WorldWideScience

Sample records for hf heart failure

  1. Geographic variations in the PARADIGM-HF heart failure trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Søren Lund; Martinez, Felipe; Jhund, Pardeep S; Arango, Juan Luis; Bĕlohlávek, Jan; Boytsov, Sergey; Cabrera, Walter; Gomez, Efrain; Hagège, Albert A; Huang, Jun; Kiatchoosakun, Songsak; Kim, Kee-Sik; Mendoza, Iván; Senni, Michele; Squire, Iain B; Vinereanu, Dragos; Wong, Raymond Ching-Chiew; Gong, Jianjian; Lefkowitz, Martin P; Rizkala, Adel R; Rouleau, Jean L; Shi, Victor C; Solomon, Scott D; Swedberg, Karl; Zile, Michael R; Packer, Milton; McMurray, John J V

    2016-11-01

    The globalization of clinical trials has highlighted geographic variations in patient characteristics, event rates, and treatment effects. We investigated these further in PARADIGM-HF, the largest and most globally representative trial in heart failure (HF) to date. We looked at five regions: North America (NA) 602 (8%), Western Europe (WE) 1680 (20%), Central/Eastern Europe/Russia (CEER) 2762 (33%), Latin America (LA) 1433 (17%), and Asia-Pacific (AP) 1487 (18%). Notable differences included: WE patients (mean age 68 years) and NA (65 years) were older than AP (58 years) and LA (63 years) and had more coronary disease; NA and CEER patients had the worst signs, symptoms, and functional status. North American patients were the most likely to have a defibrillating-device (54 vs. 2% AP) and least likely prescribed a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist (36 vs. 65% LA). Other evidence-based therapies were used most frequently in NA and WE. Rates of the primary composite outcome of cardiovascular (CV) death or HF hospitalization (per 100 patient-years) varied among regions: NA 13.6 (95% CI 11.7-15.7) WE 9.6 (8.6-10.6), CEER 12.3 (11.4-13.2), LA 11.2 (10.0-12.5), and AP 12.5 (11.3-13.8). After adjustment for prognostic variables, relative to NA, the risk of CV death was higher in LA and AP and the risk of HF hospitalization lower in WE. The benefit of sacubitril/valsartan was consistent across regions. There were many regional differences in PARADIGM-HF, including in age, symptoms, comorbidity, background therapy, and event-rates, although these did not modify the benefit of sacubitril/valsartan. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01035255. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  2. EURObservational Research Programme : The Heart Failure Pilot Survey (ESC-HF Pilot)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maggioni, Aldo P.; Dahlstrom, Ulf; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Chioncel, Ovidiu; Crespo Leiro, Marisa; Drozdz, Jaroslaw; Fruhwald, Friedrich; Gullestad, Lars; Logeart, Damien; Metra, Marco; Parissis, John; Persson, Hans; Ponikowski, Piotr; Rauchhaus, Mathias; Voors, Adriaan A.; Nielsen, Olav Wendelboe; Zannad, Faiez; Tavazzi, Luigi

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of the new ESC-HF Pilot Survey was to describe the clinical epidemiology of outpatients and inpatients with heart failure (HF) and the diagnostic/therapeutic processes applied across 12 participating European countries. This pilot study was specifically aimed at validating the

  3. EURObservational Research Programme: the Heart Failure Pilot Survey (ESC-HF Pilot)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maggioni, Aldo P; Dahlström, Ulf; Filippatos, Gerasimos;

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of the new ESC-HF Pilot Survey was to describe the clinical epidemiology of outpatients and inpatients with heart failure (HF) and the diagnostic/therapeutic processes applied across 12 participating European countries. This pilot study was specifically aimed at validating...... the structure, performance, and quality of the data set, for continuing the survey into a permanent registry....

  4. Heart failure - tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - tests; Congestive heart failure - tests; Cardiomyopathy - tests; HF - tests ... the best test to: Identify which type of heart failure (systolic versus diastolic, valvular) Monitor your heart failure ...

  5. Troponin I in acute decompensated heart failure : insights from the ASCEND-HF study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felker, G. Michael; Hasselblad, Vic; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Armstrong, Paul W.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Voors, Adriaan A.; Metra, Marco; McMurray, John J. V.; Butler, Javed; Heizer, Gretchen M.; Dickstein, Kenneth; Massie, Barry M.; Atar, Dan; Troughton, Richard W.; Anker, Stefan D.; Califf, Robert M.; Starling, Randall C.; O'Connor, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the prognostic importance of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) in a cohort of patients enrolled in the ASCEND-HF study of nesiritide in acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). Circulating troponins are a prognostic marker in patients with ADHF. Contemporary assays with greater sensitivity requ

  6. Predictors of arrhythmic sudden cardiac death in heart failure patients in the CARE-HF study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uretsky, B.; Cleland, J.G.F.; Freemantle, N.

    2006-01-01

    Topic(s):Rsynchronisation therapy   Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has become an important modality to improve symptoms, exercise performance, and survival in patients with severe heart failure and left ventricular dyssynchrony. The CARE-HF study showed that CRT reduced mortality in syst...

  7. Telemonitoring Adherence to Medications in Heart Failure Patients (TEAM-HF): A Pilot Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Benjamin D; Moise, Nathalie; Haerizadeh, Mytra; Ye, Siqin; Medina, Vivian; Kronish, Ian M

    2017-04-01

    Medication nonadherence contributes to hospitalizations in recently discharged patients with heart failure (HF). We aimed to test the feasibility of telemonitoring medication adherence in patients with HF. We randomized 40 patients (1:1) hospitalized for HF to 30 days of loop diuretic adherence monitoring with telephonic support or to passive adherence monitoring alone. Eighty-three percent of eligible patients agreed to participate. The median age of patients was 64 years, 25% were female, and 45% were Hispanic. Overall, 67% of patients were nonadherent (percentage of days that the correct number of doses were taken telemonitoring was acceptable to most patients with HF. Diuretic nonadherence was common even when patients knew they were being monitored. Future studies should assess whether adherence telemonitoring can improve adherence and reduce readmissions among patients with HF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Diabetes mellitus, cachexia and obesity in heart failure: rationale and design of the Studies Investigating Co-morbidities Aggravating Heart Failure (SICA-HF)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    von Haehling, Stephan; Lainscak, Mitja; Doehner, Wolfram; Ponikowski, Piotr; Rosano, Giuseppe; Jordan, Jens; Rozentryt, Piotr; Rauchhaus, Mathias; Karpov, Rostislav; Tkachuk, Vsevolod; Parfyonova, Yelena; Zaritskey, Andrey Y; Shlyakhto, Eugeniy V; Cleland, John G; Anker, Stefan D

    2010-01-01

    .... Cachexia is an ominous and often missed sign in patients with CHF.This manuscript describes the rationale and the design of Studies Investigating Co-morbidities Aggravating Heart Failure (SICA-HF...

  9. Rationale and Design of the Reduce Elevated Left Atrial Pressure in Patients With Heart Failure (Reduce LAP-HF) Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasenfuss, Gerd; Gustafsson, Finn; Kaye, David

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is characterized by elevated left atrial pressure during rest and/or exercise. The Reduce LAP-HF (Reduce Elevated Left Atrial Pressure in Patients With Heart Failure) trial will evaluate the safety and performance of the Interatrial...... include exercise tolerance, quality of life, and the incidence of heart failure hospitalization. CONCLUSION: Reduce LAP-HF is the first trial intended to lower left atrial pressure in HFpEF by means of creating a permanent shunt through the atrial septum with the use of a device. Although the trial...... patients with ejection fraction ≥40% and New York Heart Association functional class III or IV heart failure with a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) ≥15 mm Hg at rest or ≥25 mm Hg during supine bike exercise will be implanted with an IASD System II, and followed for 6 months to assess the primary...

  10. Usefulness of Iron Deficiency Correction in Management of Patients With Heart Failure [from the Registry Analysis of Iron Deficiency-Heart Failure (RAID-HF) Registry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienbergen, Harm; Pfister, Otmar; Hochadel, Matthias; Michel, Stephan; Bruder, Oliver; Remppis, Björn Andrew; Maeder, Micha Tobias; Strasser, Ruth; von Scheidt, Wolfgang; Pauschinger, Matthias; Senges, Jochen; Hambrecht, Rainer

    2016-12-15

    Iron deficiency (ID) has been identified as an important co-morbidity in patients with heart failure (HF). Intravenous iron therapy reduced symptoms and rehospitalizations of iron-deficient patients with HF in randomized trials. The present multicenter study investigated the "real-world" management of iron status in patients with HF. Consecutive patients with HF and ejection fraction ≤40% were recruited and analyzed from December 2010 to October 2015 by 11 centers in Germany and Switzerland. Of 1,484 patients with HF, iron status was determined in only 923 patients (62.2%), despite participation of the centers in a registry focusing on ID and despite guideline recommendation to determine iron status. In patients with determined iron status, a prevalence of 54.7% (505 patients) for ID was observed. Iron therapy was performed in only 8.5% of the iron-deficient patients with HF; 2.6% were treated with intravenous iron therapy. The patients with iron therapy were characterized by a high rate of symptomatic HF and anemia. In conclusion, despite strong evidence of beneficial effects of iron therapy on symptoms and rehospitalizations, diagnostic and therapeutic efforts on ID in HF are low in the actual clinical practice, and the awareness to diagnose and treat ID in HF should be strongly enforced.

  11. Baseline characteristics of patients in the Reduction of Events with Darbepoetin alfa in Heart Failure trial (RED-HF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurray, John J.V.; Anand, Inder S.; Diaz, Rafael; Maggioni, Aldo P.; O'Connor, Christopher; Pfeffer, Marc A.; Solomon, Scott D.; Tendera, Michal; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Albizem, Moetaz; Cheng, Sunfa; Scarlata, Debra; Swedberg, Karl; Young, James B.; Amuchastegui, M.; Belziti, C.; Bluguermann, J.; Caccavo, M.; Cartasegna, L.; Colque, R.; Cuneo, C.; Fernandez, A.; Gabito, A.; Goicochea, R.; Gonzalez, M.; Gorosito, V.; Grinfeld, L.; Hominal, M.; Kevorkian, R.; Litvak Bruno, M.; Llanos, J.; Mackinnon, I.; Manuale, O.; Marzetti, E.; Nul, D.; Perna, E.; Riccitelli, M.; Sanchez, A.; Santos, D.; Schygiel, P.; Toblli, J.; Vogel, D.; Aggarwal, A.; Amerena, J.; De Looze, F.; Fletcher, P.; Hare, D.; Ireland, M.; Krum, H.; Lattimore, J.; Marwick, T.; Sindone, A.; Thompson, P.; Waites, J.; Altenberger, J.; Ebner, C.; Lenz, K.; Pacher, R.; Poelzl, G.; Charlier, F.; de Ceuninck, M.; De Keulenaer, G.; Dendale, P.; Maréchal, P.; Mullens, W.; Thoeng, J.; Vanderheyden, M.; Vanhaecke, J.; Weytjens, C.; Wollaert, B.; Albuquerque, D.; Almeida, D.; Aspe y Rosas, J.; Bocchi, E.; Bordignon, S.; Clausell, N.; Kaiser, S.; Leaes, P.; Martins Alves, S.; Montera, M.; Moura, L.; Pereira de Castro, R.; Rassi, S.; Reis, A.; Saraiva, J.; Simões, M.; Souza Neto, J.; Teixeira, M.; Benov, H.; Chompalova, B.; Donova, T.; Georgiev, P.; Gotchev, D.; Goudev, A.; Grigorov, M.; Guenova, D.; Hergeldjieva, V.; Ivanov, D.; Kostova, E.; Manolova, A.; Marchev, S.; Nikolov, F.; Popov, A.; Raev, D.; Tzekova, M.; Czarnecki, W.; Giannetti, N.; Haddad, H.; Heath, J.; Huynh, T.; Lepage, S.; Liu, P.; Lonn, E.; Ma, P.; Manyari, D.; Moe, G.; Parker, J.; Pesant, Y.; Rajda, M.; Ricci, J.; Roth, S.; Sestier, F.; Sluzar, V.; Sussex, B.; Vizel, S.; Antezana, G.; Bugueno, C.; Castro, P.; Conejeros, C.; Manriquez, L.; Martinez, D.; Potthoff, S.; Stockins, B.; Vukasovic, J.; Gregor, P.; Herold, M.; Jerabek, O.; Jirmar, R.; Kuchar, R.; Linhart, A.; Podzemska, B.; Soucek, M.; Spac, J.; Spacek, R.; Vodnansky, P.; Bronnum-Schou, J.; Clemmensen, K.; Egstrup, K.; Jensen, G.; Kjoller-Hansen, L.; Kober, L.; Markenvard, J.; Rokkedal, J.; Skagen, K.; Torp-Pedersen, C.; Tuxen, C.; Videbak, L.; Laks, T.; Vahula, V.; Harjola, V.; Kettunen, R.; Kotila, M.; Bauer, F.; Cohen Solal, A.; Coisne, D.; Davy, J.; De Groote, P.; Dos Santos, P.; Funck, F.; Galinier, M.; Gibelin, P.; Isnard, R.; Neuder, Y.; Roul, G.; Sabatier, R.; Trochu, J.; Anker, S.; Denny, S.; Dreykluft, T.; Flesch, M.; Genth-Zotz, S.; Hambrecht, R.; Hein, J.; Jeserich, M.; John, M.; Kreider-Stempfle, H.; Laufs, U.; Muellerleile, K.; Natour, M.; Sandri, M.; Schäufele, T.; von Hodenberg, E.; Weyland, K.; Winkelmann, B.; Tse, H.; Yan, B.; Barsi, B.; Csikasz, J.; Dezsi, C.; Edes, I.; Forster, T.; Karpati, P.; Kerekes, C.; Kis, E.; Kosa, I.; Lupkovics, G.; Nagy, A.; Preda, I.; Ronaszeki, A.; Tomcsanyi, J.; Zamolyi, K.; Agarwal, D.; Bahl, V.; Bordoloi, A.; Chockalingam, K.; Chopda, M.; Chopra, V.; Dugal, J.; Ghaisas, N.; Ghosh, S.; Grant, P.; Hiremath, S.; Iyengar, S.; Jagadeesa Subramania, B.; Jain, P.; Joshi, A.; Khan, A.; Mullasari, A.; Naik, S.; Oomman, A.; Pai, V.; Pareppally Gopal, R.; Parikh, K.; Patel, T.; Prakash, V.; Sastry, B.; Sathe, S.; Sinha, N.; Srikanthan, V.; Subburamakrishnan, P.; Thacker, H.; Wander, G.; Admon, D.; Katz, A.; Klainman, E.; Lewis, B.; Marmor, A.; Moriel, M.; Mosseri, M.; Shotan, A.; Weinstein, J.; Zimlichman, R.; Agostoni, P.; Albanese, M.; Alunni, G.; Bini, R.; Boccanelli, A.; Bolognese, L.; Campana, C.; Carbonieri, E.; Carpino, C.; Checco, L.; Cosmi, F.; D'Angelo, G.; De Cristofaro, M.; Floresta, A.; Fucili, A.; Galvani, M.; Ivleva, A.; Marra, S.; Musca, G.; Peccerillo, N.; Perrone Filardi, P.; Picchio, E.; Russo, T.; Scelsi, L.; Senni, M.; Tavazzi, L.; Erglis, A.; Jasinkevica, I.; Kakurina, N.; Veze, I.; Volans, E.; Bagdonas, A.; Berukstis, E.; Celutkiene, J.; Dambrauskaite, A.; Jarasuniene, D.; Luksiene, D.; Rudys, A.; Sakalyte, G.; Sliaziene, S.; Aguilar-Romero, R.; Cardona-Muñoz, E.; Castro-Jimenez, J.; Chavez-Herrera, J.; Chuquiure Valenzuela, E.; De la Pena, G.; Herrera, E.; Leiva-Pons, J.; Lopez Alvarado, A.; Mendez Machado, G.; Ramos-Lopez, G.; Basart, D.; Buijs, E.; Cornel, J.; de Leeuw, M.; Dijkgraaf, R.; Dunselman, P.; Freericks, M.; Hamraoui, K.; Lenderlink, T.; Linssen, G.; Lodewick, P.; Lodewijks, C.; Lok, D.; Nierop, P.; Ronner, E.; Somsen, A.; van Dantzig, J.; van der Burgh, P.; van Kempen, L.; van Vlies, B.; Voors, A.; Wardeh, A.; Willems, F.; Dickstein, K.; Gundersen, T.; Hole, T.; Thalamus, J.; Westheim, A.; Dabrowski, M.; Gorski, J.; Korewicki, J.; Kuc, K.; Miekus, P.; Musial, W.; Niegowska, J.; Piotrowski, W.; Podolec, P.; Polonski, L.; Ponikowski, P.; Rynkiewicz, A.; Szelemej, R.; Trusz-Gluza, M.; Ujda, M.; Wojciechowski, D; Wysokinski, A.; Camacho, A.; Fonseca, C.; Monteiro, P.; Apetrei, E.; Bruckner, I.; Carasca, E.; Coman, I.; Datcu, M.; Dragulescu, S.; Ionescu, P.; Iordachescu-Petica, D.; Manitiu, I.; Popa, V.; Pop-Moldovan, A.; Radoi, M.; Stamate, S.; Tomescu, M.; Vita, I.; Aroutiounov, G.; Ballyuzek, M.; Bart, B.; Churina, S.; Glezer, M.; Goloshchekin, B.; Ivleva, A.; Kobalava, Z.; Kostenko, V.; Lopatin, Y.; Martynov, A.; Orlov, V.; Semernin, E.; Shogenov, Z.; Sidorenko, B.; Skvortsov, A.; Storzhakov, G.; Sulimov, V.; Talibov, O.; Tereshenko, S.; Tsyrline, V.; Zadionchenko, V.; Zateyshchikov, D.; Dzupina, A.; Hranai, M.; Kmec, J.; Micko, K.; Murin, J.; Pella, D.; Sojka, G.; Spisak, V.; Vahala, P.; Vinanska, D.; Badat, A.; Bayat, J.; Dawood, S.; Delport, E.; Ellis, G.; Garda, R.; Klug, E.; Mabin, T.; Naidoo, D.; Pretorius, M.; Ranjith, N.; Van Zyl, L.; Weich, H.; Anguita, M.; Berrazueta, J.; Bruguera i Cortada, J.; de Teresa, E.; Gómez Sánchez, M.; González Juanatey, J.; Gonzalez-Maqueda, I.; Jordana, R.; Lupon, J.; Manzano, L.; Pascual Figal, D.; Pulpón, L.; Recio, J.; Ridocci Soriano, F.; Rodríguez Lambert, J.; Roig Minguell, E.; Roig Minguell, E.; Romero, J.; Valdovinos, P.; Klintberg, L.; Kronvall, T.; Lycksell, M.; Morner, S.; Rydberg, E.; Swedberg, K.; Timberg, I.; Wikstrom, G.; Moccetti, T.4; Ashok, J.; Banerjee, P.; Carr-White, G.; Cleland, J.; Connolly, E.; Francis, M.; Greenbaum, R.; Kadr, H.; Lindsay, S.; McMurray, J.; Megarry, S.; Memon, A.; Murdoch, D.; Senior, R.; Squire, I.; Tan, L.; Witte, K.; Adams, K.; Adamson, P.; Adler, A.; Altschul, L.; Altschuller, A.; Amirani, H.; Anand, I.; Andreou, C.; Ansari, M.; Antonishen, M.; Banchs, H.; Banerjee, S.; Banish, D.; Bank, A.; Barbagelata, A.; Barnard, D.; Bellinger, R.; Benn, A.; Berk, M.; Berry, B.; Bethala, V.; Bilazarian, S.; Bisognano, J.; Bleyer, F.; Blum, M.; Boehmer, J.; Bouchard, A.; Boyle, A.; Bozkurt, B.; Brown, C.; Burlew, B.; Burnham, K.; Butler, J.; Call, J.; Cambier, P.; Cappola, T.; Carlson, R.; Chandler, B.; Chandra, R.; Chandraratna, P.; Chernick, R.; Colan, D.; Colfer, H.; Colucci, W.; Connelly, T.; Costantini, O.; Dadkhah, S.; Dauber, I.; Davis, J.; Davis, S.; Denning, S.; Drazner, M.; Dunlap, S.; Egbujiobi, L.; Elkayam, U.; Elliott, J.; El-Shahawy, M.; Essandoh, L.; Ewald, G.; Fang, J.; Farhoud, H.; Felker, G.; Fernandez, J.; Festin, R.; Fishbein, G.; Florea, V.; Flores, E.; Floro, J.; Gabris, M.; Garg, M.; Gatewood, R.; Geller, M.; Ghali, J.; Ghumman, W.; Gibbs, G.; Gillespie, E.; Gilmore, R.; Gogia, H.; Goldberg, L.; Gradus-Pizlo, I.; Grainger, T.; Gudmundsson, G.; Gunawardena, D.; Gupta, D.; Hack, T.; Hall, S.; Hamroff, G.; Hankins, S.; Hanna, M.; Hargrove, J.; Haught, W.; Hauptman, P.; Hazelrigg, M.; Herzog, C.; Heywood, J.; Hill, T.; Hilton, T.; Hirsch, H.; Hunter, J.; Ibrahim, H.; Imburgia, M.; Iteld, B.; Jackson, B.; Jaffrani, N.; Jain, D.; Jain, A.; James, M.; Jimenez, J.; Johnson, E.; Kale, P.; Kaneshige, A.; Kapadia, S.; Karia, D.; Karlsberg, R.; Katholi, R.; Kerut, E.; Khoury, W.; Kipperman, R.; Klapholz, M.; Kosinski, E.; Kozinn, M.; Kraus, D.; Krueger, S.; Krum, H.; Kumar, S.; Lader, E.; Lee, C.; Levy, W.; Lewis, E.; Light-McGroary, K.; Loh, I.; Lombardi, W.; Machado, C.; Maislos, F.; Mancini, D.; Markus, T.; Mather, P.; McCants, K.; McGrew, F.; McLaurin, B.; McMillan, E.; McNamara, D.; Meyer, T.; Meymandi, S.; Miller, A.; Minami, E.; Modi, M.; Mody, F.; Mohanty, P.; Moscoso, R.; Moskowitz, R.; Moustafa, M.; Mullen, M.; Naz, T.; Noonan, T.; O'Brien, T.; Oellerich, W.; Oren, R.; Pamboukian, S.; Pereira, N.; Pitt, W.; Porter, C.; Prabhu, S.; Promisloff, S.; Ratkovec, R.; Richardson, R.; Ross, A.; Saleh, N.; Saltzberg, M.; Sarkar, S.; Schmedtje, J.; Schneider, R.; Schuyler, G.; Shanes, J.; Sharma, A.; Siegel, C.; Siegel, R.; Silber, D.; Singh, V.; Singh, N.; Singh, J.; Sklar, J.; Small, R.; Smith, A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smull, D.; Sotolongo, R.; Staniloae, C.; Stapleton, D.; Steele, P.; Stehlik, J.; Stein, M.; Tang, W.; Thadani, U.; Torre-Amoine, G.; Trichon, B.; Tsai, C.; Tummala, R.; Van Bakel, A.; Vicari, R.; Vijay, N.; Vijayaraghavan, K.; Vittorio, T.; Vossler, M.; Wagoner, L.; Wallis, D.; Ward, N.; Widmer, M.; Wight, J.; Wilkins, C.; Williams, C.; Williams, G.; Winchester, M.; Winkel, E.; Wittmer, B.; Wood, D.; Wormer, D.; Wright, R.; Xu, Z.; Yasin, M.; Zolty, R.

    2013-01-01

    Aims This report describes the baseline characteristics of patients in the Reduction of Events with Darbepoetin alfa in Heart Failure trial (RED-HF) which is testing the hypothesis that anaemia correction with darbepoetin alfa will reduce the composite endpoint of death from any cause or hospital admission for worsening heart failure, and improve other outcomes. Methods and results Key demographic, clinical, and laboratory findings, along with baseline treatment, are reported and compared with those of patients in other recent clinical trials in heart failure. Compared with other recent trials, RED-HF enrolled more elderly [mean age 70 (SD 11.4) years], female (41%), and black (9%) patients. RED-HF patients more often had diabetes (46%) and renal impairment (72% had an estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m2). Patients in RED-HF had heart failure of longer duration [5.3 (5.4) years], worse NYHA class (35% II, 63% III, and 2% IV), and more signs of congestion. Mean EF was 30% (6.8%). RED-HF patients were well treated at randomization, and pharmacological therapy at baseline was broadly similar to that of other recent trials, taking account of study-specific inclusion/exclusion criteria. Median (interquartile range) haemoglobin at baseline was 112 (106–117) g/L. Conclusion The anaemic patients enrolled in RED-HF were older, moderately to markedly symptomatic, and had extensive co-morbidity. PMID:23329651

  12. Effects of Nesiritide and Predictors of Urine Output in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Results From ASCEND-HF (Acute Study of Clinical Effectiveness of Nesiritide and Decompensated Heart Failure)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gottlieb, Stephen S.; Stebbins, Amanda; Voors, Adriaan A.; Hasselblad, Vic; Ezekowitz, Justin A.; Califf, Robert M.; O'Connor, Christopher M.; Starling, Randall C.; Hernandez, Adrian F.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to determine if nesiritide increases diuresis in congestive heart failure patients. Background In the ASCEND-HF (Acute Study of Clinical Effectiveness of Nesiritide and Decompensated Heart Failure), 7,141 patients hospitalized with acute decompensated heart failure

  13. Effects of Nesiritide and Predictors of Urine Output in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Results From ASCEND-HF (Acute Study of Clinical Effectiveness of Nesiritide and Decompensated Heart Failure)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gottlieb, Stephen S.; Stebbins, Amanda; Voors, Adriaan A.; Hasselblad, Vic; Ezekowitz, Justin A.; Califf, Robert M.; O'Connor, Christopher M.; Starling, Randall C.; Hernandez, Adrian F.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to determine if nesiritide increases diuresis in congestive heart failure patients. Background In the ASCEND-HF (Acute Study of Clinical Effectiveness of Nesiritide and Decompensated Heart Failure), 7,141 patients hospitalized with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF

  14. Effect of Peripheral Arterial Disease on Functional and Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Heart Failure From HF-ACTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, W. Schuyler; Clare, Robert; Ellis, Stephen J.; Mills, James S.; Fischman, David L.; Kraus, William E.; Whellan, David J.; O'Connor, Christopher M.; Patel, Manesh R.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) have lower functional capacity and worse clinical outcomes than age and gender matched patients. Few data exist on the relationship of PAD with functional and clinical outcomes in heart failure (HF) patients. We sought to compare HF patients with and without PAD for baseline functional capacity, response to exercise training, and clinical outcomes. HF-ACTION was a randomized controlled trial comparing usual care to structured exercise training plus usual care in HF patients with an ejection fraction ≤ 35% and NYHA class II – IV heart failure symptoms. Cardiopulmonary exercise (CPX) testing occurred at enrollment, 3 months, and 1 year. Clinical follow-up occurred up to 4 years. Of the 2331 HF-ACTION patients, 157 (6.8%) had PAD. At baseline, HF patients with PAD had a lower exercise duration (8.0 vs. 9.8 minutes, p<0.001), lower peak oxygen consumption (VO2) (12.5 vs. 14.6 mL/kg/min, p<0.001), and shorter six minute walking distance (306 vs. 371 meters, p<0.001) compared to HF patients without PAD. At three months, HF patients with PAD had less improvement on CPX testing [exercise duration (0.5 vs. 1.1 minutes; p=0.002) and peak VO2 (mean change; 0.1 vs. 0.6 mL/kg/min; p=0.04)] compared to HF patients without PAD. PAD was an independent predictor of all-cause death or hospitalization [hazard ratio (95% CI); 1.31 (1.06 – 1.62), p=0.011]. PAD patients with HF have depressed baseline exercise capacity and decreased response to exercise training. In conclusion, PAD is an independent predictor of all-cause death or hospitalization in HF patients. PMID:21565325

  15. Presence and development of atrial fibrillation in chronic heart failure - Experiences from the MERIT-HF Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Aass, Halfdan; El Allaf, Dia; Dunselman, Peter H. J. M.; Gullestad, Lars; Halinen, Matti; Kjekshus, John; Ohlsson, Lis; Wedel, Hans; Wikstrand, John

    2006-01-01

    Background: Atrial fibrillation is common in heart failure, but data regarding beta-blockade in these patients and its ability to prevent new occurrence of atrial fibrillation are scarce. Methods: Baseline ECGs in MERIT-HF were coded regarding baseline rhythm, and outcome was analyzed in relation to

  16. Baseline characteristics of patients in the Reduction of Events with Darbepoetin alfa in Heart Failure trial (RED-HF)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McMurray, John J. V.; Anand, Inder S.; Diaz, Rafael; Maggioni, Aldo P.; O'Connor, Christopher; Pfeffer, Marc A.; Solomon, Scott D.; Tendera, Michal; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Albizem, Moetaz; Cheng, Sunfa; Scarlata, Debra; Swedberg, Karl; Young, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Aims This report describes the baseline characteristics of patients in the Reduction of Events with Darbepoetin alfa in Heart Failure trial (RED-HF) which is testing the hypothesis that anaemia correction with darbepoetin alfa will reduce the composite endpoint of death from any cause or hospital ad

  17. Home telemonitoring study for Japanese patients with heart failure (HOMES-HF): protocol for a multicentre randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotooka, Norihiko; Asaka, Machiko; Sato, Yasunori; Kinugasa, Yoshiharu; Nochioka, Kotaro; Mizuno, Atsushi; Nagatomo, Daisuke; Mine, Daigo; Yamada, Yoko; Eguchi, Kazuo; Hanaoka, Hideki; Inomata, Takayuki; Fukumoto, Yoshihiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Masuyama, Tohru; Kitakaze, Masafumi; Inoue, Teruo; Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Momomura, Shin-Ichi; Seino, Yoshihiko; Node, Koichi

    2013-06-20

    Despite the encouraging results from several randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and meta-analyses, the ability of home telemonitoring for heart failure (HF) to improve patient outcomes remains controversial as a consequence of the two recent large-scale RCTs. However, it has been suggested that there is a subgroup of patients with HF who may benefit from telemonitoring. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether an HF management programme using telemonitoring could improve outcomes in patients with HF under the Japanese healthcare system. The Home Telemonitoring Study for Japanese Patients with Heart Failure (HOMES-HF) study is a prospective, multicentre RCT to investigate the effectiveness of home telemonitoring on the primary composite endpoint of all-cause death and rehospitalisation due to worsening HF in recently admitted HF patients (aged 20 and older, New York Heart Association classes II-III). The telemonitoring system is an automated physiological monitoring system including body weight, blood pressure and pulse rate by full-time nurses 7 days a week. Additionally, the system was designed to make it a high priority to support patient's self-care instead of an early detection of HF decompensation. A total sample size of 420 patients is planned according to the Schoenfeld and Richter method. Eligible patients are randomly assigned via a website to either the telemonitoring group or the usual care group by using a minimisation method with biased-coin assignment balancing on age, left ventricular ejection fraction and a history of ischaemic heart disease. Participants will be enrolled until August 2013 and followed until August 2014. Time to events will be estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and HRs and 95% CIs will be calculated using the Cox proportional hazards models with stratification factors. The study is registered at UMIN Clinical Trials Registry (UMIN000006839).

  18. Early Postdischarge STOP-HF-Clinic Reduces 30-day Readmissions in Old and Frail Patients With Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacho, Cristina; Domingo, Mar; Núñez, Raquel; Lupón, Josep; Moliner, Pedro; de Antonio, Marta; González, Beatriz; Santesmases, Javier; Vela, Emili; Tor, Jordi; Bayes-Genis, Antoni

    2017-08-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with a high rate of readmissions within 30 days postdischarge. Strategies to lower readmission rates generally show modest results. To reduce readmission rates, we developed a STructured multidisciplinary outpatient clinic for Old and frail Postdischarge patients hospitalized for HF (STOP-HF-Clinic). This prospective all-comers study enrolled patients discharged from internal medicine or geriatric wards after HF hospitalization. The intervention involved a face-to-face early visit (within 7 days), HF nurse education, treatment titration, and intravenous medication when needed. Thirty-day readmission risk was calculated using the CORE-HF risk score. We also studied the impact of 30-day readmission burden on regional health care by comparing the readmission rate in the STOP-HF-Clinic Referral Area (∼250000 people) with that of the rest of the Catalan Health Service (CatSalut) (∼7.5 million people) during the pre-STOP-HF-Clinic (2012-2013) and post-STOP-HF-Clinic (2014-2015) time periods. From February 2014 to June 2016, 518 consecutive patients were included (age, 82 years; Barthel score, 70; Charlson index, 5.6, CORE-HF 30-day readmission risk, 26.5%). The observed all-cause 30-day readmission rate was 13.9% (47.5% relative risk reduction) and the observed HF-related 30-day readmission rate was 7.5%. The CatSalut registry included 65131 index HF admissions, with 9267 all-cause and 6686 HF-related 30-day readmissions. The 30-day readmission rate was significantly reduced in the STOP-HF-Clinic Referral Area in 2014-2015 compared with 2012-2013 (P < .001), mainly driven by fewer HF-related readmissions. The STOP-HF-Clinic, an approach that could be promptly implemented elsewhere, is a valuable intervention for reducing the global burden of early readmissions among elder and vulnerable patients with HF. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Clinical trials update from the Heart Failure Society of America Meeting 2009: FAST, IMPROVE-HF, COACH galectin-3 substudy, HF-ACTION nuclear substudy, DAD-HF, and MARVEL-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lainscak, Mitja; Coletta, Alison P; Sherwi, Nasser; Cleland, John G F

    2010-02-01

    This article presents findings and a commentary on late-breaking trials presented during the meeting of the Heart Failure Society of America in September 2009. Unpublished reports should be considered as preliminary, since analyses may change in the final publication. The FAST trial showed somewhat better performance of intrathoracic impedance for prediction of deterioration in patients with heart failure (HF) when compared with daily weighing. The IMPROVE-HF study reported the benefits of education on the management of patients with systolic HF. Galectin-3 appeared a useful method for improving risk stratification of patients with chronic HF in a substudy of the COACH trial. A nuclear substudy of the HF-ACTION trial failed to demonstrate that resting myocardial perfusion imaging, a measure of myocardial scar and viability, was clinically useful. A small randomized controlled trial (DAD-HF) suggested that the use of low-dose dopamine in patients with acutely decompensated HF was associated with less deterioration in renal function and less hypokalaemia. The MARVEL-1 trial raises further concerns about the safety of myoblast transplantation in ischaemic HF.

  20. Rationale and Design of the ATHENA-HF Trial: Aldosterone Targeted Neurohormonal Combined With Natriuresis Therapy in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Javed; Hernandez, Adrian F; Anstrom, Kevin J; Kalogeropoulos, Andreas; Redfield, Margaret M; Konstam, Marvin A; Tang, W H Wilson; Felker, G Michael; Shah, Monica R; Braunwald, Eugene

    2016-09-01

    Although therapy with mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) is recommended for patients with chronic heart failure (HF) with reduced ejection fraction and in post-infarction HF, it has not been studied well in acute HF (AHF) despite being commonly used in this setting. At high doses, MRA therapy in AHF may relieve congestion through its natriuretic properties and mitigate the effects of adverse neurohormonal activation associated with intravenous loop diuretics. The ATHENA-HF (Aldosterone Targeted Neurohormonal Combined with Natriuresis Therapy in Heart Failure) trial is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the safety and efficacy of 100 mg/day spironolactone versus placebo (or continued low-dose spironolactone use in participants who are already receiving spironolactone at baseline) in 360 patients hospitalized for AHF. Patients are randomized within 24 h of receiving the first dose of intravenous diuretics. The primary objective is to determine if high-dose spironolactone, compared with standard care, will lead to greater reductions in N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels from randomization to 96 h. The secondary endpoints include changes in the clinical congestion score, dyspnea relief, urine output, weight change, loop diuretic dose, and in-hospital worsening HF. Index hospital length of stay and 30-day clinical outcomes will be assessed. Safety endpoints include risk of hyperkalemia and renal function. Differences among patients with reduced versus preserved ejection fraction will be determined. (Study of High-dose Spironolactone vs. Placebo Therapy in Acute Heart Failure [ATHENA-HF]; NCT02235077).

  1. Computed tomographic coronary angiography for patients with heart failure (CTA-HF): a randomized controlled trial (IMAGE HF Project 1-C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Benjamin J W; Green, Rachel E; Coyle, Doug; Laine, Mika; Hanninen, Helena; Leskinen, Hanna; Rajda, Miroslav; Larose, Eric; Hartikainen, Juha; Hedman, Marja; Mielniczuk, Lisa; O'Meara, Eileen; deKemp, Robert A; Klein, Ran; Paterson, Ian; White, James A; Yla-Herttuala, Seppo; Leber, Alex; Tandon, Vikas; Lee, Ting; Al-Hesayen, Abdul; Hessian, Renee; Dowsley, Taylor; Kass, Malek; Kelly, Cathy; Garrard, Linda; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Knuuti, Juhani; Beanlands, Rob S; Wells, George A

    2013-12-26

    The prevalence of heart failure (HF) is rising in industrialized and developing countries. Though invasive coronary angiography (ICA) remains the gold standard for anatomical assessment of coronary artery disease in HF patients, alternatives are being sought. Computed tomographic coronary angiography (CTA) has emerged as an accurate non-invasive diagnostic tool for coronary artery disease (CAD) and has been demonstrated to have prognostic value. Whether or not CTA can be used in HF patients is unknown. Acknowledging the aging population, the growing prevalence of HF and the increasing financial burden of healthcare, we need to identify non-invasive diagnostic tests that are available, safe, accurate and cost-effective. The proposed study aims to provide insight into the efficacy of CTA in HF patients. A multicenter randomized controlled trial will enroll 250 HF patients requiring coronary anatomical definition. Enrolled patients will be randomized to either CTA or ICA (n = 125 per group) as the first test to define coronary anatomy. The primary outcomes will be collected to determine downstream resource utilization. Secondary outcomes will include the composite clinical events and major adverse cardiac events. In addition, the accuracy of CTA for detecting coronary anatomy and obstruction will be assessed in patients who subsequently undergo both CTA and ICA. It is expected that CTA will be a more cost-effective strategy for diagnosis: yielding similar outcomes with fewer procedural risks and improved resource utilization. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01283659. Team grant #CIF 99470.

  2. Chronic vagal stimulation for the treatment of low ejection fraction heart failure : results of the NEural Cardiac TherApy foR Heart Failure (NECTAR-HF) randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zannad, Faiez; De Ferrari, Gaetano M; Tuinenburg, Anton E; Wright, David; Brugada, Josep; Butter, Christian; Klein, Helmut; Stolen, Craig; Meyer, Scott; Stein, Kenneth M; Ramuzat, Agnes; Schubert, Bernd; Daum, Doug; Neuzil, Petr; Botman, Cornelis; Castel, Maria Angeles; D'Onofrio, Antonio; Solomon, Scott D; Wold, Nicholas; Ruble, Stephen B

    2015-01-01

    AIM: The neural cardiac therapy for heart failure (NECTAR-HF) was a randomized sham-controlled trial designed to evaluate whether a single dose of vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) would attenuate cardiac remodelling, improve cardiac function and increase exercise capacity in symptomatic heart failure

  3. Copeptin in Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balling, Louise; Gustafsson, Finn

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is one of the most common causes of hospitalization and mortality in the modern Western world and an increasing proportion of the population will be affected by HF in the future. Although HF management has improved quality of life and prognosis, mortality remains very high...

  4. Development of a novel heart failure risk tool: the barcelona bio-heart failure risk calculator (BCN bio-HF calculator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Lupón

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A combination of clinical and routine laboratory data with biomarkers reflecting different pathophysiological pathways may help to refine risk stratification in heart failure (HF. A novel calculator (BCN Bio-HF calculator incorporating N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP, a marker of myocardial stretch, high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT, a marker of myocyte injury, and high-sensitivity soluble ST2 (ST2, (reflective of myocardial fibrosis and remodeling was developed. METHODS: Model performance was evaluated using discrimination, calibration, and reclassification tools for 1-, 2-, and 3-year mortality. Ten-fold cross-validation with 1000 bootstrapping was used. RESULTS: The BCN Bio-HF calculator was derived from 864 consecutive outpatients (72% men with mean age 68.2 ± 12 years (73%/27% New York Heart Association (NYHA class I-II/III-IV, LVEF 36%, ischemic etiology 52.2% and followed for a median of 3.4 years (305 deaths. After an initial evaluation of 23 variables, eight independent models were developed. The variables included in these models were age, sex, NYHA functional class, left ventricular ejection fraction, serum sodium, estimated glomerular filtration rate, hemoglobin, loop diuretic dose, β-blocker, Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor/Angiotensin-2 receptor blocker and statin treatments, and hs-cTnT, ST2, and NT-proBNP levels. The calculator may run with the availability of none, one, two, or the three biomarkers. The calculated risk of death was significantly changed by additive biomarker data. The average C-statistic in cross-validation analysis was 0.79. CONCLUSIONS: A new HF risk-calculator that incorporates available biomarkers reflecting different pathophysiological pathways better allowed individual prediction of death at 1, 2, and 3 years.

  5. The clinical course of health status and association with outcomes in patients hospitalized for heart failure : insights from ASCEND-HF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambrosy, Andrew P; Hernandez, Adrian F; Armstrong, Paul W; Butler, Javed; Dunning, Allison; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Felker, G Michael; Greene, Stephen J; Kaul, Padma; McMurray, John J; Metra, Marco; O'Connor, Christopher M; Reed, Shelby D; Schulte, Phillip J; Starling, Randall C; Wilson Tang, W H; Voors, Adriaan A; Mentz, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: A longitudinal and comprehensive analysis of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) was performed during hospitalization for heart failure (HF) or soon after discharge. METHODS AND RESULTS: A post-hoc analysis was performed of the ASCEND-HF trial. The EuroQOL five dimensions questionnaire (EQ-

  6. Design of the Reduction of Events with Darbepoetin alfa in Heart Failure (RED-HF) : a Phase III, anaemia correction, morbidity-mortality trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McMurray, John J. V.; Anand, Inder S.; Diaz, Rafael; Maggioni, Aldo P.; O'Connor, Christopher; Pfeffer, Marc A.; Polu, Krishna R.; Solomon, Scott D.; Sun, Yan; Swedberg, Karl; Tendera, Michal; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Wasserman, Scott M.; Young, James B.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with heart failure (HF) and anaemia have greater functional impairment, worse symptoms, increased rates of hospital admission, and a higher risk of death, compared with non-anaemic HF patients. Whether correcting anaemia can improve outcomes is unknown. The Reduction of Events with Darbepoe

  7. Adherence to optimal heart rate control in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction: insight from a survey of heart rate in heart failure in Sweden (HR-HF study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, M; Ahrenmark, U; Berglund, S; Lindholm, C J; Lehto, A; Broberg, A Månsson; Tasevska-Dinevska, G; Wikstrom, G; Ågard, A; Andersson, B

    2017-08-09

    Despite that heart rate (HR) control is one of the guideline-recommended treatment goals for heart failure (HF) patients, implementation has been painstakingly slow. Therefore, it would be important to identify patients who have not yet achieved their target heart rates and assess possible underlying reasons as to why the target rates are not met. The survey of HR in patients with HF in Sweden (HR-HF survey) is an investigator-initiated, prospective, multicenter, observational longitudinal study designed to investigate the state of the art in the control of HR in HF and to explore potential underlying mechanisms for suboptimal HR control with focus on awareness of and adherence to guidelines for HR control among physicians who focus on the contributing role of beta-blockers (BBs). In 734 HF patients the mean HR was 68 ± 12 beats per minute (bpm) (37.2% of the patients had a HR >70 bpm). Patients with HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) (n = 425) had the highest HR (70 ± 13 bpm, with 42% >70 bpm), followed by HF with preserved ejection fraction and HF with mid-range ejection fraction. Atrial fibrillation, irrespective of HF type, had higher HR than sinus rhythm. A similar pattern was observed with BB treatment. Moreover, non-achievement of the recommended target HR (bpm) in HFrEF and sinus rhythm was unrelated to age, sex, cardiovascular risk factors, cardiovascular diseases, and comorbidities, but was related to EF and the clinical decision of the physician. Approximately 50% of the physicians considered a HR of >70 bpm optimal and an equal number considered a HR of >70 bpm too high, but without recommending further action. Furthermore, suboptimal HR control cannot be attributed to the use of BBs because there was neither a difference in use of BBs nor an interaction with BBs for HR >70 bpm compared with HR bpm. Suboptimal control of HR was noted in HFrEF with sinus rhythm, which appeared to be attributable to physician decision making rather

  8. Rationale and methods of the multicenter randomised trial of a heart failure management programme among geriatric patients (HF-Geriatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casado Jose

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disease management programmes (DMPs have been shown to reduce hospital readmissions and mortality in adults with heart failure (HF, but their effectiveness in elderly patients or in those with major comorbidity is unknown. The Multicenter Randomised Trial of a Heart Failure Management Programme among Geriatric Patients (HF-Geriatrics assesses the effectiveness of a DMP in elderly patients with HF and major comorbidity. Methods/Design Clinical trial in 700 patients aged ≥ 75 years admitted with a primary diagnosis of HF in the acute care unit of eight geriatric services in Spain. Each patient should meet at least one of the following comorbidty criteria: Charlson index ≥ 3, dependence in ≥ 2 activities of daily living, treatment with ≥ 5 drugs, active treatment for ≥ 3 diseases, recent emergency hospitalization, severe visual or hearing loss, cognitive impairment, Parkinson's disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, anaemia, or constitutional syndrome. Half of the patients will be randomly assigned to a 1-year DMP led by a case manager and the other half to usual care. The DMP consists of an educational programme for patients and caregivers on the management of HF, COPD (knowledge of the disease, smoking cessation, immunizations, use of inhaled medication, recognition of exacerbations, diabetes (knowledge of the disease, symptoms of hyperglycaemia and hypoglycaemia, self-adjustment of insulin, foot care and depression (knowledge of the disease, diagnosis and treatment. It also includes close monitoring of the symptoms of decompensation and optimisation of treatment compliance. The main outcome variables are quality of life, hospital readmissions, and overall mortality during a 12-month follow-up. Discussion The physiological changes, lower life expectancy, comorbidity and low health literacy associated with aging may influence the effectiveness of DMPs in HF. The HF-Geriatrics study

  9. Treatment of atrial fibrillation with a dual defibrillator in heart failure patients (TRADE HF: protocol for a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grandinetti Giuseppe

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heart failure(HF and atrial fibrillation(AF frequently coexist in the same patient and are associated with increased mortality and frequent hospitalizations. As the concomitance of AF and HF is often associated with a poor prognosis, the prompt treatment of AF in HF patients may significantly improve outcome. Methods/design Recent implantable cardiac resynchronization (CRT devices allow electrical therapies to treat AF automatically. TRADE-HF (trial registration: NCT00345592; http://www.clinicaltrials.gov is a prospective, randomized, double arm study aimed at demonstrating the efficacy of an automatic, device-based therapy for treatment of atrial tachycardia and fibrillation(AT/AF in patients indicated for CRT. The study compares automatic electrical therapy to a traditional more usual treatment of AT/AF: the goal is to demonstrate a reduction in a combined endpoint of unplanned hospitalizations for cardiac reasons, death from cardiovascular causes or permanent AF when using automatic atrial therapy as compared to the traditional approach involving hospitalization for symptoms and in-hospital treatment of AT/AF. Discussion CRT pacemaker with the additional ability to convert AF as well as ventricular arrhythmias may play a simultaneous role in rhythm control and HF treatment. The value of the systematic implantation of CRT ICDs with the capacity to deliver atrial therapy in HF patients at risk of AF has not yet been explored. The TRADE-HF study will assess in CRT patients whether a strategy based on automatic management of atrial arrhythmias might be a valuable option to reduce the number of hospital admission and to reduce the progression the arrhythmia to a permanent form. Trial registration NCT00345592

  10. Iron deficiency and anaemia in heart failure: understanding the FAIR-HF trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Costello, José; Comín-Colet, Josep

    2010-11-01

    Treatment of anaemia in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction has traditionally focused on erythropoietin-stimulating agents. However, recent studies have shown that treatment with intravenous (IV) iron can improve the symptoms and quality of life in patients with CHF and iron deficiency (ID), with or without anaemia. The management of ID is becoming an important therapeutic target in patients with CHF, and in this article, we will review iron metabolism in the context of anaemia and heart failure. We will also focus on the importance of diagnosing and treating ID, preferably with IV iron preparations, in patients with CHF.

  11. Arrival by ambulance in acute heart failure: insights into the mode of presentation from Acute Studies of Nesiritide in Decompensated Heart Failure (ASCEND-HF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezekowitz, Justin A; Podder, Mohua; Hernandez, Adrian F; Armstrong, Paul W; Starling, Randall C; O'Connor, Christopher M; Califf, Robert M

    2016-03-17

    Limited data exist assessing the relationship between ambulance versus self-presentation and outcomes in patients with acute heart failure (AHF). Clinical trial sites in North America. 1068 patients enrolled in the Acute Studies of Nesiritide in Decompensated Heart Failure (ASCEND-HF) trial. The association between ambulance use and dyspnoea improvement, 30-day mortality or HF rehospitalisation and 180-day mortality. Of the 1068 patients in the substudy, 832 (78%) self-presented (SP) and 236 (22%) patients presented via ambulance. Patients presenting via ambulance were older, more likely to be female, have a higher ejection fraction but similar natriuretic peptide levels as patients who SP. Patients presenting by ambulance (compared with SP) trended towards more dyspnoea improvement at 6 (p=0.09) and 24 h (p=0.10). The co-primary end point (30-day mortality or HF rehospitalisation) was similar between groups (ambulance 12.2% vs SP 11.4%, p=0.74). Patients who presented by ambulance had a higher 30-day and 180-day mortality rate than those who SP (30-day: 4.3% vs 2.2%, p=0.08; 180-day: 15.1% vs 10.3%, p=0.04). After adjustment for baseline characteristics, patients arriving by ambulance (compared with SP) had a 2-fold high risk of 30-day mortality (OR 2.12, 95% CI 0.94 to 4.79), but no relationship to the composite of 30-day mortality/HF rehospitalisation (OR 1.01, 95% CI 0.63 to 1.63). Among patients with AHF, 30-day and 180-day mortality is 1.5-2 times higher for those with presenting via ambulance compared with patients who self-present. Understanding patient-related and system-related factors of ambulance use for patients with AHF is important. NCT00475852. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. Ergebnisse der SICA-HF-Studie (Studies Investigating Co-morbidities Aggravating Heart Failure)

    OpenAIRE

    Steinbeck, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle wasting affects about 20% of ambulatory patients with chronic heart failure and has serious implications for their activities of daily living. The assessment of muscle wasting is technically challenging. C-terminal agrin-fragment (CAF), a breakdown product of the synaptically located protein agrin, has shown early promise as biomarker for the detection of muscle wasting. We sought to investigate the diagnostic properties of CAF in the detection of muscle wasting among patients...

  13. Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart failure due to systolic dysfunction. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 26, 2014. Colucci WS. ... patient with heart failure or cardiomyopathy. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 26, 2014. Colucci WS. ...

  14. Heart failure etiology impacts survival of patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecini, Redi; Møller, Daniel Vega; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of heart failure (HF) etiology on prognosis of HF is not well known. METHODS: 3078 patients (median age 75years, 61% male) hospitalized with HF were studied. Patients were classified into six etiology groups: hypertension (HTN, 13.9%), ischemic heart disease (IHD, 42...

  15. Relief and Recurrence of Congestion During and After Hospitalization for Acute Heart Failure: Insights From Diuretic Optimization Strategy Evaluation in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure (DOSE-AHF) and Cardiorenal Rescue Study in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure (CARESS-HF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lala, Anuradha; McNulty, Steven E; Mentz, Robert J; Dunlay, Shannon M; Vader, Justin M; AbouEzzeddine, Omar F; DeVore, Adam D; Khazanie, Prateeti; Redfield, Margaret M; Goldsmith, Steven R; Bart, Bradley A; Anstrom, Kevin J; Felker, G Michael; Hernandez, Adrian F; Stevenson, Lynne W

    2015-07-01

    Congestion is the most frequent cause for hospitalization in acute decompensated heart failure. Although decongestion is a major goal of acute therapy, it is unclear how the clinical components of congestion (eg, peripheral edema, orthopnea) contribute to outcomes after discharge or how well decongestion is maintained. A post hoc analysis was performed of 496 patients enrolled in the Diuretic Optimization Strategy Evaluation in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure (DOSE-AHF) and Cardiorenal Rescue Study in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure (CARRESS-HF) trials during hospitalization with acute decompensated heart failure and clinical congestion. A simple orthodema congestion score was generated based on symptoms of orthopnea (≥2 pillows=2 points, <2 pillows=0 points) and peripheral edema (trace=0 points, moderate=1 point, severe=2 points) at baseline, discharge, and 60-day follow-up. Orthodema scores were classified as absent (score of 0), low-grade (score of 1-2), and high-grade (score of 3-4), and the association with death, rehospitalization, or unscheduled medical visits through 60 days was assessed. At baseline, 65% of patients had high-grade orthodema and 35% had low-grade orthodema. At discharge, 52% patients were free from orthodema at discharge (score=0) and these patients had lower 60-day rates of death, rehospitalization, or unscheduled visits (50%) compared with those with low-grade or high-grade orthodema (52% and 68%, respectively; P=0.038). Of the patients without orthodema at discharge, 27% relapsed to low-grade orthodema and 38% to high-grade orthodema at 60-day follow-up. Increased severity of congestion by a simple orthodema assessment is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Despite intent to relieve congestion, current therapy often fails to relieve orthodema during hospitalization or to prevent recurrence after discharge. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifiers: NCT00608491, NCT00577135. © 2015 American Heart

  16. Dementia-related adverse events in PARADIGM-HF and other trials in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Jane A; Shen, Li; Jhund, Pardeep S; Kristensen, Søren L; Køber, Lars; Chen, Fabian; Gong, Jianjian; Lefkowitz, Martin P; Rouleau, Jean L; Shi, Victor C; Swedberg, Karl; Zile, Michael R; Solomon, Scott D; Packer, Milton; McMurray, John J V

    2017-01-01

    Inhibition of neprilysin, an enzyme degrading natriuretic and other vasoactive peptides, is beneficial in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), as shown in PARADIGM-HF which compared the angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitor (ARNI) sacubitril/valsartan with enalapril. As neprilysin is also one of many enzymes clearing amyloid-β peptides from the brain, there is a theoretical concern about the long-term effects of sacubitril/valsartan on cognition. Therefore, we have examined dementia-related adverse effects (AEs) in PARADIGM-HF and placed these findings in the context of other recently conducted HFrEF trials. In PARADIGM-HF, patients with symptomatic HFrEF were randomized to sacubitril/valsartan 97/103 mg b.i.d. or enalapril 10 mg b.i.d. in a 1:1 ratio. We systematically searched AE reports, coded using the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA), using Standardized MedDRA Queries (SMQs) with 'broad' and 'narrow' preferred terms related to dementia. In PARADIGM-HF, 8399 patients aged 18-96 years were randomized and followed for a median of 2.25 years (up to 4.3 years). The narrow SMQ search identified 27 dementia-related AEs: 15 (0.36%) on enalapril and 12 (0.29%) on sacubitril/valsartan [hazard ratio (HR) 0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.33-1.59]. The broad search identified 97 (2.30%) and 104 (2.48%) AEs (HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.75-1.37), respectively. The rates of dementia-related AEs in both treatment groups in PARADIGM-HF were similar to those in three other recent trials in HFrEF. We found no evidence that sacubitril/valsartan, compared with enalapril, increased dementia-related AEs, although longer follow-up may be necessary to detect such a signal and more sensitive tools are needed to detect lesser degrees of cognitive impairment. Further studies to address this question are warranted. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Society of

  17. A randomized controlled pilot study of outcomes of strict allowance of fluid therapy in hyponatremic heart failure (SALT-HF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Nancy M; Nutter, Benjamin; Forney, Jennifer; Slifcak, Ellen; Tang, W H Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Currently, fluid restriction recommendations in heart failure (HF) are based on expert opinion. After implementing a 1,000-mL/d fluid restriction for 60 days after discharge, outcomes were examined. In a randomized controlled design, hyponatremic patients (serum sodium ≤137 mg/dL) received usual care (UC; n = 26) or 1,000 mL/d fluid restriction (n = 20) at discharge. Quality of life (QoL), thirst, difficulty following fluid recommendations, adherence to fluid restriction, HF emergency care, HF rehospitalization, and all-cause death were examined. Mean age was 62.8 ± 12.8 years; 46% were white. There were no differences by group in baseline demographics, comorbidities, and QoL, except that more UC patients had New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class III/IV status (P = .019). Median [interquartile range] QoL scores were better in the 1,000 mL/d group for symptom burden (83.3 [68.8-91.7] vs 50 [29.2-79.2]; P = .018), total symptoms (77.1 [58.1-91.7] vs 54.2 [30.2-73.9]; P = .022), overall QoL summary (72.6 [52.2-86.3] vs 51.0 [37.7-68.5]; P = .038), and clinical QoL summary (75.5 [57.8-92.9] vs 59.1 [35.7-77.3]; P = .039). There were no group differences in thirst, difficulty adhering to fluid recommendations, adherence to fluid restriction, or health care consumption. The 1,000 mL/d fluid restriction led to improved QoL at 60 days after discharge. Future research in a larger more heterogeneous sample is needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of Plasma Kynurenine Level on Functional Capacity and Outcome in Heart Failure - Results From Studies Investigating Co-morbidities Aggravating Heart Failure (SICA-HF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Masaaki; Ebner, Nicole; Springer, Jochen; Schefold, Joerg C; Doehner, Wolfram; Dschietzig, Thomas Bernd; Anker, Stefan D; von Haehling, Stephan

    2016-12-22

    Kynurenine is a circulating metabolite from the essential amino acid tryptophan. Accelerated degradation of kynurenine in skeletal muscle has been reported to provide an anti-inflammatory effect. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between blood kynurenine and muscle mass/function in patients with heart failure (HF), in whom diseased muscle mass/function plays a pathophysiological role.Methods and Results:Plasma kynurenine was assessed in 249 patients with HF (67±11 years, 21% women) and in 45 controls from the SICA-HF study. Kynurenine was higher in 173 HF patients with reduced ejection fraction (EF) and in 76 patients with preserved EF than controls (3.5±1.5, 3.4±1.3, and 2.4±1.1 μmol/L, P<0.001). In HF patients, kynurenine had an inverse association with handgrip strength (r=-0.26, P<0.01), peak oxygen consumption (r=-0.29, P<0.01), 6-min walk distance (r=-0.23, P<0.01), and had a positive association with kidney and liver function parameters. No correlation was observed between kynurenine and lean mass. On multivariable linear regression analysis, a significant association was noted between kynurenine and peak oxygen consumption even after adjustment for age, gender, BMI, and hemoglobin (β=-0.23, P<0.001). Patients with higher kynurenine were at higher risk of death (adjusted HR, 1.46 per 1 μmol/L, P<0.01). In stable HF patients, plasma kynurenine was inversely correlated with muscle strength and functional capacity as well as with liver and kidney function.

