron-phosphate glass as a high-level waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chick, L.A.; Bunnell, L.R.; Strachan, D.M.; Kissinger, H.E.; Hodges, F.N.

    1986-09-01

    The lead-iron-phosphate (Pb-Fe-P) glass developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was evaluated for its potential as an improvement over the current reference nuclear waste form, borosilicate (B-Si) glass. The evaluation was conducted as part of the Second Generation HLW Technology Subtask of the Nuclear Waste Treatment Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The purpose of this work was to investigate possible alternatives to B-Si glass as second-generation waste forms. While vitreous Pb-Fe-P glass appears to have substantially better chemical durability than B-Si glass, severe crystallization or devitrification leading to deteriorated chemical durability would result if this glass were poured into large canisters as is the procedure with B-Si glass. Cesium leach rates from this crystallized material are orders of magnitude greater than those from B-Si glass. Therefore, to realize the potential performance advantages of the Pb-Fe-P material in a nuclear waste form, the processing method would have to cool the material rapidly to retain its vitreous structure

  12. Optimization of Inactive Material Content in Lithium Iron Phosphate Electrodes for High Power Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Seonbaek; Ramani, Vijay K.; Lu, Wenquan; Prakash, Jai

    2016-01-01

    The electrochemical performance of lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO 4 ) electrodes has been studied to find the optimum content of inactive materials (carbon black + polyvinylidene difluoride [PVDF] polymer binder) and to better understand electrode performance with variation in electrode composition. Trade-offs between inactive material content and electrochemical performance have been characterized in terms of electrical resistance, rate-capability, area-specific impedance (ASI), pulse-power characterization, and energy density calculations. The ASI and electrical conductivity were found to correlate well with ohmic polarization. The results showed that a 80:10:10 (active material: binder: carbon agents) electrode had a higher pulse-power density and energy density at rates above 1C as compared to 90:5:5, 86:7:7 and 70:15:15 formulations, while the 70:15:15 electrode had the highest electrical conductivity of 0.79 S cm −1 . A CB/PVDF ratio of ca. 1.22 was found to be the optimum formulation of inactive material when the LiFePO 4 composition was 80 wt%.

  13. High temperature fluidized bed zero valent iron process for flue gas nitrogen monoxide removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.Y.; Chen, S.S.; Tang, C.H.; Chang, Y.M.; Cheng, H.H.; Liu, H.L.

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NO x ) are generated from a variety of sources, and are critical components of photochemical smog. Zero valent iron (ZVI) has been used to remove NO x in a number of studies. The ZVI process requires no extra chemicals or catalysts. In this study, a fluidized ZVI process for removing NO x from flue gases was proposed. The study examined the effects of temperature, ZVI dosage and influent NO concentrations, and observed the kinetic effects between the fluidized ZVI and NO x . A life cycle analysis of the process was also provided. The parametric analysis was conducted in a series of column studies using a continuous emissions monitoring system. Minimum fluidization velocity equations were provided, and the drag coefficient was determined. Capacities of ZVI for NO removal at different temperatures were calculated. Results of the study suggested that temperature, influent concentrations, and flow rates all influenced kinetic coefficients. Different temperatures resulted in different rates of NO removal. It was concluded that between 673 K and 773 K, almost complete NO removals were achieved. 14 refs., 2 tabs., 9 figs

  14. The Influences of Iron Ore Tailings as Fine Aggregate on the Strength of Ultra-High Performance Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study looks for the feasibility of preparing UHPC with iron ore tailings (IOT for short as fine aggregate. To enhance outstanding high performances, some influences on UHPC mortars were investigated such as different kinds of sands, different mix ratio of sands, and different largest particle size of fine aggregate. The results show that IOT have negligible poorer aggregate performance than silica sands but better than river sands. The strength of UHPC reaches the highest point when silica sands were instead 60% by IOT. As the largest particle size of fine aggregate is decreasing, the strength and frost resistance of UHPC were improved, but the liquidity was decreased. Micropowder of IOT affects the strength and the optimal content was 4%.

  15. Effects of aspect ratio and specimen size on uniaxial failure stress of iron green bodies at high strain rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuroyanagi Yuki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Powder metallurgy is used for the production of a number of mechanical parts and is an essential production method. These are great advantages such as product cost effectiveness and product uniqueness. In general, however parts created by powder metallurgy have low strength because of low density. In order to increase strength as well as density, new techniques such as high-velocity-compaction (HVC was developed and further investigation has been conducted on improvement of techniques and optimum condition using computer simulation. In this study, the effects of aspect ratio and specimen size of iron green bodies on failure strength of uniaxial compression and failure behavior were examined using a split Hopkinson pressure Bar. The diameters of specimens were 12.5 mm and 25 mm the aspect ratios (thickness/diameter were 0.8 and 1.2.

  16. High-resolution structural characterization and magnetic properties of epitaxial Ce-doped yttrium iron garnet thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong; Vikram Singh, Amit; Rastogi, Ankur; Gazquez, Jaume; Borisevich, Albina Y.; Mishra, Rohan; Gupta, Arunava

    2017-07-01

    Thin films of magnetic garnet materials, e.g. yttrium iron garnet (Y3Fe5O12, YIG), are useful for a variety of applications including microwave integrated circuits and spintronics. Substitution of rare earth ions, such as cerium, is known to enhance the magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) as compared to pure YIG. Thin films of Ce0.75Y2.25Fe5O12 (Ce:YIG) have been grown using the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique and their crystal structure examined using high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. Homogeneous substitution of Ce in YIG, without oxidation to form a separate CeO2 phase, can be realized in a narrow process window with resulting enhancement of the MOKE signal. The thermally generated signal due to spin Seebeck effect for the optimally doped Ce:YIG films has also been investigated.

  17. Structural and compositional characterization of LiNbO{sub 3} crystals implanted with high energy iron ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sada, C., E-mail: cinzia.sada@unipd.i [Universita di Padova and CNISM, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Argiolas, N.; Bazzan, M.; Ciampolillo, M.V.; Zaltron, A.M.; Mazzoldi, P. [Universita di Padova and CNISM, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Agarwal, D.C.; Avastshi, D.K. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Post Box-10502, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2010-10-01

    Iron ions were implanted with a total fluence of 6 x 10{sup 17} ions/m{sup 2} into lithium niobate crystals by way of a sequential implantation at different energies of 95, 100 and 105 MeV respectively through an energy retarder Fe foil to get a uniform Fe doping of about few microns from the surface. The implanted crystals were then annealed in air in the range 200-400 {sup o}C for different durations to promote the crystalline quality that was damaged by implantation. In order to understand the basic phenomena underlying the implantation process, compositional in-depth profiles obtained by the secondary ion mass spectrometry were correlated to the structural properties of the implanted region measured by the high resolution X-ray diffraction depending on the process parameters. The optimised preparation conditions are outlined in order to recover the crystalline quality, essential for integrated photorefractive applications.

