WorldWideScience

Sample records for hfr petten neutron

  1. Neutron radiography at the HFR Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markgraf, J.F.W.

    1990-03-01

    This report contains the five papers on neutron radiography activities at the Petten High Flux Reactor (HFR) presented at the Third World Conference on Neutron Radiography which was held in May 1989 in Osaka, Japan. In addition, a survey on neutron radiography in Europe for industry and research as presented at the SITEF NDT symposium 1989 on European Advances in Non-Destructive Testing, held in Toulouse/France in October 1989 is included. The papers compiled here are concerned with: the neutron radiography services available in Petten; the experience with and applications of neutron radiography at Petten; image evaluation and analysis techniques at Petten; the practical utilization of nitrocellulose film in neutron radiography in Europe; an introduction into the basic principles of neutron radiography; an overview of the neutron radiography facilities in Europe for industry and research; and a survey of typical applications of neutron radiography in industry, research and sciences. It is the intention of this compilation to provide a comprehensive overview of the present Petten activities and European facilities in this young and promising field of non-destructive testing of materials and components from the nuclear and the non-nuclear industries and research organizations, and from the sciences

  2. Neutron radiography at the HFR Petten compilation of HFR Petten contributions to the second world conference on neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markgraf, J.W.F.

    1986-01-01

    This booklet summarizes the six papers on neutron radiography activities at the Petten High Flux Reactor (HFR), presented at the Second World Conference on neutron radiography, held in June 1986 in Paris, France. The conference was organized by the French CEA and COFREND, and JRC Petten, HFR Division, with joint sponsorship of the national societies on Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) from the Federal Republic of Germany, United Kingdom, Japan and the United States. The Petten papers are concerned with: (i) the work of the Neutron Radiography Working Group (NRWG), an expert group operating under the auspices of the Commission of the European Communities represented by JRC Petten, HFR Division; (ii) applications of neutron radiography in research programmes performed at HFR; (iii) neutron radiography facilities at HFR; and (iv) image evaluation techniques

  3. Progress in neutron beam development at the HFR Petten (feasibility study for a BNCT facility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantine, G.; Moss, R.L.; Watkins, P.R.D.; Perks, C.A.; Delafield, H.J.; Ross, D.; Voorbraak, W.P.; Paardekooper, A.; Freudenreich, W.E.; Stecher-Rasmussen, F.

    1990-08-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, using intermediate energy neutrons to achieve the deep penetration essential for treating brain tumours, can be implemented with a filtered reactor neutron beam. This is designed to minimize the mean energy of the neutrons to keep proton recoil damage to the scalp within normal tissue tolerance limits whilst delivering the required thermal neutron fluence to the tumour over a reasonably short period. This can only be realized in conjunction with a high power density reactor. At the Joint Research Centre Petten an optimized neutron filter is currently being built for installation into the HB11 beam tube of the High Flux Reactor HFR. Part of the development leading to this design has been an extensive study of broad spectrum, filtered beam performance on the HB7 beam tube facility. A wide range of calculations was performed using the Monte Carlo code, MCPN, supported by validation experiments in which several filter configuration incorporating aluminium, sulphur, liquid argon, titanium and cadmium were installed for low power measurements of the neutron fluence rate, neutron spectra and beam gamma-ray contamination. The measurements were carried out within a successful European collaboration. Evaluations were made of the reactor core edge and unfiltered beam spectra, for comparison with MCNP calculations. Multi-foil activation methods and also gamma dose determination in the filtered beam using thermo-luminescent detectors were performed by the ECN. The Harwell/ Birmingham University collaborators undertook the neutron spectrum measurements in the filtered beam. proton recoil spectrometry was used above 30 keV, combined with a multi-sphere and BF 3 chamber response modification technique. Subsequent spectrum adjustment was carried out with the SENSAK code. The agreement between the calculated and measured spectra has given confidence in the reactor and filter modelling methods used to design the HB11 therapy facility. (author). 12 refs

  4. Neutronic feasibility studies for LEU conversion of the HFR Petten reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanan, N.A.; Deen, J.R.; Matos, J.E.; Hendriks, J.A.; Thijssen, P.J.M.; Wijtsma, F.J.

    2000-01-01

    Design and safety analyses to determine an optimum LEU fuel assembly design using U 3 Si 2 -Al fuel with up to 4.8 g/cm 3 for conversion of the HFR Petten reactor were performed by the RERTR program in cooperation with the Joint Research Centre and NRG. Credibility of the calculational methods and models were established by comparing calculations with recent measurements by NRG for a core configuration set up for this purpose. This model and methodology were then used to study various LEU fissile loading and burnable poison options that would satisfy specific design criteria. (author)

  5. High Flux Materials Testing Reactor (HFR), Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-09-01

    After conversion to burnable poison fuel elements, the High Flux Materials Testing Reactor (HFR) Petten (Netherlands), operated through 1974 for 280 days at 45 MW. Equipment for irradiation experiments has been replaced and extended. The average annual occupation by experiments was 55% as compared to 38% in 1973. Work continued on thirty irradiation projects and ten development activities

  6. Structural integrity assessment based on the HFR Petten neutron beam facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Ohms, C; Idsert, P V D

    2002-01-01

    Neutrons are becoming recognized as a valuable tool for structural-integrity assessment of industrial components and advanced materials development. Microstructure, texture and residual stress analyses are commonly performed by neutron diffraction and a joint CEN/ISO Pre-Standard for residual stress analysis is under development. Furthermore neutrons provide for defects analyses, i.e. precipitations, voids, pores and cracks, through small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) or radiography. At the High Flux Reactor, 12 beam tubes have been installed for the extraction of thermal neutrons for such applications. Two of them are equipped with neutron diffractometers for residual stress and structure determination and have been extensively used in the past. Several other facilities are currently being reactivated and upgraded. These include the SANS and radiography facilities as well as a powder diffractometer. This paper summarizes the main characteristics and current status of these facilities as well as recently in...

  7. A neutronics study of LEU fuel options for the HFR-Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deen, J.R.; Snelgrove, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    The standard HEU fuel cycle characteristics are compared with those of several different LEU fuel cycles in the new vessel configuration. The primary design goals were to provide similar reactivity performance and neutron flux profiles with a minimal increase in 235 U loading. The fuel cycle advantages of Cd burnable absorbers over 10 B are presented. The LEU fuel cycle requirements were calculated also for an extended 32-day cycle and for a reload batch size reduction from six to five standard elements for the standard 26-day cycle. The effects of typical in-core experiments upon neutron flux profiles and fuel loading requirements are also presented. (author)

  8. Upgrading activities for the HFR Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlf, J.

    1990-01-01

    The HFR in Petten, the Netherlands, is a water cooled and moderated research reactor. It has been in continuous and successful operation for more than 25 years. The reactor is utilized as a multi-purpose research reactor with a predominance of materials testing for fission and fusion energy. It has been continuous policy to keep the installation up to date by implementing technical developments and by refurbishing or replacing all components and equipment which approach the end of their useful life. In addition the facilities and the ancillary experimental equipment are continuously adapted and kept versatile in view of changing requirements from the experimental programmes. Performance upgrading comprised increasing the power in two steps to 30 MW and now 45 MW, accompanied by improving the core loading pattern in order to provide an increasing number of high flux irradiation positions. These improvements were rendered possible because of achievements in fuel element design and manufacture. In the mid 70's it became apparent that embrittlement of the reactor vessel material would become a licensing problem. A decision was taken to replace the old vessel by a new one which then could take into account recent experience with respect to experimental requirements. After the vessel replacement a programme was started to replace other ageing components. The primary heat exchangers and the pool heat exchanger have been replaced recently; replacement of the beryllium reflector is nearly finished. All the nuclear instrumentation channels have been replaced. Repair or refurbishment of peripheral equipment such as the outlet line for secondary cooling, the guaranteed power supply for the reactor and the fire prevention system is under preparation. Because all upgrading actions were carefully planned well in advance of actual component failures, unanticipated outages could be avoided

  9. Neutron metrology in the HFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polle, A.N.; Voorbraak, W.P.

    1991-11-01

    The experiment R-139-416 for testing the stainless steel type 316L(N) has been irradiated in the HFR Petten. This report presents the final metrology results obtained from activation monitors near the CT-specimen (Compact Tension). Data about the helium production as well as the number of displacements per atom are also included. The irradiation conditions for this experiment, carried out in a REFA-170 type capsule in the HFR position H8, are as close as possible to the conditions of the EFR (European Fast Reactor) above-core structures. The main results of the thermal and fast neutron fluence measurements are presented in table 1 and in figure 1. (author). 10 refs.; 2 figs.; 11 tabs

  10. Design and testing of a rotating, cooled device for extra-corporate treatment of liver cancer by BNCT in the epithermal neutron beam at the HFR Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, Ray; Nievaart, Sander; Pott, Lucien; Wittig, Andrea; Sauerwein, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    As part of the joint project on extra-corporal treatment of liver cancer by BNCT between JRC Petten and the University Hospital Essen, a facility has been designed and built to contain the liver during its irradiation treatment at the HFR Petten. The design consists of a rotating spheroid shaped PMMA holder, manufactured to open at the equator and closed by screwing together, surrounded by PMMA and graphite blocks. A validation exercise has been performed regarding both the nuclear conditions and the physical conditions. For the former, activation foil sets of Au, Cu and Mn, were irradiated at positions inside the liver holder filled with water, whilst a second measurement campaign has been performed using gel dosimetry. For the physical test, it is required to operate (rotate) the facility for up to 4 hours and to maintain the liver at approximately 4degC. The latter test was performed using 'cold gun sprays' that inject cold air near the liver holder. Both the nuclear and physical validation tests were performed successfully. (author)

  11. Neutron metrology in the HFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraakman, R.; Voorbraak, W.P.

    1993-04-01

    Additional to the in-core EXOTIC experiments, six irradiations of ceramic material, R212-001 to R212-006, have been performed in the PSF of the HFR. This note presents the neutron metrology results for these irradiations. (orig.)

  12. Neutron metrology in the HFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voorbraak, W.P.; Freudenreich, W.E.; Stecher-Rasmussen, F.; Verhagen, H.W.

    1991-10-01

    Neutron fluence rate and gamma dose data are presented for the first series of experiments at the filtered HFR beam HB11 at full reactor power. Measurements were performed on two beagle dogs and one cylindrical phantom. The main results for thermal and epithermal fluence rates, physical neutron dose and gamma dose are presented in the tables 1 and 2. (author). 10 refs.; 9 figs.; 8 tabs

  13. The BNCT facility at the HFR Petten: Quality assurance for reactor facilities in clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, R.; Watkins, P.; Vroegindeweij, C.; Stecher-Rasmussen, F.; Huiskamp, R.; Ravensberg, K.; Appelman, K.; Sauerwein, W.; Hideghety, K.; Gabel, D.

    2001-01-01

    The first clinical trial in Europe of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for the treatment of glioblastoma was opened in July 1997. The trial is a Phase I study with the principal aim to establish the maximum tolerated radiation dose and the dose limiting toxicity under defined conditions. It is the first time that a clinical application could be realised on a completely multi-national scale. The treatment takes place at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, the Netherlands, is operated by an international team of experts under the leadership of a German radiotherapist, and treats patients coming from different European countries. It has therefore been necessary to create a very specialised organisation and contractual structure with the support of administrations from different countries, who had to find and adapt solutions within existing laws that had never foreseen such a situation. Furthermore, the treatment does not take place in an hospital environment and even more so, the facility is at a nuclear research reactor. Hence, special efforts were made on quality assurance, in order that the set-up at the facility and the personnel involved complied, as closely as possible, with similar practices in conventional radiotherapy departments. (author)

  14. Tests of the SNR fuel pin behaviour in case of operational transients in the HFR Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plitz, H.

    1989-05-01

    The loadings on fast reactor fuel pins under operational transients (power and temperature increases in the design area) have been studied in the High-Flux-Reactor HFR in Petten with sodium cooled irradiation capsules. The results of the first campaign of transient experiments are described in the report. No cladding defects have been observed, and the fuel pins of the Mark-I and Mark-II type resisted to linear power levels of more than 800 W/cm, thus demonstrating the required design margins. The plans for further experiments are outlined

  15. Status of the in-pile test of HCPB pebble-bed assemblies in the HFR Petten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laan, J.G. van der; Fokkens, J.H.; Hofmans, H.E.; Jong, M.; Magielsen, A.J.; Pijlgroms, B.J.; Stijkel, M.P. [NRG, Petten (Netherlands); Conrad, R. [JRC, Inst. for Energy, Petten (Netherlands); Malang, S.; Reimann, J. [FZK, Karlsruhe (Germany); Roux, N. [CEA Saclay (France)

    2002-06-01

    In the framework of developing the helium cooled pebble-bed (HCPB) blanket an irradiation test of pebble-bed assemblies is prepared at the HFR Petten. The test objective is to concentrate on the effect of neutron irradiation on the thermal-mechanical behaviour of the HCPB breeder pebble-bed at DEMO representative levels of temperature and defined thermal-mechanical loads. The basic test elements are EUROFER-97 cylinders with a horizontal bed of ceramic breeder pebbles sandwiched between two beryllium beds. The pebble beds are separated by EUROFER-97 steel plates. The heat flow is managed such as to have a radial temperature distribution in the ceramic breeder pebble-bed as flat as reasonably possible. The paper reports on the project status, and presents the results of pre-tests, material characteristics, the manufacturing of the pebble-bed assemblies, and the nuclear and thermo-mechanical loading parameters. (orig.)

  16. LIBRETTO-3: Performance of tritium permeation barriers under irradiation at the HFR Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, R.; Fuetterer, M.A.; Giancarli, L.; May, R.; Perujo, A.; Sample, T.

    1994-01-01

    The LIBRETTO-3 irradiation was performed at the HFR Petten during 77 full power days in three cycles to compare the efficiency of three different tritium permeation barriers in presence of Pb-17Li to uncoated AISI 316L steel. For this purpose four steel capsules (arnothing o =10 mm, arnothing i =8 mm, l=300 mm) were filled with 28 g Pb-17Li. The coatings included CVD TiC (outside), CVD TiC+Al 2 O 3 (inside), and pack cementation aluminisation (inside). The generated tritium was partly extracted by bubbling, partly it permeated through the capsules. Permeated and extracted tritium were measured as a function of temperature (280-450 C), H 2 doping (0-1 vol%) and purge gas flow rate. The driving partial pressure in the coated capsules were from an extraction model calibrated by the uncoated capsule for which tritium partial pressure could be calculated. In LIBRETTO-3 conditons, the best barrier was pack cementation aluminisation. The first interpretation of the experiment could, however, not confirm permeation reduction factors of 100 or more expected from this barrier. ((orig.))

  17. The second Euratom sponsored 9000C HTR fuel irradiation experiment in the HFR Petten Project E 96.02: Pt.2. Post-irradiation examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roettger, R.; Bueger, J. de; Schoots, T.

    1977-01-01

    A large variety of HTR fuel specimens, loose coated particles, coupons and compacts provided by Belgonucleaire, the Dragon Project and the KFA Juelich have been irradiated in the HFR at Petten at about 900 0 C up to a maximum fast neutron fluence of about 7x10 21 cm -2 (EDN) as a Euratom sponsored experiment. The maximum burn-ups were between 11 and 18.5% FIMA. The results of the post-irradiation examinations, comprising visual inspection, dimensional measurements, microradiography, metallography, and burn-up determinations are presented in this part 2 of the final report. The examinations have shown that the endurance limit of most of the tested fuel varieties is beyond the reached irradiation values

  18. Evaluation of dose components for healthy tissue tolerance studies on dogs at the HFR Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, P.; Moss, R.L.; Siefert, A.; Huiskamp, R.; Gavin, P.; Konijnenberg, M.

    1993-01-01

    Before the start of clinical trails of BNCT on glioma patients at the Petten reactor, certain preconditions must be determined. In particular the tolerance of healthy brain tissue exposed to the epithermal neutron beam requires investigation. In these studies, beagle dogs have been subjected to different levels of irradiation and 10 B, the latter in the form of BSH. To support this work a treatment planning tool is being developed to predict the various dose components within the treatment volume. A Monte Carlo code, MCNP, has been used to simulate the particle transport and to predict the different dose rate distributions. The doses rates generated by MCNP are manipulated with a processing code, TREAT, to give irradiation times, peak dose positions and to display the required data in a graphical format. This paper explains the basic methodology used in the system and a practical case is presented for one of the healthy tissue tolerance dogs. Doses, both physical and RBE weighted, have been produced for pre-treatment planning studies

  19. Neutron metrology in the HFR. Steel irradiation R139-697/698

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoving, A.H.; Voorbraak, W.P.

    1996-06-01

    The experiment R139-697/698, for testing the austenitic stainless steel type AISI-316 TIG, has been irradiated in the HFR Petten. This report presents the final metrology results obtained from activation monitors in the specimen holders, coded as R139/697 and R139/698. Data about the helium production as well as the number of displacements per atom are also included. The irradiation conditions for this experiment, carried out in a TRIO type capsule in HFR position F2, are as close as possible relevant for the candidate materials which will be used for the first wall of the NET (Next European Torus). The main results of the thermal and fast neutron fluence mesurements are presented in table 2 and 3 as well as in figures 3 and 4. (orig.)

  20. High flux materials testing reactor HFR Petten. Characteristics of facilities and standard irradiation devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roettger, H.; Hardt, P. von der; Tas, A.; Voorbraak, W.P.

    1981-01-01

    For the materials testing reactor HFR some characteristic information is presented. Besides the nuclear data for the experiment positions short descriptions are given of the most important standard facilities for material irradiation and radionuclide production. One paragraph deals with the experimental set-ups for solid state and nuclear structure investigations. The information in this report refers to a core type, which is operational since March 1977. The numerical data compiled have been up-dated to January 1981

  1. Comparison of thermohydraulic and nuclear aspects in a standard HEU core and a typical LEU core for the HFR Petten. A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruimboom, H.; Tas, A.

    1985-01-01

    Within the framework of the RERTR program various HEU-LEU core calculations have been performed by ANL in a cooperative effort with ECN and JRC Petten. The main purpose of this work has been to gain competence in analysing HEU-LEU core conversion for high power Materials Testing Reactors and to assist in a possible HEU-LEU conversion of the HFR Petten. For reference purposes the present HFR standard core (HEU) in the 'old' vessel geometry was calculated at first. As a next step the new vessel geometry and the increased fuel weights were taken into account. Subsequently various LEU HFR core options have been analysed. Main parameters in the LEU study were the uranium loading in the meat, the fuel type, the thickness of the meat, the number of fuel plates per element and the type of burnable poison applied. Though the study has not yet been completed, one of its striking preliminary results concerns the increased power peaking in the LEU fuel elements as compared with the HEU situation. A preliminary analysis of the thermal characteristics of a typical LEU core as compared with a standard HEU core has been made and is presented in the paper. A short survey of the various HEU and LEU calculations is given. The thermal safety analysis procedure for the HFR, as based on the flow instability criterion, is clarified. Finally, the thermal comparison HEU versus LEU and the resulting conclusions are presented. (author)

  2. Neutron metrology in the HFR. Steel irradiation. R139-801 (SINAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketema, D.J.

    1999-02-01

    The R139-80 series irradiation experiments is part of the NRG materials test programme to evaluate the irradiation behaviour of several types of austenitic stainless steel. Within this programme five R139-80 specimen holders were irradiated in the HFR Petten to different dose levels. This report presents the final metrology results obtained from activation monitors in a specimen holder, coded as R139-801, containing 12 Compact Tension (CT-10 mm) specimens made from the austenitic stainless steel types 308LSXB/TIG and 304-SXB. The R139-801 assembly was irradiated in channel 1 of a TRIO type facility placed in HFR core-position F8. The aim of this irradiation of specimen holder R139-801 was to reach a minimum target damage level of 7.5 dpa for the specimens at a temperature of 335C. The monitor sets are used to calculate the thermal and fast neutron fluences, displacements per atom and the generated helium content. Additionally detailed information concerning an estimation of the fluence and damage doses received by each specimen and its temperature during irradiation are presented. The main results of the thermal and fast neutron fluence measurements are presented. The results indicate that the obtained damage levels in the steel specimens loaded in this specimen holder vary from 5.8 to 7.9 dpa. The temperatures of the specimens during irradiation varied between 304 and 337C. 14 refs

  3. Neutron metrology in the HFR. Steel irradiation R139-805 (SINAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baard, J.H.

    1996-10-01

    The experiment R139-80 is part of a material program to test austenitic stainless steel of different types and has been irradiated in the HFR Petten. This report presents the final metrology results obtained from activation monitors in the specimen holder, coded as R139-805. Data about the helium production as well as the number of displacements per atom are included. The irradiation circumstances for this experiment, carried out in a TRIO type capsule in HFR position F2, represent the conditions at the first wall of NET (Next European Torus). The aim of this irradiation for specimen holder R139-805 was to reach a damage level of 2.4 dpa at a temperature of 325 C. However, the specimens have been irradiated up to a damage level of 1.7-2.0 dpa. The main results of the thermal and fast neutron fluence measurements are presented in tables 2 and 3 as well as in the figure 2. (orig.)

  4. Irradiaiton facilities for testing solid and liquid blanket breeder materials with in-situ tritium release measurements in the HFR Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, R.; Debarberis, L.

    1991-01-01

    Lithium-based tritium breeder materials for solid and liquid fusion reactor blanket concepts are being tested in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) Petten with in-situ tritium release measurements since 1985, within the European Fusion Technology Programme and the BEATRIX-I programme. Ceramic breeder materials are being tested in the EXOTIC and COMPLIMENT experimental programmes and the liquid breeder material, Pb-17Li, is being tested in the LIBRETTO experimental programme. The in-pile experiments are performed with irradiation facilities developed by the Joint Research Centre (JRC) Petten. The irradiation vehicles are multi-channel rigs. The sample holders consist of independent, fully instrumented and triple contained capsules. The out-of-pile experimental equipment consist of twelve independent circuits for on-line tritium release and tritium permeation measurements and eight independent circuits for temperature control. The experimental achievements obtained so far contribute to the selection of candidate tritium breeder materials for blanket concepts of near future machines like NET, ITER and DEMO. (orig.)

  5. Results from post-mortem tests with materials from the old core-box of the High Flux Reactor (HFR) at Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Vries, M.I.; Cundy, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    Results are reported from hardness measurements, tensile tests and fracture mechanics experiments (fatigue crack growth and fracture toughness) on 5154 aluminum specimens fabricated from remnants of the old HFR core box. The specimen material was exposed to a maximum thermal neutron fluence of 7.5 * 10 26 n/m 2 (E 26 n/m 2 , but with a thermal to fast neutron ratio of about 4, shows more radiation hardening : 67HR15N, 0.2 - yield strength 580 MPa and 1.5% total elongation. Fatigue crack growth rates range from 5 * 10 -5 mm/cycle to 10 -3 mm/cycle for ΔK ranging from 8 to 20 MPa√m. The most highly exposed (7.5 * 10 26 n/m 2 ) materials shows accelerated fatigue crack growth due to unstable crack extension at ΔK of about 15 MPa√m. The lowermost meaningful measure of plane strain fracture toughness is 18 MPa√m. Except for the fracture toughness, which is a factor of about 3 higher, the results show reasonable agreement with the expected mechanical properties estimated in the 'safe end-of-life' assessment of the old HFR vessel

  6. Radiological protection considerations during the treatment of glioblastoma patients by boron neutron capture therapy at the high flux reactor in Petten, The Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, R.L.; Rassow, J.; Finke, E.; Sauerwein, W.; Stecher-Rasmussen, F.

    2001-01-01

    A clinical trial of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for glioblastoma patients has been in progress at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) at Petten since October 1997. The JRC (as licence holder of the HFR) must ensure that radiological protection measures are provided. The BNCT trial is a truly European trial, whereby the treatment takes place at a facility in the Netherlands under the responsibility of clinicians from Germany and patients are treated from several European countries. Consequently, radiological protection measures satisfy both German and Dutch laws. To respect both laws, a BNCT radioprotection committee was formed under the chairmanship of an independent radioprotection expert, with members representing all disciplines in the trial. A special nuance of BNCT is that the radiation is provided by a mixed neutron/gamma beam. The radiation dose to the patient is thus a complex mix due to neutrons, gammas and neutron capture in boron, nitrogen and hydrogen, which, amongst others, need to be correctly calculated in non-commercial and validated treatment planning codes. Furthermore, due to neutron activation, measurements on the patient are taken regularly after treatment. Further investigations along these lines include dose determination using TLDs and boron distribution measurements using on-line gamma ray spectroscopy. (author)

  7. Prospects and future utilization. Proceedings of a colloquium held in Petten (Netherlands), 20-21 April 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlf, J.; Roettger, H.

    1989-01-01

    These proceedings of a colloquium held in Petten on prospects and future utilization of the HFR reactor are divided into 6 sessions bearing on: - The high flux reactor - irradiation testing of fuel and material for fast breeder reactors - irradiation testing of fuel and material for high temperature reactors and light water reactors - irradiation testing for fusion reactors - neutron radiography, radioisotopes, neutron capture therapy - neutron beam research and application of neutron activation analysis

  8. The high flux reactor Petten, A multi-purpose research and test facility for the future of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmans, H.; Duijves, K.; Conrad, R.; Markgraf, J.F.W.; May, R.; Moss, R.L.; Sordon, G.; Tartaglia, G.P.

    1996-01-01

    The High Flux Reactor (HFR) at Petten, is owned by the European Commission (EC) and managed by the Institute for Advanced Materials (IAM) of the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the EC. Its operation has been entrusted since 1962 to the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN). The HFR is one of the most powerful multi-purpose research and test reactors in the world. Together with the ECN hot cells at Petten, it has provided since three decades an integral and full complement of irradiation and examination services as required by current and future research and development for nuclear energy, industry and research organizations. Since 1963, the HFR has recognized record of consistent, reliable and high availability of more than 250 days of operation per year. The HFR has 20 in-core and 12 poolside irradiation positions, plus 12 beam tubes. With a variety of dedicated irradiation devices, and with its long-standing experience in executing small and large irradiation projects, the HFR is particularly suited for fuel, materials and components testing for all reactor lines, including thermonuclear fusion reactors. In addition, processing with neutrons and gamma rays, neutron-based research and inspection services are employed by industry and research, such as activation analysis, boron neutron capture therapy, neutron radiography and neutron diffraction. Moreover, in recent years, HFRs' mission has been broadened within the area of radioisotopes production, where, within a few years, the HFR has attained the European leadership in production volume

  9. Comparison of quality assurance for performance and safety characteristics of the facility for Boron Neutron Capture therapy in Petten/NL with medical electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassow, Juergen; Stecher-Rasmussen, Finn; Voorbraak, Wim; Moss, Ray; Vroegindeweij, Corine; Hideghety, Katalin; Sauerwein, Wolfgang

    2001-01-01

    Background and purpose: The European Council Directive on health protection 97/43/EURATOM requires radiotherapy quality assurance programmes for performance and safety characteristics including acceptance and repeated tests. For Boron Neutron Capture therapy (BNCT) at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten/NL such a programme has been developed on the basis of IEC publications for medical electron accelerators. Results: The fundamental differences of clinical dosimetry for medical electron accelerators and BNCT are presented and the order of magnitude of dose components and their stability and that of the main other influencing parameter 10 B concentration for BNCT patient treatments. A comparison is given for requirements for accelerators and BNCT units indicating items which are not transferable, equal or additional. Preliminary results of in vivo measurements done with a set of 55 Mn, 63 Cu and 197 Au activation foils for all single fields for the four fractions at all 15 treated patients show with <±4% up to now a worse reproducibility than the used dose monitoring systems (±1.5%) caused by influence of hair position on the foil-skull distance. Conclusions: Despite the more complex clinical dosimetry (because of four relevant dose components, partly of different linear energy transfer (LET)) BNCT can be regulated following the principles of quality assurance procedures for therapy with medical electron accelerators. The reproducibility of applied neutron fluence (proportional to absorbed doses) and the main safety aspects are equal for all teletherapy methods including BNCT

  10. Expertise and facilities of the IAM and ECN Petten in support of nuclear plant life management programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crutzen, S.; Debarberis, L.; Toerroenen, K.; Horsten, M.G.; Tjoa, G.L.; Vries, M.I. de

    1995-01-01

    The steel material properties of the pressure vessel are slowly degrading throughout the component lifetime; generally of the order of 30 year. The degradation could be attributed to many factors, like neutron irradiation, thermal aging, stress aging, corrosion, etc. and the synergism between the different factors. Neutron irradiation is one of the major known single factors for Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steel degradation. Within the frame of activities of the 4th Framework programme of the European Commission and of the European Network 'Aging Materials and Evaluation Studies' (AMES), a number of projects dealing with aging of materials, radiation and thermal aging, and the validation of mitigation measures, like annealing, and the sensibility to re-embrittlement after annealing are ongoing at the Institute for Advanced Materials (IAM) of the JRC, Petten and at ECN in Petten. A survey of irradiation technology available at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) Petten, as well as expertise and facilities of the IAM and ECN Petten in support of the programmes is given. The AMES irradiation facility for the HFR Petten and the irradiation projects are discussed in detail. A general overview of the ongoing and planned projects is also given. (author). 12 refs, 5 figs

  11. Neutron metrology in the HFR. Steel irradiation R139-699 (SINAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baard, J.H.; Paardekooper, A.

    1996-06-01

    The aim of the irradiation of experiment R139-699 was the testing of austenitic stainless steel type AISI-316 TIG. This report presents the final metrology results obtained from activation monitors in the specimen holder, coded as R139-699. Data about the helium production as well as the number of displacements per atom are also included. The irradiation circumstances for this experiment, carried out in a TRIO type capsule in HFR position F2, are as close as possible relevant for the candidate materials which will be used for the first wall of the NET (Next European Torus). The main results of the thermal and fast neutron fluence measurements are presented in tables 2 and 3 as well as in the figure 2. (orig.)

  12. Surveillance programme and upgrading of the High Flux Reactor Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieth, Michel

    1995-01-01

    The High Flux Reactor (HFR) at Petten (The Netherlands), a 45 MW light water cooled and moderated research reactor in operation during more than 30 years, has been kept up to date by replacing ageing components. In 1984, the HFR was shut down for replacement of the aluminium. reactor vessel which had been irradiated during more than 20 years. The demonstration that the new vessel contains no critical defect requires knowledge of the material properties of the aluminium alloy Al 5154 with and without neutron irradiation and of the likely defect presence through the periodic in-service inspections. An irradiation damage surveillance programme has been started in 1985 for the new vessel material to provide information on fracture mechanics properties. After the vessel replacement, the existing process of continuous upgrading and replacement of ageing components was accelerated. A stepwise upgrade of the control room is presently under realization. (author)

  13. Surveillance programme and upgrading of the High Flux Reactor Petten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieth, Michel [Commission of the European Communities, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Advanced Materials, High Flux Reactor Unit, Petten (Netherlands)

    1995-07-01

    The High Flux Reactor (HFR) at Petten (The Netherlands), a 45 MW light water cooled and moderated research reactor in operation during more than 30 years, has been kept up to date by replacing ageing components. In 1984, the HFR was shut down for replacement of the aluminium. reactor vessel which had been irradiated during more than 20 years. The demonstration that the new vessel contains no critical defect requires knowledge of the material properties of the aluminium alloy Al 5154 with and without neutron irradiation and of the likely defect presence through the periodic in-service inspections. An irradiation damage surveillance programme has been started in 1985 for the new vessel material to provide information on fracture mechanics properties. After the vessel replacement, the existing process of continuous upgrading and replacement of ageing components was accelerated. A stepwise upgrade of the control room is presently under realization. (author)

  14. Investigation of alleged releases of the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, Netherlands. Measured data from the Nuclear Research and consultancy Group (NRG) in the period September 2001; Onderzoek naar vermeende lozingen HFR Petten. Meetgegevens van NRG in de periode september 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-15

    During the open house at the Nuclear Research and consultancy Group (NRG) on May 28th 2006 NRG publicly presented the measuring values of the Central Radiological Monitoring System (CRM). On detailed inquiry of a visitor strongly increased brief peak values appeared on 19 and 26 September 2001. This resulted in questions from many parties (Meldpunt Nucleaire Veiligheid Noord-Holland (Registration office Nuclear Safety North Holland), Provinciale States North Holland, Greenpeace Netherlands and Vereniging Pettemerduinen Kernreactorvrij (Association against Nuclear reactor in the dunes of Petten)) about a possible radiological emission. The press reported a radioactive gas cloud. The Department of Nuclear Safety, Security and Safeguards of the Netherlands Ministry of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment has examined the circumstances. The following research questions were examined: (1) How is the CRM system composed? (2) Has there been a radiological emission? (3) How can the peak values be explained? (4) What conclusions can be drawn from the National Measuring network for Radiology of the RIVM? [mk]. [Dutch] Tijdens een open dag bij Nuclear Research and consultancy Group (NRG) op 28 mei 2006 werden door NRG publiekelijk meetwaarden gepresenteerd van het Centraal Radiologisch Monitoring Systeem (CRM). Bij gedetailleerde navraag van een bezoeker manifesteerden zich op twee dagen, 19 en 26 september 2001, sterk verhoogde kort durende piekwaarden. Dit heeft ertoe geleid dat van diverse zijden (Meldpunt Nucleaire Veiligheid Noord-Holland, Provinciale Staten Noord-Holland, Greenpeace Nederland en Vereniging Pettemerduinen Kernreactorvrij!) de KFD vragen bereikten of er sprake zou kunnen zijn van een radiologische emissie. In de publiciteit werd gewag gemaakt van een 'radioactieve gaswolk'. De KFD van de VROM-Inspectie heeft de toedracht hiervan onderzocht. Hierbij zijn de volgende onderzoeksvragen gesteld: (1) Hoe zit het CRM-systeem in elkaar?; (2) Is

  15. PASC-1, Petten AMPX-II/SCALE-3 Code System for Reactor Neutronics Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaoqing, W.; Oppe, J.; Haas, J.B.M. de; Gruppelaar, H.; Slobben, J.

    1995-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The Petten AMPX-II/SCALE-3 Code System PASC-1 is a reactor neutronics calculation programme system consisting of well known IBM-oriented codes, that have been translated into FORTRAN-77, for calculations on a CDC-CYBER computer. Thus, the portability of these codes has been increased. In this system, some AMPX-II and SCALE-3 modules, the one-dimensional transport code ANISN and the 1 to 3-dimensional diffusion code CITATION are linked together on the CDC-CYBER/855 computer. The new cell code XSDRNPM-S and the old XSDRN code are included in the system. Starting from an AMPX fine group library up to CITATION, calculations can be performed for each individual module. Existing AMPX master interface format libraries, such as CSRL-IV, JEF-1, IRI and SCALE-45, and the old XSDRN-formatted libraries such as the COBB library can be used for the calculations. The code system contains the following modules and codes at present: AIM, AJAX, MALOCS, NITAWL-S, REVERT-I, ICE-2, CONVERT, JUAN, OCTAGN, XSDRNPM-S, XSDRN, ANISN and CITATION. The system will be extended with other SCALE modules and transport codes. 2 - Method of solution: The PASC-1 system is based on AMPX-II/SCALE-3 modules. Except for some SCALE-3 modules taken from the SCALIAS package, the original AMPX-II modules were IBM versions written in FORTRAN IV. These modules have been translated into CDC FORTRAN V. In order to test these modules and link them with some codes, some of the sample problem calculations have been performed for the whole PASC-1 system. During these calculations, some FORTRAN-77 errors were found in MALOCS, REVERT, CONVERT and some subroutines of SUBLIB (FORTRAN-77 subroutine library). These errors have been corrected. Because many corrections were made for the REVERT module, it is renamed as REVERT-I (improved version of REVERT). After these corrections, the whole system is running on a CDC-CYBER Computer (NOS-BE operating system). 3 - Restrictions on the

  16. Irradiation experiments and materials testing capabilities in High Flux Reactor in Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzginova, N.; Blagoeva, D.; Hegeman, H.; Van der Laan, J.

    2011-01-01

    The text of publication follows: The High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten is a powerful multi-purpose research and materials testing reactor operating for about 280 Full Power Days per year. In combination with hot cells facilities, HFR provides irradiation and post-irradiation examination services requested by nuclear energy research and development programs, as well as by industry and research organizations. Using a variety of the custom developed irradiation devices and a large experience in executing irradiation experiments, the HFR is suitable for fuel, materials and components testing for different reactor types. Irradiation experiments carried out at the HFR are mainly focused on the understanding of the irradiation effects on materials; and providing databases for irradiation behavior of materials to feed into safety cases. The irradiation experiments and materials testing at the HFR include the following issues. First, materials irradiation to support the nuclear plant life extensions, for instance, characterization of the reactor pressure vessel stainless steel claddings to insure structural integrity of the vessel, as well as irradiation of the weld material coupons to neutron fluence levels that are representative for Light Water Reactors (LWR) internals applications. Secondly, development and qualification of the structural materials for next generation nuclear fission reactors as well as thermo-nuclear fusion machines. The main areas of interest are in both conventional stainless steel and advanced reduced activation steels and special alloys such as Ni-base alloys. For instance safety-relevant aspects of High Temperature Reactors (HTR) such as the integrity of fuel and structural materials with increasing neutron fluence at typical HTR operating conditions has been recently assessed. Thirdly, support of the fuel safety through several fuel irradiation experiments including testing of pre-irradiated LWR fuel rods containing UO 2 or MOX fuel. Fourthly

  17. Tritium besmetting in Petten en mogelijke risico's voor de omgeving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slaper H; Twenhöfel C; van der Knaap Y; VLH; M&V

    2017-01-01

    In 2012 is bij de Hoge Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten een lekkage ontdekt van de radioactieve stof tritium in de bodem. De beheerder, NRG, heeft inmiddels maatregelen genomen om de lekkage te stoppen. RIVM heeft onderzocht wat de gevolgen voor omwonenden kunnen zijn. Uit dit onderzoek komt dat ook bij

  18. The High Flux Reactor Petten, present status and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlf, J [Institute for Advanced Materials, Joint Research Centre, Petten (Netherlands)

    1990-05-01

    The High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, The Netherlands, is a light water cooled and moderated multipurpose research reactor of the closed-tank in pool type. It is operated with highly enriched Uranium fuel at a power of 45 MW. The reactor is owned by the European Communities and operated under contract by the Dutch ECN. The HFR programme is funded by The Netherlands and Germany, a smaller share comes from the specific programmes of the Joint Research Centre (JRC) and from third party contract work. Since its first criticality in 1961 the reactor has been continuously upgraded by implementing developments in fuel element technology and increasing the power from 20 MW to the present 45 MV. In 1984 the reactor vessel was replaced by a new one with an improved accessibility for experiments. In the following years also other ageing equipment has been replaced (primary heat exchangers, pool heat exchanger, beryllium reflector elements, nuclear and process instrumentation, uninterruptable power supply). Control room upgrading is under preparation. A new safety analysis is near to completion and will form the basis for a renewed license. The reactor is used for nuclear energy related research (structural materials and fuel irradiations for LWR's, HTR's and FBR's, fusion materials irradiations). The beam tubes are used for nuclear physics as well as solid state and materials sciences. Radioisotope production at large scale, processing of gemstones and silicon with neutrons, neutron radiography and activation analysis are actively pursued. A clinical facility for boron neutron capture therapy is being designed at one of the large cross section beam tubes. It is foreseen to operate the reactor at least for a further decade. The exploitation pattern may undergo some changes depending on the requirements of the supporting countries and the JRC programmes. (author)

  19. The High Flux Reactor Petten, present status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlf, J.

    1990-01-01

    The High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, The Netherlands, is a light water cooled and moderated multipurpose research reactor of the closed-tank in pool type. It is operated with highly enriched Uranium fuel at a power of 45 MW. The reactor is owned by the European Communities and operated under contract by the Dutch ECN. The HFR programme is funded by The Netherlands and Germany, a smaller share comes from the specific programmes of the Joint Research Centre (JRC) and from third party contract work. Since its first criticality in 1961 the reactor has been continuously upgraded by implementing developments in fuel element technology and increasing the power from 20 MW to the present 45 MV. In 1984 the reactor vessel was replaced by a new one with an improved accessibility for experiments. In the following years also other ageing equipment has been replaced (primary heat exchangers, pool heat exchanger, beryllium reflector elements, nuclear and process instrumentation, uninterruptable power supply). Control room upgrading is under preparation. A new safety analysis is near to completion and will form the basis for a renewed license. The reactor is used for nuclear energy related research (structural materials and fuel irradiations for LWR's, HTR's and FBR's, fusion materials irradiations). The beam tubes are used for nuclear physics as well as solid state and materials sciences. Radioisotope production at large scale, processing of gemstones and silicon with neutrons, neutron radiography and activation analysis are actively pursued. A clinical facility for boron neutron capture therapy is being designed at one of the large cross section beam tubes. It is foreseen to operate the reactor at least for a further decade. The exploitation pattern may undergo some changes depending on the requirements of the supporting countries and the JRC programmes. (author)

  20. High flux testing reactor Petten. Replacement of the reactor vessel and connected components. Overall report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrysochoides, N.G.; Cundy, M.R.; Von der Hardt, P.; Husmann, K.; Swanenburg de Veye, R.J.; Tas, A.

    1985-01-01

    The project of replacing the HFR originated in 1974 when results of several research programmes confirmed severe neutron embrittlement of aluminium alloys suggesting a limited life of the existing facility. This report contains the detailed chronology of events concerning preparation and execution of the replacement. After a 14 months' outage the reactor resumed routine operation on 14th February, 1985. At the end of several years of planning and preparation the reconstruction proceded in the following steps: unloading of the old core, decay of short-lived radioactivity in December 1983, removal of the old tank and of its peripheral equipment in January-February 1984, segmentation and waste disposal of the removed components in March-April, decontamination of the pools, bottom penetration overhauling in May-June, installation of the new tank and other new components in July-September, testing and commissioning, including minor modifications in October-December, and, trials runs and start-up preparation in January-February 1985. The new HFR Petten features increased and improved experimental facilities. Among others the obsolete thermal columns was replaced by two high flux beam tubes. Moreover the new plant has been designed for future increases of reactor power and neutron fluxes. For the next three to four years the reactor has to cope with a large irradiation programme, claiming its capacity to nearly 100%

  1. HFR irradiation testing of fusion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, R.; von der Hardt, P.; Loelgen, R.; Scheurer, H.; Zeisser, P.

    1984-01-01

    The present and future role of the High Flux Reactor Petten for fusion materials testing has been assessed. For practical purposes the Tokamak-based fusion reactor is chosen as a point of departure to identify material problems and materials data needs. The identification is largely based on the INTOR and NET design studies, the reported programme strategies of Japan, the U.S.A. and the European Communities for technical development of thermonuclear fusion reactors and on interviews with several experts. Existing and planned irradiation facilities, their capabilities and limitations concerning materials testing have been surveyed and discussed. It is concluded that fission reactors can supply important contributions for fusion materials testing. From the point of view of future availability of fission testing reactors and their performance it appears that the HFR is a useful tool for materials testing for a large variety of materials. Prospects and recommendations for future developments are given

  2. Dose effect comparisons between HFR and BMRR irradiated dogs with respect to healthy tissue tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huiskamp, R.; Philipp, K.H.I.; Gavin, P.R.; Wheeler, F.J.; Siefert, A.

    1993-01-01

    Epithermal neutron beams are being developed for the application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of deep seated tumors, like glioblastoma and astrocytomas, through the intact skin. Epithermal neutrons will be moderated by the tissue mass between skin and tumour to produce the thermal neutrons necessary for the 10 B(n,α) 7 Li reaction in the target tissue. Although the neutron capture cross-sections of elements in normal tissue are several orders of magnitude lower that for boron, the high abundance of hydrogen and nitrogen will cause a significant contribution to the total absorbed radiation dose through the 1 H(n,γ) 2 H and the 14 N(n,p) 14 C reaction, respectively. Due to inevitable incomplete filtration, an epithermal beam will also contain a fast neutron component, i.e. neutrons with energies ≥ 10 keV, and a γ-photon component originating from the reactor and produced in structural and filter materials. Therefore, the resultant radiation consists of a complex of low and high LET radiation of which the constitutents vary rapidly with depth in tissue. Based on the ongoing canine healthy tissue tolerance study at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) using the epithermal beam without BSH, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the fast neutron beam component has been determined for skin reactions. In addition, a open-quotes compound factorclose quotes, i.e geometry x RBE, for the 10 B(n,α) 7 Li reaction was derived for dogs irradiated at the BMRR with the epithermal beam and BSH (Gavin et al.). Currently, a healthy tissue tolerance study with BSH is being carried out at the HB11 epithermal beam of the High Flux Reactor at Petten. The present paper describes preliminary dose effect comparisons between High Flux Reactor (HFR) and BMRR irradiated dogs with respect to healthy tissue tolerance in order to refine the BSH compound factors and the fast neutron RBE for skin and brain

  3. Fuel management at the Petten high flux reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thijssen, P.J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Several years ago the shipment of spent fuel of the High Flux Reactor (HFR) at Petten has come to a standstill resulting in an ever growing stock of fuel elements that are labelled 'fully burnt up'. Examination of those elements showed that a reasonably number of them have a relatively high 235 U mass left. A reactor physics analysis showed that the use of such elements in the peripheral core zone allows the loading of four instead of five fresh fuel elements in many cycle cores. For the assessment of safety and performance parameters of HFR cores a new calculational tool is being developed. It is based on AEA Technology's Reactor physics code suite Winfrith Improved Multigroup Scheme (WIMS). NRG produced pre- and post-processing facilities to feed input data into WIMS's 2D transport code CACTUS and to extract relevant parameters from the output. The processing facilities can be used for many different types of application. (author)

  4. Preliminary clinical results from the EORTC 11961 trial at the petten irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauerwein, W.; Hideghety, K.; Vries, M.J. de

    2000-01-01

    Based on the pre-clinical work of the European Collaboration on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy a study protocol was prepared in 1995 to initiate Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in patients at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten. Bio-distribution and pharmacokinetics data of the boron drug Na 2 B 12 H 11 SH (BSH) as well as the radiobiological effects of BNCT with BSH in healthy brain tissue of dogs were considered in designing the strategy for this clinical Phase I trial. The primary goal of the radiation dose escalation study is the investigation of possible adverse events due to BNCT; i.e. to establish the dose limiting toxicity and the maximal tolerated radiation dose. The treatment is delivered in 4 fractions at a defined average boron concentration in blood. After an observation period of at least 6 months, the dose is increased by 10% for the next cohort. The preliminary results of the first cohort are presented here. The evaluated dose level can be considered to be safe. (author)

  5. Decontamination of the HFR dismantling cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cloes, K.; Husmann, K.; Hardt, P. von der.

    1976-05-01

    The Commission of the European Communities operates in the Petten Establishment of the Joint Research Centre (EURATOM), a 45 MW light-water cooled materials testing reactor, the HFR. Inside the reactor containment building, on top of a side wing of the main pool, a hot cell had been constructed for the dismantling, of irradiated equipment, and brought into active service in July 1966. Early in 1973, the cell was contaminated by 0.1 to 1 Ci of Po 210 , originating from an irradiation capsule containing Bi impregnated graphite specimens. Due to the elevated radiotoxicity of this isotope, and to numerous potential ways of spreading out the contamination it was decided to stop routine operation of the cell until a satisfactory degree of decontamination had been reached. Two years have been spent for preparation of specialized equipment and thorough clean-up and overhaul work of the cell. It went back into normal operation on February 21st, 1975 and has since then been working very successfully

  6. First clinical results from the EORTC phase I Trial ''postoperative treatment of glioblastoma with BNCT at the Petten irradiation facility''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauerwein, W.; Hideghety, K.; Rassow, J.; Devries, M.J.; Goetz, C.; Paquis, P.; Grochulla, F.; Wolbers, J.G.; Haselsberger, K.; Turowski, B.; Moss, R.L.; Stecher-Rasmussen, F.; Touw, D.; Wiestler, O.D.; Frankhauser, H.; Gabel, D.

    2001-01-01

    Based on the pre-clinical work of the European Collaboration on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy a study protocol was prepared in 1995 to initiate Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in patients at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten. Bio-distribution and pharmacokinetics data of the boron drug Na 2 B 12 H 11 SH (BSH) as well as the radiobiological effects of BNCT with BSH in healthy brain tissue of dogs were considered in designing the strategy for this clinical Phase I trial. The primary goal of the radiation dose escalation study is the investigation of possible adverse events due to BNCT; i.e. to establish the dose limiting toxicity and the maximal tolerated dose. The treatment is delivered in 4 fractions at a defined average boron concentration in blood. Cohorts of 10 patients are treated per dose group. The starting dose was set at 80% of the dose at which neurological symptoms occurred in preclinical dog experiments following a single fraction. After an observation period of at least 6 months, the dose is increased by 10% for the next cohort if less then three severe side effects related to the treatment occurred. The results of the first cohort are presented here. The evaluated dose level can be considered safe. (author)

  7. First clinical results from the EORTC phase I Trial ''postoperative treatment of glioblastoma with BNCT at the Petten irradiation facility''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauerwein, W; Hideghety, K; Rassow, J [Department of Radiotherapy, University of Essen (Germany); Devries, M J [NDDO Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Goetz, C [Neurochirurgische Klinik, Klinikum Grosshadern Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Paquis, P [Dept. de Neurochirurgie, Hopital Pasteur, Nice (France); Grochulla, F [Klinik fuer Neurochirurgie, Zentralkrankenhaus Bremen (Germany); Wolbers, J G [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital ' ' Vrije Universiteit' ' , Amsterdam (Netherlands); Haselsberger, K [Klinik fuer Neurochirurgie, Karl-Franzens-Universitaet, Graz (Austria); Turowski, B [Institut fuer Neuroradiologie, Johann-Wolfgang-von-Goethe-Universitaet, Frankfurt (Germany); Moss, R L [HFR Unit, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, Petten (Netherlands); Stecher-Rasmussen, F [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group NRG, Petten (Netherlands); Touw, D [Pharmacy, University/Academic Hospital ' ' Vrije Universiteit' ' , Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wiestler, O D [Department of Neuropathology, German Brain Tumour Reference Centre, Universitaetsklinikum Bonn (Germany); Frankhauser, H [Service de Neurochirurgie CHUV, Lausanne (Switzerland); Gabel, D [Chemistry Department, University of Bremen (Germany)

    2001-05-01

    Based on the pre-clinical work of the European Collaboration on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy a study protocol was prepared in 1995 to initiate Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in patients at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten. Bio-distribution and pharmacokinetics data of the boron drug Na{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 11}SH (BSH) as well as the radiobiological effects of BNCT with BSH in healthy brain tissue of dogs were considered in designing the strategy for this clinical Phase I trial. The primary goal of the radiation dose escalation study is the investigation of possible adverse events due to BNCT; i.e. to establish the dose limiting toxicity and the maximal tolerated dose. The treatment is delivered in 4 fractions at a defined average boron concentration in blood. Cohorts of 10 patients are treated per dose group. The starting dose was set at 80% of the dose at which neurological symptoms occurred in preclinical dog experiments following a single fraction. After an observation period of at least 6 months, the dose is increased by 10% for the next cohort if less then three severe side effects related to the treatment occurred. The results of the first cohort are presented here. The evaluated dose level can be considered safe. (author)

  8. Neutron metrology in the fuel assemblies of a material test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voorbraak, W.P.; Paardekoper, A.; Polle, A.N.; Freudenreich, W.E.

    1993-08-01

    Results are presented of detailed thermal and fast neutron measurements performed in all fuel and control assemblies of the HFR in Petten. The results give information about deviations of a general shape of vertical thermal and fast fluence rate distributions due to material transitions in the reactor core and different control assembly settings. Further it is demonstrated that the ratio of fast and thermal fluence rate at the various monitor positions in the assemblies give useful information for the (relative) local burn-up of the fuel. (orig.)

  9. New temperature monitoring devices for high-temperature irradiation experiments in the high flux reactor Petten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurie, M.; Futterer, M. A.; Lapetite, J. M. [European Commission Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Fourrez, S. [THERMOCOAX SAS, BP 26, Planquivon, 61438 Flers Cedex (France); Morice, R. [Laboratoire National de Metrologie et d' Essais, 1 rue Gaston Boissier, 75724 Paris (France)

    2009-07-01

    Within the European High Temperature Reactor Technology Network (HTR-TN) and related projects a number of HTR fuel irradiations are planned in the High Flux Reactor Petten (HFR), The Netherlands, with the objective to explore the potential of recently produced fuel for even higher temperature and burn-up. Irradiating fuel under defined conditions to extremely high burn-ups will provide a better understanding of fission product release and failure mechanisms if particle failure occurs. After an overview of the irradiation rigs used in the HFR, this paper sums up data collected from previous irradiation tests in terms of thermocouple data. Some research and development work for further improvement of thermocouples and other on-line instrumentation will be outlined. (authors)

  10. A comparative and predictive study of the annual fuel cycle costs for HEU and LEU fuels in the High Flux Reactor, Petten, 1985-1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, R L; May, P

    1985-07-01

    The internationally agreed constraint on availability of supply of HEU fuels to Research and Test Reactors has necessitated that a cost analysis be carried out to determine the financial effect of converting the core of the HFR from HEU to LEU fuels. A computer program, written at Petten and based on information extracted from studies in Europe and the USA, identifies the major cost variables to be manufacturing, uranium, reprocessing and transport costs. Comparison between HEU and LEU cores have been carried out and includes the effects of inflation and exchange rate fluctuations. Conversion of the HFR core to LEU fuels is shown to be financially disadvantageous. (author)

  11. A comparative and predictive study of the annual fuel cycle costs for HEU and LEU fuels in the High Flux Reactor, Petten, 1985-1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, R.L.; May, P.