  19. Clinical benefits of eplerenone in patients with systolic heart failure and mild symptoms when initiated shortly after hospital discharge : analysis from the EMPHASIS-HF trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girerd, Nicolas; Collier, Tim; Pocock, Stuart; Krum, Henry; McMurray, John J.; Swedberg, Karl; Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Vincent, John; Pitt, Bertram; Zannad, Faiez

    2015-01-01

    Aims Cardiovascular hospitalization (CVH) in patients with heart failure (HF) is associated with a high post-discharge rate of early re-admission and CV death. Eplerenone might be effective in reducing the incidence of these adverse clinical outcomes during this period. Methods and results The EMPHA

  20. Sarcopenia and Endothelial Function in Patients With Chronic Heart Failure: Results From the Studies Investigating Comorbidities Aggravating Heart Failure (SICA-HF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Marcelo R; Saitoh, Masakazu; Ebner, Nicole; Valentova, Miroslava; Konishi, Masaaki; Ishida, Junichi; Emami, Amir; Springer, Jochen; Sandek, Anja; Doehner, Wolfram; Anker, Stefan D; von Haehling, Stephan

    2017-03-01

    Skeletal muscle wasting, also known as sarcopenia, has recently been identified as a serious comorbidity in patients with heart failure (HF). We aimed to assess the impact of sarcopenia on endothelial dysfunction in patients with HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Cross-sectional study. Ambulatory patients with HF were recruited at Charité Medical School, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin, Germany. We assessed peripheral blood flow (arm and leg) in 228 patients with HF and 32 controls who participated in the Studies Investigating Comorbidities Aggravating HF (SICA-HF). The appendicular skeletal muscle mass of the arms and the legs combined was assessed by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Sarcopenia was defined as the appendicular muscle mass two standard deviations below the mean of a healthy reference group of adults aged 18 to 40 years, as suggested for the diagnosis of muscle wasting in healthy aging. All patients underwent a 6-minute walk test and spiroergometry testing. Forearm and leg blood flow were measured by venous occlusion plethysmography. Peak blood flow was assessed after a period of ischemia in the limbs to test endothelial function. Sarcopenia was identified in 37 patients (19.5%). Patients with sarcopenia presented with lower baseline forearm blood flow (2.30 ± 1.21 vs. 3.06 ± 1.49 vs. 4.00 ± 1.66 mL min(-1) 100 mL(-1); P = .02) than those without sarcopenia or controls. The group of patients with sarcopenia showed similar baseline leg blood flow (2.06 ± 1.62 vs. 2.39 ± 1.39 mL min(-1) 100 mL(-1); P = .11) to those without but lower values when compared to controls (2.06 ± 1.62 vs. 2.99 ± 1.28 mL min(-1) 100 mL(-1); P = .03). In addition, patients with and without sarcopenia presented with lower peak flow in the forearm when compared to controls (18.37 ± 7.07 vs. 22.19 ± 8.64 vs. 33.63 ± 8.57 mL min(-1) 100 mL(-1); P < .001). A similar result was

  1. Screening for heart transplantation and left ventricular assist system: results from the ScrEEning for advanced Heart Failure treatment (SEE-HF) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Lars H; Trochu, Jean-Noel; Meyns, Bart; Caliskan, Kadir; Shaw, Steven; Schmitto, Jan D; Schibilsky, David; Damme, Laura; Heatley, Jerry; Gustafsson, Finn

    2017-09-27

    Heart transplantation (HTx) and implantable left ventricular assist systems (LVAS) improve outcomes in advanced heart failure but may be underutilized. We hypothesized that screening can identify appropriate candidates. The ScrEEning for advanced Heart Failure treatment (SEE-HF) study was a multicentre prospective study screening patients with existing cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) and/or implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) for ejection fraction ≤40% and New York Heart Association (NYHA) class III-IV, and subsequently for guideline-based HTx and LVAS indication. Of 1722 (mean age 64 ± 14 years, 26% women) patients screened at eight centres in seven European countries, 121 (7.0%) were eligible and 99 (5.7%; mean age 61 ± 10 years, 19% women) patients were enrolled for detailed assessment. Twenty-six of the 99 enrolled patients (26%) were eligible for either HTx or LVAD (18 eligible for HTx; 7 eligible for LVAD; and 1 eligible for both). Eleven patients were listed for HTx and three received an LVAS. Eligible patients were 61 ± 8 years and 19% women, whereas those actually receiving intervention were 56 ± 8 years and 8% women. Among patients with CRT and/or ICD, a minority have NYHA class III-IV heart failure and ejection fraction ≤40%. Among these, however, more than one-quarter have an unrecognized need for HTx or LVAS. When patients are offered intervention based on screening, many decline. Discrepancies exist between clinical and patient equipoise. Clinical Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Unique Identifier: NCT00894387. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2017 European Society of Cardiology.

  2. Detection heart failures (HF) biomarkers by proton transfer reaction - mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltaeva, Y. R.; Vasilev, V. K.; Yakovlev, D. Y.; Kopylov, F. Iu; Syrkin, A. L.; Chomakhidze, P. Sh; Bykova, A. A.; Malinovskaya, L. K.; Skorokhod, A. I.

    2016-10-01

    Exhaled breath contains 1% of volatile organic compounds. The concentration of individual biomarkers in hundreds of volatile organic compounds lies within the range ppm- ppb. In compare with control group the concentrations of acetone, acetic acid, ethanol, propylene biomarkers is significantly higher in HF-PEF group.

  3. Levosimendan beyond inotropy and acute heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farmakis, Dimitrios; Alvarez, Julian; Gal, Tuvia Ben

    2016-01-01

    Levosimendan is a positive inotrope with vasodilating properties (inodilator) indicated for decompensated heart failure (HF) patients with low cardiac output. Accumulated evidence supports several pleiotropic effects of levosimendan beyond inotropy, the heart and decompensated HF. Those effects a...

  4. Baseline characteristics and treatment of patients in prospective comparison of ARNI with ACEI to determine impact on global mortality and morbidity in heart failure trial (PARADIGM-HF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurray, John J V; Packer, Milton; Desai, Akshay S; Gong, Jianjian; Lefkowitz, Martin; Rizkala, Adel R; Rouleau, Jean L; Shi, Victor C; Solomon, Scott D; Swedberg, Karl; Zile, Michael R

    2014-07-01

    To describe the baseline characteristics and treatment of the patients randomized in the PARADIGM-HF (Prospective comparison of ARNi with ACEi to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and morbidity in Heart Failure) trial, testing the hypothesis that the strategy of simultaneously blocking the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and augmenting natriuretic peptides with LCZ696 200 mg b.i.d. is superior to enalapril 10 mg b.i.d. in reducing mortality and morbidity in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction. Key demographic, clinical and laboratory findings, along with baseline treatment, are reported and compared with those of patients in the treatment arm of the Studies Of Left Ventricular Dysfunction (SOLVD-T) and more contemporary drug and device trials in heart failure and reduced ejection fraction. The mean age of the 8442 patients in PARADIGM-HF is 64 (SD 11) years and 78% are male, which is similar to SOLVD-T and more recent trials. Despite extensive background therapy with beta-blockers (93% patients) and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (60%), patients in PARADIGM-HF have persisting symptoms and signs, reduced health related quality of life, a low LVEF (mean 29 ± SD 6%) and elevated N-terminal-proB type-natriuretic peptide levels (median 1608 inter-quartile range 886-3221 pg/mL). PARADIGM-HF will determine whether LCZ696 is more beneficial than enalapril when added to other disease-modifying therapies and if further augmentation of endogenous natriuretic peptides will reduce morbidity and mortality in heart failure and reduced ejection fraction. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Society of Cardiology.

  5. Exercise Intolerance in Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brassard, Patrice; Gustafsson, Finn

    2016-01-01

    Exercise tolerance is affected in patients with heart failure (HF). Although the inability of the heart to pump blood to the working muscle has been the conventional mechanism proposed to explain the lowered capacity of patients with HF to exercise, evidence suggests that the pathophysiological m...

  6. Impact of dopamine infusion on renal function in hospitalized heart failure patients: results of the Dopamine in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure (DAD-HF) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giamouzis, Gregory; Butler, Javed; Starling, Randall C; Karayannis, George; Nastas, John; Parisis, Charalambos; Rovithis, Dimitrios; Economou, Dimitrios; Savvatis, Konstantinos; Kirlidis, Themistoklis; Tsaknakis, Themistoklis; Skoularigis, John; Westermann, Dirk; Tschöpe, Carsten; Triposkiadis, Filippos

    2010-12-01

    Worsening renal function (WRF) and hypokalemia related to diuretic use for acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) are common and associated with poor prognosis. Low-dose dopamine infusion improves renal perfusion; its effect on diuresis or renal function specifically in ADHF is not known. Sixty consecutive ADHF patients (age 75.7 ± 11.2 years; 51.7% female; left ventricular ejection fraction 35.3 ± 12.1%) were randomized, after receiving a 40 mg intravenous furosemide bolus, to either high-dose furosemide (HDF, 20 mg/h continuous infusion for 8 hours) or low-dose furosemide combined with low-dose dopamine (LDFD, furosemide 5 mg/h plus dopamine 5 μg kg(-1) min(-1) continuous infusion for 8 hours). Both strategies were compared for total diuresis, WRF (defined as a rise in serum creatinine of >0.3 mg/dL from baseline to 24 hours), electrolyte balance, and 60-day postdischarge outcomes. Mean hourly excreted urine volume (272 ± 149 mL in HDF vs 278 ± 186 mL in LDFD group; P = .965) and changes in dyspnea score (Borg index: -4.4 ± 2.1 in HDF group vs -4.7 ± 2.0 in LDFD group; P = .575) during the 8 hours of protocol treatment were similar in the two groups. WRF was more frequent in the HDF (n = 9; 30%) than in the LDFD group (n = 2; 6.7%; P = .042). Serum potassium changed from 4.3 ± 0.5 to 3.9 ± 0.4 mEq/L at 24 hours (P = .003) in the HDF group and from 4.4 ± 0.5 to 4.2 ± 0.5 mEq/L at 24 hours (P = .07) in the LDFD group. Length of stay and 60-day mortality or rehospitalization rates (all-cause, cardiovascular, and worsening HF) were similar in the two groups. In ADHF patients, the combination of low-dose furosemide and low-dose dopamine is equally effective as high-dose furosemide but associated with improved renal function profile and potassium homeostasis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008275 Relationship of calcineure in mRNA level in peripheral blood and cardiac muscle of patients with heart failure.WANG Mengmeng(王萌萌),et al.Dept Cardiol,Shandong Prov Hosp,Shandong Univ,Jinan 250021.Chin Cir J 2008;23(2):113-116.Objective To study the relationship of calcineurin mRNA level between peripheral lymphocytes and cardiac muscles of patients with chronic heart failure.Methods

  8. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008037 Factors associated with efficacy of cardiac resynchronization therapy for patients with congestive heart failure. SHI Haoying(史浩颖), et al. Dept Cardiol, Zhongshan Hosp Fudan Univ, Shanghai 200032. Chin J Cardiol 2007;35(12):1099-1163. Objective The efficacy of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in patients with congestive heart failure and the potential factors associated with responder or nonresponder were investigated. Methods Fifty

  9. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    970284 Effects of enalapril on heart rate variabilityin patients with congestive heart failure. ZHANGYouhua(章友华), et a1. Dept Cardiol, Cardiovasc Instit& Fuwai Hosp, CAMS & PUMC, Beijing, 100037. ChinCir J 1996; 11(2): 729-732.

  10. A comparative analysis of the results from 4 trials of beta-blocker therapy for heart failure: BEST, CIBIS-II, MERIT-HF, and COPERNICUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanski, Michael J; Krause-Steinrauf, Heidi; Massie, Barry M; Deedwania, Prakash; Follmann, Dean; Kovar, David; Murray, David; Oren, Ron; Rosenberg, Yves; Young, James; Zile, Michael; Eichhorn, Eric

    2003-10-01

    Recent large randomized, controlled trials (BEST [Beta-blocker Evaluation of Survival Trial], CIBIS-II [Cardiac Insufficiency Bisoprolol Trial II], COPERNICUS [Carvedilol Prospective Randomized Cumulative Survival Study], and MERIT-HF [Metoprolol Randomized Intervention Trial in Congestive Heart Failure]) have addressed the usefulness of beta-blockade in the treatment of advanced heart failure. CIBIS-II, COPERNICUS, and MERIT-HF have shown that beta-blocker treatment with bisoprolol, carvedilol, and metoprolol XL, respectively, reduce mortality in advanced heart failure patients, whereas BEST found a statistically nonsignificant trend toward reduced mortality with bucindolol. We conducted a post hoc analysis to determine whether the response to beta-blockade in BEST could be related to differences in the clinical and demographic characteristics of the study populations. We generated a sample from BEST to resemble the patient cohorts studied in CIBIS-II and MERIT-HF to find out whether the response to beta-blocker therapy was similar to that reported in the other trials. These findings are further compared with COPERNICUS, which entered patients with more severe heart failure. To achieve conformity with the entry criteria for CIBIS-II and MERIT-HF, the BEST study population was adjusted to exclude patients with systolic blood pressure 80 years (exclusion criteria employed in those trials). The BEST comparison subgroup (BCG) was further modified to more closely reflect the racial demographics reported for patients enrolled in CIBIS-II and MERIT-HF. The association of beta-blocker therapy with overall survival and survival free of cardiac death, sudden cardiac death, and progressive pump failure in the BCG was assessed. In the BCG subgroup, bucindolol treatment was associated with significantly lower risk of death from all causes (hazard ratio (HR)=0.77 [95% CI=0.65, 0.92]), cardiovascular death (HR=0.71 [0.58, 0.86]), sudden death (HR=0.77 [0.59, 0.999]), and pump

  11. Decongestion in acute heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mentz, Robert J.; Kjeldsen, Keld; Rossi, Gian Paolo; Voors, Adriaan A.; Cleland, John G. F.; Anker, Stefan D.; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Fiuzat, Mona; Rossignol, Patrick; Zannad, Faiez; Pitt, Bertram; O'Connor, Christopher; Felker, G. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Congestion is a major reason for hospitalization in acute heart failure (HF). Therapeutic strategies to manage congestion include diuretics, vasodilators, ultrafiltration, vasopressin antagonists, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists, and potentially also novel therapies such as gut sequesterants

  12. Investigating a TELEmedicine solution to improve MEDication adherence in chronic Heart Failure (TELEMED-HF: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widdershoven Jos

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frequent rehospitalisations and poorer survival chances in heart failure (HF patients may partly be explained by poor medication adherence. There are multiple medication-related reasons for suboptimal adherence, but psychological reasons may also be important. A novel TELEmonitoring device may improve MEDication adherence in HF patients (TELEMED-HF. TELEMED-HF is a randomized, controlled clinical intervention trial designed to examine (1 the efficacy and cost-efficiency of an electronic medication adherence support system in improving and monitoring HF patients' medication adherence; (2 the effect of medication adherence on hospitalizations and health care consumption; as well as on (3 clinical characteristics, and Quality of Life (QoL; and (4 clinical, sociodemographic, and psychological determinants of medication adherence. Methods/Design Consecutive patients with chronic, systolic HF presenting to the outpatient clinic of the TweeSteden Hospital, The Netherlands, will be approached for study participation and randomly assigned (1:1 following blocked randomization procedures to the intervention (n = 200 or usual care arm (n = 200. Patients in the intervention arm use the medication support device for six months in addition to usual care. Post-intervention, patients return to usual care only and all patients participate in four follow-up occasions over 12 months. Primary endpoints comprise objective and subjective medication adherence, healthcare consumption, number of hospitalizations, and cost-effectiveness. Secondary endpoints include disease severity, physical functioning, and QoL. Discussion The TELEMED-HF study will provide us a comprehensive understanding of medication adherence in HF patients, and will show whether telemonitoring is effective and cost-efficient in improving adherence and preventing hospitalization in HF patients. Trial registration number NCT01347528.

  13. Understand Your Risk for Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Causes and Risks for Heart Failure Updated:Feb 1,2017 Who Develops Heart Failure ( ... HF. This content was last reviewed April 2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  14. Epigenetics in heart failure phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Berezin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic heart failure (HF is a leading clinical and public problem posing a higher risk of morbidity and mortality in different populations. HF appears to be in both phenotypic forms: HF with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (HFrEF and HF with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HFpEF. Although both HF phenotypes can be distinguished through clinical features, co-morbidity status, prediction score, and treatment, the clinical outcomes in patients with HFrEF and HFpEF are similar. In this context, investigation of various molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to the development and progression of both HF phenotypes is very important. There is emerging evidence that epigenetic regulation may have a clue in the pathogenesis of HF. This review represents current available evidence regarding the implication of epigenetic modifications in the development of different HF phenotypes and perspectives of epigenetic-based therapies of HF.

  15. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    2009170 Curcumin attenuates left ventricular dysfunction and remodeling in rabbits with chronic heart failure. TANG Yanhong(唐艳红),et al.Dept Cardiol,Renmin Hosp,Wuhan Univ,Wuhan 430060.Chin J Cardiol,2009;37(3):262-267.

  16. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008411 Expression of S100B during heart failure in rats. JIANG Zhenni(蒋珍妮), et al. Dept Cardiol, 2nd Affili Hosp, Zhejiang Univ, Coll Med Hangzhou 310009. Chin J Emerg Med 2008;17(5):475-478. Objective To evaluate the value of S100B gene on cardiovascular remodeling in rats with abdominal aorta coarctation.

  17. Clinical Characteristics, Response to Exercise Training and Outcomes in Heart Failure Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Findings from HF-ACTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentz, Robert J.; Schulte, Phillip J.; Fleg, Jerome L.; Fiuzat, Mona; Kraus, William E.; Piña, Ileana L.; Keteyian, Steven J.; Kitzman, Dalane W.; Whellan, David J.; Ellis, Stephen J.; O’Connor, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate the clinical characteristics, exercise training response, beta-blocker selectivity and outcomes in heart failure (HF) patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods We performed an analysis of HF-ACTION, which randomized 2,331 HF patients with ejection fraction ≤35% to usual care with or without aerobic exercise training. We examined clinical characteristics and outcomes [mortality/hospitalization, mortality, cardiovascular (CV) mortality/CV hospitalization, and CV mortality/HF hospitalization] by physician-reported COPD status using adjusted Cox models and explored an interaction with exercise training. The interaction between beta-blocker cardioselectivity and outcomes was investigated. Results Of patients with COPD status documented (N=2311), 11% (N=249) had COPD. COPD patients were older, had more comorbidities, and lower use of beta-blockers compared to those without COPD. At baseline, COPD patients had lower peak VO2 and higher VE/VCO2 slope. During a median follow-up of 2.5 years, COPD was associated with increased mortality/hospitalization, mortality, and CV mortality/HF hospitalization. After multivariable adjustment, the risk of CV mortality/HF hospitalization remained increased (Hazard Ratio [HR] 1.46, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.14–1.87), while mortality/hospitalization (HR 1.15, 95% CI: 0.96–1.37) and mortality (HR 1.33, 95% CI: 0.99–1.76) were not significantly increased. There was no interaction between COPD and exercise training on outcomes or between COPD and beta-blocker selectivity on mortality/hospitalization (all P>0.1). Conclusions COPD in HF patients was associated with older age, more comorbidities, reduced exercise capacity, and increased CV mortality/HF hospitalization, but not a differential response to exercise training. Beta-blocker selectivity was not associated with differences in outcome for patients with versus without COPD. PMID:23351822

  18. Safety and Efficacy of Eplerenone in Patients at High Risk for Hyperkalemia and/or Worsening Renal Function Analyses of the EMPHASIS-HF Study Subgroups (Eplerenone in Mild Patients Hospitalization And SurvIval Study in Heart Failure)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eschalier, Romain; McMurray, John J. V.; Swedberg, Karl; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Krum, Henry; Pocock, Stuart J.; Shi, Harry; Vincent, John; Rossignol, Patrick; Zannad, Faiez; Pitt, Bertram

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The study sought to investigate the safety and efficacy of eplerenone in patients at high risk for hyperkalemia or worsening renal function (WRF) in EMPHASIS-HF, a trial that enrolled patients at least 55 years old with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HF-REF), in New York Hea

  19. The Danish Heart Failure Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjødt, Inge; Nakano, Anne; Egstrup, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the Danish Heart Failure Registry (DHFR) is to monitor and improve the care of patients with incident heart failure (HF) in Denmark. STUDY POPULATION: The DHFR includes inpatients and outpatients (≥18 years) with incident HF. Reporting to the DHFR is mandatory...... in an annual report. All standards for the quality indicators have been met at a national level since 2014. Indicators for treatment status 1 year after diagnosis are under consideration (now prevalent HF). CONCLUSION: The DHFR is a valuable tool for continuous improvement of quality of care in patients...

  20. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    2005186 The diagnostic application of bedside measurement of plasma brain natriuretic in patients with heart failure. SHAO Le-wen (邵乐文) , Advanced Ward Dept, 1st Hosp, Med Sch, Zhejiang Univ, Hangzhou 310003. Chin J Intern Med, 2005;44(2): 99-101. Objective: To investigate differential diagnosis value of ultra-rapid bedside measurement of brain na-triuretic peptide (BNP) in patients with dyspnea.

  1. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    2010316 Tissue doppler imaging observation on effect of long-term use of gingko biloba tabtet on left ventricular function in patients with chronic heart failure. ZHANG Hui(张辉),et al. Dept Cardiovasc Med, 2nd Hosp, Hebei Med Univ,Shijiazhuang 050000. Chin J Integr Tradit & West Med 2010;30(5):478-481. Objective To quantitatively observe the effect of long-term

  2. About Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... talk about your health and the medicines About Heart Failure Heart failure is a disease where the heart cannot do ... very important for your health. common causes of heart failure are diseases or conditions that damage the heart. ...

  3. What Is Heart Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Heart Failure? Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can' ... force. Some people have both problems. The term "heart failure" doesn't mean that your heart has stopped ...

  4. The prognostic value of arterial blood gas analysis in high-risk acute heart failure patients: an analysis of the Korean Heart Failure (KorHF) registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Joo; Choi, Dong-Ju; Yoon, Chang-Hwan; Oh, Il-Young; Lee, Ju Hyun; Ahn, Soyeon; Yoo, Byung-Su; Kang, Seok-Min; Kim, Jae-Joong; Baek, Sang-Hong; Cho, Myeong-Chan; Jeon, Eun-Seok; Chae, Shung Chull; Ryu, Kyu-Hyung; Oh, Byung-Hee

    2015-06-01

    In acute heart failure (AHF) patients, pulmonary oedema and low tissue perfusion may lead to changes in the acid-base balance, which may be associated with worse outcomes. In this prospective nationwide cohort study from 24 academic hospitals, arterial blood gas (ABG) was measured in 1982 AHF patients at hospital admission. Acidosis was defined as pH 7.44. Mortality was stratified according to ABG results. Overall, 19% had acidosis, 37% had normal pH, and 44% had alkalosis. The most common type of acidosis was the mixed type (42%) followed by metabolic acidosis (40%), and the most common type of alkalosis was respiratory alkalosis (58%). At 12 months' follow-up 304 patients (15%) died. Patients with acidosis had higher mortality (acidosis 19.5%, neutral pH 13.7%, alkalosis 14.9%; P = 0.007). In the Cox proportional-hazards regression model, acidosis was a significant predictor of mortality (hazard ratio 1.93; 95% confidence intervals 1.27-2.93) along with N-terminal pro-brain type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), among others. In contrast, alkalosis was not associated with increased mortality. pH had an incremental prognostic value over NT-proBNP (net reclassification improvement 30%; P analysis identified extra patients at increased risk for mortality among patients with an NT-proBNP level less than the median (12-month mortality 17.5% vs. 9.9%; P = 0.009). In high-risk AHF patients, the most common acid-base imbalance is respiratory alkalosis. Acidosis is observed in every fifth patient and is a significant predictor of mortality. pH provides an additional prognostic value and may be used to optimize risk stratification in high-risk AHF patients. © 2015 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2015 European Society of Cardiology.

  5. An investigation of CYP2D6 genotype and response to metoprolol CR/XL during dose titration in patients with heart failure: a MERIT-HF substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batty, J A; Hall, A S; White, H L; Wikstrand, J; de Boer, R A; van Veldhuisen, D J; van der Harst, P; Waagstein, F; Hjalmarson, Å; Kjekshus, J; Balmforth, A J

    2014-03-01

    To explore the pharmacogenetic effects of the cytochrome P450 (CYP)2D6 genotype in patients with systolic heart failure treated using controlled/extended-release (CR/XL) metoprolol, this study assessed the CYP2D6 locus for the nonfunctional *4 allele (1846G>A; rs3892097) in the Metoprolol CR/XL Randomised Intervention Trial in Congestive Heart Failure (MERIT-HF; n = 605). Participants were characterized as extensive, intermediate, or poor metabolizers (EMs, IMs, or PMs, respectively), based on the presence of the CYP2D6*4 allele (EM: *1*1, 60.4%; IM: *1*4, 35.8%; and PM: *4*4, 3.8%). Plasma metoprolol concentrations were 2.1-/4.6-fold greater in the IM/PM groups as compared with the EM group (P Metoprolol induced significantly lower heart rates and diastolic blood pressures during early titration, indicating a CYP2D6*4 allele dose-response effect (P metoprolol pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics during early titration; however, the MERIT-HF-defined titration schedule remains recommended for all patients, regardless of genotype.

  6. Comparative effectiveness of different forms of telemedicine for individuals with heart failure (HF: a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Kotb

    Full Text Available Previous studies on telemedicine have either focused on its role in the management of chronic diseases in general or examined its effectiveness in comparison to standard post-discharge care. Little has been done to determine the comparative impact of different telemedicine options for a specific population such as individuals with heart failure (HF.Systematic reviews (SR of randomized controlled trials (RCTs that examined telephone support, telemonitoring, video monitoring or electrocardiographic monitoring for HF patients were identified using a comprehensive search of the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and The Cochrane Library. Studies were included if they reported the primary outcome of mortality or any of the following secondary outcomes: all-cause hospitalization and heart failure hospitalization. Thirty RCTs (N = 10,193 patients were included. Compared to usual care, structured telephone support was found to reduce the odds of mortality(Odds Ratio 0.80; 95% Credible Intervals [0.66 to 0.96] and hospitalizations due to heart failure (0.69; [0.56 to 0.85]. Telemonitoring was also found to reduce the odds of mortality(0.53; [0.36 to 0.80] and reduce hospitalizations related to heart failure (0.64; [0.39 to 0.95] compared to usual post-discharge care. Interventions that involved ECG monitoring also reduced the odds of hospitalization due to heart failure (0.71; [0.52 to 0.98].Much of the evidence currently available has focused on the comparing either telephone support or telemonitoring with usual care. This has therefore limited our current understanding of how some of the less common forms of telemedicine compare to one another.Compared to usual care, structured telephone support and telemonitoring significantly reduced the odds of deaths and hospitalization due to heart failure. Despite being the most widely studied forms of telemedicine, little has been done to directly compare these two interventions against one another

  7. Heart failure - home monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... failure - discharge Heart failure - fluids and diuretics Heart failure - what to ask ... Medical Center, University of Washington Medical School, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, ...

  8. Heart Failure in Zambia: Evidence for Improving Clinical Practice.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    Heart failure (HF) is a common condition in Zambian hospitals, causing ... predisposition to cardiomyopathy, higher prevalence of ... Anaemia and iron deficiency in HF. The role ... cardiovascular and renal systems are well demonstrated in HF.

  9. Prognostic Impact of Diabetes and Prediabetes on Survival Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Heart Failure: A Post-Hoc Analysis of the GISSI-HF (Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Sopravvivenza nella Insufficienza Cardiaca-Heart Failure) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauriz, Marco; Targher, Giovanni; Temporelli, Pier Luigi; Lucci, Donata; Gonzini, Lucio; Nicolosi, Gian Luigi; Marchioli, Roberto; Tognoni, Gianni; Latini, Roberto; Cosmi, Franco; Tavazzi, Luigi; Maggioni, Aldo Pietro

    2017-07-05

    The independent prognostic impact of diabetes mellitus (DM) and prediabetes mellitus (pre-DM) on survival outcomes in patients with chronic heart failure has been investigated in observational registries and randomized, clinical trials, but the results have been often inconclusive or conflicting. We examined the independent prognostic impact of DM and pre-DM on survival outcomes in the GISSI-HF (Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Sopravvivenza nella Insufficienza Cardiaca-Heart Failure) trial. We assessed the risk of all-cause death and the composite of all-cause death or cardiovascular hospitalization over a median follow-up period of 3.9 years among the 6935 chronic heart failure participants of the GISSI-HF trial, who were stratified by presence of DM (n=2852), pre-DM (n=2013), and non-DM (n=2070) at baseline. Compared with non-DM patients, those with DM had remarkably higher incidence rates of all-cause death (34.5% versus 24.6%) and the composite end point (63.6% versus 54.7%). Conversely, both event rates were similar between non-DM patients and those with pre-DM. Cox regression analysis showed that DM, but not pre-DM, was associated with an increased risk of all-cause death (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.28-1.60) and of the composite end point (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.13-1.32), independently of established risk factors. In the DM subgroup, higher hemoglobin A1c was also independently associated with increased risk of both study outcomes (all-cause death: adjusted hazard ratio, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.02-1.43; and composite end point: adjusted hazard ratio, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.01-1.29, respectively). Presence of DM was independently associated with poor long-term survival outcomes in patients with chronic heart failure. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00336336. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  10. Model for heart failure education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldonado, Analiza; Dutra, Danette; Abriam-Yago, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is the heart's inability to meet the body's need for blood and oxygen. According to the American Heart Association 2013 update, approximately 5.1 million people are diagnosed with HF in the United States in 2006. Heart failure is the most common diagnosis for hospitalization. In the United States, the HF direct and indirect costs are estimated to be US $39.2 billion in 2010. To address this issue, nursing educators designed innovative teaching frameworks on HF management both in academia and in clinical settings. The model was based on 2 resources: the American Association of Heart Failure Nurses (2012) national nursing certification and the award-winning Pierce County Responsive Care Coordination Program. The HF educational program is divided into 4 modules. The initial modules offer foundational levels of Bloom's Taxonomy then progress to incorporate higher-levels of learning when modules 3 and 4 are reached. The applicability of the key components within each module allows formatting to enhance learning in all areas of nursing, from the emergency department to intensive care units to the medical-surgical step-down units. Also applicable would be to provide specific aspects of the modules to nurses who care for HF patients in skilled nursing facility, rehabilitation centers, and in the home-health care setting.

  11. Classes of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Classes of Heart Failure Updated:Sep 28,2016 Doctors usually classify patients' ... Blood Pressure Tracker Find additional helpful resources here Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure Introduction Types of Heart ...

  12. Predicting Heart Failure With Preserved and Reduced Ejection Fraction : The International Collaboration on Heart Failure Subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, Jennifer E; Enserro, Danielle; Brouwers, Frank P; Kizer, Jorge R; Shah, Sanjiv J; Psaty, Bruce M; Bartz, Traci M; Santhanakrishnan, Rajalakshmi; Lee, Douglas S; Chan, Cheeling; Liu, Kiang; Blaha, Michael J; Hillege, Hans L; van der Harst, Pim; van Gilst, Wiek H; Kop, Willem J; Gansevoort, Ron T; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Gardin, Julius M; Levy, Daniel; Gottdiener, John S; de Boer, Rudolf A; Larson, Martin G

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heart failure (HF) is a prevalent and deadly disease, and preventive strategies focused on at-risk individuals are needed. Current HF prediction models have not examined HF subtypes. We sought to develop and validate risk prediction models for HF with preserved and reduced ejection fract

  13. Predicting Heart Failure With Preserved and Reduced Ejection Fraction : The International Collaboration on Heart Failure Subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, Jennifer E.; Enserro, Danielle; Brouwers, Frank P.; Kizer, Jorge R.; Shah, Sanjiv J.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Bartz, Traci M.; Santhanakrishnan, Rajalakshmi; Lee, Douglas S.; Chan, Cheeling; Liu, Kiang; Blaha, Michael J.; Hillege, Hans L.; van der Harst, Pim; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Kop, Willem J.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Gardin, Julius M.; Levy, Daniel; Gottdiener, John S.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Larson, Martin G.

    2016-01-01

    Background-Heart failure (HF) is a prevalent and deadly disease, and preventive strategies focused on at-risk individuals are needed. Current HF prediction models have not examined HF subtypes. We sought to develop and validate risk prediction models for HF with preserved and reduced ejection fracti

  14. Detection of muscle wasting in patients with chronic heart failure using C-terminal agrin fragment: results from the Studies Investigating Co-morbidities Aggravating Heart Failure (SICA-HF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeck, Lisa; Ebner, Nicole; Valentova, Miroslava; Bekfani, Tarek; Elsner, Sebastian; Dahinden, Pius; Hettwer, Stefan; Scherbakov, Nadja; Schefold, Jörg C; Sandek, Anja; Springer, Jochen; Doehner, Wolfram; Anker, Stefan D; von Haehling, Stephan

    2015-12-01

    Skeletal muscle wasting affects 20% of patients with chronic heart failure and has serious implications for their activities of daily living. Assessment of muscle wasting is technically challenging. C-terminal agrin-fragment (CAF), a breakdown product of the synaptically located protein agrin, has shown early promise as biomarker of muscle wasting. We sought to investigate the diagnostic properties of CAF in muscle wasting among patients with heart failure. We assessed serum CAF levels in 196 patients who participated in the Studies Investigating Co-morbidities Aggravating Heart Failure (SICA-HF). Muscle wasting was identified using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) in 38 patients (19.4%). Patients with muscle wasting demonstrated higher CAF values than those without (125.1 ± 59.5 pmol/L vs. 103.8 ± 42.9 pmol/L, P = 0.01). Using receiver operating characteristics (ROC), we calculated the optimal CAF value to identify patients with muscle wasting as >87.5 pmol/L, which had a sensitivity of 78.9% and a specificity of 43.7%. The area under the ROC curve was 0.63 (95% confidence interval 0.56-0.70). Using simple regression, we found that serum CAF was associated with handgrip (R = - 0.17, P = 0.03) and quadriceps strength (R = - 0.31, P < 0.0001), peak oxygen consumption (R = - 0.5, P < 0.0001), 6-min walk distance (R = - 0.32, P < 0.0001), and gait speed (R = - 0.2, P = 0.001), as well as with parameters of kidney and liver function, iron metabolism and storage. CAF shows good sensitivity for the detection of skeletal muscle wasting in patients with heart failure. Its assessment may be useful to identify patients who should undergo additional testing, such as detailed body composition analysis. As no other biomarker is currently available, further investigation is warranted. © 2015 The Authors European Journal of Heart Failure © 2015 European Society of Cardiology.

  15. Living with Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Heart Failure Currently, heart failure has no cure. You'll ... avoid harmful side effects. Take Steps To Prevent Heart Failure From Getting Worse Certain actions can worsen your ...

  16. Types of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Types of Heart Failure Updated:Feb 9,2017 Left-sided heart failure ... making. This content was last reviewed April 2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure Introduction Types of Heart ...

  17. Understanding chronic heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Fenton, Matthew; Burch, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The key principles of chronic heart failure and the development of clinical management strategies are described. The physiological changes in chronic heart failure and the clinical management of children with heart failure are considered, but the treatment of heart failure related to congenital heart disease or the intensive care management of heart failure are not mentioned as both topics require consideration in their own right. A greater understanding of the maladaptive responses to chroni...

  18. Prevalence and inter-relationship of different Doppler measures of dyssynchrony in patients with heart failure and prolonged QRS: a report from CARE-HF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maru Fikru

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT improves mortality and morbidity in heart failure patients with wide QRS. Observational studies suggest that patients having more left ventricular dyssynchrony pre-implantation obtain greater benefit on ventricular function and symptoms with CRT. Aim To provide an analysis of the prevalence and type of dyssynchrony in patients included in the CARE-HF trial. Methods 100 patients 67 (58 to 71 years were examined with echocardiography including tissue doppler imaging before receiving a CRT-pacemaker. Atrio-ventricular dyssynchrony (LVFT/RR was defined as left ventricular filling time 40 ms. Intra-ventricular (regional dyssynchrony in a 16-segment model was expressed either as a delayed longitudinal contraction (DLC during the postsystolic phase or by tissue synchronisation imaging (TSI with a predefined time-difference in systolic maximal velocities >85 ms. Results LVFT/RR was present in 34% and IVMD in 60% of patients while intra-ventricular dyssynchrony was present in 85% (DLC and 86% (TSI with a high agreement between the measures (Kappascore 0.86–1.00, indicating the methods being interchangeable. Patients with cardiomyopathy (53% were more likely to have LVFT/RR Conclusion The prevalence of intra-ventricular dyssynchrony is high in patients with heart failure, wide QRS and depressed systolic function. Most important, TSI appears to be a fast and reliable method to identify patients with intra-ventricular dyssynchrony likely to benefit from CRT.

  19. Heart Failure Readmission Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozda, Joseph P; Smith, Donna A; Freiman, Paul C; Pursley, Janet; VanSlette, Jeffrey A; Smith, Timothy R

    Little is known regarding effectiveness of readmission reduction programs over time. The Heart Failure Management Program (HFMP) of St. John's Physician Group Practice (PGP) Demonstration provided an opportunity to assess outcomes over an extended period. Data from an electronic health record, an inpatient database, a disease registry, and the Social Security Death Master File were analyzed for patients admitted with heart failure (HF) for 5 years before (Period 1) and 5 years after (Period 2) inception of PGP. HF admissions decreased (Period 1, 58.3/month; Period 2, 52.4/month, P = .007). Thirty-day all-cause readmission rate dropped from Period 1 (annual average 18.8% [668/3545]) to year 1 of Period 2 (16.9% [136/804], P = .04) and remained stable thereafter (annual average 16.8% [589/3503]). Thirty-day mortality rate was flat throughout. HFMP was associated with decreased readmissions, primarily related to outpatient case management, while mortality remained stable.

  20. Rationale and design of MinerAlocorticoid Receptor antagonist Tolerability Study-Heart Failure (ARTS-HF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitt, Bertram; Anker, Stefan D; Böhm, Michael

    2015-01-01

    2 diabetes mellitus and/or chronic kidney disease (CKD) will be randomized within 7 days of emergency presentation to hospital for worsening chronic HF to receive finerenone (one of five doses in the range 2.5-20.0 mg once daily) or eplerenone (25 mg every second day to 50 mg once daily for 90 days...... with eplerenone. Other objectives are to assess the effects of finerenone on a composite clinical endpoint (death from any cause, cardiovascular hospitalizations, or emergency presentations for worsening chronic HF), and on changes in health-related quality of life from baseline. CONCLUSIONS: ARTS-HF is the first...... phase 2b clinical trial to investigate the effects of finerenone on plasma NT-proBNP in a high-risk population of patients who have worsening chronic HF with type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or CKD presenting at the emergency department....

  1. Risk of Stroke in Chronic Heart Failure Patients Without Atrial Fibrillation: Analysis of the Controlled Rosuvastatin in Multinational Trial Heart Failure (CORONA) and the Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Sopravvivenza nell'Insufficienza Cardiaca-Heart Failure (GISSI-HF) Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Rahim, Azmil H; Perez, Ana-Cristina; Fulton, Rachael L; Jhund, Pardeep S; Latini, Roberto; Tognoni, Gianni; Wikstrand, John; Kjekshus, John; Lip, Gregory Y H; Maggioni, Aldo P; Tavazzi, Luigi; Lees, Kennedy R; McMurray, John J V

    2015-04-28

    Our aim was to describe the incidence and predictors of stroke in patients who have heart failure without atrial fibrillation (AF). We pooled 2 contemporary heart failure trials, the Controlled Rosuvastatin in Multinational Trial Heart Failure (CORONA) and the Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Sopravvivenza nell'Insufficienza cardiaca-Heart Failure trial (GISSI-HF). Of the 9585 total patients, 6054 did not have AF. Stroke occurred in 165 patients (4.7%) with AF and in 206 patients (3.4%) without AF (rates 16.8/1000 patient-years and 11.1/1000 patient-years, respectively). Using Cox proportional-hazards models, we identified the following independent predictors of stroke in patients without AF (ranked by χ(2) value): age (hazard ratio, 1.34; 95% confidence interval, 1.18-1.63 per 10 years), New York Heart Association class (1.60, 1.21-2.12 class III/IV versus II), diabetes mellitus treated with insulin (1.87, 1.22-2.88), body mass index (0.74, 0.60-0.91 per 5 kg/m(2) up to 30), and previous stroke (1.81, 1.19-2.74). N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (available in 2632 patients) was also an independent predictor of stroke (hazard ratio, 1.31; 1.11-1.57 per log unit) when added to this model. With the use of a risk score formulated from these predictors, we found that patients in the upper third of risk had a rate of stroke that approximated the risk in patients with AF. A small number of demographic and clinical variables identified a subset of patients who have heart failure without AF at a high risk of stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Efficacy of sacubitril/valsartan vs. enalapril at lower than target doses in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction: the PARADIGM-HF trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardeny, Orly; Claggett, Brian; Packer, Milton; Zile, Michael R; Rouleau, Jean; Swedberg, Karl; Teerlink, John R; Desai, Akshay S; Lefkowitz, Martin; Shi, Victor; McMurray, John J V; Solomon, Scott D

    2016-10-01

    In this analysis, we utilized data from PARADIGM-HF to test the hypothesis that participants who exhibited any dose reduction during the trial would have similar benefits from lower doses of sacubitril/valsartan relative to lower doses of enalapril. In a post-hoc analysis from PARADIGM-HF, we characterized patients by whether they received the maximal dose (200 mg sacubitril/valsartan or 10 mg enalapril twice daily) throughout the trial or had any dose reduction to lower doses (100/50/0 mg sacubitril/valsartan or 5/2.5/0 mg enalapril twice daily). The treatment effect for the primary outcome was estimated, stratified by dose level using time-updated Cox regression models. In the two treatment arms, participants with a dose reduction (43% of those randomized to enalapril and 42% of those randomized to sacubitril/valsartan) had similar baseline characteristics and similar baseline predictors of the need for dose reduction. In a time-updated analysis, any dose reduction was associated with a higher subsequent risk of the primary event [hazard ratio (HR) 2.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.2-2.7]. However, the treatment benefit of sacubitril/valsartan over enalapril following a dose reduction was similar (HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.70-0.93, P PARADIGM-HF, study medication dose reduction identified patients at higher risk of a major cardiovascular event. The magnitude of benefit for patients on lower doses of sacubitril/valsartan relative to those on lower doses of enalapril was similar to that of patients who remained on target doses of both drugs. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Society of Cardiology.

  3. The effect of adaptive servo ventilation (ASV) on objective and subjective outcomes in Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) with central sleep apnea (CSA) in heart failure (HF): A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyunju; Sawyer, Amy M

    2016-01-01

    To summarize the current evidence for adaptive servo ventilation (ASV) in Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) with central sleep apnea (CSA) in heart failure (HF) and advance a research agenda and clinical considerations for ASV-treated CSR-CSA in HF. CSR-CSA in HF is associated with higher overall mortality, worse outcomes and lower quality of life (QOL) than HF without CSR-CSA. Five databases were searched using key words (n = 234). Randomized controlled trials assessed objective sleep quality, cardiac, and self-reported outcomes in adults (≥18 years) with HF (n = 10). ASV has a beneficial effect on the reduction of central sleep apnea in adult patients with CSR-CSA in HF, but it is not be superior to CPAP, bilevel PPV, or supplemental oxygen in terms of sleep quality defined by polysomnography, cardiovascular outcomes, subjective daytime sleepiness, and quality of life. ASV is not recommended for CSR-CSA in HF. It is important to continue to refer HF patients for sleep evaluation to clearly discern OSA from CSR-CSA. Symptom management research, inclusive of objective and subjective outcomes, in CSR-CSA in HF adults is needed.

  4. European Society of Cardiology Heart Failure Association Standards for delivering heart failure care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McDonagh, Theresa A.; Blue, Lynda; Clark, Andrew L.; Dahlstroem, Ulf; Ekman, Inger; Lainscak, Mitja; McDonald, Kenneth; Ryder, Mary; Stroemberg, Anna; Jaarsma, Tiny

    2011-01-01

    The management of heart failure (HF) is complex. As a consequence, most cardiology society guidelines now state that HF care should be delivered in a multiprofessional manner. The evidence base for this approach now means that the establishment of HF management programmes is a priority. This documen

  5. Psoriasis and risk of heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalid, Usman; Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar;

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Psoriasis is a common inflammatory disease that is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, including myocardial infarction. Heart failure (HF) is independently associated with several cardiovascular risk factors and is a major cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality...

  6. [Is iron important in heart failure?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murín, Ján; Pernický, Miroslav

    2015-12-01

    Iron deficiency is a frequent comorbidity in a patient with chronic heart failure, and it associates with a worse prognosis of that patient. Mainly worse quality of life and more rehospitalizations are in these iron deficient patients. Iron metabolism is rather complex and there is some new information concerning this complexity in heart failure. We distinquish an absolute and a functional iron deficiency in heart failure. It is this deficit which is important and not as much is anemia important here. Prevalence of anaemia in heart failure is about 30-50%, higher it is in patients suffering more frequently heart failure decompensations. Treatment of iron deficiency is important and it improves prognosis of these patients. Most experiences there are with i.v. iron treatment (FERRIC HF, FAIR HF and CONFIRM HF studies), less so with per oral treatment. There are no clinical trials which analysed mortality influences.

  7. Controlled study of myocardial recovery after interval training in heart failure: SMARTEX-HF - rationale and design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støylen, Asbjørn; Conraads, Viviane; Halle, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Background: The large randomized controlled multicentre clinical trial, HF-ACTION, recently demonstrated that a programme of recommendation of regular exercise training at moderate intensity is safe, improves quality of life, and reduces the combined endpoint of all-cause death and hospitalizatio...

  8. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    920647 Comparative effects of commonvasodilators on experimental cardiac fai-lure. LI Zhijian (李志坚), et al. Dept Cardiol,2nd Hosp, Tianjin Med Coll. Tianjin Med J1992; 20(8): 456-458. A 9×9 latin square design was employed forcomparing the effects of (1) placebo, (2) nitr-oprusside, (3) phentolamine, (4) isosorbide dini-trate. (5) captopril, (6) captopril-isosorbide

  9. Chronic heart failure and micronutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, K K; Clark, A L; Cleland, J G

    2001-06-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with weight loss, and cachexia is a well-recognized complication. Patients have an increased risk of osteoporosis and lose muscle bulk early in the course of the disease. Basal metabolic rate is increased in HF, but general malnutrition may play a part in the development of cachexia, particularly in an elderly population. There is evidence for a possible role for micronutrient deficiency in HF. Selective deficiency of selenium, calcium and thiamine can directly lead to the HF syndrome. Other nutrients, particularly vitamins C and E and beta-carotene, are antioxidants and may have a protective effect on the vasculature. Vitamins B6, B12 and folate all tend to reduce levels of homocysteine, which is associated with increased oxidative stress. Carnitine, co-enzyme Q10 and creatine supplementation have resulted in improved exercise capacity in patients with HF in some studies. In this article, we review the relation between micronutrients and HF. Chronic HF is characterized by high mortality and morbidity, and research effort has centered on pharmacological management, with the successful introduction of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-adrenergic antagonists into routine practice. There is sufficient evidence to support a large-scale trial of dietary micronutrient supplementation in HF.

  10. Heart failure in the elderly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elizabete Viana de Freitas; Michel Batlouni; Roberto Gamarsky

    2012-01-01

    The aging of the population is, currently, a major phenomenon, drawing the attention of a number of investigators. The significant increase of life expectancies over the past few decades, in addition to social and economic consequences, has lead to a major change in the morbidity and mortality profile of elders. Heart failure (HF) is a condition in which the heart can not pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. HF is predominantly a disorder of the elderly with rates increasing exponentially. The prevalence of HF approximately doubles with each decade of life. As people live longer, the occurrence of HF rises, as well as other conditions that complicate its treatment. Impaired heart function implies a reduced duration of survival. Fortunately, many factors that can prevent HF and improve outcome are known and can be applied at any stage. This review emphasizes the importance of factors inherent in aging itself, focusing on heart disease, particularly as a disease of aging, can help critically refine management of this acute and chronic disease, as well as foster preventive strategies to reduce the incidence of this common malady.

  11. Nesiritide, Renal Function, and Associated Outcomes During Hospitalization for Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Results From the Acute Study of Clinical Effectiveness of Nesiritide and Decompensated Heart Failure (ASCEND-HF)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deursen, Vincent M.; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Stebbins, Amanda; Hasselblad, Vic; Ezekowitz, Justin A.; Califf, Robert M.; Gottlieb, Stephen S.; O'Connor, Christopher M.; Starling, Randall C.; Tang, W. H. Wilson; McMurray, John J.; Dickstein, Kenneth; Voors, Adriaan A.

    2014-01-01

    Background-Contradictory results have been reported on the effects of nesiritide on renal function in patients with acute decompensated heart failure. We studied the effects of nesiritide on renal function during hospitalization for acute decompensated heart failure and associated outcomes. Methods

  12. Nesiritide, Renal Function, and Associated Outcomes During Hospitalization for Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Results From the Acute Study of Clinical Effectiveness of Nesiritide and Decompensated Heart Failure (ASCEND-HF)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deursen, Vincent M.; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Stebbins, Amanda; Hasselblad, Vic; Ezekowitz, Justin A.; Califf, Robert M.; Gottlieb, Stephen S.; O'Connor, Christopher M.; Starling, Randall C.; Tang, W. H. Wilson; McMurray, John J.; Dickstein, Kenneth; Voors, Adriaan A.

    2014-01-01

    Background-Contradictory results have been reported on the effects of nesiritide on renal function in patients with acute decompensated heart failure. We studied the effects of nesiritide on renal function during hospitalization for acute decompensated heart failure and associated outcomes. Methods

  13. [Diuretic therapy in heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trullàs, Joan Carles; Morales-Rull, José Luís; Formiga, Francesc

    2014-02-20

    Many of the primary clinical manifestations of heart failure (HF) are due to fluid retention, and treatments targeting congestion play a central role in HF management. Diuretic therapy remains the cornerstone of congestion treatment, and diuretics are prescribed to the majority of HF patients. Despite this ubiquitous use, there is limited evidence from prospective randomized studies to guide the use of diuretics. With the chronic use of diuretic and usually in advanced stages of HF, diuretics may fail to control salt and water retention. This review describes the mechanism of action of available diuretic classes, reviews their clinical use based on scientific evidence and discusses strategies to overcome diuretic resistance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. A snapshot of the latest heart failure guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caboral-Stevens, Meriam F

    2014-07-13

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex chronic condition with high morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this article is to present a snapshot of the 2013 ACCF/AHA guidelines focusing on management and treatment of HF in primary care.

  15. Aldosterone blockade in post-acute myocardial infarction heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitt, Bertram; Ferrari, Roberto; Gheorghiade, Mihai; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Krum, Henry; McMurray, John; Lopez-Sendon, Jose

    2006-01-01

    Development of heart failure (HF) or left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) significantly increases mortality post acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Aldosterone contributes to the development and progression of HF post AMI, and major guidelines now recommend aldosterone blockade in this setti

  16. CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE: EXPERIMENTAL MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Francesco Corno

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION.Surgically induced, combined volume and pressure overload has been used in rabbits to create a simplified and reproducible model of acute left ventricular (LV failure.MATERIALS AND METHODS.New Zealand white male rabbits (n=24, mean weight 3.1±0.2kg were randomly assigned to either the Control group (n=10 or to the Heart Failure group (HF, n=14. Animals in the Control group underwent sham procedures. Animals in the HF group underwent procedures to induce LV volume overload by inducing severe aortic valve regurgitation with aortic cusp disruption and pressure overload using an occlusive silver clip positioned around the pre-renal abdominal aorta.RESULTS.Following Procedure-1 (volume overload echocardiography confirmed severe aortic regurgitation in all animals in the HF group, with increased mean pulse pressure difference from 18±3mmHg to 38±3mmHg (P

  17. Living with heart failure : Partner perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttik, Marie Louise; Blaauwbroek, Arnarins; Dijker, Anton; Jaarsma, Tiny

    2007-01-01

    To preserve the supportive capabilities of partners of heart failure (HF) patients, it is necessary to gain insight in the experiences and potential needs of these partners. Thirteen partners of HF patients participated in semistructured interviews specifically focused on their experiences as a

  18. Selecting heart failure patients for metabolic interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, Harmen G.; Koning, Anne M.; van Goor, Harry; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Westenbrink, B. Daan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Heart failure (HF) has become the cardiovascular epidemic of the century and now imposes an immense burden on health care systems. While our understanding of the pathophysiology of HF has increased dramatically, the translation of knowledge into clinical practice has been

  19. Copeptin as a biomarker in heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balling, Louise; Gustafsson, Finn

    2014-01-01

    Increased neurohormonal activation is a key feature of heart failure (HF). Copeptin is a surrogate marker for proarginine vasopressin and the prognostic value of copeptin has been reported for multiple disease states of both nonvascular and cardiovascular etiology. Elevated plasma copeptin in HF...

  20. [Understanding heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boo, José Fernando Guadalajara

    2006-01-01

    Heart failure is a disease with several definitions. The term "heart failure" is used by has brougth about confusion in the terminology. For this reason, the value of the ejection fraction (< 0.40 or < 0.35) is used in most meganalyses on the treatment of heart failure, avoiding the term "heart failure" that is a confounding concept. In this paper we carefully analyze the meaning of contractility, ventricular function or performance, preload, afterload, heart failure, compensation mechanisms in heart failure, myocardial oxygen consumption, inadequate, adequate and inappropriate hypertrophy, systole, diastole, compliance, problems of relaxation, and diastolic dysfunction. Their definitions are supported by the original scientific descriptions in an attempt to clarify the concepts about ventricular function and heart failure and, in this way, use the same scientific language about the meaning of ventricular function, heart failure, and diastolic dysfunction.

  1. The Danish Heart Failure Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schjødt I

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Inge Schjødt,1 Anne Nakano,2,3 Kenneth Egstrup,4 Charlotte Cerqueira5 1Department of Cardiology, 2Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, 3Registry Support Centre of Clinical Quality and Health Informatics (West, Aarhus, 4Department of Cardiology, Odense University Hospital, Svendborg Hospital, Svendborg, 5Registry Support Centre of Epidemiology and Biostatistics (East, Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Capital Region of Denmark, Glostrup, Denmark Aim of database: The aim of the Danish Heart Failure Registry (DHFR is to monitor and improve the care of patients with incident heart failure (HF in Denmark. Study population: The DHFR includes inpatients and outpatients ($18 years with incident HF. Reporting to the DHFR is mandatory for the Danish hospital departments treating patients with incident HF. Final decision to register a patient in the DHFR is made by a cardiologist to ensure the validity of the diagnosis. Approximately 42,400 patients with incident HF were registered in the DHFR in July 2015. Main variables and descriptive data: The main variables recorded in the DHFR are related to the indicators for quality of care in patients with incident HF: performance of echocardiography, functional capacity (New York Heart Association functional classification, pharmacological therapy (angiotensin converting enzyme/angiotensin II antagonist inhibitors, beta-blockers, and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist, nonpharmacological therapy (physical training, patient education, 4-week readmission rate, and 1-year mortality. Furthermore, basic patient characteristics and prognostic factors (eg, smoking and alcohol are recorded. At the annual national audit in the DHFR, the indicators and standards for good clinical quality of care for patients with HF are discussed, and recommendations are reported back to clinicians to promote quality improvement initiatives. Furthermore, results and recommendations are communicated

  2. [Palliative care in heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavazzi, Antonello; Svanoni, Fausto; De Maria, Renata

    2012-12-01

    The natural history of heart failure (HF) is characterized by a progressive decline in functional capacity, punctuated by acute heart destabilization episodes which contribute to a spiraling worsening course. Advanced HF affects one in four patients who are referred to the hospital for the syndrome and has an estimated yearly incidence of 12 000 new cases in Italy. Life expectancy is very limited, and in general less than 50% of advanced HF patients are alive at 1-2 years. Advanced HF patients show a high, not modifiable mortality, severe symptoms and impaired quality of life. Treatment goals should focus on the improvement of symptoms and quality of life, the aims of palliative care. Palliative consultations during hospital admissions reduce the number of interventions and procedures in the last stages of life, the length of stay in the intensive care unit and general ward. HF patients who receive home palliative care are more likely to die at home, in accordance with their expressed will. The research project RF-MAR-2007-67955 aims to analyze, through a prospective observational registry, the palliative care needs of HF patients in Italy, to answer the gaps in knowledge on symptom changes during the terminal stages of the disease, on the quality of communication between healthcare professionals, patients and their families and caregivers' needs.