  18. One-dimensional photonic crystals with highly Bi-substituted iron garnet defect in reflection polar geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhailova, T V; Berzhansky, V N; Karavainikov, A V; Shaposhnikov, A N; Prokopov, A R; Lyashko, S D

    2016-01-01

    It is represented the results of modelling of magnetooptical properties in reflection polar geometry of one-dimensional photonic crystal, in which highly Bi-substituted iron garnet defect of composition Bi 1.0 Y 0.5 Gd 1.5 Fe 4.2 A l0.8 O 12 / Bi 2.8 Y 0.2 Fe 5 Oi 2 is located between the dielectric Bragg mirrors (SiO 2 / TiO 2 ) m (were m is number of layer pairs) and buffer SiO 2 and gold top layers of different thicknesses is placed on structure. The modification of spectral line- shapes of microcavity and Tamm plasmon-polariton modes depending on m is found. (paper)

  19. Concurrent thermochemoradiotherapy for brain high-grade glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryabova, A. I., E-mail: ranigor@mail.ru; Novikov, V. A.; Startseva, Zh. A.; Bober, E. E.; Frolova, I. G. [Tomsk Cancer Research Institute, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Choinzonov, E. L. [Tomsk Cancer Research Institute, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Siberian State Medical University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Gribova, O. V. [Tomsk Cancer Research Institute, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Baranova, A. V. [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-02

    Despite the achievements in the current strategies for treatment, the prognosis in malignant glioma patients remains unsatisfactory. Hyperthermia is currently considered to be the most effective and universal modifier of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Preliminary treatment outcomes for 28 patients with newly diagnosed (23) and recurrent (5) high-grade gliomas were presented. All the patients received multimodality treatment including surgery, thermoche-moradiotherapy followed by 4 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy. All the patients endured thermochemoradiotherapy well. A complication, limited skin burn (II stage), was diagnosed in two cases and treated conservatively without treatment interruption. A month after thermochemoradiotherapy the results were as follows: complete regression was achieved in 4 cases, partial regression in 4 cases, stable disease in 14 cases and disease progression in 6 cases (one of them is pseudo-progression). After completing the adjuvant chemotherapy 2 more patients demonstrated complete response and 1 patient had disease progression. Introduction of local hyperthermia in multimodal therapy of malignant glioma does not impair the combined modality treatment tolerability of patients with malignant gliomas. A small number of studied patients and short follow-up time do not allow making reliable conclusions about the impact of local hyperthermia on the treatment outcomes; however, there is a tendency towards the increase in disease-free survival in the patients with newly diagnosed malignant gliomas.

  20. Ferric reductase genes involved in high-affinity iron uptake are differentially regulated in yeast and hyphae of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeeves, Rose E; Mason, Robert P; Woodacre, Alexandra; Cashmore, Annette M

    2011-09-01

    The pathogenic yeast Candida albicans possesses a reductive iron uptake system which is active in iron-restricted conditions. The sequestration of iron by this mechanism initially requires the reduction of free iron to the soluble ferrous form, which is catalysed by ferric reductase proteins. Reduced iron is then taken up into the cell by a complex of a multicopper oxidase protein and an iron transport protein. Multicopper oxidase proteins require copper to function and so reductive iron and copper uptake are inextricably linked. It has previously been established that Fre10 is the major cell surface ferric reductase in C. albicans and that transcription of FRE10 is regulated in response to iron levels. We demonstrate here that Fre10 is also a cupric reductase and that Fre7 also makes a significant contribution to cell surface ferric and cupric reductase activity. It is also shown, for the first time, that transcription of FRE10 and FRE7 is lower in hyphae compared to yeast and that this leads to a corresponding decrease in cell surface ferric, but not cupric, reductase activity. This demonstrates that the regulation of two virulence determinants, the reductive iron uptake system and the morphological form of C. albicans, are linked. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Brain network characterization of high-risk preterm-born school-age children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elda Fischi-Gomez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Higher risk for long-term cognitive and behavioral impairments is one of the hallmarks of extreme prematurity (EP and pregnancy-associated fetal adverse conditions such as intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR. While neurodevelopmental delay and abnormal brain function occur in the absence of overt brain lesions, these conditions have been recently associated with changes in microstructural brain development. Recent imaging studies indicate changes in brain connectivity, in particular involving the white matter fibers belonging to the cortico-basal ganglia-thalamic loop. Furthermore, EP and IUGR have been related to altered brain network architecture in childhood, with reduced network global capacity, global efficiency and average nodal strength. In this study, we used a connectome analysis to characterize the structural brain networks of these children, with a special focus on their topological organization. On one hand, we confirm the reduced averaged network node degree and strength due to EP and IUGR. On the other, the decomposition of the brain networks in an optimal set of clusters remained substantially different among groups, talking in favor of a different network community structure. However, and despite the different community structure, the brain networks of these high-risk school-age children maintained the typical small-world, rich-club and modularity characteristics in all cases. Thus, our results suggest that brain reorganizes after EP and IUGR, prioritizing a tight modular structure, to maintain the small-world, rich-club and modularity characteristics. By themselves, both extreme prematurity and IUGR bear a similar risk for neurocognitive and behavioral impairment, and the here defined modular network alterations confirm similar structural changes both by IUGR and EP at school age compared to control. Interestingly, the combination of both conditions (IUGR + EP does not result in a worse outcome. In such cases, the alteration

  2. High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials: Iron-Based Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, J C; Haslam, J J; Wong, F; Ji, X; Day, S D; Branagan, D J; Marshall, M C; Meacham, B E; Buffa, E J; Blue, C A; Rivard, J K; Beardsley, M B; Weaver, D T; Aprigliano, L F; Kohler, L; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E J; Wolejsza, T M; Martin, F J; Yang, N; Lucadamo, G; Perepezko, J H; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Heuer, A H; Ernst, F; Michal, G M; Kahn, H; Lavernia, E J

    2004-01-01

    The multi-institutional High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Team is cosponsored by the Defense Advanced Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Science Office (DSO) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), and has developed new corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals that can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The Fe-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove of importance for applications on ships. Such coatings could be used as an ''integral drip shield'' on spent fuel containers, as well as protective coatings that could be applied over welds, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking. In the future, such new high-performance iron-based materials could be substituted for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling a reduction in the $58-billion life cycle cost for the long-term storage of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel by tens of percent

  3. Determination of antimony by electrochemical hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry in samples with high iron content using chelating resins as on-line removal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolea, E.; Arroyo, D.; Laborda, F.; Castillo, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    A method for the removal of the interference caused by iron on electrochemical generation of stibine is proposed. It consists of a chelating resin Chelex 100 column integrated into a flow injection system and coupled to the electrochemical hydride generator quartz tube atomic absorption spectrometer (EcHG-QT-AAS). Iron, as Fe(II), is retained in the column with high efficiency, close to 99.9% under optimal conditions. No significant retention was observed for Sb(III) under same conditions and a 97 ± 5% signal recovery was achieved. An electrochemical hydride generator with a concentric configuration and a reticulated vitreous carbon cathode was employed. The system is able to determine antimony concentrations in the range of ng ml -1 in presence of iron concentrations up to 400 mg l -1 . The procedure was validated by analyzing PACS-2 marine sediments reference material with a 4% (w/w) iron content and a [Fe]:[Sb] ratio of 4000:1, which caused total antimony signal suppression on the electrochemical hydride generation system. A compost sample with high iron content (0.7%, w/w), was also analyzed. A good agreement was found on both samples with the certified value and the antimony concentration determined by ICP-MS, respectively