    1985-01-01

    The internationally agreed constraint on availability of supply of HEU fuels to Research and Test Reactors has necessitated that a cost analysis be carried out to determine the financial effect of converting the core of the HFR from HEU to LEU fuels. A computer program, written at Petten and based on information extracted from studies in Europe and the USA, identifies the major cost variables to be manufacturing, uranium, reprocessing and transport costs. Comparison between HEU and LEU cores have been carried out and includes the effects of inflation and exchange rate fluctuations. Conversion of the HFR core to LEU fuels is shown to be financially disadvantageous. (author)

  12. Neutron use in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidez, J.; May, R.; Moss, R. [HFR-Unit, European Commission, IAM, Petten (Netherlands); Askienazy, S. [Departement Central de Medicine Nucleaire et Biophysique, Saint Antoine Hospital, Paris (France); Hildebrand, J. [Neurology Department, Erasmus Hospital, Brussels (Belgium)

    1999-07-01

    Neutrons produced by research reactors are being used in nuclear medicine and other medical applications in several ways. The High Flux Reactor (HFR) based in Petten (The Netherlands), owned by the European Commission, has been working increasingly in this field of health care for the European citizen. On the basis of this experience, a survey has been carried out on the main possibilities of neutrons used in nuclear medicine. The most important and most well known is the production of radioisotopes for diagnosis and therapy. Ten million patients receive nuclear medicine in Europe each year, with more than 8 million made with the products issued from research reactors. The survey of the market and the techniques (cyclotron, PET) shows that this market will continue to increase in the future. The direct use of reactors in medicine is actually made by the Boron Neutron capture Therapy (BNCT) for the treatment of glioblastoma, which kills about 15.000 people in Europe each year. For this promising technique, HFR is the most advanced for experimental possibilities and treatment studies. Medical research is also made in other promising fields: the use beam tubes for characterizing of prostheses and bio-medical materials, alpha-immuno therapy products, new types of radioisotopes, new types of illness to be treated by BNCT, etc. (author)

  13. Neutron use in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidez, J.; May, R.; Moss, R.; Askienazy, S.; Hildebrand, J.

    1999-01-01

    Neutrons produced by research reactors are being used in nuclear medicine and other medical applications in several ways. The High Flux Reactor (HFR) based in Petten (The Netherlands), owned by the European Commission, has been working increasingly in this field of health care for the European citizen. On the basis of this experience, a survey has been carried out on the main possibilities of neutrons used in nuclear medicine. The most important and most well known is the production of radioisotopes for diagnosis and therapy. Ten million patients receive nuclear medicine in Europe each year, with more than 8 million made with the products issued from research reactors. The survey of the market and the techniques (cyclotron, PET) shows that this market will continue to increase in the future. The direct use of reactors in medicine is actually made by the Boron Neutron capture Therapy (BNCT) for the treatment of glioblastoma, which kills about 15.000 people in Europe each year. For this promising technique, HFR is the most advanced for experimental possibilities and treatment studies. Medical research is also made in other promising fields: the use beam tubes for characterizing of prostheses and bio-medical materials, alpha-immuno therapy products, new types of radioisotopes, new types of illness to be treated by BNCT, etc. (author)

  14. Upgrading and modernization of the high flux reactor Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlf, J.

    1992-01-01

    The High Flux Reactor (HFR) at Petten, The Netherlands, owned by the European Communities and operated by the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation, is a water-cooled and moderated, multipurpose research reactor of the closed-tank in-pool type, operated at 45 MW. Performance upgrading comprised two power increases from 20 MW via 30 MW to 45 MW, providing more and higher rated irradiation positions in the tank. With the replacement of the original reactor vessel the experimental capabilities of the reactor were improved. Better pool side facilities and the introduction of a large cross-section, double, beam tube were implemented. Additional major installation upgrading activities consisted of the replacement of the primary and the pool heat exchangers, replacement of the beryllium reflector elements, extension of the overpower protection systems and upgrading of the nuclear instrumentation as well as the guaranteed power supply. Control room upgrading is in progress. A full new safety analysis, as well as the introduction of a comprehensive Quality Assurance system, are summarized under software upgrading. Continuous modernization and upgrading also takes place of equipment for fuel and structural materials irradiations for fission reactors and future fusion machines. In parallel, all supporting services, as well as the management structure for large irradiation programmes, have been developed. Presently the reactor is operating at about 275 full power days per year with an average utilization of the irradiation positions of 70 to 80%. (orig.)

  15. Commission of the european communities. Joint research centre. Petten Establishment. Annual Report 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977 marked the beginning of a new multiannual research programme for the European Commission's Joint research Centre. Regarding the exploitation of HFR (High Flux Reactor), the year was one of steady, on-schedule operation with high utilization, although this fell off slightly in the autumn due to overloading of our capsule project engineering team and manufacturing services. We are pleased to note that the HFR Users' Meeting, held in October, drew about 100 participants from Europe and America and demonstrated a lively interest in the Commission's materials testing reactor. Technical improvements to the plant are being examined as one means of maintaining or even increasing this interest in the 1980's. Following the wishes of the Council of Ministers, new Advisory Committees for Programme Management have been set up for all the Joint Research Centre's activities and those for HFR and High Temperature Materials Programmes have met at Petten. This latter Committee is entirely new to its task, the programme having been served until 1977 by a number of ad hoc meetings of national experts. The work of the Organic Chemistry Laboratory falls under the wings of the Community Reference Bureau Advisory Committee, who have met in Brussels and strongly encouraged the development of the activity

  16. Application of semiconductor MOSFET and pin diode dosimeters to epithermal neutron beam dose distribution measurements in phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carolan, M.G.; Wallace, S.A.; Allen, B.J.; Rosenfeld, A.B.; Mathur, J.N.

    1996-01-01

    For any clinical application of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) fast and accurate dose calculations will be required for treatment planning. Such calculations are also necessary for the planning and interpretation of results from pre-clinical and clinical trials where the speed of calculation is not so critical. A dose calculation system based on the MCNP Monte Carlo Neutron transport code has been developed by Wallace. This system takes image data from CT scans and constructs a voxel based geometrical model for input into MCNP. To validate the calculations, a number of phantoms were constructed and exposed in the HB11 epithermal neutron beam at the HFR of the CEC Joint Research Centre in Petten. The doses recorded by arrays of PIN diode neutron dosimeters and MOSFET gamma dosimeters in these phantoms were compared with the calculated results from the MCNP dose planning system. Initial results have been reported elsewhere. Poster 197. (author)

  17. Report on HFR power cycling experiment MEDINA/POCY 02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetzmann, O.

    1993-09-01

    MEDINA or POCY 02 was a single rod experiment to study power ramp induced FCMI with the smear density parameter. Four separate fuel columns with different void volume redistribution were integrated in one rod. The irradiation device should allow for the measurements of the rod diameter along all fuel columns after each power cycle. Irradiation took place in the Pool Side Facility of the HFR in Petten from October 1985 through January 1988. The experiment had to be terminated prematurely due to mishandling of the capsule. The in-pile diameter measurements were of no use. Even though the primary goal was not attained, the experiment furnished some interesting insights into the fuel behaviour during cyclic operation. Mechanical interactions between fuel and cladding took place in all four fuel columns. Maximum rod diameter increase observed was 0,2%. The largest value was measured in the rod section where the original gap was the largest. Apparently, in cyclic operation a large gap does not ease the FCMI situtation. Fuel and fission product movements seem to be enhanced by cyclic operation. Large quantities of solid fission products in the central channel and large reaction zones in the gap between fuel and cladding were observed for these short fuel stacks. Both ends of the annular pellet column were closed by fuel condensation. Pore migration was activated throughout the experiment. It was even capable of transporting cladding reaction products into the central hole. (orig.) [de

  18. Status report on the HFR conversion and re-licensing project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wijtsma, F.G.

    2003-01-01

    In 1999 the HFR license holder (JRC, Petten, the Netherlands) initiated a project to study the conversion of the HFR from HEU to LEU. The first phase of this project consisted of a parametric study to determine the optimum fuel element and control rod design within given boundary conditions such as geometry, density, performance and cycle length. Results of this study are a 22 plates fuel element (550 g 235 U) at a density of 4.8 g.cm -3 and a 17 plates control rod (440 g 235 U). The second phase contains all aspects related to the conversion including a full-scale test irradiation of a prototype LEU element. The actual conversion of the HFR requires a new license. For this reason the re-licensing project has started in 2001. In this context many studies have been performed e.g. Risk Scoping Study, Safety Analyses, TOPA (Technical, Operational, Personnel and Administrative) evaluation. The license application will be based on a new Safety Report and an Environmental Impact Statement and will be submitted to the competent Authorities at the end of October 2003. (author)

  19. Petten establishment. Annual report 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    1978 was the second year in the Joint Research Centre's 1977-1980 multiannual research programme. Since the following exercise is intended to run from 1980 to 1983 with a one year overlap, new proposals will be placed before the Council of Ministers in 1979. To this end, a considerable part of the programme and project management staff activities has been devoted to the peliminary preparation of future plans. In general it is expected that the Establishment's three research activities will continue along the lines already proceeding successfully in the present programme in the materials testing reactor (HFR), high temperature materials and organic chemistry spheres with some updating and refocussing where necessary. Consultation with the appropriate Advisory Committees for Programme Management has been contributed to these processes. Another important development has been the question of site security, following decisions of the European Commission and the Dutch Government to apply International Atomic Agency regulations. The work to apply the necessary measures has had to be executed in the shortest possible time. We have endeavoured to maintain and increase for all three programmes the already intensive contacts with research institutes and industry in the Member States. Important in this connection are the international conferences, 'Alloy 800' held in March and 'Ramping and Load following Behaviour of Reactor Fuel' in December, as well as an international meeting of the 'irradiation Devices Working Party' which took place in May

  20. KüFA safety testing of HTR fuel pebbles irradiated in the High Flux Reactor in Petten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, O., E-mail: oliver.seeger@rwth-aachen.de [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Safety of Irradiated Nuclear Materials Unit, Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Laurie, M., E-mail: mathias.laurie@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Safety of Irradiated Nuclear Materials Unit, Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Abjani, A. El; Ejton, J.; Boudaud, D.; Freis, D.; Carbol, P.; Rondinella, V.V. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Safety of Irradiated Nuclear Materials Unit, Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Fütterer, M. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Energy and Transport (IET), Nuclear Reactor Integrity Assessment and Knowledge Management Unit, PO Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Allelein, H.-J. [Lehrstuhl für Reaktorsicherheit und -technik an der RWTH Aachen, Kackertstraße 9, 52072 Aachen (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    The Cold Finger Apparatus (KühlFinger-Apparatur—KüFA) in operation at JRC-ITU is designed to experimentally scrutinize the effects of Depressurization LOss of Forced Circulation (D-LOFC) accident scenarios on irradiated High Temperature Reactor (HTR) fuel pebbles. Up to 1600 °C, the reference maximum temperature for these accidents, high-quality German HTR fuel pebbles have already demonstrated a small fission product release. This paper discusses and compares the releases obtained from KüFA-testing the pebbles HFR-K5/3 and HFR-EU1/3, which were both irradiated in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten. We present the time-dependent fractional release of the volatile fission product {sup 137}Cs as well as the fission gas {sup 85}Kr for both pebbles. For HFR-EU1/3 the isotopes {sup 134}Cs and {sup 154}Eu as well as the shorter-lived {sup 110m}Ag have also been measured. A detailed description of the experimental setup and its accuracy is given. The data for the recently tested pebbles is discussed in the context of previous results.

  1. RBE of the NCT beam at Petten (The Netherlands) for intestinal crypt regeneration in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueulette, J.; Coster, B.M. de; Wambersie, A.; Stecher-Rasmussen, F.; Huiskamp, R.; Moss, R.; Morrissey, J.

    2000-01-01

    RBE of the BNCT epithermal neutron beam at Petten (The Netherlands) has been determined for intestinal crypt regeneration in mice i.e. an in vivo system. No boron was administered. This experiment is part of an IAEA programme aiming at intercomparing radiobiologically the NCT neutron beams of different facilities world-wide. Six MV photons were used as the reference radiation. For the NCT beam at Petten, irradiation times ranging between 1 and 3 hours were applied. These low dose rate irradiations (∼3 Gy/hour) were found ∼2.4 more effective than acute photon irradiations. This type of experiment - repeated at different BNCT facilities - will improve harmonisation in the radiobiological specification of NCT neutron beams and facilitate exchange of clinical information. (author)

  2. License renewal of the HFR research reactor - A regulatory view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Plas, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Regulatory policy in The Netherlands is having safety evaluations of a nuclear installation each ten year. Recently a periodic safety evaluation has been finished on the 45 MW High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten divided over the following main topics: Risk Scoping Study; HEU-LEU fuel conversion; Evaluation against a pre-defined Reference Licensing Basis; Ageing study. The Risk Scoping Study is a limited probabilistic safety assessment showing scenarios towards serious core degradation and their probabilities. Individual risks for members of the public induced by the incidents analyzed in the first phase are compared with the mortality limits and probabilistic doses limits of the national BKSE decree. For non- proliferation reasons the fuel is converted from high to low enriched uranium. Before starting the project a reference licensing basis (RLB) was defined. A list of postulated initiating events (PIEs), re-establishing a design basis has been approved. An ageing management system shall provide information on the actual status and the residual life time of the plant. The evaluation results into a list of deficiencies, recommendations and suggestions from which modifications are to be proposed. Examples are: more redundancy and separation within the reactor protection system; renewal of the emergency and decay heat cooling; addition of a secundary reactor shut down system; more redundancy in the electric power supply; addition of injection valves introducing efficient use of passive cooling inventor) under LOCA conditions; damping of the impact from loads accidentally falling into the pool. A new nuclear license was issued begin 2004, covering all modifications which are to be implemented ultimate end 2007

  3. On-Line Fission Gas Release Monitoring System in the High Flux Reactor Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurie, M.; Fuetterer, M. A.; Appelman, K.H.; Lapetite, J.-M.; Marmier, A.; Knol, S.; Best, J.

    2013-06-01

    For HTR fuel irradiation tests in the HFR Petten a specific installation was designed and installed dubbed the 'Sweep Loop Facility' (SLF). The SLF is tasked with three functions, namely temperature control by gas mixture technique, surveillance of safety parameters (temperature, pressure, radioactivity etc.) and analysis of fission gas release for three individual capsules in two separate experimental rigs. The SLF enables continuous and independent surveillance of all gas circuits. The release of volatile fission products (FP) from the in-pile experiments is monitored by continuous gas purging. The fractional release of these FP, defined as the ratio between release rate of a gaseous fission isotope (measured) to its instantaneous birth rate (calculated), is a licensing-relevant test for HTR fuel. The developed gamma spectrometry station allows for higher measurement frequencies, thus enabling follow-up of rapid and massive release transients. The designed stand-alone system was tested and fully used through the final irradiation period of the HFR-EU1 experiment which was terminated on 18 February 2010. Its robustness allowed the set up to be used as extra safety instrumentation. This paper describes the gas activity measurement technique based on HPGe gamma spectrometry and illustrates how qualitative and quantitative analysis of volatile FP can be performed on-line. (authors)

  4. Reactor beam calculations to determine optimum delivery of epithermal neutrons for treatment of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, F.J.; Nigg, D.W.; Capala, J.

    1997-01-01

    Studies were performed to assess theoretical tumor control probability (TCP) for brain-tumor treatment with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using epithermal neutron sources from reactors. The existing epithermal-neutron beams at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor Facility (BMRR), the Petten High Flux Reactor Facility (HWR) and the Finnish Research Reactor 1 (FIR1) have been analyzed and characterized using common analytical and measurement methods allowing for this inter-comparison. Each of these three facilities is unique and each offers an advantage in some aspect of BNCT, but none of these existing facilities excel in all neutron-beam attributes as related to BNCT. A comparison is therefore also shown for a near-optimum reactor beam which does not currently exist but which would be feasible with existing technology. This hypothetical beam is designated BNCT-1 and has a spectrum similar to the FIR-1, the mono-directionality of the HFR and the intensity of the BMRR. A beam very similar to the BNCT-1 could perhaps be achieved with modification of the BMRR, HFR, or FIR, and could certainly be realized in a new facility with today's technology

  5. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy at European research reactors - Status and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    Over the last decade. there has been a significant revival in the development of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) as a treatment modality for curing cancerous tumours, especially glioblastoma multiforme and subcutaneous malignant melanoma. In 1987 a European Collaboration on BNCT was formed, with the prime task to identify suitable research reactors in Europe where BNCT could be applied. Due to reasons discussed in this paper, the HFR Petten was chosen as the test-bed for demonstrating BNCT. Currently, the European Collaboration is approaching the start of clinical trials, using epithermal neutrons and borocaptate sodium (BSH) as the 10 B delivery agent. The treatment is planned to start in the first half of 1996. The paper here presents an overview on the principle of BNCT, the requirements imposed on a research reactor in order to be considered for BNCT, and the perspectives for other European materials testing reactors. A brief summary on the current status of the work at Petten is given, including: the design, construction and characterisation of the epithermal neutron beam: performance and results of the healthy tissue tolerance study; the development of a treatment planning programme based on the Monte Carlo code MCNP; the design of an irradiation room; and on the clinical trials themselves. (author)

  6. Joint research centre fusion materials irradiations in HFR: Present status and prospectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casini, G.; Fenici, P.

    1989-01-01

    First a review is made of the Joint Research Centre experimental activity at HFR-Petten in the frame of the Fusion Technology and Safety Programme. The materials under investigation are: Cr-Ni Austenitic steels (316-L type) and Cr-Mn Austenitic steels (AMCR and FI type) as structural materials and Pb-17Li eutetic as tritium breeding material. The experiments on structural materials comprise: Sample irradiations with post-irradiation tensile tests (FRUST) Sample irradiations under constant load and post-irradiation strain measurement (TRIESTE) On-line creep tests (CRISP). The experiments on Pb-17Li breeder material regard sample irradiations to investigate tritium production and recovery as well as tritium permeation through blanket structures (LIBRETTO Experiment). Both irradiations on structural and breeding materials will be pursued up to the end of the current JRC-Multiannual Programme (1988-1991) and even further. In the last part of the paper expected developments of the testing programme at HFR are discussed. New areas of research should involve materials for divertor applications (NET/ITER) and advanced low activation composite materials for Commercial Power Reactors

  7. LWR fuel rod testing facilities in high flux reactor (HFT) Petten for investigation of power cycling and ramping behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markgraf, J; Perry, D; Oudaert, J [Commission of the European Communities, Joint Reserach Centre, Petten Establishment, Petten (Netherlands)

    1983-06-01

    LWR fuel rod irradiation experiments are being performed in HFR's Pool Side Facility (PSF) by means of pressurized boiling water capsules (BWFC). For more than 6 years the major application of these devices has been in performing irradiation programs to investigate the power ramp behaviour of PWR and BWR rods which have been pre-irradiated in power reactors. Irradiation devices with various types of monitoring instrumentation are available, e.g. for fuel rod length, fuel stack length, fuel rod internal pressure and fuel rod central temperature measurements. The application scope covers PWR and BWR fuel rods, with burn-up levels up to 45 MWd/kg(U), max. linear heat generation rates up to 700 W/cm and simulation of constant power change rates between 0.05 and 1000 W/cm.min. The paper describes the different designs of LWR fuel rod testing facilities and associated non-destructive testing devices in use at the HFR Petten. It also addresses the new test capabilities that will become available after exchange of the HFR vessel in 1983. Furthermore it shows some typical results. (author)

  8. Argentine nuclear fuels MOX irradiated in the Petten reactor: Analysis of experience with the BACO code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marino, A C; Perez, E; Adelfang, P [Argentine Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1997-08-01

    The irradiation of our first prototypes of MOX nuclear fuels fabricated in Argentina began in 1986. These experiences had been made in the HFR-Petten reactor, Holland. The six rods were fabricated in the {alpha} Facility (GAID-CNEA-Argentina). The first rod has been used for destructive pre-irradiation analysis in the KFK (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe), Germany. The second one was a pathfinder for calibrating systems in the HFR. Another two rods included doped pellets based on iodine. One of them included CsI and auxiliary components. The second one included elemental iodine. The concentration of iodine was intended to simulate 15 MWd/ton(M) of burnup. We defined the power histories with the BACO code. We assumed a cycle of 15 days that included interaction treatments of cladding and pellet due to the power cycling. The last ramp is let run until stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is induced. The experience named BU15 was done with the last two rods. The final burnup was 15 MWd/ton(M), and a final ramp test was arranged for one of them. This burnup is the same as the previous two rods. The power level during irradiation was low and without major solicitations, only the normal shutdowns of the HFR. The ramp was similar to that used for the iodine test. We attempt to see the correct correspondence between the BU15 and the doping test. The pathfinder had an excellent behavior in the HFR reactor. The presence of microcracks inside the cladding was observed in the iodine test as we predicted with the BACO code. The post-irradiation tests of the BU15 experience has just ended. The development of the ramp was interrupted due to an increase of activity in the system. We presumed the presence of a failure in the rod. The visual inspection of the rod shows an atypical failure for this kind of fuel, i.e. they found a small circular hole. We use the BACO code for the behavior analysis of the fuel rods. 23 refs, 29 figs, 5 tabs.

  9. Argentine nuclear fuels MOX irradiated in the Petten reactor: Analysis of experience with the BACO code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marino, A.C.; Perez, E.; Adelfang, P.

    1997-01-01

    The irradiation of our first prototypes of MOX nuclear fuels fabricated in Argentina began in 1986. These experiences had been made in the HFR-Petten reactor, Holland. The six rods were fabricated in the α Facility (GAID-CNEA-Argentina). The first rod has been used for destructive pre-irradiation analysis in the KFK (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe), Germany. The second one was a pathfinder for calibrating systems in the HFR. Another two rods included doped pellets based on iodine. One of them included CsI and auxiliary components. The second one included elemental iodine. The concentration of iodine was intended to simulate 15 MWd/ton(M) of burnup. We defined the power histories with the BACO code. We assumed a cycle of 15 days that included interaction treatments of cladding and pellet due to the power cycling. The last ramp is let run until stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is induced. The experience named BU15 was done with the last two rods. The final burnup was 15 MWd/ton(M), and a final ramp test was arranged for one of them. This burnup is the same as the previous two rods. The power level during irradiation was low and without major solicitations, only the normal shutdowns of the HFR. The ramp was similar to that used for the iodine test. We attempt to see the correct correspondence between the BU15 and the doping test. The pathfinder had an excellent behavior in the HFR reactor. The presence of microcracks inside the cladding was observed in the iodine test as we predicted with the BACO code. The post-irradiation tests of the BU15 experience has just ended. The development of the ramp was interrupted due to an increase of activity in the system. We presumed the presence of a failure in the rod. The visual inspection of the rod shows an atypical failure for this kind of fuel, i.e. they found a small circular hole. We use the BACO code for the behavior analysis of the fuel rods. 23 refs, 29 figs, 5 tabs

  10. Testing of research reactor fuel in the high flux reactor (Petten)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidez, J.; Markgraf, J.W.; Sordon, G.; Wijtsma, F.J.; Thijssen, P.J.M.; Hendriks, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    The two types of fuel most frequently used by the main research reactors are metallic: highly enriched uranium (>90%) and silicide low enriched uranium ( 3 . However, a need exists for research on new reactor fuel. This would permit some plants to convert without losses in flux or in cycle length and would allow new reactor projects to achieve higher possibilities especially in fluxes. In these cases research is made either on silicide with higher density, or on other types of fuel (UMo, etc.). In all cases when new fuel is proposed, there is a need, for safety reasons, to test it, especially regarding the mechanical evolution due to burn-up (swelling, etc.). Initially, such tests are often made with separate plates, but lately, using entire elements. Destructive examinations are often necessary. For this type of test, the High Flux Reactor, located in Petten (The Netherlands) has many specific advantages: a large core, providing a variety of interesting positions with high fluence rate; a downward coolant flow simplifies the engineering of the device; there exists easy access with all handling possibilities to the hot-cells; the high number of operating days (>280 days/year), together with the high flux, gives a possibility to reach quickly the high burn-up needs; an experienced engineering department capable of translating specific requirements to tailor-made experimental devices; a well equipped hot-cell laboratory on site to perform all necessary measurements (swelling, γ-scanning, profilometry) and all destructive examinations. In conclusion, the HFR reactor readily permits experimental research on specific fuels used for research reactors with all the necessary facilities on the Petten site. (author)

  11. Tritium release from neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Werle, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reactortechnik

    1998-01-01

    One of the most important open issues related to beryllium for fusion applications refers to the kinetics of the tritium release as a function of neutron fluence and temperature. The EXOTIC-7 as well as the `Beryllium` experiments carried out in the HFR reactor in Petten are considered as the most detailed and significant tests for investigating the beryllium response under neutron irradiation. This paper reviews the present status of beryllium post-irradiation examinations performed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe with samples from the above mentioned irradiation experiments, trying to elucidate the tritium release controlling processes. In agreement with previous studies it has been found that release starts at about 500-550degC and achieves a maximum at about 700-750degC. The observed release at about 500-550degC is probably due to tritium escaping from chemical traps, while the maximum release at about 700-750degC is due to tritium escaping from physical traps. The consequences of a direct contact between beryllium and ceramics during irradiation, causing tritium implanting in a surface layer of beryllium up to a depth of about 40 mm and leading to an additional inventory which is usually several times larger than the neutron-produced one, are also presented and the effects on the tritium release are discussed. (author)

  12. Safety and quality management at the high flux reactor Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zurita, A.; Ahlf, J.

    1995-01-01

    The High Flux Reactor (HFR) is one high power multi-purpose materials testing research reactor of the tank-in-pool type, cooled and moderated by light-water. It is operated at 45 MW at a prescribed schedule of 11 cycles per year, each comprising 25 operation days and three shut-down days. Since the licence for the operation of HFR was granted in 1962, a total of 14 amendments to the original licence have been made following different modifications in the installations. In the meantime, international nuclear standards were developed, especially in the framework of the NUSS programme of the IAEA, which were adopted by the Dutch Licensing Authorities. In order to implement the new standards, the situation at the HFR was comprehensively reviewed in the course of an audit performed by the Dutch Licensing Authorities in 1988. This also resulted in formulating the task of setting-up an 'HFR - Integral Quality Assurance Handbook' (HFR-IQAD) involving both organizations JRCIAM and ECN, which had the unique framework and basic guideline to assure the safe and efficient operation and exploitation of the HFR and to promote safety and quality in all aspects of HFR related activities. The assurance of safe and efficient operation and exploitation of the HFR is condensed together under the concepts of safety and quality of services and is achieved through the safety and quality management. (orig.)

  13. Tritium release and retention properties of highly neutron-irradiated beryllium pebbles from HIDOBE-01 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakin, V., E-mail: vladimir.chakin@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Rolli, R.; Moeslang, A.; Klimenkov, M.; Kolb, M.; Vladimirov, P.; Kurinskiy, P.; Schneider, H.-C. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Til, S. van; Magielsen, A.J. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Westerduinweg 3, Postbus 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Zmitko, M. [The European Joint Undertaking for ITER and the Development of Fusion Energy, c/Josep Pla, no. 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-11-15

    The current helium cooled pebble bed (HCPB) tritium breeding blanket concept for fusion reactors includes a bed of 1 mm diameter beryllium pebbles to act as a neutron multiplier. Beryllium pebbles, fabricated by the rotating electrode method, were neutron irradiated in the HFR in Petten within the HIDOBE-01 experiment. This study presents tritium release and retention properties and data on microstructure evolution of beryllium pebbles irradiated at 630, 740, 873, 948 K up to a damage dose of 18 dpa, corresponding to a helium accumulation of about 3000 appm. The measured cumulative released activity from the beryllium pebbles irradiated at 948 K was found to be significantly lower than the calculated value. After irradiation at 873 and 948 K scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses revealed large pores or bubbles in the bulk and oxide films with a thickness of up to 8 μm at the surface of the beryllium pebbles. The radiation-enhanced diffusion of tritium and the formation of open porosity networks accelerate the tritium release from the beryllium pebbles during the high-flux neutron irradiation.

  14. Effect of neutron irradiation on the microstructure of tungsten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Klimenkov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Two grades of pure tungsten, single and polycrystalline, were irradiated for 282 days in the HFR reactor, Petten, at 900 °C to an average damage level of 1.6dpa. Each grade of tungsten was investigated using the transmission electron microscope (TEM to assess the effect of neutron irradiation on tungsten microstructure. Investigations revealed the formation of faceted cavities, whose diameter varies from 4 to 14nm in both materials. The cavities are homogeneously distributed only inside single crystalline tungsten. The local distribution of cavities in polycrystalline tungsten is strongly influenced by grain boundaries. The number densities of cavities were measured to be 4×1021 m−3 for polycrystalline and 2.5×1021 m−3 for single crystalline tungsten. This corresponds to volumetric densities of 0.45% and 0.33% respectively. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM revealed that faces of cavities are oriented in (110 plane. Analytical investigations showed precipitation of rhenium and osmium produced by a transmutation reaction around cavities and at grain boundaries.

  15. Reactor transients tests for SNR fuel elements in HFR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plitz, H.

    1989-01-01

    In HFR reactor, fuel pins of LMFBR reactors are putted in irradiation specimen capsules cooled with sodium for reactor transients tests. These irradiation capsules are instrumented and the experiences realized until this day give results on: - Fuel pins subjected at a continual variation of power - melting fuel - axial differential elongation of fuel pins

  16. HFR irradiation testing of light water reactor (LWR) fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markgraf, J.F.W.

    1985-01-01

    For the materials testing reactor HFR some characteristic information with emphasis on LWR fuel rod testing capabilities and hot cell investigation is presented. Additionally a summary of LWR fuel irradiation programmes performed and forthcoming programmes are described. Project management information and a list of publications pertaining to LWR fuel rod test programmes is given

  17. High heat flux components with Be armour before and after neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lodato, A.; Derz, H.; Duwe, R.; Linke, J.; Roedig, M.

    2000-01-01

    Beryllium/copper mock-ups produced by different joining techniques have been tested in the electron beam facility JUDITH (Juelich Divertor Test Facility in Hot Cells) at Forschungszentrum Juelich. The experiments described in this paper represent the conclusive part of a test program started in 1994. The properties of non-irradiated Be/Cu joints have been characterised in a previous test campaign. Post-irradiation tests are now being carried out to investigate the neutron damage on the joints. The neutron irradiation on selected mock-ups has been carried out in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) at Petten (The Netherlands). Parametric finite element thermal analyses have been carried out to establish the allowable heat flux value to be applied during the tests. Screening tests up to power densities of ∼7 MW/m 2 and thermal fatigue tests up to 1000 cycles have been performed. None of these mock-ups showed any indication of failure. Post-mortem analyses (metallography, SEM) have also been conducted

  18. Mechanical compression tests of beryllium pebbles after neutron irradiation up to 3000 appm helium production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakin, V., E-mail: vladimir.chakin@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institite for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Rolli, R.; Moeslang, A. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institite for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Zmitko, M. [The European Joint Undertaking for ITER and the Development of Fusion Energy, c/Josep Pla, no. 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Compression tests of highly neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles have been performed. • Irradiation hardening of beryllium pebbles decreases the steady-state strain-rates. • The steady-state strain-rates of irradiated beryllium pebbles exceed their swelling rates. - Abstract: Results: of mechanical compression tests of irradiated and non-irradiated beryllium pebbles with diameters of 1 and 2 mm are presented. The neutron irradiation was performed in the HFR in Petten, The Netherlands at 686–968 K up to 1890–2950 appm helium production. The irradiation at 686 and 753 K cause irradiation hardening due to the gas bubble formation in beryllium. The irradiation-induced hardening leads to decrease of steady-state strain-rates of irradiated beryllium pebbles compared to non-irradiated ones. In contrary, after irradiation at higher temperatures of 861 and 968 K, the steady-state strain-rates of the pebbles increase because annealing of irradiation defects and softening of the material take place. It was shown that the steady-state strain-rates of irradiated beryllium pebbles always exceed their swelling rates.

  19. Annual report 1981. Joint Research Centre Petten Establishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    In this 1981 report, the first chapter introduces the Establishment's activities during the year, followed by brief accounts of the three major programmes assigned to Petten. The scientific work is then described in Chapters II and IV with selected topics being presented in Chapters III and V. The remainder of the report contains charts and tables concerned with staff and budgetary matters and finally a list of technical publications and contributions to conferences made during the year. The year has seen heavy demands being made on the facilities, both the High Flux Reactor and Materials Research installations being fully occupied for most of the time, important results being obtained in both these fields

  20. Reactor vessel dismantling at the high flux materials testing reactor Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tas, A.; Teunissen, G.

    1986-01-01

    The project of replacing the reactor vessel of the high flux materials testing reactor (HFR) originated in 1974 when results of several research programs confirmed severe neutron embrittlement of aluminium alloys suggesting a limited life of the existing facility. This report describes the dismantling philosophy and organisation, the design of special underwater equipment, the dismantling of the reactor vessel and thermal column, and the conditioning and shielding activities resulting in a working area for the installation of the new vessel with no access limitations due to radiation. Finally an overview of the segmentation, waste disposal and radiation exposure is given. The total dismantling, segmentation and conditioning activities resulted in a total collective radiation dose of 300 mSv. (orig.) [de

  1. Residual stress measurements in thick structural weldments by means of neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohms, C.; Youtsos, A.G.; Idsert, P. v.d.; Timke, T.

    2000-01-01

    Welding residual stresses in large structural components are a major concern with respect to their performance and lifetime. In large structures reasonable thermal stress relief treatment is usually impossible due to the component size. On the other hand, prediction of welding stresses by numerical modelling has not yet proven to be generally reliable, while the experimental determination of such stresses remains a demanding task. At the high flux reactor (HFR), Petten, a new residual stress diffractometer has been installed recently capable of handling of components up to 1000 kg - the large component neutron diffraction facility (LCNDF). It has facilitated residual stress measurements in two large welded components, of which results are presented here. The first component represents a bi-metallic weld in form of a pipe of 25 mm wall thickness. Three dimensional measurements of residual stress are discussed in detail. The second specimen is a 66 mm wall thickness austenitic steel nuclear piping weld. Results on relief of strain within the weld through post weld heat treatment (PWHT) are presented. Additionally results obtained earlier at former CRNL (CAN) on a section of a thick nuclear piping weld are presented in order to illustrate the variation in the reference lattice parameter trough the weld and the heat affected zone (HAZ). These results clearly show the necessity to determine the reference parameters for each location in all measurement directions by means of measurements in small coupons free of macro-stresses. (orig.)

  2. Tensile properties of neutron irradiated solid HIP 316L(N). ITER Task T214, NET deliverable GB6 ECN-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Osch, E.V.; Tjoa, G.L.; Boskeljon, J.; Van Hoepen, J.

    1998-05-01

    The tensile properties of neutron irradiated Hot Isostatically Pressed (HIP) joints of type 316L(N) stainless steel (heat PM-130) have been measured. Cylindrical tensile test specimens of 4 mm diameter were irradiated in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, The Netherlands, simulating the first wall conditions by a combination of high displacement damage with proportional amounts of helium. The solid HIP specimens were irradiated up to a target dose level of 5 dpa at a temperature of 550K. The damage levels realized range from 3.0 to 4.1 dpa, with helium contents up to 38 appm. Post irradiation testing temperatures ranged from 300 to 700K. The report contains the experimental conditions and summarises the results, which are given in terms of engineering stresses and strains and reduction of area. The main conclusions are that the unirradiated solid-HIP material is very soft, assumingly due to the relatively large grain size. Neutron irradiation induces both hardening and reduction of ductility, similar to the behaviour of 316L(N) plate. No failures related to debonding were observed for the tests of the unirradiated samples, however one of eight tested irradiated specimens fractured in the HIP joint, showing a flat fracture surface and a low reduction of area. 6 refs

  3. Experiment HFR-B1: A preliminary analysis of the water-vapor injection experiments in capsule 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, B.F.

    1993-01-01

    A preliminary analysis of the response of uranium oxycarbide (UCO) fuel to water vapor addition in capsule 3 of experiment HFR-B1 (HFR-B1/3) has been conducted. The analysis provides an early indication of the behavior of fission gas release under a wider range of water-vapor pressures and of temperatures than heretofore studied. A preliminary analysis of selected aspects of the water-vapor injection tests in capsule 3 of experiment HFR-B1 is presented. The release of fission gas stored in bubbles and the diffusive release of fission-gas atoms are distinguished. The dependence of the release of stored fission gas ( 85m Kr) on water-vapor pressure, P(H 2 O), and temperature were established taking into account the contributing mechanisms of gaseous release, the effect of graphite hydrolysis, and the requirement of consistency with experiment HRB-17 in which similar water-vapor injection tests were conducted. The dependence on P(H 2 O) becomes weaker as temperatures increase above 770 degree C; the activation energy for release of stored-fission gas is 393 kJ/mol. Isorelease curves for the pressure-temperature plane were deduced from a derived functional relation. The stored-fission gas releases as a function of P(H 2 O) at a common temperature for experiments HFR-B1 and HRB-17 differ by a factor of 4; this discrepancy could be attributed to the differences in fission-rate density and neutron flux between the two experiments. Diffusive release of fission gas occurred during and after the release of stored gas. The ratio of diffusive release during water-vapor injection to that prior to injection varied in contrast to the results from HRB-17. The variation was attributed to the practice of injecting water vapor into HFR-B1 before sintering of the fuel, hydrolyzed in the previous test, was completed. The derived activation energy for diffusive release is 23.6 kJ/mol

  4. Experiment HFR-B1: A preliminary analysis of the water-vapor injection experiments in capsule 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, B.F.

    1993-08-01

    A preliminary analysis of the response of uranium oxycarbide (UCO) fuel to water vapor addition in capsule 3 of experiment HFR-B1 (HFR-B1/3) has been conducted. The analysis provides an early indication of the behavior of fission gas release under a wider range of water-vapor pressures and of temperatures than heretofore studied. A preliminary analysis of selected aspects of the water-vapor injection tests in capsule 3 of experiment HFR-B1 is presented. The release of fission gas stored in bubbles and the diffusive release of fission-gas atoms are distinguished. The dependence of the release of stored fission gas ({sup 85m}Kr) on water-vapor pressure, P(H{sub 2}O), and temperature were established taking into account the contributing mechanisms of gaseous release, the effect of graphite hydrolysis, and the requirement of consistency with experiment HRB-17 in which similar water-vapor injection tests were conducted. The dependence on P(H{sub 2}O) becomes weaker as temperatures increase above 770{degree}C; the activation energy for release of stored-fission gas is 393 kJ/mol. Isorelease curves for the pressure-temperature plane were deduced from a derived functional relation. The stored-fission gas releases as a function of P(H{sub 2}O) at a common temperature for experiments HFR-B1 and HRB-17 differ by a factor of 4; this discrepancy could be attributed to the differences in fission-rate density and neutron flux between the two experiments. Diffusive release of fission gas occurred during and after the release of stored gas. The ratio of diffusive release during water-vapor injection to that prior to injection varied in contrast to the results from HRB-17. The variation was attributed to the practice of injecting water vapor into HFR-B1 before sintering of the fuel, hydrolyzed in the previous test, was completed. The derived activation energy for diffusive release is 23.6 kJ/mol.

  5. Nuclear fusion and neutron processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlov, V.V.; Shatalov, G.E.; Sherstnev, K.E.

    1984-01-01

    Problems of providing development of the design of an experimental fusion reactor with necessary neutron-physical data are discussed. Isotope composition of spent fuel in the blanket of a hybride fusion reactor (HFR) is given. Neutron balance of the reactor with Li-blanket and neutron balance of the reactor with Pb-multiplier are disclosed. A simplified scheme of neutron and energy balance in the HFR blanket is given. Development and construction of the experimental power reactor is shown to become the nearest problem of the UTS program. Alongside with other complex physical and technical problems solution of this problem requires realization of a wide program of neutron-physical investigations including measurements with required accuracy of neutron cross sections, development of methodical, program and constant basis of neutron calculations and macroscopic experiments on neutron sources

  6. Effects of neutron radiation and residual stresses on the corrosion of welds in light water reactor internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaaf, Bob van der; Gavillet, Didier; Lapena, Jesus; Ohms, Carsten; Roth, Armin; Dyck, Steven van

    2006-01-01

    After many years of operation in Light Water Reactors (LWR) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) of internals has been observed. In particular the heat-affected zone (HAZ) has been associated with IASCC attack. The welding process induces residual stresses and micro-structural modifications. Neutron irradiation affects the materials response to mechanical loading. IASCC susceptibility of base materials is widely studied, but the specific conditions of irradiated welds are rarely assessed. Core component relevant welds of Type 304 and 347 steels have been fabricated and were irradiated in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten to 0.3 and 1 dpa (displacement per atom). In-service welds were cut from the thermal shield of the decommissioned BR-3 reactor. Residual stresses, measured using neutron diffraction, ring core tests and X-ray showed residual stress levels up to 400 MPa. Micro-structural characterization showed higher dislocation densities in the weld and HAZ. Neutron radiation increased the dislocation density, resulting in hardening and reduced fracture toughness. The sensitization degree of the welds, measured with the electrochemical potentio-dynamic reactivation method, was negligible. The Slow Strain Rate Tensile (SSRT) tests, performed at 290 deg. C in water with 200 ppb dissolved oxygen, (DO), did not reveal inter-granular cracking. Inter-granular attack of in-service steel is observed in water with 8 ppm (DO), attributed not only to IASCC, but also to IGSCC from thermal sensitization during fabrication. Stress-relieve annealing has caused Cr-grain boundary precipitation, indicating the sensitization. The simulated internal welds, irradiated up to 1.0 dpa, did not show inter-granular cracking with 8 ppm DO. (authors)

  7. Burnup calculations for cadmium. A case study for HFR experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pijlgroms, B.J.; Sciolla, C.M

    2000-09-11

    This report describes the pre-design burnup calculations performed for a cadmium shielded high fluence irradiation experiment in the HFR. The very high absorption cross section in cadmium causes problems in the calculations for two different reasons. Firstly, because of the large reaction rates the assumption that the flux and the cross sections remain piecewise constant is no longer true. Therefore the correct solution can only be obtained when using extremely small time steps which leads to excessive computing times. Secondly, the self-shielding in the cadmium becomes complete (black absorber) causing the depletion to progress in a shell-wise manner. As a consequence the depletion evolves nearly linear instead of exponential with time. Because of this the depletion codes are used in a regime for which these have not been designed leading to a systematic error. The analysis shows however that a good estimate for the burnup time can be obtained by extrapolation from calculations with practically sized time steps and a correction is derived to compensate the systematic error. The calculations were done using the OCTOPUS burnup code system, including the 3-D Monte-Carlo spectrum code MCNP-4B and the depletion code FISPACT-4.2. Verifications were performed with the WIMS code system. The first part of the report describes the study of the cadmium burnup calculations for a shielded steel sample with the emphasis on analyzing the requirements for obtaining the correct solution. The second part describes the time-dependent power production calculations with the steel replaced by lithium containing ceramic material such as to be used in the 'High Fluence Irradiation of Ceramics for Fusion' (HICU) experiment. 12 refs.

  8. Development and modelling of fission chambers designed for high neutron fluxes: applications at the HFR reactor (ILL) and the MEGAPIE target (PSI); Developpement et modelisation de chambres a fission pour les hauts flux, mise en application au RHF (ILL) et a MEGAPIE (PSI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabod, S

    2006-11-15

    The international project MEGAPIE (MEGAwatt PIlot Experiment) at the Paul Scherrer Institute aims to build and operate the first 1 MW liquid lead-bismuth spallation target. This work is dedicated to the characterization of the neutron flux and the actinide incineration potential of the target. This mission has required the development of an innovating neutron detector (DNM) made of 8 micro fission chambers, installed inside the central rod of the MEGAPIE target. The combination of uranium chambers with chambers without deposit allows an efficient compensation of the gamma radiation background. The optimisation and development work on the MEGAPIE chambers have enabled us to measure the {sigma}{sub f} * {phi} product at each level of the DNM with an uncertainty of less than 3 per cent. We have inferred from these data the value of the epithermal neutron flux (E > 1 eV) at 37 cm away from the window: 3.4*10{sup 13} n.cm{sup -2}.s{sup -1}, and the values of the neutron flux at 50, 60 and 74 cm: 1.2*10{sup 13}, 7.9*10{sup 12} and 3.9*10{sup 12} n.cm{sup -2}.s{sup -1} respectively. All these values are notably less important than those obtained from MCNPX simulations. Thermocouples installed in DMN have enabled us to know the temperature distribution inside the target. For a beam intensity of 1.2 mA, the temperature ranges from 360 to 420 Celsius degrees in the low part of the central rod. The thermal inertia of the system composed of the central rod and DNM has been assessed for brutal changes of the beam intensity and is worth about 60 s. (A.C.)

  9. Design of a {gamma}-ray analysis system for determination of boron in a patient`s head, during neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verbakel, W.F.A.R.

    1997-12-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a new radiation therapy in which thermal neutron capture by {sup 10}B is used for the selective destruction of a cancer tumour. At the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, Netherlands, a therapy facility is built for the neutron irradiations. In first instance, patients with a brain tumour will be treated. The doses delivered to the tumour and to the healthy tissue depend on the thermal neutron fluence and on the boron concentrations in these regions. Yet, both concentrations change in time after the administration of the tumour-seeking boron compound. An accurate determination of the patient`s dose requires the knowledge of these time dependent concentrations during the therapy. For this reason, a {gamma}-ray telescope system, together with a reconstruction tool, are developed. Two HPGe-detectors measure the 478 keV prompt {gamma}-rays which are emitted at the boron neutron capture reaction, in a large background of {gamma}-rays and neutrons. By using the detectors in a telescope configuration, only {gamma}-rays emitted by a small specific region are detected. The best shielding of the detectors is obtained by performing the measurements through a small hole in the iron roof. A reconstruction tool is developed to calculate absolute boron concentrations using the measured boron {gamma}-ray detection rates. Besides the boron {gamma}-rays, a large component of 2.2 MeV {gamma}-rays emitted at thermal neutron capture in hydrogen is measured. Since the hydrogen distribution is almost homogeneous over the head, this component can serve as a measure of the total number of thermal neutrons in the observed volume. By using the hydrogen {gamma}-line for normalisation of the boron concentration, the reconstruction tool eliminates the greater part of the influence of the inhomogeneity of the thermal neutron distribution. MCNP calculations are used as a tool for the optimisation of the detector configuration. Experiments on a head phantom

  10. Site investigation SFR. Boremap mapping of percussion drilled borehole HFR106

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winell, Sofia (Geosigma AB (Sweden))

    2010-06-15

    This report presents the result from the Boremap mapping of the percussion drilled borehole HFR106, which is drilled from an islet located ca 220 m southeast of the pier above SFR. The purpose of the location and orientation of the borehole is to investigate the possible occurrence of gently dipping, water-bearing structures in the area. HFR106 has a length of 190.4 m and oriented 269.4 deg/-60.9 deg. The mapping is based on the borehole image (BIPS), investigation of drill cuttings and generalized, as well as more detailed geophysical logs. The dominating rock type, which occupies 68% of HFR106, is fine- to medium-grained, pinkish grey metagranite-granodiorite (rock code 101057) mapped as foliated with a medium to strong intensity. Pegmatite to pegmatitic granite (rock code 101061) occupies 29% of the borehole. Subordinate rock types are felsic to intermediate meta volcanic rock (rock code 103076) and fine- to medium-grained granite (rock code 111058). Rock occurrences (rock types < 1 m in length) occupy about 16% of the mapped interval, of which half is veins, dykes and unspecified occurrences of pegmatite and pegmatitic granite. Only 5.5% of HFR106 is inferred to be altered, mainly oxidation in two intervals with an increased fracture frequency. A total number of 845 fractures are registered in HFR106. Of these are 64 interpreted as open with a certain aperture, 230 open with a possible aperture, and 551 sealed. This result in the following fracture frequencies: 1.6 open fractures/m and 3.0 sealed fractures/m. Three fracture sets of open and sealed fractures with the orientations 290 deg/70 deg, 150 deg/85 deg and 200 deg/85 deg can be distinguished in HFR106. The fracture frequency is generally higher in the second half of the borehole, and particularly in the interval 176-187.4 m.

  11. Site investigation SFR. Boremap mapping of percussion drilled borehole HFR106

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winell, Sofia

    2010-06-01

    This report presents the result from the Boremap mapping of the percussion drilled borehole HFR106, which is drilled from an islet located ca 220 m southeast of the pier above SFR. The purpose of the location and orientation of the borehole is to investigate the possible occurrence of gently dipping, water-bearing structures in the area. HFR106 has a length of 190.4 m and oriented 269.4 deg/-60.9 deg. The mapping is based on the borehole image (BIPS), investigation of drill cuttings and generalized, as well as more detailed geophysical logs. The dominating rock type, which occupies 68% of HFR106, is fine- to medium-grained, pinkish grey metagranite-granodiorite (rock code 101057) mapped as foliated with a medium to strong intensity. Pegmatite to pegmatitic granite (rock code 101061) occupies 29% of the borehole. Subordinate rock types are felsic to intermediate meta volcanic rock (rock code 103076) and fine- to medium-grained granite (rock code 111058). Rock occurrences (rock types < 1 m in length) occupy about 16% of the mapped interval, of which half is veins, dykes and unspecified occurrences of pegmatite and pegmatitic granite. Only 5.5% of HFR106 is inferred to be altered, mainly oxidation in two intervals with an increased fracture frequency. A total number of 845 fractures are registered in HFR106. Of these are 64 interpreted as open with a certain aperture, 230 open with a possible aperture, and 551 sealed. This result in the following fracture frequencies: 1.6 open fractures/m and 3.0 sealed fractures/m. Three fracture sets of open and sealed fractures with the orientations 290 deg/70 deg, 150 deg/85 deg and 200 deg/85 deg can be distinguished in HFR106. The fracture frequency is generally higher in the second half of the borehole, and particularly in the interval 176-187.4 m

  12. Formation of Escherichia coli Hfr strains by integrative suppression with the P group plasmid RP1.

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, R R; Thorlton, C L; Unger, L

    1981-01-01

    Hfr strains of Escherichia coli were obtained by integrative suppression of a dnaA(Ts) mutation by the Inc P-1 plasmid RP1 without prior creation of an unnatural homology between the plasmid and the E. coli chromosome. Unmodified RP1 mobilized the polarized transfer of the chromosome in a counterclock-wise direction from a distinct origin between 81 min (pyrE) and 82 min (dnaA) with pyrE as a leading marker. Inheritance of RP1-Hfr chromosomal and antibiotic resistance genes was due to recombi...

  13. Low cycle fatigue properties of neutron irradiated solid HIP 316L(N). ITER Task T214, NET deliverable GB6 ECN-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rensman, J.; Van Osch, E.V.; Tjoa, G.L.; Boskeljon, J.; Van Hoepen, J.

    1998-05-01

    The Low Cycle Fatigue (LCF) properties of neutron irradiated Hot Isostatically Pressed (HIP) joints of type 316L(N) stainless steel (heat PM-130) have been measured, as well as the LCF properties of reference 316L(N)-ERHII. Cylindrical LCF test specimens of 3 mm diameter were irradiated in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, The Netherlands, simulating the first wall conditions of future fusion reactors by a combination of high displacement damage with proportional amounts of helium. The solid HIP specimens were irradiated up to a target dose level of 5 dpa at a temperature of 550K. The damage levels realised range from 3.0 to 4.4 dpa, with helium contents up to 41 appm. Testing temperature was equal to the irradiation temperature: 550K. The report contains the experimental conditions and summarises the results, which are given in terms of first cycle stress, the peak stress, the number of cycles where the peak stress is reached, the stress at half life and the plastic strain at half life, and the total number of cycles to failure, N f . The main conclusions are that the unirradiated solid-HIP materials has the same LCF properties as unirradiated 316L(N)-ERHII plate material. The neutron irradiation induces both hardening and reduction of fatigue life. The bond does not seem to have any effect on the fatigue properties for the unirradiated solid HIP 316L(N), whereas a combined effect of irradiation and the bond cannot be established. No failures related to debonding of the joint were observed for the tests. 7 refs

  14. Neutron irradiation creep in stainless steel alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuele, Wolfgang (Commission of the European Union, Institute for Advanced Materials, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy)); Hausen, Hermann (Commission of the European Union, Institute for Advanced Materials, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy))

    1994-09-01

    Irradiation creep elongations were measured in the HFR at Petten on AMCR steels, on 316 CE-reference steels, and on US-316 and US-PCA steels varying the irradiation temperature between 300 C and 500 C and the stress between 25 and 300 MPa. At the beginning of an irradiation a type of primary'' creep stage is observed for doses up to 3-5 dpa after which dose the secondary'' creep stage begins. The primary'' creep strain decreases in cold-worked steel materials with decreasing stress and decreasing irradiation temperature achieving also negative creep strains depending also on the pre-treatment of the materials. These primary'' creep strains are mainly attributed to volume changes due to the formation of radiation-induced phases, e.g. to the formation of [alpha]-ferrite below about 400 C and of carbides below about 700 C, and not to irradiation creep. The secondary'' creep stage is found for doses larger than 3 to 5 dpa and is attributed mainly to irradiation creep. The irradiation creep rate is almost independent of the irradiation temperature (Q[sub irr]=0.132 eV) and linearly dependent on the stress. The total creep elongations normalized to about 8 dpa are equal for almost every type of steel irradiated in the HFR at Petten or in ORR or in EBR II. The negative creep elongations are more pronounced in PCA- and in AMCR-steels and for this reason the total creep elongation is slightly smaller at 8 dpa for these two steels than for the other steels. ((orig.))

