WorldWideScience

Sample records for high academic competence

  1. Relating emotional intelligence to social competence and academic achievement in high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Olarte Márquez, Paloma; Palomera Martín, Raquel; Brackett, Marc A

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the discriminant, criterion and incremental validity of an ability measure of Emotional Intelligence (EI). High school students (N = 77) took the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test - Spanish Version (MSCEIT V. 2.0, 2002), a measure of Big Five personality traits (BFQ; Caprara, Barbanelli, & Borgogni , 1993), an General Intelligence test (IGF-r 5; Yuste, 2002), and a social competence inventory (AECS; Moraleda, González, & García-Gallo, 1998). Students' academic grades also were obtained from official school records at the end of the school year. As predicted, the MSCEIT was discriminable from well-established measures of personality and intelligence. The test was also moderately related to social competence and predicted students' final grades. Most of the findings remained significant after personality and academic intelligence were statistically controlled. The potential utility of EI in the context of academic institutions is discussed.

  2. Conversational Competence in Academic Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    Conversational competence is a process, not a state. Ithaca does not exist, only the voyage to Ithaca. Vibrant campuses are a series of productive conversations. At its core, communicative competence in academic settings mirrors a collective search for meaning regarding the purpose and direction of a campus community. Communicative competence…

  3. Conversational Competence in Academic Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    Conversational competence is a process, not a state. Ithaca does not exist, only the voyage to Ithaca. Vibrant campuses are a series of productive conversations. At its core, communicative competence in academic settings mirrors a collective search for meaning regarding the purpose and direction of a campus community. Communicative competence…

  4. Family Factors Associated with High Academic Competence among Former Head Start Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Nancy M.; Weinberg, Richard A.; Redden, David; Ramey, Sharon L.; Ramey, Craig T.

    1998-01-01

    A study of 154 Head Start children with high academic achievement found that their families reported higher educational and income levels, had fewer children, were more likely to be Caucasian, reported less prolonged depression, and had more responsive, flexible, and less restrictive parenting practices than other Head Start children. (Author/CR)

  5. Academic Writing: Supporting Faculty in a Critical Competency for Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankoski, Mary E.; Palmer, Megan M.; Banks, Julianna; Brutkiewicz, Randy R.; Walvoord, Emily; Hoffmann-Longtin, Krista; Bogdewic, Stephen P.; Gopen, George D.

    2012-01-01

    All faculty regardless of discipline or school need to be highly competent at writing for an academic audience. The "publish or perish" pressure is alive and well for academic advancement, publications, and external grant funding. Yet few faculty, particularly in the health professions and sciences, receive formal training on the craft of writing.…

  6. Competência social e práticas educativas parentais em adolescentes com alto e baixo rendimento acadêmico Social competence and parental practices in adolescents with high and low academic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziela Sapienza

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho investigou as relações entre competência social, práticas educativas parentais e rendimento acadêmico em adolescentes. Participaram deste estudo 66 adolescentes divididos em dois grupos: alto e baixo rendimento acadêmico. Os instrumentos utilizados foram o CBCL e o YSR (Achenbach, 1991 e o IEP (Gomide, 2006. Os resultados mostraram que adolescentes de alto rendimento acadêmico são percebidos pelos pais como socialmente competentes e são criados com mais práticas educativas parentais positivas. Esses dados indicam que o rendimento acadêmico também é influenciado pela competência social e pelo modo como os adolescentes são educados pelos pais. Esses aspectos devem ser considerados em intervenções que pretendem promover a melhoria do rendimento acadêmico e o desenvolvimento de comportamentos ajustados ao contexto escolar.This paper investigated the relations between social competence, parental practices and academic performance in adolescents. 66 adolescents took part in the study and they were divided in two groups: high and low academic performance. The tools used in this research were CBCL and YSR (Achenbach, 1991, and IEP (Gomide, 2006. The results showed that adolescents of high academic achievements are perceived by the parents as socially competent and are raised with more positive parental practices. The data indicated that academic performance is also influenced by the social competence and the way the adolescents are educated by the parents. Those aspects should be considered in interventions that aim at promoting the improvement of academic performance and development of a behavior adjusted to the school.

  7. Different forces, same consequence: conscientiousness and competence beliefs are independent predictors of academic effort and achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautwein, Ulrich; Lüdtke, Oliver; Roberts, Brent W; Schnyder, Inge; Niggli, Alois

    2009-12-01

    Conscientiousness and domain-specific competence beliefs are known to be highly important predictors of academic effort and achievement. Given their basis in distinct research traditions, however, these constructs have rarely been examined simultaneously. Three studies with 571, 415, and 1,535 students, respectively, found a moderate association between conscientiousness and competence beliefs. Both conscientiousness and competence beliefs meaningfully predicted academic effort, irrespective of how academic effort was measured (single-measurement questionnaire or diary data). The associations of competence beliefs with academic effort were highly domain specific, whereas conscientiousness was predictive of academic effort across a wide range of academic subjects. Conscientiousness and competence beliefs were also associated with academic achievement. Figural and verbal reasoning ability, although associated with academic achievement, only loosely predicted academic effort.

  8. ADHD symptoms, academic achievement, self-perception of academic competence and future orientation: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtens, Sara; Rydell, Ann-Margret; Yang-Wallentin, Fan

    2013-06-01

    In the investigation of the effect of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms on school careers there is a need to study the role of adolescent and childhood ADHD symptoms and academic achievement, and to incorporate measures that include the individual's perspective. Our aim was to gain an overview of the long-term development of school careers in relation to ADHD symptoms. We studied associations between ADHD symptoms and academic achievement at different time-points and future orientation at the end of high school, and assessed the role of self-perceptions of academic competence in these associations. Participants were 192 children (47% girls) with a range of ADHD symptoms taken from a community sample. Collecting data at three time points, in 6th, 11th and 12th grade we tested a structural equation model. Results showed that ADHD symptoms in 6th grade negatively affected academic achievement concurrently and longitudinally. ADHD symptoms in 11th grade negatively affected concurrent academic achievement and academic self-perception and future orientation in 12th grade. Academic achievement had a positive influence on academic self-perception and future orientation. Given the other factors, self-perception of academic competence did not contribute to outcomes. We concluded that early ADHD symptoms may cast long shadows on young people's academic progress. This happens mainly by way of stability in symptoms and relations to early low academic achievement.

  9. Effects of high-fidelity patient simulation led clinical reasoning course: Focused on nursing core competencies, problem solving, and academic self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, JuHee; Lee, Yoonju; Lee, Senah; Bae, Juyeon

    2016-01-01

    To examine the effects of high-fidelity patient simulation (HFPS) led clinical reasoning course among undergraduate nursing students. A quasi-experimental study of non-equivalent control group pretest-post test design was applied. A total of 49 senior nursing students participated in this study. The experimental group consisted of the students who took the "clinical reasoning" course (n = 23) while the control group consisted of students who did not (n = 26). Self-administered scales including the nursing core competencies, problem solving, academic self-efficacy, and Kolb learning style inventory were analyzed quantitatively using SPSS version 20.0. Data analysis was conducted using one-way ancova due to a significant difference in nursing core competencies between the experimental group and control group. There was a significant improvement in nursing core competencies in the experimental group (F = 7.747, P = 0.008). The scores of problem solving and academic self-efficacy were higher in the experimental group after the HFPS led clinical reasoning course without statistical difference. There is a need for the development of effective instructional methods to improve learning outcomes in nursing education. Future research is needed related to simulation education as well as management strategies so that learning outcomes can be achieved within different students' learning style. © 2015 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2015 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  10. Student displays of academic competence in the international university

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Elisabeth Dalby

    multimodal methods for displaying academic competence, specifically in group projects requiring the students to construct a physical object. In such situations, language, writing and formulating are not oriented to as relevant resources for displaying academic competence. Lastly, the study finds...... competence and the physical object as the main product of the students' project....

  11. Academic staff competence development as a gap in quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Academic staff competence development as a gap in quality assurance in universities in ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search ... that quality in university education depends on the quality of the academic staff, ...

  12. Different Forces, Same Consequence: Conscientiousness and Competence Beliefs are Independent Predictors of Academic Effort and Achievement

    OpenAIRE

    Trautwein, Ulrich; Lüdtke, Oliver; Roberts, Brent W.; Schnyder, Inge; Niggli, Alois

    2015-01-01

    Conscientiousness and domain-specific competence beliefs are known to be highly important predictors of academic effort and achievement. Given their basis in distinct research traditions, however, these constructs have rarely been examined simultaneously. Three studies with 571, 415, and 1,535 students, respectively, found a moderate association between conscientiousness and competence beliefs, but competence beliefs meaningfully predicted both conscientiousness and academic effort, irrespect...

  13. Children's Effortful Control and Academic Competence: Mediation through School Liking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente, Carlos; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Castro, Kimberly S.

    2007-01-01

    We examined the relations among children's effortful control, school liking, and academic competence with a sample of 240 7- to 12-year-old children. Parents and children reported on effortful control, and teachers and children assessed school liking. Children, parents, and teachers reported on children's academic competence. Significant positive…

  14. Academic training and clinical placement problems to achieve nursing competency

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    NARJES RAHMATI SHARGHI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: High quality of care is one of the requirements of nursing which depends on the nursing competency. In this connection, the aim of this research was to determine the problems related to the academic training (nursing’ educational program and clinical practice to achieve competency from the viewpoint of nurses, faculty members, and nursing students. Methods: The study was an analytical cross-sectional one. The sample consisted of the academic staff, the third and the fourth year nursing students and nurses in practice. The instrument of the study was a two-part researcher-made questionnaire with 22 questions in the theoretical- clinical realm to assess problems related to the theoretical and clinical teaching in nursing, and 23 questions to assess the clinical functions. The questionnaire was validated in terms of both face and content validity. Its reliability, using Cronbach’s Alpha coefficient, was 0.72 in the theoretical-clinical and 0.73 in the clinical realm. Both descriptive and analytical statistics were used to analyze the data, using SPSS software. Results: The results of this study indicated that from the participants’ viewpoints, the most important problems in the academic education for nurses to acquire competency were as follows: lack of academic research during the clinical period (88.9%, no application of theoretical aspects of the nursing process in practice (85.6%, insufficient knowledgeable and professional educators (81.1%, the use of traditional routine-oriented methods on the wards (75.6%; also insufficient time for performance based on knowledge in relation to the nurse’s workload (86.5%, weakness and usefulness of scientific function encouragement systems in clinic (85.2%, and learnt theoretical subjects not coming into practice in clinical fields after graduation (75.6%. Conclusion: Efforts to reduce the gap between the theoretical and practical (clinical function knowledge in educational and work

  15. Academic training and clinical placement problems to achieve nursing competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    RAHMATI SHARGHI, NARJES; ALAMI, ALI; KHOSRAVAN, SHAHLA; MANSOORIAN, MOHAMMAD REZA; EKRAMI, ALI

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: High quality of care is one of the requirements of nursing which depends on the nursing competency. In this connection, the aim of this research was to determine the problems related to the academic training (nursing' educational program) and clinical practice to achieve competency from the viewpoint of nurses, faculty members, and nursing students. Methods: the study was an analytical cross-sectional one. The sample consisted of the academic staff, the third and the fourth year nursing students and nurses in practice. The instrument of the study was a two-part researcher-made questionnaire with 22 questions in the theoretical- clinical realm to assess  problems related to the theoretical and clinical teaching in nursing, and 23 questions to assess the clinical functions. The questionnaire was validated in terms of both face and content validity. Its reliability, using Cronbach's Alpha coefficient, was 0.72 in the theoretical-clinical and 0.73 in the clinical realm. Both descriptive and analytical statistics were used to analyze the data, using SPSS software. Results: The results of this study indicated that from the participants’ viewpoints, the most important problems in the academic education for nursea to acquire competency were as follows: lack of academic research the clinical period (88.9%), no application of theoretical aspects of the nursing process in practice (85.6%), insufficient knowledgeable and professional educators (81.1%), the use of traditional routine-oriented methods on the wards (75.6%); also insufficient time for performance based on knowledge in relation to  the nurse's workload (86.5%), weakness and usefulness of scientific function encouragement systems in clinic (85.2%), and learnt theoretical subjects not coming into practice in clinical fields after graduation (75.6%). Conclusion: Efforts to reduce the gap between the theoretical and practical (clinical function) knowledge in educational and work environment are

  16. Promoting Multilingual Communicative Competence through Multimodal Academic Learning Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyppö, Anna; Natri, Teija

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents information on the factors affecting the development of multilingual and multicultural communicative competence in interactive multimodal learning environments in an academic context. The interdisciplinary course in multilingual interaction offered at the University of Jyväskylä aims to enhance students' competence in…

  17. School Competence and Fluent Academic Performance: Informing Assessment of Educational Outcomes in Survivors of Pediatric Medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Alice Ann; Hughes, Carroll W; Stavinoha, Peter L

    2015-01-01

    Academic difficulties are widely acknowledged but not adequately studied in survivors of pediatric medulloblastoma. Although most survivors require special education services and are significantly less likely than healthy peers to finish high school, measured academic skills are typically average. This study sought to identify potential factors associated with academic difficulties in this population and focused on school competence and fluent academic performance. Thirty-six patients (ages 7-18 years old) were recruited through the Departments of Neurosurgery and Neuro-Oncology at Children's Medical Center Dallas and Cook Children's Medical Center in Fort Worth, TX. Participants completed a neuropsychological screening battery including selected Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Achievement subtests. Parents completed the Child Behavior Checklist. School competence was significantly correlated with measured academic skills and fluency. Basic academic skill development was broadly average, in contrast to significantly worse fluent academic performance. School competence may have utility as a measure estimating levels of educational success in this population. Additionally, academic difficulties experienced by childhood medulloblastoma survivors may be better captured by measuring deficits in fluent academic performance rather than skills. Identification of these potential factors associated with educational outcomes of pediatric medulloblastoma survivors has significant implications for research, clinical assessment, and academic services/interventions.

  18. The design of a study environment for acquiring academic and professional competence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirschner, P.A.; Vilsteren, P. van

    1997-01-01

    Proposes a framework for the design of a learning environment which encourages the acquisition of academic and professional competence. Definition of knowledge, cognitive skill and competence; Acquisition of competence; Designing an environment for competence acquisition; Implementation of study env

  19. Relationship between Academic Performance, Spatial Competence, Learning Styles and Attrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianela Noriega Biggio

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the results of research on factors affecting academic performance and attrition in a sample of 1,500 freshman students majoring in architecture, design and urbanism at the Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina [University of Buenos Aires, Argentina] who were enrolled in a drafting course. The hypotheses we tested concern the mediating role of learning styles on the relationship between spatial competence and academic performance, learning-style differences by gender and cohort, and the relationship between attrition, spatial competence level and learning style. Statistical analysis of the data was performed and spatial competence enhanced by motivational profile was found to predict final achievement. Educational implications are identified, highlighting the need to promote in students those academic behaviors that characterize a self-regulated learning style and encourage the use of specific intellectual abilities.

  20. Implicit theories of intelligence, perceived academic competence, and school achievement: testing alternative models.

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    Gonida, Eleftheria; Kiosseoglou, Grigoris; Leondari, Angeliki

    2006-01-01

    In the present study 3 alternative causal models concerning the relationships between implicit theories of intelligence, perceived academic competence, and school achievement were tested. The direction of changes in implicit theories and perceived competence during early adolescence also was examined. A total of 187 fifth and sixth graders were tested and retested a year later, when they were sixth and seventh graders, respectively. Cross-lagged regression analyses indicated that school achievement determined the adoption of a particular implicit theory through the mediation of perceived competence. Implicit theories were found to change toward the adoption of more incremental beliefs and perceived academic competence declined; however, high achievers, as compared with their low- and middle-level classmates, adopted more incremental beliefs and had significantly higher perceived competence.

  1. The relationship between competencies acquired through Swiss academic sports science courses and the job requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, T; Studer, F; Nagel, S

    2016-01-01

    In view of the changes in and growing variety of sports-related occupations, it is highly relevant for educational institutions to know how well the educational contents of their sport science courses meet the professional requirements. This study analyses the relationship between the competencies acquired through academic sports science courses and the requirements of the relevant jobs in Switzerland. The data for this empirical analysis were drawn from a sample of n = 1054 graduates of different academic sport science programmes at all eight Swiss universities. The results show that academic sport science courses primarily communicate sports-specific expertise and practical sports skills. On the other hand, most graduates consider that the acquisition of interdisciplinary competencies plays a comparatively minor role in sport science education, even though these competencies are felt to be an important requirement in a variety of work-related environments and challenges.

  2. ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE AND COMPETENCE IN KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY

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    Neamţu Adina Claudia

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The current economical evolution determines the improvement process of the employees that should be prepared as well as possible at all levels, so that they could accomplish the objectives of the organization in a world where the success depends on the capacity to supply quality, diversity, the satisfaction of the clients’ needs, optimal advantages and promptness. The easy access to information in the current world forces the universities to keep up to the requirements of the labour market and of the future graduates, to change into open, active, dynamic, emphatic spaces, in launching ramps for them, allowing the simulation of the roles the students will have as adults in the knowledge economy. In this context, the higher education institutions in Romania have understood that only by means of performance and competence we may reach the global domination of a category of complex situation, by mobilizing certain diverse resources (knowledge, practical abilities, social representations, values and attitudes. All of these may develop in the context of a university centre that understands that, next to the theory, the students’ practice is based on an integrated ensemble of knowledge, skills and attitudes that allow the subject, in front of a category of situations of adapting, solving problems and accomplishing projects.

  3. Foreign Language Professional Communicative Competence as a Component of the Academic Science Teacher's Professional Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeeva, Roza A.; Baykova, Olga V.; Kusainov, Askarbek K.

    2016-01-01

    The urgency of the problem raised in the article is explained by the increasing demand for qualified specialists who have a good command of a foreign language. The communicative competence of an academic science teacher under the conditions of international cooperation development is of great importance. The article discusses the problem of…

  4. Teamwork competence and academic motivation in computer science engineering studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Martínez, Jorge Enrique; García Martín, Javier; Sierra Alonso, Almudena

    2014-01-01

    The present work is focused on studying two issues: the “teamwork” generic competence and the “academic motivation”. Currently the professional profile of engineers has a strong component of teamwork. On the other hand, motivational profile of students determines their tendencies when they come to work in team, as well as their performance at work. In this context we suggest four hypotheses: (H1) students improve their teamwork capacity by specific training and carrying out a set of ...

  5. Student and Teacher Ratings of Academic Competence: An Examination of Cross-Informant Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettler, Ryan J.; Elliott, Stephen N.; DiPerna, James C.; Bolt, Daniel M.; Reiser, Deitra; Resurreccion, Leilani

    2014-01-01

    Two studies were conducted with samples of middle and high school teachers and students to examine cross-informant agreement on the Academic Competence Evaluation Scales. Cross-informant agreement was examined using Pearson correlations and conditional probability indices. Results of Study 1 (N = 65) and Study 2 (N = 66) indicated that teacher and…

  6. [Postdoctoral lecturer thesis in medicine: academic competence or career booster?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorg, H; Betzler, C; Grieswald, C; Schwab, C G G; Tilkorn, D J; Hauser, J

    2016-06-01

    The postdoctoral lecturer thesis in medicine represents an essential success factor for the career of a physician; however, there is controversial discussion on whether this reflects academic competence or is more a career booster. In this context we conducted a survey among postdoctoral medical lecturers with the aim to evaluate the significance of this qualification. The online survey was performed using a questionnaire requesting biographical parameters and subjective ratings of topics concerning the postdoctoral lecturer thesis. Overall 628 questionnaires were included in the study. The significance of the postdoctoral qualification was rated high in 68.6 % and was seen to be necessary for professional advancement in 71.0 %. The chances of obtaining a full professorship after achieving a postdoctoral qualification were rated moderate to low (68.1 %); nevertheless, 92.3 % would do it again and 86.5 % would recommend it to colleagues. Accordingly, 78.8 % were against its abolishment. Wishes for reforms included standardized federal regulations, reduced dependency on professors and more transparency. The postdoctoral lecturer qualification in medicine is highly valued and the majority of responders did not want it to be abolished. Although the chances for a full professorship were only rated low, successful graduation seems to be beneficial for the career; however, there is a need for substantial structural and international changes.

  7. Academic Intrinsic Motivation and Perceived Academic Competence in Greek Elementary Students with and without Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zisimopoulos, Dimitrios A.; Galanaki, Evangelia P.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine differences in intrinsic motivation and perceived academic competence as well as in their association between 5th- and 6th-grade students with learning disabilities (LD) (n = 40) and their typically achieving peers. Participants were 980 Greek elementary students from the metropolitan area of Athens. As…

  8. ACADEMIC SUCCESS IN THE CONTEXT OF COMPETENCE APPROACH

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    Liudmyla M. Dybkova

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted the problem of evaluation of results of students educational activity in the context of competence approach. Research actuality is conditioned by socio-political, economic and cultural processes which take place in modern society under act of globalization. These processes require from the system of education an innovative approach in preparation of future specialists. Students acquisition of high level competences, selected in the on-line training in preparation for the proper speciality, will provide them with permanent update of knowledges, succesful finding of decisions for problem tasks, independence, selfefficiency while implementation of their professional duties. Existent forms and methods of evaluation of educational achievements are complemented and approved within the framework of the competence approach.

  9. Relations among Maternal Parenting Style, Academic Competence, and Life Satisfaction in Chinese Early Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Candice Y.-W.; McBride-Chang, Catherine; Lai, Beatrice P.-Y.

    2004-01-01

    The relations among maternal concern and restrictiveness, self-evaluated academic competence, and life satisfaction were explored in a short-term longitudinal study of 346 7th-grade students (126 males and 220 females) in Hong Kong. The authors found that perceived maternal concern, academic competence, and life satisfaction significantly declined…

  10. Relations among Maternal Parenting Style, Academic Competence, and Life Satisfaction in Chinese Early Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Candice Y.-W.; McBride-Chang, Catherine; Lai, Beatrice P.-Y.

    2004-01-01

    The relations among maternal concern and restrictiveness, self-evaluated academic competence, and life satisfaction were explored in a short-term longitudinal study of 346 7th-grade students (126 males and 220 females) in Hong Kong. The authors found that perceived maternal concern, academic competence, and life satisfaction significantly declined…

  11. Nurse Assistant. FasTrak Specialization Integrated Technical and Academic Competency (ITAC). Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Career-Technical and Adult Education.

    This document contains an introduction to the Ohio Integrated Technical and Academic Competency (ITAC) and Specialization ITAC; an overview of the nurse assistant occupation; a list acknowledging professionals who helped develop the competency list; and the comprehensive list of the professional or occupational competencies deemed essential for…

  12. Students' Achievement Goals in Relation to Academic Motivation, Competence Expectancy, and Classroom Environment Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sungur, Semra; Senler, Burcu

    2010-01-01

    The present study aimed at investigating elementary students' academic motivation (intrinsic motivation, external regulation, introjected regulation, identified regulation, and amotivation), achievement goals (mastery approach goals, mastery avoidance goals, performance approach goals, performance avoidance goals), competence expectancies, and…

  13. Competency-based medical education and scholarship: Creating an active academic culture during residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, James A; Hategan, Ana; Azzam, Amin

    2015-10-01

    The competency-based medical education movement has been adopted in several medical education systems across the world. This has the potential to result in a more active involvement of residents in the educational process, inasmuch as scholarship is regarded as a major area of competency. Substantial scholarly activities are well within the reach of motivated residents, especially when faculty members provide sufficient mentoring. These academically empowered residents have the advantage of early experience in the areas of scholarly discovery, integration, application, and teaching. Herein, the authors review the importance of instituting the germinal stages of scholarly productivity in the creation of an active scholarly culture during residency. Clear and consistent institutional and departmental strategies to promote scholarly development during residency are highly encouraged.

  14. There is no "i" in teamwork in the patient-centered medical home: defining teamwork competencies for academic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leasure, Emily L; Jones, Ronald R; Meade, Lauren B; Sanger, Marla I; Thomas, Kris G; Tilden, Virginia P; Bowen, Judith L; Warm, Eric J

    2013-05-01

    Evidence suggests that teamwork is essential for safe, reliable practice. Creating health care teams able to function effectively in patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs), practices that organize care around the patient and demonstrate achievement of defined quality care standards, remains challenging. Preparing trainees for practice in interprofessional teams is particularly challenging in academic health centers where health professions curricula are largely siloed. Here, the authors review a well-delineated set of teamwork competencies that are important for high-functioning teams and suggest how these competencies might be useful for interprofessional team training and achievement of PCMH standards. The five competencies are (1) team leadership, the ability to coordinate team members' activities, ensure appropriate task distribution, evaluate effectiveness, and inspire high-level performance, (2) mutual performance monitoring, the ability to develop a shared understanding among team members regarding intentions, roles, and responsibilities so as to accurately monitor one another's performance for collective success, (3) backup behavior, the ability to anticipate the needs of other team members and shift responsibilities during times of variable workload, (4) adaptability, the capability of team members to adjust their strategy for completing tasks on the basis of feedback from the work environment, and (5) team orientation, the tendency to prioritize team goals over individual goals, encourage alternative perspectives, and show respect and regard for each team member. Relating each competency to a vignette from an academic primary care clinic, the authors describe potential strategies for improving teamwork learning and applying the teamwork competences to academic PCMH practices.

  15. Functional Competency Development Model for Academic Personnel Based on International Professional Qualification Standards in Computing Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumthong, Suwut; Piriyasurawong, Pullop; Jeerangsuwan, Namon

    2016-01-01

    This research proposes a functional competency development model for academic personnel based on international professional qualification standards in computing field and examines the appropriateness of the model. Specifically, the model consists of three key components which are: 1) functional competency development model, 2) blended training…

  16. Organisation of English for Academic Purposes Activity for Developing Communicative Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zascerinska, Jelena

    2009-01-01

    Individuals need communicative competence for personal fulfillment and development, active citizenship, social inclusion and employment. Aim of the research is to work out English for Academic Purposes activity organization model and its introducing sequence for promoting communicative competence. Content: the search for English for Academic…

  17. English Language Proficiency and Teacher Judgments of the Academic and Interpersonal Competence of English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freberg, Miranda E.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate how English language proficiency is related to teacher judgments of students' academic and interpersonal competence. It was hypothesized that English Language Learner (ELL) students would generally be perceived as having weaker academic and interpersonal skills than their non-ELL counterparts regardless…

  18. Relations of Perceived Maternal Parenting Style, Practices, and Learning Motivation to Academic Competence in Chinese Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Cecilia S.; McBride-Chang, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    A measure of academic parenting practices was developed through parent and teacher interviews and subsequently administered to 91 Hong Kong Chinese fifth graders, who also rated their mothers' restrictiveness and concern, school motivation, and self-perceived academic competence. Children's actual school grades were obtained from school records.…

  19. Relations of Perceived Maternal Parenting Style, Practices, and Learning Motivation to Academic Competence in Chinese Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Cecilia S.; McBride-Chang, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    A measure of academic parenting practices was developed through parent and teacher interviews and subsequently administered to 91 Hong Kong Chinese fifth graders, who also rated their mothers' restrictiveness and concern, school motivation, and self-perceived academic competence. Children's actual school grades were obtained from school records.…

  20. Nurturing Interdisciplinary Competence in Academic Writing Classes: Two Taiwanese TESOL Professionals' Shared Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheryl Wei-yu; Wang, Hung-chun

    2016-01-01

    This study delineates two Taiwanese TESOL teachers' efforts of combining English writing with entrepreneurship education to cultivate English majors' interdisciplinary competence in academic writing classes. An integrated business-and-writing approach was proposed to foster English majors' academic writing skills and entrepreneurial capacities. In…

  1. Are Approaches to Learning in Kindergarten Associated with Academic and Social Competence Similarly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razza, Rachel A.; Martin, Anne; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    Background: Approaches to learning (ATL) is a key domain of school readiness with important implications for children's academic trajectories. Interestingly, however, the impact of early ATL on children's social competence has not been examined. Objective: This study examines associations between children's ATL at age 5 and academic achievement…

  2. A Study of the Competencies Needed of Entry-Level Academic Health Sciences Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philbrick, Jodi Lynn

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the professional and personal competencies that entry-level academic health sciences librarians should possess from the perspectives of academic health sciences library directors, library and information sciences (LIS) educators who specialize in educating health sciences librarians, and individuals who…

  3. Competency Modeling in Extension Education: Integrating an Academic Extension Education Model with an Extension Human Resource Management Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Scott D.; Cochran, Graham R.; Harder, Amy; Place, Nick T.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare and contrast an academic extension education model with an Extension human resource management model. The academic model of 19 competencies was similar across the 22 competencies of the Extension human resource management model. There were seven unique competencies for the human resource management model.…

  4. Aggression, social competence, and academic achievement in Chinese children: a 5-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinyin; Huang, Xiaorui; Chang, Lei; Wang, Li; Li, Dan

    2010-08-01

    The primary purpose of this longitudinal study was to examine, in a sample of Chinese children (initial M age = 8 years, N = 1,140), contributions of aggression to the development of social competence and academic achievement. Five waves of panel data on aggression and social and school performance were collected from peer evaluations, teacher ratings, and school records in Grades 2 to 5. Structural equation modeling revealed that aggression had unique effects on later social competence and academic achievement after their stabilities were controlled, particularly in the junior grades. Aggression also had significant indirect effects on social and academic outcomes through multiple pathways. Social competence and academic achievement contributed to the development of each other, but not aggression. The results indicate cascade effects of aggression in Chinese children from a developmental perspective.

  5. 初中生人际交往能力、学业成绩及其发展背景系统间的关系%Relationships Among the Interpersonal Competence, Academic Achievement and Developmental Contexts of Junior High School Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张野; 卢笳

    2012-01-01

    采用问卷法调查586名初中生,探讨其人际交往能力、学业水平及发展背景系统的互动关系模式。研究发现初二学生的人际交往能力表现最为突出。高交往能力学生的学业成绩明显优于低交往能力学生。良好的父母教养方式能有效促进学生的人际交往能力,有助于积极师生关系和同伴关系的发展。人际交往能力受家庭教养背景系统的直接影响,并作用于学校人际背景系统,两大系统以直接或间接方式影响学业成绩。%Interpersonal competence is a major part of one' s social competence. It is the important driving force for one' s successful socialization and adaptation to the society, while academic achievement is the core indicator of one' s learning ability and school environment adaptability. These two are the key aspects of a teenager' s individual development and also significant for them to get adapted to the society in the future. For junior high school students, adaptability in various aspects develops in different degrees in the double developmental contexts of family and school and manifests itself as division of interpersonal competence and difference in academic achievement. Thus, a systematic study of junior high school students' interpersonal competence and academic achievement has its theoretical and realistic significance for the improvement of the future social development. Based on a questionnaire survey which included EMBU, Interpersonal Competence Questionnaire -- Chinese Version ( ICQ - R) and a questionnaire of the teacher-student relationship of junior high school students and peer nomination from 586 junior high school students ranging from grade one to grade three, this study established and validated a theoretical model through a structural equation model and explored the interactive relationship model of junior high school students' interpersonal competence, their academic achievement and the

  6. Longitudinal predictors of adult socioeconomic attainment: the roles of socioeconomic status, academic competence, and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slominski, Lisa; Sameroff, Arnold; Rosenblum, Katherine; Kasser, Tim

    2011-02-01

    Educational attainment and occupational status are key markers of success in adulthood. We expand upon previous research that focused primarily on the contributions of academic competence and family socioeconomic status (SES) by investigating the role of mental health in predicting adult SES. In a longitudinal study spanning 30 years, we used structural equation modeling to examine how parental mental health in early childhood and family SES, offspring academic competence, and offspring mental health in adolescence relate to occupational and educational attainment at age 30. Results were that adolescent academic competence predicted adult educational attainment, and that educational attainment then predicted occupational attainment. The pathways between academic competence and occupational attainment, family SES and educational attainment, and family SES and occupational attainment were not significant. In contrast, adolescent mental health not only predicted educational attainment, but was also directly related to adult occupational attainment. Finally, early maternal mental health was associated with offspring's adult socioeconomic attainment through its relations with adolescent academic competence and mental health. These results highlight the importance of mental health to adult socioeconomic attainment.

  7. Student Engagement in After-School Programs, Academic Skills, and Social Competence among Elementary School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn E. Grogan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on the relationship between after-school program participation and student outcomes has been mixed, and beneficial effects have been small. More recent studies suggest that participation is best characterized as a multidimensional concept that includes enrollment, attendance, and engagement, which help explain differences in student outcomes. The present study uses data from a longitudinal study of after-school programs in elementary schools to examine staff ratings of student engagement in after-school activities and the association between engagement and school outcomes. The factor structure of the staff-rated measure of student engagement was examined by exploratory factor analysis. Multiple regression analyses found that student engagement in academic, youth development, and arts after-school program activities was significantly related to changes in teacher ratings of academic skills and social competence over the course of the school year and that students with the greatest increase in academic skills both were highly engaged in activities and attended the after-school program regularly. The results of this study provide additional evidence regarding the benefits of after-school programs and the importance of student engagement when assessing student outcomes.

  8. THE NEW COMPETENCY PROFILE OF ACADEMIC LIBRARIES IN THE FUNCTION OF EVALUATION OF SCIENTIFIC PRODUCTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasminka Mihaljević

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper starts from the definition of competency and then discusses the competencies that librarians employed in academic libraries must have so that the library could provide their mission. The requirements of the scientific community as a dynamic category go towards the achievement of the knowledge society, and therefore they change and improve methods of evaluating its productivity. Measurement and evaluation of the overall scientific creativity is an extremely demanding job that must be made by competent professionals. The paper informs on qualitative and quantitative: bibliometrics, sociometrics, altmetrics and other methods that can be used for evaluation of scientific production. It presents and explains the new competency profile which the scientific community requires from the academic library as a service user and special attention is paid to the possible role and place of the library in the evaluation of scientific productivity. This paper is designed to provide information on the new competencies that the library must have if it is involved in the provision of various metric services. In this regard, possibilities of the academic library as a partner in measuring and increasing scientific productivity are discussed. It is explained how academic libraries can adapt to their new role. Furthermore, it is attempted to answer the question in which direction education of librarians should move in order to realize this partnership.

  9. Alignment of Epidemiology Practice and Academic Competencies through Effective Collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Glenn, Kimberly R.; Masters, Paula R.; Quinn, Megan A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Online learning has recently garnered increased attention as technology use in the classroom grows. However, most of the published approaches regarding this topic in postgraduate education centers on clinical environments. Models of partnerships between applied public health agencies and academic centers to produce mutually beneficial online learning opportunities for graduate-level public health courses have not been explored in the literature. Methods East Tennessee State Univers...

  10. Alignment of Epidemiology Practice and Academic Competencies through Effective Collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Kimberly Renee Glenn; Paula eMasters; Megan eQuinn

    2016-01-01

    Background: Online learning has recently garnered increased attention as technology use in the classroom grows. However, most of the published approaches regarding this topic in postgraduate education centers on clinical environments. Models of partnerships between applied public health agencies and academic centers to produce mutually beneficial online learning opportunities for graduate-level public health courses have not been explored in the literature.Methods: East Tennessee State Univ...

  11. Cultural Competency Education in Academic Dental Institutions in Australia and New Zealand: A Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Sheree L; Hayes, Melanie J; Taylor, Jane A

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the status of cultural competency education in Australian and New Zealand dental, dental hygiene, and oral health therapy programs. The study sought to explore the extent to which cultural competence is included in these programs' curricula, building on similar studies conducted in the United States and thus contributing to the international body of knowledge on this topic. A 12-item instrument was designed with questions in four areas (demographics, content of cultural competency education, organization of overall program curriculum, and educational methods used to teach cultural competence) and was sent to all Australian and New Zealand dental, dental hygiene, and oral health therapy educational programs. Of the total 24 programs, 15 responded for a response rate of 62.5%. The results showed that lectures were the most frequent teaching method used in cultural competency education; however, the variation in responses indicated inconsistencies across study participants, as discussions and self-directed learning also featured prominently in the responses. The majority of respondents reported that cultural competence was not taught as a specific course but rather integrated into their programs' existing curricula. The variations in methods may indicate the need for a standardized framework for cultural competency education in these countries. In addition, the notion of cultural competency education in academic dental institutions demands additional evaluation, and further research is required to develop a solid evidence base on which to develop cultural competency education, specifically regarding content, most effective pedagogies, and assessment of student preparedness.

  12. Enhancing Academic Performance and Social and Emotional Competence with the RULER Feeling Words Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackett, Marc A.; Rivers, Susan E.; Reyes, Maria R.; Salovey, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A pre- and post-test quasi-experimental design was used to test the impact of a 30-week, theoretically-based social and emotional learning (SEL) curriculum, The RULER Feeling Words Curriculum ("RULER"), on the academic performance and social and emotional competence of 5th and 6th grade students (N = 273) in fifteen classrooms in three schools.…

  13. Can Socially Adept Friends Protect Peer-Victimized Early Adolescents against Lower Academic Competence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Kelly M.; Erath, Stephen A.; Flanagan, Kelly S.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined indices of friends' social adjustment (prosocial skills and social anxiety) that may protect against or exacerbate vulnerability to lower academic competence in the context of peer victimization during middle school (N=320). Peer victimization was assessed with peer nominations, social anxiety was measured with self…

  14. Self-Representations of Social and Academic Competence: Contextual Correlates in Middle Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isabella, Russell A.; Diener, Marissa L.

    2010-01-01

    Self-representations of 1st-, 3rd-, and 5th-graders' social and academic competence were examined in relation to children's personal (grade/age); family (attachment to parents, marital conflict, anxiety related to conflict); and school (teacher appraisals) contexts. Children who reported higher levels of security of attachment to parents and lower…

  15. Studying the Impact of Academic Mobility on Intercultural Competence: A Mixed-Methods Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cots, Josep M.; Aguilar, Marta; Mas-Alcolea, Sònia; Llanes, Àngels

    2016-01-01

    This paper contributes to the study of the impact of academic mobility on the development of students' intercultural competence (IC). Following Byram, IC is seen as comprising the three components of knowledge, behaviour and attitude. The study adopts a mixed-methods approach, analysing the results of a quantitative pre-stay post-stay survey…

  16. Marketing Technology. FasTrak Specialization Integrated Technical and Academic Competency (ITAC). Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Career-Technical and Adult Education.

    This document presents the Ohio Integrated Technical and Academic Competency profile for marketing technology. The profile is to serve as the basis for curriculum development in Ohio's secondary, adult, and postsecondary programs. The profile includes a comprehensive listing of 580 specialty and foundation key indicators for evaluating mastery of…

  17. A Longitudinal Study of the Social and Academic Competence of Economically Disadvantaged Bilingual Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oades-Sese, Geraldine V.; Esquivel, Giselle B.; Kaliski, Pamela K.; Maniatis, Lisette

    2011-01-01

    This longitudinal study was conducted to gain understanding of the social-emotional and academic development of economically disadvantaged bilingual preschool children. In Study 1, the authors combined cognitive, psychosocial, and cultural-linguistic factors to determine profiles of social competence as measured by peer play. A person-centered…

  18. Prediction of Children's Academic Competence from Their Effortful Control, Relationships, and Classroom Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente, Carlos; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Swanson, Jodi; Reiser, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The authors examined the relations among children's effortful control, school relationships, classroom participation, and academic competence with a sample of 7- to 12-year-old children (N = 264). Parents and children reported on children's effortful control, and teachers and children reported on children's school relationships and classroom…

  19. School Belonging, Generational Status, and Socioeconomic Effects on Mexican-Origin Children’s Later Academic Competence and Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Maciel M.; Robins, Richard W.; Widaman, Keith F.; Conger, Rand D.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined factors that relate to academic competence and expectations from elementary to middle school for 674 fifth grade students (50% boys; Mage = 10.86 years) of Mexican origin. Models predicting academic competence and expectations were estimated using a Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) framework, with longitudinal data from fifth to eighth grades. School belonging (i.e., social and emotional connectedness to school) predicted greater academic competence and expectations over time. Findings indicate that student feelings of belonging in school may act as a resource that promotes academic competence and expectations. Furthermore, family income, parent education, and generational status had direct effects on academic competence and expectations to some degree, suggesting the importance of contextual factors in this process. PMID:27231419

  20. School Belonging, Generational Status, and Socioeconomic Effects on Mexican-Origin Children's Later Academic Competence and Expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Maciel M; Robins, Richard W; Widaman, Keith F; Conger, Rand D

    2016-06-01

    This study examined factors that relate to academic competence and expectations from elementary to middle school for 674 fifth grade students (50% boys; Mage = 10.86 years) of Mexican origin. Models predicting academic competence and expectations were estimated using a Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) framework, with longitudinal data from fifth to eighth grades. School belonging (i.e., social and emotional connectedness to school) predicted greater academic competence and expectations over time. Findings indicate that student feelings of belonging in school may act as a resource that promotes academic competence and expectations. Furthermore, family income, parent education, and generational status had direct effects on academic competence and expectations to some degree, suggesting the importance of contextual factors in this process.

  1. Predicting academic performance and clinical competency for international dental students: seeking the most efficient and effective measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, D Graham; Whittaker, John M

    2005-02-01

    Measures used in the selection of international dental students to a U.S. D.D.S. program were examined to identify the grouping that most effectively and efficiently predicted academic performance and clinical competency. Archival records from the International Dental Program (IDP) at Loma Linda University provided data on 171 students who had trained in countries outside the United States. The students sought admission to the D.D.S. degree program, successful completion of which qualified them to sit for U.S. licensure. As with most dental schools, competition is high for admission to the D.D.S. program. The study's goal was to identify what measures contributed to a fair and accurate selection process for dental school applicants from other nations. Multiple regression analyses identified National Board Part II and dexterity measures as significant predictors of academic performance and clinical competency. National Board Part I, TOEFL, and faculty interviews added no significant additional help in predicting eventual academic performance and clinical competency.

  2. Academic Librarian Competency: A Description of Trends in the Peer-Reviewed Journal Literature of 2001- 2005.

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer Lyn Soutter

    2007-01-01

    Describes publishing trends in academic librarian competency articles to providecontext for a later investigation of definitions found in this library and informationscience (LIS) literature. Explores peer-reviewed articles from 2001 – 2005 todetermine: who is writing on academic librarian competency, including anycollaboration; whether there are areas of focus in the literature; if these articlesare published in academic journals and to what degree; whether we incorporateother literatures, e...