  4. Sexually dimorphic brain fatty acid composition in low and high fat diet-fed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Navas, Carlos; Morselli, Eugenia; Clegg, Deborah J

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we analyzed the fatty acid profile of brains and plasma from male and female mice fed chow or a western-style high fat diet (WD) for 16 weeks to determine if males and females process fatty acids differently. Based on the differences in fatty acids observed in vivo, we performed in vitro experiments on N43 hypothalamic neuronal cells to begin to elucidate how the fatty acid milieu may impact brain inflammation. Using a comprehensive mass spectrometry fatty acid analysis, which includes a profile for 52 different fatty acid isomers, we assayed the plasma and brain fatty acid composition of age-matched male and female mice maintained on chow or a WD. Additionally, using the same techniques, we determined the fatty acid composition of N43 hypothalamic cells following exposure to palmitic and linoleic acid, alone or in combination. Our data demonstrate there is a sexual dimorphism in brain fatty acid content both following the consumption of the chow diet, as well as the WD, with males having an increased percentage of saturated fatty acids and reductions in ω6-polyunsaturated fatty acids when compared to females. Interestingly, we did not observe a sexual dimorphism in fatty acid content in the plasma of the same mice. Furthermore, exposure of N43 cells to the ω6-PUFA linoleic acid, which is higher in female brains when compared to males, reduces palmitic acid-induced inflammation. Our data suggest male and female brains, and not plasma, differ in their fatty acid profile. This is the first time, to our knowledge, lipidomic analyses has been used to directly test the hypothesis there is a sexual dimorphism in brain and plasma fatty acid composition following consumption of the chow diet, as well as following exposure to the WD.

  5. Sexually dimorphic brain fatty acid composition in low and high fat diet-fed mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Rodriguez-Navas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, we analyzed the fatty acid profile of brains and plasma from male and female mice fed chow or a western-style high fat diet (WD for 16 weeks to determine if males and females process fatty acids differently. Based on the differences in fatty acids observed in vivo, we performed in vitro experiments on N43 hypothalamic neuronal cells to begin to elucidate how the fatty acid milieu may impact brain inflammation. Methods: Using a comprehensive mass spectrometry fatty acid analysis, which includes a profile for 52 different fatty acid isomers, we assayed the plasma and brain fatty acid composition of age-matched male and female mice maintained on chow or a WD. Additionally, using the same techniques, we determined the fatty acid composition of N43 hypothalamic cells following exposure to palmitic and linoleic acid, alone or in combination. Results: Our data demonstrate there is a sexual dimorphism in brain fatty acid content both following the consumption of the chow diet, as well as the WD, with males having an increased percentage of saturated fatty acids and reductions in ω6-polyunsaturated fatty acids when compared to females. Interestingly, we did not observe a sexual dimorphism in fatty acid content in the plasma of the same mice. Furthermore, exposure of N43 cells to the ω6-PUFA linoleic acid, which is higher in female brains when compared to males, reduces palmitic acid-induced inflammation. Conclusions: Our data suggest male and female brains, and not plasma, differ in their fatty acid profile. This is the first time, to our knowledge, lipidomic analyses has been used to directly test the hypothesis there is a sexual dimorphism in brain and plasma fatty acid composition following consumption of the chow diet, as well as following exposure to the WD. Keywords: Obesity, N43, Palmitic acid, Linoleic acid, Central nervous system, Western diet, ω6-fatty acids

  6. Brain tumor magnetic targeting and biodistribution of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles linked with 70-kDa heat shock protein study by nonlinear longitudinal response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevtsov, Maxim A., E-mail: shevtsov-max@mail.ru [Institute of Cytology of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Tikhoretsky Ave. 4, St. Petersburg 194064 (Russian Federation); A.L. Polenov Russian Research Scientific Institute of Neurosurgery, Mayakovsky str. 12, St. Petersburg 191014 (Russian Federation); Nikolaev, Boris P. [Research Institute of Highly Pure Biopreparations, Pudozhskaya str. 12, St. Petersburg 197110 (Russian Federation); Ryzhov, Vyacheslav A. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, NRC Kurchatov Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation); Yakovleva, Ludmila Y. [Research Institute of Highly Pure Biopreparations, Pudozhskaya str. 12, St. Petersburg 197110 (Russian Federation); Dobrodumov, Anatolii V. [Institute of Macromolecular Compounds of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Bolshoi pr. 31, St. Petersburg 199004 (Russian Federation); Marchenko, Yaroslav Y. [Research Institute of Highly Pure Biopreparations, Pudozhskaya str. 12, St. Petersburg 197110 (Russian Federation); Margulis, Boris A. [Institute of Cytology of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Tikhoretsky Ave. 4, St. Petersburg 194064 (Russian Federation); Pitkin, Emil [The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, 3730 Walnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Guzhova, Irina V. [Institute of Cytology of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Tikhoretsky Ave. 4, St. Petersburg 194064 (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-15

    Brain tumor targeting efficiency and biodistribution of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles conjugated with heat shock protein Hsp70 (SPION–Hsp70) were evaluated in experimental glioma model. Synthesized conjugates were characterized using the method of longitudinal nonlinear response of magnetic nanoparticles to a weak ac magnetic field with measurements of second harmonic of magnetization (NLR-M{sub 2}). Cellular interaction of magnetic conjugates was analyzed in 9L glioma cell culture. The biodistribution of the nanoparticles and their accumulation in tumors was assessed by the latter approach as well. The efficacy of Hsp70-conjugates for contrast enhancement in the orthotopic model of 9L glioma was assessed by MR imaging (11 T). Magnetic nanoparticles conjugated with Hsp70 had the relaxivity properties of the MR-negative contrast agents. Morphological observation and cell viability test demonstrated good biocompatibility of Hsp70-conjugates. Analysis of the T{sub 2}-weighted MR scans in tumor-bearing rats demonstrated the high efficacy of Hsp70-conjugates in contrast enhancement of the glioma in comparison to non-conjugated nanoparticles. High contrast enhancement of the glioma was provided by the accumulation of the SPION–Hsp70 particles in the glioma tissue (as shown by the histological assay). Biodistribution analysis by NLR-M{sub 2} measurements evidenced the many-fold increase (~40) in the tumor-to-normal brain uptake ratio in the Hsp70-conjugates treated animals. Biodistribution pattern of Hsp70-decorated nanoparticles differed from that of non-conjugated SPIONs. Coating of the magnetic nanoparticles with Hsp70 protein enhances the tumor-targeting ability of the conjugates that could be applied in the MR imaging of the malignant brain tumors. - Highlights: • Second-harmonic nonlinear magnetic response is used for biodistribution analysis. • NLR-M{sub 2} ensures high sensibility in detection of SPIONs in tissue. • SPION–Hsp70 conjugates

  7. Perrhenate sorption kinetics in zerovalent iron in high pH and nitrate media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenell, Brian A.; Arai, Yuji

