WorldWideScience

Sample records for high angle faults

  1. Geometry and evolution of low-angle normal faults (LANF) within a Cenozoic high-angle rift system, Thailand: Implications for sedimentology and the mechanisms of LANF development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Chris K.

    2009-10-01

    At least eight examples of large (5-35 km heave), low-angle normal faults (LANFs, 20°-30° dip) occur in the Cenozoic rift basins of Thailand and laterally pass into high-angle extensional fault systems. Three large-displacement LANFs are found in late Oligocene-Miocene onshore rift basins (Suphan Buri, Phitsanulok, and Chiang Mai basins), they have (1) developed contemporaneous with, or after the onset of, high-angle extension, (2) acted as paths for magma and associated fluids, and (3) impacted sedimentation patterns. Displacement on low-angle faults appears to be episodic, marked by onset of lacustrine conditions followed by axial progradation of deltaic systems that infilled the lakes during periods of low or no displacement. The Chiang Mai LANF is a low-angle (15°-25°), high-displacement (15-35 km heave), ESE dipping LANF immediately east of the late early Miocene Doi Inthanon and Doi Suthep metamorphic core complexes. Early Cenozoic transpressional crustal thickening followed by the northward motion of India coupled with Burma relative to east Burma and Thailand (˜40-30 Ma) caused migmatization and gneiss dome uplift in the late Oligocene of the core complex region, followed by LANF activity. LANF displacement lasted 4-6 Ma during the early Miocene and possibly transported a late Oligocene-early Miocene high-angle rift system 35 km east. Other LANFs in Thailand have lower displacements and no associated metamorphic core complexes. The three LANFs were initiated as low-angle faults, not by isostatic rotation of high-angle faults. The low-angle dips appear to follow preexisting low-angle fabrics (thrusts, shear zones, and other low-angle ductile foliations) predominantly developed during Late Paleozoic and early Paleogene episodes of thrusting and folding.

  2. Using Order Tracking Analysis Method to Detect the Angle Faults of Blades on Wind Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Pengfei; Hu, Weihao; Liu, Juncheng;

    2016-01-01

    The angle faults of blades on wind turbines are usually included in the set angle fault and the pitch angle fault. They are occupied with a high proportion in all wind turbine faults. Compare with the traditional fault detection methods, using order tracking analysis method to detect angle faults...

  3. Deformation Mechanism and Petroleum Accumulation of the High Angle Faults in the Western Circle Zone of Mahu Depression, Junggar Basin%玛湖西环带高角度断裂成因与控藏作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭文建; 吴孔友; 任本兵; 裴仰文; 黄立良

    2016-01-01

    According to the high-resolution 3D seismic interpretation,a series of high angle faults are developed in the western circle zone of Mahu depression.In section view,these high angle faults present single or combination distribution;while in plain view,they present oblique or parallel distribution. The large shearing fault branches several splays to form flower structures in section view; whereas the smaller shearing fault usually presents single fault development. It is sug-gested that the high angle faults are accommodation structures of the Daerbute fault, corresponding to the R’shearing in the Sylvester shearing model,which is also verified by the physical experiments. These high angle faults can be good con-duits for the vertical migration of petroleum, as the deformation timing is properly matched with the hydrocarbon genera-tion timing. During stable period, the high angle faults present good sealing properties to form effective hydrocarbon traps. Therefore, the fault blocks and fault noses constrained by these high angle faults can be emphasizes in the follow-ing petroleum exploration.%通过高密度三维地震资料精细解释,在准噶尔盆地玛湖凹陷西环带发现众多高角度断层,断层剖面组合为复合型与单一型,平面组合为斜交式与平行式。规模大、压扭强的断层,分支多,剖面组合呈“花状”构造;规模小、压扭性弱的断层,常单独发育。成因机理分析表明,高角度断层是达尔布特断裂的派生构造,属Sylvester简单剪切模式中R’剪裂面,并得到物理模拟实验证实。高角度断层与油气运聚关系极密切,形成期与油气生成期匹配合理,构成油气垂向运移的良好通道。静止期形成有效的油气圈闭,高角度断层围限的断块、断鼻是下一步油气勘探的重点目标。

  4. Mechanical basis for slip along low-angle normal faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomte, Emmanuel; Le Pourhiet, Laetitia; Lacombe, Olivier

    2012-02-01

    The existence of active low-angle normal faults is much debated because (1) the classical theory of fault mechanics implies that normal faults are locked when the dip is less than 30° and (2) shallow-dipping extensional fault planes do not produce large earthquakes (M > 5.5). However, a number of field observations suggest that brittle deformation occurs on low-angle normal faults at very shallow dip. To reconcile observations and theory, we use an alternative model of fault reactivation including a thick elasto-plastic frictional fault gouge, and test it at large strain by the mean of 2D mechanical modeling. We show that plastic compaction allows reducing the effective friction of faults sufficiently for low-angle normal faults to be active at dip of 20°. As the model predicts that these faults must be active in a slip-hardening regime, it prevents the occurrence of large earthquakes. However, we also evidence the neoformation of Riedel-type shear bands within thick fault zone, which, we believe, may be responsible for repeated small earthquakes and we apply the model to the Gulf of Corinth (Greece).

  5. Fault Line Selection Method Considering Grounding Fault Angle for Distribution Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Si-bo; Zhao Yu-lin; Li Ji-chang; Sui Tao

    2015-01-01

    In the distribution network system with its neutral point grounding via arc suppression coil, when single-phase grounding fault occurred near zero-crossing point of the phase voltage, the inaccuracy of the line selection always existed in existing methods. According to the characteristics that transient current was different between the fault feeder and other faultless feeders, wavelet transformation was performed on data of the transient current within a power frequency cycle after the fault occurred. Based on different fault angles, wavelet energy in corresponding frequency band was chosen to compare. The result was that wavelet energy in fault feeder was the largest of all, and it was larger than sum of those in other faultless feeders, when the bus broke down, the disparity between each wavelet energy was not significant. Fault line could be selected out by the criterion above. The results of MATLAB/simulink simulation experiment indicated that this method had anti-interference capacity and was feasible.

  6. On the mechanical behaviour of a low-angle normal fault: the Alto Tiberina fault (Northern Apennines, Italy) system case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadacca, Luigi; Casarotti, Emanuele; Chiaraluce, Lauro; Cocco, Massimo

    2016-11-01

    Geological and seismological observations have been used to parameterize 2-D numerical elastic models to simulate the interseismic deformation of a complex extensional fault system located in the Northern Apennines (Italy). The geological system is dominated by the presence of the Alto Tiberina fault (ATF), a large (60 km along strike) low-angle normal fault dipping 20° in the brittle crust (0-15 km). The ATF is currently characterized by a high and constant rate of microseismic activity, and no moderate-to-large magnitude earthquakes have been associated with this fault in the past 1000 years. Modelling results have been compared with GPS data in order to understand the mechanical behaviour of this fault and a suite of minor syn- and antithetic normal fault segments located in the main fault hanging wall. The results of the simulations demonstrate the active role played by the Alto Tiberina fault in accommodating the ongoing tectonic extension in this sector of the chain. The GPS velocity profile constructed through the fault system cannot be explained without including the ATF's contribution to deformation, indicating that this fault, although misoriented, has to be considered tectonically active and with a creeping behaviour below 5 km depth. The low-angle normal fault also shows a high degree of tectonic coupling with its main antithetic fault (the Gubbio fault), suggesting that creeping along the ATF may control the observed strain localization and the pattern of microseismic activity.

  7. Low-angle normal faults-low differential stress at mid crustal levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    A simple model for frictional slip on pre-existing faults that considers the local stress state near the fault and the effect of non-hydrostatic fluid pressures predicts that low-angle normal faulting is restricted to areas of the crust characterized by low differential stress and nearly lithostatic fluid pressures. The model considers frictional slip on a cohesionless low-angle normal fault governed by the failure criterion tau = mu sub f (sigma (*) sub n) =mu sub f (sigma sub n - P sub f) where tau and sigma sub n are the shear and normal stresses across the fault plane, mu sub f is the static coefficient of friction, and P sub f is the pore fluid pressure. As a first approximation, the model considers a vertical greatest principal compressive stress, sigma sub 1. It is apparent that if slip on low-angle normal faults is governed by the avove frictional failure criterion, slip on the low-angle normal fault occurs only if the least effective principal stress, sigma (*) sub 3 = sigma sub 3 - P sub f, is tensile, whenever tan superscrip -1(mu sub f d, where d is the dip of the fault. If detachment faulting occurs at any significant depth in the crust, P sub f sigma sub 3 is required. In light of this conclusion I allow P sub f to vary as necessary to allow slip on the low-angle normal fault.

  8. Hypothesis for the mechanics and seismic behaviour of low-angle normal faults: the example of the Altotiberina fault Northern Apennines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Collettini

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Widespread mapping of low-angle normal faults in areas of former continental extension continues to prompt debate as to whether such structures may be seismically active at very low dips (? <30 °in the upper continental crust.The Northern Apennines provide an example where an active low-angle normal fault (Altotiberina fault, ATFcan be studied.A set of commercial seismic reflection profiles plus deep boreholes have been used to constrain the geometry of the fault at depth.These data have been integrated with a microseismic survey showing that part of the microseismicity (M <3.0is consistent with the geometry of the ATF as imaged by depth converted seismic reflection profiles.Frictional fault mechanics under Byerlee ?s friction coefficient and vertical ? 1 (constrained from the inversion of the focal mechanismsdefines the peculiar condition for reactivation of the ATF:small values of differential stress,? 1 ?? 3 <28 MPa,relatively high value of tensile strength of the fault surrounding rocks (T ~10 MPaand tensile fluid overpressure P f >? 3 (i.e.? v >0.93.The short-lived attainment of P f >? 3 along small fault portions,in an area characterised by large amounts of CO2,account for the microseismic activity located along the ATF,which occurs on rupture surfaces in the range of 10 ??10 ? 3 km 2..

  9. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1997-01-01

    A fault current limiter (10) for an electrical circuit (14). The fault current limiter (10) includes a high temperature superconductor (12) in the electrical circuit (14). The high temperature superconductor (12) is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter (10).

  10. Weakening mechanisms along Low-Angle Normal Faults in pelagic limestones (Southern Apennine, Italy): insights from microstructural analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novellino, R.; Prosser, G.; Viti, C.; Spiess, R.; Agosta, F.; Tavarnelli, E.; Bucci, F.

    2013-12-01

    Low-Angle Normal Faults (LANFs) consist of shallowly-dipping extensional tectonic structures, whose origin relates to a mechanical paradox currently debated by a number of researches. The easy slip along these faults suggests a strain-weakening process active during fault nucleation and growth. Weakening mechanisms may include: i) presence of weak minerals; ii) high fluid pressure which, causing a drastic reduction of the effective stress, and iii) dynamic fault weakening during coseismic rupture. In the Basilicata portion of Southern Apennines, LANFs have been extensively studied by geological mapping and field structural analysis. Differently, a detailed microstructural observations are not hitherto available in the geological literature. For this reason, in this note, we summarize the results of microstructural analysis carried out on fault rock samples collected from a well-exposed mesoscopic LANFs. The present work is aimed at analyzing the weakening mechanisms that took place along the study faults. The incipient study LANFs are characterized by a narrow and discontinuous damage zone surrounding a very thin fault core that include a discrete slip-surface. The offset is in the range of tens of centimeters to few meters. At the microscope scale, the sampled rocks reveal the coexistence of different structural features such as: i) pervasive shape preferred orientation defined by elongated grains of calcite, producing a distinct foliation; ii) Crush Microbreccia (CM), formed of angular clasts locally in contact with each other; iii) several Ultracataclastic Veins (UV), departing from the slip-surfaces and cutting across the slip-zone. TEM investigation reveal the presence of ultrafine to calcite-nanoparticles (dynamic recrystallization. At least, two generation of calcite veins, approximately orthogonal to the slip-surface, show systematic cross-cutting relationships with the above illustrated structural features. Overall, the investigated features form a complex

  11. Unusual low-angle normal fault earthquakes after the 2011 Tohoku-oki megathrust earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Yuji; Okuwaki, Ryo; Enescu, Bogdan; Fukahata, Yukitoshi

    2015-06-01

    A few low-angle normal fault earthquakes at approximately the depth of the plate interface, with a strike nearly parallel to the trench axis, were detected immediately after the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake. After that, however, no such normal fault events have been observed until the occurrence of the 2014 M W 6.6 Fukushima-oki earthquake. Here we analyze the teleseismic body waveforms of the 2014 Fukushima-oki earthquake. We first compare the observed teleseismic body waves of the 2014 Fukushima-oki earthquake with those of the largest previous low-angle normal fault aftershock ( M W 6.6), which occurred on 12 March 2011, and then estimate the centroid depth and moment tensor solution of the 2014 Fukushima-oki earthquake. The teleseismic body waves and moment tensor solution of the 2014 Fukushima-oki earthquake are similar to those of the 2011 normal fault aftershock, which suggests that the 2014 Fukushima-oki earthquake occurred at a similar depth and had a similar mechanism to that of the 2011 aftershock. We detected five low-angle normal fault aftershocks at approximately the depth of the plate interface, with a strike nearly parallel to the trench axis, and confirmed that all of them except for the 2014 Fukushima-oki earthquake occurred within 17 days after the mainshock. The occurrence of these low-angle normal fault events is likely to reflect the reversal of shear stress due to overshooting of slip during the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake. We speculate that a fast but heterogeneous recovery of stress state at the plate interface may explain why these events preferentially occurred immediately after the megathrust event, while one of them occurred with a significant delay. In order to better understand the characteristics of stress state in the crust, we have to carefully observe the ongoing seismic activity around this region.

  12. Integrated application of gravity and seismic methods for determining the dip angle of a fault plane: Case of Mahjouba fault (Central Tunisian Atlas Province, North Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabtni, H.; Hajji, O.; Jallouli, C.

    2016-07-01

    A procedure for a dip angle determination of a fault plane from gravity field data is presented to constrain a seismic profile interpretation. This procedure is applied on Mahjouba normal fault at the western border of Kalaa Khesba graben (Central Tunisian Atlas Province, North Africa). Seismic and detailed gravity data, in this region, were analyzed to provide more constraints on the geometry of the fault dip angle. The Mahjouba fault is mapped as three major parallel lineaments extended for 2 km with a NW-SE to N-S trend. The dip of the Mahjouba fault is estimated from the gravity modeling data to be 45°E. This study reveals that integrating gravity and seismic data provides accurate mapping of faults geometry and such result provides useful information and constraints on the exploration of natural resources.

  13. On the mechanics of low-angle normal faults: interdisciplinary observations and open questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collettini, C.

    2016-12-01

    "Standard" frictional fault reactivation predicts that in an extending crust normal faults should cease to slip at dips of 30°. This mechanical prediction is consistent with the absence on continental low-angle normal faults, LANF, of moderate-to-large earthquakes where the rupture plane is unambiguously discriminated. In marked contrast, widespread geological data and seismic reflection profiles show that LANF have played a key-role in crustal extension. In the last 15 years we have tried to address this LANF paradox focusing on the Northern Apennines of Italy by comparing active with ancient-exhumed LANFs of the same fault system. In the active (3 mm/yr) extending area geophysical data define a regional LANF characterized by locked and creeping (1.7 mm/yr) portions with interspersed microseismicity (about 3 events per day, ML seismological records. Although the above conditions can be invoked to explain some aspects of LANF mechanics, they do not represent the solution of the LANF paradox. First, a widespread development of phyllosilicates does not seem to be a common feature in plenty of exhumed LANF. Second, a significant number of LANF formed as gently dipping structures within a brittle crust characterized by a vertical S1 and a well-constrained mechanical explanation for LANF initiation is still lacking. These two points highlight an important gap of knowledge in fault mechanics.

  14. Fault Tolerant and Optimal Control of Wind Turbines with Distributed High-Speed Generators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urs Giger

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the control scheme of a distributed high-speed generator system with a total amount of 12 generators and nominal generator speed of 7000 min − 1 is studied. Specifically, a fault tolerant control (FTC scheme is proposed to keep the turbine in operation in the presence of up to four simultaneous generator faults. The proposed controller structure consists of two layers: The upper layer is the baseline controller, which is separated into a partial load region with the generator torque as an actuating signal and the full-load operation region with the collective pitch angle as the other actuating signal. In addition, the lower layer is responsible for the fault diagnosis and FTC characteristics of the distributed generator drive train. The fault reconstruction and fault tolerant control strategy are tested in simulations with several actuator faults of different types.

  15. Low Angle Normal Fault System Controls the Structure Evolution of Baiyun Deepwater Basin and Its Lithosphere Thinning, Northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y.; Ren, J.; Yang, L.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of the transition area from ~30 km to weakly thinned continental crust (<12 km) in Baiyun deepwater basin, Northern South China Sea leads to two questions: What controls extreme crustal thinning and what is the nature of Baiyun basin. The 3D seismic data newly acquired show that Baiyun basin is an asymmetric half graben mainly controlled by a set of north-dipping normal faults converging in deep. By employing the principle of back-stripping, we estimate the fault dips and slip amount would be in the absence of post-rift sediments and seawater loading. Results show these Middle Eocene faults were extremely active, with a high accumulation horizontal displacement (> 10 km) and an initial very low angle (<7°), followed by a rotated into sub-horizontal. A general scenario for extension of the uppermost continental crust probably includes simultaneous operation of low angle normal fault (F1) as well as parallel arrays of step-faults (domino-faults, f2-f9). Under such a scenario, it shows no obvious extension discrepancy in Baiyun basin. Our results indicate that Baiyun sag preserves information recording the continent thinning before the seafloor spreading, and it could be an abandoned inner rifted basin.

  16. A New Algorithm of Online Stator Faults Diagnosis of Three-Phase Induction Motors Using Duty Ratios of Half-Period Frequencies According to Phase Angle Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go YoungJin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The causes of faults of induction motors are largely categorized into bearing fault, which causes a mechanical fault, and stator fault and rotor fault, which cause an electrical fault. A stator fault among these faults, which causes an electrical fault, occurs due to the breakdown of insulation, meaning the stator is directly connected with the power supply, and the direct connection is a direct cause of a major accident. For this reason, many studies are being performed to detect the faults. This paper explained the effects of a negative sequence on phase angle change by analyzing the effects of the existing negative sequence on the d-q transform of Park’s vector approach. This paper suggested a new algorithm that identifies the causes of stator faults with the use of the change in the duty ratio of the half-period frequency of the frequency when a phase angle change occurs at that moment.

  17. Preliminary Results on the Mechanics of the Active Mai'iu Low Angle Normal Fault (Dayman Dome), Woodlark Rift, SE Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, T. A.; Boulton, C. J.; Mizera, M.; Webber, S. M.; Oesterle, J.; Ellis, S. M.; Norton, K. P.; Wallace, L. M.; Biemiller, J.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid slip on the Mai'iu low-angle normal fault (LANF) has exhumed a smooth, corrugated fault surface contiguous for >24 km up-dip, rising from near sea level to ~2900 m. The fault emerges from the ground dipping ~21° N and flattens over the crest of the dome to dip south. Geomorphic analysis reveals a progressive back-tilting of the surface during exhumation accompanied by cross-cutting antithetic-sense high-angle faults—features that we attribute to "rolling-hinge" deformation of a once more steeply-dipping fault. Near the scarp base, the footwall exposes mafic mylonites that deformed at ~400-450°C. The younger Mai'iu fault cross-cuts this ductile mylonite zone, with most brittle slip being localized into a ~20 cm-thick, gouge-filled core. Near the range front, active faults bite across both the hangingwall and footwall of the Mai'iu fault and record overprinting across a dying, shallow (<~1 km deep) part of the fault by more optimally oriented, steeper faults. Such depth-dependent locking up of the fault suggests it weakens primarily by friction reduction rather than cohesion loss. Outcrop-scale fractures in the exhumed footwall reflect formation in an Andersonian stress regime. Previous campaign GPS data suggest the fault slips at up to ~1 cm/yr. To improve resolution and test for aseismic creep, we installed 12 GPS sites across the fault trace in 2015. Quantitative XRD indicates the gouges were derived primarily from mafic footwall, containing up to 65% corrensite and saponite. Hydrothermal friction experiments on two gouges from a relict LANF strand were done at varying normal stresses (30-120 MPa), temperatures (50-200oC), and sliding velocities (0.3-100 μm/s). Results reveal very weak frictional strength (μ=0.13-0.15 and 0.20-0.28) and velocity-strengthening behavior conducive to fault creep. At the highest temperatures (T≥150oC) and lowest sliding velocities (<3 μm/s), a transition to velocity-weakening behavior indicates the potential for

  18. The effects of lower crustal strength and preexisting midcrustal shear zones on the formation of continental core complexes and low-angle normal faults

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Guangliang

    2016-08-22

    To investigate the formation of core complexes and low-angle normal faults, we devise thermomechanical simulations on a simplified wedge-like orogenic hinterland that has initial topography, Moho relief, and a preexisting midcrustal shear zone that can accommodate shear at very low angles (<20°). We mainly vary the strength of the lower crust and the frictional strength of the preexisting midcrustal shear zone. We find that the strength of the lower crust and the existence and strength of a preexisting shear zone significantly affect the formation and evolution of core complexes. With increasing lower crustal strength, we recognize varying extensional features with decreasing exhumation rate: these are characterized by bivergent metamorphic massifs, classic Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes, multiple consecutive core complexes (or boudinage structures), and a flexural core complex underlined by a large subsurface low-angle detachment fault with a small convex curvature. Topographic loading and mantle buoyancy forces, together with divergent boundaries, drive a regional lower crustal flow that leads to the exhumation of the lower crust where intensive upper crustal faulting induces strong unloading. The detachment fault is a decoupling zone that accommodates large displacement and accumulates sustained shear strain at very low angle between upper and lower crust. Though the regional stress is largely Andersonian, we find non-Andersonian stress in regions adjacent to the preexisting shear zone and those with high topographic gradient. Our new models provide a view that is generally consistent with geological and geophysical observations on how core complexes form and evolve.

  19. Ductile deformation, boudinage and low angle normal faults. An overview of the structural variability at present-day rifted margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerc, Camille; Jolivet, Laurent; Ringenbach, Jean-Claude; Ballard, Jean-François

    2016-04-01

    High quality industrial seismic profiles acquired along most of the world's passive margins present stunningly increased resolution that leads to unravel an unexpected variety of structures. An important benefit of the increased resolution of recent seismic profiles is that they provide an unprecedented access to the processes occurring in the middle and lower continental crust. We present a series of so far unreleased profiles that allow the identification of various rift-related geological processes such as crustal boudinage, ductile shear and low angle detachment faulting. The lower crust in passive margins appears much more intensely deformed than usually represented. At the foot of both magma-rich and magma-poor margins, we observe clear indications of ductile deformation of the deep continental crust along large-scale shallow dipping shear zones. These shear zones generally show a top-to-the-continent sense of shear consistent with the activity of overlying continentward dipping normal faults observed in the upper crust. This pattern is responsible for a migration of the deformation and associated sedimentation and/or volcanic activity toward the ocean. In some cases, low angle shear zones define an anastomosed pattern that delineates boudin-like structures. The interboudins areas seem to localize the maximum of deformation. The lower crust is intensely boudinaged and the geometry of those boudins seems to control the position and dip of upper crustal normal faults. We present some of the most striking examples (Uruguay, West Africa, Barents sea…) and discuss their implications for the time-temperature-subsidence history of the margins.

  20. Syn-Extensional Constrictional Folding of the Gwoira Rider Block, a Large Fault-Bounded Slice Atop the Mai'iu Low-Angle Normal Fault, Woodlark Rift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, T. A.; Webber, S. M.; Norton, K. P.; Mizera, M.; Oesterle, J.; Ellis, S. M.

    2016-12-01

    The Mai'iu Fault is an active and corrugated low-angle normal fault (LANF) in Woodlark Rift, Eastern Papua New Guinea, which dips 21° NNE, accommodating rapid N-S extension. The Gwoira rider block is a large fault-bounded sedimentary slice comprising the Gwoira Conglomerate, located within a large synformal megamullion in the Mai'iu Fault surface. The Gwoira Conglomerate was originally deposited on the Mai'iu Fault hanging wall concurrent with extension, and has since been buried to a maximum depth of 1600-2100 m (evidenced by vitrinite reflectance data), back-tilted, and synformally folded. Both the Gwoira Conglomerate (former hanging wall) and mylonitic foliation (footwall) of the Mai'iu Fault have been shortened E-W, perpendicular to the extension direction. We show that E-W synformal folding of the Gwoira Conglomerate was concurrent with ongoing sedimentation and extension on the Mai'iu Fault. Structurally shallower Gwoira Conglomerate strata are folded less than deeper strata, indicating that folding was progressively accrued concurrent with N-S extension. We also show that abandonment of the inactive strand of the Mai'iu Fault in favor of the Gwoira Fault, which resulted in formation of the Gwoira rider block, occurred in response to progressive megamullion amplification and resultant misorientation of the inactive strand of the Mai'iu Fault. We attribute E-W folding to extension-perpendicular constriction. This is consistent with observations of outcrop-scale conjugate strike-slip faults that deform the footwall and hanging wall of the Mai'iu Fault, and accommodate E-W shortening. Constrictional folding remains active in the near-surface as evidenced by synformal tilting of inferred Late Quaternary fluvial terraces atop the Gwoira rider block. This sequence of progressive constrictional folding is dated using 26Al/10Be terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide burial dating of the Gwoira Conglomerate. Finally, because rider block formation records abandonment of the

  1. Fault tolerant highly reliable inertial navigation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeerage, Mahesh; Boettcher, Kevin

    This paper describes a development of failure detection and isolation (FDI) strategies for highly reliable inertial navigation systems. FDI strategies are developed based on the generalized likelihood ratio test (GLRT). A relationship between detection threshold and false alarm rate is developed in terms of the sensor parameters. A new method for correct isolation of failed sensors is presented. Evaluation of FDI performance parameters, such as false alarm rate, wrong isolation probability, and correct isolation probability, are presented. Finally a fault recovery scheme capable of correcting false isolation of good sensors is presented.

  2. Fault Analysis and Detection in Microgrids with High PV Penetration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Khatib, Mohamed [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hernandez Alvidrez, Javier [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ellis, Abraham [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    In this report we focus on analyzing current-controlled PV inverters behaviour under faults in order to develop fault detection schemes for microgrids with high PV penetration. Inverter model suitable for steady state fault studies is presented and the impact of PV inverters on two protection elements is analyzed. The studied protection elements are superimposed quantities based directional element and negative sequence directional element. Additionally, several non-overcurrent fault detection schemes are discussed in this report for microgrids with high PV penetration. A detailed time-domain simulation study is presented to assess the performance of the presented fault detection schemes under different microgrid modes of operation.

  3. High Resolution Seismic Imaging of Fault Zones: Methods and Examples From The San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catchings, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Goldman, M.; Prentice, C. S.; Sickler, R. R.; Criley, C.

    2011-12-01

    Seismic imaging of fault zones at shallow depths is challenging. Conventional seismic reflection methods do not work well in fault zones that consist of non-planar strata or that have large variations in velocity structure, two properties that occur in most fault zones. Understanding the structure and geometry of fault zones is important to elucidate the earthquake hazard associated with fault zones and the barrier effect that faults impose on subsurface fluid flow. In collaboration with the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) at San Andreas Lake on the San Francisco peninsula, we acquired combined seismic P-wave and S-wave reflection, refraction, and guided-wave data to image the principal strand of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) that ruptured the surface during the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and additional fault strands east of the rupture. The locations and geometries of these fault strands are important because the SFPUC is seismically retrofitting the Hetch Hetchy water delivery system, which provides much of the water for the San Francisco Bay area, and the delivery system is close to the SAF at San Andreas Lake. Seismic reflection images did not image the SAF zone well due to the brecciated bedrock, a lack of layered stratigraphy, and widely varying velocities. Tomographic P-wave velocity images clearly delineate the fault zone as a low-velocity zone at about 10 m depth in more competent rock, but due to soil saturation above the rock, the P-waves do not clearly image the fault strands at shallower depths. S-wave velocity images, however, clearly show a diagnostic low-velocity zone at the mapped 1906 surface break. To image the fault zone at greater depths, we utilized guided waves, which exhibit high amplitude seismic energy within fault zones. The guided waves appear to image the fault zone at varying depths depending on the frequency of the seismic waves. At higher frequencies (~30 to 40 Hz), the guided waves show strong amplification at the

  4. Identification of High Angle Structures Controlling the Geothermal System at Rye Patch, Nevada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehni, W. J.

    2001-12-01

    The successful completion of a recent well in the Rye Patch Geothermal field, located in Pershing County, Nevada, supports the geologic and geophysical interpretation that high angle structures control this geothermal system. Although lower angle structures are present, hot water migrates up from deeper sources along high angle faults more efficiently than structures with a shallower dip. Earlier attempts to develop the resource focused on structures that dipped at an angle between 60 and 70 degrees from horizontal. Recently acquired geophysical data indicated that numerous high angle structures were present in the area, with dips between 80 and 90 degrees. Original drilling targets focused on the subsurface projection of a surface structure, mapped as the Rye Patch fault, with an erroneously low angle. These early attempts at drilling were discouraging and might have been more successful if additional geology and geophysics were used to evaluate the geothermal system and map the Rye Patch fault more accurately. The successful completion of the most recent well can be attributed to the incorporation of the geology of previous wells with additional geology and geophysics. Temperature gradient holes were used to confirm that the Rye Patch fault provided the primary plumbing for this geothermal system, and 3D seismic data indicated that most of the structures had dips between 80 and 90 degrees. Geothermometry at Rye Patch indicates that the resource has a relatively high quartz equilibrium temperature and it is speculated that the higher the angle of the structural control, the higher the resource temperature. The dip of Basin and Range normal faults varies considerably and the interpretation of these structures for geothermal, fossil geothermal mineral prospects, and or oil and gas prospects is important. At Rye Patch, the high angle structure feeds geothermal fluids into cavernous limestone beds, dipping to the west usually between 40 and 60 degrees, which is a

  5. High Frequency Ground Motion from Finite Fault Rupture Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crempien, Jorge G. F.

    There are many tectonically active regions on earth with little or no recorded ground motions. The Eastern United States is a typical example of regions with active faults, but with low to medium seismicity that has prevented sufficient ground motion recordings. Because of this, it is necessary to use synthetic ground motion methods in order to estimate the earthquake hazard a region might have. Ground motion prediction equations for spectral acceleration typically have geometric attenuation proportional to the inverse of distance away from the fault. Earthquakes simulated with one-dimensional layered earth models have larger geometric attenuation than the observed ground motion recordings. We show that as incident angles of rays increase at welded boundaries between homogeneous flat layers, the transmitted rays decrease in amplitude dramatically. As the receiver distance increases away from the source, the angle of incidence of up-going rays increases, producing negligible transmitted ray amplitude, thus increasing the geometrical attenuation. To work around this problem we propose a model in which we separate wave propagation for low and high frequencies at a crossover frequency, typically 1Hz. The high-frequency portion of strong ground motion is computed with a homogeneous half-space and amplified with the available and more complex one- or three-dimensional crustal models using the quarter wavelength method. We also make use of seismic coda energy density observations as scattering impulse response functions. We incorporate scattering impulse response functions into our Green's functions by convolving the high-frequency homogeneous half-space Green's functions with normalized synthetic scatterograms to reproduce scattering physical effects in recorded seismograms. This method was validated against ground motion for earthquakes recorded in California and Japan, yielding results that capture the duration and spectral response of strong ground motion.

  6. 3D architecture and structural characterization of the Lima Valley low-angle fault system (Northern Apennines, Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemenzi, L.; Molli, G.; Botti, F.; Ungari, A.; Storti, F.

    2012-04-01

    The nappe pile of the northern Apennines is characterized, from bottom to top, by metamorphic units (Apuane and Massa), overlain by the anchimetamorphic cover unit (Tuscan Nappe), in turn overlain by remnants of former intraoceanic accretionary wedge (Subligurian and Ligurian units) and by the Epiligurian wedge-top sediments. The upper part of the structural edifice, in several areas, is dismembered and thinned by low-angle extensional fault systems, such as those described in southern Tuscany (Carmignani et al., 1994) and in southernmost Liguria (e.g. Tellaro detachment, Storti, 1995). Here we present another example of such low-angle fault systems, exposed in the Lima valley (northern Tuscany). It consists of a well developed bedding-parallel fault system which appears to be, in turn, affected by superimposed folds and late-stage normal faults (Botti et al., 2010). The original geometry of the low-angle fault system has been reconstructed and superimposed deformations have been restored. The fault system is composed by two first order segments, both of them showing bedding-parallel attitude and top-to-NE kinematics. The uppermost segment causes the tectonic repetition of the pelagic sediments of Scaglia fm. (Upper Cretaceous - Oligocene) and the sandstone of Macigno fm. (Oligocene - Miocene); the lowermost one causes the direct contact of the Macigno fm. on the pelagic carbonate of the Maiolica fm. (Upper Jurassic - Lower Cretaceous), via the elision of the Scaglia fm.. In the central part of the study area, other formations are elided by the lowermost fault segment, giving the direct contact of the Macigno fm. with the Calcare selcifero di Limano fm. (Lower Jurassic). The damage zone of the two main tectonic contacts has been studied in detail to investigate the role of the different lithologies involved. In the Macigno sandstone, a foliated cataclasite developed in the proximity of the fault core, intercalated with smaller lithons of less deformed rock

  7. Faults

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Through the study of faults and their effects, much can be learned about the size and recurrence intervals of earthquakes. Faults also teach us about crustal...

  8. Control switching in high performance and fault tolerant control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2010-01-01

    The problem of reliability in high performance control and in fault tolerant control is considered in this paper. A feedback controller architecture for high performance and fault tolerance is considered. The architecture is based on the Youla-Jabr-Bongiorno-Kucera (YJBK) parameterization. By usi...

  9. Fault healing promotes high-frequency earthquakes in laboratory experiments and on natural faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaskey, Gregory C.; Thomas, Amanda M.; Glaser, Steven D.; Nadeau, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    Faults strengthen or heal with time in stationary contact and this healing may be an essential ingredient for the generation of earthquakes. In the laboratory, healing is thought to be the result of thermally activated mechanisms that weld together micrometre-sized asperity contacts on the fault surface, but the relationship between laboratory measures of fault healing and the seismically observable properties of earthquakes is at present not well defined. Here we report on laboratory experiments and seismological observations that show how the spectral properties of earthquakes vary as a function of fault healing time. In the laboratory, we find that increased healing causes a disproportionately large amount of high-frequency seismic radiation to be produced during fault rupture. We observe a similar connection between earthquake spectra and recurrence time for repeating earthquake sequences on natural faults. Healing rates depend on pressure, temperature and mineralogy, so the connection between seismicity and healing may help to explain recent observations of large megathrust earthquakes which indicate that energetic, high-frequency seismic radiation originates from locations that are distinct from the geodetically inferred locations of large-amplitude fault slip

  10. Fault Diagnosis and Fault-tolerant Control of Modular Multi-level Converter High-voltage DC System: A Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Hui; Ma, Ke; Wang, Chao;

    2016-01-01

    Modular Multilevel Converter based High Voltage Direct Current (MMC-HVDC) configuration is a promising solution for the efficient grid integration and bulky power transmission over long distance. However, the large number of series connected identical modules in MMC may increase the probability...... strategies of MMC-HVDC systems for the most common faults happened in MMC-HVDC systems covering MMC faults, DC side faults as well as AC side faults. An important part of this paper is devoted to a discussion of the vulnerable spots as well as failure mechanism of the MMC-HVDC system covering switching...... device fault, DC line faults as well as AC grid faults. Special attention is given to the comparison of the corresponding fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control approaches. Further, focus is dedicated to control/protection strategies and topologies with fault ride-though capability for MMC...

  11. Role of low angle normal faulting and basement thrusting on the structural architecture of the Northern Apennines (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molli, Giancarlo; Carlini, Mirko; Vescovi, Paolo; Artoni, Andrea; Balsamo, Fabrizio; Camurri, Francesca; Clemenzi, Luca; Storti, Fabrizio; Torelli, Luigi

    2017-04-01

    The Northern Apennines of Italy are a classical site for studying fundamental issues in thrust wedges, such as ophiolite formation and emplacement, interplay between tectonics and sedimentation, role of out-of-sequence thrusting, syn-orogenic versus post-orogenic extension, along strike segmentation, etc. Accordingly, the Northern Apennines have been extensively studied since more than two centuries ago. Despite the huge amount of available data with different resolution, a 3D comprehensive regional view combining in a modern framework all available surface and subsurface information for contiguous sectors of the chain is still lacking. We performed such an attempt in the area framed between the Taro valley to the north and the northern termination of the Alpi Apuane to the south. The region includes the main morphostructural zones of the North-West Apennines from the Tyrrhenian coast West-Northwest of La Spezia, through the main topographic divide of the Apennines, to the external frontal part of the chain. The area has been investigated through a multidisciplinary approach that integrated: 1) surface geological data collected during the last two decades of structural and stratigraphic field works in the internal as well as external sectors of the chain; 2) subsurface geological data including: a) interpretation of 1200 Km of seismic reflection profiles tied to surface geology and b) analysis of 39 boreholes stratigraphies. The construction of two regional NE-SW trending cross-sections (the Levanto-Pontremoli-Parma to the North and the La Spezia-Sarzana-North Apuane-Cerreto to the South), connected by the NW-SE trending Taro River-Lunigiana Area-Alpi Apuane composite section, allowed us to illustrate (i) the role of out-of-sequence blind thrusting in the basement, (ii) the presence of low angle normal faulting and its relationships with recent to active high angle normal faulting. Both extensional and contractional systems have relevant implications for the

  12. Continental Rupture Controlled by Low-Angle Normal Faults in the Northern Gulf of California: Analysis of Seismic Reflection Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Barajas, A.; González-Escobar, M.; Fletcher, J. M.; Pacheco, M.; Mar-Hernández, E.

    2010-12-01

    -basinal high that separates the Tiburon from the Delfin basin. The AGD detachment fault was abandoned during Pleistocene time when dextral shear and rupture of the continental crust focused to the west into the Ballenas transform fault and the Lower Delfin basin. Our results demonstrate that extreme crustal thinning in oblique rifts occurs along detachment faults bounded by zones of dextral shear with decreasing gradients of shearing away the rift axis.

  13. GPR measurements to assess the Emeelt active fault's characteristics in a highly smooth topographic context, Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dujardin, Jean-Rémi; Bano, Maksim; Schlupp, Antoine; Ferry, Matthieu; Munkhuu, Ulziibat; Tsend-Ayush, Nyambayar; Enkhee, Bayarsaikhan

    2014-07-01

    To estimate the seismic hazard, the geometry (dip, length and orientation) and the dynamics (type of displacements and amplitude) of the faults in the area of interest need to be understood. In this paper, in addition to geomorphologic observations, we present the results of two ground penetrating radar (GPR) campaigns conducted in 2010 and 2011 along the Emeelt fault in the vicinity of Ulaanbaatar, capital of Mongolia, located in an intracontinental region with low deformation rate that induces long recurrence time between large earthquakes. As the geomorphology induced by the fault activity has been highly smoothed by erosion processes since the last event, the fault location and geometry is difficult to determine precisely. However, by using GPR first, a non-destructive and fast investigation, the fault and the sedimentary deposits near the surface can be characterized and the results can be used for the choice of trench location. GPR was performed with a 50 MHz antenna over 2-D lines and with a 500 MHz antenna for pseudo-3-D surveys. The 500 MHz GPR profiles show a good consistency with the trench observations, dug next to the pseudo-3-D surveys. The 3-D 500 MHz GPR imaging of a palaeochannel crossed by the fault allowed us to estimate its lateral displacement to be about 2 m. This is consistent with a right lateral strike-slip displacement induced by an earthquake around magnitude 7 or several around magnitude 6. The 2-D 50 MHz profiles, recorded perpendicular to the fault, show a strong reflection dipping to the NE, which corresponds to the fault plane. Those profiles provided complementary information on the fault such as its location at shallow depth, its dip angle (from 23° to 35°) and define its lateral extension.

  14. Wide-Angle Seismic Experiment Across the Oeste Fault Zone, Central Andes, Northern Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, J. M.; Yáñez, G. A.; Vera, E. E.; Sepúlveda, J.

    2008-12-01

    From December 6-21, 2007, we conducted a 3-component, radio-telemetric, seismic survey along a ~ 15-km wide E-W transect in the Central Andes, at a latitude of ~ 22.41° S, centered north of the city of Calama (68.9° W), Chile. The study area is sandwiched between the Central Depression in the west and the Andean Western Cordillera of Chile. Recording stations, nominally spaced at intervals of either 125 or 250 m collected up to 3.5 s of refracted seismic arrivals at maximum source-receiver offsets exceeding 15 km. Ten shothole sources, spaced 2-6 km apart focused energy on the shallow (0-3 km), crustal, Paleogene-age structures. Preliminary, tomographic inversions of refracted first arrivals show the top of a shallow ( 600 km), strike-slip fault zone known as the Oeste fault. Turning ray densities suggest the base of the overlying velocity gradient unit (VP, 2-4 km/s) dips inwardly from both east and west directions toward the Oeste fault to depths of almost 1 km. Plate reorganization commencing at least by the latter half of the Oligocene led from oblique to more orthogonal convergence between the South American and the Nazca (Farallon) Plates. We interpret previously mapped, older, minor faults as being generated within the right-lateral, orogen-parallel, Oeste strike-slip fault zone, and postdated by Neogene, N-S striking thrust faults. In this context we also interpret that the spatial distribution of velocity units requires an period of extensional activity that may (1) postdate the transpressional strike slip fault activity of the Neogene, (2) be related to a later releasing bend through the translation and interaction of rigid blocks hidden at depth or even (3) be the consequence of inelastic failure from the result of flexural loading.

  15. Methodology for high accuracy contact angle measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantarian, A; David, R; Neumann, A W

    2009-12-15

    A new version of axisymmetric drop shape analysis (ADSA) called ADSA-NA (ADSA-no apex) was developed for measuring interfacial properties for drop configurations without an apex. ADSA-NA facilitates contact angle measurements on drops with a capillary protruding into the drop. Thus a much simpler experimental setup, not involving formation of a complete drop from below through a hole in the test surface, may be used. The contact angles of long-chained alkanes on a commercial fluoropolymer, Teflon AF 1600, were measured using the new method. A new numerical scheme was incorporated into the image processing to improve the location of the contact points of the liquid meniscus with the solid substrate to subpixel resolution. The images acquired in the experiments were also analyzed by a different drop shape technique called theoretical image fitting analysis-axisymmetric interfaces (TIFA-AI). The results were compared with literature values obtained by means of the standard ADSA for sessile drops with the apex. Comparison of the results from ADSA-NA with those from TIFA-AI and ADSA reveals that, with different numerical strategies and experimental setups, contact angles can be measured with an accuracy of less than 0.2 degrees. Contact angles and surface tensions measured from drops with no apex, i.e., by means of ADSA-NA and TIFA-AI, were considerably less scattered than those from complete drops with apex. ADSA-NA was also used to explore sources of improvement in contact angle resolution. It was found that using an accurate value of surface tension as an input enhances the accuracy of contact angle measurements.

  16. Simultaneous estimation of the dip angles and slip distribution on the faults of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake through a weak nonlinear inversion of InSAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukahata, Yukitoshi; Hashimoto, Manabu

    2016-12-01

    At the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake, surface ruptures were observed not only along the Futagawa fault, where main ruptures occurred, but also along the Hinagu fault. To estimate the slip distribution on these faults, we extend a method of nonlinear inversion analysis (Fukahata and Wright in Geophys J Int 173:353-364, 2008) to a two-fault system. With the method of Fukahata and Wright (2008), we can simultaneously determine the optimal dip angle of a fault and the slip distribution on it, based on Akaike's Bayesian information criterion by regarding the dip angle as an hyperparameter. By inverting the InSAR data with the developed method, we obtain the dip angles of the Futagawa and Hinagu faults as 61° ± 6° and 74° ± 12°, respectively. The slip on the Futagawa fault is mainly strike slip. The largest slip on it is over 5 m around the center of the model fault (130.9° in longitude) with a significant normal slip component. The slip on the Futagawa fault quickly decreases to zero beyond the intersection with the Hinagu fault. On the other hand, the slip has a local peak just inside Aso caldera, which would be a cause of severe damage in this area. A relatively larger reverse fault slip component on a deeper part around the intersection with Aso caldera suggests that something complicated happened there. The slip on the Hinagu fault is almost a pure strike slip with a peak of about 2.4 m. The developed method is useful in clarifying the slip distribution, when a complicated rupture like the Kumamoto earthquake happens in a remote area.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  17. Initiation of a Low-Angle Normal Fault Active Across the Upper Brittle-Plastic Transition, Chemehuevi Mountains, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaForge, J.; John, B. E.; Grimes, C. B.; Stunitz, H.; Heilbronner, R.

    2016-12-01

    The Chemehuevi detachment fault system, part of the regionally developed Colorado River extensional corridor, hosts exceptional exposures of a denuded fault system related to Miocene extension. Here, we characterize the early history of extension associated with a small slip (1-2 km) low-angle normal fault, the Mohave Wash fault (MWF), initially active across the brittle-plastic transition. Strain localized in three principal ways across the 23-km down-dip exposure (T 400°C): a brittle fault zone, localized, disseminated quartz mylonites, and syntectonic dikes hosting mylonitic fabrics. Brittle deformation in these crystalline rocks was concentrated into a 10-62-m thick brittle fault zone hosting localized, unmineralized to chlorite-epidote-quartz mineralized zones of cataclasite series fault rocks ≤3 m thick and rare pseudotachylite. Mylonitic deformation played an increased role in deformation down dip (NE), with mylonites increasing in quantity and average thickness. At shallow structural levels, footwall mylonites are absent; at 9-18 km down dip, cm-scale quartz mylonites are common; ≥18 km down dip, meter-scale syntectonic intermediate-felsic dikes are mylonitic, are attenuated into parallelism with the MWF, and host well-developed L-S fabric; 23 km down dip, the footwall hosts meter-thick zones of disseminated mylonitic quartz of varying intensities. These mylonites host microstructures that record progressively higher deformation temperature down dip, with dislocation-creep in quartz indicative of T of 280-400°C to ≥500°C, and diffusion creep with grain boundary sliding in dikes suggestive of even higher T deformation. Dike emplacement in the system is syntectonic with MWF slip; mafic-intermediate composition dikes intruded damage zone fractures and cataclasites, and were in turn fractured; Pb/U zircon ages of intermediate-felsic dikes range from ca. 1.5 ± 1 Ma to 3.8 ± 1 Ma after the onset of regional extension, but predate rapid slip. Cross

  18. Fault Diagnosis and Fault-Tolerant Control of Uncertain Robot Manipulators Using High-Order Sliding Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mien Van

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A robust fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control (FTC system for uncertain robot manipulators without joint velocity measurement is presented. The actuator faults and robot manipulator component faults are considered. The proposed scheme is designed via an active fault-tolerant control strategy by combining a fault diagnosis scheme based on a super-twisting third-order sliding mode (STW-TOSM observer with a robust super-twisting second-order sliding mode (STW-SOSM controller. Compared to the existing FTC methods, the proposed FTC method can accommodate not only faults but also uncertainties, and it does not require a velocity measurement. In addition, because the proposed scheme is designed based on the high-order sliding mode (HOSM observer/controller strategy, it exhibits fast convergence, high accuracy, and less chattering. Finally, computer simulation results for a PUMA560 robot are obtained to verify the effectiveness of the proposed strategy.

  19. Fault Diagnosis and Fault-tolerant Control of Modular Multi-level Converter High-voltage DC System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Hui; Ma, Ke; Wang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Modular Multilevel Converter based High Voltage Direct Current (MMC-HVDC) configuration is a promising solution for the efficient grid integration and bulky power transmission over long distance. However, the large number of series connected identical modules in MMC may increase the probability...... strategies of MMC-HVDC systems for the most common faults happened in MMC-HVDC systems covering MMC faults, DC side faults as well as AC side faults. An important part of this paper is devoted to a discussion of the vulnerable spots as well as failure mechanism of the MMC-HVDC system covering switching...

  20. High resolution reflection seismic profiling over the Tjellefonna fault in the Møre-Trøndelag Fault Complex, Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lundberg

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Møre-Trøndelag Fault Complex (MTFC is one of the most prominent fault zones of Norway, both onshore and offshore. In spite of its importance, very little is known of the deeper structure of the individual fault segments comprising the fault complex. Most seismic lines have been recorded offshore or focused on deeper structures. This paper presents results from two reflection seismic profiles, located on each side of the Tingvollfjord, acquired over the Tjellefonna fault in the south-eastern part of the MTFC. Possible kilometer scale vertical offsets reflecting, large scale north-west dipping normal faulting separating the high topography to the south-east from lower topography to the north-west have been proposed for the Tjellefonna fault. In this study, however, the Tjellefonna fault is interpreted to dip approximately 50–60° towards the south-east to depths of at least 1.4 km. Travel-time modeling of reflections associated with the fault was used to establish the geometry of the fault structure at depth and detailed analysis of first P-wave arrivals in shot-gathers together with resistivity profiles were used to define the near surface geometry of the fault zone. A continuation of the structure on the north-eastern side of the Tingvollfjord is suggested by correlation of an in strike direction P-S converted reflection (generated by a fracture zone seen on the reflection data from that side of the Tingvollfjord. The reflection seismic data correlate well with resistivity profiles and recently published near surface geophysical data. A highly reflective package forming a gentle antiform structure was also identified on both seismic profiles. The structure may be an important boundary within the gneissic basement rocks of the Western Gneiss Region. The Fold Hinge Line is parallel with the Tjellefonna fault trace while the topographic lineament diverges, following secondary fracture zones towards north-east.

  1. Transmission Level High Temperature Superconducting Fault Current Limiter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Gary [SuperPower, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States)

    2016-10-05

    The primary objective of this project was to demonstrate the feasibility and reliability of utilizing high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials in a Transmission Level Superconducting Fault Current Limiter (SFCL) application. During the project, the type of high temperature superconducting material used evolved from 1st generation (1G) BSCCO-2212 melt cast bulk high temperature superconductors to 2nd generation (2G) YBCO based high temperature superconducting tape. The SFCL employed SuperPower's “Matrix” technology that offers modular features to enable scale up to transmission voltage levels. The SFCL consists of individual modules that contain elements and parallel inductors that assist in carrying the current during the fault. A number of these modules are arranged in an m x n array to form the current limiting matrix.

  2. Transmission Level High Temperature Superconducting Fault Current Limiter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Gary [SuperPower, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States)

    2016-10-05

    The primary objective of this project was to demonstrate the feasibility and reliability of utilizing high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials in a Transmission Level Superconducting Fault Current Limiter (SFCL) application. During the project, the type of high-temperature superconducting material used evolved from 1st generation (1G) BSCCO-2212 melt cast bulk high-temperature superconductors to 2nd generation (2G) YBCO-based high-temperature superconducting tape. The SFCL employed SuperPower's “Matrix” technology, that offers modular features to enable scale up to transmission voltage levels. The SFCL consists of individual modules that contain elements and parallel inductors that assist in carrying the current during the fault. A number of these modules are arranged in an m x n array to form the current-limiting matrix.

  3. High Resolution Seismic Imaging of the Brawley Seismic Fault Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, M.; Catchings, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Lohman, R. B.; McGuire, J. J.; Sickler, R. R.; Criley, C.; Rosa, C.

    2011-12-01

    In March 2010, we acquired a series of high-resolution P-wave seismic reflection and refraction data sets across faults in the Brawley seismic zone (BSZ) within the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF). Our objectives were to determine the dip, possible structural complexities, and seismic velocities within the BSZ. One dataset was 3.4 km long trending east-west, and consisted of 334 shots recorded by a 2.4 km spread of 40 hz geophones placed every 10 meters. The spread was initially laid out from the first station at the eastern end of the profile to roughly 2/3 into the profile. After about half the shots, the spread was shifted from roughly 1/3 into the profile to the last station at the western end of the profile. P-waves were generated by Betsy-Seisgun 'shots' spaced every 10 meters. Initial analysis of first breaks indicate near-surface velocities of ~500-600 meters/sec, and deeper velocities of around 2000 meters/sec. Preliminary investigation of shot gathers indicate a prominent fault that extends to the ground surface. This fault is on a projection of the Kalin fault from about 40 m to the south, and broke the surface down to the west with an approximately north-south strike during a local swarm of earthquakes in 2005 and also slipped at the surface in association with the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake in Baja California. The dataset is part of the combined Obsidian Creep data set, and provides the most detailed, publicly available subsurface images of fault structures in the BSZ and SSGF.

  4. Mandibular advancement surgery in high-angle and low-angle class II patients: different long-term skeletal responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobarak, K A; Espeland, L; Krogstad, O; Lyberg, T

    2001-04-01

    The objective of this cephalometric study was to compare skeletal stability and the time course of postoperative changes in high-angle and low-angle Class II patients after mandibular advancement surgery. The subjects were 61 consecutive mandibular retrognathism patients whose treatment included bilateral sagittal split osteotomy and rigid fixation. The patients were divided according to the preoperative mandibular plane angle; the 20 patients with the lowest mandibular plane angle (20.8 degrees +/- 4.9 degrees ) constituted the low-angle group, while the 20 cases with the highest mandibular plane angle (43.0 degrees +/- 4.0 degrees ) represented the high-angle group. Lateral cephalograms were taken on 6 occasions: immediately before surgery, immediately after surgery, 2 and 6 months after surgery, and 1 and 3 years after surgery. Results demonstrated that the high-angle and low-angle groups had different patterns of surgical and postoperative changes. High-angle patients were associated with both a higher frequency and a greater magnitude of horizontal relapse. While 95% of the total relapse took place during the first 2 months after surgery in the low-angle group, high-angle patients demonstrated a more continuous relapse pattern, with a significant proportion (38%) occurring late in the follow-up period. Possible reasons for the different postsurgical response are discussed.

  5. Analytical Model for High Impedance Fault Analysis in Transmission Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Maximov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A high impedance fault (HIF normally occurs when an overhead power line physically breaks and falls to the ground. Such faults are difficult to detect because they often draw small currents which cannot be detected by conventional overcurrent protection. Furthermore, an electric arc accompanies HIFs, resulting in fire hazard, damage to electrical devices, and risk with human life. This paper presents an analytical model to analyze the interaction between the electric arc associated to HIFs and a transmission line. A joint analytical solution to the wave equation for a transmission line and a nonlinear equation for the arc model is presented. The analytical model is validated by means of comparisons between measured and calculated results. Several cases of study are presented which support the foundation and accuracy of the proposed model.

  6. High Pressure Angle Gears: Comparison to Typical Gear Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Zabrajsek, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    A preliminary study has been completed to determine the feasibility of using high-pressure angle gears in aeronautic and space applications. Tests were conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) Spur Gear Test Facility at speeds up to 10,000 rpm and 73 N*m (648 in.*lb) for 3.18, 2.12, and 1.59 module gears (8, 12, and 16 diametral pitch gears), all designed to operate in the same test facility. The 3.18 module (8-diametral pitch), 28 tooth, 20deg pressure angle gears are the GRC baseline test specimen. Also, 2.12 module (12-diametral pitch), 42 tooth, 25deg pressure angle gears were tested. Finally 1.59 module (16-diametral pitch), 56 tooth, 35deg pressure angle gears were tested. The high-pressure angle gears were the most efficient when operated in the high-speed aerospace mode (10,000 rpm, lubricated with a synthetic turbine engine oil), and produced the lowest wear rates when tested with a perfluoroether-based grease. The grease tests were conducted at 150 rpm and 71 N*m (630 in.*lb).

  7. High contact angle hysteresis of superhydrophobic surfaces: Hydrophobic defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Feng-Ming; Hong, Siang-Jie; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2009-08-01

    A typical superhydrophobic surface is essentially nonadhesive and exhibits very low water contact angle (CA) hysteresis, so-called Lotus effect. However, leaves of some plants such as scallion and garlic with an advancing angle exceeding 150° show very serious CA hysteresis. Although surface roughness and epicuticular wax can explain the very high advancing CA, our analysis indicates that the unusual hydrophobic defect, diallyl disulfide, is the key element responsible for contact line pinning on allium leaves. After smearing diallyl disulfide on an extended polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) film, which is originally absent of CA hysteresis, the surface remains superhydrophobic but becomes highly adhesive.

  8. High-fidelity angle-modulated analog optical link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Di; Yuan, Feng; Shieh, William

    2016-07-25

    There has long existed a debate over whether analog or digital optical link is more suitable for wireless convergence applications. Digital link achieves the highest fidelity, with the sacrifice of huge bandwidth due to the high resolution of digitization, and large power consumption due to the exhaustive digital data recovery. Analog link avoids these drawbacks, but it inevitably suffers from the SNR degradation. In this paper, we propose the angle modulation for analog optical link, which successfully breaks the SNR ceiling of amplitude modulation, and achieves ultrahigh link fidelity. Using the digital link (CPRI) equivalent bandwidth, angle modulation exhibits around 30-dB SNR advantage over the conventional amplitude modulation. Combined with its high tolerance on link nonlinearity, angle modulation has great potential in the future SNR-hungry analog optical applications.

  9. High Grazing Angle Sea-Clutter Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Optimal and sub-optimal detection .................................................................... 37 7.3 Polarimetry ... polarimetry for target detection from high grazing angles. UNCLASSIFIED DSTO-GD-0736 UNCLASSIFIED 36 7.1 Parametric modelling There have not been...relationships were also found to be intrinsically related to Gaussian detection counterparts. 7.3 Polarimetry Early studies by Stacy et al. [45, 46] and

  10. Multiple exchange and high-energy fixed-angle scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Halliday, I G; Orzalesi, C A; Tau, M

    1975-01-01

    The application of the eikonal ansatz to fermion fermion elastic scattering with Abelian vector gluon exchanges is discussed. The behaviours of the elastic scattering amplitude and the elastic form factor are considered and an important mechanism for fixed angle high energy elastic scattering is identified. (6 refs).

  11. Hot, Fast Faults: Evidence for High-Temperature Slip on Exhumed Faults, and Insights into Seismic Slip Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J. P.; Ault, A. K.; Janecke, S. U.; Prante, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Microstructural and geochemical techniques combined with prior observations of naturally occurring faults provide insights into slip rates and slip dimensions of seismicity. We review four indicators for high coseismic paleotemperatures in brittle to semi-brittle faults from a wide range of tectonic settings with mm to km of slip. Thin, high-gloss, Fe-rich slip surfaces indicate high-temperature slip occurred on mm- to m-scales. Elliptical and circular zones of concentric iridescence indicate localized sites of elevated temperature that may be caused by heating at asperity contacts. The surface iridescence is associated with changes in Fe oxidation states detected by X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Minimum temperature increases of 300 °C above ambient are supported by geochemical arguments and up to 800 °C are supported by analogs to high-speed friction experiments in steels and ceramics firing in reduced conditions. The presence of clay-rich foliated fault-related rocks, and the presence of nm- to mm-thick clay coatings indicate that syn-kinematic endothermic reactions occur at a range of scales. We suggest these features reflect temperature increases of ≥100-200 °C for activation energy required to drive the clay alteration is sourced from seismic energy and Schleicher-van der Pluijm-type slip surfaces to record instantaneous slip. Dense, low porosity planar porcelainite zones mm- to cm-thick along fault surfaces are the result of sintering of quartz-clay-feldspar mixtures and indicate T≥1000 °C localized along the surfaces, the result of post-slip cooling. Highly indurated, ultrafine fault-related rocks often consists of comminuted grains, vein fragments, and neocrystallized grains that represent retrograde cooling or alteration after peak heating. These observations and those of other recent workers indicate that many naturally occurring exhumed faults record elevated temperatures. In many cases, careful observations can delineate fault slip

  12. Non-linear Flight Dynamics at High Angles of Attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granasy, P.; Sørensen, C.B.; Mosekilde, Erik

    1998-01-01

    The methods of nonlinear dynamics are applied to the longitudinal motion of a vectored thrust aircraft, in particular the behavior at high angles of attack. Our model contains analytic nonlinear aerodynamical coefficients based on NASA windtunnel experiments on the F-18 high-alpha research vehicle...... (HARV). When the aircraft is forced with small thrust deflections whilst in poststall equilibrium, chaotic motion is observed at certain frequencies. At other frequencies, several limiting states coexist....

  13. Angles-only relative navigation in highly elliptical orbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li-jia; CUI Nai-gang

    2010-01-01

    For angles-only relative navigation system only measures line-of-sight information,there are inherent problems in the ability to determine the range between Chaser and Target.Angles-only relative navigation is an at tractive alternative for inspecting or rendezvous with noncooperative target,if adequate accuracy can be achieved.Angles-only relative navigation model considering J2 perturbation is presented for tracking and rendezvous with nonco operative target in highly elliptical orbit.Impulsive out-of-plane maneuvers of the Chaser axe used to improve the navigation accuracy.The frrst impulse burns in cross-track directions to change the orbit inclination of the Chaser.The second impulse burns after one orbit period to change the orbit of the Chaser back.The simulation results show that the relative navigation system without maneuvers can' t correct the initial state errors,while impulsive out-of plane maneuvers of the Chaser improves the navigation accuracy.Angles-only relative navigation with chaser vehicle maneuvers to improve observability is effective when the spacecrafts are in highly elliptical orbits.

  14. Fault slip and earthquake recurrence along strike-slip faults — Contributions of high-resolution geomorphic data

    KAUST Repository

    Zielke, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Understanding earthquake (EQ) recurrence relies on information about the timing and size of past EQ ruptures along a given fault. Knowledge of a fault\\'s rupture history provides valuable information on its potential future behavior, enabling seismic hazard estimates and loss mitigation. Stratigraphic and geomorphic evidence of faulting is used to constrain the recurrence of surface rupturing EQs. Analysis of the latter data sets culminated during the mid-1980s in the formulation of now classical EQ recurrence models, now routinely used to assess seismic hazard. Within the last decade, Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) surveying technology and other high-resolution data sets became increasingly available to tectono-geomorphic studies, promising to contribute to better-informed models of EQ recurrence and slip-accumulation patterns. After reviewing motivation and background, we outline requirements to successfully reconstruct a fault\\'s offset accumulation pattern from geomorphic evidence. We address sources of uncertainty affecting offset measurement and advocate approaches to minimize them. A number of recent studies focus on single-EQ slip distributions and along-fault slip accumulation patterns. We put them in context with paleoseismic studies along the respective faults by comparing coefficients of variation CV for EQ inter-event time and slip-per-event and find that a) single-event offsets vary over a wide range of length-scales and the sources for offset variability differ with length-scale, b) at fault-segment length-scales, single-event offsets are essentially constant, c) along-fault offset accumulation as resolved in the geomorphic record is dominated by essentially same-size, large offset increments, and d) there is generally no one-to-one correlation between the offset accumulation pattern constrained in the geomorphic record and EQ occurrence as identified in the stratigraphic record, revealing the higher resolution and preservation potential of

  15. High Speed Fault Injection Tool Implemented With Verilog HDL on FPGA for Testing Fault Tolerance Designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gopinath Reddy

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an FPGA-based fault injection tool, called FITO that supports several synthesizable fault models for dependability analysis of digital systems modeled by Verilog HDL. Using the FITO, experiments can be performed in real-time with good controllability and observability. As a case study, an Open RISC 1200 microprocessor was evaluated using an FPGA circuit. About 4000 permanent, transient, and SEUfaults were injected into this microprocessor. The results show that the FITO tool is more than 79 times faster than a pure simulation-based fault injection with only 2.5% FPGA area overhead.

  16. Coordinated Fault Tolerance for High-Performance Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongarra, Jack; Bosilca, George; et al.

    2013-04-08

    Our work to meet our goal of end-to-end fault tolerance has focused on two areas: (1) improving fault tolerance in various software currently available and widely used throughout the HEC domain and (2) using fault information exchange and coordination to achieve holistic, systemwide fault tolerance and understanding how to design and implement interfaces for integrating fault tolerance features for multiple layers of the software stack—from the application, math libraries, and programming language runtime to other common system software such as jobs schedulers, resource managers, and monitoring tools.

  17. Fault tolerant, radiation hard, high performance digital signal processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmann, Edgar; Linscott, Ivan R.; Maurer, Michael J.; Tyler, G. L.; Libby, Vibeke

    1990-01-01

    An architecture has been developed for a high-performance VLSI digital signal processor that is highly reliable, fault-tolerant, and radiation-hard. The signal processor, part of a spacecraft receiver designed to support uplink radio science experiments at the outer planets, organizes the connections between redundant arithmetic resources, register files, and memory through a shuffle exchange communication network. The configuration of the network and the state of the processor resources are all under microprogram control, which both maps the resources according to algorithmic needs and reconfigures the processing should a failure occur. In addition, the microprogram is reloadable through the uplink to accommodate changes in the science objectives throughout the course of the mission. The processor will be implemented with silicon compiler tools, and its design will be verified through silicon compilation simulation at all levels from the resources to full functionality. By blending reconfiguration with redundancy the processor implementation is fault-tolerant and reliable, and possesses the long expected lifetime needed for a spacecraft mission to the outer planets.

  18. Fault Modeling of ECL for High Fault Coverage of Physical Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankaran M. Menon

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Bipolar Emitter Coupled Logic (ECL devices can now be fabricated at higher densities and consumes much lower power. Behaviour of simple and complex ECL gates are examined in the presence of physical faults. The effectiveness of the classical stuck-at model in representing physical failures in ECL gates is examined. It is shown that the conventional stuck-at fault model cannot represent a majority of circuit level faults. A new augmented stuck-at fault model is presented which provides a significantly higher coverage of physical failures. The model may be applicable to other logic families that use logic gates with both true and complementary outputs. A design for testability approach is suggested for on-line detection of certain error conditions occurring in gates with true and complementary outputs which is a normal implementation for ECL devices.

  19. High angle of attack aerodynamics subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flows

    CERN Document Server

    Rom, Josef

    1992-01-01

    The aerodynamics of aircraft at high angles of attack is a subject which is being pursued diligently, because the modern agile fighter aircraft and many of the current generation of missiles must perform well at very high incidence, near and beyond stall. However, a comprehensive presentation of the methods and results applicable to the studies of the complex aerodynamics at high angle of attack has not been covered in monographs or textbooks. This book is not the usual textbook in that it goes beyond just presenting the basic theoretical and experimental know-how, since it contains reference material to practical calculation methods and technical and experimental results which can be useful to the practicing aerospace engineers and scientists. It can certainly be used as a text and reference book for graduate courses on subjects related to high angles of attack aerodynamics and for topics related to three-dimensional separation in viscous flow courses. In addition, the book is addressed to the aerodynamicist...

  20. Atomistic aspects of crack propagation along high angle grain boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas, D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-31

    The author presents atomistic simulations of the crack tip configuration near a high angle {Sigma} = 5 [001](210) symmetrical tilt grain boundary in NiAl. The simulations were carried out using molecular statics and embedded atom (EAM) potentials. The cracks are stabilized near a Griffith condition involving the cohesive energy of the grain boundary. The atomistic configurations of the tip region are different in the presence of the high angle grain boundary than in the bulk. Three different configurations of the grain boundary were studied corresponding to different local compositions. It was found that in ordered NiAl, cracks along symmetrical tilt boundaries show a more brittle behavior for Al rich boundaries than for Ni-rich boundaries. Lattice trapping effects in grain boundary fracture were found to be more significant than in the bulk.