  3. Alignment of Epidemiology Practice and Academic Competencies through Effective Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Renee Glenn

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Online learning has recently garnered increased attention as technology use in the classroom grows. However, most of the published approaches regarding this topic in postgraduate education centers on clinical environments. Models of partnerships between applied public health agencies and academic centers to produce mutually beneficial online learning opportunities for graduate-level public health courses have not been explored in the literature.Methods: East Tennessee State University (ETSU and the Tennessee Department of Health (TDH partnered to build three online, asynchronous epidemiology modules for an interdisciplinary audience of graduate students. The goal of the modules were to 1 introduce students to a public health issue, 2 provide students with hands-on learning about data and information available through TDH, and 3 allow students to connect theory to practice by having them create a product for use by TDH. TDH created topic-specific modules that would be used within the infectious disease, chronic disease and cancer epidemiology courses and piloted during the 2015-2016 academic term.Results: Conference calls between the two institutions occurred in the spring and the summer of 2015. Two of the three epidemiology modules were presented to ETSU staff for critique and edits at an in-person meeting during the summer. The methods of delivery for each section within a module varied from recorded webinar format to self-guided instruction. One module utilized available learning tools provided by the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention while the other module was constructed entirely using TDH data. Both modules included various exercises and assignments to be conducted in-class and as homework, and concluded with the student being asked to construct a learning product as a final project. The ETSU-TDH team decided that this learning product would be provided back to TDH for possible future use. Discussion: The innovative

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF THE INFORMATION COMPETENCE OF THE ACADEMIC COMMUNITY: TWENTY YEARS AFTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glosiene, Audrone

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Twenty years ago, reading culture, library skills’ development used to be one of the core directions in research and teaching policy of the Department of Library Science at Vilnius University. Lateron, the topic was marginalized and today we return to the field that meanwhile has developed huge knowledge and experience base worldwide. A stimulus for the return was participation in BIBLIONOVA project. The aim of the article is to present a holistic approach towards information competency development in a modern academic institution. Prescriptive approach based on information literacy standards proved to be limited and not always effective in the academic environment.Information competency development is problem-specific, domain-specific, and disciplinespecific. It is interrelated with critical thinking, analytical skills as well as creativity and computerliteracy skills. Holistically, information competency development is an integral part of university’s life-long learning strategy. Critical success factors for information competency development areopen and problem-based learning and cooperative, inclusive strategies of the whole university. Academic libraries continue to play a major role in the process but the connections with faculty and administration in the process are of major importance.

  5. The Development of the Communication Competences. Contribution of the Journal to Academic Education of Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandrache Carmen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Our paper presents the importance of the journal for developing the communication competences and social and professional integration of students. These aspects are important but often they are neglected in academic activities, because the professional skills are priority in Curricula of faculties. In this paper we analyze the theoretical importance of the journal and its forms to present from communicate and reflexive perspectives. The paper offers a few examples of good practice which hopes the teacher to develop the communication competences of students.

  6. Do Perceived Academic Competence and School Satisfaction Mediate the Relationships between Perceived Support Provided by Teachers and Classmates, and Academic Initiative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsen, Anne G.; Breivik, Kyrre; Wold, Bente

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was twofold: (1) to examine how psychosocial support provided by teachers and classmates related to students' self-regulated learning as expressed through self-reported academic initiative, and (2) whether academic competence and school satisfaction mediated these relationships. The data were from a nationally representative…

  7. Development of language competencies through the «Academic and Professional Portfolio»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana PIERCE MCMAHON

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The implantation of the European Higher Education Area requires a change of methodology from an emphasis on teaching to an emphasis on learning in which the evaluation system acquires a determining relevance. In the area of second language acquisition, Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR has established levels of communicative competencies for all the Member States facilitating the student mobility. The Department of Linguistic Policy of the Council of Europe has also developed the European Portfolio of Languages (ELP to enhance self-evaluation and reflection on the part of the student. It serves two fundamental functions: pedagogical and the informative one. Nevertheless, the existing versions of portfolios do not consider the specific aspects of the use of languages in the university and professional context. For this reason, our research group has developed a specific portfolio for the of Academic and Professional context. This portfolio has been elaborated to determine the linguistic competencies at all the levels of the CEFR. In this article, after a brief description of competencies put forward by the Council of Europe and Bologna, the process of elaboration of the Academic and Professional English Portfolio as an instrument for the evaluation student learning in the context of architecture and engineering students is detailed. This paper also deals with the development of a bank of more than 350 descriptors, arranged by skills, which describe concrete degrees of skill in performing academic and professional language tasks. The competencies range in difficulty from A1 to C2 Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFRL levels. They describe language learning outcomes in terms of ‘can do statements’, therefore becoming a useful instrument for language learning.

  8. Establishing a method to support academic and professional competence throughout an undergraduate radiography programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Curtise K.C. [Department of Health Technology and Informatics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong)], E-mail: or.curtis@polyu.edu.hk; White, Peter [Department of Health Technology and Informatics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong)], E-mail: htpwhite@polyu.edu.hk; McKay, Janice C. [Department of Health Technology and Informatics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong)], E-mail: htjanmck@polyu.edu.hk

    2008-08-15

    Purpose: Radiography degree programmes are coming under increasing pressure from the community to ensure that graduates have not only the necessary academic development but also the practice-based skills. This study aims to establish a method of monitoring students' progress towards, and ability to meet, academic and professional competences throughout a radiography programme. Methods: Questionnaires were designed for students and academic staff to determine the stages and standards of progress of competence development, and to inform the review process of the current assessment tools throughout the programme. A literature search identified the appropriate pedagogy as a basis for devising the method. Another questionnaire was distributed to overseas radiography institutions to gain insights into other assessment practices to validate the framework. Results and discussion: It was established that years of study rather than semester periods were appropriate to allow students to meet the standards. Discrepancies were noted in the expectations between academic staff (higher expectations) and students (more realistic) in terms of the pace of development expected. As students progress at different rates, and do not experience the same clinical exposure, their ability to meet expectations may differ and so both sets of expectations were combined as a range of criteria. A multi-dimensional assessment approach should be adequate to gauge students' progress but time and resource effectiveness has not yet been addressed. The portfolio was identified as the pedagogy capable of integrating all the competence assessment tools, linked by reflective writing, to gather individual outcomes into a whole, and form a holistic framework. Outcome: The portfolio framework will initially run as a voluntary activity and standards of progress corresponding to the students' stages will be delivered to participants in advance. Participants will be required to select materials

  9. What is a Pharmacist: Opinions of Pharmacy Department Academics and Community Pharmacists on Competences Required for Pharmacy Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atkinson, Jeffrey; de Paepe, Kristien; Sánchez Pozo, Antonio; Rekkas, Dimitrios; Volmer, Daisy; Hirvonen, Jouni; Bozic, Borut; Skowron, Agnieska; Mircioiu, Constantin; Marcincal, Annie; Koster, Andries; Wilson, Keith; van Schravendijk, Chris; Wilkinson, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    This paper looks at the opinions of 241 European academics (who provide pharmacy education), and of 258 European community pharmacists (who apply it), on competences for pharmacy practice. A proposal for competences was generated by a panel of experts using Delphi methodology. Once finalized, the

  10. Do Pre-Entry Tests Predict Competencies Required to Excel Academically in Law School?: An Empirical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamala, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Prospective students of law are required to demonstrate competence in certain disciplines to attain admission to law school. The grounding in the disciplines is expected to demonstrate competencies required to excel academically in law school. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relevance of the law school admission test to…

  11. When Teachers' and Parents' Values Differ: Teachers' Ratings of Academic Competence in Children from Low-Income Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser-Cram, Penny; Sirin, Selcuk R.; Stipek, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    Examines predictors of teachers' ratings of academic competence of 105 kindergarten children from low-income families. Controlling for children's skills and socioeconomic status, teachers rated children as less competent when they perceived value differences with parents. The findings suggest a mechanism by which some children from low-income…

  12. The Twofold Multidimensionality of Academic Self-Concept: Domain Specificity and Separation between Competence and Affect Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arens, A. Katrin; Yeung, Alexander Seeshing; Craven, Rhonda G.; Hasselhorn, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Academic self-concept is consistently proven to be multidimensional rather than unidimensional as it is domain specific in nature. However, each specific self-concept domain may be further separated into competence and affect components. This study examines the twofold multidimensionality of academic self-concept (i.e., its domain specificity and…

  13. Early Adolescent Depression Symptoms and School Dropout: Mediating Processes Involving Self-Reported Academic Competence and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, Cintia V.; Janosz, Michel; Bisset, Sherri; Morin, Alexandre J. S.

    2013-01-01

    Research on adolescent well-being has shown that students with depression have an increased risk of facing academic failure, yet few studies have looked at the implications of adolescent depression in the process of school dropout. This study examined mediation processes linking depression symptoms, self-perceived academic competence, and…

  14. Early Adolescent Depression Symptoms and School Dropout: Mediating Processes Involving Self-Reported Academic Competence and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, Cintia V.; Janosz, Michel; Bisset, Sherri; Morin, Alexandre J. S.

    2013-01-01

    Research on adolescent well-being has shown that students with depression have an increased risk of facing academic failure, yet few studies have looked at the implications of adolescent depression in the process of school dropout. This study examined mediation processes linking depression symptoms, self-perceived academic competence, and…

  15. Younger children experience lower levels of language competence and academic progress in the first year of school: evidence from a population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, Courtenay Frazier; Gooch, Debbie; Baird, Gillian; Charman, Tony; Simonoff, Emily; Pickles, Andrew

    2015-06-04

    The youngest children in an academic year are reported to be educationally disadvantaged and overrepresented in referrals to clinical services. In this study we investigate for the first time whether these disadvantages are indicative of a mismatch between language competence at school entry and the academic demands of the classroom. We recruited a population sample of 7,267 children aged 4 years 9 months to 5 years 10 months attending state-maintained reception classrooms in Surrey, England. Teacher ratings on the Children's Communication Checklist-Short (CCC-S), a measure of language competence, the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire-Total Difficulties Score (SDQ), a measure of behavioural problems, and the Early Years Foundation Stage Profile (EYFSP), a measure of academic attainment, were obtained at the end of the reception year. The youngest children were rated by teachers as having more language deficits, behaviour problems, and poorer academic progress at the end of the school year. Language deficits were highly associated with behaviour problems; adjusted odds ratio 8.70, 95% CI [7.25-10.45]. Only 4.8% of children with teacher-rated language deficits and 1.3% of those with co-occurring language and behaviour difficulties obtained a 'Good Level of Development' on the EYFSP. While age predicted unique variance in academic attainment (1%), language competence was the largest associate of academic achievement (19%). The youngest children starting school have relatively immature language and behaviour skills and many are not yet ready to meet the academic and social demands of the classroom. At a population level, developing oral language skills and/or ensuring academic targets reflect developmental capacity could substantially reduce the numbers of children requiring specialist clinical services in later years. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association for Child and

  16. Shaping of Competencies of Managers in Academic Incubators of Entrepreneurship in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurowska-Pysz Joanna

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Participation of future entrepreneurs in Academic Incubators of Entrepreneurship (AIE in Poland is one of the innovative paths to shape their managerial competences. The aim of the paper is to analyse and evaluate the activities of the AIEs as an environment inside of which managerial competencies are formed, and formulate recommendations concerning the improvement of AIEs, in terms of the development of managerial skills of future entrepreneurs. Design/methodology/approach: The author relied on research - study surveys and empirical, qualitative, exploratory research, which were supported by figures. The author focused on four important issues: - Motives of researchers and students interested in the support of AIE; - The quality of support offered by the incubator to its participants as well as the frequency of use of this support by future entrepreneurs; - The possibility of extending the support system for AIE participants; - Traits / managerial and entrepreneurial competences desired in people running their own businesses. Results: AIE participants are focused primarily on implementing their business ventures and to a much lesser extent, care about the simultaneous development of their managerial competencies to manage these projects. It is manifested, among other by differentiated assessment of the suitability of certain forms of support from the incubator and the low intensity of use of this support. Despite this, AIE participants perceive the development of desirable traits and strengthening of specific entrepreneurial, management competencies. It is not a very dynamic growth, although it translates into their motivation to start a business after leaving the incubator. Conclusion: It is recommended to place greater emphasis on mobilizing the future entrepreneurs to make use of forms of support for the development of their managerial competences. It is necessary for complex preparation of future entrepreneurs to

  17. High academic achievement in psychotic students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defries, Z; Grothe, L

    1978-02-01

    The authors studied 21 schizophrenic and borderline college students who achieved B+ or higher grade averages and underwent psychotherapy while in college. High academic achievement was found to provide relief from feelings of worthlessness and ineffectuality resulting from poor relationships with parents, siblings, and peers. Psychotherapy and the permissive yet supportive college atmosphere reinforced the students' self-esteem.

  18. Analysing written production competence descriptors for academic and professional purposes and their calibration to the CEFR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Pierce McMahon

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR “describes in a comprehensive way what language learners have to learn to do in order to use a language for communication and what knowledge and skills they have to develop so as to be able to act effectively” (Council of Europe, 2001: 1. This paper reports on the findings of two studies whose purpose was to assess written production competence descriptors meant for their inclusion into the Academic and Professional English Language Portfolio (ELP for students of engineering and architecture. The main objective of these studies was to establish whether the language competence descriptors were a satisfactory valid tool in their language programmes from the point of view of clarity, relevance and reliability, as perceived by the students and fellow English for Academic Purposes (EAP / English for Science and Technology (EST instructors. The studies shed light on how to improve unsatisfactory descriptors. Results show that the final descriptor lists were on the whole well calibrated and fairly well written: the great majority was considered valid for both teachers and students involved.

  19. Competence and competency of high school teacher as the components of his innovative development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. K. Yarmola

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Priority direction of state policy concerning the development of higher education inUkraineis to prepare qualified and competitive staff in the labor market. The high level of competence and scientific competence along with pedagogical craftsmanship and psychological culture of teachers is condition for improving the efficiency of the educational process in higher education. Aim of research was theoretical justification importance of competence and competency of high school teacher for the establishment his innovation potential. In the article the analysis of interpretation of the terms competence and competency in various scientific sources and scientific works of individual authors were presented. Moreover important are ability to creativity, solving of problem’s tasks, ingenuity, flexibility and criticality mind, intuition, originality and self-confidence; ability to formulate and solve non-standard tasks; ability to analyse, synthesis and combination, to share experiences, predictions, etc.. Emotionally-shaped quality represented by the following components as spirituality, the emotional upsurge in creative situations; associativity, imagination, sense of novelty, sensitivity to contradictions, empathy; insight, ability to see the familiar in an unfamiliar; overcome the stereotypes; risk appetite, desire for freedom. The general regularities of formation of research competence have been detected. In particular, the formation carried out through the development of competencies invariant character and increasing of specialized skills. It is proved that scientific and research competence is determined primarily by the system of teacher's professional education and self-education. The most important objective characteristics that reflect the competence of teachers in the field R & D is the total number of publications, number of scientific articles, monographs, and also won grants, competitions, etc. Moreover the level of competence in the

  20. Locus of Control, Academic Self-Concept, and Academic Dishonesty among High Ability College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinn, Anne N.; Boazman, Janette

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of the current study were to evaluate a measure of academic dishonesty and examine high ability college students' loci of control and its effect on behaviors of academic dishonesty, as moderated by academic self-concept. A total of 357 high ability college students enrolled at two universities in the southwestern United States took…

  1. What is a Pharmacist: Opinions of Pharmacy Department Academics and Community Pharmacists on Competences Required for Pharmacy Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Atkinson

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks at the opinions of 241 European academics (who provide pharmacy education, and of 258 European community pharmacists (who apply it, on competences for pharmacy practice. A proposal for competences was generated by a panel of experts using Delphi methodology. Once finalized, the proposal was then submitted to a large, European-wide community of academics and practicing pharmacists in an additional Delphi round. Academics and community pharmacy practitioners recognized the importance of the notion of patient care competences, underlining the nature of the pharmacist as a specialist of medicines. The survey revealed certain discrepancies. Academics placed substantial emphasis on research, pharmaceutical technology, regulatory aspects of quality, etc., but these were ranked much lower by community pharmacists who concentrated more on patient care competences. In a sub-analysis of the data, we evaluated how perceptions may have changed since the 1980s and the introduction of the notions of competence and pharmaceutical care. This was done by splitting both groups into respondents < 40 and > 40 years old. Results for the subgroups were essentially statistically the same but with some different qualitative tendencies. The results are discussed in the light of the different conceptions of the professional identity of the pharmacist.

  2. IT Professionals' Competences: High School Students' Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Crespo, Angel; Colomo-Palacios, Ricardo; Gomez-Berbis, Juan Miguel; Tovar-Caro, Edmundo

    2009-01-01

    During last few years, the competential paradigm has become a standard for modern Human Resources Management. The importance and the impact of this concept have led higher education institutions to adopt this concept in the definition of educational resources. In this scenario, knowing which competencies and characteristics define professionals in…

  3. The Role of Friends in Early Adolescents' Academic Self-Competence and Intrinsic Value for Math and English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissell-Havran, Joanna M.; Loken, Eric

    2009-01-01

    In a sample of 207 eighth grade students, we examined similarities between students and their friends in achievement motivation and whether friendship support moderated these associations. Academic self-competence and intrinsic value for math and English were assessed using both perceptions of friends and actual friend reports collected through…

  4. The Effect of Training in Instructional Designer Competencies on Teachers' Planning Routine and Their Students' Academic Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwazeh, Afnan N.

    A class of 37 in-service government school teachers from the Nablus (Palestine) district was studied to investigate the effects of 18 hours of training in Instructional Designer's Competencies (IDC) on teachers' planning routine, and their students' academic achievement. A questionnaire measured IDC in five domains: analysis, design,…

  5. Predicting Early Adolescents' Academic Achievement, Social Competence, and Physical Health from Parenting, Ego Resilience, and Engagement Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Jodi; Valiente, Carlos; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; O'Brien, T. Caitlin

    2011-01-01

    This study examined ego resilience and engagement coping as mediators of the relationships between supportive and controlling parenting practices and early adolescents' academic achievement, social competence, and physical health. Participants were 240 predominantly Mexican American early adolescents, their parents, and their teachers. There were…

  6. Professional Competency Differences among High School Teachers in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, M. Nur

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the levels of professional competency among high school teachers as well as to identify the differnces based on gender and work experience, as the teachers' professional competency level is of paramount importance in quality of teaching and learning and students' achievements. The study sample involved 327 teachers from…

  7. Academic Librarian Competency: A Description of Trends in the Peer-Reviewed Journal Literature of 2001-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Lyn Soutter

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Decribes publishing trends in academic librarian competency articles to provide context for a later investigation of definitions found in this library and information science (LIS literature. Explores peer-reviewed articles from 2001 – 2005 to determine: who is writing on academic librarian competency, including any collaboration; whether there are areas of focus in the literature; if these articles are published in academic journals and to what degree; whether we incorporate other literatures, especially those relevant to competency; and what other trends may be important to an understanding of this topic. Discovers three major areas of focus: management-related with 35 articles, 19 education and professional development articles and 12 articles on professional issues. Most are written by single authors and by authors associated with academic libraries or library schools. There are only three college-based articles. There is minimal collaboration across boundaries of any kind. Most of the authors associated with academic libraries are writing the management-related articles. The majority of these authors are US-based. The majority of articles on education and continuing professional development are written by authors at library schools. Further, these authors represent a more international representation of this topic and a greater degree of international collaboration than found in the management articles. The authors who wrote articles on professional issues are almost equally from library schools and libraries.

  8. Predicting changes in children's self-perceptions of academic competence: a naturalistic examination of evaluative discourse among classmates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altermatt, Ellen Rydell; Pomerantz, Eva M; Ruble, Diane N; Frey, Karin S; Greulich, Faith Knesz

    2002-11-01

    Classroom discourse was examined as a predictor of changes in children's beliefs about their academic capabilities. Kindergarten, first-grade, and second-grade students (N = 106) participated in 2 waves of data collection, approximately 1 year apart. During the 1st year of the study, children's verbal interactions with their classmates were observed and recorded. Children rated their self-perceptions of academic competence during the 1st and 2nd years. Analyses revealed that changes over time in children's competence perceptions could be predicted from the types of statements that children made and had directed toward them by classmates. Examining sequences of child and classmate statements proved helpful in explaining the observed changes in children's perceptions of competence.

  9. The "Secrets" of Chinese Students' Academic Success: Academic Resilience among Students from Highly Competitive Academic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haibin

    2017-01-01

    Given Chinese students often perform well academically despite the challenges of their competitive academic environments, it is important to explore what enables the academic resilience of these students. Moreover, because the extant resilience literature is biased towards Western accounts of resilience, it is crucial that non-Western perspectives…

  10. Good practice or positive action? Using Q methodology to identify competing views on improving gender equality in academic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Louise D; Burkinshaw, Paula; House, Allan O; West, Robert M; Ward, Vicky

    2017-08-22

    The number of women entering medicine has increased significantly, yet women are still under-represented at senior levels in academic medicine. To support the gender equality action plan at one School of Medicine, this study sought to (1) identify the range of viewpoints held by staff on how to address gender inequality and (2) identify attitudinal barriers to change. Q methodology. 50 potential interventions representing good practice or positive action, and addressing cultural, organisational and individual barriers to gender equality, were ranked by participants according to their perception of priority. The School of Medicine at the University of Leeds, UK. Fifty-five staff members were purposively sampled to represent gender and academic pay grade. Principal components analysis identified six competing viewpoints on how to address gender inequality. Four viewpoints favoured positive action interventions: (1) support careers of women with childcare commitments, (2) support progression of women into leadership roles rather than focus on women with children, (3) support careers of all women rather than just those aiming for leadership, and (4) drive change via high-level financial and strategic initiatives. Two viewpoints favoured good practice with no specific focus on women by (5) recognising merit irrespective of gender and (6) improving existing career development practice. No viewpoint was strongly associated with gender, pay grade or role; however, latent class analysis identified that female staff were more likely than male to prioritise the setting of equality targets. Attitudinal barriers to the setting of targets and other positive action initiatives were identified, and it was clear that not all staff supported positive action approaches. The findings and the approach have utility for those involved in gender equality work in other medical and academic institutions. However, the impact of such initiatives needs to be evaluated in the longer term.

  11. Multidimensional Scaling of High School Students' Perceptions of Academic Dishonesty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelkin, Liora Pedhazur; Gilbert, Kimberly A.; Silva, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Although cheating on tests and other forms of academic dishonesty are considered rampant, no standard definition of academic dishonesty exists. The current study was conducted to investigate the perceptions of academic dishonesty in high school students, utilizing an innovative methodology, multidimensional scaling (MDS). Two methods were used to…

  12. Multidimensional Scaling of High School Students' Perceptions of Academic Dishonesty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelkin, Liora Pedhazur; Gilbert, Kimberly A.; Silva, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Although cheating on tests and other forms of academic dishonesty are considered rampant, no standard definition of academic dishonesty exists. The current study was conducted to investigate the perceptions of academic dishonesty in high school students, utilizing an innovative methodology, multidimensional scaling (MDS). Two methods were used to…

  13. The Competency Crisis and the High School Diploma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spady, William G.

    1978-01-01

    The high school diploma is attacked as providing inadequate evidence of student development, socialization, and achievement. Discussed are major potential consequences of the movement towards "competency-based education" affecting college admissions, curricula, graduation requirements, and student learning. (AF)

  14. Spread of Academic Success in a High School Social Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blansky, Deanna; Kavanaugh, Christina; Boothroyd, Cara; Benson, Brianna; Gallagher, Julie; Endress, John; Sayama, Hiroki

    2013-01-01

    Application of social network analysis to education has revealed how social network positions of K-12 students correlate with their behavior and academic achievements. However, no study has been conducted on how their social network influences their academic progress over time. Here we investigated correlations between high school students’ academic progress over one year and the social environment that surrounds them in their friendship network. We found that students whose friends’ average GPA (Grade Point Average) was greater (or less) than their own had a higher tendency toward increasing (or decreasing) their academic ranking over time, indicating social contagion of academic success taking place in their social network. PMID:23418483

  15. Spread of academic success in a high school social network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deanna Blansky

    Full Text Available Application of social network analysis to education has revealed how social network positions of K-12 students correlate with their behavior and academic achievements. However, no study has been conducted on how their social network influences their academic progress over time. Here we investigated correlations between high school students' academic progress over one year and the social environment that surrounds them in their friendship network. We found that students whose friends' average GPA (Grade Point Average was greater (or less than their own had a higher tendency toward increasing (or decreasing their academic ranking over time, indicating social contagion of academic success taking place in their social network.

  16. Academic dishonesty among high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, D L

    1999-01-01

    Research on academic dishonesty has generally relied on survey techniques, which may fail to capture students' true feelings about cheating. The present investigation used focus group discussions to gain a fuller understanding of students' beliefs about academic dishonesty. The results suggest that, in regard to their cheating, students generally place the blame on others.

  17. Academic performance in high school as factor associated to academic performance in college

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mileidy Salcedo Barragán

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This study intends to find the relationship between academic performance in High School and College, focusing on Natural Sciences and Mathematics. It is a descriptive correlational study, and the variables were academic performance in High School, performance indicators and educational history. The correlations between variables were established with Spearman’s correlation coefficient. Results suggest that there is a positive relationship between academic performance in High School and Educational History, and a very weak relationship between performance in Science and Mathematics in High School and performance in College.

  18. Academic Librarian Competency as Defined in the Library and Information Science Journal Literature of 2001‒2005 and 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Lyn Soutter

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Competency definitions continue to become more popular in Library and Information Science (LIS and are being used not only to describe library positions but also as a means of assessment. This study investigates competency in the LIS academic context using English language peer-reviewed articles from the LIS journal literature for 2001‒2005, with findings tested by the later inclusion of 2011 data. A quadripartite definition consisting of cognitive, functional, behavioral, and meta-competence elements is used as a template against which to explore definition creation and use. Results offer a template for critical analysis of competency as found within the LIS journal literature. The methodology used, one of coding, reveals a commonality to discussions of competency within these articles — reflecting a more holistic understanding than expected. But authors’ highlighted competency definitions tend not to parallel the discussion in their respective articles, as shown by the lack of inclusion of multiple elements from the same quadripartite definition.

  19. Impacts of teachers’ competency on job performance in research universities with industry characteristics: Taking academic atmosphere as moderator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anguo Xu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Research universities with industry characteristics play an irreplaceable role in national economic development and social development. With the rapid development of research universities with industry characteristics in China, these universities face new challenges in managing teachers and promoting their quality. This paper aims to examine the impact of teachers’ competency on job performance in research university with industry characteristics Design/methodology/approach: Based on the behavioral event interview and questionnaire methods, a four-dimension (i.e. basic quality, teaching ability, industry awareness and research capacity competency model was proposed, the influence mechanism of competency on job performance was examined using empirical research. Findings: We found that there is a significant positive correlation between the teachers’ competency level, four dimensions and job performance in research universities with industry characteristics, especially between research capacity, teaching ability, industry awareness and job performance. And academic atmosphere plays a regulatory role in the interaction between the competency and job performance. Practical implications: Our findings can help to improve the management level of teachers in research universities with industry characteristics.Originality/value: The paper introduces the competency theory to the teacher management in research universities with industry characteristics, and gives some interesting findings.

  20. The Experience of Nursing Instructors and Students on Professional Competency of Nursing Academic Staff: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Hedayat; Mohammadi, Eesa; Ahmadi, Fazollah; Kazemnejad, Anoshiravan; Shorofi, Seyed Afshin

    2014-01-01

    Background: One of the most important purposes of health-oriented educational centers is to train competent nurses. This study was intended to discover the meaning of “competency of nursing academic staff” among nursing students and instructors. Methodology & Methods: A qualitative study using the content analysis approach was conducted. The data was collected through in-depth interviews consisting of 30 individuals and a focus group. Results: Data analysis resulted in the extraction of 15 categories and 6 themes. The themes included ‘providing effective education’, ‘increasing research capability of oneself and that of the students’, ‘promoting managerial competency’, ‘being a cultural and behavioral role model’, ‘motivating and nurturing the students’, and ‘boosting teaching values and disposition’. Conclusion: This study resulted in discovering the real meaning of professional competency among the nursing faculty staff. The findings could be utilized in designing assessment tools for professional competency of nursing academic staff in nursing schools and other medical fields. PMID:24999130

  1. MECHANISM FOR DESIGNING COMPETENCE-ORIENTED TASKS IN VARIOUS ACADEMIC SUBJECTS AND REQUIREMENTS FOR ITS IMPLEMENTATION IN HIGHER EDUCATIONAL ESTABLISHMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya M. Zhukova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The research objective is to develop a mechanism for designing competence-oriented tasks in various academic subjects and requirements for its implementation in higher educational establishments. Methods. The authors conducted a theoretical analysis of philosophical, psychological and pedagogical literature sources on the research issues to implement the objectives of the study; Russian and foreign educational experience on the use of study tasks in the study process is studied and summarized; educational and syllabus documentation and training materials are analyzed (syllabi, textbooks, manuals, task and exercise books, etc.; normative documents are studied (State Educational Standards, Federal State Educational Standards, Main Syllabi, curricula, instructional acts, etc.. Empirical research methods involve observation, testing, questioning, modeling, peer review, pedagogical experiment and statistical interpretation of the study results. The study was carried out from 2007 to 2012 in the Engineering-Pedagogical Faculty of Moscow State Agroengineering Goryachkin University. 240 students were engaged in the pedagogical experiment. The following Moscow colleges provided facilities for the peer review of the list and solution frequency of vocational education tasks by secondary vocational school teachers: Colleges of Civil Engineering No 1 and No 12, Small Business College No 48, Polytechnic College No 13, Printing and Publishing College No 56, and Electromechanical College No 55. Results. The research findings demonstrate that the competence-oriented tasks are shown as an integrative didactic unit of professional competence development. Its functions, classification, and structural components are given. The mechanism of designing competence-oriented tasks in various academic subjects is developed and tested. The proposed mechanism is an invariant for academic and teaching staff of educational establishments at all levels of professional

  2. Building technology and information competences among university students through an academic contest and social networking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Eugenia Ruiz-Molina

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Spanish universities have recently adapted their studies to the requirements of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA. As part of these requirements, the development of computer and informational skills must be considered as an academic objective. Amongst other activities geared towards developing these skills, an informational video was disseminated. The design of the communication campaign promoting this video, developed through viral marketing and social networking sites, was the result of empirical research carried out by students of the University of Valencia. This paper describes the research objectives, questions, techniques and main findings of the study. A survey was conducted on a sample of 844 valid questionnaires completed by students after watching the video, following a non-probability procedure of quota sampling (gender and type of studies and convenience sampling in order to achieve a representative sample of the total population. After processing data through descriptive analysis techniques, we were given a fairly detailed picture of the most commonly used electronic devices, social networking sites and activities developed by students using Web 2.0. In particular, personal computers were the most commonly used electronic devices for access to the Internet. Regarding the most commonly used social networking services, Tuenti and Facebook are the most popular websites among students, the majority of whom use social networks several times a day for chatting and sending messages. Concerning the students’ opinions about the video, most of them liked the video and its individual elements (music, images, story, etc.. They also find the message easy to understand. However, differences observed across gender and type of studies suggest the need to include several social networks as well as video features in order to effectively reach these different groups of students. This information enables the design of a communication plan to

  3. The Construction and Cultivation of English Academic Thesis Writing Competence%英语学术论文写作能力的构成与培养

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐彬

    2014-01-01

    如何通过英语写作教学提高英语专业学生的英语学术论文写作能力是目前我国高校英语专业教学面临的一个重要问题。本文分析了英语学术论文写作能力的成分构成,提出了英语学术论文写作能力构成的模式,剖析了我国高校英语专业教学中英语学术论文写作能力培养情况,并结合英语学术论文写作能力的特点,构建了英语学术论文写作能力培养模式。%It is an important question how to improve English major students’ English academic thesis writing competence in English Writing Course, confronting China’s colleges and universities English major teaching. This paper presents an analysis on English academic thesis writing competence components, constructs a model of English academic thesis writing competence components, and expounds on the situation of English academic thesis writing competence cultivation in China’s English major teaching. In view of the characteristics of English academic thesis writing competence, it attempts to construct a cultivation scheme of English academic thesis writing competence.

  4. SOCIAL COMPETENCE DEVELOPMENT IN HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS› SOCIALIZATION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anzhelika Ahmetovna Novikova

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the social competence structure and diagnostic methods; described author matrix of diagnosis and determination of students’ social competence formed level in high school educational space.

  5. Competency-Based Medical Education in the Internal Medicine Clerkship: A Report From the Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine Undergraduate Medical Education Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Sara B; Ledford, Cynthia H; Aronowitz, Paul B; Chheda, Shobhina G; Choe, John H; Call, Stephanie A; Gitlin, Scott D; Muntz, Marty; Nixon, L James; Pereira, Anne G; Ragsdale, John W; Stewart, Emily A; Hauer, Karen E

    2017-09-14

    As medical educators continue to redefine learning and assessment across the continuum, implementation of competency-based medical education in the undergraduate setting has become a focus of many medical schools. While standards of competency have been defined for the graduating student, there is no uniform approach for defining competency expectations for students during their core clerkship year. The authors describe the process by which an Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine task force developed a paradigm for competency-based assessment of students during their inpatient internal medicine (IM) clerkship. Building on work at the resident and fellowship levels, the task force focused on the development of key learning outcomes as defined by entrustable professional activities (EPAs) that were specific to educational experiences on the IM clerkship, as well as identification of high-priority assessment domains. The work was informed by a national survey of clerkship directors.Six key EPAs emerged: generating a differential diagnosis, obtaining a complete and accurate history and physical exam, obtaining focused histories and clinically relevant physical exams, preparing an oral presentation, interpreting the results of basic diagnostic studies, and providing well-organized clinical documentation. A model for assessment was proposed, with descriptors aligned to the scale of supervision and mapped to Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education domains of competence. The proposed paradigm offers a standardized template that may be used across IM clerkships, and which would effectively bridge competency evaluation in the clerkship to fourth-year assessment as well as eventual postgraduate training.Written work prepared by employees of the Federal Government as part of their official duties is, under the U.S. Copyright Act, a "work of the United States Government" for which copyright protection under Title 17 of the United States Code is not available. As

  6. Younger Children Experience Lower Levels of Language Competence and Academic Progress in the First Year of School: Evidence from a Population Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, Courtenay Frazier; Gooch, Debbie; Baird, Gillian; Charman, Tony; Simonoff, Emily; Pickles, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Background: The youngest children in an academic year are reported to be educationally disadvantaged and overrepresented in referrals to clinical services. In this study we investigate for the first time whether these disadvantages are indicative of a mismatch between language competence at school entry and the academic demands of the classroom.…

  7. Academic Dishonesty among Gifted and High-Achieving Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, Kimberly A.

    2011-01-01

    Gifted high school students are essentially absent in the research concerning academic integrity; however, over the past few years, educators of gifted students have noticed an increase in the occurrences of academic dishonesty among students in gifted classrooms (Abilock, 2009). This research may be analyzed to provide some insight into the…

  8. Academic Dishonesty among Gifted and High-Achieving Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, Kimberly A.

    2011-01-01

    Gifted high school students are essentially absent in the research concerning academic integrity; however, over the past few years, educators of gifted students have noticed an increase in the occurrences of academic dishonesty among students in gifted classrooms (Abilock, 2009). This research may be analyzed to provide some insight into the…

  9. Does High School Homework Increase Academic Achievement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalenkoski, Charlene Marie; Pabilonia, Sabrina Wulff

    2017-01-01

    Although previous research has shown that homework improves students' academic achievement, the majority of these studies use data on students' homework time from retrospective questionnaires, which may be less accurate than time-diary data. We use data from the combined Child Development Supplement (CDS) and the Transition to Adulthood Survey…

  10. A survey of New Zealand academic reference librarians: Current and future skills and competencies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brenda Chawner; Gillian Oliver

    2013-01-01

    .... The results from New Zealand show that, serving academic library customers requires not only traditional 'reference' skills, but also skills in customer service, technology support, and training...

  11. Recursive Model of a Methodical Competency Formation of a High School Teacher in the Context of Competency-Based Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    ??lekhina, ??rina Borisovna

    2015-01-01

    The present study examines the professional development problems of a high school teacher. A high school teacher is both a scientist and a teacher. Teaching and research activities are integrated by using methodical activity. Methodical competency of a teacher is defined as a basis in the context of Competence-based Education. The methodical…

  12. Lessons learned from a community-academic initiative: the development of a core competency-based training for community-academic initiative community health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Yumary; Matos, Sergio; Kapadia, Smiti; Islam, Nadia; Cusack, Arthur; Kwong, Sylvia; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau

    2012-12-01

    Despite the importance of community health workers (CHWs) in strategies to reduce health disparities and the call to enhance their roles in research, little information exists on how to prepare CHWs involved in community-academic initiatives (CAIs). Therefore, the New York University Prevention Research Center piloted a CAI-CHW training program. We applied a core competency framework to an existing CHW curriculum and bolstered the curriculum to include research-specific sessions. We employed diverse training methods, guided by adult learning principles and popular education philosophy. Evaluation instruments assessed changes related to confidence, intention to use learned skills, usefulness of sessions, and satisfaction with the training. Results demonstrated that a core competency-based training can successfully affect CHWs' perceived confidence and intentions to apply learned content, and can provide a larger social justice context of their role and work. This program demonstrates that a core competency-based framework coupled with CAI-research-specific skill sessions (1) provides skills that CAI-CHWs intend to use, (2) builds confidence, and (3) provides participants with a more contextualized view of client needs and CHW roles.

  13. Precision Machining. FasTrak Specialization Integrated Technical and Academic Competency (ITAC). 2002 Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Career-Technical and Adult Education.

    This publication provided the competencies and key indicators for a program that enables students to prepare for a number of occupations within the broader metalworking industry. Specializations include machinist, computer numerical control programmers, and maintenance and machine builders. Competencies and the related key indicators are presented…

  14. Cosmetology. FasTrak Specialization Integrated Technical and Academic Competency (ITAC). 2002 Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Career-Technical and Adult Education.

    This publication provides the competencies and key indicators for a cosmetology program that prepares students to become licensed in the State of Ohio to work in the area of hair, skin, and/or nail care. Competencies and the related key indicators are presented for these 14 units: orientation to the cosmetology profession; dispensary operations…

  15. Doctorate Holders outside the Academy in Finland: Academic Engagement and Industry-Specific Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapakorpi, Arja

    2017-01-01

    In Finland, doctoral employment outside the academy has been increasing. Universities can no longer absorb the numbers in the doctoral labour force and research and development (R&D) policy emphasises the need for specialised research capacity in non-academic sectors; the highest academic degree is assumed to add value. However, the transition…

  16. Doctorate Holders outside the Academy in Finland: Academic Engagement and Industry-Specific Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapakorpi, Arja

    2017-01-01

    In Finland, doctoral employment outside the academy has been increasing. Universities can no longer absorb the numbers in the doctoral labour force and research and development (R&D) policy emphasises the need for specialised research capacity in non-academic sectors; the highest academic degree is assumed to add value. However, the transition…

  17. Family and academic performance: identifying high school student profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Aleli Chaparro Caso López

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify profiles of high school students, based on variables related to academic performance, socioeconomic status, cultural capital and family organization. A total of 21,724 high school students, from the five municipalities of the state of Baja California, took part. A K-means cluster analysis was performed to identify the profiles. The analyses identified two clearly-defined clusters: Cluster 1 grouped together students with high academic performance and who achieved higher scores for socioeconomic status, cultural capital and family involvement, whereas Cluster 2 brought together students with low academic achievement, and who also obtained lower scores for socioeconomic status and cultural capital, and had less family involvement. It is concluded that the family variables analyzed form student profiles that can be related to academic achievement.

  18. Cultivation of Intercultural Communicative Competence of Senior High School Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏丹

    2014-01-01

    With the trend of globalization in education and the strengthened position of English as a foreign language in China, the need to understand the cultural differences between Chinese and Western culture is becoming increasingly urgent, especially for the students in senior high schools in China. This paper is aimed to arouse the awareness of the urgency to improve the inter-cultural communication competence of the students in senior high school in China. It proposes four feasible and conducive sug-gestions for senior high schools in China to set up curriculum about Western culture to meet the needs of their students.

  19. Prosocial behavior and academic motivation in Spanish High School Students

    OpenAIRE

    Cándido J. Inglés; Agustin E. Martínez-González; Antonio Valle; José M. García-Fernández; Cecilia Ruiz-Esteban

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed the relationship between prosocial behaviour and academic goals in a sample of 2,022 Spanish compulsory secondary education students. The prosocial behaviour was measured with the Prosocial Behaviour scale of the Teenage Inventory of Social Skills (TISS) and academic goals were measured with the Achievement Goal Tendencies Questionnaire (AGTQ). The results revealed that students with high prosocial behaviour presented higher significantly scores in learning and performance...

  20. Welding. COM-LINK. Competency Based Vocational Curricula with Basic Skills and Academic Linkages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Terry

    This competency-based module uses the Ocean County (New Jersey) Vocational-Technical Schools curriculum-infused model for infusing basic skills instruction into vocational education. The model demonstrates the relationship of vocational skills to communication, mathematics, and science. The document begins with a philosophy statement; preface; a…

  1. Developing Intercultural Competence and Global Citizenship through International Experiences: Academics' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trede, Franziska; Bowles, Wendy; Bridges, Donna

    2013-01-01

    International education is a key priority for Australian universities, government and employer groups. For students, an international professional experience is uniquely placed in providing opportunities for developing intercultural learning, intercultural competence and global citizenship. Employers see graduates with international experiences as…

  2. Fashion Merchandising. COM-LINK. Competency Based Vocational Curricula with Basic Skills and Academic Linkages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Edwina

    This competency-based module uses the Ocean County (New Jersey) Vocational-Technical Schools curriculum-infused model for infusing basic skills instruction into vocational education. The model demonstrates the relationship of vocational skills to communication, mathematics, and science. The document begins with a philosophy statement; preface; a…

  3. Professional Competencies and Jurisdictional Claims in Evaluative Bibliometrics: The Educational Mandate of Academic Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersohn, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative metrics in research assessment are proliferating all over the world. The demand has led to an increase in bibliometric practitioners and service providers. Their professional roles and competencies have not yet been subject to systematic study. This paper focuses on one important service provider in evaluative bibliometrics--academic…

  4. Effects of Class Size and Adaptive Teaching Competency on Classroom Processes and Academic Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhwiler, Christian; Blatchford, Peter

    2011-01-01

    In many studies of class size effects, teacher characteristics are missing, even though many argue it is not class size that is important but teacher quality. In the present study teachers' effectiveness on the learning progress was assessed while teaching a unit with predefined learning objectives. To measure adaptive teaching competency a…

  5. SCORING: Bibliographic Instruction Helps Freshman Athletes Compete in the Academic League.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscella, Phyllis L.

    Motivated by accreditation standards, sanctions, legal, and other issues threatening American collegiate athletic programs, academia has put into place, on many campuses, structured programs which attempt to ensure both academic achievement and the physical prowess of its "players." As a component of the overall support program at the…

  6. Undergraduate Nurse Variables that Predict Academic Achievement and Clinical Competence in Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Ian; Hall, Margaret; Darmawan, I Gusti Ngurah.