  15. HFpEF and HFrEF Display Different Phenotypes as Assessed by IGF-1 and IGFBP-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faxén, Ulrika Ljung; Hage, Camilla; Benson, Lina; Zabarovskaja, Stanislava; Andreasson, Anna; Donal, Erwan; Daubert, Jean-Claude; Linde, Cecilia; Brismar, Kerstin; Lund, Lars H

    2017-04-01

    Anabolic drive is impaired in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) but insufficiently studied in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) mediates growth hormone effects and IGF binding protein 1 (IGFBP-1) regulates IGF-1 activity. We tested the hypothesis that HFpEF and HFrEF are similar with regard to IGF-1 and IGFBP-1. In patients with HFpEF (n = 79), HFrEF (n = 85), and controls (n = 136), we analyzed serum IGF-1 and IGFBP-1 concentrations, correlations, and associations with outcome. Age-standardized scores of IGF-1 were higher in HFpEF, median arbitrary units (interquartile range); 1.21 (0.57-1.96) vs HFrEF, 0.09 (-1.40-1.62), and controls, 0.22 (-0.47-0.96), P overall IGF-1 was associated with outcomes in HFrEF, hazard ratio per natural logarithmic increase in IGF-1 SD score 0.51 (95% confidence interval 0.32-0.82, P = .005), but not significantly in HFpEF. IGFBP-1 was not associated with outcomes in either HFpEF nor HFrEF. HFpEF and HFrEF phenotypes were similar with regard to increased IGFBP-1 concentrations but differed regarding IGF-1 levels and prognostic role. HFrEF and HFpEF may display different impairment in anabolic drive. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Sample preparation for the HAW project and experimental results from the HFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Celma, A.; Wees, H. van; Miralles, L.

    1990-09-01

    This report deals with the preparation and analysis of samples, during the period May 1989-November 1989, for the High-Active Waste (HAW) project, a large-scale in situ test being performed underground in the Asse salt mine, Remlingen FRG. The development of the technical procedures required, and the scientific results, which regard mostly characterization of Potasas del Llobregat sample, are reported. Prior to using the samples in both the H.A.W. and the H.F.R. experiments they have to be machined to fit their holders. Technical improvements for machining samples of salt are reported. (H.W.). 9 refs.; 68 figs.; 10 tabs

  17. Dispersion studies with continuous release near Petten, 3.5 km from the shore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westhoff, J.W.; Dam, G.C. van; Davids, J.A.G.

    1971-01-01

    An experiment is described in which the spread of a continuously injected tracer, rhodamine-B, was studied as a function of time and place. The tracer was released over a period of 12 days at a constant rate with the implementation of an existing pipeline which debouches into the sea at a distance of 3.5 km from the Netherlands' coast near Petten. The main experiment was performed in the fall of 1966; a preparative experiment on a smaller scale was made in 1965. The investigation as a whole has three purposes: a) acquisition of an immediate and direct insight into the pattern of spreading arising with continuous release of conservative, dissolvable materials at the Petten disposal site; b) the obtaining of parametric values to be used in mathematical models by which situations other than the one observed can be computed (e.g. release of non-conservative substances, longer release periods, periods with different net current values etc.); c) an increase in the understanding of diffusion and advection processes in the sea, as well as pertinent information concerning currents and turbulence patterns. In broadening this understanding, mathematical models play the part of an auxiliary tool. Comparison with results from other times and places is important. The knowledge gained may lead, among other things, to an extension of the set of models or to modifications within the existing models and in this way achieve a certain degree of feedback for various practical applications. For direct application the report at hand can only be used for purpose a). The remaining two purposes require a further examination of the material, for which the reader is referred to the proposed supplementary report (ref. 8). The principal expedients used for the observations in the present experiments have been fluorimetric determination of tracer concentration (by means of both surf zone samples and continuous sampling with direct detection and recording aboard cruising ships) and aerial

  18. Factual material data banks: CEC Workshop, JRC Petten, November 14-16, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroeckel, H; Reynard, K; Steven, G

    1985-01-01

    The CEC Workshop on Factual Materials Data Banks was held at JRC Petten, The Netherlands, on November 14-16, 1984. The workshop was limited to consideration of data bases of machine-readable, factual data on technically relevant properties of engineering materials. Its objectives were to: review with the aid of demonstrations, the present status and availability of materials data bases in Europe; compare these with the experience of those in other countries; define aims for a cooperative approach to integration in the CEC, taking advantage of the discussions which have taken place on a similar approach in other countries; and recommend and assign priorities as to how the CEC structures, means of action and funding should be used to produce timely, practical and effective results. The importance of materials data and information systems were reviewed and summary papers on the situation in the UK, France, Germany, Japan and the USA were given. Recommendations under the following eleven headings have been gathered from the findings of the group discussions and plenary sessions: Directory of Data Information Sources; Improving Awareness; Multilingual Dictionary of Technical Terms and Definitions; Defining a European System; Guidelines for the Functional Specification of Software and ''Standards'' for Uniformity and User Friendliness in Access; Demonstrator Program; Analysis of Economic and Cost-benefit Aspects; Strategy for Coping with a Variety of User Needs; Educational Aspects; Confidentiality and Restrictions on Data Access; and Standardization of Test Methods and Test Result Presentation.

  19. A novel option for reducing free light chains in myeloma kidney: supra-hemodiafiltration with endogenous reinfusion (HFR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquali, Sonia; Iannuzzella, Francesco; Corradini, Mattia; Mattei, Silvia; Bovino, Achiropita; Stefani, Alfredo; Palladino, Giuseppe; Caiazzo, Marialuisa

    2015-04-01

    In myeloma cast nephropathy, fast reduction of serum free light chain (FLC) levels correlates with renal recovery. Recently, extracorporeal treatments using filters with a high-molecular weight cut-off have been successfully used for FLC removal. However, using these new filters, high cost and elevated albumin leakage are common drawbacks. We studied a new and cheaper therapeutic approach with adsorbent resins to evaluate its efficacy. We treated four patients, affected by dialysis-dependent acute kidney injury (AKI) due to biopsy proven de novo FLC myeloma cast nephropathy. Each patient underwent bortezomib chemotherapy and extracorporeal treatment with the supra-hemodiafiltration with endogenous reinfusion (HFR) technique (Supra-HFR, Bellco Mirandola, Modena, Italy). Supra-HFR is a kind of hemodiafiltration that utilizes separated convection, diffusion and adsorption. The sorbent cartridge has a high affinity for FLC (both κ and λ) but is able to re-infuse albumin, avoiding the need for albumin perfusions. Supra HFR treatments (4 h each) were carried out for eight consecutive days and then every other day. All patients showed a significant reduction of serum FLC, whereas serum albumin concentration remained unchanged. Renal function recovered in three out of four patients. FLC removal with adsorbent resins represents an effective therapeutic strategy that does not require replacement with albumin .

  20. Status of the conversion working plan in the High Flux Reactor (Petten, The Netherlands)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendriks, J.A.; Thijssen, P.J.M.; Wijtsma, F.J.; Gevers, A.; Guidez, J.

    2000-01-01

    The conversion from HEU to LEU has often many disadvantages: flux penalties, increase of fuel consumption, cost and delay to obtain a new license etc. But to fulfill the non-proliferation programme, and to simplify the future fuel supply, the HFR renewed in 1998 studies on conversion possibilities. To minimize the conversion costs, these studies were made with a progressive conversion that avoids the need of one new core and permits to begin the conversion with a replacement of 5 elements at each cycle. Hence the conversion can be made in 7 cycles, without special elements and with a normal bum-up for each element. To avoid an increase of fuel consumption, an increase of the fuel cycle length from 24.7 to 28.3 days was also considered. This point allows reducing the number of annual cycles from 1 to 10 and enables in one cycle to have the possibility of four successive irradiations for Molybdenum production (7 days) in one irradiation position. A working plan for fuel licensing has been sent to the safety authorities and is presented in the paper. (author)

  1. Prevalence of Prediabetes and Undiagnosed Diabetes in Patients with HFpEF and HFrEF and Associated Clinical Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Søren L; Jhund, Pardeep S; Lee, Matthew M Y

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The prevalence and consequences of prediabetic dysglycemia and undiagnosed diabetes is unknown in patients with heart failure (HF) and preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) and has not been compared to heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). METHODS: We examined the prevalence...... and outcomes associated with normoglycemia, prediabetic dysglycemia and diabetes (diagnosed and undiagnosed) among individuals with a baseline glycated hemoglobin (hemoglobin A1c, HbA1c) measurement stratified by HFrEF or HFpEF in the Candesartan in Heart failure Assessment of Reduction in Mortality...... and was available in 1072/3023 (35%) of patients with HFpEF and 1578/4576 (34%) patients with HFrEF. 18 and 16% had normoglycemia (HbA1c prediabetes (HbA1c 6.0-6.4), respectively. Finally among patients with HFpEF 22% had undiagnosed diabetes (HbA1c > 6.4), and 40% had known diabetes (any Hb...

  2. HFR1 Sequesters PIF1 to Govern the Transcriptional Network Underlying Light-Initiated Seed Germination in Arabidopsis[C][W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hui; Zhong, Shangwei; Mo, Xiaorong; Liu, Na; Nezames, Cynthia D.; Deng, Xing Wang

    2013-01-01

    Seed germination is the first step for seed plants to initiate a new life cycle. Light plays a predominant role in promoting seed germination, where the initial phase is mediated by photoreceptor phytochrome B (phyB). Previous studies showed that PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR1 (PIF1) represses seed germination downstream of phyB. Here, we identify a positive regulator of phyB-dependent seed germination, LONG HYPOCOTYL IN FAR-RED1 (HFR1). HFR1 blocks PIF1 transcriptional activity by forming a heterodimer with PIF1 that prevents PIF1 from binding to DNA. Our whole-genomic analysis shows that HFR1 and PIF1 oppositely mediate the light-regulated transcriptome in imbibed seeds. Through the HFR1–PIF1 module, light regulates expression of numerous genes involved in cell wall loosening, cell division, and hormone pathways to initiate seed germination. The functionally antagonistic HFR1–PIF1 pair constructs a fail-safe mechanism for fine-tuning seed germination during low-level illumination, ensuring a rapid response to favorable environmental changes. This study identifies the HFR1–PIF1 pair as a central module directing the whole genomic transcriptional network to rapidly initiate light-induced seed germination. PMID:24179122

  3. Fracture toughness of neutron irradiated solid and powder HIP 316L(N). ITER Task 214, NET deliverable GB6 ECN-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rensman, J.; Van den Broek, F.P.; Jong, M.; Van Osch, E.V.

    1998-04-01

    The fracture toughness properties of unirradiated and neutron irradiated type 316L(N) stainless steel plate (European Reference Heat ERHII), conventional 316L(N) solid HIP joints (heat PM-130), and 316L(N)-1G powder HIP material have been measured. Compact tension specimens with a thickness of 12 and 5 mm were irradiated in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, The Netherlands, simulating the fusion reactor's first wall conditions by a combination of high displacement damage with proportional amounts of helium. The solid HIP (or HIP-bonded) CT-specimens were irradiated in two separate experiments: SIWAS-6 with 1.3 to 2.3 dpa (1.7 dpa av.) at 353 K, and CHARIOT-3 with 2.7 to 3.1 dpa (2.9 dpa av.) at 600 K. The plate material and powder HIP CT-specimens were irradiated in one experiment only, SIWAS-6. The helium content is up to 20 appm for the 2.9 dpa (av.) dose level. Testing temperatures of 353K and 573K have been used for the fracture toughness experiments. The report contains the experimental conditions and summarises the results, which are given in terms of J-resistance curve fits. The main conclusions are that all three materials have very high toughness in the unirradiated state with little difference between them; the solid HIP has the highest toughness, the powder HIP lowest. The toughness of all three materials is reduced significantly by irradiation, the reduction is the least for the plate material and the highest for the powder HIP material. However, many, but not all, of the solid HIP CT specimens showed debonding of the joint during testing. The machined notch of the CT specimens was not exactly on the joint interface, which could lead to unjustified interpretation of the measured values as being the toughness of the joint, the toughness of the joint being probably much lower. The reduction by irradiation of the fracture toughness of the powder HIP material is clearly larger than for plate material, which is confirmed by the observed early initiation

  4. Recent developments on micrometric fission chambers for high neutron fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letourneau, A.; Bringer, O.; Dupont, E.; Marie, F.; Panebianco, S.; Toussaint, J. C.; Veyssiere, C.; Chabod, S.; Breaud, S.; Oriol, L.

    2009-01-01

    With the development of innovative nuclear systems and new generation neutron sources, the nuclear instrumentation should be adapted. Since several years, we developed microscopic fission chambers to study the transmutation of minor actinides in high thermal-neutron fluxes. The recent developments done to fulfill the drastic conditions of irradiations are described in this paper together with the feedback from the measurements. Two installations were used: the HFR of the ILL for its highest thermal neutron flux of the world and the MEGAPIE target which was the first 1 MW liquid Pb-Bi spallation target in the world. (authors)

  5. Recent developments on micrometric fission chambers for high neutron fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Letourneau, A. [Irfu, Service de Physique Nucleaire, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bringer, O.; Dupont, E.; Marie, F.; Panebianco, S.; Toussaint, J. C.; Veyssiere, C. [Irfu, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Chabod, S. [LPSC, Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3 (France); Breaud, S.; Oriol, L. [DEN/DER/SPEX, CEA-Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durances (France)

    2009-07-01

    With the development of innovative nuclear systems and new generation neutron sources, the nuclear instrumentation should be adapted. Since several years, we developed microscopic fission chambers to study the transmutation of minor actinides in high thermal-neutron fluxes. The recent developments done to fulfill the drastic conditions of irradiations are described in this paper together with the feedback from the measurements. Two installations were used: the HFR of the ILL for its highest thermal neutron flux of the world and the MEGAPIE target which was the first 1 MW liquid Pb-Bi spallation target in the world. (authors)

  6. Computational analysis of modern HTGR fuel performance and fission product release during the HFR-EU1 irradiation experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verfondern, Karl, E-mail: k.verfondern@fz-juelich.de [Research Center Jülich, Institute of Energy and Climate Research, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Xhonneux, André, E-mail: xhonneux@lrst.rwth-aachen.de [Research Center Jülich, Institute of Energy and Climate Research, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Nabielek, Heinz, E-mail: heinznabielek@me.com [Research Center Jülich, Monschauerstrasse 61, 52355 Düren (Germany); Allelein, Hans-Josef, E-mail: h.j.allelein@fz-juelich.de [Research Center Jülich, Institute of Energy and Climate Research, 52425 Jülich (Germany); RWTH Aachen, Chair for Reactor Safety and Reactor Technology, 52072 Aachen (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • HFR-EU1 irradiation test demonstrates high quality of HTGR spherical fuel elements. • Irradiation performance is in good agreement with German fuel performance modeling. • International benchmark exercise expected first particle to fail at ∼13–17% FIMA. • EOL silver release is predicted to be in the percentage range. • EOL cesium and strontium are expected to remain at a low level. - Abstract: Various countries engaged in the development and fabrication of modern HTGR fuel have initiated activities of modeling the fuel and fission product release behavior with the aim of predicting the fuel performance under HTGR operating and accident conditions. Verification and validation studies are conducted by code-to-code benchmarking and code-to-experiment comparisons as part of international exercises. The methodology developed in Germany since the 1980s represents valuable and efficient tools to describe fission product release from spherical fuel elements and TRISO fuel performance, respectively, under given conditions. Continued application to new results of irradiation and accident simulation testing demonstrates the appropriateness of the models in terms of a conservative estimation of the source term as part of interactions with HTGR licensing authorities. Within the European irradiation testing program for HTGR fuel and as part of the former EU RAPHAEL project, the HFR-EU1 irradiation experiment explores the potential for high performance of the presently existing German and newly produced Chinese fuel spheres under defined conditions up to high burnups. The fuel irradiation was completed in 2010. Test samples are prepared for further postirradiation examinations (PIE) including heatup simulation testing in the KÜFA-II furnace at the JRC-ITU, Karlsruhe, to be conducted within the on-going ARCHER Project of the European Commission. The paper will describe the application of the German computer models to the HFR-EU1 irradiation test and

  7. Post-irradiation mechanical tests on F82H EB and TIG welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rensman, J.; Osch, E.V. van; Horsten, M.G.; D'Hulst, D.S.

    2000-01-01

    The irradiation behaviour of electron beam (EB) and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welded joints of the reduced-activation martensitic steel IEA heat F82H-mod. was investigated by neutron irradiation experiments in the high flux reactor (HFR) in Petten. Mechanical test specimens, such as tensile specimens and KLST-type Charpy impact specimens, were neutron irradiated up to a dose level of 2-3 dpa at a temperature of 300 deg. C in the HFR reactor in Petten. The tensile results for TIG and EB welds are as expected with practically no strain hardening capacity left. Considering impact properties, there is a large variation in impact properties for the TIG weld. The irradiation tends to shift the DBTT of particularly the EB welds to very high values, some cases even above +250 deg. C. PWHT of EB-welded material gives a significant improvement of the DBTT and USE compared to the as-welded condition

  8. TR-LIF LIFETIME MEASUREMENTS AND HFR+CPOL CALCULATIONS OF RADIATIVE PARAMETERS IN VANADIUM ATOM (V I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Q.; Jiang, L. Y.; Shang, X.; Tian, Y. S.; Dai, Z. W.; Quinet, P.; Palmeri, P.; Zhang, W.

    2014-01-01

    Radiative lifetimes of 79 levels belonging to the 3d 3 4s4p, 3d 4 4p, 3d 3 4s5p, 3d 4 5p, and 3d 3 4s4d configurations of V I with energy from 26,604.807 to 46,862.786 cm –1 have been measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TR-LIF) spectroscopy in laser-produced plasma. The lifetime values reported in this paper are in the range of 3.3-494 ns, and the uncertainties of these measurements are within ±10%. A good agreement was obtained with previous data. HFR+CPOL calculations have been performed and used to combine the calculated branching fractions with the available experimental lifetimes to determine semi-empirical transition probabilities for 784 V I transitions

  9. Evaluating the Safety and Tolerability of Sacubitril/Valsartan for HFrEF Managed Within a Pharmacist Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogge, Elizabeth K; Davis, Lindsay E

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this research was to describe the use of pharmacist-managed sacubitril/valsartan therapy in a multi-center, outpatient cardiac group. Sacubitril/valsartan, an angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitor (ARNi), is a novel agent for the treatment of heart failure. An ARNi is recommended by national guidelines to be used in place of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) therapy for patients who remain symptomatic. A retrospective chart review was performed to identify patients initiated and fully titrated on sacubitril/valsartan therapy from July 7, 2015 to March 7, 2017. Fifty-two of the 72 symptomatic heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) patients prescribed sacubitril/valsartan during the 21-month period were included in this analysis. The average ejection fraction was 26%. The average age was 69 years. At baseline, 26.9% of patients were not on ACEi/ARB therapy and 13.5% were on target-dose therapy. After completing the uptitration process, the maximally tolerated dose of sacubitril/valsartan was 5.8% low-dose, 7.7% mid-dose, and 86.5% target-dose. Loop and thiazide diuretic use decreased significantly. There was a significant mean reduction in systolic blood pressure of 6 mmHg with no significant changes in serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, or potassium levels. With close monitoring and follow-up, ARNi therapy was a safe alternative to ACEi/ARB therapy for chronic symptomatic HFrEF when initiated within a pharmacist clinic.

  10. Radiative neutron capture: Hauser Feshbach vs. statistical resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochman, D., E-mail: dimitri-alexandre.rochman@psi.ch [Reactor Physics and Systems Behavior Laboratory, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Goriely, S. [Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, CP-226, Université Libre de Bruxelles, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Koning, A.J. [Nuclear Data Section, IAEA, Vienna (Austria); Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Ferroukhi, H. [Reactor Physics and Systems Behavior Laboratory, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)

    2017-01-10

    The radiative neutron capture rates for isotopes of astrophysical interest are commonly calculated on the basis of the statistical Hauser Feshbach (HF) reaction model, leading to smooth and monotonically varying temperature-dependent Maxwellian-averaged cross sections (MACS). The HF approximation is known to be valid if the number of resonances in the compound system is relatively high. However, such a condition is hardly fulfilled for keV neutrons captured on light or exotic neutron-rich nuclei. For this reason, a different procedure is proposed here, based on the generation of statistical resonances. This novel technique, called the “High Fidelity Resonance” (HFR) method is shown to provide similar results as the HF approach for nuclei with a high level density but to deviate and be more realistic than HF predictions for light and neutron-rich nuclei or at relatively low sub-keV energies. The MACS derived with the HFR method are systematically compared with the traditional HF calculations for some 3300 neutron-rich nuclei and shown to give rise to significantly larger predictions with respect to the HF approach at energies of astrophysical relevance. For this reason, the HF approach should not be applied to light or neutron-rich nuclei. The Doppler broadening of the generated resonances is also studied and found to have a negligible impact on the calculated MACS.

  11. A neutron irradiator applied to cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Tarcisio P.R.; Andrade, Ana P. de

    2000-01-01

    Cancer and the way of treating it with neutron capture therapy are addressed. This paper discusses also the type of neutron facilities used to treat cancer around the world, as follow: discrete neutron sources, accelerators, and nuclear reactors. The major features of an epithermal neutron irradiation facility applied to BNCT treatment are addressed. The main goal is to give another choice of neutron irradiators to be set in a hospital. The irradiation facility embeds a set of 252 Cf neutron source coupled with a homogeneous mixture of uranium-zirconium hydride alloy containing 8.4 wt % uranium enriched to 20% U 235 . The facility delivers an epithermal neutron beam with low background of fast neutron and gamma rays. The N particle transport code (MCNP-4A) has been used during the simulation in order to achieve the desired configurations and to estimate the multiplication factor, k eff . The present facility loaded with 30 mg of 252 Cf neutron source generates an external beam with an intensity of 10 7 n/cm 2 .s on the spectrum of 4 eV to 40 KeV. The 252 Cf - facility coupled with fissile material was able to amplify the epithermal flux to 10 8 n/cm 2 .s, maintaining the figure-of-merits represented by the ratios of the fast dose and gamma dose in air per epithermal neutron flux closed to those values presented by BMRR, MITR-II and Petten Reactor. The medical irradiation facility loaded with 252 Cf- 235 U can be a choice for BNCT. (author)

  12. Remarks on the comparison of cross section libraries for neutron metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zijp, W.L.; Nolthenius, H.J.; Appelman, K.H.

    1977-01-01

    Cross section libraries in a 620 group structure were available from different origin: CCC-112B, DETAN-74 and ENDF/B-IV. For a few well known neutron spectra (CFRMF spectrum, ΣΣ spectrum, fission neutron spectrum, HFR neutron spectrum) a comparison was made of the available experimental reaction rates in foil detectors and the reaction rates as calculated with the different cross section libraries. This investigation is dealing with the consistency of cross section data within a library, and the consistency of activity data in actual reaction rate determinations. Some preliminary conclusions are given

  13. A comparison of HFrEF vs HFpEF's clinical workload and cost in the first year following hospitalization and enrollment in a disease management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, T M; Waterhouse, D F; James, S; Casey, C; Fitzgerald, E; O'Connell, E; Watson, C; Gallagher, J; Ledwidge, M; McDonald, K

    2017-04-01

    Admission with heart failure (HF) is a milestone in the progression of the disease, often resulting in higher intensity medical care and ensuing readmissions. Whilst there is evidence supporting enrolling patients in a heart failure disease management program (HF-DMP), not all reported HF-DMPs have systematically enrolled patients with HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) and there is a scarcity of literature differentiating costs based on HF-phenotype. 1292 consenting, consecutive patients admitted with a primary diagnosis of HF were enrolled in a hospital based HF-DMP and categorized as HFpEF (EF≥45%) or HFrEF (EFHospitalizations, primary care, medications, and DMP workload with associated costs were evaluated assessing DMP clinic-visits, telephonic contact, medication changes over 1year using a mixture of casemix and micro-costing techniques. The total average annual cost per patient was marginally higher in patients with HFrEF €13,011 (12,011, 14,078) than HFpEF, €12,206 (11,009, 13,518). However, emergency non-cardiovascular admission rates and average cost per patient were higher in the HFpEF vs HFrEF group (0.46 vs 0.31 per patient/12months) & €655 (318, 1073) vs €584 (396, 812). In the first 3months of the outpatient HF-DMP the HFrEF population cost more on average €791 (764, 819) vs €693 (660, 728). There are greater short-term (3-month) costs of HFrEF versus HFpEF as part of a HF-DMP following an admission. However, long-term (3-12month) costs of HFpEF are greater because of higher non-cardiovascular rehospitalisations. As HFpEF becomes the dominant form of HF, more work is required in HF-DMPs to address prevention of non-cardiovascular rehospitalisations and to integrate hospital based HF-DMPs into primary healthcare structures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irvine, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters entitled: introduction (resume of stellar evolution, gross characteristics of neutron stars); pulsars (pulsar characteristics, pulsars as neutron stars); neutron star temperatures (neutron star cooling, superfluidity and superconductivity in neutron stars); the exterior of neutron stars (the magnetosphere, the neutron star 'atmosphere', pulses); neutron star structure; neutron star equations of state. (U.K.)

  15. A preliminary inter-centre comparison study for photon, thermal neutron and epithermal neutron responses of two pairs of ionisation chambers used for BNCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, Antoaneta; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Wojnecki, Cecile; Green, Stuart; Nievaart, Sander; Ghani, Zamir; Moss, Ray

    2009-01-01

    The dual ionisation chamber technique is the recommended method for mixed field dosimetry of epithermal neutron beams. This paper presents initial data from an ongoing inter-comparison study involving two identical pairs of ionisation chambers used at the BNCT facilities of Petten, NL and of University of Birmingham, UK. The goal of this study is to evaluate the photon, thermal neutron and epithermal neutron responses of both pairs of TE(TE) (Exradin T2 type) and Mg(Ar) (Exradin M2 type) ionisation chambers in similar experimental conditions. At this stage, the work has been completed for the M2 type chambers and is intended to be completed for the T2 type chambers in the near future.

  16. Crystallographic and magnetic properties of (C6D11ND3)CuBr3 and (Zn1-xMnx)3As2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, G.C. de.

    1989-08-01

    The investigations described concern the crystallographic and magnetic properties of the quasi one-dimensional (1d) ferromagnetic system (C 6 D 11 ND 3 )CuBr 3 (or CHAB) and the II-V type diluted magnetic semiconductor (Zn 1 - x Mn x ) 3 As 2 (or ZMA). Both compounds have been studied with various neutron scattering techniques. The crystallographic properties of CHAB and ZMA have been investigated by neutron diffraction. These diffraction experiments were carried out at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) at Petten, Netherlands. For the investigation of the static and dynamic magnetic properties of CHAB neutron scattering experiments were performed in Petten as well as other European reactor institutes. These investigations comprise a study of the 3d long-rate order and the 1d correlations of the magnetic moments, and a study of the behaviour of the linear spin-wave excitations

  17. Non-destructive examinations of D247.01 SiC-ball. Gamma scan wires 1 and 2 and SiC-ball 1 through 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dassel, G.; Buurveld, H.A.; Plakman, J.C.

    1996-07-01

    In the frame of the KFA programme on Innovative Nuclear Technology SiC-coated graphite spheres have been irradiated in the HFR Petten. With this irradiation two stainless steel gamma scan wires have been irradiated to be able to reconstruct the neutron flux profile during the irradiation and to calculate the absorption of neutrons in the spheres. This report presents the results from the gamma scanning of the two gamma scan wires. Appended are the results from dose rate measurements and weighing of the spheres and gamma spectrometric results from balls 5 and 6. (orig.).

  18. Non-destructive examinations of D247.01 SiC-ball. Gamma scan wires 1 and 2 and SiC-ball 1 through 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dassel, G.; Buurveld, H.A.; Plakman, J.C.

    1996-07-01

    In the frame of the KFA programme on Innovative Nuclear Technology SiC-coated graphite spheres have been irradiated in the HFR Petten. With this irradiation two stainless steel gamma scan wires have been irradiated to be able to reconstruct the neutron flux profile during the irradiation and to calculate the absorption of neutrons in the spheres. This report presents the results from the gamma scanning of the two gamma scan wires. Appended are the results from dose rate measurements and weighing of the spheres and gamma spectrometric results from balls 5 and 6. (orig.)

  19. User's guide for the small-angle neutron scattering facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlak, W.A.H.M.; Werkhoven, E.J.

    1989-04-01

    This report serves as a manual for the users of the small-angle neutron scattering instrument located at beamport HB3 of the High Flux Reactor in Petten. The main part of the text is devoted to the control of the facility and the data handling by means of a μVAX computer. Also, the various possibilities to access the facility across computer networks are discussed. A collection of menu-driven and command-driven programs, which utilize the flexibility of the VMS operating system without requiring detailed knowledge of the user about the computer environment, enables to control the instrument. For the convenience of the experienced user, who might wish to update or extend the software, a technical supplement is included. 15 figs.; 8 refs

  20. Biological dosimetry following exposure to neutrons in a criticality accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindholm, C. (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, STUK (Finland)); Wojcik, A. (Stockholm Univ. (SU), Stockholm (Sweden)); Jaworska, A. (Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA) (Norway))

    2011-01-15

    The aim of the BIONCA project was to implement cytogenetic techniques for biodosimetry purposes in the Nordic countries. The previous NKS-funded biodosimetry activities (BIODOS and BIOPEX) concentrated on experiments using gamma-irradiation and on developing the PCC ring assay for biodosimetry. Experiments conducted during the present BIONCA project has broadened the biodosimetry capacity of the Nordic countries to include dose estimation of exposure to neutrons for both PCC ring and dicentric chromosome techniques. In 2009, experiments were conducted for establishing both PCC ring and dicentric dose calibration curves. Neutron irradiation of human whole blood obtained from two volunteers was conducted in the Netherlands at the Petten reactor. Cell cultures and analysis of whole blood exposed to eight doses between 0 and 10 Gy were performed for both techniques. For the dicentric assay, excellent uniformity in dose calibration for data from both SU and STUK was observed. For PCC rings, the SU and STUK curves were not equally congruent, probably due to the less uniform scoring criteria. However, both curves displayed strong linearity throughout the dose range. In 2010, an exercise was conducted to simulate a criticality accident and to test the validity of the established dose calibration curves. For accident simulation, 16 blood samples were irradiated in Norway at the Kjeller reactor and analysed for dose estimation with both assays. The results showed that, despite a different com-position of the radiation beams in Petten and Kjeller, good dose estimates were obtained. The activity has provided good experience on collaboration required in radiation emergency situations where the biodosimetry capacity and resources of one laboratory may be inadequate. In this respect, the project has strengthened the informal network between the Nordic countries: STUK, the Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, NRPA, the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority and SU

  1. Principles and methods of neutron interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonse, U.

    1978-01-01

    The merits of Angstrom range interferometry with neutrons are briefly outlined. The energy (wavelength) range which is accessible with the triple Laue case (LLL) crystal interferometer is estimated, assuming a neutron source with flux characteristics similar to that of the HFR at Grenoble. It appears that a range in E from roughly 2.3 meV to 8.2eV (lambda approximatly equal to 6A to 0.1A) can be covered with LLL interferometers manufactured with presently available perfect crystals of silicon. Within this range there exists a number of scattering resonances that it seems worth while to investigate interferometrically. The attainable resolution ΔE/E is estimated to be at least 10 -3 for E -2 above. The essentials of zero absorption Bragg diffraction optics of the neutron LLL interferometer are described. Virtues and weaknesses of different LLL geometries are discussed. The influence of geometrical abberrations, strain and position instabilities are surveyed. Aspects of coherent scattering length measurements and of neutron phase topography are discussed

  2. Impact of Exhaled Breath Acetone in the Prognosis of Patients with Heart Failure with Reduced Ejection Fraction (HFrEF. One Year of Clinical Follow-up.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana G Marcondes-Braga

    Full Text Available The identification of new biomarkers of heart failure (HF could help in its treatment. Previously, our group studied 89 patients with HF and showed that exhaled breath acetone (EBA is a new noninvasive biomarker of HF diagnosis. However, there is no data about the relevance of EBA as a biomarker of prognosis.To evaluate whether EBA could give prognostic information in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF.After breath collection and analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and by spectrophotometry, the 89 patients referred before were followed by one year. Study physicians, blind to the results of cardiac biomarker testing, ascertained vital status of each study participant at 12 months.The composite endpoint death and heart transplantation (HT were observed in 35 patients (39.3%: 29 patients (32.6% died and 6 (6.7% were submitted to HT within 12 months after study enrollment. High levels of EBA (≥3.7μg/L, 50th percentile were associated with a progressively worse prognosis in 12-month follow-up (log-rank = 11.06, p = 0.001. Concentrations of EBA above 3.7μg/L increased the risk of death or HT in 3.26 times (HR = 3.26, 95%CI = 1.56-6.80, p = 0.002 within 12 months. In a multivariable cox regression model, the independent predictors of all-cause mortality were systolic blood pressure, respiratory rate and EBA levels.High EBA levels could be associated to poor prognosis in HFrEF patients.

  3. Impact of Exhaled Breath Acetone in the Prognosis of Patients with Heart Failure with Reduced Ejection Fraction (HFrEF). One Year of Clinical Follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldiva, Paulo H. N.; Mangini, Sandrigo; Issa, Victor S.; Ayub-Ferreira, Silvia M.; Bocchi, Edimar A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The identification of new biomarkers of heart failure (HF) could help in its treatment. Previously, our group studied 89 patients with HF and showed that exhaled breath acetone (EBA) is a new noninvasive biomarker of HF diagnosis. However, there is no data about the relevance of EBA as a biomarker of prognosis. Objectives To evaluate whether EBA could give prognostic information in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). Methods After breath collection and analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and by spectrophotometry, the 89 patients referred before were followed by one year. Study physicians, blind to the results of cardiac biomarker testing, ascertained vital status of each study participant at 12 months. Results The composite endpoint death and heart transplantation (HT) were observed in 35 patients (39.3%): 29 patients (32.6%) died and 6 (6.7%) were submitted to HT within 12 months after study enrollment. High levels of EBA (≥3.7μg/L, 50th percentile) were associated with a progressively worse prognosis in 12-month follow-up (log-rank = 11.06, p = 0.001). Concentrations of EBA above 3.7μg/L increased the risk of death or HT in 3.26 times (HR = 3.26, 95%CI = 1.56–6.80, p = 0.002) within 12 months. In a multivariable cox regression model, the independent predictors of all-cause mortality were systolic blood pressure, respiratory rate and EBA levels. Conclusions High EBA levels could be associated to poor prognosis in HFrEF patients. PMID:28030609

  4. Polarized neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, W.G.

    1988-01-01

    The book on 'polarized neutrons' is intended to inform researchers in condensed matter physics and chemistry of the diversity of scientific problems that can be investigated using polarized neutron beams. The contents include chapters on:- neutron polarizers and instrumentation, polarized neutron scattering, neutron polarization analysis experiments and precessing neutron polarization. (U.K.)

  5. Neutron--neutron logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, L.S.

    1977-01-01

    A borehole logging tool includes a steady-state source of fast neutrons, two epithermal neutron detectors, and two thermal neutron detectors. A count rate meter is connected to each neutron detector. A first ratio detector provides an indication of the porosity of the formation surrounding the borehole by determining the ratio of the outputs of the two count rate meters connected to the two epithermal neutron detectors. A second ratio detector provides an indication of both porosity and macroscopic absorption cross section of the formation surrounding the borehole by determining the ratio of the outputs of the two count rate meters connected to the two thermal neutron detectors. By comparing the signals of the two ratio detectors, oil bearing zones and salt water bearing zones within the formation being logged can be distinguished and the amount of oil saturation can be determined. 6 claims, 2 figures

  6. Ultracold neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steenstrup, S.

    Briefly surveys recent developments in research work with ultracold neutrons (neutrons of very low velocity, up to 10 m/s at up to 10 -7 eV and 10 -3 K). Slow neutrons can be detected in an ionisation chamber filled with B 10 F 3 . Very slow neutrons can be used for investigations into the dipole moment of neutrons. Neutrons of large wave length have properties similar to those of light. The limit angle for total reflection is governed by the wave length and by the material. Total reflection can be used to filter ultracold neutrons out of the moderator material of a reactor. Total reflection can also be used to store ultracold neutrons but certain problems with storage have not yet been clarified. Slow neutrons can be made to lose speed in a neutron turbine, and come out as ultracold neutrons. A beam of ultracold neutrons could be used in a neutron microscope. (J.S.)

  7. Predictors and Prognostic Value of Worsening Renal Function During Admission in HFpEF Versus HFrEF: Data From the KorAHF (Korean Acute Heart Failure) Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jeehoon; Park, Jin Joo; Cho, Young-Jin; Oh, Il-Young; Park, Hyun-Ah; Lee, Sang Eun; Kim, Min-Seok; Cho, Hyun-Jai; Lee, Hae-Young; Choi, Jin Oh; Hwang, Kyung-Kuk; Kim, Kye Hun; Yoo, Byung-Su; Kang, Seok-Min; Baek, Sang Hong; Jeon, Eun-Seok; Kim, Jae-Joong; Cho, Myeong-Chan; Chae, Shung Chull; Oh, Byung-Hee; Choi, Dong-Ju

    2018-03-13

    Worsening renal function (WRF) is associated with adverse outcomes in patients with heart failure. We investigated the predictors and prognostic value of WRF during admission, in patients with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) versus those with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). A total of 5625 patients were enrolled in the KorAHF (Korean Acute Heart Failure) registry. WRF was defined as an absolute increase in creatinine of ≥0.3 mg/dL. Transient WRF was defined as recovery of creatinine at discharge, whereas persistent WRF was indicated by a nonrecovered creatinine level. HFpEF and HFrEF were defined as a left ventricle ejection fraction ≥50% and ≤40%, respectively. Among the total population, WRF occurred in 3101 patients (55.1%). By heart failure subgroup, WRF occurred more frequently in HFrEF (57.0% versus 51.3%; P failure subgroups. Among various predictors of WRF, chronic renal failure was the strongest predictor. WRF was an independent predictor of adverse in-hospital outcomes (HFrEF: odds ratio; 2.75; 95% confidence interval, 1.50-5.02; P =0.001; HFpEF: odds ratio, 9.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-75.89; P =0.034) and 1-year mortality (HFrEF: hazard ratio, 1.41; 95% confidence interval, 1.12-1.78; P =0.004 versus HFpEF: hazard ratio, 1.72; 95% confidence interval, 1.23-2.42; P =0.002). Transient WRF was a risk factor for 1-year mortality, whereas persistent WRF had no additive risk compared to transient WRF. In patients with acute heart failure patients, WRF is an independent predictor of adverse in-hospital and follow-up outcomes in both HFrEF and HFpEF, though with a different effect size. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01389843. © 2018 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  8. Studies and modeling of cold neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campioni, G.

    2004-11-01

    With the purpose of updating knowledge in the fields of cold neutron sources, the work of this thesis has been run according to the 3 following axes. First, the gathering of specific information forming the materials of this work. This set of knowledge covers the following fields: cold neutron, cross-sections for the different cold moderators, flux slowing down, different measurements of the cold flux and finally, issues in the thermal analysis of the problem. Secondly, the study and development of suitable computation tools. After an analysis of the problem, several tools have been planed, implemented and tested in the 3-dimensional radiation transport code Tripoli-4. In particular, a module of uncoupling, integrated in the official version of Tripoli-4, can perform Monte-Carlo parametric studies with a spare factor of Cpu time fetching 50 times. A module of coupling, simulating neutron guides, has also been developed and implemented in the Monte-Carlo code McStas. Thirdly, achieving a complete study for the validation of the installed calculation chain. These studies focus on 3 cold sources currently functioning: SP1 from Orphee reactor and 2 other sources (SFH and SFV) from the HFR at the Laue Langevin Institute. These studies give examples of problems and methods for the design of future cold sources

  9. Test-element assembly and loading parameters for the in-pile test of HCPB ceramic pebble beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laan, J.G. van der E-mail: vanderlaan@nrg-nl.com; Boccaccini, L.V.; Conrad, R.; Fokkens, J.H.; Jong, M.; Magielsen, A.J.; Pijlgroms, B.J.; Reimann, J.; Stijkel, M.P.; Malang, S

    2002-11-01

    In the framework of developing the helium cooled pebble-bed (HCPB) blanket an irradiation test of pebble-bed assemblies is prepared at the HFR Petten. The test objective is to concentrate on the effect of neutron irradiation on the thermal-mechanical behaviour of the HCPB breeder pebble-bed at DEMO representative levels of temperature and defined thermal-mechanical loads. The paper reports on the project status, and presents the results of pre-tests, material characteristics, the manufacturing of the pebble-bed assemblies, and the nuclear and thermo-mechanical loading parameters.

  10. MCNP calculations for the HCPB submodules in-pile test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pijlgroms, B.J. [Section Nuclear and Reactor Physics, ECN Nuclear Research, Petten (Netherlands)

    1998-11-01

    This report describes the MCNP calculations that have been performed for the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) Submodules In-pile Test that has been planned for irradiation in the materials testing High Flux Reactor (HFR) at Petten. In this test, four HSM-8 submodules will be placed at core position H4. The report presents the neutron flux and power density profiles to be expected in the submodules. For the gamma induced heating only a rough estimation could be made. In the HCPB submodules the total specific heating does not exceed (36.7 {+-} 2.9)[W/cc]. 8 refs.

  11. Neutronics validation during conversion to LEU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendriks, J. A.; Sciolla, C. M.; Van Der Marck, S. C.; Valko, J.

    2006-01-01

    From October 2005 to May 2006 the High Flux Reactor at Petten, the Netherlands, was progressively converted to low-enriched uranium. The core calculations were performed with two code systems, one being Rebus/MCNP, the other being Oscar-3. These systems were chosen because Rebus (for fuel burn-up) and MCNP (for flux, power, and activation reaction rates) have a long and good track record, whereas Oscar-3 is a newer code, with more user-friendly interfaces that facilitate day to day and cycle to cycle variable input generation. The following measurements have been used for validation of the neutronics calculations: control rod settings at begin and end of cycle, reactivity of control rods, Cu-wire activation during low power runs of the reactor, activation monitor sets present during part of the full power cycle, and isotope production measurements. We report on a comparison of measurements and calculational results for the control rod settings, Cu-wire activation and monitor set data. The Cu-wire activation results are mostly within 10% of experimental values, the monitor set activation results are easily within 5%, based on absolute predictions from the calculations. (authors)

  12. Irradiation creep experiments on fusion reactor candidate structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausen, H.; Cundy, M.R.; Schuele, W.

    1991-01-01

    Irradiation creep rates were determined for annealed and cold-worked AMCR- and 316-type steel alloys in the high flux reactor at Petten, for various irradiation temperatures, stresses and for neutron doses up to 4 dpa. Primary creep elongations were found in all annealed materials. A negative creep elongation was found in cold-worked materials for stresses equal to or below about 100 MPa. An increase of the negative creep elongation is found for decreasing irradiation temperatures and decreasing applied stresses. The stress exponent of the irradiation creep rate in annealed and cold-worked AMCR alloys is n = 1.85 and n = 1.1, respectively. The creep rates of cold-worked AMCR alloys are almost temperature independent over the range investigated (573-693 K). The results obtained in the HFR at Petten are compared with those obtained in ORR and EBR II. The smallest creep rates are found for cold-worked materials of AMCR- and US-PCA-type at Petten which are about a factor two smaller than the creep rates obtained of US-316 at Petten or for US-PCA at ORR or for 316L at EBR II. The scatter band factor for US-PCA, 316L, US-316 irradiated in ORR and EBR II is about 1.5 after a temperature and damage rate normalization

  13. Neutron reflectometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Well, A.A.

    1999-01-01

    Neutron research where reflection, refraction, and interference play an essential role is generally referred to as 'neutron optics'. The neutron wavelength, the scattering length density and the magnetic properties of the material determine the critical angle for total reflection. The theoretical background of neutron reflection, experimental methods and the interpretation of reflection data are presented. (K.A.)

  14. Studies and modeling of cold neutron sources; Etude et modelisation des sources froides de neutron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campioni, G

    2004-11-15

    With the purpose of updating knowledge in the fields of cold neutron sources, the work of this thesis has been run according to the 3 following axes. First, the gathering of specific information forming the materials of this work. This set of knowledge covers the following fields: cold neutron, cross-sections for the different cold moderators, flux slowing down, different measurements of the cold flux and finally, issues in the thermal analysis of the problem. Secondly, the study and development of suitable computation tools. After an analysis of the problem, several tools have been planed, implemented and tested in the 3-dimensional radiation transport code Tripoli-4. In particular, a module of uncoupling, integrated in the official version of Tripoli-4, can perform Monte-Carlo parametric studies with a spare factor of Cpu time fetching 50 times. A module of coupling, simulating neutron guides, has also been developed and implemented in the Monte-Carlo code McStas. Thirdly, achieving a complete study for the validation of the installed calculation chain. These studies focus on 3 cold sources currently functioning: SP1 from Orphee reactor and 2 other sources (SFH and SFV) from the HFR at the Laue Langevin Institute. These studies give examples of problems and methods for the design of future cold sources.

  15. Neutron radiography with ultracold neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    The neutron transmission factor of very thin films may be low if the neutron energy is comparable to the pseudo-potential of the film material. Surprisingly, perhaps, it is relatively easy to obtain neutrons with such low energies in sufficient numbers to produce neutron radiographs. (orig.)

  16. Neutron Skins and Neutron Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Piekarewicz, J.

    2013-01-01

    The neutron-skin thickness of heavy nuclei provides a fundamental link to the equation of state of neutron-rich matter, and hence to the properties of neutron stars. The Lead Radius Experiment ("PREX") at Jefferson Laboratory has recently provided the first model-independence evidence on the existence of a neutron-rich skin in 208Pb. In this contribution we examine how the increased accuracy in the determination of neutron skins expected from the commissioning of intense polarized electron be...

  17. Fission-product behaviour in irradiated TRISO-coated particles: Results of the HFR-EU1bis experiment and their interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrachin, M.; Dubourg, R.; Groot, S. de; Kissane, M.P.; Bakker, K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The microstructure and FPs in UO 2 TRISO particles (10% FIMA, 1573 K) were studied. → Very large porosities (>10 μm) were observed in the high temperature particles. → Significant Xe and Cs releases from the kernel were observed. → Mo and Ru are mainly present in the metallic precipitates in the kernel. - Abstract: It is important to understand fission-product (FP) and kernel micro-structure evolution in TRISO-coated fuel particles. FP behaviour, while central to severe-accident evaluation, impacts: evolution of the kernel oxygen potential governing in turn carbon oxidation (amoeba effect and pressurization); particle pressurization through fission-gas release from the kernel; and coating mechanical resistance via reaction with some FPs (Pd, Cs, Sr). The HFR-Eu1bis experiment irradiated five HTR fuel pebbles containing TRISO-coated UO 2 particles and went beyond current HTR specifications (e.g., central temperature of 1523 K). This study presents ceramographic and EPMA examinations of irradiated urania kernels and coatings. Significant evolutions of the kernel (grain structure, porosity, metallic-inclusion size, intergranular bubbles) as a function of temperature are shown. Results concerning FP migration are presented, e.g., significant xenon, caesium and palladium release from the kernel, molybdenum and ruthenium mainly present in metallic precipitates. The observed FP and micro-structural evolutions are interpreted and explanations proposed. The effect of high flux rate and high temperature on fission-gas behaviour, grain-size evolution and kernel swelling is discussed. Furthermore, Cs, Mo and Zr behaviour is interpreted in connection with oxygen-potential. This paper shows that combining state-of-the-art post-irradiation examination and state-of-the-art modelling fundamentally improves understanding of HTR fuel behaviour.

  18. Microstructural defects in EUROFER 97 after different neutron irradiation conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Dethloff

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of irradiation induced microstructural evolution is essential for assessing the applicability of structural steels like the Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic steel EUROFER 97 in upcoming fusion reactors. In this work Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM is used to determine the defect microstructure after different neutron irradiation conditions. In particular dislocation loops, voids and precipitates are analyzed concerning defect nature, density and size distribution after irradiation to 15 dpa at 300 °C in the mixed spectrum High Flux Reactor (HFR. New results are combined with previously obtained data from irradiation in the fast spectrum BOR-60 reactor (15 and 32 dpa, 330 °C, which allows for assessment of dose and dose rate effects on the aforementioned irradiation induced defects and microstructural characteristics.

  19. Neutron Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhavere, F.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's R and D programme on neutron dosimetry is to improve the determination of neutron doses by studying neutron spectra, neutron dosemeters and shielding adaptations. In 2000, R and D focused on the contiued investigation of the bubble detectors type BD-PND and BDT, in particular their sensitivity and temperature dependence; the updating of SCK-CEN's criticality dosemeter, the investigation of the characteristics of new thermoluminescent materials and their use in neutron dosemetry; and the investigation of neutron shielding

  20. Neutron Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanhavere, F

    2001-04-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's R and D programme on neutron dosimetry is to improve the determination of neutron doses by studying neutron spectra, neutron dosemeters and shielding adaptations. In 2000, R and D focused on the contiued investigation of the bubble detectors type BD-PND and BDT, in particular their sensitivity and temperature dependence; the updating of SCK-CEN's criticality dosemeter, the investigation of the characteristics of new thermoluminescent materials and their use in neutron dosemetry; and the investigation of neutron shielding.

  1. Neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrdlicka, Z.

    1977-01-01

    Neutron radiography is a radiographic method using a neutron beam of a defined geometry. The neutron source usually consists of a research reactor, a specialized neutron radiography reactor or the 252 Cf radioisotope source. There are two types of the neutron radiography display system, viz., a system producing neutron radiography images by a photographic process or a system allowing a visual display, eg., using a television monitor. The method can be used wherever X-ray radiography is used except applications in the radiography of humans. The neutron radiography unit at UJV uses the WWR-S reactor as the neutron source and both types of the above mentioned display system. (J.P.)

  2. The neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kredov, B.M.

    1979-01-01

    The history of the neutron is displayed on the basis of contributions by scientists who produced outstanding results in neutron research (part 1), of summarizing discoveries and theories which led to the discovery of the neutron and the resulting development of nuclear physics (part 2), and of fundamental papers written by Rutherford, Chadwick, Iwanenko, and others (appendix). Of interest to physicists, historians, and students

  3. Neutron techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlton, J.S.

    1986-01-01

    The way in which neutrons interact with matter such as slowing-down, diffusion, neutron absorption and moderation are described. The use of neutron techniques in industry, in moisture gages, level and interface measurements, the detection of blockages, boron analysis in ore feedstock and industrial radiography are discussed. (author)

  4. Irradiation induced creep in graphite with respect to the flux effect and the high fluence behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cundy, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    In accelerated irradiation creep tests, performed in the HFR Petten, in a fast neutron flux of about 2x10 4 cm -2 s -1 and at temperatures of 300 and 500 0 C, a fast neutron fluence in excess of 20x10 21 cm -2 (EDN) has been attained so far. As a supplement to this, an analogous creep test was conducted in a fast neutron flux lower by a factor of four which is more typical for the service conditions in a HTR, with a maximum fast fluence of only 4x10 21 cm -2 (EDN). This experiment was aimed at answering the question if, for equal fast fluence, enhanced irradiation creep and Wigner dimensional change would take place in a reduced fast neutron flux. This problem has more generally been addressed to as the ''flux effect'' or the ''equivalent temperature concept''. (orig./IHOE)

  5. Study of a neutronic potential of a modular fast spectrum ADS for radiotoxic waste transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slessarev, I.; Arkhipov, V.

    1999-01-01

    The IAEA has maintained an active interest in advanced nuclear technology related to Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS). The activities carried out by the IAEA within its Programme on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems for Energy Generation and Transmutation include preparation of status reports on advanced technologies development, conduct of technical information exchange meetings and co-operative Co-ordinated Research Programmes (CRPs). Consultancy on Accelerator Driven Systems and Related Fuel Cycles held from 1-2 February 1996 in Cadarache, France reviewed the recent progress in studies on feasibility of Accelerator Driven Systems and participants recommended the IAEA to organize a CRP to investigate the accelerator driven systems potential. In 1996 the CRP: 'Use of Th-based Fuel Cycle in Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) to Incinerate Pu and to Reduce Long-term Waste Toxicities' was established and the first Research Coordination Meeting was convened in March 1997 at the ENEA Research Center in Bologna, Italy. Results of the first stage 'Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS)-Neutronic Benchmark' were reported to the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Feasibility and Motivation for Hybrid Concepts for Nuclear Energy Generation and Transmutation in Madrid, Spain, in September 1997. Results obtained during the second stage of the CRP were presented and analysed at the RCM in December 1998 in Petten, Netherlands. The meeting was attended by 21 representatives and observers from IAEA, Belarus, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, the Russian Federation, Spain, Sweden and USA. This paper was prepared on recommendation of the participants of the meeting in Petten, Netherlands. Accelerator Driven System (ADS) neutronic potential, i.e. capability to burnout transuranic elements (TRU) or minor actinides (MA) and Long-Lived Fission Products (LLFP) with minimum ADS park as well as the rate of LLFP transmutation (mass/energy production) for nuclear waste

  6. Neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Eiichi

    1988-01-01

    The thermal neutron absorption coefficient is essentially different from the X-ray absorption coefficient. Each substance has a characteristic absorption coefficient regardless of its density. Neutron deams have the following features: (1) neutrons are not transmitted efficiently by low molecular weight substances, (2) they are transmitted efficiently by heavy metals, and (3) the transmittance differs among isotopes. Thus, neutron beams are suitable for cheking for foreign matters in heavy metals and testing of composites consisting of both heavy and light materials. A neutron source generates fast neutrons, which should be converted into thermal neutrons by reducing their energy. Major neutron souces include nuclear reactors, radioisotopes and particle accelerators. Photographic films and television systems are mainly used to observe neutron transmission images. Computers are employed for image processing, computerized tomography and three-dimensional analysis. The major applications of neutron radiography include inspection of neclear fuel; evaluation of material for airplane; observation of fuel in the engine and oil in the hydraulic systems in airplanes; testing of composite materials; etc. (Nogami, K.)