  1. Ticoflux I - Seismic Results: Deep Crustal Faulting Associated With Localized Very High Heat Flow in the Cocos Plate Offshore Northern Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, E.; Fisher, A.; Wheat, G.; Hutnak, M.; Cherkaoui, A.; Bodzin, R.; Friedmann, P.; Cleary, R.

    2001-12-01

    Anomalously low heat flow was documented in the Middle America Trench off northern Costa Rica (Langseth and Silver, 1996) and confirmed by ODP drilling. Understanding the fluid and thermal structure of the incoming crust is a primary input to the Subduction Factory. Ticoflux I greatly increased the number of heat flow stations and obtained 1800 km of 480 channel MCS data and accompanying hydrosweep swath bathymetry, along with 43 gravity and piston cores. Twenty km from the region of ultra low heat flow (5-8 mW/sq m), we found abnormally high values (up to 643 mW/sq m) associated with a basement high. Dipping northward from this high is a low angle fault (approx. 25 degrees) that cuts the entire oceanic crust to depths of 2 seconds below the sediment-basement interface. We have imaged the fault on three parallel seismic lines and one crossing line. The fault surface varies from planar to sinuous in these sections, whereas the crossing line runs parallel to the fault and images as a non-dipping reflection deep in the crust. The local juxtaposition between very low and very high heat flow may be understood in terms of thermally driven fluid flow, and geochemical studies support a source of fluids either deep within the oceanic crust or derived from the adjacent subduction zone. The sense of displacement along the fault has not been determined, though a component of normal slip is likely. It strikes at a high angle to the magnetic anomalies but no transform trends are reported here. The fault appears to be an older feature of the crust because Plio-Pleistocene sediments are not clearly displaced, yet high reflectivity of the fault surface may indicate high porosity in the fault zone, possibly supported by elevated fluid pressures.

  2. Mechanical Fault Diagnosis of High Voltage Circuit Breakers with Unknown Fault Type Using Hybrid Classifier Based on LMD and Time Segmentation Energy Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nantian Huang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the identification accuracy of the high voltage circuit breakers’ (HVCBs mechanical fault types without training samples, a novel mechanical fault diagnosis method of HVCBs using a hybrid classifier constructed with Support Vector Data Description (SVDD and fuzzy c-means (FCM clustering method based on Local Mean Decomposition (LMD and time segmentation energy entropy (TSEE is proposed. Firstly, LMD is used to decompose nonlinear and non-stationary vibration signals of HVCBs into a series of product functions (PFs. Secondly, TSEE is chosen as feature vectors with the superiority of energy entropy and characteristics of time-delay faults of HVCBs. Then, SVDD trained with normal samples is applied to judge mechanical faults of HVCBs. If the mechanical fault is confirmed, the new fault sample and all known fault samples are clustered by FCM with the cluster number of known fault types. Finally, another SVDD trained by the specific fault samples is used to judge whether the fault sample belongs to an unknown type or not. The results of experiments carried on a real SF6 HVCB validate that the proposed fault-detection method is effective for the known faults with training samples and unknown faults without training samples.

  3. Fault Diagnosis and Fault Tolerant Control with Application on a Wind Turbine Low Speed Shaft Encoder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Sardi, Hector Eloy Sanchez; Escobet, Teressa

    2015-01-01

    . This sensor has to be correct as blade pitch actions should be different at different azimuth angle as the wind speed varies within the rotor field due to different phenomena. A scheme detecting faults in this sensor has previously been designed for the application of a high end fault diagnosis and fault...... tolerant control of wind turbines using a benchmark model. In this paper, the fault diagnosis scheme is improved and integrated with a fault accommodation scheme which enables and disables the individual pitch algorithm based on the fault detection. In this way, the blade and tower loads are not increased...

  4. High resolution, shallow seismic reflection survey of the Pen Branch fault

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stieve, A.

    1991-05-15

    The purpose of this project, at the Savannah River River Site (SRS) was to acquire, process, and interpret 28 km (17.4 miles) of high resolution seismic reflection data taken across the trace of the Pen Branch fault and other suspected, intersecting north-south trending faults. The survey was optimized for the upper 300 ft of geologic strata in order to demonstrate the existence of very shallow, flat lying horizons, and to determine the depth of the fault or to sediments deformed by the fault. Field acquisition and processing parameters were selected to define small scale spatial variability and structural features in the vicinity of the Pen Branch fault leading to the definition and the location of the Pen Branch fault, the shallowest extent of the fault, and the quantification of the sense and magnitude of motion. Associated geophysical, borehole, and geologic data were incorporated into the investigation to assist in the determination of optimal parameters and aid in the interpretation.

  5. Multiple incipient sensor faults diagnosis with application to high-speed railway traction devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yunkai; Jiang, Bin; Lu, Ningyun; Yang, Hao; Zhou, Yang

    2017-03-01

    This paper deals with the problem of incipient fault diagnosis for a class of Lipschitz nonlinear systems with sensor biases and explores further results of total measurable fault information residual (ToMFIR). Firstly, state and output transformations are introduced to transform the original system into two subsystems. The first subsystem is subject to system disturbances and free from sensor faults, while the second subsystem contains sensor faults but without any system disturbances. Sensor faults in the second subsystem are then formed as actuator faults by using a pseudo-actuator based approach. Since the effects of system disturbances on the residual are completely decoupled, multiple incipient sensor faults can be detected by constructing ToMFIR, and the fault detectability condition is then derived for discriminating the detectable incipient sensor faults. Further, a sliding-mode observers (SMOs) based fault isolation scheme is designed to guarantee accurate isolation of multiple sensor faults. Finally, simulation results conducted on a CRH2 high-speed railway traction device are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  6. Independence-oriented VMD to identify fault feature for wheel set bearing fault diagnosis of high speed locomotive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zipeng; Chen, Jinglong; Zi, Yanyang; Pan, Jun

    2017-02-01

    As one of most critical component of high-speed locomotive, wheel set bearing fault identification has attracted an increasing attention in recent years. However, non-stationary vibration signal with modulation phenomenon and heavy background noise make it difficult to excavate the hidden weak fault feature. Variational Mode Decomposition (VMD), which can decompose the non-stationary signal into couple Intrinsic Mode Functions adaptively and non-recursively, brings a feasible tool. However, heavy background noise seriously affects setting of mode number, which may lead to information loss or over decomposition problem. In this paper, an independence-oriented VMD method via correlation analysis is proposed to adaptively extract weak and compound fault feature of wheel set bearing. To overcome the information loss problem, the appropriate mode number is determined by the criterion of approximate complete reconstruction. Then the similar modes are combined according to the similarity of their envelopes to solve the over decomposition problem. Finally, three applications to wheel set bearing fault of high speed locomotive verify the effectiveness of the proposed method compared with original VMD, EMD and EEMD methods.

  7. A High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey to Identify Buried Faults at Dixie Valley, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Richard Paul; Grauch, V. J. S.; Blackwell, David D.

    2002-09-01

    Preliminary results from a high-resolution aeromagnetic survey (200m line spacing) acquired in Dixie Valley early in 2002 provide confirmation of intra-basin faulting based on subtle surface indications. In addition the data allow identification of the locations and trends of many faults that have not been recognized at the surface, and provide a picture of intrabasin faulting patterns not possible using other techniques. The data reveal a suite of northeasterly-trending curving and branching faults that surround a relatively coherent block in the area of Humboldt Salt Marsh, the deepest part of the basin. The producing reservoir occurs at the north end of this coherent block, where rampart faults from the northwest side of the valley merge with anthithetic faults from the central and southeast parts of the valley.

  8. High-pressure magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, David W.; Turcu, Romulus V. F.; Sears, Jesse A.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Burton, Sarah D.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2011-10-01

    A high-pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR capability, consisting of a reusable high-pressure MAS rotor, a high-pressure rotor loading/reaction chamber for in situ sealing and re-opening of the high-pressure MAS rotor, and a MAS probe with a localized RF coil for background signal suppression, is reported. The unusual technical challenges associated with development of a reusable high-pressure MAS rotor are addressed in part by modifying standard ceramics for the rotor sleeve by abrading the internal surface at both ends of the cylinder. In this way, not only is the advantage of ceramic cylinders for withstanding very high-pressure utilized, but also plastic bushings can be glued tightly in place so that other removable plastic sealing mechanisms/components and O-rings can be mounted to create the desired high-pressure seal. Using this strategy, sealed internal pressures exceeding 150 bars have been achieved and sustained under ambient external pressure with minimal loss of pressure for 72 h. As an application example, in situ13C MAS NMR studies of mineral carbonation reaction intermediates and final products of forsterite (Mg 2SiO 4) reacted with supercritical CO 2 and H 2O at 150 bar and 50 °C are reported, with relevance to geological sequestration of carbon dioxide.

  9. High-pressure magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyt, David W.; Turcu, Romulus V. F.; Sears, Jesse A.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Burton, Sarah D.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2011-10-01

    A high-pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR capability, consisting of a reusable high-pressure MAS rotor, a high-pressure rotor loading/reaction chamber for in situ sealing and re-opening of the high-pressure MAS rotor, and a MAS probe with a localized RF coil for background signal suppression, is reported. The unusual technical challenges associated with development of a reusable high-pressure MAS rotor are addressed in part by modifying standard ceramics for the rotor sleeve by abrading the internal surface at both ends of the cylinder. In this way, not only is the advantage of ceramic cylinders for withstanding very high-pressure utilized, but also plastic bushings can be glued tightly in place so that other removable plastic sealing mechanisms/components and O-rings can be mounted to create the desired high-pressure seal. Using this strategy, sealed internal pressures exceeding 150 bars have been achieved and sustained under ambient external pressure with minimal loss of pressure for 72 h. Finally, as an application example, in situ13C MAS NMR studies of mineral carbonation reaction intermediates and final products of forsterite (Mg2SiO4) reacted with supercritical CO2 and H2O at 150 bar and 50 °C are reported, with relevance to geological sequestration of carbon dioxide.

  10. Dynamic weakening by nanoscale smoothing during high velocity fault slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X.; Madden, A. S.; Bickmore, B. R.; Reches, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Rock friction is commonly determined through measurements on rock samples with areas from a few cm^2 to 1 m^2. On the other hand, theoretical models suggest that frictional processes are scale-dependent, and active at scales of a few microns or less. We used Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) to determine the frictional strength and roughness of experimental fault surfaces that slipped under high velocity (Sierra White granite (SWG) and Kasota dolomite (KD), and the sheared surfaces were sampled for the nanoscale measurements by the AFM. The friction coefficient (FC) at the sub-micron scale was measured by using the AFM to press & shear a tiny silica glass bead against the rock surface (Stiernstedt et al., 2005). The 3D morphology of the fault surfaces at the nano- to microscale was measured with the standard AFM intermittent contact mode with sharp tip probe. In the AFM friction measurements, a total of 43 sites have been measured and each site was repeated hundreds of times; 33 of these sites were measured under air and 10 sites were measured under deionized water. The SWG and KD samples display FC values that vary systematically with orientation and conditions. Room-dry, un-sheared surfaces have FC = 0.64 ± 0.05 for both rock types. KD normal to striations has FC = 0.60 ± 0.15. SWG rough, sheared surface display FC = 0.71 ± 0.02. Significant friction drop was observed under dry, parallel to striations, with FC = 0.34 ± 0.08 (KD) and FC = 0.52 ± 0.03 (SWG). Under wet (water covered) conditions parallel to slickensides, the friction dropped even further to FC = 0.15 ± 0.05 (dolomite) and FC = 0.31 ± 0.05 (granite). The nanoscale FC (room dry, parallel to striations) is comparable to the macroscopic FC for the host experiments. Roughness calculations are based on AFM topographic images, and analyzed by both Power Spectral Density (PSD) and RMS. The PSD curves display a clear, expected trend: the cleaved biotite is the smoothest surface, the un-sheared surface is

  11. Continent-scale strike-slip on a low-angle fault beneath New Zealand's Southern Alps: Implications for crustal thickening in oblique collision zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Simon; Smith, Euan; Stern, Tim; Warren-Smith, Emily

    2015-09-01

    New Zealand's Southern Alps lie adjacent to the continent-scale dextral strike-slip Alpine Fault, on the boundary between the Pacific and Australian plates. We show with a simple 2-D model of crustal balancing that the observed crustal root and erosion (expressed as equivalent crustal shortening) is up to twice that predicted by the orthogonal plate convergence since ˜11 Ma, and even since ˜23 Ma when the Alpine Fault formed. We consider two explanations for this, involving a strong component of motion along the length of the plate-boundary zone. Geophysical data indicate that the Alpine Fault has a listric geometry, flattening at mid crustal levels, and has accommodated sideways underthrusting of Australian plate crust beneath Pacific plate crust. The geometry of the crustal root, together with plate reconstructions, requires the underthrust crust to be the hyperextended part of an asymmetric rift system which formed over 500 km farther south during the Eocene—the narrow remnant part today forms the western margin of the Campbell Plateau. At ˜10 Ma, the hyperextended margin underwent shallow subduction in the Puysegur subduction zone, and then was dragged over 300 km along the length of the Southern Alps beneath a low-angle (plate boundary zone, providing a mechanism for clockwise rotation of the Hikurangi margin.

  12. High T-P frictional strength and stability of exhumed fault core gouges, Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulton, C. J.; Moore, D. E.; Lockner, D. A.; Toy, V. G.; Townend, J.; Sutherland, R.

    2013-12-01

    Borehole temperature measurements acquired during the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP-1) reveal a high geothermal gradient at shallow depths on the central Alpine Fault, New Zealand [62.6×2.1°C/km; Sutherland et al., 2012]. To investigate how an elevated geothermal gradient might affect fault strength and stability, eighteen hydrothermal shearing experiments have been performed using samples of two fault gouges recovered from depths of 90 m and 128 m. Using a triaxial deformation apparatus, ten experiments were conducted following a lithostatic pressure gradient (average crustal density, ρ, = 2650 kg/m3), hydrostatic pore fluid pressure (pore fluid factor, λ, = 0.40), and a 35°C/km geothermal gradient. Six experiments were conducted at equivalent effective normal stresses with elevated temperatures, and two experiments were conducted at room temperature, σn'=31.2 MPa. Sliding velocities varied between 0.01 μm/s and 3 μm/s. The coefficient of friction of montmorillonite-bearing DFDP-1B brown gouge was observed to increase markedly with temperature and pressure (T=70°C to 210°C, σn'=31.2 MPa to 93.6 MPa), from μ=0.49 to μ=0.74; it also underwent a stability transition from positive to negative rate dependence at 140°C, σn'=62.4 MPa. The chlorite/white mica-bearing DFDP-1A blue gouge was frictionally strong (μ=0.61-0.76) across a range of experimental conditions (T=70°C to 350°C, σn'=31.2 MPa to 156 MPa) and underwent a stability transition from positive to negative rate dependence at 210°C, σn'≥31.2 MPa. To investigate the conditions necessary for shear failure to occur on a fault plane composed of the 1A blue gouge, the experimentally determined coefficient of friction (μ=0.70 at T=210°C and σn'=62.4 MPa to 93.6 MPa) was used with the seismologically determined stress tensor [Boese et al., 2012] in a three-dimensional analysis following the method of Leclère and Fabbri [2013]. A low stress ratio, (σ2-σ3)/(σ1-σ3)≤0.30, and/or pore

  13. Coordinated Fault-Tolerance for High-Performance Computing Final Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panda, Dhabaleswar Kumar [The Ohio State University; Beckman, Pete

    2011-07-28

    With the Coordinated Infrastructure for Fault Tolerance Systems (CIFTS, as the original project came to be called) project, our aim has been to understand and tackle the following broad research questions, the answers to which will help the HEC community analyze and shape the direction of research in the field of fault tolerance and resiliency on future high-end leadership systems. Will availability of global fault information, obtained by fault information exchange between the different HEC software on a system, allow individual system software to better detect, diagnose, and adaptively respond to faults? If fault-awareness is raised throughout the system through fault information exchange, is it possible to get all system software working together to provide a more comprehensive end-to-end fault management on the system? What are the missing fault-tolerance features that widely used HEC system software lacks today that would inhibit such software from taking advantage of systemwide global fault information? What are the practical limitations of a systemwide approach for end-to-end fault management based on fault awareness and coordination? What mechanisms, tools, and technologies are needed to bring about fault awareness and coordination of responses on a leadership-class system? What standards, outreach, and community interaction are needed for adoption of the concept of fault awareness and coordination for fault management on future systems? Keeping our overall objectives in mind, the CIFTS team has taken a parallel fourfold approach. Our central goal was to design and implement a light-weight, scalable infrastructure with a simple, standardized interface to allow communication of fault-related information through the system and facilitate coordinated responses. This work led to the development of the Fault Tolerance Backplane (FTB) publish-subscribe API specification, together with a reference implementation and several experimental implementations on top of

  14. The high granularity and large solid angle detection array EXPADES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strano, E., E-mail: estrano@pd.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); INFN – Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Anastasio, A. [INFN – Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Bettini, M. [INFN – Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Boiano, A. [INFN – Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Boiano, C. [INFN – Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Cassese, C. [INFN – Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Castellani, L.; Corti, D. [INFN – Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Di Meo, P. [INFN – Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Galet, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Glodariu, T. [NIPNE, Str. Reactorului No. 30, P.O. Box MG-6, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Grebosz, J. [IFJ PAN, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Kraków (Poland); Guglielmetti, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); INFN – Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); La Commara, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Università di Napoli, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); INFN – Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Manea, C. [INFN – Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Mazzocco, M.; Molini, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); INFN – Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Nicoletto, M. [INFN – Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); and others

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • We realized a detection array for Exotic Radioactive Ion Beams. • High granularity (32 × 32 pixels 2 × 2 mm wide for 8 telescopes). • High solid angle (8 telescopes 64 × 64 mm wide in a cylindrical configuration covering up to 2.6 sr). • We tested each component of the array by both alpha particles and in-beam environment. • We measured the angular distribution for {sup 17}O elastic scattering on a {sup 58}Ni target. -- Abstract: The EXPADES (EXotic PArticle DEtection System) detector array consists of 16 Double Side Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSSD) with active areas of 64 × 64 mm{sup 2}, arranged in 8 ΔE (40/50 μm)–E (300 μm) telescopes. All detector faces are segmented into 32 × 2-mm wide strips, ensuring a 2 × 2 mm{sup 2} pixel configuration. Eight ionization chambers can be alternatively used as ΔE stages or, if needed, as an additional third layer for more complex triple telescopes. The signals from silicon ΔE layers and from ionization chambers are read by standard electronics, while innovative 32-channel ASIC chips are employed for the readout of the E stages. The results of off-line tests with alpha sources and from the first in-beam experiment with a {sup 17}O beam are presented.

  15. Continental Dynamics in High Tibetan Plateau: Normal Faulting Type Earthquake Activities and Mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Jiren; Zhao Zhixin

    2009-01-01

    Various earthquake fault types were analyzed for this study on the crust movement in the high region of the Tibetan plateau by analyzing mechanism solutions and stress fields. The results show that a lot of normal faulting type earthquakes are concentrated in the central High Tibetan plateau. Many of them are nearly perfect normal fault events. The strikes of the fault planes of normal faulting earthquakes are almost in an N-S direction based on the analyses of the Wulff stereonet diagrams of fault plane solutions. It implies that the dislocation slip vectors of the normal faulting type events have quite great components in the E-W direction. The extensions probably are an eastward extensional motion, being mainly a tectonic active regime in the plateau altitudes. The tensional stress in the E-W or NWW-SEE direction predominates earthquake occurrences in the normal event region of the central plateau. The eastward extensional motion in the high Tibetan plateau is attributable to the gravitational collapse of the high plateau and the eastward extrusion of hotter mantle materials beneath the east boundary of the plateau. Extensional motions from the relaxation of the topography and/or gravitational collapse in the high plateau hardly occurred along the N-S direction. The obstruction for the plateau to move eastward is rather weak.

  16. The Pinning by Particles of Low and High Angle Grain Boundaries during Grain Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tweed, C.J.; Ralph, B.; Hansen, Niels

    1984-01-01

    and coworkers. These estimates of local driving pressures have shown that they are similar for both the low and the high angle boundaries encountered in the samples. The pinning effects by particles at high angle boundaries are in general accord with the model due to Zener whilst those at low angle boundaries...

  17. High-Resolution LiDAR Topography of the Plate-Boundary Faults in Northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, C. S.; Phillips, D. A.; Furlong, K. P.; Brown, A.; Crosby, C. J.; Bevis, M.; Shrestha, R.; Sartori, M.; Brocher, T. M.; Brown, J.

    2007-12-01

    GeoEarthScope acquired more than 1500 square km of airborne LiDAR data in northern California, providing high-resolution topographic data of most of the major strike-slip faults in the region. The coverage includes the San Andreas Fault from its northern end near Shelter Cove to near Parkfield, as well as the Rodgers Creek, Maacama, Calaveras, Green Valley, Paicines, and San Gregorio Faults. The Hayward fault was added with funding provided by the US Geological Survey, the City of Berkeley, and the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission. Data coverage is typically one kilometer in width, centered on the fault. In areas of particular fault complexity the swath width was increased to two kilometers, and in selected areas swath width is as wide as five kilometers. A five-km-wide swath was flown perpendicular to the plate boundary immediately south of Cape Mendocino to capture previously unidentified faults and to understand off-fault deformation associated with the transition zone between the transform margin and the Cascadia subduction zone. The data were collected in conjunction with an intensive GPS campaign designed to improve absolute data accuracy and provide quality control. Data processing to classify the LiDAR point data by return type allows users to filter out vegetation and produce high-resolution DEMs of the ground surface beneath forested regions, revealing geomorphic features along and adjacent to the faults. These data will allow more accurate mapping of fault traces in regions where the vegetation canopy has hampered this effort in the past. In addition, the data provide the opportunity to locate potential sites for detailed paleoseismic studies aimed at providing slip rates and event chronologies. The GeoEarthScope LiDAR data will be made available via an interactive data distribution and processing workflow currently under development.

  18. New High-Resolution 3D Seismic Imagery of Deformation and Fault Architecture Along Newport-Inglewood/Rose Canyon Fault in the Inner California Borderlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, J. J.; Bormann, J. M.; Driscoll, N. W.; Kent, G.; Harding, A. J.; Wesnousky, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    The tectonic deformation and geomorphology of the Inner California Borderlands (ICB) records the transition from a convergent plate margin to a predominantly dextral strike-slip system. Geodetic measurements of plate boundary deformation onshore indicate that approximately 15%, or 6-8 mm/yr, of the total Pacific-North American relative plate motion is accommodated by faults offshore. The largest near-shore fault system, the Newport-Inglewood/Rose Canyon (NI/RC) fault complex, has a Holocene slip rate estimate of 1.5-2.0 mm/yr, according to onshore trenching, and current models suggest the potential to produce an Mw 7.0+ earthquake. The fault zone extends approximately 120 km, initiating from the south near downtown San Diego and striking northwards with a constraining bend north of Mt. Soledad in La Jolla and continuing northwestward along the continental shelf, eventually stepping onshore at Newport Beach, California. In late 2013, we completed the first high-resolution 3D seismic survey (3.125 m bins) of the NI/RC fault offshore of San Onofre as part of the Southern California Regional Fault Mapping project. We present new constraints on fault geometry and segmentation of the fault system that may play a role in limiting the extent of future earthquake ruptures. In addition, slip rate estimates using piercing points such as offset channels will be explored. These new observations will allow us to investigate recent deformation and strain transfer along the NI/RC fault system.

  19. Quaternary layer anomalies around the Carlsberg Fault zone mapped with high-resolution shear-wave seismics south of Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammann, Janina; Hübscher, Christian; Nielsen, Lars

    . In the Upper Cretaceous growth faulting documents continued rifting. This finding contrasts the Late Cretaceous to Paleogene inversion tectonics in neighboring structures, as the Tornquist Zone. The high-resolution shear-wave seismic method was used to image structures in Quaternary layers in the Carlsberg....... In the shear-wave profile, we imaged the 30 m of the upward continuation of the Carlsberg Fault zone. In our area of investigation, the fault zone appears to comprise normal block faults and one reverse block fault showing the complexity of the fault zone. The observed faults appear to affect both the Danian......The Carlsberg Fault zone is located in the N-S striking Höllviken Graben and traverses the city of Copenhagen. The fault zone is a NNW-SSE striking structure in direct vicinity to the transition zone of the Danish Basin and the Baltic Shield. Recent small earthquakes indicate activity in the area...

  20. Definition and Paleoseismology of the Active, Left-Lateral Enriquillo-Plantain Garden Fault Zone Based on High-Resolution Chirp Profiles: Lakes Azuey and Mirogoane, Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Mann, P.; von Lignau, A. V.

    2014-12-01

    In July 2014, we obtained a total of 94 km of high-resolution Chirp profiles from the 129 km2, brackish Lake Azuey and 37 km of profiles from the 14 km2, fresh water Lake Mirogoane that both straddle the active trace of the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault zone (EPGFZ) of Haiti. 80% of the grid on Azuey and 85% on Mirogoane was dedicated to north-south profiles of the EPGFZ. In Azuey we defined the linear and east-west-striking fault trace in deformed Holocene sediments along with its landfalls west of Lake Azuey in Haiti and east of Lake Azuey in the Dominican Republic. All profiles showed the fault to be a sub-vertical flower structure whose active traces could be traced on Chirp data to a depth of 30 m below the lake floor. Previous workers have suggested that this fault ruptured during a large November, 1751, earthquake with a parallel and elongate felt zone. We hypothesize the most recent break of the fault several meters below the lake floor to have formed during the 1751 event but plan a coring program to precisely constrain the timing of historical and prehistorical events based on syn-faulting colluvial wedges observed on Chirp profiles. Our survey of Mirogoane confirmed its rhomboidal pull-apart structure with the basin center at a depth of 42-8 m making this basin the deepest lake in the Caribbean region. Deformational features include active folds at the lake bottom, large oblique-slip normal faults at an angle to the bounding east-west faults, and 30 m of recognizable stratigraphy. The 7 m of Holocene cored in the basin center in 1988 is observed to be highly deformed and locally folded and overlies with angular unconformity a well stratified and more folded lower basinal unit. Historical events are proposed to have ruptured on or near this segment of the EPGFZ in 1701 and 1770.

  1. The offshore Yangsan fault activity in the Quaternary, SE Korea: Analysis of high-resolution seismic profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han-Joon; Moon, Seonghoon; Jou, Hyeong-Tae; Lee, Gwang Hoon; Yoo, Dong Geun; Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Kwang Hee

    2016-12-01

    The NNE-trending dextral Yangsan fault is a > 190-km-long structure in the Korean Peninsula traced to the southeastern coast. The scarcity of Quaternary deposits onland precludes any detailed investigation of the Quaternary activity and structure of the Yangsan fault using seismic reflection profiling. We acquired offshore high-resolution seismic profiles to investigate the extension of the Yangsan fault and constrain its Quaternary activity using stratigraphic markers. The seismic profiles reveal a NNE-trending fault system consisting of a main fault and an array of subsidiary faults that displaced Quaternary sequences. Stratigraphic analysis of seismic profiles indicates that the offshore faults were activated repeatedly in the Quaternary. The up-to-the-east sense of throw on the main fault and plan-view pattern of the fault system are explained by dextral strike-slip faulting. The main fault, when projected toward the Korean Peninsula along its strike, aligns well with the Yangsan fault. We suggest that the offshore fault system is a continuation of the Yangsan fault and has spatial correlation with weak but ongoing seismicity.

  2. High available and fault tolerant mobile communications infrastructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beiroumi, Mohammad Zib

    2006-01-01

    as it is the case for many recovery techniques. In addition, the method does not require any modification to mobile clients. The Communicating Extended Finite State Machine (CEFSM) is used to model the behavior of the infrastructure applications. The model based recovery scheme is integrated in the application...... using rollback or replication techniques inapplicable. This dissertation presents a novel failure recovery approach based on a behavioral model of the communication protocols. The new recovery method is able to deal with software and hardware faults and is particularly suitable for mobile communications...... infrastructure. The method enables the faulty applications in the infrastructure to quickly and effectively resume their services to their mobile clients with no or minimal loss of work after failure. In our approach, we do not assume a specific fault behavior for example failstop or transient behavior...

  3. Soft computing applications in high impedance fault detection in distribution systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedighi, A.-R.; Haghifam, M.-R. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Tarbiat Modarres University, P.O. Box 14115-111, Tehran (Iran); Malik, O.P. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada T2N 1N4)

    2005-09-15

    Two methods, one based on genetic algorithm (GA) and one based on neural networks (NN), are proposed for high impedance fault (HIF) detection in distribution systems. These methods are used to discriminate HIFs from isolator leakage current (ILC) and transients such as capacitor switching, load switching (high/low voltage), ground fault, inrush current and no load line switching. Wavelet transform is used for the decomposition of signals and feature extraction in both methods. In one method, GA is used for feature vector reduction and Bayes for classification. In the other method, principal component analysis (PCA) is applied for feature vector reduction and NN for classification. HIF and ILC data was acquired by experimental tests and the data for other faults was obtained by simulating a real network using EMTP. Results show that either of the proposed procedures can be used to identify HIF from other events efficiently. (author) [Bayes classifier; High impedance fault; Genetic algorithm; Neural network; Principal component analysis; Wavelet transform].

  4. Faulting mechanism of the Campania–Lucania 1980 earthquake, Italy, from high-resolution, 3D velocity structure, aftershock relocation, fault-plane solutions, and post-seismic deformation modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Scarpa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available

    This study performs a detailed reconstruction of the rupture mechanism of the 1980 Campania–Lucania (southern Italy earthquake. This is achieved by relocation of the main event through computation of fault-plane solutions of the aftershocks, P-wave velocity inversion, and analysis of post-seismic ground deformation, which provide an overall picture of the faulting mechanism. All of these data are in favor of a complex rupture mechanism, as already identified by many studies, which consists of three separate events. The present study defines a graben-like rupture, with the first event rupturing a (>20-km-long segment of a large, high-angle, NE-dipping, SE-NW-striking, normal fault. The two successive ruptures occurred separately, the first along the southern segment, and the second along the northern segment, of a complementary SW-dipping, normal fault. This mechanism is well evidenced by the revised location of the hypocenter of the main event, and the location of the aftershocks and their fault-plane solutions, as well as by the underlying three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure. The model proposed by Amoruso et al. [2005a] that was based on the inversion of co-seismic vertical displacement data is confirmed by the present analyses, as it satisfies all of the available experimental observations, and better constrains the location and fault-plane solutions of the aftershocks, the velocity discontinuities, and the rupture observations at the surface. This conclusion is also supported by analyses of the post-seismic data.

  5. Wavelet Entropy-Based Traction Inverter Open Switch Fault Diagnosis in High-Speed Railways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keting Hu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a diagnosis plan is proposed to settle the detection and isolation problem of open switch faults in high-speed railway traction system traction inverters. Five entropy forms are discussed and compared with the traditional fault detection methods, namely, discrete wavelet transform and discrete wavelet packet transform. The traditional fault detection methods cannot efficiently detect the open switch faults in traction inverters because of the low resolution or the sudden change of the current. The performances of Wavelet Packet Energy Shannon Entropy (WPESE, Wavelet Packet Energy Tsallis Entropy (WPETE with different non-extensive parameters, Wavelet Packet Energy Shannon Entropy with a specific sub-band (WPESE3,6, Empirical Mode Decomposition Shannon Entropy (EMDESE, and Empirical Mode Decomposition Tsallis Entropy (EMDETE with non-extensive parameters in detecting the open switch fault are evaluated by the evaluation parameter. Comparison experiments are carried out to select the best entropy form for the traction inverter open switch fault detection. In addition, the DC component is adopted to isolate the failure Isolated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT. The simulation experiments show that the proposed plan can diagnose single and simultaneous open switch faults correctly and timely.

  6. An Integrated Fault Tolerant Robotic Controller System for High Reliability and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzwell, Neville I.; Tso, Kam S.; Hecht, Myron

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the concepts and features of a fault-tolerant intelligent robotic control system being developed for applications that require high dependability (reliability, availability, and safety). The system consists of two major elements: a fault-tolerant controller and an operator workstation. The fault-tolerant controller uses a strategy which allows for detection and recovery of hardware, operating system, and application software failures.The fault-tolerant controller can be used by itself in a wide variety of applications in industry, process control, and communications. The controller in combination with the operator workstation can be applied to robotic applications such as spaceborne extravehicular activities, hazardous materials handling, inspection and maintenance of high value items (e.g., space vehicles, reactor internals, or aircraft), medicine, and other tasks where a robot system failure poses a significant risk to life or property.

  7. Bayesian Network Based Fault Prognosis via Bond Graph Modeling of High-Speed Railway Traction Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunkai Wu

    2015-01-01

    component-level faults accurately for a high-speed railway traction system, a fault prognosis approach via Bayesian network and bond graph modeling techniques is proposed. The inherent structure of a railway traction system is represented by bond graph model, based on which a multilayer Bayesian network is developed for fault propagation analysis and fault prediction. For complete and incomplete data sets, two different parameter learning algorithms such as Bayesian estimation and expectation maximization (EM algorithm are adopted to determine the conditional probability table of the Bayesian network. The proposed prognosis approach using Pearl’s polytree propagation algorithm for joint probability reasoning can predict the failure probabilities of leaf nodes based on the current status of root nodes. Verification results in a high-speed railway traction simulation system can demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  8. Active fault survey on the Tanlu fault zone in Laizhou Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi-cai; YANG Xi-ha; LI Chang-chuan; DENG Qi-dong; DU Xian-song; CHAO Hong-tai; WU Zi-quan; XIAO Lan-xi; SUN Zhao-ming; MIN Wei; LING Hong

    2006-01-01

    Shallow-depth acoustic reflection profiling survey has been conducted on the Tanlu fault zone in Laizhou Bay. It is found that the Tanlu fault zone is obviously active during the late Quaternary and it is still the dominating structure in this region. The Tanlu fault zone consists of two branches. The KL3 fault of the western branch is composed of several high angle normal faults which had been active during the period from the latest Pleistocene to early Holocene, dissected by a series of northeast or approximate east-west trending fault which leaped sediment of the late Pleistocene. The Longkou fault of the eastern branch consists of two right-laterally stepped segments. Late Quaternary offsets and growth strata developed along the Tanlu fault zone verify that the fault zone retained active in the latest Pleistocene to the early Holocene. The Anqiu-Juxian fault that passes through the middle of Shandong and corresponds to the Longkou fault is composed of a series of right-laterally stepped segments. The active faults along the eastern branch of the Tanlu fault zone from the Laizhou bay to the north of Anqiu make up a dextral simple shear deformation zone which is characterized by right-lateral strike-slip movement with dip-slip component during the late Quaternary.

  9. High-resolution NMR of anisotropic samples with spinning away from the magic angle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakellariou, Dimitris; Meriles, Carlos A.; Martin, Rachel W.; Pines, Alexander

    2003-03-31

    High-resolution NMR of samples in the solid state is typically performed under mechanical sample spinning around an axis that makes an angle, called the magic angle, of 54.7 degrees with the static magnetic field. There are many cases in which geometrical and engineering constraints prevent spinning at this specific angle. Implementations of in-situ and ex-situ magic angle field spinning might be extremely demanding because of the power requirements or an inconvenient sample size or geometry. Here we present a methodology based on switched angle spinning between two angles, none of which is the magic angle, which provide both isotropic and anisotropic information. Using this method, named Projected Magic Angle Spinning, we were able to obtain resolved isotropic chemical shifts in spinning samples where the broadening is mostly inhomogeneous.

  10. A diagnostic system for electrical faults in a high current discharge plasma setup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, S; Aneesh, K; Navathe, C P; Gupta, P D

    2011-02-01

    A diagnostic system to detect electrical faults inside a coaxial high current discharge device is presented here. This technique utilizes two biconical antennas picking up electromagnetic radiation from the discharge device, a voltage divider sensing input voltage, and a Rogowski coil measuring the main discharge current. A computer program then analyses frequency components in these signals and provides information as to whether the discharge event was normal or any breakdown fault occurred inside the coaxial device. The diagnostic system is developed for a 450 kV and 50 kA capillary discharge plasma setup. For the setup various possible faults are analyzed by electrical simulation, followed by experimental results. In the case of normal discharge through the capillary load the dominant frequency is ∼4 MHz. Under faulty conditions, the peak in magnitude versus frequency plot of the antenna signal changes according to the fault position which involves different paths causing variation in the equivalent circuit elements.

  11. A diagnostic system for electrical faults in a high current discharge plasma setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, S.; Aneesh, K.; Navathe, C. P.; Gupta, P. D.

    2011-02-01

    A diagnostic system to detect electrical faults inside a coaxial high current discharge device is presented here. This technique utilizes two biconical antennas picking up electromagnetic radiation from the discharge device, a voltage divider sensing input voltage, and a Rogowski coil measuring the main discharge current. A computer program then analyses frequency components in these signals and provides information as to whether the discharge event was normal or any breakdown fault occurred inside the coaxial device. The diagnostic system is developed for a 450 kV and 50 kA capillary discharge plasma setup. For the setup various possible faults are analyzed by electrical simulation, followed by experimental results. In the case of normal discharge through the capillary load the dominant frequency is ˜4 MHz. Under faulty conditions, the peak in magnitude versus frequency plot of the antenna signal changes according to the fault position which involves different paths causing variation in the equivalent circuit elements.

  12. High precision analysis of an embryonic extensional fault-related fold using 3D orthorectified virtual outcrops: The viewpoint importance in structural geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavani, Stefano; Corradetti, Amerigo; Billi, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Image-based 3D modeling has recently opened the way to the use of virtual outcrop models in geology. An intriguing application of this method involves the production of orthorectified images of outcrops using almost any user-defined point of view, so that photorealistic cross-sections suitable for numerous geological purposes and measurements can be easily generated. These purposes include the accurate quantitative analysis of fault-fold relationships starting from imperfectly oriented and partly inaccessible real outcrops. We applied the method of image-based 3D modeling and orthorectification to a case study from the northern Apennines, Italy, where an incipient extensional fault affecting well-layered limestones is exposed on a 10-m-high barely accessible cliff. Through a few simple steps, we constructed a high-quality image-based 3D model of the outcrop. In the model, we made a series of measurements including fault and bedding attitudes, which allowed us to derive the bedding-fault intersection direction. We then used this direction as viewpoint to obtain a distortion-free photorealistic cross-section, on which we measured bed dips and thicknesses as well as fault stratigraphic separations. These measurements allowed us to identify a slight difference (i.e. only 0.5°) between the hangingwall and footwall cutoff angles. We show that the hangingwall strain required to compensate the upward-decreasing displacement of the fault was accommodated by this 0.5° rotation (i.e. folding) and coeval 0.8% thickening of strata in the hangingwall relatively to footwall strata. This evidence is consistent with trishear fault-propagation folding. Our results emphasize the viewpoint importance in structural geology and therefore the potential of using orthorectified virtual outcrops.

  13. Analysis of the growth of strike-slip faults using effective medium theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydin, A.; Berryman, J.G.

    2009-10-15

    Increases in the dimensions of strike-slip faults including fault length, thickness of fault rock and the surrounding damage zone collectively provide quantitative definition of fault growth and are commonly measured in terms of the maximum fault slip. The field observations indicate that a common mechanism for fault growth in the brittle upper crust is fault lengthening by linkage and coalescence of neighboring fault segments or strands, and fault rock-zone widening into highly fractured inner damage zone via cataclastic deformation. The most important underlying mechanical reason in both cases is prior weakening of the rocks surrounding a fault's core and between neighboring fault segments by faulting-related fractures. In this paper, using field observations together with effective medium models, we analyze the reduction in the effective elastic properties of rock in terms of density of the fault-related brittle fractures and fracture intersection angles controlled primarily by the splay angles. Fracture densities or equivalent fracture spacing values corresponding to the vanishing Young's, shear, and quasi-pure shear moduli were obtained by extrapolation from the calculated range of these parameters. The fracture densities or the equivalent spacing values obtained using this method compare well with the field data measured along scan lines across the faults in the study area. These findings should be helpful for a better understanding of the fracture density/spacing distribution around faults and the transition from discrete fracturing to cataclastic deformation associated with fault growth and the related instabilities.

  14. The SCEC 3D Community Fault Model (CFM-v5): An updated and expanded fault set of oblique crustal deformation and complex fault interaction for southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, C.; Plesch, A.; Sorlien, C. C.; Shaw, J. H.; Hauksson, E.

    2014-12-01

    Southern California represents an ideal natural laboratory to investigate oblique deformation in 3D owing to its comprehensive datasets, complex tectonic history, evolving components of oblique slip, and continued crustal rotations about horizontal and vertical axes. As the SCEC Community Fault Model (CFM) aims to accurately reflect this 3D deformation, we present the results of an extensive update to the model by using primarily detailed fault trace, seismic reflection, relocated hypocenter and focal mechanism nodal plane data to generate improved, more realistic digital 3D fault surfaces. The results document a wide variety of oblique strain accommodation, including various aspects of strain partitioning and fault-related folding, sets of both high-angle and low-angle faults that mutually interact, significant non-planar, multi-stranded faults with variable dip along strike and with depth, and active mid-crustal detachments. In places, closely-spaced fault strands or fault systems can remain surprisingly subparallel to seismogenic depths, while in other areas, major strike-slip to oblique-slip faults can merge, such as the S-dipping Arroyo Parida-Mission Ridge and Santa Ynez faults with the N-dipping North Channel-Pitas Point-Red Mountain fault system, or diverge with depth. Examples of the latter include the steep-to-west-dipping Laguna Salada-Indiviso faults with the steep-to-east-dipping Sierra Cucapah faults, and the steep southern San Andreas fault with the adjacent NE-dipping Mecca Hills-Hidden Springs fault system. In addition, overprinting by steep predominantly strike-slip faulting can segment which parts of intersecting inherited low-angle faults are reactivated, or result in mutual cross-cutting relationships. The updated CFM 3D fault surfaces thus help characterize a more complex pattern of fault interactions at depth between various fault sets and linked fault systems, and a more complex fault geometry than typically inferred or expected from

  15. High-frequency maximum observable shaking map of Italy from fault sources

    KAUST Repository

    Zonno, Gaetano

    2012-03-17

    We present a strategy for obtaining fault-based maximum observable shaking (MOS) maps, which represent an innovative concept for assessing deterministic seismic ground motion at a regional scale. Our approach uses the fault sources supplied for Italy by the Database of Individual Seismogenic Sources, and particularly by its composite seismogenic sources (CSS), a spatially continuous simplified 3-D representation of a fault system. For each CSS, we consider the associated Typical Fault, i. e., the portion of the corresponding CSS that can generate the maximum credible earthquake. We then compute the high-frequency (1-50 Hz) ground shaking for a rupture model derived from its associated maximum credible earthquake. As the Typical Fault floats within its CSS to occupy all possible positions of the rupture, the high-frequency shaking is updated in the area surrounding the fault, and the maximum from that scenario is extracted and displayed on a map. The final high-frequency MOS map of Italy is then obtained by merging 8,859 individual scenario-simulations, from which the ground shaking parameters have been extracted. To explore the internal consistency of our calculations and validate the results of the procedure we compare our results (1) with predictions based on the Next Generation Attenuation ground-motion equations for an earthquake of M w 7.1, (2) with the predictions of the official Italian seismic hazard map, and (3) with macroseismic intensities included in the DBMI04 Italian database. We then examine the uncertainties and analyse the variability of ground motion for different fault geometries and slip distributions. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  16. An automatic procedure for high-resolution earthquake locations: a case study from the TABOO near fault observatory (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valoroso, Luisa; Chiaraluce, Lauro; Di Stefano, Raffaele; Latorre, Diana; Piccinini, Davide

    2014-05-01

    The characterization of the geometry, kinematics and rheology of fault zones by seismological data depends on our capability of accurately locate the largest number of low-magnitude seismic events. To this aim, we have been working for the past three years to develop an advanced modular earthquake location procedure able to automatically retrieve high-resolution earthquakes catalogues directly from continuous waveforms data. We use seismograms recorded at about 60 seismic stations located both at surface and at depth. The network covers an area of about 80x60 km with a mean inter-station distance of 6 km. These stations are part of a Near fault Observatory (TABOO; http://taboo.rm.ingv.it/), consisting of multi-sensor stations (seismic, geodetic, geochemical and electromagnetic). This permanent scientific infrastructure managed by the INGV is devoted to studying the earthquakes preparatory phase and the fast/slow (i.e., seismic/aseismic) deformation process active along the Alto Tiberina fault (ATF) located in the northern Apennines (Italy). The ATF is potentially one of the rare worldwide examples of active low-angle (search earthquake location algorithms to compute accurate absolute locations of single-events in a 3D geological model (see Latorre et al. same session); iv) cross-correlation and double-difference location methods to compute high-resolution relative event locations. This procedure is now running off-line with a delay of 1 week to the real-time. We are now implementing this procedure to obtain high-resolution double-difference earthquake locations in real-time (DDRT). We show locations of ~30k low-magnitude earthquakes recorded during the past 4 years (2010-2013) of network operation, reaching a completeness magnitude of the catalogue of 0.2. The spatiotemporal seismicity distribution has an almost constant and high rate of r = 24.30e-04 eqks/day*km2, interrupted by low to moderate magnitude seismic sequences such as the 2010 Pietralunga sequence (M L

  17. Accurate Angle Estimator for High-Frame-rate 2-D Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Lindskov Hansen, Kristoffer

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for estimating 2-D flow angles using a high-frame-rate ultrasound method. The angle estimator features high accuracy and low standard deviation (SD) over the full 360° range. The method is validated on Field II simulations and phantom measurements using the ex...

  18. Nanometer scale high-aspect-ratio trench etching at controllable angles using ballistic reactive ion etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cybart, Shane; Roediger, Peter; Ulin-Avila, Erick; Wu, Stephen; Wong, Travis; Dynes, Robert

    2012-11-30

    We demonstrate a low pressure reactive ion etching process capable of patterning nanometer scale angled sidewalls and three dimensional structures in photoresist. At low pressure the plasma has a large dark space region where the etchant ions have very large highly-directional mean free paths. Mounting the sample entirely within this dark space allows for etching at angles relative to the cathode with minimal undercutting, resulting in high-aspect ratio nanometer scale angled features. By reversing the initial angle and performing a second etch we create three-dimensional mask profiles.

  19. Mechanical Fault Diagnosis of High Voltage Circuit Breakers Based on Variational Mode Decomposition and Multi-Layer Classifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nantian Huang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical fault diagnosis of high-voltage circuit breakers (HVCBs based on vibration signal analysis is one of the most significant issues in improving the reliability and reducing the outage cost for power systems. The limitation of training samples and types of machine faults in HVCBs causes the existing mechanical fault diagnostic methods to recognize new types of machine faults easily without training samples as either a normal condition or a wrong fault type. A new mechanical fault diagnosis method for HVCBs based on variational mode decomposition (VMD and multi-layer classifier (MLC is proposed to improve the accuracy of fault diagnosis. First, HVCB vibration signals during operation are measured using an acceleration sensor. Second, a VMD algorithm is used to decompose the vibration signals into several intrinsic mode functions (IMFs. The IMF matrix is divided into submatrices to compute the local singular values (LSV. The maximum singular values of each submatrix are selected as the feature vectors for fault diagnosis. Finally, a MLC composed of two one-class support vector machines (OCSVMs and a support vector machine (SVM is constructed to identify the fault type. Two layers of independent OCSVM are adopted to distinguish normal or fault conditions with known or unknown fault types, respectively. On this basis, SVM recognizes the specific fault type. Real diagnostic experiments are conducted with a real SF6 HVCB with normal and fault states. Three different faults (i.e., jam fault of the iron core, looseness of the base screw, and poor lubrication of the connecting lever are simulated in a field experiment on a real HVCB to test the feasibility of the proposed method. Results show that the classification accuracy of the new method is superior to other traditional methods.

  20. Note: High precision angle generator using multiple ultrasonic motors and a self-calibratable encoder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Ahn; Kim, Jae Wan; Kang, Chu-Shik; Jin, Jonghan; Bong Eom, Tae

    2011-11-01

    We present an angle generator with high resolution and accuracy, which uses multiple ultrasonic motors and a self-calibratable encoder. A cylindrical air bearing guides a rotational motion, and the ultrasonic motors achieve high resolution over the full circle range with a simple configuration. The self-calibratable encoder can compensate the scale error of a divided circle (signal period: 20″) effectively by applying the equal-division-averaged method. The angle generator configures a position feedback control loop using the readout of the encoder. By combining the ac and dc operation mode, the angle generator produced stepwise angular motion with 0.005″ resolution. We also evaluated the performance of the angle generator using a precision angle encoder and an autocollimator. The expanded uncertainty (k = 2) in the angle generation was estimated less than 0.03″, which included the calibrated scale error and the nonlinearity error.

  1. Protection system for high impedance faults; Sistema de protecao para faltas de alta impedancia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malagodi, Caius Vinicius Sampaio

    1997-07-01

    This paper proposes a protection system against high impedance faults based on the voltage unbalance along the feeder. The main focus is on the sensor developed together with Sao Paulo state utilities through the CED - Center of Excellence in Distribution, to detect this kind of fault. These simulations show the voltage unbalance that allows to safely determine the conductor breakdown, taking into consideration the distribution transformers and the way they are connected to the line. A zero consequence prototype sensor that has as its greatest advantage the coupling with the distribution line through the electric field, is also presented. Sensibility settings and timings delay are included to allow the coordination between the sensors and other feeder protections.When a fault occurs, only the downstream sensors work. In order to have the information of the sensor situation reaching an upstream fault protection device, a way of communication is needed. Distribution lines with supervision and control system already have this advantage, allowing for the function of protection against faults and high impedance to be aggregated to this communication system. For distribution lines that do not have this kind of system, a more detailed study on the carrier signals as a means of communication should be carried out. (author)

  2. High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Profiling Across the Black Hills Fault, Clark County, Nevada: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragoza, S. A.; Snelson, C. M.; Jernsletten, J. A.; Saldana, S. C.; Hirsch, A.; McEwan, D.

    2005-12-01

    The Black Hills fault (BHF) is located in the central Basin and Range Province of western North America, a region that has undergone significant Cenozoic extension. The BHF is an east-dipping normal fault that forms the northwestern structural boundary of the Eldorado basin and lies ~20 km southeast of Las Vegas, Nevada. A recent trench study indicated that the fault offsets Holocene strata, and is capable of producing Mw 6.4-6.8 earthquakes. These estimates indicate a subsurface rupture length at least 10 km greater than the length of the scarp. This poses a significant hazard to structures such as the nearby Hoover Dam Bypass Bridge, which is being built to withstand a Mw 6.2-7.0 earthquake on local faults. If the BHF does continue in the subsurface, this structure, as well as nearby communities (Las Vegas, Boulder City, and Henderson), may not be as safe as previously expected. Previous attempts to image the fault with shallow seismics (hammer source) were inconclusive. However, gravity studies imply that the fault continues south of the scarp. Therefore, a new experiment utilizing high-resolution seismic reflection was performed to image subsurface geologic structures south of the scarp. At each shot point, a stack of four 30-160 Hz vibroseis sweeps of 15 s duration was recorded on a 60-channel system with 40 Hz geophones. This produced two 300 m reflection profiles, with a maximum depth of 500-600 m. A preliminary look at these data indicates the existence of two faults, potentially confirming that the BHF continues in the subsurface south of the scarp.

  3. Imaging the Black Hills Fault, Clark County, Nevada Utilizing High-Resolution Seismic Reflection and Vibroseis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragoza, S. A.; Snelson, C. M.; Saldana, S. C.; Hirsch, A.; Poche, S.; Taylor, W. J.

    2006-12-01

    Historically, the location, geometries, and seismic potential of southern Nevada faults are poorly constrained. Collection of such data and seismic hazard characterization of the Black Hills fault (BHF) are important steps in better defining one of these faults. The BHF forms the northwestern structural boundary of the Eldorado Valley, which lies ~20 km southeast of Las Vegas, Nevada, between the growing communities of Henderson and Boulder City. Earthquake magnitude estimates based on surface rupture length (SRL) indicate an earthquake potential of Mw 5.7; however, estimates based on displacement values documented in a paleoseismic trench indicate a higher value of Mw 6.4-6.8. This implies that the subsurface rupture length is significantly greater than the length of the scarp. Although previous attempts to image the fault with a hammer source were inconclusive, gravity studies and local geology imply that the fault continues south of the scarp. Therefore, additional high-resolution seismic reflection and refraction data were acquired in SEG2 format along portions of a 1 km profile at 5 m station spacing utilizing a vibroseis source. At each shot point, a stack of four 30-160 Hz vibroseis sweeps of 15 s duration was recorded on a 60-channel system with 40 Hz geophones. A preliminary examination of these data indicates the existence of an eastward dipping structure, potentially confirming that the BHF continues in the subsurface south of the scarp.

  4. Pen Branch fault program: Interim report on the High Resolution, Shallow Seismic Reflection surveys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stieve, A.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1991-01-31

    The Pen Branch fault was identified in the subsurface at the Savannah River Site in 1989 based upon the interpretation of earlier seismic reflection surveys and other geologic investigations. A program was initiated at that time to further define the fault in terms of its capability to release seismic energy. The High-Resolution, Shallow Seismic Reflection survey recently completed at SRS was initiated to determine the shallowest extent of the fault and to demonstrate the presence of flat-lying sediments in the top 300 feet of sediments. Conclusions at this time are based upon this shallow seismic survey and the Conoco deep seismic survey (1988--1989). Deformation related to the Pen Branch fault is at least 200 milliseconds beneath the surface in the Conoco data and at least 150 milliseconds in the shallow seismic reflection data. This corresponds to approximately 300 feet below the surface. Sediments at that depth are lower Tertiary (Danian stage) or over 60 million years old. This indicates that the fault is not capable.

  5. High Order Sliding Mode Control of Doubly-fed Induction Generator under Unbalanced Grid Faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Rongwu; Chen, Zhe; Wu, Xiaojie

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with a doubly-fed induction generator-based (DFIG) wind turbine system under grid fault conditions such as: unbalanced grid voltage, three-phase grid fault, using a high order sliding mode control (SMC). A second order sliding mode controller, which is robust with respect......) control. In order to improve control performance of the overall system, electromagnetic power and active power oscillations elimination strategies are proposed respectively. Lastly, the effective of the proposed control strategy is verified by the simulation results of a 2 MW DFIG system....

  6. Implementation of a high-impedance fault detection algorithm. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balser, S.J.; Lawrence, D.J.; Caprino, B.; Delaney, L.

    1985-05-01

    A digital computer based algorithm was developed to detect high impedance faults on distribution systems using statistical methods. The algorithm is written in PL/M 86 and PASCAL and implemented on an INTEL SYS380 microcomputer system, designed to operate in real time and interface with acquisition software. The report contains a description of the calculation procedures comprising the detection algorithm, implementation requirements, and test results for algorithm verification. A discussion of hardware limitations and an estimation of fault detection rate based on historical records is also presented.

  7. A method for detection and location of high resistance earth faults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haenninen, S.; Lehtonen, M. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Antila, E. [ABB Transmit Oy (Finland)

    1998-08-01

    In the first part of this presentation, the theory of earth faults in unearthed and compensated power systems is briefly presented. The main factors affecting the high resistance fault detection are outlined and common practices for earth fault protection in present systems are summarized. The algorithms of the new method for high resistance fault detection and location are then presented. These are based on the change of neutral voltage and zero sequence currents, measured at the high voltage / medium voltage substation and also at the distribution line locations. The performance of the method is analyzed, and the possible error sources discussed. Among these are, for instance, switching actions, thunder storms and heavy snow fall. The feasibility of the method is then verified by an analysis based both on simulated data, which was derived using an EMTP-ATP simulator, and by real system data recorded during field tests at three substations. For the error source analysis, some real case data recorded during natural power system events, is also used

  8. Sliding mode observer based incipient sensor fault detection with application to high-speed railway traction device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kangkang; Jiang, Bin; Yan, Xing-Gang; Mao, Zehui

    2016-07-01

    This paper considers incipient sensor fault detection issue for a class of nonlinear systems with "observer unmatched" uncertainties. A particular fault detection sliding mode observer is designed for the augmented system formed by the original system and incipient sensor faults. The designed parameters are obtained using LMI and line filter techniques to guarantee that the generated residuals are robust to uncertainties and that sliding motion is not destroyed by faults. Then, three levels of novel adaptive thresholds are proposed based on the reduced order sliding mode dynamics, which effectively improve incipient sensor faults detectability. Case study of on the traction system in China Railway High-speed is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed incipient senor faults detection schemes.

  9. Fabrication of surfaces with extremely high contact angle hysteresis from polyelectrolyte multilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liming; Wei, Jingjing; Su, Zhaohui

    2011-12-20

    High contact angle hysteresis on polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) ion-paired with hydrophobic perfluorooctanoate anions is reported. Both the bilayer number of PEMs and the ionic strength of deposition solutions have significant influence on contact angle hysteresis: higher ionic strength and greater bilayer number cause increased contact angle hysteresis values. The hysteresis values of ~100° were observed on smooth PEMs and pinning of the receding contact line on hydrophilic defects is implicated as the cause of hysteresis. Surface roughness can be used to further tune the contact angle hysteresis on the PEMs. A surface with extremely high contact angle hysteresis of 156° was fabricated when a PEM was deposited on a rough substrate coated with submicrometer scale silica spheres. It was demonstrated that this extremely high value of contact angle hysteresis resulted from the penetration of water into the rough asperities on the substrate. The same substrate hydrophobized by chemical vapor deposition of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltriethoxysilane exhibits high advancing contact angle and low hysteresis.

  10. Optimum angle-cut of collimator for dense objects in high-energy proton radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hai-Bo; Zheng, Na

    2016-02-01

    The use of minus identity lenses with an angle-cut collimator can achieve high contrast images in high-energy proton radiography. This article presents the principles of choosing the angle-cut aperture of the collimator for different energies and objects. Numerical simulation using the Monte Carlo code Geant4 has been implemented to investigate the entire radiography for the French test object. The optimum angle-cut apertures of the collimators are also obtained for different energies. Supported by NSAF (11176001) and Science and Technology Developing Foundation of China Academy of Engineering Physics (2012A0202006)

  11. Fault Characteristics and Control Strategies of Multiterminal High Voltage Direct Current Transmission Based on Modular Multilevel Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Chang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The modular multilevel converter (MMC is an emerging voltage source converter topology suitable for multiterminal high voltage direct current transmission based on modular multilevel converter (MMC-MTDC. This paper presents fault characteristics of MMC-MTDC including submodule fault, DC line fault, and fault ride-through of wind farm integration. Meanwhile, the corresponding protection strategies are proposed. The correctness and effectiveness of the control strategies are verified by establishing a three-terminal MMC-MTDC system under the PSCAD/EMTDC electromagnetic transient simulation environment.

  12. Near-fault directivity pulse-like ground motion effect on high-speed railway bridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈令坤; 张楠; 蒋丽忠; 曾志平; 陈格威; 国巍

    2014-01-01

    The vehicle-track-bridge (VTB) element was used to investigate how a high-speed railway bridge reacted when it was subjected to near-fault directivity pulse-like ground motions. Based on the PEER NAG Strong Ground Motion Database, the spatial analysis model of a vehicle-bridge system was developed, the VTB element was derived to simulate the interaction of train and bridge, and the elasto-plastic seismic responses of the bridge were calculated. The calculation results show that girder and pier top displacement, and bending moment of the pier base increase subjected to near-fault directivity pulse-like ground motion compared to far-field earthquakes, and the greater deformation responses in near-fault shaking are associated with fewer reversed cycles of loading. The hysteretic characteristics of the pier subjected to a near-fault directivity pulse-like earthquake should be explicitly expressed as the bending moment-rotation relationship of the pier base, which is characterized by the centrally strengthened hysteretic cycles at some point of the loading time-history curve. The results show that there is an amplification of the vertical deflection in the girder’s mid-span owing to the high vertical ground motion. In light of these findings, the effect of the vertical ground motion should be used to adjust the unconservative amplification constant 2/3 of the vertical-to-horizontal peak ground motion ratio in the seismic design of bridge.

  13. Detecting Blind Fault with Fractal and Roughness Factors from High Resolution LiDAR DEM at Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Y. S.; Yu, T. T.

    2014-12-01

    There is no obvious fault scarp associated with blind fault. The traditional method of mapping this unrevealed geological structure is the cluster of seismicity. Neither the seismic event nor the completeness of cluster could be captured by network to chart the location of the entire possible active blind fault within short period of time. High resolution DEM gathered by LiDAR could denote actual terrain information despite the existence of plantation. 1-meter interval DEM of mountain region at Taiwan is utilized by fractal, entropy and roughness calculating with MATLAB code. By jointing these handing, the regions of non-sediment deposit are charted automatically. Possible blind fault associated with Chia-Sen earthquake at southern Taiwan is served as testing ground. GIS layer help in removing the difference from various geological formation, then multi-resolution fractal index is computed around the target region. The type of fault movement controls distribution of fractal index number. The scale of blind fault governs degree of change in fractal index. Landslide induced by rainfall and/or earthquake possesses larger degree of geomorphology alteration than blind fault; special treatment in removing these phenomena is required. Highly weathered condition at Taiwan should erase the possible trace remained upon DEM from the ruptured of blind fault while reoccurrence interval is higher than hundreds of years. This is one of the obstacle in finding possible blind fault at Taiwan.

  14. Small-angle X-ray scattering at the ESRF high-brillance beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boesecke, P.; Diat, O. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 38 -Grenoble (France)

    1997-10-01

    The high-brilliance beamline (BL4/ID2) at the European synchrotron radiation facility (ESRF) in Grenoble has been constructed with the emphasis on time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering and macromolecular crystallography. It has been open to users for two years. The beamline has opened up new areas in small-angle scattering research, facilitating (a) small-angle crystallography on structures with unit cells of several hundredths of nanometres, (b) overlap with the light scattering range for the study of optical systems, (c) high photon flux for time-resolved experiments and (d) a high spatial coherence allowing submicrometre imaging with X-rays. The set-up and the detector system of the small-angle scattering station are presented. A method for obtaining absolute scattering intensities is described. The parasitic background at the station is discussed in terms of absolute scattering intensities. (orig.). 22 refs.

  15. High resolution seismic survey, Pen Branch Fault, Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkman, E. (Emerald Exploration Consultants, Inc., Austin, TX (United States))

    1991-04-01

    An investigation of the Pen Branch Fault at the Savannah River Site by a series of short, high resolution seismic reflection lines was conducted. The purpose was to acquire, process, and interpret 19.9 miles of data, optimized for the upper 300 ft of geologic strata, in sufficient density such that processing performed in the conventional stepwise approach, followed by detailed interpretation, would define small scale spatial variability and structural features in the vicinity of the fault leading to definition of the location of the fault, the shallowest extent of the fault, and the quantification of the sense and magnitude of motion. The depth of optimization for the last two lines was modified to the 300 ft of geologic strata immediately above basement. Three older seismic surveys, other geophysical data, and associated borehole and geologic data were reviewed. The equipment and the acquisition, processing, and interpretation procedures are discussed in the report. The report includes a detailed line by line description and discussion of the interpretation. Figures include reference maps, contour displays of the stacking and interval velocities, diagrammatic references sketches of the interpreted layering and sedimentary features, index sketches, and specific color prints made on the workstation during the course of the interpretation. A volume of manuals on seismic devices and related equipment is included.

  16. High resolution seismic survey, Pen Branch Fault, Savannah River Site, South Carolina. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkman, E. [Emerald Exploration Consultants, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

    1991-04-01

    An investigation of the Pen Branch Fault at the Savannah River Site by a series of short, high resolution seismic reflection lines was conducted. The purpose was to acquire, process, and interpret 19.9 miles of data, optimized for the upper 300 ft of geologic strata, in sufficient density such that processing performed in the conventional stepwise approach, followed by detailed interpretation, would define small scale spatial variability and structural features in the vicinity of the fault leading to definition of the location of the fault, the shallowest extent of the fault, and the quantification of the sense and magnitude of motion. The depth of optimization for the last two lines was modified to the 300 ft of geologic strata immediately above basement. Three older seismic surveys, other geophysical data, and associated borehole and geologic data were reviewed. The equipment and the acquisition, processing, and interpretation procedures are discussed in the report. The report includes a detailed line by line description and discussion of the interpretation. Figures include reference maps, contour displays of the stacking and interval velocities, diagrammatic references sketches of the interpreted layering and sedimentary features, index sketches, and specific color prints made on the workstation during the course of the interpretation. A volume of manuals on seismic devices and related equipment is included.

  17. A microprocessor-based digital feeder monitor with high-impedance fault detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, R.; Tyska, W. [GE Protection and Control, Malvern, PA (United States); Russell, B.D. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    The high impedance fault detection technology developed at Texas A&M University after more than a decade of research, funded in large part by the Electric Power Research Institute, has been incorporated into a comprehensive monitoring device for overhead distribution feeders. This digital feeder monitor (DFM) uses a high waveform sampling rate for the ac current and voltage inputs in conjunction with a high-performance reduced instruction set (RISC) microprocessor to obtain the frequency response required for arcing fault detection and power quality measurements. Expert system techniques are employed to assure security while maintaining dependability. The DFM is intended to be applied at a distribution substation to monitor one feeder. The DFM is packaged in a non-drawout case which fits the panel cutout for a GE IAC overcurrent relay to facilitate retrofits at the majority of sites were electromechanical overcurrent relays already exist.

  18. Devices and process for high-pressure magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, David W; Sears, Jr., Jesse A; Turcu, Romulus V.F.; Rosso, Kevin M; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2014-04-08

    A high-pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) rotor is detailed that includes a high-pressure sample cell that maintains high pressures exceeding 150 bar. The sample cell design minimizes pressure losses due to penetration over an extended period of time.

