WorldWideScience

Sample records for high acoustic sensitivity

  1. High-sensitivity fiber optic acoustic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Liu, Deming; Liao, Hao

    2016-11-01

    Due to the overwhelming advantages compared with traditional electronicsensors, fiber-optic acoustic sensors have arisen enormous interest in multiple disciplines. In this paper we present the recent research achievements of our group on fiber-optic acoustic sensors. The main point of our research is high sensitivity interferometric acoustic sensors, including Michelson, Sagnac, and Fabry-Pérot interferometers. In addition, some advanced technologies have been proposed for acoustic or acoustic pressure sensing such as single-mode/multimode fiber coupler, dual FBGs and multi-longitudinal mode fiber laser based acoustic sensors. Moreover, our attention we have also been paid on signal demodulation schemes. The intensity-based quadrature point (Q-point) demodulation, two-wavelength quadrature demodulation and symmetric 3×3 coupler methodare discussed and compared in this paper.

  2. High-overtone Bulk-Acoustic Resonator gravimetric sensitivity: towards wideband acoustic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Rabus, D; Ballandras, S; Baron, T; Lebrasseur, E; Carry, E

    2015-01-01

    In the context of direct detection sensors with compact dimensions, we investigate the gravimetric sensitivity of High-overtone Bulk Acoustic Resonators, through modeling of their acoustic characteristics and experiment. The high frequency characterizing such devices is expected to induce a significant effect when the acoustic field boundary conditions are modified by a thin adlayer. Furthermore, the multimode spectral characteristics is considered for wideband acoustic spectroscopy of the adlayer, once the gravimetric sensitivity dependence of the various overtones is established. Finally, means of improving the gravimetric sensitivity by confining the acoustic field in a low acoustic-impedance layer is theoretically established.

  3. Highly Mass-Sensitive Thin Film Plate Acoustic Resonators (FPAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arapan, Lilia; Alexieva, Gergana; Avramov, Ivan D.; Radeva, Ekaterina; Strashilov, Vesseline; Katardjiev, Ilia; Yantchev, Ventsislav

    2011-01-01

    The mass sensitivity of thin aluminum nitride (AlN) film S0 Lamb wave resonators is theoretically and experimentally studied. Theoretical predictions based on modal and finite elements method analysis are experimentally verified. Here, two-port 888 MHz synchronous FPARs are micromachined and subsequently coated with hexamethyl-disiloxane(HMDSO)-plasma-polymerized thin films of various thicknesses. Systematic data on frequency shift and insertion loss versus film thickness are presented. FPARs demonstrate high mass-loading sensitivity as well as good tolerance towards the HMDSO viscous losses. Initial measurements in gas phase environment are further presented. PMID:22163994

  4. Highly mass-sensitive thin film plate acoustic resonators (FPAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arapan, Lilia; Alexieva, Gergana; Avramov, Ivan D; Radeva, Ekaterina; Strashilov, Vesseline; Katardjiev, Ilia; Yantchev, Ventsislav

    2011-01-01

    The mass sensitivity of thin aluminum nitride (AlN) film S0 Lamb wave resonators is theoretically and experimentally studied. Theoretical predictions based on modal and finite elements method analysis are experimentally verified. Here, two-port 888 MHz synchronous FPARs are micromachined and subsequently coated with hexamethyl-disiloxane(HMDSO)-plasma-polymerized thin films of various thicknesses. Systematic data on frequency shift and insertion loss versus film thickness are presented. FPARs demonstrate high mass-loading sensitivity as well as good tolerance towards the HMDSO viscous losses. Initial measurements in gas phase environment are further presented.

  5. Highly Mass-Sensitive Thin Film Plate Acoustic Resonators (FPAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ventsislav Yantchev

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The mass sensitivity of thin aluminum nitride (AlN film S0 Lamb wave resonators is theoretically and experimentally studied. Theoretical predictions based on modal and finite elements method analysis are experimentally verified. Here, two-port 888 MHz synchronous FPARs are micromachined and subsequently coated with hexamethyl-disiloxane(HMDSO-plasma-polymerized thin films of various thicknesses. Systematic data on frequency shift and insertion loss versus film thickness are presented. FPARs demonstrate high mass-loading sensitivity as well as good tolerance towards the HMDSO viscous losses. Initial measurements in gas phase environment are further presented.

  6. A novel fiber optic geophone with high sensitivity for geo-acoustic detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenhui; Yang, Huayong; Xiong, Shuidong; Luo, Hong; Cao, Chunyan; Ma, Shuqing

    2014-12-01

    A novel interferometric fiber optic geophone is introduced in this paper. This geophone is mainly used for geo-acoustic signal detection. The geophone use one of the three orthogonal components of mandrel type push-pull structure in mechanically and single-mode fiber optic Michelson interferometer structure with Faraday Rotation Mirror (FRM) elements in optically. The resonance frequency of the geophone is larger than 1000Hz. The acceleration sensitivity is as high as 56.6 dB (0dB re 1rad/g) with a slight sensitivity fluctuation of +/-0. 2dB within the frequency band from 20Hz to 200Hz. The geo-acoustic signals generated by underwater blasting are detected successfully. All the channels show good uniformity in the detected wave shape and the amplitudes exhibit very slight differences. The geo-acoustic signal excitated by the engine of surface vehicles was also detected successfully.

  7. High-sensitivity open-loop electronics for gravimetric acoustic-wave-based sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabus, David; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Ballandras, Sylvain; Martin, Gilles; Carry, Emile; Blondeau-Patissier, Virginie

    2013-06-01

    Detecting chemical species in gas phase has recently received an increasing interest mainly for security control, trying to implement new systems allowing for extended dynamics and reactivity. In this work, an open-loop interrogation strategy is proposed to use radio-frequency acoustic transducers as micro-balances for that purpose. The resulting system is dedicated to the monitoring of chemical compounds in gaseous or liquid-phase state. A 16 Hz standard deviation is demonstrated at 125 MHz, with a working frequency band in the 60 to 133 MHz range, answering the requirements for using Rayleigh- and Love-wave-based delay lines operating with 40-μm acoustic wavelength transducers. Moreover, this electronic setup was used to interrogate a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR) microbalance, a new sensor class allowing for multi-mode interrogation for gravimetric measurement improvement. The noise source still limiting the system performance is due to the analog-to-digital converter of the microcontroller, thus leaving open degrees-of-freedom for improving the obtained results by optimizing the voltage reference and board layout. The operation of the system is illustrated using a calibrated galvanic deposition at the surface of Love-wave delay lines to assess theoretical predictions of their gravimetric sensitivity and to compare them with HBAR-based sensor sensitivity.

  8. A high sensitivity wireless mass-loading surface acoustic wave DNA biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hua-Lin; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Yi-Han; Zhou, Chang-Jian; Guo, Cang-Ran; Liu, Jing; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor with gold delay area on LiNbO3 substrate detecting DNA sequences is proposed. By well-designed device parameters of the SAW sensor, it achieves a high performance for highly sensitive detection of target DNA. In addition, an effective biological treatment method for DNA immobilization and abundant experimental verification of the sensing effect have made it a reliable device in DNA detection. The loading mass of the probe and target DNA sequences is obtained from the frequency shifts, which are big enough in this work due to an effective biological treatment. The experimental results show that the biosensor has a high sensitivity of 1.2 pg/ml/Hz and high selectivity characteristic is also verified by the few responses of other substances. In combination with wireless transceiver, we develop a wireless receiving and processing system that can directly display the detection results.

  9. D33 mode piezoelectric diaphragm based acoustic transducer with high sensitivity

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Zhiyuan

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of an acoustic transducer using a piezoelectric freestanding bulk diaphragm as the sensing element. The diaphragm bearing the spiral electrode operates in d 33 mode, which allows the in-plane deformation of the diaphragm to be converted to the out-of-plane deformation and generates an acoustic wave in the same direction. A finite element code is developed to reorient the material polarization distribution according to the poling field calculated. The first four resonance modes have been simulated and verified by impedance and velocity spectra. The sensitivity and the sound pressure level of the transducer were characterized. The realized sensitivity of 126.21 μV/Pa at 1 kHz is nearly twenty times of the sensitivity of a sandwich d31 mode transducer. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  10. Standoff photoacoustic detections with high-sensitivity microphones and acoustic arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choa, Fow-Sen; Wang, Chen-Chia; Khurgin, Jacob; Samuels, Alan; Trivedi, Sudhir; Gupta, Deepa

    2016-05-01

    Standoff detection of dangerous chemicals like explosives, nerve gases, and harmful aerosols has continuously been an important subject due to the serious concern about terrorist threats to both overseas and homeland lives and facility. Compared with other currently available standoff optical detection techniques, like Raman, photo-thermal, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy,...etc., photoacoustic (PA) sensing has the advantages of background free and very high detection sensitivity, no need of back reflection surfaces, and 1/R instead of 1/R2 signal decay distance dependence. Furthermore, there is still a great room for PA sensitivity improvement by using different PA techniques, including lockin amplifier, employing new microphones, and microphone array techniques. Recently, we have demonstrated standoff PA detection of isopropanol vapor, solid phase TNT and RDX at a standoff distance. To further calibrate the detection sensitivity, we use nerve gas simulants that were generated and calibrated by a commercial vapor generator. For field operations, array of microphones and microphone-reflector pairs can be utilized to achieve noise rejection and signal enhancement. We have experimentally demonstrated signal enhancement and noise reduction using an array of 4 microphone/4 reflector system as well as an array of 16-microphone/1 reflector. In this work we will review and compare different standoff techniques and discuss the advantages of using different photoacoustic techniques. We will also discuss new advancement of using new types of microphone and the performance comparison of using different structure of microphone arrays and combining lock-in amplifier with acoustic arrays. Demonstration of out-door real-time operations with high power mid-IR laser and microphone array will be presented.

  11. High sensitivity of p-modes near the acoustic cutoff frequency to solar model parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, D. B.

    1991-01-01

    The p-mode frequencies of low l have been calculated for solar models with initial helium mass fraction varying from Y = 0.2753-0.2875. The differences in frequency of the p-modes in the frequency range, 2500-4500 microHz, do not exceed 1-5 microHz among the models. But in the vicinity of the acoustic cutoff frequency, near 5000 microHz the p-mode frequency differences are enhanced by a factor of 4. The enhanced sensitivity of p-modes near the acoustic cutoff frequency was further tested by calculating and comparing p-mode frequencies of low l for two solar models one incorporating the Eddington T-tau relation and the other the Krishna Swamy T-tau relation. Again, it is found that p-modes with frequencies near the acoustic cutoff frequency show a significant increase in sensitivity to the different T-tau relations, compared to lower frequency p-modes. It is noted that frequencies above the acoustic cutoff frequency are complex, hence, cannot be modeled by the adiabatic pulsation code (assumes real eigenfrequencies) used in these calculations.

  12. Fast Response and High Sensitivity ZnO/glass Surface Acoustic Wave Humidity Sensors Using Graphene Oxide Sensing Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Weipeng; He, Mei; Meng, Nan; He, Xingli; Wang, Wenbo; Chen, Jinkai; Shi, Tianjin; Hasan, Tawfique; Xu, Zhen; Xu, Yang; Luo, J. K.

    2014-11-01

    We report ZnO/glass surface acoustic wave (SAW) humidity sensors with high sensitivity and fast response using graphene oxide sensing layer. The frequency shift of the sensors is exponentially correlated to the humidity change, induced mainly by mass loading effect rather than the complex impedance change of the sensing layer. The SAW sensors show high sensitivity at a broad humidity range from 0.5%RH to 85%RH with SAW humidity sensors, complemented with full humidity range measurement, highlights their potential in a wide range of applications.

  13. Highly sensitive and ultrafast response surface acoustic wave humidity sensor based on electrospun polyaniline/poly(vinyl butyral) nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Qianqian [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications, Zhejiang University, MOE Key Laboratory of Macromolecule Synthesis and Functionalization, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Li Yang, E-mail: liyang@zju.edu.cn [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications, Zhejiang University, MOE Key Laboratory of Macromolecule Synthesis and Functionalization, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Yang Mujie [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications, Zhejiang University, MOE Key Laboratory of Macromolecule Synthesis and Functionalization, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2012-10-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polyanline/poly(vinyl butyral) nanofibers are prepared by electrospinning. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanofiber-based SAW humidity sensor show high sensitivity and ultrafast response. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SAW sensor can detect very low humidity. - Abstract: Polyaniline (PANi) composite nanofibers were deposited on surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonator with a central frequency of 433 MHz to construct humidity sensors. Electrospun nanofibers of poly(methyl methacrylate), poly(vinyl pyrrolidone), poly(ethylene oxide), poly(vinylidene fluoride), poly(vinyl butyral) (PVB) were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, and humidity response of corresponding SAW humidity sensors were investigated. The results indicated that PVB was suitable as a matrix to form nanofibers with PANi by electrospinning (ES). Electrospun PANi/PVB nanofibers exhibited a core-sheath structure as revealed by transmittance electron microscopy. Effects of ES collection time on humidity response of SAW sensor based on PANi/PVB nanofibers were examined at room temperature. The composite nanofiber sensor exhibited very high sensitivity of {approx}75 kHz/%RH from 20 to 90%RH, ultrafast response (1 s and 2 s for humidification and desiccation, respectively) and good sensing linearity. Furthermore, the sensor could detect humidity as low as 0.5%RH, suggesting its potentials for low humidity detection. Attempts were done to explain the attractive humidity sensing performance of the sensor by considering conductivity, hydrophilicity, viscoelasticity and morphology of the polymer composite nanofibers.

  14. Highly sensitive and ultrafast response surface acoustic wave humidity sensor based on electrospun polyaniline/poly(vinyl butyral) nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qianqian; Li, Yang; Yang, Mujie

    2012-10-20

    Polyaniline (PANi) composite nanofibers were deposited on surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonator with a central frequency of 433 MHz to construct humidity sensors. Electrospun nanofibers of poly(methyl methacrylate), poly(vinyl pyrrolidone), poly(ethylene oxide), poly(vinylidene fluoride), poly(vinyl butyral) (PVB) were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, and humidity response of corresponding SAW humidity sensors were investigated. The results indicated that PVB was suitable as a matrix to form nanofibers with PANi by electrospinning (ES). Electrospun PANi/PVB nanofibers exhibited a core-sheath structure as revealed by transmittance electron microscopy. Effects of ES collection time on humidity response of SAW sensor based on PANi/PVB nanofibers were examined at room temperature. The composite nanofiber sensor exhibited very high sensitivity of ~75kHz/%RH from 20 to 90%RH, ultrafast response (1s and 2s for humidification and desiccation, respectively) and good sensing linearity. Furthermore, the sensor could detect humidity as low as 0.5%RH, suggesting its potentials for low humidity detection. Attempts were done to explain the attractive humidity sensing performance of the sensor by considering conductivity, hydrophilicity, viscoelasticity and morphology of the polymer composite nanofibers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Creating geometrically robust designs for highly sensitive problems using topology optimization: Acoustic cavity design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Rasmus E.; Lazarov, Boyan S.; Jensen, Jakob S.;

    2015-01-01

    and limitations are discussed. In addition, a known explicit penalization approach is considered for comparison. For near-uniform spatial variations it is shown that highly robust designs can be obtained using the double filter approach. It is finally demonstrated that taking non-uniform variations into account...

  16. High-frequency seafloor acoustics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jackson, D. R; Richardson, M. D

    2007-01-01

    This title provides access to experimental data, theory, and models relevant to high-frequency seafloor acoustics and will be of interest to sonar engineers and researchers working in underwater acoustics...

  17. Properties of high sensitivity ZnO surface acoustic wave sensors on SiO 2/(1 0 0) Si substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, Soumya; Iliadis, Agis A.

    2008-11-01

    The properties of ZnO/SiO2/Si surface acoustic wave (SAW) Love mode sensors were examined and optimized to achieve high mass sensitivity. SAW devices A and B, were designed and fabricated to operate at resonant frequencies around 0.7 and 1.5 GHz. The ZnO films grown by pulsed laser deposition on SiO2/Si demonstrated c-axis growth and the fabricated devices showed guided shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (or Love mode) propagation. Acoustic phase velocity in the ZnO layer was measured in both devices A and B and theoretical and experimental evaluation of the mass sensitivity showed that the maximum sensitivity is obtained for devices with ZnO guiding layer thicknesses of 340 nm and 160 nm for devices A and B, respectively. The performance of the SAW sensors was validated by measuring the mass of a well-characterized polystyrene-polyacrylic acid diblock copolymer film. For the optimized sensors, maximum mass sensitivity values were as high as 4.309 μm2/pg for device A operating at 0.7477 GHz, and 8.643 μm2/pg for device B operating at 1.5860 GHz. The sensors demonstrated large frequency shifts per applied mass (0.1-4 MHz), excellent linearity, and extended range in the femto-gram region. The large frequency shifts indicated that these sensors have the potential to measure mass two to three orders of magnitude lower in the atto-gram range.

  18. Highly sensitive monitoring of chest wall dynamics and acoustics provides diverse valuable information for evaluating ventilation and diagnosing pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesin, Jimy; Faingersh, Anna; Waisman, Dan; Landesberg, Amir

    2014-06-15

    Current practice of monitoring lung ventilation in neonatal intensive care units, utilizing endotracheal tube pressure and flow, end-tidal CO2, arterial O2 saturation from pulse oximetry, and hemodynamic indexes, fails to account for asymmetric pathologies and to allow for early detection of deteriorating ventilation. This study investigated the utility of bilateral measurements of chest wall dynamics and sounds, in providing early detection of changes in the mechanics and distribution of lung ventilation. Nine healthy New Zealand rabbits were ventilated at a constant pressure, while miniature accelerometers were attached to each side of the chest. Slowly progressing pneumothorax was induced by injecting 1 ml/min air into the pleural space on either side of the chest. The end of the experiment (tPTX) was defined when arterial O2 saturation from pulse oximetry dropped ventilation was attained for all animals. Side identification of the pneumothorax was achieved at 50% tPTX, within a 95% confidence interval. Diagnosis was, on average, 34.1 ± 18.8 min before tPTX. In conclusion, bilateral monitoring of the chest dynamics and acoustics provide novel information that is sensitive to asymmetric changes in ventilation, enabling early detection and localization of pneumothorax.

  19. High-Frequency Seafloor Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, Darrell R

    2007-01-01

    High-Frequency Seafloor Acoustics is the first book in a new series sponsored by the Office of Naval Research on the latest research in underwater acoustics. This exciting new title provides ready access to experimental data, theory, and models relevant to high-frequency seafloor acoustics and will be of interest to sonar engineers and researchers working in underwater acoustics. The physical characteristics of the seafloor affecting acoustic propagation and scattering are covered, including physical and geoacoustic properties and surface roughness. Current theories for acoustic propagation in sediments are presented along with corresponding models for reflection, scattering, and seafloor penetration. The main text is backed up by an extensive bibliography and technical appendices.

  20. Design considerations and sensitivity estimates for an acoustic neutrino detector

    CERN Document Server

    Karg, T; Graf, K; Hoessl, J; Kappes, A; Katz, U; Lahmann, R; Naumann, C; Salomon, K; Karg, Timo; Anton, Gisela; Graf, Kay; Hoessl, Juergen; Kappes, Alexander; Katz, Uli; Lahmann, Robert; Naumann, Christopher; Salomon, Karsten

    2005-01-01

    We present a Monte Carlo study of an underwater neutrino telescope based on the detection of acoustic signals generated by neutrino induced cascades. This provides a promising approach to instrument large detector volumes needed to detect the small flux of cosmic neutrinos at ultra-high energies (E > 1 EeV). Acoustic signals are calculated based on the thermo-acoustic model. The signal is propagated to the sensors taking frequency dependent attenuation into account, and detected using a threshold trigger, where acoustic background is included as an effective detection threshold. A simple reconstruction algorithm allows for the determination of the cascade direction and energy. Various detector setups are compared regarding their effective volumes. Sensitivity estimates for the diffuse neutrino flux are presented.

  1. Research on acoustic-structure sensitivity using FEM and BEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jun; ZHAO Wenzhong; ZHANG Weiying

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic-structure sensitivity is used to predict the change of acoustic pressure when a structure design variable is changed. The sensitivity is significant for reducing noise of structure. Using FEM (finite element method) and BEM (boundary element method) acoustic-structure sensitiv- ity was formulated and presented. The dynamic response and response velocity sensitivity with respect to structure design variable were carried out by using structural FEM, the acous- tic response and acoustic pressure sensitivity with respect to structure velocity were carded out by using acoustic BEM. Then, acoustic-structure sensitivity was computed by linking velocity sensitivity in FEM and acoustic sensitivity in BEM. This method was applied to an empty box as an example. Acoustic pressure sensitivity with respect to structure thick- ness achieved in frequency ranges 1-100 Hz, and its change role along with stimulating frequency and design variable were analyzed. Results show that acoustic-structure sensi- tivity method linked with FEM and BEM is effective and correct.

  2. Highly sensitive room-temperature surface acoustic wave (SAW) ammonia sensors based on Co₃O₄/SiO₂ composite films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yong-Liang; Li, Zhi-Jie; Ma, Jin-Yi; Su, Hai-Qiao; Guo, Yuan-Jun; Wang, Lu; Du, Bo; Chen, Jia-Jun; Zhou, Weilie; Yu, Qing-Kai; Zu, Xiao-Tao

    2014-09-15

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors based on Co3O4/SiO2 composite sensing films for ammonia detection were investigated at room temperature. The Co3O4/SiO2 composite films were deposited onto ST-cut quartz SAW resonators by a sol-gel method. SEM and AFM characterizations showed that the films had porous structures. The existence of SiO2 was found to enhance the ammonia sensing property of the sensor significantly. The sensor based on a Co3O4/SiO2 composite film, with 50% Co3O4 loading, which had the highest RMS value (3.72), showed the best sensing property. It exhibited a positive frequency shift of 3500 Hz to 1 ppm ammonia as well as excellent selectivity, stability and reproducibility at room temperature. Moreover, a 37% decrease in the conductance of the composite film as well as a positive frequency shift of 12,500 Hz were observed when the sensor was exposed to 20 ppm ammonia, indicating the positive frequency shift was derived from the decrease in film conductance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Sensitive acoustic vibration sensor using single-mode fiber tapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Wang, Xiaozhen; Bao, Xiaoyi

    2011-05-01

    Optical fiber sensors are a good alternative to piezoelectric devices in electromagnetic sensitive environments. In this study, we reported a fiber acoustic sensor based on single-mode fiber (SMF) tapers. The fiber taper is used as the sensing arm in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Benefiting from their micrometer dimensions, fiber tapers have shown higher sensitivities to the acoustic vibrations than SMFs. Under the same conditions, the thinnest fiber taper in this report, with a diameter of 1.7 µm, shows a 20 dB improvement in the signal to noise ratio as compared to that of an SMF. This acoustic vibration sensor can detect the acoustic waves over the frequencies of 30 Hz-40 kHz, which is limited by the acoustic wave generator in experiments. We also discussed the phase changes of fiber tapers with different diameters under acoustic vibrations.

  4. High Resolution Acoustical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    1028 (September 1982). 26 G. Arfken , Mathematical Methods for Physicists (Academic Press, New York, 1971), 2nd printing, pp.662-666. 27 W. R. Hahn...difference in the approach used by the two methods , as noted in the previous paragraph, forming a direct mathematical com- parison may be impossible...examines high resolution methods which use a linear array to locate stationary objects which have scattered the fressure waves. Several;- new methods

  5. Phase-sensitive imaging of tissue acoustic vibrations using spectrally encoded interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilgayev, Ovadia; Yelin, Dvir

    2013-08-26

    Acoustic vibrations in tissue are often difficult to image, requiring high-speed scanning, high sensitivity and nanometer-scale axial resolution. Here we use spectrally encoded interferometry to measure the vibration pattern of two-dimensional surfaces, including the skin of a volunteer, at nanometric resolution, without the need for rapid lateral scanning and with no prior knowledge of the driving acoustic waveform. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of this technique for measuring tissue biomechanics using simple and compact imaging probes.

  6. Sensitivity of surface acoustic wave devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipiak, Jerzy; Zubko, Konrad

    2001-08-01

    The SAW devices are widely used as filters, delay lines, resonators and gas sensors. It is possible to use it as mechanical force. The paper describes sensitivity of acceleration sensor based on SAW using the Rayleigh wave propagation. Since characteristic of acceleration SAW sensors are largely determined by piezoelectric materials, it is very important to select substrate with required characteristics. Researches and numerical modeling based on simply sensor model include piezoelectric beam with unilateral free end. An aggregated mass is connected to the one. The dimension and aggregated mass are various. In this case a buckling stress and sensitivity are changed. Sensitivity in main and perpendicular axis are compare for three sensor based on SiO2, LiNbO3, Li2B4O7. Influences of phase velocity, electro-mechanical coupling constant and density on sensitivity are investigated. Some mechanical parameters of the substrates in dynamic work mode are researched using sensor model and Rayleigh model of vibrations without vibration damping. The model is useful because it simply determines dependencies between sensor parameters and substrate parameters. Differences between measured and evaluated quantities are less than 5 percent. Researches based on sensor modes, which fulfilled mechanical specifications similarly to aircraft navigation.

  7. Acoustic design sensitivity analysis of structural sound radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许智生

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an acoustic design sensitivity(ADS)analysis on sound radiation of structures by using the boundary element method(BEM).We calculated the velocity distribution of the thin plate by analytical method and the surface sound pressure by Rayleigh integral,and expressed the sound radiation power of the structure in a positive definite quadratic form of the Hermitian with an impedance matrix.The ADS analysis of the plate was thus translated into the analysis of structure dynamic sensitivity and ...

  8. High Resolution X-ray-Induced Acoustic Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Tang, Shanshan; Ahmad, Moiz; Xing, Lei

    2016-05-01

    Absorption based CT imaging has been an invaluable tool in medical diagnosis, biology, and materials science. However, CT requires a large set of projection data and high radiation dose to achieve superior image quality. In this letter, we report a new imaging modality, X-ray Induced Acoustic Tomography (XACT), which takes advantages of high sensitivity to X-ray absorption and high ultrasonic resolution in a single modality. A single projection X-ray exposure is sufficient to generate acoustic signals in 3D space because the X-ray generated acoustic waves are of a spherical nature and propagate in all directions from their point of generation. We demonstrate the successful reconstruction of gold fiducial markers with a spatial resolution of about 350 μm. XACT reveals a new imaging mechanism and provides uncharted opportunities for structural determination with X-ray.

  9. Love-mode surface acoustic wave devices based on multilayers of TeO2/ZnO(112¯0)/Si(100) with high sensitivity and temperature stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jing-Ting; Quan, Ao-Jie; Liang, Guang-Xing; Zheng, Zhuang-Hao; Ramadan, Sami; Fu, Chen; Li, Hong-Lang; Fu, Yong-Qing

    2017-03-01

    A multilayer structure of TeO2/interdigital transducers (IDTs)/ZnO(112¯0)/Si(100) was proposed and investigated to achieve both high sensitivity and temperature-stability for bio-sensing applications. Dispersions of phase velocities, electromechanical coupling coefficients K(2), temperature coefficient of delay (TCD) and sensitivity in the multilayer structures were simulated as functions of normalized thicknesses of ZnO (hZnO/λ) and TeO2 (hTeO2/λ) films. The fundamental mode of Love mode (LM) - surface acoustic wave (SAW) shows a larger value of K(2) and higher sensitivity compared with those of the first mode. TeO2 film with a positive TCD not only compensates the temperature effect induced due to the negative TCD of ZnO(112¯0)/Si(100), but also enhances the sensitivity of the love mode device. The optimal normalized thickness ratios were identified to be hTeO2/λ=0.021 and hZnO/λ=0.304, and the devices with such structures can which generate a normalized sensitivity of -1.04×10(-3)m(3)/kg, a TCD of 0.009ppm/°C, and a K(2) value of 2.76%.

  10. Location Dependence of Mass Sensitivity for Acoustic Wave Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kewei Zhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available It is introduced that the mass sensitivity (Sm of an acoustic wave (AW device with a concentrated mass can be simply determined using its mode shape function: the Sm is proportional to the square of its mode shape. By using the Sm of an AW device with a uniform mass, which is known for almost all AW devices, the Sm of an AW device with a concentrated mass at different locations can be determined. The method is confirmed by numerical simulation for one type of AW device and the results from two other types of AW devices.

  11. Influence of electromagnetic interferences on the gravimetric sensitivity of surface acoustic waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Francis, L; De Palma, R; Bertrand, P; Campitelli, A

    2003-01-01

    Surface acoustic waveguides are increasing in interest for (bio)chemical detection. The surface mass modification leads to measurable changes in the propagation properties of the waveguide. Among a wide variety of waveguides, Love mode has been investigated because of its high gravimetric sensitivity. The acoustic signal launched and detected in the waveguide by electrical transducers is accompanied by an electromagnetic wave; the interaction of the two signals, easily enhanced by the open structure of the sensor, creates interference patterns in the transfer function of the sensor. The influence of these interferences on the gravimetric sensitivity is presented, whereby the structure of the entire sensor is modelled. We show that electromagnetic interferences generate an error in the experimental value of the sensitivity. This error is different for the open and the closed loop configurations of the sensor. The theoretical approach is completed by the experimentation of an actual Love mode sensor operated un...

  12. High-Sensitivity Spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, T. D.

    1982-01-01

    Selected high-sensitivity spectrophotometric methods are examined, and comparisons are made of their relative strengths and weaknesses and the circumstances for which each can best be applied. Methods include long path cells, noise reduction, laser intracavity absorption, thermocouple calorimetry, photoacoustic methods, and thermo-optical methods.…

  13. Highly Sensitive Optical Receivers

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Kerstin

    2006-01-01

    Highly Sensitive Optical Receivers primarily treats the circuit design of optical receivers with external photodiodes. Continuous-mode and burst-mode receivers are compared. The monograph first summarizes the basics of III/V photodetectors, transistor and noise models, bit-error rate, sensitivity and analog circuit design, thus enabling readers to understand the circuits described in the main part of the book. In order to cover the topic comprehensively, detailed descriptions of receivers for optical data communication in general and, in particular, optical burst-mode receivers in deep-sub-µm CMOS are presented. Numerous detailed and elaborate illustrations facilitate better understanding.

  14. Acoustic Coherent Perfect Absorbers as Sensitive Null Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Meng, Chong; Tang, Suet To; Yang, Min; Yang, Zhiyu

    2016-01-01

    We report the experimental realization of acoustic coherent perfect absorption (CPA) of four symmetric scatterers of very different structures. The only conditions necessary for these scatterers to exhibit CPA are that both the reflection and transmission amplitudes of the scatterers are 0.5 under one incident wave, and there are two collinear and counter-propagating incident waves with appropriate relative amplitude and phase. Nearly 1000 times in the modulation of output power has been demonstrated by changing the relative phase of the incident waves over 180{\\deg}. We further demonstrate that these scatterers are sensitive devices to detect the small differences between two nearly equal incident waves. A 27 % change in the strength of the scattering wave has been demonstrated for every degree of phase deviation from the optimum condition between the incident waves.

  15. Investigation into Mass Loading Sensitivity of Sezawa Wave Mode-Based Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    N. Ramakrishnan; Parthiban, R.; Sawal Hamid Md Ali; Md. Shabiul Islam; Ajay Achath Mohanan

    2013-01-01

    In this work mass loading sensitivity of a Sezawa wave mode based surface acoustic wave (SAW) device is investigated through finite element method (FEM) simulation and the prospects of these devices to function as highly sensitive SAW sensors is reported. A ZnO/Si layered SAW resonator is considered for the simulation study. Initially the occurrence of Sezawa wave mode and displacement amplitude of the Rayleigh and Sezawa wave mode is studied for lower ZnO film thickness. Further, a thin film...

  16. Study of influence of the fiber optic coatings parameters on optical acoustic sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrov, V. S.; Kulikov, A. V.; Plotnikov, M. U.; Efimov, M. E.; Varzhel, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents the optical fiber acoustic sensitivity dependence on the coating parameters and the thickness of coating layer. A comparison of data obtained from the theoretical research and experimental estimates of real samples sensitivity in air and water.

  17. Study on demodulated signal distribution and acoustic pressure phase sensitivity of a self-interfered distributed acoustic sensing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Ying; Yang, Yuan-Hong; Wang, Chen; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Chang; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2016-06-01

    We propose a demodulated signal distribution theory for a self-interfered distributed acoustic sensing system. The distribution region of Rayleigh backscattering including the acoustic sensing signal in the sensing fiber is investigated theoretically under different combinations of both the path difference and pulse width Additionally we determine the optimal solution between the path difference and pulse width to obtain the maximum phase change per unit length. We experimentally test this theory and realize a good acoustic pressure phase sensitivity of  -150 dB re rad/(μPa·m) of fiber in the frequency range from 200 Hz to 1 kHz.

  18. Phase sensitivity of hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber to acoustic pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, M.; Jin, W.

    2009-10-01

    Detection of acoustic pressure with optical fiber interferometers has been studied for many years1-3. The conventional solid silica fiber hydrophone was sufficient to prove the concept; however, it has low acoustic sensitivity. This is because 1) the silica glass material has relatively high Young's modulus, which makes the conventional fiber incompressible; 2) the refractive index change resulted from fiber strain has opposite sign with respective to the strain term and hence compromises the acoustic sensitivity. In a hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber (PBF), the fundamental mode is almost entirely confined to the air core, the effective Young's modulus of fiber is expected to be reduced and the undesirable "negative" index effect is anticipated to be greatly decreased. We experimentally measured that the phase sensitivity of the commercial HC-1550-02 PBF and found it is improved by a factor of 15dB compared to a conventional (HNSM-155) single mode fiber, which agrees well with theoretical prediction.

  19. Development of anticavitation hydrophone using a titanium front plate: Effect of the titanium front plate in high-intensity acoustic field with generation of acoustic cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiiba, Michihisa; Okada, Nagaya; Kurosawa, Minoru; Takeuchi, Shinichi

    2016-07-01

    Novel anticavitation hydrophones were fabricated by depositing a hydrothermally synthesized lead zirconate titanate polycrystalline film at the back of a titanium front plate. These anticavitation hydrophones were not damaged by the measurement of the acoustic field formed by a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) device. Their sensitivity was improved by approximately 20 dB over that of the conventional anticavitation hydrophone by modifying their basic structure and materials. The durability of the anticavitation hydrophone that we fabricated was compared by exposing it to a high-intensity acoustic field at the focal point of the HIFU field and in the water tank of an ultrasound cleaner. Therefore, the effect of the surface of the titanium front plate on acoustic cavitation was investigated by exposing such a surface to the high-intensity acoustic field. We found that the fabricated anticavitation hydrophone was robust and was not damaged easily, even in the focused acoustic field where acoustic cavitation occurs.

  20. Vibro-acoustic design sensitivity analysis using the wave-based method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Kunmo; Pluymers, Bert; Desmet, Wim; Wang, Semyung

    2011-08-01

    Conventional element-based methods, such as the finite element method (FEM) and boundary element method (BEM), require mesh refinements at higher frequencies in order to converge. Therefore, their applications are limited to low frequencies. Compared to element-based methods, the wave-based method (WBM) adopts exact solutions of the governing differential equation instead of simple polynomials to describe the dynamic response variables within the subdomains. As such, the WBM does not require a finer division of subdomains as the frequency increases in order to exhibit high computational efficiency. In this paper, the design sensitivity formulation of a semi-coupled structural-acoustic problem is implemented using the WBM. Here, the results of structural harmonic analyses are imported as the boundary conditions for the acoustic domain, which consists of multiple wave-based subdomains. The cross-sectional area of each beam element is considered as a sizing design variable. Then, the adjoint variable method (AVM) is used to efficiently compute the sensitivity. The adjoint variable is obtained from structural reanalysis using an adjoint load composed of the system matrix and an evaluation of the wave functions of each boundary. The proposed sensitivity formulation is subsequently applied to a two-dimensional (2D) vehicle model. Finally, the sensitivity results are compared to the finite difference sensitivity results, which show good agreement.

  1. Highly Localized Acoustic Streaming and Size-Selective Submicrometer Particle Concentration Using High Frequency Microscale Focused Acoustic Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, David J; Ma, Zhichao; Ai, Ye

    2016-05-17

    Concentration and separation of particles and biological specimens are fundamental functions of micro/nanofluidic systems. Acoustic streaming is an effective and biocompatible way to create rapid microscale fluid motion and induce particle capture, though the >100 MHz frequencies required to directly generate acoustic body forces on the microscale have traditionally been difficult to generate and localize in a way that is amenable to efficient generation of streaming. Moreover, acoustic, hydrodynamic, and electrical forces as typically applied have difficulty manipulating specimens in the submicrometer regime. In this work, we introduce highly focused traveling surface acoustic waves (SAW) at high frequencies between 193 and 636 MHz for efficient and highly localized production of acoustic streaming vortices on microfluidic length scales. Concentration occurs via a novel mechanism, whereby the combined acoustic radiation and streaming field results in size-selective aggregation in fluid streamlines in the vicinity of a high-amplitude acoustic beam, as opposed to previous acoustic radiation induced particle concentration where objects typically migrate toward minimum pressure locations. Though the acoustic streaming is induced by a traveling wave, we are able to manipulate particles an order of magnitude smaller than possible using the traveling wave force alone. We experimentally and theoretically examine the range of particle sizes that can be captured in fluid streamlines using this technique, with rapid particle concentration demonstrated down to 300 nm diameters. We also demonstrate that locations of trapping and concentration are size-dependent, which is attributed to the combined effects of the acoustic streaming and acoustic forces.

  2. Use of multiple acoustic reflections to enhance SAW UV photo-detector sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapetyan, G. Y.; Kaydashev, V. E.; Zhilin, D. A.; Minasyan, T. A.; Abdulvakhidov, K. G.; Kaidashev, E. M.

    2017-03-01

    A new approach to enhance the sensitivity of existing SAW UV-visible photo-detectors based on the monitoring of the multiple reflections of the acoustic waves in the Fourier transform of the frequency response (S21) is demonstrated. By using this concept, it is possible to monitor the UV-visible light in a wide intensity range from very high to ultralow. We present a strategy to obtain an ultrafast SAW UV photo-detector with millisecond response by tuning the deposition conditions of the ZnO film and using the multiple-reflections concept.

  3. Investigation into Mass Loading Sensitivity of Sezawa Wave Mode-Based Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ramakrishnan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work mass loading sensitivity of a Sezawa wave mode based surface acoustic wave (SAW device is investigated through finite element method (FEM simulation and the prospects of these devices to function as highly sensitive SAW sensors is reported. A ZnO/Si layered SAW resonator is considered for the simulation study. Initially the occurrence of Sezawa wave mode and displacement amplitude of the Rayleigh and Sezawa wave mode is studied for lower ZnO film thickness. Further, a thin film made of an arbitrary material is coated over the ZnO surface and the resonance frequency shift caused by mass loading of the film is estimated. It was observed that Sezawa wave mode shows significant sensitivity to change in mass loading and has higher sensitivity (eight times higher than Rayleigh wave mode for the same device configuration. Further, the mass loading sensitivity was observed to be greater for a low ZnO film thickness to wavelength ratio. Accordingly, highly sensitive SAW sensors can be developed by coating a sensing medium over a layered SAW device and operating at Sezawa mode resonance frequency. The sensitivity can be increased by tuning the ZnO film thickness to wavelength ratio.

  4. Investigation into mass loading sensitivity of sezawa wave mode-based surface acoustic wave sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanan, Ajay Achath; Islam, Md Shabiul; Ali, Sawal Hamid; Parthiban, R; Ramakrishnan, N

    2013-02-06

    In this work mass loading sensitivity of a Sezawa wave mode based surface acoustic wave (SAW) device is investigated through finite element method (FEM) simulation and the prospects of these devices to function as highly sensitive SAW sensors is reported. A ZnO/Si layered SAW resonator is considered for the simulation study. Initially the occurrence of Sezawa wave mode and displacement amplitude of the Rayleigh and Sezawa wave mode is studied for lower ZnO film thickness. Further, a thin film made of an arbitrary material is coated over the ZnO surface and the resonance frequency shift caused by mass loading of the film is estimated. It was observed that Sezawa wave mode shows significant sensitivity to change in mass loading and has higher sensitivity (eight times higher) than Rayleigh wave mode for the same device configuration. Further, the mass loading sensitivity was observed to be greater for a low ZnO film thickness to wavelength ratio. Accordingly, highly sensitive SAW sensors can be developed by coating a sensing medium over a layered SAW device and operating at Sezawa mode resonance frequency. The sensitivity can be increased by tuning the ZnO film thickness to wavelength ratio.

  5. Acoustic and streaming velocity components in a resonant waveguide at high acoustic levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daru, Virginie; Reyt, Ida; Bailliet, Hélène; Weisman, Catherine; Baltean-Carlès, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Rayleigh streaming is a steady flow generated by the interaction between an acoustic wave and a solid wall, generally assumed to be second order in a Mach number expansion. Acoustic streaming is well known in the case of a stationary plane wave at low amplitude: it has a half-wavelength spatial periodicity and the maximum axial streaming velocity is a quadratic function of the acoustic velocity amplitude at antinode. For higher acoustic levels, additional streaming cells have been observed. Results of laser Doppler velocimetry measurements are here compared to direct numerical simulations. The evolution of axial and radial velocity components for both acoustic and streaming velocities is studied from low to high acoustic amplitudes. Two streaming flow regimes are pointed out, the axial streaming dependency on acoustics going from quadratic to linear. The evolution of streaming flow is different for outer cells and for inner cells. Also, the hypothesis of radial streaming velocity being of second order in a Mach number expansion, is not valid at high amplitudes. The change of regime occurs when the radial streaming velocity amplitude becomes larger than the radial acoustic velocity amplitude, high levels being therefore characterized by nonlinear interaction of the different velocity components.

  6. The Acoustic Properties of Low Intensity Vocalizations Match Hearing Sensitivity in the Webbed-Toed Gecko, Gekko subpalmatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingfeng; Jono, Teppei; Cui, Jianguo; Yue, Xizi; Tang, Yezhong

    2016-01-01

    The design of acoustic signals and hearing sensitivity in socially communicating species would normally be expected to closely match in order to minimize signal degradation and attenuation during signal propagation. Nevertheless, other factors such as sensory biases as well as morphological and physiological constraints may affect strict correspondence between signal features and hearing sensitivity. Thus study of the relationships between sender and receiver characteristics in species utilizing acoustic communication can provide information about how acoustic communication systems evolve. The genus Gekko includes species emitting high-amplitude vocalizations for long-range communication (loud callers) as well as species producing only low-amplitude vocalizations when in close contact with conspecifics (quiet callers) which have rarely been investigated. In order to investigate relationships between auditory physiology and the frequency characteristics of acoustic signals in a quiet caller, Gekko subpalmatus we measured the subjects’ vocal signal characteristics as well as auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) to assess auditory sensitivity. The results show that G. subpalmatus males emit low amplitude calls when encountering females, ranging in dominant frequency from 2.47 to 4.17 kHz with an average at 3.35 kHz. The auditory range with highest sensitivity closely matches the dominant frequency of the vocalizations. This correspondence is consistent with the notion that quiet and loud calling species are under similar selection pressures for matching auditory sensitivity with spectral characteristics of vocalizations. PMID:26752301

  7. Sensitivity of simulated transcranial ultrasound fields to acoustic medium property maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, James; Martin, Eleanor; Cox, Ben; Treeby, Bradley E.

    2017-04-01

    High intensity transcranial focused ultrasound is an FDA approved treatment for essential tremor, while low-intensity applications such as neurostimulation and opening the blood brain barrier are under active research. Simulations of transcranial ultrasound propagation are used both for focusing through the skull, and predicting intracranial fields. Maps of the skull acoustic properties are necessary for accurate simulations, and can be derived from medical images using a variety of methods. The skull maps range from segmented, homogeneous models, to fully heterogeneous models derived from medical image intensity. In the present work, the impact of uncertainties in the skull properties is examined using a model of transcranial propagation from a single element focused transducer. The impact of changes in bone layer geometry and the sound speed, density, and acoustic absorption values is quantified through a numerical sensitivity analysis. Sound speed is shown to be the most influential acoustic property, and must be defined with less than 4% error to obtain acceptable accuracy in simulated focus pressure, position, and volume. Changes in the skull thickness of as little as 0.1 mm can cause an error in peak intracranial pressure of greater than 5%, while smoothing with a 1 \\text{m}{{\\text{m}}3} kernel to imitate the effect of obtaining skull maps from low resolution images causes an increase of over 50% in peak pressure. The numerical results are confirmed experimentally through comparison with sonications made through 3D printed and resin cast skull bone phantoms.

  8. Sensitivity of simulated transcranial ultrasound fields to acoustic medium property maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, James; Martin, Eleanor; Cox, Ben; Treeby, Bradley E

    2017-04-07

    High intensity transcranial focused ultrasound is an FDA approved treatment for essential tremor, while low-intensity applications such as neurostimulation and opening the blood brain barrier are under active research. Simulations of transcranial ultrasound propagation are used both for focusing through the skull, and predicting intracranial fields. Maps of the skull acoustic properties are necessary for accurate simulations, and can be derived from medical images using a variety of methods. The skull maps range from segmented, homogeneous models, to fully heterogeneous models derived from medical image intensity. In the present work, the impact of uncertainties in the skull properties is examined using a model of transcranial propagation from a single element focused transducer. The impact of changes in bone layer geometry and the sound speed, density, and acoustic absorption values is quantified through a numerical sensitivity analysis. Sound speed is shown to be the most influential acoustic property, and must be defined with less than 4% error to obtain acceptable accuracy in simulated focus pressure, position, and volume. Changes in the skull thickness of as little as 0.1 mm can cause an error in peak intracranial pressure of greater than 5%, while smoothing with a 1 [Formula: see text] kernel to imitate the effect of obtaining skull maps from low resolution images causes an increase of over 50% in peak pressure. The numerical results are confirmed experimentally through comparison with sonications made through 3D printed and resin cast skull bone phantoms.

  9. High order Nystrom method for acoustic scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kun; Yang, Siming; Song, Jiming; Roberts, Ron

    2015-03-01

    While high frequency approximation methods are widely used to solve flaw scattering in ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation, full wave approaches based on integral equations have great potentials due to their high accuracy. In this work, boundary integral equations for acoustic wave scattering are solved using high order Nyström method. Compared with boundary elements method, it features the coincidence of the samples for interpolation basis and quadrature, which makes the far-field interaction free from numerical integration. The singular integral is dealt with using the Duffy transformation, while efficient singularity subtraction techniques are employed to evaluate the near singular integrals. This approach has the ease to go high order so highly accurate results can be obtained with fewer unknowns and faster convergence, and it is also amenable to incorporate fast algorithms like the multi-level fast multi-pole algorithm. The convergence of the approach for different orders of elements and interpolation basis functions is investigated. Numerical results are shown to validate this approach.

  10. Pressure Sensitivity Kernels Applied to Time-reversal Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-29

    Edelmann [14] showed that it is possible to encode phase information in the time- reversed Green’s function that can then be recovered at the receiver end...conjugation experiment in shallow water. J. Acoustic Soc. Am., 105:1597–1604, 1999. [14] G. F. Edelmann , T. Akal, W. S. Hodgkiss, S. Kim, W. A...15] S. Kim, W. A. Kuperman, W. S. Hodgkiss, H. C. Song, and G. F. Edelmann . Robust time-reversal focusing in the ocean. J. Acoustic Soc. Am., 114:145

  11. Effects of envelope shape on interaural envelope delay sensitivity in acoustic and electric hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laback, Bernhard; Zimmermann, Inge; Majdak, Piotr; Baumgartner, Wolf-Dieter; Pok, Stefan-Marcel

    2011-09-01

    The envelope shape is important for the perception of interaural time difference (ITD) in the envelope as supported by the improved sensitivity for transposed tones compared to sinusoidally amplitude-modulated (SAM) tones. The present study investigated the effects of specific envelope parameters in nine normal-hearing (NH) and seven cochlear-implant (CI) listeners, using high-rate carriers with 27-Hz trapezoidal modulation. In NH listeners, increasing the off time (the silent interval in each modulation cycle) up to 12 ms, increasing the envelope slope from 6 to 8 dB/ms, and increasing the peak level improved ITD sensitivity. The combined effect of the off time and slope accounts for the gain in sensitivity for transposed tones relative to SAM tones. In CI listeners, increasing the off time up to 20 ms improved sensitivity, but increasing the slope showed no systematic effect. A 27-pulses/s electric pulse train, representing a special case of modulation with infinitely steep slopes and maximum possible off time, yielded considerably higher sensitivity compared to the best condition with trapezoidal modulation. Overall, the results of this study indicate that envelope-ITD sensitivity could be improved by using CI processing schemes that simultaneously increase the off time and the peak level of the signal envelope. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  12. High Temperature Acoustic Noise Reduction Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is to use combustion synthesis techniques to manufacture ceramic-based acoustic liners capable of withstanding temperatures up to 2500?C....

  13. Mass sensitivity analysis and designing of surface acoustic wave resonators for chemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshetrimayum, Roshan; Yadava, R. D. S.; Tandon, R. P.

    2009-05-01

    The sensitivity of surface acoustic wave (SAW) chemical sensors depends on several factors such as the frequency and phase point of SAW device operation, sensitivity of the SAW velocity to surface mass loading, sensitivity of the SAW oscillator resonance to the loop phase shift, film thickness and oscillator electronics. This paper analyzes the influence of the phase point of operation in SAW oscillator sensors based on two-port resonator devices. It is found that the mass sensitivity will be enhanced if the SAW device has a nonlinear dependence on the frequency (delay ~ frequency-1). This requires the device to generate and operate in a ωτg(ω) = const region in the device passband, where ω denotes the angular frequency of oscillation and τg(ω) denotes the phase slope of the SAW resonator device. A SAW coupled resonator filter (CRF) that take advantage of mode coupling is considered in realizing such a device to help in shaping the phase transfer characteristics of a high mass sensitivity sensor. The device design and simulation results are presented within the coupling-of-modes formalism.

  14. Sensitivity comparisons of layered Rayleigh wave and Love wave acoustic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrick, Michael K.; Tittmann, Bernhard R.

    2007-04-01

    Due to their high sensitivity, layered Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices are ideal for various film characterization and sensor applications. Two prominent wave types realized in these devices are Rayleigh waves consisting of coupled Shear Vertical and Longitudinal displacements and Love waves consisting of Shear Horizontal displacements. Theoretical calculations of sensitivity of SAW devices to pertubations in wave propagation are limited to idealized scenarios. Derivations of sensitivity to mass change in an overlayer are often based on the effect of rigid body motion of the overlayer on the propagation of one of the aforementioned wave types. These devices often utilize polymer overlayers for enhanced sensitivity. The low moduli of such overlayers are not sufficiently stiff to accommodate the rigid body motion assumption. This work presents device modeling based on the Finite Element Method. A coupled-field model allows for a complete description of device operation including displacement profiles, frequency, wave velocity, and insertion loss through the inclusion of transmitting and receiving IDTs. Geometric rotations and coordinate transformations allow for the modeling of different crystal orientations in piezoelectric substrates. The generation of Rayleigh and Love Wave propagation was realized with this model by examining propagation in ST Quartz both normal to and in the direction of the X axis known to support Love Waves and Rayleigh Waves, respectively. Sensitivities of layered SAW devices to pertubations in mass, layer thickness, and mechanical property changes of a Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and SU-8 overlayers were characterized and compared. Experimental validation of these models is presented.

  15. High-Sensitivity Magnetization Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The three most common instruments for high-sensitivity magnetization measurements (the vibrating-sample magnetometer, the alternating gradient magnetometer, and the SQUID magne tometer) are described and their limiting sensitivities are discussed. The advantages and disad vantages of each are described. Magnetometers using micro-machined force detectors are briefly mentioned.

  16. Photospheric high-frequency acoustic power excess in sunspot umbra: signature of magneto-acoustic modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zharkov

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We present observational evidence for the presence of MHD (magnetohydrodynamic waves in the solar photosphere deduced from SOHO/MDI (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager Dopplergram velocity observations. The magneto-acoustic perturbations are observed as acoustic power enhancement in the sunspot umbra at high-frequency bands in the velocity component perpendicular to the magnetic field. We use numerical modelling of wave propagation through localised non-uniform magnetic field concentration along with the same filtering procedure as applied to the observations to identify the observed waves. Guided by the results of the numerical simulations we classify the observed oscillations as magneto-acoustic waves excited by the trapped sub-photospheric acoustic waves. We consider the potential application of the presented method as a diagnostic tool for magnetohelioseismology.

  17. Pseudo working-point control measurement scheme for acoustic sensitivity of interferometric fiber-optic hydrophones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zefeng Wang; Yongming Hu; Zhou Meng; Ming Ni

    2008-01-01

    A novel pseudo working-point control measurement scheme for the acoustic sensitivity of interferometric fiber-optic hydrophones is described and demonstrated.The measurement principle is introduced in detail.An experimental system,which interrogates an interferometric fiber-optic hydrophone with this method,is designed.The acoustic pressure phase sensitivity of the fiber-optic hydrophone is measured over the frequency range of 20-2500Hz.The measured acoustic sensitivity is about-156.5dB re 1rad/μPa with a fluctuation lower than ±1.2dB,which is in good agreement with the results obtained by the method of phase generated carrier.The experimental results testify the validity of this new method which has the advantages of no electric elements in the sensing head,the simplicity of signal processing,and wide working bandwidth.

  18. Acoustic emission analysis coupled with thermogravimetric experiments dedicated to high temperature corrosion studies on metallic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serris, Eric; Al Haj, Omar; Peres, Veronique; Cournil, Michel [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne (France); Kittel, Jean; Grosjean, Francois; Ropital, Francois [IFP Energies nouvelles, BP3 rond-point de l' echangeur de Solaize (France)

    2014-11-01

    High temperature corrosion of metallic alloys (like iron, nickel, zirconium alloys) can damage equipment of many industrial fields (refinery, petrochemical, nuclear..). Acoustic emission (AE) is an interesting method owing to its sensitivity and its non-destructive aspect to quantify the level of damage in use of these alloys under various environmental conditions. High temperature corrosive phenomena create stresses in the materials; the relaxation by cracks of these stresses can be recorded and analyzed using the AE system. The goal of our study is to establish an acoustic signals database which assigns the acoustic signals to the specific corrosion phenomena. For this purpose, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) is coupled with acoustic emission (AE) devices. The oxidation of a zirconium alloy, zircaloy-4, is first studied using thermogravimetric experiment coupled to acoustic emission analysis at 900 C. An inward zirconium oxide scale, preliminary dense, then porous, grow during the isothermal isobaric step. The kinetic rate increases significantly after a kinetic transition (breakaway). This acceleration occurs with an increase of acoustic emission activity. Most of the acoustic emission bursts are recorded after the kinetic transition. Acoustic emission signals are also observed during the cooling of the sample. AE numerical treatments (using wavelet transform) completed by SEM microscopy characterizations allows us to distinguish the different populations of cracks. Metal dusting represents also a severe form of corrosive degradation of metal alloy. Iron metal dusting corrosion is studied by AE coupled with TGA at 650 C under C{sub 4}H{sub 10} + H{sub 2} + He atmosphere. Acoustic emission signals are detected after a significant increase of the sample mass.

  19. Cooperative implementation of a high temperature acoustic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, S. E.; Nowakowski, Edward; Smith, Herbert G.; Friebele, E. J.; Putnam, Martin A.; Rogowski, Robert; Melvin, Leland D.; Claus, Richard O.; Tran, Tuan; Holben, Milford S., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The current status and results of a cooperative program aimed at the implementation of a high-temperature acoustic/strain sensor onto metallic structures are reported. The sensor systems that are to be implemented under this program will measure thermal expansion, maneuver loads, aircraft buffet, sonic fatigue, and acoustic emissions in environments that approach 1800 F. The discussion covers fiber development, fabrication of an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer acoustic sensor, sensor mounting/integration, and results of an evaluation of the sensor capabilities.

  20. THE BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATION BROADBAND AND BROAD-BEAM ARRAY: DESIGN OVERVIEW AND SENSITIVITY FORECASTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pober, Jonathan C.; Parsons, Aaron R.; McQuinn, Matthew; Ali, Zaki [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); DeBoer, David R. [Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); McDonald, Patrick [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Aguirre, James E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bradley, Richard F. [Astronomy Department and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Chang, Tzu-Ching [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Morales, Miguel F. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2013-03-15

    This work describes a new instrument optimized for a detection of the neutral hydrogen 21 cm power spectrum between redshifts of 0.5 and 1.5: the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Broadband and Broad-beam (BAOBAB) array. BAOBAB will build on the efforts of a first generation of 21 cm experiments that are targeting a detection of the signal from the Epoch of Reionization at z {approx} 10. At z {approx} 1, the emission from neutral hydrogen in self-shielded overdense halos also presents an accessible signal, since the dominant, synchrotron foreground emission is considerably fainter than at redshift 10. The principle science driver for these observations are baryon acoustic oscillations in the matter power spectrum which have the potential to act as a standard ruler and constrain the nature of dark energy. BAOBAB will fully correlate dual-polarization antenna tiles over the 600-900 MHz band with a frequency resolution of 300 kHz and a system temperature of 50 K. The number of antennas will grow in staged deployments, and reconfigurations of the array will allow for both traditional imaging and high power spectrum sensitivity operations. We present calculations of the power spectrum sensitivity for various array sizes, with a 35 element array measuring the cosmic neutral hydrogen fraction as a function of redshift, and a 132 element system detecting the BAO features in the power spectrum, yielding a 1.8% error on the z {approx} 1 distance scale, and, in turn, significant improvements to constraints on the dark energy equation of state over an unprecedented range of redshifts from {approx}0.5 to 1.5.

  1. Acoustic trapping with a high frequency linear phased array

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Fan; Ying LI; Hsu, Hsiu-Sheng; Liu, Changgeng; Tat Chiu, Chi; Lee, Changyang; Ham Kim, Hyung; Shung, K. Kirk

    2012-01-01

    A high frequency ultrasonic phased array is shown to be capable of trapping and translating microparticles precisely and efficiently, made possible due to the fact that the acoustic beam produced by a phased array can be both focused and steered. Acoustic manipulation of microparticles by a phased array is advantageous over a single element transducer since there is no mechanical movement required for the array. Experimental results show that 45 μm diameter polystyrene microspheres can be eas...

  2. Mass Sensitivity Optimization of a Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Incorporating a Resonator Configuration

    OpenAIRE

    Wenchang Hao; Jiuling Liu; Minghua Liu; Yong Liang; Shitang He

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the sensitive area of the two-port resonator configuration on the mass sensitivity of a Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (R-SAW) sensor was investigated theoretically, and verified in experiments. A theoretical model utilizing a 3-dimensional finite element method (FEM) approach was established to extract the coupling-of-modes (COM) parameters in the absence and presence of mass loading covering the electrode structures. The COM model was used to simulate the frequency response of...

  3. High frequency acoustic microscopy with Fresnel zoom lens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The acoustic field distributions and the convergent beams generated by the planar-structure Fresnel zone transducers on solid surface are investigated. Because only 0 and 180 degree phase transducers are used, an imaging system with the Fresnel zoom lens could work at very high frequency, which overcomes the frequency limit of the traditional phased array acoustic imaging system. Simulation results are given to illustrate the acoustic field distributions along the focal axis and the whole plane as well. Based on the principle of scanning of the focus with the change of frequency for the excited signal, an experimental imaging system is also built. Acoustic Fresnel zone transducers are fabricated at center frequency of 400 MHz. Measurements and detections of the known hole flaws at different depths of the fused quartz sample are presented to show that the imaging system with Fresnel zoom lens could move its focus by only changing the frequency of the excited signal.

  4. Sandia National Laboratories' new high level acoustic test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, J. D.; Hendrick, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    A high intensity acoustic test facility has been designed and is under construction at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM. The chamber is designed to provide an acoustic environment of 154dB (re 20 {mu}Pa) overall sound pressure level over the bandwidth of 50 Hz to 10,000 Hz. The chamber has a volume of 16,000 cubic feet with interior dimensions of 21.6 ft {times} 24.6 ft {times} 30 ft. The construction of the chamber should be complete by the summer of 1990. This paper discusses the design goals and constraints of the facility. The construction characteristics are discussed in detail, as are the acoustic performance design characteristics. The authors hope that this work will help others in designing acoustic chambers. 12 refs., 6 figs.

  5. High frequency surface acoustic wave resonator-based sensor for particulate matter detection

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Sanju; Cole, Marina; Villa-López, Farah Helue; Gardner, J. W.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the characterization of high frequency Surface Acoustic Wave Resonator-based (SAWR) sensors, for the detection of micron and sub-micron sized particles. The sensor comprises two 262 MHz ST-cut quartz based Rayleigh wave SAWRs where one is used for particle detection and the other as a reference. Electro-acoustic detection of different sized particles shows a strong relationship between mass sensitivity (Δf/Δm) and particle diameter (Dp). This enables frequency-dependent S...

  6. Giant strain-sensitivity of acoustic energy dissipation in solids containing dry and saturated cracks with wavy interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Zaitsev, V Yu

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms of acoustic energy dissipation in heterogeneous solids attract much attention in view of their importance for material characterization, nondestructive testing, and geophysics. Due to the progress in measurement techniques in recent years it has been revealed that rocks can demonstrate extremely high strain sensitivity of seismo-acoustic loss. In particular, it has been found that strains of order $10^{-8}$ produced by lunar and solar tides are capable to cause variations in the seismoacoustic decrement on the order of several percents. Some laboratory data (although obtained for higher frequencies) also indicate the presence of very high dissipative nonlinearity. Conventionally discussed dissipation mechanisms (thermoelastic loss in dry solids, Biot and squirt-type loss in fluid-saturated ones) do not suffice to interpret such data. Here, the dissipation at individual cracks is revised taking into account the influence of wavy asperities of their surfaces quite typical of real cracks, which can dr...

  7. Global modes, receptivity, and sensitivity analysis of diffusion flames coupled with duct acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Magri, Luca

    2014-01-01

    In this theoretical and numerical paper, we derive the adjoint equations for a thermo-acoustic system consisting of an infinite-rate chemistry diffusion flame coupled with duct acoustics. We then calculate the thermo-acoustic system's linear global modes (i.e. the frequency/growth rate of oscillations, together with their mode shapes), and the global modes' receptivity to species injection, sensitivity to base-state perturbations, and structural sensitivity to advective-velocity perturbations. We then compare these with the Rayleigh index. The receptivity analysis shows the regions of the flame where open-loop injection of fuel or oxidizer will have most influence on the thermo-acoustic oscillation. We find that the flame is most receptive at its tip. The base-state sensitivity analysis shows the influence of each parameter on the frequency/growth rate. We find that perturbations to the stoichiometric mixture fraction, the fuel slot width, and the heat-release parameter have most influence, while perturbation...