  7. Neutron detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Andrew C [Knoxville, TN; Jardret,; Vincent, D [Powell, TN

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  8. Fusion neutronics

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yican

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a systematic and comprehensive introduction to fusion neutronics, covering all key topics from the fundamental theories and methodologies, as well as a wide range of fusion system designs and experiments. It is the first-ever book focusing on the subject of fusion neutronics research. Compared with other nuclear devices such as fission reactors and accelerators, fusion systems are normally characterized by their complex geometry and nuclear physics, which entail new challenges for neutronics such as complicated modeling, deep penetration, low simulation efficiency, multi-physics coupling, etc. The book focuses on the neutronics characteristics of fusion systems and introduces a series of theories and methodologies that were developed to address the challenges of fusion neutronics, and which have since been widely applied all over the world. Further, it introduces readers to neutronics design’s unique principles and procedures, experimental methodologies and technologies for fusion systems...

  9. Neutron spectometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poortmans, F.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental work in the field of low-energy neutron physics can be subdivided into two classes: 1)Study of the decay process of the compound-nucleus state as for example the study of the capture gamma rays and of the neutron induced fission process; 2)Study of the reaction mechanism, mainly by measuring the reaction cross-sections and resonance parameters. These neutron cross-sections and resonance parameters are also important data required for many technological applications especially for reactor development programmes. In general, the second class of experiments impose other requirements on the neutron spectrometer than the first class. In most cases, a better neutron energy resolution and a broader neutron energy range are required for the study of the reaction mechanism than for the study of various aspects of the decay process. (author)

  10. Neutron exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prillinger, G.; Konynenburg, R.A. van

    1998-01-01

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. In chapter 6, LWR-PV neutron transport calculations and dosimetry methods and how they are combined to evaluate the neutron exposure of the steel of pressure vessels are discussed. An effort to correlate neutron exposure parameters with damage is made

  11. Atmospheric neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preszler, A.M.; Moon, S.; White, R.S.

    1976-01-01

    Additional calibrations of the University of California double-scatter neutron and additional analysis corrections lead to the slightly changed neutron fluxes reported here. The theoretical angular distributions of Merker (1975) are in general agreement with our experimental fluxes but do not give the peaks for vertical upward and downward moving neutrons. The theoretical neutron escape current J 2 /sub pi/ (Merker, 1972; Armstrong et al., 1973) is in agreement with the experimental values from 10 to 100 MeV. Our experimental fluxes agree with those of the Kanbach et al. (1974) in the overlap region from 70 to 100 MeV

  12. Neutron Albedo

    CERN Document Server

    Ignatovich, V K

    2005-01-01

    A new, algebraic, method is applied to calculation of neutron albedo from substance to check the claim that use of ultradispersive fuel and moderator of an active core can help to gain in size and mass of the reactor. In a model of isotropic distribution of incident and reflected neutrons it is shown that coherent scattering on separate grains in the case of thermal neutrons increases transport cross section negligibly, however it decreases albedo from a wall of finite thickness because of decrease of substance density. A visible increase of albedo takes place only for neutrons with wave length of the order of the size of a single grain.

  13. Neutron dosimetry; Dosimetria de neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fratin, Luciano

    1993-12-31

    A neutron irradiation facility was designed and built in order to establish a procedure for calibrating neutron monitors and dosemeters. A 185 GBq {sup 241} Am Be source of known is used as a reference source. The irradiation facility using this source in the air provides neutron dose rates between 9 nSv s{sup -1} and 0,5 {sup {mu}}Sv s{sup -1}. A calibrated 50 nSv s{sup -1} thermal neutron field is obtained by using a specially designed paraffin block in conjunction with the {sup 241} Am Be source. A Bonner multisphere spectrometer was calibrated, using a procedure based on three methods proposed by international standards. The unfold {sup 241} Am Be neutron spectrum was determined from the Bonner spheres data and resulted in a good agreement with expected values for fluence rate, dose rate and mean energy. A dosimetric system based on the electrochemical etching of CR-39 was developed for personal dosimetry. The dosemeter badge using a (n,{alpha}) converter, the etching chamber and high frequency power supply were designed and built specially for this project. The electrochemical etching (ECE) parameters used were: a 6N KOH solution, 59 deg C, 20 kV{sub pp} cm{sup -1}, 2,0 kHz, 3 hours of ECE for thermal and intermediate neutrons and 6 hours for fast neutrons. The calibration factors for thermal, intermediate and fast neutrons were determined for this personal dosemeter. The sensitivities determined for the developed dosimetric system were (1,46{+-} 0,09) 10{sup 4} tracks cm{sup -2} mSv{sup -1} for thermal neutrons, (9{+-}3) 10{sup 2} tracks cm{sup -2} mSV{sup -1} for intermediate neutrons and (26{+-}4) tracks cm{sup -2} mSv{sup -1} for fast neutrons. The lower and upper limits of detection were respectively 0,002 mSv and 0,6 mSv for thermal neutrons, 0,04 mSv and 8 mSv for intermediate neutrons and 1 mSv and 12 mSv for fast neutrons. In view of the 1990`s ICRP recommendations, it is possible to conclude that the personal dosemeter described in this work is

  14. Neutron dosimetry; Dosimetria de neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fratin, Luciano

    1994-12-31

    A neutron irradiation facility was designed and built in order to establish a procedure for calibrating neutron monitors and dosemeters. A 185 GBq {sup 241} Am Be source of known is used as a reference source. The irradiation facility using this source in the air provides neutron dose rates between 9 nSv s{sup -1} and 0,5 {sup {mu}}Sv s{sup -1}. A calibrated 50 nSv s{sup -1} thermal neutron field is obtained by using a specially designed paraffin block in conjunction with the {sup 241} Am Be source. A Bonner multisphere spectrometer was calibrated, using a procedure based on three methods proposed by international standards. The unfold {sup 241} Am Be neutron spectrum was determined from the Bonner spheres data and resulted in a good agreement with expected values for fluence rate, dose rate and mean energy. A dosimetric system based on the electrochemical etching of CR-39 was developed for personal dosimetry. The dosemeter badge using a (n,{alpha}) converter, the etching chamber and high frequency power supply were designed and built specially for this project. The electrochemical etching (ECE) parameters used were: a 6N KOH solution, 59 deg C, 20 kV{sub pp} cm{sup -1}, 2,0 kHz, 3 hours of ECE for thermal and intermediate neutrons and 6 hours for fast neutrons. The calibration factors for thermal, intermediate and fast neutrons were determined for this personal dosemeter. The sensitivities determined for the developed dosimetric system were (1,46{+-} 0,09) 10{sup 4} tracks cm{sup -2} mSv{sup -1} for thermal neutrons, (9{+-}3) 10{sup 2} tracks cm{sup -2} mSV{sup -1} for intermediate neutrons and (26{+-}4) tracks cm{sup -2} mSv{sup -1} for fast neutrons. The lower and upper limits of detection were respectively 0,002 mSv and 0,6 mSv for thermal neutrons, 0,04 mSv and 8 mSv for intermediate neutrons and 1 mSv and 12 mSv for fast neutrons. In view of the 1990`s ICRP recommendations, it is possible to conclude that the personal dosemeter described in this work is

  15. Neutronic reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wende, C.W.J.

    1976-01-01

    A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield

  16. Neutron polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firk, F.W.K.

    1976-01-01

    Some recent experiments involving polarized neutrons are discussed; they demonstrate how polarization studies provide information on fundamental aspects of nuclear structure that cannot be obtained from more traditional neutron studies. Until recently, neutron polarization studies tended to be limited either to very low energies or to restricted regions at higher energies, determined by the kinematics of favorable (p, vector n) and (d, vector n) reactions. With the advent of high intensity pulsed electron and proton accelerators and of beams of vector polarized deuterons, this is no longer the case. One has entered an era in which neutron polarization experiments are now being carried out, in a routine way, throughout the entire range from thermal energies to tens-of-MeV. The significance of neutron polarization studies is illustrated in discussions of a wide variety of experiments that include the measurement of T-invariance in the β-decay of polarized neutrons, a search for the effects of meson exchange currents in the photo-disintegration of the deuteron, the determination of quantum numbers of states in the fission of aligned 235 U and 237 Np induced by polarized neutrons, and the double- and triple-scattering of fast neutrons by light nuclei

  17. Neutron holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beynon, T.D.

    1986-01-01

    the paper concerns neutron holography, which allows an image to be constructed of the surfaces, as well as the interiors, of objects. The technique of neutron holography and its applications are described. Present and future use of the method is briefly outlined. (U.K.)

  18. Neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cason, J.L. Jr.; Shaw, C.B.

    1975-01-01

    A neutron source which is particularly useful for neutron radiography consists of a vessel containing a moderating media of relatively low moderating ratio, a flux trap including a moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio at the center of the vessel, a shell of depleted uranium dioxide surrounding the moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio, a plurality of guide tubes each containing a movable source of neutrons surrounding the flux trap, a neutron shield surrounding one part of each guide tube, and at least one collimator extending from the flux trap to the exterior of the neutron source. The shell of depleted uranium dioxide has a window provided with depleted uranium dioxide shutters for each collimator. Reflectors are provided above and below the flux trap and on the guide tubes away from the flux trap

  19. Neutron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthoud, Georges; Ducros, Gerard; Feron, Damien; Guerin, Yannick; Latge, Christian; Limoge, Yves; Santarini, Gerard; Seiler, Jean-Marie; Vernaz, Etienne; Coste-Delclaux, Mireille; M'Backe Diop, Cheikh; Nicolas, Anne; Andrieux, Catherine; Archier, Pascal; Baudron, Anne-Marie; Bernard, David; Biaise, Patrick; Blanc-Tranchant, Patrick; Bonin, Bernard; Bouland, Olivier; Bourganel, Stephane; Calvin, Christophe; Chiron, Maurice; Damian, Frederic; Dumonteil, Eric; Fausser, Clement; Fougeras, Philippe; Gabriel, Franck; Gagnier, Emmanuel; Gallo, Daniele; Hudelot, Jean-Pascal; Hugot, Francois-Xavier; Dat Huynh, Tan; Jouanne, Cedric; Lautard, Jean-Jacques; Laye, Frederic; Lee, Yi-Kang; Lenain, Richard; Leray, Sylvie; Litaize, Olivier; Magnaud, Christine; Malvagi, Fausto; Mijuin, Dominique; Mounier, Claude; Naury, Sylvie; Nicolas, Anne; Noguere, Gilles; Palau, Jean-Marc; Le Pallec, Jean-Charles; Peneliau, Yannick; Petit, Odile; Poinot-Salanon, Christine; Raepsaet, Xavier; Reuss, Paul; Richebois, Edwige; Roque, Benedicte; Royer, Eric; Saint-Jean, Cyrille de; Santamarina, Alain; Serot, Olivier; Soldevila, Michel; Tommasi, Jean; Trama, Jean-Christophe; Tsilanizara, Aime; Behar, Christophe; Provitina, Olivier; Lecomte, Michael; Forestier, Alain; Bender, Alexandra; Parisot, Jean-Francois; Finot, Pierre

    2013-10-01

    This bibliographical note presents a reference book which addresses the study of neutron transport in matter, the study of conditions for a chain reaction and the study of modifications of matter composition due to nuclear reactions. This book presents the main nuclear data, their measurement, assessment and processing, and the spallation. It proposes an overview of methods applied for the study of neutron transport: basic equations and their derived forms, deterministic methods and Monte Carlo method of resolution of the Boltzmann equation, methods of resolution of generalized Bateman equations, methods of time resolution of space kinetics coupled equations. It presents the main calculation codes, discusses the qualification and experimental aspects, and gives an overview of neutron transport applications: neutron transport calculation of reactors, neutron transport coupled with other disciplines, physics of fuel cycle, criticality

  20. Measurement of vapor behavior in tight-lattice bundles by neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kureta, Masatoshi; Akimoto, Hajime

    2004-01-01

    Three-dimensional and instantaneous void fractions in tight-lattice 7-rod and 14-rod bundles were measured by neutron radiography in order to make clear the flow behavior and to verify the advanced fine-mesh numerical analysis codes for the R and D of the Reduced-Moderation Water Reactors (RMWR). Time-averaged 3D void fraction distribution is evaluated with the spatial resolution of 0.1 - 0.2 mm using neutron tomography, and consecutive change of vapor behavior is observed quantitatively with time step of 1 ms using high-frame-rate neutron radiography (HFR-NR). In this paper, void fraction distribution and vapor behavior of flow boiling of water in tight-lattice rod bundles are focused on and discussed based on the obtained results. 'High void fraction spot', 'void drift phenomenon', and 'vapor chimney' were observed under atmospheric pressure conditions. Here, 'high void fraction spot' indicates that high void fraction regions are appeared between adjacent rods, narrow space, at/near point of net vapor generation region. 'Void drift' and 'vapor chimney' represent that high void fraction region moves to wide triangular space and is formed a vapor flow channel so-called 'vapor chimney'. It was confirmed from the time-averaged 3D data that void fraction in the center is higher than that in the periphery. On the other hand, it was found from the HFR-NR experiments that big vapor bubbles and/or cluster flow upward intermittently not only in the center but in the periphery of the channel and, therefore, point of net vapor generation is scattered statistically in wide region. (author)

  1. Extensive neutronic sensitivity-uncertainty analysis of a fusion reactor shielding blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogenbirk, A.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper the results are presented of an extensive neutronic sensitivity-uncertainty study performed for the design of a shielding blanket for a next-step fusion reactor, such as ITER. A code system was used, which was developed at ECN Petten. The uncertainty in an important response parameter, the neutron heating in the inboard superconducting coils, was evaluated. Neutron transport calculations in the 100 neutron group GAM-II structure were performed using the code ANISN. For the sensitivity and uncertainty calculations the code SUSD was used. Uncertainties due to cross-section uncertainties were taken into account as well as uncertainties due to uncertainties in energy and angular distributions of scattered neutrons (SED and SAD uncertainties, respectively). The subject of direct-term uncertainties (i.e. uncertainties due to uncertainties in the kerma factors of the superconducting coils) is briefly touched upon. It is shown that SAD uncertainties, which have been largely neglected until now, contribute significantly to the total uncertainty. Moreover, the contribution of direct-term uncertainties may be large. The total uncertainty in the neutron heating, only due to Fe cross-sections, amounts to approximately 25%, which is rather large. However, uncertainty data are scarce and the data may very well be conservative. It is shown in this paper that with the code system used, sensitivity and uncertainty calculations can be performed in a straightforward way. Therefore, it is suggested that emphasis is now put on the generation of realistic, reliable covariance data for cross-sections as well as for angular and energy distributions. ((orig.))

  2. Neutron therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riesler, Rudi

    1995-01-01

    Standard radiotherapy uses Xrays or electrons which have low LET (linear energy transfer); in contrast, particles such as neutrons with high LET have different radiobiological responses. In the late 1960s, clinical trials by Mary Catterall at the Hammersmith Hospital in London indicated that fast neutron radiation had clinical advantages for certain malignant tumours. Following these early clinical trials, several cyclotron facilities were built in the 1980s for fast neutron therapy, for example at the University of Washington, Seattle, and at UCLA. Most of these newer machines use extracted cyclotron proton beams in the range 42 to 66 MeV with beam intensities of 15 to 60 microamps. The proton beams are transported to dedicated therapy rooms, where neutrons are produced from beryllium targets. Second-generation clinical trials showed that accurate neutron beam delivery to the tumour site is more critical than for photon therapy. In order to achieve precise beam geometries, the extracted proton beams have to be transported through a gantry which can rotate around the patient and deliver beams from any angle; also the neutron beam outline (''field shape'') must be adjusted to extremely irregular shapes using a flexible collimation system. A therapy procedure has to be appropriately organized, with physicians, radiotherapists, nurses, medical physicists and other staff in attendance; other specialized equipment, such as CT or MRI scanners and radiation simulators must be made available. Neutron therapy is usually performed only in radiation oncology departments of major medical centres

  3. Neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alaa eldin, M.T.

    2011-01-01

    The digital processing of the neutron radiography images gives the possibility for data quantification. In this case an exact relation between the measured neutron attenuation and the real macroscopic attenuation coefficient for every point of the sample is required. The assumption that the attenuation of the neutron beam through the sample is exponential is valid only in an ideal case where a monochromatic beam, non scattering sample and non background contribution are assumed. In the real case these conditions are not fulfilled and in dependence on the sample material we have more or less deviation from the exponential attenuation law. Because of the high scattering cross-sections of hydrogen (σs=80.26 barn) for thermal neutrons, the problem with the scattered neutrons at quantitative radiography investigations of hydrogenous materials (as PE, Oil, H 2 O, etc) is not trivial. For these strong scattering materials the neutron beam attenuation is no longer exponential and a dependence of the macroscopic attenuation coefficient on the material thickness and on the distance between the sample and the detector appears. When quantitative radiography (2 D) or tomography investigations (3 D) are performed, some image correction procedures for a description of the scattering effect are required. This thesis presents a method that can be used to enhance the neutron radiography image for objects with high scattering materials like hydrogen, carbon and other light materials. This method uses the Monte Carlo code, MCNP5, to simulate the neutron radiography process and get the flux distribution for each pixel of the image and determine the scattered neutrons distribution that causes the image blur and then subtract it from the initial image to improve its quality.

  4. Neutronics codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckel, G.

    1983-01-01

    The objectives are the development, testing and cultivation of reliable, efficient and user-optimized neutron-physical calculation methods and conformity with users' requirements concerning design of power reactors, planning and analysis of experiments necessary for their protection as well as research on physical key problems. A short outline of available computing programmes for the following objectives is given: - Provision of macroscopic group constants, - Calculation of neutron flux distribution in transport theory and diffusion approximation, - Evaluation of neutron flux-distribution, - Execution of disturbance calculations for the determination reactivity coefficients, and - graphical representation of results. (orig./RW) [de

  5. Neutron reflectometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klösgen-Buchkremer, Beate Maria

    2014-01-01

    of desired information. In the course, an introduction into the method and an overview on selected instruments at large scale facilities will be presented. Examples will be given that illustrate the potential of the method, mostly based on organic films. Results from the investigation of layered films......Neutron (and X-ray) reflectometry constitute complementary interfacially sensitive techniques that open access to studying the structure within thin films of both soft and hard condensed matter. Film thickness starts oxide surfaces on bulk substrates, proceeding to (pauci-)molecular layers and up...... films or films with magnetic properties. The reason is the peculiar property of neutron light since the mass of a neutron is close to the one of a proton, and since it bears a magnetic moment. The optical properties of matter, when interacting with neutrons, are described by a refractive index...

  6. Neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furrer, A.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains the text of 16 lectures given at the Summer School and the report on a panel discussion entitled ''the relative merits and complementarities of x-rays, synchrotron radiation, steady- and pulsed neutron sources''. figs., tabs., refs

  7. Neutron storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strelkov, A.V.

    2004-01-01

    The report is devoted to neutron storage (NS) and describes the history of experiments on the NS development. Great attention is paid to ultracold neutron (UCN) storage. The experiments on the UCN generation, transport, spectroscopy, storage and detection are described. Experiments on searching the UCN electric-dipole moment and electric charge are continued. Possible using of UCN for studying the nanoparticles is discussed [ru

  8. Neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayon, G.

    1989-01-01

    Neutronography or neutron radiography, a non-destructive test method which is similar in its principle to conventional X-ray photography, presently occupies a marginal position among non-destructive test methods (NDT) (no source of suitable performance or cost). Neutron radiography associated with the ORPHEE reactor permits industrial testing; it can very quickly meet a cost requirement comparable to that of conventional test methods. In 1988, 2500 parts were tested on this unit [fr

  9. Neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Hiroshi.

    1993-01-01

    The device of the present invention detects neutrons in a reactor container under a high temperature and reduces the noise level in an FBR type reactor. That is, the detection section comprises a high heat resistant vessel containing a scintillator therein for detecting neutrons. Neutron signals sent from the detection section are inputted to a neutron measuring section by way of a signal transmission section. The detection section is disposed at the inside of the reactor container. Further, the signal transmission section is connected optically to the detection section. With such a constitution, since the detection section comprising the high temperature resistant vessel is disposed at the inside of the reactor container, neutron fluxes can be detected and measured at high sensitivity even under a high temperature circumstance. Since the signal transmission section is optically connected to the detection section, influence of radiation rays upon transmission of the neutron detection signals can be reduced. Accordingly, the noise level can be kept low. (I.S.)

  10. Neutron Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayer, Michael J.; Gee, Glendon W.

    2005-01-01

    The neutron probe is a standard tool for measuring soil water content. This article provides an overview of the underlying theory, describes the methodology for its calibration and use, discusses example applications, and identifies the safety issues. Soil water makes land-based life possible by satisfying plant water requirements, serving as a medium for nutrient movement to plant roots and nutrient cycling, and controlling the fate and transport of contaminants in the soil environment. Therefore, a successful understanding of the dynamics of plant growth, nutrient cycling, and contaminant behavior in the soil requires knowledge of the soil water content as well as its spatial and temporal variability. After more than 50 years, neutron probes remain the most reliable tool available for field monitoring of soil water content. Neutron probes provide integrated measurements over relatively large volumes of soil and, with proper access, allow for repeated sampling of the subsurface at the same locations. The limitations of neutron probes include costly and time-consuming manual operation, lack of data automation, and costly regulatory requirements. As more non-radioactive systems for soil water monitoring are developed to provide automated profiling capabilities, neutron-probe usage will likely decrease. Until then, neutron probes will continue to be a standard for reliable measurements of field water contents in soils around the globe

  11. Neutron-neutron probe for uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.C.

    1979-01-01

    A neutron activation probe for assaying the amount of fissionable isotopes in an ore body is described which comprises a casing which is movable through a borehole in the ore body, a neutron source and a number of delayed neutron detectors arranged colinearly in the casing below the neutron source for detecting delayed neutrons

  12. neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    Neutron radiography (or radiology) is a diverse filed that uses neutrons of various energies, subthermal, thermal, epithermal or fast in either steady state or pulsed mode to examine objects for industrial, medical, or other purposes, both microscopic and macroscopic. The applications include engineering design, biological studies, nondestructive inspection and materials evaluation. In the past decade, over 100 different centers in some 30 countries have published reports of pioneering activities using reactors, accelerators and isotopic neutron sources. While film transparency and electronic video are most common imaging methods for static or in motion objects respectively, there are other important data gathering techniques, including track etch, digital gauging and computed tomography. A survey of the world-wide progress shows the field to be gaining steadily in its diversity, its sophistication and its importance. (author)

  13. Specific contributions of the Dutch progamme ''RAS'' towards accelerator-based transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahams, K.; Franken, W.M.P.; Bultman, J.H.; Heil, J.A.; Koning, A.J.

    1994-09-01

    Accelerator-based transmutation is being studied by ECN within its general nuclear waste transmutation programme RAS. In this paper the following contributions are presented: (1) Evaluation of cross sections at intermediate energies, within an international frame given by NEA, (2) Cell calculations on the equilibration of transuranium actinides in thermal molten-salt transmuters, (3) Irradiation facilities at the European research reactor HFR in Petten, which have been constructed with the purpose to demonstrate and investigate the transmutation of waste in a high neutron flux, (4) Studies of accelerator-based neutron generating systems to transmute neptunium and technetium, (5) Comparison of several systems on the basis of criteria for successful nuclear waste-management. (orig.)

  14. Specific contributions of the Dutch programme {open_quotes}RAS{close_quotes} towards accelerator-based transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrahams, K.; Franken, W.M.P.; Bultman, J.H. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Accelerator-based transmutation is being studied by ECN within its general nuclear waste transmutation programme RAS. In this paper the following contributions are presented: (1) Evaluation of cross sections at intermediate energies, within an international frame given by NEA, (2) Cell calculations on the equilibration of transuranium actinides in thermal molten-salt transmuters, (3) Irradiation facilities at the European research reactor HFR in Petten, which have been constructed with the purpose to demonstrate and investigate the transmutation of waste in a high neutron flux, (4) Studies of accelerator-based neutron generating systems to transmute neptunium and technetium, (5) Comparison of several systems on the basis of criteria for successful nuclear waste-management.

  15. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.W.; Young, G.J.

    1958-04-15

    A nuclear reactor which uses uranium in the form of elongated tubes as fuel elements and liquid as a coolant is described. Elongated tubular uranium bodies are vertically disposed in an efficient neutron slowing agent, such as graphite, for example, to form a lattice structure which is disposed between upper and lower coolant tanks. Fluid coolant tubes extend through the uranium bodies and communicate with the upper and lower tanks and serve to convey the coolant through the uranium body. The reactor is also provided with means for circulating the cooling fluid through the coolant tanks and coolant tubes, suitable neutron and gnmma ray shields, and control means.

  16. Neutron dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartko, J.; Schoch, K.F. Jr.; Congedo, T.V.; Anderson, S.L. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear reactor. It comprises a reactor core; a thermal shield surrounding the reactor core; a pressure vessel surrounding the thermal shield; a neutron dosimeter positioned outside of the thermal shield, the neutron dosimeter comprising a layer of fissile material and a second layer made of a material having an electrical conductivity which permanently varies as a function of its cumulative ion radiation dose; and means, outside the pressure vessel and electrically connected to the layer of second material, for measuring electrical conductivity of the layer of second material

  17. Quantitative neutron radiography using neutron absorbing honeycomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, Masayoshi; Oda, Masahiro; Takahashi, Kenji; Ohkubo, Kohei; Tasaka, Kanji; Tsuruno, Akira; Matsubayashi, Masahito.

    1993-01-01

    This investigation concerns quantitative neutron radiography and computed tomography by using a neutron absorbing honeycomb collimator. By setting the neutron absorbing honeycomb collimator between object and imaging system, neutrons scattered in the object were absorbed by the honeycomb material and eliminated before coming to the imaging system, but the neutrons which were transmitted the object without interaction could reach the imaging system. The image by purely transmitted neutrons gives the quantitative information. Two honeycombs were prepared with coating of boron nitride and gadolinium oxide and evaluated for the quantitative application. The relation between the neutron total cross section and the attenuation coefficient confirmed that they were in a fairly good agreement. Application to quantitative computed tomography was also successfully conducted. The new neutron radiography method using the neutron-absorbing honeycomb collimator for the elimination of the scattered neutrons improved remarkably the quantitativeness of the neutron radiography and computed tomography. (author)

  18. Neutronics of pulsed spallation neutron sources

    CERN Document Server

    Watanabe, N

    2003-01-01

    Various topics and issues on the neutronics of pulsed spallation neutron sources, mainly for neutron scattering experiments, are reviewed to give a wide circle of readers a better understanding of these sources in order to achieve a high neutronic performance. Starting from what neutrons are needed, what the spallation reaction is and how to produce slow-neutrons more efficiently, the outline of the target and moderator neutronics are explained. Various efforts with some new concepts or ideas have already been devoted to obtaining the highest possible slow-neutron intensity with desired pulse characteristics. This paper also reviews the recent progress of such efforts, mainly focused on moderator neutronics, since moderators are the final devices of a neutron source, which determine the source performance. Various governing parameters for neutron-pulse characteristics such as material issues, geometrical parameters (shape and dimensions), the target-moderator coupling scheme, the ortho-para-hydrogen ratio, po...

  19. Neutronic reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wende, C.W.J.

    1976-01-01

    The method of operating a water-cooled neutronic reactor having a graphite moderator is described which comprises flowing a gaseous mixture of carbon dioxide and helium, in which the helium comprises 40--60 volume percent of the mixture, in contact with the graphite moderator. 2 claims, 4 figures

  20. Neutron reflectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cousin Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The specular neutron reflectivity is a technique enabling the measurement of neutron scattering length density profile perpendicular to the plane of a surface or an interface, and thereby the profile of chemical composition. The characteristic sizes that are probed range from around 5 Å up 5000 Å. It is a scattering technique that averages information on the entire surface and it is therefore not possible to obtain information within the plane of the interface. The specific properties of neutrons (possibility of tuning the contrast by isotopic substitution, sensitivity to magnetism, negligible absorption, low energy of the incident neutrons makes it particularly interesting in the fields of soft matter, biophysics and magnetic thin films. This course is a basic introduction to the technique and does not address the magnetic reflectivity. It is composed of three parts describing respectively its principle and its formalism, the experimental aspects of the method (spectrometers, samples and two examples related to the materials for energy.

  1. Methods for absorbing neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillen, Donna P [Idaho Falls, ID; Longhurst, Glen R [Idaho Falls, ID; Porter, Douglas L [Idaho Falls, ID; Parry, James R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-07-24

    A conduction cooled neutron absorber may include a metal matrix composite that comprises a metal having a thermal neutron cross-section of at least about 50 barns and a metal having a thermal conductivity of at least about 1 W/cmK. Apparatus for providing a neutron flux having a high fast-to-thermal neutron ratio may include a source of neutrons that produces fast neutrons and thermal neutrons. A neutron absorber positioned adjacent the neutron source absorbs at least some of the thermal neutrons so that a region adjacent the neutron absorber has a fast-to-thermal neutron ratio of at least about 15. A coolant in thermal contact with the neutron absorber removes heat from the neutron absorber.

  2. Neutron stars as cosmic neutron matter laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pines, D.

    1986-01-01

    Recent developments which have radically changed our understanding of the dynamics of neutron star superfluids and the free precession of neutron stars are summarized, and the extent to which neutron stars are cosmic neutron matter laboratories is discussed. 17 refs., 1 tab

  3. Basic of Neutron NDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trahan, Alexis Chanel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-15

    The objectives of this presentation are to introduce the basic physics of neutron production, interactions and detection; identify the processes that generate neutrons; explain the most common neutron mechanism, spontaneous and induced fission and (a,n) reactions; describe the properties of neutron from different sources; recognize advantages of neutron measurements techniques; recognize common neutrons interactions; explain neutron cross section measurements; describe the fundamental of 3He detector function and designs; and differentiate between passive and active assay techniques.

  4. Organisation and management of the first clinical trial of BNCT in Europe (EORTC Protocol 11961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauerwein, W.; Rassow, J.; Hideghety, K.; Sack, H.; Moss, R.; Stecher-Rasmussen, F.; Wolbers, J.G.

    1999-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy is based on the ability of the isotope 10 B to capture thermal neutrons and to disintegrate instantaneously producing high LET particles. The only neutron beam available in Europe for such a treatment is based at the European High Flux Reactor HFR at Petten (The Netherlands). The European Commission, owners of the reactor, decided that the potential benefit of the facility should be opened to all European citizens and therefore insisted on a multinational approach to perform the first clinical trial in Europe on BNCT. This precondition had to be respected as well as the national laws and regulations. Together with the Dutch authorities actions were undertaken to overcome the obvious legal problems. Furthermore, the clinical trial at Petten takes place in a nuclear research reactor, which apart from being conducted in a non-hospital environment, is per se known to be dangerous. It was therefore of the utmost importance that special attention is given to safety, beyond normal rules, and to the training of staff. In itself, the trial is an unusual Phase I study, introducing a new drug with a new irradiation modality, with really an unknown dose-effect relationship. This trial must follow optimal procedures, which underscore the quality and qualified manner of performance. (orig.)

  5. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner

    2013-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, symmetry of crystals, nanostructures investigated by small-angle neutron scattering, structure of macromolecules, spin dependent and magnetic scattering, structural analysis, neutron reflectometry, magnetic nanostructures, inelastic neutron scattering, strongly correlated electrons, polymer dynamics, applications of neutron scattering. (HSI)

  6. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner

    2012-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron scattering in contemporary research, neutron sources, symmetry of crystals, diffraction, nanostructures investigated by small-angle neutron scattering, the structure of macromolecules, spin dependent and magnetic scattering, structural analysis, neutron reflectometry, magnetic nanostructures, inelastic scattering, strongly correlated electrons, dynamics of macromolecules, applications of neutron scattering. (HSI)

  7. Pulsed neutron generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bespalov, D.F.; Bykovskii, Yu.A.; Vergun, I.I.; Kozlovskii, K.I.; Kozyrev, Yu.P.; Leonov, R.K.; Simagin, B.I.; Tsybin, A.S.; Shikanov, A.Ie.

    1986-03-01

    The paper describes a new device for generating pulsed neutron fields, utilized in nuclear geophysics for carrying out pulsed neutron logging and activation analysis under field conditions. The invention employs a sealed-off neutron tube with a laser ion source which increases neutron yield to the level of 10 neutrons per second or higher. 2 refs., 1 fig

  8. Neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    The annual report on hand gives an overview of the research work carried out in the Laboratory for Neutron Scattering (LNS) of the ETH Zuerich in 1990. Using the method of neutron scattering, it is possible to examine in detail the static and dynamic properties of the condensed material. In accordance with the multidisciplined character of the method, the LNS has for years maintained a system of intensive co-operation with numerous institutes in the areas of biology, chemistry, solid-state physics, crystallography and materials research. In 1990 over 100 scientists from more than 40 research groups both at home and abroad took part in the experiments. It was again a pleasure to see the number of graduate students present, who were studying for a doctorate and who could be introduced into the neutron scattering during their stay at the LNS and thus were in the position to touch on central ways of looking at a problem in their dissertation using this modern experimental method of solid-state research. In addition to the numerous and interesting ways of formulating the questions to explain the structure, nowadays the scientific programme increasingly includes particularly topical studies in connection with high temperature-supraconductors and materials research

  9. Neutron radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    The rationale for the application of neutron radiation for the treatment of malignancies is well established based on radiobiological studies. These factors include the presence of tissue hypoxia, radiation response as a function of cell cycle kinetics, the repair capacity of the malignant cells and the regeneration of malignant cells during a fractionated course of radiation. Despite the constraints under which the clinical trials to date have been conducted, promising results have been obtained. Randomized trials have demonstrated that neutron therapy is the treatment of choice for inoperable salivary gland carcinomas. A randomized trial of the RTOG has demonstrated a probable advantage for neutron radiation in the treatment of advanced prostate carcinomas but is yet to be confirmed. An improvement in local control has also been observed for selected sarcomas. Equivocal or contradictory results have been obtained for squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck, bronchogenic carcinomas, advanced rectal, transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder and cervical carcinomas. The practical consequences of these radiobiological and clinical observations on the current generation of clinical trials is discussed

  10. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a next-generation spallation neutron source for neutron scattering that is currently the most powerful neutron source in...

  11. Recycling and transmutation of nuclear waste. ECN-Petten and Belgonucleaire contributions in the framework of 'Partitioning and transmutation studies of the 4th CEC programme on rad waste management and disposal'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahams, K.; Kloosterman, J.L.; Gruppelaar, H.; Brusselaers, P.; Evrard, G.; La Fuente, A.; Maldague, T.; Pilate, S.; Renard, A.

    1995-12-01

    A 'Strategy study on nuclear waste transmutation' by Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN) and Belgonucleaire (BN) in the frame of the EU R and D Programme 1990/1994 on management and storage of radioactive waste has been executed in collaboration with AEA Technology, CEA and Siemens. First of all the motivation for transmuting long-lived radioactive products has been formulated, next transmutation of Tc-99 and I-129 in fission reactors has been studied for the PWR, HFR, Superphenix, and the CANDU reactor. Cross section libraries have been improved for ORIGEN-S on the basis of JEF2.2 and EAF3. This study has been amended by a graphical representation of important reactions for activation of cladding and inert matrix materials. By means of the derived new data libraries, some sample calculations on transmutation of americium in thermal reactors have been performed. Implications of recycling plutonium and americium in the form of MOX fuel in light water reactors have been investigated. It became clear from the present study that trasmutation of the existing plutonium has the highest priority and that reduction of minor-actinides is next on the priority list. Thirdly, the (difficult) large-scale transmutation of Tc-99 and of I-129 could reduce the leakage dose risks. It also seems most worthwhile to be careful with naturally occurring U-234 in the waste, as this will in the long run lead to a substantial increase of the 'natural' radon dose in the neighbourhood of the storage facility. (orig.)

  12. Recycling and transmutation of nuclear waste. ECN-Petten and Belgonucleaire contributions in the framework of `Partitioning and transmutation studies of the 4th CEC programme on rad waste management and disposal`

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrahams, K. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands); Kloosterman, J.L. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands); Gruppelaar, H. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands); Brusselaers, P. [Belgonucleaire S.A., Brussels (Belgium); Evrard, G. [Belgonucleaire S.A., Brussels (Belgium); La Fuente, A. [Belgonucleaire S.A., Brussels (Belgium); Maldague, T. [Belgonucleaire S.A., Brussels (Belgium); Pilate, S. [Belgonucleaire S.A., Brussels (Belgium); Renard, A. [Belgonucleaire S.A., Brussels (Belgium)

    1995-12-01

    A `Strategy study on nuclear waste transmutation` by Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN) and Belgonucleaire (BN) in the frame of the EU R and D Programme 1990/1994 on management and storage of radioactive waste has been executed in collaboration with AEA Technology, CEA and Siemens. First of all the motivation for transmuting long-lived radioactive products has been formulated, next transmutation of Tc-99 and I-129 in fission reactors has been studied for the PWR, HFR, Superphenix, and the CANDU reactor. Cross section libraries have been improved for ORIGEN-S on the basis of JEF2.2 and EAF3. This study has been amended by a graphical representation of important reactions for activation of cladding and inert matrix materials. By means of the derived new data libraries, some sample calculations on transmutation of americium in thermal reactors have been performed. Implications of recycling plutonium and americium in the form of MOX fuel in light water reactors have been investigated. It became clear from the present study that trasmutation of the existing plutonium has the highest priority and that reduction of minor-actinides is next on the priority list. Thirdly, the (difficult) large-scale transmutation of Tc-99 and of I-129 could reduce the leakage dose risks. It also seems most worthwhile to be careful with naturally occurring U-234 in the waste, as this will in the long run lead to a substantial increase of the `natural` radon dose in the neighbourhood of the storage facility. (orig.).

  13. High energy neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavron, A.; Morley, K.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.; Ullmann, J.; Yates, G.; Zumbro, J.

    1996-01-01

    High-energy spallation neutron sources are now being considered in the US and elsewhere as a replacement for neutron beams produced by reactors. High-energy and high intensity neutron beams, produced by unmoderated spallation sources, open potential new vistas of neutron radiography. The authors discuss the basic advantages and disadvantages of high-energy neutron radiography, and consider some experimental results obtained at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility at Los Alamos

  14. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, neutron properties and elastic scattering, correlation functions measured by scattering experiments, symmetry of crystals, applications of neutron scattering, polarized-neutron scattering and polarization analysis, structural analysis, magnetic and lattice excitation studied by inelastic neutron scattering, macromolecules and self-assembly, dynamics of macromolecules, correlated electrons in complex transition-metal oxides, surfaces, interfaces, and thin films investigated by neutron reflectometry, nanomagnetism. (HSI)

  15. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner

    2010-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, neutron properties and elastic scattering, correlation functions measured by scattering experiments, symmetry of crystals, applications of neutron scattering, polarized-neutron scattering and polarization analysis, structural analysis, magnetic and lattice excitation studied by inelastic neutron scattering, macromolecules and self-assembly, dynamics of macromolecules, correlated electrons in complex transition-metal oxides, surfaces, interfaces, and thin films investigated by neutron reflectometry, nanomagnetism. (HSI)

  16. Neutron Therapy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Neutron Therapy Facility provides a moderate intensity, broad energy spectrum neutron beam that can be used for short term irradiations for radiobiology (cells)...

  17. Calculations of neutron spectra after neutron-neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, B E [Gettysburg College, Box 405, Gettysburg, PA 17325 (United States); Stephenson, S L [Gettysburg College, Box 405, Gettysburg, PA 17325 (United States); Howell, C R [Duke University and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States); Mitchell, G E [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States); Tornow, W [Duke University and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States); Furman, W I [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Lychagin, E V [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Muzichka, A Yu [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Nekhaev, G V [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Strelkov, A V [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Sharapov, E I [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Shvetsov, V N [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2004-09-01

    A direct neutron-neutron scattering length, a{sub nn}, measurement with the goal of 3% accuracy (0.5 fm) is under preparation at the aperiodic pulsed reactor YAGUAR. A direct measurement of a{sub nn} will not only help resolve conflicting results of a{sub nn} by indirect means, but also in comparison to the proton-proton scattering length, a{sub pp}, shed light on the charge-symmetry of the nuclear force. We discuss in detail the analysis of the nn-scattering data in terms of a simple analytical expression. We also discuss calibration measurements using the time-of-flight spectra of neutrons scattered on He and Ar gases and the neutron activation technique. In particular, we calculate the neutron velocity and time-of-flight spectra after scattering neutrons on neutrons and after scattering neutrons on He and Ar atoms for the proposed experimental geometry, using a realistic neutron flux spectrum-Maxwellian plus epithermal tail. The shape of the neutron spectrum after scattering is appreciably different from the initial spectrum, due to collisions between thermal-thermal and thermal-epithermal neutrons. At the same time, the integral over the Maxwellian part of the realistic scattering spectrum differs by only about 6 per cent from that of a pure Maxwellian nn-scattering spectrum.

  18. Performance characterisation and optimisation of the HIPOS positron generator setup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucek, K., E-mail: kamil.tucek@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy and Transport, P.O. Box 2, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Zeman, A.; Daquino, G.; Debarberis, L. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy and Transport, P.O. Box 2, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Hogenbirk, A. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), P.O. Box 25, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01

    As part of an Exploratory Research Project at the Institute for Energy and Transport (Joint Research Centre of the European Commission), a feasibility assessment was performed for the construction and placement of a high-intensity positron facility (HIPOS) in a beam tube, HB9, at the High flux reactor (HFR) in Petten. This paper reports on the results of Monte Carlo simulations to optimise the concept of the HIPOS positron generator and to determine the performance characteristics of the chosen generator design. In the first step, a detailed model of the HFR reactor core, reflector, instrumentation and HB9 beam tube was prepared, and coupled neutron and photon transport calculations were carried out with the MCNP4C3 code to establish neutron and photon source terms on boundary surfaces of the HB9 beam tube. These sources were subsequently used with the MCNPX code to optimise the positron generator concept and geometry. The results showed that the positron beam can reach an integral intensity of 10{sup 13} e{sup +}/s before the moderation stage, easily meeting the specified target and confirming the hypothesis that very high positron yields can be obtained by using combined neutron and gamma radiation sources from a high flux reactor. Full details of the research work are reported in this study.

  19. Human applications of the INEL patient treatment planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, F.; Wessol, D.; Atkinson, C.; Nigg, D.

    1995-01-01

    During the past few years, murine and large animal research, as well as human studies have provided data to the point where human clinical trials have been initiated at the BMRR using BPA-F for gliomas and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR) using BPA for melanomas of the extremeties. It is expected that glioma trials using BSH will proceed soon at the Petten High Flux Reactor (HFR) in the Netherlands. The first human glioma epithermal boron neutron capture therapy application was performed at the BMRR in the fall of 1994. This was a collaborative effort by BNL, Beth Israel Manhattan hospital, and INEL. The INEL planning system was chosen to perform dose predictions for this application

  20. Neutron matter, symmetry energy and neutron stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefano, Gandolfi [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Steiner, Andrew W [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in quantum Monte Carlo with modern nucleon-nucleon interactions have enabled the successful description of properties of light nuclei and neutron-rich matter. Of particular interest is the nuclear symmetry energy, the energy cost of creating an isospin asymmetry, and its connection to the structure of neutron stars. Combining these advances with recent observations of neutron star masses and radii gives insight into the equation of state of neutron-rich matter near and above the saturation density. In particular, neutron star radius measurements constrain the derivative of the symmetry energy.

  1. Directional epithermal neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Givens, W.W.; Mills, W.R. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A borehole tool for epithermal neutron die-away logging of subterranean formations surrounding a borehole is described which consists of: (a) a pulsed source of fast neutrons for irradiating the formations surrounding a borehole, (b) at least one neutron counter for counting epithermal neutrons returning to the borehole from the irradiated formations, (c) a neutron moderating material, (d) an outer thermal neutron shield providing a housing for the counter and the moderating material, (e) an inner thermal neutron shield dividing the housing so as to provide a first compartment bounded by the inner thermal neutron shield and a first portion of the outer thermal neutron shield and a second compartment bounded by the inner thermal neutron shield and a second portion of the outer thermal neutron shield, the counter being positioned within the first compartment and the moderating material being positioned within the second compartment, and (f) means for positioning the borehole tool against one side of the borehole wall and azimuthally orienting the borehole tool such that the first chamber is in juxtaposition with the borehole wall, the formation epithermal neutrons penetrating into the first chamber through the first portion of the outer thermal neutron shield are detected by the neutron counter for die-away measurement, thereby maximizing the directional sensitivty of the neutron counter to formation epithermal neutrons, the borehole fluid epithermal neutrons penetrating into the second chamber through the second chamber through the second portion of the outer thermal neutron shield are largely slowed down and lowered in energy by the moderating material and absorbed by the inner thermal neutron shield before penetrating into the first chamber, thereby minimizing the directional sensitivity of the neutron counter to borehole fluid epithermal neutrons

  2. Powder neutron diffractometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.

    2002-01-01

    Basic properties and applications of powder neutron Diffractometers are described for optimum use of the continuous neutron beams. These instruments are equipped with position sensitive detectors, neutron guide tubes, and both high intensity and high resolution modes of operation are possible .The principles of both direct and Fourier reverse time-of-flight neutron Diffractometers are also given

  3. Neutron dosimetry - A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, J W

    1955-03-29

    This review summarizes information on the following subjects: (1) physical processes of importance in neutron dosimetry; (2) biological effects of neutrons; (3) neutron sources; and (4) instruments and methods used in neutron dosimetry. Also, possible improvements in dosimetry instrumentation are outlined and discussed. (author)

  4. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner [eds.

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, symmetry of crystals, diffraction, nanostructures investigated by small-angle neutron scattering, the structure of macromolecules, spin dependent and magnetic scattering, structural analysis, neutron reflectometry, magnetic nanostructures, inelastic scattering, strongly correlated electrons, dynamics of macromolecules, applications of neutron scattering. (HSI)

  5. Neutron generator control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peelman, H.E.; Bridges, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    A method is described of controlling the neutron output of a neutron generator tube used in neutron well logging. The system operates by monitoring the target beam current and comparing a function of this current with a reference voltage level to develop a control signal used in a series regulator to control the replenisher current of the neutron generator tube. (U.K.)

  6. Genetic effect of neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luchnik, N.V.; Sevan'kaev, A.V.; Fesenko, Eh.V.

    1984-01-01

    Gene mutations resulting from neutron effect are considered, but attention is focused on chromosome mutations. Dose curves for different energy of neutrons obtained at different objects are obtained which makes it possible to consider RBE of neutrons depending on their energy and radiation dose and to get some information on the neutron effect on heredity

  7. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner

    2010-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, symmetry of crystals, diffraction, nanostructures investigated by small-angle neutron scattering, the structure of macromolecules, spin dependent and magnetic scattering, structural analysis, neutron reflectometry, magnetic nanostructures, inelastic scattering, strongly correlated electrons, dynamics of macromolecules, applications of neutron scattering. (HSI)

  8. Neutronics of pulsed spallation neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Noboru

    2003-01-01

    Various topics and issues on the neutronics of pulsed spallation neutron sources, mainly for neutron scattering experiments, are reviewed to give a wide circle of readers a better understanding of these sources in order to achieve a high neutronic performance. Starting from what neutrons are needed, what the spallation reaction is and how to produce slow-neutrons more efficiently, the outline of the target and moderator neutronics are explained. Various efforts with some new concepts or ideas have already been devoted to obtaining the highest possible slow-neutron intensity with desired pulse characteristics. This paper also reviews the recent progress of such efforts, mainly focused on moderator neutronics, since moderators are the final devices of a neutron source, which determine the source performance. Various governing parameters for neutron-pulse characteristics such as material issues, geometrical parameters (shape and dimensions), the target-moderator coupling scheme, the ortho-para-hydrogen ratio, poisoning, etc are discussed, aiming at a high performance pulsed spallation source

  9. Neutron shieldings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarutani, Kohei

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the stresses resulted by the core bendings to the base of an entrance nozzle. Constitution: Three types of round shielding rods of different diameter are arranged in a hexagonal tube. The hexagonal tube is provided with several spacer pads receiving the loads from the core constrain mechanism at its outer circumference, a handling head for a fuel exchanger at its top and an entrance nozzle for self-holding the neutron shieldings and flowing heat-removing coolants at its bottom. The diameters for R 1 , R 2 and R 3 for the round shielding rods are designed as: 0.1 R 1 2 1 and 0.2 R 1 2 1 . Since a plurality of shielding rods of small diameter are provided, soft structure are obtained and a plurality of coolant paths are formed. (Furukawa, Y.)

  10. Miscellaneous neutron techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iddings, F.A.

    1976-01-01

    Attention is brought to the less often uses of neutrons in the areas of neutron radiography, well logging, and neutron gaging. Emphasis on neutron radiography points toward the isotopic sensitivity of the method versus the classical bulk applications. Also recognized is the ability of neutron radiography to produce image changes that correspond to thickness and density changes obtained in photon radiography. Similarly, neutron gaging applications center on the measurement of radiography. Similarly, neutron gaging applications center on the measurement of water, oil, or plastics in industrial samples. Well logging extends the neutron gaging to encompass many neutron properties and reactions besides thermalization and capture. Neutron gaging also gives information on organic structure and concentrations of a variety of elements or specific compounds in selected matrices

  11. Nuclear reactor neutron shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speaker, Daniel P; Neeley, Gary W; Inman, James B

    2017-09-12

    A nuclear reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel and a nuclear reactor core comprising fissile material disposed in a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel. The lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel is disposed in a reactor cavity. An annular neutron stop is located at an elevation above the uppermost elevation of the nuclear reactor core. The annular neutron stop comprises neutron absorbing material filling an annular gap between the reactor pressure vessel and the wall of the reactor cavity. The annular neutron stop may comprise an outer neutron stop ring attached to the wall of the reactor cavity, and an inner neutron stop ring attached to the reactor pressure vessel. An excore instrument guide tube penetrates through the annular neutron stop, and a neutron plug comprising neutron absorbing material is disposed in the tube at the penetration through the neutron stop.

  12. The representation of neutron polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrne, J.

    1979-01-01

    Neutron beam polarization representation is discussed under the headings; transfer matrices, coherent parity violation for neutrons, neutron spin rotation in helical magnetic fields, polarization and interference. (UK)

  13. Pulsed neutron sources for epithermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windsor, C.G.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown how accelerator based neutron sources, giving a fast neutron pulse of short duration compared to the neutron moderation time, promise to open up a new field of epithermal neutron scattering. The three principal methods of fast neutron production: electrons, protons and fission boosters will be compared. Pulsed reactors are less suitable for epithermal neutrons and will only be briefly mentioned. The design principle of the target producing fast neutrons, the moderator and reflector to slow them down to epithermal energies, and the cell with its beam tubes and shielding will all be described with examples taken from the new Harwell electron linac to be commissioned in 1978. A general comparison of pulsed neutron performance with reactors is fraught with difficulties but has been attempted. Calculation of the new pulsed source fluxes and pulse widths is now being performed but we have taken the practical course of basing all comparisons on extrapolations from measurements on the old 1958 Harwell electron linac. Comparisons for time-of-flight and crystal monochromator experiments show reactors to be at their best at long wavelengths, at coarse resolution, and for experiments needing a specific incident wavelength. Even existing pulsed sources are shown to compete with the high flux reactors in experiments where the hot neutron flux and the time-of-flight methods can be best exploited. The sources under construction can open a new field of inelastic neutron scattering based on energy transfer up to an electron volt and beyond

  14. Investigation of current status in Europe and USA on boron neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-11-01

    This report describes on the spot investigation results of current status of medical irradiation in Europe and USA at Feb. 1999. In HFR (Netherlands), the phase 1 study with the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the EU had been already finished in those days, at the same time, an improvement of medical irradiation field of VTT(Finland) had been finishing and then clinical trial research had been about to start. On the other hand, phase 1 studies by two groups of BNL (Brook heaven National Laboratory) and MIT (Nuclear Engineering of Massachusetts Institute of Technology) in US were now in almost final stage, and they would start on phase 2 study. Either reactors of MIT and BNL were in modification to increase neutron flux, especially that employing fission converter into the irradiation facility and installation of irradiation room were carrying out in the former. In Europe and USA, the accelerator-based BNCT planes are now in progress vigorously, and will have reality. A reform of dynamitron accelerator at University of Birmingham was progressed, and the clinical treatment would be started from September 2000. The accelerator group at MIT has a small type of tandem accelerator, and they were performing basic experiment for BNCS (Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy) with this accelerator. The concept design for an accelerator and a moderator had been finished at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of Berkeley. (author)

  15. Irradiation effects on aluminium and beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieth, M.

    1992-01-01

    The High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten (The Netherlands) is a 45 MW light water cooled and moderated research reactor. The vessel was replaced in 1984 after more than 20 years of operation because doubts had arisen over the condition of the aluminium alloy construction material. Data on the mechanical properties of the aluminium alloy Al 5154 with and without neutron irradiation are necessary for the safety analysis of the new HFR vessel which is constructed from the same material as the old vessel. Fatigue, fracture mechanics (crack growth and fracture toughness) and tensile properties have been obtained from several experimental testing programmes with materials of the new and the old HFR vessel. 1) Low-cycle fatigue testing has been carried out on non-irradiated specimens from stock material of the new HFR vessel. The number of cycles to failure ranges from 90 to more than 50,000 for applied strain from 3.0% to 0.4%; 2) Fatigue crack growth rate testing has been conducted: - with unirradiated specimens from stock material of the new vessel; - with irradiated specimens from the remnants of the old core box. Irradiation has a minor effect on the sub-critical fatigue crack growth rate. The ultimate increase of the mean crack growth rate amounts to a factor of 2. However crack extension is strongly reduced due to the smaller crack length for crack growth instability (reduction of K IC ). - Irradiated material from the core box walls of the old vessel has been used for fracture toughness testing. The conditional fracture toughness values K IQ ranges from 30.3 down to 16.5 MPa√m. The lowermost meaningful 'K IC ' is 17.7 MPa√m corresponding to the thermal fluence of 7.5 10 26 n/m 2 for the End of Life (EOL) of the old vessel. - Testing carried out on irradiated material from the remnants of the old HFR core box shows an ultimate neutron irradiation hardening of 35 points increase of HSR 15N and an ultimate tensile yield stress of 589 MPa corresponding to the

  16. Neutron in biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niimura, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-11-01

    Neutron in biology can provide an experimental method of directly locating relationship of proteins and DNA. However, there are relatively few experimental study of such objects since it takes a lot of time to collect a sufficient number of Bragg reflections and inelastic spectra due to the low flux of neutron illuminating the sample. Since a next generation neutron source of JAERI will be 5MW spallation neutron source and its effective neutron flux will be 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 3} times higher than the one of JRR-3M, neutron in biology will open a completely new world for structural biology. (author)

  17. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  18. Neutron in biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niimura, Nobuo

    1997-01-01

    Neutron in biology can provide an experimental method of directly locating relationship of proteins and DNA. However, there are relatively few experimental study of such objects since it takes a lot of time to collect a sufficient number of Bragg reflections and inelastic spectra due to the low flux of neutron illuminating the sample. Since a next generation neutron source of JAERI will be 5MW spallation neutron source and its effective neutron flux will be 10 2 to 10 3 times higher than the one of JRR-3M, neutron in biology will open a completely new world for structural biology. (author)

  19. A neutron activation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambardanishvili, T.S.; Kolomiitsev, M.A.; Zakharina, T.Y.; Dundua, V.J.; Chikhladze, N.V.