  19. Near Fault Observatories: multidisciplinary research infrastructures, high resolution data and scientific products available through dedicated services implemented within the EPOS-IP project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festa, Gaetano; Chiaraluce, Lauro; Ergintav, Semih; Bernard, Pascal; Clinton, John; Marmureanu, Alexandru; Tataru, Dragos; Vogfjord, Kristin

    2017-04-01

    Near Fault Observatories (NFOs) are innovative research infrastructures based on dense, state of the art networks of multi-parametric sensors that continuously monitor the underlying Earth instability processes over a broad time interval. They aim at understanding the physical/chemical processes responsible for earthquakes and faulting and tracking their evolution over time by enabling advancements in ground shaking prediction. EPOS-IP is aimed at contributing in creating and harmonizing data and products distributors from seven NFOs, operating on different tectonic regimes and different areas of Europe. They include plate boundary systems at South Iceland Seismic Zone, the Marmara Sea and the Corinth rift. In mountain settings, NFOs monitor the Alto Tiberina and Irpinia faults in the Apennine mountain range, the Valais region in the Alps, and the Vrancea fault in the Carpathian Mountains. They monitor diverse faulting mechanisms (strike-slip, normal and thrust), high to low angle faults, shallow and deep faults, as well as regions with fast and slow strain rate accumulation. The focus of the observatories varies, ranging from small- to large-scale seismicity and includes the role of different parameters such as fluid playing in fault initiation, the internal structure of fault systems, site effects and derived processes such as earthquake generated landslides and tsunamis. In response to their specific objectives, the NFOs operate a diverse set of monitoring instrumentation using seismic, deformation, strain, geochemical and electromagnetic equipment. Since NFO methodological approach is based on extremely dense networks and less common instruments deserving multi-parameter data description, a main goal of this group is to build inclusive and harmonised services supporting the installation over the next decade of tens of near-fault observatories monitoring active faults in different tectonic environments in Europe. The NFO Thematic Core Service (TCS) relies on

  20. Fault gouge rheology under confined, high-velocity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reches, Z.; Madden, A. S.; Chen, X.

    2012-12-01

    We recently developed the experimental capability to investigate the shear properties of fine-grain gouge under confined conditions and high-velocity. The experimental system includes a rotary apparatus that can apply large displacements of tens of meters, slip velocity of 0.001- 2.0 m/s, and normal stress of 35 MPa (Reches and Lockner, 2010). The key new component is a Confined ROtary Cell (CROC) that can shear a gouge layer either dry or under pore-pressure. The pore pressure is controlled by two syringe pumps. CROC includes a ring-shape gouge chamber of 62.5 mm inner diameter, 81.25 mm outer diameter, and up to 3 mm thick gouge sample. The lower, rotating part of CROC contains the sample chamber, and the upper, stationary part includes the loading, hollow cylinder and setting for temperature, and dilation measurements, and pore-pressure control. Each side of the gouge chamber has two pairs of industrial, spring-energized, self-lubricating, teflon-graphite seals, built for particle media and can work at temperature up to 250 ded C. The space between each of the two sets of seals is pressurized by nitrogen. This design generates 'zero-differential pressure' on the inner seal (which is in contact with the gouge powder), and prevents gouge leaks. For the preliminary dry experiments, we used ~2.0 mm thick layers of room-dry kaolinite powder. Total displacements were on the order of meters and normal stress up to 4 MPa. The initial shear was accommodated by multiple internal slip surfaces within the kaolinite layer accommodated as oriented Riedel shear structures. Later, the shear was localized within a thin, plate-parallel Y-surface. The kaolinite layer was compacted at a quasi-asymptotic rate, and displayed a steady-state friction coefficient of ~ 0.5 with no clear dependence on slip velocity up to 0.15 m/s. Further experiments with loose quartz sand (grain size ~ 125 micron) included both dry runs and pore-pressure (distilled water) controlled runs. The sand was

  1. High resolution seismic velocity structure around the Yamasaki fault zone of southwest Japan as revealed from travel-time tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugraha, Andri Dian; Ohmi, Shiro; Mori, Jim; Shibutani, Takuo

    2013-08-01

    The Yamasaki fault zone in southwestern Japan currently has a high potential for producing a large damaging earthquake. We carried out a seismic tomographic study to determine detailed crustal structures for the region. The velocity model clearly images a low-velocity and high V p / V s (high Poisson's ratio) anomaly in the lower crust beneath the Yamasaki fault zone at a depth of ~15-20 km. This anomaly may be associated with the existence of partially-melted minerals. The existence of this anomaly below the fault zone may contribute to changing the long-term stress concentration in the seismogenic zone.

  2. High-resolution seismic profiling reveals faulting associated with the 1934 Ms 6.6 Hansel Valley earthquake (Utah, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Pier Paolo G.; Duross, Christopher; Kokkalas, Sotirios

    2017-01-01

    The 1934 Ms 6.6 Hansel Valley, Utah, earthquake produced an 8-km-long by 3-km-wide zone of north-south−trending surface deformation in an extensional basin within the easternmost Basin and Range Province. Less than 0.5 m of purely vertical displacement was measured at the surface, although seismologic data suggest mostly strike-slip faulting at depth. Characterization of the origin and kinematics of faulting in the Hansel Valley earthquake is important to understand how complex fault ruptures accommodate regions of continental extension and transtension. Here, we address three questions: (1) How does the 1934 surface rupture compare with faults in the subsurface? (2) Are the 1934 fault scarps tectonic or secondary features? (3) Did the 1934 earthquake have components of both strike-slip and dip-slip motion? To address these questions, we acquired a 6.6-km-long, high-resolution seismic profile across Hansel Valley, including the 1934 ruptures. We observed numerous east- and west-dipping normal faults that dip 40°−70° and offset late Quaternary strata from within a few tens of meters of the surface down to a depth of ∼1 km. Spatial correspondence between the 1934 surface ruptures and subsurface faults suggests that ruptures associated with the earthquake are of tectonic origin. Our data clearly show complex basin faulting that is most consistent with transtensional tectonics. Although the kinematics of the 1934 earthquake remain underconstrained, we interpret the disagreement between surface (normal) and subsurface (strike-slip) kinematics as due to slip partitioning during fault propagation and to the effect of preexisting structural complexities. We infer that the 1934 earthquake occurred along an ∼3-km wide, off-fault damage zone characterized by distributed deformation along small-displacement faults that may be alternatively activated during different earthquake episodes.

  3. A SVM framework for fault detection of the braking system in a high speed train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Li, Yan-Fu; Zio, Enrico

    2017-03-01

    In April 2015, the number of operating High Speed Trains (HSTs) in the world has reached 3603. An efficient, effective and very reliable braking system is evidently very critical for trains running at a speed around 300 km/h. Failure of a highly reliable braking system is a rare event and, consequently, informative recorded data on fault conditions are scarce. This renders the fault detection problem a classification problem with highly unbalanced data. In this paper, a Support Vector Machine (SVM) framework, including feature selection, feature vector selection, model construction and decision boundary optimization, is proposed for tackling this problem. Feature vector selection can largely reduce the data size and, thus, the computational burden. The constructed model is a modified version of the least square SVM, in which a higher cost is assigned to the error of classification of faulty conditions than the error of classification of normal conditions. The proposed framework is successfully validated on a number of public unbalanced datasets. Then, it is applied for the fault detection of braking systems in HST: in comparison with several SVM approaches for unbalanced datasets, the proposed framework gives better results.

  4. Yield behaviour associated with stacking faults in a high-temperature annealed ultra-low carbon high manganese steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Liming [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai, 200240 (China); Fan, Likun [Shanghai Research Institute of Materials, 99 Handan Road, Shanghai, 200437 (China); Li, Zhigang; Sun, Nairong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai, 200240 (China); Wang, Huanrong; Wang, Wei [Baosteel Research Institute, 889 Fujin Road, Shanghai, 201900 (China); Shan, Aidang, E-mail: adshan@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai, 200240 (China)

    2013-10-10

    This paper investigated the tensile behaviour of high-temperature annealed ultra-low carbon high manganese steel with 42 vol% delta-ferrite. The results show that the tensile stress-strain curve of plastic deformation exhibits three distinct stages of deformation: a yielding stage with a remarkably large elongation and a positive strain-hardening rate, a second stage in which the strain-hardening rate rapidly increases, and a third stage in which the strain-hardening rate slowly increase. The yield plateau is intrinsically associated with the increasing formation of strain-induced stacking faults. The stacking faults quickly form during yield deformation, and the yield elongation monotonically increases with the extent of the stacking faults. The localised strain concentration of delta-ferrite and the heterogeneous strain partitioning between harder delta-ferrite and softer austenite play important roles in the rapid formation of stacking faults during strain at the yield plateau, which is an important prerequisite for this yielding phenomenon. The results and analysis demonstrate that the rapid and then slow hardening deformation after the yield plateau result from strain-induced transformation and deformation twinning, respectively.

  5. High-yielding aquifers in crystalline basement: insights about the role of fault zones, exemplified by Armorican Massif, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roques, Clément; Bour, Olivier; Aquilina, Luc; Dewandel, Benoît

    2016-12-01

    While groundwater constitutes a crucial resource in many crystalline-rock regions worldwide, well-yield conditions are highly variable and barely understood. Nevertheless, it is well known that fault zones may have the capacity to ensure sustainable yield in crystalline media, but there are only a few and disparate examples in the literature that describe high-yield conditions related to fault zones in crystalline rock basements. By investigating structural and hydraulic properties of remarkable yielding sites identified in the Armorican Massif, western France, this study discusses the main factors that may explain such exceptional hydrogeological properties. Twenty-three sites, identified through analysis of databases available for the region, are investigated. Results show that: (1) the highly transmissive fractures are related to fault zones which ensure the main water inflow in the pumped wells; (2) the probability of intersecting such transmissive fault zones does not vary significantly with depth, at least within the range investigated in this study (0-200 m); and (3) high yield is mainly controlled by the structural features of the fault zones, in particular the fault dip and the presence of a connected storage reservoir. Conceptual models that summarize the hydrological properties of high-yield groundwater resources related to fault zones in crystalline basement are shown and discussed.

  6. Angle Tree: Nearest Neighbor Search in High Dimensions with Low Intrinsic Dimensionality

    CERN Document Server

    Zvedeniouk, Ilia

    2010-01-01

    We propose an extension of tree-based space-partitioning indexing structures for data with low intrinsic dimensionality embedded in a high dimensional space. We call this extension an Angle Tree. Our extension can be applied to both classical kd-trees as well as the more recent rp-trees. The key idea of our approach is to store the angle (the "dihedral angle") between the data region (which is a low dimensional manifold) and the random hyperplane that splits the region (the "splitter"). We show that the dihedral angle can be used to obtain a tight lower bound on the distance between the query point and any point on the opposite side of the splitter. This in turn can be used to efficiently prune the search space. We introduce a novel randomized strategy to efficiently calculate the dihedral angle with a high degree of accuracy. Experiments and analysis on real and synthetic data sets shows that the Angle Tree is the most efficient known indexing structure for nearest neighbor queries in terms of preprocessing ...

  7. Active faulting in the Inner California Borderlands: new constraints from high-resolution multichannel seismic and multibeam bathymetric data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormann, J. M.; Holmes, J. J.; Sahakian, V. J.; Klotsko, S.; Kent, G.; Driscoll, N. W.; Harding, A. J.; Wesnousky, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Geodetic data indicate that faults offshore of Southern California accommodate 6-8 mm/yr of dextral Pacific-North American relative plate motion. In the Inner California Borderlands (ICB), modern strike-slip deformation is overprinted on topography formed during plate boundary reorganization 30-15 Ma. Despite its proximity to urban Southern California, the hazard posed by active faults in the ICB remains poorly understood. We acquired a 4000-line-km regional grid of high-resolution, 2D multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection data and multibeam bathymetry to examine the fault architecture and tectonic evolution of the ICB. We interpret the MCS data using a sequence stratigraphic approach to establish a chronostratigraphy and identify discrete episodes of deformation. We present our results in a regional fault model that distinguishes active deformation from older structures. Significant differences exist between our model of ICB deformation and existing models. Mounting evidence suggests a westward temporal migration of slip between faults in the ICB. In the eastern ICB, slip on the Newport-Inglewood/Rose Canyon fault and the neighboring Coronado Bank fault (CBF) diminishes to the north and appears to decrease over time. Undeformed Late Pliocene sediments overlie the northern extent of the CBF and the breakaway zone of the purported Oceanside Blind Thrust. Therefore, CBF slip rate estimates based on linkage with the Palos Verdes fault to the north are unwarranted. Deformation along the San Mateo, San Onofre, and Carlsbad trends is best explained as localized deformation resulting from geometrical complexities in a dextral strike-slip fault system. In the western ICB, the San Diego Trough fault (SDTF) offsets young sediments between the US/Mexico border and the eastern margin of Avalon Knoll, where the fault is spatially coincident with the San Pedro Basin fault (SPBF). Farther west, the San Clemente fault (SCF) has a strong linear bathymetric expression. The length

  8. Structure of a normal seismogenic fault zone in carbonates: The Vado di Corno Fault, Campo Imperatore, Central Apennines (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demurtas, Matteo; Fondriest, Michele; Balsamo, Fabrizio; Clemenzi, Luca; Storti, Fabrizio; Bistacchi, Andrea; Di Toro, Giulio

    2016-09-01

    The Vado di Corno Fault Zone (VCFZ) is an active extensional fault cutting through carbonates in the Italian Central Apennines. The fault zone was exhumed from ∼2 km depth and accommodated a normal throw of ∼2 km since Early-Pleistocene. In the studied area, the master fault of the VCFZ dips N210/54° and juxtaposes Quaternary colluvial deposits in the hangingwall with cataclastic dolostones in the footwall. Detailed mapping of the fault zone rocks within the ∼300 m thick footwall-block evidenced the presence of five main structural units (Low Strain Damage Zone, High Strain Damage Zone, Breccia Unit, Cataclastic Unit 1 and Cataclastic Unit 2). The Breccia Unit results from the Pleistocene extensional reactivation of a pre-existing Pliocene thrust. The Cataclastic Unit 1 forms a ∼40 m thick band lining the master fault and recording in-situ shattering due to the propagation of multiple seismic ruptures. Seismic faulting is suggested also by the occurrence of mirror-like slip surfaces, highly localized sheared calcite-bearing veins and fluidized cataclasites. The VCFZ architecture compares well with seismological studies of the L'Aquila 2009 seismic sequence (mainshock MW 6.1), which imaged the reactivation of shallow-seated low-angle normal faults (Breccia Unit) cut by major high-angle normal faults (Cataclastic Units).

  9. High-temperature superconducting fault-current limiter - optimisation of superconducting elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This report summarises the findings of a study initiated to continue the work of a DTI-LINK Collaborative Research Programme 'Enhancing the Properties of Bulk High Temperature Superconductors and their Potential Application as Fault Current Limiters (FCL). Details are given of computer modelling of the quenching process involving the transition from superconducting to normal conducting states undergone by the material when large currents are present. The design of compound elements, and a multi-element model are described along with FCL design covering distribution bus-coupler, embedded generator connection, larger generator connection, hazardous area safety, and interconnection to fault-prone network. The evaluation of thermal loss, test equipment and schedule, the optimised element, installed cost data, and the UK market are considered.

  10. High-Speed Spindle Fault Diagnosis with the Empirical Mode Decomposition and Multiscale Entropy Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan-Kai Hsieh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The root mean square (RMS value of a vibration signal is an important indicator used to represent the amplitude of vibrations in evaluating the quality of high-speed spindles. However, RMS is unable to detect a number of common fault characteristics that occur prior to bearing failure. Extending the operational life and quality of spindles requires reliable fault diagnosis techniques for the analysis of vibration signals from three axes. This study used empirical mode decomposition to decompose signals into intrinsic mode functions containing a zero-crossing rate and energy to represent the characteristics of rotating elements. The MSE curve was then used to identify a number of characteristic defects. The purpose of this research was to obtain vibration signals along three axes with the aim of extending the operational life of devices included in the product line of an actual spindle manufacturing company.

  11. Enhanced terahertz radiation from high stacking fault density nonpolar GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Grace D.; Shen, Hongen; Wraback, Michael; Hirai, Asako; Wu, Feng; Speck, James S.

    2008-06-01

    Terahertz emission from high stacking fault density m-GaN has been observed using ultrafast pulse excitation. The terahertz signal exhibits a 360° periodicity with sample rotation and a polarity flip at 180°, characteristic of real carrier transport in an in-plane electric field parallel to the c axis induced by stacking fault (SF)-terminated internal polarization at wurtzite domain boundaries. The terahertz emission can be enhanced by several times relative to that from a SF-free m-GaN sample, for which the terahertz signal emanates from surface surge currents and diffusion-driven carrier transport normal to the surface and is independent of the c-axis orientation.

  12. Synchronization of grid-connected renewable energy sources under highly distorted voltages and unbalanced grid faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadjidemetriou, Lenos; Kyriakides, Elias; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2013-01-01

    renewable energy systems. Therefore, the performance of the new PLL can increase the quality of the injected power under abnormal conditions and in addition enable the renewable energy systems to provide the appropriate support to the grid under balanced and unbalanced grid faults.......Renewable energy sources require accurate and appropriate performance not only under normal grid operation but also under abnormal and faulty grid conditions according to the modern grid codes. This paper proposes a novel phase-locked loop algorithm (MSHDC-PLL), which can enable the fast...... and dynamic synchronization of the interconnected renewable energy system under unbalanced grid faults and under highly harmonic distorted voltage. The outstanding performance of the suggested PLL is achieved by implementing an innovative multi-sequence/harmonic decoupling cell in order to dynamically cancel...

  13. Simulation of Near-Fault High-Frequency Ground Motions from the Representation Theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresnev, Igor A.

    2017-07-01

    "What is the maximum possible ground motion near an earthquake fault?" is an outstanding question of practical significance in earthquake seismology. In establishing a possible theoretical cap on extreme ground motions, the representation integral of elasticity, providing an exact, within limits of applicability, solution for fault radiation at any frequency, is an under-utilized tool. The application of a numerical procedure leading to synthetic ground displacement, velocity, and acceleration time histories to modeling of the record at the Lucerne Valley hard-rock station, uniquely located at 1.1 km from the rupture of the M w 7.2 Landers, California event, using a seismologically constrained temporal form of slip on the fault, reveals that the shape of the displacement waveform can be modeled closely, given the simplicity of the theoretical model. High precision in the double integration, as well as carefully designed smoothing and filtering, are necessary to suppress the numerical noise in the high-frequency (velocity and acceleration) synthetic motions. The precision of the integration of at least eight decimal digits ensures the numerical error in the displacement waveforms generally much lower than 0.005% and reduces the error in the peak velocities and accelerations to the levels acceptable to make the representation theorem a reliable tool in the practical evaluation of the magnitude of maximum possible ground motions in a wide-frequency range of engineering interest.

  14. Oceanic Transform Fault-Zone Geomorphology in the Gulf of California from High-Resolution Bathymetric Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilley, G. E.; Aron, F.; Baden, C. W.; Castillo, C. M.; Johnstone, S. A.; Nevitt, J. M.; McHargue, T.; Paull, C. K.; Sare, R.; Shumaker, L.; Young, H.

    2015-12-01

    We use high-resolution, deep-water bathymetry to examine the structure of, and offset along, transform faults in the Gulf of California. These data provide detailed observations of fault-zone geomorphology of an active transform fault hosted in an area transitioning from continental to oceanic crust. Bathymetric data were collected by an autonomous underwater vehicle deployed by the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute in 2012. Dense ocean-bottom point clouds allowed construction of an ~1-m-resolution digital terrain model, which provides comparable spatial resolution to early airborne laser swath mapping surveys. The data reveal a set of complex, multi-stranded fault zones, whose morphologies suggest a temporal migration of deformation between individual strands contained within an up to 1 km wide zone, similar to complex fault zones observed within continental crust in subaerial environments. Individual fault strands show restraining steps that create positive relief along the ocean floor in their vicinity. Although the depositional nature of these deep-water systems makes identification of offset features challenging, we found a series of offset fans along a fault strand with consistent right-lateral offsets of 17-21 m. These are likely multi-event offsets, given the length of the transform segments and magnitudes of historically recorded earthquakes in the region. The consistency of these multi-event offsets suggests that an external process predating the displacement of the fans, such as seismic shaking due to large earthquakes, may be responsible for the synchroneity of these features. Our study demonstrates that the fault-zone geomorphology of oceanic transform faults in the Gulf of California bears resemblance to that of terrestrial strike-slip faults hosted in continental crust, and that high-resolution, deep water bathymetry can provide information about the earthquake history of these environments.

  15. Stress sensitivity of fault seismicity: A comparison between limited-offset oblique and major strike-slip faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Tom; Stein, Ross S.; Simpson, Robert W.; Reasenberg, Paul A.

    1999-09-01

    We present a new three-dimensional inventory of the southern San Francisco Bay area faults and use it to calculate stress applied principally by the 1989 M = 7.1 Loma Prieta earthquake and to compare fault seismicity rates before and after 1989. The major high-angle right-lateral faults exhibit a different response to the stress change than do minor oblique (right-lateral/thrust) faults. Seismicity on oblique-slip faults in the southern Santa Clara Valley thrust belt increased where the faults were undamped. The strong dependence of seismicity change on normal stress change implies a high coefficient of static friction. In contrast, we observe that faults with significant offset (>50-100 km) behave differently; microseismicity on the Hayward fault diminished where right-lateral shear stress was reduced and where it was undamped by the Loma Prieta earthquake. We observe a similar response on the San Andreas fault zone in southern California after the Landers earthquake sequence. Additionally, the offshore San Gregorio fault shows a seismicity rate increase where right-lateral/oblique shear stress was increased by the Loma Prieta earthquake despite also being clamped by it. These responses are consistent with either a low coefficient of static friction or high pore fluid pressures within the fault zones. We can explain the different behavior of the two styles of faults if those with large cumulative offset become impermeable through gouge buildup; coseismically pressurized pore fluids could be trapped and negate imposed normal stress changes, whereas in more limited offset faults, fluids could rapidly escape. The difference in behavior between minor and major faults may explain why frictional failure criteria that apply intermediate coefficients of static friction can be effective in describing the broad distributions of aftershocks that follow large earthquakes, since many of these events occur both inside and outside major fault zones.

  16. The relationship of near-surface active faulting to megathrust splay fault geometry in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, S.; Liberty, L. M.; Haeussler, P. J.; Northrup, C.; Pratt, T. L.

    2010-12-01

    We interpret regionally extensive, active faults beneath Prince William Sound (PWS), Alaska, to be structurally linked to deeper megathrust splay faults, such as the one that ruptured in the 1964 M9.2 earthquake. Western PWS in particular is unique; the locations of active faulting offer insights into the transition at the southern terminus of the previously subducted Yakutat slab to Pacific plate subduction. Newly acquired high-resolution, marine seismic data show three seismic facies related to Holocene and older Quaternary to Tertiary strata. These sediments are cut by numerous high angle normal faults in the hanging wall of megathrust splay. Crustal-scale seismic reflection profiles show splay faults emerging from 20 km depth between the Yakutat block and North American crust and surfacing as the Hanning Bay and Patton Bay faults. A distinct boundary coinciding beneath the Hinchinbrook Entrance causes a systematic fault trend change from N30E in southwestern PWS to N70E in northeastern PWS. The fault trend change underneath Hinchinbrook Entrance may occur gradually or abruptly and there is evidence for similar deformation near the Montague Strait Entrance. Landward of surface expressions of the splay fault, we observe subsidence, faulting, and landslides that record deformation associated with the 1964 and older megathrust earthquakes. Surface exposures of Tertiary rocks throughout PWS along with new apatite-helium dates suggest long-term and regional uplift with localized, fault-controlled subsidence.

  17. Lattice Boltzmann Method used for the aircraft characteristics computation at high angle of attack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Traditional Finite Volume Method(FVM)and Lattice Boltzmann Method(LBM)are both used to compute the high angle attack aerodynamic characteristics of the benchmark aircraft model named CT-1.Even though the software requires flow on the order of Ma<0.4,simulation at Ma=0.5 is run in PowerFLOW after theoretical analysis.The consistency with the wind tunnel testing is satisfied,especially for the LBM which can produce perfect results at high angle attack.PowerFLOW can accurately capture the detail of flows because it is inherently time-dependent and parallel and suits large-scale computation very well.

  18. A Novel High-Frequency Voltage Standing-Wave Ratio-Based Grounding Electrode Line Fault Supervision in Ultra-High Voltage DC Transmission Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufei Teng

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the fault monitoring performance of grounding electrode lines in ultra-high voltage DC (UHVDC transmission systems, a novel fault monitoring approach based on the high-frequency voltage standing-wave ratio (VSWR is proposed in this paper. The VSWR is defined considering a lossless transmission line, and the characteristics of the VSWR under different conditions are analyzed. It is shown that the VSWR equals 1 when the terminal resistance completely matches the characteristic impedance of the line, and when a short circuit fault occurs on the grounding electrode line, the VSWR will be greater than 1. The VSWR will approach positive infinity under metallic earth fault conditions, whereas the VSWR in non-metallic earth faults will be smaller. Based on these analytical results, a fault supervision criterion is formulated. The effectiveness of the proposed VSWR-based fault supervision technique is verified with a typical UHVDC project established in Power Systems Computer Aided Design/Electromagnetic Transients including DC(PSCAD/EMTDC. Simulation results indicate that the proposed strategy can reliably identify the grounding electrode line fault and has strong anti-fault resistance capability.

  19. Assessment of Automated Snow Cover Detection at High Solar Zenith Angles with PROBA-V

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the snow cover extent are both a cause and a consequence of climate change. Optical remote sensing with heliosynchronous satellites currently provides snow cover data at high spatial resolution with daily revisiting time. However, high latitude image acquisition is limited because reflective sensors of many satellites are switched off at high solar zenith angles (SZA) due to lower signal quality. In this study, the relevance and reliability of high SZA acquisition are objectively q...

  20. Limited Angle Torque Motors Having High Torque Density, Used in Accurate Drive Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Obreja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A torque motor is a special electric motor that is able to develop the highest possible torque in a certain volume. A torque motor usually has a pancake configuration, and is directly jointed to a drive system (without a gear box. A limited angle torque motor is a torque motor that has no rotary electromagnetic field — in certain papers it is referred to as a linear electromagnet. The main intention of the authors for this paper is to present a means for analyzing and designing a limited angle torque motor only through the finite element method. Users nowadays require very high-performance limited angle torque motors with high density torque. It is therefore necessary to develop the highest possible torque in a relatively small volume. A way to design such motors is by using numerical methods based on the finite element method.

  1. COMPUTATION OF FIELD STRUCTURE AND AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF DELTA WINGS AT HIGH ANGLES OF ATTACK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Li-zhi; GAO Zheng-hong

    2005-01-01

    A numerical investigation of the structure of the vortical flowfield over delta wings at high angles of attack in longitudinal and with small sideslip angle is presented.Three-dimensional Navier-Stokes numerical simulations were carried out to predict the complex leeward-side flowfield characteristics that are dominated by the effect of the breakdown of the leading-edge vortices. The methods that analyze the flowfield structure quantitatively were given by using flowfield data from the computational results. In the region before the vortex breakdown, the vortex axes are approximated as being straight line. As the angle of attack increases, the vortex axes are closer to the root chord, and farther away from the wing surface. Along the vortex axes, as the adverse pressure gradients occur, the axial velocity decreases, that is, λ is negative, so the vortex is unstable, and it is possible to breakdown. The occurrence of the breakdown results in the instability of lateral motion for a delta wing, and the lateral moment diverges after a small perturbation occurs at high angles of attack. However,after a critical angle of attack is reached, the vortices breakdown completely at the wing apex, and the instability resulting from the vortex breakdown disappears.

  2. Development of a phenotyping platform for high throughput screening of nodal root angle in sorghum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Dinesh C; Singh, Vijaya; Hunt, Colleen; Mace, Emma; van Oosterom, Erik; Sulman, Richard; Jordan, David; Hammer, Graeme

    2017-01-01

    In sorghum, the growth angle of nodal roots is a major component of root system architecture. It strongly influences the spatial distribution of roots of mature plants in the soil profile, which can impact drought adaptation. However, selection for nodal root angle in sorghum breeding programs has been restricted by the absence of a suitable high throughput phenotyping platform. The aim of this study was to develop a phenotyping platform for the rapid, non-destructive and digital measurement of nodal root angle of sorghum at the seedling stage. The phenotyping platform comprises of 500 soil filled root chambers (50 × 45 × 0.3 cm in size), made of transparent perspex sheets that were placed in metal tubs and covered with polycarbonate sheets. Around 3 weeks after sowing, once the first flush of nodal roots was visible, roots were imaged in situ using an imaging box that included two digital cameras that were remotely controlled by two android tablets. Free software (openGelPhoto.tcl) allowed precise measurement of nodal root angle from the digital images. The reliability and efficiency of the platform was evaluated by screening a large nested association mapping population of sorghum and a set of hybrids in six independent experimental runs that included up to 500 plants each. The platform revealed extensive genetic variation and high heritability (repeatability) for nodal root angle. High genetic correlations and consistent ranking of genotypes across experimental runs confirmed the reproducibility of the platform. This low cost, high throughput root phenotyping platform requires no sophisticated equipment, is adaptable to most glasshouse environments and is well suited to dissect the genetic control of nodal root angle of sorghum. The platform is suitable for use in sorghum breeding programs aiming to improve drought adaptation through root system architecture manipulation.

  3. Highly plastic behavior and fluidization of gouge; implications for fault and landslide mechanics and for the generation of mud volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamoto, Toshihiko; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Seshimo, Kazuyoshi; Hu, Wei; Ma, Shengli; Yao, Lu; Xiong, Ran; Xiao, Yinke

    2016-04-01

    minimum of 0.02 when the initial pore water was greater than about 30 wt%. The landslide is moving slowly at velocities to ca. 1 cm/day on a very gentle slope with a dip angle of 1 to 3 degrees, corresponding to friction coefficients of 0.02 to 0.05. Our drained tests still could not fully reproduce this landslide and we plan to conduct undrained tests as the other extreme case. Highly plastic behavior of gouge with very low friction may lead to extreme weakening of faults with dehydration, and mud volcanoes may also be caused by dramatic weakening of granular materials with abundant water. Fluidization of gouge can be an important mechanism for ultra-low friction of faults and landslide slip zones with degassing reactions or with vaporization of dehydrated water at low normal stresses. We have just made a gouge sample cell with O-rings and a pore-pressure gauge to refine those preliminary experiment, by conducting undrained tests with controlled amount of pore water while monitoring pore pressure. Additional data will be reported on those materials and on fine sandstone from a mud volcano in the Nankai Trough.

  4. Seismicity and Tectonics of the West Kaibab Fault Zone, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilgus, J. T.; Brumbaugh, D. S.

    2014-12-01

    The West Kaibab Fault Zone (WKFZ) is the westernmost bounding structure of the Kaibab Plateau of northern Arizona. The WKFZ is a branching complex of high angle, normal faults downthrown to the west. There are three main faults within the WKFZ, the Big Springs fault with a maximum of 165 m offset, the Muav fault with 350 m of displacement, and the North Road fault having a maximum throw of approximately 90 m. Mapping of geologically recent surface deposits at or crossing the fault contacts indicates that the faults are likely Quaternary with the most recent offsets occurring one of the most seismically active areas in Arizona and lies within the Northern Arizona Seismic Belt (NASB), which stretches across northern Arizona trending NW-SE. The data set for this study includes 156 well documented events with the largest being a M5.75 in 1959 and including a swarm of seven earthquakes in 2012. The seismic data set (1934-2014) reveals that seismic activity clusters in two regions within the study area, the Fredonia cluster located in the NW corner of the study area and the Kaibab cluster located in the south central portion of the study area. The fault plane solutions to date indicate NE-SW to EW extension is occurring in the study area. Source relationships between earthquakes and faults within the WKFZ have not previously been studied in detail. The goal of this study is to use the seismic data set, the available data on faults, and the regional physiography to search for source relationships for the seismicity. Analysis includes source parameters of the earthquake data (location, depth, and fault plane solutions), and comparison of this output to the known faults and areal physiographic framework to indicate any active faults of the WKFZ, or suggested active unmapped faults. This research contributes to a better understanding of the present nature of the WKFZ and the NASB as well.

  5. High Speed Operation and Testing of a Fault Tolerant Magnetic Bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Kenneth; Clark, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Research activities undertaken to upgrade the fault-tolerant facility, continue testing high-speed fault-tolerant operation, and assist in the commission of the high temperature (1000 degrees F) thrust magnetic bearing as described. The fault-tolerant magnetic bearing test facility was upgraded to operate to 40,000 RPM. The necessary upgrades included new state-of-the art position sensors with high frequency modulation and new power edge filtering of amplifier outputs. A comparison study of the new sensors and the previous system was done as well as a noise assessment of the sensor-to-controller signals. Also a comparison study of power edge filtering for amplifier-to-actuator signals was done; this information is valuable for all position sensing and motor actuation applications. After these facility upgrades were completed, the rig is believed to have capabilities for 40,000 RPM operation, though this has yet to be demonstrated. Other upgrades included verification and upgrading of safety shielding, and upgrading control algorithms. The rig will now also be used to demonstrate motoring capabilities and control algorithms are in the process of being created. Recently an extreme temperature thrust magnetic bearing was designed from the ground up. The thrust bearing was designed to fit within the existing high temperature facility. The retrofit began near the end of the summer, 04, and continues currently. Contract staff authored a NASA-TM entitled "An Overview of Magnetic Bearing Technology for Gas Turbine Engines", containing a compilation of bearing data as it pertains to operation in the regime of the gas turbine engine and a presentation of how magnetic bearings can become a viable candidate for use in future engine technology.

  6. A robust smart window: reversibly switching from high transparency to angle-independent structural color display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Dengteng; Lee, Elaine; Yang, Lili; Cho, Yigil; Li, Min; Gianola, Daniel S; Yang, Shu

    2015-04-17

    A smart window is fabricated from a composite consisting of elastomeric poly(dimethylsiloxane) embedded with a thin layer of quasi-amorphous silica nanoparticles. The smart window can be switched from the initial highly transparent state to opaqueness and displays angle-independent structural color via mechanical stretching. The switchable optical property can be fully recovered after 1000 stretching/releasing cycles.

  7. Bifurcation analysis of polynomial models for longitudinal motion at high angle of attack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Zhongke; Fan Li

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the longitudinal motion stability of aircraft maneuvers conveniently,a new stability analysis approach is presented in this paper.Based on describing longitudinal aerodynamics at high angle-of-attack (α < 50°) motion by polynomials,a union structure of two-order differential equation is suggested.By means of nonlinear theory and method,analytical and global bifurcation analyses of the polynomial differential systems are provided for the study of the nonlinear phenomena of high angle-of-attack flight.Applying the theories of bifurcations,many kinds of bifurcations,such as equilibrium,Hopf,homoclinic (heteroclinic) orbit and double limit cycle bifurcations are discussed and the existence conditions for these bifurcations as well as formulas for calculating bifurcation curves are derived.The bifurcation curves divide the parameter plane into several regions; moreover,the complete bifurcation diagrams and phase portraits in different regions are obtained.Finally,our conclusions are applied to analyzing the stability and bifurcations of a practical example of a high angle-of-attack flight as well as the effects of elevator deflection on the asymptotic stability regions of equilibrium.The model and analytical methods presented in this paper can be used to study the nonlinear flight dynamic of longitudinal stall at high angle of attack.

  8. Wing-Alone Aerodynamic Characteristics to High Angles of Attack at Subsonic and Transonic Speeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-01

    indicators of symmetry since the wings were unbanked within the limits of tolerances and flow angularity. Longitudinal, spanwise, and vertical... unbanked wings at subsonic and transonic speeds from low to high angles of attack. The wing planforms varied in aspect ratio and taper ratio with

  9. Surface pressure model for simple delta wings at high angles of attack

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A A Pashilkar

    2001-12-01

    A new aerodynamic modelling approach is proposed for the longitudinal static characteristics of a simple delta wing. It captures the static variation of normal force and pitching moment characteristics throughout the angle of attack range. The pressure model is based on parametrizing the surface pressure distribution on a simple delta wing. The model is then extended to a wing/body combination where body-alone data are also available. The model is shown to be simple and consistent with experimental data. The pressure model can be used as a first approximation for the load estimation on the delta wing at high angles of attack.

  10. Prediction of forces and moments on finned bodies at high angle of attack in transonic flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberkampf, W. L.

    1981-04-01

    This report describes a theoretical method for the prediction of fin forces and moments on bodies at high angle of attack in subsonic and transonic flow. The body is assumed to be a circular cylinder with cruciform fins (or wings) of arbitrary planform. The body can have an arbitrary roll (or bank) angle, and each fin can have individual control deflection. The method combines a body vortex flow model and lifting surface theory to predict the normal force distribution over each fin surface. Extensive comparisons are made between theory and experiment for various planform fins. A description of the use of the computer program that implements the method is given.

  11. Magnus effects at high angles of attack and critical Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seginer, A.; Ringel, M.

    1983-01-01

    The Magnus force and moment experienced by a yawed, spinning cylinder were studied experimentally in low speed and subsonic flows at high angles of attack and critical Reynolds numbers. Flow-field visualization aided in describing a flow model that divides the Magnus phenomenon into a subcritical region, where reverse Magnus loads are experienced, and a supercritical region where these loads are not encountered. The roles of the spin rate, angle of attack, and crossflow Reynolds number in determining the boundaries of the subcritical region and the variations of the Magnus loads were studied.

  12. Double-layer rotor magnetic shield performance analysis in high temperature superconducting synchronous generators under short circuit fault conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekmati, Arsalan; Aliahmadi, Mehdi

    2016-12-01

    High temperature superconducting, HTS, synchronous machines benefit from a rotor magnetic shield in order to protect superconducting coils against asynchronous magnetic fields. This magnetic shield, however, suffers from exerted Lorentz forces generated in light of induced eddy currents during transient conditions, e.g. stator windings short-circuit fault. In addition, to the exerted electromagnetic forces, eddy current losses and the associated effects on the cryogenic system are the other consequences of shielding HTS coils. This study aims at investigating the Rotor Magnetic Shield, RMS, performance in HTS synchronous generators under stator winding short-circuit fault conditions. The induced eddy currents in different circumferential positions of the rotor magnetic shield along with associated Joule heating losses would be studied using 2-D time-stepping Finite Element Analysis, FEA. The investigation of Lorentz forces exerted on the magnetic shield during transient conditions has also been performed in this paper. The obtained results show that double line-to-ground fault is of the most importance among different types of short-circuit faults. It was revealed that when it comes to the design of the rotor magnetic shields, in addition to the eddy current distribution and the associated ohmic losses, two phase-to-ground fault should be taken into account since the produced electromagnetic forces in the time of fault conditions are more severe during double line-to-ground fault.

  13. Fuzzy PI Controller Based Fault Analysis and Recovery in Sensorless BLDC Motor using High Gain Hybrid Converter (HGHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Jayanthi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Renewable Energy Sources (RES has been widely used in various applications due to increase in power demand. In this study, a High Gain Hybrid Converter (HGHC has been used to utilize maximum power from PV panel and to control the battery mode of operation such as charging/discharging in an efficient manner. In the load side, sensor less BLDC motor has been used in this study. After the back EMF is generated in the load side BLDC motor, it is taken as feedback to the HGHC. So, this will act as the main supply and thus, more power can be saved. Moreover, this research study also focuses on the transient analysis of the BLDC motor. The inverter in BLDC motor plays a vital role as it is responsible for flux generation and fixing up of angle ‘θ’ to the motor for its operation. So, the failures in the switches of the inverter would greatly affect the overall functioning of the BLDC motor. Thus, this research study focuses on the failure analysis of these switches in the inverter. In order to analyze and recover these faults, error controllers have been used in this proposed study. The simulations are carried out in MATLAB r2011a and the results are taken. The results show the significant performance of the proposed model.

  14. Investigation on high angle of attack characteristics of hypersonic space vehicle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Wei; LI ShiBin; LIU Jun; WANG ZhenGuo

    2012-01-01

    The high angle of attack characteristics play an important role in the aerodynamic performances of the hypersonic space vehicle.The three-dimensional Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations and the two-equation RNG k-ε turbulence model have been employed to investigate the influence of the high angle of attack on the lift-to-drag ratio and the flow field characteristics of the hypersonic space vehicle,and the contributions of each component to the aerodynamic forces of the vehicle have been discussed as well.At the same time,in order to validate the numerical method,the predicted results have been compared with the available experimental data of a hypersonic slender vehicle,and the grid independency has been analyzed.The obtained results show that the predicted lift-to-drag ratio and pitching moment coefficient show very good agreement with the experimental data in the open literature,and the grid system makes only a slight difference to the numerical results.There exists an optimal angle of attack for the aerodynamic performance of the hypersonic space vehicle,and its value is 20°.When the angle of attack is 20°,the high pressure does not leak from around the leading edge to the upper surface.With the further increasing of the angle of attack,the high pressure spreads from the wing tips to the central area of the vehicle,and overflows from the leading edge again.Further,the head plays an important role in the drag performance of the vehicle,and the lift percentage of the flaperon is larger than that of the rudderevator.This illustrates that the optimization of the flaperon configuration is a great work for the improvement of the aerodynamic performance of the hypersonic space vehicle,especially for a high lift-to-drag ratio.

  15. Fault geometry and mechanics of marly carbonate multilayers: An integrated field and laboratory study from the Northern Apennines, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgetti, C.; Collettini, C.; Scuderi, M. M.; Barchi, M. R.; Tesei, T.

    2016-12-01

    Sealing layers are often represented by sedimentary sequences characterized by alternating strong and weak lithologies. When involved in faulting processes, these mechanically heterogeneous multilayers develop complex fault geometries. Here we investigate fault initiation and evolution within a mechanical multilayer by integrating field observations and rock deformation experiments. Faults initiate with a staircase trajectory that partially reflects the mechanical properties of the involved lithologies, as suggested by our deformation experiments. However, some faults initiating at low angles in calcite-rich layers (θi = 5°-20°) and at high angles in clay-rich layers (θi = 45°-86°) indicate the important role of structural inheritance at the onset of faulting. With increasing displacement, faults develop well-organized fault cores characterized by a marly, foliated matrix embedding fragments of limestone. The angles of fault reactivation, which concentrate between 30° and 60°, are consistent with the low friction coefficient measured during our experiments on marls (μs = 0.39), indicating that clay minerals exert a main control on fault mechanics. Moreover, our integrated analysis suggests that fracturing and faulting are the main mechanisms allowing fluid circulation within the low-permeability multilayer, and that its sealing integrity can be compromised only by the activity of larger faults cutting across its entire thickness.

  16. High energy arcing fault fires in switchgear equipment : a literature review.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowlen, Steven Patrick; Brown, Jason W.; Wyant, Francis John

    2008-10-01

    In power generating plants, switchgear provide a means to isolate and de-energize specific electrical components and buses in order to clear downstream faults, perform routine maintenance, and replace necessary electrical equipment. These protective devices may be categorized by the insulating medium, such as air or oil, and are typically specified by voltage classes, i.e. low, medium, and high voltage. Given their high energy content, catastrophic failure of switchgear by means of a high energy arcing fault (HEAF) may occur. An incident such as this may lead to an explosion and fire within the switchgear, directly impact adjacent components, and possibly render dependent electrical equipment inoperable. Historically, HEAF events have been poorly documented and discussed in little detail. Recent incidents involving switchgear components at nuclear power plants, however, were scrupulously investigated. The phenomena itself is only understood on a very elementary level from preliminary experiments and theories; though many have argued that these early experiments were inaccurate due to primitive instrumentation or poorly justified methodologies and thus require re-evaluation. Within the past two decades, however, there has been a resurgence of research that analyzes previous work and modern technology. Developing a greater understanding of the HEAF phenomena, in particular the affects on switchgear equipment and other associated switching components, would allow power generating industries to minimize and possibly prevent future occurrences, thereby reducing costs associated with repair and downtime. This report presents the findings of a literature review focused on arc fault studies for electrical switching equipment. The specific objective of this review was to assess the availability of the types of information needed to support development of improved treatment methods in fire Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) for nuclear power plant applications.

  17. A Study on the Dependable and Secure Relaying Scheme under High Resistance Earth Faults on HV, EHV Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, I.D.; Han, K.N. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    This report contains following items for the purpose of investigating and analyzing characteristics of high impedance ground faults. - Reason and characteristics identification of HIF - Modeling of power system - Testing of protective relays using RTD(Real Time Digital Simulator) - Staged ground faults test - Development of new algorithm to detect HIF - Protective coordination schemes between different types of relays - HIF monitoring and relaying scheme and H/W prototyping. (author). 22 refs., 28 figs., 21 tabs.

  18. Significant Cenozoic faulting, east margin of the Española Basin, Rio Grande rift, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, James H.; Riecker, Robert E.

    1989-03-01

    Tectonic interpretation of the east margin of the Española Basin, Rio Grande rift, New Mexico, has been controversial. Previous authors have disagreed as to whether significant faulting defines the boundary between the basin and the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. A more recent geophysical basin transect that suggests no significant faulting and held observation of faceted spurs along the western Sangre de Cristo Mountain front indicating a faulted margin motivate our study. The east margin of the Española Basin for about 37 km north of Santa Fe, New Mexico, is marked by a complex array of significant, late Cenozoic high-angle faults. Locally, three parallel, north-trending, high-angle faults cut Precambrian basement and Tertiary basin-fill rocks along the basin margin. Elsewhere along the margin, tilted fault blocks and intersecting faults occur. Fault area, fault attitude with depth, magnitude of fault motion, and timing of fault motion remain uncertain. However, faults studied in detail are 1-2 km long, have minimum dip-slip motion of 33-100 m, and underwent movement during the late Cenozoic. Potentially significant tectonic and seismic hazard implications arise from the possibility of post-150 ka fault motion.

  19. Paleoseismology at high latitudes: Seismic disturbance of upper Quaternary deposits along the Castle Mountain fault near Houston, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeussler, P.J.; Best, T.C.; Waythomas, C.F.

    2002-01-01

    Most paleoseismic studies are at low to moderate latitudes. Here we present results from a high-latitude (61??30??? N) trenching study of the Castle Mountain fault in south-central Alaska. This fault is the only one known in the greater Anchorage, Alaska, area with historical seismicity and a Holocene fault scarp. It strikes eastnortheast and cuts glacial and postglacial sediments in an area of boreal spruce-birch forest, shrub tundra, and sphagnum bog. The fault has a prominent vegetation lineament on the upthrown, north side of the fault. Nine trenches were logged across the fault in glacial and postglacial deposits, seven along the main trace, and two along a splay. In addition to thrust and strike-slip faulting, important controls on observed relationships in the trenches are the season in which faulting occurred, the physical properties of the sediments, liquefaction, a shallow water table, soil-forming processes, the strength of the modern root mat, and freeze-thaw processes. Some of these processes and physical properties are unique to northern-latitude areas and result in seismic disturbance effects not observed at lower latitudes. The two trenches across the Castle Mountain fault splay exposed a thrust fault and few liquefaction features. Radiocarbon ages of soil organic matter and charcoal within and overlying the fault indicate movement on the fault at ca. 2735 cal. (calendar) yr B.P. and no subsequent movement. In the remaining seven trenches, surface faulting was accompanied by extensive liquefaction and a zone of disruption 3 m or more wide. The presence of numerous liquefaction features at depths of soil, but did not penetrate the interlocking spruce-birch root mat. The strength of the root mat prohibited development of a nonvegetated scarp face and colluvial wedge. In only one trench did we observe a discrete fault plane with measurable offset. It lay beneath a 2-m-thick carapace of liquefied sand and silt and displayed a total of 0.9-1.85 m of

  20. A highly accurate dynamic contact angle algorithm for drops on inclined surface based on ellipse-fitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z N; Wang, S Y

    2015-02-01

    To improve the accuracy in the calculation of dynamic contact angle for drops on the inclined surface, a significant number of numerical drop profiles on the inclined surface with different inclination angles, drop volumes, and contact angles are generated based on the finite difference method, a least-squares ellipse-fitting algorithm is used to calculate the dynamic contact angle. The influences of the above three factors are systematically investigated. The results reveal that the dynamic contact angle errors, including the errors of the left and right contact angles, evaluated by the ellipse-fitting algorithm tend to increase with inclination angle/drop volume/contact angle. If the drop volume and the solid substrate are fixed, the errors of the left and right contact angles increase with inclination angle. After performing a tremendous amount of computation, the critical dimensionless drop volumes corresponding to the critical contact angle error are obtained. Based on the values of the critical volumes, a highly accurate dynamic contact angle algorithm is proposed and fully validated. Within nearly the whole hydrophobicity range, it can decrease the dynamic contact angle error in the inclined plane method to less than a certain value even for different types of liquids.

  1. Empirical sea ice thickness retrieval during the freeze up period from SMOS high incident angle observations

    OpenAIRE

    Huntemann, M.; G. Heygster; Kaleschke, L.; T. Krumpen; M. Mäkynen; M. Drusch

    2014-01-01

    Sea ice thickness information is important for sea ice modelling and ship operations. Here a method to detect the thickness of sea ice up to 50 cm during the freeze-up season based on high incidence angle observations of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite working at 1.4 GHz is suggested. By comparison of thermodynamic ice growth data with SMOS brightness temperatures, a high correlation to intensity and an anticorrelation to the difference bet...

  2. Lidar Mapping Documents Post-glacial Faulting West of the High Cascades Axis at Crater Lake National Park, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, C. R.; Robinson, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    The Cascades magmatic arc lies mainly within the High Cascades graben system in the state of Oregon. Normal faults of the Klamath graben trend north into Mount Mazama, the volcano whose catastrophic eruption ~7700 cal y BP resulted in collapse of 8x10 km Crater Lake caldera. Geologic mapping of Mount Mazama (Bacon, USGS SIM 2832, 2008) delineated faults of the West Klamath Lake fault zone (WKLFZ) and their northern extensions through Crater Lake National Park west of the caldera. Outcrop patterns implied presence of normal faults farther west but dense conifer forest made discovery of subtle scarps impractical. Closer to the Cascades axis, successively decreasing offsets of mapped Mazama lava flows with decreasing age yielded a long-term vertical slip rate of ~0.3 mm/y on the principal fault segments of the WKLFZ near Crater Lake, where the youngest offset lavas are 35 ka in age. Other workers have found offset lateral moraine crests where Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) valley glaciers crossed the WKLFZ south of Crater Lake. A lidar survey of Crater Lake National Park in 2010 supported by the Oregon Lidar Consortium (Robinson, USGS Data Series 716, 2012) revealed meter-scale, dominantly N-S trending fault scarps with down-to-the-east displacement west of most previously mapped faults at the latitude of Crater Lake, increasing the known width of the fault zone there to as much as 11 km. Fault segments as long as 7-16 km form a semi-continuous system for virtually the entire 32 km N-S extent of lidar coverage. Along the western part of the fault zone, scarp height is as great as ~20 m. Scarp length and height imply that several M>6-7 earthquakes have occurred in late Pleistocene-Holocene time. Field observations show that the ignimbrite of the Mazama climactic eruption banks against or covers scarps. One fault vertically displaces a lateral moraine ~3 m. The moraine contains clasts of ~50 ka andesite and therefore likely dates from the LGM so that the most recent

  3. Active faults in the deformation zone off Noto Peninsula, Japan, revealed by high- resolution seismic profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, T.; Okamura, Y.; Murakami, F.; Kimura, H.; Ikehara, K.

    2008-12-01

    Recently, a lot of earthquakes occur in Japan. The deformation zone which many faults and folds have concentrated exists on the Japan Sea side of Japan. The 2007 Noto Hanto Earthquake (MJMA 6.9) and 2007 Chuetsu-oki Earthquake (MJMA 6.8) were caused by activity of parts of faults in this deformation zone. The Noto Hanto Earthquake occurred on 25 March, 2007 under the northwestern coast of Noto Peninsula, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan. This earthquake is located in Quaternary deformation zone that is continued from northern margin of Noto Peninsula to southeast direction (Okamura, 2007a). National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) carried out high-resolution seismic survey using Boomer and 12 channels short streamer cable in the northern part off Noto Peninsula, in order to clarify distribution and activities of active faults in the deformation zone. A twelve channels short streamer cable with 2.5 meter channel spacing developed by AIST and private corporation is designed to get high resolution seismic profiles in shallow sea area. The multi-channel system is possible to equip on a small fishing boat, because the data acquisition system is based on PC and the length of the cable is short and easy to handle. Moreover, because the channel spacing is short, this cable is very effective for a high- resolution seismic profiling survey in the shallow sea, and seismic data obtained by multi-channel cable can be improved by velocity analysis and CDP stack. In the northern part off Noto Peninsula, seismic profiles depicting geologic structure up to 100 meters deep under sea floor were obtained. The most remarkable reflection surface recognized in the seismic profiles is erosion surface at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). In the western part, sediments about 30 meters (40 msec) thick cover the erosional surface that is distributed under the shelf shallower than 100m in depth and the sediments thin toward offshore and east. Flexures like deformation in

  4. Study on Recovery Performance of High Tc Superconducting Tapes for Resistive Type Superconducting Fault Current Limiter Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    kar, Soumen; Kulkarni, Sandeep; Dixit, Manglesh; Singh, Kuwar Pal; Gupta, Alok; Balasubramanyam, P. V.; Sarangi, S. K.; Rao, V. V.

    Recent advances in reliable production of long length high temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes have resulted in commercial application of superconducting fault current limiters (SFCLs) in electrical utility networks. SFCL gives excellent technical performance when compared to conventional fault current limiters. The fast self-recovery from normal state to superconducting state immediately after the fault removal is an essential criterion for resistive type SFCL operation. In this paper, results on AC over-current testing of 1st generation (1G) Bi2223 tapes and 2nd generation (2G) YBCO coated conductors operating at 77 K are reported. From these results, the recovery time is estimated for different available HTS tapes in the market. The current limiting tests have also been performed to study the effective current limitation. Further, the recovery characteristics after the current limitation are quantitatively discussed for repetitive faults for different time intervals in the range of 100 ms to few seconds.

  5. Fault detection and isolation of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell stack under the influence of degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Christian; Araya, Samuel Simon; Sahlin, Simon Lennart

    2017-01-01

    This study proposes a data-drive impedance-based methodology for fault detection and isolation of low and high cathode stoichiometry, high CO concentration in the anode gas, high methanol vapour concentrations in the anode gas and low anode stoichiometry, for high temperature PEM fuel cells. The ...

  6. High Temperature, Permanent Magnet Biased, Fault Tolerant, Homopolar Magnetic Bearing Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzolo, Alan; Tucker, Randall; Kenny, Andrew; Kang, Kyung-Dae; Ghandi, Varun; Liu, Jinfang; Choi, Heeju; Provenza, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarizes the development of a magnetic bearing designed to operate at 1,000 F. A novel feature of this high temperature magnetic bearing is its homopolar construction which incorporates state of the art high temperature, 1,000 F, permanent magnets. A second feature is its fault tolerance capability which provides the desired control forces with over one-half of the coils failed. The construction and design methodology of the bearing is outlined and test results are shown. The agreement between a 3D finite element, magnetic field based prediction for force is shown to be in good agreement with predictions at room and high temperature. A 5 axis test rig will be complete soon to provide a means to test the magnetic bearings at high temperature and speed.

  7. Empirical sea ice thickness retrieval during the freeze up period from SMOS high incident angle observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntemann, M.; Heygster, G.; Kaleschke, L.; Krumpen, T.; Mäkynen, M.; Drusch, M.

    2013-08-01

    Sea ice thickness information is needed for climate modeling and ship operations. Here a method to detect the thickness of sea ice up to 50 cm during the freezeup season based on high incidence angle observations of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite working at 1.4 GHz is suggested. By comparison of thermodynamic ice growth data with SMOS brightness temperatures, a high correlation to intensity and an anti correlation to the difference between vertically and horizontally polarised brightness temperatures at incidence angles between 40 and 50 ° are found and used to develop an empirical retrieval sensitive to thin sea ice up to 50 cm thickness. It shows high correlations with ice thickness data from airborne measurements and reasonable ice thickness patterns for the Arctic freeze up period.

  8. Empirical sea ice thickness retrieval during the freeze up period from SMOS high incident angle observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Huntemann

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Sea ice thickness information is needed for climate modeling and ship operations. Here a method to detect the thickness of sea ice up to 50 cm during the freezeup season based on high incidence angle observations of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS satellite working at 1.4 GHz is suggested. By comparison of thermodynamic ice growth data with SMOS brightness temperatures, a high correlation to intensity and an anti correlation to the difference between vertically and horizontally polarised brightness temperatures at incidence angles between 40 and 50 ° are found and used to develop an empirical retrieval sensitive to thin sea ice up to 50 cm thickness. It shows high correlations with ice thickness data from airborne measurements and reasonable ice thickness patterns for the Arctic freeze up period.

  9. Dynamic rupture scenarios from Sumatra to Iceland - High-resolution earthquake source physics on natural fault systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Alice-Agnes; Madden, Elizabeth H.; Ulrich, Thomas; Wollherr, Stephanie

    2017-04-01

    Capturing the observed complexity of earthquake sources in dynamic rupture simulations may require: non-linear fault friction, thermal and fluid effects, heterogeneous fault stress and fault strength initial conditions, fault curvature and roughness, on- and off-fault non-elastic failure. All of these factors have been independently shown to alter dynamic rupture behavior and thus possibly influence the degree of realism attainable via simulated ground motions. In this presentation we will show examples of high-resolution earthquake scenarios, e.g. based on the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake, the 1994 Northridge earthquake and a potential rupture of the Husavik-Flatey fault system in Northern Iceland. The simulations combine a multitude of representations of source complexity at the necessary spatio-temporal resolution enabled by excellent scalability on modern HPC systems. Such simulations allow an analysis of the dominant factors impacting earthquake source physics and ground motions given distinct tectonic settings or distinct focuses of seismic hazard assessment. Across all simulations, we find that fault geometry concurrently with the regional background stress state provide a first order influence on source dynamics and the emanated seismic wave field. The dynamic rupture models are performed with SeisSol, a software package based on an ADER-Discontinuous Galerkin scheme for solving the spontaneous dynamic earthquake rupture problem with high-order accuracy in space and time. Use of unstructured tetrahedral meshes allows for a realistic representation of the non-planar fault geometry, subsurface structure and bathymetry. The results presented highlight the fact that modern numerical methods are essential to further our understanding of earthquake source physics and complement both physic-based ground motion research and empirical approaches in seismic hazard analysis.

  10. High level organizing principles for display of systems fault information for commercial flight crews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, William H.; Schutte, Paul C.

    1993-01-01

    Advanced fault management aiding concepts for commercial pilots are being developed in a research program at NASA Langley Research Center. One aim of this program is to re-evaluate current design principles for display of fault information to the flight crew: (1) from a cognitive engineering perspective and (2) in light of the availability of new types of information generated by advanced fault management aids. The study described in this paper specifically addresses principles for organizing fault information for display to pilots based on their mental models of fault management.

  11. Characterization of Fault Roughness at Various Scales: Implications of Three-Dimensional High Resolution Topography Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Candela, Thibault; Bouchon, Michel; Marsan, David; Schmittbuhl, Jean; Voisin, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Accurate description of the topography of active faults surfaces represents an important geophysical issue because this topography is strongly related to the stress distribution along fault planes, and therefore to processes implicated in earthquake nucleation, propagation, and arrest. With the recent development of Light Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) apparatus, it is now possible to measure accurately the 3D topography of rough surfaces with a comparable resolution in all directions, both at field and laboratory scales. In the present study, we have investigated the scaling properties including possible anisotropy properties of several outcrops of two natural fault surfaces (Vuache strike-slip fault, France, and Magnola normal fault, Italy) in limestones.

  12. Validation of meter-scale surface faulting offset measurements from high-resolution topographic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Barrett; Haddad, D.E.; Rockwell, T.K.; Arrowsmith, R.; Madugo, C.; Zielke, O.; Scharer, Katherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of active fault zones have flourished with the availability of high-resolution topographic data, particularly where airborne light detection and ranging (lidar) and structure from motion (SfM) data sets provide a means to remotely analyze submeter-scale fault geomorphology. To determine surface offset at a point along a strike-slip earthquake rupture, geomorphic features (e.g., stream channels) are measured days to centuries after the event. Analysis of these and cumulatively offset features produces offset distributions for successive earthquakes that are used to understand earthquake rupture behavior. As researchers expand studies to more varied terrain types, climates, and vegetation regimes, there is an increasing need to standardize and uniformly validate measurements of tectonically displaced geomorphic features. A recently compiled catalog of nearly 5000 earthquake offsets across a range of measurement and reporting styles provides insight into quality rating and uncertainty trends from which we formulate best-practice and reporting recommendations for remote studies. In addition, a series of public and beginner-level studies validate the remote methodology for a number of tools and emphasize considerations to enhance measurement accuracy and precision for beginners and professionals. Our investigation revealed that (1) standardizing remote measurement methods and reporting quality rating schemes is essential for the utility and repeatability of fault-offset measurements; (2) measurement discrepancies often involve misinterpretation of the offset geomorphic feature and are a function of the investigator’s experience; (3) comparison of measurements made by a single investigator in different climatic regions reveals systematic differences in measurement uncertainties attributable to variation in feature preservation; (4) measuring more components of a displaced geomorphic landform produces more consistently repeatable estimates of offset; and (5

  13. A multi-layer robust adaptive fault tolerant control system for high performance aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Ying

    Modern high-performance aircraft demand advanced fault-tolerant flight control strategies. Not only the control effector failures, but the aerodynamic type failures like wing-body damages often result in substantially deteriorate performance because of low available redundancy. As a result the remaining control actuators may yield substantially lower maneuvering capabilities which do not authorize the accomplishment of the air-craft's original specified mission. The problem is to solve the control reconfiguration on available control redundancies when the mission modification is urged to save the aircraft. The proposed robust adaptive fault-tolerant control (RAFTC) system consists of a multi-layer reconfigurable flight controller architecture. It contains three layers accounting for different types and levels of failures including sensor, actuator, and fuselage damages. In case of the nominal operation with possible minor failure(s) a standard adaptive controller stands to achieve the control allocation. This is referred to as the first layer, the controller layer. The performance adjustment is accounted for in the second layer, the reference layer, whose role is to adjust the reference model in the controller design with a degraded transit performance. The upmost mission adjust is in the third layer, the mission layer, when the original mission is not feasible with greatly restricted control capabilities. The modified mission is achieved through the optimization of the command signal which guarantees the boundedness of the closed-loop signals. The main distinguishing feature of this layer is the the mission decision property based on the current available resources. The contribution of the research is the multi-layer fault-tolerant architecture that can address the complete failure scenarios and their accommodations in realities. Moreover, the emphasis is on the mission design capabilities which may guarantee the stability of the aircraft with restricted post

  14. Validation of meter-scale surface faulting offset measurements from high-resolution topographic data

    KAUST Repository

    Salisbury, J. Barrett

    2015-10-24

    Studies of active fault zones have flourished with the availability of high-resolution topographic data, particularly where airborne light detection and ranging (lidar) and structure from motion (SfM) data sets provide a means to remotely analyze submeter- scale fault geomorphology. To determine surface offset at a point along a strike-slip earthquake rupture, geomorphic features (e.g., stream channels) are measured days to centuries after the event. Analysis of these and cumulatively offset features produces offset distributions for successive earthquakes that are used to understand earthquake rupture behavior. As researchers expand studies to more varied terrain types, climates, and vegetation regimes, there is an increasing need to standardize and uniformly validate measurements of tectonically displaced geomorphic features. A recently compiled catalog of nearly 5000 earthquake offsets across a range of measurement and reporting styles provides insight into quality rating and uncertainty trends from which we formulate best-practice and reporting recommendations for remote studies. In addition, a series of public and beginner-level studies validate the remote methodology for a number of tools and emphasize considerations to enhance measurement accuracy and precision for beginners and professionals. Our investigation revealed that (1) standardizing remote measurement methods and reporting quality rating schemes is essential for the utility and repeatability of fault-offset measurements; (2) measurement discrepancies often involve misinterpretation of the offset geomorphic feature and are a function of the investigator\\'s experience; (3) comparison of measurements made by a single investigator in different climatic regions reveals systematic differences in measurement uncertainties attributable to variation in feature preservation; (4) measuring more components of a displaced geomorphic landform produces more consistently repeatable estimates of offset; and (5

  15. Low Voltage Electrowetting on Ferroelectric PVDF-HFP Insulator with Highly Tunable Contact Angle Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawane, Yogesh B; Ogale, Satishchandra B; Banpurkar, Arun G

    2016-09-14

    We demonstrate a consistent electrowetting response on ferroelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP) insulator covered with a thin Teflon AF layer. This bilayer exhibits a factor of 3 enhancement in the contact angle modulation compared to that of conventional single-layered Teflon AF dielectric. On the basis of the proposed model the enhancement is attributed to the high value of effective dielectric constant (εeff ≈ 6) of the bilayer. Furthermore, the bilayer dielectric exhibits a hysteresis-free contact angle modulation over many AC voltage cycles. But the contact angle modulation for DC voltage shows a hysteresis because of the field-induced residual polarization in the ferroelectric layer. Finally, we show that a thin bilayer exhibits contact angle modulation of Δθ (U) ≈ 60° at merely 15 V amplitude of AC voltage indicating a potential dielectric for practical low voltage electrowetting applications. A proof of concept confirms electrowetting based rapid mixing of a fluorescent dye in aqueous glycerol solution for 15 V AC signal.

  16. Polarization measurement analysis III. Analysis of the polarization angle dispersion function with high precision polarization data

    CERN Document Server

    Alina, D; Ristorcelli, I; Bernard, J -P; Levrier, F; Abdikamalov, E

    2016-01-01

    High precision polarization measurements open new opportunities for the study of the magnetic field structure as traced by polarimetric measurements of the interstellar dust emission. Polarization parameters suffer from bias in the presence of measurement noise. It is critical to take into account all the information available in the data in order to accurately derive these parameters. The goal of this paper is to characterize the bias on the polarization angle dispersion function that is used to study the spatial coherence of the polarization angle. We characterize, for the first time, the bias on the conventional estimator of the polarization angle dispersion function (S hereafter) and show that it can be positive or negative depending on the true value. Monte Carlo simulations are performed in order to explore the impact of the noise properties of the polarization data, as well as the impact of the distribution of the true polarization angles on the bias. We show that in the case where the ellipticity of t...

  17. High-resolution seafloor mapping surveys over the San Gregorio-Palo Colorado Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paull, C. K.; Caress, D. W.; Thomas, H.; Lundsten, E.; Anderson, K.; Gwiazda, R.

    2011-12-01

    The San Gregorio-Palo Colorado Fault (SGPCF) is mapped as traversing the outer end of Monterey Bay and crossing Monterey Canyon near its intersection with Carmel Canyon. The location of the fault is based on offsets in seismic reflection profiles, lineations in the bathymetry, and locations of epicenters associated with small earthquakes. However, much of the offshore area where the trace of the SGPCF is postulated to be located is sediment bare, making it difficult to determine if there has been recent movement along this segment of the fault. High-resolution multibeam bathymetry (vertical precision of 0.15 m and horizontal resolution of 1.0 m) and 1-4.5 kHz chirp seismic reflection profiles have recently been collected in up to 1.6 km water depths on the northern flank of Monterey Canyon where the SGPCF is thought to cut across the canyon wall. The objective of these surveys was to look for indications of recent deformation associated with the SGPCF where accumulations of sediments could provide evidence of seafloor displacement along this segment of the fault since these sediments have been deposited. The surveys were conducted using an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) during two 17.5-hour-long dives. An inertial navigation system combined with a Doppler velocity sonar allowed the AUV to fly pre-programmed grids at 3 knots while maintaining an altitude of 50 m above the seafloor. These surveys are in addition to other recently published AUV surveys of the floor of Monterey Canyon extending out to 2.2 km water depths and including the zone where the SGPCF is mapped to cross the canyon floor. The lack of clear evidence of fault deformation along the SGPCF trace on the canyon floor is easily attributable to frequent sediment transport events within the canyon's channel, which would presumably overwrite sediment deformation associated with the SGPCF. The surveys presented here extend above the active canyon floor and cover the northern flank of Monterey Canyon

  18. Fault tolerant computing systems

    CERN Document Server

    Randell, B

    1981-01-01

    Fault tolerance involves the provision of strategies for error detection, damage assessment, fault treatment and error recovery. A survey is given of the different sorts of strategies used in highly reliable computing systems, together with an outline of recent research on the problems of providing fault tolerance in parallel and distributed computing systems. (15 refs).