    2007-01-01

    A hypothetical model was formulated to explore factors that influenced academic and clinical achievement for undergraduate nursing students. Sixteen latent variables were considered including the students' background, gender, type of first language, age, their previous successes with their undergraduate nursing studies and status given for…

  7. Social, Academic, and Behavioral Competence of Depressed Children: Relationship to Diagnostic Status and Family Interaction Style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Elizabeth Burney; And Others

    1997-01-01

    The social adjustment and academic performance of 15 children hospitalized for depression were compared to 14 children with schizophrenia and 20 normal children, ages 7 to 14. Analyses reveal an association between children's adaptive functioning and both diagnostic status and family transactional processes. (SLD)

  8. Competing Discourses of Academic Spanish in the Texas-Mexico Borderlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Michael D.; Guerrero, Maria Consuelo

    2017-01-01

    In this descriptive study the efforts of a faculty to prepare a cohort of pre-service bilingual education teachers to pass a newly adopted state certification test of academic Spanish are presented. The faculty's efforts were aimed at offsetting a low pass rate on this test, but unfortunately efforts fell short. To unpack this outcome, the authors…

  9. Competing Discourses of Academic Spanish in the Texas-Mexico Borderlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Michael D.; Guerrero, Maria Consuelo

    2017-01-01

    In this descriptive study the efforts of a faculty to prepare a cohort of pre-service bilingual education teachers to pass a newly adopted state certification test of academic Spanish are presented. The faculty's efforts were aimed at offsetting a low pass rate on this test, but unfortunately efforts fell short. To unpack this outcome, the authors…

  10. Academic Library as the Space for the Development of Future Specialists' Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardeliene, Laimute; Kardelis, Kestutis; Bakutyte, Rima

    2014-01-01

    The article discloses the value of academic library. This value is deriving from the university purpose to prepare students to be able to deal with the increasing the flow of information in the society (Owusu-Ansah, 2001). Research was carried out in Utena University of applied science. First-year students (n = 140) made 48,3% of the sample, and…

  11. Parental Beliefs and Values Related to Family Risk, Educational Intervention, and Child Academic Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Frances A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Studied the relation of child-rearing beliefs and values of parents of children entering kindergarten to children's academic achievements. Examined effects of a child-centered educational preschool program for socioeconomically disadvantaged children on parents' beliefs and values. Parents of children at risk differed from other parents in beliefs…

  12. The Development Of Career Competence Instrument Based On Computer Assisted Testing For Students Of Junior High Schools In Jakarta, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Gantina Komalasari, M.Psi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This research is motivated by results of theoretical studies and empirical facts about the importance of student’s career competence achievement, as well as the study of government policies on the mandate for the assessment in the specialization program/career counseling of Junior High School students. The research was aimed at developing student’s career competence standardized instrument based on Computer Assisted Testing (CAT which is effective as a support system of specialization program/career counseling in junior high schools. The study employed the standardized instrument development procedure (Anwar, 2010. The study population was all Grade IX students of Junior High School of Jakarta in the academic year of 2015/2016. The research sample was gained by using multistage cluster random sampling technique. Members of the research sample were 466 junior high school students representing the five regions of Jakarta. The data collection was performed by using Junior High School Student’s Career Competence Scale. The data were then analyzed by using validity and reliability tests. Operational data analysis was performed by using IBM SPSS version 20.0 for Windows. The results show that: first, all statements of Junior High School Student’s Career Competence Scale are valid because the Sig. (2-tailed < α (0.05; second, the reliability of Junior High School Student’s Career Competence Scale is in the high category because the reliability index reached r = 0.880. The final version of Junior High School Student’s Career Competence Scale consists of 43 items.

  13. High School Employment and Academic Achievement: A Note for Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keister, Mary; Hall, Joshua

    2010-01-01

    Educators are often in a position to affect student decisions to work during the school term. This study reviews and summarizes the literature on the effect that employment during high school has on academic achievement. The available evidence suggests that part-time jobs for high school students are beneficial as long as the number of hours…

  14. Integrating e-Learning and Classroom Learning; Four Years of Asynchronous Learning to Improve Academic Competences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart Rienties

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In an ever-changing world, competencies to process information efficiently are essential. However, several researchers indicate that graduates have limited abilities to solve complex problems in reality. In this paper, a possible solution to increase competences in effective searching, analysing and comparing information is provided. In a blended-learning environment, students had to share information before coming to class. The results of an analysis of four consecutive years of computersupported learning in a master-course indicate that students are willing to share information when conditions are favourable. In addition, a specific redesign of the task, control and social dimension let to increased knowledge sharing. Future research is necessary to assess whether this also has increased performance.

  15. Learning to talk the talk and walk the walk: Interactional competence in academic spoken English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard F. Young

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article I present the theory of interactional competence and contrast it with alternative ways of describing a learner’s knowledge of language. The focus of interactional competence is the structure of recurring episodes of face-to-face interaction, episodes that are of social and cultural significance to a community of speakers. Such episodes I call discursive practices, and I argue that participants co-construct a discursive practice through an architecture of interactional resources that is specific to the practice. The resources include rhetorical script, the register of the practice, the turn-taking system, management of topics, the participation framework, and means for signalling boundaries and transitions. I exemplify the theory of interactional competence and the architecture of discursive practice by examining two instances of the same practice: office hours between teaching assistants and undergraduate students at an American university, one in Mathematics, one in Italian as a foreign language. By a close comparison of the interactional resources that participants bring to the two instances, I argue that knowledge and interactional skill are local and practice-specific, and that the joint construction of discursive practice involves participants making use of the resources that they have acquired in previous instances of the same practice.

  16. 上海某三级医院学科带头人胜任力素质评价研究%Study on evaluation for characteristic items of the competency of academic leaders in a tertiary hospital in shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈玮; 费健; 杨伟国; 沈柏用; 李国红

    2015-01-01

    目的:了解上海某三级医院学科带头人的现状,为学科发展、人才梯队建设提供参考建议。方法:采用文献学习、专家访谈、行为事件访谈法、问卷调查等方式研究学科带头人胜任力的有关核心因素,形成学科带头人胜任力问卷,获得有关胜任力特征项数据。结果:学科带头人在不同胜任力特征项得分具有显著性差异(P<0.05)。与其他胜任力特征项相比,弹性与适应、培养他人、全局观念得分较高,而追求卓越、激励他人得分较低。上海某三级医院学科带头人胜任力处于中等水平,与绩优水平的学科带头人还有一定距离。结论:学科带头人往往不缺乏其专业素质,真正影响其学科发展程度、效率、效果的是处于冰山模型下深层次特质。学科带头人胜任力特征要素研究对提升学科带头人的科学性,改善其综合能力,为医院未来发展具有较强的指导意义。%Objectives: To investigate the current status of academic leaders in a tertiary hospital in shanghai area, and put forward some proposals about subject development, staff rundle construction for reference. Methods: Core elements of competency of the academic leaders were investigated by literature reviews, expert interviews, behavioral event interview, and questionnaires. The questionnaire of the competency of academic leaders was prepared and the data relevant to characteristic items of the competency were obtained. Results: The data relevant to characteristic items of the competency among the academic leaders have significant difference (P<0.05). Compared with the other items of competency, elasticity and adaptation, training others, concept of overall situation were higher, but pursue excellence, motivating others were significantly lower. Compared with the high achievement academic leaders, Academic leaders of a tertiary hospital in Shanghai area have some distance, and the

  17. Dispositional Hope as a Moderator of the Link between Social Comparison with Friends and Eighth-Grade Students' Perceptions of Academic Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissell-Havran, Joanna M.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the link between social comparison with friends and self-perceptions of academic competence during adolescence and how personality may play a role in this link. Participants were 193 eighth-grade students who attended a rural, mid-Atlantic middle school. We used difference scores to measure the extent to which students' nominated and…

  18. A Study to Determine the Academic Progression between Economically Disadvantaged Students and Their Economically Advantaged Peers on Georgia's Statewide Criteria Referenced Competency Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Tonya

    2009-01-01

    This quantitative study implemented a non-experimental design that was descriptive, ex-post facto, and longitudinal. This study is examining economically disadvantaged students (EDS) with comparison to non-economically disadvantaged students (non-EDS) and their academic performance on Georgia's Criterion-Referenced Competency Tests (CRCT).…

  19. Academic achievement of junior high school students with sleep disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fijri Auliyanti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Sleep disorders are prevalent in adolescents and may influence their academic achievement. To date, no study has been done in Indonesia on academic achievement in students with sleep disorders and its related factors. Objective To assess for relationships between academic achievement and related factors, including gender, motivation and learning strategies, IQ level, maternal educational level, socioeconomic status, family structure, after-hours education program, presence of TV/computer in the bedroom, sleep duration during school days, as well as bedtime and wakeup time difference in junior high school students with sleep disorders. Methods This cross-sectional study was performed from January to March 2013. Subjects were students from five junior high schools in Jakarta who fulfilled the criteria for sleep disorders based on the Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children questionnaire. Results There were 111 study subjects. The prevalence of sleep disorders was 39.7%, mostly in difficulties initiating and maintaining sleep (70.2%. Below-average academic achievement was seen in 47.6% of subjects. Factors significantly related to below-average academic achievement were after-hours education program (prevalence ratio 5.6; 95%CI 1.36 to 23.18; P = 0.017, average IQ level (prevalence ratio 3.26; 95%CI 1.38 to 7.71; P = 0.007, and male gender (prevalence ratio 2.68; 95%CI 1.06 to 6.78; P = 0.037. Conclusion Among junior high school students with sleep disorders, factors related to below-average academic achievement are after-hours education program (more than 2 types, the average IQ level, and male gender. [Paediatr Indones. 2015;55:50-8.].

  20. Academic achievement of junior high school students with sleep disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fijri Auliyanti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Sleep disorders are prevalent in adolescents and may influence their academic achievement. To date, no study has been done in Indonesia on academic achievement in students with sleep disorders and its related factors. Objective To assess for relationships between academic achievement and related factors, including gender, motivation and learning strategies, IQ level, maternal educational level, socioeconomic status, family structure, after-hours education program, presence of TV/computer in the bedroom, sleep duration during school days, as well as bedtime and wakeup time difference in junior high school students with sleep disorders. Methods This cross-sectional study was performed from January to March 2013. Subjects were students from five junior high schools in Jakarta who fulfilled the criteria for sleep disorders based on the Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children questionnaire. Results There were 111 study subjects. The prevalence of sleep disorders was 39.7%, mostly in difficulties initiating and maintaining sleep (70.2%. Below-average academic achievement was seen in 47.6% of subjects. Factors significantly related to below-average academic achievement were after-hours education program (prevalence ratio 5.6; 95%CI 1.36 to 23.18; P = 0.017, average IQ level (prevalence ratio 3.26; 95%CI 1.38 to 7.71; P = 0.007, and male gender (prevalence ratio 2.68; 95%CI 1.06 to 6.78; P = 0.037. Conclusion Among junior high school students with sleep disorders, factors related to below-average academic achievement are afterhours education program (more than 2 types, the average IQ level, and male gender.

  1. Financial Thought in Ukraine as an Academic Discipline and a Component of Formation of the Professional Competence of Future Financiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boiko Svitlana V.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses issues of the necessary improvement of quality of training students in the direction of greater attention to the evolution of the financial economy in Ukraine, the formation and development of financial thought in Ukraine. Importance of the academic discipline «Financial thought in Ukraine» for the formation of professional competence of future financiers has been displayed, objectives, tasks and content of the discipline have been substantiated. Objective of the academic discipline «Financial thought in Ukraine» contains studying and creative interpretation, which are directed at the basic stages of formation, development and features of current status of financial thought in Ukraine in the context of a critical analysis of the scientific heritage of Ukrainian scientists-financiers. The main tasks of the academic discipline «Financial thought in Ukraine» are as follows: exploration of the features of the both formation and development of financial thought in Ukraine; determination of the effect of the Western financial thought on its formation and development; determination of the specific features and characteristics of the Ukrainian scientific school of the State (public finance; exploration of the theoretical developments by Ukrainian scientists in the area of budget, taxation, public credit, corporate finance, insurance, etc.; substantiation of proposals on how to use the existing theoretical provisions with a view to enhancing the efficiency of the public finance as well as the further development of the domestic financial science. Studying views on financial economy of the State was an integral part of the papers on finance and teaching of the theory of finance in the pre-revolutionary period. With the 1990's begins the period of an active revival of research in the financial thought of Ukraine, which continues today.

  2. The Academic Experience of Male High School Students with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Kristine M.; Pelham, William E.; Molina, Brooke S. G.; Sibley, Margaret H.; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Yu, Jihnhee; Gnagy, Elizabeth M.; Biswas, Aparajita; Babinski, Dara E.; Karch, Kathryn M.

    2011-01-01

    This study compared the high school academic experience of adolescents with and without childhood ADHD using data from the Pittsburgh ADHD Longitudinal Study (PALS). Participants were 326 males with childhood ADHD and 213 demographically similar males without ADHD who were recruited at the start of the follow-up study. Data were collected yearly…

  3. Self-Esteem and Academic Achievement of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi Sheykhjan, Tohid; Jabari, Kamran; Rajeswari, K.

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine the influence of self-esteem on academic achievement among high school students in Miandoab City of Iran. The methodology of the research is descriptive and correlation that descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data. Statistical Society includes male and female high…

  4. The race for a new internet rival academics are competing to create a new, faster internet.

    CERN Document Server

    Dodson, S

    2001-01-01

    From Dec 1, Europe's research communities will be able to hook up to the fastest network in the world, serving more than 3000 academic and research institutions and operating in 32 countries. When the LHC becomes operational in 2005, terabytes of data will be generated. The idea is that computers held on the networks could be connected to share processing power and hard disc space. They will be locked in to a grid to imitate one super computer. Apart from the computing advantages, this new network will actively promote collaboration between institutions enabling them to work on projects on scales too large for individual groups to manage alone.

  5. Are We in Sync? How Industry Practitioners and Academics Profile Managerial Competencies: A Study of an Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business-Accredited Business School in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Stephen; Chan, Simon C. H.

    2017-01-01

    The authors draw on the taxonomy of managerial competencies to assess the alignment of perceptions between industry practitioners and business academics when profiling managerial competencies required for effective performance in workplaces. Findings show that the set of managerial competency profiles, as viewed by practitioners, generally fit…

  6. Corpus of High School Academic Texts (COHAT): Data-Driven, Computer Assisted Discovery in Learning Academic English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohát, Róbert; Rödlingová, Beata; Horáková, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Corpus of High School Academic Texts (COHAT), currently of 150,000+ words, aims to make academic language instruction a more data-driven and student-centered discovery learning as a special type of Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL), emphasizing students' critical thinking and metacognition. Since 2013, high school English as an additional…

  7. Cognitive Determinants of Academic Performance in Nigerian Pharmacy Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubaka, Chukwuemeka M; Sansgiry, Sujit S; Ukwe, Chinwe V

    2015-09-25

    Objective. To evaluate cognitive factors that might influence academic performance of students in Nigerian pharmacy schools. Methods. A cross-sectional, multi-center survey of Nigerian pharmacy students from 7 schools of pharmacy was conducted using 2 validated questionnaires measuring cognitive constructs such as test anxiety, academic competence, test competence, time management, and strategic study habits. Results. Female students and older students scored significantly better on time management skills and study habits, respectively. Test anxiety was negatively associated with academic performance while test competence, academic competence, and time management were positively associated with academic performance. These 4 constructs significantly discriminated between the lower and higher performing students, with the first 2 contributing to the most differences. Conclusion. Test and academic competence, test anxiety, and time management were significant factors associated with low and high academic performance among Nigerian pharmacy students. The study also demonstrated the significant effects of age, gender, and marital status on these constructs.

  8. Fostering academic competence or putting students under general suspicion? Voluntary plagiarism check of academic papers by means of a web-based plagiarism detection system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Eleonora Kohl

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In view of the increasing number of cases of plagiarism and the ease of use of online published texts, universities are faced with a considerable challenge to prevent and take action against plagiarism in academic student papers. In reaction to plagiarism, web-based plagiarism detection systems (PDSs are increasingly used to check submitted papers - this checking entails various problems, for example the percentage of plagiarism found is only an indication of the actual extent of plagiarism and not all types of plagiarism can be identified. To cope with this problematic situation the voluntary plagiarism check (VPC, an alternative preventive university didactic concept, was developed at the University of Education, Freiburg (Germany. It focused on the development of individual skills. Students were able to submit their academic papers (e.g. an undergraduate paper, final thesis anonymously. These were then tested with the PDS Ephorus. Following interpretation and summary of the findings by the project team - plagiarism as well as referencing mistakes - we advised the students on a suitable approach to academic writing based on their own typical mistakes. The VPC was conducted as a three-semester research project and was later evaluated. About 500 academic papers were tested. In 90% of the undergraduates' work incorrect and/or missing citations were found. This high percentage decreased among students in later semesters. Instances of plagiarism were detected in about 40% of the papers when the texts of advanced students (≥6th semester were tested. At the same time the length of the plagiarised texts decreased. Around half of the students stated that it was acceptable to copy single sentences or short passages from other sources without citation; they did not consider plagiarising on a limited scale as cheating. A similar number of students admitted to having doubts about whether they could write a good paper without plagiarising. Almost all

  9. Investigating Social Competence in Students with High Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirvar, Wendi Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Social competence is vital for healthy development (Canto-Sperber & Dupuy, 2001; Spence, Barrett & Tuner, 2003). Beginning in childhood and heavily influenced by culture, social competence develops as we combine personal and environmental resources for positive social outcomes and includes the absence of negative behaviors alongside the…

  10. Physical fitness and health indices in children, adolescents and adults with high or low motor competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantell, Marja; Crawford, Susan G; Tish Doyle-Baker, P K

    2008-04-01

    The overall purpose of the study was to examine if individuals with low motor competence achieve age-adequate fitness and health. A group of 149 children, adolescents, and adults with low or high motor competence participated in motor, fitness, and health assessments. Individuals with low motor competence did not differ on their basic physiological health parameters, but they had less optimal levels of overall health and fitness indices than those with high motor competence. As a function of age, musculoskeletal fitness was significantly compromised for the low motor competence group. The metabolic indices suggested that the low motor competence group had significantly higher BMI's compared to the high motor competence group. Motor skills and static balance were significant predictors of the BMI. Exercise intensity differed between children in the low and high motor competence group. The findings suggest that individuals with low motor competence have compromised health-related fitness. In order to discriminate between individuals with high and low motor competence, fitness assessment should include at least back extension, curl ups, and sit and reach. In addition, health-related fitness measurements such as BMI, waist circumference, blood lipid profile and bone mineral density are also recommended.

  11. Prosocial behavior and academic motivation in Spanish High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cándido J. Inglés

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the relationship between prosocial behaviour and academic goals in a sample of 2,022 Spanish compulsory secondary education students. The prosocial behaviour was measured with the Prosocial Behaviour scale of the Teenage Inventory of Social Skills (TISS and academic goals were measured with the Achievement Goal Tendencies Questionnaire (AGTQ. The results revealed that students with high prosocial behaviour presented higher significantly scores in learning and performance goals. The prosocial behaviour was a positive and statistically significant predictor of learning and performance goals. Furthermore, learning and performance goals were positive and statistically significant predictors of the prosocial behaviour, whereas social reinforcement goals were a negative and statisticallysignificant predictor of prosocial behaviour.

  12. Academic Expectations of a High School and the Frequency of AcademicDishonesty as Reported by High School Principals in Virginia

    OpenAIRE

    Nichols, Richard Duane

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A review of research indicates that academic dishonesty is a common occurrence at all levels of education with high school being a significant determinant in whether one will engage in cheating at the college level. Current research is heavily concentrated on cheating at the college level. This study investigated the academic expectations of a high school and the frequency of academic dishonesty as reported by high school principals. Specifically, four research questions were add...

  13. Academic Expectations of a High School and the Frequency of AcademicDishonesty as Reported by High School Principals in Virginia

    OpenAIRE

    Nichols, Richard Duane

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A review of research indicates that academic dishonesty is a common occurrence at all levels of education with high school being a significant determinant in whether one will engage in cheating at the college level. Current research is heavily concentrated on cheating at the college level. This study investigated the academic expectations of a high school and the frequency of academic dishonesty as reported by high school principals. Specifically, four research questions were add...

  14. Motivation and Academic Help-Seeking in High School Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Yuk Fai; Pajares, Frank; Oberman, Paul S.

    2004-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the degree to which academic motivation predicted the executive help-seeking, instrumental help-seeking, perceived benefits of help-seeking, and avoidance of help-seeking of high school students enrolled in computer science ( n = 314). Task goals were positively associated with instrumental help-seeking and perceiving the benefits of help-seeking and negatively associated with executive help-seeking; performance-avoid goals were negatively associated with instrumental help-seeking and positively associated with avoiding help-seeking. Controlling for motivation and computer science competence, girls were more likely to seek instrumental help and to perceive the benefits of help-seeking, and African American students were more likely to seek help than were White students or Asian American students. Despite possessing equal computer science skills, girls reported lower self-efficacy, self-concept, self-efficacy for self-regulation, and value than did boys.

  15. The relation of dialogic, control, and racial socialization practices to early academic and social competence: effects of gender, ethnicity, and family socioeconomic status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarin, Oscar; Jean-Baptiste, Esther

    2013-01-01

    This research tests the relations of parental practices to child competence and assertions that practices differ by gender of the child. Home-based interviews and structured observations of parent-child interactions were conducted with an ethnically and socioeconomically diverse sample of families (N = 501) whose 4-year-old children were served in public prekindergarten. Study data confirmed the importance of parental practices for children's academic and social competence but did not support claims that use of any of the practices was related to the child's gender. Significant differences were found for economic status on dialogic practices and for ethnicity on control and ethnic socialization. Poor parents employed dialogic practices less than nonpoor parents' and African American parents employed dialogic practices less often and control and ethnic socialization more often than European Americans. Dialogic practices were related to competence, but parental control and ethnic socialization were not.

  16. International note: between-domain relations of Chinese high school students' academic achievements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yangyang, Liu

    2012-08-01

    The present study examined the between-domain relations of Chinese high school students' academic achievements. In a sample of 1870 Chinese 10th grade students, the results indicated that Chinese high school students' academic achievements were correlated across nine subjects. In line with the previous Western findings, the findings suggested that academic achievement was largely domain-general in nature.

  17. Using Competencies to Assess Entry-Level Knowledge of Students Graduating from Parks and Recreation Academic Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, Amy R.; Elkins, Daniel J.; Beggs, Brent A.

    2014-01-01

    To address the Council on Accreditation of Parks, Recreation, Tourism, and Related Professions accreditation standard 7.01.01, the Entry Level Competency Assessment was developed to measure 46 competencies in four categories needed by entry level professionals. Students rated their competence prior to beginning their senior internship. The results…

  18. The Development of Perceived Scholastic Competence and Global Self-Worth in African American Adolescents from Low-Income Families: The Roles of Family Factors, Early Educational Intervention, and Academic Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Frances A.; Pungello, Elizabeth P.; Miller-Johnson, Shari

    2002-01-01

    Examined early childhood and concurrent factors associated with adolescents' self-perceptions of scholastic competence and global self-worth. Found that family conflict in adolescence, early childhood educational intervention (Abecedarian Project), and academic achievement predicted perceived scholastic competence. Perceptions of scholastic,…

  19. The Influence of Competence, Motivation, and Organisational Culture to High School Teacher Job Satisfaction and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifin, H. Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to find out and analyze the influence of competence, motivation, and organizational competence to high school teacher job satisfaction and performance in Jayapura City, Papua, Indonesia. The study was conducted on 117 respondents of 346 teachers by means of questionnaire. Data is analyzed by SEM analysis method in AMOS program.…

  20. The Influence of Online Catalogs on Academic Library Use by College-Bound High School Seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craver, Kathleen W.

    1988-01-01

    This study examined the effect of the availability of an academic online catalog on the use of academic libraries by college-bound high school seniors to determine: (1) degree of academic library use in connection with research projects; (2) use of the catalog to search for library materials; and (3) the nature of library materials used. (12…

  1. Associations of Future Expectations, Negative Friends, and Academic Achievement in High-Achieving African American Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Michael; Corprew, Charles S., III; Becker, Jonathan E.

    2009-01-01

    The relations of future expectations (general and academic) to academic outcomes were examined in a sample of 129 African American high-achieving adolescents (majority female participants, n = 92). This study was interested in the multidimensional nature of future expectations. Results from the study confirm the hypothesis that academic future…

  2. Academically Buoyant Students Are Less Anxious about and Perform Better in High-Stakes Examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putwain, David W.; Daly, Anthony L.; Chamberlain, Suzanne; Sadreddini, Shireen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prior research has shown that test anxiety is negatively related to academic buoyancy, but it is not known whether test anxiety is an antecedent or outcome of academic buoyancy. Furthermore, it is not known whether academic buoyancy is related to performance on high-stakes examinations. Aims: To test a model specifying reciprocal…

  3. Effects of public health nursing participation in selected academic courses on self-reported functions and competencies: a collaborative pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundy, K S; Bender, K W; Powell, C

    1993-03-01

    A profile of the education levels of practicing public health nurses (PHNs) in Mississippi in 1988 indicated that 71% of those nurses were prepared in associate degree or diploma programs. Since these programs typically do not provide formal academic courses in community health nursing, nurses currently enter the workplace with insufficient preparation for this increasingly complex role. A collaborative pilot study between the agency and a state-supported school of nursing evaluated the impact of participating in selected components of an academic community health nursing program on the self-reported competencies and functions of beginning PHNs. Twelve PHNs who were employed during six months in the geographic area contiguous to the school were selected to attend 10 classroom sessions on basic topics applicable to the generic PHN role in a southern state. A control group of 12 PHNs hired during the same period of time was also selected. Both groups completed an instrument on functions and competencies before and after the course. A significant difference was seen in certain functions and competencies between attenders and nonattenders.

  4. A Qualitative Exploration of the DIGCOMP Digital Competence Framework: Attitudes of students, academics and administrative staff in the health faculty of a UK HEI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Evangelinos

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports upon findings of a series of semi-structured interviews with students, academics and administrative staff from a health care faculty in a UK Higher Education Institution (HEI. Exploring their experiences of mapping to the EU DIGCOMP Digital Competence Framework, a hermeneutic lens enables a more nuanced approach to attitudes towards Digital Competence (DC. One of the eight lifelong learning key-competences required for managers, doctors, nurses and other health-related professionals, DC is crucial to professional development. Defined by 14 themes, the findings express the participants’ experiences, knowledge and level of comprehension of the subject. Our findings indicate students are conflating digital social media skills with their skills for the workplace, resulting in over-confidence; academics raising concerns about work/private life balance offered by the affordances of handheld devices; administrative staff that are far more confident and managing a range of technology’s effectively. The research further reveals that the DIGICOMP framework is applicable as a generic framework for professional practice.

  5. From High School Users College Students Grow: Providing Academic Library Research Opportunities to High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Debra; McNeil, Beth

    2002-01-01

    Describes the University of Nebraska-Lincoln University Libraries' high school users program, which has grown from a small operation into a well-developed program. The resources of a large academic research library are made available to students so they may complete their high school coursework with a wider range of resources, and possibly, gain…

  6. Oral Language Competence and the Transition to School: Socio-Economic and Behavioural Factors That Influence Academic and Social Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Oral language competence (skill in everyday talking and listening) is critical in the early years of school in two key respects: it underpins the transition to literacy in the early years, and is the means by which children form and maintain interpersonal relationships in the school setting. In this paper, the role of oral language competence with…

  7. Beyond Linguistic Proficiency: Early Language Learning as a Lever for Building Students' Global Competence, Self-Esteem, and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livaccari, Chris

    2013-01-01

    It is no exaggeration to say that language learning is the very foundation of global competence and the most deeply effective way for students to be able to "investigate the world, recognize perspectives, communicate ideas, and take action," which is the definition of global competence developed by Asia Society Vice President for…

  8. Evaluation of social competencies in chemical engineering: Application and results of the pilot test (academic year 2012-2013

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    Francisco José Suñé Grande

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Escola Tècnica Superior d’Enginyeria Química has a long tradition in the deployment of social competencies in engineering curricula through Integrated Projects (IP carried out in structured teams. Social competencies are taught and practiced during the development of the IPs. We conceptually introduce a methodology for a 360o assessment of the students’ social competencies, as a tool to foster the improvement of their competency levels. In this article we analyze the results of the pilot test where the aforementioned methodology has been implemented in the Bachelor studies of Chemical Engineering. The results indicate that it is possible to objectively obtain the student’s competency level discriminating among different social competencies, as well as among different students in the same team. The application of this tool fosters the development of specific educative actions to help the students with low competency profile, to reach acceptable levels for a successful insertion in the labor market.

  9. Implementation of the interdisciplinary curriculum Teaching and Assessing Communicative Competence in the fourth academic year of medical studies (CoMeD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortsiefer, Achim; Rotthoff, Thomas; Schmelzer, Regine; Immecke, J.; Ortmanns, B.; in der Schmitten, J.; Altiner, A.; Karger, André

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Implementation of a longitudinal curriculum for training in advanced communications skills represents an unmet need in most German medical faculties, especially in the 4rth and 5th years of medical studies. The CoMeD project (communication in medical education Düsseldorf) attempted to establish an interdisciplinary program to teach and to assess communicative competence in the 4th academic year. In this paper, we describe the development of the project and report results of its evaluation by medical students. Methods: Teaching objectives and lesson formats were developed in a multistage process. A teaching program for simulated patients (SP) was built up and continuous lecturer trainings were estabilshed. Several clinical disciplines co-operated for the purpose of integrating the communication training into the pre-existing clinical teaching curriculum. The CoMeD project was evaluated using feedback-forms after each course. Results: Until now, six training units for especially challenging communication tasks like “dealing with aggression” or “breaking bad news” were implemented, each unit connected with a preliminary tutorial or e-learning course. An OSCE (objective structured clinical examination) with 4 stations was introduced. The students’ evaluation of the six CoMeD training units showed the top or second-best rating in more than 80% of the answers. Discussion: Introducing an interdisciplinary communication training and a corresponding OSCE into the 4th year medical curriculum is feasible. Embedding communication teaching in a clinical context and involvement of clinicians as lecturers seem to be important factors for ensuring practical relevance and achieving high acceptance by medical students. PMID:22403591

  10. Implementation of the interdisciplinary curriculum Teaching and Assessing Communicative Competence in the fourth academic year of medical studies (CoMeD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortsiefer, Achim; Rotthoff, Thomas; Schmelzer, Regine; Immecke, J; Ortmanns, B; in der Schmitten, J; Altiner, A; Karger, André

    2012-01-01

    Implementation of a longitudinal curriculum for training in advanced communications skills represents an unmet need in most German medical faculties, especially in the 4rth and 5th years of medical studies. The CoMeD project (communication in medical education Düsseldorf) attempted to establish an interdisciplinary program to teach and to assess communicative competence in the 4th academic year. In this paper, we describe the development of the project and report results of its evaluation by medical students. Teaching objectives and lesson formats were developed in a multistage process. A teaching program for simulated patients (SP) was built up and continuous lecturer trainings were estabilshed. Several clinical disciplines co-operated for the purpose of integrating the communication training into the pre-existing clinical teaching curriculum. The CoMeD project was evaluated using feedback-forms after each course. Until now, six training units for especially challenging communication tasks like "dealing with aggression" or "breaking bad news" were implemented, each unit connected with a preliminary tutorial or e-learning course. An OSCE (objective structured clinical examination) with 4 stations was introduced. The students' evaluation of the six CoMeD training units showed the top or second-best rating in more than 80% of the answers. Introducing an interdisciplinary communication training and a corresponding OSCE into the 4th year medical curriculum is feasible. Embedding communication teaching in a clinical context and involvement of clinicians as lecturers seem to be important factors for ensuring practical relevance and achieving high acceptance by medical students.

  11. High School Concussions in the 2008–2009 Academic Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, William P.; d’Hemecourt, Pierre; Comstock, R. Dawn

    2011-01-01

    Background An estimated 136 000 concussions occur per academic year in high schools alone. The effects of repetitive concussions and the potential for catastrophic injury have made concussion an injury of significant concern for young athletes. Purpose The objective of this study was to describe the mechanism of injury, symptoms, and management of sport-related concussions using the High School Reporting Information Online (HS RIO) surveillance system. Study Design Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods All concussions recorded by HS RIO during the 2008–2009 academic year were included. Analyses were performed using SPSS software. Chi-square analysis was performed for all categorical variables. Statistical significance was considered for P concussions were recorded. The most common mechanism (76.2%) was contact with another player, usually a head-to-head collision (52.7%). Headache was experienced in 93.4%; 4.6% lost consciousness. Most (83.4%) had resolution of their symptoms within 1 week. Symptoms lasted longer than 1 month in 1.5%. Computerized neuropsychological testing was used in 25.7% of concussions. When neuropsychological testing was used, athletes were less likely to return to play within 1 week than those for whom it was not used (13.6% vs 32.9%; P < .01). Athletes who had neuropsychological testing appeared less likely to return to play on the same day (0.8% vs 4.2%; P = .056). A greater proportion of injured, nonfootball athletes had computerized neuropsychological testing than injured football players (23% vs 32%; P = .02) Conclusion When computerized neuropsychological testing is used, high school athletes are less likely to be returned to play within 1 week of their injury. Concussed football players are less likely to have computerized neuropsychological testing than those participating in other sports. Loss of consciousness is relatively uncommon among high school athletes who sustain a sport-related concussion. The most common mechanism is

  12. Parental support, self-concept, motivational orientaions and teacher-student relationship, and academic competnece: an exploratory analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Tariq Bhatti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the relationship among academic competence, Grade Point Averages (GPAs and factors responsible for students’ academic competence. A four factored questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of 100 graduate and post-graduate students to find out the factors responsible for academic competence. In addition, The Academic Competence Evaluation Scale (ACES-College applied for calculating the academic competence. Significant and positive correlations are found between factors affecting academic competence, GPAs and academic competence. Students’ scores on the ACES and their GPAs provided significant evidence to support the idea that the factors such as parental support, clearer self-concept, positive teacher-student relationship and strong motivational orientations are correlated with their GPAs at low magnitude and; academic competence with high ratings. It is concluded that students with stronger presence of these factors have better academic competence than their peers at graduate and post-graduate level. An integrated framework that is related to students’ academic competence and that promotes other related factors is suggested.

  13. Chinese high school students' academic stress and depressive symptoms: gender and school climate as moderators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangyang; Lu, Zuhong

    2012-10-01

    In a sample of 368 Chinese high school students, the present study examined the different effects of Chinese high school students' academic stress on their depressive symptoms and the moderating effects of gender and students' perceptions of school climate on the relationships between their academic stress and depressive symptoms. Regression mixture model identified two different kinds of subgroups in the effects of students' academic stress on their depressive symptoms. One subgroup contained 90% of the students. In this subgroup, the students' perceptions of academic stress from lack of achievement positively predicted their depressive symptoms. For the other 10% of the students, academic stress did not significantly predict their depressive symptoms. Next, multinomial regression analysis revealed that girls or students who had high levels of achievement orientation were more likely to be in the first subgroup. The findings suggested that gender and students' perceptions of school climate could moderate the relationships between Chinese high school students' academic stress and their depressive symptoms.

  14. The Chinese High School Student's Stress in the School and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangyang; Lu, Zuhong

    2011-01-01

    In a sample of 466 Chinese high school students, we examined the relationships between Chinese high school students' stress in the school and their academic achievements. Regression mixture modelling identified two different classes of the effects of Chinese high school students' stress on their academic achievements. One class contained 87% of…

  15. College and Academic Self-Efficacy as Antecedents for High School Dual-Credit Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmun, Cliff D.

    2013-01-01

    Do high school students who are predisposed to enroll in dual-credit courses already possess high levels of motivation or college and academic self-efficacy? Students in this study reported being academically motivated, but they did not report high levels of confidence in their ability to perform certain college-associated tasks. Of 52 items…

  16. The Chinese High School Student's Stress in the School and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangyang; Lu, Zuhong

    2011-01-01

    In a sample of 466 Chinese high school students, we examined the relationships between Chinese high school students' stress in the school and their academic achievements. Regression mixture modelling identified two different classes of the effects of Chinese high school students' stress on their academic achievements. One class contained 87% of…

  17. Academic self-concept in high school: predictors and effects on adjustment in higher education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, Sofie; Germeijs, Veerle; Colpin, Hilde; Verschueren, Karine

    2011-12-01

    Academic self-concept is considered a relevant psychological construct influencing many educational outcomes directly or indirectly. Therefore, the major focus of the current study is on the predictors and effects of academic self-concept in late adolescence. First, we studied the simultaneous effects of individual, class-average and school-average achievement (i.e., assessed by school grades) on academic self-concept in the final year of high school, thereby replicating and extending previous research on the big-fish-little-pond effect model. Second, the predictive value of high school academic self-concept for academic adjustment and success in the first year of higher education was examined. The sample comprised 536 twelfth grade students (44% boys) recruited from 24 schools (67 classes) that were representative with regard to geographical region and educational network in Flanders. Structural equation modeling showed that, when examining the joint contribution of school- and class-average achievement, only class-average achievement was significantly and negatively associated with academic self-concept. Furthermore, a significant effect of academic self-concept in high school on academic adjustment and success in higher education (in addition to any effects of high school academic achievement) was found. These results highlight the importance of considering academic self-concept in educational research and policy.

  18. COACHES' PERCEPTIONS OF COMPETENCE AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF TRAINING NEEDS RELATED TO PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCES

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    Sofia Santos

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to examine coaches' perceptions of competence and acknowledgement of training needs related to professional competences according to the professional experience and academic education. The participants were 343 coaches from several sports, who answered to a questionnaire that includes a scale focused on perceptions of competence and another scale on acknowledgment of training needs. An exploratory factor analysis with Maximum Likelihood Factoring was used with Oblimin rotation for the identification of emergent factors. Comparison on coaches' perceptions in function of coaching experience and coaches' academic background were made applying One-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc multiple comparisons. Factor analysis on coaches' perceptions of competence and acknowledgement of training needs made apparent three main areas of competences, i.e. competences related to annual and multi-annual planning; competences related to orientation towards practice and competition; and personal and coaching education competences. Coaches' perceptions were influenced by their experience, as low experienced coaches rated themselves at lower levels of competence and with more training needs; also coaches with high education, in Physical Education or others, perceived themselves as more competent than coaches with no higher education. Finally, the majority of the coaches perceived themselves to be competent but, nevertheless, they indicated to have training needs, which brings an important feedback to coach education. This suggests that coaches are interested in increasing their knowledge and competence in a broad range of areas which should be considered in future coach education programs

  19. High School 21+: A Competency-Based Diploma for Adults. Washington's Community and Technical Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Adults who lack a high school diploma now have a new way to get a second chance. It's called "High School 21+," a competency-based high school diploma offered at Washington's community and technical colleges. Adults 21 years old and older can go to participating colleges to earn a high school diploma. An advisor will look at transcripts…

  20. The role of information literacy competence and higher order thinking skills to develop academic writing in science and engineering students

    OpenAIRE

    Kranthi Kumari, B.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses a study organized to develop academic writing skills in undergraduate students pursuing engineering courses. The target group consisted of 30 students pursuing a Bachelor of Technology in their third year. The classroom observations regarding teaching writing revealed that writing proficiency for most of the students was at a very low level. Followed by this, an intervention program was organized in one college, where the researcher taught academic writing to the studen...

  1. Evaluating Community Health Advisor (CHA) Core Competencies: The CHA Core Competency Retrospective Pretest/Posttest (CCCRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, Lachel; To, Yen M

    2016-05-01

    Health care and academic systems are increasingly collaborating with community health advisors (CHAs) to provide culturally relevant health interventions that promote sustained community transformation. Little attention has been placed on CHA training evaluation, including core competency attainment. This study identified common CHA core competencies, generated a theoretically based measure of those competencies, and explored psychometric properties of that measure. A concept synthesis revealed five CHA core competencies (leadership, translation, guidance, advocacy, and caring). The CHA Core Competency Retrospective Pretest/Posttest (CCCRP) resulted from that synthesis, which was administered using multiple approaches to individuals who previously received CHA training (N= 142). Exploratory factor analyses revealed a two-factor structure underlying the posttraining data, and Cronbach's alpha indicated high internal consistency. This study suggested some CHA core competencies might be more interrelated than previously thought, and two major competencies exist rather than five and supported the CCCRP's use to evaluate core competency attainment resulting from training.

  2. Study-Orientation of High and Low Academic Achievers at Secondary Level in Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwar, Muhammad; Bashir, Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad Naemullah; Khan, Muhammad Saeed

    2009-01-01

    The study orientation of low and high academic achievers was compared, measured through a self-developed study orientation scale (SOS) primarily based on 47 items comparing study habits and attitude. Students' marks obtained in the 10th grade Examination determined the measure of academic performance. The analysis revealed that the high achievers…

  3. The Experience of Transitioning Two Adolescents with Asperger Syndrome in Academically Focused High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Roselyn M.; Tanner, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Adolescents with Asperger syndrome (AS) are increasingly being placed in academically focused high schools. These students, although academically able, may not be coping with the wider classroom and social demands of transition to, and within, the high school environment. Schools are keen to enroll these students. However, there appears to be a…

  4. Correlation among High School Senior Students' Test Anxiety, Academic Performance and Points of University Entrance Exam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatas, Hakan; Alci, Bulent; Aydin, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Test anxiety seems like a benign problem to some people, but it can be potentially serious when it leads to high levels of distress and academic failure. The aim of this study is to define the correlation among high school senior students' test anxiety, academic performance (GPA) and points of university entrance exam (UEE). The study group of…

  5. Correlation among High School Senior Students' Test Anxiety, Academic Performance and Points of University Entrance Exam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatas, Hakan; Alci, Bulent; Aydin, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Test anxiety seems like a benign problem to some people, but it can be potentially serious when it leads to high levels of distress and academic failure. The aim of this study is to define the correlation among high school senior students' test anxiety, academic performance (GPA) and points of university entrance exam (UEE). The study group of…

  6. Investigating the Link between Home-School Dissonance and Academic Cheating among High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Wright, Lynda; Tyler, Kenneth M.; Stevens-Watkins, Danelle; Thomas, Deneia; Mulder, Shambra; Hughes, Travonia; Stevens-Morgan, Ruby; Roan-Belle, Clarissa; Gadson, Nadia; Smith, La Toya

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined the association between home-school dissonance and academic cheating among 344 high school juniors and seniors at two urban high schools. Students completed two subscales of the Patterns of Adaptive Learning Scale (PALS) and one subscale of the Academic Motivation Scale (AMS). Analyses revealed that home-school…

  7. Peer relationships and academic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krnjajić Stevan B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available After their childhood, when children begin to establish more intensive social contacts outside family, first of all, in school setting, their behavior i.e. their social, intellectual, moral and emotional development is more strongly affected by their peers. Consequently, the quality of peer relationships considerably affects the process of adaptation and academic achievement and their motivational and emotional attitude towards school respectively. Empirical findings showed that there is bi-directional influence between peer relationships and academic achievement. In other words, the quality of peer relationships affects academic achievement, and conversely, academic achievement affects the quality of peer relationships. For example, socially accepted children exhibiting prosocial, cooperative and responsible forms of behavior in school most frequently have high academic achievement. On the other hand, children rejected by their peers often have lower academic achievement and are a risk group tending to delinquency, absenteeism and drop out of school. Those behavioral and interpersonal forms of competence are frequently more reliable predictors of academic achievement than intellectual abilities are. Considering the fact that various patterns of peer interaction differently exert influence on students' academic behavior, the paper analyzed effects of (a social competence, (b social acceptance/rejection, (c child's friendships and (d prosocial behavior on academic achievement.