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Ammonium adsorption enhanced ReO 4 − adsorption in ZVI under alkaline conditions (modified from Cho et al., 2015) [39]. - Highlights: • ZVI effectively sorbs Re(VII) at near neutral pH. • Sorption of Re(VII) in ZVI is attributed to the reductive precipitation of Re(IV)O 2 . • The extent of Re(VII) sorption in ZVI decreases with increasing pH from 8 to 10. • The rate of Re(VII) sorption in ZVI increases with increasing nitrate concentration. - Abstract: Technetium(Tc)-99 is one of major risk drivers in low level radioactive liquid waste at the U.S. Department of Energy sites. Cementitious waste technology (CWT) has been considered immobilizing pertechnetate, Tc(VII)O 4 − , in brine and alkaline waste solutions, as Tc(IV) oxides and/or sulfides with the use of reducing agents like slag. In this study, zero valent iron (ZVI) was evaluated as a potential reducing agent in CWT as a function of pH and [nitrate] (0–0.1 M) using perrhenate, Re(VII)O 4 − , as an analogue for Tc(VII)O 4 − . Batch Re(VII)O 4 − sorption experiments in conjunction with X-ray absorption spectroscopic analysis showed that the Re(VII) sorption occurred via the reductive precipitation of Re(IV)O 2 (s) and the extent of sorption decreased with increasing pH from 8 to 10. Interestingly, pseudo 2nd order kinetic rates increased with increasing [nitrate] which was attributed to co-adsorption of NH 4 + (i.e., a reaction product of reduced nitrate by ZVI), facilitating electrostatic attraction towards ReO 4 − under alkaline conditions. Considering the thermodynamically favorable reduction of Tc(VII) over Re(VII), ZVI might have potential for improving the reduction capacity of the current CWT.

  8. Ultra-high-speed imaging of the brain by the echo planar technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worthington, B.S.; Stehling, M.K.; Ordidge, R.J.; Coxon, R.; Howseman, A.M.; Chapman, B.; Turner, R.; Firth, J.L.; Mansfield, P.

    1988-01-01

    Reduced examination time, greater patient tolerance and throughput, and the ability to study vascular and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow phenomena are important advantages of ultra-high-speed brain imaging. The EPI derivatives BEST and MBEST create a complete 128 X 128-pixel image in 64 msec and 128 msec, respectively. In BEST images, T2 weighting is altered by adjusting the echo time, modulus BEST images have intrinsic T2 weighting. Repetition time alterations provide variable T1 weighting in both. Volunteer and patient studies illustrate how selective contrast manipulation allows excellent discrimination between gray and white matter and the brain and the CSF, enabling the demonstration of pathology

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is caused by strong muscle contractions and the impact of feet repeatedly striking the ground, such as ... funding on iron-deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may recommend erythropoiesis stimulating agents (esa) . These medicines stimulate the bone marrow to make more red blood ... NHLBI is funding on iron-deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision ...

  11. APPLICATION OF SPHEROIDIZING «CHIPS»-MASTER ALLOY ON COPPER BASE CONTAINING NANOSCALE PARTICLES OF YTTRIUM OXIDE FOR HIGH-STRENGTH CAST IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Kalinichenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The peculiarity of the technology of obtaining high-strength cast iron is application in out-furnace treatment various inoculants containing magnesium. In practice of foundry production spheroidizing master alloys based on ferrosilicon (Fe-Si-Mg type and «heavy» alloying alloys on copper and nickel base are widespread. The urgent issue is to improve their efficiency by increasing the degree of magnesium assimilation, reduction of specific consumption of additives, and minimizing dust and gas emissions during the process of spheroidizing treatment of liquid iron. One method of solving this problem is the use of inoculants in a compact form in which the process of dissolution proceeds more efficiently. For example, rapidly quenched granules or «chip»-inoculants are interesting to apply.The aim of present work was to study the peculiarities of production and application of «Chips»-inoculants on copper and magnesium base with additions of yttrium oxide. The principle of mechatronics was used, including the briquetting inoculants’ components after their mixing with the subsequent high-speed mechanical impact and obtaining plates with a thickness of 1–2 mm.Spheroidizing treatment of molten metal has been produced by ladle method using «Chips»-inoculants in the amount of 0.8%. Secondary graphitization inoculation was not performed. Studies have shown that when the spheroidizing treatment of ductile iron was performed with inoculants developed, the process of interaction of magnesium with the liquid melt runs steadily without significant pyroeffect and emissions of metal outside of the ladle.This generates a structure of spheroidal graphite of regular shape (SGf5. The presence in the inoculant of yttrium oxide has a positive impact on the spheroidal graphite counts and the tendency of high-strength cast iron to form «white» cast iron structure. Mechanical properties of the obtained alloy correspond to high-strength cast iron HSCI60.

  12. Aluminum stimulates uptake of non-transferrin bound iron and transferrin bound iron in human glial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yongbae; Olivi, Luisa; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Maertens, Alex; Bressler, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    Aluminum and other trivalent metals were shown to stimulate uptake of transferrin bound iron and nontransferrin bound iron in erytholeukemia and hepatoma cells. Because of the association between aluminum and Alzheimer's Disease, and findings of higher levels of iron in Alzheimer's disease brains, the effects of aluminum on iron homeostasis were examined in a human glial cell line. Aluminum stimulated dose- and time-dependent uptake of nontransferrin bound iron and iron bound to transferrin. A transporter was likely involved in the uptake of nontransferrin iron because uptake reached saturation, was temperature-dependent, and attenuated by inhibitors of protein synthesis. Interestingly, the effects of aluminum were not blocked by inhibitors of RNA synthesis. Aluminum also decreased the amount of iron bound to ferritin though it did not affect levels of divalent metal transporter 1. These results suggest that aluminum disrupts iron homeostasis in Brain by several mechanisms including the transferrin receptor, a nontransferrin iron transporter, and ferritin

  13. Practical MRI atlas of neonatal brain development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkovich, A.J.; Truwit, C.L.

    1990-01-01

    This book is an anatomical reference for cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in neonates and infants. It contains 122 clear, sharp MRI scans and drawings showing changes in the normal appearance of the brain and skull during development. Sections of the atlas depict the major processes of maturation: brain myelination, development of the corpus callosum, development of the cranial bone marrow, and iron deposition in the brain. High-quality scans illustrate how these changes appear on magnetic resonance images during various stages of development

  14. Extracting phosphoric iron under laboratorial conditions smelting bog iron ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Török, B; Thiele, A

    2013-01-01

    In recent years it has been indicated by archaeometric investigations that phosphoric-iron (P-iron, low carbon steel with 0,5-1,5wt% P), which is an unknown and unused kind of steel in the modern industry, was widely used in different parts of the world in medieval times. In this study we try to explore the role of phosphorus in the arhaeometallurgy of iron and answer some questions regarding the smelting bog iron ores with high P-content. XRF analyses were performed on bog iron ores collected in Somogy county. Smelting experiments were carried out on bog iron ores using a laboratory model built on the basis of previously conducted reconstructed smelting experiments in copies of excavated furnaces. The effect of technological parameters on P-content of the resulted iron bloom was studied. OM and SEM-EDS analyses were carried out on the extracted iron and slag samples. On the basis of the material analyses it can be stated that P-iron is usually extracted but the P-content is highly affected by technological parameters. Typical microstructures of P-iron and of slag could also be identified. It could also be established that arsenic usually solved in high content in iron as well