  19. Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells and Multiple Hydraulic Fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mike L. Laue

    1997-05-30

    The distal fan margin in the northeast portion of the Yowlumne field contains significant reserves but is not economical to develop using vertical wells. Numerous interbedded shales and deteriorating rock properties limit producibility. In addition, extreme depths (13,000 ft) present a challenging environment for hydraulic fracturing and artificial lift. Lastly, a mature waterflood increases risk because of the uncertainty with size and location of flood fronts. This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting the distal fan margin of this slope-basin clastic reservoir through the use of a high-angle well completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. The combination of a high-angle (or horizontal) well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. The equivalent production rate and reserves of three vertical wells are anticipated at one-half to two-thirds the cost.

  20. Fall speed measurement and high-resolution multi-angle photography of hydrometeors in free fall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Garrett

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We describe here a new instrument for imaging hydrometeors in free fall. The Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC captures high-resolution photographs of hydrometeors from three angles while simultaneously measuring their fall speed. Based on the stereoscopic photographs captured over the two months of continuous measurements obtained at a high altitude location within the Wasatch Front in Utah, we derive statistics for fall speed, hydrometeor size, shape, orientation and aspect ratio. From a selection of the photographed hydrometeors, an illustration is provided for how the instrument might be used for making improved microwave scattering calculations. Complex, aggregated snowflake shapes appear to be more strongly forward scattering, at the expense of reduced back-scatter, than heavily rimed graupel particles of similar size.

  1. High resolution iridocorneal angle imaging system by axicon lens assisted gonioscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perinchery, Sandeep Menon; Shinde, Anant; Fu, Chan Yiu; Jeesmond Hong, Xun Jie; Baskaran, Mani; Aung, Tin; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2016-07-01

    Direct visualization and assessment of the iridocorneal angle (ICA) region with high resolution is important for the clinical evaluation of glaucoma. However, the current clinical imaging systems for ICA do not provide sufficient structural details due to their poor resolution. The key challenges in achieving high quality ICA imaging are its location in the anterior region of the eye and the occurrence of total internal reflection due to refractive index difference between cornea and air. Here, we report an indirect axicon assisted gonioscopy imaging probe with white light illumination. The illustrated results with this probe shows significantly improved visualization of structures in the ICA including TM region, compared to the current available tools. It could reveal critical details of ICA and expected to aid management by providing information that is complementary to angle photography and gonioscopy.

  2. A method to determine fault vectors in 4H-SiC from stacking sequences observed on high resolution transmission electron microscopy images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Fangzhen; Wang, Huanhuan; Raghothamachar, Balaji; Dudley, Michael, E-mail: michael.dudley@stonybrook.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11790 (United States); Mueller, Stephan G.; Chung, Gil; Sanchez, Edward K.; Hansen, Darren; Loboda, Mark J. [Dow Corning Compound Semiconductor Solutions, Midland, Michigan 48686 (United States); Zhang, Lihua; Su, Dong; Kisslinger, Kim; Stach, Eric [Center for Functional Materials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2014-09-14

    A new method has been developed to determine the fault vectors associated with stacking faults in 4H-SiC from their stacking sequences observed on high resolution TEM images. This method, analogous to the Burgers circuit technique for determination of dislocation Burgers vector, involves determination of the vectors required in the projection of the perfect lattice to correct the deviated path constructed in the faulted material. Results for several different stacking faults were compared with fault vectors determined from X-ray topographic contrast analysis and were found to be consistent. This technique is expected to applicable to all structures comprising corner shared tetrahedra.

  3. High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (HRMAS NMR) for Studies of Reactive Fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic Resonance (HRMAS NMR) for Studies of Reactive Fabrics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W911SR-11-C-0047 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...ECBC-TR-1326 HIGH RESOLUTION MAGIC ANGLE SPINNING NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE (HRMAS NMR) FOR STUDIES OF REACTIVE FABRICS David J. McGarvey...unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT An analytical chemistry method is described for measuring the reactivity and permeation of

  4. The Cenzonic tail derived structures of transtensional faults in Bohai Sea, East China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangzeng; Wu, Zhiping

    2017-04-01

    Two pre-exsiting giant strike-slip fault zones, Tanlu Fault Zone and Zhangpeng Fault Zone, comprise a conjugate strike-slip fualt system in Bohai Sea. They reactivated and developped into many branches under the extensional and shear stresses indued by the combined action of plate collision and deep mantle upwelling in Cenzonic. In response to the stress concentration at the tails of those branches, various kinds of tail derived structures develop. To systematically describe and distinguish above tail derived structures, we reviewed numerous high-resolution seismic sections and plandimetric maps of Bohai Sea, such as deteiled fault system diagroms, coherence slices and 3D visualization structural diagrams, and distinguished three types of tail derived structures at the tails of the transtensional branches of Tanlu Fault Zone and Zhangpeng Fault Zone, based on their geometric characteristics, namely, extensional horsetail/imbricate fan, wedge-shaped tail, and mixed tail of extensional horsetail fan and wedge-shaped tail (the tail derived structures develops in stepovers of transtensioanl branches are not discussed in this paper). Extensional horsetail fan mainly develops at fault tails with releasing single bend and the horsetail splay faults are T faults (about 45° to main strike-slip fault), while the wedge-shaped tail mainly develops at fault tails unfavorable for strike slip, they could be straight or with gentle restaining single bend and the derived faults are mainly antithetic faults (R' shears, normally above 70° to main strike-slip fault). If the fault tail developing a wedge-shaped tail has a small releasing single bend at its tip, a extensional horsetail fan would occur at the tip of the wedge-shaped tail, viz., mixed tail derived structure. All above tail derived faults show normal throws in profile and develop in extensional quadrant of the hanging wall of those branches. And with the shear of above main strike-slip faults, the angles bewteen the main

  5. Lamina cribrosa defects and optic disc morphology in primary open angle glaucoma with high myopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yugo Kimura

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate whether lamina cribrosa (LC defects are associated with optic disc morphology in primary open angle glaucoma (POAG eyes with high myopia. METHODS: A total of 129 POAG patients and 55 age-matched control subjects with high myopia were evaluated. Three-dimensional scan images obtained by swept source optical coherence tomography were used to detect LC defects. Radial B-scans and infrared images obtained by spectral domain optical coherence tomography were used to measure β-peripapillary atrophy (PPA lengths with and without Bruch's membrane (BM (temporal, nasal, superior, and inferior, tilt angle (vertical and horizontal, and disc diameter (transverse and longitudinal. Peripapillary intrachoroidal cavitations (PICCs, disc area, ovality index, and cyclotorsion of the optic disc were analyzed as well. RESULTS: LC defects were found in 70 of 129 (54.2% POAG eyes and 1 of 55 (1.8% control eyes (P < 0.001. Age, sex, spherical equivalent, axial length, intraocular pressure, and central corneal thickness were not significantly different among POAG eyes with LC defects, POAG eyes without LC defects, and control eyes. Temporal PPA lengths without BM in all three groups correlated significantly with vertical and horizontal tilt angles, although no PPA length with BM correlated significantly with any tilt angle. PICCs were detected more frequently in POAG eyes with LC defects than those without LC defects (P = 0.01 and control eyes (P = 0.02. POAG eyes with LC defects showed a smaller ovality index (P = 0.004, longer temporal PPA without BM (P < 0.001, and larger vertical/horizontal tilt angles (vertical, P < 0.001; horizontal, P = 0.01, and transverse diameter (P = 0.01. In multivariate analysis for the presence of LC defects, presence of POAG (P < 0.001 and vertical tilt angle (P < 0.001 were identified as significant. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of LC defects was associated with myopic optic disc morphology in POAG eyes with high

  6. Real-time inversions for finite fault slip models and rupture geometry based on high-rate GPS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minson, Sarah E.; Murray, Jessica R.; Langbein, John O.; Gomberg, Joan S.

    2015-01-01

    We present an inversion strategy capable of using real-time high-rate GPS data to simultaneously solve for a distributed slip model and fault geometry in real time as a rupture unfolds. We employ Bayesian inference to find the optimal fault geometry and the distribution of possible slip models for that geometry using a simple analytical solution. By adopting an analytical Bayesian approach, we can solve this complex inversion problem (including calculating the uncertainties on our results) in real time. Furthermore, since the joint inversion for distributed slip and fault geometry can be computed in real time, the time required to obtain a source model of the earthquake does not depend on the computational cost. Instead, the time required is controlled by the duration of the rupture and the time required for information to propagate from the source to the receivers. We apply our modeling approach, called Bayesian Evidence-based Fault Orientation and Real-time Earthquake Slip, to the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake, 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake, and a simulated Hayward fault earthquake. In all three cases, the inversion recovers the magnitude, spatial distribution of slip, and fault geometry in real time. Since our inversion relies on static offsets estimated from real-time high-rate GPS data, we also present performance tests of various approaches to estimating quasi-static offsets in real time. We find that the raw high-rate time series are the best data to use for determining the moment magnitude of the event, but slightly smoothing the raw time series helps stabilize the inversion for fault geometry.

  7. Multi-Core Technology for and Fault Tolerant High-Performance Spacecraft Computer Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Peter M.; Haulsen, Ivo; Van Kampenhout, J. Reinier; Pletner, Samuel

    2012-08-01

    The current architectural trends in the field of multi-core processors can provide an enormous increase in processing power by exploiting the parallelism available in many applications. In particular because of their high energy efficiency, it is obvious that multi-core processor-based systems will also be used in future space missions. In this paper we present the system architecture of a powerful optical sensor system based on the eight core multi-core processor P4080 from Freescale. The fault tolerant structure and the highly effective FDIR concepts implemented on different hardware and software levels of the system are described in detail. The space application scenario and thus the main requirements for the sensor system have been defined by a complex tracking sensor application for autonomous landing or docking manoeuvres.

  8. Study on flow behavior and structure over chined fuselage at high angle of attack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A study of leeward vortex structure over chined fuselage and the effects of micro tip perturbation on its vortex flow have been carried out in wind tunnel experiments at Reynolds numbers from 1.26×105 to 5.04×105 with PIV and pressure measurement techniques.Firstly,the experiment results have proved that micro tip perturbation has no effects on the vortex flow and its aerodynamic characteristics over chined fuselage at high angle of attack,in which there are not any non-deterministic flow behaviors.Secondly,the evolution of leeward vortex structure over chined fuselage along the axis of model can be divided into four flow regimes:linear conical developed regime,decay regime of leeward vortex intensity,asymmetric leeward vortex break down regime and completely break down regime.And a correlation between leeward vortex structure and sectional aerodynamic force was also revealed in the present paper.Thirdly,the experiment results show the behavior of leeward vortex core trajectories and zonal characteristics of leeward vortex structure with angles of attack.Finally,the experiment results of Reynolds number effect on the leeward vortex flow have further confirmed research conclusions from previous studies:the flows over chined fuselage at high angles of attack are insensitive to variation of Reynolds number,and there is a little effect on the secondary boundary layer separation and the suction peak induced by leeward vortex.

  9. Measurement of tibial slope angle after medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy: case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Hideki Yanasse

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: In the past, changes in tibial slope were not considered when planning or evaluating osteotomies, and success in high tibial osteotomy was related to the alignment and amount of femorotibial angular correction. The aim here was to measure changes in tibial slope after medial opening wedge tibial osteotomy and investigate the effect of tibial slope angle on the clinical results. DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective review study on a series of cases, at the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Faculdade de Medicina de Marília (Famema, Marília, Brazil. METHODS: Twenty-eight patients were studied, and a total of thirty-one knees. Lateral roentgenograms of the tibia were used pre and postoperatively to measure the tibial slope based on the proximal tibial anatomical axis. The clinical results were measured using the Lysholm knee score. RESULTS: There was an average increase in tibial slope angle after surgery of 2.38° (95% confidence interval: ± 0.73°. There was no correlation (r = -0.28 between the postoperative Lysholm knee score and the difference in tibial slope angle from before to after surgery (P = 0.13. CONCLUSION: Medial opening wedge tibial osteotomy led to a small increase in tibial slope. No significant correlation was found between increased tibial slope and short-term clinical results after high tibial osteotomy. Other clinical studies are needed in order to establish whether extension or flexion osteotomy could benefit patients with medial compartment gonarthrosis.

  10. A High shear stress segment along the San Andreas Fault: Inferences based on near-field stress direction and stress magnitude observations in the Carrizo Plain Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, D. A., [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Adelaide (Australia); Younker, L.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-01-30

    Nearly 200 new in-situ determinations of stress directions and stress magnitudes near the Carrizo plain segment of the San Andreas fault indicate a marked change in stress state occurring within 20 km of this principal transform plate boundary. A natural consequence of this stress transition is that if the observed near-field ``fault-oblique`` stress directions are representative of the fault stress state, the Mohr-Coulomb shear stresses resolved on San Andreas sub-parallel planes are substantially greater than previously inferred based on fault-normal compression. Although the directional stress data and near-hydrostatic pore pressures, which exist within 15 km of the fault, support a high shear stress environment near the fault, appealing to elevated pore pressures in the fault zone (Byerlee-Rice Model) merely enhances the likelihood of shear failure. These near-field stress observations raise important questions regarding what previous stress observations have actually been measuring. The ``fault-normal`` stress direction measured out to 70 km from the fault can be interpreted as representing a comparable depth average shear strength of the principal plate boundary. Stress measurements closer to the fault reflect a shallower depth-average representation of the fault zone shear strength. If this is true, only stress observations at fault distances comparable to the seismogenic depth will be representative of the fault zone shear strength. This is consistent with results from dislocation monitoring where there is pronounced shear stress accumulation out to 20 km of the fault as a result of aseismic slip within the lower crust loading the upper locked section. Beyond about 20 km, the shear stress resolved on San Andreas fault-parallel planes becomes negligible. 65 refs., 15 figs.

  11. Near-Surface & High Resolution Seismic Imaging of the Bennett Thrust Fault in the Indio Mountains of West Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennemann, A.; Karplus, M. S.; Kaip, G.; Harder, S. H.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the crustal structure of the Indio Mountains in southwest Texas, 34 km southwest of Van Horn at the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) field station using newly acquired active-source seismic data. These new data are the first active-source seismic data acquired at the UTEP field station. The dominant regional lithologies in this area comprise a transgressive sequence nearly 2 km in total stratigraphic thickness, formed by extensional processes. The area is highly faulted with multiple fault generations. I will show images of the Bennett Thrust Fault, a northwest-striking, northeast-dipping fault associated with the Laramide Orogeny and discuss the near-surface geometries of this fault and adjacent rock units. This region is a pre-salt analog for similar areas that are ideal for petroleum reservoirs, such are reservoirs off the coasts of Brazil and Angola. While there are no petroleum plays in the Indio Mountains region, imaging and understanding subsurface structural and lithological geometries and how that geometry directs potential fluid flow has implications for other regions with petroleum plays. I will present processed data and interpretation of a 1 km 2-D near-surface, high-resolution seismic reflection line. Along the 1 km line, we collected a lower frequency dataset using 100 third-pound explosions and a higher frequency dataset produced from 500 sledge-hammer blows at the same 100 source points (5 blows will be stacked at each source point). The lower frequency data set will be the focus of this presentation. The data will be processed using standard seismic reflection practices using ProMAX. This image will be imported into Petrel to create a model of the faults' geometries and the sedimentary layers. My research will identify near-surface structures, fault geometries and lithologies.

  12. Wide-angle and high-efficiency achromatic metasurfaces for visible light

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Zi-Lan; Wang, Guo Ping

    2016-01-01

    Recently, an achromatic metasurface was successfully demonstrated to deflect light of multiple wavelengths in the same direction and it was further applied to the design of planar lenses without chromatic aberrations [Science, 347, 1342(2015)]. However, such metasurface can only work for normal incidence and exhibit low conversion efficiency. Here, we present an ultrawide-angle and high-efficiency metasurface without chromatic aberration for wavefront shaping in visible range. The metasurface is constructed by multiple metallic nano-groove gratings, which support enhanced diffractions for an ultrawide incident angle range from 10o to 80o due to the excitations of localized gap plasmon modes at different resonance wavelengths. Incident light at these resonance wavelengths can be efficiently diffracted into the same direction with complete suppression of the specular reflection. This approach is applied to the design of an achromatic flat lens for focusing light of different wavelengths into the same position. ...

  13. Development of a high resolution laser based angle-resolving time-of-flight photoelectron spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Berntsen, M H; Tjernberg, O

    2011-01-01

    We present the design and performance of a novel Laser-based Angle-Resolving Time-of-Flight (LARTOF) system for photoemission from solids in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) energy range. A pulsed laser provides photons which through a third harmonic generation (THG) process performed in a xenon filled gas cell generates VUV photons of energy 10.5 eV. The time-of-flight analyzer is able to collect all electrons that are emitted from the sample within a circular cone of up to +/-15 degrees. By simultaneously measuring the energy and emission angle along two spatial directions for the electrons the analyzer provides three-dimensional detection capability. Data from a test measurement performed on the Au(111) surface state is presented along with some more advanced measurements of the Fermi surface of the high-temperature superconductor Bi2212.

  14. Effects of angling and manual handling on pike behaviour investigated by high-resolution positional telemetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baktoft, Henrik; Aarestrup, Kim; Berg, Søren;

    2013-01-01

    Human disturbances such as angling and manual handling may have long-term effects on the behaviour of pike, Esox lucius L., an ecologically important species. Using continuous high-resolution positional telemetry, this study compared the swimming activity of handled and unhandled pike in a small...... lake. Pike pre-equipped with acoustic transmitters were angled and exposed to a handling protocol including measurements of length and mass. Pike not recaptured constituted an unhandled control group. Results demonstrated that the handling protocol caused temperature-dependent changes in pike activity......, with higher temperatures leading to lower activity of the recaptured pike. The effects, however, were transitory and not detectable after 48-h post-release. These findings indicate that pike are relatively resilient to handling and quickly resume pre-handling activity...

  15. Assessment of Automated Snow Cover Detection at High Solar Zenith Angles with PROBA-V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent Hawotte

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the snow cover extent are both a cause and a consequence of climate change. Optical remote sensing with heliosynchronous satellites currently provides snow cover data at high spatial resolution with daily revisiting time. However, high latitude image acquisition is limited because reflective sensors of many satellites are switched off at high solar zenith angles (SZA due to lower signal quality. In this study, the relevance and reliability of high SZA acquisition are objectively quantified in the purpose of high latitude snow cover detection, thanks to the PROBA-V (Project for On-Board Autonomy-Vegetation satellite. A snow cover extent classification based on Normalized Difference Snow Index (NDSI and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI has been performed for the northern hemisphere on latitudes between 55°N and 75°N during the 2015–2016 winter season. A stratified probabilistic sampling was used to estimate the classification accuracy. The latter has been evaluated among eight SZA intervals to determine the maximum usable angle. The global overall snow classification accuracy with PROBA-V, 82% ± 4%, was significantly larger than the MODIS (Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer snow cover extent product (75% ± 4%. User and producer accuracy of snow are above standards and overall accuracy is stable until 88.5° SZA. These results demonstrate that optical remote sensing data can still be used with large SZA. Considering the relevance of snow cover mapping for ecology and climatology, the data acquisition at high solar zenith angles should be continued by PROBA-V.

  16. High-pressure, high-temperature magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance devices and processes for making and using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Hu, Mary Y.; Townsend, Mark R.; Lercher, Johannes A.; Peden, Charles H. F.

    2015-10-06

    Re-usable ceramic magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR rotors constructed of high-mechanic strength ceramics are detailed that include a sample compartment that maintains high pressures up to at least about 200 atmospheres (atm) and high temperatures up to about least about 300.degree. C. during operation. The rotor designs minimize pressure losses stemming from penetration over an extended period of time. The present invention makes possible a variety of in-situ high pressure, high temperature MAS NMR experiments not previously achieved in the prior art.

  17. High-pressure, high-temperature magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance devices and processes for making and using same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Hu, Mary Y.; Townsend, Mark R.; Lercher, Johannes A.; Peden, Charles H. F.

    2015-10-06

    Re-usable ceramic magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR rotors constructed of high-mechanic strength ceramics are detailed that include a sample compartment that maintains high pressures up to at least about 200 atmospheres (atm) and high temperatures up to about least about 300.degree. C. during operation. The rotor designs minimize pressure losses stemming from penetration over an extended period of time. The present invention makes possible a variety of in-situ high pressure, high temperature MAS NMR experiments not previously achieved in the prior art.

  18. High-frequency impedance of small-angle tapers and collimators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Stupakov

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Collimators and transitions in accelerator vacuum chambers often include small-angle tapering to lower the wakefields generated by the beam. While the low-frequency impedance is well described by Yokoya’s formula (for axisymmetric geometry, much less is known about the behavior of the impedance in the high-frequency limit. In this paper we develop an analytical approach to the high-frequency regime for round collimators and tapers. Our analytical results are compared with computer simulations using the code ECHO.

  19. Fault Monitoring and Fault Recovery Control for Position Moored Tanker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Shaoji; Blanke, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses fault tolerant control for position mooring of a shuttle tanker operating in the North Sea. A complete framework for fault diagnosis is presented but the loss of a sub-sea mooring line buoyancy element is given particular attention, since this fault could lead to mooring line....... Properties of detection and fault-tolerant control are demonstrated by high fidelity simulations....

  20. Fault detection on the Large Hadron Collider at CERN: design, simulation and realization of a High Voltage Pulse Generator

    CERN Document Server

    Cavicchioli, C; Biagi, E; Bozzini, D

    2007-01-01

    This project was developed inside the Quality Assurance Plan (ELQA) of the LHC. The superconducting circuits of the collider show a great complexity concerning the control system, because of various reasons: the tunnel is placed around 50 to 175 m underground, the circuits work at temperatures of 1.9 K, all the structure should be perfectly aligned and the electronic part has considerable dimensions. To maximize the running time of the collider, it is necessary to develop methods for the diagnostic of defects and for the precise localization of the segment of the accelerator that contains the fault. From my studies it emerged that a possible way to localize electrical faults in the LHC superconducting circuits is to combine the use of time domain reflectometry methods and high voltage pulses. Therefore, I have designed and realized a high voltage pulse generator that will be an important instrument for the fault location among the accelerator.

  1. Fault Tolerance and COTS: Next Generation of High Performance Satellite Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, P.; Bärwald, W.; Brieß, K.; Montenegro, S.

    The increasing complexity of future satellite missions requires adequately powerful on- board computer systems. The obvious performance gap between state-of-the-art micro- processor technology ("commercial-off-the-shelf", COTS) and available radiation hard components already impedes the realization of innovative satellite applications requiring high performance on-board data processing. In the paper we emphasize the advantages of the COTS approach for future OBCS and we show why we are convinced that this approach is feasible. We present the architecture of the fault tolerant control computer of the BIRD satellite and finally we show some results of the BIRD mission after 20 months in orbit, especially the experience with its COTS based control computer.

  2. Film Cooling from Two Staggered Rows of Compound Angle Holes at High Blowing Ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip M. Ligrani

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental results are presented which describe the development and structure of flow downstream of two staggered rows of film-cooling holes with compound angle orientations at high blowing ratios. These film cooling configurations are important because they are frequently employed on the first stage of rotating blades of operating gas turbine engines. With this configuration, holes are spaced 3d apart in the spanwise direction, with inclination angles of 24 degrees, and angles of orientation of 50.5 degrees. Blowing ratios range from 0.5 to 4.0 and the ratio of injectant to freestream density is near 1.0. Results show that spanwise averaged adiabatic effectiveness, spanwise-averaged iso-energetic Stanton number ratios, surveys of streamwise mean velocity, and surveys of injectant distributions change by important amounts as the blowing ratio increases. This is due to injectant lift-off from the test surface just downstream of the holes which becomes more pronounced as blowing ratio increases.

  3. Soil radon dynamics in the Amer fault zone: An example of very high seasonal variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, V; Bach, J; Font, Ll; Baixeras, C; Zarroca, M; Linares, R; Roqué, C

    2016-01-01

    Soil radon levels of the Amer fault zone have been measured for a 4 year-period with the aim of checking seasonal fluctuations obtained in previous studies and to understand radon origin and dynamics. In this manuscript additional results are presented: updated continuous and integrated soil radon measurements, radionuclide content of soil materials and a detailed analysis of an urban profile by means of the electrical resistivity imaging technique and punctual soil radon, thoron and CO2 measurements. Integrated and continuous measurements present a wide range of values, [0.2-151.6] kBq m(-3) for radon, [4.5-39.6] kBq m(-3) for thoron and [4.0-71.2] g m(-2) day(-1) for CO2. The highest soil radon levels in the vicinity of the Amer fault (>40 kBq m(-3)) are found close to the fractured areas and present very important fluctuations repeated every year, with values in summer much higher than in winter, confirming previous studies. The highest radon values, up to 150 kBq m(-3), do not have a local origin because the mean value of radium concentration in this soil (19 ± 5 Bq kg(-1)) could not explain these values. Then soil radon migration through the fractures, influenced by atmospheric parameters, is assumed to account for such a high seasonal fluctuation. As main conclusion, in fractured areas, seasonal variations of soil radon concentration can be very important even in places where average soil radon concentration and radium content are not especially high. In these cases the migration capability of the soil is given not by intrinsic permeability but by the fracture structure. Potential risk estimation based on soil radon concentration and intrinsic permeability must be complemented with geological information in fractured systems.

  4. Fault-Tree Compiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Boerschlein, David P.

    1993-01-01

    Fault-Tree Compiler (FTC) program, is software tool used to calculate probability of top event in fault tree. Gates of five different types allowed in fault tree: AND, OR, EXCLUSIVE OR, INVERT, and M OF N. High-level input language easy to understand and use. In addition, program supports hierarchical fault-tree definition feature, which simplifies tree-description process and reduces execution time. Set of programs created forming basis for reliability-analysis workstation: SURE, ASSIST, PAWS/STEM, and FTC fault-tree tool (LAR-14586). Written in PASCAL, ANSI-compliant C language, and FORTRAN 77. Other versions available upon request.

  5. Discussion on the Seismogenic Fault of the 1976 Tangshan Earthquake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The opinions of two papers carried in the journal "Seismology and Geology" are discussed in the paper. One is that the Tangshan fault is a high-angle, west-dipping and thrust with strikeslip fault. The other is that the Fuzhuang-Xihe fault distributed on the east side of Tangshan city is the seismogenic fault that caused the Tangshan earthquake. For the former opinion, it needs to explain the relationship between the active style of the thrust Tangshan fault and the formation genesis of a Quaternary depression along the west side of Tangshan city. For the latter opinion, if the Fuzhuang-Xihe fault is the seismogenic fault of the Tangshan earthquake,it needs to explain the genesis relationship between this west-dip slip fault zone and the strikeslip surface fissure zone that extends through Tangshan city. And it needs more evidence exclude the possibility that the surface rupture belongs to the rupturing of a secondary structure. This paper suggests doing more work on the active fault that controls the Caobo Quaternary depression.

  6. Style and rate of quaternary deformation of the Hosgri Fault Zone, offshore south-central coastal California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Kathryn L.; Lettis, William R.; McLaren, Marcia; Savage, William U.; Hall, N. Timothy; Keller, Mararget A.

    2004-01-01

    The Hosgri Fault Zone is the southernmost component of a complex system of right-slip faults in south-central coastal California that includes the San Gregorio, Sur, and San Simeon Faults. We have characterized the contemporary style of faulting along the zone on the basis of an integrated analysis of a broad spectrum of data, including shallow high-resolution and deep penetration seismic reflection data; geologic and geomorphic data along the Hosgri and San Simeon Fault Zones and the intervening San Simeon/Hosgri pull-apart basin; the distribution and nature of near-coast seismicity; regional tectonic kinematics; and comparison of the Hosgri Fault Zone with worldwide strike-slip, oblique-slip, and reverse-slip fault zones. These data show that the modern Hosgri Fault Zone is a convergent right-slip (transpressional) fault having a late Quaternary slip rate of 1 to 3 mm/yr. Evidence supporting predominantly strike-slip deformation includes (1) a long, narrow, linear zone of faulting and associated deformation; (2) the presence of asymmetric flower structures; (3) kinematically consistent localized extensional and compressional deformation at releasing and restraining bends or steps, respectively, in the fault zone; (4) changes in the sense and magnitude of vertical separation both along trend of the fault zone and vertically within the fault zone; (5) strike-slip focal mechanisms along the fault trace; (6) a distribution of seismicity that delineates a high-angle fault extending through the seismogenic crust; (7) high ratios of lateral to vertical slip along the fault zone; and (8) the separation by the fault of two tectonic domains (offshore Santa Maria Basin, onshore Los Osos domain) that are undergoing contrasting styles of deformation and orientations of crustal shortening. The convergent component of slip is evidenced by the deformation of the early-late Pliocene unconformity. In characterizing the style of faulting along the Hosgri Fault Zone, we assessed

  7. Structural character of Hosgri fault zone and adjacent areas in offshore central California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crouch, J.K.; Bachman, S.B.

    1987-05-01

    The Hosgri fault zone extends from the east-west Transverse Ranges structures near Point Arguello northward for more than 150 km to the offshore area near San Simeon Point. The fault zone is seismically active and consists chiefly of a continuous series of eastside-up thrust and high-angle reverse faults. East of the fault zone, Miocene Monterey and volcanic rocks, along with underlying pre-Miocene strata, have been tightly folded as a result of low-angle imbricate thrust faulting during post-Miocene time. These highly deformed strata have been uplited and truncated along the inner shelf. Immediately west of the Hosgria fault zone, similar Monterey and older rocks, which are less folded, conformably underlie Pliocene and younger basinal strata at structural levels that are generally 1200 to 2000 m deeper than correlative strata east of the Hosgri fault zone. Following its discovery in 1971, the Hosgri fault zone was characterized by subsequent investigators as a northwest-trending fault that was part of the San Andreas system of strike-slip faults, with disagreements on the timing and amount of right-lateral offset along the fault zone. However, modern offshore seismic-reflection data, earthquake focal-mechanism studies, and recently available offshore well information suggest that the Hosgri fault zone is instead a major imbricate thrust zone. Detailed structural analyses along part of the Hosgri fault zone suggest that little, if any, strike-slip offset has occurred along this structural trend since its post-Miocene inception. Nevertheless, the Hosgri fault zone itself can be interpreted to be a product of the larger overall San Andreas transform system in that compression has developed because the San Andreas is not parallel to the Pacific-North American plate motion.

  8. Performance Analysis of Faults Detection in Wind Turbine Generator Based on High-Resolution Frequency Estimation Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHAKKOR SAAD

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Electrical energy production based on wind power has become the most popular renewable resources in the recent years because it gets reliable clean energy with minimum cost. The major challenge for wind turbines is the electrical and the mechanical failures which can occur at any time causing prospective breakdowns and damages and therefore it leads to machine downtimes and to energy production loss. To circumvent this problem, several tools and techniques have been developed and used to enhance fault detection and diagnosis to be found in the stator current signature for wind turbines generators. Among these methods, parametric or super-resolution frequency estimation methods, which provides typical spectrum estimation, can be useful for this purpose. Facing on the plurality of these algorithms, a comparative performance analysis is made to evaluate robustness based on differents metrics: accuracy, dispersion, computation cost, perturbations and faults severity. Finally, simulation results in Matlab with most occurring faults indicate that ESPRIT and R-MUSIC algorithms have high capability of correctly identifying the frequencies of fault characteristic components, a performance ranking had been carried out to demonstrate the efficiency of the studied methods in faults detecting.

  9. Design, Test and Demonstration of Saturable Reactor High-Temperature Superconductor Fault Current Limiters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darmann, Frank [Zenergy Power, Inc., Burlingame, CA (United States); Lombaerde, Robert [Zenergy Power, Inc., Burlingame, CA (United States); Moriconi, Franco [Zenergy Power, Inc., Burlingame, CA (United States); Nelson, Albert [Zenergy Power, Inc., Burlingame, CA (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Zenergy Power has successfully designed, built, tested, and installed in the US electrical grid a saturable reactor Fault Current Limiter. Beginning in 2007, first as SC Power Systems and from 2008 as Zenergy Power, Inc., ZP used DOE matching grant and ARRA funds to help refine the design of the saturated reactor fault current limiter. ZP ultimately perfected the design of the saturated reactor FCL to the point that ZP could reliably design a suitable FCL for most utility applications. Beginning with a very basic FCL design using 1G HTS for a coil housed in a LN2 cryostat for the DC bias magnet, the technology progressed to a commercial system that was offered for sale internationally. Substantial progress was made in two areas. First, the cryogenics cooling system progressed from a sub-cooled liquid nitrogen container housing the HTS coils to cryostats utilizing dry conduction cooling and reaching temperatures down to less than 20 degrees K. Large, round cryostats with warm bore diameters of 1.7 meters enabled the design of large tanks to hold the AC components. Second, the design of the AC part of the FCL was refined from a six legged spider design to a more compact and lighter design with better fault current limiting capability. Further refinement of the flux path and core shape led to an efficient saturated reactor design requiring less Ampere-turns to saturate the core. In conclusion, the development of the saturable reactor FCL led to a more efficient design not requiring HTS magnets and their associated peripheral equipment, which yielded a more economical product in line with the electric utility industry expectations. The original goal for the DOE funding of the ZP project Design, Test and Demonstration of Saturable Reactor High-Temperature Superconductor Fault Current Limiters was to stimulate the HTS wire industry with, first 1G, then 2G, HTS wire applications. Over the approximately 5 years of ZP's product development program, the amount of HTS

  10. Measuring slip in paleoearthquakes using high-resolution aerial lidar data: Combined analysis of the Wairau, Awatere, Clarence, and Hope faults, South Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinke, R. W.; Dolan, J. F.; Hatem, A. E.; Van Dissen, R. J.; Langridge, R.; Grenader, J.; McGuire, C. P.; Rhodes, E. J.; Nicol, A., , Prof

    2016-12-01

    Analysis of a large new high-resolution aerial lidar microtopographic data set provides > 500 measured fault offsets from sections of the four primary right-lateral strike-slip faults of the Marlborough Fault System (MFS), in northern South Island, New Zealand. With a shot density of >12 shots/m2 (and locally up to 18 shots/m2) these high-quality data allow us to resolve topographically defined geomorphic offsets with decimeter precision along 250 km of combined fault length. The measured offsets range in size from 2 m to > 100 m, and allow us to constrain displacements in the past one to several surface ruptures along stretches of the Wairau, Awatere, Clarence, and Hope faults. Our results reveal a number of important details of the rupture history of these faults, including: (1) the amount of slip and spatial variability (along and across strike) of strain released in the most recent event along sections of each of the four faults; (2) the consistency of slip throughout the past several ruptures on specific faults; and (3) suggestions of potential linkages and segment boundaries along each fault. The lidar data also facilitate precise measurements of larger offsets that, when combined with age data collected as part of our broader collaborative analyses of incremental fault slip rates and paleoearthquake ages, help to constrain the broader spatial and temporal patterns of strain release across the MFS during Holocene and latest Pleistocene time.

  11. Study on Anti-Disturbance and High-Resolution Shallow Seismic Exploration of Active Faults in Urban Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan Jishun; Zhang Xiankang; Liu Baojin; Fan Shengming; Wang Fuyun; Duan Yonghong; Zhang Hongqiang

    2003-01-01

    The significance of detection of urban active faults and the general situation concerning detection of urban active faults in the world are briefly introduced. In a brief description of the basic principles of anti-disturbance and high-resolution shallow seismic exploration, the stress is put on the excitation of seismic sources, the performance of digital seismographs, receiving mode and conditions, geometry as well as data acquisition, processing and interpretation in the anti-disturbance and high-resolution shallow seismic exploration of urban active faults. The study indicates that a controlled seismic source with a linear or nonlinear frequency-conversion scanning function and the relevant seismographs must be used in data acquisition, as well as working methods for small group interval, small offset, multi-channel receiving, short-array and high-frequency detectors for receiving are used. Attention should be paid to the application of techniques for static correction of refraction, noise suppressing, high-precision analysis of velocity, wavelet compressing, zero-phasing of wavelet and pre-stacking migration to data processing and interpretation. Finally, some cases of anti-disturbance and high-resolution shallow seismic exploration of urban active faults are present in the paper.

  12. On the relationship between sequential faulting, margin asymmetry and highly thinned continental crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, Sascha; Heine, Christian; Pérez-Gussinyé, Marta; Sobolev, Stephan

    2014-05-01

    The architecture of magma-poor continental margins is remarkably variable. The width of highly thinned continental crust (with a thickness material; (2) Formation of a low viscosity exhumation channel adjacent to the rift centre that is generated by heat transfer from the upwelling mantle and enhanced by viscous strain softening. Rift migration takes place in a steady-state manner and is accomplished by oceanward-younging sequential faults within the upper crust and balanced through lower crustal flow. We demonstrate that the rate of extension has paramount control on margin width. Since higher velocities lead to elevated heat flow within the rift and hence to hot and weak lower crust, a larger low-viscosity exhumation channel is generated that facilitates rift migration leading to wider margins. The South Atlantic is an ideal test bed for the hypothesis of velocity-dependent margin width since rifting was fast in the south, but slow in the northern part. As predicted by our numerical models, the maximum present-day margin width increases almost linearly from the conjugate Equatorial margin segments to the Florianopolis/Walvis ridge. Even though the polarity of the magma-poor South Atlantic margins alternates, the asymmetry and the width of the wider margin are in very good agreement with our simulations. The described rift evolution has three fundamental implications: (1) It implies sustained transfer of material across the extensional plate boundary thereby predicting that large portions of a wide margin originate from its conjugate side. (2) Migration of the deformation locus causes faulting in the distal parts of the margin to postdate that of the proximal parts by as much as 10 million years. This means that syn-rift and post-rift phase are location-dependent. (3) Lateral movement of the rift centre generates drastically different peak heat flow and subsidence histories at the proximal and the distal margin.

  13. Enhancing Condensers for Geothermal Systems: the Effect of High Contact Angles on Dropwise Condensation Heat Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, John M.; Kim, Sunwoo; Kim, Kwang J.

    2009-10-06

    Phase change heat transfer is notorious for increasing the irreversibility of, and therefore decreasing the efficiency of, geothermal power plants. Its significant contribution to the overall irreversibility of the plant makes it the most important source of inefficiency in the process. Recent studies here have shown the promotion of drop wise condensation in the lab by means of increasing the surface energy density of a tube with nanotechnology. The use of nanotechnology has allowed the creation of surface treatments which discourage water from wetting a tube surface during a static test. These surface treatments are unique in that they create high- contact angles on the condensing tube surfaces to promote drop wise condensation.

  14. High zenith angle observations of PKS 2155-304 with the MAGIC-I telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksić, J.; Alvarez, E. A.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Asensio, M.; Backes, M.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Berdyugin, A.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Boller, A.; Bonnoli, G.; Borla Tridon, D.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Cañellas, A.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Cossio, L.; Covino, S.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Caneva, G.; De Cea del Pozo, E.; De Lotto, B.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Diago Ortega, A.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Eisenacher, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Fruck, C.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido, D.; Giavitto, G.; Godinović, N.; Gozzini, S. R.; Hadasch, D.; Häfner, D.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Höhne-Mönch, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Jogler, T.; Kellermann, H.; Klepser, S.; Krähenbühl, T.; Krause, J.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Leonardo, E.; Lewandowska, N.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López, M.; López, R.; López-Oramas, A.; Lorenz, E.; Makariev, M.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moldón, J.; Moralejo, A.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nieto, D.; Nilsson, K.; Nowak, N.; Orito, R.; Paiano, S.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Pardo, S.; Paredes, J. M.; Partini, S.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Persic, M.; Peruzzo, L.; Pilia, M.; Pochon, J.; Prada, F.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puerto Gimenez, I.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, K.; Saito, T. Y.; Salvati, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shayduk, M.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Spiro, S.; Stamatescu, V.; Stamerra, A.; Steinke, B.; Storz, J.; Strah, N.; Sun, S.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Treves, A.; Uellenbeck, M.; Vankov, H.; Vogler, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Weitzel, Q.; Zabalza, V.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.

    2012-08-01

    Context. The high frequency peaked BL Lac PKS 2155-304 with a redshift of z = 0.116 was discovered in 1997 in the very high energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) γ-ray range by the University of Durham Mark VI γ-ray Cherenkov telescope in Australia with a flux corresponding to 20% of the Crab Nebula flux. It was later observed and detected with high significance by the southern Cherenkov observatory H.E.S.S. establishing this source as the best studied southern TeV blazar. Detection from the northern hemisphere is difficult due to challenging observation conditions under large zenith angles. In July 2006, the H.E.S.S. collaboration reported an extraordinary outburst of VHE γ-emission. During the outburst, the VHE γ-ray emission was found to be variable on the time scales of minutes and with a mean flux of ~7 times the flux observed from the Crab Nebula. Follow-up observations with the MAGIC-I standalone Cherenkov telescope were triggered by this extraordinary outburst and PKS 2155-304 was observed between 28 July to 2 August 2006 for 15 h at large zenith angles. Aims: We studied the behavior of the source after its extraordinary flare. Furthermore, we developed an analysis method in order to analyze these data taken under large zenith angles. Methods: Here we present an enhanced analysis method for data taken at high zenith angles. We developed improved methods for event selection that led to a better background suppression. Results: The quality of the results presented here is superior to the results presented previously for this data set: detection of the source on a higher significance level and a lower analysis threshold. The averaged energy spectrum we derived has a spectral index of (-3.5 ± 0.2) above 400 GeV, which is in good agreement with the spectral shape measured by H.E.S.S. during the major flare on MJD 53 944. Furthermore, we present the spectral energy distribution modeling of PKS 2155-304. With our observations we increased the duty cycle of the source

  15. A hemispherical, high-solid-angle optical micro-cavity for cavity-QED studies

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Guoqiang; Hannigan, J. M.; Loeckenhoff, R.; Matinaga, F. M.; Raymer, M. G.; Bhongale, S.; Holland, M.; Mosor, S.; Chatterjee, S.; Gibbs, H. M.; Khitrova, G.

    2006-01-01

    We report a novel hemispherical micro-cavity that is comprised of a planar integrated semiconductor distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) mirror, and an external, concave micro-mirror having a radius of curvature $50\\mathrm{\\mu m}$. The integrated DBR mirror containing quantum dots (QD), is designed to locate the QDs at an antinode of the field in order to maximize the interaction between the QD and the cavity. The concave micro-mirror, with high-reflectivity over a large solid-angle, creates a d...

  16. High dimension feature extraction based visualized SOM fault diagnosis method and its application in p-xylene oxidation process☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Tian; Wenli Du; Feng Qian

    2015-01-01

    Purified terephthalic acid (PTA) is an important chemical raw material. P-xylene (PX) is transformed to terephthalic acid (TA) through oxidation process and TA is refined to produce PTA. The PX oxidation reaction is a complex process involving three-phase reaction of gas, liquid and solid. To monitor the process and to im-prove the product quality, as wel as to visualize the fault type clearly, a fault diagnosis method based on self-organizing map (SOM) and high dimensional feature extraction method, local tangent space alignment (LTSA), is proposed. In this method, LTSA can reduce the dimension and keep the topology information simultaneously, and SOM distinguishes various states on the output map. Monitoring results of PX oxidation reaction process in-dicate that the LTSA–SOM can wel detect and visualize the fault type.

  17. High zenith angle observations of PKS 2155-304 with the MAGIC-I telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksić, J; Antoranz, P; Asensio, M; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bock, R K; Boller, A; Bonnoli, G; Tridon, D Borla; Bretz, T; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Cossio, L; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Caneva, G; del Pozo, E De Cea; De Lotto, B; Mendez, C Delgado; Ortega, A Diago; Doert, M; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Eisenacher, D; Elsaesser, D; Ferenc, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Fruck, C; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Giavitto, G; Godinović, N; Muñoz, A González; Gozzini, S R; Hadamek, A; Hadasch, D; Häfner, D; Herrero, A; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Huber, B; Jankowski, F; Jogler, T; Kadenius, V; Klepser, S; Knoetig, M L; Krähenbühl, T; Krause, J; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Leonardo, E; Lewandowska, N; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Makariev, M; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Meucci, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moldón, J; Moralejo, A; Munar-Adrover, P; Niedzwiecki, A; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Nowak, N; Orito, R; Paiano, S; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Partini, S; Persic, M; Pilia, M; Pochon, J; Prada, F; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Puljak, I; Reichardt, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, K; Saito, T Y; Salvati, M; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Spiro, S; Stamatescu, V; Stamerra, A; Steinke, B; Storz, J; Sun, S; Surić, T; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Uellenbeck, M; Vogler, P; Wagner, R M; Weitzel, Q; Zabalza, V; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R

    2012-01-01

    The high frequency peaked BL Lac PKS 2155-304 with a redshift of z=0.116 was discovered in 1997 in the very high energy (VHE, E >100GeV) gamma-ray range by the University of Durham Mark VI gamma-ray Cherenkov telescope in Australia with a flux corresponding to 20% of the Crab Nebula flux. It was later observed and detected with high significance by the Southern Cherenkov observatory H.E.S.S. Detection from the Northern hemisphere is difficult due to challenging observation conditions under large zenith angles. In July 2006, the H.E.S.S. collaboration reported an extraordinary outburst of VHE gamma-emission. During the outburst, the VHE gamma-ray emission was found to be variable on the time scales of minutes and with a mean flux of ~7 times the flux observed from the Crab Nebula. Follow-up observations with the MAGIC-I standalone Cherenkov telescope were triggered by this extraordinary outburst and PKS 2155-304 was observed between 28 July to 2 August 2006 for 15 hours at large zenith angles. Here we present ...

  18. Quasi-periodic dynamics of a high angle of attack aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohith, G.; Sinha, Nandan K.

    2017-01-01

    High angle of attack maneuvers closer to stall is a commonly accessed flight regime especially in case of fighter aircrafts. Stall and post-stall dynamics are dominated by nonlinearities which make the analysis difficult. Presence of external factors such as wind makes the system even more complex. Rich nonlinearities point to the possibility of existence of chaotic solutions. Past studies in this area confirm the development of such solutions. These studies are mainly concentrated on very high angle of attack regimes, which may not be practically easily accessible. This paper examines the possibility of existence of chaotic solutions in the lower, more accessible areas in the post stall domain. The analysis is composed of the study of effect of external wind as an agent to drive the system towards the possibility of a chaotic solution. Investigations reveal presence of quasi-periodic solutions, which are characterized by two incommensurate frequencies. This solution appears in the time simulation by varying the control parameter viz., wind. The solutions correspond to the values in the lower region of the angle of attack versus elevator bifurcation curve in the post-stall region. A steady wind is considered for the analysis and explores the possibility of chaotic motion by increasing the wind in a step wise manner. It is found that wind adds extra energy to the system which in turn drives the system in to chaos. The analysis is done with the help of phase portrait, Poincare map and amplitude spectrum and a quasi-periodic route to chaos via torus doubling is also presented.

  19. Flight validation of ground-based assessment for control power requirements at high angles of attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogburn, Marilyn E.; Ross, Holly M.; Foster, John V.; Pahle, Joseph W.; Sternberg, Charles A.; Traven, Ricardo; Lackey, James B.; Abbott, Troy D.

    1994-01-01

    A review is presented in viewgraph format of an ongoing NASA/U.S. Navy study to determine control power requirements at high angles of attack for the next generation high-performance aircraft. This paper focuses on recent flight test activities using the NASA High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV), which are intended to validate results of previous ground-based simulation studies. The purpose of this study is discussed, and the overall program structure, approach, and objectives are described. Results from two areas of investigation are presented: (1) nose-down control power requirements and (2) lateral-directional control power requirements. Selected results which illustrate issues and challenges that are being addressed in the study are discussed including test methodology, comparisons between simulation and flight, and general lessons learned.

  20. Mechanical Fault Diagnosis of High Voltage Circuit Breakers Based on Wavelet Time-Frequency Entropy and One-Class Support Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nantian Huang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical faults of high voltage circuit breakers (HVCBs are one of the most important factors that affect the reliability of power system operation. Because of the limitation of a lack of samples of each fault type; some fault conditions can be recognized as a normal condition. The fault diagnosis results of HVCBs seriously affect the operation reliability of the entire power system. In order to improve the fault diagnosis accuracy of HVCBs; a method for mechanical fault diagnosis of HVCBs based on wavelet time-frequency entropy (WTFE and one-class support vector machine (OCSVM is proposed. In this method; the S-transform (ST is proposed to analyze the energy time-frequency distribution of HVCBs’ vibration signals. Then; WTFE is selected as the feature vector that reflects the information characteristics of vibration signals in the time and frequency domains. OCSVM is used for judging whether a mechanical fault of HVCBs has occurred or not. In order to improve the fault detection accuracy; a particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm is employed to optimize the parameters of OCSVM; including the window width of the kernel function and error limit. If the mechanical fault is confirmed; a support vector machine (SVM-based classifier will be used to recognize the fault type. The experiments carried on a real SF6 HVCB demonstrated the improved effectiveness of the new approach.

  1. Experimental study on hydrodynamic coefficients for high-incidence-angle maneuver of a submarine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Yong Park

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Snap rolling during hard turning and instability during emergency rising are important features of submarine operation. Hydrodynamics modeling using a high incidence flow angle is required to predict these phenomena. In the present study, a quasi-steady dynamics model of a submarine suitable for high-incidence-angle maneuvering applications is developed. To determine the hydrodynamic coefficients of the model, static tests, dynamic tests, and control surface tests were conducted in a towing tank and wind tunnel. The towing tank test is conducted utilizing a Reynolds number of 3.12 × 106, and the wind tunnel test is performed utilizing a Reynolds number of 5.11 × 106. In addition, least squares, golden section search, and surface fitting using polynomial models were used to analyze the experimental results. The obtained coefficients are presented in tabular form and can be used for various purposes such as hard turning simulation, emergency rising simulation, and controller design.

  2. Angle-dependent magnetoresistance and quantum oscillations in high-mobility semimetal LuPtBi

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Guizhou

    2017-03-14

    The recent discovery of ultrahigh mobility and large positive magnetoresistance in topologically non-trivial Half-Heusler semimetal LuPtBi provides a unique playground for studying exotic physics and significant perspective for device applications. As an fcc-structured electron-hole-compensated semimetal, LuPtBi theoretically exhibits six symmetrically arranged anisotropic electron Fermi pockets and two nearly-spherical hole pockets, offering the opportunity to explore the physics of Fermi surface with a simple angle-related magnetotransport properties. In this work, through the angle-dependent transverse magnetoresistance measurements, in combination with high-field SdH quantum oscillations, we achieved to map out a Fermi surface with six anisotropic pockets in the high-temperature and low-field regime, and furthermore, identify a possible magnetic field driven Fermi surface change at lower temperatures. Reasons account for the Fermi surface change in LuPtBi are discussed in terms of the field-induced electron evacuation due to Landau quantization.

  3. Experimental verification of the model for formation of double Shockley stacking faults in highly doped regions of PVT-grown 4H–SiC wafers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yu; Guo, Jianqiu; Goue, Ouloide; Raghothamachar, Balaji; Dudley, Michael; Chung, Gil; Sanchez, Edward; Quast, Jeff; Manning, Ian; Hansen, Darren

    2016-10-01

    Recently, we reported on the formation of overlapping rhombus-shaped stacking faults from scratches left over by the chemical mechanical polishing during high temperature annealing of PVT-grown 4H–SiC wafer. These stacking faults are restricted to regions with high N-doped areas of the wafer. The type of these stacking faults were determined to be Shockley stacking faults by analyzing the behavior of their area contrast using synchrotron white beam X-ray topography studies. A model was proposed to explain the formation mechanism of the rhombus shaped stacking faults based on double Shockley fault nucleation and propagation. In this paper, we have experimentally verified this model by characterizing the configuration of the bounding partials of the stacking faults on both surfaces using synchrotron topography in back reflection geometry. As predicted by the model, on both the Si and C faces, the leading partials bounding the rhombus-shaped stacking faults are 30° Si-core and the trailing partials are 30° C-core. Finally, using high resolution transmission electron microscopy, we have verified that the enclosed stacking fault is a double Shockley type.

  4. Feature Extraction Method for High Impedance Ground Fault Localization in Radial Power Distribution Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kåre Jean; Munk, Steen M.; Sørensen, John Aasted

    1998-01-01

    processes and communication systems lead to demands for improved monitoring of power distribution networks so that the quality of power delivery can be kept at a controlled level. The ground fault localization method for each feeder in a network is based on the centralized frequency broadband measurement...... of three phase voltages and currents. The method consists of a feature extractor, based on a grid description of the feeder by impulse responses, and a neural network for ground fault localization. The emphasis of this paper is the feature extractor, and the detection of the time instance of a ground fault...

  5. Fault-zone structure and weakening processes in basin-scale reverse faults: The Moonlight Fault Zone, South Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alder, S.; Smith, S. A. F.; Scott, J. M.

    2016-10-01

    The >200 km long Moonlight Fault Zone (MFZ) in southern New Zealand was an Oligocene basin-bounding normal fault zone that reactivated in the Miocene as a high-angle reverse fault (present dip angle 65°-75°). Regional exhumation in the last c. 5 Ma has resulted in deep exposures of the MFZ that present an opportunity to study the structure and deformation processes that were active in a basin-scale reverse fault at basement depths. Syn-rift sediments are preserved only as thin fault-bound slivers. The hanging wall and footwall of the MFZ are mainly greenschist facies quartzofeldspathic schists that have a steeply-dipping (55°-75°) foliation subparallel to the main fault trace. In more fissile lithologies (e.g. greyschists), hanging-wall deformation occurred by the development of foliation-parallel breccia layers up to a few centimetres thick. Greyschists in the footwall deformed mainly by folding and formation of tabular, foliation-parallel breccias up to 1 m wide. Where the hanging-wall contains more competent lithologies (e.g. greenschist facies metabasite) it is laced with networks of pseudotachylyte that formed parallel to the host rock foliation in a damage zone extending up to 500 m from the main fault trace. The fault core contains an up to 20 m thick sequence of breccias, cataclasites and foliated cataclasites preserving evidence for the progressive development of interconnected networks of (partly authigenic) chlorite and muscovite. Deformation in the fault core occurred by cataclasis of quartz and albite, frictional sliding of chlorite and muscovite grains, and dissolution-precipitation. Combined with published friction and permeability data, our observations suggest that: 1) host rock lithology and anisotropy were the primary controls on the structure of the MFZ at basement depths and 2) high-angle reverse slip was facilitated by the low frictional strength of fault core materials. Restriction of pseudotachylyte networks to the hanging-wall of the

  6. Characterization of active fault scarps from medium to high resolution DEM: case studies from Central and Southern Apennines (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunori, C.; Cinti, F. R.; Ventura, G.

    2013-12-01

    We identify geo-morphometric features of active fault scarps in Italy through a semiautomatic processing using GIS. Medium to high resolution DEM was used to characterize the geometry, structural, and erosive elements of two seismogenic normal faults in Central and Southern Apennines. The Pettino fault in L'Aquila area was detected using a 1 m pixel DEM derived from airborne LiDAR survey (Friuli Venezia Giulia Civil Protection). For the Castrovillari fault in northern Calabria region was used a 4 m pixel DEM (Regional Cartography Office of Regione Calabria). Scarp segments are region of planar discontinuities identified by selected values of DEM-derived Terrain Ruggedness Index (TRI) and Vector Ruggedness Measure (VRM). These planar discontinuities corresponds to landscape features such as, river terraces, roads scarps, and other natural or human features. The discrimination between these features have been accomplished overlaying extracted features on aerial photograph, geological and geomorphologic maps and in situ survey. After that, we perform the quantitative and statistical analysis of these areas identified as "fault scarps". The identification of elements relative to the scarps (e.g. base, crest, slope) is then obtained to derive the estimate of parameters describing the fault: altitude, height of the scarp, length, slope and aspect, Terrain Ruggedness Index (TRI) and Vector Ruggedness Measure (VRM). The spatial distribution of the extracted values was obtained through their statistical analysis. We analyze scarp parameters variations along the whole scarp extent, such as strike value from aspect variations, slope and profile curvature differences as indicators of tectonic and/or erosion activity. The combined analysis of the DEM-derived parameters allows us to (a) define aspects of three-dimensional scarp geometry, (b) decipher its geomorphological significance, and (c) estimate the long-term slip rate.

  7. The effect of mechanical discontinuities on the growth of faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonini, Lorenzo; Basili, Roberto; Bonanno, Emanuele; Toscani, Giovanni; Burrato, Pierfrancesco; Seno, Silvio; Valensise, Gianluca

    2016-04-01

    The growth of natural faults is controlled by several factors, including the nature of host rocks, the strain rate, the temperature, and the presence of fluids. In this work we focus on the mechanical characteristics of host rocks, and in particular on the role played by thin mechanical discontinuities on the upward propagation of faults and on associated secondary effects such as folding and fracturing. Our approach uses scaled, analogue models where natural rocks are simulated by wet clay (kaolin). A clay cake is placed above two rigid blocks in a hanging wall/footwall configuration on either side of a planar fault. Fault activity is simulated by motor-controlled movements of the hanging wall. We reproduce three types of faults: a 45°-dipping normal fault, a 45°-dipping reverse fault and a 30°-dipping reverse fault. These angles are selected as representative of most natural dip-slip faults. The analogues of the mechanical discontinuities are obtained by precutting the wet clay cake before starting the hanging wall movement. We monitor the experiments with high-resolution cameras and then obtain most of the data through the Digital Image Correlation method (D.I.C.). This technique accurately tracks the trajectories of the particles of the analogue material during the deformation process: this allows us to extract displacement field vectors plus the strain and shear rate distributions on the lateral side of the clay block, where the growth of new faults is best seen. Initially we run a series of isotropic experiments, i.e. experiments without discontinuities, to generate a reference model: then we introduce the discontinuities. For the extensional models they are cut at different dip angles, from horizontal to 45°-dipping, both synthetic and antithetic with respect to the master fault, whereas only horizontal discontinuities are introduced in the contractional models. Our experiments show that such discontinuities control: 1) the propagation rate of faults

  8. Neotectonic fault detection and lithosphere structure beneath SW of High Atlas (Morocco)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timoulali, Youssef; Radi, Said; Azguet, Roumaissae; Bachaoui, Mostapha

    2016-08-01

    The High Atlas is a 100 km wide zone defined by E-W to NE-SW trending folds nearly orthogonal to the Atlantic coastline. The major compressional structures in the High Atlas consist of large-scale fold systems which affect Mesozoic and Cainozoic formations. The extreme West of the High Atlas including the region of Agadir is defined as an earthquake Zone. Historical seismicity data shows that the Agadir region was hit by two destructive earthquakes in 1731 and 1960 with magnitude 6.4 and 6.0, respectively. The present study has two main goals: 1) to use remote sensing techniques to detect and map the surface geological structures including faults; 2) to use the local earthquake tomography for imaging the lithosphere (subsurface) and detect deep structures. For the remote sensing techniques we used ETM + Landsat7 images and the SRTM 90 m image as a Digital Terrane Elevation Model. This study focuses on the computerized identification, feature extraction and quantitative interpretation of lineaments over the SW High Atlas. The analysis developed here is based on the numerical enhancement of a Landsat image and on the statistical processing of data generated through enhancement. The results generated by the numerical enhancement and statistical analysis are presented on fault maps, lineament maps, polar diagrams and lineament density maps. The lineaments have a high concentration of orientations around the directions N40E, N80W and N-S. For the subsurface study, seismic data sets were used to define the 3-D velocity structures. We also used local earthquake tomography to obtain the velocity map and crustal structure of the SW High Atlas region. The tomography results show a new and detailed lithosphere structure defined by a high velocity body in the northern of SW High Atlas from 15 to 45 Km depth, dipping to the north beneath the Essaouira basin in the western Meseta with P velocity variations from 6.5 to 7.8 km/s. This anomaly can be interpreted as an old

  9. Bifurcation analysis and stability design for aircraft longitudinal motion with high angle of attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Qi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Bifurcation analysis and stability design for aircraft longitudinal motion are investigated when the nonlinearity in flight dynamics takes place severely at high angle of attack regime. To predict the special nonlinear flight phenomena, bifurcation theory and continuation method are employed to systematically analyze the nonlinear motions. With the refinement of the flight dynamics for F-8 Crusader longitudinal motion, a framework is derived to identify the stationary bifurcation and dynamic bifurcation for high-dimensional system. Case study shows that the F-8 longitudinal motion undergoes saddle node bifurcation, Hopf bifurcation, Zero-Hopf bifurcation and branch point bifurcation under certain conditions. Moreover, the Hopf bifurcation renders series of multiple frequency pitch oscillation phenomena, which deteriorate the flight control stability severely. To relieve the adverse effects of these phenomena, a stabilization control based on gain scheduling and polynomial fitting for F-8 longitudinal motion is presented to enlarge the flight envelope. Simulation results validate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  10. Applications of high-resolution magic angle spinning MRS in biomedical studies II-Human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Christopher; Ehret, Felix; Palmas, Francesco; Vandergrift, Lindsey A; Jiang, Yanni; Schmitt, Vanessa; Dufner, Vera; Habbel, Piet; Nowak, Johannes; Cheng, Leo L

    2017-09-15

    High-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) MRS is a powerful method for gaining insight into the physiological and pathological processes of cellular metabolism. Given its ability to obtain high-resolution spectra of non-liquid biological samples, while preserving tissue architecture for subsequent histopathological analysis, the technique has become invaluable for biochemical and biomedical studies. Using HRMAS MRS, alterations in measured metabolites, metabolic ratios, and metabolomic profiles present the possibility to improve identification and prognostication of various diseases and decipher the metabolomic impact of drug therapies. In this review, we evaluate HRMAS MRS results on human tissue specimens from malignancies and non-localized diseases reported in the literature since the inception of the technique in 1996. We present the diverse applications of the technique in understanding pathological processes of different anatomical origins, correlations with in vivo imaging, effectiveness of therapies, and progress in the HRMAS methodology. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Robust, high-throughput solution structural analyses by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hura, Greg L.; Menon, Angeli L.; Hammel, Michal; Rambo, Robert P.; Poole II, Farris L.; Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Jenney Jr, Francis E.; Classen, Scott; Frankel, Kenneth A.; Hopkins, Robert C.; Yang, Sungjae; Scott, Joseph W.; Dillard, Bret D.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Tainer, John A.

    2009-07-20

    We present an efficient pipeline enabling high-throughput analysis of protein structure in solution with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Our SAXS pipeline combines automated sample handling of microliter volumes, temperature and anaerobic control, rapid data collection and data analysis, and couples structural analysis with automated archiving. We subjected 50 representative proteins, mostly from Pyrococcus furiosus, to this pipeline and found that 30 were multimeric structures in solution. SAXS analysis allowed us to distinguish aggregated and unfolded proteins, define global structural parameters and oligomeric states for most samples, identify shapes and similar structures for 25 unknown structures, and determine envelopes for 41 proteins. We believe that high-throughput SAXS is an enabling technology that may change the way that structural genomics research is done.

  12. High energy x-ray phase contrast CT using glancing-angle grating interferometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarapata, A., E-mail: adrian.sarapata@tum.de [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 and Department of Physics and Institute of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Stayman, J. W.; Siewerdsen, J. H. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Pfeiffer, F. [Department of Physics and Institute of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The authors present initial progress toward a clinically compatible x-ray phase contrast CT system, using glancing-angle x-ray grating interferometry to provide high contrast soft tissue images at estimated by computer simulation dose levels comparable to conventional absorption based CT. Methods: DPC-CT scans of a joint phantom and of soft tissues were performed in order to answer several important questions from a clinical setup point of view. A comparison between high and low fringe visibility systems is presented. The standard phase stepping method was compared with sliding window interlaced scanning. Using estimated dose values obtained with a Monte-Carlo code the authors studied the dependence of the phase image contrast on exposure time and dose. Results: Using a glancing angle interferometer at high x-ray energy (∼45 keV mean value) in combination with a conventional x-ray tube the authors achieved fringe visibility values of nearly 50%, never reported before. High fringe visibility is shown to be an indispensable parameter for a potential clinical scanner. Sliding window interlaced scanning proved to have higher SNRs and CNRs in a region of interest and to also be a crucial part of a low dose CT system. DPC-CT images of a soft tissue phantom at exposures in the range typical for absorption based CT of musculoskeletal extremities were obtained. Assuming a human knee as the CT target, good soft tissue phase contrast could be obtained at an estimated absorbed dose level around 8 mGy, similar to conventional CT. Conclusions: DPC-CT with glancing-angle interferometers provides improved soft tissue contrast over absorption CT even at clinically compatible dose levels (estimated by a Monte-Carlo computer simulation). Further steps in image processing, data reconstruction, and spectral matching could make the technique fully clinically compatible. Nevertheless, due to its increased scan time and complexity the technique should be thought of not as

  13. High energy x-ray phase contrast CT using glancing-angle grating interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarapata, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Finkenthal, M.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Pfeiffer, F.; Stutman, D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The authors present initial progress toward a clinically compatible x-ray phase contrast CT system, using glancing-angle x-ray grating interferometry to provide high contrast soft tissue images at estimated by computer simulation dose levels comparable to conventional absorption based CT. Methods: DPC-CT scans of a joint phantom and of soft tissues were performed in order to answer several important questions from a clinical setup point of view. A comparison between high and low fringe visibility systems is presented. The standard phase stepping method was compared with sliding window interlaced scanning. Using estimated dose values obtained with a Monte-Carlo code the authors studied the dependence of the phase image contrast on exposure time and dose. Results: Using a glancing angle interferometer at high x-ray energy (∼45 keV mean value) in combination with a conventional x-ray tube the authors achieved fringe visibility values of nearly 50%, never reported before. High fringe visibility is shown to be an indispensable parameter for a potential clinical scanner. Sliding window interlaced scanning proved to have higher SNRs and CNRs in a region of interest and to also be a crucial part of a low dose CT system. DPC-CT images of a soft tissue phantom at exposures in the range typical for absorption based CT of musculoskeletal extremities were obtained. Assuming a human knee as the CT target, good soft tissue phase contrast could be obtained at an estimated absorbed dose level around 8 mGy, similar to conventional CT. Conclusions: DPC-CT with glancing-angle interferometers provides improved soft tissue contrast over absorption CT even at clinically compatible dose levels (estimated by a Monte-Carlo computer simulation). Further steps in image processing, data reconstruction, and spectral matching could make the technique fully clinically compatible. Nevertheless, due to its increased scan time and complexity the technique should be thought of not as

  14. High-resolution shear-wave seismics across the Carlsberg Fault zone south of Copenhagen - Implications for linking Mesozoic and late Pleistocene structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammann, Janina; Hübscher, Christian; Boldreel, Lars Ole; Nielsen, Lars

    2016-07-01

    The Carlsberg Fault zone (CFZ) is a NNW-SSE striking structure close to the transition zone between the Danish Basin and the Baltic Shield. We examine the fault evolution by combining very-high-resolution onshore shear-wave seismic data, one conventional onshore seismic profile and marine reflection seismic profiles. The faulting geometry indicates a strong influence of Triassic subsidence and rifting in the Central European Basin System. Growth strata within the CFZ surrounding Höllviken Graben reveal syntectonic sedimentation in the Lower Triassic, indicating the opening to be a result of Triassic rifting. In the Upper Cretaceous growth faulting documents continued rifting. These findings contrast the Late Cretaceous to Paleogene inversion tectonics in neighboring structures, such as the Tornquist Zone. The high-resolution shear-wave seismic method was used to image faulting in Quaternary and Danian layers in the CFZ. The portable compact vibrator source ElViS III S8 was used to acquire a 1150 m long seismic section on the island Amager, south of Copenhagen. The shallow subsurface in the investigation area is dominated by Quaternary glacial till deposits in the upper 5-11 m and Danian limestone below. In the shear-wave profile, we imaged the uppermost 30 m of the western part of CFZ. The complex fault zone comprises normal block faults and one reverse block fault. The observed faults cut through the Danian as well as the Quaternary overburden. Hence, there are strong indicators for ongoing faulting, like mapped faulting in Quaternary sediments and ongoing subsidence of the eastern block of the CFZ as interpreted by other authors. The lack of earthquakes localized in the fault zone implies that either the frequency of occurring earthquakes is too small to be recorded in the observation time-span, or that the movement of the shallow sub-surface layers may be due to other sources than purely tectonic processes.