    1973-01-01

    The present invention concerns a neutron activation detector made from a moulded and hardened composition. According to the invention, that composition contains an activable substance constituted by at least two chemical elements and/or compounds of at least two chemical elements. Each of these chemical elements is capable of reacting with the neutrons forming radio-active isotopes with vatious levels of energy during desintegration. This neutron detector is mainly suitable for measuring integral thermal neutron and fast neutron fluxes during irradiation of the sample, and also for measuring the intensities of neutron fields [fr

  20. Very slow neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, A.

    1983-01-01

    The history is briefly presented of the research so far of very slow neutrons and their basic properties are explained. The methods are described of obtaining very slow neutrons and the problems of their preservation are discussed. The existence of very slow neutrons makes it possible to perform experiments which may deepen the knowledge of the fundamental properties of neutrons. Their wavelength approximates that of visible radiation. The possibilities and use are discussed of neutron optical systems (neutron microscope) which could be an effective instrument for the study of the detailed arrangement, especially of organic substances. (B.S.)

  1. Reactor neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najzer, M.; Pauko, M.; Glumac, B.; Acquah, I.N.; Moskon, F.

    1977-01-01

    An analysis of requirements and possibilities for experimental neutron spectrum determination during the reactor pressure vessel surveil lance programme is given. Fast neutron spectrum and neutron dose rate were measured in the Fast neutron irradiation facility of our TRIGA reactor. It was shown that the facility can be used for calibration of neutron dosimeters and for irradiation of samples sensitive to neutron radiation. The investigation of the unfolding algorithm ITER was continued. Based on this investigations are two specialized unfolding program packages ITERAD and ITERGS written this year. They are able to unfold data from activation detectors and NaI(T1) gamma spectrometer respectively

  2. Neutron stochastic transport theory with delayed neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz-Cobo, J.L.; Verdu, G.

    1987-01-01

    From the stochastic transport theory with delayed neutrons, the Boltzmann transport equation with delayed neutrons for the average flux emerges in a natural way without recourse to any approximation. From this theory a general expression is obtained for the Feynman Y-function when delayed neutrons are included. The single mode approximation for the particular case of a subcritical assembly is developed, and it is shown that Y-function reduces to the familiar expression quoted in many books, when delayed neutrons are not considered, and spatial and source effects are not included. (author)

  3. Neutron Beam Filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of filters is to transmit neutrons with selected energy, while remove unwanted ones from the incident neutron beam. This reduces the background, and the number of spurious. The types of commonly used now-a-day neutron filters and their properties are discussed in the present work. There are three major types of neutron filters. The first type is filter of selective thermal neutron. It transmits the main reflected neutrons from a crystal monochromate, while reject the higher order contaminations accompanying the main one. Beams coming from the moderator always contain unwanted radiation like fast neutrons and gamma-rays which contribute to experimental background and to the biological hazard potential. Such filter type is called filter of whole thermal neutron spectrum. The third filter type is it transmits neutrons with energies in the resonance energy range (En . 1 KeV). The main idea of such neutron filter technique is the use of large quantities of a certain material which have the deep interference minima in its total neutron cross-section. By transmitting reactor neutrons through bulk layer of such material, one can obtain the quasimonochromatic neutron lines instead of white reactor spectrum.

  4. Neutron anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacon, G.E. [Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    The familiar extremes of crystalline material are single-crystals and random powders. In between these two extremes are polycrystalline aggregates, not randomly arranged but possessing some preferred orientation and this is the form taken by constructional materials, be they steel girders or the bones of a human or animal skeleton. The details of the preferred orientation determine the ability of the material to withstand stress in any direction. In the case of bone the crucial factor is the orientation of the c-axes of the mineral content - the crystals of the hexagonal hydroxyapatite - and this can readily be determined by neutron diffraction. In particular it can be measured over the volume of a piece of bone, utilizing distances ranging from 1mm to 10mm. The major practical problem is to avoid the intense incoherent scattering from the hydrogen in the accompanying collagen; this can best be achieved by heat-treatment and it is demonstrated that this does not affect the underlying apatite. These studies of bone give leading anatomical information on the life and activities of humans and animals - including, for example, the life history of the human femur, the locomotion of sheep, the fracture of the legs of racehorses and the life-styles of Neolithic tribes. We conclude that the material is placed economically in the bone to withstand the expected stresses of life and the environment. The experimental results are presented in terms of the magnitude of the 0002 apatite reflection. It so happens that for a random powder the 0002, 1121 reflections, which are neighboring lines in the powder pattern, are approximately equal in intensity. The latter reflection, being of manifold multiplicity, is scarcely affected by preferred orientation so that the numerical value of the 0002/1121 ratio serves quite accurately as a quantitative measure of the degree of orientation of the c-axes in any chosen direction for a sample of bone.

  5. Neutron anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacon, G.E.

    1994-01-01

    The familiar extremes of crystalline material are single-crystals and random powders. In between these two extremes are polycrystalline aggregates, not randomly arranged but possessing some preferred orientation and this is the form taken by constructional materials, be they steel girders or the bones of a human or animal skeleton. The details of the preferred orientation determine the ability of the material to withstand stress in any direction. In the case of bone the crucial factor is the orientation of the c-axes of the mineral content - the crystals of the hexagonal hydroxyapatite - and this can readily be determined by neutron diffraction. In particular it can be measured over the volume of a piece of bone, utilizing distances ranging from 1mm to 10mm. The major practical problem is to avoid the intense incoherent scattering from the hydrogen in the accompanying collagen; this can best be achieved by heat-treatment and it is demonstrated that this does not affect the underlying apatite. These studies of bone give leading anatomical information on the life and activities of humans and animals - including, for example, the life history of the human femur, the locomotion of sheep, the fracture of the legs of racehorses and the life-styles of Neolithic tribes. We conclude that the material is placed economically in the bone to withstand the expected stresses of life and the environment. The experimental results are presented in terms of the magnitude of the 0002 apatite reflection. It so happens that for a random powder the 0002, 1121 reflections, which are neighboring lines in the powder pattern, are approximately equal in intensity. The latter reflection, being of manifold multiplicity, is scarcely affected by preferred orientation so that the numerical value of the 0002/1121 ratio serves quite accurately as a quantitative measure of the degree of orientation of the c-axes in any chosen direction for a sample of bone

  6. Basics of Neutrons for First Responders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rees, Brian G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-02-05

    These are slides from a presentation on the basics of neutrons. A few topics covered are: common origins of terrestrial neutron radiation, neutron sources, neutron energy, interactions, detecting neutrons, gammas from neutron interactions, neutron signatures in gamma-ray spectra, neutrons and NaI, neutron fluence to dose (msV), instruments' response to neutrons.

  7. Neutron radiography using neutron imaging plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chankow, Nares; Wonglee, Sarinrat

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The aims of this research are to study properties of neutron imaging plate, to obtain a suitable condition for neutron radiography and to use the neutron imaging plate for testing of materials nondestructively. The experiments were carried out by using a neutron beam from the Thai Research Reactor TRR-1/M1 at a power of 1.2 MW. A BAS-ND 2040 FUJI neutron imaging plate and a MX125 Kodak X-ray film/Gadolinium neutron converter screen combination were tested for comparison. It was found that the photostimulated light (PSL) read out of the imaging plate was directly proportional to the exposure time. It was also found that radiography with neutron using the imaging plate was approximately 40 times faster than the conventional neutron radiography using x-ray film/Gd converter screen combination. The sensitivity of the imaging plate to gamma-rays was investigated by using gamma-rays from an 192 Ir and a 60 Co radiographic sources. The imaging plate was found to be 5-6 times less sensitive to gamma-rays than a FUJI BAS-MS 2040 gamma-ray imaging plate. Finally, some specimens were selected to be radiographed with neutrons using the imaging plate and the x-ray film/Gd converter screen combination in comparison to x-rays. Parts containing light elements could be clearly observed by the two neutron radiographic techniques. It could be concluded that the image quality from the neutron imaging plate was comparable to the conventional x-ray film/Gd converter screen combination but the exposure time could be approximately reduced by a factor of 40

  8. Sources of polarized neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, L.

    1983-01-01

    Various sources of polarized neutrons are reviewed. Monoenergetic source produced with unpolarized or polarized beams, white sources of polarized neutrons, production by transmissions through polarized hydrogen targets and polarized thermal neutronsare discussed, with appropriate applications included. (U.K.)

  9. Neutron delayed choice experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    Delayed choice experiments for neutrons can help extend the interpretation of quantum mechanical phenomena. They may also rule out alternative explanations which static interference experiments allow. A simple example of a feasible neutron test is presented and discussed. (orig.)

  10. Neutron radiation capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    For all stable and experimentally studied radionuclides evaluated data are presented on cross sections of thermal neutrons, on resonance integrals and medium neutron cross sections with energy of 30 KeV. Refs, figs and tabs

  11. Neutron radiography in metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rant, J.; Ilic, R.

    1977-01-01

    The review surveys microneutronographic and neutron-induced autoradiographic techniques and their applications in metallurgy. A brief survey of applications of neutron radiography as a method of non-destructive testing to some macroscopic problems in metallurgy is included. (author)

  12. Applications of neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yasuo

    1999-01-01

    The present state of art of applications of neutron irradiation is overviewed taking neutron activation analysis, prompt gamma-ray analysis, fission/alpha track methods, boron neutron capture therapy as examples. What is common among them is that the technologies are nearly matured for wide use by non- nuclear scientists. But the environment around research reactors is not prospective. These applications should be encouraged by incorporating in the neutron science society. (author)

  13. Neutron beams for therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuplenikov, Eh.L.; Dovbnya, A.N.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Tsymbal, V.A.; Kandybej, S.S.

    2011-01-01

    It was given the analysis and generalization of the study results carried out during some decades in many world countries on application of thermal, epithermal and fast neutrons for neutron, gamma-neutron and neutron-capture therapy. The main attention is focused on the practical application possibility of the accumulated experience for the base creation for medical research and the cancer patients effective treatment.

  14. Polarimetric neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasset, F.

    2001-01-01

    Polarimetric Neutron Scattering in introduced, both by, explaining methodological issues and the corresponding instrumental developments. After a short overview of neutron spin polarization and the neutron polarization 3d-vector a pictorial approach of the microscopic theory is used to show how a polarized beam interacts with lattice and magnetic Fourier components in a crystal. Examples are given of using Spherical Neutron Polarimetry (SNP) and the corresponding Cryopad polarimeter for the investigation of non-collinear magnetic structures. (R.P.)

  15. Reactor Neutron Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksenov, V.L.

    1994-01-01

    The present status and the prospects for development of reactor neutron sources for neutron scattering research in the world are considered. The fields of application of neutron scattering relative to synchrotron radiation, the creation stages of reactors (steady state and pulsed) and their position in comparison with spallation neutron sources at present and in the foreseen future are discussed. (author). 15 refs.; 8 figs.; 3 tabs

  16. Properties of neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    The Conference presentations were divided into sessions devoted to the following topics: white neutron sources, primarily pulsed (6 papers); fast neutron fields (5 papers); Californium-252 prompt fission neutron spectra (14 papers); monoenergetic sources and filtered beams (11 papers); 14 MeV neutron sources (10 papers); selected special application (one paper); and a general interest session (4 papers). Individual abstracts were prepared separately for the papers

  17. Intense fusion neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Goncharov, P. R.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Khripunov, V. I.

    2010-01-01

    The review describes physical principles underlying efficient production of free neutrons, up-to-date possibilities and prospects of creating fission and fusion neutron sources with intensities of 10 15 -10 21 neutrons/s, and schemes of production and application of neutrons in fusion-fission hybrid systems. The physical processes and parameters of high-temperature plasmas are considered at which optimal conditions for producing the largest number of fusion neutrons in systems with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement are achieved. The proposed plasma methods for neutron production are compared with other methods based on fusion reactions in nonplasma media, fission reactions, spallation, and muon catalysis. At present, intense neutron fluxes are mainly used in nanotechnology, biotechnology, material science, and military and fundamental research. In the near future (10-20 years), it will be possible to apply high-power neutron sources in fusion-fission hybrid systems for producing hydrogen, electric power, and technological heat, as well as for manufacturing synthetic nuclear fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neutron sources with intensities approaching 10 20 neutrons/s may radically change the structure of power industry and considerably influence the fundamental and applied science and innovation technologies. Along with utilizing the energy produced in fusion reactions, the achievement of such high neutron intensities may stimulate wide application of subcritical fast nuclear reactors controlled by neutron sources. Superpower neutron sources will allow one to solve many problems of neutron diagnostics, monitor nano-and biological objects, and carry out radiation testing and modification of volumetric properties of materials at the industrial level. Such sources will considerably (up to 100 times) improve the accuracy of neutron physics experiments and will provide a better understanding of the structure of matter, including that of the neutron itself.

  18. Intense fusion neutron sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Goncharov, P. R.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Khripunov, V. I.

    2010-04-01

    The review describes physical principles underlying efficient production of free neutrons, up-to-date possibilities and prospects of creating fission and fusion neutron sources with intensities of 1015-1021 neutrons/s, and schemes of production and application of neutrons in fusion-fission hybrid systems. The physical processes and parameters of high-temperature plasmas are considered at which optimal conditions for producing the largest number of fusion neutrons in systems with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement are achieved. The proposed plasma methods for neutron production are compared with other methods based on fusion reactions in nonplasma media, fission reactions, spallation, and muon catalysis. At present, intense neutron fluxes are mainly used in nanotechnology, biotechnology, material science, and military and fundamental research. In the near future (10-20 years), it will be possible to apply high-power neutron sources in fusion-fission hybrid systems for producing hydrogen, electric power, and technological heat, as well as for manufacturing synthetic nuclear fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neutron sources with intensities approaching 1020 neutrons/s may radically change the structure of power industry and considerably influence the fundamental and applied science and innovation technologies. Along with utilizing the energy produced in fusion reactions, the achievement of such high neutron intensities may stimulate wide application of subcritical fast nuclear reactors controlled by neutron sources. Superpower neutron sources will allow one to solve many problems of neutron diagnostics, monitor nano-and biological objects, and carry out radiation testing and modification of volumetric properties of materials at the industrial level. Such sources will considerably (up to 100 times) improve the accuracy of neutron physics experiments and will provide a better understanding of the structure of matter, including that of the neutron itself.

  19. Polarized neutron spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abov, Yu.G.; Novitskij, V.V.; Alfimenkov, V.P.; Galinskij, E.M.; Mareev, Yu.D.; Pikel'ner, L.B.; Chernikov, A.N.; Lason', L.; Tsulaya, V.M.; Tsulaya, M.I.

    2000-01-01

    The polarized neutron spectrometer, intended for studying the interaction of polarized neutrons with nuclei and condensed media in the area of energies from thermal up to several electron-volt, is developed at the IBR-2 reactor (JINR, Dubna). Diffraction on the Co(92%)-Fe(8%) magnetized monocrystals is used for the neutron polarization and polarization analysis. The neutron polarization within the whole energy range equals ∼ 95% [ru

  20. Isotopic neutron sources for neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoste, J.

    1988-06-01

    This User's Manual is an attempt to provide for teaching and training purposes, a series of well thought out demonstrative experiments in neutron activation analysis based on the utilization of an isotopic neutron source. In some cases, these ideas can be applied to solve practical analytical problems. 19 refs, figs and tabs

  1. Workshop on polarized neutron filters and polarized pulsed neutron experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Shinichi

    2004-07-01

    The workshop was held in KEK by thirty-three participants on April 26, 2004. The polarized neutron filter method was only discussed. It consists of three parts; the first part was discussed on the polarized neutron methods, the second part on the polarized neutron experiments and the third on the pulse neutron spectrometer and polarized neutron experiments. The six papers were presented such as the polarized 3 He neutron spin filter, neutron polarization by proton polarized filter, soft master and neutron scattering, polarized neutron in solid physics, polarization experiments by chopper spectroscope and neutron polarization system in superHRPD. (S.Y.)

  2. Spallation neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, J.S.; Bartholomew, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    The principles and theory of spallation neutron sources are outlined and a comparison is given with other types of neutron source. A summary of the available accelerator types for spallation neutron sources and their advantages and disadvantages is presented. Suitable target materials are discussed for specific applications, and typical target assemblies shown. (U.K.)

  3. Shielded regenerative neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terhune, J.H.; Neissel, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    An ion chamber type neutron detector is disclosed which has a greatly extended lifespan. The detector includes a fission chamber containing a mixture of active and breeding material and a neutron shielding material. The breeding and shielding materials are selected to have similar or substantially matching neutron capture cross-sections so that their individual effects on increased detector life are mutually enhanced

  4. Prototype Neutron Energy Spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, Stephen; Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    The project goals are: (1) Use three to five pressurized helium tubes with varying polyethylene moderators to build a neutron energy spectrometer that is most sensitive to the incident neutron energy of interest. Neutron energies that are of particular interest are those from the fission neutrons (typically around 1-2 MeV); (2) Neutron Source Identification - Use the neutron energy 'selectivity' property as a tool to discriminate against other competing processes by which neutrons are generated (viz. Cosmic ray induced neutron production (ship effect), (a, n) reactions); (3) Determine the efficiency as a function of neutron energy (response function) of each of the detectors, and thereby obtain the composite neutron energy spectrum from the detector count rates; and (4) Far-field data characterization and effectively discerning shielded fission source. Summary of the presentation is: (1) A light weight simple form factor compact neutron energy spectrometer ready to be used in maritime missions has been built; (2) Under laboratory conditions, individual Single Neutron Source Identification is possible within 30 minutes. (3) Sources belonging to the same type of origin viz., (a, n), fission, cosmic cluster in the same place in the 2-D plot shown; and (4) Isotopes belonging to the same source origin like Cm-Be, Am-Be (a, n) or Pu-239, U-235 (fission) do have some overlap in the 2-D plot.

  5. Prototype Neutron Energy Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Mitchell, Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay, Richard Maurer, Ronald Wolff

    2010-06-16

    The project goals are: (1) Use three to five pressurized helium tubes with varying polyethylene moderators to build a neutron energy spectrometer that is most sensitive to the incident neutron energy of interest. Neutron energies that are of particular interest are those from the fission neutrons (typically around 1-2 MeV); (2) Neutron Source Identification - Use the neutron energy 'selectivity' property as a tool to discriminate against other competing processes by which neutrons are generated (viz. Cosmic ray induced neutron production [ship effect], [a, n] reactions); (3) Determine the efficiency as a function of neutron energy (response function) of each of the detectors, and thereby obtain the composite neutron energy spectrum from the detector count rates; and (4) Far-field data characterization and effectively discerning shielded fission source. Summary of the presentation is: (1) A light weight simple form factor compact neutron energy spectrometer ready to be used in maritime missions has been built; (2) Under laboratory conditions, individual Single Neutron Source Identification is possible within 30 minutes. (3) Sources belonging to the same type of origin viz., (a, n), fission, cosmic cluster in the same place in the 2-D plot shown; and (4) Isotopes belonging to the same source origin like Cm-Be, Am-Be (a, n) or Pu-239, U-235 (fission) do have some overlap in the 2-D plot.

  6. Thermal neutron polarisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satya Murthy, N.S.; Madhava Rao, L.

    1984-01-01

    The basic principle for the production of polarised thermal neutrons is discussed and the choice of various crystal monochromators surveyed. Brief mention of broad-spectrum polarisers is made. The application of polarised neutrons to the study of magnetisation density distributions in magnetic crystals, the dynamic concept of polarisation, principle and use of polarisation analysis, the neutron spin-echo technique are discussed. (author)

  7. Fundamental neutron physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deslattes, R.; Dombeck, T.; Greene, G.; Ramsey, N.; Rauch, H.; Werner, S.

    1984-01-01

    Fundamental physics experiments of merit can be conducted at the proposed intense neutron sources. Areas of interest include: neutron particle properties, neutron wave properties, and fundamental physics utilizing reactor produced γ-rays. Such experiments require intense, full-time utilization of a beam station for periods ranging from several months to a year or more

  8. Neutron detection and radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollen, R.H.; Van Esch, R.F.

    1975-01-01

    An improved method of recording neutron images is described which comprises imagewise irradiating with neutrons an intensifying screen containing a gadolinium compound that fluoresces when struck by x-rays and subjecting the fluorescent light pattern resulting from the impact of the neutrons on the screen onto a photographic material. (auth)

  9. Neutron Scattering Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home Page | Facilities | Reference | Software | Conferences | Announcements | Mailing Lists Neutron Scattering Banner Neutron Scattering Software A new portal for neutron scattering has just been established sets KUPLOT: data plotting and fitting software ILL/TAS: Matlab probrams for analyzing triple axis data

  10. International Neutron Radiography Newsletter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1986-01-01

    At the First World Conference on Neutron Radiography i t was decided to continue the "Neutron Radiography Newsletter", published previously by J.P. Barton, as the "International Neutron Radiography Newsletter" (INRNL), with J.C. Doraanus as editor. The British Journal of Non-Destructive Testing...

  11. Polarized Neutron Scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Roessli, B.; Böni, P.

    2000-01-01

    The technique of polarized neutron scattering is reviewed with emphasis on applications. Many examples of the usefulness of the method in various fields of physics are given like the determination of spin density maps, measurement of complex magnetic structures with spherical neutron polarimetry, inelastic neutron scattering and separation of coherent and incoherent scattering with help of the generalized XYZ method.

  12. Monitoring of blood-10B concentration for boron neutron capture therapy using prompt gamma-ray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raaijmakers, C.P.J.; Konijnenberg, M.W.; Dewit, L.; Mijnheer, B.J.; Haritz, D.; Huiskamp, R.; Philipp, K.; Siefert, A.; Stecher-Rasmussen, F.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to monitor the blood- 10 B concentration of laboratory dogs receiving boron neutron capture therapy, in order to obtain optimal agreement between prescribed and actual dose. A prompt gamma-ray analysis system was developed for this purpose at the High Flux Reactor in Petten. The technique was compared with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry and showed good agreement. A substantial variation in 10 B clearance pattern after administration of borocaptate sodium was found between the different dogs. Consequently, the irradiation commencement was adjusted to the individually determined boron elimination curve. Mean blood- 10 B concentratios during irradiation of 25.8±2.2 μg/g (1 SD, n=18) and 49.3±5.3 μg/g (1 SD, n=17) were obtained for intended concentrations of 25 μg/g and 50 μg/g, respectively. These variations are a factor of two smaller than irradiations performed at a uniform post-infusion irradiation starting time. Such a careful bolld- 10 B monitoring procedure is a prerequisite for accurately obtaining such steep dose-response curves as observed during the dog study. (orig.)

  13. Refractive neutron lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, P.V.; Kolchevsky, N.N.

    2013-01-01

    Model of the refractive neutron lens is proposed. System of N lenses acts as one thin lens with a complex refraction index n*. The maximum number N max of individual lenses for 'thick' neutron lens is calculated. Refractive neutron lens properties (resolution, focal depth) as function of resolution factor F 0 =ρbc/μ and depth of field factor dF 0 =λF 0 =λρbc/μ are calculated. It is shown that micro resolution of the refractive neutron optics is far from the wavelength in size and its open possibilities for progress in refractive neutron optics. (authors)

  14. Neutron scattering. Experiment manuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: The thermal triple axis spectrometer PUMA, the high-resolution powder diffractometer SPODI, the hot single-crystal diffractometer HEiDi for structure analysis with neutrons, the backscattering spectrometer SPHERES, neutron polarization analysis with tht time-of-flight spectrometer DNS, the neutron spin-echo spectrometer J-NSE, small-angle neutron scattering with the KWS-1 and KWS-2 diffractometers, the very-small-angle neutron scattering diffractrometer with focusing mirror KWS-3, the resonance spin-echo spectrometer RESEDA, the reflectometer TREFF, the time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF. (HSI)

  15. Activation neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambardanishvili, T.S.; Kolomiitsev, M.A.; Zakharina, T.Y.; Dundua, V.J.; Chikhladze, N.V.

    1976-01-01

    An activation neutron detector made as a moulded and cured composition of a material capable of being neutron-activated is described. The material is selected from a group consisting of at least two chemical elements, a compound of at least two chemical elements and their mixture, each of the chemical elements and their mixture, each of the chemical elements being capable of interacting with neutrons to form radioactive isotopes having different radiation energies when disintegrating. The material capable of being neutron-activated is distributed throughout the volume of a polycondensation resin inert with respect to neutrons and capable of curing. 17 Claims, No Drawings

  16. High energy neutron dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, K.S.F.

    1994-01-01

    A device for measuring dose equivalents in neutron radiation fields is described. The device includes nested symmetrical hemispheres (forming spheres) of different neutron moderating materials that allow the measurement of dose equivalents from 0.025 eV to past 1 GeV. The layers of moderating material surround a spherical neutron counter. The neutron counter is connected by an electrical cable to an electrical sensing means which interprets the signal from the neutron counter in the center of the moderating spheres. The spherical shape of the device allows for accurate measurement of dose equivalents regardless of its positioning. 2 figures

  17. Pulse neutron logging technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bespalov, D.F.; Dylyuk, A.A.

    1975-01-01

    A new method of neutron-burst logging is proposed, residing in irradiating rocks with fast neutron bursts and registering the integrated flux burst of thermal and/or epithermal neutrons, from the moment of its initiation to that of full absorption. The obtaained value is representative of the rock properties (porosity, hydrogen content). The integrated flux in a burst of thermal and epithermal neutrons can be measured both by way of activation of a reference sample of a known chemical composition during the neutron burst and by recording the radiation of induced activity of the sample within an interval between two bursts. The proposed method features high informative value, accuracy and efficiency

  18. Neutron scattering. Experiment manuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner

    2012-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: The thermal triple-axis spectrometer PUMA, the high-resolution powder diffractometer SPODI, the hot single-crystal diffractometer HEiDi for structure analysis with neutrons, the backscattering spectrometer SPHERES, the neutron polarization analyzer DNS, the neutron spin-echo spectrometer J-NSE, the small-angle neutron diffractometers KWS-1/-2, the very-small-angle neutron diffractometer with focusing mirror KWS-3, the resonance spin-echo spectrometer RESEDA, the reflectometer TREFF, the time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF. (HSI)

  19. Neutron techniques in Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucker, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    An essential part of Safeguards is the ability to quantitatively and nondestructively assay those materials with special neutron-interactive properties involved in nuclear industrial or military technology. Neutron techniques have furnished most of the important ways of assaying such materials, which is no surprise since the neutronic properties are what characterizes them. The techniques employed rely on a wide selection of the many methods of neutron generation, detection, and data analysis that have been developed for neutron physics and nuclear science in general

  20. Nanosecond neutron generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobov, S.I.; Pavlovskaya, N.G.; Pukhov, S.P.

    1991-01-01

    High-voltage nanosecond neutron generator for obtaining neutrons in D-T reaction is described. Yield of 6x10 6 neutron/pulse was generated in a sealed gas-filled diode with a target on the cathode by accelerating pulse voltage of approximately 0.5 MV and length at half-height of 0.5 ns and deuterium pressure of 6x10 -2 Torr. Ways of increasing neutron yield and possibilities of creating generators of nanosecond neutron pulses with great service life are considered

  1. Principles of neutron reflection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felcher, G.P.

    1988-08-01

    Neutron reflection is perhaps the most developed branch of slow neutrons optics, which in itself is a direct consequence of the undulatory nature of the neutron. After reviewing the basic types of interactions (nuclear and magnetic) between neutrons and matter, the formalism is introduced to calculate the reflectivity from a sample composed of stacked flat layers and, inversely, to calculate the stacking from reflectivity measurements. Finally, a brief survey of the applications of neutron reflection is given, both in technology and in fundamental research. 32 refs., 6 figs

  2. Grazing Incidence Neutron Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubarev, Mikhail V. (Inventor); Ramsey, Brian D. (Inventor); Engelhaupt, Darell E. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Neutron optics based on the two-reflection geometries are capable of controlling beams of long wavelength neutrons with low angular divergence. The preferred mirror fabrication technique is a replication process with electroform nickel replication process being preferable. In the preliminary demonstration test an electroform nickel optics gave the neutron current density gain at the focal spot of the mirror at least 8 for neutron wavelengths in the range from 6 to 20.ANG.. The replication techniques can be also be used to fabricate neutron beam controlling guides.

  3. Neutron scattering. Experiment manuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner

    2010-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: The thermal triple axis spectrometer PUMA, the high-resolution powder diffractometer SPODI, the hot single-crystal diffractometer HEiDi for structure analysis with neutrons, the backscattering spectrometer SPHERES, neutron polarization analysis with tht time-of-flight spectrometer DNS, the neutron spin-echo spectrometer J-NSE, small-angle neutron scattering with the KWS-1 and KWS-2 diffractometers, the very-small-angle neutron scattering diffractrometer with focusing mirror KWS-3, the resonance spin-echo spectrometer RESEDA, the reflectometer TREFF, the time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF. (HSI)

  4. Thermal neutron moderating device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takigami, Hiroyuki.

    1995-01-01

    In a thermal neutron moderating device, superconductive coils for generating magnetic fields capable of applying magnetic fields vertical to the longitudinal direction of a thermal neutron passing tube, and superconductive coils for magnetic field gradient for causing magnetic field gradient in the longitudinal direction of the thermal neutron passing tube are disposed being stacked at the outside of the thermal neutron passing tube. When magnetic field gradient is present vertically to the direction of a magnetic moment, thermal neutrons undergo forces in the direction of the magnetic field gradient in proportion to the magnetic moment. Then, the magnetic moment of the thermal neutrons is aligned with the direction vertical to the passing direction of the thermal neutrons, to cause the magnetic field gradient in the passing direction of the thermal neutrons. The speed of the thermal neutrons can be optionally selected and the wavelength can freely be changed by applying forces to the thermal neutrons and changing the extent and direction of the magnetic field gradient. Superconductive coils are used as the coils for generating magnetic fields and the magnetic field gradient in order to change extremely high energy of the thermal neutrons. (N.H.)

  5. Atlas of neutron resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Mughabghab, Said

    2018-01-01

    Atlas of Neutron Resonances: Resonance Properties and Thermal Cross Sections Z= 1-60, Sixth Edition, contains an extensive list of detailed individual neutron resonance parameters for Z=1-60, as well as thermal cross sections, capture resonance integrals, average resonance parameters and a short survey of the physics of thermal and resonance neutrons. The long introduction contains: nuclear physics formulas aimed at neutron physicists; topics of special interest such as valence neutron capture, nuclear level density parameters, and s-, p-, and d-wave neutron strength functions; and various comparisons of measured quantities with the predictions of nuclear models, such as the optical model. As in the last edition, additional features have been added to appeal to a wider spectrum of users. These include: spin-dependent scattering lengths that are of interest to solid-state physicists, nuclear physicists and neutron evaluators; calculated and measured Maxwellian average 5-keV and 30-keV capture cross sections o...

  6. Neutron image intensifier tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verat, M.; Rougeot, H.; Driard, B.

    1983-01-01

    The most frequently used techniques in neutron radiography employ a neutron converter consisting of either a scintillator or a thin metal sheet. The radiation created by the neutrons exposes a photographic film that is in contact with the converter: in the direct method, the film is exposed during the time that the object is irradiated with neutrons; in the transfer method, the film is exposed after the irradiation of the object with neutrons. In industrial non-destructive testing, when many identical objects have to be checked, these techniques have several disadvantages. Non-destructive testing systems without these disadvantages can be constructed around neutron-image intensifier tubes. A description and the operating characteristics of neutron-image intensifier tubes are given. (Auth.)

  7. Methods of neutron spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerschel, B.

    1981-01-01

    The different methods of neutron spectrometry are based on the direct measurement of neutron velocity or on the use of suitable energy-dependent interaction processes. In the latter case the measuring effect of a detector is connected with the searched neutron spectrum by an integral equation. The solution needs suitable unfolding procedures. The most important methods of neutron spectrometry are the time-of-flight method, the crystal spectrometry, the neutron spectrometry by use of elastic collisions with hydrogen nuclei, and neutron spectrometry with the aid of nuclear reactions, especially of the neutron-induced activation. The advantages and disadvantages of these methods are contrasted considering the resolution, the measurable energy range, the sensitivity, and the experimental and computational efforts. (author)

  8. Neutrons as a probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizumi, Masashi

    1993-01-01

    As an introduction to the symposium a brief overview will be given about the features of neutrons as a probe. First it will be pointed out that the utilization of neutrons as a probe for investigating the structural and dynamical properties of condensed matters is a benign gift eventuated from the release of atomic energy initiated by Enrico Fermi exactly half century ago. Features of neutrons as a probe are discussed in accordance with the four basic physical properties of neutrons as an elementary particle; (1) no electric charge (the interaction with matter is nuclear), (2) the mass of neutron is 1 amu, (3) spin is 1/2 and (4) neutrons have magnetic dipole moment. Overview will be given on the uniqueness of neutrons as a probe and on the variety in the way they are used in the wide research area from the pure science to the industrial applications. (author)

  9. Neutron response study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endres, G.W.R.; Fix, J.J.; Thorson, M.R.; Nichols, L.L.

    1981-01-01

    Neutron response of the albedo type dosimeter is strongly dependent on the energy of the incident neutrons as well as the moderating material on the backside of the dosimeter. This study characterizes the response of the Hanford dosimeter for a variety of neutron energies for both a water and Rando phantom (a simulated human body consisting of an actual human skeleton with plastic for body muscles and certain organs). The Hanford dosimeter response to neutrons of different energies is typical of albedo type dosimeters. An approximate two orders of magnitude difference in response is observed between neutron energies of 100 keV and 10 MeV. Methods were described to compensate for the difference in dosimeter response between a laboratory neutron spectrum and the different spectra encountered at various facilities in the field. Generally, substantial field support is necessary for accurate neutron dosimetry

  10. Neutron structural biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niimura, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Neutron diffraction provides an experimental method of directly locating hydrogen atoms in protein which play important roles in physiological functions. However, there are relatively few examples of neutron crystallography in biology since it takes a lot of time to collect a sufficient number of Bragg reflections due to the low flux of neutrons illuminating the sample. In order to overcome the flux problem, we have successfully developed the neutron IP, where the neutron converter, {sup 6}Li or Gd, was mixed with a photostimulated luminescence material on flexible plastic support. Neutron Laue diffraction 2A data from tetragonal lysozyme were collected for 10 days with neutron imaging plates, and 960 hydrogen atoms in the molecule and 157 bound water molecules were identified. These results explain the proposed hydrolysis mechanism of the sugar by the lysozyme molecule and that lysozyme is less active at pH7.0. (author)

  11. Neutron Research in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hark Rho

    2005-01-01

    HANARO (High-flux Advanced Neutron Application Reactor), which was designed and constructed by indigenous technology, is a world-class multi-purpose research reactor with a design thermal power of 30 MW, providing high neutron flux for various applications in Korea. HANARO has been operated since its first criticality in February 1995, and is now successfully utilized in such areas as neutron beam research, fuel and materials tests, radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals production, neutron activation analysis, and neutron transmutation doping, etc. A number of experimental facilities have been developed and installed since the beginning of reactor operation, and R and D activities for installing more facilities are actively under progress. Three flux traps in the core (CT, IR1, IR2), providing a high fast neutron flux, can be used for materials and fuel irradiation tests. They are also proper for production of high specific activity radioisotopes. Four vertical holes in the outer core region, abundant in epithermal neutrons, are used for fuel or material tests and radioisotope production. In the heavy water reflector region, 25 vertical holes with high quality thermal neutrons are located for radioisotope production, neutron activation analysis, neutron transmutation doping and cold neutron source installation. The two largest holes named NTD1 and NTD2 are for neutron transmutation doping, CNS for the cold neutron source installation, and LH for the irradiation of large targets. The high resolution powder diffractometer (HRPD) became operational in 1998, followed by the four circle diffractometer (FCD) in 1999, the residual stress instrument (RSI) in 2000, and the small angle neutron spectrometer (SANS) in 2001, respectively. HRPD and SANS became the most popular instruments these days, attracting wide range of users from academia, institutes and industries. We have made a lot of efforts during the last 10 years to develop some key components such as

  12. Neutron transportation simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uenohara, Yuzo.

    1995-01-01

    In the present invention, problems in an existent parallelized monte carlo method is solved, and behaviors of neutrons in a large scaled system are accurately simulated at a high speed. Namely, a neutron transportation simulator according to the monte carlo method simulates movement of each of neutrons by using a parallel computer. In this case, the system to be processed is divided based on a space region and an energy region to which neutrons belong. Simulation of neutrons in the divided regions is allotted to each of performing devices of the parallel computer. Tarry data and nuclear data of the neutrons in each of the regions are memorized dispersedly to memories of each of the performing devices. A transmission means for simulating the behaviors of the neutrons in the region by each of the performing devices, as well as transmitting the information of the neutrons, when the neutrons are moved to other region, to the performing device in a transported portion are disposed to each of the performing devices. With such procedures, simulation for the neutrons in the allotted region can be conducted with small capacity of memories. (I.S.)

  13. Instrumentation with polarized neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeni, P.; Muenzer, W.; Ostermann, A.

    2009-01-01

    Neutron scattering with polarization analysis is an indispensable tool for the investigation of novel materials exhibiting electronic, magnetic, and orbital degrees of freedom. In addition, polarized neutrons are necessary for neutron spin precession techniques that path the way to obtain extremely high resolution in space and time. Last but not least, polarized neutrons are being used for fundamental studies as well as very recently for neutron imaging. Many years ago, neutron beam lines were simply adapted for polarized beam applications by adding polarizing elements leading usually to unacceptable losses in neutron intensity. Recently, an increasing number of beam lines are designed such that an optimum use of polarized neutrons is facilitated. In addition, marked progress has been obtained in the technology of 3 He polarizers and the reflectivity of large-m supermirrors. Therefore, if properly designed, only factors of approximately 2-3 in neutron intensity are lost. It is shown that S-benders provide neutron beams with an almost wavelength independent polarization. Using twin cavities, polarized beams with a homogeneous phase space and P>0.99 can be produced without significantly sacrificing intensity. It is argued that elliptic guides, which are coated with large m polarizing supermirrors, provide the highest flux.

  14. Neutron wave optics studied with ultracold neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steyerl, A.

    1984-01-01

    The author discusses experiments demonstrating or utilizing the wave properties of neutrons with wavelengths of about 100 nm. In particular the 'UCN gravity diffractometer' and the gravity spectrometer NESSIE (Neutronen-Schwerkraft-Spectrometrie) are illustrated. (Auth.)

  15. Neutron Optics: Towards Applications for Hot Neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schanzer, C; Schneider, M; Böni, P

    2016-01-01

    Supermirrors with large critical angles of reflection, i.e. large index m are an essential ingredient to transport, focus and polarise neutrons over a wide range of energy. Here we summarise the recent developments of supermirror with very large critical angles of reflection and high reflectivity that were conducted at SwissNeutronics as well as their implementation in devices. Approaching critical angles m = 8 times the critical angle of natural nickel makes new applications possible and extends the use of reflection optics towards the regime of hot and epithermal neutrons. Based on comparisons of simulations with experiment we demonstrate future possibilities of applications of large-m supermirrors towards devices for neutrons with short wavelength. (paper)

  16. A polarizing neutron periscope for neutron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Michael; Boeni, Peter; Calzada, Elbio; Muehlbauer, Martin; Neubauer, Andreas; Schillinger, Burkhard

    2009-01-01

    Optical neutron polarizers like guides or benders destroy the collimation of a neutron beam due to multiple reflections or scattering. This makes them unsuitable for their use in polarized neutron radiography, because the beam collimation is essential to obtain high spatial resolution. We have developed a neutron polarizer based on the principle of an optical periscope with a zigzag double reflection on two parallel high-m supermirror polarizers. If the supermirrors are perfectly parallel and flat, the beam collimation is left unchanged by such a device. A first proof of concept version of this type of polarizer was built and tested. We expect to achieve a beam polarization of up to 99% with an improved version yet to be built.

  17. Pulsed neutron porosity logging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.D. Jr.; Smith, M.P.; Schultz, W.E.

    1978-01-01

    An improved pulsed neutron porosity logging system is provided in the present invention. A logging tool provided with a 14 MeV pulsed neutron source, an epithermal neutron detector, and a fast neutron detector is moved through a borehole. Repetitive bursts of neutrons irradiate the earth formations and, during the bursts, the fast neutron population is sampled. During the interval between bursts the epithermal neutron population is sampled along with background gamma radiation due to lingering thermal neutrons. The fast and epithermal neutron population measurements are combined to provide a measurement of formation porosity

  18. Bouncing neutrons and the neutron centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, P J S

    2003-01-01

    The recent observation of the quantum state of the neutron bouncing freely under gravity allows some novel experiments. A possible method of purifying the ground state is given. We investigate two possible applications. It appears that the state could not be used to set better limits on the electric dipole moment of the neutron. However, it would be possible to use the state to set limits on modifications of gravity at short distances

  19. Status of spallation neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyama, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Existing and planned facilities using proton accelerator driven spallation neutron source are reviewed. These include new project of neutron science proposed from Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The present status of facility requirement and accelerator technology leads us to new era of neutron science such as neutron scattering research and nuclear transmutation study using very intense neutron source. (author)

  20. Post-irradiation examinations and theoretical analyses of the fuel and fuel pin behavior of innovative systems; Bestrahlungsnachuntersuchungen und modelltheoretische Analysen zum Brennstoff- und Brennstabverhalten innovativer Systeme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, W.; Freund, D.; Geithoff, D.; Heck, M.; Jacobi, O.; Steiner, H.; Weimar, P.

    1995-08-01

    For the development of LMR cladding materials an irradiation test was performed in the KNK II reactor between 1986 and 1991. It demonstrated that a temperature gradient in the cladding has no observable effect on swelling behavior. PIEs of transient experiments in the Petten HFR have shown no significant cladding deformations. (orig.)

  1. Post-irradiation examinations and theoretical analyses of the fuel and fuel pin behavior of innovative systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, W.; Freund, D.; Geithoff, D.; Heck, M.; Jacobi, O.; Steiner, H.; Weimar, P.

    1995-01-01

    For the development of LMR cladding materials an irradiation test was performed in the KNK II reactor between 1986 and 1991. It demonstrated that a temperature gradient in the cladding has no observable effect on swelling behavior. PIEs of transient experiments in the Petten HFR have shown no significant cladding deformations. (orig.)

  2. On the use of spinel-based nuclear fuels for the transmutation of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konings, R.J.M.; Bakker, K.; Boshoven, J.G.; Hein, H.; Huntelaar, M.E.; Zhang, H.; Meeldijk, J.D.; Woensdregt, C.F.

    1997-01-01

    The properties of spinel-based nuclear fuels for the transmutation of actinides are investigated. The results of laboratory experiments, thermodynamic calculations and irradiations in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) at Petten are presented, and allow us to evaluate the potential of spinel as an inert matrix for fuels and targets for transmutation. (author)

  3. Comparison of nuclear irradiation parameters of fusion breeder materials in high flux fission test reactors and a fusion power demonstration reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.; Herring, S.; Hogenbirk, A.; Leichtle, D.; Nagao, Y.; Pijlgroms, B.J.; Ying, A.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear irradiation parameters relevant to displacement damage and burn-up of the breeder materials Li 2 O, Li 4 SiO 4 and Li 2 TiO 3 have been evaluated and compared for a fusion power demonstration reactor and the high flux fission test reactor (HFR), Petten, the advanced test reactor (ATR, INEL) and the Japanese material test reactor (JMTR, JAERI). Based on detailed nuclear reactor calculations with the MCNP Monte Carlo code and binary collision approximation (BCA) computer simulations of the displacement damage in the polyatomic lattices with MARLOWE, it has been investigated how well the considered HFRs can meet the requirements for a fusion power reactor relevant irradiation. It is shown that a breeder material irradiation in these fission test reactors is well suited in this regard when the neutron spectrum is well tailored and the 6 Li-enrichment is properly chosen. Requirements for the relevant nuclear irradiation parameters such as the displacement damage accumulation, the lithium burn-up and the damage production function W(T) can be met when taking into account these prerequisites. Irradiation times in the order of 2-3 full power years are necessary for the HFR to achieve the peak values of the considered fusion power Demo reactor blanket with regard to the burn-up and, at the same time, the dpa accumulation

  4. Prototype Stilbene Neutron Collar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, M. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shumaker, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Snyderman, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Verbeke, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wong, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-26

    A neutron collar using stilbene organic scintillator cells for fast neutron counting is described for the assay of fresh low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel assemblies. The prototype stilbene collar has a form factor similar to standard He-3 based collars and uses an AmLi interrogation neutron source. This report describes the simulation of list mode neutron correlation data on various fuel assemblies including some with neutron absorbers (burnable Gd poisons). Calibration curves (doubles vs 235U linear mass density) are presented for both thermal and fast (with Cd lining) modes of operation. It is shown that the stilbene collar meets or exceeds the current capabilities of He-3 based neutron collars. A self-consistent assay methodology, uniquely suited to the stilbene collar, using triples is described which complements traditional assay based on doubles calibration curves.

  5. Biological effects of neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogiu, Toshiaki; Ohmachi, Yasushi; Ishida, Yuka [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (JP)] [and others

    2003-03-01

    Although the occasion to be exposed to neutrons is rare in our life, except for nuclear accidents like in the critical accident at Tokai-mura in 1999, countermeasures against accident should be always prepared. In the Tokai-mura accident, residents received less than 21 mSv of neutrons and gamma rays. The cancer risks and fetal effects of low doses of neutrons were matters of concern among residents. The purpose of this program is to investigate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for leukemias, and thereby to assess risks of neutrons. Animal experiments are planed to obtain the following RBEs: (1) RBE for the induction of leukemias in mice and (2) RBE for effects on fetuses. Cyclotron fast neutrons (10 MeV) and electrostatic accelerator-derived neutrons (2 MeV) are used for exposure in this program. Furthermore, cytological and cytogenetic analyses will be performed. (author)

  6. Neutron sources and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, D.L. [ed.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Rush, J.J. [ed.] [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Review of Neutron Sources and Applications was held at Oak Brook, Illinois, during September 8--10, 1992. This review involved some 70 national and international experts in different areas of neutron research, sources, and applications. Separate working groups were asked to (1) review the current status of advanced research reactors and spallation sources; and (2) provide an update on scientific, technological, and medical applications, including neutron scattering research in a number of disciplines, isotope production, materials irradiation, and other important uses of neutron sources such as materials analysis and fundamental neutron physics. This report summarizes the findings and conclusions of the different working groups involved in the review, and contains some of the best current expertise on neutron sources and applications.

  7. Neutron sources and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, D.L.; Rush, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    Review of Neutron Sources and Applications was held at Oak Brook, Illinois, during September 8--10, 1992. This review involved some 70 national and international experts in different areas of neutron research, sources, and applications. Separate working groups were asked to (1) review the current status of advanced research reactors and spallation sources; and (2) provide an update on scientific, technological, and medical applications, including neutron scattering research in a number of disciplines, isotope production, materials irradiation, and other important uses of neutron sources such as materials analysis and fundamental neutron physics. This report summarizes the findings and conclusions of the different working groups involved in the review, and contains some of the best current expertise on neutron sources and applications

  8. Neutron scattering and magnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackintosh, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    Those properties of the neutron which make it a unique tool for the study of magnetism are described. The scattering of neutrons by magnetic solids is briefly reviewed, with emphasis on the information on the magnetic structure and dynamics which is inherent in the scattering cross-section. The contribution of neutron scattering to our understanding of magnetic ordering, excitations and phase transitions is illustrated by experimental results on a variety of magnetic crystals. (author)

  9. The Advanced Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayter, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new user experimental facility planned to be operational at Oak Ridge in the late 1990's. The centerpiece of the ANS will be a steady-state research reactor of unprecedented thermal neutron flux (φ th ∼ 9·10 19 m -2 ·s -1 ) accompanied by extensive and comprehensive equipment and facilities for neutron-based research. 5 refs., 5 figs

  10. Neutrons and Nuclear Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekkebus, Allen E.

    2007-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory hosted two workshops in April 2007 relevant to nuclear engineering education. In the Neutron Stress, Texture, and Phase Transformation for Industry workshop (http://neutrons.ornl.gov/workshops/nst2/), several invited speakers gave examples of neutron stress mapping for nuclear engineering applications. These included John Root of National Research Council of Canada, Mike Fitzpatrick of the UK's Open University, and Yan Gao of GE Global Research on their experiences with industrial and academic uses of neutron diffraction. Xun-Li Wang and Camden Hubbard described the new instruments at ORNL that can be used for such studies. This was preceded by the Neutrons for Materials Science and Engineering educational symposium (http://neutrons.ornl.gov/workshops/edsym2007). It was directed to the broad materials science and engineering community based in universities, industry and laboratories who wish to learn what the neutron sources in the US can provide for enhancing the understanding of materials behavior, processing and joining. Of particular interest was the presentation of Donald Brown of Los Alamos about using 'Neutron diffraction measurements of strain and texture to study mechanical behavior of structural materials.' At both workshops, the ORNL neutron scattering instruments relevant to nuclear engineering studies were described. The Neutron Residual Stress Mapping Facility (NRSF2) is currently in operation at the High Flux Isotope Reactor; the VULCAN Engineering Materials Diffractometer will begin commissioning in 2008 at the Spallation Neutron Source. For characteristics of these instruments, as well as details of other workshops, meetings, capabilities, and research proposal submissions, please visit http://neutrons.ornl.gov. To submit user proposals for time on NRSF2 contact Hubbard at hubbardcratornl.gov

  11. The neutron porosity tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oelgaard, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    The report contains a review of available information on neutron porosity tools with the emphasis on dual thermal-neutron-detector porosity tools and epithermal-neutron-detector porosity tools. The general principle of such tools is discussed and theoretical models are very briefly reviewed. Available data on tool designs are summarized with special regard to the source-detector distance. Tool operational data, porosity determination and correction of measurements are briefly discussed. (author) 15 refs

  12. Individual neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauricio, C.L.P.

    1987-01-01

    The most important concepts and development in individual neutron dosimetry are presented, especially the dosimetric properties of the albedo technique. The main problem in albedo dosimetry is to calibrate the dosemeter in the environs of each neutron source. Some of the most used calibration techniques are discussed. The IRD albedo dosemeter used in the routine neutron individual monitoring is described in detail. Its dosimetric properties and calibration methods are discussed. (Author) [pt

  13. The advanced neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman, S.; Hayter, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new user experimental facility planned to be operational at Oak Ridge in the late 1990's. The centerpiece of the ANS will be a steady-state research reactor of unprecedented thermal neutron flux (φ th ∼ 8 x 10 19 m -2 ·s -1 ) accompanied by extensive and comprehensive equipment and facilities for neutron-based research

  14. ATR neutron spectral characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, J.W.; Anderl, R.A.

    1995-11-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INEL provides intense neutron fields for irradiation-effects testing of reactor material samples, for production of radionuclides used in industrial and medical applications, and for scientific research. Characterization of the neutron environments in the irradiation locations of the ATR has been done by means of neutronics calculations and by means of neutron dosimetry based on the use of neutron activation monitors that are placed in the various irradiation locations. The primary purpose of this report is to present the results of an extensive characterization of several ATR irradiation locations based on neutron dosimetry measurements and on least-squares-adjustment analyses that utilize both neutron dosimetry measurements and neutronics calculations. This report builds upon the previous publications, especially the reference 4 paper. Section 2 provides a brief description of the ATR and it tabulates neutron spectral information for typical irradiation locations, as derived from the more historical neutron dosimetry measurements. Relevant details that pertain to the multigroup neutron spectral characterization are covered in section 3. This discussion includes a presentation on the dosimeter irradiation and analyses and a development of the least-squares adjustment methodology, along with a summary of the results of these analyses. Spectrum-averaged cross sections for neutron monitoring and for displacement-damage prediction in Fe, Cr, and Ni are given in section 4. In addition, section4 includes estimates of damage generation rates for these materials in selected ATR irradiation locations. In section 5, the authors present a brief discussion of the most significant conclusions of this work and comment on its relevance to the present ATR core configuration. Finally, detailed numerical and graphical results for the spectrum-characterization analyses in each irradiation location are provided in the Appendix.