  3. Predicting survival in heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pocock, Stuart J; Ariti, Cono A; McMurray, John J V

    2012-01-01

    AimsUsing a large international database from multiple cohort studies, the aim is to create a generalizable easily used risk score for mortality in patients with heart failure (HF).Methods and resultsThe MAGGIC meta-analysis includes individual data on 39 372 patients with HF, both reduced...... and preserved left-ventricular ejection fraction (EF), from 30 cohort studies, six of which were clinical trials. 40.2% of patients died during a median follow-up of 2.5 years. Using multivariable piecewise Poisson regression methods with stepwise variable selection, a final model included 13 highly significant...

  4. Cognitive Impairment in Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efthimios Dardiotis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment (CI is increasingly recognized as a common adverse consequence of heart failure (HF. Although the exact mechanisms remain unclear, microembolism, chronic or intermittent cerebral hypoperfusion, and/or impaired cerebral vessel reactivity that lead to cerebral hypoxia and ischemic brain damage seem to underlie the development of CI in HF. Cognitive decline in HF is characterized by deficits in one or more cognition domains, including attention, memory, executive function, and psychomotor speed. These deficits may affect patients’ decision-making capacity and interfere with their ability to comply with treatment requirements, recognize and self-manage disease worsening symptoms. CI may have fluctuations in severity over time, improve with effective HF treatment or progress to dementia. CI is independently associated with disability, mortality, and decreased quality of life of HF patients. It is essential therefore for health professionals in their routine evaluations of HF patients to become familiar with assessment of cognitive performance using standardized screening instruments. Future studies should focus on elucidating the mechanisms that underlie CI in HF and establishing preventive strategies and treatment approaches.

  5. Targeting Iron Deficiency Anemia in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraon, Tajinderpal; Katz, Stuart D

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency is common in heart failure (HF) patients, and is associated with increased risk of adverse clinical outcomes. Clinical trials of intravenous iron supplementation in iron-deficient HF patients have demonstrated short-term improvement in functional capacity and quality of life. In some trials, the benefits of iron supplementation were independent of the hemoglobin levels. Additional investigations of iron supplementation are needed to characterize the mechanisms contributing to clinical benefit and long-term safety in HF.

  6. The survival of patients with heart failure with preserved or reduced left ventricular ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesgaard, Søren

    2012-01-01

    A substantial proportion of patients with heart failure have preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HF-PEF). Previous studies have reported mixed results whether survival is similar to those patients with heart failure and reduced EF (HF-REF).......A substantial proportion of patients with heart failure have preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HF-PEF). Previous studies have reported mixed results whether survival is similar to those patients with heart failure and reduced EF (HF-REF)....

  7. A study to evaluate the prevalence and determinants of stress coping strategies in heart failure patients in Poland (CAPS-LOCK-HF sub-study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzych, Łukasz J; Wybraniec, Maciej T; Siennicka, Agnieszka; Lees, Belinda; Gościńska-Bis, Kinga; Wójcik, Maciej; Błaszczyk, Robert; Szymański, Filip M; Orszulak, Michał; Michalski, Błażej; Kamiński, Karol; Kopeć, Grzegorz; Hrynkiewicz-Szymańska, Anna; Jankowska, Ewa A

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the prevalence and determinants of different stress coping strategies in Polish patients suffering from heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFREF). This manuscript is a sub-study of the CAPS-LOCK-HF multicentre psychological status assessment of patients with HFREF. Patients with > six-month history of HFREF and clinical stability for ≥ three months and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) study. Demographic and clinical variables were obtained from medical records, while a standardised Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS) was applied to all subjects. The study comprised 758 patients (599 men; 79%) with a median age of 64 years (IQR 58-71). Median LVEF was 33% (25-40). Subjects most commonly used task-oriented coping strategies (median CISS score 55 points; IQR 49-61), followed by avoidance (45 points; 39-50) and emotion-oriented coping strategies (41 points; 34-48). Distraction-based avoidance coping strategies (20 points; 16-23) were more pronounced than social diversion strategies (16 points; 14-19). Multiple regression analysis showed that higher New York Heart Association (NYHA) class and lower systolic blood pressure were independent predictors of task-oriented style. Emotion-oriented coping was more common among females and higher NYHA classes, and in patients who did not take angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. Patients who used avoidance-oriented strategies were more frequently those in sinus rhythm on assessment and those who had less history of neoplastic disease. Patients with HFREF most commonly use favourable task-oriented coping strategies. However, female patients and those with higher NYHA classes tend to use potentially detrimental emotion-oriented coping strategies.

  8. Heart Failure and Pulmonary Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Jordan T.; Semigran, Marc J.

    2010-01-01

    When PH and RV dysfunction accompany HF, the impact on functional capacity and prognosis are ominous. Newer clinical strategies to preferentially lower pulmonary pressures and pulmonary vascular tone improve functional performance and symptoms of heart failure by targeting the NO signal transduction pathways as with PDE5 inhibition. Additional studies are needed to delineate if these therapies will impact long-term patient outcomes and to elucidate the specific mechanisms whereby these treatm...

  9. Managing Feelings about Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Heart Failure Module 6: Managing Feelings About Heart Failure Download Module Order Hardcopy Heart failure can cause ... professional help for emotional problems. Common Feelings About Heart Failure It is common for people to feel depressed ...

  10. Mitochondrial dysfunction in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosca, Mariana G; Hoppel, Charles L

    2013-09-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex chronic clinical syndrome. Energy deficit is considered to be a key contributor to the development of both cardiac and skeletal myopathy. In HF, several components of cardiac and skeletal muscle bioenergetics are altered, such as oxygen availability, substrate oxidation, mitochondrial ATP production, and ATP transfer to the contractile apparatus via the creatine kinase shuttle. This review focuses on alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis and respirasome organization, substrate oxidation coupled with ATP synthesis in the context of their contribution to the chronic energy deficit, and mechanical dysfunction of the cardiac and skeletal muscle in HF. We conclude that HF is associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis and function in both heart and skeletal muscle, supporting the concept of a systemic mitochondrial cytopathy. The sites of mitochondrial defects are located within the electron transport and phosphorylation apparatus and differ with the etiology and progression of HF in the two mitochondrial populations (subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar) of cardiac and skeletal muscle. The roles of adrenergic stimulation, the renin-angiotensin system, and cytokines are evaluated as factors responsible for the systemic energy deficit. We propose a cyclic AMP-mediated mechanism by which increased adrenergic stimulation contributes to the mitochondrial dysfunction.

  11. n-3PUFA and Holter-derived autonomic variables in patients with heart failure: data from the Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Sopravvivenza nell'Insufficienza Cardiaca (GISSI-HF) Holter substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rovere, Maria Teresa; Staszewsky, Lidia; Barlera, Simona; Maestri, Roberto; Mezzani, Alessandro; Midi, Paolo; Marchioli, Roberto; Maggioni, Aldo P; Tognoni, Gianni; Tavazzi, Luigi; Latini, Roberto

    2013-02-01

    n-3 Polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3PUFA) supplementation in the Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Sopravvivenza nell'Insufficienza Cardiaca (GISSI-HF) study reduced total mortality in patients with heart failure (HF), but the mechanism of action is still debated. The hypothesis of the present GISSI-HF substudy was that n-3PUFA may have beneficial effects on cardiac autonomic control. To evaluate the effect of 1 g/day of n-3PUFA vs placebo on heart rate variability variables, deceleration capacity, and turbulence slope. The GISSI-HF study enrolled patients with HF of any cause and severity. Twenty-four-hour (range 16-24 hours) Holter recordings were performed and analyzed in 388 patients at baseline, 3 months, and 12 months. Baseline characteristics were compared by using the χ(2) test, t test, or nonparametric Wilcoxon 2-sample test. Changes over time were tested by using the analysis of covariance adjusted by baseline values. At baseline, 36% of the patients were older than 70 years, 82% were men, 92% presented a left ventricular ejection fraction<40%, and 80% were in New York Heart Association class II. An increase in mean RR interval, standard deviation of all normal-to-normal RR intervals, very low frequency power (all P<.05), and turbulence slope (P = .05) was observed after 3 months in the n-3PUFA group compared to the placebo group, independently of the frequency of dietary fish consumption or beta-blocker treatment. These differences between study groups were no longer statistically significant at 12 months. A per-protocol analysis in patients compliant with study treatment showed similar results. n-3PUFA supplementation partially restored autonomic modulation in patients with chronic HF; this effect was maximal after 3 months of treatment. Copyright © 2013 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Heart failure overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms) You feel a severe crushing chest pain Prevention Most cases of heart failure can be prevented by living a healthy lifestyle and taking steps aimed at reducing your risk for heart disease . . Alternative Names CHF; Congestive heart failure; Left-sided ...

  13. Relief and Recurrence of Congestion During and After Hospitalization for Acute Heart Failure: Insights from DOSE-AHF and CARRESS-HF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lala, Anuradha; McNulty, Steven E.; Mentz, Robert J.; Dunlay, Shannon; Vader, Justin M.; AbouEzzeddine, Omar F.; DeVore, Adam D.; Khazanie, Prateeti; Redfield, Margaret M.; Goldsmith, Steven R.; Bart, Bradley A.; Anstrom, Kevin J.; Felker, Michael; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Stevenson, Lynne W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Congestion is the most frequent cause for hospitalization in acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). Although decongestion is a major goal of acute therapy, it is unclear how the clinical components of congestion (e.g., peripheral edema, orthopnea) contribute to outcomes after discharge or how well decongestion is maintained. Methods and Results A post-hoc analysis was performed of 496 patients enrolled in the DOSE-AHF and CARRESS-HF trials during hospitalization with ADHF and clinical congestion. A simple “orthodema” congestion score was generated based on symptoms of orthopnea (≥2 pillows=2 points, <2 pillows=0 points) and peripheral edema (trace=0 points, moderate=1 point, severe=2 points) at baseline, discharge, and 60-day follow-up. Orthodema scores were classified as absent (score of 0), low-grade (score of 1–2), and high-grade (score of 3–4), and the association with death, rehospitalization or unscheduled medical visits through 60 days was assessed. At baseline, 65% of patients had high-grade orthodema and 35% had low-grade orthodema. At discharge, 52% patients were free from orthodema at discharge (score = 0) and these patients had lower 60-day rates of death, rehospitalization, or unscheduled visits (50%) compared to those with low-grade or high-grade orthodema (52% and 68%, respectively, p=0.038). Of the patients without orthodema at discharge, 27% relapsed to low-grade orthodema and 38% to high-grade orthodema at 60-day follow-up. Conclusions Increased severity of congestion by a simple orthodema assessment is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Despite intent to relieve congestion, current therapy often fails to relieve orthodema during hospitalization or to prevent recurrence after discharge. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifiers: NCT00608491, NCT00577135. PMID:26041600

  14. QT variability index on 24-hour Holter independently predicts mortality in patients with heart failure: analysis of Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Sopravvivenza nell'Insufficienza Cardiaca (GISSI-HF) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Craig P; La Rovere, Maria Teresa; Pinna, Gian Domenico; Goldstein, Robert; Olsen, Cara; Bernardinangeli, Marino; Veniani, Marco; Midi, Paolo; Tavazzi, Luigi; Haigney, Mark

    2011-08-01

    Increased temporal variability of repolarization, as reflected by QT interval variability measured over 10-15 minutes, predicted spontaneous ventricular arrhythmias and death in implantable cardioverter-defibrillator patients in mild to moderate heart failure (HF). The purpose of this study was to test our hypothesis that increased mean QT variability over 24 hours would be associated with increased cardiovascular (CV) mortality in a heterogeneous HF population. The Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Sopravvivenza nell'Insufficienza Cardiaca-Heart Failure trial prospectively enrolled subjects with HF of any cause. Twenty-four-hour Holter recordings from 268 subjects were analyzed using a template-matching, semiautomatic algorithm to measure QT and heart rate time series in sequential 5-minute epochs over 24 hours. The QT variability index (QTVI) was expressed as the log ratio of the normalized QT variance over normalized heart rate variance. Total and CV mortality were assessed as a function of continuous and dichotomous QTVI (>-0.84) in univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards models, adjusting for significant clinical predictors. After a median of 47 months, there were 53 deaths, of which 44 were from CV causes. A significant association with the outcome was found for QTVI both as continuous and dichotomous variables after adjustment for clinical covariates (age >70, New York Heart Association class III-IV, left ventricular ejection fraction, nonsustained ventricular tachycardia, creatinine): QTVI hazard ratio (HR) 4.0 (confidence interval [CI] 1.8-88; P = .008) for total and 4.4 (CI 1.9-10.1; P = .0006) for CV mortality; QTVI >-0.84 HR 2.0 (CI 1.1-3.6; P = .02) for total and 2.1 (CI 1.1-3.8; P = .02) for CV mortality. Increased repolarization lability, as reflected in QTVI measured over 24 hours, is associated with increased risk for total and CV mortality in a heterogeneous population with chronic HF. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Heart failure - medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are working and to measure your potassium levels. Beta Blockers Beta blockers slow your heart rate and decrease the strength ... muscle contracts in the short term. Long term beta blockers help keep your heart failure from becoming worse. ...

  16. Iron deficiency anemia in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Natasha P; Ghali, Jalal K

    2013-07-01

    Anemia and iron deficiency are quite prevalent in patients with heart failure (HF) and may overlap. Both anemia and iron deficiency are associated with worse symptoms and adverse clinical outcomes. In the past few years, there has been an enormous interest in the subject of iron deficiency and its management in patients with HF. In this review, the etiology and relevance of iron deficiency, iron metabolism in the setting of HF, studies on iron supplementation in patients with HF and potential cardiovascular effects of subclinical iron overload are discussed.

  17. Dilemmas in end-stage heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen-Scarabelli, Carol; Saravolatz, Louis; Hirsh, Benjamin; Agrawal, Pratik; Scarabelli, Tiziano M

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF), a complex clinical syndrome due to structural or functional disorder of the heart, is a major global health issue, with a prevalence of over 5.8 million in the USA alone, and over 23 million worldwide. As a leading cause of hospitalizations among patients aged 65 years or older, HF is a major consumer of healthcare resources, creating a substantial strain on the healthcare system. This paper discusses the epidemiology of HF, financial impact, and multifaceted predicaments in end-stage HF care. A search was conducted on the U.S. National Library of Medicine website (www.pubmed.gov) using keywords such as end-stage heart failure, palliative care, ethical dilemmas. Despite the poor prognosis of HF (worse than that for many cancers), many HF patients, caregivers, and clinicians are unaware of the poor prognosis. In addition, the unpredictable clinical trajectory of HF complicates the planning of end-of-life care, such as palliative care and hospice, leading to underutilization of such resources. In conclusion, ethical dilemmas in end-stage HF are numerous, embroiling not only the patient, but also the caregiver, healthcare team, and society.

  18. Heart Failure in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butrous, Hoda; Hummel, Scott L

    2016-09-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a leading cause of morbidity, hospitalization, and mortality in older adults and a growing public health problem placing a huge financial burden on the health care system. Many challenges exist in the assessment and management of HF in geriatric patients, who often have coexisting multimorbidity, polypharmacy, cognitive impairment, and frailty. These complex "geriatric domains" greatly affect physical and functional status as well as long-term clinical outcomes. Geriatric patients have been under-represented in major HF clinical trials. Nonetheless, available data suggest that guideline-based medical and device therapies improve morbidity and mortality. Nonpharmacologic strategies, such as exercise training and dietary interventions, are an active area of research. Targeted geriatric evaluation, including functional and cognitive assessment, can improve risk stratification and guide management in older patients with HF. Clinical trials that enroll older patients with multiple morbidities and HF and evaluate functional status and quality of life in addition to mortality and cardiovascular morbidity should be encouraged to guide management of this age group.

  19. Are there long-term benefits in following stable heart failure patients in a heart failure clinic?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leetmaa, Tina; Villadsen, Henrik; Mikkelsen, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    Objectives and Design. This study describes the long-term outcome of 163 patients with stable mild to moderate heart failure (NYHA II-III), who already were enrolled in a heart failure clinic and now were randomized to continued follow-up in the heart failure (HF) clinic or else to usual care (UC...

  20. Transcatheter Interatrial Shunt Device for the Treatment of Heart Failure Rationale and Design of the Randomized Trial to REDUCE Elevated Left Atrial Pressure in Heart Failure (REDUCE LAP-HF I)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feldman, Ted; Komtebedde, Jan; Burkhoff, Daniel; Massaro, Joseph; Maurer, Mathew S.; Leon, Martin B.; Kaye, David; Silvestry, Frank E.; Cleland, John G. F.; Kitzman, Dalane; Kubo, Spencer H.; Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Kleber, Franz; Trochu, Jean-Noel; Auricchio, Angelo; Gustafsson, Finn; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Ponikowski, Piotr; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Mauri, Laura; Shah, Sanjiv J.

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), a major public health problem with high morbidity and mortality rates, remains difficult to manage because of a lack of effective treatment options. Although HFpEF is a heterogeneous clinical syndrome, elevated left atrial pressure-either at re

  1. Chronic heart failure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    population, and up to 10% in people aged 75 years and older. It is also estimated that ... The first step in the development of heart failure is an injury to the myocardium ... treatment of heart failure by blocking the compensatory mechanisms with ... pulmonary disease, cognitive dysfunction, depression, chronic kidney disease ...

  2. Adrenal adrenoceptors in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio ede Lucia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is a chronic clinical syndrome characterized by the reduction in left ventricular (LV function and it represents one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite considerable advances in pharmacological treatment, HF represents a severe clinical and social burden. Sympathetic outflow, characterized by increased circulating catecholamines (CAs biosynthesis and secretion, is peculiar in HF and sympatholytic treatments (as β-blockers are presently being investigated for the treatment of this disease. Adrenal gland secretes Epinephrine (80% and Norepinephrine (20% in response to acetylcholine stimulation of nicotinic cholinergic receptors on the chromaffin cell membranes. This process is regulated by adrenergic receptors (ARs: α2ARs inhibit CA release through coupling to inhibitory Gi-proteins, and βARs (mainly β2ARs stimulate CA release through coupling to stimulatory Gs-proteins. All ARs are G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs and GPCR kinases (GRKs regulate their signaling and function. Adrenal GRK2-mediated α2AR desensitization and downregulation are increased in HF and seem to be a fundamental regulator of CA secretion from the adrenal gland. Consequently, restoration of adrenal a2AR signaling through the inhibition of GRK2 is a fascinating sympatholytic therapeutic strategy for chronic HF. This strategy could have several significant advantages over existing HF pharmacotherapies (antiadrenergic, such as bAR-blockers minimizing side-effects on extra-cardiac tissues and reducing the chronic activation of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone and endothelin systems.The role of adrenal ARs in regulation of sympathetic hyperactivity opens interesting perspectives in understanding pathophysiology of HF and identifying new potential therapeutic targets.

  3. Adults living with heart failure and fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjødt, Inge; Sommer, Irene; Bjerrum, Merete

    Background Fatigue is one of the most common symptoms reported by patients with heart failure (HF). Fatigue negatively impacts on patients’ everyday life, prognosis and quality of life. No specific cure or effective interventions to alleviate fatigue are available. Over the past decade, qualitative...... To synthesise the best available evidence related to the lived experiences and management of fatigue in everyday life in adult patients with stable heart failure to develop effective interventions to support self-care. Specific questions on the patients’ lived experiences included: • How do patients with HF...... describe their experiences of fatigue? • How do patients with HF perceive the impact of fatigue in everyday life? • How do patients with HF manage fatigue and its consequences in everyday life? Methods A systematic literature search for published and unpublished studies 1995-2012 was carried out from...

  4. Gastrointestinal and Liver Issues in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Varun; Fang, James C

    2016-04-26

    Heart failure affects ≈23 million people worldwide and continues to have a high mortality despite advancements in modern pharmacotherapy and device therapy. HF is a complex clinical syndrome that can result in the impairment of endocrine, hematologic, musculoskeletal, renal, respiratory, peripheral vascular, hepatic, and gastrointestinal systems. Although gastrointestinal involvement and hepatic involvement are common in HF and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, their bidirectional association with HF progression remains poorly fathomed. The current understanding of multiple mechanisms, including proinflammatory cytokine milieu, hormonal imbalance, and anabolic/catabolic imbalance, has been used to explain the relationship between the gut and HF and has been the basis for many novel therapeutic strategies. However, the failure of these novel therapies such as anti-tumor necrosis factor-α has resulted in further complexity. In this review, we describe the involvement of the gastrointestinal and liver systems within the HF syndrome, their pathophysiological mechanisms, and their clinical consequences.

  5. Heart Failure-Induced Diaphragm Myopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Regina Ruiz Lima

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intracellular signaling pathways involved in skeletal myosin heavy chain (MyHC isoform alterations during heart failure (HF are not completely understood. We tested the hypothesis that diaphragm expression of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK and myogenic regulatory factors is changed in rats with myocardial infarction (MI induced HF. Methods: Six months after MI rats were subjected to transthoracic echocardiography. After euthanasia, infarcted rats were subdivided in MI/HF- group (with no HF evidence; n=10, and MI/HF+ (with right ventricular hypertrophy and lung congestion; n=10. Sham-operated rats were used as controls (n=10. MyHC isoforms were analyzed by electrophoresis. Statistical analysis: ANOVA and Pearson correlation. Results: MI/HF- had left cardiac chambers dilation with systolic and diastolic left ventricular dysfunction. Cardiac injury was more intense in MI/HF+ than MI/HF-. MyHC I isoform percentage was higher in MI/HF+ than MI/HF-, and IIb isoform lower in MI/HF+ than Sham. Left atrial diameter-to-body weight ratio positively correlated with MyHC I (p=0.005 and negatively correlated with MyHC IIb (p=0.02. TNF-a serum concentration positively correlated with MyHC I isoform. Total and phosphorylated ERK was lower in MI/HF- and MI/HF+ than Sham. Phosphorylated JNK was lower in MI/HF- than Sham. JNK and p38 did not differ between groups. Expression of NF-κB and the myogenic regulatory factors MyoD, myogenin, and MRF4 was similar between groups. Conclusion: Diaphragm MyHC fast-to-slow shift is related to cardiac dysfunction severity and TNF-a serum levels in infarcted rats. Reduced ERK expression seems to participate in MyHC isoform changes. Myogenic regulatory factors and NF-κB do not modulate diaphragm MyHC distribution during chronic HF.

  6. Chronic Oral Study of Myosin Activation to Increase Contractility in Heart Failure (COSMIC-HF) : a phase 2, pharmacokinetic, randomised, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teerlink, John R.; Felker, G. Michael; McMurray, John J. V.; Solomon, Scott D.; Adams, Kirkwood F.; Cleland, John G. F.; Ezekowitz, Justin A.; Goudev, Assen; Macdonald, Peter; Metra, Marco; Mitrovic, Veselin; Ponikowski, Piotr; Serpytis, Pranas; Spinar, Jindrich; Tomcsanyi, Janos; Vandekerckhove, Hans J.; Voors, Adriaan A.; Monsalvo, Maria Laura; Johnston, James; Malik, Fady I.; Honarpour, Narimon

    2016-01-01

    Background Impaired contractility is a feature of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. We assessed the pharmacokinetics and eff ects on cardiac function and structure of the cardiac myosin activator, omecamtiv mecarbil. Methods In this randomised, double-blind study, done at 87 sites in 13

  7. Lungs in Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Apostolo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung function abnormalities both at rest and during exercise are frequently observed in patients with chronic heart failure, also in the absence of respiratory disease. Alterations of respiratory mechanics and of gas exchange capacity are strictly related to heart failure. Severe heart failure patients often show a restrictive respiratory pattern, secondary to heart enlargement and increased lung fluids, and impairment of alveolar-capillary gas diffusion, mainly due to an increased resistance to molecular diffusion across the alveolar capillary membrane. Reduced gas diffusion contributes to exercise intolerance and to a worse prognosis. Cardiopulmonary exercise test is considered the “gold standard” when studying the cardiovascular, pulmonary, and metabolic adaptations to exercise in cardiac patients. During exercise, hyperventilation and consequent reduction of ventilation efficiency are often observed in heart failure patients, resulting in an increased slope of ventilation/carbon dioxide (VE/VCO2 relationship. Ventilatory efficiency is as strong prognostic and an important stratification marker. This paper describes the pulmonary abnormalities at rest and during exercise in the patients with heart failure, highlighting the principal diagnostic tools for evaluation of lungs function, the possible pharmacological interventions, and the parameters that could be useful in prognostic assessment of heart failure patients.

  8. [Heart failure and comorbidities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boully, Clémence; Hanon, Olivier

    2015-03-01

    Heart failure is a frequent disease in the elderly. Its clinical presentation is less typical and the prognosis more severe than in younger subjects because heart failure occurs in patients with multiple comorbidities. A comprehensive geriatric assessment should therefore be performed to detect the vulnerabilities and manage the comorbidities. The main diseases associated with heart failure are dementia, depression, malnutrition, atrial fibrillation, coronary artery disease, orthostatic hypotension, renal failure, anemia and iron deficiency. Comorbidities worsen heart failure and makes its treatment more difficult. The identification and treatment of comorbidities improve the prognosis in terms of mortality but especially in terms of quality of life. Caution with drugs is necessary because of pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic changes related to aging and the comorbidities. In this context, clinical and laboratory monitoring should be increased, mostly during an acute event (acute heart failure, infection, dehydration, fall, new therapy…). Therefore, the follow-up of elderly patients with heart failure requires a multidisciplinary approach that involves close cooperation between cardiologists, geriatricians, general practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists.

  9. Prognostic effect of carbohydrate antigen 125-guided therapy in patients recently discharged for acute heart failure (CHANCE-HF). Study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Julio; Merlos, Pilar; Fácila, Lorenzo; Llàcer, Pau; Bosch, Maria José; Bertomeu-Martínez, Vicente; García-Blas, Sergio; Montagud, Vicente; Pedrosa, Valle; Mendizábal, Andrea; Cordero, Alberto; Miñana, Gema; Sanchis, Juan; Bertomeu-González, Vicente

    2015-02-01

    Morbidity and mortality after admission for acute heart failure remain prohibitively high. In that setting, plasma levels of antigen carbohydrate 125 have shown to correlate with the severity of fluid overload and the risk of mortality and readmission. Preliminary data suggests a potential role of antigen carbohydrate 125 to guide therapy. The objective of this study is to evaluate the prognostic effect of an antigen carbohydrate 125-guided management strategy vs standard therapy in patients recently discharged for acute heart failure. This is a multicenter, randomized, single-blind, efficacy trial study of patients recently discharged from acute heart failure ( 35 U/ml. A randomization scheme was used to allocate participants (in a 1:1 ratio) to receive therapy guided by antigen carbohydrate 125 (aiming to keep normal values) or standard treatment. Mainly, antigen carbohydrate 125-guided therapy is focused on the frequency of monitoring and titration of decongestive therapies and statins. As of December 10, 2013, there were 383 patients enrolled. The primary outcome was the composite of 1-year all-cause mortality or rehospitalization for acute heart failure. Analysis was planned to be intention-to-treat. Discovering novel therapeutic strategies or finding better ways of optimizing established treatments have become a health care priority in heart failure. This study will add important knowledge about the potential of antigen carbohydrate 125 as a management tool for monitoring and titration of therapies where optimal utilization has not been well defined, such as diuretics and statins. ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT02008110. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Advanced Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... patients and their doctors, making good decisions requires teamwork. Through shared decision making, doctors and patients consider ... Heart Failure and Knowing Your Options Planning Ahead Communicating With Your Healthcare Provider Overcoming Barriers to Shared ...

  11. Hyperkalemia in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwar, Chaudhry M S; Papadimitriou, Lampros; Pitt, Bertram; Piña, Ileana; Zannad, Faiez; Anker, Stefan D; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Butler, Javed

    2016-10-01

    Disorders of potassium homeostasis can potentiate the already elevated risk of arrhythmia in heart failure. Heart failure patients have a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease, which further heightens the risk of hyperkalemia, especially when renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors are used. Acute treatment for hyperkalemia may not be tolerated in the long term. Recent data for patiromer and sodium zirconium cyclosilicate, used to treat and prevent high serum potassium levels on a more chronic basis, have sparked interest in the treatment of hyperkalemia, as well as the potential use of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors in patients who were previously unable to take these drugs or tolerated only low doses. This review discusses the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and outcomes of hyperkalemia in heart failure; provides an overview of traditional and novel ways to approach management of hyperkalemia; and discusses the need for further research to optimally treat heart failure.

  12. Acute heart failure syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tandfonline.com/ ... When heart failure develops gradually, there is time for the compensatory ... of this can be seen in acute brain injury, some forms of takotsubo syndrome or .... reduce blood pressure in cases presenting with elevated blood pressure.

  13. Obesity paradox, cachexia, frailty, and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavie, Carl J; De Schutter, Alban; Alpert, Martin A; Mehra, Mandeep R; Milani, Richard V; Ventura, Hector O

    2014-04-01

    Overweight and obesity adversely affect cardiovascular (CV) risk factors and CV structure and function, and lead to a marked increase in the risk of developing heart failure (HF). Despite this, an obesity paradox exists, wherein those who are overweight and obese with HF have a better prognosis than their leaner counterparts, and the underweight, frail, and cachectic have a particularly poor prognosis. In light of this, the potential benefits of exercise training and efforts to improve cardiorespiratory fitness, as well as the potential for weight reduction, especially in severely obese patients with HF, are discussed.

  14. Pathophysiology of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiariello, M; Perrone-Filardi, P

    1999-01-01

    Heart failure is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in Western countries. Common etiology is mostly represented by ischemic and hypertensive heart disease. Clinically, heart failure can be defined as an impaired cardiac performance, unable to meet the energy requirements of the periphery. Pathophysiologically, the clinical onset of heart failure symptoms already represents an advanced stage of disease when compensatory mechanisms triggered by the underlying decrease in contractility are no longer capable of maintaining adequate cardiac performance during exercise and, subsequently, under resting conditions. Independent of its underlying etiology, cardiac failure is always characterized by an impairment in the intrinsic contractility of myocytes. As a consequence of reduced contractility, a number of central and peripheral compensatory mechanisms take place that are capable of effectively counteracting reduced intravascular intrinsic performance for a long period of time. Among them, recruitment of preload reserve, enhanced neurohormonal stimulation and cardiac hypertrophy are the most important. All of them, however, also carry unfavorable effects that contribute to further deterioration of cardiac function. In fact, increased end-diastolic volume determines increased wall stress that further reduces systolic performance; sympathetic and angiotensin stimulation increases peripheral resistance and contributes to increase volume expansion; hypertrophic myocytes demonstrate impaired intrinsic contractility and relaxation, and hypertrophy causes a clinically relevant deterioration of ventricular relaxation and compliance that substantially participates in increased end-diastolic pressure, and, therefore, to limited exercise performance. Diastolic dysfunction usually accompanies systolic dysfunction, although in some cases it may represent the prevalent mechanism of congestive heart failure in patients in whom systolic performance is preserved. Biological causes

  15. Heart failure in COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, Frans Hendrik

    2005-01-01

    The main aim of the thesis was to assess the prevalence of heart failure in patients with a diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Furthermore, to explore diagnostic strategies (including natriuretic peptides and cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR)) to identify heart

  16. Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agents and Heart Failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lipsic, Erik; van der Meer, Peter; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    2011-01-01

    Anemia is a common comorbidity in heart failure (HF) patients. Its occurrence and severity are associated with worse prognosis. Although the etiology of anemia is multifactorial, inappropriate erythropoietin (EPO) production and/or bone-marrow resistance to EPO appear crucial in majority of anemic

  17. Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agents and Heart Failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lipsic, Erik; van der Meer, Peter; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    2011-01-01

    Anemia is a common comorbidity in heart failure (HF) patients. Its occurrence and severity are associated with worse prognosis. Although the etiology of anemia is multifactorial, inappropriate erythropoietin (EPO) production and/or bone-marrow resistance to EPO appear crucial in majority of anemic H

  18. Cardiac arrhythmia and heart failure: From bench to bedside

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Fu Xiao

    2011-01-01

    @@ Cardiac arrhythmia is an abnormal rate and/or rhythm of a heart due to its abnormal electrical impulse origination and/or propagation.Various etiologies can cause arrhythnuas.Heart failure(HF)is a clinical syndrome due to an impaired heart that can not pump sufficient blood to meet the systemic metabolic needs.The common causes of HF include myocardial infarction,hypertension,valvular heart disease,and cardiomyopathy.

  19. Nutritional Deficiency in Patients with Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo Sciatti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is the main cause of mortality and morbidity in Western countries. Although evidence-based treatments have substantially improved outcomes, prognosis remains poor with high costs for health care systems. In patients with HF, poor dietary behaviors are associated with unsatisfactory quality of life and adverse outcome. The HF guidelines have not recommended a specific nutritional strategy. Despite the role of micronutrient deficiency, it has been extensively studied, and data about the efficacy of supplementation therapy in HF are not supported by large randomized trials and there is limited evidence regarding the outcomes. The aim of the present review is to analyze the state-of-the-art of nutritional deficiencies in HF, focusing on the physiological role and the prognostic impact of micronutrient supplementation.

  20. Targeting interleukin-1 in heart failure and inflammatory heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tassell, Benjamin W; Raleigh, Juan M Valle; Abbate, Antonio

    2015-02-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a clinical syndrome characterized by dyspnea, fatigue, and poor exercise capacity due to insufficient cardiac function. HF represents the leading cause of hospitalization among adult patients over 65 years of age. Neurohormonal blockade has improved clinical outcomes; however, HF incidence continues to rise, suggesting an urgent need to develop novel drugs that target a different pathophysiological paradigm. Inflammation plays a central role in many cardiovascular diseases. Interleukin-1 (IL-1), a prototypical proinflammatory cytokine, is upregulated in HF and associated with worse prognosis. Preclinical models suggest a beneficial effect of IL-1 blockade, and pilot clinical trials are currently underway to evaluate the role of IL-1 blockade to reduce inflammation, ameliorate ventricular remodeling, and improve exercise capacity in patients with HF.

  1. Heart rate reduction in coronary artery disease and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Roberto; Fox, Kim

    2016-08-01

    Elevated heart rate is known to induce myocardial ischaemia in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), and heart rate reduction is a recognized strategy to prevent ischaemic episodes. In addition, clinical evidence shows that slowing the heart rate reduces the symptoms of angina by improving microcirculation and coronary flow. Elevated heart rate is an established risk factor for cardiovascular events in patients with CAD and in those with chronic heart failure (HF). Accordingly, reducing heart rate improves prognosis in patients with HF, as demonstrated in SHIFT. By contrast, data from SIGNIFY indicate that heart rate is not a modifiable risk factor in patients with CAD who do not also have HF. Heart rate is also an important determinant of cardiac arrhythmias; low heart rate can be associated with atrial fibrillation, and high heart rate after exercise can be associated with sudden cardiac death. In this Review, we critically assess these clinical findings, and propose hypotheses for the variable effect of heart rate reduction in cardiovascular disease.

  2. The role of coronary artery disease in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lala, Anuradha; Desai, Akshay S

    2014-04-01

    Enhanced survival following acute myocardial infarction and the declining prevalence of hypertension and valvular heart disease as contributors to incident heart failure (HF) have fueled the emergence of coronary artery disease (CAD) as the primary risk factor for HF development. Despite the acknowledged role of CAD in the development of HF, the role of coronary revascularization in reducing HF-associated morbidity and mortality remains controversial. The authors review key features of the epidemiology and pathophysiology of CAD in patients with HF as well as the emerging data from recent clinical trials that inform the modern approach to management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. MicroRNA and Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Lee Wong

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF imposes significant economic and public health burdens upon modern society. It is known that disturbances in neurohormonal status play an important role in the pathogenesis of HF. Therapeutics that antagonize selected neurohormonal pathways, specifically the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and sympathetic nervous systems, have significantly improved patient outcomes in HF. Nevertheless, mortality remains high with about 50% of HF patients dying within five years of diagnosis thus mandating ongoing efforts to improve HF management. The discovery of short noncoding microRNAs (miRNAs and our increasing understanding of their functions, has presented potential therapeutic applications in complex diseases, including HF. Results from several genome-wide miRNA studies have identified miRNAs differentially expressed in HF cohorts suggesting their possible involvement in the pathogenesis of HF and their potential as both biomarkers and as therapeutic targets. Unravelling the functional relevance of miRNAs within pathogenic pathways is a major challenge in cardiovascular research. In this article, we provide an overview of the role of miRNAs in the cardiovascular system. We highlight several HF-related miRNAs reported from selected cohorts and review their putative roles in neurohormonal signaling.

  4. The large-scale placebo-controlled beta-blocker studies in systolic heart failure revisited: results from CIBIS-II, COPERNICUS and SENIORS-SHF compared with stratified subsets from MERIT-HF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikstrand, J; Wedel, H; Castagno, D; McMurray, J J V

    2014-02-01

    The four pivotal beta-blocker trials in heart failure (HF) had different inclusion criteria, making comparison difficult without patient stratifying. The aim of this study was to compare, in similar patients, the effects of bisoprolol, metoprolol controlled release/extended release (CR/XL), carvedilol and nebivolol on (i) total mortality, (ii) all-cause mortality or hospitalization due to cardiovascular causes (time to first event), (iii) all-cause mortality or hospitalization because of HF and (iv) tolerability, defined as discontinuation of randomized treatment. We compared stratified (s ) subsets in MERIT-HF with patients in CIBIS-II [New York Heart Association (NYHA) class III/IV and ejection fraction (EF) ≤ 35%] and COPERNICUS (NYHA III/IV and EF COPERNICUS (n = 2289), 19.7% vs. 12.8% (relative risk reduction 35%, 95% CI: 19-48, P = 0.0014) and MERIT-HFs (n = 795), 19.1% vs. 11.7% (relative risk reduction 39%; 95% CI: 11-58, P = 0.0086); (iii) SENIORS-SHF (n = 1359), 11.3% vs. 9.7% (relative risk reduction 16%, NS) and MERIT-HFs (n = 985), 14.8% vs. 10.1% (relative risk reduction 32%, 95% CI: 2-53, P = 0.038). The effects on the other outcomes assessed were similar. Analyses indicated fewer discontinuations from randomized treatment on beta-blockers compared with placebo in COPERNICUS and the MERIT-HFs subsets. The efficacy and tolerability of bisoprolol, carvedilol and metoprolol CR/XL are similar in patients with systolic HF, irrespective of NYHA class or ejection fraction. Nebivolol is less effective and not better tolerated. © 2013 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  5. [Heart failure and anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reda, S; Motloch, L J; Hoppe, U C

    2013-09-01

    Chronic heart failure has an age-dependent prevalence of 2% and is therefore one of the most frequent diseases in western societies. A reduced hemoglobin concentration according to the definition of the World Health Organization is a common comorbidity affecting more than half of all heart failure patients. Elderly patients, patients suffering from renal impairment and women are more likely to develop anemia but a definitive etiology of anemia is only identified in the minority of cases. Anemia is associated with a poor clinical status and a greater risk of hospitalization and is a predictive factor for increased mortality. The incidence of anemia appears to increase with a poorer functional class. Intravenous iron therapy improves the exercise capacity in patients with systolic heart failure and iron deficiency and is currently being recommended for patients with persistent symptoms despite optimal medical and device therapy. However, erythropoietin-stimulating agents as a treatment for anemia in chronic heart failure have failed to improve clinical outcome in a large randomized trial. In patients with heart failure but with maintained ejection fraction, anemia is also associated with a poor prognosis. Specific therapeutic recommendations for these patients are still not available.

  6. Exploring the Microbiome in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitai, Takeshi; Kirsop, Jennifer; Tang, W H Wilson

    2016-04-01

    Recent years have brought interesting insights into the human gut microbiota and have highlighted its increasingly recognized impact on cardiovascular (CV) diseases, including heart failure (HF). Changes in composition of gut microbiota, called dysbiosis, can trigger systemic inflammation, which is known to be involved in the pathophysiology of HF. Trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), which is derived from gut microbiota metabolites of specific dietary nutrients, has emerged as a key contributor to cardiovascular disease pathogenesis. Elevated TMAO levels have been reported to be associated with poor outcomes in patients with both HF and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Dysbiosis of gut microbiota can contribute to higher levels of TMAO and the generation of uremic toxins, progressing to both HF and CKD. Therefore, this bidirectional relationship between HF and CKD through gut microbiota may be a novel therapeutic target for the cardiorenal syndrome. However, the mechanisms by which gut microbiota could influence the development of heart failure are still unknown, and there are still some questions regarding the causative effects of TMAO and the underlying mechanistic link that explains how TMAO might directly or indirectly promote CV diseases including HF. Further studies are warranted to clarify the function of TMAO on the pathophysiology of cardiorenal syndrome and the handling of TMAO levels by the kidneys.

  7. A prospective comparison of alginate-hydrogel with standard medical therapy to determine impact on functional capacity and clinical outcomes in patients with advanced heart failure (AUGMENT-HF trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anker, Stefan D; Coats, Andrew J S; Cristian, Gabriel; Dragomir, Dinu; Pusineri, Enrico; Piredda, Massimo; Bettari, Luca; Dowling, Robert; Volterrani, Maurizio; Kirwan, Bridget-Anne; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Mas, Jean-Louis; Danchin, Nicolas; Solomon, Scott D; Lee, Randall J; Ahmann, Frank; Hinson, Andy; Sabbah, Hani N; Mann, Douglas L

    2015-09-07

    AUGMENT-HF was an international, multi-centre, prospective, randomized, controlled trial to evaluate the benefits and safety of a novel method of left ventricular (LV) modification with alginate-hydrogel. Alginate-hydrogel is an inert permanent implant that is directly injected into LV heart muscle and serves as a prosthetic scaffold to modify the shape and size of the dilated LV. Patients with advanced chronic heart failure (HF) were randomized (1 : 1) to alginate-hydrogel (n = 40) in combination with standard medical therapy or standard medical therapy alone (Control, n = 38). The primary endpoint of AUGMENT-HF was the change in peak VO2 from baseline to 6 months. Secondary endpoints included changes in 6-min walk test (6MWT) distance and New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class, as well as assessments of procedural safety. Enrolled patients were 63 ± 10 years old, 74% in NYHA functional class III, had a LV ejection fraction of 26 ± 5% and a mean peak VO2 of 12.2 ± 1.8 mL/kg/min. Thirty-five patients were successfully treated with alginate-hydrogel injections through a limited left thoracotomy approach without device-related complications; the 30-day surgical mortality was 8.6% (3 deaths). Alginate-hydrogel treatment was associated with improved peak VO2 at 6 months-treatment effect vs. +1.24 mL/kg/min (95% confidence interval 0.26-2.23, P = 0.014). Also 6MWT distance and NYHA functional class improved in alginate-hydrogel-treated patients vs. Control (both P Alginate-hydrogel in addition to standard medical therapy for patients with advanced chronic HF was more effective than standard medical therapy alone for improving exercise capacity and symptoms. The results of AUGMENT-HF provide proof of concept for a pivotal trial. NCT01311791. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  8. Novel therapies in heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Licette Cécile Yang

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is a clinical condition that is characterized by the inability of the heart to meet the oxygen requirements of peripheral tissues and organs, despite normal filling pressures. Despite recent developments in the treatment of heart failure, the prognosis of heart failure patients remains

  9. Novel therapies in heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Licette Cécile Yang

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is a clinical condition that is characterized by the inability of the heart to meet the oxygen requirements of peripheral tissues and organs, despite normal filling pressures. Despite recent developments in the treatment of heart failure, the prognosis of heart failure patients remains

  10. Ejection Fraction Heart Failure Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Ejection Fraction Heart Failure Measurement Updated:Feb 15,2017 The ejection fraction ( ... failure This content was last reviewed April 2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  11. Mitochondria in cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosca, Mariana G; Tandler, Bernard; Hoppel, Charles L

    2013-02-01

    Heart failure (HF) frequently is the unfavorable outcome of pathological heart hypertrophy. In contrast to physiological cardiac hypertrophy, which occurs in response to exercise and leads to full adaptation of contractility to the increased wall stress, pathological hypertrophy occurs in response to volume or pressure overload, ultimately leading to contractile dysfunction and HF. Because cardiac hypertrophy impairs the relationship between ATP demand and production, mitochondrial bioenergetics must keep up with the cardiac hypertrophic phenotype. We review data regarding the mitochondrial proteomic and energetic remodeling in cardiac hypertrophy, as well as the temporal and causal relationships between mitochondrial failure to match the increased energy demand and progression to cardiac decompensation. We suggest that the maladaptive effect of sustained neuroendocrine signals on mitochondria leads to bioenergetic fading which contributes to the progression from cardiac hypertrophy to failure. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Focus on Cardiac Metabolism". Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mitochondria in cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosca, Mariana G.; Tandler, Bernard; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) frequently is the unfavorable outcome of pathological heart hypertrophy. In contrast to physiological cardiac hypertrophy, which occurs in response to exercise and leads to full adaptation of contractility to the increased wall stress, pathological hypertrophy occurs in response to volume or pressure overload, ultimately leading to contractile dysfunction and HF. Because cardiac hypertrophy impairs the relationship between ATP demand and production, mitochondrial bioenergetics must keep up with the cardiac hypertrophic phenotype. We review data regarding the mitochondrial proteomic and energetic remodeling in cardiac hypertrophy, as well as the temporal and causal relationship between mitochondrial failure to match the increased energy demand and progression to cardiac decompensation. We suggest that the maladaptive effect of sustained neuroendocrine signals on mitochondria leads to bioenergetic fading which contributes to the progression from cardiac hypertrophy to failure. PMID:22982369

  13. Management strategies to meet the core heart failure measures for acute decompensated heart failure: a nursing perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardetto, Nancy J; Carroll, Karen C

    2007-01-01

    Despite enormous advances in the medical management of heart disease, heart failure (HF) persists as a leading cause of hospitalization in our elderly. In 2001, the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology published Guidelines for Secondary Prevention for Patients With Coronary and Other Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease. The guidelines proactively responded to a growing body of evidence confirming that comprehensive risk factor management and risk reduction improve quality of life and survival, while reducing recurrent cardiovascular events. In spite of the well-crafted, comprehensive HF guidelines, morbidity, mortality, and hospital readmission rates for acute decompensated heart failure remain high, and adherence to HF guidelines is not always optimal. The Joint Commission has implemented a number of quality care performance indicators based on the Guidelines for Secondary Prevention; among them are the Core HF Measures for hospitalized HF patients. The Core HF Measures are endorsed by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid and has been adopted as a national benchmark for measurement and public reporting of healthcare performance and for Medicare payments (Joint Commission). The implementation and monitoring of Core HF Measures has prioritized attention toward patient education and risk factor modification to prevent future hospitalization. Critical care nurses are on the frontline to champion uptake and adherence of Core HF Measures. The purpose of this article is to highlight the critical component that nursing care, guided by the Core HF Measures, can offer to improve the quality of patient care in acute decompensated heart failure.

  14. Efficiently screening heart failure in patients with type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonman-de Winter, Leandra J M; Rutten, Frans H; Cramer, Maarten J; Landman, Marcel J; Zuithoff, Nicolaas P A; Liem, Anho H; Hoes, Arno W

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Our aim was to develop a screening tool for heart failure in patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 581 consecutive patients from 21 primary care practices in The Netherlands with type 2 diabetes, in whom the diagnosis of heart failure (HF) was not known, underwent an e

  15. Complex relationship of obesity and obesity paradox in heart failure - higher risk of developing heart failure and better outcomes in established heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagiakrishnan, Kannayiram; Banach, Maciej; Ahmed, Ali; Aronow, Wilbert S

    2016-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) and obesity are major public health problems. Studies have shown that obesity may increase the risk of developing new HF but after patients have developed HF, obesity may be associated with improved outcomes. This paradoxical association of obesity with HF remains poorly understood. It is believed that the obesity paradox may in part be due to the inherent limitations of body mass index (BMI) as a measure of obesity. BMI may not appropriately measure important components of body mass like body fat, fat distribution, lean body mass, and body fluid content and may not be ideal for examining the relationship of body composition with health outcomes. Differentiating between body fat and lean body mass may explain some of the paradoxical association between higher BMI and better prognosis in patients with HF. Paradoxical outcomes in HF may also be due to phenotypes of obesity. Future studies need to develop and test metrics that may better measure body composition and may serve as a better tool for the estimation of the true association of obesity and outcomes in HF and determine whether the association may vary by obesity phenotypes. KEY MESSAGES Obesity predisposes to heart failure in all age groups. But obesity in heart failure is an area of controversy, because of obesity paradox, the apparent protective effect of overweight and mild obesity on mortality after development of heart failure. Traditional markers of obesity do not measure different components of body weight like muscle mass, fat, water, and skeletal weight. Body Mass Index in heart failure subjects does not measure accurately body fat or fluid retention. So new markers of obesity like visceral adiposity index, body composition analysis, sarcopenic status assessment may be helpful in the assessment of heart failure outcomes. Different phenotypes of obesity may be responsible for the different morbidity, mortality as well as therapeutic outcomes in heart failure.

  16. Organ protection possibilities in acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Pérez-Barquero, M; Morales-Rull, J L

    2016-04-01

    Unlike chronic heart failure (HF), the treatment for acute HF has not changed over the last decade. The drugs employed have shown their ability to control symptoms but have not achieved organ protection or managed to reduce medium to long-term morbidity and mortality. Advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of acute HF suggest that treatment should be directed not only towards correcting the haemodynamic disorders and achieving symptomatic relief but also towards preventing organ damage, thereby counteracting myocardial remodelling and cardiac and extracardiac disorders. Compounds that exert vasodilatory and anti-inflammatory action in the acute phase of HF and can stop cell death, thereby boosting repair mechanisms, could have an essential role in organ protection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  17. Heart Failure Update: Chronic Disease Management Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountain, Lorna B

    2016-03-01

    With high mortality and readmission rates among patients with heart failure (HF), multiple disease management models have been and continue to be tested, with mixed results. Early postdischarge care improves outcomes for patients. Telemonitoring also can assist in reducing mortality and HF-related hospitalizations. Office-based team care improves patient outcomes, with important components including rapid access to physicians, partnerships with clinical pharmacists, education, monitoring, and support. Pay-for-performance measures developed for HF, primarily use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta blockers, also improve patient outcomes, but the influence of adherence to other measures has been minimal. Evaluating comorbid conditions, including diabetes and hypertension, and making drug adjustments for patients with HF to include blood pressure control and use of metformin, when possible, can reduce mortality and morbidity.

  18. Forecasting the Impact of Heart Failure in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, Paul A.; Albert, Nancy M.; Allen, Larry A.; Bluemke, David A.; Butler, Javed; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Ikonomidis, John S.; Khavjou, Olga; Konstam, Marvin A.; Maddox, Thomas M.; Nichol, Graham; Pham, Michael; Piña, Ileana L.; Trogdon, Justin G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF) is an important contributor to both the burden and cost of national healthcare expenditures, with more older Americans hospitalized for HF than for any other medical condition. With the aging of the population, the impact of HF is expected to increase substantially. Methods and Results We estimated future costs of HF by adapting a methodology developed by the American Heart Association to project the epidemiology and future costs of HF from 2012 to 2030 without double counting the costs attributed to comorbid conditions. The model assumes that HF prevalence will remain constant by age, sex, and race/ethnicity and that rising costs and technological innovation will continue at the same rate. By 2030, >8 million people in the United States (1 in every 33) will have HF. Between 2012 and 2030, real (2010$) total direct medical costs of HF are projected to increase from $21 billion to $53 billion. Total costs, including indirect costs for HF, are estimated to increase from $31 billion in 2012 to $70 billion in 2030. If one assumes all costs of cardiac care for HF patients are attributable to HF (no cost attribution to comorbid conditions), the 2030 projected cost estimates of treating patients with HF will be 3-fold higher ($160 billion in direct costs). Conclusions The estimated prevalence and cost of care for HF will increase markedly because of aging of the population. Strategies to prevent HF and improve the efficiency of care are needed. PMID:23616602

  19. Qualitative examination of compliance in heart failure patients in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, Martje H. L.; Jaarsma, Tiny; Moser, Debra K.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Noncompliance with pharmacological and nonpharmacological recommendations is a problem in many heart failure (HF) patients, leading to worse symptoms and readmission. Although knowledge is available regarding factors related to compliance with HF regimens, little is known about patients'

  20. Qualitative examination of compliance in heart failure patients in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, Martje H. L.; Jaarsma, Tiny; Moser, Debra K.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Noncompliance with pharmacological and nonpharmacological recommendations is a problem in many heart failure (HF) patients, leading to worse symptoms and readmission. Although knowledge is available regarding factors related to compliance with HF regimens, little is known about patients'

  1. Neuroimaging and Correlates of Cognitive Function among Patients with Heart Failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogels, R.L.C.; Oosterman, J.M.; Harten, B. van; Gouw, A.A.; Schroeder-Tanka, J.M.; Scheltens, P.; Flier, W.M. van der; Weinstein, H.C.

    2007-01-01

    Background/Aims: We purposed to investigate the relationship between cerebral abnormalities detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and cognitive performance in nondemented outpatients with heart failure (HF). Methods: In 58 patients with HF neuropsychological assessment was performed including

  2. Neurohormonal profile of patients with heart failure and diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Horst, I. C. C.; de Boer, R. A.; Hillege, H. L.; Boomsma, F.; Voors, A. A.; van Veldhuisen, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Neurohormonal activation is generally recognised to play an important role in the pathophysiology, prognosis and treatment of chronic heart failure (HF). While the number of patients with diabetes increases, little if anything is known about neurohormonal activation in HF patients with d

  3. Sexual concerns and sexual counseling in heart failure.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medina, M.; Walker, C.; Steinke, E.E.; Wright, D.W.; Mosack, V.; Farhoud, M.H.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with heart failure (HF) face significant challenges in maintaining quality of life (QOL), particularly for sexual intimacy. Although recommended for all cardiac patients, it has been suggested that few HF patients receive sexual counseling. This study explored sexual counseling needs, sexua

  4. Practical implications of having a dedicated heart failure programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucas, C.M.H.B.; Cleuren, G.V.J.; Jaarsma, Trijntje (Tiny); Van Rees, C.; Kirchhof, C.J.H.J.

    2005-01-01

    : Background: The prevalence of heart failure (HF) is gaining epidemic proportions. Recent data stress the importance of multidisciplinary strategies for the management of HF patients, but the practical consequences of such programmes remain unclear. Objective: To describe our experience with a

  5. Soluble guanylate cyclase : a potential therapeutic target for heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gheorghiade, Mihai; Marti, Catherine N.; Sabbah, Hani N.; Roessig, Lothar; Greene, Stephen J.; Boehm, Michael; Burnett, John C.; Campia, Umberto; Cleland, John G. F.; Collins, Sean P.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Levy, Phillip D.; Metra, Marco; Pitt, Bertram; Ponikowski, Piotr; Sato, Naoki; Voors, Adriaan A.; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Butler, Javed

    2013-01-01

    The number of annual hospitalizations for heart failure (HF) and the mortality rates among patients hospitalized for HF remains unacceptably high. The search continues for safe and effective agents that improve outcomes when added to standard therapy. The nitric oxide (NO)-soluble guanylate cyclase

  6. State of the Art : Newer biomarkers in heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Rudolf A.; Daniels, Lori B.; Maisel, Alan S.; Januzzi, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Since natriuretic peptides were successfully integrated into the clinical practice of heart failure (HF), the possibility of using new biomarkers to advance the management of affected patients has been explored. While a huge number of candidate HF biomarkers have been described recently, very few ha

  7. Current and novel renal biomarkers in heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, Kevin; Voors, Adriaan A.; Navis, Gerjan; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Hillege, Hans L.

    2012-01-01

    Renal function is the most important predictor of clinical outcome in heart failure (HF). It is therefore essential to have accurate and reliable measurement of renal function and early specific markers of renal impairment in patients with HF. Several renal functional entities exist, including glome

  8. Galectin-3 in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Rudolf A.; Edelmann, Frank; Cohen-Solal, Alain; Mamas, Mamas A.; Maisel, Alan; Pieske, Burkert

    2013-01-01

    In the last decades it has been appreciated that many patients with heart failure (HF) suffer from HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). The diagnosis and treatment of HFpEF is difficult, as we lack specific markers of the disease and no specific treatments have been identified. Galectin-3 ha

  9. Vitamin B-12 and folate deficiency in chronic heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, Haye H.; Comin-Colet, Josep; Klip, Ijsbrand T.; Enjuanes, Cristina; Grote Beverborg, Niels; Voors, Adriaan A.; Banasiak, Waldemar; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Bruguera, Jordi; Ponikowski, Piotr; Jankowska, Ewa A.; van der Meer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence, clinical correlates and the effects on outcome of vitamin B-12 and folic acid levels in patients with chronic heart failure (HF). Methods We studied an international pooled cohort comprising 610 patients with chronic HF. The main outcome measure was all-cause m

  10. Daily Physical Activity in Stable Heart Failure Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dontje, Manon L.; van der Wal, M.H.L.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Brugemann, Johan; Jaarsma, Tiny; Wijtvliet, Petra E. P. J.; van der Schans, Cees P.; de Greef, Mathieu H. G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Physical activity is the only nonpharmacological therapy that is proven to be effective in heart failure (HF) patients in reducing morbidity. To date, little is known about the levels of daily physical activity in HF patients and about related factors. Objective: The objectives of this s

  11. Daily physical activity in stable heart failure patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dontje, Manon L.; Wal, M.H. van der; Stolk, R.P.; Brügemann, J.; Jaarsma, J.; Wijtvliet, P.E.; Schans, Cees van der; Greef, M.H. de

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: Physical activity is the only nonpharmacological therapy that is proven to be effective in heart failure (HF) patients in reducing morbidity. To date, little is known about the levels of daily physical activity in HF patients and about related factors. OBJECTIVE:: The objectives of this

  12. Heart failure in the elderly: a U.S. Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael W. Rich

    2006-01-01

    @@ Heart failure (HF) affects 5 million Americans, of whom three-fourths are over age 65 and half are over age 75.1 HF is currently the leading cause of hospitalization among older adults in the U.S., and it is the most costly medical illness by a factor of almost two.