  15. Change detection from very high resolution satellite time series with variable off-nadir angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barazzetti, Luigi; Brumana, Raffaella; Cuca, Branka; Previtali, Mattia

    2015-06-01

    Very high resolution (VHR) satellite images have the potential for revealing changes occurred overtime with a superior level of detail. However, their use for metric purposes requires accurate geo-localization with ancillary DEMs and GCPs to achieve sub-pixel terrain correction, in order to obtain images useful for mapping applications. Change detection with a time series of VHS images is not a simple task because images acquired with different off-nadir angles have a lack of pixel-to-pixel image correspondence, even after accurate geo-correction. This paper presents a procedure for automatic change detection able to deal with variable off-nadir angles. The case study concerns the identification of damaged buildings from pre- and post-event images acquired on the historic center of L'Aquila (Italy), which was struck by an earthquake in April 2009. The developed procedure is a multi-step approach where (i) classes are assigned to both images via object-based classification, (ii) an initial alignment is provided with an automated tile-based rubber sheeting interpolation on the extracted layers, and (iii) change detection is carried out removing residual mis-registration issues resulting in elongated features close to building edges. The method is fully automated except for some thresholds that can be interactively set to improve the visualization of the damaged buildings. The experimental results proved that damages can be automatically found without additional information, such as digital surface models, SAR data, or thematic vector layers.

  16. Ability of High-Resolution Resistivity Tomography to Detect Fault and Fracture Zones: Application to the Tournemire Experimental Platform, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gélis, C.; Noble, M.; Cabrera, J.; Penz, S.; Chauris, H.; Cushing, E. M.

    2016-02-01

    The Experimental Platform of Tournemire (Aveyron, France) developed by IRSN (French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety) is composed of a tunnel excavated in an argillite formation belonging to a limestone-argillite-limestone subhorizontal sedimentary sequence. Subvertical secondary fault zones were intercepted in argillite using drifts and boreholes in the tunnel excavated at a depth of about 250 m located under the Larzac Plateau. A 2D 2.5 km baseline large-scale electrical resistivity survey conducted in 2007 allowed detecting in the upper limestones several significantly low electrical resistivity subvertical zones (G élis et al. Appl Geophys 167(11): 1405-1418, 2010). One of these discontinuities is consistent with the extension towards the surface of the secondary fault zones identified in the argillite formation from the tunnel. In an attempt to better characterize this zone, IRSN and MINES ParisTech conducted a high-resolution electrical resistivity survey located transversally to the fault and fracture zones. A 760-m-long profile was acquired using two array geometries and take-outs of 2, 4 and 8 m, requiring several roll-alongs. These data were first inverted independently for each take-out and then using all take-outs together for a given array geometry. Different inverted 2D electrical resistivity models display the same global features with high (higher than 5000 Ωm) to low (lower than 100 Ωm) electrical resistivity zones. These electrical resistivity models are finally compared with a geological cross-section based on independent data. The subvertical conductive zones are in agreement with the fault and fracture locations inferred from the geological cross-section. Moreover, the top of a more conductive zone, below a high electrical conductive zone and between two subvertical fault zones, is located in a more sandy and argillaceous layer. This conductive zone is interpreted as the presence of a more scattered fracture zone

  17. Detection and Modeling of High-Dimensional Thresholds for Fault Detection and Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuning

    2015-01-01

    Many Fault Detection and Diagnosis (FDD) systems use discrete models for detection and reasoning. To obtain categorical values like oil pressure too high, analog sensor values need to be discretized using a suitablethreshold. Time series of analog and discrete sensor readings are processed and discretized as they come in. This task isusually performed by the wrapper code'' of the FDD system, together with signal preprocessing and filtering. In practice,selecting the right threshold is very difficult, because it heavily influences the quality of diagnosis. If a threshold causesthe alarm trigger even in nominal situations, false alarms will be the consequence. On the other hand, if threshold settingdoes not trigger in case of an off-nominal condition, important alarms might be missed, potentially causing hazardoussituations. In this paper, we will in detail describe the underlying statistical modeling techniques and algorithm as well as the Bayesian method for selecting the most likely shape and its parameters. Our approach will be illustrated by several examples from the Aerospace domain.

  18. The down-faulted basin zone and high disaster risk zone in Shanxi Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘惠敏; 苏桂武; 邓砚; 高庆华

    2004-01-01

    Shanxi Province is a region with frequent occurrence of earthquakes, floods and waterlogging, meteorological and geologic hazards, and agrobiohazards in China. The study shows that the formation and development of the down-faulted basin zone in Shanxi Province provides an available condition for preparation and occurrence of these hazards, so that the basin zone becomes an area with frequent occurrence of the hazards, such as earthquakes, floods and waterlogging, meteorological and geologic hazards and agrobiohazards in Shanxi and with their most serious interaction and mutual intensification. Moreover, the basin zone is an area with dense population and most concentrated industrial and agricultural productions and social-economic property in Shanxi. The comprehensive effect of the two factors caused the zone to be a high natural disaster risk area in Shanxi. For reduction of natural disasters and ensuring the sustainable social-economic development in Shanxi, it is necessary to regard the basin zone as an important area for disaster reduction in Shanxi and to carry out integrated disaster reduction.

  19. Designing a Scalable Fault Tolerance Model for High Performance Computational Chemistry: A Case Study with Coupled Cluster Perturbative Triples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, Hubertus J J; Vishnu, Abhinav; de Jong, Wibe A

    2011-01-11

    In the past couple of decades, the massive computational power provided by the most modern supercomputers has resulted in simulation of higher-order computational chemistry methods, previously considered intractable. As the system sizes continue to increase, the computational chemistry domain continues to escalate this trend using parallel computing with programming models such as Message Passing Interface (MPI) and Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS) programming models such as Global Arrays. The ever increasing scale of these supercomputers comes at a cost of reduced Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF), currently on the order of days and projected to be on the order of hours for upcoming extreme scale systems. While traditional disk-based check pointing methods are ubiquitous for storing intermediate solutions, they suffer from high overhead of writing and recovering from checkpoints. In practice, checkpointing itself often brings the system down. Clearly, methods beyond checkpointing are imperative to handling the aggravating issue of reducing MTBF. In this paper, we address this challenge by designing and implementing an efficient fault tolerant version of the Coupled Cluster (CC) method with NWChem, using in-memory data redundancy. We present the challenges associated with our design, including an efficient data storage model, maintenance of at least one consistent data copy, and the recovery process. Our performance evaluation without faults shows that the current design exhibits a small overhead. In the presence of a simulated fault, the proposed design incurs negligible overhead in comparison to the state of the art implementation without faults.

  20. ASYMMETRIC VORTICES FLOW OVER SLENDER BODY AND ITS ACTIVE CONTROL AT HIGH ANGLE OF ATTACK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Xueying; WANG Yankui

    2004-01-01

    The studies of asymmetric vortices flow over slender body and its active control at high angles of attack have significant importance for both academic field and engineering area. This paper attempts to provide an update state of art to the investigations on the fields of forebody asymmetric vortices. This review emphasizes the correlation between micro-perturbation on the model nose and its response and evolution behaviors of the asymmetric vortices. The critical issues are discussed,which include the formation and evolution mechanism of asymmetric multi-vortices; main behaviors of asymmetric vortices flow including its deterministic feature and vortices flow structure; the evolution and development of asymmetric vortices under the perturbation on the model nose; forebody vortex active control especially discussed micro-perturbation active control concept and technique in more detail. However present understanding in this area is still very limited and this paper tries to identify the key unknown problems in the concluding remarks.

  1. Forensic examination of electrical tapes using high resolution magic angle spinning ¹H NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenberger, Torsten; Simmross, Ulrich; Poppe, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The application of high resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) (1)H NMR spectroscopy is ideally suited for the differentiation of plastics. In addition to the actual material composition, the different types of polymer architectures and tacticity provide characteristic signals in the fingerprint of the (1)H NMR spectra. The method facilitates forensic comparison, as even small amounts of insoluble but swellable plastic particles are utilized. The performance of HR-MAS NMR can be verified against other methods that were recently addressed in various articles about forensic tape comparison. In this study samples of the 90 electrical tapes already referenced by the FBI laboratory were used. The discrimination power of HR-MAS is demonstrated by the fact that more tape groups can be distinguished by NMR spectroscopy than by using the combined evaluation of several commonly used analytical techniques. An additional advantage of this robust and quick method is the very simple sample preparation.

  2. A hemispherical, high-solid-angle optical micro-cavity for cavity-QED studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Guoqiang; Hannigan, J. M.; Loeckenhoff, R.; Matinaga, F. M.; Raymer, M. G.; Bhongale, S.; Holland, M.; Mosor, S.; Chatterjee, S.; Gibbs, H. M.; Khitrova, G.

    2006-03-01

    We report a novel hemispherical micro-cavity that is comprised of a planar integrated semiconductor distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) mirror, and an external, concave micro-mirror having a radius of curvature 50 µm. The integrated DBR mirror containing quantum dots (QD), is designed to locate the QDs at an antinode of the field in order to maximize the interaction between the QD and cavity. The concave micro-mirror, with high-reflectivity over a large solid-angle, creates a diffraction-limited (sub-micron) mode-waist at the planar mirror, leading to a large coupling constant between the cavity mode and QD. The half-monolithic design gives more spatial and spectral tuning abilities, relatively to fully monolithic structures. This unique micro-cavity design will potentially enable us to both reach the cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) strong coupling regime and realize the deterministic generation of single photons on demand.

  3. High Resolution Angle Resolved Photoemission Studies on Quasi-Particle Dynamics in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leem, C.S.

    2010-06-02

    We obtained the spectral function of the graphite H point using high resolution angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). The extracted width of the spectral function (inverse of the photo-hole lifetime) near the H point is approximately proportional to the energy as expected from the linearly increasing density of states (DOS) near the Fermi energy. This is well accounted by our electron-phonon coupling theory considering the peculiar electronic DOS near the Fermi level. And we also investigated the temperature dependence of the peak widths both experimentally and theoretically. The upper bound for the electron-phonon coupling parameter is 0.23, nearly the same value as previously reported at the K point. Our analysis of temperature dependent ARPES data at K shows that the energy of phonon mode of graphite has much higher energy scale than 125K which is dominant in electron-phonon coupling.

  4. Towards weighing individual atoms by high-angle scattering of electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Argentero, G; Kotakoski, J; Eder, F R; Meyer, J C

    2015-01-01

    We consider theoretically the energy loss of electrons scattered to high angles when assuming that the primary beam can be limited to a single atom. We discuss the possibility of identifying the isotopes of light elements and of extracting information about phonons in this signal. The energy loss is related to the mass of the much heavier nucleus, and is spread out due to atomic vibrations. Importantly, while the width of the broadening is much larger than the energy separation of isotopes, only the shift in the peak positions must be detected if the beam is limited to a single atom. We conclude that the experimental case will be challenging but is not excluded by the physical principles as far as considered here. Moreover, the initial experiments demonstrate the separation of gold and carbon based on a signal that is related to their mass, rather than their atomic number.

  5. What can we learn from high precision measurements of neutrino mixing angles?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R N Mohapatra

    2004-12-01

    Many experiments are being planned to measure the neutrino mixing angles more precisely. In this note, the theoretical significance of a high precision measurement of these parameters is discussed. It is emphasized that they can provide crucial information about different ways to understand the origin of large atmospheric neutrino mixing and move us closer towards determining the neutrino mass matrix. They may also be able to throw light on the question of lepton–quark unification as well as the existence of any leptonic symmetries. For instance if exact ↔ symmetry in the neutrino mass matrix is assumed to be the reason for maximal - mixing, one gets 13 = 0 and 13 ≃ $\\sqrt{ m^{2}_{\\odot} / m^{2}_{{\\text{A}}}$ or 13 ≃ $ m^{2}_{\\odot} / m^{2}_{{\\text{A}}}$ can provide information about the way the ↔ symmetry breaking manifests in the case of normal hierarchy.

  6. High resolution-angle resolved photoemission studies of high temperature superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, C.G.; Liu, R.; Lynch, D.W. (Ames Lab. and Dept. of Physics, Iowa State Univ. (USA)); Veal, B.W.; Chang, Y.C.; Jiang, P.Z.; Liu, J.Z.; Paulikas, A.P. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Arko, A.J.; List, R.S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Recent photoemission studies of Y 123 and Bi 2212 performed with high energy and angular resolution have provided detailed information on the nature of the states near the Fermi level. Measurements of the superconducting gap, band dispersion, and the density of states near the Fermi level in the normal state all support a Fermi liquid description of these materials. (orig.).

  7. High resolution-angle resolved photoemission studies of high temperature superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, C.G.; Liu, R.; Lynch, D.W.; Veal, B.W.; Chang, Y.C.; Jiang, P.Z.; Liu, J.Z.; Paulikas, A.P.; Arko, A.J.; List, R.S. (Ames Lab., IA (USA); Argonne National Lab., IL (USA); Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1989-08-01

    Recent photoemission studies of Y 123 and Bi 2212 performed with high energy and angular resolution have provided detailed information on the nature of the states near the Fermi level. Measurements of the superconducting gap, band dispersion, and the density of states near the Fermi level in the normal state all support a Fermi liquid description of these materials. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Fast computation of high energy elastic collision scattering angle for electric propulsion plume simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Samuel J.

    2016-11-01

    In the plumes of Hall thrusters and ion thrusters, high energy ions experience elastic collisions with slow neutral atoms. These collisions involve a process of momentum exchange, altering the initial velocity vectors of the collision pair. In addition to the momentum exchange process, ions and atoms can exchange electrons, resulting in slow charge-exchange ions and fast atoms. In these simulations, it is particularly important to accurately perform computations of ion-atom elastic collisions in determining the plume current profile and assessing the integration of spacecraft components. The existing models are currently capable of accurate calculation but are not fast enough such that the calculation can be a bottleneck of plume simulations. This study investigates methods to accelerate an ion-atom elastic collision calculation that includes both momentum- and charge-exchange processes. The scattering angles are pre-computed through a classical approach with ab initio spin-orbit free potential and are stored in a two-dimensional array as functions of impact parameter and energy. When performing a collision calculation for an ion-atom pair, the scattering angle is computed by a table lookup and multiple linear interpolations, given the relative energy and randomly determined impact parameter. In order to further accelerate the calculations, the number of collision calculations is reduced by properly defining two cut-off cross-sections for the elastic scattering. In the MCC method, the target atom needs to be sampled; however, it is confirmed that initial target atom velocity does not play a significant role in typical electric propulsion plume simulations such that the sampling process is unnecessary. With these implementations, the computational run-time to perform a collision calculation is reduced significantly compared to previous methods, while retaining the accuracy of the high fidelity models.

  9. Fault and dyke detectability in high resolution seismic surveys for coal: a view from numerical modelling*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Binzhong 13Hatherly, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Modern underground coal mining requires certainty about geological faults, dykes and other structural features. Faults with throws of even just a few metres can create safety issues and lead to costly delays in mine production. In this paper, we use numerical modelling in an ideal, noise-free environment with homogeneous layering to investigate the detectability of small faults by seismic reflection surveying. If the layering is horizontal, faults with throws of 1/8 of the wavelength should be detectable in a 2D survey. In a coal mining setting where the seismic velocity of the overburden ranges from 3000 m/s to 4000 m/s and the dominant seismic frequency is ~100 Hz, this corresponds to a fault with a throw of 4-5 m. However, if the layers are dipping or folded, the faults may be more difficult to detect, especially when their throws oppose the trend of the background structure. In the case of 3D seismic surveying we suggest that faults with throws as small as 1/16 of wavelength (2-2.5 m) can be detectable because of the benefits offered by computer-aided horizon identification and the improved spatial coherence in 3D seismic surveys. With dykes, we find that Berkhout's definition of the Fresnel zone is more consistent with actual experience. At a depth of 500 m, which is typically encountered in coal mining, and a 100 Hz dominant seismic frequency, dykes less than 8 m in width are undetectable, even after migration.

  10. Microstructure and mechanical properties of bulk highly faulted fcc/hcp nanostructured cobalt microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry, Aliou Hamady [Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, LSPM CNRS UPR 3407, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Laboratoire Chimie des Matériaux, Département de Chimie, Faculté des Sciences et Technique, Université de Nouakchott (Mauritania, Islamic Republic of); Dirras, Guy, E-mail: dirras@unv-paris13.fr [Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, LSPM CNRS UPR 3407, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Schoenstein, Frederic; Tétard, Florent; Jouini, Noureddine [Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, LSPM CNRS UPR 3407, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)

    2014-05-01

    Nanostructured cobalt powders with an average particle size of 50 nm were synthesized using a polyol method and subsequently consolidated by spark plasma sintering (SPS). SPS experiments performed at 650 °C with sintering times ranging from 5 to 45 min under a pressure of 100 MPa, yielded to dense bulk nanostructured cobalt (relative density greater than 97%). X-ray diffraction patterns of the as-prepared powders showed only a face centered cubic (fcc) crystalline phase, whereas the consolidated samples exhibited a mixture of both fcc and hexagonal close packed (hcp) phases. Transmission electron microscopy observations revealed a lamellar substructure with a high density of nanotwins and stacking faults in every grain of the sintered samples. Room temperature compression tests, carried out at a strain rate of 10{sup −3} s{sup −1}, yielded to highest strain to fracture values of up to 5% for sample of holding time of 15 min, which exhibited a yield strength of 1440 MPa, an ultimate strength as high as 1740 MPa and a Young's modulus of 205 GPa. The modulus of elasticity obtained from the nanoindentation tests, ranges from 181 to 218 GPa. The lowest modulus value of 181 GPa was obtained for the sample with the highest sintering time (45 min), which could be related to mass density loss as a consequence of trapped gases releasing. - Highlights: • Co nanopowder (50 nm) was prepared by reduction in polyol medium. • SPS was used to process bulk nanostructured Co specimens. • Microstructures were made of intricate fcc/hcp, along with nanotwins and SFs. • High strengths and moderate compressive ductility were obtained. • Deformation mechanisms related to complex interplay of different length scales.

  11. Fault Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, H.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a range of optimization based approaches to fault diagnosis. A variety of fault diagnosis prob-lems are reformulated in the so-called standard problem setup introduced in the literature on robust control. Once the standard problem formulations are given, the fault diagnosis pr...... problems can be solved by standard optimization tech-niques. The proposed methods include: (1) fault diagnosis (fault estimation, (FE)) for systems with model uncertainties; (2) FE for systems with parametric faults, and (3) FE for a class of nonlinear systems.......This paper presents a range of optimization based approaches to fault diagnosis. A variety of fault diagnosis prob-lems are reformulated in the so-called standard problem setup introduced in the literature on robust control. Once the standard problem formulations are given, the fault diagnosis...

  12. Seismic attribute detection of faults and fluid pathways within an active strike-slip shear zone: New insights from high-resolution 3D P-Cable™ seismic data along the Hosgri Fault, offshore California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluesner, Jared; Brothers, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Poststack data conditioning and neural-network seismic attribute workflows are used to detect and visualize faulting and fluid migration pathways within a 13.7 km2 13.7 km2 3D P-Cable™ seismic volume located along the Hosgri Fault Zone offshore central California. The high-resolution 3D volume used in this study was collected in 2012 as part of Pacific Gas and Electric’s Central California Seismic Imaging Project. Three-dimensional seismic reflection data were acquired using a triple-plate boomer source (1.75 kJ) and a short-offset, 14-streamer, P-Cable system. The high-resolution seismic data were processed into a prestack time-migrated 3D volume and publically released in 2014. Postprocessing, we employed dip-steering (dip and azimuth) and structural filtering to enhance laterally continuous events and remove random noise and acquisition artifacts. In addition, the structural filtering was used to enhance laterally continuous edges, such as faults. Following data conditioning, neural-network based meta-attribute workflows were used to detect and visualize faults and probable fluid-migration pathways within the 3D seismic volume. The workflow used in this study clearly illustrates the utility of advanced attribute analysis applied to high-resolution 3D P-Cable data. For example, results from the fault attribute workflow reveal a network of splayed and convergent fault strands within an approximately 1.3 km wide shear zone that is characterized by distinctive sections of transpressional and transtensional dominance. Neural-network chimney attribute calculations indicate that fluids are concentrated along discrete faults in the transtensional zones, but appear to be more broadly distributed amongst fault bounded anticlines and structurally controlled traps in the transpressional zones. These results provide high-resolution, 3D constraints on the relationships between strike-slip fault mechanics, substrate deformation, and fluid migration along an active

  13. Fabrication of nanoelectromechanical systems via the integration of high surface area glancing angle deposition thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westwood, J. N.; Sauer, V. T. K.; Kwan, J. K.; Hiebert, W. K.; Sit, J. C.

    2014-06-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) coated with a high surface area thin film are fabricated. Glancing angle deposition (GLAD) is used to uniformly deposit high surface area, nanostructured SiO2 films on top of released NEMS. The resonance frequencies and quality factors are measured to assess the potential of the high surface area NEMS for sensing experiments. Resonance frequencies of coated cantilevers, although reduced by mass loading, can be predicted accurately using our derived model. Compressive stress makes the resonance frequencies of coated doubly-clamped beams difficult to predict. The quality factors of the coated NEMS are reduced by one order of magnitude by a quasi-continuous layer at the base of the GLAD film, which also introduces an estimated compressive stress of 5.3-9.3 MPa. The limit of detection is demonstrated to be ˜2 pg cm-2. With this successful proof-of-concept demonstration, we anticipate the future use of these devices as high surface area gravimetric mass sensors for applications such as gas chromatography.

  14. High resolution triple resonance micro magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy of nanoliter sample volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauckmann, J Ole; Janssen, J W G Hans; Kentgens, Arno P M

    2016-02-14

    To be able to study mass-limited samples and small single crystals, a triple resonance micro-magic angle spinning (μMAS) probehead for the application of high-resolution solid-state NMR of nanoliter samples was developed. Due to its excellent rf performance this allows us to explore the limits of proton NMR resolution in strongly coupled solids. Using homonuclear decoupling we obtain unprecedented (1)H linewidths for a single crystal of glycine (Δν(CH2) = 0.14 ppm) at high field (20 T) in a directly detected spectrum. The triple channel design allowed the recording of high-resolution μMAS (13)C-(15)N correlations of [U-(13)C-(15)N] arginine HCl and shows that the superior (1)H resolution opens the way for high-sensitivity inverse detection of heteronuclei even at moderate spinning speeds and rf-fields. Efficient decoupling leads to long coherence times which can be exploited in many correlation experiments.

  15. Structural Load Analysis of a Wind Turbine under Pitch Actuator and Controller Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etemaddar, Mahmoud; Gao, Zhen; Moan, Torgeir

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the characteristics of a wind turbine under blade pitch angle and shaft speed sensor faults as well as pitch actuator faults. A land-based NREL 5MW variable speed pitch reg- ulated wind turbine is considered as a reference. The conventional collective blade pitch angle controller strategy with independent pitch actuators control is used for load reduction. The wind turbine class is IEC-BII. The main purpose is to investigate the severity of end effects on structural loads and responses and consequently identify the high-risk components according to the type and amplitude of fault using a servo-aero-elastic simulation code, HAWC2. Both transient and steady state effects of faults are studied. Such information is useful for wind turbine fault detection and identification as well as system reliability analysis. Results show the effects of faults on wind turbine power output and responses. Pitch sensor faults mainly affects the vibration of shaft main bearing, while generator power and aerodynamic thrust are not changed significantly, due to independent pitch actuator control of three blades. Shaft speed sensor faults can seriously affect the generator power and aerodynamic thrust. Pitch actuator faults can result in fully pitching of the blade, and consequently rotor stops due to negative aerodynamic torque.

  16. Digital map of geologic faults for the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set consists of faults for the High Plains aquifer in the central United States. The High Plains aquifer extends from south of 32 degrees to almost...

  17. High frequency of labral pathology in dysplastic hips with a CE angle between 20-25

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Stig Storgaard; Hartig-Andreasen, Charlotte; Mikkelsen, Lone Rømer

    Background: Hip dysplasia becomes symptomatic due to labral pathology and secondary muscular pain. A CE angle CE angle between 20 and 25 is borderline. Purpose / Aim of Study: We aimed...... to investigate the degree of labral pathology in symptomatic patients with CE between 20 and 25 compared with patients with CE ... with CE angle between 20 and 25 (n=41) 80% had labral pathology (Czerny 1A:2, 1B:1, 2A:7, 2B:3, 3A:15, 3B:5), whereas in the the group with CE angle

  18. High-resolution seismic velocities and shallow structure of the San Andreas fault zone at Middle Mountain, Parkfield, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catchings, R.D.; Rymer, M.J.; Goldman, M.R.; Hole, J.A.; Huggins, R.; Lippus, C.

    2002-01-01

    A 5-km-long, high-resolution seismic imaging survey across the San Andreas fault (SAF) zone and the proposed San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) drill site near Parkfield, California, shows that velocities vary both laterally and vertically. Velocities range from 4.0 km/sec) probably correspond to granitic rock of the Salinian block, which is exposed a few kilometers southwest of the SAF. The depth to the top of probable granitic rock varies laterally along the seismic profile but is about 600 m below the surface at the proposed SAFOD site. We observe a prominent, lateral low-velocity zone (LVZ) beneath and southwest of the surface trace of the SAF. The LVZ is about 1.5 km wide at 300-m depth but tapers to about 600 m wide at 750-m depth. At the maximum depth of the velocity model (750 m), the LVZ is centered approximately 400 m southwest of the surface trace of the SAF. Similar velocities and velocity gradients are observed at comparable depths on both sides of the LVZ, suggesting that the LVZ is anomalous relative to rocks on either side of it. Velocities within the LVZ are lower than those of San Andreas fault gouge, and the LVZ is also anomalous with respect to gravity, magnetic, and resistivity measurements. Because of its proximity to the surface trace of the SAF, it is tempting to suggest that the LVZ represents a zone of fractured crystalline rocks at depth. However, the LVZ instead probably represents a tectonic sliver of sedimentary rock that now rests adjacent to or encompasses the SAF. Such a sliver of sedimentary rock implies fault strands on both sides and possibly within the sliver, suggesting a zone of fault strands at least 1.5 km wide at a depth of 300 m, tapering to about 600 m wide at 750-m depth. Fluids within the sedimentary sliver are probably responsible for observed low-resistivity values.

  19. Progress in small-angle scattering from biological solutions at high-brilliance synchrotrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne T. Tuukkanen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS is an established technique that provides low-resolution structural information on macromolecular solutions. Recent decades have witnessed significant progress in both experimental facilities and in novel data-analysis approaches, making SAXS a mainstream method for structural biology. The technique is routinely applied to directly reconstruct low-resolution shapes of proteins and to generate atomistic models of macromolecular assemblies using hybrid approaches. Very importantly, SAXS is capable of yielding structural information on systems with size and conformational polydispersity, including highly flexible objects. In addition, utilizing high-flux synchrotron facilities, time-resolved SAXS allows analysis of kinetic processes over time ranges from microseconds to hours. Dedicated bioSAXS beamlines now offer fully automated data-collection and analysis pipelines, where analysis and modelling is conducted on the fly. This enables SAXS to be employed as a high-throughput method to rapidly screen various sample conditions and additives. The growing SAXS user community is supported by developments in data and model archiving and quality criteria. This review illustrates the latest developments in SAXS, in particular highlighting time-resolved applications aimed at flexible and evolving systems.

  20. High-resolution 3D reconstruction of microtubule structures by quantitative multi-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Luhong; Wu, Jian; Xiu, Peng; Fan, Jiannan; Hu, Miao; Kuang, Cuifang; Xu, Yingke; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Liu, Xu

    2017-07-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) has been widely used in biomedical research to visualize cellular processes near the cell surface. In this study, a novel multi-angle ring-illuminated TIRFM system, equipped with two galvo mirrors that are on conjugate plan of a 4f optical system was developed. Multi-angle TIRFM generates images with different penetration depths through the controlled variation of the incident angle of illuminating laser. We presented a method to perform three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of microtubules from multi-angle TIRFM images. The performance of our method was validated in simulated microtubules with variable signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and the axial resolution and accuracy of reconstruction were evaluated in selecting different numbers of illumination angles or in different SNR conditions. In U373 cells, we reconstructed the 3-D localization of microtubules near the cell surface with high resolution using over a hundred different angles. Theoretically, the presented TIRFM setup and 3-D reconstruction method can achieve 40 nm axial resolution in experimental conditions where SNR is as low as 2, with 35 different illumination angles. Moreover, our system and reconstruction method have the potential to be used in live cells to track membrane dynamics in 3-D.

  1. Loading Analysis of Modular Multi-level Converter for Offshore High-voltage DC Application under Various Grid Faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Hui; Ma, Ke; Loh, Poh Chiang;

    2016-01-01

    The modular multi-level converter has become an interesting candidate in high-voltage DC systems due to its higher voltage levels and modular construction. Low-voltage ride-through is an important grid requirement for modular multi-level converter–high-voltage DC since not only causes control...... challenges but may also result in overstressed components for the modular multi-level converter. However, the thermal loading of the modular multi-level converter under various grid faults has not yet been clarified. In this article, the power loss and thermal performance of the modular multi-level converter...... during grid voltage dips are studied. The impacts of two typical grid faults to the modular multi-level converter in terms of operating and loading conditions are analytically researched and simulated. It has been found that the operating and loading conditions of the modular multi-level converter under...

  2. Fault Tolerant Message Efficient Coordinator Election Algorithm in High Traffic Bidirectional Ring Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danial Rahdari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays use of distributed systems such as internet and cloud computing is growing dramatically. Coordinator existence in these systems is crucial due to processes coordinating and consistency requirement as well. However the growth makes their election algorithm even more complicated. Too many algorithms are proposed in this area but the two most well known one are Bully and Ring. In this paper we propose a fault tolerant coordinator election algorithm in typical bidirectional ring topology which is twice as fast as Ring algorithm although far fewer messages are passing due to election. Fault tolerance technique is applied which leads the waiting time for the election reaching to zero.

  3. Mercury's radius change estimates revisited using high incidence angle MESSENGER data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Achille, G.; Popa, C.; Massironi, M.; Ferrari, S.; Mazzotta Epifani, E.; Zusi, M.; Cremonese, G.; Palumbo, P.

    2012-04-01

    Estimates of Mercury's radius decrease obtained using the amount of strain recorded by tectonics on the planet range from 0.5 km to 2 km. These latter figures appear too low with respect to the radius contraction (up to 5-6 km) predicted by the most accredited studies based on thermo-mechanical evolution models. For this reason, it has been suggested that there may be hidden strain accommodated by features yet unseen on Mercury. Indeed, as it has been already cautioned by previous studies, the identification of tectonic features on Mercury might be largely biased by the lighting geometry of the used basemaps. This limitation might have affected the results of the extrapolations for estimating the radius change. In this study, we mapped tectonic features at the terminator thus using images acquired at high sun incidence angle (>50°) that represents the optimal condition for their observation. In fact, images with long shadows enhance the topography and texture of the surface and are ideal to detect tectonic structures. This favorable illumination conditions allowed us to infer reliable measurements of spatial distribution (i.e. frequency, orientation, and areal density) of tectonic features which can be used to estimate the average contractional strain and planetary radius decrease. We digitized tectonic structures within a region extending for an area of about 12 million sq. km (~16% of planet's surface). More than 1300 tectonic lineaments were identified and interpreted to be compressional features (i.e. lobate scarps, wrinkle ridges, and high relief ridges) with a total length of more than 12300 km. Assuming that the extensional strain is negligible within the area, the average contractional strain calculated for the survey area is ~0.21-0.28% (~0.24% for θ=30°). This strain, extrapolated to the entire surface, corresponds to a contraction in radius of about 2.5-3.4 km (~2.9 km for θ=30°). Interestingly, the values of contractional strain and radius decrease

  4. Rotor Design for High Pressure Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcu, Romulus VF; Hoyt, David W.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Sears, Jesse A.; Loring, John S.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hu, Jian Z.

    2013-01-01

    High pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with a sample spinning rate exceeding 2.1 kHz and pressure greater than 165 bar has never been realized. In this work, a new sample cell design is reported, suitable for constructing cells of different sizes. Using a 7.5 mm high pressure MAS rotor as an example, internal pressure as high as 200 bar at a sample spinning rate of 6 kHz is achieved. The new high pressure MAS rotor is re-usable and compatible with most commercial NMR set-ups, exhibiting low 1H and 13C NMR background and offering maximal NMR sensitivity. As an example of its many possible applications, this new capability is applied to determine reaction products associated with the carbonation reaction of a natural mineral, antigorite ((Mg,Fe2+)3Si2O5(OH)4), in contact with liquid water in water-saturated supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at 150 bar and 50 deg C. This mineral is relevant to the deep geologic disposal of CO2, but its iron content results in too many sample spinning sidebands at low spinning rate. Hence, this chemical system is a good case study to demonstrate the utility of the higher sample spinning rates that can be achieved by our new rotor design. We expect this new capability will be useful for exploring solid-state, including interfacial, chemistry at new levels of high-pressure in a wide variety of fields.

  5. Rotor design for high pressure magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcu, Romulus V. F.; Hoyt, David W.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Sears, Jesse A.; Loring, John S.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2013-01-01

    High pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with a sample spinning rate exceeding 2.1 kHz and pressure greater than 165 bar has never been realized. In this work, a new sample cell design is reported, suitable for constructing cells of different sizes. Using a 7.5 mm high pressure MAS rotor as an example, internal pressure as high as 200 bar at a sample spinning rate of 6 kHz is achieved. The new high pressure MAS rotor is re-usable and compatible with most commercial NMR set-ups, exhibiting low 1H and 13C NMR background and offering maximal NMR sensitivity. As an example of its many possible applications, this new capability is applied to determine reaction products associated with the carbonation reaction of a natural mineral, antigorite ((Mg,Fe2+)3Si2O5(OH)4), in contact with liquid water in water-saturated supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at 150 bar and 50 °C. This mineral is relevant to the deep geologic disposal of CO2, but its iron content results in too many sample spinning sidebands at low spinning rate. Hence, this chemical system is a good case study to demonstrate the utility of the higher sample spinning rates that can be achieved by our new rotor design. We expect this new capability will be useful for exploring solid-state, including interfacial, chemistry at new levels of high-pressure in a wide variety of fields.

  6. Invited Article: High resolution angle resolved photoemission with tabletop 11 eV laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yu; Vishik, Inna M.; Yi, Ming; Yang, Shuolong; Lee, James J.; Chen, Sudi; Rebec, Slavko N.; Leuenberger, Dominik; Shen, Zhi-Xun [SIMES, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Liu, Zhongkai [SIMES, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Zong, Alfred [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Jefferson, C. Michael; Merriam, Andrew J. [Lumeras LLC, 207 McPherson St, Santa Cruz, California 95060 (United States); Moore, Robert G.; Kirchmann, Patrick S. [SIMES, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We developed a table-top vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser with 113.778 nm wavelength (10.897 eV) and demonstrated its viability as a photon source for high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). This sub-nanosecond pulsed VUV laser operates at a repetition rate of 10 MHz, provides a flux of 2 × 10{sup 12} photons/s, and enables photoemission with energy and momentum resolutions better than 2 meV and 0.012 Å{sup −1}, respectively. Space-charge induced energy shifts and spectral broadenings can be reduced below 2 meV. The setup reaches electron momenta up to 1.2 Å{sup −1}, granting full access to the first Brillouin zone of most materials. Control over the linear polarization, repetition rate, and photon flux of the VUV source facilitates ARPES investigations of a broad range of quantum materials, bridging the application gap between contemporary low energy laser-based ARPES and synchrotron-based ARPES. We describe the principles and operational characteristics of this source and showcase its performance for rare earth metal tritellurides, high temperature cuprate superconductors, and iron-based superconductors.

  7. High-energy spectrum and zenith-angle distribution of atmospheric neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Sinegovsky, S I; Sinegovskaya, T S

    2011-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos, arising from decays of mesons produced through the collisions of cosmic ray particles with air nuclei, form the background in the astrophysical neutrino detection problem. An ambiguity in high-energy behavior of pion and especially kaon production cross sections for nucleon-nucleus collisions may affect essentially the calculated neutrino flux. We present results of the calculation of the energy spectrum and zenith-angle distribution of the muon and electron atmospheric neutrinos in the energy range 10 GeV to 10 PeV. The calculation was performed with usage of known hadronic models (QGSJET-II-03, SIBYLL 2.1, Kimel & Mokhov) for two of the primary spectrum parametrizations, by Gaisser & Honda and by Zatsepin & Sokolskaya. The comparison of the calculated muon neutrino spectrum with the IceCube40 experiment data make it clear that even at energies above 100 TeV the prompt neutrino contribution is not so apparent because of tangled uncertainties of the strange (kaons) and charm...

  8. High-resolution proton scattering off {sup 70}Zn under extreme forward angles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, Andreas; Martin, Dirk; Neumann-Cosel, Peter von; Pietralla, Norbert [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Tamii, Atsushi [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka (Japan); Collaboration: E377-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    A high-resolution scattering experiment was performed with a 295 MeV proton beam at the Research Center of Nuclear Physics in Osaka, Japan. The nucleus {sup 70}Zn has been measured under scattering angles of 0 {sup circle}, 3 {sup circle} and 4.5 {sup circle}. From the angular distributions it is possible to distinguish spin-M1 and E1 response. The spin-M1 response is assumed to be affected by the shell evolution due to the tensor force towards the exotic neutron-rich doubly magic nuclei {sup 78}Ni. The experiments will also provide important information on the evolution of the pygmy dipole resonance with neutron excess by comparison with unstable neutron-rich isotones {sup 68}Ni discovered recently at GSI. During the analysis procedure, ion optical correction methods, drift time to distance conversion, high-resolution corrections and an energy calibration are applied. After the background subtraction, double differential cross sections can be extracted.

  9. Influence of spatial and temporal coherences on atomic resolution high angle annular dark field imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Andreas; Belz, Jürgen; Knaub, Nikolai; Jandieri, Kakhaber; Volz, Kerstin

    2016-10-01

    Aberration-corrected (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) has become a widely used technique when information on the chemical composition is sought on an atomic scale. To extract the desired information, complementary simulations of the scattering process are inevitable. Often the partial spatial and temporal coherences are neglected in the simulations, although they can have a huge influence on the high resolution images. With the example of binary gallium phosphide (GaP) we elucidate the influence of the source size and shape as well as the chromatic aberration on the high angle annular dark field (HAADF) intensity. We achieve a very good quantitative agreement between the frozen phonon simulation and experiment for different sample thicknesses when a Lorentzian source distribution is assumed and the effect of the chromatic aberration is considered. Additionally the influence of amorphous layers introduced by the preparation of the TEM samples is discussed. Taking into account these parameters, the intensity in the whole unit cell of GaP, i.e. at the positions of the different atomic columns and in the region between them, is described correctly. With the knowledge of the decisive parameters, the determination of the chemical composition of more complex, multinary materials becomes feasible.

  10. Dynamic surface measurements on a model helicopter rotor during blade slap at high angles of attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, J. E., Jr.; Harris, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    The modern helicopter offers a unique operational capability to both the public and private sectors. However, the use of the helicopter may become severely limited due to the radiated noise generated by the rotor system. A description is presented of some of the experimental results obtained with a model helicopter rotor in an anechoic wind tunnel with regard to blade stall as a source mechanism of blade slap. Attention is given to dynamic rotor blade surface phenomena and the resulting far field impulsive noise from the model helicopter rotor at high angles of attack and low tip speed. The results of the investigation strongly implicates the boundary layer as playing an important role in blade slap due to blade/vortex interaction (BVI) in a highly loaded rotor. Intermittent stall cannot be ruled out as a possible source mechanism for blade slap. This implies that blade surface characteristics, airfoil shape and local Reynolds number may now be used as tools to reduce the resultant far-field sound pressure levels in helicopters.

  11. Bifurcation analysis and stability design for aircraft longitudinal motion with high angle of attack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Qi; Shi Zhongke

    2015-01-01

    Bifurcation analysis and stability design for aircraft longitudinal motion are investigated when the nonlinearity in flight dynamics takes place severely at high angle of attack regime. To pre-dict the special nonlinear flight phenomena, bifurcation theory and continuation method are employed to systematically analyze the nonlinear motions. With the refinement of the flight dynam-ics for F-8 Crusader longitudinal motion, a framework is derived to identify the stationary bifurca-tion and dynamic bifurcation for high-dimensional system. Case study shows that the F-8 longitudinal motion undergoes saddle node bifurcation, Hopf bifurcation, Zero-Hopf bifurcation and branch point bifurcation under certain conditions. Moreover, the Hopf bifurcation renders ser-ies of multiple frequency pitch oscillation phenomena, which deteriorate the flight control stability severely. To relieve the adverse effects of these phenomena, a stabilization control based on gain scheduling and polynomial fitting for F-8 longitudinal motion is presented to enlarge the flight envelope. Simulation results validate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  12. The 2009MW 6.1 L'Aquila fault system imaged by 64k earthquake locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valoroso, Luisa

    2016-03-01

    On April 6 2009, a MW 6.1 normal-faulting earthquake struck the axial area of the Abruzzo region in central Italy. We investigate the complex architecture and mechanics of the activated fault system by using 64k high-resolution foreshock and aftershock locations. The fault system is composed by two major SW dipping segments forming an en-echelon NW trending system about 50km long: the high-angle L'Aquila fault and the listric Campotosto fault, located in the first 10km depth. From the beginning of 2009, foreshocks activated the deepest portion of the mainshock fault. A week before the MW 6.1 event, the largest (MW 4.0) foreshock triggered seismicity migration along a minor off-fault segment. Seismicity jumped back to the main plane a few hours before the mainshock. High-precision locations allowed us to peer into the fault zone showing complex geological structures from the metre to the kilometre scale, analogous to those observed by field studies and seismic profiles. Also, we were able to investigate important aspects of earthquakes nucleation and propagation through the upper crust in carbonate-bearing rocks such as: the role of fluids in normal-faulting earthquakes; how crustal faults terminate at depths; the key role of fault zone structure in the earthquake rupture evolution processes.

  13. Absence of earthquake correlation with Earth tides: An indication of high preseismic fault stress rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidale, J.E.; Agnew, D.C.; Johnston, M.J.S.; Oppenheimer, D.H.

    1998-01-01

    Because the rate of stress change from the Earth tides exceeds that from tectonic stress accumulation, tidal triggering of earthquakes would be expected if the final hours of loading of the fault were at the tectonic rate and if rupture began soon after the achievement of a critical stress level. We analyze the tidal stresses and stress rates on the fault planes and at the times of 13,042 earthquakes which are so close to the San Andreas and Calaveras faults in California that we may take the fault plane to be known. We find that the stresses and stress rates from Earth tides at the times of earthquakes are distributed in the same way as tidal stresses and stress rates at random times. While the rate of earthquakes when the tidal stress promotes failure is 2% higher than when the stress does not, this difference in rate is not statistically significant. This lack of tidal triggering implies that preseismic stress rates in the nucleation zones of earthquakes are at least 0.15 bar/h just preceding seismic failure, much above the long-term tectonic stress rate of 10-4 bar/h.

  14. Study of blind thrust faults underlying Tokyo and Osaka urban areas using a combination of high-resolution seismic reflection profiling and continuous coring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Miura

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available We acquired high-resolution seismic reflection profiles and continuously cored boreholes to evaluate active flexures produced by major blind thrust fault systems within two densely populated Neogene-Quaternary sedimentary basins in Japan: the Fukaya Fault System near Tokyo in the Kanto Basin and the Uemachi Fault System in the Osaka Basin. The high-resolution seismic reflection survey made clear the length, geometry and growth history of fault-related folds, or flexures formed above the two blind thrusts. Continuously cored boreholes linked with high-resolution seismic profiles enabled us to estimate the uplift rate as defined by shallow stratigraphic horizons and constrain the age of the most recent growth of the flexures during earthquakes on the Fukaya and Uemachi fault systems. Even with the high quality of the data we collected, it is still not possible to exactly constrain the age of the most recent blind thrust earthquake recorded by flexure of these fault-related folds. Data presented in this paper form the basis for future efforts aimed at mechanical and kinematic models for fault growth to evaluate the activity of blind thrusts underlying urban areas.

  15. Society of Automotive Engineers AS4074 family high-speed, fault-tolerant data communications standards for integrated avionics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, John W.

    The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) has been addressing the need for data buses in advanced avionics systems. Since 1979, the SAE has had task groups developing a family of commercial data bus standards designed specifically for the unique fault-tolerant requirements of avionics applications: AS4074.1 linear, token-passing multiplex data bus (LTPB), and AS4074.2 high-speed ring bus (HSRB). The author explains the background of the two bus standards, gives a brief overview of the two protocols, and reviews current and future SAE activities in the avionics data bus field. It is concluded that the SAE LTPB and HSRB satisfy the data latency needs of emerging avionics architectures, as well as the reliability and fault tolerance requirements. Because of their ability to be supplemented with higher data rate versions, they will continue to support emerging avionics architectures.

  16. High-Resolution, Semi-Automatic Fault Mapping Using Umanned Aerial Vehicles and Computer Vision: Mapping from an Armchair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micklethwaite, S.; Vasuki, Y.; Turner, D.; Kovesi, P.; Holden, E.; Lucieer, A.

    2012-12-01

    Our ability to characterise fractures depends upon the accuracy and precision of field techniques, as well as the quantity of data that can be collected. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs; otherwise known as "drones") and photogrammetry, provide exciting new opportunities for the accurate mapping of fracture networks, over large surface areas. We use a highly stable, 8 rotor, UAV platform (Oktokopter) with a digital SLR camera and the Structure-from-Motion computer vision technique, to generate point clouds, wireframes, digital elevation models and orthorectified photo mosaics. Furthermore, new image analysis methods such as phase congruency are applied to the data to semiautomatically map fault networks. A case study is provided of intersecting fault networks and associated damage, from Piccaninny Point in Tasmania, Australia. Outcrops >1 km in length can be surveyed in a single 5-10 minute flight, with pixel resolution ~1 cm. Centimetre scale precision can be achieved when selected ground control points are measured using a total station. These techniques have the potential to provide rapid, ultra-high resolution mapping of fracture networks, from many different lithologies; enabling us to more accurately assess the "fit" of observed data relative to model predictions, over a wide range of boundary conditions.igh resolution DEM of faulted outcrop (Piccaninny Point, Tasmania) generated using the Oktokopter UAV (inset) and photogrammetric techniques.

  17. Dynamic weakening of fault gouge affected by thermal conductivity of host specimen: implications for the high-velocity weakening mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lu; Ma, Shengli; Shimamoto, Toshihiko; Niemeijer, André

    2015-04-01

    Since many high-velocity weakening mechanisms are thermal in origin, we study the effects of thermal conductivity of host specimen on fault gouge friction behavior at seismic slip rates. By using host specimens made of brass, stainless steel, Ti-Al-V alloy and gabbro with thermal conductivities of 123, 15, 5.8 and 3.25 W/m/K, respectively, the experiments in this study produce completely different temperature conditions within the same gouge under the same slip rates and normal stresses. Fault gouges used in the experiments are a natural illite- and quartz-rich gouge from Longmenshan fault zone and pure periclase (MgO) nanopowder. High-velocity weakening of gouges were more pronounced with decreasing thermal conductivity of the specimens. Particularly, almost no dynamic weakening was observed in the tests performed with brass host specimens, while tests with specimens of gabbro and Ti-Al-V alloy exhibits quite similar dramatic weakening behaviors. Such differences in gouge frictional behavior cannot be explained by original flash heating model, since asperity contacts within the slip zone and experimental conditions are still same, even though host specimens are different. Microstructure observations under scanning and transmission electron microscopes reveal that slip zone materials tend to change from individual ultrafine nanograins to larger sintered grains or aggregates, with decreasing thermal conductivities of host specimens. Calculated temperature together with observed microstructure indicate that bulk temperature rise may be also play an important role in fault weakening, as predicted by a recent theoretical analysis of the role of flash heating within the gouge zone [Proctor et al., 2014]. Current results demonstrate the importance of frictional heating in causing the dynamic weakening of gouge, and the powder lubrication hypothesis is not consistent with our experimental data.

  18. Nodal Quasiparticle Meltdown in Ultra-High Resolution Pump-Probe Angle-Resolved Photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, Jeff; Jozwiak, Chris; Smallwood, Chris L.; Eisaki, H.; Kaindl, Robert A.; Lee, Dung-Hai; Lanzara, Alessandra

    2011-06-03

    High-T{sub c} cuprate superconductors are characterized by a strong momentum-dependent anisotropy between the low energy excitations along the Brillouin zone diagonal (nodal direction) and those along the Brillouin zone face (antinodal direction). Most obvious is the d-wave superconducting gap, with the largest magnitude found in the antinodal direction and no gap in the nodal direction. Additionally, while antin- odal quasiparticle excitations appear only below T{sub c}, superconductivity is thought to be indifferent to nodal excitations as they are regarded robust and insensitive to T{sub c}. Here we reveal an unexpected tie between nodal quasiparticles and superconductivity using high resolution time- and angle-resolved photoemission on optimally doped Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} . We observe a suppression of the nodal quasiparticle spectral weight following pump laser excitation and measure its recovery dynamics. This suppression is dramatically enhanced in the superconducting state. These results reduce the nodal-antinodal dichotomy and challenge the conventional view of nodal excitation neutrality in superconductivity. The electronic structures of high-Tc cuprates are strongly momentum-dependent. This is one reason why the momentum-resolved technique of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has been a central tool in the field of high-temperature superconductivity. For example, coherent low energy excitations with momenta near the Brillouin zone face, or antinodal quasiparticles (QPs), are only observed below T{sub c} and have been linked to superfluid density. They have therefore been the primary focus of ARPES studies. In contrast, nodal QPs, with momenta along the Brillouin zone diagonal, have received less attention and are usually regarded as largely immune to the superconducting transition because they seem insensitive to perturbations such as disorder, doping, isotope exchange, charge ordering, and temperature. Clearly

  19. Nodal Quasiparticle Meltdown in Ultra-High Resolution Pump-Probe Angle-Resolved Photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, Jeff; Jozwiak, Chris; Smallwood, Chris L.; Eisaki, H.; Kaindl, Robert A.; Lee, Dung-Hai; Lanzara, Alessandra

    2011-06-03

    High-T{sub c} cuprate superconductors are characterized by a strong momentum-dependent anisotropy between the low energy excitations along the Brillouin zone diagonal (nodal direction) and those along the Brillouin zone face (antinodal direction). Most obvious is the d-wave superconducting gap, with the largest magnitude found in the antinodal direction and no gap in the nodal direction. Additionally, while antin- odal quasiparticle excitations appear only below T{sub c}, superconductivity is thought to be indifferent to nodal excitations as they are regarded robust and insensitive to T{sub c}. Here we reveal an unexpected tie between nodal quasiparticles and superconductivity using high resolution time- and angle-resolved photoemission on optimally doped Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} . We observe a suppression of the nodal quasiparticle spectral weight following pump laser excitation and measure its recovery dynamics. This suppression is dramatically enhanced in the superconducting state. These results reduce the nodal-antinodal dichotomy and challenge the conventional view of nodal excitation neutrality in superconductivity. The electronic structures of high-Tc cuprates are strongly momentum-dependent. This is one reason why the momentum-resolved technique of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has been a central tool in the field of high-temperature superconductivity. For example, coherent low energy excitations with momenta near the Brillouin zone face, or antinodal quasiparticles (QPs), are only observed below T{sub c} and have been linked to superfluid density. They have therefore been the primary focus of ARPES studies. In contrast, nodal QPs, with momenta along the Brillouin zone diagonal, have received less attention and are usually regarded as largely immune to the superconducting transition because they seem insensitive to perturbations such as disorder, doping, isotope exchange, charge ordering, and temperature. Clearly

  20. High Resolution Angle Resolved Photoemission with Tabletop 11eV Laser

    CERN Document Server

    He, Yu; Yi, Ming; Yang, Shuolong; Liu, Zhongkai; Lee, James; Chen, Sudi; Rebec, Slavko; Leuenberger, Dominik; Zong, Alfred; Jefferson, Michael; Moore, Robert; Kirchmann, Patrick; Merriam, Andrew; Shen, Zhixun

    2015-01-01

    We developed a table-top vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser with $113.778$nm wavelength (10.897eV) and demonstrated its viability as a photon source for high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). This sub-nanosecond pulsed VUV laser operates at a repetition rate of 10MHz, provides a flux of 2$\\times$10$^{12}$ photons/second, and enables photoemission with energy and momentum resolutions better than 2meV and 0.012\\AA$^{-1}$, respectively. Space-charge induced energy shifts and spectral broadenings can be reduced below 2meV. The setup reaches electron momenta up to 1.2\\AA$^{-1}$, granting full access to the first Brillouin zone of most materials. Control over the linear polarization, repetition rate, and photon flux of the VUV source facilitates ARPES investigations of a broad range of quantum materials, bridging the application gap between contemporary low energy laser-based ARPES and synchrotron-based ARPES. We describe the principles and operational characteristics of this source, and sho...

  1. Towards weighing individual atoms by high-angle scattering of electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argentero, G.; Mangler, C.; Kotakoski, J.; Eder, F.R.; Meyer, J.C., E-mail: Jannik.Meyer@univie.ac.at

    2015-04-15

    We consider theoretically the energy loss of electrons scattered to high angles when assuming that the primary beam can be limited to a single atom. We discuss the possibility of identifying the isotopes of light elements and of extracting information about phonons in this signal. The energy loss is related to the mass of the much heavier nucleus, and is spread out due to atomic vibrations. Importantly, while the width of the broadening is much larger than the energy separation of isotopes, only the shift in the peak positions must be detected if the beam is limited to a single atom. We conclude that the experimental case will be challenging but is not excluded by the physical principles as far as considered here. Moreover, the initial experiments demonstrate that the separation of gold and carbon based on a signal that is related to their mass, rather than their atomic number. - Highlights: • We explore how energy loss spectroscopy could be used to obtain information about the mass, rather than the charge, of atoms. • The dose and precision that would be needed to distinguish between the two isotopes of carbon, C12 and C13, is estimated. • Signal broadening due to phonons is included in the calculation. • Initial experiments show the separation between gold and carbon based on their mass rather than charge.

  2. High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission investigation of potassium and phosphate tungsten bronzes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Sanhita; Kumari, Spriha; Raj, Satyabrata, E-mail: raj@iiserkol.ac.in

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Electronic structure of potassium and phosphate tungsten bronzes. • Origin of transport anomalies in bronzes. • Flat segments of Fermi surfaces are connected by a nesting vector, q. • Nesting driven charge-density wave is responsible for the anomalies. - Abstract: We have performed high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and density functional ab initio theoretical calculation to study the electronic structure of potassium (K{sub 0.25}WO{sub 3}) and phosphate (P{sub 4}W{sub 12}O{sub 44}) tungsten bronzes. We have experimentally determined the band dispersions and Fermi surface topology of these bronzes and compared with our theoretical calculations and a fair agreement has been seen between them. Our experimental as well as theoretical investigation elucidates the origin of transport anomalies in these bronzes. The Fermi surfaces of these bronzes consist of flat patches, which can be connected with each other by a constant nesting wave vector, q. The scattering wave vectors found from diffraction measurements match with these nesting vectors and the anomalies in the transport properties of these bronzes can be well explained by the evolution of charge-density wave with a partial nesting between the flat segments of the Fermi surfaces.

  3. Direct angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy and superconductivity of strained high-c films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Davor Pavuna; Daniel Ariosa; Dominique Cloetta; Claudia Cancellieri; Mike Abrecht

    2008-02-01

    Since 1997 we systematically perform direct angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) on in-situ grown thin (< 30 nm) cuprate films. Specifically, we probe low-energy electronic structure and properties of high-c superconductors (HTSC) under different degrees of epitaxial (compressive vs. tensile) strain. In overdoped and underdoped in-plane compressed (the strain is induced by the choice of substrate) ≃ 15 nm thin La2-SrCuO4 (LSCO) films we almost double c to 40 K, from 20 K and 24 K, respectively. Yet the Fermi surface (FS) remains essentially two-dimensional. In contrast, ARPES data under tensile strain exhibit the dispersion that is three-dimensional, yet c drastically decreases. It seems that the in-plane compressive strain tends to push the apical oxygen far away from the CuO2 plane, enhances the two-dimensional character of the dispersion and increases c, while the tensile strain acts in the opposite direction and the resulting dispersion is three-dimensional. We have established the shape of the FS for both cases, and all our data are consistent with other ongoing studies, like EXAFS. As the actual lattice of cuprates is like a `Napoleon-cake', i.e. rigid CuO2 planes alternating with softer `reservoir', that distort differently under strain, our data rule out all oversimplified two-dimensional (rigid lattice) mean field models. The work is still in progress on optimized La-doped Bi-2201 films with enhanced c.

  4. High angle of attack: Forebody flow physics and design emphasizing directional stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, R.

    A framework for understanding the fundamental physics of flowfields over forebody type shapes at low speed, high angle of attack conditions with special emphasis on sideslip has been established. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been used to study flowfieids over experimentally investigated forebodies: the Lamont tangent-ogive forebody, the F-5A forebody and the Erickson chine forebody. A modified version of a current advanced code, CFL3D, was used to solve the Euler and thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. The Navier-Stokes equations used a form of the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model modified to account for massive crossflow separation. Using the insight provided by the solutions obtained using CFD, together with comparison with limited available data, the aerodynamics of forebodies with positive directional stability has been revealed. An unconventional way of presenting the results is used to illustrate how a positive contribution to directional stability arises. Based on this new understanding, a parametric study was then conducted to determine which shapes promote a positive contribution to directional stability. The effect of cross-sectional shape on directional stability was found to be very significant. Broad chine-shaped cross-sections were found to promote directional stability. Also, directional stability is improved if the chine is placed closer to the top of the cross-section. Planform shapes also played an important role in determining the forebody directional stability characteristics. This initial parametric study has been used to propose some guidelines for aerodynamic design to promote positive directional stability.

  5. High tip angle approximation based on a modified Bloch-Riccati equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulant, Nicolas; Hoult, David I

    2012-02-01

    When designing a radio-frequency pulse to produce a desired dependence of magnetization on frequency or position, the small flip angle approximation is often used as a first step, and a Fourier relation between pulse and transverse magnetization is then invoked. However, common intuition often leads to linear scaling of the resulting pulse so as to produce a larger flip angle than the approximation warrants--with surprisingly good results. Starting from a modified version of the Bloch-Riccati equation, a differential equation in the flip angle itself, rather than in magnetization, is derived. As this equation has a substantial linear component that is an instance of Fourier's equation, the intuitive approach is seen to be justified. Examples of the accuracy of this higher tip angle approximation are given for both constant- and variable-phase pulses.

  6. Fault Monitooring and Fault Recovery Control for Position Moored Tanker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Shaoji; Blanke, Mogens

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses fault tolerant control for position mooring of a shuttle tanker operating in the North Sea. A complete framework for fault diagnosis is presented but the loss of a sub-sea mooring line buoyancy element is given particular attention, since this fault could lead to line breakage...... algorithm is proposed to accommodate buoyancy element failure and keep the mooring system in a safe state. Detection properties and fault-tolerant control are demonstrated by high delity simulations...

  7. Methods for calculating the transonic boundary layer separation for V/STOL inlets at high incidence angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, D. C.; Lee, H. C.; Luidens, R. W.; Stockman, N. O.

    1978-01-01

    A semi-empirical scheme for the prediction of transonic pressure distribution on the surface of V/STOL inlets at high incidence angles has been developed. The investigation is intended to improve the boundary layer calculation and separation prediction by including the effects of shock wave-boundary layer interaction into the Lewis Inlet Viscous Computer Program. Wind-tunnel results and theoretical pressure calculation for critical cases are used in constructing the transonic pressure distribution. The program, which describes the development of the boundary layer and predicts the possible flow separation, can handle the cases of inlets at high incidence angles where local supersonic region may occur in the flow.

  8. ANÁLISIS EN EL PLANO R-X PARA LOCALIZAR FALLAS DE ALTA IMPEDANCIA R-X AXIS ANALYSIS TO LOCATE HIGH IMPEDANCE FAULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán Andrés Morales-España

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo propone una herramienta de análisis en el plano R-X de un sistema en falla para resolver el problema de localización de fallas en sistemas de potencia. La herramienta permite localizar todo tipo de fallas incluidas las de alta impedancia y fallas en sistemas con sobrecarga. Metodológicamente, se analiza el plano R-X de la impedancia aparente de las fases involucradas en la falla, y utilizando interpolación bidimensional se logra la ubicación de la falla a partir de curvas de distancia previamente obtenidas del sistema mediante simulación. Como resultados se presentan pruebas en un sistema de referencia sometido a los cuatro tipos de falla con diversas resistencias localizadas en diferentes sitios dentro del sistema, resaltándose la obtención de errores inferiores al 3% para fallas monofásicas y resistencia de falla hasta 1000[Ω].This paper proposes an analysis tool using the R-X axis of a faulted system to solve the fault location problem in power systems. The proposed approach allows locating all types of faults including high impedance ones and faults on overload systems. Methodologically, the apparent impedance R-X axis of faulted phases is analyzed and the fault is located from distance curves, previously obtained from the power system, by using two-dimensional interpolation. As results, tests of a reference system with four types of faults and different fault resistances located on different places on the system are presented. Errors are kept lower than 3% for single phase faults and fault resistances up to 1000[Ω].

  9. Fault-rock Magnetism from Wenchuan earthquake Fault Scientific Drilling project (WFSD) Implies the Different Slip Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D.; Li, H.; Lee, T. Q.; Sun, Z.

    2015-12-01

    The 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan Earthquake had caused great human and financial loss, and it had induced two major earthquake surface rupture zones, including the Yingxiu-Beichuan earthquake fault (Y-B F.) and Guanxian-Anxian earthquake fault (G-A F.) earthquake surface rupture zones. After main shock, the Wenchuan earthquake Fault Scientific Drilling project (WFSD) was co-organized by the Ministry of Science and Technology, Ministry of Land and Resources and China Bureau of Seismology, and this project focused on earthquake fault mechanics, earthquake slip process, fault physical and chemical characteristics, mechanical behavior, fluid behavior, fracture energy, and so on. Fault-rocks magnetism is an effective method for the earthquake fault research, such as earthquake slip dynamics. In this study, the fault-rocks from the drilling-hole cores and close to the Wenchuan Earthquake surface rupture zone were used to do the rock-magnetism and discuss the earthquake slip dynamics. The measurement results of magnetic susceptibility (MS) show that the relative high or low MS values are corresponded to the fault-rocks from the Y-B F. and G-A F., respectively. Other rock-magnetism gives more evidence to the magnetic mineral assemblage of fault-rocks from the two earthquake fault zones. The relative high MS in the drilling-holes and trench along the Y-B F. was caused by the new-formed ferrimagnetic minerals during the high temperature and rapid speed earthquake slip process, such as magnetite and hematite, so the Y-B F. had experienced high temperature and rapid speed thermal pressurization earthquake slip mechanism. The relative low MS in the trench along the G-A F. was possible caused by high content of Fe-sulfides, and the G-A F. had possibly experienced the low temperature and slow speed mechanical lubrication earthquake slip mechanism. The different earthquake slip mechanism was possibly controlled by the deep structure of the two earthquake faults, such as the fault

  10. Operating Circuit Fault Diagnosis of High Voltage Circuit Breaker%高压断路器操作回路的故障诊断

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵红宇; 龙树峰

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes and studies the fault diagnosis operation requirements of high voltage circuit breaker operation circuit and the fault diagnosis method of high voltage circuit breaker.%本文对高压断路器操作回路的故障诊断操作要求和高压断路器操作回路的故障诊断方法进行了分析和研究。

  11. Investigating the deformation of upper crustal faults at the N-Chilean convergent plate boundary at different scales using high-resolution topography datasets and creepmeter measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewiak, O.; Victor, P.; Ziegenhagen, T.; Oncken, O.

    2012-04-01

    The Chilean convergent plate boundary is one of the tectonically most active regions on earth and prone to large megathrust earthquakes as e. g. the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake which ruptured a mature seismic gap in south-central Chile. In northern Chile historical data suggests the existence of a seismic gap between Arica and Mejillones Peninsula (MP), which has not ruptured since 1877. Further south, the 1995 Mw 8.0 Antofagasta earthquake ruptured the subduction interface between MP and Taltal. In this study we investigate the deformation at four active upper plate faults (dip-slip and strike-slip) located above the coupling zone of the subduction interface. The target faults (Mejillones Fault - MF, Salar del Carmen Fault - SCF, Cerro Fortuna Fault - CFF, Chomache Fault - CF) are situated in forearc segments, which are in different stages of the megathrust seismic cycle. The main question of this study is how strain is accumulated in the overriding plate, what is the response of the target faults to the megathrust seismic cycle and what are the mechanisms / processes involved. The hyper arid conditions of the Atacama desert and the extremely low erosion rates enable us to investigate geomorphic markers, e .g. fault scarps and knickpoints, which serve as a record for upper crustal deformation and fault activity about ten thousands years into the past. Fault scarp data has been acquired with Differential-GPS by measuring high-resolution topographic profiles perpendicular to the fault scarps and along incised gullies. The topographic data show clear variations between the target faults which possibly result from their position within the forearc. The surveyed faults, e. g. the SCF, exhibit clear along strike variations in the morphology of surface ruptures attributed to seismic events and can be subdivided into individual segments. The data allows us to distinguish single, composite and multiple fault scarps and thus to detect differences in fault growth initiated

  12. Optimal Design of the Absolute Positioning Sensor for a High-Speed Maglev Train and Research on Its Fault Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies an absolute positioning sensor for a high-speed maglev train and its fault diagnosis method. The absolute positioning sensor is an important sensor for the high-speed maglev train to accomplish its synchronous traction. It is used to calibrate the error of the relative positioning sensor which is used to provide the magnetic phase signal. On the basis of the analysis for the principle of the absolute positioning sensor, the paper describes the design of the sending and rece...