  8. ASYNCHRONICAL MEANS OF FORMING CROSS CULTURAL COMPETENCE OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS (IN THE CASE OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING

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    Valeriy G. Apalkov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article covers the key problems of forming cross cultural competence by means of asynchronic Internet-communication techniques. A concise overview of main studies in using e-mail group in forming cross cultural competence. An algorithm of forming cross cultural competence of high school students is described. 

  9. Academic attainment and the high school science experiences among high-achieving African American males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trice, Rodney Nathaniel

    This study examines the educational experiences of high achieving African American males. More specifically, it analyzes the influences on their successful navigation through high school science. Through a series of interviews, observations, questionnaires, science portfolios, and review of existing data the researcher attempted to obtain a deeper understanding of high achieving African American males and their limitations to academic attainment and high school science experiences. The investigation is limited to ten high achieving African American male science students at Woodcrest High School. Woodcrest is situated at the cross section of a suburban and rural community located in the southeastern section of the United States. Although this investigation involves African American males, all of whom are successful in school, its findings should not be generalized to this nor any other group of students. The research question that guided this study is: What are the limitations to academic attainment and the high school science experiences of high achieving African American males? The student participants expose how suspension and expulsion, special education placement, academic tracking, science instruction, and teacher expectation influence academic achievement. The role parents play, student self-concept, peer relationships, and student learning styles are also analyzed. The anthology of data rendered three overarching themes: (1) unequal access to education, (2) maintenance of unfair educational structures, and (3) authentic characterizations of African American males. Often the policies and practices set in place by school officials aid in creating hurdles to academic achievement. These policies and practices are often formed without meaningful consideration of the unintended consequences that may affect different student populations, particularly the most vulnerable. The findings from this study expose that high achieving African American males face major

  10. Air Conditioning, Refrigeration and Heating. COM-LINK. Competency Based Vocational Curricula with Basic Skills and Academic Linkages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, Thomas

    This competency-based module uses the Ocean County (New Jersey) Vocational-Technical Schools curriculum-infused model for infusing basic skills instruction into vocational education. The model demonstrates the relationship of vocational skills to communication, mathematics, and science. The document begins with a philosophy statement; preface; a…

  11. Competency to Study and Learn in Stressful Contests: Fundamentals of the "e-Coping with Academic Stress"™ Utility

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, Jesús; López, Mireia; Zapata, Lucía; Martínez-Vicente, Jose Manuel; Vera, Manuel Mariano; Solinas, Giulliana; Fadda, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    There has been growing research interest in achievement emotions in university teaching-learning processes in recent years. While their importance has been firmly established, there continues to be a need for assessment and intervention models. The objective of this report is to present the "Competency Model for Studying, Learning and…

  12. Interaction with a high-versus low-competence influence source in inductive reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butera, Fabrizio; Caverni, Jean-Paul; Rossi, Sandrine

    2005-04-01

    Literature on inductive reasoning shows that when testing hypotheses, people are biased toward the use of confirmatory strategies (P. C. Wason, 1960). In the present article, the authors presented 2 studies showing how people use confirmation and disconfirmation strategies during actual interaction in problem solving. Study 1 showed that participants were able to learn to use disconfirmation when confronted with a low-competence, nonthreatening partner. When the partner was high in competence (thereby threatening the participant's competence), participants used confirmation, even when the partner used disconfirmation. In Study 2, the authors aimed at generalizing the aforementioned results by exploring the hypothesis that disconfirmation stems from the possibility of diverging from norms. Participants who were confronted with the violation of a conversational norm used a high proportion of disconfirmation, whatever the source of influence. When there was no violation but there was a low-competence partner, the proportion of disconfirmation was high; when there was no violation but there was a high-competence partner, the proportion of disconfirmation was low. The authors discussed the interpersonal functions of confirmation and disconfirmation.

  13. THE ACADEMIC PERSONNEL MOTIVATION - A FACTOR FOR HIGH QUALITY EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viara Slavianska

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper consecutively puts an accent on 1 the quality of higher education as a national priority, 2 the qualification and motivation of the academic staff as factors for offering an educational product of high quality, 3 the strategies, policies and practices for motivating the academic personnel. The necessity of education improvement is adduced, the strategies and politics in the field of academic personnel training are presented, and the possible effects from a wrong approach to employees’ motivation in academic environment are commented.

  14. THE FORMATION OF IT COMPETENCE OF THE ACADEMIC STAFF IN A THREE LEVEL SYSTEM OF HIGHER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Boronenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to discuss organizational and methodical bases of formation of ICT competence graduate in the third stage of higher education.Methods. Theoretical methods involve analysis and synthesis, induction and deduction, comparison and classification methods, and empirical method of observation.Results. Trends in the selection of the content of the educational program of graduate students at the third level of higher education in the formation of IT competence are presented: education of the valuable relation to the use of IT in professional activities; the formation of readiness to use IT in education and scientific research; the development of IT skills for processing and visualization of experimental data; modeling of processes and phenomena of professional activities; preparation of the teaching staff to the creation of a new information and educational environment among educational organizations; the development of new social and educational role, forming a system of knowledge and skills of students in the field of information; the development of ready-to-use information technology in the management of education. The discipline content «Information and communication technologies in education and research activities» is selected in accordance with a preferred direction of formation of IT competence. Target indicators and indicators of graduates’ IT competences are developed.Scientific novelty. The concept of IT competence of the teaching staff is introduced. The model of discipline «Information and communication technologies in education and research activities» is designed on the basis of evolutionary development of ICT competence of graduate students in the two-level system of higher education content.Practical significance. The proposed content of the course «Information and communication technologies in education and research activities» which is the basis for the formation of IT competence of the teaching staff

  15. Competence in Mathematics and Academic Achievement: An Analysis of Enrollees in the Bachelor of Science in Actuarial Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamala, Robert; Maswere, Dyson W.; Mwanga, Yeko

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the role of prior grounding attained in mathematics in predicting the academic achievement of enrollees in Bachelor of Science in Actuarial Science (BSAS). The investigation is based on administrative records of 240 BSAS enrollees at Makerere University, School of Statistics and Planning in the 2007-2009 cohorts. Students'…

  16. Becoming In/Competent Learners in the United States: Refugee Students' Academic Identities in the Figured World of Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Aydin

    2014-01-01

    A practice-based dialectic theory of identity was used in this study to explore the cultural-historical context of an urban charter school in which a group of newly arrived Muslim Turk refugee students' academic identities were formed. The school, located in the Southwestern United States, was founded by a global Islamist movement. Ethnographic…

  17. The Role of Information Literacy Competence and Higher Order Thinking Skills to Develop Academic Writing in Science and Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, B. Kranthi

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses a study organized to develop academic writing skills in undergraduate students pursuing engineering courses. The target group consisted of 30 students pursuing a Bachelor of Technology in their third year. The classroom observations regarding teaching writing revealed that writing proficiency for most of the students was at…

  18. Supporting the Development of Emotional Intelligence Competencies to Ease the Transition from Primary to High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualter, P.; Whiteley, H. E.; Hutchinson, J. M.; Pope, D. J.

    2007-01-01

    This study aims to explore (1) whether pupils with high emotional intelligence (EI) cope better with the transition to high school; and (2) whether the introduction of an intervention programme to support the development of EI competencies can increase EI and self-worth, and so ease the negative effects of transition. Results suggest that pupils…

  19. Teachers' and Administrators' Perceptions of Knowledge Management Competence of High School Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memisoglu, Salih Pasa

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to determine the teachers' and administrators' perceptions of knowledge management competence in high school administration. The study was conducted using the screening model and the study group consisted of 162 teachers and 35 administrators working at eight high schools in Turkey. Administrators' knowledge management competence…

  20. The Effects of Academic Career Magnet Education on High Schools and Their Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain, Robert L.; Allen, Anna; Thaler, Robert; Sullivan, Debora; Zellman, Gail L.; Little, Judith Warren; Quigley, Denise D.

    This book contains eight papers on a study of the effects of academic career magnetic education on high schools and their graduates. "Introduction" (Robert L. Crain) explains the study's objectives and methodology, which included an analysis of data files on 9,176 students who applied to 59 different academic career magnet education and…

  1. Use of Academic Libraries by High School Students: Implications for Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craver, Kathleen W.

    1987-01-01

    This comprehensive review of the literature on the use of academic libraries by high school students and academic library/school library cooperation, examines descriptive articles, research studies, and reports of questionnaire data. Problems associated with the literature are discussed, and implications for future research are identified.…

  2. A Quantitative Study of Michigan High School Students' Perception of Parents' Role in Their Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Veryl

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between parental involvement in academic success as determined by grade point average and Michigan high school students' perception of parent involvement with school, participation in homework, recognition of academic success, knowledge of school policies, and support of participation in…

  3. Unforgiving Confucian Culture: A Breeding Ground for High Academic Achievement, Test Anxiety and Self-Doubt?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankov, Lazar

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews findings from several studies that contribute to our understanding of cross-cultural differences in academic achievement, anxiety and self-doubt. The focus is on comparisons between Confucian Asian and European regions. Recent studies indicate that high academic achievement of students from Confucian Asian countries is…

  4. Gender, Student Motivation and Academic Achievement in a Midsized Wisconsin High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutzke, Steven Ronald

    2013-01-01

    This mixed-methods study investigated relationships among gender, academic motivation and achievement in a mid-sized Wisconsin high school. A questionnaire was developed that focused on perceived ability, achievement motives and achievement goals. Interviews with teachers focused on relationships among academic motivation and gender achievement.…

  5. Against the Odds: Academic Resilience among High-Ability African American Adolescents Living in Rural Poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Wendy Taylor

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated the internal and external protective factors that serve to ameliorate barriers to academic achievement posed by the cultural factors of poverty, minority status, and rural residence for high-ability students, rendering them academically resilient. While there has been ample research on underachievement among…

  6. The Social Competence of Highly Gifted Math and Science Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seon-Young; Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula; Thomson, Dana

    2012-01-01

    Involving 740 highly gifted math and science students from two different countries, Korea and the United States, this study examined how these gifted adolescents perceived their interpersonal ability and peer relationships and whether there were differences between these two groups by demographic variables. Based on the survey data, results showed…

  7. High Hydrostatic Pressure Treatment of Porcine Oocytes before Handmade Cloning Improves Developmental Competence and Cryosurvival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Yutao; Lin, Lin; Schmidt, Mette

    2008-01-01

    An innovative technique, called the high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment, has been recently reported to improve the cryosurvival of gametes or embryos in certain mammalian species. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vitro and in vivo developmental competence and cryotoler......An innovative technique, called the high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment, has been recently reported to improve the cryosurvival of gametes or embryos in certain mammalian species. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vitro and in vivo developmental competence...... on day 5 of the estrous cycle. One recipient was diagnosed pregnant and gave birth to two healthy piglets by naturally delivery on day 122 of gestation. This pilot study proved that the sublethal HHP treatment of porcine oocytes before HMC results in improved in vitro developmental competence...

  8. 中国大学学术民主制度的胜任力反思与制度重构%The Competency of University's Academic Democracy System:Reflections and Reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘小芳; 李汝璇; 冯惠敏

    2016-01-01

    Academic democracy, generally accepted as a principle of modern university, constitutes the legal basis of university academic system. Given that academic affairs have their own particularity, university's academic democracy not only follows the procedural requirements of democracy, but also attaches great importance to the competency of system. Based on the competency of university's academic democracy, university's academic democracy system can be established by centering on voter qualification system, decision-making power configuration system, and decision-making criteria. It is a way of resolving conflicts in the academic governance of university.%学术民主是现代大学普遍接受的原则,是大学学术制度的法理基础.学术事务具有其自身的特殊性,大学学术民主制度不仅遵循民主制度的程序性要求,还要重视制度的胜任力.本文基于大学学术民主制度胜任力,建构以投票人资格制度、决策权力配置制度、决策标准为核心的大学学术民主制度. 它是解决大学学术管理冲突的途径.

  9. Investigation of Academic Procrastination Prevalence and Its Relationship with Academic Self-Regulation and Achievement Motivation among High-School Students in Tehran City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebadi, Setareh; Shakoorzadeh, Reza

    2015-01-01

    The present study was carried out with the aim of Investigation of academic procrastination prevalence and its relationship with academic self-regulation and achievement motivation among high-school students in Tehran city. The sample included 624 high school students (312 Boys & 312 Girls) from different areas and regions that selected using…

  10. The relationship between psychological adjustment and social protection with academic self-concept and academic achievement among high school female students in Rasht

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobra Dadarigashti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study conducted to examinethe relationship between psychological adjustment and social protection with academic self-concept and academic achievement among high school female students in Rasht. The research is descriptive correlational. The target population includes all female students studying in Rasht in 2015. By random cluster sampling method and based on the variables, 180 subjects selected. In this study, to collect data, psychological adjustment and social support, academic self-concept and academic achievement questionnaire are used. To test the hypothesis of this research, the parametric statistical Pearson correlation and regression tests are used. Moreover, all statistical operations were analyzed by using spss software. The research results showed that the correlation values between psychological adjustment and social support with academic self-concept and academic achievement of high school female students is statistically significant (0/01> p.

  11. The relationship between psychological adjustment and social protection with academic self-concept and academic achievement among high school female students in Rasht

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobra Dadarigashti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The study conducted to examine the relationship between psychological adjustment and social protection with academic self-concept and academic achievement among high school female students in Rasht. The research is descriptive correlational. The target population includes all female students studying in Rasht in 2015. By random cluster sampling method and based on the variables, 180 subjects selected. In this study, to collect data, psychological adjustment and social support, academic self-concept and academic achievement questionnaire are used. To test the hypothesis of this research, the parametric statistical Pearson correlation and regression tests are used. Moreover, all statistical operations were analyzed by using SPSS software. The research results showed that the correlation values between psychological adjustment and social support with academic self-concept and academic achievement of high school female students is statistically significant ( 01/0 > p.

  12. Digital Academic Revolution Mentorship Competency: #2 The Conversation--Viewing Instructional Design & Pedagogy as a Holistic Unit Transformative Teamwork in a Learn by Doing Approach--Student Turned Mentor & Mentor Turned Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, Martin; Fose, Luanne

    2016-01-01

    The following is the second article in the "Digital Academic Revolution: Mentorship Competency Series" by Martin Mehl and Luanne Fose. It is a "transcribed" conversation between Luanne and Martin about their experience collaborating as a research team and the conceptualization, implementation, and assessment of the Digital…

  13. High-fidelity nursing simulation: impact on student self-confidence and clinical competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Cynthia A; Borglund, Susan; Parcells, Dax

    2010-01-01

    Development of safe nursing practice in entry-level nursing students requires special consideration from nurse educators. The paucity of data supporting high-fidelity patient simulation effectiveness in this population informed the development of a quasi-experimental, quantitative study of the relationship between simulation and student self-confidence and clinical competence. Moreover, the study reports a novel approach to measuring self-confidence and competence of entry-level nursing students. Fifty-three baccalaureate students, enrolled in either a traditional or simulation-enhanced laboratory, participated during their first clinical rotation. Student self-confidence and faculty perception of student clinical competence were measured using selected scale items of the Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric. The results indicated an overall improvement in self-confidence and competence across the semester, however, simulation did not significantly enhance these caring attributes. The study highlights the need for further examination of teaching strategies developed to promote the transfer of self-confidence and competence from the laboratory to the clinical setting.

  14. The Preparation of Highly Motivated and Professionally Competent Teachers in Initial Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Sylvia Y. F.; Wong, Angel K. Y.; Cheng, May M. H.

    2015-01-01

    Education systems around the world need to recruit highly motivated individuals to become teachers and prepare professionally competent teacher education graduates to take up these broadened and deepened roles and responsibilities with a deep and lasting engagement to the profession. This article reports on a mixed-methods study that examines…

  15. Core Competencies and the Prevention of High-Risk Sexual Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Vignetta Eugenia; Blum, Robert Wm.

    2008-01-01

    Adolescent sexual risk-taking behavior has numerous individual, family, community, and societal consequences. In an effort to contribute to the research and propose new directions, this chapter applies the core competencies framework to the prevention of high-risk sexual behavior. It describes the magnitude of the problem, summarizes explanatory…

  16. Developing the Principal Technology Leadership Competency Indicators for Technical High Schools in K-12 in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyr, Wen-Jye

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop principal technology leadership competency indicators for technical high schools in K-12 in Taiwan in order to improve the effectiveness of school administration and teaching. In the first part of the study, five experts in the technology leadership field are interviewed to explore the technology leadership…

  17. Students' Evaluation of Professional Personality Competencies of Physical Education Teachers Working in High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Erdal

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to examine the relationship between professional personality competencies of physical education teachers working in high schools and gender, school type, and class variables of students. The study was organised according to the screening model. The study was carried out in a total of 17 schools, 16 state and one…

  18. Strengthening High School Teaching and Learning in New Hampshire's Competency-Based System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    For a century, most students have advanced from grade to grade based on the number of days they spend in class, but in New Hampshire, schools have moved away from "seat time" and toward "competency-based learning," which advances students when they have mastered course content. This report profiles how two high schools in New…

  19. Competencies That Count: Strategies for Assessing High-Performance Skills. LAB Working Paper No. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Lili

    This guide provides a "road map" to the various ways that schools and employers assess high-performance competencies, such as problem solving, information management, and communication and negotiation skills. The guide begins with a brief analysis of why it is important to assess these skills in light of the current standards environment…

  20. Acculturative and Psychosocial Predictors of Academic-Related Outcomes among Cambodian American High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanh Dinh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the acculturative and psychosocial predictors of academic-related outcomes among Cambodian American high school students from an urban school district in the State of Massachusetts. Student participants (N = 163 completed an anonymous survey that assessed demographic characteristics, acculturative experiences, intergenerational conflict, depression, and academic-related outcomes. The main results indicated that acculturative and psychosocial variables were significant predictors of academic-related outcomes. Specifically, Cambodian and Anglo/White cultural orientations and depression played significant roles across the four dimensions of academic-related outcomes, including grade point average, educational aspirations, beliefs in the utility of education, and psychological sense of school membership. This study provides important implications for school-based and family-based prevention and intervention programs in addressing the acculturative and academic challenges faced by Cambodian American students.

  1. Acculturative and Psychosocial Predictors of Academic-Related Outcomes among Cambodian American High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanh Dinh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the acculturative and psychosocial predictors of academic-related outcomes among Cambodian American high school students from an urban school district in the State of Massachusetts. Student participants (N = 163 completed an anonymous survey that assessed demographic characteristics, acculturative experiences, intergenerational conflict, depression, and academic-related outcomes. The main results indicated that acculturative and psychosocial variables were significant predictors of academic-related outcomes. Specifically, Cambodian and Anglo/White cultural orientations and depression played significant roles across the four dimensions of academic-related outcomes, including grade point average, educational aspirations, beliefs in the utility of education, and psychological sense of school membership. This study provides important implications for school-based and family-based prevention and intervention programs in addressing the acculturative and academic challenges faced by Cambodian American students.

  2. High School Counselors' Perceptrons of the Academic and Personality Attributes Important to a Career in Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasdell, Alison L.; Hudgins-Brewer, Sandra

    1999-01-01

    High school counselors (n=95) identified characteristics they considered important for nursing. Leadership and academic achievement were rated less important than for other careers. compassion, kindness, and obedience were considered important but not decision making or assertiveness. (SK)

  3. FORMATION OF TEACHER’S SOCIO-ECONOMIC COMPETENCE THROUGH HIGH SCHOOL’S PUBLIC MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna G . Ryabova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the article explores one of topical issues in modernisation of contemporary education – enhancement of socio-economic competence of a teacher. Social and economic functions, such as goal-setting, planning, organisation, analysis, control and correction act as integral components in its structure. Materials and Мethods: scholarly works on the formation of social and economic competence of teacher and public school management are a basis for the article. Methods of pedagogical research with emphasis on theoretical and practical methods were used in this study. Results: the pedagogical analysis examines the ways of shaping socio-economic competence of a teacher capable of comprehending a social situation, able to effectively operate educational institution in market conditions, to think economically, to find social consent, to shape open educational environment, to quickly solve problems of specific goal realisation. The article substantiates that the problem of formation of social and economic competence can be solved if a teacher acquires skills of public intraschool management. Further, the authors present the analysis of results of a long-term experimental work on the organisation of public management environment at the educational institution, lyceum no. 26 in Saransk (Republic of Mordovia. Discussion and Сonclusion: the article highlights the importance of professional development of educators specialising in “State and public management: public expert review” as a factor in broadening social and economic competence of a teacher. Criteria of participation in public management of education are discussed. It is proved that democratisation of management and its public character allow to involve the personality (administrator, teacher, pupil, parents in the processes of a goal-setting, joint administrative activity, improvement of the interpersonal relations. All these factors make educational system open and take it to a

  4. Emotional expression in school context, social relationships, and academic adjustment in kindergarten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Maciel M; Eisenberg, Nancy; Valiente, Carlos; VanSchyndel, Sarah K; Spinrad, Tracy L; Silva, Kassondra M; Berger, Rebecca H; Diaz, Anjolii; Terrell, Nathan; Thompson, Marilyn S; Southworth, Jody

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated direct relations of both kindergarteners' (N = 301) naturalistically observed emotion in 2 different school contexts and early kindergarten verbal competence to academic adjustment (i.e., standardized measures of academic achievement, teacher-reported academic skills, teacher-reported and observed school engagement) and if these relations were mediated by teacher-reported conflict with students and by peer acceptance. When controlling for verbal competence, positive emotions expressed in the classroom context positively directly predicted academic skills, whereas positive emotions expressed outside class (lunch/recess) negatively predicted academic skills. Negative emotions observed in the classroom context and during lunch/recess negatively predicted academic achievement. Positive emotions observed in both contexts indirectly predicted higher school engagement through its positive relation to peer acceptance; positive emotions expressed in lunch and recess indirectly predicted higher school engagement via lower teacher-student conflict. Negative emotions observed in both contexts also indirectly predicted lower school engagement via higher teacher-student conflict. Furthermore, verbal competence indirectly predicted higher academic adjustment via lower teacher-student conflict. Moreover, verbal competence moderated the association between peer acceptance (but not teacher-student conflict) and academic adjustment. Because verbal competence moderated the associations from peer competence, positive emotions in both contexts indirectly predicted higher academic adjustment via higher peer acceptance primarily for children with low, but not high, initial verbal competence. (PsycINFO Database Record

  5. Relations among Academic Enablers and Academic Achievement in Children with and without High Levels of Parent-Rated Symptoms of Inattention, Impulsivity, and Hyperactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaray, Michelle Kilpatrick; Jenkins, Lyndsay N.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among academic enablers (i.e., engagement, interpersonal skills, motivation, study skills) and academic achievement in children with and without high levels of parent-rated symptoms of inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity (Symptoms of IIH Group). The study included 69 participants (29 [42%] in the IIH…

  6. High-Achieving High School Students and Not so High-Achieving College Students: A Look at Lack of Self-Control, Academic Ability, and Performance in College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honken, Nora B.; Ralston, Patricia A. S.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship among lack of self-control, academic ability, and academic performance for a cohort of freshman engineering students who were, with a few exceptions, extremely high achievers in high school. Structural equation modeling analysis led to the conclusion that lack of self-control in high school, as measured by…

  7. Factors Influencing Academic Self-Concept of High-Ability Girls in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Melissa Mui Mei; Garces-Bacsal, Rhoda Myra

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the impact of entering high-ability classes on the academic self-concept of high-ability primary girls in Singapore. Participants in this study are 91 Primary 4 girls, 30 high-ability pupils, and 61 pupils from classes that include high-, middle-, and low-ability pupils. This study utilized a mixed-method…

  8. Explorations of Metacognition Among Academically Talented Middle and High School Mathematics Students

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Adena Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to examine metacognition among academically talented middle and high school mathematics students from both educational psychology and mathematics education perspectives. A synthesis of the literatures and three studies employing quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methodologies were used to address three research questions: (a) What is metacognition, (b) What are the relationships between metacognition and academic achievement, and (c) How should educati...

  9. Affective variables, parental involvement and competence among South Korean high school learners of English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Morris

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the relationships between various affective variables and two measures of competence in English, for 190 South Korean high school students. A 55-item questionnaire was used to measure attitudes (Attitudes toward English Speakers and their Communities and Attitudes toward the English-speaking Culture, motivation (Motivational Intensity, Desire to Learn and Attitudes toward the Learning of English, amotivation, parental involvement (Active Parental Encouragement, Passive Parental Encouragement and Parental Pressure, parental disinterest and students’ competence in L2 (English- EXAM and English-SELF. Pearson product-moment coefficients indicate that active and passive forms of parental encouragement correlate with motivationto learn, as conceptualized by Gardner (1985, 2010, as well as with parental pressure, which suggests that South Korean students report undergoing forms of pressure when their parents actively or passively encourage them. Furthermore, the obtained correlations of the active and passive forms of encouragement with different variables suggest that the two forms represent two distinct concepts. While parental disinterest correlated negatively with motivational variables, parental pressure correlated only with motivational intensity, and only weakly. Therefore, parental pressure seems not to interact significantly with participants’ attitudes, motivation and competence. Multiple linear regression analyses confirm the importance of motivation to learn for students' L2 competence.

  10. The Theoretical Connotation and Systematic Essence of Core Competence of Agricultural High-tech Enterprises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Six representative interpretations about the core competence of the corporate proposed by the researchers both at home and abroad from different perspectives are introduced,which includes "Resource theory","Capacity theory","Integration theory of assets and mechanism","Theory of consumer surplus","Theory of institutions and systems" and "Theory of innovation". It is pointed out that although these interpretations play an active role in enriching the theory of core competence,it still faces the problems to further deepen these interpretations:the first problem is how to give a precise definition;the second is about its extension;the third is on the logical and practical relationship between the production mechanism and its sustainable competitive advantages;the fourth is the problems in the production process and the corresponding management. Both the systematic essence and features of core competence are introduced:the first is the system self-organization process produced within the corporate;the second is the interaction between corporate system and environment;it needs a growing and evolution process. This paper briefly describes the essence of core competence of agricultural high-tech corporate,introduces its five features including systematicness,integration,non-imitation,ductility and non-equilibrium,and finally explains its component parts,mainly including corporate culture system,technological innovation system,human resource system,management capability system,corporate production and marketing system,financial capability system and adaptability system.

  11. Academic coordination at university: Strategies for high quality education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria del Mar Durán Bellonch

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Most lecturers and professors involved in teaching School Management and Education Management courses have been engaged in developing some innovative actions to improve the training quality that we offer to students in the Pedagogy degree at the Autonomous University of Barcelona. These actions are aimed at increasing co-ordination among the teaching staff when designing and implementing the course curricula. Co-ordination meetings, exchanges of teaching experiences, discussions about what, how and when to teach the different contents, in which courses and at what level, methodological issues pointed out through technical description cards or the elaboration of study cases to be solved have become the basis of relevant actions during the last academic years. This paper explains each one of them, and provides useful information about the theoretical background, the process carried out, some of the results obtained, the output and the tools created.

  12. Study on Self-organization Mechanism for University Academic Competence Based on Knowledge Capital%基于知识资本的大学学术竞争力自组织机理研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱浩

    2012-01-01

    学术性是大学的本质所在,大学的核心竞争力本质上是基于知识资本的学术竞争力.大学学术竞争力是大学人力、科教、文化、组织与社会等五种(知识)资本学术竞争力的整体协同涌现,其自组织演进,既受到大学内部因素的协同作用,又离不开外部环境作用的影响.%The essence of university lies in academy. The competence of university is university academic competence based on knowledge capital in essence. In this paper university academic competence based on knowledge capital is deduced by Synergism and conceptual mathematical model, which is the positive effect emergency of whole academic competence including human capital, teaching and research capital, culture capital, organization capital and social capital. Meanwhile, its self-organization evolution cannot be separated from the influence of environment.

  13. The Effect of School Supervisors Competence and School Principals Competence on Work Motivation and Performance of Junior High School Teachers in Maros Regency, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arman; Thalib, Syamsul Bachri; Manda, Darman

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at analyzing the effect of the competence of school supervisors and school principals on work motivation and performance of Junior High School teachers in Maros Regency. This research was a quantitative research by using survey approach. This approach was used because it is adjusted to the nature and assumptions of the study in…

  14. Formalization of informally acquired competences as part of academic certificate programs in healthcare – “prototype” of a model / Formalisierung informell erworbener Kompetenzen im Rahmen akademischer Zertifikatsprogramme im Gesundheitsbereich – „Prototyp“ eines Modells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Alexander Karsten

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The health care sector is facing many aspects of transformation. One aspect amongst others herein is an alteration of qualification profiles. Universities have to focus on both aspects determining future qualification profiles and increasing permeability between educational systems in a sense of optimally intermeshing competences that have been acquired at universities and those that have been acquired outside of them. This leads to the question how to create university certificate programs that offers two aspects: academic qualification on the one hand and on the other hand a possibility to identify, evaluate and certify non-formally and informally acquired competences of participating students. The ultimate goal is to identify and evaluate a person´s overall competence in a clearly defined thematic context, whereat competences that have been acquired outside universities will play an important role. Competences that have been certified by these academic programs may be used later for crediting purposes. In this report an initial prototype is being presented. It defines itself mainly as additional novel way of discussing crediting concepts.

  15. Affective variables, parental involvement and competence among South Korean high school learners of English

    OpenAIRE

    Annie Morris; Marc Lafontaine; François Pichette; Linda de Serres

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships between various affective variables and two measures of competence in English, for 190 South Korean high school students. A 55-item questionnaire was used to measure attitudes (Attitudes toward English Speakers and their Communities and Attitudes toward the English- speaking Culture), motivation (Motivational Intensity, Desire to Learn and Attitudes toward the Learning of English), amotivation, parental involvement (Active Parental E...

  16. COMPET: High resolution high sensitivity MRI compatible pre-clinical PET scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Hines, Kim-Eigard; Skretting, Arne; Rohne, Ole; Bjaalie, Jan G; Volgyes, David; Rissi, Michael; Dorholt, Ole; Stapnes, Steinar

    2013-01-01

    COMPET is a pre-clinical MRI compatible PET scanner which decouples sensitivity and resolution by the use of a novel detector design. The detector has been built using 8 x 8 cm(2) square layers consisting of 30 LYSO crystals (2 x 3 x 80 mm(2)) interleaved with 24 Wavelength Shifting Fibers (WLS) (3 x 1 x 80 mm(3)). By stacking several layers into a module, the point-of-interaction (POI) can be measured in 3D. Four layers form a PET ring where the sensitivity can be increased by stacking several layers. The layers can be stacked so that no inter-crystal or inter-module gap is formed. COMPET has used four assembled layers for module and scanner characterization. The modules are connected to the COMPET data-acquisition chain and the reconstructed images are produced with the novel geometry-independent COMPET image reconstruction algorithm. Time and energy resolution have been resolved and found to be around 4 as and 14% respectively. Tests for MRI interference and count rate performance have been carried out The...

  17. Academic achievement in the high school years: the changing role of school engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Paul A; Hilliard, Lacey J; Geldhof, G John; Warren, Daniel J A; Lerner, Richard M

    2014-06-01

    School engagement is an important theoretical and practical cornerstone to the promotion of academic accomplishments. This article used a tripartite-behavioral, emotional, and cognitive-model of school engagement to assess the relationship between school engagement and academic success among high school students, and to determine whether a reciprocal relationship exists between these constructs. Data were derived from 710 youth (69% female) who took part in Waves 6 through 8 (Grades 10 through 12) of the 4-H study of positive youth development. Longitudinal confirmatory factor analyses confirmed the invariance of the tripartite model of school engagement. Results of a structural equation model showed that the components of school engagement and academic achievement were mutually predictive and that these predictions varied from grade to grade. Future possibilities for evaluating the relationship between school engagement and academic achievement, as well as the implications for educational policy and practice, are discussed.

  18. Competency Modeling for Academic Leaders in Hospital An Integrated Approach%临床医学学科带头人胜任特征模型建构——量化与质化结合的方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王桢; 苏景宽; 罗正学; 时勘

    2011-01-01

    Research on competency model is one of the frontier issues of HRM research. This study is conducted to obtain the competency model of clinical academic leaders by ways of structured job analysis questionnaires and Behavioral Event Interview (BEI). Questionnaires of Occupational Information Network (O*NET) are administered to 494 clinical workers, on the results of which, further Behavioral Event Interviews (BEI) are carried out with 20 clinical academic leaders. Moreover, subject matter experts are invited to confirm the primary competency construct along with the process. The results of this study show that a combined method to establish the competency model of clinical academic leaders is effective. The findings also demonstrate the competency model of clinical academic leaders is composed of eighteen competencies, divided into three levels, and with seven distinctive competencies. The findings also indicate three new competencies: individual consideration, outer resource seeking and business sense.%胜任特征模型研究是人力资源管理理论和实践的前沿问题,然而目前研究多采用单一的方法.本研究首先使用0*NET问卷对494位医院工作人员进行工作分析,然后对20位学科带头人进行行为事件访谈,结合进行专家小组访谈,构建临床医学学科带头人的胜任特征模型.研究发现多方法构建模型具有较好的效果.该职位胜任特征模型包括18项特征,可以分为个性特征,认知技能,管理能力三个理论层次.此外,本研究发现了个性化关怀等三项较新的素质要求.

  19. Intellectual Ability, Self-Perceived Social Competence, and Depressive Symptomatology in Children with High-Functioning Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickerstaff, Sandy; Heriot, Sandra; Wong, Michelle; Lopes, Ana; Dossetor, David

    2007-01-01

    Although social competence deficits in children with high-functioning autistic spectrum disorders (HFASD) are well documented, there is little research investigating self-perceptions of social limitations. This study replicated research showing a negative association between self-perceived social competence and intellectual ability and…

  20. Opportunity Makes the Cheater: High School Students and Academic Dishonesty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Šorgo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to reveal data about cheating behaviours in Slovenian upper secondary schools, to raise awareness and to lower tolerance for such behaviour. To acquire information about demographics, cheating behaviour, and opinions on such behaviour, we compiled a questionnaire that targeted a university population of first-year students (N=323. From the results, it was revealed that cheating is a way of life in Slovenian schools, and almost all students at least occasionally indulge in some academic misbehaviour. It seems that a culture tolerant or even supportive of such behaviour has been established among students, parents and teachers, all working together to “help” students climb the ladder of success. The open question is whether all kinds of cheating are even recognized as such. Cheating is most common in homework, but at the other end, even systems such as external exams are not immune to fraud. At the moment, classic methods of cheating dominate. Differences between characters (e.g. gender and educational institutions in most cases are non-existent or small, a finding that could aid in establishing measures to prevent cheating inside schools as institutions.

  1. The impact of personal background and school contextual factors on academic competence and mental health functioning across the primary-secondary school transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmila Vaz

    Full Text Available Students negotiate the transition to secondary school in different ways. While some thrive on the opportunity, others are challenged. A prospective longitudinal design was used to determine the contribution of personal background and school contextual factors on academic competence (AC and mental health functioning (MHF of 266 students, 6-months before and after the transition to secondary school. Data from 197 typically developing students and 69 students with a disability were analysed using hierarchical linear regression modelling. Both in primary and secondary school, students with a disability and from socially disadvantaged backgrounds gained poorer scores for AC and MHF than their typically developing and more affluent counterparts. Students who attended independent and mid-range sized primary schools had the highest concurrent AC. Those from independent primary schools had the lowest MHF. The primary school organisational model significantly influenced post-transition AC scores; with students from Kindergarten--Year 7 schools reporting the lowest scores, while those from the Kindergarten--Year 12 structure without middle school having the highest scores. Attending a school which used the Kindergarten--Year 12 with middle school structure was associated with a reduction in AC scores across the transition. Personal background factors accounted for the majority of the variability in post-transition AC and MHF. The contribution of school contextual factors was relatively minor. There is a potential opportunity for schools to provide support to disadvantaged students before the transition to secondary school, as they continue to be at a disadvantage after the transition.

  2. Academic self-efficacy for high school scale: search for psychometrics evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soely Polydoro

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to present the adaptation and the search for psychometrics evidence of an academic self-efficacy scale. High school students (N = 453 participated of the research (mean age 15.93; SD 1.2. The Academic Self-efficacy Scale for High School is an adapted scale composed of 16 items and organized into three factors: self-efficacy for learning, self-efficacy to act in school life, and self-efficacy for the career decision. Through exploratory factor analysis, a KMO = 0.90 was verified, and 56.57% of the variance was explained. The internal consistency was 0.88. The scale demonstrated good conditions to identify academic self-efficacy of high school students.

  3. 上海三级医院临床学科带头人胜任力模型研究%Study on the competency model of academic leaders in tertiary hospitals in shanghai area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈玮; 费健; 俞郁萍; 杨伟国; 李国红

    2016-01-01

    Objective This research puts the academic leader under the competency background to investigate the current status of academic leaders in tertiary hospitals in Shanghai,combines the theories a-nalysis with practice on the Correlative Research,takes evaluation of academic leaders as the target to deep into the discussion,studies the application value and special significance of the competency model on culti-vation,introduction and evaluation of academic leaders in tertiary hospitals in Shanghai area.Methods Core elements of competency of the academic leaders were investigated by literature reviews,expert inter-views,behavioral event interview,and questionnaires.The questionnaire of the competency of academic leaders was prepared and the numbers and induction relevant to characteristic items of the competency were obtained.Results The notion of six feature families is proposed by study of the competency model which composed 18 relative characteristic items.Six feature families are leadership,organization team with coordi-nation,innovation and implement of project,strategic thinking and overall outlook,self-control and self-management,pursuit excellence and development.Conclusions The academic leader not being lack of professional quality,it is the deep characteristics under the Iceberg Model that influenced the development degree,efficiency,effects of subjects.The study on the competency of the academic leader is helpful for e-valuation of academic leaders'comprehensive abilities and put forward some proposal about stuff rundle con-struction for reference in hospital.%目的:调查上海三级医院学科带头人现状,结合理论分析与实证调查,以评价学科带头人为目标进行相关研究及深入讨论,研究胜任力模型在上海三级医院的学科带头人培养、引进、评价等方面的应用价值和特殊意义。方法采用文献学习、专家咨询、行为事件访谈法、问卷调查等方式研究临床学科带头人胜

  4. Relationship of High School Principal Organizational Commitment and Campus Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edison, David Allen

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the relationship of Texas high school principals' organizational commitment and the academic performance of the high schools served by the principals. Three components of principal organizational commitment--affective commitment, continuance commitment, and normative commitment--were assessed using the…

  5. The Effect of the Time Management Art on Academic Achievement among High School Students in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zoubi, Maysoon

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at recognizing the effect of the Time Management Art on academic achievement among high school students in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan. The researcher employed the descriptive-analytic research to achieve the purpose of the study where he chose a sample of (2000) high school female and male students as respondents to the…

  6. The Role of Goal Importance in Predicting University Students' High Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Vanessa A.; White, Katherine M.; Hyde, Melissa K.; Occhipinti, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    We examined goal importance, focusing on high, but not exclusive priority goals, in the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) to predict students' academic performance. At the beginning of semester, students in a psychology subject (N = 197) completed TPB and goal importance items for achieving a high grade. Regression analyses revealed partial…

  7. The Effects of Modeling Instruction on High School Physics Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Tiffanie L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether Modeling Instruction, compared to traditional lecturing, is an effective instructional method to promote academic achievement in selected high school physics classes at a rural middle Tennessee high school. This study used an "ex post facto," quasi-experimental research methodology. The…

  8. Learning Strategies and Their Relationships to Academic Performance of High School Students in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Michael C. W.

    2013-01-01

    The present study examines the dynamic relationship between academic performance of high school students and their respective learning and study strategies. Two hundred thirty-six high school students were recruited to participate in this study by completing a Chinese version of the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory--LASSI, to probe into the…

  9. The Frog Pond Revisited: High School Academic Context, Class Rank, and Elite College Admission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espenshade, Thomas J.; Hale, Lauren E.; Chung, Chang Y.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the authors test a "frog-pond" model of elite college admission proposed by Attewell, operationalizing high school academic context as the secondary school-average SAT score and number of Advanced Placement tests per high school senior. Data on more than 45,000 applications to three elite universities show that a high…

  10. Impact of Principal Leadership on Catholic High School Students' Academic Achievement in Edo State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhangbe, Osayamen Samson

    2012-01-01

    Over the years, students of Catholic High/Senior secondary schools in Edo state, Nigeria have maintained a significantly higher level of academic achievement than their counterparts in public schools in the state. This development has not only been a cause of serious concern for parents of students who attend public High/Senior secondary schools…

  11. Coaches' perceptions of competence and acknowledgement of training needs related to professional competences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sofia; Mesquita, Isabel; Graça, Amândio; Rosado, António

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine coaches' perceptions of competence and acknowledgement of training needs related to professional competences according to the professional experience and academic education. The participants were 343 coaches from several sports, who answered to a questionnaire that includes a scale focused on perceptions of competence and another scale on acknowledgment of training needs. An exploratory factor analysis with Maximum Likelihood Factoring was used with Oblimin rotation for the identification of emergent factors. Comparison on coaches' perceptions in function of coaching experience and coaches' academic background were made applying One-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc multiple comparisons. Factor analysis on coaches' perceptions of competence and acknowledgement of training needs made apparent three main areas of competences, i.e. competences related to annual and multi-annual planning; competences related to orientation towards practice and competition; and personal and coaching education competences. Coaches' perceptions were influenced by their experience, as low experienced coaches rated themselves at lower levels of competence and with more training needs; also coaches with high education, in Physical Education or others, perceived themselves as more competent than coaches with no higher education. Finally, the majority of the coaches perceived themselves to be competent but, nevertheless, they indicated to have training needs, which brings an important feedback to coach education. This suggests that coaches are interested in increasing their knowledge and competence in a broad range of areas which should be considered in future coach education programs. Key pointsCoaches' perceptions of competence and acknowledgement of training needs resulted in three main areas: competences related to annual and multi-annual planning, competences related to practice and competition orientation and, finally, personal and coaching

  12. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PERCEIVED DISCRIMINATION AND HOPE FOR THE FUTURE, GLOBAL SELF WORTH AND ACADEMIC COMPETENCE: IN A MULTI-RACIAL/ETHNIC, LOW INCOME SAMPLE OF SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    Quattrocki, Grace Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine the extent to which a change in perceived interpersonal discrimination was associated with a change in the levels of hope for the future, global self-worth and perceived academic competence among a multiracial sample of adolescents attending a four-week, summer positive youth development program. Method: We first estimated means with standard errors of continuous variables and percentages within categorical variables in our total sample, and between those returning to PA...

  13. Recovery High Schools: Students and Responsive Academic and Therapeutic Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberg, D. Paul; Finch, Andrew J.; Lindsley, Stephanie M.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews findings from the authors' studies of recovery high schools (RHS), including a 1995 program evaluation of a school in New Mexico (Moberg & Thaler, 1995), a 2006-09 descriptive study of 17 recovery high schools (Moberg & Finch, 2008), and presents early findings from a current study of the effectiveness of recovery high…

  14. The Relationship between Cognitive and Emotional Intelligence and High School Academic Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matešić, Krunoslav

    2015-06-01

    The study investigated the relationship between intelligence, emotional intelligence and academic achievement in high school. The study was conducted within the standardization of two instruments for Croatian samples. A total of 369 high school students from the Republic of Croatia participated in the study. They completed the Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Test (NNAT)--a test of cognitive intelligence and the BarOn Emotional Quotient Inventory: Youth Version (EQ-i:YV). Academic achievement criteria were general school achievement, Croatian language and mathematics. Several regression analyses were conducted on the results. The results show that cognitive intelligence and the adaptability scale to be consistent predictors of academic achievement. Emotional intelligence was not shown to be a significant predictor of school success.