  8. Stability analysis of thermo-acoustic nonlinear eigenproblems in annular combustors. Part I. Sensitivity

    CERN Document Server

    Magri, Luca; Juniper, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    We present an adjoint-based method for the calculation of eigenvalue perturbations in nonlinear, degenerate and non self-adjoint eigenproblems. This method is applied to a thermo-acoustic annular combustor network, the stability of which is governed by a nonlinear eigenproblem. We calculate the first- and second-order sensitivities of the growth rate and frequency to geometric, flow and flame parameters. Three different configurations are analysed. The benchmark sensitivities are obtained by finite difference, which involves solving the nonlinear eigenproblem at least as many times as the number of parameters. By solving only one adjoint eigenproblem, we obtain the sensitivities to any thermo-acoustic parameter, which match the finite-difference solutions at much lower computational cost.

  9. Acoustic power measurement of high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer using a pressure sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yufeng

    2015-03-01

    The acoustic power of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is an important parameter that should be measured prior to each treatment to guarantee effective and safe outcomes. A new calibration technique was developed that involves estimating the pressure distribution, calculating the acoustic power using an underwater pressure blast sensor, and compensating the contribution of harmonics to the acoustic power. The output of a clinical extracorporeal HIFU system (center frequency of ~1 MHz, p+ = 2.5-57.2 MPa, p(-) = -1.8 to -13.9 MPa, I(SPPA) = 513-22,940 W/cm(2), -6 dB size of 1.6 × 10 mm: lateral × axial) was measured using this approach and then compared with that obtained using a radiation force balance. Similarities were found between each method at acoustic power ranging from 18.2 W to 912 W with an electrical-to-acoustic conversion efficiency of ~42%. The proposed method has advantages of low weight, smaller size, high sensitivity, quick response, high signal-to-noise ratio (especially at low power output), robust performance, and easy operation of HIFU exposimetry measurement.

  10. Mixing high-viscosity fluids via acoustically driven bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbay, Sinem; Ozcelik, Adem; Lata, James; Kaynak, Murat; Wu, Mengxi; Huang, Tony Jun

    2017-01-01

    We present an acoustofluidic micromixer which can perform rapid and homogeneous mixing of highly viscous fluids in the presence of an acoustic field. In this device, two high-viscosity polyethylene glycol (PEG) solutions were co-injected into a three-inlet PDMS microchannel with the center inlet containing a constant stream of nitrogen flow which forms bubbles in the device. When these bubbles were excited by an acoustic field generated via a piezoelectric transducer, the two solutions mixed homogenously due to the combination of acoustic streaming, droplet ejection, and bubble eruption effects. The mixing efficiency of this acoustofluidic device was evaluated using PEG-700 solutions which are ~106 times more viscous than deionized (DI) water. Our results indicate homogenous mixing of the PEG-700 solutions with a ~0.93 mixing index. The acoustofluidic micromixer is compact, inexpensive, easy to operate, and has the capacity to mix highly viscous fluids within 50 ms.

  11. Acoustic wave propagation in high-pressure system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foldyna, Josef; Sitek, Libor; Habán, Vladimír

    2006-12-22

    Recently, substantial attention is paid to the development of methods of generation of pulsations in high-pressure systems to produce pulsating high-speed water jets. The reason is that the introduction of pulsations into the water jets enables to increase their cutting efficiency due to the fact that the impact pressure (so-called water-hammer pressure) generated by an impact of slug of water on the target material is considerably higher than the stagnation pressure generated by corresponding continuous jet. Special method of pulsating jet generation was developed and tested extensively under the laboratory conditions at the Institute of Geonics in Ostrava. The method is based on the action of acoustic transducer on the pressure liquid and transmission of generated acoustic waves via pressure system to the nozzle. The purpose of the paper is to present results obtained during the research oriented at the determination of acoustic wave propagation in high-pressure system. The final objective of the research is to solve the problem of transmission of acoustic waves through high-pressure water to generate pulsating jet effectively even at larger distances from the acoustic source. In order to be able to simulate numerically acoustic wave propagation in the system, it is necessary among others to determine dependence of the sound speed and second kinematical viscosity on operating pressure. Method of determination of the second kinematical viscosity and speed of sound in liquid using modal analysis of response of the tube filled with liquid to the impact was developed. The response was measured by pressure sensors placed at both ends of the tube. Results obtained and presented in the paper indicate good agreement between experimental data and values of speed of sound calculated from so-called "UNESCO equation". They also show that the value of the second kinematical viscosity of water depends on the pressure.

  12. Optimal pressure-sensitive cuts for surface acoustic waves on langasite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The crystal langasite manifests its unique advantages and potentials for high temperature applications due to a high electromechanical coupling coefficient, temperature compensated orientations for surface acoustic wave (SAW), and temperature stability. In order to analyze the pressure-induced frequency shift in SAW resonator type sensors at high temperature, this paper presents the electroelastic wave equations employing the effective material constants for small vibrations superimposed on biases originated from homogeneous temperature and external pressure fields in the Lagrangian description. Incorporated with the first-order perturbation integration, a model including both the mechanical and electrical perturbation items originating from thermal biases and small pressure fields is proposed. This universal model is suitable for substrate with high piezoelectricity and can be applied at either room temperature or high temperature circumstance. The criteria of optimal cuts for SAW pressure sensitivity, I.e., high electromechanical coupling coefficient and low temperature coefficient of delay, are proposed. A thorough investigation in trebly rotated cuts has shown that optimal pressure sensitive crystallographic areas can be obtained. The areas suitable for pressure sensors at room temperature are defined with Euler anglesThe areas suitable for pressure sensors at high temperature are defined with Euler anglesΩ1: φ= 0°―0.6°,θ= 144.4°―145.8°, ψ= 23.2°―24.1°,Ω2: φ=59.4°―61°,θ= 34.2°―36.2°, ψ= 24.1°―22.3°,Ω3: φ=119°―120°,θ = 143.8°―145.5°, ψ= 22.3°―23.5°.The areas suitable for pressure sensors at high temperature are defined with Euler anglesI:φ= 8°―30°,θ= 24°―36°,ψ= 4°―25°,II:φ = 30°―55°,θ= 144°―158°,ψ= 4°―28°.A set of experiments employing LGS (0, 150°, 22°) and (0, 90°, 0) has been performed to check the validity of the proposed calculation. The experimental relative sensitivity is

  13. Acoustic emission monitoring of medieval towers considered as sensitive earthquake receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Carpinteri

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Many ancient masonry towers are present in Italian territory. In some cases these structures are at risk on account of the intensity of the stresses they are subjected to due to the high level of regional seismicity. In order to preserve this inestimable cultural heritage, a sound safety assessment should take into account the evolution of damage phenomena. In this connection, acoustic emission (AE monitoring can be highly effective. This study concerns the structural stability of three medieval towers rising in the centre of Alba, a characteristic town in Piedmont (Italy. During the monitoring period a correlation between peaks of AE activity in the masonry of these towers and regional seismicity was found. Earthquakes always affect structural stability. Besides that, the towers behaved as sensitive earthquake receptors. Here a method to correlate bursts of AE activity in a masonry building and regional seismicity is proposed. In particular, this method permits to identify the premonitory signals that precede a catastrophic event on a structure, since, in most cases, these warning signs can be captured well in advance.

  14. High-frequency acoustic for nanostructure wetting characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sizhe; Lamant, Sebastien; Carlier, Julien; Toubal, Malika; Campistron, Pierre; Xu, Xiumei; Vereecke, Guy; Senez, Vincent; Thomy, Vincent; Nongaillard, Bertrand

    2014-07-01

    Nanostructure wetting is a key problem when developing superhydrophobic surfaces. Conventional methods do not allow us to draw conclusions about the partial or complete wetting of structures on the nanoscale. Moreover, advanced techniques are not always compatible with an in situ, real time, multiscale (from macro to nanoscale) characterization. A high-frequency (1 GHz) acoustic method is used for the first time to characterize locally partial wetting and the wetting transition between nanostructures according to the surface tension of liquids (the variation is obtained by ethanol concentration modification). We can see that this method is extremely sensitive both to the level of liquid imbibition and to the impalement dynamic. We thus demonstrate the possibility to evaluate the critical surface tension of a liquid for which total wetting occurs according to the aspect ratio of the nanostructures. We also manage to identify intermediate states according to the height of the nanotexturation. Finally, our measurements revealed that the drop impalement depending on the surface tension of the liquid also depends on the aspect ratio of the nanostructures. We do believe that our method may lead to new insights into nanoscale wetting characterization by accessing the dynamic mapping of the liquid imbibition under the droplet.

  15. Naturally enhanced ion-acoustic lines at high altitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ogawa

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Naturally enhanced ion-acoustic lines (NEIALs between 1200 and 1900 km altitude are investigated. The NEIALs were found in the background gates of data from the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT Svalbard radar (ESR at 78° N looking field-aligned. Only strongly enhanced lines are detected at such high altitudes. The estimated enhancement above incoherent scattering integrated over the antenna beam and preintegration time of 10 s reaches about 10 000. Both lines are always enhanced above 1000 km altitude, and the downshifted line, corresponding to upward propagating ion-acoustic waves, is always stronger than the upshifted line, for downgoing waves. The ratio of the downshifted and upshifted peaks is often remarkably constant along a profile. Using the line positions as indicators of the ion-acoustic speeds and the bulk drift velocity, we find that the bulk drift does not exceed the ion-acoustic (sound speed, but extrapolation of the profiles suggests that the sound barrier is reached around 2000 km in one event. The highest ion-acoustic speed is seen near 600 km, above the density peak, indicating that electrons are heated not only by ionizing precipitation but significantly also by upgoing waves. Upflow continues to speed up above the estimated temperature maximum. A certain qualitative similarity to the solar corona seems to be the case.

  16. Acoustic trapping with a high frequency linear phased array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fan; Li, Ying; Hsu, Hsiu-Sheng; Liu, Changgeng; Tat Chiu, Chi; Lee, Changyang; Ham Kim, Hyung; Shung, K Kirk

    2012-11-19

    A high frequency ultrasonic phased array is shown to be capable of trapping and translating microparticles precisely and efficiently, made possible due to the fact that the acoustic beam produced by a phased array can be both focused and steered. Acoustic manipulation of microparticles by a phased array is advantageous over a single element transducer since there is no mechanical movement required for the array. Experimental results show that 45 μm diameter polystyrene microspheres can be easily and accurately trapped and moved to desired positions by a 64-element 26 MHz phased array.

  17. (Collection of high quality acoustical records for honeybees)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, H.T.; Buchanan, M.E.

    1987-02-19

    High quality acoustical data records were collected for both European and Africanized honeybees under various field conditions. This data base was needed for more rigorous evaluation of a honeybee identification technique previously developed by the travelers from preliminary data sets. Laboratory-grade recording equipment was used to record sounds made by honeybees in and near their nests and during foraging flights. Recordings were obtained from European and Africanized honeybees in the same general environment. Preliminary analyses of the acoustical data base clearly support the general identification algorithm: Africanized honeybee noise has significantly higher frequency content than does European honeybee noise. As this algorithm is refined, it may result in the development of a simple field-portable device for identifying subspecies of honeybees. Further, the honeybee's acoustical signals appear to be correlated with specific colony conditions. Understanding these variations may have enormous benefit for entomologists and for the beekeeping industry.

  18. Finite frequency traveltime sensitivity kernels for acoustic anisotropic media: Angle dependent bananas

    KAUST Repository

    Djebbi, Ramzi

    2013-08-19

    Anisotropy is an inherent character of the Earth subsurface. It should be considered for modeling and inversion. The acoustic VTI wave equation approximates the wave behavior in anisotropic media, and especially it\\'s kinematic characteristics. To analyze which parts of the model would affect the traveltime for anisotropic traveltime inversion methods, especially for wave equation tomography (WET), we drive the sensitivity kernels for anisotropic media using the VTI acoustic wave equation. A Born scattering approximation is first derived using the Fourier domain acoustic wave equation as a function of perturbations in three anisotropy parameters. Using the instantaneous traveltime, which unwraps the phase, we compute the kernels. These kernels resemble those for isotropic media, with the η kernel directionally dependent. They also have a maximum sensitivity along the geometrical ray, which is more realistic compared to the cross-correlation based kernels. Focusing on diving waves, which is used more often, especially recently in waveform inversion, we show sensitivity kernels in anisotropic media for this case.

  19. Enhanced Sensitivity of Surface Acoustic Wave-Based Rate Sensors Incorporating Metallic Dot Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A new surface acoustic wave (SAW-based rate sensor pattern incorporating metallic dot arrays was developed in this paper. Two parallel SAW delay lines with a reverse direction and an operation frequency of 80 MHz on a same X-112°Y LiTaO3 wafer are fabricated as the feedback of two SAW oscillators, and mixed oscillation frequency was used to characterize the external rotation. To enhance the Coriolis force effect acting on the SAW propagation, a copper (Cu dot array was deposited along the SAW propagation path of the SAW devices. The approach of partial-wave analysis in layered media was referred to analyze the response mechanisms of the SAW based rate sensor, resulting in determination of the optimal design parameters. To improve the frequency stability of the oscillator, the single phase unidirectional transducers (SPUDTs and combed transducer were used to form the SAW device to minimize the insertion loss and accomplish the single mode selection, respectively. Excellent long-term (measured in hours frequency stability of 0.1 ppm/h was obtained. Using the rate table with high precision, the performance of the developed SAW rate sensor was evaluated experimentally; satisfactory detection sensitivity (16.7 Hz∙deg∙s−1 and good linearity were observed.

  20. Enhanced sensitivity of surface acoustic wave-based rate sensors incorporating metallic dot arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Shao, Xiuting; Liu, Xinlu; Liu, Jiuling; He, Shitang

    2014-02-26

    A new surface acoustic wave (SAW)-based rate sensor pattern incorporating metallic dot arrays was developed in this paper. Two parallel SAW delay lines with a reverse direction and an operation frequency of 80 MHz on a same X-112°Y LiTaO3 wafer are fabricated as the feedback of two SAW oscillators, and mixed oscillation frequency was used to characterize the external rotation. To enhance the Coriolis force effect acting on the SAW propagation, a copper (Cu) dot array was deposited along the SAW propagation path of the SAW devices. The approach of partial-wave analysis in layered media was referred to analyze the response mechanisms of the SAW based rate sensor, resulting in determination of the optimal design parameters. To improve the frequency stability of the oscillator, the single phase unidirectional transducers (SPUDTs) and combed transducer were used to form the SAW device to minimize the insertion loss and accomplish the single mode selection, respectively. Excellent long-term (measured in hours) frequency stability of 0.1 ppm/h was obtained. Using the rate table with high precision, the performance of the developed SAW rate sensor was evaluated experimentally; satisfactory detection sensitivity (16.7 Hz∙deg∙s(-1)) and good linearity were observed.

  1. Acoustic detection of ultra-high energy cascades in ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeser, S.

    2006-12-08

    Current underwater optical neutrino telescopes are designed to detect neutrinos from astrophysical sources with energies in the TeV range. Due to the low fluxes and small cross sections, no high energy neutrinos of extraterrestrial origin have been observed so far. Only the Cherenkov neutrino detectors on the km{sup 3} scale that are currently under construction will have the necessary volume to observe these rare interactions. For the guaranteed source of neutrinos from interactions of the ultra-high energy cosmic at EeV energies rays with the ambient cosmic microwave background, event rates of only one per year are expected in these experiments. To measure the flux and verify the predicted cross sections of these cosmogenic neutrinos, an observed volume of the order of 100 km{sup 3} will be necessary, that will not be feasible with existing detection techniques. Alternative methods are required to build a detector on these scales. One promising idea is to record the acoustic waves generated in hadronic or electromagnetic cascades following the neutrino interaction. The higher amplitudes of the sonic signal and the large expected absorption length of sound favour South Polar ice instead of sea water as a medium. The prerequisites for an estimate of the potential of such a detector are suitable acoustic sensors, a verification of the model of thermo-acoustic sound generation and a determination of the acoustic properties of the ice. In a theoretical derivation the mechanism of thermo-elastic excitation of acoustic waves was shown to be equivalent for isotropic solids and liquids. Following a detailed analysis of the existing knowledge a simulation study of a hybrid optical-radio-acoustic detector has been performed. Ultrasonic sensors dedicated to in-ice application were developed and have been used to record acoustic signals from intense proton and laser beams in water and ice. With the obtained experience, the hitherto largest array of acoustic sensors and

  2. A Fiber-Optic Sensor for Acoustic Emission Detection in a High Voltage Cable System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongzhi Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We have proposed and demonstrated a Michelson interferometer-based fiber sensor for detecting acoustic emission generated from the partial discharge (PD of the accessories of a high-voltage cable system. The developed sensor head is integrated with a compact and relatively high sensitivity cylindrical elastomer. Such a sensor has a broadband frequency response and a relatively high sensitivity in a harsh environment under a high-voltage electric field. The design and fabrication of the sensor head integrated with the cylindrical elastomer is described, and a series of experiments was conducted to evaluate the sensing performance. The experimental results demonstrate that the sensitivity of our developed sensor for acoustic detection of partial discharges is 1.7 rad / ( m ⋅ Pa . A high frequency response up to 150 kHz is achieved. Moreover, the relatively high sensitivity for the detection of PD is verified in both the laboratory environment and gas insulated switchgear. The obtained results show the great potential application of a Michelson interferometer-based fiber sensor integrated with a cylindrical elastomer for in-situ monitoring high-voltage cable accessories for safety work.

  3. A Fiber-Optic Sensor for Acoustic Emission Detection in a High Voltage Cable System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tongzhi; Pang, Fufei; Liu, Huanhuan; Cheng, Jiajing; Lv, Longbao; Zhang, Xiaobei; Chen, Na; Wang, Tingyun

    2016-11-30

    We have proposed and demonstrated a Michelson interferometer-based fiber sensor for detecting acoustic emission generated from the partial discharge (PD) of the accessories of a high-voltage cable system. The developed sensor head is integrated with a compact and relatively high sensitivity cylindrical elastomer. Such a sensor has a broadband frequency response and a relatively high sensitivity in a harsh environment under a high-voltage electric field. The design and fabrication of the sensor head integrated with the cylindrical elastomer is described, and a series of experiments was conducted to evaluate the sensing performance. The experimental results demonstrate that the sensitivity of our developed sensor for acoustic detection of partial discharges is 1.7 rad / ( m ⋅ Pa ) . A high frequency response up to 150 kHz is achieved. Moreover, the relatively high sensitivity for the detection of PD is verified in both the laboratory environment and gas insulated switchgear. The obtained results show the great potential application of a Michelson interferometer-based fiber sensor integrated with a cylindrical elastomer for in-situ monitoring high-voltage cable accessories for safety work.

  4. Simulation chain for acoustic ultra-high energy neutrino detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neff, M., E-mail: max.neff@physik.uni-erlangen.de [Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Anton, G.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Graf, K.; Hößl, J.; Katz, U.; Lahmann, R. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2013-10-11

    Acoustic neutrino detection is a promising approach for large-scale ultra-high energy neutrino detectors in water. In this paper, a Monte Carlo simulation chain for acoustic neutrino detection devices in water is presented. It is designed within the SeaTray/IceTray software framework. Its modular architecture is highly flexible and makes it easy to adapt to different environmental conditions, detector geometries, and hardware. The simulation chain covers the generation of the acoustic pulse produced by a neutrino interaction and the propagation to the sensors within the detector. In this phase of the development, ambient and transient noise models for the Mediterranean Sea and simulations of the data acquisition hardware, similar to the one used in ANTARES/AMADEUS, are implemented. A pre-selection scheme for neutrino-like signals based on matched filtering is employed, as it can be used for on-line filtering. To simulate the whole processing chain for experimental data, signal classification and acoustic source reconstruction algorithms are integrated. In this contribution, an overview of the design and capabilities of the simulation chain will be given, and some applications and preliminary studies will be presented.

  5. Simulation Chain for Acoustic Ultra-high Energy Neutrino Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Neff, M; Enzenhöfer, A; Graf, K; Hößl, J; Katz, U; Lahmann, R; 10.1016/j.nima.2012.11.147

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic neutrino detection is a promising approach for large-scale ultra-high energy neutrino detectors in water. In this article, a Monte Carlo simulation chain for acoustic neutrino detection devices in water is presented. It is designed within the SeaTray/IceTray software framework. Its modular architecture is highly flexible and makes it easy to adapt to different environmental conditions, detector geometries, and hardware. The simulation chain covers the generation of the acoustic pulse produced by a neutrino interaction and the propagation to the sensors within the detector. In this phase of the development, ambient and transient noise models for the Mediterranean Sea and simulations of the data acquisition hardware, similar to the one used in ANTARES/AMADEUS, are implemented. A pre-selection scheme for neutrino-like signals based on matched filtering is employed, as it can be used for on-line filtering. To simulate the whole processing chain for experimental data, signal classification and acoustic so...

  6. Semicircular Canal Pressure Changes During High-intensity Acoustic Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Anne K; Banakis Hartl, Renee M; Greene, Nathaniel T; Benichoux, Victor; Mattingly, Jameson K; Cass, Stephen P; Tollin, Daniel J

    2017-08-01

    Acoustic stimulation generates measurable sound pressure levels in the semicircular canals. High-intensity acoustic stimuli can cause hearing loss and balance disruptions. To examine the propagation of acoustic stimuli to the vestibular end-organs, we simultaneously measured fluid pressure in the cochlea and semicircular canals during both air- and bone-conducted sound presentation. Five full-cephalic human cadaveric heads were prepared bilaterally with a mastoidectomy and extended facial recess. Vestibular pressures were measured within the superior, lateral, and posterior semicircular canals, and referenced to intracochlear pressure within the scala vestibuli with fiber-optic pressure probes. Pressures were measured concurrently with laser Doppler vibrometry measurements of stapes velocity during stimulation with both air- and bone-conduction. Stimuli were pure tones between 100 Hz and 14 kHz presented with custom closed-field loudspeakers for air-conducted sounds and via commercially available bone-anchored device for bone-conducted sounds. Pressures recorded in the superior, lateral, and posterior semicircular canals in response to sound stimulation were equal to or greater in magnitude than those recorded in the scala vestibuli (up to 20 dB higher). The pressure magnitudes varied across canals in a frequency-dependent manner. High sound pressure levels were recorded in the semicircular canals with sound stimulation, suggesting that similar acoustical energy is transmitted to the semicircular canals and the cochlea. Since these intralabyrinthine pressures exceed intracochlear pressure levels, our results suggest that the vestibular end-organs may also be at risk for injury during exposure to high-intensity acoustic stimuli known to cause trauma in the auditory system.

  7. Mass Sensitivity Optimization of a Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Incorporating a Resonator Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenchang Hao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the sensitive area of the two-port resonator configuration on the mass sensitivity of a Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (R-SAW sensor was investigated theoretically, and verified in experiments. A theoretical model utilizing a 3-dimensional finite element method (FEM approach was established to extract the coupling-of-modes (COM parameters in the absence and presence of mass loading covering the electrode structures. The COM model was used to simulate the frequency response of an R-SAW resonator by a P-matrix cascading technique. Cascading the P-matrixes of unloaded areas with mass loaded areas, the sensitivity for different sensitive areas was obtained by analyzing the frequency shift. The performance of the sensitivity analysis was confirmed by the measured responses from the silicon dioxide (SiO2 deposited on different sensitive areas of R-SAW resonators. It is shown that the mass sensitivity varies strongly for different sensitive areas, and the optimal sensitive area lies towards the center of the device.

  8. Mass Sensitivity Optimization of a Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Incorporating a Resonator Configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Wenchang; Liu, Jiuling; Liu, Minghua; Liang, Yong; He, Shitang

    2016-04-20

    The effect of the sensitive area of the two-port resonator configuration on the mass sensitivity of a Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (R-SAW) sensor was investigated theoretically, and verified in experiments. A theoretical model utilizing a 3-dimensional finite element method (FEM) approach was established to extract the coupling-of-modes (COM) parameters in the absence and presence of mass loading covering the electrode structures. The COM model was used to simulate the frequency response of an R-SAW resonator by a P-matrix cascading technique. Cascading the P-matrixes of unloaded areas with mass loaded areas, the sensitivity for different sensitive areas was obtained by analyzing the frequency shift. The performance of the sensitivity analysis was confirmed by the measured responses from the silicon dioxide (SiO₂) deposited on different sensitive areas of R-SAW resonators. It is shown that the mass sensitivity varies strongly for different sensitive areas, and the optimal sensitive area lies towards the center of the device.

  9. Sensitivity to interaural time differences with combined cochlear implant and acoustic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francart, Tom; Brokx, Jan; Wouters, Jan

    2009-03-01

    The interaural time difference (ITD) is an important cue to localize sound sources. Sensitivity to ITD was measured in eight users of a cochlear implant (CI) in the one ear and a hearing aid (HA) in the other severely impaired ear. The stimulus consisted of an electric pulse train of 100 pps and an acoustic filtered click train. Just-noticeable differences (JNDs) in ITD were measured using a lateralization paradigm. Four subjects exhibited median JNDs in ITD of 156, 341, 254, and 91 mus; the other subjects could not lateralize the stimuli consistently. Only the subjects who could lateralize had average acoustic hearing thresholds at 1,000 and 2,000 Hz better than 100-dB SPL. The electric signal had to be delayed by 1.5 ms to achieve synchronous stimulation at the auditory nerves.

  10. High Performance Computing Assets for Ocean Acoustics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-18

    that make them easily parallelizable in the manner that, for example, atmospheric or ocean general circulation models (GCMs) are parallel. Many GCMs...Enclosed is the Final Report for ONR Grant No. NOOO 14-15-1-2840 entitled "High Performance Computing Assets for Ocean Acoustjc Research," Principal...distribution is unlimited. ONR DURIP Grant Final Report High Performance Computing Assets for Ocean Acoustics Research Timothy F. Dud a Applied Ocean

  11. Enhancing gas-phase reaction in a plasma using high intensity and high power ultrasonic acoustic waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    is absorbed into said plasma (104), and where a sound pressure level of said generated ultrasonic high intensity and high power acoustic waves (102) is at least substantially 140 dB and where an acoustic power of said generated ultrasonic high intensity and high power acoustic waves (102); is at least......This invention relates to enhancing a gas-phase reaction in a plasma comprising: creating plasma (104) by at least one plasma source (106), and wherein that the method further comprises: generating ultrasonic high intensity and high power acoustic waves (102) having a predetermined amount...... of acoustic energy by at least one ultrasonic high intensity and high power gas-jet acoustic wave generator (101), where said ultrasonic high intensity and high power acoustic waves are directed to propagate towards said plasma (104) so that at least a part of said predetermined amount of acoustic energy...

  12. High frequency acoustic microscopy with Fresnel zoom lens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO DongHai; LI ShunZhou; WANG ChengHao

    2007-01-01

    The acoustic field distributions and the convergent beams generated by the planar-structure Fresnel zone transducers on solid surface are investigated.Because only 0 and 180 degree phase transducers are used,an imaging system with the Fresnel zoom lens could work at very high frequency,which overcomes the frequency limit of the traditional phased array acoustic imaging system.Simulation results are given to illustrate the acoustic field distributions along the focal axis and the whole plane as well.Based on the principle of scanning of the focus with the change of frequency for the excited signal,an experimental imaging system is also built.Acoustic Fresnel zone transducers are fabricated at center frequency of 400 MHz.Measurements and detections of the known hole flaws at different depths of the fused quartz sample are presented to show that the imaging system with Fresnel zoom lens could move its focus by only changing the frequency of the excited signal.

  13. Sympathetic Tone Induced by High Acoustic Tempo Requires Fast Respiration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Watanabe

    Full Text Available Many studies have revealed the influences of music, and particularly its tempo, on the autonomic nervous system (ANS and respiration patterns. Since there is the interaction between the ANS and the respiratory system, namely sympatho-respiratory coupling, it is possible that the effect of musical tempo on the ANS is modulated by the respiratory system. Therefore, we investigated the effects of the relationship between musical tempo and respiratory rate on the ANS. Fifty-two healthy people aged 18-35 years participated in this study. Their respiratory rates were controlled by using a silent electronic metronome and they listened to simple drum sounds with a constant tempo. We varied the respiratory rate-acoustic tempo combination. The respiratory rate was controlled at 15 or 20 cycles per minute (CPM and the acoustic tempo was 60 or 80 beats per minute (BPM or the environment was silent. Electrocardiograms and an elastic chest band were used to measure the heart rate and respiratory rate, respectively. The mean heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV were regarded as indices of ANS activity. We observed a significant increase in the mean heart rate and the low (0.04-0.15 Hz to high (0.15-0.40 Hz frequency ratio of HRV, only when the respiratory rate was controlled at 20 CPM and the acoustic tempo was 80 BPM. We suggest that the effect of acoustic tempo on the sympathetic tone is modulated by the respiratory system.

  14. Sensitivity of the human auditory cortex to acoustic degradation of speech and non-speech sounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiitinen Hannu

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have shown that the human right-hemispheric auditory cortex is particularly sensitive to reduction in sound quality, with an increase in distortion resulting in an amplification of the auditory N1m response measured in the magnetoencephalography (MEG. Here, we examined whether this sensitivity is specific to the processing of acoustic properties of speech or whether it can be observed also in the processing of sounds with a simple spectral structure. We degraded speech stimuli (vowel /a/, complex non-speech stimuli (a composite of five sinusoidals, and sinusoidal tones by decreasing the amplitude resolution of the signal waveform. The amplitude resolution was impoverished by reducing the number of bits to represent the signal samples. Auditory evoked magnetic fields (AEFs were measured in the left and right hemisphere of sixteen healthy subjects. Results We found that the AEF amplitudes increased significantly with stimulus distortion for all stimulus types, which indicates that the right-hemispheric N1m sensitivity is not related exclusively to degradation of acoustic properties of speech. In addition, the P1m and P2m responses were amplified with increasing distortion similarly in both hemispheres. The AEF latencies were not systematically affected by the distortion. Conclusions We propose that the increased activity of AEFs reflects cortical processing of acoustic properties common to both speech and non-speech stimuli. More specifically, the enhancement is most likely caused by spectral changes brought about by the decrease of amplitude resolution, in particular the introduction of periodic, signal-dependent distortion to the original sound. Converging evidence suggests that the observed AEF amplification could reflect cortical sensitivity to periodic sounds.

  15. High-Temperature Piezoelectric Crystals for Acoustic Wave Sensor Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Hongfei; Wu, Huiyan; Wang, Qing-Ming

    2016-03-01

    In this review paper, nine different types of high-temperature piezoelectric crystals and their sensor applications are overviewed. The important materials' properties of these piezoelectric crystals including dielectric constant, elastic coefficients, piezoelectric coefficients, electromechanical coupling coefficients, and mechanical quality factor are discussed in detail. The determination methods of these physical properties are also presented. Moreover, the growth methods, structures, and properties of these piezoelectric crystals are summarized and compared. Of particular interest are langasite and oxyborate crystals, which exhibit no phase transitions prior to their melting points ∼ 1500 °C and possess high electrical resistivity, piezoelectric coefficients, and mechanical quality factor at ultrahigh temperature ( ∼ 1000 °C). Finally, some research results on surface acoustic wave (SAW) and bulk acoustic wave (BAW) sensors developed using this high-temperature piezoelectric crystals are discussed.

  16. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, Darren W

    2013-05-07

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  17. A novel optimal sensitivity design scheme for yarn tension sensor using surface acoustic wave device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Bingbing; Lu, Wenke; Zhu, Changchun; Liu, Qinghong; Zhang, Haoxin

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel optimal sensitivity design scheme for the yarn tension sensor using surface acoustic wave (SAW) device. In order to obtain the best sensitivity, the regression model between the size of the SAW yarn tension sensor substrate and the sensitivity of the SAW yarn tension sensor was established using the least square method. The model was validated too. Through analyzing the correspondence between the regression function monotonicity and its partial derivative sign, the effect of the SAW yarn tension sensor substrate size on the sensitivity of the SAW yarn tension sensor was investigated. Based on the regression model, a linear programming model was established to gain the optimal sensitivity of the SAW yarn tension sensor. The linear programming result shows that the maximum sensitivity will be achieved when the SAW yarn tension sensor substrate length is equal to 15 mm and its width is equal to 3mm within a fixed interval of the substrate size. An experiment of SAW yarn tension sensor about 15 mm long and 3mm wide was presented. Experimental results show that the maximum sensitivity 1982.39 Hz/g was accomplished, which confirms that the optimal sensitivity design scheme is useful and effective. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. High frequency and pulse scattering physical acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Pierce, Allan D

    1992-01-01

    High Frequency and Pulse Scattering investigates high frequency and pulse scattering, with emphasis on the phenomenon of echoes from objects. Geometrical and catastrophe optics methods in scattering are discussed, along with the scattering of sound pulses and the ringing of target resonances. Caustics and associated diffraction catastrophes are also examined.Comprised of two chapters, this volume begins with a detailed account of geometrically based approximation methods in scattering theory, focusing on waves transmitted through fluid and elastic scatterers and glory scattering; surface ray r

  19. Acoustically shielded exhaust system for high thrust jet engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, John P. (Inventor); Lee, Robert (Inventor); Majjigi, Rudramuni K. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A flade exhaust nozzle for a high thrust jet engine is configured to form an acoustic shield around the core engine exhaust flowstream while supplementing engine thrust during all flight conditions, particularly during takeoff. The flade airflow is converted from an annular 360.degree. flowstream to an arcuate flowstream extending around the lower half of the core engine exhaust flowstream so as to suppress exhaust noise directed at the surrounding community.

  20. Phase-Sensitive Noise Suppression in a Photoacoustic Sensor based on Acoustic Circular Membrane Modes

    CERN Document Server

    Lassen, Mikael; Balslev-Harder, David; Petersen, Jan C

    2014-01-01

    A photoacoustic (PA) sensor based on higher order acoustic modes is demonstrated. The PA sensor is designed to enhance the gas-detection performance and simultaneously suppress ambient noise sources (e.g. flow noise, electrical noise and external acoustic noise). Two microphones are used and positioned such that the PA signals are ($\\pi$) out of phase. Ambient acoustic noise are approximately in the same phase and will be subtracted and thus improve the SNR. In addition, by placing the gas in- and outlets so that the gas flows through the node of the first higher order membrane mode the coupling of flow noise is approximately 20 dB lower compared with flow through the fundamental mode at 5 L/min. The noise reduction and thus the increase in sensitivity is demonstrated by measuring vibrational lines of methanol and methane using a broadband interband cascade laser emitting radiation at 3.38 $\\mu$m. A signal-to-noise improvement of 20 (26 dB) using higher order modes are demonstrated compared with the fundament...

  1. Acoustic contrast sensitivity to transfer function errors in the design of a personal audio system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Young; Choi, Jung-Woo; Kim, Yang-Hann

    2013-07-01

    An analytic means to evaluate the error sensitivity of a personal audio system is proposed. The personal audio system, which focuses acoustic energy into a zone of interest using multiple loudspeakers, is subject to various errors when implemented. The performance of a personal audio system, defined as an energy ratio between the zone of interest and the rest, is inevitably influenced by errors. Thus the ability to predict performance change at the design stage is crucial when building a robust personal audio system. The dependence of the energy ratio change on various types of errors is formulated.

  2. Sensitivity to Interaural Time Differences with Combined Cochlear Implant and Acoustic Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Francart, Tom; Brokx, Jan; Wouters, Jan

    2008-01-01

    The interaural time difference (ITD) is an important cue to localize sound sources. Sensitivity to ITD was measured in eight users of a cochlear implant (CI) in the one ear and a hearing aid (HA) in the other severely impaired ear. The stimulus consisted of an electric pulse train of 100 pps and an acoustic filtered click train. Just-noticeable differences (JNDs) in ITD were measured using a lateralization paradigm. Four subjects exhibited median JNDs in ITD of 156, 341, 254, and 91 mus; the ...

  3. Detection of ultra high energy neutrinos with an underwater very large volume array of acoustic sensors: A simulation study

    CERN Document Server

    Karg, T

    2006-01-01

    This thesis investigates the detection of ultra high energy (E > 1 EeV) cosmic neutrinos using acoustic sensors immersed in water. The method is based on the thermoacoustic model describing the production of microsecond bipolar acoustic pulses by neutrino-induced particle cascades. These cascades locally heat the medium which leads to rapid expansion and a short sonic pulse detectable in water with hydrophones over distances of several kilometres. This makes acoustic detection an approach complementary to todays optical Cerenkov and radio Cerenkov detectors, and could help to reduce the respective systematic uncertainties. In this work a complete simulation / reconstruction chain for a submarine acoustic neutrino telescope is developed, and the sensitivity of such a detector to a diffuse flux of ultra highenergy cosmic neutrinos is estimated.

  4. High levels of sound pressure: acoustic reflex thresholds and auditory complaints of workers with noise exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Scalli Mathias Duarte

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The clinical evaluation of subjects with occupational noise exposure has been difficult due to the discrepancy between auditory complaints and auditory test results. This study aimed to evaluate the contralateral acoustic reflex thresholds of workers exposed to high levels of noise, and to compare these results to the subjects' auditory complaints.METHODS: This clinical retrospective study evaluated 364 workers between 1998 and 2005; their contralateral acoustic reflexes were compared to auditory complaints, age, and noise exposure time by chi-squared, Fisher's, and Spearman's tests.RESULTS: The workers' age ranged from 18 to 50 years (mean = 39.6, and noise exposure time from one to 38 years (mean = 17.3. We found that 15.1% (55 of the workers had bilateral hearing loss, 38.5% (140 had bilateral tinnitus, 52.8% (192 had abnormal sensitivity to loud sounds, and 47.2% (172 had speech recognition impairment. The variables hearing loss, speech recognition impairment, tinnitus, age group, and noise exposure time did not show relationship with acoustic reflex thresholds; however, all complaints demonstrated a statistically significant relationship with Metz recruitment at 3000 and 4000 Hz bilaterally.CONCLUSION: There was no significance relationship between auditory complaints and acoustic reflexes.

  5. High-Frequency Acoustic Sediment Classification in Shallow Water

    CERN Document Server

    Bentrem, F W; Kalcic, M T; Duncan, M E; Bentrem, Frank W.; Sample, John; Kalcic, Maria T.; Duncan, Michael E.

    2002-01-01

    A geoacoustic inversion technique for high-frequency (12 kHz) multibeam sonar data is presented as a means to classify the seafloor sediment in shallow water (40-300 m). The inversion makes use of backscattered data at a variety of grazing angles to estimate mean grain size. The need for sediment type and the large amounts of multibeam data being collected with the Naval Oceanographic Office's Simrad EM 121A systems, have fostered the development of algorithms to process the EM 121A acoustic backscatter into maps of sediment type. The APL-UW (Applied Physics Laboratory at the University of Washington) backscattering model is used with simulated annealing to invert for six geoacoustic parameters. For the inversion, three of the parameters are constrained according to empirical correlations with mean grain size, which is introduced as an unconstrained parameter. The four unconstrained (free) parameters are mean grain size, sediment volume interaction, and two seafloor roughness parameters. Acoustic sediment cla...

  6. High sensitivity RNA pseudoknot prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Xiaolu; Ali, Hesham

    2006-01-01

    Most ab initio pseudoknot predicting methods provide very few folding scenarios for a given RNA sequence and have low sensitivities. RNA researchers, in many cases, would rather sacrifice the specificity for a much higher sensitivity for pseudoknot detection. In this study, we introduce the Pseudoknot Local Motif Model and Dynamic Partner Sequence Stacking (PLMM_DPSS) algorithm which predicts all PLM model pseudoknots within an RNA sequence in a neighboring-region-interference-free fashion. T...

  7. Enhanced Sensitive Love Wave Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Designed for Immunoassay Formats

    OpenAIRE

    Mihaela Puiu; Ana-Maria Gurban; Lucian Rotariu; Simona Brajnicov; Cristian Viespe; Camelia Bala

    2015-01-01

    We report a Love wave surface acoustic wave (LW-SAW) immunosensor designed for the detection of high molecular weight targets in liquid samples, amenable also for low molecular targets in surface competition assays. We implemented a label-free interaction protocol similar to other surface plasmon resonance bioassays having the advantage of requiring reduced time analysis. The fabricated LW-SAW sensor supports the detection of the target in the nanomolar range, and can be ultimately incorporat...

  8. High sensitivity RNA pseudoknot prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaolu; Ali, Hesham

    2007-01-01

    Most ab initio pseudoknot predicting methods provide very few folding scenarios for a given RNA sequence and have low sensitivities. RNA researchers, in many cases, would rather sacrifice the specificity for a much higher sensitivity for pseudoknot detection. In this study, we introduce the Pseudoknot Local Motif Model and Dynamic Partner Sequence Stacking (PLMM_DPSS) algorithm which predicts all PLM model pseudoknots within an RNA sequence in a neighboring-region-interference-free fashion. The PLM model is derived from the existing Pseudobase entries. The innovative DPSS approach calculates the optimally lowest stacking energy between two partner sequences. Combined with the Mfold, PLMM_DPSS can also be used in predicting complicated pseudoknots. The test results of PLMM_DPSS, PKNOTS, iterated loop matching, pknotsRG and HotKnots with Pseudobase sequences have shown that PLMM_DPSS is the most sensitive among the five methods. PLMM_DPSS also provides manageable pseudoknot folding scenarios for further structure determination.

  9. High transmission acoustic focusing by impedance-matched acoustic meta-surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Al Jahdali, Rasha

    2016-01-19

    Impedance is an important issue in the design of acoustic lenses because mismatched impedance is detrimental to real focusing applications. Here, we report two designs of acoustic lenses that focus acoustic waves in water and air, respectively. They are tailored by acoustic meta-surfaces, which are rigid thin plates decorated with periodically distributed sub-wavelength slits. Their respective building blocks are constructed from the coiling-up spaces in water and the layered structures in air. Analytic analysis based on coupled-mode theory and transfer matrix reveals that the impedances of the lenses are matched to those of the background media. With these impedance-matched acoustic lenses, we demonstrate the acoustic focusing effect by finite-element simulations.

  10. High-Temperature Surface-Acoustic-Wave Transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoliang; Tittmann, Bernhard R.

    2010-01-01

    Aircraft-engine rotating equipment usually operates at high temperature and stress. Non-invasive inspection of microcracks in those components poses a challenge for the non-destructive evaluation community. A low-profile ultrasonic guided wave sensor can detect cracks in situ. The key feature of the sensor is that it should withstand high temperatures and excite strong surface wave energy to inspect surface/subsurface cracks. As far as the innovators know at the time of this reporting, there is no existing sensor that is mounted to the rotor disks for crack inspection; the most often used technology includes fluorescent penetrant inspection or eddy-current probes for disassembled part inspection. An efficient, high-temperature, low-profile surface acoustic wave transducer design has been identified and tested for nondestructive evaluation of structures or materials. The development is a Sol-Gel bismuth titanate-based surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) sensor that can generate efficient surface acoustic waves for crack inspection. The produced sensor is very thin (submillimeter), and can generate surface waves up to 540 C. Finite element analysis of the SAW transducer design was performed to predict the sensor behavior, and experimental studies confirmed the results. One major uniqueness of the Sol-Gel bismuth titanate SAW sensor is that it is easy to implement to structures of various shapes. With a spray coating process, the sensor can be applied to surfaces of large curvatures. Second, the sensor is very thin (as a coating) and has very minimal effect on airflow or rotating equipment imbalance. Third, it can withstand temperatures up to 530 C, which is very useful for engine applications where high temperature is an issue.

  11. High sensitivity radon emanation measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuzel, G; Simgen, H

    2009-05-01

    The presented radon detection technique employs miniaturized ultra-low background proportional counters. (222)Rn samples are purified, mixed with a counting gas and filled into a counter using a special glass vacuum line. The absolute sensitivity of the system is estimated to be 40 microBq (20 (222)Rn atoms). For emanation investigations two metal sealed stainless steel vessels and several glass vials are available. Taking into account their blank contributions, measurements at a minimum detectable activity of about 100 microBq can be performed.

  12. MEMS acoustic emission transducers designed with high aspect ratio geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saboonchi, H.; Ozevin, D.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, micro-electro-mechanic systems (MEMS) acoustic emission (AE) transducers are manufactured using an electroplating technique. The transducers use a capacitance change as their transduction principle, and are tuned to the range 50-200 kHz. Through the electroplating technique, a thick metal layer (20 μm nickel + 0.5 μm gold) is used to form a freely moving microstructure layer. The presence of the gold layer reduces the potential corrosion of the nickel layer. A dielectric layer is deposited between the two electrodes, thus preventing the stiction phenomenon. The transducers have a measured quality factor in the range 15-30 at atmospheric pressure and are functional without vacuum packaging. The transducers are characterized using electrical and mechanical tests to identify the capacitance, resonance frequency and damping. Ultrasonic wave generation using a Q-switched laser shows the directivity of the transducer sensitivity. The comparison of the MEMS transducers with similar frequency piezoelectric transducers shows that the MEMS AE transducers have better response characteristics and sensitivity at the resonance frequency and well-defined waveform signatures (rise time and decay time) due to pure resonance behavior in the out-of-plane direction. The transducers are sensitive to a unique wave direction, which can be utilized to increase the accuracy of source localization by selecting the correct wave velocity at the structures.

  13. Determination of sound velocity and acoustic impedance of thin chitosan films by phase-sensitive acoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamanyi, Albert E.; Ahmed Mohamed, Esam T.; Ngwa, Wilfred; Grill, Wolfgang

    2010-03-01

    The biomaterial chitosan is used in the paper manufacturing industry, as a wound healing agent and in filtration amongst others. In this paper the longitudinal sound velocity and acoustic impedance of thin films of chitosan of varying thicknesses are determined by vector-contrast acoustic microscopy. The exploitation of the relative reflectivity information from the maximum amplitude images and a comparison of the experimentally obtained V(z) curves with simulations using appropriate models are applied for the evaluation of the sound velocity. These results were compared to those previously obtained results with the same instrument.

  14. Cryogenic High-Sensitivity Magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Peter; Chui, Talso; Goodstein, David

    2005-01-01

    A proposed magnetometer for use in a cryogenic environment would be sensitive enough to measure a magnetic-flux density as small as a picogauss (10(exp -16) Tesla). In contrast, a typical conventional flux-gate magnetometer cannot measure a magnetic-flux density smaller that about 1 microgauss (10(exp -10) Tesla). One version of this device, for operation near the low end of the cryogenic temperature range, would include a piece of a paramagnetic material on a platform, the temperature of which would be controlled with a periodic variation. The variation in temperature would be measured by use of a conventional germanium resistance thermometer. A superconducting coil would be wound around the paramagnetic material and coupled to a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer.

  15. Acoustic damping of honeycomb-construction plates by pressure-sensitive adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, D. J. E.; Pharaoh, K. I.

    1991-04-01

    Materials available as pressure sensitive adhesives in tape form are found to have suitable properties for damping acoustic vibrations in the 200 to 1000 Hz range. Comparative experiments were made to damp small honeycomb construction base plates, of length about 1 m and of thickness 50 mm, which are used for mounting lasers. Added masses bonded to the edge of the plate with the lossy adhesives are most effective in damping out of plane motion when placed where the edge has parallel rather than torsional motion for the particular Chladni's figure mode. A reduction of Q from about 100 to about 10 for modes between 218 and 800 Hz was achieved by an added 10 mass loading. When the lowest frequency mode is damped in this way the impact response sounds dead to the ear.

  16. Microstructure-Sensitive Investigation of Fracture Using Acoustic Emission Coupled With Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisner, Brian; Cabal, Mike; Vanniamparambiland, Prashanth A.; Leser, William; Hochhalter, Jacob; Kontsos, Antonios

    2015-01-01

    A novel technique using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) in conjunction with Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring is proposed to investigate microstructure-sensitive fatigue and fracture of metals. The coupling between quasi in situ microscopy with actual in situ nondestructive evaluation falls into the ICME framework and the idea of quantitative data-driven characterization of material behavior. To validate the use of AE monitoring inside the SEM chamber, Aluminum 2024-B sharp notch specimen were tested both inside and outside the microscope using a small scale mechanical testing device. Subsequently, the same type of specimen was tested inside the SEM chamber. Load data were correlated with both AE information and observations of microcracks around grain boundaries as well as secondary cracks, voids, and slip bands. The preliminary results are in excellent agreement with similar findings at the mesoscale. Extensions of the application of this novel technique are discussed.

  17. Enhanced Sensitive Love Wave Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Designed for Immunoassay Formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Puiu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a Love wave surface acoustic wave (LW-SAW immunosensor designed for the detection of high molecular weight targets in liquid samples, amenable also for low molecular targets in surface competition assays. We implemented a label-free interaction protocol similar to other surface plasmon resonance bioassays having the advantage of requiring reduced time analysis. The fabricated LW-SAW sensor supports the detection of the target in the nanomolar range, and can be ultimately incorporated in portable devices, suitable for point-of-care testing (POCT applications.

  18. Enhanced sensitive love wave surface acoustic wave sensor designed for immunoassay formats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puiu, Mihaela; Gurban, Ana-Maria; Rotariu, Lucian; Brajnicov, Simona; Viespe, Cristian; Bala, Camelia

    2015-05-05

    We report a Love wave surface acoustic wave (LW-SAW) immunosensor designed for the detection of high molecular weight targets in liquid samples, amenable also for low molecular targets in surface competition assays. We implemented a label-free interaction protocol similar to other surface plasmon resonance bioassays having the advantage of requiring reduced time analysis. The fabricated LW-SAW sensor supports the detection of the target in the nanomolar range, and can be ultimately incorporated in portable devices, suitable for point-of-care testing (POCT) applications.

  19. Nano-textured high sensitivity ion sensitive field effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajmirzaheydarali, M.; Sadeghipari, M.; Akbari, M.; Shahsafi, A.; Mohajerzadeh, S., E-mail: mohajer@ut.ac.ir [Thin Film and Nanoelectronics Lab, Nanoelectronics Center of Excellence, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran 143957131 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-02-07

    Nano-textured gate engineered ion sensitive field effect transistors (ISFETs), suitable for high sensitivity pH sensors, have been realized. Utilizing a mask-less deep reactive ion etching results in ultra-fine poly-Si features on the gate of ISFET devices where spacing of the order of 10 nm and less is achieved. Incorporation of these nano-sized features on the gate is responsible for high sensitivities up to 400 mV/pH in contrast to conventional planar structures. The fabrication process for this transistor is inexpensive, and it is fully compatible with standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor fabrication procedure. A theoretical modeling has also been presented to predict the extension of the diffuse layer into the electrolyte solution for highly featured structures and to correlate this extension with the high sensitivity of the device. The observed ultra-fine features by means of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy tools corroborate the theoretical prediction.

  20. Real-Time Characterization of Electrospun PVP Nanofibers as Sensitive Layer of a Surface Acoustic Wave Device for Gas Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Matatagui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this work has been to study the polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP fibers deposited by means of the electrospinning technique for using as sensitive layer in surface acoustic wave (SAW sensors to detect volatile organic compounds (VOCs. The electrospinning process of the fibers has been monitored and RF characterized in real time, and it has been shown that the diameters of the fibers depend mainly on two variables: the applied voltage and the distance between the needle and the collector, since all the electrospun fibers have been characterized by a scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Real-time measurement during the fiber coating process has shown that the depth of penetration of mechanical perturbation in the fiber layer has a limit. It has been demonstrated that once this saturation has been reached, the increase of the thickness of the fibers coating does not improve the sensitivity of the sensor. Finally, the parameters used to deposit the electrospun fibers of smaller diameters have been used to deposit fibers on a SAW device to obtain a sensor to measure different concentrations of toluene at room temperature. The present sensor exhibited excellent sensitivity, good linearity and repeatability, and high and fast response to toluene at room temperature.

  1. Characterizing riverbed sediment using high-frequency acoustics 1: spectral properties of scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscombe, Daniel D.; Grams, Paul E.; Kaplinski, Matt A.

    2014-01-01

    Bed-sediment classification using high-frequency hydro-acoustic instruments is challenging when sediments are spatially heterogeneous, which is often the case in rivers. The use of acoustic backscatter to classify sediments is an attractive alternative to analysis of topography because it is potentially sensitive to grain-scale roughness. Here, a new method is presented which uses high-frequency acoustic backscatter from multibeam sonar to classify heterogeneous riverbed sediments by type (sand, gravel,rock) continuously in space and at small spatial resolution. In this, the first of a pair of papers that examine the scattering signatures from a heterogeneous riverbed, methods are presented to construct spatially explicit maps of spectral properties from geo-referenced point clouds of geometrically and radiometrically corrected echoes. Backscatter power spectra are computed to produce scale and amplitude metrics that collectively characterize the length scales of stochastic measures of riverbed scattering, termed ‘stochastic geometries’. Backscatter aggregated over small spatial scales have spectra that obey a power-law. This apparently self-affine behavior could instead arise from morphological- and grain-scale roughnesses over multiple overlapping scales, or riverbed scattering being transitional between Rayleigh and geometric regimes. Relationships exist between stochastic geometries of backscatter and areas of rough and smooth sediments. However, no one parameter can uniquely characterize a particular substrate, nor definitively separate the relative contributions of roughness and acoustic impedance (hardness). Combinations of spectral quantities do, however, have the potential to delineate riverbed sediment patchiness, in a data-driven approach comparing backscatter with bed-sediment observations (which is the subject of part two of this manuscript).

  2. High energy neutrino acoustic detection activities in Lake Baikal: Status and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aynutdinov, V.; Avrorin, A.; Balkanov, V. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Belolaptikov, I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Bogorodsky, D. [Applied Physics Institute of Irkutsk State University, Gagarin blvd. 20, Irkutsk 664003 (Russian Federation); Budnev, N. [Applied Physics Institute of Irkutsk State University, Gagarin blvd. 20, Irkutsk 664003 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: nbudnev@api.isu.ru; Danilchenko, I.; Domogatsky, G.; Doroshenko, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Dyachok, A. [Applied Physics Institute of Irkutsk State University, Gagarin blvd. 20, Irkutsk 664003 (Russian Federation); Dzhilkibaev, Zh.-A. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Fialkovsky, S. [Nizhni Novgorod State Technical University, Nizhni Novgorod (Russian Federation); Gaponenko, O. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Golubkov, K. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Gress, O.; Gress, T.; Grishin, O. [Applied Physics Institute of Irkutsk State University, Gagarin blvd. 20, Irkutsk 664003 (Russian Federation); Klabukov, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Klimov, A. [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kochanov, A. [Applied Physics Institute of Irkutsk State University, Gagarin blvd. 20, Irkutsk 664003 (Russian Federation)] (and others)

    2009-06-01

    We review the status of high-energy acoustic neutrino detection activities in Lake Baikal. The Baikal collaboration constructed a hydro-acoustic device which may be regarded as a prototype subunit for a future underwater acoustic neutrino telescope. The device is capable of common operation with the Baikal neutrino telescope NT200+, and is operating at a depth of about 150 m on the 'NT200+ instrumentation string'. Our measurements show that the integral noise power in the frequency band 20-40 kHz can reach levels as low as about 1 mPa, i.e. one of the lowest noise levels measured at the currently considered acoustic neutrino sites. At the same time, short acoustic pulses with different amplitudes and shapes have been observed. Low sound absorption in Baikal freshwater and absence of strong acoustic noise sources do motivate further activities towards a large-scale acoustic neutrino detector in Lake Baikal.

  3. High undercooling of bulk water during acoustic levitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü; Yongjun(吕勇军); CAO; Chongde(曹崇德); WEI; Bingbo(魏炳波)

    2003-01-01

    The experiments on undercooling of acoustically levitated water drops with the radius of 5-8 mm are carried out, and the maximum undercooling of 24 K is obtained in such a containerless state. Various factors influencing the undercoolability of water under acoustic levitation are synthetically analyzed. The experimental results indicate that impurities tend to decrease the undercooling level, whereas the dominant factor is the effect of ultrasound. The stirring and cavitation effects of ultrasound tend to stimulate the nucleation of water and prevent further bulk undercooling in experiments. The stirring effect provides some extra energy fluctuation to overcome the thermodynamic barrier for nucleation. The local high pressure caused by cavitation effect increases the local undercooling in water and stimulates nucleation before the achievement of a large bulk undercooling. According to the cooling curves, the dendrite growth velocity of ice is estimated, which is in good agreement with the theoretical prediction at the lower undercooling. The theoretical calculation predicts a dendrite growth velocity of 0.23 m/s corresponding to the maximum undercooling of 24 K, at which the rapid solidification of ice occurs.

  4. Detecting sensitization in aluminum alloys using acoustic resonance and EMAT ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Adam; Macha, Erica; Bartlett, Jonathan; Xia, Yanquan

    2017-02-01

    Sensitization of 5xxx series aluminum alloys is characterized by the gradual precipitation of the alloying element magnesium as a beta phase (Al3Mg2) along the grain boundaries after prolonged exposure to the environment. While the 5xxx alloy is corrosion resistant, these beta phases are corrosive and thus their formation increases the susceptibility of the alloy to intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. The standardized approach for measuring the degree of sensitization (DoS) is the ASTM G67 test standard. This test, however, is time consuming, difficult to perform, and destructive, as it involves measurement of a mass loss after exposing the alloy to a nitric acid solution. Given the limitations of this test standard, there is a need to develop a nondestructive evaluation (NDE) solution that is easy-to-use, non-intrusive, and faster than current inspection methods while suitable for use outside a laboratory. This paper describes the development of an NDE method for quantifying the DoS value in an alloy using ultrasonic measurements. The work builds upon prior efforts described in the literature that use electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) to quantify DoS based on velocity measurements. The prior approaches used conventional ultrasonic inspection techniques with short-duration excitation signals (less than 3 cycles) to allow identification of the echo time-of-flight and amplitude decay pattern, but their success was limited by EMAT transducer inefficiency in general, especially at higher frequencies. To overcome these challenges, this paper presents a modified ultrasonic measurement strategy using long-duration excitation signals (greater than 100 cycles), where multiple reverberations in the material overlap. By sweeping through test frequencies, it is possible to establish an acoustic resonance when the wavelength is an integer multiple of twice the material thickness. This approach allows for greatly improved signal to noise ratios as

  5. Open-circuit sensitivity model based on empirical parameters for a capacitive-type MEMS acoustic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaewoo; Jeon, J. H.; Je, C. H.; Lee, S. Q.; Yang, W. S.; Lee, S.-G.

    2016-03-01

    An empirical-based open-circuit sensitivity model for a capacitive-type MEMS acoustic sensor is presented. To intuitively evaluate the characteristic of the open-circuit sensitivity, the empirical-based model is proposed and analysed by using a lumped spring-mass model and a pad test sample without a parallel plate capacitor for the parasitic capacitance. The model is composed of three different parameter groups: empirical, theoretical, and mixed data. The empirical residual stress from the measured pull-in voltage of 16.7 V and the measured surface topology of the diaphragm were extracted as +13 MPa, resulting in the effective spring constant of 110.9 N/m. The parasitic capacitance for two probing pads including the substrate part was 0.25 pF. Furthermore, to verify the proposed model, the modelled open-circuit sensitivity was compared with the measured value. The MEMS acoustic sensor had an open- circuit sensitivity of -43.0 dBV/Pa at 1 kHz with a bias of 10 V, while the modelled open- circuit sensitivity was -42.9 dBV/Pa, which showed good agreement in the range from 100 Hz to 18 kHz. This validates the empirical-based open-circuit sensitivity model for designing capacitive-type MEMS acoustic sensors.

  6. Signal processing for high speed underwater acoustic transmission of image

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Weiqing; ZHU Min; WANG Junwei; HUANG Haiyun; YANG Bo; XU Lijun; ZHAO Liang

    2009-01-01

    A signal processing method for high-speed underwater acoustic transmission of image is presented. It has two parts. Part 1 introduces signal processing for underwater acoustic coherent communication. Part 1 includes 3 technical points. (1) Doppler shift compensation.Chirp signals are inserted between data packages. A correlation process between two copy correlation functions gives more accurate estimation of the mean Doppler shift. Then it could be compensated by resampling the data. In adaptive decision feedback equalizer (DFE) an adaptive phase compensator with fast self-optimized least mean square (FOLMS) adaptation algorithm is utilized resulting in better motion tolerance than compensators with 2nd order Phase-Lock Loop algorithm. The performance of the combination of mean Doppler shift compensation and adaptive phase compensator is quite good. (2) A diversity combiner (DC) used in advance of equalizer. Both combiner and adaptive DFE are based on FOLMS adaptation algorithm. This results in reduced computation complexity and better performance. (3) Cascaded equalizer and Turbo-Trellis Coded Modulation (TCM) decoder and the iteration algorithm. A new bitsymbol converter based on Soft Output Viterbi Algorithm (SOVA) is studied. Comparing with the traditional decision, coding and mapping algorithm, the new converter can reduce Bit Error Rate(BER) by nearly 2 orders. Part 2 is mainly around a robust image compression algorithm. Based on Discrete wavelet transform and fixed length coding, a robust compression algorithm for acoustic image is studied. The algorithm includes 4 technical points. (1) Utilizes CDF9/7 wavelet bases to transform the images. (2) Analyses the energy distribution of subband coefficients. Suitable transformation layer number is 3. (3) Applies different quantization steps to different subbands in accordance with their energy distribution. (4) Uses fixed length coding to prevent error propagation. The results show the algorithm achieves a balance

  7. Innovative High Temperature Acoustic Liner Development and Modeling Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The massive acoustic loads produced by launch vehicles can detrimentally affect the proper functioning of vehicle components, payloads, and launch support...

  8. Acoustic biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  9. Acoustic characteristics of bubble bursting at the surface of a high-viscosity liquid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xiao-Bo; Zhang Jian-Run; Li Pu

    2012-01-01

    An acoustic pressure model of bubble bursting is proposed.An experiment studying the acoustic characteristics of the bursting bubble at the surface of a high-viscosity liquid is reported.It is found that the sudden bursting of a bubble at the high-viscosity liquid surface generates N-shape wave at first,then it transforms into a jet wave.The fundamental frequency of the acoustic signal caused by the bursting bubble decreases linearly as the bubble size increases.The results of the investigation can be used to understand the acoustic characteristics of bubble bursting.