  13. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients admitted with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, K K; Kjaergaard, J; Akkan, D

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an important differential diagnosis in patients with heart failure (HF). The primary aims were to determine the prevalence of COPD and to test the accuracy of self-reported COPD in patients admitted with HF. Secondary aims were to study...

  14. Vitamin D status and outcomes in heart failure patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Licette C. Y.; Voors, Adriaan A.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; van der Veer, Eveline; Belonje, Anne M.; Szymanski, Mariusz K.; Sillje, Herman H. W.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Jaarsma, Tiny; de Boer, Rudolf A.

    2011-01-01

    Aims Vitamin D status has been implicated in the pathophysiology of heart failure (HF). The aims of this study were to determine whether a low vitamin D status is associated with prognosis in HF and whether activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and inflammatory markers could explain this

  15. Iron deficiency in chronic heart failure : An international pooled analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klip, IJsbrand T.; Comin-Colet, Josep; Voors, Adriaan A.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Enjuanes, Cristina; Banasiak, Waldemar; Lok, Dirk J.; Rosentryt, Piotr; Torrens, Ainhoa; Polonski, Lech; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; van der Meer, Peter; Jankowska, Ewa A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency (ID) is an emerging problem in patients with chronic heart failure (HF) and can be a potential therapeutic target. However, not much is known about the prevalence, predictors, and prognosis of ID in patients with chronic HF. Methods In an international pooled cohort compri

  16. Sexual concerns and sexual counseling in heart failure.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medina, M.; Walker, C.; Steinke, E.E.; Wright, D.W.; Mosack, V.; Farhoud, M.H.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with heart failure (HF) face significant challenges in maintaining quality of life (QOL), particularly for sexual intimacy. Although recommended for all cardiac patients, it has been suggested that few HF patients receive sexual counseling. This study explored sexual counseling needs,

  17. Co-morbidities in patients with heart failure : an analysis of the European Heart Failure Pilot Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deursen, Vincent M.; Urso, Renato; Laroche, Cecile; Damman, Kevin; Dahlstrom, Ulf; Tavazzi, Luigi; Maggioni, Aldo P.; Voors, Adriaan A.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Co-morbidities frequently accompany heart failure (HF), contributing to increased morbidity and mortality, and an impairment of quality of life. We assessed the prevalence, determinants, regional variation, and prognostic implications of co-morbidities in patients with chronic HF in Europe. Met

  18. A Strategy to Reduce Heart Failure Readmissions and Inpatient Costs

    OpenAIRE

    Howie-Esquivel, Jill; Carroll, Maureen; Brinker, Eileen; Kao, Helen; Pantilat, Steven; Rago, Karen; De Marco, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of a disease management intervention on rehospitalization rates in hospitalized heart failure (HF) patients. Methods Patients treated with the TEACH-HF intervention that included Teaching and Education, prompt follow-up Appointments, Consultation for support services, and Home follow-up phone calls (TEACH-HF) from January 2010 to January 2012 constituted the intervention group (n = 548). Patients treated from January 2007 to Ja...

  19. Sleep Apnea and Cognitive Function in Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krysten M. Knecht

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Prior research indicates that heart failure (HF patients exhibit significant cognitive deficits on neuropsychological testing. Sleep apnea is associated with both HF and reduced cognitive function, but the combined impact of these conditions on cognitive function is unknown. Methods. In the current study, 172 older adults with a dual diagnosis of HF and sleep apnea or HF alone completed a battery of cognitive tests measuring attention, executive functioning, and memory. Results. Relative to patients with HF alone, persons with both HF and sleep apnea performed worse on measures of attention after adjusting for demographic and medical variables. Conclusions. The current findings suggest that HF patients with comorbid sleep apnea may be at greater risk for cognitive impairment relative to HF patient without such history. Further work is needed to clarify mechanisms for these findings and to determine whether the interactive effects on cognitive function lead to poorer patient outcomes.

  20. [Specificities of heart failure in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanon, Olivier

    2013-06-01

    Heart failure (HF) is frequent in the elderly population and is associated with high mortality, prolonged and frequent hospitalisations. In old patients with multiple comorbid diseases, clinical symptoms of HF are less typical and the prognosis is poorer. Comprehensive geriatric assessment, using simple tests to evaluate cognitive function, falls, depression, malnutrition, dependency, comorbidities, context of life and social conditions, is needed in order to screen concomitant diseases and loss of autonomy. Because of lack of specific studies on octogenarians, most recommendations for HF treatment in this population have been extrapolated from data based on younger populations. Epidemiological studies show that recommended HF therapies as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers are underused in elderly patients with HF. Reasons for this under prescription are various and include the absence of well-defined therapeutic strategy especially in case of preserved ejection fraction, the existence of comorbidities and the fear of adverse events. Special precautions for the use of HF drugs must be followed because of the comorbidities and age-related changes in drug pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics. Increase of drug dose must be closely monitored for adverse reactions. Overall, the therapeutic strategy must not be based on the subject's age, but rather on the individual analysis taking into account the severity of the heart disease, the geriatric assessment, the life expectancy and the quality of life. Clinical and laboratory monitoring should be intensified, especially in case of acute episode (infection, dehydration, introduction of a new treatment, fall…). Therefore, monitoring of heart failure in the elderly, involves multidisciplinary collaboration between cardiologists, geriatricians, general practitioners, pharmacists and paramedical team.

  1. Regulation of the renal sympathetic nerves in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit eRamchandra

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is a serious debilitating condition with poor survival rates and an increasing level of prevalence. Heart failure is associated with an increase in renal norepinephrine spillover, which is an independent predictor of mortality in HF patients. The excessive sympatho-excitation that is a hallmark of heart failure has long-term effects that contribute to disease progression. An increase in directly recorded renal sympathetic nerve activity has also been recorded in animal models of heart failure. This review will focus on the mechanisms controlling sympathetic nerve activity to the kidney during normal conditions and alterations in these mechanisms during heart failure. In particular the roles of afferent reflexes and central mechanisms will be discussed.

  2. Neurohumoral activation in heart failure: the role of adrenergic receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia C. Brum; Rolim, Natale P. L.; BACURAU, Aline V. N.; Alessandra Medeiros

    2006-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a common endpoint for many forms of cardiovascular disease and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The development of end-stage HF often involves an initial insult to the myocardium that reduces cardiac output and leads to a compensatory increase in sympathetic nervous system activity. Acutely, the sympathetic hyperactivity through the activation of beta-adrenergic receptors increases heart rate and cardiac contractility, which compensate for decreased cardia...

  3. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction in women : The dutch queen of hearts program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Ruijter, H.; Pasterkamp, G.; Rutten, F. H.; Lam, C. S P; Chi, C.; Tan, K. H.; van Zonneveld, A. J.; Spaanderman, M.; de Kleijn, D. P V

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) poses a heavy burden on patients, their families and society. The syndrome of HF comes in two types: with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). The latter is on the increase and predominantly present in women, especially the older ones. There i

  4. MODELS OF INSULIN RESISTANCE AND HEART FAILURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Mauricio; Kohli, Smita; Sabbah, Hani N.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of heart failure (HF) and diabetes mellitus is rapidly increasing and is associated with poor prognosis. In spite of the advances in therapy, HF remains a major health problem with high morbidity and mortality. When HF and diabetes coexist, clinical outcomes are significantly worse. The relationship between these two conditions has been studied in various experimental models. However, the mechanisms for this interrelationship are complex, incompletely understood, and have become a matter of considerable clinical and research interest. There are only few animal models that manifest both HF and diabetes. However, the translation of results from these models to human disease is limited and new models are needed to expand our current understanding of this clinical interaction. In this review, we discuss mechanisms of insulin signaling and insulin resistance, the clinical association between insulin resistance and HF and its proposed pathophysiologic mechanisms. Finally, we discuss available animal models of insulin resistance and HF and propose requirements for future new models. PMID:23456447

  5. Cardiorenal biomarkers in acute heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajiv Choudhary; Dipika Gopal; Ben A. Kipper; Alejandro De La Parra Landa; Hermineh Aramin

    2012-01-01

    Managing patients with heart failure (HF) is a challenging task within itself, but the presence of associated worsening renal function can greatly increase mortality and morbidity. Early diagnosis and treatment is the key to prevent re-hospitalizations and reduce healthcare costs. Biomarkers have long been established as highly sensitive and specific tools in diagnosing and prognosticating patients with HF. Reflecting distinct pathophysiological events and ongoing cellular insult, biomarkers have been proven superior to conventional laboratory tests. Availability of better assays and rapid analysis has allowed the use of biomarkers as point-of-care tests in the emergency department and at the patient's bed-side. Acute HF patients often go on to develop worsening renal function, termed as acute cardiorenal syndrome. The growing breadth of studies has shown the implications of combining multiple biomarkers to better chart outcomes and produce desirable results in such patients.

  6. Cardiorenal biomarkers in acute heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Rajiv; Gopal, Dipika; Kipper, Ben A.; De La Parra Landa, Alejandro; Lee, Hermineh Aramin Elizabeth; Shah, Saloni; Maisel, Alan S.

    2012-01-01

    Managing patients with heart failure (HF) is a challenging task within itself, but the presence of associated worsening renal function can greatly increase mortality and morbidity. Early diagnosis and treatment is the key to prevent re-hospitalizations and reduce healthcare costs. Biomarkers have long been established as highly sensitive and specific tools in diagnosing and prognosticating patients with HF. Reflecting distinct pathophysiological events and ongoing cellular insult, biomarkers have been proven superior to conventional laboratory tests. Availability of better assays and rapid analysis has allowed the use of biomarkers as point-of-care tests in the emergency department and at the patient's bed-side. Acute HF patients often go on to develop worsening renal function, termed as acute cardiorenal syndrome. The growing breadth of studies has shown the implications of combining multiple biomarkers to better chart outcomes and produce desirable results in such patients. PMID:23097660

  7. Aging, telomeres and heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong, Liza S. M.; van der Harst, Pim; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Huzen, Jardi; van Gilst, Wiek H.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    2010-01-01

    During normal aging, the heart undergoes functional, morphological and cellular changes. Although aging per se does not lead to the expression of heart failure, it is likely that age-associated changes lower the threshold for the manifestation of signs and symptoms of heart failure. In patients, the

  8. Heart failure - fluids and diuretics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000112.htm Heart failure - fluids and diuretics To use the sharing features on ... at Home When you have heart failure, your heart does not pump out enough blood. This causes fluids to build up in your body. If you ...

  9. Update on Obesity and Obesity Paradox in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavie, Carl J; Sharma, Abhishek; Alpert, Martin A; De Schutter, Alban; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco; Milani, Richard V; Ventura, Hector O

    2016-01-01

    Obesity has reached epidemic proportions in most of the Westernized world. Overweightness and obesity adversely impact cardiac structure and function, including on both the right and, especially, left sides of the heart, with adverse affects on systolic and, especially, diastolic ventricular function. Therefore, it is not surprising that obesity markedly increases the prevalence of heart failure (HF). Nevertheless, many studies have documented an obesity paradox in large cohorts with HF, where overweight and obese have a better prognosis, at least in the short-term, compared with lean HF patients. Although weight loss clearly improves cardiac structure and function and reduces symptoms in HF, there are no large studies on the impact of weight loss on clinical events in HF, preventing definitive guidelines on optimal body composition in patients with HF.

  10. Heart failure and cognitive impairment: Challenges and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George A Heckman

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available George A Heckman, Christopher J Patterson, Catherine Demers, Joye St.Onge, Irene D Turpie, Robert S McKelvieDepartment of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, CanadaAbstract: As populations age, heart failure (HF is becoming increasingly common, and in addition to a high burden of morbidity and mortality, HF has an enormous financial impact. Though disproportionately affected by HF, the elderly are less likely to receive recommended therapies, in part because clinical trials of HF therapy have ignored outcomes of importance to this population, including impaired cognitive function (ICF. HF is associated with ICF, manifested primarily as delirium in hospitalized patients, or as mild cognitive impairment or dementia in otherwise stable outpatients. This association is likely the result of shared risk factors, as well as perfusion and rheological abnormalities that occur in patients with HF. Evidence suggests that these abnormalities may be partially reversible with standard HF therapy. The clinical consequences of ICF in HF patients are significant. Clinicians should consider becoming familiar with screening instruments for ICF, including delirium and dementia, in order to identify patients at risk of nonadherence to HF therapy and related adverse consequences. Preliminary evidence suggests that optimal HF therapy in elderly patients may preserve or even improve cognitive function, though the impact on related outcomes remains to be determined.Keywords: heart failure, mild cognitive impairment, delirium, dementia, elderly

  11. Prognostic significance of cardiovascular biomarkers and renal dysfunction in outpatients with systolic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosselmann, Helle; Egstrup, Michael; Rossing, Kasper

    2013-01-01

    To assess whether the prognostic significance of cardiovascular (CV) biomarkers, is affected by renal dysfunction (RD) in systolic heart failure (HF).......To assess whether the prognostic significance of cardiovascular (CV) biomarkers, is affected by renal dysfunction (RD) in systolic heart failure (HF)....

  12. Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation is uncommon in outpatients with chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corell, Pernille; Gustafsson, Finn; Mehlsen, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the prevalence of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) in patients with heart failure (HF) due to systolic dysfunction.......The objective was to evaluate the prevalence of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) in patients with heart failure (HF) due to systolic dysfunction....

  13. Prevalence and prognostic significance of hyponatraemia in outpatients with chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balling, Louise; Schou, Morten; Videbæk, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Hyponatraemia has been reported to be a potent predictor of poor outcome in patients hospitalized for heart failure (HF). The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and prognostic significance of hyponatraemia in a large cohort of HF outpatients followed in clinics participating...... in the Danish Heart Failure Clinics Network....

  14. Microarray Expression Profile of Circular RNAs in Heart Tissue of Mice with Myocardial Infarction-Induced Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Jin Wu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Myocardial infarction (MI is a serious complication of atherosclerosis associated with increasing mortality attributable to heart failure. This study is aimed to assess the global changes in and characteristics of the transcriptome of circular RNAs (circRNAs in heart tissue during MI induced heart failure (HF. Methods: Using a post-myocardial infarction (MI model of HF in mice, we applied microarray assay to examine the transcriptome of circRNAs deregulated in the heart during HF. We confirmed the changes in circRNAs by quantitative PCR. Results: We revealed and confirmed a number of circRNAs that were deregulated during HF, which suggests a potential role of circRNAs in HF. Conclusions: The distinct expression patterns of circulatory circRNAs during HF indicate that circRNAs may actively respond to stress and thus serve as biomarkers of HF diagnosis and treatment.

  15. Unanswered Questions in Contemporary Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilstrap, Lauren G; Snipelisky, David; AbouEzzeddine, Omar; Vader, Justin; Cooper, Lauren; Kelley, Jacob; Perez, Antonio; Varian, Kenneth; Lala, Anuradha; Shah, Monica; Stevenson, Lynne W

    2017-10-01

    The epidemiology of heart failure (HF) is changing. This study aimed to describe questions that arise during the routine care of HF patients that are unanswered by the current literature and describe how the type and focus of these questions has changed over time. Investigators from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-sponsored Heart Failure Apprentice Network collected and categorized questions from 5 academic hospitals over 12 months. A total of 174 unanswered questions were collected and analyzed. Compared with 2004, there were more unanswered questions about "whether" to use therapies and fewer about "how" to use therapies. There were fewer questions about what therapeutic targets, therapy adjustment, and combination therapies. There were more questions about whether or how to stop therapies and how to add therapies back. Newly prominent topics, not observed in 2004, including novel therapeutics, refractory ventricular tachycardia, right heart failure, and nutrition/frailty, accounted for 24% of questions. Compared with 2004, there are fewer unanswered questions about how to use, adjust, and combine therapies. There were more unanswered questions about whether and how to stop therapies. Almost 25% of unanswered questions dealt with topics indicative of more advanced disease which were not observed in 2004. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Acute heart failure: too sick for discharge teaching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Catherine A

    2009-01-01

    Most patients with heart failure (HF) respond within a matter of hours to days to available medical treatments. Nursing's current challenge in HF inpatient care is their short length of stay and content dense patient education needs. Only 54% of US hospitalized HF patients received all HF-1 mandated discharge education components. By using nursing evidence and adult learning principles, we can transform HF-1 topic descriptions into a "workable" plan for our newly stable HF patients. Pragmatically viewed, we need to turn the 5 key areas upside down to meet our HF patient's needs during early hospitalization: (1) recognizing symptoms, (2) pacing rest and exercise, (3) daily weights, (4) restricting sodium and fluids, and (5) managing medications. This "organizing" issue is important to our success and costly to all those who accepted the published order as prescriptive for their video, audio, and printed discharge education materials.

  17. Insomnia Self-Management in Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-07

    Cardiac Failure; Heart Failure; Congestive Heart Failure; Heart Failure, Congestive; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders; Chronic Insomnia; Disorders of Initiating and Maintaining Sleep; Fatigue; Pain; Depressive Symptoms; Sleep Disorders; Anxiety

  18. NEW HORIZONS IN THE MANAGEMENT OF HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneeta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Heart failure (HF is a global problem with an estimated prevalence of 38 million people worldwide; a number that is increasing with the ageing of the population. The heart failure is associated with high health expenditure, mostly because of cost of hospitalisations. The five year survival for individuals with heart failure is about 50%, and in advanced heart failure, the one year survival is as low as 22%, regardless of therapy. The modern history of therapy for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction began with the introduction of vasodilatation with hydralazine plus isosorbide dinitrate. Research about heart failure is now quite active worldwide and many areas are being explored e.g. gene therapy, modification of function of micro RNAs by antagomirs, stem cell therapy besides development of new pharmacological therapeutic agents.

  19. Nuclear cardiology and heart failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giubbini, Raffaele; Bertagna, Francesco [University of Brescia, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Brescia (Italy); Milan, Elisa [Ospedale Di Castelfranco Veneto, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Castelfranco Veneto (Italy); Mut, Fernando; Dondi, Maurizio [International Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Medicine Section, Division of Human Health, Vienna (Austria); Metra, Marco [University of Brescia, Department of Cardiology, Brescia (Italy); Rodella, Carlo [Health Physics Department, Spedali Civili di Brescia, Brescia (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    The prevalence of heart failure in the adult population is increasing. It varies between 1% and 2%, although it mainly affects elderly people (6-10% of people over the age of 65 years will develop heart failure). The syndrome of heart failure arises as a consequence of an abnormality in cardiac structure, function, rhythm, or conduction. Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of heart failure and it accounts for this disorder in 60-70% of all patients affected. Nuclear techniques provide unique information on left ventricular function and perfusion by gated-single photon emission tomography (SPECT). Myocardial viability can be assessed by both SPECT and PET imaging. Finally, autonomic dysfunction has been shown to increase the risk of death in patients with heart disease and this may be applicable to all patients with cardiac disease regardless of aetiology. MIBG scanning has a very promising prognostic value in patients with heart failure. (orig.)

  20. Home telemonitoring in heart failure patients: the HHH study (Home or Hospital in Heart Failure)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortara, Andrea; Pinna, Gian Domenico; Johnson, Paul; Maestri, Roberto; Capomolla, Soccorso; La Rovere, Maria Teresa; Ponikowski, Piotr; Tavazzi, Luigi; Sleight, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Aims The Home or Hospital in Heart failure (HHH) study was a European Community-funded, multinational, randomized controlled clinical trial, conducted in the UK, Poland, and Italy, to assess the feasibility of a new system of home telemonitoring (HT). The HT system was used to monitor clinical and physiological parameters, and its effectiveness (compared with usual care) in reducing cardiac events in heart failure (HF) patients was evaluated. Measurements were patient-managed. Methods and results From 2002 to 2004, 461 HF patients (age 60 ± 11 years, New York Heart Association class 2.4 ± 0.6, left ventricular ejection fraction 29 ± 7%) were enrolled at 11 centres and randomized (1:2) to either usual outpatient care or HT administered as three randomized strategies: (i) monthly telephone contact; (ii) strategy 1 plus weekly transmission of vital signs; and (iii) strategy 2 plus monthly 24 h recording of cardiorespiratory activity. Patients completed 81% of vital signs transmissions, as well as 92% of cardiorespiratory recordings. Over a 12-month follow-up, there was no significant effect of HT in reducing bed-days occupancy for HF or cardiac death plus HF hospitalization. Post hoc analysis revealed a heterogeneous effect of HT in the three countries with a trend towards a reduction of events in Italy. Conclusion Home or Hospital in Heart failure indicates that self-managed HT of clinical and physiological parameters is feasible in HF patients, with surprisingly high compliance. Whether HT contributes to a reduction of cardiac events requires further investigation. PMID:19228800

  1. The Influence of a High Salt Diet on a Rat Model of Isoproterenol-Induced Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rat models of heart failure (HF) show varied pathology and time to disease outcome, dependent on induction method. We found that subchronic (4 weeks) isoproterenol (ISO) infusion exacerbated cardiomyopathy in Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure (SHHF) rats. Others have shown...

  2. A rare cause of heart failure treated by heart transplantation: noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordes, Julien; Jop, Bertrand; Imbert, Sandrine; Hraiech, Sami; Collard, Frédéric; Kerbaul, François

    2009-01-01

    Noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium is a rare cardiomyopathy due to an arrest of myocardial morphogenesis. The characteristic echocardiographic findings are prominent myocardial trabeculations and deep intertrabecular spaces communicating with the left ventricular cavity. The clinical manifestations include heart failure (HF) signs, ventricular arrhythmias, and cardioembolic events. We describe an illustrative case of noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium associated with bicuspid aortic valve, a 42-year-old male presenting a refractory acute heart failure successfully treated by emergency heart transplantation.

  3. Acute Heart Failure Registry: Risk Assessment Model in Decompensated Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Anne; Rodrigues, Bruno; Nunes, Sara; Baptista, Rui; Marmelo, Bruno; Moreira, Davide; Gama, Pedro; Nunes, Luís; Santos, Oliveira; Cabral, Costa

    2016-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF) is a highly prevalent syndrome. Although the long-term prognostic factors have been identified in chronic HF, this information is scarcer with respect to patients with acute HF. despite available data in the literature on long-term prognostic factors in chronic HF, data on acute HF patients are more scarce. Objectives To develop a predictor of unfavorable prognostic events in patients hospitalized for acute HF syndromes, and to characterize a group at higher risk regarding their clinical characteristics, treatment and outcomes. Methods cohort study of 600 patients admitted for acute HF, defined according to the European Society of Cardiology criteria. Primary endpoint for score derivation was defined as all-cause mortality and / or rehospitalization for HF at 12 months. For score validation, the following endpoints were used: all-cause mortality and / or readmission for HF at 6, 12 and 24 months. The exclusion criteria were: high output HF; patients with acute myocardial infraction, acute myocarditis, infectious endocarditis, pulmonary infection, pulmonary artery hypertension and severe mitral stenosis. Results 505 patients were included, and prognostic predicting factors at 12 months were identified. One or two points were assigned according to the odds ratio (OR) obtained (p < 0.05). After the total score value was determined, a 4-point cut-off was determined for each ROC curve at 12 months. Two groups were formed according to the number of points, group A < 4 points, and group B = 4 points. Group B was composed of older patients, with higher number of comorbidities and predictors of the combined endpoint at 6, 12 and 24 months, as linearly represented in the survival curves (Log rank). Conclusions This risk score enabled the identification of a group with worse prognosis at 12 months.

  4. New medications for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordin, Jonathan S; Fonarow, Gregg C

    2016-08-01

    Heart failure is common and results in substantial morbidity and mortality. Current guideline-based therapies for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, including beta blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, and aldosterone antagonists aim to interrupt deleterious neurohormonal pathways and have shown significant success in reducing morbidity and mortality associated with heart failure. Continued efforts to further improve outcomes in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction have led to the first new-in-class medications approved for heart failure since 2005, ivabradine and sacubitril/valsartan. Ivabradine targets the If channels in the sinoatrial node of the heart, decreasing heart rate. Sacubitril/valsartan combines a neprilysin inhibitor that increases levels of beneficial vasodilatory peptides with an angiotensin receptor antagonist. On a background of previously approved, guideline-directed medical therapies for heart failure, these medications have shown improved clinical outcomes ranging from decreased hospitalizations in a select group of patients to a reduction in all-cause mortality across all pre-specified subgroups. In this review, we will discuss the previously established guideline-directed medical therapies for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, the translational research that led to the development of these new therapies, and the results from the major clinical trials of ivabradine and sacubitril/valsartan. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Sex differences in heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, Sven

    2016-01-01

    This thesis examined differences between men and women with heart failure. First, it was shown that biological sex is a strong modulator in the clinical expression of various cardiomyopathies. In the general population it was shown that men are more likely to develop heart failure with reduced eject

  6. Biomarkers in acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Aditi; Januzzi, James L

    2015-06-01

    The care of patients with acutely decompensated heart failure is being reshaped by the availability and understanding of several novel and emerging heart failure biomarkers. The gold standard biomarkers in heart failure are B-type natriuretic peptide and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, which play an important role in the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. Novel biomarkers that are increasingly involved in the processes of myocardial injury, neurohormonal activation, and ventricular remodeling are showing promise in improving diagnosis and prognosis among patients with acute decompensated heart failure. These include midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide, soluble ST2, galectin-3, highly-sensitive troponin, and midregional proadrenomedullin. There has also been an emergence of biomarkers for evaluation of acute decompensated heart failure that assist in the differential diagnosis of dyspnea, such as procalcitonin (for identification of acute pneumonia), as well as markers that predict complications of acute decompensated heart failure, such as renal injury markers. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology and usefulness of established and emerging biomarkers for the clinical diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Cardiomyocytic apoptosis and heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quanzhou Feng

    2008-01-01

    Heart failure is a major disease seriously threatening human health.Once left ventricular dysfunction develops,cardiac function usually deteriorates and progresses to congestive heart failure in several months or years even if no factors which accelerate the deterioration repeatedly exist.Mechanism through which cardiac function continually deteriorates is still unclear.Cardiomyocytic apoptosis can occur in acute stage of ischemic heart diseases and the compensated stage of cardiac dysfunction.In this review,we summarize recent advances in understanding the role of cardiomyocytic apoptosis in heart failure.

  8. Bisoprolol for congestive heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J.; Gustafsson, F.

    2008-01-01

    Background: beta-Blockers are a cornerstone in the treatment of systolic heart failure treatment, but not all beta-blockers are effective or in this setting. Objective: To define the role of bisoprolol, a highly selective beta(1)-antagonist in congestive heart failure due to systolic dysfunction....... Methods: Using the keywords 'bisoprolol' and 'heart failure' PubMed and BIOSIS databases were searched for information regarding pharmacology and relevant randomised clinical trials. Supplementary publications were acquired by scrutinising reference lists of relevant papers. Additional information...... was obtained from the FDA website. Conclusion: Bisoprolol is an effective and well-tolerated first-line beta-blocker for patients with systolic heart failure. The knowledge is primarily based on study patients with moderate-to-severe heart failure from the three CIBIS trials Udgivelsesdato: 2008/2...

  9. Telephone titration of heart failure medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckler, Anne E; Bishu, Kalkidan; Wassif, Heba; Sigurdsson, Gardar; Wagner, Judy; Jaenicke, Connie; Vats, Shashank; Rector, Thomas; Anand, Inder S

    2011-01-01

    In clinical practice, heart failure (HF) medications are underused and prescribed at lower than recommended doses. Telephone care is an option that could help to titrate HF medication in a timely manner. We describe our experience of a nurse-run, cardiologist- or nurse practitioner-supervised clinic to up-titrate HF medications via telephone. Patients with the diagnosis of HF, New York Heart Association classes I to III, were referred to a registered nurse-run, cardiologist-/nurse practitioner-supervised HF medication titration clinic. Clinical and medication data collected at enrollment to the clinic and at 3 to 6 months after optimization of HF medications in patients who did or did not reach the target doses were compared. Effect on left ventricular (LV) function was also evaluated. There were 79 patients in the evaluation: 64 with HF and LV systolic dysfunction (LVSD) and the remaining 15 with HF and preserved ejection fraction (EF). Seventy-two percent of patients with LVSD were on an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB), and 61% were on a β-blocker at baseline, and this increased to 98% and 97%, respectively, after optimization. Target doses was achieved in 50% of patients for ACEI or ARB, and in 41% for β-blockers. The median time to optimization was 54 days (interquartile range, 20-97 days). The average number of phone calls at the time of optimization were 5.4 (SD, 3.7), and the average number of clinic visits was 1.9 (SD, 1.3). Reasons for not reaching the target doses included hypotension, hyperkalemia, and renal dysfunction for ACEI and bradycardia for β-blockers. Overall, the EF increased by 10% (SD, 10%) after 6 months, and 35% or greater in 42% of patients whose baseline EF was less than 35%. There were no adverse events related to the dose up-titration. Telephonic titration of HF medications was feasible and safe and was achieved in 97% patients on ACEI/ARB and β-blockers. Medication titration was

  10. Telemonitoring in Chronic Heart Failure: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Giamouzis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is a growing epidemic with the annual number of hospitalizations constantly increasing over the last decades for HF as a primary or secondary diagnosis. Despite the emergence of novel therapeutic approached that can prolong life and shorten hospital stay, HF patients will be needing rehospitalization and will often have a poor prognosis. Telemonitoring is a novel diagnostic modality that has been suggested to be beneficial for HF patients. Telemonitoring is viewed as a means of recording physiological data, such as body weight, heart rate, arterial blood pressure, and electrocardiogram recordings, by portable devices and transmitting these data remotely (via a telephone line, a mobile phone or a computer to a server where they can be stored, reviewed and analyzed by the research team. In this systematic review of all randomized clinical trials evaluating telemonitoring in chronic HF, we aim to assess whether telemonitoring provides any substantial benefit in this patient population.

  11. The Emerging Epidemic of Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction

    OpenAIRE

    Oktay, A. Afşin; Rich, Jonathan D.; Sanjiv J Shah

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), which currently represents approximately 50 % of heart failure (HF) cases, is common and associated with high morbidity and mortality. Understanding the epidemiology of HFpEF has been difficult due to the challenges in HFpEF diagnosis and the heterogeneous etiologies and pathophysiologies that underlie HFpEF. Nevertheless, several high-quality epidemiology and observational registry studies of HFpEF demonstrate that an increasing prevale...

  12. Lung congestion in chronic heart failure: haemodynamic, clinical, and prognostic implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melenovsky, Vojtech; Andersen, Mads Jønsson; Andress, Krystof

    2015-01-01

    AIMS:The goal of the study was to examine the prognostic impact, haemodynamic and clinical features associated with lung congestion in patients with chronic heart failure (HF). METHODS AND RESULTS:HF patients (n = 186) and HF-free controls (n = 21) underwent right heart catheterization...... and dysfunction and increased mortality in HF. These data reinforce the importance of aggressive decongestion in HF and suggest that novel agents aimed at reducing lung water may help to deter progression of pulmonary vascular disease and biventricular HF....

  13. Crosstalk between the heart and peripheral organs in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahng, James Won Suk; Song, Erfei; Sweeney, Gary

    2016-03-11

    Mediators from peripheral tissues can influence the development and progression of heart failure (HF). For example, in obesity, an altered profile of adipokines secreted from adipose tissue increases the incidence of myocardial infarction (MI). Less appreciated is that heart remodeling releases cardiokines, which can strongly impact various peripheral tissues. Inflammation, and, in particular, activation of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors with pyrin domain (NLRP3) inflammasome are likely to have a central role in cardiac remodeling and mediating crosstalk with other organs. Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in response to cardiac injury induces the production and secretion of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. In addition to having local effects in the myocardium, these pro-inflammatory cytokines are released into circulation and cause remodeling in the spleen, kidney, skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. The collective effects of various cardiokines on peripheral organs depend on the degree and duration of myocardial injury, with systematic inflammation and peripheral tissue damage observed as HF progresses. In this article, we review mechanisms regulating myocardial inflammation in HF and the role of factors secreted by the heart in communication with peripheral tissues.

  14. A critical review on telemonitoring in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurné, Olivier; Conraads, Viviane; Missault, Luc; Mullens, Wilfried; Vachierys, Jean-Luc; Van Mieghem, Walter; Droogne, Walter; Pouleur, Anne-Catherine; Troisfontaine, Pierre; Huez, Sandrine; Nellessens, Eric; Peperstraete, Beatrice; Blouardo, Philippe; Vanhaecke, Johan; Raes, David

    2012-08-01

    Morbidity and mortality remain high in heart failure despite considerable progress achieved with medical therapy and electrical devices. A multidisciplinary approach is actually strongly recommended. In order to provide optimal care to the ever-growing population of patients with heart failure, telemonitoring has been proposed as a modality to improve usual care. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the existing evidence on telemonitoring in HF. Despite two major meta-analyses with favourable results, two recent, large, multicentre, randomized controlled trials, one with a sophisticated technical remote telemonitoring approach (TIM-HF) in stable chronic HF and the other with a comprehensive telephone-based interactive voice-response monitoring (Tele-HF) in patients recently hospitalized for heart failure, have been performed and both failed to demonstrate a clinical benefit for telemonitoring. Newer technologies or other modalities, such as collaboration between a general practitioner and a heart failure clinic facilitated by telemonitoring should be further evaluated. Dedicated telemonitoring for heart failure may be a practical adjunct in selective centres and patients, on top of usual care, including education and a multidisciplinary approach. However, prior to being accepted as a standard of care, more evidence from large, randomized clinical trials is required.

  15. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation in patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewinter, Christian; Doherty, Patrick; Gale, Christopher P;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guidelines recommend exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (EBCR) for patients with heart failure (HF). However, established research has not investigated the longer-term outcomes including mortality and hospitalisation in light of the contemporary management of HF. METHODS......: This was a systematic review including a meta-analysis of EBCR on all-cause mortality, hospital admission, and standardised exercise capacity using four separate exercise tests in patients with heart failure over a minimum follow-up of six months from January 1999-January 2013. Electronic searches were performed...

  16. Biomarkers and low risk in heart failure. Data from COACH and TRIUMPH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijers, Wouter C.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Jaarsma, Tiny; Hillege, Hans L.; Maisel, Alan S.; Di Somma, Salvatore; Voors, Adriaan A.; Peacock, W. Frank

    2015-01-01

    AimTraditionally, risk stratification in heart failure (HF) emphasizes assessment of high risk. We aimed to determine if biomarkers could identify patients with HF at low risk for death or HF rehospitalization. Methods and resultsThis analysis was a substudy of The Coordinating Study Evaluating Outc

  17. How Do Cognitive Function and Knowledge Affect Heart Failure Self-Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Victoria Vaughan; Lee, Christopher S.; Riegel, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Despite extensive patient education, few heart failure (HF) patients master self-care. Impaired cognitive function may explain why patient education is ineffective. A concurrent triangulation mixed methods design was used to explore how knowledge and cognitive function influence HF self-care. A total of 41 adults with HF participated in interviews…

  18. Serum ferritin and risk for new-onset heart failure and cardiovascular events in the community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klip, Ijsbrand T.; Voors, Adriaan A.; Swinkels, Dorine W.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Kootstra-Ros, Jenny E.; Lam, Carolyn S. P.; van der Harst, Pim; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; van der Meer, Peter

    Aims Heart failure (HF) is a common manifestation of patients with primary and secondary causes of iron overload, whereas in patients with established HF iron deficiency impairs outcome. Whether iron stores, either depleted or in overload, amplify the risk for new-onset HF among healthy individuals

  19. Korean Guidelines for Diagnosis and Management of Chronic Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of heart failure (HF) is skyrocketing worldwide, and is closely associated with serious morbidity and mortality. In particular, HF is one of the main causes for the hospitalization and mortality in elderly individuals. Korea also has these epidemiological problems, and HF is responsible for huge socioeconomic burden. However, there has been no clinical guideline for HF management in Korea. 
The present guideline provides the first set of practical guidelines for the management of HF in Korea and was developed using the guideline adaptation process while including as many data from Korean studies as possible. The scope of the present guideline includes the definition, diagnosis, and treatment of chronic HF with reduced/preserved ejection fraction of various etiologies.

  20. Prevalence and importance of comorbidities in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triposkiadis, Filippos K; Skoularigis, John

    2012-12-01

    Heart failure (HF), being a disease of the elderly, is associated with several noncardiac comorbidities, defined as chronic conditions coexisting with HF that play an integral role in its development, progression, and response to treatment. These include pulmonary dysfunction, sleep-disordered breathing, renal dysfunction, liver dysfunction, anaemia, thyroid disorders, diabetes mellitus, skeletal myopathy, depression, and cognitive impairment. The noncardiac comorbidity burden is higher and associated with higher non-HF hospitalizations in patients with HF and preserved, as compared with those with HF and reduced, left-ventricular ejection fraction. Since chronic inflammation is a characteristic feature of both HF and the coexisting morbidities, it may play a pivotal role in their development, progression, and interactions.

  1. Disparities in heart failure and other cardiovascular diseases among women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSweeney, Jean; Pettey, Christina; Lefler, Leanne L; Heo, Seongkum

    2012-07-01

    This article reviews literature pertinent to cardiovascular disparities in women, focusing primarily on heart failure (HF). It provides an in-depth look at causes, biological influences, self-management and lack of adherence to HF-treatment guidelines in women. Disparities in treatment of causative factors of HF, such as myocardial infarction and hypertension, contribute to women having poorer HF outcomes than men. This article discusses major contributing reasons for nonadherence to medication regimes for HF in women, including advanced age at time of diagnosis, likelihood of multiple comorbidities, lack of social support and low socioeconomic status. Limited inclusion of women in clinical trials and the scarcity of gender analyses for HF and other cardiovascular diseases continues to limit the applicability of research findings to women.

  2. Differing prognostic value of pulse pressure in patients with heart failure with reduced or preserved ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Colette E.; Castagno, Davide; Maggioni, Aldo P.

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Low pulse pressure is a marker of adverse outcome in patients with heart failure (HF) and reduced ejection fraction (HF-REF) but the prognostic value of pulse pressure in patients with HF and preserved ejection fraction (HF-PEF) is unknown. We examined the prognostic value of pulse pressure...

  3. New strategies for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: the importance of targeted therapies for heart failure phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senni, Michele; Paulus, Walter J; Gavazzi, Antonello; Fraser, Alan G; Díez, Javier; Solomon, Scott D; Smiseth, Otto A; Guazzi, Marco; Lam, Carolyn S P; Maggioni, Aldo P; Tschöpe, Carsten; Metra, Marco; Hummel, Scott L; Edelmann, Frank; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Stewart Coats, Andrew J; Filippatos, Gerasimos S; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Anker, Stefan D; Levy, Daniel; Pfeffer, Marc A; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Pieske, Burkert M

    2014-10-21

    The management of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HF-REF) has improved significantly over the last two decades. In contrast, little or no progress has been made in identifying evidence-based, effective treatments for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HF-PEF). Despite the high prevalence, mortality, and cost of HF-PEF, large phase III international clinical trials investigating interventions to improve outcomes in HF-PEF have yielded disappointing results. Therefore, treatment of HF-PEF remains largely empiric, and almost no acknowledged standards exist. There is no single explanation for the negative results of past HF-PEF trials. Potential contributors include an incomplete understanding of HF-PEF pathophysiology, the heterogeneity of the patient population, inadequate diagnostic criteria, recruitment of patients without true heart failure or at early stages of the syndrome, poor matching of therapeutic mechanisms and primary pathophysiological processes, suboptimal study designs, or inadequate statistical power. Many novel agents are in various stages of research and development for potential use in patients with HF-PEF. To maximize the likelihood of identifying effective therapeutics for HF-PEF, lessons learned from the past decade of research should be applied to the design, conduct, and interpretation of future trials. This paper represents a synthesis of a workshop held in Bergamo, Italy, and it examines new and emerging therapies in the context of specific, targeted HF-PEF phenotypes where positive clinical benefit may be detected in clinical trials. Specific considerations related to patient and endpoint selection for future clinical trials design are also discussed. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. SAFETY AND EFFICACY OF EPLERENONE IN PATIENTS AT HIGH RISK FOR HYPERKALEMIA AND/OR WORSENING RENAL FUNCTION. ANALYSES OF THE EMPHASIS-HF STUDY SUBGROUPS (EPLERENONE IN MILD PATIENTS HOSPITALIZATION AND SURVIVAL STUDY IN HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Eschalier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Translation articles:R. Eschalier, J.J.V. McMurray, K. Swedberg, D.J. van Veldhuisen, H. Krum, S.J. Pocock, H. Shi, J. Vincent, P. Rossignol, F. Zannad, B. Pitt, for the EMPHASIS-HF Investigators “Safety and Efficacy of Eplerenone in Patients at High Risk for Hyperkalemia and/or Worsening Renal Function. Analyses of the EMPHASIS-HF Study Subgroups (Eplerenone in Mild Patients Hospitalization And SurvIval Study in Heart Failure”  J Am Coll Cardiol 2013;62(17:1585-93; http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2013.04.086

  5. Circular RNAs in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaux, Yvan; Creemers, Esther E; Boon, Reinier A; Werfel, Stanislas; Thum, Thomas; Engelhardt, Stefan; Dimmeler, Stefanie; Squire, Iain

    2017-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease, and particularly heart failure, is still a serious health care issue for which novel treatments and biomarkers are needed. The RNA family comprises different subgroups, among which the small-sized microRNAs and the larger long non-coding RNAs have shown some potential to aid in moving personalized health care of heart failure patients a step forward. Here, members of the Cardiolinc network review the recent findings suggesting that the less well-known circular RNAs may constitute a novel reservoir of therapeutic targets and biomarkers of heart failure. The knowledge of the mode of biogenesis of circular RNAs will first be reported, followed by a description of different features that make these RNA molecules of interest for the heart failure community. The functions of circular RNAs in the heart will be described, with some emphasis given to their regulation in the failing heart. Circulating in the bloodstream, circular RNAs have appeared as potential biomarkers and recent findings associated with the use of circular RNAs as heart failure biomarkers will be discussed. Finally, some directions for future research will be provided. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2017 European Society of Cardiology.

  6. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A; Zugck, Christian; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P <0.00001). The severity of periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases.

  7. Cognitive impairment in heart failure patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laura Leto; Mauro Feola

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive damage in heart failure (HF) involves different domains thus interfering with the ability for single patient to self-care and to cope with treatment regimens, modifying symptoms and health behaviours. Many cerebral and functional changes were detected in brain imaging, involving areas of both grey and white matter deputed to cognition. Although various instruments are available to explore cognition, no consensus was obtained on better tools to be used in HF population. Reduction in cerebral blood flow, decreased cardiac output, altera-tions of cerebrovascular reactivity and modification of blood pressure levels are the main features involved in the etiopathogenetic mecha-nisms of cognitive deficit. Several cardiac variables, laboratory parameters, demographic and clinical elements were studied for their possible relation with cognition and should be properly evaluated to define patients at increased risk of impairment. The present review gathers avail-able data pointing out assured information and discussing possible areas of research development.

  8. [The heart failure patient: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alconero-Camarero, Ana Rosa; Arozamena-Pérez, Jorge; García-Garrido, Lluïsa

    2014-01-01

    Given its prevalence, high mortality rate, morbidity, chronicity and use of resources, heart failure (HF) is a priority issue from a social and health standpoint, due to the ageing population and to lack of adherence to and the complexity of treatment. For these reasons, an individualized care plan needs to be established to meet the real and potential needs of the patient diagnosed with HF. A clinical case is presented of a patient admitted to the Cardiology Critical Care (CCC) unit of a tertiary hospital. A patient care plan was prepared following the steps of the scientific method and relying on the NANDA taxonomy, and the NOC and NIC to design goals and nursing interventions, respectively.

  9. Adults living with heart failure and fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjødt, Inge; Sommer, Irene; Bjerrum, Merete

    studies have been performed to develop more coherent and effective interventions to support self-care among heart failure patients experiencing fatigue. The findings of qualitative research should be synthesised to optimise nurses' understanding of fatigue and develop recommendations for practice. Aim...... describe their experiences of fatigue? • How do patients with HF perceive the impact of fatigue in everyday life? • How do patients with HF manage fatigue and its consequences in everyday life? Methods A systematic literature search for published and unpublished studies 1995-2012 was carried out from....... The Australian Joanna Briggs Institute Qualitative Review Instrument (JBI-QARI) is used to manage, critically appraise, analyse and synthesise findings. Results A total of 255 references were identified and five qualitative research articles met the inclusion criteria and were included after assessment...

  10. Smoking Thickens Heart Wall, Leading to Heart Failure: Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160932.html Smoking Thickens Heart Wall, Leading to Heart Failure: Study ... 13, 2016 TUESDAY, Sept. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking leads to heart failure by causing thickened heart ...

  11. Heart failure - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ... Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of ...

  12. [Does diastolic heart failure exist?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadalajara Boo, José Fernando

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the concepts of systolic function, diastolic function, heart failure, diastolic dysfunction, and diastolic heart failure. We refer to the historic evolution of the concept of heart failure and the origin of the term diastolic heart failure. Based on the current concepts of the physiology of the heart and its pathophysiology, we discuss the inappropriateness of the term and to the confusion it has generated in clinical practice, treatment, and prognosis, as well as in numerous research papers (of which some examples are given) when terming as "heart failure" the diastolic dysfunction and using both terms indistinctively. We conclude that an increasing need has arisen, ever more imperative, to identify clearly the concepts of heart failure and diastolic dysfunction, emphasizing on their differences to recognize them as distinct clinical entities with their own personality and, hence, having different prognosis and treatment. This would be of great help to achieve more accuracy in the clinical guidelines, standards, and consensus, especially regarding treatment. Besides it would be useful to avoid, inconsistencies in the design of research, which appear in some of the publications just by the lack of a clear meaning of the terms. Finally, at present we have the necessary elements to conclude that the terms "diastolic heart failure" and "cardiac failure with preserved systolic function" are inexact, poorly gauged, and far away from the actual problem they try to define. Therefore, they should be substituted by the concept of Diastolic Dysfunction, which defines clearly the pathophysiology of the functional alteration, without having to state that "the heart is failing".

  13. Merits of Non-Invasive Rat Models of Left Ventricular Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart failure (HF) is defined primarily by the impairment of cardiac function and consequent inability of the heart to supply tissues with ample oxygen. To study HF etiology, investigators have applied many different techniques to elicit this condition in animals, with varying de...

  14. Immunological Aspects of the Statins' Function in Patients with Heart Failure: A Report from the Annual Conference of ESC-Heart Failure 2005

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maciej Banach; Jaroslaw Dro(z)d(z); Piotr Okonski; Jacek Rysz

    2005-01-01

    The annual meeting of the Heart Failure Association of ESC in Lisbon, in June 2005, was exceptionally successful.There were many very interesting presentations and workshops with the unique title: Statins in heart failureCholesterol-lowering is not the only goal Heart failure (HF) is a progressive disease with coronary artery disease (CAD) as the most often underlying etiology. Treatment to prevent progression of heart failure has been targeted to reverse the consequences of HF and to a less extent the cause - the atherosclerotic plaque itself. On the average 50% of patients with heart failure are treated with lipid intervention. Lipid-lowering treatment with statins clearly reduces morbidity and mortality of patients with documented CAD. Since the prevalent etiology of heart failure is CAD, its prevention may reduce heart failure progression. However, recent studies suggest that pleiotropic effects of statins are more important than the influence related to their cholesterol lowering mechanism. Furthermore it is suggested that low levels of circulating lipoproteins and cholesterol may be independent predictors of impaired outcome in patients with heart failure. There are some possible explanations for this finding. High levels of cholesterol can be beneficial to heart failure patients; cholesterol-rich serum lipoproteins are able to modulate inflammatory immune function because they bind and detoxify bacterial lipopolysaccharide, a very strong stimulator of the release of proinflammatory cytokines that promote heart failure progression and death. So current recommendations strongly emphasize that the aim of treatment of HF is not to lower cholesterol.

  15. Severe Obesity and Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161011.html Severe Obesity and Heart Failure Study sees link even without ... 2016 FRIDAY, Sept. 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Severe obesity appears to be an independent risk factor for ...

  16. Warning Signs of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of heart failure may not be cause for alarm. But if you have more than one of ... also causing fluid retention in the tissues. Tiredness, fatigue ...a tired feeling all the time and difficulty ...

  17. Planning Ahead: Advanced Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Planning Ahead: Advanced Heart Failure Updated:Sep 30,2016 ... making your preferences known is called advance care planning. It allows you to speak for yourself, even ...

  18. Incidence of cancer in patients with chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banke, Ann; Schou, Morten; Videbaek, Lars;

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: With improvement in survival of chronic heart failure (HF), the clinical importance of co-morbidity is increasing. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence and risk of cancer and all-cause mortality in a large Danish HF cohort. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 9307 outpatients......-specific risk of cancer was analysed in an adjusted Poisson and Cox regression analysis. The 975 diagnoses of cancer in the HF cohort and 330 843 in the background population corresponded to incidence rates per 10 000 patient-years of 188.9 [95% confidence interval (CI) 177.2-200.6] and 63.0 (95% CI 63...

  19. Technology to promote and increase physical activity in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Nina C

    2015-01-01

    Regular physical activity is firmly recommended as part of a multifaceted approach to heart failure (HF) self-management. Unfortunately, research indicates that most patients are less likely to engage in and adhere to such activities. The widespread use of information and communication technology tools and resources offers an innovative and potentially beneficial avenue for increasing physical activity levels in HF patients. This article presents specific ways in which advances in information and communication technologies, including Internet- and mobile-based communications, social media platforms, and self-monitoring health devices, can serve as a means to broadly promote increasing levels of physical activity to improve health outcomes in the HF population.

  20. Erectile dysfunction in heart failure patients: a critical reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, L; Torlasco, C; Lauretta, L; Loffi, M; Maranta, F; Salonia, A; Margonato, A; Montorsi, F; Fragasso, G

    2013-03-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex clinical syndrome with a constantly increasing incidence and prevalence in western countries. Total absence of sexual activity is registered in 30% of HF patients. Moreover, HF-induced reduction in exercise tolerance, side effects of HF medications and the coexistence of shared risk factors between HF and sexual dysfunction may further aggravate the sexual health of HF patients. The purpose of this review is to examine the pathophysiological mechanisms behind the association of erectile dysfunction (ED) and HF, the potential therapeutic approaches and the eventual indications for sexual activity in HF patients. Medline and Cochrane Library search was performed from January 1970 through October 2012 to retrieve relevant papers outlining the association between ED and HF. Many evidences have outlined a tight association between ED and HF pathophysiological standpoint. Shared risk factors, common pathogenic traits and epidemiologic association represent some of the links between these conditions. Erectile dysfunction has been recognized as an earlier predictor of cardiovascular events; moreover, HF itself may cause and/or worsen ED because of its particular feature and co-morbidities. Furthermore, some cardiovascular drugs may contribute to impaired erectile function. In stable patients with stable HF, sexual activity is generally not contraindicated but it should be encouraged, as a form of moderate-intensity physical exertion. An effective treatment of ED in HF patients should be founded on the correction of reversible risk factors, on the choice of cardiovascular drugs with the lowest effect upon patient's erectile function, and on the use of phosphodiesterase-5-inhibitors. Physicians should be aware of the close relation between HF and ED and of the related clinical and therapeutic implications, in order to improve patients quality of life and clinical outcome. © 2013 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  1. Heart Failure Considerations of Antihyperglycemic Medications for Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standl, Eberhard; Schnell, Oliver; McGuire, Darren K

    2016-05-27

    Prevalent and incident heart failure (HF) is increased in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus, with risk directly associated with the severity of hyperglycemia. Furthermore, in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, mortality is increased ≈10-fold in patients with versus without HF. Reducing HF with antihyperglycemic therapies, however, has been unsuccessful until recently. In fact, HF as an important outcome in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus seems to be heterogeneously modulated by antihyperglycemic medications, as evidenced by results from cardiovascular outcome trials (CVOTs) and large observational cohort studies. Appropriately powered and executed CVOTs are necessary to truly evaluate cardiovascular safety and efficacy of new antihyperglycemic medications, as reflected by the guidance of the US Food and Drug Administration and other regulatory agencies since 2008. In light of the best available evidence at present, metformin and the sodium-glucose-co-transporter 2-inhibitor empagliflozin seem to be especially advantageous with regard to HF effects, with their use associated with reduced HF events and improved mortality. Acarbose, the dipeptidyl-peptidase 4-inhibitor sitagliptin, the glucagon-like peptide 1-receptor agonist lixisenatide based on presently available CVOT results comprise reasonable additional options, as significant harm in terms of HF has been excluded for those drugs. Additions to this list are anticipated pending results of ongoing CVOTs. Although no HF harm was seen in CVOTs for insulin or sulfonylureas, they should be used only with caution in patients with HF, given their established high risk for hypoglycemia and some uncertainties on their safety in patients with HF derived from epidemiological observations. Pioglitazone is contraindicated in patients with HF>New York Heart Association I, despite some benefits suggested by CVOT subanalyses. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Reassessing guidelines for heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Drexler

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been made in the last few years in the management of heart failure. In particular several trials have given significant results. It has become apparent that heart failure may be prevented in some patients by treatment of risk factors such as coronary artery disease. Experience with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors has shown that the survival and symptomatic benefits do last in the long term, and confirm that they are the first-line treatment in heart failure. The results of a number of trials using the angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs candesartan, valsartan and losartan are presented and discussed. There is also some experience now in the use of candesartan for patients with heart failure and preserved left ventricular systolic function. The COMET trial compared the β-blockers carvedilol and metoprolol tartrate, and suggests that there may be differences in clinical effect between β-blockers. The selective aldosterone receptor blocker eplerenone was evaluated in the EPHESUS trial in post-MI patients with signs of heart failure. Based on these clinical trials, heart failure guidelines are now being updated.

  3. Childhood heart failure in Ibadan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    respiratory tract infections (36%), intrinsic heart disease. (31%) and severe ... la maladie de coeur intrinsèque 31%, et l'anémie grave 28%. D'autres causes qui ..... Colucci N, Braunwald E. Pathophysiology of heart failure. In: Braunwald E ed.

  4. Evidence-Based Heart Failure Medications and Cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratzke, Lisa C; Moser, Debra K; Pelter, Michele M; Paul, Steven M; Nesbitt, Thomas S; Cooper, Lawton S; Dracup, Kathleen A

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of cognitive impairment in heart failure (HF) is controversial and likely multifactorial. Physicians may hesitate to prescribe evidence-based HF medication because of concerns related to potential negative changes in cognition among a population that is already frequently impaired. We conducted a study to determine if prescription of evidence-based HF medications (specifically, β-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-receptor blocking agents, diuretics, and aldosterone inhibitors) was associated with cognition in a large HF sample. A total of 612 patients completed baseline data collection for the Rural Education to Improve Outcomes in Heart Failure clinical trial, including information about medications. Global cognition was evaluated using the Mini-Cog. The sample mean (SD) age was 66 (13) years, 58% were men, and 89% were white. Global cognitive impairment was identified in 206 (34%) of the 612 patients. Prescription of evidence-based HF medications was not related to global cognitive impairment in this sample. This relationship was maintained even after adjusting for potential confounders (eg, age, education, and comorbid burden). Prescription of evidence-based HF medications is not related to low scores on a measure of global cognitive function in rural patients with HF.

  5. Short Term Survival after Admission for Heart Failure in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghith, Nermin; Wagner, Philippe; Frølich, Anne

    2016-01-01

    heterogeneity around averages, which is of fundamental relevance for a correct evaluation. Therefore, we apply an innovative methodology based on measures of components of variance and discriminatory accuracy to analyze 30-day mortality after hospital discharge with a diagnosis of Heart Failure (HF) in Sweden...

  6. TREATMENT OF CHRONIC HEART FAILURE: FOCUS ON METOPROLOL SUCCINATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. D. Ostroumova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Advantages of metoprolol succinate in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF are covered. Results of MERIT-HF study are taken as the main evidences. Patterns of the metoprolol succinate use in the treatment of different categories of patients with CHF (women, the elderly , severe CHF forms, CHF with concomitant hypertension or diabetes are considered.