  15. New insights into iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camaschella, Clara

    2017-07-01

    Recent advances in iron metabolism have stimulated new interest in iron deficiency (ID) and its anemia (IDA), common conditions worldwide. Absolute ID/IDA, i.e. the decrease of total body iron, is easily diagnosed based on decreased levels of serum ferritin and transferrin saturation. Relative lack of iron in specific organs/tissues, and IDA in the context of inflammatory disorders, are diagnosed based on arbitrary cut offs of ferritin and transferrin saturation and/or marker combination (as the soluble transferrin receptor/ferritin index) in an appropriate clinical context. Most ID patients are candidate to traditional treatment with oral iron salts, while high hepcidin levels block their absorption in inflammatory disorders. New iron preparations and new treatment modalities are available: high-dose intravenous iron compounds are becoming popular and indications to their use are increasing, although long-term side effects remain to be evaluated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Brain MRI findings of welders : high signal intensity in T1WI secondary to manganese exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K. W.; Lim, M. A.; Shon, M. Y.; Lee, S. H.; Ha, D. G.; Kwon, K. R.; Kim, S. S.; Hong, Y. S.; Lee, Y. H. [Sunlin Presbyterian Hospital, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, H. K. [Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-03-01

    To evaluate the clinical and brain MRI findings of welders and to determine the utility of MRI in the assessment of occupational manganese exposure. All welders complained of fatigue, headache, anorexia, and decreased libido. The palmomental reflex was positive in five (28%), Myerson`s sign in four (22%), and intention tremor in three (17%). Mean blood Mn was 5.18 (range, 1.77-9.34) {mu}g/dl, mean urine Mn was 5.84 (range, 1.07 -22) {mu}g/l, serum Fe was elevated in one welder, and serum Cd in two. T1WI of brain MRI revealed high signal intensities in the globus pallidus, the putamen, the substantia nigra, the tectum, the caudate nucleus, the subthalamic nucleus, the hypothalamus and the pituitary gland. These intensities correlated closely with blood Mn levels, suggesting their potential role in estimating the accumulation of Mn in the brain. (author). 25 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  17. High vulnerability of the developing fetal brain to ionizing radiation and hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameyama, Yoshiro

    1989-01-01

    The developing brain is one of the fetal structures most susceptible to environmental teratogenic insults, because of its long-lasting sensitive period extending from the beginning of embryonic organogenesis to the postnatal infantile period, the great vulnerability of undifferentiated neural cells to a wide range of environmental agents, and the lack of further reproductive capacity of neurons. Among the environmental agents which affect the developing brain, ionizing radiation and hyperthermia are regarded as the most important physical agents. The most prevalent disorders of the brain produced are histogenetic ones such as a deficit of cortical neurons, disorganized cortical architecture, and poor dendritic arborization of the cortical neurons. In this review, emphasis is given to a review of studies on the critical development stage for the induction of histogenetic disorders of the cerebral cortex and on the high vulnerability of developing neuronal cells to the two physical environmental agents mentioned. (author) 59 refs

  18. Pharmacokinetic and in vivo evaluation of a self-assembled gadolinium(III)-iron(II) contrast agent with high relaxivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N; Vander Elst, Luce; Kimpe, Kristof; Laurent, Sophie; Burtéa, Carmen; Chen, Feng; Van Deun, Rik; Ni, Yicheng; Muller, Robert N; Binnemans, Koen

    2006-01-01

    A high-molecular weight tetrametallic supramolecular complex [(Ln-DTPA-phen)3Fe]- (Ln = Gd, Eu, La) has been obtained upon self-assembly around one iron(II) ion of three 1,10-phenantroline-based molecules substituted in 5'-position with the polyaminocarboxylate diethylenetriamine-N,N,N',N',N'-pentaacetate, DTPA-phen(4-). The ICP-MS measurements indicated that the lanthanide:iron ratio is 3:1. Photoluminescence spectra of [Eu-DTPA-phen](-) and of [(Eu-DTPA-phen)3Fe]- are nearly identical, implying that the first coordination sphere of the lanthanide(III) ion has not been changed upon coordination of phenantroline unit to iron(II) ion. NMRD measurements revealed that at 20 MHz and 310 K the relaxivity of the [(Gd-DTPA-phen)3Fe]- is equal to 9.5 +/- 0.3 s(-1) mM(-1) of Gd (28.5 s(-1) per millimole per liter of complex) which is significantly higher than that for Gd-DTPA (3.9 s(-1) mM(-1)). The pharmacokinetic parameters of [(Gd-DTPA-phen)3Fe]- in rats indicate that the elimination of [(Gd-DTPA-phen)3Fe]- is significantly slower than that of Gd-DTPA and is correlated with a reduced volume of distribution. The low volume of distribution and the longer elimination time (T(e1/2)) suggest that the agent is confined to the blood compartment, so it could have an important potential as a blood pool contrast agent. The biodistribution profile of [(Gd-DTPA-phen)3Fe]- 2 h after injection indicates significantly higher concentrations of [(Gd-DTPA-phen)3Fe]- as compared with Gd-DTPA in kidney, liver, lungs, heart and spleen. The images obtained on rats by MR angiography show the enhancement of the abdominal blood vessels. The signal intensity reaches a maximum of 55% at 7 min post-contrast and remains around 25% after 90 min. MRI-histomorphological correlation studies of [Gd-DTPA-phen]- and [(Gd-DTPA-phen)3Fe]- showed that both agents displayed potent contrast enhancement in organs including the liver. The necrosis avidity tests indicated that, in contrast to the [Gd

  19. Anti-high mobility group box-1 antibody therapy for traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuma, Yu; Liu, Keyue; Wake, Hidenori; Zhang, Jiyong; Maruo, Tomoko; Date, Isao; Yoshino, Tadashi; Ohtsuka, Aiji; Otani, Naoki; Tomura, Satoshi; Shima, Katsuji; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hideo K; Mori, Shuji; Nishibori, Masahiro

    2012-09-01

    High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) plays an important role in triggering inflammatory responses in many types of diseases. In this study, we examined the involvement of HMGB1 in traumatic brain injury (TBI) and evaluated the ability of intravenously administered neutralizing anti-HMGB1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) to attenuate brain injury. Traumatic brain injury was induced in rats or mice by fluid percussion. Anti-HMGB1 mAb or control mAb was administered intravenously after TBI. Anti-HMGB1 mAb remarkably inhibited fluid percussion-induced brain edema in rats, as detected by T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging; this was associated with inhibition of HMGB1 translocation, protection of blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity, suppression of inflammatory molecule expression, and improvement of motor function. In contrast, intravenous injection of recombinant HMGB1 dose-dependently produced the opposite effects. Experiments using receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE)(-/-) , toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4)(-/-) , and TLR2(-/-) mice suggested the involvement of RAGE as the predominant receptor for HMGB1. Anti-HMGB1 mAb may provide a novel and effective therapy for TBI by protecting against BBB disruption and reducing the inflammatory responses induced by HMGB1. Copyright © 2012 American Neurological Association.