  10. Development of acoustic devices for ultra-high energy neutrino detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Karg, T; Graf, K; Hoessl, J; Kappes, A; Katz, U; Lahmann, R; Naumann, C; Salomon, K; Schwemmer, S

    2005-01-01

    Acoustic neutrino detection is a promising approach to instrument the large detector volumes needed for the detection of the small neutrino fluxes expected at ultra-high energies (E > 1 EeV). We report on several studies investigating the feasibility of such an acoustic detector. High-precision lab measurements using laser and proton beams aiming at the verification of the thermo-acoustic model have been performed. Different types of acoustic sensors have been developed and characterized. An autonomous acoustic system, attached to the ANTARES prototype string "Line0", has been deployed and operated successfully at 2400 m depth, allowing for in-situ studies of the acoustic background in the Mediterranean Sea.

  11. Interferometric imaging of acoustical phenomena using high-speed polarization camera and 4-step parallel phase-shifting technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, K.; Yatabe, K.; Ikeda, Y.; Oikawa, Y.; Onuma, T.; Niwa, H.; Yoshii, M.

    2017-02-01

    Imaging of sound aids the understanding of the acoustical phenomena such as propagation, reflection, and diffraction, which is strongly required for various acoustical applications. The imaging of sound is commonly done by using a microphone array, whereas optical methods have recently been interested due to its contactless nature. The optical measurement of sound utilizes the phase modulation of light caused by sound. Since light propagated through a sound field changes its phase as proportional to the sound pressure, optical phase measurement technique can be used for the sound measurement. Several methods including laser Doppler vibrometry and Schlieren method have been proposed for that purpose. However, the sensitivities of the methods become lower as a frequency of sound decreases. In contrast, since the sensitivities of the phase-shifting technique do not depend on the frequencies of sounds, that technique is suitable for the imaging of sounds in the low-frequency range. The principle of imaging of sound using parallel phase-shifting interferometry was reported by the authors (K. Ishikawa et al., Optics Express, 2016). The measurement system consists of a high-speed polarization camera made by Photron Ltd., and a polarization interferometer. This paper reviews the principle briefly and demonstrates the high-speed imaging of acoustical phenomena. The results suggest that the proposed system can be applied to various industrial problems in acoustical engineering.

  12. Computational Aero-Acoustic Using High-order Finite-Difference Schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a high-order technique to accurately predict flow-generated noise is introduced. The technique consists of solving the viscous incompressible flow equations and inviscid acoustic equations using a incompressible/compressible splitting technique. The incompressible flow equations ar...... discretizations of the acoustic equations. The classical fourth-order Runge-Kutta time scheme is applied to the acoustic equations for time discretization....

  13. High accuracy acoustic relative humidity measurement in duct flow with air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schaik, Wilhelm; Grooten, Mart; Wernaart, Twan; van der Geld, Cees

    2010-01-01

    An acoustic relative humidity sensor for air-steam mixtures in duct flow is designed and tested. Theory, construction, calibration, considerations on dynamic response and results are presented. The measurement device is capable of measuring line averaged values of gas velocity, temperature and relative humidity (RH) instantaneously, by applying two ultrasonic transducers and an array of four temperature sensors. Measurement ranges are: gas velocity of 0-12 m/s with an error of ± 0.13 m/s, temperature 0-100 °C with an error of ± 0.07 °C and relative humidity 0-100% with accuracy better than 2 % RH above 50 °C. Main advantage over conventional humidity sensors is the high sensitivity at high RH at temperatures exceeding 50 °C, with accuracy increasing with increasing temperature. The sensors are non-intrusive and resist highly humid environments.

  14. Mass sensitivity of layered shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave devices for sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh; Trinchi, Adrian; Wlodarski, Wojtek; Holland, Anthony; Galatsis, Kosmas

    2001-11-01

    Layered Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices that allow the propagation of Love mode acoustic waves will be studied in this paper. In these devices, the substrate allows the propagation of Surface Skimming Bulks Waves (SSBWs). By depositing layers, that the speed of Shear Horizontal (SH) acoustic wave propagation is less than that of the substrate, the propagation mode transforms to Love mode. Love mode devices which will be studied in this paper, have SiO2 and ZnO acoustic guiding layers. As Love mode of propagation has no movement of particles component normal to the active sensor surface, they can be employed for the sensing applications in the liquid media.

  15. Formation of high-order acoustic Bessel beams by spiral diffraction gratings

    CERN Document Server

    Jiménez, Noé; Sánchez-Morcillo, Víctor; Romero-García, Vicent; García-Raffi, Lluis M; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2016-01-01

    The formation of high-order Bessel beams by a passive acoustic device consisting of an Archimedes' spiral diffraction grating is theoretically, numerically and experimentally reported in this work. These beams are propagation-invariant solutions of the Helmholtz equation and are characterized by an azimuthal variation of the phase along its annular spectrum producing an acoustic vortex in the near field. In our system, the scattering of plane acoustic waves by the spiral grating leads to the formation of the acoustic vortex with zero pressure on-axis and the angular phase dislocations characterized by the spiral geometry. The order of the generated Bessel beam and, as a consequence, the size of the generated vortex can be fixed by the number of arms in the spiral diffraction grating. The obtained results allow to obtain Bessel beams with controllable vorticity by a passive device, which has potential applications in low-cost acoustic tweezers and acoustic radiation force devices.

  16. Formation of high-order acoustic Bessel beams by spiral diffraction gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Noé; Picó, R.; Sánchez-Morcillo, V.; Romero-García, V.; García-Raffi, L. M.; Staliunas, K.

    2016-11-01

    The formation of high-order Bessel beams by a passive acoustic device consisting of an Archimedes' spiral diffraction grating is theoretically, numerically, and experimentally reported in this paper. These beams are propagation-invariant solutions of the Helmholtz equation and are characterized by an azimuthal variation of the phase along its annular spectrum producing an acoustic vortex in the near field. In our system, the scattering of plane acoustic waves by the spiral grating leads to the formation of the acoustic vortex with zero pressure on axis and the angular phase dislocations characterized by the spiral geometry. The order of the generated Bessel beam and, as a consequence, the size of the generated vortex can be fixed by the number of arms in the spiral diffraction grating. The obtained results allow for obtaining Bessel beams with controllable vorticity by a passive device, which has potential applications in low-cost acoustic tweezers and acoustic radiation force devices.

  17. Formation of high-order acoustic Bessel beams by spiral diffraction gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Noé; Picó, R; Sánchez-Morcillo, V; Romero-García, V; García-Raffi, L M; Staliunas, K

    2016-11-01

    The formation of high-order Bessel beams by a passive acoustic device consisting of an Archimedes' spiral diffraction grating is theoretically, numerically, and experimentally reported in this paper. These beams are propagation-invariant solutions of the Helmholtz equation and are characterized by an azimuthal variation of the phase along its annular spectrum producing an acoustic vortex in the near field. In our system, the scattering of plane acoustic waves by the spiral grating leads to the formation of the acoustic vortex with zero pressure on axis and the angular phase dislocations characterized by the spiral geometry. The order of the generated Bessel beam and, as a consequence, the size of the generated vortex can be fixed by the number of arms in the spiral diffraction grating. The obtained results allow for obtaining Bessel beams with controllable vorticity by a passive device, which has potential applications in low-cost acoustic tweezers and acoustic radiation force devices.

  18. Cryogenic Impinging Jets Subjected to High Frequency Transverse Acoustic Forcing in a High Pressure Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-27

    Forcing in a High Pressure Environment 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Mario Roa, S. Alex Schumaker...disclose the work. PA Clearance Number: 16308 Clearance Date: 6/17/2016 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES For presentation at AIAA Propulsion and Energy; Salt...the coupling between the impact waves created by impinging jets and high frequency acoustic pressure perturbations. High speed, backlit imaging was

  19. High sensitivity knitted fabric strain sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Juan; Long, Hairu; Miao, Menghe

    2016-10-01

    Wearable sensors are increasingly used in smart garments for detecting and transferring vital signals and body posture, movement and respiration. Existing fabric strain sensors made from metallized yarns have low sensitivity, poor comfort and low durability to washing. Here we report a knitted fabric strain sensor made from a cotton/stainless steel (SS) fibre blended yarn which shows much higher sensitivity than sensors knitted from metallized yarns. The fabric feels softer than pure cotton textiles owing to the ultrafine stainless steel fibres and does not lose its electrical property after washing. The reason for the high sensitivity of the cotton/SS knitted fabric sensor was explored by comparing its sensing mechanism with the knitted fabric sensor made from metallized yarns. The results show that the cotton/SS yarn-to-yarn contact resistance is highly sensitive to strain applied to hooked yarn loops.

  20. Determination of the sensitivity behavior of an acoustic thermal flow sensor by electronic characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honschoten, van J.W.; Svetovoy, V.B.; Lammerink, T.S.J.; Krijnen, G.J.M.; Elwenspoek, M.C.

    2004-01-01

    The microflown is an acoustic, thermal flow sensor that measures sound particle velocity instead of sound pressure. It is a specific example of a wide range of two- and three-wire thermal flow sensors. For most applications the microflown should be calibrated, which is usually performed acoustically

  1. High Sensitivity deflection detection of nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanii, Babak; Ashby, Paul

    2009-10-28

    A critical limitation of nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) is the lack of a high-sensitivity position detection mechanism. We introduce a noninterferometric optical approach to determine the position of nanowires with a high sensitivity and bandwidth. Its physical origins and limitations are determined by Mie scattering analysis. This enables a dramatic miniaturization of detectable cantilevers, with attendant reductions to the fundamental minimum force noise in highly damping environments. We measure the force noise of an 81{+-}9??nm radius Ag{sub 2}Ga nanowire cantilever in water at 6{+-}3??fN/{radical}Hz.

  2. Characterizing riverbed sediment using high-frequency acoustics: 1. Spectral properties of scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscombe, D.; Grams, P. E.; Kaplinski, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Bed sediment classification using high-frequency hydroacoustic instruments is challenging when sediments are spatially heterogeneous, which is often the case in rivers. The use of acoustic backscatter to classify sediments is an attractive alternative to analysis of topography because it is potentially sensitive to grain scale roughness. Here a new method is presented which uses high-frequency acoustic backscatter from multibeam sonar to classify heterogeneous riverbed sediments by type (sand, gravel, and rock) continuously in space and at small spatial resolution. In this, the first of a pair of papers that examine the scattering signatures from a heterogeneous riverbed, methods are presented to construct spatially explicit maps of spectral properties from georeferenced point clouds of geometrically and radiometrically corrected echoes. Backscatter power spectra are computed to produce scale and amplitude metrics that collectively characterize the length scales of stochastic measures of riverbed scattering, termed "stochastic geometries." Backscatter aggregated over small spatial scales have spectra that obey a power law. This apparently self-affine behavior could instead arise from morphological scale and grain scale roughnesses over multiple overlapping scales or riverbed scattering being transitional between Rayleigh and geometric regimes. Relationships exist between stochastic geometries of backscatter and areas of rough and smooth sediments. However, no one parameter can uniquely characterize a particular substrate nor definitively separate the relative contributions of roughness and acoustic impedance (hardness). Combinations of spectral quantities do, however, have the potential to delineate riverbed sediment patchiness, in a data-driven approach comparing backscatter with bed sediment observations (which is the subject of part two of this manuscript).

  3. Acoustic Search for High Energy Neutrinos in Lake Baikal: Status and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budnev N.M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The status and perspectives of the feasibility study to detect high energy cosmic neutrinos acoustically in Lake Baikal is presented. The concept of on acoustic array as a part of the Baikal Gigaton Volume Neutrino Telescope GVD based on results of simulation and background measurements is described.

  4. High-frequency acoustic charge transport in GaAs nanowires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Büyükköse, S.; Hernandez-Minguez, A.; Vratzov, B.; Somaschini, C.; Geelhaar, L.; Riechert, H.; van der Wiel, Wilfred Gerard; Santos, P.V.

    2014-01-01

    The oscillating piezoelectric fields accompanying surface acoustic waves are able to transport charge carriers in semiconductor heterostructures. Here, we demonstrate high-frequency (above 1 GHz) acoustic charge transport in GaAs-based nanowires deposited on a piezoelectric substrate. The short

  5. High sensitivity optically pumped quantum magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiporlini, Valentina; Alameh, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    Quantum magnetometers based on optical pumping can achieve sensitivity as high as what SQUID-based devices can attain. In this paper, we discuss the principle of operation and the optimal design of an optically pumped quantum magnetometer. The ultimate intrinsic sensitivity is calculated showing that optimal performance of the magnetometer is attained with an optical pump power of 20 μW and an operation temperature of 48°C. Results show that the ultimate intrinsic sensitivity of the quantum magnetometer that can be achieved is 327 fT/Hz(½) over a bandwidth of 26 Hz and that this sensitivity drops to 130 pT/Hz(½) in the presence of environmental noise. The quantum magnetometer is shown to be capable of detecting a sinusoidal magnetic field of amplitude as low as 15 pT oscillating at 25 Hz.

  6. A compact acoustic calibrator for ultra-high energy neutrino detection

    CERN Document Server

    Adrián-Martínez, S; Bou-Cabo, M; Larosa, G; Llorens, C D; Martínez-Mora, J A

    2012-01-01

    With the aim to optimize and test the method of acoustic detection of ultra-high energy neutrinos in underwater telescopes a compact acoustic transmitter array has been developed. The acoustic parametric effect is used to reproduce the acoustic signature of an ultra-high-energy neutrino interaction. Different reseach and development studies are presented in order to show the viability of the parametric sources technique to deal with the difficulties of the acoustic signal generation: a very directive transient bipolar signal with pancake directivity. The design, construction and characterization of the prototype are described, including simulation of the propagation of an experimental signal, measured in a pool, over a distance of 1 km. Following these studies, next steps will be testing the device in situ, in underwater neutrino telescope, or from a vessel in a sea campaign.

  7. Backcoupling of acoustic streaming on the temperature field inside high-intensity discharge lamps

    CERN Document Server

    Schwieger, Joerg; Wolff, Marcus; Manders, Freddy; Suijker, Jos

    2015-01-01

    Operating high-intensity discharge lamps in the high frequency range (20-300 kHz) provides energy-saving and cost reduction potentials. However, commercially available lamp drivers do not make use of this operating strategy because light intensity fluctuations and even lamp destruction are possible. The reason for the fluctuating discharge arc are acoustic resonances in this frequency range that are excited in the arc tube. The acoustic resonances in turn generate a fluid flow that is caused by the acoustic streaming effect. Here, we present a 3D multiphysics model to determine the influence of acoustic streaming on the temperature field in the vicinity of an acoustic eigenfrequency. In that case a transition from stable to instable behavior occurs. The model is able to predict when light flicker can be expected. The results are in very good accordance with accompanying experiments.

  8. Structural-acoustic coupling characteristics of honeycomb sandwich plate based on parameter sensitivity analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王盛春; 沈卫东; 徐嘉锋; 李赟

    2014-01-01

    The structural-acoustic coupling model for isotropic thin elastic plate was extended to honeycomb sandwich plate (HSP) by applying Green function method. Then an equivalent circuit model of the weakly-strongly coupled system was proposed. Based on that, the estimation formulae of the coupled eigenfrequency were derived. The accuracy of the theoretical predictions was checked against experimental data, with good agreement achieved. Finally, the effects of HSP design parameters on the system coupling degree, the acoustic cavity eigenfrequency, and sound pressure response were analyzed. The results show that mechanical and acoustical characteristics of HSP can be improved by increasing the thickness of face sheet and reducing the mass density of material.

  9. Transparent ZnO/glass surface acoustic wave based high performance ultraviolet light sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Bo; Gu, Hang; He, Xing-Li; Xuan, Wei-Peng; Chen, Jin-Kai; Wang, Xiao-Zhi; Luo, Ji-Kui

    2015-05-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators are a type of ultraviolet (UV) light sensors with high sensitivity, and they have been extensively studied. Transparent SAW devices are very useful and can be developed into various sensors and microfluidics for sensing/monitoring and lab-on-chip applications. We report the fabrication of high sensitivity SAW UV sensors based on piezoelectric (PE) ZnO thin films deposited on glass substrates. The sensors were fabricated and their performances against the post-deposition annealing condition were investigated. It was found that the UV-light sensitivity is improved by more than one order of magnitude after annealing. The frequency response increases significantly and the response becomes much faster. The optimized devices also show a small temperature coefficient of frequency and excellent repeatability and stability, demonstrating its potential for UV-light sensing application. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61274037 and 61301046) and the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant Nos. 20120101110031 and 20120101110054).

  10. Enhancing the sensitivity of three-axis detectable surface acoustic wave gyroscope by using a floating thin piezoelectric membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Munhwan; Lee, Keekeun

    2017-06-01

    A new type of surface acoustic wave (SAW) gyroscope was developed on a floating thin piezoelectric membrane to enhance sensitivity and reliability by removing a bulk noise effect and by importing a higher amplitude of SAW. The developed device constitutes a two-port SAW resonator with a metallic dot array between two interdigital transducers (IDTs), and a one-port SAW delay line. The bulk silicon was completely etched away, leaving only a thin piezoelectric membrane with a thickness of one wavelength. A voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) was connected to a SAW resonator to activate the SAW resonator, while the SAW delay line was connected to the oscilloscope to monitor any variations caused by the Coriolis force. When the device was rotated, a secondary wave was generated, changing the amplitude of the SAW delay line. The highest sensitivity was observed in a device with a full acoustic wavelength thickness of the membrane because most of the acoustic field is confined within an acoustic wavelength thickness from the top surface; moreover, the thin-membrane-based gyroscope eliminates the bulk noise effect flowing along the bulk substrate. The obtained sensitivity and linearity of the SAW gyroscope were ˜27.5 µV deg-1 s-1 and ˜4.3%, respectively. Superior directivity was observed. The device surface was vacuum-sealed using poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) bonding to eliminate environmental interference. A three-axis detectable gyroscope was also implemented by placing three gyrosensors with the same configuration at right angles to each other on a printed circuit board.

  11. Aluminum nanocantilevers for high sensitivity mass sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Zachary James; Boisen, Anja

    2005-01-01

    We have fabricated Al nanocantilevers using a simple, one mask contact UV lithography technique with lateral and vertical dimensions under 500 and 100 nm, respectively. These devices are demonstrated as highly sensitive mass sensors by measuring their dynamic properties. Furthermore, it is shown ...

  12. Nonclassical characteristic functions for highly sensitive measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Richter, T; Richter, Th.

    2007-01-01

    Characteristic functions are shown to be useful for highly sensitive measurements. Redistributions of motional Fock states of a trapped atom can be directly monitored via the most fragile nonclassical part of the characteristic function. The method can also be used for decoherence measurements in optical quantum-information systems.

  13. Sensitivity analysis of a time-delayed thermo-acoustic system via an adjoint-based approach

    CERN Document Server

    Magri, Luca

    2013-01-01

    We apply adjoint-based sensitivity analysis to a time-delayed thermo-acoustic system: a Rijke tube containing a hot wire. We calculate how the growth rate and frequency of small oscillations about a base state are affected either by a generic passive control element in the system (the structural sensitivity analysis) or by a generic change to its base state (the base-state sensitivity analysis). We illustrate the structural sensitivity by calculating the effect of a second hot wire with a small heat release parameter. In a single calculation, this shows how the second hot wire changes the growth rate and frequency of the small oscillations, as a function of its position in the tube. We then examine the components of the structural sensitivity in order to determine the passive control mechanism that has the strongest influence on the growth rate. We find that a force applied to the acoustic momentum equation in the opposite direction to the instantaneous velocity is the most stabilizing feedback mechanism. We ...

  14. Cryogenic Impinging Jets Subjected to High Frequency Transverse Acoustic Forcing in a High Pressure Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-27

    other provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a ...Transverse Acoustic Forcing in a High Pressure Environment 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Mario...Briefing Charts 15. SUBJECT TERMS N/ A 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE

  15. High blood pressure and visual sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisner, Alvin; Samples, John R.

    2003-09-01

    The study had two main purposes: (1) to determine whether the foveal visual sensitivities of people treated for high blood pressure (vascular hypertension) differ from the sensitivities of people who have not been diagnosed with high blood pressure and (2) to understand how visual adaptation is related to standard measures of systemic cardiovascular function. Two groups of middle-aged subjects-hypertensive and normotensive-were examined with a series of test/background stimulus combinations. All subjects met rigorous inclusion criteria for excellent ocular health. Although the visual sensitivities of the two subject groups overlapped extensively, the age-related rate of sensitivity loss was, for some measures, greater for the hypertensive subjects, possibly because of adaptation differences between the two groups. Overall, the degree of steady-state sensitivity loss resulting from an increase of background illuminance (for 580-nm backgrounds) was slightly less for the hypertensive subjects. Among normotensive subjects, the ability of a bright (3.8-log-td), long-wavelength (640-nm) adapting background to selectively suppress the flicker response of long-wavelength-sensitive (LWS) cones was related inversely to the ratio of mean arterial blood pressure to heart rate. The degree of selective suppression was also related to heart rate alone, and there was evidence that short-term changes of cardiovascular response were important. The results suggest that (1) vascular hypertension, or possibly its treatment, subtly affects visual function even in the absence of eye disease and (2) changes in blood flow affect retinal light-adaptation processes involved in the selective suppression of the flicker response from LWS cones caused by bright, long-wavelength backgrounds.

  16. Highly Energetic, Low Sensitivity Aromatic Peroxy Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamage, Nipuni-Dhanesha H; Stiasny, Benedikt; Stierstorfer, Jörg; Martin, Philip D; Klapötke, Thomas M; Winter, Charles H

    2016-02-18

    The synthesis, structure, and energetic materials properties of a series of aromatic peroxy acid compounds are described. Benzene-1,3,5-tris(carboperoxoic) acid is a highly sensitive primary energetic material, with impact and friction sensitivities similar to those of triacetone triperoxide. By contrast, benzene-1,4-bis(carboperoxoic) acid, 4-nitrobenzoperoxoic acid, and 3,5-dinitrobenzoperoxoic acid are much less sensitive, with impact and friction sensitivities close to those of the secondary energetic material 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene. Additionally, the calculated detonation velocities of 3,5-dinitrobenzoperoxoic acid and 2,4,6-trinitrobenzoperoxoic acid exceed that of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene. The solid-state structure of 3,5-dinitrobenzoperoxoic acid contains intermolecular O-H⋅⋅⋅O hydrogen bonds and numerous N⋅⋅⋅O, C⋅⋅⋅O, and O⋅⋅⋅O close contacts. These attractive lattice interactions may account for the less sensitive nature of 3,5-dinitrobenzoperoxoic acid.

  17. High-Fidelity Prediction of Launch Vehicle Liftoff Acoustic Fields Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The high-intensity level acoustic load generated by large launch vehicle lift-off propulsion is of major concern for the integrity of the launch complex and the...

  18. The Impact of Very High Frequency Surface Reverberation on Coherent Acoustic Propagation and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    is to measure and model very high frequency underwater sound generated by processes at the sea surface, relevant to the high-frequency underwater...realizations generated from wave gauge data synchronized with the acoustic measurements. The curves are not generally smooth because of the limited...on Coherent Acoustic Propagation and Modeling Grant B. Deane Marine Physical Laboratory, Scripps Institution of Oceanography UCSD La Jolla, CA

  19. Differences in acoustic and perceptual parameters of the voice between elderly and young women at habitual and high intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzetto de Menezes, Keyla S; Master, Suely; Guzman, Marco; Bortnem, Cori; Ramos, Luiz Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to compare elderly and young female voices in habitual and high intensity. The effect of increased intensity on the acoustic and perceptual parameters was assessed. Sound pressure level, fundamental frequency, jitter, shimmer, and harmonic to noise ratio were obtained at habitual and high intensity voice in a group of 30 elderly women and 30 young women. Perceptual assessment was also performed. Both groups demonstrated an increase in sound pressure level and fundamental frequency from habitual voice to high intensity voice. No differences were found between groups in any acoustic variables on samples recorded with habitual intensity level. No significant differences between groups were found in habitual intensity level for pitch, hoarseness, roughness, and breathiness. Asthenia and instability obtained significant higher values in elderly than young participants, whereas, the elderly demonstrated lower values for perceived tension and loudness than young subjects. Acoustic and perceptual measures do not demonstrate evident differences between elderly and young speakers in habitual intensity level. The parameters analyzed may lack the sensitivity necessary to detect differences in subjects with normal voices. Phonation with high intensity highlights differences between groups, especially in perceptual parameters. Therefore, high intensity should be included to compare elderly and young voice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. The sensitivity of acoustic cough recording relative to intraesophageal pressure recording and patient report during reflux testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, R; Amirault, J; Heinz, N; Litman, H; Khatwa, U

    2014-11-01

    One of the primary indications for reflux testing with multichannel intraluminal impedance with pH (pH-MII) is to correlate reflux events with symptoms such as cough. Adult and pediatric studies have shown, using cough as a model, that patient report of symptoms is inaccurate. Unfortunately, intraesophageal pressure recording (IEPR) to record coughs is more invasive which limits its utility in children. The primary aim of this study was to validate the use of acoustic cough recording (ACR) during pH-MII testing. We recruited children undergoing pH-MII testing for the evaluation of cough. We simultaneously placed IEPR and pH-MII catheters and an ACR device in each patient. Each 24 h ACR, pH-MII, and IEPR tracing was scored by blinded investigators. Sensitivities for each method of symptom recording were calculated. A total of 2698 coughs were detected; 1140 were patient reported PR, 2425 were IEPR detected, and 2400 were ACR detected. The sensitivity of PR relative to ACR was 45.9% and the sensitivity of IEPR relative to ACR was 93.6%. There was strong inter-rater reliability (κ = 0.78) for the identification of cough by ACR. Acoustic recording is a non-invasive, sensitive method of recording cough during pH-MII testing that is well suited for the pediatric population. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. An Acoustic Charge Transport Imager for High Definition Television

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, William D.; Brennan, Kevin; May, Gary; Glenn, William E.; Richardson, Mike; Solomon, Richard

    1999-01-01

    This project, over its term, included funding to a variety of companies and organizations. In addition to Georgia Tech these included Florida Atlantic University with Dr. William E. Glenn as the P.I., Kodak with Mr. Mike Richardson as the P.I. and M.I.T./Polaroid with Dr. Richard Solomon as the P.I. The focus of the work conducted by these organizations was the development of camera hardware for High Definition Television (HDTV). The focus of the research at Georgia Tech was the development of new semiconductor technology to achieve a next generation solid state imager chip that would operate at a high frame rate (I 70 frames per second), operate at low light levels (via the use of avalanche photodiodes as the detector element) and contain 2 million pixels. The actual cost required to create this new semiconductor technology was probably at least 5 or 6 times the investment made under this program and hence we fell short of achieving this rather grand goal. We did, however, produce a number of spin-off technologies as a result of our efforts. These include, among others, improved avalanche photodiode structures, significant advancement of the state of understanding of ZnO/GaAs structures and significant contributions to the analysis of general GaAs semiconductor devices and the design of Surface Acoustic Wave resonator filters for wireless communication. More of these will be described in the report. The work conducted at the partner sites resulted in the development of 4 prototype HDTV cameras. The HDTV camera developed by Kodak uses the Kodak KAI-2091M high- definition monochrome image sensor. This progressively-scanned charge-coupled device (CCD) can operate at video frame rates and has 9 gm square pixels. The photosensitive area has a 16:9 aspect ratio and is consistent with the "Common Image Format" (CIF). It features an active image area of 1928 horizontal by 1084 vertical pixels and has a 55% fill factor. The camera is designed to operate in continuous mode

  2. Investigation of air-assisted sprays submitted to high frequency transverse acoustic fields: Droplet clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficuciello, A.; Blaisot, J. B.; Richard, C.; Baillot, F.

    2017-06-01

    An experimental investigation of the effects of a high amplitude transverse acoustic field on coaxial jets is presented in this paper. Water and air are used as working fluids at ambient pressure. The coaxial injectors are placed on the top of a semi-open resonant cavity where the acoustic pressure fluctuations of the standing wave can reach a maximum peak-to-peak amplitude of 12 kPa at the forcing frequency of 1 kHz. Several test conditions are considered in order to quantify the influence of injection conditions, acoustic field amplitude, and injector position with respect to the standing wave acoustic field. A high speed back-light visualization technique is used to characterize the jet response. Image processing is used to obtain valuable information about the jet behavior. It is shown that the acoustic field drastically affects the atomization process for all atomization regimes. The position of the injector in the acoustic field determines the jet response, and a droplet-clustering phenomenon is highlighted in multi-point injection conditions and quantified by determining discrete droplet location distributions. A theoretical model based on nonlinear acoustics related to the spatial distribution of the radiation pressure exerted on an object explains the behavior observed.

  3. Envelope enhancement increases cortical sensitivity to interaural envelope delays with acoustic and electric hearing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas E H Hartley

    Full Text Available Evidence from human psychophysical and animal electrophysiological studies suggests that sensitivity to interaural time delay (ITD in the modulating envelope of a high-frequency carrier can be enhanced using half-wave rectified stimuli. Recent evidence has shown potential benefits of equivalent electrical stimuli to deaf individuals with bilateral cochlear implants (CIs. In the current study we assessed the effects of envelope shape on ITD sensitivity in the primary auditory cortex of normal-hearing ferrets, and profoundly-deaf animals with bilateral CIs. In normal-hearing animals, cortical sensitivity to ITDs (±1 ms in 0.1-ms steps was assessed in response to dichotically-presented i sinusoidal amplitude-modulated (SAM and ii half-wave rectified (HWR tones (100-ms duration; 70 dB SPL presented at the best-frequency of the unit over a range of modulation frequencies. In separate experiments, adult ferrets were deafened with neomycin administration and bilaterally-implanted with intra-cochlear electrode arrays. Electrically-evoked auditory brainstem responses (EABRs were recorded in response to bipolar electrical stimulation of the apical pair of electrodes with singe biphasic current pulses (40 µs per phase over a range of current levels to measure hearing thresholds. Subsequently, we recorded cortical sensitivity to ITDs (±800 µs in 80-µs steps within the envelope of SAM and HWR biphasic-pulse trains (40 µs per phase; 6000 pulses per second, 100-ms duration over a range of modulation frequencies. In normal-hearing animals, nearly a third of cortical neurons were sensitive to envelope-ITDs in response to SAM tones. In deaf animals with bilateral CI, the proportion of ITD-sensitive cortical neurons was approximately a fifth in response to SAM pulse trains. In normal-hearing and deaf animals with bilateral CI the proportion of ITD sensitive units and neural sensitivity to ITDs increased in response to HWR, compared with SAM stimuli

  4. Highly sensitive catalytic spectrophotometric determination of ruthenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Radhey M.; Srivastava, Abhishek; Prasad, Surendra

    2008-01-01

    A new and highly sensitive catalytic kinetic method (CKM) for the determination of ruthenium(III) has been established based on its catalytic effect on the oxidation of L-phenylalanine ( L-Pheala) by KMnO 4 in highly alkaline medium. The reaction has been followed spectrophotometrically by measuring the decrease in the absorbance at 526 nm. The proposed CKM is based on the fixed time procedure under optimum reaction conditions. It relies on the linear relationship where the change in the absorbance (Δ At) versus added Ru(III) amounts in the range of 0.101-2.526 ng ml -1 is plotted. Under the optimum conditions, the sensitivity of the proposed method, i.e. the limit of detection corresponding to 5 min is 0.08 ng ml -1, and decreases with increased time of analysis. The method is featured with good accuracy and reproducibility for ruthenium(III) determination. The ruthenium(III) has also been determined in presence of several interfering and non-interfering cations, anions and polyaminocarboxylates. No foreign ions interfered in the determination ruthenium(III) up to 20-fold higher concentration of foreign ions. In addition to standard solutions analysis, this method was successfully applied for the quantitative determination of ruthenium(III) in drinking water samples. The method is highly sensitive, selective and very stable. A review of recently published catalytic spectrophotometric methods for the determination of ruthenium(III) has also been presented for comparison.

  5. Inlet Acoustic Data from a High Bypass Ratio Turbofan Rotor in an Internal Flow Component Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozak, Richard F.

    2017-01-01

    In February 2017, aerodynamic and acoustic testing was completed on a scale-model high bypass ratio turbofan rotor, R4, in an internal flow component test facility. The objective of testing was to determine the aerodynamic and acoustic impact of fan casing treatments designed to reduce noise. The baseline configuration consisted of the R4 rotor with a hardwall fan case. Data are presented for a baseline acoustic run with fan exit instrumentation removed to give a clean acoustic configuration.

  6. Acoustic model of micro-pressure wave emission from a high-speed train tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyachi, T.

    2017-03-01

    The micro-pressure wave (MPW) radiated from a tunnel portal can, if audible, cause serious problems around tunnel portals in high-speed railways. This has created a need to develop an acoustic model that considers the topography around a radiation portal in order to predict MPWs more accurately and allow for higher speed railways in the future. An acoustic model of MPWs based on linear acoustic theory is developed in this study. First, the directivity of sound sources and the acoustical effect of topography are investigated using a train launcher facility around a portal on infinitely flat ground and with an infinite vertical baffle plate. The validity of linear acoustic theory is then discussed through a comparison of numerical results obtained using the finite difference method (FDM) and experimental results. Finally, an acoustic model is derived that considers sound sources up to the second order and Green's function to represent the directivity and effect of topography, respectively. The results predicted by this acoustic model are shown to be in good agreement with both numerical and experimental results.

  7. Development of sensors for the acoustic detection of ultra high energy neutrinos in the deep sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumann, C.L.

    2007-09-17

    In addition to the optical detection system used by the ANTARES detector, a proposal was made to include an acoustic system consisting of several modified ANTARES storeys to investigate the feasibility of building and operating an acoustic particle detection system in the deep sea and at the same time perform an extensive study of the acoustic properties of the deep sea environment. The directional characteristics of the sensors and their placement within the ANTARES detector had to be optimised for the study of the correlation properties of the acoustic noise at different length scales - from below a metre to above 100 metres. The so-called 'equivalent circuit diagram (=ECD) model' - was applied to predict the acoustic properties of piezo elements, such as sensitivity and intrinsic noise, and was extended by including effects resulting from the geometrical shape of the sensors. A procedure was devised to gain the relevant ECD parameters from electrical impedance measurements of the piezo elements, both free and coupled to a surrounding medium. Based on the findings of this ECD model, intensive design studies were performed with prototype hydrophones using piezo elements as active sensors. The design best suited for the construction of acoustic sensors for ANTARES was determined, and a total of twelve hydrophones were built with a sensitivity of -145 to -140 dB re 1V/{mu}Pa between 5 and 50 kHz and an intrinsic noise power density around -90 dB re 1 V/{radical}(Hz), giving a total noise rms of 7 mV in this frequency range. The hydrophones were pressure tested and calibrated for integration into the ANTARES acoustic system. In addition, three so-called Acoustic Modules, sensors in pressure resistant glass spheres with a sensitive bandwidth of about 80 kHz, were developed and built. The calibration procedure employed during the sensor design studies as well as for the final sensors to be installed in the ANTARES framework is presented, together with

  8. Acoustic imaging and mirage effects with high transmittance in a periodically perforated metal slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Sheng-Dong; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we present a high-quality superlens to focus acoustic waves using a periodically perforated metallic structure which is made of zinc and immersed in water. By changing a geometrical parameter gradually, a kind of gradient-index phononic crystal lens is designed to attain the mirage effects. The acoustic waves can propagate along an arc-shaped trajectory which is precisely controlled by the angle and frequency of the incident waves. The negative refraction imaging effect depends delicately on the transmittance of the solid structure. The acoustic impedance matching between the solid and the liquid proposed in this article, which is determined by the effective density and group velocity of the unit-cell, is significant for overcoming the inefficiency problem of acoustic devices. This study focuses on how to obtain the high transmittance imaging and mirage effects based on the adequate material selection and geometrical design.

  9. High amplitude nonlinear acoustic wave driven flow fields in cylindrical and conical resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antao, Dion Savio; Farouk, Bakhtier

    2013-08-01

    A high fidelity computational fluid dynamic model is used to simulate the flow, pressure, and density fields generated in a cylindrical and a conical resonator by a vibrating end wall/piston producing high-amplitude standing waves. The waves in the conical resonator are found to be shock-less and can generate peak acoustic overpressures that exceed the initial undisturbed pressure by two to three times. A cylindrical (consonant) acoustic resonator has limitations to the output response observed at one end when the opposite end is acoustically excited. In the conical geometry (dissonant acoustic resonator) the linear acoustic input is converted to high energy un-shocked nonlinear acoustic output. The model is validated using past numerical results of standing waves in cylindrical resonators. The nonlinear nature of the harmonic response in the conical resonator system is further investigated for two different working fluids (carbon dioxide and argon) operating at various values of piston amplitude. The high amplitude nonlinear oscillations observed in the conical resonator can potentially enhance the performance of pulse tube thermoacoustic refrigerators and these conical resonators can be used as efficient mixers.

  10. High-sensitive cardiac troponin T

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ru-Yi Xu; Xiao-Fa Zhu; Ye Yang; Ping Ye

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac troponin is the preferred biomarker for the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The recent development of a high-sensitive cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) assay permits detection of very low levels of cTnT. Using the hs-cTnT assay improves the overall diagnostic accuracy in patients with suspected AMI, while a negative result also has a high negative predictive value. The gain in sensitivity may be particularly important in patients with a short duration from symptom onset to admission. Measurement of cardiac troponin T with the hs-cTnT assay may provide strong prognostic information in patients with acute coronary syndromes, stable coronary artery disease, heart failure and even in the general population; however, increased sensitivity comes at a cost of decreased specificity. Serial testing, as well as clinical context and co-existing diseases, are likely to become increasingly important for the interpretation of hs-cTnT assay results.

  11. High resolution hybrid optical and acoustic sea floor maps (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, C.; Inglis, G.

    2013-12-01

    This abstract presents a method for creating hybrid optical and acoustic sea floor reconstructions at centimeter scale grid resolutions with robotic vehicles. Multibeam sonar and stereo vision are two common sensing modalities with complementary strengths that are well suited for data fusion. We have recently developed an automated two stage pipeline to create such maps. The steps can be broken down as navigation refinement and map construction. During navigation refinement a graph-based optimization algorithm is used to align 3D point clouds created with both the multibeam sonar and stereo cameras. The process combats the typical growth in navigation error that has a detrimental affect on map fidelity and typically introduces artifacts at small grid sizes. During this process we are able to automatically register local point clouds created by each sensor to themselves and to each other where they overlap in a survey pattern. The process also estimates the sensor offsets, such as heading, pitch and roll, that describe how each sensor is mounted to the vehicle. The end results of the navigation step is a refined vehicle trajectory that ensures the points clouds from each sensor are consistently aligned, and the individual sensor offsets. In the mapping step, grid cells in the map are selectively populated by choosing data points from each sensor in an automated manner. The selection process is designed to pick points that preserve the best characteristics of each sensor and honor some specific map quality criteria to reduce outliers and ghosting. In general, the algorithm selects dense 3D stereo points in areas of high texture and point density. In areas where the stereo vision is poor, such as in a scene with low contrast or texture, multibeam sonar points are inserted in the map. This process is automated and results in a hybrid map populated with data from both sensors. Additional cross modality checks are made to reject outliers in a robust manner. The final

  12. Acoustic Methods for Evaluation of High Energy Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Lobanovsky, Yury I

    2013-01-01

    Two independent acoustic methods were used to verify the results of earlier explosion energy calculations of Chelyabinsk meteoroid. They are: estimations through a path length of infrasound wave and through maximum concentration of the wave energy. The energy of this explosion turned out the same as in earlier calculations, and it is close to 58 Mt of TNT. The first method, as well as evaluations through seismic signals and barograms, have confirmed the energy of Tunguska meteoroid explosion at 14.0 - 14.5 Mt level. Moreover, there is a good agreement between acoustic estimations and other data for the explosion energy of another meteoroid that was ended its flight over the southern part of Indian Ocean, and for two catastrophic volcanoes explosions - Bezymyanny and Krakatoa.

  13. Thermo-acoustic instabilities of high-frequency combustion in rocket engines; Instabilites thermo-acoustiques de combustion haute-frequence dans les moteurs fusees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheuret, F.

    2005-10-15

    Rocket motors are confined environments where combustion occurs in extreme conditions. Combustion instabilities can occur at high frequencies; they are tied to the acoustic modes of the combustion chamber. A common research chamber, CRC, allows us to study the response of a turbulent two-phase flame to acoustic oscillations of low or high amplitudes. The chamber is characterised under cold conditions to obtain, in particular, the relative damping coefficient of acoustic oscillations. The structure and frequency of the modes are determined in the case where the chamber is coupled to a lateral cavity. We have used a powder gun to study the response to a forced acoustic excitation at high amplitude. The results guide us towards shorter flames. The injectors were then modified to study the combustion noise level as a function of injection conditions. The speed of the gas determines whether the flames are attached or lifted. The noise level of lifted flames is higher. That of attached flames is proportional to the Weber number. The shorter flames whose length is less than the radius of the CRC, necessary condition to obtain an effective coupling, are the most sensitive to acoustic perturbations. The use of a toothed wheel at different positions in the chamber allowed us to obtain informations on the origin of the thermo-acoustic coupling, main objective of this thesis. The flame is sensitive to pressure acoustic oscillations, with a quasi-zero response time. These observations suggest that under the conditions of the CRC, we observe essentially the response of chemical kinetics to pressure oscillations. (author)

  14. A closed-loop automatic control system for high-intensity acoustic test systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slusser, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Sound at sound pressure levels in the range from 130 to 160 dB is used in the investigation. Random noise is passed through a series of parallel filters, generally 1/3-octave wide. A basic automatic system is investigated because of preadjustment inaccuracies and high costs found in a study of a typical manually controlled acoustic testing system. The unit described has been successfully used in automatic acoustic tests in connection with the spacecraft tests for the Mariner 1971 program.

  15. Coherent Path Beamformer Front End for High Performance Acoustic Modems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-30

    data were transmitted using a standard AUV modem towed by a boat moving in a zig - zag pattern within a 120 degrees cone, at distances from 1km to 1.5...16kHz to 32kHz, using a 32 by 32 Mills -Cross array and a single-channel acoustic modem. The intents are to measure and characterize the underwater

  16. High sensitive mesoporous TiO2-coated love wave device for heavy metal detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammoudi, I; Blanc, L; Moroté, F; Grauby-Heywang, C; Boissière, C; Kalfat, R; Rebière, D; Cohen-Bouhacina, T; Dejous, C

    2014-07-15

    This work deals with the design of a highly sensitive whole cell-based biosensor for heavy metal detection in liquid medium. The biosensor is constituted of a Love wave sensor coated with a polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM). Escherichia coli bacteria are used as bioreceptors as their viscoelastic properties are influenced by toxic heavy metals. The acoustic sensor is constituted of a quartz substrate with interdigitated transducers and a SiO2 guiding layer. However, SiO2 shows some degradation when used in a saline medium. Mesoporous TiO2 presents good mechanical and chemical stability and offers a high active surface area. Then, the addition of a thin titania layer dip-coated onto the acoustic path of the sensor is proposed to overcome the silica degradation and to improve the mass effect sensitivity of the acoustic device. PEM and bacteria deposition, and heavy metal influence, are real time monitored through the resonance frequency variations of the acoustic device. The first polyelectrolyte layer is inserted through the titania mesoporosity, favouring rigid link of the PEM on the sensor and improving the device sensitivity. Also, the mesoporosity of surface increases the specific surface area which can be occupied and favors the formation of homogeneous PEM. It was found a frequency shift near -20±1 kHz for bacteria immobilization with titania film instead of -7±3 kHz with bare silica surface. The sensitivity is highlighted towards cadmium detection. Moreover, in this paper, particular attention is given to the immobilization of bacteria and to biosensor lifetime. Atomic Force Microscopy characterizations of the biosurface have been done for several weeks. They showed significant morphological differences depending on the bacterial life time. We noticed that the lifetime of the biosensor is longer in the case of using a mesoporous TiO2 layer.

  17. Effect of acoustic streaming on tissue heating due to high-intensity focused ultrasound

    CERN Document Server

    Solovchuk, Maxim A; Thiriet, Marc; Lin, Win-Li

    2011-01-01

    The influences of blood vessels and focused location on temperature distribution during high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation of liver tumors is studied. A three-dimensional acoustics-thermal-fluid coupling model is employed to compute the temperature field in the hepatic cancerous region. The model is based on the linear Westervelt and bioheat equations as well as the nonlinear Navier-Stokes equations for the liver parenchyma and blood vessels. The effect of acoustic streaming is also taken into account in the present HIFU simulation study. Different blood vessel diameters and focal point locations were investigated. We found from this three-dimensional numerical study that in large blood vessels both the convective cooling and acoustic streaming can change considerably the temperature field and the thermal lesion near blood vessels. If the blood vessel is located within the beam width, both acoustic streaming and blood flow cooling effects should be taken into account. The predicted temperature ...

  18. In situ high temperature oxidation analysis of Zircaloy-4 using acoustic emission coupled with thermogravimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Al Haj; Véronique, Peres; Eric, Serris; François, Grosjean; Jean, Kittel; François, Ropital; Michel, Cournil

    2015-06-01

    Zircaloy-4 oxidation behavior at high temperature (900 °C), which can be reached in case of severe accidental situations in nuclear pressurised water reactor, was studied using acoustic emission analysis coupled with thermogravimetry. Two different atmospheres were used to study the oxidation of Zircaloy-4: (a) helium and pure oxygen, (b) helium and oxygen combined with slight addition of air. The experiments with 20% of oxygen confirm the dependence on oxygen anions diffusion in the oxide scale. Under a mixture of oxygen and air in helium, an acceleration of the corrosion was observed due to the detrimental effect of nitrogen. The kinetic rate increased significantly after a kinetic transition (breakaway). This acceleration was accompanied by an acoustic emission activity. Most of the acoustic emission bursts were recorded after the kinetic transition (post-transition) or during the cooling of the sample. The characteristic features of the acoustic emission signals appear to be correlated with the different populations of cracks and their occurrence in the ZrO2 layer or in the α-Zr(O) layer. Acoustic events were recorded during the isothermal dwell time at high temperature under air. They were associated with large cracks in the zirconia porous layer. Acoustic events were also recorded during cooling after oxidation tests both under air or oxygen. For the latter, cracks were observed in the oxygen enriched zirconium metal phase and not in the dense zirconia layer after 5 h of oxidation.

  19. Photodetector having high speed and sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention provides a photodetector having an advantageous combination of sensitivity and speed; it has a high sensitivity while retaining high speed. In a preferred embodiment, visible light is detected, but in some embodiments, x-rays can be detected, and in other embodiments infrared can be detected. The present invention comprises a photodetector having an active layer, and a recombination layer. The active layer has a surface exposed to light to be detected, and comprises a semiconductor, having a bandgap graded so that carriers formed due to interaction of the active layer with the incident radiation tend to be swept away from the exposed surface. The graded semiconductor material in the active layer preferably comprises Al.sub.1-x Ga.sub.x As. An additional sub-layer of graded In.sub.1-y Ga.sub.y As may be included between the Al.sub.1-x Ga.sub.x As layer and the recombination layer. The recombination layer comprises a semiconductor material having a short recombination time such as a defective GaAs layer grown in a low temperature process. The recombination layer is positioned adjacent to the active layer so that carriers from the active layer tend to be swept into the recombination layer. In an embodiment, the photodetector may comprise one or more additional layers stacked below the active and recombination layers. These additional layers may include another active layer and another recombination layer to absorb radiation not absorbed while passing through the first layers. A photodetector having a stacked configuration may have enhanced sensitivity and responsiveness at selected wavelengths such as infrared.

  20. High sensitivity troponin and valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Cian P; Donnellan, Eoin; Phelan, Dermot; Griffin, Brian P; Sarano, Maurice Enriquez-; McEvoy, John W

    2017-01-16

    Blood-based biomarkers have been extensively studied in a range of cardiovascular diseases and have established utility in routine clinical care, most notably in the diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (e.g., troponin) and the management of heart failure (e.g., brain-natriuretic peptide). The role of biomarkers is less well established in the management of valvular heart disease (VHD), in which the optimal timing of surgical intervention is often challenging. One promising biomarker that has been the subject of a number of recent VHD research studies is high sensitivity troponin (hs-cTn). Novel high-sensitivity assays can detect subclinical myocardial damage in asymptomatic individuals. Thus, hs-cTn may have utility in the assessment of asymptomatic patients with severe VHD who do not have a clear traditional indication for surgical intervention. In this state-of-the-art review, we examine the current evidence for hs-cTn as a potential biomarker in the most commonly encountered VHD conditions, aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation. This review provides a synopsis of early evidence indicating that hs-cTn has promise as a biomarker in VHD. However, the impact of its measurement on clinical practice and VHD outcomes needs to be further assessed in prospective studies before routine clinical use becomes a reality.

  1. Field acoustic measurements of high-speed train sound along BTIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, HuaHua; Li, JiaChun

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, single-point field measurements of noise radiated from high-speed trains were performed at two sites along Beijing-Tianjin intercity railway (BTIR), aiming at acquiring the realistic acoustic data for validation and verification of physical model and computational prediction. The measurements showed that A-weighted sound pressure levels (SPLs) were between 80 and 87 dBA as trains passed. The maximum noise occurred at the moment when the pantograph arrived, suggesting that pantograph noise was one of the most significant sources. Sound radiated from high-speed trains of BTIR was a typical broadband spectrum with most acoustic power restricted in the range of medium-high frequency from about 400 Hz to 5 kHz. Aerodynamic noise was shown to be the dominant one over other acoustic sources for high-speed trains.

  2. Nonlinear electron acoustic structures generated on the high-potential side of a double layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Pottelette

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available High-time resolution measurements of the electron distribution function performed in the auroral upward current region reveals a large asymmetry between the low- and high-potential sides of a double-layer. The latter side is characterized by a large enhancement of a locally trapped electron population which corresponds to a significant part (~up to 30% of the total electron density. As compared to the background hot electron population, this trapped component has a very cold temperature in the direction parallel to the static magnetic field. Accordingly, the differential drift between the trapped and background hot electron populations generates high frequency electron acoustic waves in a direction quasi-parallel to the magnetic field. The density of the trapped electron population can be deduced from the frequency where the electron acoustic spectrum maximizes. In the auroral midcavity region, the electron acoustic waves may be modulated by an additional turbulence generated in the ion acoustic range thanks to the presence of a pre-accelerated ion beam located on the high-potential side of the double layer. Electron holes characterized by bipolar pulses in the electric field are sometimes detected in correlation with these electron acoustic wave packets.

  3. Design and construction of a reverberation chamber for high-intensity acoustic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slusser, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    A high-intensity acoustic test facility was constructed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to support the Mariner Mars 1971 project. For ease of construction, the reverberation chamber itself is rectangular, which resulted in very little sacrifice in acoustic performance. Levels as high as 156 dB can be achieved with the chamber empty and test levels of 150 dB have been used with a Mariner Mars spacecraft model (full size) in the chamber. Levels as high as this must be generated using electropneumatic transducers, which modulate gaseous nitrogen to this facility.

  4. Highly Sensitive Electro-Optic Modulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeVore, Peter S [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-26

    There are very important diagnostic and communication applications that receive faint electrical signals to be transmitted over long distances for capture. Optical links reduce bandwidth and distance restrictions of metal transmission lines; however, such signals are only weakly imprinted onto the optical carrier, resulting in low fidelity transmission. Increasing signal fidelity often necessitates insertion of radio-frequency (RF) amplifiers before the electro-optic modulator, but (especially at high frequencies) RF amplification results in large irreversible distortions. We have investigated the feasibility of a Sensitive and Linear Modulation by Optical Nonlinearity (SALMON) modulator to supersede RF-amplified modulators. SALMON uses cross-phase modulation, a manifestation of the Kerr effect, to enhance the modulation depth of an RF-modulated optical wave. This ultrafast process has the potential to result in less irreversible distortions as compared to a RF-amplified modulator due to the broadband nature of the Kerr effect. Here, we prove that a SALMON modulator is a feasible alternative to an RFamplified modulator, by demonstrating a sensitivity enhancement factor greater than 20 and significantly reduced distortion.

  5. In situ high temperature oxidation analysis of Zircaloy-4 using acoustic emission coupled with thermogravimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omar, Al Haj [Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, SPIN-EMSE, CNRS:UMR 5307, LGF, 42023 Saint-Etienne (France); Véronique, Peres, E-mail: peres@emse.fr [Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, SPIN-EMSE, CNRS:UMR 5307, LGF, 42023 Saint-Etienne (France); Eric, Serris [Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, SPIN-EMSE, CNRS:UMR 5307, LGF, 42023 Saint-Etienne (France); François, Grosjean; Jean, Kittel; François, Ropital [IFP Energies nouvelles, Rond-point de l’échangeur de Solaize BP3, 69360 Solaize (France); Michel, Cournil [Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, SPIN-EMSE, CNRS:UMR 5307, LGF, 42023 Saint-Etienne (France)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Thermogravimetry associated to acoustic emission (AE) improves knowledge on the corrosion of metals at high temperature. • Kinetic transition is detected under air oxidation tests at 900 °C of Zircaloy-4 by a change in the rate of mass gain and by the AE activity. • AE analysis is complementary to characterizations of post mortem oxidized samples. • AE allows us to distinguish the cracks which occur during the Zircaloy-4 oxidation from the cracks which arise during the cooling of the samples. - Abstract: Zircaloy-4 oxidation behavior at high temperature (900 °C), which can be reached in case of severe accidental situations in nuclear pressurised water reactor, was studied using acoustic emission analysis coupled with thermogravimetry. Two different atmospheres were used to study the oxidation of Zircaloy-4: (a) helium and pure oxygen, (b) helium and oxygen combined with slight addition of air. The experiments with 20% of oxygen confirm the dependence on oxygen anions diffusion in the oxide scale. Under a mixture of oxygen and air in helium, an acceleration of the corrosion was observed due to the detrimental effect of nitrogen. The kinetic rate increased significantly after a kinetic transition (breakaway). This acceleration was accompanied by an acoustic emission activity. Most of the acoustic emission bursts were recorded after the kinetic transition (post-transition) or during the cooling of the sample. The characteristic features of the acoustic emission signals appear to be correlated with the different populations of cracks and their occurrence in the ZrO{sub 2} layer or in the α-Zr(O) layer. Acoustic events were recorded during the isothermal dwell time at high temperature under air. They were associated with large cracks in the zirconia porous layer. Acoustic events were also recorded during cooling after oxidation tests both under air or oxygen. For the latter, cracks were observed in the oxygen enriched zirconium metal phase and

  6. Heterogeneous catalysis in highly sensitive microreactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jakob Lind

    This thesis present a highly sensitive silicon microreactor and examples of its use in studying catalysis. The experimental setup built for gas handling and temperature control for the microreactor is described. The implementation of LabVIEW interfacing for all the experimental parts makes...... automated experiments and data collection possible. An argon ush at the O-rings (used to interface the silicon microreactor with the gas system), which was developed, is presented. It enables experiments with temperatures up to 400., and up to 500. for short periods of time. The CO oxidation reaction...... of adsorbates readily converted to methanol as the source of the transient increase in methanol production, is eliminated. A study of mass selected ruthenium nanoparticles from a magnetron-sputter gas-aggregation source, deposited in microreactors, is presented. It is, shown that CO methanation can be measured...

  7. High sensitive radiation detector for radiology dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valente, M.; Malano, F. [Instituto de Fisica Enrique Gaviola, Oficina 102 FaMAF - UNC, Av. Luis Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Molina, W.; Vedelago, J., E-mail: valente@famac.unc.edu.ar [Laboratorio de Investigaciones e Instrumentacion en Fisica Aplicada a la Medicina e Imagenes por Rayos X, Laboratorio 448 FaMAF - UNC, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2014-08-15

    Fricke solution has a wide range of applications as radiation detector and dosimetry. It is particularly appreciated in terms of relevant comparative advantages, like tissue equivalence when prepared in aqueous media like gel matrix, continuous mapping capability, dose rate recorded and incident direction independence as well as linear dose response. This work presents the development and characterization of a novel Fricke gel system, based on modified chemical compositions making possible its application in clinical radiology. Properties of standard Fricke gel dosimeter for high dose levels are used as starting point and suitable chemical modifications are introduced and carefully investigated in order to attain high resolution for low dose ranges, like those corresponding to radiology interventions. The developed Fricke gel radiation dosimeter system achieves the expected typical dose dependency, actually showing linear response in the dose range from 20 up to 4000 mGy. Systematic investigations including several chemical compositions are carried out in order to obtain a good enough dosimeter response for low dose levels. A suitable composition among those studied is selected as a good candidate for low dose level radiation dosimetry consisting on a modified Fricke solution fixed to a gel matrix containing benzoic acid along with sulfuric acid, ferrous sulfate, xylenol orange and ultra-pure reactive grade water. Dosimeter samples are prepared in standard vials for its in phantom irradiation and further characterization by spectrophotometry measuring visible light transmission and absorbance before and after irradiation. Samples are irradiated by typical kV X-ray tubes and calibrated Farmer type ionization chamber is used as reference to measure dose rates inside phantoms in at vials locations. Once sensitive material composition is already optimized, dose-response curves show significant improvement regarding overall sensitivity for low dose levels. According to

  8. High sensitivity field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavarria, Mario A.; Matheoud, Alessandro V.; Marmillod, Philippe; Liu, Youjiang; Kong, Deyi; Brugger, Jürgen; Boero, Giovanni

    2017-03-01

    A high sensitivity field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometer (FAIMS) was designed, fabricated, and tested. The main components of the system are a 10.6 eV UV photoionization source, an ion filter driven by a high voltage/high frequency n-MOS inverter circuit, and a low noise ion detector. The ion filter electronics are capable to generate square waveforms with peak-to-peak voltages up to 1000 V at frequencies up to 1 MHz with adjustable duty cycles. The ion detector current amplifier has a gain up to 1012 V/A with an effective equivalent input noise level down to about 1 fA/Hz1/2 during operation with the ion filter at the maximum voltage and frequency. The FAIMS system was characterized by detecting different standard chemical compounds. Additionally, we investigated the use of a synchronous modulation/demodulation technique to improve the signal-to-noise ratio in FAIMS measurements. In particular, we implemented the modulation of the compensation voltage with the synchronous demodulation of the ion current. The analysis of the measurements at low concentration levels led to an extrapolated limit of detection for acetone of 10 ppt with an averaging time of 1 s.

  9. Ultra-High Q Acoustic Resonance in Superfluid ^4He

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzo, L. A.; Schwab, K. C.

    2017-02-01

    We report the measurement of the acoustic quality factor of a gram-scale, kilohertz-frequency superfluid resonator, detected through the parametric coupling to a superconducting niobium microwave cavity. For temperatures between 400 mK and 50 mK, we observe a T^{-4} temperature dependence of the quality factor, consistent with a 3-phonon dissipation mechanism. We observe Q factors up to 1.4× 10^8, consistent with the dissipation due to dilute ^3He impurities, and expect that significant further improvements are possible. These experiments are relevant to exploring quantum behavior and decoherence of massive macroscopic objects, the laboratory detection of continuous gravitational waves from pulsars, and the probing of possible limits to physical length scales.

  10. High tech cognitive and acoustic enrichment for captive elephants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Fiona; Mancini, Clara; Sharp, Helen

    2017-09-23

    This paper investigates the potential for using technology to support the development of sensory and cognitive enrichment activities for captive elephants. It explores the usefulness of applying conceptual frameworks from interaction design and game design to the problem of developing species-specific smart toys that promote natural behaviours and provide stimulation. We adopted a Research through Design approach, and describe how scientific inquiry supported our design process, while the creation of artefacts guided our investigations into possible future solutions. Our fieldwork resulted in the development of an interactive prototype of an acoustic toy that elephants are able to control using interface elements constructed from a range of natural materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A study of the mechanical properties of highly porous ceramics using acoustic emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aué, J.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    1998-01-01

    In this paper the results of indirect tensile tests on highly porous ceramics are presented. A relation between the mechanical strength of the highly porous ceramic materials and Acoustic Emission (AE) has been established. We have shown that the amplitude distribution of the AE events depends on th

  12. Unipolar and Bipolar High-Magnetic-Field Sensors Based on Surface Acoustic Wave Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polewczyk, V.; Dumesnil, K.; Lacour, D.; Moutaouekkil, M.; Mjahed, H.; Tiercelin, N.; Petit Watelot, S.; Mishra, H.; Dusch, Y.; Hage-Ali, S.; Elmazria, O.; Montaigne, F.; Talbi, A.; Bou Matar, O.; Hehn, M.

    2017-08-01

    While surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors have been used to measure temperature, pressure, strains, and low magnetic fields, the capability to measure bipolar fields and high fields is lacking. In this paper, we report magnetic surface acoustic wave sensors that consist of interdigital transducers made of a single magnetostrictive material, either Ni or TbFe2 , or based on exchange-biased (Co /IrMn ) multilayers. By controlling the ferromagnet magnetic properties, high-field sensors can be obtained with unipolar or bipolar responses. The issue of hysteretic response of the ferromagnetic material is especially addressed, and the control of the magnetic properties ensures the reversible behavior in the SAW response.

  13. Sound-maps of environmentally sensitive areas constructed from Wireless Acoustic Sensors Network data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidis, E. T.; Liaperdos, J.; Tatlas, N.-A.; Potirakis, S. M.; Rangoussi, M.

    2016-03-01

    “E-SOUNDMAPS” is a distributed microelectronic system for the sound/acoustic monitoring of areas of environmental interest that is based on an appropriately designed wireless acoustic sensor network (WASN). It involves the automated generation of multi-level sound-maps for environmental assessment of areas of interest. This paper focuses on the method and the software application for the construction of sound-maps, which is developed as part of the integrated “E-SOUNDMAPS” system. The software application periodically produces geographically-referenced, accurate environmental sound information, based on real- field measurement data, and integrates them in the geographic map of the area of interest in a concise and comprehensive manner. Following the field recording of sound and the hierarchical recognition/classification of sound events and corresponding sources, the obtained sound sources characterization tags feed the specific software application. The output is a multilevel soundmap, constructed on the basis of the data and published electronically on the Web, for human inspection and assessment. All necessary steps for handling, archiving, monitoring, visualization and retrieval of sound data are also presented.