  7. ST2 and patient prognosis in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Zhang, Yuhui; Ky, Bonnie

    2015-04-02

    Biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases are indispensable tools for diagnosis and prognosis, and the use of several biomarkers is now considered the standard of care. New markers continue to be developed, but few prove to be substantially better than established markers. Suppression of tumorigenicity 2 (ST2) is a marker of cardiomyocyte stress and fibrosis that provides incremental value to natriuretic peptides for risk stratification of patients with a wide spectrum of cardiovascular diseases. On the basis of all available data, the 2013 American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association guidelines now recommend measurement of ST2 for additive risk stratification in patients with acute or chronic ambulatory heart failure (HF). This report provides an up-to-date overview of the clinical studies that led to the endorsement of ST2 as a cardiovascular prognostic marker in chronic HF. The presented data suggest that the addition of ST2 to a model that includes established mortality risk factors, including natriuretic peptides, substantially improves the risk stratification for death and HF hospitalization in patients with HF. ST2's prognostic value remains strong even in the subset of patients with renal insufficiency and is superior to other remodeling-fibrosis biomarkers currently being evaluated. In conclusion, these results have been repeatedly validated; thus, ST2 could be rapidly incorporated into clinical practice for risk prediction. Indeed, the body of evidence supporting the use of ST2 in chronic HF stratification continues to grow, with consistent data from cohorts around the world in single-center (Barcelona, Brussels, and San Diego cohorts) and multicenter (Penn Heart Failure Study [PHFS] and Muerte Subita en Insuficiencia Cardiac [MUSIC]) studies and in post hoc studies from clinical trials (Prospective Randomized Amlodipine Survival Evaluation 2 [PRAISE-2], Heart Failure: A Controlled Trial Investigating Outcomes of Exercise Training [HF

  8. Relationship between angina pectoris and outcomes in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction : an analysis of the Controlled Rosuvastatin Multinational Trial in Heart Failure (CORONA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badar, Athar A.; Perez-Moreno, Ana Cristina; Jhund, Pardeep S.; Wong, Chih M.; Hawkins, Nathaniel M.; Cleland, John G. F.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Wikstrand, John; Kjekshus, John; Wedel, Hans; Watkins, Stuart; Gardner, Roy S.; Petrie, Mark C.; McMurray, John J. V.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Angina pectoris is common in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HF-REF) but its relationship with outcomes has not been well defined. This relationship was investigated further in a retrospective analysis of the Controlled Rosuvastatin Multinational Trial in Heart Failure

  9. Pathophysiology of acute heart failure: a world to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Marteles, M; Rubio Gracia, J; Giménez López, I

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of heart failure (HF) has changed considerably in recent years, progressing from a merely haemodynamic viewpoint to a concept of systemic and multifactorial involvement in which numerous mechanisms interact and concatenate. The effects of these mechanisms go beyond the heart itself, to other organs of vital importance such as the kidneys, liver and lungs. Despite this, the pathophysiology of acute HF still has aspects that elude our deeper understanding. Haemodynamic overload, venous congestion, neurohormonal systems, natriuretic peptides, inflammation, oxidative stress and its repercussion on cardiac and vascular remodelling are currently considered the main players in acute HF. Starting with the concept of acute HF, this review provides updates on the various mechanisms involved in this disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  10. Obesity and heart failure: epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, Martin A; Lavie, Carl J; Agrawal, Harsh; Aggarwal, Kul B; Kumar, Senthil A

    2014-10-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for heart failure (HF) in both men and women. The mortality risk of overweight and class I and II obese adults with HF is lower than that of normal weight or underweight adults with HF of comparable severity, a phenomenon referred to as the obesity paradox. Severe obesity produces hemodynamic alterations that predispose to changes in cardiac morphology and ventricular function, which may lead to the development of HF. The presence of systemic hypertension, sleep apnea, and hypoventilation, comorbidities that occur commonly with severe obesity, may contribute to HF in such patients. The resultant syndrome is known as obesity cardiomyopathy. Substantial weight loss in severely obese persons is capable of reversing most obesity-related abnormalities of cardiac performance and morphology and improving the clinical manifestations of obesity cardiomyopathy.

  11. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation for muscle wasting in heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Masakazu; Dos Santos, Marcelo Rodrigues; Anker, Markus; Anker, Stefan D; von Haehling, Stephan; Springer, Jochen

    2016-12-15

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) seems to be safe and beneficial in improvement in functional capacity, muscle strength, and quality of life when compared with conventional aerobic exercise, while the change in muscle fiber composition and muscle size was conflicting in patients with heart failure (HF). Moreover, NMES studies seem to have beneficial effects on pro-inflammatory cytokine, oxidative enzyme activity, and protein anabolic and catabolic metabolism that are the key molecular mechanism of muscle wasting in patients with HF. We review specific issues related to the effects of NMES on muscle wasting in patients with HF, whether NMES seems to be an alternative exercise modality preventing or improving in muscle wasting for HF patients who are unable or unwilling to engage in conventional exercise training; however no established strategies currently exist to focus on the patients with HF accompanied by muscle wasting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Obesity and the obesity paradox in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pritha P; Fonarow, Gregg C; Horwich, Tamara B

    2015-02-01

    Obesity has reached epidemic proportions in the general population and is associated with an increased risk for the development of new-onset heart failure (HF). However, in acute and chronic HF, overweight and mild to moderate obesity is associated with substantially improved survival compared with normal weight. This phenomenon has been termed the "obesity paradox" in HF. The majority of data pertaining to the obesity paradox identifies obesity with body mass index; however, the reliability of this method has been questioned. Newer studies have explored the use of other measures of body fat and body composition, including waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, skinfold thickness, and bioelectrical impedance analysis of body composition. The relationship between the obesity paradox and cardiorespiratory fitness in HF is also discussed in this review, and we explore the various potential explanations for the obesity paradox and summarize the current evidence and guidelines for intentional weight loss treatments for HF in the obese population.

  13. Emerging Biomarkers in Heart Failure and Cardiac Cachexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Loncar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers are objective tools with an important role for diagnosis, prognosis and therapy optimization in patients with heart failure (HF. To date, natriuretic peptides are closest to optimal biomarker standards for clinical implications in HF. Therefore, the efforts to identify and test new biomarkers in HF are reasonable and justified. Along the natural history of HF, cardiac cachexia may develop, and once at this stage, patient performance and prognosis is particularly poor. For these reasons, numerous biomarkers reflecting hormonal, inflammatory and oxidative stress pathways have been investigated, but only a few convey relevant information. The complex pathophysiology of HF appears far too complex to be embraced by a single biomarker; thus, a combined approach appears reasonable. With these considerations, we have reviewed the recent developments in the field to highlight key candidates with diagnostic, prognostic and therapy optimization properties, either alone or in combination.

  14. Safety of diabetes drugs in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Sánchez, F J; Ostos-Ruiz, A I; Soto-Martín, M

    2017-08-28

    Heart failure (HF) and diabetes mellitus are 2 clinical conditions that often coexist, particularly in patients older than 65 years. Diabetes mellitus promotes the development of HF and confers a poorer prognosis. Hypoglycaemic agents (either by their mechanism of action, hypoglycaemic action or adverse effects) can be potentially dangerous for patients with HF. In this study, we performed a review of the available evidence on the safety of diabetes drugs in HF, focused on the main observational and experimental studies. Recent studies on cardiovascular safety have evaluated, although as a secondary objective, the impact of new hypoglycaemic agents on HF, helping us understand the neutrality, risks and potential benefits of these agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  15. Paediatric heart failure from the eyes of the cardiologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier Paolo Bassareo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The causes of heart failure (HF in children differ substantially from those found in the adult population. They comprise cardiac and noncardiac causes. Today, with the near-disappearance of rheumatic fever, the most common cause of pediatric HF are congenital heart diseases, whilst cardiomyopathies are the most common cause of HF in children with a structurally normal heart. Signs and symptoms of pediatric HF are often not specific, most of all in newborns (difficulties in breastfeeding, excessive sweating, growth retardation and poor weight gain. The aim of the therapy is to clinically control HF through general measures as well as drugs administration. In this respect, due to the lack of large interventional trials, the HF in newborns and children is often extrapolated from adult large trials. Cardiac transplantation is currently the treatment option with good outcome and long-term survival in pediatric patients with end-stage or refractory HF.  Proceedings of the International Course on Perinatal Pathology (part of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · Cagliari (Italy · October 25th, 2014 · The role of the clinical pathological dialogue in problem solving Guest Editors: Gavino Faa, Vassilios Fanos, Peter Van Eyken

  16. Left ventricular heart failure and pulmonary hypertension†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkranz, Stephan; Gibbs, J. Simon R.; Wachter, Rolf; De Marco, Teresa; Vonk-Noordegraaf, Anton; Vachiéry, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    In patients with left ventricular heart failure (HF), the development of pulmonary hypertension (PH) and right ventricular (RV) dysfunction are frequent and have important impact on disease progression, morbidity, and mortality, and therefore warrant clinical attention. Pulmonary hypertension related to left heart disease (LHD) by far represents the most common form of PH, accounting for 65–80% of cases. The proper distinction between pulmonary arterial hypertension and PH-LHD may be challenging, yet it has direct therapeutic consequences. Despite recent advances in the pathophysiological understanding and clinical assessment, and adjustments in the haemodynamic definitions and classification of PH-LHD, the haemodynamic interrelations in combined post- and pre-capillary PH are complex, definitions and prognostic significance of haemodynamic variables characterizing the degree of pre-capillary PH in LHD remain suboptimal, and there are currently no evidence-based recommendations for the management of PH-LHD. Here, we highlight the prevalence and significance of PH and RV dysfunction in patients with both HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), and provide insights into the complex pathophysiology of cardiopulmonary interaction in LHD, which may lead to the evolution from a ‘left ventricular phenotype’ to a ‘right ventricular phenotype’ across the natural history of HF. Furthermore, we propose to better define the individual phenotype of PH by integrating the clinical context, non-invasive assessment, and invasive haemodynamic variables in a structured diagnostic work-up. Finally, we challenge current definitions and diagnostic short falls, and discuss gaps in evidence, therapeutic options and the necessity for future developments in this context. PMID:26508169

  17. [Clinical competence certification for advanced heart failure: an emerging need also in Italy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Marco; Pini, Daniela; Russo, Giulia; Milli, Massimo; De Maria, Renata; Di Tano, Giuseppe; Aspromonte, Nadia

    2015-02-01

    Advanced heart failure (HF) is a deadly condition. Fortunately, an increasing array of effective (but often expensive) therapies has become available. The management of patients with advanced HF is complex and requires a high level of expertise. The American Board of Internal Medicine was the first regulatory board to recognize the need for a subspecialty in Advanced HF and Transplant Cardiology. More recently, the HF Association of the European Society of Cardiology has proposed a curriculum for HF specialists that includes the optional module of advanced HF therapy. However, the successful completion of such a curriculum does not result in a European Certification in Heart Failure, because no European Board of Medicine does exist. While in some European countries the secondary specialty of HF has been implemented, no country has a subspecialty in advanced HF. The ANMCO HF Area has proposed a survey to 25 Italian centers with accredited programs for heart transplant or ventricular assist device implant as destination therapy with the aim to assess the actual need of a certification of clinical competence in advanced HF and a certification of institutional competence for the centers with the highest expertise in advanced HF management. The survey indicated that there is a perceived need. A first step towards education of advanced HF specialists could be the implementation of CME courses by Scientific Societies. As regards certification of institutional competence for the centers with the highest expertise in advanced HF management, the government appears to be the only entity that can grant it.

  18. Home monitoring of chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bockeria O. L.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Being a common syndrome chronic heart failure (CHF results in high mortality among cardiosurgical patients and requires very high expenditures for the treatment. All over the world the number of patients with CHF syndrome is about 22 millions. Heart failure is difficult to treat because of high level of hospitalization due to decompensation. Care aimed at constant home observation of patients could have been more efficient and not only symptomatic and as a response to complications induced. There are methods controlling CHF patients at home. These methods vary from increase of self-care and telephone support to telemonitoring and remote monitoring of implantable devices. Self-care includes such components as maintenance of drug intake, keeping to a diet, physical exercises and active control over edemas. Telephone calls are also a source of monitoring and treatment of heart failure at home. Meta-analysis of programs for structured phone support showed that telephone support could reduce the level of readmission of HF patients approximately by 25%. Telemonitoring implies transmission of such physiological data as blood pressure, body weight, electrocardiographic signals or oxygen saturation using phone lines, broadband and satellite or wireless networks. Having cardiac pacemakers, implantable cardioverter defibrillators and cardiac resynchronization therapy devices that are placed in HF patients, it is possible to use their opportunities for the further evaluation of the patient. Some regularly controlled parameters can show the clinical state of the patient and predict the following heart failure. For example, atrial fibrillation, decrease of cardiac rhythm variability and decrease of the level of the patient`s activity (according to integrated accelerometer can predict clinical decompensation. Also, implantable hemodynamic monitors for immediate pressure measuring in the left atrium, sensor system of pressure measuring in the right atrium are

  19. Ejection fraction and outcomes in patients with atrial fibrillation and heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banerjee, Amitava; Taillandier, Sophie; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring;

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) increases the risk of stroke and thrombo-embolism (TE) in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), and is incorporated in stroke risk stratification scores. We aimed to establish the role of ejection fraction (EF) in risk prediction in patients with NVAF and HF.......Heart failure (HF) increases the risk of stroke and thrombo-embolism (TE) in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), and is incorporated in stroke risk stratification scores. We aimed to establish the role of ejection fraction (EF) in risk prediction in patients with NVAF and HF....

  20. Hereditary hemochromatosis (HFE) genotypes in heart failure: relation to etiology and prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Daniel Vega; Pecini, Redi; Gustafsson, Finn;

    2010-01-01

    It is believed that hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) might play a role in cardiac disease (heart failure (HF) and ischemia). Mutations within several genes are HH-associated, the most common being the HFE gene. In a large cohort of HF patients, we sought to determine the etiological role and the p......It is believed that hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) might play a role in cardiac disease (heart failure (HF) and ischemia). Mutations within several genes are HH-associated, the most common being the HFE gene. In a large cohort of HF patients, we sought to determine the etiological role...

  1. A perspective on sympathetic renal denervation in chronic congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madanieh, Raef; El-Hunjul, Mohammed; Alkhawam, Hassan; Kosmas, Constantine E; Madanieh, Abed; Vittorio, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    Medical therapy has indisputably been the mainstay of management for chronic congestive heart failure. However, a significant percentage of patients continue to experience worsening heart failure (HF) symptoms despite treatment with multiple therapeutic agents. Recently, catheter-based interventional strategies that interrupt the renal sympathetic nervous system have shown promising results in providing better symptom control in patients with HF. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology of HF for better understanding of the interplay between the cardiovascular system and the kidney. Subsequently, we will briefly discuss pivotal renal denervation (RDN) therapy trials in patients with resistant hypertension and then present the available evidence on the role of RDN in HF therapy.

  2. The relationship between mitral regurgitation and ejection fraction as predictors for the prognosis of patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thune, Jens Jakob; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Hassager, Christian;

    2011-01-01

    To study whether there is interaction between mitral regurgitation (MR) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in the mortality risk of heart failure (HF) patients.......To study whether there is interaction between mitral regurgitation (MR) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in the mortality risk of heart failure (HF) patients....

  3. Complexity of program and clinical outcomes of heart failure disease management incorporating specialist nurse-led heart failure clinics. A meta-regression analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phillips, CO; Singa, RM; Rubin, HR; Jaarsma, T

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether a hierarchy of effectiveness exists with respect to complexity of published protocols of heart failure (HF) disease management (DM) incorporating specialist nurse-led HF clinics. Data sources and study selection: We searched MEDLINE (1966-November 2004), the Cochrane

  4. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation as a Bridge for Heart Failure and Cardiogenic Shock

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao-peng Zhong; Hong Wang; Xiao-tong Hou

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) can be defined as cardiac structural or functional abnormality leading to a series of symptoms due to deficiency of oxygen delivery. In the clinical practice, acute heart failure (AHF) is usually performed as cardiogenic shock (CS), pulmonary edema, and single or double ventricle congestive heart failure. CS refers to depressed or insufficient cardiac output (CO) attributable to myocardial infarction, fulminant myocarditis, acute circulatory failure attributable to intracta...

  5. Prognostic indices in childhood heart failure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hood heart failure and highlight the factors that affect out- come among cases of heart failure ... month period were studied prospectively. Diagnosis of heart ... a case-fatality rate of 24% among the study population. Poor prognostic indices ...

  6. Focus on renal congestion in heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Afsar, Baris; Ortiz, Alberto; Covic, Adrian; Solak, Yalcin; Goldsmith, David; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Hospitalizations due to heart failure are increasing steadily despite advances in medicine. Patients hospitalized for worsening heart failure have high mortality in hospital and within the months following discharge. Kidney dysfunction is associated with adverse outcomes in heart failure patients. Recent evidence suggests that both deterioration in kidney function and renal congestion are important prognostic factors in heart failure. Kidney congestion in heart failure results from low cardia...

  7. Contemporary strategies in the diagnosis and management of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlay, Shannon M; Pereira, Naveen L; Kushwaha, Sudhir S

    2014-05-01

    Heart failure (HF) is an important public health problem, and strategies are needed to improve outcomes and decrease health care resource utilization and costs. Its prevalence has increased as the population ages, and HF continues to be associated with a high mortality rate and frequent need for hospitalization. The total cost of care for patients with HF was $30.7 billion in 2012, and it is estimated to more than double to $69.8 billion by 2030. Given this reality, there has been recent investigation into ways of identifying and preventing HF in patients at risk (stage A HF) and those with cardiac structural and functional abnormalities but no clinical HF symptoms (stage B). For patients who have symptoms of HF (stage C), there has been important research into the most effective ways to decongest patients hospitalized with acute decompensated HF and prevent future hospital readmissions. Successful strategies to treat patients with HF and preserved ejection fraction, which has increased in prevalence, continue to be sought. We are in the midst of a rapid evolution in our ability to care for patients with end-stage HF (stage D) because of the introduction of and improvements in mechanical circulatory support. Left ventricular assist devices used as destination therapy offer an important therapeutic option to patients who do not qualify for heart transplant because of advanced age or excessive comorbidity. This review provides a thorough update on contemporary strategies in the diagnosis and management of HF by stage (A to D) that have emerged during the past several years.

  8. Heart failure in the general Danish population and among individuals with ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildemoes, Helle Wallach

    MI. Yet, the treatment of heart failure has also improved. It is unknown to what extent the incidence, prevalence and survival with heart failure in the general population and among patients with ischemic heart disease has changed over time. Aim The aim of this study is to estimate incidence...... and prevalence of heart failure (HF) in the Danish population and among individuals with ischemic heart disease (IHD) during 1996-2006, applying register data from the national patient register (NPR) and the national dispensing register (NDR). Data and methods All Danish inhabitants (aged >15) by January 1996......Background The incidence and fatality of acute myocardial infarction (MI) has decreased during the last decade - due to both improved medical treatment and a shift toward a healthier lifestyle. The consequence of the improved treatment is likely to be a falling incidens of heart failure following...

  9. Gene therapy for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Barry

    2017-04-01

    Novel strategies are needed to treat the growing population of heart failure patients. While new drug and device based therapies have improved outcomes over the past several decades, heart failure patients continue to experience amongst the lowest quality of life of any chronic disease, high likelihood of being hospitalized and marked reduction in survival. Better understanding of many of the basic mechanisms involved in the development of heart failure has helped identify abnormalities that could potentially be targeted by gene transfer. Despite success in experimental animal models, translating gene transfer strategies from the laboratory to the clinic remains at an early stage. This review provides an introduction to gene transfer as a therapy for treating heart failure, describes some of the many factors that need to be addressed in order for it to be successful and discusses some of the recent studies that have been carried out in heart failure patients. Insights from these studies highlight both the enormous promise of gene transfer and the obstacles that still need to be overcome for this treatment approach to be successful. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Insulin Signaling and Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehle, Christian; Abel, E Dale

    2016-04-01

    Heart failure is associated with generalized insulin resistance. Moreover, insulin-resistant states such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity increases the risk of heart failure even after adjusting for traditional risk factors. Insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes mellitus alters the systemic and neurohumoral milieu, leading to changes in metabolism and signaling pathways in the heart that may contribute to myocardial dysfunction. In addition, changes in insulin signaling within cardiomyocytes develop in the failing heart. The changes range from activation of proximal insulin signaling pathways that may contribute to adverse left ventricular remodeling and mitochondrial dysfunction to repression of distal elements of insulin signaling pathways such as forkhead box O transcriptional signaling or glucose transport, which may also impair cardiac metabolism, structure, and function. This article will review the complexities of insulin signaling within the myocardium and ways in which these pathways are altered in heart failure or in conditions associated with generalized insulin resistance. The implications of these changes for therapeutic approaches to treating or preventing heart failure will be discussed.

  11. Highlights of the physical examination in heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sandesh Dev

    2006-01-01

    Because decompensated heart failure (HF) patients present primarily with symptoms of congestion, the assessment of volume status is of paramount importance. Despite the addition of new technologies that can predict intracardiac filling pressures, the physical exam (PE) remains the most accessible and cost-effective tool available to clinicians. An elevated jugular venous pressure (JVP)useful cutoff is that if the JVP is greater than 3 cm in vertical distance above the sternal angle, the central venous pressure is elevated. In addition to assessment of volume status, the PE in HF can reveal adverse prognostic signs, namely: elevated JVP, presence of third heart sound, elevated heart rate, low systolic BP, and low proportional pulse pressure (< 25%). This article will review the evidence for the diagnostic and prognostic utility of common PE findings in HF.

  12. Recognizing Pulmonary Hypertension and Right Ventricular Dysfunction in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lala, Anuradha; Pinney, Sean P

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) in the setting of left heart disease (LHD) or heart failure (HF) is the most common form of PH, yet its prevalence is underappreciated. Varying terminology possibly leads to misconceptions in pathophysiology, diagnosis and management. The accurate diagnosis of PH due to LHD is contingent upon hemodynamic assessment via right heart catheterization, however due to limitations in access, comprehensive echocardiography and integrative scoring systems are frequently used. When present in the setting of PH due to LHD, right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) confers a poor clinical prognosis. The management of RVD is directed towards treating underlying HF and/or valvular disease. Implantable hemodynamic monitors may offer opportunity to obtain longitudinal information to increase diagnostic accuracy as well as monitor the effect of treatment of PH in the setting of HF with and without the presence of RVD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of diabetes mellitus on heart failure risk and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Belle Eric

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Our aim is to summarize and discuss the recent literature linking diabetes mellitus with heart failure, and to address the issue of the optimal treatment for diabetic patients with heart failure. The studies linking diabetes mellitus (DM with heart failure (HF The prevalence of diabetes mellitus in heart failure populations is close to 20% compared with 4 to 6% in control populations. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated an increased risk of heart failure in diabetics; moreover, in diabetic populations, poor glycemic control has been associated with an increased risk of heart failure. Various mechanisms may link diabetes mellitus to heart failure: firstly, associated comorbidities such as hypertension may play a role; secondly, diabetes accelerates the development of coronary atherosclerosis; thirdly, experimental and clinical studies support the existence of a specific diabetic cardiomyopathy related to microangiopathy, metabolic factors or myocardial fibrosis. Subgroup analyses of randomized trials demonstrate that diabetes is also an important prognostic factor in heart failure. In addition, it has been suggested that the deleterious impact of diabetes may be especially marked in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy. Treatment of heart failure in diabetic patients The knowledge of the diabetic status may help to define the optimal therapeutic strategy for heart failure patients. Cornerstone treatments such as ACE inhibitors or beta-blockers appear to be uniformly beneficial in diabetic and non diabetic populations. However, in ischemic cardiomyopathy, the choice of the revascularization technique may differ according to diabetic status. Finally, clinical studies are needed to determine whether improved metabolic control might favorably influence the outcome of diabetic heart failure patients.

  14. Can individualized weight monitoring using the HeartPhone algorithm improve sensitivity for clinical deterioration of heart failure?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ledwidge, Mark T

    2013-04-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated poor sensitivity of guideline weight monitoring in predicting clinical deterioration of heart failure (HF). This study aimed to evaluate patterns of remotely transmitted daily weights in a high-risk HF population and also to compare guideline weight monitoring and an individualized weight monitoring algorithm.

  15. [Right heart failure after pacemaker implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego Galiana, Juan; López Castellanos, Genoveva; Gioia, Francesca; Ruiz Ortega, Raúl Antonio; Cobo Reinoso, Maria Eugenia; Manzano Espinosa, Luis

    2015-06-22

    Severe tricuspid regurgitation (TR) secondary to interference pacemaker (PM) cable is a rare cause of progressive right heart failure (HF), which can worsen patient outcomes. We present 3 clinical cases of right HF secondary to TR after PM implantation. In these patients the clinic is right HF, which can appear early, as in our second patient, or after years of implementation of the PM, as in the first and third patients. The diagnosis is confirmed by echocardiography, the most accurate 3D, followed by transesophageal. The 2D transthoracic can not detect it, because it has low sensitivity for TR associated with PM. Medical treatment is always the first choice, since any other procedure carries significant morbidity and mortality. Probably this is a condition that we will diagnose with increasing frequency, because there are more and more patients with devices and, at the same time, the diagnostic tools are improving. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Mechanisms of heart failure in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebong, Imo A; Goff, David C; Rodriguez, Carlos J; Chen, Haiying; Bertoni, Alain G

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality and its prevalence continues to rise. Because obesity has been linked with heart failure, the increasing prevalence of obesity may presage further rise in heart failure in the future. Obesity-related factors are estimated to cause 11% of heart failure cases in men and 14% in women. Obesity may result in heart failure by inducing haemodynamic and myocardial changes that lead to cardiac dysfunction, or due to an increased predisposition to other heart failure risk factors. Direct cardiac lipotoxicity has been described where lipid accumulation in the heart results in cardiac dysfunction inexplicable of other heart failure risk factors. In this overview, we discussed various pathophysiological mechanisms that could lead to heart failure in obesity, including the molecular mechanisms underlying cardiac lipotoxicity. We defined the obesity paradox and enumerated various premises for the paradoxical associations observed in the relationship between obesity and heart failure.

  17. Relationship of literacy and heart failure in adults with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Nancy

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although reading ability may impact educational strategies and management of heart failure (HF, the prevalence of limited literacy in patients with HF is unknown. Methods Subjects were drawn from the Vermont Diabetes Information System Field Survey, a cross-sectional study of adults with diabetes in primary care. Participants' self-reported characteristics were subjected to logistic regression to estimate the association of heart failure and literacy while controlling for social and economic factors. The Short Test of Functional Health Literacy was used to measure literacy. Results Of 172 subjects with HF and diabetes, 27% had limited literacy compared to 15% of 826 subjects without HF (OR 2.05; 95% CI 1.39, 3.02; P P = .05. After adjusting for education, however, HF was no longer independently associated with literacy (OR 1.31; 95% CI 0.82 – 2.08; P = 0.26. Conclusion Over one quarter of diabetic adults with HF have limited literacy. Although this association is no longer statistically significant when adjusted for education, clinicians should be aware that many of their patients have important limitations in dealing with written materials.

  18. [Heart failure prevalence and predictors in Turkey: HAPPY study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Değertekin, Muzaffer; Erol, Cetin; Ergene, Oktay; Tokgözoğlu, Lale; Aksoy, Mehmet; Erol, Mustafa Kemal; Eren, Mehmet; Sahin, Mahmut; Eroğlu, Elif; Mutlu, Bülent; Kozan, Omer

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of heart failure (HF) in adult residents of Turkey based on echocardiography and N-terminal B type natriuretic factor. 4650 randomly selected residents aged ≥ 35 years were enrolled. Height, weight, waist and hip circumference, and blood pressure measurements were taken, and a 12-lead ECG was performed. Advanced age, hypertension (HT), diabetes mellitus (DM), obesity, and chronic renal failure (CRF) were assessed. History of any heart disease, any abnormal ECG, or an NT-proBNP ≥ 120 pg/mL was accepted as echocardiography indication. Patients with systolic and/or diastolic dysfunction, or NT-proBNP ≥ 2000 pg/mL were classified as having HF if their functional capacity was NYHA ≥ Class II, and were classified as having asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction (ASVD) if their functional capacity was NYHA countries, despite a younger Turkish population. The established predictors of HF are valid for Turkey as well. There is a significant ASVD population in Turkey with similar characteristics and risk factors to HF. Focusing on the early detection and treatment of ASVD may prevent the progression to HF, and therefore would decrease the prevalence of HF in Turkey.

  19. Lowering body weight in obese mice with diastolic heart failure improves cardiac insulin sensitivity and function: implications for the obesity paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaralingam, Sowndramalingam; Abo Alrob, Osama; Zhang, Liyan; Jaswal, Jagdip S; Wagg, Cory S; Fukushima, Arata; Padwal, Raj S; Johnstone, David E; Sharma, Arya M; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies suggest improved outcomes and survival in obese heart failure patients (i.e., the obesity paradox), although obesity and heart failure unfavorably alter cardiac function and metabolism. We investigated the effects of weight loss on cardiac function and metabolism in obese heart failure mice. Obesity and heart failure were induced by feeding mice a high-fat (HF) diet (60% kcal from fat) for 4 weeks, following which an abdominal aortic constriction (AAC) was produced. Four weeks post-AAC, mice were switched to a low-fat (LF) diet (12% kcal from fat; HF AAC LF) or maintained on an HF (HF AAC HF) for a further 10 weeks. After 18 weeks, HF AAC LF mice weighed less than HF AAC HF mice. Diastolic function was improved in HF AAC LF mice, while cardiac hypertrophy was decreased and accompanied by decreased SIRT1 expression, increased FOXO1 acetylation, and increased atrogin-1 expression compared with HF AAC HF mice. Insulin-stimulated glucose oxidation was increased in hearts from HF AAC LF mice, compared with HF AAC HF mice. Thus lowering body weight by switching to LF diet in obese mice with heart failure is associated with decreased cardiac hypertrophy and improvements in both cardiac insulin sensitivity and diastolic function, suggesting that weight loss does not negatively impact heart function in the setting of obesity.

  20. Is Correction of Iron Deficiency a New Addition to the Treatment of the Heart Failure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald S. Silverberg

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Anemia is present in about 40% of heart failure (HF patients. Iron deficiency (ID is present in about 60% of the patients with anemia (about 24% of all HF patients and in about 40% of patients without anemia (about 24% of all HF patients. Thus ID is present in about half the patients with HF. The ID in HF is associated with reduced iron stores in the bone marrow and the heart. ID is an independent risk factor for severity and worsening of the HF. Correction of ID with intravenous (IV iron usually corrects both the anemia and the ID. Currently used IV iron preparations are very safe and effective in treating the ID in HF whereas little information is available on the effectiveness of oral iron. In HF IV iron correction of ID is associated with improvement in functional status, exercise capacity, quality of life and, in some studies, improvement in rate of hospitalization for HF, cardiac structure and function, and renal function. Large long-term adequately-controlled intervention studies are needed to clarify the effect of IV iron in HF. Several heart associations suggest that ID should be routinely sought for in all HF patients and corrected if present. In this paper we present our approach to diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency in heart failure.

  1. Is Correction of Iron Deficiency a New Addition to the Treatment of the Heart Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Donald S; Wexler, Dov; Schwartz, Doron

    2015-06-18

    Anemia is present in about 40% of heart failure (HF) patients. Iron deficiency (ID) is present in about 60% of the patients with anemia (about 24% of all HF patients) and in about 40% of patients without anemia (about 24% of all HF patients). Thus ID is present in about half the patients with HF. The ID in HF is associated with reduced iron stores in the bone marrow and the heart. ID is an independent risk factor for severity and worsening of the HF. Correction of ID with intravenous (IV) iron usually corrects both the anemia and the ID. Currently used IV iron preparations are very safe and effective in treating the ID in HF whereas little information is available on the effectiveness of oral iron. In HF IV iron correction of ID is associated with improvement in functional status, exercise capacity, quality of life and, in some studies, improvement in rate of hospitalization for HF, cardiac structure and function, and renal function. Large long-term adequately-controlled intervention studies are needed to clarify the effect of IV iron in HF. Several heart associations suggest that ID should be routinely sought for in all HF patients and corrected if present. In this paper we present our approach to diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency in heart failure.

  2. Epidemiology and importance of renal dysfunction in heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giamouzis, Gregory; Kalogeropoulos, Andreas P; Butler, Javed; Karayannis, Georgios; Georgiopoulou, Vasiliki V; Skoularigis, John; Triposkiadis, Filippos

    2013-12-01

    Renal dysfunction (RD) is a frequent comorbid condition and a major determinant of outcomes in patients with heart failure (HF). It is likely that the etiology of RD in patients with HF is much more complex than we first thought and represents a matrix of independent, albeit interacting, pathophysiological pathways with effects on both the kidney and the heart that share a common denominator: aging and inflammation. Renal dysfunction in HF has been attributed, among others, to biochemical, hormonal, and hemodynamic factors, coupled with pharmacological interventions. Regardless of the cause, the development of RD or worsening renal function is common in patients with HF, and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. There is increasing evidence, however, that transient increases in creatinine in the setting of acute HF are not prognostically important, whereas persistent deterioration does portend a higher mortality in this patient population. In addition, congestion seems to play an important role in the course of renal deterioration, and the combination of congestion and worsening renal function is the most significant clinical prognosticator in HF patients. This review aims to provide an update on the epidemiology and prognostic significance of RD in HF patients, in both the acute and the chronic setting.

  3. Management of advanced heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bakel, Adrian B; Chidsey, Geoffrey

    2002-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) due to progressive systolic dysfunction has become a modern-day epidemic. Despite the increased incidence and prevalence, significant progress has been made in the past 10 to 15 years in the treatment of CHF at all stages. The current outlook for patients with newly diagnosed, mild heart failure is encouraging. It should be noted, however, that most of the morbidity and health care expenditure is incurred by a minority of patients diagnosed with CHF who are in the advanced stages of their disease. The thrust of this article will be to provide practical advice beyond current guidelines on the management of advanced CHF.

  4. Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction in the Elderly: Scope of the Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Upadhya, Bharathi; Taffet, George E.; Cheng, Che Ping; Kitzman, Dalane W.

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is the most common form of heart failure (HF) in older adults, particularly women, and is increasing in prevalence as the population ages. With morbidity and mortality on par with HF with reduced ejection fraction, it remains a most challenging clinical syndrome for the practicing clinician and basic research scientist. Originally considered to be predominantly caused by diastolic dysfunction, more recent insights indicate that HFpEF in o...

  5. The prognostic importance of lung function in patients admitted with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Kasper Karmark; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Akkan, Dilek

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the prognostic importance for all-cause mortality of lung function variables obtained by spirometry in an unselected group of patients admitted with heart failure (HF).......The purpose of the present study was to determine the prognostic importance for all-cause mortality of lung function variables obtained by spirometry in an unselected group of patients admitted with heart failure (HF)....

  6. Role of Diuretics and Ultrafiltration in Congestive Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo Ann Lindenfeld

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Volume overload in heart failure (HF results from neurohumoral activation causing renal sodium and water retention secondary to arterial underfilling. Volume overload not only causes signs and symptoms of congestion, but can impact myocardial remodeling and HF progression. Thus, treating congestion is a cornerstone of HF management. Loop diuretics are the most commonly used drugs in this setting. However, up to 30% of the patients with decompensated HF present with loop-diuretic resistance. A universally accepted definition of loop diuretic resistance, however, is lacking. Several approaches to treat diuretic-resistant HF are available, including addition of distal acting thiazide diuretics, natriuretic doses of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs, or vasoactive drugs. Slow continuous veno-venous ultrafiltration is another option. Ultrafiltration, if it is started early in the course of HF decompensation, may result in prominent decongestion and a reduction in re-hospitalization. On the other hand, ultrafiltration in HF patients with worsening renal function and volume overload after aggressive treatment with loop diuretics, failed to show benefit compared to a stepwise pharmacological approach, including diuretics and vasoactive drugs. Early detection of congested HF patients for ultrafiltration treatment might improve decongestion and reduce readmission. However, the best patient characteristics and best timing of ultrafiltration requires further evaluation in randomized controlled studies.

  7. Role of Diuretics and Ultrafiltration in Congestive Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchekochikhin, Dmitry; Al Ammary, Fawaz; Lindenfeld, JoAnn; Schrier, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Volume overload in heart failure (HF) results from neurohumoral activation causing renal sodium and water retention secondary to arterial underfilling. Volume overload not only causes signs and symptoms of congestion, but can impact myocardial remodeling and HF progression. Thus, treating congestion is a cornerstone of HF management. Loop diuretics are the most commonly used drugs in this setting. However, up to 30% of the patients with decompensated HF present with loop-diuretic resistance. A universally accepted definition of loop diuretic resistance, however, is lacking. Several approaches to treat diuretic-resistant HF are available, including addition of distal acting thiazide diuretics, natriuretic doses of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs), or vasoactive drugs. Slow continuous veno-venous ultrafiltration is another option. Ultrafiltration, if it is started early in the course of HF decompensation, may result in prominent decongestion and a reduction in re-hospitalization. On the other hand, ultrafiltration in HF patients with worsening renal function and volume overload after aggressive treatment with loop diuretics, failed to show benefit compared to a stepwise pharmacological approach, including diuretics and vasoactive drugs. Early detection of congested HF patients for ultrafiltration treatment might improve decongestion and reduce readmission. However, the best patient characteristics and best timing of ultrafiltration requires further evaluation in randomized controlled studies. PMID:24276318

  8. Conceptual model for heart failure disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrikopoulou, Efstathia; Abbate, Kariann; Whellan, David J

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this review is to propose a conceptual model for heart failure (HF) disease management (HFDM) and to define the components of an efficient HFDM plan in reference to this model. Articles that evaluated 1 or more of the following aspects of HFDM were reviewed: (1) outpatient clinic follow-up; (2) self-care interventions to enhance patient skills; and (3) remote evaluation of worsening HF either using structured telephone support (STS) or by monitoring device data (telemonitoring). The success of programs in reducing readmissions and mortality were mixed. Outpatient follow-up programs generally resulted in improved outcomes, including decreased readmissions. Based on 1 meta-analysis, specialty clinics improved outcomes and nonspecialty clinics did not. Results from self-care programs were inconsistent and might have been affected by patient cognitive status and educational level, and intervention intensity. Telemonitoring, despite initially promising meta-analyses demonstrating a decrease in the number and duration of HF-related readmissions and all-cause mortality rates at follow-up, has not been shown in randomized trials to consistently reduce readmissions or mortality. However, evidence from device monitoring trials in particular might have been influenced by technology and design issues that might be rectified in future trials. Results from the literature suggest that the ideal HFDM plan would include outpatient follow-up at an HF specialty clinic and continuous education to improve patient self-care. The end result of this plan would lead to better understanding on the part of the patient and improved patient ability to recognize and respond to signs of decompensation. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Anger proneness, gender, and the risk of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharska-Newton, Anna M; Williams, Janice E; Chang, Patricia P; Stearns, Sally C; Sueta, Carla A; Blecker, Saul B; Mosley, Thomas H

    2014-12-01

    Evidence regarding the association of anger proneness with incidence of heart failure is lacking. Anger proneness was ascertained among 13,171 black and white participants of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study cohort with the use of the Spielberger Trait Anger Scale. Incident heart failure events, defined as occurrence of ICD-9-CM code 428.x, were ascertained from participants' medical records during follow-up in the years 1990-2010. Relative hazard of heart failure across categories of trait anger was estimated with the use of Cox proportional hazard models. Study participants (mean age 56.9 [SD 5.7] years) experienced 1,985 incident HF events during 18.5 (SD 4.9) years of follow-up. Incidence of HF was greater among those with high, as compared to those with low or moderate trait anger, with higher incidence observed for men than for women. The relative hazard of incident HF was modestly high among those with high trait anger, compared with those with low or moderate trait anger (age-adjusted hazard ratio for men: 1.44 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.23-1.69). Adjustment for comorbidities and depressive symptoms attenuated the estimated age-adjusted relative hazard in men to 1.26 (95% CI 1.00-1.60). Assessment of anger proneness may be necessary in successful prevention and clinical management of heart failure, especially in men. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) can predict outcomes in ambulatory patients with advanced heart failure who have been referred for cardiac transplantation evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Szyguła-Jurkiewicz, Bożena; Zakliczyński, Michał; Andrejczuk, Mariusz; Mościński, Mateusz; Zembala, Marian

    2014-01-01

    Risk stratification in heart failure (HF) patients is an important element for management. There are several risk stratification models that can be used to predict the prognosis of patients with HF, such as Aaronson's scale, CVM-HF (CardioVascular Medicine Heart Failure), the Seattle Heart Failure Model (SHFM) and the Munich score. These models fail to adequately address the impact of multiorgan dysfunction on prognosis. The classical Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score consists of...

  11. Up-to-date clinical approaches of biomarkers’ use in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander E. Berezin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is considered a leading cause of death in patients with established cardiovascular (CV and metabolic diseases. Although current treatment strategy has improved survival rate and clinical outcomes of HF, the HF prevalence exhibits growth especially in older patients’ population and survivors after coronary atherothrombotic events. Current clinical guidelines regarding treatment and prevention of HF claim the role of biological markers as pretty easy and powerful tool for diagnosis, risk stratification, and prognostication of HF. However, there is not clear whether all these biological markers are able to equally predict CV death and HF-related outcomes in patients with acute and chronic HF as well as in various phenotypes of HF. The aim of the review is to discuss a role of in risk stratification and individual treatment in patients with different phenotypes of HF.

  12. 10.3.Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    920271 The relationship between plasmacatecholamines and cardiac function in pa-tients with congestive heart failure.ZHAOShuyuan (赵树元),et al.Dept Intern Med,HebeiProv Hosp.Chin Cir J 1991;6(6):484-486.

  13. Obesity and the obesity paradox in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Adrienne L; Fonarow, Gregg C; Horwich, Tamara B

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a growing public health problem in the general population, and significantly increases the risk for the development of new-onset heart failure (HF). However, in the setting of chronic HF, overweight and mild to moderate obesity is associated with substantially improved survival compared to normal-weight patients. Evidence exists for an "obesity paradox" in HF, with the majority of data measuring obesity by body mass index, but also across various less-frequently used measures of body fat (BF) and body composition including waist circumference, waist-hip ratio, skinfold estimates of percent BF, and bioelectrical impedance analysis of body composition. Other emerging areas of investigation such as the relationship of the obesity paradox to cardiorespiratory fitness are also discussed. Finally, this review explores various explanations for the obesity paradox, and summarizes the current evidence for intentional weight loss treatments for HF in context. © 2014.

  14. Iron deficiency and heart failure: diagnostic dilemmas and therapeutic perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska, Ewa A; von Haehling, Stephan; Anker, Stefan D; Macdougall, Iain C; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2013-03-01

    Iron is a micronutrient essential for cellular energy and metabolism, necessary for maintaining body homoeostasis. Iron deficiency is an important co-morbidity in patients with heart failure (HF). A major factor in the pathogenesis of anaemia, it is also a separate condition with serious clinical consequences (e.g. impaired exercise capacity) and poor prognosis in HF patients. Experimental evidence suggests that iron therapy in iron-deficient animals may activate molecular pathways that can be cardio-protective. Clinical studies have demonstrated favourable effects of i.v. iron on the functional status, quality of life, and exercise capacity in HF patients. It is hypothesized that i.v. iron supplementation may become a novel therapy in HF patients with iron deficiency.

  15. Dysbiosis and compositional alterations with aging in the gut microbiota of patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamo, Takehiro; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Suda, Wataru; Saga-Kamo, Akiko; Shimizu, Yu; Yagi, Hiroki; Liu, Qing; Nomura, Seitaro; Naito, Atsuhiko T; Takeda, Norifumi; Harada, Mutsuo; Toko, Haruhiro; Kumagai, Hidetoshi; Ikeda, Yuichi; Takimoto, Eiki; Suzuki, Jun-Ichi; Honda, Kenya; Morita, Hidetoshi; Hattori, Masahira; Komuro, Issei

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence has suggested a potential impact of gut microbiota on the pathophysiology of heart failure (HF). However, it is still unknown whether HF is associated with dysbiosis in gut microbiota. We investigated the composition of gut microbiota in patients with HF to elucidate whether gut microbial dysbiosis is associated with HF. We performed 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing of fecal samples obtained from 12 HF patients and 12 age-matched healthy control (HC) subjects, and analyzed the differences in gut microbiota. We further compared the composition of gut microbiota of 12 HF patients younger than 60 years of age with that of 10 HF patients 60 years of age or older. The composition of gut microbial communities of HF patients was distinct from that of HC subjects in both unweighted and weighted UniFrac analyses. Eubacterium rectale and Dorea longicatena were less abundant in the gut microbiota of HF patients than in that of HC subjects. Compared to younger HF patients, older HF patients had diminished proportions of Bacteroidetes and larger quantities of Proteobacteria. The genus Faecalibacterium was depleted, while Lactobacillus was enriched in the gut microbiota of older HF patients. These results suggest that patients with HF harbor significantly altered gut microbiota, which varies further according to age. New concept of heart-gut axis has a great potential for breakthroughs in the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic approach for HF.

  16. Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 Reduces Hypothalamic Excitation in Rats with Adriamycin-Induced Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus plays an important role in the progression of heart failure (HF). We investigated whether cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition in the PVN attenuates the activities of sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in rats with adriamycin-induced heart failure. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Heart failure was induced by intraperitoneal injection of adriamycin over a period of 2 weeks (cumulative dose of 15 mg...

  17. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' readmission reports inaccurately describe an institution's decompensated heart failure admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Zachary L; Lai, Pikki; Lewis, Connie M; Lenihan, Daniel J

    2017-09-01

    Hospitals typically use Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services' (CMS) Hospital Readmission Reduction Program (HRRP) administrative reports as the standard of heart failure (HF) admission quantification. We aimed to evaluate the HF admission population identified by CMS HRRP definition of HF hospital admissions compared with a clinically based HF definition. We evaluated all hospital admissions at an academic medical center over 16 months in patients with Medicare fee-for service benefits and age ≥65 years. We compared the CMS HRRP HF definition against an electronic HF identification algorithm. Admissions identified solely by the CMS HF definition were manually reviewed by HF providers. Admissions confirmed with having decompensated HF as the primary problem by manual review or by the HF ID algorithm were deemed "HF positive," whereas those refuted were "HF negative." Of the 1672 all-cause admissions evaluated, 708 (42%) were HF positive. The CMS HF definition identified 440 admissions: sensitivity (54%), specificity (94%), positive predictive value (87%), negative predictive value (74%). The CMS HF definition missed 324 HF admissions because of inclusion/exclusion criteria (15%) and decompensated HF being a secondary diagnosis (85%). The CMS HF definition falsely identified 56 admissions as HF. The most common admission reasons in this cohort included elective pacemaker or defibrillator implantations (n = 13), noncardiac dyspnea (n = 9), left ventricular assist device complications (n = 8), and acute coronary syndrome (n = 6). The CMS HRRP HF report is a poor representation of an institution's HF admissions because of limitations in administrative coding and the HRRP HF report inclusion/exclusion criteria. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A Rare Cause of Heart Failure Treated by Heart Transplantation: Noncompaction of the Ventricular Myocardium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Bordes

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium is a rare cardiomyopathy due to an arrest of myocardial morphogenesis. The characteristic echocardiographic findings are prominent myocardial trabeculations and deep intertrabecular spaces communicating with the left ventricular cavity. The clinical manifestations include heart failure (HF signs, ventricular arrhythmias, and cardioembolic events. We describe an illustrative case of noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium associated with bicuspid aortic valve, a 42-year-old male presenting a refractory acute heart failure successfully treated by emergency heart transplantation.

  19. Regression of ECG-LVH is associated with lower risk of new-onset heart failure and mortality in patients with isolated systolic hypertension; The LIFE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larstorp, Anne Cecilie K; Okin, Peter M; Devereux, Richard B

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension and electrocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy (ECG-LVH) are strong predictors of heart failure (HF). It is unclear whether regression of ECG-LVH during treatment predicts less new-onset HF in patients with isolated systolic hypertension (ISH)....

  20. Beta-Blockers and Outcome in Heart Failure and Atrial Fibrillation A Meta-Analysis : a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rienstra, Michiel; Damman, Kevin; Mulder, Bart A.; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.; McMurray, John J. V.; Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of beta blockade on outcome in patients with heart failure (HF) and atrial fibrillation (AF). Background Beta-blockers are widely used in patients with HF and AF. Recommendation in current HF guidelines, however, is based on populations

  1. Plasma calcidiol, calcitriol, and parathyroid hormone and risk of new onset heart failure in a population-based cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meems, Laura M G; Brouwers, Frank P; Joosten, Michel M; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J; de Zeeuw, Dick; Bakker, Stephan J L; Gansevoort, Ron T; van Gilst, Wiek H; van der Harst, Pim; de Boer, Rudolf A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heart failure (HF) is a major problem in the Western world, with increasing prevalence and incidence. Because HF cannot be cured, prevention of HF is of utter importance. Calcidiol, calcitriol, and parathyroid hormone (PTH) have been identified as risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

  2. Long-term impact of diabetes in patients hospitalized with ischemic and non-ischemic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Charlotte; Weeke, Peter; Pecini, Redi

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objectives. Diabetes mellitus (DM) in combination with heart failure (HF) is associated with a high risk of death, but it is uncertain whether the prognosis differs in ischemic and non-ischemic HF groups. Design. One thousand, three hundred and six patients with ischemic HF and 1315...

  3. Pharmacotherapy for co-morbidities in chronic heart failure : a focus on hematinic deficiencies, diabetes mellitus and hyperkalemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, Haye H.; Beverborg, Niels Grote; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Voors, Adriaan A.; van der Meer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Chronic heart failure (HF) is frequently accompanied by one or more co-morbidities. The presence of co-morbidities in chronic HF is strongly correlated to HF severity and impaired outcome. AREAS COVERED: This review will address several co-morbidities with high prevalence and/or high i

  4. Assessing patient preferences in heart failure using conjoint methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pisa G

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Giovanni Pisa,1 Florian Eichmann,1 Stephan Hupfer21Kantar Health GmbH, Munich, Germany; 2Novartis Pharma GmbH, Nuernberg, GermanyAim: The course of heart failure (HF is characterized by frequent hospitalizations, a high mortality rate, as well as a severely impaired health-related quality of life (HRQoL. To optimize disease management, understanding of patient preferences is crucial. We aimed to assess patient preferences using conjoint methodology and HRQoL in patients with HF.Methods: Two modules were applied: an initial qualitative module, consisting of in-depth interviews with 12 HF patients, and the main quantitative module in 300 HF patients from across Germany. Patients were stratified according to the time of their last HF hospitalization. Each patient was presented with ten different scenarios during the conjoint exercise. Additionally, patients completed the generic HRQoL instrument, EuroQol health questionnaire (EQ-5D™.Results: The attribute with the highest relative importance was dyspnea (44%, followed by physical capacity (18%. Of similar importance were exhaustion during mental activities (13%, fear due to HF (13%, and autonomy (12%. The most affected HRQoL dimensions according to the EQ-5D questionnaire were anxiety/depression (23% with severe problems, pain/discomfort (19%, and usual activities (15%. Overall average EQ-5D score was 0.39 with stable, chronic patients (never hospitalized having a significantly better health state vs the rest of the cohort.Conclusion: This paper analyzed patient preference in HF using a conjoint methodology. The preference weights resulting from the conjoint analysis could be used in future to design HRQoL questionnaires which could better assess patient preferences in HF care.Keywords: heart failure, quality of life, conjoint analysis, utility, patient preference

  5. Heart failure in pregnant women with cardiac disease : data from the ROPAC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruys, Titia P. E.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.; Hall, Roger; Subirana-Domenech, Maria T.; Grando-Ting, Jennifer; Estensen, Mette; Crepaz, Roberto; Fesslova, Vlasta; Gurvitz, Michelle; De Backer, Julie; Johnson, Mark R.; Pieper, Petronella G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Heart failure (HF) is one of the most important complications in pregnant women with heart disease, causing maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. Methods This is an international observational registry of patients with structural heart disease during pregnancy. Sixty hospitals in 28

  6. Heart Failure Telemonitoring in Japan and Sweden : A Cross-Sectional Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kato, Naoko P.; Johansson, Peter; Okada, Ikuko; de Vries, Arjen E.; Kinugawa, Koichiro; Stromberg, Anna; Jaarsma, Tiny

    2015-01-01

    Background: Telemonitoring of heart failure (HF) patients is increasingly discussed at conferences and addressed in research. However, little is known about actual use in specific countries. Objective: We aimed to (1) describe the use of non-invasive HF telemonitoring, (2) clarify expectations of

  7. Symptoms of anxiety and cardiac hospitalizations at 12 months in patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damen, Nikki L; Pelle, Aline J; Szabó, Balázs M;

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a leading cause of hospitalization. Clinical and socio-demographic factors have been associated with cardiac admissions, but little is known about the role of anxiety. We examined whether symptoms of anxiety were associated with cardiac hospitalizations at 12 months in HF...

  8. The influence of diabetes mellitus on midregional proadrenomedullin concentrations and prognostic value in heart failure outpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmager, Pernille; Schou, Morten; Egstrup, Michael;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with an adverse outcome in heart failure (HF). Increased concentrations of midregional proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM) have been associated with DM and are predictors of mortality in HF patients. The aim of this study was to elucidate the impact of DM...

  9. Social support and self-care of patients with heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sayers, Steven L.; Riegel, Barbara; Pawlowski, Stephanie; Coyne, James C.; Samaha, Frederick F.

    2008-01-01

    Background Social support can influence treatment adherence of patients with chronic illnesses, which may explain the positive effects of social support on heart failure (HF) outcomes. Purpose To investigate the effects of social support among patients with HF, we examined whether aspects of social

  10. Heart failure: optimizing early detection and subsequent drug treatment in older people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riet, E.E.S. van

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a progressive syndrome mainly and often encountered in older people, and has been called ‘the cardiovascular epidemic of the 21st century’. With extrapolation of the results of our literature review about the prevalence of HF in the older population at large, we even think the

  11. Treatment with beta-blockers in nurse-led heart failure clinics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Finn; Schou, Morten; Videbaek, Lars

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Beta-blockers (BBs) are a cornerstone in the treatment of chronic heart failure (HF), but several surveys have documented that many patients are not offered treatment or are not titrated to target doses. In part to address this problem, specialized, nurse-led HF clinics have been...

  12. Educational Level and the Quality of Life of Heart Failure Patients : A Longitudinal Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barbareschi, Giorgio; Sanderman, Robbert; Lesman-Leegte, Ivonne; Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Jaarsma, Tiny

    2011-01-01

    Background: Lower education in heart failure (HF) patients is associated with high levels of anxiety, limited physical functioning, and an increased risk of hospitalization. We examined whether educational level is related to longitudinal differences in quality of life (QoL) in HF patients. Methods

  13. Health-related quality of life and anemia in hospitalized patients with heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraai, I. H.; Luttik, M. L. A.; Johansson, P.; De Jong, R. M.; Van Veldhuisen, D. J.; Hillege, H. L.; Jaarsma, T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Anemia is a serious and highly prevalent co-morbidity in chronic heart failure (HF) patients. Its influence on health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) has rarely been studied, and no data is available regarding the role it plays in hospitalized HF patients. Methods: Baseline data from th

  14. Physiological consequences of transient outward K(+) current activation during heart failure in the canine left ventricle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordeiro, Jonathan M; Callø, Kirstine; Moise, N Sydney

    2012-01-01

    Background: Remodeling of ion channel expression is well established in heart failure (HF). We determined the extent to which I(to) is reduced in tachypacing-induced HF and assessed the ability of an I(to) activator (NS5806) to recover this current. Method and results: Whole-cell patch clamp was ...

  15. Relationship between left ventricular longitudinal deformation and clinical heart failure during admission for acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ersbøll, Mads; Valeur, Nana; Mogensen, Ulrik Madvig

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) complicating acute myocardial infarction (MI) is an ominous prognostic sign frequently caused by left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction. However, many patients develop HF despite preserved LV ejection fractions. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that LV...

  16. Health-related quality of life and anemia in hospitalized patients with heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraai, I. H.; Luttik, M. L. A.; Johansson, P.; De Jong, R. M.; Van Veldhuisen, D. J.; Hillege, H. L.; Jaarsma, T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Anemia is a serious and highly prevalent co-morbidity in chronic heart failure (HF) patients. Its influence on health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) has rarely been studied, and no data is available regarding the role it plays in hospitalized HF patients. Methods: Baseline data from

  17. Heart Failure Telemonitoring in Japan and Sweden : A Cross-Sectional Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kato, Naoko P.; Johansson, Peter; Okada, Ikuko; de Vries, Arjen E.; Kinugawa, Koichiro; Stromberg, Anna; Jaarsma, Tiny

    2015-01-01

    Background: Telemonitoring of heart failure (HF) patients is increasingly discussed at conferences and addressed in research. However, little is known about actual use in specific countries. Objective: We aimed to (1) describe the use of non-invasive HF telemonitoring, (2) clarify expectations of te

  18. Evidence-based treatment and quality of life in heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobre, Daniela; van Jaarsveld, Cornelia H. M.; Ranchor, Adelita V.; Arnold, Rosemarie; de Jongste, Mike J. L.; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.