  20. High-throughput mapping of brain-wide activity in awake and drug-responsive vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xudong; Wang, Shiqi; Yu, Xudong; Liu, Zhuguo; Wang, Fei; Li, Wai Tsun; Cheng, Shuk Han; Dai, Qiuyun; Shi, Peng

    2015-02-07

    The reconstruction of neural activity across complete neural circuits, or brain activity mapping, has great potential in both fundamental and translational neuroscience research. Larval zebrafish, a vertebrate model, has recently been demonstrated to be amenable to whole brain activity mapping in behaving animals. Here we demonstrate a microfluidic array system ("Fish-Trap") that enables high-throughput mapping of brain-wide activity in awake larval zebrafish. Unlike the commonly practiced larva-processing methods using a rigid gel or a capillary tube, which are laborious and time-consuming, the hydrodynamic design of our microfluidic chip allows automatic, gel-free, and anesthetic-free processing of tens of larvae for microscopic imaging with single-cell resolution. Notably, this system provides the capability to directly couple pharmaceutical stimuli with real-time recording of neural activity in a large number of animals, and the local and global effects of pharmacoactive drugs on the nervous system can be directly visualized and evaluated by analyzing drug-induced functional perturbation within or across different brain regions. Using this technology, we tested a set of neurotoxin peptides and obtained new insights into how to exploit neurotoxin derivatives as therapeutic agents. The novel and versatile "Fish-Trap" technology can be readily unitized to study other stimulus (optical, acoustic, or physical) associated functional brain circuits using similar experimental strategies.

  1. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of mouse brain using high-resolution anatomical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, L. J.; Hadimani, R. L.; Kanthasamy, A. G.; Jiles, D. C.

    2014-05-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) offers the possibility of non-invasive treatment of brain disorders in humans. Studies on animals can allow rapid progress of the research including exploring a variety of different treatment conditions. Numerical calculations using animal models are needed to help design suitable TMS coils for use in animal experiments, in particular, to estimate the electric field induced in animal brains. In this paper, we have implemented a high-resolution anatomical MRI-derived mouse model consisting of 50 tissue types to accurately calculate induced electric field in the mouse brain. Magnetic field measurements have been performed on the surface of the coil and compared with the calculations in order to validate the calculated magnetic and induced electric fields in the brain. Results show how the induced electric field is distributed in a mouse brain and allow investigation of how this could be improved for TMS studies using mice. The findings have important implications in further preclinical development of TMS for treatment of human diseases.

  2. The actin-binding protein profilin 2 is a novel regulator of iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luscieti, Sara; Galy, Bruno; Gutierrez, Lucia; Reinke, Michael; Couso, Jorge; Shvartsman, Maya; Di Pascale, Antonio; Witke, Walter; Hentze, Matthias W; Pilo Boyl, Pietro; Sanchez, Mayka

    2017-10-26

    Cellular iron homeostasis is controlled by the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) 1 and 2 that bind cis -regulatory iron-responsive elements (IRE) on target messenger RNAs (mRNA). We identified profilin 2 ( Pfn2 ) mRNA, which encodes an actin-binding protein involved in endocytosis and neurotransmitter release, as a novel IRP-interacting transcript, and studied its role in iron metabolism. A combination of electrophoretic mobility shift assay experiments and bioinformatic analyses led to the identification of an atypical and conserved IRE in the 3' untranslated region of Pfn2 mRNA. Pfn2 mRNA levels were significantly reduced in duodenal samples from mice with intestinal IRP ablation, suggesting that IRPs exert a positive effect on Pfn2 mRNA expression in vivo. Overexpression of Pfn2 in HeLa and Hepa1-6 cells reduced their metabolically active iron pool. Importantly, Pfn2-deficient mice showed iron accumulation in discrete areas of the brain (olfactory bulb, hippocampus, and midbrain) and reduction of the hepatic iron store without anemia. Despite low liver iron levels, hepatic hepcidin expression remained high, likely because of compensatory activation of hepcidin by mild inflammation. Splenic ferroportin was increased probably to sustain hematopoiesis. Overall, our results indicate that Pfn2 expression is controlled by the IRPs in vivo and that Pfn2 contributes to maintaining iron homeostasis in cell lines and mice. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  3. Uremic anorexia: a consequence of persistently high brain serotonin levels? The tryptophan/serotonin disorder hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, A; Selgas, R; Codoceo, R; Bajo, A

    2000-01-01

    Anorexia is a frequent part of uremic syndrome, contributing to malnutrition in dialysis patients. Many factors have been suggested as responsible for uremic anorexia. In this paper we formulate a new hypothesis to explain the appetite disorders in dialysis patients: "the tryptophan/serotonin disorder hypothesis." We review current knowledge of normal hunger-satiety cycle control and the disorders described in uremic patients. There are four phases in food intake regulation: (1) the gastric phase, during which food induces satiety through gastric distention and satiety peptide release; (2) the post absorptive phase, during which circulating compounds, including glucose and amino acids, cause satiety by hepatic receptors via the vagus nerve; (3) the hepatic phase, during which adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration is the main stimulus inducing hunger or satiety, with cytokines inhibiting ATP production; and (4) the central phase, during which appetite is regulated through peripheral (circulating plasma substances and neurotransmitters) and brain stimuli. Brain serotonin is the final target for peripheral mechanisms controlling appetite. High brain serotonin levels and a lower serotonin/dopamine ratio cause anorexia. Plasma and brain amino acid concentrations are recognized factors involved in neurotransmitter synthesis and appetite control. Tryptophan is the substrate of serotonin synthesis. High plasma levels of anorectics such as tryptophan (plasma and brain), cholecystokinin, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1, and leptin, and deficiencies of nitric oxide and neuropeptide Y have been described in uremia; all increase intracerebral serotonin. We suggest that brain serotonin hyperproduction due to a uremic-dependent excess of tryptophan may be the final common pathway involved in the genesis of uremic anorexia. Various methods of ameliorating anorexia by decreasing the central effects of serotonin are proposed.

  4. Subnanomolar indazole-5-carboxamide inhibitors of monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) continued: indications of iron binding, experimental evidence for optimised solubility and brain penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzvetkov, Nikolay T; Antonov, Liudmil

    2017-12-01

    Pharmacological and physicochemical studies of N-unsubstituted indazole-5-carboxamides (subclass I) and their structurally optimised N1-methylated analogues (subclass II), initially developed as drug and radioligand candidates for the treatment and diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD), are presented. The compounds are highly brain permeable, selective, reversible, and competitive monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibitors with improved water-solubility and subnanomolar potency (pIC 50  >8.8). Using a well-validated, combined X-ray/modelling technology platform, we performed a semi-quantitative analysis of the binding modes of all compounds and investigated the role of the indazole N1 position for their MAO-B inhibitory activity. Moreover, compounds NTZ-1006, 1032, and 1441 were investigated for their ability to bind Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ ions using UV-visible spectroscopy.

  5. Characterisation of powerful antioxidants and synthetic iron ligands, as protective agents against oxidative damages, using new high throughput screening assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meunier, St.