  14. The Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Broadband and Broad-beam Array: Design Overview and Sensitivity Forecasts

    CERN Document Server

    Pober, Jonathan C; DeBoer, David R; McDonald, Patrick; McQuinn, Matthew; Aguirre, James E; Ali, Zaki; Bradley, Richard F; Chang, Tzu-Ching; Morales, Miguel F

    2012-01-01

    This work describes a new instrument optimized for a detection of the neutral hydrogen 21cm power spectrum between redshifts of 0.5-1.5: the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Broadband and Broad-beam (BAOBAB) Array. BAOBAB will build on the efforts of a first generation of 21cm experiments which are targeting a detection of the signal from the Epoch of Reionization at z ~ 10. At z ~ 1, the emission from neutral hydrogen in self-shielded overdense halos also presents an accessible signal, since the dominant, synchrotron foreground emission is considerably fainter than at redshift 10. The principle science driver for these observations are Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in the matter power spectrum which have the potential to act as a standard ruler and constrain the nature of dark energy. BAOBAB will fully correlate dual-polarization antenna tiles over the 600-900MHz band with a frequency resolution of 300 kHz and a system temperature of 50K. The number of antennas will grow in staged deployments, and reconfigurations...

  15. NOTE: Initial evaluation of acoustic reflectors for the preservation of sensitive abdominal skin areas during MRgFUS treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorny, Krzysztof R.; Chen, Shigao; Hangiandreou, Nicholas J.; Hesley, Gina K.; Woodrum, David A.; Brown, Douglas L.; Felmlee, Joel P.

    2009-04-01

    During MR-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) treatments of uterine fibroids using ExAblate®2000 (InSightec, Haifa, Israel), individual tissue ablations are performed extracorporeally through the patient's abdomen using an annular array FUS transducer embedded within the MR table. Ultrasound intensities in the near field are below therapeutic levels and, under normal conditions, heating of the patient skin is minimal. However, increased absorption of ultrasound energy within sensitive skin areas or areas with differing acoustic properties, such as scars, may lead to skin burns and therefore these areas must be kept outside the near field of the FUS beam. Depending on their location and size the sensitive areas may either obstruct parts of the fibroid from being treated or prevent the entire MRgFUS treatment altogether. The purpose of this work is to evaluate acoustic reflector materials that can be applied to protect skin and the underlying sensitive areas. Reflection coefficients of cork (0.88) and foam (0.91) based materials were evaluated with a hydrophone. An ExAblate 2000 MRgFUS system was used to simulate clinical treatment with discs of reflector materials placed in a near field underneath a gel phantom. MR thermometry was used to monitor temperature elevations as well as the integrity of the focal spot. The phantom measurements showed acoustic shadow zones behind the reflectors with zone depths changing between 7 and 27 mm, for reflector disc diameters increasing from 10 to 30 mm (40 mm diameter discs completely blocked the FUS beam at the depth evaluated). The effects on thermal lesions due to the presence of the reflectors in the FUS beam were found to diminish with decreasing disc diameter and increasing sonication depth. For a 20 mm diameter disc and beyond 50 mm sonication depth, thermal lesions were minimally affected by the presence of the disc. No heating was observed on the skin side of the foam reflectors, as confirmed by measurements performed

  16. Study on resonance frequency distribution of high-overtone bulk acoustic resonators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hui; WANG Zuoqing; ZHANG Shuyi

    2005-01-01

    Based on the method of characterizing piezo-films by the resonance frequency distributions, the factors influencing the resonance frequency distribution of a High-overtone Bulk Acoustic Resonator (HBAR) consisting of a piezoelectric thin film with twoelectrodes and a substrate are studied. Some HBARs are simulated. The results manifest that changing the acoustic impedance ratio of the substrate to piezo-film the distribution of the space of the parallel resonance frequency and the effective electromechanical coupling factor are changed. When the fundamental mode of the piezo-film is at high frequency, changing the acoustic impedance ratio of the electrode to piezo-film and the thickness of the electrodes make the resonance frequency distribution of HBARs change. These results manifest that the HBARs can be resonant at specified frequencies by means of adjusting the factors affecting the resonance frequency distribution.

  17. Analysis of the traveltime sensitivity kernels for an acoustic transversely isotropic medium with a vertical axis of symmetry

    KAUST Repository

    Djebbi, Ramzi

    2016-02-05

    In anisotropic media, several parameters govern the propagation of the compressional waves. To correctly invert surface recorded seismic data in anisotropic media, a multi-parameter inversion is required. However, a tradeoff between parameters exists because several models can explain the same dataset. To understand these tradeoffs, diffraction/reflection and transmission-type sensitivity-kernels analyses are carried out. Such analyses can help us to choose the appropriate parameterization for inversion. In tomography, the sensitivity kernels represent the effect of a parameter along the wave path between a source and a receiver. At a given illumination angle, similarities between sensitivity kernels highlight the tradeoff between the parameters. To discuss the parameterization choice in the context of finite-frequency tomography, we compute the sensitivity kernels of the instantaneous traveltimes derived from the seismic data traces. We consider the transmission case with no encounter of an interface between a source and a receiver; with surface seismic data, this corresponds to a diving wave path. We also consider the diffraction/reflection case when the wave path is formed by two parts: one from the source to a sub-surface point and the other from the sub-surface point to the receiver. We illustrate the different parameter sensitivities for an acoustic transversely isotropic medium with a vertical axis of symmetry. The sensitivity kernels depend on the parameterization choice. By comparing different parameterizations, we explain why the parameterization with the normal moveout velocity, the anellipitic parameter η, and the δ parameter is attractive when we invert diving and reflected events recorded in an active surface seismic experiment. © 2016 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  18. Acoustic radiation force of high-order Bessel beam standing wave tweezers on a rigid sphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F G

    2009-12-01

    Particle manipulation using the acoustic radiation force of Bessel beams is an active field of research. In a previous investigation, [F.G. Mitri, Acoustic radiation force on a sphere in standing and quasi-standing zero-order Bessel beam tweezers, Annals of Physics 323 (2008) 1604-1620] an expression for the radiation force of a zero-order Bessel beam standing wave experienced by a sphere was derived. The present work extends the analysis of the radiation force to the case of a high-order Bessel beam (HOBB) of positive order m having an angular dependence on the phase phi. The derivation for the general expression of the force is based on the formulation for the total acoustic scattering field of a HOBB by a sphere [F.G. Mitri, Acoustic scattering of a high-order Bessel beam by an elastic sphere, Annals of Physics 323 (2008) 2840-2850; F.G. Mitri, Equivalence of expressions for the acoustic scattering of a progressive high order Bessel beam by an elastic sphere, IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control 56 (2009) 1100-1103] to derive the general expression for the radiation force function YJm,st(ka,beta,m)Bessel beam standing wave incident upon a rigid sphere immersed in non-viscous water are computed. The rigid sphere calculations for YJm,st(ka,beta,m)Bessel beam standing wave (m=0). The proposed theory is of particular interest essentially due to its inherent value as a canonical problem in particle manipulation using the acoustic radiation force of a HOBB standing wave on a sphere. It may also serve as the benchmark for comparison to other solutions obtained by strictly numerical or asymptotic approaches.

  19. Highly sensitive direct conversion ultrasound interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svitelskiy, Oleksiy; Grossmann, John; Suslov, Alexey

    2015-03-01

    Being invented more than fifty years ago, the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique has proven itself as a valuable and indispensable non-destructive tool to explore elastic properties of materials in engineering and scientific tasks. We propose a new design for the instrument based on mass-produced integral microchips. In our design the radiofrequency echo-pulse signal is processed by AD8302 RF gain and phase detector (www.analog.com).Its phase output is linearly proportional to the phase difference between the exciting and response signals. The gain output is proportional to the log of the ratio of amplitudes of the received to the exciting signals. To exclude the non-linear fragments and to enable exploring large phase changes, we employ parallel connection of two detectors, fed by in-phase and quadrature signals respectively. The instrument allowed us exploring phase transitions with precision of ΔV / V ~10-7 (V is the ultrasound speed). The high sensitivity of the logarithmic amplifiers embedded into AD8302 requires good grounding and screening of the receiving circuitry.

  20. Design, construction, activation, and operation of a high intensity acoustic test chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, L. T.

    1986-01-01

    The design philosophy, construction, integration, and activation of the high intensity acoustic test chamber for production acceptance testing of satellites are discussed. The 32,000 cubic-foot acoustic test cell consists of a steel reinforced concrete chamber with six electropneumatic noise generators. One of the innovative features of the chamber is a unique quarter horn assembly that acoustically couples the noise generators to the chamber. Design concepts, model testing, and evaluation results are presented. Considerations such as nitrogen versus compressed air source, digital closed loop spectrum control versus manual equalizers, and microprocessor based interlock systems are included. Construction difficulties, anomalies encountered, and their resolution are also discussed. Results of the readiness testing are highlighted.

  1. Visco-thermal effects in acoustic metamaterials: from total transmission to total reflection and high absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Molerón, Miguel; Daraio, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate visco-thermal effects on the acoustic propagation through metamaterials consisting of rigid slabs with subwavelength slits embedded in air. We demonstrate that this unavoidable loss mechanism is not merely a refinement, but it plays a dominant role in the actual acoustic response of the structure. Specifically, in the case of very narrow slits, the visco-thermal losses avoid completely the excitation of Fabry-Perot resonances, leading to 100% reflection. This is exactly opposite to the perfect transmission predicted in the idealised lossless case. Moreover, for a wide range of geometrical parameters, there exists an optimum slit width at which the energy dissipated in the structure can be as high as 50%. This work provides a clear evidence that visco-thermal effects are necessary to describe realistically the acoustic response of locally resonant metamaterials.

  2. Surface acoustic admittance and absorption of highly porous, layered, fibrous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesar, J. S.; Lambert, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    Some acoustic properties of Kevlar-29 - a fine fibered, layered material is investigated. Kevlar is characterized by very high strength, uniform filaments arranged in a parallel batt where most filaments are random in the x-y plane but ordered as planes in the z direction. For experimental purposes, volume porosity, static flow resistance and mean filament diameter are used to identify the material. To determine the acoustic surface admittance of Kevlar, batts of the material are cut into small pads and placed into a standing wave tube terminated by a rigid brass plug. The attenuation and relative phase shift are recorded at each frequency in the range of 50 to 6000 Hz. Normalized conductance and susceptance are combined to form the acoustic absorption coefficient. The data are compared with theory by plotting the normalized admittance and normal incident absorption coefficient versus cyclic frequency.

  3. Frequency-Preserved Acoustic Diode Model with High Forward-Power-Transmission Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Du, Zongliang; Sun, Zhi; Gao, Huajian; Guo, Xu

    2015-06-01

    The acoustic diode (AD) can provide brighter and clearer ultrasound images by eliminating acoustic disturbances caused by sound waves traveling in two directions at the same time and interfering with each other. Such an AD could give designers new flexibility in making ultrasonic sources like those used in medical imaging or nondestructive testing. However, current AD designs, based on nonlinear effects, only partially fill this role by converting sound to a new frequency and blocking any backward flow of the original frequency. In this work, an AD model that preserves the frequencies of acoustic waves and has a relatively high forward-power-transmission rate is proposed. Theoretical analysis indicates that the proposed AD has forward, reverse, and breakdown characteristics very similar to electrical diodes. The significant rectifying effect of the proposed AD is verified numerically through a one-dimensional example. Possible schemes for experimental realization of this model as well as more complex and efficient AD designs are also discussed.

  4. Acoustics of dual-stream high-speed jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debiasi, Marco Tullio

    2000-10-01

    This work presents the results of noise measurements in high-speed, round jets whose Mach number and velocity simulate the conditions of jet engines at take-off. The Mach number of the jet potential core ranged from 1.27 to 1.77 and the velocity ranged from 550 m/s to 1010 m/s. Most of the jets were silenced with a coflow that prevented the formation of Mach waves, a dominant contribution to supersonic jet noise. This method, called Mach Wave Elimination, relies on the shielding effect of the coflow which makes the motion of the eddies subsonic with respect to the surrounding streams, thus impeding the creation of Mach waves. Schlieren photography and pitot probe surveys were used to detect the principal features and the growth rate of the jets. Microphone measurements were performed inside an anechoic chamber at many positions around the jet exit. The results were corrected for the microphone response and for the effect of human sensitivity to sound. Equal-thrust comparison of different experimental results shows that elimination of Mach waves is very effective in reducing noise in the direction of strongest emission. Except for localized shock-associated components, noise emission was found to be insensitive to nozzle exit pressure and to depend principally on the values of fully-expanded Mach number and velocity in the jet potential core. Jets with a shorter Mach wave emitting region exhibited better noise suppression. Best results were obtained with an eccentric coflow that allows the shear layer of the upper part of the jet to grow naturally while silencing the jet in the downward direction. Coflows are capable of reducing the near-field screech peaks by up to 10 dB in imperfectly-expanded jets. Scaling the experimental results to a fall-size engine shows that eccentric coflows reduce the noise perceived in the direction of peak emission by up to 11 dB. Preliminary analysis of the application of this silencing technique to engine design indicates that Mach

  5. High Sensitivity, High Frequency and High Time Resolution Decimetric Spectroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, H. S.; Rosa, R. R.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Se ha desarrollado el primer espectroscopio decimetrico latino americano operando en una banda de 100 MHz con alta resoluci6n de fre- cuencia (100 KHz) y tiempo (10 ms), alrededor de cualquier centro de frecuencia en el intervalo de 2000-200 MHz. El prop6sito de esta nota es describir investigaciones solares y no solares que se planean, progra ma de investigaci6n y la situaci6n actual de desarrollo de este espectroscopio. ABSTRACT. First Latin American Decimetric Spectroscope operating over a band of 100 MHz with high resolution in frequency (100 KHz) and time (10 ms), around any center frequency in the range of 2000-200 MHz is being developed. The purpose of this note is to describe planned solar, and non-solar, research programmes and present status of development of this spectroscope. Keq wo : INSTRUMENTS - SPECTROSCOPY

  6. Picosecond opto-acoustic interferometry and polarimetry in high-index GaAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherbakov, A V; Bombeck, M; Jäger, J V; Salasyuk, A S; Linnik, T L; Gusev, V E; Yakovlev, D R; Akimov, A V; Bayer, M

    2013-07-15

    By means of a metal opto-acoustic transducer we generate quasi-longitudinal and quasi-transverse picosecond strain pulses in a (311)-GaAs substrate and monitor their propagation by picosecond acoustic interferometry. By probing at the sample side opposite to the transducer the signals related to the compressive and shear strain pulses can be separated in time. In addition to conventional monitoring of the reflected probe light intensity we monitor also the polarization rotation of the optical probe beam. This polarimetric technique results in improved sensitivity of detection and provides comprehensive information about the elasto-optical anisotropy. The experimental observations are in a good agreement with a theoretical analysis.

  7. Free-jet acoustic investigation of high-radius-ratio coannular plug nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, P. R.; Janardan, B. A.; Majjigi, R. K.; Bhutiani, P. K.; Vogt, P. G.

    1984-01-01

    The experimental and analytical results of a scale model simulated flight acoustic exploratory investigation of high radius ratio coannular plug nozzles with inverted velocity and temperature profiles are summarized. Six coannular plug nozzle configurations and a baseline convergent conical nozzle were tested for simulated flight acoustic evaluation. The nozzles were tested over a range of test conditions that are typical of a Variable Cycle Engine for application to advanced high speed aircraft. It was found that in simulate flight, the high radius ratio coannular plug nozzles maintain their jet noise and shock noise reduction features previously observed in static testing. The presence of nozzle bypass struts will not significantly affect the acousticn noise reduction features of a General Electric type nozzle design. A unique coannular plug nozzle flight acoustic spectral prediction method was identified and found to predict the measured results quite well. Special laser velocimeter and acoustic measurements were performed which have given new insights into the jet and shock noise reduction mechanisms of coannular plug nozzles with regard to identifying further benificial research efforts.

  8. Assessment of hepatic VX2 tumors of rabbits with second harmonic imaging under high and low acoustic pressures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Hua Du; Wei-Xiao Yang; Xiang Wang; Xiu-Qin Xiong; Yi Zhou; Tao Li

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the possible clinical application value of second harmonic imaging under low acoustic pressure.METHODS: Six New Zealand rabbits, averaging 2.7±0.4kg, were selected and operated upon to construct hepatic VX2 tumor carrier model. Hepatic VX2 tumors were imaged with B mode Ultrasonography (US), and second harmonic imaging (SHI) under high mechanic index (1.6) and low mechanic index (0.1). Echo agent was intravenously injected through ear vein at a dose of 0.01 mL/kg under B mode US and high MI SHI, and 0.05 mL/kg under low MI SHI, and then the venous channel was cleaned with sterilized saline.All the images were recorded by magnetic optics (MO),and they were analyzed further by at least two independent experienced sonographers.RESULTS: Totally 6 hypoechoic and 3 hyperechoic lesions were found in the six carrier rabbits with a mean size about 2.1±0.4 under B mode ultrasound, they were oval or round in shape with a clear outline or a hypoechoic halo at the margin of the lesions. Contrast agent could not change the echogenicity of the lesions under B mode US and SHI under high acoustic pressure. However, it could greatly increase the real time visualization sensitivity of the lesions with SHI under low acoustic pressure.CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that contrast enhanced SHI with low MI and a bubble non-destructive method would be much more helpful than conventional SHI in our future clinical applications.

  9. Fabrication of a high performance acoustic emission (AE) sensor to monitor and diagnose disturbances in HTS tapes and magnet systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju-Hyung; Song, Jung-Bin; Jeong, Young Hun; Lee, Young-Jin; Paik, Jong-Hoo; Kim, Woo-Seok; Lee, Haigun

    2010-02-01

    An acoustic emission (AE) technique was introduced as a non-destructive method to monitor sudden deformation caused by local heat concentrations and micro-cracks within superconductors and superconducting magnets. However, the detection of AE signals in a high temperature superconductor (HTS) tape is not easy because of its low signal to noise ratio caused by the noise from boiling liquid cryogen or mechanical vibration from the cryo-cooler. Therefore, high performance piezoelectric ceramics are needed to improve the sensitivity of the AE sensor. The aim of this study was to improve the piezoelectric and dielectric properties to enhance the performance of an AE sensor. This study examined the effects of Nb2O5 addition (0.0 wt.% to 2.0 wt.%) on the properties of high performance piezoelectric ceramics, Pb(Zr0.54 Ti0.46)O3 + 0.2 wt.% Cr2O3, sintered at 1200 °C for 2 h. The performance was examined with respect to the acoustic emission response of AE sensors manufactured using the specimens with various Nb2O5 contents. Superior sensor performance was obtained for the AE sensors fabricated with the specimens containing 1.0 wt.% to 1.5 wt.% Nb2O5. The performance and characteristics of the AE sensors were in accordance with their piezoelectric and dielectric properties.

  10. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  11. Theoretical investigation of conductivity sensitivities of SiC-based bio-chemical acoustic wave sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Li; Chen, Zhe; Zhang, Shu-yi; Zhang, Hui

    2014-02-01

    The phase velocities, electromechanical coupling coefficients, conductivity sensitivities, insert losses, and minimum detectable masses of Rayleigh and Lamb waves sensors based on silicon carbide (SiC) substrates are theoretically studied. The results are compared with the performances of the sensors based on conventional silicon substrates. It is found that the sensors using SiC substrates have higher electromechanical coupling coefficients and conductivity sensitivities than the conventional silicon-based sensors in virtue of piezoelectricity of the SiC. Moreover, higher phase velocities in SiC substrates can reduce the insert losses and minimum detectable masses of the sensors. In this case, in the detection of the gas with the tiny mass as the hydrogen, in which the conductivity sensitivity is more important than the mass sensitivity, the sensor based on the SiC substrate has a higher sensitivity and exhibits the potential to detect the gas with the concentration below the ppm level. According to the results, the performances of the sensors based on the Rayleigh and Lamb waves using the SiC substrates can be optimized by properly selecting piezoelectric films, structural parameters, and operating wavelengths.

  12. Receptivity and Forced Response to Acoustic Disturbances in High-Speed Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakumar, P.; King, Rudolph A.; Chou, Amanda; Owens, Lewis R.; Kegerise, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Supersonic boundary-layer receptivity to freestream acoustic disturbances is investigated by solving the Navier-Stokes equations for Mach 3.5 flow over a sharp flat plate and a 7-deg half-angle cone. The freestream disturbances are generated from a wavy wall placed at the nozzle wall. The freestream acoustic disturbances radiated by the wavy wall are obtained by solving the linearized Euler equations. The results for the flat plate show that instability modes are generated at all the incident angles ranging from zero to highly oblique. However, the receptivity coefficient decreases by about 20 times when the incident angle increases from zero to a highly oblique angle of 68 degrees. The results for the cone show that no instability modes are generated when the acoustic disturbances impinge the cone obliquely. The results show that the perturbations generated inside the boundary layer by the acoustic disturbances are the response of the boundary layer to the external forcing. The amplitude of the forced disturbances inside the boundary layer are about 2.5 times larger than the incoming field for zero azimuthal wavenumber and they are about 1.5 times for large azimuthal wavenumbers.

  13. Demonstration of novel high-power acoustic through-the-wall sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Felber, Franklin

    2015-01-01

    A high-power acoustic sensor, capable of detecting and tracking persons through steel walls of cargo containers, trailer truck bodies, and train cars, has been developed and demonstrated. The sensor is based on a new concept for narrowband mechanical-impact acoustic transmitters and matched resonant receivers. The lightweight, compact, and low-cost transmitters produce high-power acoustic pulses at one or more discrete frequencies with little input power. The energy for each pulse is accumulated over long times at low powers, like a mousetrap, and therefore can be operated with ordinary batteries and no power conditioning. A breadboard impact-transmitter and matched-receiver system that detected human motion through thick walls with only rudimentary signal processing is described, and results are presented. A conceptual design is presented of an acoustic through-the-wall sensor, costing about $10,000 per unit and capable of remotely and non-intrusively scanning steel cargo containers for stowaways at a rate o...

  14. Increasing the Sensitivity of Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) Chemical Sensors and other Chemical Sensing Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    that composes the wire. Nanowires sensitive to methanol and ethanol are composed of Polypyrrole (PPy) and Polyaniline ( PANI ). Palladium (Pd) nanowires...nanowires involves measuring the v resistance of palladium, polypyrrole and polyaniline nanowires. The nanowires need to be measured with currents of

  15. Characterization of Films with Thickness Less than 10 nm by Sensitivity-Enhanced Atomic Force Acoustic Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muraoka Mikio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a method for characterizing ultrathin films using sensitivity-enhanced atomic force acoustic microscopy, where a concentrated-mass cantilever having a flat tip was used as a sensitive oscillator. Evaluation was aimed at 6-nm-thick and 10-nm-thick diamond-like carbon (DLC films deposited, using different methods, on a hard disk for the effective Young's modulus defined as E/(1 - ν2, where E is the Young's modulus, and ν is the Poisson's ratio. The resonant frequency of the cantilever was affected not only by the film's elasticity but also by the substrate even at an indentation depth of about 0.6 nm. The substrate effect was removed by employing a theoretical formula on the indentation of a layered half-space, together with a hard disk without DLC coating. The moduli of the 6-nm-thick and 10-nm-thick DLC films were 392 and 345 GPa, respectively. The error analysis showed the standard deviation less than 5% in the moduli.

  16. A Sensitivity-Enhanced Film Bulk Acoustic Resonator Gas Sensor with an Oscillator Circuit and Its Detection Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengying Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a sensitivity-enhanced gas sensor based on a film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR. It was designed and fabricated with micro through-holes in its top electrode for sensitivity enhancement. The sensor was driven by a Colpitts oscillator circuit, and the output signal had characteristics of a power of −2.6 dBm@3 V and a phase noise of −90 dBc/Hz@100 kHz. In order to test the performance of the sensor, it was used for the detection of relative humidity (RH and ethanol. When the relative humidity ranged from 25% to 88%, the frequency shift of the sensor was 733 kHz, which was 3.2 times higher than that of the existing FBAR sensor with a complete top electrode. Fitting results of the frequency shift and the relative humidity indicated that the measurement error was within ±0.8% RH. When the ethanol concentration ranged from 0 to 0.2355 g/L, the frequency shift of the sensor was 365 kHz. The effect of the oscillator circuit on the adsorption reaction and temperature response of the FBAR sensor device was analyzed to optimize its detection application.

  17. High-fidelity simulation capability for virtual testing of seismic and acoustic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, D. Keith; Moran, Mark L.; Ketcham, Stephen A.; Lacombe, James; Anderson, Thomas S.; Symons, Neill P.; Aldridge, David F.; Marlin, David H.; Collier, Sandra L.; Ostashev, Vladimir E.

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes development and application of a high-fidelity, seismic/acoustic simulation capability for battlefield sensors. The purpose is to provide simulated sensor data so realistic that they cannot be distinguished by experts from actual field data. This emerging capability provides rapid, low-cost trade studies of unattended ground sensor network configurations, data processing and fusion strategies, and signatures emitted by prototype vehicles. There are three essential components to the modeling: (1) detailed mechanical signature models for vehicles and walkers, (2) high-resolution characterization of the subsurface and atmospheric environments, and (3) state-of-the-art seismic/acoustic models for propagating moving-vehicle signatures through realistic, complex environments. With regard to the first of these components, dynamic models of wheeled and tracked vehicles have been developed to generate ground force inputs to seismic propagation models. Vehicle models range from simple, 2D representations to highly detailed, 3D representations of entire linked-track suspension systems. Similarly detailed models of acoustic emissions from vehicle engines are under development. The propagation calculations for both the seismics and acoustics are based on finite-difference, time-domain (FDTD) methodologies capable of handling complex environmental features such as heterogeneous geologies, urban structures, surface vegetation, and dynamic atmospheric turbulence. Any number of dynamic sources and virtual sensors may be incorporated into the FDTD model. The computational demands of 3D FDTD simulation over tactical distances require massively parallel computers. Several example calculations of seismic/acoustic wave propagation through complex atmospheric and terrain environments are shown.

  18. Radiation acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Lyamshev, Leonid M

    2004-01-01

    Radiation acoustics is a developing field lying at the intersection of acoustics, high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and condensed matter physics. Radiation Acoustics is among the first books to address this promising field of study, and the first to collect all of the most significant results achieved since research in this area began in earnest in the 1970s.The book begins by reviewing the data on elementary particles, absorption of penetrating radiation in a substance, and the mechanisms of acoustic radiation excitation. The next seven chapters present a theoretical treatment of thermoradiation sound generation in condensed media under the action of modulated penetrating radiation and radiation pulses. The author explores particular features of the acoustic fields of moving thermoradiation sound sources, sound excitation by single high-energy particles, and the efficiency and optimal conditions of thermoradiation sound generation. Experimental results follow the theoretical discussions, and these clearl...

  19. Gradient for the acoustic VTI full waveform inversion based on the instantaneous traveltime sensitivity kernels

    KAUST Repository

    Djebbi, Ramzi

    2015-08-19

    The instantaneous traveltime is able to reduce the non-linearity of full waveform inversion (FWI) that originates from the wrapping of the phase. However, the adjoint state method in this case requires a total of 5 modeling calculations to compute the gradient. Also, considering the larger modeling cost for anisotropic wavefield extrapolation and the necessity to use a line-search algorithm to estimate a step length that depends on the parameters scale, we propose to calculate the gradient based on the instantaneous traveltime sensitivity kernels. We, specifically, use the sensitivity kernels computed using dynamic ray-tracing to build the gradient. The resulting update is computed using a matrix decomposition and accordingly the computational cost is reduced. We consider a simple example where an anomaly is embedded into a constant background medium and we compute the update for the VTI wave equation parameterized using vh, η and ε.

  20. High-resolution velocimetry in energetic tidal currents using a convergent-beam acoustic Doppler profiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sellar, Brian [Univ. of Edinburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom); Harding, Samuel F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richmond, Marshall C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-07-16

    An array of convergent acoustic Doppler velocimeters has been developed and tested for the high resolution measurement of three-dimensional tidal flow velocities in an energetic tidal site. This configuration has been developed to increase spatial resolution of velocity measurements in comparison to conventional acoustic Doppler profilers (ADPs) which characteristically use diverging acoustic beams emanating from a single instrument. This is achieved using converging acoustic beams with a sample volume at the focal point of 0.03 m3. The array is also able to simultaneously measure three-dimensional velocity components in a profile throughout the water column, and as such is referred to herein as a converging-beam acoustic Doppler profiler (CADP). Mid-depth profiling is achieved through integration of the sensor platform with the operational Alstom 1MW DeepGen-IV Tidal Turbine. This proof-of-concept paper outlines system configuration and comparison to measurements provided by co-installed reference instrumentation. Comparison of CADP to standard ADP velocity measurements reveals a mean difference of 8 mm/s, standard deviation of 18 mm/s, and order-of-magnitude reduction in realizable length-scale. CADP focal point measurements compared to a proximal single-beam reference show peak cross-correlation coefficient of 0.96 over 4.0 s averaging period and a 47% reduction in Doppler noise. The dual functionality of the CADP as a profiling instrument with a high resolution focal point make this configuration a unique and valuable advancement in underwater velocimetry enabling improved turbulence, resource and structural loading quantification and validation of numerical simulations. Alternative modes of operation have been implemented including noise-reducing bi-static sampling. Since waves are simultaneously measured it is expected that derivatives of this system will be a powerful tool in wave-current interaction studies.

  1. [A simple highly sensitive recording microspectrophotometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govardovskiĭ, V I; Zueva, L V

    1988-04-01

    A design of the recording microspectrophotometer is described. The instrument possesses an absolutely flat base line and quantum-noise limited detection threshold. Two principal elements of the design are the "jumping" stage, and the logarithmic amplifier with the phase-sensitive detector which converts the photomultiplier output into the optical density signal. The performance of the instrument is illustrated by the recordings of visual pigment spectra in single photoreceptors.

  2. Note: High-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvesting using Helmholtz resonator and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Aichao; Li, Ping; Wen, Yumei; Lu, Caijiang; Peng, Xiao; He, Wei; Zhang, Jitao; Wang, Decai; Yang, Feng

    2014-06-01

    A high-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvester consisting of a compliant-top-plate Helmholtz resonator (HR) and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams is proposed. Due to the high mechanical quality factor of beams and the strong multimode coupling of HR cavity, top plate and beams, the high efficiency in a broad bandwidth is obtained. Experiment exhibits that the proposed harvester at 170-206 Hz has 28-188 times higher efficiency than the conventional harvester using a HR with a piezoelectric composite diaphragm. For input acoustic pressure of 2.0 Pa, the proposed harvester exhibits 0.137-1.43 mW output power corresponding to 0.035-0.36 μW cm(-3) volume power density at 170-206 Hz.

  3. Note: High-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvesting using Helmholtz resonator and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Aichao; Li, Ping, E-mail: liping@cqu.edu.cn; Wen, Yumei; Lu, Caijiang; Peng, Xiao; He, Wei; Zhang, Jitao; Wang, Decai; Yang, Feng [Research Center of Sensors and Instruments, College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2014-06-15

    A high-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvester consisting of a compliant-top-plate Helmholtz resonator (HR) and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams is proposed. Due to the high mechanical quality factor of beams and the strong multimode coupling of HR cavity, top plate and beams, the high efficiency in a broad bandwidth is obtained. Experiment exhibits that the proposed harvester at 170–206 Hz has 28–188 times higher efficiency than the conventional harvester using a HR with a piezoelectric composite diaphragm. For input acoustic pressure of 2.0 Pa, the proposed harvester exhibits 0.137–1.43 mW output power corresponding to 0.035–0.36 μW cm{sup −3} volume power density at 170–206 Hz.

  4. Ion acoustic shock and solitary waves in highly relativistic plasmas with nonextensive electrons and positrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, M. G.; Talukder, M. R.; Hossain Ali, M.

    2016-01-01

    The Korteweg-de Vries Burgers (KdVB) -like equation is derived to study the characteristics of nonlinear propagation of ion acoustic solitions in a highly relativistic plasma containing relativistic ions and nonextensive distribution of electrons and positrons using the well known reductive perturbation technique. The KdVB-like equation is solved employing the Bernoulli's equation method taking unperturbed positron to electron concentration ratio, electron to positron temperature ratio, strength of nonextensivity, ion kinematic viscosity, and highly relativistic streaming factor. It is found that these parameters significantly modify the structures of the solitonic excitation. The ion acoustic shock profiles are observed due to the influence of ion kinematic viscosity. In the absence of dissipative term to the KdVB equation, compressive and rarefactive solitons are observed in case of superthermality, but only compressive solitons are found for the case of subthermality.

  5. Novel Acoustic Loading of a Mass Spectrometer: Toward Next-Generation High-Throughput MS Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Ian; Stearns, Rick; Pringle, Steven; Wingfield, Jonathan; Datwani, Sammy; Hall, Eric; Ghislain, Luke; Majlof, Lars; Bachman, Martin

    2016-02-01

    High-throughput, direct measurement of substrate-to-product conversion by label-free detection, without the need for engineered substrates or secondary assays, could be considered the "holy grail" of drug discovery screening. Mass spectrometry (MS) has the potential to be part of this ultimate screening solution, but is constrained by the limitations of existing MS sample introduction modes that cannot meet the throughput requirements of high-throughput screening (HTS). Here we report data from a prototype system (Echo-MS) that uses acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) to transfer femtoliter-scale droplets in a rapid, precise, and accurate fashion directly into the MS. The acoustic source can load samples into the MS from a microtiter plate at a rate of up to three samples per second. The resulting MS signal displays a very sharp attack profile and ions are detected within 50 ms of activation of the acoustic transducer. Additionally, we show that the system is capable of generating multiply charged ion species from simple peptides and large proteins. The combination of high speed and low sample volume has significant potential within not only drug discovery, but also other areas of the industry.

  6. Use of acoustic vortices in acoustic levitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic fields are known to exert forces on the surfaces of objects. These forces are noticeable if the sound pressure is sufficiently high. Two phenomena where acoustic forces are relevant are: i) acoustic levitation, where strong standing waves can hold small objects at certain positions...... of acoustical vortices uses an efficient numerical implementation based on the superposition of two orthogonal sound fields with a delay of 90° between them. It is shown that acoustic levitation and the use of acoustic vortices can be combined to manipulate objects in an efficient and controlled manner without...

  7. High-Sensitivity GaN Microchemical Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Kyung-ah; Yang, Baohua; Liao, Anna; Moon, Jeongsun; Prokopuk, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    Systematic studies have been performed on the sensitivity of GaN HEMT (high electron mobility transistor) sensors using various gate electrode designs and operational parameters. The results here show that a higher sensitivity can be achieved with a larger W/L ratio (W = gate width, L = gate length) at a given D (D = source-drain distance), and multi-finger gate electrodes offer a higher sensitivity than a one-finger gate electrode. In terms of operating conditions, sensor sensitivity is strongly dependent on transconductance of the sensor. The highest sensitivity can be achieved at the gate voltage where the slope of the transconductance curve is the largest. This work provides critical information about how the gate electrode of a GaN HEMT, which has been identified as the most sensitive among GaN microsensors, needs to be designed, and what operation parameters should be used for high sensitivity detection.

  8. Microfluidic pumping through miniaturized channels driven by ultra-high frequency surface acoustic waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shilton, Richie J., E-mail: richard.shilton@iit.it [Center for Nanotechnology Innovation @ NEST, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Travagliati, Marco [Center for Nanotechnology Innovation @ NEST, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy); NEST, Scuola Normale Superiore and Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Beltram, Fabio [NEST, Scuola Normale Superiore and Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Center for Nanotechnology Innovation @ NEST, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Cecchini, Marco, E-mail: marco.cecchini@nano.cnr.it [NEST, Scuola Normale Superiore and Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2014-08-18

    Surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are an effective means to pump fluids through microchannel arrays within fully portable systems. The SAW-driven acoustic counterflow pumping process relies on a cascade phenomenon consisting of SAW transmission through the microchannel, SAW-driven fluid atomization, and subsequent coalescence. Here, we investigate miniaturization of device design, and study both SAW transmission through microchannels and the onset of SAW-driven atomization up to the ultra-high-frequency regime. Within the frequency range from 47.8 MHz to 754 MHz, we show that the acoustic power required to initiate SAW atomization remains constant, while transmission through microchannels is most effective when the channel widths w ≳ 10 λ, where λ is the SAW wavelength. By exploiting the enhanced SAW transmission through narrower channels at ultra-high frequencies, we discuss the relevant frequency-dependent length scales and demonstrate the scaling down of internal flow patterns and discuss their impact on device miniaturization strategies.

  9. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuttitta, Christina M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); The City University of New York, 2800 Victory Boulevard, Staten Island, NY 10314 (United States); Ericson, Daniel L. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); University at Buffalo, SUNY, 12 Capen Hall, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Scalia, Alexander [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Binghamton University, 4400 Vestal Parkway East, Binghamton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Roessler, Christian G. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Teplitsky, Ella [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5215 (United States); Joshi, Karan [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); PEC University of Technology, Chandigarh (India); Campos, Olven [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33414 (United States); Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Orville, Allen M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S., E-mail: soares@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic high-throughput screening method is described for harvesting protein crystals and combining the protein crystals with chemicals such as a fragment library. Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s{sup −1}) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.

  10. Imaging living cells with a combined high-resolution multi-photon-acoustic microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkl, Selma; Weiss, Eike; Stark, Martin; Stracke, Frank; Riemann, Iris; Lemor, Robert; König, Karsten

    2007-02-01

    With increasing demand for in-vivo observation of living cells, microscope techniques that do not need staining become more and more important. In this talk we present a combined multi-photon-acoustic microscope with the possibility to measure synchronously properties addressed by ultrasound and two-photon fluorescence. Ultrasound probes the local mechanical properties of a cell, while the high resolution image of the two-photon fluorescence delivers insight in cell morphology and activity. In the acoustic part of the microscope an ultrasound wave, with a frequency of GHz, is focused by an acoustic sapphire lens and detected by a piezo electric transducer assembled to the lens. The achieved lateral resolution is in the range of 1μm. Contrast in the images arises mainly from the local absorption of sound in the cells, related to properties, such as mass density, stiffness and viscose damping. Additionally acoustic microscopy can access the cell shape and the state of the cell membrane as it is a intrinsic volume scanning technique.The optical part bases on the emission of fluorescent biomolecules naturally present in cells (e.g. NAD(P)H, protophorphyrin IX, lipofuscin, melanin). The nonlinear effect of two-photon absorption provides a high lateral and axial resolution without the need of confocal detection. In addition, in the near-IR cell damages are drastically reduced in comparison to direct excitation in the visible or UV. Both methods can be considered as minimal invasive, as they relay on intrinsic contrast mechanisms and dispense with the need of staining. First results on living cells are presented and discussed.

  11. Inversion of High Frequency Acoustic Data for Sediment Properties Needed for the Detection and Classification of UXOs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-26

    inversion testing. Due to time limitations and to facilitate the deployments of both sonars, the 7125s were deployed using a pole mount on the...FINAL REPORT Inversion of High Frequency Acoustic Data for Sediment Properties Needed for the Detection and Classification of UXOs SERDP...2015 Inversion of High Frequency Acoustic Data for Sediment Properties Needed for the Detection and Classification of UXO’s W912HQ-12-C-0049 MR

  12. Angular measurement of acoustic reflection coefficients by the inversion of V(z, t) data with high frequency time-resolved acoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Bai, Xiaolong; Yang, Keji; Ju, Bing-Feng

    2012-01-01

    For inspection of mechanical properties and integrity of critical components such as integrated circuits or composite materials by acoustic methodology, it is imperative to evaluate their acoustic reflection coefficients, which are in close correlation with the elastic properties, thickness, density, and attenuation and interface adhesion of these layered structures. An experimental method based on angular spectrum to evaluate the acoustic coefficient as a function of the incident angle, θ, and frequency, ω, is presented with high frequency time-resolved acoustic microscopy. In order to achieve a high spatial resolution for evaluation of thin plates with thicknesses about one or two wavelengths, a point focusing transducer with a nominal center frequency of 25 MHz is adopted. By measuring the V(z, t) data in pulse mode, the reflection coefficient, R(θ, ω), can be reconstructed from its two-dimensional spectrum. It brings simplicity to experimental setup and measurement procedure since only single translation of the transducer in the vertical direction is competent for incident angle and frequency acquisition. It overcomes the disadvantages of the conventional methods requiring the spectroscopy for frequency scanning and/or ultrasonic goniometer for angular scanning. Two substrates of aluminum and Plexiglas and four stainless plates with various thicknesses of 100 μm, 150 μm, 200 μm, and 250 μm were applied. The acoustic reflection coefficients are consistent with the corresponding theoretical calculations. It opened the way of non-destructive methodology to evaluate the elastic and geometrical properties of very thin multi-layers structures simultaneously.

  13. Triggers for a high sensitivity charm experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, D.C.

    1994-07-01

    Any future charm experiment clearly should implement an E{sub T} trigger and a {mu} trigger. In order to reach the 10{sup 8} reconstructed charm level for hadronic final states, a high quality vertex trigger will almost certainly also be necessary. The best hope for the development of an offline quality vertex trigger lies in further development of the ideas of data-driven processing pioneered by the Nevis/U. Mass. group.

  14. Scalloped electrodes for highly sensitive electrical measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vazquez Rodriguez, Patricia; Dimaki, Maria; Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    2011-01-01

    In this work we introduce a novel out-of-plane electrode with pronounced scalloped surface and high aspect ratio for electrical recordings of brain tissue in vitro, with the aim to reduce significantly the impedance of the measuring system. The profile and height of the structures is tailored...... by means of silicon fabrication techniques that sharpen them progressively and in a controlled manner. We will show that the use of the scalloped area achieves a great decrease in impedance, which is very significant for a reduction of noise in electrical measurements. The measured impedance reflects...

  15. Direct and sustained intracellular delivery of exogenous molecules using acoustic-transfection with high frequency ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sangpil; Kim, Min Gon; Chiu, Chi Tat; Hwang, Jae Youn; Kim, Hyung Ham; Wang, Yingxiao; Shung, K. Kirk

    2016-02-01

    Controlling cell functions for research and therapeutic purposes may open new strategies for the treatment of many diseases. An efficient and safe introduction of membrane impermeable molecules into target cells will provide versatile means to modulate cell fate. We introduce a new transfection technique that utilizes high frequency ultrasound without any contrast agents such as microbubbles, bringing a single-cell level targeting and size-dependent intracellular delivery of macromolecules. The transfection apparatus consists of an ultrasonic transducer with the center frequency of over 150 MHz and an epi-fluorescence microscope, entitled acoustic-transfection system. Acoustic pulses, emitted from an ultrasonic transducer, perturb the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane of a targeted single-cell to induce intracellular delivery of exogenous molecules. Simultaneous live cell imaging using HeLa cells to investigate the intracellular concentration of Ca2+ and propidium iodide (PI) and the delivery of 3 kDa dextran labeled with Alexa 488 were demonstrated. Cytosolic delivery of 3 kDa dextran induced via acoustic-transfection was manifested by diffused fluorescence throughout whole cells. Short-term (6 hr) cell viability test and long-term (40 hr) cell tracking confirmed that the proposed approach has low cell cytotoxicity.

  16. Numerical simulation of the processes in the normal incidence tube for high acoustic pressure levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedotov, E. S.; Khramtsov, I. V.; Kustov, O. Yu.

    2016-10-01

    Numerical simulation of the acoustic processes in an impedance tube at high levels of acoustic pressure is a way to solve a problem of noise suppressing by liners. These studies used liner specimen that is one cylindrical Helmholtz resonator. The evaluation of the real and imaginary parts of the liner acoustic impedance and sound absorption coefficient was performed for sound pressure levels of 130, 140 and 150 dB. The numerical simulation used experimental data having been obtained on the impedance tube with normal incidence waves. At the first stage of the numerical simulation it was used the linearized Navier-Stokes equations, which describe well the imaginary part of the liner impedance whatever the sound pressure level. These equations were solved by finite element method in COMSOL Multiphysics program in axisymmetric formulation. At the second stage, the complete Navier-Stokes equations were solved by direct numerical simulation in ANSYS CFX in axisymmetric formulation. As the result, the acceptable agreement between numerical simulation and experiment was obtained.

  17. High-rate wireless data communications: An underwater acoustic communications framework at the physical layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bessios Anthony G.

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A variety of signal processing functions are performed by Underwater Acoustic Systems. These include: 1 detection to determine presence or absence of information signals in the presence of noise, or an attempt to describe which of a predetermined finite set of possible messages { m i , i , ... , M } the signal represents; 2 estimation of some parameter θ ˆ associated with the received signal (i.e. range, depth, bearing angle, etc.; 3 classification and source identification; 4 dynamics tracking; 5 navigation (collision avoidance and terminal guidance; 6 countermeasures; and 7 communications. The focus of this paper is acoustic communications. There is a global current need to develop reliable wireless digital communications for the underwater environment, with sufficient performance and efficiency to substitute for costly wired systems. One possible goal is a wireless system implementation that insures underwater terminal mobility. There is also a vital need to improve the performance of the existing systems in terms of data-rate, noise immunity, operational range, and power consumption, since, in practice, portable high-speed, long range, compact, low-power systems are desired. We concede the difficulties associated with acoustic systems and concentrate on the development of robust data transmission methods anticipating the eventual need for real time or near real time video transmission. An overview of the various detection techniques and the general statistical digital communication problem is given based on a statistical decision theory framework. The theoretical formulation of the underwater acoustic data communications problem includes modeling of the stochastic channel to incorporate a variety of impairments and environmental uncertainties, and proposal of new compensation strategies for an efficient and robust receiver design.

  18. Multipurpose High Sensitivity Radiation Detector: Terradex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alpat, Behcet [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Perugia and INFN Sezione di Perugia (Italy)]. E-mail: behcet.alpat@pg.infn.it; Aisa, Damiano [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Perugia and INFN Sezione di Perugia (Italy); Bizzarri, Marco [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Perugia and INFN Sezione di Perugia (Italy); Blasko, Sandor [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Perugia and INFN Sezione di Perugia (Italy); Esposito, Gennaro [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Perugia and INFN Sezione di Perugia (Italy); Farnesini, Lucio [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Perugia and INFN Sezione di Perugia (Italy); Fiori, Emmanuel [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Perugia and INFN Sezione di Perugia (Italy); Papi, Andrea [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Perugia and INFN Sezione di Perugia (Italy); Postolache, Vasile [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Perugia and INFN Sezione di Perugia (Italy); Renzi, Francesca [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Perugia and INFN Sezione di Perugia (Italy); Ionica, Romeo [Politecnica University of Bucarest, Splaiul Indipendentei, Bucharest (Romania); Manolescu, Florentina [Space Science Institute of Bucharest, Maugurele, Bucharest (Romania); Ozkorucuklu, Suat [Suleyman Demirel Universitesi, Isparta (Turkey); Denizli, Haluk [Abant Izzet Baysal Universitesi, Bolu (Turkey); Tapan, Ilhan [Uludag Universitesi, Bursa (Turkey); Ercan Pilicer [Uludag Universitesi, Bursa (Turkey); Egidi, Felice [SITE Technology, Carsoli (Italy); Moretti, Cesare [SITE Technology, Carsoli(AQ) (Italy); Dicola, Luca [SITE Technology, Carsoli(AQ) (Italy)

    2007-05-11

    Terradex project aims to realise an accurate and programmable multiparametric tool which will measure relevant physical quantities such as observation time, energy and type of all decay products of three naturally occurring decay chains of uranium and thorium series present in nature as well as the decay products of man-made radioactivity. The measurements described in this work are based on the performance tests of the first version of an instrument that is designed to provide high counting accuracy, by introducing self-triggering, delayed time-coincidence technique, of products of a given decay chain. In order to qualify the technique and to calibrate the Terradex, a {sup 222}Rn source is used. The continuous and accurate monitoring of radon concentration in air is realised by observing the alpha and beta particles produced by the decay of {sup 222}Rn and its daughters and tag each of them with a precise occurrence time. The validity of delayed coincident technique by using the state of the art electronics with application of novel data sampling and analysis methods are discussed. The flexibility of sampling protocols and the advantages of online calibration capability to achieve the highest level of precision in natural and man-made radiation measurements are also described.

  19. High-resolution velocimetry in energetic tidal currents using a convergent-beam acoustic Doppler profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellar, Brian; Harding, Samuel; Richmond, Marshall

    2015-08-01

    An array of single-beam acoustic Doppler profilers has been developed for the high resolution measurement of three-dimensional tidal flow velocities and subsequently tested in an energetic tidal site. This configuration has been developed to increase spatial resolution of velocity measurements in comparison to conventional acoustic Doppler profilers (ADPs) which characteristically use divergent acoustic beams emanating from a single instrument. This is achieved using geometrically convergent acoustic beams creating a sample volume at the focal point of 0.03 m3. Away from the focal point, the array is also able to simultaneously reconstruct three-dimensional velocity components in a profile throughout the water column, and is referred to herein as a convergent-beam acoustic Doppler profiler (C-ADP). Mid-depth profiling is achieved through integration of the sensor platform with the operational commercial-scale Alstom 1 MW DeepGen-IV Tidal Turbine deployed at the European Marine Energy Center, Orkney Isles, UK. This proof-of-concept paper outlines the C-ADP system configuration and comparison to measurements provided by co-installed reference instrumentation. Comparison of C-ADP to standard divergent ADP (D-ADP) velocity measurements reveals a mean difference of 8 mm s-1, standard deviation of 18 mm s-1, and an order of magnitude reduction in realisable length scale. C-ADP focal point measurements compared to a proximal single-beam reference show peak cross-correlation coefficient of 0.96 over 4.0 s averaging period and a 47% reduction in Doppler noise. The dual functionality of the C-ADP as a profiling instrument with a high resolution focal point make this configuration a unique and valuable advancement in underwater velocimetry enabling improved quantification of flow turbulence. Since waves are simultaneously measured via profiled velocities, pressure measurements and surface detection, it is expected that derivatives of this system will be a powerful tool in

  20. Piezoelectric Shunt Vibration Damping of F-15 Panel under High Acoustic Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shu-Yau; Turner, Travis L.; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2000-01-01

    At last year's SPIE symposium, we reported results of an experiment on structural vibration damping of an F-15 underbelly panel using piezoelectric shunting with five bonded PZT transducers. The panel vibration was induced with an acoustic speaker at an overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of about 90 dB. Amplitude reductions of 13.45 and 10.72 dB were achieved for the first and second modes, respectively, using single- and multiple-mode shunting. It is the purpose of this investigation to extend the passive piezoelectric shunt-damping technique to control structural vibration induced at higher acoustic excitation levels, and to examine the controllability and survivability of the bonded PZT transducers at these high levels. The shunting experiment was performed with the Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA) at the NASA Langley Research Center using the same F-15 underbelly panel. The TAFA is a progressive wave tube facility. The panel was mounted in one wall of the TAFA test section using a specially designed mounting fixture such that the panel was subjected to grazing-incidence acoustic excitation. Five PZT transducers were used with two shunt circuits designed to control the first and second modes of the structure between 200 and 400 Hz. We first determined the values of the shunt inductance and resistance at an OASPL of 130 dB. These values were maintained while we gradually increased the OASPL from 130 to 154 dB in 6-dB steps. During each increment, the frequency response function between accelerometers on the panel and the acoustic excitation measured by microphones, before and after shunting, were recorded. Good response reduction was observed up to the 148dB level. The experiment was stopped at 154 dB due to wire breakage from vibration at a transducer wire joint. The PZT transducers, however, were still bonded well on the panel and survived at this high dB level. We also observed shifting of the frequency peaks toward lower frequency when the OASPL

  1. High Frequency Acoustic Microscopy for the Determination of Porosity and Young's Modulus in High Burnup Uranium Dioxide Nuclear Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Mara; Laux, Didier; Cappia, Fabiola; Laurie, M.; Van Uffelen, P.; Rondinella, V. V.; Wiss, T.; Despaux, G.

    2016-06-01

    During irradiation UO2 nuclear fuel experiences the development of a non-uniform distribution of porosity which contributes to establish varying mechanical properties along the radius of the pellet. Radial variations of both porosity and elastic properties in high burnup UO2 pellet can be investigated via high frequency acoustic microscopy. For this purpose ultrasound waves are generated by a piezoelectric transducer and focused on the sample, after having travelled through a coupling liquid. The elastic properties of the material are related to the velocity of the generated Rayleigh surface wave (VR). A UO2 pellet with a burnup of 67 GWd/tU was characterized using the acoustic microscope installed in the hot cells of the JRC-ITU at a 90 MHz frequency, with methanol as coupling liquid. VR was measured at different radial positions. A good agreement was found, when comparing the porosity values obtained via acoustic microscopy with those determined using SEM image analysis, especially in the areas close to the centre. In addition, Young's modulus was calculated and its radial profile was correlated to the corresponding burnup profile and to the hardness radial profile data obtained by Vickers micro-indentation.

  2. Development of a high sensitive MEMS hydrophone using PVDF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Zhu, Bei; K. A, Jose

    2002-05-01

    The design and experimental evaluation of a PVDF-based MEMS hydrophone is presented in this paper. The basic structure of the hydrophone was fabricated on a silicon wafer using standard NMOS process technology. A MOSFET with extended gate electrode was designed as the interface circuit to the sensing material, which is a piezoelectric polymer, polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF). Acoustic impedance possessed by this piezoelectric material provides a reasonable match to water, which makes it very attractive for underwater applications. The electrical signal generated by the PVDF film was directly coupled to the gate of the MOSFET. To minimize the parasitic capacitance underneath the PVDF film and hence improve the device sensitivity, a thick photoresist was first employed as the dielectric layer under the extended gate electrode. For underwater operation, a waterproof Rho-C rubber encapsulated the hydrophone. A silicon nitride layer passivated the active device, which is a good barrier material to most mobile ions and solvents. The device after passivation also shows a lower noise level. The theoretical model developed to predict the sensitivity of the hydrophone shows a reasonable agreement between the theory and the experiment.

  3. A wearable and highly sensitive pressure sensor with ultrathin gold nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Shu; Schwalb, Willem; Wang, Yongwei; Chen, Yi; Tang, Yue; Si, Jye; Shirinzadeh, Bijan; Cheng, Wenlong

    2014-02-01

    Ultrathin gold nanowires are mechanically flexible yet robust, which are novel building blocks with potential applications in future wearable optoelectronic devices. Here we report an efficient, low-cost fabrication strategy to construct a highly sensitive, flexible pressure sensor by sandwiching ultrathin gold nanowire-impregnated tissue paper between two thin polydimethylsiloxane sheets. The entire device fabrication process is scalable, enabling facile large-area integration and patterning for mapping spatial pressure distribution. Our gold nanowires-based pressure sensors can be operated at a battery voltage of 1.5 V with low energy consumption (1.14 kPa-1) and high stability (>50,000 loading-unloading cycles). In addition, our sensor can resolve pressing, bending, torsional forces and acoustic vibrations. The superior sensing properties in conjunction with mechanical flexibility and robustness enabled real-time monitoring of blood pulses as well as detection of small vibration forces from music.

  4. Design optimization of high pressure and high temperature piezoresistive pressure sensor for high sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhe; Zhao, Yulong; Tian, Bian

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a design method for optimizing sensitivity of piezoresistive pressure sensor in high-pressure and high-temperature environment. In order to prove the method, a piezoresistive pressure sensor (HPTSS) is designed. With the purpose of increasing sensitivity and to improve the measurement range, the piezoresistive sensor adopts rectangular membrane and thick film structure. The configuration of piezoresistors is arranged according to the characteristic of the rectangular membrane. The structure and configuration of the sensor chip are analyzed theoretically and simulated by the finite element method. This design enables the sensor chip to operate in high pressure condition (such as 150 MPa) with a high sensitivity and accuracy. The silicon on insulator wafer is selected to guarantee the thermo stability of the sensor chip. In order to optimize the fabrication and improve the yield of production, an electric conduction step is devised. Series of experiments demonstrates a favorable linearity of 0.13% and a high accuracy of 0.48%. And the sensitivity of HTPSS is about six times as high as a conventional square-membrane sensor chip in the experiment. Compared with the square-membrane pressure sensor and current production, the strength of HPTTS lies in sensitivity and measurement. The performance of the HPTSS indicates that it could be an ideal candidate for high-pressure and high-temperature sensing in real application.

  5. Design optimization of high pressure and high temperature piezoresistive pressure sensor for high sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhe; Zhao, Yulong; Tian, Bian

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a design method for optimizing sensitivity of piezoresistive pressure sensor in high-pressure and high-temperature environment. In order to prove the method, a piezoresistive pressure sensor (HPTSS) is designed. With the purpose of increasing sensitivity and to improve the measurement range, the piezoresistive sensor adopts rectangular membrane and thick film structure. The configuration of piezoresistors is arranged according to the characteristic of the rectangular membrane. The structure and configuration of the sensor chip are analyzed theoretically and simulated by the finite element method. This design enables the sensor chip to operate in high pressure condition (such as 150 MPa) with a high sensitivity and accuracy. The silicon on insulator wafer is selected to guarantee the thermo stability of the sensor chip. In order to optimize the fabrication and improve the yield of production, an electric conduction step is devised. Series of experiments demonstrates a favorable linearity of 0.13% and a high accuracy of 0.48%. And the sensitivity of HTPSS is about six times as high as a conventional square-membrane sensor chip in the experiment. Compared with the square-membrane pressure sensor and current production, the strength of HPTTS lies in sensitivity and measurement. The performance of the HPTSS indicates that it could be an ideal candidate for high-pressure and high-temperature sensing in real application.

  6. Generating, Detecting, and Analyzing High Frequency Acoustic Signals in Accelerator-Grade Copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwood, Elizabeth L

    2002-12-11

    One of the major limitations on the Next Linear Collider (NLC), a high-gradient particle accelerator in development, is that sparks form within the copper structure, damaging the material. The sparks also generate high frequency acoustic signals that can be used as diagnostics to solve the problem. First, however, the signals' location, attenuation, and propagation must be established, so an effective method for generating and detecting these signals in a simple copper block is necessary. Impact trials with ball bearings and a BB gun as well as tests with a grinder, a laser, and a sparker were conducted to determine how to produce the greatest ratio of high to low frequency acoustic signals. The laser had the largest ratio, but the sparker was chosen because it also had high ratios and was both more practical and more analogous to the actual signals in the accelerator. Further tests were then conducted to determine the best sensor; an International Transducer Corporation 9020 1 N57 was chosen. Subsequent analysis of signals using this setup could establish the location and types of signals and, ultimately, how to solve the problem in the structure.

  7. A highly sensitive colorimetric and ratiometric sensor for fluoride ion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Wu Xu; Jin Tang; He Tian

    2008-01-01

    A new benzoimidazole-naphthalimide derivative 4 was synthesized and its photophysical properties were studied.This compound showed highly selectively and sensitive colorimetric and ratiometric sensing ability for fluoride anion.

  8. Design and Analyses of High Aspect Ratio Nozzles for Distributed Propulsion Acoustic Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dippold, Vance F., III

    2016-01-01

    A series of three convergent round-to-rectangular high-aspect ratio nozzles were designed for acoustics measurements. The nozzles have exit area aspect ratios of 8:1, 12:1, and 16:1. With septa inserts, these nozzles will mimic an array of distributed propulsion system nozzles, as found on hybrid wing-body aircraft concepts. Analyses were performed for the three nozzle designs and showed that the flow through the nozzles was free of separated flow and shocks. The exit flow was mostly uniform with the exception of a pair of vortices at each span-wise end of the nozzle.

  9. Ion-Acoustic Instability in the Presence of High Frequency Oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Sandu, D.; Schrittwieser, R.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements are presented of a standing ion-acoustic wave instability, which is excited by a positively biased grid inserted perpendicularly into the plasma column of a single-ended Q-machine, under the influence of a high frequency signal superimposed onto the positive voltage at the grid....... The experimental results show that in certain regions of the frequency and amplitude of the h.f. signal the ion wave instability is stabilized or destabilized. A possible explanation of these effects is presented....

  10. High Frequency Acoustic Reflectometry for Solid/Liquid Interface Characterization: Application to Droplet Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier, Julien; Toubal, Malika; Li, Sizhe; Campistron, Pierre; Callens, Dorothée; Thomy, Vincent; Senez, Vincent; Nongaillard, Bertrand

    Evolution of the local concentration in a 1 μL droplet of ethanol/water mixture during an evaporation process has been followed using high frequency acoustic reflectometry. This method has been developed for wetting characterization on micro/nanostructures and makes it possible to follow concentration evolution in a droplet deposited on a solid surface. This information gives the opportunity to predict wetting depending on surface tension linked to alcohol concentration evolution. The calibration of the method and concentration evolution in 50% and 30% ethanol droplets are presented. The evolution of a pure ethanol droplet composition is tracked so as to follow hydration process.

  11. Highly asymmetric interaction forces induced by acoustic waves in coupled plate structures

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Xiying; Zhang, Shenwei; Ke, Manzhu; Liu, Zhengyou

    2015-01-01

    Mutual forces can be induced between coupled structures when illuminated by external acoustic waves. In this Letter, we propose a concept of asymmetric interaction between two coupled plate-like structures, which is generated by oppositely incident plane waves. Besides the striking contrast in magnitude, the mutual force induced by one of the incidences can be tuned extremely strong due to the resonant excitation of the flexural plate modes. The highly asymmetric interaction with enhanced strength in single side should be potentially useful, such as in designing ultrasound instruments and sensors.

  12. High-Fidelity Prediction of Launch Vehicle Lift-off Acoustic Environment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Launch vehicles experience extreme acoustic loads during liftoff driven by the interaction of rocket plumes and plume-generated acoustic waves with ground...

  13. Temperature-dependent differences in the nonlinear acoustic behavior of ultrasound contrast agents revealed by high-speed imaging and bulk acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvana, Helen; Stride, Eleanor; Tang, Mengxing; Hajnal, Jo V; Eckersley, Robert

    2011-09-01

    Previous work by the authors has established that increasing the temperature of the suspending liquid from 20°C to body temperature has a significant impact on the bulk acoustic properties and stability of an ultrasound contrast agent suspension (SonoVue, Bracco Suisse SA, Manno, Lugano, Switzerland). In this paper the influence of temperature on the nonlinear behavior of microbubbles is investigated, because this is one of the most important parameters in the context of diagnostic imaging. High-speed imaging showed that raising the temperature significantly influences the dynamic behavior of individual microbubbles. At body temperature, microbubbles exhibit greater radial excursion and oscillate less spherically, with a greater incidence of jetting and gas expulsion, and therefore collapse, than they do at room temperature. Bulk acoustics revealed an associated increase in the harmonic content of the scattered signals. These findings emphasize the importance of conducting laboratory studies at body temperature if the results are to be interpreted for in vivo applications.