    2006-01-01

    To explore whether prescription of evidence-based drug therapy is associated with better quality of life (QoL) in patients with heart failure (HF). Patients (n = 62) were recruited in the outpatient clinic of Groningen University Hospital. Inclusion criteria were previous diagnosis of HF, age 40-80

  19. Partial adenosine A1 receptor agonism : a potential new therapeutic strategy for heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greene, Stephen J.; Sabbah, Hani N.; Butler, Javed; Voors, Adriaan A.; Albrecht-Kuepper, Barbara E.; Duengen, Hans-Dirk; Dinh, Wilfried; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    Heart failure (HF) represents a global public health and economic problem associated with unacceptable rates of death, hospitalization, and healthcare expenditure. Despite available therapy, HF carries a prognosis comparable to many forms of cancer with a 5-year survival rate of similar to 50 %. The

  20. The WAP Four-Disulfide Core Domain Protein HE4 : A Novel Biomarker for Heart Failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Rudolf A.; Cao, Qi; Postmus, Douwe; Damman, Kevin; Voors, Adriaan A.; Jaarsma, Tiny; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Arnold, William D.; Hillege, Hans L.; Sillje, Herman H. W.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study investigated clinical determinants and added prognostic value of HE4 as a biomarker not previously described in heart failure (HF). Background Identification of plasma biomarkers that help to risk stratify HF patients may help to improve treatment. Methods Plasma HE4 levels wer

  1. Partial adenosine A1 receptor agonism : a potential new therapeutic strategy for heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greene, Stephen J.; Sabbah, Hani N.; Butler, Javed; Voors, Adriaan A.; Albrecht-Kuepper, Barbara E.; Duengen, Hans-Dirk; Dinh, Wilfried; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) represents a global public health and economic problem associated with unacceptable rates of death, hospitalization, and healthcare expenditure. Despite available therapy, HF carries a prognosis comparable to many forms of cancer with a 5-year survival rate of similar to 50 %. The

  2. Inflammation and anaemia in a broad spectrum of patients with heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijn, Lennaert; Belonje, Anne M. S.; Voors, Adriaan A.; De Boer, Rudolf A.; Jaarsma, Tiny; Ghosh, Sudip; Kim, Joseph; Hillege, Hans L.; Van Gilst, Wiek H.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; van der Meer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Aims Anaemia in heart failure (HF) is associated with a poor prognosis. Although inflammation is assumed to be an important cause of anaemia, the association between anaemia and inflammatory markers in patients with HF has not been well established. Methods Data from a multicentre randomised clinica

  3. Worsening renal function and prognosis in heart failure : Systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, Kevin; Navis, Gerjan; Voors, Adriaan A.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Smilde, Tom D. J.; Cleland, John G. F.; Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Hillege, Hans L.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Renal impairment is associated with increased mortality in heart failure (HF). Recently, reports suggest that worsening renal function (WRF) is another predictor of clinical outcome in HE The present study was designed to establish the proportion of patients with HF that exhibits (WRF) a

  4. Worsening renal function and prognosis in heart failure: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, Kevin; Navis, Ger Jan; Voors, Adriaan; Asselbergs, Folkert; Smilde, Tom; Cleland, J.G.F.; Van Veldhuisen, D.J.; Hillege, Hans

    2007-01-01

    Background: Renal impairment is associated with increased mortality in heart failure (HF). Recently, reports suggest that worsening renal function (WRF) is another predictor of clinical outcome in HE The present study was designed to establish the proportion of patients with HF that exhibits (WRF) a

  5. Prognostic Significance of Spouse We Talk in Couples Coping with Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrbaugh, Michael J.; Mehl, Matthias R.; Shoham, Varda; Reilly, Elizabeth S.; Ewy, Gordon A.

    2008-01-01

    Recent research suggests that marital quality predicts the survival of patients with heart failure (HF), and it is hypothesized that a communal orientation to coping marked by first-person plural pronoun use (we talk) may be a factor in this. During a home interview, 57 HF patients (46 men and 16 women) and their spouses discussed how they coped…

  6. Prevalence and prognostic significance of hyponatraemia in outpatients with chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balling, Louise; Schou, Morten; Videbæk, Lars;

    2011-01-01

    Hyponatraemia has been reported to be a potent predictor of poor outcome in patients hospitalized for heart failure (HF). The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and prognostic significance of hyponatraemia in a large cohort of HF outpatients followed in clinics participating in the ...

  7. Anemia and iron deficiency in heart failure : mechanisms and therapeutic approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Anker, Stefan D.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Macdougall, Iain C.

    Anemia and iron deficiency are common in patients with heart failure (HF), and are associated with worse symptoms and adverse outcomes in this population. Although the two can occur together, anemia in HF is often not caused by iron deficiency, and iron deficiency can be present without causing

  8. Trends in quality of care among patients with incident heart failure in Denmark 2003-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne Nakano; Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of heart failure (HF) is complex and the prognosis remains serious. A range of strategies is used across health care systems to improve the quality of care for HF patients. We present results from a nationwide multidisciplinary initiative to monitor and improve the quality of care...

  9. Educational Level and the Quality of Life of Heart Failure Patients : A Longitudinal Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barbareschi, Giorgio; Sanderman, Robbert; Lesman-Leegte, Ivonne; Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Jaarsma, Tiny

    2011-01-01

    Background: Lower education in heart failure (HF) patients is associated with high levels of anxiety, limited physical functioning, and an increased risk of hospitalization. We examined whether educational level is related to longitudinal differences in quality of life (QoL) in HF patients. Methods

  10. Anemia and iron deficiency in heart failure : mechanisms and therapeutic approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Anker, Stefan D.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Macdougall, Iain C.

    2011-01-01

    Anemia and iron deficiency are common in patients with heart failure (HF), and are associated with worse symptoms and adverse outcomes in this population. Although the two can occur together, anemia in HF is often not caused by iron deficiency, and iron deficiency can be present without causing anem

  11. Perceived Adverse Drug Events in Heart Failure Patients' Perception and Related Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Smedt, Ruth H. E.; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.; Groenier, Klaas H.; van der Meer, Klaas; Jaarsma, Tiny

    2011-01-01

    Background: Patients with heart failure (HF) often perceive adverse drug events (ADEs), affecting quality of life. For weighing the benefits and burden of medication in HF care, knowledge on patients' perception of ADEs is needed. Our aim was to assess these ADE perceptions and to identify factors r

  12. Red blood cell distribution width and 1-year mortality in acute heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kimmenade, Roland R. J.; Mohammed, Asim A.; Uthamalingam, Shanmugam; van der Meer, Peter; Felker, G. Michael; Januzzi, James L.

    2010-01-01

    Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) predicts mortality in chronic heart failure (HF) and stable coronary artery disease. The prognostic value of RDW in more acute settings such as acute HF, and its relative prognostic value compared with more established measures such as N-terminal pro-brain nat

  13. Use of different types of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and mortality in systolic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svanström, Henrik; Pasternak, Björn; Melbye, Mads;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitors (ACEIs) are the first-line treatment for patients with heart failure (HF) with reduced ejection fraction (EF). The benefit of ACEIs in HF is regarded as a class effect and different types of agents are used interchangeably. However, evidence...

  14. Intra- and interatrial asynchrony in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Beeumen, Katarina; Duytschaever, Mattias; Tavernier, Rene; Van de Veire, Nico; De Sutter, Johan

    2007-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with atrial conduction delay. Color tissue Doppler imaging was used to evaluate intra- and interatrial asynchrony in patients with HF, patients with structural heart disease without HF, and controls. Twenty-three controls (mean age 65 +/- 13 years), 29 patients with structural heart disease without HF (mean age 68 +/- 9 years), and 29 patients with HF (mean age 67 +/- 9 years) were studied. Patients had no histories of atrial fibrillation. Echocardiographic color tissue Doppler imaging of the atria was performed. Measurements below the atrioventricular plane were selected on the right atrial (RA) free wall, interatrial septum (IAS), and left atrial (LA) free wall. The time difference from the onset of the P wave to the onset of the A wave at the right atrium (P-RA), the IAS (P-IAS), and the left atrium (P-LA) was measured. Asynchrony was defined as the differences between P-IAS and P-RA (RA asynchrony), P-LA and P-IAS (LA asynchrony), and P-LA and P-RA (interatrial asynchrony). In patients with HF, a significant increase in RA asynchrony was observed compared with controls and patients without HF (30 +/- 21 vs 12 +/- 13 and 14 +/- 15 ms, p 17 ms, p = 0.04). There were moderate but significant correlations of RA asynchrony with log N-terminal-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (r = 0.3, p = 0.01) and the ejection fraction (r = -0.4, p <0.001). In conclusion, in patients with HF, significant RA and interatrial asynchrony was documented, evaluated by noninvasive color tissue Doppler imaging. Asynchrony was related to N-terminal-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide and to the ejection fraction.

  15. Can Stem Cell 'Patch' Help Heart Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164475.html Can Stem Cell 'Patch' Help Heart Failure? Small improvement seen over ... Scientists report another step in the use of stem cells to help treat people with debilitating heart failure. ...

  16. Heart failure in patients treated with bisphosphonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grove, Erik; Abrahamsen, B; Vestergaard, P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of heart failure in patients treated with bisphosphonates.......The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of heart failure in patients treated with bisphosphonates....

  17. Hemodynamic and neuroendocrine responses to changes in sodium intake in compensated heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Morten; Norsk, Peter; Gustafsson, Finn

    2005-01-01

    Patients with untreated heart failure (HF) exhibit a blunted hemodynamic and neuroendocrine response to a high sodium intake, leading to excessive sodium and water retention. However, it is not known whether this is the case for patients with compensated HF receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme...... not support the advice for HF patients to restrict dietary sodium.......Patients with untreated heart failure (HF) exhibit a blunted hemodynamic and neuroendocrine response to a high sodium intake, leading to excessive sodium and water retention. However, it is not known whether this is the case for patients with compensated HF receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme...... inhibitors and beta-adrenoreceptor blockers. Therefore, we determined the hemodynamic and neuroendocrine responses to 1 wk of a low-sodium diet (70 mmol/day) and 1 wk of a high-sodium diet (250 mmol/day) in 12 HF patients and 12 age-matched controls in a randomized, balanced fashion. During steady...

  18. Hemodynamic and neuroendocrine responses to changes in sodium intake in compensated heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Morten; Norsk, Peter; Gustafsson, Finn

    2006-01-01

    Patients with untreated heart failure (HF) exhibit a blunted hemodynamic and neuroendocrine response to a high sodium intake, leading to excessive sodium and water retention. However, it is not known whether this is the case for patients with compensated HF receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme...... not support the advice for HF patients to restrict dietary sodium.......Patients with untreated heart failure (HF) exhibit a blunted hemodynamic and neuroendocrine response to a high sodium intake, leading to excessive sodium and water retention. However, it is not known whether this is the case for patients with compensated HF receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme...... inhibitors and beta-adrenoreceptor blockers. Therefore, we determined the hemodynamic and neuroendocrine responses to 1 wk of a low-sodium diet (70 mmol/day) and 1 wk of a high-sodium diet (250 mmol/day) in 12 HF patients and 12 age-matched controls in a randomized, balanced fashion. During steady...

  19. A new clinical entity: multi-etiological heart failure in the elderly and its therapeutic implication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shiwen WANG; Haiyun WU

    2005-01-01

    @@ Heart failure (HF) is a major health problem for the geriatric population. In the United States, most of the 5 millions patients with HF are elderly.1 Seventy-five percent of HF hospitalizations occurred in patients older than 65 years and 50% in patients 75 years and older.1 In the Framingham population, the prevalence of HF increased eightfold among men from the fifth decade of life to the seventh decade.2 However, despite of considerable improvement in the treatment, the mortality of HF patients remained relatively constant between 1948 and 1997.

  20. The importance of assessing nutritional status in elderly patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargento, Luis; Longo, Susana; Lousada, Nuno; dos Reis, Roberto Palma

    2014-06-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a syndrome characterized by high morbidity and mortality, despite advances in medical and device therapy that have significantly improved survival. The outcome of HF in elderly patients results from a combination of biological, functional, psychological, and environmental factors, one of which is nutritional status. Malnutrition, as well as HF, is frequently present with aging. Early detection might lead to earlier intervention. It is our goal to review the importance of nutritional status in elderly patients with HF, as well as tools for assessing it. We also propose a simple decision algorithm for the nutritional assessment of elderly patients with HF.

  1. Leveraging Behavioral Economics to Improve Heart Failure Care and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Leslie L; DeVore, Adam D; Granger, Bradi B; Eapen, Zubin J; Ariely, Dan; Hernandez, Adrian F

    2017-08-22

    Behavioral challenges are often present in human illness, so behavioral economics is increasingly being applied in healthcare settings to better understand why patients choose healthy or unhealthy behaviors. The application of behavioral economics to healthcare settings parallels recent shifts in policy and reimbursement structures that hold providers accountable for outcomes that are dependent on patient behaviors. Numerous studies have examined the application of behavioral economics principles to policy making and health behaviors, but there are limited data on applying these concepts to the management of chronic conditions, such as heart failure (HF). Given its increasing prevalence and high associated cost of care, HF is a paradigm case for studying novel approaches to improve health care; therefore, if we can better understand why patients with HF make the choices they do, then we may be more poised to help them manage their medications, influence daily behaviors, and encourage healthy decision making. In this article, we will give a brief explanation of the core behavioral economics concepts that apply to patients with HF. We will also examine how to craft these concepts into tools such as financial incentives and social networks that may improve the management of patients with HF. We believe that behavioral economics can help us understand barriers to change, encourage positive behaviors, and offer additional approaches to improving the outcomes of patients with HF. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Positive predictive value and impact of misdiagnosis of a heart failure diagnosis in administrative registers among patients admitted to a University Hospital cardiac care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mard, Shan; Nielsen, Finn Erland

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the positive predictive value (PPV) of a diagnosis of heart failure (HF) in the Danish National Registry of Patients (NRP) among patients admitted to a University Hospital cardiac care unit, and to evaluate the impact of misdiagnosing HF.......To evaluate the positive predictive value (PPV) of a diagnosis of heart failure (HF) in the Danish National Registry of Patients (NRP) among patients admitted to a University Hospital cardiac care unit, and to evaluate the impact of misdiagnosing HF....

  3. Relationship of serum sodium concentration to mortality in a wide spectrum of heart failure patients with preserved and with reduced ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rusinaru, Dan; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Berry, Colin

    2012-01-01

    Hyponatraemia has been associated with reduced survival in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HF-REF). The relationship between serum sodium and outcome is unclear in heart failure with preserved (≥ 50%) ejection fraction (HF-PEF). Therefore, we used a large individual...... patient data meta-analysis to study the risk of death associated with hyponatraemia in HF-REF and in HF-PEF....

  4. Anemia and iron deficiency in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Victor M; Ferreira, Jorge S

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a common problem and a major cause of mortality, morbidity and impaired quality of life. Anemia is a frequent comorbidity in heart failure and further worsens prognosis and disability. Regardless of anemia status, iron deficiency is a common and usually unidentified problem in patients with heart failure. This article reviews the mechanisms, impact on outcomes and treatment of anemia and iron deficiency in patients with heart failure.

  5. Potential applications of pharmacogenomics to heart failure therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Kishan S; Ahmad, Tariq; Fiuzat, Mona

    2014-10-01

    Pharmacogenomics explores one drug's varying effects on different patient genotypes. A better understanding of genomic variation's contribution to drug response can impact 4 arenas in heart failure (HF): (1) identification of patients most likely to receive benefit from therapy, (2) risk stratify patients for risk of adverse events, (3) optimize dosing of drugs, and (4) steer future clinical trial design and drug development. In this review, the authors explore the potential applications of pharmacogenomics in patients with HF in the context of these categories.

  6. The impact of heart failure clinic in the improvement on quality of life of heart failure patients in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Gustavo F; Betancourt, Lidia; Galicia-Mora, Guillermo

    2007-02-07

    Heart failure clinic (HFC) has emerged as an innovative strategy to improve prognosis and Quality of Life (QOL) of Heart Failure (HF) patients. Unfortunately, there is no-evidence of such benefit on HF patients by HFC in Latin-America. We undertake a research to investigate the impact of HFC on QOL in HF patients in Mexico. From October 2004 to July 2005 all patients that attended for the first time the HFC of the Specialties Hospital No 14 in Veracruz, Mexico were analysed. The study group included patients with HF and left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD). QOL was measured by the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ). MLHFQ score was compared between basal vs 6 months follow-up. Every patient served as his/her own control. Forty-five HF patients were included and 34 completed 6 months follow-up. Four patients died within 6 months (mortality rate 12% [95% CI 2-22%]). Of the 30 remaining patients, median age was 61 years (range 37-74 years) and 47% was women with a mean left ventricular ejection fraction of 34%. The MLHFQ had a significant reduction at 6 months compared with basal condition from the first evaluation (Basal vs 6 months: mean [SD], 50 [26] vs 31 [19]; p = 0.0001) with a strong correlation between the MLHFQ score and NYHA functional class (p = 0.001; r = 0.59). HFC improves QOL of HF patients in Mexico. This disease management strategy would be considered for widely use in Latin-America countries.

  7. Chronic Pain in Chronic Heart Failure: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Alemzadeh-Ansari

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is one of the main causes of death and disability in the world. The prevalence of HF in developed countries is between 1% and 2% of the adult population and approximately between 6% and 10% in the elderly, giving rise to high costs of care and treatment. Indeed, in the United States, the direct and indirect costs exceeded 23 billion dollars in 2002.  HF is typically characterized by periods of acute symptoms followed by returns to nearly asymptomatic periods. As dyspnea and fatigue are considered the signature symptoms of HF, other symptoms such as pain go unnoticed. Awareness of the burden of pain, however, is growing in patients with chronic HF. The past 2 decades have witnessed remarkable technical headway in cardiology and many patients have survived despite the progressive impairment of their cardiovascular function. It is, therefore, of great value to investigate the prevalence and management of pain in patients with HF. To that end, we undertook a comprehensive search using the MEDLINE database for studies and guidelines on the subject of pain and HF and the complications and considerations and finally selected 65 studies for review.

  8. Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor Updated:Oct 4, ... content was last reviewed on 04/06/2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  9. Central Nervous System Changes in Pediatric Heart Failure: A Volumetric Study

    OpenAIRE

    Menteer, Jondavid; Macey, Paul M.; Woo, Mary A.; Panigrahy, Ashok; Harper, Ronald M.

    2010-01-01

    Autonomic dysfunction, mood disturbances, and memory deficits appear in pediatric and adult heart failure (HF). Brain areas controlling these functions show injury in adult HF patients, many of whom have comorbid cerebrovascular disease. We examined whether similar brain pathology develops in pediatric subjects without such comorbidities. In this study, high-resolution T1 brain magnetic resonance images were collected from seven severe HF subjects age (age 8–18 years [mean 13]; left ventricul...

  10. Reducing risk of Anthracycline-related heart failure after childhood cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Childhood cancer survivors are at a 15-fold risk of developing heart failure (HF) compared to age-matched controls. There is a strong dose-dependent association between anthracyclines and risk of HF;the incidence approaches 20% at cumulative doses between 300-600 mg/m2, and exceeds 30% for doses >600 mg/m2. Outcome following HF is poor;5-year survival rate is |

  11. Combined Aerobic and Resistance Exercise Program Improves Task Performance in Patients with Heart Failure,"

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    ObjectivesTo assess the effects of a home-based aerobic and resistance training program on the physical function of adults with New York Heart Association (NYHA) class II and III patients and systolic heart failure (HF).DesignRandomized controlled trial.SettingHome based.ParticipantsStable patients (N=24; mean age, 60±10y; left ventricular ejection fraction, 25%±9%; 50% white; 50% women) with New York Heart Association (NYHA) classes II and III (NYHA class III, 58%) systolic heart failure (HF...

  12. Development of heart failure is independent of K+ channel-interacting protein 2 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Speerschneider, Tobias; Grubb, Søren; Metoska, Artina

    2013-01-01

    Abstract  Abnormal ventricular repolarization in ion channelopathies and heart disease is a major cause of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. K(+) channel-interacting protein 2 (KChIP2) expression is significantly reduced in human heart failure (HF), contributing to a loss of the t......Abstract  Abnormal ventricular repolarization in ion channelopathies and heart disease is a major cause of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. K(+) channel-interacting protein 2 (KChIP2) expression is significantly reduced in human heart failure (HF), contributing to a loss...

  13. CHRONIC HEART FAILURE: CLINICAL GUIDELINES AND REAL CLINICAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. K. Shavarova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Expert assessment of real clinical practice compliance with national guidelines on management of patients with chronic heart failure (HF before the opening of the Expert Center of HF treatment.Material and methods. All patients admitted to 2 city clinical hospitals of Moscow with HF were included into the register. Clinical, demographic, laboratory and instrumental characteristics and medical treatment before and during hospitalization were evaluated, as well as recommendations contained in the discharge summary.Results. 300 patients with HF were included into the register. The mean age was 75 years (39, 95; the proportion of men – 44%. 95% of patients had HF IIIV (NYHA, among them 24% HF II, 61% HF III, 15% HF IV (NYHA. HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF was found in 45% of patients. 22% of the patients did not receive medical treatment before admission. 34% of patients with HFrEF received ACE inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs, of which only 23% in effective dose. β-blockers were prescribed in 41% of HFeEF patients, of which 22% in the target dose. A third of patients needed in mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRA received spironolactone. During hospitalization 81% of HFrEF patients received ACEI therapy, 12% – ARBs, 91% – β-blockers, 90% – MRA, 81% – loop diuretics and 13% – thiazide diuretics. According to the discharge summary 5% of patients did not receive post-discharge blocker of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system without explanation in the medical documentation. β-blocker with proven efficacy was prescribed to 70% of HFrEF patients. Spironolactone was recommended after discharge in 89% of HFrEF patients.Conclusion. Implementation of register of hospitalized patients with HF gives an opportunity to identify shortcomings in the provision of medical care both in outpatient and inpatient stages. 

  14. Heart failure treatment in adults with congenital heart disease: where do we stand in 2014?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Eric V; Valente, Anne Marie

    2014-09-01

    Heart failure (HF) is the leading cause of death in adults with repaired congenital heart disease (CHD). However there is currently little evidence to guide treatment strategies in this growing group of patients. Unlike the majority of HF, which is usually caused by LV systolic or diastolic dysfunction, CHD-HF is more often a consequence of RV disease, valve dysfunction, shunting or pulmonary hypertension. It is therefore not appropriate to extrapolate from the acquired HF literature and apply it to this heterogeneous population of CHD patients. Additionally, patients with CHD have been excluded from most large trials of medical or device therapy of HF, which has resulted in small retrospective and underpowered studies in the CHD population. This article critically reviews the current knowledge about CHD-HF, paying particular attention to medical therapy in different CHD populations, cardiac resynchronisation therapy and implantable cardiac defibrillators, and the challenges of heart transplantation and mechanical circulatory support in CHD patients. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Incidence and Predictors of End-Stage Renal Disease in Outpatients With Systolic Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosselmann, Helle Skovmand; Gislason, Gunnar; Gustafsson, Finn

    2013-01-01

    Background- Renal dysfunction is an important prognostic factor in heart failure (HF), but whether this dysfunction progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is unknown. Therefore, we examined incidence and predictors of ESRD in outpatients with HF. Methods and Results- Patients with systolic HF...... were identified in The Danish Heart Failure database and new-onset ESRD from the Danish Registry on Dialysis. Renal function was estimated by The Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation and patients grouped by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)-group I: ≥60 mL/min per 1.73 m...

  16. Endothelial function is unaffected by changing between carvedilol and metoprolol in patients with heart failure-a randomized study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falskov, Britt; Hermann, Thomas Steffen; Raunsø, Jakob;

    2011-01-01

    Carvedilol has been shown to be superior to metoprolol tartrate to improve clinical outcomes in patients with heart failure (HF), yet the mechanisms responsible for these differences remain unclear. We examined if there were differences in endothelial function, insulin stimulated endothelial...... function, 24 hour ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate during treatment with carvedilol, metoprolol tartrate and metoprolol succinate in patients with HF....

  17. Personalized Computer Simulation of Diastolic Function in Heart Failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali Amr; Derliz Mereles; h Edgar Zitron; Andreas E Posch; Maximilian Wu rstle; Tommaso Mansi; Hugo A Katus; Benjamin Meder; Elham Kayvanpour; Farbod Sedaghat-Hamedani; Tiziano Passerini; Viorel Mihalef; e Alan Lai; f Dominik Neumann; g Bogdan Georgescu; Sebastian Buss

    2016-01-01

    The search for a parameter representing left ventricular relaxation from non-invasive and invasive diagnostic tools has been extensive, since heart failure (HF) with preserved ejection fraction (HF-pEF) is a global health problem. We explore here the feasibility using patient-specific cardiac computer modeling to capture diastolic parameters in patients suffering from different degrees of systolic HF. Fifty eight patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy have undergone thorough clinical evaluation, including cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), heart catheterization, echocardiography, and cardiac biomarker assessment. A previously-introduced framework for creating multi-scale patient-specific cardiac models has been applied on all these patients. Novel parameters, such as global stiffness factor and maximum left ventricular active stress, representing cardiac active and passive tissue properties have been computed for all patients. Invasive pressure measurements from heart catheterization were then used to evaluate ventricular relaxation using the time constant of isovolumic relaxation Tau (s). Parameters from heart catheterization and the multi-scale model have been evaluated and compared to patient clinical presentation. The model parameter global stiffness factor, representing diastolic passive tissue properties, is correlated signif-icantly across the patient population with s. This study shows that multi-modal cardiac models can successfully capture diastolic (dys) function, a prerequisite for future clinical trials on HF-pEF.

  18. Heart failure in a cohort of patients with chronic kidney disease: the GCKD study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Beck

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a risk factor for development and progression of heart failure (HF. CKD and HF share common risk factors, but few data exist on the prevalence, signs and symptoms as well as correlates of HF in populations with CKD of moderate severity. We therefore aimed to examine the prevalence and correlates of HF in the German Chronic Kidney Disease (GCKD study, a large observational prospective study.We analyzed data from 5,015 GCKD patients aged 18-74 years with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR of 500 mg/d. We evaluated a definition of HF based on the Gothenburg score, a clinical HF score used in epidemiological studies (Gothenburg HF, and self-reported HF. Factors associated with HF were identified using multivariable adjusted logistic regression. The prevalence of Gothenburg HF was 43% (ranging from 24% in those with eGFR >90 to 59% in those with eGFR<30 ml/min/1.73m2. The corresponding estimate for self-reported HF was 18% (range 5%-24%. Lower eGFR was significantly and independently associated with the Gothenburg definition of HF (p-trend <0.001. Additional significantly associated correlates included older age, female gender, higher BMI, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, valvular heart disease, anemia, sleep apnea, and lower educational status.The burden of self-reported and Gothenburg HF among patients with CKD is high. The proportion of patients who meet the criteria for Gothenburg HF in a European cohort of patients with moderate CKD is more than twice as high as the prevalence of self-reported HF. However, because of the shared signs, symptoms and medications of HF and CKD, the Gothenburg score cannot be used to reliably define HF in CKD patients. Our results emphasize the need for early screening for HF in patients with CKD.

  19. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 reduces hypothalamic excitation in rats with adriamycin-induced heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The paraventricular nucleus (PVN of the hypothalamus plays an important role in the progression of heart failure (HF. We investigated whether cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibition in the PVN attenuates the activities of sympathetic nervous system (SNS and renin-angiotensin system (RAS in rats with adriamycin-induced heart failure. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Heart failure was induced by intraperitoneal injection of adriamycin over a period of 2 weeks (cumulative dose of 15 mg/kg. On day 19, rats received intragastric administration daily with either COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib (CLB or normal saline. Treatment with CLB reduced mortality and attenuated both myocardial atrophy and pulmonary congestion in HF rats. Compared with the HF rats, ventricle to body weight (VW/BW and lung to body weight (LW/BW ratios, heart rate (HR, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP, left ventricular peak systolic pressure (LVPSP and maximum rate of change in left ventricular pressure (LV±dp/dtmax were improved in HF+CLB rats. Angiotensin II (ANG II, norepinephrine (NE, COX-2 and glutamate (Glu in the PVN were increased in HF rats. HF rats had higher levels of ANG II and NE in plasma, higher level of ANG II in myocardium, and lower levels of ANP in plasma and myocardium. Treatment with CLB attenuated these HF-induced changes. HF rats had more COX-2-positive neurons and more corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH positive neurons in the PVN than did control rats. Treatment with CLB decreased COX-2-positive neurons and CRH positive neurons in the PVN of HF rats. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that PVN COX-2 may be an intermediary step for PVN neuronal activation and excitatory neurotransmitter release, which further contributes to sympathoexcitation and RAS activation in adriamycin-induced heart failure. Treatment with COX-2 inhibitor attenuates sympathoexcitation and RAS activation in adriamycin-induced heart failure.

  20. Metabolomic fingerprint of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beshay N Zordoky

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF is increasingly recognized as an important clinical entity. Preclinical studies have shown differences in the pathophysiology between HFpEF and HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF. Therefore, we hypothesized that a systematic metabolomic analysis would reveal a novel metabolomic fingerprint of HFpEF that will help understand its pathophysiology and assist in establishing new biomarkers for its diagnosis.Ambulatory patients with clinical diagnosis of HFpEF (n = 24, HFrEF (n = 20, and age-matched non-HF controls (n = 38 were selected for metabolomic analysis as part of the Alberta HEART (Heart Failure Etiology and Analysis Research Team project. 181 serum metabolites were quantified by LC-MS/MS and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Compared to non-HF control, HFpEF patients demonstrated higher serum concentrations of acylcarnitines, carnitine, creatinine, betaine, and amino acids; and lower levels of phosphatidylcholines, lysophosphatidylcholines, and sphingomyelins. Medium and long-chain acylcarnitines and ketone bodies were higher in HFpEF than HFrEF patients. Using logistic regression, two panels of metabolites were identified that can separate HFpEF patients from both non-HF controls and HFrEF patients with area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves of 0.942 and 0.981, respectively.The metabolomics approach employed in this study identified a unique metabolomic fingerprint of HFpEF that is distinct from that of HFrEF. This metabolomic fingerprint has been utilized to identify two novel panels of metabolites that can separate HFpEF patients from both non-HF controls and HFrEF patients.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02052804.

  1. Metabolomic Fingerprint of Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zordoky, Beshay N.; Sung, Miranda M.; Ezekowitz, Justin; Mandal, Rupasri; Han, Beomsoo; Bjorndahl, Trent C.; Bouatra, Souhaila; Anderson, Todd; Oudit, Gavin Y.; Wishart, David S.; Dyck, Jason R. B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF) with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is increasingly recognized as an important clinical entity. Preclinical studies have shown differences in the pathophysiology between HFpEF and HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). Therefore, we hypothesized that a systematic metabolomic analysis would reveal a novel metabolomic fingerprint of HFpEF that will help understand its pathophysiology and assist in establishing new biomarkers for its diagnosis. Methods and Results Ambulatory patients with clinical diagnosis of HFpEF (n = 24), HFrEF (n = 20), and age-matched non-HF controls (n = 38) were selected for metabolomic analysis as part of the Alberta HEART (Heart Failure Etiology and Analysis Research Team) project. 181 serum metabolites were quantified by LC-MS/MS and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Compared to non-HF control, HFpEF patients demonstrated higher serum concentrations of acylcarnitines, carnitine, creatinine, betaine, and amino acids; and lower levels of phosphatidylcholines, lysophosphatidylcholines, and sphingomyelins. Medium and long-chain acylcarnitines and ketone bodies were higher in HFpEF than HFrEF patients. Using logistic regression, two panels of metabolites were identified that can separate HFpEF patients from both non-HF controls and HFrEF patients with area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of 0.942 and 0.981, respectively. Conclusions The metabolomics approach employed in this study identified a unique metabolomic fingerprint of HFpEF that is distinct from that of HFrEF. This metabolomic fingerprint has been utilized to identify two novel panels of metabolites that can separate HFpEF patients from both non-HF controls and HFrEF patients. Clinical Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02052804 PMID:26010610

  2. Renal sodium avidity in heart failure: from pathophysiology to treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullens, Wilfried; Verbrugge, Frederik Hendrik; Nijst, Petra; Tang, Wai Hong Wilson

    2017-02-23

    Increased neurohumoral stimulation resulting in excessive sodium avidity and extracellular volume overload are hallmark features of decompensated heart failure. Especially in case of concomitant renal dysfunction, the kidneys often fail to elicit effective natriuresis. While assessment of renal function is generally performed by measuring serum creatinine-a surrogate for glomerular filtration-, this only represents part of the nephron's function. Alterations in tubular sodium handling are at least equally important in the development of volume overload and congestion. Venous congestion and neurohumoral activation in advanced HF further promote renal sodium and water retention. Interestingly, early on, before clinical signs of heart failure are evident, intrinsic renal derangements already impair natriuresis. This clinical review discusses the importance of heart failure (HF) induced changes in different nephron segments. A better understanding of cardiorenal interactions which ultimately result in sodium avidity in HF might help to treat and prevent congestion in chronic and acute HF.

  3. Incidence, Determinants, and Prognostic Significance of Hyperkalemia and Worsening Renal Function in Patients With Heart Failure Receiving the Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Eplerenone or Placebo in Addition to Optimal Medical Therapy Results From the Eplerenone in Mild Patients Hospitalization and Survival Study in Heart Failure (EMPHASIS-HF)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossignol, Patrick; Dobre, Daniela; McMurray, John J. V.; Swedberg, Karl; Krum, Henry; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Shi, Harry; Messig, Michael; Vincent, John; Girerd, Nicolas; Bakris, George; Pitt, Bertram; Zannad, Faiez

    2014-01-01

    Background Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists improve outcomes in patients with systolic heart failure but may induce worsening of renal function (WRF) and hyperkalemia (HK). We assessed the risk factors for mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist-related WRF and for HK, as well as the association

  4. Pediatric Heart Failure in the Developing World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Sivasubramanian

    2014-01-01

    The exact prevalence of heart failure among children of developing countries is not known, as the data is limited. The relative frequency of different causes of pediatric heart failure varies widely across different countries and even among different parts of large countries like India. Children of developing countries face a double burden of etiologies. Conditions such us congenital heart disease, myocarditis and cardiomyopathies are common causes of pediatric of heart failure. In addition, diseases like rheumatic heart disease, nutritional deficiencies, and other tropical diseases also result in heart failure among children of the developing countries. However, most of the developing countries have low resources and hence management of pediatric heart failure becomes challenging. Advanced therapies for heart failure are rarely used in children of developing countries and cardiac transplant remains a distant dream.

  5. Heart failure re-admission: measuring the ever shortening gap between repeat heart failure hospitalizations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Bakal

    Full Text Available Many quality-of-care and risk prediction metrics rely on time to first rehospitalization even though heart failure (HF patients may undergo several repeat hospitalizations. The aim of this study is to compare repeat hospitalization models. Using a population-based cohort of 40,667 patients, we examined both HF and all cause re-hospitalizations using up to five years of follow-up. Two models were examined: the gap-time model which estimates the adjusted time between hospitalizations and a multistate model which considered patients to be in one of four states; community-dwelling, in hospital for HF, in hospital for any reason, or dead. The transition probabilities and times were then modeled using patient characteristics and number of repeat hospitalizations. We found that during the five years of follow-up roughly half of the patients returned for a subsequent hospitalization for each repeat hospitalization. Additionally, we noted that the unadjusted time between hospitalizations was reduced ∼40% between each successive hospitalization. After adjustment each additional hospitalization was associated with a 28 day (95% CI: 22-35 reduction in time spent out of hospital. A similar pattern was seen when considering the four state model. A large proportion of patients had multiple repeat hospitalizations. Extending the gap between hospitalizations should be an important goal of treatment evaluation.

  6. Prehospital use of furosemide for the treatment of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Andy; Stiell, Ian G; Dionne, Richard; Maloney, Justin

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis and management of acute decompensated heart failure (HF) in the prehospital setting can be challenging. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the appropriateness of furosemide use by Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and its association with adverse outcomes. This study was a multi-centre health records review of EMS patients who received prehospital furosemide or had an emergency department (ED) diagnosis of HF. We included acutely ill patients ≥50 years of age with shortness of breath transported by land EMS. Univariate and logistic regression analyses were performed to determine associations between furosemide use and serious adverse outcomes (acute renal failure, intubation, vasopressors or death). The study population consisted of 330 patients (N=58, furosemide given by EMS but no HF diagnosed in ED; N=110, furosemide given, HF diagnosed; N=162, no furosemide given, HF diagnosed). The median dose of intravenous furosemide was 80 mg (range 20-80 mg). Serious adverse outcomes occurred in 61 patients (19.0%, 23.6% and 14.8% of the three groups, respectively; p=0.18). The adjusted ORs for adverse events with furosemide use was 0.62 (95% CI 0.33 to 1.43) in patients with a diagnosis of HF and 1.14 (95% CI 0.58 to 2.23) in those without. More than a third of patients who received prehospital furosemide did not have an HF diagnosis, suggesting that the prehospital diagnosis of HF can be challenging. Serious adverse outcomes were identified in all patient groups and we found no statistically significant associations between furosemide use and adverse events. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. [The efficacy of ivabradine in chronic heart failure (review)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakadze, A; Makharadze, T; Gvishiani, M

    2015-04-01

    This review article is devoted to the treatment of chronic heart failure (HF) with a new generation drug - ivabradine. It is well known that HF is one of the most frequent reason of high mortality worldwide. HF is characterised by cardiac remodeling, which is central in the pathophysiology of HF including hemodynamic, neurohumoral and neurohormonal mechanisms during its development and established prognostic factor in patients suffered with this disease. Despite the introduction in medical practice of many drugs for the treatment of chronic HF the lethal outcome associated with HF remains high nowadays, which can be explained by complexity of remodeling mechanisms characteristic for development of HF. Ivabradine that has been introduced in medical practice in last decade is a pure heart rate-slowing agent. A large number of studies in patients with cardiovascular disease have demonstrated that heart rate (HR) is a very important and major independent risk factor for prognosis, because lowering of HR reduces cardiac work and diminished myocardial oxygen requirement. It was shown that ivabradine a selective inhibitor of the hyperpolarisation activated sodium chanel (If) is involved in pacemaker generation and responsiveness of the sino-atrial node resulting in HR reduction without negative inotropic action. Ivabradine in chronic HF improves diastolic function and attenuates cardiac tissue hypoxia. Long-term reduction of HR induced by ivabradine reduced remodeling and preserved nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, resulting from processes triggered early after reduction of HR. The complex therapy including ivabradine promotes HR fall, leading in reduction of attacks of a stable angina and improved quality of life. Ivabradine may target the endothelial NO production via inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B leading to endothelial protection. HR reduction by ivabradine reduces oxidative stress, improves endothelial function and prevents development of

  8. Influence of heart failure on nucleolar organization and protein expression in human hearts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosello-Lleti, Esther; Rivera, Miguel; Cortes, Raquel [Cardiocirculatory Unit, Research Center, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Azorin, Inmaculada [Experimental Neurology, Research Center, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Sirera, Rafael [Biotechnology Department, Universidad Politecnica, Valencia (Spain); Martinez-Dolz, Luis [Cardiology Unit, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Hove, Leif; Cinca, Juan [Cardiology Unit, Hospital San Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Lago, Francisca; Gonzalez-Juanatey, Jose R. [Cardiology Unit, Institute of Biomedical Research, Hospital Clinicode Santiagode Compostela (Spain); Salvador, Antonio [Experimental Neurology, Research Center, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Portoles, Manuel, E-mail: portoles_man@gva.es [Cell Biology and Pathology Unit, Research Center, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia (Spain)

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heart failure alters nucleolar morphology and organization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nucleolin expression is significant increased in ischemic and dilated cardiomyopathy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ventricular function of heart failure patients was related with nucleolin levels. -- Abstract: We investigate for the first time the influence of heart failure (HF) on nucleolar organization and proteins in patients with ischemic (ICM) or dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). A total of 71 human hearts from ICM (n = 38) and DCM (n = 27) patients, undergoing heart transplantation and control donors (n = 6), were analysed by western-blotting, RT-PCR and cell biology methods. When we compared protein levels according to HF etiology, nucleolin was increased in both ICM (117%, p < 0.05) and DCM (141%, p < 0.01). Moreover, mRNA expression were also upregulated in ICM (1.46-fold, p < 0.05) and DCM (1.70-fold, p < 0.05. Immunofluorescence studies showed that the highest intensity of nucleolin was into nucleolus (p < 0.0001), and it was increased in pathological hearts (p < 0.0001). Ultrastructure analysis by electron microscopy showed an increase in the nucleus and nucleolus size in ICM (17%, p < 0.05 and 131%, p < 0.001) and DCM (56%, p < 0.01 and 69%, p < 0.01). Nucleolar organization was influenced by HF irrespective of etiology, increasing fibrillar centers (p < 0.001), perinucleolar chromatin (p < 0.01) and dense fibrillar components (p < 0.01). Finally, left ventricular function parameters were related with nucleolin levels in ischemic hearts (p < 0.0001). The present study demonstrates that HF influences on morphology and organization of nucleolar components, revealing changes in the expression and in the levels of nucleolin protein.

  9. Application of Transformational Leadership Principles in the Development and Integration of Palliative Care Within an Advanced Heart Failure Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Susan; Leasure, A Renee

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a major health problem in United States, and it has reached epidemic proportions. Heart failure is associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and cost. Although the prognosis of HF is worse than many forms of cancer, many patients, families, and clinicians are unaware of the dire prognosis. As the disease progress to advanced HF, patients are faced with many challenges, such as poor quality of life due to worsening symptoms and frequent hospitalizations. Heart failure management adds significant financial burden to the health care system. Palliative care can be integrated into HF care to improve quality of life and symptom management and to address physical, spiritual, and psychosocial needs of patients and families. Palliative care can be used concurrently with or independent of curative or life-prolonging HF therapies. Transformational leadership principles were used to guide the development of a plan to enhance integration of palliative care within traditional advanced HF care.

  10. A Comparison of three diuretic Regimens in Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, F.; Eriksen, U.H.; Guul, S.-J.

    1993-01-01

    Farmakologi, bendroflumethiazide, diuretics, heart failure, bumethanide, ergometry plasma lactate......Farmakologi, bendroflumethiazide, diuretics, heart failure, bumethanide, ergometry plasma lactate...

  11. Characterising the difference in electrophysiological substrate and outcomes between heart failure and non-heart failure patients with persistent atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Shouvik K; Jones, David G; Khan, Habib; Panikker, Sandeep; Jarman, Julian W E; Butcher, Charlie; Lim, Eric; Wynn, Gareth; Gupta, Dhiraj; Hussain, Wajid; Markides, Vias; Wong, Tom

    2017-01-20

    Characterizing the differences in substrate and clinical outcome between heart failure (HF) and non-heart failure (non-HF) patients undergoing persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. Using complex fractionated electrograms (CFE) as a surrogate marker of substrate complexity, we compared the bi-atrial substrate in patients with persistent AF with and without HF, at baseline and after ablation, to determine its impact on clinical outcome. In this retrospective analysis of two prospective studies, 60 patients underwent de-novo step-wise left atrial (LA) ablation, 30 with normal left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≥ 50% (non-HF group) and 30 with LVEF ≤ 35% (HF group). Multiple high-density bi-atrial CFE maps were acquired along with AF cycle length (AFCL) at each procedural stage. Change in bi-atrial CFE areas, AFCL and outcome data were then compared. In the non-HF group, higher CFE-areas were found at baseline and at each step of the procedure in the LA. In both LA and the right atrium (RA), baseline and final CFE area were also higher in the non-HF group. Single procedure, arrhythmia-free survival at 1 year was higher in the HF group compared with the non-HF group (72% vs. 43%, log rank P = 0.04). Final total bi-atrial CFE area was an independent predictor of arrhythmia recurrence. CFE represents an important surrogate marker of atrial substrate complexity. The atrial substrate in persistent AF differs between HF and non-HF with the latter representing a more complex 'primary' bi-atrial myopathy. LA focussed ablation results in more extensive substrate modification in HF and better clinical outcomes as compared with non-HF. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Learning Clinical Workflows to Identify Subgroups of Heart Failure Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chao; Chen, You; Li, Bo; Liebovitz, David; Malin, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Heart Failure (HF) is one of the most common indications for readmission to the hospital among elderly patients. This is due to the progressive nature of the disease, as well as its association with complex comorbidities (e.g., anemia, chronic kidney disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hyper- and hypothyroidism), which contribute to increased morbidity and mortality, as well as a reduced quality of life. Healthcare organizations (HCOs) have established diverse treatment plans for HF patients, but such routines are not always formalized and may, in fact, arise organically as a patient’s management evolves over time. This investigation was motivated by the hypothesis that patients associated with a certain subgroup of HF should follow a similar workflow that, once made explicit, could be leveraged by an HCO to more effectively allocate resources and manage HF patients. Thus, in this paper, we introduce a method to identify subgroups of HF through a similarity analysis of event sequences documented in the clinical setting. Specifically, we 1) structure event sequences for HF patients based on the patterns of electronic medical record (EMR) system utilization, 2) identify subgroups of HF patients by applying a k-means clustering algorithm on utilization patterns, 3) learn clinical workflows for each subgroup, and 4) label each subgroup with diagnosis and procedure codes that are distinguishing in the set of all subgroups. To demonstrate its potential, we applied our method to EMR event logs for 785 HF inpatient stays over a 4 month period at a large academic medical center. Our method identified 8 subgroups of HF, each of which was found to associate with a canonical workflow inferred through an inductive mining algorithm. Each subgroup was further confirmed to be affiliated with specific comorbidities, such as hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. PMID:28269922

  13. Scoring system based on electrocardiogram features to predict the type of heart failure in patients with chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendry Purnasidha Bagaswoto

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Heart failure is divided into heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF. Additional studies are required to distinguish between these two types of HF. A previous study showed that HFrEF is less likely when ECG findings are normal. This study aims to create a scoring system based on ECG findings that will predict the type of HF. We performed a cross-sectional study analyzing ECG and echocardiographic data from 110 subjects. HFrEF was defined as an ejection fraction ≤40%. Fifty people were diagnosed with HFpEF and 60 people suffered from HFrEF. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed certain ECG variables that were independent predictors of HFrEF i.e., LAH, QRS duration >100 ms, RBBB, ST-T segment changes and prolongation of the QT interval. Based on ROC curve analysis, we obtained a score for HFpEF of -1 to +3, while HFrEF had a score of +4 to +6 with 76% sensitivity, 96% specificity, 95% positive predictive value, an 80% negative predictive value and an accuracy of 86%. The scoring system derived from this study, including the presence or absence of LAH, QRS duration >100 ms, RBBB, ST-T segment changes and prolongation of the QT interval can be used to predict the type of HF with satisfactory sensitivity and specificity

  14. Managing anemia in patients with chronic heart failure: what do we know?

    OpenAIRE

    Besarab, Anatole

    2010-01-01

    Ankur Sandhu1, Sandeep Soman1, Michael Hudson2, Anatole Besarab11Divisions of Nephrology, 2Cardiology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan, USAAbstract: Anemia is common in patients with chronic heart failure (HF) with an incidence ranging from 4% to 55% depending on the studied population. Several studies have highlighted that the prevalence of anemia increases with worsening heart failure as reflected by New York Heart Association classification. Additionally, several epidemiologica...

  15. Melatonin protects against ischemic heart failure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şehirli, Ahmet Özer; Koyun, Derya; Tetik, Şermin; Özsavcı, Derya; Yiğiner, Ömer; Çetinel, Şule; Tok, Olgu Enis; Kaya, Zehra; Akkiprik, Mustafa; Kılıç, Ertugrul; Şener, Göksel

    2013-09-01

    Ischemic injury, which occurs as a result of sympathetic hyperactivity, plays an important role in heart failure. Melatonin is thought to have antiatherogenic, antioxidant, and vasodilatory effects. In this study, we investigated whether melatonin protects against ischemic heart failure (HF). In Wistar albino rats, HF was induced by left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery ligation and rats were treated with either vehicle or melatonin (10 mg/kg) for 4 weeks. At the end of this period, echocardiographic measurements were recorded and the rats were decapitated to obtain plasma and cardiac tissue samples. Lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and lysosomal enzymes (β-D-glucuronidase, β-galactosidase, β-D-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, acid phosphatase, and cathepsin-D) were studied in plasma samples, while malondialdehyde and glutathione levels and Na+, K+-ATPase, caspase-3 and myeloperoxidase activities were determined in the cardiac samples. Sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) and caveolin-3 levels in cardiac tissues were evaluated using Western blot analyses. Furthermore, caveolin-3 levels were also determined by histological analyses. In the vehicle-treated HF group, cardiotoxicity resulted in decreased cardiac Na+, K+-ATPase and SERCA activities, GSH contents and caveolin-3 levels, while plasma LDH, CK, and lysosomal enzyme activities and cardiac MDA and Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activities were found to be increased. On the other hand, melatonin treatment reversed all the functional and biochemical changes. The present results demonstrate that Mel ameliorates ischemic heart failure in rats. These observations highlight that melatonin is a promising supplement for improving defense mechanisms in the heart against oxidative stress caused by heart failure.

  16. Return to the Workforce After First Hospitalization for Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørth, Rasmus; Wong, Chih; Sørensen, Kristian Dahl Kragholm

    2016-01-01

    Background: Return to work is important financially, as a marker of functional status and for self-esteem in patients developing chronic illness. We examined return to work after first heart failure (HF) hospitalization. Methods: By individual-level linkage of nationwide Danish registries, we ide...... with lower chance of return to work. Conclusions: Patients in the workforce before HF hospitalization had low mortality but high risk of detachment from the workforce 1 year later. Young age, male sex, and a higher level of education were predictors of return to work.......Background: Return to work is important financially, as a marker of functional status and for self-esteem in patients developing chronic illness. We examined return to work after first heart failure (HF) hospitalization. Methods: By individual-level linkage of nationwide Danish registries, we...... between age, sex, length of hospital stay, level of education, income, comorbidity, and return to work. Results: One year after first HF hospitalization, 8040 (67.7%) returned to the workforce, 2981 (25.1%) did not, 805 (6.7%) died, and 54 (0.5%) emigrated. Predictors of return to work included younger...

  17. Self-awareness of heart failure in the oldest old-an observational study of participants, ≥ 80 years old, with an objectively verified heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selan, Suzana; Siennicki-Lantz, Arkadiusz; Berglund, Johan; Fagerström, Cecilia

    2016-01-20

    One of the primary reasons for hospitalisation among elderly individuals with heart failure (HF) is poor self-care. Self-awareness of having HF may be a key-element in successful self-care. The prevalence of self-awareness of HF, and how it is affected by age-and HF-related factors, remains poorly understood. The aims of the present study were to determine the prevalence of self-awareness of HF in participants, ≥ 80 years of age, and to investigate the association between this self-awareness and age-related and HF-related factors. A single-centre observational study was conducted in which non-hospitalised participants (80+) with objectively verified HF were identified (n = 90). The statement of having HF or not having HF was used to divide the participants into two groups for comparisons: aware or unaware of one's own HF. Logistic regression models were completed to determine the impact of age-and HF-related factors on self-awareness. Twenty-six percent (23/90) were aware of their own HF diagnosis. No significant differences were found between the participants who were aware of their own HF diagnosis and the participants who were not. Neither age-nor HF-related factors had influence on the prevalence of self-awareness. Prevalence of self-awareness of own HF in the oldest old is insufficient, and this self-awareness may be influenced by external factors. One such factor is likely the manner in which the HF diagnosis is relayed to the patient by health care professionals.

  18. Loss of K+ currents in heart failure is accentuated in KChIP2 deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grubb, Søren Jahn; Speerschneider, Tobias; Occhipinti, Dona;

    2014-01-01

    KV 4 together with KV Channel-Interacting Protein 2 (KChIP2) mediate the fast recovering transient outward potassium current (Ito,f ) in the heart. KChIP2 is downregulated in human heart failure (HF), potentially underlying the loss of Ito,f . We investigated remodeling associated with HF hypothe...... hypothesizing that KChIP2 plays a central role in the modulation of outward K(+) currents in HF....

  19. 10.3.Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930264 Treatment of congestive heart failurecomplicating chronic keshen disease with mag-nesium suelfate and captorril.LIU Wenhe (刘文和),et al.Dept Intern Med,224th Hosp,PLA,Jiamusi,154007.Chin J Intern Med1993;32(1):49—51.In 150 patients of chronic keshen disease withcongestive heart failure were divided into twogroups:the treatment group (TG) and controlgroup (CG).Patients in TG (80 patients) weretreated with magnesium sulfate and eaptopril,while those in CG (70 patients) with digoxin.The results showed a marked difference (P<0.01) in the total effective rate between TG (92.5percent) and CG (65.7 percent).Both groupshad an increase in cardiac outnut and cardiac in-

  20. Galectin-3 and fibulin-1 in systolic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmager, Pernille; Egstrup, Michael; Gustafsson, Ida

    2017-01-01

    Background: Heart failure (HF) patients with diabetes (DM) have an adverse prognosis and reduced functional capacity, which could be associated with cardiac fibrosis, increased chamber stiffness and reduced left ventricular (LV) contractile reserve. Galectin-3 (Gal-3) and fibulin-1 are circulating......-dose dobutamine echocardiography and blood sampling for biomarker measurements. Patients were classified according to history of DM and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) as: normal glucose tolerance (NGT) (n = 70), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) (n = 25) and DM (n = 60). Results: Galectin-3 levels were...... adjustment for estimated glomerular filtration rate (P = 0.66). Fibulin-1 was not associated with LV contractile reserve (P = 0.71). Conclusions: Galectin-3 and fibulin-1 levels were elevated in HF patients with impaired glucose metabolism. However, reduced LV contractile reserve among HF patients with DM...

  1. Erectile dysfunction as a complication of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraghoush, Afshan; Phan, Anita; Willix, Robert D; Schwarz, Ernst R

    2010-12-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is an increasingly common problem in the aging population and has been associated with chronic heart failure (HF), either as an epiphenomenon or even as an early marker for underlying cardiovascular disease. ED has a significant effect on patients' quality of life. This chapter reviews ED in patients with HF and prevention and treatment based on current data from the literature. Causes include physiologic changes resulting in decreased cardiac function and exercise capacity, intrinsic vascular and neurohormonal abnormalities, and extrinsic factors such as medication side effects and psychological issues. Physicians should address these issues with patients and begin treatment by optimizing HF management and minimizing medications with ED side effects. Use of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors provides significant improvement of ED and quality of life. Further research still is needed regarding long-term effects of ED treatment, investigation of newer medications, and preventive measures in this patient population.

  2. Intersections Between Microbiome and Heart Failure: Revisiting the Gut Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatomo, Yuji; Tang, W H Wilson

    2015-12-01

    Microbes play an important role in human health and disease. In the setting of heart failure (HF), substantial hemodynamic changes, such as hypoperfusion and congestion in the intestines, can alter gut morphology, permeability, function, and possibly the growth and composition of gut microbiota. These changes can disrupt the barrier function of the intestines and exacerbate systemic inflammation via microbial or endotoxin translocation into systemic circulation. Furthermore, cardiorenal alterations via metabolites derived from gut microbiota can potentially mediate or modulate HF pathophysiology. Recently, trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) has emerged as a key mediator that provides a mechanistic link between gut microbiota and multiple cardiovascular diseases, including HF. Potential intervention strategies which may target this microbiota-driven pathology include dietary modification, prebiotics/probiotics, and selective binders of microbial enzymes or molecules, but further investigations into their safety and efficacy are warranted.

  3. Dietary management of heart failure: room for improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Thomas

    2016-04-14

    There is growing awareness of the role of diet in both health and disease management. Much data are available on the cardioprotective diet in the primary and secondary prevention of CVD. However, there is limited information on the role of diet in the management of heart failure (HF). Animal models of HF have provided interesting insight and potential mechanisms by which dietary manipulation may improve cardiac performance and delay the progression of the disease, and small-scale human studies have highlighted beneficial diet patterns. The aim of this review is to summarise the current data available on the role of diet in the management of human HF and to demonstrate that dietary manipulation needs to progress further than the simple recommendation of salt and fluid restriction.

  4. Exercise training in congestive heart failure: risks and benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keteyian, Steven J

    2011-01-01

    After decades of concern about the safety and effectiveness of exercise training in patients with heart failure (HF) due to reduced ejection fraction, initial research demonstrated the feasibility and physiologic benefits associated with such an intervention. Subsequent controlled studies confirmed these results and suggested improved clinical outcomes as well. This review summarizes the findings from single-site and multisite trials and meta-analyses that addressed the effects of exercise training on exercise capacity and clinical outcomes. Conclusions from these studies indicate that exercise is safe, improves health status and exercise capacity, attenuates much of the abnormal physiology that develops with HF, and yields a modest reduction in clinical events. Future research needs to identify which patient subgroups might benefit the most, the optimal exercise dose needed to lessen disease-related symptoms and maximize clinical benefit, and the effects of exercise training in patients with HF and preserved ejection fraction.

  5. An Unusual Cause of Postpartum Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaddash, Ibrahim; Hawatmeh, Amer; Altheeb, Zaid; Hamdan, Aiman; Shamoon, Fayez

    2017-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a weakness of the heart muscle. It is an idiopathic cardiomyopathy that presents with heart failure secondary to left ventricular systolic dysfunction toward the end of pregnancy or in the months after delivery, in the absence of any other cause of heart failure. It is a rare condition that can carry mild or severe symptoms. PMID:28074806

  6. An unusual cause of postpartum heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Khaddash

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a weakness of the heart muscle. It is an idiopathic cardiomyopathy that presents with heart failure secondary to left ventricular systolic dysfunction toward the end of pregnancy or in the months after delivery, in the absence of any other cause of heart failure. It is a rare condition that can carry mild or severe symptoms.

  7. Co-morbidities in heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deursen, Vincent M.; Damman, Kevin; van der Meer, Peter; Wijkstra, Peter J.; Luijckx, Gert-Jan; van Beek, Andre; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Voors, Adriaan A.

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a clinical syndrome characterized by poor quality of life and high morbidity and mortality. Co-morbidities frequently accompany heart failure and further decrease in both quality of life and clinical outcome. We describe that the prevalence of co-morbidities in patients with heart f

  8. Effect of yoga therapy on heart rate, blood pressure and cardiac autonomic function in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Bandi Hari; Pal, Pravati; G K, Pal; J, Balachander; E, Jayasettiaseelon; Y, Sreekanth; M G, Sridhar; G S, Gaur

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that a hall mark of heart failure is adverse changes in autonomic function. Elevated blood pressure is a powerful predictor of congestive heart failure and other Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) outcomes. In this study, we planned to examine the effects of a 12 week yoga therapy on blood pressure, heart rate, heart rate variability, and rate pressure product (RPP). Out of 130 heart failure patients recruited for the study, 65 patients were randomly selected to receive 12 week yoga therapy along with standard medical therapy (yoga group). Other patients (n=65) received only standard medical therapy (control group). Heart rate, blood pressure, cardiac autonomic function (by short-term heart-rate variability analysis) and myocardial oxygen consumption (by RPP) were assessed before and after 12 weeks. In the yoga group, 44 patients and in the control group, 48 patients completed the study. There was a significant decrease in heart rate, blood pressure and RPP in yoga group compared to control group. Also, LFnu and LF-HF ratio decreased significantly and HFnu increased significantly in yoga group compared to control group. Twelve-week yoga therapy significantly improved the parasympathetic activity and decreased the sympathetic activity in heart failure patients (NYHA I&II).