  13. Direct angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy and superconductivity of strained high-Tc films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavuna, Davor; Ariosa, Daniel; Cloetta, Dominique; Cancellieri, Claudia; Abrecht, Mike

    2008-02-01

    Since 1997 we systematically perform direct angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) on in-situ grown thin (<30 nm) cuprate films. Specifically, we probe low-energy electronic structure and properties of high-T_{c} superconductors (HTSC) under different degrees of epitaxial ({compressive vs. tensile}) strain. In overdoped and underdoped in-plane compressed (the strain is induced by the choice of substrate) ≈15 nm thin La_{2-x}Sr_{x}CuO_{4} (LSCO) films we almost double T_{c} to 40 K, from 20 K and 24 K, respectively. Yet the Fermi surface (FS) remains essentially two-dimensional. In contrast, ARPES data under {tensile} strain exhibit the dispersion that is three-dimensional, yet T_{c} drastically decreases. It seems that the in-plane compressive strain tends to push the apical oxygen far away from the CuO_{2} plane, enhances the two-dimensional character of the dispersion and increases T_{c}, while the tensile strain acts in the opposite direction and the resulting dispersion is three-dimensional. We have established the shape of the FS for both cases, and all our data are consistent with other ongoing studies, like EXAFS. As the actual lattice of cuprates is like a `Napoleon-cake', i.e. rigid CuO_{2 } planes alternating with softer `reservoir', that distort differently under strain, our data rule out all oversimplified two-dimensional (rigid lattice) mean field models. The work is still in progress on optimized La-doped Bi-2201 films with enhanced T_{c}.

  14. An experimental study of an airfoil with a bio-inspired leading edge device at high angles of attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandadzhiev, Boris A.; Lynch, Michael K.; Chamorro, Leonardo P.; Wissa, Aimy A.

    2017-09-01

    Robust and predictable aerodynamic performance of unmanned aerial vehicles at the limits of their design envelope is critical for safety and mission adaptability. Deployable aerodynamic surfaces from the wing leading or trailing edges are often used to extend the aerodynamic envelope (e.g. slats and flaps). Birds have also evolved feathers at the leading edge (LE) of their wings, known as the alula, which enables them to perform high angles of attack maneuvers. In this study, a series of wind tunnel experiments are performed to quantify the effect of various deployment parameters of an alula-like LE device on the aerodynamic performance of a cambered airfoil (S1223) at stall and post stall conditions. The alula relative angle of attack, measured from the mean chord of the airfoil, is varied to modulate tip-vortex strength, while the alula deflection angle is varied to modulate the distance between the tip vortex and the wing surface. Integrated lift force measurements were collected at various alula-inspired device configurations. The effect of the alula-inspired device on the boundary layer velocity profile and turbulence intensity were investigated through hot-wire anemometer measurements. Results show that as alula deflection angle increases, the lift coefficient also increase especially at lower alula relative angles of attack. Moreover, at post stall wing angles of attack, the wake velocity deficit is reduced in the presence of alula device, confirming the mitigation of the wing adverse pressure gradient. The results are in strong agreement with measurements taken on bird wings showing delayed flow reversal and extended range of operational angles of attack. An engineered alula-inspired device has the potential to improve mission adaptability in small unmanned air vehicles during low Reynolds number flight.

  15. Delayed detached eddy simulations of fighter aircraft at high angle of attack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guoliang Xu; Xiong Jiang; Gang Liu

    2016-01-01

    The massively separated flows over a realistic air-craft configuration at 40◦, 50◦, and 60◦angles of attack are studied using the delayed detached eddy simulation (DDES). The calculations are carried out at experimental conditions corresponding to a mean aerodynamic chord-based Reynolds number of 8.93 × 105 and Mach number of 0.088. The influ-ence of the grid size is investigated using two grids, 20.0×106 cells and 31.0 × 106 cells. At the selected conditions, the lift, drag, and pitching moment from DDES predictions agree with the experimental data better than that from the Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes. The effect of angle of attack on the flow structure over the general aircraft is also studied, and it is found that the dominated frequency associated with the vortex shedding process decreases with increasing angle of attack.

  16. Correlation of geothermal springs with sub-surface fault terminations revealed by high-resolution, UAV-acquired magnetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glen, Jonathan; A.E. Egger,; C. Ippolito,; N.Athens,

    2013-01-01

    There is widespread agreement that geothermal springs in extensional geothermal systems are concentrated at fault tips and in fault interaction zones where porosity and permeability are dynamically maintained (Curewitz and Karson, 1997; Faulds et al., 2010). Making these spatial correlations typically involves geological and geophysical studies in order to map structures and their relationship to springs at the surface. Geophysical studies include gravity and magnetic surveys, which are useful for identifying buried, intra-basin structures, especially in areas where highly magnetic, dense mafic volcanic rocks are interbedded with, and faulted against less magnetic, less dense sedimentary rock. High-resolution magnetic data can also be collected from the air in order to provide continuous coverage. Unmanned aerial systems (UAS) are well-suited for conducting these surveys as they can provide uniform, low-altitude, high-resolution coverage of an area without endangering crew. In addition, they are more easily adaptable to changes in flight plans as data are collected, and improve efficiency. We have developed and tested a new system to collect magnetic data using small-platform UAS. We deployed this new system in Surprise Valley, CA, in September, 2012, on NASA's SIERRA UAS to perform a reconnaissance survey of the entire valley as well as detailed surveys in key transition zones. This survey has enabled us to trace magnetic anomalies seen in ground-based profiles along their length. Most prominent of these is an intra-basin magnetic high that we interpret as a buried, faulted mafic dike that runs a significant length of the valley. Though this feature lacks surface expression, it appears to control the location of geothermal springs. All of the major hot springs on the east side of the valley lie along the edge of the high, and more specifically, at structural transitions where the high undergoes steps, bends, or breaks. The close relationship between the springs

  17. The TR method: A new graphical method that uses the slip preference of the faults to separate heterogeneous fault-slip data in extensional and compressional stress regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranos, Markos

    2013-04-01

    stress regimes into "real" and "hybrid" ones. The "real" compressional regimes are the RC, RC-PC and PC, where the activated faults dip at angles up to 50° and their slip deviation from the reverse activation is no more than 30°. The "hybrid" compressional stress regimes are PC-TRP and TRP, where the activated faults can dip with even higher angles than 50° and their slip deviation from the reverse activation increases with the dip angle and the decrease of the stress ratio. In these stress regimes, the steeply dipping faults behave as contractional oblique strike-slip and strike-slip faults when their dip direction shifts at high angles away from the σ1 trend. Examples of the application of the TR method indicate that the method not only succeeds in separating heterogeneous fault-slip data into homogeneous groups, but it can (a) distinguish stress regimes whose horizontal principal stress axes trend close to each other, (b) distinguish faults driven by either tectonic or magmatic stresses, e.g., along the South Aegean Volcanic Arc, and (c) partition the contemporary stress regime related with the plate convergence between the Philippines Sea and Eurasia due to the different orientation of the activated structures, e.g., the inherited N-S striking Chelungpu Thrust and NE-SW striking Shihkang-Shangchi fault zone that have been activated during the 1999 Chi Chi earthquake, Taiwan.

  18. Size and shape of the repetitive domain of high molecular weight wheat gluten proteins. 1. Small angle neutron scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egelhaaf, SU; van Swieten, E; Bosma, T; de Boef, E; van Dijk, AA; Robillard, GT; Egelhaaf, Stefan U.

    2003-01-01

    The solution structure of the central repetitive domain of high molecular weight (HMW) wheat gluten proteins has been investigated for a range of concentrations and temperatures using mainly small-angle neutron scattering. A representative part of the repetitive domain (dBl) was studied as well as a

  19. Pyrometamorphism of Fault Zone Rocks Induced by Frictional Heating in High-velocity Friction Tests: Reliable Records of Seismic Slip?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ree, J.; Ando, J.; Kim, J.; Han, R.; Shimamoto, T.

    2008-12-01

    Recognition of seismic slip zone is important for a better understanding of earthquake generation processes in fault zones and paleoseismology. However, there has been no reliable record of ancient seismic slip except pseudotachylyte. Recently, it has been suggested that decomposition (dehydration or decarbonation) products due to frictional heating can be used as a seismic slip record. The decomposition products, however, can be easily rehydrated or recarbonated with pervasive fluid migration in the fault zone after seismic slip, raising some question about their stability as a seismic slip record. Here, we review microstructural and mineralogical changes of the simulated fault zones induced by frictional heating (pyrometamorphism) from high-velocity friction tests (HVFT) on siltstone, sandstone and carbonates at seismic slip rates, and discuss on their stability after seismic slip. HVFT on siltstone generates pseuodotachylyte in the principal slip zone (0.30-0.75 mm thick) with 'damage' layer (0.1-0.2 mm thick) along its margins. Chlorite in the damage layer suffers an incipient dehydration with many voids (0.2-1.0 μm in diameter) in transmission electron microscopy (TEM), appearing as dark tiny spots both in plane-polarized light and back-scattered electron (BSE) photomicrographs. HVFT on brown sandstone induces a color change of wall rocks adjacent to the principal slip zone (brown to red) due to the dehydration of iron hydroxides with frictional heating. These dehydration products in siltstone and sandstone due to frictional heating may be unstable since they would be easily rehydrated with fluid infiltration after a seismic slip. HVFT on carbonates including Carrara marble and siderite-bearing gouges produces decarbonation products of nano-scale lime (CaO) and magnetite (Fe3O4), respectively. Lime is a very unstable phase whereas magnetite is a stable and thus may be used as an indicator of seismic slip. The simulated fault zones of Carrara marble contain

  20. Transient fluvial incision as an indicator of active faulting and surface uplift in the Moroccan High Atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulton, Sarah; Stokes, Martin; Mather, Anne

    2013-04-01

    Quantifying the extent to which geomorphic features can be used to extract tectonic signals is a key challenge for the Earth Sciences. Here, we analyse the long profiles of rivers that drain southwards across the Southern Atlas Fault (SAF), a segmented thrust fault that forms the southern margin of the High Atlas Mountains in Morocco, with the aim of deriving new data on the recent activity of this little known fault system. River long profiles were extracted for the 32 major rivers that drain southwards into the Ouarzazate foreland basin. Of these, twelve exhibit concave-up river profiles with a mean concavity (Θ) of 0.61 and normalized steepness indices (Ksn) in the range 42-219; these are interpreted as rivers at or near steady-state. By contrast, 20 rivers are characterised by the presence of at least one knickpoint upstream of the thrust front. Knickzone height (the vertical distance between the knickpoint and the fault) varies from 100 - 1300 m, with calculated amounts of uplift at the range bounding fault ranging from 1040 - 80 m. In map view, knickpoint locations generally plot along sub-parallel lines to the thrust front and there are no obvious relationships with specific lithological units or boundaries. Furthermore, drainage areas upstream of the knickpoints range over several orders of magnitude indicating that they are not pinned at threshold drainage areas. Therefore, these features are interpreted as a transient response to base-level change. However, three distinct populations of knickpoints can be recognised based upon knickpoint elevation, these are termed K1, K2 and K3 and channel reaches are universally steeper below knickpoints than above. K1 and K2 knickpoints share common characteristics in that the elevation of the knickpoints, calculated incision and ksn all increase from west to east. Whereas, K3 knickpoints show little systematic variation along the range front, are observed at the lowest altitudes with calculated incision of < 200 m

  1. Multidisciplinary approach for fault detection: Integration of PS-InSAR, geomorphological, stratigraphic and structural data in the Venafro intermontane basin (Central-Southern Apennines, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Vincenzo; Aucelli, Pietro P. C.; Bellucci Sessa, Eliana; Cesarano, Massimo; Incontri, Pietro; Pappone, Gerardo; Valente, Ettore; Vilardo, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    A multidisciplinary methodology, integrating stratigraphic, geomorphological and structural data, combined with GIS-aided analysis and PS-InSAR interferometric data, was applied to characterize the relationships between ground deformations and the stratigraphic and the morphostructural setting of the Venafro intermontane basin. This basin is a morphostructural depression related to NW-SE and NE-SW oriented high angle normal faults bordering and crossing it. In particular, a well-known active fault crossing the plain is the Aquae Juliae Fault, whose recent activity is evidenced by archeoseismological data. The approach applied here reveals new evidence of possible faulting, acting during the Lower to Upper Pleistocene, which has driven the morphotectonic and the environmental evolution of the basin. In particular, the tectonic setting emerging from this study highlights the influence of the NW-SE oriented extensional phase during the late Lower Pleistocene - early Middle Pleistocene, in the generation of NE-SW trending, SE dipping, high-angle faults and NW-SE trending, high-angle transtensive faults. This phase has been followed by a NE-SW extensional one, responsible for the formation of NW-SE trending, both NW and SE dipping, high-angle normal faults, and the reactivation of the oldest NE-SW oriented structures. These NW-SE trending normal faults include the Aquae Juliae Fault and a new one, unknown until now, crossing the plain between the Venafro village and the Colle Cupone Mt. (hereinafter named the Venafro-Colle Cupone Fault, VCCF). This fault has controlled deposition of the youngest sedimentary units (late Middle Pleistocene to late Upper Pleistocene) suggesting its recent activity and it is well constrained by PS-InSAR data, as testified by the increase of the subsidence rate in the hanging wall block.

  2. Statistical Contact Angle Analyses with the High-Precision Drop Shape Analysis (HPDSA Approach: Basic Principles and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Heib

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Surface science, which includes the preparation, development and analysis of surfaces and coatings, is essential in both fundamental and applied as well as in engineering and industrial research. Contact angle measurements using sessile drop techniques are commonly used to characterize coated surfaces or surface modifications. Well-defined surfaces structures at both nanoscopic and microscopic level can be achieved but the reliable characterization by means of contact angle measurements and their interpretation often remains an open question. Thus, we focused our research effort on one main problem of surface science community, which is the determination of correct and valid definitions and measurements of contact angles. In this regard, we developed the high-precision drop shape analysis (HPDSA, which involves a complex transformation of images from sessile drop experiments to Cartesian coordinates and opens up the possibility of a physically meaningful contact angle calculation. To fulfill the dire need for a reproducible contact angle determination/definition, we developed three easily adaptable statistical analyses procedures. In the following, the basic principles of HPDSA will be explained and applications of HPDSA will be illustrated. Thereby, the unique potential of this analysis approach will be illustrated by means of selected examples.

  3. 'Abnormal' angle response curves of TW/Rs for near zero tilt and high tilt channeling implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Baonian; Gossmann, Hans-Joachim; Toh, Terry; Colombeau, Benjamin; Todorov, Stan; Sinclair, Frank; Shim, Kyu-Ha; Henry, Todd [Applied Materials - Varian Semiconductor Equipment, 35 Dory Road, Gloucester, MA 01930 (United States)

    2012-11-06

    Angle control has been widely accepted as the key requirement for ion implantation in semiconductor device processing. From an ion implanter point of view, the incident ion direction should be measured and corrected by suitable techniques, such as XP-VPS for the VIISta implanter platform, to ensure precision ion placement in device structures. So called V-curves have been adopted to generate the wafer-based calibration using channeling effects as the Si lattice steer ions into a channeling direction. Thermal Wave (TW) or sheet resistance (Rs) can be used to determine the minimum of the angle response curve. Normally it is expected that the TW and Rs have their respective minima at identical angles. However, the TW and Rs response to the angle variations does depend on factors such as implant species, dose, and wafer temperature. Implant damage accumulation effects have to be considered for data interpretation especially for some 'abnormal' V-curve data. In this paper we will discuss some observed 'abnormal' angle responses, such as a) TW/Rs reverse trend for Arsenic beam, 2) 'W' shape of Rs Boron, and 3) apparent TW/Rs minimum difference for high tilt characterization, along with experimental data and TCAD simulations.

  4. Midcourse Guidance Law Based on High Target Acquisition Probability Considering Angular Constraint and Line-of-Sight Angle Rate Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Random disturbance factors would lead to the variation of target acquisition point during the long distance flight. To acquire a high target acquisition probability and improve the impact precision, missiles should be guided to an appropriate target acquisition position with certain attitude angles and line-of-sight (LOS angle rate. This paper has presented a new midcourse guidance law considering the influences of random disturbances, detection distance restraint, and target acquisition probability with Monte Carlo simulation. Detailed analyses of the impact points on the ground and the random distribution of the target acquisition position in the 3D space are given to get the appropriate attitude angles and the end position for the midcourse guidance. Then, a new formulation biased proportional navigation (BPN guidance law with angular constraint and LOS angle rate control has been derived to ensure the tracking ability when attacking the maneuvering target. Numerical simulations demonstrates that, compared with the proportional navigation guidance (PNG law and the near-optimal spatial midcourse guidance (NSMG law, BPN guidance law demonstrates satisfactory performances and can meet both the midcourse terminal angular constraint and the LOS angle rate requirement.

  5. Production of Structural Colors with High Contrast and Wide Viewing Angles from Assemblies of Polypyrrole Black Coated Polystyrene Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoming; Ge, Dengteng; Wu, Gaoxiang; Liao, Zhiwei; Yang, Shu

    2016-06-29

    Structural color with wide viewing angles has enormous potential applications in pigment, ink formulation, displays, and sensors. However, colors obtained from colloidal assemblies with low refractive index contrast or without black additives typically appear pale. Here, we prepare polypyrrole (PPy) black coated polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles and demonstrate well-defined colors with high color contrast and wide viewing angles under ambient light. Depending on the loading of pyrrole during polymerization, PPy nanogranules of different sizes and coverages are grafted to the surface of PS nanoparticles. The bumpy particles can self-assemble into quasi-amorphous arrays, resulting in low angle dependent structure colors under ambient light. The color can be tuned by the size of the PS nanoparticles, and the presence of the PPy black on PS nanoparticles enhances the color contrast by suppressing incoherent and multiple scattering.

  6. Fluid-faulting evolution in high definition: Connecting fault structure and frequency-magnitude variations during the 2014 Long Valley Caldera, California earthquake swarm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, David R.; Ellsworth, William L.; Hill, David P.

    2016-01-01

    An extended earthquake swarm occurred beneath southeastern Long Valley Caldera between May and November 2014, culminating in three magnitude 3.5 earthquakes and 1145 cataloged events on 26 September alone. The swarm produced the most prolific seismicity in the caldera since a major unrest episode in 1997-1998. To gain insight into the physics controlling swarm evolution, we used large-scale cross-correlation between waveforms of cataloged earthquakes and continuous data, producing precise locations for 8494 events, more than 2.5 times the routine catalog. We also estimated magnitudes for 18,634 events (~5.5 times the routine catalog), using a principal component fit to measure waveform amplitudes relative to cataloged events. This expanded and relocated catalog reveals multiple episodes of pronounced hypocenter expansion and migration on a collection of neighboring faults. Given the rapid migration and alignment of hypocenters on narrow faults, we infer that activity was initiated and sustained by an evolving fluid pressure transient with a low-viscosity fluid, likely composed primarily of water and CO2 exsolved from underlying magma. Although both updip and downdip migration were observed within the swarm, downdip activity ceased shortly after activation, while updip activity persisted for weeks at moderate levels. Strongly migrating, single-fault episodes within the larger swarm exhibited a higher proportion of larger earthquakes (lower Gutenberg-Richter b value), which may have been facilitated by fluid pressure confined in two dimensions within the fault zone. In contrast, the later swarm activity occurred on an increasingly diffuse collection of smaller faults, with a much higher b value.

  7. Fluid-faulting evolution in high definition: Connecting fault structure and frequency-magnitude variations during the 2014 Long Valley Caldera, California, earthquake swarm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, David R.; Ellsworth, William L.; Hill, David P.

    2016-03-01

    An extended earthquake swarm occurred beneath southeastern Long Valley Caldera between May and November 2014, culminating in three magnitude 3.5 earthquakes and 1145 cataloged events on 26 September alone. The swarm produced the most prolific seismicity in the caldera since a major unrest episode in 1997-1998. To gain insight into the physics controlling swarm evolution, we used large-scale cross correlation between waveforms of cataloged earthquakes and continuous data, producing precise locations for 8494 events, more than 2.5 times the routine catalog. We also estimated magnitudes for 18,634 events (~5.5 times the routine catalog), using a principal component fit to measure waveform amplitudes relative to cataloged events. This expanded and relocated catalog reveals multiple episodes of pronounced hypocenter expansion and migration on a collection of neighboring faults. Given the rapid migration and alignment of hypocenters on narrow faults, we infer that activity was initiated and sustained by an evolving fluid pressure transient with a low-viscosity fluid, likely composed primarily of water and CO2 exsolved from underlying magma. Although both updip and downdip migration were observed within the swarm, downdip activity ceased shortly after activation, while updip activity persisted for weeks at moderate levels. Strongly migrating, single-fault episodes within the larger swarm exhibited a higher proportion of larger earthquakes (lower Gutenberg-Richter b value), which may have been facilitated by fluid pressure confined in two dimensions within the fault zone. In contrast, the later swarm activity occurred on an increasingly diffuse collection of smaller faults, with a much higher b value.

  8. Seismological Studies for Tensile Faults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwo-Bin Ou

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A shear slip fault, an equivalence of a double couple source, has often been assumed to be a kinematic source model in ground motion simulation. Estimation of seismic moment based on the shear slip model indicates the size of an earthquake. However, if the dislocation of the hanging wall relative to the footwall includes not only a shear slip tangent to the fault plane but also expansion and compression normal to the fault plane, the radiating seismic waves will feature differences from those out of the shear slip fault. Taking account of the effects resulting from expansion and compression to a fault plane, we can resolve the tension and pressure axes as well as the fault plane solution more exactly from ground motions than previously, and can evaluate how far a fault zone opens or contracts during a developing rupture. In addition to a tensile angle and Poisson¡¦s ratio for the medium, a tensile fault with five degrees of freedom has been extended from the shear slip fault with only three degrees of freedom, strike, dip, and slip.

  9. Quasi-isometric classification of some high dimensional right-angled Artin groups

    CERN Document Server

    Behrstock, Jason A; Neumann, Walter D

    2009-01-01

    In this note we give the quasi-isometry classification for a class of right angled Artin groups. In particular, we obtain the first such classification for a class of Artin groups with dimension larger than 2; our families exist in every dimension.

  10. Aerodynamic characteristics of wind turbine blade airfoils at high angles-of-attack

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, W.A.

    2010-01-01

    Airfoil characteristics at deep stall angles were investigated. It appeared that the maximum drag coefficient as a function of the airfoil upwind y/c ordinate at x/c=0.0125 can be approximated by a straight line. The lift-drag ratios in deep stall of a number of airfoils with moderate lower surface

  11. Structural styles of the intracratonic reactivation of the Perimbó fault zone, Paraná basin, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostirolla, Sidnei Pires; Mancini, Fernando; Rigoti, Augustinho; Kraft, Ronaldo Paulo

    2003-08-01

    The style and origin of intracratonic deformation along the Perimbó fault zone (PFZ) in the Paraná basin, Santa Catarina State, southern Brazil, is defined by the integration of outcrop, borehole, aerial photography, and digital terrain modeling data. Typical structures are high-angle strike-slip and oblique-slip normal faults in the Permian sedimentary cover that propagate upward from medium-angle reverse faults in the underlying Precambrian basement. Regional and minor structures suggest blind transtensional faulting and tilting of the overlying strata controlled by the basement heritage. A hypothesis linking deformation between the cover and the basement is proposed on the basis of a structural analysis of a branched fault pattern striking N40-50E and N70-80E. Semi-detailed scale mapping shows that the PFZ has a complex history of polyphase reactivation and is characterized as a plate margin fault in the Proterozoic, evolving to an intracratonic fault in the Phanerozoic, with a main period of reactivation in Permian or Permian-Triassic transition times. The reported data imply that fault reactivation is characterized by normal to left-lateral strike-slip faulting produced by strain propagation from the La Ventana orogenic belt toward the continental interior.

  12. Fault rock texture and porosity type in Triassic dolostones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Fabrizio; Grieco, Donato; Bardi, Alessandro; Prosser, Giacomo

    2015-04-01

    Preliminary results of an ongoing project aimed at deciphering the micromechanics and porosity evolution associated to brittle deformation of Triassic dolostones are presented. Samples collected from high-angle, oblique-slip, 10's to 100's m-throw normal faults crosscutting Mesozoic carbonates of the Neo Tethys (Campanian-Lucanian Platform) are investigated by mean of field geological mapping, optical microscopy, SEM and image analyses. The goal is to characterize in detail composition, texture and porosity of cataclastic rocks in order to assess the structural architecture of dolomitic fault cores. Moreover, the present study addresses the time-space control exerted by several micro-mechanisms such as intragranular extensional fracturing, chipping and shear fracturing, which took place during grain rolling and crushing within the evolving faults, on type, amount, dimensions and distribution of micropores present within the cataclastic fault cores. Study samples are representative of well-exposed dolomitic fault cores of oblique-slip normal faults trending either NW-SE or NE-SW. The high-angle normal faults crosscut the Mesozoic carbonates of the Campanian-Lucanian Platform, which overrode the Lagonegro succession by mean of low-angle thrust faults. Fault throws are measured by considering the displaced thrust faults as key markers after large scale field mapping (1:10,000 scale) of the study areas. In the field, hand samples were selected according to their distance from main slip surfaces and, in some case, along secondary slip surfaces. Microscopy analysis of about 100 oriented fault rock samples shows that, mostly, the study cataclastic rocks are made up of dolomite and sparse, minute survivor silicate grains deriving from the Lagonegro succession. In order to quantitatively assess the main textural classes, a great attention is paid to the grain-matrix ratio, grain sphericity, grain roundness, and grain sorting. By employing an automatic box-counting technique

  13. Seismic hazard in low slip rate crustal faults, estimating the characteristic event and the most hazardous zone: study case San Ramón Fault, in southern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estay, Nicolás P.; Yáñez, Gonzalo; Carretier, Sebastien; Lira, Elias; Maringue, José

    2016-11-01

    Crustal faults located close to cities may induce catastrophic damages. When recurrence times are in the range of 1000-10 000 or higher, actions to mitigate the effects of the associated earthquake are hampered by the lack of a full seismic record, and in many cases, also of geological evidences. In order to characterize the fault behavior and its effects, we propose three different already-developed time-integration methodologies to define the most likely scenarios of rupture, and then to quantify the hazard with an empirical equation of peak ground acceleration (PGA). We consider the following methodologies: (1) stream gradient and (2) sinuosity indexes to estimate fault-related topographic effects, and (3) gravity profiles across the fault to identify the fault scarp in the basement. We chose the San Ramón Fault on which to apply these methodologies. It is a ˜ 30 km N-S trending fault with a low slip rate (0.1-0.5 mm yr-1) and an approximated recurrence of 9000 years. It is located in the foothills of the Andes near the large city of Santiago, the capital of Chile (> 6 000 000 inhabitants). Along the fault trace we define four segments, with a mean length of ˜ 10 km, which probably become active independently. We tested the present-day seismic activity by deploying a local seismological network for 1 year, finding five events that are spatially related to the fault. In addition, fault geometry along the most evident scarp was imaged in terms of its electrical resistivity response by a high resolution TEM (transient electromagnetic) profile. Seismic event distribution and TEM imaging allowed the constraint of the fault dip angle (˜ 65°) and its capacity to break into the surface. Using the empirical equation of Chiou and Youngs (2014) for crustal faults and considering the characteristic seismic event (thrust high-angle fault, ˜ 10 km, Mw = 6.2-6.7), we estimate the acceleration distribution in Santiago and the hazardous zones. City domains that are under

  14. Superconducting gap in Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O by high-resolution angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, C.G.; Liu, R.; Yang, A.B.; Lynch, D.W. (Iowa State Univ., Ames (USA)); Arko, A.J.; List, R.S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Veal, B.W.; Chang, Y.C.; Jiang, P.Z.; Paulikas, A.P. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1989-08-18

    Detailed studies indicate a superconducting gap in the high-temperature superconductor Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8}. Photoemission measurements with high energy and angle resolution isolate the behavior of a single band as it crosses the Fermi level in both the normal and superconducting states, giving support to the Fermi liquid picture. The magnitude of the gap is 24 millielectron volts. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Mapping 3D fault geometry in earthquakes using high-resolution topography: Examples from the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah (Mexico) and 2013 Balochistan (Pakistan) earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu; Walker, Richard T.; Elliott, John R.; Parsons, Barry

    2016-04-01

    Fault dips are usually measured from outcrops in the field or inferred through geodetic or seismological modeling. Here we apply the classic structural geology approach of calculating dip from a fault's 3-D surface trace using recent, high-resolution topography. A test study applied to the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake shows very good agreement between our results and those previously determined from field measurements. To obtain a reliable estimate, a fault segment ≥120 m long with a topographic variation ≥15 m is suggested. We then applied this method to the 2013 Balochistan earthquake, getting dips similar to previous estimates. Our dip estimates show a switch from north to south dipping at the southern end of the main trace, which appears to be a response to local extension within a stepover. We suggest that this previously unidentified geometrical complexity may act as the endpoint of earthquake ruptures for the southern end of the Hoshab fault.

  16. Distributed fault-tolerant time-varying formation control for high-order linear multi-agent systems with actuator failures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Yongzhao; Dong, Xiwang; Li, Qingdong; Ren, Zhang

    2017-06-29

    This paper investigates the fault-tolerant time-varying formation control problems for high-order linear multi-agent systems in the presence of actuator failures. Firstly, a fully distributed formation control protocol is presented to compensate for the influences of both bias fault and loss of effectiveness fault. Using the adaptive online updating strategies, no global knowledge about the communication topology is required and the bounds of actuator failures can be unknown. Then an algorithm is proposed to determine the control parameters of the fault-tolerant formation protocol, where the time-varying formation feasible conditions and an approach to expand the feasible formation set are given. Furthermore, the stability of the proposed algorithm is proven based on the Lyapunov-like theory. Finally, two simulation examples are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Faulting at Thebes Gap, Mo. -Ill. : Implications for New Madrid tectonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, R.W.; Schultz, A.P. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Recent geologic mapping in the Thebes Gap area has identified numerous NNE- and NE-striking faults having a long-lived and complex structural history. The faults are located in an area of moderate recent seismicity at the northern margin of the Mississippi embayment, approximately 45 km north of the New Madrid seismic zone. Earliest deformation occurred along dextral strike-slip faults constrained as post-Devonian and pre-Cretaceous. Uplift and erosion of all Carboniferous strata suggest that this faulting is related to development of the Pascola arch (Ouachita orogeny). This early deformation is characterized by strongly faulted and folded Ordovician through Devonian rocks overlain in places with angular unconformity by undeformed Cretaceous strata. Elsewhere, younger deformation involves Paleozoic, Cretaceous, Paleocene, and Eocene formations. These units have experienced both minor high-angle normal faulting and major, dextral strike-slip faulting. Quaternary-Tertiary Mounds Gravel is also involved in the latest episode of strike-slip deformation. Enechelon north-south folds, antithetic R[prime] shears, and drag folds indicate right-lateral motion. Characteristic positive and negative flower structures are commonly revealed in cross section. Right-stepping fault strands have produced pull-apart basins where Ordovician, Silurian, Devonian, Cretaceous, and Tertiary units are downdropped several hundreds of meters and occur in chaotic orientations. Similar fault orientations and kinematics, as well as recent seismicity and close proximity, clearly suggest a structural relationship between deformation at Thebes Gap and tectonism associated with the New Madrid area.

  18. A novel fault tolerant permanent magnet synchronous motor with improved optimal torque control for aerospace application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Hong

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Improving fault tolerant performance of permanent magnet synchronous motor has always been the central issue of the electrically supplied actuator for aerospace application. In this paper, a novel fault tolerant permanent magnet synchronous motor is proposed, which is characterized by two stators and two rotors on the same shaft with a circumferential displacement of mechanical angle of 4.5°. It helps to reduce the cogging torque. Each segment of the stator and the rotor can be considered as an 8-pole/10-slot five-phase permanent magnet synchronous motor with concentrated, single-layer and alternate teeth wound winding, which enhance the fault isolation capacity of the motor. Furthermore, the motor has high phase inductance to restrain the short-circuit current. In addition, an improved optimal torque control strategy is proposed to make the motor work well under the open-circuit fault and short-circuit fault conditions. Simulation and experiment results show that the proposed fault tolerant motor system has excellent fault tolerant capacity, which is able to operate continuously under the third open-circuit fault and second short-circuit fault condition without system performance degradation, which was not available earlier.

  19. Velocity structure and active fault of Yanyuan-Mabian seismic zone——The result of high-resolution seismic refraction experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG FuYun; XU XiWei; LIU BaoFeng; DUAN YongHong; YANG ZhuoXin; ZHANG ChengKe; ZHAO JinRen; ZHANG JianShi; ZHANG XianKang; LIU QiYuan; ZHU AiLan

    2008-01-01

    The authors processed the seismic retraction Pg-wave travel time data with finite difference tomography method and revealed velocity structure of the upper crust on active block boundaries and deep features of the active faults in western Sichuan Province.The following are the results of our investigation.The upper crust of Yanyuan basin and the Houlong Mountains consists of the superficial low-velocity layer and the deep uniform high-velocity layer, and between the two layers, there is a distinct, and gently west-dipping structural plane.Between model coordinates 180-240 km, P-wave velocity distribution features steeply inclined strip-like structure with strongly non-uniform high and low velocities alternately.Xichang Mesozoic basin between 240 and 300 km consists of a thick low-velocity upper layer and a high-velocity lower layer, where lateral and vertical velocity variations are very strong and the interface between the two layers fluctuates a lot.The Daliang Mountains to the east of the 300 km coordinate is a non-uniform high-velocity zone, with a superficial velocity of approximately 5 km/s.From 130 to 150 km and from 280 to 310 km, there are extremely distinct deep anomalous high-velocity bodies, which are supposed to be related with Permian magmatic activity.The Yanyuan nappe structure is composed of the superficial low-velocity nappe, the gently west-dipping detachment surface and the deep high-velocity basement, with Jinhe-Qinghe fault zone as the nappe front.Mopanshan fault is a west-dipping low-velocity zone, which extends to the top surface of the basement.Anninghe fault and Zemuhe fault are east-dipping, tabular-like, and low-velocity zones, which extend deep into the basement.At a great depth, Daliangshan fault separates into two segments, which are represented by drastic variation of velocity structures in a narrow strip: the west segment dips westward and the east segment dips eastward, both stretching into the basement.The east margin fault of

  20. Velocity structure and active fault of Yanyuan-Mabian seismic zone―The result of high-resolution seismic refraction experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The authors processed the seismic refraction Pg-wave travel time data with finite difference tomography method and revealed velocity structure of the upper crust on active block boundaries and deep features of the active faults in western Sichuan Province. The following are the results of our investigation. The upper crust of Yanyuan basin and the Houlong Mountains consists of the superficial low-velocity layer and the deep uniform high-velocity layer, and between the two layers, there is a distinct, and gently west-dipping structural plane. Between model coordinates 180-240 km, P-wave velocity distribution features steeply inclined strip-like structure with strongly non-uniform high and low velocities alternately. Xichang Mesozoic basin between 240 and 300 km consists of a thick low-velocity upper layer and a high-velocity lower layer, where lateral and vertical velocity variations are very strong and the interface between the two layers fluctuates a lot. The Daliang Mountains to the east of the 300 km coordinate is a non-uniform high-velocity zone, with a superficial velocity of approximately 5 km/s. From 130 to 150 km and from 280 to 310 km, there are extremely distinct deep anomalous high-velocity bodies, which are supposed to be related with Permian magmatic activity. The Yanyuan nappe structure is composed of the superficial low-velocity nappe, the gently west-dipping detachment surface and the deep high-velocity basement, with Jinhe-Qinghe fault zone as the nappe front. Mopanshan fault is a west-dipping low-velocity zone, which extends to the top surface of the basement. Anninghe fault and Zemuhe fault are east-dipping, tabular-like, and low-velocity zones, which extend deep into the base-ment. At a great depth, Daliangshan fault separates into two segments, which are represented by drastic variation of velocity structures in a narrow strip: the west segment dips westward and the east segment dips eastward, both stretching into the basement. The east margin

  1. Formation of coastline features by large-scale instabilities induced by high-angle waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, A; Murray, A B; Arnault, O

    2001-11-15

    Along shore sediment transport that is driven by waves is generally assumed to smooth a coastline. This assumption is valid for small angles between the wave crest lines and the shore, as has been demonstrated in shoreline models. But when the angle between the waves and the shoreline is sufficiently large, small perturbations to a straight shoreline will grow. Here we use a numerical model to investigate the implications of this instability mechanism for large-scale morphology over long timescales. Our simulations show growth of coastline perturbations that interact with each other to produce large-scale features that resemble various kinds of natural landforms, including the capes and cuspate forelands observed along the Carolina coast of southeastern North America. Wind and wave data from this area support our hypothesis that such an instability mechanism could be responsible for the formation of shoreline features at spatial scales up to hundreds of kilometres and temporal scales up to millennia.

  2. Large zenith angle observations with the high-resolution GRANITE III camera

    CERN Document Server

    Petry, D

    2001-01-01

    The GRANITE III camera of the Whipple Cherenkov Telescope at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory on Mount Hopkins, Arizona (2300 m a.s.l.) has the highest angular resolution of all cameras used on this telescope so far. The central region of the camera has 379 pixels with an individual angular diameter of 0.12 degrees. This makes the instrument especially suitable for observations of gamma-induced air-showers at large zenith angles since the increase in average distance to the shower maximum leads to smaller shower images in the focal plane of the telescope. We examine the performance of the telescope for observations of gamma-induced air-showers at zenith angles up to 63 degrees based on observations of Mkn 421 and using Monte Carlo Simulations. An improvement to the standard data analysis is suggested.

  3. High-resolution seismic reflection imaging of growth folding and shallow faults beneath the Southern Puget Lowland, Washington State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odum, Jackson K.; Stephenson, William J.; Pratt, Thomas L.; Blakely, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Marine seismic reflection data from southern Puget Sound, Washington, were collected to investigate the nature of shallow structures associated with the Tacoma fault zone and the Olympia structure. Growth folding and probable Holocene surface deformation were imaged within the Tacoma fault zone beneath Case and Carr Inlets. Shallow faults near potential field anomalies associated with the Olympia structure were imaged beneath Budd and Eld Inlets. Beneath Case Inlet, the Tacoma fault zone includes an ∼350-m wide section of south-dipping strata forming the upper part of a fold (kink band) coincident with the southern edge of an uplifted shoreline terrace. An ∼2 m change in the depth of the water bottom, onlapping postglacial sediments, and increasing stratal dips with increasing depth are consistent with late Pleistocene to Holocene postglacial growth folding above a blind fault. Geologic data across a topographic lineament on nearby land indicate recent uplift of late Holocene age. Profiles acquired in Carr Inlet 10 km to the east of Case Inlet showed late Pleistocene or Holocene faulting at one location with ∼3 to 4 m of vertical displacement, south side up. North of this fault the data show several other disruptions and reflector terminations that could mark faults within the broad Tacoma fault zone. Seismic reflection profiles across part of the Olympia structure beneath southern Puget Sound show two apparent faults about 160 m apart having 1 to 2 m of displacement of subhorizontal bedding. Directly beneath one of these faults, a dipping reflector that may mark the base of a glacial channel shows the opposite sense of throw, suggesting strike-slip motion. Deeper seismic reflection profiles show disrupted strata beneath these faults but little apparent vertical offset, consistent with strike-slip faulting. These faults and folds indicate that the Tacoma fault and Olympia structure include active structures with probable postglacial motion.

  4. A Near-linear Time Approximation Algorithm for Angle-based Outlier Detection in High-dimensional Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, Ninh Dang; Pagh, Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    Outlier mining in d-dimensional point sets is a fundamental and well studied data mining task due to its variety of applications. Most such applications arise in high-dimensional domains. A bottleneck of existing approaches is that implicit or explicit assessments on concepts of distance or nearest...... neighbor are deteriorated in high-dimensional data. Following up on the work of Kriegel et al. (KDD '08), we investigate the use of angle-based outlier factor in mining high-dimensional outliers. While their algorithm runs in cubic time (with a quadratic time heuristic), we propose a novel random...... projection-based technique that is able to estimate the angle-based outlier factor for all data points in time near-linear in the size of the data. Also, our approach is suitable to be performed in parallel environment to achieve a parallel speedup. We introduce a theoretical analysis of the quality...

  5. Empirical sea ice thickness retrieval during the freeze-up period from SMOS high incident angle observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Huntemann

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sea ice thickness information is important for sea ice modelling and ship operations. Here a method to detect the thickness of sea ice up to 50 cm during the freeze-up season based on high incidence angle observations of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS satellite working at 1.4 GHz is suggested. By comparison of thermodynamic ice growth data with SMOS brightness temperatures, a high correlation to intensity and an anticorrelation to the difference between vertically and horizontally polarised brightness temperatures at incidence angles between 40 and 50° are found and used to develop an empirical retrieval algorithm sensitive to thin sea ice up to 50 cm thickness. The algorithm shows high correlation with ice thickness data from airborne measurements and reasonable ice thickness patterns for the Arctic freeze-up period.

  6. Relationship between boundary misorientation angle and true strain during high temperature deformation of 7050 aluminum alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Hui-e; YANG Li; ZHEN Liang; SHAO Wen-zhu; ZHANG Bao-you

    2008-01-01

    Tensile tests of solid solution treated 7050 aluminum alloy were conducted to different strain degrees (0.1, 0.4, 0.6 and failure) at 460 ℃ with the strain rate of 1.0×10-4-1.0×10-1s-1. The boundary misorientation angle evolution during hot deformation of the 7050 aluminum alloy was studied by EBSD technique and the fracture surfaces were observed using SEM. A linear relationship between the increase in the average boundary misorientation angle and the true strain at different strain rates is assumed when aluminum alloy is deformed at 460 ℃. The increasing rate of average boundary misorientation angle is 15.1-, 15.7- and -0.75- corresponding to the strain rate of 1.0×10-4, 1.0×10-2 and 0.1 s-1, respectively. The main softening mechanism is continuous dynamic recrystallization when the strain rates are 1.0×10-4 and 1.0×10-2 s-1, and it is dynamic recovery when strain rate is 0.1 s-1.

  7. Optimal Design of the Absolute Positioning Sensor for a High-Speed Maglev Train and Research on Its Fault Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junge Zhang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies an absolute positioning sensor for a high-speed maglev train and its fault diagnosis method. The absolute positioning sensor is an important sensor for the high-speed maglev train to accomplish its synchronous traction. It is used to calibrate the error of the relative positioning sensor which is used to provide the magnetic phase signal. On the basis of the analysis for the principle of the absolute positioning sensor, the paper describes the design of the sending and receiving coils and realizes the hardware and the software for the sensor. In order to enhance the reliability of the sensor, a support vector machine is used to recognize the fault characters, and the signal flow method is used to locate the faulty parts. The diagnosis information not only can be sent to an upper center control computer to evaluate the reliability of the sensors, but also can realize on-line diagnosis for debugging and the quick detection when the maglev train is off-line. The absolute positioning sensor we study has been used in the actual project.

  8. Optimal design of the absolute positioning sensor for a high-speed maglev train and research on its fault diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dapeng; Long, Zhiqiang; Xue, Song; Zhang, Junge

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies an absolute positioning sensor for a high-speed maglev train and its fault diagnosis method. The absolute positioning sensor is an important sensor for the high-speed maglev train to accomplish its synchronous traction. It is used to calibrate the error of the relative positioning sensor which is used to provide the magnetic phase signal. On the basis of the analysis for the principle of the absolute positioning sensor, the paper describes the design of the sending and receiving coils and realizes the hardware and the software for the sensor. In order to enhance the reliability of the sensor, a support vector machine is used to recognize the fault characters, and the signal flow method is used to locate the faulty parts. The diagnosis information not only can be sent to an upper center control computer to evaluate the reliability of the sensors, but also can realize on-line diagnosis for debugging and the quick detection when the maglev train is off-line. The absolute positioning sensor we study has been used in the actual project.

  9. An Interactive, 3D Fault Editor for VR Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aalsburg, J.; Yikilmaz, M. B.; Kreylos, O.; Kellogg, L. H.; Rundle, J. B.

    2008-12-01

    Digitial Fault Models (DFM) play a vital role in the study of earthquake dynamics, fault-earthquake interactions, and seismicity. DFMs serve as input for finite-element method (FEM) or other earthquake simulations such as Virtual California. Generally, digital fault models are generated by importing a digitized and georeferenced (2D) fault map and/or a hillshade image of the study area into a geographical information system (GIS) application, where individual fault lines are traced by the user. Data assimilation and creation of a DFM, or updating an existing DFM based on new observations, is a tedious and time-consuming process. In order to facilitate the creation process, we are developing an immersive virtual reality (VR) application to visualize and edit fault models. This program is designed to run in immersive environments such as a CAVE (walk-in VR environment), but also works in a wide range of other environments, including desktop systems and GeoWalls. It is being developed at the UC Davis W.M. Keck Center for Active Visualization in the Earth Sciences (KeckCAVES, http://www.keckcaves.org). Our program allows users to create new models or modify existing ones; for instance by repositioning individual fault-segments, by changing the dip angle, or by modifying (or assigning) the value of a property associated with a particular fault segment (i.e. slip rate). With the addition of high resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEM) , georeferenced active tectonic fault maps and earthquake hypocenters, the user can accurately add new segments to an existing model or create a fault model entirely from scratch. Interactively created or modified models can be written to XML files at any time; from there the data may easily be converted into various formats required by the analysis software or simulation. We believe that the ease of interaction provided by VR technology is ideally suited to the problem of creating and editing digital fault models. Our software provides

  10. Geophysical characterization of transtensional fault systems in the Eastern California Shear Zone-Walker Lane Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, M.; Keranen, K. M.; Stockli, D. F.; Feldman, J. D.; Keller, G. R.

    2011-12-01

    The Eastern California Shear Zone (ECSZ) and Walker Lane belt (WL) accommodate ~25% of plate motion between the North American and Pacific plates. Faults within the Mina deflection link the ECSZ and the WL, transferring strain from the Owens Valley and Death Valley-Fish Lake Valley fault systems to the transcurrent faults of the central Walker Lane. During the mid to late Miocene the majority of strain between these systems was transferred through the Silver Peak-Lone Mountain (SPLM) extensional complex via a shallowly dipping detachment. Strain transfer has since primarily migrated north to the Mina Deflection; however, high-angle faults bounding sedimentary basins and discrepancies between geodetic and geologic models indicate that the SPLM complex may still actively transfer a portion of the strain from the ECSZ to the WL on a younger set of faults. Establishing the pattern and amount of active strain transfer within the SPLM region is required for a full accounting of strain accommodation, and provides insight into strain partitioning at the basin scale within a broader transtensional zone. To map the active structures in and near Clayton Valley, within the SPLM region, we collected seismic reflection and refraction profiles and a dense grid of gravity readings that were merged with existing gravity data. The primary goals were to determine the geometry of the high-angle fault system, the amount and sense of offset along each fault set, connectivity of the faults, and the relationship of these faults to the Miocene detachment. Seismic reflection profiles imaged the high-angle basin-bounding normal faults and the detachment in both the footwall and hanging wall. The extensional basin is ~1 km deep, with a steep southeastern boundary, a gentle slope to the northwest, and a sharp boundary on the northwest side, suggestive of another fault system. Two subparallel dip-slip faults bound the southeast (deeper) basin margin with a large lateral velocity change (from ~2

  11. Fault-tolerant design

    CERN Document Server

    Dubrova, Elena

    2013-01-01

    This textbook serves as an introduction to fault-tolerance, intended for upper-division undergraduate students, graduate-level students and practicing engineers in need of an overview of the field.  Readers will develop skills in modeling and evaluating fault-tolerant architectures in terms of reliability, availability and safety.  They will gain a thorough understanding of fault tolerant computers, including both the theory of how to design and evaluate them and the practical knowledge of achieving fault-tolerance in electronic, communication and software systems.  Coverage includes fault-tolerance techniques through hardware, software, information and time redundancy.  The content is designed to be highly accessible, including numerous examples and exercises.  Solutions and powerpoint slides are available for instructors.   ·         Provides textbook coverage of the fundamental concepts of fault-tolerance; ·         Describes a variety of basic techniques for achieving fault-toleran...

  12. Inherent predominance of high chiral angle metallic carbon nanotubes in continuous fibers grown from a molten catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemán, B.; Bernal, M. Mar; Mas, B.; Pérez, Emilio M.; Reguero, V.; Xu, G.; Cui, Y.; Vilatela, Juan J.

    2016-02-01

    We present evidence that high temperature CVD growth of SWNTs under conditions of continuous spinning of macroscopic fibers leads to an inherent predominance of high chiral angle CNTs, peaking at the armchair end. Raman, UV-vis-NIR absorption, and photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements show the prevalence of metallic SWNTs. The complete chiral angle distribution is obtained by electron diffraction of over 390 CNTs. It is biased towards high chiral angles and peaks at the armchair end (30°), in good agreement with the established atomistic models for SWNT growth from a liquid catalyst. Based on the Fe-C-S constituent binary and ternary phase diagrams, thermodynamic calculations of phase compositions from fast cooling and experimental evidence of a post-synthesis catalyst, the proposed thermodynamic path of the catalyst is to form a solid FCC Fe core and a liquid Fe-S shell. S in the outer liquid shell first stabilizes the edge of the nascent CNT, but once a graphitic wall forms it is rejected due to the high interfacial energy of the Fe-C-S alloy.We present evidence that high temperature CVD growth of SWNTs under conditions of continuous spinning of macroscopic fibers leads to an inherent predominance of high chiral angle CNTs, peaking at the armchair end. Raman, UV-vis-NIR absorption, and photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements show the prevalence of metallic SWNTs. The complete chiral angle distribution is obtained by electron diffraction of over 390 CNTs. It is biased towards high chiral angles and peaks at the armchair end (30°), in good agreement with the established atomistic models for SWNT growth from a liquid catalyst. Based on the Fe-C-S constituent binary and ternary phase diagrams, thermodynamic calculations of phase compositions from fast cooling and experimental evidence of a post-synthesis catalyst, the proposed thermodynamic path of the catalyst is to form a solid FCC Fe core and a liquid Fe-S shell. S in the outer liquid shell first

  13. Design of Low Power Test Pattern Generator using Low Transition LFSR for high Fault Coverage Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chethan J

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A low power Test Pattern Generator (TPG designed by modifying Linear Feedback Shift Register is proposed to produce low power test vectors that are deployed on Circuit under Test (CUT to slenderize thedynamic power consumption by CUT. The technique involved in generating low power test patterns is performed by increasing the correlativity between the successive vectors; the ambiguity in increasing the similarity between consecutive vectors is resolved by reducing the number of bit flips between successive test patterns. Upon deploying the low power test patterns at the inputs of CUT, slenderizes the switching activities inside CUT that in turn reduces its dynamic power consumption. The resulted low power test vectors are deployed on CUT to obtain fault coverage. The experimental results demonstrate significant power reduction by low power TPG than compared to standard LFSR.

  14. Evidence for active faults in Küçükçekmece Lagoon (Marmara Sea, Turkey), inferred from high-resolution seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alp, Hakan

    2014-10-01

    A total of 42 km of high-resolution seismic reflection and bathymetric data were collected for the first time to document stratigraphic and structural features of the uppermost 5 m of the Holocene sedimentary infill of Küçükçekmece Lagoon along the Marmara Sea coast of Turkey. The lagoon gradually deepens from 1 m off the northern coast to a maximum of 20 m in the southern basin. Stratigraphically, the uppermost seismic unit is characterized by a generally parallel reflection configuration, indicating deposition under low-energy conditions. In the southern basin of the lagoon, the sub-bottom is locally characterized by frequency attenuated and chaotic reflections interpreted as gas-charged sediments. Structurally, the soft sediment of the first 5 m below the lagoon floor is locally deformed by active strike-slip fault zones, here named FZ1, FZ2, and FZ3. These fault zones are NW-SE oriented and follow the long axis of the lagoon, compatible with the geographic alignment of the lagoon, the onland drainage pattern, and the scarps of the surrounding terrain. Moreover, the fault zones in Küçükçekmece Lagoon are well correlated with active offshore faults mapped during previous studies. This suggests that the FZ1, FZ2, and FZ3 fault zones are not merely local fault systems deforming the Küçükçekmece Lagoon bottom, but that they may be part of a regional fault zone extending both north and southward to merge with the northern branch of the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) in the Çınarcık Basin. This, however, needs to be confirmed by further structural and seismological studies around Küçükçekmece Lagoon in order to more firmly establish its link with the NAFZ in the Marmara Sea, and to highlight potential seismic risks for the densely populated Istanbul metropolitan area.

  15. The microstructural evolution of clay-bearing carbonate faults during high-velocity friction experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Rachael; De Paola, Nicola; Holdsworth, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Seismicity in the Northern Apennines, Italy, nucleates within and propagates through a multilayer sequence comprising limestones with marl interbeds. Observations from the Gubbio fault (1984, Ms = 5.2) indicate that the majority of earthquake displacement is localized within principal slip zones (PSZs), thermal decomposition of calcite. Initial microstructure of the wet gouges, on the other hand, is characterized by a distributed and interconnected network of wet clay surrounding calcite grains. The microstructure of the sheared wet gouges is characterized by a diffuse PSS, limited fabric development, and no PSZ; deformation is much more distributed. In addition, grain-size reduction in the wet gouges is ~1 order of magnitude less than in dry gouge equivalents. Thus, we attribute the contrasting frictional behaviour and microstructural evolution in the dry vs. wet gouges to the fact that in the wet gouges, distributed slip preferentially occurs on the pre-existing, weak clay network. This reduces the need for grain-breakage to occur before slip is able to localize, explaining the lack of a slip-hardening phase. Shear induced compaction of the wet clay-bearing gouges is also likely to generate a considerable pore-fluid overpressure within the impermeable clay network, further contributing to their weak behaviour. The lack of resistance to frictional sliding shown by the wet clay-bearing gouges contrasts with the traditional concept that phyllosilicates, due to their velocity-strengthening nature, should have a stabilizing role in upper crustal fault zones, and has significant implications for seismic hazard in the Apennines.

  16. Parametric approximation of airfoil aerodynamic coefficients at high angles of attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrzypinski, Witold Robert; Zahle, Frederik; Bak, Christian

    2014-01-01

    , and the third method, also utilizing trigonometric functions, was developed with the scope on stall-regulated turbines. The method of the even sine and cosine functions was further developed in the present work by using two independent harmonic approximations in the positive and negative α regions......Three methods for estimating the lift and drag curves in the 360° angle of attack (α) range with harmonic approximation functions were analyzed in the present work. The first method assumes aerodynamic response of a flat plate, the second utilizes even sine and even cosine approximation functions...

  17. Magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus and process for high-resolution in situ investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Hoyt, David W.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Peden, Charles H. F.

    2015-11-24

    A continuous-flow (CF) magic angle sample spinning (CF-MAS) NMR rotor and probe are described for investigating reaction dynamics, stable intermediates/transition states, and mechanisms of catalytic reactions in situ. The rotor includes a sample chamber of a flow-through design with a large sample volume that delivers a flow of reactants through a catalyst bed contained within the sample cell allowing in-situ investigations of reactants and products. Flow through the sample chamber improves diffusion of reactants and products through the catalyst. The large volume of the sample chamber enhances sensitivity permitting in situ .sup.13C CF-MAS studies at natural abundance.

  18. Accounting for Fault Roughness in Pseudo-Dynamic Ground-Motion Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Mai, Paul Martin

    2017-04-03

    Geological faults comprise large-scale segmentation and small-scale roughness. These multi-scale geometrical complexities determine the dynamics of the earthquake rupture process, and therefore affect the radiated seismic wavefield. In this study, we examine how different parameterizations of fault roughness lead to variability in the rupture evolution and the resulting near-fault ground motions. Rupture incoherence naturally induced by fault roughness generates high-frequency radiation that follows an ω−2 decay in displacement amplitude spectra. Because dynamic rupture simulations are computationally expensive, we test several kinematic source approximations designed to emulate the observed dynamic behavior. When simplifying the rough-fault geometry, we find that perturbations in local moment tensor orientation are important, while perturbations in local source location are not. Thus, a planar fault can be assumed if the local strike, dip, and rake are maintained. We observe that dynamic rake angle variations are anti-correlated with the local dip angles. Testing two parameterizations of dynamically consistent Yoffe-type source-time function, we show that the seismic wavefield of the approximated kinematic ruptures well reproduces the radiated seismic waves of the complete dynamic source process. This finding opens a new avenue for an improved pseudo-dynamic source characterization that captures the effects of fault roughness on earthquake rupture evolution. By including also the correlations between kinematic source parameters, we outline a new pseudo-dynamic rupture modeling approach for broadband ground-motion simulation.

  19. AEROX: Computer program for transonic aircraft aerodynamics to high angles of attack. Volume 1: Aerodynamic methods and program users' guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelson, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The AEROX program estimates lift, induced-drag and pitching moments to high angles (typ. 60 deg) for wings and for wingbody combinations with or without an aft horizontal tail. Minimum drag coefficients are not estimated, but may be input for inclusion in the total aerodynamic parameters which are output in listed and plotted formats. The theory, users' guide, test cases, and program listing are presented.

  20. Phacoemulsification using iris-hooks for capsular support in high myopic patient with subluxated lens and secondary angle closure glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Brid

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an unusual case of angle closure glaucoma in a 78-year-old highly myopic female patient. The patient did not show any preoperative signs of subluxation of lens. However, the capsular bag was noted to be unstable during surgery. The patient was managed with phacoemulsification of lens using a novel method of iris hooks for stabilization of capsular bag during surgery.

  1. Sensor fault detection and isolation via high-gain observers: application to a double-pipe heat exchanger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, R F; Astorga-Zaragoza, C M; Téllez-Anguiano, A C; Juárez-Romero, D; Hernández, J A; Guerrero-Ramírez, G V

    2011-07-01

    This paper deals with fault detection and isolation (FDI) in sensors applied to a concentric-pipe counter-flow heat exchanger. The proposed FDI is based on the analytical redundancy implementing nonlinear high-gain observers which are used to generate residuals when a sensor fault is presented (as software sensors). By evaluating the generated residual, it is possible to switch between the sensor and the observer when a failure is detected. Experiments in a heat exchanger pilot validate the effectiveness of the approach. The FDI technique is easy to implement allowing the industries to have an excellent alternative tool to keep their heat transfer process under supervision. The main contribution of this work is based on a dynamic model with heat transfer coefficients which depend on temperature and flow used to estimate the output temperatures of a heat exchanger. This model provides a satisfactory approximation of the states of the heat exchanger in order to allow its implementation in a FDI system used to perform supervision tasks.

  2. Acoustic Detection of Faults and Degradation in a High-Bypass Turbofan Engine during VIPR Phase III Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Devin K.

    2017-01-01

    The Vehicle Integrated Propulsion Research (VIPR) Phase III project was executed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and several industry, academic, and government partners in the summer of 2015. One of the research objectives was to use external radial acoustic microphone arrays to detect changes in the noise characteristics produced by the research engine during volcanic ash ingestion and seeded fault insertion scenarios involving bleed air valves. Preliminary results indicate the successful acoustic detection of suspected degradation as a result of cumulative exposure to volcanic ash. This detection is shown through progressive changes, particularly in the high-frequency content, as a function of exposure to greater cumulative quantities of ash. Additionally, detection of the simulated failure of the 14th stage stability bleed valve and, to a lesser extent, the station 2.5 stability bleed valve, to their fully-open fail-safe positions was achieved by means of spectral comparisons between nominal (normal valve operation) and seeded fault scenarios.

  3. Structural character of the northern segment of the Paintbrush Canyon fault, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickerson, R.P. [Science Applications International Corp., Golden, CO (United States); Spengler, R.W. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Detailed mapping of exposed features along the northern part of the Paintbrush Canyon fault was initiated to aid in construction of the computer-assisted three-dimensional lithostratigraphic model of Yucca Mountain, to contribute to kinematic reconstruction of the tectonic history of the Paintbrush Canyon fault, and to assist in the interpretation of geophysical data from Midway Valley. Yucca Mountain is segmented into relatively intact blocks of east-dipping Miocene volcanic strata, bounded by north-striking, west-dipping high-angle normal faults. The Paintbrush Canyon fault, representing the easternmost block-bounding normal fault, separates Fran Ridge from Midway Valley and continues northward across Yucca Wash to at least the southern margin of the Timber Mountain Caldera complex. South of Yucca Wash, the Paintbrush Canyon Fault is largely concealed beneath thick Quaternary deposits. Bedrock exposures to the north reveal a complex fault, zone, displaying local north- and west-trending grabens, and rhombic pull-apart features. The fault scarp, discontinuously exposed along a mapped length of 8 km north of Yucca Wash, dips westward by 41{degrees} to 74{degrees}. Maximum vertical offset of the Rhyolite of Comb Peak along the fault measures about 210 m in Paintbrush Canyon and, on the basis of drill hole information, vertical offset of the Topopoah Spring Tuff is about 360 m near the northern part of Fran Ridge. Observed displacement along the fault in Paintbrush Canyon is down to the west with a component of left-lateral oblique slip. Unlike previously proposed tectonic models, strata adjacent to the fault dip to the east. Quaternary deposits do not appear displaced along the fault scarp north of Yucca Wash, but are displaced in trenches south of Yucca Wash.

  4. Evidence for distributed clockwise rotation of the crust in the northwestern United States from fault geometries and focal mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocher, Thomas M.; Wells, Ray E.; Lamb, Andrew P.; Weaver, Craig S.

    2017-01-01

    Paleomagnetic and GPS data indicate that Washington and Oregon have rotated clockwise for the past 16 Myr. Late Cenozoic and Quaternary fault geometries, seismicity lineaments, and focal mechanisms provide evidence that this rotation is accommodated by north directed thrusting and right-lateral strike-slip faulting in Washington, and SW to W directed normal faulting and right-lateral strike-slip faulting to the east. Several curvilinear NW to NNW trending high-angle strike-slip faults and seismicity lineaments in Washington and NW Oregon define a geologic pole (117.7°W, 47.9°N) of rotation relative to North America. Many faults and focal mechanisms throughout northwestern U.S. and southwestern British Columbia have orientations consistent with this geologic pole as do GPS surface velocities corrected for elastic Cascadia subduction zone coupling. Large Quaternary normal faults radial to the geologic pole, which appear to accommodate crustal rotation via crustal extension, are widespread and can be found along the Lewis and Clark zone in Montana, within the Centennial fault system north of the Snake River Plain in Idaho and Montana, to the west of the Wasatch Front in Utah, and within the northern Basin and Range in Oregon and Nevada. Distributed strike-slip faults are most prominent in western Washington and Oregon and may serve to transfer slip between faults throughout the northwestern U.S.

  5. Fault diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Kathy

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the research in this area of fault management is to develop and implement a decision aiding concept for diagnosing faults, especially faults which are difficult for pilots to identify, and to develop methods for presenting the diagnosis information to the flight crew in a timely and comprehensible manner. The requirements for the diagnosis concept were identified by interviewing pilots, analyzing actual incident and accident cases, and examining psychology literature on how humans perform diagnosis. The diagnosis decision aiding concept developed based on those requirements takes abnormal sensor readings as input, as identified by a fault monitor. Based on these abnormal sensor readings, the diagnosis concept identifies the cause or source of the fault and all components affected by the fault. This concept was implemented for diagnosis of aircraft propulsion and hydraulic subsystems in a computer program called Draphys (Diagnostic Reasoning About Physical Systems). Draphys is unique in two important ways. First, it uses models of both functional and physical relationships in the subsystems. Using both models enables the diagnostic reasoning to identify the fault propagation as the faulted system continues to operate, and to diagnose physical damage. Draphys also reasons about behavior of the faulted system over time, to eliminate possibilities as more information becomes available, and to update the system status as more components are affected by the fault. The crew interface research is examining display issues associated with presenting diagnosis information to the flight crew. One study examined issues for presenting system status information. One lesson learned from that study was that pilots found fault situations to be more complex if they involved multiple subsystems. Another was pilots could identify the faulted systems more quickly if the system status was presented in pictorial or text format. Another study is currently under way to

  6. Solutions on a high-speed wide-angle zoom lens with aspheric surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanashi, Takanori

    2012-10-01

    Recent development in CMOS and digital camera technology has accelerated the business and market share of digital cinematography. In terms of optical design, this technology has increased the need to carefully consider pixel pitch and characteristics of the imager. When the field angle at the wide end, zoom ratio, and F-number are specified, choosing an appropriate zoom lens type is crucial. In addition, appropriate power distributions and lens configurations are required. At points near the wide end of a zoom lens, it is known that an aspheric surface is an effective means to correct off-axis aberrations. On the other hand, optical designers have to focus on manufacturability of aspheric surfaces and perform required analysis with respect to the surface shape. Centration errors aside, it is also important to know the sensitivity to aspheric shape errors and their effect on image quality. In this paper, wide angle cine zoom lens design examples are introduced and their main characteristics are described. Moreover, technical challenges are pointed out and solutions are proposed.

  7. Seismic reflection profiles from offshore central California: evidence for post-Miocene imbricate thrust faulting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crouch, J.K.; Bachman, S.

    1984-04-01

    High-resolution, 36-fold seismic reflection data with penetration to 3 sec have been collected recently in the northeastern offshore Santa Maria basin, the northern Santa Barbara Channel, and off Point Conception, California. These profiles reveal major east-over-west thrust in areas previously interpreted as being characterized by strike-slip faults and/or high-angle normal or reverse faults. Like those in well known foreland thrust belts, these faults typically from an imbricate system in which they curve asymptotically downward to a common basal sole thrust. ''Soling out'' generally occurs at depths of 1.5-3km (5000-10,000 ft). Detailed mapping of faults and folds associated with these thrust systems coupled with fault-plane solutions suggest that: these thrust formed within the last 5 m.y.,; many have modern activity; and compressive forces causing them are normal to the strike of the San Andreas fault. These observations agree with present-day plate motion studies which require that Pacific-North American relative plate motion include a component of compression orthogonal to the San Andreas fault. These overthrust regions are all sites of recent major petroleum discoveries. However, these discoveries have all been made on obvious anticlinal structures that generally are attributed to wrench tectonics. Recognition of thrust faulting in these areas may lead to additional discoveries from more subtle geologic traps associated with overthrusting.

  8. From detachment to transtensional faulting: A model for the Lake Mead extensional domain based on new ages and correlation of subbasins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, L.; Umhoefer, P. J.; Martin, K. L.; Blythe, N.