  14. A film bulk acoustic resonator-based high-performance pressure sensor integrated with temperature control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mengying; Zhao, Zhan; Du, Lidong; Fang, Zhen

    2017-04-01

    This paper presented a high-performance pressure sensor based on a film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR). The support film of the FBAR chip was made of silicon nitride and the part under the resonator area was etched to enhance the sensitivity and improve the linearity of the pressure sensor. A micro resistor temperature sensor and a micro resistor heater were integrated in the chip to monitor and control the operating temperature. The sensor chip was fabricated, and packaged in an oscillator circuit for differential pressure detection. When the detected pressure ranged from  ‑100 hPa to 600 hPa, the sensitivity of the improved FBAR pressure sensor was  ‑0.967 kHz hPa‑1, namely  ‑0.69 ppm hPa‑1, which was 19% higher than that of existing sensors with a complete support film. The nonlinearity of the improved sensor was less than  ±0.35%, while that of the existing sensor was  ±5%. To eliminate measurement errors from humidity, the temperature control system integrated in the sensor chip controlled the temperature of the resonator up to 75 °C, with accuracy of  ±0.015 °C and power of 20 mW.

  15. Photoacoustic cell using elliptical acoustic focusing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heritier, J.-M.; Fouquet, J. E.; Siegman, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    A photoacoustic cell has been developed in the form of an elliptical cylinder in which essentially all the acoustic energy generated by a laser beam passing down one axis is focused onto a cylindrical acoustic tranducer located along the other axis. Preliminary measurements on a liquid-filled cell of this design show high sensitivity and a notably clean impulse response. A similar design may be useful for photoacoustic measurements in vapors as well.

  16. Experimental investigation on dynamic response of aircraft panels excited by high-intensity acoustic loads in thermal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    WU, Z. Q.; LI, H. B.; ZHANG, W.; CHENG, H.; KONG, F. J.; LIU, B. R.

    2016-09-01

    Metallic and composite panels are the major components for thermal protection system of aircraft vehicles, which are exposed to a severe combination of aerodynamic, thermal and acoustic environments during hypersonic flights. A thermal-acoustic testing apparatus which simulates thermal and acoustic loads was used to validate the integrity and the reliability of these panels. Metallic and ceramic matrix composite flat panels were designed. Dynamic response tests of these panels were carried out using the thermal acoustic apparatus. The temperature of the metallic specimen was up to 400 °C, and the temperature of the composite specimen was up to 600 °C. Moreover, the acoustic load was over 160 dB. Acceleration responses of these testing panels were measured using high temperature instruments during the testing process. Results show that the acceleration root mean square values are dominated by sound pressure level of acoustic loads. Compared with testing data in room environment, the peaks of the acceleration dynamic response shifts obviously to the high frequency in thermal environment.

  17. The near-field acoustic levitation of high-mass rotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Z Y; Lü, P; Geng, D L; Zhai, W; Yan, N; Wei, B

    2014-10-01

    Here we demonstrate that spherical rotors with 40 mm diameter and 0-1 kg mass can be suspended more than tens of micrometers away from an ultrasonically vibrating concave surface by near-field acoustic radiation force. Their rotating speeds exceed 3000 rpm. An acoustic model has been developed to evaluate the near-field acoustic radiation force and the resonant frequencies of levitation system. This technique has potential application in developing acoustic gyroscope.

  18. The near-field acoustic levitation of high-mass rotors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Z. Y.; Lü, P.; Geng, D. L.; Zhai, W.; Yan, N.; Wei, B., E-mail: bbwei@nwpu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Here we demonstrate that spherical rotors with 40 mm diameter and 0-1 kg mass can be suspended more than tens of micrometers away from an ultrasonically vibrating concave surface by near-field acoustic radiation force. Their rotating speeds exceed 3000 rpm. An acoustic model has been developed to evaluate the near-field acoustic radiation force and the resonant frequencies of levitation system. This technique has potential application in developing acoustic gyroscope.

  19. Applications of adaptive focused acoustics to compound management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Elizabeth; Holland-Crimmin, Sue; Lupotsky, Brian; Chan, James; Curtis, Jon; Dobbs, Karen; Blaxill, Zoe

    2009-06-01

    Since the introduction of lithotripsy kidney stone therapy, Focused Acoustics and its properties have been thoroughly utilized in medicine and exploration. More recently, Compound Management is exploring its applications and benefits to sample integrity. There are 2 forms of Focused Acoustics: Acoustic Droplet Ejection and Adaptive Focused Acoustics, which work by emitting high-powered acoustic waves through water toward a focused point. This focused power results in noncontact plate-to-plate sample transfer or sample dissolution, respectively. For the purposes of this article, only Adaptive Focused Acoustics will be addressed. Adaptive Focused Acoustics uses high-powered acoustic waves to mix, homogenize, dissolve, and thaw samples. It facilitates transferable samples through noncontact, closed-container, isothermal mixing. Experimental results show significantly reduced mixing times, limited degradation, and ideal use for heat-sensitive compounds. Upon implementation, acoustic dissolution has reduced the number of samples requiring longer mixing times as well as reducing the number impacted by incomplete compound dissolution. It has also helped in increasing the overall sample concentration from 6 to 8 mM to 8 to 10 mM by ensuring complete compound solubilization. The application of Adaptive Focused Acoustics, however, cannot be applied to all Compound Management processes, such as sample thawing and low-volume sample reconstitution. This article will go on to describe the areas where Adaptive Focused Acoustics adds value as well as areas in which it has shown no clear benefit.

  20. HIGH-PRECISION PREDICTIONS FOR THE ACOUSTIC SCALE IN THE NONLINEAR REGIME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Hee-Jong; Eckel, Jonathan; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Mehta, Kushal; Metchnik, Marc; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Pinto, Phillip; Takahashi, Ryuichi; White, Martin; Xu, Xiaoying

    2010-09-10

    We measure shifts of the acoustic scale due to nonlinear growth and redshift distortions to a high precision using a very large volume of high-force-resolution simulations. We compare results from various sets of simulations that differ in their force, volume, and mass resolution. We find a consistency within 1.5-sigma for shift values from different simulations and derive shift alpha(z) -1 = (0.300\\pm 0.015)% [D(z)/D(0)]^{2} using our fiducial set. We find a strong correlation with a non-unity slope between shifts in real space and in redshift space and a weak correlation between the initial redshift and low redshift. Density-field reconstruction not only removes the mean shifts and reduces errors on the mean, but also tightens the correlations: after reconstruction, we recover a slope of near unity for the correlation between the real and redshift space and restore a strong correlation between the low and the initial redshifts. We derive propagators and mode-coupling terms from our N-body simulations and compared with Zeldovich approximation and the shifts measured from the chi^2 fitting, respectively. We interpret the propagator and the mode-coupling term of a nonlinear density field in the context of an average and a dispersion of its complex Fourier coefficients relative to those of the linear density field; from these two terms, we derive a signal-to-noise ratio of the acoustic peak measurement. We attempt to improve our reconstruction method by implementing 2LPT and iterative operations: we obtain little improvement. The Fisher matrix estimates of uncertainty in the acoustic scale is tested using 5000 (Gpc/h)^3 of cosmological PM simulations from Takahashi et al. (2009). (abridged)

  1. Experimental investigation of acoustic streaming in a cylindrical wave guide up to high streaming Reynolds numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyt, Ida; Bailliet, Hélène; Valière, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of streaming velocity are performed by means of Laser Doppler Velocimetry and Particle Image Velociimetry in an experimental apparatus consisting of a cylindrical waveguide having one loudspeaker at each end for high intensity sound levels. The case of high nonlinear Reynolds number ReNL is particularly investigated. The variation of axial streaming velocity with respect to the axial and to the transverse coordinates are compared to available Rayleigh streaming theory. As expected, the measured streaming velocity agrees well with the Rayleigh streaming theory for small ReNL but deviates significantly from such predictions for high ReNL. When the nonlinear Reynolds number is increased, the outer centerline axial streaming velocity gets distorted towards the acoustic velocity nodes until counter-rotating additional vortices are generated near the acoustic velocity antinodes. This kind of behavior is followed by outer streaming cells only and measurements in the near wall region show that inner streaming vortices are less affected by this substantial evolution of fast streaming pattern. Measurements of the transient evolution of streaming velocity provide an additional insight into the evolution of fast streaming.

  2. [Acoustically guided behavior in the early ontogeny of the long-eared owl: the development of hearing sensitivity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubeva, T V

    1996-01-01

    The development of hearing sensitivity was studied in 15 nestlings and 7 adult long eared owls by cochlear recording potentials. The dynamic of frequency threshold characteristics of cochlear microphonic, action potential of cochlear nerve, and electromyogram of reflectory contraction of middle ear muscle were followed from the 1st to 40 day posthatching. The upper limit of hearing determined by cochlear microphonic, was about 3 kHz on the 1st day after hatching, 7 kHz on the 6th day, and 10 kHz on the 11th. Within 11 days after hatching the low-frequency range of higher sensitivity was revealed (with the maximum at 0.5 kHz), which was the same as that of monotonic signals effective for stimulation of the feeding reaction. The middle frequency range of higher sensitivity corresponded to the spectrum of own vocalization of the nestlings. During the period of formation of the patterned vision there was a delay in development of low- and middle-frequency sensitivity of cochlear microphonic while the high-frequency thresholds continued to decrease. After this period the guiding stimulation for eliciting feeding reaction changes from the auditory for the visual. The action potential of the cochlear nerve could be recorded from the 6th day simultaneously with the appearance of locating head movements and the reflectory contraction of the middle ear muscle.

  3. Phenomenological Description of Acoustic Emission Processes Occurring During High-Pressure Sand Compaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Martín, Jordi; Muñoz-Ibáñez, Andrea; Grande-García, Elisa; Rodríguez-Cedrún, Borja

    2016-04-01

    Compaction, pore collapse and grain crushing have a significant impact over the hydrodynamic properties of sand formations. The assessment of the crushing stress threshold constitutes valuable information in order to assess the behavior of these formations provided that it can be conveniently identified. Because of the inherent complexities of the direct observation of sand crushing, different authors have developed several indirect methods, being acoustic emission a promising one. However, previous researches have evidenced that there are different processes triggering acoustic emissions which need to be carefully accounted. Worth mentioning among them are grain bearing, grain to container friction, intergranular friction and crushing. The work presented here addresses this purpose. A broadband acoustic emission sensor (PA MicroHF200) connected to a high-speed data acquisition system and control software (AeWIN for PCI1 2.10) has been attached to a steel ram and used to monitor the different processes occurring during the oedometric compaction of uniform quartz sand up to an axial load of about 110 MPa and constant temperature. Load was stepwise applied using a servocontrolled hydraulic press acting at a constant load rate. Axial strain was simultaneously measured with the aid of a LDT device. Counts, energy, event duration, rise time and amplitude were recorded along each experiment and after completion selected waveforms were transformed from the time to the frequency domain via FFT transform. Additional simplified tests were performed in order to isolate the frequency characteristics of the dominant processes occurring during sand compaction. Our results show that, from simple tests, it is possible to determine process-dependent frequency components. When considering more complex experiments, many of the studied processes overlap but it is still possible to identify when a particular one dominates as well as the likely onset of crushing.

  4. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuttitta, Christina M; Ericson, Daniel L; Scalia, Alexander; Roessler, Christian G; Teplitsky, Ella; Joshi, Karan; Campos, Olven; Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M; Sweet, Robert M; Soares, Alexei S

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s(-1)) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.

  5. Examination of the Measurement of Absorption Using the Reverberant Room Method for Highly Absorptive Acoustic Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.; Chris Nottoli; Eric Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    The absorption coefficient for material specimens are needed to quantify the expected acoustic performance of that material in its actual usage and environment. The ASTM C423-09a standard, "Standard Test Method for Sound Absorption and Sound Absorption Coefficients by the Reverberant Room Method" is often used to measure the absorption coefficient of material test specimens. This method has its basics in the Sabine formula. Although widely used, the interpretation of these measurements are a topic of interest. For example, in certain cases the measured Sabine absorption coefficients are greater than 1.0 for highly absorptive materials. This is often attributed to the diffraction edge effect phenomenon. An investigative test program to measure the absorption properties of highly absorbent melamine foam has been performed at the Riverbank Acoustical Laboratories. This paper will present and discuss the test results relating to the effect of the test materials' surface area, thickness and edge sealing conditions. A follow-on paper is envisioned that will present and discuss the results relating to the spacing between multiple piece specimens, and the mounting condition of the test specimen.

  6. Transplantation in highly HLA-sensitized patients: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim IK

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Irene K Kim, Ashley Vo, Stanley C Jordan Transplant Immunotherapy Program, Comprehensive Transplant Center, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Despite better understanding of the impact of development of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA antibody and numerous advancements in immunosuppressive therapy, the ability to successfully transplant highly sensitized patients remains a significant challenge. As the percentage of the waiting list becomes increasingly populated with highly sensitized patients, there is a growing demand for effective strategies to manage these patients. Over the past 20 years, desensitization therapies have been modified and developed, and are mainly utilized at transplant centers that have developed expertise. In addition, recognition that the highly sensitized patient population is disadvantaged on the transplant waiting list has led to recent changes in national kidney allocation policy. Furthermore, creative strategies, such as enrollment of sensitized patients into paired kidney exchange programs, have been developed to find compatible matches for these patients. The goal of this article is to address some of the specific challenges related to transplanting the highly sensitized patient at a high-volume transplant center with experience in desensitization and to review established and emerging solutions to help this patient population. Keywords: human leukocyte antigen, antibodies, desensitization, high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin, rituximab

  7. Time-Efficient High-Rate Data Flooding in One-Dimensional Acoustic Underwater Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jae Kyun; Seo, Bo-Min; Yun, Kyungsu; Cho, Ho-Shin

    2015-01-01

    Because underwater communication environments have poor characteristics, such as severe attenuation, large propagation delays and narrow bandwidths, data is normally transmitted at low rates through acoustic waves. On the other hand, as high traffic has recently been required in diverse areas, high rate transmission has become necessary. In this paper, transmission/reception timing schemes that maximize the time axis use efficiency to improve the resource efficiency for high rate transmission are proposed. The excellence of the proposed scheme is identified by examining the power distributions by node, rate bounds, power levels depending on the rates and number of nodes, and network split gains through mathematical analysis and numerical results. In addition, the simulation results show that the proposed scheme outperforms the existing packet train method.

  8. Time-Efficient High-Rate Data Flooding in One-Dimensional Acoustic Underwater Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Kyun Kwon

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Because underwater communication environments have poor characteristics, such as severe attenuation, large propagation delays and narrow bandwidths, data is normally transmitted at low rates through acoustic waves. On the other hand, as high traffic has recently been required in diverse areas, high rate transmission has become necessary. In this paper, transmission/reception timing schemes that maximize the time axis use efficiency to improve the resource efficiency for high rate transmission are proposed. The excellence of the proposed scheme is identified by examining the power distributions by node, rate bounds, power levels depending on the rates and number of nodes, and network split gains through mathematical analysis and numerical results. In addition, the simulation results show that the proposed scheme outperforms the existing packet train method.

  9. High Temperature Shear Horizontal Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer for Guided Wave Inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogia, Maria; Gan, Tat-Hean; Balachandran, Wamadeva; Livadas, Makis; Kappatos, Vassilios; Szabo, Istvan; Mohimi, Abbas; Round, Andrew

    2016-04-22

    Guided Wave Testing (GWT) using novel Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs) is proposed for the inspection of large structures operating at high temperatures. To date, high temperature EMATs have been developed only for thickness measurements and they are not suitable for GWT. A pair of water-cooled EMATs capable of exciting and receiving Shear Horizontal (SH₀) waves for GWT with optimal high temperature properties (up to 500 °C) has been developed. Thermal and Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations of the EMAT design have been performed and experimentally validated. The optimal thermal EMAT design, material selection and operating conditions were calculated. The EMAT was successfully tested regarding its thermal and GWT performance from ambient temperature to 500 °C.

  10. High Temperature Shear Horizontal Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer for Guided Wave Inspection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kogia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Guided Wave Testing (GWT using novel Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs is proposed for the inspection of large structures operating at high temperatures. To date, high temperature EMATs have been developed only for thickness measurements and they are not suitable for GWT. A pair of water-cooled EMATs capable of exciting and receiving Shear Horizontal (SH0 waves for GWT with optimal high temperature properties (up to 500 °C has been developed. Thermal and Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD simulations of the EMAT design have been performed and experimentally validated. The optimal thermal EMAT design, material selection and operating conditions were calculated. The EMAT was successfully tested regarding its thermal and GWT performance from ambient temperature to 500 °C.

  11. Mutagen sensitivity has high heritability: evidence from a twin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xifeng; Spitz, Margaret R; Amos, Christopher I; Lin, Jie; Shao, Lina; Gu, Jian; de Andrade, Mariza; Benowitz, Neal L; Shields, Peter G; Swan, Gary E

    2006-06-15

    Despite numerous studies showing that mutagen sensitivity is a cancer predisposition factor, the heritability of mutagen sensitivity has not been clearly established. In this report, we used a classic twin study design to examine the role of genetic and environmental factors on the mutagen sensitivity phenotype. Mutagen sensitivity was measured in peripheral blood lymphocytes from 460 individuals [148 pairs of monozygotic (MZ) twins, 57 pairs of dizygotic (DZ) twins, and 50 siblings]. The intraclass correlation coefficients were all significantly higher in MZ twins than in dizygotes (DZ pairs and MZ-sibling pairs combined) for sensitivity to four different mutagen challenges. Applying biometric genetic modeling, we calculated a genetic heritability of 40.7%, 48.0%, 62.5%, and 58.8% for bleomycin, benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide, gamma-radiation, and 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide sensitivity, respectively. This study provides the strongest and most direct evidence that mutagen sensitivity is highly heritable, thereby validating the use of mutagen sensitivity as a cancer susceptibility factor.

  12. Achieving sensitive, high-resolution laser spectroscopy at CRIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groote, R. P. de [Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven (Belgium); Lynch, K. M., E-mail: kara.marie.lynch@cern.ch [EP Department, CERN, ISOLDE (Switzerland); Wilkins, S. G. [The University of Manchester, School of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Collaboration: the CRIS collaboration

    2017-11-15

    The Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment, located at the ISOLDE facility, has recently performed high-resolution laser spectroscopy, with linewidths down to 20 MHz. In this article, we present the modifications to the beam line and the newly-installed laser systems that have made sensitive, high-resolution measurements possible. Highlights of recent experimental campaigns are presented.

  13. A highly sensitive optical detector for use in deep underwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, H.; Hayashino, T.; Ito, M.; Iwasaki, A.; Kawamorita, K.; Kawamoto, H.; Matsumoto, T.; Narita, S.; Takayama, T.; Tanaka, S.; Yamaguchi, A.; Aoki, T.; Mitsui, K.; Ohashi, Y.; Okada, A.; Fukawa, M.; Uehara, S.; Bolesta, J. W.; Gorham, P. W.; Kondo, S.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Mignard, M.; Mitiguy, R.; O'Connor, D. J.; Peterson, V. Z.; Roberts, A.; Rosen, M.; Stenger, V. J.; Takemori, D.; Wilkins, G.; Grieder, P. K. F.; Minkowski, P.; Kitamura, T.; Camerini, U.; Grogan, W.; Jaworski, M.; March, R.; Narita, T.; Nicklaus, D.

    1998-05-01

    The authors have developed an optical detector module for use in deep underwater experiments that will search for high-energy neutrinos from cosmic rays and astronomical sources. This module is sensitive to single photons, is operable under high pressure, functions automatically and is remotely controlled.

  14. Use of acoustic vortices in acoustic levitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic fields are known to exert forces on the surfaces of objects. These forces are noticeable if the sound pressure is sufficiently high. Two phenomena where acoustic forces are relevant are: i) acoustic levitation, where strong standing waves can hold small objects at certain positions......, counterbalancing their weight, and ii) acoustic vortices, spinning sound fields that can impinge angular momentum and cause rotation of objects. In this contribution, both force-creating sound fields are studied by means of numerical simulations. The Boundary Element Method is employed to this end. The simulation...... of acoustical vortices uses an efficient numerical implementation based on the superposition of two orthogonal sound fields with a delay of 90° between them. It is shown that acoustic levitation and the use of acoustic vortices can be combined to manipulate objects in an efficient and controlled manner without...

  15. Role of acoustic interface layer during high intensity focused ultrasound therapeutics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    After interface layer was simulated by the magnetic nano-particles in the egg white phantom, high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) at the same dosage was introduced to radiate the phantom in different depths to blow the acoustic interface layer to mimic "point" exposure. The results showed that the volumes of biological focal region (BFR) were enlarged when the acoustic focal region (AFR) is close with interface layer. This meant that the magnetic nano-particles enhanced the therapeutic efficiency of HIFU. When the distance of the AFR from the interface layer was 10 mm, the size and shape of the BFR were similar with those of the control group, but a larger lesion at the interface, which was harmful for treatment, was observed. When the distance of the AFR to the interface layer increased to 30 mm, the size and shape of the BFR were also similar to those of the control group. When the thickness of the interface layer diminished, the utility of enhancement decreased. Continuous increase of the safe area for treatment and decrease of the utility of enhancement were observed along with the abatement of the thickness of the interface layer

  16. Demodulation of acoustic telemetry binary phase shift keying signal based on high-order Duffing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bing-Nan; Liu, Chong-Xin; Ni, Jun-Kang; Zhao, Liang

    2016-10-01

    In order to grasp the downhole situation immediately, logging while drilling (LWD) technology is adopted. One of the LWD technologies, called acoustic telemetry, can be successfully applied to modern drilling. It is critical for acoustic telemetry technology that the signal is successfully transmitted to the ground. In this paper, binary phase shift keying (BPSK) is used to modulate carrier waves for the transmission and a new BPSK demodulation scheme based on Duffing chaos is investigated. Firstly, a high-order system is given in order to enhance the signal detection capability and it is realized through building a virtual circuit using an electronic workbench (EWB). Secondly, a new BPSK demodulation scheme is proposed based on the intermittent chaos phenomena of the new Duffing system. Finally, a system variable crossing zero-point equidistance method is proposed to obtain the phase difference between the system and the BPSK signal. Then it is determined that the digital signal transmitted from the bottom of the well is ‘0’ or ‘1’. The simulation results show that the demodulation method is feasible. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51177117) and the National Key Science & Technology Special Projects, China (Grant No. 2011ZX05021-005).

  17. Particle-turbulence-acoustic interactions in high-speed free-shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shallcross, Gregory; Buchta, David; Capecelatro, Jesse

    2016-11-01

    Experimental studies have shown that the injection of micro-water droplets in turbulent flows can be used to reduce the intensity of near-field pressure fluctuations. In this study, direct numerical simulation (DNS) is used to evaluate the effects of particle-turbulence-acoustic coupling for the first time. Simulations of temporally developing mixing layers are conducted for a range of Mach numbers and mass loadings. Once the turbulence reaches a self-similar state, the air-density shear layer is seeded with a random distribution of mono disperse water-density droplets. For M =0.9 to M =1.75, preliminary results show reductions in the near-field pressure fluctuations for moderate mass loadings, consistent with experimental studies under similar conditions. At high speed, the principle reduction of the normal velocity fluctuations, which increases with particle mass loading, appears to correlate to the reduction of the near-field radiated pressure fluctuations. These findings demonstrate that the DNS reproduces the observed particle-turbulence-acoustic phenomenology, and its complete space-time database can be used to further understand their interactions.

  18. Miniaturization of High-Throughput Epigenetic Methyltransferase Assays with Acoustic Liquid Handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Bonnie; Lesnick, John; Wang, Jing; Tang, Nga; Peters, Carl

    2016-02-01

    Epigenetics continues to emerge as an important target class for drug discovery and cancer research. As programs scale to evaluate many new targets related to epigenetic expression, new tools and techniques are required to enable efficient and reproducible high-throughput epigenetic screening. Assay miniaturization increases screening throughput and reduces operating costs. Echo liquid handlers can transfer compounds, samples, reagents, and beads in submicroliter volumes to high-density assay formats using only acoustic energy-no contact or tips required. This eliminates tip costs and reduces the risk of reagent carryover. In this study, we demonstrate the miniaturization of a methyltransferase assay using Echo liquid handlers and two different assay technologies: AlphaLISA from PerkinElmer and EPIgeneous HTRF from Cisbio.

  19. Rapid Growth of Ice Dendrite in Acoustically Levitated and Highly Undercooled Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕勇军; 解文军; 魏炳波

    2002-01-01

    Water drops with diameters ranging from 2.5 to 4 mm are highly undercooled by up to 24 K with the acousticlevitation technique. Compared to the case of water contained in a tube, acoustic levitation has efficientlyavoided the heterogeneous nucleation from container walls and consequently increased the undercooling level.However, the cavitation effect induced by ultrasound may prematurely catalyse nucleation, which hinders thefurther achievement of bulk undercooling. The growth velocity of ice dendrite determined experimentally inhighly undercooled water is characteristic of rapid dendritic growth, which reaches 0.17m/s at the undercoolingof 24 K. The Lipton-Kurz-Trivedi dendritic growth model is used to predict the kinetic characteristics of rapidgrowth of ice dendrite under high undercooling conditions, which shows good agreement with the experimentalresults.

  20. High time resolution PFISR and optical observations of naturally enhanced ion acoustic lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Michell

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Observations of naturally enhanced ion acoustic lines (NEIALs taken with the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR using a mode with very high time resolution are presented. The auroral event took place over Poker Flat, Alaska on 8 February 2007 at 09:35 UT (~22:00 MLT, and the radar data are complemented by common-volume high-resolution auroral imaging. The NEIALs occurred during only one of the standard 15-s integration periods. The raw data of this time show very intermittent NEIALs which occur only during a few very short time intervals (≤1 s within the 15-s period. The time sampling of the raw data, ~19 ms on average, allows study of the time development of the NEIALs, though there are indications that even finer time resolution would be of interest. The analysis is based on the assumption that the NEIAL returns are the result of Bragg scattering from ion-acoustic waves that have been enhanced significantly above thermal levels. The spectra of the raw data indicate that although the up- and down-shifted shoulders can both become enhanced at the same time, (within 19 ms, they are most often enhanced individually. The overall power in the up-and down-shifted shoulders is approximately equal throughout the event, with the exception of one time, when very large up-shifted power was observed with no corresponding down-shifted power. This indicates that during the 480 μs pulse, the strongly enhanced ion-acoustic waves were only traveling downward and not upward. The exact time that the NEIALs occurred was when the radar beam was on the boundary of a fast-moving (~10 km/s, bright auroral structure, as seen in the high resolution auroral imaging of the magnetic zenith. When viewed with high time resolution, the occurrence of NEIALs is associated with rapid changes in auroral luminosity within the radar field of view due to fast-moving auroral fine structures.

  1. Research of High Sensitivity Uncooled Infrared Detector Array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Pingchuan [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhang, Bo, E-mail: redmoon123456@126.com, E-mail: lhzyzb@126.com [Luohe Vocational Technology College, Luohe 462002 (China)

    2011-02-01

    The infrared thermal imaging technology has been widely used in military and civilian fields and the field of the infrared detection and infrared thermal imaging technology has been of concern for a long time. On infrared thermal imaging, its core components for the infrared focal plane arrays, how to develop a high sensitivity of the multi-focal plane infrared detector is a key issue. Although the Common focal plane array of quantum has high sensitivity, but it requires low temperature cooling work environment and led to complexity and high cost, difficult to compact. Conventional uncooled infrared focal plane array is contrast to the quantum focal plane arrays. Therefore, this article preceded by the uncooled infrared detector array to improve the wide temperature sensitivity in examining the feasibility PMN composite film, materials composition, structure design and preparation process technology.

  2. Distributions of the high temperature and the high pressure inside a single acoustically driven bubble

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    应崇福; 安宇

    2002-01-01

    The physical circumstances inside an acoustically driven single gas bubble in water has been intensively explored during the past few years. Starting from the results obtained for a typical case in a well known early paper (Wu, C. C., Roberts, P. H., Phys. Rev. Lett., 1993, 70(22): 3424) and introducing successively several corrections to the physical model, this paper computes in corresponding order the temporal and spatial distributions of significant physical parameters, including the temperature and the pressure, in the bubble around the moment of the bubble's violent collapse, until expectations in consistence with the present points of view are procured. For the peak temperature our results agree with the prevailing belief that in a typical stable single bubble it is of the order of ten thousand degrees.

  3. A highly directional transducer for multipath mitigation in high-frequency underwater acoustic communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Simon E; Emokpae, Lloyd; Nicholas, Michael; Edelmann, Geoffrey F

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a transducer design of the hollow cylinder type designed to minimize transmission multipath and the need for channel equalization over short acoustic communication distances in shallow water. Operating at 750 kHz, the half-maximum envelope of the main lobe is approximately 3°. The transducer was incorporated into a low-complexity modem system in which it acted as both transmitter and receiver. At-sea testing indicated that the system is capable of operating over horizontal distances of 5 m without evidence of multipath distortion. The system was also found to be effective as an omnidirectional transmitter/receiver in the 10-60 kHz band.

  4. Highly sensitive optical sensor system for blood leakage detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Jie, Chen; Sanae, Mizuno; Touma, Yasunori

    A highly sensitive method for the detection of blood leakage has been developed, and a practical sensor system for blood concentration measurement has been constructed. The present method is based on the attenuation of laser light by blood cells. The effects of the fluctuations of the incident laser light power are eliminated by normalizing the attenuated light intensity by the incident light intensity. A part of the incident laser light is reflected by a beam splitter mounted at the entrance of the test cell, of which the power is measured to provide base data for normalization. The optical path is extended to enhance sensitivity by using a pair of side mirrors. This multi-reflection method is very effective to increase sensitivity; the maximum sensitivity obtained for blood concentration is about 4 X 10 -6 by volume, which is significantly higher than that of the conventional sensors.

  5. Scalable photonic crystal chips for high sensitivity protein detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Feng; Clarke, Nigel; Patel, Parth; Loncar, Marko; Quan, Qimin

    2013-12-30

    Scalable microfabrication technology has enabled semiconductor and microelectronics industries, among other fields. Meanwhile, rapid and sensitive bio-molecule detection is increasingly important for drug discovery and biomedical diagnostics. In this work, we designed and demonstrated that photonic crystal sensor chips have high sensitivity for protein detection and can be mass-produced with scalable deep-UV lithography. We demonstrated label-free detection of carcinoembryonic antigen from pg/mL to μg/mL, with high quality factor photonic crystal nanobeam cavities.

  6. Experimental Investigation on a Highly Sensitive Atomic Magnetometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shu-Guang; XU Yun-Fei; WANG Zhao-Ying; LIU Yun-Xian; LIN Qiang

    2009-01-01

    A highly sensitive all-optical atomic magnetometer based on the magnetooptical effect which uses the advanced technique of single laser beam detection is reported and demonstrated experimentally.A sensitivityof 0.5 pT/Hz1/2 is obtained by analyzing the magnetic noise spectrum,which exceeds that of most traditional magnetometers.This kind of atomic magnetometer is very compact,has a low power consumption,and has a high theoretical sensitivity limit,which make it suitable for many applications.

  7. Free-jet acoustic investigation of high-radius-ratio coannular plug nozzles. Comprehensive data report, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, P. R.; Janardan, B. A.; Majjigi, R. K.; Shutiani, P. K.; Vogt, P. G.

    1981-01-01

    Six coannular plug nozzle configurations having inverted velocity and temperature profiles, and a baseline convergent conical nozzle were tested for simulated flight acoustic evaluation in General Electric's Anechoic Free-Jet Acoustic Facility. The nozzles were tested over a range of test conditions that are typical of a Variable Cycle Engine for application to advanced high speed aircraft. The outer stream radius ratio for most of the configurations was 0.853, and the inner-stream-outer-stream area ratio was tested in the range of 0.54. Other variables investigated were the influence of bypass struts, a simple noncontoured convergent-divergent outer stream nozzle for forward quadrant shock noise control, and the effects of varying outer stream radius and inner-stream-to-outer-stream velocity ratios on the flight noise signatures of the nozzles. It was found that in simulated flight, the high-radius-ratio coannular plug nozzles maintain their jet noise and shock noise reduction features previously observed in static testing. The presence of nozzle bypass structs will not significantly effect the acoustic noise reduction features of a General Electric-type nozzle design. A unique coannular plug nozzle flight acoustic spectral prediction method was identified and found to predict the measured results quite well. Special laser velocimeter and acoustic measurements were performed which have given new insight into the jet and shock noise reduction mechanisms of coannular plug nozzles with regard to identifying further beneficial research efforts.

  8. Acoustic comparison of Er,Cr:YSGG laser and dental high speed handpiece for primary anterior tooth preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorden, Monserrat; Chen, Jung-Wei; Easley, Elisabeth; Li, Yiming; Kurti, R. Steven

    The acoustics of a dental hard tissue laser (Er,Cr:YSGG laser, Waterlase MD, Biolase, USA) and a traditional dental high speed hand piece (Midwest®, Dentsply International, USA) were compared in vitro using a simple approach that can be easily adapted for in vivo studies. Thirty one extracted caries and restoration free primary anterior teeth were selected. These teeth were sectioned along a symmetry axis to give two identical halves for use in a split study. These halves were randomly assigned to either the laser (experimental) or the high speed (control) group. A miniature electret microphone was coupled to the sample using a polymer and used to collect the acoustic signal at the interface of the pulp chamber. This signal was captured periodically by a digitizing oscilloscope and multiple traces were stored for subsequent analysis. 2x1x1mm3 preparations were made according to manufacturers recommendations for the given method. Each cavity was prepared by the same clinician and calibration tests were performed to ensure consistency. The measurements indicated that the peak acoustic pressures as well as cumulative acoustic effects (due to duty cycle) were significantly higher (Phand piece than with the dental laser. Our study suggests the need for further investigations into the neurological implications of acoustic effects in dental patient care such as pain studies.

  9. High-sensitivity, high-speed continuous imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Scott A; Bender, III, Howard A

    2014-11-18

    A continuous imaging system for recording low levels of light typically extending over small distances with high-frame rates and with a large number of frames is described. Photodiode pixels disposed in an array having a chosen geometry, each pixel having a dedicated amplifier, analog-to-digital convertor, and memory, provide parallel operation of the system. When combined with a plurality of scintillators responsive to a selected source of radiation, in a scintillator array, the light from each scintillator being directed to a single corresponding photodiode in close proximity or lens-coupled thereto, embodiments of the present imaging system may provide images of x-ray, gamma ray, proton, and neutron sources with high efficiency.

  10. High-frequency combustion instability control through acoustic modulation at the inlet boundary for liquid rocket engine applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennewitz, John William

    This research investigation encompasses experimental tests demonstrating the control of a high-frequency combustion instability by acoustically modulating the propellant flow. A model rocket combustor burned gaseous oxygen and methane using a single-element, pentad-style injector. Flow conditions were established that spontaneously excited a 2430 Hz first longitudinal combustion oscillation at an amplitude up to p'/pc ≈ 6%. An acoustic speaker was placed at the base of the oxidizer supply to modulate the flow and alter the oscillatory behavior of the combustor. Two speaker modulation approaches were investigated: (1) Bands of white noise and (2) Pure sinusoidal tones. The first approach adjusted 500 Hz bands of white noise ranging from 0-500 Hz to 2000-2500 Hz, while the second implemented single-frequency signals with arbitrary phase swept from 500-2500 Hz. The results showed that above a modulation signal amplitude threshold, both approaches suppressed 95+% of the spontaneous combustion oscillation. By increasing the applied signal amplitude, a wider frequency range of instability suppression became present for these two acoustic modulation approaches. Complimentary to these experiments, a linear modal analysis was undertaken to investigate the effects of acoustic modulation at the inlet boundary on the longitudinal instability modes of a dump combustor. The modal analysis employed acoustically consistent matching conditions with a specific impedance boundary condition at the inlet to represent the acoustic modulation. From the modal analysis, a naturally unstable first longitudinal mode was predicted in the absence of acoustic modulation, consistent with the spontaneously excited 2430 Hz instability observed experimentally. Subsequently, a detailed investigation involving variation of the modulation signal from 0-2500 Hz and mean combustor temperature from 1248-1685 K demonstrated the unstable to stable transition of a 2300-2500 Hz first longitudinal mode. The

  11. Large pi-aromatic molecules as potential sensitizers for highly efficient dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imahori, Hiroshi; Umeyama, Tomokazu; Ito, Seigo

    2009-11-17

    Recently, dye-sensitized solar cells have attracted much attention relevant to global environmental issues. Thus far, ruthenium(II) bipyridyl complexes have proven to be the most efficient TiO(2) sensitizers in dye-sensitized solar cells. However, a gradual increment in the highest power conversion efficiency has been recognized in the past decade. More importantly, considering that ruthenium is a rare metal, novel dyes without metal or using inexpensive metal are desirable for highly efficient dye-sensitized solar cells. Large pi-aromatic molecules, such as porphyrins, phthalocyanines, and perylenes, are important classes of potential sensitizers for highly efficient dye-sensitized solar cells, owing to their photostability and high light-harvesting capabilities that can allow applications in thinner, low-cost dye-sensitized solar cells. Porphyrins possess an intense Soret band at 400 nm and moderate Q bands at 600 nm. Nevertheless, the poor light-harvesting properties relative to the ruthenium complexes have limited the cell performance of porphyrin-sensitized TiO(2) cells. Elongation of the pi conjugation and loss of symmetry in porphyrins cause broadening and a red shift of the absorption bands together with an increasing intensity of the Q bands relative to that of the Soret band. On the basis of the strategy, the cell performance of porphyrin-sensitized solar cells has been improved intensively by the enhanced light absorption. Actually, some push-pull-type porphyrins have disclosed a remarkably high power conversion efficiency (6-7%) that was close to that of the ruthenium complexes. Phthalocyanines exhibit strong absorption around 300 and 700 nm and redox features that are similar to porphyrins. Moreover, phthalocyanines are transparent over a large region of the visible spectrum, thereby enabling the possibility of using them as "photovoltaic windows". However, the cell performance was poor, owing to strong aggregation and lack of directionality in the

  12. Design and development of a synthetic acoustic antenna for highly directional sound measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Rinus

    1987-12-01

    A SYNThetic ACoustic ANtenna (SYNTACAN) for highly directional sound measurements with an average resolving power of 1.5 deg in the frequency range from 89 to 1413 Hz (4 octave bands) with resolution of 1/12 octave, was developed for measurement of sound emissions from individual sources on industrial areas. The applicability of SYNTACAN is illustrated with a large number of test measurements concerning resolution, focussing, correlations, screening, and coherence loss. Measurements of sound from large factories, sound radiation from rotor blades of wind turbines, and the estimation of the source height of passing vehicles are described. Similarity between the imaging technique of SYNTACAN and techniques in optical and radioastronomy, sonar, radar, and seismology is discussed. The influence of the finite length of the antenna and the disturbance of the wave propagation by turbulence in the medium, causing finite beam patterns and thus unsharp source images is considered.

  13. Effects of Noise and Absorption on High Frequency Measurements of Acoustic-Backscatter from Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiko Furusawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative echosounders operating at multiple frequencies (e.g., 18, 38, 70, 120, 200, 333, and 710 kHz are often used to observe fish and zooplankton and identify their species. At frequencies above 100 kHz, the absorption attenuation increases rapidly and decreases the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR. Also, incomplete compensation for the attenuation may result in measurement error. This paper addresses the effects of the attenuation and noise on high frequency measurements of acoustic backscatter from fish. It is shown that measurements of a fish with target strength of −40 dB at 200 m depth are limited by SNR to frequencies up to about 100 kHz. Above 100 kHz, absorption coefficients must be matched to local environmental conditions.

  14. Portable High Sensitivity and High Resolution Sensor to Determine Oxygen Purity Levels Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this Phase I STTR project is to develop a highly sensitive oxygen (O2) sensor, with high accuracy and precision, to determine purity levels of high...

  15. Aluminum nano-cantilevers for high sensitivity mass sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Zachary James; Boisen, Anja

    2005-01-01

    We have fabricated Al nano-cantilevers using a very simple one mask contact UV lithography technique with lateral dimensions under 500 nm and vertical dimensions of approximately 100 nm. These devices are demonstrated as highly sensitive mass sensors by measuring their dynamic properties. Further...

  16. Highly Sensitive AMS Measurement of 53Mn at CIAE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG; Ke-jun; HU; Hao; LIU; Guang-shan; HE; Ming; LI; Zhen-yu; DOU; Liang; XIE; Lin-bo; LIU; Jian-cheng; WANG; Xiang-gao; SHEN; Hong-tao; LIN; De-yu; ZHENG; Guo-wen; WANG; Xiao-bo; LI; Heng; LI; Chao-li; WU; Shao-yong; YOU; Qu-bo; JIN; Chun-sheng; CHEN; Zhi-gang; YUAN; Jian; JIANG; Shan

    2013-01-01

    Methods for highly sensitive AMS measurement of 53Mn were explored by extracting different Mn-containing molecular ions in ion source and using different chemical forms of sample materials.Preliminary results indicate that a method for AMS measurement of 53Mn has been established and a-155355

  17. Sensitivity Study of Strapdown Inertial Sensors in High Performance Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    system error varied with a change in heading 7K. ( xii 1 SENSITIVITY STUDY OF STRAPDOWN INERTIAL SENSORS IN HIGH PERFORMANCE APPLICATIONS I. Introduction...given in Tabla 10. 23 State Meaning o Basic Altitude Damped INS x(1) Error in East Longitude 5.7735 x 1O Ŗ arc min x(2) Error in North Latitude

  18. [Burner head with high sensitivity in atomic absorption spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, X; Yang, Y

    1998-12-01

    This paper presents a burner head with gas-sample separate entrance and double access, which is used for atomic absorption spectroscopy. According to comparison and detection, the device can improve sensitivity by a factor of 1 to 5. In the meantime it has properties of high stability and resistance to interference.

  19. Symmetry-Breaking as a Paradigm to Design Highly-Sensitive Sensor Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Palacios

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A large class of dynamic sensors have nonlinear input-output characteristics, often corresponding to a bistable potential energy function that controls the evolution of the sensor dynamics. These sensors include magnetic field sensors, e.g., the simple fluxgate magnetometer and the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID, ferroelectric sensors and mechanical sensors, e.g., acoustic transducers, made with piezoelectric materials. Recently, the possibilities offered by new technologies and materials in realizing miniaturized devices with improved performance have led to renewed interest in a new generation of inexpensive, compact and low-power fluxgate magnetometers and electric-field sensors. In this article, we review the analysis of an alternative approach: a symmetry-based design for highly-sensitive sensor systems. The design incorporates a network architecture that produces collective oscillations induced by the coupling topology, i.e., which sensors are coupled to each other. Under certain symmetry groups, the oscillations in the network emerge via an infinite-period bifurcation, so that at birth, they exhibit a very large period of oscillation. This characteristic renders the oscillatory wave highly sensitive to symmetry-breaking effects, thus leading to a new detection mechanism. Model equations and bifurcation analysis are discussed in great detail. Results from experimental works on networks of fluxgate magnetometers are also included.

  20. Microelectromechanical Resonant Accelerometer Designed with a High Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Su, Yan; Shi, Qin; Qiu, An-Ping

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the design and experimental evaluation of a silicon micro-machined resonant accelerometer (SMRA). This type of accelerometer works on the principle that a proof mass under acceleration applies force to two double-ended tuning fork (DETF) resonators, and the frequency output of two DETFs exhibits a differential shift. The dies of an SMRA are fabricated using silicon-on-insulator (SOI) processing and wafer-level vacuum packaging. This research aims to design a high-sensitivity SMRA because a high sensitivity allows for the acceleration signal to be easily demodulated by frequency counting techniques and decreases the noise level. This study applies the energy-consumed concept and the Nelder-Mead algorithm in the SMRA to address the design issues and further increase its sensitivity. Using this novel method, the sensitivity of the SMRA has been increased by 66.1%, which attributes to both the re-designed DETF and the reduced energy loss on the micro-lever. The results of both the closed-form and finite-element analyses are described and are in agreement with one another. A resonant frequency of approximately 22 kHz, a frequency sensitivity of over 250 Hz per g, a one-hour bias stability of 55 μg, a bias repeatability (1σ) of 48 μg and the bias-instability of 4.8 μg have been achieved. PMID:26633425

  1. Microelectromechanical Resonant Accelerometer Designed with a High Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the design and experimental evaluation of a silicon micro-machined resonant accelerometer (SMRA. This type of accelerometer works on the principle that a proof mass under acceleration applies force to two double-ended tuning fork (DETF resonators, and the frequency output of two DETFs exhibits a differential shift. The dies of an SMRA are fabricated using silicon-on-insulator (SOI processing and wafer-level vacuum packaging. This research aims to design a high-sensitivity SMRA because a high sensitivity allows for the acceleration signal to be easily demodulated by frequency counting techniques and decreases the noise level. This study applies the energy-consumed concept and the Nelder-Mead algorithm in the SMRA to address the design issues and further increase its sensitivity. Using this novel method, the sensitivity of the SMRA has been increased by 66.1%, which attributes to both the re-designed DETF and the reduced energy loss on the micro-lever. The results of both the closed-form and finite-element analyses are described and are in agreement with one another. A resonant frequency of approximately 22 kHz, a frequency sensitivity of over 250 Hz per g, a one-hour bias stability of 55 μg, a bias repeatability (1σ of 48 μg and the bias-instability of 4.8 μg have been achieved.

  2. Field testing of a convergent array of acoustic Doppler profilers for high-resolution velocimetry in energetic tidal currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, Samuel F.; Sellar, Brian; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2016-04-25

    An array of single-beam acoustic Doppler profilers has been developed for the high resolution measurement of three-dimensional tidal flow velocities and subsequently tested in an energetic tidal site. This configuration has been developed to increase spatial resolution of velocity measurements in comparison to conventional acoustic Doppler profilers (ADPs) which characteristically use divergent acoustic beams emanating from a single instrument. This is achieved using geometrically convergent acoustic beams creating a sample volume at the focal point of 0.03 m3. Away from the focal point, the array is also able to simultaneously reconstruct three-dimensional velocity components in a profile throughout the water column, and is referred to herein as a convergent-beam acoustic Doppler profiler (C-ADP). Mid-depth profiling is achieved through integration of the sensor platform with the operational commercial-scale Alstom 1MW DeepGen-IV Tidal Turbine deployed at the European Marine Energy Center, Orkney Isles, UK. This proof-of-concept paper outlines the C-ADP system configuration and comparison to measurements provided by co-installed reference instrumentation.

  3. Stability of the high-order finite elements for acoustic or elastic wave propagation with high-order time stepping

    KAUST Repository

    De Basabe, Jonás D.

    2010-04-01

    We investigate the stability of some high-order finite element methods, namely the spectral element method and the interior-penalty discontinuous Galerkin method (IP-DGM), for acoustic or elastic wave propagation that have become increasingly popular in the recent past. We consider the Lax-Wendroff method (LWM) for time stepping and show that it allows for a larger time step than the classical leap-frog finite difference method, with higher-order accuracy. In particular the fourth-order LWM allows for a time step 73 per cent larger than that of the leap-frog method; the computational cost is approximately double per time step, but the larger time step partially compensates for this additional cost. Necessary, but not sufficient, stability conditions are given for the mentioned methods for orders up to 10 in space and time. The stability conditions for IP-DGM are approximately 20 and 60 per cent more restrictive than those for SEM in the acoustic and elastic cases, respectively. © 2010 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 RAS.

  4. Highly sensitive detection using microring resonator and nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougot-Robin, K.; Hoste, J. W.; Le Thomas, N.; Bienstman, P.; Edel, J. B.

    2016-04-01

    One of the most significant challenges facing physical and biological scientists is the accurate detection and identification of single molecules in free-solution environments. The ability to perform such sensitive and selective measurements opens new avenues for a large number of applications in biological, medical and chemical analysis, where small sample volumes and low analyte concentrations are the norm. Access to information at the single or few molecules scale is rendered possible by a fine combination of recent advances in technologies. We propose a novel detection method that combines highly sensitive label-free resonant sensing obtained with high-Q microcavities and position control in nanoscale pores (nanopores). In addition to be label-free and highly sensitive, our technique is immobilization free and does not rely on surface biochemistry to bind probes on a chip. This is a significant advantage, both in term of biology uncertainties and fewer biological preparation steps. Through combination of high-Q photonic structures with translocation through nanopore at the end of a pipette, or through a solid-state membrane, we believe significant advances can be achieved in the field of biosensing. Silicon microrings are highly advantageous in term of sensitivity, multiplexing, and microfabrication and are chosen for this study. In term of nanopores, we both consider nanopore at the end of a nanopipette, with the pore being approach from the pipette with nanoprecise mechanical control. Alternatively, solid state nanopores can be fabricated through a membrane, supporting the ring. Both configuration are discussed in this paper, in term of implementation and sensitivity.

  5. Two-dimensional acoustic attenuation mapping of high-temperature interstitial ultrasound lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyréus, Per Daniel; Diederich, Chris

    2004-02-01

    simulations also indicated that the characterization of tissue acoustic and thermal properties over a large range of temperatures is critical for accurate treatment planning or design studies involving high-temperature interstitial ultrasound.

  6. Low-cost, high-power mechanical impact transducers for sonar and acoustic through-wall surveillance applications

    CERN Document Server

    Felber, Franklin

    2014-01-01

    A new concept is presented for mechanical acoustic transmitters and matched resonant receivers. The lightweight, compact, and low-cost transmitters produce high-power acoustic pulses at one or more discrete frequencies with very little input power. The transducer systems are well suited for coupling acoustic pulse energy into dense media, such as walls and water. Applications of the impact transducers are discussed, including detection and tracking of humans through walls and long-duration underwater surveillance by a low-cost network of autonomous, self-recharging, battery-operated sonobuoys. A conceptual design of a sonobuoy surveillance network for harbors and littoral waters is presented. An impact-transmitter and matched-receiver system that detected human motion through thick walls with only rudimentary signal processing is described, and results are presented. Signal processing methods for increasing the signal-to-noise ratio by several tens of dB are discussed.

  7. Design and Fabrication of High Sensitive Piezoresistive MEMS Accelerometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSHI A.B

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the design and fabrication of high sensitive single axis piezoresistive micro-accelerometer for 50 g application. MEMS based accelerometer structure comprise of flexure fixed at one end and having attached proof mass at other end. This structure is designed and simulated using Coventorware. The simulation results show the sensitivity of 4mV/g. The structure is fabricated in N type silicon (100 substrate using Silicon bulk micromachining. This paper also discuses the use of PECVD Si3N4 layer as a masking material for silicon micromachining and process flow for accelerometer.

  8. Cardiac troponins and high-sensitivity cardiac troponin assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Michael J; Jarolim, Petr

    2014-03-01

    Measurement of circulating cardiac troponins I and T has become integral to the diagnosis of myocardial infarction. This article discusses the structure and function of the troponin complex and the release of cardiac troponin molecules from the injured cardiomyocyte into the circulation. An overview of current cardiac troponin assays and their classification according to sensitivity is presented. The diagnostic criteria, role, and usefulness of cardiac troponin for myocardial infarction are discussed. In addition, several examples are given of the usefulness of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin assays for short-term and long-term prediction of adverse events.

  9. High Sensitivity Very Low Frequency Receiver for Earthquake Data Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, A.; Najmurrokhman, A.

    2017-03-01

    high sensitivity very low frequency (VLF) receiver is developed based on AD744 monolithic operational amplifier (Op-Amp) for earthquake data acquisition. In research related natural phenomena such as atmospheric noise, lightning and earthquake, a VLF receiver particularly with high sensitivity is utterly required due to the low power of VLF wave signals received by the antenna. The developed receiver is intended to have high sensitivity reception for the signals in frequency range of 10-30kHz allocated for earthquake observation. The VLF receiver which is portably designed is also equipped with an output port connectable to the soundcard of personal computer for further data acquisition. After obtaining the optimum design, the hardware realization is implemented on a printed circuit board (PCB) for experimental characterization. It shows that the sensitivity of realized VLF receiver is almost linear in the predefined frequency range for the input signals lower than -12dBm and to be quadratic for the higher level input signals.

  10. Acoustic detection of high energy neutrinos in sea water: status and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lahmann Robert

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The acoustic neutrino detection technique is a promising approach for future large-scale detectors with the aim of measuring the small expected flux of neutrinos at energies in the EeV-range and above. The technique is based on the thermo-acoustic model, which implies that the energy deposition by a particle cascade – resulting from a neutrino interaction in a medium with suitable thermal and acoustic properties – leads to a local heating and a subsequent characteristic pressure pulse that propagates in the surrounding medium. Current or recent test setups for acoustic neutrino detection have either been add-ons to optical neutrino telescopes or have been using acoustic arrays built for other purposes, typically for military use. While these arrays have been too small to derive competitive limits on neutrino fluxes, they allowed for detailed studies of the experimental technique. With the advent of the research infrastructure KM3NeT in the Mediterranean Sea, new possibilities will arise for acoustic neutrino detection. In this article, results from the “first generation” of acoustic arrays will be summarized and implications for the future of acoustic neutrino detection will be discussed.

  11. Acoustic detection of high energy neutrinos in sea water: status and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahmann, Robert

    2017-03-01

    The acoustic neutrino detection technique is a promising approach for future large-scale detectors with the aim of measuring the small expected flux of neutrinos at energies in the EeV-range and above. The technique is based on the thermo-acoustic model, which implies that the energy deposition by a particle cascade - resulting from a neutrino interaction in a medium with suitable thermal and acoustic properties - leads to a local heating and a subsequent characteristic pressure pulse that propagates in the surrounding medium. Current or recent test setups for acoustic neutrino detection have either been add-ons to optical neutrino telescopes or have been using acoustic arrays built for other purposes, typically for military use. While these arrays have been too small to derive competitive limits on neutrino fluxes, they allowed for detailed studies of the experimental technique. With the advent of the research infrastructure KM3NeT in the Mediterranean Sea, new possibilities will arise for acoustic neutrino detection. In this article, results from the "first generation" of acoustic arrays will be summarized and implications for the future of acoustic neutrino detection will be discussed.

  12. Study of the Tensile Damage of High-Strength Aluminum Alloy by Acoustic Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Sun

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The key material of high-speed train gearbox shells is high-strength aluminum alloy. Material damage is inevitable in the process of servicing. It is of great importance to study material damage for in-service gearboxes of high-speed train. Structural health monitoring methods have been widely used to study material damage in recent years. This study focuses on the application of an acoustic emission (AE method to quantify tensile damage evolution of high-strength aluminum alloy. First, a characteristic parameter was developed to connect AE signals with tensile damage. Second, a tensile damage quantification model was presented based on the relationship between AE counts and tensile behavior to study elastic deformation of tensile damage. Then tensile tests with AE monitoring were employed to collect AE signals and tensile damage data of nine samples. The experimental data were used to quantify tensile damage of high-strength aluminum alloy A356 to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. High Sensitivity Polymer Optical Fiber-Bragg-Grating-Based Accelerometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefani, Alessio; Andresen, Søren; Yuan, Wu

    2012-01-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of the first accelerometer based on a polymer optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) for operation at both 850 and 1550 nm. The devices have a flat frequency response over a 1-kHz bandwidth and a resonance frequency of about 3 kHz. The response is linear...... up to at least 15 g and sensitivities as high as 19 pm/g (shift in resonance wavelength per unit acceleration) have been demonstrated. Given that 15 g corresponds to a strain of less than 0.02% and that polymer fibers have an elastic limit of more than 1%, the polymer FBG accelerometer can measure...... very strong accelerations. We compare with corresponding silica FBG accelerometers and demonstrate that using polymer FBGs improves the sensitivity by more than a factor of four and increases the figure of merit, defined as the sensitivity times the resonance frequency squared....

  14. Vibro-acoustical instabilities induced by combustion dynamics in gas turbine combustors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pozarlik, Artur

    2010-01-01

    The lean premixed combustion suffers from a high sensitivity to thermo-acoustic instabilities which may occur in a combustion chamber of a gas turbine. The high level of acoustic excitation is hazardous to the combustion chamber walls (liner). The situation is even worse when mutual interaction betw

  15. Are Inflationary Predictions Sensitive to Very High Energy Physics?

    CERN Document Server

    Burgess, C P; Lemieux, F; Holman, R

    2003-01-01

    It has been proposed that the successful inflationary description of density perturbations on cosmological scales is sensitive to the details of physics at extremely high (trans-Planckian) energies. We test this proposal by examining how inflationary predictions depend on higher-energy scales within a simple model where the higher-energy physics is well understood. We find the best of all possible worlds: inflationary predictions are robust against the vast majority of high-energy effects, but can be sensitive to some effects in certain circumstances, in a way which does not violate ordinary notions of decoupling. This implies both that the comparison of inflationary predictions with CMB data is meaningful, and that it is also worth searching for small deviations from the standard results in the hopes of learning about very high energies.

  16. Design of highly sensitive multichannel bimetallic photonic crystal fiber biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Mohamed Farhat O.; Alrayk, Yassmin K. A.; Shaalan, Abdelhamid A.; El Deeb, Walid S.; Obayya, Salah S. A.

    2016-10-01

    A design of a highly sensitive multichannel biosensor based on photonic crystal fiber is proposed and analyzed. The suggested design has a silver layer as a plasmonic material coated by a gold layer to protect silver oxidation. The reported sensor is based on detection using the quasi transverse electric (TE) and quasi transverse magnetic (TM) modes, which offers the possibility of multichannel/multianalyte sensing. The numerical results are obtained using a finite element method with perfect matched layer boundary conditions. The sensor geometrical parameters are optimized to achieve high sensitivity for the two polarized modes. High-refractive index sensitivity of about 4750 nm/RIU (refractive index unit) and 4300 nm/RIU with corresponding resolutions of 2.1×10-5 RIU, and 2.33×10-5 RIU can be obtained according to the quasi TM and quasi TE modes of the proposed sensor, respectively. Further, the reported design can be used as a self-calibration biosensor within an unknown analyte refractive index ranging from 1.33 to 1.35 with high linearity and high accuracy. Moreover, the suggested biosensor has advantages in terms of compactness and better integration of microfluidics setup, waveguide, and metallic layers into a single structure.

  17. Sensitivity of HAWC to high-mass dark matter annihilations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeysekara, A. U.; Alfaro, R.; Alvarez, C.; Álvarez, J. D.; Arceo, R.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Ayala Solares, H. A.; Barber, A. S.; Baughman, B. M.; Bautista-Elivar, N.; Becerra Gonzalez, J.; Belmont, E.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Berley, D.; Bonilla Rosales, M.; Braun, J.; Caballero-Lopez, R. A.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Carramiñana, A.; Castillo, M.; Cotti, U.; Cotzomi, J.; de la Fuente, E.; De León, C.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz Hernandez, R.; Diaz-Cruz, L.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dingus, B. L.; DuVernois, M. A.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Fiorino, D. W.; Fraija, N.; Galindo, A.; Garfias, F.; González, M. M.; Goodman, J. A.; Grabski, V.; Gussert, M.; Hampel-Arias, Z.; Harding, J. P.; Hui, C. M.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Imran, A.; Iriarte, A.; Karn, P.; Kieda, D.; Kunde, G. J.; Lara, A.; Lauer, R. J.; Lee, W. H.; Lennarz, D.; León Vargas, H.; Linares, E. C.; Linnemann, J. T.; Longo, M.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Marinelli, A.; Martinez, H.; Martinez, O.; Martínez-Castro, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; McEnery, J.; Mendoza Torres, E.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P.; Moreno, E.; Mostafá, M.; Nellen, L.; Newbold, M.; Noriega-Papaqui, R.; Oceguera-Becerra, T.; Patricelli, B.; Pelayo, R.; Pérez-Pérez, E. G.; Pretz, J.; Rivière, C.; Rosa-González, D.; Ryan, J.; Salazar, H.; Salesa, F.; Sanchez, F. E.; Sandoval, A.; Schneider, M.; Silich, S.; Sinnis, G.; Smith, A. J.; Sparks Woodle, K.; Springer, R. W.; Taboada, I.; Toale, P. A.; Tollefson, K.; Torres, I.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Villaseñor, L.; Weisgarber, T.; Westerhoff, S.; Wisher, I. G.; Wood, J.; Yodh, G. B.; Younk, P. W.; Zaborov, D.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, H.; Abazajian, K. N.; Milagro Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a wide field-of-view detector sensitive to gamma rays of 100 GeV to a few hundred TeV. Located in central Mexico at 19° North latitude and 4100 m above sea level, HAWC will observe gamma rays and cosmic rays with an array of water Cherenkov detectors. The full HAWC array is scheduled to be operational in Spring 2015. In this paper, we study the HAWC sensitivity to the gamma-ray signatures of high-mass (multi-TeV) dark matter annihilation. The HAWC observatory will be sensitive to diverse searches for dark matter annihilation, including annihilation from extended dark matter sources, the diffuse gamma-ray emission from dark matter annihilation, and gamma-ray emission from nonluminous dark matter subhalos. Here we consider the HAWC sensitivity to a subset of these sources, including dwarf galaxies, the M31 galaxy, the Virgo cluster, and the Galactic center. We simulate the HAWC response to gamma rays from these sources in several well-motivated dark matter annihilation channels. If no gamma-ray excess is observed, we show the limits HAWC can place on the dark matter cross section from these sources. In particular, in the case of dark matter annihilation into gauge bosons, HAWC will be able to detect a narrow range of dark matter masses to cross sections below thermal. HAWC should also be sensitive to nonthermal cross sections for masses up to nearly 1000 TeV. The constraints placed by HAWC on the dark matter cross section from known sources should be competitive with current limits in the mass range where HAWC has similar sensitivity. HAWC can additionally explore higher dark matter masses than are currently constrained.