  9. Comparable long-term mortality risk associated with individual sulfonylureas in diabetes patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Charlotte; Gislason, Gunnar H; Jørgensen, Casper H

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the outcomes of individual sulfonylureas in patients with heart failure (HF). Methods All patients hospitalized with HF for the first time in 1997–2006, alive 30 days after discharge, and who received anti-diabetic monotherapy with glimepiride (n = 1097), glibenclamide...... was not dependent on prior acute myocardial infarction or ischemic heart disease (p for interactions >0.3). Conclusions In current clinical practice, it is unlikely that there are considerable differences in risk of mortality associated with individual sulfonylureas in patients with heart failure....

  10. Cardiac resynchronization therapy in the elderly heart failure patient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    George E. Taffet

    2005-01-01

    @@ Ms. BP is an 83 year old white female with a long history of congestive heart failure (HF). She is now symptomatic with minimal exertion, has a left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) of 20%. Her CHF is due to hypertension (HTN) plus coronary artery disease (CAD) and she is on angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI), furosemide, digoxin,spironolactone, low dose beta blocker and nitrates. Her beta-natriuretic peptide (BNP) in clinic is 3030 pg/ml, heart rate (HR) 100, blood pressure (BP) 89/43.

  11. Reducing mortality with device therapy in heart failure patients without ventricular arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapa, Deborah W; Lee, Hyeon-Joo; Kao, Chi-Wen; Friedmann, Erika; Thomas, Sue A; Anderson, Jill; Bardy, Gust H

    2008-09-01

    Use of device therapy to prevent sudden cardiac death in patients with heart failure is expanding on the basis of evidence from recent clinical trials. Three multicenter prospective clinical trials-Sudden Cardiac Death in Heart Failure (SCD-HeFT); Comparison of Medical Therapy, Pacing, and Defibrillation in Heart Failure (COMPANION); and Cardiac Resynchronization-Heart Failure (CARE-HF)-were conducted to determine the effectiveness of devices in reducing mortality in patients with heart failure who did not have a history of ventricular arrhythmias. The 3 trials varied in the devices used, the population of patients included, and the study designs. In SCD-HeFT, implantable cardioverter defibrillators were more effective than pharmacological therapy in preventing mortality among patients with mild to moderate heart failure. In COMPANION, cardiac resynchronization therapy alone and cardiac resynchronization therapy plus an implantable cardioverter defibrillator were more effective than optimal drug treatment in reducing morbidity and all-cause mortality in patients with moderate to severe heart failure. In CARE-HF, cardiac resynchronization therapy alone was more effective than optimal drug treatment in reducing all-cause mortality in patients with moderate to severe heart failure. No direct comparison of the devices used has been done. These 3 clinical trials provide clear evidence that device therapy is beneficial for some patients with heart failure, even patients who do not have a history of ventricular arrhythmia.

  12. SP 01-3 ALDOSTERONE ANTAGONISTS IN HEART FAILURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Colin

    2016-09-01

    Aldosterone's deleterious pathophysiological effects on the cardiovascular system if blocked by mineralcorticord antagonists (MRAs) logically should lead to improvement in heart function and outcomes in heart failure (HF). The first trial to test this hypothesis was tthe RALES trial in 1999 which treated patients with class III-IV HF with spironolactone. It showed significant reduction in mortality and cardiovascular hospitalzation rates. This was confirmed & extended in EMHASIS-HF RCT with classs II-III being treated with ACEIs & BB who received placebo or elperinone (a MRA) with again a statistically significant fall in mortality & hospitalization.The possible cardioprotective effects of MRA post acute myocardial infarct (MI) is less clear. The EPHESUS RCT in 2003 demostrated that elperinone given 3-14 days AMI in patients with early signs of HF reduced mortality & morbidity. However in the ALBTROSS trial using spironolactone 2 days after AMI showed no benfit in patients without HF but in a subgroup with ST elevation there was a 80% reduction in mortality after 6 months. However a recent meta-analysis from 25 RCT with data invovling 19,333 patients with either HF or post MI assigned aldosterone antagonists (AA)or placebo showed a 18% reduction in mortality including a 20% fall in CV mortality and a 19% reduction in SCD.The role of AA in HFPEF is even even more contraversial. The TOPCAT RCT of 3445 patients with symptomatc HFPEF randomised to spironolactone failed to meet the primary composite end point of death, aborted cardiac arrest or hospitalization although there was a reduction in hospitalization for HF (HR 0.83 P = 0.04).The differences between selective or non-selective MRAs, their ADRs & off target effects will also be discussed.

  13. NEW ADVANCES IN BETA-BLOCKER THERAPY IN HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo eBarrese

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of -blockers (BB in heart failure (HF has been considered a contradiction for many years. Considering HF simply as a state of inadequate systolic function, BB were contraindicated because of their negative effects on myocardial contractility. Nevertheless, evidence collected in the past years have suggested that additional mechanisms, such as compensatory neuro-humoral hyperactivation or inflammation, could participate in the pathogenesis of this complex disease. Indeed, chronic activation of the sympathetic nervous system, although initially compensating the reduced cardiac output from the failing heart, increases myocardial oxygen demand, ischemia and oxidative stress; moreover, high catecholamine levels induce peripheral vasoconstriction and increase both cardiac pre- and after-load, thus determining additional stress to the cardiac muscle (1. As a consequence of such a different view of the pathogenic mechanisms of HF, the efficacy of BB in the treatment of HF has been investigated in numerous clinical trials. Results from these trials highlighted BB as valid therapeutic tools in HF, providing rational basis for their inclusion in many HF treatment guidelines. However, controversy still exists about their use, in particular with regards to the selection of specific molecules, since BB differ in terms of adrenergic -receptors selectivity, adjunctive effects on -receptors, and effects on reactive oxygen species and inflammatory cytokines production. Further concerns about the heterogeneity in the response to , as well as the use in specific patients, are matter of debate among clinicians. In this review, we will recapitulate the pharmacological properties and the classification of BB, and the alteration of the adrenergic system occurring during HF that provide a rationale for their use; we will also focus on the possible molecular mechanisms, such as genetic polymorphisms, underlying the different efficacy of molecules

  14. Impact of obesity and the obesity paradox on prevalence and prognosis in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavie, Carl J; Alpert, Martin A; Arena, Ross; Mehra, Mandeep R; Milani, Richard V; Ventura, Hector O

    2013-04-01

    Obesity has reached epidemic proportions in the United States and worldwide. Considering the adverse effects of obesity on left ventricular (LV) structure, diastolic and systolic function, and other risk factors for heart failure (HF), including hypertension and coronary heart disease, HF incidence and prevalence, not surprisingly, is markedly increased in obese patients. Nevertheless, as with most other cardiovascular diseases, numerous studies have documented an obesity paradox, in which overweight and obese patients, defined by body mass index, percent body fat, or central obesity, demonstrate a better prognosis compared with lean or underweight HF patients. This review will describe the data on obesity in the context of cardiopulmonary exercise testing in HF. Additionally, the implications of obesity on LV assist devices and heart transplantation are reviewed. Finally, despite the obesity paradox, we address the current state of weight reduction in HF.

  15. Iron deficiency in chronic systolic heart failure(indic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Verma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic systolic heart failure (HF is characterized by the left ventricular dysfunction, exercise intolerance and is associated with neurohormonal activation that affects several organs such as kidney and skeletal muscle. Anemia is common in HF and may worsen symptoms. Iron deficiency (ID is also common in HF patients with or without anemia. Iron is the key cofactor in oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle and the Krebs cycle. There is a paucity of data regarding iron metabolism in chronic systolic HF in India. Methods: IroN Deficiency In CHF study (INDIC is an observational study that investigated forty chronic heart failure patients for the presence of ID. Serum ferritin (micrograms per liter, serum iron (micrograms per liter, total iron binding capacity (micrograms per liter, transferring (milligrams per deciliter, and transferrin saturation were measured to assess iron status. Results: There were 67.5% (27/40 patients who had ID with a mean serum ferritin level of 76.4 μg/L. Of the 27 iron deficient patients, 22 (55% had an absolute ID, and 5 had a functional ID. Eight out of 27 of the iron deficient patients were anemic (20% of the total cohort, 30% of the iron deficient patients. Anemia was seen in 6 other patients, which was possibly anemia of chronic disease. There was a trend for more advanced New York Heart Association (NYHA class (NYHA III and NYHA IV patients with ID (37.4% vs. 30.77%, P = 0.697. Conclusion: In our study, ID was very common, affecting more than half of the patients with systolic HF. Absolute ID was the most common cause of ID and patients with ID had a tendency to have advanced NYHA class. Our study also demonstrated that ID can occur in the absence of anemia (iron depletion.

  16. Peripheral vascular insufficiency impairs functional capacity in patients with heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Murayama

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Heart failure (HF is a complex syndrome in which effort limitation is associated with deterioration of peripheral musculature. Improving survival rates among these patients have led to the appearance of cases in which other pathologies are associated with HF, such as peripheral vascular insufficiency (PVI. The combination of these two pathologies is common, with significant repercussions for affected patients. OBJECTIVE: To compare functional limitations and quality of life between patients with HF in isolation or HF + PVI. METHOD: Twelve patients with HF+PVI were paired to 12 patients with HF in isolation. All had ejection fraction 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: The study participants who had mixed disease exhibited a greater degree of functional impairment than the group with HF, without reporting worsened quality of life.

  17. [Anemia in congestive heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abassade, P; Rabenirina, F; Garcon, P; Antakly, Y; Cador, R

    2009-11-01

    Anemia is a common disorder in congestive heart failure and an independant prognostic factor. The aims of this study are to evaluate the prevalence of anemia among a population of in-hospital congestive heart failure patients, to compare anemic patients (A) with non anemic patients (NA) and to study their cares. One hundred and thirty-two patients, 70 men (53%), et 62 women (47%) are enrolled. Mean age is 76.4+/-13.5 years. The prevalence of anemia (WHO criteria) is 49%. Patients A are older than NA: 79.1+/-13.8 years versus 73.8+/-12.9 years (p=0.025), renal function is more altered in A than in NA, creatinine clearance is 56.5 ml/min (A) versus 76.2 ml/min (NA) (p=0.003). Ejection fraction (EF) is lower in A than in NA: 35.1+/-15.3% versus 50.9+/-15.9%, (pAnemia is less frequent in preserved EF (28%) than in low EF (63%) (pAnemia is frequent in our population, and is associated with others prognostic factors and comorbidity.

  18. Apoptosis and congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, G; Ruffolo, R R; Yue, T L

    1997-10-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is the final clinical manifestation of a variety of cardiac (myopathies), coronary (atherosclerosis), and systemic diseases (diabetes, hypertension). Regardless of the origin of the cardiac insult, left ventricular dysfunction resulting in decreased cardiac output elicits a series of adaptational processes that attempt to compensate for some of the decrement in myocardial function. One of the key manifestations of these compensatory processes is cardiac hypertrophy, which is characterized by a marked increase in myocyte size and an increase in contractile proteins. The benefits resulting from these compensatory adaptational mechanisms, however, are only transient, and within a period of months to years, the changes induced in the myocardium fail to sustain cardiac output at a level that is sufficient to meet the demands of the body; subsequently, physical performance is impaired. Typically, progressive dilation and thinning of the left ventricle occur along with progression of CHF. The mechanisms responsible for the thinning of ventricular tissue and loss of left ventricular mass are poorly understood; traditionally, such loss has been attributed to tissue necrosis based on the morphologic observation of dead cardiac myocytes. Very recently, there have been data suggesting that apoptosis, a form of programmed cell death (PCD), occurs in the heart and may be responsible, at least in part, for the progression of CHF and the chronic loss of left ventricular function and mass. Evidence for a role of apoptosis/PCD in the progression of heart failure has been obtained from a variety of observations, including in vitro studies of cardiac myocytes in culture, experimental animal models of cardiac injury, and cardiac tissue obtained from patients with CHF. Thus, apoptosis/PCD may be a critical mechanism involved in the progressive loss of cardiac myocytes, which ultimately results in end-stage heart failure. In this brief review, the evidence

  19. Parallel paths to improve heart failure outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Nancy M.

    2013-01-01

    Gaps and disparities in delivery of heart failure education by nurses and performance in accomplishing self-care behaviors by patients with advanced heart failure may be factors in clinical decompensation and unplanned consumption of health care. Is nurse-led education effectively delivered before...... and exercise. Further, clinical nurses may not have time to provide in-depth education to patients before discharge. Equally important, research is needed to learn about factors that enhance patients’ adherence to heart failure self-care behaviors, because adherence to recommendations of national, evidence......-based, heart failure guidelines improves clinical outcomes. Thus, nurses and patients are on parallel paths related to setting the foundation for improved self-care adherence in advanced heart failure. Through research, we found that nurses were not adequately prepared as heart failure educators...

  20. High saturated fat feeding prevents left ventricular dysfunction and enhances mitochondrial function in heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accumulation of lipids in the heart is associated with contractile dysfunction, and has been proposed to be a causative factor in mitochondrial dysfunction. We have previously shown that administration of a high saturated fat diet in heart failure (HF) increased mitochondrial respiration and ETC com...

  1. Effect of renal function on prognosis in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löffler, Adrián Ignacio; Cappola, Thomas P; Fang, James; Hetzel, Scott J; Kadlec, Andrew; Astor, Brad; Sweitzer, Nancy K

    2015-01-01

    Renal dysfunction (RD) is associated with increased mortality in heart failure (HF). The aim of this study was to identify whether worsened or improved renal function during mid-term follow-up is associated with worsened outcomes in patients with chronic HF. A total of 892 participants from a multicenter cohort study of chronic HF were followed over 3.1 ± 1.9 years of enrollment. Worsened and improved renal functions were tested with multivariate models as independent predictors of HF hospitalization and mortality. Although 12% of subjects experienced a ≥25% decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), 17% experienced a ≥25% increase in eGFR, and there was stability of kidney function observed in the cohort as a whole. The quartile with the worst RD at any point in time had increased risk of HF hospitalization and mortality. Worsened eGFR was associated with HF outcomes in the unadjusted (hazard ratio = 1.71, 95% confidence interval 1.04 to 2.81, p = 0.035), but not the adjusted analysis. Improvement in eGFR was not associated with outcome (p = 0.453). In chronic HF, the severity of RD predicts risk of poor outcome better than changes in renal function during mid-term follow-up. This suggests that in patients with appropriately treated chronic HF, worsening renal function in itself does not yield useful prognostic information and may not reflect poor outcome.

  2. Strategies to Modify the Risk of Heart Failure Readmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas T. H. Wan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human factors play an important role in health-care outcomes of heart failure (HF patients. A systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trial studies on HF hospitalization may yield positive proofs of the beneficial effect of specific care management strategies. Purpose: To investigate how the 8 guiding principles of choice, rest, environment, activity, trust, interpersonal relationships, outlook, and nutrition reduce HF readmissions. Basic Procedures: Appropriate keywords were identified related to the (1 independent variable of hospitalization and treatment, (2 the moderating variable of care management principles, (3 the dependent variable of readmission, and (4 the disease of HF to conduct searches in 9 databases. Databases searched included CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ERIC, MEDLINE, PubMed, PsycInfo, Science Direct, and Web of Science. Only prospective studies associated with HF hospitalization and readmissions, published in English, Chinese, Spanish, and German journals between January 1, 1990, and August 31, 2015, were included in the systematic review. In the meta-analysis, data were collected from studies that measured HF readmission for individual patients. Main Findings: The results indicate that an intervention involving any human factor principles may nearly double an individual’s probability of not being readmitted. Participants in interventions that incorporated single or combined principles were 1.4 to 6.8 times less likely to be readmitted. Principal Conclusions: Interventions with human factor principles reduce readmissions among HF patients. Overall, this review may help reconfigure the design, implementation, and evaluation of clinical practice for reducing HF readmissions in the future.

  3. Treatment of heart failure in nursing home residents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marille AMJ Daamen; Jan PH Hamers; Anton PM Gorgels; Frans ES Tan; Jos MGA Schols; Hans-Peter Brunner-la Rocca

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundFor the treatment of chronic heart failure (HF), both pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment should be em-ployed in HF patients. Although HF is highly prevalent in nursing home residents, it is not clear whether the recommendations in the guide-lines for pharmacological therapy also are followed in nursing home residents. The aim of this study is to investigate how HF is treated in nursing home residents and to determine to what extent the current treatment corresponds to the guidelines.MethodsNursing home resi-dents of five large nursing home care organizations in the southern part of the Netherlands with a previous diagnosis of HF based on medical records irrespective of the left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) were included in this cross-sectional design study. Data were gathered on the (medical) records, which included clinical characteristics and pharmacological- and non-pharmacological treatment. Echocardiography was used as part of the study to determine the LVEF.ResultsOut of 501 residents, 112 had a diagnosis of HF at inclusion. One-third of them received an ACE-inhibitor and 40% used aβ-blocker. In 66%, there was a prescription of diuretics with a preference of a loop diuretic. Focusing on the residents with a LVEF£ 40%, only 46% of the 22 residents used an ACE-inhibitor and 64% aβ-blocker. The median daily doses of prescribed medication were lower than those that were recommended by the guidelines. Non-pharmacological interventions were recorded in almost none of the residents with HF.ConclusionsThe recommended medical therapy of HF was often not prescribed; if pre-scribed, the dosage was usually far below what was recommended. In addition, non-pharmacological interventions were mostly not used at all.

  4. Heart Failure: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3orMore Aging & Health A to Z Find a Geriatrics Healthcare Professional Medications & Older Adults Making Your Wishes ... to help your body reduce the extra fluid. Depression and Heart Failure If you have chronic heart ...

  5. Towards defining heart failure in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolger, Aidan P; Gatzoulis, Michael A

    2004-12-01

    Injury to the myocardium disrupts geometric integrity and results in changes to intracardiac pressure, wall stress and tension, and the pattern of blood flow through the heart. Significant disruption to pump function results in heart failure which is defined in terms of symptoms: breathlessness and fatigue, signs of salt and water retention, and neurohormonal activation. This syndrome most commonly occurs in the context of injury due to ischaemic heart disease and dilated cardiomyopathy but because patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) are born with sometimes gross distortions of cardiac anatomy they too are subject to the forces that drive heart failure. This paper explores the available data relating to the clinical and neurohormonal manifestations of heart failure in patients with congenital heart disease and describes how, by additionally exploring events at a cellular level, we may be able to arrive at a definition of heart failure relevant to this population.

  6. Prevalence of anemia and renal insufficiency in non-hospitalized patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Francisco José Farias Borges dos; Fernandes, André Maurício Souza; Bitencourt, Almir Galvão Vieira; Neves, Flávia Branco Cerqueira Serra; Kuwano, André Yoichi; França, Victor Hugo Pinheiro; Macedo, Cristiano Ricardo Bastos de; Cruz, Cristiano Gonçalves da; Sahade, Viviane; Aras Júnior, Roque

    2009-09-01

    Heart Failure (HF) is a common disease with a high rate of mortality. Anemia and renal failure (RF) are often found in patients with HF associated with higher severity of the heart disease and a worse prognosis. To evaluate the prevalence of anemia and RF, as well as the association between these two conditions, in non-hospitalized patients with HF. Patients treated at the HF Outpatient Clinic of a university hospital were followed from July 2003 to November 2006. Anemia was defined as hemoglobin levels Renal function was assessed by the glomerular filtration rate (GFR), calculated by the simplified formula of the MDRD (Modification of Diet in Renal Disease) study. Of the 345 patients included in this study, 26.4% (n = 91) had anemia and 29.6% had moderate to severe renal failure (GFR anemia and a higher prevalence of renal failure was statistically significant (41.8% vs. 25.2%; p = 0.005). The patients at functional class III and IV presented a higher incidence of anemia (39.0% vs. 19.4%; p renal failure (38.2% vs. 24.8%; p = 0.007). No association was observed between anemia or renal failure and history of hypertension, diabetes, systolic function or etiology of HF. The prevalence of anemia and renal failure was high in this population and was associated with the severity of the HF (functional classes III and IV).

  7. Recent advances in treatment of heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Kitai, Takeshi; Tang, WH Wilson

    2015-01-01

    With the total cases and economic burden of heart failure continuing to rise, there is an overwhelming need for novel therapies. Several drugs for heart failure have succeeded in preclinical and early-phase clinical trials, but most of them failed to show the real benefit in pivotal clinical trials. Meanwhile, the US Food and Drug Administration recently approved two promising new drugs to treat heart failure: ivabradine and sacubitril/valsartan. Furthermore, some of the newer agents in testi...

  8. ExtraHF survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piepoli, Massimo F; Binno, Simone; Corrà, Ugo

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: In heart failure (HF), exercise training programmes (ETPs) are a well-recognized intervention to improve symptoms, but are still poorly implemented. The Heart Failure Association promoted a survey to investigate whether and how cardiac centres in Europe are using ETPs in their HF patients...... of evidence on safety or benefit was cited. When implemented, an ETP was proposed to all HF patients in only 55% of the centres, with restriction according to severity or aetiology. CONCLUSIONS: With respect to previous surveys, there is evidence of increased availability of ETPs in HF in Europe, although too...

  9. Diuretics as pathogenetic treatment for heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Guglin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Maya GuglinUniversity of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USAAbstract: Increased intracardiac filling pressure or congestion causes symptoms and leads to hospital admissions in patients with heart failure, regardless of their systolic function. A history of hospital admission, in turn, predicts further hospitalizations and morbidity, and a higher number of hospitalizations determine higher mortality. Congestion is therefore the driving force of the natural history of heart failure. Congestion is the syndrome shared by heart failure with preserved and reduced systolic function. These two conditions have almost identical morbidity, mortality, and survival because the outcomes are driven by congestion. A small difference in favor of heart failure with preserved systolic function comes from decreased ejection fraction and left ventricular remodeling which is only present in heart failure with decreased systolic function. The magnitude of this difference reflects the contribution of decreased systolic function and ventricular remodeling to the progression of heart failure. The only treatment available for congestion is fluid removal via diuretics, ultrafiltration, or dialysis. It is the only treatment that works equally well for heart failure with reduced and preserved systolic function because it affects congestion, the main pathogenetic feature of the disease. Diuretics are pathogenetic therapy for heart failure.Keywords: heart failure, diuretics, congestion, systolic function, diastolic function, ejection fraction

  10. Epidemiology of anemia in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, W H Wilson; Yeo, P S Daniel

    2010-07-01

    Anemia is being increasingly recognized as an important comorbidity in patients with heart failure. Despite wide variations in defining anemia, approximately one-fifth to one-third of patients with heart failure may experience anemia at a given time. The prevalence may increase to more than half of patients in the setting of severe heart failure, and it may differ with different settings. Meanwhile, up to a fifth of patients may experience new-onset anemia, even though most cases may resolve over time. Different factors contribute to the development of anemia, including increasing age, renal insufficiency, hemodilution, chronic inflammation, and increasing heart failure disease severity.

  11. Effect of Visit‐to‐Visit Variation of Heart Rate and Systolic Blood Pressure on Outcomes in Chronic Systolic Heart Failure: Results From the Systolic Heart Failure Treatment With the I f Inhibitor Ivabradine Trial (SHIFT) Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Böhm, Michael; Robertson, Michele; Borer, Jeffrey; Ford, Ian; Komajda, Michel; Mahfoud, Felix; Ewen, Sebastian; Swedberg, Karl; Tavazzi, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Background Elevated resting heart rate (HR) and low systolic blood pressure (SBP) are related to poor outcomes in heart failure (HF). The association between visit‐to‐visit variation in SBP and HR and risk in HF is unknown. Methods and Results In Systolic Heart Failure Treatment with the I f inhibitor ivabradine Trial (SHIFT) patients, we evaluated relationships between mean HR, mean SBP, and visit‐to‐visit variations (coefficient of variation [CV]=SD/mean×100%) in SBP and HR (SBP‐CV and HR‐C...

  12. A Systematic Review to Investigate Whether Angiotensin-(1-7 Is a Promising Therapeutic Target in Human Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent C. H. Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context. Heart failure (HF is a common condition causing much morbidity and mortality despite major advances in pharmacological and device therapies. Preclinical data suggest a cardioprotective role of Angiotensin-(1-7 in animal models of HF. Objective. Perform a systematic review on the effects of Angiotensin-(1-7 on humans, focusing on HF. Results. 39 studies were included in the review (4 in human HF and (35 in non-HF patients. There is only one intervention study on 8 patients with human HF, using Angiotensin-(1-7, with forearm blood flow (FBF as the endpoint. Angiotensin-(1-7 caused no significant effect on FBF in this HF study but caused vasodilation in 3 out of 4 non-HF studies. In one other non-HF study, Angiotensin-(1-7 infusion led to a significant increase in blood pressure in normal men; however, effects were <0.03% that of angiotensin II. Cardioprotective effects seen in non-HF studies include for instance beneficial actions against atherosclerosis and myocardial fibrosis. Conclusions. The main finding of our systematic review is that Angiotensin-(1-7 plays an important cardioprotective role in HF in animals and in patients without heart failure. More research is required to test the hypothesis that Angiotensin-(1-7 benefits patients with heart failure.

  13. DOCA-salts induce heart failure in the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiritilli, A

    2001-10-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a common clinical problem confronting physicians and is often the final manifestation of many cardiovascular disorders. Despite recent advances in the pharmacological management of HF, it remains a highly lethal and disabling disorder. A number of animal models have been developed to study both the pathophysiology of HF and new therapeutic approaches to this complex syndrome. Only through an improved understanding of the basic biology of the early stages of the syndrome can HF be prevented or at least anticipated. With this in view, we have developed an easily realisable and inexpensive model in the guinea pig, which presents numerous structural, metabolic and biochemical similarities compared with the human heart. Thirty guinea pigs, aged 5 weeks and weighing 300 g were used. After anaesthesia, left nephrectomy was performed. After 1 week the guinea pigs were divided into: (a) control group (n=15), which received an injection of vehicle as well as tap water for 10 weeks; (b) DOCA-salts group (n=15), where the animals were treated with an IM injection of 10 mg DOCA 5 days a week for 10 weeks and with drinking water containing 9 g/l(-1) NaCl and 2 g/l(-1) KCl. Our results demonstrate that the administration of DOCA-salts to guinea pigs for 10 weeks caused a significant increase in blood pressure (BP+30%) associated with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), evaluated by LV weight (+37%), LV wall (+36%), by the ratio LV weight/Body weight (+23%) and by an increase in LV volume (+51%). Concerning HF, the latter was clinically evident through an increase in body weight, heart rate and dyspnoea. Indeed, guinea pigs presented pleural and/or pericardial effusion often associated with ascite. This model, which combines pressure and volume overload, results in a slow evolution towards HF. This allows a better understanding of the mechanisms in early LV remodelling which has the potential to develop into HF. Some recent studies have emphasised the value

  14. Renovascular heart failure: heart failure in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawarada, Osami; Yasuda, Satoshi; Noguchi, Teruo; Anzai, Toshihisa; Ogawa, Hisao

    2016-07-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery disease presents with a broad spectrum of clinical features, including heart failure as well as hypertension, and renal failure. Although recent randomized controlled trials failed to demonstrate renal artery stenting can reduce blood pressure or the number of cardiovascular or renal events more so than medical therapy, increasing attention has been paid to flash pulmonary edema and congestive heart failure associated with atherosclerotic renal artery disease. This clinical entity "renovascular heart failure" is diagnosed retrospectively. Given the increasing global burden of heart failure, this review highlights the background and catheter-based therapeutic aspects for renovascular heart failure.

  15. Effect of Visit-to-Visit Variation of Heart Rate and Systolic Blood Pressure on Outcomes in Chronic Systolic Heart Failure: Results From the Systolic Heart Failure Treatment With the If Inhibitor Ivabradine Trial (SHIFT) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Michael; Robertson, Michele; Borer, Jeffrey; Ford, Ian; Komajda, Michel; Mahfoud, Felix; Ewen, Sebastian; Swedberg, Karl; Tavazzi, Luigi

    2016-02-12

    Elevated resting heart rate (HR) and low systolic blood pressure (SBP) are related to poor outcomes in heart failure (HF). The association between visit-to-visit variation in SBP and HR and risk in HF is unknown. In Systolic Heart Failure Treatment with the If inhibitor ivabradine Trial (SHIFT) patients, we evaluated relationships between mean HR, mean SBP, and visit-to-visit variations (coefficient of variation [CV]=SD/mean×100%) in SBP and HR (SBP-CV and HR-CV, respectively) and primary composite endpoint (cardiovascular mortality or HF hospitalization), its components, all-cause mortality, and all-cause hospitalization. High HR and low SBP were closely associated with risk for primary endpoint, all-cause mortality, and HF hospitalization. The highest number of primary endpoint events occurred in the highest HR tertile (38.8% vs 16.4% lowest tertile; PHeart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  16. Is the Blood Pressure Paradox Observed in All Heart Failure Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, F. M.; Lourenço, P.; Couto, M.; Tavares, P.; Silva, S.; Guimarães, J. T.; Bettencourt, P.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Heart failure (HF) patients with higher systolic blood pressure (SBP) survive longer. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a frequent comorbidity in HF. We evaluated the prognostic significance of low SBP according to DM in acute HF. Methods. We prospectively recruited 589 patients admitted with acute HF. DM was defined according to the 2011 American Diabetes Association recommendations. Patients were followed for 6 months and HF-death was the endpoint. A multivariate Cox-regression model was used to assess the prognostic impact of SBP. A stratified analysis according to DM was performed. Results. Median patients' age was 79 years and DM was present in 50.8%. Ischemic aetiology HF and hypertension history were more common in diabetics. Diabetic patients had worse renal function and lower total cholesterol and were more often discharged with antiplatelet therapy and statin. During followup, 89 patients died due to HF. The multivariate-adjusted HR for the 6-month HF death in non-diabetic patients with an admission SBP < 115 mmHg (1st quartile) was 2.94 (95% CI: 1.49–5.79), while lower admission SBP was not associated with HF mortality in diabetics. Conclusions. The blood pressure paradox in HF is only observed in non-diabetic HF patients. Diabetic patients seem to be a particular subgroup of HF patients. PMID:24371821

  17. Focus on renal congestion in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, Baris; Ortiz, Alberto; Covic, Adrian; Solak, Yalcin; Goldsmith, David; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-02-01

    Hospitalizations due to heart failure are increasing steadily despite advances in medicine. Patients hospitalized for worsening heart failure have high mortality in hospital and within the months following discharge. Kidney dysfunction is associated with adverse outcomes in heart failure patients. Recent evidence suggests that both deterioration in kidney function and renal congestion are important prognostic factors in heart failure. Kidney congestion in heart failure results from low cardiac output (forward failure), tubuloglomerular feedback, increased intra-abdominal pressure or increased venous pressure. Regardless of the cause, renal congestion is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in heart failure. The impact on outcomes of renal decongestion strategies that do not compromise renal function should be explored in heart failure. These studies require novel diagnostic markers that identify early renal damage and renal congestion and allow monitoring of treatment responses in order to avoid severe worsening of renal function. In addition, there is an unmet need regarding evidence-based therapeutic management of renal congestion and worsening renal function. In the present review, we summarize the mechanisms, diagnosis, outcomes, prognostic markers and treatment options of renal congestion in heart failure.

  18. Atrial Electrophysiological Remodeling and Fibrillation in Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Sandeep V.; Workman, Antony J.

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) causes complex, chronic changes in atrial structure and function, which can cause substantial electrophysiological remodeling and predispose the individual to atrial fibrillation (AF). Pharmacological treatments for preventing AF in patients with HF are limited. Improved understanding of the atrial electrical and ionic/molecular mechanisms that promote AF in these patients could lead to the identification of novel therapeutic targets. Animal models of HF have identified numerous changes in atrial ion currents, intracellular calcium handling, action potential waveform and conduction, as well as expression and signaling of associated proteins. These studies have shown that the pattern of electrophysiological remodeling likely depends on the duration of HF, the underlying cardiac pathology, and the species studied. In atrial myocytes and tissues obtained from patients with HF or left ventricular systolic dysfunction, the data on changes in ion currents and action potentials are largely equivocal, probably owing mainly to difficulties in controlling for the confounding influences of multiple variables, such as patient’s age, sex, disease history, and drug treatments, as well as the technical challenges in obtaining such data. In this review, we provide a summary and comparison of the main animal and human electrophysiological studies to date, with the aim of highlighting the consistencies in some of the remodeling patterns, as well as identifying areas of contention and gaps in the knowledge, which warrant further investigation. PMID:27812293

  19. A Strategy to Reduce Heart Failure Readmissions and Inpatient Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howie-Esquivel, Jill; Carroll, Maureen; Brinker, Eileen; Kao, Helen; Pantilat, Steven; Rago, Karen; De Marco, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of a disease management intervention on rehospitalization rates in hospitalized heart failure (HF) patients. Methods Patients treated with the TEACH-HF intervention that included Teaching and Education, prompt follow-up Appointments, Consultation for support services, and Home follow-up phone calls (TEACH-HF) from January 2010 to January 2012 constituted the intervention group (n = 548). Patients treated from January 2007 to January 2008 constituted the usual care group (n = 485). Results Group baseline characteristics were similar with 30-day readmission rates significantly different (19% usual care vs. 12% for the intervention respectively (P = 0.003)). Patients in the usual care group were 1.5 times more likely to be hospitalized (95% CI: 1.2 - 1.9; P = 0.001) compared to the intervention group. A savings of 641 bed days with potential revenue of $640,000 occurred after TEACH-HF. Conclusions The TEACH-HF intervention was associated with significantly fewer hospital readmissions and savings in bed days. PMID:28197226

  20. Major developments in the 2016 european guidelines for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trullàs, J C; González-Franco, Á

    2017-03-15

    The European Society of Cardiology has recently published new guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic heart failure (HF). This article aims to review these recommendations and their level of scientific evidence and to present the most innovative aspects. The most significant deviations from the 2012 edition are: 1) the introduction of the concept of HF with midrange LVEF (40-49%); 2) a new diagnostic algorithm for chronic HF, initially considering the clinical probability; 3) recommendations on preventing or delaying the apparition of HF; 4) indications for the use of the new sacubitril-valsartan compound, the first angiotensin receptor blocker and neprilysin inhibitor; 5) modification of indications for cardiac resynchronisation therapy; and 6) a new algorithm for a combined diagnostic and treatment strategy for acute HF based on the presence or absence of congestion and hypoperfusion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  1. A novel ventricular restraint device (ASD) repetitively deliver Salvia miltiorrhiza to epicardium have good curative effects in heart failure management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Wenhua, Li; Gang, Wang; Mohammad, Imran Shair; Abbas, Muhammad; Liao, Xiaoqian; Yang, Mengqi; Zhang, Li; Liu, Xiaolin; Qi, Xiaoming; Chen, Yineng; Jiadi, Lv; Ye, Linlan; Zhijie, Wang; Ding, Chen Ding; Feng, Yu; Xiaohui, Zhou

    2017-09-05

    A novel ventricular restraint is the non-transplant surgical option for the management of an end-stage dilated heart failure (HF). To expand the therapeutic techniques we design a novel ventricular restraint device (ASD) which has the ability to deliver a therapeutic drug directly to the heart. We deliver a Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Salvia miltiorrhiza (Danshen Zhusheye) through active hydraulic ventricular support drug delivery system (ASD) and we hypothesize that it will show better results in HF management than the restraint device and drug alone. SD rats were selected and divided into five groups (n=6), Normal, HF, HF+SM (IV), HF+ASD, HF+ASD+SM groups respectively. Post myocardial infarction (MI), electrocardiography (ECG) showed abnormal heart function in all groups and HF+ASD+SM group showed a significant therapeutic improvement with respect to other treatment HF, HF+ASD, and HF+SM (IV) groups on day 30. The mechanical functions of the heart such as heart rate, LVEDP, and LVSP were brought to normal when treated with ASD+SM and show significant (P valueASD+SM group animals compared with other treatment groups. Masson's Trichrome staining was used to study histopathology of cardiac myocytes and quantification of fibrosis was assessed. The large blue fibrotic area was observed in HF, HF+ASD, and HF+SM (IV) groups while HF+ASD+SM showed negligible fibrotic myocyte at the end of study period (30days). This study proves that novel ASD device augments the therapeutic effect of the drug and delivers Salvia miltiorrhiza to the cardiomyocytes significantly as well as provides additional support to the dilated ventricle by the heart failure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Exercise intolerance in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction:more than a heart problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bharathi Upadhya; Mark J Haykowsky; Joel Eggebeen; Dalane W Kitzman

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is the most common form of HF in older adults, and is increasing in preva-lence as the population ages. Furthermore, HFpEF is increasing out of proportion to HF with reduced EF (HFrEF), and its prognosis is worsening while that of HFrEF is improving. Despite the importance of HFpEF, our understanding of its pathophysiology is incomplete, and optimal treatment remains largely undefined. A cardinal feature of HFpEF is reduced exercise tolerance, which correlates with symptoms as well as reduced quality of life. The traditional concepts of exercise limitations have focused on central dysfunction related to poor cardiac pump function. However, the mechanisms are not exclusive to the heart and lungs, and the understanding of the pathophysiology of this dis-ease has evolved. Substantial attention has focused on defining the central versus peripheral mechanisms underlying the reduced functional capacity and exercise tolerance among patients with HF. In fact, physical training can improve exercise tolerance via peripheral adaptive mechanisms even in the absence of favorable central hemodynamic function. In addition, the drug trials performed to date in HFpEF that have focused on influencing cardiovascular function have not improved exercise capacity. This suggests that peripheral limitations may play a significant role in HF limiting exercise tolerance, a hallmark feature of HFpEF.

  3. Genomic variation associated with mortality among adults of European and African ancestry with heart failure: The cohorts for heart and aging research in genomic epidemiology consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Morrison (Alanna); J.F. Felix (Janine); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); N.L. Glazer (Nicole); L.R. Loehr (Laura); A. Dehghan (Abbas); S. Demissie (Serkalem); J.C. Bis (Joshua); W.D. Rosamond (Wayne); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); T. Haritunians (Talin); A.R. Folsom (Aaron); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); E.J. Benjamin (Emelia); T. Lumley (Thomas); D.J. Couper (David); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); K. Rice (Kenneth); T.J. Wang (Thomas); P.P. Chang (Patricia); A. Hofman (Albert); D. Levy (Daniel); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); E.R. Fox (Ervin); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); J.T. Willerson (James); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); R.S. Vasan (Ramachandran Srini); N.L. Smith (Nicholas); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground-Prognosis and survival are significant concerns for individuals with heart failure (HF). To better understand the pathophysiology of HF prognosis, the association between 2 366 858 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and all-cause mortality was evaluated among individuals

  4. Post-exercise heart rate recovery independently predicts mortality risk in patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yi-Da; Dewland, Thomas A; Wencker, Detlef; Katz, Stuart D

    2009-12-01

    Post-exercise heart rate recovery (HRR) is an index of parasympathetic function associated with clinical outcomes in populations with and without documented coronary heart disease. Decreased parasympathetic activity is thought to be associated with disease progression in chronic heart failure (HF), but an independent association between post-exercise HRR and clinical outcomes among such patients has not been established. We measured HRR (calculated as the difference between heart rate at peak exercise and after 1 minute of recovery) in 202 HF subjects and recorded 17 mortality and 15 urgent transplantation outcome events over 624 days of follow-up. Reduced post-exercise HRR was independently associated with increased event risk after adjusting for other exercise-derived variables (peak oxygen uptake and change in minute ventilation per change in carbon dioxide production slope), for the Heart Failure Survival Score (adjusted HR 1.09 for 1 beat/min reduction, 95% CI 1.05-1.13, P Heart Failure Model score (adjusted HR 1.08 for one beat/min reduction, 95% CI 1.05-1.12, P exercise HRR (>or=30 beats/min) had low risk of events irrespective of the risk predicted by the survival scores. In a subgroup of 15 subjects, reduced post-exercise HRR was associated with increased serum markers of inflammation (interleukin-6, r = 0.58, P = .024; high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, r = 0.66, P = .007). Post-exercise HRR predicts mortality risk in patients with HF and provides prognostic information independent of previously described survival models. Pathophysiologic links between autonomic function and inflammation may be mediators of this association.

  5. Resting heart rate as predictor for left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure: MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opdahl, Anders; Ambale Venkatesh, Bharath; Fernandes, Veronica R S; Wu, Colin O; Nasir, Khurram; Choi, Eui-Young; Almeida, Andre L C; Rosen, Boaz; Carvalho, Benilton; Edvardsen, Thor; Bluemke, David A; Lima, João A C

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between baseline resting heart rate and incidence of heart failure (HF) and global and regional left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. The association of resting heart rate to HF and LV function has not been well described in an asymptomatic multi-ethnic population. Resting heart rate was measured in participants in the MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis) trial at inclusion. Incident HF was registered (n = 176) during follow-up (median 7 years) in those who underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (n = 5,000). Changes in ejection fraction (ΔEF) and peak circumferential strain (Δεcc) were measured as markers of developing global and regional LV dysfunction in 1,056 participants imaged at baseline and 5 years later. Time to HF (Cox model) and Δεcc and ΔEF (multiple linear regression models) were adjusted for demographics, traditional cardiovascular risk factors, calcium score, LV end-diastolic volume, and mass in addition to resting heart rate. Cox analysis demonstrated that for 1 beat/min increase in resting heart rate, there was a 4% greater adjusted relative risk for incident HF (hazard ratio: 1.04; 95% CI: 1.02 to 1.06; p heart rate was positively associated with deteriorating εcc and decrease in EF, even when all coronary heart disease events were excluded from the model. Elevated resting heart rate was associated with increased risk for incident HF in asymptomatic participants in the MESA trial. Higher heart rate was related to development of regional and global LV dysfunction independent of subclinical atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis [MESA]; NCT00005487). Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Complement C3c as a Biomarker in Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Frey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Experimental data indicates an important role of the innate immune system in cardiac remodeling and heart failure (HF. Complement is a central effector pathway of the innate immune system. Animals lacking parts of the complement system are protected from adverse remodeling. Based on these data, we hypothesized that peripheral complement levels could be a good marker for adverse remodeling and prognosis in patients with HF. Methods and Results. Since complement activation converges on the complement factor C3, we measured serum C3c, a stable C3-conversion product, in 197 patients with stable systolic HF. Subgroups with normal and elevated C3c levels were compared. C3c levels were elevated in 17% of the cohort. Patients with elevated C3c levels exhibited a trend to better survival, slightly higher LVEF, and lower NTpro-BNP values in comparison to patients with normal C3c values. No differences were found regarding NYHA functional class. Significantly more patients with elevated C3c had preexisting diabetes. The prevalence of CAD, arterial hypertension, and atrial fibrillation was not increased in patients with elevated C3c. Conclusion. Elevated C3c levels are associated with less adverse remodeling and improved survival in patients with stable systolic heart failure.

  7. [Predictive factors for readmission in heart failure patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galofré, Nuria; San Vicente, Ludmila; González, Josep Anton; Planas, Francesc; Vila, Joaquim; Grau, Jordi

    2005-03-05

    Heart failure (HF) is a prevalent and increasing disease and represents one of the main causes of hospital admission. It is associated with an important morbi-mortality and a high rate of readmission. The objective of this study was to know the clinical characteristics of admitted patients with HF and to detect any valuable prognosis factors. Prospective study of admitted HF patients between May'99 and May'00. Readmission rate was evaluated six months later. 204 patients were included with an average age of 78 (9.9) years. 66% were women. Diabetes mellitus (DM) (36.4%) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (23.4%) were the most outstanding associated pathologies. Ischemic heart disease (IHD) was the most frequent etiology in 33.4% cases. Mean time of admission was 10 days. 34% patients had systolic dysfunction (SD). Men with IHD presented a higher rate of SD (p IECAs were prescribed in 71.2% in the SD group. Readmission rate at 6 months was about 43%. Patients with renal failure (p < 0.04) and those with a more impaired functional class (p < 0.02) displayed a higher readmission rate. Several clinical factors determine the morbi-mortality and prognosis including an older age, associated comorbility, type of cardiopathy and presence of systolic dysfunction. All these factors are detected at the time of hospital admission.

  8. Descriptive epidemiology and short-term outcomes of heart failure hospitalisation in rural Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Gene F; Jean-Baptiste, Waking; Cleophat, Philip; Leandre, Fèrnet; Louine, Martineau; Luma, Maxo; Benjamin, Emelia J; Mukherjee, Joia S; Bukhman, Gene; Hirschhorn, Lisa R

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is increasing attention to cardiovascular diseases in low-income countries. However, little is known about heart failure (HF) in rural areas, where most of the populations in low-income countries live. We studied HF epidemiology, care delivery and outcomes in rural Haiti. Methods Among adults admitted with HF to a rural Haitian tertiary care hospital during a 12-month period (2013–2014), we studied the clinical characteristics and short-term outcomes including length of stay, inhospital death and outpatient follow-up rates. Results HF accounted for 392/1049 (37%) admissions involving 311 individuals; over half (60%) were women. Mean age was 58.8 (SD 16.2) years for men and 48.3 (SD 18.8) years for women; 76 (41%) women were cardiomyopathy (64%), right HF (12%), hypertensive heart disease (7%) and rheumatic heart disease (5%). One-half of the women with cardiomyopathy by echocardiogram had peripartum cardiomyopathy. Conclusions HF is a common cause of hospitalisation in rural Haiti. Among diagnosed patients, HF is overwhelming due to non-atherosclerotic heart disease and particularly affects young adults. Implementing effective systems to improve HF diagnosis and linkage to essential outpatient care is needed to reduce long-term morbidity and mortality. PMID:26729609

  9. Peripheral reflex feedbacks in chronic heart failure: Is it time for a direct treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoni, Alberto; Mirizzi, Gianluca; Aimo, Alberto; Emdin, Michele; Passino, Claudio

    2015-12-26

    Despite repeated attempts to develop a unifying hypothesis that explains the clinical syndrome of heart failure (HF), no single conceptual paradigm for HF has withstood the test of time. The last model that has been developed, the neurohormonal model, has the great virtue of highlighting the role of the heart as an endocrine organ, as well as to shed some light on the key role on HF progression of neurohormones and peripheral organs and tissues beyond the heart itself. However, while survival in clinical trials based on neurohormonal antagonist drugs has improved, HF currently remains a lethal condition. At the borders of the neurohormonal model of HF, a partially unexplored path trough the maze of HF pathophysiology is represented by the feedback systems. There are several evidences, from both animal studies and humans reports, that the deregulation of baro-, ergo- and chemo-reflexes in HF patients elicits autonomic imbalance associated with parasympathetic withdrawal and increased adrenergic drive to the heart, thus fundamentally contributing to the evolution of the disease. Hence, on top of guideline-recommended medical therapy, mainly based on neurohormonal antagonisms, all visceral feedbacks have been recently considered in HF patients as additional potential therapeutic targets.

  10. Peripheral reflex feedbacks in chronic heart failure:Is it time for a direct treatment?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alberto Giannoni; Gianluca Mirizzi; Alberto Aimo; Michele Emdin; Claudio Passino

    2015-01-01

    Despite repeated attempts to develop a unifying hypothesis that explains the clinical syndrome of heart failure(HF),no single conceptual paradigm for HF has withstood the test of time. The last model that has been developed,the neurohormonal model,has the great virtue of highlighting the role of the heart as an endocrine organ,as well as to shed some light on the key role on HF progression of neurohormones and peripheral organs and tissues beyond the heart itself. However,while survival in clinical trials based on neurohormonal antagonist drugs has improved,HF currently remains a lethal condition. At the borders of the neurohormonal model of HF,a partially unexplored path trough the maze of HF pathophysiology is represented by the feedback systems. There are several evidences,from both animal studies and humans reports,that the deregulation of baro-,ergo- and chemo-reflexes in HF patients elicits autonomic imbalance associated with parasympathetic withdrawal and increased adrenergic drive to the heart,thus fundamentally contributing to the evolution of the disease. Hence,on top of guidelinerecommended medical therapy,mainly based on neurohormonal antagonisms,all visceral feedbacks have been recently considered in HF patients as additional potential therapeutic targets.

  11. Efficacy of carvedilol in pediatric heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Alex Hørby; Fatkin, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of: Huang M, Zhang X, Chen S et al. The effect of carvedilol treatment on chronic heart failure in pediatric patients with dilated cardiomyopathy: a prospective, randomized-controlled study. Pediatr. Cardiol. 34, 680-685 (2013). A role for β-blockers in children with heart failure has...

  12. Psychosocial risk factors and heart failure hospitalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Naja Hulvej; Andersen, Ingelise; Prescott, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Prospective studies on the role of psychosocial factors in heart failure development are virtually nonexistent. The authors aimed to address the effect of psychosocial factors on the risk of heart failure hospitalization in men and women free of cardiovascular disease. In 1991-1993, the 8,670 par...

  13. Hemoconcentration-guided Diuresis in Heart Failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Greene, Stephen J.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Voors, Adriaan A.; Butler, Javed; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2014-01-01

    One quarter of patients hospitalized for heart failure are readmitted within 30 days, perhaps related to ineffective decongestion. Limited data exist guiding the extent and duration of diuresis in patients hospitalized for heart failure. The objective of this review was to determine the prognostic v

  14. Diuretics as pathogenetic treatment for heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglin, Maya

    2011-01-01

    Increased intracardiac filling pressure or congestion causes symptoms and leads to hospital admissions in patients with heart failure, regardless of their systolic function. A history of hospital admission, in turn, predicts further hospitalizations and morbidity, and a higher number of hospitalizations determine higher mortality. Congestion is therefore the driving force of the natural history of heart failure. Congestion is the syndrome shared by heart failure with preserved and reduced systolic function. These two conditions have almost identical morbidity, mortality, and survival because the outcomes are driven by congestion. A small difference in favor of heart failure with preserved systolic function comes from decreased ejection fraction and left ventricular remodeling which is only present in heart failure with decreased systolic function. The magnitude of this difference reflects the contribution of decreased systolic function and ventricular remodeling to the progression of heart failure. The only treatment available for congestion is fluid removal via diuretics, ultrafiltration, or dialysis. It is the only treatment that works equally well for heart failure with reduced and preserved systolic function because it affects congestion, the main pathogenetic feature of the disease. Diuretics are pathogenetic therapy for heart failure. PMID:21403798

  15. A Randomized Trial of Heart Failure Disease Management in Skilled Nursing Facilities: Design and Rationale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxer, Rebecca S.; Dolansky, Mary A.; Bodnar, Christine A.; Singer, Mendel E.; Albert, Jeffery M.; Gravenstein, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Background Heart failure disease management can improve health outcomes for older community dwelling patients with heart failure. Heart failure disease management has not been studied in skilled nursing facilities, a major site of transitional care for older adults. Methods and Anticipated Results The objective of this trial is to investigate if a heart failure disease management program (HF-DMP) in skilled nursing facilities (SNF) will decrease all-cause rehospitalizations for the first 60 days post SNF admission. The trial is a randomized cluster trial to be conducted in 12 for-profit SNF in the greater Cleveland area. The study population is inclusive of patients with heart failure regardless of ejection fraction but excludes those patients on dialysis and with a life expectancy of 6 months or less. The HF-DMP includes 7 elements considered standard of care for patients with heart failure: documentation of left ventricular function, tracking of weight and symptoms, medication titration, discharge instructions, 7 day follow up appointment post SNF discharge, patient education. The HF-DMP is conducted by a research nurse tasked with adhering to each element of the program and regularly audited to maintain fidelity of the program. Additional outcomes include health status, self-care management, and discharge destination. Conclusion The SNF-Connect Trial is the first trial of its kind to assess if a HF-DMP will improve outcomes for patients in SNFs. This trial will provide evidence on the effectiveness of HF-DMP to improve outcomes for older frail heart failure patients undergoing post-acute rehabilitation. PMID:23871475

  16. Comparison of outcomes after hospitalization for worsening heart failure, myocardial infarction, and stroke in patients with heart failure and reduced and preserved ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Søren L; Jhund, Pardeep S; Køber, Lars

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the prognostic significance of hospitalization for worsening heart failure (WHF), myocardial infarction (MI), and stroke in patients with chronic heart failure (HF). METHODS AND RESULTS: We studied 5011 patients with HF and reduced EF (HF-REF) in the CORONA trial and 4128...... patients with HF and preserved EF (HF-PEF) in the I-Preserve trial. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for death were estimated for 0-30 days and ≥31 days after first post-randomization WHF, MI, or stroke used as a time-dependent variable, compared with patients with none of these events. In CORONA, 1616.......21-700.17), and stroke 223.30 (95% CI 51.42-969.78); for >30 days it was WHF 3.36 (95% CI 2.79-4.05), MI 3.29 (95% CI 2.14-5.06), and stroke 5.13 (95% CI 3.61-7.29). CONCLUSIONS: In patients with both HF-REF and HF-PEF, hospitalization for WHF was associated with high early and late mortality. The early relative risk...

  17. Quality of life in elderly heart failure patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kathleen L. Grady; Kathleen Halvey

    2006-01-01

    Quality of life (QOL), as a relevant area of research in the understanding of heart failure (HF) patient outcomes, has been increasingly studied during the last two decades. The purposes of this review article are to (1) describe QOL in older adults with HF, (2)identify and critique research designed to test interventions to improve QOL, (3) identify gaps in the literature, and (4) provide recommendations for future research. Seventeen studies describing QOL in older adults with HF were identified. Elderly HF patient QOL has been reported to be fair to poor and is worse as compared to a healthy control group. Furthermore, there is some evidence that suggests that QOL is better in older adults than younger adults and worse in women (both older and younger) than in men, although these findings are not consistent across studies. Predictors of QOL and its dimensions in older HF patients included demographic, clinical, and psychosocial variables. Sixteen interventional studies were identified that reported QOL as an outcome in older adults. Findings among randomized clinical trials (RCTs) to improve QOL outcomes in elderly HF patients do not allow strong conclusions about the benefits of the interventions. It must be noted, though, that while not all studies reported improvements in QOL (either significant or as a trend),no studies reported deterioration in QOL with randomization to an intervention versus control. These studies were limited by several methodological issues. While there has been some research of QOL in this elderly cohort, it is paramount that we address methodological issues and thereby improve the scientific rigor of our research, continue to explore QOL in elderly HF patients, and design intervention trials for elders at risk for poor QOL.

  18. Cyclooxygenase products sensitize muscle mechanoreceptors in humans with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlekauff, Holly R; Chiu, Josephine; Hamilton, Michele A; Fonarow, Gregg C; Maclellan, W Robb; Hage, Antoine; Moriguchi, Jaime; Patel, Jignesh

    2008-04-01

    Prior work in animals and humans suggests that muscle mechanoreceptor control of sympathetic activation [muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA)] during exercise in heart failure (HF) patients is heightened compared with that of healthy humans and that muscle mechanoreceptors are sensitized by metabolic by-products. We sought to determine whether cyclooxygenase products and/or endogenous adenosine, two metabolites of ischemic exercise, sensitize muscle mechanoreceptors during rhythmic handgrip (RHG) exercise in HF patients. Indomethacin, which inhibits the production of prostaglandins, and saline control were infused in 12 HF patients. In a different protocol, aminophylline, which inhibits adenosine receptors, and saline control were infused in 12 different HF patients. MSNA was recorded (microneurography). During exercise following saline, MSNA increased in the first minute of exercise, consistent with baseline heightened mechanoreceptor sensitivity. MSNA continued to increase during 3 min of RHG, indicative that muscle mechanoreceptors are sensitized by ischemia metabolites. Indomethacin, but not aminophylline, markedly attenuated the increase in MSNA during the entire 3 min of low-level rhythmic exercise, consistent with the sensitization of muscle mechanoreceptors by cyclooxygenase products. Interestingly, even the early increase in MSNA was abolished by indomethacin infusion, indicative of the very early generation of cyclooxygenase products after the onset of exercise in HF patients. In conclusion, muscle mechanoreceptors mediate the increase in MSNA during low-level RHG exercise in HF. Cyclooxygenase products, but not endogenous adenosine, play a central role in muscle mechanoreceptor sensitization. Finally, muscle mechanoreceptors in patients with HF have heightened basal sensitivity to mechanical stimuli, which also appears to be mediated by the early generation of cyclooxygenase products, resulting in exaggerated early increases in MSNA.