    2007-12-01

    in the Lake Mead fault system as detachment faulting waned. The Lake Mead fault system began to propagate to the west and faults and subbasins north of Gold Butte died with major progradation of alluvial conglomerates over the step-over basin. The geometry of the SVWHD that dominated the early Lake Mead extension history fundamentally controlled patterns of faulting and magmatism throughout the rest of the extensional history. This process of detachment faulting changing to dominant high-angle faulting and possible lower crustal flow has been suggested previously and may be a general process.

  9. High Yield of GaAs Nanowire Arrays on Si Mediated by the Pinning and Contact Angle of Ga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo-Averchi, Eleonora; Vukajlovic Plestina, Jelena; Tütüncüoglu, Gözde; Matteini, Federico; Dalmau-Mallorquí, Anna; de la Mata, Maria; Rüffer, Daniel; Potts, Heidi A; Arbiol, Jordi; Conesa-Boj, Sonia; Fontcuberta i Morral, Anna

    2015-05-13

    GaAs nanowire arrays on silicon offer great perspectives in the optoelectronics and solar cell industry. To fulfill this potential, gold-free growth in predetermined positions should be achieved. Ga-assisted growth of GaAs nanowires in the form of array has been shown to be challenging and difficult to reproduce. In this work, we provide some of the key elements for obtaining a high yield of GaAs nanowires on patterned Si in a reproducible way: contact angle and pinning of the Ga droplet inside the apertures achieved by the modification of the surface properties of the nanoscale areas exposed to growth. As an example, an amorphous silicon layer between the crystalline substrate and the oxide mask results in a contact angle around 90°, leading to a high yield of vertical nanowires. Another example for tuning the contact angle is anticipated, native oxide with controlled thickness. This work opens new perspectives for the rational and reproducible growth of GaAs nanowire arrays on silicon.

  10. Fault-tolerant system for catastrophic faults in AMR sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zambrano Constantini, A.C.; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    Anisotropic Magnetoresistance angle sensors are widely used in automotive applications considered to be safety-critical applications. Therefore dependability is an important requirement and fault-tolerant strategies must be used to guarantee the correct operation of the sensors even in case of

  11. Low-frequency unsteadiness of vortex wakes over slender bodies at high angle of attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Baofeng

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A type of flow unsteadiness with low frequencies and large amplitude was investigated experimentally for vortex wakes around an ogive-tangent cylinder. The experiments were carried out at angles of attack of 60–80° and subcritical Reynolds numbers of 0.6–1.8 × 105. The reduced frequencies of the unsteadiness are between 0.038 and 0.072, much less than the frequency of Karman vortex shedding. The unsteady flow induces large fluctuations of sectional side forces. The results of pressure measurements and particle image velocimetry indicate that the flow unsteadiness comes from periodic oscillation of the vortex wakes over the slender body. The time-averaged vortex patterns over the slender body are asymmetric, whose orientation is dependent on azimuthal locations of tip perturbations. Therefore, the vortex oscillation is a type of unsteady oscillation around a time-averaged asymmetric vortex structure.

  12. A simple method for measuring the superhydrophobic contact angle with high accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yi-Lin; Chang, Yao-Yuan; Wang, Meng-Jiy; Lin, Shi-Yow

    2010-06-01

    A modified selected-plane method for contact angle (θ) measurement is proposed in this study that avoids the difficulty of finding the real contact point and image-distortion effects adjacent to the contact point. This method is particularly suitable for superhydrophobic surfaces. The sessile-drop method coupled with the tangent line is the most popular method to find the contact angle in literature, but it entails unavoidable errors in determining the air-solid base line due to the smoothness problem and substrate tilting. In addition, the tangent-line technique requires finding the actual contact point. The measurement error due to the base line problem becomes more profound for superhydrophobic surfaces. A larger θ deviation results from a more superhydrophobic surface with a fixed base line error. The proposed modified selected-plane method requires only four data points (droplet apex, droplet height, and two interfacial loci close to the air-solid interface), avoiding the problem of the sessile-drop-tangent method in finding the contact point and saving the trouble of the sessile-drop-fitting method for best fitting of the numerous edge points with the theoretical profile. A careful error analysis was performed, and a user-friendly program was provided in this work. This method resulted in an accurate θ measurement and a method that was much improved over the classical selected plane and the sessile-drop-tangent methods. The θ difference between this method and the sessile-drop-fitting method was found to be less than three degrees.

  13. Angle-dependent hard X-ray photoemission study of Nb hydride formation in high-pressure supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soda, Kazuo, E-mail: j45880a@cc.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Quantum Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Kondo, Hiroki; Yamaguchi, Kanta; Kato, Masahiko [Department of Quantum Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Shiraki, Tatsuhito; Niwa, Ken; Kusaba, Keiji; Hasegawa, Masashi [Department of Crystalline Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Xeniya, Kozina; Ikenaga, Eiji [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1, Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Nb hydrides in 10-GPa supercritical water are studied by photoelectron spectroscopy. • The hydride components of the Nb 3d core-level spectra are increased with the depth. • The bulk valence-band spectrum shows a split band due to the Nb–H bond formation. • The hydrides are formed in the bulk and their surfaces are covered with Nb oxides. - Abstract: Nb hydrides formation in 10-GPa supercritical water has been investigated by angle-dependent micro-beam hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. In the Nb 3d core-level spectra, Nb hydride components are found in the slightly high binding energy side of the metallic components, and the oxide ones are observed even though little oxides are recognized in X-ray diffraction patterns. Obtained emission-angle dependence of the Nb 3d core-level spectra of Nb hydride specimens shows that the Nb hydride components increase with the emission angle decreased i.e. the sampling depth increased, while the oxide ones decrease. The bulk valence-band spectrum is obtained by decomposing the measured valence-band spectra into a bulk and surface components with use of the emission-angle dependence of the core-level and valence-band spectra; it consists of two bands. This implies the Nb–H chemical bond formation and Nb in an oxidation state, consistent with reported band structure calculations and the observed core-level chemical shifts. Thus it is confirmed by valence-band and core-level photoelectron spectroscopy that the Nb hydrides are formed inside the specimen, irrespective to the well-known high oxidation ability of supercritical water.

  14. Facile Synthesis of Monodispersed Polysulfide Spheres for Building Structural Colors with High Color Visibility and Broad Viewing Angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feihu; Tang, Bingtao; Wu, Suli; Zhang, Shufen

    2017-01-01

    The synthesis and assembly of monodispersed colloidal spheres are currently the subject of extensive investigation to fabricate artificial structural color materials. However, artificial structural colors from general colloidal crystals still suffer from the low color visibility and strong viewing angle dependence which seriously hinder their practical application in paints, colorimetric sensors, and color displays. Herein, monodispersed polysulfide (PSF) spheres with intrinsic high refractive index (as high as 1.858) and light-absorbing characteristics are designed, synthesized through a facile polycondensation and crosslinking process between sodium disulfide and 1,2,3-trichloropropane. Owing to their high monodispersity, sufficient surface charge, and good dispersion stability, the PSF spheres can be assembled into large-scale and high-quality 3D photonic crystals. More importantly, high structural color visibility and broad viewing angle are easily achieved because the unique features of PSF can remarkably enhance the relative reflectivity and eliminate the disturbance of scattering and background light. The results of this study provide a simple and efficient strategy to create structural colors with high color visibility, which is very important for their practical application.

  15. Evolution of a highly dilatant fault zone in the grabens of Canyonlands National Park, Utah/USA – integrating field work, ground penetrating radar and airborne imagery analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kettermann

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The grabens of the Canyonlands National Park are a young and active system of sub-parallel, arcuate grabens, whose evolution is the result of salt movement in the subsurface and a slight regional tilt of the faulted strata. We present results of ground penetrating radar surveys in combination with field observations and analysis of high resolution airborne imagery. GPR data show intense faulting of the Quaternary sediments at the flat graben floors, implying a more complex fault structure than visible at the surface. Direct measurements of heave and throw at several locations to infer fault dips at depth, combined with observations of primary joint surfaces in the upper 100 m suggest a model of the highly dilatant fault geometry in profile. Sinkholes observed in the field as well as in airborne imagery give insights in local massive dilatancy and show where water and sediments are transported underground. Based on correlations of paleosols observed in outcrops and GPR profiles, we argue that the grabens in Canyonlands National Park are either older than previously assumed, or that sedimentation rates were much higher in the Pleistocene.

  16. Evolution of a highly dilatant fault zone in the grabens of Canyonlands National Park, Utah/USA - integrating field work, ground penetrating radar and airborne imagery analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettermann, M.; Grützner, C.; van Gent, H. W.; Urai, J. L.; Reicherter, K.; Mertens, J.

    2015-03-01

    The grabens of the Canyonlands National Park are a young and active system of sub-parallel, arcuate grabens, whose evolution is the result of salt movement in the subsurface and a slight regional tilt of the faulted strata. We present results of ground penetrating radar surveys in combination with field observations and analysis of high resolution airborne imagery. GPR data show intense faulting of the Quaternary sediments at the flat graben floors, implying a more complex fault structure than visible at the surface. Direct measurements of heave and throw at several locations to infer fault dips at depth, combined with observations of primary joint surfaces in the upper 100 m suggest a model of the highly dilatant fault geometry in profile. Sinkholes observed in the field as well as in airborne imagery give insights in local massive dilatancy and show where water and sediments are transported underground. Based on correlations of paleosols observed in outcrops and GPR profiles, we argue that the grabens in Canyonlands National Park are either older than previously assumed, or that sedimentation rates were much higher in the Pleistocene.

  17. Shallow subsurface imaging of the Piano di Pezza active normal fault (central Italy) by high-resolution refraction and electrical resistivity tomography coupled with time domain electromagnetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, Fabio; Tulliani, Valerio; Fierro, Elisa; Sapia, Vincenzo; Civico, Riccardo

    2015-04-01

    The Piano di Pezza fault is the north-westernmost segment of the >20 km long Ovindoli-Pezza active normal fault-system (central Italy). Although existing paleoseismic data document high vertical Holocene slip rates (~1 mm/yr) and a remarkable seismogenic potential of this fault, its subsurface setting and Pleistocene cumulative displacement are still poorly known. We investigated for the first time by means of high-resolution seismic and electrical resistivity tomography coupled with time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) measurements the shallow subsurface of a key section of the Piano di Pezza fault. Our surveys cross a ~5 m-high fault scarp that was generated by repeated surface-rupturing earthquakes displacing some Late Holocene alluvial fans. We provide 2-D Vp and resistivity images which clearly show significant details of the fault structure and the geometry of the shallow basin infill material down to 50 m depth. We can estimate the dip (~50°) and the Holocene vertical displacement of the master fault (~10 m). We also recognize in the hangingwall some low-velocity/low-resistivity regions that we relate to packages of colluvial wedges derived from scarp degradation, which may represent the record of several paleo-earthquakes older than the Late Holocene events previously recognized by paleoseismic trenching. Conversely, due to the limited investigation depth of seismic and electrical tomography, the estimation of the cumulative amount of Pleistocene throw is hampered. Therefore, to increase the depth of investigation, we performed 7 TDEM measurements along the electrical profile using a 50 m loop size both in central and offset configuration. The recovered 1-D resistivity models show a good match with 2-D resistivity images in the near surface. Moreover, TDEM inversion results indicate that in the hangingwall, ~200 m away from the surface fault trace, the carbonate pre-Quaternary basement may be found at ~90-100 m depth. The combined approach of electrical and

  18. Assessment of the impact of HTSCs on superconducting fault-current limiters. [High Temperature SuperConductors (HTSCs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giese, R.F. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Runde, M. (Energiforsyningens Forskningsinstitutt A/S, Trondheim (Norway))

    1993-01-01

    The possible impact of nitrogen-cooled superconductors on the desip and cost of superconducting fault-current limiters is assessed by considering the technical specifications such devices must meet and by comparing material properties of 77-K and 4-K superconductors. The main advantages of operating superconductors at 77 K are that the refrigeration operating cost is reduced by a factor of up to 25 and the refrigeration capital cost is reduced by a factor of up to 10. The heat capacity is several orders of magnitude Larger at 77 K and at 4 K. This phenomenon increases conductor stability against flux jumps but makes switching from the superconducting to the normal state slow and difficult. Therefore, a high critical current density, probably at least 10[sup 5] A/cm[sup 2], is required.

  19. The seismogenic fault of the 2010 Efpalion moderate-size seismic sequence (western Corinth gulf, Central Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranos, M. D.

    2016-08-01

    The 2010 Efpalion seismic sequence with two main moderate earthquake events occurred in the northwestern part of the Corinth Gulf (Central Greece)—a region that has been intensely stretched due to an on-going N-S extensional stress regime. Previous studies assign these two events to activations of (a) two faults dipping to the north with low angles; (b) two faults dipping at high angles, the first dipping to the south, and the second to the north; and (c) two faults dipping at high angles, but the first dips to the north, and the second to the south. The recently proposed TR method for focal mechanisms that identifies the seismogenic fault of an earthquake sequence is applied on the available focal mechanisms of the sequence, and its results are interrelated with the geology of the region, and previous contradictory interpretations. The focal mechanisms constructed with MT inversion define a steep north-dipping normal fault, whereas those constructed with first motions of P-waves define the activation of two adjoining faults that dip with high angles to the SSE and south, respectively, and which are characterized by strain (slip) compatibility. The latter option fits well with the geology of the region that is dominated by a SE to S-dipping horse-tail splay fault zone which exists at the eastern tip of the Nafpaktos Mountain Front. The application of the TR method reveals that the usage itself of different methods for the construction of the focal mechanisms complicates the problem of correctly identifying the seismogenic fault.

  20. High Performance of Space Vector Modulation Direct Torque Control SVM-DTC Based on Amplitude Voltage and Stator Flux Angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Farhan Rashag

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Various aspects related to controlling induction motor are investigated. Direct torque control is an original high performance control strategy in the field of AC drive. In this proposed method, the control system is based on Space Vector Modulation (SVM, amplitude of voltage in direct- quadrature reference frame (d-q reference and angle of stator flux. Amplitude of stator voltage is controlled by PI torque and PI flux controller. The stator flux angle is adjusted by rotor angular frequency and slip angular frequency. Then, the reference torque and the estimated torque is applied to the input of PI torque controller and the control quadrature axis voltage is determined. The control d-axis voltage is determined from the flux calculator. These q and d axis voltage are converted into amplitude voltage. By applying polar to Cartesian on amplitude voltage and stator flux angle, direct voltage and quadratures voltage are generated. The reference stator voltages in d-q are calculated based on forcing the stator voltage error to zero at next sampling period. By applying inverse park transformation on d-q voltages, the stator voltages in &alpha and &beta frame are generated and apply to SVM. From the output of SVM, the motor control signal is generated and the speed of the induction motor regulated toward the rated speed. The simulation Results have demonstrated exceptional performance in steady and transient states and shows that decrease of torque and flux ripples is achieved in a complete speed range.

  1. Semi-automated fault system extraction and displacement analysis of an excavated oyster reef using high-resolution laser scanned data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, Gábor; Székely, Balázs; Harzhauser, Mathias; Djuricic, Ana; Mandic, Oleg; Dorninger, Peter; Nothegger, Clemens; Exner, Ulrike; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2015-04-01

    In this contribution we present a semi-automated method for reconstructing the brittle deformation field of an excavated Miocene oyster reef, in Stetten, Korneuburg Basin, Lower Austria. Oyster shells up to 80 cm in size were scattered in a shallow estuarine bay forming a continuous and almost isochronous layer as a consequence of a catastrophic event in the Miocene. This shell bed was preserved by burial of several hundred meters of sandy to silty sediments. Later the layers were tilted westward, uplifted and erosion almost exhumed them. An excavation revealed a 27 by 17 meters area of the oyster covered layer. During the tectonic processes the sediment volume suffered brittle deformation. Faults mostly with some centimeter normal component and NW-SE striking affected the oyster covered volume, dissecting many shells and the surrounding matrix as well. Faults and displacements due to them can be traced along the site typically at several meters long, and as fossil oysters are broken and parts are displaced due to the faulting, along some faults it is possible to follow these displacements in 3D. In order to quantify these varying displacements and to map the undulating fault traces high-resolution scanning of the excavated and cleaned surface of the oyster bed has been carried out using a terrestrial laser scanner. The resulting point clouds have been co-georeferenced at mm accuracy and a 1mm resolution 3D point cloud of the surface has been created. As the faults are well-represented in the point cloud, this enables us to measure the dislocations of the dissected shell parts along the fault lines. We used a semi-automatic method to quantify these dislocations. First we manually digitized the fault lines in 2D as an initial model. In the next step we estimated the vertical (i.e. perpendicular to the layer) component of the dislocation along these fault lines comparing the elevations on two sides of the faults with moving averaging windows. To estimate the strike

  2. Investigating the architecture of the Paganica Fault (2009 Mw 6.1 earthquake, central Italy) by integrating high-resolution multiscale refraction tomography and detailed geological mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, F.; Improta, L.; Pucci, S.; Civico, R.; Bruno, P. P. G.; Pantosti, D.

    2017-01-01

    We present a 2-D subsurface image of the Paganica Fault from a high-resolution refraction tomography and detailed geological investigation carried out across part of the northwestern segment of the 20-km-long Paganica-San Demetrio fault-system, and which was responsible of the 2009 April 6 Mw 6.1 L'Aquila earthquake (central Italy). We acquired two seismic profiles crossing the Paganica basin with a dense-wide aperture configuration. More than 30 000 P wave first-arrival traveltimes were input to a non-linear tomographic inversion. The obtained 250-300 m deep 2-D Vp images illuminate the shallow portion of the Paganica Fault, and depict additional unreported splays defining a complex half-graben structure. We interpret local thickening of low-Vp (tectonic clastic wedges above a high-Vp (3800-5000 m s-1) carbonate basement. These results are condensed in a 4.2-km-long section across the Paganica basin, clearly indicating that the Paganica Fault is a mature normal fault cutting the whole upper ˜10 km of the crust. We evaluate a minimum cumulative net displacement of 650 ± 90 m and a total heave of 530 ± 65 m accomplished by the Paganica Fault, respectively. In the conservative hypothesis that the extension started during the Gelasian (1.80-2.59 Ma), we obtain a minimum long-term slip-rate of 0.30 ± 0.07 mm yr-1 and an extension-rate of 0.25 ± 0.06 mm yr-1, respectively. Considering the regional averaged extensional field of ˜1 mm yr-1 obtained from geodetic and geological analyses at 104 yr timescale, we infer that the Paganica Fault accounts for ˜20 per cent of the NE-extension affecting this zone of the central Apennines axis due to the concurrent activity of other parallel normal fault-systems nearby (e.g. the Liri, Velino-Magnola, L'Aquila-Celano and Gran Sasso fault-systems).

  3. Fault strength evolution during high velocity friction experiments with slip-pulse and constant-velocity loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Z.; Chang, J. C.; Reches, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic analyses show that slip during large earthquakes evolves in a slip-pulse mode that is characterized by abrupt, intense acceleration followed by moderate deceleration. We experimentally analyze the friction evolution under slip-pulse proxy of a large earthquake, and compare it with the evolution at loading modes of constant-velocity and changing-velocity. We present a series of 42 experiments conducted on granite samples sheared in a high-velocity rotary apparatus. The experiments were conducted on room-dry, solid granite samples at slip-velocities of 0.0006-1 m/s, and normal stress of 1-11.5 MPa. The constitutive relations are presented with respect to mechanical power-density: PD= [shear stress * slip velocity], with units of power per area (MW/m^2). The experimental constitutive relations strongly depend on the loading mode. Constant velocity mode displays initial weakening with increasing PD that is followed by strengthening for PD = 0.02-0.5 MW/m^2, and abrupt weakening at PD > 0.5 MW/m^2. Changing-velocity modes display gentle strengthening for PD < 0.2 MW/m^2 that is followed by abrupt weakening as PD reaches 0.7-0.8 MW/m^2. Beyond this level of power-density, the two loading modes diverge: in changing-velocity of quake-mode the experimental fault continues to weaken with friction coefficient approaching 0.2, whereas in changing-velocity of ramp-mode the fault strengthens with friction coefficient approaching 1.0. The analysis demonstrates that (1) the strength evolution and constitutive parameters of the granite fault strongly depend on the loading mode, and (2) the slip-pulse mode is energy efficient relatively to the constant-velocity mode as manifested by faster, more intense weakening and 50-90% lower energy dissipation. The results suggest that the frictional strength determined in slip-pulse experiments, is more relevant to simulations of earthquake rupture than frictional strength determined in constant-velocity experiments.Figure 1. Friction

  4. High resolution magic angle spinning 1H NMR of childhood brain and nervous system tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies Nigel P

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain and nervous system tumours are the most common solid cancers in children. Molecular characterisation of these tumours is important for providing novel biomarkers of disease and identifying molecular pathways which may provide putative targets for new therapies. 1H magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy (1H HR-MAS is a powerful tool for determining metabolite profiles from small pieces of intact tissue and could potentially provide important molecular information. Methods Forty tissue samples from 29 children with glial and primitive neuro-ectodermal tumours were analysed using HR-MAS (600 MHz Varian gHX nanoprobe. Tumour spectra were fitted to a library of individual metabolite spectra to provide metabolite values. These values were then used in a two tailed t-test and multi-variate analysis employing a principal component analysis and a linear discriminant analysis. Classification accuracy was estimated using a leave-one-out analysis and B632+ bootstrapping. Results Glial tumours had significantly (two tailed t-test p Conclusion HR-MAS identified key differences in the metabolite profiles of childhood brain and nervous system improving the molecular characterisation of these tumours. Further investigation of the underlying molecular pathways is required to assess their potential as targets for new agents.

  5. Joint-Angle Specific Strength Adaptations Influence Improvements in Power in Highly Trained Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhea Matthew R.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of training at different ranges of motion during the squat exercise on joint-angle specific strength adaptations. Methods. Twenty eight men were randomly assigned to one of three training groups, differing only in the depth of squats (quarter squat, half squat, and full squat performed in 16-week training intervention. Strength measures were conducted in the back squat pre-, mid-, and post-training at all three depths. Vertical jump and 40-yard sprint time were also measured. Results. Individuals in the quarter and full squat training groups improved significantly more at the specific depth at which they trained when compared to the other two groups (p < 0.05. Jump height and sprint speed improved in all groups (p < 0.05; however, the quarter squat had the greatest transfer to both outcomes. Conclusions. Consistently including quarter squats in workouts aimed at maximizing speed and jumping power can result in greater improvements.

  6. Diagnosis Method for Analog Circuit Hard fault and Soft Fault

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoru Han

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Because the traditional BP neural network slow convergence speed, easily falling in local minimum and the learning process will appear oscillation phenomena. This paper introduces a tolerance analog circuit hard fault and soft fault diagnosis method based on adaptive learning rate and the additional momentum algorithm BP neural network. Firstly, tolerance analog circuit is simulated by OrCAD / Pspice circuit simulation software, accurately extracts fault waveform data by matlab program automatically. Secondly, using the adaptive learning rate and momentum BP algorithm to train neural network, and then applies it to analog circuit hard fault and soft fault diagnosis. With shorter training time, high precision and global convergence effectively reduces the misjudgment, missing, it can improve the accuracy of fault diagnosis and fast.  

  7. Strike-slip faulting at Thebes Gap, Missouri and Illinois: Implications for New Madrid tectonism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Richard W.; Schultz, Art

    1994-04-01

    Numerous NNE and NE striking strike-slip faults and associated normal faults, folds, and transtensional grabens occur in the Thebes Gap area of Missouri and Illinois. These structures developed along the northwestern margin of the buried Reelfoot rift of Precambrian-Cambrian age at the northern edge of the Mississippi embayment. They have had a long-lived and complex structural history. This is an area of recent moderate seismicity, approximately 45 km north of the New Madrid seismic zone. Stratigraphic evidence suggests that these faults were active during the Middle Ordovician. They were subsequently reactivated between the Early Devonian and Late Cretaceous, probably in response to both the Acadian and Ouachita orogenies. Deformation during this period was characterized by strongly faulted and folded Ordovician through Devonian rocks. In places, these deformed rocks are overlain with angular unconformity by undeformed Cretaceous strata. Fault motion is interpreted as dominantly strike slip. A still younger period of reactivation involved Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic formations as young as the Miocene or Pliocene Mounds Gravel. These formations have experienced both minor high-angle normal faulting and subsequent major, right-lateral strike-slip faulting. En echelon north-south folds, ENE striking normal faults, regional fracture patterns, and drag folds indicate the right-lateral motion for this major episode of faulting which predates deposition of Quaternary loess. Several nondefinitive lines of evidence suggest Quaternary faulting. Similar fault orientations and kinematics, as well as recent seismicity and proximity, clearly suggest a structural relationship between deformation at Thebes Gap and tectonism associated with the New Madrid area.

  8. High-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy of protons with homonuclear dipolar decoupling schemes under magic-angle spinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhu, P K

    2009-02-01

    High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of (1)H spins in the solid state is normally rendered difficult due to the strong homonuclear (1)H-(1)H dipolar couplings. Even under very high-speed magic-angle spinning (MAS) at ca. 60-70kHz, these couplings are not completely removed. An appropriate radiofrequency pulse scheme is required to average out the homonuclear dipolar interactions in combination with MAS to get high-resolution (1)H NMR spectrum in solid state. Several schemes have been introduced in the recent past with a variety of applications also envisaged. Development of some of these schemes has been made possible with a clear understanding of the underlying spin physics based on bimodal Floquet theory. The utility of these high-resolution pulse schemes in combination with MAS has been demonstrated for spinning speeds of 10-65kHz in a range of (1)H Larmor frequencies from 300 to 800MHz.

  9. Characterization of intrabasin faulting and deformation for earthquake hazards in southern Utah Valley, Utah, from high-resolution seismic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, William J.; Odum, Jack K.; Williams, Robert A.; McBride, John H.; Tomlinson, Iris

    2012-01-01

    We conducted active and passive seismic imaging investigations along a 5.6-km-long, east–west transect ending at the mapped trace of the Wasatch fault in southern Utah Valley. Using two-dimensional (2D) P-wave seismic reflection data, we imaged basin deformation and faulting to a depth of 1.4 km and developed a detailed interval velocity model for prestack depth migration and 2D ground-motion simulations. Passive-source microtremor data acquired at two sites along the seismic reflection transect resolve S-wave velocities of approximately 200 m/s at the surface to about 900 m/s at 160 m depth and confirm a substantial thickening of low-velocity material westward into the valley. From the P-wave reflection profile, we interpret shallow (100–600 m) bedrock deformation extending from the surface trace of the Wasatch fault to roughly 1.5 km west into the valley. The bedrock deformation is caused by multiple interpreted fault splays displacing fault blocks downward to the west of the range front. Further west in the valley, the P-wave data reveal subhorizontal horizons from approximately 90 to 900 m depth that vary in thickness and whose dip increases with depth eastward toward the Wasatch fault. Another inferred fault about 4 km west of the mapped Wasatch fault displaces horizons within the valley to as shallow as 100 m depth. The overall deformational pattern imaged in our data is consistent with the Wasatch fault migrating eastward through time and with the abandonment of earlier synextensional faults, as part of the evolution of an inferred 20-km-wide half-graben structure within Utah Valley. Finite-difference 2D modeling suggests the imaged subsurface basin geometry can cause fourfold variation in peak ground velocity over distances of 300 m.

  10. The evolution of fault geometry and lithosphere mechanical response to faulting during lithosphere hyper-extension at magma-poor rifted margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Romeu, Júlia; Kusznir, Nick; Manatschal, Gianreto; Roberts, Alan

    2016-04-01

    ), similar to that observed for continental rift faulting. The heaves of the main modelled faults are typically between 2 and 15 km with a maximum of 25 km. In contrast to extensional fault geometries at continental rifting, slow spreading ocean ridges show a concave down fault geometry at shallower depth (between 0 and 2 km depth) and an emergence angle of exhumed fault footwall between 15° and 20°. This rolling-hinge response to extensional faulting (Buck 1988) requires a low effective elastic thickness for the flexural isostatic response, typically ranging between 0.25 and 1 km. Some ambiguity exists when modelling bathymetry at slow spreading ridges; in some cases the same bathymetric profile can be modelled with low effective elastic thickness and high fault extension, or with higher effective elastic thickness and lower extension. This ambiguity arises because of the difficulty in distinguishing an extensional break-away for a large fault from a simple footwall uplift of a smaller fault. Future work will focus on developing and applying a unified model of extensional fault geometry and lithosphere mechanical response to the development of hyper-extended domains at magma-poor rifted continental margins.

  11. In Vivo Detection of the Cyclic Osmoregulated Periplasmic Glucan of Ralstonia solanacearum by High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieruszeski, J.-M.; Bohin, A.; Bohin, J.-P.; Lippens, G.

    2001-07-01

    We investigate the mobility of the osmoregulated periplasmic glucans of Ralstonia solanacearum in the bacterial periplasm through the use of high-resolution (HR) NMR spectroscopy under static and magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions. Because the nature of periplasm is far from an isotropic aqueous solution, the molecules could be freely diffusing or rather associated to a periplasmic protein, a membrane protein, a lipid, or the peptidoglycan. HR MAS NMR spectroscopy leads to more reproducible results and allows the in vivo detection and characterization of the complex molecule.

  12. Multiple-quantum magic-angle spinning: high-resolution solid state NMR spectroscopy of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Goldbourt, A

    2002-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical aspects of the multiple-quantum magic-angle spinning experiment (MQMAS) are discussed in this review. The significance of this experiment, introduced by Frydman and Harwood, is in its ability to provide high-resolution NMR spectra of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei (I /geq 3/2). This technique has proved to be useful in various systems ranging from inorganic materials to biological samples. This review addresses the development of various pulse schemes aimed at improving the signal-to-noise ratio and anisotropic lineshapes. Representative spectra are shown to underscore the importance and applications of the MQMAS experiment. Refs. 97 (author)

  13. Handling Software Faults with Redundancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carzaniga, Antonio; Gorla, Alessandra; Pezzè, Mauro

    Software engineering methods can increase the dependability of software systems, and yet some faults escape even the most rigorous and methodical development process. Therefore, to guarantee high levels of reliability in the presence of faults, software systems must be designed to reduce the impact of the failures caused by such faults, for example by deploying techniques to detect and compensate for erroneous runtime conditions. In this chapter, we focus on software techniques to handle software faults, and we survey several such techniques developed in the area of fault tolerance and more recently in the area of autonomic computing. Since practically all techniques exploit some form of redundancy, we consider the impact of redundancy on the software architecture, and we propose a taxonomy centered on the nature and use of redundancy in software systems. The primary utility of this taxonomy is to classify and compare techniques to handle software faults.

  14. USING MUTATION IN FAULT LOCALIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenglong Sun

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Fault localization is time-consuming and difficult, which makes it the bottleneck of the debugging progress. To help facilitate this task, there exist many fault localization techniques that help narrow down the region of the suspicious code in a program. Better accuracy in fault localization is achieved from heavy computation cost. Fault localization techniques that can effectively locate faults also manifest slow response rate. In this paper, we promote the use of pre-computing to distribute the time-intensive computations to the idle period of coding phase, in order to speed up such techniques and achieve both low-cost and high accuracy. We raise the research problems of finding suitable techniques that can be pre-computed and adapt it to the pre-computing paradigm in a continuous integration environment. Further, we use an existing fault localization technique to demonstrate our research exploration, and shows visions and challenges of the related methodologies.

  15. An Experimental Study on 3—D Flow in an Annular Cascade of High Turning Angle Turbine Blades

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangWensheng; LiangXizhi; 等

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of the three-dimensional turbulent flow fields in a lowspeed annular cascade of high turning angle turbine blades.Detailed measurements were performed on the blade surfaces and mid-streamsurface in the passage and at three axial planes downstream of the cascade by using wall static pressure taps,a five-hole probe and a hot-wire anemometer,The test data include static pressure distribution on blade surfaces,total pressure loss cofeeicient,mean flow velocity components.radial flow angle,turbulence intensity and Reynolds shear stress.Analyses of the three-dimensional cascade flow characteristics were made on the noset location of high loss vortices.the variation of pressure gradient inside the cascade passage and the properties of endwall boundary layers total pressure loss distributions,secondary vortex turbulent dissipation and wake decay downtream of the cascade.These experimental results are valuable for revealing the details of the complex vortex flow structure in modern highly loaded axial turbomachines and validating the three-dimensional flow numerical computation codes.

  16. Tool for Viewing Faults Under Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Herbert, L.; Li, P. Peggy

    2005-01-01

    Multi Surface Light Table (MSLT) is an interactive software tool that was developed in support of the QuakeSim project, which has created an earthquake- fault database and a set of earthquake- simulation software tools. MSLT visualizes the three-dimensional geometries of faults embedded below the terrain and animates time-varying simulations of stress and slip. The fault segments, represented as rectangular surfaces at dip angles, are organized into collections, that is, faults. An interface built into MSLT queries and retrieves fault definitions from the QuakeSim fault database. MSLT also reads time-varying output from one of the QuakeSim simulation tools, called "Virtual California." Stress intensity is represented by variations in color. Slips are represented by directional indicators on the fault segments. The magnitudes of the slips are represented by the duration of the directional indicators in time. The interactive controls in MSLT provide a virtual track-ball, pan and zoom, translucency adjustment, simulation playback, and simulation movie capture. In addition, geographical information on the fault segments and faults is displayed on text windows. Because of the extensive viewing controls, faults can be seen in relation to one another, and to the terrain. These relations can be realized in simulations. Correlated slips in parallel faults are visible in the playback of Virtual California simulations.

  17. Fault-Tree Compiler Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Martensen, Anna L.

    1992-01-01

    FTC, Fault-Tree Compiler program, is reliability-analysis software tool used to calculate probability of top event of fault tree. Five different types of gates allowed in fault tree: AND, OR, EXCLUSIVE OR, INVERT, and M OF N. High-level input language of FTC easy to understand and use. Program supports hierarchical fault-tree-definition feature simplifying process of description of tree and reduces execution time. Solution technique implemented in FORTRAN, and user interface in Pascal. Written to run on DEC VAX computer operating under VMS operating system.

  18. Faulting evidence of isostatic uplift in the Rincon Mountains metamorphic core complex: An image processing analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Guerra, Edna Patricia

    This study focuses on the applications of remote sensing techniques and digital analysis to characterizing of tectonic features of the Rincon Mountains metamorphic core complex. Data included Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images, digital elevation models (DEM), and digital orthophoto quadrangle quads (DOQQ). The main findings in this study are two nearly orthogonal systems of structures that have never been reported in the Rincon Mountains. The first system, a penetrative faulting system of the footwall rocks, trends N10--30°W. Similar structures identified in other metamorphic core complexes. The second system trends N60--70°E, and has only been alluded indirectly in the literature of metamorphic core complexes. The structures pervade mylonites in Tanque Verde Mountain, Mica Mountain, and the Rincon Peak area. As measured on the imagery, spacing between the N10--30°W lineaments ranges from ˜0.5 to 2 km, and from 0.25 to 1 km for the N60--70°E system. Field inspection reveals that the N10--30°W trending system, are high-angle normal faults dipping mainly to the west. One of the main faults, named here the Cabeza de Vaca fault, has a polished, planar, striated and grooved surface with slickenlines indicating pure normal dip-slip movement (N10°W, 83°SW; slickensides rake 85°SW). The Cabeza de Vaca fault is the eastern boundary of a 2 km-wide graben, with displacement as great as 400 meters. The N10--30°W faults are syn- to post-mylonitic, high-angle normal faults that formed during isostatic uplift of the Rincon core complex during mid-Tertiary time. This interpretation is based on previous works, which report similar fault patterns in other metamorphic core complexes. Faults trending N20--30°W, shape the east flank of Mica Mountain. These faults, on the back dipping mylonitic zone, dip east and may represent late-stage antithetic shear zones. The Cabeza de Vaca fault and the back dipping antithetic faults accommodate as much as 65% of the extension due to

  19. A 3D Immersive Fault Visualizer and Editor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yikilmaz, M. B.; van Aalsburg, J.; Kreylos, O.; Kellogg, L. H.; Rundle, J. B.

    2007-12-01

    Digital fault models are an important resource for the study of earthquake dynamics, fault-earthquake interactions and seismicity. Once digitized these fault models can be used in Finite Element Model (FEM) programs or earthquake simulations such as Virtual California (VC). However, these models are often difficult to create, requiring a substantial amount of time to generate the fault topology and compute the properties of the individual segments. To aid in the construction of such models we have developed an immersive virtual reality (VR) application to visualize and edit fault models. Our program is designed to run in a CAVE (walk-in VR environment), but also works in a wide range of other environments, including desktop systems and GeoWalls. It is being developed at the UC Davis W.M. Keck Center for Active Visualization in the Earth Sciences (KeckCAVES, http://www.keckcaves.org). Immersive VR environments are ideal for visualizing and manipulating three- dimensional data sets. Our program allows users to create new models or modify existing ones; for example by repositioning individual fault-segments, by changing the dip angle, or by modifying (or assigning) the value of a property associated with a particular fault segment (i.e. slip rate). With the addition of high resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEM) the user can accurately add new segments to an existing model or create a fault model entirely from scratch. Interactively created or modified models can be written to XML files at any time; from there the data may easily be converted into various formats required by the analysis software or simulation. We believe that the ease of interaction provided by VR technology is ideally suited to the problem of creating and editing digital fault models. Our software provides the user with an intuitive environment for visualizing and editing fault model data. This translates not only into less time spent creating fault models, but also enables the researcher to

  20. First observation of angle-dependent Stark cyclotron resonance in bulk crystals: High-electric-field interlayer magnetotransport in a layered organic conductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumagai, A.; Konoike, T.; Uchida, K. [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Osada, T., E-mail: osada@issp.u-tokyo.ac.j [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan)

    2010-06-01

    We report a novel angle-dependent magnetotransport phenomenon in layered conductors under strong interlayer electric fields. Interlayer conduction shows the Stark cyclotron resonance (SCR) when electron orbital motion becomes periodic in k-space. The SCR amplitude oscillates depending on magnetic field orientations. The conventional angle-dependent magnetoresistance oscillation (AMRO) switches to the angle-dependent SCR in high electric fields. We predict angle-dependent SCR due to electron orbital motion in layered conductors with coherent interlayer coupling. In addition, we demonstrate the expected switching from conventional AMRO to angle-dependent SCR in high electric fields using an organic conductor {alpha}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}NH{sub 4}Hg(SCN){sub 4}. This is the first observation of the SCR with orbital origin in bulk crystals.

  1. High strain-rate deformation fabrics characterize a kilometers-thick Paleozoic fault zone in the Eastern Sierras Pampeanas, central Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmeyer, Steven J.; Simpson, Carol

    2003-06-01

    High strain rate fabrics that transgress a crustal depth range of ca. 8-22 km occur within a major Paleozoic fault zone along the western margin of the Sierras de Córdoba, central Argentina. The NNW-striking, east-dipping 'Tres Arboles' fault zone extends for at least 250 km and separates two metamorphic terranes that reached peak temperatures in the middle Cambrian and Ordovician, respectively. Exposed fault zone rocks vary from a 16-km-thickness of ultramylonite and mylonite in the southern, deepest exposures to 520 °C. Reaction-enhanced grain size reduction and grain boundary sliding were the predominant deformation mechanisms in these high strain rate rocks. Ultramylonites in the intermediate depth section also contain evidence for grain boundary sliding and diffusional mass transfer, although overprinted by late stage chlorite. In the shallowest exposed section, rocks were deformed at or near to the brittle-ductile transition to produce mylonite, cataclasite, shear bands and pseudotachylyte. The overall structure of the Tres Arboles zone is consistent with existing fault zone models and suggests that below the brittle-ductile transition, strain compatibility may be accommodated through very thick zones of high temperature ultramylonite.

  2. Navy and the HARV: High angle of attack tactical utility issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Charles A.; Traven, Ricardo; Lackey, James B.

    1994-01-01

    This presentation will highlight results from the latest Navy evaluation of the HARV (March 1994) and focus primarily on the impressions from a piloting standpoint of the tactical utility of thrust vectoring. Issue to be addressed will be mission suitability of high AOA flight, visual and motion feedback cues associated with operating at high AOA, and the adaptability of a pilot to effectively use the increased control power provided by the thrust vectoring system.

  3. Significance of stiffening of high damping rubber bearings on the response of base-isolated buildings under near-fault earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhan, Cenk; Gazi, Hatice; Kurtuluş, Hakan

    2016-10-01

    High Damping Rubber Bearings (HDRBs) are among various types of laterally flexible isolation system elements that effectively protect structures from detrimental effects of earthquakes by lengthening their fundamental periods. However, large isolator displacements resulting in strains larger than 100% may come into scene in case of near-fault ground motions containing long-period and large-amplitude velocity and/or displacement pulses. This is particularly important when HDRBs are used since the post-yield stiffness of an HDRB increases due to inherent strain hardening characteristics when a threshold isolator displacement limit is exceeded. Therefore, it may be critical to consider the stiffening of HDRBs in modeling of these elements for accurate seismic response evaluation of the buildings equipped with HDRBs that are located in near-fault regions. In this study, the significance of stiffening of HDRBs on the response of base-isolated buildings is investigated by conducting nonlinear time history analyses of benchmark six-story base-isolated buildings which employ HDRBs that are represented by non-stiffening or stiffening models under both historical and synthetic near-fault ground motions of various magnitudes and fault distances. The structural response parameters included in the comparisons are base displacements, story drifts, and floor accelerations. It is found that, the significance of stiffening of HDRBs on the response of base-isolated buildings under near-fault earthquakes becomes more prominent as the earthquake magnitude increases and the fault distance decreases and thus suggestions for modifications to seismic code regulations are made accordingly.

  4. Identification of Transient and Permanent Faults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李幼仪; 董新洲; 孙元章

    2003-01-01

    A new algorithm was developed for arcing fault detection based on high-frequency current transients analyzed with wavelet transforms to avoid automatic reclosing on permanent faults. The characteristics of arc currents during transient faults were investigated. The current curves of transient and permanent faults are quite similar since current variation from the fault arc is much less than the voltage variation. However, the fault current details are quite different because of the arc extinguishing and reigniting. Dyadic wavelet transforms were used to identify the current variation since wavelet transform has time-frequency localization ability. Many electric magnetic transient program (EMTP) simulations have verified the feasibility of the algorithm.

  5. New Frontiers in Fault Model Visualization and Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aalsburg, J.; Yikilmaz, M. B.; Kreylos, O.; Kellogg, L. H.; Rundle, J. B.

    2009-12-01

    Previously we introduced an interactive, 3D fault editor for virtual reality (VR) environments. This application is designed to provide an intuitive environment for visualizing and editing fault model data. It is being developed at the UC Davis W.M. Keck Center for Active Visualization in the Earth Sciences (KeckCAVES, http://www.keckcaves.org). By utilizing high resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEM), georeferenced active tectonic fault maps and earthquake hypocenters, users can accurately position fault-segments including the dip angle. Once a model has been created or modified it can be written to an XML file; from there the data may be easily converted into various formats required by the analysis software or simulation. To demonstrate this we have written a simple program which generates a KML file from the program output for visualization of the model in Google Earth. Our current research has focused on the addition of new tools which enable the user to associate meta-data with individual fault segments or group of segments (i.e. slip rate). We have also added enhanced mapping abilities such as creating closed polygons for defining geologic formations. The program is designed to take full advantage of immersive environments such as a CAVE (walk-in VR environment), but works in a wide range of other environments including desktop systems and GeoWalls. This software is open-source can be freely downloaded (debian packages are also available).

  6. An Overview of Transmission Line Protection by Artificial Neural Network: Fault Detection, Fault Classification, Fault Location, and Fault Direction Discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamika Yadav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary power systems are associated with serious issues of faults on high voltage transmission lines. Instant isolation of fault is necessary to maintain the system stability. Protective relay utilizes current and voltage signals to detect, classify, and locate the fault in transmission line. A trip signal will be sent by the relay to a circuit breaker with the purpose of disconnecting the faulted line from the rest of the system in case of a disturbance for maintaining the stability of the remaining healthy system. This paper focuses on the studies of fault detection, fault classification, fault location, fault phase selection, and fault direction discrimination by using artificial neural networks approach. Artificial neural networks are valuable for power system applications as they can be trained with offline data. Efforts have been made in this study to incorporate and review approximately all important techniques and philosophies of transmission line protection reported in the literature till June 2014. This comprehensive and exhaustive survey will reduce the difficulty of new researchers to evaluate different ANN based techniques with a set of references of all concerned contributions.

  7. Small angle neutron diffraction studies of vortex structures in high temperature superconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cubitt, R.; Forgan, E.M.; Wylie, M.T.

    1994-01-01

    We have used neutron scattering to provide direct information about flux structures in the bulk of crystals of the superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8. Its extremely high effective mass anisotropy, makes the flux lattice susceptable to melting and also to decomposition into 'pancake' vortices, which would...

  8. High-Threshold Low-Overhead Fault-Tolerant Classical Computation and the Replacement of Measurements with Unitary Quantum Gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, Benjamin; Jacobs, Kurt

    2017-07-01

    von Neumann's classic "multiplexing" method is unique in achieving high-threshold fault-tolerant classical computation (FTCC), but has several significant barriers to implementation: (i) the extremely complex circuits required by randomized connections, (ii) the difficulty of calculating its performance in practical regimes of both code size and logical error rate, and (iii) the (perceived) need for large code sizes. Here we present numerical results indicating that the third assertion is false, and introduce a novel scheme that eliminates the two remaining problems while retaining a threshold very close to von Neumann's ideal of 1 /6 . We present a simple, highly ordered wiring structure that vastly reduces the circuit complexity, demonstrates that randomization is unnecessary, and provides a feasible method to calculate the performance. This in turn allows us to show that the scheme requires only moderate code sizes, vastly outperforms concatenation schemes, and under a standard error model a unitary implementation realizes universal FTCC with an accuracy threshold of p <5.5 %, in which p is the error probability for 3-qubit gates. FTCC is a key component in realizing measurement-free protocols for quantum information processing. In view of this, we use our scheme to show that all-unitary quantum circuits can reproduce any measurement-based feedback process in which the asymptotic error probabilities for the measurement and feedback are (32 /63 )p ≈0.51 p and 1.51 p , respectively.

  9. Stability of High Slope Interbedded Strata with Low Dip Angle Constituted by Soft and Hard Rock Mass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓荣贵; 周德培; 张倬元

    2002-01-01

    Slopes consisting of interbedded strata of soft and hard rock mass, such as purplish red mudstone and grey-brown arkosic sandstone of Jurassic age, are very common in Sichuan basin of China. The mudstone is soft while the sandstone is hard and contains many opening or closing joints with a high dip angle. Some are nearly parallel and the others are nearly decussated with the trend of the slopes. Many natural slopes are in deformation or sliding because of those reasons. The stability of cutting slopes and supporting method to be taken for their stability in civil engineering are important. In this paper, the stability and deformation of the slopes are studied. The methods of analysis and support design principle are analyzed also. Finally, the method put forward is applied to study Fengdian high cutting slope in Sichuan section of the express way from Chengdu to Shanghai. The results indicate that the method is effective.

  10. Magnetic and electric fields associated with changes in high pore pressure in fault zones: Application to the Loma Prieta ULF emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenoglio, Mark A.; Johnston, Malcom J. S.; Byerlee, Jim D.

    1995-07-01

    We determined the electric and magnetic fields generated during failure of faults containing sealed compartments with pore pressures ranging from hydrostatic to lithostatic levels. Exhumed fault studies and strain measurement data limit the possible size of these compartments to less than 1 km in extent. Rupture of seals between compartments produces rapid pore pressure changes and fluid flow and may create fractures that propagate away from the high-pressure compartment, along the fault face. Nonuniform fluid flow results from pressure decrease in the fracture from crack-generated dilatancy, partial blockage by silica deposition, and clearing as pressure increases. A direct consequence of this unsteady fluid flow may be associated transient magnetic signals caused by electrokinetic, piezomagnetic, and magnetohydrodynamic effects. Models of these processes for fault geometries with 1-km-high pressure compartments show that electrokinetic effects are several orders of magnitude larger than the other mechanisms. The electrokinetic signals produced by this unsteady flow are comparable in magnitude and frequency to the magnetic signals observed prior to the ML 7.1 Loma Prieta earthquake of October 18, 1989, provided fracture lengths are less than 200 m.

  11. Measurement of carbon condensates using small-angle x-ray scattering during detonation of the high explosive hexanitrostilbene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagge-Hansen, M.; Lauderbach, L.; Hodgin, R.; Bastea, S.; Fried, L.; Jones, A.; Buuren, T. van; Hansen, D.; Benterou, J.; May, C.; Willey, T. M., E-mail: willey1@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Graber, T. [Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164 (United States); Jensen, B. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Ilavsky, J. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2015-06-28

    The dynamics of carbon condensation in detonating high explosives remains controversial. Detonation model validation requires data for processes occurring at nanometer length scales on time scales ranging from nanoseconds to microseconds. A new detonation endstation has been commissioned to acquire and provide time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) from detonating explosives. Hexanitrostilbene (HNS) was selected as the first to investigate due to its ease of initiation using exploding foils and flyers, vacuum compatibility, high thermal stability, and stoichiometric carbon abundance that produces high carbon condensate yields. The SAXS data during detonation, collected with 300 ns time resolution, provide unprecedented signal fidelity over a broad q-range. This fidelity permits the first analysis of both the Guinier and Porod/power-law regions of the scattering profile during detonation, which contains information about the size and morphology of the resultant carbon condensate nanoparticles. To bolster confidence in these data, the scattering angle and intensity were additionally cross-referenced with a separate, highly calibrated SAXS beamline. The data show that HNS produces carbon particles with a radius of gyration of 2.7 nm in less than 400 ns after the detonation front has passed, and this size and morphology are constant over the next several microseconds. These data directly contradict previous pioneering work on RDX/TNT mixtures and TATB, where observations indicate significant particle growth (50% or more) continues over several microseconds. The power-law slope is about −3, which is consistent with a complex disordered, irregular, or folded sp{sup 2} sub-arrangement within a relatively monodisperse structure possessing radius of gyration of 2.7 nm after the detonation of HNS.

  12. Measurement of carbon condensation using small-angle x-ray scattering during detonation of the high explosive hexanitrostilbene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagge-Hansen, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lauderbach, L. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hodgin, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bastea, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fried, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jones, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); van Buuren, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hansen, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Benterou, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); May, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Graber, T. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Jensen, B. J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ilavsky, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Willey, T. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-06-24

    The dynamics of carboncondensation in detonating high explosives remains controversial. Detonation model validation requires data for processes occurring at nanometer length scales on time scales ranging from nanoseconds to microseconds. A new detonation endstation has been commissioned to acquire and provide time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) from detonating explosives. Hexanitrostilbene (HNS) was selected as the first to investigate due to its ease of initiation using exploding foils and flyers, vacuum compatibility, high thermal stability, and stoichiometric carbon abundance that produces high carbon condensate yields. The SAXS data during detonation, collected with 300 ns time resolution, provide unprecedented signal fidelity over a broad q-range. This fidelity permits the first analysis of both the Guinier and Porod/power-law regions of the scattering profile during detonation, which contains information about the size and morphology of the resultant carbon condensate nanoparticles. To bolster confidence in these data, the scattering angle and intensity were additionally cross-referenced with a separate, highly calibrated SAXS beamline. The data show that HNS produces carbon particles with a radius of gyration of 2.7 nm in less than 400 ns after the detonation front has passed, and this size and morphology are constant over the next several microseconds. These data directly contradict previous pioneering work on RDX/TNT mixtures and TATB, where observations indicate significant particle growth (50% or more) continues over several microseconds. As a result, the power-law slope is about –3, which is consistent with a complex disordered, irregular, or folded sp2 sub-arrangement within a relatively monodisperse structure possessing radius of gyration of 2.7 nm after the detonation of HNS.

  13. High Voltage Smart Power Module For Fault-Tolerant Launcher Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Debrouwere

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a low cost and highly integrated smart power module (SPM intended to be used into launchers applications, embedding technologies and components from automotive world and being mainly producible by large-scale industry.

  14. Modelling of AlAs/GaAs interfacial structures using high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) image simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Paul D; Finnie, Michael; Craven, Alan J

    2012-07-01

    High angle annular dark field (HAADF) image simulations were performed on a series of AlAs/GaAs interfacial models using the frozen-phonon multislice method. Three general types of models were considered-perfect, vicinal/sawtooth and diffusion. These were chosen to demonstrate how HAADF image measurements are influenced by different interfacial structures in the technologically important III-V semiconductor system. For each model, interfacial sharpness was calculated as a function of depth and compared to aberration-corrected HAADF experiments of two types of AlAs/GaAs interfaces. The results show that the sharpness measured from HAADF imaging changes in a complicated manner with thickness for complex interfacial structures. For vicinal structures, it was revealed that the type of material that the probe projects through first of all has a significant effect on the measured sharpness. An increase in the vicinal angle was also shown to generate a wider interface in the random step model. The Moison diffusion model produced an increase in the interface width with depth which closely matched the experimental results of the AlAs-on-GaAs interface. In contrast, the interface width decreased as a function of depth in the linear diffusion model. Only in the case of the perfect model was it possible to ascertain the underlying structure directly from HAADF image analysis.

  15. Normal Faulting at the Western Margin of the Altiplano Plateau, Southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildgen, T. F.; Hodges, K. V.; Whipple, K. X.; Perignon, M.; Smith, T. M.

    2004-12-01

    Although the western margin of the Altiplano Plateau is commonly used to illustrate the marked differences in the evolution of a mountain range with strong latitudinal and longitudinal precipitation gradients, the nature of tectonism in this semi-arid region is poorly understood and much debated. The western margin of the Altiplano in southern Peru and northern Chile marks an abrupt transition from the forearc region of the Andes to the high topography of the Cordillera Occidental. This transition has been interpreted by most workers as a monocline, with modifications due to thrust faulting, normal faulting, and gravity slides. Based on recent fieldwork and satellite image analysis, we suggest that, at least in the semi-arid climate of southern Peru, this transition has been the locus of significant high-angle normal faulting related to the block uplift of the Cordillera Occidental. We have focused our initial work in the vicinity of 15\\deg S latitude, 71\\deg W longitude, where the range front crosses Colca Canyon, a major antecedent drainage northwest of Arequipa. In that area, Oligocene to Miocene sediments of the Moquegua Formation, which were eroded from uplifted terrain to the northeast, presently dip to the northeast at angles between 2 and 10º. Field observations of a normal fault contact between the Moquegua sedimentary rocks and Jurassic basement rocks, as well as 15-m resolution 3-D images generated from ASTER satellite imagery, show that the Moquegua units are down-dropped to the west across a steeply SW-dipping normal fault of regional significance. Morphology of the range front throughout southern Peru suggests that normal faulting along the range front has characterized the recent tectonic history of the region. We present geochronological data to constrain the timing of movement both directly from the fault zone as well as indirectly from canyon incision that likely responded to fault movement.

  16. Development of microprocessor-based laser velocimeter and its application to measurement of jet exhausts and flows over missiles at high angles of attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwell, K. E.; Farmer, W. M.; Hornkohl, J. O.; Stallings, E.

    1981-03-01

    During the past three years, personnel have developed a unique three-component laser velocimeter for the in situ measurement of particle and/or gas velocities in flow fields produced behind bodies at high angles of attack and in jet exhaust plumes. This report describes the development of the laser velocimeter and its subsequent application of the measurement of the velocity distribution and vortex structure in free jets and in flows over missiles at high angles of attack.

  17. Comparative study of rare earth hexaborides using high resolution angle-resolved photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramankutty, S.V., E-mail: s.v.ramankutty@uva.nl [Van der Waals-Zeeman Institute, Institute of Physics (IoP), University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jong, N. de; Huang, Y.K.; Zwartsenberg, B. [Van der Waals-Zeeman Institute, Institute of Physics (IoP), University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); Massee, F. [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Bay, T.V. [Van der Waals-Zeeman Institute, Institute of Physics (IoP), University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); Golden, M.S., E-mail: m.s.golden@uva.nl [Van der Waals-Zeeman Institute, Institute of Physics (IoP), University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); Frantzeskakis, E., E-mail: e.frantzeskakis@uva.nl [Van der Waals-Zeeman Institute, Institute of Physics (IoP), University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • ARPES electronic structure study of rare-earth (RE) hexaborides SmB{sub 6}, CeB{sub 6} and YbB{sub 6}. • Increasing RE valence Yb[II], Sm[II/III], Ce[III] increases d-band occupancy. • YbB{sub 6} and SmB{sub 6} posses 2D states at E{sub F}, whereas the Fermi surface of CeB{sub 6} is 3D. • ARPES, LEED and STM data prove structural relaxation of the SmB{sub 6}(001) surface. - Abstract: Strong electron correlations in rare earth hexaborides can give rise to a variety of interesting phenomena like ferromagnetism, Kondo hybridization, mixed valence, superconductivity and possibly topological characteristics. The theoretical prediction of topological properties in SmB{sub 6} and YbB{sub 6} has rekindled the scientific interest in the rare earth hexaborides, and high-resolution ARPES has been playing a major role in the debate. The electronic band structure of the hexaborides contains the key to understand the origin of the different phenomena observed, and much can be learned by comparing the experimental data from different rare earth hexaborides. We have performed high-resolution ARPES on the (001) surfaces of YbB{sub 6}, CeB{sub 6} and SmB{sub 6}. On the most basic level, the data show that the differences in the valence of the rare earth element are reflected in the experimental electronic band structure primarily as a rigid shift of the energy position of the metal 5d states with respect to the Fermi level. Although the overall shape of the d-derived Fermi surface contours remains the same, we report differences in the dimensionality of these states between the compounds studied. Moreover, the spectroscopic fingerprint of the 4f states also reveals considerable differences that are related to their coherence and the strength of the d–f hybridization. For the SmB{sub 6} case, we use ARPES in combination with STM imaging and electron diffraction to reveal time dependent changes in the structural symmetry of the highly debated SmB{sub 6

  18. Air cisternography of the cerebellopontine angle using high-resolution computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.W.

    1984-05-01

    While high-resolution CT/air cisternography is considered the preferred method of investigating non-enhancing or small acoustic neuromas, it is not without pitfalls. Eight such studies were reviewed, emphasizing procedural problems and sources of interpretive error. Two patients presented difficulty in transporting the air bolus due to a spinal cord tumor coexisting with bilaterial acoustic neuromas; spinal cord decompression was required in one case. Three potential false positives were avoided by persistent efforts to fill the internal auditory canal. Of 4 patients thought to have a tiny acoustic neuroma, elective vestibular nerve section in 2 revealed no evidence of tumor.

  19. A New and Accurate Fault Location Method in Three-Terminal Transmission Lines Compensated by Series-Connected Flexible AC Transmission System Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haniyeh Marefatjou

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new method to fault location in the three terminals transmission line compensated with series FACTS Devices. This method is based on the converting three line networks to two line networks after recognizing the faulty section and solving accessing the fault distance. So to solve the problem of fault location before determining distance to faulty section, new method to determine faulty section is proposed and then by converting three line networks to two line networks, the location of fault is determined using the proposed algorithm. In this method distributed transmission line model in time domain has been used which is another advantage of the proposed method compared to previous methods. This method for determining the faulty section used simultaneous voltage and current of all three terminals as input data. Due to problems in the modeling of FACTS devices during fault location, our proposed method does not used modeling series FACTS devices. Our proposed algorithm is not sensitive to the resistance of fault, the fault inception angle and fault type and do not dependent on compensator device location and its parameters. This method is good for all transmission lines compensated with any type of series compensator. Different types of fault in any different distance and situation simulated by using MATLAB/SIMULINK software on compensated three line network with Thyristor Control Series Capacitor(TCSC. The performance of the proposed algorithm is evaluated under different structural and fault conditions. The simulation results confirm the high accuracy of the proposed algorithm

  20. Architecture of small-scale fault zones in the context of the Leinetalgraben Fault System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyer, Dorothea; Philipp, Sonja L.

    2010-05-01

    local stress field so that it stops many joints. Well developed fracture networks are therefore in most cases limited to single layers. From the data we finally determined the structural indices of the fault zones, that is, the ratios of damage zone and fault zone widths. By their nature structural indices can obtain values from 0 to 1; the values having implications for fault zone permeability. An ideal value of 0 would mean that a fault damage zone is absent. Such fault zones generally have low permeabilities as long as the faults are not active (slipping). A structural index of 1, however, would imply that there is practically no fault core and the fault zone permeability is entirely controlled by the fractures within the damage zone. Our measurements show that the damage zones of normal faults in the Muschelkalk limestone are relatively thick so that their structural indices are relatively high. In contrast to normal faults, reverse and strike-slip faults have smaller indices because of well developed brecciated fault cores. In addition we found that small-scale fault zones with parallel orientations to the major Leinetalgraben fault zones are more likely to have well developed damage zones than those with conjugate or perpendicular orientation. Our field data lead to the hypothesis that fault systems in the North German Basin may generally be surrounded by small-scale fault zones which have high permeabilities if orientated parallel to the major fault and lower permeabilities if conjugate or perpendicularly orientated. However, further studies of fault systems in different geological settings are needed to support or reject this hypothesis. Such studies help to improve the general understanding of fault zones and fault systems and thereby minimise the risk in matters of the exploitation of fault-related geothermal reservoirs.

  1. Electronic structure of ion arsenic high temperature superconductors studied by angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chang [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of the present thesis is to present our ARPES results on the iron arsenic superconductors. As revealed by a series of ARPES measurements on both the AEFe2As2 and the RFeAs(O,F) families (parent compound and carrier-doped systems), the electronic structures of the pnictides are complicated, three dimensional, and closely linked to their superconducting behavior (13; 14; 15; 16; 17; 18; 19). Parent compounds of these materials exhibit the basic hole-electron pocket dual plus an apparent Fermi surface reconstruction caused by long range antiferromagnetism (13; 15). When carriers are introduced, the chemical potential shifts in accordance with the Luttinger theorem and the rigid band shifting picture (13). Importantly, both the appearance and disappearance of the superconducting dome at low and high doping levels have intimate relation with topological changes at the Fermi surfaces, resulting in a specific Fermi topology being favored by superconductivity (15; 16). On the low doping side, superconductivity emerges in the phase diagram once the antiferromagnetic reconstruction disappears below the Fermi level, returning the Fermi surface to its paramagnetic-like appearance. On the high doping side, superconductivity disappears around a doping level at which the central hole pocket vanishes due to increasing electron concentration. Such phenomena are evidence for the governing role the electronic structure plays in their superconducting behavior.

  2. Simulator study of the effectiveness of an automatic control system designed to improve the high-angle-of-attack characteristics of a fighter airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, W. P.; Nguyen, L. T.; Vangunst, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    A piloted, fixed-base simulation was conducted to study the effectiveness of some automatic control system features designed to improve the stability and control characteristics of fighter airplanes at high angles of attack. These features include an angle-of-attack limiter, a normal-acceleration limiter, an aileron-rudder interconnect, and a stability-axis yaw damper. The study was based on a current lightweight fighter prototype. The aerodynamic data used in the simulation were measured on a 0.15-scale model at low Reynolds number and low subsonic Mach number. The simulation was conducted on the Langley differential maneuvering simulator, and the evaluation involved representative combat maneuvering. Results of the investigation show the fully augmented airplane to be quite stable and maneuverable throughout the operational angle-of-attack range. The angle-of-attack/normal-acceleration limiting feature of the pitch control system is found to be a necessity to avoid angle-of-attack excursions at high angles of attack. The aileron-rudder interconnect system is shown to be very effective in making the airplane departure resistant while the stability-axis yaw damper provided improved high-angle-of-attack roll performance with a minimum of sideslip excursions.

  3. High resolution energy-angle correlation measurement of hard x rays from laser-Thomson backscattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochmann, A; Irman, A; Bussmann, M; Couperus, J P; Cowan, T E; Debus, A D; Kuntzsch, M; Ledingham, K W D; Lehnert, U; Sauerbrey, R; Schlenvoigt, H P; Seipt, D; Stöhlker, Th; Thorn, D B; Trotsenko, S; Wagner, A; Schramm, U

    2013-09-13

    Thomson backscattering of intense laser pulses from relativistic electrons not only allows for the generation of bright x-ray pulses but also for the investigation of the complex particle dynamics at the interaction point. For this purpose a complete spectral characterization of a Thomson source powered by a compact linear electron accelerator is performed with unprecedented angular and energy resolution. A rigorous statistical analysis comparing experimental data to 3D simulations enables, e.g., the extraction of the angular distribution of electrons with 1.5% accuracy and, in total, provides predictive capability for the future high brightness hard x-ray source PHOENIX (photon electron collider for narrow bandwidth intense x rays) and potential gamma-ray sources.

  4. Treatment of Class II high angle malocclusions with the Herbst appliance: a cephalometric investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavoni, R; Grenga, V; Macri, V

    1992-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the results of treatment of Class II malocclusions by using two different designs of the Herbst appliance. Cephalometric records from lateral headplates of 19 consecutively treated Class II cases were evaluated. The headplates were taken before and after the treatment stage in which the Herbst appliance was used. The patients were divided into two groups: the first group, normohypodivergent, was treated with the Herbst appliance attached to bands; the second group, hyperdivergent, was treated with the Herbst appliance attached to acrylic splints in which a high-pull headgear was also used. The results were compared between these groups and with a control group age-matched from Bolton standards to match the changes in the Herbst samples against what might be expected in case of normal growth during similar periods of time. The results of the investigation revealed the following: (1) 9 months of treatment resulted in Class I dental arch relationships in all 19 cases; (2) the Herbst appliance attached to bands did not significantly modify the vertical growth pattern of the normohypodivergent patients; and (3) in hyperdivergent patients, the use of a Herbst appliance attached to acrylic splints in conjunction with the use of a high-pull headgear allowed a better control of the vertical dimension, as assessed by the cephalometric parameters (FA, FMA, Go-Gn-SN). The clinician should be aware of the different dentofacial changes induced in the vertical plane by different designs of the Herbst appliance to better program treatment strategy.

  5. Intermediate Depth Earthquakes in Middle America: Fault Reactivation or Formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langstaff, M. A.; Warren, L. M.; Silver, P. G.

    2006-12-01

    Intermediate-depth earthquakes are often attributed to dehydration embrittlement reactivating pre-existing weak zones. The orientations of pre-subduction faults are particularly well known offshore of Middle America, where seismic reflection profiles show outer-rise faults dipping towards the trench and extending >20~km into the lithosphere. If water is transported along these faults and incorporated into hydrous minerals, the faults may be reactivated later when the minerals dehydrate. In this case, the fault orientations should be the same in the outer rise and at depth, after accounting for the angle of subduction. To test this hypothesis, we analyze the directivity of 54 large (M_W > 5.7) earthquakes between 40--220~km depth in the Middle America Trench. For 15 of these earthquakes, the directivity vector allows us to confidently distinguish the fault plane of the earthquake. Between 40--85~km depth, we observe both subhorizontal and subvertical fault planes. The subvertical fault planes are consistent with the reactivation of outer rise faults, whereas the subhorizontal fault planes suggest the formation of new faults. Deeper than 85~km, we only observe subhorizontal faults, indicating that the outer rise faults are no longer reactivated. The occurrence of only subhorizontal faults may be due to unbending stresses preferentially creating horizontal faults, or an isobaric rupture process.