  18. Highly Sensitive Rayleigh Wave Hydrogen Sensors with WO3 Sensing Layers at Room Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Cheng; FAN Li; ZHANG Shu-Yi; YANG Yue-Tao; ZHOU Ding-Mao; SHUI Xiu-Ji

    2011-01-01

    Rayleigh wave hydrogen sensors based on 128° YX-LiNbO3 substrates with WO3 sensing layers operating at room temperature are studied.The experimental results indicate that the WO3 layers obtained by a sol-gel method have much higher sensitivities because the sensing layers produced by the sol-gel method have small grains and high roughness and porosity.It is also confirmed that in the sol-gel method,keeping WO3 solutions at low temperature and/or decreasing the viscosity of the solutions can decrease the grain sizes and increase the hydrogen-absorbability of the sensing layer.Under the optimized preparation conditions,the high sensitivity of the hydrogen sensors at room temperature is obtained,in which 1% hydrogen in natural air induces the frequency shift of 72 kHz at the operating frequency of 124.2 MHz.Surface acoustic wave (SAW) hydrogen sensors have attracted a great deal of attention so far,in which the sensors have achieved high sensitivity as the sensors were often operated at high temperature,such as higher than 100℃.[1-4] However,in these experiments,a heater and a thermostat were required,which induced the sensors to be more complicated and unfavorable for miniaturization,and limited their application at room temperature.Furthermore,the heater can induce extra power loss and risks of fire and explosion.%Rayleigh wave hydrogen sensors based on 128° YX-LiNbO3 substrates with WO3 sensing layers operating at room temperature are studied. The experimental results indicate that the WO3 layers obtained by a sol-gel method have much higher sensitivities because the sensing layers produced by the sol-gel method have small grains and high roughness and porosity. It is also confirmed that in the sol-gel method, keeping WO3 solutions at low temperature and/or decreasing the viscosity of the solutions can decrease the grain sizes and increase the hydrogen-absorbability of the sensing layer. Under the optimized preparation conditions, the high sensitivity of the

  19. Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers Applied to High Temperature Plates for Potential Use in the Solar Thermal Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kogia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Concentrated Solar Plants (CSPs are used in solar thermal industry for collecting and converting sunlight into electricity. Parabolic trough CSPs are the most widely used type of CSP and an absorber tube is an essential part of them. The hostile operating environment of the absorber tubes, such as high temperatures (400–550 °C, contraction/expansion, and vibrations, may lead them to suffer from creep, thermo-mechanical fatigue, and hot corrosion. Hence, their condition monitoring is of crucial importance and a very challenging task as well. Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs are a promising, non-contact technology of transducers that has the potential to be used for the inspection of large structures at high temperatures by exciting Guided Waves. In this paper, a study regarding the potential use of EMATs in this application and their performance at high temperature is presented. A Periodic Permanent Magnet (PPM EMAT with a racetrack coil, designed to excite Shear Horizontal waves (SH0, has been theoretically and experimentally evaluated at both room and high temperatures.

  20. Acoustic Droplet Ejection Applications for High-Throughput Screening of Infectious Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Lynn; White, E Lucile; Bostwick, James R

    2016-02-01

    When acoustic droplet ejection technology was first introduced for high-throughput applications, it was used primarily for dispensing compounds dissolved in DMSO. The high precision and accuracy achieved for low-volume transfers in this application were noted by those working outside of the compound management area, and interest was generated in expanding the scope of the technology to include other liquid types. Later-generation instruments included calibrations for several aqueous buffers that were applicable to the life sciences. The High Throughput Screening Center at Southern Research has made use of this range of liquid calibrations for the Infectious Disease Program. The original calibration for DMSO has allowed the preparation of assay-ready plates that can be sent to remote locations. This process was used as part of the collaboration between Southern Research and Galveston National Laboratory, University of Texas Medical Branch, to develop high-throughput screening for biological safety level 4 containment and to provide compounds for two pilot screens that were run there with BSL-4-level pathogens. The aqueous calibrations have been instrumental in miniaturizing assays used for infectious disease, such as qPCR, tissue culture infectious dose 50, and bacterial motility, to make them compatible with HTS operations.

  1. Postauricular reflexes elicited by soft acoustic clicks and loud noise probes: Reliability, prepulse facilitation, and sensitivity to picture contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, Rachel V; Benning, Stephen D

    2016-12-01

    The startle blink reflex is facilitated during early picture viewing, then inhibited by attention during pleasant and aversive pictures compared to neutral pictures, and finally potentiated during aversive pictures specifically. However, it is unclear whether the postauricular reflex, which is elicited by the same loud acoustic probe as the startle blink reflex but enhanced by appetitive instead of defensive emotion, has the same pattern and time course of emotional modulation. We examined this issue in a sample of 90 undergraduates using serially presented soft acoustic clicks that elicited postauricular (but not startle blink) reflexes in addition to standard startle probes. Postauricular reflexes elicited by both clicks and probes correlated during food and nurturant contents, during which they were potentiated compared to neutral pictures, suggesting clicks effectively elicit emotionally modulated postauricular reflexes. The postauricular reflex was initially facilitated during the first 500 ms of picture processing but was larger during pleasant than neutral pictures throughout picture processing, with larger effect sizes during the latter half of picture processing. Across reflexes and eliciting stimuli, measures of emotional modulation had higher coefficient alphas than magnitudes during specific picture contents within each valence, indicating that only emotional modulation measures assess higher-order appetitive or defensive processing. © 2016 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  2. Opto-Acoustic Biosensing with Optomechanofluidic Resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Kaiyuan; Carmon, Tal; Fan, Xudong; Bahl, Gaurav

    2014-01-01

    Opto-mechano-fluidic resonators (OMFRs) are a unique optofluidics platform that can measure the acoustic properties of fluids and bioanalytes in a fully-contained microfluidic system. By confining light in ultra-high-Q whispering gallery modes of OMFRs, optical forces such as radiation pressure and electrostriction can be used to actuate and sense structural mechanical vibrations spanning MHz to GHz frequencies. These vibrations are hybrid fluid-shell modes that entrain any bioanalyte present inside. As a result, bioanalytes can now reflect their acoustic properties on the optomechanical vibrational spectrum of the device, in addition to optical property measurements with existing optofluidics techniques. In this work, we investigate acoustic sensing capabilities of OMFRs using computational eigenfrequency analysis. We analyze the OMFR eigenfrequency sensitivity to bulk fluid-phase materials as well as nanoparticles, and propose methods to extract multiple acoustic parameters from multiple vibrational modes. ...

  3. Development of High Sensitivity Nuclear Emulsion and Fine Grained Emulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawahara, H.; Asada, T. [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Naka, T. [Institute of Advanced Research, Nagoya University (Japan); Naganawa, N.; Kuwabara, K.; Nakamura, M. [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Nuclear emulsion is a particle detector having high spacial resolution and angular resolution. It became useful for large statistics experiment thanks to the development of automatic scanning system. In 2010, a facility for emulsion production was introduced and R and D of nuclear emulsion began at Nagoya university. In this paper, we present results of development of the high sensitivity emulsion and fine grained emulsion for dark matter search experiment. Improvement of sensitivity is achieved by raising density of silver halide crystals and doping well-adjusted amount of chemicals. Production of fine grained emulsion was difficult because of unexpected crystal condensation. By mixing polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to gelatin as a binder, we succeeded in making a stable fine grained emulsion.

  4. Highly sensitive troponin T in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J K; Ueland, T; Aukrust, P;

    2012-01-01

    in decedents than in survivors. After adjustment for stroke severity, C-reactive protein, age, NT-proBNP and prior heart and/or renal failure, hsTnT levels were not a significant predictor of long-term all-cause or cardiovascular mortality. Conclusion: Elevated levels of hsTnT are frequently present......Background: Newly developed troponin assays have superior diagnostic and prognostic performance in acute coronary syndrome (ACS), when compared to conventional troponin assays; however, highly sensitive troponin has not been evaluated in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods: Highly...... sensitive troponin T (hsTnT) was measured daily during the first 4 days in 193 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke without overt ACS or atrial fibrillation. The patients were previously tested normal with a fourth-generation TnT assay. The patients were followed for 47 months, with all...

  5. Applications of Wigner high-order spectra in feature extraction of acoustic emission signals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Siwen; Liao Chuanjun; Li Xuejun

    2009-01-01

    The characteristics of typical AE signals initiated by mechanical component damages are analyzed. Based on the extracting principle of acoustic emission(AE) signals from damaged components, the paper introduces Wigner high-order spectra to the field of feature extraction and fault diagnosis of AE signals. Some main performances of Wigner bi-nary spectra, Wigner triple spectra and Wigner-Ville distribution (WVD) are discussed, including of time-frequency resolution, energy accumulation, reduction of crossing items and noise elimination. Wigncr triple spectra is employed to the fault diagnosis of rolling bearings with AE techniques. The fault features reading from experimental data analysis are clear, accurate and intuitionistic. The validity and accuracy of Wigner high-order spectra methods proposed agree quite well with simulation results. Simulation and research results indicate that wigncr high-order spectra is quite useful for condition monitoring and fault diagnosis in conjunction with AE technique, and has very important research and applica-tion values in feature extraction and faults diagnosis based on AE signals due to mechanical component damages.

  6. Investigation of Material Performance Degradation for High-Strength Aluminum Alloy Using Acoustic Emission Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibo Ai

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Structural materials damages are always in the form of micro-defects or cracks. Traditional or conventional methods such as micro and macro examination, tensile, bend, impact and hardness tests can be used to detect the micro damage or defects. However, these tests are destructive in nature and not in real-time, thus a non-destructive and real-time monitoring and characterization of the material damage is needed. This study is focused on the application of a non-destructive and real-time acoustic emission (AE method to study material performance degradation of a high-strength aluminum alloy of high-speed train gearbox shell. By applying data relative analysis and interpretation of AE signals, the characteristic parameters of materials performance were achieved and the failure criteria of the characteristic parameters for the material tensile damage process were established. The results show that the AE method and signal analysis can be used to accomplish the non-destructive and real-time detection of the material performance degradation process of the high-strength aluminum alloy. This technique can be extended to other engineering materials.

  7. High-speed noncontact acoustic inspection method for civil engineering structure using multitone burst wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Tsuneyoshi; Sugimoto, Kazuko; Kosuge, Nobuaki; Utagawa, Noriyuki; Katakura, Kageyoshi

    2017-07-01

    The noncontact acoustic inspection method focuses on the resonance phenomenon, and the target surface is measured by being vibrated with an airborne sound. It is possible to detect internal defects near the surface layer of a concrete structure from a long distance. However, it requires a fairly long measurement time to achieve the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio just to find some resonance frequencies. In our method using the conventional waveform “single-tone burst wave”, only one frequency was used for one-sound-wave emission to achieve a high S/N ratio using a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) at a safe low power (e.g., He-Ne 1 mW). On the other hand, in terms of the difference in propagation velocity between laser light and sound waves, the waveform that can be used for high-speed measurement was devised using plural frequencies for one-sound-wave emission (“multitone burst wave”). The measurement time at 35 measurement points has been dramatically decreased from 210 to 28 s when using this waveform. Accordingly, 7.5-fold high-speed measurement became possible. By some demonstration experiments, we confirmed the effectiveness of our measurement technique.

  8. Structural Glycomic Analyses at High Sensitivity: A Decade of Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, William R.; Novotny, Milos V.

    2013-06-01

    The field of glycomics has recently advanced in response to the urgent need for structural characterization and quantification of complex carbohydrates in biologically and medically important applications. The recent success of analytical glycobiology at high sensitivity reflects numerous advances in biomolecular mass spectrometry and its instrumentation, capillary and microchip separation techniques, and microchemical manipulations of carbohydrate reactivity. The multimethodological approach appears to be necessary to gain an in-depth understanding of very complex glycomes in different biological systems.

  9. Highly Sensitive Flexible Magnetic Sensor Based on Anisotropic Magnetoresistance Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiguang; Wang, Xinjun; Li, Menghui; Gao, Yuan; Hu, Zhongqiang; Nan, Tianxiang; Liang, Xianfeng; Chen, Huaihao; Yang, Jia; Cash, Syd; Sun, Nian-Xiang

    2016-11-01

    A highly sensitive flexible magnetic sensor based on the anisotropic magnetoresistance effect is fabricated. A limit of detection of 150 nT is observed and excellent deformation stability is achieved after wrapping of the flexible sensor, with bending radii down to 5 mm. The flexible AMR sensor is used to read a magnetic pattern with a thickness of 10 μm that is formed by ferrite magnetic inks.

  10. Shallow Water Acoustic Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports experimental research where high-frequency acoustic scattering and surface vibration measurements of fluid-loaded and non-fluid-loaded structures...

  11. Flat acoustic lens by acoustic grating with curled slits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Pai; Xiao, Bingmu; Wu, Ying, E-mail: ying.wu@kaust.edu.sa

    2014-10-03

    We design a flat sub-wavelength lens that can focus acoustic wave. We analytically study the transmission through an acoustic grating with curled slits, which can serve as a material with tunable impedance and refractive index for acoustic waves. The effective parameters rely on the geometry of the slits and are independent of frequency. A flat acoustic focusing lens by such acoustic grating with gradient effective refractive index is designed. The focusing effect is clearly observed in simulations and well predicted by the theory. We demonstrate that despite the large impedance mismatch between the acoustic lens and the matrix, the intensity at the focal point is still high due to Fabry–Perot resonance. - Highlights: • Expression of transmission coefficient of an acoustic grating with curled slits. • Non-dispersive and tunable effective medium parameters for the acoustic grating. • A flat acoustic focusing lens with gradient index by using the acoustic grating.

  12. Speech privacy and annoyance considerations in the acoustic environment of passenger cars of high-speed trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jin Yong; Hong, Joo Young; Jang, Hyung Suk; Kim, Jae Hyeon

    2015-12-01

    It is necessary to consider not only annoyance of interior noises but also speech privacy to achieve acoustic comfort in a passenger car of a high-speed train because speech from other passengers can be annoying. This study aimed to explore an optimal acoustic environment to satisfy speech privacy and reduce annoyance in a passenger car. Two experiments were conducted using speech sources and compartment noise of a high speed train with varying speech-to-noise ratios (SNRA) and background noise levels (BNL). Speech intelligibility was tested in experiment I, and in experiment II, perceived speech privacy, annoyance, and acoustic comfort of combined sounds with speech and background noise were assessed. The results show that speech privacy and annoyance were significantly influenced by the SNRA. In particular, the acoustic comfort was evaluated as acceptable when the SNRA was less than -6 dB for both speech privacy and noise annoyance. In addition, annoyance increased significantly as the BNL exceeded 63 dBA, whereas the effect of the background-noise level on the speech privacy was not significant. These findings suggest that an optimal level of interior noise in a passenger car might exist between 59 and 63 dBA, taking normal speech levels into account.

  13. Acoustic search for high-energy neutrinos in the Lake Baikal: Results and plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aynutdinov, V.; Avrorin, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Belolaptikov, I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Bogorodsky, D. [Applied Physics Institute of Irkutsk State University, Gagarin blvd. 20, Irkutsk (Russian Federation); Budnev, N., E-mail: nbudnev@api.isu.ru [Applied Physics Institute of Irkutsk State University, Gagarin blvd. 20, Irkutsk (Russian Federation); Danilchenko, I.; Domogatsky, G.; Doroshenko, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Dyachok, A. [Applied Physics Institute of Irkutsk State University, Gagarin blvd. 20, Irkutsk (Russian Federation); Dzhilkibaev, Zh.-A. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Fialkovsky, S. [Nizhni Novgorod State Technical University, Nizhni Novgorod (Russian Federation); Gaponenko, O. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Golubkov, K. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Gress, O.; Gress, T.; Grishin, O. [Applied Physics Institute of Irkutsk State University, Gagarin blvd. 20, Irkutsk (Russian Federation); Karnaukhov, V. [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics MSU, Moscow (Russian Federation); Klabukov, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Klimov, A. [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kochanov, A. [Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics, Lermontov st. 126a, Irkutsk (Russian Federation); and others

    2012-01-11

    We report the present status and perspectives of the feasibility study to detect cosmic neutrinos acoustically in the Lake Baikal. The results of background studies are presented. It was shown that most of the detected neutrino-like pulses come from the lake surface. This fact has been used in the project of an acoustic prototype detector that consists of compact Acoustic Sensor Modules with 4-channel antennas each, arranged above the Baikal Neutrino Telescope at shallow depths and 'listening' the deep-water layers of the lake.

  14. New acoustooptic effect: Constant high diffraction efficiency in wide range of acoustic power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, S. N.; Vainer, A. V.; Proklov, V. V.; Rezvov, Yu. G.

    2009-06-01

    A new effect, viz., acoustooptic Bragg diffraction without the overmodulation mode, in which the efficiency of the Bragg order attains its maximal value (close to 100%) upon an increase in the intensity of an acoustic wave and then remains practically unchanged, is predicted theoretically and observed experimentally. The effect takes place in the case of considerable bending of phase fronts of the acoustic field in the acoustooptic diffraction plane and attains its maximal value at a relatively low frequency of sound, a small width of a piezoelectric transducer, strong acoustic anisotropy of the medium, and a large distance between the light beam and the piezoelectric transducer.

  15. Recent trends in high spin sensitivity magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Aharon; Twig, Ygal; Ishay, Yakir

    2017-07-01

    new ideas, show how these limiting factors can be mitigated to significantly improve the sensitivity of induction detection. Finally, we outline some directions for the possible applications of high-sensitivity induction detection in the field of electron spin resonance.

  16. Pulsed Discharge Helium Ionization Detector for Highly Sensitive Aquametry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowry, Curtis D; Pimentel, Adam S; Sparks, Elizabeth S; Moorman, Matthew W; Achyuthan, Komandoor E; Manginell, Ronald P

    2016-01-01

    Trace moisture quantitation is crucial in medical, civilian and military applications. Current aquametry technologies are limited by the sample volume, reactivity, or interferences, and/or instrument size, weight, power, cost, and complexity. We report for the first time on the use of a pulsed discharge helium ionization detector (PDHID-D2) (∼196 cm(3)) for the sensitive (limit of detection, 0.047 ng; 26 ppm), linear (r(2) >0.99), and rapid (volume of liquid or gas. The relative humidity sensitivity was 0.22% (61.4 ppmv) with a limit of detection of less than 1 ng moisture with gaseous samples. The sensitivity was 10 to 100 to fold superior to competing technologies without the disadvantages inherent to these technologies. The PDHID-D2, due to its small footprint and low power requirement, has good size, weight, and power-portability (SWAPP) factors. The relatively low cost (∼$5000) and commercial availability of the PDHID-D2 makes our technique applicable to highly sensitive aquametry.

  17. Prediction and validation of high frequency vibration repsonses of NASA Mars Pathfinder spacecraft due to acoustic launch load using statistical energy analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, H. J.

    2002-01-01

    Mid and high frequency structural responses of a spacecraft during the launch condition are mainly dominated by the intense acoustic pressure field over the exterior of the launch vehicle. The prediction of structural responses due to the acoustic launch load is therefore an important analysis for engineers and scientists to correctly define various dynamics specifications of the spacecraft.

  18. Observation of the Fundamental Nyquist Noise Limit in an Ultra-High $Q$-Factor Cryogenic Bulk Acoustic Wave Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Goryachev, Maxim; van Kann, Frank; Galliou, Serge; Tobar, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    Thermal Nyquist noise fluctuations of high-$Q$ Bulk Acoustic Wave (BAW) cavities have been observed at cryogenic temperatures with a DC Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) amplifier. High $Q$ modes with bandwidths of few tens of milliHz produce thermal fluctuations with a Signal-To-Noise ratio of up to 23dB. The estimated effective temperature from the Nyquist noise is in good agreement with the physical temperature of the device, confirming the validity of the equivalent circuit model and the non-existence of any excess resonator self-noise. The measurements also confirm that the quality factor remains extremely high ($Q>10^8$ at low order overtones) for very weak (thermal) system motion at low temperatures, when compared to values measured with relatively strong external excitation. This result represents an enabling step towards operating such a high-Q acoustic device at the standard quantum limit.

  19. Development of a highly sensitive galvanic cell oxygen sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, H; Asakura, K

    1995-02-01

    A highly sensitive galvanic cell oxygen sensor was successfully developed for determining parts per billion of oxygen in high purity gases such as nitrogen, argon, etc. The response of this improved sensor was proportional in the range of oxygen concentrations from 10.0 ppm to the detection limit. The response speed in this study was improved to within 90 sec for a 90% response. The detection limit was tentatively found to be less than 0.4 ppb corresponding to S N = 2 .

  20. A Study of Relationship between the Acoustic Sensitivity of Vestibular System and the Ability to Trigger Sound-Evoked Muscle Reflex of the Middle Ear in Adults with Normal Hearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.F. Emami

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: The vestibular system is sound sensitive and the sensitivity is related to the saccule. The vestibular afferents are projected to the middle ear muscles (such as the stapedius. The goal of this research was studying the relationship between the vestibular hearing and the sound-evoked muscle reflex of the middle ear to 500 HZ. Materials & Methods: This study was a cross sectional-comparison done in audiology department of Sheikholreis C‍‍linic (Hamadan, Iran. The study groups consisted of thirty healthy people and thirty patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Inclusion criteria of the present study were to have normal hearing on pure tone audiometry, acoustic reflex, and speech discrimination scores. Based on ipsilateral acoustic reflex test at 500HZ, they were divided to normal and abnormal groups. Then they were evaluated by cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs and finally classified in three groups (N Normal ear , (CVUA Contra lateral vertiginous ear with unaffected saccular sensitivity to sound,(IVA Ipsilateral vertiginous ear with affected saccular sensitivity to sound. Results: Thirty affected ears (IVA with decreased vestibular excitability as detected by ab-normal cVEMPs, revealed abnormal findings of acoustic reflex at 500HZ. Whereas, both un-affected (CVUA and normal ears (N had normal results. Multiple comparisons of mean values of cVEMPs (p13,n23 and acoustic reflex at500HZ among the three groups were sig-nificant. The correlation between acoustic reflex at 500HZ and p13 latencies was significant. The n23 latencies showed significant correlation with acoustic reflex at 500HZ. Conclusion: The vestibular sensitivity to sound retains the ability to trigger sound-evoked re-flex of the middle ear at 500 HZ. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2014; 21 (2:99-104

  1. An electrochemical and high-speed imaging study of micropore decontamination by acoustic bubble entrapment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offin, Douglas G; Birkin, Peter R; Leighton, Timothy G

    2014-03-14

    Electrochemical and high-speed imaging techniques are used to study the abilities of ultrasonically-activated bubbles to clean out micropores. Cylindrical pores with dimensions (diameter × depth) of 500 μm × 400 μm (aspect ratio 0.8), 125 μm × 350 μm (aspect ratio 2.8) and 50 μm × 200 μm (aspect ratio 4.0) are fabricated in glass substrates. Each pore is contaminated by filling it with an electrochemically inactive blocking organic material (thickened methyl salicylate) before the substrate is placed in a solution containing an electroactive species (Fe(CN)6(3-)). An electrode is fabricated at the base of each pore and the Faradaic current is used to monitor the decontamination as a function of time. For the largest pore, decontamination driven by ultrasound (generated by a horn type transducer) and bulk fluid flow are compared. It is shown that ultrasound is much more effective than flow alone, and that bulk fluid flow at the rates used cannot decontaminate the pore completely, but that ultrasound can. In the case of the 125 μm pore, high-speed imaging is used to elucidate the cleaning mechanisms involved in ultrasonic decontamination and reveals that acoustic bubble entrapment is a key feature. The smallest pore is used to explore the limits of decontamination and it is found that ultrasound is still effective at this size under the conditions employed.

  2. The effect of process parameters on audible acoustic emissions from high-shear granulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansuld, Erin M; Briens, Lauren; Sayani, Amyn; McCann, Joe A B

    2013-02-01

    Product quality in high-shear granulation is easily compromised by minor changes in raw material properties or process conditions. It is desired to develop a process analytical technology (PAT) that can monitor the process in real-time and provide feedback for quality control. In this work, the application of audible acoustic emissions (AAEs) as a PAT tool was investigated. A condenser microphone was placed at the top of the air exhaust on a PMA-10 high-shear granulator to collect AAEs for a design of experiment (DOE) varying impeller speed, total binder volume and spray rate. The results showed the 10 Hz total power spectral densities (TPSDs) between 20 and 250 Hz were significantly affected by the changes in process conditions. Impeller speed and spray rate were shown to have statistically significant effects on granulation wetting, and impeller speed and total binder volume were significant in terms of process end-point. The DOE results were confirmed by a multivariate PLS model of the TPSDs. The scores plot showed separation based on impeller speed in the first component and spray rate in the second component. The findings support the use of AAEs to monitor changes in process conditions in real-time and achieve consistent product quality.

  3. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging of zebrafish embryo by high-frequency coded excitation sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinhyoung; Lee, Jungwoo; Lau, Sien Ting; Lee, Changyang; Huang, Ying; Lien, Ching-Ling; Kirk Shung, K

    2012-04-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging has been developed as a non-invasive method for quantitative illustration of tissue stiffness or displacement. Conventional ARFI imaging (2-10 MHz) has been implemented in commercial scanners for illustrating elastic properties of several organs. The image resolution, however, is too coarse to study mechanical properties of micro-sized objects such as cells. This article thus presents a high-frequency coded excitation ARFI technique, with the ultimate goal of displaying elastic characteristics of cellular structures. Tissue mimicking phantoms and zebrafish embryos are imaged with a 100-MHz lithium niobate (LiNbO₃) transducer, by cross-correlating tracked RF echoes with the reference. The phantom results show that the contrast of ARFI image (14 dB) with coded excitation is better than that of the conventional ARFI image (9 dB). The depths of penetration are 2.6 and 2.2 mm, respectively. The stiffness data of the zebrafish demonstrate that the envelope is harder than the embryo region. The temporal displacement change at the embryo and the chorion is as large as 36 and 3.6 μm. Consequently, this high-frequency ARFI approach may serve as a remote palpation imaging tool that reveals viscoelastic properties of small biological samples.

  4. Performance of terahertz metamaterials as high-sensitivity sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yanan; Zhang, Bo; Shen, Jingling

    2017-09-01

    A high-sensitivity sensor based on the resonant transmission characteristics of terahertz (THz) metamaterials was investigated, with the proposal and fabrication of rectangular bar arrays of THz metamaterials exhibiting a period of 180 μm on a 25 μm thick flexible polyimide. Varying the size of the metamaterial structure revealed that the length of the rectangular unit modulated the resonant frequency, which was verified by both experiment and simulation. The sensing characteristics upon varying the surrounding media in the sample were tested by simulation and experiment. Changing the surrounding medium from that of air to that of alcohol or oil produced resonant frequency redshifts of 80 GHz or 150 GHz, respectively, which indicates that the sensor possessed a high sensitivity of 667 GHz per unit of refractive index. Finally, the influence of the sample substrate thickness on the sensor sensitivity was investigated by simulation. It may be a reference for future sensor design.

  5. High-sensitivity strain visualization using electroluminescence technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Jo, Hongki

    2016-04-01

    Visualizing mechanical strain/stress changes is an emerging area in structural health monitoring. Several ways are available for strain change visualization through the color/brightness change of the materials subjected to the mechanical stresses, for example, using mechanoluminescence (ML) materials and mechanoresponsive polymers (MRP). However, these approaches were not effectively applicable for civil engineering system yet, due to insufficient sensitivity to low-level strain of typical civil structures and limitation in measuring both static and dynamic strain. In this study, design and validation for high-sensitivity strain visualization using electroluminescence technologies are presented. A high-sensitivity Wheatstone bridge, of which bridge balance is precisely controllable circuits, is used with a gain-adjustable amplifier. The monochrome electroluminescence (EL) technology is employed to convert both static and dynamic strain change into brightness/color change of the EL materials, through either brightness change mode (BCM) or color alternation mode (CAM). A prototype has been made and calibrated in lab, the linearity between strain and brightness change has been investigated.

  6. High-sensitive scanning laser magneto-optical imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Hironaru; Tonouchi, Masayoshi

    2010-01-01

    A high-sensitive scanning laser magneto-optical (MO) imaging system has been developed. The system is mainly composed of a laser source, galvano meters, and a high-sensitive differential optical-detector. Preliminary evaluation of system performance by using a Faraday indicator with a Faraday rotation coefficient of 3.47 x 10(-5) rad/microm Oe shows a magnetic sensitivity of about 5 microT, without any need for accumulation or averaging processing. Using the developed MO system we have succeeded in the fast and quantitative imaging of a rotationally symmetric magnetic field distribution around an YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-delta) (YBCO) strip line applied with dc-biased current, and also succeeded in the detection of quantized fine signals corresponding to magnetic flux quantum generation in a superconducting loop of an YBCO Josephson vortex flow transistor. Thus, the developed system enables us not only to do fast imaging and local signal detection but also to directly evaluate both the strength and direction of a magnetic signal.

  7. HIGHLY SENSITIVE CATALASE ELECTRODE BASED ON POLYPYRROLE FILMS WITH MICROCONTAINERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-ying Gao; Gao-quan Shi

    2006-01-01

    Highly sensitive catalase electrodes for sensing hydrogen peroxide have been fabricated based on polypyrrole films with microcontainers. The microcontainers have a cup-like morphology and are arranged in a density of 4000 units cm-2.Catalase was immobilized into the polypyrrole films with microcontainers (Ppy-mc), which were coated on a Pt substrate electrode. The catalase/Ppy-mc/Pt electrode showed linear response to hydrogen peroxide in the range of 0-18 mmol/L at a potential of -0.3 V (versus SCE). Its sensitivity was measured to be approximately 3.64 μA (mmol/L)-1 cm-2, which is about two times that of the electrode fabricated from a flat Ppy film (catalase/Ppy-flat/Pt electrode). The electrode is highly selective for hydrogen peroxide and its sensitivity is interfered by potential interferents such as ascorbic acid, urea and fructose. Furthermore, such catalase electrodes showed long-term storage stability of 15 days under dry conditions at 4℃.

  8. Low complexity iterative MLSE equalization in highly spread underwater acoustic channels

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Myburgh, HC

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available given to the equalization of underwater acoustic signals with long delay spreads. Due to the nature of the underwater acoustic channel (UAC), the inter-symbol interference (ISI) caused by multipath may extend over hundreds of symbols for moderate... are practically infeasible, as their computational complexities are exponentially related to the number of interfering symbols, rendering them computationally infeasible for UAC equaliza- tion. Attention has therefore been drawn to developing compu- tationally...

  9. Architectural acoustics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Long, Marshall

    2014-01-01

    .... Beginning with a brief history, it reviews the fundamentals of acoustics, human perception and reaction to sound, acoustic noise measurements, noise metrics, and environmental noise characterization...

  10. Development of highly sensitive monolithic interferometer for infrared planet search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang P.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We present the design, fabrication and testing of a highly sensitive monolithic interferometer for InfraRed Exoplanet Tracker (IR-ET. This interferometer is field-compensated, thermal-stable for working in the wavelength range between 0.8 and 1.35 μm. Two arms of the interferometer creates a fixed delay of 18.0 mm, which is optimized to have the best sensitivity for radial velocity measurements of slow-rotating M dwarfs for planet detection. IR-ET is aiming to reach 3–20 m/s Doppler precision for J<10 M dwarfs in less than 15 min exposures. We plan to conduct a planet survey around hundreds of nearby M dwarfs through collaborations with Astrophysical Research Consortium scientists in 2011–2014.

  11. Polymer-Particle Pressure-Sensitive Paint with High Photostability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Matsuda

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel fast-responding and paintable pressure-sensitive paint (PSP based on polymer particles, i.e. polymer-particle (pp-PSP. As a fast-responding PSP, polymer-ceramic (PC-PSP is widely studied. Since PC-PSP generally consists of titanium (IV oxide (TiO2 particles, a large reduction in the luminescent intensity will occur due to the photocatalytic action of TiO2. We propose the usage of polymer particles instead of TiO2 particles to prevent the reduction in the luminescent intensity. Here, we fabricate pp-PSP based on the polystyrene particle with a diameter of 1 μm, and investigate the pressure- and temperature-sensitives, the response time, and the photostability. The performances of pp-PSP are compared with those of PC-PSP, indicating the high photostability with the other characteristics comparable to PC-PSP.

  12. New application of superconductors: high sensitivity cryogenic light detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Cardani, L; Casali, N; Casellano, M G; Colantoni, I; Coppolecchia, A; Cosmelli, C; Cruciani, A; D'Addabbo, A; Di Domizio, S; Martinez, M; Tomei, C; Vignati, M

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we describe the current status of the CALDER project, which is developing ultra-sensitive light detectors based on superconductors for cryogenic applications. When we apply an AC current to a superconductor, the Cooper pairs oscillate and acquire kinetic inductance, that can be measured by inserting the superconductor in a LC circuit with high merit factor. Interactions in the superconductor can break the Cooper pairs, causing sizable variations in the kinetic inductance and, thus, in the response of the LC circuit. The continuous monitoring of the amplitude and frequency modulation allows to reconstruct the incident energy with excellent sensitivity. This concept is at the basis of Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs), that are characterized by natural aptitude to multiplexed read-out (several sensors can be tuned to different resonant frequencies and coupled to the same line), resolution of few eV, stable behavior over a wide temperature range, and ease in fabrication. We present the results ob...

  13. Highly sensitive detection of urinary cadmium to assess personal exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argun, Avni A.; Banks, Ashley M.; Merlen, Gwendolynne; Tempelman, Linda A. [Giner, Inc., 89 Rumford Ave., Newton 02466, MA United States (United States); Becker, Michael F.; Schuelke, Thomas [Fraunhofer USA – CCL, 1449 Engineering Research Ct., East Lansing 48824, MI (United States); Dweik, Badawi M., E-mail: bdweik@ginerinc.com [Giner, Inc., 89 Rumford Ave., Newton 02466, MA United States (United States)

    2013-04-22

    Highlights: ► An electrochemical sensor capable of detecting cadmium at parts-per-billion levels in urine. ► A novel fabrication method for Boron-Doped Diamond (BDD) ultramicroelectrode (UME) arrays. ► Unique combination of BDD UME arrays and a differential pulse voltammetry algorithm. ► High sensitivity, high reproducibility, and very low noise levels. ► Opportunity for portable operation to assess on-site personal exposure. -- Abstract: A series of Boron-Doped Diamond (BDD) ultramicroelectrode arrays were fabricated and investigated for their performance as electrochemical sensors to detect trace level metals such as cadmium. The steady-state diffusion behavior of these sensors was validated using cyclic voltammetry followed by electrochemical detection of cadmium in water and in human urine to demonstrate high sensitivity (>200 μA ppb{sup −1} cm{sup −2}) and low background current (<4 nA). When an array of ultramicroelectrodes was positioned with optimal spacing, these BDD sensors showed a sigmoidal diffusion behavior. They also demonstrated high accuracy with linear dose dependence for quantification of cadmium in a certified reference river water sample from the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) as well as in a human urine sample spiked with 0.25–1 ppb cadmium.

  14. [Highly sensitive detection technology for biological toxins applying sugar epitopes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzawa, Hirotaka

    2009-01-01

    The Shiga toxin is a highly poisonous protein produced by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157. This bacterial toxin causes the hemolytic uremic syndrome. Another plant toxin from castor beans, ricin, is also highly toxic. The toxin was used for assassination in London. Recently, there were several cases of postal matter containing ricin. Both toxins are categorized as biological warfare agents by the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention. Conventional detection methods based on the antigen-antibody reaction, PCR and other cell-free assays have been proposed. However, those approaches have drawbacks in terms of sensitivity, analytical time, or stability of the detection reagents. Therefore, development of a facile and sensitive detection method is essential. Here we describe new detection methods applying carbohydrate epitopes as the toxin ligands, which is based on the fact that the toxins bind cell-surface oligosaccharides. Namely, the Shiga toxin has an affinity for globobiosyl (Gb(2)) disaccharide, and ricin binds the beta-D-galactose residue. For Shiga toxin detection, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was applied. A polyanionic Gb(2)-glycopolymer was designed for this purpose, and it was used for the assembly of Gb(2)-chips using alternating layer-by-layer technology. The method allowed us to detect the toxin at a low concentration of LD(50). A synthetic carbohydrate ligand for ricin was designed and immobilized on the chips. SPR analysis with the chips allows us to detect ricin in a highly sensitive and facile manner (10 pg/ml, 5 min). Our present approaches provide a highly effective way to counter bioterrorism.

  15. Development of Acoustic Sensors for the ANTARES Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Naumann, C L; Graf, K; Hoessl, J; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Katz, U; Lahmann, R; Salomon, K; Naumann, Christopher Lindsay; Anton, Gisela; Graf, Kay; Hoessl, Juergen; Kappes, Alexander; Karg, Timo; Katz, Uli; Lahmann, Robert; Salomon, Karsten

    2005-01-01

    In order to study the possibility of acoustic detection of ultra-high energy neutrinos in water, our group is planning to deploy and operate an array of acoustic sensors using the ANTARES Neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. Therefore, acoustic sensor hardware has to be developed which is both capable of operation under the hostile conditions of the deep sea and at the same time provides the high sensitivity necessary to detect the weak pressure signals resulting from the neutrino's interaction in water. In this paper, two different approaches to building such sensors, as well as performance studies in the laboratory and in situ, are presented.

  16. Measurements of high-frequency acoustic scattering from glacially-eroded rock outcrops

    CERN Document Server

    Olson, Derek R; Sæbo, Torstein

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of acoustic backscattering from glacially-eroded rock outcrops were made off the coast of Sandefjord, Norway using a high-frequency synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) system. A method by which scattering strength can be estimated from data collected by a SAS system is detailed, as well as a method to estimate an effective calibration parameter for the system. Scattering strength measurements from very smooth areas of the rock outcrops agree with predictions from both the small-slope approximation and perturbation theory, and range between -33 and -26 dB at 20$^\\circ$ grazing angle. Scattering strength measurements from very rough areas of the rock outcrops agree with the sine-squared shape of the empirical Lambertian model and fall between -30 and -20 dB at 20$^\\circ$ grazing angle. Both perturbation theory and the small-slope approximation are expected to be inaccurate for the very rough area, and overestimate scattering strength by 8 dB or more for all measurements of very rough surfaces. Supportin...

  17. Development of high precision digital driver of acoustic-optical frequency shifter for ROG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Kong, Mei; Xu, Yameng

    2016-10-01

    We develop a high precision digital driver of the acoustic-optical frequency shifter (AOFS) based on the parallel direct digital synthesizer (DDS) technology. We use an atomic clock as the phase-locked loop (PLL) reference clock, and the PLL is realized by a dual digital phase-locked loop. A DDS sampling clock up to 320 MHz with a frequency stability as low as 10-12 Hz is obtained. By constructing the RF signal measurement system, it is measured that the frequency output range of the AOFS-driver is 52-58 MHz, the center frequency of the band-pass filter is 55 MHz, the ripple in the band is less than 1 dB@3MHz, the single channel output power is up to 0.3 W, the frequency stability is 1 ppb (1 hour duration), and the frequency-shift precision is 0.1 Hz. The obtained frequency stability has two orders of improvement compared to that of the analog AOFS-drivers. For the designed binary frequency shift keying (2-FSK) and binary phase shift keying (2-PSK) modulation system, the demodulating frequency of the input TTL synchronous level signal is up to 10 kHz. The designed digital-bus coding/decoding system is compatible with many conventional digital bus protocols. It can interface with the ROG signal detecting software through the integrated drive electronics (IDE) and exchange data with the two DDS frequency-shift channels through the signal detecting software.

  18. MIMO Underwater Acoustic Communications in Ports and Shallow Waters at Very High Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaultier Real

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hermes is a Single-Input Single-Output (SISO underwater acoustic modem that achieves very high-bit rate digital communications in ports and shallow waters. Here, the authors study the capability of Hermes to support Multiple-Input-Multiple-Output (MIMO technology. A least-square channel estimation algorithm is used to evaluate multiple MIMO channel impulse responses at the receiver end. A deconvolution routine is used to separate the messages coming from different sources. This paper covers the performance of both the channel estimation and the MIMO deconvolution processes using either simulated data or field data. The MIMO equalization performance is measured by comparing three relative root mean-squared errors (RMSE, obtained by calculations between the source signal (a pseudo-noise sequence and the corresponding received MIMO signal at various stages of the deconvolution process; prior to any interference removal, at the output of the Linear Equalization (LE process and at the output of an interference cancellation process with complete a priori knowledge of the transmitted signal. Using the simulated data, the RMSE using LE is −20.5 dB (where 0 dB corresponds to 100% of relative error while the lower bound value is −33.4 dB. Using experimental data, the LE performance is −3.3 dB and the lower bound RMSE value is −27 dB.

  19. High order local absorbing boundary conditions for acoustic waves in terms of farfield expansions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamizar, Vianey; Acosta, Sebastian; Dastrup, Blake

    2017-03-01

    We devise a new high order local absorbing boundary condition (ABC) for radiating problems and scattering of time-harmonic acoustic waves from obstacles of arbitrary shape. By introducing an artificial boundary S enclosing the scatterer, the original unbounded domain Ω is decomposed into a bounded computational domain Ω- and an exterior unbounded domain Ω+. Then, we define interface conditions at the artificial boundary S, from truncated versions of the well-known Wilcox and Karp farfield expansion representations of the exact solution in the exterior region Ω+. As a result, we obtain a new local absorbing boundary condition (ABC) for a bounded problem on Ω-, which effectively accounts for the outgoing behavior of the scattered field. Contrary to the low order absorbing conditions previously defined, the error at the artificial boundary induced by this novel ABC can be easily reduced to reach any accuracy within the limits of the computational resources. We accomplish this by simply adding as many terms as needed to the truncated farfield expansions of Wilcox or Karp. The convergence of these expansions guarantees that the order of approximation of the new ABC can be increased arbitrarily without having to enlarge the radius of the artificial boundary. We include numerical results in two and three dimensions which demonstrate the improved accuracy and simplicity of this new formulation when compared to other absorbing boundary conditions.

  20. High-throughput screening and scale-up of cocrystals using resonant acoustic mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagapudi, Karthik; Umanzor, Evelyn Yanez; Masui, Colin

    2017-04-15

    This paper explores the effectiveness of resonant acoustic mixing RAM for screening and scale up of cocrystals. 16 cocrystal systems were selected as test cases based on previous literature precedent. A 96 well plate set up in conjunction with zirconia beads was used for cocrystal screening using RAM. A success rate of 80% was obtained in the screen for plates containing solvent or solvent plus Zirconia beads. A proof of concept production of hydrated and anhydrous cocrystals of 1:1 Theophylline Citric acid system at a 400mg scale was demonstrated using solvent and bead assisted RAM. Finally the parameters affecting the scale up of 2:1 Theophylline Oxalic acid cocrystals was explored in a systematic fashion using a Design of Experiments DOE approach. The RAM parameters of acceleration and mixing time were optimized using the DOE approach. A quantitative XRPD method was developed to determine the extent of conversion to the cocrystal when using RAM Mixing time of 2h and an acceleration of 60G were determined to be optimal. The optimized parameters were used to demonstrate scale up of 2:1 Theophylline Oxalic acid cocrystals at an 80 gram scale with a net yield of 94%. RAM is thus established as an environmentally friendly mechanochemical technique for both high throughput screening and scaled up production of cocrystals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A new acoustic lens material for large area detectors in photoacoustic breast tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Xia, Wenfeng; van Hespen, Johan C G; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic lenses made of acrylic plastic (PMMA) have been used to enlarge the acceptance angle of sensitive large surface area detectors and improve lateral resolution. However, PMMA lenses introduce image artifacts due to ultrasound internal reflections within the lenses. In this work we investigated this issue proposing a new lens material Stycast 1090SI. We characterized the acoustic properties of the proposed material in comparison with PMMA. Detector performance using negative lenses with the two materials, was tested using finite element simulation and experiment. Further the image quality of a photoacoustic tomography system was studied using k-Wave simulation and experiment. Our acoustic characterization showed that Stycast 1090SI has tissue-like acoustic impedance, high speed of sound and low acoustic attenuation. Both acoustic lenses show significant enlargement of detector acceptance angle and lateral resolution improvement. However, image artifacts induced by acoustic lenses are reduced using the p...

  2. Influence of Smoking on Ultra-High-Frequency Auditory Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Prashanth; Varma, Gowtham; Dutta, Kristi Kaveri; Kumar, Prajwal; Goyal, Swati

    2017-04-01

    In this study, an attempt was made to determine the effect of smoking on ultra-high-frequency auditory sensitivity. The study also attempted to determine the relationship between the nature of smoking and ultra-high-frequency otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) and thresholds. The study sample included 25 smokers and 25 non-smokers. A detailed history regarding their smoking habits was collected. High-frequency audiometric thresholds and amplitudes of high-frequency distortion-product OAEs were analyzed for both ears from all participants. The results showed that the ultra-high-frequency thresholds were elevated and that there was reduction in the amplitudes of ultra-high-frequency OAEs in smokers. There was an increased risk of auditory damage with chronic smoking. The study results highlight the application of ultra-high-frequency OAEs and ultra-high-frequency audiometry for the early detection of auditory impairment. However, similar studies should be conducted on a larger population for better generalization of the results.

  3. Acoustic modal analysis and control in w-shaped triple-layer optical fibers with highly-germanium-doped core and F-doped inner cladding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Weiwen; He, Zuyuan; Hotate, Kazuo

    2008-07-07

    The numerical study of acoustic modal properties in w-shaped optical fibers with high-delta germanium-doped core and F-doped inner cladding (F-HDF) is demonstrated. The cutoff conditions of acoustic modes in the F-HDF show opposite behaviors in contrast with those of optical ones because F-doped inner cladding contributes differently to acoustic and optical waveguides. The acoustic dispersion characteristics vary to a great extent with respect to the location of the acoustic modes in the fiber's core or in the fiber's inner cladding. The resonance frequency spacing between neighboring acoustic modes is theoretically and experimentally found to have a quadratic relation to the core's germanium concentration. We also investigate the critical conditions to move high-order acoustic modes into the F-doped inner cladding and validate the optimal feasibility of employing L(01) and L(03) acoustic modes to fiber-optic Brillouin-based discriminative sensing of strain and temperature.

  4. Ultrathin plasmonic nanogratings for rapid and highly-sensitive detection

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, Beibei; Bartoli, Filbert J

    2014-01-01

    We developed a nanoplasmonic sensor platform employing the extraordinary optical properties of one-dimensional nanogratings patterned on 30nm-thick ultrathin Ag films. Excitation of Fano resonances in the ultrathin Ag nanogratings results in transmission spectra with high amplitude, large contrast, and narrow bandwidth, making them well-suited for rapid and highly-sensitive sensing applications. The ultrathin nanoplasmonic sensor chip was integrated with a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic channel, and the measured refractive index resolution was found to be 1.46x10-6 refractive index units (RIU) with a high temporal resolution of 1 sec. This compares favorably with commercial prism-based surface plasmon resonance sensors, but is achieved using a more convenient collinear transmission geometry and a significantly smaller sensor footprint of 50x50um2. In addition, an order-of-magnitude improvement in the temporal and spatial resolutions was achieved relative to state-of-the-art nanoplasmonic sensors, fo...

  5. Potential programs for high sensitivity FIR spectroscopy with SPICA

    CERN Document Server

    Spinoglio, L; Saraceno, P; Spinoglio, Luigi; Giorgio, Anna Maria Di; Saraceno, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the potential of high sensitivity mid-IR and far-IR spectroscopy to proof the physical properties of active nuclei and starburst regions of local and distant galaxies. For local galaxies, it will be possible to map the discs and ISM through the low ionization ionic lines and a variety of molecular tracers, such as OH, H2O and high-J CO. At increasing distance, most of the ionic nebular lines (typical of stars and AGNs) are shifted into the FIR, making possible to compare the observed spectra with those predicted by different evolutionary scenarios. At the very high redshift of 10-15, sensitive mid-to-far-IR spectrometers, such as those planned to be at the focal plane of the future SPICA mision, could be adequate to detect the H recombination lines excited in the HII regions around population III stars, if these stars happened to reside in large clusters of more than 10^5 members.

  6. High-sensitivity piezoelectric perovskites for magnetoelectric composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorín, Harvey; Algueró, Miguel; Campo, Rubén Del; Vila, Eladio; Ramos, Pablo; Dollé, Mickael; Romaguera-Barcelay, Yonny; Cruz, Javier Pérez De La; Castro, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    A highly topical set of perovskite oxides are high-sensitivity piezoelectric ones, among which Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 at the morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) between ferroelectric rhombohedral and tetragonal polymorphic phases is reckoned a case study. Piezoelectric ceramics are used in a wide range of mature, electromechanical transduction technologies like piezoelectric sensors, actuators and ultrasound generation, to name only a few examples, and more recently for demonstrating novel applications like magnetoelectric composites. In this case, piezoelectric perovskites are combined with magnetostrictive materials to provide magnetoelectricity as a product property of the piezoelectricity and piezomagnetism of the component phases. Interfaces play a key issue, for they control the mechanical coupling between the piezoresponsive phases. We present here main results of our investigation on the suitability of the high sensitivity MPB piezoelectric perovskite BiScO3–PbTiO3 in combination with ferrimagnetic spinel oxides for magnetoelectric composites. Emphasis has been put on the processing at low temperature to control reactions and interdiffusion between the two oxides. The role of the grain size effects is extensively addressed. PMID:27877758

  7. High-Sensitivity Measurement of Density by Magnetic Levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemiroski, Alex; Kumar, A A; Soh, Siowling; Harburg, Daniel V; Yu, Hai-Dong; Whitesides, George M

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents methods that use Magnetic Levitation (MagLev) to measure very small differences in density of solid diamagnetic objects suspended in a paramagnetic medium. Previous work in this field has shown that, while it is a convenient method, standard MagLev (i.e., where the direction of magnetization and gravitational force are parallel) cannot resolve differences in density mm) because (i) objects close in density prevent each other from reaching an equilibrium height due to hard contact and excluded volume, and (ii) using weaker magnets or reducing the magnetic susceptibility of the medium destabilizes the magnetic trap. The present work investigates the use of weak magnetic gradients parallel to the faces of the magnets as a means of increasing the sensitivity of MagLev without destabilization. Configuring the MagLev device in a rotated state (i.e., where the direction of magnetization and gravitational force are perpendicular) relative to the standard configuration enables simple measurements along the axes with the highest sensitivity to changes in density. Manipulating the distance of separation between the magnets or the lengths of the magnets (along the axis of measurement) enables the sensitivity to be tuned. These modifications enable an improvement in the resolution up to 100-fold over the standard configuration, and measurements with resolution down to 10(-6) g/cm(3). Three examples of characterizing the small differences in density among samples of materials having ostensibly indistinguishable densities-Nylon spheres, PMMA spheres, and drug spheres-demonstrate the applicability of rotated Maglev to measuring the density of small (0.1-1 mm) objects with high sensitivity. This capability will be useful in materials science, separations, and quality control of manufactured objects.

  8. High-speed imaging, acoustic features, and aeroacoustic computations of jet noise from Strombolian (and Vulcanian) explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddeucci, J.; Sesterhenn, J.; Scarlato, P.; Stampka, K.; Del Bello, E.; Pena Fernandez, J. J.; Gaudin, D.

    2014-05-01

    High-speed imaging of explosive eruptions at Stromboli (Italy), Fuego (Guatemala), and Yasur (Vanuatu) volcanoes allowed visualization of pressure waves from seconds-long explosions. From the explosion jets, waves radiate with variable geometry, timing, and apparent direction and velocity. Both the explosion jets and their wave fields are replicated well by numerical simulations of supersonic jets impulsively released from a pressurized vessel. The scaled acoustic signal from one explosion at Stromboli displays a frequency pattern with an excellent match to those from the simulated jets. We conclude that both the observed waves and the audible sound from the explosions are jet noise, i.e., the typical acoustic field radiating from high-velocity jets. Volcanic jet noise was previously quantified only in the infrasonic emissions from large, sub-Plinian to Plinian eruptions. Our combined approach allows us to define the spatial and temporal evolution of audible jet noise from supersonic jets in small-scale volcanic eruptions.

  9. Bayesian hindcast of acoustic transmission loss in the western Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmsten, Margaret; Paquin Fabre, J.

    2016-09-01

    A Bayesian network is developed to demonstrate the feasibility of using environmental acoustic feature vectors (EAFVs) to predict underwater acoustic transmission loss (TL) versus range at two locations for a single acoustic source depth and frequency. Features for the networks are chosen based on a sensitivity analysis. The final network design resulted in a well-trained network, with high skill, little gain error, and low bias. The capability presented here shows promise for expansion to a more generalized approach, which could be applied at varying locations, depths and frequencies to estimate acoustic performance over a highly variable oceanographic area in real-time or near-real-time.

  10. High pressure-sensitive gene expression in Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.F. Vogel

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis is a Gram-positive lactic acid bacterium used in food biotechnology. It is necessary to investigate many aspects of a model organism to elucidate mechanisms of stress response, to facilitate preparation, application and performance in food fermentation, to understand mechanisms of inactivation, and to identify novel tools for high pressure biotechnology. To investigate the mechanisms of the complex bacterial response to high pressure we have analyzed changes in the proteome and transcriptome by 2-D electrophoresis, and by microarrays and real time PCR, respectively. More than 16 proteins were found to be differentially expressed upon high pressure stress and were compared to those sensitive to other stresses. Except for one apparently high pressure-specific stress protein, no pressure-specific stress proteins were found, and the proteome response to pressure was found to differ from that induced by other stresses. Selected pressure-sensitive proteins were partially sequenced and their genes were identified by reverse genetics. In a transcriptome analysis of a redundancy cleared shot gun library, about 7% of the genes investigated were found to be affected. Most of them appeared to be up-regulated 2- to 4-fold and these results were confirmed by real time PCR. Gene induction was shown for some genes up-regulated at the proteome level (clpL/groEL/rbsK, while the response of others to high hydrostatic pressure at the transcriptome level seemed to differ from that observed at the proteome level. The up-regulation of selected genes supports the view that the cell tries to compensate for pressure-induced impairment of translation and membrane transport.

  11. Underwater acoustic channel estimation using multiple sources and receivers in shallow waters at very-high frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaddouri, Samar

    The underwater channel poses numerous challenges for acoustic communication. Acoustic waves suffer long propagation delay, multipath, fading, and potentially high spatial and temporal variability. In addition, there is no typical underwater acoustic channel; every body of water exhibits quantifiably different properties. Underwater acoustic modems are traditionally operated at low frequencies. However, the use of broadband, high frequency communication is a good alternative because of the lower background noise compared to low-frequencies, considerably larger bandwidth and better source transducer efficiency. One of the biggest problems in the underwater acoustic communications at high frequencies is time-selective fading, resulting in the Doppler spread. While many Doppler detection, estimation and compensation techniques can be found in literature, the applications are limited to systems operating at low frequencies contained within frequencies ranging from a few hundred Hertz to around 30 kHz. This dissertation proposes two robust channel estimation techniques for simultaneous transmissions using multiple sources and multiple receivers (MIMO) that closely follows the rapidly time-varying nature of the underwater channel. The first method is a trended least square (LS) estimation that combines the traditional LS method with an empirical modal decomposition (EMD) based trend extraction algorithm. This method allows separating the slow fading modes in the MIMO channels from the fast-fading ones and thus achieves a close tracking of the channel impulse response time fluctuations. This dissertation also outlines a time-varying underwater channel estimation method based on the channel sparsity characteristic. The sparsity of the underwater communication channel is exploited by using the MIMO P-iterative greedy orthogonal matching pursuit (MIMO-OMP) algorithm for the channel estimation. Both techniques are demonstrated in a fully controlled environment, using simulated

  12. Rituximab induction therapy in highly sensitized kidney transplant recipients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Hang; WAN Hao; HU Xiao-peng; LI Xiao-bei; WANG Wei; LIU Hang; REN Liang; ZHANG Xiao-dong

    2011-01-01

    Background The number of highly sensitized patients is rising, and sensitization can lead to renal transplant failure.The present study aimed to investigate the safety and efficacy of renal transplantation following induction therapy with rituximab in highly sensitized kidney transplant recipients.Methods Seven highly sensitized kidney transplant recipients who underwent rituximab therapy from December 2008 to December 2009 were retrospectively analyzed. There were 3 men and 4 women, with a mean age of 38.5 years (range, 21-47 years). The duration of hemodialysis was 3-12 months, with a mean duration of 11 months. For 4 patients,this was the second transplant; the previous graft survival time was 2-11 years, with a mean survival time of 5.8 years. All the female recipients had history of multiple pregnancies, and all patients had previously received blood transfusions. All donors were men, with a mean age of 32.5 years (range, 25-37 years). In 2 of the 7 patients, both class I and class II of panel reactive antibody were high; the remaining 5 patients showed either high in class I or in class II of panel reactive antibody. The mean panel reactive antibody value was 31% for class I and 51% for class II respectively. The donors and the recipients had the same blood type, with low lymphocyte cytotoxicity ranging from 2% to 5%. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatch numbers were from 2 to 4. All patients received tacrolimus (0.1 mg·kg-1·d-1) and mycophenolate mofetil (750 mg twice per day) orally 3 days prior to surgery. All patients received a single dose of 600 mg rituximab (375 mg/m2) infusion on the day before surgery and polyclonal antibody (antithymocyte globulin) on the day of surgery.Postoperative creatinine, creatinine clearance rate, and occurrence of rejection by pathological biopsy confirmation were monitored.Results No patient had delayed graft function after surgery. Two patients had acute rejection, one on day 7 and the other on day 13 post

  13. Highly sensitive detection of Staphylococcus aureus directly from patient blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmapriya P Banada

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rapid detection of bloodstream infections (BSIs can be lifesaving. We investigated the sample processing and assay parameters necessary for highly-sensitive detection of bloodstream bacteria, using Staphylococcus aureus as a model pathogen and an automated fluidic sample processing-polymerase chain reaction (PCR platform as a model diagnostic system. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We compared a short 128 bp amplicon hemi-nested PCR and a relatively shorter 79 bp amplicon nested PCR targeting the S. aureus nuc and sodA genes, respectively. The sodA nested assay showed an enhanced limit of detection (LOD of 5 genomic copies per reaction or 10 colony forming units (CFU per ml blood over 50 copies per reaction or 50 CFU/ml for the nuc assay. To establish optimal extraction protocols, we investigated the relative abundance of the bacteria in different components of the blood (white blood cells (WBCs, plasma or whole blood, using the above assays. The blood samples were obtained from the patients who were culture positive for S. aureus. Whole blood resulted in maximum PCR positives with sodA assay (90% positive as opposed to cell-associated bacteria (in WBCs (71% samples positive or free bacterial DNA in plasma (62.5% samples positive. Both the assays were further tested for direct detection of S. aureus in patient whole blood samples that were contemporaneous culture positive. S. aureus was detected in 40/45 of culture-positive patients (sensitivity 89%, 95% CI 0.75-0.96 and 0/59 negative controls with the sodA assay (specificity 100%, 95% CI 0.92-1. CONCLUSIONS: We have demonstrated a highly sensitive two-hour assay for detection of sepsis causing bacteria like S. aureus directly in 1 ml of whole blood, without the need for blood culture.

  14. Virtual Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokki, Tapio; Savioja, Lauri

    The term virtual acoustics is often applied when sound signal is processed to contain features of a simulated acoustical space and sound is spatially reproduced either with binaural or with multichannel techniques. Therefore, virtual acoustics consists of spatial sound reproduction and room acoustics modeling.

  15. Coumarin-bearing triarylamine sensitizers with high molar extinction coefficient for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Changjian; Gao, Jianrong; Cui, Yanhong; Li, Ting; Han, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Coumarin unit is introduced into triarylamine and three organic sensitizers are designed and synthesized with triarylamine bearing coumarin moiety as the electron donor, conjugated system containing thiophene unit as the π-bridge, and cyanoacetic acid moiety as the electron acceptor. The light-harvesting capabilities and photovoltaic performance of these dyes are investigated systematically with the comparison of different π-bridges. High molar extinction coefficients are observed in these triarylamine dyes and the photocurrent and photovoltage are increased with the introduction of another thiophene or benzene. Optimal photovoltaic performance (η = 6.24%, Voc = 690 mV, Jsc = 14.33 mA cm-2, and ff = 0.63) is observed in the DSSC based on dye with thiophene-phenyl unit as the π-conjugated bridge under 100 mW cm-2 simulated AM 1.5 G solar irradiation.

  16. Highly Sensitive Assay for Measurement of Arenavirus-cell Attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, Joseph P; Botten, Jason

    2016-03-02

    Arenaviruses are a family of enveloped RNA viruses that cause severe human disease. The first step in the arenavirus life cycle is attachment of viral particles to host cells. While virus-cell attachment can be measured through the use of virions labeled with biotin, radioactive isotopes, or fluorescent dyes, these approaches typically require high multiplicities of infection (MOI) to enable detection of bound virus. We describe a quantitative (q)RT-PCR-based assay that measures Junin virus strain Candid 1 attachment via quantitation of virion-packaged viral genomic RNA. This assay has several advantages including its extreme sensitivity and ability to measure attachment over a large dynamic range of MOIs without the need to purify or label input virus. Importantly, this approach can be easily tailored for use with other viruses through the use of virus-specific qRT-PCR reagents. Further, this assay can be modified to permit measurement of particle endocytosis and genome uncoating. In conclusion, we describe a simple, yet robust assay for highly sensitive measurement of arenavirus-cell attachment.

  17. A highly sensitive method for quantification of iohexol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, A.; Boeringer, F.; Swifka, J.

    2014-01-01

    lohexol (1-N,3-N-bis(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)-5-IN-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl) acetamide-2,4,6-triiodobenzene1,3-dicarboxamide) is used for accurate determination of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. However, high iohexol amounts might lead to adverse effects in...... in organisms. In order to minimize the iohexol dosage required for the GFR determination in humans, the development of a sensitive quantification method is essential. Therefore, the objective of our preclinical study was to establish and validate a simple and robust liquid...... with a cut-off of 3 kDa. The chromatographic separation was achieved on an analytical Zorbax SB C18 column. The detection and quantification were performed on a high capacity trap mass spectrometer using positive ion ESI in the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. Furthermore, using real-time polymerase...

  18. Sensitivity study of reliable, high-throughput resolution metricsfor photoresists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Christopher N.; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2007-07-30

    The resolution of chemically amplified resists is becoming an increasing concern, especially for lithography in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) regime. Large-scale screening and performance-based down-selection is currently underway to identify resist platforms that can support shrinking feature sizes. Resist screening efforts, however, are hampered by the absence of reliable resolution metrics that can objectively quantify resist resolution in a high-throughput fashion. Here we examine two high-throughput metrics for resist resolution determination. After summarizing their details and justifying their utility, we characterize the sensitivity of both metrics to two of the main experimental uncertainties associated with lithographic exposure tools, namely: limited focus control and limited knowledge of optical aberrations. For an implementation at EUV wavelengths, we report aberration and focus limited error bars in extracted resolution of {approx} 1.25 nm RMS for both metrics making them attractive candidates for future screening and down-selection efforts.