  15. The Impact of the Norton High School Early College Program on the Academic Performance of Students at Norton High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, Eric Matthew

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the Norton High School Early College Early College Program on academic measures for students at Norton High School. Measures of achievement include the results of the English Language Arts (ELA), Mathematics, Social Science, and Science portions of the California Standards Test (CST), Student…

  16. Academic achievement of junior high school students with sleep disorders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Auliyanti, Fijri; Sekartini, Rini; Mangunatmadja, Irawan

    2016-01-01

    ... status, family structure, after-hours education program, presence of TV/computer in the bedroom, sleep duration during school days, as well as bedtime and wakeup time difference in junior high school...

  17. Academic Language Socialization in High School Writing Conferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, Betsy

    2014-01-01

    This study examines multilingual high school writers' individual talk with their teachers in two advanced English language development classes to observe how such talk shapes linguistically diverse adolescents' writing. Addressing adolescent writers' language socialization through microethnographic discourse analysis, the author…

  18. Academic Discipline and Personal Finance Instruction in High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loibl, Cäzilia; Fisher, Patti J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite public support for personal finance instruction in high school, its effectiveness has not been firmly established. The current study investigates instructional approaches as a reason for these inconsistent outcomes by comparing survey responses of business education, family and consumer sciences, and social studies/economics teachers. The…

  19. Critical perspectives on cultural competence as a strategic opportunity for achieving high performance in healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelitz, Philippa; Watson, Kerry

    2008-01-01

    * Cultural proficiency is a critical component of diversity competence. Diversity competency attends to issues of cultural proficiency and links cultural competence to issues of diverse representation and organizational inclusivity. * Developing and applying cultural competencies in diagnostic and invasive imaging services provides strategic opportunities to experience better patient cooperation, increase patient satisfaction, reduce medical errors, reduce patient complaints, and improve service recovery. * New Jersey recently passed legislation that requires 16 hours of cultural competency education as a condition of licensure to practice medicine. Four other states have similar legislation pending. The state of Washington passed legislation requiring all state accredited programs to include cultural competency education.

  20. Factors Influencing High School Students' Science Enrollments Patterns: Academic Abilities, Parental Influences, and Attitudes toward Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Ghada A.; Voss, Burton E.

    This study was designed, using a path analytic model, to assess the relative impact of different factors on science concentration decisions made by grade 10 high school students (N=237). Included in the model were selected demographic and socioeconomic factors, academic abilities factors (including logical thinking), indicators of home and school…

  1. Early Reading Skills and Academic Achievement Trajectories of Students Facing Poverty, Homelessness, and High Residential Mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbers, Janette E.; Cutuli, J. J.; Supkoff, Laura M.; Heistad, David; Chan, Chi-Keung; Hinz, Elizabeth; Masten, Ann S.

    2012-01-01

    This investigation tested the importance of early academic achievement for later achievement trajectories among 18,011 students grouped by level of socioeconomic risk. Students considered to be at highest risk were those who experienced homelessness or high residential mobility (HHM). HHM students were compared with students eligible for free…

  2. Filial Piety and Academic Motivation: High-Achieving Students in an International School in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    This study uses self-determination theory to explore the mechanisms of filial piety in the academic motivation of eight high-achieving secondary school seniors at an international school in South Korea, resulting in several findings. First, the students attributed their parents' values and expectations as a major source of the students'…

  3. Explorations of Metacognition among Academically Talented Middle and High School Mathematics Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Adena Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to examine metacognition among academically talented middle and high school mathematics students from both educational psychology and mathematics education perspectives. A synthesis of the literatures and three studies employing quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methodologies were used to address three…

  4. Intergenerational Closure and Academic Achievement in High School: A New Evaluation of Coleman's Conjecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Stephen L.; Todd, Jennifer J.

    2009-01-01

    This article reexamines the conjecture of James S. Coleman that intergenerational social closure promotes student achievement in high schools, analyzing the best national data on academic achievement and social networks: the 2002 and 2004 waves of the Education Longitudinal Study. The results show that within the Catholic school sector, schools…

  5. Academic Achievement and Emotional Intelligence: Predicting the Successful Transition from High School to University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, James D. A.; Duffy, Jon M.; Wood, Laura M.; Bond, Barbara J.; Hogan, Marjorie J.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the impact of emotional intelligence (EI) on the successful transition from high school to university. The short form of the Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i) was completed by 1,426 first-year students attending four different universities within the first week of classes (September). At the end of the academic year (May),…

  6. Middle-Class Parents' Educational Work in an Academically Selective Public High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Meghan

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a study on the nature of parent-school engagement at an academically selective public high school in New South Wales, Australia. Such research is pertinent given recent policies of "choice" and decentralization, making a study of local stakeholders timely. The research comprised a set of interviews…

  7. Spatial Experiences of High Academic Achievers: Insights from a Developmental Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weckbacher, Lisa Marie; Okamoto, Yukari

    2012-01-01

    The study explored the relationship between types of spatial experiences and spatial abilities among 13- to 14-year-old high academic achievers. Each participant completed two spatial tasks and a survey assessing favored spatial activities across five categories (computers, toys, sports, music, and art) and three developmental periods (early…

  8. Social Media Use, Loneliness, and Academic Achievement: A Correlational Study with Urban High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Roque; Golz, Nancy; Polega, Meaghan

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the association between social media use, loneliness, and academic achievement in high school students and identified the demographic characteristics associated with these three elements. This study also aimed to identify the percentage of variance in loneliness accounted for by social media use and GPA. Participants were 345…

  9. The Effects of Alcohol Use on Academic Achievement in High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsa, Ana I.; Giuliano, Laura M.; French, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of alcohol use on high school students' quality of learning. We estimate fixed-effects models using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Our primary measure of academic achievement is the student's grade point average (GPA) abstracted from official school transcripts. We find that…

  10. Obesity, High-Calorie Food Intake, and Academic Achievement Trends among U.S. School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; O'Connell, Ann A.

    2012-01-01

    The authors investigated children's self-reported high-calorie food intake in Grade 5 and its relationship to trends in obesity status and academic achievement over the first 6 years of school. They used 3-level hierarchical linear models in the large-scale database (the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study--Kindergarten Cohort). Findings indicated…

  11. Explorations of Metacognition among Academically Talented Middle and High School Mathematics Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Adena Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to examine metacognition among academically talented middle and high school mathematics students from both educational psychology and mathematics education perspectives. A synthesis of the literatures and three studies employing quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methodologies were used to address three…

  12. Spatial Experiences of High Academic Achievers: Insights from a Developmental Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weckbacher, Lisa Marie; Okamoto, Yukari

    2012-01-01

    The study explored the relationship between types of spatial experiences and spatial abilities among 13- to 14-year-old high academic achievers. Each participant completed two spatial tasks and a survey assessing favored spatial activities across five categories (computers, toys, sports, music, and art) and three developmental periods (early…

  13. Emotional Intelligence and Academic Achievement of High School Students in Kanyakumari District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, A. S. Arul; Deepa, T.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study is to find the significant relationship between emotional intelligence and academic achievement of high school students with reference to the background variables. Survey method was employed. Two tools are used in this study namely self-made Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire Short Form (TEIQue SF) and the…

  14. A Phenomenological Exploration of Teacher Training Regarding Academically Advanced/High-Ability Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueker, Carrie Olstad

    2011-01-01

    The needs of academically advanced/high-ability students may not be met in today's schools. When educational needs are not met, students may not reach full potential, may lose intrinsic motivation for learning, and may develop poor work and study habits. The rural school district involved in this study lacks a formal gifted and talented program.…

  15. Competency-Based Education in Three Pilot Programs: Examining Implementation and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Jennifer L.; Lewis, Matthew W.; Santibanez, Lucrecia; Faxon-Mills, Susannah; Rudnick, Mollie; Stecher, Brian M.; Hamilton, Laura S.

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation created the Project Mastery grant program to support competency-based education initiatives in large school systems that serve a high proportion of disadvantaged youth. Competency-based education meets students where they are academically, provides students with opportunities for choice, and awards…

  16. Competency-Based Education in Three Pilot Programs: Examining Implementation and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Jennifer L.; Lewis, Matthew W.; Santibanez, Lucrecia; Faxon-Mills, Susannah; Rudnick, Mollie; Stecher, Brian M.; Hamilton, Laura S.

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation created the Project Mastery grant program to support competency-based education initiatives in large school systems that serve a high proportion of disadvantaged youth. Competency-based education meets students where they are academically, provides students with opportunities for choice, and awards…

  17. Competence is Competence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bramming, Pia

    2004-01-01

    The article will address competence, its' diffusion, application, and the consequence of this application within the field of Human Resource Management (HRM). The concept competence-in-practice will be presented and in conclusion the article will consider implications and possibilities of compete...

  18. The effect of high school chemistry instruction on students' academic self-concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Peter Wallace

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of extended instruction in high school chemistry on the academic self-concept of students and determine what parts of the learning experience need to be addressed to make the interaction a more positive one. Fifty-seven students from three metropolitan public schools, who were enrolled in college preparatory chemistry classes, were asked to complete a written instrument, before and after extended chemistry instruction, that measures academic self-concept. Twenty-one of the students who took part in the written task volunteered to answer some in-depth interview questions concerning their academic self-concept and its relationship to chemistry instruction. Student responses, instrument scores, and student chemistry grades were analyzed for a variety of chemistry learning--academic self-concept connections and interactions. Results showed that there was a positive interaction for less than half of the students involved in the interview sessions. The results from the written instrument showed similar findings. Comparing chemistry grades and academic self-concept revealed an uncertain connection between the two, especially for students with strong academic self-concepts. Students felt that the laboratory experience was often disconnected from the remainder of chemistry instruction and recommended that the laboratory experience be integrated with classroom work. Students also expressed concerns regarding the volume of algorithmic mathematical calculations associated with college preparatory chemistry instruction. Results of this study suggest that secondary chemistry instruction must become more aware of the affective domain of learning and develop a mindful awareness of its connection to the cognitive domain if chemistry teaching and learning is going to better facilitate the intellectual growth of secondary students.

  19. A Comparative Study of the Academic Stress and Depression among High School Girl and Boy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanehkeshi, Ali; Basavarajappa

    2012-01-01

    This paper compares the difference between boy and girl high school students of 1st grade to 3rd grade in academic stress and depression. Using a random stratified sampling 120 girl and boy students (60 girls and 60 boys) were selected from 1st grade (n = 40), 2nd grade (n = 40) and 3rd grade (n = 40) high school students. In this study gender and…

  20. Physical Fitness Measures Among Adolescents With High and Low Motor Competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Þórdís Gísladóttir

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Physical fitness level is considered to yield substantial health benefits. Earlier studies have demonstrated poor physical fitness outcomes and reduced level of physical activity among adolescents. There have been very few studies on adolescents concerning motor competence and its possible relationship with physical fitness. This study’s aim was to compare physical fitness in adolescents aged 15 to 16 years with high (HMC and low motor competence (LMC. From an initial sample of 94 adolescents, a group of 18 were identified as having HMC or LMC on the Movement Assessment Battery for Children-2. Eight adolescents (3 girls and 5 boys comprised the LMC group, and 10 children (5 girls and 5 boys made up the HMC group. To measure physical fitness, four tasks were used: one endurance test, one power test, one speed test (Test of Physical Fitness and one flexibility test (EUROFIT. A one-way ANOVA revealed significant differences between the group with LMC and the HMC group in all tasks except the endurance task (Reduced Cooper Test. The findings suggest that physical fitness components are negatively associated with LMC. However, no significant difference between the two groups in the Reduced Cooper Test might indicate that adolescents with LMC can enhance their cardiovascular fitness despite their poor motor coordination.

  1. Competing Risks Data Analysis with High-dimensional Covariates:An Application in Bladder Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Leili Tapak; Massoud Saidijam; Majid Sadeghifar; Jalal Poorolajal; Hossein Mahjub

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of microarray data is associated with the methodological problems of high dimension and small sample size. Various methods have been used for variable selection in high-dimension and small sample size cases with a single survival endpoint. However, little effort has been directed toward addressing competing risks where there is more than one failure risks. This study compared three typical variable selection techniques including Lasso, elastic net, and likelihood-based boosting for high-dimensional time-to-event data with competing risks. The per-formance of these methods was evaluated via a simulation study by analyzing a real dataset related to bladder cancer patients using time-dependent receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve and bootstrap .632+prediction error curves. The elastic net penalization method was shown to outper-form Lasso and boosting. Based on the elastic net, 33 genes out of 1381 genes related to bladder cancer were selected. By fitting to the Fine and Gray model, eight genes were highly significant (P< 0.001). Among them, expression of RTN4, SON, IGF1R, SNRPE, PTGR1, PLEK, and ETFDH was associated with a decrease in survival time, whereas SMARCAD1 expression was associated with an increase in survival time. This study indicates that the elastic net has a higher capacity than the Lasso and boosting for the prediction of survival time in bladder cancer patients. Moreover, genes selected by all methods improved the predictive power of the model based on only clinical variables, indicating the value of information contained in the microarray features.

  2. Job competencies for the malaysian consultant project managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Ilias Said

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Architects, engineers and quantity surveyors are among the main players in construction.Coming from different background and professional background, these professionals bring in their own respective styles and methods of project management practices. There is now a body of opinion among industry people and academics alike that the industry needs to establish competency standard especially for project managers. Irrespective of their professional background, competent project managers should hypothetically deliver high quality services to the clients. A study was conducted at the School of Housing, Building and Planning, University of Science Malaysia (USM, to develop a job competence model for Consultant Project Managers (CPMs. It attempts to determine a set of minimum standards of skills and competencies for CPMs. This paper reports the findings of the study. It provides an insight into the type of competencies needed by CPMs based on the “Job Competence Model for Consultant Project Managers” developed from the study.

  3. The role of chronotype, gender, test anxiety, and conscientiousness in academic achievement of high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahafar, Arash; Maghsudloo, Mahdis; Farhangnia, Sajedeh; Vollmer, Christian; Randler, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Previous findings have demonstrated that chronotype (morningness/intermediate/eveningness) is correlated with cognitive functions, that is, people show higher mental performance when they do a test at their preferred time of day. Empirical studies found a relationship between morningness and higher learning achievement at school and university. However, only a few of them controlled for other moderating and mediating variables. In this study, we included chronotype, gender, conscientiousness and test anxiety in a structural equation model (SEM) with grade point average (GPA) as academic achievement outcome. Participants were 158 high school students and results revealed that boys and girls differed in GPA and test anxiety significantly, with girls reporting better grades and higher test anxiety. Moreover, there was a positive correlation between conscientiousness and GPA (r = 0.17) and morningness (r = 0.29), respectively, and a negative correlation between conscientiousness and test anxiety (r = -0.22). The SEM demonstrated that gender was the strongest predictor of academic achievement. Lower test anxiety predicted higher GPA in girls but not in boys. Additionally, chronotype as moderator revealed a significant association between gender and GPA for evening types and intermediate types, while intermediate types showed a significant relationship between test anxiety and GPA. Our results suggest that gender is an essential predictor of academic achievement even stronger than low or absent test anxiety. Future studies are needed to explore how gender and chronotype act together in a longitudinal panel design and how chronotype is mediated by conscientiousness in the prediction of academic achievement.

  4. The role of Effective Supervision on academic performance of Senior High Schools in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Rosemary Ankoma-Sey

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In all facets of life, supervision has become a cross-cutting edge tool and a pivot around which performance revolves. There are widespread and on-going debates centred on the influence of effective supervision on academic performance in our academic institutions. This study examined the role of supervision on academic performance in Senior High Schools (SHS in Ghana. The study was based on the collegial model of educational management and the supervision model, Theory Y as proposed by Douglas McGregor. This study employed the descriptive research survey design. Through a questionnaire, data analysed was collected from 963 respondents who were purposively selected from randomised schools in each region comprising of headmasters, their assistants and heads of department of 155 SHSs across Ghana. The WAEC results (2006-2009 and 2011 of the sampled schools were analysed. Reliability coefficient of the questionnaire was Cronbach’s alpha (α = 0.826. The Statistical Product and Service Solutions (SPSS version 18 software was employed in the analyses of data using, mean, standard deviation, correlation and independent t-test. The study revealed that there was a positive weak significant relationship between supervision roles of heads and academic performance of students. Moreso, there was a positive weak significant relationship between gender of heads and their supervision roles. The study recommended that supervision should be intensified in SHS. Heads of SHS should be re-orientated in the new trends of supervision in schools.

  5. High school students with asthma: attitudes about school health, absenteeism, and its impact on academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenitsky-Korn, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is the most frequent reason for absence from school; it accounts for one-third of all days of missed instruction, placing students at risk for academic failure and social isolation. This study compared high school students with asthma with those without asthma, and examined the relationship of their attitudes toward school health services, absenteeism, academic achievement, and the supposition that school nurse services play an essential part in the academic process. Surveys were completed by all students who participated in the study. Twenty-eight students with asthma reported levels of illness and school nurse support in an additional survey. Data revealed that students with asthma were absent more frequently, scored lower in mathematics, and participated less in school activities than their peers without asthma. Their level of illness did not predict the number of days absent, which was negatively correlated with achievement and positively correlated with students' permissive attitudes toward absenteeism. Findings indicate that school nurse interventions were sources of physical, social, emotional, and academic support.

  6. Reliability and validity of academic motivation scale for sports high school students’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haslofça Fehime

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to test validity and reliability of Academic Motivation Scale (AMS for sports high school students. The research conducted with 357 volunteered girls (n=117 and boys (n=240. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that Chi square (χ2, degrees of freedom (df and χ2/df ratio were 1102.90, 341 and 3.234, respectively. Goodness of Fit Index, Comparative Fit Index, Non-normed Fit Index and Incremental Fit Index were between 0.92-0.95. Additionally, Adjusted Goodness of Fit Index, An Average Errors Square Root and Root Mean Square Error of Approximation were 0.88, 0.070 and 0.079, respectively. Subscale reliability coefficients were between 0.77 and 0.86. Test-retest correlations of AMS were found between 0.79 and 0.91. Results showed that scale was suitable for determination of sports high school students’ academicals motivation levels.

  7. Academic Motivation Scale: adaptation and psychometric analyses for high school and college students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stover JB

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Juliana Beatriz Stover,1 Guadalupe de la Iglesia,1 Antonio Ria,l Boubeta,2 Mercedes Fernández Liporace11Buenos Aires University and National Research Council (CONICET, Buenos Aires, Argentina; 2Santiago de Compostela University, Santiago de Compostela, SpainAbstract: The Academic Motivation Scale (AMS, supported in Self-Determination Theory, has been applied in recent decades as well in high school as in college education. Although several versions in Spanish are available, the underlying linguistic and cultural differences raise important issues when they are applied to Latin-American population. Consequently an adapted version of the AMS was developed, and its construct validity was analyzed in Argentine students. Results obtained on a sample that included 723 students from Buenos Aires (393 high school and 330 college students verified adequate psychometric properties in this new version, solving some controversies regarded to its dimensionality.Keywords: Academic Motivation, self-determination, confirmatory factor analysis, internal consistency

  8. Poultry Producer. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), derived from a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process, is a comprehensive and verified employer competency list for a poultry producer program. It contains units (with or without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that identify the occupational, academic, and employability…

  9. Machine Trades. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), derived from a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process, is a current comprehensive and verified employer competency program list for machine trades. Each unit (with or without subunits) contains competencies and competency builders that identify the occupational, academic, and employability…

  10. A Comparative Analysis of Social Media Usage and Academic Performance in Public and Private Senior High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingle, Jeffrey; Adams, Musah; Adjei, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    The study comparatively analyzed social media usage and academic performance in public and private senior high schools. The issue of social media and academic performance has been a very debatable topic with regard to its effect. This study further explores the relation between private and public schools in relation to social media use and…

  11. Yoga Improves Academic Performance in Urban High School Students Compared to Physical Education: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagins, Marshall; Rundle, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Yoga programs within schools have become more widespread but research regarding the potential effect on academic achievement remains limited. This study cluster-randomized 112 students within a single New York City public high school to participate in either school-based yoga or physical education (PE) for an entire academic year. The primary…

  12. Bullshit in Academic Writing: A Protocol Analysis of a High School Senior's Process of Interpreting "Much Ado about Nothing"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smagorinsky, Peter; Daigle, Elizabeth Anne; O'Donnell-Allen, Cindy; Bynum, Susan

    2010-01-01

    This article reports a study of one high school senior's process of academic bullshitting as she wrote an analytic essay interpreting Shakespeare's "Much Ado about Nothing." The construct of bullshit has received little scholarly attention; although it is known as a common phenomenon in academic speech and writing, it has rarely been the subject…

  13. The Impact of Principal Perception on Student Academic Climate and Achievement in High School: How Does It Measure Up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urick, Angela; Bowers, Alex J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the independent direct effects of student and principal perceptions of academic climate on student achievement in high school. To date, few studies have considered the influence of principal perceptions of academic climate on student achievement. In the present study, we test a set of two-level hierarchical…

  14. Study or internship abroad and the acquisition of international competencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoven, R.F.M. (Rudy) van den; Walenkamp, Jos; Heijer, J. den

    2015-01-01

    The focus of the present study is the extent to which an internship or study abroad contributes to students’ development of international competencies, such as interpersonal and intercultural competencies, foreign language skills, and international academic and professional competencies.

  15. Study or internship abroad and the acquisition of international competencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. den Heijer; Jos Walenkamp; R.F.M. (Rudy) van den Hoven

    2015-01-01

    The focus of the present study is the extent to which an internship or study abroad contributes to students’ development of international competencies, such as interpersonal and intercultural competencies, foreign language skills, and international academic and professional competencies.

  16. Developing high-level change and innovation agents: competencies and challenges for executive leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloch, Kathy; Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek

    2013-01-01

    The work of health care reform and revolution requires leadership competencies that integrate the digital realities of time, space, and media. Leadership skills and behaviors of command, control, and directing from predigital times are no longer effective, given the impacts of the digital changes. Developing leadership competence in evidence-driven processes, facilitation, collaborative teamwork, and instilling a sense of urgency is the work of today's executive leaders. Ten competencies necessary for contemporary executive leadership are presented in this article.

  17. Psychosocial Stress, Internalized Symptoms, and the Academic Achievement of Hispanic Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alva, Sylvia Alatorre; de Los Reyes, Rydda

    1999-01-01

    Examined the relationship between stressful life events, internalized symptoms of stress, and academic achievement in urban Hispanic high school students. Found direct effects of stressful life events and perceived competence on school grades and internalized symptoms. Multiplicative interactions for perceived competence were not significant…

  18. A Framework for Assessing High School Students' Intercultural Communicative Competence in a Computer-Mediated Language Learning Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hsinyi; Lu, Wei-Hsin; Wang, Chao-I

    2009-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to identify the essential dimensions of intercultural communicative competence (ICC) and to establish a framework for assessing the ICC level of high school students that included a self-report inventory and scoring rubrics for online interaction in intercultural contexts. A total of 472 high school students from…

  19. Collective academic supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete; Thomsen, Rie; Wichmann-Hansen, Gitte

    2013-01-01

    are interconnected. Collective Academic Supervision provides possibilities for systematic interaction between individual master students in their writing process. In this process they learn core academic competencies, such as the ability to assess theoretical and practical problems in their practice and present them...

  20. Alcohol consumption and academic performance in a population of Spanish high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Frías, M; de la fe Fernandez, M; Planells, E; Miranda, M T; Mataix, J; Llopis, J

    2001-11-01

    The present study was designed to identify patterns of alcohol consumption among Spanish high school students and describe the relationship between alcohol intake and school performance. The sample population consisted of students, aged 14 to 19 years, who were attending high school during the academic year 1994-95 in the city of Granada in southern Spain. We studied 1,602 (861 female) students (alpha error - 0.05, sampling error = 5%), using a self-administered questionnaire that contained items about individual and family demographics, quantity and frequency of alcohol consumption, and school performance. Total alcohol consumption was recorded as grams (g) of alcohol per week and per day for three categories of alcoholic drinks: wine, beer and distilled spirits. The percentage of nondrinkers was 21.05% for male adolescents and 28.56% for female adolescents. The mean amount of alcohol consumed per week was larger in male than in female students (F= 18.36, l/l,594 df, p alcohol consumed. No significant differences in drinking patterns were found between students at public and private schools. The risk of academic failure increased considerably when more than 150 g of alcohol were consumed per week (OR: 2.91; 95% CI: 1.94-4.43). Although we cannot draw any conclusions about the causes of the association between academic failure and teenage drinking, our results do show that the risk of failing increases together with alcohol intake. However, it should be noted that academic achievement is also influenced by many factors other than alcohol consumption.

  1. DEVELOPMENT PERSONALITY/SOCIAL COMPETENCY OF SECONDARY HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS TROUGH A COMPREHENSIVE GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar Sutoyo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The goal this research is to find the effectiveness of model guidance and counseling comprehensive program to develop the personality/ social competency of secondary high school students.This research uses method one group pretest and posttest design. In data collecting technique, this research was directly done through interview, documentation and assessment scale.The conclusions of the research are, The model of guidance and counseling comprehensive program that developed is effective to evolving the personality/ social competency of secondary high school students. Therefore it, counselor need to have leadership ability, create an collaboration atmospherebetweenstakeholders, and tecnology information mastered. Keywords: Comprehensive Program; Personality/ Social Competency 

  2. Mature seed-derived callus of the model indica rice variety Kasalath is highly competent in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saika, Hiroaki; Toki, Seiichi

    2010-12-01

    We previously established an efficient Agrobacterium-mediated transformation system using primary calli derived from mature seeds of the model japonica rice variety Nipponbare. We expected that the shortened tissue culture period would reduce callus browning--a common problem with the indica transformation system during prolonged tissue culture in the undifferentiated state. In this study, we successfully applied our efficient transformation system to Kasalath--a model variety of indica rice. The Luc reporter system is sensitive enough to allow quantitative analysis of the competency of rice callus for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. We unexpectedly discovered that primary callus of Kasalath exhibits a remarkably high competency for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation compared to Nipponbare. Southern blot analysis and Luc luminescence showed that independent transformation events in primary callus of Kasalath occurred successfully at ca. tenfold higher frequency than in Nipponbare, and single copy T-DNA integration was observed in ~40% of these events. We also compared the competency of secondary callus of Nipponbare and Kasalath and again found superior competency in Kasalath, although the identification and subsequent observation of independent transformation events in secondary callus is difficult due to the vigorous growth of both transformed and non-transformed cells. An efficient transformation system in Kasalath could facilitate the identification of QTL genes, since many QTL genes are analyzed in a Nipponbare × Kasalath genetic background. The higher transformation competency of Kasalath could be a useful trait in the establishment of highly efficient systems involving new transformation technologies such as gene targeting.

  3. Academic Buoyancy: Towards an Understanding of Students' Everyday Academic Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew J.; Marsh, Herbert W.

    2008-01-01

    Academic buoyancy is developed as a construct reflecting everyday academic resilience within a positive psychology context and is defined as students' ability to successfully deal with academic setbacks and challenges that are typical of the ordinary course of school life (e.g., poor grades, competing deadlines, exam pressure, difficult…

  4. Contingencies of self-worth, academic failure, and goal pursuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Lora E; Crocker, Jennifer; Kiefer, Amy K

    2007-11-01

    Two studies examine the effects of failure on explicit and implicit self-esteem, affect, and self-presentation goals as a function of people's trait self-esteem and academic contingency of self-worth. Study 1 shows that participants with low self-esteem (LSE) who receive failure feedback experience lower state self-esteem, less positive affect, and less desire to be perceived as competent the more they base self-worth on academics. In contrast, participants with high self-esteem (HSE) who strongly base self-worth on academics show a slight boost in state self-esteem and desire to be perceived as competent following failure. Study 2 shows that following failure, academically contingent LSE participants downplay the importance of appearing competent to others and associate themselves with failure on an implicit level. Taken together, these findings suggest that academically contingent HSE people show resilience following failure, whereas academically contingent LSE people experience negative outcomes and disengage from the pursuit of competence self-presentation goals.

  5. Leadership development study :success profile competencies and high-performing leaders at Sandia National Laboratories.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Katherine M.; Mulligan, Deborah Rae; Szenasi, Gail L.; Crowder, Stephen Vernon

    2005-04-01

    Sandia is undergoing tremendous change. Sandia's executive management recognized the need for leadership development. About ten years ago the Business, Leadership, and Management Development department in partnership with executive management developed and implemented the organizational leadership Success Profile Competencies to help address some of the changes on the horizon such as workforce losses and lack of a skill set in the area of interpersonal skills. This study addresses the need for the Business, Leadership, and Management Development department to provide statistically sound data in two areas. One is to demonstrate that the organizational 360-degree success profile assessment tool has made a difference for leaders. A second area is to demonstrate the presence of high performing leaders at the Labs. The study utilized two tools to address these two areas. Study participants were made up of individuals who have solid data on Sandia's 360-degree success profile assessment tool. The second assessment tool was comprised of those leaders who participated in the Lockheed Martin Corporation Employee Preferences Survey. Statistical data supports the connection between leader indicators and the 360-degree assessment tool. The study also indicates the presence of high performing leaders at Sandia.

  6. Factors that contribute to Hispanic English Language Learners' high academic performance in high school science in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas: A multicase study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizondo, Antonio

    The purpose of this multicase study was to discover factors that contribute to Hispanic English language learners' (ELL) high academic performance in high school science in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas. Participants were high school seniors enrolled in college-level classes who had scored commended on the science exit-level Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills and ranked toward the top of their class. One student from each of four different high schools in south Texas were selected to participate. Schools identified students meeting the participant criteria and provided consent documents. In this qualitative research study, students were interviewed on three different dates. Administrators and science teachers were also interviewed for triangulation. Significant findings showed that intrinsic qualities were mainly responsible for factors contributing to high academic performance. Hispanic ELL students need meaningful responsibilities to internalize self-esteem and self-efficacy to realize high academic performance. Self-motivation, a contributing factor, provides students with a positive outlook on high academic performance and the ability to defer more immediate undermining rewards. Students expect to contribute to society by helping others. This helps their self-esteem as well as their self-worth and supports high academic performance. Parental and teacher support are critical for high academic performance. Low socioeconomic status alone is not a causal factor for poor academic performance. School administrations should assign willing and enthusiastic teachers as mentors to target students and provide skills to parents that promote, inspire, and motivate students' intrinsic qualities. Future studies should examine different leadership styles that maximize teachers' ability to influence students' high academic performance. Finally, students should be given guidance in setting career goals and demonstrating that high academic achievement is attainable and

  7. The effects of modeling instruction on high school physics academic achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Tiffanie L.

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether Modeling Instruction, compared to traditional lecturing, is an effective instructional method to promote academic achievement in selected high school physics classes at a rural middle Tennessee high school. This study used an ex post facto , quasi-experimental research methodology. The independent variables in this study were the instructional methods of teaching. The treatment variable was Modeling Instruction and the control variable was traditional lecture instruction. The Treatment Group consisted of participants in Physical World Concepts who received Modeling Instruction. The Control Group consisted of participants in Physical Science who received traditional lecture instruction. The dependent variable was gains scores on the Force Concepts Inventory (FCI). The participants for this study were 133 students each in both the Treatment and Control Groups (n = 266), who attended a public, high school in rural middle Tennessee. The participants were administered the Force Concepts Inventory (FCI) prior to being taught the mechanics of physics. The FCI data were entered into the computer-based Statistical Package for the Social Science (SPSS). Two independent samples t-tests were conducted to answer the research questions. There was a statistically significant difference between the treatment and control groups concerning the instructional method. Modeling Instructional methods were found to be effective in increasing the academic achievement of students in high school physics. There was no statistically significant difference between FCI gains scores for gender. Gender was found to have no effect on the academic achievement of students in high school physics classes. However, even though there was not a statistically significant difference, female students' gains scores were higher than male students' gains scores when Modeling Instructional methods of teaching were used. Based on these findings, it is recommended

  8. Intellectual and non-intellectual determinants of high academic achievement – the contribution of personality traits to the assessment of high performance potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Schubhart

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a study is presented which tries to explain and predict high academic achievement in children or adolescents on the basis of intellectual and non-intellectual determinants – in this case, performance relevant personality traits as well as the social environment of stimulation. The prognosis of high academic achievement is based on a new diagnostic model, the Viennese Diagnostic Model of High Achievement Potential, which undergoes its first empirical validation here. The results show impressive evidence that performance-relevant personality traits and categories of social environment of stimulation contribute to high academic achievement in children and adolescents of above-average intelligence.

  9. Relationships between Health-Related Fitness Knowledge, Perceived Competence, Self- Determination, and Physical Activity Behaviors of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslem, Liz; Wilkinson, Carol; Prusak, Keven A.; Christensen, William F.; Pennington, Todd

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was (a) to test a hypothesized model of motivation within the context of conceptual physical education (CPE), and (b) to explore the strength and directionality of perceived competence for physical activity as a possible mediator for health-related fitness knowledge (HRFK) and physical activity behaviors. High school…

  10. Dome-shaped magnetic order competing with high-temperature superconductivity at high pressures in FeSe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J P; Matsuura, K; Ye, G Z; Mizukami, Y; Shimozawa, M; Matsubayashi, K; Yamashita, M; Watashige, T; Kasahara, S; Matsuda, Y; Yan, J-Q; Sales, B C; Uwatoko, Y; Cheng, J-G; Shibauchi, T

    2016-07-19

    The coexistence and competition between superconductivity and electronic orders, such as spin or charge density waves, have been a central issue in high transition-temperature (Tc) superconductors. Unlike other iron-based superconductors, FeSe exhibits nematic ordering without magnetism whose relationship with its superconductivity remains unclear. Moreover, a pressure-induced fourfold increase of Tc has been reported, which poses a profound mystery. Here we report high-pressure magnetotransport measurements in FeSe up to ∼15 GPa, which uncover the dome shape of magnetic phase superseding the nematic order. Above ∼6 GPa the sudden enhancement of superconductivity (Tc≤38.3 K) accompanies a suppression of magnetic order, demonstrating their competing nature with very similar energy scales. Above the magnetic dome, we find anomalous transport properties suggesting a possible pseudogap formation, whereas linear-in-temperature resistivity is observed in the normal states of the high-Tc phase above 6 GPa. The obtained phase diagram highlights unique features of FeSe among iron-based superconductors, but bears some resemblance to that of high-Tc cuprates.

  11. A pilot study examining activity participation, sensory responsiveness, and competence in children with high functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Stacey; Bendixen, Roxanna M; Lawrence, Tami; Lane, Shelly J

    2011-11-01

    This pilot study explored activity patterns in children with and without ASD and examined the role of sensory responsiveness in determining children's level of competence in activity performance. Twenty-six children with high functioning ASD and twenty-six typically-developing children 6-12 years old were assessed using the Sensory Profile and the Child Behavior Checklist. Results reflect differences in the types of activities and jobs/chores engaged in by children with ASD compared to children without ASD. Significant differences were seen in overall level of competence in activities, social, and school performance. Children demonstrating more frequent Sensory Sensitivity and Sensory Avoiding had significantly lower competence scores than children with fewer behaviors in these domains, suggesting that sensory responsiveness may impact the ability to participate successfully.

  12. THE DEVELOPMENT OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING (ELT COMPETENCY-BASED SYLLABUS IN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besral Besral

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Although competency has long been the major concern in ELT either in the EFL or ESL contexts, the rise of competency-based syllabus launched by the Ministry of National Education (2006 brought about significant issue among the English teachers in the country. One of the crucial issues is that how to transfer the concepts of competences into the syllabus design.  Since a syllabus does not only contain a list of subject content, but also how curriculum planners (teachers reflect their understanding and belief about nature of language and of language teaching and learning, the ELT must be carried out to achieve communicative competence. Current investigation on the practices of ELT, however, indicates that English teachers are still walking in place, leaving the CC as a big slogan in their jobs.

  13. THE DEVELOPMENT OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING (ELT COMPETENCY-BASED SYLLABUS IN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besral Besral

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Although competency has long been the major concern in ELT either in the EFL or ESL contexts, the rise of competency-based syllabus launched by the Ministry of National Education (2006 brought about significant issue among the English teachers in the country. One of the crucial issues is that how to transfer the concepts of competences into the syllabus design.  Since a syllabus does not only contain a list of subject content, but also how curriculum planners (teachers reflect their understanding and belief about nature of language and of language teaching and learning, the ELT must be carried out to achieve communicative competence. Current investigation on the practices of ELT, however, indicates that English teachers are still walking in place, leaving the CC as a big slogan in their jobs.

  14. Core Competence Development : paradigm and practical implementations

    OpenAIRE

    Koay, Ze Wei; E.Markov, Denis

    2011-01-01

    The theory of core competence has drawn a large amount of attention in the academic field as well as of practitioners in the corporate world. Theory asserts that long-term value creation and competitiveness of the corporation relies on full-scale exploitation and timely development of company Core Competences; business strategies should be built around the core competencies of a firm. Identification and exploitation of Core Competences as well as essential elements comprising Core Competences...

  15. Adolescents' perceptions of their parents' academic expectations: comparison of American, Chinese-American, and Chinese high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H; Lan, W

    1998-01-01

    Cultural background not only influences family beliefs about the value of education, but may affect how academic expectations are communicated by parents and perceived by their children. This study examined differences in willingness to conform to parents' expectations of academic achievement as perceived by American, Chinese-American, and Chinese high school students. Findings indicated that Chinese students were more willing to accept their parents' advice and cared more about fulfilling academic expectations than did American students. Students in all three groups had similar feelings of independence. The views of Chinese-American students reflected the influence of both their Chinese heritage and the American culture in which they resided.

  16. Social Competence with an Unfamiliar Peer in Children and Adolescents with High Functioning Autism: Measurement and Individual Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, Lauren V; Burrows, Catherine A; Schwartz, Caley B; Henderson, Heather A

    2015-09-01

    Children and adolescents with high functioning autism (HFA) display heterogeneity in social competence, which may be particularly evident during interactions with unfamiliar peers. The goal of this study was to examine predictors of social competence variability during an unfamiliar peer interaction. Thirty-nine participants with HFA and 39 age-, gender- and IQ-matched comparison participants were observed during dyadic laboratory interactions and detailed behavioral coding revealed three social competence dimensions: social initiative, social reciprocity, and social self-monitoring. Participants with HFA displayed higher social initiative but lower reciprocity than comparison participants. For participants with HFA, theory of mind was positively associated with observed initiative. For COM participants, social anxiety was negatively associated with reciprocity. However, for HFA participants, there was a quadratic relation between parent-reported social anxiety and observed reciprocity, demonstrating that low and high levels of anxiety were associated with low reciprocity. Results demonstrated the utility of our behavioral coding scheme as a valid assessment of social competence for children and adolescents with and without HFA. The curvilinear association between social anxiety and reciprocity highlights the importance of examining nonlinear relations in individuals with HFA, and emphasizes that discrete profiles of social anxiety in individuals with HFA may necessitate different treatment options.

  17. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    6, 7 May LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Decoding the Human Genome, Scientific basis and ethic and social aspects by S.E. Antonarakis and A. Mauron / Univ. of Geneva Decoding the Human genome is a very up-to-date topic, raising several questions besides purely scientific, in view of the two competing teams (public and private), the ethics of using the results, and the fact that the project went apparently faster and easier than expected. The lecture series will address the following chapters: Scientific basis and challenges, Ethical and social aspects of genomics. Academic Training Françoise Benz Tel. 73127

  18. Scientific reasoning skills of high school students’ relationship gender and their academic success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Demirtas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed to examine the relationships between scientific reasoning skills of high school students and academic success that science (Physics, Chemistry and Biology, language (Turkish Language and Literature with Foreign Language, social (History and Geograpy and ability groups (Painting, Music and Physical Education. For this purpose a test was executed to 408 first grade students from different seven high schools in Sakarya. Data were collected by a Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning created by Lawson. Success grades in first semester of students were used to determine the GPA of students. According to reasons of the research, a relation between scientific reasoning skills of high school students with their GPA and gender was found.

  19. STEM Education-An Exploration of Its Impact on Female Academic Success in High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ybarra, Michael E.

    The 21st century presents many new career opportunities and choices for women today. However, over the past decade, there has been a growing concern that there will not be enough students trained in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) to fill jobs in the United States. Current research reveals that there will be a need for highly skilled workers in the STEM industries, along with the opportunities to earn higher wages. With these opportunities ahead, it is paramount that secondary schools prepare not only their male students, but also their female students for these lucrative STEM careers. The purpose of this study was to investigate to what degree female high school students enrolled in a STEM academy, and who may play sports, experience academic differences in college preparatory math and science courses, and in the math and science portions of the California Standards Test. Academic differences shall be defined as differences in grade point averages. A comparison will be made of female students who take similar classes and play sports, but who are not enrolled in a STEM academy program. This comparison will then incorporate a quantitative non-experimental research design, along with a chi-square test.

  20. Reciprocal Effects between Intrinsic Reading Motivation and Reading Competence? A Cross-Lagged Panel Model for Academic Track and Nonacademic Track Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffner, Ellen; Philipp, Maik; Schiefele, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated positive relations between intrinsic reading motivation and reading competence. However, the causal direction of these relations and the moderating role of relevant background variables (e.g., students' achievement level) are not well understood. In the present study, a cross-lagged panel model was applied to…

  1. Faculty Sense of Academic Optimism and Its Relationship to Students' Achievement in Well Performing High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromartie, Michael Tyrone

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the organizational characteristics and behaviors that contribute to sustaining a culture of academic optimism as a mechanism of student achievement. While there is a developing research base identifying both the individual elements of academic optimism as well as the academic optimism construct itself as…

  2. Effects of the Performance Management Context on Australian Academics' Engagement with the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathison, Karin

    2015-01-01

    In the context of increased demands for excellence in all areas, academic promotion and tenure is now directly linked to achievement of measurable outputs in all areas of performance. In a work environment characterised by high workloads, competing expectations and reduced resources, academics must increasingly demonstrate active engagement with…

  3. Becoming In/Competent Learners in the United States: Refugee Students' Academic Identities in the Figured World of Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Aydin

    2014-01-01

    A practice-based dialectic theory of identity was used in this study to explore the cultural-historical context of an urban charter school in which a group of newly arrived Muslim Turk refugee students' academic identities were formed. The school, located in the Southwestern United States, was founded by a global Islamist movement.…

  4. Digital Academic Revolution Mentorship Competency: #1 The Declaration--Mentoring the Process of Learning with Screencast Assessment--Plugging into Students' Digital DNA a Decade Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, Martin; Fose, Luanne

    2016-01-01

    Spanning the 2015-2016 academic year, Cal Poly Communications Studies Sr. Lecturer, Martin Mehl, and Lead Instructional Designer, Luanne Fose, from the Cal Poly Center for Teaching, Learning, and Technology, conducted a formal, institute-wide research pilot on whether or not video assessment can improve faculty feedback for student assignments.…

  5. Closing the Academic Achievement Gap on the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE) through Professional Learning Communities (PLC) Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buenrostro, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of importance that DuFour's nine characteristics of highly effective schools have on closing the academic achievement gap on the California High School Exit Exam, as perceived by high school principals. The study also examined the strategies believed to be most important in developing…

  6. Closing the Academic Achievement Gap on the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE) through Professional Learning Communities (PLC) Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buenrostro, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of importance that DuFour's nine characteristics of highly effective schools have on closing the academic achievement gap on the California High School Exit Exam, as perceived by high school principals. The study also examined the strategies believed to be most important in…

  7. School Engagement, Risky Peers, and Student-Teacher Relationships as Mediators of School Violence in Taiwanese Vocational versus Academically Oriented High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ji-Kang; Astor, Ron Avi

    2011-01-01

    Educational tracking based on academic ability accounts for different school dynamics between vocational versus academically-oriented high schools in Taiwan. Many educational practitioners predict that the settings of vocational schools and academic schools mediate school violence in different ways. Alternatively, some researchers argue the actual…

  8. High work ability in the scientific activity of older and experienced academics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjuhan, Ulo; Taidre, Erika

    2012-01-01

    At present the health of people in theirs 60s is the same as in theirs 50s around fifty years ago. Using older academics is a topical problem for universities in remaining efficient. Data regarding academics' scientific productivity at universities were collected and questionnaires compiled in the Faculty of Economics and Business Administration of Tallinn University of Technology in Estonia. Studies showed that the productivity of academics at university increases as they grow older (into their 60s). These academics are valuable to the university. The choice of academics should be made according to the candidates' knowledge and ability to work.