  6. Response of low voltage networks with high penetration of photovoltaic systems to transmission network faults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skaloumpakas, K.; Boemer, J.C.; Van Ruitenbeek, E.; Gibescu, M.

    2014-01-01

    The installed capacity of photovoltaic (PV) systems connected to low voltage (LV) networks in Germany has increased to more than 25 GW. Current grid codes still mandate these PV systems to disconnect in case of voltage dips below 0.8 p.u. The resulting response of LV distribution systems with high p

  7. Scientific drilling into the San Andreas Fault Zone - an overview of SAFOD's first five years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoback, Mark; Hickman, Stephen; Ellsworth, William; ,

    2011-01-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) was drilled to study the physical and chemical processes controlling faulting and earthquake generation along an active, plate-bounding fault at depth. SAFOD is located near Parkfield, California and penetrates a section of the fault that is moving due to a combination of repeating microearthquakes and fault creep. Geophysical logs define the San Andreas Fault Zone to be relatively broad (~200 m), containing several discrete zones only 2–3 m wide that exhibit very low P- and S-wave velocities and low resistivity. Two of these zones have progressively deformed the cemented casing at measured depths of 3192 m and 3302 m. Cores from both deforming zones contain a pervasively sheared, cohesionless, foliated fault gouge that coincides with casing deformation and explains the observed extremely low seismic velocities and resistivity. These cores are being now extensively tested in laboratories around the world, and their composition, deformation mechanisms, physical properties, and rheological behavior are studied. Downhole measurements show that within 200 m (maximum) of the active fault trace, the direction of maximum horizontal stress remains at a high angle to the San Andreas Fault, consistent with other measurements. The results from the SAFOD Main Hole, together with the stress state determined in the Pilot Hole, are consistent with a strong crust/weak fault model of the San Andreas. Seismic instrumentation has been deployed to study physics of faulting—earthquake nucleation, propagation, and arrest—in order to test how laboratory-derived concepts scale up to earthquakes occurring in nature.

  8. New horizon for high performance Mg-based biomaterial with uniform degradation behavior: Formation of stacking faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinghuai; Xu, Chi; Jing, Yongbin; Lv, Shuhui; Liu, Shujuan; Fang, Daqing; Zhuang, Jinpeng; Zhang, Milin; Wu, Ruizhi

    2015-09-01

    Designing the new microstructure is an effective way to accelerate the biomedical application of magnesium (Mg) alloys. In this study, a novel Mg-8Er-1Zn alloy with profuse nano-spaced basal plane stacking faults (SFs) was prepared by combined processes of direct-chill semi-continuous casting, heat-treatment and hot-extrusion. The formation of SFs made the alloy possess outstanding comprehensive performance as the biodegradable implant material. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS: 318 MPa), tensile yield strength (TYS: 207 MPa) and elongation (21%) of the alloy with SFs were superior to those of most reported degradable Mg-based alloys. This new alloy showed acceptable biotoxicity and degradation rate (0.34 mm/year), and the latter could be further slowed down through optimizing the microstructure. Most amazing of all, the uniquely uniform in vitro/vivo corrosion behavior was obtained due to the formation of SFs. Accordingly we proposed an original corrosion mechanism for the novel Mg alloy with SFs. The present study opens a new horizon for developing new Mg-based biomaterials with highly desirable performances.

  9. High-precision differential earthquake location in 3-D models: evidence for a rheological barrier controlling the microseismicity at the Irpinia fault zone in southern Apennines

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Landro, Grazia; Amoroso, Ortensia; Stabile, Tony Alfredo; Matrullo, Emanuela; Lomax, Antony; Zollo, Aldo

    2015-12-01

    A non-linear, global-search, probabilistic, double-difference earthquake location technique is illustrated. The main advantages of this method are the determination of comprehensive and complete solutions through the probability density function (PDF), the use of differential arrival times as data and the possibility to use a 3-D velocity model both for absolute and double-difference locations, all of which help to obtain accurate differential locations in structurally complex geological media. The joint use of this methodology and an accurate differential time data set allowed us to carry out a high-resolution, earthquake location analysis, which helps to characterize the active fault geometries in the studied region. We investigated the recent microseismicity occurring at the Campanian-Lucanian Apennines in the crustal volume embedding the fault system that generated the 1980 MS 6.9 earthquake in Irpinia. In order to obtain highly accurate seismicity locations, we applied the method to the P and S arrival time data set from 1312 events (ML models optimized for the area under study. Both manually refined and cross-correlation refined absolute arrival times have been used. The refined seismicity locations show that the events occur in a volume delimited by the faults activated during the 1980 MS 6.9 Irpinia earthquake on subparallel, predominantly normal faults. We find an abrupt interruption of the seismicity across an SW-NE oriented structural discontinuity corresponding to a contact zone between different rheology rock formations (carbonate platform and basin residuals). This `barrier' appears to be located in the area bounded by the fault segments activated during the first (0 s) and the second (18 s) rupture episodes of the 1980s Irpinia earthquake. We hypothesize that this geometrical barrier could have played a key role during the 1980 Irpinia event, and possibly controlled the delayed times of activation of the two rupture segments.

  10. Support vector machine based fault classification and location of a long transmission line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papia Ray

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates support vector machine based fault type and distance estimation scheme in a long transmission line. The planned technique uses post fault single cycle current waveform and pre-processing of the samples is done by wavelet packet transform. Energy and entropy are obtained from the decomposed coefficients and feature matrix is prepared. Then the redundant features from the matrix are taken out by the forward feature selection method and normalized. Test and train data are developed by taking into consideration variables of a simulation situation like fault type, resistance path, inception angle, and distance. In this paper 10 different types of short circuit fault are analyzed. The test data are examined by support vector machine whose parameters are optimized by particle swarm optimization method. The anticipated method is checked on a 400 kV, 300 km long transmission line with voltage source at both the ends. Two cases were examined with the proposed method. The first one is fault very near to both the source end (front and rear and the second one is support vector machine with and without optimized parameter. Simulation result indicates that the anticipated method for fault classification gives high accuracy (99.21% and least fault distance estimation error (0.29%.

  11. The Best Combination Methods and Applied Research of Seismic Prospecting for Active Faults in Urban Areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces briefly the basic principles of various seismic prospecting techniques and working methods according to nationwide practices of seismic prospecting of active faults beneath big cities in recent years. Furthermore, it analyzes the application range of different seismic prospecting methods, main achievements and solved problems, and discusses the best combination of seismic exploration methods for detecting crustal structures and locating the faults used in the present stage, that is, to trace faults which are at depths of hundred of meters underground using shallow seismic investigation, to detect the faults which are above basement (at a depth of kilometers) using high resolution refraction sounding, and the deep crustal faults using combined seismic prospecting methods of reflection seismic sounding and wide-angle reflection/refraction sounding, and furthermore, to use the 3-D deep seismic sounding method to obtain 3-D velocity structures beneath urban areas. Thus, we can get information about fault attitude and distribution at different depths and a complete image of faults from their shallow part to deep part using the combined seismic exploration method. Some application examples are presented in the article.

  12. THE EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON STICK­SLIP PROCESS  OF BENDING FAULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Yanshuang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The stick­slip process of bending faults with one angle change of 5° at the connection location between the two line fault segments is investigated in this paper. The dynamic process and physical field evolution were observed in the laboratory, and measurements were recorded with application of fault displacement measurement, strain tensor analysis and acoustic emission (AE techniques. The experimental results from the study of bending faults give grounds for the following primary conclusions: (1 It is clearly revealed that there is a negative correlation between the logarithms of the stick­slip cycle and loading rate; (2 With different loading rates, most of the instabilities from bending faults occurred as earthquake doublets. It means that an instable event can contains two sub­events which occur with an interval of time from 100 ms to 200 ms. (3 With application of different observation approaches, regardless of the fact that the sampling rates were the same, differences of the co­seismic response were observed. For instance, strain measurements indicated significant strain weakening stage, but fault displacement was not significantly changed before fault instability. (4 Experimental studies of high sampling rates contribute to a better understanding and awareness of earthquake precursors and the seismogenic process; such studies are helpful in analyzing the mechanism of strong earthquake processes and parameters of aftershocks.

  13. All-angle negative refraction of highly squeezed plasmon and phonon polaritons in graphene-boron nitride heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiao; Yang, Yi; Rivera, Nicholas; López, Josué J; Shen, Yichen; Kaminer, Ido; Chen, Hongsheng; Zhang, Baile; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljačić, Marin

    2017-06-27

    A fundamental building block for nanophotonics is the ability to achieve negative refraction of polaritons, because this could enable the demonstration of many unique nanoscale applications such as deep-subwavelength imaging, superlens, and novel guiding. However, to achieve negative refraction of highly squeezed polaritons, such as plasmon polaritons in graphene and phonon polaritons in boron nitride (BN) with their wavelengths squeezed by a factor over 100, requires the ability to flip the sign of their group velocity at will, which is challenging. Here we reveal that the strong coupling between plasmon and phonon polaritons in graphene-BN heterostructures can be used to flip the sign of the group velocity of the resulting hybrid (plasmon-phonon-polariton) modes. We predict all-angle negative refraction between plasmon and phonon polaritons and, even more surprisingly, between hybrid graphene plasmons and between hybrid phonon polaritons. Graphene-BN heterostructures thus provide a versatile platform for the design of nanometasurfaces and nanoimaging elements.

  14. All-angle negative refraction of highly squeezed plasmon and phonon polaritons in graphene-boron nitride heterostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Xiao; Rivera, Nicholas; Lopez, Josue J; Shen, Yichen; Kaminer, Ido; Chen, Hongsheng; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljacic, Marin

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental building block for nanophotonics is the ability to achieve negative refraction of polaritons, because this could enable the demonstration of many unique nanoscale applications such as deep-subwavelength imaging, superlens, and novel guiding. However, to achieve negative refraction of highly squeezed polaritons, such as plasmon polaritons in graphene and phonon polaritons in boron nitride (BN) with their wavelengths squeezed by a factor over 100, requires the ability to flip the sign of their group velocity at will, which is challenging. Here we reveal that the strong coupling between plasmon and phonon polaritons in graphene-BN heterostructures can be used to flip the sign of the group velocity of the resulting hybrid (plasmon-phonon-polariton) modes. We predict all-angle negative refraction between plasmon and phonon polaritons, and even more surprisingly, between hybrid graphene plasmons, and between hybrid phonon polaritons. Graphene-BN heterostructures thus provide a versatile platform for t...

  15. Seasonal Variations of Polarization Diversity Gain in a Vegetated Area considering High Elevation Angles and a Nomadic User

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Kvicera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal variations of the polarization diversity gain are addressed for a nomadic user in a vegetated area taking high elevation angles and nongeostationary satellites into consideration. Corresponding experimental data were obtained at a frequency of 2.0 GHz at Stromovka Park in Prague, the Czech Republic, within the full in-leaf and out-of-leaf periods of 2013 and 2014, respectively. By detecting copolarized and cross-polarized components of the transmitted left- and right-handed circularly polarized signals, the corresponding diversity gain was obtained for multiple-input single-output (MISO, single-input multiple-output (SIMO, and combined MISO/SIMO cases. It was found that tree defoliation results in a significant decrease of the polarization diversity gain achieved for low time percentages in particular scenarios.

  16. High speed fault tolerant secure communication for muon chamber using FPGA based GBTx emulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sau, Suman; Mandal, Swagata; Saini, Jogender; Chakrabarti, Amlan; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis

    2015-12-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment is a part of the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt at the GSI. The CBM experiment will investigate the highly compressed nuclear matter using nucleus-nucleus collisions. This experiment will examine lieavy-ion collisions in fixed target geometry and will be able to measure hadrons, electrons and muons. CBM requires precise time synchronization, compact hardware, radiation tolerance, self-triggered front-end electronics, efficient data aggregation schemes and capability to handle high data rate (up to several TB/s). As a part of the implementation of read out chain of Muon Cliamber(MUCH) [1] in India, we have tried to implement FPGA based emulator of GBTx in India. GBTx is a radiation tolerant ASIC that can be used to implement multipurpose high speed bidirectional optical links for high-energy physics (HEP) experiments and is developed by CERN. GBTx will be used in highly irradiated area and more prone to be affected by multi bit error. To mitigate this effect instead of single bit error correcting RS code we have used two bit error correcting (15, 7) BCH code. It will increase the redundancy which in turn increases the reliability of the coded data. So the coded data will be less prone to be affected by noise due to radiation. The data will go from detector to PC through multiple nodes through the communication channel. The computing resources are connected to a network which can be accessed by authorized person to prevent unauthorized data access which might happen by compromising the network security. Thus data encryption is essential. In order to make the data communication secure, advanced encryption standard [2] (AES - a symmetric key cryptography) and RSA [3], [4] (asymmetric key cryptography) are used after the channel coding. We have implemented GBTx emulator on two Xilinx Kintex-7 boards (KC705). One will act as transmitter and other will act as receiver and they are connected

  17. Homogeneous Earthquake Faulting, Stress and Fault Strength on Kilometer Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardebeck, J. L.

    2006-12-01

    I investigate small-scale fault structure using three new high-quality focal mechanism datasets of small (MLoma Prieta earthquake. I quantify the degree of mechanism variability on a range of length scales, by comparing the hypocentral distance between every pair of events and the angular difference between their focal mechanisms. I explore the implications of focal mechanism variability for the heterogeneity or homogeneity of stress and fault strength on various length scales. Focal mechanisms are very similar, often identical to within the 1σ uncertainty of ~25°, on small length scales of effect of uncertainty in earthquake locations and focal mechanisms on the apparent mechanism variability. The result that fault geometry, stress and fault strength are generally homogeneous on ~10 km length scales is encouraging for understanding earthquake physics. It may be possible to measure these parameters with enough precision to be useful in studying and modeling large earthquakes and the behavior of major faults.

  18. FTDSS:High Fault-Tolerance Distributed Shared Storage Mechanism%FTDSS:高容错分布式共享存储机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏青松; 卢显良; 雷宇

    2003-01-01

    Computerized data has become critical to the survival of an enterprise. Company must have a strategy forrecovering their data should data lose. RAID is a popular mechanism to offer good fault-tolerance. But RAID can notwork well when one more disks fail. In this paper, we present an efficient Network-based high High-Tolerance Distributed Shared Storage mechanism called FTDSS. FTDSS makes use of disk space of node in Network to build alarge public shared storage space. Users can read/write their file from/to the public storage space from node of net-work Physically File is stored in each node in form of data fragment or XOR verify fragment. Because of redundantXOR fragments, file is available even when two more nodes fail. FTDSS realize distant redundant srorage. At last.this paper use experiment to prove that FTDSS can offer high fault-tolerance and advanced performance.

  19. High-angle triple-axis specimen holder for three-dimensional diffraction contrast imaging in transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hata, S., E-mail: hata.satoshi.207@m.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Materials Science, Kyushu University, Kasuga, 6-1 Kasugakoen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Miyazaki, H. [Mel-Build, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0052 (Japan); Miyazaki, S. [FEI Company Japan Ltd., Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0075 (Japan); Mitsuhara, M. [Department of Electrical and Materials Science, Kyushu University, Kasuga, 6-1 Kasugakoen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Tanaka, M.; Kaneko, K.; Higashida, K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyushu University, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Ikeda, K.; Nakashima, H. [Department of Electrical and Materials Science, Kyushu University, Kasuga, 6-1 Kasugakoen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Matsumura, S. [Department of Applied Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Barnard, J.S. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Sharp, J.H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Midgley, P.A. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15

    Electron tomography requires a wide angular range of specimen-tilt for a reliable three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction. Although specimen holders are commercially available for tomography, they have several limitations, including tilting capability in only one or two axes at most, e.g. tilt-rotate. For amorphous specimens, the image contrast depends on mass and thickness only and the single-tilt holder is adequate for most tomographic image acquisitions. On the other hand, for crystalline materials where image contrast is strongly dependent on diffraction conditions, current commercially available tomography holders are inadequate, because they lack tilt capability in all three orthogonal axes needed to maintain a constant diffraction condition over the whole tilt range. We have developed a high-angle triple-axis (HATA) tomography specimen holder capable of high-angle tilting for the primary horizontal axis with tilting capability in the other (orthogonal) horizontal and vertical axes. This allows the user to trim the specimen tilt to obtain the desired diffraction condition over the whole tilt range of the tomography series. To demonstrate its capabilities, we have used this triple-axis tomography holder with a dual-axis tilt series (the specimen was rotated by 90{sup o} ex-situ between series) to obtain tomographic reconstructions of dislocation arrangements in plastically deformed austenitic steel foils. -- Highlights: {yields} A double tilt-rotate specimen holder for diffraction contrast imaging in electron tomography. {yields} Precise alignment of a diffraction condition for tilt-series acquisition of TEM/STEM images. {yields} Complete visualization of 3D dislocation arrangements by dual-axis STEM tomography.

  20. High Resolution Wide Angle Seismics of A Mud Volcano - Crimea, Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialas, J.; Broser, A.; Zillmer, M.; M52-1 Shipboard Party, The

    Gashydrates in marine sediments have been identified in the Black Sea first (Yefre- mova and Zhizchenko, 1974). Since russian researchers frequently reported gashy- drate findings near the seafloor from sediment cores (Soliviev and Ginsburg, 1994; Ivanov et al., 1998). Additional indications for emplacements of gas hydrates near the surface are observations of gas plumes by acoustic systems (Polikarpov et al., 1999) as well as direct observations of the ocean floor by video systems (Limonov et al., 1997). The existence of a Bottom-Simulating-Reflector (BSR) is used to identify gashydrate layers in seismic sections. These negative polarized reflector indicates the base of the hydrate stability zone (BHSZ) and generally cuts stratigraphic sequences. Still in dis- cussion is the question whether this reflection is caused by a velocity increase above the BHSZ or a velocity decrease due to free gas below the BHSZ (Pecher et al., 1996). Knowledge about gas and gashydrate concentrations in the sediments will be neces- sary to answer these questions. In January 2002 an interdisciplinary team of researches from Germany (Kiel and Bre- men), the Ukraine and Russia is going to carry out detailed investigations across a mud volcano in the waters offshore Crimea. Besides ocean floor video observations and geological sampling high resolution seismic data acquisition will be done. Record- ings of a multichannel streamer adopted to the alternating shot sequences (University of Bremen) will be accompanied by Ocean-Bottom-Hydrophones (OBH) and Ocean- Bottom-Seismometers (OBS) from GEOMAR, Kiel. During data acquisition three dif- ferent seismic sources (water gun, 2 GI gun) will be shot in alternating mode. There- fore three profiles of different frequency content will be achieved simultaneously. The corresponding resolution and depth of signal penetration will allow to study different sediment layers with increased resolution near the seafloor. It is planned to observe the shots with

  1. Maine Pseudotachylyte Localities and the Role of Host Rock Anisotropy in Fault Zone Development and Frictional Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, M. T.

    2004-12-01

    Three brittle strike-slip fault localities in coastal Maine have developed pseudotachylyte fault veins, injection veins and other reservoir structures in a variety of host rocks where the pre-existing layering can serve as a controlling fabric for brittle strike-slip reactivation. Host rocks with a poorly-oriented planar anisotropy at high angles to the shear direction will favor the development of R-shears in initial en echelon arrays as seen in the Two Lights and Richmond Island Fault Zones of Cape Elizabeth that cut gently-dipping phyllitic quartzites. These en echelon R-shears grow to through-going faults with the development of P-shear linkages across the dominantly contractional stepovers in the initial arrays. Pseudotachylyte on these faults is very localized, typically up to 1-2 mm in thickness and is restricted to through-going fault segments, P-shear linkages and some sidewall ripouts. Overall melt production is limited by the complex geometry of the multi-fault array. Host rocks with a favorably-oriented planar anisotropy for reactivation in brittle shear, however, preferentially develop a multitude of longer, non-coplanar layer-parallel fault segments. Pseudotachylyte in the newly-discovered Harbor Island Fault Zone in Muscongus Bay is developed within vertical bedding on regional upright folds with over 50 individual layer-parallel single-slip fault veins, some of which can be traced for over 40 meters along strike. Many faults show clear crosscuts of pre-existing quartz veins that indicate a range of coseismic displacements of 0.23-0.53 meters yielding fault vein widths of a few mm and dilatant reservoirs up to 2 cm thick. Both vertical and rare horizontal lateral injection veins can be found in the adjoining wall rock up to 0.7 cm thick and 80 cm in length. The structure of these faults is simple with minor development of splay faults, sidewall ripouts and strike-slip duplexes. The prominent vertical flow layering within the mylonite gneisses of

  2. Growth of faults in crystalline rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, S. J.

    2009-04-01

    The growth of faults depends on the coupled interplay of the distribution of slip, fault geometry, the stress field in the host rock, and deformation of the host rock, which commonly is manifest in secondary fracturing. The distribution of slip along a fault depends highly on its structure, the stress perturbation associated with its interaction with nearby faults, and its strength distribution; mechanical analyses indicate that the first two factors are more influential than the third. Slip distribution data typically are discrete, but commonly are described, either explicitly or implicitly, using continuous interpolation schemes. Where the third derivative of a continuous slip profile is discontinuous, the compatibility conditions of strain are violated, and fracturing and perturbations to fault geometry should occur. Discontinuous third derivatives accompany not only piecewise linear functions, but also functions as seemingly benign as cubic splines. The stress distribution and fracture distribution along a fault depends strongly on how the fault grows. Evidence to date indicates that a fault that nucleates along a pre-existing, nearly planar joint or a dike typically develops secondary fractures only near its tipline when the slip is small relative to the fault length. In contrast, stress concentrations and fractures are predicted where a discontinuous or non-planar fault exhibits steps and bends; field observations bear this prediction out. Secondary fracturing influences how faults grow by creating damage zones and by linking originally discontinuous elements into a single fault zone. Field observations of both strike-slip faults and dip-slip faults show that linked segments usually will not be coplanar; elastic stress analyses indicate that this is an inherent tendency of how three-dimensional faults grow. Advances in the data we collect and in the rigor and sophistication of our analyses seem essential to substantially advance our ability to successfully

  3. Fault Diagnosis of a High-Speed Cam-Driven Pin Assembly System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Cheng Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A cam-driven mechanical system applied for pin assembly of connectors of electrical devices is studied in this paper. Three cooperative cams are involved in the tasks of approaching, cutting, insertion, and restoring. In order to meet the demanded productivity growth, the operation speed tends to be elevated. However, high running speeds usually cause deficiencies of pin dropping and inaccurate positioning. Diagnosis is therefore conducted to explore their physical reasons so that modification of future mechanical design can be made. Frequency responses of experimental measurements show greater natural frequency and system stiffness caused by nonlinear dynamics for higher operation speed. It also appears that the clamping force is reduced and drift of the locked pin’s location is induced for higher running speed. In addition, separation of the fixture system induced by contact oscillation generates clearance larger than the thickness of the pin. Based on the mathematical models obtained from the technique of system identification, deeper insight of the mechanical system and future system improvement can be highly expected.

  4. Shallow subsurface imaging of the Piano di Pezza active normal fault (central Italy) by high-resolution refraction and electrical resistivity tomography coupled with time-domain electromagnetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, Fabio; Tulliani, Valerio; Sapia, Vincenzo; Fierro, Elisa; Civico, Riccardo; Pantosti, Daniela

    2015-12-01

    The Piano di Pezza fault is the central section of the 35 km long L'Aquila-Celano active normal fault-system in the central Apennines of Italy. Although palaeoseismic data document high Holocene vertical slip rates (˜1 mm yr-1) and a remarkable seismogenic potential of this fault, its subsurface setting and Pleistocene cumulative displacement are still poorly known. We investigated for the first time the shallow subsurface of a key section of the main Piano di Pezza fault splay by means of high-resolution seismic and electrical resistivity tomography coupled with time-domain electromagnetic soundings (TDEM). Our surveys cross a ˜5-m-high fault scarp that was generated by repeated surface-rupturing earthquakes displacing Holocene alluvial fans. We provide 2-D Vp and resistivity images, which show significant details of the fault structure and the geometry of the shallow basin infill material down to 50 m depth. Our data indicate that the upper fault termination has a sub-vertical attitude, in agreement with palaeoseismological trench evidence, whereas it dips ˜50° to the southwest in the deeper part. We recognize some low-velocity/low-resistivity regions in the fault hangingwall that we relate to packages of colluvial wedges derived from scarp degradation, which may represent the record of some Holocene palaeo-earthquakes. We estimate a ˜13-15 m throw of this fault splay since the end of the Last Glacial Maximum (˜18 ka), leading to a 0.7-0.8 mm yr-1 throw rate that is quite in accordance with previous palaeoseismic estimation of Holocene vertical slip rates. The 1-D resistivity models from TDEM soundings collected along the trace of the electrical profile significantly match with 2-D resistivity images. Moreover, they indicate that in the fault hangingwall, ˜200 m away from the surface fault trace, the pre-Quaternary carbonate basement is at ˜90-100 m depth. We therefore provide a minimal ˜150-160 m estimate of the cumulative throw of the Piano di Pezza

  5. High-throughput studies of protein shapes and interactions by synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Cy M; Svergun, Dmitri I

    2015-01-01

    Solution-based small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) affords the opportunity to extract accurate structural parameters and global shape information from diverse biological macromolecular systems. SAXS is an ideal complementary technique to other structural and biophysical methods but it can also be applied alone to access structural information that is otherwise unobtainable using high-resolution methods. Macromolecular structures ranging from kilodaltons to gigadaltons can be analyzed, which encompasses the size of most proteins and functional cellular complexes. The SAXS analysis is performed using only a few microliters of solution containing microgram quantities of purified material in sample environments that can be tailored to mimic physiological conditions or altered to suit a particular question. High-brilliance synchrotron X-ray sources and parallel advances in hardware and computing have reduced data acquisition times to the millisecond range and the application of automated methods have allowed data processing and low resolution shape modelling to be completed within minutes. These developments have paved the way for high-throughput studies that generate significant quantities of structural information over a short period of time. Here, we briefly consider the basics of SAXS and describe major methods and protocols employed in high-throughput SAXS studies.

  6. A Distributed Fault Tolerance Global Coordinator Election Algorithm in Unreliable High Traffic Distributed Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danial Rahdari

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Distributed systems consist of several management sites which have different resource sharing levels. Resources can be shared among inner site and outer site processes at first and second level respectively. Global coordinator should exist in order to coordinate access to multi site’s shared resources. Moreover; some other coordinators should manage access to inner site’s shared resources so that exerting appropriate coordinator election algorithms in each level is crucial to achieve most efficient system. In this paper a hierarchical distributed election algorithm is proposed which eliminates single point of failure of election launcher. Meanwhile traffic is applied to network at different times and the number of election messages is extremely decreased as well which applies more efficiency especially in high traffic networks. A standby system between coordinators and their first alternative is considered to induct less wait time to processes which want to communicate with coordinator

  7. Evaluating transmission towers potentials during ground faults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    During ground faults on transmission lines, a number of towers near the fault are likely to acquire high potentials to ground. These tower voltages, if excessive, may present a hazard to humans and animals. This paper presents analytical methods in order to determine the transmission towers potentials during ground faults, for long and short lines. The author developed a global systematic approach to calculate these voltages, which are dependent of a number of factors. Some of the most important factors are: magnitudes of fault currents, fault location with respect to the line terminals, conductor arrangement on the tower and the location of the faulted phase, the ground resistance of the faulted tower, soil resistivity, number, material and size of ground wires. The effects of these factors on the faulted tower voltages have been also examined for different types of power lines.

  8. Recent faulting in the Gulf of Santa Catalina: San Diego to Dana Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, H.F.; Legg, M.R.; Conrad, J.E.; Sliter, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    fault zone is more discontinuous and in places has no strong physiographic expression. The San Diego Trough fault zone consists of one or two well-defined linear fault strands that cut through the center of the San Diego Trough and strike N30??W. North of the La Jolla fan valley, this fault zone steps to the west and is composed of up to four fault strands. At the base of the continental slope, faults that show recency of movement include the San Onofre fault and reverse, oblique-slip faulting associated with the San Mateo and Carlsbad faults. In addition, the low-angle Oceanside detachment fault is imaged beneath much of the continental slope, although reflectors associated with the detachment are more prominent in the area directly offshore of San Mateo Point. North of San Mateo Point, the Oceanside fault is imaged as a northeast-dipping detachment surface with prominent folds deforming hanging-wall strata. South of San Mateo point, reflectors associated with the Oceanside detachment are often discontinuous with variable dip as imaged in WesternGeco MCS data. Recent motion along the Oceanside detachment as a reactivated thrust fault appears to be limited primarily to the area between Dana and San Mateo Points. Farther south, offshore of Carlsbad, an additional area of folding associated with the Carlsbad fault also is imaged near the base of the slope. These folds coincide with the intersection of a narrow subsurface ridge that trends at a high angle to and intersects the base of the continental slope. The complex pattern of faulting observed along the base of the continental slope associated with the San Mateo, San Onofre, and Carlsbad fault zones may be the result of block rotation. We propose that the clockwise rotation of a small crustal block between the Newport-Inglewood-Rose Canyon and Coronado Bank fault zones accounts for the localized enhanced folding along the Gulf of Santa Catalina margin. Prominent subsurface basement ridges imaged offshore of Dana Point

  9. The crustal structure of Beira High, central Mozambique-Combined investigation of wide-angle seismic and potential field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Christian Olaf; Jokat, Wilfried; Schreckenberger, Bernd

    2016-06-01

    The timing and geometry of the initial Gondwana break-up between Africa and East Antarctica is still poorly known due to missing information about the continent-ocean boundaries along the rifted margins. In this context, the Beira High off central Mozambique forms a critical geological feature of uncertain crustal fabric. Based on new wide-angle seismic and potential field data across Beira High a P-wave velocity model, supported by amplitude and gravity modelling, provides constraints on the crustal composition of this area. In the Mozambique Basin mainly normal oceanic crust of 5.5-7 km thickness with velocities of 6.5-7.0 km/s in the lower crust is present. A sharp transition towards Beira High marks the continent-ocean boundary. Here the crust thickens to 23 km at maximum. A small velocity-depth gradient and a constant increase in velocity with basal velocities of maximum 7.0 km/s are in good agreement with typical velocities of continental crust and continental fragments. The density model indicates the existence of felsic material in greater depths and supports a fabric of stretched, but highly intruded continental crust below Beira High. A gradual decrease in crustal thickness characterizes the transition towards the Mozambican shelf area. Here, in the Zambezi Delta Depression 12 km of sediments cover the underlying 7 km thick crust. The presence of a high-velocity lower crustal body with velocities of 7.1-7.4 km/s indicates underplated, magmatic material in this part of the profile. However, the velocity structure in the shelf area allows no definite interpretation because of the experimental setup. Thus, the crustal nature below the Zambezi Delta and consequently the landward position of the continent-ocean boundary remains unknown. The difference in stretching below the margins of Beira High suggests the presence of different thinning directions and a rift jump during the early rifting stage.

  10. Modification of ITU-R Rain Fade Slope Prediction Model Based on Satellite Data Measured at High Elevation Angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Dao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rain fade slope is one of fade dynamics behaviour used by system engineers to design fade mitigation techniques (FMT for space-earth microwave links. Recent measurements found that fade slope prediction model proposed by ITU-R is unable to predict fade slope distribution accurately in tropical regions. Rain fade measurement was conducted  in Kuala Lumpur (3.3° N, 101.7° E where located in heavy rain zone by receiving signal at 10.982 GHz (Ku-band from MEASAT3 (91.5° E on 77.4° elevation angle. The measurement has been carried out for one year period. Fade slope S parameter on ITU-R prediction model has been investigated. New parameter is proposed for the fade slope prediction modeling based on measured data at high elevation angle, Ku-band. ABSTRAK: Cerun hujan pudar adalah salah satu dinamik tingkah laku pudar yang digunakan oleh jurutera sistem untuk mereka bentuk teknik-teknik pengurangan pudar (FMT bagi link gelombang mikro ruang bumi. Ukuran baru-baru ini mendapati bahawa cerun pudar ramalan model yang dicadangkan oleh ITU-R tidak mampu untuk meramalkan pengagihan cerun pudar tepat di kawasan tropika. Pengukuran  hujan pudar telah dijalankan di Kuala Lumpur (3.3° N, 101.7° E yang terletak di kawasan hujan lebat dengan menerima isyarat pada 10,982 GHz (Ku-band dari MEASAT3 (91.5° E pada sudut ketinggian 77.4°. Pengukuran telah dijalankan untuk tempoh satu tahun. Parameter cerun pudar S pada model ramalan ITU-R telah disiasat. Parameter baru adalah dicadangkan untuk pemodelan cerun pudar ramalan berdasarkan data yang diukur pada sudut paras ketinggian, Ku-band.KEYWORDS: fade slope; ITU-R; fade mitigation techniques; sampling time interval

  11. High resolution 3D laser scanner measurements of a strike-slip fault quantify its morphological anisotropy at all scales

    CERN Document Server

    Renard, Francois; Marsan, Davd; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2008-01-01

    The surface roughness of a recently exhumed strikeslip fault plane has been measured by three independent 3D portable laser scanners. Digital elevation models of several fault surface areas, from 1 m2 to 600 m2, have been measured at a resolution ranging from 5 mm to 80 mm. Out of plane height fluctuations are described by non-Gaussian distribution with exponential long range tails. Statistical scaling analyses show that the striated fault surface exhibits self-affine scaling invariance with a small but significant directional morphological anisotropy that can be described by two scaling roughness exponents, H1 = 0.7 in the direction of slip and H2 = 0.8 perpendicular to the direction of slip.

  12. The Seismic Response of High-Speed Railway Bridges Subjected to Near-Fault Forward Directivity Ground Motions Using a Vehicle-Track-Bridge Element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ling-kun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the Next Generation Attenuation (NGA project ground motion library, the finite element model of the high-speed railway vehicle-bridge system is established. The model was specifically developed for such system that is subjected to near-fault ground motions. In addition, it accounted for the influence of the rail irregularities. The vehicle-track-bridge (VTB element is presented to simulate the interaction between train and bridge, in which a train can be modeled as a series of sprung masses concentrated at the axle positions. For the short period railway bridge, the results from the case study demonstrate that directivity pulse effect tends to increase the seismic responses of the bridge compared with far-fault ground motions or nonpulse-like motions and the directivity pulse effect and high values of the vertical acceleration component can notably influence the hysteretic behaviour of piers.

  13. Processing of high resolution magic angle spinning spectra of breast cancer cells by the filter diagonalization method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria, Roberta Manzano; Moraes, Tiago Bueno; Magon, Claudio José; Venâncio, Tiago; Altei, Wanessa Fernanda; Andricopulo, Adriano Defini; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2012-10-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopy for detection of biochemical changes in biological samples is a successful technique. However, the achieved NMR resolution is not sufficiently high when the analysis is performed with intact cells. To improve spectral resolution, high resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) is used and the broad signals are separated by a T(2) filter based on the CPMG pulse sequence. Additionally, HR-MAS experiments with a T(2) filter are preceded by a water suppression procedure. The goal of this work is to demonstrate that the experimental procedures of water suppression and T(2) or diffusing filters are unnecessary steps when the filter diagonalization method (FDM) is used to process the time domain HR-MAS signals. Manipulation of the FDM results, represented as a tabular list of peak positions, widths, amplitudes and phases, allows the removal of water signals without the disturbing overlapping or nearby signals. Additionally, the FDM can also be used for phase correction and noise suppression, and to discriminate between sharp and broad lines. Results demonstrate the applicability of the FDM post-acquisition processing to obtain high quality HR-MAS spectra of heterogeneous biological materials.

  14. A single reflection approach to HCPV: Very high concentration ratio and wide acceptance angles using low cost materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nardis, Davide

    2012-10-01

    The Italian engineering company Becar (Beghelli SpA group) presents its latest HCPV module currently sold under the brand name "Life Tree". The module is characterized by an efficiency of 26% that is in line with systems having higher complexity. The high efficiency and flexibility of the system are reached thanks to the single reflection scheme of the optical system. The module characterized by high acceptance angles comprises a metalized plastic primary reflector and a secondary optical element. The latter being a crucial technical feature of the Becar's system. This secondary optic element has been developed and manufactured by the German group Evonik Industries, which markets the product under the trade name SAVOSIL(TM). This technology, compared to other optics available in the market, offer high transparency in the whole solar spectrum and it is manufactured with an innovative sol-gel process that guarantees a precision in the micron range, at a fraction of the other approaches cost . Those two important features boost the light harvesting power of the Beghelli's systems. The article shows also the results of extensive in-field tests carried out to confirm reliability, performance and easy maintenance of the system.

  15. Evaluation of cartilage composition and degradation by high-resolution magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Jürgen; Huster, Daniel; Fuchs, Beate; Naji, Lama; Kaufmann, Jörn; Arnold, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    Rheumatic diseases are accompanied by a progressive destruction of the cartilage layers of the joints. Although the number of patients suffering from rheumatic diseases is steadily increasing, degradation mechanisms of cartilage are not yet understood, and methods for early diagnosis are not available. Although some information on pathogenesis could be obtained from the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of degradation products in the supernatants of cartilage specimens incubated with degradation-causing agents, the most direct information on degradation processes would come from the native cartilage as such. To obtain highly resolved NMR spectra of cartilage, application of the recently developed high-resolution magic-angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR technique is advisable to obtain small line-widths of individual cartilage resonances. This technique is nowadays commercially available for most NMR spectrometers and has the considerable advantage that the same pulse sequences as in high-resolution NMR can be applied. Except for a MAS spinning equipment, no solid-state NMR hardware is required. Therefore, this method can be easily implemented. Here, we describe the most important requirements that are necessary to record HR-MAS NMR spectra. The capabilities of the HR-MAS technique are discussed for the 1H and 13C NMR spectra of cartilage.

  16. Identifying fault segments from 3D fault drag analysis (Vienna Basin, Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahić, Darko; Grasemann, Bernhard; Exner, Ulrike

    2013-10-01

    The segmented growth of the Markgrafneusiedl normal fault in the late Miocene clastic sediments of the central Vienna Basin (Austria) was investigated by construction of a detailed three-dimensional (3D) structural model. Using high resolution 3D seismic data, the fault surface and marker horizons in the hanging wall and the footwall of the Markgrafneusiedl Fault were mapped and orientation, displacement and morphology of the fault surface were quantified. Individual, fault segments were identified by direct mapping of the deflection of the marker horizons close to the fault surface. Correlating the size of the identified segments with the magnitude of fault drag and displacement distribution showed that fault evolution progressed in several stages. The proposed method allows the detection of segments that are not recorded by the magnitude of displacement or fault morphology. Most importantly, detailed mapping of marker deflections in the hanging wall could help to constrain equivalent structures in the footwall, which may represent potential hydrocarbon traps.

  17. Machine Fault Signature Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratesh Jayaswal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to present recent developments in the field of machine fault signature analysis with particular regard to vibration analysis. The different types of faults that can be identified from the vibration signature analysis are, for example, gear fault, rolling contact bearing fault, journal bearing fault, flexible coupling faults, and electrical machine fault. It is not the intention of the authors to attempt to provide a detailed coverage of all the faults while detailed consideration is given to the subject of the rolling element bearing fault signature analysis.

  18. Mining-induced fault reactivation associated with the main conveyor belt roadway and safety of the Barapukuria Coal Mine in Bangladesh: Constraints from BEM simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Md. Rafiqul; Shinjo, Ryuichi [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa, 903-0213 (Japan)

    2009-09-01

    Fault reactivation during underground mining is a critical problem in coal mines worldwide. This paper investigates the mining-induced reactivation of faults associated with the main conveyor belt roadway (CBR) of the Barapukuria Coal Mine in Bangladesh. The stress characteristics and deformation around the faults were investigated by boundary element method (BEM) numerical modeling. The model consists of a simple geometry with two faults (Fb and Fb1) near the CBR and the surrounding rock strata. A Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion with bulk rock properties is applied to analyze the stability and safety around the fault zones, as well as for the entire mining operation. The simulation results illustrate that the mining-induced redistribution of stresses causes significant deformation within and around the two faults. The horizontal and vertical stresses influence the faults, and higher stresses are concentrated near the ends of the two faults. Higher vertical tensional stress is prominent at the upper end of fault Fb. High deviatoric stress values that concentrated at the ends of faults Fb and Fb1 indicate the tendency towards block failure around the fault zones. The deviatoric stress patterns imply that the reinforcement strength to support the roof of the roadway should be greater than 55 MPa along the fault core zone, and should be more than 20 MPa adjacent to the damage zone of the fault. Failure trajectories that extend towards the roof and left side of fault Fb indicate that mining-induced reactivation of faults is not sufficient to generate water inflow into the mine. However, if movement of strata occurs along the fault planes due to regional earthquakes, and if the faults intersect the overlying Lower Dupi Tila aquiclude, then liquefaction could occur along the fault zones and enhance water inflow into the mine. The study also reveals that the hydraulic gradient and the general direction of groundwater flow are almost at right angles with the trends of

  19. Growth Normal Faulting at the Western Edge of the Metropolitan Taipei Basin since the Last Glacial Maximum, Northern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Tung Chen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth strata analysis is an useful tool in understanding kinematics and the evolution of active faults as well as the close relationship between sedimentation and tectonics. Here we present the Shanchiao Fault as a case study which is an active normal fault responsible for the formation of the 700-m-thick late Quaternary deposits in Taipei Basin at the northern tip of the Taiwan mountain belt. We compiled a sedimentary record, particularly the depositional facies and their dated ages, at three boreholes (SCF-1, SCF-2 and WK-1, from west to east along the Wuku Profile that traverses the Shanchiao Fault at its central segment. By incorporating the global sea level change curve, we find that thickness changes of sediments and changes of depositional environments in the Wuku area are in a good agreement with a rapid sea level rise since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM of about 23 ka. Combining depositional facies changes and their ages with their thickness, we are able to introduce a simple back-stripping method to reconstruct the evolution of growing strata across the Shanchiao Fault since the LGM. We then estimate the vertical tectonic slip rate since 23 ka, which exhibits 2.2 mm yr-1 between SCF-2 and WK-1 and 1.1 mm yr-1 between SCF-1 and SCF-2. We also obtain the Holocene tectonic subsidence rate of 2.3 mm yr-1 at WK-1 and 0.9 mm yr-1 at SCF-2 since 8.4 ka. We thus conclude that the fault zone consists of a high-angle main fault to the east between SCF-2 and WK-1 and a western lower-angle branch fault between SCF-1 and SCF-2, resembling a tulip structure developed under sinistral transtensional tectonism. We find that a short period of 600-yr time span in 9 - 8.4 ka shows important tectonic subsidence of 7.4 and 3.3 m for the main and branch fault, respectively, consistent with possible earthquake events proposed by previous studies during that time. A correlation between geomorphology and subsurface geology in the Shanchiao Fault zone shows

  20. An angle encoder for super-high resolution and super-high accuracy using SelfA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tsukasa; Kon, Masahito; Nabeshima, Nobuo; Taniguchi, Kayoko

    2014-06-01

    Angular measurement technology at high resolution for applications such as in hard disk drive manufacturing machines, precision measurement equipment and aspherical process machines requires a rotary encoder with high accuracy, high resolution and high response speed. However, a rotary encoder has angular deviation factors during operation due to scale error or installation error. It has been assumed to be impossible to achieve accuracy below 0.1″ in angular measurement or control after the installation onto the rotating axis. Self-calibration (Lu and Trumper 2007 CIRP Ann. 56 499; Kim et al 2011 Proc. MacroScale; Probst 2008 Meas. Sci. Technol. 19 015101; Probst et al Meas. Sci. Technol. 9 1059; Tadashi and Makoto 1993 J. Robot. Mechatronics 5 448; Ralf et al 2006 Meas. Sci. Technol. 17 2811) and cross-calibration (Probst et al 1998 Meas. Sci. Technol. 9 1059; Just et al 2009 Precis. Eng. 33 530; Burnashev 2013 Quantum Electron. 43 130) technologies for a rotary encoder have been actively discussed on the basis of the principle of circular closure. This discussion prompted the development of rotary tables which achieve reliable and high accuracy angular verification. We apply these technologies for the development of a rotary encoder not only to meet the requirement of super-high accuracy but also to meet that of super-high resolution. This paper presents the development of an encoder with 221 = 2097 152 resolutions per rotation (360°), that is, corresponding to a 0.62″ signal period, achieved by the combination of a laser rotary encoder supplied by Magnescale Co., Ltd and a self-calibratable encoder (SelfA) supplied by The National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science & Technology (AIST). In addition, this paper introduces the development of a rotary encoder to guarantee ±0.03″ accuracy at any point of the interpolated signal, with respect to the encoder at the minimum resolution of 233, that is, corresponding to a 0.0015″ signal period after

  1. A note on 2-D lithospheric deformation due to a blind strike-slip fault

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sunita Rani; Sarva Jit Singh

    2005-02-01

    Analytical solution for the problem of a surface-breaking long strike-slip fault in an elastic layer overlying an elastic half-space is well known. The purpose of this note is to obtain the corresponding solution for a blind fault. Since the solution is valid for arbitrary values of the fault-depth and the dip angle, the effects of these two important fault parameters can be studied numerically. The variation of the parallel displacement and shear stress with the distance from the fault is studied numerically for different values of the fault-depth and dip angle.

  2. Mapping of normal fault scarps in airborne laser swath mapping data using wavelet analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sare, R.; Hilley, G. E.

    2015-12-01

    Wavelet analysis of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) successfully identifies degraded fault scarps where earthquakes produce topographic steps and provides an estimate of their morphologic age. However, these methods may fail to detect relatively young, sloping scarps created by more gently-dipping normal faults, misidentifying them as mature, highly-degraded vertical scarps if they are detected at all. We present new wavelet templates incorporating initial scarp slope and above- and below-scarp surface angles to better describe the curvature of observed fault scarps. These templates are based on an analytic solution for scarp curvature, allowing for more accurate estimation of the relative age of the scarp. Synthetic tests show that scarp-like landforms that went largely undetected by a vertical-scarp template are more clearly detected using profile geometries that reflect subtle changes in curvature due to scarp and far-field slope angles. Analysis of DEMs from sites in Surprise Valley in the northwestern Basin and Range and near Jenny Lake on the Teton rangefront illustrates the effects of along-strike variability in scarp morphology on best-fit template parameters. Where normal fault scarps have high slopes, they are identified by filters designed to detect topographic step functions. Scarps with finite initial slopes, as well as those that cut surfaces with different angles above and below the scarp, can be resolved with higher signal-to-noise ratios using more sophisticated template functions. Adaptive use of different wavelet templates could reduce the number of false negatives in wavelet analysis of data from complex faulting regimes, improving the robustness of these methods and enabling automated fault mapping of large areas.

  3. Applications of high-resolution magic angle spinning MRS in biomedical studies I-cell line and animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaebisch, Eva; Fuss, Taylor L; Vandergrift, Lindsey A; Toews, Karin; Habbel, Piet; Cheng, Leo L

    2017-06-01

    High-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) MRS allows for direct measurements of non-liquid tissue and cell specimens to present valuable insights into the cellular metabolisms of physiological and pathological processes. HRMAS produces high-resolution spectra comparable to those obtained from solutions of specimen extracts but without complex metabolite extraction processes, and preserves the tissue cellular structure in a form suitable for pathological examinations following spectroscopic analysis. The technique has been applied in a wide variety of biomedical and biochemical studies and become one of the major platforms of metabolomic studies. By quantifying single metabolites, metabolite ratios, or metabolic profiles in their entirety, HRMAS presents promising possibilities for diagnosis and prediction of clinical outcomes for various diseases, as well as deciphering of metabolic changes resulting from drug therapies or xenobiotic interactions. In this review, we evaluate HRMAS MRS results on animal models and cell lines reported in the literature, and present the diverse applications of the method for the understanding of pathological processes and the effectiveness of therapies, development of disease animal models, and new progress in HRMAS methodology. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Extraction of structural and chemical information from high angle annular dark-field image by an improved peaks finding method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wenhao; Huang, Rong; Qi, Ruijuan; Duan, Chungang

    2016-09-01

    With the development of spherical aberration (Cs) corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), high angle annular dark filed (HAADF) imaging technique has been widely applied in the microstructure characterization of various advanced materials with atomic resolution. However, current qualitative interpretation of the HAADF image is not enough to extract all the useful information. Here a modified peaks finding method was proposed to quantify the HAADF-STEM image to extract structural and chemical information. Firstly, an automatic segmentation technique including numerical filters and watershed algorithm was used to define the sub-areas for each atomic column. Then a 2D Gaussian fitting was carried out to determine the atomic column positions precisely, which provides the geometric information at the unit-cell scale. Furthermore, a self-adaptive integration based on the column position and the covariance of statistical Gaussian distribution were performed. The integrated intensities show very high sensitivity on the mean atomic number with improved signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. Consequently, the polarization map and strain distributions were rebuilt from a HAADF-STEM image of the rhombohedral and tetragonal BiFeO3 interface and a MnO2 monolayer in LaAlO3 /SrMnO3 /SrTiO3 heterostructure was discerned from its neighbor TiO2 layers. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:820-826, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Combination of high-resolution magic angle spinning proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and microscale genomics to type brain tumor biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzika, A Aria; Astrakas, Loukas; Cao, Haihui; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Andronesi, Ovidiu C; Mindrinos, Michael; Zhang, Jiangwen; Rahme, Laurence G; Blekas, Konstantinos D; Likas, Aristidis C; Galatsanos, Nikolas P; Carroll, Rona S; Black, Peter M

    2007-08-01

    Advancements in the diagnosis and prognosis of brain tumor patients, and thus in their survival and quality of life, can be achieved using biomarkers that facilitate improved tumor typing. We introduce and implement a combinatorial metabolic and molecular approach that applies state-of-the-art, high-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) proton (1H) MRS and gene transcriptome profiling to intact brain tumor biopsies, to identify unique biomarker profiles of brain tumors. Our results show that samples as small as 2 mg can be successfully processed, the HRMAS 1H MRS procedure does not result in mRNA degradation, and minute mRNA amounts yield high-quality genomic data. The MRS and genomic analyses demonstrate that CNS tumors have altered levels of specific 1H MRS metabolites that directly correspond to altered expression of Kennedy pathway genes; and exhibit rapid phospholipid turnover, which coincides with upregulation of cell proliferation genes. The data also suggest Sonic Hedgehog pathway (SHH) dysregulation may play a role in anaplastic ganglioglioma pathogenesis. That a strong correlation is seen between the HRMAS 1H MRS and genomic data cross-validates and further demonstrates the biological relevance of the MRS results. Our combined metabolic/molecular MRS/genomic approach provides insights into the biology of anaplastic ganglioglioma and a new potential tumor typing methodology that could aid neurologists and neurosurgeons to improve the diagnosis, treatment, and ongoing evaluation of brain tumor patients.

  6. Influence of fault geometry and fault interaction on strain partitioning within western Sichuan and its adjacent region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    There are several major active fault zones in the western Sichuan and its vicinity. Slip rates and seismicity vary on different fault zones. For example, slip rates on the Xianshuihe fault zone are higher than 10 mm/a. Its seismicity is also intense. Slip rates on the Longmenshan fault zone are low. However, Wenchuan Ms8.0 earthquake occurred on this fault zone in 2008. Here we study the impact of fault geometry on strain partitioning in the western Sichuan region using a three-dimensional viscoe- lastoplastic model. We conclude that the slip partitioning on the Xianshuihe-Xiaojiang fault presents as segmented, and it is related to fault geometry and fault structure. Slip rate is high on fault segment with simple geometry and structure, and vice versa. Strain rate outside the fault is localized around the fault segment with complex geometry and fault structure. Strain partitioning on the central section of the Xianshuihe-Xiaojiang fault zone is influenced by the interaction between the Anninghe-Zemuhe fault and the Daliangshan fault zone. Striking of the Longmenshan fault zone is nearly orthogonal to the direction of eastward extrusion in the Tibetan Plateau. It leads to low slip rate on the fault zone.

  7. Observations at a San Jacinto Fault Zone site (Sage Brush Flat) Using a Nodal Seismic High Frequency Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, F.; Reyes, J. C.; White, M. C. A.; Davis, G. A.; Meyer, J. C.; Sahakian, V. J.; Mancinelli, N. J.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Zigone, D.; Harris, C.; Liu, X.; Qiu, H.; Share, P. E.; Ozakin, Y.; Hollis, D.; Barklage, M.

    2014-12-01

    Between 7 May 2014 and 13 June 2014 we deployed a tight 1108 element array of 10 Hz vertical geophones in a two-dimensional array with 700 meter aperture centered on the Clark Fault of the San Jacinto Fault Zone. The array was designed to make detailed observations of the shallow damage zone, local failure processes and noise properties of the Clark Fault near the Anza seismic gap. The core of the array consisted of a grid organized with 20 rows perpendicular to and centered on the fault trace, each row with 50 sensors at a nominal 10 meter interstation spacing. The spacing between rows was nominally 30 meters. The remaining 108 sensors were deployed as extensions to multiple rows providing a maximum 700 meter aperture. Each sensor was surveyed using a Real Time Kinematic (RTK) GPS system to an accuracy of approximately 30 cm. The RTK survey was enabled via ad-hoc networking using HPWREN. We will present observations of earthquakes with magnitudes -1 100 kilometers, along with prosperities of local structures and noise characteristics.

  8. High stable, high efficient ultraviolet laser with angle-phase-mismatching compensation by adjusting temperature of the nonlinear crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Houwen; Wang, Bo; Wang, Junhua; Li, Xiaofang; Liu, Zhaojun; Cheng, Wenyong

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrated an ultraviolet laser at 355 nm using a type-I and a type-II phase-matching nonlinear optical crystal of LiB3O5 (LBO). A method of adjusting temperature for compensation is presented. The crystal temperature is controlled by proportional integral derivative (PID) thermal controllers with a  ±0.01 °C resolution. The value of wave vector mismatch, distance of light propagation in nonlinear crystals, effective nonlinear coefficient, theoretical analysis and calculation of conversion efficiency versus temperature are discussed. The experimental results show that the average output power of the 355 nm laser is 1.24 W with the pump power of 13.33 W, when the repetition frequency is 15 kHz. The pulse duration is 9.8 ns, and the beam quality factors are of Mx2   =  1.8, My2   =  1.7. The conversion efficiency from 808 nm to 355 nm laser is 9.3%, which nearly reaches the optimum value reported so far and is limited by the wavelength mismatch between the pumping and absorbing lasers. The 355 nm output power instability of the laser device is 0.45% in 2 h. A compact no-water-cooling ultraviolet laser with high stability and high efficiency is obtained.

  9. Fault Detection Using Polarimetric Single-Input-Multi-Output Ground Penetrating Radar Technique in Mason, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amara, A.; Everett, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    At the Mason Mountain Wildlife Management Area (MMWMA) near Mason, Texas, we conducted a 2D ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey using single-input-multi-output (SIMO) acquisition technique to image a Pennsylvanian high-angle normal fault. At the MMWMA, the surface geology is mapped extensively but the subsurface remains largely unknown. The main objective of our study is to develop a detailed subsurface structural image of the fault and evaluate existing hypotheses on fault development. Also, to develop and apply a new methodology based on Polarimetric SIMO acquisition geometry. This new methodology allows the subsurface structures to be viewed simultaneously from different angles and can help reduce noise caused by the heterogeneities that affect the electromagnetic waves. We used a pulseEKKO pro 200 GPR with 200 MHz antennae to acquire 8 north-south lines across the fault. Each line is 30 meters long with the transmitter starting on the Town Mountain Granite, footwall, with the receiver stepping 40 cm until the end of the line crossing the fault on to the Hickory Sandstone, hanging wall. Each pass consisted of a stationary transmitter antenna and the moving receiver antenna. The data were initially processed with standard steps including low-cut dewow filter, background subtraction filter and gain control. Advanced processing techniques include migration, phased array processing, velocity analysis, and normal moveout. We will compare the GPR results with existing geophysical datasets at the same site, including electromagnetic (EM), seismic, and seismoelectric.

  10. The Alto Tiberina Near Fault Observatory (northern Apennines, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauro Chiaraluce

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The availability of multidisciplinary and high-resolution data is a fundamental requirement to understand the physics of earthquakes and faulting. We present the Alto Tiberina Near Fault Observatory (TABOO, a research infrastructure devoted to studying preparatory processes, slow and fast deformation along a fault system located in the upper Tiber Valley (northern Apennines, dominated by a 60 km long low-angle normal fault (Alto Tiberina, ATF active since the Quaternary. TABOO consists of 50 permanent seismic stations covering an area of 120 × 120 km2. The surface seismic stations are equipped with 3-components seismometers, one third of them hosting accelerometers. We instrumented three shallow (250 m boreholes with seismometers, creating a 3-dimensional antenna for studying micro-earthquakes sources (detection threshold is ML 0.5 and detecting transient signals. 24 of these sites are equipped with continuous geodetic GPS, forming two transects across the fault system. Geochemical and electromagnetic stations have been also deployed in the study area. In 36 months TABOO recorded 19,422 events with ML ≤ 3.8 corresponding to 23.36e-04 events per day per squared kilometres; one of the highest seismicity rate value observed in Italy. Seismicity distribution images the geometry of the ATF and its antithetic/synthetic structures located in the hanging-wall. TABOO can allow us to understand the seismogenic potential of the ATF and therefore contribute to the seismic hazard assessment of the area. The collected information on the geometry and deformation style of the fault will be used to elaborate ground shaking scenarios adopting diverse slip distributions and rupture directivity models.

  11. 高密度电法在隐伏断裂探测中的应用%APPLICATION OF HIGH-DENSITY RESISTIVITY METHOD TO BURIED FAULT EXPLORATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    玄月; 王金萍; 冯军; 孙铭心; 李红光

    2011-01-01

    The Wenner and Diple devices of high-density resistivity method are used for exploring Huang-zhuang-Gaoliying fault. Through data processing and analysis, the results show that the distribution, strike and dip of the fault are consistent with the results of shallow seismic exploration and trench. The study indicates that the application of high-density resistivity method to explore the buried fault has a good prospect.%应用高密度电法中的温纳和偶极两种探测方法,对北京地区的黄庄-高丽营隐伏断裂进行了探测,结果表明,该断裂的走向、倾向与浅层地震勘探和探槽剖面探测结果非常一致,说明电法探测技术在隐伏断裂探测中有着良好的应用前景.

  12. Adaptive Fault-Tolerant Cruise Control for a Class of High-Speed Trains with Unknown Actuator Failure and Control Input Saturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Tao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the position and velocity tracking control of a class of high-speed trains (HST with unknown actuator failures (AF and control input saturation (CIS. Firstly, a nonlinear dynamic model for HST at normal operating status is built. The structure of traction system in HST is analyzed and the corresponding model for HST with unknown AF is presented as well. The type of AF under consideration is that some of the plant inputs are influenced by hopping function. An adaptive model-based fault detection and diagnosis (AMFDD module is proposed based on immersion and invariance (I&I method to make decisions on whether a fault has occurred. A new framework to design a monotone mapping is proposed in I&I method, that is, P(x-monotone. Using on-line obtained fault information, an adaptive law is designed to update the controller parameters to handle unknown AF and CIS in HST simultaneously when some of plant parameters are unknown. Closed-loop stability and asymptotic position and velocity tracking are ensured. Numerical simulations of China Railways High-speed 2 (CRH2 train are provided to verify the effectiveness of the presented scheme.

  13. High-Resolution Seismic Reflection and Refraction Imaging of the Hayward Fault in Fremont, Alameda County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everson, E. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Goldman, M. R.; Catchings, R. D.

    2007-12-01

    In July 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey acquired a 60-m-long seismic reflection and refraction profile across the main trace of the Hayward fault in Fremont Central Park, Fremont, California. The profile was designed to determine the geometry, seismic velocities, and possible structural complexities of the fault. The study was along a part of the surface rupture of the 1868 M 7.0 Hayward earthquake. We used single-element, 40-Hz vertical geophones placed at 1-m intervals along the profile with 0.5-m lateral offset from the shot points, also with 1-m intervals. Seismic sources were generated by multiple sledgehammer blows at each shot point. Data were recorded unfiltered in the field on a Geometrics Strataview RX-60 seismograph at a sampling rate of 0.5 ms for 2 s. Geophone locations were measured in 3D using differential GPS. We developed a velocity model using the Hole (1992) code to invert P-wave first arrivals of the refraction data. Seismic P-wave velocities range from about 200 m/s near the surface to approximately 800 m/s at a depth of 13 to 16 m. The velocity model was then applied to the reflection data to develop an unmigrated common depth point (CDP) stack. The reflection data indicate the presence of at least three fault strands in an approximately 20-m-wide zone. We believe the three strands define an upwardly flaring 'flower structure', with the central strand being the main strand of the Hayward fault. The three strands project to merge at a depth of about 150 m; the overall dip of the fault zone in the upper 100 m is to the northeast, at about 88 degrees.

  14. Mechanical constraints on inversion of co-seismic geodetic data for fault slip and geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, F.; Sun, J.; Johnson, K. M.; Shen, Z.; Burgmann, R.

    2010-12-01

    Modern geodetic techniques, such as the Global Positioning System (GPS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), provide high-precision deformation measurements of earthquakes. Through elastic models and mathematical optimization methods, the observations can be related to a slip-distribution model. The classic linear, kinematic, and static slip inversion problem requires specification of a smoothing norm of slip parameters and a residual norm of the data, and a choice about the relative weight between the two norms. Inversions for unknown fault geometry are nonlinear and therefore the fault geometry is often assumed to be known for the slip inversion problem. We present a new method to invert simultaneously for fault slip and fault geometry assuming a uniform stress drop over the slipping area of the fault. The method uses a Full Bayesian Inference method as an engine to estimate the posterior probability distribution of stress drop, fault geometry parameters, and fault slip. We validate the method with a synthetic data set and apply the method to InSAR observations of a moderate-sized normal faulting event, the October 6, 2008 Mw 6.3 Dangxiong-Yangyi (Tibet) earthquake. The results show a 45.0±0.2° west dipping fault with a maximum net slip of ~1.13 m, and the static stress drop and rake angle are estimated as ~5.43 MPa and ~92.5° respectively. The stress drop estimate falls within the typical range of earthquake stress drops known from previous studies.

  15. Bridging faults in BiCMOS circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Sankaran M.; Malaiya, Yashwant K.; Jayasumana, Anura P.

    1993-01-01

    Combining the advantages of CMOS and bipolar, BiCMOS is emerging as a major technology for many high performance digital and mixed signal applications. Recent investigations revealed that bridging faults can be a major failure mode in IC's. Effects of bridging faults in BiCMOS circuits are presented. Bridging faults between logical units without feedback and logical units with feedback are considered. Several bridging faults can be detected by monitoring the power supply current (I(sub DDQ) monitoring). Effects of bridging faults and bridging resistance on output logic levels were examined along with their effects on noise immunity.

  16. Hydrogen release: new indicator of fault activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakita, H; Nakamura, Y; Kita, I; Fujii, N; Notsu, K

    1980-10-10

    The hydrogen concentration in soil gas has been measured in the area around the Yamasaki Fault, one of the active faults in southwestern Japan. Degassing of a significant amount of hydrogen (up to more than 3 percent by volume) has been observed for sites along the fault zone. The hydrogen concentration in soil gas at sites away from the fault zone was about 0.5 part per million, almost the same as that found in the atmosphere. The spatial distribution of sites with high hydrogen concentrations is quite systematic. A hypothesis on the production of hydrogen by fault movements is postulated.

  17. The Application of Constant Angle Re-sampling Method in Camshaft Fault Diagnosis Based on EMD Theory%基于EMD理论的等角度重采样方法在凸轮轴故障诊断中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨翠丽; 秦荣; 杜灿谊

    2011-01-01

    将一种无转速测量信号,基于希尔伯特—黄变换等角度重采样的阶次分析方法应用于发动机凸轮轴故障诊断,从而有效消除转速波动的影响,使信号处理与分析结果更加准确.应用所提出的方法对某6缸柴油机缸体振动信号进行分析,对比凸轮轴轴瓦断裂修复前后振动信号特征的变化,有效地提取出了故障特征.%The order analysis method based on the Hilbert-Huang transformation constant angle re-sampling was applied to the fault diagnosis of camshaft, the disturbance of speed was effectively eliminated and the signal processing and analysis results were improved. By analyzing the vibration signal of a 6-cylinder diesel engine and comparing the variation of vibration signal before and after the camshaft bearing fracture repair, the fault characteristics were extracted effectively.

  18. Surface Interactions and Confinement of Methane: A High Pressure Magic Angle Spinning NMR and Computational Chemistry Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ok, Salim; Hoyt, David W.; Andersen, Amity; Sheets, Julie; Welch, Susan A.; Cole, David R.; Mueller, Karl T.; Washton, Nancy M.

    2017-01-18

    Characterization and modeling of the molecular-level behavior of simple hydrocarbon gases, such as methane, in the presence of both nonporous and nano-porous mineral matrices allows for predictive understanding of important processes in engineered and natural systems. In this study, changes in local electromagnetic environments of the carbon atoms in methane under conditions of high pressure (up to 130 bar) and moderate temperature (up to 346 K) were observed with 13C magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy while the methane gas was mixed with two model solid substrates: a fumed non-porous, 12 nm particle size silica and a mesoporous silica with 200 nm particle size and 4 nm average pore diameter. Examination of the interactions between methane and the silica systems over temperatures and pressures that include the supercritical regime was allowed by a novel high pressure MAS sample containment system, which provided high resolution spectra collected under in situ conditions. For pure methane, no significant thermal effects were found for the observed 13C chemical shifts at all pressures studied here (28.2 bar, 32.6 bar, 56.4 bar, 65.1 bar, 112.7 bar, and 130.3 bar). However, the 13C chemical shifts of resonances arising from confined methane changed slightly with changes in temperature in mixtures with mesoporous silica. The chemical shift values of 13C nuclides in methane change measurably as a function of pressure both in the pure state and in mixtures with both silica matrices, with a more pronounced shift when meso-porous silica is present. Molecular-level simulations utilizing GCMC, MD and DFT confirm qualitatively that the experimentally measured changes are attributed to interactions of methane with the hydroxylated silica surfaces as well as densification of methane within nanopores and on pore surfaces.

  19. Complete protocol for slow-spinning high-resolution magic-angle spinning NMR analysis of fragile tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Marion; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Rezig, Lamya; Shintu, Laetitia; Piotto, Martial; Caldarelli, Stefano

    2014-11-04

    High-resolution magic-angle spinning (HR-MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is an essential tool to characterize a variety of semisolid systems, including biological tissues, with virtually no sample preparation. The "non-destructive" nature of NMR is typically compromised, however, by the extreme centrifugal forces experienced under conventional HR-MAS frequencies of several kilohertz. These features limit the usefulness of current HR-MAS approaches for fragile samples. Here, we introduce a full protocol for a