  19. Correcting systematic errors in high-sensitivity deuteron polarization measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brantjes, N.P.M. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, NL-9747AA Groningen (Netherlands); Dzordzhadze, V. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Gebel, R. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Gonnella, F. [Physica Department of ' Tor Vergata' University, Rome (Italy); INFN-Sez. ' Roma tor Vergata,' Rome (Italy); Gray, F.E. [Regis University, Denver, CO 80221 (United States); Hoek, D.J. van der [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, NL-9747AA Groningen (Netherlands); Imig, A. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Kruithof, W.L. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, NL-9747AA Groningen (Netherlands); Lazarus, D.M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Lehrach, A.; Lorentz, B. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Messi, R. [Physica Department of ' Tor Vergata' University, Rome (Italy); INFN-Sez. ' Roma tor Vergata,' Rome (Italy); Moricciani, D. [INFN-Sez. ' Roma tor Vergata,' Rome (Italy); Morse, W.M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Noid, G.A. [Indiana University Cyclotron Facility, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); and others

    2012-02-01

    This paper reports deuteron vector and tensor beam polarization measurements taken to investigate the systematic variations due to geometric beam misalignments and high data rates. The experiments used the In-Beam Polarimeter at the KVI-Groningen and the EDDA detector at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY at Juelich. By measuring with very high statistical precision, the contributions that are second-order in the systematic errors become apparent. By calibrating the sensitivity of the polarimeter to such errors, it becomes possible to obtain information from the raw count rate values on the size of the errors and to use this information to correct the polarization measurements. During the experiment, it was possible to demonstrate that corrections were satisfactory at the level of 10{sup -5} for deliberately large errors. This may facilitate the real time observation of vector polarization changes smaller than 10{sup -6} in a search for an electric dipole moment using a storage ring.

  20. Simulation and Analysis Chain for Acoustic Ultra-high Energy Neutrino Detectors in Water

    CERN Document Server

    Neff, M; Enzenhöfer, A; Graf, K; Hößl, J; Katz, U; Lahmann, R; Sieger, C

    2013-01-01

    Acousticneutrinodetectionisapromisingapproachforlarge-scaleultra-highenergyneutrinodetectorsinwater.In this article, a Monte Carlo simulation chain for acoustic neutrino detection devices in water will be presented. The simulation chain covers the generation of the acoustic pulse produced by a neutrino interaction and its propagation to the sensors within the detector. Currently, ambient and transient noise models for the Mediterranean Sea and simulations of the data acquisition hardware, equivalent to the one used in ANTARES/AMADEUS, are implemented. A pre-selection scheme for neutrino-like signals based on matched filtering is employed, as it is used for on-line filtering. To simulate the whole processing chain for experimental data, signal classification and acoustic source reconstruction algorithms are integrated in an analysis chain. An overview of design and capabilities of the simulation and analysis chain will be presented and preliminary studies will be discussed.

  1. High Sensitivity MEMS Strain Sensor: Design and Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmond Lou

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we report on the new design of a miniaturized strain microsensor. The proposed sensor utilizes the piezoresistive properties of doped single crystal silicon. Employing the Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS technology, high sensor sensitivities and resolutions have been achieved. The current sensor design employs different levels of signal amplifications. These amplifications include geometric, material and electronic levels. The sensor and the electronic circuits can be integrated on a single chip, and packaged as a small functional unit. The sensor converts input strain to resistance change, which can be transformed to bridge imbalance voltage. An analog output that demonstrates high sensitivity (0.03mV/me, high absolute resolution (1μe and low power consumption (100μA with a maximum range of ±4000μe has been reported. These performance characteristics have been achieved with high signal stability over a wide temperature range (±50oC, which introduces the proposed MEMS strain sensor as a strong candidate for wireless strain sensing applications under harsh environmental conditions. Moreover, this sensor has been designed, verified and can be easily modified to measure other values such as force, torque…etc. In this work, the sensor design is achieved using Finite Element Method (FEM with the application of the piezoresistivity theory. This design process and the microfabrication process flow to prototype the design have been presented.

  2. High-pressure acoustic properties of glycerol studied by Brillouin spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Min-Seok; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Ko, Young Ho; Kim, Kwang Joo

    2015-12-01

    Acoustic properties of glycerol was investigated in a wide pressure range from ambient pressure to 30.9 GPa by using a multi-pass Fabry-Perot interferometer and a diamond anvil cell. Pressure dependences of the sound velocity and the Brillouin linewidth showed substantial changes at low pressures below ~4 GPa. This was attributed to the coupling between the main structural relaxation process and the longitudinal acoustic waves. The pressure dependence of the refractive index and the density of glycerol could be obtained by using two scattering geometries and the Lorentz-Lorenz relation.

  3. High-pressure acoustic properties of glycerol studied by Brillouin spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Min-Seok [Department of Physics, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Gangwondo 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Jae-Hyeon, E-mail: hwangko@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Gangwondo 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Young Ho; Kim, Kwang Joo [Agency for Defense Development, 4-2-2, P.O. Box 35, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-01

    Acoustic properties of glycerol was investigated in a wide pressure range from ambient pressure to 30.9 GPa by using a multi-pass Fabry–Perot interferometer and a diamond anvil cell. Pressure dependences of the sound velocity and the Brillouin linewidth showed substantial changes at low pressures below ~4 GPa. This was attributed to the coupling between the main structural relaxation process and the longitudinal acoustic waves. The pressure dependence of the refractive index and the density of glycerol could be obtained by using two scattering geometries and the Lorentz–Lorenz relation.

  4. A high-powered siren for stable acoustic levitation of dense materials in the earth's gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammel, Paul M.; Croonquist, Arvid P.; Wang, Taylor G.

    1988-01-01

    Levitation of large dense samples (e.g., 1-cm diameter steel balls) has been performed in a 1-g environment. A siren was used to study the effects of reflector geometry and variable-frequency operation in order to attain stable acoustic positioning. The harmonic content and spatial distribution of the acoustic field have been investigated. The best stability was obtained with an open reflector system, using a flat lower reflector and a slightly concave upper reflector while operating at a frequency slightly below resonance.

  5. Ion acoustic shock and periodic waves through Burgers equation in weakly and highly relativistic plasmas with nonextensivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    M, G. Hafez; N, C. Roy; M, R. Talukder; M Hossain, Ali

    2017-01-01

    A comparative study is carried out for the nonlinear propagation of ion acoustic shock waves both for the weakly and highly relativistic plasmas consisting of relativistic ions and q-distributed electrons and positions. The Burgers equation is derived to reveal the physical phenomena using the well known reductive perturbation technique. The integration of the Burgers equation is performed by the (G\\prime /G)-expansion method. The effects of positron concentration, ion–electron temperature ratio, electron–positron temperature ratio, ion viscosity coefficient, relativistic streaming factor and the strength of the electron and positron nonextensivity on the nonlinear propagation of ion acoustic shock and periodic waves are presented graphically and the relevant physical explanations are provided.

  6. Acoustic Performance of Novel Fan Noise Reduction Technologies for a High Bypass Model Turbofan at Simulated Flights Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, David M.; Woodward, Richard P.; Podboy, Gary G.

    2010-01-01

    Two novel fan noise reduction technologies, over the rotor acoustic treatment and soft stator vane technologies, were tested in an ultra-high bypass ratio turbofan model in the NASA Glenn Research Center s 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel. The performance of these technologies was compared to that of the baseline fan configuration, which did not have these technologies. Sideline acoustic data and hot film flow data were acquired and are used to determine the effectiveness of the various treatments. The material used for the over the rotor treatment was foam metal and two different types were used. The soft stator vanes had several internal cavities tuned to target certain frequencies. In order to accommodate the cavities it was necessary to use a cut-on stator to demonstrate the soft vane concept.

  7. Hearing sensitivity in context: Conservation implications for a highly vocal endangered species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan A. Owen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hearing sensitivity is a fundamental determinant of a species’ vulnerability to anthropogenic noise, however little is known about the hearing capacities of most conservation dependent species. When audiometric data are integrated with other aspects of species’ acoustic ecology, life history, and characteristic habitat topography and soundscape, predictions can be made regarding probable vulnerability to the negative impacts of different types of anthropogenic noise. Here we used an adaptive psychoacoustic technique to measure hearing thresholds in the endangered giant panda; a species that uses acoustic communication to coordinate reproduction. Our results suggest that giant pandas have functional hearing into the ultrasonic range, with good sensitivity between 10.0 and 16.0 kHz, and best sensitivity measured at 12.5–14.0 kHz. We estimated the lower and upper limits of functional hearing as 0.10 and 70.0 kHz respectively. While these results suggest that panda hearing is similar to that of some other terrestrial carnivores, panda hearing thresholds above 14.0 kHz were significantly lower (i.e., more sensitive than those of the polar bear, the only other bear species for which data are available. We discuss the implications of this divergence, as well as the relationship between hearing sensitivity and the spectral parameters of panda vocalizations. We suggest that these data, placed in context, can be used towards the development of a sensory-based model of noise disturbance for the species.

  8. Interpreting underwater acoustic images of the upper ocean boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulloa, Marco J [Departamento de Fisica, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Exactas e IngenierIas, Universidad de Guadalajara, Avenida Revolucion 1500, Sector Reforma, 44420 Guadalajara, Jal. (Mexico)

    2007-03-15

    A challenging task in physical studies of the upper ocean using underwater sound is the interpretation of high-resolution acoustic images. This paper covers a number of basic concepts necessary for undergraduate and postgraduate students to identify the most distinctive features of the images, providing a link with the acoustic signatures of physical processes occurring simultaneously beneath the surface of the sea. Sonars are so sensitive that they detected a new acoustic signature at the breaking of surface gravity waves in deep water, which resembles oblique motion-like vortices.

  9. Highly sensitive flow-injection chemiluminescence determination of pyrogallol compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanwal, Shamsa; Fu, Xiaohong; Su, Xingguang

    2009-12-01

    A highly sensitive flow-injection chemiluminescent method for the direct determination of pyrogallol compounds has been developed. Proposed method is based on the enhanced effect of pyrogallol compounds on the chemiluminescence signals of KMnO 4-H 2O 2 system in slightly alkaline medium. Three important pyrogallol compounds, pyrogallic acid, gallic acid and tannic acid, have been detected by this method, and the possible mechanism of the CL reaction is also discussed. The proposed method is simple, convenient, rapid (60 samples h -1), and sensitive, has a linear range of 8 × 10 -10 mol L -1 to 1 × 10 -5 mol L -1, for pyrogallic acid, with a detection limit of 6 × 10 -11 mol L -1, 4 × 10 -8 mol L -1 to 5 × 10 -3 mol L -1 for gallic acid with a detection limit of 9 × 10 -10 mol L -1, and 8 × 10 -8 mol L -1 to 5 × 10 -2 mol L -1 for tannic acid, with a detection limit of 2 × 10 -9 mol L -1, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD, n = 15) was 0.8, 1.1 and 1.3% for 5 × 10 -6 mol L -1 pyrogallic acid, gallic acid and tannic acid, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of pyrogallol compounds in tea and coffee samples.

  10. PlanetPol: A Very High Sensitivity Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, J. H.; Lucas, P. W.; Bailey, J. A.; Tamura, M.; Hirst, E.; Harrison, D.; Bartholomew-Biggs, M.

    2006-09-01

    We have built and used on several occasions an optical broadband stellar polarimeter, PlanetPol, which employs photoelastic modulators and avalanche photodiodes and achieves a photon-noise-limited sensitivity of at least 1 in 106 in fractional polarization. Observations of a number of polarized standards taken from the literature show that the accuracy of polarization measurements is ~1%. We have developed a method for accurately measuring the polarization of altitude-azimuth mounted telescopes by observing bright nearby stars at different parallactic angles, and we find that the on-axis polarization of the William Herschel Telescope is typically ~15 × 10-6, measured with an accuracy of a few parts in 107. The nearby stars (distance less than 32 pc) are found to have very low polarizations, typically a few ×10-6, indicating that very little interstellar polarization is produced close to the Sun and that their intrinsic polarization is also low. Although the polarimeter can be used for a wide range of astronomy, the very high sensitivity was set by the goal of detecting the polarization signature of unresolved extrasolar planets.

  11. Kinetics of Highly Sensitive Troponin T after Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr S. Omar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Perioperative myocardial infarction (PMI confers a considerable risk in cardiac surgery settings; finding the ideal biomarker seems to be an ideal goal. Our aim was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of highly sensitive troponin T (hsTnT in cardiac surgery settings and to define a diagnostic level for PMI diagnosis. This was a single-center prospective observational study analyzing data from all patients who underwent cardiac surgeries. The primary outcome was the diagnosis of PMI through a specific level. The secondary outcome measures were the lengths of mechanical ventilation (LOV, stay in the intensive care unit (LOSICU, and hospitalization. Based on the third universal definition of PMI, patients were divided into two groups: no PMI (Group I and PMI (Group II. Data from 413 patients were analyzed. Nine patients fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of PMI, while 41 patients were identified with a 5-fold increase in their CK-MB (≥120 U/L. Using ROC analysis, a hsTnT level of 3,466 ng/L or above showed 90% sensitivity and 90% specificity for the diagnosis of PMI. Secondary outcome measures in patients with PMI were significantly prolonged. In conclusion, the hsTnT levels detected here paralleled those of CK-MB and a cut-off level of 3466 ng/L could be diagnostic of PMI.

  12. Development of a New, High Sensitivity 2000 kg Mechanical Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian

    2017-04-13

    Mass measurement of more than 500 kg on an electronic mass comparator has no better repeatability and linearity of measurement for meeting the calibration requirement of over class F1 weights from pharmacy and power generation plants. For this purpose, a new 2000 kg mechanical balance was developed by the National Institute of Metrology (NIM). The advantages of measurement of more than 500 kg on a new 2000 kg mechanical balance are introduced in the paper. In order to obtain high measurement uncertainty, four vertical forces of two sides of beam are measured and used as reference for adjustment of the beam position. Laser displacement sensors in the indication system are more effective for decreasing reading errors caused by human vision. To improve the repeatability and sensitivity of the equipment, a synchronous lifting control is designed for synchronously lifting the beam ends along the vertical direction. A counterweight selection system is developed to get any combination of weights in a limited space. The sensitivity of the new mechanical balance for 2000 kg is more than 1.7 parts in 10(-4) rad/g. The extended uncertainties for the mechanical balance of 500 kg, 1000 kg and 2000 kg are 0.47 g, 1.8 g and 3.5 g respectively.

  13. New application of superconductors: High sensitivity cryogenic light detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardani, L.; Bellini, F.; Casali, N.; Castellano, M. G.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Cosmelli, C.; Cruciani, A.; D'Addabbo, A.; Di Domizio, S.; Martinez, M.; Tomei, C.; Vignati, M.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we describe the current status of the CALDER project, which is developing ultra-sensitive light detectors based on superconductors for cryogenic applications. When we apply an AC current to a superconductor, the Cooper pairs oscillate and acquire kinetic inductance, that can be measured by inserting the superconductor in a LC circuit with high merit factor. Interactions in the superconductor can break the Cooper pairs, causing sizable variations in the kinetic inductance and, thus, in the response of the LC circuit. The continuous monitoring of the amplitude and frequency modulation allows to reconstruct the incident energy with excellent sensitivity. This concept is at the basis of Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) that are characterized by natural aptitude to multiplexed read-out (several sensors can be tuned to different resonant frequencies and coupled to the same line), resolution of few eV, stable behavior over a wide temperature range, and ease in fabrication. We present the results obtained by the CALDER collaboration with 2×2 cm2 substrates sampled by 1 or 4 Aluminum KIDs. We show that the performances of the first prototypes are already competitive with those of other commonly used light detectors, and we discuss the strategies for a further improvement.

  14. A highly sensitive fiber Bragg grating diaphragm pressure transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allwood, Gary; Wild, Graham; Lubansky, Alex; Hinckley, Steven

    2015-10-01

    In this work, a novel diaphragm based pressure transducer with high sensitivity is described, including the physical design structure, in-depth analysis of optical response to changes in pressure, and a discussion of practical implementation and limitations. A flat circular rubber membrane bonded to a cylinder forms the body of the transducer. A fiber Bragg grating bonded to the center of the diaphragm structure enables the fractional change in pressure to be determined by analyzing the change in Bragg wavelength of the reflected spectra. Extensive evaluation of the physical properties and optical characteristics of the transducer has been performed through experimentation, and modeling using small deformation theory. The results show the transducer has a sensitivity of 0.116 nm/kPa, across a range of 15 kPa. Ultra-low cost interrogation of the optical signal was achieved through the use of an optically mismatched Bragg grating acting as an edge filter to convert the spectral change into an intensity change. A numerical model of the intensity based interrogation was implemented in order to validate the experimental results. Utilizing this interrogation technique and housing both the sensing and reference Bragg gratings within the main body of the transducer means it is effectively temperature insensitive and easily connected to electronic systems.

  15. Sensitivity of once-shocked, weathered high explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, K.L.; Harris, B.W.

    1998-07-01

    Effects caused by stimulating once-shocked, weathered high explosives (OSW-HE) are investigated. The sensitivity of OSW-HE to mechanical stimuli was determined using standard industry tests. Some initial results are given. Pieces of OSW-HE were collected from active and inactive firing sites and from an area surrounding a drop tower at Los Alamos where skid and spigot tests were done. Samples evaluated were cast explosives or plastic bonded explosive (PBX) formulations containing cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX), cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX), 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), mock or inert HE [tris(beta-chloroethyl)phosphate (CEF)], barium nitrate, cyanuric acid, talc, and Kel-F. Once-shocked, weathered LX-10 Livermore explosive [HMX/Viton A, (95/5 wt %)], PBX 9011 [HMX/Estane, (90/10 wt %)], PBX 9404 [HMX/nitrocellulose, tris(beta-chloroethyl) phosphate, (94/3/3 wt %)], Composition B or cyclotol (TNT/RDX explosives), and PBX 9007 (90% RDX, 9.1% styrene, 0.5% dioctyl phthalate, and 0.45 resin) were subjected to the hammer test, the drop-weight impact sensitivity test, differential thermal analysis (DTA), the spark test, the Henkin`s critical temperature test, and the flame test. Samples were subjected to remote, wet cutting and drilling; remote, liquid-nitrogen-cooled grinding and crushing; and scanning electron microscope (SEM) surface analyses for morphological changes.

  16. Luminescent Lanthanide Reporters for High-Sensitivity Novel Bioassays.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anstey, Mitchell R.; Fruetel, Julia A.; Foster, Michael E.; Hayden, Carl C.; Buckley, Heather L.; Arnold, John

    2013-09-01

    Biological imaging and assay technologies rely on fluorescent organic dyes as reporters for a number of interesting targets and processes. However, limitations of organic dyes such as small Stokes shifts, spectral overlap of emission signals with native biological fluorescence background, and photobleaching have all inhibited the development of highly sensitive assays. To overcome the limitations of organic dyes for bioassays, we propose to develop lanthanide-based luminescent dyes and demonstrate them for molecular reporting applications. This relatively new family of dyes was selected for their attractive spectral and chemical properties. Luminescence is imparted by the lanthanide atom and allows for relatively simple chemical structures that can be tailored to the application. The photophysical properties offer unique features such as narrow and non-overlapping emission bands, long luminescent lifetimes, and long wavelength emission, which enable significant sensitivity improvements over organic dyes through spectral and temporal gating of the luminescent signal.Growth in this field has been hindered due to the necessary advanced synthetic chemistry techniques and access to experts in biological assay development. Our strategy for the development of a new lanthanide-based fluorescent reporter system is based on chelation of the lanthanide metal center using absorbing chromophores. Our first strategy involves "Click" chemistry to develop 3-fold symmetric chelators and the other involves use of a new class of tetrapyrrole ligands called corroles. This two-pronged approach is geared towards the optimization of chromophores to enhance light output.

  17. Measurement and Modeling of the Acoustic Response in a High Pressure Combustor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapucu, M.; Kapucu, Mehmet; Alemela, P.R.; Kok, Jacobus B.W.; Pozarlik, Artur Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a one dimensional acoustic network model is presented which can be used as a design tool to predict the limit cycle pressure oscillations in a gas turbine combustor. Analytically represented models are combined with measured flame transfer functions and well defined boundary condition

  18. Shallow-water acoustic communication with high bit rate BPSK signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijzen, M.B. van; Walree, P.A. van

    2000-01-01

    BPSK signals have been defined for transmission through a shallow-water acoustic communication channel. The signals were accompanied by two displaced carriers to facilitate carrier recovery. To correct for the adverse effects of time spreading, a pseudo-random learning sequence was transmitted ahead

  19. Finite element analysis of surface acoustic waves in high aspect ratio electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard; Laude, Vincent; Khelif, Abdelkrim

    2008-01-01

    down the SAWvelocity because of mechanical energy storage. A finite model is furthermore employed to study the acousto-optical interaction and shows that it is possible to get a bigger change in effective refractive index with these surface acoustic waves compared to using conventional interdigital...

  20. Structure of Harbor Porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) Acoustic Signals with High Repetition Rates.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verboom, W.C.; Kastelein, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Since July 1993, a systematic study on harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) acoustic signals was conducted in the Netherlands. The first general results were published in Verboom and Kastelein (1995, 1997). Studied were animals kept for veterinary treatment in the Cetacean Rehabilitation Centre at

  1. Tunable diameter electrostatically formed nanowire for high sensitivity gas sensing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alex Henning; Nandhini Swaminathan; Andrey Godkin; Gil Shalev; Iddo Amit; Yossi Rosenwaks

    2015-01-01

    We report on an electrostatically formed nanowire (EFN)-based sensor with tunable diameters in the range of 16 nm to 46 nm and demonstrate an EFN- based field-effect transistor as a highly sensitive and robust room temperature gas sensor. The device was carefully designed and fabricated using standard integrated processing to achieve the 16 nm EFN that can be used for sensing without any need for surface modification. The effective diameter for the EFN was determined using Kelvin probe force microscopy accompanied by three- dimensional electrostatic simulations. We show that the EFN transistor is capable of detecting 100 parts per million of ethanol gas with bare SiO2.

  2. Magnetic probe array with high sensitivity for fluctuating field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamaru, Yuki; Gota, Hiroshi; Fujimoto, Kayoko; Ikeyama, Taeko; Asai, Tomohiko; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Nogi, Yasuyuki

    2007-03-01

    A magnetic probe array is constructed to measure precisely the spatial structure of a small fluctuating field included in a strong confinement field that varies with time. To exclude the effect of the confinement field, the magnetic probes consisting of figure-eight-wound coils are prepared. The spatial structure of the fluctuating field is obtained from a Fourier analysis of the probe signal. It is found that the probe array is more sensitive to the fluctuating field with a high mode number than that with a low mode number. An experimental demonstration of the present method is attempted using a field-reversed configuration plasma, where the fluctuating field with 0.1% of the confinement field is successfully detected.

  3. High Efficiency of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liyuan Han

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Much attention has been paid to the development of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) during the past decade. In general, a DSC comprises a nanocrystalline titanium dioxide (TiO2) electrode modified with a dye fabricated on a transparent conducting oxide (TCO), a platinum (Pt) counter electrode, and an electrolyte solution with a dissolved iodide ion/tri-iodide ion redox couple between the electrodes. Although a DSC using black dye with high efficiency of 10.4%, which was measured by NREL(U. S. A. ), was reported by Graetzel et al. [1], the efficiency of DSCs should be further improved for practical use in comparison with silicon solar cells.

  4. High efficiency solid-state sensitized heterojunction photovoltaic device

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Mingkui

    2010-06-01

    The high molar extinction coefficient heteroleptic ruthenium dye, NaRu(4,4′-bis(5-(hexylthio)thiophen-2-yl)-2,2′-bipyridine) (4-carboxylic acid-4′-carboxylate-2,2′-bipyridine) (NCS) 2, exhibits certified 5% electric power conversion efficiency at AM 1.5 solar irradiation (100 mW cm-2) in a solid-state dye-sensitized solar cell using 2,2′,7,7′-tetrakis-(N,N-di-pmethoxyphenylamine)-9, 9′-spirobifluorene (spiro-MeOTAD) as the organic hole-transporting material. This demonstration elucidates a class of photovoltaic devices with potential for low-cost power generation. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Acoustic minor losses in high amplitude resonators with single-sided junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doller, Andrew J.

    Steady flow engineering handbooks like Idelchik20 do not exist for investigators interested in acoustic (oscillating) fluid flows in complex resonators. Measurements of acoustic minor loss coefficients are presented in this dissertation for a limited number of resonator configurations having single-sided junctions. While these results may be useful, the greater purpose of this work is to provide a set of controlled measurements that can be used to benchmark computational models of acoustic flows used for more complicated resonator structures. The experiments are designed around a driver operating at 150 Hz enabling acoustic pressures in excess of 10k Pa in liquid cooled, temperature controlled resonators with 90°, 45° and 25° junctions. These junctions join a common 109 cm long 4.7 cm diameter section to a section of 8.4 mm diameter tube making two sets of resonators: one set with a small diameter length approximately a quarter-wavelength (45 cm), the other approximately a half-wavelength (112 cm). The long resonators have a velocity node at the junction; the short resonators have a velocity anti-node generating the greatest minor losses. Input power is measured by an accelerometer and a pressure transducer at the driver. A pressure sensor at the rigid termination measures radiation pressure from the driver and static junction pressure, as well as the acoustic pressure used to calculate linear thermal and viscous resonator wall losses. At the largest amplitudes, the 90° junction was found to dissipate as much as 0.3 Watt, 1/3 the power of linear losses alone. For each junction, the power dissipation depends on acoustic pressure differently: pressure cubed for the 90°, pressure to the 3.76 for the 45° and pressure to the 4.48 for the 25°. Common among all resonators, blowing acoustic half-cycle minor losses (KB) are excited at lower amplitudes than the suction half-cycle (KS) minor losses. Data collected for the 90° junction shows KB reaches an asymptotic

  6. High sensitivity moiré interferometry with compact achromatic interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnek, Robert

    Experimental observations and measurements are the sources of information essential for correct development of mathematical models of real structural materials. Moiré interferometry offers high sensitivity in full-field measurements of in-plane displacements on the surface of a specimen. Although it is a powerful method in experimental stress analysis, it has some shortcomings. One is that existing systems require highly coherent light. The only sufficient source of light for this application is a long cavity laser, which is relatively expensive and at best cumbersome. Another shortcoming is that measurements must be performed in a vibration-free environment, such as that found on a holographic table. These requirements limit the use of existing moiré interferometers to a holographic laboratory. In this paper a modified concept of compensation is presented, which permits the use of a chromatic source of light in a compact moiré system. The compensator provides order in the angles of incident light for each separate wavelength, so that the virtual reference grating created by each wavelength in a continuous spectrum is identical in frequency and spatial position. The result is a virtual reference grating that behaves exactly like that created in coherent light. With this development the use of a laser diode, which is a non-coherent light source of tiny dimensions, becomes practical. The special configuration of the optics that create the virtual grating allows its synchronization with the specimen grating and leads to an interferometer design that is relatively insensitive to the vibrations found in a mechanical testing laboratory. Sensitivity to relative motion is analyzed theoretically. This development provides the oppurtunity to apply moiré interferometry to solid mechanics problems that cannot be studied in an optics laboratory. Experimental verification of the optical concepts is provided. A compact moiré interferometer based on the presented idea was

  7. Scanning Auger microscopy for high lateral and depth elemental sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, E., E-mail: eugenie.martinez@cea.fr [CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Yadav, P. [CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Bouttemy, M. [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles, 45 av. des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles Cedex (France); Renault, O.; Borowik, Ł.; Bertin, F. [CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Etcheberry, A. [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles, 45 av. des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles Cedex (France); Chabli, A. [CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: •SAM performances and limitations are illustrated on real practical cases such as the analysis of nanowires and nanodots. •High spatial elemental resolution is shown with the analysis of reference semiconducting Al{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}As/GaAs multilayers. •High in-depth elemental resolution is also illustrated. Auger depth profiling with low energy ion beams allows revealing ultra-thin layers (∼1 nm). •Analysis of cross-sectional samples is another effective approach to obtain in-depth elemental information. -- Abstract: Scanning Auger microscopy is currently gaining interest for investigating nanostructures or thin multilayers stacks developed for nanotechnologies. New generation Auger nanoprobes combine high lateral (∼10 nm), energy (0.1%) and depth (∼2 nm) resolutions thus offering the possibility to analyze the elemental composition as well as the chemical state, at the nanometre scale. We report here on the performances and limitations on practical examples from nanotechnology research. The spatial elemental sensitivity is illustrated with the analysis of Al{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}As/GaAs heterostructures, Si nanowires and SiC nanodots. Regarding the elemental in-depth composition, two effective approaches are presented: low energy depth profiling to reveal ultra-thin layers (∼1 nm) and analysis of cross-sectional samples.

  8. Laser-engraved carbon nanotube paper for instilling high sensitivity, high stretchability, and high linearity in strain sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Xin, Yangyang

    2017-06-29

    There is an increasing demand for strain sensors with high sensitivity and high stretchability for new applications such as robotics or wearable electronics. However, for the available technologies, the sensitivity of the sensors varies widely. These sensors are also highly nonlinear, making reliable measurement challenging. Here we introduce a new family of sensors composed of a laser-engraved carbon nanotube paper embedded in an elastomer. A roll-to-roll pressing of these sensors activates a pre-defined fragmentation process, which results in a well-controlled, fragmented microstructure. Such sensors are reproducible and durable and can attain ultrahigh sensitivity and high stretchability (with a gauge factor of over 4.2 × 10(4) at 150% strain). Moreover, they can attain high linearity from 0% to 15% and from 22% to 150% strain. They are good candidates for stretchable electronic applications that require high sensitivity and linearity at large strains.

  9. Seafloor roughness estimation employing bathymetric systems: An appraisal of the classification and characterization of high-frequency acoustic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Bishwajit; Haris, K.

    2012-11-01

    The study of the seafloor is important for living and non-living resource estimation along with the related processes identification. To understand the fine-scale seafloor processes, various methods such as application of acoustic remote sensing, seafloor photographic and geological samplings are well established. Among these, the high-frequency single beam echo-sounding system (SBES) and multi-beam echo-sounding system (MBES) became more familiar due to their rapid data acquisition advantages. These systems are extensively used to study the seafloor morphology etc. Seafloor acoustic backscatter information provides fine-scale seafloor roughness and associated sediment processes. The angular and normal incidence backscatter strength data can be utilized to estimate seafloor roughness parameters using physics based numerical inversion models. However, for such applications, the segmentation of the backscatter data is essential, especially before initiating any numerical based models to characterize the seafloor. Under such situations, the employment of the soft-computational techniques e.g., artificial neural networks (ANNs) are found to be suitable for seafloor acoustic data segmentation and classifications. Seafloor studies are carried out at the National Institute of Oceanography, Goa during the last two decades employing similar techniques, and study results related to the seafloor classification and characterizations are documented in this research review.

  10. Acoustic characterization of multi-element, dual-frequency transducers for high-intensity contact ultrasound therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtnyk, M.; N'Djin, W. A.; Persaud, L.; Bronskill, M.; Chopra, R.

    2012-10-01

    High-intensity contact ultrasound therapy can generate precise volumes of thermal damage in deep-seated tissue using interstitial or intracavitary devices. Multi-element, dual-frequency transducers offer increased spatial control of the heating pattern by enabling modulation of ultrasound power and frequency along the device. The performance and acoustic coupling between elements of simple, multi-element, dual-frequency transducers was measured. Transducer arrays were fabricated by cutting halfway through a rectangular plate of PZT, creating individual 4 × 5 mm segments with fundamental frequency (4.1 MHz) and third harmonic (13.3 MHz). Coupling between elements was investigated using a scanning laser vibrometer to measure transducer surface displacements at each frequency and different acoustic powers (0, 10, 20 W/cm2). The measured acoustic power was proportional to the input electrical power with no hysteresis and efficiencies >50% at both frequencies. Maximum transducer surface displacements were observed near element centers, reducing to ˜1/3-maximum near edges. The power and frequency of neighboring transducer segments had little impact on an element's output. In the worst case, an element operating at 4.1 MHz and 20 W/cm2 coupled only 1.5 W/cm2 to its immediate neighboring element. Multi-element, dual-frequency transducers were successfully constructed using a simple dicing method. Coupling between elements was minor, therefore the power and frequency of each transducer element could be considered independent.

  11. Optimization of Fixed Microphone Array in High Speed Train Noises Identification Based on Far-Field Acoustic Holography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rujia Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustical holography has been widely applied for noise sources location and sound field measurement. Performance of the microphones array directly determines the sound source recognition method. Therefore, research is very important to the performance of the microphone array, its array of applications, selection, and how to design instructive. In this paper, based on acoustic holography moving sound source identification theory, the optimization method is applied in design of the microphone array, we select the main side lobe ratio and the main lobe area as the optimization objective function and then put the optimization method use in the sound source identification based on holography, and finally we designed this paper to optimize microphone array and compare the original array of equally spaced array with optimization results; by analyzing the optimization results and objectives, we get that the array can be achieved which is optimized not only to reduce the microphone but also to change objective function results, while improving the far-field acoustic holography resolving effect. Validation experiments have showed that the optimization method is suitable for high speed trains sound source identification microphone array optimization.

  12. Reconstructing the vibro-acoustic quantities on a highly non-spherical surface using the Helmholtz equation least squares method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Logesh Kumar; Wu, Sean F

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents helpful guidelines and strategies for reconstructing the vibro-acoustic quantities on a highly non-spherical surface by using the Helmholtz equation least squares (HELS). This study highlights that a computationally simple code based on the spherical wave functions can produce an accurate reconstruction of the acoustic pressure and normal surface velocity on planar surfaces. The key is to select the optimal origin of the coordinate system behind the planar surface, choose a target structural wavelength to be reconstructed, set an appropriate stand-off distance and microphone spacing, use a hybrid regularization scheme to determine the optimal number of the expansion functions, etc. The reconstructed vibro-acoustic quantities are validated rigorously via experiments by comparing the reconstructed normal surface velocity spectra and distributions with the benchmark data obtained by scanning a laser vibrometer over the plate surface. Results confirm that following the proposed guidelines and strategies can ensure the accuracy in reconstructing the normal surface velocity up to the target structural wavelength, and produce much more satisfactory results than a straight application of the original HELS formulations. Experiment validations on a baffled, square plate were conducted inside a fully anechoic chamber.

  13. Alemtuzumab induction therapy in highly sensitized kidney transplant recipients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Tie-ming; YANG Shun-liang; WU Wei-zhen; TAN Jian-ming

    2011-01-01

    Background Immunosuppression for immunologically high-risk kidney transplant patients usually involves antithymocyte globulin induction with triple drug maintenance therapy. Alemtuzumab, a humanized anti-CD52 antibody,was expected to be a promising induction therapy agent for kidney transplantation. However, currently no consensus is available about its efficacy and safety. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of alemtuzumab as immune induction therapy in highly sensitized kidney transplant recipients.Methods In this prospective, open-label, randomized, controlled trial, we enrolled 23 highly immunological risk patients (panel reactive antibody >20%). They were divided into two groups: alemtuzumab group (trial group) and anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) group (control group). Patients in the alemtuzumab group received intravenous alemtuzumab (15 mg) as a single dose before reperfusion. At the 24th hour post-operation, another dosage of alemtuzumab (15 mg) was given.The control group received a bolus of rabbit ATG (9 mg/kg), which was given 2 hours before kidney transplantation and lasted until the removal of vascular clamps when the anastomoses were completed. Maintenance immunosuppression in both groups comprised standard triple therapy consisting of tacrolimus, prednisone, and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF).Acute rejection (AR) and infection episodes were recorded, and kidney function was monitored during a 2-year follow-up.χ2 test, t test and Kaplan-Meier analysis were performed with SPSS17.0 software.Results Median follow-up was 338 days. In both the alemtuzumab group and ATG group, creatinine and blood urea nitrogen values in surviving recipients were similar (P >0.05). White blood cell counts were significantly reduced in the alemtuzumab group for the most time points up to 6 months (P <0.05). One patient receiving alemtuzumab died for acute myocardial infarction at the 65th day post-operation. Two ATG patients died for severe pulmonary

  14. Monitoring microbe-induced physical property changes using high-frequency acoustic waveform data: Toward the development of a microbial megascope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Kenneth Hurst

    2002-05-20

    A laboratory investigation was undertaken to determine the effect of microbe generated gas bubbles in controlled, saturated sediment columns utilizing a novel technique involving acoustic wave propagation. Specifically, the effect of denitrifying bacteria on saturated flow conditions was evaluated in light of the stimulated production of N{sub 2} gas and the resulting plugging of the pore throats. The propagation of high frequency acoustic waves through the sediment columns was used to locate those regions in the column where gas accumulation occurred. Over a period of six weeks, regions of gas accumulation resulted in the attenuation of acoustic wave energies with the decreases in amplitude typically greater than one order of magnitude.

  15. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book...... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology....

  16. Innovative nanostructures for highly sensitive vibrational biosensing (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, Juergen; Mayerhöfer, Thomas; Cialla-May, Dana; Weber, Karina; Huebner, Uwe

    2016-03-01

    Employing vibrational spectroscopy (IR-absorption and Raman spectroscopy) allows for the labelfree detection of molecular specific fingerprints of inorganic, organic and biological substances. The sensitivity of vibrational spectroscopy can be improved by several orders of magnitude via the application of plasmonic active surfaces. Within this contribution we will discuss two such approaches, namely surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) as well as surface enhanced IR absorption (SEIRA). It will be shown that SERS using metal colloids as SERS active substrate in combination with a microfluidic lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device enables high throughput and reproducible measurements with highest sensitivity and specificity. The application of such a LOC-SERS approach for therapeutic drug monitoring (e.g. quantitative detection of antibiotics in a urine matrix) will be presented. Furthermore, we will introduce innovative bottom-up strategies to prepare SERS-active nanostructures coated with a lipophilic sensor layer as one-time use SERS substrates for specific food analysis (e.g. quantitative detection of toxic food colorants). The second part of this contribution presents a slit array metamaterial perfect absorber for IR sensing applications consisting of a dielectric layer sandwiched between two metallic layers of which the upper layer is perforated with a periodic array of slits. Light-matter interaction is greatly amplified in the slits, where also the analyte is concentrated, as the surface of the substrate is covered by a thin silica layer. Thus, already small concentrations of analytes down to a monolayer can be detected by refractive index sensing and identified by their spectral fingerprints with a standard mid-infrared lab spectrometer.

  17. Highly sensitive phage-based biosensor for the detection of beta-galactosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanduri, Viswaprakash; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Sista, Srinivas; Vodyanoy, Vitaly J; Simonian, Aleksandr L

    2007-04-25

    Development of real-time sensor based on the target-specific probe that make possible sensitive, rapid and selective detection and monitoring of the particular antigen molecules could be of substantial importance to the many applications. Because of its high specificity to the target molecules, excellent temperature stability, and easy production, bacterial phage might serve as a powerful biorecognition probe in biosensor applications. Here, we report extremely sensitive and specific label-free direct detection of model antigen, beta-galactosidase (beta-gal), based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. The beta-gal specific landscape phage 1G40 has been immobilized on the gold surface of SPR SPREETA sensor chip through physical adsorption [V. Nanduri, A.M. Samoylova, V.Petrenko, V. Vodyanoy and A.L.Simonian, Comparison of optical and acoustic wave phage biosensors, 206th Meeting of The Electrochemical Society, Honolulu, Hawaii, October 3-8, (2004)]. Another non-specific to the beta-gal phage, a wild-type phage F8-5, was used in the reference channel. The concentration-dependent binding of beta-gal in both channels were assessed by monitoring the sensor optical response as a function of time under different experimental conditions, and the concentration of beta-gal was computed in differential mode. Concentrations of beta-gal between 10(-12) M and 10(-7) M could be readily detected, with linear part of calibration curve between 10(-9) M and 10(-6) M. When beta-gal was pre-incubated with different concentrations of free 1G40 phage prior to exposure to the biosensor, concentration-dependent inhibition was observed, indicating on biosensor high specificity toward beta-gal. Apart from a flow through mode used to deliver the samples to the surface for the SPR sensor, batch mode sensing was also employed to study the binding of beta-gal to immobilized phage on the SPR sensor surface. Experiments using a flow through mode provided more consistent results in the

  18. Conducting polymer nanofibers for high sensitivity detection of chemical analytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Abhishek; Leshchiner, Ignaty; Nagarajan, Subhalakshmi; Nagarajan, Ramaswamy; Kumar, Jayant

    2008-03-01

    Possessing large surface area materials is vital for high sensitivity detection of analyte. We report a novel, inexpensive and simple technique to make high surface area sensing interfaces using electrospinning. Conducting polymers (CP) nanotubes were made by electrospinning a solution of a catalyst (ferric tosylate) along with poly (lactic acid), which is an environment friendly biodegradable polymer. Further vapor deposition polymerization of the monomer ethylenedioxy thiophene (EDOT) on the nanofiber surface yielded poly (EDOT) covered fibers. X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS) study reveals the presence of PEDOT predominantly on the surface of nanofibers. Conducting nanotubes had been received by dissolving the polymer in the fiber core. By a similar technique we had covalently incorporated fluorescent dyes on the nanofiber surface. The materials obtained show promise as efficient sensing elements. UV-Vis characterization confirms the formation of PEDOT nanotubes and incorporation of chromophores on the fiber surface. The morphological characterization was carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  19. Accelerated Sensitivity Analysis in High-Dimensional Stochastic Reaction Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arampatzis, Georgios; Katsoulakis, Markos A; Pantazis, Yannis

    2015-01-01

    Existing sensitivity analysis approaches are not able to handle efficiently stochastic reaction networks with a large number of parameters and species, which are typical in the modeling and simulation of complex biochemical phenomena. In this paper, a two-step strategy for parametric sensitivity analysis for such systems is proposed, exploiting advantages and synergies between two recently proposed sensitivity analysis methodologies for stochastic dynamics. The first method performs sensitivity analysis of the stochastic dynamics by means of the Fisher Information Matrix on the underlying distribution of the trajectories; the second method is a reduced-variance, finite-difference, gradient-type sensitivity approach relying on stochastic coupling techniques for variance reduction. Here we demonstrate that these two methods can be combined and deployed together by means of a new sensitivity bound which incorporates the variance of the quantity of interest as well as the Fisher Information Matrix estimated from the first method. The first step of the proposed strategy labels sensitivities using the bound and screens out the insensitive parameters in a controlled manner. In the second step of the proposed strategy, a finite-difference method is applied only for the sensitivity estimation of the (potentially) sensitive parameters that have not been screened out in the first step. Results on an epidermal growth factor network with fifty parameters and on a protein homeostasis with eighty parameters demonstrate that the proposed strategy is able to quickly discover and discard the insensitive parameters and in the remaining potentially sensitive parameters it accurately estimates the sensitivities. The new sensitivity strategy can be several times faster than current state-of-the-art approaches that test all parameters, especially in "sloppy" systems. In particular, the computational acceleration is quantified by the ratio between the total number of parameters over the

  20. Acoustically Induced Vibration of Structures: Reverberant Vs. Direct Acoustic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Tsoi, Wan B.

    2009-01-01

    Large reverberant chambers have been used for several decades in the aerospace industry to test larger structures such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify and to detect faults in the design and fabrication of spacecraft and satellites. In the past decade some companies have begun using direct near field acoustic testing, employing speakers, for qualifying larger structures. A limited test data set obtained from recent acoustic tests of the same hardware exposed to both direct and reverberant acoustic field testing has indicated some differences in the resulting structural responses. In reverberant acoustic testing, higher vibration responses were observed at lower frequencies when compared with the direct acoustic testing. In the case of direct near field acoustic testing higher vibration responses appeared to occur at higher frequencies as well. In reverberant chamber testing and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes of the reverberant chamber or the speakers and spacecraft parallel surfaces can strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware. In this paper data from recent acoustic testing of flight hardware, that yielded evidence of acoustic standing wave coupling with structural responses, are discussed in some detail. Convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave/structural coupling phenomenon will be discussed, citing observations from acoustic testing of a simple aluminum plate. The implications of such acoustic coupling to testing of sensitive flight hardware will be discussed. The results discussed in this paper reveal issues with over or under testing of flight hardware that could pose unanticipated structural and flight qualification issues. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the structural modal coupling with standing acoustic waves that has been observed in both methods of acoustic testing. This study will assist the community to choose an appropriate testing method and test setup in

  1. A high transmission broadband gradient index lens using elastic shell acoustic metamaterial elements

    CERN Document Server

    Titovich, Alexey S; Norris, Andrew N

    2016-01-01

    The use of cylindrical elastic shells as elements in acoustic metamaterial devices is demonstrated through simulations and underwater measurements of a cylindrical-to-plane wave lens. Transformation acoustics (TA) of a circular region to a square dictates that the effective density in the lens remain constant and equal to that of water. Piecewise approximation to the desired effective compressibility is achieved using a square array with elements based on the elastic shell metamaterial concept developed in [30]. The size of the elements are chosen based on availability of shells, minimizing fabrication difficulties. The tested device is neutrally buoyant comprising 48 elements of nine different types of commercial shells made from aluminum, brass, copper, and polymers. Simulations indicate a broadband range in which the device acts as a cylindrical to plane wave lens. The experimental findings confirm the broadband quadropolar response from approximately 20 to 40 kHz, with positive gain of the radiation patte...

  2. Second Harmonic Generation and Confined Acoustic Phonons in HighlyExcited Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Dong Hee; Wittenberg, Joshua S.; Banin, Uri; Alivisatos, A.Paul

    2006-03-30

    The photo-induced enhancement of second harmonic generation, and the effect of nanocrystal shape and pump intensity on confined acoustic phonons in semiconductor nanocrystals, has been investigated with time-resolved scattering and absorption measurements. The second harmonic signal showed a sublinear increase of the second order susceptibility with respect to the pump pulse energy, indicating a reduction of the effective one-electron second-order nonlinearity with increasing electron-hole density in the nanocrystals. The coherent acoustic phonons in spherical and rod-shaped semiconductor nanocrystals were detected in a time-resolved absorption measurement. Both nanocrystal morphologies exhibited oscillatory modulation of the absorption cross section, the frequency of which corresponded to their coherent radial breathing modes. The amplitude of the oscillation also increased with the level of photoexcitation, suggesting an increase in the amplitude of the lattice displacement as well.

  3. Highly sensitive and multiplexed platforms for allergy diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Margo R.

    Allergy is a disorder of the immune system caused by an immune response to otherwise harmless environmental allergens. Currently 20% of the US population is allergic and 90% of pediatric patients and 60% of adult patients with asthma have allergies. These percentages have increased by 18.5% in the past decade, with predicted similar trends for the future. Here we design sensitive, multiplexed platforms to detect allergen-specific IgE using the Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (IRIS) for various clinical settings. A microarray platform for allergy diagnosis allows for testing of specific IgE sensitivity to a multitude of allergens, while requiring only small volumes of patient blood sample. However, conventional fluorescent microarray technology is limited by i) the variation of probe immobilization, which hinders the ability to make quantitative, assertive, and statistically relevant conclusions necessary in immunodiagnostics and ii) the use of fluorophore labels, which is not suitable for some clinical applications due to the tendency of fluorophores to stick to blood particulates and require daily calibration methods. This calibrated fluorescence enhancement (CaFE) method integrates the low magnification modality of IRIS with enhanced fluorescence sensing in order to directly correlate immobilized probe (major allergens) density to allergen-specific IgE in patient serum. However, this platform only operates in processed serum samples, which is not ideal for point of care testing. Thus, a high magnification modality of IRIS was adapted as an alternative allergy diagnostic platform to automatically discriminate and size single nanoparticles bound to specific IgE in unprocessed, characterized human blood and serum samples. These features make IRIS an ideal candidate for clinical and diagnostic applications, such a POC testing. The high magnification (nanoparticle counting) modality in conjunction with low magnification of IRIS in a combined instrument

  4. Efficient Processing of Acoustic Signals for High Rate Information Transmission over Sparse Underwater Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-02

    Institute of Technology Cmabridge, MA 02139 millitsa@mit.edu Abstract For underwater acoustic channels where multipath spread is measured in tens of symbol...eliminates the need for a separate channel estimator/equalizer for each array element. The advantages of this approach are reduction in the number of...of a large equalizer, it is possible to design an adaptive processing method that takes into account only the significant channel components. The

  5. High-resolution acoustic imaging at low frequencies using 3D-printed metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Laureti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An acoustic metamaterial has been constructed using 3D printing. It contained an array of air-filled channels, whose size and shape could be varied within the design and manufacture process. In this paper we analyze both numerically and experimentally the properties of this polymer metamaterial structure, and demonstrate its use for the imaging of a sample with sub-wavelength dimensions in the audible frequency range.

  6. High Frequency Acoustic Response Characterization and Analysis of the Deep Throttling Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casiano, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    The Common Extensive Cryogenic Engine program demonstrated the operation of a deep throttling engine design. The program, spanning five years from August 2005 to July 2010, funded testing through four separate engine demonstration test series. Along with successful completion of multiple objectives, a discrete response of approximately 4000 Hz was discovered and explored throughout the program. The typical low-amplitude acoustic response was evident in the chamber measurement through almost every operating condition; however, at certain off-nominal operating conditions, the response became discrete with higher amplitude. This paper summarizes the data reduction, characterization, and analysis of the 4,000 Hz response for the entire program duration, using the large amount of data collected. Upon first encountering the response, new objectives and instrumentation were incorporated in future test series to specifically collect 4,000 Hz data. The 4,000 Hz response was identified as being related to the first tangential acoustic mode by means of frequency estimation and spatial decomposition. The latter approach showed that the effective node line of the mode was aligned with the manifold propellant inlets with standing waves and quasi-standing waves present at various times. Contour maps that contain instantaneous frequency and amplitude trackings of the response were generated as a significant improvement to historical manual approaches of data reduction presentation. Signal analysis and dynamic data reduction also uncovered several other features of the response including a stable limit cycle, the progressive engagement of subsequent harmonics, the U-shaped time history, an intermittent response near the test-based neutral stability region, other acoustic modes, and indications of modulation with a separate subsynchronous response. Although no engine damage related to the acoustic mode was noted, the peak-to-peak fluctuating pressure amplitude achieved 12.1% of the

  7. Theoretical study of the transverse acoustic phonons of GaSb at high pressure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Shinde; M Talati; Prafulla K Jha; S P Sanyal

    2004-08-01

    We have investigated the phonon dispersion curves and one-phonon density of states up to the pressure of 8 GPa using a theoretical model, namely the rigid ion model. The transverse acoustic phonons as a function of pressure have been compared with the recently measured inelastic neutron scattering data which show a strong softening near the zone boundaries. The calculated one-phonon density of states show pronounced shift in the peak positions with the increase in pressure.

  8. High accuracy acoustic relative humidity measurement in duct flow with air

    OpenAIRE

    Cees van der Geld; Twan Wernaart; Mart Grooten; Wilhelm van Schaik

    2010-01-01

    An acoustic relative humidity sensor for air-steam mixtures in duct flow is designed and tested. Theory, construction, calibration, considerations on dynamic response and results are presented. The measurement device is capable of measuring line averaged values of gas velocity, temperature and relative humidity (RH) instantaneously, by applying two ultrasonic transducers and an array of four temperature sensors. Measurement ranges are: gas velocity of 0–12 m/s with an error of ±0.13 m/s, temp...

  9. High-resolution acoustic imaging at low frequencies using 3D-printed metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laureti, S.; Hutchins, D. A.; Davis, L. A. J.; Leigh, S. J.; Ricci, M.

    2016-12-01

    An acoustic metamaterial has been constructed using 3D printing. It contained an array of air-filled channels, whose size and shape could be varied within the design and manufacture process. In this paper we analyze both numerically and experimentally the properties of this polymer metamaterial structure, and demonstrate its use for the imaging of a sample with sub-wavelength dimensions in the audible frequency range.

  10. Characterization of High-Power Rocket and Jet Noise Using Near-Field Acoustical Holography

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Structural fatigue, hearing damage, and community disturbances are all consequences of rocket and jet noise, especially as they become more powerful. Noise-reduction schemes require accurate characterization of the noise sources within rocket plumes and jets. Nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) measurements were made to visualize the sound field in the jet exhaust region of an F-22 Raptor. This is one of the largest-scale applications of NAH since its development in the 1980s. A scan-based ...

  11. Acoustic telemetry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To determine movements of green turtles in the nearshore foraging areas, we deployed acoustic tags and determined their movements through active and passive acoustic...

  12. Underwater acoustic detection of ultra high energy neutrinos in Antares; Detection acoustique sous-marine de neutrinos de ultra haute energie dans le cadre de l'experience ANTARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niess, V

    2005-09-15

    We investigate the possibility to detect ultra high energy neutrinos (UHE, 1018+ eV) by the mean of underwater acoustic methods. This study is based on experimental measurements and, when none of those are available, on numerical simulations. The sea water acts as a target for neutrinos of cosmic origin. The electroweak interaction of high energy neutrinos with water molecules leads to a cascade of secondary particles resulting in the emission of an ultra-sonic impulse by a thermo-acoustic coupling mechanism. This mechanism is little efficient, however the generated signal has good propagation properties. Ambient sea noise, as well as the self noise of the ceramic transducers used for the detection, restrict the method to UHE. In addition, the strong directivity of the signal implies that location methods, by the detection in coincidence on multiple detectors, are little efficient. At extremely high energies (10{sup 20}+ eV) and for a single detector we estimate the sensitivity limit of this acoustic method to be of the order of E{sup 2}*{phi} 10{sup 6} GeV cm{sup -2} sr{sup -1}*s{sup -1}, for an astrophysical flux 0 falling as 1/E{sup 2}. (author)

  13. Computation of acoustic ressure fields produced in feline brain by high-intensity focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidi, Nazanin

    In 1975, Dunn et al. (JASA 58:512-514) showed that a simple relation describes the ultrasonic threshold for cavitation-induced changes in the mammalian brain. The thresholds for tissue damage were estimated for a variety of acoustic parameters in exposed feline brain. The goal of this study was to improve the estimates for acoustic pressures and intensities present in vivo during those experimental exposures by estimating them using nonlinear rather than linear theory. In our current project, the acoustic pressure waveforms produced in the brains of anesthetized felines were numerically simulated for a spherically focused, nominally f1-transducer (focal length = 13 cm) at increasing values of the source pressure at frequencies of 1, 3, and 9 MHz. The corresponding focal intensities were correlated with the experimental data of Dunn et al. The focal pressure waveforms were also computed at the location of the true maximum. For low source pressures, the computed waveforms were the same as those determined using linear theory, and the focal intensities matched experimentally determined values. For higher source pressures, the focal pressure waveforms became increasingly distorted, with the compressional amplitude of the wave becoming greater, and the rarefactional amplitude becoming lower than the values calculated using linear theory. The implications of these results for clinical exposures are discussed.

  14. Cogging Torque and Acoustic Noise Reduction in High Torque BLDC Motors by Teeth Pairings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Min [Halla Climate Control Co. (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Sang Moon [Pusan National University (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-01

    This paper investigates reduction of acoustic noise and cogging torque in a BLDC motor with larger stator slot open width. Using energy method, cogging torque is analytically determined with airgap MMF function and airgap permeance function and confirmed by FEM analysis. It show that the cogging torque is firstly governed by N{sub L} G{sub NL} B{sub NL} with the fundamental period of N{sub L}, where N{sub L} is the least common multiple of the number of slots and the number of poles, G{sub NL}, airgap permeance function and B{sub NL}, airgap MMF function. It also shows that there exist several tooth width which minimizes the cogging torque, for the motors that smaller slot open width or stator teeth notching is not available. And it proposes a teeth pairing with two different tooth width which can effectively eliminate the cogging torque and thus the acoustic noise. Experimental results show that the proposed teeth pairing reduces the cogging torque by 85% and the acoustic noise by 3.1 dB. (author). 9 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  15. A new time–space domain high-order finite-difference method for the acoustic wave equation

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Yang

    2009-12-01

    A new unified methodology was proposed in Finkelstein and Kastner (2007) [39] to derive spatial finite-difference (FD) coefficients in the joint time-space domain to reduce numerical dispersion. The key idea of this method is that the dispersion relation is completely satisfied at several designated frequencies. We develop this new time-space domain FD method further for 1D, 2D and 3D acoustic wave modeling using a plane wave theory and the Taylor series expansion. New spatial FD coefficients are frequency independent though they lead to a frequency dependent numerical solution. We prove that the modeling accuracy is 2nd-order when the conventional (2 M)th-order space domain FD and the 2nd-order time domain FD stencils are directly used to solve the acoustic wave equation. However, under the same discretization, the new 1D method can reach (2 M)th-order accuracy and is always stable. The 2D method can reach (2 M)th-order accuracy along eight directions and has better stability. Similarly, the 3D method can reach (2 M)th-order accuracy along 48 directions and also has better stability than the conventional FD method. The advantages of the new method are also demonstrated by the results of dispersion analysis and numerical modeling of acoustic wave equation for homogeneous and inhomogeneous acoustic models. In addition, we study the influence of the FD stencil length on numerical modeling for 1D inhomogeneous media, and derive an optimal FD stencil length required to balance the accuracy and efficiency of modeling. A new time-space domain high-order staggered-grid FD method for the 1D acoustic wave equation with variable densities is also developed, which has similar advantages demonstrated by dispersion analysis, stability analysis and modeling experiments. The methodology presented in this paper can be easily extended to solve similar partial difference equations arising in other fields of science and engineering. © 2009 Elsevier Inc.

  16. On the measurement of high-energetic neutrinos with the IceCube neutrino telescope and with acoustic detection methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schunck, Matthias

    2011-10-07

    In this thesis, two subjects have been addressed to enhance the detection of astrophysical neutrinos with the existing IceCube neutrino telescope as well as to explore new detection methods, namely the acoustic detection. In the first part of this thesis, the determination of the acoustic attenuation length in South-Pole ice is presented. This is part of a feasibility study to investigate the acoustic neutrino detection as a possibility to enhance the detection of the highest-energy neutrinos. For this, the acoustic properties of the ice have to be known, and the South-Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) has been built to determine these. The attenuation length is determined using in-situ measurements with SPATS and a retrievable transmitter (pinger), which was deployed in a depth between 190 and 500 m into the water-filled drilling holes. Even though, the unknown angular-dependent sensitivities of the SPATS sensor channels cannot be avoided and are considered as the dominant systematic effect for these measurements. In this thesis, the acoustic attenuation length is calculated by comparing the energy contents of the pinger pulses recorded by the various SPATS sensor channels for different distances between the pinger and the respective channel. The energy was calculated from the Fourier spectra of the pinger pulses for a frequency range between 5 and 35 kHz. The attenuation coefficient is calculated for each channel individually and the weighted mean over the distribution of all considered channels leads to an attenuation length of 264{sup +52} {sub -37} m. The dependence of the attenuation on both depth and frequency has been investigated, showing no indications for either. In the second part, a new event reconstruction method based on a Top-Down approach is presented. The method has been implemented for the IC40 detector and applied to the muon energy reconstruction. The Top-Down method is based on the direct comparison of single measured events with a large sample

  17. Effects of acoustic noise on the auditory nerve compound action potentials evoked by electric pulse trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourski, Kirill V; Abbas, Paul J; Miller, Charles A; Robinson, Barbara K; Jeng, Fuh-Cherng

    2005-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of acoustic noise on the auditory nerve compound action potentials in response to electric pulse trains. Subjects were adult guinea pigs, implanted with a minimally invasive electrode to preserve acoustic sensitivity. Electrically evoked compound action potentials (ECAP) were recorded from the auditory nerve trunk in response to electric pulse trains both during and after the presentation of acoustic white noise. Simultaneously presented acoustic noise produced a decrease in ECAP amplitude. The effect of the acoustic masker on the electric probe was greatest at the onset of the acoustic stimulus and it was followed by a partial recovery of the ECAP amplitude. Following cessation of the acoustic noise, ECAP amplitude recovered over a period of approximately 100-200 ms. The effects of the acoustic noise were more prominent at lower electric pulse rates (interpulse intervals of 3 ms and higher). At higher pulse rates, the ECAP adaptation to the electric pulse train alone was larger and the acoustic noise, when presented, produced little additional effect. The observed effects of noise on ECAP were the greatest at high electric stimulus levels and, for a particular electric stimulus level, at high acoustic noise levels.

  18. Characterization of Three High Efficiency and Blue Sensitive Silicon Photomultipliers

    CERN Document Server

    Otte, Adam Nepomuk; Nguyen, Thanh; Purushotham, Dhruv

    2016-01-01

    We report about the optical and electrical characterization of three high efficiency and blue sensitive Silicon photomultipliers from FBK, Hamamatsu, and SensL. Key features of the tested devices when operated at 90% breakdown probability are peak photon detection efficiencies between 40% and 55%, temperature dependencies of gain and PDE that are less than 1%/$^{\\circ}$C, dark rates of $\\sim$50\\,kHz/mm$^{2}$ at room temperature, afterpulsing of about 2%, and direct optical crosstalk between 6% and 20%. The characteristics of all three devices impressively demonstrate how the Silicon-photomultiplier technology has improved over the past ten years. It is further demonstrated how the voltage and temperature characteristics of a number of quantities can be parameterized on the basis of physical models. The models provide a deeper understanding of the device characteristics over a wide bias and temperature range. They also serve as examples how producers could provide the characteristics of their SiPMs to users. A...

  19. Characterization of three high efficiency and blue sensitive silicon photomultipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otte, Adam Nepomuk; Garcia, Distefano; Nguyen, Thanh; Purushotham, Dhruv

    2017-02-01

    We report about the optical and electrical characterization of three high efficiency and blue sensitive Silicon photomultipliers from FBK, Hamamatsu, and SensL. Key features of the tested devices when operated at 90% breakdown probability are peak photon detection efficiencies between 40% and 55%, temperature dependencies of gain and PDE that are less than 1%/°C, dark rates of ∼50 kHz/mm2 at room temperature, afterpulsing of about 2%, and direct optical crosstalk between 6% and 20%. The characteristics of all three devices impressively demonstrate how the Silicon-photomultiplier technology has improved over the past ten years. It is further demonstrated how the voltage and temperature characteristics of a number of quantities can be parameterized on the basis of physical models. The models provide a deeper understanding of the device characteristics over a wide bias and temperature range. They also serve as examples how producers could provide the characteristics of their SiPMs to users. A standardized parameterization of SiPMs would enable users to find the optimal SiPM for their application and the operating point of SiPMs without having to perform measurements thus significantly reducing design and development cycles.