  9. Intelligence, classroom behavior, and academic achievement in children at high and low risk for psychopathology: a structural equation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worland, J; Weeks, D G; Janes, C L; Strock, B D

    1984-09-01

    The intelligence, academic achievement, and classroom behavior of 158 children were assessed in a sample that is being followed longitudinally. The sample included children at high risk for mental disorder by virtue of having a parent with a psychiatric diagnosis of schizophrenia or affective disorder, children at moderate risk, and children at low risk. A series of path analyses indicated that in this sample (1) classroom behavior was more likely an affect that a cause of academic achievement, and (2) the influence of parental psychopathology on classroom behavior was mediated by a child's intelligence and academic achievement. We were unable to substantiate an unmediated causal link between parental psychopathology and children's academic achievement or classroom behavior.

  10. What Makes a Good Program? A Case Study of a School Admitting High Academic Achievers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching Man Lam

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of a qualitative study that explored the administration and implementation of the Tier 1 Program (Secondary 1 Curriculum of the Project P.A.T.H.S. The case study method was used to explore perceptions of the teachers and the project coordinator of program effectiveness, and to identify various factors for program success. A school admitting high academic achievers was selected, and site visits, as well as individual and focus group interviews, were conducted with the program coordinator, social worker, and course teachers. The results suggested that clear vision and program goals, high quality of curriculum, helpful leadership, positive teacher attitude, and strong administrative support are factors for program success. Analyzing the data enables the researchers to understand the characteristics of a successful program as well as the interplay among factors for producing success.

  11. High school concussions in the 2008-2009 academic year: mechanism, symptoms, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, William P; d'Hemecourt, Pierre; Comstock, R Dawn

    2010-12-01

    An estimated 136 000 concussions occur per academic year in high schools alone. The effects of repetitive concussions and the potential for catastrophic injury have made concussion an injury of significant concern for young athletes. The objective of this study was to describe the mechanism of injury, symptoms, and management of sport-related concussions using the High School Reporting Information Online (HS RIO) surveillance system. Descriptive epidemiology study. All concussions recorded by HS RIO during the 2008-2009 academic year were included. Analyses were performed using SPSS software. Chi-square analysis was performed for all categorical variables. Statistical significance was considered for P concussions were recorded. The most common mechanism (76.2%) was contact with another player, usually a head-to-head collision (52.7%). Headache was experienced in 93.4%; 4.6% lost consciousness. Most (83.4%) had resolution of their symptoms within 1 week. Symptoms lasted longer than 1 month in 1.5%. Computerized neuropsychological testing was used in 25.7% of concussions. When neuropsychological testing was used, athletes were less likely to return to play within 1 week than those for whom it was not used (13.6% vs 32.9%; P < .01). Athletes who had neuropsychological testing appeared less likely to return to play on the same day (0.8% vs 4.2%; P = .056). A greater proportion of injured, nonfootball athletes had computerized neuropsychological testing than injured football players (23% vs 32%; P = .02) When computerized neuropsychological testing is used, high school athletes are less likely to be returned to play within 1 week of their injury. Concussed football players are less likely to have computerized neuropsychological testing than those participating in other sports. Loss of consciousness is relatively uncommon among high school athletes who sustain a sport-related concussion. The most common mechanism is contact with another player. Some athletes (1

  12. Criminal Justice. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) contains a competency list verified by expert workers and developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives from Ohio. This OCAP identifies the occupational, academic, and employability skills (competencies)…

  13. Competence: Conceptual Approach and Practice in France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Deist, Francoise

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to analyse the conceptual approaches to competence and practice in competence management in France. Design/methodology/approach: Extensive literature review, discussion with academic experts in the French competence network of AGRH and interviews concerning developments following the 2003 national agreement…

  14. Evaluating Positive Social Competence in Preschool Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    Social competence is seen as a critical aspect of academic and social success; however, the construct is often minimized to a set of social skills or the absence of negative behaviors. The current study aims to broaden the understanding of social competence by incorporating the factors associated with the development of social competence and the…

  15. Marketing Management. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) contains a competency list verified by expert workers and developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives from Ohio. This OCAP identifies the occupational, academic, and employability skills (competencies)…

  16. Academic achievement and career choice in science: Perceptions of African American urban high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sheila Kay

    2007-12-01

    Low test scores in science and fewer career choices in science among African American high school students than their White counterparts has resulted in lower interest during high school and an underrepresentation of African Americans in science and engineering fields. Reasons for this underachievement are not known. This qualitative study used a grounded theory methodology to examine what influence parental involvement, ethnic identity, and early mentoring had on the academic achievement in science and career choice in science of African American urban high school 10th grade students. Using semi-structured open-ended questions in individual interviews and focus groups, twenty participants responded to questions about African American urban high school student achievement in science and their career choice in science. The median age of participants was 15 years; 85% had passed either high school biology or physical science. The findings of the study revealed influences and interactions of selected factors on African American urban high school achievement in science. Sensing potential emerged as the overarching theme with six subthemes; A Taste of Knowledge, Sounds I Hear, Aromatic Barriers, What Others See, The Touch of Others, and The Sixth Sense. These themes correlate to the natural senses of the human body. A disconnect between what science is, their own individual learning and success, and what their participation in science could mean for them and the future of the larger society. Insight into appropriate intervention strategies to improve African American urban high school achievement in science was gained.

  17. Not choosing nursing: work experience and career choice of high academic achieving school leavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, Gavin R; McNally, James G

    2010-01-01

    Work experience has been a feature of the secondary school curriculum in the United Kingdom for a number of years. Usually requested by the pupil, it aims to provide opportunities for school pupils to enhance their knowledge and understanding of an occupation. The main benefits are claimed to be that it can help pupils develop an insight into the skills and attitudes required for an occupation and an awareness of career opportunities. However the quality and choice of placements are considered to be of great importance in this process and in influencing career choice [Department for Education and Skills (DfES), 2002a. Work Experience: A Guide for Employers. Department for Education and Skills, London]. As university departments of nursing experience a decline in the number of school pupils entering student nurse education programmes, and with the competition for school leavers becoming even greater, it is important to consider whether school pupils have access to appropriate work placements in nursing and what influence their experience has on pursuing nursing as a career choice. This paper is based on interview data from 20 high academic achieving fifth and sixth year school pupils in Scotland, paradigmatic cases from a larger survey sample (n=1062), who had considered nursing as a possible career choice within their career preference cluster, but then later disregarded nursing and decided to pursue medicine or another health care profession. This was partly reported by Neilson and Lauder [Neilson, G.R., Lauder, W., 2008. What do high academic achieving school pupils really think about a career in nursing: analysis of the narrative from paradigmatic case interviews. Nurse Education Today 28(6), 680-690] which examined what high academic achieving school pupils really thought about a career in nursing. However, the data was particularly striking in revealing the poor quality of nursing work experience for the pupils, and also their proposal that there was a need

  18. An examination of the perceived teaching competencies of novice alternatively licensed and traditionally licensed high school science teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Kathleen A.

    In most states, there are two routes to teacher licensure; traditional and alternative. The alternative route provides an accelerated entry into the classroom, often without the individual engaging in education coursework or a practicum. No matter the route, teaching skills continue to be learned by novice teachers while in the classroom with the guidance of a school-based mentor. In this study, the perceptions of mentor teachers of traditionally and alternatively licensed high school science teachers were compared with respect to mentees' science teaching competency. Further, the study explored the novice teachers' self-perception of their teaching competency. A survey, consisting of 56 Likert-type questions, was completed by mentors (N = 79) and novice high school science teachers (N = 83) in six northeastern states. The results revealed a statistically significant difference in the perceptions of the mentors of traditionally and alternatively licensed novice high school science teachers in the areas of general pedagogical knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge and professional growth, with more favorable perceptions recorded by mentors of traditionally licensed science teachers. There were no differences in the perceptions of the mentors with respect to novice high school teachers' content knowledge. There was no statistical difference in the self-perceptions of competency of the novice teachers. While alternative routes to licensure in science may be a necessity, the results of this study indicate that the lack of professional preparation may need to be addressed at the school level through the agency of the mentor. This study indicates that mentors must be prepared to provide alternatively licensed novice teachers with different assistance to that given to traditionally licensed novice teachers. School districts are urged to develop mentoring programs designed to develop the teaching competency of all novice teachers regardless of the route that led them

  19. Association of overweight and obesity with decline in academic performance among female high-school students, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adaili, M A; Mohamed, A G; Alkhashan, H

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between overweight/obesity and future academic performance among high-school students in Saudi Arabia. This was a retrospective cohort study of 257 12th grade female students in Alabna (Ministry of Defence) high schools in Riyadh during 2013/14. Overweight/obesity was based on weight and height at 10th grade. Decline in academic performance was defined as a reduction by > 1 standard deviation in marks between 10th and 12th grades. One hundred and five students were overweight/obese and 30 had declined academic performance. Self-esteem scale was similar in both groups. In a multiple logistic regression model adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, study-related lifestyle and self-esteem, overweight/obesity was associated with declining academic performance. Other independent associates included paternal and maternal education, and living outside governmentally provided housing. We report a negative independent association between overweight/obesity and subsequent academic performance among female high-school students in Saudi Arabia. The results highlight the need for community and school programmes to target overweight/obesity among high-school students.

  20. ACADEMIC TRAINING: Probing nature with high precision; particle traps, laser spectroscopy and optical combs

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    17, 18, 19 June LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Probing nature with high precision; particle traps, laser spectroscopy and optical combs by G. GABRIELSE / Harvard University, USA Experiments with atomic energy scales probe nature and its symmetries with exquisite precision. Particle traps allow the manipulation of single charged particles for months at a time, allow the most accurate comparison of theory and experiment, and promise to allow better measurement of fundamental quantities like the fine structure constant. Ions and atoms can be probed with lasers that are phase locked to microwave frequency standards via optical combs, thus calibrating optical sources in terms of the official cesium second. A series of three lectures will illustrate what can be measured and discuss key techniques.  ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz Tel. 73127 francoise.benz@cern.ch

  1. A multitrait (ADHD-IN, ADHD-HI, ODD toward adults, academic and social competence) by multisource (mothers and fathers) evaluation of the invariance and convergent/discriminant validity of the Child and Adolescent Disruptive Behavior Inventory with Thai adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, G Leonard; Desmul, Chris; Walsh, James A; Silpakit, Chatchawan; Ussahawanitchakit, Phapruke

    2009-12-01

    Confirmatory factor analysis was used with a multitrait (attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder-inattention, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder-hyperactivity/impulsivity, oppositional defiant disorder toward adults, academic competence, and social competence) by multisource (mothers and fathers) matrix to test the invariance and convergent/discriminant validity of the 5-factor model between mothers' and fathers' ratings of Thai adolescents (Year 1: n = 872; Year 2: n = 903; Year 3: n = 700; Year 4: n = 984) with the Child and Adolescent Disruptive Behavior Inventory (G. L. Burns, T. Taylor, & J. Rusby, 2001). The results showed equality of like-item loadings, intercepts, and residuals, as well as like-factor variances, covariances, and means between mothers' and fathers' ratings within each of the 4 yearly samples. In addition, the between-parent factor correlations showed convergent and discriminant validity with the within-parent factor correlations, showing discriminant validity for each year as well. These results for Thai adolescents and similar results (G. L. Burns et al., 2008) for mothers' and fathers' ratings of Brazilian, Thai, and American children provide broader support for the construct validity of the scale. The confirmatory factor analysis invariance and convergent/discriminant validity procedure with multiple sources is considered to provide a much more sophisticated procedure to evaluate the construct validity of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and oppositional defiant disorder rating scales than a single-source approach.

  2. A Comparative Study of Foreign Language Anxiety and Motivation of Academic- and Vocational-Track High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui-ju; Chen, Chien-wei

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate EFL learner language anxiety and learning motivation of high school students. Subjects included 155 students from the same private senior high school in central Taiwan, 60 in academic track and 95 in vocational track. The majority of the participants started taking English lessons either before entering elementary…

  3. Is Early Ability Grouping Good for High-Achieving Students' Psychosocial Development? Effects of the Transition into Academically Selective Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Michael; Neumann, Marko; Tetzner, Julia; Böse, Susanne; Knoppick, Henrike; Maaz, Kai; Baumert, Jürgen; Lehmann, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates school context effects on psychosocial characteristics (academic self-concept, peer relations, school satisfaction, and school anxiety) of high-achieving and gifted students. Students who did or did not make an early transition from elementary to secondary schools for high-achieving and gifted students in 5th grade…

  4. Factors Affecting Burnout and School Engagement among High School Students: Study Habits, Self- Efficacy Beliefs, and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilge, Filiz; Tuzgol Dost, Meliha; Cetin, Bayram

    2014-01-01

    This study examines high school students' levels of burnout and school engagement with respect to academic success, study habits, and self-efficacy beliefs. The data were gathered during the 2011-2012 school year from 633 students attending six high schools located in Ankara, Turkey. The analyses were conducted on responses from 605 students. The…

  5. A Comparative Investigation on the Learning Efficacy of Mechatronic Technology between Academic and Vocational High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jou, Min; Hung, Chen-Kang; Lai, Shih-Hung

    2014-01-01

    Universities in Taiwan can be divided into two major categories of comprehensive universities and technological universities. Students studying engineering majors in comprehensive universities are often recruited from academic high schools while those in technological universities tend to be recruited from vocational high schools. The purpose of…

  6. Folk High Schools and Dropouts from Upper Secondary School: Effects of Non-Academic Investments in Dropouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgen, Solveig T.; Borgen, Nicolai T.

    2015-01-01

    High dropout rates from upper secondary school are related to substantial societal costs, and are hence a major policy concern. The Norwegian folk high schools provide a non-academic education in an intimate and nurturing environment where interpersonal and social skills are emphasised, and where individuals grow in sense of self-esteem and sense…

  7. Impacts of Academic R&D on High-Tech Manufacturing Products: Tentative Evidence from Supercomputer Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Thanh; Tang, Kam Ki

    2015-01-01

    This paper empirically examines the impact of academic research on high-tech manufacturing growth of 28 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and emerging countries over the 1991-2005 period. A standard research and development (R&D) expenditure based measure is found to be too general to capture the input in high-tech…

  8. The Enabling and Protective Role of Academic Buoyancy in the Appraisal of Fear Appeals Used Prior to High Stakes Examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symes, Wendy; Putwain, David W.; Remedios, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Prior to high stakes examinations, teachers may engage in instructional practices to encourage their students to prepare well for their exams, including the use of "fear appeals". The current study examined whether academic buoyancy played a role in student appraisals of fear appeals as threatening or challenging. High school students…

  9. Physical Fitness and Academic Performance: Empirical Evidence from the National Administrative Senior High School Student Data in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Pei-An; Chang, Hung-Hao; Wang, Jiun-Hao; Wu, Min-Chen

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between the changes of physical fitness across the 3-year spectrum of senior high school study and academic performance measured by standardized tests in Taiwan. A unique dataset of 149 240 university-bound senior high school students from 2009 to 2011 was constructed by merging two nationwide administrative…

  10. Impacts of Academic R&D on High-Tech Manufacturing Products: Tentative Evidence from Supercomputer Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Thanh; Tang, Kam Ki

    2015-01-01

    This paper empirically examines the impact of academic research on high-tech manufacturing growth of 28 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and emerging countries over the 1991-2005 period. A standard research and development (R&D) expenditure based measure is found to be too general to capture the input in high-tech…

  11. Academic Success for Students of Color . . . At What Cost? The Importance of School Context at Birch High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Terah T. Venzant; Tabron, Lolita A.

    2013-01-01

    Kiara, an African American rising freshman, has aspirations to become a medical doctor. She enrolls at Birch High School because of the reputation of the principal, Mr. Brown, whose vision for academic excellence permeates every corner of the school. Kiara graduates from high school with top honors, but realizes her success may have come at a…

  12. Academic Success for Students of Color . . . At What Cost? The Importance of School Context at Birch High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Terah T. Venzant; Tabron, Lolita A.

    2013-01-01

    Kiara, an African American rising freshman, has aspirations to become a medical doctor. She enrolls at Birch High School because of the reputation of the principal, Mr. Brown, whose vision for academic excellence permeates every corner of the school. Kiara graduates from high school with top honors, but realizes her success may have come at a…

  13. Physical Fitness and Academic Performance: Empirical Evidence from the National Administrative Senior High School Student Data in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Pei-An; Chang, Hung-Hao; Wang, Jiun-Hao; Wu, Min-Chen

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between the changes of physical fitness across the 3-year spectrum of senior high school study and academic performance measured by standardized tests in Taiwan. A unique dataset of 149 240 university-bound senior high school students from 2009 to 2011 was constructed by merging two nationwide administrative…

  14. A Comparative Investigation on the Learning Efficacy of Mechatronic Technology between Academic and Vocational High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jou, Min; Hung, Chen-Kang; Lai, Shih-Hung

    2014-01-01

    Universities in Taiwan can be divided into two major categories of comprehensive universities and technological universities. Students studying engineering majors in comprehensive universities are often recruited from academic high schools while those in technological universities tend to be recruited from vocational high schools. The purpose of…

  15. The influence of high school academics on freshman college mathematics and science courses at SUNY Oswego

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayali, Tolga

    This study examined the relationship between 2011 freshman college mathematics and science grades and freshman students' high school academics and demographic data, exploring the factors that contribute to the success of first-year STEM majoring freshman students at State University of New York at Oswego. The variables were Gender, Race, SES, School Size, Parent with College Education, High School Grade Point Average (HSGPA), Transfer Credit, SAT Composite Score, and New York State Regents Exam results, based on data from 237 freshman students entering college immediately following high school. The findings show HSGPA as a significant predictor of success in freshman College Mathematics and Sciences, Transfer Credit as a significant predictor in College Mathematics and College Chemistry, SES as a significant predictor in College Biology and College Chemistry, Parent with College Education as a significant predictor in College Biology and New York State Chemistry Regents Exam as a significant predictor in College Chemistry. Based on these findings, guidance counselors, science educators, and education institutions can develop a framework to determine which measurements are meaningful and advise students to focus on excellent performance in the Chemistry Regents Exams, take more college courses during high school, and maintain a high grade point average.

  16. The associations among fundamental movement skills, self-reported physical activity and academic performance during junior high school in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaakkola, Timo; Hillman, Charles; Kalaja, Sami; Liukkonen, Jarmo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the longitudinal associations between (1) fundamental movement skills (FMSs) and academic performance, and (2) self-reported physical activity and academic performance through junior high school in Finland. The participants of the study were 325 Finnish students (162 girls and 163 boys), who were 13 years old at the beginning of the study at Grade 7. Students performed three FMS tests and responded to a self-reported physical activity questionnaire at Grades 7 and 8. Marks in Finnish language, mathematics and history from Grades 7, 8 and 9 were collected. Structural equation modelling with multigroup method demonstrated that in the boys' group, a correlation (0.17) appeared between FMS and academic performance measured at Grade 7. The results also indicated that FMS collected at Grade 8 were significantly but weakly (path coefficient 0.14) associated with academic performance at Grade 9 for both gender groups. Finally, the results of this study demonstrated that self-reported physical activity was not significantly related to academic performance during junior high school. The findings of this study suggest that mastery of FMS may contribute to better student achievement during junior high school.

  17. High school students' science academic achievement: The effect of the Lemov positive framing trust-building technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigliette, Linda Marie

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the effect of a trust-building technique called "positive-framing" (Lemov, 2010, p. 204) on the level of student-teacher trust and students' science academic achievement. The existing literature was reviewed under the constructs of trust, types of trust, trust-building strategies, and student academic achievement. The identified problem is a lack of research into the effect of trust from the high school student perspective and the effect of trust on student academic achievement in science. In addition, there is no empirical evidence to support the effectiveness of the "positive-framing" (Lemov, 2010, p. 204) trust-building intervention. The study involved a volunteer, convenience sample of 9th-grade science students at one high school in Northern California (N=240). The study employed a quasi-experimental, pretest, posttest non-equivalent control group design to examine the level of student trust in the teacher, using the "Student trust in faculty scale" (Forsyth, Adams, & Hoy, 2011, p. 180), and the students' academic achievement, according to the Integrated Process Skills Test II (Okey, Wise, & Burns, 1982). The independent variable was the "positive-framing" (Lemov, 2010, p. 204) trust-building intervention; the two dependent variables were the level of student-teacher trust and student academic achievement. The composite data from the "Student trust in faculty scale" and the academic achievement test were evaluated by a multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA). Results of this study indicated that the null hypothesis was accepted. The "positive-framing" (Lemov, 2010, p. 204) trust-building intervention did not have a significant effect on either the student-teacher trust level or academic achievement in science.

  18. Academic Race Stereotypes, Academic Self-Concept, and Racial Centrality in African American Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeke, Ndidi A; Howard, Lionel C; Kurtz-Costes, Beth; Rowley, Stephanie J

    2009-08-01

    The relation between academic race stereotype endorsement and academic self-concept was examined in two studies of seventh- and eighth-grade African Americans. Based on expectancy-value theory, the authors hypothesized that academic race stereotype endorsement would be negatively related to self-perceptions. Furthermore, it was anticipated that the relation between stereotype endorsement and self-perceptions would be moderated by racial centrality. The hypothesis was supported in two independent samples. Among students with high racial centrality, endorsement of traditional race stereotypes was linked to lower self-perceptions of academic competence. The stereotype/self-concept relation was nonsignificant among youth for whom race was less central to their identities. These results confirm the supposition of expectancy-value theory and illustrate the interweaving of group and individual identity with motivational beliefs.

  19. Peer interactions and academic engagement of youth with developmental disabilities in inclusive middle and high school classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Erik W; Sisco, Lynn G; Brown, Lissa; Brickham, Dana; Al-Khabbaz, Zainab A

    2008-11-01

    We examined the peer interactions and academic engagement of 23 middle and high school students with developmental disabilities within inclusive academic and elective classrooms. The extent to which students with and without disabilities interacted socially was highly variable and influenced by instructional format, the proximity of general and special educators, and curricular area. Peer interactions occurred more often within small group instructional formats, when students were not receiving direct support from a paraprofessional or special educator, and in elective courses. Academic engagement also varied, with higher levels evidenced during one-to-one or small group instruction and when in proximity of general or special educators. Implications for designing effective support strategies for students with autism and/or intellectual disability within general education classrooms are discussed.

  20. Academic motivation, self-concept, engagement, and performance in high school: key processes from a longitudinal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jasmine; Liem, Gregory Arief D; Martin, Andrew J; Colmar, Susan; Marsh, Herbert W; McInerney, Dennis

    2012-10-01

    The study tested three theoretically/conceptually hypothesized longitudinal models of academic processes leading to academic performance. Based on a longitudinal sample of 1866 high-school students across two consecutive years of high school (Time 1 and Time 2), the model with the most superior heuristic value demonstrated: (a) academic motivation and self-concept positively predicted attitudes toward school; (b) attitudes toward school positively predicted class participation and homework completion and negatively predicted absenteeism; and (c) class participation and homework completion positively predicted test performance whilst absenteeism negatively predicted test performance. Taken together, these findings provide support for the relevance of the self-system model and, particularly, the importance of examining the dynamic relationships amongst engagement factors of the model. The study highlights implications for educational and psychological theory, measurement, and intervention.

  1. Student self-esteem and academic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Nikoleta M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing belief that academic achievement is the product of a complex network of teacher-student relations, where the identity of successful and unsuccessful student is developing with high, moderate or low self-esteem level. Self-esteem is most often defined as a conscious cognitive-affective expression of self-evaluation which is one of the most immediate indicators of self-concept integration degree. A number of authors view high self-esteem level as an important prerequisite for high academic achievement. In contrast, academic achievement and other experiences related to teaching and learning are considered to exert significant influence on self-esteem and a student should be successful at school first so as to develop a positive self-image and his academic abilities. The debate on what comes first - self-esteem or academic achievement - is in its character more academic than practical. This claim is supported by an increasing number of studies indicating the dynamism and reciprocity of correlation between academic achievement and self-esteem. The paper gives recommendations for educational practice to promote self-esteem and development of personal and social responsibility, which contributes to better student academic achievement. It is pointed out that teacher education in the field is necessary and that self-esteem and responsibility must become essential segments of curricula. Teacher is expected to become sensitive to the needs of students who are at risk to be unsuccessful and to largely apply cooperative learning methods. Findings demonstrate that cooperative learning either sustain or increase student self-esteem, whereas traditional teaching methods, in general, lead to its decline. Cooperative relations improve student self-image in respect of academic abilities and social interactions. Positive feedback, peer support, more frequent experience of learning achievement leads mainly to general increase in self-esteem and

  2. The Effect of the Flipped Classroom on Urban High School Students' Motivation and Academic Achievement in a High School Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Keshia L.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of the flipped classroom on urban high school students' motivation and academic achievement in a high school science course. In this quantitative study, the sample population was comprised of North Star High School 12th grade students enrolled in human anatomy and physiology. A quasi-experimental,…

  3. A Model of Academic Self-Concept for High School Hispanic Students in New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calero, Flor R.; Dalley, Christopher; Fernandez, Nicole; Davenport-Dalley, Tania Marie; Morote, Elsa-Sofia; Tatum, Stephanie L.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined how Hispanic students' academic self-concept influences the independent variables of family academic expectations, peer relationships, schoolwork, and student-teacher relationships. A survey was administered to 222 ninth-grade students in Long Island, New York, 99 of whom self-identified as Hispanic. A structural equation model…

  4. Academic Libraries and High-Impact Practices for Student Retention: Library Deans' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies on retention have highlighted the role of student engagement in influencing students' withdrawal decisions. This study seeks to address how academic libraries affect student retention by examining the perception of academic library deans or directors on the alignment between library services and resources with ten nationally…

  5. Longitudinal Analysis of Chinese High School Student's Stress in School and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangyang; Lu, Zuhong

    2011-01-01

    In previous research, few studies have examined the effects of adolescents' stress in school on the change rates of their academic achievement. In the present study, we seek to examine the longitudinal relationships between adolescents' stress in school and the change rates of their academic achievement. The results indicated that for those whose…

  6. Publishing Strategies of Young, Highly Mobile Academics: The Question of Language in the European Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Laurie

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines links between publishing strategies and the academic mobility of multilingual entry-level scholars in the European context against the backdrop of European Union (EU) policies and research on academic labor market characteristics, skilled migration and scholarly publishing. An analysis of language of publication, patterns of…

  7. A Model of Academic Self-Concept for High School Hispanic Students in New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calero, Flor R.; Dalley, Christopher; Fernandez, Nicole; Davenport-Dalley, Tania Marie; Morote, Elsa-Sofia; Tatum, Stephanie L.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined how Hispanic students' academic self-concept influences the independent variables of family academic expectations, peer relationships, schoolwork, and student-teacher relationships. A survey was administered to 222 ninth-grade students in Long Island, New York, 99 of whom self-identified as Hispanic. A structural equation model…

  8. Longitudinal Analysis of Chinese High School Student's Stress in School and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangyang; Lu, Zuhong

    2011-01-01

    In previous research, few studies have examined the effects of adolescents' stress in school on the change rates of their academic achievement. In the present study, we seek to examine the longitudinal relationships between adolescents' stress in school and the change rates of their academic achievement. The results indicated that for those whose…

  9. Academic Libraries as High-Tech Gateways: A Guide to Design & Space Decisions. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazillion, Richard J.; Braun, Connie L.

    This book, based on research about libraries around the country, provides tools that can be used for planning and building an academic library space that streamlines access to information. It explains how to incorporate the latest innovations in academic library facility design; how to make the facility flexible for changing information technology…

  10. DEVELOPING A TEACHING FACTORY LEARNING MODEL TO IMPROVE PRODUCTION COMPETENCIES AMONG MECHANICAL ENGINEERING STUDENTS IN A VOCATIONAL SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dadang Hidayat Martawijaya

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to develop a learning model that can provide vocational senior high school students with an authentic industrial working experience in the manufacturing and production sector in the very same school that they are enrolled.  An appropriate in-school industrial experience is expected to improve students’ competences and skills. A four stage research and development method was used, involving preliminary study, development, testing and model validation. The study uses both qualitative and quantitative analysis techniques to produce a six steps teaching factory learning model (TF-6M Model. Data was gathered from teachers (n= 8 of a school in Indonesia and students of class XI (n=132 who formed the experimental and the control groups in the model validation stage, and student of class XII for the preliminary study (n=35 and development test (n=98. The focus group discussion (FGD reveals that the production teacher believes that the TF-6M model can be used to improve students’ competences. Data from students shows that TF-6M Model increases students’ competences, is preferred by students, increases their time spent at work, and improves their soft and hard skills, motivation, sense of responsibility and work ethics.

  11. The effects of a visualization-centered curriculum on conceptual understanding and representational competence in high school biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, Anna

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a visualization-centered curriculum, Hemoglobin: A Case of Double Identity, on conceptual understanding and representational competence in high school biology. Sixty-nine students enrolled in three sections of freshman biology taught by the same teacher participated in this study. Online Chemscape Chime computer-based molecular visualizations were incorporated into the 10-week curriculum to introduce students to fundamental structure and function relationships. Measures used in this study included a Hemoglobin Structure and Function Test, Mental Imagery Questionnaire, Exam Difficulty Survey, the Student Assessment of Learning Gains, the Group Assessment of Logical Thinking, the Attitude Toward Science in School Assessment, audiotapes of student interviews, students' artifacts, weekly unit activity surveys, informal researcher observations and a teacher's weekly questionnaire. The Hemoglobin Structure and Function Test, consisting of Parts A and B, was administered as a pre and posttest. Part A used exclusively verbal test items to measure conceptual understanding, while Part B used visual-verbal test items to measure conceptual understanding and representational competence. Results of the Hemoglobin Structure and Function pre and posttest revealed statistically significant gains in conceptual understanding and representational competence, suggesting the visualization-centered curriculum implemented in this study was effective in supporting positive learning outcomes. The large positive correlation between posttest results on Part A, comprised of all-verbal test items, and Part B, using visual-verbal test items, suggests this curriculum supported students' mutual development of conceptual understanding and representational competence. Evidence based on student interviews, Student Assessment of Learning Gains ratings and weekly activity surveys indicated positive attitudes toward the use of Chemscape Chime

  12. [Essential professional core competencies for nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chih

    2010-10-01

    Core competency is vital to the nursing profession. Such helps guarantee the high quality and effectiveness of delivered care and maintains the social value and status of the nursing profession. This article introduces the definition of nursing core competency and its connotations. The core competency profile for the nursing profession embraces basic behavioral attributes as well as mastery of advanced practice skills. The former include such attributes as gentleness, willingness to serve, keen observation and judgment, efficiency, skillfulness, responsibility and accountability. The latter embraces skills in general care, communication and collaboration, management, self-development, innovation and research, and stress-adjustment. To cultivate competent nurses, academic education should emphasize critical thinking skills, integrate problem-based and evidence-based learning approaches into curricula, and use objective structured clinical examination to evaluate learning outcomes. In the healthcare sector, systematic professional training models such as the clinical ladder with multidiscipline rotation hold the potential to train novice nurses as expert professionals. Meanwhile, to advance the professional capabilities of nurses, nursing administrators should provide a positive work environment to fuel and maintain learning motivation. Education and healthcare systems should work closely together to promote the professional competence of nurses and to strengthen the value of the nursing profession.

  13. Honors and High-Ability Students: Factors That Predict Academic Efficacy, Critical Thinking Skills, and Academic Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jessica Lynn

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the quantitative study was threefold: (a) to examine high-ability students in and outside an honors program at a midwestern comprehensive university to determine differences in background and demographic characteristics between honors participants and nonparticipants of similar ability; (b) to determine differences in academic…

  14. Academic buoyancy, student's achievement, and the linking role of control: A cross-lagged analysis of high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collie, Rebecca J; Martin, Andrew J; Malmberg, Lars-Erik; Hall, James; Ginns, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Previous research has indicated that although academic buoyancy and student's achievement are associated, the relationship is relatively modest. We sought to determine whether another construct might link academic buoyancy and student's achievement. Based on prior theoretical and empirical work, we examined a sense of control as one possible linking mechanism. The study analysed data from 2,971 students attending 21 Australian high schools. We conducted a cross-lagged panel design as a first means of disentangling the relative salience of academic buoyancy, control, and achievement (Phase 1). Based upon these results, we proceeded with follow-up analyses of an ordered process model linking the constructs over time (Phase 2). Findings showed that buoyancy and achievement were associated with control over time, but not with one another (Phase 1). In addition, control appeared to play a role in how buoyancy influenced achievement and that a cyclical process may operate among the three factors over time (Phase 2). The findings suggest that control may play an important role in linking past experiences of academic buoyancy and achievement to subsequent academic buoyancy and achievement. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  15. Differences between High and Low Academic Achieving University Students in Learning and Study Strategies: A Further Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Michael C. W.

    2009-01-01

    Following up on the general framework of the research study of Yip (2007), this article sets out a similar research question, investigating the differences between high and low academic achieving Hong Kong university students based on their different learning and study strategies. In this study, we recruited 100 university students who pursued…

  16. A Comparative Study on China-U.S.' APTHS (Academic Proficiency Test for High Schools): Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Yan, Wenfan

    2012-01-01

    This study followed the comparative research mode of description, interpretation, juxtaposition and comparison. Based on the literatures and data collected on the topic, the paper compared and analyzed the past, present and future of APTHS (academic proficiency test for high schools) in the two countries. Some contemplations on the common issues…

  17. The Impact of Cyberbullying on the Self-Esteem and Academic Functioning of Arab American Middle and High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Wael Shaher Mohammed; Bellamy, Al

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cyberbullying has received a considerable amount of attention within the academic and public literature. However, very little if any cyberbullying research has been conducted among Arab American students. This current study explored the impact of cyberbullying among middle and high school Arab American students on their self-esteem…

  18. The Impact of Cyberbullying on the Self-Esteem and Academic Functioning of Arab American Middle and High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Wael Shaher Mohammed; Bellamy, Al

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cyberbullying has received a considerable amount of attention within the academic and public literature. However, very little if any cyberbullying research has been conducted among Arab American students. This current study explored the impact of cyberbullying among middle and high school Arab American students on their self-esteem…

  19. Effectiveness of Selected Advanced Placement Programs on the Academic Performance and College Readiness of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Traschell S.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of selected Advanced Placement (AP) programs on the academic performance and college readiness of high school students. Specifically, the researcher was concerned with ascertaining the effectiveness of social science, math, science, English, music/art and language AP programs on the…

  20. A Cross-National Validation of the Academic Expectations Stress Inventory with Chinese and Korean High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaozhou; Tze, Virginia M. C.; Buhr, Erin; Klassen, Robert M.; Daniels, Lia M.

    2016-01-01

    The current study provided evidence for the factor structure of the Academic Expectation Stress Inventory (AESI) in a sample of 213 Mainland Chinese and 184 South Korean high school students. We examined cross-national invariance of the AESI using multiple-group confirmatory factor analysis across two Asian cultural samples. Results suggested a…

  1. Differences between High and Low Academic Achieving University Students in Learning and Study Strategies: A Further Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Michael C. W.

    2009-01-01

    Following up on the general framework of the research study of Yip (2007), this article sets out a similar research question, investigating the differences between high and low academic achieving Hong Kong university students based on their different learning and study strategies. In this study, we recruited 100 university students who pursued…

  2. Minimal Competency Testing: The Need for a Broader Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Bernard

    1979-01-01

    Citing William Spady's distinction between capacity and competence, the author asserts that current competency tests mainly measure academic (capacity) not life (competency) skills. He then considers problems inherent in delineating, teaching, and testing essential practical living competencies and presents some alternatives. Part of a theme issue…

  3. Academic health centers on the front lines: survival strategies in highly competitive markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, D; Weissman, J S; Griner, P F

    1999-09-01

    The authors describe approaches that five academic health centers (AHCs) have taken to reduce costs, enhance quality, or improve their market positions since the onset of price competition and managed care. The five AHCs, all on the West Coast, were selected for study because they (1) are located in markets that had been highly competitive for the longest time; (2) are committed to all the major missions of AHCs; and (3) own or substantially control their major clinical teaching facilities. The study findings reflect the status of the five AHCs during the fall of 1998. Although some findings may no longer be current (especially in light of ongoing implementation of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997), they still provide insights into the options and opportunities available to many AHCs in highly competitive markets. The authors report on the institutions' financial viability (positive), levels of government support (advantageous), and competition from other AHCs (modest). They outline the study AHCs' survival strategies in three broad areas: increasing revenues via exploiting market niches, reducing costs, and reorganizing to improve internal governance and decision making. They also report how marketplace competition and the strategies the AHCs used to confront it have affected the AHCs' missions. The authors summarize the outstanding lessons that all AHCs can learn from the experiences of the AHCs studied, although adding that AHCs in other parts of the country should use caution in looking to the West Coast AHCs for answers.

  4. ENGLISH TASK TO DEVELOP THE STUDENTS’ COMMUNICATIVE COMPETENCE: A STUDY OF EDUKATIF WORK BOOK FOR JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Rohma Wati

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study is mainly intended to find out the extent to which tasks in English work books are designed to develop the students’ communicative competence. The objective of this study is to describe how the tasks in Edukatif work books are designed to develop students’ discourse competence, linguistic competence, actional competence, sociolinguistic competence, and strategic competence. This study is a qualitative research which involves content analysis approach. The data are the tasks in Edukatif work books used by eight grade students of the first and second semester. In collecting the data, the writer uses documentation method. The data analysis used Huberman and Miles’ concept which involves data reduction, data display and verification. The findings show that among the five competences and its components of communicative com- petence, some components are not well developed in the work books. The tasks develop all components of discourse competence except one aspect in linguistic competence, that is, phonology. The tasks develop all components of actional competence except the speech act. The tasks develop components of sociolinguistic competence except the cultural and non-verbal communicative factor. The tasks develop only one component of strategic competence, that is, time gaining strategy. The conclusion is that the tasks in Edukatif work books are sufficient to develop the students’ discourse, linguistic, and actional competence. The tasks, however, are not sufficient to develop students’ sociolinguistic and strategic competence.

  5. Positive Correlation Between Academic Library Services and High-Impact Practices for

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saori Wendy Herman, MLIS, AHIP

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To investigate the perceived alignment between academic library services and high-impact practices (HIPs that affect student retention. Design – Survey questionnaire. Setting – Public comprehensive universities in the United States of America with a Carnegie classification of master’s level as of January 2013. Subjects – 68 library deans or directors out of the 271 who were originally contacted. Methods – The author used Qualtrics software to create a survey based on the HIPs, tested the survey for reliability, and then distributed it to 271 universities. Library services were grouped into 1 of 3 library scales: library collection, library instruction, or library facilities. The survey consisted of a matrix of 10 Likert-style questions addressing the perceived level of alignment between the library scales and the HIPs. Each question provided an opportunity for the respondent to enter a “brief description of support practices” (p 477. Additional demographic questions addressed the years of experience of the respondent, undergraduate student enrollment of the university, and whether librarians held faculty rank. Main Results – The author measured Pearson correlation coefficients and found a positive correlation between the library scales and the HIPs. All three library scales displayed a moderately strong positive correlation between first-year seminars and experiences (HIP 1, common intellectual experiences (HIP 2, writing-intensive courses (HIP 4, undergraduate research (HIP 6, diversity and global learning (HIP 7, service learning and community-based learning (HIP 8, internships (HIP 9, and capstone courses and projects (HIP 10. The library collections scale and library facilities scale displayed a moderately strong correlation with learning communities (HIP 3 and collaborative assignments and projects (HIP 5. The library instruction scale displayed a strong positive correlation with HIP 3 and a very strong

  6. Donde Estan los Estudiantes Puertorriquenos/os Exitosos? [Where Are the Academically Successful Puerto Rican Students?]: Success Factors of High-Achieving Puerto Rican High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antrop-Gonzalez, Rene; Velez, William; Garrett, Tomas

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the 4 success factors that 10 working class Puerto Rican urban high school students attributed to their high academic achievement. These success factors were (a) the acquisition of social capital through religiosity and participation in school and community-based extracurricular activities, (b) having a strong Puerto Rican…

  7. Mathematical Competences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westphael, Henning; Mogensen, Arne

    2013-01-01

    In this article we present the notion of Mathematical competences as a tool to describe the mathematically gifted students.......In this article we present the notion of Mathematical competences as a tool to describe the mathematically gifted students....