    2002-12-01

    This work was devoted to the development of pertinent high throughput screening assays in the aim of studying oxidative stress. Three screening assays have been developed for the evaluation of protective agents toward ROS generated by gamma irradiation, UV or by a Fenton-like system. 24 natural extracts and a library of 120 pure compounds, containing among the most powerful antioxidants known to date, have been readily studied using, these new techniques. We found that two pulvinic acid derivatives possess excellent protective properties, and especially a pigment of fungus named norbadione A. Beyond its in vitro activity, this molecule displays remarkable biological properties. In the aim of studying an alternative pathway of protection against oxidation induced by iron, ligands able to modify the redox properties of this metal, have been synthesised. We have developed a parallel synthesis allowing the variation of the architecture, denticity, chelating moieties and hydrophobicity of iron chelates. Using this strategy, 47 potential Fe(III) ligands were obtained. Their protective capacities have been studied using a fourth screening assay, demonstrating the effectiveness of some ligands. Finally, the immunoassay technique called SPI-RAD has been used in order to study a particular consequence of drastic oxidative stress, namely covalent crosslinks between proteins. Our results demonstrate that these linkages occur in the presence of metals (FeII or CuII) and hydrogen peroxide, as well as in the presence of NO . radical. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that tyrosines residues and disulfide bridges play an important role in these phenomena. (author)

  6. High molecular weight chitosan derivative polymeric micelles encapsulating superparamagnetic iron oxide for tumor-targeted magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Y

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Yunbin Xiao,1,* Zuan Tao Lin,2,* Yanmei Chen,1 He Wang,1 Ya Li Deng,2 D Elizabeth Le,3 Jianguo Bin,1 Meiyu Li,1 Yulin Liao,1 Yili Liu,1 Gangbiao Jiang,2 Jianping Bin1 1State Key Laboratory of Organ Failure Research, Division of Cardiology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 3Cardiovascular Division, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agents based on chitosan derivatives have great potential for diagnosing diseases. However, stable tumor-targeted MRI contrast agents using micelles prepared from high molecular weight chitosan derivatives are seldom reported. In this study, we developed a novel tumor-targeted MRI vehicle via superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs encapsulated in self-aggregating polymeric folate-conjugated N-palmitoyl chitosan (FAPLCS micelles. The tumor-targeting ability of FAPLCS/SPIONs was demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. The results of dynamic light scattering experiments showed that the micelles had a relatively narrow size distribution (136.60±3.90 nm and excellent stability. FAPLCS/SPIONs showed low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility in cellular toxicity tests. Both in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that FAPLCS/SPIONs bound specifically to folate receptor-positive HeLa cells, and that FAPLCS/SPIONs accumulated predominantly in established HeLa-derived tumors in mice. The signal intensities of T2-weighted images in established HeLa-derived tumors were reduced dramatically after intravenous micelle administration. Our study indicates that FAPLCS/SPION micelles can potentially serve as safe and effective MRI contrast agents for detecting tumors that overexpress folate receptors. Keywords: superparamagnetic

  7. Perrhenate sorption kinetics in zerovalent iron in high pH and nitrate media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenell, Brian A.; Arai, Yuji, E-mail: yarai@illinois.edu

    2017-01-05

    Graphical abstract: Ammonium adsorption enhanced ReO{sub 4}{sup −} adsorption in ZVI under alkaline conditions (modified from Cho et al., 2015) [39]. - Highlights: • ZVI effectively sorbs Re(VII) at near neutral pH. • Sorption of Re(VII) in ZVI is attributed to the reductive precipitation of Re(IV)O{sub 2}. • The extent of Re(VII) sorption in ZVI decreases with increasing pH from 8 to 10. • The rate of Re(VII) sorption in ZVI increases with increasing nitrate concentration. - Abstract: Technetium(Tc)-99 is one of major risk drivers in low level radioactive liquid waste at the U.S. Department of Energy sites. Cementitious waste technology (CWT) has been considered immobilizing pertechnetate, Tc(VII)O{sub 4}{sup −}, in brine and alkaline waste solutions, as Tc(IV) oxides and/or sulfides with the use of reducing agents like slag. In this study, zero valent iron (ZVI) was evaluated as a potential reducing agent in CWT as a function of pH and [nitrate] (0–0.1 M) using perrhenate, Re(VII)O{sub 4}{sup −}, as an analogue for Tc(VII)O{sub 4}{sup −}. Batch Re(VII)O{sub 4}{sup −} sorption experiments in conjunction with X-ray absorption spectroscopic analysis showed that the Re(VII) sorption occurred via the reductive precipitation of Re(IV)O{sub 2}(s) and the extent of sorption decreased with increasing pH from 8 to 10. Interestingly, pseudo 2nd order kinetic rates increased with increasing [nitrate] which was attributed to co-adsorption of NH{sub 4}{sup +} (i.e., a reaction product of reduced nitrate by ZVI), facilitating electrostatic attraction towards ReO{sub 4}{sup −} under alkaline conditions. Considering the thermodynamically favorable reduction of Tc(VII) over Re(VII), ZVI might have potential for improving the reduction capacity of the current CWT.

  8. Iron oxyhydroxide nanorods with high electrochemical reactivity as a sensitive and rapid determination platform for 4-chlorophenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan [Key Laboratory for Material Chemistry of Energy Conversion and Storage, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Britton Chance Center for Biomedical Photonics at Wuhan, National Laboratory for Optoelectronics-Hubei Bioinformatics & Molecular Imaging Key Laboratory, Systems Biology Theme, Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Cheng, Qin; Zheng, Meng [Key Laboratory for Material Chemistry of Energy Conversion and Storage, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Liu, Xin [Britton Chance Center for Biomedical Photonics at Wuhan, National Laboratory for Optoelectronics-Hubei Bioinformatics & Molecular Imaging Key Laboratory, Systems Biology Theme, Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Wu, Kangbing, E-mail: kbwu@hust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Material Chemistry of Energy Conversion and Storage, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Prepared FeOOH nanorods exhibited high reactivity toward the oxidation of 4-CP. • Response signals and detection sensitivity of 4-CP increased greatly by FeOOH. • Highly-sensitive and rapid determination platform was developed for 4-CP. • Practical application in water samples was studied, and the accuracy was good. - Abstract: Iron oxyhydroxide (FeOOH) nanorods were prepared through solvothermal reaction, and characterized using Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Thereafter, the prepared FeOOH nanorods were used as sensing material to construct a novel detection platform for 4-chlorophenol (4-CP). The electrochemical behaviors of 4-CP were studied, and the oxidation peak currents increased greatly on the surface of FeOOH nanorods. The signal enhancement mechanism was studied for 4-CP, and it was found that the prepared FeOOH nanorods remarkably improved the electron transfer ability and surface adsorption efficiency of 4-CP. The influences of pH value, amount of FeOOH nanorods and accumulation time were examined. As a result, a highly-sensitive electrochemical method was developed for the rapid determination of 4-CP. The linear range was from 10 to 500 nM, and the detection limit was 3.2 nM. It was used in different water samples, and the results consisted with the values that obtained by high-performance liquid chromatography.