  15. Experimental investigation of high He/dpa microstructural effects in neutron irradiated B-alloyed Eurofer97 steel by means of small angle neutron scattering (SANS and electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Coppola

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available High He/dpa microstructural effects have been investigated, by means of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS and transmission electron microscopy (TEM, in B-alloyed ferritic/martensitic steel Eurofer97-1 (0.12 C, 9 Cr, 0.2V, 1.08W wt%, B contents variable between 10 and 1000ppm, neutron irradiated at the High Flux Reactor of the JRC-Petten at temperatures between 250 °C and 450 °C, up do a dose level of 16 dpa. Under these irradiation parameters, B activation is expected to produce corresponding helium contents variable between 80 and 5600appm, with helium bubble distributions relevant for the technological applications. The SANS measurements were carried out under magnetic field to separate nuclear and magnetic SANS components; a reference, un-irradiated sample was also measured to evaluate as accurately as possible the genuine effect of the irradiation on the microstructure. Increasing the estimated helium content from 400 to 5600appm, the analysis of the SANS cross-sections yields an increase in the volume fraction, attributed to helium bubbles, of almost one order of magnitude (from 0.007 to 0.038; furthermore, the difference between nuclear and magnetic SANS components is strongly reduced. These results are discussed in correlation with TEM observations of the same samples and are tentatively attributed to the effect of drastic microstructural changes in Eurofer97-1 for high He/dpa ratio values, possibly relating to the dissolution of large B-carbides due to transmutation reactions.

  16. Neutrons for probing matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, F. Ed.; Mazzucchetti, D.

    2008-01-01

    The authors tell the story of the French Orphee reactor located in Saclay from the decision to build it in the seventies, to its commissioning in 1980, to its upgrading in the nineties and to its today's operating life. As early as its feasibility studies Orphee has been designed as a dual-purpose reactor: scientific research for instance in crystallography and magnetism, and industrial uses like neutron radiography, silicon doping or radionuclide production. This book is divided into 4 parts: 1) the neutron: an explorer of the matter, 2) the Orphee reactor: a neutron source, 3) the adventurers of the matter: Leon Brillouin laboratory's staff, and 4) the perspectives for neutrons

  17. Spallation neutrons pulsed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, J.

    1996-01-01

    This article describes the range of scientific applications which can use these pulsed neutrons sources: Studies on super fluids, measures to verify the crawling model for the polymers diffusion; these sources are also useful to study the neutron disintegration, the ultra cold neutrons. In certain applications which were not accessible by neutrons diffusion, for example, radiations damages, radionuclides production and activation analysis, the spallation sources find their use and their improvement will bring new possibilities. Among others contributions, one must notice the place at disposal of pulsed muons sources and neutrinos sources. (N.C.). 3 figs

  18. Microcomputerized neutron moisture gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shengkang; Mei Yu

    1987-01-01

    A microcomputerized neutron moisture gauge is introduced. This gauge consists of a neutron moisture sensor and instruments. It is developed from the neutron moisture gauge for concrete mixer. A TECH-81 single card microcomputer is used for count, computation and display. It has the function of computing compensated quantity of sand. It can acquire the data from several neutron sensors by the multichanneling sampling, therefore it can measure moisture values of sand in several hoppers simultaneously. The precision of the static state calibration curve is 0.24% wt. The error limits of the dynamic state check is < 0.50% wt

  19. Neutrons from Antiproton Irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    the neutron spectrum. Additionally, we used a cylindrical polystyrene loaded with several pairs of thermoluminescent detectors containing Lithium-6 and Lithium-7, which effectively detects thermalized neutrons. The obtained results are compared with FLUKA imulations. Results: The results obtained...... spectrum is very low, and does not pose a problem for radiation therapy. However, the contribution from fast neutrons is much more significant. The dose equivalent contribution from neutrons originate from the patient alone and reaches levels which are found in passive moderated proton therapy. The exact...

  20. Introduction to neutron stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lattimer, James M. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States)

    2015-02-24

    Neutron stars contain the densest form of matter in the present universe. General relativity and causality set important constraints to their compactness. In addition, analytic GR solutions are useful in understanding the relationships that exist among the maximum mass, radii, moments of inertia, and tidal Love numbers of neutron stars, all of which are accessible to observation. Some of these relations are independent of the underlying dense matter equation of state, while others are very sensitive to the equation of state. Recent observations of neutron stars from pulsar timing, quiescent X-ray emission from binaries, and Type I X-ray bursts can set important constraints on the structure of neutron stars and the underlying equation of state. In addition, measurements of thermal radiation from neutron stars has uncovered the possible existence of neutron and proton superfluidity/superconductivity in the core of a neutron star, as well as offering powerful evidence that typical neutron stars have significant crusts. These observations impose constraints on the existence of strange quark matter stars, and limit the possibility that abundant deconfined quark matter or hyperons exist in the cores of neutron stars.

  1. Neutron detection technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oblath, N.S.; Poon, A.W.P.

    2000-01-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) has the ability to measure the total flux of all active flavors of neutrinos using the neutral current reaction, whose signature is a neutron. By comparing the rates of the neutral current reaction to the charged current reaction, which only detects electron neutrinos, one can test the neutrino oscillation hypothesis independent of solar models. It is necessary to understand the neutron detection efficiency of the detector to make use of the neutral current reaction. This report demonstrates a coincidence technique to identify neutrons emitted from the 252 Cf neutron calibration source. The source releases on average four neutrons when a 252 Cf nucleus spontaneously fissions. Each neutron is detected as a separate event when the neutron is captured by a deuteron, releasing a gamma ray of approximately 6.25 MeV. This gamma ray is in turn detected by the photomultiplier tube (PMT) array. By investigating the time and spatial separation between neutron-like events, it is possible to obtain a pure sample of neutrons for calibration study. Preliminary results of the technique applied to two calibration runs are presented

  2. Neutron scattering. Experiment manuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner

    2014-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: The thermal triple-axis spectrometer PUMA, the high-resolution powder diffractometer SPODI, the hot-single-crystal diffractometer HEiDi, the three-axis spectrometer PANDA, the backscattering spectrometer SPHERES, the DNS neutron-polarization analysis, the neutron spin-echo spectrometer J-NSE, small-angle neutron scattering at KWS-1 and KWS-2, a very-small-angle neutron scattering diffractometer with focusing mirror, the reflectometer TREFF, the time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF. (HSI)

  3. Neutrons in biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funahashi, Satoru; Niimura, Nobuo.

    1993-01-01

    The start of JRR-3M in 1990 was a great epoch to the neutron scattering research in Japan. Abundant neutron beam generated by the JRR-3M made it possible to widen the research field of neutron scattering in Japan. In the early days of neutron scattering, biological materials were too difficult object to be studied by neutrons not only because of their complexity but also because of the strong incoherent scattering by hydrogen. However, the remarkable development of the recent neutron scattering and its related sciences, as well as the availability of higher flux, has made the biological materials one of the most attractive subjects to be studied by neutrons. In early September 1992, an intensive workshop titled 'Neutrons in Biology' was held in Hitachi City by making use of the opportunity of the 4th International Conference on Biophysics and Synchrotron Radiation (BSR92) held in Tsukuba. The workshop was organized by volunteers who are eager to develop the researches in this field in Japan. Numbers of outstanding neutron scattering biologists from U.S., Europe and Asian countries met together and enthusiastic discussions were held all day long. The editors believe that the presentations at the workshop were so invaluable that it is absolutely adequate to put them on record as an issue of JAERI-M and to make them available for scientists to refer to in order to further promote the research in the future. (author)

  4. Polycapillary neutron lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mildner, D.F.R.

    1997-01-01

    The principle of multiple mirror reflection from smooth surfaces at small grazing angles enables the transport and guiding of high intensity slow neutron beams to locations of low background for neutron scattering and absorption experiments and to provide facilities for multiple instruments. Curved guides have been widely used at cold neutron facilities to remove the unwanted radiation (fast neutrons and gamma rays) from the beam without the use of filters. A typical guide has transverse dimensions of 50 mm and, with a radius of curvature of 1 km, transmits wavelengths longer than 5 A. Much tighter curves requires narrower transverse dimensions, otherwise there is little transmission. Typical neutron benders have a number of slots with transverse dimensions of ∼5 mm. Based on the same principle but using a different technology, recent developments in glass polycapillary fibers have produced miniature versions of neutron guides. Fibers with many thousands of channels having sizes of ∼ 10 μm enable beams of long wavelength neutrons (λ > 4 A) to be transmitted efficiently in a radius of curvature as small as a fraction of 1 m. A large collection of these miniature versions of neutron guides can be used to bend the neutron trajectories such that the incident beam can be focused. (author)

  5. Neutron structural biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niimura, Nobuo

    1999-01-01

    Neutron structural biology will be one of the most important fields in the life sciences which will interest human beings in the 21st century because neutrons can provide not only the position of hydrogen atoms in biological macromolecules but also the dynamic molecular motion of hydrogen atoms and water molecules. However, there are only a few examples experimentally determined at present because of the lack of neutron source intensity. Next generation neutron source scheduled in JAERI (Performance of which is 100 times better than that of JRR-3M) opens the life science of the 21st century. (author)

  6. Tensile behavior of EUROFER ODS steel after neutron irradiation up to 16.3 dpa between 250 and 450 °C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materna-Morris, Edeltraud; Lindau, Rainer; Schneider, Hans-Christian; Möslang, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The first 9%CrWVTa steel (0.5% Y_2O_3), EUROFER ODS HIP, have been neutron irradiated up to 16.3 dpa, between 250 and 450 °C, in the High Flux Reactor (HFR). • After post-irradiation tensile tests, there was not any increase of the upper yield strength or strain localization after irradiation which is typical of RAFM steels. • Initially higher yield strength, R_p_0_._2, and distinctive tensile strength, R_m, of EUROFER ODS HIP compared to EUROFER97 steel. • These values increased due to the neutron irradiation at lower irradiation temperatures. - Abstract: During the development of structural material for future fusion reactors, a 50 kg heat of reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic 9%CrWVTa steel with nanoscaled Y_2O_3-particles, EUROFER97 ODS HIP, was produced using powder metallurgy fabrication technology. This first batch of EUROFER97 ODS HIP and, for comparison, the steel EUROFER97 were prepared for a post-irradiation tensile test program. During neutron irradiation in the HFR (High Flux Reactor, The Netherlands), an accumulated dose of up to 16.3 dpa was reached for 771 days at full power, with the irradiation temperature ranging between 250 and 450 °C. During the post-examinations, all specimens showed the highest tensile strength at lower irradiation temperatures between 250 and 350 °C. However, ODS-alloy and steel were found to clearly differ in the mechanical behavior, which could be documented by fully instrumented tensile tests. In the un-irradiated state, tensile strength of the ODS-alloy already was increased considerably by about 60% compared to the steel. Strengthening was further increased by another 20% after neutron irradiation, but with a much better ductility than observed in the steel. The typical irradiation-induced strain localization of EUROFER97 or RAFM steels could not be observed in the EUROFER97 ODS HIP alloy.

  7. Effects of high temperature neutron irradiation on the physical, chemical and mechanical properties of fine-grained isotropic graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, H.; Nomura, S.; Imai, H.; Oku, T.; Eto, M.

    1987-01-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation on the dimensional change, coefficient of thermal expansion(CTE), thermal conductivity, corrosion rate, Young's modulus and strengths were studied for the candidate graphite material IG-110 of the experimental very high temperature gas-cooled reactor(VHTR) after irradiation at 585 - 1273 deg C to neutron fluences of up to about 3 x 10 25 n/m 2 (E > 29 fJ) in the JMTR and JRR-2, and to about 7 x 10 25 n/m 2 (E > 29 fJ) in the HFR. The results were compared with the irradiation behaviors of other graphites. Dimensional shrinkage was observed in the whole irradiation temperature range, showing lower value than 2 %. The shrinkage rate showed the minimum in the irradiation temperature of around 850 deg C, followed by the increase for the samples irradiated at higher temperatures. The dimensional stability of the material was clarified to be almost the same with that of H451 graphite. The CTE, thermal resistivity and Young's modulus increased in the early stage of irradiation and then only the CTE decreased while the thermal resistivity and Young's modulus levelled off with further irradiation. The neutron fluence showing the maximum CTE shifted to the lower fluence with increasing irradiation temperature. The increases of both thermal resistivity and Young's modulus were remarkable for the samples irradiated at lower temperatures. Compressive and bending strengths measured at room temperature increased after irradiation as well. The corrosion rate with water-vapor of 0.65 % in helium at high temperatures decreased owing to irradiation and the reduction was independent of irradiation temperature and neutron fluence. The activation energy for the reaction was estimated to be the same before and after irradiation. (author)

  8. JRR-3 neutron radiography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubayashi, M.; Tsuruno, A.

    1992-01-01

    JRR-3 neutron radiography facility consists of thermal neutron radiography facility (TNRF) and cold neutron radiography facility (CNRF). TNRF is installed in JRR-3 reactor building. CNRF is installed in the experimental beam hall adjacent to the reactor building. (author)

  9. Thermoluminescence albedo-neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, T.; Storruste, A.

    1986-10-01

    The report discusses neutron detection with respect to dosimetry and compares different thermoluminescent dosimetry materials for neutron dosimetry. Construction and calibration of a thermoluminescence albedo neutron dosemeter, developed by the authors, is described

  10. Wide range neutron detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todt, W.H. Sr.

    1978-01-01

    A neutron detection system for reactor control is described which is operable over a wide range of neutron flux levels. The system includes a fission type ionization chamber neutron detector, means for gamma and alpha signal compensation, and means for operating the neutron detector in the pulse counting mode for low neutron flux levels, and in the direct current mode for high neutron flux levels

  11. Neutron monitoring for radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, J.A.B.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron monitoring is a subject of increasing general interest and considerable attention is being paid to the development of improved techniques and methods for neutron monitoring. The Agency, therefore, considered it important to prepare a guide on the subject of neutron monitoring for radiation protection purposes. The present Manual is intended for those persons or authorities in Member States, particularly developing countries, who are responsible for the organization of neutron monitoring programmes and practical neutron monitoring. This Manual consequently, deals with topics such as neutron dosimetry, sources of neutrons and neutron detection as well as field instruments and operational systems used in this context

  12. Neutron spectroscopy, nuclear structure, related topics. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhovoj, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    Neutron spectroscopy, nuclear structure and related topics are considered. P, T-breaking, neutron beta decay, neutron radiative capture and neutron polarizability are discussed. Reaction with fast neutrons, methodical aspect low-energy fission are considered too

  13. Feasibility neutronic conceptual design for the core configuration of a 75 kWth Aqueous Homogeneous Reactor for 99Mo production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milian, D.; Milian, D. E.; Rodriguez, L. P.; Salomon, J.; Cadavid, N.

    2015-01-01

    99m Tc is a very useful radioisotope, which is used in nearly 80% of all nuclear medicine procedures. 99m Tc is produced from 99 Mo decay. Since 2007 the medical community has been plagued by 99 Mo shortages due to aging reactors, such as the National Research Universal reactor in Canada and the High Flux Reactor in Petten, The Netherlands. At present, most of the world's supply of 99 Mo for medical isotope production involves the neutron fission of 235 U in multipurpose research reactors. 99 Mo mostly results from the fission reaction of 235 U targets with a fission yield about 6.1%. After irradiation in the reactor, the target is digested in acid or alkaline solutions and 99 Mo is recovered through a series of extraction (separation) and purification steps. 99 Mo production system in an Aqueous Homogeneous Reactor (AHR) offers a better method, because all of the 99 Mo can be extracted from the fuel solution. Over 30 AHRs has been built and operated around the world with 149 years of combined experience. In this paper, an AHR conceptual design using LEU (Low Enriched Uranium) is optimized to meet the South American demand for 99 Mo for the coming years. Aspect related with the neutronic behavior such as optimal reflector thickness, critical height, medical isotope production and others are evaluated. The neutronic calculations have been performed with the well-known MCNPX computational code. A benchmarking experiments performed at the Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute' in order to validate that the developed models of AHRs with MCNPX code and the available library in XSDIR, ENDF/B VI.2, are adequate for studies of aqueous fuel solutions. (Author)

  14. Laser neutron generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anan'in, O.B.; Bespalov, D.F.; Bykovskii, Yu.A.; Kozyrev, Yu.P.; Mints, A.Z.; Riabov, E.V.; Tsybin, A.S.; Cherkasov, Yu.; Shikanov, A.E.

    1986-01-01

    Information is presented concerning devices for producing intense neutrons flows, and may be utilized in nuclear geophysics for carrying out pulsed neutron logging of wells, in studies of the critical characteristics of nuclear reactors, for activation analysis, radiation therapy, defectoscopy, and so on

  15. Muons, neutrons and superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aeppli, G.; Risoe National Lab., Roskilde

    1988-01-01

    The principles of the neutron scattering and muon spin relaxation (μSR) techniques and their applications to studies of superconductors are described briefly. μSR and neutron scattering work on magnetic correlations in superconductors and materials directly related to superconductors are reviewed. (orig.)

  16. Neutron resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunsing, F.

    2005-06-01

    The present document has been written in order to obtain the diploma 'Habilitation a Diriger des Recherches'. Since this diploma is indispensable to supervise thesis students, I had the intention to write a document that can be useful for someone starting in the field of neutron resonance spectroscopy. Although the here described topics are already described elsewhere, and often in more detail, it seemed useful to have most of the relevant information in a single document. A general introduction places the topic of neutron-nucleus interaction in a nuclear physics context. The large variations of several orders of magnitude in neutron-induced reaction cross sections are explained in terms of nuclear level excitations. The random character of the resonances make nuclear model calculation predictions impossible. Then several fields in physics where neutron-induced reactions are important and to which I have contributed in some way or another, are mentioned in a first synthetic chapter. They concern topics like parity nonconservation in certain neutron resonances, stellar nucleosynthesis by neutron capture, and data for nuclear energy applications. The latter item is especially important for the transmutation of nuclear waste and for alternative fuel cycles. Nuclear data libraries are also briefly mentioned. A second chapter details the R-matrix theory. This formalism is the foundation of the description of the neutron-nucleus interaction and is present in all fields of neutron resonance spectroscopy. (author)

  17. Neutron resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunsing, F

    2005-06-15

    The present document has been written in order to obtain the diploma 'Habilitation a Diriger des Recherches'. Since this diploma is indispensable to supervise thesis students, I had the intention to write a document that can be useful for someone starting in the field of neutron resonance spectroscopy. Although the here described topics are already described elsewhere, and often in more detail, it seemed useful to have most of the relevant information in a single document. A general introduction places the topic of neutron-nucleus interaction in a nuclear physics context. The large variations of several orders of magnitude in neutron-induced reaction cross sections are explained in terms of nuclear level excitations. The random character of the resonances make nuclear model calculation predictions impossible. Then several fields in physics where neutron-induced reactions are important and to which I have contributed in some way or another, are mentioned in a first synthetic chapter. They concern topics like parity nonconservation in certain neutron resonances, stellar nucleosynthesis by neutron capture, and data for nuclear energy applications. The latter item is especially important for the transmutation of nuclear waste and for alternative fuel cycles. Nuclear data libraries are also briefly mentioned. A second chapter details the R-matrix theory. This formalism is the foundation of the description of the neutron-nucleus interaction and is present in all fields of neutron resonance spectroscopy. (author)

  18. Lunar neutron source function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornblum, J.J.

    1974-01-01

    The search for a quantitative neutron source function for the lunar surface region is justified because it contributes to our understanding of the history of the lunar surface and of nuclear process occurring on the moon since its formation. A knowledge of the neutron source function and neutron flux distribution is important for the interpretation of many experimental measurements. This dissertation uses the available pertinent experimental measurements together with theoretical calculations to obtain an estimate of the lunar neutron source function below 15 MeV. Based upon reasonable assumptions a lunar neutron source function having adjustable parameters is assumed for neutrons below 15 MeV. The lunar neutron source function is composed of several components resulting from the action of cosmic rays with lunar material. A comparison with previous neutron calculations is made and significant differences are discussed. Application of the results to the problem of lunar soil histories is examined using the statistical model for soil development proposed by Fireman. The conclusion is drawn that the moon is losing mass

  19. Neutron Multiplicity Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frame, Katherine Chiyoko [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-28

    Neutron multiplicity measurements are widely used for nondestructive assay (NDA) of special nuclear material (SNM). When combined with isotopic composition information, neutron multiplicity analysis can be used to estimate the spontaneous fission rate and leakage multiplication of SNM. When combined with isotopic information, the total mass of fissile material can also be determined. This presentation provides an overview of this technique.

  20. Applications of polarized neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezei, F.

    1993-01-01

    The additional spin degree of freedom of the neutron can be made use of in neutron scattering work in two fundamental ways: (a) directly for the identification of magnetic scattering effects and (b) indirectly as a spectroscopic tool for modulating and analysing beams. Although strong magnetic scattering contributions can often be studied by unpolarized neutrons, a fully unambiguous separation of nuclear and magnetic phenomena can only be achieved by the additional information provided by polarized neutrons, especially if one of the two kinds of contributions is weak compared to the other. In the most general case a sample with both magnetic and nuclear features can be characterized by as many as 16 independent dynamic correlation functions instead of the single well known S(q, ω) for non-magnetic nuclear scattering only. Polarization analysis in principle allows one to determine all these 16 functions. The indirect applications of polarized neutrons are also steadily gaining importance. The most widely used method of this kind, the application of Larmor precessions for high resolution energy analysis in Neutron Spin Echo spectroscopy opened up a whole new domain in inelastic neutron scattering which was not accessible to any other spectroscopic method with or without neutrons before. (author)

  1. Symposium on neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, M.S.; Saenger, W.; Hildebrandt, G.; Dachs, H.

    1984-01-01

    Extended abstracts of the named symposium are presented. The first part of this report contains the abstracts of the lectures, the second those of the posters. Topics discussed on the symposium include neutron diffraction and neutron scattering studies in magnetism, solid state chemistry and physics, materials research. Some papers discussing instruments and methods are included too. (GSCH)

  2. filled neutron detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Boron trifluoride (BF3) proportional counters are used as detectors for thermal neutrons. They are characterized by high neutron sensitivity and good gamma discriminating properties. Most practical BF3 counters are filled with pure boron trifluoride gas enriched up to 96% 10B. But BF3 is not an ideal proportional counter ...

  3. Mathematical methods in neutronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planchard, J.

    1995-01-01

    This book presents the mathematical theory of nuclear reactors. It applies to engineers in neutronics and applied mathematicians. After a recall of the elementary notions of neutronics and of diffusion-type partial derivative equations, the theory of reactors criticality calculation is described. (J.S.)

  4. Multidisc neutron velocity selector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosta, L.; Zsigmond, Gy.; Farago, B.; Mezei, F.; Ban, K.; Perendi, J.

    1987-12-01

    The prototype of a velocity selector for neutron monochromatization in the 4-20 A wavelength range is presented. The theoretical background of the multidisc rotor system is given together with a description of the mechanical construction and electronic driving system. The first tests and neutron measurements prove easy handling and excellent parameters. (author) 6 refs.; 7 figs.; 2 tabs

  5. The advanced neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayter, J.B.

    1994-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), slated for construction start in 1994, will be a multipurpose neutron research laboratory serving academic and industrial users in chemistry, biology, condensed matter physics, nuclear and fundamental physics, materials science and engineering, and many other fields. It will be centered on the world's highest flux neutron beam reactor, operating at 330 MW, with careful design integration between the neutron source and the experiment systems. Many instruments will be situated in low backgrounds at distances up to 80 m from the reactor, using neutron guides with tailored neutron optical coatings for beam transport. Apart from the many stations for neutron scattering research, specialized stations will also be provided for isotope separation on-line, experiments with liquid hydrogen targets, neutron optical techniques such as interferometry, activation analysis, depth profiling, and positron production. Careful consideration has been given to providing a good research environment for visiting scientists, including easy access to the experimental areas, while maintaining a highly secure nuclear facility. This paper will describe the reactor and experimental facilities and give some examples of the types of research for which ANS has been designed

  6. Compact neutron generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui

    2005-03-22

    A compact neutron generator has at its outer circumference a toroidal shaped plasma chamber in which a tritium (or other) plasma is generated. A RF antenna is wrapped around the plasma chamber. A plurality of tritium ion beamlets are extracted through spaced extraction apertures of a plasma electrode on the inner surface of the toroidal plasma chamber and directed inwardly toward the center of neutron generator. The beamlets pass through spaced acceleration and focusing electrodes to a neutron generating target at the center of neutron generator. The target is typically made of titanium tubing. Water is flowed through the tubing for cooling. The beam can be pulsed rapidly to achieve ultrashort neutron bursts. The target may be moved rapidly up and down so that the average power deposited on the surface of the target may be kept at a reasonable level. The neutron generator can produce fast neutrons from a T-T reaction which can be used for luggage and cargo interrogation applications. A luggage or cargo inspection system has a pulsed T-T neutron generator or source at the center, surrounded by associated gamma detectors and other components for identifying explosives or other contraband.

  7. Development of Neutron Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Hee; Lee, J. S.; Seong, B. S. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    Neutron spectrometers which are used in the basic researches such as physics, chemistry and materials science and applied in the industry were developed at the horizontal beam port of HANARO reactor. In addition, the development of core components for neutron scattering and the upgrade of existing facilities are also performed. The vertical neutron reflectometer was fabricated and installed at ST3 beam port. The performance test of the reflectometer was completed and the reflectometer was opened to users. The several core parts and options were added in the polarized neutron spectrometer. The horizontal neutron reflectometer from Brookhaven National Laboratory was moved to HANARO and installed, and the performance of the reflectometer was examined. The HIPD was developed and the performance test was completed. The base shielding for TAS was fabricated. The soller collimator, Cu mosaic monochromator, Si BPC monochromator and position sensitive detector were developed and applied in the neutron spectrometer as part of core component development activities. In addition, the sputtering machine for mirror device are fabricated and the neutron mirror is made using the sputtering machine. The FCD was upgraded and the performance of the FCD are improved over the factor of 10. The integration and upgrade of the neutron detection system were also performed.

  8. Synovectomy by Neutron capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega C, H.R.; Torres M, C.

    1998-01-01

    The Synovectomy by Neutron capture has as purpose the treatment of the rheumatoid arthritis, illness which at present does not have a definitive curing. This therapy requires a neutron source for irradiating the articulation affected. The energy spectra and the intensity of these neutrons are fundamental since these neutrons induce nuclear reactions of capture with Boron-10 inside the articulation and the freely energy of these reactions is transferred at the productive tissue of synovial liquid, annihilating it. In this work it is presented the neutron spectra results obtained with moderator packings of spherical geometry which contains in its center a Pu 239 Be source. The calculations were realized through Monte Carlo method. The moderators assayed were light water, heavy water base and the both combination of them. The spectra obtained, the average energy, the neutron total number by neutron emitted by source, the thermal neutron percentage and the dose equivalent allow us to suggest that the moderator packing more adequate is what has a light water thickness 0.5 cm (radius 2 cm) and 24.5 cm heavy water (radius 26.5 cm). (Author)

  9. Neutron filters for producing monoenergetic neutron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.; Harvey, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    Neutron transmission measurements have been made on high-purity, highly-enriched samples of 58 Ni (99.9%), 60 Ni (99.7%), 64 Zn (97.9%) and 184 W (94.5%) to measure their neutron windows and to assess their potential usefulness for producing monoenergetic beams of intermediate energies from a reactor. Transmission measurements on the Los Alamos Sc filter (44.26 cm Sc and 1.0 cm Ti) have been made to determine the characteristics of the transmitted neutron beam and to measure the total cross section of Sc at the 2.0 keV minimum. When corrected for the Ti and impurities, a value of 0.35 +- 0.03 b was obtained for this minimum

  10. Neutron Stars and Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Werner

    2009-01-01

    Neutron stars are the most compact astronomical objects in the universe which are accessible by direct observation. Studying neutron stars means studying physics in regimes unattainable in any terrestrial laboratory. Understanding their observed complex phenomena requires a wide range of scientific disciplines, including the nuclear and condensed matter physics of very dense matter in neutron star interiors, plasma physics and quantum electrodynamics of magnetospheres, and the relativistic magneto-hydrodynamics of electron-positron pulsar winds interacting with some ambient medium. Not to mention the test bed neutron stars provide for general relativity theories, and their importance as potential sources of gravitational waves. It is this variety of disciplines which, among others, makes neutron star research so fascinating, not only for those who have been working in the field for many years but also for students and young scientists. The aim of this book is to serve as a reference work which not only review...

  11. Fast neutrons dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rzyski, B.M.

    1977-01-01

    A proton recoil technique has been developed for inducing thermoluminescence with incident fast neutrons. CaF 2 was used as the TL phosphor, and cane sugar and polyethylene were used as proton radiators. The phosphor and the hydrogeneous material powders were well mixed, encapsulated in glass tubes and exposed to Am-Be sources, resulting in recoils from incident fast neutrons of energy between 0,25 and 11,25 MeV. The intrinsic response of pure CaF 2 to fast neutrons without a hydrogeneous radiator was checked by using LiF (TLD-700). Glow curves were recorded from room temperature up to 350 0 C after different doses of neutrons and gamma rays of 60 Co. First collision dose due to fast neutrons in tissue like materials such as cane sugar and polyethylene was also calculated [pt

  12. Diffuse scattering of neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novion, C.H. de.

    1981-02-01

    The use of neutron scattering to study atomic disorder in metals and alloys is described. The diffuse elastic scattering of neutrons by a perfect crystal lattice leads to a diffraction spectrum with only Bragg spreads. the existence of disorder in the crystal results in intensity and position modifications to these spreads, and above all, to the appearance of a low intensity scatter between Bragg peaks. The elastic scattering of neutrons is treated in this text, i.e. by measuring the number of scattered neutrons having the same energy as the incident neutrons. Such measurements yield information on the static disorder in the crystal and time average fluctuations in composition and atomic displacements [fr

  13. A Neutron Rem Counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, I Oe; Braun, J

    1964-01-15

    A neutron detector is described which measures the neutron dose rate in rem/h independently of the energy of the neutrons from thermal to 15 MeV. The detector consists of a BF{sub 3} proportional counter surrounded by a shield made of polyethylene and boron plastic that gives the appropriate amount of moderation and absorption to the impinging neutrons to obtain rem response. Two different versions have been developed. One model can utilize standard BF{sub 3} counters and is suitable for use in installed monitors around reactors and accelerators and the other model is specially designed for use in a portable survey instrument. The neutron rem counter for portable instruments has a sensitivity of 2.4 cps/mrem/h and is essentially nondirectional in response. With correct bias setting the counter is insensitive to gamma exposure up to 200 r/h from Co-60.

  14. Simulated workplace neutron fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacoste, V.; Taylor, G.; Rottger, S.

    2011-01-01

    The use of simulated workplace neutron fields, which aim at replicating radiation fields at practical workplaces, is an alternative solution for the calibration of neutron dosemeters. They offer more appropriate calibration coefficients when the mean fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion coefficients of the simulated and practical fields are comparable. Intensive Monte Carlo modelling work has become quite indispensable for the design and/or the characterization of the produced mixed neutron/photon fields, and the use of Bonner sphere systems and proton recoil spectrometers is also mandatory for a reliable experimental determination of the neutron fluence energy distribution over the whole energy range. The establishment of a calibration capability with a simulated workplace neutron field is not an easy task; to date only few facilities are available as standard calibration fields. (authors)

  15. Neutron PSDs for the next generation of spallation neutron sources

    CERN Document Server

    Eijk, C W

    2002-01-01

    A review of R and D for neutron PSDs to be used at anticipated new spallation neutron sources: the Time-of-Flight system facility, European Spallation Source, Spallation Neutron Source and Neutron Arena, is presented. The gas-filled detectors, scintillation detectors and hybrid systems are emphasized.

  16. Fail-safe neutron shutter used for thermal neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachs, R.D.; Morris, R.A.

    1976-11-01

    A fail-safe, reliable, easy-to-use neutron shutter was designed, built, and put into operation at the Omega West Reactor, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. The neutron shutter will be used primarily to perform thermal neutron radiography, but is also available for a highly collimated source of thermal neutrons [neutron flux = 3.876 x 10 6 (neutrons)/(cm 2 .s)]. Neutron collimator sizes of either 10.16 by 10.16 cm or 10.16 by 30.48 cm are available

  17. Neutron optics using transverse field neutron spin echo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achiwa, Norio; Hino, Masahiro; Yamauchi, Yoshihiro; Takakura, Hiroyuki; Tasaki, Seiji; Akiyoshi, Tsunekazu; Ebisawa, Toru.

    1993-01-01

    A neutron spin echo (NSE) spectrometer with perpendicular magnetic field to the neutron scattering plane, using an iron yoke type electro-magnet has been developed. A combination of cold neutron guider, supermirror neutron polarizer of double reflection type and supermirror neutron analyser was adopted for the spectrometer. The first application of the NSE spectrometer to neutron optics by passing Larmor precessing neutrons through gas, solid and liquid materials of several different lengths which are inserted in one of the precession field have been examined. Preliminary NSE spectra of this sample geometry are discussed. (author)

  18. Progress in transmutation targets from Efttra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, D.; Fernandez, A.; Warin, D.; Bonnerot, J.M.; Garzenne, C.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Maschek, W.; Schram, R.; Klaassen, F.

    2007-01-01

    Since 15 years, the EFTTRA partners have organised programmes to demonstrate the feasibility of the transmutation of americium in uranium-free targets. In the related transmutation scenario, the targets are introduced in a thermal neutron zone of a fast reactor, to maximize the efficiency of transmutation. Amongst these programmes, those carried out in the HFR reactor in Petten have led to important conclusions and are still at the core of the research in that field. The analysis of the EFTTRA T4 and T4bis irradiation experiments, carried out with targets of MgAl 2 O 4 +11 wt% 241 Am, showed that the release/trapping of helium is the key issue for target design, and also demonstrated a lack of technical benefits of this material, due to a unsatisfactory in-pile behaviour in terms of irradiation damage and chemical stability. A new irradiation experiment called HELIOS is currently under fabrication and will be carried out in HFR. The in-pile behaviour of U-free fuels and targets such as (Am,Zr)O 2 , (Pu,Am,Zr)O 2 , CERCER (MgO) or CERMET (Mo) will be examined. The irradiation temperature will be high enough in some of the pins to be able to tune the release of a significant fraction of helium produced so that the material swelling can be minimized as much as reasonably possible. The HELIOS irradiation experiment is planned to be carried out in the HFR core and shall last 300 full power days starting in 2007. (authors)

  19. Neutron flux monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Naotaka.

    1993-01-01

    The device of the present invention greatly saves an analog processing section such as an analog filter and an analog processing circuit. That is, the device of the present invention comprises (1) a neutron flux detection means for detecting neutron fluxed in the reactor, (2) a digital filter means for dividing signals corresponding to the detected neutron fluxes into predetermined frequency band regions, (3) a calculation processing means for applying a calculation processing corresponding to the frequency band regions to the neutron flux detection signals divided by the digital filter means. With such a constitution, since the neutron detection signals are processed by the digital filter means, the accuracy is improved and the change for the property of the filter is facilitated. Further, when a neutron flux level is obtained, a calculation processing corresponding to the frequency band region can be conducted without the analog processing circuit. Accordingly, maintenance and accuracy are improved by greatly decreasing the number of parts. Further, since problems inherent to the analog circuit are solved, neutron fluxes are monitored at high reliability. (I.S.)

  20. Neutron Science 21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung Il; Choi, Yong Nam; Ahn, Geun Young; Lee, Hee Joo; Hong, Ji Sun; Kim, Hyo Sun

    2009-01-01

    The project aims to make the HANARO neutron beam facility a neutron research hub in the Asia-Pacific. This is a part of the effort to make the facility as productive as other neutron beam facilities in America and Europe which already operate as a hub that attracts thousands of users and produces hundreds of publications annually. The projects promotes 1) collaborative research between HANARO personnel and users, 2) internationally collaboration on various fronts of neutron science related activities. To achieve the above in an effective manner, its direction is adjusted by a series of meetings and the activities of the project are advertised to the public media. 3 domestic and 1 international collaborative research was carried out successfully in 2008 by using the HRPD. The 1st Asia-Oceania Neutron Summer School was successfully hosted in Korea. The annual report of the HANARO neutron beam facility was published. 3 advisory meetings and 6 internal meetings to promote the hub were held. Users were surveyed on their needs. The media was contacted twice in an effort to advertise the project activities. All of the above achievements are directly applicable to determining the national policy on neutron science. It is advised that the KAERI management take notice of the results to manage the facility effectively

  1. Neutrons at COSY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filges, D.; Freiesleben, H.

    1988-05-01

    For many years neutrons were considered important both as a useful probe in nuclear physics research and as an initiator and catalyst for fission, fusion and other applications. As a result knowledge about neutrons, especially below 20 MeV, received organized world-wide attention. Research with neutrons at medium energies, say 50 MeV to several GeV, has not consistently received attention and no systematic evaluations exist. But there is a large and considerable interest today because medium energy neutrons are very important in basic science and technology. The aim of this workshop was to provide an overview of the present status and the research which should be carried out in this field in future and which kind of experiments should be performed at the COSY facility: State-of-the-art about medium energy neutron experiments and existing facilities; planned experiments; needs for experiments doing research with neutrons at COSY (detectors, accelerator requirements, time structure etc.); what will be a first experiment to measure neutrons at COSY. The interest in this workshop is documented by a large number of participants. Copies of the viewgraphs of the talks are provided. (orig./HP)

  2. Neutron generation in lightning bolts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, G.N.; Razdan, H.; Bhat, C.L.; Ali, Q.M.

    1985-01-01

    To ascertain neutron generation in lightning bolts, the authors have searched for neutrons from individual lightning strokes, for a time-interval comparable with the duration of the lightning stroke. 10 7 -10 10 neutrons per stroke were found, thus providing the first experimental evidence that neutrons are generated in lightning discharges. (U.K.)

  3. Neutron Electric Dipole Moment Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Jen-Chieh

    2008-01-01

    The neutron electric dipole moment (EDM) provides unique information on CP violation and physics beyond the Standard Model. We first review the history of experimental searches for neutron electric dipole moment. The status of future neutron EDM experiments, including experiments using ultra-cold neutrons produced in superfluid helium, will then be presented.

  4. Basic research of neutron radiography using cold neutron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Masahiro; Tamaki, Masayoshi; Tasaka, Kanji

    1995-01-01

    As the result of demanding high quality images, now the nuclear reactors which can supply stably intense neutron beam have become the most general neutron source for radiography. For the purpose, mostly thermal neutrons have been used, but it is indispensable to use other neutrons than thermal neutrons for advancing neutron radiography technology and expanding the application fields. The radiography using cold neutrons is most behind in the development because the suitable neutron source was not available in Japan. The neutron sources for exclusively obtaining intense cold neutron beam were installed in the Kyoto University reactor in 1986 and in the JRR-3M of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in 1991. Basically as neutron energy lowers, the cross section of substances increases. In certain crystalline substances, the Bragg cutoff arises. The removal of scattered neutrons, the measurement of parallelism of beam and the relation of the thickness of objects with the transmissivity of cold neutrons are described. The imaging by TV method and the cold neutron CT in the CNRF and the simplified neutron CT by film method are reported. (K.I.)

  5. Double beam neutron radiography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanus, J.C.

    1977-09-01

    The DR1 reactor at Risoe is used as a neutron source for neutron radiography. In the double-beam neutron radiography facility a neutron flux of an intensity of 1.4 and 1.8 x 10 6 n. cm -2 . s -1 reaches the object to be radiographed. The transport and exposure container used for neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel rods is described, and the exposure technique and procedure are reviewed. The mode by which single neutron radiographs are assembled and assessed is described. This report will be published in the ''Neutron Radiography Newsletter''. (author)

  6. Thermal neutron source study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, T.M.

    1983-05-01

    The value of intense neutron beams for condensed matter research is discussed with emphasis on the complementary nature of steady state and pulsed neutron sources. A large body of information on neutron sources, both existing and planned, is then summarized under four major headings: fission reactors, electron accelerators with heavy metal targets, pulsed spallation sources and 'steady state' spallation sources. Although the cost of a spallation source is expected to exceed that of a fission reactor of the same flux by a factor of two, there are significant advantages for a spallation device such as the proposed Electronuclear Materials Test Facility (EMTF)

  7. Virtual neutron scattering experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Julie Hougaard; Bruun, Jesper; May, Michael

    2017-01-01

    . In the last week of the course, students travel to a large-scale neutron scattering facility to perform real neutron scattering experiments. Through student interviews and survey answers, we argue, that the virtual training prepares the students to engage more fruitfully with experiments by letting them focus......We describe how virtual experiments can be utilized in a learning design that prepares students for hands-on experiments at large-scale facilities. We illustrate the design by showing how virtual experiments are used at the Niels Bohr Institute in a master level course on neutron scattering...

  8. Fruits of neutron research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, C.

    1994-01-01

    Car windshields that don't break during accidents and jets that fly longer without making a refueling stop. Compact discs, credit cards, and pocket calculators. Refrigerator magnets and automatic car window openers. Beach shoes, food packaging, and bulletproof vests made of tough plastics. The quality and range of consumer products have improved steadily since the 1970s. One of the reasons: neutron research. Industries, employing neutron scattering techniques, to study materials properties, to act as diagnostics in tracing system performance, or as sources for radioactive isotopes used in medical fields for diagnostics or treatment, have all benefited from the fruits of advanced work with neutron sources

  9. Deep inelastic neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayers, J.

    1989-03-01

    The report is based on an invited talk given at a conference on ''Neutron Scattering at ISIS: Recent Highlights in Condensed Matter Research'', which was held in Rome, 1988, and is intended as an introduction to the techniques of Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering. The subject is discussed under the following topic headings:- the impulse approximation I.A., scaling behaviour, kinematical consequences of energy and momentum conservation, examples of measurements, derivation of the I.A., the I.A. in a harmonic system, and validity of the I.A. in neutron scattering. (U.K.)

  10. Coupled moderator neutronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.; Pitcher, E.J.; Ferguson, P.D.

    1995-01-01

    Optimizing the neutronic performance of a coupled-moderator system for a Long-Pulse Spallation Source is a new and challenging area for the spallation target-system designer. For optimal performance of a neutron source, it is essential to have good communication with instrument scientists to obtain proper design criteria and continued interaction with mechanical, thermal-hydraulic, and materials engineers to attain a practical design. A good comprehension of the basics of coupled-moderator neutronics will aid in the proper design of a target system for a Long-Pulse Spallation Source

  11. Fission neutron multiplicity calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerten, H.; Ruben, A.; Seeliger, D.

    1991-01-01

    A model for calculating neutron multiplicities in nuclear fission is presented. It is based on the solution of the energy partition problem as function of mass asymmetry within a phenomenological approach including temperature-dependent microscopic energies. Nuclear structure effects on fragment de-excitation, which influence neutron multiplicities, are discussed. Temperature effects on microscopic energy play an important role in induced fission reactions. Calculated results are presented for various fission reactions induced by neutrons. Data cover the incident energy range 0-20 MeV, i.e. multiple chance fission is considered. (author). 28 refs, 13 figs

  12. Neutron irradiation therapy machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Conventional neutron irradiation therapy machines, based on the use of cyclotrons for producing neutron beams, use a superconducting magnet for the cyclotron's magnetic field. This necessitates complex liquid He equipment and presents problems in general hospital use. If conventional magnets are used, the weight of the magnet poles considerably complicates the design of the rotating gantry. Such a therapy machine, gantry and target facilities are described in detail. The use of protons and deuterons to produce the neutron beams is compared and contrasted. (U.K.)

  13. Advanced neutron source project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorynina, L.V.; Proskuryakov, S.F.; Tishchenko, V.A.; Uzhanova, V.V.

    1991-01-01

    The project of the ANS improved neutron source intended for fundamental researches in nuclear physics and materials testing is considered. New superhigh-flux heavy-water 350 MW reactor is used for the source creation. The standard fuel is uranium silicide (U 3 Si 2 ). Reactor core volume equals 67.4 l and average power density is 4.9 MW/l. Neutron flux density is 10 16 neutron/(cm 2 xs). The facility construction begin is planned for 1996. The first experiments should be accomplished in 2000

  14. 1. The determination of crystal and magnetic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elemans, J.B.A.A.

    1975-01-01

    A theoretical foundation of the technique of thermal neutron scattering by powders is outlined. A description of the experimental set-up is given. A beam of themalized neutrons emerges from the reactor (HFR at Petten) through a slit system. It is diffracted by a manochromator crystal with a finite mosaic structure, a Cu (111) crystal being used. After passing through 10 cm pyrolytic graphite with a ''window'' from 0.23 to 0.29 nm as a lambda/2 filter, resulting in a wave length of 0.257 nm, the neutrons are taken off at a predetermined angle defined by a second slit system, resulting in a beam in which the sample is bathed. The neutrons scattered by the sample are detected by a counter moving in an arc with the position of the sample as center. The standard measurement time for a 10 cm 3 sample was two days. A discussion of the mathematical procedures for deriving the magnetic structure from the observed counts is given

  15. Neutron spectra produced by moderating an isotopic neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrillo Nunnez, Aureliano; Vega Carrillo, Hector Rene

    2001-01-01

    A Monte Carlo study has been carried out to determine the neutron spectra produced by an isotopic neutron source inserted in moderating media. Most devices used for radiation protection have a response strongly dependent on neutron energy. ISO recommends several neutron sources and monoenergetic neutron radiations, but actual working situations have broad spectral neutron distributions extending from thermal to MeV energies, for instance, near nuclear power plants, medical applications accelerators and cosmic neutrons. To improve the evaluation of the dosimetric quantities, is recommended to calibrate the radiation protection devices in neutron spectra which are nearly like those met in practice. In order to complete the range of neutron calibrating sources, it seems useful to develop several wide spectral distributions representative of typical spectra down to thermal energies. The aim of this investigation was to use an isotopic neutron source in different moderating media to reproduce some of the neutron fields found in practice. MCNP code has been used during calculations, in these a 239PuBe neutron source was inserted in H2O, D2O and polyethylene moderators. Moderators were modeled as spheres and cylinders of different sizes. In the case of cylindrical geometry the anisotropy of resulting neutron spectra was calculated from 0 to 2 . From neutron spectra dosimetric features were calculated. MCNP calculations were validated by measuring the neutron spectra of a 239PuBe neutron source inserted in a H2O cylindrical moderator. The measurements were carried out with a multisphere neutron spectrometer with a 6LiI(Eu) scintillator. From the measurements the neutron spectrum was unfolded using the BUNKIUT code and the UTA4 response matrix. Some of the moderators with the source produce a neutron spectrum close to spectra found in actual applications, then can be used during the calibration of radiation protection devices

  16. Boron neutron capture therapy: An interdisciplinary co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauerwein, W.; Hideghety, K.; Rassow, J.; Moss, R.L.; Stecher-Rasmussen, F.; Heimans, J.; Gabel, D.; Vries, M.J. de; Touw, D.J.

    2001-01-01

    The international (European) undertaking in BNCT in the Netherlands has required close scrutiny of the organisational structure required to establish BNCT facilities. The multidisciplinary co-operation and the tasks of the participants in the hospital (Radiation Oncologist, Medical Physicist, Pharmacist and other medical and paramedical staff) and those attached to the reactor) are described. The organisational structure and regulatory aspects required for the international functioning of the Petten treatment facility are provided for guidance to new projects in this field. (author)

  17. Neutron Depolarization in Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuchenko, N. K.

    1995-04-01

    The dependences of neutron depolarization on applied magnetic field are deduced along the magnetization hysteresis loop in terms of the Bean model of the critical state. The depolarization in uniaxial superconductors with the reversible magnetization, including uniaxial magnetic superconductors, is also considered. A strong depolarization is expected if the neutrons travel along the vortex lines. On calcule la dépendance en champ magnétique de la dépolarisation des neutrons le long du cycle d'hystérésis en termes du modèle critique de Bean. On considère aussi la dépolarisation dans les supraconducteurs uniaxiaux en fonction de l'aimantation réversible, y compris pour les supraconducteurs magnétiques. On attend une forte dépolarisation si les neutrons se propagent le long des vortex.

  18. Scattering with polarized neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweizer, J.

    2007-01-01

    In the history of neutron scattering, it was shown very soon that the use of polarized neutron beams brings much more information than usual scattering with unpolarized neutrons. We shall develop here the different scattering methods that imply polarized neutrons: 1) polarized beams without polarization analysis, the flipping ratio method; 2) polarized beams with a uniaxial polarization analysis; 3) polarized beams with a spherical polarization analysis. For all these scattering methods, we shall give examples of the physical problems which can been solved by these methods, particularly in the field of magnetism: investigation of complex magnetic structures, investigation of spin or magnetization densities in metals, insulators and molecular compounds, separation of magnetic and nuclear scattering, investigation of magnetic properties of liquids and amorphous materials and even, for non magnetic material, separation between coherent and incoherent scattering. (author)

  19. Personnel neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hankins, D.

    1982-04-01

    This edited transcript of a presentation on personnel neutron discusses the accuracy of present dosimetry practices, requirements, calibration, dosemeter types, quality factors, operational problems, and dosimetry for a criticality accident. 32 figs

  20. High energy neutron generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barjon, R.; Breynat, G.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a generator of fast neutrons only slightly contaminated by neutrons of energy less than 15 MeV, comprising a source of charged particles of energy equal to at least 15 MeV, a target made of lithium deuteride, and means for cooling the target. The target comprises at least two elements placed in series in the path of the charged particles and separated from each other, the thickness of each of the elements being selected as a function of the average energy of the charged particles emitted from the source and the energy of the fast neutrons to be generated such that neutrons of energy equal to at least 15 MeV are emitted in the forward direction in response to the bombardment of the target from behind by the charged particles. The target cooling means comprises means for circulating between and around the elements a gas which does not chemically react with lithium deuteride

  1. The neutron computer tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, G.; Krata, S.

    1983-01-01

    The method of computer tomography (CT) was applied for neutrons instead of X-rays. The neutron radiography image of samples was scanned by microphotometer to get the transmission data. This process was so time-consuming that the number of incident angles to samples could not be increased. The transmission data was processed by FACOM computer and CT image was gained. In the experiment at the Japan Research Reactor No. 4 at Tokai-mura with 18 projection angles, the resolution of paraffin in the aluminum block was less than 0.8 mm. In the experiment at Van de Graaf accelerator of Nagoya University, this same resolution was 1.2 mm because of the angle distribution of neutron beam. This experiment is the preliminary one, the facility which utilizes neutron television and video-recorder will be necessary for the next stage. (Auth.)

  2. Neutron dosimetry in biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigurbjoernsson, B.; Smith, H.H.; Gustafsson, A.

    1965-01-01

    To study adequately the biological effects of different energy neutrons it is necessary to have high-intensity sources which are not contaminated by other radiations, the most serious of which are gamma rays. An effective dosimetry must provide an accurate measure of the absorbed dose, in biological materials, of each type of radiation at any reactor facility involved in radiobiological research. A standardized biological dosimetry, in addition to physical and chemical methods, may be desirable. The ideal data needed to achieve a fully documented dosimetry has been compiled by H. Glubrecht: (1) Energy spectrum and intensity of neutrons; (2) Angular distribution of neutrons on the whole surface of the irradiated object; (3) Additional undesired radiation accompanying the neutrons; (4) Physical state and chemical composition of the irradiated object. It is not sufficient to note only an integral dose value (e.g. in 'rad') as the biological effect depends on the above data

  3. The intense neutron generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, W B

    1966-07-01

    The presentation discusses both the economic and research contexts that would be served by producing neutrons in gram quantities at high intensities by electrical means without uranium-235. The revenue from producing radioisotopes is attractive. The array of techniques introduced by the multipurpose 65 megawatt Intense Neutron Generator project includes liquid metal cooling, superconducting magnets for beam bending and focussing, super-conductors for low-loss high-power radiofrequency systems, efficient devices for producing radiofrequency power, plasma physics developments for producing and accelerating hydrogen, ions at high intensity that are still far out from established practice, a multimegawatt high voltage D.C. generating machine that could have several applications. The research fields served relate principally to materials science through neutron-phonon and other quantum interactions as well as through neutron diffraction. Nuclear physics is served through {mu}-, {pi}- and K-meson production. Isotope production enters many fields of applied research. (author)

  4. Neutron personnel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, R.V.

    1981-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art in neutron personnel dosimetry is reviewed. Topics covered include dosimetry needs and alternatives, current dosimetry approaches, personnel monitoring devices, calibration strategies, and future developments

  5. Neutron resonance averaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrien, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    The principles of resonance averaging as applied to neutron capture reactions are described. Several illustrations of resonance averaging to problems of nuclear structure and the distribution of radiative strength in nuclei are provided. 30 refs., 12 figs

  6. Neutron flux monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Yasushi; Mitsubori, Minehisa; Ohashi, Kazunori.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a neutron flux monitoring device for preventing occurrence of erroneous reactor scram caused by the elevation of the indication of a start region monitor (SRM) due to a factor different from actual increase of neutron fluxes. Namely, judgement based on measured values obtained by a pulse counting method and a judgment based on measured values obtained by a Cambel method are combined. A logic of switching neutron flux measuring method to be used for monitoring, namely, switching to an intermediate region when both of the judgements are valid is adopted. Then, even if the indication value is elevated based on the Cambel method with no increase of the counter rate in a neutron source region, the switching to the intermediate region is not conducted. As a result, erroneous reactor scram such as 'shorter reactor period' can be avoided. (I.S.)