  8. Text of High Court's Ruling on Judges' Right to Upset Academic Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, John Paul

    1985-01-01

    The Supreme Court's opinion and concurring opinion in a case limiting the right of courts to overturn academic decisions, based on the case of university's dismissal of a student after his failure of an important examination, are presented. (MSE)

  9. The Effect of a Zoo-Based Experiential Academic Science Program on High School Students' Math and Science Achievement and Perceptions of School Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulkerrin, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of an 11th-grade and 12th-grade zoo-based academic high school experiential science program compared to a same school-district school-based academic high school experiential science program on students' pretest and posttest science, math, and reading achievement, and student perceptions of…

  10. The Effect of a Zoo-Based Experiential Academic Science Program on High School Students' Math and Science Achievement and Perceptions of School Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulkerrin, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of an 11th-grade and 12th-grade zoo-based academic high school experiential science program compared to a same school-district school-based academic high school experiential science program on students' pretest and posttest science, math, and reading achievement, and student perceptions of…

  11. Relationships between high-stakes clinical skills exam scores and program director global competency ratings of first-year pediatric residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik E. Langenau

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Responding to mandates from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME and American Osteopathic Association (AOA, residency programs have developed competency-based assessment tools. One such tool is the American College of Osteopathic Pediatricians (ACOP program directors’ annual report. High-stakes clinical skills licensing examinations, such as the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination Level 2-Performance Evaluation (COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE, also assess competency in several clinical domains.The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships between program director competency ratings of first-year osteopathic residents in pediatrics and COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores from 2005 to 2009.The sample included all 94 pediatric first-year residents who took COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE and whose training was reviewed by the ACOP for approval of training between 2005 and 2009. Program director competency ratings and COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores (domain and component were merged and analyzed for relationships.Biomedical/biomechanical domain scores were positively correlated with overall program director competency ratings. Humanistic domain scores were not significantly correlated with overall program director competency ratings, but did show moderate correlation with ratings for interpersonal and communication skills. The six ACGME or seven AOA competencies assessed empirically by the ACOP program directors’ annual report could not be recovered by principal component analysis; instead, three factors were identified, accounting for 86% of the variance between competency ratings.A few significant correlations were noted between COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores and program director competency ratings. Exploring relationships between different clinical skills assessments is inherently difficult because of the heterogeneity of tools used and overlap of constructs within the AOA and ACGME core competencies.

  12. Motivational profiles of slovenian high school students and their academic performance outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrtačnik, Margareta; Juriševič, Mojca; Savec, Vesna Ferk

    2010-09-01

    Self-determination theory defines motivation as a multidimensional concept, with autonomous and controlled motivation as central factors of broader distinctions. Previous research has proven that academic achievements are positively correlated with autonomous motivation. Students from 10 Slovenian grammar schools were involved in empirical study, in which a cluster analysis revealed two motivational profiles: a low quantity motivation group (low controlled and autonomous motivation) and a good quality motivation group (high autonomous and low or average controlled motivation). Statistically significant differences between the two identified motivational profiles were found for students' general as well as chemistry performance in three grades of schooling. Furthermore, a good quality motivation group is also more in favour of autonomy-supportive teaching methods used in chemistry classes. Examination of students' opinions about important chemistry topics, and on the other hand, unimportant ones, and not connected with life, reveals that the basic reason for distinction might lie in the chemistry teacher's approach used while presenting these topics. Some chemistry teachers are not using an autonomy-supportive way of teaching which would contribute to better teaching outcomes; therefore a need for further research on Slovenian chemistry teachers' motivation and their teaching approaches was recognized.

  13. Race and Academic Achievement in Racially Diverse High Schools: Opportunity and Stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Chandra; Riegle-Crumb, Catherine; Schiller, Kathryn S; Wilkinson, Lindsey; Frank, Kenneth A

    2010-04-01

    BACKGROUND/CONTEXT: Brown v Board of Education fundamentally changed our nation's schools, yet we know surprisingly little about how and whether they provide equality of educational opportunity. Although substantial evidence suggests that African American and Latino students who attend these schools face fewer learning opportunities than their White counterparts, until now, it has been impossible to examine this using a representative sample because of lack of data. PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE/RESEARCH QUESTION/FOCUS OF STUDY: This study uses newly available data to investigate whether racially diverse high schools offer equality of educational opportunity to students from different racial and ethnic groups. This is examined by measuring the relative representation of minority students in advanced math classes at the beginning of high school and estimating whether and how this opportunity structure limits the level of achievement attained by African American and Latino students by the end of high school. SETTING: This study uses data from the Adolescent Health and Academic Achievement Study (AHAA) and its partner study, the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), a stratified, nationally representative study of students in U.S. high schools first surveyed in 1994-1995. POPULATION/PARTICIPANTS/SUBJECTS: Two samples of racially diverse high schools were used in the analysis: one with African Americans, Whites, and Asians (26 schools with 3,149 students), and the other with Latinos, Whites, and Asians (22 schools with 2,775 students). RESEARCH DESIGN: Quantitative analyses first assess how high schools vary in the extent to which minority students are underrepresented in advanced sophomore math classes. Hierarchical multilevel modeling is then used to estimate whether racial-ethnic differences in representation in advanced math have an impact on African American and Latino students' achievement by the end of high school, relative to the Whites and Asians

  14. Development of Technology Competencies for Public Services’ Staff Has Limited External Validity. A Review of: Wong, G. K. W. (2010. Information commons help desk transactions study. Journal of Academic Librarianship, 36(3, 235-241.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Martin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective - To develop an understanding of the types of technology questions asked at an information commons help desk for the purposes of staffing the desk and training. Specifically, the study looked to answer the following questions:1. What kind of assistance do users seek from the help desk?2. How complex is it to handle the technology questions?3. What are the key competencies desirable of the help desk staff?Design - Qualitative analysis of transactions completed at an information commons help desk.Setting - A medium sized academic library located in Hong Kong.Data - 1,636 transactions completed at an information commons help desk between January 2007 and May 2009.Methods - From the opening in 2006, the staff of the information commons help desk recorded all transactions electronically using a modified version of the open source software LibStats. The author examined the transactions for roughly the second and third weeks of each month from January 2007 to May 2009 in an effort to determine the types of questions asked and their complexity.Main Results - In response to question one, 86.3% of questions asked at the help desk concerned technology; the majority of those questions (76.5% were about printing, wireless connection, and various software operation. For question two, 82% of technology questions were determined to be of the lowest tier (Tier 1 of complexity, one-third of the questions required only “direct answers,” and 80% of questions could be answered consistently via the creation of a “knowledge base of answers for these foreseeable questions.” For question three, a list of fourteen competencies for help desk staff were created.Conclusion - With the low complexity of the technology questions asked, the creation of a knowledge base of common questions and answers, and proper training of staff based on the competencies identified in the study, an information commons could be effective with one integrated desk staffed by a

  15. Building the Diversity Bridge Abroad: The Journey to Implement Cultural Competent Health Care in Lausanne, Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas, Alejandra; Paroz, Sophie; Dory, Elody; Green, Alexander; Vu, Francis; Bodenmann, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Although the United States has been central in bringing cultural competency into the discussion of high-quality care, health systems all over the world are faced with the effects of global immigration and the widening disparities gap between socioeconomic classes. Lausanne University Hospital is one of five Swiss academic medical…

  16. The hidden face of academic researches on classified highly pathogenic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaux, Christian A

    2015-01-01

    Highly pathogenic microorganisms and toxins are manipulated in academic laboratories for fundamental research purposes, diagnostics, drugs and vaccines development. Obviously, these infectious pathogens represent a potential risk for human and/or animal health and their accidental or intentional release (biosafety and biosecurity, respectively) is a major concern of governments. In the past decade, several incidents have occurred in laboratories and reported by media causing fear and raising a sense of suspicion against biologists. Some scientists have been ordered by US government to leave their laboratory for long periods of time following the occurrence of an incident involving infectious pathogens; in other cases laboratories have been shut down and universities have been forced to pay fines and incur a long-term ban on funding after gross negligence of biosafety/biosecurity procedures. Measures of criminal sanctions have also been taken to minimize the risk that such incidents can reoccur. As United States and many other countries, France has recently strengthened its legal measures for laboratories' protection. During the past two decades, France has adopted a series of specific restriction measures to better protect scientific discoveries with a potential economic/social impact and prevent their misuse by ill-intentioned people without affecting the progress of science through fundamental research. French legal regulations concerning scientific discoveries have progressively strengthened since 2001, until the publication in November 2011 of a decree concerning the "PPST" (for "Protection du Potentiel Scientifique et Technique de la nation", the protection of sensitive scientific data). Following the same logic of protection of sensitive scientific researches, regulations were also adopted in an order published in April 2012 concerning the biology and health field. The aim was to define the legal framework that precise the conditions for authorizing

  17. Validating clinical competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Kathy; Koithan, Mary

    2012-07-01

    Professional registered nurses must be competent to provide care in today's fast-paced, highly technical clinical environment. Competency programs designed to teach and evaluate essential knowledge, skills, and abilities of registered nurses are one method organizations may use to demonstrate nursing proficiency.

  18. MODERN MODELS AND METHODS OF DIAGNOSIS OF METHODOLOGY COMPETENT TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loyko V. I.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research is development of models and methods of diagnostics of methodical competence of a teacher. According to modern views, methodical thinking is the key competence of teachers. Modern experts consider the methodical competence of a teacher as a personal and professional quality, which is a fundamentally important factor in the success of the professional activity of teachers, as well as a subsystem of its professional competence. This is due to the fact that in today's world, a high level of knowledge of teachers of academic subjects and their possessing of learnt basics of teaching methods can not fully describe the level of professional competence of the teacher. The authors have characterized the functional components of methodical competence of the teacher, its relationship with other personalprofessional qualities (first - to the psychological and educational, research and informational competence, as well as its levels of formation. Forming a model of methodical competence of the teacher, the authors proceeded from the fact that a contemporary teacher high demands: it must be ready to conduct independent research, design-learning technologies, forecasting results of training and education of students. As a leading component of the methodical competence of the teacher is his personal experience in methodological activities and requirements of methodical competence determined goals and objectives of methodical activity, the process of the present study, the formation of patterns of methodical competence of the teacher preceded the refinement of existing models methodical activity of scientific and pedagogical staff of higher education institutions and secondary vocational education institutions. The proposed model of methodical competence of the teacher - the scientific basis of a system of monitoring of his personal and professional development, and evaluation criteria and levels of her diagnosis - targets system of

  19. The model of creation of energy-saving competence of students of high school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeer Evald

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the most important conditions for the creationof energy-saving competence of students – undergraduate training. The actualityof the problem is caused by low energy efficiency of industrial production, significantly reduces the competitiveness of the domestic economy and, consequently, the need to intensify activities on the rational use of energy resources. The definition of energy-saving expertise, marked its structural components (value-motivational, cognitive activity-reflexive. Stages of creationof energy-saving expertise in system of continuous vocational training: diagnosis, motivation, learning and reflective-evaluative. The possibilities of educational technology and psycho designed to work with the psychological barriers and resistance to the process of regulation of energy consumption, the production facilities at its energy efficiency and energy saving. In particular, it is recommended to use active learning methods (discussion, games, analysis of problem situations, etc., Information and communication technologies for the implementation of educational and research projects in the field of energy conservation, the development and implementation of interactive multimedia learning environments.

  20. Parent Rated Symptoms of Inattention in Childhood Predict High School Academic Achievement Across Two Culturally and Diagnostically Diverse Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astri J. Lundervold

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate parent reports of childhood symptoms of inattention as a predictor of adolescent academic achievement, taking into account the impact of the child’s intellectual functioning, in two diagnostically and culturally diverse samples.Method: Samples: (a an all-female sample in the U.S. predominated by youth with ADHD (Berkeley Girls with ADHD Longitudinal Study [BGALS], N = 202, and (b a mixed-sex sample recruited from a Norwegian population-based sample (the Bergen Child Study [BCS], N = 93. Inattention and intellectual function were assessed via the same measures in the two samples; academic achievement scores during and beyond high school and demographic covariates were country-specific.Results: Childhood inattention predicted subsequent academic achievement in both samples, with a somewhat stronger effect in the BGALS sample, which included a large subgroup of children with ADHD. Intellectual function was another strong predictor, but the effect of early inattention remained statistically significant in both samples when intellectual function was covaried.Conclusion: The effect of early indicators of inattention on future academic success was robust across the two samples. These results support the use of remediation procedures broadly applied. Future longitudinal multicenter studies with pre-planned common inclusion criteria should be performed to increase our understanding of the importance of inattention in primary school children for concurrent and prospective functioning.

  1. Balancing Managerial and Academic Values: Mid-Level Academic Management at a Private University in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thian, Lok Boon; Alam, Gazi Mahabubul; Idris, Abdul Rahman

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Representing both "central university administration" and academics, deans are increasingly being confronted with the competing managerial and academic values. Being able to manage the competing values is pivotal to the success of a dean. However, there is dearth of research studying this. Considering the for-profit private…

  2. Balancing Managerial and Academic Values: Mid-Level Academic Management at a Private University in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thian, Lok Boon; Alam, Gazi Mahabubul; Idris, Abdul Rahman

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Representing both "central university administration" and academics, deans are increasingly being confronted with the competing managerial and academic values. Being able to manage the competing values is pivotal to the success of a dean. However, there is dearth of research studying this. Considering the for-profit private…

  3. Core competencies in internal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcel, José Manuel; Casademont, Jordi; Conthe, Pedro; Pinilla, Blanca; Pujol, Ramón; García-Alegría, Javier

    2012-06-01

    The working group on Competencies of Internal Medicine from the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine (SEMI) proposes a series of core competencies that we consider should be common to all European internal medicine specialists. The competencies include aspects related to patient care, clinical knowledge, technical skills, communication skills, professionalism, cost-awareness in medical care and academic activities. The proposal could be used as a working document for the Internal Medicine core curriculum in the context of the educational framework of medical specialties in Europe.

  4. Behavior problems at ages 6 and 11 and high school academic achievement: longitudinal latent variable modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslau, Naomi; Breslau, Joshua; Miller, Elizabeth; Raykov, Tenko

    2011-02-28

    Previous studies documented long-run effects of behavior problems at the start of school on academic achievement. However, these studies did not examine whether the observed effects of early behavior problems are explained by more proximate behavior problems, given the tendency of children's behavior problems to persist. Latent variable modeling was applied to estimate the effects of behavior problems at ages 6 and 11 on academic achievement at age 17, using data from a longitudinal study (n=823). Behavior problems at ages 6 and 11, each stage independently of the other, predicted lower math and reading test scores at age 17, controlling for intelligence quotient (IQ), birth weight, maternal characteristics, family and community environment, and taking into account behavior problems at age 17. Behavior problems at the start of school, independent of later behavior problems, exert lingering effects on achievement by impeding the acquisition of cognitive skills that are the foundation for later academic progress.

  5. Mechanical competence of ovariectomy-induced compromised bone after single or combined treatment with high-frequency loading and bisphosphonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargos, G V; Bhattacharya, P; van Lenthe, G H; Del Bel Cury, A A; Naert, I; Duyck, J; Vandamme, K

    2015-06-01

    Osteoporosis leads to increased bone fragility, thus effective approaches enhancing bone strength are needed. Hence, this study investigated the effect of single or combined application of high-frequency (HF) loading through whole body vibration (WBV) and alendronate (ALN) on the mechanical competence of ovariectomy-induced osteoporotic bone. Thirty-four female Wistar rats were ovariectomized (OVX) or sham-operated (shOVX) and divided into five groups: shOVX, OVX-shWBV, OVX-WBV, ALN-shWBV and ALN-WBV. (Sham)WBV loading was applied for 10 min/day (130 to 150 Hz at 0.3g) for 14 days and ALN at 2 mg/kg/dose was administered 3x/week. Finite element analysis based on micro-CT was employed to assess bone biomechanical properties, relative to bone micro-structural parameters. HF loading application to OVX resulted in an enlarged cortex, but it was not able to improve the biomechanical properties. ALN prevented trabecular bone deterioration and increased bone stiffness and bone strength of OVX bone. Finally, the combination of ALN with HF resulted in an increased cortical thickness in OVX rats when compared to single treatments. Compared to HF loading, ALN treatment is preferred for improving the compromised mechanical competence of OVX bone. In addition, the association of ALN with HF loading results in an additive effect on the cortical thickness.

  6. Reflection: a critical proficiency essential to the effective development of a high competence in communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Cindy L; Nestel, Debra; Wolf, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Reflection, or the ability to step back from an experience and consider it critically, in an analytical, non-subjective manner, is an essential aspect of problem solving and decision making, and also of effective communication with clients and colleagues. Reflective practice has been described as the essence of professionalism and is therefore a core professional skill; rarely, however, has it been explicitly taught in veterinary curricula, and it has only a recent history in undergraduate human medical curricula. We describe here two preliminary case studies, one in a veterinary medical education context and the other within a human medical education framework, as examples of approaches to assessing a student's ability for ''reflection.'' The case studies also illustrate some of the key principles. Both of the case studies described had as their end goal the enhancement of communication skills through critical reflection. At Monash University, Australia, the majority of students were assessed as being at a level of ''reflection in development.'' The students in the Ontario Veterinary College case study showed moderately good use of self-awareness and critical reflection as a basis for modifying and integrating communication skills into practice. While both preliminary case studies point to the fact that students recognize the importance of communication and value the opportunity to practice it, few students in either case study identified the importance of reflection for lifelong learning and professional competence. Opportunities to complete critical reflection exercises in other parts of curricula and outside of communication would likely reinforce its importance as a generic skill. Ongoing scholarly approaches to teaching, learning, and evaluating reflection and self-awareness are needed.

  7. A cross-sectional comparative study to determine the factors contributing to the academic performance of the high performers and low performers in 2nd year medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogeeta Sushant Walke

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Through our study, we identified important factors contributing to high performance in academics, and we concluded that students should incorporate all the factors in a well-coordinated manner rather than focusing on any single factor. If executed, appropriately it will definitely upgrade their academic performance and prevent undesirable failures. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2015; 4(6.000: 1072-1079

  8. The Role of Internet-Specific Epistemic Beliefs and Self-Regulation in High School Students' Online Academic Help Seeking: A Structural Equation Modeling Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kun-Hung; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Three instruments (i.e., Internet-specific epistemic beliefs, self-regulation, and online academic help seeking questionnaires) were administered to 319 high school students with the aim of understanding the role of Internet specific epistemic beliefs and self-regulation in their online academic help seeking. Through a structure equation modeling…

  9. A New Model for Student Support in High-Poverty Urban Elementary Schools: Effects on Elementary and Middle School Academic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Mary E.; Madaus, George F.; Raczek, Anastasia E.; Dearing, Eric; Foley, Claire; An, Chen; Lee-St. John, Terrence J.; Beaton, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to support children in schools require addressing not only academic issues, but also out-of-school factors that can affect students' ability to succeed. This study examined academic achievement of students participating in City Connects, a student support intervention operating in high-poverty elementary schools. The sample included 7,948…

  10. Counselors and Testing: Academic Assessment. Searchlight Plus: Relevant Resources in High Interest Areas. 14+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Warren S.; Beard, Joseph W.

    This review of literature from the Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) database is the second volume on the topic of testing and assessment for the counseling professional; the first volume was published in 1979. The sections on minimum competency tests identify issues of current interest, e.g., the basic issue of definition; the…

  11. A research and practice of medical English reading course based on "the hierarchical model of academic foreign language competence"%基于"学术外语能力层级模型"的医学英语阅读课程的研究与实践

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王庆怡; 姜冬蕾; 周玉梅

    2015-01-01

    在全球化背景下,针对高层次人才的外语教学正在从通用英语向学术英语转型.本文根据"学术外语能力层级模型",针对硕士研究生,构建了以培养思辨能力和学术体裁能力为主导的医学英语阅读课程模式,在教学实践中打破传统教学思路,按照思辨能力、学术体裁能力和语言基本功的顺序为侧重点进行能力培养,并通过研究生阅读能力自评和课程反馈验证了该模式在教学实践中的效果.%With the advent of globalization, foreign language education for advanced learners has undergone a transition from English for general purpose (EGP) teaching to English for acdemic purpose (EAP) teaching.On the basis of "the hierarchical model of academic foreign language competence", this paper proposes a new English for medical purpose (EMP) reading course model for postgraduates, with a primary focus on the cultivation of critical thinking skills and academic genre competence.The paper further illustrates how this model is applied in class to develop students' critical thinking skills, academic genre competence and basic English skills in sequence.Students' feedback to teaching and self-evaluation results of their academic foreign language competence are then collected to investigate the value of this course model.

  12. The negative influence of significant others on high academic achieving school pupils' choice of nursing as a career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, Gavin R; McNally, Jim

    2013-03-01

    The International Council of Nurses proposes that the shortage of nurses is global in scale and is expected to become much worse in the years ahead. A major factor impacting on the worldwide nursing shortage is the diminishing number of young people choosing nursing as a career (International Council of Nurses, 2008). One important dimension of the school pupils' career choice process is their interactions with significant others and the influence of these significant others (Hodkinson and Sparkes, 1997). As Schools/Departments of Nursing endeavour to attract more intellectual school leavers it is important to examine what advice and opinions are significant others giving regarding nursing as a career choice and how influential is this advice. This paper is based on interview data from 20 high academic achieving 5th and 6th year school pupils in Scotland, paradigmatic cases from a larger sample, who had considered nursing as a possible career choice within their career preference cluster, but then later disregarded nursing and decided to pursue medicine or another health care profession. The data was particularly striking in revealing the negative influence of significant others on high academic achieving school pupils' choice of nursing as a career. The influence of significant others, these being specifically parents, guardians, guidance teachers and career advisors was very apparent in the data in that they had a very negative view regarding nursing as a career choice for high academic achieving school pupils.

  13. The impact of peer relations on academic progress in junior high

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbers, Miranda J.; Van der Werf, Margaretha P. C.; Snijders, Tom A. B.; Creemers, Bert P. M.; Kuyper, Hans

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether peer relations within classrooms were related to students' academic progress, and if so, whether this can be explained by students' relatedness and engagement, in line with Connell and Wellborn's self-system model. We analyzed data of 18,735 students i

  14. Unequal Academic Achievement in High School: The Mediating Roles of Concerted Cultivation and Close Friends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolan, Brian V.

    2016-01-01

    Building from the classic Wisconsin model of status attainment, this study examines whether a specific style of parenting, concerted cultivation, and a close friend's school-related attitudes and behaviors mediate the relationship between a family's socioeconomic status and their child's academic achievement in the United States. Using a recursive…

  15. Differences in Academic Achievement among Texas High School Students as a Function of Music Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Robert Wayne

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the score differences on the Texas Academic Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) Reading and Mathematics measures among students in Grades 10 and 11 as a function of music enrollment. Specifically, gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and enrollment in choir, band, or orchestra or no music enrollment…

  16. High-Risk Drinking and Academic Performance among College Student Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossbard, Joel R.; Widome, Rachel; Lust, Katherine; Simpson, Tracy L.; Lostutter, Ty W.; Saxon, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Heavy drinking and psychiatric symptoms pose challenges to college student Veterans and may undermine academic success. We used Boynton College Student Health Survey data to assess highrisk drinking (HRD), psychiatric symptoms, and psychosocial stressors among student Veterans (N = 1,679) with and without prior deployment. Rates of HRD and…

  17. Self-Regulation, Executive Function, Working Memory, and Academic Achievement of Female High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halloran, Roberta Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    Self-regulation, executive function and working memory are areas of cognitive processing that have been studied extensively. Although many studies have examined the constructs, there is limited empirical support suggesting a formal link between the three cognitive processes and their prediction of academic achievement. Thus, the present study…

  18. Modeling the Relations among Parental Involvement, School Engagement and Academic Performance of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alwan, Ahmed F.

    2014-01-01

    The author proposed a model to explain how parental involvement and school engagement related to academic performance. Participants were (671) 9th and 10th graders students who completed two scales of "parental involvement" and "school engagement" in their regular classrooms. Results of the path analysis suggested that the…

  19. Educational Expectations and Academic Achievement among Middle and High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Khanh

    2007-01-01

    Using data from the National Education Longitudinal Study (NELS), this report examined the prospective relationships between educational expectations and academic achievement among students (n = 10,262) surveyed and tested in Grades 8, 10, and 12. Cross-lagged analyses indicated that between Grades 8 and 10 the path from achievement to…

  20. Cocoa High School's Academic Courses as Viewed by Their Consumers: A Field Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louwerse, F. H.

    A 16-item self-report instrument (included in an appendix) was developed to determine the views held by students (N=1,004) concerning aspects of courses in 5 academic areas: English, foreign languages, mathematics, science, and social studies. Individual items reflected views concerning: understanding course requirments (2 items), teacher/student…

  1. Differences in Academic Achievement among Texas High School Students as a Function of Music Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Robert Wayne

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the score differences on the Texas Academic Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) Reading and Mathematics measures among students in Grades 10 and 11 as a function of music enrollment. Specifically, gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and enrollment in choir, band, or orchestra or no music enrollment…

  2. Academically Successful African American Male Urban High School Students' Experiences of Mattering to Others at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Catherine; Dixon, Andrea; Griddine, Ke'Shana

    2010-01-01

    Mattering to others has been shown to be a key construct of mental health and wellness. Emerging research links interpersonal mattering and school climate. In this study, the authors use transcendental phenomenology to explore how interpersonal mattering impacts the academic achievement of urban African American males who are academically…

  3. Penalized estimation for competing risks regression with applications to high-dimensional covariates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambrogi, Federico; Scheike, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    and better response to the therapy. Although in the last years the number of contributions for coping with high and ultra-high-dimensional data in standard survival analysis have increased (Witten and Tibshirani, 2010. Survival analysis with high-dimensional covariates. Statistical Methods in Medical...... to the binomial model in the package timereg (Scheike and Martinussen, 2006. Dynamic Regression models for survival data New York: Springer), available through CRAN.......High-dimensional regression has become an increasingly important topic for many research fields. For example, biomedical research generates an increasing amount of data to characterize patients' bio-profiles (e.g. from a genomic high-throughput assay). The increasing complexity...

  4. The Effects of Financial Aid in High School on Academic and Labor Market Outcomes: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humlum, Maria Knoth; Vejlin, Rune Majlund

    We investigate the effects of financial aid on student employment and academic outcomes in high school. We exploit administrative differences in the amount of financial aid received based on timing of birth to identify the causal effects of interest. Specifically, individuals born early...... in a quarter receive less financial aid than comparable individuals born late in the previous quarter. We find that receiving less aid induces individuals to work more during high school. However, we do not find any evidence that receiving less financial aid and thereby working more is associated with any...... adverse outcomes, such as a lower high school grade point average....

  5. The States' Role in Ensuring Assessment Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Michael S.

    2002-01-01

    Argues that because of research evidence linking competent assessment with academic achievement, all states should require assessment competence for teacher, administrator, and counselor licenses; reviews current status of state requirements; briefly describes assessment standards developed by several national organizations; describes several…

  6. Competency-Based Education: Leadership Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodine, Thad; Johnstone, Sally M.

    2015-01-01

    Competency-based education (CBE) refers to online and hybrid courses and programs that offer credit or degrees based on evidence of student learning, or competencies, rather than on the amount of time spent in a course. Students work at their own pace, receive personalized academic support, and demonstrate mastery as they progress through their…

  7. Natural Competence of Xylella fastidiosa Occurs at a High Frequency Inside Microfluidic Chambers Mimicking the Bacterium's Natural Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Prem P.; Lopez, Samantha M.; Almeida, Rodrigo P. P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited bacterium that is the causal agent of emerging diseases in a number of economically important crops. Genetic diversity studies have demonstrated homologous recombination occurring among X. fastidiosa strains, which has been proposed to contribute to host plant shifts. Moreover, experimental evidence confirmed that X. fastidiosa is naturally competent for recombination in vitro. Here, as an approximation of natural habitats (plant xylem vessels and insect mouthparts), recombination was studied in microfluidic chambers (MCs) filled with media amended with grapevine xylem sap. First, different media were screened for recombination in solid agar plates using a pair of X. fastidiosa strains that were previously reported to recombine in coculture. The highest frequency of recombination was obtained with PD3 medium, compared to those with the other two media (X. fastidiosa medium [XFM] and periwinkle wilt [PW] medium) used in previous studies. Dissection of the media components led to the identification of bovine serum albumin as an inhibitor of recombination that was correlated to its previously known effect on inhibition of twitching motility. When recombination was performed in liquid culture, the frequencies were significantly higher under flow conditions (MCs) than under batch conditions (test tubes). The recombination frequencies in MCs and agar plates were not significantly different from each other. Grapevine xylem sap from both susceptible and tolerant varieties allowed high recombination frequency in MCs when mixed with PD3. These results suggest that X. fastidiosa has the ability to be naturally competent in the natural growth environment of liquid flow, and this phenomenon could have implications in X. fastidiosa environmental adaptation. IMPORTANCE Xylella fastidiosa is a plant pathogen that lives inside xylem vessels (where water and nutrients are transported inside the plant) and the mouthparts of insect

  8. Academic Achievement Trajectories of Homeless and Highly Mobile Students: Resilience in the Context of Chronic and Acute Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutuli, J. J.; Desjardins, Christopher David; Herbers, Janette E.; Long, Jeffrey D.; Heistad, David; Chan, Chi-Keung; Hinz, Elizabeth; Masten, Ann S.

    2012-01-01

    Analyses examined academic achievement data across 3rd through 8th grades (N = 26,474), comparing students identified as homeless or highly mobile (HHM) to other students in the federal free meal program (FM), reduced-price meals (RM), or neither (General). Achievement was lower as a function of rising risk status (General > RM > FM > HHM). Achievement gaps appeared stable or widened between HHM students and lower-risk groups. Math and reading achievement were lower and growth in math was slower in years of HHM identification, suggesting acute consequences of residential instability. Nonetheless, 45% of HHM students scored within or above the average range, suggesting academic resilience. Results underscore the need for research on risk and resilience processes among HHM students to address achievement disparities. PMID:23110492

  9. 教育技术学硕士研究生学术能力发展取向探析%An Analysis of the Developmental Orientation in the Academic Competence of Postgraduate Students Majoring in Educational Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗江华; 王静贤

    2015-01-01

    Selecting the thesis research topic and research methods is a significant w ay to examine the academic competence of postgraduate students . This study takes 3914 masters theses in Educational Technology in the last 5 years as samples , and makes a description of the research interests and research skills through keyword knowledge mapping and research methods classification . It yields the following findings:in mainland China , the masters thesis research topics in educational technology are diversified , but basically center on the hot topics of the academic research ;there was an increase in cross‐disciplinary research , but different research and training institutions have different understandings on subject orientation of educational technology , leading to the different research interests with great importance attached either to “technology” “or to “education” ;mixed methods were increasingly adopted , but there still exist the problems of inappropriate research methods in some and others being simply the summaries of the experiences .%学位论文选题与研究方法的选择是考察硕士研究生学术能力的重要环节,分析近5年来的3914篇教育技术学硕士学位论文,以关键词知识图谱、研究方法类型分布等描述教育技术学硕士研究生的选题意趣和研究方法技能,发现我国大陆高校教育技术学硕士学位论文的选题虽然较为分散,但基本契合学术界的研究热点;跨学科选题渐增,但不同培养机构对教育技术学科定位的理解存在差异,导致偏“技术”或重“教育”的不同选题意趣;混合的方法不断涌现,但亦存在研究方法选择不合理、研究仅停留在经验总结的层面等问题。

  10. Reducing test anxiety and improving academic self-esteem in high school and college students with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachelka, D; Katz, R C

    1999-09-01

    Test anxiety seems like a benign problem to some people, but it can be potentially serious when it leads to high levels of distress and academic failure in otherwise capable students. Because test anxiety is common in older students with learning disabilities (LD), it is surprising that little research has been done on ways to reduce the distress these students experience in test situations. In this study, we used a randomized pretest-posttest control group design to examine the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral treatment for reducing test anxiety and improving academic self-esteem in a cohort (N = 27) of high school and college students with learning disabilities (LD). All of the students participated voluntarily. They were enrolled in classes for students with learning problems. Before the study began, they complained of test anxiety and showed an elevated score on the Test Anxiety Inventory (TAI). Eleven students (85%) completed the 8-week long treatment, which consisted of progressive muscle relaxation, guided imagery, self-instruction training, as well as training in study and test-taking skills. Results showed significant improvement in the treated group which was not evident in an untreated control group (N = 16). Compared to the control group, the treated group showed significant reductions in test anxiety on the TAI, as well as improvement in study skills and academic self-esteem as measured by the Survey of Study Habits and Attitudes, and the school scale of the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory. These results extend the generality of similar studies on reducing test anxiety and improving academic self-esteem in younger students. They also suggest that relief from test anxiety can be expected fairly quickly when cognitive-behavioral methods are used. Additional implications and methodological limitations of the study are discussed.

  11. Outsourcing competence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.; Delen, G.; van Vlijmen, B.

    2011-01-01

    The topic of this paper, competences needed for outsourcing, is organized by first providing a generic competence scheme, which is subsequently instantiated to the area of sourcing and outsourcing. Sourcing and outsourcing are positioned as different areas of activity, neither one of which is

  12. Timespacing competence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Helle Pia; Mogensen, Naja Dahlstrup

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on Kramsch’s (2009) conceptualization of the multilingual subject and the symbolic self, in this paper, we explore how multilingual children re-signify three intertwined myths about the bilingual student, linguistic diversity and language competence, when, in the researcher-generated acti......Drawing on Kramsch’s (2009) conceptualization of the multilingual subject and the symbolic self, in this paper, we explore how multilingual children re-signify three intertwined myths about the bilingual student, linguistic diversity and language competence, when, in the researcher....... By perceiving competences from a subjective child perspective, we learn how children do what we call timespacing competence. On that basis, we suggest paying attention to how children themselves timespace competence by focusing (more consistently) on the subjective, social, spatial and temporal dimensions...

  13. Parental styles, conscientiousness, and academic performance in high school: a three-wave longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaven, Patrick C L; Ciarrochi, Joseph

    2008-04-01

    This article assesses whether perceived parental style influenced the extent to which adolescents became increasingly conscientious and whether changes in conscientiousness influenced academic grades 1 year later. Parental styles, conscientiousness, verbal, and numerical ability at Time 1 were measured. One year later conscientiousness was again assessed, and 1 year after that end-of-year exam results were obtained. More than 784 students (mean age=12.3 years, SD=0.49) participated in the 1st year. The data of 563 students were matched across the 3 years. Conscientiousness tended to decrease from Time 1 to Time 2. Structural equation modeling showed that adolescents with more authoritative parents experienced less of a decrease in conscientiousness at Time 2 than did students with less authoritative parents and the same baseline level of conscientiousness at Time 1. Additionally, the decrease in conscientiousness at Time 2 predicted worse grades at Time 3, even after controlling for baseline levels of academic achievement.

  14. Development and psychometric testing of the Ascent to Competence Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Michelle A; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Pitt, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the development and psychometric testing of the Ascent to Competence Scale, an instrument designed to measure nursing students' perceptions of the quality of their clinical placement experience. The key purpose of clinical placements is to facilitate students' learning and progress toward the attainment of competence. The attainment of competence requires personal commitment and active involvement of students; support and guidance of clinical and academic staff; and clinical environments that are welcoming and inclusive of students. The items for the Ascent to Competence Scale were identified following a critical review of the literature. Content and face validity were established by an expert panel. During 2010 the instrument was tested with third year nursing students (n=88) from one Australian university. Exploratory factor analysis with promax oblique rotation was used to determine construct validity and Cronbach's coefficient alpha determined the scale's internal consistency reliability. The final scale demonstrated satisfactory internal consistency (alpha 0.98). Exploratory factor analysis yielded a three-component structure termed "Being welcomed"; "Belongingness" and "Learning and competence". Each subscale demonstrated high internal consistency: 0.89; 0.96; and 0.95 respectively. The Ascent to Competence Scale provides a fresh perspective on clinical placements as it allows for the relationship between belongingness, learning and competence to be explored. The scale was reliable and valid for this cohort. Further research in different contexts would be valuable in extending upon this work. The Ascent to Competence Scale profiled in this paper will be of benefit to both educational and healthcare institutions. The use of a quantified yardstick, such as the Ascent to Competence Scale, is important in evaluating the efficacy of programs, placements and partnerships between higher education and health services. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd

  15. Establishing a Unified Model of Academic Literacy and a Method for Measuring Academic Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Sherry Louise

    2012-01-01

    Substantial changes to the undergraduate population at US universities have created a need for the development of a model of academic literacy and a corresponding means of measuring academic readiness that addresses contextualized, communicative English language competence. This paper presents a unified model of academic literacy which treats…

  16. Is There an "Academic Vocabulary"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Ken; Tse, Polly

    2007-01-01

    This article considers the notion of "academic vocabulary": the assumption that students of English for academic purposes (EAP) should study a core of high frequency words because they are common in an English academic register. We examine the value of the term by using Cox-head's (2000) Academic Word List (AWL) to explore the distribution of its…

  17. Competency assessment of nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Lynn

    2006-01-01

    Changes in the healthcare industry have created great challenges for leaders of acute-care organizations. One of the greatest challenges is ensuring a competent nursing staff to care for patients within this changing environment (Boylan & Westra, 1998). Patients are more acutely ill and have shorter lengths of stay, placing greater demands on nurses who must demonstrate competency in caring for increasingly complex patients in a continually changing healthcare environment. Competency is defined as "the knowledge, skills, ability and behaviors that a person possesses in order to perform tasks correctly and skillfully" (O'Shea, 2002, p. 175). Competency assessment involves more than a checklist and a test. Hospitals are required to assess, maintain, demonstrate, track, and improve the competence of the staff. Competency assessment is an ongoing process of initial development, maintenance of knowledge and skills, educational consultation, remediation, and redevelopment. Methods to assess competencies include competency fairs, Performance Based Development System and online programs. Certain key people should be involved in the development of competencies. The department managers can give input related to department-specific competencies. Experienced staff members can provide valuable insight into the competencies that need to be assessed. Educators should be involved for providing the input for the methods used to validate competencies. Competencies are an important part of the work world. They are a part of a continual process to help ensure that the organization provides a high-quality care to its customers and patients.

  18. Kompetenceprofil for academic developers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsen, Rie; Mørcke, Anne Mette

    universitetspædagog. Med udgangspunkt i en kompetenceprofil fra Staff and Educational Development Association (SEDA – www.seda.ac.uk) har Maarit Ansela, University of Tampere og Merja Maikkola, University of Oulu foreslået en kompetenceprofil bestående af 4 kernekompetencer, som alle universitetspædagoger bør besidde...... gerne vil udføre? Vi vil også diskutere hvilke positive og negative konsekvenser en (mulig fælles nordisk) kompetenceprofil kunne få.Referencer:Ansela, M. & Maikkola, M. (2007). ACADEMIC DEVELOPER’S COMPETENCE-BASED DESCRIPTION:Core and basic competences. Retrieved 22/01/15 at http...

  19. Competing perspectives during organizational socialization on the role of certified athletic trainers in high school settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensch, James; Crews, Candice; Mitchell, Murray

    2005-01-01

    When certified athletic trainers (ATCs) enter a workplace, their potential for professional effectiveness is affected by a number of factors, including the individual's ability to put acquired knowledge, skills, and attitudes into practice. This ability may be influenced by the preconceived attitudes and expectations of athletes, athletes' parents, athletic directors, physical therapists, physicians, and coaches. To examine the perspectives of high school coaches and ATCs toward the ATC's role in the high school setting by looking at 3 questions: (1) What are coaches' expectations of ATCs during different phases of a sport season? (2) What do ATCs perceive their role to be during different phases of a season? and (3) How do coaches' expectations compare with ATCs' expectations? Qualitative research design involving semistructured interviews. High schools. Twenty high school varsity basketball coaches from 10 high schools in 2 states and the ATCs assigned to these teams. For the coaches, 12 questions focused on 3 specific areas: (1) the athletic training services they received as high school basketball coaches, (2) each coach's expectations of the ATC with whom he or she was working during various phases of the season, and (3) coaches' levels of satisfaction with the athletic training services provided to their team. For the ATCs, 17 questions focused on 3 areas: (1) the ATC's background, (2) the ATC's perceived duties at different phases of the basketball season and his or her relationship with the coach, and (3) other school factors that enhanced or interfered with the ATC's ability to perform duties. Three themes emerged. Coaches had limited knowledge and understanding of ATCs' qualifications, training, professional preparation, and previous experience. Coaches simply expected ATCs to be available to complement their roles. Positive communication was identified as a critical component to a good coach-ATC relationship. Although all participants valued good

  20. Competency Mapping of the Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisha, N.

    2012-10-01

    Human resource management is a process of bringing people and organizations together so that the goals of each other are met. Nowadays it is not possible to show a good financial or operating report unless your personnel relations are in order. Over the years, highly skilled and knowledge based jobs are increasing while low skilled jobs are decreasing. Competency Mapping is a process of identifying key competencies for an organization, the jobs and functions within it. Competency mapping, the buzz word in any industry is not complicated as it may appear. At the heart of any successful activity lies a competence or skill. In the recent years, various thought leaders in business strategy have emphasized the need to identify what competencies a business needs, in order to compete in a specific environment. In this article explains the why competencies needed and how is measured competency of employees in the organization.

  1. Restorative Justice Conferencing, Oral Language Competence, and Young Offenders: Are These High-Risk Conversations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    This article is concerned with the oral language demands (both talking and listening) associated with restorative justice conferencing--an inherently highly verbal and conversational process. Many vulnerable young people (e.g., those in the youth justice system) have significant, yet unidentified language impairments, and these could compromise…

  2. Learner Identity Amid Figured Worlds: Constructing (In)competence at an Urban High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Beth C.

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the figured world of learning at urban Oakcity High School, describing the learner identities that were available to students amid the practices, categories, discourses and interactions of this world. My aims are 2-fold and interconnected: (1) to reframe a taken-for-granted phenomenon--that students tend to do poorly at urban…

  3. High-impact practices and first-year seminars: A quasi-experimental study measuring change in academic self-efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber Applewhite, Stephanie

    First-year seminars, high-impact practices, and academic self-efficacy have been identified as relevant to the successful transition process from high school to college. This study investigated the interconnections between freshman academic self-efficacy, high-impact practices, zone of proximal development and first-year seminars. This research contributed to the understandings of the significance of high-impact practices in the development of academic self-efficacy in freshman students. As colleges strive to improve retention from the freshman to sophomore years, it is useful to identify the relevance of high-impact practices within a first-year seminar on academic self-efficacy. A two-group, quasi-experimental study using a pre/post survey was conducted at a regional comprehensive university in east Texas in which 800 students were given a pre and post survey to measure academic self-efficacy. After matching for fidelity, eleven sections were identified for the control group (104 participants) and eleven sections (91 participants) were selected for the experiment group. The findings revealed that the overall gain in the mean of both groups from the pre to post survey was statistically significant. While the students in the high-impact sections reported a higher post mean on the College Academic Self-Efficacy Scale than those who did not receive high-impact instruction, the gain was not statistically significant.

  4. OPPORTUNITIES OF PEDAGOGICAL MODELING IN THE SOLVING OF THE PROBLEM OF THE FORMATION OF THE DESIGN AND RESEARCH COMPETENCE OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Инга Валерьевна Дементьева

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of  forming high-school students’  design and research  competence can be successfully solved with the help of the realization of pedagogical model based on the systematic, person- orientated  and competence - active  approach. The aim of the research is to theoretically justify and experimentally  examine  the model of formation  of high-school students’ design and research competence.  The importance of the research is that during it the set of scientific approaches (systematic, person- orientated  and competence - active  ones as the methodological basis for projecting the model were justified and the complex of pedagogical conditions served as the guide for the further research of the problem of  high-school students’  design and research  competence formation. The methods of the analysis of pedagogical, methodological literature, theoretical modeling, as well as empiric methods of research served as the basis of the methodology of the research in the process of model approbation.   The value of  the given research is that the practice-oriented model of forming design and research competence of high school students represents the multilevel dynamic system consisting of mutually conditioned components (objective, methodological, meaningful, technological and diagnostic-effective ones and can be included into the practice of other educational institutions.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-11-2

  5. Competence Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borrás, Susana; Edquist, Charles

    on the one hand, and the real world of innovation policy-making on the other, typically not speaking to each other. With this purpose in mind, this paper discusses the role of competences and competence-building in the innovation process from a perspective of innovation systems; it examines how governments...... and public agencies in different countries and different times have actually approached the issue of building, maintaining and using competences in their innovation systems; it examines what are the critical and most important issues at stake from the point of view of innovation policy, looking particularly...