  19. Effects of Rosuvastatin on Coronary Flow Reserve and Metabolic Mismatch in Patients With Heart Failure (from the CORONA Study)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Harst, Pim; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.; Tio, Rene A.; Dunselman, Peter H. J. M.; Willemsen, Antoon T. M.; van den Heuvel, Ad F. M.; Voors, Adriaan A.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    2010-01-01

    In patients with heart failure (HF), statin treatment might improve myocardial perfusion, but could also have detrimental effects on myocardial metabolism. A predefined substudy of the Controlled Rosuvastatin Multinational Trial in Heart Failure (CORONA) trial sought to determine the effects of stat

  20. Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15) in patients admitted for acute heart failure : results from the RELAX-AHF study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cotter, Gad; Voors, Adriaan A.; Prescott, Margaret F.; Felker, G. Michael; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Greenberg, Barry H.; Pang, Peter S.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Milo, Olga; Hua, Tsushung A.; Qian, Min; Severin, Thomas M.; Teerlink, John R.; Metra, Marco; Davison, Beth A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15) was found to be upregulated in patients with chronic heart failure (HF) and associated with disease severity, however, data on patients with acute heart failure (AHF) is lacking. Methods and results Levels of GDF-15 were measured at pre-specified

  1. ANMCO/SIC Consensus Document: cardiology networks for outpatient heart failure care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspromonte, Nadia; Gulizia, Michele Massimo; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Mortara, Andrea; Battistoni, Ilaria; De Maria, Renata; Gabriele, Michele; Iacoviello, Massimo; Navazio, Alessandro; Pini, Daniela; Di Tano, Giuseppe; Marini, Marco; Ricci, Renato Pietro; Alunni, Gianfranco; Radini, Donatella; Metra, Marco; Romeo, Francesco

    2017-05-01

    Changing demographics and an increasing burden of multiple chronic comorbidities in Western countries dictate refocusing of heart failure (HF) services from acute in-hospital care to better support the long inter-critical out-of- hospital phases of HF. In Italy, as well as in other countries, needs of the HF population are not adequately addressed by current HF outpatient services, as documented by differences in age, gender, comorbidities and recommended therapies between patients discharged for acute hospitalized HF and those followed-up at HF clinics. The Italian Working Group on Heart Failure has drafted a guidance document for the organisation of a national HF care network. Aims of the document are to describe tasks and requirements of the different health system points of contact for HF patients, and to define how diagnosis, management and care processes should be documented and shared among health-care professionals. The document classifies HF outpatient clinics in three groups: (i) community HF clinics, devoted to management of stable patients in strict liaison with primary care, periodic re-evaluation of emerging clinical needs and prompt treatment of impending destabilizations, (ii) hospital HF clinics, that target both new onset and chronic HF patients for diagnostic assessment, treatment planning and early post-discharge follow-up. They act as main referral for general internal medicine units and community clinics, and (iii) advanced HF clinics, directed at patients with severe disease or persistent clinical instability, candidates to advanced treatment options such as heart transplant or mechanical circulatory support. Those different types of HF clinics are integrated in a dedicated network for management of HF patients on a regional basis, according to geographic features. By sharing predefined protocols and communication systems, these HF networks integrate multi-professional providers to ensure continuity of care and patient empowerment. In

  2. Cognitive impairment and self-care in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajduk AM

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Alexandra M Hajduk,1,2 Stephenie C Lemon,3 David D McManus,1,2,4 Darleen M Lessard,1 Jerry H Gurwitz,1,2,4 Frederick A Spencer,5 Robert J Goldberg,1,2 Jane S Saczynski1,2,4 1Division of Epidemiology of Chronic Diseases and Vulnerable Populations, Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA; 2Meyers Primary Care Institute, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA; 3Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA; 4Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA; 5Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada Background: Heart failure (HF is a prevalent chronic disease in older adults that requires extensive self-care to prevent decompensation and hospitalization. Cognitive impairment may impact the ability to perform HF self-care activities. We examined the association between cognitive impairment and adherence to self-care in patients hospitalized for acute HF. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting and participants: A total of 577 patients (mean age = 71 years, 44% female hospitalized for HF at five medical centers in the United States and Canada. Measurements and methods: Participants were interviewed for information on self-reported adherence to self-care using the European Heart Failure Self-care Behaviour Scale. We assessed cognitive impairment in three domains (memory, processing speed, and executive function using standardized measures. Patients' demographic and clinical characteristics were obtained through medical record review. Multivariable linear regression was used to examine the association between cognitive impairment and self-care practices adjusting for demographic and clinical factors. Results: A total of 453 patients (79% were impaired in at least one cognitive

  3. Fluid management strategies in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Nancy M

    2012-04-01

    In patients with chronic heart failure, fluid retention (or hypervolemia) is often the stimulus for acute decompensated heart failure that requires hospitalization. The pathophysiology of fluid retention is complex and involves both hemodynamic and clinical congestion. Signs and symptoms of both hemodynamic and clinical congestion should be assessed serially during hospitalization. Core heart failure drug and cardiac device therapies should be provided, and ultrafiltration may be warranted. Critical care, intermediate care, and telemetry nurses have roles in both assessment and management of patients hospitalized with acute decompensated heart failure and fluid retention. Nurse administrators and managers have heightened their attention to fluid retention because the Medicare performance measure known as the risk-standardized 30-day all-cause readmission rate after heart failure hospitalization can be attenuated by fluid management strategies initiated by nurses during a patient's hospitalization.

  4. Influence of Diabetes Mellitus and Hyperglycemia on Prognosis in Patients >= 70 Years Old With Heart Failure and Effects of Nebivolol (Data from the Study of Effects of Nebivolol Intervention on Outcomes and Rehospitalization in Seniors With Heart Failure [SENIORS])

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Rudolf A.; Doehner, Wolfram; van der Horst, Iwan C. C.; Anker, Stefan D.; Babalis, Daphne; Roughton, Michael; Coats, Andrew J.; Flather, Marcus D.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    2010-01-01

    The beneficial effects of beta blockers in younger patients with heart failure (HF) due to systolic dysfunction are well established. However, data from patients >= 70 years old with diabetes mellitus and HF are lacking. The Study of Effects of Nebivolol Intervention on Outcomes and Rehospitalizatio

  5. Liver Function, In-Hospital, and Post-Discharge Clinical Outcome in Patients With Acute Heart Failure-Results From the Relaxin for the Treatment of Patients With Acute Heart Failure Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deursen, Vincent M.; Edwards, Christopher; Cotter, Gad; Davison, Beth A.; Damman, Kevin; Teerlink, John R.; Metra, Marco; Felker, G. Michael; Ponikowski, Piotr; Unemori, Elaine; Severin, Thomas; Voors, Adriaan A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Elevated plasma concentrations of liver function tests are prevalent in patients with chronic heart failure (HF). Little is known about liver function in patients with acute HF. We aimed to assess the prevalence and prognostic value of serial measurements of liver function tests in patie

  6. Long-term statin therapy in patients with systolic heart failure and normal cholesterol: effects on elevated serum markers of collagen turnover, inflammation, and B-type natriuretic peptide.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Abulhul, Esam

    2012-01-01

    The role of statin therapy in heart failure (HF) is unclear. The amino-terminal propeptide of procollagen type III (PIIINP) predicts outcome in HF, and yet there are conflicting reports of statin therapy effects on PIIINP.

  7. Advances in the management of heart failure: the role of ivabradine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Werdan, Ursula; Stöckl, Georg; Werdan, Karl

    2016-01-01

    A high resting heart rate (≥70-75 b.p.m.) is a risk factor for patients with heart failure (HF) with reduced ejection fraction (EF), probably in the sense of accelerated atherosclerosis, with an increased morbidity and mortality. Beta-blockers not only reduce heart rate but also have negative inotropic and blood pressure-lowering effects, and therefore, in many patients, they cannot be given in the recommended dose. Ivabradine specifically inhibits the pacemaker current (funny current, If) of the sinoatrial node cells, resulting in therapeutic heart rate lowering without any negative inotropic and blood pressure-lowering effect. According to the European Society of Cardiology guidelines, ivabradine should be considered to reduce the risk of HF hospitalization and cardiovascular death in symptomatic patients with a reduced left ventricular EF ≤35% and sinus rhythm ≥70 b.p.m. despite treatment with an evidence-based dose of beta-blocker or a dose below the recommended dose (recommendation class "IIa" = weight of evidence/opinion is in favor of usefulness/efficacy: "should be considered"; level of evidence "B" = data derived from a single randomized clinical trial or large nonrandomized studies). Using a heart rate cutoff of ≥ 75 b.p.m., as licensed by the European Medicines Agency, treatment with ivabradine 5-7.5 mg b.i.d. reduces cardiovascular mortality by 17%, HF mortality by 39% and HF hospitalization rate by 30%. A high resting heart rate is not only a risk factor in HF with reduced EF but also at least a risk marker in HF with preserved EF, in acute HF and also in special forms of HF. In this review, we discuss the proven role of ivabradine in the validated indication "HF with reduced EF" together with interesting preliminary findings, and the potential role of ivabradine in further, specific forms of HF.

  8. Addressing Major Unmet Needs in Patients with Systolic Heart Failure: The Role of Ivabradine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira-Barretto, Antonio Carlos

    2016-04-01

    We reviewed clinical evidence for the use of ivabradine in systolic heart failure (HF), in which it appears to improve symptoms, improve quality of life, prevent hospitalization, and prolong survival, thereby addressing unmet needs in the management of HF. Ivabradine provides symptomatic benefits in HF on top of standard therapies, in terms of functional parameters and exercise capacity, and there is some evidence that this leads to improvements in quality of life in symptomatic HF patients, who may have dyspnea, altered exercise capacity, and fatigue. The SHIFT trial demonstrated that ivabradine has significant beneficial effects on major outcomes in HF. Ivabradine had a significant effect on pump failure death, which was reduced by 26 % (p = 0.014), with no effect on sudden cardiac death. This is an important result since pump failure death is currently the main cause of death in HF, and also because the reductions in mortality obtained with beta-blockers and spironolactone in the last 20 years appear to be mainly due to reduction in sudden death rather than reduction in pump failure death. Ivabradine also has a beneficial effect on hospital admissions (-26 %, p Ivabradine-treated patients are also at significantly lower risk of experiencing a second or third hospitalization for worsening HF. Ivabradine clearly has a key role to play in the management of HF by covering the main therapeutic objectives of symptoms, quality of life, and outcomes.

  9. Heart failure severity, as determined by loop diuretic dosages, predicts the risk of developing diabetes after myocardial infarction: a nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Charlotte; Norgaard, Mette Lykke; Hansen, Peter R;

    2010-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with increased insulin resistance, but the consequences of HF for development of diabetes are not well studied. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between HF severity and risk of developing diabetes in a nationwide cohort of patients ...

  10. Beneficial effects of long-term intravenous iron therapy with ferric carboxymaltose in patients with symptomatic heart failure and iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponikowski, Piotr; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Comin-Colet, Josep; Ertl, Georg; Komajda, Michel; Mareev, Viacheslav; McDonagh, Theresa; Parkhomenko, Alexander; Tavazzi, Luigi; Levesque, Victoria; Mori, Claudio; Roubert, Bernard; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Ruschitzka, Frank; Anker, Stefan D.

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to evaluate the benefits and safety of long-term i.v. iron therapy in iron-deficient patients with heart failure (HF). Methods and results CONFIRM-HF was a multi-centre, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial that enrolled 304 ambulatory symptomatic HF patients with lef

  11. Cheyne-stokes respiration in chronic heart failure. Treatment with adaptive servoventilation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenburg, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) with predominant obstructive or central sleep apnea (OSA/CSA) with Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) is a common, but underestimated and underappreciated, comorbidity in patients with heart failure (HF). Regardless of the type of HF (systolic or diastolic) or its etiology (ischemic, non-ischemic, valvular etc), the prevalence of SDB is remarkably high in this patient group, at 70-76%. Even more so in HF than in the general population, OSA and CSA in particular are independently associated with an impaired prognosis. This review details the pathophysiology of CSA-CSR in HF, highlights the challenges and tools available for diagnosis, explains the concept of adaptive servoventilation (ASV) therapy, and summarizes the existing literature on the use of ASV therapy in HF patients in general and HF with reduced ejection fraction in particular.

  12. Heart failure with normal ejection fraction: consideration of mechanisms other than diastolic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bench, Travis; Burkhoff, Daniel; O'Connell, John B; Costanzo, Maria Rosa; Abraham, William T; St John Sutton, Martin; Maurer, Mathew S

    2009-03-01

    More than half of patients with heart failure (HF) have a normal ejection fraction (EF). These patients are typically elderly, are predominantly female, and have a high incidence of multiple comorbid conditions associated with development of ventricular hypertrophy and/or interstitial fibrosis. Thus, the cause of HF has been attributed to diastolic dysfunction. However, the same comorbidities may also impact myocardial systolic, ventricular, vascular, renal, and extracardiovascular properties in ways that can also contribute to symptoms of HF by way of mechanisms not related to diastolic dysfunction. Accordingly, the descriptive term HF with normal EF has been suggested as an alternative to the mechanistic term diastolic HF. In this article, we review the current understanding of nondiastolic mechanisms that may contribute to the HF with normal EF syndrome to highlight potential pathways for research that may lead to new targets for therapy.

  13. Depression Is Associated with Cognitive Dysfunction in Older Adults with Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Garcia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Persons with heart failure (HF frequently exhibit cognitive impairment with deficits in attention and memory. Depression is common in HF though its possible contribution to cognitive impairment is unknown. Cognitive dysfunction and depression may share common mechanisms in HF, as both are associated with similar abnormalities on neuroimaging. A total of 116 participants with HF (68.53±9.30 years completed a neuropsychological battery and self-report measures of depression. Regression models showed depression incrementally and independently predicted test performance in all cognitive domains. Follow-up partial correlations revealed that greater depressive symptoms were associated with poorer performance on tests of attention, executive function, psychomotor speed, and language. These results indicate that depressive symptoms are associated with poorer cognitive performance in HF though further work is needed to clarify mechanisms for this association and possible cognitive benefits of treating depression in persons with HF.

  14. What physicians need to know about renal function in outpatients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldum-Grevbo, Bård

    2015-01-01

    The majority of outpatients with heart failure (HF) have chronic kidney disease (CKD) as an important comorbidity. Both glomerular filtration rate and abnormal urinary albumin excretion are major predictors of outcome in HF patients. Despite this, patients with renal dysfunction have been systematically excluded from the large randomized HF trials. There is lack of evidence for optimal treatment in these cardiorenal patients and treatment nihilism may account in part for their bad prognosis. Identifying and monitoring the progression of renal disease and making an effort to preserve renal function should be an important task in the management of all patients with HF. In this review, the current understanding of the pathophysiology of renal dysfunction in outpatients with HF will be summarized. Furthermore, important principles of the identification and management of cardiorenal patients will be described in order to make the physician more capable of managing outpatients with HF and renal dysfunction.

  15. The obesity paradox in chronic heart failure: what does it mean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Paul J; Davis, Paul G; Bensimhon, Daniel R

    2014-03-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a growing health problem, at least in part due to the concurrent obesity epidemic plaguing developed countries. However, once a patient develops HF, an elevated BMI appears to confer a survival benefit--a phenomenon termed the "obesity paradox." The exact explanation for this paradox has been difficult to ascertain. Numerous plausible mechanisms have been asserted, including the fact that obese patients tend to be younger and more symptomatic, leading them to seek medical attention earlier in the course of their HF. Obese patients may also have larger energy reserves that help to offset the catabolic changes seen with HF. Other hypotheses highlight the limitations of BMI as an obesity classifier. The purpose of this review is to examine the various theories for the obesity paradox in HF and discuss the implications for the clinical management of obese patients with HF.

  16. Novel insight into the dangerous connection between diabetes and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, C; Spigoni, V; Gorga, E; Dei Cas, A

    2016-05-01

    Heart failure (HF) affects approximately 1-2 % of the adult population. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the most frequent comorbidities in HF, portending a worse prognosis. DM is associated with an increased risk of artery disease, and consequently of post-ischemic HF, but it may also alter directly the myocardial structure and function. Insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms of diabetic cardiomyopathy have been provided by both experimental and clinical investigations. In recent years, it has emerged that the fibrotic process is a result of the convergence of multiple neurohormonal alterations in diabetic cardiomyopathy at the basis of disease progression and phenotype determination: HF with reduced or preserved ejection fraction. Therapies for HF and DM should demonstrate an improved prognosis and have a neutral effect on glucose homeostasis and the risk of HF development.

  17. Quantification of myocardial iron deficiency in nonischemic heart failure by cardiac T2* magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Michinobu; Matsuo, Yoshio; Kamitani, Takeshi; Yonezawa, Masato; Yamasaki, Yuzo; Kawanami, Satoshi; Abe, Kohtaro; Mukai, Yasushi; Higo, Taiki; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Takemura, Atsushi; Yoshiura, Takashi; Sunagawa, Kenji; Honda, Hiroshi

    2014-03-15

    The aim of this study was to use T2* cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging to quantify myocardial iron content in patients with heart failure (HF) and to investigate the relation between iron content, cardiac function, and the cause of HF. CMR data were analyzed from 167 patients with nonischemic and 31 with ischemic HF and 50 patients with normal ventricular function. Short-axis T2* imaging was accomplished using 3-T scanner and multiecho gradient-echo sequence. Myocardial T2* value (M-T2*) was calculated by fitting the signal intensity data for the mid-left ventricular (LV) septum to a decay curve. Patients with nonischemic HF were categorized into patients with LV ejection fraction (LVEF) iron deficiency and nonischemic HF. M-T2* is a biomarker that can predict adverse cardiac function in patients with nonischemic HF.

  18. Antidiabetic medications in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samia El Hayek, Marylene M; Beydoun, Maya F; Azar, Sami T

    2017-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus increases the mortality secondary to heart failure independent of hypertension and coronary artery disease. Several hypoglycemic agents are used to achieve glycemic control, of which several classes however still raise controversies in terms of safety in patients with concomitant heart failure: Metformin does not carry an increased risk of exacerbation in patients with stable heart failure, yet should be avoided in patients with unstable disease or chronic kidney disease. Sulfonylureas are neither associated with an increased mortality, nor do they seem to have deleterious effects on heart failure. Thiazolidinediones are relatively contraindicated in patients with New York Heart Association class III or IV disease secondary to concerns of fluid retention and heart failure exacerbation. Glucagon-like peptide 1 agonists have shown trends towards improvement of heart failure parameters. Dipeptidylpeptidase 4 inhibitors show an overall neutral outcome, although saxagliptin can possibly be associated with an increased risk of hospitalization for heart failure. The use of sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors is associated with beneficial cardiovascular outcomes, and further studies are underway.

  19. TNM-Like Classification: A New Proposed Method for Heart Failure Staging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Fedele

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart Failure (HF is an acute or chronic syndrome, that causes a lot of damaging effects to every system. The involvement of different systems is variably related to age and others comorbidities. The severity of organ damage is often proportional to the duration of heart failure. The typology of HF and the duration determine which organs will be affected and vice versa the severity of organ damage supplies precious information about prognosis and outcome of patients with heart failure. Moreover, a classification based not only on symptomatic and syndromic typical features of heart failure, but also on functional data of each system, could allow us to apply the most appropriate therapies, to obtain a more accurate prognosis, and to employ necessary and not redundant human and financial resources. With an eye on the TNM staging used in oncology, we drawn up a classification that will consider the different involvement of organs such as lungs, kidneys, and liver in addition to psychological pattern and quality of life in HF patients. For all these reasons, it is our intention to propose a valid and more specific classification available for the clinical staging of HF that takes into account pathophysiological and structural changes that can remark prognosis and management of HF.

  20. Resting Heart Rate as Predictor for Left Ventricular Dysfunction and Heart Failure: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opdahl, Anders; Venkatesh, Bharath Ambale; Fernandes, Veronica R. S.; Wu, Colin O.; Nasir, Khurram; Choi, Eui-Young; Almeida, Andre L. C.; Rosen, Boaz; Carvalho, Benilton; Edvardsen, Thor; Bluemke, David A.; Lima, Joao A. C.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the relationship between baseline resting heart rate and incidence of heart failure (HF) and global and regional left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. BACKGROUND The association of resting heart rate to HF and LV function is not well described in an asymptomatic multi-ethnic population. METHODS Participants in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis had resting heart rate measured at inclusion. Incident HF was registered (n=176) during follow-up (median 7 years) in those who underwent cardiac MRI (n=5000). Changes in ejection fraction (ΔEF) and peak circumferential strain (Δεcc) were measured as markers of developing global and regional LV dysfunction in 1056 participants imaged at baseline and 5 years later. Time to HF (Cox model) and Δεcc and ΔEF (multiple linear regression models) were adjusted for demographics, traditional cardiovascular risk factors, calcium score, LV end-diastolic volume and mass in addition to resting heart rate. RESULTS Cox analysis demonstrated that for 1 bpm increase in resting heart rate there was a 4% greater adjusted relative risk for incident HF (Hazard Ratio: 1.04 (1.02, 1.06 (95% CI); Pheart rate was positively associated with deteriorating εcc and decrease in EF, even in analyses when all coronary heart disease events were excluded from the model. CONCLUSION Elevated resting heart rate is associated with increased risk for incident HF in asymptomatic participants in MESA. Higher heart rate is related to development of regional and global LV dysfunction independent of subclinical atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. PMID:24412444

  1. Benefits of Heart Rate Slowing With Ivabradine in Patients With Systolic Heart Failure and Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borer, Jeffrey S; Deedwania, Prakash C; Kim, Jae B; Böhm, Michael

    2016-12-15

    Heart rate (HR) is a risk factor in patients with chronic systolic heart failure (HF) that, when reduced, provides outcome benefits. It is also a target for angina pectoris prevention and a risk marker in chronic coronary artery disease without HF. HR can be reduced by drugs; however, among those used clinically, only ivabradine reduces HR directly in the sinoatrial nodal cells without other known effects on the cardiovascular system. This review provides current information regarding the safety and efficacy of HR reduction with ivabradine in clinical studies involving >36,000 patients with chronic stable coronary artery disease and >6,500 patients with systolic HF. The largest trials, Morbidity-Mortality Evaluation of the If Inhibitor Ivabradine in Patients With Coronary Disease and Left Ventricular Dysfunction and Study Assessing the Morbidity-Mortality Benefits of the If Inhibitor Ivabradine in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease, showed no effect on outcomes. The Systolic Heart Failure Treatment With the If Inhibitor Ivabradine Trial, a randomized controlled trial in >6,500 patients with HF, revealed marked and significant HR-mediated reduction in cardiovascular mortality or HF hospitalizations while improving quality of life and left ventricular mechanical function after treatment with ivabradine. The adverse effects of ivabradine predominantly included bradycardia and atrial fibrillation (both uncommon) and ocular flashing scotomata (phosphenes) but otherwise were similar to placebo. In conclusion, ivabradine improves outcomes in patients with systolic HF; rates of overall adverse events are similar to placebo.

  2. The Role of Dyadic Confidence on Engagement in Heart Failure Care Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Karen S; Gelow, Jill M; Hiatt, Shirin O; Mudd, James O; Auld, Jonathan; Chien, Christopher V; Lee, Christopher S

    2017-04-26

    Increasingly, older adults and their families are expected to manage complex conditions with little support. In the case of heart failure (HF), symptom monitoring and management are critical in preventing acute exacerbations and poor clinical outcomes. The current study examined the role of dyadic confidence on engagement in HF care behaviors by patients and their spouses. A cross-sectional design was used to examine 60 couples living with HF. Three dyadic confidence variables were created to represent average level of confidence, gap in confidence, and direction of gap within each couple. A series of multilevel models were used to examine dyadic engagement in HF maintenance, management, and consulting behaviors and the role of dyadic confidence. Patients were significantly more engaged in HF maintenance behaviors than spouses; couples were more collaborative in their engagement in HF management and consulting behaviors. Average level of confidence in the dyad was significantly associated with patient engagement in all three HF behaviors. Spouse engagement was associated with more congruence in confidence and having higher levels of confidence than their partners with HF. Women were significantly more engaged in HF behaviors than men, regardless of role. The study employed a dyadic approach to HF care and a novel approach to confidence. Findings confirm the social nature of confidence and its important role in HF. Clinicians have opportunities to optimize patient outcomes by fostering greater collaboration within couples.

  3. Site selection in global clinical trials in patients hospitalized for heart failure : perceived problems and potential solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gheorghiade, Mihai; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Greene, Stephen J.; Mentz, Robert J.; Adams, Kirkwood F.; Anker, Stefan D.; Arnold, Malcolm; Baschiera, Fabio; Cleland, John G. F.; Cotter, Gadi; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Giordano, Christopher; Metra, Marco; Misselwitz, Frank; Muehlhofer, Eva; Nodari, Savina; Peacock, W. Frank; Pieske, Burkert M.; Sabbah, Hani N.; Sato, Naoki; Shah, Monica R.; Stockbridge, Norman L.; Teerlink, John R.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Zalewski, Andrew; Zannad, Faiez; Butler, Javed

    2014-01-01

    There are over 1 million hospitalizations for heart failure (HF) annually in the United States alone, and a similar number has been reported in Europe. Recent clinical trials investigating novel therapies in patients with hospitalized HF (HHF) have been negative, and the post-discharge event rate re

  4. Statin therapy and clinical outcomes in myocardial infarction patients complicated by acute heart failure : insights from the EPHESUS trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobre, Daniela; Rossignol, Patrick; Murin, Jan; Parkhomenko, Alexander; Lamiral, Zohra; Krum, Henry; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Pitt, Bertram; Zannad, Faiez

    2013-01-01

    Several clinical trials have shown that in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI), statin therapy improves cardiovascular (CV) outcomes, but in these trials patients with acute heart failure (HF) were excluded or only a few were included. In patients with chronic HF, statin therapy does not

  5. Determinants of heart failure self-care behaviour in community-based patients: a cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters-Klimm, F.; Freund, T.; Kunz, C.; Laux, G.; Frankenstein, L.; Muller-Tasch, T.; Szecsenyi, J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Self-care behaviour in patients with heart failure (HF) represents a series of specific actions that patients should take, as an important treatment component. Aims: The aim of this study was to identify potential determinants of HF self-care in ambulatory patients with stable systolic H

  6. Influence of diabetes and diabetes-gender interaction on the risk of death in patients hospitalized with congestive heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Ida; Brendorp, Bente; Seibaek, Marie;

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of diabetes on long-term mortality in a large cohort of patients hospitalized with heart failure (HF). BACKGROUND: Diabetes is common in HF patients, but information on the prognostic effect of diabetes is sparse. METHODS: The...

  7. Body mass index and mortality in acutely decompensated heart failure across the world : a global obesity paradox

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shah, Ravi; Gayat, Etienne; Januzzi, James L; Sato, Naoki; Cohen-Solal, Alain; diSomma, Salvatore; Fairman, Enrique; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Ishihara, Shiro; Lassus, Johan; Maggioni, Aldo; Metra, Marco; Mueller, Christian; Mueller, Thomas; Parenica, Jiri; Pascual-Figal, Domingo; Peacock, William Frank; Spinar, Jindrich; van Kimmenade, Roland; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study sought to define the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and mortality in heart failure (HF) across the world and to identify specific groups in whom BMI may differentially mediate risk. BACKGROUND: Obesity is associated with incident HF, but it is paradoxically associa

  8. Electrocardiographic, hemodynamic, and biochemical responses to acute particulate matter (PM) exposure in aged heart failure-prone rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human exposure to ambient PM from fossil-fuel emissions is linked to cardiovascular disease and death. This association strengthens in people with preexisting cardiac disease-especially heart failure (HF). The mechanisms explaining PM-induced exacerbation ofHF are unclear. Some o...

  9. Acute Exposure to Particulate Matter (PM) Alters Physiologic and Toxicologic Endpoints in a Rat Model of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human exposure to ambient PM from fossil-fuel emissions is linked to cardiovascular disease and death. This association strengthens in people with preexisting cardiopulmonary diseases—especially heart failure (HF). We previously examined the effects of PM on HF by exposing Sponta...

  10. Determinants of heart failure self-care behaviour in community-based patients: a cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters-Klimm, F.; Freund, T.; Kunz, C.; Laux, G.; Frankenstein, L.; Muller-Tasch, T.; Szecsenyi, J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Self-care behaviour in patients with heart failure (HF) represents a series of specific actions that patients should take, as an important treatment component. Aims: The aim of this study was to identify potential determinants of HF self-care in ambulatory patients with stable systolic

  11. Efficacy and safety of nebivolol in elderly heart failure patients with impaired renal function : insights from the SENIORS trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen-Solal, Alain; Kotecha, Dipak; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Babalis, Daphne; Boehm, Michael; Coats, Andrew J.; Roughton, Michael; Poole-Wilson, Philip; Tavazzi, Luigi; Flather, Marcus

    To determine the safety and efficacy of nebivolol in elderly heart failure (HF) patients with renal dysfunction. SENIORS recruited patients aged 70 years or older with symptomatic HF, irrespective of ejection fraction, and randomized them to nebivolol or placebo. Patients (n = 2112) were divided by

  12. Acute Heart Failure in the Elderly : Differences in Clinical Characteristics, Outcomes, and Prognostic Factors in the VERITAS Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metra, Marco; Cotter, Gad; El-Khorazaty, Jill; Davison, Beth A.; Milo, Olga; Carubelli, Valentina; Bourge, Robert C.; Cleland, John G.; Jondeau, Guillaume; Krum, Henry; O'Connor, Christopher M.; Parker, John D.; Torre-Amione, Guillermo; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Rainisio, Maurizio; Kobrin, Isaac; Mcmurray, John J.; Teerlink, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute heart failure (HF) is common in the elderly, but the association of age with clinical outcomes and prognostic factors has not been examined thoroughly. Methods and Results: We analyzed the clinical and laboratory characteristics and the outcomes of 1,347 patients with acute HF enro

  13. The Potentially Modifiable Burden of Incident Heart Failure Due to Obesity: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study

    OpenAIRE

    Loehr, Laura R; Rosamond, Wayne D.; Poole, Charles; McNeill, Ann Marie; Chang, Patricia P.; Deswal, Anita; Aaron R. Folsom; Heiss, Gerardo

    2010-01-01

    The authors estimated the generalized impact fraction (GIF) for heart failure (HF) related to obesity, representing the proportion of incident HF events that could be prevented from reductions in obesity and/or overweight. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study is a biracial population-based cohort study of persons aged 45–64 years from 4 US communities with a median 14 ye...

  14. Site selection in global clinical trials in patients hospitalized for heart failure : perceived problems and potential solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gheorghiade, Mihai; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Greene, Stephen J.; Mentz, Robert J.; Adams, Kirkwood F.; Anker, Stefan D.; Arnold, Malcolm; Baschiera, Fabio; Cleland, John G. F.; Cotter, Gadi; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Giordano, Christopher; Metra, Marco; Misselwitz, Frank; Muehlhofer, Eva; Nodari, Savina; Peacock, W. Frank; Pieske, Burkert M.; Sabbah, Hani N.; Sato, Naoki; Shah, Monica R.; Stockbridge, Norman L.; Teerlink, John R.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Zalewski, Andrew; Zannad, Faiez; Butler, Javed

    2014-01-01

    There are over 1 million hospitalizations for heart failure (HF) annually in the United States alone, and a similar number has been reported in Europe. Recent clinical trials investigating novel therapies in patients with hospitalized HF (HHF) have been negative, and the post-discharge event rate re

  15. Regulation of cardiac microRNAs induced by aerobic exercise training during heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Rodrigo W A; Fernandez, Geysson J; Cunha, João P Q; Piedade, Warlen P; Soares, Luana C; Souza, Paula A T; de Campos, Dijon H S; Okoshi, Katashi; Cicogna, Antonio C; Dal-Pai-Silva, Maeli; Carvalho, Robson F

    2015-11-15

    Exercise training (ET) has beneficial effects on the myocardium in heart failure (HF) patients and in animal models of induced cardiac hypertrophy and failure. We hypothesized that if microRNAs (miRNAs) respond to changes following cardiac stress, then myocardial profiling of these miRNAs may reveal cardio-protective mechanisms of aerobic ET in HF. We used ascending aortic stenosis (AS) inducing HF in Wistar rats. Controls were sham-operated animals. At 18 wk after surgery, rats with cardiac dysfunction were randomized to 10 wk of aerobic ET (HF-ET) or to a heart failure sedentary group (HF-S). ET attenuated cardiac remodeling as well as clinical and pathological signs of HF with maintenance of systolic and diastolic function when compared with that of the HF-S. Global miRNA expression profiling of the cardiac tissue revealed 53 miRNAs exclusively dysregulated in animals in the HF-ET, but only 11 miRNAs were exclusively dysregulated in the HF-S. Out of 23 miRNAs that were differentially regulated in both groups, 17 miRNAs exhibited particularly high increases in expression, including miR-598, miR-429, miR-224, miR-425, and miR-221. From the initial set of deregulated miRNAs, 14 miRNAs with validated targets expressed in cardiac tissue that respond robustly to ET in HF were used to construct miRNA-mRNA regulatory networks that revealed a set of 203 miRNA-target genes involved in programmed cell death, TGF-β signaling, cellular metabolic processes, cytokine signaling, and cell morphogenesis. Our findings reveal that ET attenuates cardiac abnormalities during HF by regulating cardiac miRNAs with a potential role in cardio-protective mechanisms through multiple effects on gene expression.

  16. Emerging role of nuclear cardiology in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flotats, A; Carrió, I

    2010-04-01

    The management of patients with heart failure requires the integration of clinical skills and accurate complementary tests for the correct diagnosis, treatment and estimation of individual prognosis. Identification of those patients most at risk of death, and those most likely to benefit from currently available treatment technologies, remains a challenge. Although the basic characterization of patients with heart failure is supported primarily by the assessment of the left ventricular function, there are several nuclear cardiology techniques and tracers, either available or under development, which can provide important noninvasive imaging insights into the pathophysiology, prognosis and management of patients with heart failure. Nuclear techniques for molecular imaging of the myocardium such as those involved in the processes of myocardial perfusion, metabolism and viability, cellular injury, dyssynchrony, intersticial dysregulation and neurohormonal receptor function may facilitate better clinical outcomes for patients with heart failure. This review mainly focuses on cardiac sympathetic imaging, as other modalities of nuclear cardiology in the assessment of patients with HF are reviewed more extensively in other sections of this issue.

  17. Transcatheter Interatrial Shunt Device for the Treatment of Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldman, Ted; Komtebedde, Jan; Burkhoff, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), a major public health problem with high morbidity and mortality rates, remains difficult to manage because of a lack of effective treatment options. Although HFpEF is a heterogeneous clinical syndrome, elevated left atrial pressure......-either at rest or with exertion-is a common factor among all forms of HFpEF and one of the primary reasons for dyspnea and exercise intolerance in these patients. On the basis of clinical experience with congenital interatrial shunts in mitral stenosis, it has been hypothesized that the creation of a left...... the rationale for a therapeutic transcatheter interatrial shunt device in HFpEF, and we describe the design of REDUCE Elevated Left Atrial Pressure in Heart Failure (REDUCE LAP-HF I), the first randomized controlled trial of a device-based therapy to reduce left atrial pressure in HFpEF. CLINICAL TRIAL...

  18. Improvement of Heart Failure by Human Amniotic Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Transplantation in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Taghi Razavi Tousi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recently, stem cells have been considered for the treatment of heart diseases, but no marked improvement has been recorded. This is the first study to examine the functional and histological effects of the transplantation of human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells (hAMSCs in rats with heart failure (HF.Methods: This study was conducted in the years 2014 and 2015. 35 male Wistar rats were randomly assigned into 5 equal experimental groups (7 rats each as 1- Control 2- Heart Failure (HF 3- Sham 4- Culture media 5- Stem Cell Transplantation (SCT. Heart failure was induced using 170 mg/kg/d of isoproterenol subcutaneously injection in 4 consecutive days. The failure confirmed by the rat cardiac echocardiography on day 28. In SCT group, 3×106 cells in 150 µl of culture media were transplanted to the myocardium. At the end, echocardiographic and hemodynamic parameters together with histological evaluation were done.Results: Echocardiography results showed that cardiac ejection fraction in HF group increased from 58/73 ± 9% to 81/25 ± 6/05% in SCT group (p value < 0.001. Fraction shortening in HF group was increased from 27/53 ± 8/58% into 45/55 ± 6/91% in SCT group (p value < 0.001. Furthermore, hAMSCs therapy significantly improved mean diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, left ventricular systolic pressure, rate pressure product, and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure compared to those in the HF group, with the values reaching the normal levels in the control group. A marked reduction in fibrosis tissue was also found in the SCT group (p value < 0.001 compared with the animals in the HF group.Conclusion: The transplantation of hAMSCs in rats with heart failure not only decreased the level of fibrosis but also conferred significant improvement in heart performance in terms of echocardiographic and hemodynamic parameters.

  19. Evolvement of left ventricular assist device: the implications on heart failure management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chair, Sek Ying; Yu, Doris Sf; Ng, Michael Timothy; Wang, Qun; Cheng, Ho Yu; Wong, Eliza Ml; Sit, Janet Wh

    2016-07-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a potentially fatal disease that affects increasing number of people worldwide. Although heart transplant is the "gold standard" therapy for HF, due to the limited availability of organs, many patients died when waiting for the transplant. Left ventricular assist device (LVAD), as a mechanical circulatory support, has become a new light for patients with HF. With the technical advancements, LVADs work not only as a bridge to transplant, but also assist heart recovery and even as a destination therapy in long-term treatment. This observation paper reviewed the development of LVAD and its clinical roles. The challenges and possible solutions in nursing care for patients with LVAD at different stage of implantation were discussed. The healthcare professionals could obtain a better understanding about the LVAD treatment for HF patients.

  20. Self-efficacy strategies to improve exercise in patients with heart failure: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Rajati, Fatemeh; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Feizi, Awat; Sharifirad, Gholamreza; Hasandokht, Tolu; Mostafavi, Firoozeh

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Despite exercise is recommended as an adjunct to medication therapy in patients with heart failure (HF), non-adherence to exercise is a major problem. While improving self-efficacy is an effective way to increase physical activity, the evidence concerning the relationship between strategies to enhance self-efficacy and exercise among HF has not been systematically reviewed. The objective of this systematic review is to assess the effect of interventions to change the self-efficacy ...

  1. Aldosterone does not predict cardiovascular events following acute coronary syndrome in patients initially without heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Pitts, Reynaria; Gunzburger, Elise; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Barter, Philip J.; Kallend, David; Leiter, Lawrence A.; Leitersdorf, Eran; Nicholls, Stephen J.; Prediman K Shah; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Olsson, Anders G.; McMurray, John J.V.; Kittelson, John; Schwartz, Gregory G.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Aldosterone may have adverse effects in the myocardium and vasculature. Treatment with an aldosterone antagonist reduces cardiovascular risk in patients with acute myocardial infarction complicated by heart failure (HF) and left ventricular systolic dysfunction. However, most patients with acute coronary syndrome do not have advanced HF. Among such patients, it is unknown whether aldosterone predicts cardiovascular risk.\\ud \\ud Methods and Results: To address this question, we exa...

  2. Clinical Profile of Patients Hospitalized with Heart Failure inBharatpur, Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxman Dubey

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Heart failure (HF is a common cardiovascular condition whose incidence and prevalence are increasing. Being a common reason for urgent hospital admission, it is a major cause of morbidity and mortality for the patients. In the developed countries coronary artery disease remains the leading cause of HF, whereas, in the underdeveloped countries, rheumatic heart disease leading to valvular lesion still remains the commonest causes of HF admission. The current study was designed to evaluate the clinical profile and medications prescribed reflecting the extent to which evidence based medicine is being practiced at our community. Methods: Clinical profile and prescribed medications of patients with diagnosis of HF who were admitted in the cardiology department of College of Medical Sciences & Teaching Hospital (CMS-TH, Bharatpur, Nepal, April 2010 to May 2012, were analyzed. A total of 255 patients presented with HF during the studied period were included. Results: Coronary artery disease, rheumatic heart disease, dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertensive heart failure, cor-pulmonale, and congenital heart disease leading to HF were found in 93 (36.5%, 65 (25.5%, 37 (14.5%, 22 (8.6%, 31 (12.2%,and 7 (2.7% patients respectively. The commonest presenting symptom was shortness of breath (81% and the commonest sign was bilateral basal crepitations (68%. From all patients, 89%, 64%, 51%, 16%, 48%, and 32% received loop diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, digoxin, angiotensin receptor blocker, spironolactone, and beta-blocking agents respectively. Conclusion: Coronary artery disease leading to HF was the commonest cause of HF admission in our centre. Despite current guidelines suggesting the use of beta-blocking agent in patients with HF, only 32% of our patients received this class of medications. Thus, many patients were not being managed fully in accordance with the evidence-based guidelines.

  3. CPAP in chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Lari

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Chronic Heart Failure (CHF represents worldwide a clinical condition with increasing prevalence, high social, economical and epidemiological impact. Even if new pharmacological and non-pharmacological approachs have been recently used, mortality remains high in general population and quality of life is poor in these patients. DISCUSSION The association between CHF and sleep disorders is frequent but still undervalued: sleep apnoeas in CHF produce negative effects on cardiovascular system and an aggravation of prognosis. CPAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure is commonly used to treat sleep apnoeas in patients without cardiac involvement and it is also used in first line treatment of acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema thanks to its hemodynamic and ventilatory effects. The addition of nightly CPAP to standard aggressive medical therapy in patients with CHF and sleep apnoeas reduces the number of apnoeas, reduces the blood pressure, and the respiratory and cardiac rate, reduces the activation of sympathetic nervous system, the left ventricular volume and the hospitalization rate; besides CPAP increases the left ventricular ejection fraction, amd the oxygenation, it improves quality of life, tolerance to exercise and seems to reduce mortality in patients with a higher apnoeas suppression. CONCLUSIONS These implications suggest to investigate sleep apnoeas in patients with CHF in order to consider a possible treatment with CPAP. Further studies need to be developed to confirm the use of CPAP in patients with CHF without sleep disorders.

  4. Eplerenone in Patients with Systolic Heart Failure and Mild Symptoms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zannad, Faiez; McMurray, John J. V.; Krum, Henry; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Swedberg, Karl; Shi, Harry; Vincent, John; Pocock, Stuart J.; Pitt, Bertram

    2011-01-01

    Background: Mineralocorticoid antagonists improve survival among patients with chronic, severe systolic heart failure and heart failure after myocardial infarction. We evaluated the effects of eplerenone in patients with chronic systolic heart failure and mild symptoms. Methods: In this randomized,

  5. Conducting Family Nursing in Heart Failure outpatient clinics: Nurses experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voltelen, Barbara; Konradsen, Hanne; Østergaard, Birte

    2014-01-01

    throughout the FN intervention and a Focus group interview with 6 nurses who were conducting the conversations. Content analyses of all text material dealt with both manifest and latent content, and were analyzed through a deductive and inductive process. Results: Enabling bonding emerged as the overall......Aim: This study aimed to explore what was documented during structured Family Nursing (FN) conversations with patients diagnosed with Heart Failure and their families, and to gain knowledge about the nurses’ experiences conducting FN. Background: Patients with HF face many challenges, and so do...

  6. Quality of Care and Outcomes of Heart Failure Among Patients With Schizophrenia in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Mette; Mainz, Jan; Egstrup, Kenneth; Johnsen, Søren P

    2017-09-15

    Research on the association between schizophrenia and the quality of care and clinical outcomes of heart failure (HF) remains sparse. This nationwide study compared the quality of care and clinical outcomes of HF among Danish patients with and without schizophrenia. In a population-based cohort study, we identified 36,718 patients with incident HF with hospital contacts, including 108 with schizophrenia, using Danish registries between 2004 and 2013. High quality of HF care was defined as receiving ≥ 80% guideline-recommended process-performance measures of care. Potential predictors of HF care among patients with schizophrenia included patient-specific factors (age, gender, Global Assessment of Functioning [GAF] score, alcohol or drug abuse, duration of schizophrenia); provider-specific factors (quality of schizophrenia care); and system-specific factors (patient-volume defined as hospital departments and clinics yearly average patient-volume of patients with incident HF). Clinical outcomes included 4-week all-cause readmission and 1-year all-cause mortality after a first-time hospital contact with incident HF. Results showed that compared with patients with incident HF who have no schizophrenia, patients with incident HF who have schizophrenia had a lower chance of receiving high-quality HF care (relative risk 0.66, 95% confidence interval 0.48 to 0.91). A high GAF score was associated with a higher chance of receiving high-quality HF care among patients with incident HF who have schizophrenia. Patients with incident HF who have schizophrenia had a higher risk of 1-year mortality (adjusted hazard ratio 2.83, 95% confidence interval 1.59 to 5.04), but not a higher risk of readmission than patients with incident HF who have no schizophrenia. In conclusion, efforts are warranted to reduce the high mortality among patients with incident HF who have schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Myostatin signaling is up-regulated in female patients with advanced heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Junichi; Konishi, Masaaki; Saitoh, Masakazu; Anker, Markus; Anker, Stefan D; Springer, Jochen

    2017-07-01

    Myostatin, a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass, is up-regulated in the myocardium of heart failure (HF) and increased myostatin is associated with weight loss in animal models with HF. Although there are disparities in pathophysiology and epidemiology between male and female patients with HF, it remains unclear whether there is gender difference in myostatin expression and whether it is associated with weight loss in HF patients. Heart tissue samples were collected from patients with advanced heart failure (n=31, female n=5) as well as healthy control donors (n=14, female n=6). Expression levels of myostatin and its related proteins in the heart were evaluated by western blotting analysis. Body mass index was significantly lower in female HF patients than in male counterparts (20.0±4.2 in female vs 25.2±3.8 in male, p=0.04). In female HF patients, both mature myostatin and pSmad2 were significantly up-regulated by 1.9 fold (p=0.05) and 2.5 fold (p<0.01) respectively compared to female donors, while expression of pSmad2 was increased by 2.8 times in male HF patients compared to male healthy subjects, but that of myostatin was not. There was no significant difference in protein expression related to myostatin signaling between male and female patients. In this study, myostatin and pSmad2 were significantly up-regulated in the failing heart of female patients, but not male patients, and female patients displayed lower body mass index. Enhanced myostatin signaling in female failing heart may causally contribute to pathogenesis of HF and cardiac cachexia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Positive predictive value and impact of misdiagnosis of a heart failure diagnosis in administrative registers among patients admitted to a University Hospital cardiac care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mard, Shan; Nielsen, Finn Erland

    2010-01-01

    patients with heart failure from July 1, 2005 to June 30, 2007. Heart failure was defined in accordance with European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines. The recorded diagnoses from the NRP were compared with clinical data from the medical records. RESULTS: We identified 758 patients with a diagnosis......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the positive predictive value (PPV) of a diagnosis of heart failure (HF) in the Danish National Registry of Patients (NRP) among patients admitted to a University Hospital cardiac care unit, and to evaluate the impact of misdiagnosing HF. DESIGN: The NRP was used to identify...... of heart failure in the NRP. The PPV of a heart failure discharge diagnosis was 84.0% (95% confidence interval: 81.2-86.6). Patients with a discharge diagnosis of HF in the NRP without fulfilling the ESC criteria for HF had a better survival rate, a lower rate of rehospitalization, none were followed...

  9. End-of-Life Decisions and Palliative Care in Advanced Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Deborah E; Goodlin, Sarah J

    2016-09-01

    Advanced heart failure (HF) therapies are focused on extending life and improving function. In contrast, palliative care is a holistic approach that focuses on symptom alleviation and patients' physical, psychosocial, and spiritual needs. HF clinicians can integrate palliative care strategies by incorporating several important components of planning and decision-making for HF patients. Future care planning (FCP) for HF patients should incorporate the basic tenets of shared decision-making (SDM). These include understanding the patient's perspective and care preferences, articulating what is medically feasible, and integrating these considerations into the overall care plan. Use of defined triggers for FCP can stimulate important patient-caregiver conversations. Guidelines advocate an annual review of HF status and future care preferences. Advance directives are important for any individual with a chronic, life-limiting illness and should be integrated into FCP. Nevertheless, use of advance directives by HF patients is extremely low. Consideration of illness trajectories and risk-scoring tools might facilitate prognostication and delivery of appropriate HF care. Decisions about heart transplantation or left ventricular assist device implantation should include planning for potential complications associated with these therapies. Such decisions also should include a discussion of palliative management, as an alternative to intervention and also as an option for managing symptoms or adverse events after intervention. Palliative care, including FCP and SDM, should be integrated into the course of all patients with advanced HF. Clinicians who provide HF care should acquire the skills necessary for conducting FCP and SDM discussions.

  10. Self-care in heart failure patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Paula da Conceição; Mariana Alvina dos Santos; Bernardo dos Santos; Diná de Almeida Lopes Monteiro da Cruz

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to describe self-care behavior and its associated factors in a sample of heart failure Brazilian patients. Method: descriptive cross-sectional study with non-probabilistic sample of 116 ambulatory patients undergoing heart failure treatment. Self-care was evaluated using the Self-Care of Heart Failure Index, (scores ≥70 points=appropriate self-care). Association tests were applied, considering a descriptive level of 0.05. Results: the mean age of participants was 57.7 (SD ...

  11. Modern treatment methods for heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Vrtovec

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Chronic heart failure is a clinical syndrome that can result from many cardiac diseases, the most common being cardiomyopathies and coronary artery disease. According to recent epidemiological data, heart failure is the only cardiologic entity whose prevalence is actually increasing and is present in 2–5 % of general population and in 10 % of people older than 65 years. The scope of this paper includes algorithms of initial heart failure diagnostic work-up , medical management and contemporary non-medical treatment options.

  12. Ivabradine, heart failure and chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Di Lullo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and prevalence of congestive heart failure are actually increasing worldwide, especially in Western countries. In Europe and the United States, congestive heart failure represents a disabling clinical disease, accountable for increased hospitalization and health care costs. European guidelines have underlined the importance of pharmacological treatment to improve both patients’ outcomes and quality of life. The latest clinical trials to evaluate ivabradine’s efficacy have underlined its usefulness as a stand-alone medication and in combination with conventional congestive heart failure therapy, including in chronic kidney disease patients.

  13. Heart failure complicating with SAPHO syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Takeshi; Kikuta, Shota; Ishihara, Satoshi; Nakayama, Shinichi

    2017-02-23

    A 65-year-old man was referred to our hospital with dyspnoea due to acute heart failure. He presented with swelling in the left clavicle and pustulosis on both soles. An antihypertensive drug and non-invasive positive pressure ventilation improved his condition rapidly. Since all his physical symptoms were compatible with the criteria of SAPHO (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteomyelitis) syndrome, we suspected that the SAPHO syndrome might cause acute heart failure. The aetiology between SAPHO syndrome and heart failure is unclear. Further studies are needed to clarify their relationship.

  14. Risk for Incident Heart Failure: A Subject-Level Meta-Analysis From the Heart "OMics" in AGEing (HOMAGE) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Lotte; Efremov, Ljupcho; Ferreira, João Pedro; Thijs, Lutgarde; Yang, Wen-Yi; Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Latini, Roberto; Masson, Serge; Agabiti, Nera; Sever, Peter; Delles, Christian; Sattar, Naveed; Butler, Javed; Cleland, John G F; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Staessen, Jan A; Zannad, Faiez

    2017-05-02

    To address the need for personalized prevention, we conducted a subject-level meta-analysis within the framework of the Heart "OMics" in AGEing (HOMAGE) study to develop a risk prediction model for heart failure (HF) based on routinely available clinical measurements. Three studies with elderly persons (Health Aging and Body Composition [Health ABC], Valutazione della PREvalenza di DIsfunzione Cardiaca asinTOmatica e di scompenso cardiaco [PREDICTOR], and Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk [PROSPER]) were included to develop the HF risk function, while a fourth study (Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial [ASCOT]) was used as a validation cohort. Time-to-event analysis was conducted using the Cox proportional hazard model. Incident HF was defined as HF hospitalization. The Cox regression model was evaluated for its discriminatory performance (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve) and calibration (Grønnesby-Borgan χ(2) statistic). During a follow-up of 3.5 years, 470 of 10 236 elderly persons (mean age, 74.5 years; 51.3% women) developed HF. Higher age, BMI, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, serum creatinine, smoking, diabetes mellitus, history of coronary artery disease, and use of antihypertensive medication were associated with increased HF risk. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the model was 0.71, with a good calibration (χ(2) 7.9, P=0.54). A web-based calculator was developed to allow easy calculations of the HF risk. Simple measurements allow reliable estimation of the short-term HF risk in populations and patients. The risk model may aid in risk stratification and future HF prevention strategies. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  15. Renal dysfunction prevalence and clinical impact in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palazzuoli A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Alberto Palazzuoli, Susanna Benincasa, Stefanie Grothgar, Pasquale Di Sipio, Giovanni Paganini, Marco Pellegrini, Ranuccio NutiDepartment of Internal Medicine and Metabolic Diseases, Cardiology Section, Le Scotte Hospital, University of Siena, ItalyAbstract: Chronic kidney disease (CKD is associated with a significant increase in death and cardiovascular mortality. However the exact mechanism by which CKD impairs the cardiovascular outcome is not well established. Some reasons may lie in the association of CKD with several other cardiovascular and noncardiovascular disorders including accelerated systemic atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction, increased levels of inflammatory factors, anemic status, bone mineral dysfunction, electrolyte imbalance, and renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS activation. Therefore several risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, lipid disorders, and older age are common in both conditions. In patients affected with heart failure (HF a key role is represented by the neurohormonal activation. This condition causes fluid and sodium retention, peripheral vasoconstriction, as well as increased congestion and cardiac workload. Moreover, HF during the decompensated phases is often associated with a worsening renal function that leads to further RAAS activation, microvascular damage, and intrarenal flow redistribution. In order to clarify the interactions between these factors, several questions need to be answered: the universal definition of “worsening renal function,” the identification of the best laboratory parameters to investigate renal function in terms of sensitivity and specificity, and a better definition of the comorbidities’ role in the determination of the outcome, especially in patients with chronic HF. A clarification of these key points could lead to the individualization of new specific therapeutic targets and to a reduction in mortality and hospitalization in patients with HF and

  16. [Heart failure mortality trend in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latado, Adriana Lopes; Passos, Luiz Carlos Santana; Guedes, Rodrigo; Santos, Alessandra B; Andrade, Marianna; Moura, Simone

    2005-11-01

    To assess mortality trend due to heart failure (HF) in Salvador--Bahia, from 1979 to 1995. HF was defined by notations from the 9th Review of International Disease Code (IDC9) 428.0, 428.1 and 428.9. HF death and population data (metropolitan area of Salvador) were obtained by means of Secretaria de Saúde da Bahia (Bahia State Health Secretariat) and Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística (Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics). Mortality rates (/100,000) were total or per gender and age, and gross or adapted per age (straight standardization). Mortality rates due to HF had a progressive reduction in the period of time assessed, for both genders, especially up to 1992. From then and up to 1995, there was an apparent stabilization of the curves. Gross mortality rate went from 25.0/10(5), in 1979, to 16.4/10(5) inhabitants, in 1995 (a decrease of 34.4%). The reduction was 34.0% (23.3/10(5), in 1979, to 15.4/10(5) inhabitants, in 1995) for male sex and 35.2% (26.7/10(5), in 1979, to 17.3/10(5) inhabitants, in 1995), for female sex. The same trend took place in several age ranges, including the population > or = 40 years old, which has a greater risk for HF. After adaptation per age (standard population of 1979), it is observed that relative reductions in the rates were even greater. Mortality due to HF, in Salvador-Bahia, decreased from 1979 to 1992, becoming stable from then to 1995.

  17. How Is Heart Failure Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your heart pumps blood when it beats. Doppler Ultrasound A Doppler ultrasound uses sound waves to measure ... when your heart is working hard and beating fast. During stress testing , you exercise to make your ...

  18. Causes and consequences of nonpersistence with heart failure medication.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mockler, Mary

    2012-02-01

    Persistence with therapy may be more easily and objectively identified in the clinical setting than compliance and recent work has shown it to be linked to mortality in heart failure (HF). The aim of this study was to determine the extent, causes, and clinical impact of nonpersistence with disease-modifying therapy in a retrospective cohort study of 183 patients with systolic HF participating in a disease management program. The main outcome measurements were reasons\\/determinants of nonpersistence and its impact on hospitalizations. Fifty-three patients (29%) had 74 separate occurrences of nonpersistence with disease-modifying therapy. There was no medical reason for discontinuing medications in 50% of occurrences, whereas medication was discontinued for an adverse reaction in 30% and for a justified medical reason in 15% of occurrences. Nonpersistence was a significant predictor of all-cause readmission (hazard ratio 3.20, 95% confidence interval 1.74 to 11.37) and cardiovascular readmission (hazard ratio 4.45, 95% confidence interval 1.74 to 11.37). In the adjusted model, there was no significantly increased risk of HF readmission (hazard ratio 2.41, 95% confidence interval 0.88 to 6.62). In conclusion, nonpersistence with HF therapy is common, is often not medically justified, and is associated with an increased risk of hospitalization.

  19. [Use of microRNAs in heart failure management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias Sosa, Luis Alejandro

    Heart failure (HF) is a high impact disease that affects all human populations, demanding the development of new strategies and methods to manage this pathology. That's why microRNAs, small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression, appear as an important option in the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of this disease. MiRNAs seems to have a future on HF handling, because can be isolated from body fluids such as blood, and changes in its levels can be associated with the presence, stage and specific disease features, which makes them an interesting option as biomarkers. Also, due to the important role of these molecules on regulation of gene expression and cell homeostasis, it has been explored its potential use as a therapeutic method to prevent or treat HF. That is why this review seeks to show the importance of biomedical research involving the use of miRNAs as a method to approach the HF, showing the impact of disease in the world, aspects of miRNAs biology, and their use as biomarkers and as important therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2017 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  20. Sex differences in leptin modulate ventilation in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cundrle, Ivan; Somers, Virend K; Singh, Prachi; Johnson, Bruce D; Scott, Christopher G; Olson, Lyle J

    Leptin modulates ventilation and circulating levels are higher in normal women than men. The aim of this study was to compare exercise ventilation and gas exchange in men and women with heart failure (HF) and their relation to circulating leptin concentration. Consecutive HF patients were studied by cardiopulmonary exercise testing and assay of circulating leptin concentration. Fifty-seven men and 20 women were similar with respect to age, BMI, NYHA class, left ventricular ejection fraction, and peak oxygen consumption (all p > 0.05). Leptin concentration was lower (10.3 ± 10 vs. 25.3 ± 16 ng/mL; p Leptin concentration was associated with peak exercise VE/VCO2 (b = -0.35; F = 5.6; p = 0.02). Men have significantly lower circulating leptin concentration and increased ventilatory drive during exercise than women with comparable HF. In men with HF, lower leptin concentration may account for an increased ventilatory drive. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.