  7. Neutron induced radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.M.R.

    1977-01-01

    We derive a general expression for the number of displaced atoms of type j caused by a primary knock-on of type i. The Kinchin-Pease model is used, but considerably generalised to allow for realistic atomic potentials. Two cases are considered in detail: the single particle problem causing a cascade and the neutron initiated problem which leads to multiple subcascades. Numerical results have been obtained for a variety of scattering laws. An important conclusion is that neutron initiated damage is much more severe than atom-initiated damage and leads to the number of displaced atoms being a factor of (A+1) 2 /4A larger than the single primary knock-on theory predicts. A is the ratio of the atomic mass to the neutron mass. The importance of this result to the theory of neutron sputtering is explained. (orig.) [de

  8. Directionally positionable neutron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dance, W.E.; Bumgardner, H.M.

    1981-01-01

    Disclosed is apparatus for forming and directionally positioning a neutron beam. The apparatus includes an enclosed housing rotatable about a first axis with a neutron source axially positioned on the axis of rotation of the enclosed housing but not rotating with the housing. The rotatable housing is carried by a vertically positionable arm carried on a mobile transport. A collimator is supported by the rotatable housing and projects into the housing to orientationally position its inlet window at an adjustably fixed axial and radial spacing from the neutron source so that rotation of the enclosed housing causes the inlet window to rotate about a circle which is a fixed axial distance from the neutron source and has the axis of rotation of the housing as its center. (author)

  9. Cylindrical neutron generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ka-Ngo [Hercules, CA

    2008-04-22

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  10. Neutron-absorbing alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portnoi, K.I.; Arabei, L.B.; Gryaznov, G.M.; Levi, L.I.; Lunin, G.L.; Kozhukhov, V.M.; Markov, J.M.; Fedotov, M.E.

    1975-01-01

    A process is described for the production of an alloy consiting of 1 to 20% In, 0.5 to 15% Sm, and from 3 to 18% Hf, the balance being Ni. Such alloys show a good absorption capacity for thermal and intermediate neutrons, good neutron capture efficiency, and good corrosion resistance, and find application in nuclear reactor automatic control and safety systems. The Hf provides for the maintenance of a reasonably high order of neutron capture efficiency throughout the lifetime of a reactor. The alloys are formed in a vacuum furnace operating with an inert gas atmosphere at 280 to 300 mm.Hg. They have a corrosion resistance from 3 to 3.5 times that of the Ag-based alloys commonly employed, and a neutron capture efficiency about twice that of the Ag alloys. Castability and structural strength are good. (U.K.)

  11. Studsvik thermal neutron facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, O.A.; Larsson, B.; Grusell, E.; Svensson, P.

    1992-01-01

    The Studsvik thermal neutron facility at the R2-0 reactor originally designed for neutron capture radiography has been modified to permit irradiation of living cells and animals. A hole was drilled in the concrete shielding to provide a cylindrical channel with diameter of 25.3 cm. A shielding water tank serves as an entry holder for cells and animals. The advantage of this modification is that cells and animals can be irradiated at a constant thermal neutron fluence rate of approximately 10 9 n cm -2 s -1 (at 100 kW) without stopping and restarting the reactor. Topographic analysis of boron done by neutron capture autoradiography (NCR) can be irradiated under the same conditions as previously

  12. The intense neutron generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, W.B.

    1966-01-01

    The presentation discusses both the economic and research contexts that would be served by producing neutrons in gram quantities at high intensities by electrical means without uranium-235. The revenue from producing radioisotopes is attractive. The array of techniques introduced by the multipurpose 65 megawatt Intense Neutron Generator project includes liquid metal cooling, superconducting magnets for beam bending and focussing, super-conductors for low-loss high-power radiofrequency systems, efficient devices for producing radiofrequency power, plasma physics developments for producing and accelerating hydrogen, ions at high intensity that are still far out from established practice, a multimegawatt high voltage D.C. generating machine that could have several applications. The research fields served relate principally to materials science through neutron-phonon and other quantum interactions as well as through neutron diffraction. Nuclear physics is served through μ-, π- and K-meson production. Isotope production enters many fields of applied research. (author)

  13. Neutrons and fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maynard, C.W.

    1976-01-01

    The production of energy from fusion reactions does not require neutrons in the fundamental sense that they are required in a fission reactor. Nevertheless, the dominant fusion reaction, that between deuterium and tritium, yields a 14 MeV neutron. To contrast a fusion reactor based on this reaction with the fission case, 3 x 10 20 such neutrons produced per gigawatt of power. This is four times as many neutrons as in an equivalent fission reactor and they carry seven times the energy of the fission neutrons. Thus, they dominate the energy recovery problem and create technological problems comparable to the original plasma confinement problem as far as a practical power producing device is concerned. Further contrasts of the fusion and fission cases are presented to establish the general role of neutrons in fusion devices. Details of the energy deposition processes are discussed and those reactions necessary for producing additional tritium are outlined. The relatively high energy flux with its large intensity will activate almost any materials of which the reactor may be composed. This activation is examined from the point of view of decay heat, radiological safety, and long-term storage. In addition, a discussion of the deleterious effects of neutron interactions on materials is given in some detail; this includes the helium and hydrogen producing reactions and displacement rate of the lattice atoms. The various materials that have been proposed for structural purposes, for breeding, reflecting, and moderating neutrons, and for radiation shielding are reviewed from the nuclear standpoint. The specific reactions of interest are taken up for various materials and finally a report is given on the status and prospects of data for fusion studies

  14. Scope of neutron interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauch, H.

    1978-01-01

    This paper deals with the interferometry of well separated coherent beams, where the phase of the beams can be manipulated individually. The basic equation of the dynamical neutron diffraction theory are recalled. The various contributions to the interaction of as low neutron with its surroundings are discussed: the various terms denote the nuclear, magnetic, electromagnetic, intrinsic, gravitational, and weak interaction respectively. Applications to nuclear physics, fundamental physics and solid state physics are successively envisaged

  15. Pulsed spallation Neutron Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the early history of pulsed spallation neutron source development at Argonne and provides an overview of existing sources world wide. A number of proposals for machines more powerful than currently exist are under development, which are briefly described. The author reviews the status of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, its instrumentation, and its user program, and provides a few examples of applications in fundamental condensed matter physics, materials science and technology

  16. Pulsed spallation neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reviews the early history of pulsed spallation neutron source development ar Argonne and provides an overview of existing sources world wide. A number of proposals for machines more powerful than currently exist are under development, which are briefly described. The author reviews the status of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, its instrumentation, and its user program, and provide a few examples of applications in fundamental condensed matter physics, materials science and technology

  17. Introduction to neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, W E [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    We give here an introduction to the theoretical principles of neutron scattering. The relationship between scattering- and correlation-functions is particularly emphasized. Within the framework of linear response theory (justified by the weakness of the basic interaction) the relation between fluctuation and dissipation is discussed. This general framework explains the particular power of neutron scattering as an experimental method. (author) 4 figs., 4 refs.

  18. Electron volt neutron spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietropaolo, A.; Senesi, R.

    2011-01-01

    The advent of pulsed neutron sources has made available intense fluxes of epithermal neutrons (500 meV ≤E≤100 eV ). The possibility to open new investigations on condensed matter with eV neutron scattering techniques, is related to the development of methods, concepts and devices that drive, or are inspired by, emerging studies at this energy scale. Electron volt spectrometers have undergone continuous improvements since the construction of the first prototype instruments, but in the last decade major breakthroughs have been accomplished in terms of resolution and counting statistics, leading, for example, to the direct measurement of the proton 3-D Born–Oppenheimer potential in any material, or to quantitatively probe nuclear quantum effects in hydrogen bonded systems. This paper reports on the most effective methods and concepts for energy analysis and detection, as well as devices for the optimization of electron volt spectrometers for different applications. This is set in the context of the progress made up to date in instrument development. Starting from early stages of development of the technique, particular emphasis will be given to the Vesuvio eV spectrometer at the ISIS neutron source, the first spectrometer where extensive scientific, as well as research and development programmes have been carried out. The potential offered by this type of instrumentation, from single particle excitations to momentum distribution studies, is then put in perspective into the emerging fields of eV spectroscopy applied to cultural heritages and neutron irradiation effects in electronics. - Highlights: ► Neutron spectrometers at eV energies. ► Methods and techniques for eV neutrons counting at spallation sources. ► Scattering, imaging and radiation hardness tests with multi-eV neutrons.

  19. Neutron electromagnetic form factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, J.M.; Madey, R.; Eden, T.; Markowitz, P.; Rutt, P.M.; Beard, K.; Anderson, B.D.; Baldwin, A.R.; Keane, D.; Manley, D.M.; Watson, J.W.; Zhang, W.M.; Kowalski, S.; Bertozzi, W.; Dodson, G.; Farkhondeh, M.; Dow, K.; Korsch, W.; Tieger, D.; Turchinetz, W.; Weinstein, L.; Gross, F.; Mougey, J.; Ulmer, P.; Whitney, R.; Reichelt, T.; Chang, C.C.; Kelly, J.J.; Payerle, T.; Cameron, J.; Ni, B.; Spraker, M.; Barkhuff, D.; Lourie, R.; Verst, S.V.; Hyde-Wright, C.; Jiang, W.-D.; Flanders, B.; Pella, P.; Arenhoevel, H.

    1992-01-01

    Nucleon form factors provide fundamental input for nuclear structure and quark models. Current knowledge of neutron form factors, particularly the electric form factor of the neutron, is insufficient to meet these needs. Developments of high-duty-factor accelerators and polarization-transfer techniques permit new experiments that promise results with small sensitivities to nuclear models. We review the current status of the field, our own work at the MIT/Bates linear accelerator, and future experimental efforts

  20. Neutron ion temperature measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, J.D.; Hendel, H.W.; Lovberg, J.; Nieschmidt, E.B.

    1986-11-01

    One important use of fusion product diagnostics is in the determination of the deuterium ion temperature from the magnitude of the 2.5 MeV d(d,n) 3 He neutron emission. The detectors, calibration methods, and limitations of this technique are reviewed here with emphasis on procedures used at PPPL. In most tokamaks, the ion temperature deduced from neutrons is in reasonable agreement with the ion temperature deduced by other techniques

  1. Nuclear polarization and neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaettli, H.

    1985-01-01

    Different possibilities for the use of polarized nuclei in thermal neutron scattering on condensed matter are reviewed. Highly polarized nuclei are the starting point for studying dipolar magnetic order. Systematic measurement of spin-dependent scattering lengths is possible on samples with polarized nuclei. Highly polarized hydrogen should help to unravel complicated structures in chemistry and biology. The use of polarized proton targets as an energy-independent neutron polarizer in the thermal and epithermal region should be considered afresh. (author)

  2. Forensic neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishi, T.

    1987-01-01

    The progress of forensic neutron activation analysis (FNAA) in Japan is described. FNAA began in 1965 and during the past 20 years many cases have been handled; these include determination of toxic materials, comparison examination of physical evidences (e.g., paints, metal fragments, plastics and inks) and drug sample differentiation. Neutron activation analysis is applied routinely to the scientific criminal investigation as one of multielement analytical techniques. This paper also discusses these routine works. (author) 14 refs

  3. Quantum physics with neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durstberger, K.; Hasegawa, Y.; Klepp, J.; Sulyok, G.; Rauch, H.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Fundamental quantum properties like quantum coherence and entanglement are among the most interesting features of quantum mechanics. The physical system of interest is the (massive) neutron subjected to interferometric and polarimetric measurements. Neutrons are proper objects for a study of quantum mechanical behavior: they allow for rather easy experimental control and the neutron spin is the simplest two-level system with easy manipulation by magnetic fields. In combination with interferometric measurements the system has enough intrinsic richness to show interesting quantum features such as entanglement. The coupling of the neutron to an external magnetic field allows for selective manipulations of the spinor quantum states. This can be used, on the one hand, to create entangled states where the entanglement occurs between different degrees of freedom (e.g. spin and path) and, on the other hand, one can introduce dephasing and decoherence by varying magnetic fields. We investigate different kinds of entanglement for the neutron system and mechanisms for decoherence and dephasing. We discuss weak measurements and their realization for neutrons where information about the system can be revealed without disturbing the system too much. Beyond the theoretical work we develop experimental strategies to check the results directly in suitably designed experiments. The experimental work is done at the Institute Laue-Langvine (ILL) in Grenoble, France. (author)

  4. Neutron scattering in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knott, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    Neutron scattering techniques have been part of the Australian scientific research community for the past three decades. The High Flux Australian Reactor (HIFAR) is a multi-use facility of modest performance that provides the only neutron source in the country suitable for neutron scattering. The limitations of HIFAR have been recognized and recently a Government initiated inquiry sought to evaluate the future needs of a neutron source. In essence, the inquiry suggested that a delay of several years would enable a number of key issues to be resolved, and therefore a more appropriate decision made. In the meantime, use of the present source is being optimized, and where necessary research is being undertaken at major overseas neutron facilities either on a formal or informal basis. Australia has, at present, a formal agreement with the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK) for access to the spallation source ISIS. Various aspects of neutron scattering have been implemented on HIFAR, including investigations of the structure of biological relevant molecules. One aspect of these investigations will be presented. Preliminary results from a study of the interaction of the immunosuppressant drug, cyclosporin-A, with reconstituted membranes suggest that the hydrophobic drug interdigitated with lipid chains

  5. Neutron scattering in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knott, R.B. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai (Australia)

    1994-12-31

    Neutron scattering techniques have been part of the Australian scientific research community for the past three decades. The High Flux Australian Reactor (HIFAR) is a multi-use facility of modest performance that provides the only neutron source in the country suitable for neutron scattering. The limitations of HIFAR have been recognized and recently a Government initiated inquiry sought to evaluate the future needs of a neutron source. In essence, the inquiry suggested that a delay of several years would enable a number of key issues to be resolved, and therefore a more appropriate decision made. In the meantime, use of the present source is being optimized, and where necessary research is being undertaken at major overseas neutron facilities either on a formal or informal basis. Australia has, at present, a formal agreement with the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK) for access to the spallation source ISIS. Various aspects of neutron scattering have been implemented on HIFAR, including investigations of the structure of biological relevant molecules. One aspect of these investigations will be presented. Preliminary results from a study of the interaction of the immunosuppressant drug, cyclosporin-A, with reconstituted membranes suggest that the hydrophobic drug interdigitated with lipid chains.

  6. LHD neutron diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, M.; Ogawa, K.; Kobuchi, T.

    2015-01-01

    The Large Helical Device (LHD) project will step into a next stage, i.e. experiment by using deuterium gases after two years of preparation. A comprehensive set of neutron and γ-ray diagnostics is going to be installed on the LHD towards extension of energetic-particle (EP) physics research in heliotron plasmas. Conceptual design of fusion products diagnostics for the LHD was made in late 1990s. After conclusion of agreements for the LHD deuterium experiment with local government bodies, development of FPs diagnostics has begun lately. Because there are a lot of tasks to do, all Japan fusion neutron and γ-ray diagnostics team has been organized in the collaboration framework of National Institute for Fusion Science. FPs diagnostics system on the LHD will consist of 1) wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor (NFM), 2) neutron activation system (NAS), 3) vertical neutron camera (VNC). In addition to these, we are developing a directional scintillating fiber detector, an artificial diamond detector and a γ-ray scintillation detector for confinement study of MeV ions. A neutron energy spectrometer prototype is also being developed and tested in KSTAR. In this paper, roles of NFM, NAS and VNC and current status of implementation onto the LHD are briefly described. (author)

  7. Neutrons for materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windsor, C.G.; Allen, A.J.; Hutchings, M.T.; Sayers, C.M.; Sinclair, R.N.; Schofield, P.; Wright, C.J.

    1984-12-01

    The discussion will be limited to applied materials research performed on a customer/contractor basis. The information obtained using neutrons must therefore compete both scientifically and financially with information obtained using other techniques, particularly electron microscopy, X-ray, NMR, infra-red and Raman spectroscopy. It will be argued that the unique nature of the information gained from neutrons often outweighs the undoubted difficulties of access to neutron beams. Examples are given. Small angle scattering has emerged as the neutron technique of widest application in applied materials research. The penetration of neutron beams through containment vessels, as well as through the sample, allows the measurement of 'in situ' time dependent experiments within a furnace, cryostat, pressure vessel or chemical reactor vessel. High resolution powder diffraction is another technique with wide applications. Structural studies are possible on increasing complex phases. The structure and volume fraction of minority phases can be measured at levels appreciably below that possible by X-ray diffraction. A rapidly growing field at present is the measurement of internal strains through the small shifts in lattice spacing. Inelastic scattering measurements exploit the unique property of neutrons to measure the orientations of vibrating molecules. (author)

  8. Neutron imaging plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niimura, Nobuo

    1995-01-01

    Imaging plates have been used in the field of medical diagnosis since long ago, but their usefulness was verified as the two-dimensional detector for analyzing the X-ray crystalline structure of high bio molecules like protein, and they have contributed to the remarkable progress in this field. The great contribution is due to the excellent features, such as the detection efficiency of about 100%, the positional resolution smaller than 0.2 mm, the dynamic range of five digits, and the area of several hundreds mm square. The neutron imaging plates have not yet obtained the sufficient results. It was planned to construct the neutron diffractometer for biological matters, and to put imaging plate neutron detectors (IP-ND) to practical use as the detector. The research on the development of IP-NDs was carried out, and the IPp-NDs having the performance comparable with that for X-ray were able to be produced. Imaging plates are the integral type two-dimensional radiation detector using photostimulated luminescence matters, and their principle is explained. As to neutron imaging plates, the converter, neutron detection efficiency and the flight of secondary particles in photo-stimulated luminescence matters are described. As for the present state of development of neutron imaging plates, the IP-NDs made for trial, the dynamic range, the positional resolution, the detection efficiency and the kinds of converters, and the application of IP-NDs are reported. (K.I.)

  9. Neutron flux monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimazu, Yoichiro.

    1995-01-01

    In a neutron flux monitoring device, there are disposed a neutron flux measuring means for outputting signals in accordance with the intensity of neutron fluxes, a calculation means for calculating a self power density spectrum at a frequency band suitable to an object to be measured based on the output of the neutron flux measuring means, an alarm set value generation means for outputting an alarm set value as a comparative reference, and an alarm judging means for comparing the alarm set value with the outputted value of the calculation means to judge requirement of generating an alarm and generate an alarm in accordance with the result of the judgement. Namely, the time-series of neutron flux signals is put to fourier transformation for a predetermined period of time by the calculation means, and from each of square sums for real number component and imaginary number component for each of the frequencies, a self power density spectrum in the frequency band suitable to the object to be measured is calculated. Then, when the set reference value is exceeded, an alarm is generated. This can reliably prevent generation of erroneous alarm due to neutron flux noises and can accurately generate an alarm at an appropriate time. (N.H.)

  10. Neutron Diffractometer; Neutronski difraktometar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zivadinovic, M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    RA nuclear reactor is considered as a relatively strong neutron source producing the thermal neutron flux of about 3x10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2} sec when operating at nominal power of 6.5 MW. Neutron diffraction method is applied in the field of solid state physics, material science, crystallography, magnetism, nuclear physic. Neutron diffractometer at the RA reactor consists of: system for obtaining collimated neutron beam from the horizontal experimental channel neutron monochromator; goniometer and electronic equipment for measurements and collecting the the measurement data. Nuklearni reaktor RA koji pri radu na snazi od 6,5 MW ima fluks termalnih neutrona oko 3x10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2} sec predstavlja relativno jak izvor neutrona. Tehnika difrakcije neutrona primenjuje se u istrazivanjima fizike crvstog stanja, strukture materijala, kristalografije, magnetizma, nuklearne fizike. Neutronski difraktometar na reaktoru RA sastoji se od sistema za dobijanje kolimisanog snopa neutrona kroz horizontalni kanal reaktora; neutroskog monohromatora; goniometra i elektronskih uredjaja za merenja i registrovanje rezultata. Ovaj izvestaj sadrzi detaljan opis i seme neutronskog difraktometra sa pratecom opremom i elektronskim komponentama.

  11. Neutron measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatayama, Akiyoshi; Seki, Eiji; Kita, Yoshio; Nishitani, Takeo.

    1993-01-01

    The device of the present invention concerns measurement for neutrons in a tokamak type thermonuclear device and it can measure total amount of generated neutrons accurately throughout the operation period even if an error is caused in counted values by plasma disruption. That is, the device comprises (1) a means for detecting presence or absence of occurrence of plasma disruption and the time for the initiation of the occurrence, (2) a first data processing means for processing detection signals, (3) a means for detecting neutrons generated in plasmas and (4) a second data processing means for calculating integrated values for the number of neutrons generated from the start to the completion of electric discharge when no disruption occurs and calculating integrated values for the number of generated neutrons from the start of electric discharge to the time at the initiation of occurrence of the disruption when disruption is present. In the thus constituted device, even if an error is caused by frequent occurrence of plasma disruption, total time integrated amount of neutrons generated in the plasmas can be measured accurately. (I.S.)

  12. Neutron beam applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Hee; Lee, J. S.; Seong, B. S.

    2000-05-01

    For the materials science by neutron technique, the development of the various complementary neutron beam facilities at horizontal beam port of HANARO and the techniques for measurement and analysis has been performed. High resolution powder diffractometer, after the installation and performance test, has been opened and used actively for crystal structure analysis, magnetic structure analysis, phase transition study, etc., since January 1998. The main components for four circle diffractometer were developed and, after performance test, it has been opened for crystal structure analysis and texture measurement since the end of 1999. For the small angle neutron spectrometer, the main component development and test, beam characterization, and the preliminary experiment for the structure study of polymer have been carried out. Neutron radiography facility, after the precise performance test, has been used for the non-destructive test of industrial component. Addition to the development of main instruments, for the effective utilization of those facilities, the scattering techniques relating to quantitative phase analysis, magnetic structure analysis, texture measurement, residual stress measurement, polymer study, etc, were developed. For the neutron radiography, photographing and printing technique on direct and indirect method was stabilized and the development for the real time image processing technique by neutron TV was carried out. The sample environment facilities for low and high temperature, magnetic field were also developed

  13. Tensile behavior of RAFM alloys after neutron irradiation of up to 16.3 dpa between 250 and 450 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Materna-Morris, E., E-mail: edeltraud.materna-morris@kit.edu; Schneider, H.-C., E-mail: hans-christian.schneider@kit.edu; Möslang, A., E-mail: anton.moeslang@kit.edu

    2014-12-15

    Tensile specimen of steel EUROFER97 and other alloys on the basis of RAFM steels such, as OPTIFER and F82H alloys, and Ga3X were irradiated and post-examined during a neutron irradiation program of up to 16.3 dpa between 250 and 450 °C in the HFR (High Flux Reactor) in the Netherlands. These tensile results were compared with former irradiation programs, with lower neutron doses of up to 0.8 and 2.4 dpa to quantify the difference in tensile strengthening. The average increase of tensile strength was in a range of 300 MPa between 0.8 and 16.3 dpa at temperatures of 250–300 °C. This behavior can be correlated with irradiation-induced changes in the microstructure. Most of the hardening can be attributed to dislocation loops, point defects or small precipitates as observed in boron-free alloys as F82H mod. and EUROFER97. Whereas the hardening in boron-containing alloys OPTIFER alloys and Ga3X can be correlated in addition with the combination of helium bubbles. At the highest irradiation and test temperature at 450 °C, all tensile data of all investigated materials were in the range of those of non-irradiated and irradiated material due to thermal aging effects.

  14. Tensile behavior of RAFM alloys after neutron irradiation of up to 16.3 dpa between 250 and 450 °C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materna-Morris, E.; Schneider, H.-C.; Möslang, A.

    2014-01-01

    Tensile specimen of steel EUROFER97 and other alloys on the basis of RAFM steels such, as OPTIFER and F82H alloys, and Ga3X were irradiated and post-examined during a neutron irradiation program of up to 16.3 dpa between 250 and 450 °C in the HFR (High Flux Reactor) in the Netherlands. These tensile results were compared with former irradiation programs, with lower neutron doses of up to 0.8 and 2.4 dpa to quantify the difference in tensile strengthening. The average increase of tensile strength was in a range of 300 MPa between 0.8 and 16.3 dpa at temperatures of 250–300 °C. This behavior can be correlated with irradiation-induced changes in the microstructure. Most of the hardening can be attributed to dislocation loops, point defects or small precipitates as observed in boron-free alloys as F82H mod. and EUROFER97. Whereas the hardening in boron-containing alloys OPTIFER alloys and Ga3X can be correlated in addition with the combination of helium bubbles. At the highest irradiation and test temperature at 450 °C, all tensile data of all investigated materials were in the range of those of non-irradiated and irradiated material due to thermal aging effects

  15. MAGNETIC NEUTRON SCATTERING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZALIZNYAK,I.A.; LEE,S.H.

    2004-07-30

    Much of our understanding of the atomic-scale magnetic structure and the dynamical properties of solids and liquids was gained from neutron-scattering studies. Elastic and inelastic neutron spectroscopy provided physicists with an unprecedented, detailed access to spin structures, magnetic-excitation spectra, soft-modes and critical dynamics at magnetic-phase transitions, which is unrivaled by other experimental techniques. Because the neutron has no electric charge, it is an ideal weakly interacting and highly penetrating probe of matter's inner structure and dynamics. Unlike techniques using photon electric fields or charged particles (e.g., electrons, muons) that significantly modify the local electronic environment, neutron spectroscopy allows determination of a material's intrinsic, unperturbed physical properties. The method is not sensitive to extraneous charges, electric fields, and the imperfection of surface layers. Because the neutron is a highly penetrating and non-destructive probe, neutron spectroscopy can probe the microscopic properties of bulk materials (not just their surface layers) and study samples embedded in complex environments, such as cryostats, magnets, and pressure cells, which are essential for understanding the physical origins of magnetic phenomena. Neutron scattering is arguably the most powerful and versatile experimental tool for studying the microscopic properties of the magnetic materials. The magnitude of the cross-section of the neutron magnetic scattering is similar to the cross-section of nuclear scattering by short-range nuclear forces, and is large enough to provide measurable scattering by the ordered magnetic structures and electron spin fluctuations. In the half-a-century or so that has passed since neutron beams with sufficient intensity for scattering applications became available with the advent of the nuclear reactors, they have became indispensable tools for studying a variety of important areas of modern

  16. Neutron dosimetry in boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairchild, R.G.; Miola, U.J.; Ettinger, K.V.

    1981-01-01

    The recent development of various borated compounds and the utilization of one of these (Na 2 B 12 H 11 SH) to treat brain tumors in clinical studies in Japan has renewed interest in neutron capture therapy. In these procedures thermal neutrons interact with 10 B in boron containing cells through the 10 B(n,α) 7 Li reaction producing charged particles with a maximum range of approx. 10μm in tissue. Borated analogs of chlorpromazine, porphyrin, thiouracil and deoxyuridine promise improved tumor uptake and blood clearance. The therapy beam from the Medical Research Reactor in Brookhaven contains neutrons from a modified and filtered fission spectrum and dosimetric consequences of the use of the above mentioned compounds in conjunction with thermal and epithermal fluxes are discussed in the paper. One of the important problems of radiation dosimetry in capture therapy is determination of the flux profile and, hence, the dose profile in the brain. This has been achieved by constructing a brain phantom made of TE plastic. The lyoluminescence technique provides a convenient way of monitoring the neutron flux distributions; the detectors for this purpose utilize 6 Li and 10 B compounds. Such compounds have been synthesized specially for the purpose of dosimetry of thermal and epithermal beams. In addition, standard lyoluminescent phosphors, like glutamine, could be used to determine the collisional component of the dose as well as the contribution of the 14 N(n,p) 14 C reaction. Measurements of thermal flux were compared with calculations and with measurements done with activation foils

  17. Pulsed neutron generator for use with pulsed neutron activation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochau, G.E.

    1980-01-01

    A high-output, transportable, pulsed neutron generator has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories for use with Pulsed Neutron Activation (PNA) techniques. The PNA neutron generator generates > 10 10 14 MeV D-T neutrons in a 1.2 millisecond pulse. Each operation of the unit will produce a nominal total neutron output of 1.2 x 10 10 neutrons. The generator has been designed to be easily repaired and modified. The unit requires no additional equipment for operation or measurement of output

  18. Radiography with polarised neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, Michael L.

    2010-08-20

    In this thesis I present a new technique for the spatially resolved investigation of the magnetic properties of bulk samples. Standard one dimensional neutron depolarisation analysis is combined with neutron radiography to a method we call Neutron Depolarisation Imaging (NDI). The experimental setup which was installed at the neutron radiography beam line ANTARES at FRM II consists of a double crystal monochromator, neutron polariser, spin flipper, polarisation analyser and a position sensitive CCD detector. A comprehensive discussion of the requirements for these components is given and the limitations of the method are shown. The maximum spatial resolution which can be achieved with a neutron radiography setup is determined by the collimation of the neutron beam and the distance between sample and detector. Different types of polarisers have been tested and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. A double crystal monochromator and a new type of polariser employing polarising neutron supermirrors based on the principle of an optical periscope were developed and tested during this work. Furthermore, NDI measurements on various samples of the weakly ferromagnetic materials Pd{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x} and Ni{sub 3}Al are presented. Neutron depolarisation radiography and tomography measurements were conducted with a spatial resolution as high as 0.3 mm on Pd{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x} and Ni{sub 3}Al samples. The feasibility of NDI experiments under hydrostatic pressures up to 10 kbar was shown on a sample of Ni{sub 3}Al using a modified Cu:Be clamp cell. A decrease of the ordering temperature by 2 K under hydrostatic pressure was determined from the NDI measurements and shows the potential of the method for further high pressure experiments. Additionally a method was developed which in principle allows to obtain the intrinsic dependence of the ordering temperature T{sub C} on the ordered moment Ms from NDI measurements on inhomogeneous samples containing regions with

  19. Radiography with polarised neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis I present a new technique for the spatially resolved investigation of the magnetic properties of bulk samples. Standard one dimensional neutron depolarisation analysis is combined with neutron radiography to a method we call Neutron Depolarisation Imaging (NDI). The experimental setup which was installed at the neutron radiography beam line ANTARES at FRM II consists of a double crystal monochromator, neutron polariser, spin flipper, polarisation analyser and a position sensitive CCD detector. A comprehensive discussion of the requirements for these components is given and the limitations of the method are shown. The maximum spatial resolution which can be achieved with a neutron radiography setup is determined by the collimation of the neutron beam and the distance between sample and detector. Different types of polarisers have been tested and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. A double crystal monochromator and a new type of polariser employing polarising neutron supermirrors based on the principle of an optical periscope were developed and tested during this work. Furthermore, NDI measurements on various samples of the weakly ferromagnetic materials Pd 1-x Ni x and Ni 3 Al are presented. Neutron depolarisation radiography and tomography measurements were conducted with a spatial resolution as high as 0.3 mm on Pd 1-x Ni x and Ni 3 Al samples. The feasibility of NDI experiments under hydrostatic pressures up to 10 kbar was shown on a sample of Ni 3 Al using a modified Cu:Be clamp cell. A decrease of the ordering temperature by 2 K under hydrostatic pressure was determined from the NDI measurements and shows the potential of the method for further high pressure experiments. Additionally a method was developed which in principle allows to obtain the intrinsic dependence of the ordering temperature T C on the ordered moment Ms from NDI measurements on inhomogeneous samples containing regions with different ordering temperatures. This

  20. The secondary neutron sources for generation of particular neutron fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracz, G.

    2007-07-01

    The foregoing paper presents the doctor's thesis entitled '' The secondary neutron sources for generation of particular neutron fluxes ''. Two secondary neutron sources have been designed, which exploit already existing primary sources emitting neutrons of energies different from the desired ones. The first source is devoted to boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The research reactor MARIA at the Institute of Atomic Energy in Swierk (Poland) is the primary source of the reactor thermal neutrons, while the secondary source should supply epithermal neutrons. The other secondary source is the pulsed source of thermal neutrons that uses fast 14 MeV neutrons from a pulsed generator at the Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN in Krakow (Poland). The physical problems to be solved in the two mentioned cases are different. Namely, in order to devise the BNCT source the initial energy of particles ought to be increased, whilst in the other case the fast neutrons have to be moderated. Slowing down of neutrons is relatively easy since these particles lose energy when they scatter in media; the most effective moderators are the materials which contain light elements (mostly hydrogen). In order to increase the energy of neutrons from thermal to epithermal (the BNCT case) the so-called neutron converter should be exploited. It contains a fissile material, 235 U. The thermal neutrons from the reactor cause fission of uranium and fast neutrons are emitted from the converter. Then fissile neutrons of energy of a few MeV are slowed down to the required epithermal energy range. The design of both secondary sources have been conducted by means of Monte Carlo simulations, which have been carried out using the MCNP code. In the case of the secondary pulsed thermal neutron source, some of the calculated results have been verified experimentally. (author)

  1. Semiconductor Thermal Neutron Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Aoki

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The  CdTe  and  GaN  detector  with  a  Gd  converter  have  been developed  and  investigated  as  a  neutron  detector  for neutron  imaging.  The  fabricated  Gd/CdTe  detector  with  the  25  mm  thick  Gd  was  designed  on  the  basis  of  simulation results  of  thermal  neutron  detection  efficiency  and  spatial  resolution.  The  Gd/CdTe  detector  shows  the  detection  of neutron  capture  gamma  ray  emission  in  the  155Gd(n,  g156Gd,  157Gd(n,  g158Gd  and  113Cd(n,  g114Cd  reactions  and characteristic X-ray emissions due to conversion-electrons generated inside the Gd film. The observed efficient thermal neutron detection with the Gd/CdTe detector shows its promise in neutron radiography application. Moreover, a BGaN detector has also investigated to separate neutron signal from gamma-ray clearly. 

  2. Neutrons for materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windsor, C.G.; Allen, A.J.; Hutchings, M.T.; Sayers, C.M.; Sinclair, R.N.; Schofield, P.; Wright, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    The discussion will be limited to applied materials research performed on a customer/contractor basis. The information obtained using neutrons must therefore compete both scientifically and financially with information obtained using other techniques, particular electron microscopy, X-ray, NMR, infra-red and Raman spectroscopy. It will be argued that the unique nature of the information gained from neutrons often outweighs the undoubted difficulties of access to neutron beams. Small-angle scattering has emerged as the neutron technique of widest application in applied materials research. The penetration of neutron beams through containment vessels, as well as through the sample, allows the measurement of in situ time-dependent experiments within a furnace, cryostat, pressure vessel or chemical reactor vessel. Examples will be given of small-angle scattering projects from the nuclear metallurgy, coal, oil, cement, detergent and plastics industries. High-resolution powder diffraction is another technique with wide applications. Structural studies are possible on increasingly complex phases. The structure and volume fraction of minority phase can be measured at levels appreciably below that possible by X-ray diffraction. A rapidly growing field at present is the measurement of internal strains through the small shifts in lattice spacing. Neutron diffraction is unique in being able to measure the full strain tensor from a specified volume within a bulk specimen. Inelastic scattering measurements exploit the unique property of neutrons to measure the orientations of vibrating molecules. Examples will be chosen from the field of catalysis where inelastic spectroscopy has revealed the nature of the bonding of hydrocarbon molecules. (author)

  3. Neutron activation studies on JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loughlin, M.J.; Forrest, R.A.; Edwards, J.E.G.

    2001-01-01

    Extensive neutron transport calculations have been performed to determine the neutron spectrum at a number of points throughout the JET torus hall. The model has been bench-marked against a set of foil activation measurements which were activated during an experimental campaign with deuterium/tritium plasmas. The model can predict the neutron activation of the foils on the torus hall walls to within a factor of three for reactions with little sensitivity to thermal neutrons. The use of scandium foils with and without a cadmium thermal neutron absorber was a useful monitor of the thermal neutron flux. Conclusions regarding the usefulness of other foils for benchmarking the calculations are also given

  4. Neutron radiography, techniques and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanus, J.C.

    1987-10-01

    After describing the principles of the ''in pool'' and ''dry'' installations, techniques used in neutron radiography are reviewed. Use of converter foils with silver halide films for the direct and transfer methods is described. Advantages of the use of nitrocellulose film for radiographying radioactive objects are discussed. Dynamic imaging is shortly reviewed. Standardization in the field of neutron radiography (ASTM and Euratom Neutron Radiography Working Group) is described. The paper reviews main fields of use of neutron radiography. Possibilities of use of neutron radiography at research reactors in various scientific, industrial and other fields are mentioned. Examples are given of application of neutron radiography in industry and the nuclear field. (author)

  5. Support for cold neutron utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kye Hong; Han, Young Soo; Choi, Sungmin; Choi, Yong; Kwon, Hoon; Lee, Kwang Hee

    2012-06-01

    - Support for experiments by users of cold neutron scattering instrument - Short-term training of current and potential users of cold neutron scattering instrument for their effective use of the instrument - International collaboration for advanced utilization of cold neutron scattering instruments - Selection and training of qualified instrument scientists for vigorous research endeavors and outstanding achievements in experiments with cold neutron - Research on nano/bio materials using cold neutron scattering instruments - Bulk nano structure measurement using small angle neutron scattering and development of analysis technique

  6. Neutron-Induced Failures in Semiconductor Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wender, Stephen Arthur [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-04-06

    This slide presentation explores single event effect, environmental neutron flux, system response, the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) neutron testing facility, examples of SEE measurements, and recent interest in thermal neutrons.

  7. Development of highly effective neutron shields and neutron absorbing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuda, K.; Matsuda, F.; Taniuchi, H.; Yuhara, T.; Iida, T.

    1993-01-01

    A wide range of materials, including polymers and hydrogen-occluded alloys that might be usable as the neutron shielding material were examined. And a wide range of materials, including aluminum alloys that might be usable as the neutron-absorbing material were examined. After screening, the candidate material was determined on the basis of evaluation regarding its adaptabilities as a high-performance neutron-shielding and neutron-absorbing material. This candidate material was manufactured for trial, after which material properties tests, neutron-shielding tests and neutron-absorbing tests were carried out on it. The specifications of this material were thus determined. This research has resulted in materials of good performance; a neutron-shielding material based on ethylene propylene rubber and titanium hydride, and a neutron-absorbing material based on aluminum and titanium hydride. (author)

  8. Study of neutron fields around an intense neutron generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kicka, L; Machrafi, R; Miller, A

    2017-12-01

    Neutron fields in the vicinity of the newly built neutron facility, at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT), have been investigated in a series of Monte Carlo simulations and measurements. The facility hosts a P-385 neutron generator based on a deuterium-deuterium fusion reaction. The neutron fluence at different locations around the neutron generator facility has been simulated using MCNPX 2.7E Monte Carlo particle transport program. To characterize neutron fields, three neutron sources were modeled with distributions corresponding to different incident deuteron energies of 90kV, 110kV, and 130kV. Measurements have been carried out to determine the dose rate at locations adjacent to the generator using bubble detectors (BDs). The neutron intensity was evaluated and the total dose rates corresponding to different applied acceleration potentials were estimated at various locations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Imaging with cold neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, E.H.; Kaestner, A.; Josic, L.; Hartmann, S.; Mannes, D.

    2011-01-01

    Neutrons for imaging purposes are provided mainly from thermal beam lines at suitable facilities around the world. The access to cold neutrons is presently limited to very few places only. However, many challenging options for imaging with cold neutrons have been found out, given by the interaction behavior of the observed materials with neutrons in the cold energy range (3-10 A). For absorbing materials, the interaction probability increases proportionally with the wavelength with the consequence of more contrast but less transmission with cold neutrons. Many materials are predominantly scattering neutrons, in particular most of crystalline structural materials. In these cases, cold neutrons play an important role by covering the energy range of the most important Bragg edges given by the lattice planes of the crystallites. This particular behavior can be used for at least two important aspects-choosing the right energy of the initial beam enables to have a material more or less transparent, and a direct macroscopic visualization of the crystalline structure and its change in a manufacturing process. Since 2006, PSI operates its second beam line for neutron imaging, where cold neutrons are provided from a liquid deuterium cold source (operated at 25 K). It has been designed to cover the most current aspects in neutron imaging research with the help of high flexibility. This has been done with changeable inlet apertures, a turbine based velocity selector, two beam positions and variable detector systems, satisfying the demands of the individual investigation. The most important detection system was found to be a micro-tomography system that enables studies in the presently best spatial resolution. In this case, the high contrast from the sample interaction process and the high detection probability for the cold neutrons combines in an ideal combination for the best possible performance. Recently, it was found out that the energy selective studies might become a

  10. Neutron source multiplication method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, E.D.

    1985-01-01

    Extensive use has been made of neutron source multiplication in thousands of measurements of critical masses and configurations and in subcritical neutron-multiplication measurements in situ that provide data for criticality prevention and control in nuclear materials operations. There is continuing interest in developing reliable methods for monitoring the reactivity, or k/sub eff/, of plant operations, but the required measurements are difficult to carry out and interpret on the far subcritical configurations usually encountered. The relationship between neutron multiplication and reactivity is briefly discussed and data presented to illustrate problems associated with the absolute measurement of neutron multiplication and reactivity in subcritical systems. A number of curves of inverse multiplication have been selected from a variety of experiments showing variations observed in multiplication during the course of critical and subcritical experiments where different methods of reactivity addition were used, with different neutron source detector position locations. Concern is raised regarding the meaning and interpretation of k/sub eff/ as might be measured in a far subcritical system because of the modal effects and spectrum differences that exist between the subcritical and critical systems. Because of this, the calculation of k/sub eff/ identical with unity for the critical assembly, although necessary, may not be sufficient to assure safety margins in calculations pertaining to far subcritical systems. Further study is needed on the interpretation and meaning of k/sub eff/ in the far subcritical system

  11. Neutron shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nodaka, M.; Iida, T.; Taniuchi, H.; Yosimura, K.; Nagahama, H.

    1993-01-01

    From among the neutron shielding materials of the 'kobesh' series developed by Kobe Steel, Ltd. for transport and storage packagings, silicon rubber base type material has been tested for several items with a view to practical application and official authorization, and in order to determine its adaptability to actual vessels. Silicon rubber base type 'kobesh SR-T01' is a material in which, from among the silicone rubber based neutron shielding materials, the hydrogen content is highest and the boron content is most optimized. Its neutron shielding capability has been already described in the previous report (Taniuchi, 1986). The following tests were carried out to determine suitability for practical application; 1) Long-term thermal stability test 2) Pouring test on an actual-scale model 3) Fire test The experimental results showed that the silicone rubber based neutron shielding material has good neutron shielding capability and high long-term fire resistance, and that it can be applied to the advanced transport packaging. (author)

  12. Fast neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    During 1988--1990 the magnetic resonance dosimetry project was completed, as were the 250 MeV proton shielding measurements. The first cellular experiment using human cells in vitro at the 1 GeV electron storage ring was also accomplished. More detail may be found in DOE Report number-sign DOE/EV/60417-002 and the open literature cited in the individual progress subsections. We report Kinetic Energy Released in Matter (KERMA), factor measurements in several elements of critical importance to neutron radiation therapy and radiation protection for space habitation and exploration for neutron energies below 30 MeV. The results of this effort provide the only direct measurements of the oxygen and magnesium kerma factors above 20 MeV neutron energy, and the only measurements of the iron kerma factor above 15 MeV. They provide data of immediate relevance to neutron radiotherapy and impose strict criteria for normalizing and testing nuclear models used to calculate kerma factors at higher neutron energies

  13. Neutron halos in hypernuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Lue, H F; Meng, J; Zhou, S G

    2003-01-01

    Properties of single-LAMBDA and double-LAMBDA hypernuclei for even-N Ca isotopes ranging from the proton dripline to the neutron dripline are studied using the relativistic continuum Hartree-Bogolyubov theory with a zero-range pairing interaction. Compared with ordinary nuclei, the addition of one or two LAMBDA-hyperons lowers the Fermi level. The predicted neutron dripline nuclei are, respectively, sup 7 sup 5 subLAMBDA Ca and sup 7 sup 6 sub 2 subLAMBDA Ca, as the additional attractive force provided by the LAMBDA-N interaction shifts nuclei from outside to inside the dripline. Therefore, the last bound hypernuclei have two more neutrons than the corresponding ordinary nuclei. Based on the analysis of two-neutron separation energies, neutron single-particle energy levels, the contribution of continuum and nucleon density distribution, giant halo phenomena due to the pairing correlation, and the contribution from the continuum are suggested to exist in Ca hypernuclei similar to those that appear in ordinary ...

  14. Storing of free neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinks, U.

    1978-12-01

    The applied method makes use of the interaction between the magnetic moment μ vector of the neutron and a magnetic field B vector. By means of superconducting magnets there can easily be achieved potential walls of μ B approximately 2 x 10 -7 eV. The principle of magnetic storing was first used for the storage ring NESTOR and showed immediate success: the stored neutrons decreased exponentially with a time constant tau = (907 +- 70) sec corresponding to the natural lifetime of the neutrons within the statistical errors. This means that there occurred no measurable additional losses (e.g. by resonance excitation) Neutrons therefore could be observed in the storage ring during about 5 half-lives (in principle of course longer, too). The orbit dynamics for neutrons in the storage ring is smilar to that in circular accelerators for charged particles. It is so well understood that the problem of the storage ring for uncharged particles (with magnetic moment) may be considered to e solved. (orig./HSI) [de

  15. Neutrons for sale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daviss, B.

    1997-01-01

    A fusion machine, in the form of a sphere small enough to fit on a desktop, is described. It can be switched on and off at will and produces virtually no radioactive waste. The fusion sphere creates an electric potential which forms deuterium ions into beams and accelerates them towards the centre. Nuclei of deuterium inside a central spherical wire grid fuse to create neutrons, helium -3 and traces of hydrogen and tritium. The rudimentary device is expected to go on sale in a commercial form in 1998. The immediate applications are those which require a yield of neutrons falling in the range 10 7 to 10 10 neutrons per second. This is expected to be well within the capability of the sphere and would allow neutron activation analysis to be carried out for the detection of hidden high explosives in airport baggage checks, or impurities in ores as they are mined for example. With higher neutron yields other applications such as the treatment of tumours could become viable but the technical problems are likely to multiply with the increasing yields. (UK)

  16. Neutrons and art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panczyk, E.; Walis, L.

    2004-01-01

    Following modern trends in art objects connoisseurship, through examination of the structure of art objects supports traditional studies conducted by art historians based on composition, iconographic and stylistic comparisons. It must be emphasized that complete technological examinations are carried out by means of comprehensive physical and chemical studies. Among various methods used for the examination of art objects, methods which apply neutrons such as instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) and neutron-induced autoradiography are crucial due to their high sensitivity, reproducibility and capability of simultaneous determination of several tens of elements. Systematic studies on art objects using instrumental neutron activation analysis and neutron autoradiography have been carried out in the institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology. It was possible to accumulate a number of essential data on the concentration of trace elements particularly in chalk grounds and pigments (such as lead white, lead-tin yellow, smalt), Chinese porcelain, Thai ceramics, silver denarius, jewellery made of copper alloys, as well as in the clay fillings of Egyptian mummies. The above mentioned examination of art objects prior to their conservation helps to determine precisely the materials used in the process of creating art objects, as well as to identify the appropriate place of origin of particular materials. (author)

  17. Neutron instrumentation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Takao; Arita, Setsuo; Yuchi, Hiroyuki

    1989-01-01

    The neutron instrumentation system of this invention can greatly reduce the possibility that the shutdown flux is increased greater than a predetermiend value to cause scram due to vibrations caused by earthquakes or shocks in the neutron instrumentation system without injuring the reactor safety. That is, a sensor having a zero sensitivity to a neutron flux which is an object to be detected by the sensor (dummy sensor) is used together with a conventional sensor (a sensor having predetermined sensitivity to a neutron flux as an object to be measured ----- true sensor). Further, identical signal transmission cables, connector and the signal processing circuits are used for both of true sensor and the dummy sensor. The signal from the dummy sensor is subtracted from the signal from the true sensor at the output of the signal processing circuit. Since the output of the dummy sensor is zero during normal operation, the subtracted value is the same as the value from the true sensor. If the true sensor causes an output with the reason other than the neutron flux, this is outputted also from the dummy sensor but does not appear in the subtracted value. (I.S.)

  18. The Advanced Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretz, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is to be a multipurpose neutron research center, constructed around a high-flux reactor now being designed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Its primary purpose is to place the United States in the forefront of neutron scattering in the twenty-first century. Other research programs include nuclear and fundamental physics, isotope production, materials irradiation, and analytical chemistry. The ANS will be a unique and invaluable research tool because of the unprecedented neutron flux available from the high-intensity research reactor. But this reactor would be ineffective without world-class research facilities that allow the fullest utilization of the available neutrons. And, in turn, those research facilities will not produce new and exciting science without a broad population of users from all parts of the nation and the world, placed in a stimulating environment in which experiments can be effectively conducted and in which scientific exchange is encouraged. This paper discusses the measures being taken to ensure that the design of the ANS focuses not only on the reactor, but on providing the experiment and user support facilities needed to allow its effective use

  19. SUSANS With Polarized Neutrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagh, Apoorva G; Rakhecha, Veer Chand; Strobl, Makus; Treimer, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Super Ultra-Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SUSANS) studies over wave vector transfers of 10(-4) nm(-1) to 10(-3) nm(-1) afford information on micrometer-size agglomerates in samples. Using a right-angled magnetic air prism, we have achieved a separation of ≈10 arcsec between ≈2 arcsec wide up- and down-spin peaks of 0.54 nm neutrons. The SUSANS instrument has thus been equipped with the polarized neutron option. The samples are placed in a uniform vertical field of 8.8 × 10(4) A/m (1.1 kOe). Several magnetic alloy ribbon samples broaden the up-spin neutron peak significantly over the ±1.3 × 10(-3) nm(-1) range, while leaving the down-spin peak essentially unaltered. Fourier transforms of these SUSANS spectra corrected for the instrument resolution, yield micrometer-range pair distribution functions for up- and down-spin neutrons as well as the nuclear and magnetic scattering length density distributions in the samples.

  20. Neutron nuclear physics under the neutron science project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiba, Satoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-11-01

    The concept of fast neutron physics facility in the Neutron Science Research project is described. This facility makes use of an ultra-short proton pulse (width < 1 ns) for fast neutron time-of-flight works. The current design is based on an assumption of the maximum proton current of 100 {mu}A. Available neutron fluence and energy resolution are explained. Some of the research subjects to be performed at this facility are discussed. (author)

  1. Level gauge using neutron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathew, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    Apparatus for determining the level of a solid or liquid material in a container comprises: a vertical guide within or alongside the container; a sensor positioned within the guide; means for moving the sensor along the guide; and means for monitoring the position of the sensor. The sensor comprises a source of fast neutrons, a detector for thermal neutrons, and a body of a neutron moderating material in close proximity to the detector. Thermal neutrons produced by fast neutron irradiation of the solid or liquid material, or thermal neutrons produced by irradiation of the neutron-moderating material by fast or epithermal neutrons reflected by the solid or liquid material, are detected when the sensor is positioned at or below the level of the material in the container

  2. Neutron radiography with the cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tazawa, Shuichi; Asada, Yorihisa; Yano, Munehiko; Nakanii, Takehiko.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron radiography is well recognized as a powerful tool in nondestructive testing, but not widely used yet owing to lack of high intense thermal neutron source convenient for practical use. This article presents a new neutron radiograph facility, utilizing a sub-compact cyclotron as neutron source and is equipped with vertical and horizontal irradiation ports. The article describes a series of experiments, we conducted using beams of a variable energy cyclotron at Tohoku University to investigate the characteristics of thermal neutron obtained from 9 Be(p, n) reaction and thermalized by elastic scattering process. The article also describes a computer simulation of neutron moderator to analyze conditions getting maximal thermal neutron flux. Further, some of practical neutron radiograph examinations of aero-space components and museum art objects of classic bronze mirror and an attempt realizing real time imaging technique, are introduced in the article. (author)

  3. Recent advances in neutron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarland, E.; Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA; Lanza, R.