  9. High Dietary Iron and Radiation Exposure Increase Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in Blood and Liver of Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Jennifer L. L.; Theriot, Corey A.; Wu, Honglu; Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation exposure and increased iron (Fe) status independently cause oxidative damage that can result in protein, lipid, and DNA oxidation. During space flight astronauts are exposed to both increased radiation and increased Fe stores. Increased body Fe results from a decrease in red blood cell mass and the typically high Fe content of the food system. In this study we investigated the combined effects of radiation exposure (0.375 Gy of Cs-137 every other day for 16 days for a total of 3 Gy) and high dietary Fe (650 mg Fe/kg diet compared to 45 mg Fe/kg for controls) in Sprague-Dawley rats (n=8/group). Liver and serum Fe were significantly increased in the high dietary Fe groups. Likewise, radiation treatment increased serum ferritin and Fe concentrations. These data indicate that total body Fe stores increase with both radiation exposure and excess dietary Fe. Hematocrit decreased in the group exposed to radiation, providing a possible mechanism for the shift in Fe indices after radiation exposure. Markers of oxidative stress were also affected by both radiation and high dietary Fe, evidenced by increased liver glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and serum catalase as well as decreased serum GPX. We thus found preliminary indications of synergistic effects of radiation exposure and increased dietary Fe, warranting further study. This study was funded by the NASA Human Research Project.

  10. Synthesis and properties of a high-capacity iron oxide adsorbent for fluoride removal from drinking water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chang; Li, Yingzhen; Wang, Ting-Jie; Jiang, Yanping; Fok, Jason

    2017-12-01

    A novel iron oxide adsorbent with a high fluoride adsorption capacity was prepared by a facile wet-chemical precipitation method and ethanol treatment. The ethanol-treated adsorbent was amorphous and had a high specific surface area. The adsorption capacity of the treated adsorbent was much higher than that of untreated adsorbent. The Langmuir maximum adsorption capacity of the adsorbent prepared at a low final precipitation pH (≤9.0) and treated with ethanol reached 60.8 mg/g. A fast adsorption rate was obtained, and 80% of the adsorption equilibrium capacity was achieved within 2 min. The adsorbent had high fluoride-removal efficiency for water in a wide initial pH range of 3.5-10.3 and had a high affinity for fluoride in the presence of common co-anions. The ethanol treatment resulted in structure transformation of the adsorbent by inhibiting the crystallization of the nano-precipitates. The adsorption was confirmed to be ion exchange between fluoride ions and the hydroxyl groups on the adsorbent surface.

  11. Concurrent low brain and high liver uptake on FDG PET are associated with cardiovascular risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Hyun Yeol; Jun, Sung Min; Pak, Kyoung June; Kim, In Joo

    2017-01-01

    Concurrent low brain and high liver uptake are sometimes observed on fluorine-18-labeled fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). We investigated the potential clinical significance of this uptake pattern related to metabolic syndrome (MS). We retrospectively reviewed data from 264 consecutive males who had undergone general health check-ups, including FDG PET/CT scans. After an overnight fast, the men had their peripheral blood drawn and the levels of various laboratory parameters measured; an FDG PET/CT scan was performed on the same day. We measured the maximum standardized uptake values of the brain and liver from regions of interest manually placed over the frontal cortex at the level of the centrum semiovale and the right lobe of the liver parenchyma, respectively. Fasting blood glucose (FBG; odds ratio [OR] = 1.063, p < 0.001) and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c; OR = 3.634, p = 0.010) were the strongest predictive factors for low brain FDG uptake, whereas waist circumference (OR = 1.200, p < 0.001) and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (OR = 1.012, p = 0.001) were the strongest predictive factors for high liver uptake. Eleven subjects (4.2%) showed concurrent low brain and high liver FDG uptake, and all but one of these subjects (90.9%) had MS. Systolic blood pressure, waist circumference, FBG, triglyceride, alanine aminotransferase, insulin resistance (measured by homeostasis model assessment), insulin, HbA1c, and body mass index were higher in subjects with this FDG uptake pattern than in those without (all, p < 0.001). Concurrent low brain and high liver FDG uptake were closely associated with MS. Moreover, subjects with this pattern had higher values for various cardiovascular risk factors than did those without

  12. Concurrent low brain and high liver uptake on FDG PET are associated with cardiovascular risk factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Hyun Yeol [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Changwon Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Jun, Sung Min [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kosin University Gospel Hospital, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Pak, Kyoung June; Kim, In Joo [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Biomedical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Concurrent low brain and high liver uptake are sometimes observed on fluorine-18-labeled fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). We investigated the potential clinical significance of this uptake pattern related to metabolic syndrome (MS). We retrospectively reviewed data from 264 consecutive males who had undergone general health check-ups, including FDG PET/CT scans. After an overnight fast, the men had their peripheral blood drawn and the levels of various laboratory parameters measured; an FDG PET/CT scan was performed on the same day. We measured the maximum standardized uptake values of the brain and liver from regions of interest manually placed over the frontal cortex at the level of the centrum semiovale and the right lobe of the liver parenchyma, respectively. Fasting blood glucose (FBG; odds ratio [OR] = 1.063, p < 0.001) and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c; OR = 3.634, p = 0.010) were the strongest predictive factors for low brain FDG uptake, whereas waist circumference (OR = 1.200, p < 0.001) and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (OR = 1.012, p = 0.001) were the strongest predictive factors for high liver uptake. Eleven subjects (4.2%) showed concurrent low brain and high liver FDG uptake, and all but one of these subjects (90.9%) had MS. Systolic blood pressure, waist circumference, FBG, triglyceride, alanine aminotransferase, insulin resistance (measured by homeostasis model assessment), insulin, HbA1c, and body mass index were higher in subjects with this FDG uptake pattern than in those without (all, p < 0.001). Concurrent low brain and high liver FDG uptake were closely associated with MS. Moreover, subjects with this pattern had higher values for various cardiovascular risk factors than did those without.

  13. The endocytic receptor megalin binds the iron transporting neutrophil-gelatinase-associated lipocalin with high affinity and mediates its cellular uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidberg, Vibeke; Jacobsen, Christian; Strong, Roland K

    2005-01-01

    Neutrophil-gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is a prominent protein of specific granules of human neutrophils also synthesized by epithelial cells during inflammation. NGAL binds bacterial siderophores preventing bacteria from retrieving iron from this source. Also, NGAL may be important in ...... by surface plasmon resonance analysis. Furthermore, a rat yolk sac cell line known to express high levels of megalin, endocytosed NGAL by a mechanism completely blocked by an antibody against megalin.......Neutrophil-gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is a prominent protein of specific granules of human neutrophils also synthesized by epithelial cells during inflammation. NGAL binds bacterial siderophores preventing bacteria from retrieving iron from this source. Also, NGAL may be important...

  14. Prevalence of high blood pressure, heart disease, thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia among the UAE adolescent population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat-Haddad, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of high blood pressure, heart disease, and medical diagnoses in relation to blood disorders, among 6,329 adolescent students (age 15 to 18 years) who reside in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Findings indicated that the overall prevalence of high blood pressure and heart disease was 1.8% and 1.3%, respectively. Overall, the prevalence for thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia was 0.9%, 1.6%, and 5%, respectively. Bivariate analysis revealed statistically significant differences in the prevalence of high blood pressure among the local and expatriate adolescent population in the Emirate of Sharjah. Similarly, statistically significant differences in the prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia were observed among the local and expatriate population in Abu Dhabi city, the western region of Abu Dhabi, and Al-Ain. Multivariate analysis revealed the following significant predictors of high blood pressure: residing in proximity to industry, nonconventional substance a