  20. High Speed Pressure Sensitive Paint for Dynamic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Carolina; Chism, Kyle; Hubner, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Pressure sensitive paint (PSP) allows engineers to obtain accurate, high-spatial-resolution measurements of pressure fields over a structure. The pressure is directly related to the luminescence emitted by the paint due to oxygen quenching. Fast PSP has a higher surface area due to its porosity compared to conventional PSP, which enables faster diffusion and measurements to be acquired three orders of magnitude faster than with conventional PSP. A fast time response is needed when testing vibrating structures due to fluid-structure interaction. The goal of this summer project was to set-up, test and analyze the pressure field of an impinging air jet on a vibrating cantilever beam using Fast PSP. Software routines were developed for the processing of the emission images, videos of a static beam coated with Fast PSP were acquired with the air jet on and off, and the intensities of these two cases were ratioed and calibrated to pressure. Going forward, unsteady pressures on a vibrating beam will be measured and presented. Eventually, the long-term goal is to integrate luminescent pressure and strain measurement techniques, simultaneously using Fast PSP and a luminescent photoelastic coating on vibrating structures. Funding from NSF REU site Grant EEC 1358991 is greatly appreciated.

  1. Ultra-high sensitivity imaging of cancer using SERRS nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kircher, Moritz F.

    2016-05-01

    "Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy" (SERS) nanoparticles have gained much attention in recent years for in silico, in vitro and in vivo sensing applications. Our group has developed novel generations of biocompatible "surfaceenhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy" (SERRS) nanoparticles as novel molecular imaging agents. Via rigorous optimization of the different variables contributing to the Raman enhancement, we were able to design SERRS nanoparticles with so far unprecedented sensitivity of detection under in vivo imaging conditions (femto-attomolar range). This has resulted in our ability to visualize, with a single nanoparticle, many different cancer types (after intravenous injection) in mouse models. The cancer types we have tested so far include brain, breast, esophagus, stomach, pancreas, colon, sarcoma, and prostate cancer. All mouse models used are state-of-the-art and closely mimic the tumor biology in their human counterparts. In these animals, we were able to visualize not only the bulk tumors, but importantly also microscopic extensions and locoregional satellite metastases, thus delineating for the first time the true extent of tumor spread. Moreover, the particles enable the detection of premalignant lesions. Given their inert composition they are expected to have a high chance for clinical translation, where we envision them to have an impact in various scenarios ranging from early detection, image-guidance in open or minimally invasive surgical procedures, to noninvasive imaging in conjunction with spatially offset (SESORS) Raman detection devices.

  2. Fabrication of highly efficient flexible dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, H., E-mail: f10381@ntut.edu.t [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, No.1 Sec.3, Chung Hsiao E. Rd., Taipei 10608, Taiwan (China); Chen, T.L. [Department of Industrial Design, National Taipei University of Technology, No.1 Sec.3, Chung Hsiao E. Rd., Taipei 10608, Taiwan (China); Huang, K.D. [Department of Vehicle Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, No.1 Sec.3, Chung Hsiao E. Rd., Taipei 10608, Taiwan (China); Chien, S.H. [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, No. 128 Sec.2, Academia Rd., Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Hung, K.C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, No.1 Sec.3, Chung Hsiao E. Rd., Taipei 10608, Taiwan (China)

    2010-08-15

    The paper studies the fabrication of a flexible dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). The photoelectrode substrates are flexible stainless steel sheet with thickness 0.07 mm and titanium (Ti) sheet with thickness 0.25 mm. For the photoelectrode fabrication process, eletrophoresis deposition (EPD) was employed for its merits of low-cost and fast fabrication. With an electric field of 40 V/cm, after undergoing EPD process twice, the TiO{sub 2} nanofilm thickness could be controlled to around 13 {mu}m thick. In addition, to achieve counter electrode, sputtering method was applied to deposit Pt on ITO-PET, resulting in thin films with four different thicknesses of 5, 8, 11 and 14 nm. The experimental results showed that the best colloid solution used in EPD process was a mixture of 100 ml isopropyl alcohol (IPA) and 0.4 g commercial TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, Degussa P25. The best flatness for a 13 {mu}m thick film could be acquired under an electric field of 40 V/cm. Comparing the photoelectric conversion efficiency values of DSSC assembled by counter electrodes with different Pt thicknesses, the experimental results showed that the best Pt thickness was 11 nm, and the conversion efficiency could reach as high as 2.91%.

  3. ASIC for High Rate 3D Position Sensitive Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernon, E.; De Geronimo, G.; Ackley, K.; Fried, J.; He, Z.; Herman, C.; Zhang, F.

    2010-06-16

    We report on the development of an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for 3D position sensitive detectors (3D PSD). The ASIC is designed to operate with pixelated wide bandgap sensors like Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT), Mercuric Iodide (Hgl2) and Thallium Bromide (TIBr). It measures the amplitudes and timings associated with an ionizing event on 128 anodes, the anode grid, and the cathode. Each channel provides low-noise charge amplification, high-order shaping with peaking time adjustable from 250 ns to 12 {micro}s, gain adjustable to 20 mV/fC or 120 mV/fC (for a dynamic range of 3.2 MeV and 530 keV in CZT), amplitude discrimination with 5-bit trimming, and positive and negative peak and timing detections. The readout can be full or sparse, based on a flag and single- or multi-cycle token passing. All channels, triggered channels only, or triggered with neighbors can be read out thus increasing the rate capability of the system to more than 10 kcps. The ASIC dissipates 330 mW which corresponds to about 2.5 mW per channel.

  4. Adjoint sensitivity analysis of high frequency structures with Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Bakr, Mohamed; Demir, Veysel

    2017-01-01

    This book covers the theory of adjoint sensitivity analysis and uses the popular FDTD (finite-difference time-domain) method to show how wideband sensitivities can be efficiently estimated for different types of materials and structures. It includes a variety of MATLAB® examples to help readers absorb the content more easily.

  5. Highly sensitive NIR PtSi/Si-nanostructure detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua-gao; Guo, Pei; Yuan, An-bo; Long, Fei; Li, Rui-zhi; Li, Ping; Li, Yi

    2016-10-01

    We report a high external quantum efficiency (EQE) photodiode detector with PtSi/Si-nanostructures. Black silicon nanostructures were fabricated by metal-assist chemical etching (MCE), a 2 nm Pt layer was subsequently deposited on black silicon surface by DC magnetron sputtering system, and PtSi/Si-nanostructures were formed in vacuum annealing at 450 oC for 5 min. As the PtSi/Si-nanostructures presented a spiky shape, the absorption of incident light was remarkably enhanced for the repeat reflection and absorption. The breakdown voltage, dark current, threshold voltage and responsivity of the device were investigated to evaluate the performance of the PtSi/Si-nanostructures detector. The threshold voltage and dark currents of the PtSi/Si-nanostructure photodiode tends to be slightly higher than those of the standard diodes. The breakdown voltage remarkably was reduced because of existing avalanche breakdown in PtSi/Si-nanostructures. However, the photodiodes had high response at room temperature in near infrared region. At -5 V reverse bias voltage, the responsivity was 0.72 A/W in 1064 nm wavelength, and the EQE was 83.9%. By increasing the reverse bias voltage, the responsivity increased. At -60 V reverse bias voltage, the responsivity was 3.5 A/W, and the EQE was 407.5%, which means the quantum efficiency of PtSi/Si-nanostructure photodiodes was about 10 times higher than that of a standard diode. Future research includes how to apply this technology to enhance the NIR sensitivity of image sensors, such as Charge Coupled Devices (CCD).

  6. An integrated and highly sensitive ultrafast acoustoelectric imaging system for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthon, Beatrice; Dansette, Pierre-Marc; Tanter, Mickaël; Pernot, Mathieu; Provost, Jean

    2017-07-01

    Direct imaging of the electrical activation of the heart is crucial to better understand and diagnose diseases linked to arrhythmias. This work presents an ultrafast acoustoelectric imaging (UAI) system for direct and non-invasive ultrafast mapping of propagating current densities using the acoustoelectric effect. Acoustoelectric imaging is based on the acoustoelectric effect, the modulation of the medium’s electrical impedance by a propagating ultrasonic wave. UAI triggers this effect with plane wave emissions to image current densities. An ultrasound research platform was fitted with electrodes connected to high common-mode rejection ratio amplifiers and sampled by up to 128 independent channels. The sequences developed allow for both real-time display of acoustoelectric maps and long ultrafast acquisition with fast off-line processing. The system was evaluated by injecting controlled currents into a saline pool via copper wire electrodes. Sensitivity to low current and low acoustic pressure were measured independently. Contrast and spatial resolution were measured for varying numbers of plane waves and compared to line per line acoustoelectric imaging with focused beams at equivalent peak pressure. Temporal resolution was assessed by measuring time-varying current densities associated with sinusoidal currents. Complex intensity distributions were also imaged in 3D. Electrical current densities were detected for injected currents as low as 0.56 mA. UAI outperformed conventional focused acoustoelectric imaging in terms of contrast and spatial resolution when using 3 and 13 plane waves or more, respectively. Neighboring sinusoidal currents with opposed phases were accurately imaged and separated. Time-varying currents were mapped and their frequency accurately measured for imaging frame rates up to 500 Hz. Finally, a 3D image of a complex intensity distribution was obtained. The results demonstrated the high sensitivity of the UAI system proposed. The plane wave

  7. High throughput modular chambers for rapid evaluation of anesthetic sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eckmann David M

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anesthetic sensitivity is determined by the interaction of multiple genes. Hence, a dissection of genetic contributors would be aided by precise and high throughput behavioral screens. Traditionally, anesthetic phenotyping has addressed only induction of anesthesia, evaluated with dose-response curves, while ignoring potentially important data on emergence from anesthesia. Methods We designed and built a controlled environment apparatus to permit rapid phenotyping of twenty-four mice simultaneously. We used the loss of righting reflex to indicate anesthetic-induced unconsciousness. After fitting the data to a sigmoidal dose-response curve with variable slope, we calculated the MACLORR (EC50, the Hill coefficient, and the 95% confidence intervals bracketing these values. Upon termination of the anesthetic, Emergence timeRR was determined and expressed as the mean ± standard error for each inhaled anesthetic. Results In agreement with several previously published reports we find that the MACLORR of halothane, isoflurane, and sevoflurane in 8–12 week old C57BL/6J mice is 0.79% (95% confidence interval = 0.78 – 0.79%, 0.91% (95% confidence interval = 0.90 – 0.93%, and 1.96% (95% confidence interval = 1.94 – 1.97%, respectively. Hill coefficients for halothane, isoflurane, and sevoflurane are 24.7 (95% confidence interval = 19.8 – 29.7%, 19.2 (95% confidence interval = 14.0 – 24.3%, and 33.1 (95% confidence interval = 27.3 – 38.8%, respectively. After roughly 2.5 MACLORR • hr exposures, mice take 16.00 ± 1.07, 6.19 ± 0.32, and 2.15 ± 0.12 minutes to emerge from halothane, isoflurane, and sevoflurane, respectively. Conclusion This system enabled assessment of inhaled anesthetic responsiveness with a higher precision than that previously reported. It is broadly adaptable for delivering an inhaled therapeutic (or toxin to a population while monitoring its vital signs, motor reflexes, and providing precise control

  8. Fabrication and Characteristics of Thin Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators with Highly c-Axis Oriented AlN Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Hao-Shuang; ZHANG Kai; HU Guang; LI Wei-Yong

    2006-01-01

    @@ Thin film bulk acoustic resonators are fabricated by using silicon bulk micromachining technology, which are constructed mainly from aluminium nitride (AlN) piezoelectric films. The results of x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy show that the AlN films exhibit highly c-axis orientation with good surface morphology. The resonators with the AlN films possessed a reflection coefficient -10.6 dB at the resonant frequency 2.537 GHz, an effective electromechanical coupling coefficient 3.75%, series quality 101.8, and parallel quality 79.7.

  9. High-accuracy acoustic detection of nonclassical component of material nonlinearity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupert, Sylvain; Renaud, Guillaume; Rivière, Jacques; Talmant, Maryline; Johnson, Paul A; Laugier, Pascal

    2011-11-01

    The aim is to assess the nonclassical component of material nonlinearity in several classes of materials with weak, intermediate, and high nonlinear properties. In this contribution, an optimized nonlinear resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (NRUS) measuring and data processing protocol applied to small samples is described. The protocol is used to overcome the effects of environmental condition changes that take place during an experiment, and that may mask the intrinsic nonlinearity. External temperature fluctuation is identified as a primary source of measurement contamination. For instance, a variation of 0.1 °C produced a frequency variation of 0.01%, which is similar to the expected nonlinear frequency shift for weakly nonlinear materials. In order to overcome environmental effects, the reference frequency measurements are repeated before each excitation level and then used to compute nonlinear parameters. Using this approach, relative resonant frequency shifts of 10(-5) can be measured, which is below the limit of 10(-4) often considered as the limit of NRUS sensitivity under common experimental conditions. Due to enhanced sensitivity resulting from the correction procedure applied in this work, nonclassical nonlinearity in materials that before have been assumed to only be classically nonlinear in past work (steel, brass, and aluminum) is reported.

  10. High-sensitivity high-throughput chip based biosensor array for multiplexed detection of heavy metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hai; Tang, Naimei; Jairo, Grace A.; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Blake, Diane A.; Chen, Ray T.

    2016-03-01

    Heavy metal ions released into the environment from industrial processes lead to various health hazards. We propose an on-chip label-free detection approach that allows high-sensitivity and high-throughput detection of heavy metals. The sensing device consists of 2-dimensional photonic crystal microcavities that are combined by multimode interferometer to form a sensor array. We experimentally demonstrate the detection of cadmium-chelate conjugate with concentration as low as 5 parts-per-billion (ppb).

  11. Graphene oxide as sensitive layer in Love-wave surface acoustic wave sensors for the detection of chemical warfare agent simulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayago, Isabel; Matatagui, Daniel; Fernández, María Jesús; Fontecha, José Luis; Jurewicz, Izabela; Garriga, Rosa; Muñoz, Edgar

    2016-02-01

    A Love-wave device with graphene oxide (GO) as sensitive layer has been developed for the detection of chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants. Sensitive films were fabricated by airbrushing GO dispersions onto Love-wave devices. The resulting Love-wave sensors detected very low CWA simulant concentrations in synthetic air at room temperature (as low as 0.2 ppm for dimethyl-methylphosphonate, DMMP, a simulant of sarin nerve gas, and 0.75 ppm for dipropylene glycol monomethyl ether, DPGME, a simulant of nitrogen mustard). High responses to DMMP and DPGME were obtained with sensitivities of 3087 and 760 Hz/ppm respectively. Very low limit of detection (LOD) values (9 and 40 ppb for DMMP and DPGME, respectively) were calculated from the achieved experimental data. The sensor exhibited outstanding sensitivity, good linearity and repeatability to all simulants tested. The detection mechanism is here explained in terms of hydrogen bonding formation between the tested CWA simulants and GO.

  12. On the variations of acoustic absorption peak with flow velocity in Micro-Perforated Panels at high level of excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Tayong, Rostand; Leclaire, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    The acoustic behavior of micro-perforated panels (MPP) is studied theoretically and experimentally at high level of pressure excitation. A model based on Forcheimer's regime of flow velocity in the perforations is proposed. This model is valid at relatively high Reynolds numbers and low Mach numbers. The experimental method consists in measuring the acoustical pressure at three different positions in an impedance tube, the two measurement positions usually considered in an impedance tube and one measurement in the vicinity of the rear surface of the MPP. The impedance tube is equipped with a pressure driver instead of the usual loudspeaker and capable of delivering a high sound pressure level up to 160 dB. Several MPP specimens made out of steel and polypropylene were tested. Measurements using random noise or sinusoidal excitation in a frequency range between 200 and 1600 Hz were carried out on MPPs backed by air cavities. It was observed that the maximum of absorption can be a positive or a negative functio...

  13. On the variations of acoustic absorption peak with particle velocity in micro-perforated panels at high level of excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayong, Rostand; Dupont, Thomas; Leclaire, Philippe

    2010-05-01

    The acoustic behavior of micro-perforated panels (MPP) is studied theoretically and experimentally at high level of pressure excitation. A model based on Forchheimer's regime of flow velocity in the perforations is proposed. This model is valid at relatively high Reynolds numbers and low Mach numbers. The experimental method consists in measuring the acoustical pressure at three different positions in an impedance tube, the two measurement positions usually considered in an impedance tube and one measurement in the vicinity of the rear surface of the MPP. The impedance tube is equipped with a pressure driver instead of the usual loudspeaker and capable of delivering a high sound pressure level up to 160 dB. MPP specimens made out of steel, dural and polypropylene were tested. Measurements using random noise or sinusoidal excitation in a frequency range between 200 and 1600 Hz were carried out on MPPs backed by air cavities. It was observed that the maximum of absorption can be a positive or a negative function of the flow velocity in the perforations. This suggests the existence of a maximum of absorption as a function of flow velocity. This behavior was predicted by the model and confirmed experimentally.

  14. High sensitivity fiber Bragg grating pressure difference sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiwei Fu(傅海威); Junmei Fu(傅君眉); Xueguang Qiao(乔学光)

    2004-01-01

    Based on the effect of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) pressure difference sensitivity enhancement by encapsulating the FBG with uniform strength beam and metal bellows, a FBG pressure difference sensor is proposed, and its mechanism is also discussed. The relationship between Bragg wavelength and the pressure difference is derived, and the expression of the pressure difference sensitivity coefficient is also given. It is indicated that there is good linear relation between the Bragg wavelength shift and the pressure difference of the sensor. The theoretical and experimental pressure difference sensitivity coefficients are 38.67 and 37.6 nm/MPa, which are 12890 and 12533 times of that of the bare FBG, respectively. The pressure difference sensitivity and dynamic range can be easily changed by changing the size, Young's modulus, and Poisson's ratio of the beam and the bellows.

  15. Design of a High Sensitivity GNSS receiver for Lunar missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, Luciano; Dovis, Fabio; Silva, João S.; da Silva, Pedro F.; Lopes, Hugo D.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the design of a satellite navigation receiver architecture tailored for future Lunar exploration missions, demonstrating the feasibility of using Global Navigation Satellite Systems signals integrated with an orbital filter to achieve such a scope. It analyzes the performance of a navigation solution based on pseudorange and pseudorange rate measurements, generated through the processing of very weak signals of the Global Positioning System (GPS) L1/L5 and Galileo E1/E5 frequency bands. In critical scenarios (e.g. during manoeuvres) acceleration and attitude measurements from additional sensors complementing the GNSS measurements are integrated with the GNSS measurement to match the positioning requirement. A review of environment characteristics (dynamics, geometry and signal power) for the different phases of a reference Lunar mission is provided, focusing on the stringent requirements of the Descent, Approach and Hazard Detection and Avoidance phase. The design of High Sensitivity acquisition and tracking schemes is supported by an extensive simulation test campaign using a software receiver implementation and navigation results are validated by means of an end-to-end software simulator. Acquisition and tracking of GPS and Galileo signals of the L1/E1 and L5/E5a bands was successfully demonstrated for Carrier-to-Noise density ratios as low as 5-8 dB-Hz. The proposed navigation architecture provides acceptable performances during the considered critical phases, granting position and velocity errors below 61.4 m and 3.2 m/s, respectively, for the 99.7% of the mission time.

  16. A high sensitive fiber-optic strain sensor with tunable temperature sensitivity for temperature-compensation measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jie; Huang, Hui; Bai, Min; Zhan, Tingting; Yang, Zhibo; Yu, Yan; Qu, Bo

    2017-02-01

    A high sensitive fiber-optic strain sensor, which consists of a cantilever, a tandem rod and a fiber collimator, was proposed. The tandem rod, which transfer the applied strain to the cantilever, was used for tuning the temperature sensitivity from ‑0.15 to 0.19 dB/°C via changing the length ratio of the rods. Moreover, due to the small beam divergence of the collimator, high strain sensitivity can be realized via incident-angle sensitive detection-mechanism. A strain detection-range of 1.1 × 103 με (with a sensing length of 21.5 mm), a detection limit of 5.7 × 10‑3 με, and a maximum operating frequency of 1.18 KHz were demonstrated. This sensor is promising for compensating the thermal-expansion of various target objects.

  17. Flow and Acoustic Features of a Mach 0.9 Free Jet Using High-Frequency Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Puja; Alvi, Farrukh

    2016-11-01

    This study focuses on active control of a Mach 0.9 (ReD = 6 ×105) free jet using high-frequency excitation for noise reduction. Eight resonance-enhanced microjet actuators with nominal frequencies of 25 kHz (StD 2 . 2) are used to excite the shear layer at frequencies that are approximately an order of magnitude higher than the jet preferred frequency. The influence of control on mean and turbulent characteristics of the jet is studied using Particle Image Velocimetry. Additionally, far-field acoustic measurements are acquired to estimate the effect of pulsed injection on noise characteristics of the jet. Flow field measurements revealed that strong streamwise vortex pairs, formed as a result of control, result in a significantly thicker initial shear layer. This excited shear layer is also prominently undulated, resulting in a modified initial velocity profile. Also, the distribution of turbulent kinetic energy revealed that forcing results in increased turbulence levels for near-injection regions, followed by a global reduction for all downstream locations. Far-field acoustic measurements showed noise reductions at low to moderate frequencies. Additionally, an increase in high-frequency noise, mostly dominated by the actuators' resonant noise, was observed. AFOSR and ARO.

  18. High-Power Piezoelectric Acoustic-Electric Power Feedthru for Metal Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Biederman, Will; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Jones, Christopher; Aldrich, Jack; Chang, Zensheu

    2008-01-01

    Piezoelectric acoustic-electric power feed-through devices transfer electric power wirelessly through a solid wall by using acoustic waves. This approach allows for the removal of holes through structures. The technology is applicable to power supply for electric equipment inside sealed containers, vacuum or pressure vessels, etc where the holes on the wall are prohibitive or result in significant performance degrade or complex designs. In the author's previous work, 100-W electric power was transferred through a metal wall by a small, simple-structure piezoelectric device. To meet requirements of higher power applications, the feasibility to transfer kilowatts level power was investigated. Pre-stressed longitudinal piezoelectric feedthru devices were analyzed by finite element model. An equivalent circuit model was developed to predict the power transfer characteristics to different electric loads. Based on the analysis results, a prototype device was designed, fabricated and a demonstration of the transmission of electric power up to 1-kW was successfully conducted. The methods to minimize the plate wave excitation on the wall were also analyzed. Both model analysis and experimental results are presented in detail in this presentation.

  19. Sensitivity of free radicals production in acoustically driven bubble to the ultrasonic frequency and nature of dissolved gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merouani, Slimane; Hamdaoui, Oualid; Rezgui, Yacine; Guemini, Miloud

    2015-01-01

    Central events of ultrasonic action are the bubbles of cavitation that can be considered as powered microreactors within which high-energy chemistry occurs. This work presents the results of a comprehensive numerical assessment of frequency and saturating gases effects on single bubble sonochemistry. Computer simulations of chemical reactions occurring inside a bubble oscillating in liquid water irradiated by an ultrasonic wave have been performed for a wide range of ultrasonic frequencies (213-1100kHz) under different saturating gases (O2, air, N2 and H2). For O2 and H2 bubbles, reactions mechanism consisting in 25 reversible chemical reactions were proposed for studying the internal bubble-chemistry whereas 73 reversible reactions were taken into account for air and N2 bubbles. The numerical simulations have indicated that radicals such as OH, H, HO2 and O are created in the bubble during the strong collapse. In all cases, hydroxyl radical (OH) is the main oxidant created in the bubble. The production rate of the oxidants decreases as the driving ultrasonic frequency increases. The production rate of OH radical followed the order O2>air>N2>H2 and the order becomes more remarkable at higher ultrasonic frequencies. The effect of ultrasonic frequency on single bubble sonochemistry was attributed to its significant impact on the cavitation process whereas the effects of gases were attributed to the nature of the chemistry produced in the bubble at the strong collapse. It was concluded that, in addition to the gas solubility, the nature of the internal bubble chemistry is another parameter of a paramount importance that controls the overall sonochemical activity in aqueous solutions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. High spectral response heteroleptic ruthenium (II) complexes as sensitizers for dye sensitized solar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Chandrasekharam; Ch Srinivasarao; T Suresh; M Anil Reddy; M Raghavender; G Rajkumar; M Srinivasu; P Yella Reddy

    2011-01-01

    Heteroleptic ruthenium(II) bipyridyl complex, cis-Ru(II)(4,4'-bis(4-tert-butylstyryl)-2,2'-bipyridyl) (4,4'-dicarboxy-2,2'-bipyridyl) (NCS2) (H112) was synthesized and characterized by 1H-NMR, MASS, Spectrofluorometer and UV-Vis spectroscopes. The photo-voltaic performance of the sensitizer was evaluated in Dye Sensitized Solar Cell (DSSC) under irradiation of AM 1.5 G solar light and the photovoltaic characteristics were compared with those of reference cells of HRS1 and N719 fabricated under comparable conditions. Compared to N719, H112 sensitizer showed enhanced molar extinction coefficient and relatively better monochromatic incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE) across the spectral range of 400 to 800 nm with solar energy-to-electrical conversion efficiency () of 2.43% [open circuit photovoltage (VOC) = 0.631V, short-circuit photocurrent density (JSC) = 8.96 mA/cm2, fill factor (ff) = 0.430], while values of 2.51% (VOC = 0.651V, JSC = 9.41 mA/cm2, ff = 0.410) and 2.74% (VOC = 0.705 V, JSC = 8.62 mA/cm2, ff = 0.455) were obtained for HRS1 and N719 sensitized solar cells respectively. The introduction of 4,4'-bis(4-tert-butylstyryl) moieties on one of the bipyridine moieties of N719 complex shows higher light absorption abilities, IPCE and JSC.

  1. Acoustic cloaking and transformation acoustics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Huanyang [School of Physical Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215006 (China); Chan, C T, E-mail: kenyon@ust.h, E-mail: phchan@ust.h [Department of Physics and the William Mong Institute of NanoScience and Technology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay (Hong Kong)

    2010-03-24

    In this review, we give a brief introduction to the application of the new technique of transformation acoustics, which draws on a correspondence between coordinate transformation and material properties. The technique is formulated for both acoustic waves and linear liquid surface waves. Some interesting conceptual devices can be designed for manipulating acoustic waves. For example, we can design acoustic cloaks that make an object invisible to acoustic waves, and the cloak can either encompass or lie outside the object to be concealed. Transformation acoustics, as an analog of transformation optics, can go beyond invisibility cloaking. As an illustration for manipulating linear liquid surface waves, we show that a liquid wave rotator can be designed and fabricated to rotate the wave front. The acoustic transformation media require acoustic materials which are anisotropic and inhomogeneous. Such materials are difficult to find in nature. However, composite materials with embedded sub-wavelength resonators can in principle be made and such 'acoustic metamaterials' can exhibit nearly arbitrary values of effective density and modulus tensors to satisfy the demanding material requirements in transformation acoustics. We introduce resonant sonic materials and Helmholtz resonators as examples of acoustic metamaterials that exhibit resonant behaviour in effective density and effective modulus. (topical review)

  2. A signal processing approach for enhanced Acoustic Emission data analysis in high activity systems: Application to organic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharrat, M.; Ramasso, E.; Placet, V.; Boubakar, M. L.

    2016-03-01

    Structural elements made of Organic Matrix Composites (OMC) under complex loading may suffer from high Acoustic Emission (AE) activity caused by the emergence of different emission sources at high rates with high noise level, which finally engender continuous emissions. The detection of hits in this situation becomes a challenge particularly during fatigue tests. This work suggests an approach based on the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) denoising applied on signal segments. A particular attention is paid to the adjustment of the denoising parameters based on pencil lead breaks and their influence on the quality of the denoised AE signals. The validation of the proposed approach is performed on a ring-shaped Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) under in-service-like conditions involving continuous emissions with superimposed damage-related transients. It is demonstrated that errors in hit detection are greatly reduced leading to a better identification of the natural damage scenario based on AE signals.

  3. Development of High Temperature/High Sensitivity Novel Chemical Resistive Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chonglin; Nash, Patrick; Ma, Chunrui; Enriquez, Erik; Wang, Haibing; Xu, Xing; Bao, Shangyong; Collins, Gregory

    2013-08-13

    The research has been focused to design, fabricate, and develop high temperature/high sensitivity novel multifunctional chemical sensors for the selective detection of fossil energy gases used in power and fuel systems. By systematically studying the physical properties of the LnBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5+d} (LBCO) [Ln=Pr or La] thin-films, a new concept chemical sensor based high temperature chemical resistant change has been developed for the application for the next generation highly efficient and near zero emission power generation technologies. We also discovered that the superfast chemical dynamic behavior and an ultrafast surface exchange kinetics in the highly epitaxial LBCO thin films. Furthermore, our research indicates that hydrogen can superfast diffuse in the ordered oxygen vacancy structures in the highly epitaxial LBCO thin films, which suggest that the LBCO thin film not only can be an excellent candidate for the fabrication of high temperature ultra sensitive chemical sensors and control systems for power and fuel monitoring systems, but also can be an excellent candidate for the low temperature solid oxide fuel cell anode and cathode materials.

  4. A high-sensitivity push-pull magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breschi, E.; Grujić, Z. D.; Knowles, P.; Weis, A.

    2014-01-01

    We describe our approach to atomic magnetometry based on the push-pull optical pumping technique. Cesium vapor is pumped and probed by a resonant laser beam whose circular polarization is modulated synchronously with the spin evolution dynamics induced by a static magnetic field. The magnetometer is operated in a phase-locked loop, and it has an intrinsic sensitivity below 20fT/√Hz , using a room temperature paraffin-coated cell. We use the magnetometer to monitor magnetic field fluctuations with a sensitivity of 300fT/√Hz .

  5. A high-sensitivity push-pull magnetometer

    CERN Document Server

    Breschi, E; Knowles, P; Weis, A

    2013-01-01

    We describe our approach to atomic magnetometry based on the push-pull optical pumping technique. Cesium vapor is pumped and probed by a resonant laser beam whose circular polarization is modulated synchronously with the spin evolution dynamics induced by a static magnetic field. The magnetometer is operated in a phase-locked loop, and it has an intrinsic sensitivity below 20fT/\\sqrt(Hz) using a room temperature paraffin-coated cell. We use the magnetometer to monitor magnetic field fluctuations with a sensitivity of 300fT/\\sqrt(Hz).

  6. High Sensitivity SPECT for Small Animals and Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Gregory S. [UC Davis

    2015-02-28

    Imaging systems using single gamma-ray emitting radioisotopes typically implement collimators in order to form the images. However, a tradeoff in sensitivity is inherent in the use of collimators, and modern preclinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) systems detect a very small fraction of emitted gamma-rays (<0.3%). We have built a collimator-less system, which can reach sensitivity of 40% for 99mTc imaging, while still producing images of sufficient spatial resolution for certain applications in thin objects such as mice, small plants, and well plates used for in vitro experiments.

  7. High-speed high-sensitivity infrared spectroscopy using mid-infrared swept lasers (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, David T. D.; Groom, Kristian M.; Hogg, Richard A.; Revin, Dmitry G.; Cockburn, John W.; Rehman, Ihtesham U.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is a highly attractive read-out technology for compositional analysis of biomedical specimens because of its unique combination of high molecular sensitivity without the need for exogenous labels. Traditional techniques such as FTIR and Raman have suffered from comparatively low speed and sensitivity however recent innovations are challenging this situation. Direct mid-IR spectroscopy is being speeded up by innovations such as MEMS-based FTIR instruments with very high mirror speeds and supercontinuum sources producing very high sample irradiation levels. Here we explore another possible method - external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL's) with high cavity tuning speeds (mid-IR swept lasers). Swept lasers have been heavily developed in the near-infrared where they are used for non-destructive low-coherence imaging (OCT). We adapt these concepts in two ways. Firstly by combining mid-IR quantum cascade gain chips with external cavity designs adapted from OCT we achieve spectral acquisition rates approaching 1 kHz and demonstrate potential to reach 100 kHz. Secondly we show that mid-IR swept lasers share a fundamental sensitivity advantage with near-IR OCT swept lasers. This makes them potentially able to achieve the same spectral SNR as an FTIR instrument in a time x N shorter (N being the number of spectral points) under otherwise matched conditions. This effect is demonstrated using measurements of a PDMS sample. The combination of potentially very high spectral acquisition rates, fundamental SNR advantage and the use of low-cost detector systems could make mid-IR swept lasers a powerful technology for high-throughput biomedical spectroscopy.

  8. Cavity Enhanced Optical Vernier Spectroscopy, Broad Band, High Resolution, High Sensitivity

    CERN Document Server

    Gohle, Christoph; Schliesser, Albert; Udem, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor W

    2007-01-01

    A femtosecond frequency comb provides a vast number of equidistantly spaced narrow band laser modes that can be simultaneously tuned and frequency calibrated with 15 digits accuracy. Our Vernier spectrometer utilizes all of theses modes in a massively parallel manner to rapidly record both absorption and dispersion spectra with a sensitivity that is provided by a high finesse broad band optical resonator and a resolution that is only limited by the frequency comb line width while keeping the required setup simple.

  9. Broadband asymmetric acoustic transmission through an acoustic prism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ailing; Chen, Tianning; Wang, Xiaopeng; Xi, Yanhui

    2017-08-01

    Narrow bandwidth and complex structure are the main shortcomings of the existing asymmetric acoustic transmission devices. In this letter, a simple broadband asymmetric acoustic transmission device is proposed by using an acoustic prism filled with xenon gas. The sound pressure field distributions, the transmission spectra, and the prism angle effect are numerically investigated by using finite element method. The proposed device can always realize asymmetric acoustic transmission for the wave frequency larger than 480 Hz because the wave paths are not influenced by the wave frequencies. The asymmetric acoustic transmission is attributed to normal refraction and total reflection occur at different interfaces. Besides, relatively high transmission efficiency is realized due to the similar impedance between the acoustic prism and background. And the transmitted wave direction can be controlled freely by changing the prism angle. Our design provides a simple method to obtain broadband asymmetric acoustic transmission device and has potentials in many applications, such as noise control and medical ultrasound.

  10. Pajarito Monitor: a high-sensitivity monitoring system for highly enriched uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fehlau, P.E.; Coop, K.; Garcia, C. Jr.; Martinez, J.

    1984-01-01

    The Pajarito Monitor for Special Nuclear Material is a high-sensitivity gamma-ray monitoring system for detecting small quantities of highly enriched uranium transported by pedestrians or motor vehicles. The monitor consists of two components: a walk-through personnel monitor and a vehicle monitor. The personnel monitor has a plastic-scintillator detector portal, a microwave occupancy monitor, and a microprocessor control unit that measures the radiation intensity during background and monitoring periods to detect transient diversion signals. The vehicle monitor examines stationary motor vehicles while the vehicle's occupants pass through the personnel portal to exchange their badges. The vehicle monitor has four groups of large plastic scintillators that scan the vehicle from above and below. Its microprocessor control unit measures separate radiation intensities in each detector group. Vehicle occupancy is sensed by a highway traffic detection system. Each monitor's controller is responsible for detecting diversion as well as serving as a calibration and trouble-shooting aid. Diversion signals are detected by a sequential probability ratio hypothesis test that minimizes the monitoring time in the vehicle monitor and adapts itself well to variations in individual passage speed in the personnel monitor. Designed to be highly sensitive to diverted enriched uranium, the monitoring system also exhibits exceptional sensitivity for plutonium. 6 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  11. Laser Imaging of Airborne Acoustic Emission by Nonlinear Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solodov, Igor; Döring, Daniel; Busse, Gerd

    2008-06-01

    Strongly nonlinear vibrations of near-surface fractured defects driven by an elastic wave radiate acoustic energy into adjacent air in a wide frequency range. The variations of pressure in the emitted airborne waves change the refractive index of air thus providing an acoustooptic interaction with a collimated laser beam. Such an air-coupled vibrometry (ACV) is proposed for detecting and imaging of acoustic radiation of nonlinear spectral components by cracked defects. The photoelastic relation in air is used to derive induced phase modulation of laser light in the heterodyne interferometer setup. The sensitivity of the scanning ACV to different spatial components of the acoustic radiation is analyzed. The animated airborne emission patterns are visualized for the higher harmonic and frequency mixing fields radiated by planar defects. The results confirm a high localization of the nonlinear acoustic emission around the defects and complicated directivity patterns appreciably different from those observed for fundamental frequencies.

  12. A Bayesian approach for energy-based estimation of acoustic aberrations in high intensity focused ultrasound treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Hosseini, Bamdad; Pichardo, Samuel; Constanciel, Elodie; Drake, James M; Stockie, John M

    2016-01-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound is a non-invasive method for treatment of diseased tissue that uses a beam of ultrasound in order to generate heat within a small volume. A common challenge in application of this technique is that heterogeneity of the biological medium can defocus the ultrasound beam. In this study, the problem of refocusing the beam is reduced to the Bayesian inverse problem of estimating the acoustic aberration due to the biological tissue from acoustic radiative force imaging data. The solution to this problem is a posterior probability density on the aberration which is sampled using a Metropolis-within-Gibbs algorithm. The framework is tested using both a synthetic and experimental dataset. This new approach has the ability to obtain a good estimate of the aberrations from a small dataset, as little as 32 sonication tests, which can lead to significant speedup in the treatment process. Furthermore, this framework is very flexible and can work with a wide range of sonication tests and so...

  13. Gaseous bubble oscillations in anisotropic non-Newtonian fluids under influence of high-frequency acoustic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golykh, R. N.

    2016-06-01

    Progress of technology and medicine dictates the ever-increasing requirements (heat resistance, corrosion resistance, strength properties, impregnating ability, etc.) for non-Newtonian fluids and materials produced on their basis (epoxy resin, coating materials, liquid crystals, etc.). Materials with improved properties obtaining is possible by modification of their physicochemical structure. One of the most promising approaches to the restructuring of non-Newtonian fluids is cavitation generated by high-frequency acoustic vibrations. The efficiency of cavitation in non-Newtonian fluid is determined by dynamics of gaseous bubble. Today, bubble dynamics in isotropic non-Newtonian fluids, in which cavitation bubble shape remains spherical, is most full investigated, because the problem reduces to ordinary differential equation for spherical bubble radius. However, gaseous bubble in anisotropic fluids which are most wide kind of non-Newtonian fluids (due to orientation of macromolecules) deviates from spherical shape due to viscosity dependence on shear rate direction. Therefore, the paper presents the mathematical model of gaseous bubble dynamics in anisotropic non-Newtonian fluids. The model is based on general equations for anisotropic non-Newtonian fluid flow. The equations are solved by asymptotic decomposition of fluid flow parameters. It allowed evaluating bubble size and shape evolution depending on rheological properties of liquid and acoustic field characteristics.

  14. Acoustic Detection of Faults and Degradation in a High-Bypass Turbofan Engine during VIPR Phase III Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Devin K.

    2017-01-01

    The Vehicle Integrated Propulsion Research (VIPR) Phase III project was executed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and several industry, academic, and government partners in the summer of 2015. One of the research objectives was to use external radial acoustic microphone arrays to detect changes in the noise characteristics produced by the research engine during volcanic ash ingestion and seeded fault insertion scenarios involving bleed air valves. Preliminary results indicate the successful acoustic detection of suspected degradation as a result of cumulative exposure to volcanic ash. This detection is shown through progressive changes, particularly in the high-frequency content, as a function of exposure to greater cumulative quantities of ash. Additionally, detection of the simulated failure of the 14th stage stability bleed valve and, to a lesser extent, the station 2.5 stability bleed valve, to their fully-open fail-safe positions was achieved by means of spectral comparisons between nominal (normal valve operation) and seeded fault scenarios.

  15. Numerical and experimental analysis of high frequency acoustic microscopy and infrared reflectance system for early detection of melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagiannis, Georgios; Apostolidis, Georgios; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2016-03-01

    Melanoma is a very malicious type of cancer as it metastasizes early and hence its late diagnosis leads to death. Consequently, early diagnosis of melanoma and its removal is considered the most effective way of treatment. We present a design of a high frequency acoustic microscopy and infrared reflectance system for the early detection of melanoma. Specifically, the identification of morphological changes related to carcinogenesis is required. In this work, we simulate of the propagation of the ultrasonic waves of the order of 100 MHz as well as of electromagnetic waves of the order of 100 THz in melanoma structures targeting to the estimation and optimization of the basic characteristics of the systems. The simulation results of the acoustic microscopy subsystem aim to provide information such as the geometry of the transducer, the center frequency of operation, the focal length where the power transmittance is optimum and the spot size in focal length. As far as the infrared is concerned the optimal frequency range and the spot illumination size of the external probe is provided. This information is next used to assemble a properly designed system which is applied to melanoma phantoms as well as real skin lesions. Finally, the measurement data are visualized to reveal the information of the experimented structures, proving noteworthy accuracy.

  16. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Litniewski, Jerzy; Kujawska, Tamara; 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging

    2012-01-01

    The International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging is a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place continuously since 1968. In the course of the years the proceedings volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have become a reference for cutting-edge research in the field. In 2011 the 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Warsaw, Poland, April 10-13. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art as well as  in-depth research contributions by the specialists in the field, this Volume 31 in the Series contains an excellent collection of papers in six major categories: Biological and Medical Imaging Physics and Mathematics of Acoustical Imaging Acoustic Microscopy Transducers and Arrays Nondestructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Underwater Imaging

  17. Desensitization protocol in highly HLA-sensitized and ABO-incompatible high titer kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, J; Machida, Y; Iwai, T; Naganuma, T; Kitamoto, K; Iguchi, T; Maeda, S; Kamada, Y; Kuwabara, N; Kim, T; Nakatani, T

    2010-12-01

    A positive crossmatch indicates the presence of donor-specific alloantibodies and is associated with a graft loss rate of >80%; anti-ABO blood group antibodies develop in response to exposure to foreign blood groups, resulting in immediate graft loss. However, a desensitization protocol for highly HLA-sensitized and ABO-incompatible high-titer kidney transplantation has not yet been established. We treated 6 patients with high (≥1:512) anti-A/B antibody titers and 2 highly HLA-sensitized patients. Our immunosuppression protocol was initiated 1 month before surgery and included mycophenolate mofetil (1 g/d) and/or low-dose steroid (methylprednisolone 8 mg/d). Two doses of the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab (150 mg/m(2)) were administered 2 weeks before and on the day of transplantation. We performed antibody removal with 6-12 sessions of plasmapheresis (plasma exchange or double-filtration plasmapheresis) before transplantation. Splenectomy was also performed on the day of transplantation. Postoperative immunosuppression followed the same regimen as ABO-compatible cases, in which calcineurin inhibitors were initiated 3 days before transplantation, combined with 2 doses of basiliximab. Of the 8 patients, 7 subsequently underwent successful living-donor kidney transplantation. Follow-up of our recipients showed that the patient and graft survival rates were 100%. Acute cellular rejection and antibody-mediated rejection episodes occurred in 1 of the 7 recipients. These findings suggest that our immunosuppression regimen consisting of rituximab infusions, splenectomy, plasmapheresis, and pharmacologic immunosuppression may prove to be effective as a desensitization protocol for highly HLA-sensitized and ABO-incompatible high-titer kidney transplantation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Generation of Acoustic Gravity Waves by Periodic Radio Transmissions from a High-Power Ionospheric Heater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, Vladimir; Chernogor, Leonid; Rozumenko, Victor

    The Radiophysical Research Institute (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia) and Kharkiv V. N. Karazin National University (Kharkiv, Ukraine) have studied opportunities for the effective generation of acoustic gravity waves (AGWs) in 3 - 180-min period range. The excitation of such waves was conducted for the last several years using the SURA heating facility (Nizhny Novgorod). The detection of the HF-induced AGWs was carried out in the Radiophysical Observatory located near Kharkiv City at a distance of about 960 km from the SURA. A coherent radar for vertical sounding, an ionosonde, and magnetometer chains were used in our measurements. The main results are the following (see [1-5]): 1. Infrasound oscillation trains with a period of 6 min are detected during periodic SURA heater turn-on and -off. Similar oscillation trains are detected after long time pumping, during periodic transmissions with a period of 20 s, as well as after pumping turn-off. The train recordings begin 28 - 54 min after the heater turn-on or -off, and the train propagation speeds are about 300 - 570 m/s, the value of which is close to the sound speed at upper atmospheric altitudes. The amplitude of the Doppler shift frequency is of 10 - 40 mHz, which fits to the 0.1 - 0.3% electron density disturbances at ionospheric altitudes. The amplitude of the infrasound oscillations depends on the SURA mode of operation and the state of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere. 2. High-power radio transmissions stimulate the generation (or enhancement) of waves at ionospheric altitudes in the range of internal gravity wave periods. The HF-induced waves propagate with speeds of 360 - 460 m/s and produce changes in electron density with amplitudes of 2 - 3%. The generation of such periodic perturbations is more preferable with periods of 10 - 60 minutes. Their features depend significantly on the heater mode of operation. It should be stressed that perturbation intensity increases when a pumping wave frequency approaches

  19. Temperature insensitive hysteresis free highly sensitive polymer optical fiber Bragg grating humidity sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woyessa, Getinet; Nielsen, Kristian; Stefani, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    sensitivity and a high hysteresis in the humidity response, in particular when operated at high temperature. PMMA mPOFBGs annealed at high humidity show higher and more linear humidity sensitivity with negligible hysteresis. We also report how annealing at high humidity can blue-shift the FBG wavelength more...

  20. NDE Acoustic Microscopy Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The purpose is to develop advanced, more effective high-resolution micro-NDE materials characterization methods using scanning acoustic microscopy. The laboratory's...

  1. Determination of the molar mass of argon from high-precision acoustic comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, X. J.; Zhang, J. T.; Moldover, M. R.; Yang, I.; Plimmer, M. D.; Lin, H.

    2017-06-01

    This article describes the accurate determination of the molar mass M of a sample of argon gas used for the determination of the Boltzmann constant. The method of one of the authors (Moldover et al 1988 J. Res. Natl. Bur. Stand. 93 85-144) uses the ratio of the square speed of sound in the gas under analysis and in a reference sample of known molar mass. A sample of argon that was isotopically-enriched in 40Ar was used as the reference, whose unreactive impurities had been independently measured. The results for three gas samples are in good agreement with determinations by gravimetric mass spectrometry; (  -  1)  =  (-0.31  ±  0.69)  ×  10-6, where the indicated uncertainty is one standard deviation that does not account for the uncertainties from the acoustic and mass-spectroscopy references.

  2. Acoustic biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of ...

  3. Acoustic textiles

    CERN Document Server

    Nayak, Rajkishore

    2016-01-01

    This book highlights the manufacturing and applications of acoustic textiles in various industries. It also includes examples from different industries in which acoustic textiles can be used to absorb noise and help reduce the impact of noise at the workplace. Given the importance of noise reduction in the working environment in several industries, the book offers a valuable guide for companies, educators and researchers involved with acoustic materials.

  4. On the plasma confinement by acoustic resonance. An innovation for electrodeless high-pressure discharge lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courret, Gilles; Nikkola, Petri; Wasterlain, Sébastien; Gudozhnik, Olexandr; Girardin, Michel; Braun, Jonathan; Gavin, Serge; Croci, Mirko; Egolf, Peter W.

    2017-08-01

    In an applied research project on the development of a pulsed microwave sulfur lamp prototype of 1 kW, we have discovered an amazing phenomenon in which the plasma forms a ball staying at the center of the bulb despite gravity, thus protecting the glass from melting. In this paper, it is shown that this results from an acoustic resonance in a spherical mode. Measurements of the plasma response to short pulses are presented showing beats at the spherical resonance. It is demonstrated that the beats could result from the simultaneous excitation of two normal modes with a frequency difference of approximately 1%. One of the two frequencies matches precisely the microwave pulses repetition, a little below 30 kHz. Thus this one is due to a forced oscillation, whereas the other one is due to a free oscillation. The phase velocity of sound was calculated as a function of temperature in order to find the series of temperatures at which a resonance would occur if the bulb were an isothermal solid sphere. The mean temperature inside the actual bulb was determined from the only doublet of this series, that has characteristic frequencies close enough to cause the observed beats. In addition, one of these two modes has a spherical symmetry that can explain the plasma ball formation. The obtained mean temperature is consistent with the direct measurements on the bulb surface as well as with the temperature in the core of a similar plasma found in the literature. We have also proposed a model of the resonance onset based on the acoustic dispersion and the sound amplification due to electromagnetic coupling.

  5. Specification of the acoustical input to the ear at high frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, S M; Stinson, M R

    1985-02-01

    The sound fields that arise in the auditory canals of cats have been examined both experimentally and theoretically. Of particular interest was the spatial variation of sound pressure near the eardrum, where reference probes are typically located. Using a computer controlled data acquisition system, sound pressure was measured between 100 Hz and 33 kHz for constant driver input at 14 different locations in the ear canal of a cat, and the standing wave patterns formed. The shape of the patterns could be predicted quite well above 12 kHz using a theory that requires specification of only the geometry of the ear canal. This theory, an extension of the one-dimensional horn equation, applies to three-dimensional, rigid-walled tubes that have both variable cross section and curvature along their lengths. Large variations of sound pressure along the ear canal and over the surface of the eardrum are found above about 10 kHz. As a consequence it is not possible to define the acoustical input to the ear from sound pressure level measured at any single location. Even in comparative experiments, in which only the constancy of the acoustical input is important, any uncertainty in reference probe location would lead to an uncertainty in sound pressure level when different sets of measurements are compared. This error, calculated for various probe locations and frequencies, is especially large when the probe is near a minimum of the sound field. Spatial variations in pressure can also introduce anomalous features into the measured frequency response of other auditory quantities when eardrum sound pressure is used as a reference. This is illustrated with measurements of the round window cochlear microphonic.

  6. High quality broadband spatial reflections of slow Rayleigh surface acoustic waves modulated by a graded grooved surface

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Yanlong

    2015-01-21

    We report high quality broadband spatial reflections of Rayleigh surface acoustic waves (SAWs) through a graded grooved surface. High quality means that no wave is allowed to transmit and the incident wave is nearly all reflected to the input side. The graded grooved surface is structured by drilling one dimensional array of graded grooves with increased depths on a flat surface. We investigate SAW dispersion relations, wave field distribution at several typical SAW wavelengths, and time evolution of a Gaussian pulse through the graded grooved surface. Results show that the input broadband Rayleigh SAWs can be slowed, spatially enhanced and stopped, and finally reflected to the input side. The study suggests that engraving the flat surface can be used as an efficient and economical way to manipulate Rayleigh SAWs, which has potential application in novel SAW devices such as filters, reflectors, sensors, energy harvesters, and diodes.

  7. Controlling sound with acoustic metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cummer, Steven A. ; Christensen, Johan; Alù, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic metamaterials can manipulate and control sound waves in ways that are not possible in conventional materials. Metamaterials with zero, or even negative, refractive index for sound offer new possibilities for acoustic imaging and for the control of sound at subwavelength scales....... The combination of transformation acoustics theory and highly anisotropic acoustic metamaterials enables precise control over the deformation of sound fields, which can be used, for example, to hide or cloak objects from incident acoustic energy. Active acoustic metamaterials use external control to create......-scale metamaterial structures and converting laboratory experiments into useful devices. In this Review, we outline the designs and properties of materials with unusual acoustic parameters (for example, negative refractive index), discuss examples of extreme manipulation of sound and, finally, provide an overview...

  8. Highly sensitive BTX detection using surface functionalized QCM sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozkurt, Asuman Aşıkoğlu; Özdemir, Okan; Altındal, Ahmet, E-mail: altindal@yildiz.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Yildiz Technical University, Davutpasa, 34210 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2016-03-25

    A novel organic compound was designed and successfully synthesized for the fabrication of QCM based sensors to detect the low concentrations of BTX gases in indoor air. The effect of the long-range electron orbital delocalization on the BTX vapour sensing properties of azo-bridged Pcs based chemiresistor-type sensors have also been investigated in this work. The sensing behaviour of the film for the online detection of volatile organic solvent vapors was investigated by utilizing an AT-cut quartz crystal resonator. It was observed that the adsorption of the target molecules on the coating surface cause a reversible negative frequency shift of the resonator. Thus, a variety of solvent vapors can be detected by using the phthalocyanine film as sensitive coating, with sensitivity in the ppm range and response times in the order of several seconds depending on the molecular structure of the organic solvent.

  9. Highly Sensitive Cadmium Concentration Sensor Using Long Period Grating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Lalasangi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we have proposed a simple and effective Long Period Grating chemical sensor for detecting the traces of Cadmium (Cd++ in drinking water at ppm level. Long Period gratings (LPG were fabricated by point-by-point technique with CO2 laser. We have characterized the LPG concentration sensor sensitivity for different solutions of Cd concentrations varying from 0.01 ppm to 0.04 ppm by injecting white Light source and observed transmitted spectra using Optical Spectrum Analyzer (OSA. Proper reagents have been used in the solutions for detection of the Cd species. The overall shift in wavelength is 10 nm when surrounding medium gradually changed from water to 0.04 ppm of cadmium concentrations. A comparative study has been done using sophisticated spectroscopic atomic absorption spectrometer (AAS and Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP instruments. The spectral sensitivity enhancement was done by modifying grating surface with gold nanoparticles.

  10. Highly sensitive detection using Herriott cell for laser absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chongyi; Song, Guangming; Du, Yang; Zhao, Xiaojun; Wang, Wenju; Zhong, Liujun; Hu, Mai

    2016-11-01

    The tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy combined with the long absorption path technique is a significant method to detect harmful gas. The long optical path could come true by Herriott cell reducing the size of the spectrometers. A 15 cm long Herriott cell with 28.8 m optical absorption path after 96 times reflection was designed that enhanced detection sensitivity of absorption spectroscopy. According to the theory data of calculation, Herriott cell is analyzed and simulated by softwares Matlab and Lighttools.

  11. HIGH SENSITIVE C-REACTIVE PROTEIN IN CEREBROVASCULAR ISCHEMIA

    OpenAIRE

    Padmalatha; Neeraja

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cerebrovascular ischemia is recognized as a major health problem, which causes significant morbidity and mortality. The main pathophysiology of ischemic stroke is atherosclerosis of cerebral vessels. Hs-CRP is a sensitive marker of inflammation tissue injury in the arterial wall, which contributes to atherosclerosis. In this study, we aim to investigate the association of hs-CRP in patients with ischemic stroke and to correlate hs-CRP levels with possible risk facto...

  12. The strain-rate sensitivity of high-strength high-toughness steels.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilmore, M.F. (AFRL/MNMW, Eglin AFB, FL); Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Boyce, Brad Lee

    2006-01-01

    The present study examines the strain-rate sensitivity of four high strength, high-toughness alloys at strain rates ranging from 0.0002 s-1 to 200 s-1: Aermet 100, a modified 4340, modified HP9-4-20, and a recently developed Eglin AFB steel alloy, ES-1c. A refined dynamic servohydraulic method was used to perform tensile tests over this entire range. Each of these alloys exhibit only modest strain-rate sensitivity. Specifically, the strain-rate sensitivity exponent m, is found to be in the range of 0.004-0.007 depending on the alloy. This corresponds to a {approx}10% increase in the yield strength over the 7-orders of magnitude change in strain-rate. Interestingly, while three of the alloys showed a concominant {approx}3-10% drop in their ductility with increasing strain-rate, the ES1-c alloy actually exhibited a 25% increase in ductility with increasing strain-rate. Fractography suggests the possibility that at higher strain-rates ES-1c evolves towards a more ductile dimple fracture mode associated with microvoid coalescence.

  13. Antibody desensitization therapy in highly sensitized lung transplant candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, L D; Gray, A L; Reynolds, J M; Arepally, G M; Bedoya, A; Hartwig, M G; Davis, R D; Lopes, K E; Wegner, W E; Chen, D F; Palmer, S M

    2014-04-01

    As HLAs antibody detection technology has evolved, there is now detailed HLA antibody information available on prospective transplant recipients. Determining single antigen antibody specificity allows for a calculated panel reactive antibodies (cPRA) value, providing an estimate of the effective donor pool. For broadly sensitized lung transplant candidates (cPRA ≥ 80%), our center adopted a pretransplant multi-modal desensitization protocol in an effort to decrease the cPRA and expand the donor pool. This desensitization protocol included plasmapheresis, solumedrol, bortezomib and rituximab given in combination over 19 days followed by intravenous immunoglobulin. Eight of 18 candidates completed therapy with the primary reasons for early discontinuation being transplant (by avoiding unacceptable antigens) or thrombocytopenia. In a mixed-model analysis, there were no significant changes in PRA or cPRA changes over time with the protocol. A sub-analysis of the median fluorescence intensity (MFI) change indicated a small decline that was significant in antibodies with MFI 5000-10,000. Nine of 18 candidates subsequently had a transplant. Posttransplant survival in these nine recipients was comparable to other pretransplant-sensitized recipients who did not receive therapy. In summary, an aggressive multi-modal desensitization protocol does not significantly reduce pretransplant HLA antibodies in a broadly sensitized lung transplant candidate cohort. © Copyright 2014 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  14. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  15. Sediment dynamics in paired High Arctic lakes revealed from high-resolution swath bathymetry and acoustic stratigraphy surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normandeau, A.; Lamoureux, S. F.; Lajeunesse, P.; Francus, P.

    2016-09-01

    High Arctic lakes are commonly used for paleoclimatic reconstructions because they are particularly sensitive to climate variability. However, the processes leading to sediment deposition and distribution in these lakes are often poorly understood. Here for the first time in the Canadian High Arctic, we present original data resulting from swath bathymetry and subbottom surveys carried out on two lakes at Cape Bounty, Melville Island. The results reveal the dynamic nature of the lakes, in which mass movement deposits and bedforms on the deltas reflect frequent slope instabilities and hyperpycnal flow activity. The analysis of the mass movement deposits reveals that small blocky debris flows/avalanches, debris flows, and a slide occurred during the Holocene. These mass movements are believed to have been triggered by earthquakes and potentially by permafrost thawing along the shoreline. Altogether, these mass movement deposits cover more than 30% of the lake floors. Additionally, the river deltas on both lakes were mapped and reveal the presence of several gullies and bedforms. The presence of gullies along the delta front indicates that hyperpycnal flows generated at the river mouth can transport sediment in different trajectories downslope, resulting in a different sediment accumulation pattern and record. The dynamic nature of these two lakes suggests that further analysis on sediment transport and distribution within Arctic lakes is required in order to improve paleoclimatic reconstructions.

  16. High-performance and high-sensitivity applications of graphene transistors with self-assembled monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chao-Hui; Kumar, Vinod; Moyano, David Ricardo; Wen, Shao-Hsuan; Parashar, Vyom; Hsiao, She-Hsin; Srivastava, Anchal; Saxena, Preeti S; Huang, Kun-Ping; Chang, Chien-Chung; Chiu, Po-Wen

    2016-03-15

    Charge impurities and polar molecules on the surface of dielectric substrates has long been a critical obstacle to using graphene for its niche applications that involve graphene's high mobility and high sensitivity nature. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) have been found to effectively reduce the impact of long-range scatterings induced by the external charges. Yet, demonstrations of scalable device applications using the SAMs technique remains missing due to the difficulties in the device fabrication arising from the strong surface tension of the modified dielectric environment. Here, we use patterned SAM arrays to build graphene electronic devices with transport channels confined on the modified areas. For high-mobility applications, both rigid and flexible radio-frequency graphene field-effect transistors (G-FETs) were demonstrated, with extrinsic cutoff frequency and maximum oscillation frequency enhanced by a factor of ~2 on SiO2/Si substrates. For high sensitivity applications, G-FETs were functionalized by monoclonal antibodies specific to cancer biomarker chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4, enabling its detection at a concentration of 0.01 fM, five orders of magnitude lower than that detectable by a conventional colorimetric assay. These devices can be very useful in the early diagnosis and monitoring of a malignant disease.

  17. Highly sensitive method for diagnosis of subclinical B. ovis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta, Sara; Barreto, Maria C; Pepe, Ana; Campos, Joana; Oliva, Abel

    2014-10-01

    Babesia ovis is a tick-transmitted protozoa parasite that infects small ruminants causing fever, anaemia, hemoglobinuria, anorexia and, in acute cases, death. Common in tropical and sub-tropical areas, the presence of this parasite in sheep herds has an economic impact on industry and therefore sensitive methods for the diagnosis and disease eradication are required. To achieve this goal, a semi-nested PCR for B. ovis specific identification was developed and consequent reaction conditions and enzymes were optimized and tested with field samples. 300 blood samples from small ruminants and 39 ticks from Rhipicephalus genus were collected from different regions of Portugal. Afterwards, DNA extraction was performed and conventional and semi-nested PCR were accomplished for all samples. The results obtained from both methodologies were compared and the sensitivity was evaluated. Employing the semi-nested PCR it was possible to identify a higher number of positive cases among the evaluated samples than using the conventional PCR, namely 38/300 blood samples and 7/39 ticks. However, fragment amplification was only observed in 5 out of 300 blood samples and in none of the 39 ticks when a conventional PCR was employed. The validation of the results was achieved by sequencing the DNA fragments corresponding to the hypervariable v4 region of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene and performing an alignment with sequences already published on GenBank(®). The ticks collected in this study belong to the Rhipicephalus genus, although other species could be involved as a vector in the Babesia spread. The diagnostic assay here described is presently the most effective and sensitive method for detection of B. ovis in field blood samples and ticks, enabling the detection up to 1 parasite into 10(9) erythrocytes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. HIGHLY SENSITIVE TIMER-BASED RESISTANCE DEVIATION TO TIME CONVERTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheroz Khan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Based on an inexpensive popular precision timing chip 555 timer, a resistance to time converter is proposed in this paper which is indeed capable of converting resistive and capacitive changes into pulse widths of proportional durations. This converter exhibits a compatibility of wider conversion range with a reasonable level of sensitivity required for industrial applications. The circuit is expected to have utility in oil and water supply schemes. Simulated results are shown to be compared with mathematical derivations, both reporting a good level of resemblance and similarities.

  19. High order sensitivity analysis of complex, coupled systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    1990-01-01

    The Sobieszczanski-Sobieski (1988) algorithm is extended to include second- and higher-order derivatives while retaining the obviation of finite-differencing of the system analysis. This is accomplished by means of a recursive application of the same implicit function theorem as in the original algorithm. In optimization, the computational cost of the higher-order derivatives is relative to the aggregate cost of analysis together with a repetition of the first-order sensitivity analysis as often as is required to produce the equivalent information by successive linearizations within move limits.

  20. Analysis of Cyberbullying Sensitivity Levels of High School Students and Their Perceived Social Support Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akturk, Ahmet Oguz

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to determine the cyberbullying sensitivity levels of high school students and their perceived social supports levels, and analyze the variables that predict cyberbullying sensitivity. In addition, whether cyberbullying sensitivity levels and social support levels differed according to gender was also…