    1993-01-01

    Neutron imaging has been shown to be an excellent imaging tool for many nondestructive evaluation applications. Significantly improved contrast over X-ray images is possible for materials commonly found in engineering assemblies. The major limitations have been the neutron source and detection. A low cost, position sensitive neutron tomography detector system has been designed and built based on an electro-optical detector system using a LiF-ZnS scintillator screen and a cooled charge coupled device. This detector system can be used for neutron radiography as well as two and three-dimensional neutron tomography. Calculated performance of the system predicted near-quantum efficiency for position sensitive neutron detection. Experimental data was recently taken using this system at McClellan Air Force Base, Air Logistics Center, Sacramento, CA. With increased availability of low cost neutron sources and advanced image processing, neutron tomography will become an increasingly important nondestructive imaging method

  4. Virtual neutron scattering experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Julie Hougaard; Bruun, Jesper; May, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We describe how virtual experiments can be utilized in a learning design that prepares students for hands-on experiments at large-scale facilities. We illustrate the design by showing how virtual experiments are used at the Niels Bohr Institute in a master level course on neutron scattering....... In the last week of the course, students travel to a large-scale neutron scattering facility to perform real neutron scattering experiments. Through student interviews and survey answers, we argue, that the virtual training prepares the students to engage more fruitfully with experiments by letting them focus...... on physics and data rather than the overwhelming instrumentation. We argue that this is because they can transfer their virtual experimental experience to the real-life situation. However, we also find that learning is still situated in the sense that only knowledge of particular experiments is transferred...

  5. The neutron discovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six, J.

    1987-01-01

    The neutron: who had first the idea, who discovered it, who established its main properties. To these apparently simple questions, multiple answers exist. The progressive discovery of the neutron is a marvellous illustration of some characteristics of the scientific research, where the unforeseen may be combined with the expected. This discovery is replaced in the context of the 1930's scientific effervescence that succeeded the revolutionary introduction of quantum mechanics. This book describes the works of Bothe, the Joliot-Curie and Chadwick which led to the neutron in an unexpected way. A historical analysis allows to give a new interpretation on the hypothesis suggested by the Joliot-Curie. Some texts of these days will help the reader to revive this fascinating story [fr

  6. Gadolinium neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akine, Yasuyuki; Tokita, Nobuhiko; Tokuuye, Koichi; Satoh, Michinao; Churei, Hisahiko

    1993-01-01

    Gadolinium neutron capture therapy makes use of photons and electrons produced by nuclear reactions between gadolinium and lower-energy neutrons which occur within the tumor. The results of our studies have shown that its radiation effect is mostly of low LET and that the electrons are the significant component in the over-all dose. The dose from gadolinium neutron capture reactions does not seem to increase in proportion to the gadolinium concentration, and the Gd-157 concentration of about 100 μg/ml appears most optimal for therapy. Close contact between gadolinium and the cell is not necessarily required for cell inactivation, however, the effect of electrons released from intracellular gadolinium may be significant. Experimental studies on tumor-bearing mice and rabbits have shown that this is a very promising modality though further improvements in gadolinium delivery to tumors are needed. (author)

  7. Catalogue of neutron spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buxerolle, M.; Massoutie, M.; Kurdjian, J.

    1987-09-01

    Neutron dosimetry problems have arisen as a result of developments in the applications of nuclear energy. The largest number of possible irradiation situations has been collected: they are presented in the form of a compilation of 44 neutron spectra. Diagrams show the variations of energy fluence and energy fluence weighted by the dose equivalent/fluence conversion factor, with the logarithm of the corresponding energy. The equivalent dose distributions are presented as percentages for the following energy bins: 0.01 eV/0.5 eV/50 keV/1 MeV/5 MeV/15 MeV. The dose equivalent, the mean energy and the effective energy for the dose equivalent for 1 neutron cm -2 are also given [fr

  8. CARBON NEUTRON STAR ATMOSPHERES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suleimanov, V. F.; Klochkov, D.; Werner, K.; Pavlov, G. G.

    2014-01-01

    The accuracy of measuring the basic parameters of neutron stars is limited in particular by uncertainties in the chemical composition of their atmospheres. For example, the atmospheres of thermally emitting neutron stars in supernova remnants might have exotic chemical compositions, and for one of them, the neutron star in Cas A, a pure carbon atmosphere has recently been suggested by Ho and Heinke. To test this composition for other similar sources, a publicly available detailed grid of the carbon model atmosphere spectra is needed. We have computed this grid using the standard local thermodynamic equilibrium approximation and assuming that the magnetic field does not exceed 10 8  G. The opacities and pressure ionization effects are calculated using the Opacity Project approach. We describe the properties of our models and investigate the impact of the adopted assumptions and approximations on the emergent spectra

  9. Multidisk neutron velocity selectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammouda, B.

    1992-01-01

    Helical multidisk velocity selectors used for neutron scattering applications have been analyzed and tested experimentally. Design and performance considerations are discussed along with simple explanation of the basic concept. A simple progression is used for the inter-disk spacing in the 'Rosta' design. Ray tracing computer investigations are presented in order to assess the 'coverage' (how many absorbing layers are stacked along the path of 'wrong' wavelength neutrons) and the relative number of neutrons absorbed in each disk (and therefore the relative amount of gamma radiation emitted from each disk). We discuss whether a multidisk velocity selector can be operated in the 'reverse' configuration (i.e. the selector is turned by 180 0 around a vertical axis with the rotor spun in the reverse direction). Experimental tests and calibration of a multidisk selector are reported together with evidence that a multidisk selector can be operated in the 'reverse' configuration. (orig.)

  10. Spherical neutron generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2006-11-21

    A spherical neutron generator is formed with a small spherical target and a spherical shell RF-driven plasma ion source surrounding the target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) ion plasma is produced by RF excitation in the plasma ion source using an RF antenna. The plasma generation region is a spherical shell between an outer chamber and an inner extraction electrode. A spherical neutron generating target is at the center of the chamber and is biased negatively with respect to the extraction electrode which contains many holes. Ions passing through the holes in the extraction electrode are focused onto the target which produces neutrons by D-D or D-T reactions.

  11. Burnable neutron absorbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, K.C.; Carlson, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    A neutron-absorber body for use in burnable poison rods in a nuclear reactor. The body is composed of a matrix of Al 2 O 3 containing B 4 C, the neutron absorber. Areas of high density polycrystalline Al 2 O 3 particles are predominantly encircled by pores in some of which there are B 4 C particles. This body is produced by initially spray drying a slurry of A1 2 O 3 powder to which a binder has been added. The powder of agglomerated spheres of the A1 2 O 3 with the binder are dry mixed with B 4 C powder. The mixed powder is formed into a green body by isostatic pressure and the green body is sintered. The sintered body is processed to form the neutron-absorber body. In this case the B 4 C particles are separate from the spheres resulting from the spray drying instead of being embedded in the sphere

  12. Neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsaru, M.; Eisler, P.L.

    1981-01-01

    A method of simultaneously analysing the aluminium and silicon content of a sample of material is claimed. The method comprises the following steps: (1) irradiating the sample with fast neutrons; (2) monitoring the thermal neutron flux within the sample; (3) monitoring the gamma radiation from the irradiated sample at energies of 1.78 MeV and 1.015 and/or 0.844 MeV; (4) using the monitored gamma radiation at 1.015 and/or 0.844 MeV to estimate the aluminium content of the sample; and (5) using the monitored gamma radiation at 1.78 MeV, compensated by the gamma radiation at 1.78 MeV due to the thermal neutron reaction with the estimated aluminium in the sample to estimate the silicon content

  13. Semiconductor research with reactor neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Itsuro

    1992-01-01

    Reactor neutrons play an important role for characterization of semiconductor materials as same as other advanced materials. On the other hand reactor neutrons bring about not only malignant irradiation effects called radiation damage, but also useful effects such as neutron transmutation doping and defect formation for opto-electronics. Research works on semiconductor materials with the reactor neutrons of the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR) are briefly reviewed. In this review, a stress is laid on the present author's works. (author)

  14. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jor-Shan [El Cerrito, CA; Farmer, Joseph C [Tracy, CA; Lee, Chuck K [Hayward, CA; Walker, Jeffrey [Gaithersburg, MD; Russell, Paige [Las Vegas, NV; Kirkwood, Jon [Saint Leonard, MD; Yang, Nancy [Lafayette, CA; Champagne, Victor [Oxford, PA

    2012-05-29

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  15. Neutron capture in borehole logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, R.R.

    1981-01-01

    The use is described of a pulsed source of fast neutrons and a radiation detector to measure the thermal neutron population decay rate in a well logging instrument. The macroscopic neutron absorption cross-section is calculated by taking the natural logarithm of the ratio of the detected radiation counts occurring within two measurement intervals of fixed duration and starting at a fixed time after a neutron burst. (U.K.)

  16. Compact neutron flux monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhavi, V.; Phatak, P.R.; Bahadur, C.; Bayala, A.K.; Jakati, R.K.; Sathian, V.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: A compact size neutron flux monitor has been developed incorporating standard boards developed for smart radiation monitors. The sensitivity of the monitors is 0.4cps/nV. It has been tested up to 2075 nV flux with standard neutron sources. It shows convincing results even in high flux areas like 6m away from the accelerator in RMC (Parel) for 106/107 nV. These monitors have a focal and remote display, alarm function with potential free contacts for centralized control and additional provision of connectivity via RS485/Ethernet. This paper describes the construction, working and results of the above flux monitor

  17. Neutron absorbing article

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naum, R.G.; Owens, D.P.; Dooker, G.I.

    1981-01-01

    A neutron-absorbing article suitable for use in spent fuel racks is described. It comprises boron carbide particles, diluent particles, and a phenolic polymer cured to a continuous matrix. The diluent may be silicon carbide, graphite, amorphous carbon, alumina, or silica. The combined boron carbide-diluent phase contains no more than 2 percent B 2 O 3 , and the neutron-absorbing article contains from 20 to 40 percent phenol resin. The ratio of boron carbide to diluent particles is in the range 1:9 to 9:1

  18. Fast neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    This progress report concentrates on two major areas of dosimetry research: measurement of fast neutron kerma factors for several elements for monochromatic and white spectrum neutron fields and determination of the response of thermoluminescent phosphors to various ultra-soft X-ray energies and beta-rays. Dr. Zhixin Zhou from the Shanghai Institute of Radiation Medicine, People's Republic of China brought with him special expertise in the fabrication and use of ultra-thin TLD materials. Such materials are not available in the USA. The rather unique properties of these materials were investigated during this grant period

  19. MCNP neutron benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, J.S.; Whalen, D.J.; Cardon, D.A.; Uhle, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Over 50 neutron benchmark calculations have recently been completed as part of an ongoing program to validate the MCNP Monte Carlo radiation transport code. The new and significant aspects of this work are as follows: These calculations are the first attempt at a validation program for MCNP and the first official benchmarking of version 4 of the code. We believe the chosen set of benchmarks is a comprehensive set that may be useful for benchmarking other radiation transport codes and data libraries. These calculations provide insight into how well neutron transport calculations can be expected to model a wide variety of problems

  20. Slow neutron scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, R.M.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron scattering is a versatile technique that has been successfully applied to condensed-matter physics, biology, polymer science, chemistry, and materials science. The United States lost its leadership role in this field to Western Europe about 10 years ago. Recently, a modest investment in the United States in new facilities and a positive attitude on the part of the national laboratories toward outside users have resulted in a dramatic increase in the number of US scientists involved in neutron scattering research. Plans are being made for investments in new and improved facilities that could return the leadership role to the United States. 23 references, 4 figures, 3 tables

  1. Neutron optical potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmore, D.; Hodgson, P.E.

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a guide to the use of optical model computer programs to analyse and calculate neutron data. After a brief discussion of the physical basis of the optical model a survey is given of the most widely used optical model and Hauser-Feshbach computer programs. The range of applicability and reliability of the major optical potentials proposed is assessed by comparison with available experimental data and some observations and suggestions are made for the optimum choice of optical potentials for given purposes of neutron data calculations. (author)

  2. Nuclear physics and neutronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paya, D.

    1997-01-01

    After a brief review of the beginnings of the nuclear reaction physics in France in the 40's and 50's, the experimentation neutronics and nuclear physics studies are related and their uses presented, which aims were to provide data for the study of the various reactor concepts and to study fundamental physics. Progressively, pure nuclear physics lost its links with neutronics, and its influence decreases more or less. Long life radioactive waste reprocessing is an important domain where it could regain its contribution

  3. Neutron detector assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanai, Koi; Shirayama, Shinpei.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent gamma-ray from leaking externally passing through the inside of a neutron detector assembly. Constitution: In a neutron detector assembly having a protection pipe formed with an enlarged diameter portion which serves also as a spacer, partition plates with predetermined width are disposed at the upper and the lower portions in this expanded portion. A lot of metal particles are filled into spaces formed by the partition plates. In such a structure, the metal particles well-absorb the gamma-rays from above and convert them into heat to provide shielding for the gamma-rays. (Horiuchi, T.)

  4. Fast neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.

    1993-01-01

    Research concentrated on three major areas during the last twelve months: (1) investigations of energy fluence and absorbed dose measurements using crystalline and hot pressed TLD materials exposes to ultrasoft beams of photons, (2) fast neutron kerma factor measurements for several important elements as well as NE-213 scintillation material response function determinations at the intense ''white'' source available at the WNR facility at LAMPF, and (3) kerma factor ratio determinations for carbon and oxygen to A-150 tissue equivalent plastic at the clinical fast neutron radiation facility at Harper Hospital, Detroit, MI. Progress summary reports of these efforts are given in this report

  5. GUIDE FOR POLARIZED NEUTRONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailor, V.L.; Aichroth, R.W.

    1962-12-01

    The plane of polarization of a beam of polarized neutrons is changed by this invention, and the plane can be flipped back and forth quicitly in two directions in a trouble-free manner. The invention comprises a guide having a plurality of oppositely directed magnets forming a gap for the neutron beam and the gaps are spaced longitudinally in a spiral along the beam at small stepped angles. When it is desired to flip the plane of polarization the magnets are suitably rotated to change the direction of the spiral of the gaps. (AEC)

  6. Imaging with Polarized Neutrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Kardjilov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to their zero charge, neutrons are able to pass through thick layers of matter (typically several centimeters while being sensitive to magnetic fields due to their intrinsic magnetic moment. Therefore, in addition to the conventional attenuation contrast image, the magnetic field inside and around a sample can be visualized by detecting changes of polarization in a transmitted beam. The method is based on the spatially resolved measurement of the cumulative precession angles of a collimated, polarized, monochromatic neutron beam that traverses a magnetic field or sample.

  7. Neutron physics with accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonna, N.; Gunsing, F.; Käppeler, F.

    2018-07-01

    Neutron-induced nuclear reactions are of key importance for a variety of applications in basic and applied science. Apart from nuclear reactors, accelerator-based neutron sources play a major role in experimental studies, especially for the determination of reaction cross sections over a wide energy span from sub-thermal to GeV energies. After an overview of present and upcoming facilities, this article deals with state-of-the-art detectors and equipment, including the often difficult sample problem. These issues are illustrated at selected examples of measurements for nuclear astrophysics and reactor technology with emphasis on their intertwined relations.

  8. Investigation of Response of Several Neutron Surveymeters by a DT Neutron Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang In; Jang, In Su; Kim, Jang Lyul; Lee, Jung IL; Kim, Bong Hwan

    2012-01-01

    Several neutron measuring devices were tested under the neutron fields characterized with two distinct kinds of thermal and fast neutron spectrum. These neutron fields were constructed by the mixing of both thermal neutron fields and fast neutron fields. The thermal neutron field was constructed using by a graphite pile with eight AmBe neutron sources. The fast neutron field of 14 MeV was made by a DT neutron generator. In order to change the fraction of fast neutron fluence rate in each neutron fields, a neutron generator was placed in the thermal neutron field at 50 cm and 150 cm from the reference position. The polyethylene neutron collimator was used to make moderated 14 MeV neutron field. These neutron spectra were measured by using a Bonner sphere system with an LiI scintillator, and dosimetric quantities delivered to neutron surveymeters were determined from these measurement results.

  9. New electronically black neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, D.M.; Feldman, W.C.; Hurlbut, C.

    1986-03-01

    Two neutron detectors are described that can function in a continuous radiation background. Both detectors identify neutrons by recording a proton recoil pulse followed by a characteristic capture pulse. This peculiar signature indicates that the neutron has lost all its energy in the scintillator. Resolutions and efficiencies have been measured for both detectors

  10. Introductory theory of neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunn, J.M.F.

    1986-12-01

    The paper comprises a set of six lecture notes which were delivered to the summer school on 'Neutron Scattering at a pulsed source', Rutherford Laboratory, United Kingdom, 1986. The lectures concern the physical principles of neutron scattering. The topics of the lectures include: diffraction, incoherent inelastic scattering, connection with the Schroedinger equation, magnetic scattering, coherent inelastic scattering, and surfaces and neutron optics. (UK)

  11. Educational activities for neutron sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraka, Haruhiro; Ohoyama, Kenji; Iwasa, Kazuaki

    2011-01-01

    Since now we have several world-leading neutron science facilities in Japan, enlightenment activities for introducing neutron sciences, for example, to young people is an indispensable issue. Hereafter, we will report present status of the activities based on collaborations between universities and neutron facilities. A few suggestions for future educational activity of JSNS are also shown. (author)

  12. Neutron guides and scientific neutron equipment at CILAS/GMI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautier-Picard, P.

    2003-01-01

    CILAS company is the world's leading supplier of complete neutron guides systems. The neutron optics with multilayer coatings produced by CILAS have become an international standard for neutron beam transportation in the modern research institutes. During the last 30 years, CILAS designed, produced and installed more than 5000 meters of guides in many European, American and Asian countries. To reinforce its leadership and presence in neutron research, CILAS acquired the company Grenoble Modular Instruments (GMI), a leading company in high precision mechanics, engineering and manufacturing of spectrometers and scientific equipment for neutron and synchrotron research. (author)

  13. Neutron recognition in the LAND detector for large neutron multiplicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawlowski, P., E-mail: piotr.pawlowski@ifj.edu.pl [Institute of Nuclear Physics, PAN, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Brzychczyk, J. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Leifels, Y.; Trautmann, W. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Adrich, P. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, PL-00681 Warsaw (Poland); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Aumann, T. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Bacri, C.O. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, IN2P3-CNRS et Universite, F-91406 Orsay (France); Barczyk, T. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Bassini, R. [Istituto di Scienze Fisiche, Universita degli Studi and INFN, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Bianchin, S. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Boiano, C. [Istituto di Scienze Fisiche, Universita degli Studi and INFN, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Boretzky, K. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Boudard, A. [IRFU/SPhN, CEA/Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Chbihi, A. [GANIL, CEA et IN2P3-CNRS, F-14076 Caen (France); Cibor, J.; Czech, B. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, PAN, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); De Napoli, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia-Universita and INFN-CT and LNS, I-95123 Catania (Italy); and others

    2012-12-01

    The performance of the LAND neutron detector is studied. Using an event-mixing technique based on one-neutron data obtained in the S107 experiment at the GSI laboratory, we test the efficiency of various analytic tools used to determine the multiplicity and kinematic properties of detected neutrons. A new algorithm developed recently for recognizing neutron showers from spectator decays in the ALADIN experiment S254 is described in detail. Its performance is assessed in comparison with other methods. The properties of the observed neutron events are used to estimate the detection efficiency of LAND in this experiment.

  14. Neutronic analysis of JET external neutron monitor response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snoj, Luka, E-mail: luka.snoj@ijs.si [Reactor Physics Division, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Lengar, Igor; Čufar, Aljaž [Reactor Physics Division, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Syme, Brian; Popovichev, Sergey [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB, United Kingdom (United Kingdom); Batistoni, Paola [ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Conroy, Sean [VR Association, Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, PO Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We model JET tokamak containing JET remote handling system. • We investigate effect of remote handling system on external neutron monitor response. • Remote handling system correction factors are calculated. • Integral correction factors are relatively small, i.e up to 8%. - Abstract: The power output of fusion devices is measured in terms of the neutron yield which relates directly to the fusion yield. JET made a transition from Carbon wall to ITER-Like Wall (Beryllium/Tungsten/Carbon) during 2010–11. Absolutely calibrated measurement of the neutron yield by JET neutron monitors was ensured by direct measurements using a calibrated {sup 252}Cf neutron source (NS) deployed by the in-vessel remote handling system (RHS) inside the JET vacuum vessel. Neutronic calculations were required in order to understand the neutron transport from the source in the vacuum vessel to the fission chamber detectors mounted outside the vessel on the transformer limbs of the tokamak. We developed a simplified computational model of JET and the JET RHS in Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP and analyzed the paths and structures through which neutrons reach the detectors and the effect of the JET RHS on the neutron monitor response. In addition we performed several sensitivity studies of the effect of substantial massive structures blocking the ports on the external neutron monitor response. As the simplified model provided a qualitative picture of the process only, some calculations were repeated using a more detailed full 3D model of the JET tokamak.

  15. Particle physics with cold neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubbers, D.

    1991-01-01

    Slow neutrons are used in a large number of experiments to study the physics of particles and their fundamental interactions. Some of these experiments search for manifestations of ''new physics'' like baryon- or lepton-number nonconservation, time reversal nonconservation, new particles, right-handed currents, nonzero neutron charge, nonlinear terms in the Schrodinger equation, exotic e + e - states, and others. Other slow neutron experiments test the present Standard Model. The parity nonconserving weak neutron-nucleon interaction is studied in a variety of experiments. Free neutron beta decay gives precise values for the weak vector and axialvector coupling constants, which allow precise tests of basic symmetries like the conservation of the weak vector current, the unitarity of the weak quark mixing matrix, SU(3) flavour symmetry, and right-handed currents. Neutron beta decay data are further needed to calculate weak cross-sections, for applications, in big bang cosmology, in astrophysics, in solar physics and the solar neutrino problem, and in such mundane things as neutrino detection efficiencies in neutrino oscillation or proton decay experiments. Neutron-nucleon, neutron-nucleus and neutron-electron scattering lengths are determined in high precision experiments, which use methods like neutron interferometry or neutron gravity spectrometry. The experiments give information on quantities like the neutron charge radius or the neutron electric polarizability. Precision measurements of other fundamental constants lead to a better, model-independent value of the fine structure constant. Finally, the fundamental experiments on quantum mechanics, like spinor 4π -rotation, Berry's phase, dressed neutrons, Aharanov - Casher effect, or gravitational effects on the neutron's phase will be briefly discussed. (author)

  16. The tokamak as a neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendel, H.W.; Jassby, D.L.

    1989-11-01

    This paper describes the tokamak in its role as a neutron source, with emphasis on experimental results for D-D neutron production. The sections summarize tokamak operation, sources of fusion and non-fusion neutrons, principal neutron detection methods and their calibration, neutron energy spectra and fluxes outside the tokamak plasma chamber, history of neutron production in tokamaks, neutron emission and fusion power gain from JET and TFTR (the largest present-day tokamaks), and D-T neutron production from burnup of D-D tritons. This paper also discusses the prospects for future tokamak neutron production and potential applications of tokamak neutron sources. 100 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs

  17. The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Spallation Neutron Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowicki, Suzanne F.; Wender, Stephen A.; Mocko, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides the scientific community with intense sources of neutrons, which can be used to perform experiments supporting civilian and national security research. These measurements include nuclear physics experiments for the defense program, basic science, and the radiation effect programs. This paper focuses on the radiation effects program, which involves mostly accelerated testing of semiconductor parts. When cosmic rays strike the earth's atmosphere, they cause nuclear reactions with elements in the air and produce a wide range of energetic particles. Because neutrons are uncharged, they can reach aircraft altitudes and sea level. These neutrons are thought to be the most important threat to semiconductor devices and integrated circuits. The best way to determine the failure rate due to these neutrons is to measure the failure rate in a neutron source that has the same spectrum as those produced by cosmic rays. Los Alamos has a high-energy and a low-energy neutron source for semiconductor testing. Both are driven by the 800-MeV proton beam from the LANSCE accelerator. The high-energy neutron source at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility uses a bare target that is designed to produce fast neutrons with energies from 100 keV to almost 800 MeV. The measured neutron energy distribution from WNR is very similar to that of the cosmic-ray-induced neutrons in the atmosphere. However, the flux provided at the WNR facility is typically 5×107 times more intense than the flux of the cosmic-ray-induced neutrons. This intense neutron flux allows testing at greatly accelerated rates. An irradiation test of less than an hour is equivalent to many years of neutron exposure due to cosmic-ray neutrons. The low-energy neutron source is located at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center. It is based on a moderated source that provides useful neutrons from subthermal energies to ~100 keV. The characteristics of these sources

  18. The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Spallation Neutron Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicki, Suzanne F.; Wender, Stephen A.; Mocko, Michael

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides the scientific community with intense sources of neutrons, which can be used to perform experiments supporting civilian and national security research. These measurements include nuclear physics experiments for the defense program, basic science, and the radiation effect programs. This paper focuses on the radiation effects program, which involves mostly accelerated testing of semiconductor parts. When cosmic rays strike the earth's atmosphere, they cause nuclear reactions with elements in the air and produce a wide range of energetic particles. Because neutrons are uncharged, they can reach aircraft altitudes and sea level. These neutrons are thought to be the most important threat to semiconductor devices and integrated circuits. The best way to determine the failure rate due to these neutrons is to measure the failure rate in a neutron source that has the same spectrum as those produced by cosmic rays. Los Alamos has a high-energy and a low-energy neutron source for semiconductor testing. Both are driven by the 800-MeV proton beam from the LANSCE accelerator. The high-energy neutron source at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility uses a bare target that is designed to produce fast neutrons with energies from 100 keV to almost 800 MeV. The measured neutron energy distribution from WNR is very similar to that of the cosmic-ray-induced neutrons in the atmosphere. However, the flux provided at the WNR facility is typically 5×107 times more intense than the flux of the cosmic-ray-induced neutrons. This intense neutron flux allows testing at greatly accelerated rates. An irradiation test of less than an hour is equivalent to many years of neutron exposure due to cosmic-ray neutrons. The low-energy neutron source is located at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center. It is based on a moderated source that provides useful neutrons from subthermal energies to ∼100 keV. The characteristics of these sources, and

  19. Optical neutron polarizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayter, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    A neutron wave will be refracted by an appropriately varying potential. Optical neutron polarizers use spatially varying, spin- dependent potentials to refract neutrons of opposite spin states into different directions, so that an unpolarized beam will be split into two beams of complementary polarization by such a device. This paper will concentrate on two methods of producing spin-dependent potentials which are particularly well-suited to polarizing cold neutron beams, namely thin-film structures and field-gradient techniques. Thin-film optical devices, such as supermirror multilayer structures, are usually designed to deviate only one spin-state, so that they offer the possibility of making insertion (transmission) polarizers. Very good supermirrors may now be designed and fabricated, but it is not always straightforward to design mirror-based devices which are useful in real (divergent beam) applications, and some practical configurations will be discussed. Field-gradient devices, which are usually based on multipolar magnets, have tended to be too expensive for general use, but this may change with new developments in superconductivity. Dipolar and hexapolar configurations will be considered, with emphasis on the focusing characteristics of the latter. 21 refs., 7 figs

  20. Neutron-proton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, P.

    1990-02-01

    Neutron-proton scattering as fundamental interaction process below and above hundred MeV is discussed. Quark model inspired interactions and phenomenological potential models are described. The seminar also indicates the experimental improvements for achieving new precise scattering data. Concluding remarks indicate the relevance of nucleon-nucleon scattering results to finite nuclei. (orig.) [de

  1. Neutron resonance absorption theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuss, P.

    1991-11-01

    After some recalls on the physics of neutron resonance absorption during their slowing down, this paper presents the main features of the theoretical developments performed by the french school of reactor physics: the effective reaction rate method so called Livolant-Jeanpierre theory, the generalizations carried out by the author, and the probability table method [fr

  2. Neutron protein crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niimura, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-10-01

    X-ray diffraction of single crystal has enriched the knowledge of various biological molecules such as proteins, DNA, t-RNA, viruses, etc. It is difficult to make structural analysis of hydrogen atoms in a protein using X-ray crystallography, whereas neutron diffraction seems usable to directly determine the location of those hydrogen atoms. Here, neutron diffraction method was applied to structural analysis of hen egg-white lysozyme. Since the crystal size of a protein to analyze is generally small (5 mm{sup 3} at most), the neutron beam at the sample position in monochromator system was set to less than 5 x 5 mm{sup 2} and beam divergence to 0.4 degree or less. Neutron imaging plate with {sup 6}Li or Gd mixed with photostimulated luminescence material was used and about 2500 Bragg reflections were recorded in one crystal setting. A total of 38278 reflections for 2.0 A resolution were collected in less than 10 days. Thus, stereo views of Trp-111 omit map around the indol ring of Trp-111 was presented and the three-dimensional arrangement of 696H and 264D atoms in the lysozyme molecules was determined using the omit map. (M.N.)

  3. Neutron rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foucher, R.

    1979-01-01

    If some β - emitters are particularly interesting to study in light, medium, and heavy nuclei, another (and also) difficult problem is to know systematically the properties of these neutron rich nuclei far from the stability line. A review of some of their characteristics is presented. How far is it possible to be objective in the interpretation of data is questioned and implications are discussed

  4. Applied neutron resonance theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehner, F.H.

    1980-01-01

    Utilisation of resonance theory in basic and applications-oriented neutron cross section work is reviewed. The technically important resonance formalisms, principal concepts and methods as well as representative computer programs for resonance parameter extraction from measured data, evaluation of resonance data, calculation of Doppler-broadened cross sections and estimation of level-statistical quantities from resonance parameters are described. (author)

  5. Interferometry with polarised neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badurek, G.

    1978-01-01

    This paper aimed to give an outline of what might be expected from an extension of polarized beam techniques in neutron interferometry and how it could be achieved properly and what is the present state of this special field of interferometry

  6. Self powered neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalan, C.S.; Ramachandra Rao, M.N.; Ingale, A.D.

    1976-01-01

    Two types of self powered neutron detectors used for in-core flux measurements are described. The characteristics of the various detectors, with emitters Rh, V, Co, Py are presented. Details about the fabrication of these detectors are given. (A.K.)

  7. New Neutron Dosimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    CERN has been operating an Individual Dosimetry Service for neutrons for about 35 years. The service was based on nuclear emulsions in the form of film packages which were developed and scanned in the Service. In 1999, the supplier of theses packages informed CERN that they will discontinue production of this material. TIS-RP decided to look for an external service provider for individual neutron dosimetry. After an extensive market survey and an invitation for tender, a supplier that met the stringent technical requirements set up by CERN's host states for personal dosimeters was identified. The new dosimeter is based on a track-etching technique. Neutrons have the capability of damaging plastic material. The microscopic damage centres are revealed by etching them in a strong acid. The resulting etch pits can be automatically counted and their density is proportional to dose equivalent from neutrons. On the technical side, the new dosimeter provides an improved independence of its response from energy and th...

  8. NEUTRONIC REACTOR STRUCTURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, A.M.; Vernon, H.C.

    1961-05-30

    A neutronic reactor is described. It has a core consisting of natural uranium and heavy water and having a K-factor greater than unity which is surrounded by a reflector consisting of natural uranium and ordinary water having a Kfactor less than unity.

  9. Neutron metrology for SBSS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, C.L.; Anaya, J.M.; Armijo, V.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of this work is to develop new detector technologies for Science-Based Stockpile Stewardship (SBSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) using existing expertise and infrastructure from the nuclear and particle physics programs at LANL

  10. Neutron radiography in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    Neutron radiography studies being carried out in reactor centres in Brazil are discussed. These research projects are under way using the 5 MW swimming pool reactor at the Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research (IPEN) in Sao Paulo and the Argonaut reactor at the Institute of Nuclear Engineering (IEN) in Rio de Janeiro. (Auth.)

  11. Measuring thermal neutron characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnstone, C.W.; Jacobson, L.A.

    1983-01-01

    A method for providing a background-compensated measurement of the level of inducted radiation within an earth formation is claimed. The formation is irradiated with a discrete burst of neutrons and the level of radiation in the formation measured. The level of background radiation is then measured. An average level of both measurements is obtained

  12. Fast neutron physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura Neto, C. de; Amorim, E.S. do.

    1979-12-01

    Finite systems of small dimensions were investigated in comparison with systems where the diffusion theory is valid with reasonable precision. Elaborated methods were introduced for the study of small systems, based on different approximations of the neutron transport equation. Experimental data, obtained from the literature, were compared with values by the ANISN-DLC/2D system. (Author) [pt

  13. Applied neutron resonance theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehner, F.H.

    1978-07-01

    Utilisation of resonance theory in basic and applications-oriented neutron cross section work is reviewed. The technically important resonance formalisms, principal concepts and methods as well as representative computer programs for resonance parameter extraction from measured data, evaluation of resonance data, calculation of Doppler-broadened cross sections and estimation of level-statistical quantities from resonance parameters are described. (orig.) [de

  14. Delayed neutrons in ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, T.

    1988-01-01

    Delayed neutron analysis carried out at the Australian Nuclear Scientific and Technology Organization facilities, provides a fast, high sensitivity, low cost, reliable method, particularly suitable for large batches of samples, and for non destructive analysis of a range of materials. While its main use has been in uranium exploration, other applications include archeological investigations, agriculture, oceanography and biology

  15. BR2 reactor neutron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neve de Mevergnies, M.

    1977-01-01

    The use of reactor neutron beams is becoming increasingly more widespread for the study of some properties of condensed matter. It is mainly due to the unique properties of the ''thermal'' neutrons as regards wavelength, energy, magnetic moment and overall favorable ratio of scattering to absorption cross-sections. Besides these fundamental reasons, the impetus for using neutrons is also due to the existence of powerful research reactors (such as BR2) built mainly for nuclear engineering programs, but where a number of intense neutron beams are available at marginal cost. A brief introduction to the production of suitable neutron beams from a reactor is given. (author)

  16. Neutron detection efficiency determinations for the TUNL neutron-neutron and neutron-proton scattering-length measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trotter, D.E. Gonzalez [Department of Physics, Duke University and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States)], E-mail: crowell@tunl.duke.edu; Meneses, F. Salinas [Department of Physics, Duke University and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States); Tornow, W. [Department of Physics, Duke University and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States)], E-mail: tornow@tunl.duke.edu; Crowell, A.S.; Howell, C.R. [Department of Physics, Duke University and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States); Schmidt, D. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, D-38116, Braunschweig (Germany); Walter, R.L. [Department of Physics, Duke University and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States)

    2009-02-11

    The methods employed and the results obtained from measurements and calculations of the detection efficiency for the neutron detectors used at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) in the simultaneous determination of the {sup 1}S{sub 0} neutron-neutron and neutron-proton scattering lengths a{sub nn} and a{sub np}, respectively, are described. Typical values for the detector efficiency were 0.3. Very good agreement between the different experimental methods and between data and calculation has been obtained in the neutron energy range below E{sub n}=13MeV.

  17. Neutron detection efficiency determinations for the TUNL neutron-neutron and neutron-proton scattering-length measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trotter, D.E. Gonzalez; Meneses, F. Salinas; Tornow, W.; Crowell, A.S.; Howell, C.R.; Schmidt, D.; Walter, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    The methods employed and the results obtained from measurements and calculations of the detection efficiency for the neutron detectors used at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) in the simultaneous determination of the 1 S 0 neutron-neutron and neutron-proton scattering lengths a nn and a np , respectively, are described. Typical values for the detector efficiency were 0.3. Very good agreement between the different experimental methods and between data and calculation has been obtained in the neutron energy range below E n =13MeV.

  18. A review on neutron reflectometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Soo; Lee, Chang Hee; Shim, Hae Seop; Seong, Baek Seok

    1999-03-01

    This report contains principle and characteristic of neutron reflectometry. Therefore, in case of operating neutron reflectometer at HANARO in future, it will be a reference to the user who wishes to use the instrument effectively. Also, the current situation of neutron reflectometer operating in the world was examined. The detail of neutron reflectometer such as GANS(MURR), ADAM(ILL), POSY II(ANL), ROG(IRI) was described. The recent research situation on neutron reflectometry was also examined and it helps us to determine research field. (author)

  19. The stationary neutron radiography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, A.A.; Newell, D.L.; Heidel, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    To provide the high intensity neutron beam and support systems necessary for radiography, the Stationary Neutron Radiography System was constructed at McClellan Air Force Base. The Stationary Neutron Radiography System utilizes a one megawatt TRIGA reactor contained in an Aluminium tank surrounded by eight foot thick concrete walls. There are four neutron beam tubes at inclined angles from the reactor core to separate radiography bays. In three of the bays, robotic systems manipulate aircraft components in the neutron beam, while real-time imaging systems provide images concurrent with the irradiation. Film radiography of smaller components is performed in the remaining bay

  20. Scintillating fibre tracking neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, Joakim.

    1995-04-01

    A detector for measurements of collimated fluxes of neutrons in the energy range 2-20 MeV is proposed. It utilizes (n.p) elastic scattering in scintillating optical fibres placed in successive orthogonal layers perpendicular to the neutron flux. A test module has been designed, constructed and tested with respect to separation of neutron and gamma events. The pulse height measurements show the feasibility to discriminate between neutron, gamma and background events. Application to measurements of fusion neutrons is considered. 18 refs, 22 figs, 4 tabs

  1. Neutron microdosimetry at RARAF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kliauga, P.

    1986-01-01

    A comprehensive series of measurements of neutron microdosimetry spectra is underway at the RARAF facility. The neutrons generated at RARAF are semi-monoenergetic to monoenergetic, depending on energy. Thus far, measurements have concentrated on 15 MeV, with a few measurements done at 6 MeV. One of the main reasons for undertaking this project is dissatisfaction with the state of accuracy of microdosimetric measurements of neutrons, not only previous measurements done at RARAF, but reports in the literature from all over the world. Only a relatively modest amount of data has been taken for neutrons, as compared to photons, and the survey of dose mean lineal energy values done for the recent ICRU Report No. 36 (December 1983) reveals a spread of values far in excess of accepted estimates of statistical uncertainty (5-10%). One of the major motivations in undertaking this project, therefore, was to elucidate some of the factors, including experimental artifacts, which are important in contributing to systematic errors in measurements. Among the methods being employed are determination of the effect of various counter parameters on neutron spectra, and electronic parameters, also. Another important method of obtaining information is a comparison between different counters. This laboratory has access to perhaps a greater variety of microdosimetric proportional counters than any in the world, from the standard Rossi counter, to various wall-less types of differing geometries. Controlled comparisons of spectra from such differing counters using the same analysis technique can yield much information on the effect of counter geometry on the microdosimetric spectrum

  2. A neutron well logging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    A pulsed neutron well logging system using a sealed off neutron generator tube is provided with a programmable digital neutron output control system. The control system monitors the target beam current and compares a function of this current with a pre-programmed control function to develop a control signal for the neutron generator. The control signal is used in a series regulator to control the average replenisher current of the neutron generator tube. The programmable digital control system of the invention also provides digital control signals as a function of time to provide ion source voltages. This arrangement may be utilized to control neutron pulses durations and repetition rates or to produce other modulated wave forms for intensity modulating the output of the neutron generator as a function of time. (Auth.)

  3. New techniques in neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayter, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    New neutron sources being planned, such as the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) or the European Spallation Source (ESS), will provide an order of magnitude flux increase over what is available today, but neutron scattering will still remain a signal-limited technique. At the same time, the development of new materials, such as polymer and ceramic composites or a variety of complex fluids, will increasingly require neutron-based research. This paper will discuss some of the new techniques which will allow us to make better use of the available neutrons, either through improved instrumentation or through sample manipulation. Discussion will center primarily on unpolarized neutron techniques since polarized neutrons will be the subject of the next paper. (author)

  4. Clinical application of fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battermann, J.J.

    1981-01-01

    The results of treatments and clinical experiments with neutrons (from a medical d+T neutron generator with an output of 10 12 neutrons per second) are reported and discussed. Data on RBE values are presented after single doses and multiple fractions of neutrons and 60 Co-gamma rays on pulmonary metastases. The results of pilot studies on head and neck tumours, brain tumours and pelvic tumours are discussed. The accuracy of the calculated dose is tested with some in-vivo experiments during neutron irradiation of the pelvis. Estimations of RBE values for tumour control, skin damage and intestinal damage after fractionated neutron therapy are dealt with and the results obtained in treatment of sarcomas are discussed. The preliminary results are given of some clinical trials in Amsterdam. Also some data from other centres are reviewed. From these data some remarks about the future of neutron therapy are made. (Auth.)

  5. Observation of Neutron Skyshine from an Accelerator Based Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franklyn, C. B. [Radiation Science Department, Necsa, PO Box 582, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)

    2011-12-13

    A key feature of neutron based interrogation systems is the need for adequate provision of shielding around the facility. Accelerator facilities adapted for fast neutron generation are not necessarily suitably equipped to ensure complete containment of the vast quantity of neutrons generated, typically >10{sup 11} n{center_dot}s{sup -1}. Simulating the neutron leakage from a facility is not a simple exercise since the energy and directional distribution can only be approximated. Although adequate horizontal, planar shielding provision is made for a neutron generator facility, it is sometimes the case that vertical shielding is minimized, due to structural and economic constraints. It is further justified by assuming the atmosphere above a facility functions as an adequate radiation shield. It has become apparent that multiple neutron scattering within the atmosphere can result in a measurable dose of neutrons reaching ground level some distance from a facility, an effect commonly known as skyshine. This paper describes a neutron detection system developed to monitor neutrons detected several hundred metres from a neutron source due to the effect of skyshine.

  6. Pulsed neutron uranium borehole logging with prompt fission neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bivens, H.M.; Smith, G.W.; Jensen, D.H.

    1976-01-01

    The gross count natural gamma log normally used for uranium borehole logging is seriously affected by disequilibrium. Methods for the direct measurement of uranium, such as neutron logging, which are not affected by disequilibrium have been the object of considerable effort in recent years. This paper describes a logging system for uranium which uses a small accelerator to generate pulses of 14 MeV neutrons to detect and assay uranium by the measurement of prompt fission neutrons in the epithermal energy range. After an initial feasibility study, a prototype logging probe was built for field evaluation which began in January 1976. Physical and operational characteristics of the prototype probe, the neutron tube-transformer assembly, and the neutron tube are described. In logging operations, only the epithermal prompt fission neutrons detected between 250 microseconds to 2500 microseconds following the excitation neutron pulse are counted. Comparison of corrected neutron logs with the conventional gross count natural gamma logs and the chemical assays of cores from boreholes are shown. The results obtained with this neutron probe clearly demonstrate its advantages over the gross count natural gamma log, although at this time the accuracy of the neutron log assay is not satisfactory under some conditions. The necessary correction factors for various borehole and formation parameters are being determined and, when applied, should improve the assay accuracy

  7. The magnetic diffusion of neutrons; La diffusion magnetique des neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, W C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to examine briefly the diffusion of neutrons by substances, particularly by crystals containing permanent atomic or ionic magnetic moments. In other words we shall deal with ferromagnetic, antiferromagnetic, ferrimagnetic or paramagnetic crystals, but first it is necessary to touch on nuclear diffusion of neutrons. We shall start with the interaction of the neutron with a single diffusion centre; the results will then be applied to the magnetic interactions of the neutron with the satellite electrons of the atom; finally we shall discuss the diffusion of neutrons by crystals. (author) [French] Le but de ce rapport est d'examiner, brievement, la diffusion des neutrons par les substances, et surtout, par des cristaux qui contiennent des moments magnetiques atomiques ou ioniques permanents. C'est-a-dire que nous nous interesserons aux cristaux ferromagnetiques, antiferromagnetiques, ferrimagnetiques ou paramagnetiques; il nous faut cependant rappeler d'abord la diffusion nucleaire des neutrons. Nous commencerons par l'interaction du neutron avec un seul centre diffuseur; puis les resultats seront appliques aux interactions magnetiques du neutron avec les electrons satellites de l'atome; enfin nous discuterons la diffusion des neutrons par les cristaux. (auteur)

  8. Neutron beam design for low intensity neutron and gamma-ray radioscopy using small neutron sources

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, T

    2003-01-01

    Two small neutron sources of sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf and sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am-Be radioisotopes were used for design of neutron beams applicable to low intensity neutron and gamma ray radioscopy (LINGR). In the design, Monte Carlo code (MCNP) was employed to generate neutron and gamma ray beams suited to LINGR. With a view to variable neutron spectrum and neutron intensity, various arrangements were first examined, and neutron-filter, gamma-ray shield and beam collimator were verified. Monte Carlo calculations indicated that with a suitable filter-shield-collimator arrangement, thermal neutron beam of 3,900 ncm sup - sup 2 s sup - sup 1 with neutron/gamma ratio of 7x10 sup 7 , and 25 ncm sup - sup 2 s sup - sup 1 with very large neutron/gamma ratio, respectively, could be produced by using sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf(122 mu g) and a sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am-Be(37GBq)radioisotopes at the irradiation port of 35 cm from the neutron sources.

  9. neutron transmission through crystalline materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Mesiry, M.S.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the neutron transmission through crystalline materials. Therefore a study of pyrolytic graphite (PG) as a highly efficient selective thermal neutron filter and Iron single crystal as a whole one, as well as the applicability of using their polycrystalline powders as a selective cold neutron filters is given. Moreover, the use of PG and iron single crystal as an efficient neutron monochromator is also investigated. An additive formula is given which allows calculating the contribution of the total neutron cross-section including the Bragg scattering from different )(hkl planes to the neutron transmission through crystalline iron and graphite. The formula takes into account their crystalline form. A computer CFe program was developed in order to provide the required calculations for both poly- and single-crystalline iron. The validity of the CFe program was approved from the comparison of the calculated iron cross-section data with the available experimental ones. The CFe program was also adapted to calculate the reflectivity from iron single crystal when it used as a neutron monochromator The computer package GRAPHITE, developed in Neutron Physics laboratory, Nuclear Research Center, has been used in order to provide the required calculations for crystalline graphite in the neutron energy range from 0.1 meV to 10 eV. A Mono-PG code was added to the computer package GRAPHITE in order to calculate the reflectivity from PG crystal when it used as a neutron monochromator.

  10. Direct Fast-Neutron Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DC Stromswold; AJ Peurrung; RR Hansen; PL Reeder

    2000-01-01

    Direct fast-neutron detection is the detection of fast neutrons before they are moderated to thermal energy. We have investigated two approaches for using proton-recoil in plastic scintillators to detect fast neutrons and distinguish them from gamma-ray interactions. Both approaches use the difference in travel speed between neutrons and gamma rays as the basis for separating the types of events. In the first method, we examined the pulses generated during scattering in a plastic scintillator to see if they provide a means for distinguishing fast-neutron events from gamma-ray events. The slower speed of neutrons compared to gamma rays results in the production of broader pulses when neutrons scatter several times within a plastic scintillator. In contrast, gamma-ray interactions should produce narrow pulses, even if multiple scattering takes place, because the time between successive scattering is small. Experiments using a fast scintillator confirmed the presence of broader pulses from neutrons than from gamma rays. However, the difference in pulse widths between neutrons and gamma rays using the best commercially available scintillators was not sufficiently large to provide a practical means for distinguishing fast neutrons and gamma rays on a pulse-by-pulse basis. A faster scintillator is needed, and that scintillator might become available in the literature. Results of the pulse-width studies were presented in a previous report (peurrung et al. 1998), and they are only summarized here

  11. Accelerator based neutron source for neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salimov, R.; Bayanov, B.; Belchenko, Yu.; Belov, V.; Davydenko, V.; Donin, A.; Dranichnikov, A.; Ivanov, A.; Kandaurov, I; Kraynov, G.; Krivenko, A.; Kudryavtsev, A.; Kursanov, N.; Savkin, V.; Shirokov, V.; Sorokin, I.; Taskaev, S.; Tiunov, M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Novosibirsk) and the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (Obninsk) have proposed an accelerator based neutron source for neutron capture and fast neutron therapy for hospital. Innovative approach is based upon vacuum insulation tandem accelerator (VITA) and near threshold 7 Li(p,n) 7 Be neutron generation. Pilot accelerator based neutron source for neutron capture therapy is under construction now at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk, Russia. In the present report, the pilot facility design is presented and discussed. Design features of facility components are discussed. Results of experiments and simulations are presented. Complete experimental tests are planned by the end of the year 2005

  12. Neutron imaging integrated circuit and method for detecting neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarkar, Vivek V.; More, Mitali J.

    2017-12-05

    The present disclosure provides a neutron imaging detector and a method for detecting neutrons. In one example, a method includes providing a neutron imaging detector including plurality of memory cells and a conversion layer on the memory cells, setting one or more of the memory cells to a first charge state, positioning the neutron imaging detector in a neutron environment for a predetermined time period, and reading a state change at one of the memory cells, and measuring a charge state change at one of the plurality of memory cells from the first charge state to a second charge state less than the first charge state, where the charge state change indicates detection of neutrons at said one of the memory cells.

  13. Study on neutron irradiation behavior of beryllium as neutron multiplier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishitsuka, Etsuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    More than 300 tons beryllium is expected to be used as a neutron multiplier in ITER, and study on the neutron irradiation behavior of beryllium as the neutron multiplier with Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) were performed to get the engineering data for fusion blanket design. This study started as the study on the tritium behavior in beryllium neutron reflector in order to make clear the generation mechanism on tritium of JMTR primary coolant since 1985. These experiences were handed over to beryllium studies for fusion study, and overall studies such as production technology of beryllium pebbles, irradiation behavior evaluation and reprocessing technology have been started since 1990. In this presentation, study on the neutron irradiation behavior of beryllium as the neutron multiplier with JMTR was reviewed from the point of tritium release, thermal properties, mechanical properties and reprocessing technology. (author)

  14. Source characterization of Purnima Neutron Generator (PNG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishnoi, Saroj; Patel, T.; Paul, Ram K.; Sarkar, P.S.; Adhikari, P.S.; Sinha, Amar

    2011-01-01

    The use of 14.1 MeV neutron generators for the applications such as elemental analysis, Accelerated Driven System (ADS) study, fast neutron radiography requires the characterization of neutron source i.e neutron yield (emission rate in n/sec), neutron dose, beam spot size and energy spectrum. In this paper, a series of experiments carried out to characterize this neutron source. The neutron source has been quantified with neutron emission rate, neutron dose at various source strength and beam spot size at target position

  15. Self powered neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passe, J.; Petitcolas, H.; Verdant, R.

    1975-01-01

    The self-powered neutron detectors (SPND) enable to measure continuously high fluxes of thermal neutrons. They are particularly suitable for power reactor cores because of their robustness. Description of two kinds of SPND's characterized by the electrical current production way is given here: the first SPND's which present a V, Ag or Rh emitter are sensitive enough but they offer a few minute delay time: the second SPND's which are depending on the gamma activation have a short delay time. The emitter is made of Co or Pt. In any case, the signal is linear with reaction rates. Finally, the applications are briefly repeated here: irradiation facility monitor in research reactors, and flux map and space instability control in power reactors [fr

  16. Narrow beam neutron dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferenci, M Sutton

    2004-01-01

    Organ and effective doses have been estimated for male and female anthropomorphic mathematical models exposed to monoenergetic narrow beams of neutrons with energies from 10(-11) to 1000 MeV. Calculations were performed for anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left-lateral and right-lateral irradiation geometries. The beam diameter used in the calculations was 7.62 cm and the phantoms were irradiated at a height of 1 m above the ground. This geometry was chosen to simulate an accidental scenario (a worker walking through the beam) at Flight Path 30 Left (FP30L) of the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The calculations were carried out using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.5c.

  17. Neutron beam tomography software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newbery, A.C.R.

    1988-05-01

    When a sample is traversed by a neutron beam, inhomogeneities in the sample will cause deflections, and the deflections will permit conclusions to be drawn concerning the location and size of the inhomogeneities. The associated computation is similar to problems in tomography, analogous to X-ray tomography though significantly different in detail. We do not have any point-sample information, but only mean values over short line segments. Since each mean value is derived from a separate neutron counter, the quantity of available data has to be modest; also, since each datum is an integral, its geometric precision is inferior to that of X-ray data. Our software is designed to cope with these difficulties. (orig.) [de

  18. Neutron television camera detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arndt, U.W.; Gilmore, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    A neutron area detector system is being developed at the Institut Laue-Langevin which is based on a system for x-rays. The system has a large counting rate capability; this is extremely important where the total background count exceeds the total counts in the signals of interest. Its spatial resolution is of the order of one mm, while the screen size is 400 mm. The main limitation of the system is its limited counting efficiency, and this is directly attributable to the optical self-absorption of the neutron phosphor. All coherent noise in the system, i.e., all noise synchronized with the TV scans, has to be kept lower than the first bit threshold. However, this requirement can be relaxed when dealing with diffraction patterns, such as those from single crystals, for which a local background is subtracted from the pattern

  19. Neutron beam measurement dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaro, C.R.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes animal dosimetry studies and phantom measurements. During 1994, 12 dogs were irradiated at BMRR as part of a 4 fraction dose tolerance study. The animals were first infused with BSH and irradiated daily for 4 consecutive days. BNL irradiated 2 beagles as part of their dose tolerance study using BPA fructose. In addition, a dog at WSU was irradiated at BMRR after an infusion of BPA fructose. During 1994, the INEL BNCT dosimetry team measured neutron flux and gamma dose profiles in two phantoms exposed to the epithermal neutron beam at the BMRR. These measurements were performed as a preparatory step to the commencement of human clinical trials in progress at the BMRR

  20. Neutron absorbing article

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naum, R.G.; Owens, D.P.; Dooher, G.I.

    1979-01-01

    A neutron absorbing article, in flat plate form and suitable for use in a storage rack for spent fuel, includes boron carbide particles, diluent particles and a solid, irreversibly cured phenolic polymer cured to a continuous matrix binding the boron carbide and diluent particles. The total conent of boron carbide and diluent particles is a major proportion of the article and the content of cured phenolic polymer present is a minor proportion. By regulation of the ratio of boron carbide particles to diluent particles, normally within the range of 1:9 and 9:1 and preferably within the range of 1:5 to 5:1, the neutron absorbing activity of the product may be controlled, which facilitates the manufacture of articles of particular absorbing activities best suitable for specific applications