  6. Impact of College Library on Student’s Academic Achievements

    OpenAIRE

    Basheer, S; Razzaq, A

    2012-01-01

    economics has created a need for competent commerce graduates. Provision of talented and intelligent professionals in these fields is the responsibility of Governmental Institutions, (colleges & Universities). In the process of developing highly qualified , confident , and academically up rated professionals, roll played by commerce colleges and other educational institutions can never be denied. To increase economic strengths of the country and to reduce its weaknesses, it is also necessar...

  7. Competences in Demand within the Spanish Agricultural Engineering Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigones, Alicia; Valera, Diego Luis; Moreda, Guillermo Pedro; García, Jose Luis

    2014-01-01

    The Rural Engineering Department (Technical University of Madrid) ran three competence surveys during the 2006-2007 and 2007-2008 academic years and evaluated: (1) the competences gained by agricultural engineer's degree and agricultural technical engineer's degree students (360 respondents); (2) the competences demanded by agricultural employers…

  8. The Arabidopsis Floral Repressor BFT DelaysFlowering by Competing with FT for FD Bindingunder High Salinity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Soil salinity is one of the most serious agricultural problems that significantly reduce crop yields in the aridand semi-arid regions. It influences various phases of plant growth and developmental processes, such as seed germina-tion, leaf and stem growth, and reproductive propagation. Salt stress delays the onset of flowering in many plant spe-cies. We have previously reported that the Arabidopsis BROTHER OF FT AND TFL1 (BFT) acts as a floral repressor undersalt stress. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the BFT function in the salt regulation of flowering inductionis unknown. In this work, we found that BFT delays flowering under high salinity by competing with FLOWERING LOCUST (FT) for binding to the FD transcription factor. The flowering time of FD-deficient fd-2 mutant was insensitive to highsalinity. BFT interacts with FD in the nucleus via the C-terminal domain of FD, which is also required for the interactionof FD with FT, and interferes with the FT-FD interaction. These observations indicate that BFT constitutes a distinct saltstress signaling pathway that modulates the function of the FT-FD module and possibly provides an adaptation strategythat fine-tunes photoperiodic flowering under high salinity.

  9. Leadership Competences Among Managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Baczynska

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this paper is to present the results of a survey conducted among managers (N=38 in the framework of the project “Development of the Bounded Leadership Theory”. The research juxtaposes two types of variables: (1 leadership competencies outlined in Kozminski’s theory (i.e. anticipatory, visionary, value-creating, mobilizing, self-reflection with (2 three psychological predispositions of leaders, such as intelligence, personality and ability to influence others. The tested predispositions represented three groups: non-variable traits, or permanent characteristics (intelligence, partially variable characteristics (personality and variable characteristics (influence tactics. Methodology: A total of 38 middle and senior managers, students of the MBA programme at Kozminski University, took part in the survey. Participants flled out a preliminary version of the Leadership Competence Questionnaire, as well as tests pertaining to intelligence, personality and influence tactics. The hypotheses were tested using Spearman’s rho correlation. The research has brought interesting results relating to the correlation between the fve tested competencies and leadership predispositions. Findings: Permanent and partly stable characteristics do not correlate with leadership competencies, i.e. a high score in leadership competencies is not necessarily synonymous with high intelligence levels or positive personality traits. Correlations have been observed between mobilization skills and influence tactics in the surveyed sample, i.e. legitimacy and personal appeals that leaders have recourse to and, in the case of value-creating competencies, an interesting correlation with legitimacy. Originality: The study constitutes an important contribution to the extant literature, as – first and foremost – it represents a new approach to the understanding of leadership competencies. Secondly, it reveals correlations between complex skills, i

  10. Academic Hospitality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  11. Replicable Interprofessional Competency Outcomes from High-Volume, Inter-Institutional, Interprofessional Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Bambini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available There are significant limitations among the few prior studies that have examined the development and implementation of interprofessional education (IPE experiences to accommodate a high volume of students from several disciplines and from different institutions. The present study addressed these gaps by seeking to determine the extent to which a single, large, inter-institutional, and IPE simulation event improves student perceptions of the importance and relevance of IPE and simulation as a learning modality, whether there is a difference in students’ perceptions among disciplines, and whether the results are reproducible. A total of 290 medical, nursing, pharmacy, and physical therapy students participated in one of two large, inter-institutional, IPE simulation events. Measurements included student perceptions about their simulation experience using the Attitude Towards Teamwork in Training Undergoing Designed Educational Simulation (ATTITUDES Questionnaire and open-ended questions related to teamwork and communication. Results demonstrated a statistically significant improvement across all ATTITUDES subscales, while time management, role confusion, collaboration, and mutual support emerged as significant themes. Results of the present study indicate that a single IPE simulation event can reproducibly result in significant and educationally meaningful improvements in student perceptions towards teamwork, IPE, and simulation as a learning modality.

  12. Can microbes compete with cows for sustainable protein production - A feasibility study on high quality protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestergaard, Mike; Chan, Siu Hung Joshua; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2016-11-01

    An increasing population and their increased demand for high-protein diets will require dramatic changes in the food industry, as limited resources and environmental issues will make animal derived foods and proteins, gradually more unsustainable to produce. To explore alternatives to animal derived proteins, an economic model was built around the genome-scale metabolic network of E. coli to study the feasibility of recombinant protein production as a food source. Using a novel model, we predicted which microbial production strategies are optimal for economic return, by capturing the tradeoff between the market prices of substrates, product output and the efficiency of microbial production. A case study with the food protein, Bovine Alpha Lactalbumin was made to evaluate the upstream economic feasibilities. Simulations with different substrate profiles at maximum productivity were used to explore the feasibility of recombinant Bovine Alpha Lactalbumin production coupled with market prices of utilized materials. We found that recombinant protein production could be a feasible food source and an alternative to traditional sources.

  13. High hydrostatic pressure: a new way to improve in vitro developmental competence of porcine matured oocytes after vitrification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Y; Pribenszky, C S; Molnár, M

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to improve cryotolerance using high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) pretreatment of porcine in vitro matured (IVM) oocytes, to facilitate their further developmental competence after parthenogenetic activation. A total of 1668 porcine IVM oocytes were used in our...

  14. "It's Important for Them to Know Who They Are": Teachers' Efforts to Sustain Students' Cultural Competence in an Age of High-Stakes Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoch, Melody

    2017-01-01

    This article examines how four urban elementary teachers designed their literacy instruction in ways that sought to sustain students' cultural competence--maintaining their language and cultural practices while also gaining access to more dominant ones--amid expectations to prepare students for high-stakes testing. A large part of their teaching…

  15. Exploration of portfolio characteristics for the recognition of prior learning : the identification, assessment and recognition of actual competencies of highly-skilled immigrants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, Astrid Marianne

    2007-01-01

    This research study explores the characteristics of the portfolio as an instrument for highly-skilled immigrants to facilitate the identification, assessment and recognition of their actual competencies in order to define guidelines for portfolio design and implementation. The two research questions

  16. Needs Assessment for Research Use of High-Throughput Sequencing at a Large Academic Medical Center.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Geskin

    Full Text Available Next Generation Sequencing (NGS methods are driving profound changes in biomedical research, with a growing impact on patient care. Many academic medical centers are evaluating potential models to prepare for the rapid increase in NGS information needs. This study sought to investigate (1 how and where sequencing data is generated and analyzed, (2 research objectives and goals for NGS, (3 workforce capacity and unmet needs, (4 storage capacity and unmet needs, (5 available and anticipated funding resources, and (6 future challenges. As a precursor to informed decision making at our institution, we undertook a systematic needs assessment of investigators using survey methods. We recruited 331 investigators from over 60 departments and divisions at the University of Pittsburgh Schools of Health Sciences and had 140 respondents, or a 42% response rate. Results suggest that both sequencing and analysis bottlenecks currently exist. Significant educational needs were identified, including both investigator-focused needs, such as selection of NGS methods suitable for specific research objectives, and program-focused needs, such as support for training an analytic workforce. The absence of centralized infrastructure was identified as an important institutional gap. Key principles for organizations managing this change were formulated based on the survey responses. This needs assessment provides an in-depth case study which may be useful to other academic medical centers as they identify and plan for future needs.

  17. Triticale adaption and competence assessment result in the high lands of Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legesse, Wasihun

    2014-01-01

    Triticale is a crop that resulted from the addition of chromosomes of wheat (Triticum aestivum ) and rye cereals (Secale cereale). The crop came on the market as bread cereal in the 1980s. Different varieties were released. Triticale is a high yielding crop when compared with tef, wheat and barley, particularly on locations with soil nutrient deficiency. The study was initiated with the question to which extent the growing of triticale crop (Triticosecale Wittmack) improves food security, and which factors can play a major role for its successful adoption, particularly in major food insecure areas of Ethiopia. The study has three main objectives: (1) to investigate the adaptability of triticale to the Ethiopian agro-ecological conditions, particularly in areas with low soil fertility, hence this is a crop considered to provide considerably a higher harvest under low agricultural inputs, such as fertilizer, insects and pests sprays; (2) to analyze the injera--and bread-baking quality of the crop in comparison with tef (a staple cereal limited to Ethiopia) and wheat cereals, and examine the acceptance by consumers of these products made from this grain. The study was conducted in the two major triticale producing districts (wereda), Farta and Estie of the South Gondar Administrative Zone in the Amhara Region, Ethiopia. The production of crops and the adoption of triticale as a new technology by smallholder farmers are influenced by several factors such as family size, age, gender and education of the household head, availability of agricultural extension services and farm credits, and labour. Despite the high yield and widespread adoption of triticale crop in the study areas and the Amhara Region at large, it faced some amount of resistance from a few farmers and some agriculturalists. This is because of the possibility of soil nutrients exploitation by the triticale plant, with a consequent drop of nutrition for the succeeding crops. This is however, a hardly valid

  18. Achieving organisational competence for clinical leadership: the role of high performance work systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggat, Sandra G; Balding, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    While there has been substantial discussion about the potential for clinical leadership in improving quality and safety in healthcare, there has been little robust study. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a qualitative study with clinicians and clinician managers to gather opinions on the appropriate content of an educational initiative being planned to improve clinical leadership in quality and safety among medical, nursing and allied health professionals working in primary, community and secondary care. In total, 28 clinicians and clinician managers throughout the state of Victoria, Australia, participated in focus groups to provide advice on the development of a clinical leadership program in quality and safety. An inductive, thematic analysis was completed to enable the themes to emerge from the data. Overwhelmingly the participants conceptualised clinical leadership in relation to organisational factors. Only four individual factors, comprising emotional intelligence, resilience, self-awareness and understanding of other clinical disciplines, were identified as being important for clinical leaders. Conversely seven organisational factors, comprising role clarity and accountability, security and sustainability for clinical leaders, selective recruitment into clinical leadership positions, teamwork and decentralised decision making, training, information sharing, and transformational leadership, were seen as essential, but the participants indicated they were rarely addressed. The human resource management literature includes these seven components, with contingent reward, reduced status distinctions and measurement of management practices, as the essential organisational underpinnings of high performance work systems. The results of this study propose that clinical leadership is an organisational property, suggesting that capability frameworks and educational programs for clinical leadership need a broader organisation focus. The paper

  19. Academic performance in the high school mathematics standardized test at metropolitan and remote areas of Costa Rica schools in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Castillo-Sánchez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the academic performance of students from urban and distant areas in the national mathematics test corresponding to the completion of secondary education, considering the specific test and according to the different types of schools: daytime (daytime scientific, daytime humanistic, nighttime, technical or integrated centers for education of young people and adults (CINDEA, in its Spanish acronym.  The main objective is to describe the students academic performance in the national mathematics test issued to complete high-school level, for the year 2013 and according to the country educational areas.  For the analysis of such information, the main source used was the High-School Education National Report, issued by the Ministry of Public Education for 2013 standardized tests.  One of the conclusions from this study is the need to carry out a historical analysis of the performance of educational institutions which have recently obtained the highest and lowest average grades in the high-school diploma tests, in order to be able to delve into the causes of those performances.

  20. Case study teaching in high school biology: Effects on academic achievement, problem solving skills, teamwork skills, and science attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolnick, Ronald

    The purpose of this study was to examine the constructivist-based " case study teaching methodology" in High School Biology classes, specifically investigating the effect this methodology had on Academic Achievement, Science Attitudes, Problem Solving Skills, and Teamwork Skills. The effect of Teacher Beliefs toward constructivist learning environments was also explored and investigated, using a quantitative measure (the Constructivist Learning Environment Survey, or CLES). A quasi-experimental design used eleven classes, five teachers, and two hundred fifty two high school biology students over two separate, consecutive quarters of a school year. Two researcher-made instruments measured Academic Achievement after each study quarter. T-Tests were used to compare the Experimental Group (Case Study Teaching Methodology) to the Control Group (Traditional Teaching) during each study quarter. Otis-Lennon School Ability Test (OLSAT) scores were used as a covariate for ANCOVA tests. Case Study Teaching Methodology had a statistically significant improvement on Academic Achievement during the first study quarter, but not the second quarter. Case Study Teaching Methodology had a statistically significant improvement on four of seven Science Attitudes, Problem Solving Skills, and Teamwork Skills during the second quarter of the study. This study is significant in that it addresses a knowledge gap regarding the effects of the constructivist-based case study teaching methodology on secondary science education. The theoretical implications of this study are meaningful: empirical evidence is added to the growing knowledge base regarding the benefits of constructivist theory. The practical implications are equally meaningful: case study teaching methodology is supported as an effective application of constructivist theory in the secondary science classroom.

  1. Academic knowing in/through double perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margareta Melin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the cultures and learning practices of four academic schools with an expressed wish to bridge the gap between traditional academic and arts or journalistic practices. Pierre Bourdieu, the French sociologist, termed them allodoxic, in that they challenge the traditional academic way of thinking and doing. Results from two research projects, spanning over 5 years, employing a multitude of methods, have been used in this article. The results show that these challenging bridging attempts create conflictual cultures. First, faculties with different backgrounds are employed and they bring with them their respective habitus and doxa (Bourdieu, which is manifested in their different epistemologies, doxas. Despite a strong will to work interdisciplinarily, conflicts (destructive arise particularly around epistemological and pedagogic issues. Second, I show that students at these schools have had double-perspective learning, through theoretical and practice-based methods, despite little help from their lecturers who have high ideals but little actual knowledge themselves of working in/through a double perspective. In many cases, through trial-and-error processes, students have appropriated embodied knowledge of a double perspective, which has given them surplus value when compared with learning through only traditional academic learning practices. It gives reflexive insights and understandings as well as transferrable skills highly useful in professional life. I finally argue that allodoxic conflictual cultures actually construct new ways of knowing through continuous discussions and meetings between faculties with different competences.

  2. Vocational High School Effectiveness Standard ISO 9001: 2008 for Achievement Content Standards, Standard Process and Competency Standards Graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeni Ratih Pratiwi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Efektivitas Sekolah Menengah Kejuruan Berstandar ISO 9001:2008 terhadap Pencapaian Standar Isi, Standar Proses dan Standar Kompetensi Lulusan Abstract: The purpose of this study was to determine differences in the effectiveness of the achievement of the content standards, process standards, and competency standards in vocational already standard ISO 9001: 2008 with CMS that has not been standardized ISO 9001: 2008 both in public schools and private schools. Data collection using the questionnaire enclosed Likert scale models. Analysis of data using one-way ANOVA using SPSS. The results showed: (1 there is no difference in effectiveness between public SMK ISO standard ISO standards with private SMK (P = 0.001; (2 there are differences in the effectiveness of public SMK SMK ISO standards with ISO standards have not (P = 0.000; (3 there are differences in the effectiveness of public SMK ISO standards with private vocational yet ISO standards (P = 0.000; (4 there are differences in the effectiveness of the private vocational school with vocational standard ISO standard ISO country has not (P = 0.015; (5 there are differences in the effectiveness of the private vocational bertandar ISO with private vocational yet standardized ISO (P = 0.000; (6 there was no difference in the effectiveness of public SMK has not been standardized by the ISO standard ISO private SMK yet. Key Words: vocational high school standards ISO 9001: 2008, the standard content, process standards, competency standards Abstrak: Tujuan penelitian ini untuk mengetahui perbedaan efektivitas pencapaian standar isi, standar proses, dan standar kompetensi lulusan pada SMK yang sudah berstandar ISO 9001:2008 dengan SMK yang belum berstandar ISO 9001:2008 baik pada sekolah negeri maupun sekolah swasta. Pengumpulan data menggunakan kuisioner tertutup model skala likert. Analisis data menggunakan ANOVA one way menggunakan program SPSS. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan: (1 ada perbedaan

  3. Prolonged control of replication-competent dual- tropic human immunodeficiency virus-1 following cessation of highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salgado Maria

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART during primary HIV-1 infection occasionally results in transient control of viral replication after treatment interruption, the vast majority of patients eventually experience a rebound in plasma viremia. Results Here we report a case of a patient who was started on HAART during symptomatic primary infection and who has subsequently maintained viral loads of + T cells. In addition, he does not have any known protective HLA alleles. Thus it is unlikely that he was destined to become a natural elite controller or suppressor. The mechanism of control of viral replication is unclear; he is infected with a CCR5/CXCR4 dual-tropic virus that is fully replication-competent in vitro. In addition, his spouse, who transmitted the virus to him, developed AIDS. The patient's CD4+ T cells are fully susceptible to HIV-1 infection, and he has low titers of neutralizing antibodies to heterologous and autologous HIV-1 isolates. Furthermore, his CD8+ T cells do not have potent HIV suppressive activity. Conclusion This report suggests that some patients may be capable of controlling pathogenic HIV-1 isolates for extended periods of time after the cessation of HAART through a mechanism that is distinct from the potent cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL mediated suppression that has been reported in many elite suppressors.

  4. Do high-nickel leaves shed by the nickel hyperaccumulator Alyssum murale inhibit seed germination of competing plants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lan; Angle, J Scott; Chaney, Rufus L

    2007-01-01

    Elemental allelopathy suggests that nickel (Ni)-rich leaves shed by hyperaccumulators inhibit the germination and growth of nearby plant species. Here, the germination of eight herbaceous species following addition of Alyssum murale biomass or Ni(NO3)2, with the same Ni level added to soil, was assessed. The distribution of Ni in soil was tested by determining Ni phytoavailability and speciation over time. Phytoavailable Ni in soil amended with biomass declined rapidly over time due to Ni binding to iron (Fe)/manganese (Mn) oxides in the soil. No significant effects on seed germination were observed. Unlike the Ni complex in Alyssum biomass, more Ni remained soluble and phytoavailable in soil amended with Ni(NO3)2, thus significantly inhibiting seed germination. High-Ni leaves shed by hyperaccumulators did not appear to create a 'toxic zone' around the plants and inhibit germination or growth of competing plants. The lack of an allelopathic effect was probably related to low Ni availability.

  5. The writing retreat: a high-yield clinical faculty development opportunity in academic writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable, Christian T; Boyer, Debra; Colbert, Colleen Y; Boyer, Edward W

    2013-06-01

    The need for consistent academic productivity challenges junior clinician-scholars, who often lack the aptitude to ensure efficient production of manuscripts. To solve this problem, an academic division of a major medical center developed an off-site writing retreat. The purpose of the retreat was not to teach writing skills, but to offer senior mentor assistance with a focus on the elements of manuscript writing. The retreat paired senior faculty members with junior staff. Senior faculty identified manuscript topics and provided real-time writing and editing supervision. Team-building exercises, midcourse corrections, and debriefing interviews were built into the retreat. The number of manuscripts and grant proposals generated during the 2008-2011 retreats was recorded, and the program was evaluated by using unstructured debriefing interviews. An average of 6 to 7 faculty members and fellows participated in each retreat. During the past 4 years, participants produced an average of 3 grant proposals and 7 manuscripts per retreat. After the writing retreat, each fellow and junior faculty member produced an average of 4 scholarly products per year, compared to fewer than 2 for prior years' retreats. Participant feedback indicated the success of the retreat resulted from protected time, direct mentorship by the scholars involved, and pairing of authors, which allows for rapid production of manuscripts and accelerated the editing process. More than 80% of mentors returned each year to participate. The writing retreat is a feasible, effective strategy to increase scholarship among faculty, acceptable to mentees and mentors, and sustainable over time.

  6. What do high academic achieving school pupils really think about a career in nursing: analysis of the narrative from paradigmatic case interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, Gavin R; Lauder, William

    2008-08-01

    As many Departments of Nursing within universities consider raising their academic entry requirements in an attempt to attract a more high academic achieving entrant and also endeavour to attract more school leavers one of the fundamental questions that needs to be answered is--are high academic achieving school pupils really interested in pursuing a career in nursing? The aim of this paper is to report on the findings from paradigmatic case interviews of high academic achieving school pupils who at one stage in their career choice process had considered nursing as a possible career choice but had ultimately disregarded nursing and had decided to pursue medicine or another health care profession. The study reports interview data from a sub-sample of (n=20) high academic achieving 5th and 6th year school pupils who participated in a larger survey of 5th and 6th year school pupils (n=1062). These were paradigmatic cases--high academic achieving school pupils who had considered nursing as a possible career choice within their career preference cluster but had ultimately disregarded nursing and decided to pursue medicine or another health care profession as a career choice. Participants reported that nursing was eventually not viewed as using their examination grades to the maximum benefit. Also the participants reported a belief that the work of the doctor is more important and academic as they cure patients whereas the work of the nurse is practical and routine as they only care for patients. The pupils in addition asserted a negative image of nursing and a low status level of nursing as a career. They also articulated the unremarkable typical school pupils they perceived would pursue nursing as a career choice and the type of school pupil that they had witnessed being encouraged toward nursing within their schools, both of which conflicted with their own typology. Ultimately the high academic achieving school pupils were doubtful and suspicious as to the credibility

  7. A European Competence Framework for Industrial Pharmacy Practice in Biotechnology

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffrey Atkinson; Pat Crowley; Kristien De Paepe; Brian Gennery; Andries Koster; Luigi Martini; Vivien Moffat; Jane Nicholson; Gunther Pauwels; Giuseppe Ronsisvalle; Vitor Sousa; Chris van Schravendijk; Keith Wilson

    2015-01-01

    The PHAR-IN (“Competences for industrial pharmacy practice in biotechnology”) looked at whether there is a difference in how industrial employees and academics rank competences for practice in the biotechnological industry. A small expert panel consisting of the authors of this paper produced a biotechnology competence framework by drawing up an initial list of competences then ranking them in importance using a three-stage Delphi process. The framework was next evaluated and validated by a l...

  8. A Longitudinal Examination of Career Expectations and Outcomes of Academically Talented Students 10 and 20 Years Post-High School Graduation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Kristin M.; Tschopp, Molly K.; Snyder, Erin R.; Boo, Jenelle N.; Hyatt, Claudine

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine career expectations and outcomes for individuals who were identified as academically talented high school students. Data for this study were collected at two different time periods: 10 years and 20 years after participants' high school graduation. A decade after graduation from high school, participants…

  9. An Analysis of the Relationship between High School Students' Self-Efficacy, Metacognitive Strategy Use and Their Academic Motivation for Learn Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Solmaz

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the relationship between high school students' self-efficacy perceptions regarding biology, the metacognitive strategies they use in this course and their academic motivation for learn biology. The sample of the study included 286 high school students enrolled in three high schools who attended a biology course in Kars,…

  10. Academic Service Quality and Instructional Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Keith; Westbrook, Thomas S.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the relationship between academic service quality and instructional quality in higher education. Found a high correlation between academic service and instructional quality, with academic service overlapping instructional quality in three dimensions: enthusiasm, organization, and rapport. (EV)

  11. CREATING OF BILINGUAL COMPETENCES OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS BY MEANS OF PROJECT ACTIVITIES IN CONDITIONS OF INFORMATIZATION OF HIGH EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Kruchinina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Public information and communication space is a favorable environment for the development of bilingualism. Modern communication bilingual techniques may be more effective with the use of computer technology. The article investigates the necessity and possibility of the use of information and communication technologies in the project activities at the professional training of bilingual foreign language in high school. The combination of a method of projects and information and communication technologies (ICT in the teaching of foreign languages allows you to save interest in learning through the creative potential of a student, increasing motivation, independence and initiative. Using information and communication technologies, along with other modern pedagogical technologies (such as cooperative learning, project methodology, and others. helps to implement the studentcentered approach to learning, providing individualization and differentiation of education taking into account the abilities of students, their level of training; to form a stable motivation of foreign language activities in the classroom through the use of authentic materials, discuss pressing issues; to improve the skills of education and self-education, to move from reproductive assimilation of information to interactive and productive forms of education. The article presents the results of the study to assess the degree of attraction for students of various activities with the use of ICT in professional and bilingual foreign language training.

  12. An analysis of student academic outcomes in high-poverty schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCargar, Julie P.

    The present study explored the relationships between student performance outcomes in math and reading and school level variables. The purpose was to analyze the relationship between student achievement on the Tennessee Comprehensive Exam and student academic growth as measured by value-added scores and five school-level variables. The sample group was 102 Title I elementary and middle schools in the Memphis City School District. Data from three school years, 2000--2001, 2001--2002, and 2002--2003, were used. The five school level variables were school poverty rate, average class size, teacher mobility rates, percentage of teachers on permit, and percentage of teachers on waiver. A secondary purpose of this study was to examine the interrelationships among the five independent variables and the interrelationships among the four dependent variables. This was to determine whether these relationships were significant and had explanatory power in helping to identify reasons for student academic progress in the schools studied. Four hypotheses were tested using straight correlation, multiple regression, and stepwise regression. For each of the four hypotheses, at least one independent variable was found to be significantly correlated with student achievement and growth at a = .05. The percentage of teachers on permit was found to be significantly correlated with three of the four dependent variables: student achievement in math, student achievement in reading, and student growth in math. Class size was also found to be significantly correlated with math achievement. School poverty rate was the only variable found to be significantly correlated with student growth in reading. School poverty rate was also found to be significantly correlated with reading achievement. The test for relationships among the dependent variables showed that math and reading achievement were significantly correlated with each other. Schools that had higher achievement in reading were also found

  13. The Effect of a Zoo-Based Experiential Academic Science Program on High School Students' Math and Science Achievement and Perceptions of School Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulkerrin, Elizabeth A.

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of an 11th-grade and 12th-grade zoo-based academic high school experiential science program compared to a same school-district school-based academic high school experiential science program on students' pretest and posttest science, math, and reading achievement, and student perceptions of program relevance, rigor, and relationships. Science coursework delivery site served as the study's independent variable for the two naturally formed groups representing students (n = 18) who completed a zoo-based experiential academic high school science program and students (n = 18) who completed a school-based experiential academic high school science program. Students in the first group, a zoo-based experiential academic high school science program, completed real world, hands-on projects at the zoo while students in the second group, those students who completed a school-based experiential academic high school science program, completed real world, simulated projects in the classroom. These groups comprised the two research arms of the study. Both groups of students were selected from the same school district. The study's two dependent variables were achievement and school climate. Achievement was analyzed using norm-referenced 11th-grade pretest PLAN and 12th-grade posttest ACT test composite scores. Null hypotheses were rejected in the direction of improved test scores for both science program groups---students who completed the zoo-based experiential academic high school science program (p composite score comparison was not statistically different ( p = .93) indicating program equipoise for students enrolled in both science programs. No overall weighted grade point average score improvement was observed for students in either science group, however, null hypotheses were rejected in the direction of improved science grade point average scores for 11th-grade (p scores and school district criterion reference math and

  14. A two-sided academic landscape: snapshot of highly-cited documents in Google Scholar (1950-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Martín-Martín

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to identify and define the core characteristics of the set of highly-cited documents in Google Scholar (document types, language, free availability, sources, and number of versions, on the hypothesis that the wide coverage of this search engine may provide a different portrait of these documents with respect to that offered by traditional bibliographic databases. To do this, a query per year was carried out from 1950 to 2013 identifying the top 1,000 documents retrieved from Google Scholar and obtaining a final sample of 64,000 documents, of which 40% provided a free link to full-text. The results obtained show that the average highly-cited document is a journal or book article (62% of the top 1% most cited documents of the sample, written in English (92.5% of all documents and available online in PDF format (86.0% of all documents. Yet, the existence of errors should be noted, especially when detecting duplicates and linking citations properly. Nonetheless, the fact that the study focused on highly cited papers minimizes the effects of these limitations. Given the high presence of books and, to a lesser extent, of other document types (such as proceedings or reports, the present research concludes that the Google Scholar data offer an original and different vision of the most influential academic documents (measured from the perspective of their citation count, a set composed not only of strictly scientific material (journal articles but also of academic material in its broadest sense.

  15. Developing New Academic Developers: Doing before Being?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kensington-Miller, Barbara; Brailsford, Ian; Gossman, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A small group of new academic developers reflected on their induction into the profession and wondered if things could have been done differently. The researchers decided to question the directors of three tertiary academic development units about how they recruited new developers, what skills and competences they looked for and how they inducted…

  16. Academic Writing Practices in Spanish Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castello, Montserrat; Mateos, Mar; Castells, Nuria; Inesta, Anna; Cuevas, Isabel; Sole, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: This article aims at describing the use of written genres at university and how they are used to teach and learn. Method: We carried out a descriptive study focusing on teachers' perceptions regarding the importance of academic writing in promoting learning, the degree of competence they attribute to academic writing in comparison…

  17. Academic Writing Practices in Spanish Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castello, Montserrat; Mateos, Mar; Castells, Nuria; Inesta, Anna; Cuevas, Isabel; Sole, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: This article aims at describing the use of written genres at university and how they are used to teach and learn. Method: We carried out a descriptive study focusing on teachers' perceptions regarding the importance of academic writing in promoting learning, the degree of competence they attribute to academic writing in comparison…

  18. Academization of Danish semi-professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøje, Jakob Ditlev

    2012-01-01

    Academization is a phenomenon which plays an increasing role in the training programmes for the semi-professions. In Denmark academization has been researched from a predominantly student perspective, as an analysis of how abstract forms of knowledge dominate competencies for care and nursing among...... as a knowledge/power structure for the production and repression of professional identities....

  19. [The academic education in nursing and multiple-victim incidents: an integrative review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Pétala Tuani Candido de Oliveira; Dantas, Rodrigo Assis Neves; Dantas, Daniele Vieira; Torres, Gilson de Vasconcelos

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study is to reflect on the knowledge, competencies and skill that must be promoted during the academic education of nurses for an effective professional practice in view of a multiple-victim incident (MVI). This is an integrative literature review regarding academic nursing education. The literature survey was performed on the BDENF, LILACS, SciELO, MEDLINE, Web of Knowledge and HighWire Press databases, using the following descriptors: higher education; nursing education; emergency nursing; and mass casualty incidents. The publications permitted considerations regarding the following themes: particularities; competencies and skills essential in nursing practice in view of multiple-victim incidents; and the professors' strategies to promote those competencies and skills. The literature analysis demonstrated that nursing education should be configured as a space to develop critical thinking skills, which requires professors to have an eclectic educational background.

  20. Forming key competences from the position of competence approach

    OpenAIRE

    Latypova E. R.

    2012-01-01

    Teaching foreign languages pursues practical, educational, bringing-up and developing aims in non-linguistic educational institution. The practical aim in teaching foreign languages is preparation of a highly trained specialist, which masters key competences and can work hard on his specialty according to world standards and is ready to act in professional communication with foreigners. New requirements direct the system of education toward competence approach. The main aim of competence appr...

  1. Academics respond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazel, Spencer

    2015-01-01

    Contribution to the article "Academics respond: Brexit would weaken UK university research and funding", Guardian Witness, The Guardian, UK......Contribution to the article "Academics respond: Brexit would weaken UK university research and funding", Guardian Witness, The Guardian, UK...

  2. Academics respond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazel, Spencer

    2015-01-01

    Contribution to the article "Academics respond: Brexit would weaken UK university research and funding", Guardian Witness, The Guardian, UK......Contribution to the article "Academics respond: Brexit would weaken UK university research and funding", Guardian Witness, The Guardian, UK...

  3. The Influence of Cross-Cultural Experiences & Location on Teachers' Perceptions of Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Murphy, Solange A.; Murphy, Christopher G.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing cultural and linguistic diversity in academic settings necessitates greater cultural competence on the part of teachers, and enhancing the cultural competence of teachers requires a greater understanding of both the level of cultural competence among teachers and the experiences that enhance cultural competence. Teacher educators…

  4. Testing a Dual Cascade Model Linking Competence and Symptoms over 20 Years from Childhood to Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obradovic, Jelena; Burt, Keith B.; Masten, Ann S.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the unique longitudinal effects linking academic competence, social competence, and internalizing symptoms from childhood to adulthood. A multimethod and multi-informant approach was used to assess psychopathology and competence in 205 participants during four developmental periods. Social competence in childhood had a…

  5. Competencies: requirements and acquisition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuenn, A.C.; Meng, C.M.; Peters, Z.; Verhagen, A.M.C.

    2013-01-01

    Higher education is given the key task to prepare the highly talented among the young to fulfil highly qualified roles in the labour market. Successful labour market performance of graduates is generally associated with the acquisition of the correct competencies. Education as an individual investme

  6. Developing Soldier Cultural Competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-03

    providing Soldiers a “ tourist ” level of understanding which does not adequately prepare them to be culturally competent and effective. The one exception is...cultures use high-context, indirect communications. High- 7 context groups view the low context groups as abrupt and rude in their messages, while low

  7. Motivation and competence of participants in a learner-centered student-run clinic: an exploratory pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutte, Tim; Tichelaar, Jelle; Dekker, Ramon S; Thijs, Abel; de Vries, Theo P G M; Kusurkar, Rashmi A; Richir, Milan C; van Agtmael, Michiel A

    2017-01-25

    The Learner-Centered Student-run Clinic (LC-SRC) was designed to teach and train prescribing skills grounded in a real-life context, to provide students with early clinical experience and responsibility. The current studies' theoretical framework was based on the Self-determination Theory. According to the Self-determination Theory, early involvement in clinical practice combined with a high level of responsibility makes the LC-SRC an environment that can stimulate intrinsic motivation. We investigated the different types of motivation and the proficiency in CanMEDS competencies of the participating students. Type of motivation was measured using the Academic Motivation Scale and Intrinsic Motivation Inventory. CanMEDS competencies were evaluated by faculty using a mini-clinical examination and by the students themselves using a post-participation questionnaire. The 29 participating students were highly intrinsic motivated for this project on all subscales of the Intrinsic Motivation Inventory. Motivation for medical school on the Academic Motivation Scale was high before and was not significantly changed after participation. Students considered that their CanMEDS competencies "Collaborator", "Communicator", "Academic", and "Medical expert" had improved. Their actual clinical team competence was judged by faculty to be at a junior doctor level. Students showed a high level of intrinsic motivation to participate in the LC-SRC and perceived an improvement in competence. Furthermore their actual clinical competence was at junior doctor level in all CanMEDS competencies. The stimulating characteristics of the LC-SRC, the high levels of intrinsic motivation and the qualitative comments of the students in this study makes the LC-SRC an attractive place for learning.

  8. Ideal Effect of Self-Learning Process of Adaptation of Graduate Nurses to Face Test Competence in Poltekkes Ministry of Health Makassar, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Nur

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the implementation of the rules on liability competency testing for prospective nurses, any nursing college graduates are required to take the exam. The low yield competence test is a real picture of the low academic performance of students. Various factors are thought to have an important influence on the issue. The purpose of this study to see the effect of your ideal self, academic goals, motivation, and GPA to the adaptation process of learning graduates in the face of national competency test in polytechnic Ministry of Health Makassar. This study was observational analytic correlation cross-sectional approach to the new graduate nurses as 107 samples from 192 populations obtained by systematic random sampling. The research was conducted from June to November 2016 at the Department of Nursing of Ministry of Health of Makassar. The results showed that the ideal self correlation with academic goals (r = -0152, p = 0.119, academic goals with the adaptation process (r = 0.040, p = 0.681, the ideal self with academic motivation (r = -0073, p = 0.458 , the ideal self with the adaptation process (r = -0299, p = 0.002, with the goal of academic motivation (r = 0566, p = 0.000, academic motivation in the process of adaptation (r = 0158, p = 0.104, with the academic skills the adaptation process (r = -0.134, p = 0.169. The conclusion that the ideal self is too high to lower the capacity of the adaptation process of learning graduates to prepare for a test of competence nor vice versa. Academic motivation has a strong enough influence on the process of learning adaptation prospective graduate nurses.

  9. An academic writing paradox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    A key to understanding academic writing for publication lies in the tension between the need for scholars to demonstrate originality, and the need for academic discourse communities to continue using their shared repetoire1 of concepts, vocabulary, and genre structures. This tension can be highli...

  10. Impulsivity and Academic Cheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderman, Eric M.; Cupp, Pamela K.; Lane, Derek

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the relations between academic cheating and impulsivity in a large sample of adolescents enrolled in high school health education classes. Results indicated that impulsivity predicts academic cheating for students who report extensive involvement in cheating. However, students who engage in extensive cheating are less likely…

  11. Building the Competences of the Future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    2004-01-01

    What competences will be needed in the future? What kind of skills should belong to the surveyor of the future? How can the curriculum be organized to meet these demands? These questions must constantly be on the agenda to be dealt with by the university as well the profession. Competence...... it is also an adaptation to international trends. Finally, the revision is based on a survey around the competences of the graduates, and whether these competences are in line with the demands of the employment areas.    The competences of the future are not established solely through the university program....... Even if university education is of course the foundation, professional competence cannot be achieved until the academic and professional skills are merged with experiences obtained through professional practice. Therefore, it is crucial to establish an ongoing dialogue between the university...

  12. Building the Competences of the Future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    2004-01-01

    What competences will be needed in the future? What kind of skills should belong to the surveyor of the future? How can the curriculum be organized to meet these demands? These questions must constantly be on the agenda to be dealt with by the university as well the profession. Competence...... it is also an adaptation to international trends. Finally, the revision is based on a survey around the competences of the graduates, and whether these competences are in line with the demands of the employment areas.    The competences of the future are not established solely through the university program....... Even if university education is of course the foundation, professional competence cannot be achieved until the academic and professional skills are merged with experiences obtained through professional practice. Therefore, it is crucial to establish an ongoing dialogue between the university...

  13. Academic Jibberish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krashen, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about academic jibberish. Alfie Kohn states that a great deal of academic writing is incomprehensible even to others in the same area of scholarship. Academic Jibberish may score points for the writer but does not help research or practice. The author discusses jibberish as a career strategy that impresses those…

  14. Academic writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremina, Svetlana V.

    2003-10-01

    The series of workshops on academic writing have been developed by academic writing instructors from Language Teaching Centre, Central European University and presented at the Samara Academic Writing Workshops in November 2001. This paper presents only the part dealing with strucutre of an argumentative essay.

  15. Reference Management Practices of Postgraduate Students and Academic Researchers are Highly Individualized

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Miller

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Melles, A., & Unsworth, K. (2015. Examining the reference management practices of humanities and social science postgraduate students and academics. Australian Academic & Research Libraries, 46(4, 250-276. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00048623.2015.1104790 Objective – To understand patterns in reference management practices of postgraduate students and faculty members at one institution. Design – Mixed methods online survey and semi-structured interviews. Setting – Public research university in Australia. Subjects – The survey included responses from 81 postgraduate students. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 8 postgraduate students and 13 faculty members. Methods – The researchers distributed an 18-item survey via email to approximately 800 people who previously registered for EndNote training sessions. Survey participants were also recruited via a website advertisement. The researchers recruited postgraduate student interview participants from the list of survey respondents. Librarians invited faculty members to participate in the semi-structured interviews. Interview audio recordings were transcribed and coded for data analysis. Main Results – The survey found that 71.4% (n=55 of respondents used reference management software (RMS and 29% (n=22 did not. Over half of the students who did not use an RMS described other ad hoc or “manual” (p. 255 methods for organizing and tracking references. The majority of participants reported using EndNote (67.53%, n=52, while few respondents reported using other RMS tools like Zotero (1.3%, n=1 or Mendeley (1.3%, n = 1. Software awareness (49.32%, n=36, recommendations from faculty members (30.14%, n=22, and University support (47.95%, n=35 were the primary motivations for choosing a specific RMS. Other important factors included ease of use (32.88%, n=24 and integration with Microsoft Word (46.58%, n=34. Students preferred RMS features that support the process of

  16. Above- and below-ground competition in high and low irradiance: tree seedling responses to a competing liana Byttneria grandifolia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, J.Y.; Bongers, F.; Cao, K.F.; Cai, Z.Q.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: In tropical forests, trees compete not only with other trees, but also with lianas, which may limit tree growth and regeneration. Liana effects may depend on the availability of above- and below-ground resources and differ between tree species. We conducted a shade house experiment to test

  17. Investigating the Competence of Classroom Teachers in Terms of Nominating the Students with High Creativity and Gender-Biased Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Feyzullah

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to analyse the classroom teachers' competence in identifying above-average creative students, and their gender-bias during the identification process. A descriptive survey model was employed as a research method. A total of 317 elementary school students took part in this study. As data collecting tools, a…

  18. Increases in positive self-views among high school students: birth-cohort changes in anticipated performance, self-satisfaction, self-liking, and self-competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twenge, Jean M; Campbell, W Keith

    2008-11-01

    Previous research has produced contradictory findings on generational change in positive self-views. We examined 13 items measuring self-views in the Monitoring the Future study, a large national study of high school students conducted between 1975 and 2006 (in this analysis, ns between 4,698 and 29,673). Relative to high school students in the 1970s, those in 2006 were more likely to predict that they would be "very good" spouses, parents, and workers; were more satisfied with themselves; and scored higher on self-esteem items measuring self-liking. The 2006 students also reported earning higher grades and being more intelligent. However, 2006 students scored lower on two self-esteem items measuring self-competence than did students in 1975. These results suggest that there has been a small increase in positive self-views across the generations, but that it has not been accompanied by an increase in general self-competence.

  19. Improved learning in U.S. history and decision competence with decision-focused curriculum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Jacobson

    Full Text Available Decision making is rarely taught in high school, even though improved decision skills could benefit young people facing life-shaping decisions. While decision competence has been shown to correlate with better life outcomes, few interventions designed to improve decision skills have been evaluated with rigorous quantitative measures. A randomized study showed that integrating decision making into U.S. history instruction improved students' history knowledge and decision-making competence, compared to traditional history instruction. Thus, integrating decision training enhanced academic performance and improved an important, general life skill associated with improved life outcomes.

  20. The Relation of High School Academic Performance and Student Effort to Language Use and Recenty of Migration among Asian- and Pacific-Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornbusch, Sanford M.; And Others

    This report, part of a larger study of the impact of family structures and processes on the social and academic performance of American high school students, focuses on Asian- and Pacific-American high school achievement. The following findings are reported: (1) Asian-Americans and Pacific-Americans exhibit very different patterns in school…